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Sample records for resolved infrared spectroscopy

  1. Spatially Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy of Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knop, Robert Andrew, Jr.

    This thesis presents infrared spectroscopy of the circumnuclear regions of 23 Seyfert galaxies. Observations are spectrally resolved with a resolution of λΔλ~1000 and spatially resolved to ~1'', corresponding to ~102 pc for the objects in the sample. The instrument used for the observations, the Palomar Near-Infrared Spectrometer, is described, and problems peculiar to reduction of data from it are discussed. The lines observed include Paβ, Brγ, (FeII) (λ=1.2567μm), and H2 (λ=2.1213μm). In nine objects, the coronal line (SIX) (λ=1.2524μm) is also detected. Spatially resolved line emission is clearly visible in approximately half of the objects observed. The data for five of the objects showing the best spatially resolved infrared line emission are analyzed in detail. These objects include Seyfert 1.5 galaxy NGC 4151 and Seyfert 2 galaxies Mk 1066, NGC 2110, NGC 4388, and Mk 3. The data for the remaining objects is presented in tabular form, and each object is discussed briefly. The data argue that processes associated with the Seyfert nucleus are responsible for the bulk of the observed (FeII) emission. Kinematic and spatial associations can be drawn between features in the (FeII) line profiles and other processes associated with the active nucleus, such as outflows seen in ionized optical emission and radio lobes. Most of the (FeII) appears to emerge from partially ionized regions excited by nuclear x-rays, with an additional contribution from fast shocks. Some of the H2 emission also appears to be associated with the nuclear activity. However, in some cases the H2 emission is observed to have a different spatial distribution from (FeII) and the H+ emission. The H2 emission is probably thermally excited. No significant differences are found between the infrared line emission of Seyfert and Seyfert 1.x galaxies.

  2. Rotationally resolved infrared spectroscopy of adamantane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirali, O.; Boudon, V.; Oomens, J.; Vervloet, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first rotationally resolved spectra of adamantane (C10H16) applying gas-phase Fourier transform infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy. High-resolution IR spectra are recorded in the 33-4500 cm-1range using as source of IR radiation both synchrotron radiation (at the AILES beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron) as well as a classical globar. Adamantane is a spherical top molecule with tetrahedral symmetry (Td point group) and has no permanent dipole moment in its vibronic ground state. Of the 72 fundamental vibrational modes in adamantane, only 11 are IR active. Here we present rotationally resolved spectra for seven of them: ν30, ν28, ν27, ν26, ν25, ν24, and ν23. The typical rotational structure of spherical tops is observed and analyzed using the STDS software developed in the Dijon group, which provides the first accurate energy levels and rotational constants for seven fundamental modes. Rotational levels with quantum numbers as high as J = 107 have been identified and included in the fit leading to a typical standard deviation of about 10-3 cm-1.

  3. Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectroscopy and Energy-Resolving Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhauer, Frank; Raab, Walfried

    2015-08-01

    Imaging spectroscopy has seen rapid progress over the past 25 years, leading to breakthroughs in many fields of astronomy that would not have been otherwise possible. This review overviews the visible/infrared imaging spectroscopy techniques as well as energy-resolving detectors. We introduce the working principle of scanning Fabry-Perot and Fourier transform spectrometers and explain the most common integral field concepts based on mirror slicers, lenslet arrays, and fibers. The main advantage of integral field spectrographs is the simultaneous measurement of spatial and spectral information. Although Fabry-Perot and Fourier transform spectrometers can provide a larger field of view, it is ultimately the higher sensitivity of integral field units that make them the technique of choice. This is arguably the case for image slicers, which make the most efficient use of the available detector pixels and have equal or higher transmission than lenslet arrays and fiber integral field units, respectively. We also address the more specific issues of large étendue operation, focal ratio degradation, anamorphic magnification, and diffraction-limited operation. This review also covers the emerging technology of energy-resolving detectors, which promise very simple and efficient instrument designs. These energy-resolving detectors are based on superconducting thin film technology and exploit either the very small superconducting energy to count the number of quasi-particles excited in the absorption of the photon or the extremely steep phase transition between the normal- and superconducting phase to measure a temperature increase. We have put special emphasis on an overview of the underlying physical phenomena as well as on the recent technological progress and astronomical path finder experiments.

  4. Electron-transfer acceleration investigated by time resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vlček, Antonín; Kvapilová, Hana; Towrie, Michael; Záliš, Stanislav

    2015-03-17

    Ultrafast electron transfer (ET) processes are important primary steps in natural and artificial photosynthesis, as well as in molecular electronic/photonic devices. In biological systems, ET often occurs surprisingly fast over long distances of several tens of angströms. Laser-pulse irradiation is conveniently used to generate strongly oxidizing (or reducing) excited states whose reactions are then studied by time-resolved spectroscopic techniques. While photoluminescence decay and UV-vis absorption supply precise kinetics data, time-resolved infrared absorption (TRIR) and Raman-based spectroscopies have the advantage of providing additional structural information and monitoring vibrational energy flows and dissipation, as well as medium relaxation, that accompany ultrafast ET. We will discuss three cases of photoinduced ET involving the Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) moiety (N,N = polypyridine) that occur much faster than would be expected from ET theories. [Re(4-N-methylpyridinium-pyridine)(CO)3(N,N)](2+) represents a case of excited-state picosecond ET between two different ligands that remains ultrafast even in slow-relaxing solvents, beating the adiabatic limit. This is caused by vibrational/solvational excitation of the precursor state and participation of high-frequency quantum modes in barrier crossing. The case of Re-tryptophan assemblies demonstrates that excited-state Trp → *Re(II) ET is accelerated from nanoseconds to picoseconds when the Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) chromophore is appended to a protein, close to a tryptophan residue. TRIR in combination with DFT calculations and structural studies reveals an interaction between the N,N ligand and the tryptophan indole. It results in partial electronic delocalization in the precursor excited state and likely contributes to the ultrafast ET rate. Long-lived vibrational/solvational excitation of the protein Re(I)(CO)3(N,N)···Trp moiety, documented by dynamic IR band shifts, could be another accelerating factor. The last

  5. Broadband Mid-Infrared Comb-Resolved Fourier Transform Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kevin; Mills, Andrew; Mohr, Christian; Jiang, Jie; Fermann, Martin; Maslowski, Piotr

    2014-06-01

    We report on a comb-resolved, broadband, direct-comb spectroscopy system in the mid-IR and its application to the detection of trace gases and molecular line shape analysis. By coupling an optical parametric oscillator (OPO), a 100 m multipass cell, and a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS), sensitive, comb-resolved broadband spectroscopy of dilute gases is possible. The OPO has radiation output at 3.1-3.7 and 4.5-5.5 μm. The laser repetition rate is scanned to arbitrary values with 1 Hz accuracy around 417 MHz. The comb-resolved spectrum is produced with an absolute frequency axis depending only on the RF reference (in this case a GPS disciplined oscillator), stable to 1 part in 10^9. The minimum detectable absorption is 1.6x10-6 wn Hz-1/2. The operating range of the experimental setup enables access to strong fundamental transitions of numerous molecular species for applications based on trace gas detection such as environmental monitoring, industrial gas calibration or medical application of human breath analysis. In addition to these capabilities, we show the application for careful line shape analysis of argon-broadened CO band spectra around 4.7 μm. Fits of the obtained spectra clearly illustrate the discrepancy between the measured spectra and the Voigt profile (VP), indicating the need to include effects such as Dicke narrowing and the speed-dependence of the collisional width and shift in the line shape model, as was shown in previous cw-laser studies. In contrast to cw-laser based experiments, in this case the entire spectrum (˜ 250 wn) covering the whole P and R branches can be measured in 16 s with 417 MHz resolution, decreasing the acquisition time by orders of magnitude. The parallel acquisition allows collection of multiple lines simultaneously, removing the correlation of possible temperature and pressure drifts. While cw-systems are capable of measuring spectra with higher precision, this demonstration opens the door for fast

  6. Direct chemical characterization of natural wood resins by temperature-resolved and space-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-bo; Zhou, Qun; Sun, Su-qin

    2016-07-01

    Wood resins are valuable natural products with wide utilizations. Either in the form of resin exudates or in the form of resin-containing woods, natural wood resins are usually complex mixtures consisting of various compounds. Therefore, effective chemical characterization methods are necessary for the research and quality control of natural wood resins. No need for separation or labeling, wood resin samples can be measured directly by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, which reduces the testing costs and avoids the possible distortions caused by the pretreatments. However, the absorption bands of various compositions in the resin sample are assembled in a single spectrum by the separation-free measurement, which makes it difficult to identify the compounds of interest and decreases the limits of detection. In this research, the temperature-resolved and space-resolved FT-IR techniques are proposed to resolve the overlapped signals for the direct, selective, and sensitive characterization of natural wood resins. For resin exudates, the temperature-resolved FT-IR spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation analysis can resolve the absorption bands of different compounds according to their responses to the thermal perturbations. For resin-containing woods, the FT-IR microspectroscopic imaging and principal component analysis can resolve the absorption bands of different compounds according to their positions. The study of six kinds of wood resins proves the feasibility of temperature-resolved and space-resolved FT-IR techniques for the direct, selective, and sensitive chemical characterization of natural wood resins.

  7. Conventional and Time-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy of La-1111 Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Xiaoxiang; Dai, Y.; Homes, C.; Kidszun, M.; Haindl, S.; Carr, G.

    2013-03-01

    We have performed both conventional as well as time-resolved far-infrared spectroscopy on LaFeAsO1-xFx pnictide thin films. The conventional spectroscopy results can be fit using a simple gapped superconductor + normal conductor two-component model. Absorption by quasiparticles in a gap system with nodes is a plausible explanation for the normal component [Lobo et al. Phys. Rev. B 82, 100506(R) (2010)]. The time-resolved study is performed by laser-pump, far-IR probe spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation at NSLS beamline U4IR. A laser pulse breaks superconducting pairs and the synchrotron probe is used to sense the recombination process. In contrast to the picosecond response observed for cuprate superconductors, we observe a nanosecond response typical of a fully gapped superconductor where phonon-bottleneck effects slow the effective recombination rate. This result suggests the presence of a full isotropic gap, as might exist at lower energies due to electronic scattering [Carbotte et al. Phys. Rev. B 81, 104510 (2010)]. Supported by the U.S. Dep't. of Energy under contract DE-AC02-98CH10886 at Brookhaven Nat'l Lab.

  8. Time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: Application to pulsed discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Kentarou; Hama, Yoichi; Nishida, Shigeki

    2005-07-01

    Time-resolved Fourier transform spectroscopy (TR-FTS) is reviewed, with emphasis on synchronous FTS using continuously scanning interferometers. By using a high-resolution Bruker IFS 120 HR, a TR-FTS method has been developed with the help of a microcontroller SX, where a maximum of 64 time-resolved data are recorded with a preset time interval in a single scan of the interferometer. The time resolution is 1 μs, limited by the response time of the detector system used. This method has been applied to a pulsed discharge in an Ar and H 2 mixture to observe time profiles of ArH + and ArH emission spectra. Electronic transitions of He 2 have been observed in the infrared region with this method, and from the time profiles, He 2 in Rydberg states with higher energy than the b3Π state is found to be produced efficiently in afterglow plasma. Fifteen bands in the 2300-8000 cm -1 region have been assigned by using previously reported data from the optical region. A new band from the 5 f state has been assigned for the first time through the 5 f-4 d band in the 2600 cm -1 region.

  9. Optical analysis of cirrhotic liver by near infrared time resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Toshihiro; Kitai, Toshiyuki; Miwa, Mitsuharu; Takahashi, Rei; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    1999-10-01

    The severity of liver cirrhosis was related with the optical properties of liver tissue. Various grades of liver cirrhosis were produced in rats by intraperitoneal injection of thioacetamide (TAA) for different periods: 4 weeks, 8 weeks, 12 weeks, and 16 weeks. Optical properties of the liver, absorption, coefficient ((mu) a) and scattering coefficient (microsecond(s) '), were measured by near-infrared time- resolved spectroscopy. Histological examination confirmed cirrhotic changes in the liver, which were more severe in rats with TAA administration for longer periods. The (mu) a increased in 4- and 8-week rats, and then decreased in 12- and 16-week rats. The (mu) a of blood-free liver decreased as liver cirrhosis progressed. The hemoglobin content in the liver calculated from the (mu) a values increased in 4- and 8-week rats and decreased in 12- and 16-week rats. The microsecond(s) ' decreased in the cirrhotic liver, probably reflecting the decrease in the mitochondria content. It was shown that (mu) a and microsecond(s) ' determination is useful to assess the severity of liver cirrhosis.

  10. A compact time-resolved system for near infrared spectroscopy based on wavelength space multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re, Rebecca; Contini, Davide; Caffini, Matteo; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Torricelli, Alessandro

    2010-11-01

    We designed and developed a compact dual-wavelength and dual-channel time-resolved system for near-infrared spectroscopy studies of muscle and brain. The system employs pulsed diode lasers as sources, compact photomultipliers, and time-correlated single photon counting boards for detection. To exploit the full temporal and dynamic range of the acquisition technique, we implemented an approach based on wavelength space multiplexing: laser pulses at the two wavelengths are alternatively injected into the two channels by means of an optical 2×2 switch. In each detection line (i.e., in each temporal window), the distribution of photon time-of-flights at one wavelength is acquired. The proposed approach increases the signal-to-noise ratio and avoids wavelength cross-talk with respect to the typical approach based on time multiplexing. The instrument was characterized on tissue phantoms to assess its properties in terms of linearity, stability, noise, and reproducibility. Finally, it was successfully tested in preliminary in vivo measurements on muscle during standard cuff occlusion and on the brain during a motor cortex response due to hand movements.

  11. Quantification of ischemic muscle deoxygenation by near infrared time-resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaoka, Takatumi; Katsumura, Toshihito; Murase, Norio; Nishio, Shinya; Osada, Takuya; Sako, Takayuki; Higuchi, Hiroyuki; Kurosawa, Yuko; Shimomitsu, Teruichi; Miwa, Mitsuharu; Chance, Britton

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify muscle deoxygenation in human skeletal muscles using near infrared time-resolved spectroscopy (NIRTRS) and compare NIRTRS indicators and blood saturation. The forearm muscles of five healthy males (aged 27 - 32 yrs.) were monitored for changes in hemoglobin saturation (SO2) during 12 min of arterial occlusion and recovery. SO2 was determined by measuring the temporal profile of photon diffusion at 780 and 830 nm using NIRTRS, and was defined as SO2-TRS. Venous blood samples were also obtained for measurements of SvO2, and PvO2. Interstitial PO2(PintO2) was monitored by placing an O2 electrode directly into the muscle tissue. Upon the initiation of occlusion, all parameters fell progressively until reaching a plateau in the latter half of occlusion. It was observed at the end of occlusion that SO2-TRS (24.1 +/- 5.6%) agreed with SvO2 (26.2 +/- 6.4) and that PintO2 (14.7 +/- 1.0 Torr) agreed with PvO2 (17.3 +/- 2.2 Torr). The resting O2 store (oxygenated hemoglobin) and O2 consumption rate were 290 (mu) M and 0.82 (mu) Ms-1, respectively, values which reasonably agree with the reported results. These results indicate that there was no O2 gradient between vessels and interstisium at the end of occlusion.

  12. Time-resolved fluorescence polarization spectroscopy of visible and near infrared dyes in picosecond dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) dyes absorb and emit light within the range from 700 to 900 nm have several benefits in biological studies for one- and/or two-photon excitation for deeper penetration of tissues. These molecules undergo vibrational and rotational motion in the relaxation of the excited electronic states, Due to the less than ideal anisotropy behavior of NIR dyes stemming from the fluorophores elongated structures and short fluorescence lifetime in picosecond range, no significant efforts have been made to recognize the theory of these dyes in time-resolved polarization dynamics. In this study, the depolarization of the fluorescence due to emission from rotational deactivation in solution will be measured with the excitation of a linearly polarized femtosecond laser pulse and a streak camera. The theory, experiment and application of the ultrafast fluorescence polarization dynamics and anisotropy are illustrated with examples of two of the most important medical based dyes. One is NIR dye, namely Indocyanine Green (ICG) and is compared with Fluorescein which is in visible range with much longer lifetime. A set of first-order linear differential equations was developed to model fluorescence polarization dynamics of NIR dye in picosecond range. Using this model, the important parameters of ultrafast polarization spectroscopy were identified: risetime, initial time, fluorescence lifetime, and rotation times.

  13. Quantifying the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen by combining diffuse correlation spectroscopy and time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdecchia, Kyle; Diop, Mamadou; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2013-02-01

    Preterm infants are highly susceptible to ischemic brain injury; consequently, continuous bedside monitoring to detect ischemia before irreversible damage occurs would improve patient outcome. In addition to monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF), assessing the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) would be beneficial considering that metabolic thresholds can be used to evaluate tissue viability. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that changes in absolute CMRO2 could be measured by combining diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) with time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (TR-NIRS). Absolute CBF was determined using bolus-tracking TR-NIRS to calibrate the DCS measurements. Cerebral venous blood oxygenation (SvO2) was determined by multiwavelength TR-NIRS measurements, the accuracy of which was assessed by directly measuring the oxygenation of sagittal sinus blood. In eight newborn piglets, CMRO2 was manipulated by varying the anesthetics and by injecting sodium cyanide. No significant differences were found between the two sets of SvO2 measurements obtained by TR-NIRS or sagittal sinus blood samples and the corresponding CMRO2 measurements. Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean CMRO2 difference of 0.0268±0.8340 mL O2/100 g/min between the two techniques over a range from 0.3 to 4 mL O2/100 g/min.

  14. Cerebral and Muscle Tissue Oxygenation During Incremental Cycling in Male Adolescents Measured by Time-Resolved Near-Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Goutham; Leu, Szu-Yun; Cerussi, Albert; Tromberg, Bruce; Cooper, Dan M; Galassetti, Pietro

    2016-05-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy has long been used to measure tissue-specific O2 dynamics in exercise, but most published data have used continuous wave devices incapable of quantifying absolute Hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations. We used time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy to study exercising muscle (Vastus Lateralis, VL) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) Hb oxygenation in 11 young males (15.3 ± 2.1 yrs) performing incremental cycling until exhaustion (peak VO2 = 42.7 ± 6.1 ml/min/kg, mean peak power = 181 ± 38 W). Time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy measurements of reduced scattering (μs´) and absorption (μa) at three wavelengths (759, 796, and 833 nm) were used to calculate concentrations of oxyHb ([HbO2]), deoxy Hb ([HbR]), total Hb ([THb]), and O2 saturation (stO2). In PFC, significant increases were observed in both [HbO2] and [HbR] during intense exercise. PFC stO2% remained stable until 80% of total exercise time, then dropped (-2.95%, p = .0064). In VL, stO2% decreased until peak time (-6.8%, p = .01). Segmented linear regression identified thresholds for PFC [HbO2], [HbR], VL [THb]. There was a strong correlation between timing of second ventilatory threshold and decline in PFC [HbO2] (r = .84). These findings show that time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy can be used to study physiological threshold phenomena in children during maximal exercise, providing insight into tissue specific hemodynamics and metabolism. PMID:26451845

  15. PHASE-RESOLVED INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY AND PHOTOMETRY OF V1500 CYGNI, AND A SEARCH FOR SIMILAR OLD CLASSICAL NOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Thomas E.; Campbell, Randy D.; Lyke, James E. E-mail: jlyke@keck.hawaii.edu

    2013-08-01

    We present phase-resolved near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of the classical nova (CN) V1500 Cyg to explore whether cyclotron emission is present in this system. While the spectroscopy do not indicate the presence of discrete cyclotron harmonic emission, the light curves suggest that a sizable fraction of its near-infrared fluxes are due to this component. The light curves of V1500 Cyg appear to remain dominated by emission from the heated face of the secondary star in this system. We have used infrared spectroscopy and photometry to search for other potential magnetic systems among old CNe. We have found that the infrared light curves of V1974 Cyg superficially resemble those of V1500 Cyg, suggesting a highly irradiated companion. The old novae V446 Her and QV Vul have light curves with large amplitude variations like those seen in polars, suggesting they might have magnetic primaries. We extract photometry for 79 old novae from the Two Micron All Sky Survey Point Source Catalog and use those data to derive the mean, un-reddened infrared colors of quiescent novae. We also extract WISE data for these objects and find that 45 of them were detected. Surprisingly, a number of these systems were detected in the WISE 22 {mu}m band. While two of those objects produced significant dust shells (V705 Cas and V445 Pup), the others did not. It appears that line emission from their ionized ejected shells is the most likely explanation for those detections.

  16. Time-resolved spectroscopy and near infrared imaging enhanced by receptor-targeted contrast agents for prostate cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Y.; Wang, W. B.; Tang, G. C.; Achilefu, S.; Alfano, R. R.

    2011-03-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopy and near infrared imaging enhanced by receptor-targeted contrast agents for prostate cancer detection will be presented. Two contrast agents, Cybesin and Cytate, were investigated using time-resolved spectroscopy in aqueous solution and cancerous and normal prostate tissues. The time evolution of the fluorescent dipole in solution was studied using a system of first-order linear differential equations containing two main parameters: the decay rate of emission and the rate of one orthogonal emission component transferring to another. An analytical polarization model was developed and used to extract rotational times and fluorescence anisotropies of the contrast agents in prostate tissues. The differences of rotational times and polarization anisotropies were observed for Cybesin (Cytate) in cancerous and normal prostate tissue, which reflect preferred bond of contrast agents and cancerous tissue cells. The conjugation of Cybesin (Cytate) to prostate cancerous cells offers high contrast between normal and cancerous tissues.

  17. Far-field infrared super-resolution microscopy using picosecond time-resolved transient fluorescence detected IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Makoto; Kawashima, Yasutake; Takeda, Akihiro; Ohmori, Tsutomu; Fujii, Masaaki

    2007-05-01

    A new far-field infrared super-resolution microscopy combining laser fluorescence microscope and picosecond time-resolved transient fluorescence detected IR (TFD-IR) spectroscopy is proposed. TFD-IR spectroscopy is a kind of IR-visible/UV double resonance spectroscopy, and detects IR transitions by the transient fluorescence due to electronic transition originating from vibrationally excited level populated by IR light. IR images of rhodamine-6G solution and of fluorescent beads were clearly observed by monitoring the transient fluorescence. Super-resolution twice higher than the diffraction limit for IR light was achieved. The IR spectrum due to the transient fluorescence was also measured from spatial domains smaller than the diffraction limit.

  18. The Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII): Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy in the Far-Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Astronomical studies at infrared wavelengths have dramatically improved our understanding of the universe, and observations with Spitzer, the upcoming Herschel mission, and SOFIA will continue to provide exciting new discoveries. The relatively low angular resolution of these missions, however, is insufficient to resolve the physical scale on which mid-to far-infrared emission arises, resulting in source and structure ambiguities that limit our ability to answer key science questions. Interferometry enables high angular resolution at these wavelengths - a powerful tool for scientific discovery. We will build the Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII), an eight-meter baseline Michelson stellar interferometer to fly on a high-altitude balloon. BETTII's spectral-spatial capability, provided by an instrument using double-Fourier techniques, will address key questions about the nature of disks in young star clusters and active galactic nuclei and the envelopes of evolved stars. BETTII will also lay the technological groundwork for future space interferometers and for suborbital programs optimized for studying extrasolar planets.

  19. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy of the lowest triplet state of thymine and thymidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hare, Patrick M.; Middleton, Chris T.; Mertel, Kristin I.; Herbert, John M.; Kohler, Bern

    2008-05-01

    Vibrational spectra of the lowest energy triplet states of thymine and its 2'-deoxyribonucleoside, thymidine, are reported for the first time. Time-resolved infrared (TRIR) difference spectra were recorded over seven decades of time from 300 fs to 3 μs using femtosecond and nanosecond pump-probe techniques. The carbonyl stretch bands in the triplet state are seen at 1603 and ˜1700 cm -1 in room-temperature acetonitrile- d3 solution. These bands and additional ones observed between 1300 and 1450 cm -1 are quenched by dissolved oxygen on a nanosecond time scale. Density-functional calculations accurately predict the difference spectrum between triplet and singlet IR absorption cross sections, confirming the peak assignments and elucidating the nature of the vibrational modes. In the triplet state, the C4 dbnd O carbonyl exhibits substantial single-bond character, explaining the large (˜70 cm -1) red shift in this vibration, relative to the singlet ground state. Femtosecond TRIR measurements unambiguously demonstrate that the triplet state is fully formed within the first 10 ps after excitation, ruling out a relaxed 1nπ ∗ state as the triplet precursor.

  20. Resolving the coronal line region of NGC 1068 with near-infrared integral field spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzalay, X.; Rodríguez-Ardila, A.; Komossa, S.; McGregor, Peter J.

    2013-04-01

    We present adaptive optics-assisted J- and K-band integral field spectroscopy of the inner 300 × 300 pc of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068. The data were obtained with the Gemini Near-infrared Integral-Field Spectrograph integral field unit spectrometer, which provided us with high-spatial and high-spectral resolution sampling. The wavelength range covered by the observations allowed us to study the [Ca VIII], [Si VI], [Si VII], [Al IX] and [S IX] coronal line (CL) emission, covering ionization potentials up to 328 eV. The observations reveal very rich and complex structures, both in terms of velocity fields and emission-line ratios. The CL emission is elongated along the NE-SW direction, with the stronger emission preferentially localized to the NE of the nucleus. CLs are emitted by gas covering a wide range of velocities, with maximum blueshifts/redshifts of ˜ -1600/1000 km s-1. There is a trend for the gas located on the NE side of the nucleus to be blueshifted while the gas located towards the SW is redshifted. The morphology and the kinematics of the near-infrared CLs are in very good agreement with the ones displayed by low-ionization lines and optical CLs, suggesting a common origin. The line flux distributions, velocity maps, ionization structure (traced by the [Si VII]/[Si VI] emission-line ratio) and low-ionization emission-line ratios (i.e. [Fe II]/Paβ and [Fe II]/[P II]) suggest that the radio jet plays an important role in the structure of the CL region of this object, and possibly in its kinematics.

  1. Infrared absorption of CH3OSO detected with time-resolved Fourier-transform spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Dah; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2011-03-01

    A step-scan Fourier-transform spectrometer coupled with a multipass absorption cell was employed to detect temporally resolved infrared absorption spectra of CH(3)OSO produced upon irradiation of a flowing gaseous mixture of CH(3)OS(O)Cl in N(2) or CO(2) at 248 nm. Two intense transient features with origins near 1152 and 994 cm(-1) are assigned to syn-CH(3)OSO; the former is attributed to overlapping bands at 1154 ± 3 and 1151 ± 3 cm(-1), assigned to the S=O stretching mixed with CH(3) rocking (ν(8)) and the S=O stretching mixed with CH(3) wagging (ν(9)) modes, respectively, and the latter to the C-O stretching (ν(10)) mode at 994 ± 6 cm(-1). Two weak bands at 2991 ± 6 and 2956 ± 3 cm(-1) are assigned as the CH(3) antisymmetric stretching (ν(2)) and symmetric stretching (ν(3)) modes, respectively. Observed vibrational transition wavenumbers agree satisfactorily with those predicted with quantum-chemical calculations at level B3P86∕aug-cc-pVTZ. Based on rotational parameters predicted at that level, the simulated rotational contours of these bands agree satisfactorily with experimental results. The simulation indicates that the S=O stretching mode of anti-CH(3)OSO near 1164 cm(-1) likely makes a small contribution to the observed band near 1152 cm(-1). A simple kinetic model of self-reaction is employed to account for the decay of CH(3)OSO and yields a second-order rate coefficient k=(4 ± 2)×10(-10) cm(3)molecule(-1)s(-1). PMID:21384966

  2. Infrared absorption of CH3OSO detected with time-resolved Fourier-transform spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jin-Dah; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2011-03-01

    A step-scan Fourier-transform spectrometer coupled with a multipass absorption cell was employed to detect temporally resolved infrared absorption spectra of CH3OSO produced upon irradiation of a flowing gaseous mixture of CH3OS(O)Cl in N2 or CO2 at 248 nm. Two intense transient features with origins near 1152 and 994 cm-1 are assigned to syn-CH3OSO; the former is attributed to overlapping bands at 1154 ± 3 and 1151 ± 3 cm-1, assigned to the S=O stretching mixed with CH3 rocking (ν8) and the S=O stretching mixed with CH3 wagging (ν9) modes, respectively, and the latter to the C-O stretching (ν10) mode at 994 ± 6 cm-1. Two weak bands at 2991 ± 6 and 2956 ± 3 cm-1 are assigned as the CH3 antisymmetric stretching (ν2) and symmetric stretching (ν3) modes, respectively. Observed vibrational transition wavenumbers agree satisfactorily with those predicted with quantum-chemical calculations at level B3P86/aug-cc-pVTZ. Based on rotational parameters predicted at that level, the simulated rotational contours of these bands agree satisfactorily with experimental results. The simulation indicates that the S=O stretching mode of anti-CH3OSO near 1164 cm-1 likely makes a small contribution to the observed band near 1152 cm-1. A simple kinetic model of self-reaction is employed to account for the decay of CH3OSO and yields a second-order rate coefficient k = (4 ± 2)×10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1.

  3. Near-infrared spatially resolved spectroscopy of (136108) Haumea's multiple system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourgeot, F.; Carry, B.; Dumas, C.; Vachier, F.; Merlin, F.; Lacerda, P.; Barucci, M. A.; Berthier, J.

    2016-08-01

    Context. The transneptunian region of the solar system is populated by a wide variety of icy bodies showing great diversity in orbital behavior, size, surface color, and composition. Aims: The dwarf planet (136108) Haumea is among the largest transneptunian objects (TNOs) and is a very fast rotator (~3.9 h). This dwarf planet displays a highly elongated shape and hosts two small moons that are covered with crystalline water ice, similar to their central body. A particular region of interest is the Dark Red Spot (DRS) identified on the surface of Haumea from multiband light-curve analysis (Lacerda et al. 2008). Haumea is also known to be the largest member of the sole TNO family known to date, and an outcome of a catastrophic collision that is likely responsible for the unique characteristics of Haumea. Methods: We report here on the analysis of a new set of near-infrared Laser Guide Star assisted observations of Haumea obtained with the Integral Field Unit (IFU) Spectrograph for INtegral Field Observations in the Near Infrared (SINFONI) at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope (VLT) Observatory. Combined with previous data published by Dumas et al. (2011), and using light-curve measurements in the optical and far infrared to associate each spectrum with its corresponding rotational phase, we were able to carry out a rotationally resolved spectroscopic study of the surface of Haumea. Results: We describe the physical characteristics of the crystalline water ice present on the surface of Haumea for both regions, in and out of the DRS, and analyze the differences obtained for each individual spectrum. The presence of crystalline water ice is confirmed over more than half of the surface of Haumea. Our measurements of the average spectral slope (1.45 ± 0.82% by 100 nm) confirm the redder characteristic of the spot region. Detailed analysis of the crystalline water-ice absorption bands do not show significant differences between the DRS and the

  4. Multi-Object Spectroscopy with the James Webb Space Telescope’s Near Infrared Spectrograph: Observing Resolved Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Karoline; Karakla, Diane M.; Beck, Tracy

    2015-08-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope’s (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) will provide a multi-object spectroscopy mode through the four Micro-Shutter Arrays (MSAs). Each MSA is a grid of contiguous shutters that can be configured to form slits on more than 100 astronomical targets simultaneously. The combination of JWST’s sensitivity and superb resolution in the infrared and NIRSpec’s full wavelength coverage from 0.6 to 5 μm will open new parameter space for studies of galaxies and resolved stellar populations alike. We describe a NIRSpec MSA observing scenario for obtaining spectroscopy of individual stars in an external galaxy, and investigate the technical challenges posed by this scenario. We examine the multiplexing capability of the MSA as a function of the possible MSA configuration design choices, and investigate the primary sources of error in velocity measurements and the prospects for minimizing them. We give examples of how this and other use cases are guiding development of the NIRSpec user interfaces, including proposal planning and pipeline calibrations.

