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Sample records for resolve experimental lung

  1. CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs resolve experimental lung injury in mice and are present in humans with acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    D'Alessio, Franco R; Tsushima, Kenji; Aggarwal, Neil R; West, Erin E; Willett, Matthew H; Britos, Martin F; Pipeling, Matthew R; Brower, Roy G; Tuder, Rubin M; McDyer, John F; King, Landon S

    2009-10-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by rapid alveolar injury, inflammation, cytokine induction, and neutrophil accumulation. Although early events in the pathogenesis of ALI have been defined, the mechanisms underlying resolution are unknown. As a model of ALI, we administered intratracheal (i.t.) LPS to mice and observed peak lung injury 4 days after the challenge, with resolution by day 10. Numbers of alveolar lymphocytes increased as injury resolved. To examine the role of lymphocytes in this response, lymphocyte-deficient Rag-1-/- and C57BL/6 WT mice were exposed to i.t. LPS. The extent of injury was similar between the groups of mice through day 4, but recovery was markedly impaired in the Rag-1-/- mice. Adoptive transfer studies revealed that infusion of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs as late as 24 hours after i.t. LPS normalized resolution in Rag-1-/- mice. Similarly, Treg depletion in WT mice delayed recovery. Treg transfer into i.t. LPS-exposed Rag-1-/- mice also corrected the elevated levels of alveolar proinflammatory cytokines and increased the diminished levels of alveolar TGF-beta and neutrophil apoptosis. Mechanistically, Treg-mediated resolution of lung injury was abrogated by TGF-beta inhibition. Moreover, BAL of patients with ALI revealed dynamic changes in CD3+CD4+CD25hiCD127loFoxp3+ cells. These results indicate that Tregs modify innate immune responses during resolution of lung injury and suggest potential targets for treating ALI, for which there are no specific therapies currently available. PMID:19770521

  2. Comparison of lung preservation solutions in human lungs using an ex vivo lung perfusion experimental model

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Israel L.; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo M.; Mariani, Alessandro W.; Fernandes, Flávio G.; Unterpertinger, Fernando V.; Canzian, Mauro; Jatene, Fabio B.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Experimental studies on lung preservation have always been performed using animal models. We present ex vivo lung perfusion as a new model for the study of lung preservation. Using human lungs instead of animal models may bring the results of experimental studies closer to what could be expected in clinical practice. METHOD: Brain-dead donors whose lungs had been declined by transplantation teams were used. The cases were randomized into two groups. In Group 1, Perfadex® was used for pulmonary preservation, and in Group 2, LPDnac, a solution manufactured in Brazil, was used. An ex vivo lung perfusion system was used, and the lungs were ventilated and perfused after 10 hours of cold ischemia. The extent of ischemic-reperfusion injury was measured using functional and histological parameters. RESULTS: After reperfusion, the mean oxygenation capacity was 405.3 mmHg in Group 1 and 406.0 mmHg in Group 2 (p = 0.98). The mean pulmonary vascular resistance values were 697.6 and 378.3 dyn·s·cm-5, respectively (p = 0.035). The mean pulmonary compliance was 46.8 cm H2O in Group 1 and 49.3 ml/cm H2O in Group 2 (p = 0.816). The mean wet/dry weight ratios were 2.06 and 2.02, respectively (p = 0.87). The mean Lung Injury Scores for the biopsy performed after reperfusion were 4.37 and 4.37 in Groups 1 and 2, respectively (p = 1.0), and the apoptotic cell counts were 118.75/mm2 and 137.50/mm2, respectively (p = 0.71). CONCLUSION: The locally produced preservation solution proved to be as good as Perfadex®. The clinical use of LPDnac may reduce costs in our centers. Therefore, it is important to develop new models to study lung preservation. PMID:23018310

  3. Time-resolved optical spectroscopy of the chest: is it possible to probe the lung?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarto, G.; Farina, A.; Pifferi, A.; Taroni, P.; Miniati, M.

    2013-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulations and preliminary time-resolved spectroscopy measurements were performed to investigate the feasibility of the in vivo optical diagnostics of lung conditions and diseases. Absorption and reduced scattering properties of the chest, arising from in vivo spectral measurements on volunteers are presented.

  4. Energy-resolved computed tomography: first experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2008-10-01

    First experimental results with energy-resolved computed tomography (CT) are reported. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in CT has been improved with x-ray energy weighting for the first time. Further, x-ray energy weighting improved the CNR in material decomposition CT when applied to CT projections prior to dual-energy subtraction. The existing CT systems use an energy (charge) integrating x-ray detector that provides a signal proportional to the energy of the x-ray photon. Thus, the x-ray photons with lower energies are scored less than those with higher energies. This underestimates contribution of lower energy photons that would provide higher contrast. The highest CNR can be achieved if the x-ray photons are scored by a factor that would increase as the x-ray energy decreases. This could be performed by detecting each x-ray photon separately and measuring its energy. The energy selective CT data could then be saved, and any weighting factor could be applied digitally to a detected x-ray photon. The CT system includes a photon counting detector with linear arrays of pixels made from cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) semiconductor. A cylindrical phantom with 10.2 cm diameter made from tissue-equivalent material was used for CT imaging. The phantom included contrast elements representing calcifications, iodine, adipose and glandular tissue. The x-ray tube voltage was 120 kVp. The energy selective CT data were acquired, and used to generate energy-weighted and material-selective CT images. The energy-weighted and material decomposition CT images were generated using a single CT scan at a fixed x-ray tube voltage. For material decomposition the x-ray spectrum was digitally spilt into low- and high-energy parts and dual-energy subtraction was applied. The x-ray energy weighting resulted in CNR improvement of calcifications and iodine by a factor of 1.40 and 1.63, respectively, as compared to conventional charge integrating CT. The x-ray energy weighting was also applied

  5. Myeloid tissue factor does not modulate lung inflammation or permeability during experimental acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Ciara M; Grove, Brandon S; Clune, Jennifer K; Mackman, Nigel; Ware, Lorraine B; Bastarache, Julie A

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is a critical mediator of direct acute lung injury (ALI) with global TF deficiency resulting in increased airspace inflammation, alveolar-capillary permeability, and alveolar hemorrhage after intra-tracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In the lung, TF is expressed diffusely on the lung epithelium and intensely on cells of the myeloid lineage. We recently reported that TF on the lung epithelium, but not on myeloid cells, was the major source of TF during intra-tracheal LPS-induced ALI. Because of a growing body of literature demonstrating important pathophysiologic differences between ALI caused by different etiologies, we hypothesized that TF on myeloid cells may have distinct contributions to airspace inflammation and permeability between direct and indirect causes of ALI. To test this, we compared mice lacking TF on myeloid cells (TF(∆mye), LysM.Cre(+/-)TF(flox/flox)) to littermate controls during direct (bacterial pneumonia, ventilator-induced ALI, bleomycin-induced ALI) and indirect ALI (systemic LPS, cecal ligation and puncture). ALI was quantified by weight loss, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) inflammatory cell number, cytokine concentration, protein concentration, and BAL procoagulant activity. There was no significant contribution of TF on myeloid cells in multiple models of experimental ALI, leading to the conclusion that TF in myeloid cells is not a major contributor to experimental ALI. PMID:26924425

  6. Myeloid tissue factor does not modulate lung inflammation or permeability during experimental acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Shaver, Ciara M.; Grove, Brandon S.; Clune, Jennifer K.; Mackman, Nigel; Ware, Lorraine B.; Bastarache, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is a critical mediator of direct acute lung injury (ALI) with global TF deficiency resulting in increased airspace inflammation, alveolar-capillary permeability, and alveolar hemorrhage after intra-tracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In the lung, TF is expressed diffusely on the lung epithelium and intensely on cells of the myeloid lineage. We recently reported that TF on the lung epithelium, but not on myeloid cells, was the major source of TF during intra-tracheal LPS-induced ALI. Because of a growing body of literature demonstrating important pathophysiologic differences between ALI caused by different etiologies, we hypothesized that TF on myeloid cells may have distinct contributions to airspace inflammation and permeability between direct and indirect causes of ALI. To test this, we compared mice lacking TF on myeloid cells (TF∆mye, LysM.Cre+/−TFflox/flox) to littermate controls during direct (bacterial pneumonia, ventilator-induced ALI, bleomycin-induced ALI) and indirect ALI (systemic LPS, cecal ligation and puncture). ALI was quantified by weight loss, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) inflammatory cell number, cytokine concentration, protein concentration, and BAL procoagulant activity. There was no significant contribution of TF on myeloid cells in multiple models of experimental ALI, leading to the conclusion that TF in myeloid cells is not a major contributor to experimental ALI. PMID:26924425

  7. Resolving DOI Based URNs Using Squid: An Experimental System at UKOLN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Andy

    1998-01-01

    Describes UKOLN's (United Kingdom Office for Library and Information Networking--a national center for support in network information management in the library/information communities) experimental system that allows digital object identifiers (DOIs) encoded as uniform resource names (URNs) to be resolved on behalf of Web browsers by Squid, a…

  8. Development of the Experimental System for Time- and Angle-resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Azuma, Junpei; Tokudomi, Shinji; Kamada, Masao

    2007-01-19

    Experimental system for the time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy have been constructed at BL13 in SAGA Light Source, in order to study the electronic non-equilibrium in the surface layer of laser-excited materials The experimental system is very useful for photoemission spectroscopy in the wide temporal and angular ranges. The time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectra can be obtained with using the gate electronics for the MCP detector of the photoemission spectrometer. The gated MCP detector is synchronized with the laser pulse from Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier with the repetition frequency of 10 to 300 kHz. The time-window of the gated MCP detector can be changed between 10 nano- and 160 micro-second. The time-resolved measurement in pico-second region can be performed with using the pump-probe technique which uses fundamental, second and third harmonics from the Ti:sapphire laser as the excitation source. Using these systems, we can perform the time- and angle-resolved photoemission study for various photo-excited phenomena and surface dynamics.

  9. Platelet glycoprotein Ibα supports experimental lung metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shashank; Zuka, Masahiko; Liu, Jungling; Russell, Susan; Dent, Judith; Guerrero, José A.; Forsyth, Jane; Maruszak, Brigid; Gartner, T. Kent; Felding-Habermann, Brunhilde; Ware, Jerry

    2007-01-01

    The platelet paradigm in hemostasis and thrombosis involves an initiation step that depends on platelet membrane receptors binding to ligands on a damaged or inflamed vascular surface. Once bound to the surface, platelets provide a unique microenvironment supporting the accumulation of more platelets and the elaboration of a fibrin-rich network produced by coagulation factors. The platelet-specific receptor glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX, is critical in this process and initiates the formation of a platelet-rich thrombus by tethering the platelet to a thrombogenic surface. A role for platelets beyond the hemostasis/thrombosis paradigm is emerging with significant platelet contributions in both tumorigenesis and inflammation. We have established congenic (N10) mouse colonies (C57BL/6J) with dysfunctional GP Ib-IX receptors in our laboratory that allow us an opportunity to examine the relevance of platelet GP Ib-IX in syngeneic mouse models of experimental metastasis. Our results demonstrate platelet GP Ib-IX contributes to experimental metastasis because a functional absence of GP Ib-IX correlates with a 15-fold reduction in the number of lung metastatic foci using B16F10.1 melanoma cells. The results demonstrate that the extracellular domain of the α-subunit of GP Ib is the structurally relevant component of the GP Ib-IX complex contributing to metastasis. Our results support the hypothesis that platelet GP Ib-IX functions that support normal hemostasis or pathologic thrombosis also contribute to tumor malignancy. PMID:17494758

  10. Corilagin Attenuates Aerosol Bleomycin-Induced Experimental Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Guo, Qiong-Ya; Zhang, Xiao-Ju; Li, Xiao; Li, Wen-Ting; Ma, Xi-Tao; Ma, Li-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressing lethal disease with few clinically effective therapies. Corilagin is a tannin derivative which shows anti-inflammatory and antifibrotics properties and is potentiated in treating IPF. Here, we investigated the effect of corilagin on lung injury following bleomycin exposure in an animal model of pulmonary fibrosis. Corilagin abrogated bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis as assessed by H&E; Masson’s trichrome staining and lung hydroxyproline content in lung tissue. Corilagin reduced the number of apoptotic lung cells and prevented lung epithelial cells from membrane breakdown, effluence of lamellar bodies and thickening of the respiratory membrane. Bleomycin exposure induced expression of MDA, IKKα, phosphorylated IKKα (p-IKKα), NF-κB P65, TNF-α and IL-1β, and reduced I-κB expression in mice lung tissue or in BALF. These changes were reversed by high-dose corilagin (100 mg/kg i.p) more dramatically than by low dose (10 mg/kg i.p). Last, corilagin inhibits TGF-β1 production and α-SMA expression in lung tissue samples. Taken together, these findings confirmed that corilagin attenuates bleomycin-induced epithelial injury and fibrosis via inactivation of oxidative stress, proinflammatory cytokine release and NF-κB and TGF-β1 signaling. Corilagin may serve as a promising therapeutic agent for pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24886817

  11. Effects of acute hypercapnia with and without acidosis on lung inflammation and apoptosis in experimental acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Nardelli, L M; Rzezinski, A; Silva, J D; Maron-Gutierrez, T; Ornellas, D S; Henriques, I; Capelozzi, V L; Teodoro, W; Morales, M M; Silva, P L; Pelosi, P; Garcia, C S N B; Rocco, P R M

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of acute hypercapnic acidosis and buffered hypercapnia on lung inflammation and apoptosis in experimental acute lung injury (ALI). Twenty-four hours after paraquat injection, 28 Wistar rats were randomized into four groups (n=7/group): (1) normocapnia (NC, PaCO2=35-45 mmHg), ventilated with 0.03%CO2+21%O2+balancedN2; (2) hypercapnic acidosis (HC, PaCO2=60-70 mmHg), ventilated with 5%CO2+21%O2+balancedN2; and (3) buffered hypercapnic acidosis (BHC), ventilated with 5%CO2+21%O2+balancedN2 and treated with sodium bicarbonate (8.4%). The remaining seven animals were not mechanically ventilated (NV). The mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-6 (p=0.003), IL-1β (p<0.001), and type III procollagen (PCIII) (p=0.001) in lung tissue was more reduced in the HC group in comparison with NC, with no significant differences between HC and BHC. Lung and kidney cell apoptosis was reduced in HC and BHC in comparison with NC and NV. In conclusion, in this experimental ALI model, hypercapnia, regardless of acidosis, reduced lung inflammation and lung and kidney cell apoptosis. PMID:25246186

  12. Dasatinib Reduces Lung Inflammation and Fibrosis in Acute Experimental Silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Fernanda Ferreira; Horta, Lucas Felipe Bastos; Maia, Lígia de Albuquerque; Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias; da Silva, André Benedito; Morales, Marcelo Marco; Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Takiya, Christina Maeda; de Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2016-01-01

    Silicosis is an occupational lung disease with no effective treatment. We hypothesized that dasatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, might exhibit therapeutic efficacy in silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Silicosis was induced in C57BL/6 mice by a single intratracheal administration of silica particles, whereas the control group received saline. After 14 days, when the disease was already established, animals were randomly assigned to receive DMSO or dasatinib (1 mg/kg) by oral gavage, twice daily, for 14 days. On day 28, lung morphofunction, inflammation, and remodeling were investigated. RAW 264.7 cells (a macrophage cell line) were incubated with silica particles, followed by treatment or not with dasatinib, and evaluated for macrophage polarization. On day 28, dasatinib improved lung mechanics, increased M2 macrophage counts in lung parenchyma and granuloma, and was associated with reduction of fraction area of granuloma, fraction area of collapsed alveoli, protein levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, transforming growth factor-β, and reduced neutrophils, M1 macrophages, and collagen fiber content in lung tissue and granuloma in silicotic animals. Additionally, dasatinib reduced expression of iNOS and increased expression of arginase and metalloproteinase-9 in silicotic macrophages. Dasatinib was effective at inducing macrophage polarization toward the M2 phenotype and reducing lung inflammation and fibrosis, thus improving lung mechanics in a murine model of acute silicosis. PMID:26789403

  13. Dasatinib Reduces Lung Inflammation and Fibrosis in Acute Experimental Silicosis.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Fernanda Ferreira; Horta, Lucas Felipe Bastos; Maia, Lígia de Albuquerque; Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias; da Silva, André Benedito; Morales, Marcelo Marco; Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Takiya, Christina Maeda; de Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2016-01-01

    Silicosis is an occupational lung disease with no effective treatment. We hypothesized that dasatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, might exhibit therapeutic efficacy in silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Silicosis was induced in C57BL/6 mice by a single intratracheal administration of silica particles, whereas the control group received saline. After 14 days, when the disease was already established, animals were randomly assigned to receive DMSO or dasatinib (1 mg/kg) by oral gavage, twice daily, for 14 days. On day 28, lung morphofunction, inflammation, and remodeling were investigated. RAW 264.7 cells (a macrophage cell line) were incubated with silica particles, followed by treatment or not with dasatinib, and evaluated for macrophage polarization. On day 28, dasatinib improved lung mechanics, increased M2 macrophage counts in lung parenchyma and granuloma, and was associated with reduction of fraction area of granuloma, fraction area of collapsed alveoli, protein levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, transforming growth factor-β, and reduced neutrophils, M1 macrophages, and collagen fiber content in lung tissue and granuloma in silicotic animals. Additionally, dasatinib reduced expression of iNOS and increased expression of arginase and metalloproteinase-9 in silicotic macrophages. Dasatinib was effective at inducing macrophage polarization toward the M2 phenotype and reducing lung inflammation and fibrosis, thus improving lung mechanics in a murine model of acute silicosis. PMID:26789403

  14. Experimental and theoretical studies of time-averaged and time resolved rotor heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, M. G.; Rae, W. J.; Rigby, D. L.

    Efforts in support of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) structural durability program have concentrated on obtaining detailed time-averaged and time-resolved (or phase-locked) measurements on a full-scale rotating turbine both with and without cold gas injection and on theoretical studies designed to improve the prediction capability for these turbine flows. The experimental efforts have concentrated on use of the Garrett TFE 731-2 hp turbine. However, it has been possible to apply the theoretical efforts to predicting heat-flux distributions obtained for two additional turbines - i.e., (1) the Garrett low aspect ratio turbine (LART) and (2) the Teledyne 702 turbine. The experimental technique is the short duration, shock-tunnel approach, in which fast-response, thin-film resistance thermometers are used to measure surface temperature histories at prescribed locations on the turbine component parts. Heat-flux values are then inferred from the temperature histories by using standard data reduction procedures. The turbine being used is the Garrett TFE 731-2 hp stage, and both the nozzle guide vanes and the rotor blades are heavily instrumented with thin-film heat-flux gauges. Depending on how the data from a particular heat-flux gauge are recorded, one can get either time-resolved (or phase-locked) or time-averaged results. Both types of data are illustrated.

  15. Experimental and theoretical studies of time-averaged and time resolved rotor heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, M. G.; Rae, W. J.; Rigby, D. L.

    1987-01-01

    Efforts in support of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) structural durability program have concentrated on obtaining detailed time-averaged and time-resolved (or phase-locked) measurements on a full-scale rotating turbine both with and without cold gas injection and on theoretical studies designed to improve the prediction capability for these turbine flows. The experimental efforts have concentrated on use of the Garrett TFE 731-2 hp turbine. However, it has been possible to apply the theoretical efforts to predicting heat-flux distributions obtained for two additional turbines - i.e., (1) the Garrett low aspect ratio turbine (LART) and (2) the Teledyne 702 turbine. The experimental technique is the short duration, shock-tunnel approach, in which fast-response, thin-film resistance thermometers are used to measure surface temperature histories at prescribed locations on the turbine component parts. Heat-flux values are then inferred from the temperature histories by using standard data reduction procedures. The turbine being used is the Garrett TFE 731-2 hp stage, and both the nozzle guide vanes and the rotor blades are heavily instrumented with thin-film heat-flux gauges. Depending on how the data from a particular heat-flux gauge are recorded, one can get either time-resolved (or phase-locked) or time-averaged results. Both types of data are illustrated.

  16. Beneficial effects of synthetic KL₄ surfactant in experimental lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sáenz, A; Alvarez, L; Santos, M; López-Sánchez, A; Castillo-Olivares, J L; Varela, A; Segal, R; Casals, C

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether intratracheal administration of a new synthetic surfactant that includes the cationic, hydrophobic 21-residue peptide KLLLLKLLLLKLLLLKLLLLK (KL₄), might be effective in reducing ischaemia-reperfusion injury after lung transplantation. Single left lung transplantation was performed in Landrace pigs 22 h post-harvest. KL₄ surfactant at a dose of 25 mg total phospholipid·kg body weight⁻¹ (2.5 mL·kg body weight⁻¹) was instilled at 37°C to the donor left lung (n = 8) prior to explantation. Saline (2.5 mL·kg body weight⁻¹; 37°C) was instilled into the donor left lung of the untreated group (n = 6). Lung function in recipients was measured during 2 h of reperfusion. Recipient left lung bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) provided native cytometric, inflammatory marker and surfactant data. KL(4) surfactant treatment recovered oxygen levels in the recipient blood (mean ± sd arterial oxygen tension/inspiratory oxygen fraction 424 ± 60 versus 263 ± 101 mmHg in untreated group; p=0.01) and normalised alveolar-arterial oxygen tension difference. Surfactant biophysical function was also recovered in KL₄ surfactant-treated lungs. This was associated with decreased C-reactive protein levels in BAL, and recovery of surfactant protein A content, normalised protein/phospholipid ratios, and lower levels of both lipid peroxides and protein carbonyls in large surfactant aggregates. These findings suggest an important protective role for KL₄ surfactant treatment in lung transplantation. PMID:20650990

  17. Effects of exogenous surfactant on the non-heart-beating donor lung graft in experimental lung transplantation - a stereological study.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Gudrun; Knudsen, Lars; Madershahian, Navid; Mühlfeld, Christian; Frank, Konrad; Rahmanian, Parwis; Wahlers, Thorsten; Wittwer, Thorsten; Ochs, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    The use of non-heart-beating donor (NHBD) lungs may help to overcome the shortage of lung grafts in clinical lung transplantation, but warm ischaemia and ischaemia/reperfusion injury (I/R injury) resulting in primary graft dysfunction represent a considerable threat. Thus, better strategies for optimized preservation of lung grafts are urgently needed. Surfactant dysfunction has been shown to contribute to I/R injury, and surfactant replacement therapy is effective in enhancing lung function and structural integrity in related rat models. In the present study we hypothesize that surfactant replacement therapy reduces oedema formation in a pig model of NHBD lung transplantation. Oedema formation was quantified with (SF) and without (non-SF) surfactant replacement therapy in interstitial and alveolar compartments by means of design-based stereology in NHBD lungs 7 h after cardiac arrest, reperfusion and transplantation. A sham-operated group served as control. In both NHBD groups, nearly all animals died within the first hours after transplantation due to right heart failure. Both SF and non-SF developed an interstitial oedema of similar degree, as shown by an increase in septal wall volume and arithmetic mean thickness as well as an increase in the volume of peribron-chovascular connective tissue. Regarding intra-alveolar oedema, no statistically significant difference could be found between SF and non-SF. In conclusion, surfactant replacement therapy cannot prevent poor outcome after prolonged warm ischaemia of 7 h in this model. While the beneficial effects of surfactant replacement therapy have been observed in several experimental and clinical studies related to heart-beating donor lungs and cold ischaemia, it is unlikely that surfactant replacement therapy will overcome the shortage of organs in the context of prolonged warm ischaemia, for example, 7 h. Moreover, our data demonstrate that right heart function and dysfunctions of the pulmonary vascular bed are

  18. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Tourret, Damien; Wiezorek, Jörg M. K.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology in both research and industrial environments, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al-Cu and Al-Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid-liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. The observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, and presence of a morphological instability at the solid-liquid interface in the Al-4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.

  19. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; et al

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, andmore » presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.« less

  20. Controlled Experimental Study Depicting Moving Objects in View-Shared Time-Resolved 3D MRA

    PubMed Central

    Mostardi, Petrice M.; Haider, Clifton R.; Rossman, Phillip J.; Borisch, Eric A.; Riederer, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Various methods have been used for time-resolved contrast-enhanced MRA (CE-MRA), many involving view sharing. However, the extent to which the resultant image time series represents the actual dynamic behavior of the contrast bolus is not always clear. Although numerical simulations can be used to estimate performance, an experimental study can allow more realistic characterization. The purpose of this work was to use a computer-controlled motion phantom for study of the temporal fidelity of 3D time-resolved sequences in depicting a contrast bolus. It is hypothesized that the view order of the acquisition and the selection of views in the reconstruction can affect the positional accuracy and sharpness of the leading edge of the bolus and artifactual signal preceding the edge. Phantom studies were performed using dilute gadolinium-filled vials that were moved along tabletop tracks by a computer-controlled motor. Several view orders were tested, which use view-sharing and Cartesian sampling. Compactness of measuring the k-space center, consistency of view ordering within each reconstruction frame, and sampling the k-space center near the end of the temporal footprint were shown to be important in accurate portrayal of the leading edge of the bolus. A number of findings were confirmed in an in vivo CE-MRA study. PMID:19319897

  1. Controlled experimental study depicting moving objects in view-shared time-resolved 3D MRA.

    PubMed

    Mostardi, Petrice M; Haider, Clifton R; Rossman, Phillip J; Borisch, Eric A; Riederer, Stephen J

    2009-07-01

    Various methods have been used for time-resolved contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA), many involving view sharing. However, the extent to which the resultant image time series represents the actual dynamic behavior of the contrast bolus is not always clear. Although numerical simulations can be used to estimate performance, an experimental study can allow more realistic characterization. The purpose of this work was to use a computer-controlled motion phantom for study of the temporal fidelity of three-dimensional (3D) time-resolved sequences in depicting a contrast bolus. It is hypothesized that the view order of the acquisition and the selection of views in the reconstruction can affect the positional accuracy and sharpness of the leading edge of the bolus and artifactual signal preceding the edge. Phantom studies were performed using dilute gadolinium-filled vials that were moved along tabletop tracks by a computer-controlled motor. Several view orders were tested using view-sharing and Cartesian sampling. Compactness of measuring the k-space center, consistency of view ordering within each reconstruction frame, and sampling the k-space center near the end of the temporal footprint were shown to be important in accurate portrayal of the leading edge of the bolus. A number of findings were confirmed in an in vivo CE-MRA study. PMID:19319897

  2. Combined experimental setup for spin- and angle-resolved direct and inverse photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Budke, M.; Allmers, T.; Donath, M.; Rangelov, G.

    2007-11-15

    We present a combined experimental setup for spin- and angle-resolved direct and inverse photoemission in the vacuum ultraviolet energy range for measurements of the electronic structure below and above the Fermi level. Both techniques are installed in one ultrahigh-vacuum chamber and, as a consequence, allow quasisimultaneous measurements on one and the same sample preparation. The photoemission experiment consists of a gas discharge lamp and an electron energy analyzer equipped with a spin polarization detector based on spin-polarized low-energy electron diffraction. Our homemade inverse-photoemission spectrometer comprises a GaAs photocathode as spin-polarized electron source and Geiger-Mueller counters for photon detection at a fixed energy of 9.9 eV. The total energy resolution of the experiment is better than 50 meV for photoemission and better than 200 meV for inverse photoemission. The performance of our combined direct and inverse-photoemission experiment with respect to angular and energy resolutions is exemplified by the Fermi-level crossing of the Cu(111) L-gap surface state. Spin-resolved measurements of Co films on Cu(001) are used to characterize the Sherman function of the spin polarization detector as well as the spin polarization of our electron source.

  3. Spatially resolved and observer-free experimental quantification of spatial resolution in tomographic images

    SciTech Connect

    Tsekenis, S. A.; McCann, H.; Tait, N.

    2015-03-15

    We present a novel framework and experimental method for the quantification of spatial resolution of a tomography system. The framework adopts the “black box” view of an imaging system, considering only its input and output. The tomography system is locally stimulated with a step input, viz., a sharp edge. The output, viz., the reconstructed images, is analysed by Fourier decomposition of their spatial frequency components, and the local limiting spatial resolution is determined using a cut-off threshold. At no point is an observer involved in the process. The framework also includes a means of translating the quantification region in the imaging space, thus creating a spatially resolved map of objectively quantified spatial resolution. As a case-study, the framework is experimentally applied using a gaseous propane phantom measured by a well-established chemical species tomography system. A spatial resolution map consisting of 28 regions is produced. In isolated regions, the indicated performance is 4-times better than that suggested in the literature and varies by 57% across the imaging space. A mechanism based on adjacent but non-interacting beams is hypothesised to explain the observed behaviour. The mechanism suggests that, as also independently concluded by other methods, a geometrically regular beam array maintains maximum objectivity in reconstructions. We believe that the proposed framework, methodology, and findings will be of value in the design and performance evaluation of tomographic imaging arrays and systems.

  4. Experimental Lung Cancer Drug Shows Early Promise | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer A first-of-its-kind drug is showing early promise in attacking certain lung cancers that are hard to treat because they build up resistance to conventional chemotherapy. The drug, CO-1686, performed well in a preclinical study involving xenograft and transgenic mice, as reported in the journal Cancer Discovery. It is now being evaluated for safety and efficacy in Phase I and II clinical trials.

  5. Experimental Lung Cancer Drug Shows Early Promise | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer A first-of-its-kind drug is showing early promise in attacking certain lung cancers that are hard to treat because they build up resistance to conventional chemotherapy. The drug, CO-1686, performed well in a preclinical study involving xenograft and transgenic mice, as reported in the journal Cancer Discovery. It is now being evaluated for safety and efficacy in Phase I and II clinical trials.

  6. Experimental studies on lung carcinogenesis and their relationship to future research on radiation-induced lung cancer in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, F.T.

    1991-03-01

    The usefulness of experimental systems for studying human lung carcinogenesis lies in the ease of studying components of a total problem. As an example, the main thrust of attack on possible synergistic interactions between radiation, cigarette smoke, and other irritants must be by means of research on animals. Because animals can be serially sacrificed, a systematic search can be made for progressive lung changes, thereby improving our understanding of carcinogenesis. The mechanisms of radiation-induced carcinogenesis have not yet been delineated, but modern concepts of molecular and cellular biology and of radiation dosimetry are being increasingly applied to both in vivo and in vitro exposure to determine the mechanisms of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, to elucidate human data, and to aid in extrapolating experimental animal data to human exposures. In addition, biologically based mathematical models of carcinogenesis are being developed to describe the nature of the events leading to malignancy; they are also an essential part of a rational approach to quantitative cancer risk assessment. This paper summarizes recent experimental and modeling data on radon-induced lung cancer and includes the confounding effects of cigarette-smoke exposures. The applicability of these data to understanding human exposures is emphasized, and areas of future research on human radiation-induced carcinogenesis are discussed. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Ultrafine particles in the airway aggravated experimental lung injury through impairment in Treg function.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanggang; Cao, Yinghua; Sun, Yue; Xu, Ruxiang; Zheng, Zhendong; Song, Haihan

    2016-09-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a life-threatening condition characterized by rapid-onset alveolar-capillary damage mediated by pathogenic proinflammatory immune responses. Since exposure to airway particulate matter (PM) could significantly change the inflammatory status of the individual, we investigated whether PM instillation in the airway could alter the course of ALI, using a murine model with experimental lung injury induced by intratracheal LPS challenge. We found that PM-treated mice presented significantly aggravated lung injury, which was characterized by further reductions in body weight, increased protein concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and higher mortality rate, compared to control saline-treated mice. The PM-treated mice also presented elevated lung and systemic type 1 T helper cell (Th1) frequency as well as reduced lung regulatory T cell (Treg) frequency, which was associated with severity of lung injury. Further examinations revealed that the Treg function was impaired in PM-treated mice, characterized by significantly repressed transforming growth factor beta production. Adoptive transfer of functional Tregs from control mice to PM-treated mice significantly improved their prognosis after intratracheal LPS challenge. Together, these results demonstrated that first, PM in the airway aggravated lung injury; second, severity of lung injury was associated with T cell subset imbalance in PM-treated mice; and third, PM treatment induced quantitative as well as qualitative changes in the Tregs. PMID:27179778

  8. Collagen crosslink location: a molecular marker for fibrosis in lungs of rats with experimental silicosis

    SciTech Connect

    Gerriets, J.E.; Reiser, K.M.; Last, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    Collagen content is increased in lungs of animals with experimental silicosis. They hypothesize that the collagen deposited in such fibrotic lungs differs structurally from normal lung collagen. Silicotic lung collagen shows an increase in lysine hydroxylation. In addition, the ratio of the difunctional crosslinks DHLNL (dihydroxylysinonorleucine) to HLNL (hydroxylysinonorleucine) is sharply elevated compared to that in control lungs. The peptide ..cap alpha..1(I)CB7 x ..cap alpha..2(I)CB1 crosslinked by HLNL was demonstrated in NaB/sup 3/H/sub 4/-reduced, CNBr-digested collagen from rat tail tendon by peptide purification, followed by periodate oxidation and amino acid analysis. Further structural analysis of this peptide was obtained by digestion of the crosslinked peptide with trypsin and purification of the tryptic peptide containing this crosslink followed by amino acid analysis. They then examined the analogous collagenous peptide in normal and silicotic lungs and analyzed the crosslink it contained. They observed that DHLNL was present at specific sites previously containing HLNL; that is, the collagen in fibrotic lungs is altered at specific sites by post-translational modification of a lysine residue by hydroxylation in a predictable way. They conclude that such unusual hydroxylation of a specific lysine residue in the ..cap alpha..2 chain provides a molecular marker for fibrotic lung collagen.

  9. Blunted Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction in Experimental Neonatal Chronic Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rey-Parra, Gloria Juliana; Archer, Stephen L.; Bland, Richard D.; Albertine, Kurt H.; Carlton, David P.; Cho, Soo-Chul; Kirby, Beth; Haromy, Al; Eaton, Farah; Wu, Xichen; Thébaud, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Neonatal chronic lung disease (CLD), caused by prolonged mechanical ventilation (MV) with O2-rich gas, is the most common cause of long-term hospitalization and recurrent respiratory illness in extremely premature infants. Recurrent episodes of hypoxemia and associated ventilator adjustments often lead to worsening CLD. The mechanism that causes these hypoxemic episodes is unknown. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV), which is partially controlled by O2-sensitive voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, is an important adaptive response to local hypoxia that helps to match perfusion and ventilation in the lung. Objectives: To test the hypothesis that chronic lung injury (CLI) impairs HPV. Methods: We studied preterm lambs that had MV with O2-rich gas for 3 weeks and newborn rats that breathed 95%-O2 for 2 weeks, both of which resulted in airspace enlargement and pulmonary vascular changes consistent with CLD. Measurements and Main Results: HPV was attenuated in preterm lambs with CLI after 2 weeks of MV and in newborn rats with CLI after 2 weeks of hyperoxia. HPV and constriction to the Kv1.x-specific inhibitor, correolide, were preferentially blunted in excised distal pulmonary arteries (dPAs) from hyperoxic rats, whose dPAs exhibited decreased Kv1.5 and Kv2.1 mRNA and K+ current. Intrapulmonary gene transfer of Kv1.5, encoding the ion channel that is thought to trigger HPV, increased O2-sensitive K+ current in cultured smooth muscle cells from rat dPAs, and restored HPV in hyperoxic rats. Conclusions: Reduced expression/activity of O2-sensitive Kv channels in dPAs contributes to blunted HPV observed in neonatal CLD. PMID:18511704

  10. Autoimmune thrombocytopenia in a patient with small cell lung cancer developing after chemotherapy and resolving following autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Demirer, T; Celebi, H; Arat, M; Ustün, C; Demirer, S; Dilek, I; Ozcan, M; Ilhan, O; Akan, H; Gürman, G; Koç, H

    1999-08-01

    A 46-year-old white male with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) limited to the thorax developed autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (AITP), following a cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel and G-CSF-containing regimen for peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization. AITP associated with small or non-small cell lung cancer has been reported. We considered that the AITP in this case may be a part of paraneoplastic syndrome, which is frequently seen in patients with SCLC. The patient received HDC and autologous PBSC transplantation (APBSCT) for SCLC and the AITP resolved following transplantation, thus supporting the concept of HDC + APBSCT for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:10455376

  11. Therapeutic Transcutaneous Immunization with a Band-Aid Vaccine Resolves Experimental Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Novotny, Laura A.; Clements, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization (TCI) is a noninvasive strategy to induce protective immune responses. We describe TCI with a band-aid vaccine placed on the postauricular skin to exploit the unique organization of the stratum corneum and to promote the development of immune responses to resolve active experimental otitis media due to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI). This therapeutic immunization strategy induced significantly earlier resolution of middle ear fluid and rapid eradication of both planktonic and mucosal biofilm-resident NTHI within 7 days after receipt of the first immunizing band-aid vaccine. Efficacy was ascribed to the homing of immunogen-bearing cutaneous dendritic cells to the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue, induction of polyfunctional CD4+ T cells, and the presence of immunogen-specific IgM and IgG within the middle ear. TCI using band-aid vaccines could expand the use of traditional parenteral preventative vaccines to include treatment of active otitis media, in addition to other diseases of the respiratory tract due to NTHI. PMID:26018536

  12. Therapeutic Transcutaneous Immunization with a Band-Aid Vaccine Resolves Experimental Otitis Media.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Laura A; Clements, John D; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2015-08-01

    Transcutaneous immunization (TCI) is a noninvasive strategy to induce protective immune responses. We describe TCI with a band-aid vaccine placed on the postauricular skin to exploit the unique organization of the stratum corneum and to promote the development of immune responses to resolve active experimental otitis media due to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI). This therapeutic immunization strategy induced significantly earlier resolution of middle ear fluid and rapid eradication of both planktonic and mucosal biofilm-resident NTHI within 7 days after receipt of the first immunizing band-aid vaccine. Efficacy was ascribed to the homing of immunogen-bearing cutaneous dendritic cells to the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue, induction of polyfunctional CD4(+) T cells, and the presence of immunogen-specific IgM and IgG within the middle ear. TCI using band-aid vaccines could expand the use of traditional parenteral preventative vaccines to include treatment of active otitis media, in addition to other diseases of the respiratory tract due to NTHI. PMID:26018536

  13. Experimental pressure-temperature phase diagram of boron: resolving the long-standing enigma

    PubMed Central

    Parakhonskiy, Gleb; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Bykova, Elena; Wirth, Richard; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2011-01-01

    Boron, discovered as an element in 1808 and produced in pure form in 1909, has still remained the last elemental material, having stable natural isotopes, with the ground state crystal phase to be unknown. It has been a subject of long-standing controversy, if α-B or β-B is the thermodynamically stable phase at ambient pressure and temperature. In the present work this enigma has been resolved based on the α-B-to- β-B phase boundary line which we experimentally established in the pressure interval of ∼4 GPa to 8 GPa and linearly extrapolated down to ambient pressure. In a series of high pressure high temperature experiments we synthesised single crystals of the three boron phases (α-B, β-B, and γ-B) and provided evidence of higher thermodynamic stability of α-B. Our work opens a way for reproducible synthesis of α-boron, an optically transparent direct band gap semiconductor with very high hardness, thermal and chemical stability. PMID:22355614

  14. Distribution of aerosolized particles in healthy and emphysematous rat lungs: comparison between experimental and numerical studies.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Jessica M; Marsden, Alison L; Grandmont, Céline; Darquenne, Chantal; Vignon-Clementel, Irene E

    2015-04-13

    In silico models of airflow and particle deposition in the lungs are increasingly used to determine the therapeutic or toxic effects of inhaled aerosols. While computational methods have advanced significantly, relatively few studies have directly compared model predictions to experimental data. Furthermore, few prior studies have examined the influence of emphysema on particle deposition. In this work we performed airflow and particle simulations to compare numerical predictions to data from our previous aerosol exposure experiments. Employing an image-based 3D rat airway geometry, we first compared steady flow simulations to coupled 3D-0D unsteady simulations in the healthy rat lung. Then, in 3D-0D simulations, the influence of emphysema was investigated by matching disease location to the experimental study. In both the healthy unsteady and steady simulations, good agreement was found between numerical predictions of aerosol delivery and experimental deposition data. However, deposition patterns in the 3D geometry differed between the unsteady and steady cases. On the contrary, satisfactory agreement was not found between the numerical predictions and experimental data for the emphysematous lungs. This indicates that the deposition rate downstream of the 3D geometry is likely proportional to airflow delivery in the healthy lungs, but not in the emphysematous lungs. Including small airway collapse, variations in downstream airway size and tissue properties, and tracking particles throughout expiration may result in a more favorable agreement in future studies. PMID:25682537

  15. Experimental evolution of sprays in a lung model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguete, Javier; Aliseda, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    We present the first results of an experiment conceived to observe the evolution of sprays inside the lungs. We have built a model that covers the first 6 generations (from the trachea to segmental bronchi of 5th generation). This setup is placed on a wind tunnel, and the flow inside the model is induced by a vacuum pump that emulates the breathing process using a valve. We inject a previously determined distribution of particles (water droplets), whose average diameter can be modified. Then, we measure the droplet distribution in different branches and compare how the droplet distribution is modified at each generation. The parameters that control the behavior are the average diameter of the original distribution, the airflow rate inside the model and the frequency of the breathing cycle.

  16. Resolving Key Uncertainties in Subsurface Energy Recovery: One Role of In Situ Experimentation and URLs (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsworth, D.

    2013-12-01

    Significant uncertainties remain and influence the recovery of energy from the subsurface. These uncertainties include the fate and transport of long-lived radioactive wastes that result from the generation of nuclear power and have been the focus of an active network of international underground research laboratories dating back at least 35 years. However, other nascent carbon-free energy technologies including conventional and EGS geothermal methods, carbon-neutral methods such as carbon capture and sequestration and the utilization of reduced-carbon resources such as unconventional gas reservoirs offer significant challenges in their effective deployment. We illustrate the important role that in situ experiments may play in resolving behaviors at extended length- and time-scales for issues related to chemical-mechanical interactions. Significantly, these include the evolution of transport and mechanical characteristics of stress-sensitive fractured media and their influence of the long-term behavior of the system. Importantly, these interests typically relate to either creating reservoirs (hydroshearing in EGS reservoirs, artificial fractures in shales and coals) or maintaining seals at depth where the permeating fluids may include mixed brines, CO2, methane and other hydrocarbons. Critical questions relate to the interaction of these various fluid mixtures and compositions with the fractured substrate. Important needs are in understanding the roles of key processes (transmission, dissolution, precipitation, sorption and dynamic stressing) on the modification of effective stresses and their influence on the evolution of permeability, strength and induced seismicity on the resulting development of either wanted or unwanted fluid pathways. In situ experimentation has already contributed to addressing some crucial issues of these complex interactions at field scale. Important contributions are noted in understanding the fate and transport of long-lived wastes

  17. Response of lung γδ T cells to experimental sepsis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, Mark; Dyugovskaya, Larissa; Kaplan, Viktoria; Krausz, Michael M

    2004-01-01

    γδ T cells link innate and adaptive immune systems and may regulate host defence. Their role in systemic inflammation induced by trauma or infection (sepsis) is still obscured. The present study was aimed to investigate functions of lung γδ T cells and their response to experimental sepsis. Mice were subjected to caecal ligation and puncture (CLP) to induce sepsis and acute lung injury (ALI), or to the sham operation. Animals were killed 1, 4, and 7 days postoperatively; lungs were examined by histology, and isolated cells were studied by flow cytometry. Absolute number of γδ T cells progressively increased in lungs during sepsis, and reached a seven-fold increase at day 7 after CLP (3·84 ± 0·41 × 105/lung; P = 0·0002 versus sham). A cellular dysfunction was revealed one day after CLP, as manifested by low cytolytic activity (22·3 ± 7·1%; P < 0·05 versus sham), low interferon-γ (IFN-γ; 8·5 ± 2·5%; P < 0·05 versus control) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) expression, and high tumour necrosis factor-α expression (19·5 ± 1·7%; P < 0·05 versus control). The restoration of cytotoxicity, and increase in IFN-γ and IL-10 expression was observed at day 7 of CLP-induced sepsis. In summary, our results demonstrate significant progressive accumulation of γδ T cells in lungs during CLP-induced ALI. The temporary functional suppression of lung γδ T cells found early after CLP may influence the outcome of sepsis, possibly being associated with uncontrolled inflammatory lung damage. PMID:15096194

  18. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 is produced during self-resolving gram-negative bacterial pneumonia and regulates host immune responses for the resolution of lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Abdulnour, R E; Sham, H P; Douda, D N; Colas, R A; Dalli, J; Bai, Y; Ai, X; Serhan, C N; Levy, B D

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Host responses to contain infection and mitigate pathogen-mediated lung inflammation are critical for pneumonia resolution. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 (AT-RvD1; 7S,8R,17R-trihydroxy-4Z,9E,11E,13Z,15E,19Z-docosahexaenoic acid) is a lipid mediator (LM) that displays organ-protective actions in sterile lung inflammation, and regulates pathogen-initiated cellular responses. Here, in a self-resolving murine model of Escherichia coli pneumonia, LM metabololipidomics performed on lungs obtained at baseline, 24, and 72 h after infection uncovered temporal regulation of endogenous AT-RvD1 production. Early treatment with exogenous AT-RvD1 (1 h post infection) enhanced clearance of E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vivo, and lung macrophage phagocytosis of fluorescent bacterial particles ex vivo. Characterization of macrophage subsets in the alveolar compartment during pneumonia identified efferocytosis by infiltrating macrophages (CD11b(Hi) CD11c(Low)) and exudative macrophages (CD11b(Hi) CD11c(Hi)). AT-RvD1 increased efferocytosis by these cells ex vivo, and accelerated neutrophil clearance during pneumonia in vivo. These anti-bacterial and pro-resolving actions of AT-RvD1 were additive to antibiotic therapy. Taken together, these findings suggest that the pro-resolving actions of AT-RvD1 during pneumonia represent a novel host-directed therapeutic strategy to complement the current antibiotic-centered approach for combatting infections. PMID:26647716

  19. Effects of surfactant/budesonide therapy on oxidative modifications in the lung in experimental meconium-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mikolka, P; Kopincova, J; Tomcikova Mikusiakova, L; Kosutova, P; Antosova, M; Calkovska, A; Mokra, D

    2016-02-01

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is a serious condition, which can be treated with exogenous surfactant and mechanical ventilation. However, meconium-induced inflammation, lung edema and oxidative damage may inactivate delivered surfactant and thereby reduce effectiveness of the therapy. As we presumed that addition of anti-inflammatory agent into the surfactant may alleviate inflammation and enhance efficiency of the therapy, this study was performed to evaluate effects of surfactant therapy enriched with budesonide versus surfactant-only therapy on markers of oxidative stress in experimental model of MAS. Meconium suspension (25 mg/ml, 4 ml/kg) was instilled into the trachea of young rabbits, whereas one group of animals received saline instead of meconium (C group, n = 6). In meconium-instilled animals, respiratory failure developed within 30 min. Then, meconium-instilled animals were divided into 3 groups according to therapy (n = 6 each): with surfactant therapy (M + S group), with surfactant + budesonide therapy (M + S + B), and without therapy (M group). Surfactant therapy consisted of two bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) with diluted surfactant (Curosurf, 5 mg phospholipids/ml, 10 ml/kg) followed by undiluted surfactant (100 mg phospholipids/kg), which was in M + S + B group enriched with budesonide (Pulmicort, 0.5 mg/ml). Animals were oxygen-ventilated for additional 5 hours. At the end of experiment, blood sample was taken for differential white blood cell (WBC) count. After euthanizing animals, left lung was saline-lavaged and cell differential in BAL was determined. Oxidative damage, i.e. oxidation of lipids (thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and conjugated dienes) and proteins (dityrosine and lysine-lipoperoxidation products) was estimated in lung homogenate and isolated mitochondria. Total antioxidant capacity was evaluated in lung homogenate and plasma. Meconium instillation increased transmigration of neutrophils and production of free

  20. Experimental station for laser-based picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dorchies, F. Fedorov, N.; Lecherbourg, L.

    2015-07-15

    We present an experimental station designed for time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). It is based on ultrashort laser-plasma x-ray pulses generated from a table-top 100 mJ-class laser at 10 Hz repetition rate. A high transmission (10%–20%) x-ray beam line transport using polycapillary optics allows us to set the sample in an independent vacuum chamber, providing high flexibility over a wide spectral range from 0.5 up to 4 keV. Some XANES spectra are presented, demonstrating 1% noise level in only ∼1 mn and ∼100 cumulated laser shots. Time-resolved measurements are reported, indicating that the time resolution of the entire experimental station is 3.3 ± 0.6 ps rms.

  1. Experimental station for laser-based picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorchies, F.; Fedorov, N.; Lecherbourg, L.

    2015-07-01

    We present an experimental station designed for time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). It is based on ultrashort laser-plasma x-ray pulses generated from a table-top 100 mJ-class laser at 10 Hz repetition rate. A high transmission (10%-20%) x-ray beam line transport using polycapillary optics allows us to set the sample in an independent vacuum chamber, providing high flexibility over a wide spectral range from 0.5 up to 4 keV. Some XANES spectra are presented, demonstrating 1% noise level in only ˜1 mn and ˜100 cumulated laser shots. Time-resolved measurements are reported, indicating that the time resolution of the entire experimental station is 3.3 ± 0.6 ps rms.

  2. Tomato Lycopene and Lung Cancer Prevention: From Experimental to Human Studies

    PubMed Central

    Palozza, Paola; Simone, Rossella E.; Catalano, Assunta; Mele, Maria Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that tomato lycopene may be preventive against the formation and the development of lung cancer. Experimental studies demonstrated that lycopene may inhibit the growth of several cultured lung cancer cells and prevent lung tumorigenesis in animal models through various mechanisms, including a modulation of redox status, cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis induction, a regulation of growth factor signaling, changes in cell growth-related enzymes, an enhancement of gap junction communication and a prevention of smoke-induced inflammation. In addition, lycopene also inhibited cell invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Several lycopene metabolites have been identified, raising the question as to whether the preventive effects of lycopene on cancer risk is, at least in part, due to its metabolites. Despite these promising reports, it is difficult at the moment to directly relate available experimental data to human pathophysiology. More well controlled clinical intervention trials are needed to further clarify the exact role of lycopene in the prevention of lung cancer cell growth. Such studies should take into consideration subject selection, specific markers of analysis, the levels of carotenoids being tested, metabolism and isomerization of lycopene, interaction with other bioactive food components. This article reviews data on the cancer preventive activities of lycopene, possible mechanisms involved, and the relationship between lycopene consumption and human cancer risk. PMID:24212813

  3. Experimental measurement of spatially resolved electron density in a filament of a pulsed positive streamer discharge in water

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Xiao Qiong; Niu, Zhi Wen; Ren, Chun-Sheng; Hou, Bo

    2015-06-29

    By combining a high-speed frame camera with a monochromator, the spatially resolved optical emission spectrum of hydrogen α line in a single filament of a pulsed positive streamer discharge in water has been experimentally measured. The spatially resolved electron densities in a single filament of a pulsed positive streamer discharge in water with a conductivity of 200 μS/cm were investigated. During the experiment, the average energy per pulse of discharge was 90.6 ± 13.6 mJ. The results show that the electron density in the streamer filament is 10{sup 17–18}/cm{sup 3}, and present a decreasing tendency along the axial direction of the streamer filament with increasing distance from the tip of the anode.

  4. A novel dual ex vivo lung perfusion technique improves immediate outcomes in an experimental model of lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Noda, K; Isse, K; Tobita, K; Maniwa, Y; Bhama, J K; D'Cunha, J; Bermudez, C A; Luketich, J D; Shigemura, N

    2015-05-01

    The lungs are dually perfused by the pulmonary artery and the bronchial arteries. This study aimed to test the feasibility of dual-perfusion techniques with the bronchial artery circulation and pulmonary artery circulation synchronously perfused using ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) and evaluate the effects of dual-perfusion on posttransplant lung graft function. Using rat heart-lung blocks, we developed a dual-perfusion EVLP circuit (dual-EVLP), and compared cellular metabolism, expression of inflammatory mediators, and posttransplant graft function in lung allografts maintained with dual-EVLP, standard-EVLP, or cold static preservation. The microvasculature in lung grafts after transplant was objectively evaluated using microcomputed tomography angiography. Lung grafts subjected to dual-EVLP exhibited significantly better lung graft function with reduced proinflammatory profiles and more mitochondrial biogenesis, leading to better posttransplant function and compliance, as compared with standard-EVLP or static cold preservation. Interestingly, lung grafts maintained on dual-EVLP exhibited remarkably increased microvasculature and perfusion as compared with lungs maintained on standard-EVLP. Our results suggest that lung grafts can be perfused and preserved using dual-perfusion EVLP techniques that contribute to better graft function by reducing proinflammatory profiles and activating mitochondrial respiration. Dual-EVLP also yields better posttransplant graft function through increased microvasculature and better perfusion of the lung grafts after transplantation. PMID:25777770

  5. Resolvin D1 protects against inflammation in experimental acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Zhou, Dan; Long, Fei-Wu; Chen, Ke-Ling; Yang, Hong-Wei; Lv, Zhao-Yin; Zhou, Bin; Peng, Zhi-Hai; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Zong-Guang

    2016-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition that may lead to multisystemic organ failure with considerable mortality. Recently, resolvin D1 (RvD1) as an endogenous anti-inflammatory lipid mediator has been confirmed to protect against many inflammatory diseases. This study was designed to investigate the effects of RvD1 in acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury. Acute pancreatitis varying from mild to severe was induced by cerulein or cerulein combined with LPS, respectively. Mice were pretreated with RvD1 at a dose of 300 ng/mouse 30 min before the first injection of cerulein. Severity of AP was assessed by biochemical markers and histology. Serum cytokines and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels in pancreas and lung were determined for assessing the extent of inflammatory response. NF-κB activation was determined by Western blotting. The injection of cerulein or cerulein combined with LPS resulted in local injury in the pancreas and corresponding systemic inflammatory changes with pronounced severity in the cerulein and LPS group. Pretreated RvD1 significantly reduced the degree of amylase, lipase, TNF-α, and IL-6 serum levels; the MPO activities in the pancreas and the lungs; the pancreatic NF-κB activation; and the severity of pancreatic injury and associated lung injury, especially in the severe acute pancreatitis model. These results suggest that RvD1 is capable of improving injury of pancreas and lung and exerting anti-inflammatory effects through the inhibition of NF-κB activation in experimental acute pancreatitis, with more notable protective effect in severe acute pancreatitis. These findings indicate that RvD1 may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy in the management of severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:26702138

  6. A theoretical and experimental study of time-resolved thermal mirror with non-absorbing heat-coupling fluids.

    PubMed

    Lukasievicz, Gustavo V B; Malacarne, Luis C; Astrath, Nelson G C; Zanuto, Vitor S; Herculano, Leandro S; Bialkowski, Stephen E

    2012-12-01

    A theoretical and experimental study taking sample-fluid heat coupling into account in time-resolved photothermal mirror experiments is presented. Thermoelastic equations were solved to obtain a semi-analytical solution to the phase shift induced by the sample and the surrounding fluid. The solution was used to model the thermal mirror effects and found to be in excellent agreement with the finite element method analysis and experiment. Heat transferred to the air-coupling fluid did not introduce important effects in the phase shift when compared with the solution obtained, without considering heat flux. However, when using water as the fluid, heat coupling led to a significant effect in fluid phase shift. Experimental results using stainless steel in air and water were used to demonstrate the potentiality of the thermal mirror technique to determine the thermal properties of both the sample and the fluid. PMID:23231909

  7. A flexible experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved broad-band ellipsometry and magneto-optics

    SciTech Connect

    Boschini, F.; Hedayat, H.; Piovera, C.; Dallera, C.; Gupta, A.; Carpene, E.

    2015-01-15

    A versatile experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved ellipsometry and magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements in the visible light range is described. The apparatus is based on the pump-probe technique and combines a broad-band probing beam with an intense near-infrared pump. According to Fresnel scattering matrix formalism, the analysis of the reflected beam at different polarization states of the incident probe light allows one to determine the diagonal and the off-diagonal elements of the dielectric tensor in the investigated sample. Moreover, the pump-probe method permits to study the dynamics of the dielectric response after a short and intense optical excitation. The performance of the experimental apparatus is tested on CrO{sub 2} single crystals as a benchmark.

  8. A flexible experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved broad-band ellipsometry and magneto-optics.

    PubMed

    Boschini, F; Hedayat, H; Piovera, C; Dallera, C; Gupta, A; Carpene, E

    2015-01-01

    A versatile experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved ellipsometry and magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements in the visible light range is described. The apparatus is based on the pump-probe technique and combines a broad-band probing beam with an intense near-infrared pump. According to Fresnel scattering matrix formalism, the analysis of the reflected beam at different polarization states of the incident probe light allows one to determine the diagonal and the off-diagonal elements of the dielectric tensor in the investigated sample. Moreover, the pump-probe method permits to study the dynamics of the dielectric response after a short and intense optical excitation. The performance of the experimental apparatus is tested on CrO2 single crystals as a benchmark. PMID:25638099

  9. A flexible experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved broad-band ellipsometry and magneto-optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschini, F.; Hedayat, H.; Piovera, C.; Dallera, C.; Gupta, A.; Carpene, E.

    2015-01-01

    A versatile experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved ellipsometry and magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements in the visible light range is described. The apparatus is based on the pump-probe technique and combines a broad-band probing beam with an intense near-infrared pump. According to Fresnel scattering matrix formalism, the analysis of the reflected beam at different polarization states of the incident probe light allows one to determine the diagonal and the off-diagonal elements of the dielectric tensor in the investigated sample. Moreover, the pump-probe method permits to study the dynamics of the dielectric response after a short and intense optical excitation. The performance of the experimental apparatus is tested on CrO2 single crystals as a benchmark.

  10. Time-resolved experimental and computational study of two-photon laser-induced fluorescence in a hydrogen plasma

    PubMed

    van Der Heijden HW; Boogaarts; Mazouffre; van Der Mullen JA; Schram

    2000-04-01

    The time profile of the fluorescence light emission of atomic hydrogen in an expanding plasma beam after pulsed excitation with a nanosecond laser is studied, both experimentally and computationally. Ground state H atoms in an expanding Ar-H cascaded arc plasma are excited to the p=3 level using two-photon laser excitation at 205 nm. The resulting fluorescence is resolved in time with a fast photomultiplier tube to investigate the occurrence of quenching. A fluorescence decay time of (10+/-0.5) ns is measured under all circumstances, indicating that there is a complete l mixing of the p=3 sublevels. A time-resolved collisional radiative model is developed to model pulsed laser induced fluorescence for a large range of plasma parameters. The model calculations agree well with the experimental results over the entire range of conditions and indicate that two-photon LIF can strongly influence the local electron and ion densities, resulting in a "self-quenching" of the laser-induced H fluorescence. PMID:11088238

  11. Experimental Research and the Managerial Attitude: A Tension to Be Resolved?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benninghoff, Martin; Sormani, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    This article analyses some typical consequences of a specific research policy on experimental research in biology. The policy is conducted by a national funding agency--the Swiss National Science Foundation--through a particular programme, the "National Centres of Competence in Research" which is designed to promote both "scientific excellence"…

  12. Angular resolved light scattering for discriminating among marine picoplankton: modeling and experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Bing; Jaffe, Jules S.; Chachisvilis, Mirianas; Esener, Sadik C.

    2006-12-01

    In order to assess the capability to optically identify small marine microbes, both simulations and experiments of angular resolved light scattering (ARLS) were performed. After calibration with 30-nm vesicles characterized by a nearly constant scattering distribution for vertically polarized light (azimuthal angle=90°), ARLS from suspensions of three types of marine picoplankton (two prokaryotes and one eukaryote) in seawater was measured with a scattering device that consisted of an elliptical mirror, a rotating aperture, and a PMT. Scattered light was recorded with adequate signal-to-noise in the 40-140°. Simulations modeled the cells as prolate spheroids with independently measured dimensions. For the prokaryotes, approximated as homogeneous spheroids, simulations were performed using the RM (Rayleigh-Mie) - I method, a hybrid of the Rayleigh-Debye approximation and the generalized Lorentz-Mie theory. For the picoeukaryote, an extended RM - I method was developed for a coated spheroid with different shell thickness distributions. The picoeukaryote was then modeled as a coated sphere with a spherical core. Good overall agreements were obtained between simulations and experiments. The distinctive scattering patterns of the different species hold promise for an identification system based on ARLS.

  13. Experimental lung injury promotes alterations in energy metabolism and respiratory mechanics in the lungs of rats: prevention by exercise.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Maira J; da Cunha, Aline A; Scherer, Emilene B S; Machado, Fernanda Rossato; Loureiro, Samanta O; Jaenisch, Rodrigo B; Guma, Fátima; Lago, Pedro Dal; Wyse, Angela T S

    2014-04-01

    In the present study we investigated the effects of lung injury on energy metabolism (succinate dehydrogenase, complex II, cytochrome c oxidase, and ATP levels), respiratory mechanics (dynamic and static compliance, elastance and respiratory system resistance) in the lungs of rats, as well as on phospholipids in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The protective effect of physical exercise on the alterations caused by lung injury, including lung edema was also evaluated. Wistar rats were submitted to 2 months of physical exercise. After this period the lung injury was induced by intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide. Adult Wistar rats were submitted to 2 months of physical exercise and after this period the lung injury was induced by intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide in dose 100 μg/100 g body weight. The sham group received isotonic saline instillation. Twelve hours after the injury was performed the respiratory mechanical and after the rats were decapitated and samples were collected. The rats subjected to lung injury presented a decrease in activities of the enzymes of the electron transport chain and ATP levels in lung, as well as the formation of pulmonary edema. A decreased lung dynamic and static compliance, as well as an increase in respiratory system resistance, and a decrease in phospholipids content were observed. Physical exercise was able to totally prevent the decrease in succinate dehydrogenase and complex II activities and the formation of pulmonary edema. It also partially prevented the increase in respiratory system resistance, but did not prevent the decrease in dynamic and static compliance, as well as in phospholipids content. These findings suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction may be one of the important contributors to lung damage and that physical exercise may be beneficial in this pathology, although it did not prevent all changes present in lung injury. PMID:24378995

  14. Pulsatility flow around a single cylinder - an experimental model of flow inside an artificial lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Chun; Bull, Joseph L.

    2004-11-01

    Pulsatile flow past a single cylinder is experimentally investigated using particle image velocimetry. This study aims to elucidate the effects of pulstility on the velocity field, which influences the convection-dominated transport within the fluid. The artificial lung device can be connected in parallel or series with the native lungs and may potentially be used as a bridge to transplant or for pulmonary replacement. The artificial lung consists of hollow microfibers through which gas flows and blood flows around. Blood flow through the device is pulsatile because it is driven entirely by the right heart. Steady flow over bluff bodies has been investigated in many contexts, such as heat exchangers. However, few studies have been investigated the effect of pulsatility. The effects of frequency, amplitude of pulsatility, and average flow rate on the formation of vortices after a cylinder are examined. Vortices near the cylinder are found to develop at lower Reynolds number in pulsatile flow than in steady flow. This work is supported by NIH grant R01 HL69420-01.

