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Sample records for resistant starch fighting

  1. Resistant starches and health.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Cyril W C; Emam, Azadeh; Augustin, Livia S A; Jenkins, David J A

    2004-01-01

    It was initially hypothesized that resistant starches, i.e., starch that enters the colon, would have protective effects on chronic colonic diseases, including reduction of colon cancer risk and in the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Recent studies have confirmed the ability of resistant starch to increase fecal bulk, increase the molar ratio of butyrate in relation to other short-chain fatty acids, and dilute fecal bile acids. However the ability of resistant starch to reduce luminal concentrations of compounds that are damaging to the colonic mucosa, including fecal ammonia, phenols, and N-nitroso compounds, still requires clear demonstration. As such, the effectiveness of resistant starch in preventing or treating colonic diseases remains to be assessed. Nevertheless, there is a fraction of what has been termed resistant (RS1) starch, which enters the colon and acts as slowly digested or lente carbohydrate in the small intestine. Foods in this class are low glycemic index and have been shown to reduce the risk of chronic disease. They have been associated with systemic physiological effects such as reduced postprandial insulin levels and higher HDL cholesterol levels. Consumption of low glycemic index foods has been shown to be related to reductions in risk of coronary heart disease and Type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes has in turn been related to a higher risk of colon cancer. If carbohydrates have a protective role in colon cancer prevention this may lie partly in the systemic effects of low glycemic index foods. The colonic advantages of different carbohydrates, varying in their glycemic index and resistant starch content, therefore, remain to be determined. However, as recent positive research findings continue to mount, there is reason for optimism over the possible health advantages of those resistant starches, which are slowly digested in the small intestine. PMID:15287678

  2. Stop the Spread of Superbugs: Help Fight Drug Resistant Bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Spread of Superbugs Help Fight Drug-Resistant Bacteria For nearly a century, bacteria-fighting drugs known as antibiotics have helped to control and destroy many of the harmful bacteria that can make us sick. But in recent ...

  3. Antimicrobial Drugs in Fighting against Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Guyue; Dai, Menghong; Ahmed, Saeed; Hao, Haihong; Wang, Xu; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The outbreak of antimicrobial resistance, together with the lack of newly developed antimicrobial drugs, represents an alarming signal for both human and animal healthcare worldwide. Selection of rational dosage regimens for traditional antimicrobial drugs based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic principles as well as development of novel antimicrobials targeting new bacterial targets or resistance mechanisms are key approaches in tackling AMR. In addition to the cellular level resistance (i.e., mutation and horizontal gene transfer of resistance determinants), the community level resistance (i.e., bilofilms and persisters) is also an issue causing antimicrobial therapy difficulties. Therefore, anti-resistance and antibiofilm strategies have currently become research hotspot to combat antimicrobial resistance. Although metallic nanoparticles can both kill bacteria and inhibit biofilm formation, the toxicity is still a big challenge for their clinical applications. In conclusion, rational use of the existing antimicrobials and combinational use of new strategies fighting against antimicrobial resistance are powerful warranties to preserve potent antimicrobial drugs for both humans and animals. PMID:27092125

  4. Starch characteristics influencing resistant starch content of cooked buckwheat groats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enzyme resistant starch (RS), owing to its health benefits such as colon cancer inhibition, reduced glycemic response, reduced cholesterol level, prevention of gall stone formation and obesity, has received an increasing attention from consumers and food manufacturers, whereas intrinsic and extrinsi...

  5. Resistant Starch: Promise for Improving Human Health12

    PubMed Central

    Birt, Diane F.; Boylston, Terri; Hendrich, Suzanne; Jane, Jay-Lin; Hollis, James; Li, Li; McClelland, John; Moore, Samuel; Phillips, Gregory J.; Rowling, Matthew; Schalinske, Kevin; Scott, M. Paul; Whitley, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Ongoing research to develop digestion-resistant starch for human health promotion integrates the disciplines of starch chemistry, agronomy, analytical chemistry, food science, nutrition, pathology, and microbiology. The objectives of this research include identifying components of starch structure that confer digestion resistance, developing novel plants and starches, and modifying foods to incorporate these starches. Furthermore, recent and ongoing studies address the impact of digestion-resistant starches on the prevention and control of chronic human diseases, including diabetes, colon cancer, and obesity. This review provides a transdisciplinary overview of this field, including a description of types of resistant starches; factors in plants that affect digestion resistance; methods for starch analysis; challenges in developing food products with resistant starches; mammalian intestinal and gut bacterial metabolism; potential effects on gut microbiota; and impacts and mechanisms for the prevention and control of colon cancer, diabetes, and obesity. Although this has been an active area of research and considerable progress has been made, many questions regarding how to best use digestion-resistant starches in human diets for disease prevention must be answered before the full potential of resistant starches can be realized. PMID:24228189

  6. [Antibiotic resistance--bacteria fight back].

    PubMed

    Tambić Andrasević, Arjana

    2004-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has become one of the leading problems in modern medicine. Resistance to antibiotics emerges in bacteria due to genetic mutations and consecutive selection of resistant mutants through selective pressure of antibiotics present in large amounts in soil, plants, animals and humans. Exchange of genetic material coding for resistance is possible even between unrelated organisms and further promotes the spread of resistance. Constantly evolving resistance mechanisms force experts to redefine breakpoint concentrations and interpretation of in vitro antibiotic sensitivity testing. Developing new antimicrobial agents does not seem to be enough to keep up pace with ever changing bacteria. Using antibiotics prudently and developing new approaches to the treatment of infections is vital for the future. The European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (EARSS) data clearly show that Scandinavian countries and The Netherlands have the lowest rates of resistance, while Southern and Eastern European countries have the highest prevalence of resistance. This is linked to the European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption (ESAC) data that show very low consumption of antibiotics in Scandinavian countries and The Netherlands. Compliance with strict infection control policies related to multidrug resistant organisms is also high in these countries. Although it is important to be aware of the resistance problems worldwide, rational use of antibiotics should be based on the knowledge of local resistance patterns in common pathogens. Since 1996 there is a continuous surveillance of resistance in Croatia through the Croatian Committee for Antibiotic Resistance Surveillance. There is a particular concern about the rising penicillin and macrolide resistance in pneumococci. In Croatia, data for 2002 suggest that resistance to penicillin in pneumococci was 30% (low level) and 2% (high level). Among invasive isolates, 19% had reduced susceptibility to

  7. The potential of resistant starch as a prebiotic.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Siti A; Sarbini, Shahrul R

    2016-06-01

    Resistant starch is defined as the total amount of starch and the products of starch degradation that resists digestion in the small intestine. Starches that were able to resist the digestion will arrive at the colon where they will be fermented by the gut microbiota, producing a variety of products which include short chain fatty acids that can provide a range of physiological benefits. There are several factors that could affect the resistant starch content of a carbohydrate which includes the starch granule morphology, the amylose-amylopectin ratio and its association with other food component. One of the current interests on resistant starch is their potential to be used as a prebiotic, which is a non-digestible food ingredient that benefits the host by stimulating the growth or activity of one or a limited number of beneficial bacteria in the colon. A resistant starch must fulfill three criterions to be classified as a prebiotic; resistance to the upper gastrointestinal environment, fermentation by the intestinal microbiota and selective stimulation of the growth and/or activity of the beneficial bacteria. The market of prebiotic is expected to reach USD 198 million in 2014 led by the export of oligosaccharides. Realizing this, novel carbohydrates such as resistant starch from various starch sources can contribute to the advancement of the prebiotic industry. PMID:25582732

  8. Synthesis of resistant starches in plants.

    PubMed

    Morell, Matthew K; Konik-Rose, Christine; Ahmed, Regina; Li, Zhongyi; Rahman, Sadiq

    2004-01-01

    The increased incidence in many countries in lifestyle diseases such as colorectal cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes has led to an enhanced interest in disease-prevention measures that can be delivered to target populations through diet. Resistant starch (RS) is emerging as an important dietary component that has the potential to reduce the incidence of bowel health disorders. However, the range of crop species that can serve as effective sources of RS is limited. In this paper the state of knowledge of the starch biosynthesis pathway is reviewed and opportunities to manipulate crop genetics in order to generate additional sources of RS are discussed. The need for a "whole of chain" approach to delivery of RS to the consumer is highlighted because of the impact that different food-processing technologies can have in maintaining, enhancing, or destroying the RS potential of a raw material or food. PMID:15287674

  9. Characterization of enzyme-resistant starch in maize amylose-extender mutant starches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the human digestive system, a type of starch known as resistant starch (RS) can not be digested. RS is not absorbed in the small intestine, and is passed to the large intestine where it is fermented by bacteria to produce short-chain fatty acids, which have anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory prop...

  10. Preparation and characterization of resistant starch III from elephant foot yam (Amorphophallus paeonifolius) starch.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Chagam Koteswara; Haripriya, Sundaramoorthy; Noor Mohamed, A; Suriya, M

    2014-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the properties of resistant starch (RS) III prepared from elephant foot yam starch using pullulanase enzyme. Native and gelatinized starches were subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis (pullulanase, 40 U/g per 10h), autoclaved (121°C/30 min), stored under refrigeration (4°C/24h) and then lyophilized. After preparation of resistant starch III, the morphological, physical, chemical and functional properties were assessed. The enzymatic and retrogradation process increased the yield of resistant starch III from starch with a concomitant increase increase in its water absorption capacity and water solubility index. A decrease in swelling power was observed due to the hydrolysis and thermal process. Te reduced pasting properties and hardness of resistant starch III were associated with the disintegration of starch granules due to the thermal process. The viscosity was found to be inversely proportional to the RS content in the sample. The thermal properties of RS increased due to retrogradation and recrystallization (P<0.05). PMID:24594151

  11. Resistant Starch and Starch Thermal Characteristics in Exotic Corn Lines Grown in Temperate and Tropical Environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn as a food that is heated and cooled to allow starch retrogradation has higher levels of resistant starch (RS). Increasing the amount of RS can make corn an even healthier food and may be accomplished by breeding and selection, especially by using exotic germplasm. Sixty breeding lines of introg...

  12. Resistant-starch Formation in High-amylose Maize Starch During Kernel Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to understand the resistant-starch (RS) formation during the kernel development of high-amylose maize, GEMS-0067 line. RS content of the starch, determined using AOAC Method 991.43 for total dietary fiber, increased with kernel maturation and the increase in amylose/...

  13. Acetylated adipate of retrograded starch as RS 3/4 type resistant starch.

    PubMed

    Kapelko-Żeberska, M; Zięba, T; Spychaj, R; Gryszkin, A

    2015-12-01

    This study was aimed at producing acetylated adipate of retrograded starch (ADA-R) with various degrees of substitution with functional groups and at determining the effect of esterification degree on resistance and pasting characteristics of the produced preparations. Paste was prepared from native potato starch, and afterwards frozen and defrosted. After drying and disintegration, the paste was acetylated and crosslinked using various doses of reagents. An increase in the total degree of esterification of the produced ADA-R-preparation caused an increase in its resistance to the action of amyloglucosidase. Viscosity of the paste produced from ADA-R-preparation in a wide range of acetylation degrees was increasing along with increasing crosslinking of starch. The study demonstrated that acetylated adipate of retrograded starch may be classified as a preparation of RS 3/4 type resistant starch (retrograded starch/chemically-modified starch) with good texture-forming properties. The conducted modification offers the possibility of modeling the level of resistance of the produced preparation. PMID:26041205

  14. In vitro analyses of resistant starch in retrograded waxy and normal corn starches.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xing; Chung, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jong-Yea; Lim, Seung-Taik

    2013-04-01

    Gelatinized waxy and normal corn starches (40% starch) were subjected to temperature cycling between 4 and 30°C (1 day at each temperature) or isothermal storage (4°C) to induce retrogradation. The in vitro analysis methods that are currently used for the measurement of resistant starch (RS), i.e. Englyst, AACC 32-40 and Goni methods, were compared with homogenized retrograded starch gels and freeze-dried powders of the gels. RS contents obtained by the three analysis methods were in the following order: Goni>Englyst>AACC. Although different RS values were obtained among the analysis methods, similar trends in regards to the starch type and storage conditions could be observed. Little or no RS was found in freeze-dried powders of the retrograded starch gels and storage conditions had no effect, indicating that the physical state for RS analysis is important. More RS was found in normal corn starch gels than in waxy corn starch gels under identical storage conditions and in the gels stored under temperature cycling than those under isothermal storage (4°C), indicating that the presence of amylose inhibits starch digestion and the level of crystalline structure of re-crystallized amylopectin also affects the RS formation during retrogradation. PMID:23291029

  15. Resistant starch improvement of rice starches under a combination of acid and heat-moisture treatments.

    PubMed

    Hung, Pham Van; Vien, Ngo Lam; Lan Phi, Nguyen Thi

    2016-01-15

    The effects of a combination of acid and heat-moisture treatment on formation of resistant starch (RS) and characteristics of high-amylose, normal and waxy rice starches were investigated in this study. The degrees of polymerization of the rice starches treated with citric acid, lactic acid or acetic acid were significantly reduced as compared to the native starches. The RS contents of acid and heat-moisture treated rice starches were in a range of 30.1-39.0%, significantly higher than those of native rice starches (6.3-10.2%) and those of heat-moisture treated rice starches (18.5-23.9%). The acid and heat-moisture treatments reduced swelling power and viscosity, but increased solubility of the starches, while the crystalline structure did not change. Among the organic acids used, citric acid had the most impact on starch characteristics and RS formation, followed by lactic acid and acetic acid. The results are useful in production of RS for functional food application. PMID:26258703

  16. Cooking behavior and starch digestibility of NUTRIOSE® (resistant starch) enriched noodles from sweet potato flour and starch.

    PubMed

    Menon, Renjusha; Padmaja, G; Sajeev, M S

    2015-09-01

    The effect of a resistant starch source, NUTRIOSE® FB06 at 10%, 15% and 20% in sweet potato flour (SPF) and 5% and 10% in sweet potato starch (SPS) in reducing the starch digestibility and glycaemic index of noodles was investigated. While NUTRIOSE (10%) significantly reduced the cooking loss in SPF noodles, this was enhanced in SPS noodles and guar gum (GG) supplementation reduced CL of both noodles. In vitro starch digestibility (IVSD) was significantly reduced in test noodles compared to 73.6g glucose/100g starch in control SPF and 65.9 g in SPS noodles. Resistant starch (RS) was 54.96% for NUTRIOSE (15%)+GG (1%) fortified SPF noodles and 53.3% for NUTRIOSE (5%)+GG (0.5%) fortified SPS noodles, as against 33.8% and 40.68%, respectively in SPF and SPS controls. Lowest glycaemic index (54.58) and the highest sensory scores (4.23) were obtained for noodles with 15% NUTRIOSE+1% GG. PMID:25842330

  17. The use of platensimycin and platencin to fight antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Bagirova, Melahat; Abamor, Emrah Sefik; Ates, Sezen Canim; Koc, Rabia Cakir; Miraloglu, Meral; Elcicek, Serhat; Yaman, Serkan; Unal, Gokce

    2013-01-01

    Infectious diseases are known as one of the most life-threatening disabilities worldwide. Approximately 13 million deaths related to infectious diseases are reported each year. The only way to combat infectious diseases is by chemotherapy using antimicrobial agents and antibiotics. However, due to uncontrolled and unnecessary use of antibiotics in particular, surviving bacteria have evolved resistance against several antibiotics. Emergence of multidrug resistance in bacteria over the past several decades has resulted in one of the most important clinical health problems in modern medicine. For instance, approximately 440,000 new cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis are reported every year leading to the deaths of 150,000 people worldwide. Management of multidrug resistance requires understanding its molecular basis and the evolution and dissemination of resistance; development of new antibiotic compounds in place of traditional antibiotics; and innovative strategies for extending the life of antibiotic molecules. Researchers have begun to develop new antimicrobials for overcoming this important problem. Recently, platensimycin - isolated from extracts of Streptomyces platensis - and its analog platencin have been defined as promising agents for fighting multidrug resistance. In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that these new antimicrobials have great potential to inhibit methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae by targeting type II fatty acid synthesis in bacteria. Showing strong efficacy without any observed in vivo toxicity increases the significance of these antimicrobial agents for their use in humans. However, at the present time, clinical trials are insufficient and require more research. The strong antibacterial efficacies of platensimycin and platencin may be established in clinical trials and their use in humans for coping with multidrug resistance may be

  18. The use of platensimycin and platencin to fight antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Bagirova, Melahat; Abamor, Emrah Sefik; Ates, Sezen Canim; Koc, Rabia Cakir; Miraloglu, Meral; Elcicek, Serhat; Yaman, Serkan; Unal, Gokce

    2013-01-01

    Infectious diseases are known as one of the most life-threatening disabilities worldwide. Approximately 13 million deaths related to infectious diseases are reported each year. The only way to combat infectious diseases is by chemotherapy using antimicrobial agents and antibiotics. However, due to uncontrolled and unnecessary use of antibiotics in particular, surviving bacteria have evolved resistance against several antibiotics. Emergence of multidrug resistance in bacteria over the past several decades has resulted in one of the most important clinical health problems in modern medicine. For instance, approximately 440,000 new cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis are reported every year leading to the deaths of 150,000 people worldwide. Management of multidrug resistance requires understanding its molecular basis and the evolution and dissemination of resistance; development of new antibiotic compounds in place of traditional antibiotics; and innovative strategies for extending the life of antibiotic molecules. Researchers have begun to develop new antimicrobials for overcoming this important problem. Recently, platensimycin – isolated from extracts of Streptomyces platensis – and its analog platencin have been defined as promising agents for fighting multidrug resistance. In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that these new antimicrobials have great potential to inhibit methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae by targeting type II fatty acid synthesis in bacteria. Showing strong efficacy without any observed in vivo toxicity increases the significance of these antimicrobial agents for their use in humans. However, at the present time, clinical trials are insufficient and require more research. The strong antibacterial efficacies of platensimycin and platencin may be established in clinical trials and their use in humans for coping with multidrug resistance may be

  19. Measurement of resistant starch by enzymatic digestion in starch and selected plant materials: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    McCleary, Barry V; McNally, Marian; Rossiter, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    Interlaboratory performance statistics was determined for a method developed to measure the resistant starch (RS) content of selected plant food products and a range of commercial starch samples. Food materials examined contained RS (cooked kidney beans, green banana, and corn flakes) and commercial starches, most of which naturally contain, or were processed to yield, elevated RS levels. The method evaluated was optimized to yield RS values in agreement with those reported for in vivo studies. Thirty-seven laboratories tested 8 pairs of blind duplicate starch or plant material samples with RS values between 0.6 (regular maize starch) and 64% (fresh weight basis). For matrixes excluding regular maize starch, repeatability relative standard deviation (RSDr) values ranged from 1.97 to 4.2%, and reproducibility relative standard deviation (RSDR) values ranged from 4.58 to 10.9%. The range of applicability of the test is 2-64% RS. The method is not suitable for products with <1% RS (e.g., regular maize starch; 0.6% RS). For such products, RSDr and RSDR values are unacceptably high. PMID:12374410

  20. Characterization of Maize Amylose-Extender (ae) Mutant Starches. Part I: Relationship Between Resistant Starch Contents and Molecular Structures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endosperm starches were isolated from kernels of seven maize amylose-extender (ae) lines. The resistant starch (RS) contents, measured using AOAC method 991.43, showed that three new ae-mutant starch lines developed by the USDA-ARS Germplasm Enhancement (GEM) and Truman State University had larger R...

  1. Role of resistant starch in improving gut health, adiposity, and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Michael J; Zhou, June; Hegsted, Maren; Pelkman, Christine; Durham, Holiday A; Coulon, Diana B; Martin, Roy J

    2015-03-01

    The realization that low-glycemic index diets were formulated using resistant starch led to more than a decade of research on the health effects of resistant starch. Determination of the metabolizable energy of the resistant starch product allowed for the performance of isocaloric studies. Fermentation of resistant starch in rodent studies results in what appears to be a healthier gut, demonstrated by increased amounts of short-chain fatty acids, an apparent positive change in the microbiota, and increased gene expression for gene products involved in normal healthy proliferation and apoptosis of potential cancer cells. Additionally, consumption of resistant starch was associated with reduced abdominal fat and improved insulin sensitivity. Increased serum glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) likely plays a role in promoting these health benefits. One rodent study that did not use isocaloric diets demonstrated that the use of resistant starch at 8% of the weight of the diet reduced body fat. This appears to be approximately equivalent to the human fiber requirement. In human subjects, insulin sensitivity is increased with the feeding of resistant starch. However, only 1 of several studies reports an increase in serum GLP-1 associated with resistant starch added to the diet. This means that other mechanisms, such as increased intestinal gluconeogenesis or increased adiponectin, may be involved in the promotion of improved insulin sensitivity. Future research may confirm that there will be improved health if human individuals consume the requirement for dietary fiber and a large amount of the fiber is fermentable. PMID:25770258

  2. Role of Resistant Starch in Improving Gut Health, Adiposity, and Insulin Resistance1234

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Michael J; Zhou, June; Hegsted, Maren; Pelkman, Christine; Durham, Holiday A; Coulon, Diana B; Martin, Roy J

    2015-01-01

    The realization that low–glycemic index diets were formulated using resistant starch led to more than a decade of research on the health effects of resistant starch. Determination of the metabolizable energy of the resistant starch product allowed for the performance of isocaloric studies. Fermentation of resistant starch in rodent studies results in what appears to be a healthier gut, demonstrated by increased amounts of short-chain fatty acids, an apparent positive change in the microbiota, and increased gene expression for gene products involved in normal healthy proliferation and apoptosis of potential cancer cells. Additionally, consumption of resistant starch was associated with reduced abdominal fat and improved insulin sensitivity. Increased serum glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) likely plays a role in promoting these health benefits. One rodent study that did not use isocaloric diets demonstrated that the use of resistant starch at 8% of the weight of the diet reduced body fat. This appears to be approximately equivalent to the human fiber requirement. In human subjects, insulin sensitivity is increased with the feeding of resistant starch. However, only 1 of several studies reports an increase in serum GLP-1 associated with resistant starch added to the diet. This means that other mechanisms, such as increased intestinal gluconeogenesis or increased adiponectin, may be involved in the promotion of improved insulin sensitivity. Future research may confirm that there will be improved health if human individuals consume the requirement for dietary fiber and a large amount of the fiber is fermentable. PMID:25770258

  3. Structural characteristics of slowly digestible starch and resistant starch isolated from heat-moisture treated waxy potato starch.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Joo; Moon, Tae Wha

    2015-07-10

    The objective of this study was to investigate the structural characteristics of slowly digestible starch (SDS) and resistant starch (RS) fractions isolated from heat-moisture treated waxy potato starch. The waxy potato starch with 25.7% moisture content was heated at 120°C for 5.3h. Scanning electron micrographs of the cross sections of RS and SDS+RS fractions revealed a growth ring structure. The branch chain-length distribution of debranched amylopectin from the RS fraction had a higher proportion of long chains (DP ≥ 37) than the SDS+RS fraction. The X-ray diffraction intensities of RS and SDS+RS fractions were increased compared to the control. The SDS+RS fraction showed a lower gelatinization enthalpy than the control while the RS fraction had a higher value than the SDS+RS fraction. In this study we showed the RS fraction is composed mainly of crystalline structure and the SDS fraction consists of weak crystallites and amorphous regions. PMID:25857975

  4. Resistant starch and dietary fibers from cereal by-products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dried distillers grains (DDG) are a cereal byproduct from ethanol distillation process. On a dry weight basis, DDG is composed of 13% fat, 30% protein, 33% fiber, with the remainder various carbohydrates. Only 6-8% of starch in DDG is in resistant form (dietary fiber). Because only about 6% of DD...

  5. High pressure intensification of cassava resistant starch (RS3) yields.

    PubMed

    Lertwanawatana, Proyphon; Frazier, Richard A; Niranjan, Keshavan

    2015-08-15

    Cassava starch, typically, has resistant starch type 3 (RS3) content of 2.4%. This paper shows that the RS3 yields can be substantially enhanced by debranching cassava starch using pullulanase followed by high pressure or cyclic high-pressure annealing. RS3 yield of 41.3% was obtained when annealing was carried out at 400MPa/60°C for 15 min, whereas it took nearly 8h to obtain the same yield under conventional atmospheric annealing at 60°C. The yield of RS3 could be further significantly increased by annealing under 400 MPa/60°C pressure for 15 min followed by resting at atmospheric pressure for 3h 45 min, and repeating this cycle for up to six times. Microstructural surface analysis of the product under a scanning electron microscope showed an increasingly rigid density of the crystalline structure formed, confirming higher RS3 content. PMID:25794725

  6. Is there variation in resistant starch among high amylose rice varieties?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistant starch (RS) is the fraction of the starch and the products of starch degradation that resist digestion in the small intestines of healthy humans and is partially or entirely fermented in the colon by the microbiota. RS in food lowers postprandial glucose concentration and has potential in ...

  7. Enzymatic modification of corn starch with 4-α-glucanotransferase results in increasing slow digestible and resistant starch.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huan; Miao, Ming; Ye, Fan; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Tao

    2014-04-01

    In this study, partial 4-α-glucanotransferase (4αGT) treatment was used to modulate the fine structure responsible for the slow digestion and resistant property of starch. Normal corn starch modified using 4αGT for 4h showed an increase of slowly digestible starch from 9.40% to 20.92%, and resistant starch from 10.52 to 17.63%, respectively. The 4αGT treatment decreased the content of amylose from 32.6% to 26.8%. The molecular weight distribution and chain length distribution of 4αGT-treated starch showed a reduction of molecular weight and a great number of short (DP<13) and long (DP>30) chains through cleaving and reorganization of starch molecules. Both the short and long chain fractions of modified amylopectin were attributed to the low in vitro digestibility. The viscosity was inversely related to the digestibility of the 4αGT-treated starch. These results suggested that the 4αGT modified starch synthesized the novel amylopectin clusters with slow digestible and resistant character. PMID:24463262

  8. Resistant starch in Micronesian banana cultivars offers health benefits.

    PubMed

    Thakorlal, J; Perera, C O; Smith, B; Englberger, L; Lorens, A

    2010-04-01

    Resistant Starch (RS) is a type of starch that is resistant to starch hydrolyzing enzymes in the stomach and thus behaves more like dietary fibre. RS has been shown to have beneficial effects in disease prevention including modulation of glycaemic index diabetes, cholesterol lowering capability and weight management, which are critically important for many people in the Federated States of Micronesia. Green bananas are known to contain substantial concentrations of RS and are a common part of the Micronesian diet. Therefore the aim of this study was to determine the RS content in banana cultivars from Pohnpei, Micronesia: Daiwang, Inahsio, Karat, Utin Kerenis and Utin Ruk, for which no such information was available. Utin Kerenis, Inahsio and Utin Ruk were found to contain the highest amounts of RS. The fate of RS after incorporation into a food product (i.e., pancakes) was also studied and a significant reduction in the RS content was found for each cultivar after cooking. Microscopy of the banana samples indicated that the overall morphology of the cultivars was similar. In conclusion, green banana, including these varieties, should be promoted in Micronesia and other places for their rich RS content and related health benefits including diabetes control. Further research is needed to more clearly determine the effects of cooking and food processing on RS. PMID:20968236

  9. Induced mutations in the starch branching enzyme II (SBEII) genes increase amylose and resistant starch content in durum wheat

    PubMed Central

    Hazard, Brittany; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Colasuonno, Pasqualina; Uauy, Cristobal; Beckles, Diane M.; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Starch is the largest component of the wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grain and consists of approximately 70-80% amylopectin and 20-30% amylose. Amylopectin is a highly-branched, readily digested polysaccharide, whereas amylose has few branches and forms complexes that resist digestion and mimic dietary fiber (resistant starch). Down-regulation of the starch branching enzyme II (SBEII) gene by RNA interference (RNAi) was previously shown to increase amylose content in both hexaploid and tetraploid wheat. We generated ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS) mutants for the SBEIIa-A and SBEIIa-B homoeologs in the tetraploid durum wheat variety Kronos (T. turgidum ssp. durum L.). Single-gene mutants showed non-significant increases in amylose and resistant starch content, but a double mutant combining a SBEIIa-A knock-out mutation with a SBEIIa-B splice-site mutation showed a 22% increase in amylose content (P<0.0001) and a 115% increase in resistant starch content (P<0.0001). In addition, we obtained mutants for the A and B genome copies of the paralogous SBEIIb gene, mapped them 1-2 cM from SBEIIa, and generated double SBEIIa-SBEIIb mutants to study the effect of the SBEIIb gene in the absence of SBEIIa. These mutants are available to those interested in increasing amylose content and resistant starch in durum wheat. PMID:26924849

  10. Resistant starch: a functional food that prevents DNA damage and chemical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Navarro, S D; Mauro, M O; Pesarini, J R; Ogo, F M; Oliveira, R J

    2015-01-01

    Resistant starch is formed from starch and its degradation products and is not digested or absorbed in the intestine; thus, it is characterized as a fiber. Because fiber intake is associated with the prevention of DNA damage and cancer, the potential antigenotoxic, antimutagenic, and anticarcinogenic capabilities of resistant starch from green banana flour were evaluated. Animals were treated with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine and their diet was supplemented with 10% green banana flour according to the following resistant starch protocols: pretreatment, simultaneous treatment, post-treatment, and pre + continuous treatment. The results demonstrated that resistant starch is not genotoxic, mutagenic, or carcinogenic. The results suggest that resistant starch acts through desmutagenesis and bio-antimutagenesis, as well as by reducing aberrant crypt foci, thereby improving disease prognosis. These findings imply that green banana flour has therapeutic properties that should be explored for human dietary applications. PMID:25867310

  11. Dietary resistant starch and chronic inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Jacobasch, G; Schmiedl, D; Kruschewski, M; Schmehl, K

    1999-11-01

    These studies were performed to test the benefit of resistant starch on ulcerative colitis via prebiotic and butyrate effects. Butyrate, propionate, and acetate are produced in the colon of mammals as a result of microbial fermentation of resistant starch and other dietary fibers. Butyrate plays an important role in the colonic mucosal growth and epithelial proliferation. A reduction in the colonic butyrate level induces chronic mucosal atrophy. Short-chain fatty acid enemas increase mucosal generation, crypt length, and DNA content of the colonocytes. They also ameliorate symptoms of ulcerative colitis in human patients and rats injected with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Butyrate, and also to a lesser degree propionate, are substrates for the aerobic energy metabolism, and trophic factors of the colonocytes. Adverse butyrate effects occur in normal and neoplastic colonic cells. In normal cells, butyrate induces proliferation at the crypt base, while inhibiting proliferation at the crypt surface. In neoplastic cells, butyrate inhibits DNA synthesis and arrests cell growth in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The improvement of the TNBS-induced colonic inflammation occurred earlier in the resistant starch (RS)-fed rats than in the RS-free group. This benefit coincided with activation of colonic epithelial cell proliferation and the subsequent restoration of apoptosis. The noncollagenous basement membrane protein laminin was regenerated initially in the RS-fed group, demonstrating what could be a considered lower damage to the intestinal barrier function. The calculation of intestinal short-chain fatty acid absorption confirmed this conclusion. The uptake of short-chain fatty acids in the colon is strongly inhibited in the RS-free group, but only slightly reduced in the animals fed with RS. Additionally, RS enhanced the growth of intestinal bacteria assumed to promote health. Further studies involving patients suffering from ulcerative colitis are necessary to

  12. Resistant starch contents of native and heat-moisture treated jackfruit seed starch.

    PubMed

    Kittipongpatana, Ornanong S; Kittipongpatana, Nisit

    2015-01-01

    Native jackfruit seed starch (JFS) contains 30% w/w type II resistant starch (RS2) and can potentially be developed as a new commercial source of RS for food and pharmaceutical application. Heat-moisture treatment (HMT) was explored as a mean to increase RS content of native JFS. The effect of the conditions was tested at varied moisture contents (MC), temperatures, and times. Moisture levels of 20-25%, together with temperatures 80-110°C, generally resulted in increases of RS amount. The highest amount of RS (52.2%) was achieved under treatment conditions of 25% MC and 80°C, for 16 h (JF-25-80-16). FT-IR peak ratio at 1047/1022 cm(-1) suggested increases in ordered structure in several HMT-JFS samples with increased RS. SEM showed no significant change in the granule appearance, except at high moisture/temperature treatment. XRD revealed no significant change in peaks intensities, suggesting the crystallinity within the granule was mostly retained. DSC showed increases in T g and, in most cases, ΔT, as the MC was increased in the samples. Slight but significant decreases in ΔH were observed in samples with low RS, indicating that a combination of high moisture and temperature might cause partial gelatinization. HMT-JFS with higher RS exhibited less swelling, while the solubility remained mostly unchanged. PMID:25642454

  13. Resistant Starch Contents of Native and Heat-Moisture Treated Jackfruit Seed Starch

    PubMed Central

    Kittipongpatana, Ornanong S.

    2015-01-01

    Native jackfruit seed starch (JFS) contains 30% w/w type II resistant starch (RS2) and can potentially be developed as a new commercial source of RS for food and pharmaceutical application. Heat-moisture treatment (HMT) was explored as a mean to increase RS content of native JFS. The effect of the conditions was tested at varied moisture contents (MC), temperatures, and times. Moisture levels of 20–25%, together with temperatures 80–110°C, generally resulted in increases of RS amount. The highest amount of RS (52.2%) was achieved under treatment conditions of 25% MC and 80°C, for 16 h (JF-25-80-16). FT-IR peak ratio at 1047/1022 cm−1 suggested increases in ordered structure in several HMT-JFS samples with increased RS. SEM showed no significant change in the granule appearance, except at high moisture/temperature treatment. XRD revealed no significant change in peaks intensities, suggesting the crystallinity within the granule was mostly retained. DSC showed increases in Tg and, in most cases, ΔT, as the MC was increased in the samples. Slight but significant decreases in ΔH were observed in samples with low RS, indicating that a combination of high moisture and temperature might cause partial gelatinization. HMT-JFS with higher RS exhibited less swelling, while the solubility remained mostly unchanged. PMID:25642454

  14. Characterization and Prebiotic Effect of the Resistant Starch from Purple Sweet Potato.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yafeng; Wang, Qi; Li, Baoyu; Lin, Liangmei; Tundis, Rosa; Loizzo, Monica R; Zheng, Baodong; Xiao, Jianbo

    2016-01-01

    Purple sweet potato starch is a potential resource for resistant starch production. The effects of heat-moisture treatment (HMT) and enzyme debranching combined heat-moisture treatment (EHMT) on the morphological, crystallinity and thermal properties of PSP starches were investigated. The results indicated that, after HMT or EHMT treatments, native starch granules with smooth surface was destroyed to form a more compact, irregular and sheet-like structure. The crystalline pattern was transformed from C-type to B-type with decreasing relative crystallinity. Due to stronger crystallites formed in modified starches, the swelling power and solubility of HMT and EHMT starch were decreased, while the transition temperatures and gelatinization enthalpy were significantly increased. In addition, HMT and EHMT exhibited greater effects on the proliferation of bifidobacteria compared with either glucose or high amylose maize starch. PMID:27447598

  15. Fighting antibiotic resistance in Sweden--past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Struwe, Johan

    2008-01-01

    Sweden has been in the favorable situation of having limited antibiotic resistance and low antibiotic consumption. When pneumococci with reduced susceptibility to penicillin and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus emerged during the 1990s, professionals and relevant authorities called for extensive action plans to avoid the critical threshold levels of resistance experienced in other countries. The purpose of this paper is to examine Swedish experiences in light of new and future challenges by reviewing Swedish data on antibiotic resistance and antibiotic use, notifications, outbreak control, action plans and scientific papers. The tradition of liberal performance of clinical cultures, together with well functioning diagnostic laboratories, has formed a basis for close collaboration and development of surveillance within quality assurance programs. For more than 20 years the pharmacy monopoly in Sweden has made it possible to collect well defined data on antibiotic sales at the county level with almost 100% coverage. Multisectorial collaboration was set up in regional Strama (Swedish Strategic Programme Against Antibiotic Resistance) groups. Large diagnosis-prescribing surveys have been undertaken, and the concept of basic hygiene precautions was introduced, together with extensive programs for early case finding. However, surveillance has been hampered by inadequate IT systems and some difficulties in collecting relevant data on antibiotic sales at the national level. Also, a decentralized system with 21 counties and regions has resulted in divergence of action plans and rules. The containment of antibiotic resistance thus far may be explained by the early response in human and veterinary medicine and close multisectorial collaboration, supported by the government, before problems got out of hand. Nevertheless, rapidly growing problems with bacteria that produce extended beta-lactamases have recently emerged and antibiotic sales have started to increase

  16. Fighting Back in Appalachia: Traditions of Resistance and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Stephen L., Ed.

    Sixteen essays document the extent and variety of community resistance and struggle in Appalachia since 1960, and the origins and factors contributing to success or failure of particular efforts. They also relate the study of Appalachian dissent to issues informing scholarly discussions of dissent nationally. Of particular educational relevance…

  17. Production of resistant starch by enzymatic debranching in legume flours.

    PubMed

    Morales-Medina, Rocío; Del Mar Muñío, María; Guadix, Emilia M; Guadix, Antonio

    2014-01-30

    Resistant starch (RS) was produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of flours from five different legumes: lentil, chickpea, faba bean, kidney bean and red kidney bean. Each legume was firstly treated thermally, then hydrolyzed with pullulanase for 24h at 50°C and pH 5 and lyophilized. At the end of each hydrolysis reaction, the RS amount ranged from 4.7% for red kidney beans to 7.5% for chickpeas. With respect to the curves of RS against hydrolysis time, a linear increase was observed initially and a plateau was generally achieved by the end of reaction. These curves were successfully modeled by a kinetic equation including three parameters: initial RS, RS at long operation time and a kinetic constant (k). Furthermore, the relative increase in hydrolysis, calculated using the kinetic parameters, was successfully correlated to the percentage of amylose. PMID:24299889

  18. Controlling the Resistive Switching Behavior in Starch-Based Flexible Biomemristors.

    PubMed

    Raeis-Hosseini, Niloufar; Lee, Jang-Sik

    2016-03-23

    Implementation of biocompatible materials in resistive switching memory (ReRAM) devices provides opportunities to use them in biomedical applications. We demonstrate a robust, nonvolatile, flexible, and transparent ReRAM based on potato starch. We also introduce a biomolecular memory device that has a starch-chitosan composite layer. The ReRAM behavior can be controlled by mixing starch with chitosan in the resistive switching layer. Whereas starch-based biomemory devices which show abrupt changes in current level; the memory device with mixed biopolymers undergoes gradual changes. Both devices exhibit uniform and robust programmable memory properties for nonvolatile memory applications. The explicated source of the bipolar resistive switching behavior is assigned to formation and rupture of carbon-rich filaments. The gradual set/reset behavior in the memory device based on a starch-chitosan mixture makes it suitable for use in neuromorphic devices. PMID:26919221

  19. Development and Characterization of Spaghetti with High Resistant Starch Content Supplemented with Banana Starch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pasta products, such as spaghetti, are relatively healthy foods traditionally manufactured from durum wheat semolina and water. Nutritionally improved spaghetti products with additional health benefits can be produced by supplementing durum wheat with suitable food additives, such as banana starch....

  20. Pasting, textural and thermal properties of resistant starch prepared from potato (Solanum tuberosum) starch using pullulanase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Chagam Koteswara; Pramila, S; Haripriya, Sundaramoorthy

    2015-03-01

    Pullulanase enzyme (40 U/g, 10 h) was used for enzymatic hydrolysis of potato starch which was autoclaved (121 °C/30 min), stored under refrigeration (4 °C/24 h) and lyophilized. Comparison of morphological, pasting, textural and thermal properties among native hydrolysed starch (V2) and gelatinized hydrolysed starch (V3) prepared using pullulanase enzyme on potato starch (V1) were studied. The round, elliptical, irregular and oval shape with smooth surface of V1 was replaced with amorphous mass of cohesive structure leading to loss of granular appearance in V2 and V3. The percentage of amylose and resistant starch content of V2 (27.16 %) and (24.16 %); V3 (51.44 %) and (29.35 %) was higher when compared to V1 (22.17 %) and (3.62 %). The swelling power of V1 observed at 60 °C (0.85 %) and 95 °C (8.64 %) were significantly different from V2 at 60 °C (4.97 %) and 95 °C (7.66 %) and that of V3 at 60 °C (5.82 %) and 95 °C (7.5 %). Significance difference in water solubility (7.62 %) and absorption capacity (6.11 %) was noted in V3 when compared with V1 and V2 owing to amylose/amylopectin content. Increase in water solubility and absorption capacity along with decrease in swelling power of V2 and V3 was noted due to hydrolytic and thermal process. RS obtained from hydrolysis showed a reduction in viscosity, indicating the rupture of starch molecules. The viscosity was found to be inversely proportional to the RS content in the sample. The thermal properties of RS increased due to the retrogradation and recrystallization (P < 0.05). PMID:25745229

  1. Analysis of Resistant Starches in Rat Cecal Contents Using Fourier Transform Infrared Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Timothy J.; Ai, Yongfeng; Jones, Roger W.; Houk, Robert S.; Jane, Jay-lin; Zhao, Yinsheng; Birt, Diane F.; McClelland, John F.

    2013-01-29

    Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) qualitatively and quantitatively measured resistant starch (RS) in rat cecal contents. Fisher 344 rats were fed diets of 55% (w/w, dry basis) starch for 8 weeks. Cecal contents were collected from sacrificed rats. A corn starch control was compared against three RS diets. The RS diets were high-amylose corn starch (HA7), HA7 chemically modified with octenyl succinic anhydride, and stearic-acid-complexed HA7 starch. To calibrate the FTIR-PAS analysis, samples from each diet were analyzed using an enzymatic assay. A partial least-squares cross-validation plot generated from the enzymatic assay and FTIR-PAS spectral results for starch fit the ideal curve with a R2 of 0.997. A principal component analysis plot of components 1 and 2 showed that spectra from diets clustered significantly from each other. This study clearly showed that FTIR-PAS can accurately quantify starch content and identify the form of starch in complex matrices.

  2. Dynamic moisture sorption characteristics of enzyme-resistant recrystallized cassava starch.

    PubMed

    Mutungi, Christopher; Schuldt, Stefan; Onyango, Calvin; Schneider, Yvonne; Jaros, Doris; Rohm, Harald

    2011-03-14

    The interaction of moisture with enzyme-resistant recrystallized starch, prepared by heat-moisture treatment of debranched acid-modified or debranched non-acid-modified cassava starch, was investigated in comparison with the native granules. Crystallinities of the powdered products were estimated by X-ray diffraction. Moisture sorption was determined using dynamic vapor sorption analyzer and data fitted to various models. Percent crystallinities of native starch (NS), non-acid-modified recrystallized starch (NAMRS), and acid-modified recrystallized starch (AMRS) were 39.7, 51.9, and 56.1%, respectively. In a(w) below 0.8, sorption decreased in the order NS > NAMRS > AMRS in line with increasing sample crystallinities but did not follow this crystallinity dependence at higher a(w) because of condensation and polymer dissolution effects. Adsorbed moisture became internally absorbed in NS but not in NAMRS and AMRS, which might explain the high resistance of the recrystallized starches to digestion because enzyme and starch cannot approach each other over fairly sufficient surface at the molecular level. PMID:21261261

  3. Banana resistant starch and its effects on constipation model mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Huang, Ji Hong; Cheng, Yan Feng; Yang, Gong Ming

    2014-08-01

    Banana resistant starch (BRS) was extracted to investigate the structural properties of BRS, its effects on the gastrointestinal transit, and dejecta of normal and experimentally constipated mice. The mouse constipation model was induced by diphenoxylate administration. The BRS administered mice were divided into three groups and gavaged with 1.0, 2.0, or 4.0 g/kg body weight BRS per day. The small intestinal movement, time of the first black dejecta, dejecta granules, weight and their moisture content, body weight, and food intake of mice were studied. Results showed that the BRS particles were oval and spindly and some light cracks and pits were in the surface. The degree of crystallinity of BRS was 23.13%; the main diffraction peaks were at 2(θ) 15.14, 17.38, 20.08, and 22.51. The degree of polymerization of BRS was 81.16 and the number-average molecular weight was 13147.92 Da, as determined by the reducing terminal method. In animal experiments, BRS at the dose of 4.0 g/kg body weight per day was able to increase the gastrointestinal propulsive rate, and BRS at the doses of 2.0 and 4.0 g/kg body weight per day was found to shorten the start time of defecation by observing the first black dejecta exhaust. However, there were no influences of BRS on the dejecta moisture content, the dejecta granules and their weight, body weight, or daily food intake in mice. BRS was effective in accelerating the movement of the small intestine and in shortening the start time of defecation, but did not impact body weight and food intake. Therefore, BRS had the potential to be useful for improving intestinal motility during constipation. PMID:25046686

  4. Effects of sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] crude extracts on starch digestibility, Estimated Glycemic Index (EGI), and Resistant Starch (Rs) contents of porridges.

    PubMed

    Lemlioglu-Austin, Dilek; Turner, Nancy D; McDonough, Cassandra M; Rooney, Lloyd W

    2012-01-01

    Bran extracts (70% aqueous acetone) of specialty sorghum varieties (tannin, black, and black with tannin) were used to investigate the effects of sorghum phenolic compounds on starch digestibility, Estimated Glycemic Index (EGI), and Resistant Starch (RS) of porridges made with normal corn starch, enzyme resistant high amylose corn starch, and ground whole sorghum flours. Porridges were cooked with bran extracts in a Rapid Visco-analyser (RVA). The cooking trials indicated that bran extracts of phenolic-rich sorghum varieties significantly reduced EGI, and increased RS contents of porridges. Thus, there could be potential health benefits associated with the incorporation of phenolic-rich sorghum bran extracts into foods to slow starch digestion and increase RS content. PMID:22986923

  5. African Flora Has the Potential to Fight Multidrug Resistance of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuete, Victor; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background. Continuous efforts from scientists of diverse fields are necessary not only to better understand the mechanism by which multidrug-resistant (MDR) cancer cells occur, but also to boost the discovery of new cytotoxic compounds to fight MDR phenotypes. Objectives. The present review reports on the contribution of African flora in the discovery of potential cytotoxic phytochemicals against MDR cancer cells. Methodology. Scientific databases such as PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus, Google Scholar, and Web of Knowledge were used to retrieve publications related to African plants, isolated compounds, and drug resistant cancer cells. The data were analyzed to highlight cytotoxicity and the modes of actions of extracts and compounds of the most prominent African plants. Also, thresholds and cutoff points for the cytotoxicity and modes of action of phytochemicals have been provided. Results. Most published data related to the antiproliferative potential of African medicinal plants were from Cameroon, Egypt, Nigeria, or Madagascar. The cytotoxicity of phenolic compounds isolated in African plants was generally much better documented than that of terpenoids and alkaloids. Conclusion. African flora represents an enormous resource for novel cytotoxic compounds. To unravel the full potential, efforts should be strengthened throughout the continent, to meet the challenge of a successful fight against MDR cancers. PMID:25961047

  6. Identification of QTLs for resistant starch and total alkaloid content in brown and polished rice.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Y W; Sun, D; Du, J; Pu, X Y; Yang, S M; Yang, X M; Yang, T; Yang, J Z

    2016-01-01

    An F3 population consisting of 117 F2:3 families derived from a cross between two varieties of rice, Gongmi No. 3 and Diantun 502, with a large difference in their resistant starch and total alkaloid content, was used for quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. Two QTLs of resistant starch for rice (qRS7-1, qRS7-2) were identified in a linkage group on chromosome 7, which could explain phenotypic variance from 7.6 to 17.3%, due to additive effects for resistant starch from Gongmi No. 3 or over-dominance effects for qRS7-2 of the marker interval (RM3404-RM478) on chromosome 7 from Gongmi No. 3, accounting for 13.8-17.3% of the phenotypic variance. Two QTLs of total alkaloids for brown rice (qALb7-1, qALb7-2) were identified in the same linkage group, which could explain phenotypic variance from 7.7 and 19.3%, respectively, due to dominance or over-dominance effects for total alkaloids on chromosome 7 from Diantun 502. To our knowledge, these are the first QTLs to be identified, which are related to resistant starch and total alkaloid content in rice. These results are beneficial for understanding the genetic basis of, as well as for developing markers linked with, resistant starch and total alkaloids of functional components for marker-assisted selection breeding in rice. PMID:27525873

  7. Effects of alpha-amylase reaction mechanisms on analysis of resistant-starch contents.

    PubMed

    Moore, Samuel A; Ai, Yongfeng; Chang, Fengdan; Jane, Jay-lin

    2015-01-22

    This study aimed to understand differences in the resistant starch (RS) contents of native and modified starches obtained using two standard methods of RS content analysis: AOAC Method 991.43 and 2002.02. The largest differences were observed in native potato starch, cross-linked wheat distarch phosphate, and high-amylose corn starch stearic-acid complex (RS5) between using AOAC Method 991.43 with Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase (BL) and AOAC Method 2002.02 with porcine pancreatic α-amylase (PPA). To determine possible reasons for these differences, we hydrolyzed raw-starch granules with BL and PPA with equal activity at pH 6.9 and 37°C for up to 84 h and observed the starch granules displayed distinct morphological differences after the hydrolysis. Starches hydrolyzed by BL showed erosion on the surface of the granules; those hydrolyzed by PPA showed pitting on granule surfaces. These results suggested that enzyme reaction mechanisms, including the sizes of the binding sites and the reaction patterns of the two enzymes, contributed to the differences in the RS contents obtained using different methods of RS analysis. PMID:25439920

  8. The effect of fermentation and addition of vegetable oil on resistant starch formation in wholegrain breads.

    PubMed

    Buddrick, Oliver; Jones, Oliver A H; Hughes, Jeff G; Kong, Ing; Small, Darryl M

    2015-08-01

    Resistant starch has potential health benefits but the factors affecting its formation in bread and baked products are not well studied. Here, the formation of resistant starch in wholemeal bread products was evaluated in relation to the processing conditions including fermentation time, temperature and the inclusion of palm oil as a vitamin source. The effects of each the factor were assessed using a full factorial design. The impact on final starch content of traditional sourdough fermentation of wholemeal rye bread, as well as the bulk fermentation process of wheat and wheat/oat blends of wholemeal bread, was also assessed by enzyme assay. Palm oil content was found to have a significant effect on the formation of resistant starch in all of the breads while fermentation time and temperature had no significant impact. Sourdough fermentation of rye bread was found to have a greater impact on resistant starch formation than bulk fermentation of wheat and wheat blend breads, most likely due the increased organic acid content of the sourdough process. PMID:25766816

  9. Carbohydrates, Dietary Fiber, and Resistant Starch in White Vegetables: Links to Health Outcomes12

    PubMed Central

    Slavin, Joanne L.

    2013-01-01

    Vegetables are universally promoted as healthy. Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 recommend that you make half of your plate fruits and vegetables. Vegetables are diverse plants that vary greatly in energy content and nutrients. Vegetables supply carbohydrates, dietary fiber, and resistant starch in the diet, all of which have been linked to positive health outcomes. Fiber lowers the incidence of cardiovascular disease and obesity. In this paper, the important role of white vegetables in the human diet is described, with a focus on the dietary fiber and resistant starch content of white vegetables. Misguided efforts to reduce consumption of white vegetables will lower intakes of dietary fiber and resistant starch, nutrients already in short supply in our diets. PMID:23674804

  10. Suppression of azoxymethane-induced colon cancer development in rats by dietary resistant starch.

    PubMed

    Le Leu, Richard K; Brown, Ian L; Hu, Ying; Esterman, Adrian; Young, Graeme P

    2007-10-01

    Resistant starch is a complex carbohydrate that reaches the colon where it can be fermented by the colonic microflora resulting in production of short chain fatty acids (SCFA), in particular butyrate. RS effects on colorectal tumourigenesis are contrasting and protection remains controversial. Butyrate has an important role as the preferred metabolic fuel and regulator of colonocyte proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis and may play a role in cancer prevention. Thus variation in butyrate production from different substrates might explain the variation in effect of RS. This study evaluated the hypothesis that feeding dietary resistant starch (as high amylose maize starch) would protect against azoxymethane (AOM)-colon carcinogenesis and favourably influence the colonic luminal environment. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 90) were provided one of three diets: Control (without added dietary fibre or RS), 10% HAS (contained 100 g/kg raw high amylose maize starch) or 20% HAS (contained 200 g/kg high amylose maize starch). Rats were fed their experimental diets for four weeks after which they were injected with AOM (15 mg/kg) during the fifth and six week. Colons were resected (25 weeks post second injection) for evaluation of tumour formation, apoptosis, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) labelling index and short chain fatty acid levels. Feeding resistant starch significantly reduced the incidence (p < 0.01) and multiplicity (p < 0.05) of adenocarcinomas in the colon compared to the Control diet. Both doses of HAS resulted in similar protection against colon tumourigenesis. Feeding RS significantly increased total SCFA concentrations, including butyrate in the distal colon. Apoptosis (p < 0.01) was also enhanced while PCNA labelling index was reduced (p < 0.01) in the distal colon with resistant starch feeding. The protective effect of consumption of RS as dietary high-amylose cornstarch against colon cancer development appears to be related to active

  11. Effect of Dietary-Resistant Starch on Inhibition of Colonic Preneoplasia and Wnt Signaling in Azoxymethane-Induced Rodent Models.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Bridget; Cray, Nicole; Ai, Yongfeng; Fang, Yinan; Liu, Peng; Whitley, Elizabeth M; Birt, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Dietary fiber has been reported to prevent preneoplastic colon lesions. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of resistant starches, novel dietary fibers, on the development of colonic preneoplasia and Wnt signaling in azoxymethane (AOM)-treated rats and mice fed resistant starches at 55% of the diet after AOM treatment. Another objective was to determine the effect of resistant starches on the development of preneoplasia in rats treated with antibiotics (Ab), administered between AOM treatment and resistant starch feeding. Diets containing resistant starches, high-amylose (HA7), high-amylose-octenyl succinic anhydride (OS-HA7), or high-amylose-stearic acid (SA-HA7) were compared with control cornstarch (CS). The resistant starch content of the diets did not alter the yield of colonic lesions but animals treated with AOM and fed the diet with the highest resistant starch content, SA-HA7 developed the highest average aberrant crypt foci (ACF) per animal. Mice fed the OS-HA7 diet had decreased expression of some upstream Wnt genes in the colonic crypts. This study suggests that further research is needed to determine if resistant starch impacts colon carcinogenesis in rodents. PMID:27367460

  12. Inhibition by resistant starch of red meat-induced promutagenic adducts in mouse colon.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jean; Nyskohus, Laura; Young, Graeme P; Hu, Ying; Conlon, Michael A; Bird, Anthony R; Topping, David L; Le Leu, Richard K

    2011-11-01

    Population studies have shown that high red meat intake may increase colorectal cancer risk. Our aim was to examine the effect of different amounts and sources of dietary protein on induction of the promutagenic adduct O(6)-methyl-2-deoxyguanosine (O(6)MeG) in colonocytes, to relate these to markers of large bowel protein fermentation and ascertain whether increasing colonic carbohydrate fermentation modified these effects. Mice (n = 72) were fed 15% or 30% protein as casein or red meat or 30% protein with 10% high amylose maize starch as the source of resistant starch. Genetic damage in distal colonocytes was detected by immunohistochemical staining for O(6)MeG and apoptosis. Feces were collected for measurement of pH, ammonia, phenols, p-cresol, and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). O(6)MeG and fecal p-cresol concentrations were significantly higher with red meat than with casein (P < 0.018), with adducts accumulating in cells at the crypt apex. DNA adducts (P < 0.01) and apoptosis (P < 0.001) were lower and protein fermentation products (fecal ammonia, P < 0.05; phenol, P < 0.0001) higher in mice fed resistant starch. Fecal SCFA levels were also higher in mice fed resistant starch (P < 0.0001). This is the first demonstration that high protein diets increase promutagenic adducts (O(6)MeG) in the colon and dietary protein type seems to be the critical factor. The delivery of fermentable carbohydrate to the colon (as resistant starch) seems to switch from fermentation of protein to that of carbohydrate and a reduction in adduct formation, supporting previous observations that dietary resistant starch opposes the mutagenic effects of dietary red meat. PMID:21885815

  13. Effects of amylosucrase treatment on molecular structure and digestion resistance of pre-gelatinised rice and barley starches.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bum-Su; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Hong, Jung-Sun; Huber, Kerry C; Shim, Jae-Hoon; Yoo, Sang-Ho

    2013-06-01

    Structural modification of rice and barley starches with Neisseria polysaccharea amylosucrase (NpAS) was conducted, and relationship between structural characteristics and resistant starch (RS) contents of NpAS-treated starches was investigated. Pre-gelatinised rice and barley starches were treated with NpAS. NpAS-treated starches were characterised with respect to morphology, X-ray diffraction pattern, amylopectin branch-chain distribution, and RS content, and their structural characteristics were correlated to RS contents. Regardless of amylose contents of native starches, NpAS-treated (relative to native) starches possessed lower and higher proportions of shorter (DP 6-12) and intermediate (DP 13-36) amylopectin (AP) branch-chains, respectively. RS contents were higher for NpAS-treated starches relative to native starches, and maximum RS contents were obtained for NpAS-treated starches of waxy rice and barley genotypes. Amylose contents were not associated with RS contents of NpAS-treated starches. However, shorter and intermediate AP branch-chain portions were negatively and positively correlated to RS contents of NpAS-treated starches, respectively. PMID:23411202

  14. Resistant starch does not affect zinc homeostasis in rural Malawian children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study tested the hypothesis that Malawian children at risk for zinc deficiency will have reduced endogenous fecal zinc (EFZ) and increased net absorbed zinc (NAZ) following the addition of high amylose maize resistant starch (RS) to their diet. This was a small controlled clinical trial to dete...

  15. Baking Performance of Phosphorylated Cross-Linked Resistant Starch in Low-Moisture Bakery Goods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorylated cross-linked resistant starch (RS) is a type 4 RS, which can be used for enhancing the benefits of dietary fiber. The baking performance of the RS was explored using wire-cut cookie baking and benchtop chemically-leavened cracker baking methods to produce low-moisture baked goods (coo...

  16. Ruminococcus bromii is a keystone species for the degradation of resistant starch in the human colon

    PubMed Central

    Ze, Xiaolei; Duncan, Sylvia H; Louis, Petra; Flint, Harry J

    2012-01-01

    The release of energy from particulate substrates such as dietary fiber and resistant starch (RS) in the human colon may depend on the presence of specialist primary degraders (or ‘keystone species') within the microbial community. We have explored the roles of four dominant amylolytic bacteria found in the human colon in the degradation and utilization of resistant starches. Eubacterium rectale and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron showed limited ability to utilize RS2- and RS3-resistant starches by comparison with Bifidobacterium adolescentis and Ruminococcus bromii. In co-culture, however, R. bromii proved unique in stimulating RS2 and RS3 utilization by the other three bacterial species, even in a medium that does not permit growth of R. bromii itself. Having previously demonstrated low RS3 fermentation in vivo in two individuals with undetectable populations of R. bromii-related bacteria, we show here that supplementation of mixed fecal bacteria from one of these volunteers with R. bromii, but not with the other three species, greatly enhanced the extent of RS3 fermentation in vitro. This argues strongly that R. bromii has a pivotal role in fermentation of RS3 in the human large intestine, and that variation in the occurrence of this species and its close relatives may be a primary cause of variable energy recovery from this important component of the diet. This work also indicates that R. bromii possesses an exceptional ability to colonize and degrade starch particles when compared with previously studied amylolytic bacteria from the human colon. PMID:22343308

  17. Peculiarities of enhancing resistant starch in ruminants using chemical methods: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Deckardt, Kathrin; Khol-Parisini, Annabella; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2013-06-01

    High-producing ruminants are fed high amounts of cereal grains, at the expense of dietary fiber, to meet their high energy demands. Grains consist mainly of starch, which is easily degraded in the rumen by microbial glycosidases, providing energy for rapid growth of rumen microbes and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) as the main energy source for the host. Yet, low dietary fiber contents and the rapid accumulation of SCFA lead to rumen disorders in cattle. The chemical processing of grains has become increasingly important to confer their starch resistances against rumen microbial glycosidases, hence generating ruminally resistant starch (RRS). In ruminants, unlike monogastric species, the strategy of enhancing resistant starch is useful, not only in lowering the amount of carbohydrate substrates available for digestion in the upper gut sections, but also in enhancing the net hepatic glucose supply, which can be utilized by the host more efficiently than the hepatic gluconeogenesis of SCFA. The use of chemical methods to enhance the RRS of grains and the feeding of RRS face challenges in the practice; therefore, the present article attempts to summarize the most important achievements in the chemical processing methods used to generate RRS, and review advantages and challenges of feeding RRS to ruminants. PMID:23736826

  18. Physical Cross-Linking Starch-Based Zwitterionic Hydrogel Exhibiting Excellent Biocompatibility, Protein Resistance, and Biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Zhang, Yabin; Wang, Qiangsong; Zhou, Xin; Yang, Boguang; Ji, Feng; Dong, Dianyu; Gao, Lina; Cui, Yuanlu; Yao, Fanglian

    2016-06-22

    In this work, a novel starch-based zwitterionic copolymer, starch-graft-poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (ST-g-PSBMA), was synthesized via Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization. Starch, which formed the main chain, can be degraded completely in vivo, and the pendent segments of PSBMA endowed the copolymer with excellent protein resistance properties. This ST-g-PSBMA copolymer could self-assemble into a physical hydrogel in normal saline, and studies of the formation mechanism indicated that the generation of the physical hydrogel was driven by electrostatic interactions between PSBMA segments. The obtained hydrogels were subjected to detailed analysis by scanning electron microscopy, swelling ratio, protein resistance, and rheology tests. Toxicity and hemolysis analysis demonstrated that the ST-g-PSBMA hydrogels possess excellent biocompatibility and hemocompatibility. Moreover, the cytokine secretion assays (IL-6, TNF-α, and NO) confirmed that ST-g-PSBMA hydrogels had low potential to trigger the activation of macrophages and were suitable for in vivo biomedical applications. On the basis of these in vitro results, the ST-g-PSBMA hydrogels were implanted in SD rats. The tissue responses to hydrogel implantation and the hydrogel degradation in vivo were determined by histological analysis (Hematoxylin and eosin, Van Gieson, and Masson's Trichrome stains). The results presented in this study demonstrate that the physical cross-linking, starch-based zwitterionic hydrogels possess excellent protein resistance, low macrophage-activation properties, and good biocompatibility, and they are a promising candidate for an in vivo biomedical application platform. PMID:27249052

  19. Development of functional milk desserts enriched with resistant starch based on consumers' perception.

    PubMed

    Ares, Florencia; Arrarte, Eloísa; De León, Tania; Ares, Gastón; Gámbaro, Adriana

    2012-10-01

    Sensory characteristics play a key role in determining consumers' acceptance of functional foods. In this context, the aim of the present work was to apply a combination of sensory and consumer methodologies to the development of chocolate milk desserts enriched with resistant starch. Chocolate milk desserts containing modified waxy maize starch were formulated with six different concentrations of two types of resistant starch (which are part of insoluble dietary fiber). The desserts were evaluated by trained assessors using Quantitative Descriptive Analysis. Moreover, consumers scored their overall liking and willingness to purchase and answered an open-ended question. Resistant starch caused significant changes in the sensory characteristics of the desserts and a significant decrease in consumers' overall liking and willingness to purchase. Consumer data was analyzed applying survival analysis on overall liking scores, considering the risk on consumers liking and willing to purchase the functional products less than their regular counterparts. The proposed methodologies proved to be useful to develop functional foods taking into account consumers' perception, which could increase their success in the market. PMID:23144240

  20. Peculiarities of Enhancing Resistant Starch in Ruminants Using Chemical Methods: Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Deckardt, Kathrin; Khol-Parisini, Annabella; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2013-01-01

    High-producing ruminants are fed high amounts of cereal grains, at the expense of dietary fiber, to meet their high energy demands. Grains consist mainly of starch, which is easily degraded in the rumen by microbial glycosidases, providing energy for rapid growth of rumen microbes and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) as the main energy source for the host. Yet, low dietary fiber contents and the rapid accumulation of SCFA lead to rumen disorders in cattle. The chemical processing of grains has become increasingly important to confer their starch resistances against rumen microbial glycosidases, hence generating ruminally resistant starch (RRS). In ruminants, unlike monogastric species, the strategy of enhancing resistant starch is useful, not only in lowering the amount of carbohydrate substrates available for digestion in the upper gut sections, but also in enhancing the net hepatic glucose supply, which can be utilized by the host more efficiently than the hepatic gluconeogenesis of SCFA. The use of chemical methods to enhance the RRS of grains and the feeding of RRS face challenges in the practice; therefore, the present article attempts to summarize the most important achievements in the chemical processing methods used to generate RRS, and review advantages and challenges of feeding RRS to ruminants. PMID:23736826

  1. A Putative Gene sbe3-rs for Resistant Starch Mutated from SBE3 for Starch Branching Enzyme in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foods high in resistant starch (RS) are beneficial to prevent various diseases including diabetes, colon cancer, diarrhea and chronic renal or hepatic diseases. Elevated RS in rice is important for public health since rice is a staple food for half of the world’s population. A japonica mutant ‘Jiang...