  5. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT; Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE’s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE’s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  6. Time-Resolved Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Vibrational Populations Monitored after Electronic and Infrared Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Werncke, W.; Kozich, V.; Dreyer, J.

    2008-11-14

    Pathways of vibrational energy flow in molecules with an intramolecular hydrogen bond are studied after intramolecular proton transfer reactions as well as after infrared excitation of the O-H stretching vibration which is coupled to this hydrogen bond.

  7. The H + OCS hot atom reaction - CO state distributions and translational energy from time-resolved infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickolaisen, Scott L.; Cartland, Harry E.

    1993-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared diode laser spectroscopy has been used to probe CO internal and translational excitation from the reaction of hot H atoms with OCS. Product distributions should be strongly biased toward the maximum 1.4 eV collision energy obtained from 278 nm pulsed photolysis of HI. Rotations and vibrations are both colder than predicted by statistical density of states theory, as evidenced by large positive surprisal parameters. The bias against rotation is stronger than that against vibration, with measurable population as high as v = 4. The average CO internal excitation is 1920/cm, accounting for only 13 percent of the available energy. Of the energy balance, time-resolved sub-Doppler line shape measurements show that more than 38 percent appears as relative translation of the separating CO and SH fragments. Studies of the relaxation kinetics indicate that some rotational energy transfer occurs on the time scale of our measurements, but the distributions do not relax sufficiently to alter our conclusions. Vibrational distributions are nascent, though vibrational relaxation of excited CO is unusually fast in the OCS bath, with rates approaching 3 percent of gas kinetic for v = 1.

  8. Time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of chemical reactions in solution using a focal plane array detector.

    PubMed

    Kaun, N; Vellekoop, M J; Lendl, B

    2006-11-01

    A Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microscope equipped with a single as well as a 64 x 64 element focal plane array MCT detector was used to measure chemical reaction taking place in a microstructured flow cell designed for time-resolved FT-IR spectroscopy. The flow cell allows transmission measurements through aqueous solutions and incorporates a microstructured mixing unit. This unit achieves lamination of the two input streams with a cross-section of 300 x 5 microm each, resulting in fast diffusion-controlled mixing of the two input streams. Microscopic measurement at defined positions along the outlet channel allows time-resolved information of the reaction taking place in the flow cell to be obtained. In this paper we show experimental results on the model reaction between formaldehyde and sulfite. Using the single-point MCT detector, high-quality FT-IR spectra could be obtained from a spot size of 80 x 200 microm whereas the FPA detector allowed recording light from an area of 260 x 260 microm focused on its 64 x 64 detector elements. Therefore, more closely spaced features could be discerned at the expense of a significantly lower signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio per spectrum. Multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares was used to extract concentration profiles of the reacting species along the outlet channel axis. PMID:17132444

  9. Relation between the OH stretching frequency and the OO distance in time-resolved infrared spectroscopy of hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratos, Savo; Leicknam, Jean-Claude; Pommeret, Stanislas

    2009-05-01

    A non-empirical theory is presented to study the relation between the OH stretching frequency and the OO distance in ultrafast laser spectra of water. Diluted solutions HDO/DO rather than pure HO were considered to switch off resonant vibrational interactions between water molecules; the local structure of water as well as the OO distribution functions remain unchanged in this substitution. Only times superior to 100-200fs are considered to avoid perturbations generated by collisions between water molecules. It is then shown that the Novak-Mikenda type relations between the OH stretching frequency and the OO distance largely survive when going from equilibrium to laser perturbed non-equilibrium systems. It is also shown that temporally varying infrared pump-probe profiles of OH stretching bands in HDO/DO closely parallel the oxygen-oxygen distribution functions of these solutions. Infrared pump-probe spectroscopy can thus replace time-resolved X-ray diffraction in this particular case.

  10. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy and Near Infrared Imaging for Prostate Cancer Detection: Receptor-targeted and Native Biomarker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang

    Optical spectroscopy and imaging using near-infrared (NIR) light provides powerful tools for non-invasive detection of cancer in tissue. Optical techniques are capable of quantitative reconstructions maps of tissue absorption and scattering properties, thus can map in vivo the differences in the content of certain marker chromophores and/or fluorophores in normal and cancerous tissues (for example: water, tryptophan, collagen and NADH contents). Potential clinical applications of optical spectroscopy and imaging include functional tumor detection and photothermal therapeutics. Optical spectroscopy and imaging apply contrasts from intrinsic tissue chromophores such as water, collagen and NADH, and extrinsic optical contrast agents such as Indocyanine Green (ICG) to distinguish disease tissue from the normal one. Fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging also gives high sensitivity and specificity for biomedical diagnosis. Recent developments on specific-targeting fluorophores such as small receptor-targeted dye-peptide conjugate contrast agent offer high contrast between normal and cancerous tissues hence provide promising future for early tumour detection. This thesis focus on a study to distinguish the cancerous prostate tissue from the normal prostate tissues with enhancement of specific receptor-targeted prostate cancer contrast agents using optical spectroscopy and imaging techniques. The scattering and absorption coefficients, and anisotropy factor of cancerous and normal prostate tissues were investigated first as the basis for the biomedical diagnostic and optical imaging. Understanding the receptors over-expressed prostate cancer cells and molecular target mechanism of ligand, two small ICG-derivative dye-peptides, namely Cypate-Bombesin Peptide Analogue Conjugate (Cybesin) and Cypate-Octreotate Peptide Conjugate (Cytate), were applied to study their clinical potential for human prostate cancer detection. In this work, the steady-state and time-resolved

  11. Applications of the Infrared Free Electron Laser in Nonlinear and Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fann, Wunshain

    1990-01-01

    Free Electron Lasers (FEL) have been envisioned as novel radiation sources tunable over a wide spectral range. In this dissertation I report two types of experiments that used the infrared FEL, Mark III, to study nonlinear optical properties of conjugated polymers and the possibility of long lived vibrational excitations in acetanilide, a hydrogen-bonded molecular crystal.

  12. Infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, B. A.

    1984-11-01

    Infrared spectroscopic analysis is reviewed. Applications to chemical analysis of preimpregnated carbon fiber materials, including polystyrene spectra, epoxy resin analysis, mineral loads analysis, determination of epoxy groups and identification of spurious organic materials are discussed. The advantages of the method for quality control are pointed out.

  13. Spatially resolved optical and near-infrared spectroscopy of I Zw 18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skillman, Evan D.; Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Long-slit optical and near-IR spectroscopy are presented for the bright NW and faint SE components of the oxygen-poor H II galaxy I Zw 18, yielding physical conditions and O, N, S, and He abundances for these components. All of the elemental abundances for the two components of I Zw 18 are equal (within errors), thereby placing constraints on evolutionary theories for this system.

  14. Study of Heat Transfer Dynamics from Gold Nanorods to the Environment via Time-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Son C; Zhang, Qiao; Manthiram, Karthish; Ye, Xingchen; Lomont, Justin P; Harris, Charles B; Weller, Horst; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2016-02-23

    Studying the local solvent surrounding nanoparticles is important to understanding the energy exchange dynamics between the particles and their environment, and there is a need for spectroscopic methods that can dynamically probe the solvent region that is in nearby contact with the nanoparticles. In this work, we demonstrate the use of time-resolved infrared spectroscopy to track changes in a vibrational mode of local water on the time scale of hundreds of picoseconds, revealing the dynamics of heat transfer from gold nanorods to the local water environment. We applied this probe to a prototypical plasmonic photothermal system consisting of organic CTAB bilayer capped gold nanorods, as well as gold nanorods coated with varying thicknesses of inorganic mesoporous-silica. The heat transfer time constant of CTAB capped gold nanorods is about 350 ps and becomes faster with higher laser excitation power, eventually generating bubbles due to superheating in the local solvent. Silica coating of the nanorods slows down the heat transfer and suppresses the formation of superheated bubbles. PMID:26840805

  15. Infrared absorption of gaseous ClCS detected with time-resolved Fourier-transform spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Li-Kang; Han, Hui-Ling; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2007-05-07

    A transient infrared absorption spectrum of gaseous ClCS was detected with a step-scan Fourier-transform spectrometer coupled with a multipass absorption cell. ClCS was produced upon irradiating a flowing mixture of Cl{sub 2}CS and N{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} with a KrF excimer laser at 248 nm. A transient band in the region of 1160-1220 cm{sup -1}, which diminished on prolonged reaction, is assigned to the C-S stretching ({nu}{sub 1}) mode of ClCS. Calculations with density-functional theory (B3P86 and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ) predict the geometry, vibrational wave numbers, and rotational parameters of ClCS. The rotational contour of the spectrum of ClCS simulated based on predicted rotational parameters agrees satisfactorily with experimental observation; from spectral simulation, the band origin is determined to be at 1194.4 cm{sup -1}. Reaction kinetics involving ClCS, CS, and CS{sub 2} are discussed.

  16. Influence of cutaneous and muscular circulation on spatially resolved versus standard Beer-Lambert near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Messere, Alessandro; Roatta, Silvestro

    2013-12-01

    The potential interference of cutaneous circulation on muscle blood volume and oxygenation monitoring by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) remains an important limitation of this technique. Spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS) was reported to minimize the contribution of superficial tissue layers in cerebral monitoring but this characteristic has never been documented in muscle tissue monitoring. This study aims to compare SRS with the standard Beer-Lambert (BL) technique in detecting blood volume changes selectively induced in muscle and skin. In 16 healthy subjects, the biceps brachii was investigated during isometric elbow flexion at 70% of the maximum voluntary contractions lasting 10 sec, performed before and after exposure of the upper arm to warm air flow. From probes applied over the muscle belly the following variables were recorded: total hemoglobin index (THI, SRS-based), total hemoglobin concentration (tHb, BL-based), tissue oxygenation index (TOI, SRS-based), and skin blood flow (SBF), using laser Doppler flowmetry. Blood volume indices exhibited similar changes during muscle contraction but only tHb significantly increased during warming (+5.2 ± 0.7 μmol/L·cm, an effect comparable to the increase occurring in postcontraction hyperemia), accompanying a 10-fold increase in SBF. Contraction-induced changes in tHb and THI were not substantially affected by warming, although the tHb tracing was shifted upward by (5.2 ± 3.5 μmol/L·cm, P < 0.01). TOI was not affected by cutaneous warming. In conclusion, SRS appears to effectively reject interference by SBF in both muscle blood volume and oxygenation monitoring. Instead, BL-based parameters should be interpreted with caution, whenever changes in cutaneous perfusion cannot be excluded. PMID:24744858

  17. The origin of (90) Antiope from component-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchis, F.; Enriquez, J. E.; Emery, J. P.; Berthier, J.; Descamps, P.; Vachier, F.

    2011-05-01

    The origin of the similarly-sized binary Asteroid (90) Antiope remains an unsolved puzzle. To constrain the origin of this unique double system, we recorded individual spectra of the components using SPIFFI, a near-infrared integral field spectrograph fed by SINFONI, an adaptive optics module available on VLT-UT4. Using our previously published orbital model, we requested telescope time when the separation of the components of (90) Antiope was larger than 0.087″, to minimize the contamination between components, during the February 2009 opposition. Several multi-spectral data-cubes in J band (SNR = 40) and H + K band (SNR = 100) were recorded in three epochs and revealed the two components of (90) Antiope. After developing a specific photometric extraction method and running an error analysis by Monte-Carlo simulations, we successfully extracted reliable spectra of both components from 1.1 to 2.4 μm taken on the night of February 21, 2009. These spectra do not display any significant absorption features due to mafic mineral, ices, or organics, and their slopes are in agreement with both components being C- or Cb-type asteroids. Their constant flux ratio indicates that both components' surface reflectances are quite similar, with a 1-sigma variation of 7%. By comparison with 2MASS J, H, K color distribution of observed Themis family members, we conclude that both bodies were most likely formed at the same time and from the same material. The similarly-sized system could indeed be the result of the breakup of a rubble-pile proto-Antiope into two equal-sized bodies, but other scenarios of formation implying a common origin should also be considered.

  18. Reduction of O2 slow component by priming exercise: novel mechanistic insights from time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fukuoka, Yoshiyuki; Poole, David C; Barstow, Thomas J; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiwaki, Masato; Okushima, Dai; Koga, Shunsaku

    2015-01-01

    Novel time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (TR-NIRS), with adipose tissue thickness correction, was used to test the hypotheses that heavy priming exercise reduces the V̇O2 slow component (V̇O2SC) (1) by elevating microvascular [Hb] volume at multiple sites within the quadriceps femoris (2) rather than reducing the heterogeneity of muscle deoxygenation kinetics. Twelve subjects completed two 6-min bouts of heavy work rate exercise, separated by 6 min of unloaded cycling. Priming exercise induced faster overall V̇O2 kinetics consequent to a substantial reduction in the V̇O2SC (0.27 ± 0.12 vs. 0.11 ± 0.09 L·min−1, P < 0.05) with an unchanged primary V̇O2 time constant. An increased baseline for the primed bout [total (Hb + Mb)] (197.5 ± 21.6 vs. 210.7 ± 22.5 μmol L−1, P < 0.01), reflecting increased microvascular [Hb] volume, correlated significantly with the V̇O2SC reduction. At multiple sites within the quadriceps femoris, priming exercise reduced the baseline and slowed the increase in [deoxy (Hb + Mb)]. Changes in the intersite coefficient of variation in the time delay and time constant of [deoxy (Hb + Mb)] during the second bout were not correlated with the V̇O2SC reduction. These results support a mechanistic link between priming exercise-induced increase in muscle [Hb] volume and the reduced V̇O2SC that serves to speed overall V̇O2 kinetics. However, reduction in the heterogeneity of muscle deoxygenation kinetics does not appear to be an obligatory feature of the priming response. PMID:26109190

  19. Complexation of polyacrylates by Ca2+ ions. Time-resolved studies using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared dialysis spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fantinel, Fabiana; Rieger, Jens; Molnar, Ferenc; Hübler, Patrick

    2004-03-30

    The attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared dialysis technique is introduced for the time-resolved investigation of the binding processes of Ca2+ to polyacrylates dissolved in water. We observed transient formation of intermediates in water with various types of coordination of the carboxylate group to Ca2+ throughout the complexation steps. Time-resolved changes in the spectra were analyzed with principal component analysis, from which the spectral species were obtained as well as their formation kinetics. We propose a model for the mechanisms of Ca2+ coordination to polyacrylates. The polymer chain length plays an important role in Ca2+ binding. PMID:15835120

  20. Characterization of a hybrid diffuse correlation spectroscopy and time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy system for real-time monitoring of cerebral blood flow and oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdecchia, K.; Diop, M.; Lee, A.; St. Lawrence, K.

    2015-03-01

    The combination of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) offers the ability to provide real-time monitoring of cerebral oxygenation, blood flow and oxygen consumption. However, measuring these parameters accurately requires depth-sensitive techniques that can remove the effects of signal contamination from extracerebral tissues. Towards this goal, we developed and characterized a hybrid DCS/time-resolved (TR)-NIRS system. Both systems acquire data at three source-detector distances (SDD: 7, 20 and 30 mm) to provide depth sensitivity. The TR-NIRS system uses three pulsed lasers (760, 810, and 830 nm) to quantify tissue optical properties, and DCS uses one continuous-wave, long coherence length (>5 m) laser (785 nm) for blood flow monitoring. The stability of the TR-NIRS system was characterized by continuously measuring the instrument response function (IRF) for four hours, and a warmup period of two hours was required to reduce the coefficient of variation of the extracted optical properties to < 2%. The errors in the measured optical properties were <10% at SDDs of 20 and 30 mm; however, the error at 7 mm was greater due to the effects of the IRF. The number of DCS detectors at each SDD and the minimum count-rate (20 kHz per detector resulting in <10% uncertainty in the extracted blood flow index) were optimized using a homogenous phantom. The depth sensitivity was assessed using a two-layer phantom, with the flow rate in the bottom layer altered to mimic cerebral blood flow.

  1. Validation of a high-power, time-resolved, near-infrared spectroscopy system for measurement of superficial and deep muscle deoxygenation during exercise.

    PubMed

    Koga, Shunsaku; Barstow, Thomas J; Okushima, Dai; Rossiter, Harry B; Kondo, Narihiko; Ohmae, Etsuko; Poole, David C

    2015-06-01

    Near-infrared assessment of skeletal muscle is restricted to superficial tissues due to power limitations of spectroscopic systems. We reasoned that understanding of muscle deoxygenation may be improved by simultaneously interrogating deeper tissues. To achieve this, we modified a high-power (∼8 mW), time-resolved, near-infrared spectroscopy system to increase depth penetration. Precision was first validated using a homogenous optical phantom over a range of inter-optode spacings (OS). Coefficients of variation from 10 measurements were minimal (0.5-1.9%) for absorption (μa), reduced scattering, simulated total hemoglobin, and simulated O2 saturation. Second, a dual-layer phantom was constructed to assess depth sensitivity, and the thickness of the superficial layer was varied. With a superficial layer thickness of 1, 2, 3, and 4 cm (μa = 0.149 cm(-1)), the proportional contribution of the deep layer (μa = 0.250 cm(-1)) to total μa was 80.1, 26.9, 3.7, and 0.0%, respectively (at 6-cm OS), validating penetration to ∼3 cm. Implementation of an additional superficial phantom to simulate adipose tissue further reduced depth sensitivity. Finally, superficial and deep muscle spectroscopy was performed in six participants during heavy-intensity cycle exercise. Compared with the superficial rectus femoris, peak deoxygenation of the deep rectus femoris (including the superficial intermedius in some) was not significantly different (deoxyhemoglobin and deoxymyoglobin concentration: 81.3 ± 20.8 vs. 78.3 ± 13.6 μM, P > 0.05), but deoxygenation kinetics were significantly slower (mean response time: 37 ± 10 vs. 65 ± 9 s, P ≤ 0.05). These data validate a high-power, time-resolved, near-infrared spectroscopy system with large OS for measuring the deoxygenation of deep tissues and reveal temporal and spatial disparities in muscle deoxygenation responses to exercise. PMID:25840439

  2. Photochemistry of a Puckered Ferracyclobutadiene in Liquid Solution Studied by Time-Resolved Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Torres-Alacan, Joel; Das, Ujjal; Wezisla, Boris; Straßmann, Martin; Filippou, Alexander C; Vöhringer, Peter

    2015-11-23

    Flash photolysis combined with step-scan and rapid-scan Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was carried out to explore the photochemistry of a puckered, quasi-square pyramidal ferracyclobutadiene, [Fe{κ(2) -C3 (NEt2 )3 }(CO)3 ]BF4 ([1]BF4 ), that features three additional carbonyl ligands in the metal coordination sphere. In liquid solution at room temperature, an excitation with λ=355 nm light resulted in the loss of one CO ligand, which is cleaved from a basal metal-coordination site. Within the time resolution of the experiment, a solvent molecule promptly refills the resultant vacancy at the coordinatively unsaturated metal center. In the weakly interacting liquid, dichloromethane, the counterion of the complex is subsequently able to substitute the solvent in the coordination sphere of the iron center, thereby forming as a stable product a neutral dicarbonyl tetrafluoroborato iron(0) species containing a four-membered ferracycle. PMID:26457465

  3. Reaction mechanism of adenylyltransferase DrrA from Legionella pneumophila elucidated by time-resolved fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gavriljuk, Konstantin; Schartner, Jonas; Itzen, Aymelt; Goody, Roger S; Gerwert, Klaus; Kötting, Carsten

    2014-07-01

    Modulation of the function of small GTPases that regulate vesicular trafficking is a strategy employed by several human pathogens. Legionella pneumophila infects lung macrophages and injects a plethora of different proteins into its host cell. Among these is DrrA/SidM, which catalyzes stable adenylylation of Rab1b, a regulator of endoplasmatic reticulum to Golgi trafficking, and thereby alters the function and interactions of this small GTPase. We employed time-resolved FTIR-spectroscopy to monitor the DrrA-catalyzed AMP-transfer to Tyr77 of Rab1b. A transient complex between DrrA, adenylylated Rab1b, and the pyrophosphate byproduct was resolved, allowing us to analyze the interactions at the active site. Combination of isotopic labeling and site-directed mutagenesis allowed us to derive the catalytic mechanism of DrrA from the FTIR difference spectra. DrrA shares crucial residues in the ATP-binding pocket with similar AMP-transferring enzymes such as glutamine synthetase adenylyltransferase or kanamycin nucleotidyltransferase, but provides the complete active site on a single subunit. We determined that Asp112 of DrrA functions as the catalytic base for deprotonation of Tyr77 of Rab1b to enable nucleophilic attack on the ATP. The study provides detailed understanding of the Legionella pneumophila protein DrrA and of AMP-transfer reactions in general. PMID:24950229

  4. Time-resolved visible and infrared absorption spectroscopy data obtained using photosystem I particles with non-native quinones incorporated into the A1 binding site

    PubMed Central

    Makita, Hiroki; Hastings, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved visible and infrared absorption difference spectroscopy data at both 298 and 77 K were obtained using cyanobacterial menB− mutant photosystem I particles with several non-native quinones incorporated into the A1 binding site. Data was obtained for photosystem I particles with phylloquinone (2-methyl-3-phytyl-1,4-naphthoquinone), 2-bromo-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2-chloro-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2,3-dibromo-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2,3-dichloro-1,4-naphthoquinone, and 9,10-anthraquinone incorporated. Transient absorption data were obtained at 487 and 703 nm in the visible spectral range, and 1950–1100 cm−1 in the infrared region. Time constants obtained from fitting the time-resolved infrared and visible data are in good agreement. The measured time constants are crucial for the development of appropriate kinetic models that can describe electron transfer processes in photosystem I, “Modeling Electron Transfer in Photosystem I” Makita and Hastings (2016) [1]. PMID:27182540

  5. Time-resolved visible and infrared absorption spectroscopy data obtained using photosystem I particles with non-native quinones incorporated into the A1 binding site.

    PubMed

    Makita, Hiroki; Hastings, Gary

    2016-06-01

    Time-resolved visible and infrared absorption difference spectroscopy data at both 298 and 77 K were obtained using cyanobacterial menB (-) mutant photosystem I particles with several non-native quinones incorporated into the A1 binding site. Data was obtained for photosystem I particles with phylloquinone (2-methyl-3-phytyl-1,4-naphthoquinone), 2-bromo-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2-chloro-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2,3-dibromo-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2,3-dichloro-1,4-naphthoquinone, and 9,10-anthraquinone incorporated. Transient absorption data were obtained at 487 and 703 nm in the visible spectral range, and 1950-1100 cm(-1) in the infrared region. Time constants obtained from fitting the time-resolved infrared and visible data are in good agreement. The measured time constants are crucial for the development of appropriate kinetic models that can describe electron transfer processes in photosystem I, "Modeling Electron Transfer in Photosystem I" Makita and Hastings (2016) [1]. PMID:27182540

  6. Mapping of calf muscle oxygenation and haemoglobin content during dynamic plantar flexion exercise by multi-channel time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torricelli, Alessandro; Quaresima, Valentina; Pifferi, Antonio; Biscotti, Giovanni; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Taroni, Paola; Ferrari, Marco; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2004-03-01

    A compact and fast multi-channel time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy system for tissue oximetry was developed. It employs semiconductor laser and fibre optics for delivery of optical signals. Photons are collected by eight 1 mm fibres and detected by a multianode photomultiplier. A time-correlated single photon counting board is used for the parallel acquisition of time-resolved reflectance curves. Estimate of the reduced scattering coefficient is achieved by fitting with a standard model of diffusion theory, while the modified Lambert-Beer law is used to assess the absorption coefficient. In vivo measurements were performed on five healthy volunteers to monitor spatial changes in calf muscle (medial and lateral gastrocnemius; MG, LG) oxygen saturation (SmO2) and total haemoglobin concentration (tHb) during dynamic plantar flexion exercise performed at 50% of the maximal voluntary contraction. At rest SmO2 was 73.0 ± 0.9 and 70.5 ± 1.7% in MG and LG, respectively (P = 0.045). At the end of the exercise, SmO2 decreased (69.1 ± 1.8 and 63.8 ± 2.1% in MG and LG, respectively; P < 0.01). The LG desaturation was greater than the MG desaturation (P < 0.02). These results strengthen the role of time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy as a powerful tool for investigating the spatial and temporal features of muscle SmO2 and tHb.

  7. Ultrafast infrared spectroscopy in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Di Donato, Mariangela; Groot, Marie Louise

    2015-01-01

    In recent years visible pump/mid-infrared (IR) probe spectroscopy has established itself as a key technology to unravel structure-function relationships underlying the photo-dynamics of complex molecular systems. In this contribution we review the most important applications of mid-infrared absorption difference spectroscopy with sub-picosecond time-resolution to photosynthetic complexes. Considering several examples, such as energy transfer in photosynthetic antennas and electron transfer in reaction centers and even more intact structures, we show that the acquisition of ultrafast time resolved mid-IR spectra has led to new insights into the photo-dynamics of the considered systems and allows establishing a direct link between dynamics and structure, further strengthened by the possibility of investigating the protein response signal to the energy or electron transfer processes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems. PMID:24973600

  8. Single water solvation dynamics in the 4-aminobenzonitrile-water cluster cation revealed by picosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Nakamura, Takashi; Wohlgemuth, Matthias; Mitrić, Roland; Dopfer, Otto; Fujii, Masaaki

    2015-11-28

    The dynamics of a solvent is important for many chemical and biological processes. Here, the migration dynamics of a single water molecule is triggered by the photoionization of the 4-aminobenzonitrile-water (4ABN-W) cluster and monitored in real time by picosecond time-resolved IR (ps TRIR) spectroscopy. In the neutral cluster, water is hydrogen-bonded to the CN group. When this CN-bound cluster is selectively ionized with an excess energy of 1238 cm(-1), water migrates with a lifetime of τ = 17 ps from the CN to the NH2 group, forming a more stable 4ABN(+)-W(NH) isomer with a yield of unity. By decreasing the ionization excess energy, the yield of the CN → NH2 reaction is reduced. The relatively slow migration in comparison to the ionization-induced solvent dynamics in the related acetanilide-water cluster cation (τ = 5 ps) is discussed in terms of the internal excess energy after photoionization and the shape of the potential energy surface. PMID:26490096

  9. Photodissociation of CH3CHO at 248 nm by time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy: Verification of roaming and triple fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Kai-Chan; Tsai, Po-Yu; Li, Hou-Kuan; Lin, King-Chuen

    2014-02-01

    By using time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy, the HCO fragment dissociated from acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) at 248 nm is found to partially decompose to H and CO. The fragment yields are enhanced by the Ar addition that facilitates the collision-induced internal conversion. The channels to CH2CO + H2 and CH3CO + H are not detected significantly. The rotational population distribution of CO, after removing the Ar collision effect, shows a bimodal feature comprising both low- and high-rotational (J) components, sharing a fraction of 19% and 81%, respectively, for the vibrational state v = 1. The low-J component is ascribed to both roaming pathway and triple fragmentation. They are determined to have a branching ratio of <0.13 and >0.06, respectively, relative to the whole v = 1 population. The CO roaming is accompanied by a highly vibrational population of CH4 that yields a vibrational bimodality.

  10. Photodissociation of gaseous CH3COSH at 248 nm by time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy: Observation of three dissociation channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, En-Lan; Tsai, Po-Yu; Fan, He; Lin, King-Chuen

    2013-01-01

    Upon one-photon excitation at 248 nm, gaseous CH3C(O)SH is dissociated following three pathways with the products of (1) OCS + CH4, (2) CH3SH + CO, and (3) CH2CO + H2S that are detected using time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy. The excited state 1(nO, π*CO) has a radiative lifetime of 249 ± 11 ns long enough to allow for Ar collisions that induce internal conversion and enhance the fragment yields. The rate constant of collision-induced internal conversion is estimated to be 1.1 × 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. Among the primary dissociation products, a fraction of the CH2CO moiety may undergo further decomposition to CH2 + CO, of which CH2 is confirmed by reaction with O2 producing CO2, CO, OH, and H2CO. Such a secondary decomposition was not observed previously in the Ar matrix-isolated experiments. The high-resolution spectra of CO are analyzed to determine the ro-vibrational energy deposition of 8.7 ± 0.7 kcal/mol, while the remaining primary products with smaller rotational constants are recognized but cannot be spectrally resolved. The CO fragment detected is mainly ascribed to the primary production. A prior distribution method is applied to predict the vibrational distribution of CO that is consistent with the experimental findings.

  11. Near Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Shyam N.

    The discovery of near-infrared energy is ascribed to Herschel in the nineteenth century; the first industrial application however began in the 1950s. Initially near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used only as an add-on unit to other optical devices, that used other wavelengths such as ultraviolet (UV), visible (Vis), or mid-infrared (MIR) spectrometers. In the 1980s, a single unit, stand-alone NIRS system was made available, but the application of NIRS was focused more on chemical analysis. With the introduction of light-fibre optics in the mid 1980s and the monochromator-detector developments in early 1990s, NIRS became a more powerful tool for scientific research. This optical method can be used in a number of fields of science including physics, physiology, medicine and food.

  12. Investigation of verbal and visual working memory by multi-channel time-resolved functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contini, D.; Caffini, M.; Re, R.; Zucchelli, L.; Spinelli, L.; Basso Moro, S.; Bisconti, S.; Ferrari, M.; Quaresima, V.; Cutini, S.; Torricelli, A.

    2013-03-01

    Working memory (WM) is fundamental for a number of cognitive processes, such as comprehension, reasoning and learning. WM allows the short-term maintenance and manipulation of the information selected by attentional processes. The goal of this study was to examine by time-resolved fNIRS neural correlates of the verbal and visual WM during forward and backward digit span (DF and DB, respectively) tasks, and symbol span (SS) task. A neural dissociation was hypothesised between the maintenance and manipulation processes. In particular, a dorsolateral/ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC/VLPFC) recruitment was expected during the DB task, whilst a lateralised involvement of Brodmann Area (BA) 10 was expected during the execution of the DF task. Thirteen subjects were monitored by a multi-channel, dual-wavelength (690 and 829 nm) time-resolved fNIRS system during 3 minutes long DF and DB tasks and 4 minutes long SS task. The participants' mean memory span was calculated for each task: DF: 6.46+/-1.05 digits; DB: 5.62+/-1.26 digits; SS: 4.69+/-1.32 symbols. No correlation was found between the span level and the heart rate data (measured by pulse oximeter). As expected, DB elicited a broad activated area, in the bilateral VLPFC and the right DLPFC, whereas a more localised activation was observed over the right hemisphere during either DF (BA 10) or SS (BA 10 and 44). The robust involvement of the DLPFC during DB, compared to DF, is compatible with previous findings and with the key role of the central executive subserving in manipulating processes.

  13. Photodissociation of gaseous CH{sub 3}COSH at 248 nm by time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy: Observation of three dissociation channels

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, En-Lan; Tsai, Po-Yu; Fan, He; Lin, King-Chuen

    2013-01-07

    Upon one-photon excitation at 248 nm, gaseous CH{sub 3}C(O)SH is dissociated following three pathways with the products of (1) OCS + CH{sub 4}, (2) CH{sub 3}SH + CO, and (3) CH{sub 2}CO + H{sub 2}S that are detected using time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy. The excited state {sup 1}(n{sub O}, {pi}{sup *}{sub CO}) has a radiative lifetime of 249 {+-} 11 ns long enough to allow for Ar collisions that induce internal conversion and enhance the fragment yields. The rate constant of collision-induced internal conversion is estimated to be 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Among the primary dissociation products, a fraction of the CH{sub 2}CO moiety may undergo further decomposition to CH{sub 2}+ CO, of which CH{sub 2} is confirmed by reaction with O{sub 2} producing CO{sub 2}, CO, OH, and H{sub 2}CO. Such a secondary decomposition was not observed previously in the Ar matrix-isolated experiments. The high-resolution spectra of CO are analyzed to determine the ro-vibrational energy deposition of 8.7 {+-} 0.7 kcal/mol, while the remaining primary products with smaller rotational constants are recognized but cannot be spectrally resolved. The CO fragment detected is mainly ascribed to the primary production. A prior distribution method is applied to predict the vibrational distribution of CO that is consistent with the experimental findings.