  15. Replication competent Semliki Forest virus prolongs survival in experimental lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Määttä, Ann-Marie; Mäkinen, Kimmo; Ketola, Anna; Liimatainen, Timo; Yongabi, Felicitas Newu; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Pirinen, Risto; Rautsi, Outi; Pellinen, Riikka; Hinkkanen, Ari; Wahlfors, Jarmo

    2008-10-01

    We evaluated the therapeutic potential of the replication competent vector VA7-EGFP, which is based on the avirulent Semliki Forest virus (SFV) strain A7 (74) carrying the EGFP marker gene in an orthotopic lung cancer tumor model in nude mice. We have previously shown that this oncolytic vector destroys tumor cells efficiently in vitro and in vivo (in subcutaneous tumor model). Tumor growth in animals with orthotopically implanted adenocarcinoma cells (A549) were monitored during the study with small animal CT. We show that locally administered virotherapy with VA7-EGFP increased survival rate in experimental lung cancer significantly (p < 0.001) comparable to results obtained with the second generation conditionally replicating adenoviral vector Ad5-Delta24TK-GFP, used for comparison. The limited efficacy in systemically administered oncolytic viruses is the essential problem in oncolytic virotherapy and also in this study we were not able to elicit significant response with systemic administration route. Despite the fact that tumor microenvironment in orthotopic lung cancer is more optimal, viruses failed to home to the tumors and were unable to initiate efficient intratumoral replication. Clearly, the efficacy of virotherapy is influenced by many factors such as the route of virus administration, immunological and physiological barriers and cancer cell-specific features (IFN-responsiveness). PMID:18651570

  16. Ultrasonic evidence of acute interstitial lung edema after SCUBA diving is resolved within 2-3h.

    PubMed

    Ljubkovic, Marko; Gaustad, Svein Erik; Marinovic, Jasna; Obad, Ante; Ivancev, Vladimir; Bilopavlovic, Nada; Breskovic, Toni; Wisloff, Ulrik; Brubakk, Alf; Dujic, Zeljko

    2010-04-30

    Recently, an increase in extravascular lung water (EVLW) accumulation with diminished left ventricular contractility within 60 min after SCUBA diving was reported. We have observed previously that diving was associated with reduced diffusing lung capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) and arterial oxygen pressure for up to 60-80 min postdive. Here we investigated whether increased EVLW persists 2-3h after successive deep dives in a group of seven male divers. The echocardiographic indices of pulmonary water accumulation (ultrasound lung comets (ULC)) and left ventricular function, respiratory functional measurements and arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2)) were assessed 2-3h post diving, while venous gas bubbles (VGB) and the blood levels of NT-proBNP and proANP were analyzed 40 min after surfacing. Spirometry values, flow-volume, DLCO, SaO(2) and ULC were unchanged after each dive, except for significant increase in ULC after the second dive. Left ventricular function was reduced, while NT-proBNP and proANP levels were significantly elevated after majority of dives, suggesting a cardiac strain. PMID:20188217

  17. A new experimental model of acid- and endotoxin-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Puig, F; Herrero, R; Guillamat-Prats, R; Gómez, M N; Tijero, J; Chimenti, L; Stelmakh, O; Blanch, L; Serrano-Mollar, A; Matthay, M A; Artigas, A

    2016-08-01

    The majority of the animal models of acute lung injury (ALI) are focused on the acute phase. This limits the studies of the mechanisms involved in later phases and the effects of long-term treatments. Thus the goal of this study was to develop an experimental ALI model of aspiration pneumonia, in which diffuse alveolar damage continues for 72 h. Rats were intratracheally instilled with one dose of HCl (0.1 mol/l) followed by another instillation of one dose of LPS (0, 10, 20, 30, or 40 μg/g body weight) 2 h later, which models aspiration of gastric contents that progresses to secondary lung injury from bacteria or bacterial products. The rats were euthanized at 24, 48, and 72 h after the last instillation. The results showed that HCl and LPS at all doses caused activation of inflammatory responses, increased protein permeability and apoptosis, and induced mild hypoxemia in rat lungs at 24 h postinstillation. However, this lung damage was present at 72 h only in rats receiving HCl and LPS at the doses of 30 and 40 μg/g body wt. Mortality (∼50%) occurred in the first 48 h and only in the rats treated with HCl and LPS at the highest dose (40 μg/g body wt). In conclusion, intratracheal instillation of HCl followed by LPS at the dose of 30 μg/g body wt results in severe diffuse alveolar damage that continues at least 72 h. This rat model of aspiration pneumonia-induced ALI will be useful for testing long-term effects of new therapeutic strategies in ALI. PMID:27317688

  18. Synergy between acid and endotoxin in an experimental model of aspiration-related lung injury progression.

    PubMed

    Tetenev, Konstantin; Cloutier, Mary E; von Reyn, Jessica A; Ather, Jennifer L; Candon, James; Allen, Gilman B

    2015-11-15

    Aspiration is a common cause of lung injury, but it is unclear why some cases are self-limited while others progress to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Sporadic exposure to more than one insult could account for this variable progression. We investigated whether synergy between airway acid and endotoxin (LPS) amplifies injury severity in mice and whether LPS levels in human patients could corroborate our experimental findings. C57BL/6 mice aspirated acid (pH 1.3) or normal saline (NS), followed by LPS aerosol or nothing. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was obtained 2 to 49 h later. Mice were injected with FITC-dextran 25 h after aspiration and connected to a ventilator, and lung elastance (H) measured periodically following deep inflation (DI). Endotracheal and gastric aspirates were also collected from patients in the intensive care unit and assayed for pH and LPS. Lung instability (ΔH following DI) and pressure-volume hysteresis in acid- or LPS-exposed mice was greater than in controls but markedly greater in the combined acid/LPS group. BALF neutrophils, cytokines, protein, and FITC-dextran in the acid/LPS mice were geometrically higher than all other groups. BALF from acid-only mice markedly amplified LPS-induced TNF-α production in cultured macrophages. Human subjects had variable endotracheal LPS levels with the highest burden in those at higher risk of aspiration. Acid aspiration amplifies LPS signaling in mice to disrupt barrier function and lung mechanics in synergy. High variation in airway LPS and greater airway LPS burden in patients at higher risk of aspiration could help explain the sporadic progression of aspiration to ARDS. PMID:26408552

  19. Resolving Apparent Conflicts between Theoretical and Experimental Models of Phosphate Monoester Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Understanding phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer is central to many biochemical processes. However, despite decades of experimental and computational studies, a consensus concerning the precise mechanistic details of these reactions has yet to be reached. In this work we perform a detailed comparative theoretical study of the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate, methyl phosphate and p-nitrophenyl sulfate, all of which have served as key model systems for understanding phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer reactions, respectively. We demonstrate the existence of energetically similar but mechanistically distinct possibilities for phosphate monoester hydrolysis. The calculated kinetic isotope effects for p-nitrophenyl phosphate provide a means to discriminate between substrate- and solvent-assisted pathways of phosphate monoester hydrolysis, and show that the solvent-assisted pathway dominates in solution. This preferred mechanism for p-nitrophenyl phosphate hydrolysis is difficult to find computationally due to the limitations of compressing multiple bonding changes onto a 2-dimensional energy surface. This problem is compounded by the need to include implicit solvation to at least microsolvate the system and stabilize the highly charged species. In contrast, methyl phosphate hydrolysis shows a preference for a substrate-assisted mechanism. For p-nitrophenyl sulfate hydrolysis there is only one viable reaction pathway, which is similar to the solvent-assisted pathway for phosphate hydrolysis, and the substrate-assisted pathway is not accessible. Overall, our results provide a unifying mechanistic framework that is consistent with the experimentally measured kinetic isotope effects and reconciles the discrepancies between theoretical and experimental models for these biochemically ubiquitous classes of reaction. PMID:25423607

  20. [Effect of L-arginine on pro- and antioxidant status of the rat vessels and lungs in experimental rhabdomyolysis].

    PubMed

    Fylymonenko, V P; Nikitchenko, I V; Kaliman, P A

    2009-01-01

    The glycerol administration was found to cause accumulation of the total heme in rat blood serum, vessels and lungs that are accompanied by increase of TBA-reactive products and protein carbonyl derivates contents. A decrease of superoxide dismutase activity and an increase of reduced glutathione in lung were observed. Heme entering the vessels and lungs is accompanied by elevation in heme oxygenase activity. Pretreatment by L-arginine (0.5 h before glycerol administration) didn't affect blood serum and vessels changes caused by glycerol injection. However, in lungs, L-arginine prevents TBA-reactive products and protein carbonyl derivates accumulation, the decrease ofsuperoxide dismutase activity and causes the ealier heme oxygenase induction. Prooxidant effects of heme in tissues studied and possible mechanisms of L-arginine protective action in lung under experimental rhabdomyolysis are discussed. PMID:20095386

  1. Resolving small signal measurements in experimental plasma environments using calibrated subtraction of noise signals

    SciTech Connect

    Fimognari, P. J. Demers, D. R.; Chen, X.; Schoch, P. M.

    2014-11-15

    The performance of many diagnostic and control systems within fusion and other fields of research are often detrimentally affected by spurious noise signals. This is particularly true for those (such as radiation or particle detectors) working with very small signals. Common sources of radiated and conducted noise in experimental fusion environments include the plasma itself and instrumentation. The noise complicates data analysis, as illustrated by noise on signals measured with the heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus. The noise is time-varying and often exceeds the secondary ion beam current (in contrast with previous applications). Analysis of the noise identifies the dominant source as photoelectric emission from the detectors induced by ultraviolet light from the plasma. This has led to the development of a calibrated subtraction technique, which largely removes the undesired temporal noise signals from data. The advantages of the technique for small signal measurement applications are demonstrated through improvements realized on HIBP fluctuation measurements.

  2. Experimentally Resolving the Atomic Structure of Supported Nanometer-size Gold Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifenberger, R.; Lovall, D.; Buss, M.; Andres, R. P.

    1998-03-01

    Techniques to soft-land nanometer size particles onto sharp tips have been used to study the structure and stability of Au clusters. These clusters have been deposited on W, Pt, and Pt/Ir tips. Field-ion microcope (FIM) techniques utilizing Ar as an imaging gas allow surface atoms on the clusters to be imaged. Time lapse studies of the FIM micrographs allow the positions of edge and corner atoms on the cluster to be mapped. Careful comparison of experimental images with simulated images allow the structure and orientation of these clusters to be identified. FIM micrographs of annealed, single crystal Au clusters show evidence of a truncated-octahedra (TO) structure with one of the Au(111) hexagonal faces of the cluster resting on the surface of the tip. Unannealed Au clusters show evidence of a multiply-twinned structure. Studies of both annealed and unannealed Au clusters also provide evidence of a high degree of stability, with no indication of structural fluctuations at room temperature.

  3. Effects on symptoms and lung function in humans experimentally exposed to diesel exhaust.

    PubMed Central

    Rudell, B; Ledin, M C; Hammarström, U; Stjernberg, N; Lundbäck, B; Sandström, T

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Diesel exhaust is a common air pollutant made up of several gases, hydrocarbons, and particles. An experimental study was carried out which was designed to evaluate if a particle trap on the tail pipe of an idling diesel engine would reduce effects on symptoms and lung function caused by the diesel exhaust, compared with exposure to unfiltered exhaust. METHODS: Twelve healthy non-smoking volunteers (aged 20-37) were investigated in an exposure chamber for one hour during light work on a bicycle ergometer at 75 W. Each subject underwent three separate double blind exposures in a randomised sequence: to air and to diesel exhaust with the particle trap at the tail pipe and to unfiltered diesel exhaust. Symptoms were recorded according to the Borg scale before, every 10 minutes during, and 30 minutes after the exposure. Lung function was measured with a computerised whole body plethysmograph. RESULTS: The ceramic wall flow particle trap reduced the number of particles by 46%, whereas other compounds were relatively constant. It was shown that the most prominent symptoms during exposure to diesel exhaust were irritation of the eyes and nose and an unpleasant smell increasing during exposure. Both airway resistance (R(aw)) and specific airway resistance (SR(aw)) increased significantly during the exposures to diesel exhaust. Despite the 46% reduction in particle numbers by the trap effects on symptoms and lung function were not significantly attenuated. CONCLUSION: Exposure to diesel exhaust caused symptoms and bronchoconstriction which were not significantly reduced by a particle trap. PMID:8943829

  4. SU-E-T-178: Experimental Study of Acceptable Movement Conditions for SBRT Lung Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco de Fez, P; Ruiz-Martinez, A; Jornet, N; Eudaldo, T; Latorre-Musoll, A; Ribas, Morales M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To experimentally study the acceptable movement conditions for SBRT lung treatments we quantified with film dosimetry the change in dose distributions due to periodic movements of 5 different amplitudes and 4 respiratory gating duty cycles on a SBRT treatment plan. Methods: We planned a SBRT treatment plan for the QUASAR™ (Modus Medical) phantom equipped with the respiratory motion device. We placed a 3 mm water-equivalent sphere simulating a tumour inside the lung-equivalent insert. This sphere is divided in two hemispheres that allow placing films in between. We used radiochromic EBT2™ (Ashland) films. We oriented the lung insert in such a way that sagittal dose distributions could be measured. We applied a sinusoidal movement with 3 s period for 5 different amplitudes of 0(static), 5, 7, 10, 15 and 20 mm without gating. For the 20 mm amplitude we studied the gating technique with 4 duty cycles of 20, 40, 60 and 80% of the respiratory cycle. Each situation was irradiated in a Clinac 2100 linac (Varian) equipped with the RPM™ system. FilmQA Pro™ (Ashland) software together with an Expression 10000XL scanner (EPSON) were used to analyze and compare the measured dose distributions with those planned by the Eclipse™ TPS v. 8.9 (Varian) by means of gamma analysis with 6 criteria: 5%/3mm, 5%/2mm, 5%/1mm, 3%/3mm, 3%/2mm and 2%/2mm (threshold of 10%). Results: Movements with amplitude of less than 7mm do not significantly modified the dosimetry. Gating duty cycles of less than 40% yielded also acceptable results for a 2 cm amplitude movement. Conclusion: To safely perform daily accurate SBRT treatments, movements have to be restricted to 7 mm amplitude (±3.5 mm). Otherwise, a gating strategy should be considered.

  5. Mean lung pressure during adult high-frequency oscillatory ventilation: an experimental study using a lung model.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Takahiro; Nagano, Osamu; Shiba, Naoki; Yumoto, Tetsuya; Sato, Keiji; Terado, Michihisa; Ugawa, Toyomu; Ichiba, Shingo; Ujike, Yoshihito

    2014-12-01

    In adult high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV), stroke volume (SV) and mean lung pressure (PLung) are important for lung protection. We measured the airway pressure at the Y-piece and the lung pressure during HFOV using a lung model and HFOV ventilators for adults (R100 and 3100B). The lung model was made of a 20-liter, airtight rigid plastic container (adiabatic compliance: 19.3 ml/cmH2O) with or without a resistor (20 cmH2O/l/sec). The ventilator settings were as follows: mean airway pressure (MAP), 30 cmH2O; frequency, 5-15 Hz (every 1 Hz); airway pressure amplitude (AMP), maximum;and % of inspiratory time (IT), 50% for R100, 33% or 50% for 3100B. The measurements were also performed with an AMP of 2/3 or 1/3 maximum at 5, 10 and 15 Hz. The PLung and the measured MAP were not consistently identical to the setting MAP in either ventilator, and decreasing IT decreased the PLung in 3100B. In conclusion, we must pay attention to the possible discrepancy between the PLung and the setting MAP during adult HFOV. PMID:25519026

  6. The proinflammatory role of HECTD2 in innate immunity and experimental lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Coon, Tiffany A.; McKelvey, Alison C.; Lear, Travis; Rajbhandari, Shristi; Dunn, Sarah R.; Connelly, William; Zhao, Joe Y.; Han, SeungHye; Liu, Yuan; Weathington, Nathaniel M.; McVerry, Bryan J.; Zhang, Yingze; Chen, Bill B.

    2015-01-01

    Invading pathogens may trigger overactivation of the innate immune system, which results in the release of large amounts of proinflammatory cytokines (cytokine storm) and leads to the development of pulmonary edema, multiorgan failure, and shock. PIAS1 is a multifunctional and potent anti-inflammatory protein that negatively regulates several key inflammatory pathways such as Janus kinase (JAK)–signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). We discovered a ubiquitin E3 ligase, HECTD2, which ubiquitinated and mediated the degradation of PIAS1, thus increasing inflammation in an experimental pneumonia model. We found that GSK3b phosphorylation of PIAS1 provided a phosphodegron for HECTD2 targeting. We also identified a mislocalized HECTD2 polymorphism, HECTD2A19P, that was present in 8.5% of the population and functioned to reduce inflammation. This polymorphism prevented HECTD2/PIAS1 nuclear interaction, thus preventing PIAS1 degradation. The HECTD2A19P polymorphism was also protective toward acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We then developed a small-molecule inhibitor, BC-1382, that targeted HECTD2 and attenuated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)– and Pseudomonas aeruginosa–induced lung inflammation. These studies describe an unreported innate immune pathway and suggest that mutation or antagonism of the E3 ligase HECTD2 results in reduced severity of lung inflammation by selectively modulating the abundance of the anti-inflammatory protein PIAS1. PMID:26157031

  7. Sex-specific lung remodeling and inflammation changes in experimental allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Mariana A; Abreu, Soraia C; Silva, Adriana L; Parra-Cuentas, Edwin R; Ab'Saber, Alexandre M; Capelozzi, Vera L; Ferreira, Tatiana P T; Martins, Marco A; Silva, Patricia M R; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2010-09-01

    There is evidence that sex and sex hormones influence the severity of asthma. Airway and lung parenchyma remodeling and the relationship of ultrastructural changes to airway responsiveness and inflammation in male, female, and oophorectomized mice (OVX) were analyzed in experimental chronic allergic asthma. Seventy-two BALB/c mice were randomly divided into three groups (n=24/each): male, female, and OVX mice, whose ovaries were removed 7 days before the start of sensitization. Each group was further randomized to be sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) or saline. Twenty-four hours after the last challenge, collagen fiber content in airways and lung parenchyma, the volume proportion of smooth muscle-specific actin in alveolar ducts and terminal bronchiole, the amount of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, and the number of eosinophils and interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were higher in female than male OVA mice. The response of OVX mice was similar to that of males, except that IL-5 remained higher. Nevertheless, after OVA provocation, airway responsiveness to methacholine was higher in males compared with females and OVX mice. In conclusion, sex influenced the remodeling process, but the mechanisms responsible for airway hyperresponsiveness seemed to differ from those related to remodeling. PMID:20634353

  8. An experimental investigation on intra-fractional organ motion effects in lung IMRT treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Steve B.; Pope, Cynthia; Jarrah, Khaled M. Al; Kung, Jong H.; Bortfeld, Thomas; Chen, George T. Y.

    2003-06-01

    Respiration-induced tumour motion can potentially compromise the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) as a dose escalation tool for lung tumour treatment. We have experimentally investigated the intra-fractional organ motion effects in lung IMRT treatments delivered by multi-leaf collimator (MLC). An in-house made motor-driven platform, which moves sinusoidally with an amplitude of 1 cm and a period of 4 s, was used to mimic tumour motion. Tumour motion was simulated along cranial-caudal direction while MLC leaves moved across the patient from left to right, as in most clinical cases. The dose to a point near the centre of the tumour mass was measured according to geometric and dosimetric parameters from two five-field lung IMRT plans. For each field, measurement was done for two dose rates (300 and 500 MU min-1), three MLC delivery modes (sliding window, step-and-shoot with 10 and 20 intensity levels) and eight equally spaced starting phases of tumour motion. The dose to the measurement point delivered from all five fields was derived for both a single fraction and 30 fractions by randomly sampling from measured dose values of each field at different initial phases. It was found that the mean dose to a moving tumour differs slightly (<2-3%) from that to a static tumour. The variation in breathing phase at the start of dose delivery results in a maximum variation around the mean dose of greater than 30% for one field. The full width at half maximum for the probability distribution of the point dose is up to 8% for all five fields in a single fraction, but less than 1-2% after 30 fractions. In general, lower dose rate can reduce the motion-caused dose variation and therefore might be preferable for lung IMRT when no motion mitigation techniques are used. From the two IMRT cases we studied where tumour motion is perpendicular to MLC leaf motion, the dose variation was found to be insensitive to the MLC delivery mode.

  9. An experimental investigation on intra-fractional organ motion effects in lung IMRT treatments.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Steve B; Pope, Cynthia; Al Jarrah, Khaled M; Kung, Jong H; Bortfeld, Thomas; Chen, George T Y

    2003-06-21

    Respiration-induced tumour motion can potentially compromise the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) as a dose escalation tool for lung tumour treatment. We have experimentally investigated the intra-fractional organ motion effects in lung IMRT treatments delivered by multi-leaf collimator (MLC). An in-house made motor-driven platform, which moves sinusoidally with an amplitude of 1 cm and a period of 4 s, was used to mimic tumour motion. Tumour motion was simulated along cranial-caudal direction while MLC leaves moved across the patient from left to right, as in most clinical cases. The dose to a point near the centre of the tumour mass was measured according to geometric and dosimetric parameters from two five-field lung IMRT plans. For each field, measurement was done for two dose rates (300 and 500 MU min(-1)), three MLC delivery modes (sliding window, step-and-shoot with 10 and 20 intensity levels) and eight equally spaced starting phases of tumour motion. The dose to the measurement point delivered from all five fields was derived for both a single fraction and 30 fractions by randomly sampling from measured dose values of each field at different initial phases. It was found that the mean dose to a moving tumour differs slightly (<2-3%) from that to a static tumour. The variation in breathing phase at the start of dose delivery results in a maximum variation around the mean dose of greater than 30% for one field. The full width at half maximum for the probability distribution of the point dose is up to 8% for all five fields in a single fraction, but less than 1-2% after 30 fractions. In general, lower dose rate can reduce the motion-caused dose variation and therefore might be preferable for lung IMRT when no motion mitigation techniques are used. From the two IMRT cases we studied where tumour motion is perpendicular to MLC leaf motion, the dose variation was found to be insensitive to the MLC delivery mode. PMID:12870582

  10. Experimental investigation of particle deposition mechanisms in the lung acinus using microfluidic models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishler, Rami; Mulligan, Molly; Dubowski, Yael; Sznitman, Josue; Sznitman Lab-department of Biomedical Engineering Team; Dubowski Lab-faculty of Civil; Environmental Engineering Team

    2014-11-01

    In order to experimentally investigate particle deposition mechanisms in the deep alveolated regions of the lungs, we have developed a novel microfluidic device mimicking breathing acinar flow conditions directly at the physiological scale. The model features an anatomically-inspired acinar geometry with five dichotomously branching airway generations lined with periodically expanding and contracting alveoli. Deposition patterns of airborne polystyrene microspheres (spanning 0.1 μm to 2 μm in diameter) inside the airway tree network compare well with CFD simulations and reveal the roles of gravity and Brownian motion on particle deposition sites. Furthermore, measured trajectories of incense particles (0.1-1 μm) inside the breathing device show a critical role for Brownian diffusion in determining the fate of inhaled sub-micron particles by enabling particles to cross from the acinar ducts into alveolar cavities, especially during the short time lag between inhalation and exhalation phases.

  11. The Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII): Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy in the Far-Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Astronomical studies at infrared wavelengths have dramatically improved our understanding of the universe, and observations with Spitzer, the upcoming Herschel mission, and SOFIA will continue to provide exciting new discoveries. The relatively low angular resolution of these missions, however, is insufficient to resolve the physical scale on which mid-to far-infrared emission arises, resulting in source and structure ambiguities that limit our ability to answer key science questions. Interferometry enables high angular resolution at these wavelengths - a powerful tool for scientific discovery. We will build the Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII), an eight-meter baseline Michelson stellar interferometer to fly on a high-altitude balloon. BETTII's spectral-spatial capability, provided by an instrument using double-Fourier techniques, will address key questions about the nature of disks in young star clusters and active galactic nuclei and the envelopes of evolved stars. BETTII will also lay the technological groundwork for future space interferometers and for suborbital programs optimized for studying extrasolar planets.

  12. RC-3095, a Selective Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor Antagonist, Does Not Protect the Lungs in an Experimental Model of Lung Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira-Freitas, Vera L.; Thomaz, Leonardo Dalla Giacomassa Rocha; Simoneti, Lucas Elias Lise; Malfitano, Christiane; De Angelis, Kátia; Ulbrich, Jane Maria; Schwartsmann, Gilberto; Andrade, Cristiano Feijó

    2015-01-01

    RC-3095, a selective GRPR antagonist, has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties in different models of inflammation. However, its protective effect on lungs submitted to lung ischemia-reperfusion injury has not been addressed before. Then, we administrated RC-3095 intravenously before and after lung reperfusion using an animal model of lung ischemia-reperfusion injury (LIRI) by clamping the pulmonary hilum. Twenty Wistar rats were subjected to an experimental model in four groups: SHAM, ischemia-reperfusion (IR), RC-Pre, and RC-Post. The final mean arterial pressure significantly decreased in IR and RC-Pre compared to their values before reperfusion (P < 0.001). The RC-Post group showed significant decrease of partial pressure of arterial oxygen at the end of the observation when compared to baseline (P = 0.005). Caspase-9 activity was significantly higher in the RC-Post as compared to the other groups (P < 0.013). No significant differences were observed in eNOS activity among the groups. The groups RC-Pre and RC-Post did not show any significant decrease in IL-1β (P = 0.159) and TNF-α (P = 0.260), as compared to IR. The histological score showed no significant differences among the groups. In conclusion, RC-3095 does not demonstrate a protective effect in our LIRI model. Additionally, its use after reperfusion seems to potentiate cell damage, stimulating apoptosis. PMID:25893195

  13. Effects of Nigella sativa seed extract on ameliorating lung tissue damage in rats after experimental pulmonary aspirations.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    Aspiration of gastric contents can cause serious lung injury, although the mechanisms of pulmonary damage are still not clear and means of amelioration of the pulmonary damage have been little investigated. The black cumin seed, Nigella sativa L. (NS) has been shown to have specific health benefits and the aim of the current study was to investigate the possible beneficial effects of NS on experimental lung injury in male Wistar rats after pulmonary aspiration of different materials. The rats were randomly allotted into one of six experimental groups (n=7 per group): (1) saline control, (2) saline+NS treated, (3) Pulmocare (a specialized nutritional supplement given to pulmonary patients), (4) Pulmocare+NS treated, (5) hydrochloric acid, (6) hydrochloric acid+NS treated. The saline, Pulmocare and hydrochloric acid were injected into the lungs in a volume of 2 ml/kg. The rats received daily oral doses of NS volatile oil (400mg/kg body weight) by means of intragastric intubation for 7 days starting immediately after the pulmonary aspiration of the materials. After 7 days, the rats were sacrificed and tissue samples from both lungs were taken for histopathological investigation. To date, no similar study investigating the potential for NS treatment to protect against lung injury after pulmonary aspiration of materials has been reported. Our study showed that NS treatment inhibits the inflammatory pulmonary responses, reducing significantly (p<0.05) peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration, alveolar septal infiltration, alveolar edema, alveolar exudate, alveolar macrophages, interstitial fibrosis, granuloma and necrosis formation in different pulmonary aspiration models. Our data indicate a significant reduction in the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and a rise in surfactant protein D in lung tissue of different pulmonary aspiration models after NS therapy. Based on our results, we conclude that NS treatment might be beneficial in lung injury and

  14. Early propranolol treatment induces lung heme-oxygenase-1, attenuates metabolic dysfunction, and improves survival following experimental sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Pharmacological agents that block beta-adrenergic receptors have been associated with improved outcome in burn injury. It has been hypothesized that injuries leading to a hypermetabolic state, such as septic shock, may also benefit from beta-blockade; however, outcome data in experimental models have been contradictory. Thus, we investigated the effect of beta-blockade with propranolol on survival, hemodynamics, lung heat shock protein (HSP) expression, metabolism and inflammatory markers in a rat cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of sepsis. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats receiving either repeated doses (30 minutes pre-CLP and every 8 hours for 24 hours postoperatively) of propranolol or control (normal saline), underwent CLP and were monitored for survival. Additionally, lung and blood samples were collected at 6 and 24 hours for analysis. Animals also underwent monitoring to evaluate global hemodynamics. Results Seven days following CLP, propranolol improved survival versus control (P < 0.01). Heart rates in the propranolol-treated rats were approximately 23% lower than control rats (P < 0.05) over the first 24 hours, but the mean arterial blood pressure was not different between groups. Metabolic analysis of lung tissue demonstrated an increase in lung ATP/ADP ratio and NAD+ content and a decreased ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acids to monounsaturated fatty acids (PUFA/MUFA). Cytokine analysis of the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) demonstrated decreased expression of TNF-alpha in both lung and plasma at 24 hours post CLP induced sepsis. Finally, propranolol led to a significant increase in lung hemeoxygenase-1 expression, a key cellular protective heat shock protein (HSP) in the lung. Other lung HSP expression was unchanged. Conclusions These results suggest that propranolol treatment may decrease mortality during sepsis potentially via a combination of improving metabolism, suppressing aspects of the inflammatory

  15. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Experimental Characterization of the Pediatric Pump-Lung

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhongjun J; Gellman, Barry; Zhang, Tao; Taskin, M Ertan; Dasse, Kurt A.; Griffith, Bartley P.

    2014-01-01

    The pediatric pump-lung (PediPL) is a miniaturized integrated pediatric pump-oxygenator specifically designed for cardiac or cardiopulmonary support for patients weighing 5-20 kg to allow mobility and extended use for 30 days. The PediPL incorporates a magnetically levitated impeller with uniquely configured hollow fiber membranes into a single unit capable of performing both pumping and gas exchange. A combined computational and experimental study was conducted to characterize the functional and hemocompatibility performances of this newly developed device. The three-dimensional flow features of the PediPL and its hemolytic characteristics were analyzed using computational fluid dynamics based modeling. The oxygen exchange was modeled based on a convection-diffusion-reaction process. The hollow fiber membranes were modeled as a porous medium which incorporates the flow resistance in the bundle by an added momentum sink term. The pumping function was evaluated for the required range of operating conditions (0.5-2.5 L/min and 1000-3000 rpm). The blood damage potentials were further analyzed in terms of flow and shear stress fields, and the calculations of hemolysis index. In parallel, the hydraulic pump performance, oxygen transfer and hemolysis level were quantified experimentally. Based on the computational and experimental results, the PediPL device is found to be functional to provide necessary oxygen transfer and blood pumping requirements for the pediatric patients. Smooth blood flow characteristics and low blood damage potential were observed in the entire device. The in-vitro tests further confirmed that the PediPL can provide adequate blood pumping and oxygen transfer over the range of intended operating conditions with acceptable hemolytic performance. The rated flow rate for oxygenation is 2.5 L/min. The normalized index of hemolysis is 0.065 g/100L at 1.0 L/min and 3000 rpm. PMID:24839468

  16. [Effect of acetylsalicylic acid on immunologically induced morphologic changes after experimental lung transplantation (light and electron microscopic study)].

    PubMed

    Hoyer, J; Garbe, L; Sicardi, F; Noirclerc, M

    1976-01-01

    In 3 comparing series the behavior of platelets after experimental lung transplantation was examined in 33 dogs. After allogenic transplantations (21 animals) the ultrastructural findings were pathologic changes of the platelets, such as hyperaggregability with irreversible aggregation prevailing, as well as capillary wall alterations. X-rays showed considerable reduction of functioning parenchyma. Since these findings were absent in animals which underwent merely pulmonary re-implantation (4 animals) and can be considered a controll group, the authors conclude that these alterations are caused by mainly immunologic reactions. Acetylsalicylic acid given to animals with grafted lungs significantly inhibited is specific and certainly immuneinduced pathologic development. Absolutely necessary, therefore, appears the application of such aggregation inhibitor as additional treatment in lung transplantations. PMID:793217

  17. /sup 111/In-platelet and /sup 125/I-fibrinogen deposition in the lungs in experimental acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Goulbourne, I.A.; Watson, H.; Davies, G.C.

    1987-12-01

    An experimental model of acute pancreatitis in rats has been used to study intrapulmonary /sup 125/I-fibrinogen and /sup 111/In-platelet deposition. Pancreatitis caused a significant increase in wet lung weight compared to normal, and this could be abolished by heparin or aspirin pretreatment. /sup 125/I-fibrinogen was deposited in the lungs of animals to a significantly greater degree than in controls (P less than 0.01). /sup 125/I-fibrinogen deposition was reduced to control levels by pretreatment with aspirin or heparin (P less than 0.05). The uptake of radiolabeled platelets was greater in pancreatitis than in controls (P less than 0.001). Pancreatitis appears to be responsible for platelet entrapment in the lungs. Platelet uptake was reduced by heparin treatment but unaffected by aspirin therapy.

  18. Effects of short-term propofol and dexmedetomidine on pulmonary morphofunction and biological markers in experimental mild acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Vinícius; Santos, Cintia Lourenço; Samary, Cynthia Santos; Araújo, Mariana Neves; Heil, Luciana Boavista Barros; Morales, Marcelo Marcos; Silva, Pedro Leme; Pelosi, Paolo; Fernandes, Fatima Carneiro; Villela, Nivaldo; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated whether the short-term use of dexmedetomidine and propofol may attenuate inflammatory response and improve lung morphofunction in experimental acute lung injury (ALI). Thirty-six Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups. Control (C) and ALI animals received sterile saline solution and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide by intraperitoneal injection respectively. After 24h, ALI animals were randomly treated with dexmedetomidine, propofol, or thiopental sodium for 1h. Propofol reduced static lung elastance and resistive pressure and was associated with less alveolar collapse compared to thiopental sodium and dexmedetomidine. Dexmedetomidine improved oxygenation, but did not modify lung mechanics or histology. Propofol was associated with lower IL (interleukin)-6 and IL-1β expression, whereas dexmedetomidine led to reduced inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) and increased nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) expression in lung tissue compared to thiopental sodium. In conclusion, in this model of mild ALI, short-term use of dexmedetomidine and propofol led to different functional effects and activation of biological markers associated with pulmonary inflammation. PMID:25149586

  19. Activity of lung neutrophils and matrix metalloproteinases in cyclophosphamide-treated mice with experimental sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, Mark; Carmel, Julie; Kaplan, Viktoria; Livne, Erella; Krausz, Michael M

    2004-01-01

    Sepsis in patients receiving chemotherapy may result in acute respiratory distress syndrome, despite decreased number of blood neutrophils [polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs)]. In the present study, we investigated the correlation of cyclophosphamide (CY)-induced neutropenia with the destructive potential of lung PMN in respect to formation of septic acute lung injury (ALI). Mice were treated with 250 mg/kg of CY or saline (control) and subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham operation. ALI was verified by histological examination. Lung PMNs and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were assessed by flow cytometry and gelatin zymography. CLP in CY-treated mice induced a typical lung injury. Despite profound neutropenia, CY treatment did not attenuate CLP-induced ALI. This might relate to only a partial suppression of PMN: CY has significantly reduced PMN influx into the lungs (P = 0.008) and suppressed their oxidative metabolism, but had no suppressive effect on degranulation (P = 0.227) and even induced MMP-9 activity (P = 0.0003). In CY-untreated animals, peak of CLP-induced ALI coincided with massive PMN influx (P = 0.013), their maximal degranulation (P = 0.014) and activation of lung MMP-9 (P = 0.002). These findings may indicate an important role of the residual lung PMN and activation of MMP-9 in septic lung injury during CY chemotherapy. PMID:15255968

  20. Towards predicting the lung fibrogenic activity of nanomaterials: experimental validation of an in vitro fibroblast proliferation assay

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Carbon nanotubes (CNT) can induce lung inflammation and fibrosis in rodents. Several studies have identified the capacity of CNT to stimulate the proliferation of fibroblasts. We developed and validated experimentally here a simple and rapid in vitro assay to evaluate the capacity of a nanomaterial to exert a direct pro-fibrotic effect on fibroblasts. Methods The activity of several multi-wall (MW)CNT samples (NM400, the crushed form of NM400 named NM400c, NM402 and MWCNTg 2400) and asbestos (crocidolite) was investigated in vitro and in vivo. The proliferative response to MWCNT was assessed on mouse primary lung fibroblasts, human fetal lung fibroblasts (HFL-1), mouse embryonic fibroblasts (BALB-3T3) and mouse lung fibroblasts (MLg) by using different assays (cell counting, WST-1 assay and propidium iodide PI staining) and dispersion media (fetal bovine serum, FBS and bovine serum albumin, BSA). C57BL/6 mice were pharyngeally aspirated with the same materials and lung fibrosis was assessed after 2 months by histopathology, quantification of total collagen lung content and pro-fibrotic cytokines in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Results MWCNT (NM400 and NM402) directly stimulated fibroblast proliferation in vitro in a dose-dependent manner and induced lung fibrosis in vivo. NM400 stimulated the proliferation of all tested fibroblast types, independently of FBS- or BSA- dispersion. Results obtained by WST1 cell activity were confirmed with cell counting and cell cycle (PI staining) assays. Crocidolite also stimulated fibroblast proliferation and induced pulmonary fibrosis, although to a lesser extent than NM400 and NM402. In contrast, shorter CNT (NM400c and MWCNTg 2400) did not induce any fibroblast proliferation or collagen accumulation in vivo, supporting the idea that CNT structure is an important parameter for inducing lung fibrosis. Conclusions In this study, an optimized proliferation assay using BSA as a dispersant, MLg cells as targets

  1. Hepatic effects of lung-protective pressure-controlled ventilation and a combination of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation and extracorporeal lung assist in experimental lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Kredel, Markus; Muellenbach, Ralf M.; Johannes, Amélie; Brederlau, Joerg; Roewer, Norbert; Wunder, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Ventilation with high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) can lead to hepatic dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate the hepatic effects of strategies using high airway pressures either in pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) or in high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) combined with an arteriovenous extracorporeal lung assist (ECLA). Material/Methods Pietrain pigs underwent induction of lung injury by saline lavage. Ventilation was continued for 24 hours either as PCV with tidal volumes of 6 ml/kg and PEEP 3 cmH2O above the lower inflection point of the pressure-volume curve or as HFOV (≥12 Hz) with a mean tracheal airway pressure 3 cmH2O above the lower inflection point combined with arteriovenous ECLA (HFOV+ECLA). Fluids and norepinephrine stabilized the circulation. The indocyanine green plasma disappearance rate, serum bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, γ-glutamyltransferase, alkaline phosphatase, glutamate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase were determined repeatedly. Finally, liver neutrophils were counted and liver cell apoptosis was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labeling (TUNEL). Results Aspartate aminotransferase increased in the PCV group about three-fold and in the HFOV+ECLA group five-fold (p<0.001). Correspondingly, creatine kinase increased about two-fold and four-fold, respectively (p<0.001). Lactate dehydrogenase was increased in the HFOV+ECLA group (p<0.028). The number of neutrophils infiltrating the liver tissue and the apoptotic index were low. Conclusions High airway pressure PCV and HFOV with ECLA in the treatment of lavage-induced lung injury in pigs did not cause liver dysfunction or damage. The detected elevation of enzymes might be of extrahepatic origin. PMID:21959601

  2. Parasite Burden and CD36-Mediated Sequestration Are Determinants of Acute Lung Injury in an Experimental Malaria Model

    PubMed Central

    Lovegrove, Fiona E.; Gharib, Sina A.; Peña-Castillo, Lourdes; Patel, Samir N.; Ruzinski, John T.; Hughes, Timothy R.

    2008-01-01

    Although acute lung injury (ALI) is a common complication of severe malaria, little is known about the underlying molecular basis of lung dysfunction. Animal models have provided powerful insights into the pathogenesis of severe malaria syndromes such as cerebral malaria (CM); however, no model of malaria-induced lung injury has been definitively established. This study used bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), histopathology and gene expression analysis to examine the development of ALI in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA). BAL fluid of PbA-infected C57BL/6 mice revealed a significant increase in IgM and total protein prior to the development of CM, indicating disruption of the alveolar–capillary membrane barrier—the physiological hallmark of ALI. In contrast to sepsis-induced ALI, BAL fluid cell counts remained constant with no infiltration of neutrophils. Histopathology showed septal inflammation without cellular transmigration into the alveolar spaces. Microarray analysis of lung tissue from PbA-infected mice identified a significant up-regulation of expressed genes associated with the gene ontology categories of defense and immune response. Severity of malaria-induced ALI varied in a panel of inbred mouse strains, and development of ALI correlated with peripheral parasite burden but not CM susceptibility. Cd36−/− mice, which have decreased parasite lung sequestration, were relatively protected from ALI. In summary, parasite burden and CD36-mediated sequestration in the lung are primary determinants of ALI in experimental murine malaria. Furthermore, differential susceptibility of mouse strains to malaria-induced ALI and CM suggests that distinct genetic determinants may regulate susceptibility to these two important causes of malaria-associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:18483551

  3. [Biochemical and histological research on lung tissue in experimental carbon disulfide exposure].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlova, A; Petrova, S; Donchev, N

    1987-01-01

    During an experiment on two species of test animals (guinea pigs and white male rats) is studied the effect of carbon sulfide on the biochemical and structural characteristic of the lung. Duration of the experiments 30 days with guinea pigs and 90 days-white male rats. A complex of biochemical and histological methods is applied. Disturbances in the metabolic processes of the lung are established: a) raised activity of the hydrolytic enzymes; b) increased activity of the glycolytic enzymes and c) stronger protein synthesis. The observed metabolic disturbances are based, most probably, on the circulation infringements, occurring in the lung tissue under the effect of carbon sulfide. PMID:3441458

  4. Imaging tumor angiogenesis in breast cancer experimental lung metastasis with positron emission tomography, near-infrared fluorescence, and bioluminescence

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Nayak, Tapas R.; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Myklejord, Duane V.; Theuer, Charles P.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Cai, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a molecular imaging agent that can allow for both positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging of CD105 expression in metastatic breast cancer. TRC105, a chimeric anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody, was labeled with both a NIRF dye (i.e., IRDye 800CW) and 64Cu to yield 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Flow cytometry analysis revealed no difference in CD105 binding affinity/specificity between TRC105 and NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Serial bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was carried out to non-invasively monitor the lung tumor burden in BALB/c mice, after intravenous injection of firefly luciferase-transfected 4T1 (i.e., fLuc-4T1) murine breast cancer cells to establish the experimental lung metastasis model. Serial PET imaging revealed that fLuc-4T1 lung tumor uptake of 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW was 11.9 ± 1.2, 13.9 ± 3.9, and 13.4 ± 2.1 %ID/g at 4, 24, and 48 h post-injection respectively (n = 3). Biodistribution studies, blocking fLuc-4T1 lung tumor uptake with excess TRC105, control experiments with 64Cu-NOTA-cetuximab-800CW (which served as an isotype-matched control), ex vivo BLI/PET/NIRF imaging, autoradiography, and histology all confirmed CD105 specificity of 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Successful PET/NIRF imaging of tumor angiogenesis (i.e., CD105 expression) in the breast cancer experimental lung metastasis model warrants further investigation and clinical translation of dual-labeled TRC105-based agents, which can potentially enable early detection of small metastases and image-guided surgery for tumor removal. PMID:23471463

  5. Successful treatment of experimental neonatal respiratory failure using extracorporeal membrane lung assist.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, R; Kolobow, T; Arosio, P; Chen, V; Buckhold, D K; Pierce, J E

    1986-11-01

    A total of 44 preterm fetal lambs at great risk of developing respiratory failure were delivered by Cesarean section, and were then managed on conventional mechanical pulmonary ventilation. Fifteen animals initially fared well, and 14 of these were long term survivors. Twenty-nine other lambs showed a progressive deterioration in arterial blood gases within 30 minutes of delivery, of which 10 lambs were continued on mechanical pulmonary ventilation (20% survival), while the remaining 19 lambs were placed on an extracorporeal membrane lung respiratory assist (79% survival). Extracorporeal membrane lung bypass rapidly corrected arterial blood gas values, and permitted the use of high levels of CPAP instead of the continuation of mechanical pulmonary ventilation at high peak airway pressures. Improvement in lung function was gradual, and predictable. Early institution of extracorporeal respiratory assist using a membrane artificial lung rapidly corrected arterial blood gas values and significantly improved on neonate survival. PMID:3643887

  6. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase prevents experimental lung fibrosis and myofibroblast formation

    PubMed Central

    Lagares, David; Busnadiego, Oscar; García-Fernández, Rosa Ana; Kapoor, Mohit; Liu, Shangxi; Carter, David E.; Abraham, David; Shi-Wen, Xu; Carreira, Patricia; Fontaine T, Benjamin A; Shea, Barry S; Tager, Andrew M; Leask, Andrew; Lamas, Santiago; Rodríguez-Pascual, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Objective Enhanced adhesive signaling including activation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a hallmark of fibroblasts from lung fibrosis patients, and FAK has been therefore hypothesized to be a key mediator of this disease. This study was undertaken to characterize the contribution of FAK to the development of pulmonary fibrosis both in vivo and in vitro. Methods FAK expression and activity were analyzed in lung tissue samples from lung fibrosis patients by immunohistochemistry. Mice orally treated with the FAK inhibitor, PF-562,271, or with siRNA-mediated silencing of FAK, were exposed to intratracheally instilled bleomycin to induce lung fibrosis, and the lungs were harvested for histological and biochemical analysis. Using endothelin-1 (ET-1) as stimulus, cell adhesion and contraction, as well as profibrotic gene expression were studied in fibroblasts isolated from wild type and FAK-deficient mouse embryos. ET-1-mediated FAK activation and gene expression were studied in primary mouse lung fibroblasts, as well as in wild type and integrin β1-deficient fibroblasts. Results Increased FAK expression and activity are upregulated in fibroblast foci and remodeled vessels in lung fibrosis patients. Pharmacological or siRNA-mediated targeting of FAK resulted in marked abrogation of bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis. Loss of FAK impaired the acquisition of a profibrotic phenotype in response to ET-1. Profibrotic gene expression leading to myofibroblast differentiation required cell adhesion, and was driven by Jun N-terminal kinase activation through integrin β1/FAK signaling. Conclusion These results implicate FAK as a central mediator of fibrogenesis, and highlight this kinase as a potential therapeutic target in fibrotic diseases. PMID:22492165

  7. Biodistribution of the boron carriers boronophenylalanine (BPA) and/or decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in an experimental model of lung metastases

    SciTech Connect

    D.W. Nigg; Various Others

    2014-06-01

    BNCT was proposed for the treatment of diffuse, non-resectable tumors in the lung. We performed boron biodistribution studies with 5 administration protocols employing the boron carriers BPA and/or GB-10 in an experimental model of disseminated lung metastases in rats. All 5 protocols were non-toxic and showed preferential tumor boron uptake versus lung. Absolute tumor boron concentration values were therapeutically useful (25–76 ppm) for 3 protocols. Dosimetric calculations indicate that BNCT at RA-3 would be potentially therapeutic without exceeding radiotolerance in the lung.

  8. Experimentally studied dynamic dose interplay does not meaningfully affect target dose in VMAT SBRT lung treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Stambaugh, Cassandra; Nelms, Benjamin E.; Dilling, Thomas; Stevens, Craig; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The effects of respiratory motion on the tumor dose can be divided into the gradient and interplay effects. While the interplay effect is likely to average out over a large number of fractions, it may play a role in hypofractionated [stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT)] treatments. This subject has been extensively studied for intensity modulated radiation therapy but less so for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), particularly in application to hypofractionated regimens. Also, no experimental study has provided full four-dimensional (4D) dose reconstruction in this scenario. The authors demonstrate how a recently described motion perturbation method, with full 4D dose reconstruction, is applied to describe the gradient and interplay effects during VMAT lung SBRT treatments.Methods: VMAT dose delivered to a moving target in a patient can be reconstructed by applying perturbations to the treatment planning system-calculated static 3D dose. Ten SBRT patients treated with 6 MV VMAT beams in five fractions were selected. The target motion (motion kernel) was approximated by 3D rigid body translation, with the tumor centroids defined on the ten phases of the 4DCT. The motion was assumed to be periodic, with the period T being an average from the empirical 4DCT respiratory trace. The real observed tumor motion (total displacement ≤8 mm) was evaluated first. Then, the motion range was artificially increased to 2 or 3 cm. Finally, T was increased to 60 s. While not realistic, making T comparable to the delivery time elucidates if the interplay effect can be observed. For a single fraction, the authors quantified the interplay effect as the maximum difference in the target dosimetric indices, most importantly the near-minimum dose (D{sub 99%}), between all possible starting phases. For the three- and five-fractions, statistical simulations were performed when substantial interplay was found.Results: For the motion amplitudes and periods obtained from

  9. Experimental system for detecting lung nodules by chest x-ray image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hideo; Inaoka, Noriko; Takabatake, Hirotsugu; Mori, Masaki; Natori, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Akira

    1991-07-01

    This paper describes a system for automatic detection of lung nodules by means of digital image-processing techniques. The objective of the system is to help chest physicians to improve their accuracy of detection. For detecting lung nodules in chest x-ray images, the authors developed the directional contrast filter for nodules (DCF-N), which consists of three concentric circles. The DCF-N is effective for detecting patterns with obscure peripheries, such as lung cancer. The filter was evaluated using 192 lung cancer cases, and a detection ratio of 88.5% with false-positive foci was obtained. The authors also developed a rule-based system for eliminating these false-positive foci. The rule-base contains six rules that were heuristically developed according to a common method of diagnosis used by chest physicians. By using the rule-base, the authors succeeded in eliminating 63.3% of false-positive foci without increasing the number of false-negatives significantly (5.0%). In addition to the rule- base, a logic was developed for discriminating between lung nodules and false-positive foci by using the nine measured values on each shadow. The discrimination was tested by using 192 lung cancer cases and 74 normal control cases. As a result, figures of 92.2% and 71.6% were obtained for the sensitivity and specificity of the system, respectively. To evaluate the logic by using external data, 30 cases of lung cancer and 78 control cases were collected. As a result of the evaluation, the authors obtained figures of 71.3%, 76.7%, and 69.2% for the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of the system, respectively.

  10. Effects of atropine and propranolol on lung inflammation in experimental envenomation: comparison of two buthidae venoms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous works had shown that scorpion venom induced neurotransmitter elevation and an inflammatory response associated with various anatomo-pathological modifications. The most dangerous scorpions species in Algeria responsible for these effects are Androctonus australis hector (Aah) and Androctonus amoreuxi (Aam). Results Comparison of the physiopathological effects induced by the two venoms showed differences in the kinetic of cytokine release and in lung injury. The lung edema was only observed in response to Aah venom and it was correlated with cell infiltration. In order to better understand the involved mechanism in inflammatory response, we used two antagonists, atropine (non-selective muscarinic antagonist) and propranolol (β adrenergic antagonist), which lead to a decrease of cell infiltration but has no effect on edema forming. Conclusion These results suggest another pathway in the development of lung injury following envenomation with Aam or Aah venom. PMID:23849182

  11. Noninvasive In Vivo Quantification of Neutrophil Elastase Activity in Acute Experimental Mouse Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kossodo, Sylvie; Zhang, Jun; Groves, Kevin; Cuneo, Garry J.; Handy, Emma; Morin, Jeff; Delaney, Jeannine; Yared, Wael; Rajopadhye, Milind; Peterson, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a neutrophil elastase-specific near-infrared fluorescence imaging agent, which, combined with fluorescence molecular tomographic imaging, allowed us to detect and quantify neutrophil elastase activity in vivo, in real time, and noninvasively in an acute model of lung injury (ALI). Significantly higher fluorescent signal was quantified in mice with LPS/fMLP-induced ALI as compared to healthy controls, correlating with increases in the number of bronchoalveolar lavage cells, neutrophils, and elastase activity. The agent was significantly activated ex vivo in lung sections from ALI but not from control mice, and this activation was ablated by the specific inhibitor sivelestat. Treatment with the specific inhibitor sivelestat significantly reduced lung signal in mice with ALI. These results underscore the unique ability of fluorescence molecular imaging to quantify specific molecular processes in vivo, crucial for understanding the mechanisms underlying disease progression and for assessing and monitoring novel pharmacological interventions. PMID:21941648

  12. The effect of fibreoptic bronchoscopy in acute respiratory distress syndrome: experimental evidence from a lung model.

    PubMed

    Nay, M-A; Mankikian, J; Auvet, A; Dequin, P-F; Guillon, A

    2016-02-01

    Flexible bronchoscopy is essential for appropriate care during mechanical ventilation, but can significantly affect mechanical ventilation of the lungs, particularly for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. We aimed to describe the consequences of bronchoscopy during lung-protective ventilation in a bench study, and thereby to determine the optimal diameter of the bronchoscope for avoiding disruption of the protective-ventilation strategy during the procedure. Immediately following the insertion of the bronchoscope into the tracheal tube, either minute ventilation decreased significantly, or positive end-expiratory pressure increased substantially, according to the setting of the inspiratory pressure limit. The increase in end-expiratory pressure led to an equivalent increase in the plateau pressure, and lung-protective ventilation was significantly altered during the procedure. We showed that a bronchoscope with an external diameter of 4 mm (or less) would allow safer bronchoscopic interventions in patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:26559154

  13. Fractal Geometry Enables Classification of Different Lung Morphologies in a Model of Experimental Asthma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obert, Martin; Hagner, Stefanie; Krombach, Gabriele A.; Inan, Selcuk; Renz, Harald

    2015-06-01

    Animal models represent the basis of our current understanding of the pathophysiology of asthma and are of central importance in the preclinical development of drug therapies. The characterization of irregular lung shapes is a major issue in radiological imaging of mice in these models. The aim of this study was to find out whether differences in lung morphology can be described by fractal geometry. Healthy and asthmatic mouse groups, before and after an acute asthma attack induced by methacholine, were studied. In vivo flat-panel-based high-resolution Computed Tomography (CT) was used for mice's thorax imaging. The digital image data of the mice's lungs were segmented from the surrounding tissue. After that, the lungs were divided by image gray-level thresholds into two additional subsets. One subset contained basically the air transporting bronchial system. The other subset corresponds mainly to the blood vessel system. We estimated the fractal dimension of all sets of the different mouse groups using the mass radius relation (mrr). We found that the air transporting subset of the bronchial lung tissue enables a complete and significant differentiation between all four mouse groups (mean D of control mice before methacholine treatment: 2.64 ± 0.06; after treatment: 2.76 ± 0.03; asthma mice before methacholine treatment: 2.37 ± 0.16; after treatment: 2.71 ± 0.03; p < 0.05). We conclude that the concept of fractal geometry allows a well-defined, quantitative numerical and objective differentiation of lung shapes — applicable most likely also in human asthma diagnostics.

  14. Total deposition of ultrafine particles in the lungs of healthy men and women: experimental and theoretical results

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Inhaled ultrafine particles (UFP) may induce greater adverse respiratory effects than larger particles occurring in the ambient atmosphere. Due to this potential of UFP to act as triggers for diverse lung injuries medical as well as physical research has been increasingly focused on the exact deposition behavior of the particles in lungs of various probands. Main purpose of the present study was the presentation of experimental and theoretical data of total, regional, and local UFP deposition in the lungs of men and women. Methods Both experiments and theoretical simulations were carried out by using particle sizes of 0.04, 0.06, 0.08, and 0.10 µm [number median diameters (NMD)]. Inhalation of UFP took place by application of predefined tidal volumes (500, 750, and 1,000 mL) and respiratory flow rates (150, 250, 375, and 500 mL·s−1). For male subjects a functional residual capacity (FRC) of 3,911±892 mL was measured, whereas female probands had a FRC of 3,314±547 mL. Theoretical predictions were based on (I) a stochastic model of the tracheobronchial tree; (II) particle transport computations according to a random walk algorithm; and (III) empirical formulae for the description of UFP deposition. Results Total deposition fractions (TDF) are marked by a continuous diminution with increasing particle size. Whilst particles measuring 0.04 µm in size deposit in the respiratory tract by 40–70%, particles with a size of 0.10 µm exhibit deposition values ranging from 20% to 45%. Except for the largest particles studied here TDF of female probands are higher than those obtained for male probands. Differences between experimental and theoretical results are most significant for 0.10 µm particles, but never exceed 20%. Predictions of regional (extrathoracic, tracheobronchial, alveolar) UFP deposition show clearly that females tend to develop higher tracheobronchial and alveolar deposition fractions than males. This discrepancy is also confirmed by

  15. The pulmonary endothelial glycocalyx regulates neutrophil adhesion and lung injury during experimental sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Eric P; Yang, Yimu; Janssen, William J; Gandjeva, Aneta; Perez, Mario J; Barthel, Lea; Zemans, Rachel L; Bowman, Joel C; Koyanagi, Dan E; Yunt, Zulma X; Smith, Lynelle P; Cheng, Sara S; Overdier, Katherine H; Thompson, Kathy R; Geraci, Mark W; Douglas, Ivor S; Pearse, David B; Tuder, Rubin M

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis, a systemic inflammatory response to infection, commonly progresses to acute lung injury (ALI), an inflammatory lung disease with high morbidity. We postulated that sepsis-associated ALI is initiated by degradation of the pulmonary endothelial glycocalyx, leading to neutrophil adherence and inflammation. Using intravital microscopy, we found that endotoxemia in mice rapidly induced pulmonary microvascular glycocalyx degradation via tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-dependent mechanisms. Glycocalyx degradation involved the specific loss of heparan sulfate and coincided with activation of endothelial heparanase, a TNF-α–responsive, heparan sulfate–specific glucuronidase. Glycocalyx degradation increased the availability of endothelial surface adhesion molecules to circulating microspheres and contributed to neutrophil adhesion. Heparanase inhibition prevented endotoxemia-associated glycocalyx loss and neutrophil adhesion and, accordingly, attenuated sepsis-induced ALI and mortality in mice. These findings are potentially relevant to human disease, as sepsis-associated respiratory failure in humans was associated with higher plasma heparan sulfate degradation activity; moreover, heparanase content was higher in human lung biopsies showing diffuse alveolar damage than in normal human lung tissue. PMID:22820644

  16. Time-resolved fluorescence of thioredoxin single-tryptophan mutants: modeling experimental results with minimum perturbation mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Norberto D., Jr.; Haydock, Christopher; Prendergast, Franklyn G.

    1994-08-01

    The time-resolved fluorescence decay of single tryptophan (Trp) proteins is typically described using either a distribution of lifetimes or a sum of two or more exponential terms. A possible interpretation for this fluorescence decay heterogeneity is the existence of different isomeric conformations of Trp about its (chi) +1) and (chi) +2) dihedral angles. Are multiple Trp conformations compatible with the remainder of the protein in its crystallographic configuration or do they require repacking of neighbor side chains? It is conceivable that isomers of the neighbor side chains interconvert slowly on the fluorescence timescale and contribute additional lifetime components to the fluorescence intensity. We have explored this possibility by performing minimum perturbation mapping simulations of Trp 28 and Trp 31 in thioredoxin (TRX) using CHARMm 22. Mappings of Trp 29 and Trp 31 give the TRX Trp residue energy landscape as a function of (chi) +1) and (chi) +2) dihedral angles. Time-resolved fluorescence intensity and anisotropy decay of mutant TRX (W28F and W31F) are measured and interpreted in light of the above simulations. Relevant observables, like order parameters and isomerization rates, can be derived from the minimum perturbation maps and compared with experiment.

  17. Inhibition of experimental lung metastasis by aerosol delivery of PEI-p53 complexes.

    PubMed

    Gautam, A; Densmore, C L; Waldrep, J C

    2000-10-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene and the pathways mediated by the p53 protein are common in many human cancers. Replacement of functional p53 by gene therapy is a potential way of combating these cancers and the associated drug resistance and tumor growth. Aerosol delivery of genes is a noninvasive way of targeting genes to the lung for gene therapy. Here we demonstrate, using a murine melanoma lung metastasis model, that aerosol delivery of polyethyleneimine-p53 (PEI-p53) complexes inhibits the growth of lung metastasis. A significantly reduced number of visible foci were observed in C57BL/6 mice injected with B16-F10 melanoma and treated with PEI-p53 complexes by aerosol for 3 weeks at twice a week. Fifty percent of the mice in the PEI-p53-treated group exhibited no visible tumor foci. There was a significant reduction in the lung weights of p53-treated mice (P < 0.01) compared to control groups. The tumor burden was also significantly lower (P < 0.001) in mice treated with PEI-p53 complexes. No extrapulmonary metastasis was observed in the groups treated with PEI-p53 complexes compared to 50% of the mice in control groups, which showed metastasis to lymph nodes in the neck or abdomen. Treatment with PEI-p53 aerosol also led to about a 50% increase in the mean length of survival of the mice injected with B16-F10 cells. These data suggest that delivery of the p53 gene by aerosol using PEI as the gene delivery vector can inhibit the growth of lung metastasis. PMID:11020346

  18. Treatment of malignant effusion by oncolytic virotherapy in an experimental subcutaneous xenograft model of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is associated with advanced stages of lung cancer and is mainly dependent on invasion of the pleura and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by cancer cells. As MPE indicates an incurable disease with limited palliative treatment options and poor outcome, there is an urgent need for new and efficient treatment options. Methods In this study, we used subcutaneously generated PC14PE6 lung adenocarcinoma xenografts in athymic mice that developed subcutaneous malignant effusions (ME) which mimic pleural effusions of the orthotopic model. Using this approach monitoring of therapeutic intervention was facilitated by direct observation of subcutaneous ME formation without the need of sacrificing mice or special imaging equipment as in case of MPE. Further, we tested oncolytic virotherapy using Vaccinia virus as a novel treatment modality against ME in this subcutaneous PC14PE6 xenograft model of advanced lung adenocarcinoma. Results We demonstrated significant therapeutic efficacy of Vaccinia virus treatment of both advanced lung adenocarcinoma and tumor-associated ME. We attribute the efficacy to the virus-mediated reduction of tumor cell-derived VEGF levels in tumors, decreased invasion of tumor cells into the peritumoral tissue, and to viral infection of the blood vessel-invading tumor cells. Moreover, we showed that the use of oncolytic Vaccinia virus encoding for a single-chain antibody (scAb) against VEGF (GLAF-1) significantly enhanced mono-therapy of oncolytic treatment. Conclusions Here, we demonstrate for the first time that oncolytic virotherapy using tumor-specific Vaccinia virus represents a novel and promising treatment modality for therapy of ME associated with advanced lung cancer. PMID:23635329

  19. The Effects of Tumstatin on Vascularity, Airway Inflammation and Lung Function in an Experimental Sheep Model of Chronic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Van der Velden, Joanne; Harkness, Louise M; Barker, Donna M; Barcham, Garry J; Ugalde, Cathryn L; Koumoundouros, Emmanuel; Bao, Heidi; Organ, Louise A; Tokanovic, Ana; Burgess, Janette K; Snibson, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Tumstatin, a protein fragment of the alpha-3 chain of Collagen IV, is known to be significantly reduced in the airways of asthmatics. Further, there is evidence that suggests a link between the relatively low level of tumstatin and the induction of angiogenesis and inflammation in allergic airway disease. Here, we show that the intra-segmental administration of tumstatin can impede the development of vascular remodelling and allergic inflammatory responses that are induced in a segmental challenge model of experimental asthma in sheep. In particular, the administration of tumstatin to lung segments chronically exposed to house dust mite (HDM) resulted in a significant reduction of airway small blood vessels in the diameter range 10(+)-20 μm compared to controls. In tumstatin treated lung segments after HDM challenge, the number of eosinophils was significantly reduced in parenchymal and airway wall tissues, as well as in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The expression of VEGF in airway smooth muscle was also significantly reduced in tumstatin-treated segments compared to control saline-treated segments. Allergic lung function responses were not attenuated by tumstatin administration in this model. The data are consistent with the concept that tumstatin can act to suppress vascular remodelling and inflammation in allergic airway disease. PMID:27199164

  20. The Effects of Tumstatin on Vascularity, Airway Inflammation and Lung Function in an Experimental Sheep Model of Chronic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Van der Velden, Joanne; Harkness, Louise M.; Barker, Donna M.; Barcham, Garry J.; Ugalde, Cathryn L.; Koumoundouros, Emmanuel; Bao, Heidi; Organ, Louise A.; Tokanovic, Ana; Burgess, Janette K.; Snibson, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Tumstatin, a protein fragment of the alpha-3 chain of Collagen IV, is known to be significantly reduced in the airways of asthmatics. Further, there is evidence that suggests a link between the relatively low level of tumstatin and the induction of angiogenesis and inflammation in allergic airway disease. Here, we show that the intra-segmental administration of tumstatin can impede the development of vascular remodelling and allergic inflammatory responses that are induced in a segmental challenge model of experimental asthma in sheep. In particular, the administration of tumstatin to lung segments chronically exposed to house dust mite (HDM) resulted in a significant reduction of airway small blood vessels in the diameter range 10+–20 μm compared to controls. In tumstatin treated lung segments after HDM challenge, the number of eosinophils was significantly reduced in parenchymal and airway wall tissues, as well as in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The expression of VEGF in airway smooth muscle was also significantly reduced in tumstatin-treated segments compared to control saline-treated segments. Allergic lung function responses were not attenuated by tumstatin administration in this model. The data are consistent with the concept that tumstatin can act to suppress vascular remodelling and inflammation in allergic airway disease. PMID:27199164

  1. Imaging tumor angiogenesis in breast cancer experimental lung metastasis with positron emission tomography, near-infrared fluorescence, and bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Nayak, Tapas R; Valdovinos, Hector F; Myklejord, Duane V; Theuer, Charles P; Barnhart, Todd E; Cai, Weibo

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a molecular imaging agent that can allow for both positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging of CD105 expression in metastatic breast cancer. TRC105, a chimeric anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody, was labeled with both a NIRF dye (i.e., IRDye 800CW) and (64)Cu to yield (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Flow cytometry analysis revealed no difference in CD105 binding affinity/specificity between TRC105 and NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Serial bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was carried out to non-invasively monitor the lung tumor burden in BALB/c mice, after intravenous injection of firefly luciferase-transfected 4T1 (i.e., fLuc-4T1) murine breast cancer cells to establish the experimental lung metastasis model. Serial PET imaging revealed that fLuc-4T1 lung tumor uptake of (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW was 11.9 ± 1.2, 13.9 ± 3.9, and 13.4 ± 2.1 %ID/g at 4, 24, and 48 h post-injection respectively (n = 3). Biodistribution studies, blocking fLuc-4T1 lung tumor uptake with excess TRC105, control experiments with (64)Cu-NOTA-cetuximab-800CW (which served as an isotype-matched control), ex vivo BLI/PET/NIRF imaging, autoradiography, and histology all confirmed CD105 specificity of (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Successful PET/NIRF imaging of tumor angiogenesis (i.e., CD105 expression) in the breast cancer experimental lung metastasis model warrants further investigation and clinical translation of dual-labeled TRC105-based agents, which can potentially enable early detection of small metastases and image-guided surgery for tumor removal. PMID:23471463

  2. Theoretical, numerical and experimental study of geometrical parameters that affect anisotropy measurements in polarization-resolved SHG microscopy.

