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Sample records for resolution carotid black-blood

  1. Resolution of Internal Carotid Arterial Thrombus by the Thrombolytic Action of Dabigatran: A first case report.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Hisanao; Hoshino, Masashi; Shimizu, Takahiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been reported to cause resolution of intracardiac thrombus, but there have been no reported cases of internal carotid arterial thrombus resolution.We report a case of a 76-year-old man in whom an internal carotid arterial thrombus resolved after administration of the NOAC dabigatran at a dose of 110 mg twice daily.This is the first reported case of carotid arterial thrombus resolution after oral intake of NOAC (direct thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors), to the best of our knowledge.We conclude that this case had major clinical significance because it might represent one of the multiple effects of NOACs. PMID:27057852

  2. Free-Breathing 3D Whole Heart Black Blood Imaging with Motion Sensitized Driven Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Subashini; Hu, Peng; Kissinger, Kraig V.; Goddu, Beth; Goepfert, Lois; Schmidt, Ehud J.; Kozerke, Sebastian; Nezafat, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To assess the efficacy and robustness of motion sensitized driven equilibrium (MSDE) for blood suppression in volumetric 3D whole heart cardiac MR. Materials and Methods To investigate the efficacy of MSDE on blood suppression and myocardial SNR loss on different imaging sequences. 7 healthy adult subjects were imaged using 3D ECG-triggered MSDE-prep T1-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE), and spoiled gradient echo (GRE), after optimization of MSDE parameters in a pilot study of 5 subjects. Imaging artifacts, myocardial and blood SNR were assessed. Subsequently, the feasibility of isotropic spatial resolution MSDE-prep black-blood was assessed in 6 subjects. Finally, 15 patients with known or suspected cardiovascular disease were recruited to be imaged using conventional multi-slice 2D DIR TSE imaging sequence and 3D MSDE-prep spoiled GRE. Results The MSDE-prep yields significant blood suppression (75-92%), enabling a volumetric 3D black-blood assessment of the whole heart with significantly improved visualization of the chamber walls. The MSDE-prep also allowed successful acquisition of black-blood images with isotropic spatial resolution. In the patient study, 3D black-blood MSDE-prep and DIR resulted in similar blood suppression in LV and RV walls but the MSDE prep had superior myocardial signal and wall sharpness. Conclusion MSDE-prep allows volumetric black-blood imaging of the heart. PMID:22517477

  3. Atherosclerosis imaging using 3D black blood TSE SPACE vs 2D TSE

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Stephanie K; Mobolaji-Iawal, Motunrayo; Arama, Leron; Cambe, Joy; Biso, Sylvia; Alie, Nadia; Fayad, Zahi A; Mani, Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To compare 3D Black Blood turbo spin echo (TSE) sampling perfection with application-optimized contrast using different flip angle evolution (SPACE) vs 2D TSE in evaluating atherosclerotic plaques in multiple vascular territories. METHODS: The carotid, aortic, and femoral arterial walls of 16 patients at risk for cardiovascular or atherosclerotic disease were studied using both 3D black blood magnetic resonance imaging SPACE and conventional 2D multi-contrast TSE sequences using a consolidated imaging approach in the same imaging session. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were performed on the images. Agreement of morphometric measurements between the two imaging sequences was assessed using a two-sample t-test, calculation of the intra-class correlation coefficient and by the method of linear regression and Bland-Altman analyses. RESULTS: No statistically significant qualitative differences were found between the 3D SPACE and 2D TSE techniques for images of the carotids and aorta. For images of the femoral arteries, however, there were statistically significant differences in all four qualitative scores between the two techniques. Using the current approach, 3D SPACE is suboptimal for femoral imaging. However, this may be due to coils not being optimized for femoral imaging. Quantitatively, in our study, higher mean total vessel area measurements for the 3D SPACE technique across all three vascular beds were observed. No significant differences in lumen area for both the right and left carotids were observed between the two techniques. Overall, a significant-correlation existed between measures obtained between the two approaches. CONCLUSION: Qualitative and quantitative measurements between 3D SPACE and 2D TSE techniques are comparable. 3D-SPACE may be a feasible approach in the evaluation of cardiovascular patients. PMID:24876923

  4. Unprotected parasphenoidal carotid artery studied by high-resolution computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.M.; Hopkins, R.J.; Hanafee, W.N.; Fisk, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    A retrospective review was made of 500 consecutive thin-section axial CT scans of the adult sphenoid sinus using contrast enhancement and the bone algorithm to determine whether there was exposure of the cavernous sinus and the carotid arteries along their parasphenoidal course. At least one cavernous-carotid complex that could be considered at risk during sphenoid sinus surgery was seen in 31.4% of the patients. Of this group, 14.4% of the patients had no bony covering on one or both sides of some point along the parasphenoidal course. In 17% the bony covering was so thin it would give minimal, if any, protection from surgical trauma. A patient who had laceration of an unprotected carotid artery with development of post-traumatic aneurysm is discussed.

  5. Spontaneous resolution of ophthalmologic symptoms following bilateral traumatic carotid cavernous fistulae

    PubMed Central

    Gapsis, Briana C.; Ranjit, Roshni U.; Malavade, Sharad; Carey, Andrew; Murtagh, Reed; Drucker, Mitchell D.; Pavan, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A 38-year-old woman developed bilateral carotid cavernous fistulae (CCF) following a motor vehicle collision. Her initial ophthalmologic findings included periorbital edema, palsies of the left oculomotor and abducens nerves, and residual dilated pupils. She subsequently developed significant optic disc edema and retinal vascular dilation bilaterally. Patients with similar injuries typically require neurosurgical or vascular intervention. In this case, the patient’s signs resolved spontaneously by 21 months after onset, leaving no residual ocular deficits. PMID:24109248

  6. To assess the intimal thickness, flow velocities, and luminal diameter of carotid arteries using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound doppler imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemuru, Madhuri; Jabbar, Afzal; Chandra, Suman

    2004-04-01

    Carotid imaging is a Gold Standard test that provides useful information about the structure and functions of carotid arteries. Spectral imaging helps to evaluate the vessel and hemodynamic changes. High resolution B-mode imaging has emerged as one of the methods of choice for determining the anatomic extent of atherosclerosis and its progression and for assessing cardiovascular risks. The measurements made with Doppler correlate well with pathologic measurements. Recent prospective studies have clearly demonstrated that these measurements of carotid intimal thickness are potent predictors of Myocardial Infarction and Stroke. This method appears very attractive as it is non-invasive, extremely safe, well accepted by the patient and relatively inexpensive. It can be performed serially and has the advantage of visualizing the arterial wall in contrast to angiographic techniques which provide only an outline of the arterial lumen. Recently, there has been an interest in the clinical use of this technique in making difficult clinical decisions like deciding on preventive therapies. 30 subjects aged 21-60 years and 30 subjects aged 61-85 years of both sexes are selected after doing a baseline study to exclude Hypertension, Diabetes, Obesity and Hyperlipidemia. The carotid arteries were examined for intimal thickening, blood flow velocities and luminal diameter. With aging there is a narrowing of the carotid vessels and significant increase in intimal thickening with a consequent increase in the blood flow velocities. Inter-observer, intra-observer and instrument variations are seen and there is no significant change in the values when the distal flow pattern is considered for measurements. Aging produces major cardiovascular changes including decreased elasticity and compliance of great arteries leading to structural and functional alterations in heart and vessels. With aging there is increased intimal thickness and increased pulse wave velocity which is clearly

  7. Massive epistaxis resulting from an intracavernous internal carotid artery traumatic pseudoaneurysm: complete resolution with overlapping uncovered stents.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Juretschke, Fernando; Castro, Enrique; Mateo Sierra, Olga; Iza, Begoña; Manuel Garbizu, Jose; Fortea, Fernando; Villoria, Francisco

    2009-12-01

    Blunt traumatic injuries of the intracranial carotid arteries can result in pseudoaneurysm formation. A pseudoaneurysm of the intracavernous carotid artery may rupture into the cavernous sinus, causing life-threatening epistaxis. We report a case of intracavernous traumatic psedoaneurysm presenting with delayed massive epistaxis. The endovascular treatment with overlapping self-expanding stents achieved complete exclusion of the pseudoaneurysm with preservation of the intracavernous carotid artery. PMID:19350203

  8. Carotid Endarterectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the carotid arteries. This limits or blocks the flow of oxygen-rich blood to your brain, which can lead to a stroke. Carotid Arteries Figure A shows ... normal carotid artery that has normal blood flow. Figure C show the inside of a carotid ...

  9. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  10. Carotid Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... plaque narrows the carotid arteries and reduces the flow of oxygen-rich blood to the brain. If the plaque ruptures, a blood clot can form on its surface. A clot can mostly or completely block blood flow through a carotid artery, which can cause a ...

  11. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Carotid Artery Disease? Carotid artery disease is a disease in ... blood to your face, scalp, and neck. Carotid Arteries Figure A shows the location of the right ...

  12. Why a standard contrast-enhanced MRI might be useful in intracranial internal carotid artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Oeinck, Maximilian; Rozeik, Christoph; Wattchow, Jens; Meckel, Stephan; Schlageter, Manuel; Beeskow, Christel; Reinhard, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    In patients with ischemic stroke of unknown cause cerebral vasculitis is a rare but relevant differential diagnosis, especially when signs of intracranial artery stenosis are found and laboratory findings show systemic inflammation. In such cases, high-resolution T1w vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 'black blood' technique) at 3 T is preferentially performed, but may not be available in every hospital. We report a case of an 84-year-old man with right hemispheric transient ischemic attack and signs of distal occlusion in the right internal carotid artery (ICA) in duplex sonography. Standard MRI with contrast agent pointed the way to the correct diagnosis since it showed an intramural contrast uptake in the right ICA and both vertebral arteries. Temporal artery biopsy confirmed the suspected diagnosis of a giant cell arteritis and dedicated vessel wall MRI performed later supported the suspected intracranial large artery inflammation. Our case also shows that early diagnosis and immunosuppressive therapy may not always prevent disease progression, as our patient suffered several infarcts in the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory with consecutive high-grade hemiparesis of the right side within the following four months. PMID:26988083

  13. Carotid artery anatomy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    There are four carotid arteries, two on each side of the neck: right and left internal carotid arteries, and right and left external carotid arteries. The carotid arteries deliver oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the head and brain.

  14. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow, usually because of atherosclerosis. ... one of the causes of stroke. Carotid artery disease often does not cause symptoms, but there are ...

  15. Carotid artery disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have had a stroke or TIA, a nervous system (neurological) exam will show other problems. You may also have the following tests: Blood cholesterol and triglycerides test Blood sugar (glucose) test Ultrasound of the carotid arteries ( carotid ...

  16. Carotid artery surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000238.htm Carotid artery surgery - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had carotid artery surgery to restore proper blood flow to your ...

  17. Carotid artery surgery - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100124.htm Carotid artery surgery - series To use the sharing features on ... 4 Normal anatomy Overview There are four carotid arteries, with a pair located on each side of ...

  18. Carotid endarterectomy or stenting?

    PubMed Central

    Ng, P Y

    2009-01-01

    The relative role of surgical or endovascular treatment in carotid stenosis remains controversial. Results of recent studies add even more confusion to the debate. Major clinical trials so far have shown a wide range of complication rates for carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting. Only surgeons or interventionists who can maintain a complication rate of 3% or below should consider treating patients with asymptomatic disease.

  19. Carotid sinus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mallet, Mark

    2003-02-01

    This article reviews the recent literature about carotid sinus syndrome. It looks principally at the various ways in which it may present, the limited knowledge of its pathophysiology, and the role of carotid sinus massage in the investigation of carotid sinus syndrome. PMID:12619336

  20. Varicella-Zoster Virus Vasculopathy: A Case Report Demonstrating Vasculitis using Black-Blood MRI

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jay; Poonawala, Husain; Keay, Susan K; Serulle, Yafell; Steven, Andrew; Gandhi, Dheeraj; Cole, John W

    2016-01-01

    Infections are rare but important causes of stroke. Among these, varicella zoster virus has been known to cause ischemic stroke. During an attack of herpes zoster ophthalmicus, it has been hypothesized that the virus replicates in the trigeminal ganglion and travels via the trigeminal nerve centrally to cause cerebral vasculopathy. Here we present a case of a 69 year-old Caucasian immunocompromised woman who suffered recurrent ischemic infarcts within the same vascular distribution following an episode of zoster ophthalmicus three months prior. An imaging technique termed black-blood magnetic resonance imaging was utilized to aid in the diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis. The case is used to provide a literature review of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of cerebral varicella zoster vasculopathy. In situations where an isolated unilateral cerebral vasculopathy is identified, neurologists are urged to consider varicella zoster as a treatable etiologic agent, as untreated vasculopathy can lead to further strokes. PMID:27065314

  1. Living with Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Carotid Artery Disease If you have carotid artery disease, you can take steps to manage the ... treatment plan, and getting ongoing care. Having carotid artery disease raises your risk of having a stroke . ...

  2. [Carotid atherosclerosis and dementia].

    PubMed

    Harlé, Louise-Marine; Plichart, Matthieu

    2015-09-01

    Over the past decade a growing interest has been devoted to exploring the role of atherosclerosis in the development of dementia. Despite a well-known association between atherosclerosis risk factors in middle-life with later cognitive decline, the pathophysiological pathways underlying this association remain unclear. The current hypothesis is that neurodegenerative and vascular lesions coexist and have a synergistic role in the development of cognitive impairment and dementia. Carotid atherosclerosis (e.g. carotid plaques and intima-media thickness as measured by carotid ultrasonography) has been associated with cognitive decline and dementia and may help to better understand the complex interaction between the vascular and neurodegenerative processes. Furthermore, carotid atherosclerosis has been used in the recent field for dementia risk prediction. In this review, we discuss the physiopathological implications from the current available data on the relationship between carotid atherosclerosis and dementia as well as the interest of carotid biomarkers for individual dementia risk prediction. PMID:26395304

  3. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... small balloon on its tip. They inflate the balloon at the blockage site in the carotid artery to flatten or compress the plaque against the artery wall. Carotid angioplasty is often combined with the placement of a small, metal, mesh-like device called a stent. When a stent is placed inside of a ...

  4. Carotid stenting and endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Yip, Hon-Kan; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Wu, Chiung-Jen; Yu, Cheuk-Man

    2016-07-01

    Stroke, either ischemic or hemorrhagic, remains the second commonest cause of death worldwide in the last decade. Etiologies for ischemic stroke (IS) vary widely. Atherothrombotic occlusion is an essential cause to which carotid artery stenosis (CAS) is a major contributor. Administration of anti-platelet agent to patients with CAS has been shown to reduce incidence of long-term IS. In additional, in patients with symptomatic CAS, clinical trials have demonstrated that carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is superior to medical therapy for prevention of future CAS-related IS. However, CEA is not suitable for CAS post-radiotherapy or those located at higher level of the internal carotid artery; and major complications of this procedure including cranial nerve injuries have stimulated the interest of using percutaneous transfemoral carotid stenting as an alternative approach. Although transfemoral arterial approach of carotid stenting is not inferior to CEA in improving clinical outcomes, it has been reported to be associated with vascular complication and has its limitations in patients with athero-occlusive disease of abdominal aorta or bilateral iliac arteries, level II or III aortic arch, or bovine type carotid arterial anatomy. Therefore, transradial/transbrachial arterial approach has emerged as a novel method for carotid stenting. This article provides a critical review on interventional approaches for the treatment of CAS. PMID:27061654

  5. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aspirin and heart disease Butter, margarine, and cooking oils Carotid artery surgery - discharge Cholesterol and ... by: Daniel Kantor, MD, Kantor Neurology, Coconut Creek, FL and Immediate Past President of the ...

  6. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting; CAS; Angioplasty - carotid artery; Carotid artery stenosis - angioplasty; ... Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) is done using a small surgical cut. Your surgeon will make a surgical cut in your groin after using some ...

  7. [Evaluation of carotid stenosis by using carotid ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Seike, Nahoko; Ito, Michiko; Yasaka, Masahiro

    2010-12-01

    Carotid stenosis is observed in several diseases such as atherosclerosis, moyamoya disease, and aortitis. Carotid stenosis can be assessed using computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), ultrasonography, or cerebral angiography. Carotid ultrasonography is superior to other modalities because it is a noninvasive, repeatable, and easy method that does not involve much cost. The intima-media complex thickness (IMT) can be easily measured using carotid ultrasonography. The incidence of cerebral and cardiovascular events increases with increase in the thickness of the IMT. The percentage of stenosis was expressed using the NASCET, ECST, or area methods. The NASCET criterion of 70% stenosis for performing carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis corresponded to 85% ECST stenosis, 90% area stenosis, and 200 cm/sec of peak systolic velocity. Carotid ultrasonography provides information on not only carotid stenosis but also unstable plaques such as ulcer, hypoechoic plaque, thin fibrous cap, and mobile plaque. In patients with moyamoya disease, carotid ultrasonography often reveals that the diameter of the internal carotid artery (ICA) is greatly reduced at the proximal portion above the bulbus (resembling a champagne bottle neck) and is less than 50% that of the common carotid artery (champagne bottle neck sign); the diameter of the ICA is smaller than that of the external carotid artery (diameter reversal sign). In patients with aortitis, IMT thickness is frequently observed at the common carotid artery (Macaroni sign) but not at the ICA. PMID:21139180

  8. Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force learned about the potential benefits and harms of screening for carotid artery stenosis: Health professionals ... blood flow through the arteries. Potential Benefits and Harms of Carotid Artery Stenosis Screening and Treatment The ...

  9. Spontaneous closure of posttraumatic high-flow carotid-cavernous fistula following cerebral angiography

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Ugan Singh; Gupta, Pankaj; Shrivastava, Trilochan; Purohit, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula (TCCF) is a direct communication between cavernous portion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and cavernous sinus due to tear in ICA. Most of the cases are treated by endovascular embolization. Spontaneous resolution of high-flow TCCFs is extremely rare. We report a case of posttraumatic, direct, high-flow carotid cavernous fistula (Barrow type A) that resolved spontaneously after cerebral angiography. PMID:27057229

  10. Spontaneous closure of posttraumatic high-flow carotid-cavernous fistula following cerebral angiography.

    PubMed

    Meena, Ugan Singh; Gupta, Pankaj; Shrivastava, Trilochan; Purohit, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula (TCCF) is a direct communication between cavernous portion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and cavernous sinus due to tear in ICA. Most of the cases are treated by endovascular embolization. Spontaneous resolution of high-flow TCCFs is extremely rare. We report a case of posttraumatic, direct, high-flow carotid cavernous fistula (Barrow type A) that resolved spontaneously after cerebral angiography. PMID:27057229

  11. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and efficacy continues to be studied in several medical centers. This procedure involves the placement of a small flexible tube (catheter) into an artery from the groin. The catheter is then directed to the neck to reach the carotid artery blockage. A balloon pushes open the artery wall and a stent ( ...

  12. Carotid Artery Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... or radiologist then places the transducer on the skin in various locations, sweeping over the area of interest or angling the sound beam from a different location to better see an area of concern. Doppler sonography and Carotid IMT US are performed using the ...

  13. Breath-hold black blood quantitative T1rho imaging of liver using single shot fast spin echo acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Queenie; Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Liver fibrosis is a key feature in most chronic liver diseases. T1rho magnetic resonance imaging is a potentially important technique for noninvasive diagnosis, severity grading, and therapy monitoring of liver fibrosis. However, it remains challenging to perform robust T1rho quantification of liver on human subjects. One major reason is that the presence of rich blood signal in liver can cause artificially high T1rho measurement and makes T1rho quantification susceptible to motion. Methods A pulse sequence based on single shot fast/turbo spin echo (SSFSE/SSTSE) acquisition, with theoretical analysis and simulation based on the extended phase graph (EPG) algorithm, was presented for breath-hold single slice quantitative T1rho imaging of liver with suppression of blood signal. The pulse sequence was evaluated in human subjects at 3.0 T with 500 Hz spinlock frequency and time-of-spinlock (TSL) 0, 10, 30 and 50 ms. Results Human scan demonstrated that the entire T1rho data sets with four spinlock time can be acquired within a single breath-hold of 10 seconds with black blood effect. T1rho quantification with suppression of blood signal results in significantly reduced T1rho value of liver compared to the results without blood suppression. Conclusions A signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficient pulse sequence was reported for T1rho quantification of liver. The black blood effect, together with a short breath-hold, mitigates the risk of quantification errors as would occur in the conventional methods. PMID:27190769

  14. How Can Carotid Artery Disease Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Carotid Artery Disease Be Prevented? Taking action to control your risk factors can help prevent or delay carotid artery disease and stroke . Your risk for carotid artery ...

  15. Management of Carotid Artery Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Thomas S.; Ducic, Yadranko; Gordin, Eli; Stroman, David

    2014-01-01

    With increased awareness and liberal screening of trauma patients with identified risk factors, recent case series demonstrate improved early diagnosis of carotid artery trauma before they become problematio. There remains a need for unified screening criteria for both intracranial and extracranial carotid trauma. In the absence of contraindications, antithrombotic agents should be considered in blunt carotid artery injuries, as there is a significant risk of progression of vessel injury with observation alone. Despite CTA being used as a common screening modality, it appears to lack sufficient sensitivity. DSA remains to be the gold standard in screening. Endovascular techniques are becoming more widely accepted as the primary surgical modality in the treatment of blunt extracranial carotid injuries and penetrating/blunt intracranial carotid lessions. Nonetheless, open surgical approaches are still needed for the treatment of penetrating extracranial carotid injuries and in patients with unfavorable lesions for endovascular intervention. PMID:25136406

  16. Antioxidant plasma concentration and supplementation in carotid intima media thickness.

    PubMed

    Riccioni, Graziano; Bazzano, Lydia A

    2008-06-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases represent a major problem in Western countries. Oxidative stress, an important condition of increased amounts of reactive oxygen species, is now recognized to be a prominent feature of many acute and chronic diseases, and even of the normal aging process. Carotid intima media thickness is an important marker of atherosclerosis that correlates with established coronary heart disease. Changes in carotid intima media thickness, measured by B-mode high-resolution carotid ultrasonography, represent an important and early step in carotid plaque formation and progression and are the most common currently used marker to evaluate the progression of atherosclerotic processes. Several therapeutic strategies have been adopted to slow the early atherosclerotic process in asymptomatic subjects in order to reduce the risk of cardiovascular events. An additional step to slow the atherosclerotic process may include interventions to decrease newly emerging coronary risk factors, such as oxidative stress and inflammation. Consuming a diet rich in fruits and vegetables will provide antioxidant vitamins, and carotenoids, which are believed to inhibit tissue damage derived from oxidative processes and may slow the progression of early atherosclerosis, modify the increase in carotid intima media thickness and, consequently, reduce cardiovascular events. This review synthesizes the published literature regarding antioxidant vitamins plasma concentration and supplementation and carotid intima media thickness. PMID:18510488

  17. Symptomatic carotid stenosis in the setting of bilateral disease and coexisting carotid body tumor: management with a carotid stent and staged excision.

    PubMed

    Smeds, Matthew; Jacobs, Donald

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the paper is to describe the management of a patient with bilateral carotid artery stenosis, symptomatic on the left, with coexisting left carotid body tumor with left carotid stenting followed by right carotid endarterectomy and excision of carotid body tumor. A 60-year-old man with significant bilateral carotid stenosis was referred to us with symptomatic left carotid disease and concomitant left carotid body tumor. A Precise nitinol carotid stent (Cordis Endovascular, Miami Lakes, FL, USA) was placed in his left carotid artery followed by interval carotid endarterectomy on the right. Excision of the carotid body tumor was then performed. Carotid stenting is a treatment option in patients with carotid stenosis and coexisting carotid body tumor. To our knowledge, this is the first reported carotid stent for symptomatic carotid stenosis in a patient with a concomitant carotid body tumor. PMID:23493283

  18. Management of carotid artery stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Louridas, George; Junaid, Asad

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To clarify the definition of carotid artery diseases, the appropriateness of screening for disease, investigation and management of patients presenting with transient ischemic attacks, and management of asymptomatic carotid bruits. SOURCES OF INFORMATION MEDLINE was searched using the terms carotid endarterectomy, carotid disease, and carotid stenosis. Most studies offer level II or III evidence. Consensus statements and guidelines from various neurovascular societies were also consulted. MAIN MESSAGE Patients with symptoms of hemispheric transient ischemic attacks associated with >70% stenosis of the internal carotid artery are at highest risk of major stroke or death. Risk is greatest within 48 hours of symptom onset; patients should have urgent evaluation by a vascular surgeon for consideration of carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Patients with 50% to 69% stenosis might benefit from urgent surgical intervention depending on clinical features and associated comorbidity. Patients with <50% stenosis do not benefit from surgery. Asymptomatic patients with >60% stenosis should be considered for elective CEA. CONCLUSION Symptomatic carotid artery syndromes need urgent carotid duplex evaluation to determine the need for urgent surgery. Those with the greatest degree of stenosis derive the greatest benefit from timely CEA. PMID:16060177

  19. Carotid and Aortic Stiffness in Patients with Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Meshkov, Alexey N.; Rozhkova, Tatyana A.; Kalinina, Maria V.; Deev, Alexander D.; Rogoza, Anatoliy N.; Balakhonova, Tatyana V.; Boytsov, Sergey A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of plasma cholesterol in impairing arterial function and elasticity remains unclear. We evaluated arterial stiffness, measured locally in the common carotid artery by high-resolution echo-tracking, and aortic stiffness, using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) (the “gold-standard” measurement of arterial stiffness), in treatment-naive patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). Methods The study included 66 patients with FH (10–66 years old) and 57 first-degree relatives without FH (11–61 years old). Carotid-femoral PWV was determined by SphygmoCor (AtCor, Australia). The parameters of carotid stiffness β-index, Peterson elastic modulus and local PWV were assessed with regard to the common carotid artery at a distance of 1cm from the bifurcation (AlokaProsound Alpha7, Japan). Results FH patients showed significantly higher β-index (6.3(4.8–8.2) vs. 5.2(4.2–6.4), p = 0.005), Ep (78(53–111) kPa vs. 62(48–79) kPa, p = 0.006), local PWV (5.4(4.5–6.4) m/c vs. 4.7(4.2–5.4) m/c, p = 0.005), but comparable values of carotid-femoral PWV (6.76(7.0–7.92) m/c vs. 6.48(6.16–7.12) m/c, p = 0.138). Carotid arteries and the aorta stiffened with age in patients with FH, but after 30 years, carotid arteries stiffened more significantly than the aorta. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that treatment-naive patients with FH had stiffer carotid arteries than their relatives, but showed no difference in aortic stiffness. We also found out that the rate of reduction of elasticity of the aorta and carotid arteries in FH patients varies: it is observed earlier in carotid arteries than in the aorta. PMID:27434535

  20. Carotid Artery Stenting versus Endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gahremanpour, Amir; Perin, Emerson C.; Silva, Guilherme

    2012-01-01

    For about 2 decades, investigators have been comparing carotid endarterectomy with carotid artery stenting in regard to their effectiveness and safety in treating carotid artery stenosis. We conducted a systematic review to summarize and appraise the available evidence provided by randomized trials, meta-analyses, and registries comparing the clinical outcomes of the 2 procedures. We searched the MEDLINE, SciVerse Scopus, and Cochrane databases and the bibliographies of pertinent textbooks and articles to identify these studies. The results of clinical trials and, consequently, the meta-analyses of those trials produced conflicting results regarding the comparative effectiveness and safety of carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting. These conflicting results arose because of differences in patient population, trial design, outcome measures, and variability among centers in the endovascular devices used and in operator skills. Careful appraisal of the trials and meta-analyses, particularly the most recent and largest National Institutes of Healthsponsored trial (the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs Stenting Trial [CREST]), showed that carotid stenting and endarterectomy were associated with similar rates of death and disabling stroke. Within the 30-day periprocedural period, carotid stenting was associated with higher risks of stroke, especially for patients aged >70 years, whereas carotid endarterectomy was associated with a higher risk of myocardial infarction. The slightly higher cost of stenting compared with endarterectomy was within an acceptable range by cost-effectiveness standards. We conclude that carotid artery stenting is an equivalent alternative to carotid endarterectomy when patient age and anatomy, surgical risk, and operator experience are considered in the choice of treatment approach. PMID:22949763

  1. Cervical carotid pseudoaneurysm: A carotid artery stenting complication

    PubMed Central

    Raso, Jair; Darwich, Rogerio; Ornellas, Carlos; Cariri, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    Background: As carotid artery stenting becomes increasingly used, more complications are likely to occur. We present a case of Staphylococcus septicemia and pseudoaneurysm arising in the neck portion of the carotid artery after stenting. Case Description: A 51-year-old man was admitted with mild left hemiparesis. CT and MRI showed right hemisphere ischemia. Duplex Scan and MRA showed bilateral severe stenosis of the carotid arteries in the neck. A percutaneous angioplasty with stenting of the left carotid artery was performed. Two weeks after the procedure, he developed fever and swelling in the right leg and shoulder. An abscess, near where the groin had been punctured for the angioplasty was surgically drained. Blood samples were positive for S. aureus. After treatment the patient complained of a painful bulky pulsatile left cervical mass. Duplex scan and MRA showed a pseudoaneurysm of the left carotid artery. We excised the pseudoaneurysm and rebuilt the carotid artery with a saphenous vein graft. The postoperative period was uneventful, and the MRA revealed a patent saphenous graft. Conclusion: Mycotic pseudoaneurysm of the carotid artery is a rare complication of percutaneous angioplasty and stenting. Surgical treatment with saphenous vein graft is the treatment of choice. PMID:21748038

  2. Contemporary carotid imaging: from degree of stenosis to plaque vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Brinjikji, Waleed; Huston, John; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Lerman, Amir; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Carotid artery stenosis is a well-established risk factor of ischemic stroke, contributing to up to 10%-20% of strokes or transient ischemic attacks. Many clinical trials over the last 20 years have used measurements of carotid artery stenosis as a means to risk stratify patients. However, with improvements in vascular imaging techniques such as CT angiography and MR angiography, ultrasonography, and PET/CT, it is now possible to risk stratify patients, not just on the degree of carotid artery stenosis but also on how vulnerable the plaque is to rupture, resulting in ischemic stroke. These imaging techniques are ushering in an emerging paradigm shift that allows for risk stratifications based on the presence of imaging features such as intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH), plaque ulceration, plaque neovascularity, fibrous cap thickness, and presence of a lipid-rich necrotic core (LRNC). It is important for the neurosurgeon to be aware of these new imaging techniques that allow for improved patient risk stratification and outcomes. For example, a patient with a low-grade stenosis but an ulcerated plaque may benefit more from a revascularization procedure than a patient with a stable 70% asymptomatic stenosis with a thick fibrous cap. This review summarizes the current state-of-the-art advances in carotid plaque imaging. Currently, MRI is the gold standard in carotid plaque imaging, with its high resolution and high sensitivity for identifying IPH, ulceration, LRNC, and inflammation. However, MRI is limited due to time constraints. CT also allows for high-resolution imaging and can accurately detect ulceration and calcification, but cannot reliably differentiate LRNC from IPH. PET/CT is an effective technique to identify active inflammation within the plaque, but it does not allow for assessment of anatomy, ulceration, IPH, or LRNC. Ultrasonography, with the aid of contrast enhancement, is a cost-effective technique to assess plaque morphology and characteristics, but it is

  3. Worsening angle closure glaucoma and choroidal detachments subsequent to closure of a carotid cavernous fistula

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Carotid cavernous fistulas are abnormal communications between the cavernous sinus and the external or internal carotid arteries. Although rare, closure of carotid cavernous fistulas can lead to immediate ocular complications. To our knowledge, our case represents the first report of worsening angle closure glaucoma and choroidal detachments over an extended period of two months subsequent to closure of a carotid cavernous fistula. Case presentation A 70-year-old female with a history of primary angle closure glaucoma presented with 4 mm of proptosis, resistance to retropulsion, tortuous corkscrew blood vessels and an orbital bruit of the right eye. Diagnostic cerebral angiogram showed a small indirect Barrow type D right carotid cavernous fistula. Transarterial embolization was planned but repeat cerebral angiography prior to the procedure demonstrated spontaneous partial closure of the carotid cavernous fistula and the procedure was aborted. One month later, our patient was noted to have worsening vision and choroidal detachments of the right eye. She declined further testing and was thus started on self-administered manual carotid jugular compressions. One month later, she developed progressive worsening of her choroidal detachments and angle closure. She eventually opted for surgical intervention but repeat cerebral angiography showed significant thrombosis of the carotid cavernous fistula and no intervention was warranted. Examination two months later showed complete resolution of the choroidal detachments and open angles of both eyes. Conclusions Our patient demonstrated worsening angle closure glaucoma and choroidal detachments after spontaneous closure of her carotid cavernous fistula had been noted. Ocular complications, including acute angle closure, have been reported to occur immediately after closure of carotid cavernous fistulas, but not over months as in our patient. It is imperative that individuals who have undergone apparent closure

  4. Lessons learnt from carotid artery trials.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, H; Limet, R

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the authors is to assess the natural history of carotid artery disease and the role of carotid intervention in preventing ipsilateral stroke. The development of endovascular techniques for correction of carotid artery stenoses made this less invasive technique very popular, with an inherent risk of unregulated overuse by a variety of medical specialists, who are not always well informed on the natural history of carotid artery disease. It re-opened the discussion on the value of carotid endarterectomy for stroke prophylaxis. This ongoing debate offers the opportunity to distil evidence-based guidelines for the management of extracranial carotid artery stenoses. In recent papers, some authors expressed doubts on the validity and general applicability of the results of the pivotal randomised trials of carotid endarterectomy. The excellent results in terms of operative outcome and long term stroke prevention would, according to certain comments, not be attainable in routine practice. Another criticism of carotid endarterectomy is its higher operative morbidity in terms of cranial nerve lesions and myocardial infarctions, compared to endovascular procedures. This consideration is, for some authors, the main reason to espouse carotid artery stenting as a better alternative to carotid endarterectomy. Any evidence supporting this point of view is missing. The supposed equivalence or non-inferiority of carotid artery stenting is purely speculative. The aim of this review paper is to summarize the crude data of carotid surgery trials. The authors aim to answer four questions. For which lesions is carotid endarterectomy most beneficial ? Are the results of randomised carotid surgery trials biased by the selection of patients ? Is operative morbidity, other than stroke, under-estimated ? Is carotid artery stenting safe and efficacious ? An in-depth review with a critical analysis is made of recently published and on-going trials, comparing carotid surgery

  5. Sympathoinhibition and hypotension in carotid sinus hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Smith, M L; Ellenbogen, K A; Eckberg, D L

    1992-12-01

    Carotid sinus reflex hypersensitivity is a known cause of syncope in humans. The condition is characterized by cardioinhibition and vasodepression, each to varying degrees. The extent and importance of sympathoinhibition has not been determined in patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity. This study reports on the extent of sympathoinhibition measured directly directly during carotid massage with and without atrioventricular sequential pacing, in a patient with symptomatic carotid sinus reflex hypersensitivity. Carotid massage elicited asystole, hypotension and complete inhibition of muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Carotid massage during atrioventricular pacing produced similar sympathoinhibition, but with minimal hypotension. Therefore, sympathoinhibition did not contribute importantly to the hypotension during carotid massage in the supine position in this patient. Further investigations are required to elucidate the relation of sympathoinhibition to hypotension in patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity in the upright position. PMID:1290922

  6. Sympathoinhibition and hypotension in carotid sinus hypersensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. L.; Ellenbogen, K. A.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    Carotid sinus reflex hypersensitivity is a known cause of syncope in humans. The condition is characterized by cardioinhibition and vasodepression, each to varying degrees. The extent and importance of sympathoinhibition has not been determined in patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity. This study reports on the extent of sympathoinhibition measured directly directly during carotid massage with and without atrioventricular sequential pacing, in a patient with symptomatic carotid sinus reflex hypersensitivity. Carotid massage elicited asystole, hypotension and complete inhibition of muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Carotid massage during atrioventricular pacing produced similar sympathoinhibition, but with minimal hypotension. Therefore, sympathoinhibition did not contribute importantly to the hypotension during carotid massage in the supine position in this patient. Further investigations are required to elucidate the relation of sympathoinhibition to hypotension in patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity in the upright position.

