Science.gov

Sample records for resolved powder diffraction

  1. X-ray characterization by energy-resolved powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, G.; Hooker, S. M.

    2016-08-01

    A method for single-shot, nondestructive characterization of broadband x-ray beams, based on energy-resolved powder diffraction, is described. Monte-Carlo simulations are used to simulate data for x-ray beams in the keV range with parameters similar to those generated by betatron oscillations in a laser-driven plasma accelerator. The retrieved x-ray spectra are found to be in excellent agreement with those of the input beams for realistic numbers of incident photons. It is demonstrated that the angular divergence of the x rays can be deduced from the deviation of the detected photons from the Debye-Scherrer rings which would be produced by a parallel beam. It is shown that the angular divergence can be measured as a function of the photon energy, yielding the angularly resolved spectrum of the input x-ray beam.

  2. In-situ time resolved synchrotron powder diffraction studies of synthesis and chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Norby, P.

    1995-09-01

    Equipment for time and temperature dependent powder diffraction has been developed, especially in order to be able to study hydrothermal syntheses of zeolites. The system is very versatile and has so far been used to study e.g. hydrothermal syntheses of zeolites and aluminophosphates, syntheses of layered phosphates, formation of Sorel cements, dehydration and phase transformations of zeolites, solid state synthesis of lanthanum manganites, ion exchange of zeolites using molten salt, and oxidation/reduction of lanthanum manganites at high temperatures. The sample is contained in quartz capillaries and is heated using a stream of hot air. External pressure can be applied allowing hydrothermal syntheses at temperatures up to 200 C to be performed. Controlled atmosphere is obtained by flowing gas or a mixture of gases through the capillary.

  3. Powder Diffraction: By Decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, William I. F.

    This introductory chapter reviews the first 100 years of powder diffraction, decade by decade, from the earliest X-ray powder diffraction measurements of the crystal structure of graphite through to the diversity and complexity of twenty-first century powder diffraction. Carbon features as an illustrative example throughout the discussion of these ten decades from graphite and the disorder of carbon black through to lonsdaleite, the elusive hexagonal polymorph of diamond, and C60, the most symmetrical of molecules. Electronics and computing have played a leading role in the development of powder diffraction, particularly over the past 60 years, and the Moore's Law decade-by-decade rise in computing power is clear in the increasing complexity of powder diffraction experiments and material systems that can be studied. The chapter concludes with a final discussion of decades - the four decades of length-scale from the ångstrom to the micron that not only represent the domain of powder diffraction but are also the distances that will dominate twenty-first century science and technology.

  4. Devitrification of Mechanically Alloyed Zr-Ti-Nb-Cu-Ni-Al Glassy Powders Studied by Time-Resolved X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Scudino, S.; Sordelet, D.J.; Eckert, J.

    2009-04-13

    The crystallization of mechanically alloyed Zr{sub 67}Ti{sub 6.14}Nb{sub 1.92}Cu{sub 10.67}Ni{sub 8.52}Al{sub 5.75} glassy powder is investigated by time-resolved X-ray diffraction. The powder displays a multi-step crystallization behavior characterized by the formation of a metastable nanoscale quasicrystalline phase during the first stage of the crystallization process. At higher temperatures, coinciding with the second crystallization event, the amorphous-to-quasicrystalline transformation is followed by the precipitation of the tetragonal Zr{sub 2}Cu phase (space group I4/mmm) and the tetragonal Zr{sub 2}Ni phase (space group I4/mcm). The transformations are gradual and the quasicrystals and the subsequent phases coexist over a temperature interval of about 25K.

  5. Time-resolved X-ray powder diffraction on a three-way catalyst at the GILDA beamline.

    PubMed

    Martorana, A; Deganello, G; Longo, A; Deganello, F; Liotta, L; Macaluso, A; Pantaleo, G; Balerna, A; Meneghini, C; Mobilio, S