  2. Maize and resistant starch enriched breads reduce postprandial glycemic responses in rats.

    PubMed

    Brites, Carla M; Trigo, Maria J; Carrapiço, Belmira; Alviña, Marcela; Bessa, Rui J

    2011-04-01

    White wheat bread is a poor source of dietary fiber, typically containing less than 2%. A demand exists for the development of breads with starch that is slowly digestible or partially resistant to the digestive process. The utilization of maize flour and resistant starch is expected to reduce the release and absorption of glucose and, hence, lower the glycemic index of bread. This study was undertaken to investigate the hypothesis that a diet of maize bread, as produced and consumed in Portugal, would have beneficial metabolic effects on rats compared to white wheat bread. We also hypothesized that the effect of resistant starch on glycemic response could be altered by the use of different formulations and breadmaking processes for wheat and maize breads. Resistant starch (RS) was incorporated into formulations of breads at 20% of the inclusion rate of wheat and maize flours. Assays were conducted with male Wistar rats (n = 36), divided into four groups and fed either wheat bread, RS-wheat bread, maize bread, and RS-maize bread to evaluate feed intake, body weight gain, fecal pH, and postprandial blood glucose response (glycemic response). Blood triglycerides, total cholesterol concentrations, and liver weights were also determined. The maize bread group presented higher body weight gain and cholesterol level, lower fecal pH, and postprandial blood glucose response than the wheat bread group. The RS-wheat bread group showed significant reductions in feed intake, fecal pH, postprandial blood glucose response, and total cholesterol. The RS-maize group displayed significant reductions of body weight gain, fecal pH, and total cholesterol levels; however, for the glycemic response, only a reduction in fasting level was observed. These results suggest that maize bread has a lower glycemic index than wheat bread, and the magnitude of the effect of RS on glycemic response depends of type of bread. PMID:21530804

  3. Resistant Starch Alters the Microbiota-Gut Brain Axis: Implications for Dietary Modulation of Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Lyte, Mark; Chapel, Ashley; Lyte, Joshua M.; Ai, Yongfeng; Proctor, Alexandra; Jane, Jay-Lin; Phillips, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing recognition that the gut microbiota plays a central role in behavior and cognition suggests that the manipulation of microbial taxa through diet may provide a means by which behavior may be altered in a reproducible and consistent manner in order to achieve a beneficial outcome for the host. Resistant starch continues to receive attention as a dietary intervention that can benefit the host through mechanisms that include altering the intestinal microbiota. Given the interest in dietary approaches to improve health, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of dietary resistant starch in mice to alter the gut microbiota also results in a change in behavior. Forty-eight 6 week-old male Swiss-Webster mice were randomly assigned to 3 treatment groups (n = 16 per group) and fed either a normal corn starch diet (NCS) or diets rich in resistant starches HA7 diet (HA7) or octenyl-succinate HA7 diet (OS-HA7) for 6 week and monitored for weight, behavior and fecal microbiota composition. Animals fed an HA7 diet displayed comparable weight gain over the feeding period to that recorded for NCS-fed animals while OS-HA7 displayed a lower weight gain as compared to either NCS or HA7 animals (ANOVA p = 0.0001; NCS:HA7 p = 0.244; HA7:OS-HA7 p<0.0001; NCS:OS-HA7 p<0.0001). Analysis of fecal microbiota using 16s rRNA gene taxonomic profiling revealed that each diet corresponded with a unique gut microbiota. The distribution of taxonomic classes was dynamic over the 6 week feeding period for each of the diets. At the end of the feeding periods, the distribution of taxa included statistically significant increases in members of the phylum Proteobacteria in OS-HA7 fed mice, while the Verrucomicrobia increased in HA7 fed mice over that of mice fed OS-HA7. At the class level, members of the class Bacilli decreased in the OS-HA7 fed group, and Actinobacteria, which includes the genus Bifidobacteria, was enriched in the HA7 fed group compared to the control

  4. Resistant Starch Alters the Microbiota-Gut Brain Axis: Implications for Dietary Modulation of Behavior.

    PubMed

    Lyte, Mark; Chapel, Ashley; Lyte, Joshua M; Ai, Yongfeng; Proctor, Alexandra; Jane, Jay-Lin; Phillips, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    The increasing recognition that the gut microbiota plays a central role in behavior and cognition suggests that the manipulation of microbial taxa through diet may provide a means by which behavior may be altered in a reproducible and consistent manner in order to achieve a beneficial outcome for the host. Resistant starch continues to receive attention as a dietary intervention that can benefit the host through mechanisms that include altering the intestinal microbiota. Given the interest in dietary approaches to improve health, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of dietary resistant starch in mice to alter the gut microbiota also results in a change in behavior. Forty-eight 6 week-old male Swiss-Webster mice were randomly assigned to 3 treatment groups (n = 16 per group) and fed either a normal corn starch diet (NCS) or diets rich in resistant starches HA7 diet (HA7) or octenyl-succinate HA7 diet (OS-HA7) for 6 week and monitored for weight, behavior and fecal microbiota composition. Animals fed an HA7 diet displayed comparable weight gain over the feeding period to that recorded for NCS-fed animals while OS-HA7 displayed a lower weight gain as compared to either NCS or HA7 animals (ANOVA p = 0.0001; NCS:HA7 p = 0.244; HA7:OS-HA7 p<0.0001; NCS:OS-HA7 p<0.0001). Analysis of fecal microbiota using 16s rRNA gene taxonomic profiling revealed that each diet corresponded with a unique gut microbiota. The distribution of taxonomic classes was dynamic over the 6 week feeding period for each of the diets. At the end of the feeding periods, the distribution of taxa included statistically significant increases in members of the phylum Proteobacteria in OS-HA7 fed mice, while the Verrucomicrobia increased in HA7 fed mice over that of mice fed OS-HA7. At the class level, members of the class Bacilli decreased in the OS-HA7 fed group, and Actinobacteria, which includes the genus Bifidobacteria, was enriched in the HA7 fed group compared to the control

  5. Physico-chemical and functional properties of Resistant starch prepared from red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris.L) starch by enzymatic method.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Chagam Koteswara; Suriya, M; Haripriya, Sundaramoorthy

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the production, physico-chemical and functional properties of Resistant starch (RS) from red kidney bean starch by enzymatic method. Native and gelatinized starch were subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis (pullulanase, 40 U/g/10 h), autoclaved (121 °C/30 min), stored under refrigeration (4 °C/24 h), and lyophilized. The enzymatic hydrolysis and thermal treatment of starch increased the formation of RS which showed an increase in water absorption and water solubility indexes and a decrease in swelling power due to hydrolytic and thermal process. The process for obtaining RS changed the crystallinity pattern from C to B and increased the crystallinity due to the retrogradation process. RS obtained from hydrolysis showed a reduction in viscosity, indicating the rupture of starch molecules. The viscosity was found to be inversely proportional to the RS content in the sample. The thermal properties of RS increased due to the retrogradation and recrystallization (P<0.05). PMID:23618263

  6. Rheological, physical, and sensory attributes of gluten-free rice cakes containing resistant starch.

    PubMed

    Tsatsaragkou, Kleopatra; Papantoniou, Maria; Mandala, Ioanna

    2015-02-01

    In this study the effect of resistant starch (RS) addition on gluten-free cakes from rice flour and tapioca starch physical and sensorial properties was investigated. Increase in RS concentration made cake batters less elastic (drop of G'(ω), G''(ω) values) and thinner (viscosity decreased). Cakes specific volume increased with an increase in RS level and was maximized for 15 g/100 g RS, although porosity values were significantly unaffected by RS content. Crumb grain analysis exhibited a decrease in surface porosity, number of pores and an increase in average pore diameter as RS concentration increased. During storage, cake crumb remained softer in formulations with increasing amounts of RS. Sensory evaluation of cakes demonstrated the acceptance of all formulations, with cake containing 20 g/100 g RS mostly preferred. Gluten-free cakes with improved quality characteristics and high nutritional value can be manufactured by the incorporation of RS. PMID:25604540

  7. [Research on Resistant Starch Content of Rice Grain Based on NIR Spectroscopy Model].

    PubMed

    Luo, Xi; Wu, Fang-xi; Xie, Hong-guang; Zhu, Yong-sheng; Zhang, Jian-fu; Xie, Hua-an

    2016-03-01

    A new method based on near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) analysis was explored to determine the content of rice-resistant starch instead of common chemical method which took long time was high-cost. First of all, we collected 62 spectral data which have big differences in terms of resistant starch content of rice, and then the spectral data and detected chemical values are imported chemometrics software. After that a near-infrared spectroscopy calibration model for rice-resistant starch content was constructed with partial least squares (PLS) method. Results are as follows: In respect of internal cross validation, the coefficient of determination (R2) of untreated, pretreatment with MSC+1thD, pretreatment with 1thD+SNV were 0.920 2, 0.967 0 and 0.976 7 respectively. Root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) were 1.533 7, 1.011 2 and 0.837 1 respectively. In respect of external validation, the coefficient of determination (R2) of untreated, pretreatment with MSC+ 1thD, pretreatment with 1thD+SNV were 0.805, 0.976 and 0.992 respectively. The average absolute error was 1.456, 0.818, 0.515 respectively. There was no significant difference between chemical and predicted values (Turkey multiple comparison), so we think near infrared spectrum analysis is more feasible than chemical measurement. Among the different pretreatment, the first derivation and standard normal variate (1thD+SNV) have higher coefficient of determination (R2) and lower error value whether in internal validation and external validation. In other words, the calibration model has higher precision and less error by pretreatment with 1thD+SNV. PMID:27400508

  8. Adaptation of the cecal bacterial microbiome of growing pigs in response to resistant starch type 4.

    PubMed

    Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Mann, Evelyne; Grüll, Dietmar; Molnar, Timea; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2015-12-01

    Resistant starch (RS) exacerbates health benefits on the host via modulation of the gut bacterial community. By far, these effects have been less well explored for RS of type 4. This study aimed at gaining a community-wide insight into the impact of enzymatically modified starch (EMS) on the cecal microbiota and hindgut fermentation in growing pigs. Castrated male pigs (n = 12/diet; 29-kg body weight) were fed diets with either 70% EMS or control starch for 10 days. The bacterial profile of each cecal sample was determined by sequencing of the V345 region of the 16S rRNA gene using the Illumina MiSeq platform. EMS diet reduced short-chain fatty acid concentrations in cecum and proximal colon compared to the control diet. Linear discriminant analyses and K means clustering indicated diet-specific cecal community profiles, whereby diversity and species richness were not different among diets. Pigs showed host-specific variation in their most abundant phyla, Firmicutes (55%), Proteobacteria (35%), and Bacteroidetes (10%). The EMS diet decreased abundance of Ruminococcus, Parasutterella, Bilophila, Enterococcus, and Lactobacillus operational taxonomic units (OTU), whereas Meniscus and Actinobacillus OTU were increased compared to those with the control diet (P < 0.05). Quantitative PCR confirmed results for host effect on Enterobacteriaceae and diet effect on members of the Lactobacillus group. The presence of less cecal short-chain fatty acids and the imputed metabolic functions of the cecal microbiome suggested that EMS was less degradable for cecal bacteria than the control starch. The present EMS effects on the bacterial community profiles were different than the previously reported RS effects and can be linked to the chemical structure of EMS. PMID:26431973

  9. Adaptation of the Cecal Bacterial Microbiome of Growing Pigs in Response to Resistant Starch Type 4

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Mann, Evelyne; Grüll, Dietmar; Molnar, Timea; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2015-01-01

    Resistant starch (RS) exacerbates health benefits on the host via modulation of the gut bacterial community. By far, these effects have been less well explored for RS of type 4. This study aimed at gaining a community-wide insight into the impact of enzymatically modified starch (EMS) on the cecal microbiota and hindgut fermentation in growing pigs. Castrated male pigs (n = 12/diet; 29-kg body weight) were fed diets with either 70% EMS or control starch for 10 days. The bacterial profile of each cecal sample was determined by sequencing of the V345 region of the 16S rRNA gene using the Illumina MiSeq platform. EMS diet reduced short-chain fatty acid concentrations in cecum and proximal colon compared to the control diet. Linear discriminant analyses and K means clustering indicated diet-specific cecal community profiles, whereby diversity and species richness were not different among diets. Pigs showed host-specific variation in their most abundant phyla, Firmicutes (55%), Proteobacteria (35%), and Bacteroidetes (10%). The EMS diet decreased abundance of Ruminococcus, Parasutterella, Bilophila, Enterococcus, and Lactobacillus operational taxonomic units (OTU), whereas Meniscus and Actinobacillus OTU were increased compared to those with the control diet (P < 0.05). Quantitative PCR confirmed results for host effect on Enterobacteriaceae and diet effect on members of the Lactobacillus group. The presence of less cecal short-chain fatty acids and the imputed metabolic functions of the cecal microbiome suggested that EMS was less degradable for cecal bacteria than the control starch. The present EMS effects on the bacterial community profiles were different than the previously reported RS effects and can be linked to the chemical structure of EMS. PMID:26431973

  10. Production of l-Phenylalanine from Starch by Analog-Resistant Mutants of Bacillus polymyxa†

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Kalidas; Crawford, Don L.; Pometto, Anthony L.

    1986-01-01

    p-Fluorophenylalanine-resistant mutants of starch-degrading Bacillus polymyxa ATCC 842, generated by ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis followed by incubation with caffeine, overproduced small amounts of l-phenylalanine (l-phe) from starch. A β-2-thienylalanine-resistant mutant (BTR-7) derived from p-fluorophenylalanine mutant (C-4000 FPR-4) and resistant to both p-fluorophenylalanine and β-2-thienylalanine produced 0.5 g of l-phe and 0.15 g of l-tyrosine per liter from 10 g of starch per liter when growing in a minimal medium. trans-Cinnamic acid (CA) was also excreted by both mutants, indicating the possibility of l-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase-induced deamination of l-phe to CA. The amount of l-phe-derived CA detected in BTR-7 was less compared with mutant C-4000 FPR-4. CA production was induced in the parent only when l-phe was used as a sole nitrogen source. Time of CA production in the two mutants could be delayed by addition of other nitrogen sources, an indication of possible l-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase inhibition or repression. The presence of l-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase in B. polymyxa mutant C-4000 FPR-4 was confirmed by assays of cell-free extracts from cells grown in starch minimal medium containing l-phe as the sole nitrogen source. Preliminary studies of the regulation of deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase and prephenate dehydratase in the wild-type strain showed that deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase was subject to feedback inhibition by l-phe, l-tyrosine, and l-tryptophan. Inhibition by each amino acid was to a similar extent singly or in combination at a 0.5 mM level of each amino acid. Prephenate dehydratase was feedback inhibited by l-phe, but not by l-tyrosine or l-tryptophan or both. In the double analog-resistant mutant BTR-7, deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase had specific activity similar to that in the wild type, and the enzyme was still subject to feedback inhibition. However

  11. Impact of Resistant Starch on Body Fat Patterning and Central Appetite Regulation

    PubMed Central

    So, Po-Wah; Yu, Wei-Sheng; Kuo, Yu-Ting; Wasserfall, Clive; Goldstone, Anthony P.; Bell, Jimmy D.; Frost, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Background Adipose tissue patterning has a major influence on the risk of developing chronic disease. Environmental influences on both body fat patterning and appetite regulation are not fully understood. This study was performed to investigate the impact of resistant starch (RS) on adipose tissue deposition and central regulation of appetite in mice. Methodology and Principle Findings Forty mice were randomised to a diet supplemented with either the high resistant starch (HRS), or the readily digestible starch (LRS). Using 1H magnetic resonance (MR) methods, whole body adiposity, intrahepatocellular lipids (IHCL) and intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) were measured. Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) was used to investigate neuronal activity in hypothalamic regions involved in appetite control when fed ad libitum. At the end of the interventional period, adipocytes were isolated from epididymal adipose tissue and fasting plasma collected for hormonal and adipokine measurement. Mice on the HRS and LRS diet had similar body weights although total body adiposity, subcutaneous and visceral fat, IHCL, plasma leptin, plasma adiponectin plasma insulin/glucose ratios was significantly greater in the latter group. Adipocytes isolated from the LRS group were significantly larger and had lower insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. MEMRI data obtained from the ventromedial and paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei suggests a satiating effect of the HRS diet despite a lower energy intake. Conclusion and Significance Dietary RS significantly impacts on adipose tissue patterning, adipocyte morphology and metabolism, glucose and insulin metabolism, as well as affecting appetite regulation, supported by changes in neuronal activity in hypothalamic appetite regulation centres which are suggestive of satiation. PMID:18074032

  12. A resistant-starch enriched yogurt: fermentability, sensory characteristics, and a pilot study in children

    PubMed Central

    Aryana, Kayanush; Greenway, Frank; Dhurandhar, Nikhil; Tulley, Richard; Finley, John; Keenan, Michael; Martin, Roy; Pelkman, Christine; Olson, Douglas; Zheng, Jolene

    2015-01-01

    The rising prevalence of obesity and the vulnerability of the pediatric age group have highlighted the critical need for a careful consideration of effective, safe, remedial and preventive dietary interventions.  Amylose starch (RS2) from high-amylose maize (HAM) ferments in the gut and affects body weight.   One hundred and ten children, of 7-8 (n=91) or 13-14 (n=19) years of age scored the sensory qualities of a yogurt supplemented with either HAM-RS2 or an amylopectin starch.  The amylopectin starch yogurt was preferred to the HAM-RS2-enriched yogurt by 7-8 year old panelists ( P<0.0001).  Appearance, taste, and sandiness scores given by 13- to 14-year-old panelists were more favorable for the amylopectin starch yogurt than for HAM-RS2-enriched yogurt ( P<0.05).  HAM-RS2 supplementation resulted in acceptable (≥6 on a 1-9 scale) sensory and hedonic ratings of the yogurt in 74% of subjects.  Four children consumed a HAM-RS2-enriched yogurt for four weeks to test its fermentability in a clinical trial.  Three adolescents, but not the single pre-pubertal child, had reduced stool pH ( P=0.1) and increased stool short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) ( P<0.05) including increased fecal acetate ( P=0.02), and butyrate ( P=0.089) from resistant starch (RS) fermentation and isobutyrate ( P=0.01) from protein fermentation post-treatment suggesting a favorable change to the gut microbiota.  HAM-RS2 was not modified by pasteurization of the yogurt, and may be a palatable way to increase fiber intake and stimulate colonic fermentation in adolescents.  Future studies are planned to determine the concentration of HAM-RS2 that offers the optimal safe and effective strategy to prevent excessive fat gain in children. PMID:26925221

  13. A resistant-starch enriched yogurt: fermentability, sensory characteristics, and a pilot study in children.

    PubMed

    Aryana, Kayanush; Greenway, Frank; Dhurandhar, Nikhil; Tulley, Richard; Finley, John; Keenan, Michael; Martin, Roy; Pelkman, Christine; Olson, Douglas; Zheng, Jolene

    2015-01-01

    The rising prevalence of obesity and the vulnerability of the pediatric age group have highlighted the critical need for a careful consideration of effective, safe, remedial and preventive dietary interventions.  Amylose starch (RS2) from high-amylose maize (HAM) ferments in the gut and affects body weight.   One hundred and ten children, of 7-8 (n=91) or 13-14 (n=19) years of age scored the sensory qualities of a yogurt supplemented with either HAM-RS2 or an amylopectin starch.  The amylopectin starch yogurt was preferred to the HAM-RS2-enriched yogurt by 7-8 year old panelists ( P<0.0001).  Appearance, taste, and sandiness scores given by 13- to 14-year-old panelists were more favorable for the amylopectin starch yogurt than for HAM-RS2-enriched yogurt ( P<0.05).  HAM-RS2 supplementation resulted in acceptable (≥6 on a 1-9 scale) sensory and hedonic ratings of the yogurt in 74% of subjects.  Four children consumed a HAM-RS2-enriched yogurt for four weeks to test its fermentability in a clinical trial.  Three adolescents, but not the single pre-pubertal child, had reduced stool pH ( P=0.1) and increased stool short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) ( P<0.05) including increased fecal acetate ( P=0.02), and butyrate ( P=0.089) from resistant starch (RS) fermentation and isobutyrate ( P=0.01) from protein fermentation post-treatment suggesting a favorable change to the gut microbiota.  HAM-RS2 was not modified by pasteurization of the yogurt, and may be a palatable way to increase fiber intake and stimulate colonic fermentation in adolescents.  Future studies are planned to determine the concentration of HAM-RS2 that offers the optimal safe and effective strategy to prevent excessive fat gain in children. PMID:26925221

  14. Films from resistant starch-pectin dispersions intended for colonic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Meneguin, Andréia Bagliotti; Cury, Beatriz Stringhetti Ferreira; Evangelista, Raul Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Free films were obtained by the solvent casting method from retrograded starch-pectin dispersions at different polymer proportions and concentrations with and without plasticizer. Film forming dispersions were characterized according to their hardness, birefringence and rheological properties. The polymer dispersions showed a predominantly viscous behavior (G″>G') and the absence of plasticizers lead to building of stronger structures, while the occurrence of Maltese crosses in the retrograded dispersions indicates the occurrence of a crystalline organization. Analyses of the films included mechanical properties, thickness, superficial and cross sectional morphology, water vapor permeability, liquid uptake ability, X-ray diffractometry, in vitro dissolution and enzymatic digestion. The high resistant starch content (65.8-96.8%) assured the resistance of materials against enzymatic digestion by pancreatin. Changes in the X-ray diffraction patterns indicated a more organized and crystalline structure of free films in relation to isolated polymers. Increasing of pectin proportion and pH values favored the dissolution and liquid uptake of films. Films prepared with lower polymer concentration presented better barrier function (WVP and mechanical properties). PMID:24274490

  15. Production of resistant starch from taro (Colocasia esculenta L. Schott) corm and determination of its effects on health by in vitro methods.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Sebnem; El, Sedef Nehir

    2012-10-15

    The aim of the study was the production of resistant starch from taro (Colocasia esculenta L. Schott) corm and determination of its effects on health by in vitro methods. Starch was isolated from taro corms with 98% purity, and 10.4±0.5% amylose content. By application of heating, autoclaving, enzymatic debranching, retrogradation, and drying processes to taro starch for two times, resistant starch (RS) content was increased 16 fold (35.1±1.9%, dry basis). The expected glycemic index (eGI) of taro starch and taro resistant starch was determined as 60.6±0.5 and 51.9±0.9, respectively and the decrease in the glycemic index of taro resistant starch was found as statistically significant (P<0.05). The in vitro binding of bile acids by taro starch and taro resistant starch relative to cholesterol decreasing drug cholestyramine were 5.2±0.2% and 7.6±1.7%, respectively. PMID:22939332

  16. Resistant starch content among several sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) genotypes and the effect of heat treatment on resistant starch retention in two genotypes.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Natália de Carvalho; Queiroz, Valéria Aparecida Vieira; Rocha, Maria Clara; Amorim, Aline Cristina Pinheiro; Soares, Thayana Oliveira; Monteiro, Marlene Azevedo Magalhães; de Menezes, Cícero Beserra; Schaffert, Robert Eugene; Garcia, Maria Aparecida Vieira Teixeira; Junqueira, Roberto Gonçalves

    2016-04-15

    The resistant starch (RS) contents in 49 sorghum genotypes and the effects of heat treatment using dry and wet heat on the grain and flour from two sorghum genotypes were investigated. The results showed a wide variation in the RS contents of the genotypes analyzed. The RS mean values were grouped into six distinct groups and ranged from 0.31±0.33 g/100 g to 65.66±5.46 g/100 g sorghum flour on dry basis. Dry heat causes minor losses in the RS content with retentions of up to 97.19±1.92% of this compound, whereas wet heat retained at most 6.98±0.43% of the RS. The SC 59 and (SSN76)FC6608 RED KAFIR BAZINE (ASA N23) cultivars, which have an average RS content of 65.51 g/100 g, were appropriate for human consumption, and the use of dry heat is presented as a better alternative for the preservation of RS in heat-treated grains. PMID:26616952

  17. Effect of resistant starch on genotoxin-induced apoptosis, colonic epithelium, and lumenal contents in rats.

    PubMed

    Le Leu, Richard K; Brown, Ian L; Hu, Ying; Young, Graeme P

    2003-08-01

    The effect of different doses of a type-2 resistant starch (RS) in the form of high amylose cornstarch (HAS) on the intralumenal environment and the acute-apoptotic response to a genotoxic carcinogen (AARGC) in the colon was assessed to determine if changes in lumenal conditions were associated with an enhanced apoptotic response to DNA damage. The control diet was a modified form of the AIN-76 diet containing fully digestible starch but no dietary fibre. HAS was added to the control diet at the expense of digestible starch to give 10% HAS, 20% HAS and 30% HAS. Rats were fed the different experimental diets for a period of 4 weeks, after which a single injection of azoxymethane was given to induce DNA damage in the colonic epithelium; 6 h later AARGC was measured. Other measures included fecal and cecal short chain fatty acids (SCFA) and pH, and cell proliferation in the colonic epithelium. In HAS-supplemented rats, fermentation events were significantly increased in both cecum and feces. There was a progressive decrease in pH in both the cecum and feces as the amount of HAS in the diet increased. SCFA concentrations, including butyrate, were significantly elevated by HAS with higher levels being observed in the cecum than in the feces. There was a significant increase in colonic AARGC with HAS doses of 20 and 30% (P < 0.01) but not with 10% HAS. Cell proliferation was not affected by any dose of HAS. Correlations with AARGC, independent of dietary group, were seen for fecal SCFAs and pH, suggesting that fermentation events, might explain the effect of RS on AARGC. Altering amounts of dietary RS changes fermentative activity in the colon. Increased RS is associated with enhanced AARGC. Changes in amount of fermentable substrate are capable of changing the biological response to DNA damage. PMID:12807738

  18. Preparation and characterization of resistant starch type IV nanoparticles through ultrasonication and miniemulsion cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yongbo; Zheng, Jiong; Xia, Xuejuan; Ren, Tingyuan; Kan, Jianquan

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the properties of resistant starch type IV (chemically modified starch, RS4) prepared from a new and convenient synthesis route by using ultrasonication combined with water-in-oil miniemulsion cross-linking technique. A three-factor Box-Behnken design and optimization was used to minimize particle size through the developed RS4 nanoparticles. The predicted minimized Z-Avel (576.1nm) under the optimum conditions of the process variables (ultrasonic power, 214.57W; sonication time, 114.73min; and oil/water ratio, 10.54:1) was very close to the experimental value (651.0nm) determined in a batch experiment. After preparing the RS4 nanoparticles, morphological, physical, chemical, and functional properties were assessed. Results revealed that RS4 nanoparticle size reached about 600nm. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that ultrasonication induced notches and grooves on the surface. Under polarized light, the polarized cross was impaired. X-ray diffraction results revealed that the crystalline structure was disrupted. Smaller or no endotherms were exhibited in DSC analysis. In the FTIR graph, new peaks at 1532.91 and 1451.50cm(-1) were observed, and pasting properties were reduced. Amylose content, solubility, and SP increased, but RS content decreased. Anti-digestibility remained after ultrasonication. The prepared RS4 nanoparticles could be extensively used in biomedical applications and in the development of new medical materials. PMID:26877007

  19. The effect of dietary resistant starch type 2 on the microbiota and markers of gut inflammation in rural Malawi children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistant starch (RS) decreases intestinal inflammation in some settings. We tested the hypothesis that gut inflammation will be reduced with dietary supplementation with RS in rural Malawian children. Eighteen stunted 3-5-year-old children were supplemented with 8.5 g/day of RS type 2 for 4 weeks. ...

  20. Resistant starch analysis of commonly consumed potatoes: Content varies by cooking method and service temperature but not by variety

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistant starch (RS) has properties which may provide health benefits. We conducted a study to determine the contributions of cultivar, cooking method and service temperature on the RS contents of potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.). We hypothesized that the RS content would vary by variety, cooking me...

  1. Structural stability and prebiotic properties of resistant starch type 3 increase bile acid turnover and lower secondary bile acid formation.

    PubMed

    Dongowski, Gerhard; Jacobasch, Gisela; Schmiedl, Detlef

    2005-11-16

    Microbial metabolism is essential in maintaining a healthy mucosa in the large bowel, preferentially through butyrate specific mechanisms. This system depends on starch supply. Two structurally different resistant starches type 3 (RS3) have been investigated with respect to their resistance to digestion, fermentability, and their effects on the composition and turnover of bile acids in rats. RSA (a mixture of retrograded maltodextrins and branched high molecular weight polymers), which is more resistant than RSB (a retrograded potato starch), increased the rate of fermentation accompanied by a decrease of pH in cecum, colon, and feces. Because they were bound to RS3, less bile acids were reabsorbed, resulting in a higher turnover through the large bowel. Because of the rise of volume, the bile acid level was unchanged and the formation of secondary bile acids was partly suppressed. The results proved a strong relation between RS3, short chain fatty acid production, and microflora. However, butyrate specific benefits are only achieved by an intake of RS3 that result in good fermentation properties, which depend on the kind of the resistant starch structures. PMID:16277431

  2. How genomics is contributing to the fight against artemisinin-resistant malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Cravo, Pedro; Napolitano, Hamilton; Culleton, Richard

    2015-08-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the malignant malaria parasite, has developed resistance to artemisinin, the most important and widely used antimalarial drug at present. Currently confined to Southeast Asia, the spread of resistant parasites to Africa would constitute a public health catastrophe. In this review we highlight the recent contributions of genomics to our understanding how the parasite develops resistance to artemisinin and its derivatives, and how resistant parasites may be monitored and tracked in real-time, using molecular approaches. PMID:25910626

  3. Resistant starch for modulation of gut microbiota: Promising adjuvant therapy for chronic kidney disease patients?

    PubMed

    Moraes, Cristiane; Borges, Natália A; Mafra, Denise

    2016-08-01

    The gut microbiota has been extensively studied in all health science fields because its imbalance is linked to many disorders, such as inflammation and oxidative stress, thereby contributing to cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) complications. Novel therapeutic strategies that aim to reduce the complications caused by this imbalance have increased in recent years. Studies have shown that prebiotic supplementation can beneficially modulate the gut microbiota in CKD patients. Prebiotics consist of non-digestible dietary soluble fiber, which acts as a substrate for the gut microbiota. Resistant starch (RS) is a type of dietary fiber that can reach the large bowel and act as a substrate for microbial fermentation; for these reasons, it has been considered to be a prebiotic. Few studies have analyzed the effects of RS on the gut microbiota in CKD patients. This review discusses recent information about RS and the potential role of the gut microbiota, with a particular emphasis on CKD patients. PMID:26830416

  4. Measurement of resistant starch content in cooked rice and analysis of gelatinization and retrogradation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Nakayoshi, Yuuki; Nakamura, Sumiko; Kameo, Yoji; Shiiba, Daisuke; Katsuragi, Yoshihisa; Ohtsubo, Ken'ichi

    2015-01-01

    Digestion-resistant starch (RS) has many physiologic functions. The RS content is measured by enzymatically degrading flour samples according to the method of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists. Experiments have been performed with wheat, corn, and other grains, but there are no data for cooked rice grains in the form ingested by humans. Thus, we investigated a method to measure RS that is suitable for cooked rice grains using rice cultivars that are reported to differentially increase postprandial blood glucose in humans. Using a method for cooking individual rice grains and optimized enzyme reaction conditions, we established an RS measurement method. We also found that the amylopectin crystal condition affects the RS content measured using our method. PMID:25996617

  5. Fighting microbial drug resistance: a primer on the role of evolutionary biology in public health

    PubMed Central

    Perron, Gabriel G; Inglis, R Fredrik; Pennings, Pleuni S; Cobey, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Although microbes have been evolving resistance to antimicrobials for millennia, the spread of resistance in pathogen populations calls for the development of new drugs and treatment strategies. We propose that successful, long-term resistance management requires a better understanding of how resistance evolves in the first place. This is an opportunity for evolutionary biologists to engage in public health, a collaboration that has substantial precedent. Resistance evolution has been an important tool for developing and testing evolutionary theory, especially theory related to the genetic basis of new traits and constraints on adaptation. The present era is no exception. The articles in this issue highlight the breadth of current research on resistance evolution and also its challenges. In this introduction, we review the conceptual advances that have been achieved from studying resistance evolution and describe a path forward. PMID:25861380

  6. Resistant starch film-coated microparticles for an oral colon-specific polypeptide delivery system and its release behaviors.

    PubMed

    Situ, Wenbei; Chen, Ling; Wang, Xueyu; Li, Xiaoxi

    2014-04-23

    For the delivery of bioactive components to the colon, an oral colon-specific controlled release system coated with a resistant starch-based film through aqueous dispersion coating process was developed. Starch was modified by a high-temperature-pressure reaction, enzymatic debranching, and retrogradation, resulting in a dramatic increase in the resistibility against enzymatic digestion (meaning the formation of resistant starch, specifically RS3). This increase could be associated with an increase in the relative crystallinity, a greater amount of starch molecular aggregation structure, and the formation of a compact mass fractal structure, resulting from the treatment. The microparticles coated with this RS3 film showed an excellent controlled release property. In streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type II diabetic rats, the RS3 film-coated insulin-loaded microparticles exhibited the ability to steadily decrease the plasma glucose level initially and then maintain the plasma glucose level within the normal range for total 14-22 h with different insulin dosages after oral administration; no glycopenia or glycemic fluctuation was observed. Therefore, the potential of this new RS3 film-coated microparticle system has been demonstrated for the accurate delivery of bioactive polypeptides or protein to the colon. PMID:24684664

  7. Fighting fire with fire: mass antimalarial drug administrations in an era of antimalarial resistance.

    PubMed

    von Seidlein, Lorenz; Dondorp, Arjen

    2015-06-01

    The emergence and spread of antimalarial resistance has been a major liability for malaria control. The spread of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains had catastrophic consequences for people in malaria-endemic regions, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. The recent emergence of artemisinin-resistant P. falciparum strains is of highest concern. Current efforts to contain artemisinin resistance have yet to show success. In the absence of more promising plans, it has been suggested to eliminate falciparum malaria from foci of artemisinin resistance using a multipronged approach, including mass drug administrations. The use of mass drug administrations is controversial as it increases drug pressure. Based on current knowledge it is difficult to conceptualize how targeted malaria elimination could contribute to artemisinin resistance, provided a full treatment course is ensured. PMID:25831482

  8. Formation of type 4 resistant starch and maltodextrins from amylose and amylopectin upon dry heating: A model study.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Fernando M; Lopes, Edgar S; Moreira, Ana S P; Simões, Joana; Coimbra, Manuel A; Domingues, Rosário M

    2016-05-01

    Starch is one of the main components of human diet. During food processing, starch is submitted to high temperatures in the presence or absence of water. Thus, the main goal of this work was to identify structural modifications caused by dry heating in starch polysaccharides (amylose and amylopectin) and structurally related oligosaccharides, maltotetraose (M4) and glucosyl-maltotriose (GM3), simulating processing conditions. The structural modifications were evaluated by methylation analysis, electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) and anionic chromatography after in vitro enzymatic digestion. Dry heating promoted dehydration, depolymerization, as well as changes in Glc glycosidic linkage positions and anomeric configuration. In oligosaccharides, polymerization was also observed. All these changes resulted in a lower in vitro digestibility, suggesting that dry heating of starch polysaccharides and related oligosaccharides may be associated with the formation of type 4 resistant starch and maltodextrins, non-digestible carbohydrates that are responsible for beneficial effects in human intestinal tract. PMID:26877020

  9. Photodynamic and Antibiotic Therapy in Combination to Fight Biofilms and Resistant Surface Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Barra, Federica; Roscetto, Emanuela; Soriano, Amata A.; Vollaro, Adriana; Postiglione, Ilaria; Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Catania, Maria Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    Although photodynamic therapy (PDT), a therapeutic approach that involves a photosensitizer, light and O2, has been principally considered for the treatment of specific types of cancers, other applications exist, including the treatment of infections. Unfortunately, PDT does not always guarantee full success since it exerts lethal effects only in cells that have taken up a sufficient amount of photosensitizer and have been exposed to adequate light doses, conditions that are not always achieved. Based on our previous experience on the combination PDT/chemotherapy, we have explored the possibility of fighting bacteria that commonly crowd infected surfaces by combining PDT with an antibiotic, which normally does not harm the strain at low concentrations. To this purpose, we employed 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), a pro-drug that, once absorbed by proliferating bacteria, is converted into the natural photosensitizer Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), followed by Gentamicin. Photoactivation generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) which damage or kill the cell, while Gentamicin, even at low doses, ends the work. Our experiments, in combination, have been highly successful against biofilms produced by several Gram positive bacteria (i.e., Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, etc.). This original approach points to potentially new and wide applications in the therapy of infections of superficial wounds and sores. PMID:26343645

  10. Fighting against FHB – an excellent novel resistance source for future wheat breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a devastating wheat disease that causes tremendous economic losses by reducing grain yield and quality in wheat-growing areas worldwide. Sources of resistance are critical for genetically improving wheat for resistance to FHB. From a large-scale evaluation of tetraploid...

  11. Resistant starch is more effective than cholestyramine as a lipid-lowering agent in the rat.

    PubMed

    Younes, H; Levrat, M A; Demigné, C; Rémésy, C

    1995-09-01

    Amylase-resistant starch (RS) represents a substrate for the bacterial flora of the colon, and the question arises as whether RS shares with soluble fibers common mechanisms for their lipid-lowering effects. It is uncertain whether a cholesterol-lowering effect depends basically on an enhanced rate of steroid excretion or whether colonic fermentations also play a role in this effect. In the present study, the effect of RS (25% raw potato starch), of a steroid sequestrant (0.8% cholestyramine), or both were compared on bile acid excretion and lipid metabolism in rats fed semipurified diets. RS diets led to a marked rise in cecal size and the cecal pool of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), as well as SCFA absorption; cholestyramine did not noticeably affect cecal fermentation. Whereas cholestyramine was particularly effective at enhancing bile acid excretion, RS was more effective in lowering plasma cholesterol (-32%) and triglycerides (-29%). The activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase was increased fivefold by cholestyramine and twofold by RS. This induction in rats fed RS diets was concomittant to a depressed fatty acid synthase activity. In rats fed the RS diet, there was a lower concentration of cholesterol in all lipoprotein fractions, especially the (d = 1.040-1.080) fraction high-density lipoprotein (HDL1), while those fed cholestyramine had only a significant reduction of HDL1 cholesterol. In contrast to cholestyramine, RS also depressed the concentration of triglycerides in the triglyceride-rich lipoprotein fraction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8577229

  12. A new strategy to fight antimicrobial resistance: the revival of old antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Cassir, Nadim; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Brouqui, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of hospital and community-acquired infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens is limiting the options for effective antibiotic therapy. Moreover, this alarming spread of antimicrobial resistance has not been paralleled by the development of novel antimicrobials. Resistance to the scarce new antibiotics is also emerging. In this context, the rational use of older antibiotics could represent an alternative to the treatment of MDR bacterial pathogens. It would help to optimize the armamentarium of antibiotics in the way to preserve new antibiotics and avoid the prescription of molecules known to favor the spread of resistance (i.e., quinolones). Furthermore, in a global economical perspective, this could represent a useful public health orientation knowing that several of these cheapest “forgotten” antibiotics are not available in many countries. We will review here the successful treatment of MDR bacterial infections with the use of old antibiotics and discuss their place in current practice. PMID:25368610

  13. Microbiome-Metabolome Responses in the Cecum and Colon of Pig to a High Resistant Starch Diet

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yue; Su, Yong; Zhu, Weiyun

    2016-01-01

    Currently, knowledge about the impact of long-term intake of high resistant starch diet on pig hindgut microbiota and metabolite profile is limited. In this study, a combination of the pyrosequencing and the mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolomics techniques were used to investigate the effects of a raw potato starch (RPS, high in resistant starch) diet on microbial composition and microbial metabolites in the hindgut of pig. The results showed that Coprococcus, Ruminococcus, and Turicibacter increased significantly, while Sarcina and Clostridium decreased in relative abundances in the hindgut of pigs fed RPS. The metabolimic analysis revealed that RPS significantly affected starch and sucrose metabolites, amino acid turnover or protein biosynthesis, lipid metabolites, glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, inositol phosphate metabolism, and nucleotide metabolism. Furthermore, a Pearson's correlation analysis showed that Ruminococcus and Coprococcus were positively correlated with glucose-6-phosphate, maltose, arachidonic acid, 9, 12-octadecadienoic acid, oleic acid, phosphate, but negatively correlated with α-aminobutyric acid. However, the correlation of Clostridium and Sarcina with these compounds was in the opposite direction. The results suggest that RPS not only alters the composition of the gut microbial community but also modulates the metabolic pathway of microbial metabolism, which may further affect the hindgut health of the host. PMID:27303373

  14. Effect of storage time on in vitro digestion rate and resistant starch content of tortillas elaborated from commercial corn masas.

    PubMed

    Agama-Acevedo, Edith; Rendón-Villalobos, Rodolfo; Tovar, Juscelino; Trejo-Estrada, Sergio Rubén; Bello-Pérez, Luis Arturo

    2005-03-01

    Tortilla samples were elaborated by four small commercial factories in Mexico, employing masas prepared with the traditional nixtamalization process. Samples were stored at 4 degrees C for up to 72 hours and their chemical composition and in vitro starch digestibility features were evaluated. Chemical composition did not change with the storage time, but soluble carbohydrates decreased slightly during storage. A significant decrease in available starch content upon storage was observed, concomitant with increased resistant starch (RS) levels. These changes are possibly due to retrogradation. Retrograded resistant starch (RRS) values increased with storage time; in some samples, RRS represented more than 75% of total RS whereas in others it only accounted for 25%. The digestion rate (DR) in the freshly prepared tortillas was similar for the various samples, but after 72 h storage some differences among tortillas were found. Also, when a single tortilla sample was compared throughout the different storage times, lower DRs were determined in samples subjected to prolonged storage, which is related to the concomitant. increase in RRS. The differences found among the various tortilla samples may be due to minor variations in the commercial processing conditions and to the use of different corn varieties. PMID:16187683

  15. Strategies and molecular tools to fight antimicrobial resistance: resistome, transcriptome, and antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Letícia S.; Silva, Carolina S. F.; de Souza, Vinicius C.; da Silva, Vânia L.; Diniz, Cláudio G.; Santos, Marcelo O.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing number of antibiotic resistant bacteria motivates prospective research toward discovery of new antimicrobial active substances. There are, however, controversies concerning the cost-effectiveness of such research with regards to the description of new substances with novel cellular interactions, or description of new uses of existing substances to overcome resistance. Although examination of bacteria isolated from remote locations with limited exposure to humans has revealed an absence of antibiotic resistance genes, it is accepted that these genes were both abundant and diverse in ancient living organisms, as detected in DNA recovered from Pleistocene deposits (30,000 years ago). Indeed, even before the first clinical use of antibiotics more than 60 years ago, resistant organisms had been isolated. Bacteria can exhibit different strategies for resistance against antibiotics. New genetic information may lead to the modification of protein structure affecting the antibiotic carriage into the cell, enzymatic inactivation of drugs, or even modification of cellular structure interfering in the drug-bacteria interaction. There are still plenty of new genes out there in the environment that can be appropriated by putative pathogenic bacteria to resist antimicrobial agents. On the other hand, there are several natural compounds with antibiotic activity that may be used to oppose them. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are molecules which are wide-spread in all forms of life, from multi-cellular organisms to bacterial cells used to interfere with microbial growth. Several AMPs have been shown to be effective against multi-drug resistant bacteria and have low propensity to resistance development, probably due to their unique mode of action, different from well-known antimicrobial drugs. These substances may interact in different ways with bacterial cell membrane, protein synthesis, protein modulation, and protein folding. The analysis of bacterial transcriptome

  16. Fighting infections due to multidrug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Cornaglia, G

    2009-03-01

    Growing bacterial resistance in Gram-positive pathogens means that what were once effective and inexpensive treatments for infections caused by these bacteria are now being seriously questioned, including penicillin and macrolides for use against pneumococcal infections and-in hospitals-oxacillin for use against staphylococcal infections. As a whole, multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-positive pathogens are rapidly becoming an urgent and sometimes unmanageable clinical problem. Nevertheless, and despite decades of research into the effects of antibiotics, the actual risk posed to human health by antibiotic resistance has been poorly defined; the lack of reliable data concerning the outcomes resulting from antimicrobial resistance stems, in part, from problems with study designs and the methods used in resistence determination. Surprisingly little is known, too, about the actual effectiveness of the many types of intervention aimed at controlling antibiotic resistance. New antibiotics active against MDR Gram-positive pathogens have been recently introduced into clinical practice, and the antibiotic pipeline contains additional compounds at an advanced stage of development, including new glycopeptides, new anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) beta-lactams, and new diaminopyrimidines. Many novel antimicrobial agents are likely to be niche products, endowed with narrow antibacterial spectra and/or targeted at specific clinical problems. Therefore, an important educational goal will be to change the current, long-lasting attitudes of both physicians and customers towards broad-spectrum and multipurpose compounds. Scientific societies, such as the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID), must play a leading role in this process. PMID:19335367

  17. Integrating Antimicrobial Therapy with Host Immunity to Fight Drug-Resistant Infections: Classical vs. Adaptive Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gjini, Erida; Brito, Patricia H.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of infectious agents is a growing problem worldwide. To prevent the continuing selection and spread of drug resistance, rational design of antibiotic treatment is needed, and the question of aggressive vs. moderate therapies is currently heatedly debated. Host immunity is an important, but often-overlooked factor in the clearance of drug-resistant infections. In this work, we compare aggressive and moderate antibiotic treatment, accounting for host immunity effects. We use mathematical modelling of within-host infection dynamics to study the interplay between pathogen-dependent host immune responses and antibiotic treatment. We compare classical (fixed dose and duration) and adaptive (coupled to pathogen load) treatment regimes, exploring systematically infection outcomes such as time to clearance, immunopathology, host immunization, and selection of resistant bacteria. Our analysis and simulations uncover effective treatment strategies that promote synergy between the host immune system and the antimicrobial drug in clearing infection. Both in classical and adaptive treatment, we quantify how treatment timing and the strength of the immune response determine the success of moderate therapies. We explain key parameters and dimensions, where an adaptive regime differs from classical treatment, bringing new insight into the ongoing debate of resistance management. Emphasizing the sensitivity of treatment outcomes to the balance between external antibiotic intervention and endogenous natural defenses, our study calls for more empirical attention to host immunity processes. PMID:27078624

  18. New small-molecule drug design strategies for fighting resistant influenza A

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zuyuan; Lou, Kaiyan; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus is the major cause of seasonal or pandemic flu worldwide. Two main treatment strategies–vaccination and small molecule anti-influenza drugs are currently available. As an effective vaccine usually takes at least 6 months to develop, anti-influenza small molecule drugs are more effective for the first line of protection against the virus during an epidemic outbreak, especially in the early stage. Two major classes of anti-influenza drugs currently available are admantane-based M2 protein blockers (amantadine and rimantadine) and neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (oseltamivir, zanamivir, and peramivir). However, the continuous evolvement of influenza A virus and the rapid emergence of resistance to current drugs, particularly to amantadine, rimantadine, and oseltamivir, have raised an urgent need for developing new anti-influenza drugs against resistant forms of influenza A virus. In this review, we first give a brief introduction of the molecular mechanisms behind resistance, and then discuss new strategies in small-molecule drug development to overcome influenza A virus resistance targeting mutant M2 proteins and neuraminidases, and other viral proteins not associated with current drugs. PMID:26579472

  19. New small-molecule drug design strategies for fighting resistant influenza A.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zuyuan; Lou, Kaiyan; Wang, Wei

    2015-09-01

    Influenza A virus is the major cause of seasonal or pandemic flu worldwide. Two main treatment strategies-vaccination and small molecule anti-influenza drugs are currently available. As an effective vaccine usually takes at least 6 months to develop, anti-influenza small molecule drugs are more effective for the first line of protection against the virus during an epidemic outbreak, especially in the early stage. Two major classes of anti-influenza drugs currently available are admantane-based M2 protein blockers (amantadine and rimantadine) and neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (oseltamivir, zanamivir, and peramivir). However, the continuous evolvement of influenza A virus and the rapid emergence of resistance to current drugs, particularly to amantadine, rimantadine, and oseltamivir, have raised an urgent need for developing new anti-influenza drugs against resistant forms of influenza A virus. In this review, we first give a brief introduction of the molecular mechanisms behind resistance, and then discuss new strategies in small-molecule drug development to overcome influenza A virus resistance targeting mutant M2 proteins and neuraminidases, and other viral proteins not associated with current drugs. PMID:26579472

  20. Indole Based Weapons to Fight Antibiotic Resistance: A Structure-Activity Relationship Study.

    PubMed

    Lepri, Susan; Buonerba, Federica; Goracci, Laura; Velilla, Irene; Ruzziconi, Renzo; Schindler, Bryan D; Seo, Susan M; Kaatz, Glenn W; Cruciani, Gabriele

    2016-02-11

    Antibiotic resistance represents a worldwide concern, especially regarding the outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a common cause for serious skin and soft tissues infections. A major contributor to Staphylococcus aureus antibiotic resistance is the NorA efflux pump, which is able to extrude selected antibacterial drugs and biocides from the membrane, lowering their effective concentrations. Thus, the inhibition of NorA represents a promising and challenging strategy that would allow recycling of substrate antimicrobial agents. Among NorA inhibitors, the indole scaffold proved particularly effective and suitable for further optimization. In this study, some unexplored modifications on the indole scaffold are proposed. In particular, for the first time, substitutions at the C5 and N1 positions have been designed to give 48 compounds, which were synthesized and tested against norA-overexpressing S. aureus. Among them, 4 compounds have NorA IC50 values lower than 5.0 μM proving to be good efflux pump inhibitor (EPI) candidates. In addition, preliminary data on their ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) profile is reported. PMID:26757340

  1. Preparation and properties of a starch-based wood adhesive with high bonding strength and water resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhua; Ding, Longlong; Gu, Jiyou; Tan, Haiyan; Zhu, Libin

    2015-01-22

    A Highly efficient method was developed for preparing starch-based wood adhesives with high performance, using H2O2, a silane coupling agent and an olefin monomer as an oxidant, cross-linking agent and comonomer, respectively. The effects of various parameters on the shear adhesive strength were investigated in the dry state (DS) and wet state (WS). The results indicated that the bonding strength of starch-based wood adhesives could reach 7.88 MPa in dry state and 4.09 MPa in wet state. The oxidation could reduce the content of the hydroxyl transforming into carboxyl and aldehyde groups, and the graft copolymerization enhanced the thermal stability, which improved the bonding strength and water resistance. The starch-based adhesive and the fractures in the bonded joints were analyzed via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The improved properties were attributed to the modified of microstructure of the graft-copolymerized starch-based adhesive. PMID:25439864

  2. A breakthrough in enzyme technology to fight penicillin resistance-industrial application of penicillin amidase.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    Enzymatic penicillin hydrolysis by penicillin amidase (also penicillin acylase, PA) represents a Landmark: the first industrially and economically highly important process using an immobilized biocatalyst. Resistance of infective bacteria to antibiotics had become a major topic of research and industrial activities. Solutions to this problem, the antibiotics resistance of infective microorganisms, required the search for new antibiotics, but also the development of derivatives, notably penicillin derivatives, that overcame resistance. An obvious route was to hydrolyse penicillin to 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA), as a first step, for the introduction via chemical synthesis of various different side chains. Hydrolysis via chemical reaction sequences was tedious requiring large amounts of toxic chemicals, and they were cost intensive. Enzymatic hydrolysis using penicillin amidase represented a much more elegant route. The basis for such a solution was the development of techniques for enzyme immobilization, a highly difficult task with respect to industrial application. Two pioneer groups started to develop solutions to this problem in the late 1960s and 1970s: that of Günter Schmidt-Kastner at Bayer AG (Germany) and that of Malcolm Lilly of Imperial College London. Here, one example of this development, that at Bayer, will be presented in more detail since it illustrates well the achievement of a solution to the problems of industrial application of enzymatic processes, notably development of an immobilization method for penicillin amidase suitable for scale up to application in industrial reactors under economic conditions. A range of bottlenecks and technical problems of large-scale application had to be overcome. Data giving an inside view of this pioneer achievement in the early phase of the new field of biocatalysis are presented. The development finally resulted in a highly innovative and commercially important enzymatic process to produce 6-APA that

  3. Changes in Bowel Microbiota Induced by Feeding Weanlings Resistant Starch Stimulate Transcriptomic and Physiological Responses

    PubMed Central

    Young, Wayne; Roy, Nicole C.; Lee, Julian; Lawley, Blair; Otter, Don; Henderson, Gemma; McCann, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to predictably engineer the composition of bowel microbial communities (microbiota) using dietary components is important because of the reported associations of altered microbiota composition with medical conditions. In a synecological study, weanling conventional Sprague-Dawley rats (21 days old) were fed a basal diet (BD) or a diet supplemented with resistant starch (RS) at 5%, 2.5%, or 1.25% for 28 days. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes and temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis (TTGE) profiles in the colonic digesta showed that rats fed RS had altered microbiota compositions due to blooms of Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria. The altered microbiota was associated with changes in colonic short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations, colonic-tissue gene expression (Gsta2 and Ela1), and host physiology (serum metabolite profiles and colonic goblet cell numbers). Comparisons between germ-free and conventional rats showed that transcriptional and serum metabolite differences were mediated by the microbiota and were not the direct result of diet composition. Altered transcriptomic and physiological responses may reflect the young host's attempts to maintain homeostasis as a consequence of exposure to a new collection of bacteria and their associated biochemistry. PMID:22798356

  4. Impact of dietary resistant starch type 4 on human gut microbiota and immunometabolic functions

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Bijaya; McCormack, Lacey; Fardin-Kia, Ali Reza; Juenemann, Robert; Nichenametla, Sailendra; Clapper, Jeffrey; Specker, Bonny; Dey, Moul

    2016-01-01

    Dietary modulation of the gut microbiota impacts human health. Here we investigated the hitherto unknown effects of resistant starch type 4 (RS4) enriched diet on gut microbiota composition and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations in parallel with host immunometabolic functions in twenty individuals with signs of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Cholesterols, fasting glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin, and proinflammatory markers in the blood as well as waist circumference and % body fat were lower post intervention in the RS4 group compared with the control group. 16S-rRNA gene sequencing revealed a differential abundance of 71 bacterial operational taxonomic units, including the enrichment of three Bacteroides species and one each of Parabacteroides, Oscillospira, Blautia, Ruminococcus, Eubacterium, and Christensenella species in the RS4 group. Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry revealed higher faecal SCFAs, including butyrate, propionate, valerate, isovalerate, and hexanoate after RS4-intake. Bivariate analyses showed RS4-specific associations of the gut microbiota with the host metabolic functions and SCFA levels. Here we show that dietary RS4 induced changes in the gut microbiota are linked to its biological activity in individuals with signs of MetS. These findings have potential implications for dietary guidelines in metabolic health management. PMID:27356770

  5. Influence of resistant starches on chemical and functional properties of tarhana.

    PubMed

    Bayrakçı, Hilal Arslan; Bilgiçli, Nermin

    2015-08-01

    Two different commercial resistant starches (RSa and RSb) were used in tarhana formulation on the basis of its replacement with wheat flour at 15, 30 and 45 % levels. Color values, some chemical, functional and sensory properties of tarhana were determined. Tarhana containing 30-45 % RSa gave lower darkness and yellowness compared to other samples. Increasing levels of RSa/RSb in tarhana formulation decreased protein and Fe, K, Mg, P and Zn content of the final products. Development in acidity was negatively affected above 30 % RS addition level. Although long fermentation period of tarhana dough, RS content of the tarhana samples changed between 5.4 and 26.2 %. Control tarhana was found to have 0.9 % RS content. Cooked viscosity decreased in tarhana soup with RS addition from 1,454 cP (control) to 166 cP. RSb showed more remarkable effect on cooked viscosity than RSa. High levels of RSa improved foaming capacity, foam stability, water and oil absorption capacity of the tarhana samples. RSa successfully incorporated into tarhana formulation up to 30 % level with minimum adverse effect on chemical and sensory properties. PMID:26243962

  6. Sensory characteristics of high-amylose maize-resistant starch in three food products

    PubMed Central

    Maziarz, Mindy; Sherrard, Melanie; Juma, Shanil; Prasad, Chandan; Imrhan, Victorine; Vijayagopal, Parakat

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 resistant starch from high-amylose maize (HAM-RS2) is considered a functional ingredient due to its positive organoleptic and physiochemical modifications associated with food and physiological benefits related to human health. The sensory characteristics of three types of food products (muffins, focaccia bread, and chicken curry) with and without HAM-RS2 were evaluated using a 9-point hedonic scale. The HAM-RS2-enriched muffins, focaccia bread, and chicken curry contained 5.50 g/100 g, 13.10 g/100 g, and 8.94 g/100 g RS, respectively, based on lyophilized dry weight. The HAM-RS2-enriched muffin had higher moisture content and was perceived as being significantly moister than the control according to the sensory evaluation. The addition of HAM-RS2 to muffins significantly enhanced all sensory characteristics and resulted in a higher mean overall likeability score. The HAM-RS2-enriched focaccia bread appeared significantly darker in color, was more dense, and had the perception of a well-done crust versus the control. A grainer texture was observed with the chicken curry containing HAM-RS2 which did not significantly affect overall likeability. We concluded that the addition of HAM-RS2 may not significantly alter consumer's acceptability in most food products. PMID:24804020

  7. Impact of dietary resistant starch type 4 on human gut microbiota and immunometabolic functions.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Bijaya; McCormack, Lacey; Fardin-Kia, Ali Reza; Juenemann, Robert; Nichenametla, Sailendra; Clapper, Jeffrey; Specker, Bonny; Dey, Moul

    2016-01-01

    Dietary modulation of the gut microbiota impacts human health. Here we investigated the hitherto unknown effects of resistant starch type 4 (RS4) enriched diet on gut microbiota composition and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations in parallel with host immunometabolic functions in twenty individuals with signs of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Cholesterols, fasting glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin, and proinflammatory markers in the blood as well as waist circumference and % body fat were lower post intervention in the RS4 group compared with the control group. 16S-rRNA gene sequencing revealed a differential abundance of 71 bacterial operational taxonomic units, including the enrichment of three Bacteroides species and one each of Parabacteroides, Oscillospira, Blautia, Ruminococcus, Eubacterium, and Christensenella species in the RS4 group. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed higher faecal SCFAs, including butyrate, propionate, valerate, isovalerate, and hexanoate after RS4-intake. Bivariate analyses showed RS4-specific associations of the gut microbiota with the host metabolic functions and SCFA levels. Here we show that dietary RS4 induced changes in the gut microbiota are linked to its biological activity in individuals with signs of MetS. These findings have potential implications for dietary guidelines in metabolic health management. PMID:27356770

  8. Greater satiety response with resistant starch and corn bran in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Willis, Holly J; Eldridge, Alison L; Beiseigel, Jeannemarie; Thomas, William; Slavin, Joanne L

    2009-02-01

    Some studies suggest high-fiber foods are more satiating than foods with little or no fiber. However, we hypothesized that certain types of dietary fiber may enhance satiety more than others. Healthy men and women (N = 20) participated in this acute, randomized double-blind, crossover study comparing the effects of 4 fibers and a low-fiber (LF) treatment on satiety. On 5 separate visits, fasting subjects consumed either a LF muffin (1.6 g fiber) or 1 of 4 high-fiber muffins (8.0-9.6 g fiber) for breakfast. The subjects used 4 questions on 100 mm visual analogue scales to rate satiety at baseline and at regular intervals for 180 minutes after muffin consumption. Responses were analyzed as area under the curve and significant differences from baseline. Satiety differed among treatments. Resistant starch and corn bran had the most impact on satiety, whereas polydextrose had little effect and behaved like the LF treatment. Results from this study indicate that not all fibers influence satiety equally. PMID:19285600

  9. Resistant starch promotes equol production and inhibits tibial bone loss in ovariectomized mice treated with daidzein.