  7. How Is Carotid Artery Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Carotid Endarterectomy Carotid Ultrasound Stents Stroke Send a link to NHLBI to someone ... outward against the wall of the artery. A stent (a small mesh tube) is then put in ...

  8. Multimodality Imaging of Carotid Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Adla, Theodor; Adlova, Radka

    2015-01-01

    Four diagnostic modalities are used to image the following internal carotid artery: digital subtraction angiography (DSA), duplex ultrasound (DUS), computed tomography angiography (CTA), and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). The aim of this article is to describe the potentials of these techniques and to discuss their advantages and disadvantages. Invasive DSA is still considered the gold standard and is an indivisible part of the carotid stenting procedure. DUS is an inexpensive but operator-dependent tool with limited visibility of the carotid artery course. Conversely, CTA and MRA allow assessment of the carotid artery from the aortic arch to intracranial parts. The disadvantages of CTA are radiation and iodine contrast medium administration. MRA is without radiation but contrast-enhanced MRA is more accurate than noncontrast MRA. The choice of methods depends on the clinical indications and the availability of methods in individual centers. However, the general approach to patient with suspected carotid artery stenosis is to first perform DUS and then other noninvasive methods such as CTA, MRA, or transcranial Doppler US. PMID:26417185

  9. Carotid bruits as predictor for carotid stenoses detected by ultrasonography: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Elias P; Wester, Per

    2008-01-01

    Background Carotid surgery in asymptomatic subjects with carotid stenosis is effective to prevent ischemic stroke. There is, however, uncertainty how to find such persons at risk, because mass screening with carotid artery ultrasonography (US) is not cost-effective. Signs of carotid bruits corresponding to the carotid arteries may serve as a tool to select subjects for further investigation. This study is thus aimed at determining the usefulness of carotid bruits in the screening of carotid stenoses. Methods 1555 consecutive carotid ultrasonography investigations from 1486 cases done between January 2004 and March 2006 at Norrlands University Hospital, Sweden, were examined. 356 subjects, medium age 69 (27–88) years, had a significant (≥ 50%) US-verified carotid stenosis uni- or bilaterally, 291 had been examined for signs of carotid bruits. The likelihood ratios for carotid bruits to predict US-verified carotid stenoses were calculated and expressed as likelihood percentages. Results Thirty-one out of 100 persons (31%) with carotid bruit as an indication to perform carotid US had a significant (≥ 50%) carotid stenosis. 281 of the 356 (79%) cases with significant carotid stenoses were found among patients with cerebrovascular disease (CVD). 145 of 226 (64%) CVD patients with a significant carotid stenosis had a carotid bruit. In patients with 50–99% carotid stenoses carotid bruits had an accuracy of 75% (436/582), a sensitivity of 71% (236/334), a specificity of 81% (200/248), a positive likelihood ratio at 3.65 and a negative likelihood at 0.36. Patients with 70–99% stenoses had the highest sensitivity at 77% (183/238). In patients with 100% carotid stenoses, carotid bruits had a sensitivity of 26% (15/57) and a specificity of 49% (256/525). Conclusion Although carotid bruits are not accurate to confirm or to exclude significant carotid stenoses, these signs are appropriate for directed screening for further investigation with carotid US if the patient

  10. Blood flow changes after unilateral carotid artery ligation monitored by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yushu; Liang, Chengbo; Suo, Yanyan; Zhao, Yuqian; Wang, Yi; Xu, Tao; Wang, Ruikang; Ma, Zhenhe

    2016-03-01

    Unilateral carotid artery ligation which could induce adaptive improvement is a classic model that has been widely used to study pathology of ischemic disease. In those studies, blood flow is an important parameter to characterize the ischemia. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful imaging modality which can provide depth resolved images in biological tissue with high spatial and temporal resolution. SPF rats was anesthetized with isoflurane and divided into two groups. In first group, bilateral carotid artery was surgically exposed, and then left carotid artery was ligated. Blood flow changes of the contralateral carotid artery was monitored using high speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography, including the absolute flow velocity and the flow volume. In the other group, skull window was opened at the ipsilateral cerebral cortex of ligation and blood supply of small artery was measured before and after the ligation. The measured results demonstrate the blood supply compensation process after unilateral carotid artery ligation. With the superiority of high resolution, OCT is an effective technology in monitoring results of carotid artery after ligation.

  11. Taking your carotid pulse (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... take oxygenated blood from the heart to the brain. The pulse from the carotids may be felt on either side of the front of the neck just below the angle of the jaw. This rhythmic "beat" is caused by varying volumes of blood being pushed out of the heart ...

  12. Stenting for Internal Carotid Artery Stenosis Associated with Persistent Primitive Hypoglossal Artery Using Proximal Flow Blockade and Distal Protection System: A Technical Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Murai, Satoshi; Kusaka, Noboru; Umakoshi, Michiari; Itami, Hisakazu; Otsuka, Shinji; Nishiura, Tsukasa; Ogihara, Kotaro

    2016-06-01

    We report a very rare case of internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis associated with persistent primitive hypoglossal artery (PPHA) treated by stenting using a proximal flow blockade and distal filter protection system. A 77-year-old man with a medical history of repeated cerebral infarction was referred to our hospital for treatment of progressive ICA stenosis. Cerebral angiography revealed that the degree of stenosis was 50% and the PPHA branched just distal to the stenosis at the C2 vertebral level. Black-blood magnetic resonance imaging indicated vulnerable plaque. The stenosis was at a high location, so carotid artery stenting was employed. Under the proximal flow blockade system with occlusion of the external and common carotid artery, distal filter protection was placed in the ICA to prevent distal embolization. A self-expanding stent was successfully deployed and the patient was discharged without any neurological deficits. In stenting for the ICA stenosis associated with PPHA, the combination of a proximal flow blockade and distal protection system is reasonable and safe. PMID:27105567

  13. Assessing carotid atherosclerosis by fiber-optic multispectral photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Jie; Li, Rui; Wang, Pu; Phillips, Evan; Bruning, Rebecca; Liao, Chien-Sheng; Sturek, Michael; Goergen, Craig J.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2015-03-01

    Atherosclerotic plaque at the carotid bifurcation is the underlying cause of the majority of ischemic strokes. Noninvasive imaging and quantification of the compositional changes preceding gross anatomic changes within the arterial wall is essential for diagnosis of disease. Current imaging modalities such as duplex ultrasound, computed tomography, positron emission tomography are limited by the lack of compositional contrast and the detection of flow-limiting lesions. Although high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging has been developed to characterize atherosclerotic plaque composition, its accessibility for wide clinical use is limited. Here, we demonstrate a fiber-based multispectral photoacoustic tomography system for excitation of lipids and external acoustic detection of the generated ultrasound. Using sequential ultrasound imaging of ex vivo preparations we achieved ~2 cm imaging depth and chemical selectivity for assessment of human arterial plaques. A multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares analysis method was applied to resolve the major chemical components, including intravascular lipid, intramuscular fat, and blood. These results show the promise of detecting carotid plaque in vivo through esophageal fiber-optic excitation of lipids and external acoustic detection of the generated ultrasound. This imaging system has great potential for serving as a point-ofcare device for early diagnosis of carotid artery disease in the clinic.

  14. Carotid blood flow measured by an ultrasonic volume flowmeter in carotid stenosis and patients with dementia.

    PubMed Central

    Uematsu, S; Folstein, M F

    1985-01-01

    The volume flowmeter is a simple, noninvasive Doppler ultrasound technique that provides accurate measurement of carotid artery diameter and flow. The device provides a useful laboratory test that can aid significantly in diagnosis of carotid stenosis and dementia. PMID:2935592

  15. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Carotid Artery Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Carotid Artery Disease? Carotid artery disease may not cause signs or symptoms until it severely narrows or blocks a carotid artery. Signs and symptoms may include a bruit, a ...

  16. Left carotid steal. A new observation.

    PubMed

    Shumacker, H B; Isch, J H

    1975-04-01

    A patient had an occlusion of the left subclavian artery just proximal to the takeoff of a previously placed subclavian-carotid graft. This caused reversal of flow in the graft and a symptomatic steal of blood via to the intracranial arteries. An axilloaxillary graft restored forward flow. In a second patient, a steal occurred from the right carotid and vertebral systems into the distal carotid system of the left side that has been isolated by a proximal carotide artery occlusion from arteriosclerosis. A saphenous vein, used as a bypass from the subclavian to the carotid artery, restored normal flow. Thus, the carotide system may be the low-pressure area responsible for the steal, although this is rarer than the subclavian. PMID:1147756

  17. Atherosclerotic carotid stenosis and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Mei, Bin; Zhang, Junjian

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerosis carotid stenosis is associated with stroke and cognitive impairment. Progressive cognitive decline may be an even greater problem than stroke, but it has not been widely recognized and therefore must be adequately addressed. Although both Carotid Endarterectomy (CEA) and Carotid Artery Stenting (CAS) have been proven can prevent future stroke in patients with atherosclerotic carotid stenosis, the influence of CEA and CAS on cognitive function is not clear. In the first part of this review, we evaluated the literature concerning carotid stenosis and the risk of cognitive impairment. Studies have suggested that both symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid stenosis are associated with cognitive impairment. In the second part, we reviewed the impact of CEA and CAS on cognitive function, some studies have shown benefits, but others have not. PMID:27152468

  18. MRI-based biomechanical parameters for carotid artery plaque vulnerability assessment.

    PubMed

    Speelman, Lambert; Teng, Zhongzhao; Nederveen, Aart J; van der Lugt, Aad; Gillard, Jonathan H

    2016-02-29

    Carotid atherosclerotic plaques are a major cause of ischaemic stroke. The biomechanical environment to which the arterial wall and plaque is subjected to plays an important role in the initiation, progression and rupture of carotid plaques. MRI is frequently used to characterize the morphology of a carotid plaque, but new developments in MRI enable more functional assessment of carotid plaques. In this review, MRI based biomechanical parameters are evaluated on their current status, clinical applicability, and future developments. Blood flow related biomechanical parameters, including endothelial wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index, have been shown to be related to plaque formation. Deriving these parameters directly from MRI flow measurements is feasible and has great potential for future carotid plaque development prediction. Blood pressure induced stresses in a plaque may exceed the tissue strength, potentially leading to plaque rupture. Multi-contrast MRI based stress calculations in combination with tissue strength assessment based on MRI inflammation imaging may provide a plaque stress-strength balance that can be used to assess the plaque rupture risk potential. Direct plaque strain analysis based on dynamic MRI is already able to identify local plaque displacement during the cardiac cycle. However, clinical evidence linking MRI strain to plaque vulnerability is still lacking. MRI based biomechanical parameters may lead to improved assessment of carotid plaque development and rupture risk. However, better MRI systems and faster sequences are required to improve the spatial and temporal resolution, as well as increase the image contrast and signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:26791734

  19. [Carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting: a vascular surgeon's point of view].

    PubMed

    Beloyartsev, D F

    2016-01-01

    Presented in the article is a review of the literature related to comparing the outcomes of carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting in treatment of atherosclerotic stenosis of the internal carotid artery. Special attention is paid to carefully considering the clinical situations wherein preference should be given to either method of intervention. PMID:27159933

  20. Carotid Stump Syndrome: Pathophysiology and Endovascular Treatment Options

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshminarayan, Raghuram; Scott, Paul M.; Robinson, Graham J.; Ettles, Duncan F.

    2011-02-15

    Carotid stump syndrome is one of the recognised causes of recurrent ipsilateral cerebrovascular events after occlusion of the internal carotid artery. It is believed that microemboli arising from the stump of the occluded internal carotid artery or the ipsilateral external carotid artery can pass into the middle cerebral artery circulation as a result of patent external carotid-internal carotid anastomotic channels. Different pathophysiologic causes of this syndrome and endovascular options for treatment are discussed.

  1. Carotid artery stenting: current and emerging options

    PubMed Central

    Morr, Simon; Lin, Ning; Siddiqui, Adnan H

    2014-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting technologies are rapidly evolving. Options for endovascular surgeons and interventionists who treat occlusive carotid disease continue to expand. We here present an update and overview of carotid stenting devices. Evidence supporting carotid stenting includes randomized controlled trials that compare endovascular stenting to open surgical endarterectomy. Carotid technologies addressed include the carotid stents themselves as well as adjunct neuroprotective devices. Aspects of stent technology include bare-metal versus covered stents, stent tapering, and free-cell area. Drug-eluting and cutting balloon indications are described. Embolization protection options and new direct carotid access strategies are reviewed. Adjunct technologies, such as intravascular ultrasound imaging and risk stratification algorithms, are discussed. Bare-metal and covered stents provide unique advantages and disadvantages. Stent tapering may allow for a more fitted contour to the caliber decrement between the common carotid and internal carotid arteries but also introduces new technical challenges. Studies regarding free-cell area are conflicting with respect to benefits and associated risk; clinical relevance of associated adverse effects associated with either type is unclear. Embolization protection strategies include distal filter protection and flow reversal. Though flow reversal was initially met with some skepticism, it has gained wider acceptance and may provide the advantage of not crossing the carotid lesion before protection is established. New direct carotid access techniques address difficult anatomy and incorporate sophisticated flow-reversal embolization protection techniques. Carotid stenting is a new and exciting field with rapidly advancing technologies. Embolization protection, low-risk deployment, and lesion assessment and stratification are active areas of research. Ample room remains for further innovations and developments. PMID:25349483

  2. Anomalous course of the external carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Katsushi

    2016-09-01

    The course and the branching patterns of the external carotid artery were investigated macroscopically in a total of 550 bodies or 1100 head sides of Japanese subjects, donated for student dissection at Kumamoto University from 1994 to 2014. With the exception of 14 head sides, the external carotid arteries running between the posterior belly of the digastric and stylohyoid muscles were found in 42 (3.87 %) out of 1086 head sides. Strictly speaking, they passed between the stylohyoid muscle and the stylohyoid branch of the facial nerve in 23 out of these 42 head sides. In the remaining 19 instances, the stylohyoid branch of the facial nerve was cut and its relationship to the external carotid artery was not clear. The external carotid artery running lateral to the intact stylohyoid branch of the facial nerve, medial to the digastric muscle was not found. The external carotid arteries running lateral to the digastric muscle were found in 4 (0.37 %) out of 1086 head sides. As a result, it is proposed that plural, potential courses of the external carotid artery originally exist and that some parts of such potential courses remain as branches of the external carotid artery in the usual instance, while the anomalous courses of the external carotid artery are induced mainly by anastomosis between the muscular branches supplying the wall of the head and neck in contrast to the usual external carotid artery induced mainly by the branches originally supplying the pharynx. PMID:26439732

  3. Quantification of carotid vessel atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Bernard; Egger, Micaela; Spence, J. D.; Parraga, Grace; Fenster, Aaron

    2006-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by the development of plaques in the arterial wall, which ultimately leads to heart attacks and stroke. 3D ultrasound (US) has been used to screen patients' carotid arteries. Plaque measurements obtained from these images may aid in the management and monitoring of patients, and in evaluating the effect of new treatment options. Different types of measures for ultrasound phenotypes of atherosclerosis have been proposed. Here, we report on the development and application of a method used to analyze changes in carotid plaque morphology from 3D US images obtained at two different time points. We evaluated our technique using manual segmentations of the wall and lumen of the carotid artery from images acquired in two US scanning sessions. To incorporate the effect of intraobserver variability in our evaluation, manual segmentation was performed five times each for the arterial wall and lumen. From this set of five segmentations, the mean wall and lumen surfaces were reconstructed, with the standard deviation at each point mapped onto the surfaces. A correspondence map between the mean wall and lumen surfaces was then established, and the thickness of the atherosclerotic plaque at each point in the vessel was estimated to be the distance between each correspondence pairs. The two-sample Student's t-test was used to judge whether the difference between the thickness values at each pair corresponding points of the arteries in the two 3D US images was statistically significant.

  4. Rapid three-dimensional segmentation of the carotid bifurcation from serial MR images.

    PubMed

    Ladak, H M; Milner, J S; Steinman, D A

    2000-02-01

    The current trend in computational hemodynamics is to employ realistic models derived from ex vivo or in vivo imaging. Such studies typically produce a series of images from which the lumen boundaries must first be individually extracted (i.e., two-dimensional segmentation), and then serially reconstructed to produce the three-dimensional lumen surface geometry. In this paper, we present a rapid three-dimensional segmentation technique that combines these two steps, based on the idea of an expanding virtual balloon. This three-dimensional technique is demonstrated in application to finite element meshing and CFD modeling of flow in the carotid bifurcation of a normal volunteer imaged with black blood MRI. Wall shear stress patterns computed using a mesh generated with the three-dimensional technique agree well with those computed using a mesh generated from conventional two-dimensional segmentation and serial reconstruction. In addition to reducing the time required to extract the lumen surface from hours to minutes, our approach is easy to learn and use and requires minimal user intervention, which can potentially increase the accuracy and precision of quantitative and longitudinal studies of hemodynamics and vascular disease. PMID:10790835

  5. Habitual fish intake and clinically silent carotid atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fish consumption is recommended as part of a healthy diet. However, there is a paucity of data concerning the relation between fish consumption and carotid atherosclerosis. We investigated the association between habitual fish consumption and asymptomatic carotid atherosclerosis, defined as the presence of plaques and/or increased intima-media thickness (≥ 0.90 mm), in non-diabetic participants. Methods Nine hundred-sixty-one (range of age: 18–89 yrs; 37.1% males) adult participants without clinically known atherosclerotic disease were randomly recruited among the customers of a shopping mall in Palermo, Italy, and cross-sectionally investigated. Each participant answered a food frequency questionnaire and underwent high-resolution ultrasonographic evaluation of both carotid arteries. Routine laboratory blood measurements were obtained in a subsample of 507 participants. Results Based on habitual fish consumption, participants were divided into three groups: non-consumers or consumers of less than 1 serving a week (24.0%), consumers of 1 serving a week (38.8%), and consumers of ≥ 2 servings a week (37.2%). Age-adjusted prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis (presence of plaques or intima media thickness ≥ 0.9 mm) was higher in the low fish consumption group (13.3%, 12.1% and 6.6%, respectively; P = 0.003). Multivariate analysis evidenced that carotid atherosclerosis was significantly associated with age (OR = 1.12; 95% CI = 1.09-1.14), hypertension on pharmacologic treatment (OR = 1.81; 95% CI = 1.16-2.82), and pulse pressure (OR = 1.03; 95% CI = 1.01-1.04), while consuming ≥2 servings of fish weekly was protective compared with the condition of consumption of <1 serving of fish weekly (OR = 0.46; 95% CI = 0.26-0.80). Conclusions High habitual fish consumption seems to be associated with less carotid atherosclerosis, though adequate interventional trials are necessary to confirm the role of fish

  6. Vessel Wall Imaging of the Intracranial and Cervical Carotid Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Jun; Jung, Seung Chai; Lee, Deok Hee

    2015-01-01

    Vessel wall imaging can depict the morphologies of atherosclerotic plaques, arterial walls, and surrounding structures in the intracranial and cervical carotid arteries beyond the simple luminal changes that can be observed with traditional luminal evaluation. Differentiating vulnerable from stable plaques and characterizing atherosclerotic plaques are vital parts of the early diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of stroke and the neurological adverse effects of atherosclerosis. Various techniques for vessel wall imaging have been developed and introduced to differentiate and analyze atherosclerotic plaques in the cervical carotid artery. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) is the most important and popular vessel wall imaging technique for directly evaluating the vascular wall and intracranial artery disease. Intracranial artery atherosclerosis, dissection, moyamoya disease, vasculitis, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome can also be diagnosed and differentiated by using HR-MRI. Here, we review the radiologic features of intracranial artery disease and cervical carotid artery atherosclerosis on HR-MRI and various other vessel wall imaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography). PMID:26437991

  7. Carotid Cavernous Fistula Associated with Persistent Trigeminal Artery

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Robert W.; Howard, Robert S.; Zager, Eric

    1998-01-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) associated with persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is a rare but important clinical entity. We present a case treated by microcoil embolization with preservation of internal carotid, PTA, and hasilar artery flow following embolization. A 62-year-old female developed pulsatile tinnitus followed by left eye proptosis and diplopia. Examination revealed a cranial nerve VI palsy and an objective bruit over the left orbit. Angiographic evaluation revealed a carotid cavernous fistula originating from a persistent trigeminal artery. Placement of a detachable balloon across the fistula site while preserving the PTA proved impossible, and the fistula was treated with microcoils following placement of a microcatheter across the fistula into the cavernous sinus. Complete closure of the fistula was followed by resolution of the patient's symptoms. Preservation of all major vessels including the PTA was accomplished through the use of coil embolization. Careful evaluation of the angiogram is necessary to identify PTA associated with a CCF. Previous reports have described treatment of CCF with PTA by surgical or balloon ocolusion, some involving sacrifice of the PTA. Examination of the relevant embryology and anatomy reveals, however, that occlusion of the PTA must be approached with caution due to potential supply to the posterior circulation. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:17171071

  8. Vessel Wall Imaging of the Intracranial and Cervical Carotid Arteries.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Jun; Jung, Seung Chai; Lee, Deok Hee

    2015-09-01

    Vessel wall imaging can depict the morphologies of atherosclerotic plaques, arterial walls, and surrounding structures in the intracranial and cervical carotid arteries beyond the simple luminal changes that can be observed with traditional luminal evaluation. Differentiating vulnerable from stable plaques and characterizing atherosclerotic plaques are vital parts of the early diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of stroke and the neurological adverse effects of atherosclerosis. Various techniques for vessel wall imaging have been developed and introduced to differentiate and analyze atherosclerotic plaques in the cervical carotid artery. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) is the most important and popular vessel wall imaging technique for directly evaluating the vascular wall and intracranial artery disease. Intracranial artery atherosclerosis, dissection, moyamoya disease, vasculitis, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome can also be diagnosed and differentiated by using HR-MRI. Here, we review the radiologic features of intracranial artery disease and cervical carotid artery atherosclerosis on HR-MRI and various other vessel wall imaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography). PMID:26437991

  9. What to Expect After Carotid Endarterectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... getting larger. As part of your long-term treatment, you can take steps to keep your carotid arteries healthy. One important step is to not smoke. Smoking increases the risk of carotid artery disease and stroke. If you smoke, ask your doctor about programs and products that can help you ...

  10. Carotid body tumor: a 25-year experience.

    PubMed

    Metheetrairut, Choakchai; Chotikavanich, Chanticha; Keskool, Phawin; Suphaphongs, Nit

    2016-08-01

    Carotid body tumor is an uncommon hypervascular benign tumor in the head and neck region. It usually presents as a slow growing mass at the carotid bifurcation. Because of the high rate of neurovascular complications, resection of this tumor is considered challenging for otolaryngologists. Between 1988 and 2013, 40 carotid body tumors from 38 patients were diagnosed and underwent resection at Siriraj Hospital (25 female and 13 male patients). Their age ranged from 15 to 59 years. Seven patients had bilateral tumors simultaneously whereas six cases had familial history of carotid body tumor. Carotid angiography was performed in 29 cases; other additional diagnostic studies included CT scan, MRI, and MRA to detect the widening of carotid bifurcation, its extension, and multifocal tumors. All diagnosed tumors were successfully removed. However, internal carotid artery and carotid bifurcation were injured in 11 cases (27.5 %). Shamblin class III and previous biopsy history were considered risk factors for vascular injury. Postoperative cranial nerves deficit was found in 20 % of the cases and CNS complication occurred in two patients (5 %). There was no surgical mortality. Additionally, upon the mean follow-up period of 36 months, no recurrence or malignant transformation was detected in this study. Multidisciplinary approach, early tumor detection, meticulous preoperative evaluation, and modern vascular surgical technique are the key success factors for tumor removal. PMID:26233244

  11. Future Management of Carotid Stenosis: Role of Urgent Carotid Interventions in the Acutely Symptomatic Carotid Patient and Best Medical Therapy for Asymptomatic Carotid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, Hernan A.; Smith, Taylor A.; Donovan, Melissa J.; Sternbergh, W. Charles

    2014-01-01

    Background Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, leading to devastating disability. Most strokes are ischemic, and nearly one-third of these are caused by carotid disease. The primary mechanism of carotid-related stroke is an atheroembolic event from an unstable atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In the 1990s, randomized trials demonstrated the benefit of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in reducing the risk of stroke in both symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid disease. Methods We review best medical therapy (BMT) for asymptomatic carotid disease and recent randomized trials comparing CEA and carotid angioplasty stenting (CAS), and we discuss the role of urgent carotid interventions in patients with acute neurologic symptoms. Results In 2010, 2 large trials demonstrated the efficacy of CAS in select patients, although CAS was associated with an increased procedural stroke risk compared to CEA. An age effect was observed; patients >75 years do worse with CAS compared to CEA. As BMT has evolved in the past decade, a future trial (CREST-2) will address whether BMT is equal to intervention (CEA or CAS) in asymptomatic carotid disease. In a subgroup of patients with asymptomatic carotid disease, CEA plus BMT will likely remain the mainstay therapy for carotid disease compared to BMT alone. CEA and CAS will continue to play complementary roles in the future, as CAS will be done in select patients in whom CEA cannot be undertaken because of high-risk anatomical or medical conditions. Finally, a role for urgent carotid interventions in a select group of patients who present with acute neurologic symptoms is developing as a way to prevent recurrent stroke after an initial carotid plaque rupture event. Conclusion CAS has an increasingly higher risk of stroke with advancing age. Patients treated with CAS have a 1.76-fold increased risk of stroke (95% CI, 1.35-2.31) with each 10-year increase in age. No such age effect is seen in patients treated with CEA

  12. 3D reconstruction of a carotid bifurcation from 2D transversal ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Eunseop; Nam, Kweon-Ho; Jin, Changzhu; Paeng, Dong-Guk; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2014-12-01

    Visualizing and analyzing the morphological structure of carotid bifurcations are important for understanding the etiology of carotid atherosclerosis, which is a major cause of stroke and transient ischemic attack. For delineation of vasculatures in the carotid artery, ultrasound examinations have been widely employed because of a noninvasive procedure without ionizing radiation. However, conventional 2D ultrasound imaging has technical limitations in observing the complicated 3D shapes and asymmetric vasodilation of bifurcations. This study aims to propose image-processing techniques for better 3D reconstruction of a carotid bifurcation in a rat by using 2D cross-sectional ultrasound images. A high-resolution ultrasound imaging system with a probe centered at 40MHz was employed to obtain 2D transversal images. The lumen boundaries in each transverse ultrasound image were detected by using three different techniques; an ellipse-fitting, a correlation mapping to visualize the decorrelation of blood flow, and the ellipse-fitting on the correlation map. When the results are compared, the third technique provides relatively good boundary extraction. The incomplete boundaries of arterial lumen caused by acoustic artifacts are somewhat resolved by adopting the correlation mapping and the distortion in the boundary detection near the bifurcation apex was largely reduced by using the ellipse-fitting technique. The 3D lumen geometry of a carotid artery was obtained by volumetric rendering of several 2D slices. For the 3D vasodilatation of the carotid bifurcation, lumen geometries at the contraction and expansion states were simultaneously depicted at various view angles. The present 3D reconstruction methods would be useful for efficient extraction and construction of the 3D lumen geometries of carotid bifurcations from 2D ultrasound images. PMID:24965564

  13. [Pharmacological preconditioning in carotid endarterectomy].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, M R; Karalkin, A V; Fedin, A I; Virganskii, A O; Kunitsyn, N V; Kholopova, E A; Yumin, S M

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed at examining efficacy of preoperative preparation (pharmacological preconditioning) for carotid endarterectomy in patients with chronic cerebrovascular insufficiency. For this purpose, we analysed the outcomes of surgical treatment in a total of 80 patients presenting with haemodynamically significant unilateral and bilateral lesions of carotid arteries. Of these, 40 patients were operated on immediately and a further 40 patients underwent surgery after pharmacological preconditioning with Actovegin taken at a daily dose of 1,200 mg for 1.5 months. It was demonstrated that preoperative preparation prior to surgery increases cerebral perfusion which is determined by means of single-photon emission computed tomography, thus substantially improving the outcomes of surgical treatment. Statistically significant differences in cognitive function of these groups of patients were revealed 7 days and 6 months after the operation. Improvement of cognitive functions was associated with fewer symptom-free postoperative cerebral ischaemic foci in various regions of the brain. A conclusion was made on a positive role of pharmacological preconditioning with Actovegin in surgical management of cerebrovascular insufficiency, first of all in relation to more complete restoration of cognitive functions. PMID:26355920

  14. [Immediate improvement of ischemic oculopathy after stenting for internal carotid artery stenosis].

    PubMed

    Arai, Naoyuki; Sasahara, Atsushi; Hagiwara, Shinji; Tani, Shigeru; Ohbuchi, Hidenori; Hirota, Kengo; Koseki, Hirokazu; Kuroi, Yasuhiro; Ohkuma, Hiroko; Matsubara, Masao; Hayashi, Morito; Iwabuchi, Satoshi; Kasuya, Hidetoshi

    2014-12-01

    Ocular ischemic syndrome occurs when ocular circulation becomes impaired owing to various causes, leading to disturbances in the visual function. It ultimately progresses to neovascular glaucoma and loss of sight. Therefore, the early diagnosis and treatment of patients with ocular ischemic syndrome has a major effect on their visual prognosis. Herein, we describe a patient who complained of decreased vision in one eye. The patient was subsequently diagnosed with internal carotid artery stenosis because of neovascularity (rubeosis iridis) around the iris in the anterior eye. The vision of the patient improved immediately after carotid artery stenting. A review of the literature indicated that the visual improvement could be attributed to the reversal of retrograde blood flow, caused by internal carotid artery stenosis, to normal levels; the resolution of rubeosis in the anterior eye; and improvement in the visual field constriction. PMID:25475037

  15. [A Case of Carotid Free-Floating Thrombus Treated by Carotid Ultrasonography-Guided Endovascular Approach].