    PubMed

    Teulon, Claire; Gusachenko, Ivan; Latour, Gaël; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2015-04-01

    Polarization-resolved second harmonic generation (P-SHG) microscopy is an efficient imaging modality for in situ observation of biopolymers structure in tissues, providing information about their mean in-plane orientation and their molecular structure and 3D distribution. Nevertheless, P-SHG signal build-up in a strongly focused regime is not throroughly understood yet, preventing reliable and reproducible measurements. In this study, theoretical analysis, vectorial numerical simulations and experiments are performed to understand how geometrical parameters, such as excitation and collection numerical apertures and detection direction, affect P-SHG imaging in homogeneous collagen tissues. A good agreement is obtained in tendon and cornea, showing that detection geometry significantly affects the SHG anisotropy measurements, but not the measurements of collagen in-plane orientation. PMID:25968762

  3. Histochemical and cellular changes accompanying the appearance of lung fibrosis in an experimental mouse model for Hermansky Pudlak syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lyerla, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Hermansky Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is a heterogeneous recessive genetic disease with a tendency to develop lung fibrosis with aging. A mouse strain with two mutant HPS genes affecting separate vesicle trafficking pathways, C57BL/6-Hps1ep-Ap3b1pe, exhibits severe lung abnormalities at young ages, including enlarged alveolar type II (ATII) cells with giant lamellar bodies and foamy alveolar macrophages (AMs), which are readily identified histologically. In this study, the appearance of lung fibrosis in older animals was studied using classical histological and biochemical methods. The HPS double mutant mice, but not Chediak Higashi syndrome (C57BL/6-Lystbg-J-J, CHS) or C57BL/6J black control (WT) mice, were found to develop lung fibrosis at about 17 months of age using Masson trichrome staining, which was confirmed by hydroxyproline analysis. TGF β1 levels were elevated in bronchial alveolar lavage samples at all ages tested in the double mutant, but not WT or CHS mice, indicative of a prefibrotic condition in this experimental strain; and AMs were highly positive for this cytokine using immunohistochemistry staining. Prosurfactant protein C staining for ATII cells showed redistribution and dysmorphism of these cells with aging, but there was no evidence for epithelial-mesenchymal transition of ATII cells by dual staining for prosurfactant C protein and α-smooth muscle actin. This investigation showed that the HPS double mutant mouse strain develops interstitial pneumonia (HPSIP) past 1 year of age, which may be initiated by abnormal ATII cells and exacerbated by AM activation. With prominent prefibrotic abnormalities, this double mutant may serve as a model for interventive therapy in HPS. PMID:20603711

  4. Experimental chronic obstructive lung disease. I. Bronchopulmonary changes induced in rabbits by prolonged exposure to formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, J; Marinescu, D; Tapu, V; Eskenasy, A

    1978-01-01

    The prolonged exposure to formaldehyde induces in the rabbit lung reactional and dystrophic changes involving the intrapulmonary bronchi, the bronchioli and the lung tissue. These changes are represented by bronchial cell hyperplasia with hypermucigenesis, extrusion of bronchial cells, bronchiolar hypermucigenesis, parcellary squamous metaplasia or necrobiosis of epithelia, thickening of bronchial and bronchiolar walls by subepithelial cell accumulations, destruction of musculo-elastic structures with stenosis or ectasia; the vascular reactions are hyperhaemic and proliferative with an obstructive and fibrous tendency; the parenchymal lesions are atelectasias, intralobular emphysema, and cellular thickening of alveolar walls and interlobular areas. The acid phosphatase, Tween-60-esterase, naphthol-AS-D-acetate-esterase, proline-oxidase and hydroxyproline-2-epimerase activities are increasing, while the leucyl-aminopeptidase and beta-glucuronidase ones are decreasing. The qualitative observations are completed and sustained by quanitative studies of mucous cell kinetics, of cell accumulations and differentiations. PMID:151223

  5. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Lung Ablation Combined with Transbronchial Saline Injection: An Experimental Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, T. Kaminou, T. Sugiura, K.; Hashimoto, M.; Ohuchi, Y.; Adachi, A.; Fujioka, S.; Ito, H.; Nakamura, K.; Ihaya, T.; Ogawa, T.

    2010-02-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of radiofrequency lung ablation with transbronchial saline injection. The bilateral lungs of eight living swine were used. A 13-gauge bone biopsy needle was inserted percutaneously into the lung, and 1 ml of muscle paste was injected to create a tumor mimic. In total, 21 nodules were ablated. In the saline injection group (group A), radiofrequency ablation (RFA) was performed for 11 nodules after transbronchial saline injection under balloon occlusion with a 2-cm active single internally cooled electrode. In the control group (group B), conventional RFA was performed for 10 nodules as a control. The infused saline liquid showed a wedge-shaped and homogeneous distribution surrounding a tumor mimic. All 21 RFAs were successfully completed. The total ablation time was significantly longer (13.4 {+-} 2.8 min vs. 8.9 {+-} 3.5 min; P = 0.0061) and the tissue impedance was significantly lower in group A compared with group B (73.1 {+-} 8.8 {Omega} vs. 100.6 {+-} 16.6 {Omega}; P = 0.0002). The temperature of the ablated area was not significantly different (69.4 {+-} 9.1{sup o}C vs. 66.0 {+-} 7.9{sup o}C; P = 0.4038). There was no significant difference of tumor mimic volume (769 {+-} 343 mm{sup 3} vs. 625 {+-} 191 mm{sup 3}; P = 0.2783). The volume of the coagulated area was significantly larger in group A than in group B (3886 {+-} 1247 mm{sup 3} vs. 2375 {+-} 1395 mm{sup 3}; P = 0.0221). Percutaneous radiofrequency lung ablation combined with transbronchial saline injection can create an extended area of ablation.

  6. Models for comparing lung-cancer risks in radon- and plutonium-exposed experimental animals

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.S.; Cross, F.T.; Sanders, C.L.; Dagle, G.E.

    1990-10-01

    Epidemiologic studies of radon-exposed underground miners have provided the primary basis for estimating human lung-cancer risks resulting from radon exposure. These studies are sometimes used to estimate lung-cancer risks resulting from exposure to other alpha- emitters as well. The latter use, often referred to as the dosimetric approach, is based on the assumption that a specified dose to the lung produces the same lung-tumor risk regardless of the substance producing the dose. At Pacific Northwest Laboratory, experiments have been conducted in which laboratory rodents have been given inhalation exposures to radon and to plutonium ({sup 239}PuO{sub 2}). These experiments offer a unique opportunity to compare risks, and thus to investigate the validity of the dosimetric approach. This comparison is made most effectively by modeling the age-specific risk as a function of dose in a way that is comparable to analyses of human data. Such modeling requires assumptions about whether tumors are the cause of death or whether they are found incidental to death from other causes. Results based on the assumption that tumors are fatal indicate that the radon and plutonium dose-response curves differ, with a linear function providing a good description of the radon data, and a pure quadratic function providing a good description of the plutonium data. However, results based on the assumption that tumors are incidental to death indicate that the dose-response curves for the two exposures are very similar, and thus support the dosimetric approach. 14 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Lung lesions after experimental combined exposure to nickel and trivalent chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, A.; Camner, P. ); Curstedt, T. ); Robertson, B. )

    1989-10-01

    Rabbits were exposed to a combination of 0.7 mg/m{sup 3} of Ni{sup 2+} as NiCl{sub 2} and 1.2 mg/m{sup 3} of Cr{sup 3+} as Cr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} to 0.6 mg/m{sup 3} of Ni{sup 2+} as NiCl{sub 2}, or to filtered air for 4 months (5 days/weeks, 6 hr/day). Light microscopy of the lung tissue showed widespread areas with nodular accumulation of macrophages in all rabbits exposed to both metals, in two rabbits exposed to nickel alone, and in none of the controls. Electron microscopy of the lung showed attenuated septa and alveoli stuffed surfactant-like material in the group exposed to both metals. In two of these rabbits, groups of alveoli were filled with densely packed debris and type I cell borders were obscure. The reaction in the group exposed to nickel alone was less prominent. The volume density of alveolar type II cells showed a fourfold increase after exposure to both metals and a twofold increase following exposure to nickel alone compared to controls. The lung tissue content of total phospholipids and especially phosphatidylcholines and phosphatidylinositols was significantly higher in the groups exposed to both metals than in controls or in animals exposed to nickel only. In lung tissue the molar percentage of 1,2-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine was significantly higher in the group exposed to both metals than in the other groups. The results indicate that trivalent chromium potentiates the effects of nickel on the type II cells resulting in an increased surfactant production; in addition, trivalent chromium probably reduces the catabolism of surfactant in alveolar macrophages.

  8. Effect of tramadol on lung injury induced by skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion: an experimental study*

    PubMed Central

    Takhtfooladi, Mohammad Ashrafzadeh; Jahanshahi, Amirali; Sotoudeh, Amir; Jahanshahi, Gholamreza; Takhtfooladi, Hamed Ashrafzadeh; Aslani, Kimia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether tramadol has a protective effect against lung injury induced by skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion. METHODS: Twenty Wistar male rats were allocated to one of two groups: ischemia-reperfusion (IR) and ischemia-reperfusion + tramadol (IR+T). The animals were anesthetized with intramuscular injections of ketamine and xylazine (50 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg, respectively). All of the animals underwent 2-h ischemia by occlusion of the femoral artery and 24-h reperfusion. Prior to the occlusion of the femoral artery, 250 IU heparin were administered via the jugular vein in order to prevent clotting. The rats in the IR+T group were treated with tramadol (20 mg/kg i.v.) immediately before reperfusion. After the reperfusion period, the animals were euthanized with pentobarbital (300 mg/kg i.p.), the lungs were carefully removed, and specimens were properly prepared for histopathological and biochemical studies. RESULTS: Myeloperoxidase activity and nitric oxide levels were significantly higher in the IR group than in the IR+T group (p = 0.001 for both). Histological abnormalities, such as intra-alveolar edema, intra-alveolar hemorrhage, and neutrophil infiltration, were significantly more common in the IR group than in the IR+T group. CONCLUSIONS: On the basis of our histological and biochemical findings, we conclude that tramadol prevents lung tissue injury after skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion. PMID:24068264

  9. Ebselen Attenuates Lung Injury in Experimental Model of Carrageenan-Induced Pleurisy in Rats.

    PubMed

    Petronilho, Fabricia; Florentino, Drielly; Silvestre, Fernanda; Danielski, Lucineia Gainski; Nascimento, Diego Zapelini; Vieira, Andriele; Kanis, Luiz Alberto; Fortunato, Jucelia Jeremias; Badawy, Marwa; Barichello, Tatiana; Quevedo, Joao

    2015-08-01

    The study evaluates the role of Ebselen (Eb), an organoselenium compound in animal model of acute lung injury induced by carrageenan (CG). Wistar rats received saline or 2 % λ-carrageenan in the pleural cavity, and treatment with Eb (50 mg/kg intragastrically) or dexamethasone (Dx) (0.5 mg/kg intraperitoneal) after CG administration. After 4 h, rats were euthanized and the pleural exudate removed for analysis of the total cell count, total protein, lactate dehydrogenase, and nitrite/nitrate. Moreover, lung tissue were removed to verify the myeloperoxidase activity and oxidative damage. Eb showed anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting leukocyte influx, myeloperoxidase activity, and nitrite/nitrate concentration. Eb presented with an anti-inflammatory activity similar to Dx and an antioxidant activity better than Dx. This study suggests that Eb plays an important role against the oxidative damage associated with anti-inflammatory activity in animal model of acute lung injury, proving to be similar or potentially more effective than Dx. PMID:25616904

  10. Exogenous Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) Protects Alveolar Growth in Experimental O2-Induced Neonatal Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Vadivel, Arul; Alphonse, Rajesh S.; Ionescu, Lavinia; Machado, Desiree S.; O’Reilly, Megan; Eaton, Farah; Haromy, Al; Michelakis, Evangelos D.; Thébaud, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Background Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), the chronic lung disease of prematurity, remains a major health problem. BPD is characterized by impaired alveolar development and complicated by pulmonary hypertension (PHT). Currently there is no specific treatment for BPD. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbon monoxide and nitric oxide (NO), belong to a class of endogenously synthesized gaseous molecules referred to as gasotransmitters. While inhaled NO is already used for the treatment of neonatal PHT and currently tested for the prevention of BPD, H2S has until recently been regarded exclusively as a toxic gas. Recent evidence suggests that endogenous H2S exerts beneficial biological effects, including cytoprotection and vasodilatation. We hypothesized that H2S preserves normal alveolar development and prevents PHT in experimental BPD. Methods We took advantage of a recently described slow-releasing H2S donor, GYY4137 (morpholin-4-ium-4-methoxyphenyl(morpholino) phosphinodithioate) to study its lung protective potential in vitro and in vivo. Results In vitro, GYY4137 promoted capillary-like network formation, viability and reduced reactive oxygen species in hyperoxia-exposed human pulmonary artery endothelial cells. GYY4137 also protected mitochondrial function in alveolar epithelial cells. In vivo, GYY4137 preserved and restored normal alveolar growth in rat pups exposed from birth for 2 weeks to hyperoxia. GYY4137 also attenuated PHT as determined by improved pulmonary arterial acceleration time on echo-Doppler, pulmonary artery remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy. GYY4137 also prevented pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation. Conclusions H2S protects from impaired alveolar growth and PHT in experimental O2-induced lung injury. H2S warrants further investigation as a new therapeutic target for alveolar damage and PHT. PMID:24603989

  11. Numerical and Experimental Aspects of Data Acquisition and Processing in Application to Temperature Resolved 3-D Sub-Millimeter Spectroscopy for Astrophysics and Spectral Assignment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Ivan R.; Fortman, Sarah M.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2009-06-01

    Experimental determination of the lower state energy for every transition in molecular spectra, made possible by temperature resolved 3-D spectroscopy, opens new frontiers in our ability to predict molecular spectra over a wide range of temperatures and to assign rotational spectra in many vibrational states. Our improved collisional cooling cell design extends temperature coverage of this technique to 77 K. This enhances our ability to simulate molecular spectra at temperatures of astronomical relevance. We are reporting on experimental and numerical aspects of dealing with exceptionally high information content of these spectra. New data reduction algorithms allow us to process this data in timely fashion in an attempt to make them available to astronomical community.

  12. BN 52021 (a platelet activating factor-receptor antagonist) decreases alveolar macrophage-mediated lung injury in experimental extrinsic allergic alveolitis.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Arellano, J L; Martín, T; López-Novoa, J M; Sánchez, M L; Montero, A; Jiménez, A

    1998-01-01

    Several lines of research indirectly suggest that platelet activating factor (PAF) may intervene in the pathogenesis of extrinsic allergic alveolitis (EAA). The specific aim of our study was to evaluate the participation of PAF on macrophage activation during the acute phase of EAA in an experimental model of this disease developed in guinea pigs. Initially we measured the concentration of PAF in bronchoalvedar lavage fluid, blood and lung tissue. In a second phase we evaluate the participation of PAF on alveolar macrophage activation and parenchymal lung injury. The effect of PAF on parenchymal lung injury was evaluated by measuring several lung parenchymatous lesion indices (lung index, bronchoalvedar lavage fluid (BALF) lactic hydrogenase activity and BALF alkaline phosphatase activity) and parameters of systemic response to the challenge (acute phase reagents). We observed that induction of the experimental EAA gave rise to an increase in the concentration of PAF in blood and in lung tissue. The use of the PAF-receptor antagonist BN52021 decreases the release of lysosomal enzymes (beta-glucuronidase and tartrate-sensitive acid phosphatase) to the extracellular environment both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, antagonism of the PAF receptors notably decreases pulmonary parenchymatous lesion. These data suggest that lung lesions from acute EAA are partly mediated by local production of PAF. PMID:9705608

  13. Lung cell toxicity experimentally induced by a mixed dust from Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Osornio-Vargas, A.R.; Hernandez-Rodriguez, N.A.; Yanez-Buruel, A.G. ); Ussler, W. ); Overby, L.H.; Brody, A.R. )

    1991-10-01

    Lung disease caused by nonoccupational exposures to inorganic particles from the soil has been reported in several areas of the world. The authors tested the toxic potential of dust samples from a Mexican city (Mexicali) that is frequently affected by dust storms and is geographically related to the area of San Diego, CA, where constituents of the soil have been reported to be fibrogenic. They found that samples of Mexicali dust are a mixture of {approximately} 75% potassium aluminum silicates (illite) and {approximately} 20% silica. Respirable size particles were highly hemolytic and induced lactic dehydrogenase release from alveolar macrophages exposed in vitro. Animals instilled intratracheally with the dust developed a multifocal interstitial lung disease associated with deposits of the aluminum silicates, which were identified by x-ray microanalysis. Inhalation studies in rats demonstrated that the majority of particles were deposited preferentially at the first alveolar duct bifurcations. Twenty-four hours later, numerous particles had been ingested by alveolar macrophages that had migrated to those sites of deposition. It is proposed that alveolar macrophages are attracted to the deposited particles by complement fragments since Mexicali dust is capable of activating complement proteins from both serum and bronchoalveolar lavage. Activation resulted in alveolar macrophage chemotaxis.

  14. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the lung.

    PubMed

    Biederer, J; Heussel, C P; Puderbach, M; Wielpuetz, M O

    2014-02-01

    Beyond being a substitute for X-ray, computed tomography, and scintigraphy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inherently combines morphologic and functional information more than any other technology. Lung perfusion: The most established method is first-pass contrast-enhanced imaging with bolus injection of gadolinium chelates and time-resolved gradient-echo (GRE) sequences covering the whole lung (1 volume/s). Images are evaluated visually or semiquantitatively, while absolute quantification remains challenging due to the nonlinear relation of T1-shortening and contrast material concentration. Noncontrast-enhanced perfusion imaging is still experimental, either based on arterial spin labeling or Fourier decomposition. The latter is used to separate high- and low-frequency oscillations of lung signal related to the effects of pulsatile blood flow. Lung ventilation: Using contrast-enhanced first-pass perfusion, lung ventilation deficits are indirectly identified by hypoxic vasoconstriction. More direct but still experimental approaches use either inhalation of pure oxygen, an aerosolized contrast agent, or hyperpolarized noble gases. Fourier decomposition MRI based on the low-frequency lung signal oscillation allows for visualization of ventilation without any contrast agent. Respiratory mechanics: Time-resolved series with high background signal such as GRE or steady-state free precession visualize the movement of chest wall, diaphragm, mediastinum, lung tissue, tracheal wall, and tumor. The assessment of volume changes allows drawing conclusions on regional ventilation. With this arsenal of functional imaging capabilities at high spatial and temporal resolution but without radiation burden, MRI will find its role in regional functional lung analysis and will therefore overcome the sensitivity of global lung function analysis for repeated short-term treatment monitoring. PMID:24481761

  15. Effect of tidal volume and positive end-expiratory pressure on expiratory time constants in experimental lung injury.

    PubMed

    Henderson, William R; Dominelli, Paolo B; Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Lipson, Rachel; Griesdale, Donald E G; Sekhon, Mypinder; Ayas, Najib; Sheel, A William

    2016-03-01

    We utilized a multicompartment model to describe the effects of changes in tidal volume (VT) and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on lung emptying during passive deflation before and after experimental lung injury. Expiratory time constants (τE) were determined by partitioning the expiratory flow-volume (V˙EV) curve into multiple discrete segments and individually calculating τE for each segment. Under all conditions of PEEP and VT, τE increased throughout expiration both before and after injury. Segmented τE values increased throughout expiration with a slope that was different than zero (P < 0. 01). On average, τE increased by 45.08 msec per segment. When an interaction between injury status and τE segment was included in the model, it was significant (P < 0.05), indicating that later segments had higher τE values post injury than early τE segments. Higher PEEP and VT values were associated with higher τE values. No evidence was found for an interaction between injury status and VT, or PEEP. The current experiment confirms previous observations that τE values are smaller in subjects with injured lungs when compared to controls. We are the first to demonstrate changes in the pattern of τE before and after injury when examined with a multiple compartment model. Finally, increases in PEEP or VT increased τE throughout expiration, but did not appear to have effects that differed between the uninjured and injured state. PMID:26997633

  16. The Complete, Temperature Resolved Experimental Spectrum of Methyl Formate (HCOOCH3) between 214.6 and 265.4 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, James P.; Fortman, Sarah M.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2016-05-01

    Because methyl formate (HCOOCH3) is abundant in the interstellar medium and has a strong, complex spectrum, it is a major contributor to the list of identified astrophysical lines. Because of its spectral complexity, with many low lying torsional and vibrational states, the quantum mechanical (QM) analysis of its laboratory spectrum is challenging and thus incomplete. As a result it is assumed that methyl formate is also one of the major contributors to the lists of unassigned lines in astrophysical spectra. This paper provides a characterization, without the need for QM analysis, of the spectrum of methyl formate between 214.6 and 265.4 GHz for astrophysically significant temperatures. The experimental basis for this characterization is a set of 425 spectra, with absolute intensity calibration, recorded between 248 and 408 K. Analysis of these spectra makes possible the calculation of the Complete Experimental Spectrum of methyl formate as a function of temperature. Of the 7132 strongest lines reported in this paper, 2523 are in the QM catalogs. Intensity differences of 5%–10% from those calculated via QM models were also found. Results are provided in a frequency point-by-point catalog that is well suited for the simulation of overlapped spectra. The common astrophysical line frequency, line strength, and lower state energy catalog is also provided.

  17. The complete, temperature resolved experimental spectrum of methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) between 560 and 654 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Fortman, Sarah M.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2014-02-20

    The complete spectrum of methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) has been characterized over a range of astrophysically significant temperatures in the 560.4-654.0 GHz spectral region. Absolute intensity calibration and analysis of 166 experimental spectra recorded over a slow 248-398 K temperature ramp provide a means for the simulation of the complete spectrum of methanol as a function of temperature. These results include contributions from v{sub t} = 3 and other higher states that are difficult to model via quantum mechanical (QM) techniques. They also contain contributions from the {sup 13}C isotopologue in terrestrial abundance. In contrast to our earlier work on semi-rigid species, such as ethyl cyanide and vinyl cyanide, significant intensity differences between these experimental values and those calculated by QM methods were found for many of the lines. Analysis of these differences shows the difficulty of the calculation of dipole matrix elements in the context of the internal rotation of the methanol molecule. These results are used to both provide catalogs in the usual line frequency, linestrength, and lower state energy format, as well as in a frequency point-by-point catalog that is particularly well suited for the characterization of blended lines.

  18. Embryonic lung morphogenesis in organ culture: experimental evidence for a proteoglycan function in the extracellular matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, B. S.; Bassett, K. E.; Spooner, B. S. Jr

    1993-01-01

    The lung rudiment, isolated from mid-gestation (11 day) mouse embryos, can undergo morphogenesis in organ culture. Observation of living rudiments, in culture, reveals both growth and ongoing bronchiolar branching activity. To detect proteoglycan (PG) biosynthesis, and deposition in the extracellular matrix, rudiments were metabolically labeled with radioactive sulfate, then fixed, embedded, sectioned and processed for autoradiography. The sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) types, composing the carbohydrate component of the proteoglycans, were evaluated by selective GAG degradative approaches that showed chondroitin sulfate PG principally associated with the interstitial matrix, and heparan sulfate PG principally associated with the basement membrane. Experiments using the proteoglycan biosynthesis disrupter, beta-xyloside, suggest that when chondroitin sulfate PG deposition into the ECM is perturbed, branching morphogenesis is compromised.

  19. Thermal Ablation of Lung Tissue: In Vivo Experimental Comparison of Microwave and Radiofrequency

    SciTech Connect

    Crocetti, Laura Bozzi, Elena; Faviana, Pinuccia; Cioni, Dania; Della Pina, Clotilde; Sbrana, Alberto; Fontanini, Gabriella; Lencioni, Riccardo

    2010-08-15

    This study was designed to compare feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation versus radiofrequency (RF) ablation of lung tissue in a rabbit model. Twenty New Zealand White rabbits were submitted to MW (n = 10, group A) or RF ablation (n = 10, group B). The procedures were performed with a prototype MW ablation device with a 1.6-cm radiating section antenna (Valleylab MW Ablation System) and with a 2-cm exposed-tip RF electrode (Cool-tip RF Ablation System). At immediate computed tomography increase in density, maximum diameters (D1-D3) of ablation zones were measured and ablation volume was calculated. Histopathologic assessment was performed 3 and 7 days after the procedure. Technical success was achieved in nine of 10 rabbits in each group. One death occurred in group B. Complications included pneumothorax (group A, n = 4; group B, n = 4), abscess (group A, n = 1; group B, n = 1), and thoracic wall burn (group A, n = 4). No significant differences were demonstrated in attenuation increase (P = 0.73), dimensions (P = 0.28, 0.86, 0.06, respectively, comparing D1-D3) and volume (P = 0.17). At histopathology, ablation zones were similar, with septal necrosis, edema, hemorrhage, and peripheral lymphocytic infiltrate. Complete thrombosis of more than 90% of vessels up to 2 mm in diameter was depicted at the periphery of the ablation zone in group A specimens. In group B specimens, complete thrombosis was depicted in 20% of vessels. Feasibility and safety of MW and RF ablation are similar in a lung rabbit model. MW ablation produces a greater damage to peripheral small vessels inducing thrombosis.

  20. Lung Radiofrequency Ablation: In Vivo Experimental Study with Low-Perfusion-Rate Multitined Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Crocetti, Laura Lencioni, Riccardo; Bozzi, Elena; Sbrana, Alberto; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of lung radiofrequency (RF) ablation by using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes in an in vivo animal model. Ten New Zealand White rabbits underwent RF ablation using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes (Starburst Talon; RITA Medical Systems, Mountain View, CA) and a 200-W RF generator. The electrode was positioned under fluoroscopy guidance and a single percutaneous RF ablation was performed. Saline perfusate was doped with nonionic iodinated contrast agent to render it visible on computed tomography (CT). The pump infused the saline doped with contrast agent into the lateral tines at a rate of 0.1ml/min. The planned ablation was of 3 min, with the hooks deployed to 2 cm at a target temperature of 105{sup o}C. An immediate posttreatment CT scan documented the distribution of the doped saline and the presence of immediate complications. The animals were monitored for delayed complications and sacrificed within 72 h (n = 4), 2 weeks (n = 3), or 4 weeks (n = 3). Assessment of ablation zone and adjacent structures was done at autopsy. Major complications consisted of pneumothorax requiring drainage (n = 2) and skin burn (n = 1). Immediately after the procedure the area of ablation was depicted at CT as a round, well-demarcated area, homogeneously opacified by iodinated contrast medium (mean size, 2.3 {+-} 0.8 cm). The presence of a sharply demarcated area of coagulation necrosis (mean size, 2.1 {+-} 0.4 cm) without severe damage to adjacent structures was confirmed at autopsy. In one case, euthanized at 4 weeks, in whom pneumothorax and pleural effusion were depicted, pleural fibrinous adhesions were demonstrated at autopsy. In conclusion, lung RF ablation performed in an in vivo animal model using low-perfusion-rate, expandable, multitined electrodes is feasible and safe. No severe damage to adjacent structures was demonstrated.

  1. Bilateral vagotomy or atropine pre-treatment reduces experimental diesel-soot induced lung inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    McQueen, D.S. . E-mail: D.S.McQueen@ed.ac.uk; Donaldson, K.; McNeilly, J.D.; Barton, N.J.; Duffin, R.

    2007-02-15

    To investigate the role of the vagus nerve in acute inflammatory and cardiorespiratory responses to diesel particulate (DP) in the rat airway, we measured changes in respiration, blood pressure and neutrophils in lungs of urethane anesthetized Wistar rats 6-h post-instillation of DP (500 {mu}g) and studied the effect of mid-cervical vagotomy or atropine (1 mg kg{sup -1}) pre-treatment. In conscious rats, we investigated DP, with and without atropine pre-treatment. DP increased neutrophil level in BAL (bronchoalveolar lavage) fluid from intact anesthetized rats to 2.5 {+-} 0.7 x 10{sup 6} cells (n = 8), compared with saline instillation (0.3 {+-} 0.1 x 10{sup 6}, n = 7; P < 0.05). Vagotomy reduced DP neutrophilia to 0.8 {+-} 0.2 x 10{sup 6} cells (n = 8; P < 0.05 vs. intact); atropine reduced DP-induced neutrophilia to 0.3 {+-} 0.2 x 10{sup 6} (n = 4; P < 0.05). In conscious rats, DP neutrophilia of 8.5 {+-} 1.8 x 10{sup 6}, n = 4, was reduced by pre-treatment with atropine to 2.2 {+-} 1.2 x 10{sup 6} cells, n = 3. Hyperventilation occurred 6 h after DP in anesthetized rats with intact vagi, but not in bilaterally vagotomized or atropine pre-treated animals and was abolished by vagotomy (P < 0.05, paired test). There were no significant differences in the other variables (mean blood pressure, heart rate and heart rate variability) measured before and 360 min after DP. In conclusion, DP activates a pro-inflammatory vago-vagal reflex which is reduced by atropine. Muscarinic ACh receptors in the rat lung are involved in DP-induced neutrophilia, and hence muscarinic antagonists may reduce airway and/or cardiovascular inflammation evoked by inhaled atmospheric DP in susceptible individuals.

  2. TIP peptide inhalation in experimental acute lung injury: effect of repetitive dosage and different synthetic variants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Inhalation of TIP peptides that mimic the lectin-like domain of TNF-α is a novel approach to attenuate pulmonary oedema on the threshold to clinical application. A placebo-controlled porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) demonstrated a reduced thermodilution-derived extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) and improved gas exchange through TIP peptide inhalation within three hours. Based on these findings, the present study compares a single versus a repetitive inhalation of a TIP peptide (TIP-A) and two alternate peptide versions (TIP-A, TIP-B). Methods Following animal care committee approval ARDS was induced by bronchoalveolar lavage followed by injurious ventilation in 21 anaesthetized pigs. A randomised-blinded three-group setting compared the single-dosed peptide variants TIP-A and TIP-B as well as single versus repetitive inhalation of TIP-A (n = 7 per group). Over two three-hour intervals parameters of gas exchange, transpulmonary thermodilution, calculated alveolar fluid clearance, and ventilation/perfusion-distribution were assessed. Post-mortem measurements included pulmonary wet/dry ratio and haemorrhage/congestion scoring. Results The repetitive TIP-A inhalation led to a significantly lower wet/dry ratio than a single dose and a small but significantly lower EVLWI. However, EVLWI changes over time and the derived alveolar fluid clearance did not differ significantly. The comparison of TIP-A and B showed no relevant differences. Gas exchange and ventilation/perfusion-distribution significantly improved in all groups without intergroup differences. No differences were found in haemorrhage/congestion scoring. Conclusions In comparison to a single application the repetitive inhalation of a TIP peptide in three-hour intervals may lead to a small additional reduction the lung water content. Two alternate TIP peptide versions showed interchangeable characteristics. PMID:24904234

  3. ZD6474, an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase, inhibits growth of experimental lung metastasis and production of malignant pleural effusions in a non-small cell lung cancer model.

    PubMed

    Matsumori, Yuka; Yano, Seiji; Goto, Hisatsugu; Nakataki, Emiko; Wedge, Stephen R; Ryan, Anderson J; Sone, Saburo

    2006-01-01

    ZD6474 is a novel, orally active inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) tyrosine kinase, with some additional activity against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase. The purpose of this study was to determine the potential of ZD6474 in the control of established experimental lung metastasis and pleural effusions produced by human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. PC14PE6 (adenocarcinoma) and H226 (squamous cell carcinoma) cells express high levels of EGFR and only PC14PE6 cells overexpress VEGF. Neither ZD6474 nor the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib inhibit proliferation of PC14PE6 or H226 cells in vitro. Both PC14PE6 and H226 cells inoculated intravenously into nude mice induced multiple lung nodules after 5-7 weeks. In addition, PC14PE6 cells produced bloody pleural effusions. Daily oral treatment with ZD6474 did not reduce the number of lung nodules produced by PC14PE6 or H226 cells, but did reduce the lung weight and the size of lung nodules. ZD6474 also inhibited the production of pleural effusions by PC14PE6 cells. Histological analyses of lung lesions revealed that ZD6474 treatment inhibited activation of VEGFR-2 and reduced tumor vascularization and tumor cell proliferation. Therapeutic effects of ZD6474 were considered likely to be due to inhibition of VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase because gefitinib was inactive in this model. These results indicate that ZD6474, an inhibitor of VEGFR-2, may be useful in controlling the growth of established lung metastasis and pleural effusions by NSCLC. PMID:16783964

  4. THE COMPLETE, TEMPERATURE-RESOLVED EXPERIMENTAL SPECTRUM OF VINYL CYANIDE (H{sub 2}CCHCN) BETWEEN 210 AND 270 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Fortman, Sarah M.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Medvedev, Ivan R.

    2011-08-10

    The results of an experimental approach to the identification and characterization of the astrophysical weed vinyl cyanide in the 210-270 GHz region are reported. This approach is based on spectrally complete, intensity-calibrated spectra taken at more than 400 different temperatures in the 210-270 GHz region and is used to produce catalogs in the usual astrophysical format: line frequency, line strength, and lower state energy. As in our earlier study of ethyl cyanide, we also include the results of a frequency point-by-point analysis, which is especially well suited for characterizing weak lines and blended lines in crowded spectra. This study shows substantial incompleteness in the quantum-mechanical (QM) models used to calculate astrophysical catalogs, primarily due to their omission of many low-lying vibrational states of vinyl cyanide, but also due to the exclusion of perturbed rotational transitions. Unlike ethyl cyanide, the QM catalogs for vinyl cyanide include analyses of perturbed excited vibrational states, whose modeling is more challenging. Accordingly, we include an empirical study of the frequency accuracy of these QM models. We observe modest frequency differences for some vibrationally excited lines.

  5. An Internal Report: Experimental Proof of Dynamical Spin Shielding in Ce from Spin-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Yu, S W; Komesu, T; Chung, B W; Morton, S A; Waddill, G D

    2006-03-31

    Using Fano Effect measurements upon polycrystalline Ce, we have observed a phase reversal between the spectral structure at the Fermi Edge and the other 4f derived feature near a binding energy of 2 eV. The Fano Effect is the observation of spin polarized photoelectron emission from NONMAGNETIC materials, under chirally selective excitation, such as circularly polarized photons. Within various models, the peak at the Fermi Energy (f{sup 1} peak, quasiparticle peak, Kondo peak) is predicted to be the manifestation of the electrons which shield the otherwise unpaired spin associated with the peak at 2 eV (f{sup 0} peak or Lower Hubbard Band). Utilizing high-energy photoelectron spectroscopy, on and off resonance, the bulk nature and f-character of both features have been confirmed. Thus, observation of phase reversal between the f{sup 0} and f{sup 1} peak is a direct experimental proof of spin shielding in Ce, confirming the original model of Gunnarsson and Shoenhammer, albeit within a Hubbard picture.

  6. Experimental validation of the van Herk margin formula for lung radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ecclestone, Gillian; Heath, Emily; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To validate the van Herk margin formula for lung radiation therapy using realistic dose calculation algorithms and respiratory motion modeling. The robustness of the margin formula against variations in lesion size, peak-to-peak motion amplitude, tissue density, treatment technique, and plan conformity was assessed, along with the margin formula assumption of a homogeneous dose distribution with perfect plan conformity.Methods: 3DCRT and IMRT lung treatment plans were generated within the ORBIT treatment planning platform (RaySearch Laboratories, Sweden) on 4DCT datasets of virtual phantoms. Random and systematic respiratory motion induced errors were simulated using deformable registration and dose accumulation tools available within ORBIT for simulated cases of varying lesion sizes, peak-to-peak motion amplitudes, tissue densities, and plan conformities. A detailed comparison between the margin formula dose profile model, the planned dose profiles, and penumbra widths was also conducted to test the assumptions of the margin formula. Finally, a correction to account for imperfect plan conformity was tested as well as a novel application of the margin formula that accounts for the patient-specific motion trajectory.Results: The van Herk margin formula ensured full clinical target volume coverage for all 3DCRT and IMRT plans of all conformities with the exception of small lesions in soft tissue. No dosimetric trends with respect to plan technique or lesion size were observed for the systematic and random error simulations. However, accumulated plans showed that plan conformity decreased with increasing tumor motion amplitude. When comparing dose profiles assumed in the margin formula model to the treatment plans, discrepancies in the low dose regions were observed for the random and systematic error simulations. However, the margin formula respected, in all experiments, the 95% dose coverage required for planning target volume (PTV) margin derivation, as

  7. [Pathomorphology of the lungs and microcirculatory bed of the lesser circulation in chronic experimental allergic alveolitis].

    PubMed

    Orekhov, O O; Kirillov, Iu A

    1985-01-01

    Granulomatous lung lesions were produced in rats by 5 intravenous or intratracheal injections of the killed BCG suspension as an antigen. On the basis of immunocomplex and cell-mediated immunopathological reactions this condition may be considered as a chronic allergic form of alveolitis. Granulomas were formed along the arteries when the antigen was administered intravenously and along the bronchi after its intratracheal administration. In both cases there were single granulomas in the alveolar septa interstitium. The microcirculatory bed was studied in semithin sections and morphometrically in thick sections after impregnation with an Indian ink and 5% gelatin. The alveolar septa capillaries in control rats were shown to form a network the parameters ow which rather correspond to the "sheet-blow" model (Fung and Sobin, 1969). In chronic allergic alveolitis, a reduction of the capillary network develops at the zone of granulomatous inflammation while in the relatively normal zone a network type of the microcirculatory bed is preformed into the main one with the formation of predominant routes of circulation that provide the blood filling of the heart cavities. PMID:4074142

  8. Experimental splenosis in the liver and lung spread through the vasculature.

    PubMed

    Seguchi, S; Yue, F; Asanuma, K; Sasaki, K

    2015-05-01

    To demonstrate that intra-organ splenosis can engraft and develop after being distributed through the vasculature, tiny fragments of splenic tissues were injected into the inferior vena cava or the portal vein to induce intrapulmonary and intrahepatic splenosis in rats. After 1 month, splenic autograft structures in the lung and liver were assessed for structure by histology, for immunologic compartments by immunohistochemistry, for phagocytic function by carbon uptake and for vascular formation by Microfil (a silicon rubber compound) injection. Intrapulmonary and intrahepatic splenoses were indeed able to spread through the vasculature. The intrapulmonary splenic autografts were trapped and spread out in the interstitium, without forming a capsule. White pulp was markedly developed, showing lymphocyte aggregations that consisted in B cells surrounding the dilated vessel. Splenic sinuses were not definitively observed. Although macrophages were detected by immunohistochemistry, they showed no indication of having phagocytized carbon particles from the vessels, implying a closed circulation. In contrast, intrahepatic splenic autografts formed well-developed capsules, trabeculae and red pulp with splenic sinuses. Macrophages detected by immunohistochemistry were observed capturing carbon particles, which clearly revealed an open system circulation, as seen in normal rat spleen. The development of white pulp was poor and lymphocytes consisting in B cells aggregated in the peripheral margins. These results demonstrate that intra-organ splenosis can spread through the vasculature and that the morphologic and immunologic structures formed in these regenerated autografts are influenced by the organ vasculature and extracellular matrix wherein the tissue fragments settled. PMID:25526699

  9. Defect detection in multi-layered, plasma sprayed zirconia by time resolved infrared radiometry: A comparison between analytical and experimental methods

    SciTech Connect

    Happoldt, P.G.; Ellingson, W.A.; Gardiner, T.; Krueger, J.

    1994-04-01

    Analytical and experimental methods were used to study a series of test specimens consisting of plasma sprayed layers of NiCrA1Y/ZrO{sub 2} of various compositions.The coatings were seeded with artificial defects and were sprayed on steel disks. Two types of defects were used: flat bottomed holes drilled in the steel substrate and patches of room temperature vulcanizing silicone within the coatings. Defect sizes ranged from 0.1 to 10 mm and were at depths below the coating surface from 0.6 to 3.6 min. The method of time resolved infrared radiometry was used with two different heat sources, an acetylene torch and a high intensity lamp, to inspect the coatings. The torch allowed excellent sensitivity at depths of less than 2 mm and the lamp revealed flaws through the full coating thickness. Two analytical models were developed to study beat flow in the test specimens: a finite element model and an electrical analog model. Results from the two models were compared to check consistency and the finite element model results were compared with experimental results. The finite element code was chosen for further development due to its greater flexibility and ease of use.

  10. RESOLVE Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Ray; Coan, Mary; Cryderman, Kate; Captain, Janine

    2013-01-01

    The RESOLVE project is a lunar prospecting mission whose primary goal is to characterize water and other volatiles in lunar regolith. The Lunar Advanced Volatiles Analysis (LAVA) subsystem is comprised of a fluid subsystem that transports flow to the gas chromatograph - mass spectrometer (GC-MS) instruments that characterize volatiles and the Water Droplet Demonstration (WDD) that will capture and display water condensation in the gas stream. The LAVA Engineering Test Unit (ETU) is undergoing risk reduction testing this summer and fall within a vacuum chamber to understand and characterize component and integrated system performance. Testing of line heaters, printed circuit heaters, pressure transducers, temperature sensors, regulators, and valves in atmospheric and vacuum environments was done. Test procedures were developed to guide experimental tests and test reports to analyze and draw conclusions from the data. In addition, knowledge and experience was gained with preparing a vacuum chamber with fluid and electrical connections. Further testing will include integrated testing of the fluid subsystem with the gas supply system, near-infrared spectrometer, WDD, Sample Delivery System, and GC-MS in the vacuum chamber. This testing will provide hands-on exposure to a flight forward spaceflight subsystem, the processes associated with testing equipment in a vacuum chamber, and experience working in a laboratory setting. Examples of specific analysis conducted include: pneumatic analysis to calculate the WDD's efficiency at extracting water vapor from the gas stream to form condensation; thermal analysis of the conduction and radiation along a line connecting two thermal masses; and proportional-integral-derivative (PID) heater control analysis. Since LAVA is a scientific subsystem, the near-infrared spectrometer and GC-MS instruments will be tested during the ETU testing phase.

  11. The orally active and bioavailable ATR kinase inhibitor AZD6738 potentiates the anti-tumor effects of cisplatin to resolve ATM-deficient non-small cell lung cancer in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Vendetti, Frank P.; Lau, Alan; Schamus, Sandra; Conrads, Thomas P.; O'Connor, Mark J.; Bakkenist, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    ATR and ATM are DNA damage signaling kinases that phosphorylate several thousand substrates. ATR kinase activity is increased at damaged replication forks and resected DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). ATM kinase activity is increased at DSBs. ATM has been widely studied since ataxia telangiectasia individuals who express no ATM protein are the most radiosensitive patients identified. Since ATM is not an essential protein, it is widely believed that ATM kinase inhibitors will be well-tolerated in the clinic. ATR has been widely studied, but advances have been complicated by the finding that ATR is an essential protein and it is widely believed that ATR kinase inhibitors will be toxic in the clinic. We describe AZD6738, an orally active and bioavailable ATR kinase inhibitor. AZD6738 induces cell death and senescence in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. AZD6738 potentiates the cytotoxicity of cisplatin and gemcitabine in NSCLC cell lines with intact ATM kinase signaling, and potently synergizes with cisplatin in ATM-deficient NSCLC cells. In contrast to expectations, daily administration of AZD6738 and ATR kinase inhibition for 14 consecutive days is tolerated in mice and enhances the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin in xenograft models. Remarkably, the combination of cisplatin and AZD6738 resolves ATM-deficient lung cancer xenografts. PMID:26517239

  12. Mechanical load and mechanical integrity of lung cells - experimental mechanostimulation of epithelial cell- and fibroblast-monolayers.

    PubMed

    Gamerdinger, Katharina; Wernet, Florian; Smudde, Eva; Schneider, Matthias; Guttmann, Josef; Schumann, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Experimental mechanostimulation of soft biologic tissue is widely used to investigate cellular responses to mechanical stress or strain. Reactions on mechanostimulation are investigated in terms of morphological changes, inflammatory responses and apoptosis/necrosis induction on a cellular level. In this context, the analysis of the mechanical characteristics of cell-layers might allow to indicate patho-physiological changes in the cell-cell contacts. Recently, we described a device for experimental mechanostimulation that allows simultaneous measurement of the mechanical characteristics of cell-monolayers. Here, we investigated how cultivated lung epithelial cell- and fibroblast-monolayers behave mechanically under different amplitudes of biaxial distension. The cell monolayers were sinusoidally deflected to 5%, 10% or 20% surface gain and their mechanical properties during mechanostimulation were analyzed. With increasing stimulation amplitudes more pronounced reductions of cell junctions were observed. These findings were accompanied by a substantial loss of monolayer rigidity. Pulmonary fibroblast monolayers were initially stiffer but were stronger effected by the mechanostimulation compared to epithelial cell-monolayers. We conclude that, according to their biomechanical function within the pulmonary tissue, epithelial cells and fibroblasts differ with respect to their mechanical characteristics and tolerance of mechanical load. PMID:25241284

  13. Cardiorespiratory effects of spontaneous breathing in two different models of experimental lung injury: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Varelmann, Dirk; Muders, Thomas; Zinserling, Jörg; Guenther, Ulf; Magnusson, Anders; Hedenstierna, Göran; Putensen, Christian; Wrigge, Hermann

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acute lung injury (ALI) can result from various insults to the pulmonary tissue. Experimental and clinical data suggest that spontaneous breathing (SB) during pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) in ALI results in better lung aeration and improved oxygenation. Our objective was to evaluate whether the addition of SB has different effects in two different models of ALI. Methods Forty-four pigs were randomly assigned to ALI resulting either from hydrochloric acid aspiration (HCl-ALI) or from increased intra-abdominal pressure plus intravenous oleic acid injections (OA-ALI) and were ventilated in PCV mode either with SB (PCV + SB) or without SB (PCV – SB). Cardiorespiratory variables were measured at baseline after induction of ALI and after 4 hours of treatment (PCV + SB or PCV – SB). Finally, density distributions and end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) were assessed by thoracic spiral computed tomography. Results PCV + SB improved arterial partial pressure of oxygen/inspiratory fraction of oxygen (PaO2/FiO2) by a reduction in intrapulmonary shunt fraction in HCl-ALI from 27% ± 6% to 23% ± 13% and in OA-ALI from 33% ± 19% to 26% ± 18%, whereas during PCV – SB PaO2/FiO2 deteriorated and shunt fraction increased in the HCl group from 28% ± 8% to 37% ± 17% and in the OA group from 32% ± 12% to 47% ± 17% (P < 0.05 for interaction time and treatment, but not ALI type). PCV + SB also resulted in higher EELV (HCl-ALI: 606 ± 171 mL, OA-ALI: 439 ± 90 mL) as compared with PCV – SB (HCl-ALI: 372 ± 130 mL, OA-ALI: 192 ± 51 mL, with P < 0.05 for interaction of time, treatment, and ALI type). Conclusions SB improves oxygenation, reduces shunt fraction, and increases EELV in both models of ALI. PMID:18980696

  14. Protective function of pirfenidone and everolimus on the development of chronic allograft rejection after experimental lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    von Suesskind-Schwendi, M; Heigel, E; Pfaehler, S; Haneya, A; Schmid, C; Hirt, S W; Lehle, K

    2016-07-01

    Long-term survival of lung allografts is limited by chronic rejection (CR). Oxidative stress (OxS) plays a central role in the development of CR. We investigated the influence of pirfenidone (alone or in combination with everolimus) on OxS and CR. A rat model of left lung allo-transplantation (F344-to-WKY) was used to evaluate the effects of pirfenidone alone [0,85% in chow from postoperative day (POD) -3 to 20/60] and in combination with everolimus [2,5 mg/kg bw daily from POD 7 to 20/60]. Allografts of non-treated animals, everolimus treated animals and right, non-transplanted lungs were used as references. Immunohistology of myeloperoxidase (MPO), haemoxygenase-1 (HO-1), iron and platelet-derived-growth-factor-receptor-alpha (PDGFR-a) were performed. On POD 20, all groups showed severe acute rejection (ISHLT A3-4/B1R-B2R). Groups treated with pirfenidone showed a lower interstitial inflammatory infiltration and a lower participation of highly fibrotic degenerated vessels (ISHLT-D2R). In the long term follow up (POD 60), pirfenidone alone significantly reduced chronic airway rejection (ISHLT-C; p≤0.05), interstitial fibrosis (IF; p≤0.05), content of collagen (p≤0.05), expression of PDGFR-a (p≤0.05) and the deposition of iron (p≤0.05). All groups treated with pirfenidone showed a high expression of the cytoprotective enzyme HO-1 (p≤0.05). The additional application of everolimus resulted in a significant decrease of chronic airway rejection (ISHLT-C; p≤0.05), vasculopathy (ISHLT; p≤0.05) and IF (p≤0.05). In conclusion, early application of pirfenidone inhibited the progression of CR by its anti-fibrotic and anti-oxidative properties. The additional application of an m-TOR-inhibitor increased the anti-fibrotic effects of pirfenidone which resulted in a reduction of CR after experimental LTx. PMID:26707547

  15. RESOLVE Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Ray O.

    2012-01-01

    The RESOLVE project is a lunar prospecting mission whose primary goal is to characterize water and other volatiles in lunar regolith. The Lunar Advanced Volatiles Analysis (LAVA) subsystem is comprised of a fluid subsystem that transports flow to the gas chromatograph- mass spectrometer (GC-MS) instruments that characterize volatiles and the Water Droplet Demonstration (WDD) that will capture and display water condensation in the gas stream. The LAVA Engineering Test Unit (ETU) is undergoing risk reduction testing this summer and fall within a vacuum chamber to understand and characterize C!Jmponent and integrated system performance. Ray will be assisting with component testing of line heaters, printed circuit heaters, pressure transducers, temperature sensors, regulators, and valves in atmospheric and vacuum environments. He will be developing procedures to guide these tests and test reports to analyze and draw conclusions from the data. In addition, he will gain experience with preparing a vacuum chamber with fluid and electrical connections. Further testing will include integrated testing of the fluid subsystem with the gas supply system, near-infrared spectrometer, WDD, Sample Delivery System, and GC-MS in the vacuum chamber. This testing will provide hands-on exposure to a flight forward spaceflight subsystem, the processes associated with testing equipment in a vacuum chamber, and experience working in a laboratory setting. Examples of specific analysis Ray will conduct include: pneumatic analysis to calculate the WOO's efficiency at extracting water vapor from the gas stream to form condensation; thermal analysis of the conduction and radiation along a line connecting two thermal masses; and proportional-integral-derivative (PID) heater control analysis. In this Research and Technology environment, Ray will be asked to problem solve real-time as issues arise. Since LAVA is a scientific subsystem, Ray will be utilizing his chemical engineering background to

  16. VEGF ameliorates pulmonary hypertension through inhibition of endothelial apoptosis in experimental lung fibrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Laszlo; Farkas, Daniela; Ask, Kjetil; Möller, Antje; Gauldie, Jack; Margetts, Peter; Inman, Mark; Kolb, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) can lead to the development of secondary pulmonary hypertension (PH) and ultimately death. Despite this known association, the precise mechanism of disease remains unknown. Using a rat model of IPF, we explored the role of the proangiogenic and antiapoptotic growth factor VEGF in the vascular remodeling that underlies PH. In this model, adenoviral delivery of active TGF-β1 induces pulmonary arterial remodeling, loss of the microvasculature in fibrotic areas, and increased pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP). Immunohistochemistry and mRNA analysis revealed decreased levels of VEGF and its receptor, which were inversely correlated with PAP and endothelial cell apoptosis in both the micro- and macrovasculature. Treatment of IPF rats with adenoviral delivery of VEGF resulted in reduced endothelial apoptosis, increased vascularization, and improved PAP due to reduced remodeling but worsened PF. These data show that experimental pulmonary fibrosis (PF) leads to loss of the microvasculature through increased apoptosis and to remodeling of the pulmonary arteries, with both processes resulting in PH. As administration of VEGF ameliorated the PH in this model but concomitantly aggravated the fibrogenic process, VEGF-based therapies should be used with caution. PMID:19381013

  17. Identification of Th1 epitopes within molecules from the lung-stage schistosomulum of Schistosoma japonicum by combining prediction analysis of the transcriptome with experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan Li; Jia, Kan; Zhao, Ben Peng; Li, Ying; Yuan, Chun Xiu; Yang, Jian Mei; Lin, Jiao Jiao; Feng, Xin Gang

    2012-12-01

    The lung-stage schistosomulum has been regarded as the main target of protective immunity induced by radiation-attenuated vaccines (RAV) in the mouse model of schistosomiasis, and immune mechanisms mediated by the CD4+ Th1 response play a major role in the RAV model. To identify Th1 epitopes rapidly within molecules from the lung schistosomulum of Schistosoma japonicum, in the present study we analyzed transcriptome data from normal and radiation-attenuated lung schistosomula of S. japonicum and Schistosoma mansoni. We selected six genes with high levels of expression of their transcripts as sample sequences from the lung schistosomula. From these six sequences, by using different algorithms, we predicted six promiscuous Th cell epitopes that are capable of binding to both murine and human MHC class II molecules. To validate our in silico prediction experimentally, first, the gene expressions of the six sequences in day 3 lung-stage schistosomula were assessed using reverse-transcription PCR (polymerase chain reaction) analysis. The result showed that all six sequences predicted can be expressed in normal day 3 schistosomula. Second, we measured the direct binding of the four peptides predicted above to APCs (Antigen Presenting Cells) from the BALB/c mouse strain using a fluorometric method, and found that the four peptides could bind to both I-Ad and I-Ed molecules of the mice. Finally, the proliferation and profiles of cytokine production by spleen lymphocytes from the BALB/c mice immunized with the six predicted peptides were detected in vitro using modified MTT (Methyl Thiazolyl Tetrazolium), and flow cytometry methods, respectively. The results showed that three of the six predicted peptides could induce a recall CD4+ Th1 response in vitro. These results demonstrate that potential Th1-type epitopes can be identified rapidly by a combination of in silico analysis of transcriptomes of lung-stage schistosomula with experimental validation. PMID:22617496

  18. Inhibition of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 suppresses tumor growth and angiogenesis in experimental non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hui; Zhao, Ying-Nan; Yu, Chang-Hai; Zhao, Yun-Long; Liu, Yang

    2016-07-15

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu1 receptor) is expressed in many cancer cell types as compared to normal counterparts underscoring its potential role in tumor behavior. The aim of present study was to test the role of mGlu1 receptor in experimental non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). First, protein expression of mGlu1 receptor was higher in human NSCLC cell lines, including both adenocarcinoma and squamous carcinoma subtypes, when compared to normal bronchial epithelial cells. Inhibition of mGlu1 receptor by BAY36-7620 (an mGlu1 receptor-specific inhibitor) inhibited tumor growth and prolonged survival of mice with tumors of A549 or H1299. Treatment with BAY36-7620 suppressed AKT phosphorylation in A549 tumors and pre-treatment with BAY36-7620 blocked the L-quisqualate (a potent mGlu1 receptor agonist)-induced AKT phosphorylation in A549 cells. Treatment with BAY36-7620 reduced cellular proliferation of A549 cells. Treatment with BAY36-7620 enhanced cleaved PARP levels and reduced protein expression of bcl-2, HIF-1α, and VEGF. In contrast, treatment with L-quisqualate reduced cleaved PARP levels and enhanced protein expression of bcl-2, HIF-1α, VEGF, and IL-8, which was reversed by co-incubation with MK2206 (an AKT inhibitor). Pre-treatment with BAY36-7620 blocked the VEGF-induced AKT phosphorylation in HUVECs. Treatment of HUVECs with L-quisqualate resulted in enhancement of capillary tube formation, which was reversed by co-incubation with MK2206. Furthermore, mGlu1 receptor knockdown suppressed tumor growth and prolonged survival of mice with tumors of A549 or H1299. Collectively, inhibition of mGlu1 receptor suppressed tumor growth and angiogenesis in experimental NSCLC. PMID:27132814

  19. Antifibrotic and anti-inflammatory activity of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor nintedanib in experimental models of lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wollin, Lutz; Maillet, Isabelle; Quesniaux, Valérie; Holweg, Alexander; Ryffel, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    The tyrosine kinase inhibitor nintedanib (BIBF 1120) is in clinical development for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To explore its mode of action, nintedanib was tested in human lung fibroblasts and mouse models of lung fibrosis. Human lung fibroblasts expressing platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor-α and -β were stimulated with platelet-derived growth factor BB (homodimer) (PDGF-BB). Receptor activation was assessed by autophosphorylation and cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)-induced fibroblast to myofibroblast transformation was determined by α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) mRNA analysis. Lung fibrosis was induced in mice by intratracheal bleomycin or silica particle administration. Nintedanib was administered every day by gavage at 30, 60, or 100 mg/kg. Preventive nintedanib treatment regimen started on the day that bleomycin was administered. Therapeutic treatment regimen started at various times after the induction of lung fibrosis. Bleomycin caused increased macrophages and lymphocytes in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and elevated interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), and collagen in lung tissue. Histology revealed chronic inflammation and fibrosis. Silica-induced lung pathology additionally showed elevated BAL neutrophils, keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) levels, and granuloma formation. Nintedanib inhibited PDGF receptor activation, fibroblast proliferation, and fibroblast to myofibroblast transformation. Nintedanib significantly reduced BAL lymphocytes and neutrophils but not macrophages. Furthermore, interleukin-1β, KC, TIMP-1, and lung collagen were significantly reduced. Histologic analysis showed significantly diminished lung inflammation, granuloma formation, and fibrosis. The therapeutic effect was dependent on treatment start and duration. Nintedanib inhibited receptor tyrosine kinase activation and the proliferation and

  20. To-and-for extracorporeal lung assist (ECLA) through a single catheter-in premature goats as an experimental model of infant respiratory Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, T; Terasaki, H; Sadanaga, M A; Tsuno, K; Morioka, T

    1988-09-01

    A new to-and-fro V-V bypass extracorporeal lung assist (ECLA) through a single catheter as a blood access was investigated for its efficacy on six premature goats delivered by Cesarean section at a gestational age of 118 approximately 139 days as an experimental model of infant respiratory insufficiency, then applied to a human premature infant suffering from life threatening barotrauma that had developed from mechanical pulmonary ventilation. The extracorporeal bypass flow and the gas flow to the artificial membrane lung were controlled to keep Pa(O)(2) above 40 mmHg and Pa(CO)(2) within normal limits. The neonate's own lungs were treated with a continuous positive airway pressure of 5 approximately 12 cmH(2)O, apneic oxygenation or IMV. Two goats weighing 1250 g and 700 g died 2 approximately 2.5 hours after birth from severe circulatory distress. However, the other four neonates which were heavier than 2000 g, were successfully weaned from ECLA, and three of these could be weaned from mechanical ventilation as well. A human infant also survived and was weaned from ECLA on the third day.(Tanoue T, Terasaki H, Sadanaga M et al.: To-and-fro extracorporeal lung assist (ECLA) through a single catheter-in premature goats as an experimental model of infant respiratory insufficiency. PMID:15236069

  1. Heat dissipation after nonanatomical lung resection using a laser is mainly due to emission to the environment: an experimental ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Kirschbaum, A; Ocker, M; Bartsch, D K; Quint, K

    2014-05-01

    Laser-directed resection of lung metastases is performed more frequently in recent years. The energy-loaded laser rays heat up the lung tissue, considerably. It is still unclear which mechanism is more important for tissue heat dissipation: the lung perfusion or the tissue emission. Therefore, we created a special experimental model to investigate the spontaneous heat dissipation after nonanatomical lung resection using a diode-pumped laser with a high output power. Experiments were conducted on paracardiac pig lung lobes (n = 12) freshly dissected at the slaughterhouse. Nonanatomical resection of lung parenchyma was performed without lobe perfusion in group 1 (n = 6), while group 2 (n = 6) was perfused at a physiological pressure of 25 cm H2O at 37 °C with saline via the pulmonary artery. For this, we used a diode-pumped neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) LIMAX® 120 laser (Gebrüder Martin GmbH & Co. KG, Tuttlingen, Germany) with a wavelength of 1,318 nm and a power output of 100 W. Immediately after completing laser resection, the lungs were monitored with an infrared camera (Type IC 120LV; Trotec, Heinsberg, Germany) while allowed to cool down. The resection surface temperature was taken at 10-s intervals and documented in a freeze-frame until a temperature of 37 °C had been reached. The temperature drop per time unit was analyzed in both groups. Immediately after laser resection, the temperature at the lung surface was 84.33 ± 8.08 °C in group 1 and 76.75 ± 5.33 °C in group 2 (p = 0.29). Group 1 attained the final temperature of 37 °C after 182.95 ± 53.76 s, and group 2 after 121.70 ± 16.02 s (p = 0.01). The temperature drop occurred exponentially in both groups. We calculated both groups' decays using nonlinear regression, which revealed nearly identical courses. The mean time of tissue temperature of >42 °C, as a surrogate marker for tissue damage, was 97.14 ± 26.90 s in group 1 and 65.00 ± 13.78 s in group 2 (p = 0.02). Heat

  2. Betulinic acid attenuates lung injury by modulation of inflammatory cytokine response in experimentally-induced polymicrobial sepsis in mice.