    PubMed

    Tousen, Yuko; Abe, Fumiko; Ishida, Tatsuya; Uehara, Mariko; Ishimi, Yoshiko

    2011-10-01

    Daidzein is metabolized to equol in the gastrointestinal tract by gut microflora. Equol has greater estrogenic activity than genistein and daidzein, with its production shown to be promoted by dietary fiber. It is known that resistant starch (RS) is not absorbed in the proximal intestine and acts as dietary fiber in the colon. In this study, we investigated the combined effects of daidzein and RS intake on equol production, bone mineral density, and intestinal microflora in ovariectomized (OVX) mice. Female mice of the ddY strain, aged 8 weeks, were either sham operated (n = 6) or OVX. The OVX mice were randomly divided into 5 groups: OVX control (n = 6), OVX fed 0.1% daidzein-supplemented diet (OVX + Dz, n = 8), OVX fed 0.1% daidzein- and 12% RS-supplemented diet (OVX + Dz + RS, n = 8), OVX fed 12% RS-supplemented diet (OVX + RS, n = 8), and OVX who received daily subcutaneous administration of 17 β-estradiol (n = 6). After 6 weeks, urinary equol concentration was significantly higher in the OVX + Dz + RS group than in the OVX + Dz group. The bone mineral density of the whole tibia was higher in the OVX + Dz +RS group compared with the OVX + Dz group. The occupation ratios of Bifidobacterium spp in the cecal microflora in groups fed RS were significantly higher than those in the other groups. The present study demonstrated that RS may increase the bioavailability of daidzein. PMID:21550090

  10. Resistant Starch from High-Amylose Maize Increases Insulin Sensitivity in Overweight and Obese Men123

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Kevin C.; Pelkman, Christine L.; Finocchiaro, E. Terry; Kelley, Kathleen M.; Lawless, Andrea L.; Schild, Arianne L.; Rains, Tia M.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of 2 levels of intake of high-amylose maize type 2 resistant starch (HAM-RS2) on insulin sensitivity (SI) in participants with waist circumference ≥89 (women) or ≥102 cm (men). Participants received 0 (control starch), 15, or 30 g/d (double-blind) of HAM-RS2 in random order for 4-wk periods separated by 3-wk washouts. Minimal model SI was assessed at the end of each period using the insulin-modified i.v. glucose tolerance test. The efficacy evaluable sample included 11 men and 22 women (mean ± SEM) age 49.5 ± 1.6 y, with a BMI of 30.6 ± 0.5 kg/m2 and waist circumference 105.3 ± 1.3 cm. A treatment main effect (P = 0.018) and a treatment × sex interaction (P = 0.033) were present. In men, least squares geometric mean analysis for SI did not differ after intake of 15 g/d HAM-RS2 (6.90 × 10−5 pmol−1 · L−1 × min−1) and 30 g/d HAM-RS2 (7.13 × 10−5 pmol−1 · L−1 × min−1), but both were higher than after the control treatment (4.66 × 10−5 pmol−1 · L−1 × min−1) (P < 0.05). In women, there was no difference among the treatments (overall least squares ln-transformed mean ± pooled SEM = 1.80 ± 0.08; geometric mean = 6.05 × 10−5 pmol−1 · L−1 × min−1). These results suggest that consumption of 15–30 g/d of HAM-RS2 improves SI in men. Additional research is needed to understand the mechanisms that might account for the treatment × sex interaction observed. PMID:22357745

  11. Effects of resistant starch on behaviour, satiety-related hormones and metabolites in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Souza da Silva, C; Haenen, D; Koopmans, S J; Hooiveld, G J E J; Bosch, G; Bolhuis, J E; Kemp, B; Müller, M; Gerrits, W J J

    2014-09-01

    Resistant starch (RS) has been suggested to prolong satiety in adult pigs. The present study investigated RS-induced changes in behaviour, satiety-related hormones and metabolites in catheterized growing pigs to explore possible underlying mechanisms for RS-induced satiety. In a cross-over design with two 14-day periods, 10 pigs (initial BW: 58 kg) were assigned to two treatments comprising diets containing either 35% pregelatinized starch (PS) or 34% retrograded starch (RS). Diets were isoenergetic on gross energy. Pigs were fed at 2.8× maintenance. Postprandial plasma response of satiety-related hormones and metabolites was measured at the end of each period using frequent blood sampling. Faecal and urinary energy losses were measured at the end of each period. Behaviour was scored 24 h from video recordings using scan sampling. Energy digestibility and metabolizability were ~6% lower in RS compared with PS diet (P<0.001), and metabolizable energy (ME) intake was ~3% lower in RS-fed than in PS-fed pigs (P<0.001). RS-fed pigs showed less feeder-directed (P=0.001) and drinking (P=0.10) behaviours than PS-fed pigs throughout the day. Postprandial peripheral short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) levels were higher in RS-fed than in PS-fed pigs (P<0.001). Postprandial glucose and insulin responses were lower in RS-fed than in PS-fed pigs (P<0.001). Triglyceride levels were higher in RS-fed than in PS-fed pigs (P<0.01), and non-esterified fatty acid levels did not differ between diets (P=0.90). Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels were lower in RS-fed than in PS-fed pigs (P<0.001), and peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY) levels did not differ between diets (P=0.90). Blood serotonin levels were lower (P<0.001), whereas monoamine oxidase activity (P<0.05) and tryptophan (P<0.01) levels were higher in RS-fed than in PS-fed pigs. Despite a lower ME intake, RS seemed to prolong satiety, based on behavioural observations. Possible underlying mechanisms for RS-induced satiety include

  12. Impact of beta-cyclodextrin and resistant starch on bile acid metabolism and fecal steroid excretion in regard to their hypolipidemic action in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Trautwein, E A; Forgbert, K; Rieckhoff, D; Erbersdobler, H F

    1999-01-29

    To examine the impact on bile acid metabolism and fecal steroid excretion as a mechanism involved in the lipid-lowering action of beta-cyclodextrin and resistant starch in comparison to cholestyramine, male golden Syrian hamsters were fed 0% (control), 8% or 12% of beta-cyclodextrin or resistant starch or 1% cholestyramine. Resistant starch, beta-cyclodextrin and cholestyramine significantly lowered plasma total cholesterol and triacylglycerol concentrations compared to control. Distinct changes in the bile acid profile of gallbladder bile were caused by resistant starch, beta-cyclodextrin and cholestyramine. While cholestyramine significantly reduced chenodeoxycholate independently of its taurine-glycine conjugation, beta-cyclodextrin and resistant starch decreased especially the percentage of taurochenodeoxycholate by -75% and -44%, respectively. As a result, the cholate:chenodeoxycholate ratio was significantly increased by 100% with beta-cyclodextrin and by 550% with cholestyramine while resistant starch revealed no effect on this ratio. beta-Cyclodextrin and resistant starch, not cholestyramine, significantly increased the glycine:taurine conjugation ratio demonstrating the predominance of glycine conjugated bile acids. Daily fecal excretion of bile acids was 4-times higher with 8% beta-cyclodextrin and 19-times with 1% cholestyramine compared to control. beta-Cyclodextrin and cholestyramine also induced a 2-fold increase in fecal neutral sterol excretion, demonstrating the sterol binding capacity of these two compounds. Resistant starch had only a modest effect on fecal bile acid excretion (80% increase) and no effect on excretion of neutral sterols, suggesting a weak interaction with intestinal steroid absorption. These data demonstrate the lipid-lowering potential of beta-cyclodextrin and resistant starch. An impaired reabsorption of circulating bile acids and intestinal cholesterol absorption leading to an increase in fecal bile acid and neutral sterol

  13. Evaluation of aromatic plants and compounds used to fight multidrug resistant infections.

    PubMed

    Perumal Samy, Ramar; Manikandan, Jayapal; Al Qahtani, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Traditional medicine plays a vital role for primary health care in India, where it is widely practiced to treat various ailments. Among those obtained from the healers, 78 medicinal plants were scientifically evaluated for antibacterial activity. Methanol extract of plants (100  μ g of residue) was tested against the multidrug resistant (MDR) Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Forty-seven plants showed strong activity against Burkholderia pseudomallei (strain TES and KHW) and Staphylococcus aureus, of which Tragia involucrata L., Citrus acida Roxb. Hook.f., and Aegle marmelos (L.) Correa ex Roxb. showed powerful inhibition of bacteria. Eighteen plants displayed only a moderate effect, while six plants failed to provide any evidence of inhibition against the tested bacteria. Purified compounds showed higher antimicrobial activity than crude extracts. The compounds showed less toxic effect to the human skin fibroblasts (HEPK) cells than their corresponding aromatic fractions. Phytochemical screening indicates that the presence of various secondary metabolites may be responsible for this activity. Most of the plant extracts contained high levels of phenolic or polyphenolic compounds and exhibited activity against MDR pathogens. In conclusion, plants are promising agents that deserve further exploration. Lead molecules available from such extracts may serve as potential antimicrobial agents for future drug development to combat diseases caused by the MDR bacterial strains as reported in this study. PMID:24223059

  14. Evaluation of Aromatic Plants and Compounds Used to Fight Multidrug Resistant Infections

    PubMed Central

    Perumal Samy, Ramar; Manikandan, Jayapal; Al Qahtani, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Traditional medicine plays a vital role for primary health care in India, where it is widely practiced to treat various ailments. Among those obtained from the healers, 78 medicinal plants were scientifically evaluated for antibacterial activity. Methanol extract of plants (100 μg of residue) was tested against the multidrug resistant (MDR) Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Forty-seven plants showed strong activity against Burkholderia pseudomallei (strain TES and KHW) and Staphylococcus aureus, of which Tragia involucrata L., Citrus acida Roxb. Hook.f., and Aegle marmelos (L.) Correa ex Roxb. showed powerful inhibition of bacteria. Eighteen plants displayed only a moderate effect, while six plants failed to provide any evidence of inhibition against the tested bacteria. Purified compounds showed higher antimicrobial activity than crude extracts. The compounds showed less toxic effect to the human skin fibroblasts (HEPK) cells than their corresponding aromatic fractions. Phytochemical screening indicates that the presence of various secondary metabolites may be responsible for this activity. Most of the plant extracts contained high levels of phenolic or polyphenolic compounds and exhibited activity against MDR pathogens. In conclusion, plants are promising agents that deserve further exploration. Lead molecules available from such extracts may serve as potential antimicrobial agents for future drug development to combat diseases caused by the MDR bacterial strains as reported in this study. PMID:24223059

  15. Enhancement of corrosion resistance of carbon steel by Dioscorea Hispida starch in NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulhusni, M. D. M.; Othman, N. K.; Lazim, Azwan Mat

    2015-09-01

    Starch is a one of the most abundant natural product in the world and has the potential as corrosion inhibitor replacing harmful synthetic chemical based corrosion inhibitor. This research was aimed to examines the potential of starch extracted from local Malaysian wild yam (Dioscorea hispida), as corrosion inhibitor to carbon steel in NaCl media replicating sea water. By using gravimetric test and analysis, in which the carbon steel specimens were immersed in NaCl media for 24, 48 and 60 hours with the starch as corrosion inhibitor. the corrosion rate (mmpy) and inhibition efficiencies (%) was calculated. The results obtained showed decrease in corrosion rate as higher concentration of starch was employed. The inhibition efficiencies also shows an increasing manner up to 95.97 % as the concentration of the inhibitor increased.

  16. A putative gene sbe3-rs for resistant starch mutated from SBE3 for starch branching enzyme in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruifang; Sun, Chunlong; Bai, Jianjiang; Luo, Zhixiang; Shi, Biao; Zhang, Jianming; Yan, Wengui; Piao, Zhongze

    2012-01-01

    Foods high in resistant starch (RS) are beneficial to prevent various diseases including diabetes, colon cancers, diarrhea and chronic renal or hepatic diseases. Elevated RS in rice is important for public health since rice is a staple food for half of the world population. A japonica mutant 'Jiangtangdao 1' (RS = 11.67%) was crossed with an indica cultivar 'Miyang 23' (RS = 0.41%). The mutant sbe3-rs that explained 60.4% of RS variation was mapped between RM6611 and RM13366 on chromosome 2 (LOD = 36) using 178 F(2) plants genotyped with 106 genome-wide polymorphic SSR markers. Using 656 plants from four F(3:4) families, sbe3-rs was fine mapped to a 573.3 Kb region between InDel 2 and InDel 6 using one STS, five SSRs and seven InDel markers. SBE3 which codes for starch branching enzyme was identified as a candidate gene within the putative region. Nine pairs of primers covering 22 exons were designed to sequence genomic DNA of the wild type for SBE3 and the mutant for sbe3-rs comparatively. Sequence analysis identified a missense mutation site where Leu-599 of the wild was changed to Pro-599 of the mutant in the SBE3 coding region. Because the point mutation resulted in the loss of a restriction enzyme site, sbe3-rs was not digested by a CAPS marker for SpeI site while SBE3 was. Co-segregation of the digestion pattern with RS content among 178 F(2) plants further supported sbe3-rs responsible for RS in rice. As a result, the CAPS marker could be used in marker-assisted breeding to develop rice cultivars with elevated RS which is otherwise difficult to accurately assess in crops. Transgenic technology should be employed for a definitive conclusion of the sbe3-rs. PMID:22937009

  17. Effects of Arabinoxylan and Resistant Starch on Intestinal Microbiota and Short-Chain Fatty Acids in Subjects with Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomised Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Mary E.; Dige, Anders; Lærke, Helle Nygaard; Agnholt, Jørgen; Bach Knudsen, Knud Erik; Hermansen, Kjeld; Marco, Maria L.; Gregersen, Søren; Dahlerup, Jens F.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the intestinal microbiota has been emphasised as an important contributor to the development of metabolic syndrome. Dietary fibre may exert beneficial effects through modulation of the intestinal microbiota and metabolic end products. We investigated the effects of a diet enriched with two different dietary fibres, arabinoxylan and resistant starch type 2, on the gut microbiome and faecal short-chain fatty acids. Nineteen adults with metabolic syndrome completed this randomised crossover study with two 4-week interventions of a diet enriched with arabinoxylan and resistant starch and a low-fibre Western-style diet. Faecal samples were collected before and at the end of the interventions for fermentative end-product analysis and 16S ribosomal RNA bacterial gene amplification for identification of bacterial taxa. Faecal carbohydrate residues were used to verify compliance. The diet enriched with arabinoxylan and resistant starch resulted in significant reductions in the total species diversity of the faecal-associated intestinal microbiota but also increased the heterogeneity of bacterial communities both between and within subjects. The proportion of Bifidobacterium was increased by arabinoxylan and resistant starch consumption (P<0.001), whereas the proportions of certain bacterial genera associated with dysbiotic intestinal communities were reduced. Furthermore, the total short-chain fatty acids (P<0.01), acetate (P<0.01) and butyrate concentrations (P<0.01) were higher by the end of the diet enriched with arabinoxylan and resistant starch compared with those resulting from the Western-style diet. The concentrations of isobutyrate (P = 0.05) and isovalerate (P = 0.03) decreased in response to the arabinoxylan and resistant starch enriched diet, indicating reduced protein fermentation. In conclusion, arabinoxylan and resistant starch intake changes the microbiome and short-chain fatty acid compositions, with potential beneficial effects on colonic health

  18. Resistant starch does not affect zinc homeostasis in rural Malawian children☆,☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Thakwalakwa, Chrissie; Ordiz, M. Isabel; Maleta, Ken; Westcott, Jamie; Ryan, Kelsey; Hambidge, K. Michael; Miller, Leland V.; Young, Graeme; Mortimer, Elissa; Manary, Mark J.; Krebs, Nancy F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study tested the hypothesis that Malawian children at risk for zinc deficiency will have reduced endogenous fecal zinc (EFZ) and increased net absorbed zinc (NAZ) following the addition of high amylose maize resistant starch (RS) to their diet. Methods This was a small controlled clinical trial to determine the effects of added dietary RS on zinc homeostasis among 17 stunted children, aged 3–5 years consuming a plant-based diet and at risk for perturbed zinc homeostasis. Dual zinc stable isotope studies were performed before and after 28 d of intervention with RS, so that each child served as their own control. The RS was incorporated into fried wheat flour dough and given under direct observation twice daily for 28 d. Changes in zinc homeostatic measures were compared using paired Student's t-tests and linear regression analysis. Results Children had a mean height-for-age Z-score of −3.3, and consumed animal source foods ≤twice per month. Their habitual diet contained a phytate:zinc molar ratio of 34:1. Children avidly consumed the RS without complaints. EFZ was 0.8±0.4 mg/d (mean±SD) both before and after the intervention. Fractional absorption of zinc was 0.38±0.08 and 0.35±0.06 before and after the RS intervention respectively. NAZ was 1.1±0.5 and 0.6±0.7 before and after the RS intervention. This reduction of NAZ corresponded with diminished dietary zinc intake on the study day following intervention with RS. Regression analysis indicated no change in zinc absorption relative to dietary intake as a result of the RS intervention. Conclusion Consumption of RS did not improve zinc homeostasis in rural African children without zinc deficiency. RS was well tolerated in this setting. PMID:25744509

  19. Fighting Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses a fight at Guilford College engaging athletes and students and the continued argument about what to call the incident. In their appeals for patience, officials have cited the college's Quaker traditions, including the "testimony of integrity," which is associated with honesty, fairness, and the search for truth. This…

  20. Fighting Back

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academe, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In this new feature of the "Academe" journal, work by faculty members is highlighted who are mobilizing in support of academic freedom on their campuses and beyond. This September-October issue of the journal includes the following brief reflections from faculty all relating to the central theme of "fighting back": "Free Speech Zones on Campus"…

  1. Consumption of Cross-Linked Resistant Starch (RS4XL) on Glucose and Insulin Responses in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Al-Tamimi, Enas K.; Seib, Paul A.; Snyder, Brian S.; Haub, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. The objective was to compare the postprandial glycemic and insulinemic responses to nutrition bars containing either cross-linked RS type 4 (RS4XL) or standard wheat starch in normoglycemic adults (n = 13; age = 27 ± 5 years; BMI = 25 ± 3 kg/m2). Methods. Volunteers completed three trials during which they consumed a glucose beverage (GLU), a puffed wheat control bar (PWB), and a bar containing cross-linked RS4 (RS4XL) matched for available carbohydrate content. Serial blood samples were collected over two hours and glucose and insulin concentrations were determined and the incremental area under the curve (iAUC) was calculated. Results. The RS4XL peak glucose and insulin concentrations were lower than the GLU and PWB (P < .05). The iAUC for glucose and insulin were lower following ingestion of RS4 compared with the GLU and PWB trials. Conclusions. These data illustrate, for the first time, that directly substituting standard starch with RS4XL, while matched for available carbohydrates, attenuated postprandial glucose and insulin levels in humans. It remains to be determined whether this response was due to the dietary fiber and/or resistant starch aspects of the RS4XL bar. PMID:20798767

  2. Physicochemical Changes and Resistant-Starch Content of Extruded Cornstarch with and without Storage at Refrigerator Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Neder-Suárez, David; Amaya-Guerra, Carlos A; Quintero-Ramos, Armando; Pérez-Carrillo, Esther; Alanís-Guzmán, María G de J; Báez-González, Juan G; García-Díaz, Carlos L; Núñez-González, María A; Lardizábal-Gutiérrez, Daniel; Jiménez-Castro, Jorge A

    2016-01-01

    Effects of extrusion cooking and low-temperature storage on the physicochemical changes and resistant starch (RS) content in cornstarch were evaluated. The cornstarch was conditioned at 20%-40% moisture contents and extruded in the range 90-130 °C and at screw speeds in the range 200-360 rpm. The extrudates were stored at 4 °C for 120 h and then at room temperature. The water absorption, solubility index, RS content, viscoelastic, thermal, and microstructural properties of the extrudates were evaluated before and after storage. The extrusion temperature and moisture content significantly affected the physicochemical properties of the extrudates before and after storage. The RS content increased with increasing moisture content and extrusion temperature, and the viscoelastic and thermal properties showed related behaviors. Microscopic analysis showed that extrusion cooking damaged the native starch structure, producing gelatinization and retrogradation and forming RS. The starch containing 35% moisture and extruded at 120 °C and 320 rpm produced the most RS (1.13 g/100 g) after to storage at low temperature. Although the RS formation was low, the results suggest that extrusion cooking could be advantageous for RS production and application in the food industry since it is a pollution less, continuous process requiring only a short residence time. PMID:27537864

  3. Feeding a diet containing resistant potato starch influences gastrointestinal tract traits and growth performance of weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Heo, J M; Agyekum, A K; Yin, Y L; Rideout, T C; Nyachoti, C M

    2014-09-01

    The aim was to evaluate the effects of feeding resistant potato starch (RPS) as a natural source of resistant starch to weaned pigs for 28 d immediately after weaning. Sixty piglets (Yorkshire-Landrace × Duroc) weaned at 21 ± 2 d (1:1 male:female) with an initial BW of 7.2 ± 0.78 kg were assigned in a completely randomized design to 1 of 5 dietary treatments to give 6 observations per treatment and 2 pigs per pen. Dietary treatments consisted of a negative control corn-soybean meal-wheat-wheat middlings-based diet (NC; no antimicrobial agents added) or the NC supplemented with RPS either as powder or in capsules and each included at 0.5 or 1.0% as a top-dressing on each day. Diets were formulated to meet 1998 NRC specifications. Pigs were offered the experimental diets on an ad libitum basis for 28 d and water was available at all times. The ADG, ADFI, and G:F were determined weekly. Fecal score was determined daily for 14 d after weaning. At the conclusion of study, 1 pig from each pen was randomly selected and euthanized (n = 6 per treatment) to determine visceral organ weight, digesta pH, VFA, and ammonia N (NH3-N) concentrations. Resistant potato starch supplementation improved (P < 0.001) fecal score, and pigs offered 1.0% RPS had more solid feces (P < 0.05) than those offered 0.5% RPS during the first 14 d after weaning, independent of the form of RPS. Resistant potato starch supplementation decreased (P < 0.05) ileal and cecal digesta pH regardless of the levels of RPS or mode of delivery. The total VFA concentrations in cecal digesta were greater (P < 0.05) but the molar proportion of branched-chain fatty acids were lower (P < 0.05) for pigs fed the RPS-containing diets compared with those fed the NC, irrespective of the RPS levels or the form of RPS. However, there were no differences (P > 0.10) in visceral organ weights, growth performance, and digestibilities of DM, CP, Ca, and P among treatments. The results of this experiment indicate that

  4. Efficacy of increased resistant starch consumption in human type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bodinham, C L; Smith, L; Thomas, E L; Bell, J D; Swann, J R; Costabile, A; Russell-Jones, D; Umpleby, A M; Robertson, M D

    2014-01-01

    Resistant starch (RS) has been shown to beneficially affect insulin sensitivity in healthy individuals and those with metabolic syndrome, but its effects on human type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are unknown. This study aimed to determine the effects of increased RS consumption on insulin sensitivity and glucose control and changes in postprandial metabolites and body fat in T2DM. Seventeen individuals with well-controlled T2DM (HbA1c 46.6±2 mmol/mol) consumed, in a random order, either 40 g of type 2 RS (HAM-RS2) or a placebo, daily for 12 weeks with a 12-week washout period in between. At the end of each intervention period, participants attended for three metabolic investigations: a two-step euglycemic–hyperinsulinemic clamp combined with an infusion of [6,6-2H2] glucose, a meal tolerance test (MTT) with arterio-venous sampling across the forearm, and whole-body imaging. HAM-RS2 resulted in significantly lower postprandial glucose concentrations (P=0.045) and a trend for greater glucose uptake across the forearm muscle (P=0.077); however, there was no effect of HAM-RS2 on hepatic or peripheral insulin sensitivity, or on HbA1c. Fasting non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations were significantly lower (P=0.004) and NEFA suppression was greater during the clamp with HAM-RS2 (P=0.001). Fasting triglyceride (TG) concentrations and soleus intramuscular TG concentrations were significantly higher following the consumption of HAM-RS2 (P=0.039 and P=0.027 respectively). Although fasting GLP1 concentrations were significantly lower following HAM-RS2 consumption (P=0.049), postprandial GLP1 excursions during the MTT were significantly greater (P=0.009). HAM-RS2 did not improve tissue insulin sensitivity in well-controlled T2DM, but demonstrated beneficial effects on meal handling, possibly due to higher postprandial GLP1. PMID:24671124

  5. In vivo degradation of alginate in the presence and in the absence of resistant starch.

    PubMed

    Jonathan, Melliana; Souza da Silva, Carol; Bosch, Guido; Schols, Henk; Gruppen, Harry

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated the intestinal degradability of alginate during 74 days intake in pigs as models for humans. Diets contained pregelatinized starch, retrograded starch, alginate, or a mix of retrograded starch and alginate. Faeces were collected on day 1, 3, 7, 14, 39 and 74. Clear trends in intestinal alginate degradation were observed. Up to day 39, the total tract digestibility of alginate was limited (0.52 ± 0.10), and was lower with the inclusion of retrograded starch in the diet (0.34 ± 0.02). More than 90% of the faecal alginate was insoluble in water, which may explain the low digestibility of the alginate. The digestibility of mannuronic acid (M) was 2-3 times higher than that of guluronic acid (G). The changes of G:M ratio and the relative amounts of alginate oligosaccharides between day 39 and 74 indicated that the microbiota needed more than 39 days to adapt to alginate. This study demonstrated that in-depth analyses of dietary fibres are valuable in understanding the fate of the dietary fibres in the large intestine as it was shown that degradation of a dietary fibre depends not only on the properties of the fibre itself, but also on the other dietary fibres present in the diet and the adaptation time. PMID:25442531

  6. Development, relative retention, and productivity of red flour beetle on resistant starches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development, relative retention, and fecundity of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), on six different types of starches, flour, and flour plus yeast was investigated in the laboratory. The viability of T. castaneum eggs was checked initially by placin...

  7. Starch poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Cooking starch poisoning; Laundry starch poisoning ... Cooking and laundry starch are both made from vegetable products, most commonly: Corn Potatoes Rice Wheat Both are usually considered nonpoisonous (nontoxic), but ...

  8. Metabolomic and transcriptomic responses induced in the livers of pigs by the long-term intake of resistant starch.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Yu, K; Zhou, L; Fang, L; Su, Y; Zhu, W

    2016-03-01

    The present study investigated metabolomic and transcriptomic responses in the livers of pigs to evaluate the effects of resistant starch on the body's metabolism at the extraintestinal level. Thirty-six Duroc× Landrace × Large White growing barrows (70 d of age) were randomly allocated to either the corn starch (CS) group or the raw potato starch (RPS) group with a randomized complete block design; each group consisted of 6 replicates (pens), with 3 pigs per pen. Pigs in the CS group were offered a corn-soybean-based diet, whereas pigs in the RPS group were put on a diet in which 230 (growing) or 280 g/kg (finishing) purified CS was replaced with purified RPS during a 100-d trial. The livers of pigs were collected for metabolome and gene expression analysis. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis showed that compared with the CS diet, the RPS diet decreased ( < 0.05) cholesterol and palmitic acid as well as increased ( < 0.05) 3-hydroxybutyric acid, which indicated the reduction of adipose weight and fatty acid biosynthesis and the elevation of fatty acid β-oxidation. In addition, 2-ketoglutaric acid and glucose-6-phosphate were increased (< 0.05) although pyruvic acid was decreased ( < 0.05) in the RPS group, indicating the upregulated capacity of glucose phosphorylation and glycolysis. Microarray analysis showed that the mRNA expression of (), (), and () were downregulated ( < 0.05) whereas (), (), and () were upregulated ( < 0.05) in the RPS diet, indicating a decrease in fatty acid intake and synthesis and an increase in fatty acid oxidation and glycerophospholipid synthesis. The results demonstrated that the long-term consumption of RPS could modulate hepatic lipid metabolism by decreasing fatty acid synthesis as well as increasing lipid oxidation and glycerophospholipid synthesis. PMID:27065270

  9. Responses in colonic microbial community and gene expression of pigs to a long-term high resistant starch diet

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yue; Zhou, Liping; Fang, Lingdong; Su, Yong; Zhu, Weiyun

    2015-01-01

    Intake of raw potato starch (RPS) has been associated with various intestinal health benefits, but knowledge of its mechanism in a long-term is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of long-term intake of RPS on microbial composition, genes expression profiles in the colon of pigs. Thirty-six Duroc × Landrace × Large White growing barrows were randomly allocated to corn starch (CS) and RPS groups with a randomized block design. Each group consisted of six replicates (pens), with three pigs per pen. Pigs in the CS group were offered a corn/soybean-based diet, while pigs in the RPS group were put on a diet in which 230 g/kg (growing period) or 280 g/kg (finishing period) purified CS was replaced with purified RPS during a 100-day trial. Real-time PCR assay showed that RPS significantly decreased the number of total bacteria in the colonic digesta. MiSeq sequencing of the V3-V4 region of the 16S rRNA genes showed that RPS significantly decreased the relative abundance of Clostridium, Treponema, Oscillospira, Phascolarctobacterium, RC9 gut group, and S24-7-related operational taxonomic units (OTUs), and increased the relative abundance of Turicibacter, Blautia, Ruminococcus, Coprococcus, Marvinbryantia, and Ruminococcus bromii-related OTUs in colonic digesta and mucosa. Analysis of the colonic transcriptome profiles revealed that the RPS diet changed the colonic expression profile of the host genes mainly involved in immune response pathways. RPS significantly increased proinflammartory cytokine IL-1β gene expression and suppressed genes involved in lysosome. Our findings suggest that long-term intake of high resistant starch (RS) diet may result in both positive and negative roles in gut health. PMID:26379652

  10. Including dietary fiber and resistant starch to increase satiety and reduce aggression in gestating sows.

    PubMed

    Sapkota, A; Marchant-Forde, J N; Richert, B T; Lay, D C

    2016-05-01

    Aggression during mixing of pregnant sows impacts sow welfare and productivity. The aim of this study was to increase satiety and reduce aggression by including dietary fiber and fermentable carbohydrates. Sows were housed in individual stalls 7 to 14 d after breeding (moving day was considered d 0 of treatment) and were fed (at 0700 h) with a CONTROL (corn-soybean meal based with no additional fiber sources), RSTARCH (10.8% resistant starch), BEETPULP (27.2% sugar beet pulp), SOYHULLS (19.1% soybean hulls), or INCSOY (14.05% soybean hulls) for 21 d (5 sows/diet × 5 diets × 8 replications = 200 sows). The CONTROL diet was targeted to contain 185 g(d∙sow) NDF and the other diets were targeted to contain 350 g(d∙sow) NDF. The INCSOY diet was fed at 2.2 kg/(d∙sow) and the other diets were fed at 2 kg(d∙sow). On d 22, sows were mixed in groups of 5 (at 1200 h). Behaviors in stalls (on d 1, 7, 14, and 21) and after mixing (d 22 and 23), heart rate (on d 1, 7, 14, and 21), blood metabolites (on d 2, 8, 15, 22, and 25), and the effects of diets on production were collected and analyzed. Sows stood more ( < 0.01) and rested less ( < 0.001) over time irrespective of the diet. Sows on BEETPULP stood more ( < 0.01) and sows on SOYHULLS rested more ( < 0.01). Sham chewing increased over days irrespective of the diet. Chewing behavior (bar and feeder) increased with days on diet ( < 0.001) and was lowest in sows on the SOYHULLS diet ( = 0.045). When mixed, biting frequency in the first hour was highest for sows on the CONTROL diet (236.5 ± 62.6) and lowest for sows on the RSTARCH diet (90.5 ± 30.5). Skin lesions increased ( < 0.001) 24 h after mixing sows irrespective of diet. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) concentration was lowest in sows fed BEETPULP and SOYHULLS ( < 0.001). Serum glucose concentration was highest in sows fed RSTARCH and BEETPULP ( = 0.04), but there was no day effect ( = 0.62) or diet × day interaction ( = 0.60). The NEFA was greatest in sows fed

  11. Resistant starch analysis of commonly consumed potatoes: Content varies by cooking method and service temperature but not by variety.

    PubMed

    Raatz, Susan K; Idso, Laura; Johnson, LuAnn K; Jackson, Matthew I; Combs, Gerald F

    2016-10-01

    Resistant starch (RS) has unique digestive and absorptive properties which may provide health benefits. We conducted a study to determine the contributions of cultivar, cooking method and service temperature on the RS contents of potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.). We hypothesized that the RS content would vary by variety, cooking method and service temperature. Potatoes of three common commercial varieties (Yukon Gold, Dark Red Norland, and Russet Burbank) were subjected to two methods of cooking (baking or boiling) and three service temperatures: hot (65°C), chilled (4°C) and reheated (4°C for 6d; reheated to 65°C) and analyzed the starch content by modification of a commercially available assay. Results showed that RS content (g/100g) varied by cooking method and service temperature but not variety. Baked potatoes had higher RS contents than boiled; chilled potatoes had more RS than either hot or reheated. These results may assist in dietary choices for reducing chronic disease risk. PMID:27132853

  12. A standardized method for preparation of potatoes and analysis of their resistant starch content: Variation by cooking method and service temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of resistant starch (RS) may lead to reduced glycemia, improved satiety, and beneficial changes in gut microbiota due to its unique digestive and absorptive properties. We developed a standardized protocol for preparation of potatoes in order to assess their RS content and modified a com...

  13. Effects of resistant starch type III polymorphs on human colon microbiota and short chain fatty acids in human gut models.

    PubMed

    Lesmes, Uri; Beards, Emma J; Gibson, Glenn R; Tuohy, Kieran M; Shimoni, Eyal

    2008-07-01

    This study probed the possible effects of type III resistant starch (RS) crystalline polymorphism on RS fermentability by human gut microbiota and the short chain fatty acids production in vitro. Human fecal pH-controlled batch cultures showed RS induces an ecological shift in the colonic microbiota with polymorph B inducing Bifidobacterium spp. and polymorph A inducing Atopobium spp. Interestingly, polymorph B also induced higher butyrate production to levels of 0.79 mM. In addition, human gut simulation demonstrated that polymorph B promotes the growth of bifidobacteria in the proximal part of the colon and double their relative proportion in the microbiota in the distal colon. These findings suggest that RS polymorph B may promote large bowel health. While the findings are limited by study constraints, they do raise the possibility of using different thermal processing to delineate differences in the prebiotic capabilities of RS, especially its butryrogenicity in the human colon. PMID:18543927

  14. Resistant starch alters gut microbiome and metabolomic profiles concurrent with amelioration of chronic kidney disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, Dorothy A; Piccolo, Brian D; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Liu, Shuman; Lau, Wei L; Khazaeli, Mahyar; Nazertehrani, Sohrab; Moore, Mary E; Marco, Maria L; Martin, Roy J; Adams, Sean H

    2016-05-01

    Patients and animals with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit profound alterations in the gut environment including shifts in microbial composition, increased fecal pH, and increased blood levels of gut microbe-derived metabolites (xenometabolites). The fermentable dietary fiber high amylose maize-resistant starch type 2 (HAMRS2) has been shown to alter the gut milieu and in CKD rat models leads to markedly improved kidney function. The aim of the present study was to identify specific cecal bacteria and cecal, blood, and urinary metabolites that associate with changes in kidney function to identify potential mechanisms involved with CKD amelioration in response to dietary resistant starch. Male Sprague-Dawley rats with adenine-induced CKD were fed a semipurified low-fiber diet or a high-fiber diet [59% (wt/wt) HAMRS2] for 3 wk (n = 9 rats/group). The cecal microbiome was characterized, and cecal contents, serum, and urine metabolites were analyzed. HAMRS2-fed rats displayed decreased cecal pH, decreased microbial diversity, and an increased Bacteroidetes-to-Firmicutes ratio. Several uremic retention solutes were altered in the cecal contents, serum, and urine, many of which had strong correlations with specific gut bacteria abundances, i.e., serum and urine indoxyl sulfate were reduced by 36% and 66%, respectively, in HAMRS2-fed rats and urine p-cresol was reduced by 47% in HAMRS2-fed rats. Outcomes from this study were coincident with improvements in kidney function indexes and amelioration of CKD outcomes previously reported for these rats, suggesting an important role for microbial-derived factors and gut microbe metabolism in regulating host kidney function. PMID:26841824

  15. High-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry fingerprinting of metabolites from cecum and distal colon contents of rats fed resistant starch

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Timothy J.; Jones, Roger W.; Ai, Yongfeng; Houk, Robert S.; Jane, Jay-lin; Zhao, Yinsheng; Birt, Diane F.; McClelland, John F.

    2013-12-04

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry along with statistical analysis was utilized to study metabolic profiles among rats fed resistant starch (RS) diets. Fischer 344 rats were fed four starch diets consisting of 55 % (w/w, dbs) starch. A control starch diet consisting of corn starch was compared against three RS diets. The RS diets were high-amylose corn starch (HA7), HA7 chemically modified with octenyl succinic anhydride, and stearic-acid-complexed HA7 starch. A subgroup received antibiotic treatment to determine if perturbations in the gut microbiome were long lasting. A second subgroup was treated with azoxymethane (AOM), a carcinogen. At the end of the 8-week study, cecal and distal colon content samples were collected from the sacrificed rats. Metabolites were extracted from cecal and distal colon samples into acetonitrile. The extracts were then analyzed on an accurate-mass time-of-flight mass spectrometer to obtain their metabolic profile. The data were analyzed using partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). The PLS-DA analysis utilized a training set and verification set to classify samples within diet and treatment groups. PLS-DA could reliably differentiate the diet treatments for both cecal and distal colon samples. The PLS-DA analyses of the antibiotic and no antibiotic-treated subgroups were well classified for cecal samples and modestly separated for distal colon samples. PLS-DA analysis had limited success separating distal colon samples for rats given AOM from those not treated; the cecal samples from AOM had very poor classification. Mass spectrometry profiling coupled with PLS-DA can readily classify metabolite differences among rats given RS diets.

  16. Effects of alginate and resistant starch on feeding patterns, behaviour and performance in ad libitum-fed growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Souza da Silva, C; Bosch, G; Bolhuis, J E; Stappers, L J N; van Hees, H M J; Gerrits, W J J; Kemp, B

    2014-12-01

    This study assessed the long-term effects of feeding diets containing either a gelling fibre (alginate (ALG)), or a fermentable fibre (resistant starch (RS)), or both, on feeding patterns, behaviour and growth performance of growing pigs fed ad libitum for 12 weeks. The experiment was set up as a 2×2 factorial arrangement: inclusion of ALG (yes or no) and inclusion of RS (yes or no) in the control diet, resulting in four dietary treatments, that is, ALG-RS- (control), ALG+RS-, ALG-RS+, and ALG+RS+. Both ALG and RS were exchanged for pregelatinized potato starch. A total of 240 pigs in 40 pens were used. From all visits to an electronic feeding station, feed intake and detailed feeding patterns were calculated. Apparent total tract digestibility of energy, dry matter (DM), and CP was determined in week 6. Pigs' postures and behaviours were scored from live observations in weeks 7 and 12. Dietary treatments did not affect final BW and average daily gain (ADG). ALG reduced energy and DM digestibility (P<0.01). Moreover, ALG increased average daily DM intake, and reduced backfat thickness and carcass gain : digestible energy (DE) intake (P<0.05). RS increased feed intake per meal, meal duration (P<0.05) and inter-meal intervals (P=0.05), and reduced the number of meals per day (P<0.01), but did not affect daily DM intake. Moreover, RS reduced energy, DM and CP digestibility (P<0.01). Average daily DE intake was reduced (P<0.05), and gain : DE intake tended to be increased (P=0.07), whereas carcass gain : DE intake was not affected by RS. In week 12, ALG+RS- increased standing and walking, aggressive, feeder-directed, and drinking behaviours compared with ALG+RS+ (ALG×RS interaction, P<0.05), with ALG-RS- and ALG-RS+ in between. No other ALG×RS interactions were found. In conclusion, pigs fed ALG compensated for the reduced dietary DE content by increasing their feed intake, achieving similar DE intake and ADG as control pigs. Backfat thickness and carcass efficiency

  17. Resistant Starches Types 2 and 4 Have Differential Effects on the Composition of the Fecal Microbiota in Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Inés; Kim, Jaehyoung; Duffy, Patrick R.; Schlegel, Vicki L.; Walter, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Background To systematically develop dietary strategies based on resistant starch (RS) that modulate the human gut microbiome, detailed in vivo studies that evaluate the effects of different forms of RS on the community structure and population dynamics of the gut microbiota are necessary. The aim of the present study was to gain a community wide perspective of the effects of RS types 2 (RS2) and 4 (RS4) on the fecal microbiota in human individuals. Methods and Findings Ten human subjects consumed crackers for three weeks each containing either RS2, RS4, or native starch in a double-blind, crossover design. Multiplex sequencing of 16S rRNA tags revealed that both types of RS induced several significant compositional alterations in the fecal microbial populations, with differential effects on community structure. RS4 but not RS2 induced phylum-level changes, significantly increasing Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes while decreasing Firmicutes. At the species level, the changes evoked by RS4 were increases in Bifidobacterium adolescentis and Parabacteroides distasonis, while RS2 significantly raised the proportions of Ruminococcus bromii and Eubacterium rectale when compared to RS4. The population shifts caused by RS4 were numerically substantial for several taxa, leading for example, to a ten-fold increase in bifidobacteria in three of the subjects, enriching them to 18–30% of the fecal microbial community. The responses to RS and their magnitudes varied between individuals, and they were reversible and tightly associated with the consumption of RS. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that RS2 and RS4 show functional differences in their effect on human fecal microbiota composition, indicating that the chemical structure of RS determines its accessibility by groups of colonic bacteria. The findings imply that specific bacterial populations could be selectively targeted by well designed functional carbohydrates, but the inter-subject variations in the response to RS

  18. Taking a break from chemotherapy to fight drug-resistance: The cases of cancer and HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Hadjiandreou, Marios M; Mitsis, Georgios D

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we present how optimized treatment interruptions during chemotherapy may be used to control drug-resistance, a major challenge for clinicians worldwide. Specifically, we examine resistance in cancer and HIV/AIDS. For each disease, we use mathematical models alongside real data to represent the respective complex biological phenomena and optimal control algorithms to design optimized treatment schedules aiming at controlling disease progression and patient death. In both diseases, it is shown that the key to controlling resistance is the optimal management of the frequency and magnitude of treatment interruptions as a way to facilitate the interplay between the competitive resistant/sensitive strains. PMID:24109658

  19. Formation of Elongated Starch Granules in High-amylose Maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GEMS-0067 maize starch contains up to 32% elongated starch granules much higher than amylose-extender (ae) single-mutant maize starch (~7%) and normal (non-mutant) maize starch (0%). These elongated granules are highly resistant to enzymatic hydrolysis at 95-100 C, which function as resistant starc...

  20. Fighting Asian Soybean Rust

    PubMed Central

    Langenbach, Caspar; Campe, Ruth; Beyer, Sebastian F.; Mueller, André N.; Conrath, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi is a biotrophic fungus provoking SBR disease. SBR poses a major threat to global soybean production. Though several R genes provided soybean immunity to certain P. pachyrhizi races, the pathogen swiftly overcame this resistance. Therefore, fungicides are the only current means to control SBR. However, insensitivity to fungicides is soaring in P. pachyrhizi and, therefore, alternative measures are needed for SBR control. In this article, we discuss the different approaches for fighting SBR and their potential, disadvantages, and advantages over other measures. These encompass conventional breeding for SBR resistance, transgenic approaches, exploitation of transcription factors, secondary metabolites, and antimicrobial peptides, RNAi/HIGS, and biocontrol strategies. It seems that an integrating approach exploiting different measures is likely to provide the best possible means for the effective control of SBR. PMID:27375652

  1. Leadership, Feminism, and Classroom Politics--Or, How I Gave up the Fight and Learned to Love Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Lee Burdette

    2004-01-01

    Most people resist learning to some extent or another, so it is not surprising that students do as well. Like many who spend time in the classroom, the resistance the author encountered in students has been a source of frustration. The author realizes how most students harbor negative feelings towards the concept of leadership and feminism. In…

  2. Gene cloning, functional expression and characterisation of a novel type I pullulanase from Paenibacillus barengoltzii and its application in resistant starch production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingjing; Liu, Yu; Yan, Feng; Jiang, Zhengqiang; Yang, Shaoqing; Yan, Qiaojuan

    2016-05-01

    A novel pullulanase gene (PbPulA) from Paenibacillus barengoltzii was cloned. PbPulA has an open reading frame of 2028 bp encoding 675 amino acids. It was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli as an intracellular soluble protein. The recombinant pullulanase (PbPulA) was purified to homogeneity with a molecular mass of about 75 kDa on SDS-PAGE. PbPulA was optimally active at pH 5.5 and 50 °C. It was stable within pH 5.5-10.5. The enzyme exhibited strict substrate specificity towards pullulan, but showed relatively low activity towards amylopectin and no activity towards other tested polysaccharides. The Km and Vmax values of the enzyme on pullulan were 2.94 mg/mL and 280.5 μmol/min/mg, respectively. The addition of PbPulA in gelatinized rice and maize starches significantly increased the resistant starch type 3 (RS3) yields. Final yields from rice and maize starches were 10.82 g/100 g and 11.41 g/100 g, respectively. These properties make PbPulA useful in starch industries. PMID:26763762

  3. Tolerance, fermentation, and cytokine expression in healthy aged male C57BL/6J mice fed resistant starch

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, June; Keenan, Michael J.; Keller, Jeffrey; Fernandez-Kim, Sun Ok; Pistell, Paul J.; Tulley, Richard T.; Raggio, Anne M.; Shen, Li; Zhang, Hanjie; Martin, Roy J.; Blackman, Marc R.

    2013-01-01

    Health benefits of resistant starch (RS), a dietary fermentable fiber, have been well documented in young, but not in old populations. As the essential step of more comprehensive evaluations of RS on healthy aging, we examined the effects of dietary RS on tolerance, colonic fermentation, and cytokine expression in aged mice. Healthy older (18–20 months) C57BL/6J male mice were fed control, 18% RS, or 36% RS diets for 10 weeks. Body weight gain, body composition, and fat pad weights did not differ among the three groups after 10 weeks, indicating good tolerance of the RS diet. Fermentation indicators (cecum weights, and cecal proglucagon and PYY mRNA expression) were enhanced in a RS dose dependent manner (P<0.01). Serum concentrations of soluble cytokine receptors (sTNF-Rb; sIL-4R; sIL-2Rα sVEGFR1; and sRAGE) and TNFα expression (gene and protein) in visceral fat did not differ significantly among groups. Adiponectin protein concentrations, but not gene expression, were greater in epididymal fat of the 36% RS versus control groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: in aged mice, dietary RS is well tolerated, fermented in the colon, and stimulates colonic expression of proglucagon and PYY mRNA, and adiponectin protein in visceral fat. PMID:22174009

  4. Effect of extrusion cooking on the physicochemical properties, resistant starch, phenolic content and antioxidant capacities of green banana flour.

    PubMed

    Sarawong, Chonthira; Schoenlechner, Regine; Sekiguchi, Ken; Berghofer, Emmerich; Ng, Perry K W

    2014-01-15

    Green banana flour was extruded through a co-rotating twin-screw extruder with constant barrel temperature. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of extrusion cooking variables (feed moisture, FM, 20% and 50%; screw speed, SS, 200 and 400rpm) and storing of the extruded flours at 4°C for 24h on the physicochemical properties, resistant starch (RS), pasting properties and antioxidant capacities. Extrusion cooking at higher FM and lower SS increased the amylose content, which was expressed in highest RS content. Water adsorption index (WAI) and pasting properties were increased, while water solubility index (WSI), total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant activities (FRAP, ABTS(+), DPPH) in free and bound phenolics were decreased compared to the other extruded samples. Storing the extruded flours at 4°C for 24h prior to oven drying was the main factor leading to a further increase in the content of amylose, RS, TPC and WSI values, as well as pasting properties - in particular peak viscosity. Compared to native banana flour, extrusion cooking caused significant changes in all studied properties of the extruded flours, except for soluble DF and antioxidant capacity (ABTS(+) and DPPH) of bound phenolics. PMID:24054209

  5. Impact of Short Term Consumption of Diets High in Either Non-Starch Polysaccharides or Resistant Starch in Comparison with Moderate Weight Loss on Indices of Insulin Sensitivity in Subjects with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lobley, Gerald E.; Holtrop, Grietje; Bremner, David M.; Calder, A. Graham; Milne, Eric; Johnstone, Alexandra M.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated if additional non-starch polysaccharide (NSP) or resistant starch (RS), above that currently recommended, leads to better improvement in insulin sensitivity (IS) than observed with modest weight loss (WL). Obese male volunteers (n = 14) were given an energy-maintenance (M) diet containing 27 g NSP and 5 g RS daily for one week. They then received, in a cross-over design, energy-maintenance intakes of either an NSP-enriched diet (42 g NSP, 2.5 g RS) or an RS-enriched diet (16 g NSP, 25 g RS), each for three weeks. Finally, a high protein (30% calories) WL diet was provided at 8 MJ/day for three weeks. During each dietary intervention, endogenous glucose production (EGP) and IS were assessed. Fasting glycaemia was unaltered by diet, but plasma insulin and C-peptide both decreased with the WL diet (p < 0.001), as did EGP (−11%, p = 0.006). Homeostatis model assessment of insulin resistance improved following both WL (p < 0.001) and RS (p < 0.05) diets. Peripheral tissue IS improved only with WL (57%–83%, p < 0.005). Inclusion of additional RS or NSP above amounts currently recommended resulted in little or no improvement in glycaemic control, whereas moderate WL (approximately 3 kg fat) improved IS. PMID:23752495

  6. Starch-Lignin Baked Foams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch-kraft lignin foams were prepared by a baking process. Replacing up to 20% of the starch with lignin has no effect on foam density or overall morphology. At 10% replacement, lignin marginally increases water resistance and modulus of elasticity but decreases strain at maximum stress. At 20% re...

  7. Physicochemical Properties of Starch Isolated from Bracken (Pteridium aquilinim) Rhizome.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xurun; Wang, Jin; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Leilei; Wang, Zhong; Xiong, Fei

    2015-12-01

    Bracken (Pteridium aquilinum) is an important wild plant starch resource worldwide. In this work, starch was separated from bracken rhizome, and the physicochemical properties of this starch were systematically investigated and compared with 2 other common starches, that is, starches from waxy maize and potato. There were significant differences in shape, birefringence patterns, size distribution, and amylose content between bracken and the 2 other starches. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that bracken starch exhibited a typical C-type crystalline structure. Bracken starch presented, respectively, lower and higher relative degree of crystallinity than waxy maize and potato starches. Ordered structures in particle surface differed among these 3 starches. The swelling power tendency of bracken starch in different temperature intervals was very similar to that of potato starch. The viscosity parameters during gelatinization were the lowest in waxy maize, followed by bracken and potato starches. The contents of 3 nutritional components, that is, rapidly digestible, slowly digestible, and resistant starches in native, gelatinized, and retrograded starch from bracken rhizome presented more similarities with potato starch than waxy maize starch. These finding indicated that physicochemical properties of bracken starch showed more similarities with potato starch than waxy maize starch. PMID:26551243

  8. Resistant starch modifies gut microflora and microbial metabolism in human flora-associated rats inoculated with faeces from Italian and UK donors.

    PubMed

    Silvi, S; Rumney, C J; Cresci, A; Rowland, I R

    1999-03-01

    The effect of sucrose and resistant starch ('CrystaLean'--a retrograded, amylose starch) on human gut microflora and associated parameters was studied in human flora-associated (HFA) rats, colonized with microfloras from UK or Italian subjects, to determine whether such floras were affected differently by dietary carbohydrates. Consumption of the resistant starch diet resulted in significant changes in four of the seven main groups of bacteria enumerated. In both the UK and Italian flora-associated rats, numbers of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria were increased 10-100-fold, and there was a concomitant decrease in enterobacteria when compared with sucrose-fed rats. The induced changes in caecal microflora of both HFA rat groups were reflected in changes in bacterial enzyme activities and caecal ammonia concentration. Although it had little effect on caecal short-chain fatty acid concentration, CrystaLean markedly increased the proportion of n-butyric acid in both rat groups and was associated with a significant increase in cell proliferation in the proximal colon of the Italian flora-associated rats. CrystaLean appeared to play a protective role in the colon environment, lowering caecal ammonia concentration, caecal pH and beta-glucuronidase activity. PMID:10196757

  9. Role of Phenothiazines and Structurally Similar Compounds of Plant Origin in the Fight against Infections by Drug Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dastidar, Sujata G.; Kristiansen, Jette E.; Molnar, Joseph; Amaral, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    Phenothiazines have their primary effects on the plasma membranes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Among the components of the prokaryotic plasma membrane affected are efflux pumps, their energy sources and energy providing enzymes, such as ATPase, and genes that regulate and code for the permeability aspect of a bacterium. The response of multidrug and extensively drug resistant tuberculosis to phenothiazines shows an alternative therapy for the treatment of these dreaded diseases, which are claiming more and more lives every year throughout the world. Many phenothiazines have shown synergistic activity with several antibiotics thereby lowering the doses of antibiotics administered to patients suffering from specific bacterial infections. Trimeprazine is synergistic with trimethoprim. Flupenthixol (Fp) has been found to be synergistic with penicillin and chlorpromazine (CPZ); in addition, some antibiotics are also synergistic. Along with the antibacterial action described in this review, many phenothiazines possess plasmid curing activities, which render the bacterial carrier of the plasmid sensitive to antibiotics. Thus, simultaneous applications of a phenothiazine like TZ would not only act as an additional antibacterial agent but also would help to eliminate drug resistant plasmid from the infectious bacterial cells. PMID:27029292

  10. The combined effects of soya isoflavones and resistant starch on equol production and trabecular bone loss in ovariectomised mice.

    PubMed

    Tousen, Yuko; Matsumoto, Yu; Matsumoto, Chiho; Nishide, Yoriko; Nagahata, Yuya; Kobayashi, Isao; Ishimi, Yoshiko

    2016-07-01

    Equol is a metabolite of the soya isoflavone (ISO) daidzein that is produced by intestinal microbiota. Equol has greater oestrogenic activity compared with other ISO, and it prevents bone loss in postmenopausal women. Resistant starch (RS), which has a prebiotic activity and is a dietary fibre, was reported to promote equol production. Conversely, the intestinal microbiota is reported to directly regulate bone health by reducing inflammatory cytokine levels and T-lymphocytes in bone. The present study evaluated the combined effects of diet supplemented with ISO and RS on intestinal microbiota, equol production, bone mineral density (BMD) and inflammatory gene expression in the bone marrow of ovariectomised (OVX) mice. Female ddY strain mice, aged 8 weeks, were either sham-operated (Sham, n 7) or OVX. OVX mice were randomly divided into the following four groups (seven per group): OVX control (OVX); OVX fed 0·05 % ISO diet (OVX+ISO); OVX fed 9 % RS diet (OVX+RS); and OVX fed 0·05 % ISO- and 9 % RS diet (OVX+ISO+RS). After 6 weeks, treatment with the combination of ISO and RS increased equol production, prevented the OVX-induced decline in trabecular BMD in the distal femur by modulating the enteric environment and altered OVX-induced inflammation-related gene expression in the bone marrow. However, there were no significant differences in bone parameters between the ISO+RS and ISO-alone groups in OVX mice. Our findings suggest that the combination of ISO and RS might alter intestinal microbiota and immune status in the bone marrow, resulting in attenuated bone resorption in OVX mice. PMID:27197747

  11. Manipulation of the gut microbiota using resistant starch is associated with protection against colitis-associated colorectal cancer in rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying; Le Leu, Richard K; Christophersen, Claus T; Somashekar, Roshini; Conlon, Michael A; Meng, Xing Q; Winter, Jean M; Woodman, Richard J; McKinnon, Ross; Young, Graeme P

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated whether dietary resistant starch (RS) and green tea extract (GTE), which have anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties, protect against colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC) using a rat model, also investigated potential mechanisms of action of these agents including their effects on the gut microbiota. Rats were fed a control diet or diets containing 10% RS, 0.5% GTE or a combination of the two (RS + GTE). CAC was initiated with 2 weekly azoxymethane (AOM) injections (10mg/kg) followed by 2% dextran sodium sulphate in drinking water for 7 days after 2 weeks on diets. Rats were killed 20 weeks after the first AOM. Colon tissues and tumours were examined for histopathology by H&E, gene/protein expression by PCR and immunohistochemistry and digesta for analyses of fermentation products and microbiota populations. RS and RS + GTE (but not GTE) diets significantly (P< 0.05) decreased tumour multiplicity and adenocarcinoma formation, relative to the control diet. Effects of RS + GTE were not different from RS alone. RS diet caused significant shifts in microbial composition/diversity, with increases in Parabacteroides, Barnesiella, Ruminococcus, Marvinbryantia and Bifidobacterium as primary contributors to the shift. RS-containing diets increased short chain fatty acids (SCFA) and expression of the SCFA receptor GPR43 mRNA, and reduced inflammation (COX-2, NF-kB, TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA) and cell proliferation P< 0.05. GTE had no effect. This is the first study that demonstrates chemopreventive effects of RS (but not GTE) in a rodent CAC model, suggesting RS might have benefit to patients with ulcerative colitis who are at an increased risk of developing CRC. PMID:26905582

  12. Effectiveness of resistant starch, compared to guar gum, in depressing plasma cholesterol and enhancing fecal steroid excretion.

    PubMed

    Levrat, M A; Moundras, C; Younes, H; Morand, C; Demigné, C; Rémésy, C

    1996-10-01

    Amylase-resistant starch (RS) represents a substrate that can be administered in substantial amounts in the diet, in contrast to gel-forming polysaccharides, such as guar gum (GG). The aim of this work was thus to compare the effects of GG and RS on cholesterol metabolism in rats adapted to 0.4% cholesterol diets, using dietary GG or RS levels (8 or 20%, respectively) that led to a similar development of fermentations, as assessed by the degree of enlargement of the cecum. The RS diet elicited a marked rise in the cecal pool of short-chain fatty acids, especially acetic and butyric acid, whereas the GG diet favored high-propionic acid fermentations. Both polysaccharides markedly altered the cholesterol excretion, from 50% of ingested cholesterol in controls, up to about 70% in rats adapted to the RS or GG diets. With these diets, the fecal excretion of bile acids was enhanced (67 and 144% with the RS and GG diets, respectively). RS and GG diets were effective in lowering plasma cholesterol (about -40%) and triglycerides (-36%). There was practically no effect of the diets on cholesterol in d > 1.040 lipoproteins (high density lipoproteins), whereas RS (and to a larger extent, GG) were very effective to depress cholesterol in d < 1.040 lipoproteins (especially in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins). Fermentable polysaccharides counteracted the accumulation of cholesterol in the liver, especially cholesterol esters. In parallel, liver acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase was depressed in rats fed the RS or GG diets, whereas only the GG diet counteracted the downregulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA by cholesterol. These data suggest that RS may be practically as effective as a gel-forming gum, such as GG, on steroid excretion and on cholesterol metabolism. PMID:8898306

  13. Development of formulae for estimating amylose content and resistant starch content based on the pasting properties measured by RVA of Japonica polished rice and starch.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Sumiko; Katsura, Junji; Kato, Kiyoko; Ohtsubo, Ken'ichi

    2016-01-01

    We searched for the easy and simple method to measure the novel indicators which reflect not only AAC, but also (RS) based on pasting properties using RVA. Novel indexes such as SB/Con and Max/Fin (Maximum viscosity/Minimum viscosity) ratios had a very high correlation with proportion of intermediate and long chains of amylopectin; Fb1+2+3 (DP ≧ 13). In Japonica polished rice, estimation formulae for AAC and RS content were developed using novel indexes based on pasting properties by RVA, and these equations showed determination coefficients of 0.89 and 0.80 for calibration and 0.71 and 0.75 for validation test. We developed the estimation formulae for AAC and RS content for Japonica starch samples. These equations showed determination coefficients of 0.86 and 1.00 for calibration and 0.76 and 0.83 for validation test, which showed that these equations can be applied to the unknown rice samples. PMID:26399277

  14. Polyhexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride-based disinfectant: a novel tool to fight meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Oulé, Mathias K; Azinwi, Richard; Bernier, Anne-Marie; Kablan, Tano; Maupertuis, Anne-Marie; Mauler, Stephanie; Nevry, Rose K; Dembélé, Korami; Forbes, Lorraine; Diop, Lamine

    2008-12-01

    Polyhexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride (PHMGH), an antimicrobial biocide of the guanidine family, was tested for efficacy against quality-control strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella choleraesuis, meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and Escherichia coli. Bactericidal activity against S. aureus, P. aeruginosa and Salmonella choleraesuis was determined using the official methods of analysis of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists, with modifications as recommended by the Canadian General Standards Board. For MRSA and E. coli, the MIC and minimal bactericidal concentration were determined using the broth dilution technique. The experiments were carried out at 20 degrees C under a range of conditions including varying PHMGH concentration (0.001-0.1 %), contact time (0.5-10 min) and water type (distilled, tap and hard water). The phenol coefficient values determined with S. aureus, Salmonella choleraesuis and P. aeruginosa were 7.5, 6.1 and 5, respectively. No matter what type of water was used to make the dilutions, PHMGH killed MRSA and E. coli at concentrations as low as 0.04 and 0.005 % (w/v), respectively, within 1.5 min. The mode of action of PHMGH was elucidated by transmission electron microscopy: the cell envelope was broken, resulting in cell content leakage into the medium. The ultimate aim of this study was to show that PHMGH can be used as an odourless, colourless, non-corrosive and harmless disinfectant for hospital and household facilities. PMID:19018024

  15. Properties of baked foams from citric acid modified cassava starch and native cassava starch blends.

    PubMed

    Pornsuksomboon, Kanlaya; Holló, Berta Barta; Szécsényi, Katalin Mészáros; Kaewtatip, Kaewta

    2016-01-20

    Starch foams from native cassava starch (NS) and citric acid modified cassava starch (CNS) were prepared using baking processes with blend ratios of 80/20, 60/40, 50/50, 40/60 and 20/80. The density, thickness, morphology, thermal stability and water absorption of the NS, CNS and blended starch foams were determined. The ratio of the two starch components had a significant influence on the density and thickness of the blended starch foams. All blended starch foams showed good water resistance. Moreover, the morphology of the blended starch foam with the NS/CNS ratio of 50/50 showed a more ordered distribution of cell sizes with thicker cell walls than for the NS and CNS foams. The thermal stability of the blended starch foams was somewhat lower than the stability of the NS foam but not to the extent that it affected any potential practical applications. PMID:26572335

  16. Chemostat Enrichments of Human Feces with Resistant Starch Are Selective for Adherent Butyrate-Producing Clostridia at High Dilution Rates

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Richard; Macfarlane, George T.