    PubMed

    Otawa, Masato; Kinkori, Takeshi; Watanabe, Kenichi; Ando, Ryo; Tambara, Masao; Arima, Toru

    2016-06-01

    We experienced a case of carotid free-floating thrombus treated by carotid ultrasonography-guided endovascular approach. A 63-year-old man was brought to our hospital with the chief complaint of sudden onset left hemiplegia. MRI revealed acute infarction of the right MCA territory due to the right M1 occlusion. Carotid ultrasonography showed a pedunculated, polypoid mobile plaque floating with the cardiac beat. We attempted ultrasonography-guided endovascular treatment. Under proximal balloon protection, the floating plaque was successfully aspirated into the Penumbra aspiration catheter. Carotid stent was also placed to stabilize the residual pedicle of the plaque. Aspirated plaque was identified as fresh thrombus by pathological examination. Carotid ultrasonography-guided endovascular approach was effective for getting the picture of real-time dynamics of the carotid FFT. PMID:27270147

  16. Carotid stent infection: a rare but potentially fatal complication of carotid artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Son, Seungnam; Choi, Nack-Cheon; Choi, Dae Seob; Cho, Oh Hyun

    2015-04-01

    Infections involving endovascular devices are rare and, to our knowledge, only three cases of infection with an inserted carotid stent have ever been reported. A 68-year-old man underwent carotid artery stenting (CAS) of the left proximal internal carotid artery. Two days after CAS the patient developed a high fever and investigation showed that the inserted carotid stent was infected. The infection could not be controlled despite adequate antibiotic therapy. Eventually a rupture of the carotid artery occurred and the patient underwent emergency resection of the left carotid bifurcation in addition to stent removal and reconstruction with a saphenous vein interposition graft. The patient recovered fully without any neurological sequelae. PMID:24688061

  17. Relation between psychological strain and carotid atherosclerosis in a general population

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, B; Grabe, H J; Völzke, H; Lüdemann, J; Kessler, C; Dahm, J B; Freyberger, H J; John, U; Felix, S B

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the hypothesis that psychological strain is related to carotid atherosclerosis in a large general population sample. Methods: Intima–media thickness and the prevalence of atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid arteries were quantitatively assessed by high resolution ultrasound among 2164 participants (1112 women and 1052 men, aged 45 to 75 years) of the SHIP (study of health in Pomerania), an epidemiological survey of a random sample of the population of north eastern Germany. Psychological strain was measured by 13 items reflecting typical psychological complaints. Each item was graded by the study participants on a four point scale (from 0, absent, to 3, severe) and a psychological strain score was generated by summing these 13 items. Results: Mean psychological strain score was 10.8 (7.0) (median score 10) among women and 8.5 (6.2) (median score 8) among men. Psychological strain did not predict carotid intima–media thickness among either men or women. However, after adjustment for covariates, high psychological strain and carotid plaques were independently and linearly related, with plaque prevalence odds of 1.03 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01 to 1.05, p  =  0.009) per increment of the psychological strain score among women and 1.04 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.07, p  =  0.003) among men. Conclusions: This study identified a relation between general psychological strain and carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:15772199

  18. Role of erythrocyte sedimentation rate in ischemic stroke as an inflammatory marker of carotid atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amit Shankar; Atam, Virendra; Yathish, Besthenahalli Erappa; Das, Liza; Koonwar, Seiddhartha

    2014-01-01

    Background: Inflammation mediates a key role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis which is an important cause of ischemic stroke. An elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) may, therefore, be a marker of the extent andor intensity of a general atherosclerotic process and thus a marker for advanced atherosclerosis heralding increased risk of arterial thrombosis leading to ischemic stroke. Materials and Methods: ESR was calculated in ischemic stroke patients by Westergren's method along with carotid sonography using high resolution 7.5 MHz techniques to find the prevalence of increased carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and presence of plaque according to Mannheim Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Consensus. Results: Average value of ESR in all patients was 27.89 ± 9.73 mm/h. A significant association was found between ESR and markers of carotid atherosclerosis, that is, high CIMT of more than 0.8 mm (P < 0.0001) and presence of plaque (P-0.026) in univariate analysis. Also, a significant positive correlation was found between ESR and serum fibrinogen, another inflammatory marker. (r = 0.88, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: The extent of inflammation may reflect in part the propensity of atherosclerotic lesions to lead to clinical disease. Study shows the association of ESR with markers of atherosclerosis confirming the strength of the inflammatory response associated with carotid atherosclerosis and might conceivably carry important prognostic information regarding occurrence of such catastrophic events in future. PMID:24741248

  19. Segment-Specific Associations of Carotid IMT with Cardiovascular Risk Factors: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Polak, Joseph F.; Person, Sharina D.; Wei, Gina S.; Godreau, Ayleen; Jacobs, David R.; Harrington, Anita; Sidney, Stephen; O’Leary, Daniel H.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose We propose to study possible differences in the associations between risk factors for cardiovascular disease (myocardial infarction and stroke) and Carotid Intima-Media thickness (IMT) measurements made at three different levels of the carotid bifurcation. Methods: Cross-sectional study of a cohort of Whites and African Americans of both genders with mean age 45 years. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors were determined in cohort members. Carotid IMT was measured from high-resolution B-mode ultrasound images at three levels: the common carotid artery (CCA), the carotid artery bulb (Bulb) and the internal carotid artery (ICA). Associations with risk factors were evaluated by multivariate linear regression analyses. Results Of 3258 who underwent carotid IMT measurements, CCA, Bulb, and ICA IMT were measured at all three separate levels in 3023 (92.7%). A large proportion of the variability of CCA IMT was explained by cardiovascular risk factors (26.8%) but less so for the Bulb (11.2%) and ICA (8.0%). Carotid IMT was consistently associated with age, LDL-cholesterol, smoking and hypertension in all segments. Associations with fasting glucose and diastolic blood pressure were stronger for CCA than for the other segments. Hypertension, diabetes and current smoking had qualitatively stronger associations with Bulb IMT, and LDL cholesterol with ICA IMT. Conclusion: In our cohort of relatively young white and African-American men and women, a greater proportion of the variability in common carotid IMT can be explained by traditional cardiovascular risk factors than for the carotid artery bulb and internal carotid arteries. PMID:19910544

  20. Race-gender differences in the association of trait anger with subclinical carotid artery atherosclerosis: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Janice E; Couper, David J; Din-Dzietham, Rebecca; Nieto, F Javier; Folsom, Aaron R

    2007-06-01

    This paper examines the association between trait anger and subclinical carotid artery atherosclerosis among 14,098 Black or White men and women, aged 48-67 years, in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study cohort, 1990-1992. Trait anger was assessed using the 10-item Spielberger Trait Anger Scale. Carotid atherosclerosis was determined by an averaged measure of the wall intimal-medial thickness (IMT) of the carotid bifurcation and of the internal and common carotids, measured by high-resolution B-mode ultrasound. In the full study cohort, trait anger and carotid IMT were significantly and positively associated (p = 0.04). In race-gender stratified analysis, the association was strongest and independent only in Black men, among whom a significant trait anger-carotid IMT relation was observed for both the overall trait anger measure (p = 0.004) and the anger reaction dimension (p = 0.001). In Black men, carotid IMT levels increased across categories of overall trait anger and anger reaction, resulting in clinically significant differences (67 microm (95% confidence interval: 23, 110) and 82 microm (95% confidence interval: 40, 125), respectively) from low to high anger. Sociodemographic, lifestyle, anthropometric, and biologic cardiovascular disease risk factors appear to mediate the relation in Black women, White men, and White women. In conclusion, these findings document disparate race-gender patterns in the association of trait anger with subclinical carotid artery atherosclerosis. PMID:17363362

  1. Evaluation of Carotid Plaque Using Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Traditional risk factors for predicting of cardiovascular disease are not always effective predictors for development of cardiovascular events. This review summarizes several newly developed noninvasive imaging techniques for evaluating carotid plaques and their role in cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:27358696

  2. Retained subintimal pellet in a carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Manousi, Maria; Sarantitis, Ioannis; Papadoulas, Spyros; Diamantopoulos, Athanasios; Kakkos, Stavros K; Lampropoulos, George; Tsolakis, Ioannis A

    2011-06-01

    A shotgun pellet is depicted in the present image in a carotid artery under the intima, which remained intact without local complications for up to six months. There is lack of data regarding the natural history of such a carotid pellet, but the experience from the myocardium is that, in the absence of infection, completely embedded missiles are usually asymptomatic, tolerated well and may be left in place. PMID:21860728

  3. Carotid artery stenting in recently symptomatic patients.

    PubMed

    Setacci, C; de Donato, G; Setacci, F; Sirignano, P; Galzerano, G; Borrelli, M P; Cappelli, A

    2013-02-01

    Treatment of acute stroke is time-dependent, with the best outcomes resulting from the earliest interventions. However, for patients with acute ischemic stroke due to a high-grade stenosis of the internal carotid artery, despite maximal medical treatment, an effective intervention to improve their neurologic symptoms and clinical outcome has not yet been established. There are two major concerns: first, cerebral revascularization in the acute stage remains challenging because of the possibility that hemorrhagic infarction or hyperperfusion syndrome will occur after revascularization; second, alarms about carotid artery stenting in patients with acute symptoms are related to the fact that, while with carotid endarterectomy the plaque is completely removed, after stenting it is only remodelled and its stabilization is essential to avoid embolic events during the procedure and in the post-operative period. Although level 1 evidence seems clearly in favor of carotid endarterectomy in symptomatic patients, carotid stenting has been proposed as a possible alternative in selected cases if the procedure is performed in high-volume center with documented low perioperative stroke and death rates. This review summarizes indications and results for carotid artery stenting in recently symptomatic patients. PMID:23296417

  4. Carotid endarterectomy and prevention of cerebral ischemia in symptomatic carotid stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberg, M.R.; Eskridge, J.; Winn, H.R.; Eskridge, J. ); Wilson, S.E. ); Yatsu, F. ); Weiss, D.G. ); Messina, L. ); Hershey, L.A. ); Colling, C. ); Deykin, D. )

    1991-12-18

    The objective of this study was to determine whether carotid endarterectomy provides protection against subsequent cerebral ischemia in men with ischemic symptoms in the distribution of significant ipsilateral internal carotid artery stenosis. The study group was comprised of men who presented within 120 days of onset of symptoms that were consistent with transient ischemic attacks, transient monocular blindness, or recent small completed strokes between July 1988 and February 1991. Among 5,000 patients screened, 189 individuals were randomized with angiographic internal carotid artery stenosis greater than 50% ipsilateral to the presenting symptoms. Forty-eight eligible patients who refused entry were followed up outside of the trial. For a selected cohort of men with symptoms of cerebral or retinal ischemia in the distribution of a high-grade internal carotid artery stenosis, carotid endarterectomy can effectively reduce the risk of subsequent ipsilateral cerebral ischemia. The risk of cerebral ischemia in this subgroup of patients is considerably higher than previously estimated.

  5. IN VITRO AND PRELIMINARY IN VIVO VALIDATION OF ECHO PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY IN CAROTID VASCULAR IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fuxing; Lanning, Craig; Mazzaro, Luciano; Barker, Alex J.; Gates, Philip; Strain, W. David; Fulford, Jonathan; Gosling, Oliver E.; Shore, Angela C.; Bellenger, Nick G.; Rech, Bryan; Chen, Jiusheng; Chen, James; Shandas, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Non-invasive, easy-to-use and accurate measurements of wall shear stress (WSS) in human blood vessels have always been challenging in clinical applications. Echo particle image velocimetry (Echo PIV) has shown promise for clinical measurements of local hemodynamics and wall shear rate. So far, however, the method has only been validated under simple flow conditions. In this study, we validated Echo PIV under in-vitro and in-vivo conditions. For in-vitro validation, we used an anatomically-correct, compliant carotid bifurcation flow phantom with pulsatile flow conditions, using optical particle image velocimetry (optical PIV) as the reference standard. For in-vivo validation, we compared Echo PIV-derived two dimensional velocity fields obtained at the carotid bifurcation in 5 normal subjects against phase-contrast MRI-derived velocity measurements obtained at the same locations. For both studies, time-dependent, two-dimensional two-component velocity vectors, peak/centerline velocity, flow rate and wall shear rate (WSR) waveforms at the common carotid artery (CCA), carotid bifurcation and distal internal carotid artery (ICA) were examined. Linear regression, correlation analysis and Bland-Altman analysis were used to quantify the agreement of different waveforms measured by the two techniques. In-vitro results showed that Echo PIV produced good images of time-dependent velocity vector maps over the cardiac cycle with excellent temporal (up to 0.7 msec) and spatial (~0.5 mm) resolutions and quality, on par with optical PIV results. Further, good agreement was found between Echo PIV and optical PIV results for velocity and WSR measurements. In-vivo results also showed good agreement between Echo PIV velocities and PC-MRI velocities. We conclude that Echo PIV provides accurate velocity vector and WSR measurements in the carotid bifurcation and has significant potential as a clinical tool for cardiovascular hemodynamics evaluation. PMID:21316562

  6. Carotid plaque is a new risk factor for peripheral vestibular disorder: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masaoki; Takeshima, Taro; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Nagasaka, Shoichiro; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Kajii, Eiji

    2016-08-01

    Many chronic diseases are associated with dizziness or vertigo, as is peripheral vestibular disorder (PVD). Although carotid plaque development is linked to atherosclerosis, it is unclear whether such plaques can lead to the development of PVD. We therefore conducted this study to investigate the presence of an association between carotid plaque and new PVD events.In this retrospective study, we consecutively enrolled 393 patients ≥20 years old who had been treated for chronic diseases such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus for ≥6 months at a primary care clinic (Oki Clinic, Japan) between November 2011 and March 2013. Carotid plaque presence was measured with high-resolution ultrasonography for all patients. During a 1-year follow-up period, an otorhinolaryngologist diagnosed and reported any new PVD events (the main end point). Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for new PVD occurrence were estimated using the Cox proportional hazard regression model.The mean age of the participants was 65.5 years; 33.8% were men, and 12.7%, 82.4%, and 93.1% had diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, respectively. There were 76 new PVD events; patients with carotid plaque had a greater risk of such events (crude HR: 3.25; 95% CI: 1.62-6.52) compared to those without carotid plaque. This risk was even higher after adjusting for traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis (adjusted HR: 4.41; 95% CI: 1.75-11.14).Carotid plaques are associated with an increased risk of new PVD events. PMID:27495105

  7. Carotid plaque is a new risk factor for peripheral vestibular disorder: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Masaoki; Takeshima, Taro; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Nagasaka, Shoichiro; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Kajii, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Many chronic diseases are associated with dizziness or vertigo, as is peripheral vestibular disorder (PVD). Although carotid plaque development is linked to atherosclerosis, it is unclear whether such plaques can lead to the development of PVD. We therefore conducted this study to investigate the presence of an association between carotid plaque and new PVD events. In this retrospective study, we consecutively enrolled 393 patients ≥20 years old who had been treated for chronic diseases such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus for ≥6 months at a primary care clinic (Oki Clinic, Japan) between November 2011 and March 2013. Carotid plaque presence was measured with high-resolution ultrasonography for all patients. During a 1-year follow-up period, an otorhinolaryngologist diagnosed and reported any new PVD events (the main end point). Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for new PVD occurrence were estimated using the Cox proportional hazard regression model. The mean age of the participants was 65.5 years; 33.8% were men, and 12.7%, 82.4%, and 93.1% had diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, respectively. There were 76 new PVD events; patients with carotid plaque had a greater risk of such events (crude HR: 3.25; 95% CI: 1.62–6.52) compared to those without carotid plaque. This risk was even higher after adjusting for traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis (adjusted HR: 4.41; 95% CI: 1.75–11.14). Carotid plaques are associated with an increased risk of new PVD events. PMID:27495105

  8. Periodontal Microbiota and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Desvarieux, Moïse; Demmer, Ryan T.; Rundek, Tatjana; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Jacobs, David R.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Papapanou, Panos N.

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic infections, including periodontal infections, may predispose to cardiovascular disease. We investigated the relationship between periodontal microbiota and subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods and Results Of 1056 persons (age 69±9 years) with no history of stroke or myocardial infarction enrolled in the Oral Infections and Vascular Disease Epidemiology Study (INVEST), we analyzed 657 dentate subjects. Among these subjects, 4561 subgingival plaque samples were collected (average of 7 samples/subject) and quantitatively assessed for 11 known periodontal bacteria by DNA-DNA checkerboard hybridization. Extensive in-person cardiovascular risk factor measurements, a carotid scan with high-resolution B-mode ultrasound, white blood cell count, and C-reactive protein values were obtained. In 3 separate analyses, mean carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) was regressed on tertiles of (1) burden of all bacteria assessed, (2) burden of bacteria causative of periodontal disease (etiologic bacterial burden), and (3) the relative predominance of causative/over other bacteria in the subgingival plaque. All analyses were adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, gender, education, body mass index, smoking, diabetes, systolic blood pressure, and LDL and HDL cholesterol. Overall periodontal bacterial burden was related to carotid IMT. This relationship was specific to causative bacterial burden and the dominance of etiologic bacteria in the observed microbiological niche. Adjusted mean IMT values across tertiles of etiologic bacterial dominance were 0.84, 0.85, and 0.88 (P=0.002). Similarly, white blood cell values increased across tertiles of etiologic bacterial burden from 5.57 to 6.09 and 6.03 cells × 109/L (P=0.01). C-reactive protein values were unrelated to periodontal microbial status (P=0.82). Conclusions Our data provide evidence of a direct relationship between periodontal microbiology and subclinical atherosclerosis. This relationship exists independent

  9. Internal carotid artery rupture caused by carotid shunt insertion

    PubMed Central

    Illuminati, Giulio; Caliò, Francesco G.; Pizzardi, Giulia; Vietri, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Shunting is a well-accepted method of maintaining cerebral perfusion during carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Nonetheless, shunt insertion may lead to complications including arterial dissection, embolization, and thrombosis. We present a complication of shunt insertion consisting of arterial wall rupture, not reported previously. Presentation of case A 78-year-old woman underwent CEA combined with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). At the time of shunt insertion an arterial rupture at the distal tip of the shunt was detected and was repaired via a small saphenous vein patch. Eversion CEA and subsequent CABG completed the procedure whose postoperative course was uneventful. Discussion Shunting during combined CEA-CABG may be advisable to assure cerebral protection from possible hypoperfusion due to potential hemodynamic instability of patients with severe coronary artery disease. Awareness and prompt management of possible shunt-related complications, including the newly reported one, may contribute to limiting their harmful effect. Conclusion Arterial wall rupture is a possible, previously not reported, shunt-related complication to be aware of when performing CEA. PMID:26255001

  10. Obesity and carotid artery remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kozakova, M; Palombo, C; Morizzo, C; Højlund, K; Hatunic, M; Balkau, B; Nilsson, P M; Ferrannini, E

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective: The present study tested the hypothesis that obesity-related changes in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) might represent not only preclinical atherosclerosis but an adaptive remodeling meant to preserve circumferential wall stress (CWS) in altered hemodynamic conditions characterized by body size-dependent increase in stroke volume (SV) and blood pressure (BP). Subjects/Methods: Common carotid artery (CCA) luminal diameter (LD), IMT and CWS were measured in three different populations in order to study: (A) cross-sectional associations between SV, BP, anthropometric parameters and CCA LD (266 healthy subjects with wide range of body weight (24–159 kg)); (B) longitudinal associations between CCA LD and 3-year IMT progression rate (ΔIMT; 571 healthy non-obese subjects without increased cardiovascular (CV) risk); (C) the impact of obesity on CCA geometry and CWS (88 obese subjects without CV complications and 88 non-obese subjects matched for gender and age). Results: CCA LD was independently associated with SV that was determined by body size. In the longitudinal study, baseline LD was an independent determinant of ΔIMT, and ΔIMT of subjects in the highest LD quartile was significantly higher (28±3 μm) as compared with those in the lower quartiles (8±3, 16±4 and 16±3 μm, P=0.001, P<0.05 and P=0.01, respectively). In addition, CCA CWS decreased during the observational period in the highest LD quartile (from 54.2±8.6 to 51.6±7.4 kPa, P<0.0001). As compared with gender- and age-matched lean individuals, obese subjects had highly increased CCA LD and BP (P<0.0001 for both), but only slightly higher CWS (P=0.05) due to a significant increase in IMT (P=0.005 after adjustment for confounders). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that in obese subjects, the CCA wall thickens to compensate the luminal enlargement caused by body size-induced increase in SV, and therefore, to normalize the wall stress. CCA diameter in obesity could

  11. Who Is at Risk for Carotid Artery Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Carotid Endarterectomy Carotid Ultrasound Stents Stroke Send a ... who don’t have diabetes. Family history of atherosclerosis . People who have a family history of atherosclerosis ...

  12. Stroke from an External Carotid: Lesion Pattern and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Kagan; Hubert, Lathelyse; Leclère, Franck Marie; Etienne, Marchand; Robert, Martinez

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally, patients with symptomatic external carotid stenosis present with neck or face pain, retinal ischemic symptoms or jaw claudication and rarely as ipsilateral cerebrovascular events. In this present case, our patient suffered a stroke from a paradoxical embolism from the external carotid, without involvement of the internal carotid artery. A plaque ulceration of the external carotid's origin was the cause of this cerebral emboli. Duplex ultrasound showed a pathologic left external carotid, with a floating thrombus in the internal carotid. The diagnostic was confirmed by a computerized tomography scan. An external carotid thromboendarterectomy was performed 6 days after symptom onset, and intraoperative findings confirmed the plaque rupture with an extensive clot in the carotid bifurcation. PMID:26802301

  13. Carotid artery disease following external cervical irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Elerding, S.C.; Fernandez, R.N.; Grotta, J.C.; Lindberg, R.D.; Causay, L.C.; McMurtrey, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    A retrospective study of 910 patients surviving at least five years after cervical irradiation for Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, or primary head an neck neoplasms showed the incidence of stroke following cervical irradiation was 63 of 910 patients (6.3%) during a mean period of observation of nine years. This represents a trend toward an increased risk for this population observed over the same period of time (p . 0.39). A prospective study of 118 similar patients currently living five years after cervical radiotherapy was performed to determine the incidence of carotid artery disease occurring as a consequence of neck irradiation. Abnormal carotid phonangiograms (CPA) were found in 25% of the patients and abnormal oculoplethysmographs (OPG) were found in 17%. These studies represent significant carotid lesions that are not expected in such a population. It is concluded that the carotid stenoses demonstrated are most likely a consequence of prior irradiation. Patients that are five-year survivors of cervical irradiation should have noninvasive vascular laboratory studies performed as part of their routine follow-up examinations in order to detect these carotid lesions while they are occult.

  14. Carotid intraplaque neovascularization quantification software (CINQS).

    PubMed

    Akkus, Zeynettin; van Burken, Gerard; van den Oord, Stijn C H; Schinkel, Arend F L; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F W; Bosch, Johan G

    2015-01-01

    Intraplaque neovascularization (IPN) is an important biomarker of atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability. As IPN can be detected by contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), imaging-biomarkers derived from CEUS may allow early prediction of plaque vulnerability. To select the best quantitative imaging-biomarkers for prediction of plaque vulnerability, a systematic analysis of IPN with existing and new analysis algorithms is necessary. Currently available commercial contrast quantification tools are not applicable for quantitative analysis of carotid IPN due to substantial motion of the carotid artery, artifacts, and intermittent perfusion of plaques. We therefore developed a specialized software package called Carotid intraplaque neovascularization quantification software (CINQS). It was designed for effective and systematic comparison of sets of quantitative imaging biomarkers. CINQS includes several analysis algorithms for carotid IPN quantification and overcomes the limitations of current contrast quantification tools and existing carotid IPN quantification approaches. CINQS has a modular design which allows integrating new analysis tools. Wizard-like analysis tools and its graphical-user-interface facilitate its usage. In this paper, we describe the concept, analysis tools, and performance of CINQS and present analysis results of 45 plaques of 23 patients. The results in 45 plaques showed excellent agreement with visual IPN scores for two quantitative imaging-biomarkers (The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.92 and 0.93). PMID:25561454

  15. 21 CFR 870.3850 - Carotid sinus nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carotid sinus nerve stimulator. 870.3850 Section... nerve stimulator. (a) Identification. A carotid sinus nerve stimulator is an implantable device used to decrease arterial pressure by stimulating Hering's nerve at the carotid sinus. (b) Classification....

  16. 21 CFR 870.3850 - Carotid sinus nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carotid sinus nerve stimulator. 870.3850 Section... nerve stimulator. (a) Identification. A carotid sinus nerve stimulator is an implantable device used to decrease arterial pressure by stimulating Hering's nerve at the carotid sinus. (b) Classification....

  17. 21 CFR 870.3850 - Carotid sinus nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carotid sinus nerve stimulator. 870.3850 Section... nerve stimulator. (a) Identification. A carotid sinus nerve stimulator is an implantable device used to decrease arterial pressure by stimulating Hering's nerve at the carotid sinus. (b) Classification....

  18. Reinterventions in vascular and endovascular carotid surgery.

    PubMed

    Setacci, F; Borrelli, M P; De Donato, G; Galzerano, G; Setacci, C

    2014-12-01

    In recent years the number of carotid revascularization has increased steadily. This increased has inevitably resulted in an increase (relative) in complications, both after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and carotid stenting (CAS), despite the technical evolutions of new available materials and the expertise of the operators. So, complications which may potentially require operative intervention, although not very frequent, are possible. However, after diagnosis, immediate management should be undertaken in order to avoid sequelae which are often irreversible and potentially fatal. To minimize this risk, it's important that these procedures are performed by skilled operators in high-volume Centers of activity. The aim of this review is to assess local complications which can lead to re-interventions after CEA and CAS. PMID:25069448

  19. Photoacoustic imaging of carotid artery atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruizinga, Pieter; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; de Jong, Nico; Springeling, Geert; Robertus, Jan Lukas; van der Lugt, Aad; van Soest, Gijs

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a method for photoacoustic imaging of the carotid artery, tailored toward detection of lipid-rich atherosclerotic lesions. A common human carotid artery was obtained at autopsy, embedded in a neck mimicking phantom and imaged with a multimodality imaging system using interstitial illumination. Light was delivered through a 1.25-mm-diameter optical probe that can be placed in the pharynx, allowing the carotid artery to be illuminated from within the body. Ultrasound imaging and photoacoustic signal detection is achieved by an external 8-MHz linear array coupled to an ultrasound imaging system. Spectroscopic analysis of photoacoustic images obtained in the wavelength range from 1130 to 1250 nm revealed plaque-specific lipid accumulation in the collagen structure of the artery wall. These spectroscopic findings were confirmed by histology.

  20. Current status of carotid ultrasound in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) primarily caused by atherosclerosis is a major cause of death and disability in developed countries. Sonographic carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) is widely studied as a surrogate marker for detecting subclinical atherosclerosis for risk prediction and disease progress to guide medical intervention. However, there is no standardized CIMT measurement methodology in clinical studies resulting in inconsistent findings, thereby undermining the clinical value of CIMT. Increasing evidences show that CIMT alone has weak predictive value for CVD while CIMT including plaque presence consistently improves the predictive power. Quantification of plaque burden further enhances the predictive power beyond plaque presence. Sonographic carotid plaque characteristics have been found to be predictive of cerebral ischaemic events. With advances in ultrasound technology, enhanced assessment of carotid plaques is feasible to detect high-risk/vulnerable plaques, and provide risk assessment for ischemic stroke beyond measurement of luminal stenosis. PMID:27429912

  1. Serum soluble RAGE levels and carotid atherosclerosis: the Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS)

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Barry I; Gardener, Hannah; Liu-Mares, Wen; Dong, Chuanhui; Cheung, Ken; Elkind, Mitchell SV; Wright, Clinton B; Sacco, Ralph L; Rundek, Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent cohort studies suggested that serum levels of soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products (sRAGE) are associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that sRAGE levels are associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in a racially and ethnically diverse population. Methods and results 828 stroke-free participants from the Northern Manhattan Study (mean age 71.1±8.7yrs; 64% Hispanic, 19% black, and 17% white) underwent high-resolution carotid B-mode ultrasound to measure carotid plaque (present in 62% of subjects) and intima-media thickness (IMT) (mean Total= 0.96±0.10 mm). Serum sRAGE was measured by ELISA and associations tested between sRAGE with IMT and plaque presence. Soluble RAGE levels were not associated with plaque presence or IMT after adjusting for sociodemographic, vascular risk factors and medication use. Stratification by race-ethnicity did not reveal any associations with carotid IMT or plaque. Conclusion In the present study, sRAGE levels were not associated with carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:25744702

  2. Place of drug therapy in the treatment of carotid stenosis.

    PubMed

    Andaluz, Norberto; Zuccarello, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Carotid stenosis is an important cause of transient ischaemic attacks and stroke. The cause of carotid stenosis is most often atherosclerosis; contributing to the pathogenesis of the lesion are endothelial injury, inflammation, lipid deposition, plaque formation, fibrin, platelets and thrombin. Carotid stenosis accounts for 10-20% of cases of brain infarction, depending on the population studied. Despite successful treatment of selected patients who have had an acute ischaemic stroke with tissue plasminogen activator and the promise of other experimental therapies, prevention remains the best approach to reducing the impact of ischaemic stroke. High-risk or stroke-prone patients can be identified and targeted for specific interventions. At this juncture, treatment of carotid stenosis is a well established therapeutic target and a pillar of stroke prevention. There are two main strategies for the treatment of carotid stenosis. The first approach is to stabilise or halt the progression of the carotid plaque through risk factor modification and medication. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, obesity and high cholesterol levels are closely associated with carotid stenosis and stroke; control of these factors may decrease the risk of plaque formation and progression. The second approach is to eliminate or reduce carotid stenosis through carotid endarterectomy or carotid angioplasty and stenting. Carotid endarterectomy, which is the mainstay of therapy for severe carotid stenosis, is beyond the scope of this review. Anticoagulants seem to play little role (if any) in the medical (i.e. non-surgical) treatment of carotid stenosis. Adoption of a healthy lifestyle combined with the reduction of risk factors has been shown to lead to a reduction in the extent of carotid stenosis. The medical treatment of carotid stenosis should be based on the triad of the reduction of risk factors, patient education, and use of antiplatelet agents. PMID:15984896

  3. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of myocardial edema using a short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) black-blood technique: Diagnostic accuracy of visual and semi-quantitative assessment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) black-blood technique has been used to visualize myocardial edema, and thus to differentiate acute from chronic myocardial lesions. However, some cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) groups have reported variable image quality, and hence the diagnostic value of STIR in routine clinical practice has been put into question. The aim of our study was to analyze image quality and diagnostic performance of STIR using a set of pulse sequence parameters dedicated to edema detection, and to discuss possible factors that influence image quality. We hypothesized that STIR imaging is an accurate and robust way of detecting myocardial edema in non-selected patients with acute myocardial infarction. Methods Forty-six consecutive patients with acute myocardial infarction underwent CMR (day 4.5, +/- 1.6) including STIR for the assessment of myocardial edema and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) for quantification of myocardial necrosis. Thirty of these patients underwent a follow-up CMR at approximately six months (195 +/- 39 days). Both STIR and LGE images were evaluated separately on a segmental basis for image quality as well as for presence and extent of myocardial hyper-intensity, with both visual and semi-quantitative (threshold-based) analysis. LGE was used as a reference standard for localization and extent of myocardial necrosis (acute) or scar (chronic). Results Image quality of STIR images was rated as diagnostic in 99.5% of cases. At the acute stage, the sensitivity and specificity of STIR to detect infarcted segments on visual assessment was 95% and 78% respectively, and on semi-quantitative assessment was 99% and 83%, respectively. STIR differentiated acutely from chronically infarcted segments with a sensitivity of 95% by both methods and with a specificity of 99% by visual assessment and 97% by semi-quantitative assessment. The extent of hyper-intense areas on acute STIR images was 85% larger than

  4. Bilateral carotid aneurysms unmasked by severe hypopituitarism.

    PubMed Central

    Michils, A.; Balériaux, D.; Mockel, J.

    1991-01-01

    We describe a patient who initially presented with severe hyponatraemia and grand mal seizures, without any focal neurological symptoms. The final diagnosis was that of giant bilateral carotid aneurysms extending into the sella turcica with anterior hypopituitarism. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of symmetrical carotid aneurysms manifested exclusively by an acute endocrine emergency with none of the concomitant usual focal signs such as headache, failing vision, oculomotor palsy or subarachnoid hemorrhage. Images p286-a Figure 1 PMID:2062778

  5. Post Tracheostomy Carotid-Tracheal Fistula.

    PubMed

    Shylendran, Sudhin; Baliyan, Vinit; Yadav, Ajay K; Kumar, Atin; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2016-03-01

    Tracheostomy is the life saving procedure in patients presenting with upper airway obstruction. The procedure is also performed in patients on chronic ventilatory support. It is generally considered a safe procedure with a low complication rate. Vascular injuries are the most serious and life threatening complications. Injury to a high lying innominate artery is the most frequent vascular injury in such cases. Injury to other vessels e.g. carotid arteries is less frequent. We are presenting one such rare type of vascular injury with a fistulous communication between trachea and carotid artery leading to massive hemoptysis. PMID:27066421

  6. Otorrhagia as the initial presentation of an internal carotid artery aneurysm in the middle ear. Case presentation

    PubMed Central

    PETRI, MARIA; DINESCU, VERONICA; NECULA, VIOLETA; COSGAREA, MARCEL

    2016-01-01

    Middle ear aneurysms are rare and difficult to treat. The case of a 50-year-old female who presented with left otorrhagia caused by an internal carotid aneurysm is reported. She had no medical history of tinnitus, vertigo, otalgia or otorrhea. Middle ear surgery was effective in resolving bleeding and did not cause any permanent neurological deficit. High resolution computed tomography angiography is the technique of choice and, in some cases, can be complemented with a magnetic resonance angiography. Misdiagnosis of the internal carotid artery aneurysm may lead to serious morbidity because of bleeding or vascular occlusion. The use of modern imaging techniques explain the current relative increase in frequency. PMID:27152084

  7. Unilateral Direct Carotid Cavernous Fistula Causing Bilateral Ocular Manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Demartini Jr., Zeferino; Liebert, Fernando; Gatto, Luana Antunes Maranha; Jung, Thiago Simiano; Rocha Jr., Carlos; Santos, Alex Marques Borges; Koppe, Gelson Luis

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral carotid cavernous fistula presents with ipsilateral ocular findings. Bilateral presentation is only seen in bilateral fistulas, usually associated with indirect (dural) carotid cavernous fistulas. Direct carotid cavernous fistulas are an abnormal communication between the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. They typically begin with a traumatic disruption in the artery wall into the cavernous sinus, presenting with a classic triad of unilateral pulsatile exophthalmos, cranial bruit and episcleral venous engorgement. We report the case of a 38-year-old male with traumatic right carotid cavernous sinus fistula and bilateral ocular presentation successfully treated by interventional neuroradiology. PMID:26955353

  8. Improving imaging to optimize screening strategies for carotid artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Ankur; Gupta, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Carotid stenosis is a major risk factor for ischemic stroke. Recently, the United States Preventive Services Task Force issued a recommendation against screening for carotid stenosis in the general population. There is the potential for efficient risk-stratifying or staged screening approaches that identify individuals at highest risk for carotid stenosis and stroke, but these tools have yet to be proven effective in external validation studies. In this paper, we review how medical imaging can be used to detect carotid stenosis and highlight several areas that could be improved to identify potentially efficient screening strategies for carotid stenosis. PMID:26275846

  9. Concurrence of the tortuosity of bilateral common and left internal carotid arteries in a case with common origin of the innominate trunk and left common carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Sema; Cece, Hasan; Karayol, Sibel; Ziylan, Zeki

    2010-10-01

    Anatomical variations of carotid arterial system, which are not infrequently encountered, have great impact on the surgical approaches of the neck. Although few reports on common carotid artery tortuosity have been published, no case of symptomatic concurrent common carotid and internal carotid artery tortuosity has been reported. Herein, we report the first case with concurrent common origin of the innominate trunk and left common carotid artery and common and internal carotid artery tortuosity presenting with an oropharyngeal mass. PMID:20407773

  10. A surgical case of paraclinoid carotid aneurysm associated with ipsilateral cervical internal carotid artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Wada, Kojiro; Sakakibara, Fumihiro; Mori, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    This report presents a 60-year-old with a large paraclinoid carotid aneurysm associated with cervical interal carotid artery (ICA) dissection (CICAD). She had a fall while riding a bicycle and hit her head on the ground. Computed tomography scan done at another facility showed a round mass lesion near the sella. Her medical history revealed gradual decrease in left eye vision since two years. Left carotid artery digital subtraction angiography demonstrated a CICAD with an intimal flap and a large paraclinoid aneurysm (15.5 mm in size). She underwent a high-flow bypass with a so-called double-insurance bypass and proximal ligation of the cervical ICA and the postoperative course was uneventful. She was discharged without any new neurological deficits. We suggest that the possible nature of carotid artery dissection (CAD)-related hemodynamic changes should be taken into consideration in cases of intracranial aneurysm associated with CAD. PMID:23135031

  11. Tasting arterial blood: what do the carotid chemoreceptors sense?

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakhar, Nanduri R.; Joyner, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The carotid bodies are sensory organs that detect the chemical composition of the arterial blood. The carotid body sensory activity increases in response to arterial hypoxemia and the ensuing chemoreflex regulates vital homeostatic functions. Recent studies suggest that the carotid bodies might also sense arterial blood glucose and circulating insulin levels. This review focuses on how the carotid bodies sense O2, glucose, and insulin and some potential implications of these sensory functions on physiological regulation and in pathophysiological conditions. Emerging evidence suggests that carbon monoxide (CO)-regulated hydrogen sulfide (H2S), stemming from hypoxia, depolarizes type I cells by inhibiting certain K+ channels, facilitates voltage-gated Ca2+ influx leading to sensory excitation of the carotid body. Elevated CO and decreased H2S renders the carotid bodies insensitive to hypoxia resulting in attenuated ventilatory adaptations to high altitude hypoxia, whereas reduced CO and high H2S result in hypersensitivity of the carotid bodies to hypoxia and hypertension. Acute hypoglycemia augments the carotid body responses to hypoxia but that a prolonged lack of glucose in the carotid bodies can lead to a failure to sense hypoxia. Emerging evidence also indicates that carotid bodies might sense insulin directly independent of its effect on glucose, linking the carotid bodies to the pathophysiological consequences of the metabolic syndrome. How glucose and insulin interact with the CO-H2S signaling is an area of ongoing study. PMID:25642193

  12. Mixing in the human carotid artery during carotid drug infusion studied with PET.

    PubMed

    Junck, L; Koeppe, R A; Greenberg, H S

    1989-10-01

    The safety and efficacy of drug infusion into the carotid artery require adequate mixing of the infused solution with carotid blood. Using positron emission tomography (PET), we studied the mixing of solutions infused into the human carotid artery in seven patients by analyzing the distribution of [15O]H2O infused into the carotid artery and by vein. At four infusion rates ranging from 0.5 to 10 ml/min, the variability in distribution averaged 16.5-17.8% among the pixels in a large volume of interest, without dependence on the infusion rate. The overall correlation between [15O]H2O influx with arterial infusion and [15O]H2O influx with venous injection was 0.78-0.82 at the four infusion rates, with no trend toward higher correlations at the faster infusion rates. The distribution into the anterior, middle, and posterior cerebral artery territories differed from distribution throughout the entire carotid territory by an average of 6.2-9.6% at the four infusion rates, with no trend toward smaller differences at the faster infusion rates. Infusions performed into a vinyl tube simulating the carotid artery indicated that at 0.5 ml/min, the velocity of fluid exiting the catheter makes no apparent contribution to mixing. We conclude that with infusions at the carotid bifurcation, mixing in the human carotid artery is complete or nearly complete over a wide range of infusion rates. The mixing appears to result from the patterns of blood flow within the artery, and not from jet effects at the catheter tip. PMID:2789230

  13. Proteomic Profile of Unstable Atheroma Plaque: Increased Neutrophil Defensin 1, Clusterin, and Apolipoprotein E Levels in Carotid Secretome.