  14. RESOLVED NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF WISE J104915.57-531906.1AB: A FLUX-REVERSAL BINARY AT THE L DWARF/T DWARF TRANSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Burgasser, Adam J.; Sheppard, Scott S.; Luhman, K. L.

    2013-08-01

    We report resolved near-infrared spectroscopy and photometry of the recently identified brown dwarf binary WISE J104915.57-531906.1AB, located 2.02 {+-} 0.15 pc from the Sun. Low-resolution spectral data from Magellan/FIRE and IRTF/SpeX reveal strong H{sub 2}O and CO absorption features in the spectra of both components, while the secondary also exhibits weak CH{sub 4} absorption at 1.6 {mu}m and 2.2 {mu}m. Spectral indices and comparison to low-resolution spectral standards indicate component types of L7.5 and T0.5 {+-} 1, the former consistent with the optical classification of the primary. Both sources also have unusually red spectral energy distributions for their spectral types, which we attribute to enhanced condensate opacity (thick clouds). Relative photometry reveals a flux reversal between the J and K bands, with the T dwarf component being brighter in the 0.95-1.3 {mu}m region ({Delta}J = -0.31 {+-} 0.05). As with other L/T transition binaries, this reversal likely reflects the depletion of condensate opacity in the T dwarf, with the contrast enhanced by the thick clouds present in the photosphere of the L dwarf primary. The 1 {mu}m flux from the T dwarf most likely emerges from gaps in its cloud layer, as suggested by the significant optical variability detected from this source by Gillon et al. Component mass measurements of the WISE J1049-5319AB system through astrometric and component radial velocity monitoring may resolve the current debate as to whether the loss of photospheric condensate clouds at the L dwarf/T dwarf boundary is a slow or rapid process, a conceivable endeavor given its proximity, brightness, small separation (3.1 {+-} 0.3 AU), and reasonable orbital period (20-30 yr)

  15. Time-resolved infrared diode laser spectroscopy of the ν1 (C O stretch) band of the CoCO radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Seiki; Hikida, Toshihide; Tanaka, Takehiko; Tanaka, Keiichi

    2008-02-01

    Infrared spectrum of the cobalt carbonyl radical CoCO produced by the 193 nm excimer laser photolysis of cobalt tricarbonyl nitrosyl Co(CO) 3NO was observed by time-resolved diode laser spectroscopy. More than 600 lines were identified as belonging to the ν1 (C-O stretch) fundamental band, consisting of the Ω=5/2 and 3/2 subbands, and the associated hot bands 112, 101211, 101311, and 101222. The 2Δi electronic ground state of CoCO was experimentally confirmed. The ν1 band origins are 1974.172582(93) cm -1 and 1973.53178(14) cm -1 for the Ω=5/2 and 3/2 subbands, respectively. The rotational constant in the ground state was determined as B0=4427.146(50) MHz. The centrifugal distortion constant D0=1.1243(68) kHz was obtained for the Ω=5/2 substate of the ground state. The equilibrium rotational constant Be=4435.44(14) MHz was derived, together with the vibration-rotation interaction constants.

  16. Assessment of human brown adipose tissue density during daily ingestion of thermogenic capsinoids using near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nirengi, Shinsuke; Homma, Toshiyuki; Inoue, Naohiko; Sato, Hitoshi; Yoneshiro, Takeshi; Matsushita, Mami; Kameya, Toshimitsu; Sugie, Hiroki; Tsuzaki, Kokoro; Saito, Masayuki; Sakane, Naoki; Kurosawa, Yuko; Hamaoka, Takafumi

    2016-09-01

    18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (FDGPET/CT) is widely used as a standard method for evaluating human brown adipose tissue (BAT), a recognized therapeutic target of obesity. However, a longitudinal BAT study using FDG-PET/CT is lacking owing to limitations of the method. Near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy (NIR(TRS)) is a technique for evaluating human BAT density noninvasively. This study aimed to test whether NIRTRS could detect changes in BAT density during or after long-term intervention. First, using FDG-PET/CT, we confirmed a significant increase (+48.8%, P < 0.05) in BAT activity in the supraclavicular region after 6-week treatment with thermogenic capsaicin analogs, capsinoids. Next, 20 volunteers were administered either capsinoids or placebo daily for 8 weeks in a double-blind design, and BAT density was measured using NIR(TRS) every 2 weeks during the 8-week treatment period and an 8-week period after stopping treatment. Consistent with FDG-PET/CT results, NIR(TRS) successfully detected an increase in BAT density during the 8-week treatment (+46.4%, P < 0.05), and a decrease in the 8-week follow-up period (-12.5%, P = 0.07), only in the capsinoid-treated, but not the placebo, group. Thus, NIR(TRS) can be applied for quantitative assessment of BAT in longitudinal intervention studies in humans. PMID:27135066

  17. Calibration of diffuse correlation spectroscopy with a time-resolved near-infrared technique to yield absolute cerebral blood flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Diop, Mamadou; Verdecchia, Kyle; Lee, Ting-Yim; St Lawrence, Keith

    2011-07-01

    A primary focus of neurointensive care is the prevention of secondary brain injury, mainly caused by ischemia. A noninvasive bedside technique for continuous monitoring of cerebral blood flow (CBF) could improve patient management by detecting ischemia before brain injury occurs. A promising technique for this purpose is diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) since it can continuously monitor relative perfusion changes in deep tissue. In this study, DCS was combined with a time-resolved near-infrared technique (TR-NIR) that can directly measure CBF using indocyanine green as a flow tracer. With this combination, the TR-NIR technique can be used to convert DCS data into absolute CBF measurements. The agreement between the two techniques was assessed by concurrent measurements of CBF changes in piglets. A strong correlation between CBF changes measured by TR-NIR and changes in the scaled diffusion coefficient measured by DCS was observed (R(2) = 0.93) with a slope of 1.05 ± 0.06 and an intercept of 6.4 ± 4.3% (mean ± standard error). PMID:21750781

  18. Calibration of diffuse correlation spectroscopy with a time-resolved near-infrared technique to yield absolute cerebral blood flow measurements

    PubMed Central

    Diop, Mamadou; Verdecchia, Kyle; Lee, Ting-Yim; St Lawrence, Keith

    2011-01-01

    A primary focus of neurointensive care is the prevention of secondary brain injury, mainly caused by ischemia. A noninvasive bedside technique for continuous monitoring of cerebral blood flow (CBF) could improve patient management by detecting ischemia before brain injury occurs. A promising technique for this purpose is diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) since it can continuously monitor relative perfusion changes in deep tissue. In this study, DCS was combined with a time-resolved near-infrared technique (TR-NIR) that can directly measure CBF using indocyanine green as a flow tracer. With this combination, the TR-NIR technique can be used to convert DCS data into absolute CBF measurements. The agreement between the two techniques was assessed by concurrent measurements of CBF changes in piglets. A strong correlation between CBF changes measured by TR-NIR and changes in the scaled diffusion coefficient measured by DCS was observed (R2 = 0.93) with a slope of 1.05 ± 0.06 and an intercept of 6.4 ± 4.3% (mean ± standard error). PMID:21750781

  19. Structure of collagen adsorbed on a model implant surface resolved by polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brand, Izabella; Habecker, Florian; Ahlers, Michael; Klüner, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    The polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectra of collagen adsorbed on a titania surface and quantum chemical calculations are used to describe components of the amide I mode to the protein structure at a sub-molecular level. In this study, imino acid rich and poor fragments, representing the entire collagen molecule, are taken into account. The amide I mode of the collagen triple helix is composed of three absorption bands which involve: (i) (∼1690cm(-1)) the CO stretching modes at unhydrated groups, (ii) (1655-1673cm(-1)) the CO stretching at carbonyl groups at imino acids and glycine forming intramolecular hydrogen bonds with H atoms at both NH2 and, unusual for proteins, CH2 groups at glycine at a neighbouring chain and (iii) (∼1640cm(-1)) the CO stretching at carbonyl groups forming hydrogen bonds between two, often charged, amino acids as well as hydrogen bonds to water along the entire helix. The IR spectrum of films prepared from diluted solutions (c<50μgml(-1)) corresponds to solution spectra indicating that native collagen molecules interact with water adsorbed on the titania surface. In films prepared from solutions (c⩾50μgml(-1)) collagen multilayers are formed. The amide I mode is blue-shifted by 18cm(-1), indicating that intramolecular hydrogen bonds at imino acid rich fragments are weakened. Simultaneous red-shift of the amide A mode implies that the strength of hydrogen bonds at the imino acid poor fragments increases. Theoretically predicted distortion of the collagen structure upon adsorption on the titania surface is experimentally confirmed. PMID:25498816

  20. An Introductory Infrared Spectroscopy Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Kenneth R.; Smith, Wendy D.; Thomsen, Marcus W.; Yoder, Claude H.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a project designed to introduce infrared spectroscopy as a structure-determination technique. Students are introduced to infrared spectroscopy fundamentals then try to determine the identity of an unknown liquid from its infrared spectrum and molecular weight. The project demonstrates that only rarely can the identity of even simple…

  1. Transient infrared emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.W.; McClelland, J.F.

    1989-04-01

    Transient infrared emission spectroscopy (TIRES) is a new method that produces analytically useful emission spectra from optically thick, solid samples by greatly reducing self-absorption of emitted radiation. The method reduces self-absorption by creating a thin, short-lived, heated layer at the sample surface and collecting the transient emission from this layer. The technique requires no sample preparation and may be applied to both moving and stationary samples. The single-ended, noncontact TIRES measurement geometry is ideal for on-line and other remote-sensing applications. TIRES spectra acquired via a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer on moving samples of coal, plastic, and paint are presented and compared to photoacoustic absorption spectra of these materials. The TIRES and photoacoustic results are in close agreement as predicted by Kirchhoff's law.

  2. Gas-phase photodissociation of CH{sub 3}COCN at 308 nm by time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Yu-Ying; Chao, Meng-Hsuan; Tsai, Po-Yu; Chang, Yuan-Bin; Tsai, Ming-Tsang; Lin, King-Chuen

    2012-01-28

    By using time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy, the fragments of HCN(v= 1, 2) and CO(v= 1-3) are detected in one-photon dissociation of acetyl cyanide (CH{sub 3}COCN) at 308 nm. The S{sub 1}(A'), {sup 1}(n{sub O}, {pi}*{sub CO}) state at 308 nm has a radiative lifetime of 0.46 {+-} 0.01 {mu}s, long enough to allow for Ar collisions that induce internal conversion and enhance the fragment yields. The rate constant of Ar collision-induced internal conversion is estimated to be (1-7) x 10{sup -12} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The measurements of O{sub 2} dependence exclude the production possibility of these fragments via intersystem crossing. The high-resolution spectra of HCN and CO are analyzed to determine the ro-vibrational energy deposition of 81 {+-} 7 and 32 {+-} 3 kJ/mol, respectively. With the aid of ab initio calculations, a two-body dissociation on the energetic ground state is favored leading to HCN + CH{sub 2}CO, in which the CH{sub 2}CO moiety may further undergo secondary dissociation to release CO. The production of CO{sub 2} in the reaction with O{sub 2} confirms existence of CH{sub 2} and a secondary reaction product of CO. The HNC fragment is identified but cannot be assigned, as restricted to a poor signal-to-noise ratio. Because of insufficient excitation energy at 308 nm, the CN and CH{sub 3} fragments that dominate the dissociation products at 193 nm are not detected.

  3. Photoionization-induced π↔ H site switching dynamics in phenol(+)-Rg (Rg = Ar, Kr) dimers probed by picosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Sakata, Yuri; Schütz, Markus; Dopfer, Otto; Fujii, Masaaki

    2016-09-21

    The ionization-induced π↔ H site switching reaction in phenol(+)-Rg (PhOH(+)-Rg) dimers with Rg = Ar and Kr is traced in real time by picosecond time-resolved infrared (ps-TRIR) spectroscopy. The ps-TRIR spectra show the prompt appearance of the non-vanishing free OH stretching band upon resonant photoionization of the π-bound neutral clusters, and the delayed appearance of the hydrogen-bonded (H-bonded) OH stretching band. This result directly proves that the Rg ligand switches from the π-bound site on the aromatic ring to the H-bonded site at the OH group by ionization. The subsequent H →π back reaction converges the dimer to a π↔ H equilibrium. This result is in sharp contrast to the single-step π→ H forward reaction in the PhOH(+)-Ar2 trimer with 100% yield. The reaction mechanism and yield strongly depend on intracluster vibrational energy redistribution. A classical rate equation analysis for the time evolutions of the band intensities of the two vibrations results in similar estimates for the time constants of the π→ H forward reaction of τ+ = 122 and 73 ps and the H →π back reaction of τ- = 155 and 188 ps for PhOH(+)-Ar and PhOH(+)-Kr, respectively. The one order of magnitude slower time constant in comparison to the PhOH(+)-Ar2 trimer (τ+ = 7 ps) is attributed to the decrease in density of states due to the absence of the second Ar in the dimer. The similar time constants for both PhOH(+)-Rg dimers are well rationalized by a classical interpretation based on the comparable potential energy surfaces, reaction pathways, and density of states arising from their similar intermolecular vibrational frequencies. PMID:27550720

  4. Gas-phase photodissociation of CH3COCN at 308 nm by time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Yu-Ying; Chao, Meng-Hsuan; Tsai, Po-Yu; Chang, Yuan-Bin; Tsai, Ming-Tsang; Lin, King-Chuen

    2012-01-01

    By using time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy, the fragments of HCN(v = 1, 2) and CO(v = 1-3) are detected in one-photon dissociation of acetyl cyanide (CH3COCN) at 308 nm. The S1(A″), 1(nO, π*CO) state at 308 nm has a radiative lifetime of 0.46 ± 0.01 μs, long enough to allow for Ar collisions that induce internal conversion and enhance the fragment yields. The rate constant of Ar collision-induced internal conversion is estimated to be (1-7) × 10-12 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The measurements of O2 dependence exclude the production possibility of these fragments via intersystem crossing. The high-resolution spectra of HCN and CO are analyzed to determine the ro-vibrational energy deposition of 81 ± 7 and 32 ± 3 kJ/mol, respectively. With the aid of ab initio calculations, a two-body dissociation on the energetic ground state is favored leading to HCN + CH2CO, in which the CH2CO moiety may further undergo secondary dissociation to release CO. The production of CO2 in the reaction with O2 confirms existence of CH2 and a secondary reaction product of CO. The HNC fragment is identified but cannot be assigned, as restricted to a poor signal-to-noise ratio. Because of insufficient excitation energy at 308 nm, the CN and CH3 fragments that dominate the dissociation products at 193 nm are not detected.

  5. Using near-infrared spectroscopy to resolve the species, gender, age, and the presence of Wolbachia infection in laboratory-reared Drosophila

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of the study was to determine the accuracy of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in determining species, gender, age and the presence of the common endosymbiont Wolbachia in laboratory reared Drosophila. NIRS measures absorption of light by organic molecules. Initially, a calibration model wa...

  6. Infrared spectroscopy with visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikov, Dmitry A.; Paterova, Anna V.; Kulik, Sergei P.; Krivitsky, Leonid A.

    2016-02-01

    Spectral measurements in the infrared optical range provide unique fingerprints of materials, which are useful for material analysis, environmental sensing and health diagnostics. Current infrared spectroscopy techniques require the use of optical equipment suited for operation in the infrared range, components of which face challenges of inferior performance and high cost. Here, we develop a technique that allows spectral measurements in the infrared range using visible-spectral-range components. The technique is based on nonlinear interference of infrared and visible photons, produced via spontaneous parametric down conversion. The intensity interference pattern for a visible photon depends on the phase of an infrared photon travelling through a medium. This allows the absorption coefficient and refractive index of the medium in the infrared range to be determined from the measurements of visible photons. The technique can substitute and/or complement conventional infrared spectroscopy and refractometry techniques, as it uses well-developed components for the visible range.

  7. Time-resolved surface infrared spectroscopy during atomic layer deposition of TiO{sub 2} using tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium and water

    SciTech Connect

    Sperling, Brent A. Hoang, John; Kimes, William A.; Maslar, James E.; Steffens, Kristen L.; Nguyen, Nhan V.

    2014-05-15

    Atomic layer deposition of titanium dioxide using tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium (TDMAT) and water vapor is studied by reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) with a time resolution of 120 ms. At 190 °C and 240 °C, a decrease in the absorption from adsorbed TDMAT is observed without any evidence of an adsorbed product. Ex situ measurements indicate that this behavior is not associated with an increase in the impurity concentration or a dramatic change in the growth rate. A desorbing decomposition product is consistent with these observations. RAIRS also indicates that dehydroxylation of the growth surface occurs only among one type of surface hydroxyl groups. Molecular water is observed to remain on the surface and participates in reactions even at a relatively high temperature (110 °C) and with long purge times (30 s)

  8. Infrared spectroscopy of stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, K. M.; Ridgway, S. T.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews applications of IR techniques in stellar classification, studies of stellar photospheres, elemental and isotopic abundances, and the nature of remnant and ejected matter in near-circumstellar regions. Qualitative IR spectral classification of cool and hot stars is discussed, along with IR spectra of peculiar composite star systems and of obscured stars, and IR characteristics of stellar populations. The use of IR spectroscopy in theoretical modeling of stellar atmospheres is examined, IR indicators of stellar atmospheric composition are described, and contributions of IR spectroscopy to the study of stellar recycling of interstellar matter are summarized. The future of IR astronomy is also considered.

  9. Proton Transfer and Protein Conformation Dynamics in Photosensitive Proteins by Time-resolved Step-scan Fourier-transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lórenz-Fonfría, Víctor A.; Heberle, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring the dynamics of protonation and protein backbone conformation changes during the function of a protein is an essential step towards understanding its mechanism. Protonation and conformational changes affect the vibration pattern of amino acid side chains and of the peptide bond, respectively, both of which can be probed by infrared (IR) difference spectroscopy. For proteins whose function can be repetitively and reproducibly triggered by light, it is possible to obtain infrared difference spectra with (sub)microsecond resolution over a broad spectral range using the step-scan Fourier transform infrared technique. With ~102-103 repetitions of the photoreaction, the minimum number to complete a scan at reasonable spectral resolution and bandwidth, the noise level in the absorption difference spectra can be as low as ~10-4, sufficient to follow the kinetics of protonation changes from a single amino acid. Lower noise levels can be accomplished by more data averaging and/or mathematical processing. The amount of protein required for optimal results is between 5-100 µg, depending on the sampling technique used. Regarding additional requirements, the protein needs to be first concentrated in a low ionic strength buffer and then dried to form a film. The protein film is hydrated prior to the experiment, either with little droplets of water or under controlled atmospheric humidity. The attained hydration level (g of water / g of protein) is gauged from an IR absorption spectrum. To showcase the technique, we studied the photocycle of the light-driven proton-pump bacteriorhodopsin in its native purple membrane environment, and of the light-gated ion channel channelrhodopsin-2 solubilized in detergent. PMID:24998200

  10. Interferometric near-infrared spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borycki, Dawid; Kholiqov, Oybek; Chong, Shau Poh; Srinivasan, Vivek J.

    2016-03-01

    We introduce and implement interferometric near-infrared spectroscopy (iNIRS), which simultaneously extracts the optical and dynamic properties of turbid media from the analysis of the spectral interference fringe pattern. The spectral interference fringe pattern is measured using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a frequency swept narrow bandwidth light source such that the temporal intensity autocorrelations can be determined for all photon path lengths. This approach enables time-of-flight (TOF) resolved measurement of scatterer motion, which is a feature inaccessible in well-established diffuse correlation spectroscopy techniques. We prove this by analyzing intensity correlations of the light transmitted through diffusive fluid phantoms with photon random walks of up to 55 (approximately 110 scattering events) using laser sweep rates on the order of 100kHz. Thus, the results we present here advance diffuse optical methods by enabling simultaneous determination of depth-resolved optical properties and dynamics in highly scattering samples.

  11. A Quantitative Infrared Spectroscopy Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krahling, Mark D.; Eliason, Robert

    1985-01-01

    Although infrared spectroscopy is used primarily for qualitative identifications, it is possible to use it as a quantitative tool as well. The use of a standard curve to determine percent methanol in a 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol sample is described. Background information, experimental procedures, and results obtained are provided. (JN)

  12. Infrared Spectroscopy of Deuterated Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacCarthy, Patrick

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for an experiment (based on the potassium bromide pressed-pellet method) involving the infrared spectroscopy of deuterated compounds. Deuteration refers to deuterium-hydrogen exchange at active hydrogen sites in the molecule. (JN)

  13. Charge Photoinjection in Intercalated and Covalently Bound [Re(CO)3(dppz)(py)]+-DNA Constructs Monitored by Time Resolved Visible and Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Olmon, Eric D.; Sontz, Pamela A.; Blanco-Rodríguez, Ana María; Towrie, Michael; Clark, Ian P.; Vlček, Antonín; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2011-01-01

    The complex [Re(CO)3(dppz)(py′-OR)]+ (dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2′,3′-c]phenazine; py′-OR = 4-functionalized pyridine) offers IR sensitivity and can oxidize DNA directly from the excited state, making it a promising probe for the study of DNA-mediated charge transport (CT). The behavior of several covalent and noncovalent Re-DNA constructs was monitored by time-resolved IR (TRIR) and UV/visible spectroscopies, as well as biochemical methods, confirming the long-range oxidation of DNA by the excited complex. Optical excitation of the complex leads to population of MLCT and at least two distinct intraligand states. Experimental observations that are consistent with charge injection from these excited states include similarity between long-time TRIR spectra and the reduced state spectrum observed by spectroelectrochemistry, the appearance of a guanine radical signal in TRIR spectra, and the eventual formation of permanent guanine oxidation products. The majority of reactivity occurs on the ultrafast timescale, although processes dependent on slower conformational motions of DNA, such as the accumulation of oxidative damage at guanine, are also observed. The ability to measure events on such disparate timescales, its superior selectivity in comparison to other spectroscopic techniques, and the ability to simultaneously monitor carbonyl ligand and DNA IR absorption bands makes TRIR a valuable tool for the study of CT in DNA. PMID:21827149

  14. In vivo swine myocardial tissue characterization and monitoring during open chest surgery by time-resolved diffuse near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Lorenzo; Contini, Davide; Farina, Andrea; Torricelli, Alessandro; Pifferi, Antonio; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Ascari, Luca; Potì, Luca; Trivella, Maria Giovanna; L'Abbate, Antonio; Puzzuoli, Stefano

    2011-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the main cause of death in industrialized countries. Worldwide, a large number of patients suffering from cardiac diseases are treated by surgery. Despite the advances achieved in the last decades with myocardial protection, surgical failure can still occur. This is due at least in part to the imperfect control of the metabolic status of the heart in the various phases of surgical intervention. At present, this is indirectly controlled by the electrocardiogram and the echographic monitoring of cardiac mechanics as direct measurements are lacking. Diffuse optical technologies have recently emerged as promising tools for the characterization of biological tissues like breast, muscles and bone, and for the monitoring of important metabolic parameters such as blood oxygenation, volume and flow. As a matter of fact, their utility has been demonstrated in a variety of applications for functional imaging of the brain, optical mammography and monitoring of muscle metabolism. However, due to technological and practical difficulties, their potential for cardiac monitoring has not yet been exploited. In this work we show the feasibility of the in-vivo determination of absorption and scattering spectra of the cardiac muscle in the 600-1100 nm range, and of monitoring myocardial tissue hemodynamics by time domain near-infrared spectroscopy at 690 nm and 830 nm. Both measurements have been performed on the exposed beating heart during open chest surgery in pigs, an experimental model closely mimicking the clinical cardio-surgical setting.

  15. Mechanistic study of electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid at platinum in acidic solution by time-resolved surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Samjeské, Gabor; Miki, Atsushi; Ye, Shen; Osawa, Masatoshi

    2006-08-24

    Surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) combined with cyclic voltammetry or chronoamperometry has been utilized to examine kinetic and mechanistic aspects of the electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid on a polycrystalline Pt surface at the molecular scale. Formate is adsorbed on the electrode in a bridge configuration in parallel to the adsorption of linear and bridge CO produced by dehydration of formic acid. A solution-exchange experiment using isotope-labeled formic acids (H(12)COOH and H(13)COOH) reveals that formic acid is oxidized to CO(2) via adsorbed formate and the decomposition (oxidation) of formate to CO(2) is the rate-determining step of the reaction. The adsorption/oxidation of CO and the oxidation/reduction of the electrode surface strongly affect the formic acid oxidation by blocking active sites for formate adsorption and also by retarding the decomposition of adsorbed formate. The interplay of the involved processes also affects the kinetics and complicates the cyclic voltammograms of formic acid oxidation. The complex voltammetric behavior is comprehensively explained at the molecular scale by taking all these effects into account. PMID:16913790

  16. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, Franziska; Lübcke, Andrea; Heine, Nadja; Schultz, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    We present a novel setup for the investigation of ultrafast dynamic processes in a liquid jet using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. A magnetic-bottle type spectrometer with a high collection efficiency allows the very sensitive detection of photoelectrons emitted from a 10 μm thick liquid jet. This translates into good signal/noise ratio and rapid data acquisition making femtosecond time-resolved experiments feasible. We describe the experimental setup, a detailed spectrometer characterization based on the spectroscopy of nitric oxide in the gas phase, and results from femtosecond time-resolved experiments on sodium iodide solutions. The latter experiments reveal the formation and evolution of the solvated electron and we characterize two distinct spectral components corresponding to initially thermalized and unthermalized solvated electrons. The absence of dark states in photoionization, the direct measurement of electron binding energies, and the ability to resolve dynamic processes on the femtosecond time scale make time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy from the liquid jet a very promising method for the characterization of photochemical processes in liquids.

  17. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Franziska; Lübcke, Andrea; Heine, Nadja; Schultz, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    We present a novel setup for the investigation of ultrafast dynamic processes in a liquid jet using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. A magnetic-bottle type spectrometer with a high collection efficiency allows the very sensitive detection of photoelectrons emitted from a 10 μm thick liquid jet. This translates into good signal/noise ratio and rapid data acquisition making femtosecond time-resolved experiments feasible. We describe the experimental setup, a detailed spectrometer characterization based on the spectroscopy of nitric oxide in the gas phase, and results from femtosecond time-resolved experiments on sodium iodide solutions. The latter experiments reveal the formation and evolution of the solvated electron and we characterize two distinct spectral components corresponding to initially thermalized and unthermalized solvated electrons. The absence of dark states in photoionization, the direct measurement of electron binding energies, and the ability to resolve dynamic processes on the femtosecond time scale make time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy from the liquid jet a very promising method for the characterization of photochemical processes in liquids. PMID:21133461

  18. Time-resolved multiple probe spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Greetham, G. M.; Sole, D.; Clark, I. P.; Parker, A. W.; Pollard, M. R.; Towrie, M.

    2012-10-15

    Time-resolved multiple probe spectroscopy combines optical, electronic, and data acquisition capabilities to enable measurement of picosecond to millisecond time-resolved spectra within a single experiment, using a single activation pulse. This technology enables a wide range of dynamic processes to be studied on a single laser and sample system. The technique includes a 1 kHz pump, 10 kHz probe flash photolysis-like mode of acquisition (pump-probe-probe-probe, etc.), increasing the amount of information from each experiment. We demonstrate the capability of the instrument by measuring the photolysis of tungsten hexacarbonyl (W(CO){sub 6}) monitored by IR absorption spectroscopy, following picosecond vibrational cooling of product formation through to slower bimolecular diffusion reactions on the microsecond time scale.

  19. Infrared absorption of C{sub 6}H{sub 5}SO{sub 2} detected with time-resolved Fourier-transform spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, L.-K.; Lee, Y.-P.

    2007-04-07

    C{sub 6}H{sub 5}SO{sub 2} radicals were produced upon irradiation of three flowing mixtures: C{sub 6}H{sub 5}SO{sub 2}Cl in N{sub 2}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}Cl and SO{sub 2} in CO{sub 2}, and C{sub 6}H{sub 5}Br and SO{sub 2} in CO{sub 2}, with a KrF excimer laser at 248 nm. A step-scan Fourier-transform spectrometer coupled with a multipass absorption cell was employed to record the time-resolved infrared (IR) absorption spectra of reaction intermediates. Two transient bands with origins at 1087.7 and 1278.2 cm{sup -1} are assigned to the SO{sub 2}-symmetric and SO{sub 2}-antisymmetric stretching modes, respectively, of C{sub 6}H{sub 5}SO{sub 2}. Calculations with density-functional theory (B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ and B3P86/aug-cc-pVTZ) predict the geometry and vibrational wave numbers of C{sub 6}H{sub 5}SO{sub 2} and C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OSO. The vibrational wave numbers and IR intensities of C{sub 6}H{sub 5}SO{sub 2} agree satisfactorily with the observed new features. Rotational contours of IR spectra of C{sub 6}H{sub 5}SO{sub 2} simulated based on predicted molecular parameters agree satisfactorily with experimental results for both bands. The SO{sub 2}-symmetric stretching band is dominated by a- and c-type rotational structures and the SO{sub 2}-antisymmetric stretching band is dominated by a b-type rotational structure. When C{sub 6}H{sub 5}SO{sub 2}Cl was used as a precursor of C{sub 6}H{sub 5}SO{sub 2}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}SO{sub 2}Cl was slowly reproduced at the expense of C{sub 6}H{sub 5}SO{sub 2}, indicating that the reaction Cl+C{sub 6}H{sub 5}SO{sub 2} takes place. When C{sub 6}H{sub 5}Br/SO{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} was used as a precursor of C{sub 6}H{sub 5}SO{sub 2}, features at 1186 and 1396 cm{sup -1} ascribable to C{sub 6}H{sub 5}SO{sub 2}Br were observed at a later period due to secondary reaction of C{sub 6}H{sub 5}SO{sub 2} with Br. Corresponding kinetics based on temporal profiles of observed IR absorption are discussed.

  20. INSTRUMENTATION FOR FAR INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY.

    SciTech Connect

    GRIFFITHS, P.R.; HOMES, C.

    2001-05-04

    Fourier transform spectrometers developed in three distinct spectral regions in the early 1960s. Pierre Connes and his coworkers in France developed remarkably sophisticated step-scan interferometers that permitted near-infrared spectra to be measured with a resolution of better than 0.0 1 cm{sup {minus}1}. These instruments may be considered the forerunners of the step-scan interferometers made by Bruker, Bio-Rad (Cambridge, MA, USA) and Nicolet although their principal application was in the field of astronomy. Low-resolution rapid-scanning interferometers were developed by Larry Mertz and his colleagues at Block Engineering (Cambridge, MA, USA) for remote sensing. Nonetheless, the FT-IR spectrometers that are so prevalent in chemical laboratories today are direct descendants of these instruments. The interferometers that were developed for far-infrared spectrometry in Gebbie's laboratory ,have had no commercial counterparts for at least 15 years. However, it could be argued that these instruments did as much to demonstrate the power of Fourier transform spectroscopy to the chemical community as any of the instruments developed for mid- and near-infrared spectrometry. Their performance was every bit as good as today's rapid-scanning interferometers. However, the market for these instruments is so small today that it has proved more lucrative to modify rapid-scanning interferometers that were originally designed for mid-infrared spectrometry than to compete with these instruments with slow continuous scan or step-scan interferometers.