    2000-01-01

    Resistant starch (RS) enrichments were made using chemostats inoculated with human feces from two individuals at two dilution rates (D = 0.03 h−1 and D = 0.30 h−1) to select for slow- and fast-growing amylolytic communities. The fermentations were studied by analysis of short-chain fatty acids, amylase and α-glucosidase activities, and viable counts of the predominant culturable populations and the use of 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes. Considerable butyrate was produced at D = 0.30 h−1, which corresponded with reduced branched-chain fatty acid formation. At both dilution rates, high levels of extracellular amylase activity were produced, while α-glucosidase was predominantly cell associated. Bacteroides and bifidobacteria predominated at the low dilution rate, whereas saccharolytic clostridia became more important at D = 0.30 h−1. Microscopic examination showed that within 48 h of inoculation, one particular bacterial morphotype predominated in RS enrichments at D = 0.30 h−1. This organism attached apically to RS granules and formed rosette-like structures which, with glycocalyx formation, agglomerated to form biofilm networks in the planktonic phase. Attempts to isolate this bacterium in pure culture were repeatedly unsuccessful, although a single colony was eventually obtained. On the basis of its 16S rDNA sequence, this RS-degrading, butyrate-producing organism was identified as being a previously unidentified group I Clostridium sp. A 16S rRNA-targeted probe was designed using this sequence and used to assess the abundance of the population in the enrichments. At 240 h, its contributions to total rRNA in the chemostats were 5 and 23% at D = 0.03 and 0.30 h−1, respectively. This study indicates that bacterial populations with significant metabolic potential can be overlooked using culture-based methodologies. This may provide a paradigm for explaining the discrepancy between the low numbers of butyrate-producing bacteria that are

  17. Fighting Fair for Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Fran; Friedman, Alice

    This document offers families the tools for handling conflict. Conflict is a normal and unavoidable part of life. We cannot avoid conflict, but we can learn to "fight fair," attacking the problem and not the person. Weapons that attack people and not problems are listed as fouls, destructive habits that can be changed. Fighting fair involves: (1)…

  18. The Fighting Mynahs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayashi, Leslie Ann

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a story from Hawaii about how it is better to share and cooperate than to squabble and fight. The story is about two large mynah birds fighting for a ripe mango hanging from a tree. In the midst of their battle, a mother and father sparrow pecked small pieces from the mango to feed their large hungry family. Flying back and…

  19. Fighting Spam And Winning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuBose, Cornelius B.

    2004-01-01

    E-mail has become a significant means of communication between teachers, students, parents and administrators in many school systems. The increasing amount of SPAM e-mail threatens to overload school email systems. The experience of Lake Forest, IL School District #67 in fighting e-mail spam is described. Spam basics, spam fighting tools, and…

  20. [Starch aspiration].

    PubMed

    Volk, O; Neidhöfer, M; Schregel, W

    1999-06-01

    Starch is a white, neutral smelling, insoluble and harmless powder. The case of a 24-year old worker with a pronounced bronchospasm and arterial hypoxaemia after a collapse and aspiration during working in a silo filled with corn starch will be reported. Medication consisted mainly in mucolytics. Intensive airway clearing consisted of repeated bronchoscopies, bedding, tapotement and vibration massage. The patient has made a complete recovery in 3 days. PMID:10429779

  1. Unique Organization of Extracellular Amylases into Amylosomes in the Resistant Starch-Utilizing Human Colonic Firmicutes Bacterium Ruminococcus bromii

    PubMed Central

    Ze, Xiaolei; Ben David, Yonit; Laverde-Gomez, Jenny A.; Dassa, Bareket; Sheridan, Paul O.; Duncan, Sylvia H.; Louis, Petra; Henrissat, Bernard; Juge, Nathalie; Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Bayer, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ruminococcus bromii is a dominant member of the human gut microbiota that plays a key role in releasing energy from dietary starches that escape digestion by host enzymes via its exceptional activity against particulate “resistant” starches. Genomic analysis of R. bromii shows that it is highly specialized, with 15 of its 21 glycoside hydrolases belonging to one family (GH13). We found that amylase activity in R. bromii is expressed constitutively, with the activity seen during growth with fructose as an energy source being similar to that seen with starch as an energy source. Six GH13 amylases that carry signal peptides were detected by proteomic analysis in R. bromii cultures. Four of these enzymes are among 26 R. bromii proteins predicted to carry dockerin modules, with one, Amy4, also carrying a cohesin module. Since cohesin-dockerin interactions are known to mediate the formation of protein complexes in cellulolytic ruminococci, the binding interactions of four cohesins and 11 dockerins from R. bromii were investigated after overexpressing them as recombinant fusion proteins. Dockerins possessed by the enzymes Amy4 and Amy9 are predicted to bind a cohesin present in protein scaffoldin 2 (Sca2), which resembles the ScaE cell wall-anchoring protein of a cellulolytic relative, R. flavefaciens. Further complexes are predicted between the dockerin-carrying amylases Amy4, Amy9, Amy10, and Amy12 and two other cohesin-carrying proteins, while Amy4 has the ability to autoaggregate, as its dockerin can recognize its own cohesin. This organization of starch-degrading enzymes is unprecedented and provides the first example of cohesin-dockerin interactions being involved in an amylolytic system, which we refer to as an “amylosome.” PMID:26419877

  2. Enhanced oxidative stability of fish oil by encapsulating in culled banana resistant starch-soy protein isolate based microcapsules in functional bakery products.

    PubMed

    Nasrin, Taslima Ayesha Aktar; Anal, Anil Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Oil in water emulsions were produced by the mixture of culled banana resistant starch (CBRS) & soy protein isolate (SPI), mixture of Hylon VII & SPI and SPI with 7.5 and 5 % (w/w) Menhaden fish oil. The emulsions were further freeze- dried obtaining 33 and 50 % oil load microcapsules. The range of particles diameter was 4.11 to 7.25 μm and viscosity was 34.6 to 146.48 cP of the emulsions. Compressibility index (CI), Hasner ratio (HR) and angle of repose (AR) was significantly (p < 0.01) lower of the microcapsules made with starch and protein (CBRS & SPI and Hylon VII & SPI) than that made with protein (SPI) only. Microcapsules composed of CBRS & SPI with 33 % oil load had maximum microencapsulation efficiency (82.49 %) and highest oxidative stability. Muffin made with emulsions containing mixture of CBRS & SPI exhibited less fishy flavour than that containing mixture of Hylon VII & SPI. PMID:26243933

  3. Effects of a highly resistant rice starch and pre-incubation temperatures on the physicochemical properties of surimi gel from grass carp (Ctenopharyn Odon Idellus).

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Haiyan; Ye, Qingfu

    2014-02-15

    The effects of a specific rice starch (SRS), containing highly resistant starch (RSIII), on gel properties of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) and the influence of five levels of SRS (0%, 2%, 4%, 6%, and 8%w/w) on gel physicochemical properties at three different pre-incubation temperatures (4 °C, 25 °C, and 40 °C) were investigated. Gels with increasing amounts of SRS addition showed lower expressible water contents and cooking loss values than did control gels. SDS gel electrophoresis revealed no changes in protein patterns, regardless of different SRS-added levels at the same pre-incubation temperature, but an evident decrease in the MHC when the pre-incubation temperature increased. The texture properties, colour attributes, SEM were optimal in the treatments containing 4%w/w SRS at the pre-incubation temperature 25 °C. Thus, the optimum SRS addition level and pre-incubation temperature are proposed to be 4%w/w and 25 °C, respectively. PMID:24128470

  4. Physiochemical properties and kinetics of glucoamylase produced from deoxy-d-glucose resistant mutant of Aspergillus niger for soluble starch hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Riaz, Muhammad; Rashid, Muhammad Hamid; Sawyer, Lindsay; Akhtar, Saeed; Javed, Muhammad Rizwan; Nadeem, Habibullah; Wear, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Glucoamylases (GAs) from a wild and a deoxy-d-glucose-resistant mutant of a locally isolated Aspergillus niger were purified to apparent homogeneity. The subunit molecular mass estimated by SDS–PAGE was 93 kDa for both strains, while the molecular masses determined by MALDI-TOF for wild and mutant GAs were 72.876 and 72.063 kDa, respectively. The monomeric nature of the enzymes was confirmed through activity staining. Significant improvement was observed in the kinetic properties of the mutant GA relative to the wild type enzyme. Kinetic constants of starch hydrolysis for A. niger parent and mutant GAs calculated on the basis of molecular masses determined through MALDI-TOF were as follows: kcat = 343 and 727 s−1, Km = 0.25 and 0.16 mg mL−1, kcat/Km (specificity constant) = 1374 and 4510 mg mL−1 s−1, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters for soluble starch hydrolysis also suggested that mutant GA was more efficient compared to the parent enzyme. PMID:24293795

  5. Resistant starch reduces colonic and urinary p-cresol in rats fed a tyrosine-supplemented diet, whereas konjac mannan does not.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bixiao; Morioka, Sahya; Nakagawa, Tomoyuki; Hayakawa, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    The effect of resistant starch (RS) and konjac mannan (KM) to maintain and improve the large intestinal environment was compared. Wistar SPF rats were fed the following diets for 4 weeks: negative control diet (C diet), tyrosine-supplemented positive control diet (T diet), and luminacoid supplemented diets containing either high-molecular konjac mannan A (KMAT diet), low-molecular konjac mannan B (KMBT diet), high-amylose cornstarch (HAST diet), or heat-moisture-treated starch (HMTST diet). The luminacoid-fed group had an increased content of short-chain fatty acids in the cecum. HAS caused a significant decrease in p-cresol content in the cecum, whereas KM did not. Urinary p-cresol was reduced in the HAST group compared with the T group, but not the KM fed groups. Deterioration in the large intestinal environment was only improved completely in the HAST and HMTST groups, suggesting that RS is considerably more effective than KM in maintaining the large intestinal environment. PMID:27296718

  6. Effect of high-pressure treatment on the structural and rheological properties of resistant corn starch/locust bean gum mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Raza; Vatankhah, Hamed; Singh, Ajaypal; Ramaswamy, Hosahalli S

    2016-10-01

    In this study, effects of a 30min high pressure (HP) treatment (200-600MPa) at room temperature on the rheological, thermal and morphological properties of resistant corn starch (RS) (5% w/w) and locust bean gum (LBG) (0.25, 0.50 and 1.0% w/v) dispersions were evaluated. Results showed that the storage modulus (G'), loss modulus (G''), and apparent viscosity values of starch/gum (RS/LBG) mixtures were enhanced with an increase pressure level, and demonstrated a bi-phasic behavior. HP treated RS/LBG samples were predominantly either solid like (G'>G'') or viscous (G''>G'), depending on the pressure level and LBG concentrations. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis of the pressurized mixtures showed a major effect on gelatinization temperatures (To, Tp,), and it was observed that RS/LBG mixtures gelatinized completely at ≥400MPa with a 30min holding time. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) images confirmed that at 600MPa, RS/LBG mixtures retained granular structures and their complete disintegration was not observed even at the endpoint of the gelatinization. PMID:27312641

  7. Resistant starch type 4-enriched diet lowered blood cholesterols and improved body composition in a double-blind controlled crossover intervention

    PubMed Central

    Nichenametla, Sailendra N.; Weidauer, Lee A.; Wey, Howard E.; Beare, Tianna M.; Specker, Bonny L.; Dey, Moul

    2014-01-01

    A metabolic health crisis is evident as cardiovascular diseases (CVD) remain the leading cause of mortality in the US. Effects of resistant starch type 4 (RS4), a prebiotic fiber, in comprehensive management of metabolic syndrome (MetS) remain unknown. This study examined the effects of a blinded exchange of resistant starch type-4 (RS4)-enriched flour (30% v/v) with regular/control flour (CF) diet on multiple MetS comorbidities. In a double-blind (participants-investigators), placebo-controlled, cluster crossover intervention (n=86, age ≥18, 2–12week interventions, 2week washout) in the US, individuals were classified as having MetS (With-MetS) or not (No-MetS) following International Diabetes Federation (IDF)-criteria. RS4 consumption compared with CF resulted in 7.2% (p=0.002) lower mean total cholesterol (TC), 5.5% (p=0.04) lower non-HDL, and a 12.8% (p<0.001) lower HDL cholesterol in the With-MetS group. No-MetS individuals had a 2.6% (p=0.02) smaller waist circumference and 1.5% (p=0.03) lower percent body fat following RS4 intervention compared to CF. A small but significant 1% increase in fat-free mass was observed in all participants combined (p=0.02). No significant effect of RS4 was observed for glycemic variables and blood pressures. RS4 consumption improved dyslipidemia and body composition. Incorporation of RS4 in routine diets could offer an effective strategy for public metabolic-CVD health promotion. The clinicaltrials.gov-reference NCT01887964. PMID:24478107

  8. No Latex Starch Utilization in Euphorbia esula L.

    PubMed

    Nissen, S J; Foley, M E

    1986-06-01

    Utilization of leaf, stem, root, and latex starch was monitored in Euphorbia esula L. plants. Leaf, stem, and root starch decreased rapidly during a 52 day light starvation period while latex starch did not. Scanning electron and light microscope studies provided additional evidence that no changes in latex starch granules had occurred. Amylase activity (6.6 units per milligram protein) could be isolated from latex. However, latex starch granules were extremely resistant to enzymic hydrolysis by latex amylases, Bacillus subtilis alpha-amylase, and by amyloglucosidase from Aspergillus niger. Results indicate that latex starch grains do not function as utilizable carbohydrate in this species under these conditions. PMID:16664883

  9. Physicochemical properties and digestibility of hydrothermally treated waxy rice starch.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Feng; Ma, Fei; Kong, Fansheng; Gao, Qunyu; Yu, Shujuan

    2015-04-01

    Waxy rice starch was subjected to annealing (ANN) and heat-moisture treatment (HMT). These starches were also treated by a combination of ANN and HMT. The impact of single and dual modifications (ANN-HMT and HMT-ANN) on the molecular weight (M(w)), crystalline structure, thermal properties, and the digestibility were investigated. The relative crystallinity and short-range order on the granule surface increased on ANN, whereas decreased on HMT. All treated starches showed lower M(w) than that of the native starch. Gelatinization onset temperature, peak temperature and conclusion temperature increased for both single and dual treatments. Increased slowly digestible starch content was found on HMT and ANN-HMT. However, resistant starch levels decreased in all treated starches as compared with native starch. The results would imply that hydrothermal treatment induced structural changes in waxy rice starch significantly affected its digestibility. PMID:25442528

  10. Can resistant starch and/or aspirin prevent the development of colonic neoplasia? The Concerted Action Polyp Prevention (CAPP) 1 Study.

    PubMed

    Mathers, John C; Mickleburgh, Ian; Chapman, Pam C; Bishop, D Tim; Burn, John

    2003-02-01

    Loss of function of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumour suppressor gene through truncating mutations or other means is an early event in most colo-rectal cancer (CRC). The APC gene encodes a large multifunctional protein that plays key roles in several cellular processes, including the wnt signalling pathway where an intact APC protein is essential for down regulation of beta-catenin. The APC protein also plays a role in regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, cell-cell adhesion, cell migration and chromosomal stability during mitosis. Acquisition of a non-functional APC gene can occur by inheritance (in the disease familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP)) or by a sporadic event in a somatic cell. Whilst there is strong epidemiological evidence that variation in diet is a major determinant of variation in CRC incidence, conventional adenoma recurrence trials in sporadic cases of the disease have been relatively unsuccessful in identifying potentially protective food components. Since the genetic basis of CRC in FAP and in sporadic CRC is similar, intervention trials in FAP gene carriers provide an attractive strategy for investigation of potential chemo-preventive agents, since smaller numbers of subjects and shorter time frames are needed. The Concerted Action Polyp Prevention (CAPP) 1 Study is using a 2 x 2 factorial design to test the efficacy of resistant starch (30 g raw potato starch-Hylon VII (1:1, w/w)/d) and aspirin (600 mg/d) in suppressing colo-rectal adenoma formation in young subjects with FAP. Biopsies of macroscopically-normal rectal mucosa are also being collected for assay of putative biomarkers of CRC risk. PMID:12740057

  11. Resistant starch induces catabolic but suppresses immune and cell division pathways and changes the microbiome in the proximal colon of male pigs.

    PubMed

    Haenen, Daniëlle; Souza da Silva, Carol; Zhang, Jing; Koopmans, Sietse Jan; Bosch, Guido; Vervoort, Jacques; Gerrits, Walter J J; Kemp, Bas; Smidt, Hauke; Müller, Michael; Hooiveld, Guido J E J

    2013-12-01

    Consumption of resistant starch (RS) has been associated with various intestinal health benefits, but knowledge of its effects on global gene expression in the colon is limited. The main objective of the current study was to identify genes affected by RS in the proximal colon to infer which biologic pathways were modulated. Ten 17-wk-old male pigs, fitted with a cannula in the proximal colon for repeated collection of tissue biopsy samples and luminal content, were fed a digestible starch (DS) diet or a diet high in RS (34%) for 2 consecutive periods of 14 d in a crossover design. Analysis of the colonic transcriptome profiles revealed that, upon RS feeding, oxidative metabolic pathways, such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle and β-oxidation, were induced, whereas many immune response pathways, including adaptive and innate immune system, as well as cell division were suppressed. The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ was identified as a potential key upstream regulator. RS significantly (P < 0.05) increased the relative abundance of several butyrate-producing microbial groups, including the butyrate producers Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Megasphaera elsdenii, and reduced the abundance of potentially pathogenic members of the genus Leptospira and the phylum Proteobacteria. Concentrations in carotid plasma of the 3 main short-chain fatty acids acetate, propionate, and butyrate were significantly higher with RS consumption compared with DS consumption. Overall, this study provides novel insights on effects of RS in proximal colon and contributes to our understanding of a healthy diet. PMID:24132577

  12. Foundation Fighting Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Boston VisionWalk Kick Off 8th Annual Central Ohio Golf For Sight Golf Classic San Antonio/Austin Chapter Speaker Series Presentations ... Foundation Fighting Blindness’ 2015 Annual Report. Read More Learn more about the latest retinal research news and ...

  13. Fast fight detection.

    PubMed

    Serrano Gracia, Ismael; Deniz Suarez, Oscar; Bueno Garcia, Gloria; Kim, Tae-Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Action recognition has become a hot topic within computer vision. However, the action recognition community has focused mainly on relatively simple actions like clapping, walking, jogging, etc. The detection of specific events with direct practical use such as fights or in general aggressive behavior has been comparatively less studied. Such capability may be extremely useful in some video surveillance scenarios like prisons, psychiatric centers or even embedded in camera phones. As a consequence, there is growing interest in developing violence detection algorithms. Recent work considered the well-known Bag-of-Words framework for the specific problem of fight detection. Under this framework, spatio-temporal features are extracted from the video sequences and used for classification. Despite encouraging results in which high accuracy rates were achieved, the computational cost of extracting such features is prohibitive for practical applications. This work proposes a novel method to detect violence sequences. Features extracted from motion blobs are used to discriminate fight and non-fight sequences. Although the method is outperformed in accuracy by state of the art, it has a significantly faster computation time thus making it amenable for real-time applications. PMID:25860667

  14. Fast Fight Detection

    PubMed Central

    Serrano Gracia, Ismael; Deniz Suarez, Oscar; Bueno Garcia, Gloria; Kim, Tae-Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Action recognition has become a hot topic within computer vision. However, the action recognition community has focused mainly on relatively simple actions like clapping, walking, jogging, etc. The detection of specific events with direct practical use such as fights or in general aggressive behavior has been comparatively less studied. Such capability may be extremely useful in some video surveillance scenarios like prisons, psychiatric centers or even embedded in camera phones. As a consequence, there is growing interest in developing violence detection algorithms. Recent work considered the well-known Bag-of-Words framework for the specific problem of fight detection. Under this framework, spatio-temporal features are extracted from the video sequences and used for classification. Despite encouraging results in which high accuracy rates were achieved, the computational cost of extracting such features is prohibitive for practical applications. This work proposes a novel method to detect violence sequences. Features extracted from motion blobs are used to discriminate fight and non-fight sequences. Although the method is outperformed in accuracy by state of the art, it has a significantly faster computation time thus making it amenable for real-time applications. PMID:25860667

  15. Fighting Fires in Educational Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weick, Karl E.

    1996-01-01

    Recent research on wildland fire fighting supports educational administrators' use of the fire-fighting metaphor to describe the nature of their work. Fire-fighting nuances illuminate subtle conditions in educational organizations that increase their vulnerability to failure. These parallels suggest five management conditions that determine…

  16. Construction of local gene network for revealing different liver function of rats fed deep-fried oil with or without resistant starch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiwei; Liao, Tianqi; Zhou, Zhongkai; Wang, Yuyang; Diao, Yongjia; Strappe, Padraig; Prenzler, Paul; Ayton, Jamie; Blanchard, Chris

    2016-09-01

    To study the mechanism underlying the liver damage induced by deep-fried oil (DO) consumption and the beneficial effects from resistant starch (RS) supplement, differential gene expression and pathway network were analyzed based on RNA sequencing data from rats. The up/down regulated genes and corresponding signaling pathways were used to construct a novel local gene network (LGN). The topology of the network showed characteristics of small-world network, with some pathways demonstrating a high degree. Some changes in genes led to a larger probability occurrence of disease or infection with DO intake. More importantly, the main pathways were found to be almost the same between the two LGNs (30 pathways overlapped in total 48) with gene expression profile. This finding may indicate that RS supplement in DO-containing diet may mainly regulate the genes that related to DO damage, and RS in the diet may provide direct signals to the liver cells and modulate its effect through a network involving complex gene regulatory events. It is the first attempt to reveal the mechanism of the attenuation of liver dysfunction from RS supplement in the DO-containing diet using differential gene expression and pathway network. PMID:27363782

  17. Effects of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) tannins on alpha-amylase activity and in vitro digestibility of starch in raw and processed flours

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of condensed tannins (CT) on in vitro starch digestibility in cooked, wholegrain sorghum flours and on corn starch was investigated. CT extracts were also tested for their inhibitory effect on alpha-amylases. Rapidly digestible starch, slowly digestible starch, and resistant starch were n...

  18. An oral colon-targeting controlled release system based on resistant starch acetate: synthetization, characterization, and preparation of film-coating pellets.

    PubMed

    Pu, Huayin; Chen, Ling; Li, Xiaoxi; Xie, Fengwei; Yu, Long; Li, Lin

    2011-05-25

    An oral colon-targeting controlled release system based on resistant starch acetate (RSA) as a film-coating material was developed. The RSA was successfully synthesized, and its digestion resistibility could be improved by increasing the degree of substitution (DS), which was favorable for the colon-targeting purpose. As a delivery carrier material, the characteristics of RSA were investigated by polarized light microscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The results revealed a decrease of the crystallinity of RSA and a change of its crystalline structure from B + V hydrid type to V type. To evaluate the colon-targeting release performance, the RSA film-coated pellets loaded with different bioactive components were prepared by extrusion-spheronization and then by fluid bed coating. The effects of the DS, plasticizer content, and coating thickness of the RSA film and those of the content and molecular weight of the loaded bioactive component on the colon-targeting release performance of the resulting delivery system were investigated. By adjusting the DS, the coating thickness, and the plasticizer content of the RSA film, either the pellets loaded with a small molecular bioactive component such as 5-aminosalicylic acid or those with a macromolecular bioactive peptide or protein such as bovine serum albumin, hepatocyte growth-promoting factor, or insulin showed a desirable colon-targeting release performance. The release percentage was less than 12% in simulated upper gastrointestinal tract and went up to 70% over a period of 40 h in simulated colonic fluid. This suggests that the delivery system based on RSA film has an excellent colon-targeting release performance and the universality for a wide range of bioactive components. PMID:21513356

  19. Properties of retrograded and acetylated starch produced via starch extrusion or starch hydrolysis with pullulanase.

    PubMed

    Kapelko, M; Zięba, T; Gryszkin, A; Styczyńska, M; Wilczak, A

    2013-09-12

    The aim of the present study was to determine the impact of serial modifications of starch, including firstly starch extrusion or hydrolysis with pullulanase, followed by retrogradation (through freezing and defrosting of pastes) and acetylation (under industrial conditions), on its susceptibility to amylolysis. The method of production had a significant effect on properties of the resultant preparations, whilst the direction and extent of changes depended on the type of modification applied. In the produced starch esters, the degree of substitution, expressed by the per cent of acetylation, ranged from 3.1 to 4.4 g/100 g. The acetylation had a significant impact on contents of elements determined with the atomic emission spectrometry, as it contributed to an increased Na content and decreased contents of Ca and K. The DSC thermal characteristics enabled concluding that the modifications caused an increase in temperatures and a decrease in heat of transition (or its lack). The acetylation of retrograded starch preparations increased their solubility in water and water absorbability. The modifications were found to exert various effects on the rheological properties of pastes determined based on the Brabender's pasting characteristics and flow curves determined with the use of an oscillatory-rotating viscosimeter. All starch acetates produced were characterized by ca. 40% resistance to amylolysis. PMID:23911484

  20. Relationship of cooked rice nutritionally-important starch fractions with other physicochemical properties.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sixteen rice cultivars representing 5 cytosine-thymine repeat (CTn) microsatellite genetic marker groups were analyzed for their cooked rice nutritionally-important starch fractions (rapidly digestible, slowly digestible, and resistant starch), basic grain quality indices (apparent amylose, crude pr...

  1. The battle against multi-resistant strains: Renaissance of antimicrobial essential oils as a promising force to fight hospital-acquired infections.

    PubMed

    Warnke, Patrick H; Becker, Stephan T; Podschun, Rainer; Sivananthan, Sureshan; Springer, Ingo N; Russo, Paul A J; Wiltfang, Joerg; Fickenscher, Helmut; Sherry, Eugene

    2009-10-01

    Hospital-acquired infections and antibiotic-resistant bacteria continue to be major health concerns worldwide. Particularly problematic is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and its ability to cause severe soft tissue, bone or implant infections. First used by the Australian Aborigines, Tea tree oil and Eucalyptus oil (and several other essential oils) have each demonstrated promising efficacy against several bacteria and have been used clinically against multi-resistant strains. Several common and hospital-acquired bacterial and yeast isolates (6 Staphylococcus strains including MRSA, 4 Streptococcus strains and 3 Candida strains including Candida krusei) were tested for their susceptibility for Eucalyptus, Tea tree, Thyme white, Lavender, Lemon, Lemongrass, Cinnamon, Grapefruit, Clove Bud, Sandalwood, Peppermint, Kunzea and Sage oil with the agar diffusion test. Olive oil, Paraffin oil, Ethanol (70%), Povidone iodine, Chlorhexidine and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) served as controls. Large prevailing effective zones of inhibition were observed for Thyme white, Lemon, Lemongrass and Cinnamon oil. The other oils also showed considerable efficacy. Remarkably, almost all tested oils demonstrated efficacy against hospital-acquired isolates and reference strains, whereas Olive and Paraffin oil from the control group produced no inhibition. As proven in vitro, essential oils represent a cheap and effective antiseptic topical treatment option even for antibiotic-resistant strains as MRSA and antimycotic-resistant Candida species. PMID:19473851

  2. The effects of feeding resistant starch on apparent total tract macronutrient digestibility, faecal characteristics and faecal fermentative end-products in healthy adult dogs.

    PubMed

    Beloshapka, Alison N; Alexander, Lucille G; Buff, Preston R; Swanson, Kelly S

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of whole grain consumption have been studied in human subjects, but little research exists on their effects in dogs. The objective of the present study was to test the effects of resistant starch (RS) in the diet of healthy adult dogs. Twelve adult Miniature Schnauzer dogs (eight males, four females; mean age: 3·3 (1·6) years; mean body weight: 8·4 (1·2) kg; mean body condition score: D/ideal) were randomly allotted to one of three treatment groups, which consisted of different amounts of RS supplied in a biscuit format. Dogs received either 0, 10 or 20 g biscuits per d (estimated to be 0, 2·5 or 5 g RS per d) that were fed within their daily energetic allowance. A balanced Latin square design was used, with each treatment period lasting 21 d (days 0-17 adaptation; days 18-21 fresh and total faecal collection). All dogs were fed the same diet to maintain body weight throughout the study. Dogs fed 5 g RS per d had lower (P = 0·03) fat digestibility than dogs fed 0 gRS per d, but DM, organic matter and crude protein digestibilities were not affected. Faecal fermentative end-products, including SCFA and branched-chain fatty acids, ammonia, phenols and indoles, and microbial populations were not affected. The minor changes observed in the present study suggest the RS doses provided to the dogs were too low. Further work is required to assess the dose of RS required to affect gut health. PMID:26101607

  3. Characterization of starch from two ecotypes of andean achira roots (Canna edulis).

    PubMed

    Cisneros, Fausto H; Zevillanos, Roberto; Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis

    2009-08-26

    Starches from two ecotypes of achira roots (Canna edulis Ker-Gawler) were characterized and compared to commercial potato and corn starches. This included scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of starch granules and amylose content determination of starch. Starch solutions or gels were tested by rotational viscometry, Rapid Visco Analyzer (RVA), and texture analysis. Some starch samples were subjected to various treatments: pH reduction, autoclaving at high temperature, and high shear before testing by rotational viscometry. Achira starch showed some unusual properties, such as very large oblong granules (approximately 45-52 microm major axis and approximately 33-34 microm minor axis) and relatively high amylose content (approximately 33-39%). The San Gaban achira ecotype formed high-consistency gels upon cooling, both in RVA study (5% starch) and in texture analysis (8% starch), compared to other starch gels and also exhibited higher thermal resistance to viscosity breakdown. PMID:19627148

  4. Starches, Sugars and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Aller, Erik E. J. G.; Abete, Itziar; Astrup, Arne; Martinez, J. Alfredo; van Baak, Marleen A.

    2011-01-01

    The rising prevalence of obesity, not only in adults but also in children and adolescents, is one of the most important public health problems in developed and developing countries. As one possible way to tackle obesity, a great interest has been stimulated in understanding the relationship between different types of dietary carbohydrate and appetite regulation, body weight and body composition. The present article reviews the conclusions from recent reviews and meta-analyses on the effects of different starches and sugars on body weight management and metabolic disturbances, and provides an update of the most recent studies on this topic. From the literature reviewed in this paper, potential beneficial effects of intake of starchy foods, especially those containing slowly-digestible and resistant starches, and potential detrimental effects of high intakes of fructose become apparent. This supports the intake of whole grains, legumes and vegetables, which contain more appropriate sources of carbohydrates associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular and other chronic diseases, rather than foods rich in sugars, especially in the form of sugar-sweetened beverages. PMID:22254101

  5. Ionic starch-based hydrogels for the prevention of nonspecific protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinmei; Sun, Hong; Li, Junjie; Dong, Dianyu; Zhang, Yabin; Yao, Fanglian

    2015-03-01

    Non-fouling materials bind water molecules via either hydrogen bonding or ionic solvation to form a hydration layer which is responsible for their resistance to protein adsorption. Three ionic starch-based polymers, namely a cationic starch (C-Starch), an anionic starch (A-Starch) and a zwitterionic starch (Z-Starch), were synthesized via etherification reactions to incorporate both hydrogen bonding and ionic solvation hydration groups into one molecule. Further, C-, A- and Z-Starch hydrogels were prepared via chemical crosslinking. The non-fouling properties of these hydrogels were tested with different proteins in solutions with different ionic strengths. The C-Starch hydrogel had low protein resistance at all ionic strengths; the A-Starch hydrogel resisted protein adsorption at ionic strengths of more than 10mM; and the Z-Starch hydrogel resisted protein adsorption at all ionic strengths. In addition, the A- and Z-Starch hydrogels both resisted cell adhesion. This work provides a new path for developing non-fouling materials using the integration of polysaccharides with anionic or zwitterionic moieties to regulate the protein resistance of materials. PMID:25498650

  6. Millennium hopes. Fighting taboos.

    PubMed

    Brueggemann, I

    1999-01-01

    The author's first wish is for International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) to be tenacious in its continuous, unstinting support of family planning in its original sense. Secondly, the author would like to see wider recognition of the urgency with which IPPF must move into the sexual and reproductive health arena, including fighting for the rights of women, men and young people in the many areas of the world still suffering from societal taboos. Thirdly, the author wants IPPF to be visionary in recognizing that young people, women and men need supportive social and economic environments to help them plan and space the children that they would like to have. Current educational and economic requirements and circumstances have become very child unfriendly, as the low birth-rate countries illustrate. Finally, the author hopes to see a much better understanding of intergenerational communication and support as IPPF steps up its efforts to support society in its sexual and reproductive needs. PMID:12295545

  7. Characterization of banana starches obtained from cultivars grown in Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Barros Mesquita, Camila; Leonel, Magali; Franco, Célia Maria Landi; Leonel, Sarita; Garcia, Emerson Loli; Dos Santos, Thaís Paes Rodrigues

    2016-08-01

    The starch market is constantly evolving and studies that provide information about the physical and rheological properties of native starches to meet the diverse demands of the sector are increasingly necessary. In this study starches obtained from five cultivars of banana were analyzed for size and shape of granules, crystallinity, chemical composition, resistant starch, swelling power, solubility, thermal and paste properties. The granules of starch were large (36.58-47.24μm), oval, showed crystallinity pattern type B and the index of crystallinity ranged from 31.94 to 34.06%. The phosphorus content ranged from 0.003 to 0.011%, the amylose ranged from 25.13 to 29.01% and the resistant starch ranged from 65.70 to 80.28%. The starches showed high peak viscosity and breakdown, especially those obtained from 'Nanicão' and 'Grand Naine'. Peak temperature of gelatinization was around 71°C, the enthalpy change (ΔH) ranged from 9.45 to 14.73Jg(-1). The starch from 'Grand Naine' showed higher swelling power (15.19gg(-1)) and the starch from 'Prata-Anã' higher solubility (11.61%). The starches studied are highlighted by their physical and chemical characteristics and may be used in several applications. PMID:27180297

  8. Starch metabolism in leaves.

    PubMed

    Orzechowski, Sławomir

    2008-01-01

    Starch is the most abundant storage carbohydrate produced in plants. The initiation of transitory starch synthesis and degradation in plastids depends mainly on diurnal cycle, post-translational regulation of enzyme activity and starch phosphorylation. For the proper structure of starch granule the activities of all starch synthase isoenzymes, branching enzymes and debranching enzymes are needed. The intensity of starch biosynthesis depends mainly on the activity of AGPase (adenosine 5'-diphosphate glucose pyrophosphorylase). The key enzymes in starch degradation are beta-amylase, isoamylase 3 and disproportionating enzyme. However, it should be underlined that there are some crucial differences in starch metabolism between heterotrophic and autotrophic tissues, e.g. is the ability to build multiprotein complexes responsible for biosynthesis and degradation of starch granules in chloroplasts. The observed huge progress in understanding of starch metabolism was possible mainly due to analyses of the complete Arabidopsis and rice genomes and of numerous mutants with altered starch metabolism in leaves. The aim of this paper is to review current knowledge on transient starch metabolism in higher plants. PMID:18787712

  9. Physicochemical properties and in vitro starch digestibility of potato starch/protein blends.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhan-Hui; Donner, Elizabeth; Yada, Rickey Y; Liu, Qiang

    2016-12-10

    This study aimed to investigate effects of starch-protein interactions on physicochemical properties and in vitro starch digestibility of composite potato starch/protein blends (0, 5, 10, or 15% protein) during processing (cooking, cooling and reheating). The effect on recrystallization and short-range ordering in starch was studied by light microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results show that protein in the blend proportionally restricted starch granule swelling during cooking and facilitated amylopectin recrystallization during cold-storage. The facilitating effect of protein diminished with increasing blend ratio. Resistant starch content in the processed blends was positively correlated to intensity ratio of 1053/1035cm(-1) in FTIR spectra arising from slow retrogradation of amylopectin (r(2)>0.88, P≤0.05), whose formation was favored by the presence of protein in the blends and further enhanced by cooling of cooked blends. As a conclusion, starch-protein interaction reduced starch digestibility of the processed blends. PMID:27577912

  10. Plantain and banana starches: granule structural characteristics explain the differences in their starch degradation patterns.

    PubMed

    Soares, Claudinéia Aparecida; Peroni-Okita, Fernanda Helena Gonçalves; Cardoso, Mateus Borba; Shitakubo, Renata; Lajolo, Franco Maria; Cordenunsi, Beatriz Rosana

    2011-06-22

    Different banana cultivars were used to investigate the influences of starch granule structure and hydrolases on degradation. The highest degrees of starch degradation were observed in dessert bananas during ripening. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed smooth granule surface in the green stage in all cultivars, except for Mysore. The small and round granules were preferentially degraded in all of the cultivars. Terra demonstrated a higher degree of crystallinity and a short amylopectin chain length distribution, resulting in high starch content in the ripe stage. Amylose content and the crystallinity index were more strongly correlated than the distribution of amylopectin branch chain lengths in banana starches. α- and β-amylase activities were found in both forms, soluble in the pulp and associated with the starch granule. Starch-phosphorylase was not found in Mysore. On the basis of the profile of α-amylase in vitro digestion and the structural characteristics, it could be concluded that the starch of plantains has an arrangement of granules more resistant to enzymes than the starch of dessert bananas. PMID:21591784

  11. [Fight against schizophrenia stigma].

    PubMed

    López-Ibor Aliño, J J

    2001-01-01

    Stigma, discrimination and prejudice against mental diseases, those who suffer from them and their families are common everywhere. To reduce stigma in schizophrenia is essential for a better outcome of the disease in each patient. Stigma interferes with the detection of the illness, with adherence to treatment, with rehabilitation and with social reinsertion. Stigma is everywhere in schizophrenia, from within the family itself to the health care system and into society at large. The WPA has developed a Program to fight the stigma of schizophrenia consisting on several modules: 1) Instructions on how to implement a campaign. 2) A monograph in schizophrenia. 3) A summary of the experiences in the sites where the program has been tested. 4) Further modules which include information on similar campaigns and material such as leaflets, books and videos and concrete examples of discrimination. A pilot study of the WPA Program was carried out in Madrid in 1999. A survey was undertaken to identify target population and specific messages, showing little knowledge about the disease and a small stigma amount. It was decided not to carry out an awareness campaign in the population, which has the risk of increasing stigma in parallel to being increased in awareness but to explore the amount of stigma in the environment closer to the patient such as patients themselves, relatives, neighbours and health services staff. The stigma degree was much more significant. Activities related to this group of people were undertaken specially by training psychiatrists to identify stigma and discrimination and to fight it. The outcome showed a great satisfaction among patients, relatives and physicians. A pilot media campaign was also undertaken. In previous years there was no information about schizophrenia in mass media only news on incidental problems of patients with schizophrenia. After the campaign news on the disease itself appeared in mass media. The Madrid experience shows that the

  12. Assessment of Blood Glucose Regulation and Safety of Resistant Starch Formula-Based Diet in Healthy Normal and Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hung; Chang, Daw-Ming; Wu, Da-Jen; Peng, Hui-Yu; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of the new resistant starch (RS) formula, PPB-R-203, on glucose homeostasis in healthy subjects and subjects with type 2 diabetes.A cohort consisting of 40 healthy participants received test and control diets and was checked for up to 3 hours post-meal. A randomized, 2-regimen, cross-over, comparative study was conducted in 44 subjects with type 2 diabetes and glycemic control was assessed with a continuous glucose monitoring system.In healthy participants, serum glucose values and incremental areas under the glucose curves (AUC) were significantly lower in the PPB-R-203 than the control group (P < 0.05). In patients with type 2 diabetes, mean blood glucose concentrations for subjects on the control regimen were higher than those for subjects on the PPB-R-203-based regimen (7.9 ± 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 7.4-8.4 vs 7.4 ± 1.6, 95% CI 6.9-7.9 mmol/L, respectively; P = 0.023). AUCs for total blood glucose and hyperglycemia (glucose >10 mmol/L) were also reduced for subjects on the PPB-R-203-based regimen as compared with those on control regimen (total blood glucose: 16.2 ± 4.0, 95% CI 14.9-17.4 vs 18.7 ± 4.0, 95% CI 17.6-20.1, P < 0.001; hyperglycemia: 4.9 ± 5.7, 95% CI 3.1-6.6 vs 6.3 ± 6.4, 95% CI 4.3-8.3 mmol/L × day, P = 0.021). However, AUC measurements for hypoglycemia (glucose <3.9 mmol/l) were not statistically significant.A PPB-R-203-based diet reduced postprandial hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia or glucose excursion. PMID:26287417

  13. Assessment of Blood Glucose Regulation and Safety of Resistant Starch Formula-Based Diet in Healthy Normal and Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Hung; Chang, Daw-Ming; Wu, Da-Jen; Peng, Hui-Yu; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the effects of the new resistant starch (RS) formula, PPB-R-203, on glucose homeostasis in healthy subjects and subjects with type 2 diabetes. A cohort consisting of 40 healthy participants received test and control diets and was checked for up to 3 hours post-meal. A randomized, 2-regimen, cross-over, comparative study was conducted in 44 subjects with type 2 diabetes and glycemic control was assessed with a continuous glucose monitoring system. In healthy participants, serum glucose values and incremental areas under the glucose curves (AUC) were significantly lower in the PPB-R-203 than the control group (P < 0.05). In patients with type 2 diabetes, mean blood glucose concentrations for subjects on the control regimen were higher than those for subjects on the PPB-R-203-based regimen (7.9 ± 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 7.4–8.4 vs 7.4 ± 1.6, 95% CI 6.9–7.9 mmol/L, respectively; P = 0.023). AUCs for total blood glucose and hyperglycemia (glucose >10 mmol/L) were also reduced for subjects on the PPB-R-203-based regimen as compared with those on control regimen (total blood glucose: 16.2 ± 4.0, 95% CI 14.9–17.4 vs 18.7 ± 4.0, 95% CI 17.6–20.1, P < 0.001; hyperglycemia: 4.9 ± 5.7, 95% CI 3.1–6.6 vs 6.3 ± 6.4, 95% CI 4.3–8.3 mmol/L × day, P = 0.021). However, AUC measurements for hypoglycemia (glucose <3.9 mmol/l) were not statistically significant. A PPB-R-203-based diet reduced postprandial hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia or glucose excursion. PMID:26287417

  14. High Intensity Resistance Training Methods with and without Protein Supplementation to Fight Cardiometabolic Risk in Middle-Aged Males: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kemmler, Wolfgang; Wittke, Andreas; Bebenek, Michael; Fröhlich, Michael; von Stengel, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Time-effective protocols may potentially increase people's compliance with exercise. The purpose of this paper was to compare the relative effects of 16 weeks of high intensity (resistance) training (HIT) with and without protein supplementation (HIT&P) and HVHIT (high volume/high intensity training) versus a nontraining control group on cardiometabolic risk factors. One hundred and twenty untrained males 30–50 years old were randomly assigned to 3 subgroups: (a) a HIT group; (b) a HIT&P group, and (c) a waiting-control group (phase I) that crossed over to (d) high volume/high intensity training (HVHIT) during the second study phase. HIT was defined as “single set to failure protocol” while HVHIT consistently applied two sets. Protein supplementation provided an overall intake of 1.5 g/kg/body mass. Primary study endpoint was the metabolic syndrome Z-Score (MetS-Z-Score). MetS-Z-Score significantly improved in all exercise groups (p ≤ 0.001) with no significant difference between HIT, HIT&P, and HVHIT (p ≥ 0.829). However, all the exercise groups differed significantly from the CG (p < 0.001) which deteriorated significantly (p = 0.039). In conclusion, all exercise protocols were similarly effective in improving cardiometabolic risk factors. Thus, HIT may be the best choice for people with low time budgets looking to improve their cardiometabolic health. PMID:26885526

  15. High Intensity Resistance Training Methods with and without Protein Supplementation to Fight Cardiometabolic Risk in Middle-Aged Males: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kemmler, Wolfgang; Wittke, Andreas; Bebenek, Michael; Fröhlich, Michael; von Stengel, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Time-effective protocols may potentially increase people's compliance with exercise. The purpose of this paper was to compare the relative effects of 16 weeks of high intensity (resistance) training (HIT) with and without protein supplementation (HIT&P) and HVHIT (high volume/high intensity training) versus a nontraining control group on cardiometabolic risk factors. One hundred and twenty untrained males 30-50 years old were randomly assigned to 3 subgroups: (a) a HIT group; (b) a HIT&P group, and (c) a waiting-control group (phase I) that crossed over to (d) high volume/high intensity training (HVHIT) during the second study phase. HIT was defined as "single set to failure protocol" while HVHIT consistently applied two sets. Protein supplementation provided an overall intake of 1.5 g/kg/body mass. Primary study endpoint was the metabolic syndrome Z-Score (MetS-Z-Score). MetS-Z-Score significantly improved in all exercise groups (p ≤ 0.001) with no significant difference between HIT, HIT&P, and HVHIT (p ≥ 0.829). However, all the exercise groups differed significantly from the CG (p < 0.001) which deteriorated significantly (p = 0.039). In conclusion, all exercise protocols were similarly effective in improving cardiometabolic risk factors. Thus, HIT may be the best choice for people with low time budgets looking to improve their cardiometabolic health. PMID:26885526

  16. Flight and fight

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, G.J.

    2008-01-01

    Honey bee nest defense involves guard bees that specialize in olfaction-based nestmate recognition and alarm-pheromone-mediated recruitment of nestmates to sting. Stinging is influenced by visual, tactile and olfactory stimuli. Both quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping and behavioral studies point to guarding behavior as a key factor in colony stinging response. Results of reciprocal F1 crosses show that paternally inherited genes have a greater influence on colony stinging response than maternally inherited genes. The most active alarm pheromone component, isoamyl acetate (IAA) causes increased respiration and may induce stress analgesia in bees. IAA primes worker bees for ‘fight or flight’, possibly through actions of neuropeptides and/or biogenic amines. Studies of aggression in other species lead to an expectation that octopamine or 5-HT might play a role in honey bee defensive response. Genome sequence and QTL mapping identified 128 candidate genes for three regions known to influence defensive behavior. Comparative bioinformatics suggest possible roles of genes involved in neurogenesis and central nervous system (CNS) activity, and genes involved in sensory tuning through G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), such as an arrestin (AmArr4) and the metabotropic GABAB receptor (GABA-B-R1). PMID:17379239

  17. Starch/fiber/poly(lactic acid) foam and compressed foam composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Composites of starch, fiber, and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) were made using a foam substrate formed by dehydrating starch or starch/fiber gels. PLA was infiltrated into the dry foam to provide better moisture resistance. Foam composites were compressed into plastics using force ranging from 4-76MPa. Te...

  18. High throughput screening of starch structures using carbohydrate microarrays.

    PubMed

    Tanackovic, Vanja; Rydahl, Maja Gro; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Shaik, Shahnoor Sultana; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Krunic, Susanne Langgaard; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Willats, William George Tycho; Blennow, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In this study we introduce the starch-recognising carbohydrate binding module family 20 (CBM20) from Aspergillus niger for screening biological variations in starch molecular structure using high throughput carbohydrate microarray technology. Defined linear, branched and phosphorylated maltooligosaccharides, pure starch samples including a variety of different structures with variations in the amylopectin branching pattern, amylose content and phosphate content, enzymatically modified starches and glycogen were included. Using this technique, different important structures, including amylose content and branching degrees could be differentiated in a high throughput fashion. The screening method was validated using transgenic barley grain analysed during development and subjected to germination. Typically, extreme branching or linearity were detected less than normal starch structures. The method offers the potential for rapidly analysing resistant and slowly digested dietary starches. PMID:27468930

  19. High throughput screening of starch structures using carbohydrate microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Tanackovic, Vanja; Rydahl, Maja Gro; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Shaik, Shahnoor Sultana; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Krunic, Susanne Langgaard; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Willats, William George Tycho; Blennow, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In this study we introduce the starch-recognising carbohydrate binding module family 20 (CBM20) from Aspergillus niger for screening biological variations in starch molecular structure using high throughput carbohydrate microarray technology. Defined linear, branched and phosphorylated maltooligosaccharides, pure starch samples including a variety of different structures with variations in the amylopectin branching pattern, amylose content and phosphate content, enzymatically modified starches and glycogen were included. Using this technique, different important structures, including amylose content and branching degrees could be differentiated in a high throughput fashion. The screening method was validated using transgenic barley grain analysed during development and subjected to germination. Typically, extreme branching or linearity were detected less than normal starch structures. The method offers the potential for rapidly analysing resistant and slowly digested dietary starches. PMID:27468930

  20. Agro-industrial residue from starch extraction of Pachyrhizus ahipa as filler of thermoplastic corn starch films.

    PubMed

    López, O V; Versino, F; Villar, M A; García, M A

    2015-12-10

    Biocomposites films based on thermoplastic corn starch (TPS) containing 0.5% w/w fibrous residue from Pachyrhizus ahipa starch extraction (PASR) were obtained by melt-mixing and compression molding. PASR is mainly constituted by remaining cell walls and natural fibers, revealed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Chemical composition of the residue indicated that fiber and starch were the principal components. Biocomposites thermo-stability was determined by Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis. A continuous PASR-TPS interface was observed by SEM, as a result of a good adhesion of the fibrous residue to starch matrix. Likewise, films containing PASR presented fewer superficial cracks than TPS ones, whereas their fracture surfaces were more irregular. Besides, the presence of PASR increased starch films roughness, due to fibers agglomerates. Films reinforced with PASR showed significantly lower water vapor permeability (WVP). In addition, PARS filler increased maximum tensile strength and Young's modulus of TPS films, thus leading to more resistant starch matrixes. PMID:26428131

  1. Recrystallization characteristics of high hydrostatic pressure gelatinized normal and waxy corn starch.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenhao; Tian, Xiaoling; Wang, Peng; Saleh, Ahmed S M; Luo, Qingui; Zheng, Jianmei; Ouyang, Shaohui; Zhang, Guoquan

    2016-02-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) can lead to starch gelatinization at room temperature, while the retrogradation mechanism of HHP gelatinized starch is not well known. HHP gelatinized normal and waxy corn starches were stored at room temperature for 192 h in order to investigate the retrogradation characteristics. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), polarised light microscopy and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) analysis showed that the pressurization of normal and waxy corn starch suspensions with concentration of 30% (w/v) at 600 MPa for 15 min resulted in a complete gelatinization. In addition, the pressure-gelatinized normal and waxy corn starch gels were stored and subjected to X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, resistant starch content determination, swelling power and pasting behavior. The retrograded normal maize and waxy maize starch showed a substantial loss of A-type crystallinity. Both pressure-gelatinized normal and waxy corn starches showed an increase in resistant starch content and relative crystallinity degree with the increase of storage time. In addition, restricted starch swelling power and lower pasting viscosities were observed for these two retrograded starches. The amylose molecule within starch granules has been regarded as the main factor to affect the structural and physicochemical properties during the retrogradation process of HHP-gelatinized starch granules. PMID:26642841

  2. Starch nanoparticles: a review.

    PubMed

    Le Corre, Déborah; Bras, Julien; Dufresne, Alain

    2010-05-10

    Starch is a natural, renewable, and biodegradable polymer produced by many plants as a source of stored energy. It is the second most abundant biomass material in nature. The starch structure has been under research for years, and because of its complexity, an universally accepted model is still lacking (Buleon, A.; et al. Int. J. Biol. Macromol. 1998, 23, 85-112). However, the predominant model for starch is a concentric semicrystalline multiscale structure that allows the production of new nanoelements: (i) starch nanocrystals resulting from the disruption of amorphous domains from semicrystalline granules by acid hydrolysis and (ii) starch nanoparticles produced from gelatinized starch. This paper intends to give a clear overview of starch nanoparticle preparation, characterization, properties, and applications. Recent studies have shown that they could be used as fillers to improve mechanical and barrier properties of biocomposites. Their use for industrial packaging, continuously looking for innovative solutions for efficient and sustainable systems, is being investigated. Therefore, recently, starch nanoparticles have been the focus of an exponentially increasing number of works devoted to develop biocomposites by blending starch nanoparticles with different biopolymeric matrices. To our knowledge, this topic has never been reviewed, despite several published strategies and conclusions. PMID:20405913

  3. Concerted suppression of all starch branching enzyme genes in barley produces amylose-only starch granules

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Starch is stored in higher plants as granules composed of semi-crystalline amylopectin and amorphous amylose. Starch granules provide energy for the plant during dark periods and for germination of seeds and tubers. Dietary starch is also a highly glycemic carbohydrate being degraded to glucose and rapidly absorbed in the small intestine. But a portion of dietary starch, termed “resistant starch” (RS) escapes digestion and reaches the large intestine, where it is fermented by colonic bacteria producing short chain fatty acids (SCFA) which are linked to several health benefits. The RS is preferentially derived from amylose, which can be increased by suppressing amylopectin synthesis by silencing of starch branching enzymes (SBEs). However all the previous works attempting the production of high RS crops resulted in only partly increased amylose-content and/or significant yield loss. Results In this study we invented a new method for silencing of multiple genes. Using a chimeric RNAi hairpin we simultaneously suppressed all genes coding for starch branching enzymes (SBE I, SBE IIa, SBE IIb) in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), resulting in production of amylose-only starch granules in the endosperm. This trait was segregating 3:1. Amylose-only starch granules were irregularly shaped and showed peculiar thermal properties and crystallinity. Transgenic lines retained high-yield possibly due to a pleiotropic upregualtion of other starch biosynthetic genes compensating the SBEs loss. For gelatinized starch, a very high content of RS (65 %) was observed, which is 2.2-fold higher than control (29%). The amylose-only grains germinated with same frequency as control grains. However, initial growth was delayed in young plants. Conclusions This is the first time that pure amylose has been generated with high yield in a living organism. This was achieved by a new method of simultaneous suppression of the entire complement of genes encoding starch branching enzymes. We

  4. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    Antibiotics are medicines that fight bacterial infections. Used properly, they can save lives. But there is a growing problem of antibiotic resistance. It happens when bacteria change and become able to resist the effects of an antibiotic. Using antibiotics can lead to resistance. ...

  5. Effect of Microwave Irradiation on the Physicochemical and Digestive Properties of Lotus Seed Starch.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Shaoxiao; Chen, Bingyan; Zeng, Hongliang; Guo, Zebin; Lu, Xu; Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Baodong

    2016-03-30

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of microwave irradiation on the physicochemical and digestive properties of lotus seed starch. The physicochemical properties of lotus seed starch were characterized by light microscopy, (1)H NMR, FT-IR spectroscopy, and HPSEC-MALLS-RI. The starch-water interaction and crystalline region increased due to the changed water distribution of starch granules and the increase of the double-helix structure. The swelling power, amylose leaching, molecular properties, and radius of gyration reduced with the increasing microwave power, which further affected the sensitivity of lotus seed starch to enzymatic degradation. Furthermore, the resistant starch and slowly digestible starch increased with the increasing microwave irradiation, which further resulted in their decreasing hydrolysis index and glycemic index. The digestive properties of lotus seed starch were mainly influenced by the reduced branching degree of amylopectin and the strong amylose-amylose interaction. PMID:26912092

  6. A Relentless Illness—Fighting Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues A Relentless Illness— Fighting Diabetes Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents For ... the fight to control and cure type 1 diabetes. As international chairman of the Juvenile Diabetes Research ...

  7. Ferocious Fighting between Male Grasshoppers

    PubMed Central

    Umbers, Kate D. L.; Tatarnic, Nikolai J.; Holwell, Gregory I.; Herberstein, Marie E.

    2012-01-01

    Contests among individuals over mating opportunities are common across diverse taxa, yet physical conflict is relatively rare. Due to the potentially fatal consequences of physical fighting, most animals employ mechanisms of conflict resolution involving signalling and ritualistic assessment. Here we provide the first evidence of ubiquitous escalated fighting in grasshoppers. The chameleon grasshopper (Kosciuscola tristis) is an Australian alpine specialist, in which males engage in highly aggressive combat over ovipositing females. We describe discrete agonistic behaviours including mandible flaring, mounting, grappling, kicking and biting, and their use depending on the individual’s role as challenger or defender. We show that male role predicts damage, with challengers being more heavily damaged than males defending females (defenders). Challengers also possess wider mandibles than defenders, but are similar in other metrics of body size. Our data suggest that fights escalate between males matched in body size and that mandibles are used as weapons in this species. This system represents an exciting opportunity for future research into the evolution of costly fighting behaviour in an otherwise placid group. PMID:23166725

  8. Molecular rearrangement of waxy and normal maize starch granules during in vitro digestion.

    PubMed

    Teng, Anju; Witt, Torsten; Wang, Kai; Li, Ming; Hasjim, Jovin

    2016-03-30

    The objective of the present study is to understand the changes in starch structures during digestion and the structures contributing to slow digestion properties. The molecular, crystalline, and granular structures of native waxy maize, normal maize, high-amylose maize, and normal potato starch granules were monitored using SEC, XRD, DSC, and SEM. The amylose and amylopectin molecules of all four starches were hydrolyzed to smaller dextrins, with some having linear molecular structure. Neither the A- nor B-type crystallinity was resistant to enzyme hydrolysis. Starch crystallites with melting temperature above 120°C appeared in waxy and normal maize starches after digestion, suggesting that the linear dextrins retrograded into thermally stable crystalline structure. These crystallites were also observed for high-amylose maize starch before and after digestion, contributing to its low enzyme digestibility. On the contrary, the enzyme-resistant granular structure of native normal potato starch was responsible for its low susceptibility to enzyme hydrolysis. PMID:26794941

  9. Starch Metabolism in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Streb, Sebastian; Zeeman, Samuel C.

    2012-01-01

    Starch is the major non-structural carbohydrate in plants. It serves as an important store of carbon that fuels plant metabolism and growth when they are unable to photosynthesise. This storage can be in leaves and other green tissues, where it is degraded during the night, or in heterotrophic tissues such as roots, seeds and tubers, where it is stored over longer time periods. Arabidopsis accumulates starch in many of its tissues, but mostly in its leaves during the day. It has proven to be a powerful genetic system for discovering how starch is synthesised and degraded, and new proteins and processes have been discovered. Such work has major significance for our starch crops, whose yield and quality could be improved by the application of this knowledge. Research into Arabidopsis starch metabolism has begun to reveal how its daily turnover is integrated into the rest of metabolism and adapted to the environmental conditions. Furthermore, Arabidopsis mutant lines deficient in starch metabolism have been employed as tools to study other biological processes ranging from sugar sensing to gravitropism and flowering time control. This review gives a detailed account of the use of Arabidopsis to study starch metabolism. It describes the major discoveries made and presents an overview of our understanding today, together with some as-yet unresolved questions. PMID:23393426

  10. Characterization of starch nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymońska, J.; Targosz-Korecka, M.; Krok, F.

    2009-01-01

    Nanomaterials already attract great interest because of their potential applications in technology, food science and medicine. Biomaterials are biodegradable and quite abundant in nature, so they are favoured over synthetic polymer based materials. Starch as a nontoxic, cheap and renewable raw material is particularly suitable for preparation of nanoparticles. In the paper, the structure and some physicochemical properties of potato and cassava starch particles of the size between 50 to 100 nm, obtained by mechanical treatment of native starch, were presented. We demonstrated, with the aim of the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and the non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy (nc-AFM), that the shape and dimensions of the obtained nanoparticles both potato and cassava starch fit the blocklets - previously proposed as basic structural features of native starch granules. This observation was supported by aqueous solubility and swelling power of the particles as well as their iodine binding capacity similar to those for amylopectin-type short branched polysaccharide species. Obtained results indicated that glycosidic bonds of the branch linkage points in the granule amorphous lamellae might be broken during the applied mechanical treatment. Thus the released amylopectin clusters could escape out of the granules. The starch nanoparticles, for their properties qualitatively different from those of native starch granules, could be utilized in new applications.

  11. Why Adolescents Fight: A Qualitative Study of Youth Perspectives on Fighting and Its Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Shetgiri, Rashmi; Lee, Simon C.; Tillitski, John; Wilson, Connie; Flores, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Objective Identify risk factors for fighting, factors that protect against fighting, and strategies to prevent fighting, among adolescents who fight and those uninvolved in fighting. Methods Focus groups were conducted with middle and high-school students, stratified by fighting (fighter/non-fighter) status, race/ethnicity, and gender. Groups were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using margin coding and thematic content analysis. Themes were independently identified by three coders; disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results The 65 participants in the 12 focus groups were 13–17 years old. Reasons for fighting include self-defense, to gain/maintain respect, or due to anger; having goals for the future is protective. Non-fighters state that their parents condone fighting only when physically attacked, and teach adolescents strategies to avoid fighting. Fighters describe mixed messages from parents, and pro-fighting attitudes and modeling of aggressive behavior among some family members. Non-fighters avoid fighting by ignoring insults or walking away. Fighters feel unable to use nonviolent conflict-resolution methods effectively. Peers may instigate or encourage fights. Suggested prevention strategies include anger-management and conflict-resolution programs, relationships with caring adults, and physicians counseling youth about the consequences of fighting. Conclusions Non-fighters use various strategies to avoid fighting, whereas fighters are aware of few alternatives to fighting. Conflicting parental messages about fighting may enhance the likelihood of fighting. Physicians can counsel youth about the negative consequences of fighting. Interventions that teach anger management and conflict resolution, promote adolescent self-efficacy for using non-violent strategies, and address parental attitudes about fighting may be effective in preventing fighting. PMID:25528128

  12. Determination of dietary starch in animal feeds and pet food by an enzymatic-colorimetric method: collaborative study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch, glycogen, maltooligosaccharides, and other alpha-1,4- and alpha-1,6-linked glucose carbohydrates exclusive of resistant starch are collectively termed "dietary starch." This nutritionally important fraction is increasingly measured for use in diet formulation for animals, as it can have posi...