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Gemma; Auguet, Teresa; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Berlanga, Alba; Curriu, Marta; Martinez, Salomé; Alibalic, Ajla; Aguilar, Carmen; Hernández, Esteban; Camara, María-Luisa; Canela, Núria; Herrero, Pol; Ruyra, Xavier; Martín-Paredero, Vicente; Richart, Cristóbal

    2016-03-01

    Because of the clinical significance of carotid atherosclerosis, the search for novel biomarkers has become a priority. The aim of the present study was to compare the protein secretion profile of the carotid atherosclerotic plaque (CAP, n = 12) and nonatherosclerotic mammary artery (MA, n = 10) secretomes. We used a nontargeted proteomic approach that incorporated tandem immunoaffinity depletion, iTRAQ labeling, and nanoflow liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry. In total, 162 proteins were quantified, of which 25 showed statistically significant differences in secretome levels between carotid atherosclerotic plaque and nondiseased mammary artery. We found increased levels of neutrophil defensin 1, apolipoprotein E, clusterin, and zinc-alpha-2-glycoprotein in CAP secretomes. Results were validated by ELISA assays. Also, differentially secreted proteins are involved in pathways such as focal adhesion and leukocyte transendothelial migration. In conclusion, this study provides a subset of identified proteins that are differently expressed in secretomes of clinical significance. PMID:26795031

  14. Emergency carotid thromboendarterectomy: safe and effective.

    PubMed

    Schneider, C; Johansen, K; Königstein, R; Metzner, C; Oettinger, W

    1999-11-01

    Whether to perform emergency carotid thromboendarterectomy (CTEA) in the presence of crescendo transient ischemic attacks or stroke-in-evolution is controversial, with the operative mortality in some reports exceeding 20% and improvement in neurologic deficit of less than 40% in others. Our anecdotal experience with emergency CTEA for acute, persistent, or crescendo neurologic deficit had been strikingly better than published reports. Accordingly, we carried out a restrospective comparison of 43 such patients undergoing emergency CTEA with 237 patients concurrently undergoing elective CTEA for conventional indications. A standard protocol followed in emergency CTEA patients included carotid Doppler ultrasonography, computed cerebral tomography (CT), four-vessel cerebral arteriography, and intravenous heparin. Exclusions from emergency CTEA included coma or cerebral CT scan evidence for either hemorrhagic or ischemic infarction with edema. Operative techniques included standard carotid endarterectomy with Dacron patch or direct suture, eversion endarterectomy, or shortening resection. No mortality or central neurologic complications resulted among the 43 emergency CTEA patients, in comparison to no deaths and one temporary hemiparesis (0.4% central neurologic morbidity) in the 237 elective CTEA patients. Our results suggest that in the absence of coma or cerebral CT scan evidence for an unstable blood-brain barrier, emergency carotid reconstruction can be performed safely and with excellent outcome notwithstanding the magnitude and severity of the acute preoperative neurologic deficit. PMID:10501879

  15. Carotid plaque and bone density and microarchitecture in psoriatic arthritis: the correlation with soluble ST2.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiayun; Shang, Qing; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Li, Edmund K; Kun, Emily W; Cheng, Isaac T; Li, Martin; Li, Tena K; Zhu, Tracy Y; Yu, Cheuk-Man; Qin, Ling; Tam, Lai-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients have increased risk of both atherosclerosis and osteoporosis. Previous studies revealed that IL-33/ST2 axis may be related to both conditions; however, these associations were never evaluated in a single patients' group. Here we explored the association among plasma levels of IL-33 and its decoy receptor soluble ST2 (sST2), carotid plaque determined by ultrasound, and volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD)/microstructure of distal radius measured by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) in 80 PsA patients (55% male; 53.0 ± 10.1 years). Plasma sST2 levels were significantly higher in 33 (41%) patients with carotid plaques (11.2 ± 4.5 vs 7.7 ± 3.7 ng/ml, P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, sST2 was an independent explanatory variable associated with carotid plaques (OR = 1.296, 95% CI: [1.091,1.540]; P = 0.003). After adjustment for the osteoporotic risk factors, sST2 was significantly associated with higher cortical porosity (β = 0.184, [0.042,0.325]; P = 0.012) and cortical pore volume (2.247, [0.434,4.060]; P = 0.016); and had a trend to be associated with lower cortical vBMD (-2.918, [-6.111,0.275]; P = 0.073). IL-33 was not associated with carotid plaque or vBMD/microstructure. In conclusion, plasma sST2 levels were independently correlated with both carotid plaque and compromised cortical vBMD/microstructure in PsA patients. IL-33/ST2 axis may be a link between accelerated atherosclerosis and osteoporosis in PsA. PMID:27554830

  16. Intracranial Carotid Calcification on Cranial Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Deepak; Zishan, Umme Sara; Chappell, Francesca; Gregoriades, Maria-Lena; Sudlow, Cathie; Sellar, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification is associated with cerebrovascular risk factors and stroke, but few quantification methods are available. We tested the reliability of visual scoring, semiautomated Agatston score, and calcium volume measurement in patients with recent stroke. Methods— We used scans from a prospective hospital stroke registry and included patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke or transient ischemic stroke whose noncontrast cranial computed tomographic scans were available electronically. Two raters measured semiautomatic quantitative Agatston score, and calcium volume, and performed qualitative visual scoring using the original 4-point Woodcock score and a modified Woodcock score, where each image on which the internal carotid arteries appeared was scored and the slice scores summed. Results— Intra- and interobserver coefficient of variations were 8.8% and 16.5% for Agatston, 8.8% and 15.5% for calcium volume, and 5.7% and 5.4% for the modified Woodcock visual score, respectively. The modified Woodcock visual score correlated strongly with both Agatston and calcium volume quantitative measures (both R2=0.84; P<0.0001); calcium volume increased by 0.47-mm/point increase in modified Woodcock visual score. Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification increased with age by all measures (eg, visual score, Spearman ρ=0.4; P=0.005). Conclusions— Visual scores correlate highly with quantitative intracranial internal carotid artery calcification measures, with excellent observer agreements. Visual intracranial internal carotid artery scores could be a rapid and practical method for epidemiological studies. PMID:26251250

  17. Automated carotid artery intima layer regional segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiburger, Kristen M.; Molinari, Filippo; Rajendra Acharya, U.; Saba, Luca; Rodrigues, Paulo; Liboni, William; Nicolaides, Andrew; Suri, Jasjit S.

    2011-07-01

    Evaluation of the carotid artery wall is essential for the assessment of a patient's cardiovascular risk or for the diagnosis of cardiovascular pathologies. This paper presents a new, completely user-independent algorithm called carotid artery intima layer regional segmentation (CAILRS, a class of AtheroEdge™ systems), which automatically segments the intima layer of the far wall of the carotid ultrasound artery based on mean shift classification applied to the far wall. Further, the system extracts the lumen-intima and media-adventitia borders in the far wall of the carotid artery. Our new system is characterized and validated by comparing CAILRS borders with the manual tracings carried out by experts. The new technique is also benchmarked with a semi-automatic technique based on a first-order absolute moment edge operator (FOAM) and compared to our previous edge-based automated methods such as CALEX (Molinari et al 2010 J. Ultrasound Med. 29 399-418, 2010 IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 57 1112-24), CULEX (Delsanto et al 2007 IEEE Trans. Instrum. Meas. 56 1265-74, Molinari et al 2010 IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 57 1112-24), CALSFOAM (Molinari et al Int. Angiol. (at press)), and CAUDLES-EF (Molinari et al J. Digit. Imaging (at press)). Our multi-institutional database consisted of 300 longitudinal B-mode carotid images. In comparison to semi-automated FOAM, CAILRS showed the IMT bias of -0.035 ± 0.186 mm while FOAM showed -0.016 ± 0.258 mm. Our IMT was slightly underestimated with respect to the ground truth IMT, but showed uniform behavior over the entire database. CAILRS outperformed all the four previous automated methods. The system's figure of merit was 95.6%, which was lower than that of the semi-automated method (98%), but higher than that of the other automated techniques.

  18. Management of carotid stenosis. History and today

    PubMed Central

    Jargiełło, Tomasz; Drelich-Zbroja, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Internal carotid stenosis constitutes a significant clinical challenge, since it is the cause of 20–25% of ischemic brain strokes. The management of the internal carotid stenosis for many years has been raising controversies amongst neurologists, vascular surgeons and interventional radiologists mainly due to the introduction of endovascular stenting as an alternative to surgical treatment. Its application, however, requires knowledge of specific selection criteria for this kind of treatment as well as of the methods of monitoring patients after stent implantation into the internal carotid artery. Duplex Doppler ultrasound examination is currently a basis for the diagnosis of the arterial stenosis of precranial segments of the carotid arteries. It allows a reliable assessment of not only the course and morphology of the walls, but also of the hemodynamics of blood flow. Interventional treatment is applicable in patients with internal carotid stenosis of ≥70%, which is accompanied by an increase of the systolic flow velocity above 200 cm/s and the end-diastolic velocity above 50–60 cm/s in the stenotic lumen. In most cases, such a diagnosis in duplex Doppler ultrasound examination does not require any confirmation by additional diagnostic methods and if neurological symptoms are also present, it constitutes a single indication for interventional treatment. When deciding about choice of surgical or endovascular method of treatment, the following factors are of crucial importance: morphology of atherosclerotic plaque, its size, echogenicity, homogeneity of its structure, its surface and outlines. By means of ultrasound examinations, patients can be monitored after endovascular stent implantation. They enable evaluation of the degree of stent patency and allow for an early detection of symptoms indicating stenosis recurrence or presence of in-stent thrombosis. When interpreting the findings of the US checkup, it is essential to refer to the initial examination

  19. Anatomical Considerations on Surgical Anatomy of the Carotid Bifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Michalinos, Adamantios; Chatzimarkos, Markos; Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos; Safioleas, Michail

    2016-01-01

    Surgical anatomy of carotid bifurcation is of unique importance for numerous medical specialties. Despite extensive research, many aspects such as precise height of carotid bifurcation, micrometric values of carotid arteries and their branches as their diameter, length, and degree of tortuosity, and variations of proximal external carotid artery branches are undetermined. Furthermore carotid bifurcation is involved in many pathologic processes, atheromatous disease being the commonest. Carotid atheromatous disease is a major predisposing factor for disabling and possibly fatal strokes with geometry of carotid bifurcation playing an important role in its natural history. Consequently detailed knowledge of various anatomic parameters is of paramount importance not only for understanding of the disease but also for design of surgical treatment, especially selection between carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting. Carotid bifurcation paragangliomas constitute unique tumors with diagnostic accuracy, treatment design, and success of operative intervention dependent on precise knowledge of anatomy. Considering those, it becomes clear that selection and application of proper surgical therapy should consider anatomical details. Further research might ameliorate available treatment options or even lead to innovative ones. PMID:27047690

  20. Application of full field optical studies for pulsatile flow in a carotid artery phantom

    PubMed Central

    Nemati, M.; Loozen, G. B.; van der Wekken, N.; van de Belt, G.; Urbach, H. P.; Bhattacharya, N.; Kenjeres, S.

    2015-01-01

    A preliminary comparative measurement between particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) and laser speckle contrast analysis (LASCA) to study pulsatile flow using ventricular assist device in a patient-specific carotid artery phantom is reported. These full-field optical techniques have both been used to study flow and extract complementary parameters. We use the high spatial resolution of PIV to generate a full velocity map of the flow field and the high temporal resolution of LASCA to extract the detailed frequency spectrum of the fluid pulses. Using this combination of techniques a complete study of complex pulsatile flow in an intricate flow network can be studied. PMID:26504652

  1. Carotid baroreflex responsiveness in heat-stressed humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of whole body heating on human baroreflex function are relatively unknown. The purpose of this project was to identify whether whole body heating reduces the maximal slope of the carotid baroreflex. In 12 subjects, carotid-vasomotor and carotid-cardiac baroreflex responsiveness were assessed in normothermia and during whole body heating. Whole body heating increased sublingual temperature (from 36.4 +/- 0.1 to 37.4 +/- 0.1 degrees C, P < 0.01) and increased heart rate (from 59 +/- 3 to 83 +/- 3 beats/min, P < 0. 01), whereas mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was slightly decreased (from 88 +/- 2 to 83 +/- 2 mmHg, P < 0.01). Carotid-vasomotor and carotid-cardiac responsiveness were assessed by identifying the maximal gain of MAP and heart rate to R wave-triggered changes in carotid sinus transmural pressure. Whole body heating significantly decreased the responsiveness of the carotid-vasomotor baroreflex (from -0.20 +/- 0.02 to -0.13 +/- 0.02 mmHg/mmHg, P < 0.01) without altering the responsiveness of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex (from -0.40 +/- 0.05 to -0.36 +/- 0.02 beats x min(-1) x mmHg(-1), P = 0.21). Carotid-vasomotor and carotid-cardiac baroreflex curves were shifted downward and upward, respectively, to accommodate the decrease in blood pressure and increase in heart rate that accompanied the heat stress. Moreover, the operating point of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex was shifted closer to threshold (P = 0.02) by the heat stress. Reduced carotid-vasomotor baroreflex responsiveness, coupled with a reduction in the functional reserve for the carotid baroreflex to increase heart rate during a hypotensive challenge, may contribute to increased susceptibility to orthostatic intolerance during a heat stress.

  2. Balloon-Assisted Coiling of the Cavernous Sinus to Treat Direct Carotid Cavernous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    De Renzis, Alioscia.; Nappini, Sergio.; Consoli, Arturo; Renieri, Leonardo; Limbucci, Nicola; Rosi, Andrea; Vignoli, Chiara; Pellicanò, Giannantonio; Mangiafico, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Summary This study evaluated clinical and neuroradiological results in 13 consecutive patients with spontaneous and traumatic direct carotid cavernous fistulas treated at our center between January 2006 and September 2012. All patients were treated by coiling of the cavernous sinus. Coiling was always performed while a semi-compliant non-detachable balloon was temporarily inflated in the internal carotid artery. This technique (balloon-assisted coiling) permitted a clear visualization of the fistula, facilitated coil positioning and protected the patency of the artery. All patients’ clinical data and radiological examinations were reviewed; nine patients underwent radiological and clinical follow-up, with a mean duration of 3.8 years (range: six months-six years). Overall results at discharge showed a complete occlusion of the fistula in seven patients (7/13, 54%) and a resolution of symptoms in eight patients (8/12, 67%). Radiological follow-up showed complete occlusion of the fistula in all patients (9/9, 100%) and clinical follow-up showed a resolution of symptoms in eight patients (8/9, 89%) and persistent symptoms in one (1/9, 11%). No procedure-related complications occurred. Balloon-assisted coiling of the cavernous sinus for the treatment of direct carotid cavernous fistulas proved an effective and safe technique, both in angiographic and clinical terms, and may be considered a technical improvement. PMID:24070084

  3. Recurrent syncope caused by compression of internal carotid artery by an anomalous hyoid bone.

    PubMed

    Janczak, Dariusz; Skora, Jan; Rucinski, Artur; Szuba, Andrzej

    2012-05-01

    In rare cases a syncope can be caused by compression or irritation of the carotid artery and the carotid sinus due to congenital anatomical anomalies of cervical structures like the hyoid bone. We present the case a of 36 year old man with recurrent syncopes when turning his head. Clinical investigations revealed a hyoid bone anomaly with elongated lesser cornua, especially on the right symptomatic side. Surgical resection of the right lesser cornu led to complete resolution of symptoms over a two year follow-up. Syncope especially in younger subjects may be caused by congenital anomalies of the musculoskeletal system in the cervical region and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of syncope, transient cerebral ischemia and stroke. PMID:22565624

  4. Micro-CT of Carotid Arteries: A Tool for Experimental Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, Andreas; Wenke, Ruediger; Roemer, Frank W.; Lynch, John A.; Gatzka, Christian; Priebe, Markus; Guermazi, Ali; Grigorian, Mikayel; Heller, Martin; Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan

    2004-11-15

    Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is a high-resolution, nondestructive tool for two- and three-dimensional imaging and quantification. The ability of this technique to assess atherosclerosis of the carotid artery was evaluated in three human cadaver samples based on the original axial acquisitions, multiplanar reconstructions and volume rendering techniques. Quantitative analysis included the calculation of: (1) the original lumen perimeter, original lumen area, plaque area, residual lumen area, calcified area and gross sectional area reduction of the vascular lumen from two-dimensional slices; (2) the total tissue volume, soft tissue volume and calcified tissue volume from the three-dimensional data set. This preliminary study demonstrates the potential of micro-CT as a supplementary method for the two- and three-dimensional ex vivo evaluation of carotid atherosclerosis.

  5. Usefulness of contrast-enhanced ultrasound for detection of carotid plaque ulceration in patients with symptomatic carotid atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    ten Kate, Gerrit L; van Dijk, Anouk C; van den Oord, Stijn C H; Hussain, Burhan; Verhagen, Hence J M; Sijbrands, Eric J G; van der Steen, Antonius F W; van der Lugt, Aad; Schinkel, Arend F L

    2013-07-15

    Previous data have indicated that carotid plaque ulceration is a strong predictor of cerebrovascular events. Standard ultrasound and color Doppler ultrasound (CDUS) scans have poor diagnostic accuracy for the detection of carotid plaque ulceration. The aim of the present prospective study was to assess the value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) scans for the detection of carotid plaque ulceration. The Institutional Ethics Committee approved the study protocol, and all patients provided informed consent. The patients had symptomatic stenosis of the internal carotid artery and underwent carotid computed tomographic angiography as part of their clinical evaluation. All patients underwent a CDUS examination in conjunction with CEUS. Carotid plaque ulceration was defined as the presence of ≥1 disruptions in the plaque-lumen border ≥1 × 1 mm. Carotid computed tomographic angiography was used as reference technique. The study population consisted of 20 patients (mean age 64 ± 9 years, 80% men), and 39 carotid arteries were included in the present analysis. Computed tomographic angiography demonstrated that the plaque surface was smooth in 15 (38%), irregular in 7 (18%) and ulcerated in 17 (44%) carotid arteries. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of CDUS for the detection of ulceration was 29%, 73%, 54%, 46%, and 57%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of CEUS for the detection of ulceration was 88%, 59%, 72%, 63%, and 87%, respectively. CEUS had superior sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy for the assessment of carotid plaque ulceration compared with CDUS. CEUS improved the intrareader and inter-reader variability for the assessment of carotid plaque ulceration compared with CDUS. In conclusion, CEUS could be an additional method for the detection of carotid plaque ulceration. The role of CDUS for the assessment of carotid

  6. Carotid Stiffness: A Novel Cerebrovascular Disease Risk Factor

    PubMed Central

    van Sloten, Thomas T.; Stehouwer, Coen D.A.

    2016-01-01

    Carotid stiffening is considered an important element in the pathogenesis of cerebrovascular diseases. These include stroke as well as vascular dementia and depression. However, results of individual studies evaluating the association between carotid stiffening and incident stroke have been inconsistent. Therefore, we have conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis, showing that carotid stiffening is associated with incident stroke independently of cardiovascular risk factors and aortic stiffness. In addition, carotid stiffening improved stroke risk prediction beyond the Framingham stroke risk factors and aortic stiffness. Other studies have shown that carotid stiffening is associated with a higher incidence of vascular dementia and depressive symptoms. This suggests that carotid stiffness is a potential separate target for prevention strategies of cerebrovascular disease. PMID:27493900

  7. Successful Reconstruction of Asymptomatic Bilateral External Carotid Artery Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Loja, Melissa N; Pevec, William C

    2016-04-01

    True aneurysms of the external carotid artery (ECA) are extremely rare with an unknown incidence and natural history. We present the successful operative management of an asymptomatic 65-year-old man found to have bilateral internal carotid artery stenosis and bilateral ECA aneurysms. His bilateral carotid arteries were reconstructed with bifurcated interposition grafts in a staged fashion. The patient recovered without sequelae and continues to be asymptomatic 1 year after reconstruction. We present the operative management of this rare case. PMID:26802292

  8. Endovascular Treatment of Extracranial Internal Carotid Aneurysms Using Endografts

    SciTech Connect

    Baldi, Sebastian Rostagno, Roman D.; Zander, Tobias; Llorens, Rafael; Schonholz, Claudio; Maynar, Manuel

    2008-03-15

    Aneurysms of the extracranial internal carotid artery (EICA) are infrequent. They are difficult to treat with conventional surgery because of their distal extension into the skull base. We report three cases of EICA aneurysms in two symptomatic patients successfully treated with polytetrafluoroethylene self-expanding endografts using an endovascular approach. The aneurysms were located distal to the carotid bifurcation and extended to the subpetrous portion of the internal carotid artery.

  9. Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysm Mimicking Peritonsillar Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Brzost, Jacek; Waniewska, Martyna; Szczepanski, Miroslaw J.

    2015-01-01

    The extracranial internal carotid artery aneurysm (EICAA) is an uncommon arterial lesion. Patients typically present with neurologic symptoms resulting from impaired cerebral perfusion and compression symptoms of cranial nerves. Often EICAA presents as a pulsatile neck mass, which is otherwise asymptomatic. We present a case of an 84-year-old female, who was initially referred to the Emergency Department for Otolaryngology with suspected peritonsillar abscess. The patient had a history of recent upper airway infection and cardiovascular comorbidities, including hypertension and ischaemic stroke complicated by extensive neurologic deficits. Physical examination revealed a compact, nonpulsatile mass in the lateral parapharyngeal space and local erythema of the mucosa. Duplex Doppler Ultrasonography and Computed Tomography revealed an atherosclerotic aneurysm of the right internal carotid artery, measuring 63 × 55 × 88 mm, stretching from the skull base to the angle of the mandible. PMID:26124973

  10. The Development of Carotid Stent Material

    PubMed Central

    He, Dongsheng; Liu, Wenhua; Zhang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular angioplasty with stenting is a promising option for treating carotid artery stenosis. There exist a rapidly increasing number of different stent types with different materials. The bare-metal stent is the most commonly used stent with acceptable results, but it leaves us with the problems of thrombosis and restenosis. The drug-eluting stent is a breakthrough as it has the ability to reduce the restenosis rate, but the problem of late thrombosis still has to be addressed. The biodegradable stent disappears after having served its function. However, restenosis and degradation rates remain to be studied. In this article, we review every stent material with its characteristics, clinical results and complications and point out the standards of an ideal carotid stent. PMID:26019710

  11. [Carotid surgery, indications, results and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Kün, P; Battino, J; Cloarec, M; Witchitz, S; Vanet, R; Mergy, R

    1985-01-01

    A series of 215 patients who had undergone 250 carotid artery operations were followed up for a mean of 30 months. Perioperative mortality was 2%, neurologic morbidity was 7% but with permanent sequelae in 1.39% of cases. Recurrence of stenosis was detected in 0.8% of patients but there were no cases of postoperative thrombosis. Indications for surgery were based on the existence of hemispheric ischemic accidents corresponding to the territory supplied by the artery operated upon, and on anatomic and evolutive arguments drawn from results of non-invasive review examinations: ultrasonography and Doppler. Results obtained: 81.9% of patients were asymptomatic after 30 months, appear to be superior to those of the natural history of carotid artery lesions. PMID:4056617

  12. Clinical & radiological evaluation of atherosclerotic changes in carotid & coronary arteries in asymptomatic & clinically symptomatic individuals as a tool for pre-symptomatic diagnosis of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Prasad, T.N.; Ananthalakshmi, S.; Karthik, G.A.; Cherian, George; Dayananda, Yaligar

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: An increase in prevalence of atherosclerosis has been noted worldwide with reports of higher incidence of atherosclerotic vascular changes in Asian Indians. There is a need to measure vascular atherosclerotic changes and provide objective parameter to predict cardiac and cerebrovascular adverse events. Atherosclerotic changes in carotids and coronaries are generally accepted as an association. We attempted in this study to relate intimal-luminal changes in carotid arteries to luminal changes in coronary arteries. Our study presents results of high resolution ultra sonographic (HRUS) evaluation of intimal-medial-thickness (IMT) in carotid with luminal changes in coronaries on multidetector-CT (MDCT) in clinically asymptomatic and symptomatic individuals. Methods: In this prospective study, HRUS examination of the carotid bifurcation was performed in 151 individuals to measure IMT in asymptomatic and symptomatic groups. Assessments of coronary arteries of the same group of patients were evaluated by MDCT within a week interval. IMT changes were associated with age, sex, predisposing factors, calcium burden of coronaries and structural atherosclerotic changes in coronary arteries. Results: A linear association of IMT was observed with increasing age. IMT of 0.5-0.69 mm was noted in 50 per cent of patients between 51-56 yr with higher number of symptomatic patients in this group. Linear increases in coronary vascular changes were noted with increasing IMT thickness. Changes were more prevalent in diabetic, hypertensive, treadmill test (TMT) positive and clinically symptomatic patients. Interpretation & conclusions: Age-related progression of atherosclerosis was evident in internal carotid arteries. Significant association was observed in the IMT thickness of right common carotid (RCC) and coronary disease in symptomatic group; whereas IMT of left common carotid and internal carotid arteries did not show any association. RCC IMT between 0

  13. Carotid artery aneurysm: last among equals.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Ajit Kaur; Rowlands, Timothy; McMahon, Greg

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old man presented initially with a swelling in the left side of the neck, which was confirmed to be a carotid artery aneurysm on ultrasonography. He was subsequently admitted reporting intermittent episodes of visual loss in the left eye and right arm weakness. Further imaging confirmed multiple, small acute infarcts in the left cerebral hemisphere. The patient underwent open repair of the aneurysm and made an uncomplicated recovery with no persisting neurological deficit. PMID:27190119

  14. Psychometric and EEG changes after carotid endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Pietro; Ortelli, Paola; Zanon, Antonio; Schiff, Sami; Montagnese, Sara; Avruscio, Giampietro; Del Piccolo, Franco; Mapelli, Daniela; Puato, Massimo; Rattazzi, Marcello; Amodio, Piero; Pauletto, Paolo

    2015-02-01

    The influence of carotid stenosis and its surgical treatment on brain function is still poorly defined. We therefore performed a study to assess psychometric and quantified EEG findings after carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Sixty-nine non-demented patients (aged 72 ± 7 years) with severe carotid stenosis (≥ 70%) eligible for CEA were studied. Forty patients (group A) had unilateral stenosis, and 29 patients (group B) had bilateral stenosis. Before and 5 months after CEA all the patients were evaluated by the Trail Making Test A, the Symbol Digit Test, and spectral EEG analysis. At baseline, compared to group A, group B patients performed slowly the Trail Making Test A (Z: 1.45 ± 1.4 vs. 0.76 ± 1.3; p <  0.05), but not the Symbol Digit Test (Z: 0.83 ± 1.38 vs. 0.64 ± 1.26; p = 0.59). Altogether, the patients with at least one abnormal psychometric test were 29% (group A: 26%; group B: 33%, p = 0.56). The EEG did not differ significantly between patients of group A compared to group B. After CEA, psychometric tests improved (mean Z score from 0.73 ± 1.12 to 0.45 ± 1.15, p <  0.05). The improvement was similar in group A and B. The EEG mean dominant frequency improved only in group B patients and it was related to the improvement in psychometric tests (r = 0.43, p = 0.05). Low psychometric performance was detectable in about 1/ 3 of non-demented patients with severe carotid stenosis. CEA improved mental performance and, in patients with severe bilateral stenosis, accelerated the EEG frequency. PMID:25034456

  15. Are Carotid Stent Fractures Clinically Significant?

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Toca, Manuel; Rodriguez, Heron E.; Naughton, Peter A.; Keeling, Aiofee; Phade, Sachin V.; Morasch, Mark D.; Kibbe, Melina R.; Eskandari, Mark K.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Late stent fatigue is a known complication after carotid artery stenting (CAS) for cervical carotid occlusive disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and clinical significance of carotid stent fractures. Materials and Methods: A single-center retrospective review of 253 carotid bifurcation lesions treated with CAS and mechanical embolic protection from April 2001 to December 2009 was performed. Stent integrity was analyzed by two independent observers using multiplanar cervical plain radiographs with fractures classified into the following types: type I = single strut fracture; type II = multiple strut fractures; type III = transverse fracture; and type IV = transverse fracture with dislocation. Mean follow-up was 32 months. Results: Follow-up imaging was completed on 106 self-expanding nitinol stents (26 closed-cell and 80 open-cell stents). Eight fractures (7.5%) were detected (type I n = 1, type II n = 6, and type III n = 1). Seven fractures were found in open-cell stents (Precise n = 3, ViVEXX n = 2, and Acculink n = 2), and 1 fracture was found in a closed-cell stent (Xact n = 1) (p = 0.67). Only a previous history of external beam neck irradiation was associated with fractures (p = 0.048). No associated clinical sequelae were observed among the patients with fractures, and only 1 patient had an associated significant restenosis ({>=}80%) requiring reintervention. Conclusions: Late stent fatigue after CAS is an uncommon event and rarely clinically relevant. Although cell design does not appear to influence the occurrence of fractures, lesion characteristics may be associated risk factors.