  1. Mid infrared emission spectroscopy of carbon plasma.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Laszlo; Brown, Ei Ei; S-C Yang, Clayton; Hommerich, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Mid infrared time-resolved emission spectra were recorded from laser-induced carbon plasma. These spectra constitute the first study of carbon materials LIB spectroscopy in the mid infrared range. The carbon plasma was induced using a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser. The laser beam was focused to high purity graphite pellets mounted on a translation stage. Mid infrared emission from the plasma in an atmospheric pressure background gas was detected by a cooled HgCdTe detector in the range 4.4-11.6μm, using long-pass filters. LIB spectra were taken in argon, helium and also in air. Despite a gate delay of 10μs was used there were strong backgrounds in the spectra. Superimposed on this background broad and noisy emission bands were observed, the form and position of which depended somewhat on the ambient gas. The spectra were digitally smoothed and background corrected. In argon, for instance, strong bands were observed around 4.8, 6.0 and 7.5μm. Using atomic spectral data by NIST it could be concluded that carbon, argon, helium and nitrogen lines from neutral and ionized atoms are very weak in this spectral region. The width of the infrared bands supports molecular origin. The infrared emission bands were thus compared to vibrational features of carbon molecules (excluding C2) of various sizes on the basis of previous carbon cluster infrared absorption and emission spectroscopic analyses in the literature and quantum chemical calculations. Some general considerations are given about the present results. PMID:27428600

  2. Infrared spectroscopy of ionic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.M. . Dept. of Chemistry Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    This thesis describes new experiments wherein the infrared vibrational predissociation spectra of a number of mass-selected ionic cluster systems have been obtained and analyzed in the 2600 to 4000 cm{sup {minus}1} region. The species studied include: the hydrated hydronium ions, H{sub 3}O{sup +} (H{sub 2}O){sub 3 {minus}10}, ammoniated ammonium ions, NH{sub 4}{sup +}(NH{sub 3}){sub 1 {minus}10} and cluster ions involving both water and ammonia around an ammonium ion core, (mixed clusters) NH{sub 4}{sup +}(NH{sub 3}){sub n}(H{sub 2}O){sub m} (n+m=4). In each case, the spectra reveal well resolved structures that can be assigned to transitions arising from the vibrational motions of both the ion core of the clusters and the surrounding neutral solvent molecules. 154 refs., 19 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Berthomieu, Catherine; Hienerwadel, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy probes the vibrational properties of amino acids and cofactors, which are sensitive to minute structural changes. The lack of specificity of this technique, on the one hand, permits us to probe directly the vibrational properties of almost all the cofactors, amino acid side chains, and of water molecules. On the other hand, we can use reaction-induced FTIR difference spectroscopy to select vibrations corresponding to single chemical groups involved in a specific reaction. Various strategies are used to identify the IR signatures of each residue of interest in the resulting reaction-induced FTIR difference spectra. (Specific) Isotope labeling, site-directed mutagenesis, hydrogen/deuterium exchange are often used to identify the chemical groups. Studies on model compounds and the increasing use of theoretical chemistry for normal modes calculations allow us to interpret the IR frequencies in terms of specific structural characteristics of the chemical group or molecule of interest. This review presents basics of FTIR spectroscopy technique and provides specific important structural and functional information obtained from the analysis of the data from the photosystems, using this method. PMID:19513810

  4. Resolving shocked and UV excited components of H2 emission in planetary nebulae with high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Kyle; Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Jaffe, Daniel Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) form when low and intermediate-mass stars eject their outer layers into the ISM at the end of the AGB phase. Many PNe exhibit near-infrared (NIR) emission from molecular hydrogen (H2). This NIR emission arises from radiative decay out of excited rotation-vibration (rovibrational) states. The rovibrational states can be populated by excitation to higher electronic states through absorption of a far-UV photon followed by a radiative cascade to the electronic ground state, or by collisions (e.g., in a hot gas). The two processes populate the rovibrational levels of H2 differently, so the observed emergent emission spectrum provides an effective probe of the mechanisms that excite the H2. Many PNe display line intensity ratios that are intermediate between these two processes (Otsuka et al. 2013). With the advantages of the high spectral resolution (R~40000), broad wavelength coverage (1.45-2.45 μm), and high spatial resolution of the Immersion GRating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS, Park et al. 2014), we are able to differentiate components in position-velocity space: we see a slowly expanding UV-excited H2 shell in the PN M 1-11 and two faster moving “bullets” of thermalized H2 that we interpret as shocked gas from a bipolar outflow. We also present observations of several other PNe that exhibit similar morphologies of thermalized and UV-excited H2 components.

  5. Infrared spectroscopy in biomedical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyeva, Natalia I.; Kolyakov, Sergei F.; Letokhov, Vladilen S.; Artioushenko, Vjacheslav G.; Golovkina, Viktoriya N.

    1998-01-01

    Fiberoptic evanescent wave Fourier transform infrared (FEW- FTIR) spectroscopy using fiberoptic sensors operated in the attenuated total reflection (ATR) regime in the middle infrared (IR) region of the spectrum (850 - 1850 cm-1) has recently found application in the diagnostics of tissues. The method is suitable for noninvasive and rapid (seconds) direct measurements of the spectra of normal and pathological tissues in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. The aim of our studies is the express testing of various tumor tissues at the early stages of their development. The method is expected to be further developed for endoscopic and biopsy applications. We measured in vivo the skin normal and malignant tissues on surface (directly on patients) in various cases of basaloma, melanoma and nevus. The experiments were performed in the operating room for measurements of skin in the depth (under/in the layers of epidermis), human breast, stomach, lung, kidney tissues. The breast and skin tissues at different stages of tumor or cancer were distinguished very clearly in spectra of amide, side cyclic and noncyclic hydrogen bonded fragments of amino acid residuals, phosphate groups and sugars. Computer monitoring is being developed for diagnostics.

  6. Phase-resolved cyclotron spectroscopy of polars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Ryan

    In this thesis we use phase-resolved cyclotron spectroscopy to study polars. Polars are a subset of cataclysmic variables where the primary WD is highly magnetic. In this case, the accretion flow is constrained along the magnetic field lines and eventually deposited on the WD, where the accreting material interacts with the atmosphere, forming a standing hydrodynamic shock at a location termed the accretion region, and emitting cyclotron radiation. Due to its field strength, cyclotron radiation from polars falls at either UV, optical or NIR wavelengths. While a substantial amount of optical cyclotron spectra have been published on polars, the NIR remains relatively unstudied. In this thesis, we present NIR spectroscopy for fifteen polars. Additionally, while a single cyclotron spectrum is needed to constrain the shock parameters, phase- resolved spectroscopy allows for a more in-depth analysis of the shock structure and the geometry of the accretion region. Of the fifteen polars observed, eight yielded spectra of adequate quality to be modeled in this manner: EF Eri, EQ Cet, AN UMa, VV Pup, AM Her, ST LMi, MR Ser, and MQ Dra. Initially, we used the industry standard "Constant Lambda (CL)" code to model each object. The code is fast, but produces only globally averaged values of the salient shock parameters: B - the magnetic field strength, kT - the plasma temperature, logL - the "size parameter" of the accretion column, and TH- the viewing angle between the observer and the magnetic field. For each object we present CL models for our NIR phase-resolved cyclotron spectra. Subsequently, we use a more advanced "Structured-Shock" code built by Fischer & Beuermann (2001)("F&B") to remodel three objects: EQ Cet, MQ Dra, and EF Eri. The F&B code allows for input of more physical parameters and most importantly does ray tracing through a simulated one-dimensional accretion column. To determine the outgoing spectrum, temperature and velocity profiles are needed to

  7. Time-resolved far-infrared experiments at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, D.B.; Reitze, D.H.; Carr, G.L.

    1999-10-12

    A facility for time-resolved infrared and far-infrared spectroscopy has been built and commissioned at the National Synchrotron Light Source. This facility permits the study of time dependent phenomena over a frequency range from 2-8000cm{sup {minus}1} (0.25 meV-1 eV). Temporal resolution is approximately 200 psec and time dependent phenomena in the time range out to 100 nsec can be investigated.

  8. Reaction dynamics of O({sup 1}D) + HCOOD/DCOOH investigated with time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shang-Chen; Putikam, Raghunath; Lin, M. C. E-mail: tsuchis@sepia.plala.or.jp Tsuchiya, Soji E-mail: tsuchis@sepia.plala.or.jp; Nghia, N. T.; Nguyen, Hue M. T.; Lee, Yuan-Pern E-mail: tsuchis@sepia.plala.or.jp

    2014-10-21

    We investigated the reaction dynamics of O({sup 1}D) towards hydrogen atoms of two types in HCOOH. The reaction was initiated on irradiation of a flowing mixture of O{sub 3} and HCOOD or DCOOH at 248 nm. The relative vibration-rotational populations of OH and OD (1 ≦ v ≦ 4, J ≤ 15) states were determined from time-resolved IR emission recorded with a step-scan Fourier-transform spectrometer. In the reaction of O({sup 1}D) + HCOOD, the rotational distribution of product OH is nearly Boltzmann, whereas that of OD is bimodal. The product ratio [OH]/[OD] is 0.16 ± 0.05. In the reaction of O({sup 1}D) + DCOOH, the rotational distribution of product OH is bimodal, but the observed OD lines are too weak to provide reliable intensities. The three observed OH/OD channels agree with three major channels of production predicted with quantum-chemical calculations. In the case of O({sup 1}D) + HCOOD, two intermediates HOC(O)OD and HC(O)OOD are produced in the initial C−H and O−D insertion, respectively. The former undergoes further decomposition of the newly formed OH or the original OD, whereas the latter produces OD via direct decomposition. Decomposition of HOC(O)OD produced OH and OD with similar vibrational excitation, indicating efficient intramolecular vibrational relaxation, IVR. Decomposition of HC(O)OOD produced OD with greater rotational excitation. The predicted [OH]/[OD] ratio is 0.20 for O({sup 1}D) + HCOOD and 4.08 for O({sup 1}D) + DCOOH; the former agrees satisfactorily with experiments. We also observed the v{sub 3} emission from the product CO{sub 2}. This emission band is deconvoluted into two components corresponding to internal energies E = 317 and 96 kJ mol{sup −1} of CO{sub 2}, predicted to be produced via direct dehydration of HOC(O)OH and secondary decomposition of HC(O)O that was produced via decomposition of HC(O)OOH, respectively.

  9. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopic techniques as applied to channelrhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Eglof; Puskar, Ljiljana; Bartl, Franz J.; Aziz, Emad F.; Hegemann, Peter; Schade, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Among optogenetic tools, channelrhodopsins, the light gated ion channels of the plasma membrane from green algae, play the most important role. Properties like channel selectivity, timing parameters or color can be influenced by the exchange of selected amino acids. Although widely used, in the field of neurosciences for example, there is still little known about their photocycles and the mechanism of ion channel gating and conductance. One of the preferred methods for these studies is infrared spectroscopy since it allows observation of proteins and their function at a molecular level and in near-native environment. The absorption of a photon in channelrhodopsin leads to retinal isomerization within femtoseconds, the conductive states are reached in the microsecond time scale and the return into the fully dark-adapted state may take more than minutes. To be able to cover all these time regimes, a range of different spectroscopical approaches are necessary. This mini-review focuses on time-resolved applications of the infrared technique to study channelrhodopsins and other light triggered proteins. We will discuss the approaches with respect to their suitability to the investigation of channelrhodopsin and related proteins. PMID:26217670

  10. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy Part III. Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the use of the FT-IR spectrometer in analyses that were previously avoided. Examines some of the applications of this spectroscopy with aqueous solutions, circular internal reflection, samples with low transmission, diffuse reflectance, infrared emission, and the infrared microscope. (TW)

  11. Enhanced visible and near-infrared capabilities of the JET mirror-linked divertor spectroscopy system

    SciTech Connect

    Lomanowski, B. A. Sharples, R. M.; Meigs, A. G.; Conway, N. J.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Heesterman, P.; Kinna, D. [EURATOM Collaboration: JET-EFDA Team

    2014-11-15

    The mirror-linked divertor spectroscopy diagnostic on JET has been upgraded with a new visible and near-infrared grating and filtered spectroscopy system. New capabilities include extended near-infrared coverage up to 1875 nm, capturing the hydrogen Paschen series, as well as a 2 kHz frame rate filtered imaging camera system for fast measurements of impurity (Be II) and deuterium Dα, Dβ, Dγ line emission in the outer divertor. The expanded system provides unique capabilities for studying spatially resolved divertor plasma dynamics at near-ELM resolved timescales as well as a test bed for feasibility assessment of near-infrared spectroscopy.

  12. Infrared Laser Spectroscopy, 1980-1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, Robin S.

    1983-11-01

    The text for the Short Course on Infrared Laser Spectroscopy given at the Los Alamos Conference on Optics '83 is R. S. McDowell, "Vibrational Spectroscopy Using Tunable Lasers," in Vibrational Spectra and Structure, J. R. Durig, ed. (Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1981) 10, 1-151, which includes references through 1979. The present paper summarizes progress in this field from 1980 to early 1983.

  13. Identification of residues by infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, T.E.; Ayala, N.L.; Jin, Hong; Drumheller, C.T.

    1997-12-31

    Mid-infrared spectroscopy of surfaces can be a very powerful technique for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of surface residues. The goal of this work was to study the application of diffuse reflectance mid-infrared spectroscopy to the identification of pesticide, herbicide, and explosive residues on surfaces. A field portable diffuse reflectance spectrometer was used to collect the mid-infrared spectra of clean surfaces and contaminated surfaces. These spectra were used as calibration sets to develop automated data analysis to classify or to identify residues on samples. In this presentation, the instrumentation and data process algorithms will be discussed.

  14. Spatially resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybiec, Maciej

    applications was in the scope of this research. Bio-conjugation and functionalization are the fundamental issues for bio-marker tagging application of semiconductor quantum dots. It was discovered that spatially resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy and PL photo-degradation kinetics can confirm the bio-conjugation. Development of a methodology that will allow the spectroscopic confirmation of bio-conjugation of quantum dot fluorescent tags and optimization of their performance was the final goal for this research project.

  15. Position-resolved Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A.; Butterling, M.; Fiedler, F.; Fritz, F.; Kempe, M.; Cowan, T. E.

    2013-06-01

    A new method which allows for position-resolved positron lifetime spectroscopy studies in extended volume samples is presented. In addition to the existing technique of in-situ production of positrons inside large (cm3) bulk samples using high-energy photons up to 16 MeV from bremsstrahlung production, granular position-sensitive photon detectors have been employed. A beam of intense bremsstrahlung is provided by the superconducting electron linear accelerator ELBE (Electron Linear Accelerator with high Brilliance and low Emittance) which delivers electron bunches of less than 10 ps temporal width and an adjustable bunch separation of multiples of 38 ns, average beam currents of 1 mA, and energies up to 40 MeV. Since the generation of bremsstrahlung and the transport to the sample preserves the sharp timing of the electron beam, positrons generated inside the entire sample volume by pair production feature a sharp start time stamp for positron annihilation lifetime studies with high timing resolutions and high signal to background ratios due to the coincident detection of two annihilation photons. Two commercially available detectors from a high-resolution medial positron-emission tomography system are being employed with 169 individual Lu2SiO5:Ce scintillation crystals, each. In first experiments, a positron-lifetime gated image of a planar Si/SiO2 (pieces of 12.5 mm × 25 mm size) sample and a 3-D structured metal in Teflon target could be obtained proving the feasibility of a three dimensional lifetime-gated tomographic system.

  16. Remote sensing by infrared heterodyne spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk, T.; Mumma, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The use of infrared heterodyne spectrocopy for the study of planetary atmospheres is discussed. Infrared heterodyne spectroscopy provides a convenient and sensitive method for measuring the true intensity profiles of atmospheric spectral lines. Application of radiative transfer theory to measured lineshapes can then permit the study of molecular abundances, temperatures, total pressures, excitation conditions, and dynamics of the regions of line formation. The theory of formation of atmospheric spectral lines and the retrieval of the information contained in these molecular lines is illustrated. Notable successes of such retrievals from infrared heterodyne measurements on Venus, Mars, Jupiter and the Earth are given. A discussion of developments in infrared heterodyne technology is also presented.

  17. Thymine Dimer Formation probed by Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Wolfgang J.; Schrader, Tobias E.; Roller, Florian O.; Gilch, Peter; Zinth, Wolfgang; Kohler, Bern

    Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers are the major photoproducts formed when DNA is exposed to UV light. Femtosecond time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy reveals that thymine dimers are formed in thymidine oligonucleotides in an ultrafast photoreaction.

  18. Phase angle description of perturbation correlation analysis and its application to time-resolved infrared spectra.

    PubMed

    Morita, Shigeaki; Tanaka, Masaru; Noda, Isao; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2007-08-01

    A method of spectral analysis, phase angle description of perturbation correlation analysis, is proposed. This method is based on global phase angle description of generalized two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy, proposed by Shin-ichi Morita et al., and perturbation-correlation moving-window 2D (PCMW2D) correlation spectroscopy, proposed by Shigeaki Morita et al. For a spectral data set collected under an external perturbation, such as time-resolved infrared spectra, this method provides only one phase angle spectrum. A phase angle of the Fourier frequency domain correlation between a spectral intensity (e.g., absorbance) variation and a perturbation variation (e.g., scores of the first principle component) as a function of spectral variable (e.g., wavenumber) is plotted. Therefore, a degree of time lag of each band variation with respect to the perturbation variation is directly visualized in the phase angle spectrum. This method is applied to time-resolved infrared spectra in the O-H stretching region of the water sorption process into a poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate) (PMEA) film. The time-resolved infrared (IR) spectra show three broad and overlapping bands in the region. Each band increases toward saturated water sorption with different relaxation times. In comparison to conventional methods of generalized 2D correlation spectroscopy and global phase angle mapping, the method proposed in the present study enables the easier visualization of the sequence as a degree of phase angle in the spectrum. PMID:17716406

  19. Flap monitoring using infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Alex; Wright, Leigh P.; Elmandjra, Mohamed; Mao, Jian-min

    2006-02-01

    We report results of clinical trials on flap monitoring in 65 plastic surgeries. Hemoglobin oxygen saturation of flap tissue (StO II) was monitored non-invasively by using ODISsey TM tissue oximeter, an infrared spectroscopic device. StO II measurements were conducted both intra-operatively and post-operatively. From the intra-operative measurements, we observed that StO II values dropped when the main blood vessels supplying the flap were clamped in surgery, and that StO II jumped after anastomosis to a value close to its pre-operative value. From post-operative monitoring measurements for the 65 flap cases, each lasted two days or so, we found that the StO II values approach to a level close to the baseline if the surgery was successful, and that the StO II value dropped to a value below 30% if there is a perfusion compromise, such as vascular thrombosis.

  20. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy Measurement of SOx using Tunable Infrared Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuchi, Tetsuo

    The absorption characteristics of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfur trioxide (SO3) in the infrared region were measured using a quantum cascade laser and an absorption cell of length 1 m heated to 150°C. The laser was scanned over the wavelength range 6.9-7.4 μm, which included the absorption bands of SO2 and SO3. Measurement results showed that the absorption bands of SO2 and SO3 partially overlapped, with peaks at 7.28 μm and 7.35 μm for SO2 and 7.14 μm and 7.25 μm for SO3. These results showed the possbility of using infrared laser absorption spectroscopy for measurement of sulfur oxides (SOx) in flue gas. For SO3 measurement, infrared absorption spectroscopy was shown to be more suitable than ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. The absorption characteristics of open air in the same wavelength region showed that the interference due to water vapor must be efficiently removed to perform SOx measurement in flue gas.

  1. Infrared microcalorimetric spectroscopy using uncooled thermal detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, P.G. |; Rajic, S.; Datskou, I.; Egert, C.M.

    1997-10-01

    The authors have investigated a novel infrared microcalorimetric spectroscopy technique that can be used to detect the presence of trace amounts of target molecules. The chemical detection is accomplished by obtaining the infrared photothermal spectra of molecules absorbed on the surface of an uncooled thermal detector. Traditional gravimetric based chemical detectors (surface acoustic waves, quartz crystal microbalances) require highly selective coatings to achieve chemical specificity. In contrast, infrared microcalorimetric based detection requires only moderately specific coatings since the specificity is a consequence of the photothermal spectrum. They have obtained infrared photothermal spectra for trace concentrations of chemical analytes including diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP), 2-mercaptoethanol and trinitrotoluene (TNT) over the wavelength region2.5 to 14.5 {micro}m. They found that in the wavelength region 2.5 to 14.5 {micro}m DIMP exhibits two strong photothermal peaks. The photothermal spectra of 2-mercaptoethanol and TNT exhibit a number of peaks in the wavelength region 2.5 to 14.5 {micro}m and the photothermal peaks for 2-mercaptoethanol are in excellent agreement with infrared absorption peaks present in its IR spectrum. The photothermal response of chemical detectors based on microcalorimetric spectroscopy has been found to vary reproducibly and sensitively as a consequence of adsorption of small number of molecules on a detector surface followed by photon irradiation and can be used for improved chemical characterization.

  2. Following [FeFe] Hydrogenase Active Site Intermediates by Time-Resolved Mid-IR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mirmohades, Mohammad; Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka; Sommer, Constanze; Reijerse, Edward; Lomoth, Reiner; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Hammarström, Leif

    2016-08-18

    Time-resolved nanosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy is for the first time employed to study the [FeFe] hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and to investigate relevant intermediates of the enzyme active site. An actinic 355 nm, 10 ns laser flash triggered photodissociation of a carbonyl group from the CO-inhibited state Hox-CO to form the state Hox, which is an intermediate of the catalytic proton reduction cycle. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy allowed us to directly follow the subsequent rebinding of the carbonyl, re-forming Hox-CO, and determine the reaction half-life to be t1/2 ≈ 13 ± 5 ms at room temperature. This gives direct information on the dynamics of CO inhibition of the enzyme. PMID:27494400

  3. Time-resolved orbital angular momentum spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Noyan, Mehmet A.; Kikkawa, James M.

    2015-07-20

    We introduce pump-probe magneto-orbital spectroscopy, wherein Laguerre-Gauss optical pump pulses impart orbital angular momentum to the electronic states of a material and subsequent dynamics are studied with 100 fs time resolution. The excitation uses vortex modes that distribute angular momentum over a macroscopic area determined by the spot size, and the optical probe studies the chiral imbalance of vortex modes reflected off the sample. First observations in bulk GaAs yield transients that evolve on time scales distinctly different from population and spin relaxation, as expected, but with surprisingly large lifetimes.

  4. Observations of Resolved Stellar Populations with the JWST Near Infrared Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Karoline; Beck, Tracy L.; Karakla, Diane M.

    2015-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope's (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) will provide a multi-object spectroscopy mode through the four Micro-Shutter Arrays (MSAs). Each MSA is a grid of contiguous shutters that can be configured to form slits on more than 100 astronomical targets simultaneously. The combination of JWST's sensitivity and superb resolution in the infrared and NIRSpec's full wavelength coverage over 1 to 5 micrometers will open new parameter space for studies of galaxies and resolved stellar populations alike. We present a NIRSpec MSA observing scenario for obtaining spectroscopy of individual stars in external galaxies. We examine the multiplexing capability of the MSA as a function of the possible MSA configuration design choices, and investigate the primary sources of error in velocity measurements and the prospects for minimizing them. We discuss how this and other use cases are being used to guide development of the NIRSpec user interfaces, including proposal planning and pipeline calibrations.

  5. Determination of hexacelsian by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Guillem Villar, M C; Monzonís, C G

    1984-07-01

    Hexacelsian has been determined by infrared spectroscopy with KBr discs and K(4)Fe(CN)(6) as internal standard. A KBr particle size of <40 mum gave better homogenization of the sample-KBr mixture than a particle size in the 40-70 mum range. For determinations of hexacelsian in synthetic samples containing amorphous phase or celsian, calibration curves were constructed. A least-squares fit yielded correlation coefficients of 0.998 and 0.997. PMID:18963645

  6. Spatially resolved spectroscopy using tapered stripline NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijssen, Koen C. H.; Bart, Jacob; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; Janssen, J. W. G. (Hans); Kentgens, Arno P. M.; van Bentum, P. Jan M.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic field B0 gradients are essential in modern Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Although RF/B1 gradients can be used to fulfill a similar role, this is not used in common practice because of practical limitations in the design of B1 gradient coils. Here we present a new method to create B1 gradients using stripline RF coils. The conductor-width of a stripline NMR chip and the strength of its radiofrequency field are correlated, so a stripline chip can be tapered to produce any arbitrary shaped B1 field gradient. Here we show the characterization of this tapered stripline configuration and demonstrate three applications: magnetic resonance imaging on samples with nL-μL volumes, reaction monitoring of fast chemical reactions (10-2-101 s) and the compensation of B0 field gradients to obtain high-resolution spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

  7. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H.

    1997-04-01

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  8. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of Eclipsing Polars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Paul

    2005-09-01

    No changes have been made since the last annual progress report was submitted in conjunction with a unilateral NCX. Dr. Barrett was affected by an STScI Reduction in Force (RIF). He is now employed by the Johns Hopkins University and plans to continue his research there. No expenses have been charged to this grant, however the FUSE data for the eclipsing polar V1432 Aql has been received and processed using CALFWSE v3.0.6. The resulting summed spectrum has been used for a preliminary analysis of the interstellar absorption towards V1432 Aql. We find a hydrogen column density of less than 1.5e21 cm^-2. We have used this result in the paper "X-Ray Emission and Optical Polarization of V1432 Aquilae: An Asynchronous Polar" to fix the hydrogen column density in the soft (<0.5 keV) X-ray band when analyzing the XMM-Newton spectra of this polar. This has enabled us to find an accurate temperature for the blackbody component of 88+/-2 eV, which is significantly higher than that of other polars (20 - 40 eV). We hope to complete our analysis of the phase-resolved emission line spectra of V1432 Aql and to prepare the results for publication in a refereed journal. We hope to begin work on this star within the next few months.

  9. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of Eclipsing Polars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Paul

    2005-01-01

    No changes have been made since the last annual progress report was submitted in conjunction with a unilateral NCX. Dr. Barrett was affected by an STScI Reduction in Force (RIF). He is now employed by the Johns Hopkins University and plans to continue his research there. No expenses have been charged to this grant, however the FUSE data for the eclipsing polar V1432 Aql has been received and processed using CALFWSE v3.0.6. The resulting summed spectrum has been used for a preliminary analysis of the interstellar absorption towards V1432 Aql. We find a hydrogen column density of less than 1.5e21 cm^-2. We have used this result in the paper "X-Ray Emission and Optical Polarization of V1432 Aquilae: An Asynchronous Polar" to fix the hydrogen column density in the soft (<0.5 keV) X-ray band when analyzing the XMM-Newton spectra of this polar. This has enabled us to find an accurate temperature for the blackbody component of 88+/-2 eV, which is significantly higher than that of other polars (20 - 40 eV). We hope to complete our analysis of the phase-resolved emission line spectra of V1432 Aql and to prepare the results for publication in a refereed journal. We hope to begin work on this star within the next few months.

  10. Infrared and infrared emission spectroscopy of the zinc carbonate mineral smithsonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Ray L.; Martens, Wayde N.; Wain, Daria L.; Hales, Matt C.

    2008-10-01

    Infrared emission and infrared spectroscopy has been used to study a series of selected natural smithsonites from different origins. An intense broad infrared band at 1440 cm -1 is assigned to the ν CO 32- antisymmetric stretching vibration. An additional band is resolved at 1335 cm -1. An intense sharp Raman band at 1092 cm -1 is assigned to the CO 32- symmetric stretching vibration. Infrared emission spectra show a broad antisymmetric band at 1442 cm -1 shifting to lower wavenumbers with thermal treatment. A band observed at 870 cm -1 with a band of lesser intensity at 842 cm -1 shifts to higher wavenumbers upon thermal treatment and is observed at 865 cm -1 at 400 °C and is assigned to the CO 32-ν mode. No ν bending modes are observed in the Raman spectra for smithsonite. The band at 746 cm -1 shifts to 743 cm -1 at 400 °C and is attributed to the CO 32-ν in phase bending modes. Two infrared bands at 744 and around 729 cm -1 are assigned to the ν in phase bending mode. Multiple bands may be attributed to the structural distortion ZnO 6 octahedron. This structural distortion is brought about by the substitution of Zn by some other cation. A number of bands at 2499, 2597, 2858, 2954 and 2991 cm -1 in both the IE and infrared spectra are attributed to combination bands.

  11. Background-Limited Infrared-Submillimeter Spectroscopy (BLISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Charles Matt

    2004-01-01

    The bulk of the cosmic far-infrared background light will soon be resolved into its individual sources with Spitzer, Astro-F, Herschel, and submm/mm ground-based cameras. The sources will be dusty galaxies at z approximately equal to 1-4. Their physical conditions and processes in these galaxies are directly probed with moderate-resolution spectroscopy from 20 micrometers to 1 mm. Currently large cold telescopes are being combined with sensitive direct detectors, offering the potential for mid-far-IR spectroscopy at the background limit (BLISS). The capability will allow routine observations of even modest high-redshift galaxies in a variety of lines. The BLISS instrument's capabilities are described in this presentation.

  12. Infrared polarization spectroscopy of CO 2 at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alwahabi, Z. T.; Li, Z. S.; Zetterberg, J.; Aldén, M.

    2004-04-01

    Polarisation spectroscopy (PS) was used to probe CO 2 gas concentration in a CO 2/N 2 binary mixture at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature. The CO 2 molecules were probed by a direct laser excitation to an overtone and combination vibrational state. The tuneable narrow linewidth infrared laser radiation at 2 μm was obtained by Raman shifting of the output from a single-longitudinal-mode pulsed alexandrite laser-system to the second Stokes component in a H 2 gas cell. Infrared polarisation spectroscopy (IRPS) and time-resolved infrared laser-induced fluorescence (IRLIF) spectra were collected. A linear dependence of the IRPS signal on the CO 2 mole fraction has been found. This indicates that the IRPS signal is only weakly affected by the molecular collisions and that the inter- and intra- molecular energy transfer processes do not strongly influence the molecular alignment at the time scale of the measurements. Thus IRPS holds great potential for quantitative instantaneous gas concentration diagnostics in general. This is especially important for molecules which do not posses an accessible optical transition such as CO, CO 2 and N 2O. In addition, an accurate experimental method to measure the extinction ratio of the IR polarisers employed in this study has been developed and applied. With its obvious merits as simplicity, easy alignment and high accuracy, the method can be generalized to all spectral regions, different polarisers and high extinction ratios.

  13. High resolution infrared spectroscopy: Some new approaches and applications to planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    The principles of spectral line formation and of techniques for retrieval of atmospheric temperature and constituent profiles are discussed. Applications to the atmospheres of Earth, Mars, Venus, and Jupiter are illustrated by results obtained with Fourier transform and infrared heterodyne spectrometers at resolving powers (lambda/delta hyperon lambda of approximately 10,000 and approximately 10 to the seventh power), respectively, showing the high complementarity of spectroscopy at these two widely different resolving powers. The principles of heterodyne spectroscopy are presented and its applications to atmospheric probing and to laboratory spectroscopy are discussed. Direct absorption spectroscopy with tuneable semiconductor lasers is discussed in terms of precision frequency-and line strength-measurements, showing substantial advances in laboratory infrared spectroscopy.

  14. [System of ns time-resolved spectroscopy diagnosis and radioprotection].

    PubMed

    Yao, Wei-Bo; Guo, Jian-Ming; Zhang, Yong-min; Tang, Jun-Ping; Cheng, Liang; Xu, Qi-fuo

    2014-06-01

    Cathode plasma of high current electron beam diode is an important research on high power microwave and strong pulsed radio accelerator. It is a reliable method to study cathode plasma by diagnosing the cathode plasma parameters with non-contact spectroscopy measurement system. The present paper introduced the work principle, system composition and performance of the nanosecond (ns) time-resolved spectroscopy diagnosis system. Furthermore, it introduced the implementing method and the temporal relation of lower jitter synchronous trigger system. Simultaneously, the authors designed electromagnetic and radio shield room to protect the diagnosis system due to the high electromagnetic and high X-ray and γ-ray radiation, which seriously interferes with the system. Time-resolved spectroscopy experiment on brass (H62) cathode shows that, the element and matter composition of cathode plasma is clearly increase with the increase in the diode pulsed voltage and current magnitude. The spectroscopy diagnosis system could be of up to 10 ns time resolve capability. It's least is 2 ns. Synchronous trigger system's jitter is less than 4 ns. The spectroscopy diagnosis system will open a new way to study the cathode emission mechanism in depth. PMID:25358142

  15. [Application of near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) for evaluating cheese quality].