  13. Starch bioengineering affects cereal grain germination and seedling establishment

    PubMed Central

    Hebelstrup, Kim H.; Blennow, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Cereal grain germination is central for plant early development, and efficient germination has a major role in crop propagation and malting. Endosperm starch is the prime energy reserve in germination and seedling establishment. In this study, it was hypothesized that optimized starch granule structure, and not only the endosperm starch content per se, is important for germination and seedling establishment. For that purpose, wild-type (WT), and specifically engineered degradable hyperphosphorylated (HP) starch and more resistant amylose-only (AO) starch barley lines were used. The transgenics showed no severe phenotypes and the WT and HP lines degraded the starch similarly, having 30% residual starch after 12 d of germination. However, the AO line showed significant resistance to degradation, having 57% residual starch. Interestingly, protein and β-glucan (BG) degradation was stimulated for both HP and AO lines as compared with the WT. At late seedling establishment stages, specific sugars were rapidly consumed in the AO line. α-Amylase activity was distinctly suppressed in both the HP and the AO lines. Pre-germination β-amylase deposition was low in the AO grains and β-amylase was generally suppressed in both HP and AO lines throughout germination. As further supported by scanning electron microscopy and histochemical analyses on grain and seedlings, it was concluded that inadequate starch granule deposition in combination with the suppressed hydrolase activity leads to temporal and compensating re-direction of starch, sugar, and protein catabolism important to maintain metabolic dynamics during grain germination and seedling establishment. PMID:24642850

  14. How to fight pertussis?

    PubMed

    Guiso, Nicole

    2013-07-01

    Universal pertussis vaccination has successfully decreased pertussis mortality and morbidity in childhood. However, despite intensive vaccination of young children, pertussis remains a major public health problem in both developing and industrialized regions. Recent epidemics in California and Australia demonstrated that the agent of the disease is still circulating. They also revealed several aspects that must not be neglected concerning vaccine-preventable diseases. Indeed, pertussis is one of the oldest vaccine-preventable bacterial diseases, so can provide a good illustration of all of the aspects associated with the need for surveillance after the introduction of vaccination. (i) The type of vaccine: two types of pertussis vaccine, whole cell and acellular, inducing different types of immunity are now used around the world. (ii) The vaccine strategy, the vaccine coverage and the duration of vaccine immunity: pertussis epidemics provide evidence that 90% of the infants must be vaccinated, vaccination must be sufficiently early and both vaccine-induced immunity and natural infection-induced immunity to pertussis wane with time indicating that pertussis is not only a pediatric disease. (iii) The agents of the disease, Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis: the intensive vaccination of young infants modified the herd immunity, controlled bacteria similar to the vaccine strains but not all, revealing polymorphism of the agents of the disease evidencing the importance of continuing their isolation and their surveillance as well as monitoring their antibiotic resistance. (iv) The diagnosis of the disease: the epidemics showed the importance of specific diagnostic techniques that are easy to use by medical laboratories and the availability of the reagents required. (v) Communication with the public, the health authorities and the health providers: any changes of vaccine type, vaccine strategy, characteristics of the disease, and biological diagnosis must

  15. Enzymatic acylation of starch.

    PubMed

    Alissandratos, Apostolos; Halling, Peter J

    2012-07-01

    Starch a cheap, abundant and renewable natural material has been chemically modified for many years. The popular modification acylation has been used to adjust rheological properties as well as deliver polymers with internal plasticizers and other potential uses. However the harsh reaction conditions required to produce these esters may limit their use, especially in sensitive applications (foods, pharmaceuticals, etc.). The use of enzymes to catalyse acylation may provide a suitable alternative due to high selectivities and mild reaction conditions. Traditional hydrolase-catalysed synthesis in non-aqueous apolar media is hard due to lack of polysaccharide solubility. However, acylated starch derivatives have recently been successfully produced in other non-conventional systems: (a) surfactant-solubilised subtilisin and suspended amylose in organic media; (b) starch nanoparticles dispersed in organic medium with immobilised lipase; (c) aqueous starch gels with lipase and dispersed fatty acids. We attempt a systematic review that draws parallels between the seemingly unrelated approaches described. PMID:22138593

  16. Films based on oxidized starch and cellulose from barley.

    PubMed

    El Halal, Shanise Lisie Mello; Colussi, Rosana; Deon, Vinícius Gonçalves; Pinto, Vânia Zanella; Villanova, Franciene Almeida; Carreño, Neftali Lenin Villarreal; Dias, Alvaro Renato Guerra; Zavareze, Elessandra da Rosa

    2015-11-20

    Starch and cellulose fibers were isolated from grains and the husk from barley, respectively. Biodegradable films of native starch or oxidized starches and glycerol with different concentrations of cellulose fibers (0%, 10% and 20%) were prepared. The films were characterized by morphological, mechanical, barrier, and thermal properties. Cellulose fibers isolated from the barley husk were obtained with 75% purity and high crystallinity. The morphology of the films of the oxidized starches, regardless of the fiber addition, was more homogeneous as compared to the film of the native starch. The addition of cellulose fibers in the films increased the tensile strength and decreased elongation. The water vapor permeability of the film of oxidized starch with 20% of cellulose fibers was lower than the without fibers. However the films with cellulose fibers had the highest decomposition with the initial temperature and thermal stability. The oxidized starch and cellulose fibers from barley have a good potential for use in packaging. The addition of cellulose fibers in starch films can contribute to the development of films more resistant that can be applied in food systems to maintain its integrity. PMID:26344323

  17. Starch chain interactions within the amorphous and crystalline domains of pulse starches during heat-moisture treatment at different temperatures and their impact on physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Ambigaipalan, P; Hoover, R; Donner, E; Liu, Q

    2014-01-15

    Pulse (faba bean [FB], black bean [BB] and pinto bean [PB]) starches were heat-moisture treated (HMT) at 80, 100 and 120°C for 12h at a moisture content of ∼23%. Structural changes on HMT were monitored by microscopy, HPAEC-PAD, ATR-FTIR, WAXS, DSC and susceptibility towards acid and enzyme hydrolysis. Amylopectin chain length distribution remained unchanged in all starches on HMT. In all starches, HMT increased crystallinity and gelatinisation temperatures. The gelatinization enthalpy remained unchanged in some starches, whereas it decreased slightly in other starches on HMT. Slowly digestible starch content decreased at all temperatures of HMT, whereas resistant starch content increased at HMT80 and HMT100 (HMT80>HMT100), but decreased at HMT120. Birefringence, B-type crystallites and acid hydrolysis decreased on HMT. The extent of the above changes varied amongst starch sources and genotypes. HMT altered the X-ray pattern from A+B→A. The results of this study showed that structural reorganisation of starch chains during HMT temperature was influenced by starch chain flexibility, starch chain interactions and crystalline stability of the native granules. PMID:24054228

  18. Structural changes of high-amylose rice starch residues following in vitro and in vivo digestion.

    PubMed

    Man, Jianmin; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Changquan; Zhou, Xinghua; Dong, Ying; Zhang, Fengmin; Liu, Qiaoquan; Wei, Cunxu

    2012-09-12

    High-amylose cereal starch has a great benefit on human health through its resistant starch content. In this paper, starches were isolated from mature grains of high-amylose transgenic rice line (TRS) and its wild-type rice cultivar Te-qing (TQ) and digested in vitro and in vivo. The structural changes of digestive starch residues were characterized using DSC, XRD, (13)C CP/MAS NMR, and ATR-FTIR. TQ starch was very susceptible to digestion; its residues following in vitro and in vivo digestion showed similar structural characteristics with TQ control starch, which suggested that both amorphous and crystalline structures were simultaneously digested. Both amorphous and the long-range order structures were also simultaneously hydrolyzed in TRS starch, but the short-range order (double helix) structure in the external region of TRS starch granule increased with increasing digestion time. The A-type polymorph of TRS C-type starch was hydrolyzed more rapidly than the B-type polymorph. These results suggested that B-type crystallinity and short-range order structure in the external region of starch granule made TRS starch resistant to digestion. PMID:22917081

  19. Characterization of Maize Amylose-extender (ae) Mutant Starches. Part II: Structures and Properties of Starch Residues Remaining After Enzymatic Hydrolyis at Boiling-water Temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GEMS-0067 maize ae-line starch developed by Truman State University and the Germplasm Enhancement of Maize (GEM) Project consisted of 39.4%-43.2% resistant-starch (RS), which was larger than the existing ae-line starches of H99ae, OH43ae, B89ae, and B84ae (11.5%-19.1%) as reported in part I of the s...

  20. Stress, fighting and neuroendocrine function.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, R. L.; Levine, S.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.

    1971-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of pituitary adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and adrenocortical steroids in rats after testing in the shock-induced fighting paradigm were examined. The investigations provide data consistent with the view that psychological aspects of the stressful situation are important in determining the effects of shock on physiological function. The data indicate that the pituitary-adrenal response can be attenuated by the expression of an organized pattern of behavior.

  1. Stickleback fights: why do winners win? Influence of metabolic and morphometric parameters.

    PubMed

    Guderley, Helga; Couture, Patrice

    2005-01-01

    Pairs of reproductively mature male three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) were introduced into unfamiliar aquaria and observed until one male became dominant. Skin carotenoid content, morphometric indexes, and metabolic capacities of the axial and pectoral muscles were examined to establish whether morphological or physiological parameters differentiated winners and losers. Stickleback that initiated fights typically won. Quick initiation led to quick victory. Overall, winners and losers differed in few morphological or metabolic characteristics, but these properties and the differences between these attributes for losers and winners of specific fights were linked with initiation time and fight duration. Morphometric indexes of losers were the primary determinants of initiation time and fight duration, whereas for winners muscle metabolic capacities were linked to these fight characteristics. The greater the hepatosomatic index (HSI) of losers, the longer the fight initiation times. Similarly, losers with high HSI and carotenoid levels resisted defeat longer. In winners, initiation time decreased as axial muscle phosphofructokinase levels increased and citrate synthase levels decreased, whereas the metabolic capacities of the pectoral muscle were linked with time to achieve victory. When losers had greater HSI values than the winners of a specific fight, fight initiation was delayed and fights lasted longer. When losers had higher carotenoid levels than winners, fights also lasted longer. On the other hand, when losers had more visceral fat (fat body mass over somatic mass) than winners, both initiation time and combat duration were reduced. These results suggest that male stickleback assess their physiological status and that of their opponents, in particular the HSI, and adjust their combat strategies accordingly. PMID:15778937

  2. Effects of thermo-resistant non-starch polysaccharide degrading multi-enzyme on growth performance, meat quality, relative weights of body organs and blood profile in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi Gheisar, M; Hosseindoust, A; Kim, I H

    2016-06-01

    This research was conducted to study the performance and carcass parameters of broiler chickens fed diets supplemented with heat-treated non-starch polysaccharide degrading enzyme. A total of 432 one-day old Ross 308 broiler chickens were allocated to five treatments: (i) CON (basal diet), (ii) E1: CON + 0.05% multi-enzyme, (iii) E2: CON + 0.1% multi-enzyme, (iv) E3: CON + 0.05% thermo-resistant multi-enzyme and (v) E4: CON + 0.1% thermo-resistant multi-enzyme, each treatment consisted of six replications and 12 chickens in each replication. The chickens were housed in three floor battery cages during 28-day experimental period. On days 1-7, gain in body weight (BWG) improved by feeding the diets supplemented with thermo-resistant multi-enzyme. On days 7-21 and 1-28, chickens fed the diets containing thermo-resistant multi-enzyme showed improved (p < 0.05) BWG and feed conversion ratio (FCR) compared to CON group. Supplementing the diets with multi-enzyme or thermo-resistant multi-enzyme affected the percentage of drip loss on d 1 (p < 0.05). Drip loss percentage on days 3 and 5 and also meat colour were not affected significantly. Supplementing the diets with multi-enzyme or thermo-resistant multi-enzyme did not affect the relative weights of organs but compared to CON group, relative weight of breast muscle increased and abdominal fat decreased (p < 0.05). Among measured blood constituents, chickens fed supplemented diets with thermo-resistant multi-enzyme showed higher (p < 0.05) IgG. Counts of red and white blood cells and lymphocyte percentage were not affected. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that supplementing pelleted diets with thermo-resistant multi-enzyme improved performance of broiler chickens. PMID:26334023

  3. Centrifugally spun starch-based fibers from amylopectin rich starches.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianglong; Chen, Huanhuan; Yang, Bin

    2016-02-10

    Centrifugal spinning and electrospinning have proved to be effective techniques for fabricating micro-to-nanofibers. However, starches of amylopectin content above 65% cannot be fabricated to fiber by electrospinning. This paper is focus on the centrifugal spinnability of amylopectin rich starches. We investigated the amylopectin content of starches by Dual-wavelength colorimetry, studied the rheological properties of starch dopes to determine entanglement concentration (ce) by rotary rheometer. Results indicated that amylopectin rich native corn and potato starches, which with amylopectin content higher than 65%, were suitable for centrifugal spinning to micro-to-nanofibers. Additionally, starch-based fibers were successfully fabricated from the amylose rich corn starch as well. Rheological studies showed that the entanglement concentration (ce) of starch solution was crucial for successful centrifugal spinning. PMID:26686151

  4. Chemical composition and starch digestibility of tortillas prepared with non-conventional commercial nixtamalized maize flours.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Salazar, M; Agama-Acevedo, E; Sáyago-Ayerdi, S G; Tovar, J; Bello-Pérez, L A

    2006-01-01

    Non-conventional nixtamalized maize flours elaborated by a factory in Mexico were used for tortilla preparation. Tortillas were stored at 4 degrees C for up to 72 h and the total starch, available starch, resistant starch and retrograded resistant starch were assessed. The traditional white tortilla, used as a control, showed higher protein and fat contents than blue maize tortilla, whereas a maize-bean mixed tortilla had the highest protein, ash and fat contents. Lower total starch was obtained in the maize-bean tortilla than in white and blue maize tortillas. The available starch content in all tortillas decreased with the cold-storage, although the change was more marked for blue-maize tortillas. The maize-bean mixed tortillas exhibited the lowest in vitro digestibility, which is consistent with the relatively high resistant starch levels in the bean. Differences in resistant starch content were found between the two maize tortillas, which might be related to the softer texture of blue-maize tortilla. The starch digestibility features of these new types of nixtamalized maize flours open up the possibility of producing tortillas with variable nutritional properties. PMID:16849122

  5. Production of an in Vitro Low-Digestible Starch via Hydrothermal Treatment of Amylosucrase-Modified Normal and Waxy Rice Starches and Its Structural Properties.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hyung; Kim, Ha Ram; Choi, Seung Jun; Park, Cheon-Seok; Moon, Tae Wha

    2016-06-22

    We investigated dual modification of normal and waxy rice starch, focusing on digestibility. Amylosucrase (AS) was applied to maximize the slowly digestible and resistant starch fractions. AS-modified starches were adjusted to 25-40% moisture levels and heated at 100 °C for 40 min. AS-modified starches exhibited a B-type crystalline structure, and hydrothermal treatment (HTT) significantly (p < 0.05) increased the relative crystallinity with moisture level. The thermal transition properties of modified starches were also affected by the moisture level. The contents of rapidly digestible starch fraction in AS-modified normal and waxy starches (43.3 ± 3.9 and 18.1 ± 0.6%) decreased to 13.0 ± 1.0 and 0.3 ± 0.3% after HTT, accordingly increasing the low digestible fractions. Although the strengthened crystalline structures of AS-modified starches by HTT were not stable enough to maintain their rigidity under cooking, application of AS and HTT was more effective in waxy rice starch than normal rice starch when lowering digestibility. PMID:27228544

  6. Preparation of slowly digestible sweet potato Daeyumi starch by dual enzyme modification.

    PubMed

    Jo, A Ra; Kim, Ha Ram; Choi, Seung Jun; Lee, Joon Seol; Chung, Mi Nam; Han, Seon Kyeong; Park, Cheon-Seok; Moon, Tae Wha

    2016-06-01

    Sweet potato Daeyumi starch was dually modified using glycogen branching enzyme (BE) from Streptococcus mutans and amylosucrase (AS) from Neisseria polysaccharea to prepare slowly digestible starch (SDS). Dually modified starches had higher SDS and resistant starch (RS) contents than control starch. The branched chain length distributions of the BE-modified starches indicated an increase in short side-chains [degree of polymerization (DP)≤12] compared with native starch. AS treatment of the BE-modified starches decreased the proportion of short side-chains and increased the proportion of long side-chains (DP≥25) and molecular mass. It also resulted in a B-type X-ray diffraction pattern and an increased relative crystallinity. Regarding thermal properties, the BE-modified starches showed no endothermic peak, whereas the BEAS-modified starches had a broader melting temperature range and lower melting enthalpy compared to native starch. The combined enzymatic treatment resulted in novel glucan polymers with slow digestion properties. PMID:27083356

  7. Effect on in vitro starch digestibility of Mexican blue maize anthocyanins.

    PubMed

    Camelo-Méndez, Gustavo A; Agama-Acevedo, Edith; Sanchez-Rivera, Mirna M; Bello-Pérez, Luis A

    2016-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of blue maize extracts obtained by acid-methanol treatment on the nutritional in vitro starch fractions such as: rapidly digestive starch (RDS), slowly digestive starch (SDS) and resistant starch (RS) of native and gelatinized commercial maize starch. Chromatographic analysis (HPLC-DAD/ESI-MS) of blue maize extracts showed the presence of seven anthocyanins, where cyanidin-3-(6″-malonylglucoside) was the main. Blue maize extracts modified nutritional in vitro starch fractions (decrease of RDS) while RS content increased (1.17 and 2.02 times for native and gelatinized commercial maize starch, respectively) when anthocyanins extracts were added to starch up to 75% (starch weight). This preliminary observation provides the basis for further suitability evaluation of blue maize extract as natural starch-modifier by the possible anthocyanins-starch interaction. Anthocyanin extracts can be a suitable to produce functional foods with higher RS content with potential human health benefits. PMID:27283633

  8. Physicochemical properties of flours and starches derived from traditional Indonesian tubers and roots.

    PubMed

    Aprianita, Aprianita; Vasiljevic, Todor; Bannikova, Anna; Kasapis, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Flours and starches isolated from traditional tubers and roots grown in Indonesia have physical and chemical properties suitable for certain food applications. Compared to other flour samples, cassava and canna flours contained the highest amount of total starch (TS) (77.4 and 77.1 %, respectively). Taro starch had the lowest amount of TS among other starch samples with 75.4 %. The highest amount of amylose was observed from yam and canna flours (25.2 and 23.2 %, respectively). Among starch samples, canna starch contained the highest amylose content (30.4 %), while taro had the lowest (7.6 %). In terms of protein content, arrowroot flour had the highest amount (7.7 %), in contrast to cassava flour which had the lowest (1.5 %). Compared to other flours, canna and konjac flour were the most slowly digested which indicated by their high amount of resistant starch (RS). Canna starch had the highest swelling power and viscosity than other starches and flours. The clearest paste was observed from cassava flour and starch as opposed to konjac starch which was the most opaque paste. PMID:25477633

  9. Polymeric tannins significantly alter properties and in vitro digestibility of partially gelatinized intact starch granule.

    PubMed

    Amoako, Derrick B; Awika, Joseph M

    2016-10-01

    Excess calorie intake is a growing global problem. This study investigated effect of complexing partially gelatinized starch with condensed tannins on in vitro starch digestibility. Extracts from tannin and non-tannin sorghum, and cellulose control, were reacted with normal and waxy maize starch in 30% (30E) and 50% ethanol (50E) solutions at 70°C/20min. More tannins complexed with the 30E than 50E starches (mean 6.2 vs 3.5mg/g, respectively). In the 30E treatments, tannins significantly increased crystallinity, pasting temperature, peak viscosity, and slow digesting starch (from 100 to 274mg/g) in normal, but not waxy starch, suggesting intragranular cross-linking with amylose. Tannins doubled resistant starch (RS) to approx. 300mg/g in both starches. In 50E treatments, tannins made both maize starches behave like raw potato starch (>90% RS), suggesting granule surface interactions dominated. Non-tannin treatments generally behaved similar to cellulose. Condensed tannins could be used to favorably alter starch digestion profile. PMID:27132818

  10. Structural properties of hydrolyzed high-amylose rice starch by α-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Fengling; Man, Jianmin; Xu, Bin; Hu, Maozhi; Gu, Minghong; Liu, Qiaoquan; Wei, Cunxu

    2011-12-14

    High-amylose cereal starch has a great benefit on human health through its resistant starch (RS) content. Enzyme hydrolysis of native starch is very helpful in understanding the structure of starch granules and utilizing them. In this paper, native starch granules were isolated from a transgenic rice line (TRS) enriched with amylose and RS and hydrolyzed by α-amylase. Structural properties of hydrolyzed TRS starches were studied by X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared, and differential scanning calorimetry. The A-type polymorph of TRS C-type starch was hydrolyzed faster than the B-type polymorph, but the crystallinity did not significantly change during enzyme hydrolysis. The degree of order in the external region of starch granule increased with increasing enzyme hydrolysis time. The amylose content decreased at first and then went back up during enzyme hydrolysis. The hydrolyzed starches exhibited increased onset and peak gelatinization temperatures and decreased gelatinization enthalpy on hydrolysis. These results suggested that the B-type polymorph and high amylose that formed the double helices and amylose-lipid complex increased the resistance to BAA hydrolysis. Furthermore, the spectrum results of RS from TRS native starch digested by pancreatic α-amylase and amyloglucosidase also supported the above conclusion. PMID:22059442

  11. Development of maize starch granules

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize kernels of self-pollinated inbred line B73 harvested on various days after pollination (DAP) were subjected for starch granule development studies. Starch in endosperms was first observed on 6 DAP. A small amount of starch granules (<2% of dry weight) was found in the endosperm on 12 DAP. S...

  12. Rheological and biochemical properties of Solanum lycocarpum starch.

    PubMed

    Di-Medeiros, Maria Carolina B; Pascoal, Aline M; Batista, Karla A; Bassinello, Priscila Z; Lião, Luciano M; Leles, Maria Inês G; Fernandes, Kátia F

    2014-04-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the rheological and physicochemical properties of Solanum lycocarpum starch. The thermogravimetric analysis of S. lycocarpum starch showed a typical three-step weight loss pattern. Microscopy revealed significant changes in the granule morphology after hydrothermal treatment. Samples hydrothermally treated at 50°C for 10 min lost 52% of their crystallinity, which was recovered after storage for 7 days at 4°C. However, samples hydrothermally treated at 65°C were totally amorphous. This treatment was sufficient to completely disrupt the starch granule, as evidenced by the absence of an endothermic peak in the DSC thermogram. The RVA of S. lycocarpum starch revealed 4440.7cP peak viscosity, 2660.5cP breakdown viscosity, 2414.1cP final viscosity, 834.3cP setback viscosity, and a pasting temperature of 49.6°C. The low content of resistant starch (10.25%) and high content of digestible starch (89.78%) in S. lycocarpum suggest that this starch may be a good source for the production of hydrolysates, such as glucose syrup and its derivatives. PMID:24607161

  13. Resistance to moist conditions of whey protein isolate and pea starch biodegradable films and low density polyethylene nondegradable films: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehyar, G. F.; Bawab, A. Al

    2015-10-01

    Biodegradable packaging materials are degraded under the natural environmental conditions. Therefore using them could alleviate the problem of plastics accumulation in nature. For effective replacement of plastics, with biodegradable materials, biodegradable packages should keep their properties under the high relative humidity (RH) conditions. Therefore the objectives of the study were to develop biodegradable packaging material based on whey protein isolate (WPI) and pea starch (PS). To study their mechanical, oxygen barrier and solubility properties under different RHs compared with those of low density polyethylene (LDPE), the most used plastic in packaging. Films of WPI and PS were prepared separately and conditioned at different RH (30-90%) then their properties were studied. At low RHs (<50%), WPI films had 2-3 times lower elongation at break (E or stretchability) than PS and LDPE. Increasing RH to 90% significantly (P<0.01) increased the elongation of PS but not WPI and LDPE films. LDPE and WPI films kept significantly (P<0.01) higher tensile strength (TS) than PS films at high RH (90%). Oxygen permeability (OP) of all films was very low (<0.5 cm3 μm m-2 d-1 kPa-1) below 40% RH but increased for PS films and became significantly (P<0.01) different than that of LDPE and WPI at > 40% RH. Oxygen permeability of WPI and LDPE did not adversely affected by increasing RH to 65%. Furthermore, WPI and LDPE films had lower degree of hydration at 50% and 90% RH and total soluble matter than PS films. These results suggest that WPI could be successfully replacing LDPE in packaging of moist products.

  14. SURFACE PROPERTIES OF WATER SOLUBLE STARCH, STARCH ACETATES AND STARCH ACETATES/ALKENYLSUCCINATES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface and interfacial tensions with hexadecane were measured for starch and water soluble starch ester solutions in order to determine their potential as stabilizers or emulsifiers. The surface tension for an acid hydrolysed starch (maltodextrin) initially declined with concentration and then rea...

  15. Youth and Parental Attitudes toward Fighting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Barry S.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Wright, Joseph; Cheng, Tina L.

    2008-01-01

    Certain parenting behaviors have been linked with youth aggression and violence, but less is known about whether parents' attitudes toward fighting are a risk factor for children's aggressive behavior problems and future injury risk. Social cognitive theory suggests that parents' beliefs about fighting and retaliation may influence their…

  16. Resistant Starch and Starch-Derived Oligosaccharides as Prebiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam-Perrot, A.; Gutton, L.; Sanders, L.; Bouvier, S.; Combe, C.; van den Abbeele, R.; Potter, S.; Einerhand, A. W. C.

    Dietary fiber has long been recommended as part of a healthy diet based on the observations made by Burkitt and Trowell (1975). Since then, epidemiological evidence has consistently shown that populations consuming higher levels of foods containing fiber have decreased risk of a variety of chronic health disorders such as cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes, and certain cancers. Average fiber intake in the United States is approximately 13 g/day for women and 18 g/day for men (National Academy of Sciences, 2006). The FDA recommends a minimum of 20-35 g/day for a healthy adult depending on calorific intake. In many EU countries including France, Germany and the UK (see Figure 9.1 ), fiber intakes are much lower than authorities recommend for men and women (Buttriss and Stokes, 2008; Gray, 2006). Thus, there is a need to increase fiber consumption and many newly isolated or developed fibers can easily be added to beverages and processed foods. The reasons for such low compliance is somewhat complex, however the most basic rationale for not consuming fiber-rich foods is perceived bad taste and mouthfeel and the availability of conventional food items containing fiber.

  17. Fighting pollution in Viet Nam.

    PubMed

    Roodman, D M

    1999-01-01

    This article investigates the fighting solution strategies in Vietnam where complaints against factories violating national pollution standards are common. Based on history, the people in Vietnam have been suffering from pollution of all sorts including air, land, water and noise. Precisely, their interaction with one another has been affected by how they interact with the natural environment and community. This worsening situation in the country gave rise to public criticisms, a foot in a door that opens different forms of people participation in the decision-making of the government. Although factories were not so much affected with public criticisms, yet public pressure played a significant role in increasing the compliance of many companies. The strategy adopted in Vietnam may be a powerful force for protecting the Vietnamese against pollution. PMID:12295336

  18. Fire Fighting from High Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent; Ambrosia, Vince

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on high altitude fire fighting is shown. The topics include: 1) Yellowstone Fire - 1988; 2) 2006 Western States Fire Mission Over-View; 3) AMS-Wildfire Scanner; 4) October 24-25 Mission: Yosemite NP and NF; 5) October 24-25 Mission MODIS Overpass; 6) October 24-25 Mission Highlights; 7) October 28-29 Mission Esperanza Fire, California; 8) Response to the Esperanza Fire in Southern California -- Timeline Oct 27-29 2006; 9) October 28-29 Mission Esperanza Fire Altair Flight Routing; 10) October 28-29 Mission Esperanza Fire Altair Over-Flights; 11) October 28-29 Mission Highlights; 12) Results from the Esperanza Fire Response; 13) 2007 Western States Fire Mission; and 14) Western States UAS Fire Mission 2007

  19. Structure and Functional Properties of Sorghum Starches Differing in Amylose Content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorghum is an important cereal grain due to its drought-resistance and relative low cost. Starch is the major component of grain sorghum, and comprises ~70% of dry grain weight. Many important physicochemical, thermal, and rheological properties of starch are influenced by the ratio of amylose and ...

  20. Nutritionally-important starch fractions of rice cultivars grown in southern United States.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary starches can be classified into three major fractions, according to in vitro digestibility: rapidly digestible (RDS), slowly digestible (SDS), and resistant starch (RS). Literature indicates that SDS and/or RS have significant implications on human health, particularly, glucose metabolism, ...

  1. RHEOLOGY OF STARCH-LIPID COMPOSITES YOGURTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yogurt is traditionally made by fermenting liquid milk. The ability of starches to thicken, gel, and hold water has been exploited in yogurt manufacture. The addition of starch increases the viscosity of yogurt, but some starches impart an undesirable taste and promote phase separation. Starch-li...

  2. Preparation and characterization of dry method esterified starch/polylactic acid composite materials.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yingfeng; Gu, Jiyou; Yang, Long; Qiao, Zhibang; Tan, Haiyan; Zhang, Yanhua

    2014-03-01

    Corn starch and maleic anhydride were synthesized from a maleic anhydride esterified starch by dry method. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used for the qualitative analysis of the esterified starches. The reaction efficiency of dry method esterified starch reached 92.34%. The dry method esterified starch was blended with polylactic acid (PLA), and the mixture was melted and extruded to produce the esterified starch/polylactic acid (ES/PLA) composites. The degree of crystallinity of the ES/PLA was lower than that of the NS/PLA, indicating that the relative dependence between these two components of starch and polylactic acid was enhanced. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that the dry method esterified starch increased the two-phase interface compatibility of the composites, thereby improving the tensile strength, bending strength, and elongation at break of the ES/PLA composite. The introduction of a hydrophobic ester bond and increase in interface compatibility led to an increase in ES/PLA water resistance. Melt index determination results showed that starch esterification modification had improved the melt flow properties of starch/PLA composite material. Strain scanning also showed that the compatibility of ES/PLA was increased. While frequency scanning showed that the storage modulus and complex viscosity of ES/PLA was less than that of NS/PLA. PMID:24315947

  3. Morphology and structural properties of high-amylose rice starch residues hydrolysed by amyloglucosidase.

    PubMed

    Man, Jianmin; Yang, Yang; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Changquan; Zhang, Fengmin; Wang, Youping; Gu, Minghong; Liu, Qiaoquan; Wei, Cunxu

    2013-06-15

    High-amylose starches are attracting considerable attention because of their potential health benefits and industrial uses. Enzyme hydrolysis of starch is involved in many biological and industrial processes. In this paper, starches were isolated from high-amylose transgenic rice (TRS) and its wild type rice, Te-qing (TQ). The morphological and structural changes of starch residues following Aspergillus niger amyloglucosidase (AAG) hydrolysis were investigated. AAG hydrolysed TQ starch from the granule surface, and TRS starch from the granule interior. During AAG hydrolysis, the content of amorphous structure increased, the contents of ordered structure and single helix decreased, and gelatinisation enthalpy decreased in TQ and TRS starch residues. The A-type polymorph of TRS C-type starch was hydrolysed faster than the B-type polymorph. The short-range ordered structure and B-type polymorph in the peripheral region of the subgranule and the surrounding band of TRS starch increased the resistance of TRS starch to AAG hydrolysis. PMID:23497862

  4. Effect of heat-moisture treatment on the structural, physicochemical, and rheological characteristics of arrowroot starch.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Larissa S; Moraes, Jaqueline; Albano, Kivia M; Telis, Vânia R N; Franco, Célia M L

    2016-04-01

    The effect of heat-moisture treatment on structural, physicochemical, and rheological characteristics of arrowroot starch was investigated. Heat-moisture treatment was performed with starch samples conditioned to 28% moisture at 100 ℃ for 2, 4, 8, and 16 h. Structural and physicochemical characterization of native and modified starches, as well as rheological assays with gels of native and 4 h modified starches subjected to acid and sterilization stresses were performed. Arrowroot starch had 23.1% of amylose and a CA-type crystalline pattern that changed over the treatment time to A-type. Modified starches had higher pasting temperature and lower peak viscosity while breakdown viscosity practically disappeared, independently of the treatment time. Gelatinization temperature and crystallinity increased, while enthalpy, swelling power, and solubility decreased with the treatment. Gels from modified starches, independently of the stress conditions, were found to have more stable apparent viscosities and higher G' and G″ than gels from native starch. Heat-moisture treatment caused a reorganization of starch chains that increased molecular interactions. This increase resulted in higher paste stability and strengthened gels that showed higher resistance to shearing and heat, even after acid or sterilization conditions. A treatment time of 4 h was enough to deeply changing the physicochemical properties of starch. PMID:26163566

  5. Intactness of cell wall structure controls the in vitro digestion of starch in legumes.

    PubMed

    Dhital, Sushil; Bhattarai, Rewati R; Gorham, John; Gidley, Michael J

    2016-03-16

    Increasing the level of starch that is not digested by the end of the small intestine and therefore enters the colon ('resistant starch') is a major opportunity for improving the nutritional profile of foods. One mechanism that has been shown to be successful is entrapment of starch within an intact plant tissue structure. However, the level of tissue intactness required for resistance to amylase digestion has not been defined. In this study, intact cells were isolated from a range of legumes after thermal treatment at 60 °C (starch not gelatinised) or 95 °C (starch gelatinised) followed by hydrolysis using pancreatic alpha amylase. It was found that intact cells, isolated at either temperature, were impervious to amylase. However, application of mechanical force damaged the cell wall and made starch accessible to digestive enzymes. This shows that the access of enzymes to the entrapped swollen starch is the rate limiting step controlling hydrolysis of starch in cooked legumes. The results suggest that a single cell wall could be sufficient to provide an effective delivery of starch to the large intestine with consequent nutritional benefits, provided that mechanical damage during digestion is avoided. PMID:26786854

  6. Comparison of pasting and gel stabilities of waxy and normal starches from potato, maize, and rice with those of a novel waxy cassava starch under thermal, chemical, and mechanical stress.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Teresa; Dufour, Dominique; Moreno, Isabel Ximena; Ceballos, Hernán

    2010-04-28

    Functional properties of normal and waxy starches from maize, rice, potato, and cassava as well as the modified waxy maize starch COLFLO 67 were compared. The main objective of this study is to position the recently discovered spontaneous mutation for amylose-free cassava starch in relation to the other starches with well-known characteristics. Paste clarity, wavelength of maximum absorption (lambda(max)), pasting properties, swelling power, solubility, and dispersed volume fraction measurements and gel stability (acid and alkaline resistance, shear, refrigeration, and freeze/thaw stability) were evaluated in the different types and sources of starch included in this study. lambda(max) in the waxy cassava starch was reduced considerably in comparison with that of normal cassava starch (535 vs 592 nm). RVA peak viscosity of waxy cassava starch was larger than in normal cassava starch (1119 vs 937 cP) and assumed a position intermediate between the waxy potato and maize starches. Acid, alkaline, and shear stability of waxy cassava starch were similar to normal cassava except for alkaline pH, at which it showed a low effect. Gels from normal root and tuber starches after refrigeration and freeze/thaw had lower syneresis than cereal starches. Gels from waxy starches (except for potato) did not present any syneresis after 5 weeks of storage at 4 degrees C. Waxy cassava starch was the only one not showing any syneresis after 5 weeks of storage at -20 degrees C. Natural waxy cassava starch is, therefore, a promising ingredient to formulate refrigerated or frozen food. PMID:20356303

  7. Enzymatically hydrolysed, acetylated and dually modified corn starch: physico-chemical, rheological and nutritional properties and effects on cake quality.

    PubMed

    Sahnoun, Mouna; Ismail, Nouha; Kammoun, Radhouane

    2016-01-01

    Corn starch was treated by enzymatic hydrolysis with Aspergillus oryzae S2 α-amylase, acetylation with vinyl acetate, and dual modification. The dual modified starch displayed a higher substitution degree than the acetylated starch and lower reducing sugar content than the hydrolysed starch. The results revealed that the cooling viscosity and amylose content of those products decrease (P < 0.05). An increase in moisture, water, and oil absorption capacity was observed for the acetylated starch and, which was less pronounced for the enzymatically hydrolysed starch but more pronounced for the enzymatically hydrolysed acetylated product. The latter product underwent an increase in resistant starch content, which is induced by a rise in hydrolysis time to attain about 67 % after 1 h of reaction. The modified starch samples were added to cake formulations at 5 and 10 % concentrations on a wheat flour basis and compared to native starch. The results revealed that when applied at 5 % concentrations, the modified starches reduced the hardness, cohesion, adhesion and chewiness of baked cakes and enhanced their elasticity, volume, height, crust color, and appearance as compared to native starch. These effects were more pronounced for the cake incorporating the dually modified starch. PMID:26787967

  8. Slowly digestible waxy maize starch prepared by octenyl succinic anhydride esterification and heat-moisture treatment: glycemic response and mechanism.

    PubMed

    He, Jinhua; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Genyi

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism and molecular structure of the slowly digestible waxy maize starch prepared by octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA) esterification and heat-moisture treatment were investigated. The in vitro Englyst test showed a proportion of 28.3% slowly digestible starch (SDS) when waxy maize starch was esterified with 3% OSA (starch weight based, and it is named OSA-starch), and a highest SDS content of 42.8% was obtained after OSA-starch (10% moisture) was further heated at 120 degrees C for 4 h (named HOSA-starch). The in vivo glycemic response of HOSA-starch, which showed a delayed appearance of blood glucose peak and a significant reduction (32.2%) of the peak glucose concentration, further confirmed its slow digestion property. Amylopectin debranching analysis revealed HOSA-starch had the highest resistance to debranching enzymes of isoamylase and pullulanase, and a simultaneous decrease of K m and V m (enzyme kinetics) was also shown when HOSA-starch was digested by either alpha-amylase or amyloglucosidase, indicating that the slow digestion of HOSA-starch resulted from an uncompetitive inhibition of enzyme activity during digestion. Size exclusion chromatography analysis of HOSA-starch showed fragmented amylopectin molecules with more nonreducing ends that are favorable for RS conversion to SDS by the action of amyloglucosidase in the Englyst test. Further solubility analysis indicates that the water-insolubility of HOSA-starch is caused by OSA-mediated cross-linking of amylopectin and the hydrophobic interaction between OSA-modified starch molecules. The water-insolubility of HOSA-starch would decrease its enzyme accessibility, and the digestion products with attached OSA molecules might also directly act as the uncompetitive inhibitor to reduce the enzyme activity leading to a slow digestion of HOSA-starch. PMID:18067261

  9. Prebiotics to fight diseases: reality or fiction?

    PubMed

    Di Bartolomeo, F; Startek, J B; Van den Ende, W

    2013-10-01

    Bacteria living in the gastrointestinal tract are crucial for human health and disease occurrence. Increasing the beneficial intestinal microflora by consumption of prebiotics, which are 'functional foods', could be an elegant way to limit the number and incidence of disorders and to recover from dysbiosis or antibiotic treatments. This review focuses on the short-chain low-digestible carbohydrates (LDCs) which are metabolized by gut microbiota serving as energy source, immune system enhancers or facilitators of mineral uptake. Intake of foods containing LDCs can improve the state of health and may prevent diseases as for example certain forms of cancer. Given the large number of different molecules belonging to LDCs, we focused our attention on fructans (inulin, fructo-oligosaccharides), galacto-oligosaccharides and resistant starches and their therapeutic and protective applications. Evidence is accumulating that LDCs can inhibit bacterial and viral infections by modulating host defense responses and by changing the interactions between pathogenic and beneficial bacteria. Animal studies and studies on small groups of human subjects suggest that LDCs might help to counteract colorectal cancer, diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The action mechanisms of LDCs in the human body might be broader than originally thought, perhaps also including reactive oxygen species scavenging and signaling events. PMID:23280537

  10. Starch Suspensions with Different Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Melody; Melville, Audrey; Dijksman, Joshua; Behringer, Robert

    2014-03-01

    A suspension made of starch particles dispersed in water displays significant non-Newtonian behavior for high enough particulate concentration. This surprising behavior has recently inspired a series of experiments that have shed much light on the possible mechanism behind this phenomenon. In our studies we assess the role of the fluid phase in these suspensions. We find that using fluids other than water can significantly alter the behavior of starch suspensions. Through mechanical tests of various kinds, we assess the interaction between starch particles and different liquids, and how this interaction affects the non-Newtonian behavior of starch suspensions.

  11. Extrusion induced low-order starch matrices: Enzymic hydrolysis and structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Dhital, Sushil; Flanagan, Bernadine M; Luckman, Paul; Halley, Peter J; Gidley, Michael J

    2015-12-10

    Waxy, normal and highwaymen maize starches were extruded with water as sole plasticizer to achieve low-order starch matrices. Of the three starches, we found that only high-amylose extrudate showed lower digestion rate/extent than starches cooked in excess water. The ordered structure of high-amylose starches in cooked and extruded forms was similar, as judged by NMR, XRD and DSC techniques, but enzyme resistance was much greater for extruded forms. Size exclusion chromatography suggested that longer chains were involved in enzyme resistance. We propose that the local molecular density of packing of amylose chains can control the digestion kinetics rather than just crystallinity, with the principle being that density sufficient to either prevent/limit binding and/or slow down catalysis can be achieved by dense amorphous packing. PMID:26428150

  12. The Fight against the Cigarette Epidemic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginzel, K. H.

    1988-01-01

    Analyzes progress in the fight against the "cigarette epidemic," presents evidence relating smoking to cancer, and provides suggestions for citizen action to curb cigarette-smoking and to prevent children from developing the habit. (LS)

  13. It’s War Out There: Fighting for life with xenobiotic degrading enzymes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It’s War Out There: Fighting for life with xenobiotic degrading enzymes Beta-lactamase enzymes are well studied because of their tremendous impact on medicine. Their prominent role is in resistance to beta-lactam (four membered lactam ring) antibiotics including the first and most famous fungally d...

  14. THERMOMECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF COMPRESSION MOLDED STARCH AND PROTEIN BLENDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One result of the rising costs of petroleum-derived plastic resins is increasing demand for biodegradable products. The main problem with using agriculture-derived biodegradable materials, based on blends of protein and starch, is their limited physical properties; such as, poor stress resistance, ...

  15. Preparation, structure, and digestibility of crystalline A- and B-type aggregates from debranched waxy starches.

    PubMed

    Cai, Liming; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2014-05-25

    Highly crystalline A- and B-type aggregates were prepared from short linear α-1,4 glucans generated from completely debranched waxy maize and waxy potato starches by manipulating the chain length and crystallization conditions including starch solids concentration and crystallization temperature. The A-type crystalline products were more resistant to enzyme digestion than the B-type crystalline products, and the digestibility of the A- and B-type allomorphs was not correlated with the size of the aggregates formed. Annealing increased the peak melting temperature of the B-type crystallites, making it similar to that of the A-type crystallites, but did not improve the enzyme resistance of the B-type crystalline products. The possible reason for these results was due to the compact morphology as well as the denser packing pattern of double helices in A-type crystallites. Our observations counter the fact that most B-type native starches are more enzyme-resistant than A-type native starches. Crystalline type per se does not seem to be the key factor that controls the digestibility of native starch granules; the resistance of native starches with a B-type X-ray diffraction pattern is probably attributed to the other structural features in starch granules. PMID:24708989

  16. Starch graft poly(methyl acrylate) loose-fill foam: preparation, properties and degradation.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Gordon, S H; Imam, S H

    2004-01-01

    Starch graft poly(methyl acrylate) (S-g-PMA) was prepared by ceric ion initiation of methyl acrylate in an aqueous corn starch slurry (prime starch) which maximized the accessibility of the starch for graft polymerization. A new ceric ion reaction sequence was established as starch-initiator-methyl acrylate followed by addition of a small amount of ceric ion solution when the graft polymerization was almost complete to quench the reaction. As a result of this improved procedure, no unreacted methyl acrylate monomer remained, and thus, essentially no ungrafted poly(methyl acrylate) homopolymer was formed in the final grafted product. Quantities of the high purity S-g-PMA so prepared in pilot scale were converted to resin pellets and loose-fill foam by single screw and twin screw extrusion. The use of prime starch significantly improved the physical properties of the final loose-fill foam, in comparison to foam produced from regular dry corn starch. The S-g-PMA loose-fill foam had compressive strength and resiliency comparable to expanded polystyrene but higher bulk density. The S-g-PMA loose-fill foam also had better moisture and water resistance than other competitive starch-based materials. Studies indicated that the starch portion in S-g-PMA loose-fill foam biodegraded rapidly, whereas poly(methyl acrylate) remained relatively stable under natural environmental conditions. PMID:14715032

  17. Responsive starch-based materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch, a low-cost, annually renewable resource, is naturally hydrophilic and its properties change with relative humidity. Starch’s hygroscopic nature can be used to develop materials which change shape or volume in response to environmental changes (e.g. humidity). For example, starch-based graf...

  18. Starch-filled polymer composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report describes the development of degradable polymer composites that can be made at room temperature without special equipments. The developed composites are made from ethyl cyanoacrylate and starch. The polymer composites produced by this procedure contain 60 wt% of starch with compressive s...

  19. Brucite nanoplate reinforced starch bionanocomposites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper the mechanical reinforcement in a series of bionanocomposites films based on starch and nano-sized brucite, Mg(OH)2, was investigated. Brucite nanoplates with an aspect ratio of 9.25 were synthesized by wet precipitation and incorporated into starch matrices at different concentrations...

  20. Starch Applications for Delivery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jason

    2013-03-01

    Starch is one of the most abundant and economical renewable biopolymers in nature. Starch molecules are high molecular weight polymers of D-glucose linked by α-(1,4) and α-(1,6) glycosidic bonds, forming linear (amylose) and branched (amylopectin) structures. Octenyl succinic anhydride modified starches (OSA-starch) are designed by carefully choosing a proper starch source, path and degree of modification. This enables emulsion and micro-encapsulation delivery systems for oil based flavors, micronutrients, fragrance, and pharmaceutical actives. A large percentage of flavors are encapsulated by spray drying in today's industry due to its high throughput. However, spray drying encapsulation faces constant challenges with retention of volatile compounds, oxidation of sensitive compound, and manufacturing yield. Specialty OSA-starches were developed suitable for the complex dynamics in spray drying and to provide high encapsulation efficiency and high microcapsule quality. The OSA starch surface activity, low viscosity and film forming capability contribute to high volatile retention and low active oxidation. OSA starches exhibit superior performance, especially in high solids and high oil load encapsulations compared with other hydrocolloids. The submission is based on research and development of Ingredion

  1. Impact of amylose content on starch physicochemical properties in transgenic sweet potato.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenzhi; Yang, Jun; Hong, Yan; Liu, Guiling; Zheng, Jianli; Gu, Zhengbiao; Zhang, Peng

    2015-05-20

    The intrinsic relationship between amylose content and starch physicochemical properties was studied using six representative starch samples (amylose content 0-65%) produced from transgenic sweet potato (cultivar Xushu22). The transgenic lines (waxy and high-amylose) and wild-type (WT) sweet potatoes were analyzed for amylose content, particle size and chain length distribution, X-ray diffraction analysis, thermal characteristics, pasting and rheological property. Compared to the WT starch, the waxy and high-amylose starches showed larger average granule sizes and had fewer short chains and more medium and long chains. X-ray diffractogram analysis revealed that high-amylose starches show a type-B crystal form with a markedly decreased degree of crystallinity in contrast to the type-A crystal form of the WT and waxy starches. In the high-amylose sweet potato starches, the rise of setback value and the reduction of breakdown value led to the high shear resistance as indicated by the higher G', G", and tanδ from the oscillation test. ΔH was not found to be decreased with the reduction of crystallinity. The shear stress resistance of starch gel after gelatinization was also enhanced as amylose content increased. Principal component analysis also confirmed that the amylose content greatly influenced the starch structure and properties, e.g., storage modulus, setback value, and average chain length. Thus, our study not only shed light on how amylose content affects starch properties but also identified novel starches that are available for various applications. PMID:25817686

  2. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ORIENTED HIGH AMYLOSE STARCH FILMS: ORIENTATION BY DRAWING OF STARCH TRIACETATES FOLLOWED BY DEACETYLATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of orientation on the properties of starch films was studied in order to determine if film strength, flexibility and water resistance could be improved. High amylose (70%) cornstarch was peracetylated, cast into films, stretched in hot glycerol 1-5 times the original length and deacetyla...

  3. Fighting Like a Girl Fighting Like a Guy: Gender Identity, Ideology, and Girls at Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lyn Mikel; Tappan, Mark B.

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter we explore the phenomenon of "girls fighting like guys" by listening to adolescent girls' justification for physical fighting with other girls. We argue that physical girlfighting is a particular kind of gendered performance--a performance of identity that expresses, at least in part, an answer to the question, "Who am I?"--that…

  4. The Fighting Phenomenon: What It Means to Be a Girl Who Fights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seibert, Maureen Louise

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate why girls in an urban high school setting engage in physical fights in order to better understand the female student's mindset about fighting. A search of ERIC, Sociological Abstracts, Psychological Abstracts, Dissertation Abstracts and dissertations was conducted to review research in the following…

  5. Removal of both cationic and anionic contaminants by amphoteric starch.

    PubMed

    Peng, Huanlong; Zhong, Songxiong; Lin, Qintie; Yao, Xiaosheng; Liang, Zhuoying; Yang, Muqun; Yin, Guangcai; Liu, Qianjun; He, Hongfei

    2016-03-15

    A novel amphoteric starch incorporating quaternary ammonium and phosphate groups was applied to investigate the efficiency and mechanism of cationic and anionic contaminant treatment. Its flocculation abilities for kaolin suspension and copper-containing wastewater were evaluated by turbidity reduction and copper removal efficiency, respectively. And the kinetics of formation, breakage and subsequent re-formation of aggregates were monitored using a Photometric Dispersion Analyzer (PDA) and characterized by flocculation index (FI). The results showed that amphoteric starch possessed the advantages of being lower-dosages-consuming and being stronger in shear resistance than cationic starch, and exhibited a good flocculation efficiency over a wide pH range from 3.0 to 11.0. PMID:26794754

  6. Mixed biopolymer systems based on starch.

    PubMed

    Abd Elgadir, M; Akanda, Md Jahurul Haque; Ferdosh, Sahena; Mehrnoush, Amid; Karim, Alias A; Noda, Takahiro; Sarker, Md Zaidul Islam

    2012-01-01

    A binary mixture of starch-starch or starch with other biopolymers such as protein and non-starch polysaccharides could provide a new approach in producing starch-based food products. In the context of food processing, a specific adjustment in the rheological properties plays an important role in regulating production processing and optimizing the applicability, stability, and sensory of the final food products. This review examines various biopolymer mixtures based on starch and the influence of their interaction on physicochemical and rheological properties of the starch-based foods. It is evident that the physicochemical and rheological characteristics of the biopolymers mixture are highly dependent on the type of starch and other biopolymers that make them up mixing ratios, mixing procedure and presence of other food ingredients in the mixture. Understanding these properties will lead to improve the formulation of starch-based foods and minimize the need to resort to chemically modified starch. PMID:22231495

  7. Powder and compaction characteristics of pregelatinized starches.

    PubMed

    Rojas, J; Uribe, Y; Zuluaga, A

    2012-06-01

    Pregelatinized starch is widely used as a pharmaceutical aid, especially as a filler-binder. It is known that the tableting performance of excipients could be affected by their source. The aim of this study was to evaluate the powder and tableting properties of pregelatinized starches obtained from yucca, corn and rice and compare those properties with those of Starch 1500. This material had the lowest particle size, and porosity and largest density and best flow. However, yucca starch and corn starch showed an irregular granule morphology, better compactibility and compressibility than Starch 1500. Their onset of plastic deformation and their strain rate sensitivity was comparable to that of Starch 1500. These two materials showed compact disintegration slower that Starch 1500. Conversely, rice starch showed a high elasticity, and friability, low compactibility, which are undesirable for direct compression. This study demonstrated the potential use of pregelatinized starches, especially those obtained from yucca and corn as direct compression filler-binders. PMID:22822539

  8. Biodegradation of starch films: the roles of molecular and crystalline structure.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Witt, Torsten; Xie, Fengwei; Warren, Frederick J; Halley, Peter J; Gilbert, Robert G

    2015-05-20

    The influences of molecular, crystalline and granular structures on the biodegradability of compression-molded starch films were investigated. Fungal α-amylase was used as model degradation agent. The substrates comprised varied starch structures obtained by different degrees of acid hydrolysis, different granular sizes using size fractionation, and different degrees of crystallinity by aging for different times (up to 14 days). Two stages are identified for unretrograded films by fitting degradation data using first-order kinetics. Starch films containing larger molecules were degraded faster, but the rate coefficient was independent of the granule size. Retrograded films were degraded much slower than unretrograded ones, with a similar rate coefficient to that in the second stage of unretrograded films. Although initially the smaller molecules or the easily accessible starch chains on the amorphous film surface were degraded faster, the more ordered structure (resistant starch) formed from retrogradation, either before or during enzymatic degradation, strongly inhibits film biodegradation. PMID:25817650

  9. In-vitro digestibility, rheology, structure, and functionality of RS3 from oat starch.

    PubMed

    Shah, Asima; Masoodi, Farooq Ahmad; Gani, Adil; Ashwar, Bilal Ahmad

    2016-12-01

    Starches isolated from three different varieties of oat were modified with dual autoclaving-retrogradation treatment to make modified food starches with high contents of type 3 resistant starch (RS3). FT-IR spectroscopy showed increase in the ratio of intensity of 1047cm(-1)/1022cm(-1) on treatment. Morphology of the oat starches changed into a continuous network with increased values for onset temperature (To), peak temperature (Tp), and conclusion temperature (Tc). XRD showed an additional peak at 13° and increase in peak intensity at 20° inclusive of the major X-ray diffraction peaks which reflects formation of amylose-lipid complex from dual autoclaving-retrogradation cycle. Peaks at 13° and 20° are the typical peaks of the V-type pattern. Rheological analysis suggested that retrogradated oat starches showed shear thickening behavior as revealed from Herschel-Bulkely model and frequency sweep. PMID:27374592

  10. Child Soldiers: Children Associated with Fighting Forces.

    PubMed

    Song, Suzan J; de Jong, Joop

    2015-10-01

    Around the world, there are an estimated 300,000 to 500,000 children involved in armed conflict. Children can be abducted into a fighting force to fight or serve as sex slaves. Child soldiers have depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress symptoms; however, evidence is mixed because of methodologic limitations. Various mental health interventions have been tried, with promising results. Child and adolescent psychiatrists are uniquely trained in understanding and assisting youth to heal from such extraordinary experiences. A public health paradigm could include interventions that are based on a comprehensive assessment of interweaving developmental, biological, psychological, and sociocultural factors. PMID:26346388

  11. Effects of granule swelling on starch saccharification by granular starch hydrolyzing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaofeng; Cai, Liming; Gu, Zhengbiao; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2014-08-13

    The effects of granule swelling on enzymatic saccharification of normal corn starch by granular starch hydrolyzing enzyme were investigated. After swelling, Km values for the saccharification of granular starch decreased compared with native granular starch, indicating that granule swelling caused granular starch hydrolyzing enzyme to have higher affinity for starch granules. The partial swelling of starch granules enhanced starch saccharification. Furthermore, the enhancement at an earlier stage of enzymatic reaction was much more significant than that at later stages. For granular starch pretreated at 67.5 °C for 30 min, conversions to glucose after incubation with the enzyme at 32 °C for 4 and 24 h were approximately 3-fold and 26% higher than for native granular starch, respectively. As a result, proper heat pretreatment of granular starch before simultaneous saccharification and fermentation has great potential to facilitate industrial production of ethanol by use of granular starch hydrolyzing enzyme. PMID:25039418

  12. Prebiotic properties of potato starch dextrins.

    PubMed

    Barczyńska, Renata; Śliżewska, Katarzyna; Libudzisz, Zdzisława; Kapuśniak, Kamila; Kapuśniak, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the prebiotic properties of starch dextrins, that is, resistant dextrins obtained from potato starch in the process of simultaneous thermolysis and chemical modification, which were selected based on previous research. Both prepared dextrins met the definition criterion of dietary fiber and also the basic prebiotic criterion - they were not degraded by the digestive enzymes of the initial sections of the gastrointestinal tract. The growth of probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, as well as Escherichia coli, Enterococcus, Bacteroides, and Clostridium strains isolated from feces of healthy people, showed that both studied dextrins were utilized as a source of assimilable carbon and energy by the strains. Furthermore, better growth (higher numbers of cells) counts of probiotic bacteria than those of fecal isolates indicated that the studied resistant dextrins showed a selective effect. Both dextrins might be considered as substances with prebiotic properties due to their chemical and physical properties and selectivity towards the studied probiotic bacterial strains. PMID:26400889

  13. Physical properties of pregelatinized and granular cold water swelling maize starches at different pH values.

    PubMed

    Hedayati, Sara; Shahidi, Fakhri; Koocheki, Arash; Farahnaky, Asgar; Majzoobi, Mahsa

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of pH changes (3, 5, 7 and 9) on physical properties of pregelatinized (PG) and granular cold water swelling (GCWS) maize starches. In acidic pH, PG starches were fragmented; however, GCWS starches mainly reserved their granular integrity but were shriveled. For both modified starches the water absorption, cold water viscosity, textural parameters, turbidity and freeze-thaw stability of the samples decreased whereas water solubility increased at pH 3 and 5. On the other hand, alkaline pH did not bring about evident changes on morphology of PG starch but the surface of GCWS starch became smoother. Water absorption, solubility, rheological and mechanical properties, freeze-thaw stability and turbidity of the starch pastes increased at high pH values. Overall, both starches were more stable at alkaline pH compared to acidic pH values and GCWS starch was more resistance to pH changes than PG starch. PMID:27288699

  14. "As a native nation, we must fight diabetes…"

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Stories "As a native nation, we must fight diabetes…" Past ... you eat and exercise. Listen to your doctor. As a native nation, we need to fight diabetes, ...

  15. Preparation and characterization of starch-based loose-fill packaging foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Qi

    Regular and waxy corn starches were blended in various ratios with biodegradable polymers including polylactic acid (PLA), Eastar Bio Copolyester 14766 (EBC) and Mater-Bi ZF03U (MBI) and extruded with a C. W. Brabender laboratory twin screw extruder using a 3-mm die nozzle at 150°C and 150 rev/min. Physical characteristics including radial expansion, unit density and bulk density and water solubility index, water absorption characteristics, mechanical properties including compressibility, Young's modulus, spring index, bulk compressibility and bulk spring index and abrasion resistance were investigated as affected by the ingredient formulations, i.e. type of polymers, type of starches, polymer to starch ratio and starch moisture content. A completely randomized factorial blocking experimental design was used. Fifty-four treatments resulted. Each treatment was replicated three times. SAS statistical software package was used to analyze the data. Foams made of waxy starch had better radial expansion, lower unit density and bulk density than did foams made of regular starch. Regular starch foams had significantly lower water solubility index than did the waxy starch foams. PLA-starch foams had the lowest compressibility and Young's modulus. MBI-starch foams were the most rigid. All foams had excellent spring indices and bulk spring indices which were comparable to the spring index of commercial expanded polystyrene foam. Correlations were established between the foam mechanical properties and the physical characteristics. Foam compressibility and Young's modulus decreased as increases in radial expansion and decreases in unit and bulk densities. Their relationships were modeled with power law equations. No correlation was observed between spring index and bulk spring index and foam physical characteristics. MBI-starch foams had the highest equilibrium moisture content. EBC-starch and PLA-starch foams had similar water absorption characteristics. No significant

  16. In vitro digestibility and some physicochemical properties of starch from wild and cultivated amadumbe corms.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, K; Amonsou, E O; Oyeyinka, S A

    2015-07-10

    Amadumbe, commonly known as taro, is an indigenous underutilised tuber to Southern Africa. In this study, starch functional properties and in vitro starch digestibility of processed products from wild and cultivated amadumbe were determined. Starch extracts from both amadumbe types had similar contents of total starch (approx. 95%). Wild and cultivated amadumbe starch granules were polygonal and very small in size (2.7 ± 0.9 μm). Amylose content of wild amadumbe (20%) was about double that of cultivated (12%). By DSC, the peak gelatinisation temperatures of wild and cultivated amadumbe starches were 81 and 85°C, respectively. The slowly digestible starch (SDS); 20% and resistant starch (RS); 64% contents of wild amadumbe appeared slightly higher than those of cultivated. Processing amadumbe into boiled and baked products did not substantially affect SDS and RS contents. Estimated glycaemic index of processed products ranged from 40 to 44%. Thus, amadumbe, both wild and cultivated, present some potential in the formulation of products for diabetics and weight management. PMID:25857954

  17. Characterization of enzymatically modified rice and barley starches with amylosucrase at scale-up production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bum-Su; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Yoo, Sang-Ho

    2015-07-10

    Physicochemical properties of Neisseria polysaccharea amylosucrase (NpAS)-treated rice and barley starches were investigated at scale-up production. Pre-gelatinized rice and barley starches were treated with significantly lower NpAS dose (0.1 U/mL) but 100 times larger reaction volume (3500 mL), compared to the analytical scale (35 mL) used in the previous study. NpAS-treated starches in this scale-up production were characterized with respect to reaction efficiency (RE), resistant starch (RS) content, amylopectin (AP) branch-chain length distribution, solubility, swelling power, pasting viscosity, and thermal transition properties. The RE enhanced up to 1.8 times by increasing the reaction volume, which improved the RS content and AP branch-chain lengths of NpAS-treated starches. Compared with the native starch, NpAS-treated starches exhibited lower solubility and swelling power, lower pasting viscosity, and a large increase in the melting peak temperature. Consequently, NpAS treatment of pre-gelatinized starches in this study would be a potential way of replacing commercial RS production. PMID:25857960

  18. "Chiefs for Change" Elbows into Policy Fight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Amid the cacophony of special interests fighting to be heard in statehouses and on Capitol Hill, a cadre of current and former chief state school officers is elbowing its way into the nation's education debate at a time when states are taking more control of K-12 education. A little more than a year old, Chiefs for Change is an invitation-only…

  19. Chinese American Students Fight for Their Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yuxiang; Phillion, JoAnn

    2007-01-01

    Parental and community involvement play a key role in the Chinese American students' fight for their rights. In order to understand the reasons behind the parental and community support of Chinese students, a survey was conducted among Chinese parents to assess what they know about language loss, power, knowledge, and democracy. The results…

  20. Fighting Juvenile Gun Violence. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, David; Grant, Heath; Rowe, Wendy; Jacobs, Nancy

    This bulletin describes the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention's efforts to fight juvenile gun violence. The Office awarded four community demonstration grants to implement "Partnerships To Reduce Juvenile Gun Violence." Partnership goals include increasing the effectiveness of existing strategies by enhancing and coordinating…

  1. Sibling Fights. From a Parent's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Roslyn

    2002-01-01

    Provides guidance for parents in dealing with sibling conflicts. Discusses the importance of defusing sibling fights calmly and with humor and love, and the need to stay out of sibling squabbles when possible. Suggestions for guiding children through a problem-solving process include listening, summarizing, examining, and generalizing. (KB)

  2. NASA helicopter helps fight fire at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A NASA helicopter takes off to bring water to fight a small fire on Kennedy Space Center grounds. The site is between Kennedy Parkway North and the Indian River. The fire is one of many throughout Central Florida, which is suffering from drought.