    PubMed

    Lingaraju, Madhu Cholenahalli; Pathak, Nitya Nand; Begum, Jubeda; Balaganur, Venkanna; Bhat, Rafia Ahmad; Ramachandra, Harish Darasaguppe; Ayanur, Anjaneya; Ram, Mahendra; Singh, Vishakha; Kumar, Dhirendra; Kumar, Dinesh; Tandan, Surendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis commonly progresses to acute lung injury (ALI), an inflammatory lung disease with high morbidity and mortality. Septic ALI is characterized by excessive production of proinflammatory mediators. It remained refractory to present therapies and new therapies need to be developed to improve further clinical outcomes. Betulinic acid (BA), a pentacyclic lupane group triterpenoid has been shown to have anti-inflammatory activities in many studies. However, its therapeutic efficacy in polymicrobial septic ALI is yet unknown. Therefore, we investigated the effects of BA on septic ALI using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model in mice. Vehicle or BA (3, 10, and 30mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally, 3 times (0, 24 and 48h) before CLP and CLP was done on 49(th)h of the study. Survival rate was observed till 120h post CLP. Lung tissues were collected for analysis by sacrificing mice 18h post CLP. BA at 10 and 30mg/kg dose significantly reduced sepsis-induced mortality and lung injury as implied by attenuated lung histopathological changes, decreased protein and neutrophils infiltration. BA also decreased lung NF-κB expression, cytokine, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 levels. These evidences suggest that, the protective effects of BA on lungs are associated with defending action against inflammatory response and BA could be a potential modulatory agent of inflammation in sepsis-induced ALI. PMID:25277468

  3. Altered Lipid Composition of Surfactant and Lung Tissue in Murine Experimental Malaria-Associated Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scaccabarozzi, Diletta; Deroost, Katrien; Lays, Natacha; Taramelli, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    Malaria-associated acute lung injury (MA-ALI) and its more severe form malaria-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (MA-ARDS) are common, often fatal complications of severe malaria infections. However, little is known about their pathogenesis. In this study, biochemical alterations of the lipid composition of the lungs were investigated as possible contributing factors to the severity of murine MA-ALI/ARDS. C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 to induce lethal MA-ARDS, or with Plasmodium chabaudi AS, a parasite strain that does not induce lung pathology. The lipid profile of the lung tissue from mice infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 developing MA-ALI/ARDS, but not that from mice without lung pathology or controls, was characterized by high levels of phospholipids -mainly phosphatidylcholine- and esterified cholesterol. The high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and the linoleic/oleic fatty acid ratio of the latter reflect the fatty acid composition of plasma cholesterol esters. In spite of the increased total polyunsaturated fatty acid pool, which augments the relative oxidability of the lung membranes, and the presence of hemozoin, a known pro-oxidant, no excess oxidative stress was detected in the lungs of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice. The bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice was characterized by high levels of plasma proteins. The phospholipid profile of BAL large and small aggregate fractions was also different from uninfected controls, with a significant increase in the amounts of sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine and the decrease in phosphatidylglycerol. Both the increase of proteins and lysophosphatidylcholine are known to decrease the intrinsic surface activity of surfactant. Together, these data indicate that an altered lipid composition of lung tissue and BAL fluid, partially ascribed to oedema and lipoprotein infiltration, is a characteristic feature of murine

  4. Altered Lipid Composition of Surfactant and Lung Tissue in Murine Experimental Malaria-Associated Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scaccabarozzi, Diletta; Deroost, Katrien; Lays, Natacha; Omodeo Salè, Fausta; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Taramelli, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    Malaria-associated acute lung injury (MA-ALI) and its more severe form malaria-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (MA-ARDS) are common, often fatal complications of severe malaria infections. However, little is known about their pathogenesis. In this study, biochemical alterations of the lipid composition of the lungs were investigated as possible contributing factors to the severity of murine MA-ALI/ARDS. C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 to induce lethal MA-ARDS, or with Plasmodium chabaudi AS, a parasite strain that does not induce lung pathology. The lipid profile of the lung tissue from mice infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 developing MA-ALI/ARDS, but not that from mice without lung pathology or controls, was characterized by high levels of phospholipids -mainly phosphatidylcholine- and esterified cholesterol. The high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and the linoleic/oleic fatty acid ratio of the latter reflect the fatty acid composition of plasma cholesterol esters. In spite of the increased total polyunsaturated fatty acid pool, which augments the relative oxidability of the lung membranes, and the presence of hemozoin, a known pro-oxidant, no excess oxidative stress was detected in the lungs of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice. The bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice was characterized by high levels of plasma proteins. The phospholipid profile of BAL large and small aggregate fractions was also different from uninfected controls, with a significant increase in the amounts of sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine and the decrease in phosphatidylglycerol. Both the increase of proteins and lysophosphatidylcholine are known to decrease the intrinsic surface activity of surfactant. Together, these data indicate that an altered lipid composition of lung tissue and BAL fluid, partially ascribed to oedema and lipoprotein infiltration, is a characteristic feature of murine

  5. Lung injury-dependent oxidative status and chymotrypsin-like activity of skeletal muscles in hamsters with experimental emphysema

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Peripheral skeletal muscle is altered in patients suffering from emphysema and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Oxidative stress have been demonstrated to participate on skeletal muscle loss of several states, including disuse atrophy, mechanical ventilation, and chronic diseases. No evidences have demonstrated the occurance in a severity manner. Methods We evaluated body weight, muscle loss, oxidative stress, and chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity in the gastrocnemius muscle of emphysemic hamsters. The experimental animals had 2 different severities of lung damage from experimental emphysema induced by 20 mg/mL (E20) and 40 mg/mL (E40) papain. Results The severity of emphysema increased significantly in E20 (60.52 ± 2.8, p < 0.05) and E40 (52.27 ± 4.7; crossed the alveolar intercepts) groups. As compared to the control group, there was a reduction on body (171.6 ± 15.9 g) and muscle weight (251.87 ± 24.87 mg) in the E20 group (157.5 ± 10.3 mg and 230.12 ± 23.52 mg, for body and muscle weight, respectively), which was accentuated in the E40 group (137.4 ± 7.2 g and 197.87 ± 10.49 mg, for body and muscle weight, respectively). Additionally, the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), tert-butyl hydroperoxide-initiated chemiluminescence (CL), carbonylated proteins, and chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity were elevated in the E40 group as compared to the E20 group (p < 0.05 for all comparisons). The severity of emphysema significantly correlated with the progressive increase in CL (r = −0.95), TBARS (r = −0.98), carbonyl proteins (r = −0.99), and chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity (r = −0.90). Furthermore, augmentation of proteolytic activity correlated significantly with CL (r = 0.97), TBARS (r = 0.96), and carbonyl proteins (r = 0.91). Conclusions Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that muscle atrophy observed in this model of emphysema is mediated by increased muscle chymotrypsin

  6. CIGB-247: a VEGF-based therapeutic vaccine that reduces experimental and spontaneous lung metastasis of C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mouse tumors.

    PubMed

    Bequet-Romero, Mónica; Morera, Yanelys; Ayala-Ávila, Marta; Ancizar, Julio; Soria, Yordanka; Blanco, Aracelys; Suárez-Alba, Jesús; Gavilondo, Jorge V

    2012-02-27

    CIGB-247 is a novel cancer therapeutic vaccine that uses a mutated form of human VEGF as antigen. Being metastatic disease the most dramatic factor of tumor biology affecting patient survival and cure, preclinical evaluation of the impact of CIGB-247 vaccination on experimental metastasis mouse models is highly relevant, and constitutes the focus of this work. CIGB-247 was administered in a weekly schedule known to effectively reduce primary tumor growth. The vaccine was tested in experimental and spontaneous metastasis models of colon (CT26), lung (3LL-D122) and breast (F3II) carcinomas growing in C57Bl/6 or BALB/c mice. Primary tumor growth parameters, metastatic counts, and/or animal survival were recorded. Histology and specific humoral and cellular responses to the vaccine were evaluated. As compared to control groups, CIGB-247 vaccination significantly reduced the number and size of metastatic tumor foci in lungs after intravenous inoculation of CT26 and 3LL-D122 tumor cells. Spontaneous lung dissemination from 3LL-D122 and F3II breast tumor cells implanted in the footpad, or subcutaneously, was also reduced by immunization with CIGB-247. The vaccine elicited in both mouse strains antibodies specific for human and murine VEGF that effectively blocked the interaction of VEGF with VEGF receptor 2. Differing from other experimental reports that describe the use of VEGF for active tumor immunotherapy, CIGB-247 elicited a specific cellular response, measured both by a DTH increment and the induction of spleen cells cytotoxic to syngeneic tumor cells producing murine VEGF. In summary our results reinforce the potential of CIGB-247 vaccination to reduce both tumor growth and the number and size of tumor metastasis in lungs, the latter both after direct inoculations of cells in the blood stream, or as part of primary tumor progression in immunocompetent mice. PMID:22240345

  7. Regulatory T Cell DNA Methyltransferase Inhibition Accelerates Resolution of Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Benjamin D.; Mock, Jason R.; Aggarwal, Neil R.; Garibaldi, Brian T.; Sidhaye, Venkataramana K.; Florez, Marcus A.; Chau, Eric; Gibbs, Kevin W.; Mandke, Pooja; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; King, Landon S.

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a common and often fatal inflammatory lung condition without effective targeted therapies. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) resolve lung inflammation, but mechanisms that enhance Tregs to promote resolution of established damage remain unknown. DNA demethylation at the forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) locus and other key Treg loci typify the Treg lineage. To test how dynamic DNA demethylation affects lung injury resolution, we administered the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (DAC) to wild-type (WT) mice beginning 24 hours after intratracheal LPS-induced lung injury. Mice that received DAC exhibited accelerated resolution of their injury. Lung CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+ Tregs from DAC-treated WT mice increased in number and displayed enhanced Foxp3 expression, activation state, suppressive phenotype, and proliferative capacity. Lymphocyte-deficient recombinase activating gene-1–null mice and Treg-depleted (diphtheria toxin-treated Foxp3DTR) mice did not resolve their injury in response to DAC. Adoptive transfer of 2 × 105 DAC-treated, but not vehicle-treated, exogenous Tregs rescued Treg-deficient mice from ongoing lung inflammation. In addition, in WT mice with influenza-induced lung inflammation, DAC rescue treatment facilitated recovery of their injury and promoted an increase in lung Treg number. Thus, DNA methyltransferase inhibition, at least in part, augments Treg number and function to accelerate repair of experimental lung injury. Epigenetic pathways represent novel manipulable targets for the treatment of ARDS. PMID:25295995

  8. Antioxidant and antitumor efficacy of Luteolin, a dietary flavone on benzo(a)pyrene-induced experimental lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kasala, Eshvendar Reddy; Bodduluru, Lakshmi Narendra; Barua, Chandana C; Gogoi, Ranadeep

    2016-08-01

    The present study is designed to assess the antioxidant and antitumor potential of luteolin against benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P]-induced lung carcinogenesis in Swiss albino mice. Here, we reported that oral administration of B(a)P (50mg/kg body weight) to mice resulted in raised lipid peroxides (LPO), lung specific tumor markers such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and neuron specific enolase (NSE) with concomitant decrease in the levels of both enzymatic antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione-s-transferase (GST), and non-enzymatic antioxidants such as reduced glutathione (GSH), vitamin E and vitamin C. Luteolin treatment (15mg/kg body weight, p.o) significantly counteracted all these alterations and maintained cellular normalcy. Moreover, assessment of protein expression levels by western blot analysis revealed that luteolin treatment effectively negates B(a)P-induced upregulated expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). Furthermore, histopathology of lung tissue and immunohistochemistry of CYP1A1 were carried out to substantiate the anti- lung cancer effect of luteolin. Overall, these findings confirm the chemopreventive potential of luteolin against B(a)P induced lung carcinogenesis. PMID:27470398

  9. Role of Complement C5 in Experimental Blunt Chest Trauma-Induced Septic Acute Lung Injury (ALI)

    PubMed Central

    Karbach, Michael; Braumueller, Sonja; Kellermann, Philipp; Gebhard, Florian; Huber-Lang, Markus; Perl, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe blunt chest trauma is associated with high mortality. Sepsis represents a serious risk factor for mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In septic patients with ARDS complement activation products were found to be elevated in the plasma. In single models like LPS or trauma complement has been studied to some degree, however in clinically highly relevant double hit models such as the one used here little data is available. Here, we hypothesized that absence of C5 is correlated with a decreased inflammatory response in trauma induced septic acute lung injury. Methods 12 hrs after DH in mice the local and systemic cytokines and chemokines were quantified by multiplex bead array or ELISA, activated caspase-3 by western blot. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Sidak’s multiple comparison test (significance, p≤ 0.05). Results In lung tissue interleukin (IL)-6, monocyte chemo attractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) was elevated in both C5-/- mice and wildtype littermates (wt), whereas caspase-3 was reduced in lungs after DH in C5-/- mice. Systemically, reduced keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) levels were observed after DH in C5-/- compared to wt mice. Locally, lung myeloperoxidase (MPO), protein, IL-6, MCP-1 and G-CSF in brochoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were elevated after DH in C5-/- compared to wt. Conclusions In the complex but clinically relevant DH model the local and systemic inflammatory immune response features both, C5-dependent and C5-independent characteristics. Activation of caspase-3 in lung tissue after DH was C5-dependent whereas local inflammation in lung tissue was C5-independent. PMID:27437704

  10. THE DETERMINATION OF CORRELATION LINKAGES BETWEEN LEVEL OF REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES, CONTENTS OF NEUTROPHILES AND BLOOD GAS COMPOSITION IN EXPERIMENTAL ACUTE LUNG INJURY.

    PubMed

    Marushchak, M; Krynytska, I; Petrenko, N; Klishch, I

    2016-04-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) remains a major cause of acute respiratory failure and death of patients. Despite the achievements at the current stage in treatment, morbidity and mortality of ALI remain high. However, a deeper understanding of the pathogenetic links of ALI, identifying of the predictors that positively or negatively influence on the course of the syndrome, the correlation between some pathogenetic mechanisms will improve therapeutic strategies for patients with ALI, which makes the actuality of this study. The aim of the research was to detect additional pathogenetic mechanisms of the acute lung injury development in rats based on a comparative analysis of the correlations between the level of reactive oxygen species in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage, contents of neutrophils and blood gas composition. The experiments were performed on 54 white nonlinear mature male rats 200-220g in weight. The animals were divided into 5 groups: the 1st - control group (n=6), the 2nd - animals affected by hydrochloric acid for 2 hours (n=12), the 3rd - animals affected by hydrochloric acid for 6 hours (n=12), the 4th - animals affected by hydrochloric acid for 12 hours (n=12), the 5th - animals affected by hydrochloric acid for 24 hours (n=12). Correlation analysis was performed between all the studied indices. Coefficient of linear correlation (r) and its fidelity (p) was calculated that was accordingly denoted in the tables (correlation matrices). The correlation coefficient was significant at p<0.05. Conducted correlative analysis showed that the level of ROS in neutrophils of blood in rats with modeled ALI had a high negative correlative linkage with pH of arterial blood in 2nd and 3rd experimental groups. Conducted correlative analysis of data in BAL showed that the level of ROS in neutrophils in rats with modeled ALI had a strong positive correlative relationship with the number of white blood cells in 3-rd, 4-th and 5-th experimental groups and positive

  11. Lung Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Lung Transplant? A lung transplant is surgery to remove a person's diseased lung ... a healthy lung from a deceased donor. Lung transplants are used for people who are likely to ...

  12. Nicotine, acetylcholine and bombesin are trophic growth factors in neuroendocrine cell lines derived from experimental hamster lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Schueller, H.M.; Nylen, E.; Park, P.; Becker, K.L. George Washington Univ., Washington, DC )

    1990-01-01

    Neuroendocrine hamster lung tumors, induced by exposure to 60% hyperoxia and subcutaneous administration of the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) for 12 weeks, were placed in cell culture. By subsequent selective transfer of epithelial cells and maintenance in an atmosphere of 8% CO{sub 2}, cell lines with characteristics of neuroendocrine cells were established. The neuroendocrine markers expressed by these cell lines included electron dense neuroendocrine secretion granules as well as secretion of calcitonin and mammalian bombesin. In keeping with data previously reported for a human neuroendocrine lung tumor cell line, nicotine, acetylcholien, and mammalian bombesin (MB) acted as strongrowth factors in these neuroendocrine hamster tumor lines. The mitogenic effect of nicotine an acetylcholine was abolished by nicotinic receptor inhibition while the effects of mammalian bombesin were inhibited by an antagonist of MB receptors. Our data suggest that a receptor-mediated mitogenic effect of nicotine on neuroendocrine lung cells may be instrumental in the induction of smoking-associated small cell lung cancer.

  13. Humidification of base flow gas during adult high-frequency oscillatory ventilation: an experimental study using a lung model.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Naoki; Nagano, Osamu; Hirayama, Takahiro; Ichiba, Shingo; Ujike, Yoshihito

    2012-01-01

    In adult high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) with an R100 artificial ventilator, exhaled gas from patient's lung may warm the temperature probe and thereby disturb the humidification of base flow (BF) gas. We measured the humidity of BF gas during HFOV with frequencies of 6, 8 and 10 Hz, maximum stroke volumes (SV) of 285, 205, and 160 ml at the respective frequencies, and, BFs of 20, 30, 40 l/min using an original lung model. The R100 device was equipped with a heated humidifier, Hummax Ⅱ, consisting of a porous hollow fiber in circuit. A 50-cm length of circuit was added between temperature probe (located at 50 cm proximal from Y-piece) and the hollow fiber. The lung model was made of a plastic container and a circuit equipped with another Hummax Ⅱ. The lung model temperature was controlled at 37℃. The Hummax Ⅱ of the R100 was inactivated in study-1 and was set at 35℃ or 37℃ in study-2. The humidity was measured at the distal end of the added circuit in study-1 and at the proximal end in study-2. In study-1, humidity was detected at 6 Hz (SV 285 ml) and BF 20 l/min, indicating the direct reach of the exhaled gas from the lung model to the temperature probe. In study-2 the absolute humidity of the BF gas decreased by increasing SV and by increasing BF and it was low with setting of 35℃. In this study setting, increasing the SV induced significant reduction of humidification of the BF gas during HFOV with R100. PMID:22918206

  14. Clinical disease and lung lesions in calves experimentally inoculated with Histophilus somni five days after metaphylactic administration of tildipirosin or tulathromycin.

    PubMed

    Confer, Anthony W; Snider, Timothy A; Taylor, Jared D; Montelongo, Marie; Sorensen, Nicholas J

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare clinical disease and lung lesions in calves experimentally inoculated with Histophilus somni 5 days after metaphylactic administration of tildipirosin or tulathromycin. ANIMALS Twenty-four 3-month-old Holstein and Holstein-crossbreed steers. PROCEDURES Calves were randomly allocated to 3 groups of 8 calves. On day 0, calves in group 1 received tildipirosin (4 mg/kg, SC), calves in group 2 received tulathromycin (2.5 mg/kg, SC), and calves in group 3 received isotonic saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (1 mL/45 kg, SC; control). On day 5, calves were inoculated with 10 mL of a solution containing H somni strain 7735 (1.6 × 10(9) CFUs/mL, intrabronchially; challenge). Calves were clinically evaluated on days 5 through 8 and euthanized on day 8. The lungs were grossly evaluated for evidence of pneumonia, and bronchial secretion samples underwent bacteriologic culture. RESULTS The mean clinical score for each group was significantly increased 12 hours after challenge, compared with that immediately before challenge, and was significantly lower for tildipirosin-treated calves on days 6, 7, and 8, compared with those for tulathromycin-treated and control calves. The mean percentage of lung consolidation for tildipirosin-treated calves was significantly lower than those for tulathromycin-treated and control calves. Histophilus somni was isolated from the bronchial secretions of some tulathromycin-treated and control calves but was not isolated from tildipirosin-treated calves. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that metaphylactic administration of tildipirosin to calves 5 days prior to H somni challenge prevented subsequent culture of the pathogen from bronchial secretions and was more effective in minimizing clinical disease and lung lesions than was metaphylactic administration of tulathromycin. PMID:27027834

  15. Xenogeneic lung transplantation models

    PubMed Central

    Burdorf, Lars; Azimzadeh, Agnes M.; Pierson, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Study of lung xenografts has proven useful to understand the remaining barriers to successful transplantation of other organ xenografts. In this chapter, the history and current status of lung xenotransplantation will be briefly reviewed and two different experimental models, the ex vivo porcine-to-human lung perfusion and the in vivo xenogeneic lung transplantation, will be presented. We will focus on the technical details of these lung xenograft models in sufficient detail, list the needed materials and mention analysis techniques to allow others to adopt them with minimal learning curve. PMID:22565996

  16. Diffusion of hyperpolarized 129Xe in the lung: a simplified model of 129Xe septal uptake and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patz, Samuel; Muradyan, Iga; Hrovat, Mirko I.; Dabaghyan, Mikayel; Washko, George R.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Butler, James P.

    2011-01-01

    We used hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR to measure pulmonary alveolar surface area per unit gas volume SA/Vgas, alveolar septal thickness h and capillary transit time τ, three critical determinants of the lung's primary role as a gas exchange organ. An analytical solution for a simplified diffusion model is described, together with a modification of the xenon transfer contrast imaging technique utilizing 90° radio-frequency pulses applied to the dissolved phase, rather than traditional 180° pulses. With this approach, three-dimensional (3D) maps of SA/Vgas were obtained. We measured global SA/Vgas, h and τ in four normal subjects, two subjects with mild interstitial lung disease (ILD) and two subjects with mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In normals, SA/Vgas decreased with increasing lung volume from ~320 to 80 cm-1 both h~13 μm and τ~1.5 s were relatively constant. For the two ILD subjects, h was, respectively, 36 and 97% larger than normal, quantifying an increased gas/blood tissue barrier; SA/Vgas and τ were normal. The two COPD subjects had SA/Vgas values ~25% that of normals, quantifying septal surface loss in emphysema; h and τ were normal. These are the first noninvasive, non-radiation-based, quantitative measurements of h and τ in patients with pulmonary disease.

  17. Manual Ventilation and Sustained Lung Inflation in an Experimental Model: Influence of Equipment Type and Operator’s Training

    PubMed Central

    Mascaretti, Renata Suman; Vale, Luciana Assis; Haddad, Luciana Branco

    2016-01-01

    Aim To compare the influence of devices for manual ventilation and individual experience on the applied respiratory mechanics and sustained lung inflation. Methods A total of 114 instructors and non-instructors from the Neonatal Resuscitation Program of the Brazilian Society of Pediatrics participated in this study. Participants ventilated an intubated manikin. To evaluate respiratory mechanics and sustained lung inflation parameters, a direct comparison was made between the self-inflating bag and the T-shaped resuscitator (T-piece), followed by an analysis of the effectiveness of the equipment according to the participants’ education and training. Results A difference between equipment types was observed for the tidal volume, with a median (interquartile range) of 28.5 mL (12.6) for the self-inflating bag and 20.1 mL (8.4) for the T-piece in the instructor group and 31.6 mL (14) for the self-inflating bag and 22.3 mL (8.8) for the T-piece in the non-instructor group. Higher inspiratory time values were observed with the T-piece in both groups of professionals, with no significant difference between them. The operator’s ability to maintain the target pressure over the 10 seconds of sustained lung inflation was evaluated using the area under the pressure-time curve and was 1.7-fold higher with the use of the T-piece. Inspiratory pressure and mean airway pressure applied during sustained lung inflation were greater with the self-inflating bag, as evaluated between the beginning and the end of the procedure. Conclusion The T-piece resulted in lower tidal volume and higher inspiratory time values, irrespective of the operator’s experience, and increased the ease of performing the sustained lung inflation maneuver, as demonstrated by the maintenance of target pressure for the desired period and a higher mean airway pressure than that obtained using the self-inflating bag. PMID:26859896

  18. Neonatal epithelial hypoxia inducible factor-1α expression regulates the response of the lung to experimental asthma.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Krista K; Proper, Steven P; Saini, Yogesh; Bramble, Lori A; Jackson-Humbles, Daven N; Wagner, James G; Harkema, Jack R; LaPres, John J

    2012-03-01

    Allergic airway disease is characterized by a T helper type 2 cell-mediated airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. Little is known about the role of hypoxia-mediated signaling in the progression of the disease. To address this knowledge gap, a mouse model was created in which doxycycline exposure induces the functional deletion of hypoxia inducible factor-1α from alveolar type II and Clara cells of the lung. When hypoxia inducible factor-1α deletion was induced during the early postnatal development period of the lung, the mice displayed an enhanced response to the ovalbumin model of allergic airway disease. These hypoxia inducible factor-1α-deficient mice exhibit increased cellular infiltrates, eosinophilia in the lavage fluid and parenchyma, and T helper type 2 cytokines, as compared with ovalbumin-treated control mice. Moreover, these hypoxia inducible factor-1α-deficient mice display increased airway resistance when compared with their control counterparts. Interestingly, if the loss of hypoxia inducible factor-1α was induced in early adulthood, the exacerbated phenotype was not observed. Taken together, these results suggest that epithelial hypoxia inducible factor-1α plays an important role in establishing the innate immunity of the lung and epithelial-specific deficiency in the transcription factor, during early postnatal development, increases the severity of inflammation and functional airway resistance, following ovalbumin challenge. Finally, these results might explain some of the chronic respiratory pathology observed in premature infants, especially those that receive supplemental oxygen. This early hyperoxic exposure, from normal ambient and supplemental oxygen, would presumably inhibit normal hypoxia inducible factor-1α signaling, mimicking the functional deletion described. PMID:22180657

  19. Lung Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergencies Cardiac Emergencies Eye Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Lung Emergencies People with Marfan syndrome can be at ... should be considered an emergency. Symptoms of sudden lung collapse (pneumothorax) Symptoms of a sudden lung collapse ...

  20. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Lung Cancer What is Lung Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made ... button on your keyboard.) Two Major Types of Lung Cancer There are two major types of lung ...

  1. Lung metastases

    MedlinePlus

    Metastases to the lung; Metastatic cancer to the lung ... Metastatic tumors in the lungs are cancers that developed at other places in the body (or other parts of the lungs) and spread through the ...

  2. Effects of Blood Flow and/or Ventilation Restriction on Radiofrequency Coagulation Size in the Lung: An Experimental Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Anai, Hiroshi; Uchida, Barry T.; Pavcnik, Dusan Seong, Chang Kyu; Baker, Phillip; Correa, Luiz Otavio; Corless, Christopher L.; Sakaguchi, Hiroshi; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Keller, Frederick S.; Roesch, Josef

    2006-10-15

    lung parenchyma is increased by ventilation and particularly by pulmonary artery blood flow restriction. The value of these restrictions for potential clinical use needs to be explored in experimentally induced lung tumors.

  3. Pathology and Virus Distribution in the Lung and Lymphoid Tissues of Pigs Experimentally Inoculated with Three Distinct Type 1 PRRS Virus Isolates of Varying Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Morgan, S B; Frossard, J P; Pallares, F J; Gough, J; Stadejek, T; Graham, S P; Steinbach, F; Drew, T W; Salguero, F J

    2016-06-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) continues to be the most economically important disease of swine worldwide. The appearance of highly pathogenic PRRS virus (PRRSV) strains in Europe and Asia has raised concerns about this disease and initiated increased efforts to understand the pathogenesis. In this study, we have compared the pathology and the virus distribution in tissues of pigs experimentally inoculated with three different genotype 1 PRRSV isolates. Sixty 5-week-old pigs were inoculated intranasally with a) the Lelystad virus (LV), b) a field strain from the UK causing respiratory clinical signs (UK) or c) a highly pathogenic strain from Belarus (BE). Sixteen animals were mock-infected and used as controls. The animals were euthanized at 3, 7 and 35 days post-infection (dpi), and lung and lymphoid tissues collected for histopathological examination and PRRSV detection by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Histopathological lesions consisted of interstitial pneumonia with mononuclear cell infiltrates in the lungs, lymphoid depletion, apoptosis and follicular hyperplasia in the spleen, lymph nodes and tonsil and lymphoid depletion in the thymus. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus was detected mainly in monocytes-macrophages. BE-infected animals showed the highest pathological scores and the highest presence of virus at 3 and 7 dpi, followed by the UK field strain and then LV. Moderate lesions were observed at 35 dpi with lesser detection of PRRSV by IHC in each infected group. The highly pathogenic BE strain induced more severe pathology in both lungs and lymphoid organs of pigs compared with the classic field isolate and the prototype LV. The increased severity of pathology was in correlation with the presence of a higher number of PRRSV-infected cells in the tissues. PMID:25382098

  4. Lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer.

  5. Experimental Study on How Human Lung Surfactant Protein SP-B1-25 is Oxidized by Ozone in the Presence of Fe(II) and Ascorbic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colussi, A. J.; Enami, S.; Hoffmann, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    We will report the results of experiments on the chemical fate of the human lung surfactant protein SP-B1-25 upon exposure to gaseous ozone in realistic aqueous media simulating the conditions prevalent in epithelial lining fluids in polluted ambient air. Our experiments consist of exposing aqueous microjets containing SP-B1-25, the natural antioxidant ascorbic acid, and the Fe2+ carried by most atmospheric fine particulates, under mild acidic conditions, such as those created by the innate lung host defense response. Reactants and the products of such interactions are detected via online electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We will show that ascorbic acid largely inhibits the ozonation of SP-B1-25 in the absence of Fe2+, leading to the formation of an ascorbic acid ozonide (Enami et al., PNAS 2008). In the presence of Fe2+, however, the ozonide decomposes into reactive intermediates that result in the partial oxidation of SP-B1-25, presumable affecting its function as surfactant. We infer that these experimental results establish a plausible causal link for the observed synergic adverse health effects of ambient ozone and fine particulates

  6. Increased expression of host iron-binding proteins precedes iron accumulation and calcification of primary lung lesions in experimental tuberculosis in the guinea pig

    PubMed Central

    Basaraba, Randall J.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Eschelbach, Ellie K.; Reisenhauer, Claire; Tolnay, Airn E.; C.Taraba, Lauren; Shanley, Crystal A.; Smith, Erin A.; Bedwell, Cathy L.; Chlipala, Elizabeth A.; Orme, Ian M.

    2008-01-01

    The growth and virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis depends on its ability to scavenge host iron, an essential and limited micronutrient in vivo. In this study we show that ferric iron accumulates both intra- and extra-cellularly in the primary lung lesions of guinea pigs aerosol-infected with the H37Rv strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Iron accumulated within macrophages at the periphery of the primary granulomatous lesions while extra-cellular ferric iron was concentrated in areas of lesion necrosis. Accumulation of iron within primary lesions was preceded by an increase in expression of heavy chain (H) ferritin, lactoferrin and receptors for transferrin, primarily by macrophages and granulocytes. The increased expression of intra-cellular H ferritin and extra-cellular lactoferrin, more so than transferrin receptor, paralleled the development of necrosis within primary lesions. The deposition of extra-cellular ferric iron within necrotic foci coincided with the accumulation of calcium and phosphorus and other cations in the form of dystrophic calcification. Primary lung lesions from guinea pigs vaccinated with Mycobactrium bovis BCG prior to experimental infection, had reduced iron accumulation as well as H ferritin, lactoferrin and transferrin receptor expression. The amelioration of primary lesion necrosis and dystrophic calcification by BCG vaccination was coincident with the lack of extra-cellular ferric iron and lactoferrin accumulation. These data demonstrate that BCG vaccination ameliorates primary lesion necrosis, dystrophic mineralization and iron accumulation, in part by down-regulating the expression of macrophage H ferritin, lactoferrin and transferrin receptors, in vivo. PMID:17942369

  7. Comparison of the rate constants for energy transfer in the light-harvesting protein, C-phycocyanin, calculated from Foerster`s theory and experimentally measured by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Debreczeny, M.P.

    1994-05-01

    We have measured and assigned rate constants for energy transfer between chromophores in the light-harvesting protein C-phycocyanin (PC), in the monomeric and trimeric aggregation states, isolated from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. In order to compare the measured rate constants with those predicted by Fdrster`s theory of inductive resonance in the weak coupling limit, we have experimentally resolved several properties of the three chromophore types ({beta}{sub 155} {alpha}{sub 84}, {beta}{sub 84}) found in PC monomers, including absorption and fluorescence spectra, extinction coefficients, fluorescence quantum yields, and fluorescence lifetimes. The cpcB/C155S mutant, whose PC is missing the {beta}{sub 155} chromophore, was, useful in effecting the resolution of the chromophore properties and in assigning the experimentally observed rate constants for energy transfer to specific pathways.

  8. The complete, temperature resolved experimental spectrum of methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) between 214.6 and 265.4 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, James P.; Fortman, Sarah M.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2014-11-01

    The spectrum of methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) has been characterized between 214.6 and 265.4 GHz for astrophysically significant temperatures. Four hundred and eighty-six spectra with absolute intensity calibration recorded between 240 and 389 K provided a means for the calculation of the complete experimental spectrum (CES) of methanol as a function of temperature. The CES includes contributions from v{sub t} = 3 and other higher states that are difficult to model quantum mechanically (QM). It also includes the spectrum of the {sup 13}C isotopologue in terrestrial abundance. In general the QM models provide frequencies that are within 1 MHz of their experimental values, but there are several outliers that differ by tens of MHz. As in our recent work on methanol in the 560-654 GHz region, significant intensity differences between our experimental intensities and cataloged values were found. In this work these differences are explored in the context of several QM analyses. The experimental results presented here are analyzed to provide a frequency point-by-point catalog that is well suited for the simulation of crowded and overlapped spectra. Additionally, a catalog in the usual line frequency, line strength, and lower state energy format is provided.

  9. Resolvability of positron decay channels

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M.J.; Howell, R.H.; Rosenberg, I.J.; Meyer, P.

    1985-03-07

    Many data analysis treatments of positron experiments attempt to resolve two or more positron decay or exist channels which may be open simultaneously. Examples of the need to employ such treatments of the experimental results can be found in the resolution of the constituents of a defect ensemble, or in the analysis of the complex spectra which arise from the interaction of slow positrons at or near the surfaces of solids. Experimental one- and two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation experiments in Al single crystals have shown that two defect species (mono- and divacancies) can be resolved under suitable conditions. Recent experiments at LLNL indicate that there are a variety of complex exit channels open to positrons interacting at surfaces, and ultimely these decay channels must also be suitably resolved from one another. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Optimization of medical imaging display systems: using the channelized Hotelling observer for detecting lung nodules: experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platisa, Ljiljana; Vansteenkiste, Ewout; Goossens, Bart; Marchessoux, Cédric; Kimpe, Tom; Philips, Wilfried

    2009-02-01

    Medical-imaging systems are designed to aid medical specialists in a specific task. Therefore, the physical parameters of a system need to optimize the task performance of a human observer. This requires measurements of human performance in a given task during the system optimization. Typically, psychophysical studies are conducted for this purpose. Numerical observer models have been successfully used to predict human performance in several detection tasks. Especially, the task of signal detection using a channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) in simulated images has been widely explored. However, there are few studies done for clinically acquired images that also contain anatomic noise. In this paper, we investigate the performance of a CHO in the task of detecting lung nodules in real radiographic images of the chest. To evaluate variability introduced by the limited available data, we employ a commonly used study of a multi-reader multi-case (MRMC) scenario. It accounts for both case and reader variability. Finally, we use the "oneshot" methods to estimate the MRMC variance of the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The obtained AUC compares well to those reported for human observer study on a similar data set. Furthermore, the "one-shot" analysis implies a fairly consistent performance of the CHO with the variance of AUC below 0.002. This indicates promising potential for numerical observers in optimization of medical imaging displays and encourages further investigation on the subject.

  11. The Protonation States of Oxo-Bridged MnIV-Dimers Resolved by Experimental and Computational Mn K Pre-Edge X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Krewald, Vera; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Boron, Thaddeus T.; Pollock, Christopher J.; Kern, Jan; Beckwith, Martha A.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Pecoraro, Vincent L.; Yano, Junko; Neese, Frank; DeBeer, Serena

    2013-01-01

    In nature, the protonation of oxo bridges is a commonly encountered mechanism for fine-tuning chemical properties and reaction pathways. Often, however, the protonation states are difficult to establish experimentally. This is of particular importance in the oxygen evolving complex of Photosystem II, where identification of the bridging oxo protonation states is one of the essential requirements toward unraveling the mechanism. In order to establish a combined experimental and theoretical protocol for the determination of protonation states, we have systematically investigated a series of Mn model complexes by Mn K pre-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. An ideal test case for selective bis-μ-oxo-bridge protonation in a Mn-dimer is represented by the system [MnIV2(salpn)2(μ-OH(n))2](n+). Although the three species [MnIV2(salpn)2(μ-O)2], [MnIV2(salpn)2(μ-O)(μ-OH)]+ and [MnIV2(salpn)2(μ-OH)2]2+ differ only in the protonation of the oxo bridges, they exhibit distinct differences in the pre-edge region while maintaining the same edge energy. The experimental spectra are correlated in detail to theoretical ly calculated spectra. A time-dependent density functional theory approach for calculating the pre-edge spectra of molecules with multiple metal centers is presented, using both high-spin (HS) and broken-symmetry (BS) electronic structure solutions. The most intense pre-edge transitions correspond to an excitation of the Mn-1s core electrons into the unoccupied orbitals of local eg character (dz2 and dxy based in the chosen coordinate system). The lowest by energy experimental feature is dominated by excitations of 1s-α electrons and the second observed feature is primarily attributed to 1s-β electron excitations. The observed energetic separation is due to spin polarization effects in spin-unrestricted density functional theory and models final state multiplet effects. The effects of spin polarization on the calculated Mn K pre-edge spectra, in both the HS

  12. Vibrationally resolved NEXAFS at C and N K-edges of pyridine, 2-fluoropyridine and 2,6-difluoropyridine: A combined experimental and theoretical assessment.

    PubMed

    Baiardi, Alberto; Mendolicchio, Marco; Barone, Vincenzo; Fronzoni, Giovanna; Cardenas Jimenez, Gustavo Adolfo; Stener, Mauro; Grazioli, Cesare; de Simone, Monica; Coreno, Marcello

    2015-11-28

    In the present work, the near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) spectra at both C and N K-edges of pyridine, 2-fluoropyridine, and 2,6-difluoropyridine have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. From an electronic point of view, both transition potential density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory approaches lead to reliable results provided that suitable basis sets and density functionals are employed. In this connection, the global hybrid B3LYP functional in conjunction with the EPR-III basis set appears particularly suitable after constant scaling of the band positions. For the N K-edge, vertical energies obtained at these levels and broadened by symmetric Gaussian distributions provide spectra in reasonable agreement with the experiment. Vibronic contributions further modulate the band-shapes leading to a better agreement with the experimental results, but are not strictly necessary for semi-quantitative investigations. On the other hand, vibronic contributions are responsible for strong intensity redistribution in the NEXAFS C K-edge spectra, and their inclusion is thus mandatory for a proper description of experiments. In this connection, the simple vertical gradient model is particularly appealing in view of its sufficient reliability and low computational cost. For more quantitative results, the more refined vertical Hessian approach can be employed, and its effectiveness has been improved thanks to a new least-squares fitting approach. PMID:26627945

  13. Vibrationally resolved NEXAFS at C and N K-edges of pyridine, 2-fluoropyridine and 2,6-difluoropyridine: A combined experimental and theoretical assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiardi, Alberto; Mendolicchio, Marco; Barone, Vincenzo; Fronzoni, Giovanna; Cardenas Jimenez, Gustavo Adolfo; Stener, Mauro; Grazioli, Cesare; de Simone, Monica; Coreno, Marcello

    2015-11-01

    In the present work, the near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) spectra at both C and N K-edges of pyridine, 2-fluoropyridine, and 2,6-difluoropyridine have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. From an electronic point of view, both transition potential density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory approaches lead to reliable results provided that suitable basis sets and density functionals are employed. In this connection, the global hybrid B3LYP functional in conjunction with the EPR-III basis set appears particularly suitable after constant scaling of the band positions. For the N K-edge, vertical energies obtained at these levels and broadened by symmetric Gaussian distributions provide spectra in reasonable agreement with the experiment. Vibronic contributions further modulate the band-shapes leading to a better agreement with the experimental results, but are not strictly necessary for semi-quantitative investigations. On the other hand, vibronic contributions are responsible for strong intensity redistribution in the NEXAFS C K-edge spectra, and their inclusion is thus mandatory for a proper description of experiments. In this connection, the simple vertical gradient model is particularly appealing in view of its sufficient reliability and low computational cost. For more quantitative results, the more refined vertical Hessian approach can be employed, and its effectiveness has been improved thanks to a new least-squares fitting approach.

  14. Vibrationally resolved NEXAFS at C and N K-edges of pyridine, 2-fluoropyridine and 2,6-difluoropyridine: A combined experimental and theoretical assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Baiardi, Alberto; Mendolicchio, Marco; Barone, Vincenzo; Fronzoni, Giovanna; Cardenas Jimenez, Gustavo Adolfo; Stener, Mauro; Grazioli, Cesare; Simone, Monica de; Coreno, Marcello

    2015-11-28

    In the present work, the near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS) spectra at both C and N K-edges of pyridine, 2-fluoropyridine, and 2,6-difluoropyridine have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. From an electronic point of view, both transition potential density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory approaches lead to reliable results provided that suitable basis sets and density functionals are employed. In this connection, the global hybrid B3LYP functional in conjunction with the EPR-III basis set appears particularly suitable after constant scaling of the band positions. For the N K-edge, vertical energies obtained at these levels and broadened by symmetric Gaussian distributions provide spectra in reasonable agreement with the experiment. Vibronic contributions further modulate the band-shapes leading to a better agreement with the experimental results, but are not strictly necessary for semi-quantitative investigations. On the other hand, vibronic contributions are responsible for strong intensity redistribution in the NEXAFS C K-edge spectra, and their inclusion is thus mandatory for a proper description of experiments. In this connection, the simple vertical gradient model is particularly appealing in view of its sufficient reliability and low computational cost. For more quantitative results, the more refined vertical Hessian approach can be employed, and its effectiveness has been improved thanks to a new least-squares fitting approach.

  15. THE COMPLETE, TEMPERATURE-RESOLVED EXPERIMENTAL SPECTRUM OF ETHYL CYANIDE (CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CN) BETWEEN 210 AND 270 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Fortman, Sarah M.; Medvedev, Ivan R.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2010-12-20

    This paper reports the extension of a previously reported experimental method for the identification and characterization of astrophysical weeds in millimeter and submillimeter spectra to the widely used 210-270 GHz atmospheric window. At 300 K, these spectra contain contributions from approximately 40 vibrational states in addition to the cataloged ground state. The quantum mechanical analysis of such a large number of states would be a formidable challenge due to the complex interactions among these dense vibrational states. A new heterodyne receiver-based system is reported, as well as its intensity calibration. Results are presented in the standard astrophysical catalog format as well as our previously described point-by-point format that is effective for the characterization of blends. We also describe and validate an additional spectral synthesis approach, based on the much smaller line list catalog, which is useful in the blended line limit.

  16. Exposure to hydrogen fluoride: an experimental study in humans of concentrations of fluoride in plasma, symptoms, and lung function.

    PubMed Central

    Lund, K; Ekstrand, J; Boe, J; Søstrand, P; Kongerud, J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the absorption of inhaled hydrogen fluoride (HF) by measuring plasma fluorides and HF concentrations in the breathing zone during exposure to HF. A possible dose-effect relation was investigated by following airway symptoms and lung function-that is, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC)-during and after exposure to HF. METHODS: 20 healthy, male volunteers were exposed for one hour to constant HF concentrations that ranged from 0.2 to 5.2 mg/m3; these concentrations are known to occur among potroom workers in the primary aluminium industry. Plasma fluorides were analysed before, during, and after exposure. Symptoms from the eyes and the upper and lower airways were registered and graded from 1 to 5 with a standardised questionnaire. RESULTS: The total symptom score was significantly increased at the end of exposure for all the subjects as a group (P < 0.01) and for the group exposed to HF below the present Norwegian standard for total fluorides 0.6 mg/m3 (P = 0.05). No change was detected in FEV15 although a significant decrease was found in FVC in the group exposed to fluorides below the hygienic standard (n = 9) and for the entire group (n = 23). Almost all the symptoms had disappeared four hours after the end of exposure. Symptom scores from the upper airways were significantly correlated with the HF concentration (r = 0.62, P = 0.002), the change in plasma fluoride concentration (delta C) (r = 0.51, P = 0.01), and the maximum plasma fluoride concentration (Cmax) (r = 0.42, P = 0.05). A significant correlation was also found between the total symptom score for airways and the HF concentration. CONCLUSIONS: The present study showed a strong relation between inhaled HF and concentrations of fluoride in plasma. Upper airway and eye symptoms occurred after one hour of exposure to HF even when below the Norwegian hygienic standard for fluorides. PMID:9072031

  17. Lung surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... balloon-like tissues (blebs) that cause lung collapse ( pneumothorax ) Wedge resection, to remove part of a lobe ... Treat injuries that cause lung tissue to collapse ( pneumothorax or hemothorax ) Treat permanently collapsed lung tissue ( atelectasis ) ...

  18. Collapsed Lung

    MedlinePlus

    A collapsed lung happens when air enters the pleural space, the area between the lung and the chest wall. If it is a total collapse, it is called pneumothorax. If only part of the lung is affected, ...

  19. Lung Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... many disorders affecting the lungs, such as asthma, COPD, infections like influenza, pneumonia and tuberculosis, lung cancer, and many other breathing problems. Some lung diseases can lead to respiratory failure. Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health

  20. Collapsed Lung

    MedlinePlus

    A collapsed lung happens when air enters the pleural space, the area between the lung and the chest wall. If it is a ... is called pneumothorax. If only part of the lung is affected, it is called atelectasis. Causes of ...

  1. Lung disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the lungs to take in oxygen and release carbon dioxide. People with this type of lung disorder often ... the lungs to take up oxygen and release carbon dioxide. These diseases may also affect heart function. An ...

  2. Acute exposure to air pollution particulate matter aggravates experimental myocardial infarction in mice by potentiating cytokine secretion from lung macrophages.

    PubMed

    Marchini, Timoteo; Wolf, Dennis; Michel, Nathaly Anto; Mauler, Maximilian; Dufner, Bianca; Hoppe, Natalie; Beckert, Jessica; Jäckel, Markus; Magnani, Natalia; Duerschmied, Daniel; Tasat, Deborah; Alvarez, Silvia; Reinöhl, Jochen; von Zur Muhlen, Constantin; Idzko, Marco; Bode, Christoph; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Evelson, Pablo; Zirlik, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Clinical, but not experimental evidence has suggested that air pollution particulate matter (PM) aggravates myocardial infarction (MI). Here, we aimed to describe mechanisms and consequences of PM exposure in an experimental model of MI. C57BL/6J mice were challenged with a PM surrogate (Residual Oil Fly Ash, ROFA) by intranasal installation before MI was induced by permanent ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Histological analysis of the myocardium 7 days after MI demonstrated an increase in infarct area and enhanced inflammatory cell recruitment in ROFA-exposed mice. Mechanistically, ROFA exposure increased the levels of the circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, and MCP-1, activated myeloid and endothelial cells, and enhanced leukocyte recruitment to the peritoneal cavity and the vascular endothelium. Notably, these effects on endothelial cells and circulating leukocytes could be reversed by neutralizing anti-TNF-α treatment. We identified alveolar macrophages as the primary source of elevated cytokine production after PM exposure. Accordingly, in vivo depletion of alveolar macrophages by intranasal clodronate attenuated inflammation and cell recruitment to infarcted tissue of ROFA-exposed mice. Taken together, our data demonstrate that exposure to environmental PM induces the release of inflammatory cytokines from alveolar macrophages which directly worsens the course of MI in mice. These findings uncover a novel link between air pollution PM exposure and inflammatory pathways, highlighting the importance of environmental factors in cardiovascular disease. PMID:27240856

  3. Lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jie; Kislinger, Thomas; Jurisica, Igor; Wigle, Dennis A.

    2010-01-01

    High-throughput genomic data for both lung development and lung cancer continue to accumulate. Significant molecular intersection between these two processes has been hypothesized due to overlap in phenotypes and genomic variation. Examining the network biology of both cancer and development of the lung may shed functional light on the individual signaling modules involved. Stem cell biology may explain a portion of this network intersection and consequently studying lung organogenesis may have relevance for understanding lung cancer. This review summarizes our understanding of the potential overlapping mechanisms involved in lung development and lung tumorigenesis. PMID:19202349

  4. In vivo lung morphometry with hyperpolarized 3He diffusion MRI: Theoretical background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukstanskii, A. L.; Yablonskiy, D. A.

    2008-02-01

    MRI-based study of 3He gas diffusion in lungs may provide important information on lung microstructure. Lung acinar airways can be described in terms of cylinders covered with alveolar sleeve [Haefeli-Bleuer, Weibel, Anat. Rec. 220 (1988) 401]. For relatively short diffusion times (on the order of a few ms) this geometry allows description of the 3He diffusion attenuated MR signal in lungs in terms of two diffusion coefficients—longitudinal (D) and transverse (D) with respect to the individual acinar airway axis [Yablonskiy et al., PNAS 99 (2002) 3111]. In this paper, empirical relationships between D and D and the geometrical parameters of airways and alveoli are found by means of computer Monte Carlo simulations. The effects of non-Gaussian signal behavior (dependence of D and D on b-value) are also taken into account. The results obtained are quantitatively valid in the physiologically important range of airway parameters characteristic of healthy lungs and lungs with mild emphysema. In lungs with advanced emphysema, the results provide only "apparent" characteristics but still could potentially be used to evaluate emphysema progression. This creates a basis for in vivo lung morphometry—evaluation of the geometrical parameters of acinar airways from hyperpolarized 3He diffusion MRI, despite the airways being too small to be resolved by direct imaging. These results also predict a rather substantial dependence of 3He ADC on the experimentally-controllable diffusion time, Δ. If Δ is decreased from 3 ms to 1 ms, the ADC in normal human lungs may increase by almost 50%. This effect should be taken into account when comparing experimental data obtained with different pulse sequences.

  5. SU-F-BRE-07: Experimental Validation of a Lung SBRT Technique Using a Novel, True Volumetric Plenoptic-Plastic-Scintillator Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Goulet, M; Rilling, M; Gingras, L; Beaulieu, L; Archambault, L; Beddar, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Lung SBRT is being used by an increasing number of clinics, including our center which recently treated its first patient. In order to validate this technique, the 3D dose distribution of the SBRT plan was measured using a previously developed 3D detector based on plenoptic camera and plastic scintillator technology. The excellent agreement between the detector measurement and the expected dose from the treatment planning system Pinnacle{sup 3} shows great promise and amply justify the development of the technique. Methods: The SBRT treatment comprised 8 non-coplanar 6MV photon fields with a mean field size of 12 cm{sup 2} at isocentre and a total prescription dose of 12Gy per fraction for a total of 48Gy. The 3D detector was composed of a 10×10×10 cm{sup 2} EJ-260 water-equivalent plastic scintillator embedded inside a truncated cylindrical acrylic phantom of 10cm radius. The scintillation light was recorded using a static R5 light-field camera and the 3D dose was reconstructed at a 2mm resolution in all 3 dimensions using an iterative backprojection algorithm. Results: The whole 3D dose distribution was recorded at a rate of one acquisition per second. The mean absolute dose difference between the detector and Pinnacle{sup 3} was 1.3% over the region with more than 10% of the maximum dose. 3D gamma tests performed over the same region yield passing rates of 98.8% and 96.6% with criteria of 3%/1mm and 2%/1mm, respectively. Conclusion: Experimental results showed that our beam modeling and treatment planning system calculation was adequate for the safe administration of small field/high dose techniques such as SBRT. Moreover, because of the real-time capability of the detector, further validation of small field rotational, dynamic or gated technique can be monitored or verified by this system.

  6. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT; Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE’s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE’s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  7. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of ... in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  8. Lung transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseases that may require a lung transplant are: Cystic fibrosis Damage to the arteries of the lung because ... BC; Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pulmonary Therapies Committee; ... Therapies Committee. Cystic fibrosis pulmonary guidelines: ...

  9. Lung transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/pubmed/20675678 . Kotloff RM, Keshavjee S. Lung transplantation. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst MD, et ... 58. Solomon M, Grasemann H, Keshavjee S. Pediatric lung transplantation. Pediatr Clin North Am . 2010; 57(2):375- ...

  10. Lung surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pneumonectomy; Lobectomy; Lung biopsy; Thoracoscopy; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery; VATS ... You will have general anesthesia before surgery. You will be asleep and unable to feel pain. Two common ways to do surgery on your lungs are thoracotomy and video- ...

  11. Resolving the Pericenter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisdom, Jack

    2015-10-01

    The Wisdom-Holman mapping method and its variations have become a mainstay of research in solar system dynamics. But the method is not without its limitations. Rauch & Holman noted that at large eccentricities sufficiently small steps must be taken to resolve the pericenter. In this paper, I explore in more detail what it means to resolve the pericenter.

  12. An important cause of non-resolving pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Shoki, Alborz; Gomes, Marcio M; Gupta, Ashish; Kify, Omar; Pakhale, Smita; Mulpuru, Sunita

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a young patient with a history of non-resolving pneumonia. She was diagnosed with a limited form of Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (GPA), by percutaneous core needle lung biopsy. In this report, we discuss the definition and clinical implications of limited GPA, treatment options, and highlight the importance of considering vasculitis in the differential diagnosis of non-resolving pneumonia. PMID:27482510

  13. Time-Resolved PIV Measurements of Vortical Structures in the Upper Human Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    e, Sebastian Groß; Schröder, Wolfgang; Klaas, Michael

    A detailed knowledge of the three-dimensional flow structures in the human lung is an inevitable prerequisite to optimize respiratory-assist devices. To achieve this goal the indepth analysis of the flow field that evolves during normal breathing conditions is indispensable. This study focuses on the experimental investigation of the steady and oscillatory flow in the first lung bifurcation of a three-dimensional realistic transparent silicone lung model. The particle image velocimetry technique was used for the measurements. To match the refractive index of the model, the fluid was a mixture of water and glycerine. The flow structures occurring in the first bifurcation during steady inflow have been studied in detail at different flow rates and Reynolds numbers ranging from ReD = 1250 to ReD = 1700 based on the hydraulic diameter D of the trachea. The results evidence a highly three-dimensional and asymmetric character of the velocity field in the upper human airways, in which the influence of the asymmetric geometry of the realistic lung model plays a significant role for the development of the flow field in the respiratory system. The inspiration flow shows large zones with secondary vortical flow structures with reduced streamwise velocity near the outer walls of the bifurcation and regions of high-speed fluid in the vicinity of the inner side walls of the bifurcation. Depending on the local geometry of the lung these zones extend to the next generation of the airway system, resulting in a strong impact on the flow-rate distribution in the different branches of the lung. During expiration small zones of reduced streamwise velocity can be observed mainly in the trachea and the flow profile is characterized by typical jet-like structures and an M-shaped velocity profile. To investigate the temporal evolution of the flow phenomena in the first lung bifurcation time-resolved recordings were performed for Womersley numbers α ranging from 3.3 to 5.8 and Reynolds

  14. Platelets in Lung Biology

    PubMed Central

    Weyrich, Andrew S.; Zimmerman, Guy A.

    2013-01-01

    Platelets and the lungs have an intimate relationship. Platelets are anucleate mammalian blood cells that continuously circulate through pulmonary vessels and that have major effector activities in hemostasis and inflammation. The lungs are reservoirs for megakaryocytes, the requisite precursor cell in thrombopoiesis, which is the intricate process by which platelets are generated. Platelets contribute to basal barrier integrity of the alveolar capillaries, which selectively restricts the transfer of water, proteins, and red blood cells out of the vessels. Platelets also contribute to pulmonary vascular repair. Although platelets bolster hemostatic and inflammatory defense of the healthy lung, experimental evidence and clinical evidence indicate that these blood cells are effectors of injury in a variety of pulmonary disorders and syndromes. Newly discovered biological capacities of platelets are being explored in the context of lung defense, disease, and remodeling. PMID:23043249

  15. UK partnership targets lung cancer.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    Cancer Research UK has joined with two major pharmaceutical companies to launch a large multiarm clinical trial, dubbed the National Lung Matrix trial, to test the effectiveness of promising experimental therapies in treating rare forms of advanced lung cancer. PMID:25002593

  16. What Is Lung Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... starts in the lungs, it is called lung cancer. Lung cancer begins in the lungs and may spread ... lung cancer. For more information, visit the National Cancer Institute’s Lung Cancer. Previous Basic Information Basic Information Basic Information ...

  17. Dynamic regulation of cardiolipin by the lipid pump Atp8b1 determines the severity of lung injury in experimental pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ray, Nancy B; Durairaj, Lakshmi; Chen, Bill B; McVerry, Bryan J; Ryan, Alan J; Donahoe, Michael; Waltenbaugh, Alisa K; O'Donnell, Christopher P; Henderson, Florita C; Etscheidt, Christopher A; McCoy, Diann M; Agassandian, Marianna; Hayes-Rowan, Emily C; Coon, Tiffany A; Butler, Phillip L; Gakhar, Lokesh; Mathur, Satya N; Sieren, Jessica C; Tyurina, Yulia Y; Kagan, Valerian E; McLennan, Geoffrey; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2010-10-01

    Pneumonia remains the leading cause of death from infection in the US, yet fundamentally new conceptual models underlying its pathogenesis have not emerged. We show that humans and mice with bacterial pneumonia have markedly elevated amounts of cardiolipin, a rare, mitochondrial-specific phospholipid, in lung fluid and find that it potently disrupts surfactant function. Intratracheal cardiolipin administration in mice recapitulates the clinical phenotype of pneumonia, including impaired lung mechanics, modulation of cell survival and cytokine networks and lung consolidation. We have identified and characterized the activity of a unique cardiolipin transporter, the P-type ATPase transmembrane lipid pump Atp8b1, a mutant version of which is associated with severe pneumonia in humans and mice. Atp8b1 bound and internalized cardiolipin from extracellular fluid via a basic residue-enriched motif. Administration of a peptide encompassing the cardiolipin binding motif or Atp8b1 gene transfer in mice lessened bacteria-induced lung injury and improved survival. The results unveil a new paradigm whereby Atp8b1 is a cardiolipin importer whose capacity to remove cardiolipin from lung fluid is exceeded during inflammation or when Atp8b1 is defective. This discovery opens the door for new therapeutic strategies directed at modulating the abundance or molecular interactions of cardiolipin in pneumonia. PMID:20852622

  18. Lung Organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, David; El-Hashash, Ahmed; Carraro, Gianni; Tiozzo, Caterina; Sala, Frederic; Rogers, Orquidea; De Langhe, Stijn; Kemp, Paul J.; Riccardi, Daniela; Torday, John; Bellusci, Saverio; Shi, Wei; Lubkin, Sharon R; Jesudason, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    Developmental lung biology is a field that has the potential for significant human impact: lung disease at the extremes of age continues to cause major morbidity and mortality worldwide. Understanding how the lung develops holds the promise that investigators can use this knowledge to aid lung repair and regeneration. In the decade since the “molecular embryology” of the lung was first comprehensively reviewed, new challenges have emerged—and it is on these that we focus the current review. Firstly, there is a critical need to understand the progenitor cell biology of the lung in order to exploit the potential of stem cells for the treatment of lung disease. Secondly, the current familiar descriptions of lung morphogenesis governed by growth and transcription factors need to be elaborated upon with the reinclusion and reconsideration of other factors, such as mechanics, in lung growth. Thirdly, efforts to parse the finer detail of lung bud signaling may need to be combined with broader consideration of overarching mechanisms that may be therapeutically easier to target: in this arena, we advance the proposal that looking at the lung in general (and branching in particular) in terms of clocks may yield unexpected benefits. PMID:20691848

  19. Regeneration of the lung: Lung stem cells and the development of lung mimicking devices.

    PubMed

    Schilders, Kim A A; Eenjes, Evelien; van Riet, Sander; Poot, André A; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Truckenmüller, Roman; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Rottier, Robbert J

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the increasing burden of lung associated diseases in society and an growing demand to accommodate patients, great efforts by the scientific community produce an increasing stream of data that are focused on delineating the basic principles of lung development and growth, as well as understanding the biomechanical properties to build artificial lung devices. In addition, the continuing efforts to better define the disease origin, progression and pathology by basic scientists and clinicians contributes to insights in the basic principles of lung biology. However, the use of different model systems, experimental approaches and readout systems may generate somewhat conflicting or contradictory results. In an effort to summarize the latest developments in the lung epithelial stem cell biology, we provide an overview of the current status of the field. We first describe the different stem cells, or progenitor cells, residing in the homeostatic lung. Next, we focus on the plasticity of the different cell types upon several injury-induced activation or repair models, and highlight the regenerative capacity of lung cells. Lastly, we summarize the generation of lung mimics, such as air-liquid interface cultures, organoids and lung on a chip, that are required to test emerging hypotheses. Moreover, the increasing collaboration between distinct specializations will contribute to the eventual development of an artificial lung device capable of assisting reduced lung function and capacity in human patients. PMID:27107715

  20. Converging Stereotactic Radiotherapy Using Kilovoltage X-Rays: Experimental Irradiation of Normal Rabbit Lung and Dose-Volume Analysis With Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kawase, Takatsugu; Kunieda, Etsuo Deloar, Hossain M.; Tsunoo, Takanori; Seki, Satoshi; Oku, Yohei; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Ogawa, Eileen N.; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Kameyama, Kaori; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To validate the feasibility of developing a radiotherapy unit with kilovoltage X-rays through actual irradiation of live rabbit lungs, and to explore the practical issues anticipated in future clinical application to humans through Monte Carlo dose simulation. Methods and Materials: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit was developed, consisting of a modified diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scanner. A tiny cylindrical volume in 13 normal rabbit lungs was individually irradiated with single fractional absorbed doses of 15, 30, 45, and 60 Gy. Observational CT scanning of the whole lung was performed every 2 weeks for 30 weeks after irradiation. After 30 weeks, histopathologic specimens of the lungs were examined. Dose distribution was simulated using the Monte Carlo method, and dose-volume histograms were calculated according to the data. A trial estimation of the effect of respiratory movement on dose distribution was made. Results: A localized hypodense change and subsequent reticular opacity around the planning target volume (PTV) were observed in CT images of rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histograms of the PTVs and organs at risk showed a focused dose distribution to the target and sufficient dose lowering in the organs at risk. Our estimate of the dose distribution, taking respiratory movement into account, revealed dose reduction in the PTV. Conclusions: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit using kilovoltage X-rays was able to generate a focused radiobiologic reaction in rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histogram analysis and estimated sagittal dose distribution, considering respiratory movement, clarified the characteristics of the irradiation received from this type of unit.

  1. Basidiobolus: An unusual cause of lung abscess.

    PubMed

    Chetambath, Ravindran; Deepa Sarma, M S; Suraj, K P; Jyothi, E; Mohammed, Safreena; Philomina, Beena J; Ramadevi, S

    2010-04-01

    Non-resolving pneumonia leading to lung abscess is always a challenge to the treating physician especially in a diabetic patient. Atypical radiological features of lung abscess should raise the suspicion of unusual organisms. This is a case report of a 42 year old diabetic male presented with features suggestive of lung abscess and multiple target organ damage. Subsequent work up revealed that the etiological agent is a rare fungus - Basidiobolus. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case of Basidiobolus lung abscess reported from India. PMID:20616942

  2. Valproic acid, an inhibitor of class I histone deacetylases, reverses acquired Erlotinib-resistance of lung adenocarcinoma cells: a Connectivity Mapping analysis and an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Wenlei; Zhang, Liang; Zhu, Yi; Xie, Qichao; Zhu, Bo; Chen, Zhengtang

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) have been used as a powerful targeting therapeutic agent for treatment of lung adenocarcinoma for years. Nevertheless, the efficacy of TKI was hampered by the appearance of acquired TKI-resistance. In the present study, we aimed to search, predict, and screen the agents that can overcome the acquired TKI-resistance of lung adenocarcinoma by using the expression profiles of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and Connectivity map (CMAP). The profiles of DEGs were obtained by searching GEO microarray database, and then, they were submitted to CMAP for analysis in order to predict and screen the agent that might reverse the TKI-resistance of lung cancer cells. Next, the effects of the selected agent on TKI-resistant cancer cells were tested and the possible signaling pathways were also evaluated. As a result, valproic acid (VPA) was selected. Then, we used a low-concentration of VPA that has little effect on the cell growth for analysis. Interestingly, the results showed that treatment with a combination of VPA and Erlotinib significantly led to a decrease in cell viability and an increase in cell apoptosis for TKI-resistant HCC827-ER cells, relative to those treated with VPA or Erlotinib alone. Further experiments confirmed that inhibition of MAPK and AKT might be involved in this process. Analyzing the DEGs through the CMAP is a good strategy for exploitation of anti-tumor agents. VPA might markedly increase the sensitivity of TKI-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells to Erlotinib, thus reversing the acquired TKI-resistance of cancer cells and raising VPA as a potential agent for TKI-resistant lung cancer therapy. PMID:26328250

  3. Lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Akhurst, Tim; MacManus, Michael; Hicks, Rodney J

    2015-04-01

    (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) plays a key role in the evaluation of undiagnosed lung nodules, when primary lung cancer is strongly suspected, or when it has already been diagnosed by other techniques. Although technical factors may compromise characterization of small or highly mobile lesions, lesions without apparent FDG uptake can generally be safely observed, whereas FDG-avid lung nodules almost always need further evaluation. FDG-PET/CT is now the primary staging imaging modality for patients with lung cancer who are being considered for curative therapy with either surgery or definitive radiation therapy. PMID:25829084

  4. Farmer's lung

    PubMed Central

    Hapke, E. J.; Seal, R. M. E.; Thomas, G. O.; Hayes, M.; Meek, J. C.