    2003-03-01

    Time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments carried out at the beamline BM08-GILDA of ESRF allowed a study of the structural modifications taking place in a Pt/ceria-zirconia catalyst while the CO oxidation reaction was in progress. The capillary tube in which the sample is stored acts effectively as a chemical microreactor that ensures homogeneity of the sample treatments and minimization of diffusion effects. During the flowing of the reactant CO/He mixture, the investigated catalyst undergoes a fast Ce(IV)-Ce(III) partial reduction that involves the release of one O atom for every two reduced Ce cations. Because Ce(III) has a larger ionic radius than Ce(IV), the structural modification produces an increase of the lattice constant of the ceria-zirconia mixed oxide, and this increase is monitored by the translating imaging-plate device implemented at GILDA. The CO(2) resulting from the oxidation of the fluxed CO is monitored by a quadrupole mass spectrometer during the recording of the time-resolved X-ray diffraction pattern. The chemical and structural information was combined to show that the CO(2) yield is nearly constant until the catalytic system can provide oxygen for the reaction, while the structural rearrangement of the catalyst is delayed with respect to the switching on of the CO/He flux. After this induction time, during which CO(2) is produced with no structural modification of the catalyst, a fast increase of the lattice constant takes place. PMID:12606797

  6. High Resolution Powder Diffraction and Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D. E.

    1999-04-23

    It is clear that high-resolution synchrotrons X-ray powder diffraction is a very powerful and convenient tool for material characterization and structure determination. Most investigations to date have been carried out under ambient conditions and have focused on structure solution and refinement. The application of high-resolution techniques to increasingly complex structures will certainly represent an important part of future studies, and it has been seen how ab initio solution of structures with perhaps 100 atoms in the asymmetric unit is within the realms of possibility. However, the ease with which temperature-dependence measurements can be made combined with improvements in the technology of position-sensitive detectors will undoubtedly stimulate precise in situ structural studies of phase transitions and related phenomena. One challenge in this area will be to develop high-resolution techniques for ultra-high pressure investigations in diamond anvil cells. This will require highly focused beams and very precise collimation in front of the cell down to dimensions of 50 {micro}m or less. Anomalous scattering offers many interesting possibilities as well. As a means of enhancing scattering contrast it has applications not only to the determination of cation distribution in mixed systems such as the superconducting oxides discussed in Section 9.5.3, but also to the location of specific cations in partially occupied sites, such as the extra-framework positions in zeolites, for example. Another possible application is to provide phasing information for ab initio structure solution. Finally, the precise determination of f as a function of energy through an absorption edge can provide useful information about cation oxidation states, particularly in conjunction with XANES data. In contrast to many experiments at a synchrotron facility, powder diffraction is a relatively simple and user-friendly technique, and most of the procedures and software for data analysis

  7. Macromolecular Powder Diffraction: Ready for genuine biological problems.

    PubMed

    Karavassili, Fotini; Margiolaki, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of 3D structures of biological molecules plays a major role in both understanding important processes of life and developing pharmaceuticals. Among several methods available for structure determination, macromolecular X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) has transformed over the past decade from an impossible dream to a respectable method. XRPD can be employed in biosciences for various purposes such as observing phase transitions, characterizing bulk pharmaceuticals, determining structures via the molecular replacement method, detecting ligands in protein-ligand complexes, as well as combining micro-sized single crystal crystallographic data and powder diffraction data. Studies using synchrotron and laboratory sources in some standard configuration setups are reported in this review, including their respective advantages and disadvantages. Methods presented here provide an alternative, complementary set of tools to resolve structural problems. A variety of already existing software packages for powder diffraction data processing and analysis, some of which have been adapted to large unit cell studies, are briefly described. This review aims to provide necessary elements of theory and current methods, along with practical explanations, available software packages and highlighted case studies. PMID:26786768

  8. X-ray diffraction investigation of ultrafine boron nitride powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gurov, S.V.; Chukalin, V.I.; Rezchikova, T.V.; Torbov, V.J.; Troitskii, V.N.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an x-ray diffraction analysis of ultrafine boron nitride powders of different mean particle sizes. Diffraction spectra of the ultrafine boron nitride powders were obtained using a DRON-1 apparatus. The experimental facts are indicative of a turbostratic character of deformation of the hexagonal lattice of ultrafinely divided boron nitride.

  9. Pulsed Neutron Powder Diffraction for Materials Science

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiyama, T.