  3. [Nurses engaged in the fight against leprosy].

    PubMed

    Guyon, Patrick; Hourlier, Juliette; Manco, Noémi

    2015-01-01

    Even now in the 21st century, leprosy is still rife, notably among poor populations. In the regions of the world concerned, nurses specialised in the disease play an essential role in supporting the screening, treatment and reintegration of patients. In more than twenty countries, the Order of Malta France is acting to fight against leprosy. PMID:26365644

  4. Dietary starch sources affect net portal appearance of amino acids and glucose in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, T-J; Dai, Q-Z; Yin, Y-L; Zhang, J; Huang, R-L; Ruan, Z; Deng, Z; Xie, M

    2008-05-01

    Four male pigs (Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire; average initial (mean ± SEM) BW = 22.5 ± 1.1 kg), fitted with permanent catheters in the portal vein, ileal vein and carotid artery, were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square experimental design to measure the effect of dietary starch sources on the net portal appearance of glucose and amino acids. Dietary starch sources were resistant starch (RS), maize, sticky rice and brown rice. Diets were provided at 0730, 1530 and 2330 h during a 6-day adjustment period and 1-day collection period. On day 7 of each period, blood samples were collected from the portal vein and carotid artery at 0730 h (prior to feeding) and hourly up to 8 h after meal. Blood samples were used to determine glucose, amino acid, packed cell volume and partial pressure of oxygen (pO2). When calculated per 100 g feed intake, cumulative portal glucose appearance was lower (P < 0.05) for resistant starch than for maize, sticky rice or brown rice up to 8 h after the meal. Cumulative portal glucose appearance was higher (P < 0.05) for sticky rice and brown rice than for other diets until 4 h after the meal, but maize had higher cumulative glucose appearance after 4 h. Net cumulative portal concentrations of most amino acids for resistant starch were also reduced (P < 0.05) than for the other starch sources. Cumulative portal appearance of amino acid represented 48.39%, 63.76%, 61.80% and 59.18% of dietary intake for resistant starch, maize, sticky rice and brown rice, respectively. Collectively, our results indicate that dietary starch sources substantially affect the appearance of amino acids and glucose in the portal circulation. PMID:22443597

  5. The mitochondrial uniporter controls fight or flight heart rate increases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuejin; Rasmussen, Tyler P.; Koval, Olha M.; Joiner, Mei-ling A.; Hall, Duane D.; Chen, Biyi; Luczak, Elizabeth D.; Wang, Qiongling; Rokita, Adam G.; Wehrens, Xander H. T.; Song, Longsheng; Anderson, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate increases are a fundamental adaptation to physiological stress, while inappropriate heart rate increases are resistant to current therapies. However, the metabolic mechanisms driving heart rate acceleration in cardiac pacemaker cells remain incompletely understood. The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) facilitates calcium entry into the mitochondrial matrix to stimulate metabolism. We developed mice with myocardial MCU inhibition by transgenic expression of a dominant negative (DN) MCU. Here we show that DN-MCU mice had normal resting heart rates but were incapable of physiological fight or flight heart rate acceleration. We found MCU function was essential for rapidly increasing mitochondrial calcium in pacemaker cells and that MCU enhanced oxidative phoshorylation was required to accelerate reloading of an intracellular calcium compartment prior to each heartbeat. Our findings show the MCU is necessary for complete physiological heart rate acceleration and suggest MCU inhibition could reduce inappropriate heart rate increases without affecting resting heart rate. PMID:25603276

  6. Desmoplasia in Pancreatic Cancer. Can We Fight It?

    PubMed Central

    Merika, E. E.; Syrigos, K. N.; Saif, M. W.

    2012-01-01

    The hallmark of pancreatic tumours, the desmoplastic reaction, provides a unique microenvironment that affects pancreatic tumour behaviour, its ability to grow and metastasize as well as resist the effects of chemotherapy. Complex molecular interactions and pathways give rise to the desmoplastic reaction. Breakdown or penetration of the desmoplastic reaction may hold the key to overcoming the limits of delivery of efficacious chemotherapy or the development of new targeted treatments. Herein we discuss such new developments to fight the desmoplastic reaction, including inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, the hedgehog pathway, as well as new molecular targets like CD40 agonist and its effects on T cells, extracellular matrix modifying enzymes such as LOXL2 inhibitor and novel tumour penetrating peptides for delivery of drugs. PMID:23125850

  7. Starch-degrading polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Vu, Van V; Marletta, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    Polysaccharide degradation by hydrolytic enzymes glycoside hydrolases (GHs) is well known. More recently, polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs, also known as lytic PMOs or LPMOs) were found to oxidatively degrade various polysaccharides via a copper-dependent hydroxylation. PMOs were previously thought to be either GHs or carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), and have been re-classified in carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZY) database as auxiliary activity (AA) families. These enzymes include cellulose-active fungal PMOs (AA9, formerly GH61), chitin- and cellulose-active bacterial PMOs (AA10, formerly CBM33), and chitin-active fungal PMOs (AA11). These PMOs significantly boost the activity of GHs under industrially relevant conditions, and thus have great potential in the biomass-based biofuel industry. PMOs that act on starch are the latest PMOs discovered (AA13), which has expanded our perspectives in PMOs studies and starch degradation. Starch-active PMOs have many common structural features and biochemical properties of the PMO superfamily, yet differ from other PMO families in several important aspects. These differences likely correlate, at least in part, to the differences in primary and higher order structures of starch and cellulose, and chitin. In this review we will discuss the discovery, structural features, biochemical and biophysical properties, and possible biological functions of starch-active PMOs, as well as their potential application in the biofuel, food, and other starch-based industries. Important questions regarding various aspects of starch-active PMOs and possible economical driving force for their future studies will also be highlighted. PMID:27170366

  8. Robust and biodegradable elastomers based on corn starch and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS).

    PubMed

    Ceseracciu, Luca; Heredia-Guerrero, José Alejandro; Dante, Silvia; Athanassiou, Athanassia; Bayer, Ilker S

    2015-02-18

    Designing starch-based biopolymers and biodegradable composites with durable mechanical properties and good resistance to water is still a challenging task. Although thermoplastic (destructured) starch has emerged as an alternative to petroleum-based polymers, its poor dimensional stability under humid and dry conditions extensively hinders its use as the biopolymer of choice in many applications. Unmodified starch granules, on the other hand, suffer from incompatibility, poor dispersion, and phase separation issues when compounded into other thermoplastics above a concentration level of 5%. Herein, we present a facile biodegradable elastomer preparation method by incorporating large amounts of unmodified corn starch, exceeding 80% by volume, in acetoxy-polyorganosiloxane thermosets to produce mechanically robust, hydrophobic bioelastomers. The naturally adsorbed moisture on the surface of starch enables autocatalytic rapid hydrolysis of polyorganosiloxane to form Si-O-Si networks. Depending on the amount of starch granules, the mechanical properties of the bioelastomers can be easily tuned with high elastic recovery rates. Moreover, starch granules considerably lowered the surface friction coefficient of the polyorganosiloxane network. Stress relaxation measurements indicated that the bioelastomers have strain energy dissipation factors that are lower than those of conventional rubbers, rendering them as promising green substitutes for plastic mechanical energy dampeners. Corn starch granules also have excellent compatibility with addition-cured polysiloxane chemistry that is used extensively in microfabrication. Regardless of the starch concentration, all of the developed bioelastomers have hydrophobic surfaces with lower friction coefficients and much less water uptake capacity than those of thermoplastic starch. The bioelastomers are biocompatible and are estimated to biodegrade in Mediterranean seawater within three to six years. PMID:25622232

  9. Fighting experience affects fruit fly behavior in a mating context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teseo, Serafino; Veerus, Liisa; Mery, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    In animals, correlations exist among behaviors within individuals, but it is unclear whether experience in a specific functional context can affect behavior across different contexts. Here, we use Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the effects of conflict-induced behavioral modifications on male mating behavior. In D. melanogaster, males fight for territories and experience a strong winner-loser effect, meaning that winners become more likely to win subsequent fights compared to losers, who continue to lose. In our protocol, males were tested for courtship intensity before and after fighting against other males. We show that male motivation to copulate before fights cannot predict the fight outcomes, but that, afterwards, losers mate less than before and less than winner and control males. Contrarily, winners show no differences between pre- and post-fight courtship intensity, and do not differ from control males. This suggests that the physiological modifications resulting from fight outcomes indirectly affect male reproductive behavior.

  10. Fighting experience affects fruit fly behavior in a mating context.

    PubMed

    Teseo, Serafino; Veerus, Liisa; Mery, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    In animals, correlations exist among behaviors within individuals, but it is unclear whether experience in a specific functional context can affect behavior across different contexts. Here, we use Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the effects of conflict-induced behavioral modifications on male mating behavior. In D. melanogaster, males fight for territories and experience a strong winner-loser effect, meaning that winners become more likely to win subsequent fights compared to losers, who continue to lose. In our protocol, males were tested for courtship intensity before and after fighting against other males. We show that male motivation to copulate before fights cannot predict the fight outcomes, but that, afterwards, losers mate less than before and less than winner and control males. Contrarily, winners show no differences between pre- and post-fight courtship intensity, and do not differ from control males. This suggests that the physiological modifications resulting from fight outcomes indirectly affect male reproductive behavior. PMID:27108453

  11. Rheological properties of reactive extrusion modified waxy starch and waxy starch-polyacrylamide copolymer gels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rheological properties of modified waxy starch and waxy starch-polyacrylamide graft copolymers prepared by reactive extrusion were investigated. Both materials can absorb huge amount of water and form gels. The modified waxy starch and waxy starch-polyacrylamide graft copolymer gels all exhibite...

  12. Comparison of Cationic and Unmodified Starches in Reactive Extrusion of Starch-Polyacrylamide Graft Copolymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Graft copolymers of starch and polyacrylamide (PAAm) were prepared using reactive extrusion in a corotating twin screw extruder. The effect of cationic starch modification was examined using unmodified and cationic dent starch (approximately 23% amylose) and waxy maize starch (approximately 2% amyl...

  13. Starch phosphorylation: insights and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mahlow, Sebastian; Orzechowski, Sławomir; Fettke, Joerg

    2016-07-01

    During starch metabolism, the phosphorylation of glucosyl residues of starch, to be more precise of amylopectin, is a repeatedly observed process. This phosphorylation is mediated by dikinases, the glucan, water dikinase (GWD) and the phosphoglucan, water dikinase (PWD). The starch-related dikinases utilize ATP as dual phosphate donor transferring the terminal γ-phosphate group to water and the β-phosphate group selectively to either C6 position or C3 position of a glucosyl residue within amylopectin. By the collaborative action of both enzymes, the initiation of a transition of α-glucans from highly ordered, water-insoluble state to a less order state is realized and thus the initial process of starch degradation. Consequently, mutants lacking either GWD or PWD reveal a starch excess phenotype as well as growth retardation. In this review, we focus on the increased knowledge collected over the last years related to enzymatic properties, the precise definition of the substrates, the physiological implications, and discuss ongoing questions. PMID:27147464

  14. Quality of Spelt Wheat and its Starch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flours from 5 spelt cultivars grown over 3 years were evaluated as to their bread baking quality and isolated starch properties. The starch properties included amylose contents, gelatinization temperatures (differential scanning calorimetry), granule size distributions and pasting properties. Mill...

  15. Resurgence in Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Stephanie P; Cançado, Carlos R X; Lattal, Kennon A

    2014-03-01

    Resurgence of previously reinforced responding was investigated in male Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens). Swimming through a ring produced 15-s mirror presentations according to, with different fish, either a fixed-ratio 1 or a variable-interval 60-s schedule of reinforcement. When responding was stable, a differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior schedule was substituted for the mirror-presentation schedule. Following this, mirror presentations were discontinued (extinction). During this latter phase, there were transient increases in the ring-swim response relative to the frequency of such responding during the differential-reinforcement-of-other behavior schedule. Resurgence was similar for the fish exposed previously to the fixed-ratio or to the variable-interval schedule. These results extend to Siamese fighting fish a well-established behavioral phenomenon previously not observed in this species or with this response topography, and only rarely reported following the removal of a non-consumable reinforcer. PMID:24462710

  16. Effect of Multiple Freezing/Thawing Cycles on the Structural and Functional Properties of Waxy Rice Starch

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Han; Yan, Juan; Zhao, Jianwei; Tian, Yaoqi; Jin, Zhengyu; Xu, Xueming

    2015-01-01

    The structural and functional properties of non-gelatinized waxy rice starch were investigated after 1, 3, 7, and 10 freezing/thawing cycles. Freezing caused an increasing damaged starch from 1.36% in native waxy rice starch to 5.77% in 10 freezing/thawing-treated starch (FTS), as evidenced by the cracking surface on starch granules. More dry matter concentration was leached, which was characterized by high amylopectin concentration (4.34 mg/mL). The leaching was accompanied by a decrease in relative crystallinity from 35.19% in native starch to 31.34% in 10 FTS. Freezing treatment also led to significant deviations in the functional characteristics, for instance decreased gelatinization temperature range, enthalpy, and pasting viscosities. The resistant starch content of 10FTS significantly decreased from 58.9% to 19%, whereas the slowly digested starch content greatly increased from 23.8% in native starch to 50.3%. The increase in susceptibility to enzyme hydrolysis may be attributed to porous granular surface, amylopectin leaching, and the decrease in the relative crystallinity caused by freezing water. PMID:26018506

  17. How to pick a good fight.

    PubMed

    Joni, Saj-nicole A; Beyer, Damon

    2009-12-01

    Peace and harmony are overrated. Though conflict-free teamwork is often held up as the be-all and end-all of organizational life, it actually can be the worst thing to ever happen to a company. Look at Lehman Brothers. When Dick Fuld took over, he transformed a notoriously contentious workplace into one of Wall Street's most harmonious firms. But his efforts backfired--directors and managers became too agreeable, afraid to rock the boat by pointing out that the firm was heading into a crisis. Research shows that the single greatest predictor of poor company performance is complacency, which is why every organization needs a healthy dose of dissent. Not all kinds of conflict are productive, of course -companies need to find the right balance of alignment and competition and make sure that people's energies are pointed in a positive direction. In this article, two seasoned business advisers lay down ground rules for the right kinds of fights. First, the stakes must be worthwhile: The issue should involve a noble purpose or create noticeable--preferably game-changing--value. Next, good fights focus on the future; they're never about placing blame for the past. And it's critical for leaders to keep fights sportsmanlike, allow informal give-and-take in the trenches, and help soften the blow for the losing parties. PMID:19968056

  18. Starch Granule Variability in Wild Solanum Species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because most of the dry matter of potato tubers is starch, an understanding of starch properties is important in potato improvement programs. Starch granule size is considered to influence tuber processing quality parameters such as gelatinization temperature, viscosity, and water holding capacity. ...

  19. TRIBOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF CHEMICALLY MODIFIED STARCH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch is one of the most abundantly available plant-based biopolymer. It is a major component of such high volume commodity crops as corn, potato, and rice. Starch is a highly crystalline, high molecular weight poly(glucose) biopolymer. Starch is insoluble in water in its native state. Various ...

  20. Studies of Amylose Content in Potato Starch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato starch is typically low in amylose (~20-25%), but high amylose starch has superior nutritional qualities. The ratio between amylose and amylopectin is the most important property influencing the physical properties of starch. There is a strong case to be made for the development of food crops...

  1. Structure of Porous Starch Microcellular Foam Particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A relatively new starch product with various novel applications is a porous microcellular foam. The foam product is made by dehydrating a starch hydrogel in a solvent such as ethanol and then removing the solvent to form a foam product. The process involves heating an aqueous slurry of starch (8% w/...

  2. Rice functionality, starch structure and the genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Through collaborative efforts among USDA scientists at Beaumont, Texas, we have gained in-depth knowledge of how rice functionality, i.e. the texture of the cooked rice, rice processing properties, and starch gelatinization temperature, are associated with starch-synthesis genes and starch structure...

  3. Esterification of Starch in Ionic Liquids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We shall discuss the use of various ionic liquids in the preparation of starch esters. Starch was reacted with vinyl acetate in different 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (bmim) salts as solvents in an effort to produce starches with different acetylation patterns. Overall degree of substitution (DS) w...

  4. Starch in the Wet-End

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Clerck, Peter

    Starch has been used in papermaking almost since the invention of paper. The global paper industry consumes almost 5 million tonnes of starch per year, making starch the third most important raw material in papermaking. Roughly 20% of this is used in the wet-end.

  5. Impact of molecular and crystalline structures on in vitro digestibility of waxy rice starches.

    PubMed

    You, Su-Yeon; Lim, Seung-Taik; Lee, Ju Hun; Chung, Hyun-Jung

    2014-11-01

    The in vitro digestibility, molecular structure and crystalline structure of waxy rice starches isolated from six Korean cultivars (Shinsun, Dongjin, Baekok, Whasun, Chungbaek, and Bosuk) were investigated. The molecular weight (M(w)) of waxy rice starches ranged from 1.1 × 10(8)g/mol to 2.2 × 10(8)g/mol. Chungbaek waxy rice starch had the highest average chain length (24.3) and proportion (20.7%) of long branch chains (DP ≥ 37), and the lowest proportion (19.0%) of short branch chains (DP 6-12) among the tested six waxy rice starches. The relative crystallinity and intensity ratio of 1047/1022 ranged from 38.9% to 41.1% and from 0.691 to 0.707, respectively. Chungbaek had the highest gelatinization temperature and enthalpy. Chungbaek had the highest pasting temperature (70.7 °C), setback (324 cP) and final viscosity (943 cP), whereas Baekok showed the highest peak viscosity (1576 cP) and breakdown (1031 cP). Chungbaek had lower rapidly digestible starch (RDS) content and expected glycemic index (eGI), and higher resistant starch (RS) content, whereas Whasun exhibited higher RDS content and eGI. The slowly digestible starch (SDS) content of Shinsun (38.3%) and Bokok (32.0%) was significantly higher than that of other cultivars (11.3-22.0%). PMID:25129802

  6. Molecular details of a starch utilization pathway in the human gut symbiont Eubacterium rectale

    PubMed Central

    Cockburn, Darrell W.; Orlovsky, Nicole I.; Foley, Matthew H.; Kwiatkowski, Kurt J.; Bahr, Constance M.; Maynard, Mallory; Demeler, Borries; Koropatkin, Nicole M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Eubacterium rectale is a prominent human gut symbiont yet little is known about the molecular strategies this bacterium has developed to acquire nutrients within the competitive gut ecosystem. Starch is one of the most abundant glycans in the human diet, and E. rectale increases in vivo when the host consumes a diet rich in resistant starch, although it is not a primary degrader of this glycan. Here we present the results of a quantitative proteomics study in which we identify two glycoside hydrolase 13 family enzymes, and three ABC transporter solute-binding proteins that are abundant during growth on starch and, we hypothesize, work together at the cell surface to degrade starch and capture the released maltooligosaccharides. EUR_21100 is a multidomain cell wall anchored amylase that preferentially targets starch polysaccharides, liberating maltotetraose, while the membrane associated maltogenic amylase EUR_01860 breaks down maltooligosaccharides longer than maltotriose. The three solute-binding proteins display a range of glycan-binding specificities that ensure the capture of glucose through maltoheptaose and some α1,6-branched glycans. Taken together, we describe a pathway for starch utilization by E. rectale DSM 17629 that may be conserved among other starch-degrading Clostridium cluster XIVa organisms in the human gut. PMID:25388295

  7. Physicochemical properties and starch digestibility of Chinese noodles in relation to optimal cooking time.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaoting; Sui, Zhongquan

    2016-03-01

    Changes in the physicochemical properties and starch digestibility of white salted noodles (WSN) at different cooking stage were investigated. The noodles were dried in fresh air and then cooked for 2-12 min by boiling in distilled water to determine the properties of cooking quality, textural properties and optical characteristic. For starch digestibility, dry noodles were milled and sieved into various particle size classes ranging from 0.5 mm to 5.0 mm, and hydrolyzed by porcine pancreatic α-amylase. The optimal cooking time of WSN determined by squeezing between glasses was 6 min. The results showed that the kinetics of solvation of starch and protein molecules were responsible for changes of the physicochemical properties of WSN during cooking. The susceptibility of starch to α-amylase was influenced by the cooking time, particle size and enzyme treatment. The greater value of rapidly digestible starch (RDS) and lower value of slowly digestible starch (SDS) and resistant starch (RS) were reached at the optimal cooking stage ranging between 63.14-71.97%, 2.47-10.74% and 23.94-26.88%, respectively, indicating the susceptibility on hydrolysis by enzyme was important in defining the cooked stage. The study suggested that cooking quality and digestibility were not correlated but the texture greatly controls the digestibility of the noodles. PMID:26718868

  8. Physicochemical properties and digestibility of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) starches.

    PubMed

    Du, Shuang-Kui; Jiang, Hongxin; Ai, Yongfeng; Jane, Jay-Lin

    2014-08-01

    Physicochemical properties and digestibility of pinto bean, red kidney bean, black bean and navy bean starches were analyzed. All the common bean starches had oval and spherical granules with average diameter of 25.3-27.4 μm. Amylose contents were 32.0-45.4%. Black bean starch showed the highest peak viscosity, breakdown, final viscosity and setback, whereas red kidney bean starch showed the lowest pasting temperature, peak viscosity, breakdown, and setback. Pinto bean starch showed the highest onset and peak gelatinization temperatures, and the lowest gelatinization temperature range; whereas navy bean starch exhibited the lowest values. Amylopectin of red kidney bean had the highest molecular weight (Mw) and z-average gyration radius (Rz), whereas black bean amylopectin had the lowest values of Mw and Rz. The proportions of DP 6-12, DP 13-24, DP 25-36, and DP ≥ 37 and average branch-chain lengths were 23.30-35.21%, 47.79-53.53%, 8.99-12.65%, 6.39-13.49%, and 17.91-21.56, respectively. All the native bean starches were highly resistant to enzyme digestion. PMID:24751265

  9. Synergistic amylomaltase and branching enzyme catalysis to suppress cassava starch digestibility.

    PubMed

    Sorndech, Waraporn; Meier, Sebastian; Jansson, Anita M; Sagnelli, Domenico; Hindsgaul, Ole; Tongta, Sunanta; Blennow, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Starch provides our main dietary caloric intake and over-consumption of starch-containing foods results in escalating life-style disease including diabetes. By increasing the content of α-1,6 branch points in starch, digestibility by human amylolytic enzymes is expected to be retarded. Aiming at generating a soluble and slowly digestible starch by increasing the content and changing the relative positioning of the branch points in the starch molecules, we treated cassava starch with amylomaltase (AM) and branching enzyme (BE). We performed a detailed molecular analysis of the products including amylopectin chain length distribution, content of α-1,6 glucosidic linkages, absolute molecular weight distribution and digestibility. Step-by-step enzyme catalysis was the most efficient treatment, and it generated branch structures even more extreme than those of glycogen. All AM- and BE-treated samples showed increased resistance to degradation by porcine pancreatic α-amylase and glucoamylase as compared to cassava starch. The amylolytic products showed chain lengths and branching patterns similar to the products obtained from glycogen. Our data demonstrate that combinatorial enzyme catalysis provides a strategy to generate potential novel soluble α-glucan ingredients with low dietary digestibility assets. PMID:26256365

  10. Deficiency of maize starch-branching enzyme i results in altered starch fine structure, decreased digestibility and reduced coleoptile growth during germination

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Two distinct starch branching enzyme (SBE) isoforms predate the divergence of monocots and dicots and have been conserved in plants since then. This strongly suggests that both SBEI and SBEII provide unique selective advantages to plants. However, no phenotype for the SBEI mutation, sbe1a, had been previously observed. To explore this incongruity the objective of the present work was to characterize functional and molecular phenotypes of both sbe1a and wild-type (Wt) in the W64A maize inbred line. Results Endosperm starch granules from the sbe1a mutant were more resistant to digestion by pancreatic α-amylase, and the sbe1a mutant starch had an altered branching pattern for amylopectin and amylose. When kernels were germinated, the sbe1a mutant was associated with shorter coleoptile length and higher residual starch content, suggesting that less efficient starch utilization may have impaired growth during germination. Conclusions The present report documents for the first time a molecular phenotype due to the absence of SBEI, and suggests strongly that it is associated with altered physiological function of the starch in vivo. We believe that these results provide a plausible rationale for the conservation of SBEI in plants in both monocots and dicots, as greater seedling vigor would provide an important survival advantage when resources are limited. PMID:21599988

  11. The influence of sex, line, and fight experience on aggressiveness of the Siamese fighting fish in intrasexual competition.

    PubMed

    Karino, K; Someya, C

    2007-07-01

    We examined the influence of sex, line, i.e., broods from different parents, and previous fight experience on the aggressiveness of the Siamese fighting fish Betta splendens in intrasexual competition. The innate aggressiveness of the fish against their mirror images was measured on the day prior to the direct fight with other individuals, and it was found to be influenced by the line type but not by the sex. In the direct fight with other individuals, the males invested more effort in the fight than the females. In addition, the individuals of a particular line that exhibited a lower innate aggressiveness spent less time in the direct fight and were often losers when compared with those of other lines. After the direct fight with other individuals, the aggressiveness of the fish against their mirror images was remarkably influenced by the outcome of the direct fight, i.e., the winners exhibited more aggressive behavior, whereas the losers exhibited a lesser degree of aggressive behavior. This influence of the previous fight experience on subsequent aggressiveness was the greatest in the individuals of the line that have exhibited the lowest innate aggressiveness. However, the positive effect of the winning experience or the negative effect of the losing experience on subsequent aggressiveness decreased following several days after the previous fight increased. PMID:17434689

  12. Electrochemical characterization of gelatinized starch dispersions: voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy on platinum surface.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Jaimes, C; Lobato-Calleros, C; Sosa, E; Bello-Pérez, L A; Vernon-Carter, E J; Alvarez-Ramirez, J

    2015-06-25

    The electrochemical properties of gelatinized starch dispersions (GSD; 5% w/w) from different botanical sources were studied using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests over a platinum surface. The phenomenological modelling of EIS data using equivalent circuits indicated that after gelatinization the electrical resistance was determined mainly by the resistance of insoluble material (i.e., ghosts). Sonication of the GSD disrupted the ghost microstructure, and produced an increase in electrical conductivity by reducing the resistance of the insoluble material. The CV data showed three oxidation peaks at potentials where glucose solutions displayed oxidation waves. It is postulated that hydrolysis at the bulk and electrocatalyzed oxidation on the Pt-surface are reactions involved in the starch transformation. Starches peak intensity increased with the amylose content, suggesting that the amylose-rich matrix played an important role in the charge transfer in the electrolytic system. PMID:25839788

  13. Physical and structural characterisation of starch/polyester blends with tartaric acid.

    PubMed

    Olivato, J B; Müller, C M O; Carvalho, G M; Yamashita, F; Grossmann, M V E

    2014-06-01

    Starch/PBAT blends were produced by reactive extrusion with tartaric acid (TA) as an additive. The effects of TA, glycerol and starch+PBAT on the mechanical, optical and structural properties of the films were evaluated, with formulations based in a constrained mixture design. Tartaric acid acts as a compatibiliser and promotes the acid hydrolysis of starch chains. These two functions explain the observed film resistance and opacity. TA reduced the weight loss in water. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that TA reduces the interfacial tension between the polymeric phases, resulting in more homogeneous films. Nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C CPMAS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) suggest that tartaric acid is able to react with the hydroxyl groups of the starch by esterification/transesterification reactions, confirming its role as a compatibiliser. The addition of TA results in materials with better properties that are suitable for use in food packaging. PMID:24863194

  14. Mechanical properties and solubility in water of corn starch-collagen composite films: Effect of starch type and concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Wang, Wenhang; Ye, Ran; Liu, Anjun; Xiao, Jingdong; Liu, Yaowei; Zhao, Yana

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated the possibility of enhancing the properties of collagen with three different maize starches: waxy maize starch, normal starch, and high amylose starch. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed that starch-collagen films had a rougher surface compared to pure collagen films which became smoother upon heating. Amylose starch and normal starch increased the tensile strength of unheated collagen films in both dry and wet states, while all starches increased tensile strength of collagen film by heating. Depending upon the amylose content and starch concentrations, film solubility in water decreased with the addition of starch. DSC thermograms demonstrated that addition of all starches improved the thermal stability of the collagen film. Moreover, X-ray diffraction results indicated that except for high amylose starch, the crystallinity of both starch and collagen was significantly decreased when subject to heating. FTIR spectra indicated that intermolecular interactions between starch and collagen were enhanced upon heating. PMID:27596411

  15. Starch composites with aconitic acid.

    PubMed

    Gilfillan, William Neil; Doherty, William O S

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this project is to examine the effectiveness of using aconitic acid (AcA), a tricarboxylic acid which contains a carbon/carbon double bond (CC), to enhance the properties of starch-based films. Starch/glycerol cast films were prepared with 0, 2, 5, 10 and 15wt% AcA (starch wt% basis) and the properties analysed. It was shown that AcA acted as both a cross-linking agent and also a strong plasticising agent. The 5wt% AcA derived starch films were the most effectively cross-linked having the lowest solubility (28wt%) and decreased swelling coefficient (35vol.%) by approximately 3 times and 2.4 times respectively compared to the control film submerged in water (23°C). There was also a significant increase in the film elongation at break by approximately 35 times (compared to the control) with the addition of 15wt% AcA, emphasising the plasticising effect of AcA. However, generally there was a reduced tensile strength, softening of the film, and reduced thermal stability with increased amounts of AcA. PMID:26876996

  16. Annealing properties of rice starch.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal properties of starch can be modified by annealing, i.e., a pre-treatment in excessive amounts of water at temperatures below the gelatinization temperatures. This treatment is known to improve the crystalline properties, and is a useful tool to gain a better control of the functional proper...

  17. In vitro and in vivo digestibility of native maize starch granules varying in amylose contents.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tatsuya; Ito, Yusuke; Brown, Ian Lewis; Ando, Ryuichi; Kiriyama, Shuhachi

    2007-01-01

    Digestibility of maize starch granules with different amylose content (AL-0, 22, 54, 68, 80, or 90%) was investigated. Measurement of the in vivo resistant starch (RS) content of the starches was performed using surgically prepared ileorectostomized rats. The rats were fed a purified diet containing one of the starches at 652.5 g/kg diet. The in vivo RS content was determined based on the fecal starch excretion. The dietary fiber (DF) value increased as a function of the amylose content in the starch and showed a positive linear correlation with the gelatinization temperature of the granules. In contrast, the in vitro RS content was likely to depend on both the surface area and amylose contents of the starch granules. The maximum in vitro RS content was obtained with AL-68 (54.4%). In vivo RS content showed a significant correlation with the amount of in vitro RS but not in respect to the DF detected. The in vivo RS content of AL-68 (43.4%) was higher than that found in AL-90 (37.8%). A profound gap was observed for AL-54 between the amount of DF (6.4%) and RS (in vitro = 46.6% and in vivo = 40.9%) present. The results suggest that both in vitro and in vivo digestibility of maize starch is affected by the amylose content and surface area of the granules. The current evaluation suggests that the physiological occurrence of RS from maize starch might be predictable by reference to the in vitro RS value. PMID:18193740

  18. In vitro digestibility and changes in physicochemical and structural properties of common buckwheat starch affected by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hang; Wang, Lijing; Cao, Rong; Fan, Huanhuan; Wang, Min

    2016-06-25

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP), a non-thermal processing technology, was applied at 120, 240, 360, 480, and 600MPa to assess its effect on the in vitro digestibility, physicochemical, and structural properties of common buckwheat starch (CBS). HHP treatment resulted in CBS granules with more rough surfaces. With the increasing pressure level, amylose content, pasting temperature, and thermal stability substantially increased and relative crystallinity, hardness, swelling power, and viscosity decreased. At 120-480MPa, HHP did not affect the 'A'-type crystalline pattern of CBS. However, at 600MPa, HHP contributed to a similar 'B'-type pattern. Compared with native starch, HHP-modified CBS samples had lower in vitro hydrolysis, reduced content of rapidly digestible starch, and increased levels of slowly digestible starch and resistant starch. These results revealed that the in vitro digestibility, physicochemical, and structural properties of CBS are effectively modified by HHP. PMID:27083786

  19. Male Weaponry in a Fighting Cricket

    PubMed Central

    Judge, Kevin A.; Bonanno, Vanessa L.

    2008-01-01

    Sexually selected male weaponry is widespread in nature. Despite being model systems for the study of male aggression in Western science and for cricket fights in Chinese culture, field crickets (Orthoptera, Gryllidae, Gryllinae) are not known to possess sexually dimorphic weaponry. In a wild population of the fall field cricket, Gryllus pennsylvanicus, we report sexual dimorphism in head size as well as the size of mouthparts, both of which are used when aggressive contests between males escalate to physical combat. Male G. pennsylvanicus have larger heads, maxillae and mandibles than females when controlling for pronotum length. We conducted two experiments to test the hypothesis that relatively larger weaponry conveys an advantage to males in aggressive contests. Pairs of males were selected for differences in head size and consequently were different in the size of maxillae and mandibles. In the first experiment, males were closely matched for body size (pronotum length), and in the second, they were matched for body mass. Males with proportionately larger weaponry won more fights and increasing differences in weaponry size between males increased the fighting success of the male with the larger weaponry. This was particularly true when contests escalated to grappling, the most intense level of aggression. However, neither contest duration nor intensity was related to weaponry size as predicted by models of contest settlement. These results are the first evidence that the size of the head capsule and mouthparts are under positive selection via male-male competition in field crickets, and validate 800-year-old Chinese traditional knowledge. PMID:19107188

  20. Inflatable partition for fighting mine fires

    DOEpatents

    Conti, Ronald S.; Lazzara, Charles P.

    1995-01-01

    The seal is a lightweight, inflatable, bag which may be inflated by a portable air generator and is used to seal a burning mine passage. A collapsible tube-like aperture extends through the seal and allows passage of high expansion foam through the seal in a feed tube. The foam fills the passageway and extinguishes the fire. In other embodiments, the feed tubes incorporate means to prevent collapse of the aperture. In these embodiments a shroud connects the feed tube to a foam generator. This seal allows creation of a high expansion foam fire fighting barrier even in upward sloping passages.

  1. Physicochemical and functional properties of ozone-oxidized starch.

    PubMed

    Chan, Hui T; Bhat, Rajeev; Karim, Alias A

    2009-07-01

    The effects of oxidation by ozone gas on some physicochemical and functional properties of starch (corn, sago, and tapioca) were investigated. Starch in dry powder form was exposed to ozone for 10 min at different ozone generation times (OGTs). Carboxyl and carbonyl contents increased markedly in all starches with increasing OGTs. Oxidation significantly decreased the swelling power of oxidized sago and tapioca starches but increased that of oxidized corn starch. The solubility of tapioca starch decreased and sago starch increased after oxidation. However, there was an insignificant changed in the solubility of oxidized corn starch. Intrinsic viscosity [eta] of all oxidized starches decreased significantly, except for tapioca starch oxidized at 5 min OGT. Pasting properties of the oxidized starches followed different trends as OGTs increased. These results show that under similar conditions of ozone treatment, the extent of starch oxidation varies among different types of starch. PMID:19489606

  2. Rheological and textural properties of pulse starch gels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The properties of starch gels from black beans, chickpeas, lentils and navy beans were investigated. Differences were shown between starch sources, and effect of starch concentration was studied. Navy bean starch had the highest peak and final viscosities in pasting tests, while black bean starch h...

  3. The Simultaneous Abolition of Three Starch Hydrolases Blocks Transient Starch Breakdown in Arabidopsis*

    PubMed Central

    Streb, Sebastian; Eicke, Simona; Zeeman, Samuel C.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated which enzymes are involved in debranching amylopectin during transient starch degradation. Previous studies identified two debranching enzymes, isoamylase 3 (ISA3) and limit dextrinase (LDA), involved in this process. However, plants lacking both enzymes still degrade substantial amounts of starch. Thus, other enzymes/mechanisms must contribute to starch breakdown. We show that the chloroplastic α-amylase 3 (AMY3) also participates in starch degradation and provide evidence that all three enzymes can act directly at the starch granule surface. The isa3 mutant has a starch excess phenotype, reflecting impaired starch breakdown. In contrast, removal of AMY3, LDA, or both enzymes together has no impact on starch degradation. However, removal of AMY3 or LDA in addition to ISA3 enhances the starch excess phenotype. In plants lacking all three enzymes, starch breakdown is effectively blocked, and starch accumulates to the highest levels observed so far. This provides indirect evidence that the heteromultimeric debranching enzyme ISA1-ISA2 is not involved in starch breakdown. However, we illustrate that ISA1-ISA2 can hydrolyze small soluble branched glucans that accumulate when ISA3 and LDA are missing, albeit at a slow rate. Starch accumulation in the mutants correlates inversely with plant growth. PMID:23019330

  4. The use of principal component and cluster analysis to differentiate banana peel flours based on their starch and dietary fibre components.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Saifullah; Ismail, Noryati; Alkarkhi, Abbas Fadhl Mubarek; Easa, Azhar Mat

    2010-08-01

    Banana peel flour (BPF) prepared from green or ripe Cavendish and Dream banana fruits were assessed for their total starch (TS), digestible starch (DS), resistant starch (RS), total dietary fibre (TDF), soluble dietary fibre (SDF) and insoluble dietary fibre (IDF). Principal component analysis (PCA) identified that only 1 component was responsible for 93.74% of the total variance in the starch and dietary fibre components that differentiated ripe and green banana flours. Cluster analysis (CA) applied to similar data obtained two statistically significant clusters (green and ripe bananas) to indicate difference in behaviours according to the stages of ripeness based on starch and dietary fibre components. We concluded that the starch and dietary fibre components could be used to discriminate between flours prepared from peels obtained from fruits of different ripeness. The results were also suggestive of the potential of green and ripe BPF as functional ingredients in food. PMID:24575193

  5. Physicochemical properties of quinoa starch.

    PubMed

    Li, Guantian; Wang, Sunan; Zhu, Fan

    2016-02-10

    Physicochemical properties of quinoa starches isolated from 26 commercial samples from a wide range of collection were studied. Swelling power (SP), water solubility index (WSI), amylose leaching (AML), enzyme susceptibility, pasting, thermal and textural properties were analyzed. Apparent amylose contents (AAM) ranged from 7.7 to 25.7%. Great variations in the diverse physicochemical properties were observed. Correlation analysis showed that AAM was the most significant factor related to AML, WSI, and pasting parameters. Correlations among diverse physicochemical parameters were analyzed. Principal component analysis using twenty three variables were used to visualize the difference among samples. Six principal components were extracted which could explain 88.8% of the total difference. The wide variations in physicochemical properties could contribute to innovative utilization of quinoa starch for food and non-food applications. PMID:26686137

  6. Biosynthesis of starch in chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Nomura, T; Nakayama, N; Murata, T; Akazawa, T

    1967-03-01

    The enzymic synthesis of ADP-glucose and UDP-glucose by chloroplastic pyrophosphorylase of bean and rice leaves has been demonstrated by paper chromatographic techniques. In both tissues, the activity of UDP-glucose-pyrophosphorylase was much higher than ADP-glucose-pyrophosphorylase. Glycerate-3-phosphate, phosphoenolpyruvate and fructose-1,6-diphosphate did not stimulate ADP-glucose formation by a pyrophosphorylation reaction. The major metabolic pathway for UDP-glucose utilization appears to be the synthesis of either sucrose or sucrose-P. On the other hand, a specific precursor role of ADP-glucose for synthesizing chloroplast starch by the ADP-glucose-starch transglucosylase reaction is supported by the coupled enzyme system of ADP-glucose-pyrophosphorylase and transglucosylase, isolated from chloroplasts. None of the glycolytic intermediates stimulated the glucose transfer in the enzyme sequence of reaction system employed. PMID:4292567

  7. Formation of nanoporous aerogels from wheat starch.

    PubMed

    Ubeyitogullari, Ali; Ciftci, Ozan N

    2016-08-20

    Biodegradable nanoporous aerogels were obtained from wheat starch using a simple and green method based on supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) drying. Effects of processing parameters (temperature, wheat starch concentration and mixing rate during gelatinization; temperature, pressure, and flow rate of CO2, during SC-CO2 drying) on the aerogel formation were investigated, and optimized for the highest surface area and smallest pore size of the aerogels. At the optimized conditions, wheat starch aerogels had surface areas between 52.6-59.7m(2)/g and densities ranging between 0.05-0.29g/cm(3). The average pore size of the starch aerogels was 20nm. Starch aerogels were stable up to 280°C. Due to high surface area and nanoporous structure, wheat starch aerogels are promising carrier systems for bioactives and drugs in food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:27178916

  8. 46 CFR 109.223 - Fire fighting equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fire fighting equipment. 109.223 Section 109.223... OPERATIONS Tests, Drills, and Inspections § 109.223 Fire fighting equipment. The master or person in charge shall insure that each hand portable fire extinguisher, semi-portable fire extinguisher, and fixed...

  9. 46 CFR 109.223 - Fire fighting equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fire fighting equipment. 109.223 Section 109.223... OPERATIONS Tests, Drills, and Inspections § 109.223 Fire fighting equipment. The master or person in charge shall insure that each hand portable fire extinguisher, semi-portable fire extinguisher, and fixed...

  10. 46 CFR 109.223 - Fire fighting equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fire fighting equipment. 109.223 Section 109.223... OPERATIONS Tests, Drills, and Inspections § 109.223 Fire fighting equipment. The master or person in charge shall insure that each hand portable fire extinguisher, semi-portable fire extinguisher, and fixed...

  11. 46 CFR 109.223 - Fire fighting equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire fighting equipment. 109.223 Section 109.223... OPERATIONS Tests, Drills, and Inspections § 109.223 Fire fighting equipment. The master or person in charge shall insure that each hand portable fire extinguisher, semi-portable fire extinguisher, and fixed...

  12. 46 CFR 109.223 - Fire fighting equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fire fighting equipment. 109.223 Section 109.223... OPERATIONS Tests, Drills, and Inspections § 109.223 Fire fighting equipment. The master or person in charge shall insure that each hand portable fire extinguisher, semi-portable fire extinguisher, and fixed...

  13. 46 CFR 185.524 - Fire fighting drills and training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire fighting drills and training. 185.524 Section 185.524 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Preparations for Emergencies § 185.524 Fire fighting drills and training. (a) The master shall conduct sufficient...

  14. School Violence: Social Bond Theory and Physical Fights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemmetz, Amy J.

    2010-01-01

    Physical fighting in school is a concern for school administrators, juvenile justice professionals, and students. This quantitative study examined the involvement of physical fights at school among 5,674 adolescents across the United States via a casual comparative design with a correlational subcomponent. Differences were discovered between…

  15. 46 CFR 185.524 - Fire fighting drills and training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fire fighting drills and training. 185.524 Section 185... 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Preparations for Emergencies § 185.524 Fire fighting drills and training. (a) The master shall conduct sufficient fire drills to make sure that each crew member is...

  16. 46 CFR 122.524 - Fire fighting drills and training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire fighting drills and training. 122.524 Section 122... Preparations for Emergencies § 122.524 Fire fighting drills and training. (a) The master shall conduct sufficient fire drills to make sure that each crew member is familiar with his or her duties in case of...

  17. 46 CFR 122.524 - Fire fighting drills and training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fire fighting drills and training. 122.524 Section 122... Preparations for Emergencies § 122.524 Fire fighting drills and training. (a) The master shall conduct sufficient fire drills to make sure that each crew member is familiar with his or her duties in case of...

  18. 46 CFR 122.524 - Fire fighting drills and training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fire fighting drills and training. 122.524 Section 122... Preparations for Emergencies § 122.524 Fire fighting drills and training. (a) The master shall conduct sufficient fire drills to make sure that each crew member is familiar with his or her duties in case of...

  19. 46 CFR 185.524 - Fire fighting drills and training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fire fighting drills and training. 185.524 Section 185... 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Preparations for Emergencies § 185.524 Fire fighting drills and training. (a) The master shall conduct sufficient fire drills to make sure that each crew member is...

  20. 46 CFR 185.524 - Fire fighting drills and training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fire fighting drills and training. 185.524 Section 185... 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Preparations for Emergencies § 185.524 Fire fighting drills and training. (a) The master shall conduct sufficient fire drills to make sure that each crew member is...

  1. 46 CFR 122.524 - Fire fighting drills and training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fire fighting drills and training. 122.524 Section 122... Preparations for Emergencies § 122.524 Fire fighting drills and training. (a) The master shall conduct sufficient fire drills to make sure that each crew member is familiar with his or her duties in case of...

  2. 46 CFR 185.524 - Fire fighting drills and training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fire fighting drills and training. 185.524 Section 185... 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Preparations for Emergencies § 185.524 Fire fighting drills and training. (a) The master shall conduct sufficient fire drills to make sure that each crew member is...

  3. Chemical composition and starch digestibility in flours from Polish processed legume seeds.

    PubMed

    Piecyk, Małgorzata; Wołosiak, Rafał; Drużynska, Beata; Worobiej, Elwira

    2012-12-01

    The study was undertaken to determine the effect of various treatments, i.e. cooking after soaking, freezing after cooking and storage at a low temperature (-18°C, 21days), and autoclaving, of Polish cultivars of bean, pea and lentil seeds on the chemical composition and starch digestibility of the resultant flours. The cooking of seeds caused a significant decrease in contents of ash (by 11-48%), polyphenols (by 10-70%) and protein (to 19%) in flours made of bean. In addition, analyses demonstrated significantly decreased contents of resistant starch, RS (by 61-71%) and slowly digestible starch, SDS (by 56-84%). Storage of frozen seeds resulted in insignificant changes in the chemical composition, and in increased contents of both RS and SDS. The flours produced upon the autoclaving process were characterized by similar changes in the contents of ash and protein as in cooked seeds, yet losses of polyphenols were lower and, simultaneously, contents of RS and SDS were higher. All the analyzed flours were shown to be characterized by a reduced content of amylose in starch, which might have affected its digestibility. This was indicated by a strict negative correlation reported between the value of the starch digestion index (SDRI) and amylose content of starch (r=0.84, p>0.05). PMID:22953824

  4. Membrane-bound amylopullulanase is essential for starch metabolism of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius DSM639.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyoung-Hwa; Cha, Jaeho

    2015-09-01

    Sulfolobus acidocaldarius DSM639 produced an acid-resistant membrane-bound amylopullulanase (Apu) during growth on starch as a sole carbon and energy source. The physiological role of Apu in starch metabolism was investigated by the growth and starch degradation pattern of apu disruption mutant as well as biochemical properties of recombinant Apu. The Δapu mutant lost the ability to grow in minimal medium in the presence of starch, and the amylolytic activity observed in the membrane fraction of the wild-type strain was not detected in the Δapu mutant when the cells were grown in YT medium. The purified membrane-bound Apu initially hydrolyzed starch, amylopectin, and pullulan into various sizes of maltooligosaccharides, and then produced glucose, maltose, and maltotriose in the end, indicating Apu is a typical endo-acting glycoside hydrolase family 57 (GH57) amylopullulanase. The maltose and maltotriose observed in the culture medium during the exponential and stationary phase growth indicates that Apu is the essential enzyme to initially hydrolyze the starch into small maltooligosaccharides to be transported into the cell. PMID:26104674

  5. Synthesis and characterization of a novel antioxidant RS4 by esterifying carboxymethyl sweetpotato starch with quercetin.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xia; Ye, Fayin; Li, Jinfeng; Ming, Jian; Zhao, Guohua

    2016-11-01

    Quercetin is grafted to carboxymethyl sweetpotato starch (CMSS) by esterification. Upon esterification, the water solubility of CMSS decreases and the CMSS-quercetin conjugates (CMSS-Q) are yellowish. FT-IR and 1H NMR indicated the covalent attachment of quercetin to CMSS. Thermogravimetry revealed the superior thermal stability of CMSS-Q over CMSS and native sweetpotato starch (NSS). The in vitro digestibility assays showed that CMSS is highly resistant to digestion while the quercetin graft with degree of substitution (DS) above 0.074 slightly increased its digestibility. The quercetin graft imparted CMSS with strong antioxidant activity and enhanced its thermal stability, which increased with quercetin DS. In vitro cyotoxicity assessment revealed that CMSS-Q is as safe as CMSS and NSS. This study showed that CMSS-Q is a novel antioxidant-resistant starch in RS4 form. PMID:27516278

  6. The diurnal metabolism of leaf starch.

    PubMed

    Zeeman, Samuel C; Smith, Steven M; Smith, Alison M

    2007-01-01

    Starch is a primary product of photosynthesis in leaves. In most plants, a large fraction of the carbon assimilated during the day is stored transiently in the chloroplast as starch for use during the subsequent night. Photosynthetic partitioning into starch is finely regulated, and the amount of carbohydrate stored is dependent on the environmental conditions, particularly day length. This regulation is applied at several levels to control the flux of carbon from the Calvin cycle into starch biosynthesis. Starch is composed primarily of branched glucans with an architecture that allows the formation of a semi-crystalline insoluble granule. Biosynthesis has been most intensively studied in non-photosynthetic starch-storing organs, such as developing seeds and tubers. Biosynthesis in leaves has received less attention, but recent reverse-genetic studies of Arabidopsis (thale cress) have produced data generally consistent with what is known for storage tissues. The pathway involves starch synthases, which elongate the glucan chains, and branching enzymes. Remarkably, enzymes that partially debranch glucans are also required for normal amylopectin synthesis. In the last decade, our understanding of starch breakdown in leaves has advanced considerably. Starch is hydrolysed to maltose and glucose at night via a pathway that requires recently discovered proteins in addition to well-known enzymes. These sugars are exported from the plastid to support sucrose synthesis, respiration and growth. In the present review we provide an overview of starch biosynthesis, starch structure and starch degradation in the leaves of plants. We focus on recent advances in each area and highlight outstanding questions. PMID:17150041

  7. Structural and functional properties of C-type starches.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jinwen; Cai, Canhui; Man, Jianmin; Zhou, Weidong; Wei, Cunxu

    2014-01-30

    This study investigated the structural and functional properties of C-type starches from pea seeds, faba bean seeds, yam rhizomes and water chestnut corms. These starches were mostly oval in shape with significantly different sizes and contents of amylose, damaged starch and phosphorus. Pea, faba bean and water chestnut starches had central hila, and yam starch had eccentric hilum. Water chestnut and yam starches had higher amylopectin short and long chain, respectively. Water chestnut and faba bean starches showed CA-type crystallinities, and pea and yam starches had C-type crystallinities. Water chestnut starch had the highest swelling power, granule swelling and pasting viscosity, lowest gelatinization temperatures and enthalpy. Faba bean starch had the lowest pasting viscosity, whereas yam starch had the highest gelatinization temperatures. Water chestnut and yam starches possessed significantly higher and lower susceptibility to acid and enzyme hydrolysis, the highest and lowest RDS contents, and the lowest and highest RS contents, respectively. PMID:24299776

  8. Structural adaptations to diverse fighting styles in sexually selected weapons

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Erin L.; Tobalske, Bret W.; Emlen, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    The shapes of sexually selected weapons differ widely among species, but the drivers of this diversity remain poorly understood. Existing explanations suggest weapon shapes reflect structural adaptations to different fighting styles, yet explicit tests of this hypothesis are lacking. We constructed finite element models of the horns of different rhinoceros beetle species to test whether functional specializations for increased performance under species-specific fighting styles could have contributed to the diversification of weapon form. We find that horns are both stronger and stiffer in response to species-typical fighting loads and that they perform more poorly under atypical fighting loads, which suggests weapons are structurally adapted to meet the functional demands of fighting. Our research establishes a critical link between weapon form and function, revealing one way male–male competition can drive the diversification of animal weapons. PMID:25201949

  9. Starch-Soybean Oil Composites with High Oil: Starch Ratios Prepared by Steam Jet Cooking

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aqueous mixtures of soybean oil and starch were jet cooked at oil:starch ratios ranging from 0.5:1 to 4:1 to yield dispersions of micron-sized oil droplets that were coated with a thin layer of starch at the oil-water interface. The jet cooked dispersions were then centrifuged at 2060 and 10,800 x ...

  10. Starch aerogel beads obtained from inclusion complexes prepared from high amylose starch and sodium palmitate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch aerogels are a class of low density highly porous renewable materials currently prepared from retrograded starch gels and are of interest for their good surface area, porosity, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Recently, we have reported on starches containing amylose-fatty acid salt h...

  11. Sucrose-to-Starch Metabolism in Tomato Fruit Undergoing Transient Starch Accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, A. A.; Petreikov, M.

    1997-01-01

    Immature green tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruits undergo a period of transient starch accumulation characterized by developmental changes in the activities of key enzymes in the sucrose (Suc)-to-starch metabolic pathway. Activities of Suc synthase, fructokinase, ADP-glucose (Glc) pyrophosphorylase, and soluble and insoluble starch synthases decline dramatically in parallel to the decrease in starch levels in the developing fruit. Comparison of "maximal" in vitro activities of the enzymes in the Suc-to-starch pathway suggests that these same enzymes are limiting to the rate of starch accumulation. In contrast, activities of invertase, UDP-Glc pyrophosphorylase, nucleoside diphosphate kinase, phosphoglucoisomerase, and phosphoglucomutase do not exhibit dramatic decreases in activity and appear to be in excess of starch accumulation rates. Starch accumulation is spatially localized in the inner and radial pericarp and columella, whereas the outer pericarp and seed locule contain little starch. The seed locule is characterized by lower activities of Suc synthase, UDP-Glc pyrophosphorylase, phosphoglucomutase, ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase, and soluble and insoluble starch synthases. The outer pericarp exhibits comparatively lower activities of ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase and insoluble starch synthase only. These data are discussed in terms of the developmental and tissue-specific coordinated control of Suc-to-starch metabolism. PMID:12223639

  12. Inducing PLA/starch compatibility through butyl-etherification of waxy and high amylose starch.

    PubMed

    Wokadala, Obiro Cuthbert; Emmambux, Naushad Mohammad; Ray, Suprakas Sinha

    2014-11-01

    In this study, waxy and high amylose starches were modified through butyl-etherification to facilitate compatibility with polylactide (PLA). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and wettability tests showed that hydrophobic butyl-etherified waxy and high amylose starches were obtained with degree of substitution values of 2.0 and 2.1, respectively. Differential scanning calorimetry, tensile testing, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrated improved PLA/starch compatibility for both waxy and high amylose starch after butyl-etherification. The PLA/butyl-etherified waxy and high amylose starch composite films had higher tensile strength and elongation at break compared to PLA/non-butyl-etherified composite films. The morphological study using SEM showed that PLA/butyl-etherified waxy starch composites had a more homogenous microstructure compared to PLA/butyl-etherified high amylose starch composites. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that PLA/starch composite thermal stability decreased with starch butyl-etherification for both waxy and high amylose starches. This study mainly demonstrates that PLA/starch compatibility can be improved through starch butyl-etherification. PMID:25129738

  13. Position of modifying groups on starch chains of octenylsuccinic anhydride-modified waxy maize starch.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yanjie; Kaufman, Rhett C; Wilson, Jeff D; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2014-06-15

    Octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA)-modified starches with a low (0.018) and high (0.092) degree of substitution (DS) were prepared from granular native waxy maize starch in aqueous slurry. The position of OS substituents along the starch chains was investigated by enzyme hydrolysis followed by chromatographic analysis. Native starch and two OS starches with a low and high DS had β-limit values of 55.9%, 52.8%, and 34.4%, respectively. The weight-average molecular weight of the β-limit dextrin from the OS starch with a low DS was close to that of the β-limit dextrin from native starch but lower than that of the β-limit dextrin from the OS starch with a high DS. Debranching of OS starches was incomplete compared with native starch. OS groups in the OS starch with a low DS were located on the repeat units near the branching points, whereas the OS substituents in the OS starch with a high DS occurred both near the branching points and the non-reducing ends. PMID:24491720

  14. Issues of Starch in Sugarcane Processing and Prospects of Breeding for Low Starch Content in Sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch is a sugarcane impurity that adversely affects the quantity and quality of sugar processes and products. The increased production of combine and green harvested sugarcane has increased delivery of starch to sugarcane factories. Starch occurs as granules composed of amylose and amylopectin p...

  15. Manipulation of starch bioaccessibility in wheat endosperm to regulate starch digestion, postprandial glycemia, insulinemia, and gut hormone responses: a randomized controlled trial in healthy ileostomy participants12

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Cathrina H; Grundy, Myriam ML; Grassby, Terri; Vasilopoulou, Dafni; Frost, Gary S; Butterworth, Peter J; Berry, Sarah EE; Sanderson, Jeremy; Ellis, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cereal crops, particularly wheat, are a major dietary source of starch, and the bioaccessibility of starch has implications for postprandial glycemia. The structure and properties of plant foods have been identified as critical factors in influencing nutrient bioaccessibility; however, the physical and biochemical disassembly of cereal food during digestion has not been widely studied. Objectives: The aims of this study were to compare the effects of 2 porridge meals prepared from wheat endosperm with different degrees of starch bioaccessibility on postprandial metabolism (e.g., glycemia) and to gain insight into the structural and biochemical breakdown of the test meals during gastroileal transit. Design: A randomized crossover trial in 9 healthy ileostomy participants was designed to compare the effects of 55 g starch, provided as coarse (2-mm particles) or smooth (<0.2-mm particles) wheat porridge, on postprandial changes in blood glucose, insulin, C-peptide, lipids, and gut hormones and on the resistant starch (RS) content of ileal effluent. Undigested food in the ileal output was examined microscopically to identify cell walls and encapsulated starch. Results: Blood glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide concentrations were significantly lower (i.e., 33%, 43%, 40%, and 50% lower 120-min incremental AUC, respectively) after consumption of the coarse porridge than after the smooth porridge (P < 0.01). In vitro, starch digestion was slower in the coarse porridge than in the smooth porridge (33% less starch digested at 90 min, P < 0.05, paired t test). In vivo, the structural integrity of coarse particles (∼2 mm) of wheat endosperm was retained during gastroileal transit. Microscopic examination revealed a progressive loss of starch from the periphery toward the particle core. The structure of the test meal had no effect on the amount or pattern of RS output. Conclusion: The structural integrity of wheat

  16. Microalgae--novel highly efficient starch producers.

    PubMed

    Brányiková, Irena; Maršálková, Barbora; Doucha, Jiří; Brányik, Tomáš; Bišová, Kateřina; Zachleder, Vilém; Vítová, Milada

    2011-04-01

    The freshwater alga Chlorella, a highly productive source of starch, might substitute for starch-rich terrestrial plants in bioethanol production. The cultivation conditions necessary for maximizing starch content in Chlorella biomass, generated in outdoor scale-up solar photobioreactors, are described. The most important factor that can affect the rate of starch synthesis, and its accumulation, is mean illumination resulting from a combination of biomass concentration and incident light intensity. While 8.5% DW of starch was attained at a mean light intensity of 215 µmol/(m2 s1), 40% of DW was synthesized at a mean light intensity 330 µmol/(m2 s1). Another important factor is the phase of the cell cycle. The content of starch was highest (45% of DW) prior to cell division, but during the course of division, its cellular level rapidly decreased to about 13% of DW in cells grown in light, or to about 4% in those kept in the dark during the division phase. To produce biomass with high starch content, it is necessary to suppress cell division events, but not to disturb synthesis of starch in the chloroplast. The addition of cycloheximide (1 mg/L), a specific inhibitor of cytoplasmic protein synthesis, and the effect of element limitation (nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus) were tested. The majority of the experiments were carried out in laboratory-scale photobioreactors, where culture treatments increased starch content to up to about 60% of DW in the case of cycloheximide inhibition or sulfur limitation. When the cells were limited by phosphorus or nitrogen supply, the cellular starch content increased to 55% or 38% of DW, respectively, however, after about 20 h, growth of the cultures stopped producing starch, and the content of starch again decreased. Sulfur limited and cycloheximide-treated cells maintained a high content of starch (60% of DW) for up to 2 days. Sulfur limitation, the most appropriate treatment for scaled-up culture of starch-enriched biomass

  17. Improved method for detection of starch hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ohawale, M.R.; Wilson, J.J.; Khachatourians, G.G.; Ingledew, W.M.

    1982-09-01

    A new starch hydrolysis detection method which does not rely on iodine staining or the use of color-complexed starch is described. A linear relationship was obtained with agar-starch plates when net clearing zones around colonies of yeasts were plotted against enzyme levels (semilogarithm scale) produced by the same yeast strains in liquid medium. A similar relationship between starch clearing zones and alpha-amylase levels from three different sources was observed. These observations suggest that the method is useful in mutant isolations, strain improvement programs, and the prediction of alpha-amylase activities in culture filtrates or column effluents. (Refs. 18).