    1968-01-01

    In assessing patients suffering from farmer's lung, the acute stage must be distinguished from the chronic stage of the disease. The conspicuous radiographic signs in the acute farmer's lung episode and the often dramatic clearing make an important contribution to the diagnosis. The radiographic changes in chronic farmer's lung are not specific and cover a wide range of appearances. Even minor nodular changes are significant. Farmer's lung, acute and chronic, is not a disease predominantly characterized by a defect in gas exchange. During the acute illness the reduction in diffusing capacity is often accompanied by a decrease in lung volumes; the pulmonary function profile of the chronic stage is variable. In only a relatively small proportion of chronic farmer's lung patients does a defect in gas exchange predominate, and in some it may be manifest only during exercise. Airway obstruction is a feature of chronic farmer's lung. In chronic farmer's lung patients discrepancies between the severity of complaints and results of pulmonary function tests are not infrequent. In some patients with considerable disability conventional pulmonary function studies may demonstrate little or no impairment of the functions measured. In patients suffering from an acute farmer's lung episode, serological tests should be positive, possibly in high titre. In the chronic stage of the disease the chance of finding positive serology in a patient diminishes with the length of time elapsed since the last acute episode. The period of serological transition appears to be the third year. Images PMID:4971361

  5. Ultrasonography for the assessment of lung recruitment maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Tusman, Gerardo; Acosta, Cecilia M; Costantini, Mauro

    2016-12-01

    Lung collapse is a known complication that affects most of the patients undergoing positive pressure mechanical ventilation. Such atelectasis and airways closure lead to gas exchange and lung mechanics impairment and has the potential to develop an inflammatory response in the lungs. These negative effects of lung collapse can be reverted by a lung recruitment maneuver (RM) i.e. a ventilatory strategy that resolves lung collapse by a brief and controlled increment in airway pressures. However, an unsolved question is how to assess such RM at the bedside. The aim of this paper is to describe the usefulness of lung sonography (LUS) to conduct and personalize RM in a real-time way at the bedside. LUS has favorable features to assess lung recruitment due to its high specificity and sensitivity to detect lung collapse together with its non-invasiveness, availability and simple use. PMID:27496127

  6. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  7. Lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, José Eduardo; Werebe, Eduardo de Campos; Carraro, Rafael Medeiros; Teixeira, Ricardo Henrique de Oliveira Braga; Fernandes, Lucas Matos; Abdalla, Luis Gustavo; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lung transplantation is a globally accepted treatment for some advanced lung diseases, giving the recipients longer survival and better quality of life. Since the first transplant successfully performed in 1983, more than 40 thousand transplants have been performed worldwide. Of these, about seven hundred were in Brazil. However, survival of the transplant is less than desired, with a high mortality rate related to primary graft dysfunction, infection, and chronic graft dysfunction, particularly in the form of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. New technologies have been developed to improve the various stages of lung transplant. To increase the supply of lungs, ex vivo lung reconditioning has been used in some countries, including Brazil. For advanced life support in the perioperative period, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and hemodynamic support equipment have been used as a bridge to transplant in critically ill patients on the waiting list, and to keep patients alive until resolution of the primary dysfunction after graft transplant. There are patients requiring lung transplant in Brazil who do not even come to the point of being referred to a transplant center because there are only seven such centers active in the country. It is urgent to create new centers capable of performing lung transplantation to provide patients with some advanced forms of lung disease a chance to live longer and with better quality of life. PMID:26154550

  8. Lung Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    When you breathe, your lungs take in oxygen from the air and deliver it to the bloodstream. The cells in your body need oxygen to ... you breathe nearly 25,000 times. People with lung disease have difficulty breathing. Millions of people in ...

  9. Impaired caveolae function and upregulation of alternative endocytic pathways induced by experimental modulation of intersectin-1s expression in mouse lung endothelium.

    PubMed

    Predescu, Dan N; Neamu, Radu; Bardita, Cristina; Wang, Minhua; Predescu, Sanda A

    2012-01-01

    Intersectin-1s (ITSN-1s), a protein containing five SH3 (A-E) domains, regulates via the SH3A the function of dynamin-2 (dyn2) at the endocytic site. ITSN-1s expression was modulated in mouse lung endothelium by liposome delivery of either a plasmid cDNA encoding myc-SH3A or a specific siRNA targeting ITSN-1 gene. The lung vasculature of SH3A-transduced and ITSN-1s- deficient mice was perfused with gold albumin (Au-BSA) to analyze by electron microscopy the morphological intermediates and pathways involved in transendothelial transport or with dinitrophenylated (DNP)-BSA to quantify by ELISA its transport. Acute modulation of ITSN-1s expression decreased the number of caveolae, impaired their transport, and opened the interendothelial junctions, while upregulating compensatory nonconventional endocytic/transcytotic structures. Chronic inhibition of ITSN-1s further increased the occurrence of nonconventional intermediates and partially restored the junctional integrity. These findings indicate that ITSN-1s expression is required for caveolae function and efficient transendothelial transport. Moreover, our results demonstrate that ECs are highly adapted to perform their transport function while maintaining lung homeostasis. PMID:22506115

  10. Impaired Caveolae Function and Upregulation of Alternative Endocytic Pathways Induced by Experimental Modulation of Intersectin-1s Expression in Mouse Lung Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Predescu, Dan N.; Neamu, Radu; Bardita, Cristina; Wang, Minhua; Predescu, Sanda A.

    2012-01-01

    Intersectin-1s (ITSN-1s), a protein containing five SH3 (A-E) domains, regulates via the SH3A the function of dynamin-2 (dyn2) at the endocytic site. ITSN-1s expression was modulated in mouse lung endothelium by liposome delivery of either a plasmid cDNA encoding myc-SH3A or a specific siRNA targeting ITSN-1 gene. The lung vasculature of SH3A-transduced and ITSN-1s- deficient mice was perfused with gold albumin (Au-BSA) to analyze by electron microscopy the morphological intermediates and pathways involved in transendothelial transport or with dinitrophenylated (DNP)-BSA to quantify by ELISA its transport. Acute modulation of ITSN-1s expression decreased the number of caveolae, impaired their transport, and opened the interendothelial junctions, while upregulating compensatory nonconventional endocytic/transcytotic structures. Chronic inhibition of ITSN-1s further increased the occurrence of nonconventional intermediates and partially restored the junctional integrity. These findings indicate that ITSN-1s expression is required for caveolae function and efficient transendothelial transport. Moreover, our results demonstrate that ECs are highly adapted to perform their transport function while maintaining lung homeostasis. PMID:22506115

  11. Therapeutic Effect of Chung-Pae, an Experimental Herbal Formula, on Acute Lung Inflammation Is Associated with Suppression of NF-κB and Activation of Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Hyun; Kim, Kwan-Il; Kim, Yong Ho; Lee, Mei; Choi, Jun-Yong; Jung, Hee Jae; Jung, Sung-Ki

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is an inflammatory disease with high mortality, but therapeutics against it is unavailable. Recently, we elaborated a formula, named Chung-pae (CP), that comprises four ethnic herbs commonly prescribed against various respiratory diseases in Asian traditional medicine. CP is being administered in aerosol to relieve various respiratory symptoms of patients in our clinic. Here, we sought to examine whether CP has a therapeutic effect on ALI and to uncover the mechanism behind it. Reporter assays show that CP suppressed the transcriptional activity of proinflammatory NF-κB and activated that of anti-inflammatory Nrf2. Similarly, CP suppressed the expression of NF-κB dependent, proinflammatory cytokines and induced that of Nrf2 dependent genes in RAW 264.7. An aerosol intratracheal administration of CP effectively reduced neutrophilic infiltration and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, hallmarks of ALI, in the lungs of mice that received a prior intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide. The intratracheal CP administration concomitantly enhanced the expression of Nrf2 dependent genes in the lung. Therefore, our results evidenced a therapeutic effect of CP on ALI, in which differential regulation of the two key inflammatory factors, NF-κB and Nrf2, was involved. We propose that CP can be a new therapeutic formula against ALI. PMID:24062787

  12. Collapsed lung (pneumothorax)

    MedlinePlus

    Air around the lung; Air outside the lung; Pneumothorax dropped lung; Spontaneous pneumothorax ... Collapsed lung can be caused by an injury to the lung. Injuries can include a gunshot or knife wound ...

  13. Lung disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - lung disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on lung disease : American Lung Association -- www.lung.org National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute -- www.nhlbi.nih.gov ...

  14. Resolving Problems through Mediation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notar, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Examines state variations in use of mediation to resolve domestic relations disputes. Mediation may be optional or mandatory, requested by the parties or the judge. Mediator qualifications vary considerably. Child support is less likely than custody and visitation to be the sole topic for mediation. More states are likely to use mediation in…

  15. Has Abstractness Been Resolved?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Omoush, Ahmad

    1989-01-01

    A discussion focusing on the abstractness of analysis in phonology, debated since the 1960s, describes the issue, reviews the literature on the subject, cites specific natural language examples, and examines the extent to which the issue has been resolved. An underlying representation is said to be abstract if it is different from the derived one,…

  16. Lung-protective ventilation initiated in the emergency department (LOV-ED): a study protocol for a quasi-experimental, before-after trial aimed at reducing pulmonary complications

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Brian M; Ferguson, Ian; Mohr, Nicholas M; Stephens, Robert J; Briscoe, Cristopher C; Kolomiets, Angelina A; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Kollef, Marin H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In critically ill patients, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and ventilator-associated conditions (VACs) are associated with increased mortality, survivor morbidity and healthcare resource utilisation. Studies conclusively demonstrate that initial ventilator settings in patients with ARDS, and at risk for it, impact outcome. No studies have been conducted in the emergency department (ED) to determine if lung-protective ventilation in patients at risk for ARDS can reduce its incidence. Since the ED is the entry point to the intensive care unit for hundreds of thousands of mechanically ventilated patients annually in the USA, this represents a knowledge gap in this arena. A lung-protective ventilation strategy was instituted in our ED in 2014. It aims to address the parameters in need of quality improvement, as demonstrated by our previous research: (1) prevention of volutrauma; (2) appropriate positive end-expiratory pressure setting; (3) prevention of hyperoxia; and (4) aspiration precautions. Methods and analysis The lung-protective ventilation initiated in the emergency department (LOV-ED) trial is a single-centre, quasi-experimental before-after study testing the hypothesis that lung-protective ventilation, initiated in the ED, is associated with reduced pulmonary complications. An intervention cohort of 513 mechanically ventilated adult ED patients will be compared with over 1000 preintervention control patients. The primary outcome is a composite outcome of pulmonary complications after admission (ARDS and VACs). Multivariable logistic regression with propensity score adjustment will test the hypothesis that ED lung-protective ventilation decreases the incidence of pulmonary complications. Ethics and dissemination Approval of the study was obtained prior to data collection on the first patient. As the study is a before-after observational study, examining the effect of treatment changes over time, it is being conducted with waiver of

  17. Radon and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Tarsheen K; El-Ghamry, Moataz N; Kloecker, Goetz H

    2012-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Radon exposure is the second leading cause of lung cancer, following tobacco smoke. Radon is not only an independent risk factor; it also increases the risk of lung cancer in smokers. Numerous cohort, case-control, and experimental studies have established the carcinogenic potential of radon. The possibility of radon having a causative effect on other cancers has been explored but not yet proven. One of the postulated mechanisms of carcinogenesis is DNA damage by alpha particles mediated by the production of reactive oxygen species. The latter are also thought to constitute one of the common mechanisms underlying the synergistic effect of radon and tobacco smoke. With an estimated 21,000 lung cancer deaths attributable to radon in the United States annually, the need for radon mitigation is well acknowledged. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established an indoor limit of 4 picocuries (pCi)/L, and various methods are available for indoor radon reduction when testing shows higher levels. Radon mitigation should accompany smoking cessation measures in lung cancer prevention efforts. PMID:22402423

  18. Experimental design of complement component 5a-induced acute lung injury (C5a-ALI): a role of CC-chemokine receptor type 5 during immune activation by anaphylatoxin

    PubMed Central

    Russkamp, Norman F.; Ruemmler, Robert; Roewe, Julian; Moore, Bethany B.; Ward, Peter A.; Bosmann, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Excessive activation of the complement system is detrimental in acute inflammatory disorders. In this study, we analyzed the role of complement-derived anaphylatoxins in the pathogenesis of experimental acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) in C57BL/6J mice. Intratracheal administration of recombinant mouse complement component (C5a) caused alveolar inflammation with abundant recruitment of Ly6-G+CD11b+ leukocytes to the alveolar spaces and severe alveolar-capillary barrier dysfunction (C5a-ALI; EC50[C5a] = 20 ng/g body weight). Equimolar concentrations of C3a or desarginated C5a (C5adesArg) did not induce alveolar inflammation. The severity of C5a-ALI was aggravated in C5-deficient mice. Depletion of Ly6-G+ cells and use of C5aR1−/− bone marrow chimeras suggested an essential role of C5aR1+ hematopoietic cells in C5a-ALI. Blockade of PI3K/Akt and MEK1/2 kinase pathways completely abrogated lung injury. The mechanistic description is that C5a altered the alveolar cytokine milieu and caused significant release of CC-chemokines. Mice with genetic deficiency of CC-chemokine receptor (CCR) type 5, the common receptor of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL) 3, CCL4, and CCL5, displayed reduced lung damage. Moreover, treatment with a CCR5 antagonist, maraviroc, was protective against C5a-ALI. In summary, our results suggest that the detrimental effects of C5a in this model are partly mediated through CCR5 activation downstream of C5aR1, which may be evaluated for potential therapeutic exploitation in ALI/ARDS.—Russkamp, N. F., Ruemmler, R., Roewe, J., Moore, B. B., Ward, P. A., Bosmann, M. Experimental design of complement component 5a-induced acute lung injury (C5a-ALI): a role of CC-chemokine receptor type 5 during immune activation by anaphylatoxin. PMID:25999468

  19. Lung Injury After One-Lung Ventilation: A Review of the Pathophysiologic Mechanisms Affecting the Ventilated and the Collapsed Lung.

    PubMed

    Lohser, Jens; Slinger, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Lung injury is the leading cause of death after thoracic surgery. Initially recognized after pneumonectomy, it has since been described after any period of 1-lung ventilation (OLV), even in the absence of lung resection. Overhydration and high tidal volumes were thought to be responsible at various points; however, it is now recognized that the pathophysiology is more complex and multifactorial. All causative mechanisms known to trigger ventilator-induced lung injury have been described in the OLV setting. The ventilated lung is exposed to high strain secondary to large, nonphysiologic tidal volumes and loss of the normal functional residual capacity. In addition, the ventilated lung experiences oxidative stress, as well as capillary shear stress because of hyperperfusion. Surgical manipulation and/or resection of the collapsed lung may induce lung injury. Re-expansion of the collapsed lung at the conclusion of OLV invariably induces duration-dependent, ischemia-reperfusion injury. Inflammatory cytokines are released in response to localized injury and may promote local and contralateral lung injury. Protective ventilation and volatile anesthesia lessen the degree of injury; however, increases in biochemical and histologic markers of lung injury appear unavoidable. The endothelial glycocalyx may represent a common pathway for lung injury creation during OLV, because it is damaged by most of the recognized lung injurious mechanisms. Experimental therapies to stabilize the endothelial glycocalyx may afford the ability to reduce lung injury in the future. In the interim, protective ventilation with tidal volumes of 4 to 5 mL/kg predicted body weight, positive end-expiratory pressure of 5 to 10 cm H2O, and routine lung recruitment should be used during OLV in an attempt to minimize harmful lung stress and strain. Additional strategies to reduce lung injury include routine volatile anesthesia and efforts to minimize OLV duration and hyperoxia. PMID:26197368

  20. Proton MRI as a noninvasive tool to assess elastase-induced lung damage in spontaneously breathing rats.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Harry Karmouty; Cannet, Catherine; Zurbruegg, Stefan; Blé, François-Xavier; Fozard, John R; Page, Clive P; Beckmann, Nicolau

    2006-12-01

    Elastase-induced changes in lung morphology and function were detected in spontaneously breathing rats using conventional proton MRI at 4.7 T. A single dose of porcine pancreatic elastase (75 U/100 g body weight) or vehicle (saline) was administered intratracheally (i.t.) to male Brown Norway (BN) rats. MRI fluid signals were detected in the lungs 24 hr after administration of elastase and resolved within 2 weeks. These results correlated with perivascular edema and cellular infiltration observed histologically. Reductions in MRI signal intensity of the lung parenchyma, and increases in lung volume were detected as early as 2 weeks following elastase administration and remained uniform throughout the study, which lasted 8 weeks. Observations were consistent with air trapping resulting from emphysema detected histologically. In a separate experiment, animals were treated daily intraperitoneally (i.p.) with all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA; 500 microg/kg body weight) or its vehicle (triglyceride oil) starting on day 21 after elastase administration and continuing for 12 days. Under these conditions, ATRA did not elicit a reversal of elastase-induced lung damage as measured by MRI and histology. The present approach complements other validated applications of proton MRI in experimental lung research as a method for assessing drugs in rat models of respiratory diseases. PMID:17029230

  1. Energy resolved X-ray grating interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Thuering, T.; Stampanoni, M.; Barber, W. C.; Iwanczyk, J. S.; Seo, Y.; Alhassen, F.

    2013-05-13

    Although compatible with polychromatic radiation, the sensitivity in X-ray phase contrast imaging with a grating interferometer is strongly dependent on the X-ray spectrum. We used an energy resolving detector to quantitatively investigate the dependency of the noise from the spectral bandwidth and to consequently optimize the system-by selecting the best energy band matching the experimental conditions-with respect to sensitivity maximization and, eventually, dose. Further, since theoretical calculations of the spectrum are usually limited due to non-ideal conditions, an energy resolving detector accurately quantifies the spectral changes induced by the interferometer including flux reduction and beam hardening.

  2. Lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplantation may be the only intervention that can prolong survival and improve quality of life for those individuals with advanced lung disease who are acceptable candidates for the procedure. However, these candidates may be extremely ill and require ventilator and/or circulatory support as a bridge to transplantation, and lung transplantation recipients are at risk of numerous post-transplant complications that include surgical complications, primary graft dysfunction, acute rejection, opportunistic infection, and chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD), which may be caused by chronic rejection. Many advances in pre- and post-transplant management have led to improved outcomes over the past decade. These include the creation of sound guidelines for candidate selection, improved surgical techniques, advances in donor lung preservation, an improving ability to suppress and treat allograft rejection, the development of prophylaxis protocols to decrease the incidence of opportunistic infection, more effective therapies for treating infectious complications, and the development of novel therapies to treat and manage CLAD. A major obstacle to prolonged survival beyond the early post-operative time period is the development of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), which is the most common form of CLAD. This manuscript discusses recent and evolving advances in the field of lung transplantation. PMID:23710330

  3. Radionuclide injury to the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Dagle, G E; Sanders, C L

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide injury to the lung has been studied in rats, hamsters, dogs, mice and baboons. Exposure of the lung to high dose levels of radionuclides produces a spectrum of progressively more severe functional and morphological changes, ranging from radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis to lung tumors. These changes are somewhat similar for different species. Their severity can be related to the absorbed radiation dose (measured in rads) produced by alpha, beta or gamma radiation emanating from various deposited radionuclides. The chemicophysical forms of radionuclides and spatial-temporal factors are also important variables. As with other forms of injury to the lung, repair attempts are highlighted by fibrosis and proliferation of pulmonary epithelium. Lung tumors are the principal late effect observed in experimental animals following pulmonary deposition of radionuclides at dose levels that do not result in early deaths from radiation pneumonitis or fibrosis. The predominant lung tumors described have been of epithelial origin and have been classified, in decreasing frequency of occurrence, as adenocarcinoma, bronchioloalveolar carcinoma, epidermoid carcinomas and combined epidermoid and adenocarcinoma. Mesothelioma and fibrosarcoma have been observed in rats, but less commonly in other species. Hemangiosarcomas were frequency observed in dogs exposed to beta-gamma emitters, and occasionally in rats exposed to alpha emitters. These morphologic changes in the lungs of experimental animals were reviewed and issues relevant to the prediction of human hazards discussed. PMID:6376095

  4. A comparative study of the local cytokine response in the lungs of pigs experimentally infected with different PRRSV-1 strains: upregulation of IL-1α in highly pathogenic strain induced lesions.

    PubMed

    Amarilla, Shyrley P; Gómez-Laguna, Jaime; Carrasco, Librado; Rodríguez-Gómez, Irene M; Caridad Y Ocerín, José M; Morgan, Sophie B; Graham, Simon P; Frossard, Jean-Pierre; Drew, Trevor W; Salguero, Francisco J

    2015-04-15

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome viruses (PRRSV) show high genetic differences both among and within genotypes. Recently, several highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) strains have been described. This study compares and characterizes the production of cytokines by pulmonary macrophages in pigs experimentally infected with four different PRRSV-1 strains: two low-virulent strains, Lelystad (LV) and a British field strain (215-06); a HP strain (SU1-bel) from Belarus and the attenuated vaccine strain DV (Porcilis(®) PRRS). Animals were clinically monitored and post-mortem examinations were performed at 3, 7 and 35 days post-infection (dpi). Lung samples were processed for histopathological and immunohistochemical studies by using specific antibodies against PRRSV, IL1-α, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-10 and IFN-γ. SU1-bel infected animals presented the highest mean scores for clinical observations, gross and microscopic lesions as well as for PRRSV expression compared with the other infected groups (p≤0.027). These animals displayed the highest expression of IL1-α at 7dpi, together with the highest score for lung pathology, whereas LV, 215-06 and DV inoculated animals only showed a transient enhancement in some of these cytokines. SU1-bel-infected pigs showed a positive correlation between the amount of PRRSV antigen and IL-1α expression (r=0.645, p<0.001). The highest expression of IL-10 was detected in 215-06-infected animals (p≤0.004), with a positive correlation with the numbers of virus-infected cells (r=0.375, p≤0.013). In conclusion, the HP-PRRSV SU1-bel strain replicated more efficiently in the lung of infected animals and induced a higher expression of IL-1α than the other PRRSV-1-infected groups, which may have played a key role in the onset of the clinical signs and interstitial pneumonia. PMID:25739319

  5. Detection of a Molecular Biomarker for Zygomycetes by Quantitative PCR Assays of Plasma, Bronchoalveolar Lavage, and Lung Tissue in a Rabbit Model of Experimental Pulmonary Zygomycosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Miki; Harrington, Susan M.; Francesconi, Andrea; Petraitis, Vidmantas; Petraitiene, Ruta; Beveridge, Mara G.; Knudsen, Tena; Milanovich, Jeffery; Cotton, Margaret P.; Hughes, Johanna; Schaufele, Robert L.; Sein, Tin; Bacher, John; Murray, Patrick R.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    We developed two real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays, targeting the 28S rRNA gene, for the diagnosis of zygomycosis caused by the most common, clinically significant Zygomycetes. The amplicons of the first qPCR assay (qPCR-1) from Rhizopus, Mucor, and Rhizomucor species were distinguished through melt curve analysis. The second qPCR assay (qPCR-2) detected Cunninghamella species using a different primer/probe set. For both assays, the analytic sensitivity for the detection of hyphal elements from germinating sporangiospores in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue homogenates from rabbits was 1 to 10 sporangiospores/ml. Four unique and clinically applicable models of invasive pulmonary zygomycosis served as surrogates of human infections, facilitating the validation of these assays for potential diagnostic utility. For qPCR-1, 5 of 98 infarcted lung specimens were positive by qPCR and negative by quantitative culture (qCx). None were qCx positive only. Among 23 BAL fluid samples, all were positive by qPCR, while 22 were positive by qCx. qPCR-1 detected Rhizopus and Mucor DNA in 20 (39%) of 51 serial plasma samples as early as day 1 postinoculation. Similar properties were observed for qPCR-2, which showed greater sensitivity than qCx for BAL fluid (100% versus 67%; P = 0.04; n = 15). The assay detected Cunninghamella DNA in 18 (58%) of 31 serial plasma samples as early as day 1 postinoculation. These qPCR assays are sensitive and specific for the detection of Rhizopus, Mucor, Rhizomucor, and Cunninghamella species and can be used for the study and detection of infections caused by these life-threatening pathogens. PMID:18845827

  6. Resource Prospector: The RESOLVE Payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, J.; Smith, J.; J., Captain; Paz, A.; Colaprete, A.; Elphic, R.; Zacny, K.

    2015-10-01

    NASA has been developing a lunar volatiles exploration payload named RESOLVE. Now the primary science payload on-board the Resource Prospector (RP) mission, RESOLVE, consists of several instruments that evaluate lunar volatiles.

  7. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, Franziska; Lübcke, Andrea; Heine, Nadja; Schultz, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    We present a novel setup for the investigation of ultrafast dynamic processes in a liquid jet using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. A magnetic-bottle type spectrometer with a high collection efficiency allows the very sensitive detection of photoelectrons emitted from a 10 μm thick liquid jet. This translates into good signal/noise ratio and rapid data acquisition making femtosecond time-resolved experiments feasible. We describe the experimental setup, a detailed spectrometer characterization based on the spectroscopy of nitric oxide in the gas phase, and results from femtosecond time-resolved experiments on sodium iodide solutions. The latter experiments reveal the formation and evolution of the solvated electron and we characterize two distinct spectral components corresponding to initially thermalized and unthermalized solvated electrons. The absence of dark states in photoionization, the direct measurement of electron binding energies, and the ability to resolve dynamic processes on the femtosecond time scale make time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy from the liquid jet a very promising method for the characterization of photochemical processes in liquids.

  8. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Franziska; Lübcke, Andrea; Heine, Nadja; Schultz, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    We present a novel setup for the investigation of ultrafast dynamic processes in a liquid jet using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. A magnetic-bottle type spectrometer with a high collection efficiency allows the very sensitive detection of photoelectrons emitted from a 10 μm thick liquid jet. This translates into good signal/noise ratio and rapid data acquisition making femtosecond time-resolved experiments feasible. We describe the experimental setup, a detailed spectrometer characterization based on the spectroscopy of nitric oxide in the gas phase, and results from femtosecond time-resolved experiments on sodium iodide solutions. The latter experiments reveal the formation and evolution of the solvated electron and we characterize two distinct spectral components corresponding to initially thermalized and unthermalized solvated electrons. The absence of dark states in photoionization, the direct measurement of electron binding energies, and the ability to resolve dynamic processes on the femtosecond time scale make time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy from the liquid jet a very promising method for the characterization of photochemical processes in liquids. PMID:21133461

  9. Rheumatoid lung disease

    MedlinePlus

    Lung disease - rheumatoid arthritis; Rheumatoid nodules; Rheumatoid lung ... Lung problems are common in rheumatoid arthritis. They often cause no symptoms. The cause of lung disease associated with rheumatoid arthritis is unknown. Sometimes, the medicines used to ...

  10. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC ...

  11. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  12. Interstitial Lung Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Interstitial lung disease is the name for a large group of diseases that inflame or scar the lungs. The inflammation and ... is responsible for some types of interstitial lung diseases. Specific types include Black lung disease among coal ...

  13. Dual Brushless Resolver Rate Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, David E. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A resolver rate sensor is disclosed in which dual brushless resolvers are mechanically coupled to the same output shaft. Diverse inputs are provided to each resolver by providing the first resolver with a DC input and the second resolver with an AC sinusoidal input. A trigonometric identity in which the sum of the squares of the sin and cosine components equal one is used to advantage in providing a sensor of increased accuracy. The first resolver may have a fixed or variable DC input to permit dynamic adjustment of resolver sensitivity thus permitting a wide range of coverage. In one embodiment of the invention the outputs of the first resolver are directly inputted into two separate multipliers and the outputs of the second resolver are inputted into the two separate multipliers, after being demodulated in a pair of demodulator circuits. The multiplied signals are then added in an adder circuit to provide a directional sensitive output. In another embodiment the outputs from the first resolver is modulated in separate modulator circuits and the output from the modulator circuits are used to excite the second resolver. The outputs from the second resolver are demodulated in separate demodulator circuit and added in an adder circuit to provide a direction sensitive rate output.

  14. Protective effect of carvacrol on acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaosheng; Jia, Aiqing

    2014-08-01

    Carvacrol, the major component of Plectranthus amboinicus, has been known to exhibit anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of carvacrol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia and acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. Mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with LPS and the mortality of mice for 7 days were observed twice a day. Meanwhile, the protective effect of carvacrol (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg) on LPS-induced endotoxemia were detected. Using an experimental model of LPS-induced ALI, we examined the effect of carvacrol in resolving lung injury. The results showed that carvacrol could improve survival during lethal endotoxemia and attenuate LPS-induced ALI in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of carvacrol may be due to its ability to inhibit NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways, thereby inhibiting inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production. PMID:24577726

  15. Tsunami lung.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yoshihiro; Fujino, Yasuhisa; Onodera, Makoto; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Shozushima, Tatsuyori; Ogino, Nobuyoshi; Mori, Kiyoshi; Oikawa, Hirotaka; Koeda, Yorihiko; Ueda, Hironobu; Takahashi, Tomohiro; Terui, Katsutoshi; Nakadate, Toshihide; Aoki, Hidehiko; Endo, Shigeatsu

    2012-04-01

    We encountered three cases of lung disorders caused by drowning in the recent large tsunami that struck following the Great East Japan Earthquake. All three were females, and two of them were old elderly. All segments of both lungs were involved in all the three patients, necessitating ICU admission and endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. All three died within 3 weeks. In at least two cases, misswallowing of oil was suspected from the features noted at the time of the detection. Sputum culture for bacteria yielded isolation of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Legionella pneumophila, Burkholderia cepacia, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The cause of tsunami lung may be a combination of chemical induced pneumonia and bacterial pneumonia. PMID:22057370

  16. Cloud Resolving Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2007-01-01

    One of the most promising methods to test the representation of cloud processes used in climate models is to use observations together with cloud-resolving models (CRMs). CRMs use more sophisticated and realistic representations of cloud microphysical processes, and they can reasonably well resolve the time evolution, structure, and life cycles of clouds and cloud systems (with sizes ranging from about 2-200 km). CRMs also allow for explicit interaction between clouds, outgoing longwave (cooling) and incoming solar (heating) radiation, and ocean and land surface processes. Observations are required to initialize CRMs and to validate their results. This paper provides a brief discussion and review of the main characteristics of CRMs as well as some of their major applications. These include the use of CRMs to improve our understanding of: (1) convective organization, (2) cloud temperature and water vapor budgets, and convective momentum transport, (3) diurnal variation of precipitation processes, (4) radiative-convective quasi-equilibrium states, (5) cloud-chemistry interaction, (6) aerosol-precipitation interaction, and (7) improving moist processes in large-scale models. In addition, current and future developments and applications of CRMs will be presented.

  17. RESOLVE 2010 Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Captain, J.; Quinn, J.; Moss, T.; Weis, K.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the field tests conducted in 2010 of the Regolith Environment Science & Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE). The Resolve program consist of several mechanism: (1) Excavation and Bulk Regolith Characterization (EBRC) which is designed to act as a drill and crusher, (2) Regolith Volatiles Characterization (RVC) which is a reactor and does gas analysis,(3) Lunar Water Resources Demonstration (LWRD) which is a fluid system, water and hydrogen capture device and (4) the Rover. The scientific goal of this test is to demonstrate evolution of low levels of hydrogen and water as a function of temperature. The Engineering goals of this test are to demonstrate:(1) Integration onto new rover (2) Miniaturization of electronics rack (3) Operation from battery packs (elimination of generator) (4) Remote command/control and (5) Operation while roving. Views of the 2008 and the 2010 mechanisms, a overhead view of the mission path, a view of the terrain, the two drill sites, and a graphic of the Master Events Controller Graphical User Interface (MEC GUI) are shown. There are descriptions of the Gas chromatography (GC), the operational procedure, water and hydrogen doping of tephra. There is also a review of some of the results, and future direction for research and tests.

  18. Wavelength resolved specific optical rotations and homochiral equilibria.

    PubMed

    Polavarapu, P L; Covington, C L

    2015-09-01

    The fundamental expressions governing specific optical rotations (SORs) of homochiral systems exhibiting monomer-dimer equilibria are presented. These equations are then utilized with the experimental measurements of wavelength resolved circular birefringence for (R)-(-)-α-hydroxy-β,β-dimethyl-γ-butyrolactone, to determine the wavelength resolved SORs of monomer and dimer components for the first time. Density functional theory predictions on the corresponding dispersion properties of monomer and dimer are found to match with experimentally determined quantities within a factor of ∼2. The wavelength resolved circular birefringence in the liquid solution phase thus provides a powerful means to investigate the molecular properties involved in homochiral equilibria. PMID:26227210

  19. Role of lung fluid volume in growth and maturation of the fetal sheep lung.

    PubMed Central

    Moessinger, A C; Harding, R; Adamson, T M; Singh, M; Kiu, G T

    1990-01-01

    We studied the effects of alterations in lung fluid volume on growth and maturation of the fetal lung. In a chronic fetal sheep preparation, right fetal lung volume was decreased by drainage of lung fluid while the volume of the left lung was expanded by mainstem bronchus ligation leading to lung fluid retention. After an experimental period of 25 d (from 105 to 129 d of gestation, term = 145 d), the right (deflated) lung was significantly hypoplastic and contained less DNA than the controls; 175.15 +/- 55.18 vs. 346.77 +/- 61.97 mg, respectively; P less than 0.001. In contrast, the left (expanded) lung was significantly hyperplastic and contained more DNA than the controls; 390.74 +/- 103.53 vs. 238.85 +/- 33.32 mg, respectively; P = 0.001. Biochemical indices of lung maturation, including total phospholipids, phosphatidylcholine, and disaturated phosphatidylcholine content expressed per unit of tissue DNA, were no different when comparing the hypoplastic, hyperplastic, and control lungs. These findings demonstrate that fetal lung cell multiplication is influenced by local distension with lung fluid, while the biochemical maturation of fetal lung surfactant is under systemic control. Images PMID:2212011

  20. Lung deformation estimation and four-dimensional CT lung reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sheng; Taylor, Russell H; Fichtinger, Gabor; Cleary, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) image acquisition is a useful technique in radiation treatment planning and interventional radiology in that it can account for respiratory motion of lungs. Current 4D lung reconstruction techniques have limitations in either spatial or temporal resolution. In addition, most of these techniques rely on auxiliary surrogates to relate the time of CT scan to the patient's respiratory phase. In this paper, we propose a novel 4D CT lung reconstruction and deformation estimation algorithm. Our algorithm is purely image based. The algorithm can reconstruct high quality 4D images even if the original images are acquired under irregular respiratory motion. The algorithm is validated using synthetic 4D lung data. Experimental results from a swine study data are also presented. PMID:16685974

  1. Image-based modeling of lung structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Tawhai, Merryn H.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2010-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art in image-based modeling allows derivation of patient-specific models of the lung, lobes, airways, and pulmonary vascular trees. The application of traditional engineering analyses of fluid and structural mechanics to image-based subject-specific models has the potential to provide new insight into structure-function relationships in the individual via functional interpretation that complements imaging and experimental studies. Three major issues that are encountered in studies of air flow through the bronchial airways are the representation of airway geometry, the imposition of physiological boundary conditions, and the treatment of turbulence. Here we review some efforts to resolve each of these issues, with particular focus on image-based models that have been developed to simulate air flow from the mouth to the terminal bronchiole, and subjected to physiologically meaningful boundary conditions via image registration and soft tissue mechanics models. PMID:21105146

  2. Lung Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... years. Their conditions are so severe that other treatments, such as medicines or breathing devices, no longer work. Lung transplants most often are used to treat people who have severe COPD Cystic fibrosis Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency Pulmonary ...

  3. Georges Bank conflict resolved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robb, David W.

    1984-04-01

    The International Court of Justice has resolved the long-term conflict between the United States and Canada over claims to mineral and living resources lying along the countries' common Atlantic maritime border. On October 12, in a 4-1 decision, the World Court rejected the United States' claim to the entire Georges Bank area, a region of the Continental Shelf off Massachusetts and Nova Scotia that is a prime fishing ground and is believed to have good potential for oil and gas deposits as well. The disputed area is roughly the top third of the Georges Bank area. The court awarded each country approximately half of this disputed area. No appeals are allowed under this decision.

  4. Lung cancer stem cells—characteristics, phenotype

    PubMed Central

    George, Rachel; Sethi, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide with unfavourable prognosis mainly due to the late stage of disease at presentation. High incidence and disease recurrence rates are a fact despite advances in treatment. Ongoing experimental and clinical observations suggest that the malignant phenotype in lung cancer is sustained by lung cancer stem cells (CSCs) which are putative stem cells situated throughout the airways that have the potential of initiating lung cancer formation. These cells share the common characteristic of increased proliferation and differentiation, long life span and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. This review summarises the current knowledge on their characteristics and phenotype. PMID:27413709

  5. The Murine Lung Microbiome Changes During Lung Inflammation and Intranasal Vancomycin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Barfod, Kenneth Klingenberg; Vrankx, Katleen; Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh Chloé; Hansen, Jitka Stilund; Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Larsen, Søren Thor; Ouwenhand, Arthur C.; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    Most microbiome research related to airway diseases has focused on the gut microbiome. This is despite advances in culture independent microbial identification techniques revealing that even healthy lungs possess a unique dynamic microbiome. This conceptual change raises the question; if lung diseases could be causally linked to local dysbiosis of the local lung microbiota. Here, we manipulate the murine lung and gut microbiome, in order to show that the lung microbiota can be changed experimentally. We have used four different approaches: lung inflammation by exposure to carbon nano-tube particles, oral probiotics and oral or intranasal exposure to the antibiotic vancomycin. Bacterial DNA was extracted from broncho-alveolar and nasal lavage fluids, caecum samples and compared by DGGE. Our results show that: the lung microbiota is sex dependent and not just a reflection of the gut microbiota, and that induced inflammation can change lung microbiota. This change is not transferred to offspring. Oral probiotics in adult mice do not change lung microbiome detectible by DGGE. Nasal vancomycin can change the lung microbiome preferentially, while oral exposure does not. These observations should be considered in future studies of the causal relationship between lung microbiota and lung diseases. PMID:26668669

  6. The Murine Lung Microbiome Changes During Lung Inflammation and Intranasal Vancomycin Treatment.

    PubMed

    Barfod, Kenneth Klingenberg; Vrankx, Katleen; Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh Chloé; Hansen, Jitka Stilund; Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Larsen, Søren Thor; Ouwenhand, Arthur C; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    Most microbiome research related to airway diseases has focused on the gut microbiome. This is despite advances in culture independent microbial identification techniques revealing that even healthy lungs possess a unique dynamic microbiome. This conceptual change raises the question; if lung diseases could be causally linked to local dysbiosis of the local lung microbiota. Here, we manipulate the murine lung and gut microbiome, in order to show that the lung microbiota can be changed experimentally. We have used four different approaches: lung inflammation by exposure to carbon nano-tube particles, oral probiotics and oral or intranasal exposure to the antibiotic vancomycin. Bacterial DNA was extracted from broncho-alveolar and nasal lavage fluids, caecum samples and compared by DGGE. Our results show that: the lung microbiota is sex dependent and not just a reflection of the gut microbiota, and that induced inflammation can change lung microbiota. This change is not transferred to offspring. Oral probiotics in adult mice do not change lung microbiome detectible by DGGE. Nasal vancomycin can change the lung microbiome preferentially, while oral exposure does not. These observations should be considered in future studies of the causal relationship between lung microbiota and lung diseases. PMID:26668669

  7. Can the preterm lung recover from perinatal stress?

    PubMed

    Hütten, Matthias C; Wolfs, Tim G A M; Kramer, Boris W

    2016-12-01

    After birth, adequate lung function is necessary for the successful adaptation of a preterm baby. Both prenatal and postnatal insults and therapeutic interventions have an immediate effect on lung function and gas exchange but also interfere with fetal and neonatal lung development. Prenatal insults like chorioamnionitis and prenatal interventions like maternal glucocorticosteroids interact but might also determine the preterm baby's lung response to postnatal interventions ("second hit") like supplementation of oxygen and drug therapy. We review current experimental and clinical findings on the influence of different perinatal factors on preterm lung development and discuss how well-established interventions in neonatal care might be adapted to attenuate postnatal lung injury. PMID:27075524

  8. Dual Brushless Resolver Rate Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, David E. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    This invention relates to dual analog angular rate sensors which are implemented without the use of mechanical brushes. A resolver rate sensor which includes two brushless resolvers which are mechanically coupled to the same output shaft is provided with inputs which are provided to each resolver by providing the first resolver with a DC input and the second resolver with an AC sinusoidal input. A trigonometric identity in which the sum of the squares of the sin and cosine components equal one is used to advantage in providing a sensor of increased accuracy. The first resolver may have a fixed or variable DC input to permit dynamic adjustment of resolver sensitivity thus permitting a wide range of coverage. Novelty and advantages of the invention reside in the excitation of a resolver with a DC signal and in the utilization of two resolvers and the trigonometric identity of cos(exp 2)(theta) + sin(exp 2)(theta) = 1 to provide an accurate rate sensor which is sensitive to direction and accurate through zero rate.

  9. Resolution of Acute Inflammation In The Lung

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Bruce D.; Serhan, Charles N.

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation in the lung is essential to health. So too is its resolution. In response to invading microbes, noxious stimuli or tissue injury, an acute inflammatory response is mounted to protect the host. To limit inflammation and prevent collateral injury of healthy, uninvolved tissue, the lung orchestrates the formation of specialized pro-resolving mediators, specifically lipoxins, resolvins, protectins and maresins. These immunoresolvents are agonists for resolution that interact with specific receptors on leukocytes and structural cells to blunt further inflammation and promote catabasis. This process appears to be defective in several common lung diseases that are characterized by excess or chronic inflammation. Here, we review the molecular and cellular effectors of resolution of acute inflammation in the lung. PMID:24313723

  10. Automated Lung Segmentation from HRCT Scans with Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Pulagam, Ammi Reddy; Kande, Giri Babu; Ede, Venkata Krishna Rao; Inampudi, Ramesh Babu

    2016-08-01

    Performing accurate and fully automated lung segmentation of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images affected by dense abnormalities is a challenging problem. This paper presents a novel algorithm for automated segmentation of lungs based on modified convex hull algorithm and mathematical morphology techniques. Sixty randomly selected lung HRCT scans with different abnormalities are used to test the proposed algorithm, and experimental results show that the proposed approach can accurately segment the lungs even in the presence of disease patterns, with some limitations in the apices and bases of lungs. The algorithm demonstrates a high segmentation accuracy (dice similarity coefficient = 98.62 and shape differentiation metrics dmean = 1.39 mm, and drms = 2.76 mm). Therefore, the developed automated lung segmentation algorithm is a good candidate for the first stage of a computer-aided diagnosis system for diffuse lung diseases. PMID:26961983

  11. Mechanisms of Lung Fibrosis Resolution.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Stephan W; Hagood, James S; Wong, Simon; Taype, Carmen A; Madala, Satish K; Hardie, William D

    2016-05-01

    Fibrogenesis involves a dynamic interplay between factors that promote the biosynthesis and deposition of extracellular matrix along with pathways that degrade the extracellular matrix and eliminate the primary effector cells. Opposing the often held perception that fibrotic tissue is permanent, animal studies and clinical data now demonstrate the highly plastic nature of organ fibrosis that can, under certain circumstances, regress. This review describes the current understanding of the mechanisms whereby the lung is known to resolve fibrosis focusing on degradation of the extracellular matrix, removal of myofibroblasts, and the role of inflammatory cells. Although there are significant gaps in understanding lung fibrosis resolution, accelerated improvements in biotechnology and bioinformatics are expected to improve the understanding of these mechanisms and have high potential to lead to novel and effective restorative therapies in the treatment not only of pulmonary fibrosis, but also of a wide-ranging spectrum of chronic disorders. PMID:27021937

  12. Lung Oxidative Damage by Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Araneda, O. F.; Tuesta, M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important functions of lungs is to maintain an adequate oxygenation in the organism. This organ can be affected by hypoxia facing both physiological and pathological situations. Exposure to this condition favors the increase of reactive oxygen species from mitochondria, as from NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase/reductase, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, as well as establishing an inflammatory process. In lungs, hypoxia also modifies the levels of antioxidant substances causing pulmonary oxidative damage. Imbalance of redox state in lungs induced by hypoxia has been suggested as a participant in the changes observed in lung function in the hypoxic context, such as hypoxic vasoconstriction and pulmonary edema, in addition to vascular remodeling and chronic pulmonary hypertension. In this work, experimental evidence that shows the implied mechanisms in pulmonary redox state by hypoxia is reviewed. Herein, studies of cultures of different lung cells and complete isolated lung and tests conducted in vivo in the different forms of hypoxia, conducted in both animal models and humans, are described. PMID:22966417

  13. Modelling of time resolved and long contact time dissolution studies of spent nuclear fuel in 10 mM carbonate solution A comparison between two different models and experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Trygve E.; Jonsson, Mats; Merino, Juan

    2008-04-01

    Using two different models, radiation induced dissolution of spent UO 2 fuel has been simulated. One of the models is conventional homogeneous radiolysis simulations where two different geometrical constraints were used and the second model is the recently developed steady-state model. The results of the simulations are compared to each other and to experimental results from spent fuel leaching experiments performed in carbonate containing aqueous solution under Ar-atmosphere. The influence of radiolytically produced H 2 is incorporated (on the basis of a recently suggested mechanism) in both models and this reproduces the experimentally observed inhibition of spent fuel dissolution fairly well. The conventional radiolysis model reproduces the experimental concentrations of the radiolysis products H 2 and O 2 very well while it fails to reproduce the experimental H 2O 2 concentration. The reasons for this are discussed. The general trend in uranium concentration as a function of time is reproduced by both the conventional radiolysis model and the steady-state model. The conventional radiolysis model (in which the radiation dose is homogeneously distributed in the whole liquid volume) underestimates the uranium concentration while the steady-state model, which represents the worst case scenario, overestimates the concentrations to some extent. When applying the conventional radiolysis model, assuming that all the radiation energy is deposited within 40 μm from the fuel surface, the uranium concentrations during the initial part of the experiments are reproduced quantitatively. The differences between the models and the applicability of the models are discussed in some detail.

  14. What is the best method to fit time-resolved data? A comparison of the residual minimization and the maximum likelihood techniques as applied to experimental time-correlated, single-photon counting data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Santra, Kalyan; Zhan, Jinchun; Song, Xueyu; Smith, Emily A.; Vaswani, Namrata; Petrich, Jacob W.

    2016-02-10

    The need for measuring fluorescence lifetimes of species in subdiffraction-limited volumes in, for example, stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, entails the dual challenge of probing a small number of fluorophores and fitting the concomitant sparse data set to the appropriate excited-state decay function. This need has stimulated a further investigation into the relative merits of two fitting techniques commonly referred to as “residual minimization” (RM) and “maximum likelihood” (ML). Fluorescence decays of the well-characterized standard, rose bengal in methanol at room temperature (530 ± 10 ps), were acquired in a set of five experiments in which the total number ofmore » “photon counts” was approximately 20, 200, 1000, 3000, and 6000 and there were about 2–200 counts at the maxima of the respective decays. Each set of experiments was repeated 50 times to generate the appropriate statistics. Each of the 250 data sets was analyzed by ML and two different RM methods (differing in the weighting of residuals) using in-house routines and compared with a frequently used commercial RM routine. Convolution with a real instrument response function was always included in the fitting. While RM using Pearson’s weighting of residuals can recover the correct mean result with a total number of counts of 1000 or more, ML distinguishes itself by yielding, in all cases, the same mean lifetime within 2% of the accepted value. For 200 total counts and greater, ML always provides a standard deviation of <10% of the mean lifetime, and even at 20 total counts there is only 20% error in the mean lifetime. Here, the robustness of ML advocates its use for sparse data sets such as those acquired in some subdiffraction-limited microscopies, such as STED, and, more importantly, provides greater motivation for exploiting the time-resolved capacities of this technique to acquire and analyze fluorescence lifetime data.« less

  15. A model of ventilation of the healthy human lung.

    PubMed

    Steimle, K L; Mogensen, M L; Karbing, D S; Bernardino de la Serna, J; Andreassen, S

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents a model of the lung mechanics which simulates the pulmonary alveolar ventilation. The model includes aspects of: the alveolar geometry; pressure due to the chest wall; pressure due to surface tension determined by surfactant activity; pressure due to lung tissue elasticity; and pressure due to the hydrostatic effects of the lung tissue and blood. The cross-sectional area of the lungs in the supine position derived from computed tomography is used to construct a horizontally layered model, which simulates heterogeneous ventilation distribution from the non-dependent to the dependent layers of the lungs. The model is in agreement with experimentally measured hysteresis of the pressure-volume curve of the lungs, static lung compliance, changes in lung depth during breathing and density distributions at total lung capacity (TLC) and residual volume (RV). In the dependent layers of the lungs, alveolar collapse may occur at RV, depending on the assumptions concerning lung tissue elasticity at very low alveolar volumes. The model simulations showed that ventilation increased with depth in the lungs, although not as pronounced as observed experimentally. The model simulates alveolar ventilation including all of the mentioned components of the respiratory system and to be validated against all the above mentioned experimental data. PMID:20655612

  16. Lung diffusion testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... as: Emphysema Interstitial fibrosis Pulmonary embolism Pulmonary hypertension Sarcoidosis Lung hemorrhage Asthma Risks There are no significant ... Read More Asbestosis Interstitial lung disease Lung disease Sarcoidosis Update Date 11/19/2015 Updated by: Denis ...

  17. How Lungs Work

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health and Diseases > How Lungs Work How Lungs Work The Respiratory System Your lungs are part of ... Parts of the Respiratory System and How They Work Airways SINUSES are hollow spaces in the bones ...

  18. Lung Carcinoid Tumor: Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... for lung carcinoid tumor symptoms Surgery to treat lung carcinoid tumors Surgery is the main treatment for ... often be cured by surgery alone. Types of lung surgery Different operations can be used to treat ( ...

  19. Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease? Childhood interstitial (in-ter-STISH-al) lung disease, ... with similar symptoms—it's not a precise diagnosis. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) also occurs in adults. However, the cause ...

  20. Lung diffusion testing

    MedlinePlus

    Lung diffusion testing measures how well the lungs exchange gases. This is an important part of lung testing , because ... Gender Height Hemoglobin (the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen) level

  1. Importance of mast cell Prss31/transmembrane tryptase/tryptase-γ in lung function and experimental chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and colitis.

    PubMed

    Hansbro, Philip M; Hamilton, Matthew J; Fricker, Michael; Gellatly, Shaan L; Jarnicki, Andrew G; Zheng, Dominick; Frei, Sandra M; Wong, G William; Hamadi, Sahar; Zhou, Saijun; Foster, Paul S; Krilis, Steven A; Stevens, Richard L

    2014-06-27

    Protease serine member S31 (Prss31)/transmembrane tryptase/tryptase-γ is a mast cell (MC)-restricted protease of unknown function that is retained on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane when MCs are activated. We determined the nucleotide sequences of the Prss31 gene in different mouse strains and then used a Cre/loxP homologous recombination approach to create a novel Prss31(-/-) C57BL/6 mouse line. The resulting animals exhibited no obvious developmental abnormality, contained normal numbers of granulated MCs in their tissues, and did not compensate for their loss of the membrane tryptase by increasing their expression of other granule proteases. When Prss31-null MCs were activated with a calcium ionophore or by their high affinity IgE receptors, they degranulated in a pattern similar to that of WT MCs. Prss31-null mice had increased baseline airway reactivity to methacholine but markedly reduced experimental chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and colitis, thereby indicating both beneficial and adverse functional roles for the tryptase. In a cigarette smoke-induced model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, WT mice had more pulmonary macrophages, higher histopathology scores, and more fibrosis in their small airways than similarly treated Prss31-null mice. In a dextran sodium sulfate-induced acute colitis model, WT mice lost more weight, had higher histopathology scores, and contained more Cxcl-2 and IL-6 mRNA in their colons than similarly treated Prss31-null mice. The accumulated data raise the possibility that inhibitors of this membrane tryptase may provide additional therapeutic benefit in the treatment of humans with these MC-dependent inflammatory diseases. PMID:24821729

  2. Improved oxacillin treatment outcomes in experimental skin and lung infection by a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolate with a vraSR operon deletion.

    PubMed

    Jo, Dae Sun; Montgomery, Christopher P; Yin, Shaohui; Boyle-Vavra, Susan; Daum, Robert S

    2011-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains are major pathogens causing infections of the skin and soft tissues and more serious, life-threatening diseases, including sepsis and necrotizing pneumonia. The vraSR operon encodes the key regulatory system that modulates the stress response of S. aureus elicited upon exposure to cell wall antibiotics. Mutation of vraS and vraR results in decreased oxacillin resistance in vitro. We investigated the effect of oxacillin treatment in experimental models employing a clinical USA300 MRSA strain (strain 923) and an isogenic vraSR deletion mutant (strain 923-M23). In a murine model of S. aureus necrotizing pneumonia, animals were treated with oxacillin, beginning 15 min after inoculation. Among mice infected with mutant strain 923-M23, oxacillin treatment significantly improved survival compared with saline treatment, whereas oxacillin treatment had no effect in mice infected with strain 923. Similarly, treatment with oxacillin decreased the bacterial burden among animals infected with strain 923-M23 but not among animals infected with strain 923. In a murine skin infection model, oxacillin eliminated the development of dermonecrosis among 923-M23-infected mice and decreased the bacterial burden in the lesions, but not among strain 923-infected mice. We conclude that deletion of the vraSR operon allowed an oxacillin regimen to be effective in murine models of MRSA pneumonia and skin infection. These findings provide proof-of-principle for development of a new antibiotic that could restore the usefulness of oxacillin against MRSA by inhibiting VraS or VraR. PMID:21383093

  3. Lung surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Thoracotomy - discharge; Lung tissue removal - discharge; Pneumonectomy - discharge; Lobectomy - discharge; Lung biopsy - discharge; Thoracoscopy - discharge; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery - discharge; VATS - discharge; Thoracoscopy - discharge

  4. Interstitial lung disease

    MedlinePlus

    Diffuse parenchymal lung disease; Alveolitis; Idiopathic pulmonary pneumonitis (IPP) ... The lungs contain tiny air sacs (alveoli), which is where oxygen is absorbed. These air sacs expand with each ...

  5. Lung surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Thoracotomy - discharge; Lung tissue removal - discharge; Pneumonectomy - discharge; Lobectomy - discharge; Lung biopsy - discharge; Thoracoscopy - discharge; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery - discharge; VATS - ...

  6. RESOLVE and ECO: Survey Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannappan, Sheila; Moffett, Amanda J.; Norris, Mark A.; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Stark, David; Berlind, Andreas A.; Snyder, Elaine M.; Norman, Dara J.; Hoversten, Erik A.; RESOLVE Team

    2016-01-01

    The REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE (RESOLVE) survey is a volume-limited census of stellar, gas, and dynamical mass as well as star formation and galaxy interactions within >50,000 cubic Mpc of the nearby cosmic web, reaching down to dwarf galaxies of baryonic mass ~10^9 Msun and spanning multiple large-scale filaments, walls, and voids. RESOLVE is surrounded by the ~10x larger Environmental COntext (ECO) catalog, with matched custom photometry and environment metrics enabling analysis of cosmic variance with greater statistical power. For the ~1500 galaxies in its two equatorial footprints, RESOLVE goes beyond ECO in providing (i) deep 21cm data with adaptive sensitivity ensuring HI mass detections or upper limits <10% of the stellar mass and (ii) 3D optical spectroscopy including both high-resolution ionized gas or stellar kinematic data for each galaxy and broad 320-725nm spectroscopy spanning [OII] 3727, Halpha, and Hbeta. RESOLVE is designed to complement other radio and optical surveys in providing diverse, contiguous, and uniform local/global environment data as well as unusually high completeness extending into the gas-dominated dwarf galaxy regime. RESOLVE also offers superb reprocessed photometry including full, deep NUV coverage and synergy with other equatorial surveys as well as unique northern and southern facilities such as Arecibo, the GBT, and ALMA. The RESOLVE and ECO surveys have been supported by funding from NSF grants AST-0955368 and OCI-1156614.

  7. Lung Circulation.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Karthik; Shimoda, Larissa A

    2016-01-01

    The circulation of the lung is unique both in volume and function. For example, it is the only organ with two circulations: the pulmonary circulation, the main function of which is gas exchange, and the bronchial circulation, a systemic vascular supply that provides oxygenated blood to the walls of the conducting airways, pulmonary arteries and veins. The pulmonary circulation accommodates the entire cardiac output, maintaining high blood flow at low intravascular arterial pressure. As compared with the systemic circulation, pulmonary arteries have thinner walls with much less vascular smooth muscle and a relative lack of basal tone. Factors controlling pulmonary blood flow include vascular structure, gravity, mechanical effects of breathing, and the influence of neural and humoral factors. Pulmonary vascular tone is also altered by hypoxia, which causes pulmonary vasoconstriction. If the hypoxic stimulus persists for a prolonged period, contraction is accompanied by remodeling of the vasculature, resulting in pulmonary hypertension. In addition, genetic and environmental factors can also confer susceptibility to development of pulmonary hypertension. Under normal conditions, the endothelium forms a tight barrier, actively regulating interstitial fluid homeostasis. Infection and inflammation compromise normal barrier homeostasis, resulting in increased permeability and edema formation. This article focuses on reviewing the basics of the lung circulation (pulmonary and bronchial), normal development and transition at birth and vasoregulation. Mechanisms contributing to pathological conditions in the pulmonary circulation, in particular when barrier function is disrupted and during development of pulmonary hypertension, will also be discussed. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:897-943, 2016. PMID:27065170

  8. Who Needs a Lung Transplant?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Who Needs a Lung Transplant? Your doctor may recommend a lung transplant ... lungs to pick up oxygen. Applying to a Lung Transplant Program Lung transplants are done in medical ...

  9. Animal models of acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Matute-Bello, Gustavo; Frevert, Charles W.; Martin, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    Acute lung injury in humans is characterized histopathologically by neutrophilic alveolitis, injury of the alveolar epithelium and endothelium, hyaline membrane formation, and microvascular thrombi. Different animal models of experimental lung injury have been used to investigate mechanisms of lung injury. Most are based on reproducing in animals known risk factors for ARDS, such as sepsis, lipid embolism secondary to bone fracture, acid aspiration, ischemia-reperfusion of pulmonary or distal vascular beds, and other clinical risks. However, none of these models fully reproduces the features of human lung injury. The goal of this review is to summarize the strengths and weaknesses of existing models of lung injury. We review the specific features of human ARDS that should be modeled in experimental lung injury and then discuss specific characteristics of animal species that may affect the pulmonary host response to noxious stimuli. We emphasize those models of lung injury that are based on reproducing risk factors for human ARDS in animals and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each model and the extent to which each model reproduces human ARDS. The present review will help guide investigators in the design and interpretation of animal studies of acute lung injury. PMID:18621912

  10. Lung Macrophage Diversity and Asthma.

    PubMed

    Lumeng, Carey N

    2016-03-01

    Macrophages (MPs) are one of the most prominent leukocyte populations in the lung and, in many ways, a forgotten player in asthma pathogenesis. Diverse functions in asthma initiation and maintenance in chronic disease have been demonstrated, which has led to confusion as to if pulmonary MPs are agents of good or evil in asthma. Much of this is due to the wide diversity of MP populations in the lung, many of which are inaccessible experimentally in most clinical studies. This review frames lung MP biology in the context of location, phenotype, function, and response phase in asthma pathogenesis. It also assesses new findings regarding MP diversity that have challenged old dogmas and generates new ways to understand how MPs function. PMID:27027949

  11. Experimental evaluations of the accuracy of 3D and 4D planning in robotic tracking stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Mark K. H.; Kwong, Dora L. W.; Ng, Sherry C. Y.; Tong, Anthony S. M.; Tam, Eric K. W.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Due to the complexity of 4D target tracking radiotherapy, the accuracy of this treatment strategy should be experimentally validated against established standard 3D technique. This work compared the accuracy of 3D and 4D dose calculations in respiration tracking stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: Using the 4D planning module of the CyberKnife treatment planning system, treatment plans for a moving target and a static off-target cord structure were created on different four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) datasets of a thorax phantom moving in different ranges. The 4D planning system used B-splines deformable image registrations (DIR) to accumulate dose distributions calculated on different breathing geometries, each corresponding to a static 3D-CT image of the 4D-CT dataset, onto a reference image to compose a 4D dose distribution. For each motion, 4D optimization was performed to generate a 4D treatment plan of the moving target. For comparison with standard 3D planning, each 4D plan was copied to the reference end-exhale images and a standard 3D dose calculation was followed. Treatment plans of the off-target structure were first obtained by standard 3D optimization on the end-exhale images. Subsequently, they were applied to recalculate the 4D dose distributions using DIRs. All dose distributions that were initially obtained using the ray-tracing algorithm with equivalent path-length heterogeneity correction (3D{sub EPL} and 4D{sub EPL}) were recalculated by a Monte Carlo algorithm (3D{sub MC} and 4D{sub MC}) to further investigate the effects of dose calculation algorithms. The calculated 3D{sub EPL}, 3D{sub MC}, 4D{sub EPL}, and 4D{sub MC} dose distributions were compared to measurements by Gafchromic EBT2 films in the axial and coronal planes of the moving target object, and the coronal plane for the static off-target object based on the {gamma} metric at 5%/3mm criteria ({gamma}{sub 5%/3mm}). Treatment plans were considered

  12. Lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Frödin, J E

    1996-01-01

    This synthesis of the literature on radiotherapy for lung cancer is based on 80 scientific articles, including 2 meta-analyses, 29 randomized studies, 19 prospective studies, and 21 retrospective studies. These studies involve 28172 patients. Basic treatment for limited-stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC), is chemotherapy. Addition of radiotherapy to the primary tumor and mediastinum reduces local recurrence, prolongs long-term survival, and is often indicated. Current, and future, studies can be expected to show successive improvements in results for SCLC by optimizing the combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Should these treatments be given simultaneously or sequentially, and in which order? Which fractionation is best? Probably, no change in resource requirements for radiotherapy will be necessary, with the possible exception of changes in fractionation. Surgery constitutes primary treatment for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) stages I and II. Radiotherapy may provide an alternative for patients who are inoperable for medical reasons. The value of radiotherapy following radical surgery for NSCLC remains to be shown. It is not indicated based on current knowledge. For NSCLC stage III, radiotherapy shrinks tumors and prolongs survival at 2 and 3 years. Whether it influences long-term survival after 5 years has not been shown. Considering the side effects of treatment, one must question whether limited improvements in survival motivate routine radiotherapy in these patients. Earlier attempts to add chemotherapy to radiotherapy to improve treatment results of NSCLC have not yielded convincing results. Several studies are currently on-going. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) greatly reduces the risk for brain metastases from SCLC. However, it has little influence on survival. Many treatment centers give PCI to SCLC patients who have achieved complete remission. This practice may be questioned since PCI is associated with serious complications. PCI is

  13. Resolving Conflicts in Middle Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddings, Evyonne

    1992-01-01

    Describes a lesson plan that explains the role of compromise as a method of resolving conflicts for use in a sixth-grade world cultures class. Includes activities, assessment, reteaching activities, and an extension project involving student skits. (DK)

  14. Lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, S A

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of pulmonary surfactant are reviewed from a biochemical perspective. The major emphasis is on the lipid components of surfactant. Topics reviewed include surfactant composition, cellular and subcellular sites as well as pathways of biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, disaturated phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. The surfactant system in the developing fetus and neonate is considered in terms of phospholipid content and composition, rates of precursor incorporation, activities of individual enzymes of phospholipid synthesis and glycogen content and metabolism. The influence of the following hormones and other factors on lung maturation and surfactant production is discussed: glucocorticoids, thyroid hormone, estrogen, prolactin, cyclic AMP, beta-adrenergic and cholinergic agonists, prostaglandins and growth factors. The influence of maternal diabetes, fetal sex, stress and labor are also considered. Nonphysiologic and toxic agents which influence surfactant in the fetus, newborn and adult are reviewed. PMID:6145585

  15. Ventilator-induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; Zhang, Haibo; Slutsky, Arthur S.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that mechanical ventilation can injure the lung, producing an entity known as ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). There are various forms of VILI, including volutrauma (i.e., injury caused by overdistending the lung), atelectrauma (injury due to repeated opening/closing of lung units), and biotrauma (release of mediators that can induce lung injury or aggravate pre-existing injury, potentially leading to multiple organ failure). Experimental data in the pediatric context are in accord with the importance of VILI, and appear to show age-related susceptibility to VILI, although a conclusive link between use of large Vts and mortality has not been demonstrated in this population. The relevance of VILI in the pediatric intensive care unit population is thus unclear. Given the physiological and biological differences in the respiratory systems of infants, children, and adults, it is difficult to directly extrapolate clinical practice from adults to children. This Critical Care Perspective analyzes the relevance of VILI to the pediatric population, and addresses why pediatric patients might be less susceptible than adults to VILI. PMID:25003705

  16. A measure for characterizing sliding on lung boundaries.

    PubMed

    Amelon, Ryan E; Cao, Kunlin; Reinhardt, Joseph M; Christensen, Gary E; Raghavan, Madhavan L

    2014-03-01

    The lobes of the lung slide relative to each other during breathing. Quantifying lobar sliding can aid in better understanding lung function, better modeling of lung dynamics, and for studying phenomenon such as pleural adhesion. We propose a novel measure to characterize lobe sliding in the lung based on the displacement field obtained from image registration of CT scans. When two sliding lobes are modeled as a continuum, the discontinuity in the displacement field at the fissure will manifest as elevated maximum shear--the proposed measure--which is capable of capturing both the level and orientation of sliding. Six human lungs were analyzed using scans spanning functional residual capacity to total lung capacity. The lung lobes were segmented and registered on a lobe-by-lobe basis to obtain the displacement field from which the proposed sliding measure was calculated. The sliding measure was found to be insignificant in the parenchyma, as relatively little tissue shear occurs here. On the other hand, it was elevated along the fissures. Thus, a map of the proposed sliding measure of the entire lung clearly delineates and quantifies sliding between lung lobes. Sliding is a key aspect of lung deformation during breathing. The proposed measure may help resolve artifacts introduced by sliding in deformation analysis techniques used for radiotherapy. PMID:24114112

  17. Interstitial Lung Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Interstitial lung disease is the name for a large group of diseases that inflame or scar the lungs. The inflammation and scarring make it hard to ... air is responsible for some types of interstitial lung diseases. Specific types include Black lung disease among ...