    2008-03-17

    The accelerator-based neutron diffraction began in the end of 60's at Tohoku University which was succeeded by the four spallation neutron facilities with proton accelerators at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (Japan), Argonne National Laboratory and Los Alamos Laboratory (USA), and Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK). Since then, the next generation source has been pursued for 20 years, and 1MW-class spallation neutron sources will be appeared in about three years at the three parts of the world: Japan, UK and USA. The joint proton accelerator project (J-PARC), a collaborative project between KEK and JAEA, is one of them. The aim of the talk is to describe about J-PARC and the neutron diffractometers being installed at the materials and life science facility of J-PARC. The materials and life science facility of J-PARC has 23 neutron beam ports and will start delivering the first neutron beam of 25 Hz from 2008 May. Until now, more than 20 proposals have been reviewed by the review committee, and accepted proposal groups have started to get fund. Those proposals include five polycrystalline diffractometers: a super high resolution powder diffractometer (SHRPD), a 0.2%-resolution powder diffractometer of Ibaraki prefecture (IPD), an engineering diffractometers (Takumi), a high intensity S(Q) diffractometer (VSD), and a high-pressure dedicated diffractometer. SHRPD, Takumi and IPD are being designed and constructed by the joint team of KEK, JAEA and Ibaraki University, whose member are originally from the KEK powder group. These three instruments are expected to start in 2008. VSD is a super high intensity diffractometer with the highest resolution of {delta}d/d = 0.3%. VSD can measure rapid time-dependent phenomena of crystalline materials as well as glass, liquid and amorphous materials. The pair distribution function will be routinely obtained by the Fourier transiformation of S(Q) data. Q range of VSD will be as wide as 0.01 A{sup -1}

  10. Pulsed Neutron Powder Diffraction for Materials Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiyama, T.

    2008-03-01

    The accelerator-based neutron diffraction began in the end of 60's at Tohoku University which was succeeded by the four spallation neutron facilities with proton accelerators at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (Japan), Argonne National Laboratory and Los Alamos Laboratory (USA), and Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK). Since then, the next generation source has been pursued for 20 years, and 1MW-class spallation neutron sources will be appeared in about three years at the three parts of the world: Japan, UK and USA. The joint proton accelerator project (J-PARC), a collaborative project between KEK and JAEA, is one of them. The aim of the talk is to describe about J-PARC and the neutron diffractometers being installed at the materials and life science facility of J-PARC. The materials and life science facility of J-PARC has 23 neutron beam ports and will start delivering the first neutron beam of 25 Hz from 2008 May. Until now, more than 20 proposals have been reviewed by the review committee, and accepted proposal groups have started to get fund. Those proposals include five polycrystalline diffractometers: a super high resolution powder diffractometer (SHRPD), a 0.2%-resolution powder diffractometer of Ibaraki prefecture (IPD), an engineering diffractometers (Takumi), a high intensity S(Q) diffractometer (VSD), and a high-pressure dedicated diffractometer. SHRPD, Takumi and IPD are being designed and constructed by the joint team of KEK, JAEA and Ibaraki University, whose member are originally from the KEK powder group. These three instruments are expected to start in 2008. VSD is a super high intensity diffractometer with the highest resolution of Δd/d = 0.3%. VSD can measure rapid time-dependent phenomena of crystalline materials as well as glass, liquid and amorphous materials. The pair distribution function will be routinely obtained by the Fourier transiformation of S(Q) data. Q range of VSD will be as wide as 0.01 Å-1

  11. Powder diffraction from a continuous microjet of submicrometer protein crystals.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, D A; Chapman, H N; Deponte, D; Doak, R B; Fromme, P; Hembree, G; Hunter, M; Marchesini, S; Schmidt, K; Spence, J; Starodub, D; Weierstall, U

    2008-11-01

    Atomic-resolution structures from small proteins have recently been determined from high-quality powder diffraction patterns using a combination of stereochemical restraints and Rietveld refinement [Von Dreele (2007), J. Appl. Cryst. 40, 133-143; Margiolaki et al. (2007), J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 11865-11871]. While powder diffraction data have been obtained from batch samples of small crystal-suspensions, which are exposed to X-rays for long periods of time and undergo significant radiation damage, the proof-of-concept that protein powder diffraction data from nanocrystals of a membrane protein can be obtained using a continuous microjet is shown. This flow-focusing aerojet has been developed to deliver a solution of hydrated protein nanocrystals to an X-ray beam for diffraction analysis. This method requires neither the crushing of larger polycrystalline samples nor any techniques to avoid radiation damage such as cryocooling. Apparatus to record protein powder diffraction in this manner has been commissioned, and in this paper the first powder diffraction patterns from a membrane protein, photosystem I, with crystallite sizes of less than 500 nm are presented. These preliminary patterns show the lowest-order reflections, which agree quantitatively with theoretical calculations of the powder profile. The results also serve to test our aerojet injector system, with future application to femtosecond diffraction in free-electron X-ray laser schemes, and for serial crystallography using a single-file beam of aligned hydrated molecules. PMID:18955765

  12. Quality experimental and calculated powder x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sullenger, D.B.; Cantrell, J.S.; Beiter, T.A.; Tomlin, D.W.