  18. Impact of high pressure treatment on functional, rheological, pasting, and structural properties of lentil starch dispersions.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Jasim; Thomas, Linu; Taher, Ayoub; Joseph, Antony

    2016-11-01

    Lentil starch (LS) dispersions (flour to water 1:4w/w) were subjected to high pressure (HP) treatment at 0.1, 400, 500 and 600MPa for 10min, followed by evaluation on the functional, particle size, rheological, pasting, and structural properties of post-process samples. Water holding capacity of pressurized starch increased with the pressure intensity due to increase in damaged starch. The amount of resistant starch increased from 5 to 6.8% after pressure treatment at 600MPa. An increase in starch granule particle size (196-207μm) was obvious after HP treatment. The lentil starch was completely gelatinized after pressure treatment at 600MPa for 10min as evidenced from differential scanning calorimetry, rheometry, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy observation. The elastic modulus, G' of lentil starch gel was less frequency dependent, and higher in magnitude at high pressure (>500MPa) than at lower pressure range (≤400MPa). XRD analysis revealed the disappearance of two diffraction peak intensities at 14.86° and 22.82° at 600MPa for 10min, which confirms the transformation of crystalline to amorphous region of lentil starch. Pasting properties were significantly influenced by the pressure treatment especially at 600MPa, resulting in a considerable decrease in peak viscosity, breakdown and final viscosity, and an increase in peak time. It can be inferred that the functional properties of pressure-treated LS are mainly based on the structural destruction of granules. PMID:27516314

  19. Lightweight composite fighting cover prototype development program

    SciTech Connect

    Wrenn, G.E. Jr.; Frame, B.J.; Gwaltney, R.C.; Akerman, M.A.

    1996-07-01

    The U.S. Army Field Assistance Science and Technology Program requested Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to demonstrate the use of lightweight composite materials in construction of overhead covers for reinforced infantry fighting positions. In recent years, ORNL researchers have designed and tested several concepts for lightweight ballistic protection structures, and they have developed numerous prototype composite structures for military and civilian applications. In the current program, composite panel designs and materials are tested and optimized to meet anticipated static and dynamic load conditions for the overhead cover structure. Ten prototype composite covers were built at ORNL for use in Army field tests. Each composite cover has a nominal surface area of 12 ft[sup 2] and a nominal weight of 8 lb. Four of the prototypes are made with folding sections to improve their handling characteristics. The composite covers exhibit equivalent performance in Army field tests to covers made with conventional materials that weigh four times as much.

  20. [Stevia in the fight against dental caries].

    PubMed

    Ma, M S; Blanksma, N G

    2015-01-01

    Stevia is a natural, non-caloric sweetener of plant origin. The sweetening power of stevia is several hundred times larger than that of table sugar (sucrose). On the basis of available research, the European Food Safety Authority concluded that stevia is safe for human consumption. Since then, stevia has been approved as a sweetener for the European market. As a substitute for sucrose, stevia can contribute to a reduced caloric intake and can play a role in the prevention and/or treatment of metabolic disorders. In addition, stevia is non-cariogenic and is, moreover, affordable. Promoting the consumption of stevia can therefore be a preventive means of fighting dental caries. PMID:26192983

  1. Fighting HIV/AIDS: is success possible?

    PubMed Central

    Okware, S.; Opio, A.; Musinguzi, J.; Waibale, P.

    2001-01-01

    The fight against HIV/AIDS poses enormous challenges worldwide, generating fears that success may be too difficult or even impossible to attain. Uganda has demonstrated that an early, consistent and multisectoral control strategy can reduce both the prevalence and the incidence of HIV infection. From only two AIDS cases in 1982, the epidemic in Uganda grew to a cumulative 2 million HIV infections by the end of 2000. The AIDS Control Programme established in 1987 in the Ministry of Health mounted a national response that expanded over time to reach other relevant sectors under the coordinating role of the Uganda AIDS Commission. The national response was to bring in new policies, expanded partnerships, increased institutional capacity for care and research, public health education for behaviour change, strengthened sexually transmitted disease (STD) management, improved blood transfusion services, care and support services for persons with HIV/AIDS, and a surveillance system to monitor the epidemic. After a decade of fighting on these fronts, Uganda became, in October 1996, the first African nation to report declining trends in HIV infection. Further decline in prevalence has since been noted. The Medical Research Council (UK) and the Uganda Virus Research Institute have demonstrated declining HIV incidence rates in the general population in the Kyamulibwa in Masaka Districts. Repeat knowledge, attitudes, behaviour and practice studies have shown positive changes in the priority prevention indicators. The data suggest that a comprehensive national response supported by strong political commitment may be responsible for the observed decline. Other countries in sub-Saharan Africa can achieve similar results by these means. Since success is possible, anything less is unacceptable. PMID:11799443

  2. Structural and molecular basis of starch viscosity in hexaploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Ral, J-P; Cavanagh, C R; Larroque, O; Regina, A; Morell, M K

    2008-06-11

    Wheat starch is considered to have a low paste viscosity relative to other starches. Consequently, wheat starch is not preferred for many applications as compared to other high paste viscosity starches. Increasing the viscosity of wheat starch is expected to increase the functionality of a range of wheat flour-based products in which the texture is an important aspect of consumer acceptance (e.g., pasta, and instant and yellow alkaline noodles). To understand the molecular basis of starch viscosity, we have undertaken a comprehensive structural and rheological analysis of starches from a genetically diverse set of wheat genotypes, which revealed significant variation in starch traits including starch granule protein content, starch-associated lipid content and composition, phosphate content, and the structures of the amylose and amylopectin fractions. Statistical analysis highlighted the association between amylopectin chains of 18-25 glucose residues and starch pasting properties. Principal component analysis also identified an association between monoesterified phosphate and starch pasting properties in wheat despite the low starch-phosphate level in wheat as compared to tuber starches. We also found a strong negative correlation between the phosphate ester content and the starch content in flour. Previously observed associations between internal starch granule fatty acids and the swelling peak time and pasting temperature have been confirmed. This study has highlighted a range of parameters associated with increased starch viscosity that could be used in prebreeding/breeding programs to modify wheat starch pasting properties. PMID:18459791

  3. To breathe or fight? Siamese fighting fish differ when facing a real opponent or mirror image.

    PubMed

    Arnott, Gareth; Beattie, Emma; Elwood, Robert W

    2016-08-01

    Displays are a feature of animal contest behaviour and have been interpreted as a means of gathering information on opponent fighting ability, as well as signalling aggressive motivation. In fish, contest displays often include frontal and lateral elements, which in the latter involves contestants showing their flanks to an opponent. Previous work in a range of fish species has demonstrated population-level lateralization of these displays, preferentially showing one side to their opponent. Mirrors are commonly used in place of a real opponent to study aggression in fish, yet they may disrupt the normal pattern of display behaviour. Here, using Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens, we compare the aggressive behaviour of males to a mirror image and real opponent behind a transparent barrier. As this species is a facultative air-breather, we also quantify surface breathing, providing insights into underlying fight motivation. Consistent with previous work, we found evidence of population-level lateralization, with a bias to present the left side and use the left eye when facing a real opponent. Contrary to expectations, there were no differences in the aggressive displays to a mirror and real opponent, with positive correlations between the behaviour in the two scenarios. However, there were important differences in surface breathing, which was more frequent and of longer duration in the mirror treatment. The reasons for these differences are discussed in relation to the repertoire of contest behaviour and motivation when facing a real opponent. PMID:27234172

  4. Cell mediated immunity to corn starch in starch-induced granulomatous peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Goodacre, R L; Clancy, R L; Davidson, R A; Mullens, J E

    1976-03-01

    Two patients with histologically diagnosed starch induced granulomatous peritonitis (SGP) have been shown to have cell mediated immunity to corn starch using the techniques of macrophage migration inhibition and lymphocyte DNA synthesis. Control groups of normal subjects, patients with uncomplicated laparotomy, and patients with Crohn's disease were negative in both tests. Lymphocytes from two patients with band adhesions, one of whom had biopsy evidence of a granulomatous reaction to starch, were sensitized to starch. Cell mediated immunity to starch may contribute to the pathogenesis of SGP, and some band adhesions may be a chronic low grade manifestation of this disorder. PMID:1269987

  5. EFFECT OF ORIENTATION ON THE PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF AMYLOSE AND HIGH AMYLOSE STARCH FILMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of orientation on the properties of amylose and starch films was studied in order to determine if film strength, flexibility and water resistance could be improved. Potato amylose and high (70%) amylose cornstarch were peracetylated, cast into films, stretched in hot glycerol 1-6 times t...

  6. Novel starch based nano scale enteric coatings from soybean meal for colon-specific delivery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean meal was used to isolate resistant starch and produce nanoparticles, which could be potential coating materials for colonic nutrient and drug deliveries. The nanoparticles were in 40 +/- 33.2 nm ranges. These nanoparticles were stable under simulated human physiological conditions. The deg...

  7. Rheology and pressurised gyration of starch and starch-loaded poly(ethylene oxide).

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, S; Ren, G G; Edirisinghe, M J

    2014-12-19

    This work investigates the rheology and spinning of starch and starch-loaded poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) by pressurised gyration in order to prepare nanofibres. The spinning dope's rheological properties played a crucial role in fibre formation. Newtonian behaviour is observed in 1-20 wt% starch suspensions and non-Newtonian behaviour is found in all the PEO-starch mixtures. Pressurised gyration of the starch suspensions produced beads only but PEO-starch mixtures generated fibres. The fibre diameter of the PEO-starch samples is shown to be a function of polymer concentration and rotating speed of the gyration system. Fibre formation can only be facilitated below a certain working pressure. The concentration of starch in the PEO-starch mixtures is crucial in defining whether beaded or continuous fibres were generated and this is related to the composition of the spinning dope. FT-IR, XRD and microscopy studies indicated very good miscibility of starch and PEO in the nanofibres. The storage modulus of the PEO-starch were also studied as a function of temperature (30-150°C) and showed interesting results but it was not possible to deduce general trends valid for the entire temperature range. PMID:25263892

  8. Characterisation of corn starch-based films reinforced with taro starch nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lei; Qiu, Chao; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2015-05-01

    Taro starch nanoparticles (TSNPs) obtained by hydrolysis with pullulanase and the recrystallisation of gelatinised starch were used as reinforcing agents in corn starch films. The influence of TSNPs contents (0.5-15%) on the physical, mechanical, thermal, and structural properties of starch films was investigated. An increase in the concentration of TSNPs led to a significant decrease in the water vapour permeability (WVP) of films. The addition of TSNPs increased the tensile strength (TS) of films from 1.11 MPa to 2.87 MPa. Compared with pure starch films, the surfaces of nanocomposite films became uneven. The onset temperature (To) and melting temperature (Tm) of films containing TSNPs were higher than those of pure starch films. The addition of TSNPs improved the thermal stability of starch films. PMID:25529655

  9. Functional properties of yam bean (Pachyrhizus erosus) starch.

    PubMed

    Mélo, E A; Stamford, T L M; Silva, M P C; Krieger, N; Stamford, N P

    2003-08-01

    The study was carried out in order to determine and establish the functional characters of starch extracted from yam bean (Pachyrhizus erosus (L) Urban) compared with cassava starch. Yam bean is a tropical tuber legume easily grown and holds a great potential as a new source of starch. Yam bean starch shows functional properties which are peculiar to those of most starch root crops. Gelatinization temperature (53-63 degrees C) and the pasting temperature (64.5 degrees C) are less than those of cereal starch, however, the swelling power is high (54.4 g gel/g dried starch). Yam bean starch paste presents a high viscosity profile, high retrogradation tendency and low stability on cooking. The functional properties of yam bean starch, similar to those of cassava starch, allows yam bean to be used as a potential new source of starch. PMID:12676508

  10. Impact of down-regulation of starch branching enzyme IIb in rice by artificial microRNA- and hairpin RNA-mediated RNA silencing

    PubMed Central

    Butardo, Vito M.; Fitzgerald, Melissa A.; Bird, Anthony R.; Gidley, Michael J.; Flanagan, Bernadine M.; Larroque, Oscar; Resurreccion, Adoracion P.; Laidlaw, Hunter K. C.; Jobling, Stephen A.; Morell, Matthew K.; Rahman, Sadequr

    2011-01-01

    The inactivation of starch branching IIb (SBEIIb) in rice is traditionally associated with elevated apparent amylose content, increased peak gelatinization temperature, and a decreased proportion of short amylopectin branches. To elucidate further the structural and functional role of this enzyme, the phenotypic effects of down-regulating SBEIIb expression in rice endosperm were characterized by artificial microRNA (amiRNA) and hairpin RNA (hp-RNA) gene silencing. The results showed that RNA silencing of SBEIIb expression in rice grains did not affect the expression of other major isoforms of starch branching enzymes or starch synthases. Structural analyses of debranched starch showed that the doubling of apparent amylose content was not due to an increase in the relative proportion of amylose chains but instead was due to significantly elevated levels of long amylopectin and intermediate chains. Rices altered by the amiRNA technique produced a more extreme starch phenotype than those modified using the hp-RNA technique, with a greater increase in the proportion of long amylopectin and intermediate chains. The more pronounced starch structural modifications produced in the amiRNA lines led to more severe alterations in starch granule morphology and crystallinity as well as digestibility of freshly cooked grains. The potential role of attenuating SBEIIb expression in generating starch with elevated levels of resistant starch and lower glycaemic index is discussed. PMID:21791436

  11. Pasting characteristics of starch-lipid composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch-lipid composites (SLC) have been used as fat replacers and stabilizers in beef patties, dairy products, and baked goods. The SLC are produced by mixing aqueous starch slurry with a lipid source, and steam jet-cooking. The SLC may be dried using a drum drier and then milled in a Retch mill. ...

  12. Friction Properties of Chemically Modified Starch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch is a high molecular weight polyglucose biopolymer that, in its native state, is insoluble in water at room temperature. One way of improving its water solubility is by esterification of its free hydroxyl groups. Waxy maize, normal corn, and high amylose corn starches were esterified with ac...

  13. Antimicrobial nanostructured starch based films for packaging.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Ana S; Oliveira, M; de Sá, Arsénio; Rodrigues, Rui M; Cerqueira, Miguel A; Vicente, António A; Machado, A V

    2015-09-20

    Montmorillonite modified with a quaternary ammonium salt C30B/starch nanocomposite (C30B/ST-NC), silver nanoparticles/starch nanocomposite (Ag-NPs/ST-NC) and both silver nanoparticles/C30B/starch nanocomposites (Ag-NPs/C30B/ST-NC) films were produced. The nanoclay (C30B) was dispersed in a starch solution using an ultrasonic probe. Different concentrations of Ag-NPs (0.3, 0.5, 0.8 and 1.0mM) were synthesized directly in starch and in clay/starch solutions via chemical reduction method. Dispersion of C30B silicate layers and Ag-NPs in ST films characterized by X-ray and scanning electron microscopy showed that the presence of Ag-NPs enhanced clay dispersion. Color and opacity measurements, barrier properties (water vapor and oxygen permeabilities), dynamic mechanical analysis and contact angle were evaluated and related with the incorporation of C30B and Ag-NPs. Films presented antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans without significant differences between Ag-NPs concentrations. The migration of components from the nanostructured starch films, assessed by food contact tests, was minor and under the legal limits. These results indicated that the starch films incorporated with C30B and Ag-NPs have potential to be used as packaging nanostructured material. PMID:26050897

  14. Production of PLA-Starch Fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Composites of polylactic acid (PLA) with starch have been prepared previously in an effort to reduce cost as well as to modify other properties such as biodegradation rate. However, strength and elongation both decrease on addition of starch due to poor adhesion and stress concentration at the inte...

  15. A high amylose (amylomaize) starch raises proximal large bowel starch and increases colon length in pigs.

    PubMed

    Topping, D L; Gooden, J M; Brown, I L; Biebrick, D A; McGrath, L; Trimble, R P; Choct, M; Illman, R J

    1997-04-01

    Young male pigs consumed a diet of fatty minced beef, safflower oil, skim milk powder, sucrose, cornstarch and wheat bran. Starch provided 50% of total daily energy either as low amylose cornstarch, high amylose (amylomaize) cornstarch or as a 50/50 mixture of corn and high amylose starch. Neither feed intake nor body weight gain as affected by dietary starch. Final plasma cholesterol concentrations were significantly higher than initial values in pigs fed the 50/50 mixture of corn and high amylose starch. Biliary concentrations of lithocholate and deoxycholate were lower in pigs fed high amylose starch. Large bowel length correlated positively with the dietary content of high amylose starch. Concentrations of butyrate in portal venous plasma were significantly lower in pigs fed high amylose starch than in those fed cornstarch. Neither large bowel digesta mass nor the concentrations of total or individual volatile fatty acids were affected by diet. However, the pool of propionate in the proximal colon and the concentration of propionate in feces were higher in pigs fed amylose starch. Concentrations of starch were uniformly low along the large bowel and were unaffected by starch type. In pigs with cecal cannula, digesta starch concentrations were higher with high amylose starch than with cornstarch. Electron micrographic examination of high amylose starch granules from these animals showed etching patterns similar to those of granules obtained from human ileostomy effluent. It appears that high amylose starch contributes to large bowel bacterial fermentation in the pig but that its utilization may be relatively rapid. PMID:9109613

  16. Biodegradation of thermoplastic starch/eggshell powder composites.

    PubMed

    Bootklad, Munlika; Kaewtatip, Kaewta

    2013-09-12

    Thermoplastic starch (TPS) was prepared using compression molding and chicken eggshell was used as a filler. The effect of the eggshell powder (EP) on the properties of TPS was compared with the effect of commercial calcium carbonate (CC). The organic compound on the surface of the eggshell powder acted as a coupling agent that resulted in a strong adhesion between the eggshell powder and the TPS matrix, as confirmed by SEM micrographs. The biodegradation was determined by the soil burial test. The TPS/EP composites were more rapidly degraded than the TPS/CC composites. In addition, the eggshell powder improved the water resistance and thermal stability of the TPS. PMID:23911451

  17. Mitigation of immunosuppressive and oxidative stress effect of dietary gelatinized starch in Labeo rohita fingerlings by elevation of rearing temperature within optimum range.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shivendra; Sahu, N P; Gal, Denes

    2015-12-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the strategy to mitigate the immunosuppressive and oxidative stress effect of gelatinized starch in fingerling of Labeo rohita. Fingerlings were either maintained at ambient water temperature (26 °C) or exposed to 32 °C for one week and then subjected to 26 °C for four weeks. Both groups were fed with isoproteinous (30% crude protein) diets containing gelatinized (G) or non-gelatinized (NG) starch. After 5 weeks of feeding trial, fingerlings were challenged by Aeromonas hydrophila and survival rate was recorded for the next 7 days. Serum cortisol and glucose content was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in G starch fed group and decreased with the increase in temperature from 26 to 32 °C, which was consistent for next four week after decrease in temperature from 32 to 26 °C. Lower respiratory burst activity and serum total protein and globulin content in G starch fed group at 26 °C significantly (p < 0.05) increased after elevation of temperature from 26 to 32 °C and levelled off to NG starch fed group. Liver superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity of G starch fed group was significantly higher in group reared at 32 °C compared to 26 °C. After challenge, fish fed G starch showed lower survival rate than that of fish fed NG starch. Subsequently, exposure of elevated temperature (32 °C) for one week significantly increased the survival rate of G starch fed group and levelled off to NG starch fed group. The results of this study indicated that dietary G starch may cause metabolic stress of fingerling L. rohita, as might consequently lead to the decrease antioxidant abilities, depressed immunity and reduced resistance to A. hydrophila infection. Subsequently, exposure of elevated temperature (32 °C) for one week mitigate immunosuppressive and oxidative stress effect of dietary G starch. PMID:26475365

  18. Starch gelatinization and in vitro digestibility behaviour after heat treatment: Comparison between plantain paste and piece of pulp.

    PubMed

    Giraldo Toro, A; Gibert, O; Briffaz, A; Ricci, J; Dufour, D; Tran, T; Bohuon, P

    2016-08-20

    Over the 65-100°C range and at a water content of 1.6kgkg(-1)db, a comparison was conducted between plantain paste (dispersion made of flour and water) and pulp pieces after cooking to evaluate their respective degree of starch gelatinization (α) and in vitro digestibility. Below 76°C and at 100°C, the gelatinization behaviour of starch into pulp pieces and paste was similar, whereas at 85°C a significant mean relative difference was observed in between. For α in the 0-1 range, pieces of plantain pulp exhibited a lower rapidly digestible starch fraction (30%) and a higher resistant starch fraction (33%) than the flour paste, suggesting some structural effects. Both Weibull and exponential models showed a good fit for α over temperature range and starch digestibility fractions over α. Although no explicit relationship was established between the intact pulp structure and grinded flour state of plantain, the evaluation of the degree of starch gelatinization and digestibility of a plantain flour paste, could be used to predict the gelatinization and digestibility behaviour of plantain starch in entire pieces of pulp. PMID:27178949

  19. A new and permanent staining method for starch granules using fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Revilla, M A; Tolivia, D; Tarrágo, J F

    1986-05-01

    A fluorescence technique has been developed for observing starch granules in plant tissues. Sections are stained with a mixture of dyes which we have named F.A.S.G.A. from the initials of the Spanish names of its components (fucsina, alcian blue, safranina, glicerina, agua), and viewed by epifluorescence microscopy. The starch granules fluoresce greenish yellow, allowing the degradative state to be observed. Cell structures which do not fluoresce are also differentiated. The stain permits identification of other structures when examined by visible light microscopy and is relatively resistant to fading over time. PMID:2425462

  20. Starch Origin and Thermal Processing Affect Starch Digestion in a Minipig Model of Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mößeler, Anne; Vagt, Sandra; Beyerbach, Martin; Kamphues, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Although steatorrhea is the most obvious symptom of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI), enzymatic digestion of protein and starch is also impaired. Low praecaecal digestibility of starch causes a forced microbial fermentation accounting for energy losses and meteorism. To optimise dietetic measures, knowledge of praecaecal digestibility of starch is needed but such information from PEI patients is rare. Minipigs fitted with an ileocaecal fistula with (n = 3) or without (n = 3) pancreatic duct ligation (PL) were used to estimate the rate of praecaecal disappearance (pcD) of starch. Different botanical sources of starch (rice, amaranth, potato, and pea) were fed either raw or cooked. In the controls (C), there was an almost complete pcD (>92%) except for potato starch (61.5%) which was significantly lower. In PL pcD of raw starch was significantly lower for all sources of starch except for amaranth (87.9%). Thermal processing increased pcD in PL, reaching values of C for starch from rice, potato, and pea. This study clearly underlines the need for precise specification of starch used for patients with specific dietetic needs like PEI. Data should be generated in suitable animal models or patients as tests in healthy individuals would not have given similar conclusions. PMID:26064101

  1. Starch Origin and Thermal Processing Affect Starch Digestion in a Minipig Model of Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Mößeler, Anne; Vagt, Sandra; Beyerbach, Martin; Kamphues, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Although steatorrhea is the most obvious symptom of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI), enzymatic digestion of protein and starch is also impaired. Low praecaecal digestibility of starch causes a forced microbial fermentation accounting for energy losses and meteorism. To optimise dietetic measures, knowledge of praecaecal digestibility of starch is needed but such information from PEI patients is rare. Minipigs fitted with an ileocaecal fistula with (n = 3) or without (n = 3) pancreatic duct ligation (PL) were used to estimate the rate of praecaecal disappearance (pcD) of starch. Different botanical sources of starch (rice, amaranth, potato, and pea) were fed either raw or cooked. In the controls (C), there was an almost complete pcD (>92%) except for potato starch (61.5%) which was significantly lower. In PL pcD of raw starch was significantly lower for all sources of starch except for amaranth (87.9%). Thermal processing increased pcD in PL, reaching values of C for starch from rice, potato, and pea. This study clearly underlines the need for precise specification of starch used for patients with specific dietetic needs like PEI. Data should be generated in suitable animal models or patients as tests in healthy individuals would not have given similar conclusions. PMID:26064101

  2. Molecular disassembly of rice and lotus starches during thermal processing and its effect on starch digestibility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujun; Sun, Yue; Wang, Jinrong; Wang, Shuo; Copeland, Les

    2016-02-01

    The molecular disassembly of starch during thermal processing is a major determinant for the susceptibility of starch to enzymatic digestion. In the present study, the effects of thermal processing on the disassembly of the granular structure and the in vitro enzymatic digestibility of rice and lotus starches were investigated. After heating at 50 °C, rice and lotus starches did not show significant changes in granular morphology, long-range crystallinity and short-range molecular order. As the temperature increased to 60 °C, rice starch underwent a partial gelatinization followed by an incomplete disruption of granular morphology, crystallites and molecular order. In contrast, lotus starch was almost completely gelatinized at 60 °C. At 70 °C or higher, both starches were fully gelatinized with complete disruption of the micro and macro structures. Our results show that gelatinization greatly increased the in vitro enzymatic digestibility of both starches, but that the degree of disassembly of the starch structure during thermal processing was not a major determinant of the digestibility of gelatinized starch. PMID:26829664

  3. Mixed Progress in Worldwide Fight Against HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Mixed Progress in Worldwide Fight Against HIV/AIDS Deaths continue 10-year decline, but new infections ... 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The number of HIV/AIDS deaths worldwide each year has fallen since peaking ...

  4. Fighting Gum Disease: Risk Factors, Treatment and Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feature: Fighting Gum Disease Risk Factors, Treatment and Research Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents Risk ... out whether it offers this service. Latest NIH Research Researchers supported by the National Institute of Dental ...

  5. Pathways to Freedom: Winning the Fight against Tobacco

    MedlinePlus

    ... pancreas also decreases Within 15 years: • Risk of coronary heart disease is now similar to that of people who ... Not Easy It is hard to fight an industry that gives us money and jobs—because the ...

  6. Injected Drug May Help Fight Osteoporosis in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_160452.html Injected Drug May Help Fight Osteoporosis in Women Abaloparatide appears to reduce fractures better ... risk of bone fractures in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis better than a placebo and the currently available ...

  7. Why Do I Fight with My Parents So Much?

    MedlinePlus

    ... no matter how old you are. continue The Upside The good news about fighting with your parents ... Parents Argue Coping With an Alcoholic Parent Stepparents Stress & Coping Center Talking to Your Parents - or Other ...

  8. Double Stem Cell Transplant May Help Fight a Childhood Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159243.html Double Stem Cell Transplant May Help Fight a Childhood Cancer ... better chance of survival if they receive two stem cell transplants, a new study reports. The double ...

  9. 3 Drugs Identified to Potentially Fight Zika Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160680.html 3 Drugs Identified to Potentially Fight Zika Virus But only one is already approved in ... developing fetuses protection against the damaging effects of Zika virus, a new multicenter study reports. Researchers identified ...

  10. "As a native nation, we must fight diabetes…"

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Stories "As a native nation, we must fight diabetes…" Past Issues / ... Springs, Az. Type 2 I didn't know a thing about diabetes when I was diagnosed, but ...

  11. 21 CFR 178.3520 - Industrial starch-modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Industrial starch-modified. 178.3520 Section 178... § 178.3520 Industrial starch-modified. Industrial starch-modified may be safely used as a component of..., transporting, or holding food, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Industrial starch-modified...

  12. Adsorption of Polyethylene from Solution onto Starch Film Surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since starch adsorbs onto polyethylene (PE) surfaces from cooled solutions of jet cooked starch, this study was carried out to determine whether adsorption of PE onto hydrophilic starch film surfaces would also take place if starch films were placed in hot solutions of PE in organic solvents, and th...

  13. Microcredit -- an emerging tool for fighting poverty.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    A summit focusing on microcredit (small business, microenterprise, loans) as a means of fighting poverty was held February 3-4 in Washington; it was co-chaired by First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and by Queen Sofia of Spain. The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) has long supported microenterprise and microfinance. The summit set a goal of reaching 100 million poor families over the next nine years. USAID Administrator Brian Atwood spoke concerning the need to involve the private sector in microfinance; previously loans had been financed outside of the mainstream financial system via nongovernmental organizations and credit unions funded mainly by governments and donors. USAID launched a Microenterprise Initiative in 1994 that has supported 150 programs in 45 countries, and that is expected to reach approximately 4 million families. Atwood said the microenterprise strategies were currently in use in nearly every country USAID supports in Latin America and Asia, and most countries in Africa; future efforts would concentrate on countries in Africa, in eastern Europe and in central Asia. Mrs. Clinton called microenterprise "an invaluable tool in alleviating poverty, promoting self-sufficiency, and stimulating the economy." Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin stated that the policy helped people help themselves by giving them the tools they needed to join the economic mainstream. Microcredit focuses on businesses with five or fewer workers; loans range from less than $100 to $10,000. More than half of the businesses are owned and operated by women. PMID:12292306

  14. Fighting proliferation new concerns for the nineties

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolski, H.

    1996-09-01

    Iraq`s threatened chemical missile strikes against US forces, combined with its efforts to build nuclear weapons, have quite literally put issues about the proliferation of strategic weapons on the map. Indeed, after Operation Desert Shield, both the Bush and Clinton administrations focused considerable attention on the need to dismantle Iraq`s strategic weapons capabilities and to assure that the strategic weapons complex in the former Soviet Union doesn`t end up helping future Iraqs. Since Operation Desert Storm, though, additional proliferation concern devising an effective strategy against proliferation, coping with the spread of space technology, and curbing Iran`s and North Korea`s strategic programs have emerged. Fighting Proliferation examines these challenges and their implications for US policy. The first of these concern how best to reform existing non- proliferation efforts-is examined in part 1. With the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) indefinitely extended, just exactly how the treaty will be implemented remains unclear. The Clinton administration is on record arguing that the NPT is a model for how the US will curb the proliferation of not only nuclear but all other kinds of strategic weapons. But what does the NPT and its obligations actually mean. Its key proscriptions in Articles 1, 2, and 3 are ambiguous. The treaty also lacks any clear enforcement measures and is nearly impossible to amend.

  15. Fighting 'personhood' initiatives in the United States.

    PubMed

    Collins, Lee Rubin; Crockin, Susan L

    2012-06-01

    'Personhood' initiatives filed in many states within the United States threaten to impose potentially significant restrictions on infertility treatment, embryo disposition, pre-natal care, abortion, contraception, and stem-cell research, all through attempts to redefine a 'person' or 'human being' as existing from the moment of fertilization or conception, and endowed with the full legal and Constitutional rights of personhood. Virginia's recent, unsuccessful attempt to pass such legislation provides both a dramatic example of these efforts and valuable lessons in the fight against them by infertility advocates and others. Arguments over loss of infertility treatment seemed more persuasive to legislatures than did restrictions on abortion or stem cell research. Indeed, persuading legislators or voters that they could be 'pro-life' and still anti-personhood initiatives was a key strategy, and consumer efforts and media attention were instrumental. The most central lessons, however, may be the degree of intensity and coordinated strategy to shift public perception that lie behind these numerous state efforts, regardless of whether the actual initiatives are won or lost. PMID:22542604

  16. Asia: fighting HIV / AIDS makes business sense.

    PubMed

    1999-11-15

    Three Asian companies are investing in HIV/AIDS education and prevention schemes because they are starting to feel the effects of the HIV/AIDS pandemic on their workforces. A total of 17 companies from the region signed a document in the Fifth International Congress on AIDS in Asia and the Pacific committing to the fight against AIDS. The group said that effective workplace programs can prevent an increase in absenteeism, health care costs and labor turnover, a decrease in productivity, loss of experienced personnel and the need for increased resources to hire and retrain replacements. American International Assurance in Thailand accredits companies with effective HIV/AIDS campaigns in the workplace and gives them a 5-10% discount on premiums on group life insurance policies. At Freeport Mining in Indonesia, an HIV/AIDS campaign markedly improved condom usage rates and decreased incidence of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among workers. Meanwhile, India's Tata Tea Limited expanded its health services to include surveys, training, education, and counseling on HIV/AIDS and STDs. PMID:12295521

  17. Impact of Fighting on Antibody Response to Hepatitis B Virus Vaccine in Mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Sheng; Li, Xin; Wan, Min; Hua, Li; Xiao, Yue; Dong, Boqi; Liu, Jialin; Diao, Wenzhen; Yu, Yongli; Wang, Liying

    2015-11-01

    Antibody responses to vaccines can be influenced by various behavioral and psychosocial factors. Few reports exist on the impact of fighting on antibody response to vaccines. This study unexpectedly found that fighting could significantly enhance antibody production in male mice immunized with hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccines. To confirm the finding, a mouse-fighting model was established in which it was observed that only intense fighting, not mild fighting, enhanced the antibody response to HBV surface antigen in male mice, and that the frequency of fighting and active attacks during fighting showed no obvious relationship with the antibody levels in the male mice that experienced fighting. In addition, fighting can cause significant upregulation of CD80 in CD11c(+) cells in the spleen of male mice. These data suggest that fighting could influence the humoral immune response in individuals immunized with vaccines or infected with microbes. PMID:26417964

  18. Enzymatically Modified Starch Ameliorates Postprandial Serum Triglycerides and Lipid Metabolome in Growing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U.; Eberspächer, Eva; Grüll, Dietmar; Kowalczyk, Lidia; Molnar, Timea; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2015-01-01

    Developing host digestion-resistant starches to promote human health is of great research interest. Chemically modified starches (CMS) are widely used in processed foods and although the modification of the starch molecule allows specific reduction in digestibility, the metabolic effects of CMS have been less well described. This short-term study evaluated the impact of enzymatically modified starch (EMS) on fasting and postprandial profiles of blood glucose, insulin and lipids, and serum metabolome in growing pigs. Eight jugular-vein catheterized pigs (initial body weight, 37.4 kg; 4 months of age) were fed 2 diets containing 72% purified starch (EMS or waxy corn starch (control)) in a cross-over design for 7 days. On day 8, an 8-hour meal tolerance test (MTT) was performed with serial blood samplings. Besides biochemical analysis, serum was analysed for 201 metabolites through targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approaches. Pigs fed the EMS diet showed increased (P<0.05) immediate serum insulin and plasma glucose response compared to pigs fed the control diet; however, area-under-the-curves for insulin and glucose were not different among diets. Results from MTT indicated reduced postprandial serum triglycerides with EMS versus control diet (P<0.05). Likewise, serum metabolome profiling identified characteristic changes in glycerophospholipid, lysophospholipids, sphingomyelins and amino acid metabolome profiles with EMS diet compared to control diet. Results showed rapid adaptations of blood metabolites to dietary starch shifts within 7 days. In conclusion, EMS ingestion showed potential to attenuate postprandial raise in serum lipids and suggested constant alteration in the synthesis or breakdown of sphingolipids and phospholipids which might be a health benefit of EMS consumption. Because serum insulin was not lowered, more research is warranted to reveal possible underlying mechanisms behind the observed changes in the profile of serum lipid

  19. Enzymatically Modified Starch Ameliorates Postprandial Serum Triglycerides and Lipid Metabolome in Growing Pigs.

    PubMed

    Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U; Eberspächer, Eva; Grüll, Dietmar; Kowalczyk, Lidia; Molnar, Timea; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2015-01-01

    Developing host digestion-resistant starches to promote human health is of great research interest. Chemically modified starches (CMS) are widely used in processed foods and although the modification of the starch molecule allows specific reduction in digestibility, the metabolic effects of CMS have been less well described. This short-term study evaluated the impact of enzymatically modified starch (EMS) on fasting and postprandial profiles of blood glucose, insulin and lipids, and serum metabolome in growing pigs. Eight jugular-vein catheterized pigs (initial body weight, 37.4 kg; 4 months of age) were fed 2 diets containing 72% purified starch (EMS or waxy corn starch (control)) in a cross-over design for 7 days. On day 8, an 8-hour meal tolerance test (MTT) was performed with serial blood samplings. Besides biochemical analysis, serum was analysed for 201 metabolites through targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approaches. Pigs fed the EMS diet showed increased (P<0.05) immediate serum insulin and plasma glucose response compared to pigs fed the control diet; however, area-under-the-curves for insulin and glucose were not different among diets. Results from MTT indicated reduced postprandial serum triglycerides with EMS versus control diet (P<0.05). Likewise, serum metabolome profiling identified characteristic changes in glycerophospholipid, lysophospholipids, sphingomyelins and amino acid metabolome profiles with EMS diet compared to control diet. Results showed rapid adaptations of blood metabolites to dietary starch shifts within 7 days. In conclusion, EMS ingestion showed potential to attenuate postprandial raise in serum lipids and suggested constant alteration in the synthesis or breakdown of sphingolipids and phospholipids which might be a health benefit of EMS consumption. Because serum insulin was not lowered, more research is warranted to reveal possible underlying mechanisms behind the observed changes in the profile of serum lipid

  20. Changes in physicochemical properties and in vitro digestibility of common buckwheat starch by heat-moisture treatment and annealing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hang; Guo, Xudan; Li, Wuxia; Wang, Xiaofang; Lv, Manman; Peng, Qiang; Wang, Min

    2015-11-01

    Heat-moisture treatment (HMT) and annealing (ANN) were applied in the test to investigate how they can affect the physicochemical properties and in vitro digestibility of common buckwheat starch (CBS). In the practice, these two modification methods did not change typical 'A'-type X-ray diffraction pattern of CBS. However, the gelatinization temperature, amylose content, and relative crystallinity increased and peak viscosity value and gelatinization enthalpy of CBS declined significantly. Both the solubility and swelling power, which were temperature dependent, progressively decreased along with the treatments. Remarkable increase in slowly digested starch and resistant starch level was found at the same time. Besides, the decreases of rapidly digested starch and total hydrolysis content by using HMT were greater than by using ANN. The results indicated that the ANN and HMT efficiently modified physicochemical properties and in vitro digestibility of CBS and were able to improve its thermal stability, healthy benefits and application value. PMID:26256346

  1. Effect of some parameters on the synthesis and the physico-chemical properties of new amphiphilic starch-g-copolymers.

    PubMed

    Worzakowska, Marta; Grochowicz, Marta

    2015-10-01

    The detailed studies on the graft copolymerization of phenyl methacrylate onto gelatinized potato starch in water using potassium persulfate as radical initiator were presented. The different reaction parameters such as effect of initiator concentration, starch to monomer ratio, reaction temperature and reaction time were studied in terms of grafting efficiency, grafting percent and percent homopolymer formation. It was found that grafting process of aromatic methacrylate monomer onto potato starch backbone allowed obtaining new amphiphilic copolymers with different physicochemical properties as compared to non-modified starch. The influence of the copolymer structure on the swelling behavior in polar and non-polar solvents, moisture absorbance, gelatinization properties, acid and base resistance, surface morphology and thermal properties was discussed. PMID:26076635

  2. Effect of gelatinized-retrograded and extruded starches on characteristics of cookies, muffins and noodles.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shagun; Singh, Narpinder; Katyal, Mehak

    2016-05-01

    The effect of substitution of wheat flour with gelatinized-retrograded starch (GRS) and extruded starch (ES) at 10 and 20 % levels on characteristics of cookies, muffins and noodles was evaluated. Cookies made by substitution of flour with GRS or ES were lighter in color, showed higher spread ratio and resistant starch (RS) content. Muffins made by substitution of flour with GRS or ES were lighter in color, showed less height, specific volume and gas cells and higher RS content. Muffins containing GRS were less firm while those made by incorporating ES showed higher firmness than those made without substitution. Noodles made with substitution of flour with GRS or ES showed higher RS content and reduced water uptake, gruel solid loss, hardness and adhesiveness. Cookies and noodles prepared with and without substitution of flour with GRS or ES did not show any significant differences in terms of overall acceptability scores. PMID:27407215

  3. Nano CaCO₃ imprinted starch hybrid polyethylhexylacrylate\\polyvinylalcohol nanocomposite thin films.

    PubMed

    Prusty, Kalyani; Swain, Sarat K

    2016-03-30

    Starch hybrid polyethylhexylacrylate (PEHA)/polyvinylalcohol (PVA) nanocomposite thin films are prepared by different composition of nano CaCO3 in aqueous medium. The chemical interaction of nano CaCO3 with PEHA in presence of starch and PVA is investigated by Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). X-ray diffraction (XRD) is used in order to study the change in crystallite size and d-spacing during the formation of nanocomposite thin film. The surface morphology of nanofilms is studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The topology and surface roughness of the films is noticed by atomic force microscope (AFM). The tensile strength, thermal stability and thermal conductivity of films are increased with increase in concentrations of CaCO3 nanopowder. The chemical resistance and biodegradable properties of the nanocomposite thin films are also investigated. The growth of bacteria and fungi in starch hybrid PEHA film is reduced substantially with imprint of nano CaCO3. PMID:26794951

  4. Processing and characterization of polyols plasticized-starch reinforced with microcrystalline cellulose.

    PubMed

    Rico, M; Rodríguez-Llamazares, S; Barral, L; Bouza, R; Montero, B

    2016-09-20

    Biocomposites suitable for short-life applications such as food packaging were prepared by melt processing and investigated. Biocomposites studied are wheat starch plasticized with two different molecular weight polyols (glycerol and sorbitol) and reinforced with various amounts of microcrystalline cellulose. The effect of the plasticizer type and the filler amount on the processing properties, the crystallization behavior and morphology developed for the materials, and the influence on thermal stability, dynamic mechanical properties and water absorption behavior were investigated. Addition of microcrystalline cellulose led to composites with good filler-matrix adhesion where the stiffness and resistance to humidity absorption were improved. The use of sorbitol as a plasticizer of starch also improved the stiffness and water uptake behavior of the material as well as its thermal stability. Biodegradable starch-based materials with a wide variety of properties can be tailored by varying the polyol plasticizer type and/or by adding microcrystalline cellulose filler. PMID:27261733

  5. Plant-crafted starches for bioplastics production.

    PubMed

    Sagnelli, Domenico; Hebelstrup, Kim H; Leroy, Eric; Rolland-Sabaté, Agnès; Guilois, Sophie; Kirkensgaard, Jacob J K; Mortensen, Kell; Lourdin, Denis; Blennow, Andreas

    2016-11-01

    Transgenically-produced amylose-only (AO) starch was used to manufacture bioplastic prototypes. Extruded starch samples were tested for crystal residues, elasticity, glass transition temperature, mechanical properties, molecular mass and microstructure. The AO starch granule crystallinity was both of the B- and Vh-type, while the isogenic control starch was mainly A-type. The first of three endothermic transitions was attributed to gelatinization at about 60°C. The second and third peaks were identified as melting of the starch and amylose-lipid complexes, respectively. After extrusion, the AO samples displayed Vh- and B-type crystalline structures, the B-type polymorph being the dominant one. The AO prototypes demonstrated a 6-fold higher mechanical stress at break and 2.5-fold higher strain at break compared to control starch. Dynamic mechanical analysis showed a significant increase in the storage modulus (E') for AO samples compared to the control. The data support the use of pure starch-based bioplastics devoid of non-polysaccharide fillers. PMID:27516287

  6. 75 FR 879 - National Starch and Chemical Company Specialty Starches Division Including On-Site Leased Workers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-06

    ..., applicable to workers of National Starch and Chemical Company, Specialty Starches Division, Island Falls, Maine. The notice was published in the Federal Register on December 31, 2007 (72 FR 74343). At the... Employment and Training Administration National Starch and Chemical Company Specialty Starches...

  7. Applicability, Commercial Utility and Recent Patents on Starch and Starch Derivative as Pharmaceutical Drug Delivery Carrier.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Shreya; Malviya, Rishabha; Sharma, Pramod K

    2015-01-01

    Natural polymers are widely utilized in pharmaceutical and food industries. Starch, a major carbohydrate is a staple food in human and animal diets which is simply extractable from various sources, like potato, maize, corn, wheat, etc. It is widely used as a raw material in various food and non food industries as well as in paper, textile and other industries. This article summarizes the starch and modification of starch and to produce a novel molecule with various applications in industries including number of advances in pharmaceutical industry. The unique characteristics of starch and their modified form can be successfully used as drug delivery carriers in various pharmaceutical preparations. It is widely used as controlled and sustained release polymer, tablet disintegrant, drug delivery carrier, plasma volume expander and also finds its applicability in bone tissue engineering and in artificial red cells. It also includes the patents related to starch and modified starch based products and their commercial utility. PMID:26205680

  8. Scanning probe acoustic microscopy of extruded starch materials: direct visual evidence of starch crystal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongdong; Liu, Boxiang; Li, Mengxing; Wei, Min; Li, Hua; Liu, Peng; Wan, Tuo

    2013-10-15

    Scanning probe acoustic microscopy (SPAM) has been successfully used to study inorganic and keratin biomaterials. However, few studies have attempted to apply SPAM to structural study of non-keratin organic materials such as starch based materials. This study investigated hardness and surface finish to establish sample preparation method suitable for SPAM imaging and acquired clear acoustic images of extruded starch materials. Acquired acoustic images directly exhibited certain structure of starch materials and provided visual evidence of starch material components and aggregates. In addition, through correlating acoustic images with X-ray diffraction data, crystal-structural information in nano-scale was obtained and acoustic image contrast showed a linear relationship with starch amylose content in extruded starch materials. PMID:23987357

  9. Effects of salts on the gelatinization and retrogradation properties of maize starch and waxy maize starch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhou, Hongxian; Yang, Hong; Zhao, Siming; Liu, Youming; Liu, Ru

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of salts on the gelatinization and retrogradation of maize and waxy maize starch. Experimental results showed that the salting-out or structure-making ions, such as F(-) and SO4(2-), decreased the swelling power, solubility and transparency of both starches, but increased the gelatinization temperature, enthalpy, and syneresis, due to the tendency of these ions to protect the hydrogen bond links among starch molecules. On the other hand, the salting-in or structure-breaking ions, such as I(-) and SCN(-), exhibited the opposite effects. Microscopic observations confirmed such effects of salts on both starches. Furthermore, the effects of salts were more significant on waxy maize and on normal maize starch. Generally, salts could significantly influence on the gelatinization and retrogradation of maize and waxy maize starch, following the order of the Hofmeister series. PMID:27507481

  10. Digestibility of gluten proteins is reduced by baking and enhanced by starch digestion

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaoyan; Bellido, Vincent; Toole, Geraldine A.; Gates, Fred K.; Wickham, Martin S. J.; Shewry, Peter R.; Bakalis, Serafim; Padfield, Philip; Mills, E. N. Clare

    2015-01-01

    Scope Resistance of proteins to gastrointestinal digestion may play a role in determining immune‐mediated adverse reactions to foods. However, digestion studies have largely been restricted to purified proteins and the impact of food processing and food matrices on protein digestibility is poorly understood. Methods and results Digestibility of a total gliadin fraction (TGF), flour (cv Hereward), and bread was assessed using in vitro batch digestion with simulated oral, gastric, and duodenal phases. Protein digestion was monitored by SDS‐PAGE and immunoblotting using monoclonal antibodies specific for celiac‐toxic sequences (QQSF, QPFP) and starch digestion by measuring undigested starch. Whereas the TGF was rapidly digested during the gastric phase the gluten proteins in bread were virtually undigested and digested rapidly during the duodenal phase only if amylase was included. Duodenal starch digestion was also slower in the absence of duodenal proteases. Conclusion The baking process reduces the digestibility of wheat gluten proteins, including those containing sequences active in celiac disease. Starch digestion affects the extent of protein digestion, probably because of gluten‐starch complex formation during baking. Digestion studies using purified protein fractions alone are therefore not predictive of digestion in complex food matrices. PMID:26202208

  11. Fight tactics in wood ants: individuals in smaller groups fight harder but die faster

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Tim P.; Briffa, Mark

    2011-01-01

    When social animals engage in inter-group contests, the outcome is determined by group sizes and individual masses, which together determine group resource-holding potential (‘group RHP’). Individuals that perceive themselves as being in a group with high RHP may receive a motivational increase and increase their aggression levels. Alternatively, individuals in lower RHP groups may increase their aggression levels in an attempt to overcome the RHP deficit. We investigate how ‘group RHP’ influences agonistic tactics in red wood ants Formica rufa. Larger groups had higher total agonistic indices, but per capita agonistic indices were highest in the smallest groups, indicating that individuals in smaller groups fought harder. Agonistic indices were influenced by relative mean mass, focal group size, opponent group size and opponent group agonistic index. Focal group attrition rates decreased as focal group relative agonistic indices increased and there was a strong negative influence of relative mean mass. The highest focal attrition rates were received when opponent groups were numerically large and composed of large individuals. Thus, fight tactics in F. rufa seem to vary with both aspects of group RHP, group size and the individual attributes of group members, indicating that information on these are available to fighting ants. PMID:21389029

  12. Occupational exposures in California wildland fire fighting.

    PubMed

    Materna, B L; Jones, J R; Sutton, P M; Rothman, N; Harrison, R J

    1992-01-01

    Industrial hygiene measurement of exposures to wildland fire fighters was conducted in northern California during three consecutive fire seasons (1986-1989) in conjunction with three separate health effects studies. Chemicals that were monitored included carbon monoxide, total and respirable particulates, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), crystalline silica, aldehydes, and benzene. Measurements were taken at both wildland fires and prescribed (planned) burns. A variety of collection methods were employed--colorimetric detector tubes and a CO monitor were used for direct-reading area measurements; colorimetric diffusion tubes, filter cassettes, sorbent tubes, and passive vapor monitors were used for determining personal time-weighted average exposures. A new screening method (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Method 2539) was used to identify the presence of specific aldehydes. Results show that wildland fire fighters may at times be exposed to concentrations of carbon monoxide, total or respirable particulates, or silica at levels near or higher than recommended occupational exposure limits, although group means were generally well below the limits. Time-weighted average formaldehyde levels, measured in a few instances above 0.37 mg/m3 (0.3 ppm), indicate a potential for formaldehyde-induced eye or respiratory irritation under these conditions. Certain characteristics of the work such as high altitude, temperature, and breathing rate; extended work shifts; and additional off-shift exposures suggest that adjustment of 8-hr exposure limits may be necessary to provide adequate protection. In part, because of the rigors of performing industrial hygiene measurements under fire fighting conditions, data are limited and could not be considered representative of the full range of exposures fire fighters may encounter.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1317093

  13. Fighting Back, Bedbugs Grow a Thicker Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Grow a Thicker Skin It helps protect against pesticides and may explain why population is growing worldwide, ... developing thicker "skins" that help them resist common pesticides, a new study suggests. This might explain why ...

  14. Drug discovery: Fighting evolution with chemical synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ming; Baran, Phil S.

    2016-05-01

    A synthetic strategy has been developed that provides easy access to structurally diverse analogues of naturally occurring antibiotics, providing a fresh means of attack in the war against drug-resistant bacteria. See Article p.338

  15. Dilute solution properties of canary seed (Phalaris canariensis) starch in comparison to wheat starch.

    PubMed

    Irani, Mahdi; Razavi, Seyed M A; Abdel-Aal, El-Sayed M; Hucl, Pierre; Patterson, Carol Ann

    2016-06-01

    Dilute solution properties of an unknown starch are important to understand its performance and applications in food and non-food industries. In this paper, rheological and molecular properties (intrinsic viscosity, molecular weight, shape factor, voluminosity, conformation and coil overlap parameters) of the starches from two hairless canary seed varieties (CO5041 & CDC Maria) developed for food use were evaluated in the dilute regime (Starch dispersions in DMSO (0.5g/dl)) and compared with wheat starch (WS). The results showed that Higiro model is the best among five applied models for intrinsic viscosity determination of canary seed starch (CSS) and WS on the basis of coefficient of determination (R(2)) and root mean square error (RMSE). WS sample showed higher intrinsic viscosity value (1.670dl/g) in comparison to CSS samples (1.325-1.397dl/g). Berry number and the slope of master curve demonstrated that CSS and WS samples were in dilute domain without entanglement occurrence. The shape factor suggested spherical and ellipsoidal structure for CO5041 starch and ellipsoidal for CDC Maria starch and WS. The molecular weight, coil radius and coil volume of CSSs were smaller than WS. The behavior and molecular characterization of canary seed starch showed its unique properties compared with wheat starch. PMID:26902890

  16. Carbohydrate-binding module 74 is a novel starch-binding domain associated with large and multidomain α-amylase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Valk, Vincent; Lammerts van Bueren, Alicia; van der Kaaij, Rachel M; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2016-06-01

    Microbacterium aurum B8.A is a bacterium that originates from a potato starch-processing plant and employs a GH13 α-amylase (MaAmyA) enzyme that forms pores in potato starch granules. MaAmyA is a large and multi-modular protein that contains a novel domain at its C terminus (Domain 2). Deletion of Domain 2 from MaAmyA did not affect its ability to degrade starch granules but resulted in a strong reduction in granular pore size. Here, we separately expressed and purified this Domain 2 in Escherichia coli and determined its likely function in starch pore formation. Domain 2 independently binds amylose, amylopectin, and granular starch but does not have any detectable catalytic (hydrolytic or oxidizing) activity on α-glucan substrates. Therefore, we propose that this novel starch-binding domain is a new carbohydrate-binding module (CBM), the first representative of family CBM74 that assists MaAmyA in efficient pore formation in starch granules. Protein sequence-based BLAST searches revealed that CBM74 occurs widespread, but in bacteria only, and is often associated with large and multi-domain α-amylases containing family CBM25 or CBM26 domains. CBM74 may specifically function in binding to granular starches to enhance the capability of α-amylase enzymes to degrade resistant starches (RSs). Interestingly, the majority of family CBM74 representatives are found in α-amylases originating from human gut-associated Bifidobacteria, where they may assist in resistant starch degradation. The CBM74 domain thus may have a strong impact on the efficiency of RS digestion in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27101946

  17. Physicochemical and binder properties of starch obtained from Cyperus esculentus.

    PubMed

    Manek, Rahul V; Builders, Philip F; Kolling, William M; Emeje, Martins; Kunle, Olobayo O

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to isolate starch from the tubers of Cyperus esculentus L. and evaluate its physicochemical and binder properties. Extraction of starch using sodium metabisulfite yielded 37 g of starch per 100 g of the tubers. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that Cyperus starch consists of oval to elliptical particles with a smooth surface. Cyperus starch demonstrates a narrow particle size distribution with a mean of 8.25 μm. Cyperus starch conforms well to United States Pharmacopeia standards established for widely used starches like maize and potato. The X-ray powder diffraction pattern and moisture sorption profile of Cyperus starch were comparable to that of maize starch. Cyperus starch had lower swelling power than maize and potato starch, indicative of stronger associative forces within the granules. Carr's index and Hausner ratio indicate that Cyperus starch should have comparable flow properties with respect to maize and potato starch. Cyperus starch was employed as binder for the formulation of metronidazole tablets. Formulations containing 5%, 7.5%, and 10% Cyperus starch were compared with those containing 10% potato starch. At 10% binder concentration, the tablets containing Cyperus starch exhibited better hardness and negligible friability as compared with those with potato starch. Although the binder concentration had a significant effect on the disintegration time of the tablets, it did not seem to affect the dissolution profile. These results indicate that Cyperus starch provides excellent binding properties without compromising drug release characteristics and should be explored in pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:22350737

  18. Starch Synthesis in Arabidopsis Is Achieved by Spatial Cotranscription of Core Starch Metabolism Genes1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Huang-Lung; Lue, Wei-Ling; Lu, Kuan-Jen; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun; Wang, Shue-Mei; Chen, Jychian

    2009-01-01

    Starch synthesis and degradation require the participation of many enzymes, occur in both photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic tissues, and are subject to environmental and developmental regulation. We examine the distribution of starch in vegetative tissues of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and the expression of genes encoding core enzymes for starch synthesis. Starch is accumulated in plastids of epidermal, mesophyll, vascular, and root cap cells but not in root proper cells. We also identify cells that can synthesize starch heterotrophically in albino mutants. Starch synthesis in leaves is regulated by developmental stage and light. Expression of gene promoter-β-glucuronidase fusion constructs in transgenic seedlings shows that starch synthesis genes are transcriptionally active in cells with starch synthesis and are inactive in root proper cells except the plastidial phosphoglucose isomerase. In addition, ADG2 (for ADPG PYROPHOSPHORYLASE2) is not required for starch synthesis in root cap cells. Expression profile analysis reveals that starch metabolism genes can be clustered into two sets based on their tissue-specific expression patterns. Starch distribution and expression pattern of core starch synthesis genes are common in Arabidopsis and rice (Oryza sativa), suggesting that the regulatory mechanism for starch metabolism genes may be conserved evolutionarily. We conclude that starch synthesis in Arabidopsis is achieved by spatial coexpression of core starch metabolism genes regulated by their promoter activities and is fine-tuned by cell-specific endogenous and environmental controls. PMID:19759345

  19. Isolation and Purification of Leaf Starch Components

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chong W.

    1979-01-01

    A procedure was developed for the separation and purification of amylose and amylopectin isolated from cotton leaves. Cotton leaves were homogenized in 0.02 molar phosphate buffer at pH 7.0 containing HgCl2 plus toluene. Crude starch granules were collected by centrifugation and partially purified by treating with acetone and toluene. The starch granules were then dispersed in dimethylsulfoxide and precipitated with ethyl alcohol. The precipitate was suspended in boiling water. Amylose was separated from amylopectin and cell wall particles on a Sepharose 2B column and further purified with thymol and butanol. Amylopectin was then separated from the colloidal cell wall contaminants by its specific interaction with concanavalin A. Purities of starch components were verified by specific biochemical and enzymic tests in addition to their iodine-binding capacity. This procedure should also be suitable for purification of starch components from other plant sources. PMID:16661064

  20. Biotechnological relevance of starch-degrading enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, G.G.

    1987-01-01

    Traditional enzymes, such as the amylases and the proteases, have been improved, novel applications have been found and new and valuable products have been marketed. The enzymatic hydrolysis of starch is described in some detail. (Refs. 8).

  1. Starch-Poly(Hydroxylalkanoate) Composites and Blends

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper summarizes research on starch-polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) blends and composites. Efforts to increase compatibility, characterize mechanical and biodegradation properties are described. A range of blend products have been prepared including molded plastics, films and foams. Finally, futu...

  2. Production of modified starches by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Il-Jun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Yook, Hong-Sun; Bae, Chun-Ho; Lee, Hyun-Soo; Kwon, Joong-Ho; Chung, Cha-Kwon

    1999-04-01

    As a new processing method for the production of modified starch, gamma irradiation and four kinds of inorganic peroxides were applied to commercial corn starch. The addition of inorganic peroxides without gamma irradiation or gamma irradiation without the addition of inorganic peroxides effectively decreased initial viscosity, but did not sufficiently keep viscosity stable. The combination of adding ammonium persulfate (APS) and gamma irradiation showed the lowest initial viscosity and the best stability out of the tested four kinds of inorganic peroxides. Among the tested mixing methods of APS, soaking was found to be more effective than dry blending or spraying. Therefore, the production of modified starch with low viscosity as well as with sufficient viscosity stability became feasible by the control of gamma irradiation dose levels and the amount of added APS to starch.

  3. Rheological behaviour of heated potato starch dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juszczak, L.; Witczak, M.; Ziêba, T.; Fortuna, T.

    2012-10-01

    The study was designed to investigate the rheological properties of heated potato starch dispersions. Water suspensions of starch were heated at 65, 80 or 95°C for 5, 15, 30 or 60 min. The dispersions obtained were examined for granule size distribution and rheology. It was found that the starch dispersions significantly differed in both respects. The mean diameters of starch granules were largest for the dispersion heated at 65°C and smallest for that heated at 95°C. As the heating temperature was raised, the yield stresses and consistency coefficients decreased, while the flow behaviour indexes and Casson plastic viscosities increased. There were also differences in the viscoelastic properties of the dispersions: for those heated at 65°C the storage and loss moduli increased with heating time whereas for those heated at 80°C both moduli decreased.

  4. Enzymatic pretreatment for preparing starch nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    LeCorre, Déborah; Vahanian, Elina; Dufresne, Alain; Bras, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Starch nanocrystals (SNCs) are crystalline platelets resulting from the acid hydrolysis of starch. A limiting factor for their more widespread use is their preparation duration. Therefore, this study investigates the possibility of developing an enzymatic pretreatment of starch to reduce the acid hydrolysis duration. A screening of three types of enzymes, namely, α-amylase, β-amylase, and glucoamylase, is proposed, and the latter was selected for a pretreatment. Compared with the regular kinetics of hydrolysis for preparing SNC, that of pretreated starch was much faster. The extent of hydrolysis normally reached in 24 h was obtained after only 6 h, and the regular final yield (15% after 5 days) was reached in 45 h. AFM and X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed that the obtained nanoparticles were indeed SNC. PMID:22133316

  5. Heat expanded starch-based compositions.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Gregory M; Klamczynski, Artur K; Holtman, Kevin M; Shey, Justin; Chiou, Bor-Sen; Berrios, Jose; Wood, Delilah; Orts, William J; Imam, Syed H

    2007-05-16

    A heat expansion process similar to that used for expanded bead polystyrene was used to expand starch-based compositions. Foam beads made by solvent extraction had the appearance of polystyrene beads but did not expand when heated due to an open-cell structure. Nonporous beads, pellets, or particles were made by extrusion or by drying and milling cooked starch slurries. The samples expanded into a low-density foam by heating 190-210 degrees C for more than 20 s at ambient pressures. Formulations containing starch (50-85%), sorbitol (5-15%), glycerol (4-12%), ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVAL, 5-15%), and water (10-20%) were studied. The bulk density was negatively correlated to sorbitol, glycerol, and water content. Increasing the EVAL content increased the bulk density, especially at concentrations higher than 15%. Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVAL) increased the bulk density more than EVAL. The bulk density was lowest in samples made of wheat and potato starch as compared to corn starch. The expansion temperature for the starch pellets decreased more than 20 degrees C as the moisture content was increased from 10 to 25%. The addition of EVAL in the formulations decreased the equilibrium moisture content of the foam and reduced the water absorption during a 1 h soaking period. PMID:17432870

  6. Radiation grafting of styrene on starch with high efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikh, N.; Akhavan, A.; Ataeivarjovi, E.

    2013-04-01

    Wheat starch grafted with polystyrene (PS-g-starch) was synthesized via polymerization grafting of styrene on starch by gamma-ray. The effects of starch/styrene weight ratio, and amount of applied doses (5-40 kGy) on the percentage of grafting, G (%), were investigated. The results showed that G (%) increased with increasing starch content. The optimum condition, starch/styrene weight ratio 1/3 and the applied dose 10 kGy, led to 252.9% of grafting. The obtained graft copolymer was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermal gravimetric analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. FTIR spectroscopy as well as the XRD analysis exhibited the changes in chemical and crystalline structure of starch after grafting reaction. TGA demonstrated the changes in thermal stability of PS-g-starch copolymer. SEM micrographs indicated porous patches of PS adhering on the starch.