    PubMed

    Zou, Qiang; Fang, Hui; Zhang, Wei; He, Yong

    2011-10-01

    Near infrared spectrocopy, widely used in food industry, is a fast, nondestructive analysis method. Although it has been in the detection of the quality of cheese for many years, related research is few in our country. The principle of near infrared spectroscopy and the characteristics are introduced. Cheese process, shrinkage control, maturation process, shelf life, brand classification and detection of components in the application of near infrared spectroscopy are summarized. There is great potential to apply near infrared spectroscopy in cheese quality analysis. It is an urgent task to promote the application of near infrared spectroscopy and the development of China's cheese industry. PMID:22250544

  16. Spatially resolved tunneling spectroscopy on TTF-TCNQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. Z.; Girard, J. C.; Pasquier, C.; Jérome, D.

    2004-04-01

    Local tunneling spectroscopy has been measured with low temperature UHV-STM on in-situ cleaved ab surface of organic TTF-TCNQ crystal. Due to ultra low image drift and clear molecular resolution, the spectroscopy is performed at specific molecular site either on TCNQ or TTF chains. In normal state (T= 63 K), a large pseudo-gap exists both in TTF and TCNQ chains. Above pseudo-gap local density of states differs for TTF and TCNQ chains that is in good agreement with double band model. By the signature of an anomalous in local spectroscopy measurement, a single impurity has been detected on a TTF chain. Charge density wave fluctuation is pinned by impurity above critical temperature (T=54K). Results obtained show that, Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy can provide spatially resolved spectroscopic information at nanometer scale. Key words. TTF-TCNQ, local tunneling spectroscopy, pseudogap.

  17. Infrared Spectroscopy of Anhydrous Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Flynn, G. J.

    2003-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is the primary means of mineralogical analysis of materials outside our solar system. The identity and properties of circumstellar grains are inferred from spectral comparisons between astronomical observations and laboratory data from natural and synthetic materials. These comparisons have been facilitated by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), which obtained IR spectra from numerous astrophysical objects over a wide spectral range (out to 50/cm) where crystalline silicates and other phases have distinct features. The anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are particularly important comparison materials because some IDPs contain carbonaceous material with non-solar D/H and N-15/N-14 ratios and amorphous and crystalline silicates with non-solar 0- isotopic ratios, demonstrating that these IDPs contain preserved interstellar material. Here, we report on micro- Fourier transform (FT) IR spectrometry of IDPs, focusing on the inorganic components of primitive IDPs (FTIR spectra from the organic/carbonacecous materials in IDPs are described elsewhere).

  18. Drill hole logging with infrared spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvin, W.M.; Solum, J.G.

    2005-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy has been used to identify rocks and minerals for over 40 years. The technique is sensitive to primary silicates as well as alteration products. Minerals can be uniquely identified based on multiple absorption features at wavelengths from the visible to the thermal infrared. We are currently establishing methods and protocols in order to use the technique for rapid assessment of downhole lithology on samples obtained during drilling operations. Initial work performed includes spectral analysis of chip cuttings and core sections from drill sites around Desert Peak, NV. In this paper, we report on a survey of 10,000 feet of drill cuttings, at 100 foot intervals, from the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD). Data from Blue Mountain geothermal wells will also be acquired. We will describe the utility of the technique for rapid assessment of lithologic and mineralogic discrimination.

  19. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for Mars science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Mark S.; Andringa, Jason M.; Carlson, Robert W.; Conrad, Pamela; Hartford, Wayne; Shafer, Michael; Soto, Alejandro; Tsapin, Alexandre I.; Dybwad, Jens Peter; Wadsworth, Winthrop; Hand, Kevin

    2005-03-01

    Presented here is a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) for field studies that serves as a prototype for future Mars science applications. Infrared spectroscopy provides chemical information that is relevant to a number of Mars science questions. This includes mineralogical analysis, nitrogen compound recognition, truth testing of remote sensing measurements, and the ability to detect organic compounds. The challenges and scientific opportunities are given for the in situ FTIR analysis of Mars soil and rock samples. Various FTIR sampling techniques are assessed and compared to other analytical instrumentation. The prototype instrument presented is capable of providing field analysis in a Mars analog Antarctic environment. FTIR analysis of endolithic microbial communities in Antarctic rocks and a Mars meteor are given as analytical examples.

  20. Infrared Heterodyne Spectroscopy and its Unique Application to Planetary Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    Since the early 1970's the infrared heterodyne technique has evolved into a powerful tool for the study of molecular constituents, temperatures, and dynamics in planetary atmospheres. Its extremely high spectral resolution (Lambda/(Delta)Lambda/>10(exp 6)) and highly accurate frequency measurement (to 1 part in 10(exp 8)) enabled the detection of nonthermal/natural lasing phenomena on Mars and Venus; direct measurements of winds on Venus, Mars, and Titan; study of mid-infrared aurorae on Jupiter; direct measurement of species abundances on Mars (ozone, isotopic CO2), hydrocarbons on Jupiter, Saturn., Neptune, and Titan, and stratospheric composition in the Earth's stratosphere (O3, CIO, N2O, CO2 ....). Fully resolved emission and absorption line shapes measured by this method enabled the unambiguous retrieval of molecular abundances and local temperatures and thermal structure in regions not probed by other techniques. The mesosphere of Mars and thermosphere of Venus are uniquely probed by infrared heterodyne spectroscopy. Results of these studies tested and constrained photochemical and dynamical theoretical models describing the phenomena measured. The infrared heterodyne technique will be described. Highlights in its evolution to today's instrumentation and resultant discoveries will be presented, including work at Goddard Space Flight Center and the University of Koln. Resultant work will include studies supporting NASA and ESA space missions and collaborations between instrumental and theoretical groups.

  1. Detection of Endolithes Using Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumas, S.; Dutil, Y.; Joncas, G.

    2009-12-01

    On Earth, the Dry Valleys of Antarctica provide the closest martian-like environment for the study of extremophiles. Colonies of bacterias are protected from the freezing temperatures, the drought and UV light. They represent almost half of the biomass of those regions. Due to their resilience, endolithes are one possible model of martian biota. We propose to use infrared spectroscopy to remotely detect those colonies even if there is no obvious sign of their presence. This remote sensing approach reduces the risk of contamination or damage to the samples.

  2. Infrared spectroscopy study of irradiated PVDF

    SciTech Connect

    Chappa, Veronica; Grosso, Mariela del; Garcia Bermudez, Gerardo; Behar, Moni

    2007-10-26

    The effects induced by 1 MeV/amu ion irradiations were compared to those induced by 4-12 MeV/amu irradiations. Structural analysis with infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was carried out on PVDF irradiated using C and He beams with different fluences. From these spectra it was observed, as a function of fluence, an overall destruction of the polymer, amorphization of the crystalline regions and the creation of in-chain unsaturations. The track dimensions were determined using a previously developed Monte Carlo simulation code and these results were compared to a semiempirical model.

  3. Infrared microcalorimetric spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E; Senesac, Larry R; Rajic, Slobodan; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Smith, Barton; Datskos, Panos G

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated an infrared (IR) microcalorimetric spectroscopy technique that can be used to detect the presence of trace amounts of target molecules. The chemical detection is accomplished by obtaining the IR photothermal spectra of molecules absorbed on the surface of uncooled thermal micromechanical detectors. IR microcalorimetric spectroscopy requires no chemical specific coatings and the chemical specificity of the presented method is a consequence of the wavelength-specific absorption of IR photons from tunable quantum cascade lasers due to vibrational spectral bands of the analyte. We have obtained IR photothermal spectra for trace concentrations of RDX and a monolayer of 2-mercaptoethanol, over the wavelength region from 6 to 10 m. We found that in this wavelength region both chemicals exhibit a number of photothermal absorption features that are in good agreement with their respective IR spectra.

  4. Disease recognition by infrared and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Krafft, Christoph; Steiner, Gerald; Beleites, Claudia; Salzer, Reiner

    2009-02-01

    Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopy are emerging biophotonic tools to recognize various diseases. The current review gives an overview of the experimental techniques, data-classification algorithms and applications to assess soft tissues, hard tissues and body fluids. The methodology section presents the principles to combine vibrational spectroscopy with microscopy, lateral information and fiber-optic probes. A crucial step is the classification of spectral data by a variety of algorithms. We discuss unsupervised algorithms such as cluster analysis or principal component analysis and supervised algorithms such as linear discriminant analysis, soft independent modeling of class analogies, artificial neural networks support vector machines, Bayesian classification, partial least-squares regression and ensemble methods. The selected topics include tumors of epithelial tissue, brain tumors, prion diseases, bone diseases, atherosclerosis, kidney stones and gallstones, skin tumors, diabetes and osteoarthritis. PMID:19343682

  5. Resolving molecular vibronic structure using high-sensitivity two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizimana, Laurie A.; Brazard, Johanna; Carbery, William P.; Gellen, Tobias; Turner, Daniel B.

    2015-10-01

    Coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy is an emerging technique for resolving structure and ultrafast dynamics of molecules, proteins, semiconductors, and other materials. A current challenge is the quality of kinetics that are examined as a function of waiting time. Inspired by noise-suppression methods of transient absorption, here we incorporate shot-by-shot acquisitions and balanced detection into coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy. We demonstrate that implementing noise-suppression methods in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy not only improves the quality of features in individual spectra but also increases the sensitivity to ultrafast time-dependent changes in the spectral features. Measurements on cresyl violet perchlorate are consistent with the vibronic pattern predicted by theoretical models of a highly displaced harmonic oscillator. The noise-suppression methods should benefit research into coherent electronic dynamics, and they can be adapted to multidimensional spectroscopies across the infrared and ultraviolet frequency ranges.

  6. Resolving molecular vibronic structure using high-sensitivity two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bizimana, Laurie A.; Brazard, Johanna; Carbery, William P.; Gellen, Tobias; Turner, Daniel B.

    2015-10-28

    Coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy is an emerging technique for resolving structure and ultrafast dynamics of molecules, proteins, semiconductors, and other materials. A current challenge is the quality of kinetics that are examined as a function of waiting time. Inspired by noise-suppression methods of transient absorption, here we incorporate shot-by-shot acquisitions and balanced detection into coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy. We demonstrate that implementing noise-suppression methods in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy not only improves the quality of features in individual spectra but also increases the sensitivity to ultrafast time-dependent changes in the spectral features. Measurements on cresyl violet perchlorate are consistent with the vibronic pattern predicted by theoretical models of a highly displaced harmonic oscillator. The noise-suppression methods should benefit research into coherent electronic dynamics, and they can be adapted to multidimensional spectroscopies across the infrared and ultraviolet frequency ranges.

  7. Infrared spectroscopy of mass-selected carbocations

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Michael A.

    2015-01-22

    Small carbocations are of longstanding interest in astrophysics, but there are few measurements of their infrared spectroscopy in the gas phase at low temperature. There are fewer-still measurements of spectra across the full range of IR frequencies useful to obtain an IR signature of these ions to detect them in space. We have developed a pulsed-discharge supersonic nozzle ion source producing high densities of small carbocations at low temperatures (50–70K). We employ mass-selected photodissociation spectroscopy and the method of rare gas “tagging”, together with new broadly tunable infrared OPO lasers, to obtain IR spectra for a variety of small carbocations including C{sub 2}H{sub 3}{sup +}, C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +}, C{sub 3}H{sub 5}{sup +}, protonated benzene and protonated naphthalene. Spectra in the frequency range of 600–4500 cm{sup −1} provide new IR data for these ions and evidence for the presence of co-existing isomeric structures (e.g., C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +} is present as both cyclopropenyl and propargyl). Protonated naphthalene has sharp bands at 6.2, 7.7 and 8.6 microns matching prominent features in the UIR spectra.

  8. Thermal infrared near-field spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew C; Raschke, Markus B

    2012-03-14

    Despite the seminal contributions of Kirchhoff and Planck describing far-field thermal emission, fundamentally distinct spectral characteristics of the electromagnetic thermal near-field have been predicted. However, due to their evanescent nature their direct experimental characterization has remained elusive. Combining scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy with Fourier-transform spectroscopy using a heated atomic force microscope tip as both a local thermal source and scattering probe, we spectroscopically characterize the thermal near-field in the mid-infrared. We observe the spectrally distinct and orders of magnitude enhanced resonant spectral near-field energy density associated with vibrational, phonon, and phonon-polariton modes. We describe this behavior and the associated distinct on- and off-resonance nanoscale field localization with model calculations of the near-field electromagnetic local density of states. Our results provide a basis for intrinsic and extrinsic resonant manipulation of optical forces, control of nanoscale radiative heat transfer with optical antennas, and use of this new technique of thermal infrared near-field spectroscopy for broadband chemical nanospectroscopy. PMID:22280474

  9. Simulations of Non-resolved, Infrared Imaging of Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jim, K.; Kuluhiwa, K.; Scott, B. Knox, R.; Frith, J.; Gibson, B.

    Simulations of near-infrared, non-resolved imaging of earth-orbiting satellites during nighttime and daytime were created to consider the feasibility of such observations. By using the atmospheric radiative transfer code MODTRAN (MODerate resolution atmospheric TRANsmission), we incorporate site-specific mean weather conditions for several possible locations. In general, the dominant effect to be modeled is the sky radiance, which has a strong dependence upon the solar angle and the nature of the distribution of aerosols. Other significant effects included in the model are telescope design, camera design, and detector selection. The simulations are used in turn to predict the signal to noise ratio (SNR) in standard astronomical filter bands for several test cases of satellite-sun-observer geometries. The SNR model is then used to devise a method to design an optimal filter band for these observations.

  10. Infrared Spectroscopy as a Chemical Fingerprinting Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Timothy L.

    2003-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is a powerful analytical tool in the chemical fingerprinting of materials. Any sample material that will interact with infrared light produces a spectrum and, although normally associated with organic materials, inorganic compounds may also be infrared active. The technique is rapid, reproducible and usually non-invasive to the sample. That it is non-invasive allows for additional characterization of the original material using other analytical techniques including thermal analysis and RAMAN spectroscopic techniques. With the appropriate accessories, the technique can be used to examine samples in liquid, solid or gas phase. Both aqueous and non-aqueous free-flowing solutions can be analyzed, as can viscous liquids such as heavy oils and greases. Solid samples of varying sizes and shapes may also be examined and with the addition of microscopic IR (microspectroscopy) capabilities, minute materials such as single fibers and threads may be analyzed. With the addition of appropriate software, microspectroscopy can be used for automated discrete point or compositional surface area mapping, with the latter providing a means to record changes in the chemical composition of a material surface over a defined area. Due to the ability to characterize gaseous samples, IR spectroscopy can also be coupled with thermal processes such as thermogravimetric (TG) analyses to provide both thermal and chemical data in a single run. In this configuration, solids (or liquids) heated in a TG analyzer undergo decomposition, with the evolving gases directed into the IR spectrometer. Thus, information is provided on the thermal properties of a material and the order in which its chemical constituents are broken down during incremental heating. Specific examples of these varied applications will be cited, with data interpretation and method limitations further discussed.

  11. Infrared spectroscopy of exoplanets: observational constraints.

    PubMed

    Encrenaz, Thérèse

    2014-04-28

    The exploration of transiting extrasolar planets is an exploding research area in astronomy. With more than 400 transiting exoplanets identified so far, these discoveries have made possible the development of a new research field, the spectroscopic characterization of exoplanets' atmospheres, using both primary and secondary transits. However, these observations have been so far limited to a small number of targets. In this paper, we first review the advantages and limitations of both primary and secondary transit methods. Then, we analyse what kind of infrared spectra can be expected for different types of planets and discuss how to optimize the spectral range and the resolving power of the observations. Finally, we propose a list of favourable targets for present and future ground-based observations. PMID:24664918

  12. Infrared spectroscopy of exoplanets: observational constraints

    PubMed Central

    Encrenaz, Thérèse

    2014-01-01

    The exploration of transiting extrasolar planets is an exploding research area in astronomy. With more than 400 transiting exoplanets identified so far, these discoveries have made possible the development of a new research field, the spectroscopic characterization of exoplanets' atmospheres, using both primary and secondary transits. However, these observations have been so far limited to a small number of targets. In this paper, we first review the advantages and limitations of both primary and secondary transit methods. Then, we analyse what kind of infrared spectra can be expected for different types of planets and discuss how to optimize the spectral range and the resolving power of the observations. Finally, we propose a list of favourable targets for present and future ground-based observations. PMID:24664918

  13. [Application of infrared spectroscopy technique to discrimination of alcoholic beverages].

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiao-Ying; Ying, Yi-Bin; Yu, Hai-Yan; Xie, Li-Juan; Fu, Xia-Ping

    2008-04-01

    Infrared spectroscopy technique is a rapid for the discrimination of food samples, and is widely used to detect and discriminate various beverages. This paper presents the advantages and disadvantages of techniques that have been used to discriminate alcoholic beverages, and the discriminating procedure with infrared spectroscopy technique. Applications of infrared spectroscopy technique to wine, whiskey, Japanese sake and Chinese rice wine etc. is presented too. Finally, problems in applications are analyzed, and the application of infrared spectroscopy technique to the discrimination of our traditional alcoholic beverages is prospected. PMID:18619303

  14. Depth-resolved measurements with elliptically polarized reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Maria J.; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    The ability of elliptical polarized reflectance spectroscopy (EPRS) to detect spectroscopic alterations in tissue mimicking phantoms and in biological tissue in situ is demonstrated. It is shown that there is a linear relationship between light penetration depth and ellipticity. This dependence is used to demonstrate the feasibility of a depth-resolved spectroscopic imaging using EPRS. The advantages and drawbacks of EPRS in evaluation of biological tissue are analyzed and discussed. PMID:27446712

  15. Momentum Resolved Radio Frequency Spectroscopy in Trapped Fermi Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qijin; Levin, K.

    2009-05-15

    We address recent momentum-resolved radio frequency (rf) spectroscopy experiments, showing how they yield more stringent tests than other comparisons with theory, associated with the ultracold Fermi gases. We demonstrate that, by providing a clear dispersion signature of pairing, they remove the ambiguity plaguing the interpretation of previous rf experiments. Our calculated spectral intensities are in semiquantitative agreement with the data. Even in the presence of a trap, the spectra are predicted to exhibit two BCS-like branches.

  16. Quantitatively Resolving Multivalent Interactions on Macroscopic Scale Using Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qiongzheng; Yang, Haopeng; Wang, Yuhong; Xu, Shoujun

    2016-01-01

    Multivalent interactions remain difficult to be characterized and consequently controlled, particularly on a macroscopic scale. Using force-induced remnant magnetization spectroscopy (FIRMS), we have resolved the single-, double-, and triple- biotin—streptavidin interactions, multivalent DNA interactions and CXCL12-CXCR4 interactions, on millimetre-scale surfaces. Our results establish FIRMS as a viable method for systematic resolution and controlled formation of multivalent interactions. PMID:26864087

  17. Visualizing Infrared (IR) Spectroscopy with Computer Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Charles B.; Fine, Leonard W.

    1996-01-01

    IR Tutor, an interactive, animated infrared (IR) spectroscopy tutorial has been developed for Macintosh and IBM-compatible computers. Using unique color animation, complicated vibrational modes can be introduced to beginning students. Rules governing the appearance of IR absorption bands become obvious because the vibrational modes can be visualized. Each peak in the IR spectrum is highlighted, and the animation of the corresponding normal mode can be shown. Students can study each spectrum stepwise, or click on any individual peak to see its assignment. Important regions of each spectrum can be expanded and spectra can be overlaid for comparison. An introduction to the theory of IR spectroscopy is included, making the program a complete instructional package. Our own success in using this software for teaching and research in both academic and industrial environments will be described. IR Tutor consists of three sections: (1) The 'Introduction' is a review of basic principles of spectroscopy. (2) 'Theory' begins with the classical model of a simple diatomic molecule and is expanded to include larger molecules by introducing normal modes and group frequencies. (3) 'Interpretation' is the heart of the tutorial. Thirteen IR spectra are analyzed in detail, covering the most important functional groups. This section features color animation of each normal mode, full interactivity, overlay of related spectra, and expansion of important regions. This section can also be used as a reference.

  18. Buccal microbiology analyzed by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Abreu, Geraldo Magno Alves; da Silva, Gislene Rodrigues; Khouri, Sônia; Favero, Priscila Pereira; Raniero, Leandro; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2012-01-01

    Rapid microbiological identification and characterization are very important in dentistry and medicine. In addition to dental diseases, pathogens are directly linked to cases of endocarditis, premature delivery, low birth weight, and loss of organ transplants. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to analyze oral pathogens Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29523, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-JP2, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans which was clinically isolated from the human blood-CI. Significant spectra differences were found among each organism allowing the identification and characterization of each bacterial species. Vibrational modes in the regions of 3500-2800 cm-1, the 1484-1420 cm-1, and 1000-750 cm-1 were used in this differentiation. The identification and classification of each strain were performed by cluster analysis achieving 100% separation of strains. This study demonstrated that FTIR can be used to decrease the identification time, compared to the traditional methods, of fastidious buccal microorganisms associated with the etiology of the manifestation of periodontitis.

  19. Surface Inspection using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, G.L.; Smyrl, N.R.; Williams, D.M.; Meyers, H.M. III; Barber, T.E.; Marrero-Rivera, M.

    1994-08-08

    The use of reflectance Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy as a tool for surface inspection is described. Laboratory instruments and portable instruments can support remote sensing probes that can map chemical contaminants on surfaces. Detection limits under the best of conditions are in the subnanometer range (i.e., near absolute cleanliness), excellent performance is obtained in the submicrometer range, and useful performance may exist for films tens of microns thick. Identifying and quantifying contamination such as mineral oils and greases, vegetable oils, and silicone oils on aluminum foil, galvanized sheet steel, smooth aluminum tubing, and gritblasted 7075 aluminum alloy and D6AC steel are described. The ability to map in time and space the distribution of oil stains on metals is demonstrated. Techniques for quantitatively applying oils to metals, subsequently verifying the application, and nonlinear relationships between reflectance and the quantity of oil are discussed.

  20. Mass loss from red giants - Infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wannier, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    A discussion is presented of IR spectroscopy, particularly high-resolution spectroscopy in the approximately 1-20 micron band, as it impacts the study of circumstellar envelopes. The molecular bands within this region contain an enormous amount of information, especially when observed with sufficient resolution to obtain kinematic information. In a single spectrum, it is possible to resolve lines from up to 50 different rotational/vibrational levels of a given molecule and to detect several different isotopic variants. When high resolution techniques are combined with mapping techniques and/or time sequence observations of variable stars, the resulting information can paint a very detailed picture of the mass-loss phenomenon. To date, near-IR observations have been made of 20 molecular species. CO is the most widely observed molecule and useful information has been gleaned from the observed rotational excitation, kinematics, time variability and spatial structure of its lines. Examples of different observing techniques are discussed in the following sections.

  1. Infrared Spectroscopy as a Chemical Fingerprinting Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Tim; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is a powerful analytical tool in the chemical fingerprinting of materials. The technique is rapid, reproducible and usually non-invasive. With the appropriate accessories, the technique can be used to examine samples in either a solid, liquid or gas phase. Solid samples of varying sizes and shapes may be used, and with the addition of microscopic IR (microspectroscopy) capabilities, minute materials such as single fibers and threads may be examined. With the addition of appropriate software, microspectroscopy can be used for automated discrete point or compositional surface area mapping, with the latter providing a means to record changes in the chemical composition of a material surface over a defined area. Both aqueous and non-aqueous free-flowing solutions can be analyzed using appropriate IR techniques, as can viscous liquids such as heavy oils and greases. Due to the ability to characterize gaseous samples, IR spectroscopy can also be coupled with thermal processes such as thermogravimetric (TG) analyses to provide both thermal and chemical data in a single run. In this configuration, solids (or liquids) heated in a TG analyzer undergo decomposition, with the evolving gases directed into the IR spectrometer. Thus, information is provided on the thermal properties of a material and the order in which its chemical constituents are broken down during incremental heating. Specific examples of these varied applications will be cited, with data interpretation and method limitations further discussed.

  2. Absorption spectroscopy of powdered materials using time-resolved diffuse optical methods.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Cosimo; Obraztsova, Ekaterina A; Farina, Andrea; Taroni, Paola; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Pifferi, Antonio

    2012-11-10

    In this paper a novel method, based on time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy, is proposed to measure the absorption of small amounts of nanostructured powder materials independent of scattering. Experimental validation, in the visible and near-infrared spectral range, has been carried out on India Inkparticles. The effectiveness of the technique to measure scattering-free absorption is demonstrated on carbon nanotubes. The comparison between the absorption spectra acquired by the proposed method and conventional measurements performed with a commercial spectrophotometer is discussed. PMID:23142900

  3. [Application of near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to the detection and identification of transgenic corn].

    PubMed

    Rui, Yu-kui; Luo, Yun-bo; Huang, Kun-lun; Wang, Wei-min; Zhang, Lu-da

    2005-10-01

    With the rapid development of the GMO, more and more GMO food has been pouring into the market. Much attention has been paid to GMO labeling under the controversy of GMO safety. Transgenic corns and their parents were scanned by continuous wave of near infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy range of 12000-4000 cm(-1); the resolution was 4 cm(-1); scanning was carried out for 64 times; BP algorithm was applied for data processing. The GMO food was easily resolved. Near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is unpolluted and inexpensive compared with PCR and ELISA, so it is a very promising detection method for GMO food. PMID:16395887

  4. TIMESCALE-RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF Cyg X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y. X.; Li, T. P.; Belloni, T. M.; Wang, T. S.; Liu, H.

    2009-04-20

    We propose the timescale-resolved spectroscopy (TRS) as a new method to combine the timing and spectral study. The TRS is based on the time domain power spectrum and reflects the variable amplitudes of spectral components on different timescales. We produce the TRS with the RXTE PCA data for Cyg X-1 and study the spectral parameters (the power-law photon index and the equivalent width of the iron fluorescent line) as a function of timescale. The results of TRS and frequency-resolved spectra have been compared, and similarities have been found for the two methods with the identical motivations. We also discover the correspondences between the evolution of photon index with timescale and the evolution of the equivalent width with timescale. The observations can be divided into three types according to the correspondences and different type is connected with different spectral state.

  5. Temporally resolved infrared spectra from the detonation of advanced munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Joe Motos; Gross, Kevin C.; Perram, Glen P.

    2009-05-01

    A suite of instruments including a 100 kHz 4-channel radiometer, a rapid scanning Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer, and two high-speed visible imagers was used to observe the detonation of several novel insensitive munitions being developed by the Air Force Research Laboratory. The spectral signatures exhibited from several different explosive compositions are discernable and may be exploited for event classification. The spectra are initially optically thick, resembling a Planckian distribution. In time, selective emission in the wings of atmospheric absorption bands becomes apparent, and the timescale and degree to which this occurs is correlated with aluminum content in the explosive formulation. By analyzing the high-speed imagery in conjunction with the time-resolved spectral measurements, it may be possible to interpret these results in terms of soot production and oxidation rates. These variables allow for an investigation into the chemical kinetics of explosions and perhaps reveal other phenomenology not yet readily apparent. With an increased phenomenological understanding, a model could be created to explain the kinetic behavior of the temperature and by-product concentration profiles and thus improve the ability of military sensing platforms to identify explosive types and sources.

  6. Stratospheric sounding by infrared heterodyne spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Kunde, V. G.; Mumma, M. J.; Kostiuk, T.; Buhl, D.; Frerking, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    Intensity profiles of infrared spectral lines of stratospheric constituents can be fully resolved with a heterodyne spectrometer of sufficiently high resolution (approximately 5 MHz = 0.000167 kaysers at 10 microns). The constituents' vertical distributions can then be evaluated accurately by analytic inversion of the measured line profiles. Estimates of the detection sensitivity of a heterodyne receiver are given in terms of minimum detectable volume mixing ratios of stratospheric constituents, indicating a large number of minor constituents which can be studied. Stratospheric spectral line shapes and the resolution required to measure them are discussed in light of calculated synthetic line profiles for some stratospheric molecules in a model atmosphere. The inversion technique for evaluation of gas concentration profiles is briefly described, and applications to synthetic lines of O3, CO2, CH4, and N2O are given. Some recent heterodyne measurements of CO2 and O3 absorption lines are analytically inverted, and the vertical distributions of the two gases are determined.

  7. Spatially resolved concentration measurements based on backscatter absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ze; Sanders, Scott T.; Robinson, Michael A.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of spatially resolved measurements of gas properties using direct absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with backscattered signals. We report a 1-D distribution of H2O mole fraction with a spatial resolution of 5 mm. The peak and average discrepancy between the measured and expected mole fraction are 21.1 and 8.0 %, respectively. The demonstration experiment is related to a diesel aftertreatment system; a selective catalytic reduction brick made of cordierite is used. The brick causes volume scattering interference; advanced baseline fitting based on a genetic algorithm is used to reduce the effects of this interference by a factor of 2.3.

  8. Resolving multi-exciton generation by attosecond spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Neukirch, A J; Neumark, D M; Kling, M F; Prezhdo, O V

    2014-10-20

    We propose an experimentally viable attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy scheme to resolve controversies regarding multiexciton (ME) generation in nanoscale systems. Absence of oscillations indicates that light excites single excitons, and MEs are created by incoherent impact ionization. An oscillation indicates the coherent mechanism, involving excitation of superpositions of single and MEs. The oscillation decay, ranging from 5 fs at ambient temperature to 20 fs at 100 K, gives the elastic exciton-phonon scattering time. The signal is best observed with multiple-cycle pump pulses. PMID:25401661

  9. Sensitive, time-resolved, broadband spectroscopy of single transient processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjodorow, Peter; Baev, Ivan; Hellmig, Ortwin; Sengstock, Klaus; Baev, Valery M.

    2015-09-01

    Intracavity absorption spectroscopy with a broadband Er3+-doped fiber laser is applied to time-resolved measurements of transient gain and absorption in electrically excited Xe and Kr plasmas. The achieved time resolution for broadband spectral recording of a single process is 25 µs. For pulsed-periodic processes, the time resolution is limited by the laser pulse duration, which is set here to 3 µs. This pulse duration also predefines the effective absorption path length, which amounts to 900 m. The presented technique can be applied to multicomponent analysis of single transient processes such as shock tube experiments, pulse detonation engines, or explosives.

  10. Spectrally resolved photon-echo spectroscopy of Rhodamine-6G

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ajitesh; Karthick, S. K.; Goswami, D.

    2013-01-01

    Wavelength dependent study of a laser dye: Rhodamine-6G (Rh6G) by using spectrally resolved photon-echo spectroscopy is presented. The coherence and population dynamics of Rh6G solution in methanol changes as the excitation wavelength is tuned near its absorption maxima of 528 nm. Specifically, the central wavelength of the femtosecond laser pulse was set to 535 nm and to 560 nm while the respective spectra of the photon-echo signals were collected. This gives information on how the ultrafast dynamics of the Rh6G molecule changes with a change in the excitation wavelength. PMID:24098869

  11. An instrument for the investigation of actinides with spin resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.-W.; Tobin, J. G.; Chung, B. W.

    2011-01-01

    A new system for spin resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy has been built and commissioned at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the investigation of the electronic structure of the actinides.Actinide materials are very toxic and radioactive and therefore cannot be brought to most general user facilities for spectroscopic studies. The technical details of the new system and preliminary data obtained therein will be presented and discussed.

  12. Multidimensional Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Vibrational Coherence in Biopolyenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckup, Tiago; Motzkus, Marcus

    2014-04-01

    Multidimensional femtosecond time-resolved vibrational coherence spectroscopy allows one to investigate the evolution of vibrational coherence in electronic excited states. Methods such as pump-degenerate four-wave mixing and pump-impulsive vibrational spectroscopy combine an initial ultrashort laser pulse with a nonlinear probing sequence to reinduce vibrational coherence exclusively in the excited states. By carefully exploiting specific electronic resonances, one can detect vibrational coherence from 0 cm-1 to over 2,000 cm-1 and map its evolution. This review focuses on the observation and mapping of high-frequency vibrational coherence for all-trans biological polyenes such as β-carotene, lycopene, retinal, and retinal Schiff base. We discuss the role of molecular symmetry in vibrational coherence activity in the S1 electronic state and the interplay of coupling between electronic states and vibrational coherence.