  18. Lung Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Treatment Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Lung cancer is ... non- skin cancer in the United States. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and in women. ...

  19. Key mechanisms governing resolution of lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Robb, C T; Regan, K H; Dorward, D A; Rossi, A G

    2016-07-01

    Innate immunity normally provides excellent defence against invading microorganisms. Acute inflammation is a form of innate immune defence and represents one of the primary responses to injury, infection and irritation, largely mediated by granulocyte effector cells such as neutrophils and eosinophils. Failure to remove an inflammatory stimulus (often resulting in failed resolution of inflammation) can lead to chronic inflammation resulting in tissue injury caused by high numbers of infiltrating activated granulocytes. Successful resolution of inflammation is dependent upon the removal of these cells. Under normal physiological conditions, apoptosis (programmed cell death) precedes phagocytic recognition and clearance of these cells by, for example, macrophages, dendritic and epithelial cells (a process known as efferocytosis). Inflammation contributes to immune defence within the respiratory mucosa (responsible for gas exchange) because lung epithelia are continuously exposed to a multiplicity of airborne pathogens, allergens and foreign particles. Failure to resolve inflammation within the respiratory mucosa is a major contributor of numerous lung diseases. This review will summarise the major mechanisms regulating lung inflammation, including key cellular interplays such as apoptotic cell clearance by alveolar macrophages and macrophage/neutrophil/epithelial cell interactions. The different acute and chronic inflammatory disease states caused by dysregulated/impaired resolution of lung inflammation will be discussed. Furthermore, the resolution of lung inflammation during neutrophil/eosinophil-dominant lung injury or enhanced resolution driven via pharmacological manipulation will also be considered. PMID:27116944

  20. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Reeb, Jeremie; Cypel, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    Lung transplantation is an established life-saving therapy for patients with end-stage lung disease. Unfortunately, greater success in lung transplantation is hindered by a shortage of lung donors and the relatively poor early-, mid-, and long-term outcomes associated with severe primary graft dysfunction. Ex vivo lung perfusion has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for a more accurate lung assessment and improvement in lung quality. This review outlines the: (i) rationale behind the method; (ii) techniques and protocols; (iii) Toronto ex vivo lung perfusion method; (iv) devices available; and (v) clinical experience worldwide. We also highlight the potential of ex vivo lung perfusion in leading a new era of lung preservation. PMID:26700566

  1. Lung cancer screening and management.

    PubMed

    Jones, G S; Baldwin, D R

    2015-12-01

    Deaths from lung cancer are greater than for any other type of malignancy. Many people present with advanced stage cancer at diagnosis and survival is limited. Low radiation dose CT (LDCT) screening appears to offer part of the solution to this. The US National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) showed a 20% reduction in cancer related mortality and a 6.7% reduction in all cause mortality in patients who had LDCT compared to chest X-ray. Lung Cancer screening is now being implemented in the US using the NLST screening criteria but many questions remain about the details of the methodology of screening and its cost effectiveness. Many of these questions are being answered by ongoing European trials that are reporting their findings. In this review we objectively analyse current research evidence and explore the issues that need to be resolved before implementation, including technical considerations, selection criteria and effective nodule management protocols. We discuss the potential barriers that will be faced when beginning a national screening programme and possible solutions to them. PMID:26605556

  2. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, Carole A.; McErlean, Aoife M.; Ginsberg, Michelle S.

    2013-01-01

    Incidence and mortality attributed to lung cancer has risen steadily since the 1930s. Efforts to improve outcomes have not only led to a greater understanding of the etiology of lung cancer, but also the histologic and molecular characteristics of individual lung tumors. This article describes this evolution by discussing the extent of the current lung cancer epidemic including contemporary incidence and mortality trends, the risk factors for development of lung cancer, and details of promising molecular targets for treatment. PMID:24436524

  3. Two-color ghost imaging with enhanced angular resolving power

    SciTech Connect

    Karmakar, Sanjit; Shih, Yanhua

    2010-03-15

    This article reports an experimental demonstration on nondegenerate, two-color, biphoton ghost imaging which reproduced a ghost image with enhanced angular resolving power by means of a greater field of view compared with that of classical imaging. With the same imaging magnification, the enhanced angular resolving power and field of view compared with those of classical imaging are 1.25:1 and 1.16:1, respectively. The enhancement of angular resolving power depends on the ratio between the idler and the signal photon frequencies, and the enhancement of the field of view depends mainly on the same ratio and also on the distances of the object plane and the imaging lens from the two-photon source. This article also reports the possibility of reproducing a ghost image with the enhancement of the angular resolving power by means of a greater imaging amplification compared with that of classical imaging.

  4. Structural relaxation of acridine orange dimer in bulk water and inside a single live lung cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Rajdeep; Nandi, Somen; Halder, Ritaban; Jana, Biman; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2016-02-01

    Structural relaxation of the acridine orange (AO) dimer in bulk water and inside a single live lung cell is studied using time resolved confocal microscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The emission maxima ( λem max ˜ 630 nm) of AO in a lung cancer cell (A549) and a non-cancer lung fibroblast cell (WI38) suggest that AO exists as a dimer inside the cell. Time-dependent red shift in emission maximum indicates dynamic relaxation of the AO dimer (in the excited state) with a time constant of 500-600 ps, both in bulk water and inside the cell. We have calculated the equilibrium relaxation dynamics of the AO dimer in the ground state using MD simulations and found a slow component of time scale ˜350 ps. The intra- and inter-molecular components of the total relaxation dynamics of the AO dimer reveal the presence of a slow component of the order of a few hundred picoseconds. Upon restricting intra-molecular dye dynamics by harmonic constraint between AO monomers, the slow component vanishes. Combining the experimental observations and MD simulation results, we ascribe the slow component of the dynamic relaxation of the AO dimer to the structural relaxation, namely, fluctuations in the distance between the two monomers and associated fluctuation in the number of water molecules.

  5. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Malcolm V.; Ford, Jean G.; Samet, Jonathan M.; Spivack, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ever since a lung cancer epidemic emerged in the mid-1900s, the epidemiology of lung cancer has been intensively investigated to characterize its causes and patterns of occurrence. This report summarizes the key findings of this research. Methods: A detailed literature search provided the basis for a narrative review, identifying and summarizing key reports on population patterns and factors that affect lung cancer risk. Results: Established environmental risk factors for lung cancer include smoking cigarettes and other tobacco products and exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke, occupational lung carcinogens, radiation, and indoor and outdoor air pollution. Cigarette smoking is the predominant cause of lung cancer and the leading worldwide cause of cancer death. Smoking prevalence in developing nations has increased, starting new lung cancer epidemics in these nations. A positive family history and acquired lung disease are examples of host factors that are clinically useful risk indicators. Risk prediction models based on lung cancer risk factors have been developed, but further refinement is needed to provide clinically useful risk stratification. Promising biomarkers of lung cancer risk and early detection have been identified, but none are ready for broad clinical application. Conclusions: Almost all lung cancer deaths are caused by cigarette smoking, underscoring the need for ongoing efforts at tobacco control throughout the world. Further research is needed into the reasons underlying lung cancer disparities, the causes of lung cancer in never smokers, the potential role of HIV in lung carcinogenesis, and the development of biomarkers. PMID:23649439

  6. [Extended hypothermic heart-lung preservation system for cardiopulmonary preservation with retrograde coronary sinus perfusion and lung immersion].

    PubMed

    Senoo, Y; Bando, K; Tago, M; Seno, S; Teraoka, H; Teramoto, S

    1990-09-01

    One major restriction of clinical heart-lung transplantation has been the inability to provide extended hypothermic organ preservation. We examined whether core-cooling, retrograde heart perfusion and lung immersion could provide adequate cardiopulmonary preservation. Hence, donor dogs were placed on cardiopulmonary bypass, and rapidly cooled to 15 degrees C. Then heterotopic heart unilateral left lung transplantations were performed. In control group I (n = 5), hearts and lungs were harvested following core-cooling and cardioplegic arrest, and transplanted immediately. In experimental group II (n = 5), heart-lung blocks were similarly excised but stored at 4 degrees C for 12 hours and then transplanted. During preservation, the lungs were immersed in the extracellular solution. For the heart, non-recirculating retrograde coronary sinus perfusion was performed with oxygenated intracellular solution containing perfluorochemicals. Myocardial function determined by the ratio of end-systolic pressure to end-systolic dimension in the experimental group was similar to that in controls. Although pulmonary vascular resistance and extravascular lung water of the experimental group was higher than those in control group, arterial oxygenation was similar in both groups. Thus, extended heart-lung preservation with core-cooling, retrograde heart perfusion and lung immersion technique could be achieved for heart-lung transplantation. PMID:2246529

  7. Plasticity of lung development in the amphibian, Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Christopher S.; James, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    Summary Contrary to previous studies, we found that Xenopus laevis tadpoles raised in normoxic water without access to air can routinely complete metamorphosis with lungs that are either severely stunted and uninflated or absent altogether. This is the first demonstration that lung development in a tetrapod can be inhibited by environmental factors and that a tetrapod that relies significantly on lung respiration under unstressed conditions can be raised to forego this function without adverse effects. This study compared lung development in untreated, air-deprived (AD) and air-restored (AR) tadpoles and frogs using whole mounts, histology, BrdU labeling of cell division and antibody staining of smooth muscle actin. We also examined the relationship of swimming and breathing behaviors to lung recovery in AR animals. Inhibition and recovery of lung development occurred at the stage of lung inflation. Lung recovery in AR tadpoles occurred at a predictable and rapid rate and correlated with changes in swimming and breathing behavior. It thus presents a new experimental model for investigating the role of mechanical forces in lung development. Lung recovery in AR frogs was unpredictable and did not correlate with behavioral changes. Its low frequency of occurrence could be attributed to developmental, physical and behavioral changes, the effects of which increase with size and age. Plasticity of lung inflation at tadpole stages and loss of plasticity at postmetamorphic stages offer new insights into the role of developmental plasticity in amphibian lung loss and life history evolution. PMID:24337117

  8. Multiphoton microscopy as a diagnostic imaging modality for lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, Ina; Hume, Kelly R.; Yazinski, Stephanie A.; Peters, Rachel M.; Weiss, Robert S.; Webb, Watt W.

    2010-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading killer among all cancers for both men and women in the US, and is associated with one of the lowest 5-year survival rates. Current diagnostic techniques, such as histopathological assessment of tissue obtained by computed tomography guided biopsies, have limited accuracy, especially for small lesions. Early diagnosis of lung cancer can be improved by introducing a real-time, optical guidance method based on the in vivo application of multiphoton microscopy (MPM). In particular, we hypothesize that MPM imaging of living lung tissue based on twophoton excited intrinsic fluorescence and second harmonic generation can provide sufficient morphologic and spectroscopic information to distinguish between normal and diseased lung tissue. Here, we used an experimental approach based on MPM with multichannel fluorescence detection for initial discovery that MPM spectral imaging could differentiate between normal and neoplastic lung in ex vivo samples from a murine model of lung cancer. Current results indicate that MPM imaging can directly distinguish normal and neoplastic lung tissues based on their distinct morphologies and fluorescence emission properties in non-processed lung tissue. Moreover, we found initial indication that MPM imaging differentiates between normal alveolar tissue, inflammatory foci, and lung neoplasms. Our long-term goal is to apply results from ex vivo lung specimens to aid in the development of multiphoton endoscopy for in vivo imaging of lung abnormalities in various animal models, and ultimately for the diagnosis of human lung cancer.

  9. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yousheng; Yang, Ding; He, Jie; Krasna, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer has been transformed from a rare disease into a global problem and public health issue. The etiologic factors of lung cancer become more complex along with industrialization, urbanization, and environmental pollution around the world. Currently, the control of lung cancer has attracted worldwide attention. Studies on the epidemiologic characteristics of lung cancer and its relative risk factors have played an important role in the tertiary prevention of lung cancer and in exploring new ways of diagnosis and treatment. This article reviews the current evolution of the epidemiology of lung cancer. PMID:27261907

  10. Children's Use of Gesture to Resolve Lexical Ambiguity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Evan; Holler, Judith

    2009-01-01

    We report on a study investigating 3-5-year-old children's use of gesture to resolve lexical ambiguity. Children were told three short stories that contained two homonym senses; for example, "bat" (flying mammal) and "bat" (sports equipment). They were then asked to re-tell these stories to a second experimenter. The data were coded for the means…

  11. Resolving Ethical Issues at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benninga, Jacques S.

    2013-01-01

    Although ethical dilemmas are a constant in teachers' lives, the profession has offered little in the way of training to help teachers address such issues. This paper presents a framework, based on developmental theory, for resolving professional ethical dilemmas. The Four-Component Model of Moral Maturity, when used in conjunction with a…

  12. Virginia Resolves, 1993-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, S. Rex, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    These two issues of "Virginia Resolves" provide articles of interest to the social studies reader and provides ideas for social studies instruction and curriculum. The fall issue features seven articles: (1) "Death and the Young Child" (Rosanne J. Marek); (2) "Simulations: Bibliography for the Middle and Elementary Teachers" (William Coleman Redd…

  13. Production of Experimental Malignant Pleural Effusions Is Dependent on Invasion of the Pleura and Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor/Vascular Permeability Factor by Human Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Seiji; Shinohara, Hisashi; Herbst, Roy S.; Kuniyasu, Hiroki; Bucana, Corazon D.; Ellis, Lee M.; Fidler, Isaiah J.

    2000-01-01

    We determined the molecular mechanisms that regulate the pathogenesis of malignant pleural effusion (PE) associated with advanced stage of human, non-small-cell lung cancer. Intravenous injection of human PC14 and PC14PE6 (adenocarcinoma) or H226 (squamous cell carcinoma) cells into nude mice yielded numerous lung lesions. PC14 and PC14PE6 lung lesions invaded the pleura and produced PE containing a high level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-localized vascular hyperpermeability. Lung lesions produced by H226 cells were confined to the lung parenchyma with no PE. The level of expression of VEGF mRNA and protein by the cell lines directly correlated with extent of PE formation. Transfection of PC14PE6 cells with antisense VEGF165 gene did not inhibit invasion into the pleural space but reduced PE formation. H226 cells transfected with either sense VEGF 165 or sense VEGF 121 genes induced localized vascular hyperpermeability and produced PE only after direct implantation into the thoracic cavity. The production of PE was thus associated with the ability of tumor cells to invade the pleura, a property associated with expression of high levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator and low levels of TIMP-2. Collectively, the data demonstrate that the production of malignant PE requires tumor cells to invade the pleura and express high levels of VEGF/VPF. PMID:11106562

  14. Production of experimental malignant pleural effusions is dependent on invasion of the pleura and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor/vascular permeability factor by human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yano, S; Shinohara, H; Herbst, R S; Kuniyasu, H; Bucana, C D; Ellis, L M; Fidler, I J

    2000-12-01

    We determined the molecular mechanisms that regulate the pathogenesis of malignant pleural effusion (PE) associated with advanced stage of human, non-small-cell lung cancer. Intravenous injection of human PC14 and PC14PE6 (adenocarcinoma) or H226 (squamous cell carcinoma) cells into nude mice yielded numerous lung lesions. PC14 and PC14PE6 lung lesions invaded the pleura and produced PE containing a high level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-localized vascular hyperpermeability. Lung lesions produced by H226 cells were confined to the lung parenchyma with no PE. The level of expression of VEGF mRNA and protein by the cell lines directly correlated with extent of PE formation. Transfection of PC14PE6 cells with antisense VEGF165 gene did not inhibit invasion into the pleural space but reduced PE formation. H226 cells transfected with either sense VEGF 165 or sense VEGF 121 genes induced localized vascular hyperpermeability and produced PE only after direct implantation into the thoracic cavity. The production of PE was thus associated with the ability of tumor cells to invade the pleura, a property associated with expression of high levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator and low levels of TIMP-2. Collectively, the data demonstrate that the production of malignant PE requires tumor cells to invade the pleura and express high levels of VEGF/VPF. PMID:11106562

  15. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H.

    1997-04-01

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  16. Open lung biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of different conditions, such as: Rheumatoid lung disease Sarcoidosis Wegener granulomatosis Risks There is a possibility of ... fibrous Mesothelioma - malignant Pulmonary tuberculosis Rheumatoid lung disease Sarcoidosis Simple pulmonary eosinophilia Viral pneumonia X-ray Update ...

  17. Lung Diseases and Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Lung Diseases and Conditions Breathing is a complex process. ... your bronchial tubes ( bronchitis ) or deep in your lungs ( pneumonia ). These infections cause a buildup of mucus ...

  18. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Machuca, Tiago N; Cypel, Marcelo

    2014-08-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  19. Ex vivo lung perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Machuca, Tiago N.

    2014-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  20. Diet and obstructive lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Romieu, I; Trenga, C

    2001-01-01

    three times the Recommended Dietary Allowance. Although the amplitude of the effect was modest, if these effects accumulate over 20-30 years, they could have a meaningful impact on the rate at which pulmonary function declines, particularly in symptomatic subjects (85). Longitudinal data support the hypothesis that fresh fruit consumption has a beneficial impact on the lung (95). Among children, consumption of fresh fruit, particularly fruit high in vitamin C, has been related to a lower prevalence of asthma symptoms and higher lung function (64). This effect was observed event at low levels of fruit consumption (one or two servings per week vs. less than one serving per week), which suggests that a small increase in dietary intake could have a beneficial effect. Consumption of fish has also been related to lower airway hyperreactivity among children (75) and higher lung function in adults (100); however, longitudinal data do not provide evidence that increased omega-3 fatty acid intake protects against lung disease (101). Experimental studies of persons with asthma suggest that magnesium infusion may have a place in the acute treatment of asthma, but it does not seem to have long-term benefits. The studies of sodium, selenium, and fish oils do not show convincing evidence of clinical benefits. Studies of vitamin C supplementation suggest a short-term protective effect on airway responsiveness and pulmonary function. It remains to be proven whether consistent use of vitamin C would have a protective effect on the evolution of chronic asthma. Results from supplementation studies conducted among subjects exposed to high levels of oxidants (57-60) suggest that daily intake of antioxidant vitamins exceeding the Recommended Dietary Allowance may have a beneficial effect on lung airways and that intake higher than the Recommended Dietary Allowance should be recommended for populations chronically exposed to photooxidant air pollutants (such as ozone), cigarette smoking, or

  1. Occupational lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cone, J E

    1987-01-01

    The author addresses the attribution of lung cancer to cigarette smoking and the problems of confounding synergistic effects of occupational and other carcinogenic risk factors, as well as the divergent trends of declining smoking rates and increasing rates of lung cancer. He also reviews the existing literature to document associations between lung cancer and occupational exposures. Finally, interventions for prevention of occupational lung cancer are discussed. PMID:3303381

  2. Occupational lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, J.E.

    1987-04-01

    The author addresses the attribution of lung cancer to cigarette smoking and the problems of confounding synergistic effects of occupational and other carcinogenic risk factors, as well as the divergent trends of declining smoking rates and increasing rates of lung cancer. He also reviews the existing literature to document associations between lung cancer and occupational exposures. Finally, interventions for prevention of occupational lung cancer are discussed.

  3. Lung cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Slatore, Christopher; Sockrider, Marianna

    2014-11-15

    Lung cancer is a common form of cancer.There are things you can do to lower your risk of lung cancer. Stop smoking tobacco. Ask your health care provider for help in quitting, including use of medicines to help with nicotine dependence. discuss with your healthcare provider,what you are taking or doing to decrease your risk for lung cancer PMID:25398122

  4. Lung tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hoganson, David M; Bassett, Erik K; Vacanti, Joseph P

    2014-01-01

    Lung tissue engineering is an emerging field focused on the development of lung replacement devices and tissue to treat patients with end stage lung disease. Microfluidic based lung assist devices have been developed that have biomimetically designed vascular networks that achieve physiologic blood flow. Gas exchange in these devices occurs across a thin respiratory membrane. Designed for intrathoracic implantation as a bridge to transplant or destination therapy, these lung assist devices will allow ambulation and hospital discharge for patients with end stage lung disease. Decellularized lungs subsequently recellularized with epithelial and endothelial cells have been implanted in small animal models with demonstration of initial gas exchange. Further development of these tissues and scaling to large animal models will validate this approach and may be an organ source for lung transplantation. Initial clinical success has been achieved with decellularized tracheal implants using autologous stem cells. Development of microfluidic lung models using similar architecture to the lung assist device technology allows study of lung biology and diseases with manipulation of lung cells and respiratory membrane strain. PMID:24896347

  5. Frequency- and time-resolved coherence transfer spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rickard, Mark A; Pakoulev, Andrei V; Mathew, Nathan A; Kornau, Kathryn M; Wright, John C

    2007-02-22

    Frequency-domain two-color triply vibrational enhanced four-wave mixing using a new phase-matching geometry discriminates against coherent multidimensional spectral features created solely by radiative transitions, spectrally resolves pathways with different numbers of coherence transfer steps, and temporally resolves modulations created by interference between coherence transfer pathways. Coherence transfer is a nonradiative transition where a superposition of quantum states evolves to a different superposition. The asymmetric and symmetric C[triple bond]O stretching modes of rhodium(I) dicarbonyl acetylacetonate are used as a model system for coherence transfer. A simplified theoretical model based on Redfield theory is used to describe the experimental results. PMID:17300169

  6. Channel-resolved above-threshold double ionization of acetylene.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaochun; Song, Qiying; Ji, Qinying; Lin, Kang; Pan, Haifeng; Ding, Jingxin; Zeng, Heping; Wu, Jian

    2015-04-24

    We experimentally investigate the channel-resolved above-threshold double ionization (ATDI) of acetylene in the multiphoton regime using an ultraviolet femtosecond laser pulse centered at 395 nm by measuring all the ejected electrons and ions in coincidence. As compared to the sequential process, diagonal lines in the electron-electron joint energy spectrum are observed for the nonsequential ATDI owing to the correlative sharing of the absorbed multiphoton energies. We demonstrate that the distinct channel-resolved sequential and nonsequential ATDI spectra can clearly reveal the photon-induced acetylene-vinylidene isomerization via proton migration on the cation or dication states. PMID:25955049

  7. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.J.

    1985-03-01

    Measurements of the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the S(1s) core level of a c(2 x 2)S/Ni(001) are analyzed to determine the spacing between the S overlayer and the first and second Ni layers. ARPEFS is a type of photoelectron diffraction measurement in which the photoelectron kinetic energy is swept typically from 100 to 600 eV. By using this wide range of intermediate energies we add high precision and theoretical simplification to the advantages of the photoelectron diffraction technique for determining surface structures. We report developments in the theory of photoelectron scattering in the intermediate energy range, measurement of the experimental photoemission spectra, their reduction to ARPEFS, and the surface structure determination from the ARPEFS by combined Fourier and multiple-scattering analyses. 202 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Approaches to resolving trade disputes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D W; Thiermann, A B

    2003-08-01

    The authors discuss the various approaches to resolving trade disputes available to Member Countries of the OIE (World organisation for animal health). The paper first describes the rights and obligations of Member Countries in setting health measures for the importation of animals and animal products, according to the provisions of the World Trade Organization (WTO) Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (the SPS Agreement). The authors indicate how OIE standards may be used to set import measures and introduce issues such as equivalence and the use of provisional measures, which are both areas of potential conflict. The authors then describe the options available for resolving disputes--bilateral discussions, mediation through the OIE, the use of the WTO SPS Committee and the formal WTO dispute settlement process, discussing the advantages and disadvantages of each. PMID:15884603

  9. Time-resolved molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Junliang; Blaga, Cosmin I.; Agostini, Pierre; DiMauro, Louis F.

    2016-06-01

    Time-resolved molecular imaging is a frontier of ultrafast optical science and physical chemistry. In this article, we review present and future key spectroscopic and microscopic techniques for ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics and show their differences and connections. The advent of femtosecond lasers and free electron x-ray lasers bring us closer to this goal, which eventually will extend our knowledge about molecular dynamics to the attosecond time domain.

  10. STED microscopy resolves nanoparticle assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willig, K. I.; Keller, J.; Bossi, M.; Hell, S. W.

    2006-06-01

    We demonstrate the ability of stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, a far-field fluorescence imaging technique with diffraction-unlimited resolution, to reveal the spatial order of fluorescent nanoparticles. Unlike its confocal counterpart, here STED microscopy resolves the arrangements of densely packed 40 nm beads, supramolecular aggregates in a cell membrane, and colloidal nanoparticles. Both raw and linearly deconvolved data disclose unprecedented details of both biological and non-biological nanopatterns.

  11. Resolved Observations of Transition Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casassus, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Resolved observations are bringing new constraints on the origin of radial gaps in protoplanetary disks. The kinematics, sampled in detail in one case-study, are indicative of non-Keplerian flows, corresponding to warped structures and accretion which may both play a role in the development of cavities. Disk asymmetries seen in the radio continuum are being interpreted in the context of dust segregation via aerodynamic trapping. We summarise recent observational progress, and describe prospects for improvements in the near term.

  12. Particle Image Velocimetry in Lung Bifurcation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theunissen, Raf; Riethmuller, Michel L.

    To better understand the human pulmonary system and governing aerosol deposition mechanisms within the lung, an accurate description of the airflow in the conductive and respiratory pulmonary airways is considered to be essential. In-vivo measurements are deemed impossible due to the small scales in the lung structure. Though numerical simulations can improve the insight, validation of the results is mostly lacking, especially in the extraction of particle trajectories. Numerical and experimental studies have been performed at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics on single and multiple bifurcation models representing simplifications of the lung system. Both steady and oscillating flows have been studied for the upper lung airways, while steady flow conditions were imposed in the modeling of the alveolar zones. Further experiments consisted in the extraction of particle trajectories in the models of the respiratory airways. This chapter presents an overview of the conducted measurement campaigns complemented with the main observations and results.

  13. CFTR and lung homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Matalon, Sadis

    2014-01-01

    CFTR is a cAMP-activated chloride and bicarbonate channel that is critical for lung homeostasis. Decreases in CFTR expression have dire consequences in cystic fibrosis (CF) and have been suggested to be a component of the lung pathology in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Decreases or loss of channel function often lead to mucus stasis, chronic bacterial infections, and the accompanying chronic inflammatory responses that promote progressive lung destruction, and, eventually in CF, lung failure. Here we discuss CFTR's functional role airway surface liquid hydration and pH, in regulation of other channels such as the epithelial sodium channel, and in regulating inflammatory responses in the lung. PMID:25381027

  14. The lung in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. Kim

    2005-01-01

    The lung is exquisitely sensitive to gravity, which induces gradients in ventilation, blood flow, and gas exchange. Studies of lungs in microgravity provide a means of elucidating the effects of gravity. They suggest a mechanism by which gravity serves to match ventilation to perfusion, making for a more efficient lung than anticipated. Despite predictions, lungs do not become edematous, and there is no disruption to, gas exchange in microgravity. Sleep disturbances in microgravity are not a result of respiratory-related events; obstructive sleep apnea is caused principally by the gravitational effects on the upper airways. In microgravity, lungs may be at greater risk to the effects of inhaled aerosols.

  15. Lung cancer in women.

    PubMed

    Coscio, Angela M; Garst, Jennifer

    2006-07-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer in both men and women; however, there are some clear gender-based differences. As the incidence of lung cancer is declining in men, the incidence of lung cancer is increasing in women. Women are more likely than men to have adenocarcinoma, a histologic subtype that correlates with worsened prognosis, but women have improved survival compared with men. Genetic predisposition and the presence of estrogen receptors in lung cancer cells may predispose women to developing lung cancer. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanism and significance of these findings. PMID:17254523

  16. Perioperative lung injury.

    PubMed

    Slinger, Peter

    2008-03-01

    Patients are at risk for several types of lung injury in the perioperative period. These injuries include atelectasis, pneumonia, pneumothorax, bronchopleural fistula, acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Anesthetic management can cause, exacerbate or ameliorate most of these injuries. Clinical research trends show that traditional protocols for perioperative mechanical ventilation, using large tidal volumes without positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) can cause a sub-clinical lung injury and this injury becomes clinically important when any additional lung injury is added. Lung-protective ventilation strategies using more physiologic tidal volumes and appropriate levels of PEEP can decrease the extent of this injury. PMID:18494396

  17. Mouse models for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min-chul; Berns, Anton

    2013-04-01

    Lung cancer is a devastating disease and a major therapeutic burden with poor survival rates. It is responsible for 30% of all cancer deaths. Lung cancer is strongly associated with smoking, although some subtypes are also seen in non-smokers. Tumors in the latter group are mostly adenocarcinomas with many carrying mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Survival statistics of lung cancer are grim because of its late detection and frequent local and distal metastases. Although DNA sequence information from tumors has revealed a number of frequently occurring mutations, affecting well-known tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes, many of the driver mutations remain ill defined. This is likely due to the involvement of numerous rather infrequently occurring driver mutations that are difficult to distinguish from the very large number of passenger mutations detected in smoking-related lung cancers. Therefore, experimental model systems are indispensable to validate putative driver lesions and to gain insight into their mechanisms of action. Whereas a large fraction of these analyzes can be performed in cell cultures in vitro, in many cases the consequences of the mutations have to be assessed in the context of an intact organism, as this is the context in which the Mendelian selection process of the tumorigenic process took place and the advantages of particular mutations become apparent. Current mouse models for cancer are very suitable for this as they permit mimicking many of the salient features of human tumors. The capacity to swiftly re-engineer complex sets of lesions found in human tumors in mice enables us to assess the contribution of defined combinations of lesions to distinct tumor characteristics such as metastatic behavior and response to therapy. In this review we will describe mouse models of lung cancer and how they are used to better understand the disease and how they are exploited to develop better intervention strategies

  18. RONI Based Secured and Authenticated Indexing of Lung CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Jasmine Selvakumari Jeya, I.; Suganthi, J.

    2015-01-01

    Medical images need to be transmitted with the patient's information without altering the image data. The present paper discusses secured indexing of lung CT image (SILI) which is a secured way of indexing the lung CT images with the patient information. Authentication is provided using the sender's logo information and the secret key is used for embedding the watermark into the host image. Watermark is embedded into the region of Noninterest (RONI) of the lung CT image. RONI is identified by segmenting the lung tissue from the CT scan image. The experimental results show that the proposed approach is robust against unauthorized access, noise, blurring, and intensity based attacks. PMID:26078782

  19. RONI Based Secured and Authenticated Indexing of Lung CT Images.

    PubMed

    Jasmine Selvakumari Jeya, I; Suganthi, J

    2015-01-01

    Medical images need to be transmitted with the patient's information without altering the image data. The present paper discusses secured indexing of lung CT image (SILI) which is a secured way of indexing the lung CT images with the patient information. Authentication is provided using the sender's logo information and the secret key is used for embedding the watermark into the host image. Watermark is embedded into the region of Noninterest (RONI) of the lung CT image. RONI is identified by segmenting the lung tissue from the CT scan image. The experimental results show that the proposed approach is robust against unauthorized access, noise, blurring, and intensity based attacks. PMID:26078782

  20. Small animal lung imaging with an in-line X-ray phase contrast benchtop system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garson, A. B.; Gunsten, S.; Guan, H.; Vasireddi, S.; Brody, S.; Anastasio, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present the results from a benchtop X-ray phase-contrast (XPC) method for lung imaging that represents a paradigm shift in the way small animal lung imaging is performed. In our method, information regarding airway microstructure that is encoded within speckle texture of a single XPC radiograph is decoded to spatially resolve changes in lung properties such as microstructure sizes, air volumes, and compliance, to name a few. Such functional information cannot be derived from conventional lung radiography or any other 2D imaging modality. By computing these images at different time points within a breathing cycle, dynamic functional imaging can be potentially achieved without the need for tomography.

  1. Differential phase shift keyed signal resolver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, P. M.; Wallingford, W. M. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A differential phase shift keyed signal resolver resolves the differential phase shift in the incoming signal to determine the data content thereof overcoming phase uncertainty without requiring a transmitted reference signal.

  2. Concept of proton radiography using energy resolved dose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentefour, El H.; Schnuerer, Roland; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Energy resolved dosimetry offers a potential path to single detector based proton imaging using scanned proton beams. This is because energy resolved dose functions encrypt the radiological depth at which the measurements are made. When a set of predetermined proton beams ‘proton imaging field’ are used to deliver a well determined dose distribution in a specific volume, then, at any given depth x of this volume, the behavior of the dose against the energies of the proton imaging field is unique and characterizes the depth x. This concept applies directly to proton therapy scanning delivery methods (pencil beam scanning and uniform scanning) and it can be extended to the proton therapy passive delivery methods (single and double scattering) if the delivery of the irradiation is time-controlled with a known time-energy relationship. To derive the water equivalent path length (WEPL) from the energy resolved dose measurement, one may proceed in two different ways. A first method is by matching the measured energy resolved dose function to a pre-established calibration database of the behavior of the energy resolved dose in water, measured over the entire range of radiological depths with at least 1 mm spatial resolution. This calibration database can also be made specific to the patient if computed using the patient x-CT data. A second method to determine the WEPL is by using the empirical relationships between the WEPL and the integral dose or the depth at 80% of the proximal fall off of the energy resolved dose functions in water. In this note, we establish the evidence of the fundamental relationship between the energy resolved dose and the WEPL at the depth of the measurement. Then, we illustrate this relationship with experimental data and discuss its imaging dynamic range for 230 MeV protons.

  3. Concept of proton radiography using energy resolved dose measurement.

    PubMed

    Bentefour, El H; Schnuerer, Roland; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2016-08-21

    Energy resolved dosimetry offers a potential path to single detector based proton imaging using scanned proton beams. This is because energy resolved dose functions encrypt the radiological depth at which the measurements are made. When a set of predetermined proton beams 'proton imaging field' are used to deliver a well determined dose distribution in a specific volume, then, at any given depth x of this volume, the behavior of the dose against the energies of the proton imaging field is unique and characterizes the depth x. This concept applies directly to proton therapy scanning delivery methods (pencil beam scanning and uniform scanning) and it can be extended to the proton therapy passive delivery methods (single and double scattering) if the delivery of the irradiation is time-controlled with a known time-energy relationship. To derive the water equivalent path length (WEPL) from the energy resolved dose measurement, one may proceed in two different ways. A first method is by matching the measured energy resolved dose function to a pre-established calibration database of the behavior of the energy resolved dose in water, measured over the entire range of radiological depths with at least 1 mm spatial resolution. This calibration database can also be made specific to the patient if computed using the patient x-CT data. A second method to determine the WEPL is by using the empirical relationships between the WEPL and the integral dose or the depth at 80% of the proximal fall off of the energy resolved dose functions in water. In this note, we establish the evidence of the fundamental relationship between the energy resolved dose and the WEPL at the depth of the measurement. Then, we illustrate this relationship with experimental data and discuss its imaging dynamic range for 230 MeV protons. PMID:27435446

  4. Longitudinal micro-CT provides biomarkers of lung disease that can be used to assess the effect of therapy in preclinical mouse models, and reveal compensatory changes in lung volume

    PubMed Central

    Vande Velde, Greetje; Poelmans, Jennifer; De Langhe, Ellen; Hillen, Amy; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen; Himmelreich, Uwe; Lories, Rik J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In vivo lung micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is being increasingly embraced in pulmonary research because it provides longitudinal information on dynamic disease processes in a field in which ex vivo assessment of experimental disease models is still the gold standard. To optimize the quantitative monitoring of progression and therapy of lung diseases, we evaluated longitudinal changes in four different micro-CT-derived biomarkers [aerated lung volume, lung tissue (including lesions) volume, total lung volume and mean lung density], describing normal development, lung infections, inflammation, fibrosis and therapy. Free-breathing mice underwent micro-CT before and repeatedly after induction of lung disease (bleomycin-induced fibrosis, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, pulmonary cryptococcosis) and therapy (imatinib). The four lung biomarkers were quantified. After the last time point, we performed pulmonary function tests and isolated the lungs for histology. None of the biomarkers remained stable during longitudinal follow-up of adult healthy mouse lungs, implying that biomarkers should be compared with age-matched controls upon intervention. Early inflammation and progressive fibrosis led to a substantial increase in total lung volume, which affects the interpretation of aerated lung volume, tissue volume and mean lung density measures. Upon treatment of fibrotic lung disease, the improvement in aerated lung volume and function was not accompanied by a normalization of the increased total lung volume. Significantly enlarged lungs were also present in models of rapidly and slowly progressing lung infections. The data suggest that total lung volume changes could partly reflect a compensatory mechanism that occurs during disease progression in mice. Our findings underscore the importance of quantifying total lung volume in addition to aerated lung or lesion volumes to accurately document growth and potential compensatory mechanisms in mouse models of

  5. Improved Magnetic-Field-Component Resolvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, H. D.

    1982-01-01

    New resolvers for vectorially summing outputs of aircraft-mounted magnetometers are lighter and more economical to fabricate than conventional electromagnetic resolvers. One resolver is based on potentiometric principles, the second uses polarization filters, and the third has variable-capacitance elements. Optical, capacitive and potentiometric devices have applications in aircraft navigation systems.

  6. Does aluminum smelting cause lung disease?

    PubMed

    Abramson, M J; Wlodarczyk, J H; Saunders, N A; Hensley, M J

    1989-04-01

    The evidence concerning a relationship between work in the aluminum industry and lung disease has been reviewed using epidemiologic criteria. Adequate data on environmental exposure are rarely presented. Case series on aluminum potroom workers over the past 50 years have identified an asthmalike syndrome that appears to be due to an irritant rather than an allergic mechanism. These studies have been supported by evidence of within shift variability of measures of lung function. However, to date, there is inadequate evidence to resolve the question of whether potroom exposure initiates asthma or merely precipitates asthmalike symptoms in a predisposed individual. Cross-sectional studies have demonstrated evidence of reduced lung function, consistent with chronic airflow limitation. In exposed aluminum smelter workers compared to unexposed control subjects. Cigarette smoking, the major potential confounding variable, has been measured and accounted for in multivariate analyses. To date, evidence is lacking from longitudinal studies about the development of disabling chronic obstructive lung disease. Exposure to coal tar pitch volatiles in the production and consumption of anodes has biologic plausibility for an association of lung cancer with work in an aluminum smelter. Although retrospective mortality studies have failed to account for the probable high prevalence of smoking in blue collar workers, the relative risk of lung cancer is very low if present at all. Pulmonary fibrosis has not been shown to be a significant problem in aluminum smelter workers. Future research in the aluminum industry needs to concentrate on longitudinal studies, preferably with an inception cohort for the investigation of potroom asthma. PMID:2648910

  7. Does aluminum smelting cause lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, M.J.; Wlodarczyk, J.H.; Saunders, N.A.; Hensley, M.J.

    1989-04-01

    The evidence concerning a relationship between work in the aluminum industry and lung disease has been reviewed using epidemiologic criteria. Adequate data on environmental exposure are rarely presented. Case series on aluminum potroom workers over the past 50 years have identified an asthmalike syndrome that appears to be due to an irritant rather than an allergic mechanism. These studies have been supported by evidence of within shift variability of measures of lung function. However, to date, there is inadequate evidence to resolve the question of whether potroom exposure initiates asthma or merely precipitates asthmalike symptoms in a predisposed individual. Cross-sectional studies have demonstrated evidence of reduced lung function, consistent with chronic airflow limitation. In exposed aluminum smelter workers compared to unexposed control subjects. Cigarette smoking, the major potential confounding variable, has been measured and accounted for in multivariate analyses. To date, evidence is lacking from longitudinal studies about the development of disabling chronic obstructive lung disease. Exposure to coal tar pitch volatiles in the production and consumption of anodes has biologic plausibility for an association of lung cancer with work in an aluminum smelter. Although retrospective mortality studies have failed to account for the probable high prevalence of smoking in blue collar workers, the relative risk of lung cancer is very low if present at all. Pulmonary fibrosis has not been shown to be a significant problem in aluminum smelter workers. Future research in the aluminum industry needs to concentrate on longitudinal studies, preferably with an inception cohort for the investigation of potroom asthma. 92 references.

  8. Micro-imaging of the Mouse Lung via MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    Quantitative measurement of lung microstructure is of great significance in assessment of pulmonary disease, particularly in the earliest stages. Conventional stereological assessment of ex-vivo fixed tissue specimens under the microscope has a long and successful tradition and is regarded as a gold standard, but the invasive nature limits its applications and the practicality of use in longitudinal studies. The technique for diffusion MRI-based 3He lung morphometry was previously developed and validated for human lungs, and was recently extended to ex-vivo mouse lungs. The technique yields accurate, quantitative information about the microstructure and geometry of acinar airways. In this dissertation, the 3He lung morphometry technique is for the first time successfully implemented for in-vivo studies of mice. It can generate spatially-resolved maps of parameters that reveal the microstructure of mouse lung. Results in healthy mice indicate excellent agreement between in-vivo morphometry via 3He MRI and microscopic morphometry after sacrifice. The implementation and validation of 3He morphometry in healthy mice open up new avenues for application of the technique as a precise, noninvasive, in-vivo biomarker of changes in lung microstructure, within various mouse models of lung disease. We have applied 3He morphometry to the Sendai mouse model of lung disease. Specifically, the Sendai-virus model of chronic obstructive lung disease has demonstrated an innate immune response in mouse airways that exhibits similarities to the chronic airway inflammation in human COPD and asthma, but the effect on distal lung parenchyma had not been investigated. We imaged the time course and regional distribution of mouse lung microstructural changes in vivo after Sendai virus (SeV) infection with 1H and 3He diffusion MRI. 1H MR images detected the SeV-induced pulmonary inflammation in vivo and 3He lung morphometry showed modest increase in alveolar duct radius distal to airway

  9. Resolving the formation of modern Chladni figures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuan, P. H.; Tung, J. C.; Liang, H. C.; Chiang, P. Y.; Huang, K. F.; Chen, Y. F.

    2015-09-01

    The resonant spectrum of a thin plate driven with a mechanical oscillator is precisely measured to distinguish modern Chladni figures (CFs) observed at the resonant frequencies from classical CFs observed at the non-resonant frequencies. Experimental results reveal that modern CFs generally display an important characteristic of avoided crossings of nodal lines, whereas the nodal lines of classical CFs form a regular grid. The formation of modern CFs and the resonant frequency spectrum are resolved with a theoretical model that characterizes the interaction between the plate and the driving source into the inhomogeneous Kirchhoff-Love equation. The derived formula for determining resonant frequencies is shown to be exactly identical to the meromorphic function given in singular billiards that deals with the coupling strength on the transition between integrable and chaotic features. The good agreement between experimental results and theoretical predictions verifies the significant role of the strong-coupling effect in the formation of modern CFs. More importantly, it is confirmed that the apparatus for generating modern CFs can be developed to serve as an expedient system for exploring the nodal domains of chaotic wave functions as well as the physics of the strong coupling with a point scatterer.

  10. Femtosecond resolved solvation dynamics in polar solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahlow, Michael A.; Jarzeba, Włodzimierz; Kang, Tai Jong; Barbara, Paul F.

    1989-01-01

    The transient solvation of a polar fluorescent probe has been studied by the time resolved Stokes shift technique with roughly five times shorter time resolution than previously reported. New shorter time components in the solvation relaxation function C(t) have been discovered for methanol, propionitrile, and propylene carbonate; the C(t) function for acetonitrile is singly exponential within the limitations of the instrument. The observed C(t) has been compared to theoretical calculations using the dielectric continuum (DC) model for each solvent, with non-Debye expressions for the solvent dielectric response. For methanol the DC model predictions agree closely with experiment. For the polar aprotic solvents propylene carbonate and propionitrile, the shape of the experimental decay is different from the DC predictions, but the average decay times <τs> are closer to the DC predictions than previously reported. The comparison of theory and experiment is clearly limited by the inconsistencies and limited frequency range of the dielectric relaxation data found in the literature. The dynamic solvation measurements have also been compared to predictions of the mean spherical approximation as applied to solvation dynamics, which appear to give slower solvation rates than are observed experimentally.

  11. Fusobacterium necrophorum presenting as isolated lung nodules.

    PubMed

    Sonti, Rajiv; Fleury, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum causes Lemierre's syndrome - a dramatic and distinct condition beginning with pharyngitis before proceeding to internal jugular vein septic thrombophlebitis and respiratory tract infection in otherwise healthy individuals. It is rare, but by far the most common pathway to parenchymal lung disease with this organism. Here we describe we a 34 year old healthy lady who was nontoxic without any antecedent illness who presented with lung nodules due to fusobacterium necrophorum as the sole manifestation of disease. Leading diagnostic consideration prior to culture data was pulmonary vasculitis. Identifying her disease process was a somewhat chance occurrence, and it began to resolve prior to antibiotic therapy. Though it would be difficult to recommend keen awareness of this organism given its rarity, it is important to consider that its scope may be broader than traditionally considered. PMID:26236610

  12. Fusobacterium necrophorum presenting as isolated lung nodules

    PubMed Central

    Sonti, Rajiv; Fleury, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum causes Lemierre's syndrome - a dramatic and distinct condition beginning with pharyngitis before proceeding to internal jugular vein septic thrombophlebitis and respiratory tract infection in otherwise healthy individuals. It is rare, but by far the most common pathway to parenchymal lung disease with this organism. Here we describe we a 34 year old healthy lady who was nontoxic without any antecedent illness who presented with lung nodules due to fusobacterium necrophorum as the sole manifestation of disease. Leading diagnostic consideration prior to culture data was pulmonary vasculitis. Identifying her disease process was a somewhat chance occurrence, and it began to resolve prior to antibiotic therapy. Though it would be difficult to recommend keen awareness of this organism given its rarity, it is important to consider that its scope may be broader than traditionally considered. PMID:26236610

  13. Lung transplantation at Duke

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Alice L.; Hartwig, Matthew G.

    2016-01-01

    Lung transplantation represents the gold-standard therapy for patients with end-stage lung disease. Utilization of this therapy continues to rise. The Lung Transplant Program at Duke University Medical Center was established in 1992, and since that time has grown to one of the highest volume centers in the world. The program to date has performed over 1,600 lung transplants. This report represents an up-to-date review of the practice and management strategies employed for safe and effective lung transplantation at our center. Specific attention is paid to the evaluation of candidacy for lung transplantation, donor selection, surgical approach, and postoperative management. These evidence-based strategies form the foundation of the clinical transplantation program at Duke. PMID:27076968

  14. Linear dimensions and volumes of human lungs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hickman, David P.

    2012-03-30

    TOTAL LUNG Capacity is defined as “the inspiratory capacity plus the functional residual capacity; the volume of air contained in the lungs at the end of a maximal inspiration; also equals vital capacity plus residual volume” (from MediLexicon.com). Within the Results and Discussion section of their April 2012 Health Physics paper, Kramer et al. briefly noted that the lungs of their experimental subjects were “not fully inflated.” By definition and failure to obtain maximal inspiration, Kramer et. al. did not measure Total Lung Capacity (TLC). The TLC equation generated from this work will tend to underestimate TLC and does notmore » improve or update total lung capacity data provided by ICRP and others. Likewise, the five linear measurements performed by Kramer et. al. are only representative of the conditions of the measurement (i.e., not at-rest volume, but not fully inflated either). While there was significant work performed and the data are interesting, the data does not represent a maximal situation, a minimal situation, or an at-rest situation. Moreover, while interesting, the linear data generated by this study is limited by the conditions of the experiment and may not be fully comparative with other lung or inspiratory parameters, measures, or physical dimensions.« less

  15. Linear dimensions and volumes of human lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, David P.

    2012-03-30

    TOTAL LUNG Capacity is defined as “the inspiratory capacity plus the functional residual capacity; the volume of air contained in the lungs at the end of a maximal inspiration; also equals vital capacity plus residual volume” (from MediLexicon.com). Within the Results and Discussion section of their April 2012 Health Physics paper, Kramer et al. briefly noted that the lungs of their experimental subjects were “not fully inflated.” By definition and failure to obtain maximal inspiration, Kramer et. al. did not measure Total Lung Capacity (TLC). The TLC equation generated from this work will tend to underestimate TLC and does not improve or update total lung capacity data provided by ICRP and others. Likewise, the five linear measurements performed by Kramer et. al. are only representative of the conditions of the measurement (i.e., not at-rest volume, but not fully inflated either). While there was significant work performed and the data are interesting, the data does not represent a maximal situation, a minimal situation, or an at-rest situation. Moreover, while interesting, the linear data generated by this study is limited by the conditions of the experiment and may not be fully comparative with other lung or inspiratory parameters, measures, or physical dimensions.

  16. Lung Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Wu, Geena X; Raz, Dan J

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States and worldwide. Since lung cancer outcomes are dependent on stage at diagnosis with early disease resulting in longer survival, the goal of screening is to capture lung cancer in its early stages when it can be treated and cured. Multiple studies have evaluated the use of chest X-ray (CXR) with or without sputum cytologic examination for lung cancer screening, but none has demonstrated a mortality benefit. In contrast, the multicenter National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) from the United States found a 20 % reduction in lung cancer mortality following three consecutive screenings with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in high-risk current and former smokers. Data from European trials are not yet available. In addition to a mortality benefit, lung cancer screening with LDCT also offers a unique opportunity to promote smoking cessation and abstinence and may lead to the diagnoses of treatable chronic diseases, thus decreasing the overall disease burden. The risks of lung cancer screening include overdiagnosis, radiation exposure, and false-positive results leading to unnecessary testing and possible patient anxiety and distress. However, the reduction in lung cancer mortality is a benefit that outweighs the risks and major health organizations currently recommend lung cancer screening using age, smoking history, and quit time criteria derived from the NLST. Although more research is needed to clearly define and understand the application and utility of lung cancer screening in the general population, current data support that lung cancer screening is effective and should be offered to eligible beneficiaries. PMID:27535387

  17. Lung PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... emission tomography; PET - chest; PET - lung; PET - tumor imaging ... Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2015: ...

  18. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ann G; Cote, Michele L

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer continues to be one of the most common causes of cancer death despite understanding the major cause of the disease: cigarette smoking. Smoking increases lung cancer risk 5- to 10-fold with a clear dose-response relationship. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke among nonsmokers increases lung cancer risk about 20%. Risks for marijuana and hookah use, and the new e-cigarettes, are yet to be consistently defined and will be important areas for continued research as use of these products increases. Other known environmental risk factors include exposures to radon, asbestos, diesel, and ionizing radiation. Host factors have also been associated with lung cancer risk, including family history of lung cancer, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and infections. Studies to identify genes associated with lung cancer susceptibility have consistently identified chromosomal regions on 15q25, 6p21 and 5p15 associated with lung cancer risk. Risk prediction models for lung cancer typically include age, sex, cigarette smoking intensity and/or duration, medical history, and occupational exposures, however there is not yet a risk prediction model currently recommended for general use. As lung cancer screening becomes more widespread, a validated model will be needed to better define risk groups to inform screening guidelines. PMID:26667337

  19. Antioxidant vitamins and prevention of lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.B. )

    1992-09-30

    Although the evidence for oxidative stress for air pollution in the human lung is fragmentary, the hypothesis that oxidative stress is an important, if not the sole, mechanism of toxicity of oxidizing air pollutants and tobacco smoke is compelling and growing. First, biochemical mechanisms have been worked out for oxidation of lung lipids by the gas phase of cigarette smoke, NO[sub 2] and O[sub 3]. The oxidation of lung lipids can be prevented by both vitamins C and E. Vitamin C is more effective in preventing oxidation by NO[sub 2], and vitamin E is more effective against O[sub 3]. Second, multiple species of experimental animals develop lung disease similar to human bronchitis and emphysema from exposure to NO[sub 2] and O[sub 3], respectively. The development of these diseases occurs over a near lifetime exposure when the levels of NO[sub 2] or O[sub 3] are at near ambient air pollution values. Third, isolated human cells are protected against oxidative damage from NO[sub 2] and O[sub 3] by both vitamins C and E. Fourth, the vitamin C level in the lung either declines on exposure to NO[sub 2] for short-term exposures or increases on chronic cigarette smoke exposure. The effects of cigarette smoking on serum vitamin C is apparently complex and may be related to the daily intake of vitamin C as well as smoking. Serum vitamin C levels may be poor indicators of lung demands when daily vitamin C intakes are above 100 mg/day. Fifth, vitamin C supplementation protects against the effects of ambient levels of air pollution in adults as measured by histamine challenge. An augmented response to histamine challenge may represent increased lung permeability brought about by air pollution. In experimental animal and human experiments, the amount of vitamin C or E that afforded protection was in excess of the current recommended dietary allowance.

  20. [From isoflurane to perfluorohexane? Perfluorocarbons--therapeutic strategies in acute lung failure].

    PubMed

    Ragaller, M; Bleyl, J U; Koch, T; Albrecht, D M

    2000-04-01

    The introduction of Perfluorochemicals into medicine and especially into the treatment of severe lung injury is a fascinating scientific task. Many recall the famous experiments from Clark et al. in 1966 when he demonstrated "liquidventilation with perfluorocarbons" in the mammal species for the first time. After this hallmark, perfluorocarbons were subsequently introduced in research of acute lung injury by the techniques of Total- and Partial-Liquid-Ventilation (TLV; PLV). Perfluorocarbons (saturated organofluorids) have unique chemical and physical properties which made them attractive substances for intraalveolar application. The strong C-F bindings in the perfluorocarbon molecules are responsible for their chemical stability, biochemical inertness, high capacity to dissolve respiratory gases, low surface tension and high vapor pressures. Furthermore, the high density of the PFC lead to radio-opacity and their distribution to dependent lung areas. The efficacy of PFC liquid, applied by TLV/PLV has been demonstrated in numerous animal studies using different models of acute lung injury. Currently, several mechanisms of action of perfluorocarbon fluids in acute lung injury are discussed: recruitment of atelectatic alveoli, prevention of endexpiratory collapse of alveoli ("liquid PEEP"), redistribution of perfusion, oxygen transport, surfactant like effects and decrease of inflammation. Since total liquid ventilation has been used only in experimental models of lung injury, partial liquid ventilation has been introduced successfully into clinical trials (phase I-II). However, the results of the first randomised, controlled study of PLV in 90 adult patients suffering from severe respiratory failure (ALI/ARDS) showed no differences between PLV and conventional treatment. Furthermore, the instillation of relatively large amounts of liquid into the lungs poses several technical challenges and may be associated with complications such as liquithoraces, pneumothoraces

  1. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer This page lists cancer ... in lung cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Abitrexate ( ...

  2. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... for Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next ...

  3. Interstitial lung disease - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung disease Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis Rheumatoid lung disease Sarcoidosis Patient Instructions Eating extra calories when sick - adults ... team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Interstitial Lung Diseases Sarcoidosis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: lung cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions lung cancer lung cancer Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Lung cancer is a disease in which certain cells ...

  5. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next ...

  6. Resolving thermoelectric "paradox" in superconductors.

    PubMed

    Shelly, Connor D; Matrozova, Ekaterina A; Petrashov, Victor T

    2016-02-01

    For almost a century, thermoelectricity in superconductors has been one of the most intriguing topics in physics. During its early stages in the 1920s, the mere existence of thermoelectric effects in superconductors was questioned. In 1944, it was demonstrated that the effects may occur in inhomogeneous superconductors. Theoretical breakthrough followed in the 1970s, when the generation of a measurable thermoelectric magnetic flux in superconducting loops was predicted; however, a major crisis developed when experiments showed puzzling discrepancies with the theory. Moreover, different experiments were inconsistent with each other. This led to a stalemate in bringing theory and experiment into agreement. With this work, we resolve this stalemate, thus solving this long-standing "paradox," and open prospects for exploration of novel thermoelectric phenomena predicted recently. PMID:26933688

  7. TUBERCULOSIS AND LUNG CANCER.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Atsuhisa

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and lung cancer as comorbidities has been extensively discussed in many studies. In the past, it was well known that lung cancer is a specific epidemiological successor of PTB and that lung cancer often develops in scars caused by PTB. In recent years, the relevance of the two diseases has drawn attention in terms of the close epidemiological connection and chronic inflammation-associated carcinogenesis. In Japanese case series studies, most lung cancer patients with tuberculous sequelae received supportive care alone in the past, but more recently, the use of aggressive lung cancer treatment is increasing. Many studies on PTB and lung cancer as comorbidities have revealed that active PTB is noted in 2-5% of lung cancer cases, whereas lung cancer is noted in 1-2% of active PTB cases. In such instances of comorbidity, many active PTB cases showed Type II (non-extensively cavitary disease) and Spread 2-3 (intermediate-extensive diseases) on chest X-rays, but standard anti-tuberculosis treatment easily eradicates negative conversion of sputum culture for M. tuberculosis; lung cancer cases were often stage III- IV and squamous cell carcinoma predominant, and the administration of aggressive treatment for lung cancer is increasing. The major clinical problems associated with PTB and lung cancer as comorbidities include delay in diagnosis (doctor's delay) and therapeutic limitations. The former involves two factors of radiographic interpretation: the principles of parsimony (Occam's razor) and visual search; the latter involves three factors of lung cancer treatment: infectivity of M.tuberculosis, anatomical limitation due to lung damage by tuberculosis, and drug-drug interactions between rifampicin and anti-cancer drugs, especially molecularly targeted drugs. The comorbidity of these two diseases is an important health-related issue in Japan. In the treatment of PTB, the possibility of concurrent lung cancer should be kept

  8. A Polarization Control System for Intensity-Resolved Guided Mode Resonance Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Sheng-Fu; Chang, Fu-Chen; Chen, Zhi-Heng; Wang, Chih-Ming; Yang, Tsung-Hsun; Chen, Wen-Yih; Chang, Jenq-Yang

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a polarization-control setup for intensity-resolved guided mode resonance sensors is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. The experimental results are in good agreement with the simulation data based on rigorous coupled wave approach calculations. The proposed intensity-resolved measurement setup transfers polarization ellipses, which are produced from guided mode resonance to a linear polarization state under a buffer solution condition, and then suppresses the signals to dark using a polarization-control set. Hence, any changes in the refractive index results in an increase in the intensity signals. Furthermore, no wavelength-resolved or angular-resolved measurement is needed in this scheme. According to the experimental results, a wide linear detection range of 0.014 refractive index units is achieved and the limit of detection is 1.62E-4 RIU. PMID:24625743

  9. Aerosol delivery of synthetic lung surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Juviel, José M.; Waring, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) is a widely accepted technique of non-invasive respiratory support in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome due to lack of lung surfactant. If this approach fails, the next step is often intubation, mechanical ventilation (MV) and intratracheal instillation of clinical lung surfactant. Objective. To investigate whether aerosol delivery of advanced synthetic lung surfactant, consisting of peptide mimics of surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B and SP-C) and synthetic lipids, during nCPAP improves lung function in surfactant-deficient rabbits. Methods. Experimental synthetic lung surfactants were produced by formulating 3% Super Mini-B peptide (SMB surfactant), a highly surface active SP-B mimic, and a combination of 1.5% SMB and 1.5% of the SP-C mimic SP-Css ion-lock 1 (BC surfactant), with a synthetic lipid mixture. After testing aerosol generation using a vibrating membrane nebulizer and aerosol conditioning (particle size, surfactant composition and surface activity), we investigated the effects of aerosol delivery of synthetic SMB and BC surfactant preparations on oxygenation and lung compliance in saline-lavaged, surfactant-deficient rabbits, supported with either nCPAP or MV. Results. Particle size distribution of the surfactant aerosols was within the 1–3 µm distribution range and surfactant activity was not affected by aerosolization. At a dose equivalent to clinical surfactant therapy in premature infants (100 mg/kg), aerosol delivery of both synthetic surfactant preparations led to a quick and clinically relevant improvement in oxygenation and lung compliance in the rabbits. Lung function recovered to a greater extent in rabbits supported with MV than with nCPAP. BC surfactant outperformed SMB surfactant in improving lung function and was associated with higher phospholipid values in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid; these findings were irrespective of the type of ventilatory support

  10. Numerical simulations of time-resolved quantum electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaury, Benoit; Weston, Joseph; Santin, Matthieu; Houzet, Manuel; Groth, Christoph; Waintal, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulation has become a major tool in quantum electronics both for fundamental and applied purposes. While for a long time those simulations focused on stationary properties (e.g. DC currents), the recent experimental trend toward GHz frequencies and beyond has triggered a new interest for handling time-dependent perturbations. As the experimental frequencies get higher, it becomes possible to conceive experiments which are both time-resolved and fast enough to probe the internal quantum dynamics of the system. This paper discusses the technical aspects-mathematical and numerical-associated with the numerical simulations of such a setup in the time domain (i.e. beyond the single-frequency AC limit). After a short review of the state of the art, we develop a theoretical framework for the calculation of time-resolved observables in a general multiterminal system subject to an arbitrary time-dependent perturbation (oscillating electrostatic gates, voltage pulses, time-varying magnetic fields, etc.) The approach is mathematically equivalent to (i) the time-dependent scattering formalism, (ii) the time-resolved non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) formalism and (iii) the partition-free approach. The central object of our theory is a wave function that obeys a simple Schrödinger equation with an additional source term that accounts for the electrons injected from the electrodes. The time-resolved observables (current, density, etc.) and the (inelastic) scattering matrix are simply expressed in terms of this wave function. We use our approach to develop a numerical technique for simulating time-resolved quantum transport. We find that the use of this wave function is advantageous for numerical simulations resulting in a speed up of many orders of magnitude with respect to the direct integration of NEGF equations. Our technique allows one to simulate realistic situations beyond simple models, a subject that was until now beyond the simulation capabilities

  11. Time course and distribution of tungsten-laden macrophages in the hilar lymph nodes of the dog lung after experimental instillation of calcium tungstate into the left apical bronchus.