    1996-08-01

    For several years, we have submitted quality powder XRD patterns to the International Centre for Diffraction Data for inclusion as reference standards in their Powder Diffraction File. The procedure followed is described; examples used are {beta}-UH{sub 3}, {alpha}- BaT{sub 2}, alpha-lithium disilicate ({alpha}-Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}), and 2,2`,4,4`,6,6`hexanitroazobenzene-III (HNAB-III).

  13. Total-scattering pair-distribution function of organic material from powder electron diffraction data.

    PubMed

    Gorelik, Tatiana E; Schmidt, Martin U; Kolb, Ute; Billinge, Simon J L

    2015-04-01

    This paper shows that pair-distribution function (PDF) analyses can be carried out on organic and organometallic compounds from powder electron diffraction data. Different experimental setups are demonstrated, including selected area electron diffraction and nanodiffraction in transmission electron microscopy or nanodiffraction in scanning transmission electron microscopy modes. The methods were demonstrated on organometallic complexes (chlorinated and unchlorinated copper phthalocyanine) and on purely organic compounds (quinacridone). The PDF curves from powder electron diffraction data, called ePDF, are in good agreement with PDF curves determined from X-ray powder data demonstrating that the problems of obtaining kinematical scattering data and avoiding beam damage of the sample are possible to resolve. PMID:25510245

  14. Total-scattering pair-distribution function of organic material from powder electron diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, Tatiana E.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Schmidt, Martin U.; Kolb, Ute

    2015-04-01

    This paper shows for the first time that pair-distribution function analyses can be carried out on organic and organo-metallic compounds from powder electron diffraction data. Different experimental setups are demonstrated, including selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and nanodiffraction in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or nanodiffraction in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) modes. The methods were demonstrated on organo-metallic complexes (chlorinated and unchlorinated copper-phthalocyanine) and on purely organic compounds (quinacridone). The PDF curves from powder electron diffraction data, called ePDF, are in good agreement with PDF curves determined from X-ray powder data demonstrating that the problems of obtaining kinematical scattering data and avoiding beam-damage of the sample are possible to resolve.

  15. Total-scattering pair-distribution function of organic material from powder electron diffraction data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gorelik, Tatiana E.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Schmidt, Martin U.; Kolb, Ute

    2015-04-01

    This paper shows for the first time that pair-distribution function analyses can be carried out on organic and organo-metallic compounds from powder electron diffraction data. Different experimental setups are demonstrated, including selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and nanodiffraction in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or nanodiffraction in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) modes. The methods were demonstrated on organo-metallic complexes (chlorinated and unchlorinated copper-phthalocyanine) and on purely organic compounds (quinacridone). The PDF curves from powder electron diffraction data, called ePDF, are in good agreement with PDF curves determined from X-ray powder data demonstrating that the problems of obtaining kinematical scattering datamore » and avoiding beam-damage of the sample are possible to resolve.« less

  16. Idealized powder diffraction patterns for cellulose polymorphs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cellulose samples are routinely analyzed by X-ray diffraction to determine their crystal type (polymorph) and crystallinity. However, the connection is seldom made between those efforts and the crystal structures of cellulose that have been determined with synchrotron X-radiation and neutron diffrac...

  17. Single Hit Energy-resolved Laue Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Shamim; Suggit, Matthew J.; Stubley, Paul G.; Ciricosta, Orlando; Wark, Justin S.; Higginbotham, Andrew; Hawreliak, James A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Eggert, Jon H.; Comley, Andrew J.; Foster, John M.