  16. Aterofisiol® in carotid plaque evolution

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Bruno; Compagna, Rita; Amato, Maurizio; Gallelli, Luca; de Franciscis, Stefano; Serra, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Background In patients with carotid stenosis, the risk of plaque rupture is related to the composition of the atherosclerotic plaque rather than to its magnitude. In this regard, we evaluated the effects of a supplement, Aterofisiol,® containing omega-3 (EPA [eicosapen acid] DHA [docosahexaenoic acid]), vitamin K2, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPC) and resveratrol on the composition of atherosclerotic plaque and on neurological symptoms in patients with carotid stenosis undergoing carotid endarterectomy. Methods The study was randomized, prospective, and double-blinded. Eligible patients were of both sexes, with carotid stenosis >70% who underwent endarterectomy. Enrolled patients were randomly allocated to receive either one tablet of acetylsalicylic acid 100 mg (Cardioaspirin®) + one tablet of Aterofisiol every 24 hours or one tablet of Cardioaspirin + one tablet of placebo every 24 hours. Each treatment was started 30 days before the surgery and was stopped 5 days before the surgery. The plaques were removed “en bloc” using standard surgical technique. Results During the study period, 214 patients (135 men and 79 women) were enrolled for intent-to-treat and randomized in two groups: Group A: 107 patients (68 men and 39 women) were treated with Cardioaspirin + Aterofisiol. Group B: 107 patients (67 men and 40 women) were treated with Cardioaspirin + placebo. At the end of the study, 202 patients participated fully (103 patients in Group A and 99 patients in Group B), making up the protocol evaluation population (94.4%). The mean lipid content of removed plaques was significantly lower (P<0.05) in Group A. We recorded a significantly lower incidence of neurological symptoms in Group A in comparison with Group B (P<0.05). Conclusion In the study, Aterofisiol showed to be effective in reducing the amounts of cholesterol and lipids in the plaques and in reducing adverse neurological events in the study group with respect to controls

  17. Complete carotid and coronary revascularization in brain malperfusion.

    PubMed

    Aramendi, Claudia; Cubero, Alain; Cortés, Andrés; Rivas, Daniel; Crespo, Alejandro; Aramendi, José I

    2016-09-01

    A 54-year-old man presented with unstable angina and stroke with right hemiplegia and aphasia due to left main coronary plus 3-vessel disease, severe stenosis of bilateral internal carotid, proximal left common carotid, and proximal left subclavian arteries. Simultaneous complete revascularization was undertaken with the use of conventional cardiopulmonary bypass and moderate hypothermia (25℃). The left internal mammary artery and two saphenous vein grafts were used for coronary artery bypass, and brain revascularization consisted of a left aorta-to-common carotid Dacron graft and bilateral carotid endarterectomy. Recovery was good. PMID:26980597

  18. A preliminary anatomical study on carotid body of Makouei sheep

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Gholamreza; Soltanalinejad, Farhad; Hasanzadeh, Hamed

    2013-01-01

    The carotid is a small mass of chemoreceptor's and sustentacular cells that detects changes in the composition of the arterial blood. The aim of the present study was to identify the size, color, location, blood and nerve supply of the carotid body in Makouei sheep. Fourteen heads of sheep from both sexes were collected from Urmia public slaughter-house. The exact situation and nerve supply of the carotid body was determined. Before dissection, blue latex was injected into right and left common carotid arteries. All the branches of the common carotid artery and the branch supplying carotid body were investigated. This study showed that, carotid body in sheep has been situated around the muscular branch of the occipital artery. The mean weight, width and length, thickness of carotid body were 0.01 g, 0.83 mm, 1.07 mm, and 1.06 mm respectively. Blood to the carotid body was supplied by glomic artery which was a branch of occipital artery. It was innervated by herring nerve which was a branch of glossopharyngeal nerve. PMID:25653785

  19. A preliminary anatomical study on carotid body of Makouei sheep.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Gholamreza; Soltanalinejad, Farhad; Hasanzadeh, Hamed

    2013-01-01

    The carotid is a small mass of chemoreceptor's and sustentacular cells that detects changes in the composition of the arterial blood. The aim of the present study was to identify the size, color, location, blood and nerve supply of the carotid body in Makouei sheep. Fourteen heads of sheep from both sexes were collected from Urmia public slaughter-house. The exact situation and nerve supply of the carotid body was determined. Before dissection, blue latex was injected into right and left common carotid arteries. All the branches of the common carotid artery and the branch supplying carotid body were investigated. This study showed that, carotid body in sheep has been situated around the muscular branch of the occipital artery. The mean weight, width and length, thickness of carotid body were 0.01 g, 0.83 mm, 1.07 mm, and 1.06 mm respectively. Blood to the carotid body was supplied by glomic artery which was a branch of occipital artery. It was innervated by herring nerve which was a branch of glossopharyngeal nerve. PMID:25653785

  20. The first derivative of the carotid displacement pulse.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, A. H.; Spodick, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    The amplitude and time relationships of the carotid derivative in normal individuals and unselected cardiac patients is investigated together with the effects of different contraction strengths in patients with pulsus alternans and subjects challenged with isoproterenol and propranolol. Data regarding the relationship between the preejection period (PEP) and the ratio of peak to total amplitude of the carotid displacement pulse derivative are presented. It is found that cardiac abnormality tends to reduce the rate of rise of the carotid displacement pulse. The results obtained show that the PEP is a somewhat more sensitive index of the changes studied than the carotid displacement derivative.

  1. Carotid Stump Syndrome: Case Report and Endovascular Treatment.

    PubMed

    Dakhoul, Lara Toufic; Tawk, Rabih

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To highlight the case of a patient with multiple transient ischemic attacks and visual disturbances diagnosed with carotid stump syndrome and managed with endovascular approach. Case Presentation. We present the case of a carotid stump syndrome in an elderly patient found to have moderate left internal carotid artery stenosis in response to an advertisement for carotid screening. After a medical therapeutic approach and a close follow-up, transient ischemic attacks recurred. Computed tomographic angiography showed an occlusion of the left internal carotid artery and the presence of moderate stenosis in the right internal carotid artery, which was treated by endovascular stenting and balloon insertion. One month later, the patient presented with visual disturbances due to the left carotid stump and severe stenosis of the left external carotid artery that was reapproached by endovascular stenting. Conclusion. Considerations should be given to the carotid stump syndrome as a source of emboli for ischemic strokes, and vascular assessment could be used to detect and treat this syndrome. PMID:26425620

  2. [An integrated segmentation method for 3D ultrasound carotid artery].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Wu, Huihui; Liu, Yang; Xu, Hongwei; Liang, Huageng; Cai, Wenjuan; Fang, Mengjie; Wang, Yujie

    2013-07-01

    An integrated segmentation method for 3D ultrasound carotid artery was proposed. 3D ultrasound image was sliced into transverse, coronal and sagittal 2D images on the carotid bifurcation point. Then, the three images were processed respectively, and the carotid artery contours and thickness were obtained finally. This paper tries to overcome the disadvantages of current computer aided diagnosis method, such as high computational complexity, easily introduced subjective errors et al. The proposed method could get the carotid artery overall information rapidly, accurately and completely. It could be transplanted into clinical usage for atherosclerosis diagnosis and prevention. PMID:24195385

  3. Percutaneous Injection of Lidocaine Within the Carotid Body Area in Carotid Artery Stenting: An 'Old-New' Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mourikis, Dimitrios; Chatoupis, Konstantinos; Katsenis, Konstantinos; Vlahos, Lampros; Chatziioannou, Achilles

    2008-07-15

    Severe bradycardia is a common untoward effect during balloon angioplasty when performing carotid artery stenting. Therefore atropine injection even before dilatation and the presence of an anesthesiologist are advocated in all patients. In the surgical literature, injection of a local anesthetic agent into the carotid sinus before carotid endarterectomy was performed in an attempt to ameliorate perioperative hemodynamic instability. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that percutaneous infiltration of the carotid sinus with local anesthetic immediately before balloon dilatation reduces bradycardia and ameliorates the need for atropine injection or the presence of an anesthesiologist. Infiltration of the carotid sinus with 5 ml of 1% lidocaine, 3 min before dilatation, was performed in 30 consecutive patients. No one exhibited any significant rhythm change that required atropine injection. The anesthesiologist did not face any hemodynamic instability during the carotid artery stenting procedure.

  4. Routine ultrasound surveillance after carotid endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Pratesi, C; Pulli, R; Ferlaino, E; Michelagnoli, S; Bernacchi, R; Borgioloi, F; Nuzzaci, G

    1996-02-01

    Ultrasounds (US) are employed in preoperative carotid disease diagnosis and in carotid endarterectomy (CEA) follow-up. The authors present their experience about postoperative modifications in CEA site with US evaluation with particular interest in restenosis. Clinical and instrumental examinations were performed at intervals 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months following surgery. Follow-up data were available on 189 CEAs. In 58 cases a primary closure was performed, whereas in the other 131 cases, a patch was applied. 15 restenosis (7.9%) were seen during the follow-up control period with 2 cases of haemodynamic restenosis (1%). Good results were recorded with PTFE patch angioplasty (restenosis 4.4%), instead of vein (restenosis 14.2%) and a biosynthetic material called Omniflow (restenosis 9.5%). A vein patch dilatation was encountered in 13 applications (30.9%). In conclusion the routine application of US after carotid endarterectomy allowed us to monitor the evolution of the repair processes and of the stenotic lesions from the very beginning. PMID:8606212

  5. Early carotid endarterectomy in selected stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kahn, M B; Patterson, H K; Seltzer, J; Fitzpatrick, M; Smullens, S; Bell, R; DiMuzio, P; Carabasi, R A

    1999-09-01

    Although there are several reports suggesting the safety of performing carotid endarterectomy (CE) within 4 weeks (early) of a nondisabling stroke, at many institutions it is not standard practice. Benefits of early surgery may include reduction in the number of strokes or carotid occlusions during the time between stroke and surgery, as well as a reduction in the cost of medical care due to the elimination of interval anticoagulation and close follow-up. This review examines the outcomes of early CE in selected patients after a nondisabling stroke. A total of 1065 CEs were performed between November 1991 and April 1998. Seventy-five patients were identified by computerized hospital record and office chart review as having CE after a nondisabling stroke. Criteria for early surgery included 1) nondisabling stroke ipsilateral to a carotid stenosis >50%, 2) neurological stability, and 3) no evidence of hemorrhagic stroke or significant cerebral edema by CT/MRI evaluation. This review suggests that early CE can be performed in selected patients with an acceptable perioperative morbidity and mortality. PMID:10466988

  6. Carotid Stenting for Restenosis after Endarterectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Counsell, Andrew; Ghosh, Jonathan McCollum, Charles C. N.; Ashleigh, Raymond

    2011-06-15

    Introduction: Restenosis after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has been described in 8-19% of patients, 14-23% of whom become symptomatic. This study analyzes our experience with carotid artery stenting (CAS) for post-CEA recurrent stenoses.MethodRetrospective database and case-note review. Results: Between January 2000 and September 2008, a total of 27 patients (15 symptomatic) with hemodynamically significant internal carotid artery post-CEA restenosis underwent CAS. Median stenosis of target vessels was 90% (range 75-95%). There was one periprocedural death (3.7%); no others occurred during the median 34-month follow-up (range 0.1-84 months). There was one late transient ischemic attack 12 months after CAS that was not associated with in-stent restenosis. One 90% restenosis and one occlusion were detected during follow-up at 38 and 57 months after CAS. The remaining patients had no evidence of further restenosis and remained free from cerebrovascular symptoms. Conclusion: CAS offers a feasible option for the management of carefully selected patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic restenosis after CEA.

  7. Carotid artery rupture and cervicofacial actinomycosis.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Anne; Lhermitte, Benoît; Ödman, Micaela; Grabherr, Silke; Mangin, Patrice; Palmiere, Cristian

    2012-11-01

    Cervicofacial actinomycosis is an uncommon, progressive infection caused by bacilli of the Actinomyces genus. Actinomyces are common commensal saprophytes in the oral cavity which may have medical importance as facultative pathogens. Subsequent to local injuries to the oral mucosa, they may penetrate the deep tissues and be responsible for suppurative or granulomatous infections. We herein report a case of a 65-year-old man who underwent surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiotherapy for a tonsillar carcinoma. An ulcerous lesion in the base of the tongue developed and spread to the carotid artery wall. The man died of a massive hemorrhage due to left carotid artery rupture. Postmortem computed tomography angiography performed prior to autopsy allowed the precise localization of the source of bleeding to be detected. Postmortem biochemical investigations confirmed the presence of inflammation associated with local bacterial infection. Histological investigations revealed the rupture of the left carotid artery surrounded by numerous colonies of Actinomyces. Acute and chronic inflammation with tissue necrosis as well as post-actinic, fibrotic changes were also found in the tissues surrounding the ruptured artery wall. PMID:22819527

  8. Carotid bypass using the Gore Hybrid Vascular Graft as a rescue technique for on-table failed carotid endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Domenico; Sayed, Saiqa; Mistry, Hiren; Rashid, Hisham; Gambhir, Raghvinder; Slim, Hani

    2016-07-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) remains the "gold standard" for atherosclerotic lesions involving the carotid bifurcation. Carotid bypass grafting using either polytetrafluoroethylene or long saphenous vein is a suitable alternative technique, especially in challenging endarterectomy and on-table failed CEA. We report our initial experience of using the Gore Hybrid Vascular Graft (W. L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, Ariz) in six patients as a rescue technique when standard CEA failed. PMID:26409841

  9. Temporary axillary-carotid shunting for unusual instances of carotid stenosis.

    PubMed

    Shumacker, H B; Isch, J H; Jolly, W W

    1976-07-01

    A method has been developed which entails the introduction of the larger end of a Javid shunt tube in the axillary artery and the other in the internal carotid with only momentary interruption of blood flow. The method of closing the incision after the thromboendarterectomy almost entirely eliminates a second period of carotid occlusion. This procedure may be useful in unusual instances in which it is believed advantageous to avoid even the relatively short occlusion periods usually necessary when using the standard intraluminal shunt technique. PMID:936041

  10. Surgical Exposure to Control the Distal Internal Carotid Artery at the Base of the Skull during Carotid Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Davis, Laura; Zeitouni, Anthony; Makhoul, Nicholas; Steinmetz, Oren K

    2016-07-01

    Extracranial carotid artery aneurysms are rare. Treatment options for these lesions include endovascular interventions, such as coiling and stenting, or surgical reconstruction, such as resection and primary reanastomosis, or interposition bypass grafting. In this report, we describe the surgical technique used to perform surgical repair of an internal carotid artery aneurysm extending up to the base of the skull. Anterior exposure of the infratemporal fossa and distal control of the carotid artery at the level of the carotid canal was achieved through a transcervical approach, performing double mandibular osteotomies with superior reflection of the middle mandibular section. PMID:26902936

  11. Carotid artery stenting versus endarterectomy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gahremanpour, Amir; Perin, Emerson C; Silva, Guilherme

    2012-01-01

    For about 2 decades, investigators have been comparing carotid endarterectomy with carotid artery stenting in regard to their effectiveness and safety in treating carotid artery stenosis. We conducted a systematic review to summarize and appraise the available evidence provided by randomized trials, meta-analyses, and registries comparing the clinical outcomes of the 2 procedures. We searched the MEDLINE, SciVerse Scopus, and Cochrane databases and the bibliographies of pertinent textbooks and articles to identify these studies. The results of clinical trials and, consequently, the meta-analyses of those trials produced conflicting results regarding the comparative effectiveness and safety of carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting. These conflicting results arose because of differences in patient population, trial design, outcome measures, and variability among centers in the endovascular devices used and in operator skills. Careful appraisal of the trials and meta-analyses, particularly the most recent and largest National Institutes of Health-sponsored trial (the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs Stenting Trial [CREST]), showed that carotid stenting and endarterectomy were associated with similar rates of death and disabling stroke. Within the 30-day periprocedural period, carotid stenting was associated with higher risks of stroke, especially for patients aged >70 years, whereas carotid endarterectomy was associated with a higher risk of myocardial infarction. The slightly higher cost of stenting compared with endarterectomy was within an acceptable range by cost-effectiveness standards. We conclude that carotid artery stenting is an equivalent alternative to carotid endarterectomy when patient age and anatomy, surgical risk, and operator experience are considered in the choice of treatment approach. PMID:22949763

  12. Choosing Wisely for Syncope: Low‐Value Carotid Ultrasound Use

    PubMed Central

    Scott, John W.; Schwartz, Aaron L.; Gates, Jonathan D.; Gerhard‐Herman, Marie; Havens, Joaquim M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The United States spends more than $750 billion annually on tests and procedures that do not benefit patients. Although there is no physiological indication for carotid ultrasound in “simple” syncope in the absence of focal neurological signs or symptoms suggestive of stroke, there is concern that this practice remains common for routine syncope workups. Methods and Results We used a 5% random‐sample Medicare claims database to evaluate large‐scale national trends in utilization of low‐value carotid ultrasound imaging for simple syncope. We found that 16.5% of all Medicare beneficiaries with simple syncope underwent carotid imaging and 6.5% of all carotid ultrasounds ordered in 2009 were for this low‐value indication. These findings were complemented by a manual chart review of 313 patients at a large academic medical center who underwent carotid ultrasound for simple syncope over a 5‐year period. For the 48 (15.4%) of 313 patients with stenosis ≥50%, carotid ultrasound did not yield a causal diagnosis. Only 2% of the 313 patients imaged experienced a change in medications after a positive study, and <1% of patients underwent a carotid revascularization procedure. Conclusions These data suggest that carotid ultrasound for patients with uncomplicated syncope are still commonly ordered and may be an easy target for institutions striving to curtail low‐value care. PMID:25122665

  13. Is carotid duplex scanning sufficient as the sole investigation prior to carotid endarterectomy?

    PubMed

    Collins, P; McKay, I; Rajagoplan, S; Bachoo, P; Robb, O; Brittenden, J

    2005-11-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is the accepted treatment for certain patients who have had, or who are at risk of having, a stroke if they have a significant narrowing of the internal carotid artery. Rapid and accurate classification of the degree of stenosis is important as the benefit of surgery is highly dependent on this. The aim of this study was to assess whether the addition of angiography to duplex scanning resulted in a change in patient management in a unit where duplex scanning was used as the sole imaging investigation prior to CEA. The study population consisted of 64 patients with significant internal carotid artery stenosis on duplex scanning who were suitable for, and wished to be considered for, CEA. All patients underwent an angiogram. In this study 9 (14%) patients did not proceed to surgery on the basis of angiography and in a further 11 (17%) patients insufficient views of the distal vessel were obtained on duplex scanning. Three of these patients had extensive disease which excluded surgery. One patient experienced a transient ischaemic attack (TIA) at the time of angiography. In conclusion, this audit has highlighted the limitations in performing duplex scanning alone, and the costs that this can incur on the patient who may undergo an unnecessary operation. We cannot recommend duplex scanning as the sole investigation prior to CEA. There is need to evaluate the role of additional non-invasive carotid imaging such as magnetic resonance angiography or CT angiography in the assessment of these patients. PMID:16249605

  14. Numerical simulation of blood flow and plaque progression in carotid-carotid bypass patient specific case.

    PubMed

    Filipovic, Nenad; Saveljic, Igor; Nikolic, Dalibor; Milosevic, Zarko; Kovacevic, Pavle; Velicki, Lazar

    2015-01-01

    This study describes computer simulation of blood flow and plaque progression pattern in a patient who underwent surgical treatment for infected carotid prosthetic tube graft using carotid-carotid cross-over bypass. The 3D blood flow is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations, together with the continuity equation. Mass transfer within the blood lumen and through the arterial wall is coupled with the blood flow and is modelled by the convection-diffusion equation. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) transport in lumen of the vessel is described by Kedem-Katchalsky equations. The inflammatory process is solved using three additional reaction-diffusion partial differential equations. Calculation based on a computer simulation showed that flow distribution in the left carotid artery (CA) was around 40-50% of the total flow in the right common CA. Also, the left CA had higher pressure gradient after surgical intervention. Plaque progression simulation predicted development of the atherosclerotic plaque in the position of the right common CA and the left internal CA. A novel way of atherosclerotic plaque progression modelling using computer simulation shows a potential clinical benefit with significant impact on the treatment strategy optimization. PMID:26291584

  15. Extramedullary plasmacytoma in the carotid space: Expanding the differential diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Sneha Satish; Kane, Shubhada; Arya, Supreeta

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell neoplasms have been classified into various types, with a range of clinical and radiological presentations. Extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP) is a subset of plasma cell neoplasms which presents as an isolated non-osseous soft tissue mass. Though carotid space neoplasms are commonly encountered, EMP in the carotid space is rare and seldom considered in the initial differential diagnosis of a carotid space mass. These tumors can be treated by surgery or radiotherapy. On the other hand, the commonly encountered tumors in the carotid space are treated surgically. Also, it is mandatory to exclude multiple myeloma in the patients presenting with EMP. Hence, accurate and early diagnosis has therapeutic and prognostic implications. We report a rare case of EMP of the carotid space, describing the imaging features and the differential diagnoses with clues pointing to this rare entity. PMID:25489135

  16. Hyperacute Carotid Stent Thrombosis During Emergent Revascularization Treated with Intraarterial Eptifibatide After Systemic Administration of Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator

    PubMed Central

    Sorkin, Grant C; Dumont, Travis M.; Mokin, Maxim; Eller, Jorge L.; Natarajan, Sabareesh K.; Levy, Elad I.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score of 26 was found to have an acute left carotid occlusion with tandem left M1 thrombus within 1.5 hours of symptom onset. After no neurologic improvement following standard-dose intravenous (IV) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA), emergent neuroendovascular revascularization with carotid stenting and intracranial thrombectomy were performed under conscious sedation. Thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI)-3 flow restoration and symptom resolution were achieved postprocedure; however, complete carotid stent thrombosis was noted on final angiographic runs (25 minutes later), correlating with neurologic decline. Rapid administration of an intraarterial (IA) bolus dose of eptifibatide resulted in TIMI-3 flow restoration, with neurologic improvement. The patient was discharged three days postrevascularization on dual antiplatelet therapy with an NIHSS score of 1. Intraarterial (IA) eptifibatide can be an effective option for acute stent occlusion during emergent neuroendovascular revascularization after IV rtPA administration. ABBREVIATIONS CLEAR Combined approach to lysis utilizing eptifibatide and RtPA CT computed tomographic Fr French GP glycoprotein IA intraarterial ICA internal carotid artery IV intravenous MCA middle cerebral artery NIHSS National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale rtPA recombinant tissue plasminogen activator TIMI thrombolysis in myocardial infarction PMID:26301032

  17. Spatial mapping of dynamic cerebral autoregulation by multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy in high-grade carotid artery disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhard, Matthias; Schumacher, F. Konrad; Rutsch, Sebastian; Oeinck, Maximilian; Timmer, Jens; Mader, Irina; Schelter, Björn; Weiller, Cornelius; Kaller, Christoph P.

    2014-09-01

    The exact spatial distribution of impaired cerebral autoregulation in carotid artery disease is unknown. In this pilot study, we present a new approach of multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy (mcNIRS) for noninvasive spatial mapping of dynamic autoregulation in carotid artery disease. In 15 patients with unilateral severe carotid artery stenosis or occlusion, cortical hemodynamics in the bilateral frontal cortex were assessed from changes in oxyhemoglobin concentration using 52-channel NIRS (spatial resolution ˜2 cm). Dynamic autoregulation was graded by the phase shift between respiratory-induced 0.1 Hz oscillations of blood pressure and oxyhemoglobin. Ten of 15 patients showed regular phase values in the expected (patho) physiological range. Five patients had clearly outlying irregular phase values mostly due to artifacts. In patients with a regular phase pattern, a significant side-to-side difference of dynamic autoregulation was observed for the cortical border zone area between the middle and anterior cerebral artery (p<0.05). In conclusion, dynamic cerebral autoregulation can be spatially assessed from slow hemodynamic oscillations with mcNIRS. In high-grade carotid artery disease, cortical dynamic autoregulation is affected mostly in the vascular border zone. Spatial mapping of dynamic autoregulation may serve as a powerful tool for identifying brain regions at specific risks for hemodynamic infarction.

  18. Intima-media thickness and arterial stiffness of carotid artery in Korean patients with Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Moo-Yong; Chang, Hyun Kyu; Kim, Seong-Kyu

    2007-06-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a systemic vasculitis involving diverse sizes of arteries and veins. We performed this study to evaluate the vascular changes by assessment of the arterial stiffness and intima-media thickness (IMT) of carotid artery in Korean patients with BD. Forty-one patients with BD and age-, and sex-matched 53 healthy subjects were recruited in this study. Carotid arterial stiffness and IMT were assessed by using high-resolution B-mode ultrasonography. Arterial stiffness parameters such as carotid arterial distensibility coefficient, stiffness index, and incremental elastic modulus (E(inc)) were significantly increased in BD patients compared with those in healthy subjects, but not in IMT. Positive relationship was noted between age and IMT, whereas age of onset was significantly associated with arterial stiffness in BD. This finding suggests impaired endothelial function before visible structural changes of arterial wall in BD. Age and age of onset may be an independent risk factor for carotid IMT and arterial stiffness, respectively. Further studies in more large populations are required to confirm our results. PMID:17596642

  19. Concomitant Carotid and Coronary Artery Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Craver, Joseph M.; Murphy, Douglas A.; Jones, Ellis L.; Curling, Patrick E.; Bone, David K.; Smith, Robert B.; Perdue, Garland D.; Hatcher, Charles R.; Kandrach, Michael

    1982-01-01

    Data are presented on 68 patients who underwent concomitant carotid endarterectomy (CE) and coronary artery bypass surgery (CAB) at Emory University Hospital from January 1974 to February 1981. This group is then compared with a randomly selected, matched population without known carotid disease who underwent CAB alone. Asymptomatic bruit was the reason for investigation in 40 patients (59%); another 23 patients (34%) experienced transient cerebral ischemic attacks (TIAs); and five patients (7%) had TIA and prior stroke. Carotid stenoses (>75% luminal narrowing) were demonstrated as follows: isolated left, 24 patients; isolated right, 27 patients; and bilateral lesions, 16 patients. One patient had innominate artery stenosis. Associated total occlusion of one or both vertebral arteries was demonstrated in six patients. Ninety-seven per cent of patients had disabling angina pectoris prior to operation; the angina was unstable in 57%, 15% had congestive heart failure, and 54% had had at least one prior myocardial infarction (MI). Single-vessel coronary disease was present in 12.5% of patients, double in 37.5%, triple in 41.1%, and left main stenosis in 9%; 43% of patients had abnormal ventricular contractility. CE was performed on 67 patients (36 left and 31 right); aortocarotid bypass was performed on one. The CE procedures were performed immediately prior to the sternotomy for CAB under the same anesthesia. CAB consisted of single bypass in eight patients (11.8%); double in 16 patients (23.5%); triple in 22 patients (32.4%); and quadruple or more in 22 patients (32.4%) (mean = 2.9 grafts per patient). There was no hospital mortality. Perioperative MI occurred in 2.0% and stroke with residual deficit in 1.3%. Cumulative survival is 98.5% at two years. Sixty-three patients (92%) reported improvement or elimination of anginal symptoms after operation. Rehospitalization for stroke was necessary in 3.7% patients. Postoperative activity levels are; self-care only, 3

  20. Recommendations for Carotid Stenting in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hyuk Won; Suh, Sang-il; Jeong, Hae Woong; Suh, Dae Chul

    2015-01-01

    Carotid artery angioplasty with stenting (CAS) is being performed in many hospitals in Korea. Most of the guidelines which are being used are similar, but the practical aspects such as techniques are different between hospitals. For example, usage of various protective devices, the oral antiplatelet regimen prior to procedure and placing of temporary pacemaker to prevent bradycardia are different between hospitals. In this article, we summarize and propose the guidelines for CAS which is currently being accepted in Korea. These guidelines may be helpful in providing protocol to neurointerventionalist who perform CAS and to standardize the process including reporting of CAS in the future comparative trials in Korea. PMID:25763292

  1. Congenital Absence of the Internal Carotid Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Florio, Francesco; Balzano, Silverio; Nardella, Michele; Strizzi, Vincenzo; Cammisa, Mario; Bozzini, Vincenzo; Catapano, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Vincenzo

    1999-01-15

    We report three cases of congenital absence of an internal carotid artery (ICA), diagnosed incidentally by digital subtraction angiography. The analysis of the cases is based on the classification of segmental ICA agenesis proposed by Lasjaunias and Berenstein. Usually the patients with this rare vascular anomaly are asymptomatic; some may have symptoms related to cerebrovascular insufficiency, compression by enlarged intracranial collateral vessels, or complications associated with cerebral aneurysms. Diagnosis of congenital absence of ICA is made by skull base computed tomography (CT) scan, CT and magnetic resonance angiography, and conventional or digital subtraction angiography.

  2. Management of Extracranial Carotid Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Yinn Cher

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death in developed nations. Up to 88% of strokes are ischemic in nature. Extracranial carotid artery atherosclerotic disease is the third leading cause of ischemic stroke in the general population and the second most common non-traumatic cause among adults <45 years of age. The aim of this paper is to provide comprehensive, evidence-based recommendations for the management of extracranial atherosclerotic disease, including imaging for screening and diagnosis, medical management and interventional management. PMID:25439328

  3. Mechanical Stabilization of Mouse Carotid Artery for In Vivo Intravital Microscopy Imaging of Atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chèvre, Raphaël

    2015-01-01

    We present here a procedure that allows real-time high-resolution multichannel imaging of early atherosclerotic lesions of live mice, by dramatically reducing the respiratory and pulsatile movements of the athero-susceptible carotid artery, without significantly altering blood flow dynamics. This surgical preparation can be combined with the use of various fluorescent probes and reporter mice to simultaneously visualize the dynamics of inflammatory leukocytes, platelets, or even subcellular structures. Stabilization of the tissue renders it suitable for two-photon laser scanning microscopic imaging and allows tracking the behavior of inflammatory cells in three dimensions. PMID:26445802

  4. Successful Endovascular Treatment of a Left Common Carotid Artery Aneurysm Following Failed Surgery of a Right Common Carotid Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Cil, Barbaros E. Ucar, Ibrahim; Ozsoy, Fatma; Arat, Anil; Yorgancioglu, Cem; Boeke, Erkmen

    2005-04-15

    Aneurysm of the common carotid artery is a rare and serious disease requiring prompt treatment in order to avoid neurologic complications. A 39-year-old man presented with voice impairment and a pulsatile mass at the right side of his neck and was found by color Doppler examination to have bilateral common carotid artery aneurysms of unknown origin. The right-sided large aneurysm was treated with placement of an 8 mm interposition Gore-Tex graft between the right common and internal carotid arteries. The surgical graft thrombosed 7 days after the surgery but the left-sided aneurysm was successfully treated by a Jostent peripheral stent-graft. Color Doppler examination showed a patent stent and no filling of the aneurysm on his first and sixth-month follow-up. Bilateral common carotid artery aneurysm is an exceptionally unusual condition and endovascular treatment of carotid artery aneurysms with covered stents may become an effective treatment alternative for these lesions.

  5. Access to the carotid artery bifurcation: Cadaveric study with application to nasotracheal intubation as a technique to improve access to a high carotid artery bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Paul M; Harrigan, Mark R; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane

    2015-12-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is a common and efficacious surgical procedure for the prevention of ischemic stroke due to atherosclerosis of the internal carotid artery (ICA). A high common carotid artery bifurcation can make CEA technically difficult due to limited carotid artery exposure. A cadaveric study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of nasotracheal intubation for improving access to a high carotid artery bifurcation. Based on this study, nasotracheal intubation does not improve access to a high carotid artery bifurcation as compared with orotracheal intubation. PMID:26312946

  6. Glaucoma Management in Carotid Cavernous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Calafiore, Silvia; Perdicchi, Andrea; Scuderi, Gianluca; Contestabile, Maria Teresa; Abdolrahimzadeh, Solmaz; Recupero, Santi Maria

    2016-01-01

    Carotid cavernous fistulas (CCF) are vascular communications between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. Ophthalmologists are called to diagnose and manage the condition in cases that present with ocular features. A 73-year-old female was referred to our glaucoma center clinic. Eight years before, she had started receiving medication for glaucoma and had undergone laser iridotomy, but a satisfactory management of intraocular pressure (IOP) had not been achieved. The patient was complaining of intermittent diplopia, bilateral proptosis, and conjunctival chemosis over the past 6 months. Best-corrected visual acuity in the right (OD) and left eye (OS) was 9/10 and 10/10, respectively. Visual field testing showed slight paracentral field defects mostly in OS. IOP was 20 mm Hg in OD and 34 mm Hg in OS. We referred the patient to neuroradiology, and MRI angiography revealed a CCF with angiographic classification of Cognard grade 2. Closure of the CCF by transarterial embolization was performed in the neuroradiology department. One week following the procedure, the clinical signs of diplopia, proptosis, and conjunctival chemosis had greatly improved, and IOP was reduced to 12 mm Hg OD and 19 mm Hg in OS. Glaucoma treatment was maintained with topical brimatoprost, brinzolamide, and timolol. Owing to the risk of vision loss associated with vascular stasis, retinal ischemia, and high IOP, ophthalmologists must be aware of the clinical features of CCF and should request appropriate imaging studies such as MRI angiography in order to confirm the diagnosis and plan multidisciplinary treatment. PMID:27462258

  7. Glaucoma Management in Carotid Cavernous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Calafiore, Silvia; Perdicchi, Andrea; Scuderi, Gianluca; Contestabile, Maria Teresa; Abdolrahimzadeh, Solmaz; Recupero, Santi Maria

    2016-01-01

    Carotid cavernous fistulas (CCF) are vascular communications between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. Ophthalmologists are called to diagnose and manage the condition in cases that present with ocular features. A 73-year-old female was referred to our glaucoma center clinic. Eight years before, she had started receiving medication for glaucoma and had undergone laser iridotomy, but a satisfactory management of intraocular pressure (IOP) had not been achieved. The patient was complaining of intermittent diplopia, bilateral proptosis, and conjunctival chemosis over the past 6 months. Best-corrected visual acuity in the right (OD) and left eye (OS) was 9/10 and 10/10, respectively. Visual field testing showed slight paracentral field defects mostly in OS. IOP was 20 mm Hg in OD and 34 mm Hg in OS. We referred the patient to neuroradiology, and MRI angiography revealed a CCF with angiographic classification of Cognard grade 2. Closure of the CCF by transarterial embolization was performed in the neuroradiology department. One week following the procedure, the clinical signs of diplopia, proptosis, and conjunctival chemosis had greatly improved, and IOP was reduced to 12 mm Hg OD and 19 mm Hg in OS. Glaucoma treatment was maintained with topical brimatoprost, brinzolamide, and timolol. Owing to the risk of vision loss associated with vascular stasis, retinal ischemia, and high IOP, ophthalmologists must be aware of the clinical features of CCF and should request appropriate imaging studies such as MRI angiography in order to confirm the diagnosis and plan multidisciplinary treatment. PMID:27462258

  8. Stenting of Extracranial Carotid Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Koshimae, N.; Morimoto, T.; Nagata, K.