    PubMed

    Grande, N R; de Sá, C M; Aguas, A P; Carvalho, E; Soares, M

    1990-12-01

    We sprayed a tungsten powder (CaWO4) into the airway of a single lobe (left apical) of the dog lung in order to study: (a) the kinetics of particle translocation from the bronchoalveolar lining to hilar lymph nodes, and (b) the sorting in lung lymph nodes of inhaled microcrystals. We found that the transport of the tungsten particles to the regional lymph node takes at least 24 hours and reaches its peak at day 7. In situ detection of tungsten by elemental particle analysis of lymph node sections by scanning electron microscopy allowed precise mapping of the marker in the node; the method was complemented by light microscopy and thin-section electron microscopy of the same nodes. Virtually all of the lymph node tungsten was located inside macrophages. The first tungsten-positive macrophages seen in the regional lymph nodes (day 1 to day 3) were restricted to the subcapsular space. This was followed by massive filling of the same sinus and of the narrow interfollicular areas by the particle-laden macrophages (day 3 to day 7). The even distribution of the tungsten-bearing phagocytes found in these anatomical regions of the node indicated that the subcapsular area in the dog was a continuous domain rather than the segmented region observed in nodes of common laboratory animals such as the rat. By day 7 after tungsten instillation, a moderate number of tungsten-positive macrophages was also detected in the paracortical region of the node. Finally, the presence of tungsten-bearing macrophages was extended to the outer lymph node medulla (day 7 to day 14); here, the macrophages were located in association with cords of plasmacytes and showed interdigitations with these lymphocytes. Only minimal amounts of tungsten were detected inside lymphoid follicles in association with dendritic cells. Some of the tungsten initially deposited in the airway of the apical left lung lobe was detected in contralateral hilar lymph nodes. We conclude that: (i) particle translocation from

  12. Experimental studies on the effect of (Lambda-Cyhalothrin) insecticide on lungs and the ameliorating effect of plant extracts (Ginseng (Panax Ginseng) and garlic (Allium sativum L.) on asthma development in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lambda-cyhalothrin (LTC) is a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide for agricultural and public health applications. This study was to determine the pathological alterations of LTC in lungs, which has not previously been studied, and the ameliorating effects of plant extracts (ginseng and garlic) on the development of asthma in albino rats. Methods Four groups (gps) of albino rats, (n = 20, average body weight = 200 gm with an age of 4 months), were formed. Gp 1 was kept as control. Gp 2 was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with LTC at a dose of 1/6 LD50 that is 9.34 mg/kg body weight (w.t.) daily for 21 days (d). Gp 3 & 4 were injected (i.p.) with ginseng at the dose of 200 mg/kg b.wt and garlic (Allium sativum L.) at the dose of 100 mg/kg b.wt., respectively, one hour before being given LTC at a dose of 1/6 LD50 (9.34 mg/kg b.wt.) daily. Each groups were divided into two sacrificed, at 15 and 21 d p.i. Blood and lung samples were collected for hematological and histopathological examinations. Results Hematological findings showed that the animals in gps 2 and 3, which were treated for 21 days, showed a significant difference in RBC counts (P > .001), Hb (P > .007), PCV% (P > .004), (P > .008) in comparison with the control group. Signs of cough and nasal discharge were seen in gp 2, which became mild in gp 4. Grossly, the lungs showed congestion and consolidation in gp 2. Histopathologically, macroabscesses and interstitial alveolitis were seen in gp 2, which led to obstruction in the lumen of the bronchioles at 21 d p.i. Meanwhile, thickening in the interalveolar septa with mononuclear cells was seen in gps. 3 and 4 at 21d p.i. Conclusions The study shows 3 gps of rats injected with LHC alone or combined with garlic and ginseng extract, each group were divided into two sacrificed (15 and 21 d p.i.). Lambda cyhalothrin causes bronchial obstruction in the lungs of the rats (15 and 21 d p.i), which decreased into mild to

  13. Comparative Pathobiology of Environmentally Induced Lung Cancers in Humans and Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Pandiri, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer-related deaths in humans worldwide. Environmental factors play an important role in the epidemiology of these cancers. Rodents are the most common experimental model to study human lung cancers and are frequently used in bioassays to identify environmental exposure hazards associated with lung cancer. Lung tumors in rodents are common, particularly in certain strains of mice. Rodent lung tumors are predominantly bronchioloalveolar carcinomas and usually follow a progressive continuum of hyperplasia to adenoma to carcinoma. Human lung cancers are phenotypically more diverse and broadly constitute 2 types: small cell lung cancers or non-small cell lung cancers. Rodent lung tumors resulting from exposure to environmental agents are comparable to certain adenocarcinomas that are a subset of human non-small cell lung cancers. Human pulmonary carcinomas differ from rodent lung tumors by exhibiting greater morphologic heterogeneity (encompassing squamous cell, neuroendocrine, mucinous, sarcomatoid, and multiple cell combinations), higher metastatic rate, higher stromal response, aggressive clinical behavior, and lack of a clear continuum of proliferative lesions. In spite of these differences, rodent lung tumors recapitulate several fundamental aspects of human lung tumor biology at the morphologic and molecular level especially in lung cancers resulting from exposure to environmental carcinogens. PMID:25351923

  14. Recurrent Recruitment Manoeuvres Improve Lung Mechanics and Minimize Lung Injury during Mechanical Ventilation of Healthy Mice

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, Lucy Kathleen; Kowallik, Anke; Uhlig, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Mechanical ventilation (MV) of mice is increasingly required in experimental studies, but the conditions that allow stable ventilation of mice over several hours have not yet been fully defined. In addition, most previous studies documented vital parameters and lung mechanics only incompletely. The aim of the present study was to establish experimental conditions that keep these parameters within their physiological range over a period of 6 h. For this purpose, we also examined the effects of frequent short recruitment manoeuvres (RM) in healthy mice. Methods Mice were ventilated at low tidal volume VT = 8 mL/kg or high tidal volume VT = 16 mL/kg and a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 2 or 6 cmH2O. RM were performed every 5 min, 60 min or not at all. Lung mechanics were followed by the forced oscillation technique. Blood pressure (BP), electrocardiogram (ECG), heart frequency (HF), oxygen saturation and body temperature were monitored. Blood gases, neutrophil-recruitment, microvascular permeability and pro-inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and blood serum as well as histopathology of the lung were examined. Results MV with repetitive RM every 5 min resulted in stable respiratory mechanics. Ventilation without RM worsened lung mechanics due to alveolar collapse, leading to impaired gas exchange. HF and BP were affected by anaesthesia, but not by ventilation. Microvascular permeability was highest in atelectatic lungs, whereas neutrophil-recruitment and structural changes were strongest in lungs ventilated with high tidal volume. The cytokines IL-6 and KC, but neither TNF nor IP-10, were elevated in the BAL and serum of all ventilated mice and were reduced by recurrent RM. Lung mechanics, oxygenation and pulmonary inflammation were improved by increased PEEP. Conclusions Recurrent RM maintain lung mechanics in their physiological range during low tidal volume ventilation of healthy mice by preventing atelectasis and

  15. Rare lung cancers.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    There are several different kinds of lung cancer, often referred to as lung cancer subtypes. Some of these occur more often than others. In this factsheet we will specifically look at the subtypes of cancers that do not happen very often and are considered 'rare'. PMID:27066129

  16. Lung Cancer Indicators Recurrence

    Cancer.gov

    This study describes prognostic factors for lung cancer spread and recurrence, as well as subsequent risk of death from the disease. The investigators observed that regardless of cancer stage, grade, or type of lung cancer, patients in the study were more

  17. Lycopene and Lung Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although epidemiological studies have shown dietary intake of lycopene is associated with decreased risk of lung cancer, the effect of lycopene on lung carcinogenesis has not been well studied. A better understanding of lycopene metabolism and the mechanistic basis of lycopene chemoprevention must ...

  18. Staging of Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of N2 means cancer has spread to the middle part of the chest (called the mediastinum). A rating ... so that the surgeon can remove the cancerous part of the lung and/or lymph node ... biopsied are your lungs, bones, and brain. These types of biopsies can be done with ...

  19. Lung needle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... when there is an abnormal condition near the surface of the lung, in the lung itself, or on the chest wall. Most often, it is done to rule out cancer. The biopsy is usually done after abnormalities appear on a chest x-ray or CT ...

  20. Immunosuppression for lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Choo Y.; Madsen, Joren C.; Rosengard, Bruce R.; Allan, James S.

    2010-01-01

    1. ABSTRACT As a result of advances in surgical techniques, immunosuppressive therapy, and postoperative management, lung transplantation has become an established therapeutic option for individuals with a variety of end-stage lung diseases. The current 1-year actuarial survival rate following lung transplantation is approaching 80%. However, the 5- year actuarial survival rate has remained virtually unchanged at approximately 50% over the last 15 years due to the processes of acute and chronic lung allograft rejection (1). Clinicians still rely on a vast array of immunosuppressive agents to suppress the process of graft rejection, but find themselves limited by an inescapable therapeutic paradox. Insufficient immunosuppression results in graft loss due to rejection, while excess immunosuppression results in increased morbidity and mortality from opportunistic infections and malignancies. Indeed, graft rejection, infection, and malignancy are the three principal causes of mortality for the lung transplant recipient. One should also keep in mind that graft loss in a lung transplant recipient is usually a fatal event, since there is no practical means of long-term mechanical support, and since the prospects of re-transplantation are low, given the shortage of acceptable donor grafts. This chapter reviews the current state of immunosuppressive therapy for lung transplantation and suggests alternative paradigms for the management of future lung transplant recipients. PMID:19273152

  1. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk depends on the number of cigarettes ...

  2. Estimation of Lung Ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Kai; Cao, Kunlin; Du, Kaifang; Amelon, Ryan; Christensen, Gary E.; Raghavan, Madhavan; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    Since the primary function of the lung is gas exchange, ventilation can be interpreted as an index of lung function in addition to perfusion. Injury and disease processes can alter lung function on a global and/or a local level. MDCT can be used to acquire multiple static breath-hold CT images of the lung taken at different lung volumes, or with proper respiratory control, 4DCT images of the lung reconstructed at different respiratory phases. Image registration can be applied to this data to estimate a deformation field that transforms the lung from one volume configuration to the other. This deformation field can be analyzed to estimate local lung tissue expansion, calculate voxel-by-voxel intensity change, and make biomechanical measurements. The physiologic significance of the registration-based measures of respiratory function can be established by comparing to more conventional measurements, such as nuclear medicine or contrast wash-in/wash-out studies with CT or MR. An important emerging application of these methods is the detection of pulmonary function change in subjects undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer. During RT, treatment is commonly limited to sub-therapeutic doses due to unintended toxicity to normal lung tissue. Measurement of pulmonary function may be useful as a planning tool during RT planning, may be useful for tracking the progression of toxicity to nearby normal tissue during RT, and can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a treatment post-therapy. This chapter reviews the basic measures to estimate regional ventilation from image registration of CT images, the comparison of them to the existing golden standard and the application in radiation therapy.

  3. Occupational lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Coultas, D.B.; Samet, J.M. )

    1992-06-01

    The overall importance of occupational agents as a cause of lung cancer has been a controversial subject since the 1970s. A federal report, released in the late 1970s, projected a surprisingly high burden of occupational lung cancer; for asbestos and four other agents, from 61,000 to 98,000 cases annually were attributed to these agents alone. Many estimates followed, some much more conservative. For example, Doll and Peto estimated that 15% of lung cancer in men and 5% in women could be attributed to occupational exposures. A number of population-based case-control studies also provide relevant estimates. In a recent literature review, Vineis and Simonato cited attributable risk estimates for occupation and lung cancer that ranged from 4% to 40%; for asbestos alone, the estimates ranged from 1% to 5%. These estimates would be expected to vary across locations and over time. Nevertheless, these recent estimates indicate that occupation remains an important cause of lung cancer. Approaches to Prevention. Prevention of lung cancer mortality among workers exposed to agents or industrial processes that cause lung cancer may involve several strategies, including eliminating or reducing exposures, smoking cessation, screening, and chemo-prevention. For example, changes in industrial processes that have eliminated or reduced exposures to chloromethyl ethers and nickel compounds have provided evidence of reduced risk of lung cancer following these changes. Although occupational exposures are important causes of lung cancer, cigarette smoking is the most important preventable cause of lung cancer. For adults, the work site offers an important location to target smoking cessation efforts. In fact, the work site may be the only place to reach many smokers.

  4. Resolving Seamounts in Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, K. M.; Smith, W. H.

    2006-12-01

    We have examined three factors influencing the use of satellite altimeter data to map seamounts and guyots in the deep ocean: (1) the resolution of seamount and guyot gravity anomalies by altimetry; (2) the non-linearity of the relationship between gravity and bathymetry; and (3) the homogeneity of the mass density within the seamount or guyot. When altimeter data are used to model the marine gravity anomaly field the result may have limited resolution due to noise levels in the altimeter data, track spacing of the satellite profiles, inclination angles of the orbits, and filters used to combine and interpolate the data (Sandwell and Smith, JGR, 1997). We compared the peak-to-trough amplitude of gravity anomalies in Sandwell and Smith`'s version 15.1 field to peak-to-trough amplitudes measured by gravimeters on board ships. The satellite gravity field amplitudes match ship measurements well over seamounts and guyots having volumes exceeding ~2000 km3. Over smaller volume seamounts, where the anomalies have most of their power at quite short wavelengths, the satellite field under-estimates the anomaly amplitude. If less filtering could be done, or a new mission with a lower noise level were flown, more of the anomalies associated with small seamounts might be resolved. Smith and Sandwell (Science, 1997) predicted seafloor topography from altimetric gravity assuming that the density of seafloor topography is nearly constant over ~100 km distances, and that the relationship between gravity and topography may be approximated by a liner filter over those distances. In fact, the true theoretical relationship is non-linear (Parker, Geophys. J. R. astr. Soc, 1972); it can be expressed as an N-th order expansion, with the N=1 term representing a linear filter and the N>1 terms accounting for higher-order corrections. We find that N=2 is a sufficient approximation at both seamounts and guyots. Constant density models of large volume guyots do not fit the observed gravity

  5. Lung alveolar wall disruption in three-dimensional space identified using second-harmonic generation and multiphoton excitation fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Thomas; Hogg, James

    2010-02-01

    Second harmonic generation and multiphoton excited fluorescence microscopy methods were used to examine structural remodeling of the extracellular matrix in human lung alveolar walls undergoing emphysematous destruction. Fresh lung samples removed from a patient undergoing lung transplantation for very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were compared to similar samples from an unused donor lung that served as a control. The generated spatially resolved 3D images show the spatial distribution of collagen, elastin and other endogenously fluorescent tissue components such as macrophages. In the case of control lung tissue, we found well ordered alveolar walls with composite type structure made up of collagen matrix and relatively fine elastic fibers. In contrast, lung tissue undergoing emphysematous destruction was highly disorganized with increased alveolar wall thickness compared to control lung tissue.

  6. Lung Cancer Screening Update.

    PubMed

    Ruchalski, Kathleen L; Brown, Kathleen

    2016-07-01

    Since the release of the US Preventive Services Task Force and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recommendations for lung cancer screening, low-dose chest computed tomography screening has moved from the research arena to clinical practice. Lung cancer screening programs must reach beyond image acquisition and interpretation and engage in a multidisciplinary effort of clinical shared decision-making, standardization of imaging and nodule management, smoking cessation, and patient follow-up. Standardization of radiologic reports and nodule management will systematize patient care, provide quality assurance, further reduce harm, and contain health care costs. Although the National Lung Screening Trial results and eligibility criteria of a heavy smoking history are the foundation for the standard guidelines for low-dose chest computed tomography screening in the United States, currently only 27% of patients diagnosed with lung cancer would meet US lung cancer screening recommendations. Current and future efforts must be directed to better delineate those patients who would most benefit from screening and to ensure that the benefits of screening reach all socioeconomic strata and racial and ethnic minorities. Further optimization of lung cancer screening program design and patient eligibility will assure that lung cancer screening benefits will outweigh the potential risks to our patients. PMID:27306387

  7. Sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury in mice: Implications for acute and chronic lung disease in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Lingappan, Krithika; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Couroucli, Xanthi I.; Barrios, Roberto; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2013-10-15

    Sex-specific differences in pulmonary morbidity in humans are well documented. Hyperoxia contributes to lung injury in experimental animals and humans. The mechanisms responsible for sex differences in the susceptibility towards hyperoxic lung injury remain largely unknown. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that mice will display sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury. Eight week-old male and female mice (C57BL/6J) were exposed to 72 h of hyperoxia (FiO{sub 2} > 0.95). After exposure to hyperoxia, lung injury, levels of 8-iso-prostaglandin F{sub 2} alpha (8-iso-PGF 2α) (LC–MS/MS), apoptosis (TUNEL) and inflammatory markers (suspension bead array) were determined. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A expression in the lung was assessed using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. After exposure to hyperoxia, males showed greater lung injury, neutrophil infiltration and apoptosis, compared to air-breathing controls than females. Pulmonary 8-iso-PGF 2α levels were higher in males than females after hyperoxia exposure. Sexually dimorphic increases in levels of IL-6 (F > M) and VEGF (M > F) in the lungs were also observed. CYP1A1 expression in the lung was higher in female mice compared to males under hyperoxic conditions. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that male mice are more susceptible than females to hyperoxic lung injury and that differences in inflammatory and oxidative stress markers contribute to these sex-specific dimorphic effects. In conclusion, this paper describes the establishment of an animal model that shows sex differences in hyperoxic lung injury in a temporal manner and thus has important implications for lung diseases mediated by hyperoxia in humans. - Highlights: • Male mice were more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury than females. • Sex differences in inflammatory markers were observed. • CYP1A expression was higher in females after hyperoxia exposure.

  8. Lung Cell Oxidant Injury

    PubMed Central

    Suttorp, Norbert; Simon, Lawrence M.

    1982-01-01

    The oxidant damage of lung tissue during in vivo hyperoxic exposure appears to be amplified by neutrophils that release toxic amounts of oxygen metabolites. In our studies cloned lung epithelial cells (L2 cells), lung fibroblasts, and pulmonary artery endothelial cells were cultured under either ambient (Po2 ∼ 140 torr) or hyperoxic (Po2 ∼ 630 torr) conditions for 48 h (24 h for endothelial cells). After cultivation, phorbol myristate acetate- or opsonized zymosan-stimulated neutrophils were added to the cultivated monolayers for 4 h, and lung cell damage was quantitated using 51Cr release as an index. The data show that stimulated neutrophils are able to injure the three lung cell lines tested, with endothelial cells being highly susceptible to this injury and L2 cells being slightly more susceptible than lung fibroblasts. The studies also demonstrate that all three lung cell lines exposed to sustained hyperoxia are more susceptible to neutrophil-mediated cytotoxicity than their time-matched air controls. Hydrogen peroxide was the main toxic oxygen metabolite because catalase (2,500 U/ml) completely protected the target cells. Equivalent quantities of hydrogen peroxide generated by glucose oxidase instead of by neutrophils gave a similar degree of target cell injury. Superoxide dismutase at high concentrations (250 μg/ml) provided some protection. Other systems that detoxify oxygen metabolites were without protective effect. These findings indicate that the increase in susceptibility of lung cells to neutrophil-mediated oxidant damage is a toxic effect of hyperoxia on lung cells. This specific manifestation of oxygen damage provides insight into the integration between primary mechanisms (oxygen exposure) and secondary mechanisms (release of oxygen metabolites by neutrophils) with respect to the cellular basis for pulmonary oxygen toxicity. PMID:6284800

  9. Computational model of OCT in lung tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, David C.; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2010-02-01

    Lung research may have significant impact on human health. As two examples, recovery from collapse of the alveoli and the severe post surgery declines in forced vital capacity in patients under the effects of anesthesia are both poorly understood. Optical imaging is important to lung research for its inherently high resolution. Microscopy and color imaging are fundamentals of medicine, but interior lung tissue is usually viewed either endoscopically or ex vivo, stained slices. Techniques such as confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) have become increasingly popular in medical imaging because of their sectioning and depth penetration. Since OCT has the ability to achieve higher depth penetration than confocal it is more widely used in lung imaging, despite the difficulty of interpreting the images due to the poor numerical aperture (NA). To understand light propagation through the highly reflective and refractive surfaces of the lung, we developed a Finite-Difference Time Domain (FDTD) simulation. FDTD solves a discrete approximation to Maxwell's equations. Initial simulations have shown that structure up to 30 - 40μm below the surface is clearly visible. Deeper structures are hard to interpret, because of light scattering, compounded by speckle associated with coherent detection. Further simulations and experimental imaging may lead to improved collection and processing of images at deeper levels.

  10. Lensless single-exposure super-resolved interferometric microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granero, Luis; Ferreira, Carlos; García, Javier; Micó, Vicente

    2013-04-01

    Single Exposure Super Resolved Interferometric Microscopy (SESRIM) has been recently proposed as a way to achieve one dimensional super resolved imaging in digital holographic microscopy. SESRIM uses Red-Green-Blue (RGB) multiplexing for illuminating the sample having different propagation angles for each one of the three illumination wavelengths and it has been experimentally validated considering color (A. Calabuig, V. Mico, J. Garcia, Z. Zalevsky, and C. Ferreira, "Single-exposure super-resolved interferometric microscopy by red-green-blue multiplexing," Opt. Lett. 36, 885-887, 2011) and monochrome (A. Calabuig, J. Garcia, C. Ferreira, Z. Zalevsky, and V. Mico, "Resolution improvement by single-exposure superresolved interferometric microscopy with a monochrome sensor," J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 28, 2346-2358, 2011) digital sensors for holographic recording. In this contribution, we will first review some of the characteristics of the previously reported SESRIM approaches and second, we will present preliminary results for the extension of SESRIM to the field of lensless holographic microscopy. Experimental results are reported validating this new kind of superresolution imaging method named as lensless SESRIM (L-SESRIM).

  11. Risks of Lung Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Treatment Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Lung cancer is ... non- skin cancer in the United States. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and in women. ...

  12. Bioengineering Lungs for Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Sarah E; Charest, Jonathan M; Ren, Xi; Ott, Harald C

    2016-05-01

    Whole lung extracellular matrix scaffolds can be created by perfusion of cadaveric organs with decellularizing detergents, providing a platform for organ regeneration. Lung epithelial engineering must address both the proximal airway cells that function to metabolize toxins and aid mucociliary clearance and the distal pneumocytes that facilitate gas exchange. Engineered pulmonary vasculature must support in vivo blood perfusion with low resistance and intact barrier function and be antithrombotic. Repopulating the native lung matrix with sufficient cell numbers in appropriate anatomic locations is required to enable organ function. PMID:27112255

  13. Microgravity and the lung

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, John B.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented from studies of the effect of microgravity on the lungs of rats flown on the Cosmos 2044 mission, and from relevant laboratory experiments. The effects of microgravity fall into five categories: topographical structure and function, the lung volumes and mechanics, the intrathoracic blood pressures and volumes, the pulmonary deposition of aerosol, and denitrogenaton during EVA. The ultrastructure of the left lungs of rats flown for 14 days on the Cosmos 2044 spacecraft and that of some tail-suspended rats disclosed presence of red blood cells in the alveolar spaces, indicating that pulmonary hemorrhage and pulmonary edema occurred in these rats. Possible causes for this phenomenon are discussed.

  14. Lung Disease and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Imaizumi, Yuki; Eguchi, Kazuo; Kario, Kazuomi

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients are at a high risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. Airflow limitation is a predictor of future risks of hypertension and cardiovascular events. COPD is now understood as a systemic inflammatory disease, with the focus on inflammation of the lungs. An association between inflammation and sympathetic overactivity has also been reported. In this article, we review the association between chronic lung disease and the risks of hypertension, cardiovascular morbidity, the underlying mechanisms, and the therapeutic approach to hypertension and cardiovascular diseases in patients with lung diseases. PMID:26587450

  15. Radiation effects in the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Coggle, J E; Lambert, B E; Moores, S R

    1986-01-01

    This article outlines the principles of radiobiology that can explain the time of onset, duration, and severity of the complex reactions of the lung to ionizing radiation. These reactions have been assayed biochemically, cell kinetically, physiologically, and pathologically. Clinical and experimental data are used to describe the acute and late reactions of the lung to both external and internal radiation including pneumonitis, fibrosis and carcinogenesis. Acute radiation pneumonitis, which can be fatal, develops in both humans and animals within 6 months of exposure to doses greater than or equal to 8 Gy of low LET radiation. It is divisible into a latent period lasting up to 4 weeks; an exudative phase (3-8 weeks) and with an acute pneumonitic phase between 2 and 6 months. The latter is an inflammatory reaction with intra-alveolar and septal edema accompanied by epithelial and endothelial desquamation. The critical role of type II pneumonocytes is discussed. One favored hypothesis suggests that the primary response of the lung is an increase in microvascular permeability. The plasma proteins overwhelm the lymphatic and other drainage mechanisms and this elicits the secondary response of type II cell hyperplasia. This, in its turn, produces an excess of surfactant that ultimately causes the fall in compliance, abnormal gas exchange values, and even respiratory failure. The inflammatory early reaction may progress to chronic fibrosis. There is much evidence to suggest that pneumonitis is an epithelial reaction and some evidence to suggest that this early damage may not be predictive of late fibrosis. However, despite detailed work on collagen metabolism, the pathogenesis of radiation fibrosis remains unknown. The data on radiation-induced pulmonary cancer, both in man and experimental animals from both external and internal irradiation following the inhalation of both soluble and insoluble alpha and beta emitting radionuclides are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on

  16. A New Technique for Analysis of Static Eccentricity in Axial Flux Resolver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tootoonchian, F.; Abbaszadeh, K.; Ardebili, M.

    2012-01-01

    Resolvers have been widely used in motion control systems as position sensors. This paper deals with the analysis of Axial Flux Resolvers. Axial flux resolvers are a group of resolvers which can be used in high performance servomechanisms. The accuracy of resolver detected position is affected by errors. Some of these errors are caused by speed fluctuations, permeance ripples, unbalanced voltages, and eccentricity between rotor and stator. Among these errors the static eccentricity > and Lq values and then, the static eccentricity effect based on the developed model is studied. A novel algorithm is proposed for suppressing the eccentricity error. This method is based on analytical model and modern control fundamentals. In a comparison, simulation and experimental results show good agreement. Finally, the effect of air gap length, pole number and excitation voltage on position error of eccentric AFR is investigated, practically.

  17. Validating Excised Rodent Lungs for Functional Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lilburn, David M. L.; Hughes-Riley, Theodore; Six, Joseph S.; Stupic, Karl F.; Shaw, Dominick E.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Ex vivo rodent lung models are explored for physiological measurements of respiratory function with hyperpolarized (hp) 129Xe MRI. It is shown that excised lung models allow for simplification of the technical challenges involved and provide valuable physiological insights that are not feasible using in vivo MRI protocols. A custom designed breathing apparatus enables MR images of gas distribution on increasing ventilation volumes of actively inhaled hp 129Xe. Straightforward hp 129Xe MRI protocols provide residual lung volume (RV) data and permit for spatially resolved tracking of small hp 129Xe probe volumes during the inhalation cycle. Hp 129Xe MRI of lung function in the excised organ demonstrates the persistence of post mortem airway responsiveness to intravenous methacholine challenges. The presented methodology enables physiology of lung function in health and disease without additional regulatory approval requirements and reduces the technical and logistical challenges with hp gas MRI experiments. The post mortem lung functional data can augment histological measurements and should be of interest for drug development studies. PMID:24023683

  18. Cystic and nodular lung disease.

    PubMed

    Richards, J Caleb; Lynch, David A; Chung, Jonathan H

    2015-06-01

    Diffuse cystic and nodular lung diseases have characteristic imaging findings. The most common causes of cystic lung disease are lymphangioleiomyomatosis and Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Other less common cystic lung diseases include Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome, lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis, and light chain deposition disease. Computed tomography is used to differentiate cystic lung disease from emphysema, honeycombing, cavities, and bronchiectasis, which mimic cystic lung disease. Diffuse nodular lung disease are categorized as centrilobular, perilymphatic, and random types. In diffuse nodular lung disease, a specific diagnosis is achieved through a combination of history, physical examination, and imaging findings. PMID:26024606

  19. Overview of Clinical Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Jonathan C.; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2014-01-01

    Since the first successful lung transplant 30 years ago, lung transplantation has rapidly become an established standard of care to treat end-stage lung disease in selected patients. Advances in lung preservation, surgical technique, and immunosuppression regimens have resulted in the routine performance of lung transplantation around the world for an increasing number of patients, with wider indications. Despite this, donor shortages and chronic lung allograft dysfunction continue to prevent lung transplantation from reaching its full potential. With research into the underlying mechanisms of acute and chronic lung graft dysfunction and advances in personalized diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to both the donor lung and the lung transplant recipient, there is increasing confidence that we will improve short- and long-term outcomes in the near future. PMID:24384816

  20. Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis resolves spontaneously if dense scars are not formed

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, J.A.; Diel, J.H.; Slauson, D.O.; Halliwell, W.H.; Mauderly, J.L.

    1983-02-01

    The relation of static compliance of excised lungs to collagen accumulation and histologic fibrosis was examined in Syrian hamsters inhaling sufficient /sup 238/PuO2 particles to achieve initial lung burdens of 50 or 100 nCi. Control animals were exposed to nonradioactive aerosols. Irradiated lungs from hamsters at both dose levels had compliance reduced to the same extent at point of maximal reduction. However, collagen accumulation was more closely related to /sup 238/Pu exposure level than the compliance measurements. Histologic examination revealed both diffuse alveolar thickening and some dense fibrous scars, the former predominating at lower dose levels. Hamsters exposed to 50 nCi /sup 238/PuO2 showed normal collagen content and static lung compliance with minimal histologic fibrosis 288 days after exposure. In contrast, hamsters exposed to 100 nCi had significant pulmonary fibrosis at that time and the highest incidence of dense scars at any time period. Such findings are consistent with a stiffening of lung parenchyma. They suggest that the diffuse interstitial fibrosis developed by this injury resolves spontaneously; dense fibrous scars, however, do not.

  1. Preclinical models for interrogating drug action in human cancers using Stable Isotope Resolved Metabolomics (SIRM)

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Andrew N.; Higashi, Richard M.; Fan, Teresa W-M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims In this review we compare the advantages and disadvantages of different model biological systems for determining the metabolic functions of cells in complex environments, how they may change in different disease states, and respond to therapeutic interventions. Background All preclinical drug-testing models have advantages and drawbacks. We compare and contrast established cell, organoid and animal models with ex vivo organ or tissue culture and in vivo human experiments in the context of metabolic readout of drug efficacy. As metabolism reports directly on the biochemical state of cells and tissues, it can be very sensitive to drugs and/or other environmental changes. This is especially so when metabolic activities are probed by stable isotope tracing methods, which can also provide detailed mechanistic information on drug action. We have developed and been applying Stable Isotope-Resolved Metabolomics (SIRM) to examine metabolic reprogramming of human lung cancer cells in monoculture, in mouse xenograft/explant models, and in lung cancer patients in situ (Lane et al. 2011; T. W. Fan et al. 2011; T. W-M. Fan et al. 2012; T. W. Fan et al. 2012; Xie et al. 2014b; Ren et al. 2014a; Sellers et al. 2015b). We are able to determine the influence of the tumor microenvironment using these models. We have now extended the range of models to fresh human tissue slices, similar to those originally described by O. Warburg (Warburg 1923), which retain the native tissue architecture and heterogeneity with a paired benign versus cancer design under defined cell culture conditions. This platform offers an unprecedented human tissue model for preclinical studies on metabolic reprogramming of human cancer cells in their tissue context, and response to drug treatment (Xie et al. 2014a). As the microenvironment of the target human tissue is retained and individual patient's response to drugs is obtained, this platform promises to transcend current limitations of drug selection

  2. Four-phase differential phase shift resolver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, P. M.; Wallingford, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    Two systems have been developed to resolve phase uncertainty without transmitting reference signals. In both methods signal is impressed on carrier as differential, rather than absolute, phase shift. At the receiver four-phase demodulation and logic process unambiguously resolves differential phase shift of input carrier.

  3. Helping You Buy: Link Resolver Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Ross

    2006-01-01

    To any library with an electronic collection of any significance, the OpenURL link resolver has (or should) become an indispensable service for helping its users retrieve full text from citations. Although they are a relatively new technology (in library terms, at any rate), link resolvers arguably have become as important as the OPAC; they locate…

  4. Spatially resolved scatter measurement of diffractive micromirror arrays.

    PubMed

    Sicker, Cornelius; Heber, Jörg; Berndt, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    Spatial light modulators (SLMs) support flexible system concepts in modern optics and especially phase-only SLMs such as micromirror arrays (MMAs) appear attractive for many applications. In order to achieve a precise phase modulation, which is crucial for optical performance, careful characterization and calibration of SLM devices is required. We examine an intensity-based measurement concept, which promises distinct advantages by means of a spatially resolved scatter measurement that is combined with the MMA's diffractive principle. Measurements yield quantitative results, which are consistent with measurements of micromirror roughness components, by white-light interferometry. They reveal relative scatter as low as 10-4, which corresponds to contrast ratios up to 10,000. The potential of the technique to resolve phase changes in the subnanometer range is experimentally demonstrated. PMID:27411205

  5. Resolving fundamental limits of adhesive bonding in microfabrication.

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Jessica S.; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Emerson, John Allen; Adkins, Douglas Ray; Kent, Michael Stuart; Read, Douglas H.; Giunta, Rachel Knudsen; Lamppa, Kerry P.; Kawaguchi, Stacie; Holmes, Melissa A.

    2004-04-01

    As electronic and optical components reach the micro- and nanoscales, efficient assembly and packaging require the use of adhesive bonds. This work focuses on resolving several fundamental issues in the transition from macro- to micro- to nanobonding. A primary issue is that, as bondline thicknesses decrease, knowledge of the stability and dewetting dynamics of thin adhesive films is important to obtain robust, void-free adhesive bonds. While researchers have studied dewetting dynamics of thin films of model, non-polar polymers, little experimental work has been done regarding dewetting dynamics of thin adhesive films, which exhibit much more complex behaviors. In this work, the areas of dispensing small volumes of viscous materials, capillary fluid flow, surface energetics, and wetting have all been investigated. By resolving these adhesive-bonding issues, we are allowing significantly smaller devices to be designed and fabricated. Simultaneously, we are increasing the manufacturability and reliability of these devices.

  6. Time-resolved PIV measurements of the flow field in a stenosed, compliant arterial model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geoghegan, P. H.; Buchmann, N. A.; Soria, J.; Jermy, M. C.

    2013-05-01

    Compliant (flexible) structures play an important role in several biological flows including the lungs, heart and arteries. Coronary heart disease is caused by a constriction in the artery due to a build-up of atherosclerotic plaque. This plaque is also of major concern in the carotid artery which supplies blood to the brain. Blood flow within these arteries is strongly influenced by the movement of the wall. To study these problems experimentally in vitro, especially using flow visualisation techniques, can be expensive due to the high-intensity and high-repetition rate light sources required. In this work, time-resolved particle image velocimetry using a relatively low-cost light-emitting diode illumination system was applied to the study of a compliant flow phantom representing a stenosed (constricted) carotid artery experiencing a physiologically realistic flow wave. Dynamic similarity between in vivo and in vitro conditions was ensured in phantom construction by matching the distensibility and the elastic wave propagation wavelength and in the fluid system through matching Reynolds ( Re) and Womersley number ( α) with a maximum, minimum and mean Re of 939, 379 and 632, respectively, and a α of 4.54. The stenosis had a symmetric constriction of 50 % by diameter (75 % by area). Once the flow rate reached a critical value, Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities were observed to occur in the shear layer between the main jet exiting the stenosis and a reverse flow region that occurred at a radial distance of 0.34 D from the axis of symmetry in the region on interest 0-2.5 D longitudinally downstream from the stenosis exit. The instability had an axis-symmetric nature, but as peak flow rate was approached this symmetry breaks down producing instability in the flow field. The characteristics of the vortex train were sensitive not only to the instantaneous flow rate, but also to whether the flow was accelerating or decelerating globally.

  7. A MALDI-MSI Approach to the Characterization of Radiation-Induced Lung Injury and Medical Countermeasure Development.

    PubMed

    Carter, Claire L; Jones, Jace W; Barrow, Kory; Kieta, Kaitlyn; Taylor-Howell, Cheryl; Kearney, Sean; Smith, Cassandra P; Gibbs, Allison; Farese, Ann M; MacVittie, Thomas J; Kane, Maureen A

    2015-11-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury is highly complex and characterized by multiple pathologies, which occur over time and sporadically throughout the lung. This complexity makes biomarker investigations and medical countermeasure screenings challenging. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) has the ability to resolve differences spatially in molecular profiles within the lung following radiation exposure and can aid in biomarker identification and pharmaceutical efficacy investigations. MALDI-MSI was applied to the investigation of a whole-thorax lung irradiation model in non-human primates (NHP) for lipidomic analysis and medical countermeasure distribution. PMID:26425906

  8. The Lung Alveolar Lipofibroblast: An Evolutionary Strategy Against Neonatal Hyperoxic Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Torday, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxygen, the main mode of support for premature infants with immature lungs, can cause toxicity by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) that disrupt homeostasis; yet, these same molecules were entrained to promote vertebrate lung phylogeny. By providing a deeper understanding of this paradox, we propose physiologically rational strategies to prevent chronic lung disease (CLD) of prematurity. Recent Advances: To prevent neonatal hyperoxic lung damage biologically, we have exploited the alveolar defense mechanism(s) that evolutionarily evolved to combat increased atmospheric oxygen during the vertebrate water to land transition. Critical Issues: Over the course of vertebrate lung evolution, ROS promoted the formation of lipofibroblasts, specialized adepithelial cells, which protect the alveoli against oxidant injury; peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), the master switch for lipofibroblast differentiation, prevents such oxidant lung injury, both by directly promoting mesodermal differentiation and its antioxidant defenses, and indirectly by stimulating the developmental epithelial–mesenchymal paracrine interactions that have physiologically determined lung surfactant production in accord with the lung's phylogenetic adaptation to atmospheric oxygen, preventing Respiratory Distress Syndrome at birth. Future Directions: The molecular strategy (PPARγ agonists) to prevent CLD of prematurity, proposed by us, although seems to be robust, effective, and safe under experimental conditions, it awaits detailed pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies for its safe and effective clinical translation to human infants. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1893–1904. “I have procured air [oxygen]…between five and six times as good as the best common air that I have ever met with.” —Joseph Priestley, 1775 PMID:24386954

  9. Abscess in the Lungs

    MedlinePlus

    ... abscesses are streptococci and staphylococci, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which is a serious infection. Obstruction ... night sweats. In contrast, lung abscesses caused by Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA can be fatal within days, ...

  10. 7. Immunologic lung disease.

    PubMed

    Greenberger, Paul A

    2008-02-01

    The lung is an extremely complex organ and participates in initial responses to inhaled antigens, infectious agents, and irritants or as a response to exposure through the oral, parenteral, or transdermal routes. There can be constriction of the airways or involvement or even destruction of the lung parenchyma, depending on the condition. This review focuses on selected aspects of the pulmonary innate and adaptive immune responses; the new condition World Trade Center cough, which can cause an asthma-like presentation and resemble reactive airways dysfunction syndrome; and the diagnosis and treatment of various immunologic lung conditions. Innate immune responses occur in the acute respiratory distress syndrome and in transfusion-related acute lung injury. Adaptive immune responses involve specialized mucosal and systemic immune responses, lymphocytes, and antibodies and can result in CD4+ TH1 and TH2 phenotypes, such as TH1 for tuberculosis and TH2 for asthma. PMID:18241689

  11. Interstitial lung disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the chest Working with or around asbestos, coal dust, cotton dust, and silica dust (called occupational ... routinely screened for lung disease. These jobs include coal mining, sand blasting, and working on a ship.

  12. Reflux and Lung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reflux and Lung Disease Proper Hydration Sodium Dangers Plant-Based Diets Why Breakfast Matters Patients & Visitors Giving For Professionals About Us Treatment & Programs Health Insights Doctors & Departments Research & Science Education & Training Make an Appointment Make a Donation ...

  13. Lung gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation in the lungs, most often due to sarcoidosis or a certain type of pneumonia. Normal Results ... up very little gallium. What Abnormal Results Mean Sarcoidosis Other respiratory infections, most often pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia ...

  14. Rheumatoid lung disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 65. Lake F, Proudman S. Rheumatoid arthritis and lung disease: from mechanisms to a practical approach. Semin Respir Crit Care Med . 2014;35:222-238. PMID: 24668537 www.ncbi.nlm.nih. ...

  15. Lung Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the breakdown of uranium in rocks and soil. It seeps up through the ground, and leaks ... substances increases the risk of lung cancer: Asbestos . Arsenic . Chromium. Nickel. Beryllium. Cadmium . Tar and soot. These ...

  16. Immunotherapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Steven, Antonius; Fisher, Scott A; Robinson, Bruce W

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of lung cancer remains a challenge, and lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Immunotherapy has previously failed in lung cancer but has recently emerged as a very effective new therapy, and there is now growing worldwide enthusiasm in cancer immunotherapy. We summarize why immune checkpoint blockade therapies have generated efficacious and durable responses in clinical trials and why this has reignited interest in this field. Cancer vaccines have also been explored in the past with marginal success. Identification of optimal candidate neoantigens may improve cancer vaccine efficacy and may pave the way to personalized immunotherapy, alone or in combination with other immunotherapy such as immune checkpoint blockade. Understanding the steps in immune recognition and eradication of cancer cells is vital to understanding why previous immunotherapies failed and how current therapies can be used optimally. We hold an optimistic view for the future prospect in lung cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27101251

  17. Women and Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Horrigan Conners Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, April, ... Lung Cancer in Women: The Differences in Epidemiology, Biology and Treatment Outcomes, Maria Patricia Rivera MD Expert ...

  18. [Hypoxic lung failure].

    PubMed

    David, S; Wiesner, O

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxic lung failure is among the major indications for patients' referral to intensive care units either for surveillance or if necessary therapy. There are a vast number of pathophysiological causes of lung failure and the optimal treatment highly depends on the underlying pathology; therefore, no standard algorithm exists. So-called acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) represents a very severe manifestation of hypoxemic lung failure that is of particular relevance for intensivists and is therefore the focus of this review. In addition to fundamental pathophysiology of lung injury, the article also focuses on established and modern treatment strategies. Moreover, we will briefly highlight innovative concepts of ARDS treatment that might become relevant in the future. PMID:27084180

  19. Biomarkers of Lung Injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unlike the hepatic, cardiovascular, nervous, or excretory organ systems, where there .ls a strong contribution of host factors or extracellular biochemical milieu in causing organ damage, the causes of lung injuries and subsequent diseases are primarily from direct environmental ...

  20. Lungs and Respiratory System

    MedlinePlus

    ... called alveoli, where the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide actually takes place. Each lung houses about 300- ... growth. Without oxygen, the body's cells would die. Carbon dioxide is the waste gas produced when carbon is ...

  1. What Are the Lungs?

    MedlinePlus

    ... oxygen from the air. They also help remove carbon dioxide (a waste gas that can be toxic) from ... The lungs' intake of oxygen and removal of carbon dioxide is called gas exchange. Gas exchange is part ...

  2. [Blast lung injuries].

    PubMed

    Clapson, P; Pasquier, P; Perez, J-P; Debien, B

    2010-09-01

    In armed conflicts and during terrorist attacks, explosive devices are a major cause of mortality. The lung is one of the organs most sensitive to blasts. Thus, today it is important that every GP at least knows the basics and practices regarding treatment of blast victims. We suggest, following a review of the explosions and an assessment of the current threats, detailing the lung injuries brought about by the explosions and the main treatments currently recommended. PMID:20933166

  3. Lung epinephrine synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, B.; Elayan, H.; Ziegler, M.G. )

    1990-04-01

    We studied in vitro and in vivo epinephrine (E) synthesis by rat lung. Nine days after removal of the adrenal medullas, circulating E was reduced to 7% of levels found in sham-operated rats but 30% of lung E remained. Treatment of demedullated rats with 6 hydroxydopamine plus reserpine did not further reduce lung E. In the presence of S-(3H)adenosylmethionine lung homogenates readily N-methylated norepinephrine (NE) to form (3H)E. The rate of E synthesis by lung homogenates was progressively more rapid with increasing NE up to a concentration of 3 mM, above which it declined. The rate of E formation was optimal at an incubation pH of 8 and at temperatures of approximately 55 degrees C. We compared the E-forming enzyme(s) of lung homogenates with those of adrenal and cardiac ventricle. The adrenal contains mainly phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT), which is readily inhibited by SKF 29661 and methylates dopamine (DA) very poorly. Cardiac ventricles contain mainly nonspecific N-methyltransferase (NMT), which is poorly inhibited by SKF 29661 and readily methylates both DA and NE. Lung homogenates were inhibited by SKF 29661 about half as well as adrenal but more than ventricle. We used the rate of E formation from NE as an index of PNMT-like activity and deoxyepinephrine synthesis from DA as an index of NMT-like activity. PNMT and NMT activity in rat lung homogenates were not correlated with each other, displayed different responses to change in temperature, and were affected differently by glucocorticoids.

  4. Immunotherapy in lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Moundhri, M.; O'Brien, M.; Souberbielle, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    More research and new treatment options are needed in all stages of lung cancer. To this end immunotherapy needs a revival in view of recent improved technologies and greater understanding of the underlying biology. In this review we discuss mechanisms of tumour immunotherapy, non-specific, specific and adoptive, with particular reference to a direct therapeutic action on all subtypes of lung cancer. PMID:9703271

  5. Chemoprevention of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Keith, Robert L

    2009-04-15

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, and the majority of diagnoses are made in former smokers. While avoidance of tobacco abuse and smoking cessation clearly will have the greatest impact on lung cancer development, effective chemoprevention could prove to be more effective than treatment of established disease. Chemoprevention is the use of dietary or pharmaceutical agents to reverse or inhibit the carcinogenic process and has been successfully applied to common malignancies other than lung. Despite previous studies in lung cancer chemoprevention failing to identify effective agents, our ability to determine higher risk populations and the understanding of lung tumor and pre-malignant biology continues to advance. Additional biomarkers of risk continue to be investigated and validated. The World Health Organization/International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer classification for lung cancer now recognizes distinct histologic lesions that can be reproducibly graded as precursors of non-small cell lung cancer. For example, carcinogenesis in the bronchial epithelium starts with normal epithelium and progresses through hyperplasia, metaplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ to invasive squamous cell cancer. Similar precursor lesions exist for adenocarcinoma, and these pre-malignant lesions are targeted by chemopreventive agents in current and future trials. At this time, chemopreventive agents can only be recommended as part of well-designed clinical trials, and multiple trials are currently in progress and additional trials are in the planning stages. This review will discuss the principles of chemoprevention, summarize the completed trials, and discuss ongoing and potential future trials with a focus on targeted pathways. PMID:19349487

  6. [Pathology of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Theegarten, D; Hager, T

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and the second most frequent cause in women. The pathology of lung tumors is of special relevance concerning therapy and prognosis and current classification systems have to be taken into consideration. The results of molecular tissue subtyping allow further classification and therapeutic options. The histological entities are mainly associated with typical X‑ray morphological features. PMID:27495784

  7. [Lobectomy for lung cancer using the Da Vinci surgical system].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroshige

    2014-05-01

    Robot-assisted surgery using the da Vinci surgical system has attracted attention because of excellent operability without shaking by joint forceps under the clear vision of a three-dimensional high-definition camera in lung cancer surgery. Although this form of advanced medical care is not yet approved for insurance coverage, it is at the stage of clinical research and expected to be useful in hilar exposure, lymph node dissection, and suturing of the lung parenchyma or bronchus. Lung cancer surgery with the da Vinci system has the advantage of combining thoracotomy and minimally invasive surgery in video-assisted thoracic surgery. However, safety management, education, and significant cost are problems to be resolved. Several important issues such as sharing knowledge and technology of robotic surgery, education, training, development of new instruments, and acquisition of advanced medical insurance are discussed for the future development of robotic surgical systems. PMID:24946522

  8. Photon-number-resolved detection of photon-subtracted thermal light.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yanhua; Becerra, Francisco E; Glebov, Boris L; Wen, Jianming; Lita, Adriana E; Calkins, Brice; Gerrits, Thomas; Fan, Jingyun; Nam, Sae Woo; Migdall, Alan

    2013-07-01

    We examine the photon statistics of photon-subtracted thermal light using photon-number-resolved detection. We demonstrate experimentally that the photon number distribution transforms from a Bose-Einstein distribution to a Poisson distribution as the number of subtracted photons increases. We also show that second- and higher-order photon correlation functions can be directly determined from the photon-number-resolved detection measurements of a single optical beam. PMID:23811867

  9. Radiation-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Rosiello, R.A.; Merrill, W.W. )

    1990-03-01

    The use of radiation therapy is limited by the occurrence of the potentially fatal clinical syndromes of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Radiation pneumonitis usually becomes clinically apparent from 2 to 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. It is characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, and alveolar infiltrates on chest roentgenogram and may be difficult to differentiate from infection or recurrent malignancy. The pathogenesis is uncertain, but appears to involve both direct lung tissue toxicity and an inflammatory response. The syndrome may resolve spontaneously or may progress to respiratory failure. Corticosteroids may be effective therapy if started early in the course of the disease. The time course for the development of radiation fibrosis is later than that for radiation pneumonitis. It is usually present by 1 year following irradiation, but may not become clinically apparent until 2 years after radiation therapy. It is characterized by the insidious onset of dyspnea on exertion. It most often is mild, but can progress to chronic respiratory failure. There is no known successful treatment for this condition. 51 references.

  10. Lung models: strengths and limitations.

    PubMed

    Martonen, T B; Musante, C J; Segal, R A; Schroeter, J D; Hwang, D; Dolovich, M A; Burton, R; Spencer, R M; Fleming, J S

    2000-06-01

    The most widely used particle dosimetry models are those proposed by the National Council on Radiation Protection, International Commission for Radiological Protection, and the Netherlands National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (the RIVM model). Those models have inherent problems that may be regarded as serious drawbacks: for example, they are not physiologically realistic. They ignore the presence and commensurate effects of naturally occurring structural elements of lungs (eg, cartilaginous rings, carinal ridges), which have been demonstrated to affect the motion of inhaled air. Most importantly, the surface structures have been shown to influence the trajectories of inhaled particles transported by air streams. Thus, the model presented herein by Martonen et al may be perhaps the most appropriate for human lung dosimetry. In its present form, the model's major "strengths" are that it could be used for diverse purposes in medical research and practice, including: to target the delivery of drugs for diseases of the respiratory tract (eg, cystic fibrosis, asthma, bronchogenic carcinoma); to selectively deposit drugs for systemic distribution (eg, insulin); to design clinical studies; to interpret scintigraphy data from human subject exposures; to determine laboratory conditions for animal testing (ie, extrapolation modeling); and to aid in aerosolized drug delivery to children (pediatric medicine). Based on our research, we have found very good agreement between the predictions of our model and the experimental data of Heyder et al, and therefore advocate its use in the clinical arena. In closing, we would note that for the simulations reported herein the data entered into our computer program were the actual conditions of the Heyder et al experiments. However, the deposition model is more versatile and can simulate many aerosol therapy scenarios. For example, the core model has many computer subroutines that can be enlisted to simulate the

  11. Lung Parenchymal Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Suki, Béla; Stamenovic, Dimitrije; Hubmayr, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    The lung parenchyma comprises a large number of thin-walled alveoli, forming an enormous surface area, which serves to maintain proper gas exchange. The alveoli are held open by the transpulmonary pressure, or prestress, which is balanced by tissues forces and alveolar surface film forces. Gas exchange efficiency is thus inextricably linked to three fundamental features of the lung: parenchymal architecture, prestress, and the mechanical properties of the parenchyma. The prestress is a key determinant of lung deformability that influences many phenomena including local ventilation, regional blood flow, tissue stiffness, smooth muscle contractility, and alveolar stability. The main pathway for stress transmission is through the extracellular matrix. Thus, the mechanical properties of the matrix play a key role both in lung function and biology. These mechanical properties in turn are determined by the constituents of the tissue, including elastin, collagen, and proteoglycans. In addition, the macroscopic mechanical properties are also influenced by the surface tension and, to some extent, the contractile state of the adherent cells. This article focuses on the biomechanical properties of the main constituents of the parenchyma in the presence of prestress and how these properties define normal function or change in disease. An integrated view of lung mechanics is presented and the utility of parenchymal mechanics at the bedside as well as its possible future role in lung physiology and medicine are discussed. PMID:23733644

  12. Multiple cystic lung disease.

    PubMed

    Ferreira Francisco, Flavia Angélica; Soares Souza, Arthur; Zanetti, Gláucia; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-12-01

    Multiple cystic lung disease represents a diverse group of uncommon disorders that can present a diagnostic challenge due to the increasing number of diseases associated with this presentation. High-resolution computed tomography of the chest helps to define the morphological aspects and distribution of lung cysts, as well as associated findings. The combination of appearance upon imaging and clinical features, together with extrapulmonary manifestations, when present, permits confident and accurate diagnosis of the majority of these diseases without recourse to open-lung biopsy. The main diseases in this group that are discussed in this review are lymphangioleiomyomatosis, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis and folliculin gene-associated syndrome (Birt-Hogg-Dubé); other rare causes of cystic lung disease, including cystic metastasis of sarcoma, are also discussed. Disease progression is unpredictable, and understanding of the complications of cystic lung disease and their appearance during evolution of the disease are essential for management. Correlation of disease evolution and clinical context with chest imaging findings provides important clues for defining the underlying nature of cystic lung disease, and guides diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:26621970

  13. Lung parenchymal mechanics.

    PubMed

    Suki, Béla; Stamenović, Dimitrije; Hubmayr, Rolf

    2011-07-01

    The lung parenchyma comprises a large number of thin-walled alveoli, forming an enormous surface area, which serves to maintain proper gas exchange. The alveoli are held open by the transpulmonary pressure, or prestress, which is balanced by tissues forces and alveolar surface film forces. Gas exchange efficiency is thus inextricably linked to three fundamental features of the lung: parenchymal architecture, prestress, and the mechanical properties of the parenchyma. The prestress is a key determinant of lung deformability that influences many phenomena including local ventilation, regional blood flow, tissue stiffness, smooth muscle contractility, and alveolar stability. The main pathway for stress transmission is through the extracellular matrix. Thus, the mechanical properties of the matrix play a key role both in lung function and biology. These mechanical properties in turn are determined by the constituents of the tissue, including elastin, collagen, and proteoglycans. In addition, the macroscopic mechanical properties are also influenced by the surface tension and, to some extent, the contractile state of the adherent cells. This chapter focuses on the biomechanical properties of the main constituents of the parenchyma in the presence of prestress and how these properties define normal function or change in disease. An integrated view of lung mechanics is presented and the utility of parenchymal mechanics at the bedside as well as its possible future role in lung physiology and medicine are discussed. PMID:23733644

  14. Lung cancer in Australia.

    PubMed

    McLennan, G; Roder, D M

    1989-02-20

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death of cancer in Australian men and the third leading cause in Australian women. Efforts are being made to reduce the incidence of this disease by smoking-cessation programmes and improved industrial hygiene, and these measures need to be encouraged strongly by all sectors of the community. On a population basis, insufficient evidence is available to justify screening procedures for the early detection of lung cancer in "at-risk" groups. Cure is possible by surgical resection in early cases. Improvements in therapeutic results with traditional cancer treatments largely have reached a plateau, but a number of newer therapies, and combinations of standard therapies, currently are being evaluated. Of particular interest is concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy in localized non-small-cell lung cancer; laser "debulking" in conjunction with radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer, and biological response-modifying agents in non-small-cell and small-cell lung cancer. It is important that data be collected adequately to define epidemiological changes and to evaluate treatment results (including repeat bronchoscopy, to assess local control of tumour), and that the quality of life is recorded and reported in the evaluation process. Finally, phase-III studies in lung-cancer treatments require adequate numbers of subjects to enable meaningful conclusions to be achieve objectives within a reasonable study period. PMID:2469943

  15. Animal models of beryllium-induced lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, G.L.; Hoover, M.D.; Hahn, F.F.

    1996-10-01

    The Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) is conducting research to improve the understanding of chronic beryllium disease (CBD) and beryllium-induced lung cancer. Initial animal studies examined beagle dogs that inhaled BeO calcined at either 500 or 1000{degrees}C. At similar lung burdens, the 500{degrees}C BeO induced more severe and extensive granulomatous pneumonia, lymphocytic infiltration into the lung, and positive Be-specific lymphocyte proliferative responses in vitro than the 1000{degrees}C BeO. However, the progressive nature of human CBD was not duplicated. More recently, Strains A/J and C3H/HeJ mice were exposed to Be metal by inhalation. This produced a marked granulomatous pneumonia, diffuse infiltrates, and multifocal aggregates of interstitial lymphocytes with a pronounced T helper component and pulmonary in situ lymphocyte proliferation. With respect to lung cancer, at a mean lung burden as low as 17 pg Be/g lung, inhaled Be metal induced benign and/or malignant lung tumors in over 50% of male and female F344 rats surviving {ge}1 year on study. Substantial tumor multiplicity was found, but K-ras and p53 gene mutations were virtually absent. In mice, however, a lung burden of approximately 60 {mu}g ({approximately}300 {mu}g Be/g lung) caused only a slight increase in crude lung tumor incidence and multiplicity over controls in strain A/J mice and no elevated incidence in strain C3H mice. Taken together, this research program constitutes a coordinated effort to understand beryllium-induced lung disease in experimental animal models. 47 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Malignancies: Where Do We Stand?

    SciTech Connect

    Lencioni, Riccardo Crocetti, Laura; Cioni, Roberto; Mussi, Alfredo; Fontanini, Gabriella; Ambrogi, Marcello; Franchini, Chiara; Cioni, Dania; Fanucchi, Olivia; Gemignani, Raffaello; Baldassarri, Rubia; Angeletti, Carlo Alberto; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2004-11-15

    Percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation is a minimally invasive technique used to treat solid tumors. Because of its ability to produce large volumes of coagulation necrosis in a controlled fashion, this technique has gained acceptance as a viable therapeutic option for unresectable liver malignancies. Recently, investigation has been focused on the clinical application of RF ablation in the treatment of lung malignancies. In theory, lung tumors are well suited to RF ablation because the surrounding air in adjacent normal parenchyma provides an insulating effect, thus facilitating energy concentration within the tumor tissue. Experimental studies in rabbits have confirmed that lung RF ablation can be safely and effectively performed via a percutaneous, transthoracic approach, and have prompted the start of clinical investigation. Pilot clinical studies have shown that RF ablation enables successful treatment of relatively small lung malignancies with a high rate of complete response and acceptable morbidity, and have suggested that the technique could represent a viable alternate or complementary treatment method for patients with non-small cell lung cancer or lung metastases of favorable histotypes who are not candidates for surgical resection. This article gives an overview of lung RF ablation, discussing experimental animal findings, rationale for clinical application, technique and methodology, clinical results, and complications.

  17. Temperature Resolved 3-D Submillimeter Spectroscopy of Astronomical `WEEDs'.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortman, Sarah M.; Medvedev, Ivan R.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2009-06-01

    We have previously reported on the experimental spectroscopic approach that makes possible the calculation of lower state energy levels and transition strengths without the need for spectral assignment. Analysis of the temperature dependent measurements significantly improves the estimate of the lower state energy, recovered by division of temperature dependent spectral intensities. Also, this approach provides results both in the standard astronomical catalog form (frequency, line strength, lower state energy) and as experimental temperature dependent spectra. We are reporting on temperature resolved 3-D spectroscopy of ethyl cyanide -- a well known astronomical `weed'. "An experimental approach to the prediction of complete millimeter and submillimeter spectra at astrophysical temperatures: Applications to confusion-limited astrophysical observations," I. R. Medvedev and F. C. De Lucia, Ap. J. 656, 621-628 (2007).

  18. Long-Term Lung Transplantation in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama, A.; Tonsho, M.; Ng, C. Y.; Lee, S.; Millington, T.; Nadazdin, O.; Wain, J. C.; Cosimi, A. B.; Sachs, D. H.; Smith, R. N.; Colvin, R. B.; Kawai, T.; Madsen, J. C.; Benichou, G.; Allan, J. S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical technique and clinical care, lung transplantation still remains a short-term solution for the treatment of end-stage lung disease. To date, there has been limited experience in experimental lung transplantation using nonhuman primate models. Therefore, we have endeavored to develop a long-term, nonhuman primate model of orthotopic lung transplantation for the ultimate purpose of designing protocols to induce tolerance of lung grafts. Here, we report our initial results in developing this model and our observation that the nonhuman primate lung is particularly prone to rejection. This propensity toward rejection may be a consequence of 1) upregulated nonspecific inflammation, and 2) a larger number of pre-existing alloreactive memory T cells, leading to augmented deleterious immune responses. Our data show that triple-drug immunosuppression mimicking clinical practice is not sufficient to prevent acute rejection in nonhuman primate lung transplantation. The addition of horse-derived anti-thymocyte globulin and a monoclonal antibody to the IL-6 receptor allowed six out of six lung recipients to be free of rejection for over 120 days. PMID:25772308

  19. CXCR4 Blockade Attenuates Hyperoxia Induced Lung Injury in Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Shelley; Ramachandran, Shalini; Torres, Eneida; Huang, Jian; Hehre, Dorothy; Suguihara, Cleide; Young, Karen C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung inflammation is a key factor in the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and its receptor chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) modulate the inflammatory response. Whether antagonism of CXCR4 will alleviate lung inflammation in neonatal hyperoxia-induced lung injury is unknown. Objective To determine whether CXCR4 antagonism would attenuate lung injury in rodents with experimental BPD by decreasing pulmonary inflammation. Methods Newborn rats exposed to normoxia (RA) or hyperoxia (FiO2=0.9) from postnatal day 2 (P2)-P16 were randomized to receive the CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100 or placebo (PL) from P5 to P15. Lung alveolarization, angiogenesis, and inflammation were evaluated at P16. Results As compared to RA, hyperoxic-PL pups had a decrease in alveolarization, reduced lung vascular density and increased lung inflammation. In contrast, AMD3100-treated hyperoxic pups had improved alveolarization and increased angiogenesis. This improvement in lung structure was accompanied by a decrease in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid macrophage and neutrophil count and reduced lung myeloperoxidase activity. Conclusion CXCR4 antagonism decreases lung inflammation and improves alveolar as well as vascular structure in neonatal rats with experimental BPD. These findings suggest a novel therapeutic strategy to alleviate lung injury in preterm infants with BPD. PMID:25825119

  20. Sex-specific Differences in Hyperoxic Lung Injury in Mice: Implications for Acute and Chronic Lung Disease in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Lingappan, Krithika; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Couroucli, Xanthi I.; Barrios, Roberto; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2014-01-01

    Sex-specific differences in pulmonary morbidity in humans are well documented. Hyperoxia contributes to lung injury in experimental animals and humans. The mechanisms responsible for sex differences in the susceptibility towards hyperoxic lung injury remain largely unknown. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that mice will display sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury. Eight week-old male and female mice (C57BL/6J) were exposed to 72 h of hyperoxia (FiO2>0.95). After exposure to hyperoxia, lung injury, levels of 8-iso-prostaglandin F2 alpha (8-iso-PGF 2α) (LC-MS/MS), apoptosis (TUNEL) and inflammatory markers (suspension bead array) were determined. CytochromeP450 (CYP)1A expression in the lung was assessed using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. After exposure to hyperoxia, males showed greater lung injury, neutrophil infiltration and apoptosis, compared to air-breathing controls than females. Pulmonary 8-iso-PGF 2α levels were higher in males than females after hyperoxia exposure. Sexually dimorphic increases in levels of IL-6 (F>M) and VEGF (M>F) in the lungs were also observed. CYP1A1 expression in the lung was higher in female mice compared to males under hyperoxic conditions. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that male mice are more susceptible than females to hyperoxic lung injury and that differences in inflammatory and oxidative stress markers contribute to these sex-specific dimorphic effects. In conclusion, this paper describes the establishment of an animal model that shows sex differences in hyperoxic lung injury in a temporal manner and thus has important implications for lung diseases mediated by hyperoxia in humans. PMID:23792423

  1. /sup 238/U issues resolved and unresolved

    SciTech Connect

    de Saussure, G.; Smith, A.B.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction of 1 eV to 20 MeV neutrons with /sup 238/U is discussed with emphasis on recently resolved and remaining issues relevant to both application need and physical understanding. The apparent inability of older /sup 238/U evaluations to predict the measured /sup 238/U capture rate in thermal critical lattices has stimulated several recent precise measurements of the /sup 238/U cross sections, reanalysis of older data, and improved evaluations. The recent evaluations predict satisfactorily the /sup 238/U capture rate in thermal critical lattices. In the region from 1.5 to 4 keV there are differences of the order of 15%, sometimes larger, between the values of the neutron widths of the main resonances reported by several experimenters or obtained by different evaluators. Above 4 keV there are only sparse results of resonance analysis and most evaluations adopt a statistical treatment of the resonance structure. Some factors affecting the determination of the average properties of the resonance parameters are discussed. Above the inelastic-scattering threshold, energy-averaged neutron total, scattering, capture and fission cross sections are reviewed in a unified manner integrating measurement, calculation and evaluation. (n;n') and (n;2n') energy-transfer mechanisms are addressed. Particular attention is given to neutron capture, stressing precisions consistent with applied need. Fission properties are discussed including: prompt and delayed fission-neutron spectra and nubar, and fission-product yields. Physical understanding is assayed, with attention to compound-nucleus and direct-reaction mechanisms, and applications impact is illustrated in the context of fast-breeder-reactor performance. 95 references.

  2. Live imaging of the lung.

    PubMed

    Looney, Mark R; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-01-01

    Live lung imaging has spanned the discovery of capillaries in the frog lung by Malpighi to the current use of single and multiphoton imaging of intravital and isolated perfused lung preparations incorporating fluorescent molecular probes and transgenic reporter mice. Along the way, much has been learned about the unique microcirculation of the lung, including immune cell migration and the mechanisms by which cells at the alveolar-capillary interface communicate with each other. In this review, we highlight live lung imaging techniques as applied to the role of mitochondria in lung immunity, mechanisms of signal transduction in lung compartments, studies on the composition of alveolar wall liquid, and neutrophil and platelet trafficking in the lung under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. New applications of live lung imaging and the limitations of current techniques are discussed. PMID:24245941

  3. Live Imaging of the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Looney, Mark R.; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2015-01-01

    Live lung imaging has spanned the discovery of capillaries in the frog lung by Malpighi to the current use of single and multiphoton imaging of intravital and isolated perfused lung preparations incorporating fluorescent molecular probes and transgenic reporter mice. Along the way, much has been learned about the unique microcirculation of the lung, including immune cell migration and the mechanisms by which cells at the alveolar-capillary interface communicate with each other. In this review, we highlight live lung imaging techniques as applied to the role of mitochondria in lung immunity, mechanisms of signal transduction in lung compartments, studies on the composition of alveolar wall liquid, and neutrophil and platelet trafficking in the lung under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. New applications of live lung imaging and the limitations of current techniques are discussed. PMID:24245941

  4. Spectrally resolved multidepth fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yuan; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Oh, Se Baek; Kamm, Roger D.; Barbastathis, George

    2011-01-01

    We present a multicolor fluorescence imaging modality to visualize in real-time tissue structures emitting multispectral fluorescent light from different focal depths. Each designated spectrum of fluorescent emission from a specific depth within a volumetric tissue is probed by a depth-spectrum selective holographic grating. The grating for each fluorescent color are multiplexed within a volume hologram, which enables simultaneously obtaining multicolored fluorescent information at different depths within a biological tissue sample. We demonstrate the imaging modality's ability to obtain laser-induced multicolored fluorescence images of a biological sample from different depths without scanning. We also experimentally demonstrate that the imaging modality can be simultaneously operated at both fluorescent and bright field modes to provide complementary information of volumetric tissue structures at different depths in real-time. PMID:21950929

  5. Spectrally resolved multidepth fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yuan; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Oh, Se Baek; Kamm, Roger D.; Barbastathis, George

    2011-09-01

    We present a multicolor fluorescence imaging modality to visualize in real-time tissue structures emitting multispectral fluorescent light from different focal depths. Each designated spectrum of fluorescent emission from a specific depth within a volumetric tissue is probed by a depth-spectrum selective holographic grating. The grating for each fluorescent color are multiplexed within a volume hologram, which enables simultaneously obtaining multicolored fluorescent information at different depths within a biological tissue sample. We demonstrate the imaging modality's ability to obtain laser-induced multicolored fluorescence images of a biological sample from different depths without scanning. We also experimentally demonstrate that the imaging modality can be simultaneously operated at both fluorescent and bright field modes to provide complementary information of volumetric tissue structures at different depths in real-time.