  13. Momentum-resolved spectroscopy of a Fermi liquid.

    PubMed

    Doggen, Elmer V H; Kinnunen, Jami J

    2015-01-01

    We consider a recent momentum-resolved radio-frequency spectroscopy experiment, in which Fermi liquid properties of a strongly interacting atomic Fermi gas were studied. Here we show that by extending the Brueckner-Goldstone model, we can formulate a theory that goes beyond basic mean-field theories and that can be used for studying spectroscopies of dilute atomic gases in the strongly interacting regime. The model hosts well-defined quasiparticles and works across a wide range of temperatures and interaction strengths. The theory provides excellent qualitative agreement with the experiment. Comparing the predictions of the present theory with the mean-field Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory yields insights into the role of pair correlations, Tan's contact, and the Hartree mean-field energy shift. PMID:25941948

  14. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grills, David C.; Farrington, Jaime A.; Layne, Bobby H.; Preses, Jack M.; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Wishart, James F.

    2015-04-01

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of a unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330 to 1051 cm-1. The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ˜40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ˜100 μOD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. This new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.

  15. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility

    SciTech Connect

    Grills, David C. Farrington, Jaime A.; Layne, Bobby H.; Preses, Jack M.; Wishart, James F.; Bernstein, Herbert J.

    2015-04-15

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of a unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330 to 1051 cm{sup −1}. The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ∼40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ∼100 μOD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. This new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.

  16. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Grills, David C.; Farrington, Jaime A.; Layne, Bobby H.; Preses, Jack M.; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Wishart, James F.

    2015-04-27

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of amore » unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330-1051 cm⁻¹. The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ~40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ~100 µOD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. As a result, this new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.« less

  17. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility

    SciTech Connect

    Grills, David C.; Farrington, Jaime A.; Layne, Bobby H.; Preses, Jack M.; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Wishart, James F.

    2015-04-27

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of a unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330-1051 cm⁻¹. The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ~40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ~100 µOD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. As a result, this new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.

  18. Infrared spectroscopy of anionic hydrated fluorobenzenes

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Holger; Vogelhuber, Kristen M.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2007-09-21

    We investigate the structural motifs of anionic hydrated fluorobenzenes by infrared photodissociation spectroscopy and density functional theory. Our calculations show that all fluorobenzene anions under investigation are strongly distorted from the neutral planar molecular geometries. In the anions, different F atoms are no longer equivalent, providing structurally different binding sites for water molecules and giving rise to a multitude of low-lying isomers. The absorption bands for hexa- and pentafluorobenzene show that only one isomer for the respective monohydrate complexes is populated in our experiment. For C{sub 6}F{sub 6}{sup -}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, we can assign these bands to an isomer where water forms a weak double ionic hydrogen bond with two F atoms in the ion, in accord with the results of Bowen et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 127, 014312 (2007), following paper.] The spectroscopic motif of the binary complexes changes slightly with decreasing fluorination of the aromatic anion. For dihydrated hexafluorobenzene anions, several isomers are populated in our experiments, some of which may be due to hydrogen bonding between water molecules.

  19. ULTRAFAST CHEMISTRY: Using Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy for Interrogation of Structural Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nibbering, Erik T. J.; Fidder, Henk; Pines, Ehud

    2005-05-01

    Time-resolved infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopy elucidates molecular structure evolution during ultrafast chemical reactions. Following vibrational marker modes in real time provides direct insight into the structural dynamics, as is evidenced in studies on intramolecular hydrogen transfer, bimolecular proton transfer, electron transfer, hydrogen bonding during solvation dynamics, bond fission in organometallic compounds and heme proteins, cis-trans isomerization in retinal proteins, and transformations in photochromic switch pairs. Femtosecond IR spectroscopy monitors the site-specific interactions in hydrogen bonds. Conversion between excited electronic states can be followed for intramolecular electron transfer by inspection of the fingerprint IR- or Raman-active vibrations in conjunction with quantum chemical calculations. Excess internal vibrational energy, generated either by optical excitation or by internal conversion from the electronic excited state to the ground state, is observable through transient frequency shifts of IR-active vibrations and through nonequilibrium populations as deduced by Raman resonances.

  20. Trace water vapor determination in corrosive gases by infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stallard, B.R.; Rowe, R.K.; Garcia, M.J.; Haaland, D.M.; Espinoza, L.H.; Niemczyk, T.M.

    1993-12-01

    To extend the life of gas delivery systems and improve wafer yields, there is a need for an in-line monitor of H{sub 2}O contamination. Goal of this project is to develop such an instrument, based on infrared spectroscopy, that has a detection limit of 30 ppB or better and costs $50K or less. This year`s work considered the application of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to H{sub 2}O detection in N{sub 2} and HCl. Using a modified commercial FTIR spectrometer and a long-path gas cell, a detection limit of about 10 ppB was demonstrated for H{sub 2}O in N{sub 2} and HCl. This includes about a factor of three improvement achieved by applying quantitative multivariate calibration methods to the problem. Absolute calibration of the instrument was established from absorptivities of prominent H{sub 2}O bands between 3600 and 3910 cm{sup {minus}1}. Methods are described to minimize background moisture in the beam path. Spectral region, detector type, resolution, cell type, and path length were optimized. Resolving the narrow H{sub 2}O bands (FWHM {approx} 0.20 cm{sup {minus}1}) is not necessary to achieve optimal sensitivity. In fact, optimal sensitivity is achieved at 2 to 4 cm{sup {minus}1} resolution, allowing the use of an inexpensive interferometer. A much smaller, second generation instrument is described that will have a conservatively estimated detection limit of 1 ppB. Since the present laboratory instrument can be duplicated in its essential parts for about $90K, it is realistic to project a cost of $50K for the new instrument. An accessory for existing FTIR spectrometers was designed that may be marketed for as little as $10K.

  1. Time-resolved air monitoring using Fourier absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Biermann, H.W.

    1995-12-31

    Two categories where spectroscopic techniques excel are the capabilities to perform air analyses in situ and to obtain data at very high time resolutions. Because of these features, the Department of Pesticide Regulation augmented its extensive air monitoring capabilities with a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer using open-path optical systems for time resolved ambient air monitoring. A description of the instrumentation and the data analysis procedures will be presented based on two data sets obtained with this FTIR system. In one case, a 100 m folded optical path was used to measure methyl bromide concentrations after fumigation in a warehouse with a time resolution of 15 min and a detection limit of 0.2 ppm. And trying to assess the capability of this FTIR spectrometer to determine flux, water vapor concentrations were measured with a four-meter path length at a time resolution of 0.6 seconds.

  2. Infrared spectroscopy of Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knacke, Roger F.

    1993-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy provides unique insights into the chemistry and dynamics of the atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, and Titan. In 1991 we obtained data at J, H, K, and M and made repeated observations of Titan's albedo as the satellite orbited Saturn. The J albedo is 12% +/- 3% greater than the albedo measured in 1979; the H and K albedos are the same. There was no evidence for variations at any wavelength over the eastern half of Titan's orbit. We also obtained low resolution (R=50) spectra of Titan between 3.1 and 5.1 microns. The spectra contain evidence for CO and CH3D absorptions. Spectra of Callisto and Ganymede in the 4.5 micron spectral region are featureless and give albedos of 0.08 and 0.04 respectively. If Titan's atmosphere is transparent near 5 microns, its surface albedo there is similar to Callisto's. In 1992 and 1993 we obtained further spectroscopic data of Titan with the UKIRT CGS4 spectrometer. We discovered two unexpected and unexplained spectral features in the 3-4 micron spectrum of Titan. An apparent emission feature near the 3 micron (nu sub 3) band of methane indicated temperatures higher than known to be present in Titan's upper stratosphere and may be caused by unexpected non-LTE emission. An absorption feature near 3.47 microns may be caused by absorption in solid grains or aerosols in Titan's clouds. The feature is similar but not identical to organics in the interstellar matter and in comets.

  3. RESOLVED NEAR-INFRARED STELLAR POPULATIONS IN NEARBY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Rosenfield, Philip A.; Gilbert, Karoline E-mail: ben@astro.washington.edu E-mail: kgilbert@astro.washington.edu; and others

    2012-01-01

    We present near-infrared (NIR) color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) for the resolved stellar populations within 26 fields of 23 nearby galaxies ({approx}< 4 Mpc), based on images in the F110W and F160W filters taken with the Wide-Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The CMDs are measured in regions spanning a wide range of star formation histories, including both old dormant and young star-forming populations. We match key NIR CMD features with their counterparts in more familiar optical CMDs, and identify the red core helium-burning (RHeB) sequence as a significant contributor to the NIR flux in stellar populations younger than a few 100 Myr old. The strength of this feature suggests that the NIR mass-to-light ratio can vary significantly on short timescales in star-forming systems. The NIR luminosity of star-forming galaxies is therefore not necessarily proportional to the stellar mass. We note that these individual RHeB stars may also be misidentified as old stellar clusters in images of nearby galaxies. For older stellar populations, we discuss the CMD location of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the HST filter set and explore the separation of AGB subpopulations using a combination of optical and NIR colors. We empirically calibrate the magnitude of the NIR tip of the red giant branch in F160W as a function of color, allowing future observations in this widely adopted filter set to be used for distance measurements. We also analyze the properties of the NIR red giant branch (RGB) as a function of metallicity, showing a clear trend between NIR RGB color and metallicity. However, based on the current study, it appears unlikely that the slope of the NIR RGB can be used as an effective metallicity indicator in extragalactic systems with comparable data. Finally, we highlight issues with scattered light in the WFC3, which becomes significant for exposures taken close to a bright Earth limb.

  4. Angle resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebold, U.; Preisinger, A.; Schattschneider, P.; Varga, P.

    We report on angle resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) in reflection mode with low primary energy on a graphite single crystal. Measurements with primary electron energy of 175 eV have been performed in off-Bragg-reflex geometry in two different directions within the (0001) surface plane of the graphite single crystal. In addition, EELS measurements in specular reflection mode with different primary energies and angles of incidence were done in order to distinguish between surface and bulk plasmon losses. The energy losses and the transferred momenta of the losses have been analyzed. The results are compared with the loss functions for bulk and surface excitations calculated from the dielectric function ɛ(ω, q) obtained from TEELS-data (EELS in transmission mode) [Springer Tracts Mod. Phys. 54 (1970) 77].

  5. Nonselective and polarization effects in time-resolved optogalvanic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhechev, D.; Steflekova, V.

    2016-02-01

    Three interfering effects in optogalvanic (OG) spectroscopy are identified in a hollow cathode discharge (HCD) - OG detector. The laser beam is found to generate two nonselective processes, namely photoelectron emission (PE) from the cathode surface with a sub-breakdown bias applied, and nonresonant space ionization. The convolution of these galvanic contributions was determined experimentally as an instrumental function and a deconvolution procedure to determine the actual OG signal was developed. Specific plasma conductance is detected dependent on the polarization of the laser beam irradiating. Linearly/circularly polarized light beam is found to induce OG signals differ in amplitude (and their shape parameters in the time-resolved OG signals (TROGS)). The phenomena coherence and specific conductance are found to be in causal relationship. The additional conductance due to coherent states of atoms manifests itself as an intrinsic instrumental property of OG detector.

  6. Temperature Resolved 3-D Submillimeter Spectroscopy of Astronomical `WEEDs'.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortman, Sarah M.; Medvedev, Ivan R.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2009-06-01

    We have previously reported on the experimental spectroscopic approach that makes possible the calculation of lower state energy levels and transition strengths without the need for spectral assignment. Analysis of the temperature dependent measurements significantly improves the estimate of the lower state energy, recovered by division of temperature dependent spectral intensities. Also, this approach provides results both in the standard astronomical catalog form (frequency, line strength, lower state energy) and as experimental temperature dependent spectra. We are reporting on temperature resolved 3-D spectroscopy of ethyl cyanide -- a well known astronomical `weed'. "An experimental approach to the prediction of complete millimeter and submillimeter spectra at astrophysical temperatures: Applications to confusion-limited astrophysical observations," I. R. Medvedev and F. C. De Lucia, Ap. J. 656, 621-628 (2007).

  7. Broadband infrared vibrational nano-spectroscopy using thermal blackbody radiation.

    PubMed

    O'Callahan, Brian T; Lewis, William E; Möbius, Silke; Stanley, Jared C; Muller, Eric A; Raschke, Markus B

    2015-12-14

    Infrared vibrational nano-spectroscopy based on scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) provides intrinsic chemical specificity with nanometer spatial resolution. Here we use incoherent infrared radiation from a 1400 K thermal blackbody emitter for broadband infrared (IR) nano-spectroscopy. With optimized interferometric heterodyne signal amplification we achieve few-monolayer sensitivity in phonon polariton spectroscopy and attomolar molecular vibrational spectroscopy. Near-field localization and nanoscale spatial resolution is demonstrated in imaging flakes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and determination of its phonon polariton dispersion relation. The signal-to-noise ratio calculations and analysis for different samples and illumination sources provide a reference for irradiance requirements and the attainable near-field signal levels in s-SNOM in general. The use of a thermal emitter as an IR source thus opens s-SNOM for routine chemical FTIR nano-spectroscopy. PMID:26698997

  8. Diagnosis of meningioma by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Butte, Pramod V; Pikul, Brian K; Hever, Aviv; Yong, William H; Black, Keith L; Marcu, Laura

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the use of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-LIFS) as an adjunctive tool for the intraoperative rapid evaluation of tumor specimens and delineation of tumor from surrounding normal tissue. Tissue autofluorescence is induced with a pulsed nitrogen laser (337 nm, 1.2 ns) and the intensity decay profiles are recorded in the 370 to 500 nm spectral range with a fast digitizer (0.2 ns resolution). Experiments are conducted on excised specimens (meningioma, dura mater, cerebral cortex) from 26 patients (97 sites). Spectral intensities and time-dependent parameters derived from the time-resolved spectra of each site are used for tissue characterization. A linear discriminant analysis algorithm is used for tissue classification. Our results reveal that meningioma is characterized by unique fluorescence characteristics that enable discrimination of tumor from normal tissue with high sensitivity (>89%) and specificity (100%). The accuracy of classification is found to increase (92.8% cases in the training set and 91.8% in the cross-validated set correctly classified) when parameters from both the spectral and the time domain are used for discrimination. Our findings establish the feasibility of using TR-LIFS as a tool for the identification of meningiomas and enables further development of real-time diagnostic tools for analyzing surgical tissue specimens of meningioma or other brain tumors. PMID:16409091

  9. Complete momentum and energy resolved TOF electron spectrometerfor time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Zahid; Lebedev, G.; Tremsin, A.; Siegmund, O.; Chen, Y.; Shen, Z.X.; Hussain, Z.

    2007-08-12

    Over the last decade, high-resolution Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) has emerged as a tool of choice for studying the electronic structure of solids, in particular, strongly correlated complex materials such as cuprate superconductors. In this paper we present the design of a novel time-of-flight based electron analyzer with capability of 2D in momentum space (kx and ky) and all energies (calculated from time of flight) in the third dimension. This analyzer will utilize an improved version of a 2D delay linedetector capable of imaging with<35 mm (700x700 pixels) spatial resolution and better than 120 ps FWHM timing resolution. Electron optics concepts and optimization procedure are considered for achieving an energy resolution less than 1 meV and an angular resolution better than 0.11.

  10. IR Cards: Inquiry-Based Introduction to Infrared Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Jacqueline; Forster, Tabetha

    2010-01-01

    As infrared spectroscopy (IR) is frequently used in undergraduate organic chemistry courses, an inductive introduction to IR spectroscopy that uses index cards printed with spectra, structures, and chemical names is described. Groups of students are given an alphabetized deck of these "IR cards" to sort into functional groups. The students then…

  11. AKARI NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Chul; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Hwang, Ho Seong

    2012-09-01

    We present the AKARI near-infrared (NIR; 2.5-5 {mu}m) spectroscopic study of 36 (ultra)luminous infrared galaxies ((U)LIRGs) at z = 0.01-0.4. We measure the NIR spectral features including the strengths of 3.3 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission and hydrogen recombination lines (Br{alpha} and Br{beta}), optical depths at 3.1 and 3.4 {mu}m, and NIR continuum slope. These spectral features are used to identify optically elusive, buried active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We find that half of the (U)LIRGs optically classified as non-Seyferts show AGN signatures in their NIR spectra. Using a combined sample of (U)LIRGs with NIR spectra in the literature, we measure the contribution of buried AGNs to the infrared luminosity from the spectral energy distribution fitting to the IRAS photometry. The contribution of these buried AGNs to the infrared luminosity is 5%-10%, smaller than the typical AGN contribution of (U)LIRGs including Seyfert galaxies (10%-40%). We show that NIR continuum slopes correlate well with WISE [3.4]-[4.6] colors, which would be useful for identifying a large number of buried AGNs using the WISE data.

  12. Infrared near-field imaging and spectroscopy based on thermal or synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Peragut, Florian; De Wilde, Yannick; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale

    2014-06-23

    We demonstrate the coupling of a scattering near-field scanning optical microscope combined with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The set-up operates using either the near-field thermal emission from the sample itself, which is proportional to the electromagnetic local density of states, or with an external infrared synchrotron source, which is broadband and highly brilliant. We perform imaging and spectroscopy measurements with sub-wavelength spatial resolution in the mid-infrared range on surfaces made of silicon carbide and gold and demonstrate the capabilities of the two configurations for super-resolved near-field mid-infrared hyperspectral imaging and that the simple use of a properly chosen bandpass filter on the detector allows one to image the spatial distribution of materials with sub-wavelength resolution by studying the contrast in the near-field images.

  13. Quantification of the extracerebral contamination of near infrared spectroscopy signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudra, R.; Niederer, P.; Keller, E.

    2005-04-01

    Recently, conventional near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for oxymetry has been extended with an indocyanine green (ICG) dye dilution method which allows the estimation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV). The signal obtained through the skull is substantially influenced by extracerebral tissue. In order to quantify and eliminate extracerebral contamination of the optical density signal we have applied two approaches. Firstly, we used spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS) with a two receiver arrangement, with separations between emitter and two receivers in distances of d1=4.0cm and d2=6.5cm. The magnitude of the determined extracerebral contamination was verified with NIRS measurements in patients after brain herniation. Intracerebral circulatory arrest was confirmed by transcerebral Doppler examination. Secondly, Monte Carlo simulation was used to simulate the light propagation through the head to quantify the extracerebral contamination of the optical density signal of NIRS. The anatomical structure is determined from 3D-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a voxel resolution of 0.8 x 0.8 x 0 .8 mm3 for three different pairs of T1/T2 values. We segment the MRI data to obtain a material matrix describing the composition of skin, skull, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), grey and white matter. Each voxel in this material matrix characterizes the light absorption and dispersion coefficient of the identified material. This material matrix is applied in the Monte Carlo simulation. With SRS an extracerebral contamination of 65% of the optical density signal is extracted, while the Monte Carlo simulation results show that the extracerebral contamination decreases from 70% to 30% with increasing emitter-receiver distance. Differences between the NIRS ICG dye dilution technique and conventional NIRS oxymetry concerning the extracerebral contamination are discussed.

  14. Interferometric Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (iNIRS) for determination of optical and dynamical properties of turbid media.

    PubMed

    Borycki, Dawid; Kholiqov, Oybek; Chong, Shau Poh; Srinivasan, Vivek J

    2016-01-11

    We introduce and implement interferometric near-infrared spectroscopy (iNIRS), which simultaneously extracts optical and dynamical properties of turbid media through analysis of a spectral interference fringe pattern. The spectral interference fringe pattern is measured using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a frequency-swept narrow linewidth laser. Fourier analysis of the detected signal is used to determine time-of-flight (TOF)-resolved intensity, which is then analyzed over time to yield TOF-resolved intensity autocorrelations. This approach enables quantification of optical properties, which is not possible in conventional, continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Furthermore, iNIRS quantifies scatterer motion based on TOF-resolved autocorrelations, which is a feature inaccessible by well-established diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) techniques. We prove this by determining TOF-resolved intensity and temporal autocorrelations for light transmitted through diffusive fluid phantoms with optical thicknesses of up to 55 reduced mean free paths (approximately 120 scattering events). The TOF-resolved intensity is used to determine optical properties with time-resolved diffusion theory, while the TOF-resolved intensity autocorrelations are used to determine dynamics with diffusing wave spectroscopy. iNIRS advances the capabilities of diffuse optical methods and is suitable for in vivo tissue characterization. Moreover, iNIRS combines NIRS and DCS capabilities into a single modality. PMID:26832264

  15. Vibrationally resolved anion photoelectron spectroscopy of metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Stephen R.

    Vibrationally resolved anion photoelectron spectroscopy of metal clusters Vibrationally resolved anion photoelectron spectroscopy (APES) and density functional theory (DFT) are applied to the study of structure and reactivity in small metal containing molecules. The studies described fall into two general categories: the study of bare metal clusters and the study of metal/organic ligand reactions. The current lack of spectroscopic data for small, bare gas-phase metal compounds makes the experimental study of such compounds important for understanding structure and bonding in open-shell metallic species. The heteronuclear diatomic anions MCu- (M = Cr, Mo) were prepared in a flowing afterglow ion-molecule reactor, and studied experimentally with APES. Anion and neutral vibrational frequencies and MCu electron affinities were obtained for both systems. The experiments were supplemented by DFT calculations. The combined use of experiment and theory allows for the assignment of both photoelectron spectra, including a reassignment of the CrCu ground state reported in the literature. Similarly, DFT was used to assign the anionic/neutral electronic states observed in the photoelectron spectra of Al3- and Al3O-. The study of partially ligated organometallic complexes offers a means of examining the interactions between metal atoms and individual ligand molecules. DFT was used to assign electronic states observed in the photoelectron spectra of NbC2H2-, NbC4H4 -NbC6H6- and VC6H 6-. Comparison of the NbnHn - (n = 2, 4, 6) spectra (obtained through the reaction of C2 H4 and Nb) with DFT results provides the first direct spectroscopic evidence of the conversion of ethylene to benzene by a gas phase metal atom. Experiments were used to probe the reactivity of Y with C2H 4 in an effort to examine the generality of the metal induced C 2H4 dehydrogenation/cyclization reactions. Some of the key products in the Y reactions were YC2H-, YC 2H2-, and YC6H5 -. However, the results

  16. Muscle oxygenation during exercise under hypoxic conditions assessed by spatially resolved broadband NIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraskin, Dmitri; Platen, Petra; Franke, Julia; Andre, Christiane; Bloch, Wilhelm; Kohl-Bareis, Matthias

    2005-08-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is used for the non-invasive measurement of muscle oxygenation during an incremental cycle test in healthy volunteers. A broad band spatially resolved system is used that allows the reliability of current algorithms to be inspected with the main emphasis on tissue oxygen saturation (SO2) and oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin concentrations. Physiological conditions were modulated by changing oxygen supply from normal (21 % O2 in inspired air) to conditions corresponding to 2000 and 4000 m altitude above sea level (15.4 and 11.9 % O2). Under these hypoxic conditions the decrease in SO2 with increased exercise power is highly correlated with the oxygen content of the inspired air. There is a clear correlation with physiological parameters (heart rate, pulse oxymetry, blood gas, lactate, spirometric data). Skin oxygenation parameters are compared to those of muscle.

  17. Infrared Spectroscopy in the General Chemistry Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Margaret A.

    2001-01-01

    Acquisition of infrared spectrometers for use in general chemistry lab was made possible through the NSF-sponsored Instrumentation and Laboratory Improvement (ILI) program. Three laboratory exercises suitable for first-year students are described in which students learn to interpret infrared spectra for simple structural identification. A polymer identification lab is the first of these with minimal sample preparation. It uses familiar household polymer samples and teaches students how to use infrared spectral data to determine what bond types are present in the polymers. In a second lab, students learn to prepare potassium bromide pellets of fluorene derivatives and identify them by their functional group differences. The final exercise combines IR with several other lab techniques to identify an organic acid from a field of fourteen possibilities.

  18. A Clinical Tissue Oximeter Using NIR Time-Resolved Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fujisaka, Shin-ichi; Ozaki, Takeo; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Kamada, Tsuyoshi; Kitazawa, Ken; Nishizawa, Mitsunori; Takahashi, Akira; Suzuki, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    The tNIRS-1, a new clinical tissue oximeter using NIR time-resolved spectroscopy (TRS), has been developed. The tNIRS-1 measures oxygenated, deoxygenated and total hemoglobin and oxygen saturation in living tissues. Two-channel TRS measurements are obtained using pulsed laser diodes (LD) at three wavelengths, multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) for light detection, and time-to-digital converters (TDC) for time-of-flight photon measurements. Incorporating advanced semiconductor devices helped to make the design of this small-size, low-cost and low-power TRS instrument possible. In order to evaluate the correctness and reproducibility of measurement data obtained with the tNIRS-1, a study using blood phantoms and healthy volunteers was conducted to compare data obtained from a conventional SRS device and data from an earlier TRS system designed for research purposes. The results of the study confirmed the correctness and reproducibility of measurement data obtained with the tNIRS-1. Clinical evaluations conducted in several hospitals demonstrated a high level of usability in clinical situations and confirmed the efficacy of measurement data obtained with the tNIRS-1. PMID:26782242

  19. Improved source of infrared radiation for spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhard, D. G.; Rao, K. N.

    1971-01-01

    Radiation from a crimped V-groove in the electrically heated metallic element of a high-resolution infrared spectrometer is more intense than that from plane areas adjacent to the element. Radiation from the vee and the flat was compared by alternately focusing on the entrance slit of a spectrograph.

  20. Rotationally-Resolved Spectroscopy of the Bending Modes of Deuterated Water Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Jacob T.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2013-06-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy of small gas-phase water clusters has provided a wealth of information regarding the intermolecular interactions between water molecules. Water dimer is of particular interest because high-resolution spectroscopy can yield detailed information about the water pair potential. While there have been extensive studies of water dimer throughout the microwave and infrared regions of the spectrum, to date there has been no reported high-resolution spectrum of the intramolecular bending modes of water dimer. We have obtained rotationally-resolved spectra of the bending modes of deuterated water dimer (D_2O)_2, which are, to our knowledge, the first reported spectra of the bending modes of water dimer with rotational resolution. Dimers were produced in a supersonic expansion by bubbling Ar or He through D_2O and expanding the mixture through a 150 μm × 12 mm slit. The expansion was then probed using continuous wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy with light generated by a quantum cascade laser (QCL) operating near 8.5 μm. We have assigned the K_a = 1 ← 0 and K_a = 2 ← 1 sub-bands of the bending mode belonging to the hydrogen bond donor and have observed additional transitions which we attribute to the bending mode associated with the hydrogen bond acceptor.

  1. Angle-resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy At Ultra-low Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Borisenko, Sergey V.; Zabolotnyy, Volodymyr B.; Kordyuk, Alexander A.; Evtushinsky, Danil V.; Kim, Timur K.; Carleschi, Emanuela; Doyle, Bryan P.; Fittipaldi, Rosalba; Cuoco, Mario; Vecchione, Antonio; Berger, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of a material are defined by its electronic structure. Electrons in solids are characterized by energy (ω) and momentum (k) and the probability to find them in a particular state with given ω and k is described by the spectral function A(k, ω). This function can be directly measured in an experiment based on the well-known photoelectric effect, for the explanation of which Albert Einstein received the Nobel Prize back in 1921. In the photoelectric effect the light shone on a surface ejects electrons from the material. According to Einstein, energy conservation allows one to determine the energy of an electron inside the sample, provided the energy of the light photon and kinetic energy of the outgoing photoelectron are known. Momentum conservation makes it also possible to estimate k relating it to the momentum of the photoelectron by measuring the angle at which the photoelectron left the surface. The modern version of this technique is called Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) and exploits both conservation laws in order to determine the electronic structure, i.e. energy and momentum of electrons inside the solid. In order to resolve the details crucial for understanding the topical problems of condensed matter physics, three quantities need to be minimized: uncertainty* in photon energy, uncertainty in kinetic energy of photoelectrons and temperature of the sample. In our approach we combine three recent achievements in the field of synchrotron radiation, surface science and cryogenics. We use synchrotron radiation with tunable photon energy contributing an uncertainty of the order of 1 meV, an electron energy analyzer which detects the kinetic energies with a precision of the order of 1 meV and a He3 cryostat which allows us to keep the temperature of the sample below 1 K. We discuss the exemplary results obtained on single crystals of Sr2RuO4 and some other materials. The electronic structure of this material can be

  2. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy at ultra-low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Borisenko, Sergey V; Zabolotnyy, Volodymyr B; Kordyuk, Alexander A; Evtushinsky, Danil V; Kim, Timur K; Carleschi, Emanuela; Doyle, Bryan P; Fittipaldi, Rosalba; Cuoco, Mario; Vecchione, Antonio; Berger, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of a material are defined by its electronic structure. Electrons in solids are characterized by energy (ω) and momentum (k) and the probability to find them in a particular state with given ω and k is described by the spectral function A(k, ω). This function can be directly measured in an experiment based on the well-known photoelectric effect, for the explanation of which Albert Einstein received the Nobel Prize back in 1921. In the photoelectric effect the light shone on a surface ejects electrons from the material. According to Einstein, energy conservation allows one to determine the energy of an electron inside the sample, provided the energy of the light photon and kinetic energy of the outgoing photoelectron are known. Momentum conservation makes it also possible to estimate k relating it to the momentum of the photoelectron by measuring the angle at which the photoelectron left the surface. The modern version of this technique is called Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) and exploits both conservation laws in order to determine the electronic structure, i.e. energy and momentum of electrons inside the solid. In order to resolve the details crucial for understanding the topical problems of condensed matter physics, three quantities need to be minimized: uncertainty* in photon energy, uncertainty in kinetic energy of photoelectrons and temperature of the sample. In our approach we combine three recent achievements in the field of synchrotron radiation, surface science and cryogenics. We use synchrotron radiation with tunable photon energy contributing an uncertainty of the order of 1 meV, an electron energy analyzer which detects the kinetic energies with a precision of the order of 1 meV and a He(3) cryostat which allows us to keep the temperature of the sample below 1 K. We discuss the exemplary results obtained on single crystals of Sr2RuO4 and some other materials. The electronic structure of this material can be

  3. Infrared Spectroscopy of TeF 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, Robin S.; Holland, Redus F.; McCulla, William H.; Anderson, Graydon K.; Reisfeld, Martin J.

    1986-07-01

    Fourier transform and grating IR spectrometers and tunable diode lasers have been used to record the IR spectrum of TeF 6. The isotopic structure in the stretching fundamental ν 3is resolved, revealing a tellurium isotope shift of approximately 0.68 cm -1 amu -1. Some of the rotational structure in the P and R branches of ν 3 of 99.3% 130TeF 6 is also resolved and analyzed to yield a Coriolis constant ζ 3 = 0.225. Integrated absorptivities are reported for ν 3 and for the stronger combination bands. The isotope shifts and Coriolis constants are used to fix the general quadratic symmetry and valence force fields, and the force constants of the Group VI series SF 6, SeF 6, and TeF 6 are compared and discussed.

  4. Infrared absorption spectroscopy and chemical kinetics of free radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Curl, R.F.; Glass, G.P.

    1993-12-01

    This research is directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. During the last year, infrared kinetic spectroscopy using excimer laser flash photolysis and color-center laser probing has been employed to study the high resolution spectrum of HCCN, the rate constant of the reaction between ethynyl (C{sub 2}H) radical and H{sub 2} in the temperature region between 295 and 875 K, and the recombination rate of propargyl (CH{sub 2}CCH) at room temperature.