    2003-01-01

    Summary The purpose of this study is to evaluate our cases of cervical internal carotid artery stenosis for safty stenting. We investigate the preoperative internal carotid artery stenosis using by integrated backscatter (IBS) method of ultra sonography, comparing with the thirty five surgical specimens as to their nature, histological structure, thickness of fibrous cap. We choose the protection method according to plaque structure, and placed Easy-Wall stent or Smart stent after prePTA. We added post PTA according to the extent of expansion and IVUS findings. Calibrated IBS = IBS value (ROI) /intinal IBS value of ‘bleeding’, ‘lipiď, ‘thrombus’, fiber, ‘hyalinization’ were -27.5, -22.5, -15.2, -11.1, +2.1. That of the thin fibrous cap were -10.9*, that of thic fibrous cap were -2.4 (*p < 0.001). There was a good coleration between the extent of expansion and expected histological findings. All conplications were two cases of small cerebral infarction and a case of bleeding from the complicated lung cancer. The protection at prePTA lead to no complications in case of acute cerebral infarctions. It is very important to check the histological specimen carefully for safty stenting. PMID:20591243

  9. Hypothermia during Carotid Endarterectomy: A Safety Study

    PubMed Central

    Candela, Serena; Dito, Raffaele; Casolla, Barbara; Silvestri, Emanuele; Sette, Giuliano; Filippi, Federico; Taurino, Maurizio; Brancadoro, Domitilla; Orzi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Background CEA is associated with peri-operative risk of brain ischemia, due both to emboli production caused by manipulation of the plaque and to potentially noxious reduction of cerebral blood flow by carotid clamping. Mild hypothermia (34–35°C) is probably the most effective approach to protect brain from ischemic insult. It is therefore a substantial hypothesis that hypothermia lowers the risk of ischemic brain damage potentially associated with CEA. Purpose of the study is to test whether systemic endovascular cooling to a target of 34.5–35°C, initiated before and maintained during CEA, is feasible and safe. Methods The study was carried out in 7 consecutive patients referred to the Vascular Surgery Unit and judged eligible for CEA. Cooling was initiated 60–90 min before CEA, by endovascular approach (Zoll system). The target temperature was maintained during CEA, followed by passive, controlled rewarming (0.4°C/h). The whole procedure was carried out under anesthesia. Results All the patients enrolled had no adverse events. Two patients exhibited a transient bradycardia (heart rate 30 beats/min). There were no significant differences in the clinical status, laboratory and physiological data measured before and after CEA. Conclusions Systemic cooling to 34.5–35.0°C, initiated before and maintained during carotid clamping, is feasible and safe. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02629653 PMID:27058874

  10. Treatment of Traumatic Carotid-Cavernous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, C.; YANG, X.; Li, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Summary From 1986 to the end of 1998, 482 cases of traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula (TCCF) were treated by means of intravascular embolisation technique. The experience is overviewed in this article. Many kinds of detachable balloon catheters (including Chinese made detachable balloon catheters), coils and cyano aery late were used as embolic materials. Transcervical, transfemoral, anterior communicating artery, posterior communicating artery approach, or transvenous approach were selected according to conditions. A combination of different approaches or materials was used for complex TCCF. We found that the special sign, named “bileakage sign”, indicated multileakage of TCCF and was not mentioned before. All 482 cases of TCCF were embolised successfully, of which 405 cases maintained the patency of internal carotid artery (ICA). No death related to the treatment occurred in our group and the symptoms or signs in 462 cases were relieved after embolisation. Emergency embolisation was needed in some conditions such as serious epistaxis, delayed or repeatedly subdural haematoma and rapid visual impairment. Endovascular treatment of TCCF is a safe and efficient method. The time of operation, approach, and materials for embolisation must be carefully selected in order to obtain the best result. PMID:20667206

  11. Radiation therapy of carotid body tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Valdagni, R.; Amichetti, M. )

    1990-02-01

    Chemodectomas of carotid artery bifurcation are generally managed with surgery, irradiation being reserved for inoperable, bulky, and recurrent tumors. Probably due to this pretreatment selection of patients, chemodectomas are anedoctally considered radioresistant tumors, although this concept is not supported by the recent literature. From 1968 to 1987, 13 carotid body tumors in seven patients were treated with irradiation as sole treatment (10 lesions) or as postoperative modality (three lesions). Familial occurrence and bilateral presentation were observed in 3 of 7 and in 6 of 7 patients, respectively. Total dose of irradiation was of 46-60 Gy (median 50 Gy, mean 52.25 Gy) with dose per fraction of 1.8-2.5 Gy. Local control (subjective or objective) was obtained in all the patients. Clinical results following World Health Organization (WHO) criteria were: 3 of 13 complete response, 7 of 13 partial response and 3 of 13 no change. Follow-up range is 1-19 years. Acute side effects were minimal and mid- or long-term toxicity was absent.32 references.

  12. Carotid chemoreceptor “resetting” revisited

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, John L.; Kim, Insook

    2012-01-01

    Carotid body (CB) chemoreceptors transduce low arterial O2 tension into increased action potential activity on the carotid sinus nerves, which contributes to resting ventilatory drive, increased ventilatory drive in response to hypoxia, arousal responses to hypoxia during sleep, upper airway muscle activity, blood pressure control and sympathetic tone. Their sensitivity to O2 is low in the newborn and increases during the days or weeks after birth to reach adult levels. This postnatal functional maturation of the CB O2 response has been termed “resetting” and it occurs in every mammalian species studied to date. The O2 environment appears to play a key role; the fetus develops in a low O2 environment throughout gestation and initiation of CB “resetting” after birth is modulated by the large increase in arterial oxygen tension occurring at birth. Although numerous studies have reported age-related changes in various components of the O2 transduction cascade, how the O2 environment shapes normal CB prenatal development and postnatal “resetting” remains unknown. Viewing CB “resetting” as environment-driven (developmental) phenotypic plasticity raises important mechanistic questions that have received little attention. This review examines what is known (and not known) about mechanisms of CB functional maturation, with a focus on the role of the O2 environment. PMID:22982216

  13. Should patients with asymptomatic significant carotid stenosis undergo simultaneous carotid and cardiac surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Ogutu, Peter; Werner, Raphael; Oertel, Frank; Beyer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiovascular surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether patients with severe asymptomatic carotid and coronary artery diseases should undergo simultaneous carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). A total of 624 papers were found using the reported search, of which 20 represent the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The author, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study results of these papers are tabulated. Previous cohort studies showed mixed results, while advocating for the necessity of a randomized controlled trial (RCT). A recent RCT showed that patients undergoing prophylactic or simultaneous CEA + CABG had lower rates of stroke (0%) compared with delayed CEA 1–3 months after CABG (7.7%), without significant perioperative mortality difference. This study included patients with unilateral severe (>70%) asymptomatic carotid stenosis requiring CABG. An earlier partly randomized trial also showed better outcomes for patients undergoing simultaneous procedures (P = 0.045). Interestingly, systematic reviews previously failed to show compelling evidence supporting prophylactic CEA. This could be partly due to the fact that these reviews collectively analyse different cohort qualities. Neurological studies have, however, shown reduced cognitive and phonetic quality and function in patients with unilateral and bilateral asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis. Twenty-one RCTs comparing lone carotid artery stenting (CAS) and CEA informed the American Heart Association guidelines, which declared CAS comparable with CEA for symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid stenosis (CS). However, the risk of death/stroke for CAS alone is double that for CEA alone in the acute phase following onset of symptoms, while CEA alone is associated with a doubled risk of myocardial infarction. There is

  14. Ultrasound screening for asymptomatic carotid stenosis in subjects with calcifications in the area of the carotid arteries on panoramic radiographs: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Directed ultrasonic screening for carotid stenosis is cost-effective in populations with > 5% prevalence of the diagnosis. Occasionally, calcifications in the area of the carotid arteries are incidentally detected on odontological panoramic radiographs. We aimed to determine if directed screening for carotid stenosis with ultrasound is indicated in individuals with such calcifications. Methods This was a cross-sectional study. Carotid ultrasound examinations were performed on consecutive persons, with findings of calcifications in the area of the carotid arteries on panoramic radiography that were otherwise eligible for asymptomatic carotid endarterectomy. Results Calcification in the area of the carotid arteries was seen in 176 of 1182 persons undergoing panoramic radiography. Of these, 117 fulfilled the inclusion criterion and were examined with carotid ultrasound. Eight persons (6.8%; 95% CI 2.2-11.5%) had a carotid stenosis - not significant over the 5% pre-specified threshold (p = 0.232, Binomial test). However, there was a significant sex difference (p = 0.008), as all stenoses were found in men. Among men, 12.5% (95%CI 4.2-20.8%) had carotid stenosis - significantly over the 5% pre-specified threshold (p = 0.014, Binomial test). Conclusions The incidental finding of calcification in the area of the carotid arteries on panoramic radiographs should be followed up with carotid screening in men that are otherwise eligible for asymptomatic carotid endarterectomy. Trial Registration The study was registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00514644 PMID:21752238

  15. Peripheral Chemoreceptors: Function and Plasticity of the Carotid Body

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prem; Prabhakar, Nanduri R.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of the sensory nature of the carotid body dates back to the beginning of the 20th century. Following these seminal discoveries, research into carotid body mechanisms moved forward progressively through the 20th century, with many descriptions of the ultrastructure of the organ and stimulus-response measurements at the level of the whole organ. The later part of 20th century witnessed the first descriptions of the cellular responses and electrophysiology of isolated and cultured type I and type II cells, and there now exist a number of testable hypotheses of chemotransduction. The goal of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of current concepts on sensory transduction and transmission of the hypoxic stimulus at the carotid body with an emphasis on integrating cellular mechanisms with the whole organ responses and highlighting the gaps or discrepancies in our knowledge. It is increasingly evident that in addition to hypoxia, the carotid body responds to a wide variety of blood-borne stimuli, including reduced glucose and immune-related cytokines and we therefore also consider the evidence for a polymodal function of the carotid body and its implications. It is clear that the sensory function of the carotid body exhibits considerable plasticity in response to the chronic perturbations in environmental O2 that is associated with many physiological and pathological conditions. The mechanisms and consequences of carotid body plasticity in health and disease are discussed in the final sections of this article. PMID:23728973

  16. [A Novel, Less Invasive Protection Method for Carotid Artery Stenting].

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Tomotaka; Goto, Shunsaku; Yamamoto, Taiki; Imai, Tasuku; Nishizawa, Toshihisa; Shimato, Shinji; Kato, Kyozo

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: We present a novel, less invasive protection method for carotid artery stenting. Case presentation: A 67-year-old man presented with symptomatic severe left carotid artery stenosis. A transfemoral approach was dangerous because of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. A 6Fr Axcelguide Simmonds catheter was inserted into the right brachial artery, and advanced into the left common carotid artery. Next, a 6Fr Optimo 100-cm catheter was coaxially navigated into the left common carotid artery. A PercuSurge GuardWire 300-cm was coaxially navigated into the left external carotid artery. Under flow reversal with the 2 balloons, another PercuSurge GuardWire 300-cm was navigated into the distal left internal carotid artery through the lesion. After both PercuSurge GuardWire balloons were inflated, the 6Fr Optimo was deflated and retrieved using a catheter exchange technique. Then, under distal double-balloon protection, routine stenting was performed. Conclusions: This technique is safer and less invasive than previous methods, especially in cases with difficult femoral access and vulnerable carotid plaque. PMID:27384116

  17. Readmissions after Carotid Artery Revascularization in the Medicare Population

    PubMed Central

    Al-Damluji, Mohammed Salim; Dharmarajan, Kumar; Zhang, Weiwei; Geary, Lori; Stilp, Erik; Dardik, Alan; Mena-Hurtado, Carlos; Curtis, Jeptha P.

    2015-01-01

    Background In appropriately selected patients with severe carotid stenosis, carotid revascularization reduces ischemic stroke. Prior clinical research has focused on the efficacy and safety of carotid revascularization, but few investigators have considered readmission as a clinically important outcome. Objectives To examine frequency, timing, and diagnoses of 30-day readmission following carotid revascularization; to assess differences in 30-day readmission between patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and carotid artery stenting (CAS); to describe hospital variation in risk-standardized readmission rates (RSRR); and to examine whether hospital variation in procedural choice (CEA vs. CAS) was associated with differences in RSRRs. Methods We used Medicare fee-for-service administrative claims data to identify acute care hospitalizations for CEA and CAS from 2009–2011. We calculated crude 30-day all-cause hospital readmissions following carotid revascularization. To assess differences in readmission after CAS compared with CEA, we used Kaplan-Meier survival curves and fitted mixed-effect logistic regression. We estimated hospital RSRRs using hierarchical generalized logistic regression. We stratified hospitals into 5 groups by their proportional CAS use and compared hospital group median RSRRs. Results Of 180,059 revascularizations from 2,287 hospitals, CEA and CAS were performed in 81.5% and 18.5% of cases, respectively. The unadjusted 30-day readmission rate following carotid revascularization was 9.6%. Readmission risk after CAS was higher than after CEA. There was modest hospital-level variation in 30-day RSRRs (Median: 9.5%, Range: 7.5%–12.5%). Variation in proportional use of CAS was not associated with differences in hospital RSRR (range of median RSRR across hospital quartiles: 9.49%–9.55%, P 0.771). Conclusions Almost 10% of Medicare patients undergoing carotid revascularization were readmitted within 30-days of discharge. Compared with CEA

  18. Experimental determination of circumferential properties of fresh carotid artery plaques.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Michael G; O'Donnell, Michael R; O'Connell, Barry M; Walsh, Michael T

    2011-06-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is currently accepted as the gold standard for interventional revascularisation of diseased arteries belonging to the carotid bifurcation. Despite the proven efficacy of CEA, great interest has been generated in carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) as an alternative to open surgical therapy. CAS is less invasive compared with CEA, and has the potential to successfully treat lesions close to the aortic arch or distal internal carotid artery (ICA). Following promising results from two recent trials (CREST; Carotid revascularisation endarterectomy versus stenting trial, and ICSS; International carotid stenting study) it is envisaged that there will be a greater uptake in carotid stenting, especially amongst the group who do not qualify for open surgical repair, thus creating pressure to develop computational models that describe a multitude of plaque models in the carotid arteries and their reaction to the deployment of such interventional devices. Pertinent analyses will require fresh human atherosclerotic plaque material characteristics for different disease types. This study analysed atherosclerotic plaque characteristics from 18 patients tested on site, post-surgical revascularisation through endarterectomy, with 4 tissue samples being excluded from tensile testing based on large width-length ratios. According to their mechanical behaviour, atherosclerotic plaques were separated into 3 grades of stiffness. Individual and group material coefficients were then generated analytically using the Yeoh strain energy function. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of each sample was also recorded, showing large variation across the 14 atherosclerotic samples tested. Experimental Green strains at rupture varied from 0.299 to 0.588 and the Cauchy stress observed in the experiments was between 0.131 and 0.779 MPa. It is expected that this data may be used in future design optimisation of next generation interventional medical devices for the

  19. Opposite effects of plasma homocysteine and the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T mutation on carotid artery geometry in asymptomatic adults.

    PubMed

    Demuth, K; Moatti, N; Hanon, O; Benoit, M O; Safar, M; Girerd, X

    1998-12-01

    Studies of symptomatic patients have identified hyperhomocysteinemia as an independent risk factor for vascular disease. In case-control studies, a point mutation (C677T) in the gene encoding 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) has also been linked to an increased risk of vascular disease through its effect on homocysteinemia. Our aim was to extend these observations to asymptomatic subjects by studying the influence of both homocysteinemia and its mutation on carotid artery geometry. We examined 144 subjects free of atherosclerotic lesions. Fasting homocysteinemia was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorometric detection. MTHFR genotype was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction followed by HinfI digestion. Carotid artery geometry was characterized by internal diameter and intima-media thickness, as assessed by a high-resolution echo-tracking system. Subjects in the upper homocysteine tertile had a greater carotid internal diameter than did subjects in the middle and lower tertiles (6516+/-770 versus 6206+/-641 and 5985+/-558 microm, respectively; P<0.001). Subjects homozygous for the mutation had a smaller carotid artery internal diameter than did subjects heterozygous or homozygous for the wild-type allele (5846+/-785 versus 6345+/-673 and 6199+/-671 microm, respectively; P<0.05). Homocysteinemia was not significantly increased in subjects homozygous for the mutation. In multivariate regression analysis, homocysteinemia was independently and positively associated with lumen diameter (P=0.0008) and wall thickness (P=0.020). Conversely, homozygosity for the mutation was negatively associated with internal diameter (P=0.009). These preliminary data suggest that mildly elevated homocysteinemia and homozygosity for the MTHFR C677T mutation are associated with opposite preclinical modifications of carotid artery geometry. If confirmed, these results may have important implications for new treatment strategies for vascular disease

  20. Carotid plaque and bone density and microarchitecture in psoriatic arthritis: the correlation with soluble ST2

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jiayun; Shang, Qing; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Li, Edmund K.; Kun, Emily W.; Cheng, Isaac T.; Li, Martin; Li, Tena K.; Zhu, Tracy Y.; Yu, Cheuk-Man; Qin, Ling; Tam, Lai-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients have increased risk of both atherosclerosis and osteoporosis. Previous studies revealed that IL-33/ST2 axis may be related to both conditions; however, these associations were never evaluated in a single patients’ group. Here we explored the association among plasma levels of IL-33 and its decoy receptor soluble ST2 (sST2), carotid plaque determined by ultrasound, and volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD)/microstructure of distal radius measured by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) in 80 PsA patients (55% male; 53.0 ± 10.1 years). Plasma sST2 levels were significantly higher in 33 (41%) patients with carotid plaques (11.2 ± 4.5 vs 7.7 ± 3.7 ng/ml, P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, sST2 was an independent explanatory variable associated with carotid plaques (OR = 1.296, 95% CI: [1.091,1.540]; P = 0.003). After adjustment for the osteoporotic risk factors, sST2 was significantly associated with higher cortical porosity (β = 0.184, [0.042,0.325]; P = 0.012) and cortical pore volume (2.247, [0.434,4.060]; P = 0.016); and had a trend to be associated with lower cortical vBMD (−2.918, [−6.111,0.275]; P = 0.073). IL-33 was not associated with carotid plaque or vBMD/microstructure. In conclusion, plasma sST2 levels were independently correlated with both carotid plaque and compromised cortical vBMD/microstructure in PsA patients. IL-33/ST2 axis may be a link between accelerated atherosclerosis and osteoporosis in PsA. PMID:27554830

  1. Utility of Combining PET and MR Imaging of Carotid Plaque.

    PubMed

    Vesey, Alex T; Dweck, Marc R; Fayad, Zahi A

    2016-02-01

    By harnessing the versatility and soft tissue imaging capabilities of MR imaging alongside the unmatched sensitivity and biomolecular flexibility of PET, the potential to provide detailed multiparametric plaque characterization in the carotid arteries is clear. The ability to acquire simultaneous, and dynamic multimodal data is perhaps PET/MR's greatest strength that will be of major interest to researchers investigating carotid and coronary atherosclerosis alike. This review summarizes the current status of dedicated hybrid PET/MR imaging; to crystallize the rationale for and advantages of this technique with respect to carotid atherosclerosis; and to discuss current limitations, challenges, and future directions. PMID:26610660

  2. SCAI/SVM expert consensus statement on carotid stenting: Training and credentialing for carotid stenting.

    PubMed

    Aronow, Herbert D; Collins, Tyrone J; Gray, William A; Jaff, Michael R; Kluck, Bryan W; Patel, Rajan A G; Rosenfield, Kenneth A; Safian, Robert D; Sobieszczyk, Piotr S; Wayangankar, Siddharth A; White, Christopher J

    2016-02-01

    Carotid artery stenting (CAS) has become an integral part of the therapeutic armamentarium offered by cardiovascular medicine programs for the prevention of stroke. The purpose of this expert consensus statement is to provide physician training and credentialing guidance to facilitate the safe and effective incorporation of CAS into clinical practice within these programs. Since publication of the 2005 Clinical Competence Statement on Carotid Stenting, there has been substantial device innovation, publication of numerous clinical trials and observational studies, accumulation of extensive real-world clinical experience and widespread participation in robust national quality improvement initiatives [5]. Collectively, these advances have led to substantial evolution in the selection of appropriate patients, as well as in the cognitive, technical and clinical skills required to perform safe and effective CAS. Herein, we summarize published guidelines, describe training pathways, outline elements of competency, offer strategies for tracking outcomes, specify facility, equipment and personnel requirements, and propose criteria for maintenance of CAS competency. PMID:26602705

  3. External Carotid-Internal Jugular Fistula as a Late Complication After Carotid Endarterectomy: A Rare Case

    SciTech Connect

    Bakar, Bulent; Cekirge, Saruhan; Tekkok, Ismail Hakki

    2011-02-15

    A 66-year-old man presented with mild amnesia, progressive fatigue, ataxia, visual hallucinations, and debility. His past medical history included right-sided carotid endarterectomy performed elsewhere 6 years previously. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed left parieto-occipital arteriovenous malformation-like tortous vessels, venous congestion, and ischemic areas. Cerebral angiography showed right-sided compound external carotid artery-internal jugular vein (IJV) fistula, and distal occlusion of the right IJV. Transvenous embolization via contralateral IJV was performed, and the fistula, together with fistulous portion of the distal IJV, was sealed using coils. Two years later, patient is well with normal neurologic examination findings. The presence of an arteriovenous communication after vascular surgery is a serious complication with potential long-term effects and therefore should be diagnosed and treated as promptly as possible.

  4. Pathophysiology and management of reperfusion injury and hyperperfusion syndrome after carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad U; Goshgarian, Christopher; Min, Jiangyong; Gorelick, Philip B

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hyperperfusion is a relatively rare syndrome with significant and potentially preventable clinical consequences. The pathophysiology of cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS) may involve dysregulation of the cerebral vascular system and hypertension, in the setting of increase in cerebral blood flow. The early recognition of CHS is important to prevent complications such as intracerebral hemorrhage. This review will focus on CHS following carotid endarterectomy and carotid artery stenting. We will discuss the typical clinical features of CHS, risk factors, pathophysiology, diagnostic modalities for detection, identification of patients at risk, and prevention and treatment. Although currently there are no specific guidelines for the management of CHS, identification of patients at risk for CHS and aggressive treatment of hypertension are recommended. PMID:27602202

  5. Effect of Menopausal Status on Carotid Intima-Media Thickness and Presence of Carotid Plaque in Chinese Women Generation Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong; Wang, Dandan; Yang, Xin; Wang, Anxin; Gao, Xiang; Guo, Yuming; Wu, Shouling; Zhao, Xingquan

    2015-01-01

    Menopause is an important physiological stage in women's life. The potential association of menopause with carotid intima-media thickness as well as with occurrence and stability of carotid plaque in Chinese female population is unclear. We conducted a population-based, cross-sectional study by recruiting 2,131 participants aged above 40 years from northeast of China. Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), presence of carotid plaque and its stability were evaluated by carotid duplex sonography. Among the participants, 1,133 (53.2%) were identified to be postmenopausal. After adjusting for potential confounding factors, presence of CIMT at 50th- 75th and ≥75th percentiles, carotid plaque and its unstable status were found to be significantly associated with the postmenopausal status (P < 0.001). When matched the participants by age, post-menopausal status was still associated with a higher risk of having unstable plaque. Moreover, our data show that postmenopausal status is a risk factor for intracranial arterial stenosis when compared with premenopausal status in the univariate analysis (OR = 1.314, P = 0.043), and such relationship is lost when the confounding factors are adjusted (OR = 0.828, P = 0.225). In conclusion, the vascular risk factors increase as the menopausal status changes. Compared with premenopausal status, postmenopausal status is associated with higher morbidity of CIMT, carotid plaque and its unstable status. PMID:25627797

  6. Carotid false aneurysm after carotid stent fracture: report of a surgical solution.

    PubMed

    Sirignano, Pasqualino; Setacci, Francesco; Galzerano, Giuseppe; de Donato, Gianmarco; Setacci, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    Stent fracture has been well documented in the Literature and in the majority of cases arises from the exposition of the stent to unfavourable stresses and biomechanical forces. We report a case of carotid false aneurysm after stent placement for post-surgery restenosis. Stent fracture is a clinical reality that sometimes should be considered prior to stent deployment and may require monitoring or treatment after occurrence. PMID:24788063

  7. Evolution of Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion in Non-Traumatic Carotid Dissection

    PubMed Central

    RUSU, Octavia; VASILE, Mihai; BAJENARU, Ovidiu; ANTOCHI, Florina

    2014-01-01

    Cervical artery dissection is becoming a more frequently identified cause of ischemic stroke among the young and middleaged patients. The pathogenesis of non-traumatic dissection has not been yet entirely elucidated, but certain risk factors have been reported. We present the case of a young patient with ischemic stroke in the middle cerebral artery territory secondary to internal carotid artery dissection and occlusion, in whom we identified two rarely incriminated risk factors: migraine and recent infection (pneumonia). PMID:25705278

  8. The relationship between preoperative serum cortisol level and the stability of plaque in carotid artery stenosis patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Feng; Sun, Yudong; Hu, Wenping; Wei, Xiaolong; Li, Zhenjiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Stability of plaque has been implicated as risk factor for stroke. Serum cortisol regulates lipoprotein metabolism and immune response, contributing to plaque stability in atherosclerosis. However, the relationship between serum cortisol and stability of carotid plaque has not been well characterized. We conducted a serology analysis to identify the relationship between serum cortisol and carotid plaque stability. Methods Between May 2013 to October 2015, 73 patients with carotid stenosis patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy (CEA) were enrolled in our study. Serum cortisol was analyzed at 8:00 AM in the morning before surgery via liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. According to the classification made by the American Heart Association, hematoxylin-and-eosin staining was performed to divide these patients into either a stable or unstable group, according to the morphology of fibrous cap, lipid core and intima layer. A curve fitting method was used to identify the relationship between preoperative serum cortisol and stability of carotid plaque. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to identify carotid plaque stability-associated serum cortisol. Results Curve fitting’s result represents a U-shape characteristic. A total of 314.92 and 395.23 nmol/L were considered as the cut point for preoperative serum cortisol when trisected the patients. When adjusted for degree of stenosis, hyperlipemia, smoking and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis’ results demonstrated that preoperative serum cortisol can significantly affect carotid plaque stability. The odds ratio values in multivariate logistic regression analysis for C reactive protein (CRP), white blood cell (WBC), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and preoperative serum cortisol level were 7.67 and 20.86 respectively. Conclusions Preoperative serum cortisol was associated with stability of carotid plaque in patients

  9. Comparison of Neurocognitive Outcomes after Carotid Endarterectomy and Carotid Artery Stenting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jerry J; Schwartz, Samuel; Wen, Johnny; deVirgilio, Christian; Lobue, Abeline; Walot, Irwin; Koopmann, Matthew; Donayre, Carlos; White, Rodney A

    2015-10-01

    Cognitive and emotional outcomes after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and carotid artery stenting with embolic protection device (CAS + EPD) are not clear. Patients were entered prospectively into a United States Food and Drug Administration-approved single-center physician-sponsored investigational device exemption between 2004 and 2010 and received either CEA or CAS + EPD. Patients underwent cognitive testing preprocedure and at 6, 12, and 60 months postprocedure. Cognitive domains assessed included attention, memory, executive, motor function, visual spatial functioning, language, and processing speed. Beck Depression and anxiety scales were also compared. There were a total of 38 patients that met conventional indications for carotid surgery (symptomatic with ≥50% stenosis or asymptomatic with ≥70% stenosis)-12 patients underwent CEA, whereas 26 patients underwent CAS + EPD. Both CEA and CAS + EPD patients showed postprocedure improvement in memory and executive function. No differences were seen at follow-up in regards to emotional dysfunction (depression and anxiety), attention, visual spatial functioning, language, motor function, and processing speed. Only two patients underwent neuropsychiatric testing at 60 months-these CAS + EPD patients showed sustained improvement in memory, visual spatial, and executive functions. In conclusion, cognitive and emotional outcomes were similar between CEA and CAS + EPD patients. PMID:26463299

  10. Ex vivo differential phase contrast and magnetic resonance imaging for characterization of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Meletta, Romana; Borel, Nicole; Stolzmann, Paul; Astolfo, Alberto; Klohs, Jan; Stampanoni, Marco; Rudin, Markus; Schibli, Roger; Krämer, Stefanie D; Herde, Adrienne Müller

    2015-10-01

    Non-invasive detection of specific atherosclerotic plaque components related to vulnerability is of high clinical relevance to prevent cerebrovascular events. The feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for characterization of plaque components was already demonstrated. We aimed to evaluate the potential of ex vivo differential phase contrast X-ray tomography (DPC) to accurately characterize human carotid plaque components in comparison to high field multicontrast MRI and histopathology. Two human plaque segments, obtained from carotid endarterectomy, classified according to criteria of the American Heart Association as stable and unstable plaque, were examined by ex vivo DPC tomography and multicontrast MRI (T1-, T2-, and proton density-weighted imaging, magnetization transfer contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging). To identify specific plaque components, the plaques were subsequently sectioned and stained for fibrous and cellular components, smooth muscle cells, hemosiderin, and fibrin. Histological data were then matched with DPC and MR images to define signal criteria for atherosclerotic plaque components. Characteristic structures, such as the lipid and necrotic core covered by a fibrous cap, calcification and hemosiderin deposits were delineated by histology and found with excellent sensitivity, resolution and accuracy in both imaging modalities. DPC tomography was superior to MRI regarding resolution and soft tissue contrast. Ex vivo DPC tomography allowed accurate identification of structures and components of atherosclerotic plaques at different lesion stages, in good correlation with histopathological findings. PMID:26179860

  11. Ischemic stroke: carotid and vertebral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Vilela, P; Goulão, A

    2005-03-01

    Ischemic strokes may have distinct aetiologies, including several different intrinsic arterial pathological disorders. The diagnosis and understanding of these arterial diseases is critical for the correct management of stroke as different treatment approaches are undertaken according to the aetiology. Atherosclerosis is by far the most common arterial disease among adults, and other pathological processes include arterial dissection, small vessel disease, inflammatory and non-inflammatory vasculopathy and vasomotor disorders. In children, there are several vasculopathies responsible for vaso-occlusive disease such as sickle-cell anemia, acute regressive angiopathy and Moya-Moya disease, neurofibromatosis, dissections, vasculitis associated with intracranial and systemic infections. An overview of the major carotid and vertebral pathological diseases responsible for ischemic stroke in adults and children, highlighting the accuracy of the different imaging modalities for its diagnosis and the imaging appearance of these diseases, is given. PMID:15657789

  12. Endovascular treatment of carotid cavernous sinus fistula: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Korkmazer, Bora; Kocak, Burak; Tureci, Ercan; Islak, Civan; Kocer, Naci; Kizilkilic, Osman

    2013-01-01

    Carotid cavernous sinus fistulas are abnormal communications between the carotid system and the cavernous sinus. Several classification schemes have described carotid cavernous sinus fistulas according to etiology, hemodynamic features, or the angiographic arterial architecture. Increased pressure within the cavernous sinus appears to be the main factor in pathophysiology. The clinical features are related to size, exact location, and duration of the fistula, adequacy and route of venous drainage and the presence of arterial/venous collaterals. Noninvasive imaging (computed tomography, magnetic resonance, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, Doppler) is often used in the initial work-up of a possible carotid cavernous sinus fistulas. Cerebral angiography is the gold standard for the definitive diagnosis, classification, and planning of treatment for these lesions. The endovascular approach has evolved as the mainstay therapy for definitive treatment in situations including clinical emergencies. Conservative treatment, surgery and radiosurgery constitute other management options for these lesions. PMID:23671750

  13. Data on TREM-1 activation destabilizing carotid plaques.

    PubMed

    Rao, Velidi H; Rai, Vikrant; Stoupa, Samantha; Subramanian, Saravanan; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-09-01

    The data described herein are related to the article entitled "Tumor necrosis factor-α regulates triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1-dependent matrix metalloproteinases in the carotid plaques of symptomatic patients with carotid stenosis" (Rao et al., 2016) [1]. Additional data are provided on the dose-response effect of TNF-α, TREM-1 antibody and recombinant rTREM-1/Fc fusion chimera (TREM-1/FC) on the expression of MMP-1 and MMP-9 in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) isolated from human carotid endarterectomy tissues. Data are also presented on the distribution of CD86+ M1- and CD206+ M2-macrophages and their co-localization with TREM-1 in symptomatic carotid plaques as visualized by dual immunofluorescence. The interpretation of this data and further extensive insights can be found in Rao et al. (2016) [1]. PMID:27331093

  14. Assessment of Carotid Artery Stenosis and the Use of Statins

    PubMed Central

    Whayne, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    General thinking has previously centered on managing carotid artery stenosis (CAS) by carotid endarterectomy and subsequently, stenting for higher risk patients. However for CAS and other forms of vascular disease, especially when asymptomatic, there is new emphasis on defining underlying mechanisms. Knowledge of these mechanisms can lead to medical treatments that result in possible atherosclerotic plaque stabilization, and even plaque regression, including in the patient with CAS. For now, the key medication class for a medical approach are the statins. Their use is supported by good cardiovascular clinical trial evidence including some directed carotid artery studies, especially with a demonstrated decrease in carotid intima-media thickness. Procedural controversy still exists but the current era in medicine offers significant support for medical management of asymptomatic CAS while techniques to recognize the vulnerable plaque evolve. If CAS converts to a symptomatic status, early referral for endarterectomy or stenting is indicated. PMID:26417184

  15. Urgent Intracranial Carotid Artery Decompression after Penetrating Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong Joon

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of intracranial carotid artery occlusion due to penetrating craniofacial injury by high velocity foreign body that was relieved by decompressive surgery. A 46-year-old man presented with a penetrating wound to his face. A piece of an electric angular grinder disc became lodged in the anterior skull base. Computed tomography revealed that the disc had penetrated the unilateral paraclinoid and suprasellar areas without flow of the intracranial carotid artery on the lesion side. The cavernous sinus was also compromised. Removal of the anterior clinoid process reopened the carotid blood flow, and the injection of glue into the cavernous sinus restored complete hemostasis during extraction of the fragment from the face. Digital subtraction angiography revealed complete recanalization of the carotid artery without any evidence of dissection. Accurate diagnosis regarding the extent of the compromised structures and urgent decompressive surgery with adequate hemostasis minimized the severity of penetrating damage in our patient. PMID:23634269

  16. Carotid body tumor imitator: An interesting case of Castleman's disease

    PubMed Central

    Shakir, Hakeem J.; Diletti, Sara M.; Hart, Alexandra M.; Meyers, Joshua E.; Dumont, Travis M.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are very few reports in the literature of Castleman's disease affecting the carotid artery and a single previous report of a case of Castleman's disease of the neck originally mistaken as a carotid body tumor. Case Description: We describe a rare case of Castleman's disease, manifesting with classic radiographic hallmarks of a carotid body tumor. The postoperative pathologic examination identified the resected mass as Castleman's lymphadenopathy. The management of this particular case is discussed, and the findings are highlighted. Conclusions: We present a unique case of a tumor initially and incorrectly diagnosed as a carotid body tumor. However, after comprehensive treatment with endovascular and surgical modalities and subsequent pathologic examination, the diagnosis of this rare entity was made. PMID:26677415

  17. Carotid and Jugular Classification in ARTSENS.

    PubMed

    Sahani, Ashish Kumar; Shah, Malay Ilesh; Joseph, Jayaraj; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar

    2016-03-01

    Over past few years our group has been working on the development of a low-cost device, ARTSENS, for measurement of local arterial stiffness (AS) of the common carotid artery (CCA). This uses a single element ultrasound transducer to obtain A-mode frames from the CCA. It is designed to be fully automatic in its operation such that, a general medical practitioner can use the device without any prior knowledge of ultrasound modality. Placement of the probe over CCA and identification of echo positions corresponding to its two walls are critical steps in the process of measurement of AS. We had reported an algorithm to locate the CCA walls based on their characteristic motion. Unfortunately, in supine position, the internal jugular vein (IJV) expands in the carotid triangle and pulsates in a manner that confounds the existing algorithm and leads to wrong measurements of the AS. Jugular venous pulse (JVP), on its own right, is a very important physiological signal for diagnosis of morbidities of the right side of the heart and there is a lack of noninvasive methods for its accurate estimation. We integrated an ECG device to the existing hardware of ARTSENS and developed a method based on physiology of the vessels, which now enable us to segregate the CCA pulse (CCP) and the JVP. False identification rate is less than 4%. To retain the capabilities of ARTSENS to operate without ECG, we designed another method where the classification can be achieved without an ECG, albeit errors are a bit higher. These improvements enable ARTSENS to perform automatic measurement of AS even in the supine position and make it a unique and handy tool to perform JVP analysis. PMID:25700474

  18. Rat Carotid Artery Balloon Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Tulis, David Anthony

    2010-01-01

    i. Summary Numerous and diverse experimental animal models have been used over the years to examine reactions to various forms of blood vessel disease and/or injury across species and in multiple vascular beds in a cumulative effort to relate these findings to the human condition. In this context, the rat carotid artery balloon injury model is highly characterized and commonly used for investigating gross morphological, cellular, biochemical, and molecular components of the response to experimentally-induced arterial injury. The mechanical damage caused by the balloon catheter completely removes the intimal endothelial lining and creates a distending mural injury in the operated vessel. This elicits a reproducible remodeling response characterized by vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) mitogenesis and migration (via phenotypic switching), SMC apoptosis, partial vascular endothelial cell regeneration, enhanced matrix synthesis, and establishment of an invasive neointima in time-dependent fashion. This multi-factorial process allows for investigation of these many important pathophysiological processes and can serve as a valuable “proof-of-concept” tool to verify and substantiate in vitro results; however, inherent anatomical and adaptive constraints of this in vivo model ration comparison to the diseased human system (see Note 1). In this chapter, brief overview of the materials needed and the methodologies commonly employed for successful routine performance of this important experimental animal model will be provided. Individual sub-sections will cover animal care and handling, pre- and post-operative procedures, and the surgery proper. Protocols for histopathology and morphometry and procedures for data management and interpretation pertinent to the rat carotid artery balloon injury model will be discussed in Chapter __ of this series. Notes will conclude with important caveats, limitations, and considerations for practical use of this technique. PMID:18287662

  19. Mycotic pseudo-aneurysm of the extracranial carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Desimpelaere, J; Seynaeve, P; Kockx, M; Appel, B; Gyselinck, J; Mortelmans, L

    1997-08-01

    A rare case of mycotic pseudo-aneurysm of the common carotid artery as a complication in an immunosuppressed paediatric patient is presented. Treatment of pseudo-aneurysms of the common carotid artery is generally considered to be an emergency, necessitating quick and accurate diagnosis. In patients with septicemia, angiography has to be avoided. We were able to provide the surgeon with the exact diagnosis and accurate topographical information with helical CT with 3D reformation. PMID:9351308

  20. Cavernous Carotid Artery Pseudoaneurysm Following a Radical Cavernous Sinus Resection

    PubMed Central

    Katzir, Miki; Gil, Ziv; Cohen, José Enrique; Sviri, Gill Efraim

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic cavernous carotid pseudoaneurysms are a special group among other intracranial aneurysms. They can occur during the dissection phase of the surgery if the tumor encases a vessel. Complications of their rupture as hemorrhage or stroke are life threatening. Early recognition and treatment is mandatory to avoid catastrophic sequelae. We present the successful diagnosis and endovascular treatment of a postoperative cavernous carotid pseudoaneurysm following radical cavernous sinus resection. PMID:27330923

  1. Is Acute Carotid Artery Stent Thrombosis an Avoidable Complication?

    PubMed

    Köklü, Erkan; Yüksel, İsa Öner; Bayar, Nermin; Arslan, Şakir

    2015-10-01

    The most serious complication of carotid artery stenting (CAS) is acute carotid artery stent thrombosis (ACAST). ACAST is a very rare complication, but it may lead to dramatic and catastrophic consequences. The most important cause is inadequate or ineffective antiaggregant therapy. It is very important to identify, before CAS, those patients who might be candidates for ACAST and to start antiplatelet therapy for them. Testing patients who are candidates for CAS for acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel resistance may prevent this complication. PMID:26303788

  2. Imaging of the Fibrous Cap in Atherosclerotic Carotid Plaque

    SciTech Connect

    Saba, Luca; Potters, Fons; Lugt, Aad van der; Mallarini, Giorgio

    2010-08-15

    In the last two decades, a substantial number of articles have been published to provide diagnostic solutions for patients with carotid atherosclerotic disease. These articles have resulted in a shift of opinion regarding the identification of stroke risk in patients with carotid atherosclerotic disease. In the recent past, the degree of carotid artery stenosis was the sole determinant for performing carotid intervention (carotid endarterectomy or carotid stenting) in these patients. We now know that the degree of stenosis is only one marker for future cerebrovascular events. If one wants to determine the risk of these events more accurately, other parameters must be taken into account; among these parameters are plaque composition, presence and state of the fibrous cap (FC), intraplaque haemorrhage, plaque ulceration, and plaque location. In particular, the FC is an important structure for the stability of the plaque, and its rupture is highly associated with a recent history of transient ischaemic attack or stroke. The subject of this review is imaging of the FC.

  3. Carotid endarterectomy in awake patients: safety, tolerability and results

    PubMed Central

    Mendonça, Célio Teixeira; Fortunato Jr, Jerônimo A.; de Carvalho, Cláudio A.; Weingartner, Janaina; Filho, Otávio R. M.; Rezende, Felipe F.; Bertinato, Luciane P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the results of 125 carotid endarterectomies under loco-regional anesthesia, with selective use of shunt and bovine pericardium patch. Methods One hundred and seventeen patients with stenosis ≥ 70% in the internal carotid artery on duplex-scan + arteriography or magnetic resonance angiography underwent 125 carotid endarterectomies. Intraoperative pharmacological cerebral protection included intravenous administration of alfentanil and dexametasone. Clopidogrel, aspirin and statins were used in all cases. Seventy-seven patients were males (65.8%). Mean age was 70.8 years, ranging from 48 to 88 years. Surgery was performed to treat symptomatic stenosis in 69 arteries (55.2%) and asymptomatic stenosis in 56 arteries (44.8%). Results A carotid shunt was used in 3 cases (2.4%) due to signs and symptoms of cerebral ischemia after carotid artery clamping during the operation, and all 3 patients had a good outcome. Bovine pericardium patch was used in 71 arteries ≤ 6 mm in diameter (56.8%). Perioperative mortality was 0.8%: one patient died from a myocardial infarction. Two patients (1.6%) had minor ipsilateral strokes with good recovery, and 2 patients (1.6%) had non-fatal myocardial infarctions with good recovery. The mean follow-up period was 32 months. In the late postoperative period, there was restenosis in only three arteries (2.4%). Conclusion Carotid artery endarterectomy can be safely performed in the awake patient, with low morbidity and mortality rates. PMID:25714212

  4. Reflex carotid body chemoreceptor control of phrenic sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Bałkowiec, A; Revenko, S; Szulczyk, P

    1993-04-01

    The reflex reaction of phrenic sympathetic neurons to stimulation of carotid body chemoreceptors was tested in chloralose-anesthetized and paralyzed cats with both vago-aortic nerves cut. During systemic hypoxia (animals ventilated with 10% O2 in N2) the sympathetic phrenic nerve activity increased from 100% in the control to 269%. This increase was markedly attenuated after cutting both sinus nerves. Reflex excitatory response in phrenic sympathetic neurons with the latency of 150 msec was evoked by electrical stimulation of the right carotid sinus nerve (3 pulses of 0.2 msec, 333 Hz). The central transmission time of the reflex was about 90 msec. Injecting 0.1 ml of 1 M NaHCO3 saturated with CO2 (in order to activate carotid body chemoreceptors) into the right or left carotid sinus, evoked excitatory responses in sympathetic neurons regardless of the side. The stimulation of carotid body chemoreceptors also increased somatic phrenic nerve activity. The three methods applied to the stimulation of carotid body chemoreceptors produced increase of phrenic nerve sympathetic activity. PMID:8390088

  5. Endovascular Treatment of Iatrogenic and Traumatic Carotid Artery Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Schulte, Stefan; Donas, Konstantinos P. Pitoulias, Georgios A.; Horsch, Svante

    2008-09-15

    This paper reports on the early and midterm results of endovascular treatment of acute carotid artery dissections, its specific problems, and its limitations. We encountered seven patients with symptomatic extracranial carotid artery dissection, three cases of which occurred after carotid endarterectomy, two after carotid angioplasty and stenting, and two after trauma. Balloon-expandable and self-expanding stents were placed using a transfemoral approach. Success in restoring the carotid lumen was achieved in all patients. No procedure-related complications occurred. All patients experienced significant clinical improvement while in the hospital and achieved complete long-term recovery. At follow-up (mean, 22.4 months), good luminal patency of the stented segments was observed. In conclusion, in this small series, primary stent-supported angioplasty seems to be a safe and effective strategy in the treatment of selected patients having acute traumatic extracranial carotid artery dissection, with excellent early and midterm results. Larger series and longer-term follow-up are required before definitive recommendations can be made.

  6. Recommendations for Management of Patients with Carotid Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Lovrencic-Huzjan, Arijana; Rundek, Tatjana; Katsnelson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is a one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. Carotid atherosclerosis is recognized as an important factor in stroke pathophysiology and represents a key target in stroke prevention; multiple treatment modalities have been developed to battle this disease. Multiple randomized trials have shown the efficacy of carotid endarterectomy in secondary stroke prevention. Carotid stenting, a newer treatment option, presents a less invasive alternative to the surgical intervention on carotid arteries. Advances in medical therapy have also enabled further risk reduction in the overall incidence of stroke. Despite numerous trials and decades of clinical research, the optimal management of symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid disease remains controversial. We will attempt to highlight some of the pivotal trials already completed, discuss the current controversies and complexities in the treatment decision-making, and postulate on what likely lies ahead. This paper will highlight the complexities of decision-making optimal treatment recommendations for patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid stenosis. PMID:22645702

  7. Traumatic carotid-rosenthal fistula treated with Jostent Graftmaster.

    PubMed

    Allam, Hesham; Callison, R Charles; Scodary, Daniel; Alawi, Aws; Hogan, Daniel W; Alshekhlee, Amer

    2014-12-28

    Traumatic injuries of the carotid artery may result in severe morbidity and mortality. The most common location of carotid artery injury is the cavernous segment, which may result in fistulous connection to the cavernous sinus and ophthalmic veins, which in turn lead to pressure symptoms in the ipsilateral orbit. Unlike the commonly reported direct traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula, we describe an unusual case of a 38-year-old man presented with a traumatic brain injury led to a fistula connection between the cavernous carotid artery and the ipsilateral basal vein of Rosenthal, with eventual drainage to the straight and transverse sinuses. The basal vein of Rosenthal is usually formed from confluence of anterior and middle cerebral veins deep in the Sylvian fissure and drain the insular cortex and the cerebral peduncles to the vein of Galen. Immediate endovascular deployment of a covered stent in the cavernous carotid artery allowed sealing the laceration site. Three months follow up showed a non-focal neurological examination and healed carotid laceration over the covered stent. PMID:25550998

  8. Automated calculation of bifurcation carotid angle for analyzing the risk of carotis plaques by using carotid CT angiographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, N.; Demir, S.

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is calculation of bifurcation carotid angle by detection of vessel boundaries to assist the medical doctors if this angle is a risk factor about formation of carotid plaques.Carotid ct angiography images are clustered automatically by ISODATA unsupervised classification algorithm. Since the spectral digital numbers (DN) of vessel pixels are bigger than the other part of the images, the cluster which has the biggest median value of DN among all other classes gives the vessel class. The cluster image in raster format is converted into the vector format which allows working on the vessel geometry. The converted vector vessel cluster dataset has been simplified using Douglas-Peucker algorithm to eliminate the zigzag effects of pixel data which are remained on the vector form dataset. Then the cluster polygon is converted to lines and the vertices which will be used for the calculation of bifurcation carotid angle. For sorting the vertex points to calculate the angle on each vertex, alpha-shapes algorithm is applied along the boundary. Then all the angles on each vertex point along the boundary of vessels are calculated. It is also visually clear that the angle which has the minimum value among all the calculated angles, gives the bifurcation carotid angle for one projected plane. The final carotid angle has calculated and 18 sample datasets are used to test the method.

  9. Life-threatening common carotid artery blowout: rescue treatment with a newly designed self-expanding covered nitinol stent.

    PubMed

    Kim, H S; Lee, D H; Kim, H J; Kim, S J; Kim, W; Kim, S Y; Suh, D C

    2006-03-01

    Carotid blowout is a devastating complication in patients with head and neck malignancy. A covered stent offers an alternative to treatment of a carotid blowout patient thought to be at high risk for surgery or carotid occlusion. Stent placement in the common carotid artery or carotid bulb is a technical challenge because of large luminal diameter and luminal calibre discrepancy between internal carotid artery and common carotid artery. We present four patients with common carotid rupture and massive bleeding who were treated with self-expanding covered stents, among them, two cases were treated with newly designed self-expanding polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered nitinol stents. PMID:16498035

  10. Two Automated Techniques for Carotid Lumen Diameter Measurement: Regional versus Boundary Approaches.

    PubMed

    Araki, Tadashi; Kumar, P Krishna; Suri, Harman S; Ikeda, Nobutaka; Gupta, Ajay; Saba, Luca; Rajan, Jeny; Lavra, Francesco; Sharma, Aditya M; Shafique, Shoaib; Nicolaides, Andrew; Laird, John R; Suri, Jasjit S

    2016-07-01

    The degree of stenosis in the carotid artery can be predicted using automated carotid lumen diameter (LD) measured from B-mode ultrasound images. Systolic velocity-based methods for measurement of LD are subjective. With the advancement of high resolution imaging, image-based methods have started to emerge. However, they require robust image analysis for accurate LD measurement. This paper presents two different algorithms for automated segmentation of the lumen borders in carotid ultrasound images. Both algorithms are modeled as a two stage process. Stage one consists of a global-based model using scale-space framework for the extraction of the region of interest. This stage is common to both algorithms. Stage two is modeled using a local-based strategy that extracts the lumen interfaces. At this stage, the algorithm-1 is modeled as a region-based strategy using a classification framework, whereas the algorithm-2 is modeled as a boundary-based approach that uses the level set framework. Two sets of databases (DB), Japan DB (JDB) (202 patients, 404 images) and Hong Kong DB (HKDB) (50 patients, 300 images) were used in this study. Two trained neuroradiologists performed manual LD tracings. The mean automated LD measured was 6.35 ± 0.95 mm for JDB and 6.20 ± 1.35 mm for HKDB. The precision-of-merit was: 97.4 % and 98.0 % w.r.t to two manual tracings for JDB and 99.7 % and 97.9 % w.r.t to two manual tracings for HKDB. Statistical tests such as ANOVA, Chi-Squared, T-test, and Mann-Whitney test were conducted to show the stability and reliability of the automated techniques. PMID:27299355

  11. Radio-frequency coil selection for MR imaging of the carotid vessel wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mat Isa, S.; Shuaib, I. L.; Bauk, S.

    2014-11-01

    This aim of this study was to identify the radiofrequency coil that will produce optimum image quality for scanning the carotid vessel wall using magnetic resonance imaging. A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted using 10 volunteers. Each volunteer was scanned three times using a 1.5T Signa HDxt machine equipped with one of three different coils: a neurovascular array (NV) coil, an 8-channel CTL spine array coil, and a 3-inch surface coil. A qualitative image quality rating was assigned to each image. The images were also evaluated by measuring the signal to noise ratio (SNR) using Osirix 4.2.3 software. The noise was estimated from the mean intensities of the region of interest in the background of the images and the signal was measured in the muscle adjacent to the vessel wall. The SNRs of the three coils were compared using one-way ANOVA, with 104 images used for the data analysis. The mean image quality scores for the NV head coil, CTL coil, and 3-inch coil were 3.4, 3.33, and 1.67, respectively. In addition, the SNRs differed significantly (p < 0.05). The mean SNR for the 3-inch coil was significantly higher (56.21 ± 25.06) than those for the NV head coil (27.34 ± 15.47) and CTL coil (21.77 ± 13.14). The Bonferroni post-hoc test revealed that there was no significant difference between the NV head coil and the CTL coil (p = 0.21). The optimum SNR value was 20-27. These results indicate that the NV head coil and CTL coil can be used to evaluate the carotid arterial wall with optimum image quality and higher resolution. These coil can deliver fast and robust data to image the carotid vessel wall in vivo.

  12. Proposed clinical internal carotid artery classification system

    PubMed Central

    Abdulrauf, Saleem I; Ashour, Ahmed M; Marvin, Eric; Coppens, Jeroen; Kang, Brian; Hsieh, Tze Yu Yeh; Nery, Breno; Penanes, Juan R; Alsahlawi, Aysha K; Moore, Shawn; Al-Shaar, Hussam Abou; Kemp, Joanna; Chawla, Kanika; Sujijantarat, Nanthiya; Najeeb, Alaa; Parkar, Nadeem; Shetty, Vilaas; Vafaie, Tina; Antisdel, Jastin; Mikulec, Tony A; Edgell, Randall; Lebovitz, Jonathan; Pierson, Matt; Pires de Aguiar, Paulo Henrique; Buchanan, Paula; Di Cosola, Angela; Stevens, George

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Numerical classification systems for the internal carotid artery (ICA) are available, but modifications have added confusion to the numerical systems. Furthermore, previous classifications may not be applicable uniformly to microsurgical and endoscopic procedures. The purpose of this study was to develop a clinically useful classification system. Materials and Methods: We performed cadaver dissections of the ICA in 5 heads (10 sides) and evaluated 648 internal carotid arteries with computed tomography angiography. We identified specific anatomic landmarks to define the beginning and end of each ICA segment. Results: The ICA was classified into eight segments based on the cadaver and imaging findings: (1) Cervical segment; (2) cochlear segment (ascending segment of the ICA in the temporal bone) (relation of the start of this segment to the base of the styloid process: Above, 425 sides [80%]; below, 2 sides [0.4%]; at same level, 107 sides [20%]; P < 0.0001) (relation of cochlea to ICA: Posterior, 501 sides [85%]; posteromedial, 84 sides [14%]; P < 0.0001); (3) petrous segment (horizontal segment of ICA in the temporal bone) starting at the crossing of the eustachian tube superolateral to the ICA turn in all 10 samples; (4) Gasserian-Clival segment (ascending segment of ICA in the cavernous sinus) starting at the petrolingual ligament (PLL) (relation to vidian canal on imaging: At same level, 360 sides [63%]; below, 154 sides [27%]; above, 53 sides [9%]; P < 0.0001); in this segment, the ICA projected medially toward the clivus in 275 sides (52%) or parallel to the clivus with no deviation in 256 sides (48%; P < 0.0001); (5) sellar segment (medial loop of ICA in the cavernous sinus) starting at the takeoff of the meningeal hypophyseal trunk (ICA was medial into the sella in 271 cases [46%], lateral without touching the sella in 127 cases [23%], and abutting the sella in 182 cases [31%]; P < 0.0001); (6) sphenoid segment (lateral loop of ICA within the

  13. Carotid dosimetry for T1 glottic cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, C C; Whitehurst, P; Thomson, D; Ho, K F; Lowe, M; Sykes, A; Lee, LW; Yap, B; Slevin, N

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Radiotherapy for T1 glottic cancer is commonly delivered using a lateral parallel opposed pair of megavoltage photon fields. There is increasing reported evidence of cerebrovascular events due to radiation-induced carotid stenosis. An alternative field arrangement is to use an anterior oblique technique. This study compares the carotid dosimetry between the two techniques and reviews the evidence for the risk of radiation-induced vascular events. Methods: The radiotherapy plans of 10 patients with T1 glottic cancer treated with an anterior oblique technique were examined for carotid dose. Alternative plans were then created using a parallel opposed pair of fields and the dose to the carotids compared. All patients received 50 Gy in 16 fractions treating once daily, for 5 days in a week. Results: The average of the mean dose to the carotids with the anterior oblique technique was 21 Gy compared with 37 Gy using the lateral parallel opposed pair arrangement (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: An anterior oblique field arrangement for the treatment of T1 glottic cancer results in a significantly lower radiation dose to the carotid arteries, which may be clinically important in terms of reducing the risk of cerebrovascular events in long-term survivors. Advances in knowledge: Although the anterior oblique technique for treating early glottic cancers is well described, and it is predictable that the dose received by the carotid arteries should be lower with this technique, to our knowledge this is the first study to quantify that reduction in dose with a series of patients. PMID:24628251

  14. Carotid artery stenting and patient outcomes: The CABANA surveillance study

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, L Nelson; White, Christopher J; Foster, Malcolm T; Powell, Richard J; Zemel, Gerald; Diaz-Cartelle, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the prospective, multicenter, nonrandomized CABANA study was to evaluate periprocedural clinical outcomes in high surgical risk patients with carotid artery stenosis treated with the Carotid WALLSTENT plus FilterWire EZ Embolic Protection System by a diverse group of clinicians. Background There is a need for additional evidence evaluating carotid artery stenting (CAS) performed by operators with various experience and training levels. Methods The study enrolled symptomatic (≥50% carotid artery stenosis) and asymptomatic (≥80% carotid stenosis) patients at high risk for carotid endarterectomy. Study centers were grouped into three tiers based on previous CAS experience while individual operators were grouped by their CAS training. The primary endpoint was the 30-day composite of major adverse events [MAEs; including stroke, death, and myocardial infarction (MI)]. Individual event rates were evaluated across the overall study, and by center experience and physician training tier. Results Of 1,097 enrolled patients, 1,025 were evaluable for 30-day MAE rate. The stroke rate (3.3%) was a major contributing factor in the overall MAE rate (4.6%). Mortality was 1.3% and the MI rate was 0.5%. There was no statistically significant association between MAE rates among the center experience tiers (P = 0.61) nor among the operator training categories (P = 0.26). Conclusions CAS with the Carotid WALLSTENT and FilterWire EZ yielded a low 30-day MAE rate that did not differ significantly across operator experience and training levels. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00741091. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24948033

  15. High-resolution Magnetic Resonance Vessel Wall Imaging for Intracranial Arterial Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xian-Jin; Wang, Wu; Liu, Zun-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the feasibility and clinical value of high-resolution magnetic resonance vessel wall imaging (HRMR VWI) for intracranial arterial stenosis. Date Sources: We retrieved information from PubMed database up to December 2015, using various search terms including vessel wall imaging (VWI), high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, intracranial arterial stenosis, black blood, and intracranial atherosclerosis. Study Selection: We reviewed peer-reviewed articles printed in English on imaging technique of VWI and characteristic findings of various intracranial vasculopathies on VWI. We organized this data to explain the value of VWI in clinical application. Results: VWI with black blood technique could provide high-quality images with submillimeter voxel size, and display both the vessel wall and lumen of intracranial artery simultaneously. Various intracranial vasculopathies (atherosclerotic or nonatherosclerotic) had differentiating features including pattern of wall thickening, enhancement, and vessel remodeling on VWI. This technique could be used for determining causes of stenosis, identification of stroke mechanism, risk-stratifying patients, and directing therapeutic management in clinical practice. In addition, a new morphological classification based on VWI could be established for predicting the efficacy of endovascular therapy. Conclusions: This review highlights the value of HRMR VWI for discrimination of different intracranial vasculopathies and directing therapeutic management. PMID:27231176

  16. Endovascular repair for an extracranial internal carotid aneurysm with cervical access: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Chavarría, Ignacio J.; Alvarado-Marín, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Carotid aneurysms are a rare pathology. This vascular disorder can be asymptomatic or it can cause local compression. The disorder poses a high risk of embolization and rupture. Presentation of case A 79 years old female, presents with a right internal carotid fusiform aneurysm, approximately 3.8 cm in diameter, localized 3.30 cm from the common carotid artery bifurcation with an extremely tortuous common carotid artery. Discussion Surgical management of the extracranial internal carotid artery remains varying and challenging, particularly with a distal internal carotid aneurysm and with anatomical difficulties. Conclusion Endovascular management of an internal carotid aneurysm with cervical access using an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene covered stent with Heparin Bioactive Surface in the carotid area, is safe and effective. PMID:26706595

  17. Protocol for electrophysiological monitoring of carotid endarterectomies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong; Di Giorgio, Anthony M; Williams, Eric S; Evans, William; Russell, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Near zero stroke rates can be achieved in carotid endarterectomy (CEA) surgery with selective shunting and electrophysiological neuromonitoring. though false negative rates as high as 40% have been reported. We sought to determine if improved training for interpretation of the monitoring signals can advance the efficacy of selective shunting with electrophysiological monitoring across multiple centers, and determine if other factors could contribute to the differences in reports. Processed and raw beta band (12.5-30 Hz) electroencephalogram (EEG) and median and tibial nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) were monitored in 668 CEA cases at six surgical centers. A decrease in amplitude of 50% or more in any EEG or SSEP channel was the criteria for shunting or initiating a neuroprotective protocol. A reduction of 50% or greater in the beta band of the EEG or amplitude of the SSEP was observed in 150 cases. No patient showed signs of a cerebral infarct after surgery. Selective shunting based on EEG and SSEP monitoring can reduce CEA intraoperative stroke rate to a near zero level if trained personnel adopted standardized protocols. We also found that the rapid administration of a protective stroke protocol by attending anesthesiologists was an important aspect of this success rate. PMID:23554663

  18. Solitary fibrous tumor surrounding the carotid sheath.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Oliveira, Guillermo; Alvarez-Flores, Modesto; Arribas-García, Ignacio; Martínez-Gimeno, Carlos

    2010-03-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are rare spindle cell neoplasms that are mostly found arising from the pleura. Although SFTs recently have been reported in other regions, they are rare in the head and neck and have often been misdiagnosed due to their rarity. SFTs are benign in most cases. Clinically, SFTs usually manifest as well-circumscribed, slow-growing, smooth and painless masses. Symptoms are often minimal, although they may include sore throat, difficulty in swallowing, change of voice or trismus. CT-Scan and MRI are the most sensitive imaging procedures used. The treatment of choice is complete surgical excision of the lesion. Because recurrences have been noted up to 30 years after surgery, long-term follow up is mandatory. In this article, we present a case of a Solitary Fibrous Tumor arising in the parapharyngeal space in a 20-year-old man, involving the carotid sheath, treated by surgical excision with no recurrence after 1 year. The clinical presentation, surgical management and pathological findings are described. PMID:19767703

  19. Stenting versus Endarterectomy for Treatment of Carotid-Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Brott, Thomas G.; Hobson, Robert W.; Howard, George; Roubin, Gary S.; Clark, Wayne M.; Brooks, William; Mackey, Ariane; Hill, Michael D.; Leimgruber, Pierre P.; Sheffet, Alice J.; Howard, Virginia J.; Moore, Wesley S.; Voeks, Jenifer H.; Hopkins, L. Nelson; Cutlip, Donald E.; Cohen, David J.; Popma, Jeffrey J.; Ferguson, Robert D.; Cohen, Stanley N.; Blackshear, Joseph L.; Silver, Frank L.; Mohr, J.P.; Lal, Brajesh K.; Meschia, James F.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Carotid-artery stenting and carotid endarterectomy are both options for treating carotid-artery stenosis, an important cause of stroke. METHODS We randomly assigned patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid stenosis to undergo carotid-artery stenting or carotid endarterectomy. The primary composite end point was stroke, myocardial infarction, or death from any cause during the periprocedural period or any ipsilateral stroke within 4 years after randomization. RESULTS For 2502 patients over a median follow-up period of 2.5 years, there was no significant difference in the estimated 4-year rates of the primary end point between the stenting group and the endarterectomy group (7.2% and 6.8%, respectively; hazard ratio with stenting, 1.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.81 to 1.51; P = 0.51). There was no differential treatment effect with regard to the primary end point according to symptomatic status (P = 0.84) or sex (P = 0.34). The 4-year rate of stroke or death was 6.4% with stenting and 4.7% with endarterectomy (hazard ratio, 1.50; P = 0.03); the rates among symptomatic patients were 8.0% and 6.4% (hazard ratio, 1.37; P = 0.14), and the rates among asymptomatic patients were 4.5% and 2.7% (hazard ratio, 1.86; P = 0.07), respectively. Periprocedural rates of individual components of the end points differed between the stenting group and the endarterectomy group: for death (0.7% vs. 0.3%, P = 0.18), for stroke (4.1% vs. 2.3%, P = 0.01), and for myocardial infarction (1.1% vs. 2.3%, P = 0.03). After this period, the incidences of ipsilateral stroke with stenting and with endarterectomy were similarly low (2.0% and 2.4%, respectively; P = 0.85). CONCLUSIONS Among patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid stenosis, the risk of the composite primary outcome of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death did not differ significantly in the group undergoing carotid-artery stenting and the group undergoing carotid endarterectomy. During the

  20. Surgical Excision of Carotid Body Tumor Through Modified Approach-A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Prabakaran, Sureshkannan; Subburayulu, Anand Shankar; Ravikumar, P T

    2016-06-01

    Paragangliomas arising from the carotid body in the carotid bifurcation are termed as carotid body tumors. They are usually slow growing and asymptomatic. Considering the anatomical location, invasion or pressure on the adjacent vascular and neural tissues, the importance of early diagnosis and management is critical. In this article a case of carotid body tumor excised through transverse neck skin crease incision is presented along with literature review on the diagnosis, grading and different surgical approaches. PMID:27298550

  1. Childhood family psychosocial environment and carotid intima media thickness: the CARDIA study.

    PubMed

    Loucks, Eric B; Taylor, Shelley E; Polak, Joseph F; Wilhelm, Aude; Kalra, Preety; Matthews, Karen A

    2014-03-01

    Little is known about whether the childhood family psychosocial environment (characterized by cold, unaffectionate interactions, conflict, aggression, neglect and/or low nurturance) affects coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Objectives were to evaluate associations of childhood family psychosocial environment with carotid intima media thickness (IMT), a subclinical measure of atherosclerosis. The study population included 2659 CARDIA study participants, aged 37-52 years. Childhood family psychosocial environment was measured using a risky family questionnaire via self-report. Carotid IMT was calculated using the average of 20 measurements of mean common carotid, bulb and internal carotid IMT, assessed using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound images. Utilizing linear regression analyses adjusted for age, a 1-unit (range 0-21) increase in risky family score was associated with 0.0036 (95% CI: 0.0006,0.0066 mm) and 0.0020 (95% CI: 0.0002,0.0038) mm increase in mean IMT in white males and females, respectively. Formal mediation analyses and covariate adjustments suggested childhood socioeconomic position and smoking may be important mechanisms in white males and females, as well as education and depressive symptomatology in white males. No associations were found in black participants. Formal statistical tests for interaction between risky family score and sex, and between risky family score and race/ethnicity, demonstrated borderline evidence of interactions for both sex (p = 0.12) and race/ethnicity (p = 0.14) with risky family score for associations with mean IMT. In conclusion, childhood family psychosocial environment was positively associated with IMT in white participants, with little evidence of association in black participants. Mechanisms in white participants may include potential negative impacts of socioeconomic constraints on parenting quality, potentially influencing offspring's cardiovascular risk factors (e.g. smoking), socioeconomic position (e

  2. External carotid stenting for symptomatic stenosis in a patient with patent EDAS for Moyamoya disease

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Eric; Parker, Lindsey; Fraser, Justin F

    2014-01-01

    Background Moyamoya disease is characterized by progressive narrowing of the internal carotid artery (ICA). Symptomatic patients typically undergo cerebrovascular intervention via extracranial–intracranial (EC–IC) bypass, most often with the use of the superficial temporal artery. This case of Moyamoya disease is of particular interest as the patient presented with a unilateral atherosclerotic external carotid artery (ECA) stenosis after EC–IC bypass that eliminated the benefit of his original surgery, resulting in a symptomatic presentation. Clinical presentation A 53-year-old man presenting with Moyamoya disease and known left ICA occlusion had received a bilateral encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis (EDAS) bypass 10 years previously. He re-presented complaining of right-sided tingling, weakness, and numbness radiating up the arm. CT angiography indicated significant stenosis of the left ECA. ECA angioplasty and stenting with a distal protection device resulted in resolution of his symptoms. Conclusions This case illustrates that a patient presenting with Moyamoya disease and concurrent symptomatic ECA stenosis post-EDAS can be effectively and safely treated with ECA stenting. PMID:25085947

  3. Quest for the Vulnerable Atheroma: Carotid Stenosis and Diametric Strain--A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Canxing; Yuan, Chun; Stutzman, Edward; Canton, Gador; Comess, Keith A; Beach, Kirk W

    2016-03-01

    The Bernoulli effect may result in eruption of a vulnerable carotid atheroma, causing a stroke. We measured electrocardiography (ECG)-registered QRS intra-stenotic blood velocity and atheroma strain dynamics in carotid artery walls using ultrasonic tissue Doppler methods, providing displacement and time resolutions of 0.1 μm and 3.7 ms. Of 22 arteries, 1 had a peak systolic velocity (PSV) >280 cm/s, 4 had PSVs between 165 and 280 cm/s and 17 had PSVs <165 cm/s. Eight arteries with PSVs <65 cm/s and 4 of 9 with PSVs between 65 and 165 cm/s had normal systolic diametric expansion (0% and 7%) and corresponding systolic wall thinning. The remaining 10 arteries had abnormal systolic strain dynamics, 2 with diametric reduction (>-0.05 mm), 2 with extreme wall expansion (>0.1 mm), 2 with extreme wall thinning (>-0.1 mm) and 4 with combinations. Decreases in systolic diameter and/or extreme systolic arterial wall thickening may indicate imminent atheroma rupture. PMID:26705891

  4. Independent Association of Muscular Strength and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Children.

    PubMed

    Melo, X; Santa-Clara, H; Santos, D A; Pimenta, N M; Minderico, C S; Fernhall, B; Sardinha, L B

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the influence of muscular strength on carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) in children, controlling for the effect of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and central adiposity and to examine if differences among muscular strength tertiles translate to physiological differences. We assessed cIMT of the common carotid artery in 366 children between 11-12 years of age (191 girls). Measures included cIMT assessed with high-resolution ultrasonography, a maximal handgrip strength test, body fat mass and lean mass from DXA and CRF determined using a maximal cycle ergometer test. Association between muscular strength and cIMT adjusted for CRF and central adiposity, as measured by trunk fat, was tested with multiple linear regression analysis. Differences in risk factors among muscular strength groups were tested with ANOVA. The Muscular Strength Index (MSI) was inversely associated with cIMT independently of CRF and central adiposity (p<0.05). The low MSI group had the highest values of cIMT, waist circumference and systolic blood pressure and the lowest CRF (p<0.05). There was an inverse and independent association between muscular strength and cIMT. Low muscular strength was associated with higher levels of cardiovascular disease risk factors in children. PMID:25875317

  5. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of carotid arterial wall in pigs.