  6. Receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is a functional molecular target in human lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Qian, Ming D.; Salameh, Ahmad; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Edwards, Julianna K.; Cimino, Daniel F.; Moeller, Benjamin J.; Kelly, Patrick; Nunez, Maria I.; Tang, Ximing; Liu, Diane D.; Lee, J. Jack; Hong, Waun Ki; Ferrara, Fortunato; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.; Lobb, Roy R.; Edelman, Martin J.; Sidman, Richard L.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2015-03-20

    Lung cancer is often refractory to radiotherapy, but molecular mechanisms of tumor resistance remain poorly defined. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is specifically overexpressed in lung cancer and is involved in regulating cellular responses to genotoxic insult. In the absence of EphA5, lung cancer cells displayed a defective G1/S cell cycle checkpoint, were unable to resolve DNA damage, and became radiosensitive. Upon irradiation, EphA5 was transported into the nucleus where it interacted with activated ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) at sites of DNA repair. In conclusion, we demonstrate that a new monoclonal antibody against human EphA5 sensitized lung cancer cells and human lung cancer xenografts to radiotherapy and significantly prolonged survival, thus suggesting the likelihood of translational applications.

  7. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase EphA5 Is a Functional Molecular Target in Human Lung Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Qian, Ming D.; Salameh, Ahmad; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Edwards, Julianna K.; Cimino, Daniel F.; Moeller, Benjamin J.; Kelly, Patrick; Nunez, Maria I.; Tang, Ximing; Liu, Diane D.; Lee, J. Jack; Hong, Waun Ki; Ferrara, Fortunato; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.; Lobb, Roy R.; Edelman, Martin J.; Sidman, Richard L.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is often refractory to radiotherapy, but molecular mechanisms of tumor resistance remain poorly defined. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is specifically overexpressed in lung cancer and is involved in regulating cellular responses to genotoxic insult. In the absence of EphA5, lung cancer cells displayed a defective G1/S cell cycle checkpoint, were unable to resolve DNA damage, and became radiosensitive. Upon irradiation, EphA5 was transported into the nucleus where it interacted with activated ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) at sites of DNA repair. Finally, we demonstrate that a new monoclonal antibody against human EphA5 sensitized lung cancer cells and human lung cancer xenografts to radiotherapy and significantly prolonged survival, thus suggesting the likelihood of translational applications. PMID:25623065

  8. Selective differences in macrophage populations and monokine production in resolving pulmonary granuloma and fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, I.

    1991-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) and their production of interleukin-1-like activity (IL-1) and macrophage-derived growth factor for fibroblasts (MDGF) were examined during chronic inflammatory reactions leading to either granuloma formation or fibrosis. Groups of five rats each received, respectively, a single transtracheal injection of xonotlite, attapulgite, short chrysotile 4T30, UICC chrysotile B asbestos, or saline. One month later, such treatments induced either no change (xonotlite), granuloma formation (attapulgite and short chrysotile 4T30), or fibrosis (UICC chrysotile B). By 8 months, however, the granulomatous reactions had resolved or greatly diminished, whereas the fibrosis persisted irreversibly. Parallel examination of cell populations obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage revealed that multinucleated giant macrophages (MGC) were present in lavage fluids of animals with resolving granulomatous reactions but absent in those obtained from animals with lung fibrosis. Evaluation of monokine production by inflammatory macrophages also revealed significant differences. Enhanced production of IL-1-like activity was seen in both types of lung injury, although especially during the early stage (1 month) and decreased thereafter (8 months). By contrast, augmentation of MDGF production was observed in animals with lung fibrosis only and persisted up to 9 months. Taken together, these data indicate that production of selected cytokines, as well as AM differentiation along a given pathway, may modulate the outcome of a chronic inflammatory response. PMID:1992772

  9. Airway anastomosis for lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Diso, Daniele; Rendina, Erino Angelo; Venuta, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LT) is the only viable option for a selected group of patients with end stage pulmonary diseases. During the recent years satisfactory results in terms of long-term survival and quality of life have been achieved with improvements in surgical technique, immunosuppression and perioperative management. Since the beginning, the airway anastomosis has been considered crucial and significant efforts have been made to understand the healing process. A number of experimental studies allowed improving the surgical technique by modifying the technique of suturing, the anastomotic protection and type and dose of immunosuppression, reducing the risk of airway complications. Furthermore, a huge progress has been made in the management of such complications. Early diagnosis of bronchial complications and their prompt and correct management are crucial to achieve long-term survival. PMID:26981271

  10. Layer-Resolved Magnetic Moments in Ni/Pt Multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, F.; Poulopoulos, P.; Ceballos, G.; Wende, H.; Baberschke, K.; Srivastava, P.; Benea, D.; Ebert, H.; Angelakeris, M.; Flevaris, N. K.; Niarchos, D.; Rogalev, A.; Brookes, N. B.

    2000-07-01

    The magnetic moments in Ni/Pt multilayers are thoroughly studied by combining experimental and ab initio theoretical techniques. SQUID magnetometry probes the samples' magnetizations. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism separates the contribution of Ni and Pt and provides a layer-resolved magnetic moment profile for the whole system. The results are compared to band-structure calculations. Induced Pt magnetic moments localized mostly at the interface are revealed. No magnetically ``dead'' Ni layers are found. The magnetization per Ni volume is slightly enhanced compared to bulk NiPt alloys.

  11. Resolving multi-exciton generation by attosecond spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Neukirch, A J; Neumark, D M; Kling, M F; Prezhdo, O V

    2014-10-20

    We propose an experimentally viable attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy scheme to resolve controversies regarding multiexciton (ME) generation in nanoscale systems. Absence of oscillations indicates that light excites single excitons, and MEs are created by incoherent impact ionization. An oscillation indicates the coherent mechanism, involving excitation of superpositions of single and MEs. The oscillation decay, ranging from 5 fs at ambient temperature to 20 fs at 100 K, gives the elastic exciton-phonon scattering time. The signal is best observed with multiple-cycle pump pulses. PMID:25401661

  12. A 3-dimensional time-resolved photothermal deflection ``Mirage'' method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrath, N. G. C.; Malacarne, L. C.; Lukasievicz, G. V. B.; Bernabe, H. S.; Rohling, J. H.; Baesso, M. L.; Shen, J.; Bialkowski, S. E.

    2012-02-01

    A three-dimensional time-resolved theory and experiment for photothermal deflection spectroscopy is developed. The heat conduction equations for two semi-infinite media consisting of an opaque sample and a fluid are solved considering temperature and energy flux balance conditions for a Gaussian heat source. The time dependent perpendicular deflection signal is calculated and compared to experimental measurements on glassy carbon and copper samples. Excellent agreement with literature values for thermal diffusivity of the samples is found. The transient behavior is analyzed for different coupling fluids.

  13. High-resolving mass spectrographs and spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollnik, Hermann

    2015-11-01

    Discussed are different types of high resolving mass spectrographs and spectrometers. In detail outlined are (1) magnetic and electric sector field mass spectrographs, which are the oldest systems, (2) Penning Trap mass spectrographs and spectrometers, which have achieved very high mass-resolving powers, but are technically demanding (3) time-of-flight mass spectrographs using high energy ions passing through accelerator rings, which have also achieved very high mass-resolving powers and are equally technically demanding, (4) linear time-of-flight mass spectrographs, which have become the most versatile mass analyzers for low energy ions, while the even higher performing multi-pass systems have only started to be used, (5) orbitraps, which also have achieved remarkably high mass-resolving powers for low energy ions.

  14. Time-Resolved Photoluminescence and Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, W. K.; Ahrenkiel, R. K.; Dippo, P.; Geisz, J.; Wanlass, M. W.; Kurtz, S.

    2005-01-01

    The time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) technique and its ability to characterize recombination in bulk photovoltaic semiconductor materials are reviewed. Results from a variety of materials and a few recent studies are summarized and compared.

  15. Lung cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Keith, Robert L

    2012-05-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, and the majority of diagnoses are made in former smokers. Although avoidance of tobacco abuse and smoking cessation clearly will have the greatest impact on lung cancer development, effective chemoprevention could prove to be more effective than treatment of established, advanced-stage disease. Chemoprevention is the use of dietary or pharmaceutical agents to reverse or block the carcinogenic process and has been successfully applied to common malignancies other than lung (including recent reports on the prevention of breast cancer in high-risk individuals). Despite previous studies in lung cancer chemoprevention failing to identify effective agents, our ability to define the highest-risk populations and the understanding of lung tumor and premalignant biology continue to make advances. Squamous cell carcinogenesis in the bronchial epithelium starts with normal epithelium and progresses through hyperplasia, metaplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ to invasive cancer. Precursor lesions also have been identified for adenocarcinoma, and these premalignant lesions are targeted by chemopreventive agents in current and future trials. Chemopreventive agents can currently only be recommended as part of well-designed clinical trials, and multiple trials have recently been completed or are enrolling subjects. PMID:22550242

  16. Rovibrationally resolved photodissociation of SH+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, E. C.; Shen, G.; McCann, J. F.; McLaughlin, B. M.; Stancil, P. C.

    2016-04-01

    Photodissociation cross sections for the SH+ radical are computed from all rovibrational (RV) levels of the ground electronic state {{X}}{}3{{{Σ }}}- for wavelengths from threshold to 500 Å. The five electronic transitions, 2{}3{{{Σ }}}- ≤ftarrow {{X}}{}3{{{Σ }}}-,3{}3{{{Σ }}}- ≤ftarrow {{X}}{}3{{{Σ }}}-, A{}3{{\\Pi }} ≤ftarrow {{X}}{}3{{{Σ }}}-,2{}3{{\\Pi }} ≤ftarrow {{X}}{}3{{{Σ }}}-, and 3{}3{{\\Pi }} ≤ftarrow {{X}}{}3{{{Σ }}}-, are treated with a fully quantum–mechanical two-state model, i.e. nonadiabatic couplings between excited states were not included. The photodissociation calculations incorporate adiabatic potentials and transition dipole moment functions computed in the multireference configuration interaction approach along with the Davidson correction (MRCI+Q), but adjusted to match available experimental molecular data and asymptotic atomic limits. Local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) photodissociation cross sections were computed which assume a Boltzmann distribution of RV levels in the {{X}}{}3{{{Σ }}}- molecular state of the SH+ cation. The LTE cross sections are presented for temperatures in the range 1000–10 000 K. Applications of the current photodissociation cross sections to interstellar gas, photon-dominated regions, and stellar atmospheres are briefly discussed.

  17. Angle-resolved diffraction grating biosensor based on porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Changwu; Jia, Zhenhong; Liu, Yajun; Mo, Jiaqing; Li, Peng; Lv, Xiaoyi

    2016-03-01

    In this study, an optical biosensor based on a porous silicon composite structure was fabricated using a simple method. This structure consists of a thin, porous silicon surface diffraction grating and a one-dimensional porous silicon photonic crystal. An angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum was obtained by measuring the diffraction efficiency at a range of incident angles. The angle-resolved diffraction efficiency of the 2nd and 3rd orders was studied experimentally and theoretically. The device was sensitive to the change of refractive index in the presence of a biomolecule indicated by the shift of the diffraction efficiency spectrum. The sensitivity of this sensor was investigated through use of an 8 base pair antifreeze protein DNA hybridization. The shifts of the angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum showed a relationship with the change of the refractive index, and the detection limit of the biosensor reached 41.7 nM. This optical device is highly sensitive, inexpensive, and simple to fabricate. Using shifts in diffraction efficiency spectrum to detect biological molecules has not yet been explored, so this study establishes a foundation for future work.

  18. Polarization resolved angular optical scattering of aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redding, B.; Pan, Y.; Wang, C.; Videen, G.; Cao, Hui

    2014-05-01

    Real-time detection and identification of bio-aerosol particles are crucial for the protection against chemical and biological agents. The strong elastic light scattering properties of airborne particles provides a natural means for rapid, non-invasive aerosol characterization. Recent theoretical predictions suggested that variations in the polarization dependent angular scattering cross section could provide an efficient means of classifying different airborne particles. In particular, the polarization dependent scattering cross section of aggregate particles is expected to depend on the shape of the primary particles. In order to experimentally validate this prediction, we built a high throughput, sampling system, capable of measuring the polarization resolved angular scattering cross section of individual aerosol particles flowing through an interrogating volume with a single shot of laser pulse. We calibrated the system by comparing the polarization dependent scattering cross section of individual polystyrene spheres with that predicted by Mie theory. We then used the system to study different particles types: Polystyrene aggregates composed 500 nm spheres and Bacillus subtilis (BG, Anthrax simulant) spores composed of elongated 500 nm × 1000 nm cylinder-line particles. We found that the polarization resolved scattering cross section depends on the shape of the constituent elements of the aggregates. This work indicates that the polarization resolved scattering cross section could be used for rapid discrimination between different bio-aerosol particles.

  19. Multipulse interferometric frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Siders, C.W.; Siders, J.L.W.; Omenetto, F.G.; Taylor, A.J.

    1999-04-01

    The authors review multipulse interferometric frequency-resolved optical gating (MI-FROG) as a technique, uniquely suited for pump-probe coherent spectroscopy using amplified visible and near-infrared short-pulse systems and/or emissive targets, for time-resolving ultrafast phase shifts and intensity changes. Application of polarization-gate MI-FROG to the study of ultrafast ionization in gases is presented.

  20. What Are the Risks of Lung Transplant?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Risks of Lung Transplant? A lung transplant can improve your quality of life and ... highest. In recent years, short-term survival after lung transplant has improved. Recent data on single-lung ...

  1. How Is Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease Treated? Childhood interstitial lung disease (chILD) is ... prevent acid reflux, which can lead to aspiration. Lung Transplant A lung transplant may be an option ...

  2. Types of Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease The broad term "childhood interstitial lung disease" ( ... affect are shown in the illustration below. Normal Lungs and Lung Structures Figure A shows the location ...

  3. Regulation and repair of the alveolar-capillary barrier in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Jahar; Matthay, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in understanding the basic mechanisms that regulate fluid and protein exchange across the endothelial and epithelial barriers of the lung under both normal and pathological conditions. Clinically relevant lung injury occurs most commonly from severe viral and bacterial infections, aspiration syndromes, and severe shock. The mechanisms of lung injury have been identified in both experimental and clinical studies. Recovery from lung injury requires the reestablishment of an intact endothelial barrier and a functional alveolar epithelial barrier capable of secreting surfactant and removing alveolar edema fluid. Repair mechanisms include the participation of endogenous progenitor cells in strategically located niches in the lung. Novel treatment strategies include the possibility of cell-based therapy that may reduce the severity of lung injury and enhance lung repair. PMID:23398155

  4. Molecular developmental mechanism in polypterid fish provides insight into the origin of vertebrate lungs.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Norifumi; Kobayashi, Ritsuko; Yano, Tohru; Noda, Masatsugu; Fujimura, Koji; Okada, Norihiro; Okabe, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    The lung is an important organ for air breathing in tetrapods and originated well before the terrestrialization of vertebrates. Therefore, to better understand lung evolution, we investigated lung development in the extant basal actinopterygian fish Senegal bichir (Polypterus senegalus). First, we histologically confirmed that lung development in this species is very similar to that of tetrapods. We also found that the mesenchymal expression patterns of three genes that are known to play important roles in early lung development in tetrapods (Fgf10, Tbx4, and Tbx5) were quite similar to those of tetrapods. Moreover, we found a Tbx4 core lung mesenchyme-specific enhancer (C-LME) in the genomes of bichir and coelacanth (Latimeria chalumnae) and experimentally confirmed that these were functional in tetrapods. These findings provide the first molecular evidence that the developmental program for lung was already established in the common ancestor of actinopterygians and sarcopterygians. PMID:27466206

  5. Molecular developmental mechanism in polypterid fish provides insight into the origin of vertebrate lungs

    PubMed Central

    Tatsumi, Norifumi; Kobayashi, Ritsuko; Yano, Tohru; Noda, Masatsugu; Fujimura, Koji; Okada, Norihiro; Okabe, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    The lung is an important organ for air breathing in tetrapods and originated well before the terrestrialization of vertebrates. Therefore, to better understand lung evolution, we investigated lung development in the extant basal actinopterygian fish Senegal bichir (Polypterus senegalus). First, we histologically confirmed that lung development in this species is very similar to that of tetrapods. We also found that the mesenchymal expression patterns of three genes that are known to play important roles in early lung development in tetrapods (Fgf10, Tbx4, and Tbx5) were quite similar to those of tetrapods. Moreover, we found a Tbx4 core lung mesenchyme-specific enhancer (C-LME) in the genomes of bichir and coelacanth (Latimeria chalumnae) and experimentally confirmed that these were functional in tetrapods. These findings provide the first molecular evidence that the developmental program for lung was already established in the common ancestor of actinopterygians and sarcopterygians. PMID:27466206

  6. Manipulations of core temperatures in ischemia-reperfusion lung injury in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hung; Huang, Kun-Lun; Li, Min-Hui; Hsu, Ching-Wang; Tsai, Shih-Hung; Chu, Shi-Jye

    2008-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the effect of various core temperatures on acute lung injury induced by ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) in our isolated rabbit lung model. Typical acute lung injury was successfully induced by 30 min of ischemia followed by 90 min of reperfusion observation. The I/R elicited a significant increase in pulmonary arterial pressure, microvascular permeability (measured by using the capillary filtration coefficient, Kfc), Delta Kfc ratio, lung weight gain and the protein concentration of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Mild hypothermia significantly attenuated acute lung injury induced by I/R, all parameters having decreased significantly (p<0.05); conversely, mild hyperthermia did not further exacerbate acute lung injury. These experimental data suggest that mild hypothermia significantly ameliorated acute lung injury induced by ischemia-reperfusion in rabbits. PMID:17629529

  7. Inhaled cigarette smoke induces the formation of DNA adducts in lungs of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, J.A.; Chen, B.T.; Griffith, W.C.; Mauderly, J.L.

    1989-06-01

    Cigarette smoking causes a variety of adverse human health effects, including lung cancer. The molecular events associated with smoke-induced carcinogenesis are thought to be related in part to the genotoxic activities of the chemicals associated with smoke. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the molecular dosimetry of compounds in cigarette smoke in lungs of rats exposed by inhalation. These studies investigated the effects of exposure mode, sex, and time (adduct persistence) on the level of DNA adducts. Male and female F344/N rats were exposed 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 22 days to cigarette smoke by nose-only intermittent (NOI), nose-only continuous (NOC), or whole-body continuous (WBC) exposures. Separate groups of rats were sham-exposed nose-only (NOS) or whole-body (WBS) to filtered air. All smoke exposure modes yielded daily smoke exposure concentration X time products of 600 mg particulate.hr/m3 for the first week and 1200 mg particulate.hour/m3 thereafter. Groups of rats were killed at 18 hr and 3 weeks after the 22-day exposure period and DNA adducts in lung tissues were quantified by the /sup 32/P-postlabeling method. There were significant (p less than 0.05) increases in levels of clearly resolved lung DNA adducts in male and female rats exposed to smoke compared to sham-exposed rats. There were no significant effects of exposure mode or sex on lung DNA adducts. Mean levels (+/- SE) of clearly resolved lung DNA adducts for both sexes combined in NOI, NOC, WBC, NOS, and WBS groups were 50 +/- 4, 52 +/- 6, 52 +/- 7, 21 +/- 6, and 22 +/- 4 adducts per 10(9) bases, respectively. Levels of clearly resolved DNA adducts were significantly less in lungs of rats killed 3 weeks after exposure and had declined to near control levels, suggesting that smoke-induced adducts are repaired by lung DNA repair enzymes.

  8. Contribution of opening and closing of lung units to lung hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, W; DeLong, D S; Franz, G N; Petsonk, E L; Frazer, D G

    1995-12-01

    The recruitment and derecruitment of lung units is one explanation of the hysteresis observed in an excised lung during inflation and deflation. A simplified model has been proposed in which the recruitment-derecruitment process is a function of end-expiratory pressure (Frazer, D.G., K.C. Weber and G.N. Franz, Respir. Physiol. 61: 277-288, 1985). The object of this study was to test this model with three experimental procedures. During the first set of experiments, progressively larger pressure-volume (PL-VL) loops were recorded with end-expiratory pressure held at either -5 cmH2O, where all lung units are assumed to be closed, or +5 cmH2O, where all recruited lung units are assumed to be open. In the first case hysteresis is maximal, in the second, minimal. The difference in hysteresis is presumed to arise from the recruitment-derecruitment process. In the second set of experiments, excised lungs are slowly inflated and then deflated at a constant rate while constant-amplitude sinusoidal volume oscillations are superimposed. The end-expiratory pressure of the superimposed loops gradually rose as the lung was inflated and fell as the lung was deflated. Hysteresis was minimal when end-expiratory pressure was above 4 +/- 1 cmH2O even as peak-to-peak loop pressure greatly varied. This supports the notion of an end-expiratory pressure dependent mechanism of recruitment/derecruitment. During the third set of experiments lungs were inflated to either 50%, 75%, or 100% TLC. Volumes of air were then withdrawn and replaced so that the initial volume was restored in sinusoidal fashion as the amplitude of the volume excursions increased. For PL-VL loops with end-expiratory pressures between +4 and -2 cmH2O, pressure amplitudes rose and the hysteresis index (loop area/tidal volume) increased, regardless of the initial lung volume. These results are consistent with the previously described model of Frazer et al. (1985) which assumed that PL-VL curves can be divided into an

  9. Time-resolved protein crystallography.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, L. N.

    1992-01-01

    Advances in synchrotron radiation technology have allowed exposure times from protein crystals of the order of milliseconds to be used routinely, and in exceptional circumstances exposure times of 100 ps have been obtained. However, many data sets take seconds to record because of the slow time scale of film change or crystal reorientation or translation when more than one exposure is required. This problem has been addressed by Amemiya et al. (1989). There has been considerable progress in methods to initiate reactions in protein crystals, especially the development of photolabile caged compounds but also temperature jump, pH jump, and diffusion. Although flash lamps deliver pulses of 100 mJ/ms, often several pulses are required to release sufficient product, and reaction initiation can take several seconds. Laser illumination can provide more powerful input, but the laser must be accommodated within the restricted space at the synchrotron station. The requirement to maintain synchrony among the molecules in the crystal lattice as the reaction proceeds and to ensure that the lifetime of intermediates is longer than data collection rates emphasizes the need for chemical characterization of the reaction under study. As Ringe advocated in the studies with chymotrypsin, it may be more profitable to devise conditions under which certain intermediates along the reaction pathway accumulate in the crystal and to record these in a series of discrete steps rather than continuous monitoring of the reaction. The Laue method is limited to those proteins that give well-ordered crystals and problems of transient disorder on initiation of reaction and problems of radiation damage need to be overcome or avoided by suitable experimental protocols.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1303743

  10. Lung mass, right upper lung - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This picture is a chest x-ray of a person with a lung mass. This is a front view, where the lungs are the two dark areas and ... visible in the middle of the chest. The x-ray shows a mass in the right upper lung, ...

  11. Lung mass, right upper lung - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest x-ray of a person with a lung mass. This is a front view, where the lungs are the two dark areas and the heart ... ray shows a mass in the right upper lung, indicated with the arrow (seen on the left ...

  12. Screening for lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, D.

    1981-01-01

    The survival from bronchogenic carcinoma is highly dependent upon stage at the time of treatment. This is particularly true for squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and large cell carcinoma, but holds true for small cell carcinoma as well. The problem presented to the medical profession has been to find a practical means of detecting lung cancer while it is still at an early stage. Three studies in progress have indicated that a larger proportion of the patients may be found to have early stage lung cancer when screened with a combination of chest X-rays and sputum cytology. However, the detection of these early stage cases has not yet been translated into an improvement in the overall mortality rate from lung cancer. PMID:6278787

  13. Lung pair phantom

    DOEpatents

    Olsen, P.C.; Gordon, N.R.; Simmons, K.L.

    1993-11-30

    The present invention is a material and method of making the material that exhibits improved radiation attenuation simulation of real lungs, i.e., an ``authentic lung tissue`` or ALT phantom. Specifically, the ALT phantom is a two-part polyurethane medium density foam mixed with calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate if needed for K-40 background, lanthanum nitrate, acetone, and a nitrate or chloride form of a radionuclide. This formulation is found to closely match chemical composition and linear attenuation of real lungs. The ALT phantom material is made according to established procedures but without adding foaming agents or preparing thixotropic concentrate and with a modification for ensuring uniformity of density of the ALT phantom that is necessary for accurate simulation. The modification is that the polyurethane chemicals are mixed at a low temperature prior to pouring the polyurethane mixture into the mold.

  14. Lung cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Pastorino, U

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer is the primary cause of cancer mortality in developed countries. First diagnosis only when disease has already reached the metastatic phase is the main reason for failure in treatment. To this regard, although low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) has proven to be effective in the early detection of lung cancer (providing both higher resectability and higher long-term survival rates), the capacity of annual CT screening to reduce lung cancer mortality in heavy smokers has yet to be demonstrated. Numerous ongoing large-scale randomised trials are under way in high-risk individuals with different study designs. The initial results should be available within the next 2 years. PMID:20424610

  15. Lung pair phantom

    DOEpatents

    Olsen, Peter C.; Gordon, N. Ross; Simmons, Kevin L.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a material and method of making the material that exhibits improved radiation attenuation simulation of real lungs, i.e., an "authentic lung tissue" or ALT phantom. Specifically, the ALT phantom is a two-part polyurethane medium density foam mixed with calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate if needed for K-40 background, lanthanum nitrate, acetone, and a nitrate or chloride form of a radionuclide. This formulation is found to closely match chemical composition and linear attenuation of real lungs. The ALT phantom material is made according to established procedures but without adding foaming agents or preparing thixotropic concentrate and with a modification for ensuring uniformity of density of the ALT phantom that is necessary for accurate simulation. The modification is that the polyurethane chemicals are mixed at a low temperature prior to pouring the polyurethane mixture into the mold.

  16. [Chemoprevention of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Takaaki; Saito, Makoto; Honda, Hidetoshi; Hirata, Takeshi; Kato, Harubumi

    2003-02-01

    Since a high concentration of beta-carotene in blood reduces the risk of lung cancer, a large-scale intervention examination containing beta-carotene was conducted, mainly by the National Cancer Institute. The results showed that the risk of lung cancer increased with administration of beta-carotene. This result demonstrates that continuation of smoking is an important factor in the increased risk, and not smoking is confirmed to be the most important prevention method. The authors examined the treatment effect of raising the concentration of folic acid and vitamin B12 in blood on bronchial dysplasia as a pre-cancerous lesion. A significant medical treatment effect was see in the folic acid and vitamin B12 medication groups, which seems promising for the chemoprevention of lung cancer. PMID:12610863

  17. [Smoking and lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Postmus, P E

    1999-11-01

    Since fifty years it is clear now that smoking of tobacco products is responsible for the lung cancer epidemic that is currently in progress worldwide. Although in the Western world a small decrease of lung cancer in males is found, the number of female patients is steadily increasing. Changes in tobacco production have resulted in exposition of smokers to other carcinogens. This is probably the cause of the change in the histological pattern with an increase of adenocarcinoma and stabilisation of squamous cell lung cancer. Despite the bad prognosis there is some hope that with improvement of early detection methods more patients can be cured. However, for a real change it is necessary to discourage smoking by all means. PMID:11930407

  18. Time-Resolved Measurement of Landau-Zener Tunneling in Periodic Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Zenesini, A.; Radogostowicz, J.; Ciampini, D.; Mannella, R.; Arimondo, E.; Lignier, H.; Morsch, O.; Tayebirad, G.; Wimberger, S.

    2009-08-28

    We report time-resolved measurements of Landau-Zener tunneling of Bose-Einstein condensates in accelerated optical lattices, clearly resolving the steplike time dependence of the band populations. Using different experimental protocols we were able to measure the tunneling probability both in the adiabatic and in the diabatic bases of the system. We also experimentally determine the contribution of the momentum width of the Bose condensates to the temporal width of the tunneling steps and discuss the implications for measuring the jump time in the Landau-Zener problem.

  19. Chronic exposure to ozone causes restrictive lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Grose, E.C.; Costa, D.L.; Hatch, G.E.; Miller, F.J.; Graham, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    A chronic study to determine the progression and/or reversibility of ozone-induced lung disease was conducted. Male rats were exposed to a diurnal pattern of ozone (O{sub 3}) for 1 week, 3 weeks, 3 months, 12 months, or 18 months. The occurrence of chronic lung disease was determined by structural and functional endpoints. Structurally, a biphasic response was observed with an initial acute inflammatory response after 1 week of exposure, a reduced acute response after 3 weeks of exposure, and an epithelial and interstitial response observed after 3 months which persisted or increased in intensity up to 18 months of exposure. Functional studies showed a persistence of decreased total lung capacity and residual volumes at 3, 12, and 18 months of exposure, a response indicative of restrictive lung disease. Biochemical changes in antioxidant metabolism were also observed after 12 and 18 months of exposure. Most significant changes were resolved after the clean-air recovery period. The study has shown that chronic exposure to O{sub 3} causes restrictive lung disease as characterized by the development of focal interstitial fibrosis.

  20. Particles causing lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kilburn, K H

    1984-01-01

    The lung has a limited number of patterns of reaction to inhaled particles. The disease observed depends upon the location: conducting airways, terminal bronchioles and alveoli, and upon the nature of inflammation induced: acute, subacute or chronic. Many different agents cause narrowing of conducting airways (asthma) and some of these cause permanent distortion or obliteration of airways as well. Terminal bronchioles appear to be particularly susceptible to particles which cause goblet cell metaplasia, mucous plugging and ultimately peribronchiolar fibrosis. Cancer is the last outcome at the bronchial level and appears to depend upon continuous exposure to or retention of an agent in the airway and failure of the affected cells to be exfoliated which may be due to squamous metaplasia. Alveoli are populated by endothelial cells, Type I or pavement epithelial cells and metabolically active cuboidal Type II cells that produce the lungs specific surfactant, dipalmytol lecithin. Disturbances of surfactant lead to edema in distal lung while laryngeal edema due to anaphylaxis or fumes may produce asphyxia. Physical retention of indigestible particles or retention by immune memory responses may provoke hyaline membranes, stimulate alveolar lipoproteinosis and finally fibrosis. This later exuberant deposition of connective tissue has been best studied in the occupational pneumoconioses especially silicosis and asbestosis. In contrast emphysema a catabolic response, appears frequently to result from leakage or release of lysosomal proteases into the lung during processing of cigarette smoke particles. The insidious and probably most important human lung disease due to particles is bronchiolar obstruction and obliteration, producing progressive impairment of air flow. The responsible particle is the complex combination of poorly digestive lipids and complex carbohydrates with active chemicals which we call cigarette smoke. More research is needed to perfect, correct and

  1. The ALCHEMIST Lung Cancer Trial

    Cancer.gov

    A collection of material about the ALCHEMIST lung cancer trial that will examine tumor tissue from patients with early-stage, completely resected lung cancer for gene mutations in the EGFR and ALK genes, and a

  2. Lung Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... HPV-Associated Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Lung Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) ... incidence data are currently available. Rates of Getting Lung Cancer by State The number of people who ...

  3. Lung-MAP Clinical Trial

    Cancer.gov

    A collection of material about the Lung-MAP study, which will examine treatment outcomes for patients with squamous cell lung cancer assigned to different targeted drugs based on the results of genomic tumor profiling.

  4. National Lung Screening Trial (NLST)

    Cancer.gov

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), a research study sponsored by the National Cancer Institute that used low-dose helical CT scans or chest X-ray to screen men and women at risk for lung cancer.

  5. Predicting ventilator-induced lung injury using a lung injury cost function.

    PubMed

    Hamlington, Katharine L; Smith, Bradford J; Allen, Gilman B; Bates, Jason H T

    2016-07-01

    Managing patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requires mechanical ventilation that balances the competing goals of sustaining life while avoiding ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). In particular, it is reasonable to suppose that for any given ARDS patient, there must exist an optimum pair of values for tidal volume (VT) and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) that together minimize the risk for VILI. To find these optimum values, and thus develop a personalized approach to mechanical ventilation in ARDS, we need to be able to predict how injurious a given ventilation regimen will be in any given patient so that the minimally injurious regimen for that patient can be determined. Our goal in the present study was therefore to develop a simple computational model of the mechanical behavior of the injured lung in order to calculate potential injury cost functions to serve as predictors of VILI. We set the model parameters to represent normal, mildly injured, and severely injured lungs and estimated the amount of volutrauma and atelectrauma caused by ventilating these lungs with a range of VT and PEEP. We estimated total VILI in two ways: 1) as the sum of the contributions from volutrauma and atelectrauma and 2) as the product of their contributions. We found the product provided estimates of VILI that are more in line with our previous experimental findings. This model may thus serve as the basis for the objective choice of mechanical ventilation parameters for the injured lung. PMID:27174922

  6. Inherited interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Christine Kim; Raghu, Ganesh

    2004-09-01

    This article focuses on recent advances in the identification of genes and genetic polymorphisms that have been implicated in the development of human interstitial lung diseases. It focuses on the inherited mendelian diseases in which pulmonary fibrosis is part of the clinical phenotype and the genetics of familial idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and other rare inherited interstitial lung diseases. The article also reviews the association studies that have been published to date regarding the genetics of sporadic idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The reader is directed to recent reviews on human genetic predisposition of sarcoidosis, environmental-related, drug-related, connective tissue related pulmonary fibrosis, and genetic predisposition of fibrosis in animal models. PMID:15331184

  7. Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Akerley, Wallace; Bogner, Paul; Borghaei, Hossein; Chow, Laura QM; Downey, Robert J.; Gandhi, Leena; Ganti, Apar Kishor P.; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Grecula, John C.; Hayman, James; Heist, Rebecca Suk; Horn, Leora; Jahan, Thierry; Koczywas, Marianna; Loo, Billy W.; Merritt, Robert E.; Moran, Cesar A.; Niell, Harvey B.; O’Malley, Janis; Patel, Jyoti D.; Ready, Neal; Rudin, Charles M.; Williams, Charles C.; Gregory, Kristina; Hughes, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors account for approximately 20% of lung cancers; most (≈15%) are small cell lung cancer (SCLC). These NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for SCLC focus on extensive-stage SCLC because it occurs more frequently than limited-stage disease. SCLC is highly sensitive to initial therapy; however, most patients eventually die of recurrent disease. In patients with extensive-stage disease, chemotherapy alone can palliate symptoms and prolong survival in most patients; however, long-term survival is rare. Most cases of SCLC are attributable to cigarette smoking; therefore, smoking cessation should be strongly promoted. PMID:23307984

  8. Lung Ablation: Whats New?

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lillian; Dupuy, Damian E

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer had an estimated incidence of 221,200 in 2015, making up 13% of all cancer diagnoses. Tumor ablation is an important treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic patients. Radiofrequency ablation has been used for over a decade with newer modalities, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation presenting as additional and possibly improved treatment options for patients. This minimally invasive therapy is best for small primary lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. These technologies can offer palliation and sometimes cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the current available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation. PMID:27050331

  9. Radiotherapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bleehen, N.M.; Cox, J.D.

    1985-05-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of lung cancer was reviewed at a workshop held in Cambridge, England, in June 1984. It was concluded that there was a continuing role for radiation therapy in the primary management of small cell lung cancer, including the loco-regional treatment for patients with limited disease. Radical radiotherapy for patients with non-small cell carcinoma could be curative for a proportion of patients with limited disease. Careful planning and quality control was essential. Palliative radiotherapy provided useful treatment for many other patients. Other related aspects of treatment are also presented.

  10. The roles of diol epoxide and o-quinone pathways in mouse lung tumorigenesis induced by benzo(a)pyrene: relevance to human lung carcinogenesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is sufficient epidemiological evidence supported by experimental data that some PAH-containing complex environmental mixtures pose risks to human health by increasing lung cancer incidence. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has determined that human respirator...

  11. Time-resolved structural studies of protein reaction dynamics: a smorgasbord of X-ray approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Westenhoff, Sebastian; Nazarenko, Elena; Malmerberg, Erik; Davidsson, Jan; Katona, Gergely; Neutze, Richard

    2010-03-01

    Time-resolved structural studies of proteins have undergone several significant developments during the last decade. Recent developments using time-resolved X-ray methods, such as time-resolved Laue diffraction, low-temperature intermediate trapping, time-resolved wide-angle X-ray scattering and time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy, are reviewed. Proteins undergo conformational changes during their biological function. As such, a high-resolution structure of a protein’s resting conformation provides a starting point for elucidating its reaction mechanism, but provides no direct information concerning the protein’s conformational dynamics. Several X-ray methods have been developed to elucidate those conformational changes that occur during a protein’s reaction, including time-resolved Laue diffraction and intermediate trapping studies on three-dimensional protein crystals, and time-resolved wide-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption studies on proteins in the solution phase. This review emphasizes the scope and limitations of these complementary experimental approaches when seeking to understand protein conformational dynamics. These methods are illustrated using a limited set of examples including myoglobin and haemoglobin in complex with carbon monoxide, the simple light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin, and the superoxide scavenger superoxide reductase. In conclusion, likely future developments of these methods at synchrotron X-ray sources and the potential impact of emerging X-ray free-electron laser facilities are speculated upon.

  12. Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan? A lung ventilation/perfusion scan, or VQ scan, is a ... that measures air and blood flow in your lungs. A VQ scan most often is used to ...

  13. Environmental radiation and the lung

    PubMed Central

    Hamrick, Philip E.; Walsh, Phillip J.

    1974-01-01

    Environmental sources of radioactive materials and their relation to lung doses and lung burdens are described. The approaches used and the problems encountered in estimating lung doses are illustrated. Exposure to radon daughter products is contrasted to exposure to plutonium as particular examples of the hazards associated with radioactive materials of different chemical and physical characteristics. PMID:4620334

  14. Fingerprints of Majorana fermions in spin-resolved subgap spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirla, Razvan; Moca, Cǎtǎlin Paşcu

    2016-07-01

    When a strongly correlated quantum dot is tunnel coupled to a superconductor, it leads to the formation of Shiba bound states inside the superconducting gap. They have been measured experimentally in a superconductor-quantum dot-normal lead setup. Side coupling the quantum dot to a topological superconducting wire that supports Majorana bound states at its ends, drastically affects the structure of the Shiba states and induces supplementary in-gap states. The anomalous coupling between the Majorana bound states and the quantum dot gives rise to a characteristic imbalance in the spin-resolved spectral functions for the dot operators. These are clear fingerprints for the existence of Majorana fermions and they can be detected experimentally in transport measurements. In terms of methods employed, we have used analytical approaches combined with the numerical renormalization group approach.

  15. Targeted delivery of liquid microvolumes into the lung

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinho; O’Neill, John D.; Dorrello, N. Valerio; Bacchetta, Matthew; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    The ability to deliver drugs to specific sites in the lung could radically improve therapeutic outcomes of a variety of lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, severe bronchopneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer. Using conventional methods for pulmonary drug administration, precise, localized delivery of exact doses of drugs to target regions remains challenging. Here we describe a more controlled delivery of soluble reagents (e.g., drugs, enzymes, and radionuclides) in microvolume liquid plugs to targeted branches of the pulmonary airway tree: upper airways, small airways (bronchioles), or the most distal alveoli. In this approach, a soluble liquid plug of very small volume (<1 mL) is instilled into the upper airways, and with programmed air ventilation of the lungs, the plug is pushed into a specific desired (more distal) airway to achieve deposition of liquid film onto the lung epithelium. The plug volume and ventilation conditions were determined by mathematical modeling of plug transport in a tubular geometry, and targeted liquid film deposition was demonstrated in rat lungs by three different in vivo imaging modalities. The experimental and modeling data suggest that instillation of microvolumes of liquid into a ventilated pulmonary airway could be an effective strategy to deliver exact doses of drugs to targeted pathologic regions of the lung, especially those inaccessible by bronchoscopy, to increase in situ efficacy of the drug and minimize systemic side effects. PMID:26324893

  16. Targeted delivery of liquid microvolumes into the lung.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinho; O'Neill, John D; Dorrello, N Valerio; Bacchetta, Matthew; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-09-15

    The ability to deliver drugs to specific sites in the lung could radically improve therapeutic outcomes of a variety of lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, severe bronchopneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer. Using conventional methods for pulmonary drug administration, precise, localized delivery of exact doses of drugs to target regions remains challenging. Here we describe a more controlled delivery of soluble reagents (e.g., drugs, enzymes, and radionuclides) in microvolume liquid plugs to targeted branches of the pulmonary airway tree: upper airways, small airways (bronchioles), or the most distal alveoli. In this approach, a soluble liquid plug of very small volume (<1 mL) is instilled into the upper airways, and with programmed air ventilation of the lungs, the plug is pushed into a specific desired (more distal) airway to achieve deposition of liquid film onto the lung epithelium. The plug volume and ventilation conditions were determined by mathematical modeling of plug transport in a tubular geometry, and targeted liquid film deposition was demonstrated in rat lungs by three different in vivo imaging modalities. The experimental and modeling data suggest that instillation of microvolumes of liquid into a ventilated pulmonary airway could be an effective strategy to deliver exact doses of drugs to targeted pathologic regions of the lung, especially those inaccessible by bronchoscopy, to increase in situ efficacy of the drug and minimize systemic side effects. PMID:26324893

  17. A comprehensive computational model of sound transmission through the porcine lung

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zoujun; Peng, Ying; Henry, Brian M.; Mansy, Hansen A.; Sandler, Richard H.; Royston, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive computational simulation model of sound transmission through the porcine lung is introduced and experimentally evaluated. This “subject-specific” model utilizes parenchymal and major airway geometry derived from x-ray CT images. The lung parenchyma is modeled as a poroviscoelastic material using Biot theory. A finite element (FE) mesh of the lung that includes airway detail is created and used in comsol FE software to simulate the vibroacoustic response of the lung to sound input at the trachea. The FE simulation model is validated by comparing simulation results to experimental measurements using scanning laser Doppler vibrometry on the surface of an excised, preserved lung. The FE model can also be used to calculate and visualize vibroacoustic pressure and motion inside the lung and its airways caused by the acoustic input. The effect of diffuse lung fibrosis and of a local tumor on the lung acoustic response is simulated and visualized using the FE model. In the future, this type of visualization can be compared and matched with experimentally obtained elastographic images to better quantify regional lung material properties to noninvasively diagnose and stage disease and response to treatment. PMID:25190415

  18. A comprehensive computational model of sound transmission through the porcine lung.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zoujun; Peng, Ying; Henry, Brian M; Mansy, Hansen A; Sandler, Richard H; Royston, Thomas J

    2014-09-01

    A comprehensive computational simulation model of sound transmission through the porcine lung is introduced and experimentally evaluated. This "subject-specific" model utilizes parenchymal and major airway geometry derived from x-ray CT images. The lung parenchyma is modeled as a poroviscoelastic material using Biot theory. A finite element (FE) mesh of the lung that includes airway detail is created and used in comsol FE software to simulate the vibroacoustic response of the lung to sound input at the trachea. The FE simulation model is validated by comparing simulation results to experimental measurements using scanning laser Doppler vibrometry on the surface of an excised, preserved lung. The FE model can also be used to calculate and visualize vibroacoustic pressure and motion inside the lung and its airways caused by the acoustic input. The effect of diffuse lung fibrosis and of a local tumor on the lung acoustic response is simulated and visualized using the FE model. In the future, this type of visualization can be compared and matched with experimentally obtained elastographic images to better quantify regional lung material properties to noninvasively diagnose and stage disease and response to treatment. PMID:25190415

  19. Resolving the forbidden band of SF6.

    PubMed

    Boudon, V; Manceron, L; Kwabia Tchana, F; Loëte, M; Lago, L; Roy, P

    2014-01-28

    Sulfur hexafluoride is an important molecule for modeling thermophysical and polarizability properties. It is also a potent greenhouse gas of anthropogenic origin, whose concentration in the atmosphere, although very low is increasing rapidly; its global warming power is mostly conferred by its strong infrared absorption in the ν3 S-F stretching region near 948 cm(-1). This heavy species, however, features many hot bands at room temperature (at which only 31% of the molecules lie in the ground vibrational state), especially those originating from the lowest, v6 = 1 vibrational state. Unfortunately, the ν6 band itself (near 347 cm(-1)), in the first approximation, is both infrared- and Raman-inactive, and no reliable spectroscopic information could be obtained up to now and this has precluded a correct modeling of the hot bands. It has been suggested theoretically and experimentally that this band might be slightly activated through Coriolis interaction with infrared-active fundamentals and appears in high pressure measurements as a very faint, unresolved band. Using a new cryogenic multipass cell with 93 m optical path length and regulated at 163 ± 2 K temperature, coupled to synchrotron radiation and a high resolution interferometer, the spectrum of the ν6 far-infrared region has been recorded. Low temperature was used to avoid the presence of hot bands. We are thus able to confirm that the small feature in this region, previously viewed at low-resolution, is indeed ν6. The fully resolved spectrum has been analyzed, thanks to the XTDS software package. The band appears to be activated by faint Coriolis interactions with the strong ν3 and ν4 fundamental bands, resulting in the appearance of a small first-order dipole moment term, inducing unusual selection rules. The band center (ν6 = 347.736707(35) cm(-1)) and rovibrational parameters are now accurately determined for the v6 = 1 level. The ν6 perturbation-induced dipole moment is estimated to be 33 ± 3

  20. Microgravity and the lung.

    PubMed

    Prisk, G K

    2000-07-01

    Although environmental physiologists are readily able to alter many aspects of the environment, it is not possible to remove the effects of gravity on Earth. During the past decade, a series of space flights were conducted in which comprehensive studies of the lung in microgravity (weightlessness) were performed. Stroke volume increases on initial exposure to microgravity and then decreases as circulating blood volume is reduced. Diffusing capacity increases markedly, due to increases in both pulmonary capillary blood volume and membrane diffusing capacity, likely due to more uniform pulmonary perfusion. Both ventilation and perfusion become more uniform throughout the lung, although much residual inhomogeneity remains. Despite the improvement in the distribution of both ventilation and perfusion, the range of the ventilation-to-perfusion ratio seen during a normal breath remains unaltered, possibly because of a spatial mismatch between ventilation and perfusion on a small scale. There are unexpected changes in the mixing of gas in the periphery of the lung, and evidence suggests that the intrinsic inhomogeneity of the lung exists at a scale of an acinus or a few acini. In addition, aerosol deposition in the alveolar region is unexpectedly high compared with existing models. PMID:10904076

  1. American Lung Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lung Association Applauds EPA’s Update to Cross-State Air Pollution Rule September 7, 2016 In response to today’s ... to finalize an update to the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule to reduce ozone pollution, Harold P. Wimmer... ...

  2. Subclinical Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Tracy J.; Hunninghake, Gary M.

    2012-01-01

    The widespread use of high-resolution computed tomography in clinical and research settings has increased the detection of interstitial lung abnormalities (ILA) in asymptomatic and undiagnosed individuals. We reported that in smokers, ILA were present in about 1 of every 12 high-resolution computed tomographic scans; however, the long-term significance of these subclinical changes remains unclear. Studies in families affected with pulmonary fibrosis, smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and patients with inflammatory lung disease have shown that asymptomatic and undiagnosed individuals with ILA have reductions in lung volume, functional limitations, increased pulmonary symptoms, histopathologic changes, and molecular profiles similar to those observed in patients with clinically significant interstitial lung disease (ILD). These findings suggest that, in select at-risk populations, ILA may represent early stages of pulmonary fibrosis or subclinical ILD. The growing interest surrounding this topic is motivated by our poor understanding of the inciting events and natural history of ILD, coupled with a lack of effective therapies. In this perspective, we outline past and current research focused on validating radiologic, physiological, and molecular methods to detect subclinical ILD. We discuss the limitations of the available cross-sectional studies and the need for future longitudinal studies to determine the prognostic and therapeutic implications of subclinical ILD in populations at risk of developing clinically significant ILD. PMID:22366047

  3. Lung and Bronchus Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 224,390 % of All New Cancer Cases 13.3% Estimated Deaths in 2016 158,080 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 415,707 people living with lung and bronchus ...

  4. Lung Cancer – Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ronan J.; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    In lung cancer, early attempts to modulate the immune system via vaccine based therapeutics have to date, been unsuccessful. An improved understanding of tumor immunology has facilitated the production of more sophisticated lung cancer vaccines. It is anticipated, that it will likely require multiple epitopes of a diverse set of genes restricted to multiple haplotypes to generate a truly effective vaccine that is able to overcome the various immunologic escape mechanisms that tumors employ. Other issues to overcome include optimal patient selection, which adjuvant agent to use and how to adequately monitor for an immunological response. This review discusses the most promising vaccination strategies for non small cell lung cancer including the allogeneic tumor cell vaccine belagenpumatucel-L, which is a mixture of 4 allogeneic non small cell lung cancer cell lines genetically modified to secrete an antisense oligonucleotide to TGF-β2 and three other target protein-specific vaccines designed to induce responses against melanoma-associated antigen A3 (MAGE-A3), mucin 1 (MUC1) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). PMID:21952280

  5. CAVEOLINS AND LUNG FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Maniatis, Nikolaos A.; Chernaya, Olga; Shinin, Vasily; Minshall, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    The primary function of the mammalian lung is to facilitate diffusion of oxygen to venous blood and to ventilate carbon dioxide produced by catabolic reactions within cells. However, it is also responsible for a variety of other important functions, including host defense and production of vasoactive agents to regulate not only systemic blood pressure, but also water, electrolyte and acid-base balance. Caveolin-1 is highly expressed in the majority of cell types in the lung, including epithelial, endothelial, smooth muscle, connective tissue cells, and alveolar macrophages. Deletion of caveolin-1 in these cells results in major functional aberrations, suggesting that caveolin-1 may be crucial to lung homeostasis and development. Furthermore, generation of mutant mice that under-express caveolin-1 results in severe functional distortion with phenotypes covering practically the entire spectrum of known lung diseases, including pulmonary hypertension, fibrosis, increased endothelial permeability, and immune defects. In this Chapter, we outline the current state of knowledge regarding caveolin-1-dependent regulation of pulmonary cell functions and discuss recent research findings on the role of caveolin-1 in various pulmonary disease states, including obstructive and fibrotic pulmonary vascular and inflammatory diseases. PMID:22411320

  6. Autoimmunity: lungs and citrullination.

    PubMed

    Klareskog, Lars; Catrina, Anca I

    2015-05-01

    Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies are a distinctive feature of a subset of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A new report investigates how lung inflammation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease affects protein citrullination, providing an additional piece of information on the potential link between airway inflammation and RA. PMID:25776950

  7. [Arc welder's lung].

    PubMed

    Molinari, Luciana; Alvarez, Clarisa; Semeniuk, Guillermo B

    2010-01-01

    Pneumoconiosis of electric arc welder or siderotic pneumoconiosis was described by Doig and McLaughlin in 1936 as a lung disease caused by chronic inhalation of iron fumes in electric arc welders. We present a case report of electric arc welder siderosis associated with high levels of ferritin, without findings of iron deposit in any other organ. PMID:21163741

  8. Particles causing lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kilburn, K.H.

    1984-04-01

    The lung has a limited number of patterns of reaction to inhaled particles. The disease observed depends upon the location: conducting airways, terminal bronchioles and alveoli, and upon the nature of inflammation induced: acute, subacute or chronic. Many different agents cause narrowing of conducting airways (asthma) and some of these cause permanent distortion or obliteration of airways as well. Terminal bronchioles appear to be particularly susceptible to particles which cause goblet cell metaplasia, mucous plugging and ultimately peribronchiolar fibrosis. Cancer is the last outcome at the bronchial level and appears to depend upon continuous exposure to or retention of an agent in the airway and failure of the affected cells to be exfoliated which may be due to squamous metaplasia. Alveoli are populated by endothelial cells, Type I or pavement epithelial cells and metabolically active cuboidal Type II cells that produce the lungs specific surfactant, dipalmytol lecithin. Disturbances of surfactant lead to edema in distal lung while laryngeal edema due to anaphylaxis or fumes may produce asphyxia. Physical retention of indigestible particles or retention by immune memory responses may provoke hyaline membranes, stimulate alveolar lipoproteinosis and finally fibrosis. This later exuberant deposition of connective tissue has been best studied in the occupational pneumoconioses especially silicosis and asbestosis. In contrast emphysema a catabolic response appears frequently to result from leakage or release of lysosomal proteases into the lung during processing of cigarette smoke particles. 164 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  9. Caveolins and lung function.

    PubMed

    Maniatis, Nikolaos A; Chernaya, Olga; Shinin, Vasily; Minshall, Richard D

    2012-01-01

    The primary function of the mammalian lung is to facilitate diffusion of oxygen to venous blood and to ventilate carbon dioxide produced by catabolic reactions within cells. However, it is also responsible for a variety of other important functions, including host defense and production of vasoactive agents to regulate not only systemic blood pressure, but also water, electrolyte and acid-base balance. Caveolin-1 is highly expressed in the majority of cell types in the lung, including epithelial, endothelial, smooth muscle, connective tissue cells, and alveolar macrophages. Deletion of caveolin-1 in these cells results in major functional aberrations, suggesting that caveolin-1 may be crucial to lung homeostasis and development. Furthermore, generation of mutant mice that under-express caveolin-1 results in severe functional distortion with phenotypes covering practically the entire spectrum of known lung diseases, including pulmonary hypertension, fibrosis, increased endothelial permeability, and immune defects. In this Chapter, we outline the current state of knowledge regarding caveolin-1-dependent regulation of pulmonary cell functions and discuss recent research findings on the role of caveolin-1 in various pulmonary disease states, including obstructive and fibrotic pulmonary vascular and inflammatory diseases. PMID:22411320

  10. Marijuana and the lung.

    PubMed

    Patrick, G B

    1980-05-01

    Short-term effects of marijuana smoking include bronchodilatation; long-term effects on the respiratory tree appear comparable with those of heavy cigarette use. Contamination of marijuana with paraquat, a potent herbicide, does not at this time appear to constitute a significant hazard to the lungs. PMID:7375399

  11. Nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this review is to report the Clinical Year in Review proceedings in the field of nonsmall cell lung cancer that were presented at the 2012 European Respiratory Society Congress in Vienna, Austria. Various topics were reviewed, including epidemiology, screening, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and palliative and end of life care. PMID:23457162

  12. Time-resolved transillumination and optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Haller, Emmanuel B.

    1996-01-01

    In response to an invitation by the editor-in-chief, I would like to present the current status of time-domain imaging. With exciting new photon diffusion techniques being developed in the frequency domain and promising optical coherence tomography, time-resolved transillumination is in constant evolution and the subject of passionate discussions during the numerous conferences dedicated to this subject. The purpose of time-resolved optical tomography is to provide noninvasive, high-resolution imaging of the interior of living bodies by the use of nonionizing radiation. Moreover, the use of visible to near-infrared wavelength yields metabolic information. Breast cancer screening is the primary potential application for time-resolved imaging. Neurology and tissue characterization are also possible fields of applications. Time- resolved transillumination and optical tomography should not only improve diagnoses, but the welfare of the patient. As no overview of this technique has yet been presented to my knowledge, this paper briefly describes the various methods enabling time-resolved transillumination and optical tomography. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods, as well as the clinical challenges they face are discussed. Although an analytic and computable model of light transport through tissues is essential for a meaningful interpretation of the transillumination process, this paper will not dwell on the mathematics of photon propagation.

  13. Spectral resolvability of iterated rippled noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, William A.

    2005-04-01

    A forward-masking experiment was used to estimate the spectral ripple of iterated rippled noise (IRN) that is possibly resolved by the auditory system. Tonal signals were placed at spectral peaks and valleys of IRN maskers for a wide variety of IRN conditions that included different delays, number of iterations, and stimulus durations. The differences in the forward-masked thresholds of tones at spectral peaks and valleys were used to estimate spectral resolvability, and these results were compared to estimates obtained from a gamma-tone filter bank. The IRN spectrum has spectral peaks that are harmonics of the reciprocal of the delay used to generate IRN stimuli. As the number of iterations in the generation of IRN stimuli increases so does the difference in the spectral peak-to-valley ratio. For high number of iterations, long delays, and long durations evidence for spectral resolvability existed up to the 6th harmonic. For all other conditions spectral resolvability appeared to disappear at harmonics lower than the 6th, or was not measurable at all. These data will be discussed in terms of the role spectral resolvability might play in processing the pitch, pitch strength, and timbre of IRN stimuli. [Work supported by a grant from NIDCD.

  14. Lung cancer treatment outcomes in recipients of lung transplant

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lingling; Pennell, Nathan A.; Elson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung transplant recipients develop lung cancer more commonly than the general population. The best treatment approach for these patients is unclear. The goal of this study is to evaluate treatment outcomes in this population. Methods We used the Cleveland Clinic lung transplant database to identify patients diagnosed with lung cancer at the time of or after lung transplant. Transplant and lung cancer-related data were retrospectively reviewed. Results Among 847 patients underwent lung transplant between 2005 and 2013, 17 (2%) were diagnosed with lung cancer and included. Median age was 61 (range, 48–70) years. Majority were stage I/II (n=11), one had stage IIIA, five had stage IV. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were more common than small cell lung cancer (SCLC) (n=15 vs. 2). Curative treatment was performed as lobectomy in native lung (n=1), and radiation in transplanted lung (n=2). Chemotherapy was given in 10 patients, primarily carboplatin-based doublets with docetaxel, pemetrexed, or etoposide. Six of these received palliative chemotherapy for either metastases at diagnosis (n=3) or recurrence after early stage disease (n=3). Except for one patient with complete response, all others had progressive disease following palliative chemotherapy. Overall, patients who received chemotherapy had a median survival of 7.5 months from the initiation of chemotherapy, but 30% developed grade 5 sepsis. Median survival for stage I–IIIA and stage IV were 23.2 and 2.5 months respectively. Conclusions Lung cancer in lung transplant recipients carries various clinical courses. Patients with metastatic disease have substantial toxicities from chemotherapy and poor survival. Early stage patients should be offered treatment with modified dosages to decrease the risk of severe toxicities. PMID:26798588

  15. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of particle deposition in large-scale, multigenerational lung models.

    PubMed

    Walters, D Keith; Luke, William H

    2011-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has emerged as a useful tool for the prediction of airflow and particle transport within the human lung airway. Several published studies have demonstrated the use of Eulerian finite-volume CFD simulations coupled with Lagrangian particle tracking methods to determine local and regional particle deposition rates in small subsections of the bronchopulmonary tree. However, the simulation of particle transport and deposition in large-scale models encompassing more than a few generations is less common, due in part to the sheer size and complexity of the human lung airway. Highly resolved, fully coupled flowfield solution and particle tracking in the entire lung, for example, is currently an intractable problem and will remain so for the foreseeable future. This paper adopts a previously reported methodology for simulating large-scale regions of the lung airway (Walters, D. K., and Luke, W. H., 2010, "A Method for Three-Dimensional Navier-Stokes Simulations of Large-Scale Regions of the Human Lung Airway," ASME J. Fluids Eng., 132(5), p. 051101), which was shown to produce results similar to fully resolved geometries using approximate, reduced geometry models. The methodology is extended here to particle transport and deposition simulations. Lagrangian particle tracking simulations are performed in combination with Eulerian simulations of the airflow in an idealized representation of the human lung airway tree. Results using the reduced models are compared with those using the fully resolved models for an eight-generation region of the conducting zone. The agreement between fully resolved and reduced geometry simulations indicates that the new method can provide an accurate alternative for large-scale CFD simulations while potentially reducing the computational cost of these simulations by several orders of magnitude. PMID:21186893

  16. Update in Lung Cancer 2014.

    PubMed

    Spira, Avrum; Halmos, Balazs; Powell, Charles A

    2015-08-01

    In the past 2 years, lung cancer research and clinical care have advanced significantly. Advancements in the field have improved outcomes and promise to lead to further reductions in deaths from lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. These advances include identification of new molecular targets for personalized targeted therapy, validation of molecular signatures of lung cancer risk in smokers, progress in lung tumor immunotherapy, and implementation of population-based lung cancer screening with chest computed tomography in the United States. In this review, we highlight recent research in these areas and challenges for the future. PMID:26230235

  17. Depth-resolved fluorescence of biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yicong; Xi, Peng; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Yim, So Fan; Yu, Mei-Yung; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2005-06-01

    The depth-resolved autofluorescence ofrabbit oral tissue, normal and dysplastic human ectocervical tissue within l20μm depth were investigated utilizing a confocal fluorescence spectroscopy with the excitations at 355nm and 457nm. From the topmost keratinizing layer of oral and ectocervical tissue, strong keratin fluorescence with the spectral characteristics similar to collagen was observed. The fluorescence signal from epithelial tissue between the keratinizing layer and stroma can be well resolved. Furthermore, NADH and FADfluorescence measured from the underlying non-keratinizing epithelial layer were strongly correlated to the tissue pathology. This study demonstrates that the depth-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy can reveal fine structural information on epithelial tissue and potentially provide more accurate diagnostic information for determining tissue pathology.

  18. The conforming brain and deontological resolve.

    PubMed

    Pincus, Melanie; LaViers, Lisa; Prietula, Michael J; Berns, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Our personal values are subject to forces of social influence. Deontological resolve captures how strongly one relies on absolute rules of right and wrong in the representation of one's personal values and may predict willingness to modify one's values in the presence of social influence. Using fMRI, we found that a neurobiological metric for deontological resolve based on relative activity in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) during the passive processing of sacred values predicted individual differences in conformity. Individuals with stronger deontological resolve, as measured by greater VLPFC activity, displayed lower levels of conformity. We also tested whether responsiveness to social reward, as measured by ventral striatal activity during social feedback, predicted variability in conformist behavior across individuals but found no significant relationship. From these results we conclude that unwillingness to conform to others' values is associated with a strong neurobiological representation of social rules. PMID:25170989

  19. The Conforming Brain and Deontological Resolve

    PubMed Central

    Pincus, Melanie; LaViers, Lisa; Prietula, Michael J.; Berns, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Our personal values are subject to forces of social influence. Deontological resolve captures how strongly one relies on absolute rules of right and wrong in the representation of one's personal values and may predict willingness to modify one's values in the presence of social influence. Using fMRI, we found that a neurobiological metric for deontological resolve based on relative activity in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) during the passive processing of sacred values predicted individual differences in conformity. Individuals with stronger deontological resolve, as measured by greater VLPFC activity, displayed lower levels of conformity. We also tested whether responsiveness to social reward, as measured by ventral striatal activity during social feedback, predicted variability in conformist behavior across individuals but found no significant relationship. From these results we conclude that unwillingness to conform to others' values is associated with a strong neurobiological representation of social rules. PMID:25170989

  20. Hypo-Elastic Model for Lung Parenchyma

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, Alan D.; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2012-03-01

    A simple elastic isotropic constitutive model for the spongy tissue in lung is derived from the theory of hypoelasticity. The model is shown to exhibit a pressure dependent behavior that has been interpreted by some as indicating extensional anisotropy. In contrast, we show that this behavior arises natural from an analysis of isotropic hypoelastic invariants, and is a likely result of non-linearity, not anisotropy. The response of the model is determined analytically for several boundary value problems used for material characterization. These responses give insight into both the material behavior as well as admissible bounds on parameters. The model is characterized against published experimental data for dog lung. Future work includes non-elastic model behavior.