  5. Advances in Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Haas, Julian; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2016-06-12

    Infrared spectroscopy in the 3-20 μm spectral window has evolved from a routine laboratory technique into a state-of-the-art spectroscopy and sensing tool by benefitting from recent progress in increasingly sophisticated spectra acquisition techniques and advanced materials for generating, guiding, and detecting mid-infrared (MIR) radiation. Today, MIR spectroscopy provides molecular information with trace to ultratrace sensitivity, fast data acquisition rates, and high spectral resolution catering to demanding applications in bioanalytics, for example, and to improved routine analysis. In addition to advances in miniaturized device technology without sacrificing analytical performance, selected innovative applications for MIR spectroscopy ranging from process analysis to biotechnology and medical diagnostics are highlighted in this review. PMID:27070183

  6. Advances in Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Julian; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2016-06-01

    Infrared spectroscopy in the 3–20 μm spectral window has evolved from a routine laboratory technique into a state-of-the-art spectroscopy and sensing tool by benefitting from recent progress in increasingly sophisticated spectra acquisition techniques and advanced materials for generating, guiding, and detecting mid-infrared (MIR) radiation. Today, MIR spectroscopy provides molecular information with trace to ultratrace sensitivity, fast data acquisition rates, and high spectral resolution catering to demanding applications in bioanalytics, for example, and to improved routine analysis. In addition to advances in miniaturized device technology without sacrificing analytical performance, selected innovative applications for MIR spectroscopy ranging from process analysis to biotechnology and medical diagnostics are highlighted in this review.

  7. Infrared attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy: an innovative strategy for analyzing mineral components in energy relevant systems.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christian Menno; Pejcic, Bobby; Esteban, Lionel; Delle Piane, Claudio; Raven, Mark; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-01-01

    The direct qualitative and quantitative determination of mineral components in shale rocks is a problem that has not been satisfactorily resolved to date. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) is a non-destructive method frequently used in mineral identification, yet challenging due to the similarity of spectral features resulting from quartz, clay, and feldspar minerals. This study reports on a significant improvement of this methodology by combining infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (IR-ATR) with partial least squares (PLS) regression techniques for classifying and quantifying various mineral components present in a number of different shale rocks. The developed multivariate classification model was calibrated using pure component mixtures of the most common shale minerals (i.e., kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, calcite, and quartz). Using this model, the IR spectra of 11 real-world shale samples were analyzed and evaluated. Finally, the performance of the developed IR-ATR method was compared with results obtained via X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. PMID:25358261

  8. Infrared Attenuated Total Reflectance Spectroscopy: An Innovative Strategy for Analyzing Mineral Components in Energy Relevant Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Christian Menno; Pejcic, Bobby; Esteban, Lionel; Piane, Claudio Delle; Raven, Mark; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-10-01

    The direct qualitative and quantitative determination of mineral components in shale rocks is a problem that has not been satisfactorily resolved to date. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) is a non-destructive method frequently used in mineral identification, yet challenging due to the similarity of spectral features resulting from quartz, clay, and feldspar minerals. This study reports on a significant improvement of this methodology by combining infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (IR-ATR) with partial least squares (PLS) regression techniques for classifying and quantifying various mineral components present in a number of different shale rocks. The developed multivariate classification model was calibrated using pure component mixtures of the most common shale minerals (i.e., kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, calcite, and quartz). Using this model, the IR spectra of 11 real-world shale samples were analyzed and evaluated. Finally, the performance of the developed IR-ATR method was compared with results obtained via X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis.

  9. Infrared Attenuated Total Reflectance Spectroscopy: An Innovative Strategy for Analyzing Mineral Components in Energy Relevant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christian Menno; Pejcic, Bobby; Esteban, Lionel; Piane, Claudio Delle; Raven, Mark; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-01-01

    The direct qualitative and quantitative determination of mineral components in shale rocks is a problem that has not been satisfactorily resolved to date. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) is a non-destructive method frequently used in mineral identification, yet challenging due to the similarity of spectral features resulting from quartz, clay, and feldspar minerals. This study reports on a significant improvement of this methodology by combining infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (IR-ATR) with partial least squares (PLS) regression techniques for classifying and quantifying various mineral components present in a number of different shale rocks. The developed multivariate classification model was calibrated using pure component mixtures of the most common shale minerals (i.e., kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, calcite, and quartz). Using this model, the IR spectra of 11 real-world shale samples were analyzed and evaluated. Finally, the performance of the developed IR-ATR method was compared with results obtained via X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. PMID:25358261

  10. Near-infrared spectroscopy of dark asteroids.

    PubMed

    Barucci, M A; Lazzarin, M; Owen, T; Barbieri, C; Fulchignoni, M

    1994-08-01

    Near-infrared (J, H and K bands) spectra of nine dark asteroids (chosen among a sample of supposed primitive objects between C and D classes) have been obtained at the Mauna Kea Observatory (Hawaii) with the 2.2-m telescope using KSPEC as spectrograph. The aim of this work was to search for evidence of the presence of organic materials in these objects as found in other planetary bodies as 5145 Pholus, and in some cometary nuclei. A careful analysis of the data has revealed flat or slightly redder spectra than the solar one for all observed asteroids. No evidence of distinct absorption features was found. PMID:11539179

  11. Galileo infrared imaging spectroscopy measurements at venus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, R.W.; Baines, K.H.; Encrenaz, Th.; Taylor, F.W.; Drossart, P.; Kamp, L.W.; Pollack, James B.; Lellouch, E.; Collard, A.D.; Calcutt, S.B.; Grinspoon, D.; Weissman, P.R.; Smythe, W.D.; Ocampo, A.C.; Danielson, G.E.; Fanale, F.P.; Johnson, T.V.; Kieffer, H.H.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Soderblom, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    During the 1990 Galileo Venus flyby, the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer investigated the night-side atmosphere of Venus in the spectral range 0.7 to 5.2 micrometers. Multispectral images at high spatial resolution indicate substantial cloud opacity variations in the lower cloud levels, centered at 50 kilometers altitude. Zonal and meridional winds were derived for this level and are consistent with motion of the upper branch of a Hadley cell. Northern and southern hemisphere clouds appear to be markedly different. Spectral profiles were used to derive lower atmosphere abundances of water vapor and other species.

  12. Fourier transform infrared double-flash experiments resolve bacteriorhodopsin's M1 to M2 transition.

    PubMed Central

    Hessling, B; Herbst, J; Rammelsberg, R; Gerwert, K

    1997-01-01

    The orientation of the central proton-binding site, the protonated Schiff base, away from the proton release side to the proton uptake side is crucial for the directionality of the proton pump bacteriorhodopsin. It has been proposed that this movement, called the reprotonation switch, takes place in the M1 to M2 transition. To resolve the molecular events in this M1 to M2 transition, we performed double-flash experiments. In these experiments a first pulse initiates the photocycle and a second pulse selectively drives bR molecules in the M intermediate back into the BR ground state. For short delay times between initiating and resetting pulses, most of the M molecules being reset are in the M1 intermediate, and for longer delay times most of the reset M molecules are in the M2 intermediate. The BR-M1 and BR-M2 difference spectra are monitored with nanosecond step-scan Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Because the Schiff base reprotonation rate is kM1 = 0.8 x 10(7) s(-1) in the light-induced M1 back-reaction and kM2 = 0.36 x 10(7) s(-1) in the M2 back-reaction, the two different M intermediates represent two different proton accessibility configurations of the Schiff base. The results show only a minute movement of one or two peptide bonds in the M1 to M2 transition that changes the interaction of the Schiff base with Y185. This backbone movement is distinct from the larger one in the subsequent M to N transition. No evidence of a chromophore isomerization is seen in the M1 to M2 transition. Furthermore, the results show time-resolved reprotonation of the Schiff base from D85 in the M photo-back-reaction, instead of from D96, as in the conventional cycle. Images Scheme 2 PMID:9336202

  13. Modelling Time-Resolved Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy of the Primary Photoisomerization Event in Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Time-resolved two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra (ES) tracking the evolution of the excited state manifolds of the retinal chromophore have been simulated along the photoisomerization pathway in bovine rhodopsin, using a state-of-the-art hybrid QM/MM approach based on multiconfigurational methods. Simulations of broadband 2D spectra provide a useful picture of the overall detectable 2D signals from the near-infrared (NIR) to the near-ultraviolet (UV). Evolution of the stimulated emission (SE) and excited state absorption (ESA) 2D signals indicates that the S1 → SN (with N ≥ 2) ESAs feature a substantial blue-shift only after bond inversion and partial rotation along the cis → trans isomerization angle, while the SE rapidly red-shifts during the photoinduced skeletal relaxation of the polyene chain. Different combinations of pulse frequencies are proposed in order to follow the evolution of specific ESA signals. These include a two-color 2DVis/NIR setup especially suited for tracking the evolution of the S1 → S2 transitions that can be used to discriminate between different photochemical mechanisms of retinal photoisomerization as a function of the environment. The reported results are consistent with the available time-resolved pump–probe experimental data, and may be used for the design of more elaborate transient 2D electronic spectroscopy techniques. PMID:24794143

  14. Predicting cotton stelometer fiber strength by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The strength of cotton fibers is one of several important end-use characteristics. In routine programs, it has been mostly assessed by automation-oriented high volume instrument (HVI) system. An alternative method for cotton strength is near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. Although previous NIR models ...

  15. Exploration of the giant planets by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanel, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    The infrared spectrometer and radiometer for the Mariner-Jupiter-Saturn mission is described. Results of Nimbus and Mariner 9 IR spectroscopy of earth and Mars are used as examples to demonstrate the power and diversity of the technique. Determinations of planetary surface compositions, surface temperatures, vertical temperature profiles, surface pressures, and atmospheric constituents are summarized. Applications to Jupiter and Saturn are briefly mentioned.

  16. Measurement of lipid supplements in poultry feed by infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid measurement of a fatty acid supplement in poultry feed formulations was performed using near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy with chemometric analysis. A standard feed formulation was amended with up to 10 wt% fatty acid supplement containing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and scanned from 10,000 cm-1...

  17. Detecting Counterfeit Antimalarial Tablets by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Counterfeit antimalarial drugs are found in many developing countries, but it is challenging to differentiate between genuine and fakes due to their increasing sophistication. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a powerful tool in pharmaceutical forensics, and we tested this technique for discrim...

  18. Progress in far-infrared spectroscopy: Approximately 1890 to 1970

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuishi, Akiyoshi

    2014-03-01

    The history of far-infrared spectroscopy from its beginning to around 1970 is reviewed. Before World War II, the size of the community investigating this topic was limited. During this period, in particular before 1925, about 90% of the papers were published by H. Rubens and his co-workers in Germany. One or two researchers from the US joined the Rubens group per year from 1890 to the beginning of 1910. During the next year or two, some researchers joined M. Czerny, who is seen as the successor of Rubens. After World War II, far-infrared techniques progressed further in the US, which did not suffer damage during the war. The advanced techniques of far-infrared grating spectroscopy were transferred from the US (R. A. Oetjen) to Japan (H. Yoshinaga). Yoshinaga and his co-workers expanded the techniques by themselves. This paper describes the historical development of far-infrared spectroscopy before Fourier transform spectroscopy became popular around 1970.

  19. Social Perception in Infancy: A Near Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd-Fox, Sarah; Blasi, Anna; Volein, Agnes; Everdell, Nick; Elwell, Claire E.; Johnson, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    The capacity to engage and communicate in a social world is one of the defining characteristics of the human species. While the network of regions that compose the social brain have been the subject of extensive research in adults, there are limited techniques available for monitoring young infants. This study used near infrared spectroscopy to…

  20. Forensic applications of microscopical infrared internal reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tungol, Mary W.; Bartick, Edward G.; Reffner, John A.

    1994-01-01

    Applications of microscopical infrared internal reflection spectroscopy in forensic science are discussed. Internal reflection spectra of single fibers, hairs, paint chips, vehicle rubber bumpers, photocopy toners, carbon copies, writing ink on paper, lipstick on tissue, black electrical tape, and other types of forensic evidence have been obtained. The technique is convenient, non-destructive, and may permit smeared materials to be analyzed in situ.

  1. Infrared Spectroscopy of Explosives Residues: Measurement Techniques and Spectral Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2015-03-11

    Infrared laser spectroscopy of explosives is a promising technique for standoff and non-contact detection applications. However, the interpretation of spectra obtained in typical standoff measurement configurations presents numerous challenges. Understanding the variability in observed spectra from explosives residues and particles is crucial for design and implementation of detection algorithms with high detection confidence and low false alarm probability. We discuss a series of infrared spectroscopic techniques applied toward measuring and interpreting the reflectance spectra obtained from explosives particles and residues. These techniques utilize the high spectral radiance, broad tuning range, rapid wavelength tuning, high scan reproducibility, and low noise of an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The ECQCL source permits measurements in configurations which would be either impractical or overly time-consuming with broadband, incoherent infrared sources, and enables a combination of rapid measurement speed and high detection sensitivity. The spectroscopic methods employed include standoff hyperspectral reflectance imaging, quantitative measurements of diffuse reflectance spectra, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, microscopic imaging and spectroscopy, and nano-scale imaging and spectroscopy. Measurements of explosives particles and residues reveal important factors affecting observed reflectance spectra, including measurement geometry, substrate on which the explosives are deposited, and morphological effects such as particle shape, size, orientation, and crystal structure.

  2. WW domain folding complexity revealed by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Caitlin M; Dyer, R Brian

    2014-09-01

    Although the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of proteins offers a convenient probe of protein folding, interpretation of the fluorescence spectrum is often difficult because it is sensitive to both global and local changes. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy offers a complementary measure of structural changes involved in protein folding, because it probes changes in the secondary structure of the protein backbone. Here we demonstrate the advantages of using multiple probes, infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy, to study the folding of the FBP28 WW domain. Laser-induced temperature jumps coupled with fluorescence or infrared spectroscopy have been used to probe changes in the peptide backbone on the submillisecond time scale. The relaxation dynamics of the β-sheets and β-turn were measured independently by probing the corresponding IR bands assigned in the amide I region. Using these wavelength-dependent measurements, we observe three kinetics phases, with the fastest process corresponding to the relaxation kinetics of the turns. In contrast, fluorescence measurements of the wild-type WW domain and tryptophan mutants exhibit single-exponential kinetics with a lifetime that corresponds to the slowest phase observed by infrared spectroscopy. Mutant sequences provide evidence of an intermediate dry molten globule state. The slowest step in the folding of this WW domain is the tight packing of the side chains in the transition from the dry molten globule intermediate to the native structure. This study demonstrates that using multiple complementary probes enhances the interpretation of protein folding dynamics. PMID:25121968

  3. [Photodissociation of Acetylene and Acetone using Step-Scan Time-Resolved FTIR Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLaren, Ian A.; Wrobel, Jacek D.

    1997-01-01

    The photodissociation of acetylene and acetone was investigated as a function of added quenching gas pressures using step-scan time-resolved FTIR emission spectroscopy. Its main components consist of Bruker IFS88, step-scan Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer coupled to a flow cell equipped with Welsh collection optics. Vibrationally excited C2H radicals were produced from the photodissociation of acetylene in the unfocused experiments. The infrared (IR) emission from these excited C2H radicals was investigated as a function of added argon pressure. Argon quenching rate constants for all C2H emission bands are of the order of 10(exp -13)cc/molecule.sec. Quenching of these radicals by acetylene is efficient, with a rate constant in the range of 10(exp -11) cc/molecule.sec. The relative intensity of the different C2H emission bands did not change with the increasing argon or acetylene pressure. However, the overall IR emission intensity decreased, for example, by more than 50% when the argon partial pressure was raised from 0.2 to 2 Torr at fixed precursor pressure of 160mTorr. These observations provide evidence for the formation of a metastable C2H2 species, which are collisionally quenched by argon or acetylene. Problems encountered in the course of the experimental work are also described.

  4. Understanding ion association states and molecular dynamics using infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masser, Hanqing

    A molecular level understanding of the ion transport mechanism within polymer electrolytes is crucial to the further development for advanced energy storage applications. This can be achieved by the identification and quantitative measurement of different ion species in the system and further relating them to the ion conductivity. In the first part of this thesis, research is presented towards understanding the ion association states (free ions, ion pairs and ion aggregates) in ionomer systems, and the correlation of ion association states, ion conduction, polymer dynamics, and morphology. Ion conductivity in ionomers can be improved by lowering glass transition temperature, increasing polymer ion solvation ability, and adjusting ionomer structural variables such as ion content, cation type and side chain structure. These effects are studied in three ionomer systems respectively, using a combination of characterization methods. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) identifies and quantifies the ion association states. Dielectric Spectroscopy (DRS) characterizes ion conductivity and polymer and ion dynamics. X-ray scattering reveals changes in morphology. The influence of a cation solvating plasticizer on a polyester ionomer is systematically investigated with respect to ion association states, ion and polymer dynamics and morphology. A decrease in the number ratio of ion aggregates with increased plasticizer content and a slight increase at elevated temperature are observed in FTIR. Similar results are also detected by X-ray scattering. As determined from dielectric spectroscopy, ion conductivity increases with plasticizer content, in accordance with the decrease in glass transition temperature. Research on copolymer of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(tetramethylene oxide) (PTMO) based ionomers further develops an understanding of the trade-off between ion solvation and segmental dynamics. Upon the incorporation of PTMO, the majority of the PTMO

  5. Homogeneity study of ointment dosage forms by infrared imaging spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Renato Lajarim; Poppi, Ronei Jesus

    2012-01-25

    Ointment dosage forms are semi-solid preparations intended for local or transdermal delivery of active substances usually for application to the skin and it is important that they present a homogeneous appearance. In this work, a study of the homogeneity of a tacrolimus ointment dosage form was performed using infrared imaging spectroscopy coupled with principal component analysis (PCA) and multivariate curve resolution with alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) to interpret the imaging data. Optical visible microscopy images indicated possible phase separation in the ointment and, based on the results presented by distribution concentration maps from infrared imaging, it was possible to conclude that, in fact, there was phase separation incorporated in the ointment. Thus, infrared imaging spectroscopy associated to PCA and MCR-ALS is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for the development process of ointment dosage forms. PMID:22018891

  6. Infrared quantitative spectroscopy and planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaud, J.-M.

    2009-04-01

    Optical measurements of atmospheric minor constituents are carried out using spectrometers working in the UV-visible, infrared and microwave spectral ranges. In all cases the quality of the analysis and of the interpretation of the atmospheric spectra requires the best possible knowledge of the molecular parameters of the species of interest. To illustrate this point we will concentrate on recent laboratory studies of nitric acid, chlorine nitrate and formaldehyde. Nitric acid is one of the important minor constituent of the terrestrial atmosphere. Using new and accurate experimental results concerning the spectroscopic properties of the H14NO3 and H15NO3 molecules, as well as improved theoretical methods (Perrin et al., 2004), it has been possible to generate an improved set of line parameters for these molecules in the 11.2 μm spectral region. These line parameters were used to detect for the first time the H15NO3 molecule in the atmosphere analyzing atmospheric spectra recorded by the MIPAS experiment. The retrievals of chlorine nitrate profiles are usually performed using absorption cross sections (Birk and Wagner, 2003). Following a high resolution analysis of the ν3 and ν4bands of this species in the 12.8 μm region wepropose, as a possibility, to use line by line calculation simulating its ν4Q-branch for the atmospheric temperature and pressure ranges. For the measurement of atmospheric formaldehyde concentrations, mid-infrared and ultraviolet absorptions are both used by ground, air or satellite instruments. It is then of the utmost importance to have consistent spectral parameters in these various spectral domains. Consequently the aim of the study performed at LISA (Gratien et al., 2007) was to intercalibrate formaldehyde spectra in the infrared and ultraviolet regions acquiring simultaneously UV and IR spectra using a common optical cell. The results of the work will be presented. Also high resolution infrared data derived from Perrin et al., 2003

  7. Infrared Spectroscopy of Hydrated Nitromethane Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcum, Jesse C.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2009-06-01

    The hydration of molecular anions is still not as thoroughly explored as for atomic anions. We present IR spectra and quantum chemical calculations of hydrated nitromethane anions. In the monohydrate, the nitro group of the ion interacts with the water molecule via two hydrogen bonds, one from each O atom. This motif is partially conserved in the dihydrate. Adding the third water molecule results in a ring-like structure of the water ligands, each of which forms one H bond to one of the O atoms of the nitro group and another to a neighboring water ligand, reminiscent of the hydration motif of the heavier halides. Interestingly, while the methyl group is not directly involved in the interaction with the water ligands, its infrared signature is strongly affected by the changes in the intramolecular charge distribution through hydration.

  8. Infrared spectroscopy of simulated Martian surface materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.; Sagan, C.

    1978-01-01

    Mineralogy inferred from the Viking X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRFS) is compared with mineralogy indicated by spectral data. The comparison is done by taking laboratory spectra of Viking analog minerals. Both XRFS and infrared data are consistent with clays as the dominant SiO2 containing minerals on Mars. The X-ray fluorescence data might also be consistent with the dominance of certain mafic SiO2 igneous minerals, but the spectral data are probably inconsistent with such materials. Sulfates, inferred by XRFS, are consistent with the spectral data. Inferences following Mariner 9 that high-SiO2 minerals were important on Mars may have been biased by the presence of sulfates. Calcium carbonate, in the quantities indirectly suggested by XRFS are inconsistent with the spectral data, but smaller quantities of CaCO3 are consistent, as are large quantities of other carbonates.

  9. Airborne Infrared Spectroscopy of 1994 Western Wildfires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worden, Helen; Beer, Reinhard; Rinsland, Curtis P.

    1997-01-01

    In the summer of 1994 the 0.07/ cm resolution infrared Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES) acquired spectral data over two wildfires, one in central Oregon on August 3 and the other near San Luis Obispo, California, on August 15. The spectrometer was on board a NASA DC-8 research aircraft, flying at an altitude of 12 km. The spectra from both fires clearly show features due to water vapor, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, ammonia, methanol, formic acid, and ethylene at significantly higher abundance and temperature than observed in downlooking spectra of normal atmospheric and ground conditions. Column densities are derived for several species, and molar ratios are compared with previous biomass fire measurements. We believe that this is the first time such data have been acquired by airborne spectral remote sensing.

  10. - Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy of Small - Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Bernath, P. F.

    2011-06-01

    A series of small boron-containing molecules were synthesized in the gas phase using a tube furnace. High-resolution spectra of these species were recorded in either emission or absorption in the mid-infrared region using a Bruker IFS-125HR spectrometer. Our observations contain vibration-rotation bands of BO, the V1 and V3 bands of HBO, the V1 and V3 bands of HBS, the V1 band of FBO, and the V1 band of HBF2. The vibrational bands of HOBO, BF2OH and other boron-containing molecules may also be present. Ab initio calculations were performed at the MRCI level to assist in the vibrational assignments. Preliminary assignments of the spectra for these species will be reported.

  11. Measuring Titan's mesospheric temperatures by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penteado, P.; Griffith, C.; Greathouse, T.; Roe, H.; Yelle, R.

    2005-08-01

    Titan's temperature profile is an indicator of the atmospheric energy transport, by radiation, convection and conduction. From the surface up to ˜250 km altitude, the temperature profile was measured by the Voyager 1 radio occultations and infrared spectra. In the troposphere, heating by the surface and low atmosphere by solar radiation absorption and cooling by emission to space are the dominant processes that establish the temperature profile, which decreases from ˜94 K at the surface, to ˜70 K at 200 km. Between 200 and 350 km, the atmosphere radiative absorption and emission balance, and the temperature is approximately constante. At 250-500 km altitudes, observations of stellar occultations reveal oscillations between 170 and 150 K. Atmospheric models predict the existence of a mesosphere, in the region 350-550 km, with the temperature decreasing from ethane and other hydrocarbons' emissions. In this work we analyze emission lines of methane's ν 4 band (8.1 μ m, 1230 cm-1) with high resolution spectra. The line profiles of different intensities allow us to determine the vertical temperature profile for the region 100-600 km, which was not possible with previously available data. We present the first infrared observation that can measure independently the temperatures for the regions 100-200 km, 200-400 km, and 400-600 km. These measurements show the existence of a mesosphere, with a temperature drop of at least 15 K from 380+50-100 km altitude. Paulo Penteado is sponsored by the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program and the Brazilian Government through CAPES.

  12. Near-infrared spectroscopy in NGC 7538

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puga, E.; Marín-Franch, A.; Najarro, F.; Lenorzer, A.; Herrero, A.; Acosta Pulido, J. A.; Chavarría, L. A.; Bik, A.; Figer, D.; Ramírez Alegría, S.

    2010-07-01

    Aims: The characterisation of the stellar population in young high-mass star-forming regions allows fundamental cluster properties like distance and age to be constrained. These are essential when using high-mass clusters as probes for conducting Galactic studies. Methods: NGC 7538 is a star-forming region with an embedded stellar population unearthed only in the near-infrared (NIR). We present the first near-infrared spectro-photometric study of the candidate high-mass stellar content in NGC 7538. We obtained H and K spectra of 21 sources with both the multi-object and long-slit modes of LIRIS at the WHT, and complement these data with subarcsecond JHKs photometry of the region using the imaging mode of the same instrument. Results: We find a wide variety of objects within the studied stellar population of NGC 7538. Our results discriminate between a stellar population associated to the H ii region, but not contained within its extent, and several pockets of more recent star formation. We report the detection of CO bandhead emission toward several sources, as well as other features indicative of a young stellar nature. We infer a spectro-photometric distance of 2.7 ± 0.5 kpc, an age spread in the range 0.5-2.2 Myr and a total mass 1.7 × 103 Msun for the older population. Based on observations made with the WHT operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  13. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of cuprate superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Palczewski, Ari Deibert

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is comprised of three different angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies on cuprate superconductors. The first study compares the band structure from two different single layer cuprates Tl2Ba2CuO6+δ (Tl2201) Tc, max ≈ 95 K and (Bi 1.35Pb0.85)(Sr1.47La0.38)CuO6+δ (Bi2201) Tc, max ≈ 35 K. The aim of the study was to provide some insight into the reasons why single layer cuprate's maximum transition temperatures are so different. The study found two major differences in the band structure. First, the Fermi surface segments close to (π,0) are more parallel in Tl2201 than in Bi2201. Second, the shadow band usually related to crystal structure is only present in Bi2201, but absent in higher Tc Tl2201. The second study looks at the different ways of doping Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) in-situ by only changing the post bake-out vacuum conditions and temperature. The aim of the study is to systematically look into the generally overlooked experimental conditions that change the doping of a cleaved sample in ultra high vacuum (UHV) experiments. The study found two major experimental facts. First, in inadequate UHV conditions the carrier concentration of Bi2212 increases with time, due to the absorption of oxygen from CO2/CO molecules, prime contaminants present in UHV systems. Second, in a very clean UHV system at elevated temperatures (above about 200 K), the carrier concentration decreases due to the loss of oxygen atoms from the Bi-O layer. The final study probed the particle-hole symmetry of the pseudogap phase in high temperature superconducting cuprates by looking at the thermally excited bands above the Fermi level. The data showed a particle-hole symmetric pseudogap which symmetrically closes away from the nested FS before the node. The data is consistent

  14. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    This NASA grant covered EUVE observing and data analysis programs during EUVE Cycle 5 GO observing. The research involved a single Guest Observer project 97-EUVE-061 "Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars". The grant provided funding that covered 1.25 months of the PI's salary. The activities undertaken included observation planning and data analysis (both temporal and spectral). This project was awarded 910 ksec of observing time to study seven active binary stars, all but one of which were actually observed. Lambda-And was observed on 1997 Jul 30 - Aug 3 and Aug 7-14 for a total of 297 ksec; these observations showed two large complex flares that were analyzed by Osten & Brown (1999). AR Psc, observed for 350 ksec on 1997 Aug 27 - Sep 13, showed only relatively small flares that were also discussed by Osten & Brown (1999). EUVE observations of El Eri were obtained on 1994 August 24-28, simultaneous with ASCA X-ray spectra. Four flares were detected by EUVE with one of these also observed simultaneously, by ASCA. The other three EUVE observations were of the stars BY Dra (1997 Sep 22-28), V478 Lyr (1998 May 18-27), and sigma Gem (1998 Dec 10-22). The first two stars showed a few small flares. The sigma Gem data shows a beautiful complete flare with a factor of ten peak brightness compared to quiescence. The flare rise and almost all the decay phase are observed. Unfortunately no observations in other spectral regions were obtained for these stars. Analysis of the lambda-And and AR Psc observations is complete and the results were published in Osten & Brown (1999). Analysis of the BY Dra, V478 Lyr and sigma Gem EUVE data is complete and will be published in Osten (2000, in prep.). The El Eri EUV analysis is also completed and the simultaneous EUV/X-ray study will be published in Osten et al. (2000, in prep.). Both these latter papers will be submitted in summer 2000. All these results will form part of Rachel Osten's PhD thesis.

  15. Ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy of xanthophylls at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Cong, Hong; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Gibson, George N; Frank, Harry A

    2008-03-20

    Many of the spectroscopic features and photophysical properties of xanthophylls and their role in energy transfer to chlorophyll can be accounted for on the basis of a three-state model. The characteristically strong visible absorption of xanthophylls is associated with a transition from the ground state S0 (1(1)Ag-) to the S2 (1(1)Bu+) excited state. The lowest lying singlet state denoted S1 (2(1)Ag-), is a state into which absorption from the ground state is symmetry forbidden. Ultrafast optical spectroscopic studies and quantum computations have suggested the presence of additional excited singlet states in the vicinity of S1 (2(1)Ag-) and S2 (1(1)Bu+). One of these is denoted S* and has been suggested in previous work to be associated with a twisted molecular conformation of the molecule in the S1 (2(1)Ag-) state. In this work, we present the results of a spectroscopic investigation of three major xanthophylls from higher plants: violaxanthin, lutein, and zeaxanthin. These molecules have systematically increasing extents of pi-electron conjugation from nine to eleven conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds. All-trans isomers of the molecules were purified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and studied by steady-state and ultrafast time-resolved optical spectroscopy at 77 K. Analysis of the data using global fitting techniques has revealed the inherent spectral properties and ultrafast dynamics of the excited singlet states of each of the molecules. Five different global fitting models were tested, and it was found that the data are best explained using a kinetic model whereby photoexcitation results in the promotion of the molecule into the S2 (1(1)Bu+) state that subsequently undergoes decay to a vibrationally hot S1 (1(1)Ag-) state and with the exception of violaxanthin also to the S* state. The vibrationally hot S1 (1(1)Ag-) state then cools to a vibrationally relaxed S1 (2(1)Ag-) state in less than a picosecond. It was also found that a portion

  16. SPATIALLY RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF SDSS J0952+2552: A CONFIRMED DUAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS

    SciTech Connect

    McGurk, R. C.; Max, C. E.; Rosario, D. J.; Shields, G. A.; Smith, K. L.; Wright, S. A. E-mail: max@ucolick.org E-mail: shieldsga@mail.utexas.edu E-mail: saw@astro.berkeley.edu

    2011-09-01

    Most massive galaxies contain supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in their cores. When galaxies merge, gas is driven to nuclear regions and can accrete onto the central black hole. Thus, one expects to see dual active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in a fraction of galaxy mergers. Candidates for galaxies containing dual AGNs have been identified by the presence of double-peaked narrow [O III] emission lines and by high spatial resolution images of close galaxy pairs. Spatially resolved spectroscopy is needed to confirm these galaxy pairs as systems with spatially separated double SMBHs. With the Keck 2 Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system and the OH Suppressing InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph near-infrared integral field spectrograph, we obtained spatially resolved spectra for SDSS J09527.62+255257.2, a radio-quiet quasar shown by previous imaging to consist of a galaxy and its close (1.''0) companion. We find that the main galaxy is a Type 1 AGN with both broad and narrow AGN emission lines in its spectrum, while the companion galaxy is a Type 2 AGN with narrow emission lines only. The two AGNs are separated by 4.8 kpc, and their redshifts correspond to those of the double peaks of the [O III] emission line seen in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum. Line diagnostics indicate that both components of the double emission lines are due to AGN photoionization. These results confirm that J0952+2552 contains two spatially separated AGNs. As one of the few confirmed dual AGNs at an intermediate separation of <10 kpc, this system offers a unique opportunity to study galaxy mergers and their effect on black hole growth.