    PubMed

    Lin, W; Abendschein, D R; Haacke, E M

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of contrast agents on MR images of balloon-injured carotid arteries containing atherosclerotic-like lesions. We have evaluated an intravascular contrast agent, MS-325 (METASYN INC., Cambridge, MA) and an extravascular contrast agent, Optimark, (Mallinckrodt Medical Inc., St. Louis, MO) on MR angiograms obtained 4 weeks after balloon hyperinflation-induced injury of the left common carotid artery in 12 hypercholesterolemic minipigs. High in-plane resolution (.8 x .4 mm2), thin slice (1 mm) time-of-flight gradient echo sequences were used to acquire the MR angiographic images. Vascular lumen definition was compared before and after a single bolus intravenous injection of a contrast agent. Digital subtraction angiograms were obtained from all pigs after MR imaging. High grade stenosis developed in 1 of the 12 pigs and five pigs had complete occlusion of the injured vessel. The remaining pigs exhibited essentially no visible stenoses as assessed either by MR angiography or digital subtraction angiography. The vessel walls of the stenosed and occluded vessels were visible after the injection of either intravascular or extravascular contrast agent. Histologic analyses showed well developed neovascularization in the neointima or occlusive thrombosis. We conclude that the observed contrast-enhanced vessel wall is caused by an increased vascular supply associated with thrombosis and neointimal thickening that leads to an accumulation of contrast agent in the abnormal vessel walls after the injection of the T1-shortening paramagnetic contrast agent. PMID:9039613

  6. On the effect of calcification volume and configuration on the mechanical behaviour of carotid plaque tissue.

    PubMed

    Barrett, H E; Cunnane, E M; Kavanagh, E G; Walsh, M T

    2016-03-01

    Vascular calcification is a complex molecular process that exhibits a number of relatively characteristic morphology patterns in atherosclerotic plaques. Treatment of arterial stenosis by endovascular intervention, involving forceful circumferential expansion of the plaque, can be unpredictable in calcified lesions. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanical stretching mechanisms and define the mechanical limits for circumferentially expanding carotid plaque lesions under the influence of distinct calcification patterns. Mechanical and structural characterisation was performed on 17 human carotid plaques acquired from patients undergoing endarterectomy procedures. The mechanical properties were determined using uniaxial extension tests that stretch the lesions to complete failure along their circumferential axis. Calcification morphology of mechanically ruptured plaque lesions was characterised using high resolution micro computed tomography imaging. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the mechanically induced failure sites and to identify the interface boundary conditions between calcified and non-calcified tissue. The mechanical tests produced four distinct trends in mechanical behaviour which corresponded to the calcification patterns that structurally defined each mechanical group. Each calcification pattern produced unique mechanical restraining effects on the plaque tissue stretching properties evidenced by the variation in degree of stretch to failure. Resistance to failure appears to rely on interactions between calcification and non-calcified tissue. Scanning electron microscopy examination revealed structural gradations at interface boundary conditions to facilitate the transfer of stress. This study emphasises the mechanical influence of distinct calcification configurations on plaque expansion properties and highlights the importance of pre-operative lesion characterisation to optimise treatment outcomes. PMID:26655460

  7. Intracranial Pseudoaneurysms, Fusiform Aneurysms and Carotid-Cavernous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xianli; Jiang, Chuhan; Li, Youxiang; Lv, Ming; Zhang, Jingbo; Wu, Zhongxue

    2008-01-01

    Summary The study assessed the effectiveness and safety of endovascular covered stents in the management of intracranial pseudoaneurysms, fusiform aneurysms and direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. Fourteen endovascular covered stents were used to repair three pseudoaneurysms, six fu-siform aneurysms and six direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. Aneurysms were in the carotid artery in seven cases, in the vertebral artery two cases. It was not possible to treat two additional cases transcutaneously for technical reasons
2/15. Percutaneous closure of the lesions with an endovascular covered stent was successful in 13 of 15 cases. Initial follow-up showed good stent patency. No complications were observed after stent implantation. During follow-up, stent thromboses were detected in two of nine patients with follow-up digital subtracted angiography. One carotid-cavernous fistula of Barrow Type A transformed into Barrow Type D at nine month follow-up study was cured with a procudure of Onyx-18 injection. Endovascular covered stents may be an option for percutaneous closure of intracranial pseudoaneurysms, fusiform aneurysms and direct carotid-cavernous fistulas. Endoluminal vascular repair with covered stents offers an alternative therapeutic approach to conventional modalities. PMID:20557743

  8. Invasive and non-invasive modalities of imaging carotid stenosis.

    PubMed

    Tang, T Y; U-King-Im, J M; Walsh, S R; Young, V E; Sadat, U; Li, Z Y; Patterson, A J; Varty, K; Gillard, J H

    2009-12-01

    Despite recent therapeutic advances, acute ischemic complications of atherosclerosis remain the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in Western countries, with carotid atherosclerotic disease one of the major preventable causes of stroke. As the impact of this disease challenges our healthcare systems, we are becoming aware that factors influencing this disease are more complex than previously realized. In current clinical practice, risk stratification relies primarily on evaluation of the degree of luminal stenosis and patient symptomatology. Adequate investigation and optimal imaging are important factors that affect the quality of a carotid endarterectomy (CEA) service and are fundamental to patient selection. Digital subtraction angiography is still perceived as the most accurate imaging modality for carotid stenosis and historically has been the cornerstone of most of the major CEA trials but concerns regarding potential neurological complications have generated substantial interest in non-invasive modalities, such as contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography. The purpose of this review is to give an overview to the vascular specialist of the current imaging modalities in clinical practice to identify patients with carotid stenosis. Advantages and disadvantages of each technique are outlined. Finally, limitations of assessing luminal stenosis in general are discussed. This article will not cover imaging of carotid atheroma morphology, function and other emerging imaging modalities of assessing plaque risk, which look beyond simple luminal measurements. PMID:19935602

  9. Carotid Artery Stenting Trials: Conduct, Results, Critique, and Current Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, Sumaira

    2012-02-15

    The carotid stenting trialists have demonstrated persistence and determination in comparing an evolving technique, carotid artery stenting (CAS), against a mature and exacting standard for carotid revascularisation, carotid endarterectomy (CEA). This review focuses on their endeavours. A total of 12 1-on-1 randomised trials comparing CAS and CEA have been reported; 6 of these can be considered major, and 5 of these reflect (in part) current CAS standards of practice and form the basis of this review. At least 18 meta-analyses seeking to compare CAS and CEA exist. These are limited by the quality and heterogeneity of the data informing them (e.g., five trials were stopped prematurely such that they collectively failed to reach recruitment target by >4000 patients). The Carotid Stenting Trialists' Collaboration Publication represents a prespecified meta-analysis of European trials that were sufficiently similar to allow valid conclusions to be drawn; these trials and conclusions will be explored. When the rate of myocardial infarction (MI) is rigorously assessed, CAS and CEA are equivalent for the composite end point of stroke/death and MI, with more minor strokes for CAS and more MIs for CEA. These outcomes have a discrepant impact on quality of life and subsequent mortality. The all-stroke death outcomes for patients <70 years old are equivalent, with more minor strokes occurring in the elderly during CAS than CEA. There are significantly more severe haematomas and cranial nerve injuries after CEA. The influence of experience on outcome cannot be underestimated.

  10. An Experimental and Computational Study of Blunt Carotid Artery Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gayzik, F. Scott; Bostrom, Ola; Örtenwall, Per; Duma, Stefan M.; Stitzel, Joel D.

    2006-01-01

    A carotid artery dissection begins as a tear or defect of the intimal lining of the artery, and can lead to luminal occlusion and ultimately cerebral ischemia. Our aim is to conduct an organ level validation of a finite element model of the carotid artery using an experiment designed to elicit internal layer failure within fluid-filled carotid artery samples. A 2.4-kg beveled guillotine is dropped from three heights (0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 m) onto fluid-filled porcine carotid arteries and resulting damage is recorded. These events are modeled using finite element analysis. Stress, strain and strain rate are correlated to experimental outcome. Internal layer damage is reported in half of the experiments, with damage occurring with 100% frequency at a drop height of 0.7 m. Simulations of this experiment result in maximum principal stress and strain values of 1.43 MPa and 46.2% respectively. The strain level predicted by the model for this impact scenario approaches the strain to intimal failure level for porcine arteries found in the literature. The results of this study represent an important step in validating this finite element carotid artery model at the organ level. PMID:16968627

  11. Blunt carotid artery injury after minor facial trauma

    PubMed Central

    Murabit, Amera; Tredget, Edward E

    2012-01-01

    A healthy young man presented three days after suffering a punch to the face resulting in minimally displaced mandibular fractures. History revealed an episode of anterograde amnesia and a delayed episode of dysphonia. Apart from the fractured mandible, the physical examination was otherwise noncontributory. Imaging revealed severe luminal narrowing of the left cervical internal carotid artery distal to the carotid bifurcation, consistent with carotid dissection; and two focal hypodensities in the left frontal and parietal cortices, highly suggestive of acute secondary embolic infarcts. The patient was treated with systemic anticoagulation for three months and experienced no further neurological symptoms. His mandibular fractures, treated conservatively, healed without any complications. Blunt carotid artery injuries are uncommon and diverse. Neurological symptoms may develop in a delayed fashion, thus, a high index of suspicion based on knowledge of the injury mechanisms and patterns of associated injuries may enable earlier diagnosis and treatment. Angiographic imaging is essential for the diagnosis and classification of injury characteristics (eg, type, location, etc). Treatment must be considered on an individual patient basis depending on the presentation, grade and morphology of the lesion. Although no level I clinical trials exist on the topic, anticoagulation seems to be the treatment of choice in most cases and surgical intervention is not commonly indicated. Carotid artery dissection without complete thrombosis may be effectively treated with systemic anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy in the majority of cases. PMID:23997588

  12. Blunt carotid artery injury after minor facial trauma.

    PubMed

    Murabit, Amera; Tredget, Edward E

    2012-01-01

    A healthy young man presented three days after suffering a punch to the face resulting in minimally displaced mandibular fractures. History revealed an episode of anterograde amnesia and a delayed episode of dysphonia. Apart from the fractured mandible, the physical examination was otherwise noncontributory. Imaging revealed severe luminal narrowing of the left cervical internal carotid artery distal to the carotid bifurcation, consistent with carotid dissection; and two focal hypodensities in the left frontal and parietal cortices, highly suggestive of acute secondary embolic infarcts. The patient was treated with systemic anticoagulation for three months and experienced no further neurological symptoms. His mandibular fractures, treated conservatively, healed without any complications. Blunt carotid artery injuries are uncommon and diverse. Neurological symptoms may develop in a delayed fashion, thus, a high index of suspicion based on knowledge of the injury mechanisms and patterns of associated injuries may enable earlier diagnosis and treatment. Angiographic imaging is essential for the diagnosis and classification of injury characteristics (eg, type, location, etc). Treatment must be considered on an individual patient basis depending on the presentation, grade and morphology of the lesion. Although no level I clinical trials exist on the topic, anticoagulation seems to be the treatment of choice in most cases and surgical intervention is not commonly indicated. Carotid artery dissection without complete thrombosis may be effectively treated with systemic anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy in the majority of cases. PMID:23997588

  13. Pulp Stone, Haemodialysis, End-stage Renal Disease, Carotid Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Santosh; Sinha, Nidhi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the presence of pulp calcification and carotid artery calcification on the dental panoramic radiographs in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients who were on haemodialysis. Methods: A total of 112 End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients on who were haemodialysis participated in this study. The periapical and the panoramic radiographs for all the patients were evaluated for the presence or absence of the narrowing of the dental pulps and for pulp stones in the pulp chambers and the pulp canals. The panoramic radiographs were also evaluated to determine the carotid calcification. Results: Carotid calcifications were detected in none of the patients. 84 (74.99%) patients had dental pulp narrowing, and 38 (33.92%) patients had pulp stones. There was no statistical correlation between pulp narrowing and Carotid Artery Calcification (CAC) in the haemodialysis patient group. There was also no statistical correlation between pulp stones and CAC in the haemodialysis patients. Conclusion: However, the incidental finding of CAC on a panoramic radiograph can provide life-saving information for the vascular disease patients, but in the present study, no significant relationship was found between the presence of the pulpal calcification and CAC in the ESRD patients who were on haemodialysis. Therefore, the presence of pulp calcification does not seem to serve as a diagnostic marker for carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:23905147

  14. Arterial function of carotid and brachial arteries in postmenopausal vegetarians

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ta-Chen; Torng, Pao-Ling; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chen, Ming-Fong; Liau, Chiau-Suong

    2011-01-01

    Background: Vegetarianism is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. However, studies of arterial function in vegetarians are limited. Methods: This study investigated arterial function in vegetarianism by comparing 49 healthy postmenopausal vegetarians with 41 age-matched omnivores. The arterial function of the common carotid artery was assessed by carotid duplex, while the pulse dynamics method was used to measure brachial artery distensibility (BAD), compliance (BAC), and resistance (BAR). Fasting blood levels of glucose, lipids, lipoprotein (a), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, homocysteine, and vitamin B12 were also measured. Results: Vegetarians had significantly lower serum cholesterol, high-density and low-density lipoprotein, and glucose compared with omnivores. They also had lower vitamin B12 but higher homocysteine levels. Serum levels of lipoprotein (a) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were no different between the two groups. There were no significant differences in carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD between the two groups even after adjustment for associated covariates. However, BAR was significantly lower in vegetarians than in omnivores. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that age and pulse pressure were two important determinants of carotid beta stiffness index and BAD. Vegetarianism is not associated with better arterial elasticity. Conclusion: Apparently healthy postmenopausal vegetarians are not significantly better in terms of carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD, but have significantly decreased BAR than omnivores. Prevention of vitamin B12 deficiency might be beneficial for cardiovascular health in vegetarians. PMID:21915169

  15. Outcome of Carotid Artery Stenting for Radiation-Induced Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dorresteijn, Lucille; Vogels, Oscar; Leeuw, Frank-Erik de; Vos, Jan-Albert; Christiaans, Marleen H.; Ackerstaff, Rob; Kappelle, Arnoud C.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Patients who have been irradiated at the neck have an increased risk of symptomatic stenosis of the carotid artery during follow-up. Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) can be a preferable alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy, which is associated with increased operative risks in these patients. Methods and Materials: We performed a prospective cohort study of 24 previously irradiated patients who underwent CAS for symptomatic carotid stenosis. We assessed periprocedural and nonprocedural events including transient ischemic attack (TIA), nondisabling stroke, disabling stoke, and death. Patency rates were evaluated on duplex ultrasound scans. Restenosis was defined as a stenosis of >50% at the stent location. Results: Periprocedural TIA rate was 8%, and periprocedural stroke (nondisabling) occurred in 4% of patients. After a mean follow-up of 3.3 years (range, 0.3-11.0 years), only one ipsilateral incident event (TIA) had occurred (4%). In 12% of patients, a contralateral incident event was present: one TIA (4%) and two strokes (12%, two disabling strokes). Restenosis was apparent in 17%, 33%, and 42% at 3, 12, and 24 months, respectively, although none of the patients with restenosed vessels became symptomatic. The length of the irradiation to CAS interval proved the only significant risk factor for restenosis. Conclusions: The results of CAS for radiation-induced carotid stenosis are favorable in terms of recurrence of cerebrovascular events at the CAS site.

  16. Increased LDL susceptibility to oxidation accelerates future carotid artery atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We analyzed the causal relationship between LDL susceptibility to oxidation and the development of new carotid artery atherosclerosis over a period of 5 years. We previously described the determinants related to a risk of cardiovascular changes determined in a Japanese population participating in the Niigata Study, which is an ongoing epidemiological investigation of the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Methods We selected 394 individuals (169 males and 225 females) who underwent a second carotid artery ultrasonographic examination in 2001 - 2002 for the present study. The susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was determined as the photometric absorbance and electrophoretic mobility of samples that had been collected in 1996 - 1997. The measurements were compared with ultrasonographic findings obtained in 2001 - 2002. Results The multivariate-adjusted model showed that age (odds ratio (OR), 1.034; 95% confidence interval (95%CI), 1.010 - 1.059), HbA1c (OR, 1.477; 95%CI, 0.980 - 2.225), and photometric O/N (OR, 2.012; 95%CI, 1.000 - 4.051) were significant variables that could independently predict the risk of new carotid artery atherosclerosis. Conclusion The susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was a significant parameter that could predict new carotid artery atherosclerosis over a 5-year period, and higher susceptibility was associated with a higher incidence of new carotid artery atherosclerosis. PMID:22230558

  17. Delayed presentation of a carotid pseudoaneurysm following penetrating neck trauma

    PubMed Central

    Alfawaz, Abdullah; Li, Xiaoyi; Kénel-Pierre, Stefan; Yang, Jane; Rey, Jorge; Robinson, Handel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Penetrating carotid trauma in a hemodynamically stable patient invariably presents with a pseudoaneurysm on initial imaging. Although extremely rare, delayed pseudoaneurysm formation has been reported. The purpose of this paper is to define this rare entity and propose a diagnostic and treatment plan. Methods: We present a case of delayed presentation of carotid pseudoaneurysm following penetrating neck trauma. A systematic review of the literature was performed. Results: A 21-year-old male presents to the trauma center after sustaining a gunshot wound to the left upper back resulting in a zone 2 hematoma and pneumothorax. Bullet fragment artifact interfered with computed tomography. Carotid angiogram was normal. The patient was discharged after 3 days. He returned to the Emergency Department 3 months later with a painful pulsatile hematoma. Computed tomography angiogram revealed a 6-cm pseudoaneurysm arising from the proximal left internal carotid artery (ICA). A left common carotid artery (CCA) to ICA bypass with reversed great saphenous vein was performed. The patient’s post-operative course was uneventful, neurologic deficits improved, and he was discharged. Conclusion: Delayed presentation of traumatic pseudoaneurysms has been reported, although usually these cases are iatrogenic access complications in extremities. While endovascular therapies are first line for zone 1 and 3 vascular injuries, management of zone 2 injuries is still controversial. This patient was treated with a bypass due to the need to evacuate the hematoma that was exerting a mass effect in the neck. PMID:27489718

  18. Anatomical and functional characteristics of carotid sinus stimulation in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Querry, R. G.; Smith, S. A.; Stromstad, M.; Ide, K.; Secher, N. H.; Raven, P. B.

    2001-01-01

    Transmission characteristics of pneumatic pressure to the carotid sinus were evaluated in 19 subjects at rest and during exercise. Either a percutaneous fluid-filled (n = 12) or balloon-tipped catheter (n = 7) was placed at the carotid bifurcation to record internal transmission of external neck pressure/neck suction (NP/NS). Sustained, 5-s pulses, and rapid ramping pulse protocols (+40 to -80 Torr) were recorded. Transmission of pressure stimuli was less with the fluid-filled catheter compared with that of the balloon-tipped catheter (65% vs. 82% negative pressure, 83% vs. 89% positive pressure; P < 0.05). Anatomical location of the carotid sinus averaged 3.2 cm (left) and 3.6 cm (right) from the gonion of the mandible with a range of 0-7.5 cm. Transmission was not altered by exercise or Valsalva maneuver, but did vary depending on the position of the carotid sinus locus beneath the sealed chamber. These data indicate that transmission of external NP/NS was higher than previously recorded in humans, and anatomical variation of carotid sinus location and equipment design can affect transmission results.

  19. Carotid artery stenting compared with endarterectomy in patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis (International Carotid Stenting Study): an interim analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Stents are an alternative treatment to carotid endarterectomy for symptomatic carotid stenosis, but previous trials have not established equivalent safety and efficacy. We compared the safety of carotid artery stenting with that of carotid endarterectomy. Methods The International Carotid Stenting Study (ICSS) is a multicentre, international, randomised controlled trial with blinded adjudication of outcomes. Patients with recently symptomatic carotid artery stenosis were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive carotid artery stenting or carotid endarterectomy. Randomisation was by telephone call or fax to a central computerised service and was stratified by centre with minimisation for sex, age, contralateral occlusion, and side of the randomised artery. Patients and investigators were not masked to treatment assignment. Patients were followed up by independent clinicians not directly involved in delivering the randomised treatment. The primary outcome measure of the trial is the 3-year rate of fatal or disabling stroke in any territory, which has not been analysed yet. The main outcome measure for the interim safety analysis was the 120-day rate of stroke, death, or procedural myocardial infarction. Analysis was by intention to treat (ITT). This study is registered, number ISRCTN25337470. Findings The trial enrolled 1713 patients (stenting group, n=855; endarterectomy group, n=858). Two patients in the stenting group and one in the endarterectomy group withdrew immediately after randomisation, and were not included in the ITT analysis. Between randomisation and 120 days, there were 34 (Kaplan-Meier estimate 4·0%) events of disabling stroke or death in the stenting group compared with 27 (3·2%) events in the endarterectomy group (hazard ratio [HR] 1·28, 95% CI 0·77–2·11). The incidence of stroke, death, or procedural myocardial infarction was 8·5% in the stenting group compared with 5·2% in the endarterectomy group (72 vs 44 events

  20. Computed tomography of the carotid space and related cervical spaces. Part 1. Anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, A.J.; Mawad, M.E.; Hilal, S.K.; Sane, P.; Ganti, S.R.

    1984-03-01

    The carotid space, parapharyngeal space, and paraspinal space are described. The carotid space is shown on computed tomography (CT) to be posterior to the parapharyngeal space and separated from it by the styloid apparatus. The paraspinal space is posterior to the carotid space and separated from it by the longus and anterior scalene muscles.

  1. Hemodynamic Effects of Long-term Morphological Changes in the Human Carotid Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Jaehoon; Jeong, Woowon; Smith, Nataliya; Towner, Rheal A.

    2015-01-01

    Previous investigations of morphology for human carotid artery bifurcation from infancy to young adulthood found substantial growth of the internal carotid artery with advancing age, and the development of the carotid sinus at the root of the internal carotid artery during teen age years. Although the reasons for the appearance of the carotid sinus are not clearly understood yet, it has been hypothesized that the dilation of the carotid sinus serves to support pressure sensing, and slows the blood flow to reduce pulsatility to protect the brain. In order to understand this interesting evolvement at the carotid bifurcation in the aspects of fluid mechanics, we performed in vitro phase-contrast MR flow experiments using compliant silicone replicas of age-dependent carotid artery bifurcations. The silicone models in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood were fabricated using a rapid prototyping technique, and incorporated with a bench-top flow mock circulation loop using a computer-controlled piston pump. The results of the in vitro flow study showed highly complex flow characteristics at the bifurcation in all age-dependent models. However, the highest magnitude of kinetic energy was found at the internal carotid artery in the child model. The high kinetic energy in the internal carotid artery during childhood might be one of the local hemodynamic forces that initiate morphological long-term development of the carotid sinus in the human carotid bifurcation. PMID:25702250

  2. Left or Right Carotid Endarterectomy in Patients with Atherosclerotic Disease: Ipsilateral Effects on Cognition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, N.; Bossema, E. R.; van Ommen, M.; Moll, F. L.; Ackerstaff, R. G. A.

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated hemispheric functions ipsilateral to the side of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in patients with a severe stenosis in the left or right carotid artery. Assessments took place 1 day before and 3 months after CEA. Only right-handed males were included. Nineteen patients underwent surgery of the left carotid artery and 17 of the right.…

  3. Hemodynamic effects of long-term morphological changes in the human carotid sinus.

    PubMed

    Seong, Jaehoon; Jeong, Woowon; Smith, Nataliya; Towner, Rheal A

    2015-04-13

    Previous investigations of morphology for human carotid artery bifurcation from infancy to young adulthood found substantial growth of the internal carotid artery with advancing age, and the development of the carotid sinus at the root of the internal carotid artery during teenage years. Although the reasons for the appearance of the carotid sinus are not clearly understood yet, it has been hypothesized that the dilation of the carotid sinus serves to support pressure sensing, and slows the blood flow to reduce pulsatility to protect the brain. In order to understand this interesting evolvement at the carotid bifurcation in the aspects of fluid mechanics, we performed in vitro phase-contrast MR flow experiments using compliant silicone replicas of age-dependent carotid artery bifurcations. The silicone models in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood were fabricated using a rapid prototyping technique, and incorporated with a bench-top flow mock circulation loop using a computer-controlled piston pump. The results of the in vitro flow study showed highly complex flow characteristics at the bifurcation in all age-dependent models. However, the highest magnitude of kinetic energy was found at the internal carotid artery in the child model. The high kinetic energy in the internal carotid artery during childhood might be one of the local hemodynamic forces that initiate morphological long-term development of the carotid sinus in the human carotid bifurcation. PMID:25702250

  4. Treatment of recurrent head and neck carcinoma involving the carotid artery: carotid reconstruction with ePTFE graft.

    PubMed

    He, Xiang-bo; Li, Jing-jia; Chen, Yue-hong; Shu, Chang; Tang, Qing-lai; Yang, Xin-ming

    2011-12-01

    The aim of our study is to investigate the feasibility of reconstructing the carotid artery using expanded polytetraflouroethylene (ePTFE) in patients with recurrent head and neck carcinoma involving the carotid artery. Ten patients, who had recurrent head and neck carcinoma involving the carotid artery, received carotid artery resection and reconstruction with ePTFE, tissue defects were repaired by pectoralis major myocutaneous flap. Results show that eight patients did not present any vascular and neurologic complications. One patient presented slight hemiparesis, another patient developed wound infection and pharyngocutaneous fistula. The mean follow-up period was 33.1 ± 16.0 months. The 2-year survival rate was 50% (5/10), and there was one patient who survived for 60 months without locoreginal recurrence or distant metastasis. En bloc resection of tumor and involved carotid-associated ePTFE reconstruction provide effective improvement in the locoregional control of the recurrent head and neck carcinoma. The pedicle pectoralis major myocutaneous flap can provide not only wound bed with affluent blood supply for the vascular grafts, but also reparation of skin or the tissue defects of oropharynx and hypopharynx. PMID:21400255

  5. Carotid Endothelial VCAM-1 Is an Early Marker of Carotid Atherosclerosis and Predicts Coronary Artery Disease in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Masseau, I.; Bowles, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim was to determine if endothelial VCAM-1 (eVCAM-1) expression in the common carotid artery (CCA) would correlate with predictive markers of atherosclerotic disease, would precede reduction of markers of endothelial cell function and would predict coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods and results Carotid arterial segments (bifurcation, proximal and distal CCA) were harvested from 14 and 24 month-old male castrated familial hypercholesterolemic (FH) swine, a model of spontaneous atherosclerosis. Quantification of local expression of eVCAM-1, intimal macrophage accumulation, oxidative stress, intima-media (I/M) ratio, intima-media thickness (IMT), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and phosphorylated eNOS (p-eNOS) in selected regions of the carotids revealed a relationship between local inflammation and atheroscle-rotic plaque progression. Importantly, inflammation was not uniform throughout the CCA. Endo-thelial VCAM-1 expression was the greatest at the bifurcation and increased with age. Finally, eV-CAM-1 best estimated the severity of CAD compared to blood levels of glucose, hypercholestero-lemia, carotid IMT, and p-eNOS. Conclusion Our data suggested that eVCAM-1 was closely associated with atherosclerotic plaque progression and preceded impairment of EDD. Thus, this study supported the use of carotid VCAM-1 targeting agents to estimate the severity of CAD. PMID:26702331

  6. The vasa vasorum of the rabbit carotid artery.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, S G; Causton, B E; Baskerville, P A; Gent, S; Martin, J F

    1992-01-01

    The anatomy of the vasa vasorum of the carotid arteries was assessed by light and electron microscopy in a series of 25 New Zealand White male rabbits. The low viscosity acrylic resin, LR White, was used to cast the microvasculature. The carotid artery was found to have an endothelial monolayer placed directly upon a broad fenestrated internal elastic lamina. The media consisted of 12-18 laminae comprised of smooth muscle cells, elastin, collagen and ground substance. Vasa vasorum were confined to the adventitial layer, with no penetration into the media. They arose directly from the lumen of the carotid artery in addition to the arterial branching points. The potential role of the vasa vasorum in the aetiology of atherosclerotic plaques is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:1506278

  7. [Unusual location of a parathyroid adenoma: the carotid sheath].

    PubMed

    Smayra, T; Abi Khalil, S; Abboud, B; Halabi, G; Slaba, S

    2006-01-01

    We report the imaging features of an occult parathyroid adenoma with unusual location in the carotid sheath. Our patient presented with primary hyperparathyroidism. Following negative neck ultrasound and scintigraphy, exploratory neck dissection with partial thyroidectomy was performed twice over a 2 day period without biological response. Cervical and mediastinal CT and MRI were performed with no result. Digital angiography showed a tumoral blush supplied by the left inferior thyroid artery and located in close contact with the carotid artery. Venous sampling of the neck confirmed the left location of the adenoma and a third surgical intervention found the adenoma embedded in the left carotid sheath. This is an unusual case of parathyroid adenoma that necessitated the use of several imaging techniques. PMID:16415782

  8. Chronic Interactions Between Carotid Baroreceptors and Chemoreceptors in Obesity Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lohmeier, Thomas E; Iliescu, Radu; Tudorancea, Ionut; Cazan, Radu; Cates, Adam W; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios; Irwin, Eric D

    2016-07-01

    Carotid bodies play a critical role in protecting against hypoxemia, and their activation increases sympathetic activity, arterial pressure, and ventilation, responses opposed by acute stimulation of the baroreflex. Although chemoreceptor hypersensitivity is associated with sympathetically mediated hypertension, the mechanisms involved and their significance in the pathogenesis of hypertension remain unclear. We investigated the chronic interactions of these reflexes in dogs with sympathetically mediated, obesity-induced hypertension based on the hypothesis that hypoxemia and tonic activation of carotid chemoreceptors may be associated with obesity. After 5 weeks on a high-fat diet, the animals experienced a 35% to 40% weight gain and increases in arterial pressure from 106±3 to 123±3 mm Hg and respiratory rate from 8±1 to 12±1 breaths/min along with hypoxemia (arterial partial pressure of oxygen=81±3 mm Hg) but eucapnia. During 7 days of carotid baroreflex activation by electric stimulation of the carotid sinus, tachypnea was attenuated, and hypertension was abolished before these variables returned to prestimulation values during a recovery period. After subsequent denervation of the carotid sinus region, respiratory rate decreased transiently in association with further sustained reductions in arterial partial pressure of oxygen (to 65±2 mm Hg) and substantial hypercapnia. Moreover, the severity of hypertension was attenuated from 125±2 to 116±3 mm Hg (45%-50% reduction). These findings suggest that hypoxemia may account for sustained stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors in obesity and that this activation leads to compensatory increases in ventilation and central sympathetic outflow that contributes to neurogenically mediated hypertension. Furthermore, the excitatory effects of chemoreceptor hyperactivity are abolished by chronic activation of the carotid baroreflex. PMID:27160198

  9. Ultrasound common carotid artery segmentation based on active shape model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Jin, Jiaoying; Xu, Mengling; Wu, Huihui; He, Wanji; Yuchi, Ming; Ding, Mingyue

    2013-01-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis is a major reason of stroke, a leading cause of death and disability. In this paper, a segmentation method based on Active Shape Model (ASM) is developed and evaluated to outline common carotid artery (CCA) for carotid atherosclerosis computer-aided evaluation and diagnosis. The proposed method is used to segment both media-adventitia-boundary (MAB) and lumen-intima-boundary (LIB) on transverse views slices from three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) images. The data set consists of sixty-eight, 17 × 2 × 2, 3D US volume data acquired from the left and right carotid arteries of seventeen patients (eight treated with 80 mg atorvastatin and nine with placebo), who had carotid stenosis of 60% or more, at baseline and after three months of treatment. Manually outlined boundaries by expert are adopted as the ground truth for evaluation. For the MAB and LIB segmentations, respectively, the algorithm yielded Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of 94.4% ± 3.2% and 92.8% ± 3.3%, mean absolute distances (MAD) of 0.26 ± 0.18 mm and 0.33 ± 0.21 mm, and maximum absolute distances (MAXD) of 0.75 ± 0.46 mm and 0.84 ± 0.39 mm. It took 4.3 ± 0.5 mins to segment single 3D US images, while it took 11.7 ± 1.2 mins for manual segmentation. The method would promote the translation of carotid 3D US to clinical care for the monitoring of the atherosclerotic disease progression and regression. PMID:23533535

  10. Ultrasound Common Carotid Artery Segmentation Based on Active Shape Model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xin; Jin, Jiaoying; Xu, Mengling; Wu, Huihui; He, Wanji; Yuchi, Ming; Ding, Mingyue

    2013-01-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis is a major reason of stroke, a leading cause of death and disability. In this paper, a segmentation method based on Active Shape Model (ASM) is developed and evaluated to outline common carotid artery (CCA) for carotid atherosclerosis computer-aided evaluation and diagnosis. The proposed method is used to segment both media-adventitia-boundary (MAB) and lumen-intima-boundary (LIB) on transverse views slices from three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) images. The data set consists of sixty-eight, 17 × 2 × 2, 3D US volume data acquired from the left and right carotid arteries of seventeen patients (eight treated with 80 mg atorvastatin and nine with placebo), who had carotid stenosis of 60% or more, at baseline and after three months of treatment. Manually outlined boundaries by expert are adopted as the ground truth for evaluation. For the MAB and LIB segmentations, respectively, the algorithm yielded Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of 94.4% ± 3.2% and 92.8% ± 3.3%, mean absolute distances (MAD) of 0.26 ± 0.18 mm and 0.33 ± 0.21 mm, and maximum absolute distances (MAXD) of 0.75 ± 0.46 mm and 0.84 ± 0.39 mm. It took 4.3 ± 0.5 mins to segment single 3D US images, while it took 11.7 ± 1.2 mins for manual segmentation. The method would promote the translation of carotid 3D US to clinical care for the monitoring of the atherosclerotic disease progression and regression. PMID:23533535