  7. In vitro starch digestibility changes during storage of maize flour tortillas.

    PubMed

    Agama-Acevedo, Edith; Rendón-Villalobos, Rodolfo; Tovar, Juscelino; Paredes-López, Octavio; Islas-Hernández, José Juan; Bello-Pérez, Luis Arturo

    2004-02-01

    Nixtamalized maize flours elaborated by four factories in Mexico were used for tortilla preparation. Samples were stored at 4 degrees C for up to 72 h and their in vitro starch digestibility features were evaluated. Moisture content was different between flour and tortilla but no evident relation could be established. Protein and lipid levels were lower in tortillas than in flour but ash content was not different in both samples. A decrease in available starch content was observed upon 48 h cold storage (4 degrees C), changes that were concomitant with increased total resistant starch (RS) levels. These changes were due mainly to retrogradation, as suggested by the increased retrograded resistant starch (RRS) levels recorded in stored tortillas; in some samples, RRS represented up to 100% of total RS. The digestion (alpha-amylolysis) rate (DR) of freshly prepared tortillas differed for the various samples. Although the amylolysis patterns for fresh and 72 h-stored tortillas were similar, lower DR values were shown for the stored materials. The differences found among the various tortilla samples may be due to variations in processing conditions during commercial maize flour preparation, and to the use of different maize varieties. PMID:15053349

  8. Electrical and absorption properties of fresh cassava tubers and cassava starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnsoongnoen, S.; Siritaratiwat, A.

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the electrical and absorption properties of fresh cassava tubers and cassava starch at various frequencies using electric impedance spectroscopy and near-infrared spectroscopy, as well as determine the classification of the electrical parameters of both materials using the principle component analysis (PCA) method. All samples were measured at room temperature. The electrical and absorption parameters consisted of dielectric constant, dissipation factor, parallel capacitance, resistance, reactance, impedance and absorbance. It was found that the electrical and absorption properties of fresh cassava tubers and cassava starch were a function of frequency, and there were significant differences between the materials. The dielectric constant, parallel capacitance, resistance and impedance of fresh cassava tubers and cassava starch had similar dramatic decreases with increasing frequency. However, the reactance of both materials increased with an increasing frequency. The electrical parameters of both materials could be classified into two groups. Moreover, the dissipation factor and phase of impedance were the parameters that could be used in the separation of both materials. According to the absorbance patterns of the fresh cassava tubers and cassava starch, there were significant differences.

  9. The Other Double Helix--The Fascinating Chemistry of Starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Robert D.; Tarbet, Bryon J.

    2000-08-01

    Current textbooks deal only briefly with the chemistry of starch. A short review with 21 references is presented, describing the structure of starch and indicating the double helix structure of A-type and B-type starch. The structure of the starch granule is examined, pointing out the existence of growth rings of alternating crystalline and noncrystalline starch, with growing amylopectin molecules extending from the hilum (point of origin) to the surface of the starch granule. The swelling of starch granules in water, above the gelatinization temperature of about 60 °C, is discussed. The process of gelatinization involves unraveling of the starch helix and a manyfold increase in volume of the starch granule as water is imbibed and bound to the unraveled starch polymer by hydrogen bonding. Baking bread or pastries causes unraveling of the starch helix, and the process by which these products become stale corresponds primarily to the re-forming of the starch helix. The importance of this phenomenon in food science is discussed. The absorption of nonpolar linear molecules such as I2, or linear nonpolar portions of molecules such as n-butanol or fats and phospholipids, by the C-type helix of starch is examined. The way in which starch is structurally modified to retard staling is discussed in relation to food technology.

  10. Drug Treatment as a Crime Fighting Tool.

    PubMed

    Jofre-Bonet, Mireia; Sindelar, Jody L.

    2001-12-01

    BACKGROUND: The primary approach to reducing crime in the US has been through the criminal justice system. However, drug treatment may be an effective tool in reducing crime. In order to make better use of treatment as an alternative approach, one needs to know if reducing drug use through treatment results in decreased crime. AIMS OF THE STUDY: The objective of this paper is to model and empirically investigate the extent to which a change in drug use that results from treatment reduces crime and whether a change in drug use is causally related to change in crime. We focus on crime-for-profit. METHODS: We use a multi-site dataset of 3,502 inner-city drug users entering treatment. We analyze the change in drug use and crime pre and post treatment. We take first differences to address the omitted variable problem. RESULTS: We find that treatment reduces drug use and that, in turn, reduced drug use has a significant impact on crime. For our study population, reduced drug use seems to be causally related to reduced crime. This finding is robust to specification and subsamples. We estimate that reduced drug use due to treatment is associated with 54% fewer days of crime for profit, ceteris paribus. DISCUSSION: We use a longitudinal data set and a novel approach to analyze the relationship between crime and drugs. We analyze a low-income, inner-city, drug-addicted sample. We use self-reported crime. For our purposes, the use of individual data is an improvement over the use of aggregate level data that has been used in much of the related literature. Limitations of our paper include that we do not have a random sample and that our measure is self-reported in the previous 30 days. IMPLICATIONS FOR HEALTH POLICIES: Our findings suggest that drug treatment may be an effective crime-fighting tool. Treatment reduces not only the crime of drug possession, but also crime-for-profit. Current public policy emphasizes use of the criminal justice system, incarceration in

  11. Prevalence and factors associated with physical fighting among Malaysian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mat Hussin, Siti Fatimah; Abd Aziz, Nur Shahida; Hasim, Hazrin; Sahril, Norhafizah

    2014-09-01

    Physical fighting among adolescents is one manifestation of interpersonal violence that is an important issue globally, but attention to this problem in Malaysia has been limited. We analyzed data available from the Malaysia Global School-Based Health Survey conducted in 2012. Of the 25 507 respondents, 27.4% reported having been in a physical fight in the past 12 months. Being bullied (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 3.01; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.67-3.39) was significantly and highly associated with involvement in physical fighting. Smoking (aOR = 2.56; 95% CI = 2.20-2.97), males (aOR = 1.77; 95% CI = 1.62-1.93), using drugs (aOR = 1.73; 95% CI = 1.09-2.15), and drinking alcohol (aOR = 1.42; 95% CI = 1.24-1.63) were other factors associated with physical fighting. Parental supervision showed no significant association with physical fighting. These findings indicate that more attention needs to be given to bullying at school by school authorities and parents. PMID:25038192

  12. The 53-kDa proteolytic product of precursor starch-hydrolyzing enzyme of Aspergillus niger has Taka-amylase-like activity.

    PubMed

    Ravi-Kumar, K; Venkatesh, K S; Umesh-Kumar, S

    2007-04-01

    The 53-kDa amylase secreted by Aspergillus niger due to proteolytic processing of the precursor starch-hydrolyzing enzyme was resistant to acarbose, a potent alpha-glucosidase inhibitor. The enzyme production was induced when A. niger was grown in starch medium containing the inhibitor. Antibodies against the precursor enzyme cross-reacted with the 54-kDa Taka-amylase protein of A. oryzae. It resembled Taka-amylase in most of its properties and also hydrolyzed starch to maltose of alpha-anomeric configuration. However, it did not degrade maltotriose formed during the reaction and was not inhibited by zinc ions. PMID:17123073

  13. Effect of sorghum flour addition on in vitro starch digestibility, cooking quality, and consumer acceptability of durum wheat pasta.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imran; Yousif, Adel M; Johnson, Stuart K; Gamlath, Shirani

    2014-08-01

    Whole grain sorghum is a valuable source of resistant starch and polyphenolic antioxidants and its addition into staple food like pasta may reduce the starch digestibility. However, incorporating nondurum wheat materials into pasta provides a challenge in terms of maintaining cooking quality and consumer acceptability. Pasta was prepared from 100% durum wheat semolina (DWS) as control or by replacing DWS with either wholegrain red sorghum flour (RSF) or white sorghum flour (WSF) each at 20%, 30%, and 40% incorporation levels, following a laboratory-scale procedure. Pasta samples were evaluated for proximate composition, in vitro starch digestibility, cooking quality, and consumer acceptability. The addition of both RSF and WSF lowered the extent of in vitro starch digestion at all substitution levels compared to the control pasta. The rapidly digestible starch was lowered in all the sorghum-containing pastas compared to the control pasta. Neither RSF or WSF addition affected the pasta quality attributes (water absorption, swelling index, dry matter, adhesiveness, cohesiveness, and springiness), except color and hardness which were negatively affected. Consumer sensory results indicated that pasta samples containing 20% and 30% RSF or WSF had acceptable palatability based on meeting one or both of the preset acceptability criteria. It is concluded that the addition of wholegrain sorghum flour to pasta at 30% incorporation level is possible to reduce starch digestibility, while maintaining adequate cooking quality and consumer acceptability. PMID:25047068

  14. In vitro digestibility and in vivo glucose response of native and physically modified rice starches varying amylose contents.

    PubMed

    Van Hung, Pham; Chau, Huynh Thi; Phi, Nguyen Thi Lan

    2016-01-15

    The native and physically modified rice starches with varying amylose contents were subjected to investigate the in vitro digestibility and the in vivo glucose tolerance in mice. The amylose and resistant starch (RS) contents of five native rice starches ranged in 4.7-30.6% and 6.3-11.8%, respectively. The RS contents of rice starches increased to 18.5-23.9% after heat-moisture treatment (HMT) and to 19.5-26.9% after annealing treatment (ANN). The heat-moisture and annealing treatments significantly reduced glycemic index (GI) values of the rice starches. GI values of the native, heat-moisture treated and annealed rice starches ranged in 68.9-100, 61.2-88.9 and 21.2-43.9, respectively. There was no correlation between amylose contents and the RS contents or GI values, while a strong negative correlation between RS contents and GI values was found (R(2)=-0.747, P<0.01). PMID:26258704

  15. Impact of ancient cereals, pseudocereals and legumes on starch hydrolysis and antiradical activity of technologically viable blended breads.

    PubMed

    Collar, Concha; Jiménez, Teresa; Conte, Paola; Fadda, Costantino

    2014-11-26

    Wheat flour replacement from 22.5% up to 45% by incorporation of ternary blends of teff (T), green pea (GP) and buckwheat (BW) flours provided technologically viable and acceptable sensory rated multigrain breads with superior nutritional value compared to the 100% wheat flour (WT) counterparts. Blended breads exhibited superior nutritional composition, larger amounts of bioaccessible polyphenols, higher anti-radical activity, and lower and slower starch digestibility. Simultaneous lower rapidly digestible starch (57.1%) and higher slowly digestible starch (12.9%) and resistant starch (2.8%) contents (g per 100g fresh bread), considered suitable nutritional trends for dietary starch fractions, were met by the blend formulated 7.5% T, 15% GP, 15% BK. The associated mixture that replaced 37.5% WT, showed a rather lower extent and slower rate of starch hydrolysis with medium-low values for C∞, and H90, and lowest k, and intermediate expected Glycaemic Index (86). All multigrain breads can be labelled as source of dietary fibre (≥ 3 g dietary fibre/100g bread). PMID:25256469

  16. STARCH-OIL INTERACTION IN DRY FILM LUBRICANTS WITH CHEMICALLY MODIFIED STARCH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch is one of the most abundant farm-based raw materials. It is a significant component of such high volume commodity crops as corn, potato, rice, wheat, and barley. Because of the large surplus of these crops over demand, there is a great deal of interest in developing new uses for starch-base...

  17. Characterization of starch films containing starch nanoparticles: part 1: physical and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ai-Min; Wang, Li-Jun; Li, Dong; Adhikari, Benu

    2013-07-25

    We report, for the first time, the preparation method and characteristics of starch films incorporating spray dried and vacuum freeze dried starch nanoparticles. Physical properties of these films such as morphology, crystallinity, water vapor permeability (WVP), opacity, and glass transition temperature (Tg) and mechanical properties (strain versus temperature, strain versus stress, Young's modulus and toughness) were measured. Addition of both starch nanoparticles in starch films increased roughness of surface, lowered degree of crystallinity by 23.5%, WVP by 44% and Tg by 4.3°C, respectively compared to those of starch-only films. Drying method used in preparation of starch nanoparticles only affected opacity of films. The incorporation of nanoparticles in starch films resulted into denser films due to which the extent of variation of strain with temperature was much lower. The toughness and Young's modulus of films containing both types of starch nanoparticles were lower than those of control films especially at <100°C. PMID:23768605

  18. Rheological properties of starch-oil composites with high oil: starch ratios

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many applications have been developed for aqueous dispersions of jet-cooked starch-oil composites prepared by excess steam jet cooking. Previous formulations have typically contained between 20% and 50% oil by weight based on the weight of starch. In order to expand the range of potential applicat...

  19. Position of modifying groups on starch chains of octenylsuccinic anhydride-modified waxy maize starch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA)-modified starches with degree of substitution of 0.018 (OS-S-L) and 0.092 (OS-S-H) were prepared from granular native waxy maize starch in an aqueous slurry system. The substitution distribution of OS groups was investigated by enzyme hydrolysis followed by chromatogr...

  20. Effect of gamma irradiation on thermophysical properties of plasticized starch and starch surfactant films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśla, Krystyna; Watzeels, Nick; Rahier, Hubert

    2014-06-01

    In this work the influence of gamma irradiation on the thermomechanical properties of the films formed in potato starch-glycerol and potato starch-glycerol-surfactant systems were examined by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis, DMA, and Differential Scanning Calorimetry, DSC, and the results were correlated to the amount of the volatile fraction in the films.

  1. Cecropia peltata Accumulates Starch or Soluble Glycogen by Differentially Regulating Starch Biosynthetic Genes[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Bischof, Sylvain; Umhang, Martin; Eicke, Simona; Streb, Sebastian; Qi, Weihong; Zeeman, Samuel C.

    2013-01-01

    The branched glucans glycogen and starch are the most widespread storage carbohydrates in living organisms. The production of semicrystalline starch granules in plants is more complex than that of small, soluble glycogen particles in microbes and animals. However, the factors determining whether glycogen or starch is formed are not fully understood. The tropical tree Cecropia peltata is a rare example of an organism able to make either polymer type. Electron micrographs and quantitative measurements show that glycogen accumulates to very high levels in specialized myrmecophytic structures (Müllerian bodies), whereas starch accumulates in leaves. Compared with polymers comprising leaf starch, glycogen is more highly branched and has shorter branches—factors that prevent crystallization and explain its solubility. RNA sequencing and quantitative shotgun proteomics reveal that isoforms of all three classes of glucan biosynthetic enzyme (starch/glycogen synthases, branching enzymes, and debranching enzymes) are differentially expressed in Müllerian bodies and leaves, providing a system-wide view of the quantitative programming of storage carbohydrate metabolism. This work will prompt targeted analysis in model organisms and cross-species comparisons. Finally, as starch is the major carbohydrate used for food and industrial applications worldwide, these data provide a basis for manipulating starch biosynthesis in crops to synthesize tailor-made polyglucans. PMID:23632447

  2. US Coast Guard lightweight fire-fighting module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The U.S. Coast Guard Fire-fighting Module developed for the purpose of fighting fires in harbors and on ships is described. The module can be lifted by a dockside crane or helicopter and placed on the deck of a patrol boat or cutter for transportation to the scene of the fire. At the fire the module can be set up and put in operation by a crew of two in approximately fifteen minutes. Once in operation the module will deliver water to two fire nozzles at a pressure of 150 psi and a flow rate of 2000 gpm. Sufficient fuel is carried in the module for three hours of continuous operation. A record of the development of the fire fighting module is also presented.

  3. US Coast Guard lightweight fire-fighting module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-05-01

    The U.S. Coast Guard Fire-fighting Module developed for the purpose of fighting fires in harbors and on ships is described. The module can be lifted by a dockside crane or helicopter and placed on the deck of a patrol boat or cutter for transportation to the scene of the fire. At the fire the module can be set up and put in operation by a crew of two in approximately fifteen minutes. Once in operation the module will deliver water to two fire nozzles at a pressure of 150 psi and a flow rate of 2000 gpm. Sufficient fuel is carried in the module for three hours of continuous operation. A record of the development of the fire fighting module is also presented.

  4. A mismatch between the perceived fighting signal and fighting ability reveals survival and physiological costs for bearers.

    PubMed

    González-Santoyo, Isaac; González-Tokman, Daniel M; Munguía-Steyer, Roberto E; Córdoba-Aguilar, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Signals of fighting indicate an animal's intention to attack and so they serve to prevent costly aggressive encounters. However, according to theory, a signal that is different in design (i.e. a novel signal) but that fails to inform fighting intentions will result in negative fitness consequences for the bearer. In the present study we used males of the territorial damselfly Hetaerina americana, which have a red wing spot during territory defense that has evolved as a signal of fighting ability. By producing a novel signal (covering the red spot with blue ink) in territory owners, we investigated: a) the behavioral responses by conspecific males; b) survival cost and c) three physiological mediators of impaired survival: muscular fat reserves, muscle mass and immune ability. We predicted that males with the novel signal would be attacked more often by conspecifics as the former would fail to convey fighting ability and intentions adequately. This will result in lower survival and physiological condition for the novel signal bearers. We found that, compared to control males (males whose red spot was not changed), experimental males had reduced survival, were less able to hold a territory, and had a reduced muscle mass. It seems that spot modified males were not able to effectively communicate their territory tenancy, which may explain why they lost their defended sites. Our results provide support for theoretical models that a novel signal that fails to informing fighting ability may lead to a fitness cost for bearers. PMID:24409304

  5. A Mismatch between the Perceived Fighting Signal and Fighting Ability Reveals Survival and Physiological Costs for Bearers

    PubMed Central

    González-Santoyo, Isaac; González-Tokman, Daniel M.; Munguía-Steyer, Roberto E.; Córdoba-Aguilar, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Signals of fighting indicate an animal's intention to attack and so they serve to prevent costly aggressive encounters. However, according to theory, a signal that is different in design (i.e. a novel signal) but that fails to inform fighting intentions will result in negative fitness consequences for the bearer. In the present study we used males of the territorial damselfly Hetaerina americana, which have a red wing spot during territory defense that has evolved as a signal of fighting ability. By producing a novel signal (covering the red spot with blue ink) in territory owners, we investigated: a) the behavioral responses by conspecific males; b) survival cost and c) three physiological mediators of impaired survival: muscular fat reserves, muscle mass and immune ability. We predicted that males with the novel signal would be attacked more often by conspecifics as the former would fail to convey fighting ability and intentions adequately. This will result in lower survival and physiological condition for the novel signal bearers. We found that, compared to control males (males whose red spot was not changed), experimental males had reduced survival, were less able to hold a territory, and had a reduced muscle mass. It seems that spot modified males were not able to effectively communicate their territory tenancy, which may explain why they lost their defended sites. Our results provide support for theoretical models that a novel signal that fails to informing fighting ability may lead to a fitness cost for bearers. PMID:24409304

  6. Starch phosphorylation in potato tubers is influenced by allelic variation in the genes encoding glucan water dikinase, starch branching enzymes I and II, and starch synthase III

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Margaret A.; Joyce, Nigel I.; Genet, Russell A.; Cooper, Rebecca D.; Murray, Sarah R.; Noble, Alasdair D.; Butler, Ruth C.; Timmerman-Vaughan, Gail M.

    2015-01-01

    Starch phosphorylation is an important aspect of plant metabolism due to its role in starch degradation. Moreover, the degree of phosphorylation of starch determines its physicochemical properties and is therefore relevant for industrial uses of starch. Currently, starch is chemically phosphorylated to increase viscosity and paste stability. Potato cultivars with elevated starch phosphorylation would make this process unnecessary, thereby bestowing economic and environmental benefits. Starch phosphorylation is a complex trait which has been previously shown by antisense gene repression to be influenced by a number of genes including those involved in starch synthesis and degradation. We have used an association mapping approach to discover genetic markers associated with the degree of starch phosphorylation. A diverse collection of 193 potato lines was grown in replicated field trials, and the levels of starch phosphorylation at the C6 and C3 positions of the glucosyl residues were determined by mass spectrometry of hydrolyzed starch from tubers. In addition, the potato lines were genotyped by amplicon sequencing and microsatellite analysis, focusing on candidate genes known to be involved in starch synthesis. As potato is an autotetraploid, genotyping included determination of allele dosage. Significant associations (p < 0.001) were found with SNPs in the glucan water dikinase (GWD), starch branching enzyme I (SBEI) and the starch synthase III (SSIII) genes, and with a SSR allele in the SBEII gene. SNPs in the GWD gene were associated with C6 phosphorylation, whereas polymorphisms in the SBEI and SBEII genes were associated with both C6 and C3 phosphorylation and the SNP in the SSIII gene was associated with C3 phosphorylation. These allelic variants have potential as genetic markers for starch phosphorylation in potato. PMID:25806042

  7. Implementing a low-starch biscuit-free diet in zoo gorillas: the impact on health.

    PubMed

    Less, E H; Lukas, K E; Bergl, R; Ball, R; Kuhar, C W; Lavin, S R; Raghanti, M A; Wensvoort, J; Willis, M A; Dennis, P M

    2014-01-01

    In the wild, western lowland gorillas consume a diet high in fiber and low in caloric density. In contrast, many gorillas in zoos consume a diet that is high-calorie and low in fiber. Some items commonly used in captive gorilla diets contain high levels of starch and sugars, which are minimal in the natural diet of gorillas. There is a growing concern that captive gorillas may qualify as obese. Furthermore, the leading cause of death for adult male gorillas in zoos is heart disease. In humans, a diet that is high in simple carbohydrates is associated with both obesity and the incidence of heart disease. In response to these issues, we implemented a biscuit-free diet (free of biscuits and low in fruit) and measured serum biomarkers of obesity and insulin resistance pre- and post-diet change at three institutions: North Carolina Zoological Garden, Cleveland Metroparks Zoo, and Columbus Zoo and Aquarium. We also added a resistant starch supplement to gorilla diets at two of the above institutions. We anticipated that these diet changes would positively affect biomarkers of obesity and insulin resistance. Both diet manipulations led to a reduction in insulin. Resistant starch also decreased overall serum cholesterol levels. Future research will examine these health changes in a greater number of individuals to determine if the results remain consistent with these preliminary findings. PMID:24420273

  8. High endogenous salivary amylase activity is associated with improved glycemic homeostasis following starch ingestion in adults.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Abigail L; Breslin, Paul A S

    2012-05-01

    In the current study, we determined whether increased digestion of starch by high salivary amylase concentrations predicted postprandial blood glucose following starch ingestion. Healthy, nonobese individuals were prescreened for salivary amylase activity and classified as high (HA) or low amylase (LA) if their activity levels per minute fell 1 SD higher or lower than the group mean, respectively. Fasting HA (n = 7) and LA (n = 7) individuals participated in 2 sessions during which they ingested either a starch (experimental) or glucose solution (control) on separate days. Blood samples were collected before, during, and after the participants drank each solution. The samples were analyzed for plasma glucose and insulin concentrations as well as diploid AMY1 gene copy number. HA individuals had significantly more AMY1 gene copies within their genomes than did the LA individuals. We found that following starch ingestion, HA individuals had significantly lower postprandial blood glucose concentrations at 45, 60, and 75 min, as well as significantly lower AUC and peak blood glucose concentrations than the LA individuals. Plasma insulin concentrations in the HA group were significantly higher than baseline early in the testing session, whereas insulin concentrations in the LA group did not increase at this time. Following ingestion of the glucose solution, however, blood glucose and insulin concentrations did not differ between the groups. These observations are interpreted to suggest that HA individuals may be better adapted to ingest starches, whereas LA individuals may be at greater risk for insulin resistance and diabetes if chronically ingesting starch-rich diets. PMID:22492122

  9. Autoclave and beta-amylolysis lead to reduced in vitro digestibility of starch.

    PubMed

    Hickman, B Elliot; Janaswamy, Srinivas; Yao, Yuan

    2009-08-12

    In this study, a combination of autoclave and beta-amylolysis was used to modulate the digestibility of normal corn starch (NCS) and wheat starch (WS). The modification procedure comprised three cycles of autoclave at 35% moisture content and 121 degrees C, beta-amylolysis, and one additional cycle of autoclave. Starch materials were sampled at each stage and characterized. The fine structure of starch was determined using high-performance size-exclusion chromatography, the micromorphology of starch dispersion was imaged using cryo-SEM, the crystalline pattern was evaluated using wide-angle X-ray powder diffraction, and the digestibility was measured using Englyst assay. After beta-amylolysis, amylose was enriched (from 25.4 to 33.2% for NCS and from 27.5 to 32.8% for WS) and the branch density was increased (from 5.2 to 7.7% for NCS and from 5.3 to 7.9% for WS). Cryo-SEM images showed that the autoclave treatment led to the formation of a low-swelling, high-density gel network, whereas beta-amylolysis nearly demolished the network structure. The loss of A-type crystalline structure and the formation of B- and V-type structures resulted from autoclave, which suggests the formation of amylose-based ordered structure. Englyst assay indicated that, due to beta-amylolysis, the resistant starch (RS) content was increased to 30 from 11% of native NCS and to 23 from 9% of native WS. In contrast, autoclave showed only minor impact on RS levels. The increase of RS observed in this study is associated with enhanced branch density, which is different from the four types of RS commonly defined. PMID:19572519

  10. Effects of starch synthase IIa gene dosage on grain, protein and starch in endosperm of wheat.

    PubMed

    Konik-Rose, Christine; Thistleton, Jenny; Chanvrier, Helene; Tan, Ihwa; Halley, Peter; Gidley, Michael; Kosar-Hashemi, Behjat; Wang, Hong; Larroque, Oscar; Ikea, Joseph; McMaugh, Steve; Regina, Ahmed; Rahman, Sadequr; Morell, Matthew; Li, Zhongyi

    2007-11-01

    Starch synthases (SS) are responsible for elongating the alpha-1,4 glucan chains of starch. A doubled haploid population was generated by crossing a line of wheat, which lacks functional ssIIa genes on each genome (abd), and an Australian wheat cultivar, Sunco, with wild type ssIIa alleles on each genome (ABD). Evidence has been presented previously indicating that the SGP-1 (starch granule protein-1) proteins present in the starch granule in wheat are products of the ssIIa genes. Analysis of 100 progeny lines demonstrated co-segregation of the ssIIa alleles from the three genomes with the SGP-1 proteins, providing further evidence that the SGP-1 proteins are the products of the ssIIa genes. From the progeny lines, 40 doubled haploid lines representing the eight possible genotypes for SSIIa (ABD, aBD, AbD, ABd, abD, aBd, Abd, abd) were characterized for their grain weight, protein content, total starch content and starch properties. For some properties (chain length distribution, pasting properties, swelling power, and gelatinization properties), a progressive change was observed across the four classes of genotypes (wild type, single nulls, double nulls and triple nulls). However, for other grain properties (seed weight and protein content) and starch properties (total starch content, granule morphology and crystallinity, granule size distribution, amylose content, amylose-lipid dissociation properties), a statistically significant change only occurred for the triple nulls, indicating that all three genes had to be missing or inactive for a change to occur. These results illustrate the importance of SSIIa in controlling grain and starch properties and the importance of amylopectin fine structure in controlling starch granule properties in wheat. PMID:17721773

  11. STS-42 crewmembers participate in JSC fire fighting training exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-42 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Payload Specialist Ulf D. Merbold (far left), fire fighting trainer (center), Payload Specialist Roberta L. Bondar (holding hose nozzle), and backup Payload Specialist Roger K. Crouch position water hoses in the direction of a blazing fire in JSC's Fire Training Pit. The crewmembers and backup are learning fire extinguishing techniques during fire fighting and fire training exercises held at JSC's Fire Training Pit located across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207. Merbold is representing the European Space Agency (ESA) and Bondar is representing Canada during the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (IML-1) mission aboard OV-103.

  12. Starches of varied digestibilities differentially modify intestinal function in rats.

    PubMed

    Lajvardi, A; Mazarin, G I; Gillespie, M B; Satchithanandam, S; Calvert, R J

    1993-12-01

    Starches of different digestibilities may enter the colon to different extents and alter colonic function. Male Fischer 344 rats were fed diets containing 25% cooked potato starch, arrowroot starch, high amylose cornstarch or raw potato starch for 6 wk. Fecal weight, transit time, colonic thymidine kinase activity (a marker for cell proliferation), and weight, starch content and pH of the cecum and proximal and distal colon were measured. Raw potato starch was much less completely digested than high amylose cornstarch, resulting in a 32-fold greater amount of undigested starch entering the cecum in the raw potato starch group. Both the high amylose cornstarch and raw potato starch diets significantly enhanced fecal weight and produced large intestinal hypertrophy, effects that were greatest in the raw potato starch group. Raw potato starch feeding was associated with the highest level of thymidine kinase activity, although the differences in thymidine kinase activity among the four groups were not significant. This diet also produced a 50% longer transit time. Entry of a large amount of raw potato starch into the colon resulted in greater luminal acidity, greater luminal bulk and slower transit. A much smaller amount of starch entered the colon in the high amylose cornstarch group and resulted in fecal bulking but no alteration in transit. PMID:8263598

  13. Higher temperature coal tar enamel fights corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.R.; Henegar, S.; Roder, B.

    1996-10-01

    High temperatures create new challenges for pipeline coatings. Cracking, adhesion breakdown and electrochemical corrosion are accelerated by higher service temperatures. A new epoxy primer/coal tar pipeline coating system utilizes the latent heat of the coal tar application to fully cure the newly developed primer to achieve outstanding bonding integrity and high temperature cathodic disbondment resistance. A key reason for this overall high performance is the marriage of a newly developed epoxy primer that provides outstanding adhesion with coal tar enamel, which provides excellent long-term water resistance. The paper describes experimental studies, pilot plant application, cathodic disbondment testing, and results from hot water soak tests and the low temperature cracking test.

  14. Fighting back against male-killers.

    PubMed

    Jaenike, John

    2007-04-01

    Male-killing endosymbionts create a genetic black hole into which host nuclear genes vanish. In a recent paper, Hornett et al. transferred male-killing Wolbachia between different strains of the butterfly Hypolimnas bolina through hybridization and backcrossing. Their results provide unambiguous evidence of genetic variation for resistance to male-killers. A possible consequence of such variation is that male-killing might appear and disappear quickly on an evolutionary timescale. PMID:17276538

  15. Biocidal textiles can help fight nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Borkow, Gadi; Gabbay, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    The rates of nosocomial infections, especially by those caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria, are increasing alarmingly over the globe. Although more rigorous infection control measures are being implemented, it is clear that the current modalities to reduce nosocomial infections are not sufficient. Textiles are an excellent substrate for bacterial growth under appropriate moisture and temperature conditions. Patients shed bacteria and contaminate their pyjamas and sheets. The temperature and humidity between the patients and the bed are appropriate conditions allowing for effective bacterial proliferation. Several studies have found that personnel in contact with contaminated textiles were the source of transmission of the micro-organisms to susceptible patients. Furthermore, it has been reported that bed making in hospitals releases large quantities of micro-organisms into the air, which contaminate the immediate and non-immediate surroundings. Contaminated textiles in hospitals can thus be an important source of microbes contributing to endogenous, indirect-contact, and aerosol transmission of nosocomial related pathogens. We hypothesize that the use of antimicrobial textiles, especially in those textiles that are in close contact with the patients, may significantly reduce bioburden in clinical settings and consequently reduce the risk of nosocomial infections. These textiles should possess broad spectrum biocidal properties. They should be safe for use and highly effective against antibiotic resistant micro-organisms, including those that are commonly involved in hospital-acquired infections, and they should not permit the development of resistant micro-organisms to the active compound. PMID:17959322

  16. The composites based on plasticized starch and carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing; Zheng, Pengwu; Zhao, Feng; Ma, Xiaofei

    2013-08-01

    In this study, the nanocomposite films based on plasticized starch and modified-carbon nanotubes were prepared using a simple casting method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were oxidized to prepare CNT oxide (OCNT) by Hummer's method, and OCNTs were reduced by glucose to obtain reduced CNT (RCNT). The thermogravimetric (TG) curves revealed that OCNTs and RCNTs contained about 15 and 8wt% oxygen-containing groups, respectively. The UV-vis spectra proved that CNTs with the aid of the dispersant TNWDIS, OCNTs and RCNTs possessed the good stability in water. As the fillers, CNTs, OCNTs and RCNTs were introduced into plasticized-starch (PS) matrix to obtain the composites. They had the obvious reinforcing effect on PS matrix. The composites containing 4wt% RCNT had the maximum tensile strength of 19.5MPa, in contrast to 3.89MPa of PS. Among of them, PS/CNT composites showed the best moisture resistance. And the PS-based CNT, OCNT and RCNT composites exhibited approximate electrical conductivities. PMID:23587994

  17. Carboxymethyl starch mucoadhesive microspheres as gastroretentive dosage form.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Marc; Gosselin, Patrick; Mateescu, Mircea Alexandru

    2015-12-30

    Carboxymethyl starch microspheres (CMS-MS) were produced from carboxymethyl starch powder (CMS-P) with a degree of substitution (DS) from 0.1 to 1.5 in order to investigate the influence of DS on physicochemical, drug release and mucoadhesion properties as well as interactions with gastrointestinal tract (GIT) epithelial barrier models. Placebo and furosemide loaded CMS-MS were obtained by emulsion-crosslinking with sodium trimetaphosphate (STMP). DS had an impact on increasing equilibrium water uptake and modulating drug release properties of the CMS-MS according to the surrounding pH. The transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of NCI-N87 gastric cell monolayers was not influenced in presence of CMS-MS, whereas that of Caco-2 intestinal cell monolayers decreased with increasing DS but recovered initial values at about 15h post-treatment. CMS-MS with increasing DS also enhanced furosemide permeability across both NCI-N87 and Caco-2 monolayers at pH gradients from 3.0 to 7.4. Mucoadhesion of CMS-MS on gastric mucosa (acidic condition) increased with the DS up to 55% for a DS of 1.0 but decreased on neutral intestinal mucosa to less than 10% with DS of 0.1. The drug release, permeability enhancement and mucoadhesive properties of the CMS-MS suggest CMS-MS with DS between 0.6 and 1.0 as suitable excipient for gastroretentive oral delivery dosage forms. PMID:26456246

  18. The molecular structure of waxy maize starch nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Angellier-Coussy, Hélène; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Molina-Boisseau, Sonia; Dufresne, Alain; Bertoft, Eric; Perez, Serge

    2009-08-17

    The insoluble residues obtained by submitting amylopectin-rich native starch granules from waxy maize to a mild acid hydrolysis consist of polydisperse platelet nanocrystals that have retained the allomorphic type of the parent granules. The present investigation is a detailed characterization of their molecular composition. Two major groups of dextrins were found in the nanocrystals and were isolated. Each group was then structurally characterized using beta-amylase and debranching enzymes (isoamylase and pullulanase) in combination with anion-exchange chromatography. The chain lengths of the dextrins in both groups corresponded with the thickness of the crystalline lamellae in the starch granules. Only approximately 62 mol% of the group of smaller dextrins with an average degree of polymerization (DP) 12.2 was linear, whereas the rest consisted of branched dextrins. The group of larger dextrins (DP 31.7) apparently only consisted of branched dextrins, several of which were multiply branched molecules. It was shown that many of the branch linkages were resistant to the action of the debranching enzymes. The distribution of branched molecules in the two populations of dextrins suggested that the nanocrystals possessed a regular and principally homogeneous molecular structure. PMID:19414173

  19. Modified hydroxyethyl starch protects cells from oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Filippov, Sergey K; Sergeeva, Olga Yu; Vlasov, Petr S; Zavyalova, Margarita S; Belostotskaya, Galina B; Garamus, Vasil M; Khrustaleva, Raisa S; Stepanek, Petr; Domnina, Nina S

    2015-12-10

    This article describes the synthesis of novel starch-antioxidant conjugates, which show great potential for biomedical applications to protect cells from oxidative damage. These conjugates were synthesized by the modification of a hydroxyethyl starch (molecular weight=200,000g/mol) with various sterically hindered phenols that differ in radical scavenging activity. They possess substantial radical scavenging activity toward a model free radical. It was found that the polymer conjugate conformation depends on the antioxidant structure and degree of substitution. We constructed the complete conformational phase behavior for the polymers with increasing degrees of substitution from small-angle neutron scattering data. It was observed that the conjugate conformation changes are the result of water shifting from a thermodynamically favorable solvent to an unfavorable one, a process that then leads to compaction of the conjugate. We selected the conjugates that possess high substitution degree but still exhibit coil conformation for biological studies. The high efficiency of the conjugates was confirmed by different in vitro (hypotonic hemolysis of erythrocytes/osmotic resistance of erythrocytes and the change of [Ca(2+)]i inside freshly isolated cardiomyocytes) and in vivo (acute hemorrhage/massive blood loss) methods. PMID:26428130

  20. Robust and biodegradable polymer of cassava starch and modified natural rubber.

    PubMed

    Riyajan, Sa-Ad

    2015-12-10

    The application of starch based materials for packaging purposes has attracted significant interest because they are both cheap and renewable resources. The study investigated the preparation and properties of a novel biopolymer sheet produced from a blend of maleated epoxidized natural rubber (MENR) and natural rubber-g-cassava starch (NR-g-CSt). The water resistance, toluene resistance and elongation at break of the polymer blend were enhanced after the addition of the MENR compared to pristine NR-g-CSt. The maximum tensile strength and thermal stability of the NR-g-CSt/MENR blend were found in the 100:50 NR-g-CSt:MENR blend. The novel films demonstrated good biodegradability in soil. PMID:26428124

  1. In vitro fermentation of chewed mango and banana: particle size, starch and vascular fibre effects.

    PubMed

    Low, Dorrain Y; Williams, Barbara A; D'Arcy, Bruce R; Flanagan, Bernadine M; Gidley, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    Fruits (and vegetables) contain cellular structures that are not degraded by human digestive enzymes. Therefore, the structure of the insoluble fraction of swallowed fruits is mostly retained until intestinal microbial fermentation. In vitro fermentation of mango and banana cell structures, which survived in vivo mastication and in vitro gastrointestinal digestion, were incubated with porcine faecal inoculum and showed intensive metabolic activity. This included degradation of cell walls, leading to the release of encapsulated cell contents for further microbial metabolism. Production of cumulative gas, short chain fatty acids and ammonia were greater for mango than for banana. Microscopic and spectroscopic analyses showed this was due to a major fermentation-resistant starch fraction present in banana, that was absent in mango. This study demonstrated distinctive differences in the fermentability of banana and mango, reflecting a preferential degradation of (parenchyma) fleshy cell walls over resistant starch in banana, and the thick cellulosic vascular fibres in mango. PMID:26215214

  2. Regulation of starch synthesis in potato tubers

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, H.; Oparka, K.; Viola, R.; Wright, K.; Ross, H. )

    1990-05-01

    Following tuber excision from the mother plant sucrose synthase activity fell from 3,120 to 960 nmol/g.f. wt./h within 7 days and starch synthesis ({sup 14}C sucrose incorporated into isolated discs) from 23 to 7 nmol/g.f. wt./h. While the maximum catalytic activity of sucrose synthase was more than sufficient to account for the observed rate of starch synthesis a maximum of 27% of sucrose incorporated by discs was converted into starch within 3 h. This compared with 80% conversion of {sup 14}C glucose incorporated. Tuber excision also reduced the rate of starch biosynthesis with glucose as a substrate (from 206 to 64 nmol/g.f. wt./h). The activities of UDPG-pyrophosphorylase, PPi-PFK, ATP-PFK, starch synthase and hexokinase (glucose or fructose substrates) were unaffected by tuber removal. ADPG pyrophosphorylase activity was reduced from 8,000 to 4,500 nmol/g.f. wt./h. Preliminary experiments indicate that the decline in sucrose synthease activity is prevented by maintaining sucrose flux into tubers through the cut stolon.

  3. Initiator Effects in Reactive Extrusion of Starch Graft Copolymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Graft copolymers of starch with water-soluble polymers such as polyacrylamide have potential applications including hydrogels, superabsorbents, and thickening agents. Reactive extrusion is a rapid, continuous method for production of starch graft copolymers with high reaction and grafting efficienc...

  4. The Mind-Body Connection - How to Fight Stress and Ward Off Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues The Mind-Body Connection How to Fight Stress and Ward Off Illness Past Issues / Winter 2008 ... system's ability to fight disease." Dangers of Chronic Stress Unhealthy levels of stress come in many guises. ...

  5. Fighting With Siblings and With Peers Among Urban High School Students.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Renee M; Duncan, Dustin T; Rothman, Emily F; Gilreath, Tamika D; Hemenway, David; Molnar, Beth E; Azrael, Deborah

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the determinants of fighting is important for prevention efforts. Unfortunately, there is little research on how sibling fighting is related to peer fighting. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the association between sibling fighting and peer fighting. Data are from the Boston Youth Survey 2008, a school-based sample of youth in Boston, MA. To estimate the association between sibling fighting and peer fighting, we ran four multivariate regression models and estimated adjusted prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals. We fit generalized estimating equation models to account for the fact that students were clustered within schools. Controlling for school clustering, race/ethnicity, sex, school failure, substance use, and caregiver aggression, youth who fought with siblings were 2.49 times more likely to have reported fighting with peers. To the extent that we can confirm that sibling violence is associated with aggressive behavior, we should incorporate it into violence prevention programming. PMID:25287411

  6. Restricting carbohydrates to fight head and neck cancer-is this realistic?

    PubMed

    Klement, Rainer J

    2014-09-01

    Head and neck cancers (HNCs) are aggressive tumors that typically demonstrate a high glycolytic rate, which results in resistance to cytotoxic therapy and poor prognosis. Due to their location these tumors specifically impair food intake and quality of life, so that prevention of weight loss through nutrition support becomes an important treatment goal. Dietary restriction of carbohydrates (CHOs) and their replacement with fat, mostly in form of a ketogenic diet (KD), have been suggested to accommodate for both the altered tumor cell metabolism and cancer-associated weight loss. In this review, I present three specific rationales for CHO restriction and nutritional ketosis as supportive treatment options for the HNC patient. These are (1) targeting the origin and specific aspects of tumor glycolysis; (2) protecting normal tissue from but sensitizing tumor tissue to radiation- and chemotherapy induced cell kill; (3) supporting body and muscle mass maintenance. While most of these benefits of CHO restriction apply to cancer in general, specific aspects of implementation are discussed in relation to HNC patients. While CHO restriction seems feasible in HNC patients the available evidence indicates that its role may extend beyond fighting malnutrition to fighting HNC itself. PMID:25364576

  7. Restricting carbohydrates to fight head and neck cancer—is this realistic?

    PubMed Central

    Klement, Rainer J.

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck cancers (HNCs) are aggressive tumors that typically demonstrate a high glycolytic rate, which results in resistance to cytotoxic therapy and poor prognosis. Due to their location these tumors specifically impair food intake and quality of life, so that prevention of weight loss through nutrition support becomes an important treatment goal. Dietary restriction of carbohydrates (CHOs) and their replacement with fat, mostly in form of a ketogenic diet (KD), have been suggested to accommodate for both the altered tumor cell metabolism and cancer-associated weight loss. In this review, I present three specific rationales for CHO restriction and nutritional ketosis as supportive treatment options for the HNC patient. These are (1) targeting the origin and specific aspects of tumor glycolysis; (2) protecting normal tissue from but sensitizing tumor tissue to radiation- and chemotherapy induced cell kill; (3) supporting body and muscle mass maintenance. While most of these benefits of CHO restriction apply to cancer in general, specific aspects of implementation are discussed in relation to HNC patients. While CHO restriction seems feasible in HNC patients the available evidence indicates that its role may extend beyond fighting malnutrition to fighting HNC itself. PMID:25364576

  8. Starch behaviors and mechanical properties of starch blend films with different plasticizers.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Vu, Hoang Phuong; Lumdubwong, Namfone

    2016-12-10

    The main objective of the study was to gain insight into structural and mechanical starch behaviors of the plasticized starch blend films. Mechanical properties and starch behaviors of cassava (CS)/and mungbean (MB) (50/50, w/w) starch blend films containing glycerol (Gly) or sorbitol (Sor) at 33% weight content were investigated. It was found that tensile strength TS and %E of the Gly-CSMB films were similar to those of MB films; but%E of all Sor-films was identical. TS of plasticized films increased when AM content and crystallinity increased. When Sor was substituted for Gly, crystallinity of starch films and their TS increased. The CSMB and MB films had somewhat a similar molecular profile and comparable mechanical properties. Therefore, it was proposed the starch molecular profile containing amylopectin with high M¯w, low M¯w of amylose, and the small size of intermediates may impart the high TS and%E of starch films. PMID:27577902

  9. Conformational Contribution to the Heat Capacity of Starch and Starch-Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyda, Marek; Wunderlich, Bernhard

    2000-03-01

    The heat capacities of starch and starch-water have been measured using adiabatic calorimetry, and standard differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and are reported from 5 K to 510 K. The amorphous starch containing 10 wt water shows a glass transition around 350 K. The heat capacities of the solid of amorphous, dry starch is linked to an approximate group vibrational spectrum, and the Tarasov equation is used to estimate the heat capacity contribution due to skeletal vibrations ( theta1 = 830 K and theta2 = 85 K theta3 = 85 K, Nskeletal = 17). The calculated and experimental heat capacities agree to better than ±3between 5 and 250 K. The experimental heat capacities of starch-water and dry starch are compared over the whole range of temperatures. Above the glass transition the differences are interpreted as contributions of different conformational heat capacities from interacting chain of carbohydrate with water. The conformational part is evaluated from a fit of the experimental Cp of starch-water, decreased by the vibrational and the external Cp to a one-dimensional Ising model with two discrete states and stiffness, cooperativity, and degeneracy parameters. NSF, Polymers Program, DMR-9703692, and the Div. of Mat. Sci., BES, DOE at ORNL, managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp., DE-AC05-96OR22464.

  10. Probing starch-iodine interaction by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiongwei; An, Hongjie; Liu, Zhongdong; Yang, Hongshun; Wei, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    We explored the interaction of iodine with three crystalline type starches, corn, potato, and sweet potato starches using atomic force microscopy. Results revealed that starch molecules aggregated through interaction with iodine solution as well as iodine vapor. Detailed fine structures such as networks, chains, and super-helical structures were found in iodide solution tests. The nanostructures formed due to iodine adsorption could help to understand the formation and properties of the starch-iodine complex. PMID:24338992

  11. NASA helicopter helps fight brush fire at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A NASA helicopter dips its fire-fighting bucket into the river to pick up and deliver a cargo of water to a wildfire at KSC. Before being extinguished, the fire burned about 20 acres at a site near gate 2C on Kennedy Parkway North (route 3).

  12. STS-42 crewmembers participate in JSC fire fighting training exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-42 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Payload Specialist Roberta L. Bondar takes a break during fire fighting and fire training exercises held at JSC's Fire Training Pit located across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207. Bondar is representing Canada on the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (IML-1) mission aboard OV-103.

  13. STS-42 crewmembers participate in JSC fire fighting training exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-42 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Payload Specialist Roberta L. Bondar prepares to use fire extinguisher during fire fighting and fire training exercises held at JSC's Fire Training Pit located across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207. Bondar is representing Canada on the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (IML-1) mission aboard OV-103.

  14. STS-42 crewmembers participate in JSC fire fighting training exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-42 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Payload Specialist Ulf D. Merbold sprays a fire extinguisher at the base of a fire during fire fighting and fire training exercises held at JSC's Fire Training Pit located across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207. Merbold is representing the European Space Agency (ESA) on the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (IML-1) mission aboard OV-103.

  15. STS-42 crewmembers participate in JSC fire fighting training exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-42 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, backup Payload Specialist Roger K. Crouch (left) and Payload Specialist Roberta L. Bondar discuss procedures prior to fire fighting and fire training exercises at JSC's Fire Training Pit located across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207. Bondar is representing Canada during the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (IML-1) mission aboard OV-103.

  16. Transforming Teacher Unions: Fighting for Better Schools and Social Justice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Bob, Ed.; Charney, Michael, Ed.

    This anthology examines exemplary practices of teachers' unions at the local and national level, presenting visions for the 21st century that involve teachers' unions in the fight to improve public schools and conditions of social justice throughout U.S. communities. Six sections feature 25 articles: (1) "Overview," including "Survival and…

  17. 46 CFR 122.524 - Fire fighting drills and training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fire fighting drills and training. 122.524 Section 122.524 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS OPERATIONS Preparations for Emergencies § 122.524...

  18. Relating Personal Heritage to America's Fight for Independence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Daniel

    This unit of study is geared toward a heterogeneous eighth grade language arts class. The unit's goal is to show students that the American story chronicled in "My Brother Sam Is Dead" is not simply a story about a series of events that occurred in the past but about taking pride in your heritage and not being afraid to fight back when your…

  19. How Captain Amerika uses neural networks to fight crime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Steven K.; Kabrisky, Matthew; Ruck, Dennis W.; Oxley, Mark E.

    1994-01-01

    Artificial neural network models can make amazing computations. These models are explained along with their application in problems associated with fighting crime. Specific problems addressed are identification of people using face recognition, speaker identification, and fingerprint and handwriting analysis (biometric authentication).

  20. NASA helicopter helps fight brush fire at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A NASA helicopter flies over fire-fighting equipment and personnel in order to drop its load of water on a wildfire at KSC. Before being extinguished, the fire burned about 20 acres at a site near gate 2C on Kennedy Parkway North (route 3).

  1. Starch: Structure, Properties, Chemistry, and Enzymology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robyt, John F.

    Starch is a very important and widely distributed natural product, occurring in the leaves of green plants, seeds, fruits, stems, roots, and tubers. It serves as the chemical storage form of the energy of the sun and is the primary source of energy for the organisms on the Earth. Starch is composed of two kinds of polysaccharides, amylose and amylopectin, exclusively composed of D-glucose residues with α-(1→4) linkages in a linear amylose and α-(1→4) linkages and ˜5% α-(1→6) branch linkages in amylopectin, both combined in a water-insoluble granule that is partially crystalline and whose size, shape, and morphology are dependent on its biological source. The properties, isolation, fractionation, enzymatic degradation, biosynthesis, chemical modification, and specific methods of analysis of starch are presented.

  2. Hard fight for scientific truth in EGU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrihansky, Lubor

    2014-05-01

    Arthur Holmes and Harry Hess established a dogma about the mantle convection which for many decades is accepted as the motive force of plates in spite that it contradicts to reasonable sense and any observations. If a group of scientists tries to come out against it, always meet a strong resistance. Examples of such resistance manifest objections posted by specialists in geodynamics of EGU. Scientific public is convinced that tidal forces of semidiurnal and diurnal periods cannot move plates because triggering of earthquakes by the stress of these amplitudes give statistically insignificant results confirmed by many reports for more than 100 years. However the tidal forces act on 10 km Earth's rotation flattening and by periodic Earth's deformations resulting in earth's rotation variations giving strong forces energetically equivalent to energy of large earthquakes. Oceanic lithosphere older than 180 M.Y. drops down to the mantle by gravity and at that movement the released space facilitates the plate movement by tides. Hotspots firmly anchored in mantle show by tracks an exact movement of plates. Not Polfluchtkraft but Äquatorkraft force the tides create, which can move the large continent (for example Gondwana) far from equator as far ad the pole, where after decay the Antarctica remains being out of tidal forces actions.

  3. Extraction of starch from wheat flour by alkaline solution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Separation of starch from wheat flour with high purity is very important for the analysis of starch such as amylose and amylopectin determination by size exclusion HPLC (SE-HPLC). A procedure that extracts starch from flour by ethanol precipitation after dissolving flour in KOH and urea solution wa...

  4. Recent processing methods for preparing starch-based bioproducts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is currently an intense interest in starch-based materials because of the low cost of starch, the replacement of dwindling petroleum-based resources with annually-renewable feedstocks, the biodegradability of starch-based products, and the creation of new markets for farm commodities. Non-trad...

  5. PROSPECTS OF BREEDING FOR LOW STARCH CONTENT IN SUGARCANE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated levels of starch in sugarcane juice adversely affect the processing quality of raw and refined sugar. Despite reports of differences among cultivars for starch content, most research has focused on processing aids to minimize the negative processing effects of starch. Deploying cultivars ...

  6. Amylose Content in Tuber Starch of Potato Cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato tuber is mostly water and starch. Approximately 20% of fresh tuber weight is the starch and the remainder is water. Most of the starch in the tuber, approximately 75%, is amylopectin and 25% amylose, but can vary depending on the cultivar. A total of 162 American (85) and foreign (77) potato ...

  7. ISOLATION OF AMYLOSE FROM STARCH SOLUTIONS BY PHASE SEPARATION*

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventionally, fractionation of the two components of starches, amylopectin and amylose had been achieved by aqueous dispersion or aqueous leaching of granules, and selective retrogradation or alcohol precipitation of one component from starch dispersion. Recently, we found that starch solutions s...

  8. Adsorption of Polyethylene from Solution onto Starch Film Surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch films were prepared by jet cooking aqueous dispersions of high-amylose starch and then allowing the jet cooked dispersions to air-dry on Teflon surfaces. When the starch films were immersed in 1 % solutions of PE in 1-dodecanol, dodecane and xylene at 120º C and the solutions were allowed to...

  9. Amylose Content in Tuber Starch of Wild Potato Species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Approximately 20% of potato tuber fresh weight is starch, which is composed of amylose (straight chains of glucose) and amylopectin (branched chains). Potato starch is low in amylose (~25%), but high amylose starch has superior nutritional qualities. Amylose content has been determined in tuber samp...

  10. Starch as a feedstock for bioproducts and packaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Much progress has been achieved in developing starch-based feedstocks as a partial replacement for petroleum-based feedstocks. Although starch remains a poor direct substitute for plastics, composite starch-based materials have useful functional properties and are in commercial production as a repla...

  11. Starch-based Foam Composite Materials: processing and bioproducts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch is an abundant, biodegradable, renewable and low-cost commodity that has been explored as a replacement for petroleum-based plastics. By itself, starch is a poor replacement for plastics because of its moisture sensitivity and brittle properties. Efforts to improve starch properties and funct...

  12. HRP-Mediated Synthesis of Starch-Polyacrylamide Graft Copolymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modified starch-based polymers can be engineered for specific properties by combining starch with synthetic polymers through graft copolymerization. Polyacrylamide grafted starches have received a great deal of applications in areas such as superabsorbent paper-making additives, drag reduction and ...

  13. HRP-Mediated Synthesis of Starch-Polyacrylamide Graft Copolymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modified starch-based polymers can be engineered for specific properties by combining starch with synthetic polymers through graft copolymerization. Polyacrylamide grafted starch have received a great deal of applications in areas such as superabsorbent paper-making additives, drag reduction and te...

  14. Serious physical fighting and gambling-related attitudes and behaviors in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Slavin, Melissa; Pilver, Corey E.; Hoff, Rani A.; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; Steinberg, Marvin A.; Rugle, Loreen; Potenza, Marc N.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims: Physical fighting and gambling are common risk behaviors among adolescents. Prior studies have found associations among these behaviors in adolescents but have not examined systematically the health and gambling correlates of problem-gambling severity amongst youth stratified by fight involvement. Methods: Survey data were used from 2,276 Connecticut high school adolescents regarding their physical fight involvement, gambling behaviors and perceptions, and health and functioning. Gambling perceptions and correlates of problem-gambling severity were examined in fighting and non-fighting adolescents. Results: Gambling perceptions were more permissive and at-risk/problem gambling was more frequent amongst adolescents reporting serious fights versus those denying serious fights. A stronger relationship between problem-gambling severity and regular smoking was observed for adolescents involved in fights. Discussion and conclusions: The more permissive gambling attitudes and heavier gambling associated with serious fights in high school students suggest that youth who engage in physical fights warrant enhanced prevention efforts related to gambling. The stronger relationship between tobacco smoking and problem-gambling severity amongst youth engaging in serious fights suggest that fighting youth who smoke might warrant particular screening for gambling problems and subsequent interventions. PMID:24294502

  15. Debranching and Crystallization of Waxy Maize Starch in Relation to Enzyme Digestibility

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, L.; Shi, Y; Rong, L; Hsiao, B

    2010-01-01

    Molecular and crystal structures as well as morphology during debranching and crystallization of waxy maize starch at a high solid content (25%, w/w) were investigated, and the results were related to the digestibility of debranched products. The starch was cooked at 115-120 C for 10 min, cooled to 50 C and debranched by isoamylase. After 1 h of debranching, wormlike objects with 5-10 nm width and ca. 30 nm length were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Further release of linear chains and crystallization led to assembly of semi-crystalline structures in the form of nano-particles and subsequent growth of nano-particles into large aggregates. After 24 h at 50 C, a debranched starch product with an A-type X-ray diffraction pattern, a high melting temperature (90-140 C), and high resistant starch content (71.4%) was obtained. Small-angle X-ray scattering results indicated that all debranched products were surface fractal in a dry state (4% moisture) but had a mass fractal structure when hydrated (e.g. 45% moisture).

  16. Study of drying process on starch structural properties and their effect on semolina pasta sensory quality.

    PubMed

    Padalino, Lucia; Caliandro, Rocco; Chita, Giuseppe; Conte, Amalia; Del Nobile, Matteo Alessandro

    2016-11-20

    The influence of drying temperature on the starch crystallites and its impact on durum wheat pasta sensory properties is addressed in this work. In particular, spaghetti were produced by means of a pilot plant using 5 different drying temperature profiles. The sensory properties, as well as the cooking quality of pasta were assessed. X-ray powder diffraction was used for investigating changes in the crystallinity content of the samples. Starch crystallinity, size and density of the starch crystallites were determined from the analysis of the diffraction profiles. As expected, spaghetti sensory properties improved as the drying temperatures increased. In particular, attributes as resistance to break for uncooked samples and firmness, elasticity, bulkiness and stickiness for cooked samples, all benefit from drying temperature increase. The spaghetti cooking quality was also positively affected by the drying temperature increase. Diffraction analysis suggested that the improvement of sensory properties and cooking quality of pasta were directly related to the increase in density of both physical crosslink of starch granules and chemical crosslink of protein matrix. PMID:27561491

  17. Properties of cassava starch-based edible coating containing essential oils.

    PubMed

    Oriani, Vivian Boesso; Molina, Gustavo; Chiumarelli, Marcela; Pastore, Gláucia Maria; Hubinger, Miriam Dupas

    2014-02-01

    Edible coatings were produced using cassava starch (2% and 3% w/v) containing cinnamon bark (0.05% to 0.30% v/v) or fennel (0.05% to 0.30% v/v) essential oils. Edible cassava starch coating at 2% and 3% (w/v) containing or not containing 0.30% (v/v) of each essential oils conferred increased in water vapor resistance and decreased in the respiration rates of coated apple slices when compared with uncoated fruit. Cassava starch coatings (2% w/v) added 0.10% or 0.30% (v/v) fennel or cinnamon bark essential oils showed antioxidant capacity, and the addition of 0.30% (v/v) of each essential oil demonstrated antimicrobial properties. The coating containing cinnamon bark essential oil showed a significant antioxidant capacity, comparing to fennel essential oil. Antimicrobial tests showed that the addition of 0.30% (v/v) cinnamon bark essential oil to the edible coating inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella choleraesuis, and 0.30% fennel essential oil inhibited just S. aureus. Treatment with 2% (w/v) of cassava starch containing 0.30% (v/v) of the cinnamon bark essential oil showed barrier properties, an antioxidant capacity and microbial inhibition. PMID:24410449

  18. In vitro starch digestibility and predicted glycemic index of microwaved and conventionally baked pound cake.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Pardo, María Elena; Ortiz-Moreno, Alicia; Mora-Escobedo, Rosalva; Necoechea-Mondragón, Hugo

    2007-09-01

    The present study compares the effect of baking process (microwave vs conventional oven) on starch bioavailability in fresh pound cake crumbs and in crumbs from pound cake stored for 8 days. Proximal chemical analysis, resistant starch (RS), retrograded starch (RS3) and starch hydrolysis index (HI) were evaluated. The empirical formula suggested by Granfeldt was used to determine the predicted glycemic index (pGI). Pound cake, one of Mexico's major bread products, was selected for analysis because the quality defects often associated with microwave baking might be reduced with the use of high-fat, high-moisture, batted dough. Differences in product moisture, RS and RS3 were observed in fresh microwave-baked and conventionally baked pound cake. RS3 increased significantly in conventionally baked products stored for 8 days at room temperature, whereas no significantly changes in RS3 were observed in the microwaved product. HI values for freshly baked and stored microwaved product were 59 and 62%, respectively (P > 0.05), whereas the HI value for the conventionally baked product decreased significantly after 8 days of storage. A pound cake with the desired HI and GI characteristics might be obtained by adjusting the microwave baking process. PMID:17661177

  19. Starch-based bio-elastomers functionalized with red beetroot natural antioxidant.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thi Nga; Athanassiou, Athanassia; Basit, Abdul; Bayer, Ilker S

    2017-02-01

    Red beetroot (RB) powder was incorporated into starch-based bio-elastomers to obtain flexible biocomposites with tunable antioxidant properties. Starch granules within the bio-elastomers affected the release of the antioxidant molecule betanin in the RB powder. The bio-elastomers were hydrophobic and resisted dissolution in water, hence the release of betanin was due to diffusion rather than polymer matrix disintegration. Hydrophobicity was maintained even after water immersion. Released betanin demonstrated highly efficient antioxidant scavenging activity against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical (DPPH) and 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical cation (ABTS(+)). RB powder was also found to increase the Young's modulus of the bio-elastomers without compromising their elongation ability. Infrared spectral analysis indicated weak interactions through hydrogen bonding among starch granules, RB powder and PDMS polymer within the bio-elastomers. Hence, as a simple but intelligent biomaterial consisting of mainly edible starch and RB powder the present bio-elastomers can be used in active packaging for a variety of pharmaceutical, medical, and food applications. PMID:27596427

  20. Physicochemical characteristics of high pressure gelatinized mung bean starch during recrystallization.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenhao; Guo, Hongmei; Wang, Peng; Tian, Xiaoling; Zhang, Wei; Saleh, Ahmed S M; Zheng, Jianmei; Ouyang, Shaohui; Luo, Qingui; Zhang, Guoquan

    2015-10-20

    The changes in physicochemical and structural properties of Ultra high pressure (UHP) gelatinized mung bean starch were investigated during 0 to 196h retrogradation process by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). XRD analysis showed that the UHP-gelatinizated granules regenerated its original C-type crystallinity structures after retrogradation. The swelling power and solubility of native starch were increased with the increase in the assay temperatures from 50 to 90°C, while the changing trend of the retrogradated granules was more gradual over entire assay temperatures. In addition, retrogradated granules showed a progressive decrease in the light transmittance and an increase in the amount of resistant starch as the ageing time increased from 0 to 192h. DSC analysis suggested a slight increase in the transition temperatures (To, Tp and Tc) and the retrogradation enthalpy as the storage time increased. In contrast no endothermic transition peak could be observed using DSC after storage of heat-gelatinized mung bean starch gel. PMID:26256204