  17. Infrared microcalorimetric spectroscopy using uncooled thermal detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datskos, Panos G.; Rajic, Slobodan; Datskou, Irene; Egert, Charles M.

    1997-10-01

    We have investigated a novel IR microcalorimetric spectroscopy technique that can be used to detect the presence of trace amounts of target molecules. The chemical detection is accomplished by obtaining the IR photothermal spectra of molecules absorbed on the surface of an uncooled thermal detector. Traditional gravimetric based chemical detectors require highly selective coatings to achieve chemical specificity. In contrast, IR microcalorimetric based detection requires only moderately specific coatings since the specificity is a consequence of the photothermal spectrum. We have obtained IR photothermal spectra for trace concentrations of chemical analytes including diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP), 2-mercaptoethanol and trinitrotoluene (TNT) over the wavelength region 2.5 to 14.5 micrometers . We found that in the wavelength region 2.5 to 14.5 micrometers DIMP exhibits two strong photothermal peaks. The photothermal spectra of 2-mercaptoethanol and TNT exhibit a number of peaks in the wavelength region 2.5 to 14.5 micrometers and the photothermal peaks for 2-mercaptoethanol are in excellent agreement with IR absorption peaks present in its IR spectrum. The photothermal response of chemical detectors based on microcalorimetric spectroscopy has been found to vary reproducibly and sensitively as a consequence of adsorption of small number of molecules on a detector surface followed by photon irradiation and can be used for improved chemical characterization.

  18. Bird sexing by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Gerald; Bartels, Thomas; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Koch, Edmund

    2010-02-01

    Birds are traditionally classified as male or female based on their anatomy and plumage color as judged by the human eye. Knowledge of a bird's gender is important for the veterinary practitioner, the owner and the breeder. The accurate gender determination is essential for proper pairing of birds, and knowing the gender of a bird will allow the veterinarian to rule in or out gender-specific diseases. Several biochemical methods of gender determination have been developed for avian species where otherwise the gender of the birds cannot be determined by their physical appearances or characteristics. In this contribution, we demonstrate that FT-IR spectroscopy is a suitable tool for a quick and objective determination of the bird's gender. The method is based on differences in chromosome size. Male birds have two Z chromosomes and female birds have a W-chromosome and a Z-chromosome. Each Z-chromosome has approx. 75.000.000 bps whereas the W-chromosome has approx. 260.00 bps. This difference can be detected by FT-IR spectroscopy. Spectra were recorded from germ cells obtained from the feather pulp of chicks as well as from the germinal disk of fertilized but non-bred eggs. Significant changes between cells of male and female birds occur in the region of phosphate vibrations around 1080 and 1120 cm-1.

  19. Metal nanofilms studied with infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahsold, Gerhard; Priebe, Andreas; Pucci, Annemarie; Otto, Andreas

    2006-03-01

    Metal films with thickness in the nanometer range are optically transparent. In the IR range their transmittance may show both the Drude-type behaviour of coalesced islands and the tail of the plasmon absorption of single islands. Therefore, IR transmittance spectroscopy is a sensitive tool for in-situ studies of metal-film growth on insulating substrates and of the film conductivity. With IR transmittance spectroscopy the in-plane film conductivity and its correlation to the film-growth process can be determined without electrical contacts. Adsorbate induced changes can be observed well. Their analysis may give insight into the adsorbate-metal bonding. Depending on the film's roughness the IR lines of adsorbate-vibration modes may be strongly modified because of their interaction with electronic excitations of the film. The atomic roughness of cold-condensed metal films produces additional IR activity: strong IR activity of Raman lines of centrosymmetric adsorbate molecules is observed in those cases where the adsorbate has states close to the Fermi level.

  20. Time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy for nondestructive assessment of fruit and vegetable quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torricelli, Alessandro; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Vanoli, Maristella; Rizzolo, Anna; Eccher Zerbini, Paola

    2007-09-01

    In the majority of food and feed, due to the microscopic spatial changes in the refractive index, visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) light undergoes multiple scattering events and the overall light distribution is determined more by scattering rather than absorption. Conventional steady state VIS/NIR reflectance spectroscopy can provide information on light attenuation, which depends both on light absorption and light scattering, but cannot discriminate these two effects. On the contrary, time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy (TRS) provides a complete optical characterisation of diffusive media in terms of their absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient. From the assessment of the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients, information can then be derived on the composition and internal structure of the medium. Main advantages of the technique are the absolute non-invasiveness, the potentiality for non-contact measurements, and the capacity to probe internal properties with no influence from the skin. In this work we review the physical and technical issues related to the use of TRS for nondestructive quality assessment of fruit and vegetable. A laboratory system for broadband TRS, based on tunable mode-locked lasers and fast microchannel plate photomultiplier, and a portable setup for TRS measurements, based on pulsed diode lasers and compact metal-channel photomultiplier, will be described. Results on broadband optical characterisation of fruits and applications of TRS to the detection of internal defects in pears and to maturity assessment in nectarines will be presented.

  1. Cyclohexene Photo-oxidation over Vanadia Catalyst Analyzed by Time Resolved ATR-FT-IR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, Heinz; Mul, Guido; Wasylenko, Walter; Hamdy, M. Sameh; Frei, Heinz

    2008-06-04

    Vanadia was incorporated in the 3-dimensional mesoporous material TUD-1 with a loading of 2percent w/w vanadia. The performance in the selective photo-oxidation of liquid cyclohexene was investigated using ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy. Under continuous illumination at 458 nm a significant amount of product, i.e. cyclohexenone, was identified. This demonstrates for the first time that hydroxylated vanadia centers in mesoporous materials can be activated by visible light to induce oxidation reactions. Using the rapid scan method, a strong perturbation of the vanadyl environment could be observed in the selective oxidation process induced by a 458 nm laser pulse of 480 ms duration. This is proposed to be caused by interaction of the catalytic centre with a cyclohexenyl hydroperoxide intermediate. The restoration of the vanadyl environment could be kinetically correlated to the rate of formation of cyclohexenone, and is explained by molecular rearrangement and dissociation of the peroxide to ketone and water. The ketone diffuses away from the active center and ATR infrared probing zone, resulting in a decreasing ketone signal on the tens of seconds time scale after initiation of the photoreaction. This study demonstrates the high potential of time resolved ATR FT-IR spectroscopy for mechanistic studies of liquid phase reactions by monitoring not only intermediates and products, but by correlating the temporal behavior of these species to molecular changes of the vanadyl catalytic site.

  2. A 100 kHz Time-Resolved Multiple-Probe Femtosecond to Second Infrared Absorption Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Greetham, Gregory M; Donaldson, Paul M; Nation, Charlie; Sazanovich, Igor V; Clark, Ian P; Shaw, Daniel J; Parker, Anthony W; Towrie, Michael

    2016-04-01

    We present a dual-amplifier laser system for time-resolved multiple-probe infrared (IR) spectroscopy based on the ytterbium potassium gadolinium tungstate (Yb:KGW) laser medium. Comparisons are made between the ytterbium-based technology and titanium sapphire laser systems for time-resolved IR spectroscopy measurements. The 100 kHz probing system provides new capability in time-resolved multiple-probe experiments, as more information is obtained from samples in a single experiment through multiple-probing. This method uses the high repetition-rate probe pulses to repeatedly measure spectra at 10 µs intervals following excitation allowing extended timescales to be measured routinely along with ultrafast data. Results are presented showing the measurement of molecular dynamics over >10 orders of magnitude in timescale, out to 20 ms, with an experimental time response of <200 fs. The power of multiple-probing is explored through principal component analysis of repeating probe measurements as a novel method for removing noise and measurement artifacts. PMID:26887988

  3. Resolved Molecular Gas Properties in Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliwa, Kazimierz; Wilson, Christine

    2015-08-01

    Luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) in the local universe are mergers of gas-rich galaxies. The merger event funnels the molecular gas towards the central kiloparsec, compressing the gas, and triggering an extreme starburst, making LIRGs the perfect laboratory for studying extreme modes of star formation. We use the Submillimeter Array sample and observations of Wilson et al. (2008), supplemented with new CARMA and ALMA observations, to constrain the physical conditions such as temperature, density and column density of the molecular gas in the sample of 7 LIRGs. We use the radiative transfer code RADEX (van der Tak et al. 2007) and a Bayesian likelihood code to fit the most probable physical conditions. Comparison of the molecular gas physical conditions shows that earlier merger stage LIRGs such as Arp 299 and NGC 1614 have denser (> 103cm-1) molecular gas than a later stage merger such as VV 114 and NGC 2623. We measure the CO luminosity to H2 mass conversion factor, αCO, using the radiative transfer analysis results and find that the values are a factor of 4-10 times lower than the Galactic value of 4.3 M⊙ (K km s-1 pc2)-1. We also find unusually large 12CO-to-13CO abundance ratios (> 130), more than 2 times the local Galactic value.

  4. Resolved Star Formation Law In Nearby Infrared-bright Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Nurur; Bolatto, A.; Wong, T.; Leroy, A.; Ott, J.; Calzetti, D.; Blitz, L.; Walter, F.; Rosolowsky, E.; West, A.; Vogel, S.; Bigiel, F.; Xue, R.

    2009-05-01

    An accurate knowledge of star formation law is crucial to make progress in understanding galaxy formation and evolution. We are studying this topic using CARMA STING (Survey Toward Infrared-bright Nearby Galaxies), an interferometric CO survey of a sample of 27 star-forming nearby galaxies with a wealth of multi-wavelength data designed to study star formation in environments throughout the blue sequence at sub-kpc scales. We present results for NGC 4254 (M99), one of our sample galaxies. We construct star formation rate surface density (SFRSD) and gas (atomic and molecular) surface density indicators using a combination of high resolution data from CARMA, KPNO, Spitzer, IRAM and VLA. We find a tight correlation between SFRSD and molecular gas surface density (MGSD), whereas the relation between atomic gas surface density and SFRSD shows very large scatter. Within the central 6 kpc (radius) where CARMA is the most sensitive the MGSD derived from CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) shows similar trend, however, in the extended disk the slope, derived from CO(2-1) data alone, gets steeper.

  5. Infrared spectroscopy of starburst and Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorwood, A. F. M.; Oliva, E.

    1994-03-01

    We present and discuss some recent results ofgroundbased IR spectroscopie studies ofstarburst and Seyfert galaxies through the 1-5 μm atmospheric windows. Of particular interest in this spectral range are H and He recombination lines, stellar CO and other absorption bands which can provide information on the stellar populations; [SiVI, VII, IX], [CaVIII] and [SIX] coronal lines in Seyferts and [FeII] and ro-vibrational H2 lines from circumnuclear gas excited by high energy photons and winds associated with recently formed hot stars, SN/SNR and AGN. Recent progress in the latter case has largely been achieved through the first use of 2D arrays to obtain maps and images of the extended line emission in several relatively nearby galaxies.

  6. On-chip near-infrared spectroscopy of CO2 using high resolution plasmonic filter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Xinyuan; Li, Erwen; Squire, Kenneth; Wang, Alan X.

    2016-05-01

    We report an ultra-compact, cost-effective on-chip near-infrared spectroscopy system for CO2 sensing using narrow-band optical filter array based on plasmonic gratings with a waveguide layer. By varying the periodicity of the gratings, the transmission spectra of the filters can be continuously tuned to cover the 2.0 μm sensing window with high spectral resolution around 10 nm. Our experimental results show that the on-chip spectroscopy system can resolve the two symmetric vibrational bands of CO2 at 2.0 μm wavelength, which proves its potential to replace the expensive commercial IR spectroscopy system for on-site gas sensing.

  7. The far-infrared spectroscopy of the troposphere (FIRST) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, M. G.; Johnson, D. G.; Bingham, G. E.; Jucks, K. W.; Traub, W. A.; Gordley, L.; Yang, P.

    2005-01-01

    The far-infrared spectroscopy of the troposphere (FIRST) project is under development by NASA through its Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) administered by the Earth Science Technology Office. The objective of the FIRST project is to develop and demonstrate the technology needed to routinely observe from space the far-infrared spectrum between 15 and 100 micrometers in wavelength. This spectral region contains about half of the outgoing longwave radiation from the Earth and its atmosphere and is responsible for about half of the natural greenhouse effect. Radiative cooling of the free troposphere occurs almost exclusively in the far-infrared. The far-infrared emission is modulated almost entirely by water vapor, the main greenhouse gas. Cirrus clouds exhibit significant climate forcing in the far-infrared. Despite this fundamental science, the far-infrared has remained almost unobserved directly, primarily due to technological limitations. The FIRST project is advancing technology in the areas of high throughput interferometers, broad bandpass beamsplitters, and detector focal planes to enable routine measurement of the far-infrared from space. FIRST will conduct a technology demonstration on a high altitude balloon platform in Spring 2005.

  8. Size Dependent Ultrafast Cooling of Water Droplets in Microemulsions by Picosecond Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, G.; Patzlaff, T.; Graener, H.

    2002-04-01

    The ultrafast thermal relaxation of reversed micelles in n-octane/AOT/water (where AOT denotes sodium di-2-ethylhexyl sulfosuccinate) microemulsions was investigated by time-resolved infrared pump-probe spectroscopy. This picosecond cooling process can be described in terms of heat diffusion, demonstrating a new method to determine the nanometer radii of the water droplets. The reverse micelles are stable against transient temperatures far above the equilibrium stability range. The amphiphilic interface layer (AOT) seems to provide an efficient heat contact between the water and the nonpolar solvent.

  9. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in physics laboratory courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möllmann, K.-P.; Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    Infrared spectrometry is one of the most important tools in the field of spectroscopic analysis. This is due to the high information content of spectra in the so-called spectroscopic fingerprint region, which enables measurement not only of gases, but also of liquids and solids. Today, infrared spectroscopy is almost completely dominated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. FTIR spectroscopy is able to detect minute quantities in the ppm and ppb ranges, and the respective analyses are now standard tools in science as well as industry. Therefore FTIR spectroscopy should be taught within the standard curriculum at university to physicists and engineers. Here we present respective undergraduate laboratory experiments designed for students at the end of their third year. Experiments deal first with understanding the spectrometer and second with recording and analysing spectra. On the one hand, transmission spectra of gases are treated which relate to environmental analytics (being probably the most prominent and well-known examples), and on the other hand, the focus is on the transmission and reflection spectra of solids. In particular, silicon wafers are studied—as is regularly done in the microelectronics industry—in order to characterize their thickness, oxygen content and phonon modes.

  10. Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy of the SNR IC443

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.

    1998-01-01

    investigators examined the spatial structure of the thermal component and analyzed the GIS spectra with a non-equilibrium plasma model, and found no systematic variation of the interstellar absorption across the remnant. Evidence for shock acceleration of cosmic rays to high energies (10 TeV) was found by Keohane. X-ray imaging spectroscopy with ASCA reveals two regions of particularly hard emission: an unresolved source embedded in an extended emission region, and a ridge of emission coincident with the southeastern rim. Both features are located on part of the radio shell where the shock wave is interacting with molecular gas, and together they account for a majority of the emission at 7 keV. Though we would not have noticed it a priori, the unresolved feature is coincident with one resolved by the ROSAT HRI. The ASCA measurements were combined with higher energy data from the XTE and GRO missions and with radio and TeV gamma-ray data to produce a nonthermal multiwavelength spectrum for IC 443 which was fit with a cosmic ray interaction model. This model calculates the cynchrotron, bremsstrahlung, invers Compton, and neutral pion decay emission produced by locally accelerated cosmic ray interacting with ambient matter, soft photon fields, and magnetic fields.

  11. Monitoring the alcoholysis of isocyanates with infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kössl, F.; Lisaj, M.; Kozich, V.; Heyne, K.; Kühn, O.

    2015-02-01

    The alcoholysis reaction of phenylisocyanate with cyclohexanol (I) and of 2,4-toluene-diisocyanate with chloraldhydrate (II) is studied by infrared absorption spectroscopy in combination with anharmonic frequency calculations using density functional theory. It is shown that the progress of the reaction can be monitored by measuring infrared marker bands in the isocyanate NCO and alcohol OH stretching regions. Analysis of spectra obtained as a function of time for different temperatures yields a second-order kinetics with an Arrhenius activation energy of 6.7 ± 0.2 and 2.8 ± 0.3 kcal/mol for reaction I and II, respectively.

  12. Infrared Photodissociation Spectroscopy of Metal Oxide Carbonyl Cations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brathwaite, Antonio D.; Duncan, Michael A.

    2013-06-01

    Mass selected metal oxide-carbonyl cations of the form MO_{m}(CO)_{n}^{+} are studied via infrared laser photodissociation spectroscopy, in the 600-2300cm^{1} region. Insight into the structure and bonding of these complexes is obtained from the number of infrared active bands, their relative intensities and their frequency positions. Density functional theory calculations are carried out in support of the experimental data. Insight into the bonding of CO ligands to metal oxides is obtained and the effect of oxidation on the carbonyl stretching frequency is revealed.

  13. Synchrotron-based far-infrared spectroscopy of nickel tungstate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinko, A.; Kuzmin, A.; Roy, P.; Evarestov, R. A.

    2016-07-01

    Monoclinic antiferromagnetic NiWO4 was studied by far-infrared (30-600 cm-1) absorption spectroscopy in the temperature range of 5-300 K using the synchrotron radiation from SOLEIL source. Two isomorphous CoWO4 and ZnWO4 tungstates were investigated for comparison. The phonon contributions in the far-infrared range of tungstates were interpreted using the first-principles spin-polarized linear combination of atomic orbital calculations. No contributions from magnetic excitations were found in NiWO4 and CoWO4 below their Neel temperatures down to 5 K.

  14. Infrared Spectroscopy of the Eruptive Variable ASASSN-15qi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelley, M. S.; Reipurth, Bo; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.

    2015-11-01

    We report infrared medium-resolution spectroscopy and near-infrared photometry of the eruptive variable ASASSN-15qi = 2MASS J22560882+5831040. Recently the ASAS-SN transients survey reported that 2MASS J22560882+5831040 between Oct 2 and Oct3, 2015 brightened from V > 17.0 to V=13.6, fading slightly to V=13.9 the following night (http://www.astronomy.ohio-state.edu/~assassin/transients.html, Shappee et al. 2014, ApJ, 788:A48).

  15. Frequency- and time-resolved coherence transfer spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rickard, Mark A; Pakoulev, Andrei V; Mathew, Nathan A; Kornau, Kathryn M; Wright, John C

    2007-02-22

    Frequency-domain two-color triply vibrational enhanced four-wave mixing using a new phase-matching geometry discriminates against coherent multidimensional spectral features created solely by radiative transitions, spectrally resolves pathways with different numbers of coherence transfer steps, and temporally resolves modulations created by interference between coherence transfer pathways. Coherence transfer is a nonradiative transition where a superposition of quantum states evolves to a different superposition. The asymmetric and symmetric C[triple bond]O stretching modes of rhodium(I) dicarbonyl acetylacetonate are used as a model system for coherence transfer. A simplified theoretical model based on Redfield theory is used to describe the experimental results. PMID:17300169

  16. Astronomical imaging Fourier spectroscopy at far-infrared wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, David A.; Gom, Brad G.; van der Wiel, Matthijs H. D.; Makiwa, Gibion

    2013-11-01

    The principles and practice of astronomical imaging Fourier transform spectroscopy (FTS) at far-infrared wavelengths are described. The Mach–Zehnder (MZ) interferometer design has been widely adopted for current and future imaging FTS instruments; we compare this design with two other common interferometer formats. Examples of three instruments based on the MZ design are presented. The techniques for retrieving astrophysical parameters from the measured spectra are discussed using calibration data obtained with the Herschel–SPIRE instrument. The paper concludes with an example of imaging spectroscopy obtained with the SPIRE FTS instrument.

  17. Study on Senna alata and its different extracts by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adiana, M. A.; Mazura, M. P.

    2011-04-01

    Senna alata L. commonly known as candle bush belongs to the family of Fabaceae and the plant has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory, analgesic, laxative and antiplatelet-aggregating activity. In order to develop a rapid and effective analysis method for studying integrally the main constituents in the medicinal materials and their extracts, discriminating the extracts from different extraction process, comparing the categories of chemical constituents in the different extracts and monitoring the qualities of medicinal materials, we applied Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) associated with second derivative infrared spectroscopy and two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy (2D-IR) to study the main constituents of S. alata and its different extracts (extracted by hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and methanol in turn). The findings indicated that FT-IR and 2D-IR can provide many holistic variation rules of chemical constituents. Use of the macroscopical fingerprint characters of FT-IR and 2D-IR spectrum can identify the main chemical constituents in medicinal materials and their extracts, but also compare the components differences among similar samples. In a conclusion, FT-IR spectroscopy combined with 2D correlation analysis provides a powerful method for the quality control of traditional medicines.

  18. Noninvasive detection of gas exchange rate by near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guodong; Mao, Zongzhen; Wang, Bangde

    2008-12-01

    In order to study the relationship among the oxygen concentration in skeletal muscle tissues and the heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake (VO2), respiratory exchange ratio (RER) during incremental running exercises on a treadmill, a near-infrared spectroscopy muscle oxygen monitor system is employed to measure the relative change in muscle oxygenation, with the heart rate, oxygen uptake, production of carbon dioxide (VCO2) and respiratory exchange ratio are recorded synchronously. The results indicate parameters mentioned above present regular changes during the incremental exercise. High correlations are discovered between relative change of oxy-hemoglobin concentration and heart rate, oxygen uptake, respiratory exchange ratio at the significance level (P=0.01). This research might introduce a new measurement technology and/or a novel biological monitoring parameter to the evaluation of physical function status, control the training intensity, estimation of the effectiveness of exercise. Keywords: near-infrared spectroscopy; muscle oxygen concentration; heart rate; oxygen uptake; respiratory exchange ratio.

  19. Raman and Infrared Spectroscopy of Pyridine under High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravlev, K.; Traikov, K; Dong, Z; Xie, S; Song, Y; Liu, Z

    2010-01-01

    We report the structural transitions of pyridine as a function of pressure up to 26 GPa using in situ Raman spectroscopy and infrared absorption spectroscopy. By monitoring changes in the Raman shifts in the lattice region as well as the band profiles in both Raman and IR spectra, a liquid-to-solid transition at 1 GPa followed by solid-to-solid transitions at 2, 8, 11, and 16 GPa were observed upon compression. These transitions were found to be reversible upon decompression from 22 GPa. A further chemical transformation was observed when compressed beyond 22 GPa as evidenced by the substantial and irreversible changes in the Raman and infrared spectra, which could be attributed to the destruction of the ring structure. The observed transformations in pyridine were also compared to those for benzene. The similar transition sequence with well-aligned transition pressures suggests that these isoelectronic aromatics may have similar structures and stabilities under high pressure.

  20. Environmental Affects on Surfactin Studied Using Multidimensional Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nite, Jacob; Krummel, Amber

    2014-03-01

    Surfactin, a cyclic lipopeptide produced by Bacillus subtilis, is a pore forming toxin that has been studied in the literature extensively. It is known to exist in two different conformations, S1 and S2, which are thought to relate to surfactin's pore forming ability. The vibrational characteristics of surfactin have been studied using linear infrared spectroscopy as well as two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy in different environments. The environments probed were specifically chosen to mimic surfactin in an aqueous environment as well as a lipid membrane environment. The vibrational spectra were interpreted using transitional dipole coupling to relate the coupling evident in the data to the structural conformers obtained from NMR data. These measurements have been used to link the structural characteristics of surfactin to different solvent environments to gain insight into surfactin's pore forming ability mechanisms. Colorado State University. Maciel Fellowship.

  1. Spectrally resolved femtosecond photon echo spectroscopy of astaxanthin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajitesh; Karthick Kumar, S. K.; Gupta, Aditya; Goswami, Debabrata

    2010-12-01

    We have studied the coherence and population dynamics of Astaxanthin solution in methanol and acetonitrile by spectrally resolving their photon echo signals. Our experiments indicate that methanol has a much stronger interaction with the ultrafast dynamics of Astaxanthin in comparison to that of acetonitrile.

  2. Spectrally resolved femtosecond photon echo spectroscopy of astaxanthin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajitesh; Karthick Kumar, S. K.; Gupta, Aditya; Goswami, Debabrata

    2011-08-01

    We have studied the coherence and population dynamics of Astaxanthin solution in methanol and acetonitrile by spectrally resolving their photon echo signals. Our experiments indicate that methanol has a much stronger interaction with the ultrafast dynamics of Astaxanthin in comparison to that of acetonitrile.

  3. Infrared heterodyne spectroscopy for astronomical purposes. [laser applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townes, C. H.

    1978-01-01

    Heterodyne infrared astronomy was carried out using CO2 lasers and some solid state tunable lasers. The best available detectors are mercury cadmium telluride photodiodes. Their quantum efficiencies reach values near 0.5 and in an overall system an effective quantum efficiency, taking into account optical losses and amplifier noise, of about 0.25 was demonstrated. Initial uses of 10 micron heterodyne spectroscopy were for the study of planetary molecular spectra.

  4. Angle-resolved multioctave supercontinua from mid-infrared laser filaments.

    PubMed

    Mitrofanov, A V; Voronin, A A; Sidorov-Biryukov, D A; Mitryukovsky, S I; Rozhko, M V; Pugžlys, A; Fedotov, A B; Panchenko, V Ya; Baltuška, A; Zheltikov, A M

    2016-08-01

    Angle-resolved spectral analysis of a multioctave high-energy supercontinuum output of mid-infrared laser filaments is shown to provide a powerful tool for understanding intricate physical scenarios behind laser-induced filamentation in the mid-infrared. The ellipticity of the mid-infrared driver beam breaks the axial symmetry of filamentation dynamics, offering a probe for a truly (3+1)-dimensional spatiotemporal evolution of mid-IR pulses in the filamentation regime. With optical harmonics up to the 15th order contributing to supercontinuum generation in such filaments alongside Kerr-type and ionization-induced nonlinearities, the output supercontinuum spectra span over five octaves from the mid-ultraviolet deep into the mid-infrared. Full (3+1)-dimensional field evolution analysis is needed for an adequate understanding of this regime of laser filamentation. Supercomputer simulations implementing such analysis articulate the critical importance of angle-resolved measurements for both descriptive and predictive power of filamentation modeling. Strong enhancement of ionization-induced blueshift is shown to offer new approaches in filamentation-assisted pulse compression, enabling the generation of high-power few- and single-cycle pulses in the mid-infrared. PMID:27472598

  5. Elucidation of Intermediates and Mechanisms in Heterogeneous Catalysis Using Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savara, Aditya; Weitz, Eric

    2014-04-01

    Infrared spectroscopy has a long history as a tool for the identification of chemical compounds. More recently, various implementations of infrared spectroscopy have been successfully applied to studies of heterogeneous catalytic reactions with the objective of identifying intermediates and determining catalytic reaction mechanisms. We discuss selective applications of these techniques with a focus on several heterogeneous catalytic reactions, including hydrogenation, deNOx, water-gas shift, and reverse-water-gas shift. The utility of using isotopic substitutions and other techniques in tandem with infrared spectroscopy is discussed. We comment on the modes of implementation and the advantages and disadvantages of the various infrared techniques. We also note future trends and the role of computational calculations in such studies. The infrared techniques considered are transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy, polarization-modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy, sum-frequency generation, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, attenuated total reflectance, infrared emission spectroscopy, photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy, and surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy.

  6. Elucidation of intermediates and mechanisms in heterogeneous catalysis using infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Savara, Aditya; Weitz, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy has a long history as a tool for the identification of chemical compounds. More recently, various implementations of infrared spectroscopy have been successfully applied to studies of heterogeneous catalytic reactions with the objective of identifying intermediates and determining catalytic reaction mechanisms. We discuss selective applications of these techniques with a focus on several heterogeneous catalytic reactions, including hydrogenation, deNOx, water-gas shift, and reverse-water-gas shift. The utility of using isotopic substitutions and other techniques in tandem with infrared spectroscopy is discussed. We comment on the modes of implementation and the advantages and disadvantages of the various infrared techniques. We also note future trends and the role of computational calculations in such studies. The infrared techniques considered are transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy, polarization-modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy, sum-frequency generation, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, attenuated total reflectance, infrared emission spectroscopy, photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy, and surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy. PMID:24689797

  7. Analytical estimation of solid angle subtended by complex well-resolved surfaces for infrared detection studies.

    PubMed

    Mahulikar, Shripad P; Potnuru, Santosh K; Kolhe, Pankaj S

    2007-08-01

    The solid angle (Omega) subtended by the hot power-plant surfaces of a typical fighter aircraft, on the detector of an infrared (IR) guided missile, is analytically obtained. The use of the parallel rays projection method simplifies the incorporation of the effect of the optical blocking by engine surfaces, on Omega-subtended. This methodology enables the evaluation of the relative contribution of the IR signature from well-resolved distributed sources, and is important for imaging infrared detection studies. The complex 3D surface of a rear fuselage is projected onto an equivalent planar area normal to the viewing aspect, which would give the same Omega-subtended. PMID:17676106

  8. Vesta Rotationally Resolved Near-Infrared Spectra V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, V.

    2011-08-01

    This data set contains low-resolution near-infrared (~0.7-2.5 microns) spectra of main belt asteroid (4) Vesta observed with the SpeX instrument on NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawai'i, and reported in Reddy et al. (2011). This data set archives reduced, calibrated spectra that were obtained as part of ground-based characterization of Vesta prior to the arrival of Dawn spacecraft. They have been used for detailed rotationally-resolved mineralogical/compositional analysis.

  9. Infrared Spectroscopy of Molecules in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Keqing

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is applied to the studies of several very different molecular systems. The spectra of the diatomic molecules BF, AlF, and MgF were recorded and analyzed. Dunham coefficients were obtained. The data of two isotopomers, 11BF and 10BF, were used to determine the mass-reduced Dunham coefficients, along with Born-Oppenheimer breakdown constants. Parameterized potential energy functions of BF and AlF were determined by fitting the available data using the solutions of the radial Schrodinger equation. Two vibrational modes of the short-lived and reactive BrCNO molecule were recorded at high resolution. Rotation-vibration transitions of the fundamental bands of both isotopomers 79BrCNO and 81BrCNO were assigned and analyzed. From the rotational constants, it was found that the Br-C bond length in BrCNO anomalously short when a linear geometry was assumed. This may indicate that BrCNO is quasi-linear, simulating the parent HCNO molecule. The emission spectra of the gaseous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules naphthalene, anthracene, pyrene, and chrysene were recorded in the far-infrared and mid-infrared regions. The assignments of fundamental modes and some combination modes were made. The vibrational bands that lie in the far-infrared are unique for different PAHs and allow discrimination among the four PAH molecules. The far-infrared PAH spectra, therefore, may prove useful in the assignments of unidentified spectral features from astronomical objects.

  10. Reactivity of Binuclear Tantalum Clusters on Silica: Characterization by Transient Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nemana, Sailendra; Sun, Junming; Gates, Bruce C.

    2008-05-08

    Binuclear tantalum clusters were synthesized from Ta(CH{sub 2}Ph){sub 5} (Ph is phenyl) on the surface of nonporous SiO{sub 2} (Aerosil), and their reactions with H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and ethylene were characterized by time-resolved infrared (IR), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopies. The EXAFS data indicate the formation in H{sub 2} of clusters with a Ta-Ta coordination number of approximately 1 and a bonding distance of 2.74 {angstrom}. Reactions of the supported clusters with D{sub 2} and H{sub 2} facilitate the interconversion of O-H and O-D groups on the SiO{sub 2} surface. Reaction of these clusters with ethylene led to their rapid fragmentation to give mononuclear tantalum complexes, as the tantalum was oxidized and new ligands formed, suggested by IR spectra to be ethyl. The results demonstrate a rough analogy between the chemistry of tantalum clusters on the SiO{sub 2} surface and their chemistry in solution. Because alkenes are suggested intermediates in the catalytic disproportionation of alkanes on supported tantalum, our results indicate how these intermediates might influence the nature of the catalytically active species.