    2015-05-15

    In situ white light Laue diffraction has been successfully used to interrogate the structure of single crystal materials undergoing rapid (nanosecond) dynamic compression up to megabar pressures. However, information on strain state accessible via this technique is limited, reducing its applicability for a range of applications. We present an extension to the existing Laue diffraction platform in which we record the photon energy of a subset of diffraction peaks. This allows for a measurement of the longitudinal and transverse strains in situ during compression. Consequently, we demonstrate measurement of volumetric compression of the unit cell, in addition to the limited aspect ratio information accessible in conventional white light Laue. We present preliminary results for silicon, where only an elastic strain is observed. VISAR measurements show the presence of a two wave structure and measurements show that material downstream of the second wave does not contribute to the observed diffraction peaks, supporting the idea that this material may be highly disordered, or has undergone large scale rotation.

  18. Scanning CCD Detector for X-ray Powder Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, T.; Baldwin, J.; Von Dreele, R.; Suchomel, M.; Toby, B. H.

    2014-03-01

    We discuss the design, fabrication and use of a custom CCD detector for x-ray powder diffraction measurements. The detector is mounted on a diffractometer arm, where line-by-line readout of the CCD is coupled to continuous motion of the arm. As the arm moves, the data from the CCD detector are accumulated and can be viewed as if it were a "film strip" with partial powder diffraction rings. Because of the unique design of the camera, both high-resolution and rapid measurements can be performed. Powder diffraction patterns are collected with speeds of a few minutes, or less, with many of the advantages of large area position-sensitive detectors, for example amorphous silicon flat panels, such as high sensitivity, direct evidence of grainy samples and freedom from low-angle asymmetry, but with resolution better than linear position-sensitive detectors and nearly as good as the ultimate in resolution, analyser-crystal detection [2,3].

  19. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Electron Diffraction with Megavolt Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, J.B.; Rudakov, F.M.; Dowell, D.H.; Schmerge, J.F.; Cardoza, J.D.; Castro, J.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Loos, H.; Weber, P.M.; /Brown U.

    2006-10-24

    An rf photocathode electron gun is used as an electron source for ultrafast time-resolved pump-probe electron diffraction. We observed single-shot diffraction patterns from a 160 nm Al foil using the 5.4 MeV electron beam from the Gun Test Facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Excellent agreement with simulations suggests that single-shot diffraction experiments with a time resolution approaching 100 fs are possible.

  20. Ab Initio Structure Analysis Using Laboratory Powder Diffraction Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Akito

    Today, laboratory X-ray diffractometers are seeing increasingly wide use in the ab initio crystal structure analysis of organic powder samples. This is because optics and optical devices have been improved, making it possible to obtain precise integrated intensities of reflections in high 2-theta ranges. Another reason is that one can use direct-space methods, which do not require “high-resolution diffraction data”, much more easily than before. Described here are some key points to remember when performig ab initio crystal structure analysis using powder diffraction data from organic compounds.

  1. Powder diffraction studies using anomalous dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D.E.; Wilkinson, A.P.

    1993-05-01

    With the increasing availability and accessibility of high resolution powder diffractometers at many synchrotron radiation sources throughout the world, there is rapidly-growing interest in the exploitation of anomalous dispersion techniques for structural studies of polycrystalline materials. In conjunction with the Rietveld profile method for structure refinement, such studies are especially useful for the determination of the site distributions of two or more atoms which are near neighbors in the periodic table, or atoms which are distributed among partially occupied sites. Additionally, it is possible to (1) determine the mean-square displacements associated with different kinds of atoms distributed over a single set of sites, (2) distinguish between different oxidation states and coordination geometries of a particular atom in a compound and (3) to determine f` for a wide range of atomic species as a function of energy in the vicinity of an absorption edge. Experimental methods for making anomalous dispersion measurements are described in some detail, including data collection strategies, data analysis and correlation problems, possible systematic errors, and the accuracy of the results. Recent work in the field is reviewed, including cation site-distribution studies (e.g. doped high {Tc} superconductors, ternary alloys, FeCo{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}, FeNi{sub 2}BO{sub 5}), oxidation-state contrast (e.g. YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x}, Eu{sub 3}O{sub 4}, GaCl{sub 2}, Fe{sub 2}PO{sub 5}), and the effect of coordination geometry (e.g. Y{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub l2}).

  2. Powder diffraction studies using anomalous dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D.E. ); Wilkinson, A.P. . Dept. of Materials)

    1993-01-01

    With the increasing availability and accessibility of high resolution powder diffractometers at many synchrotron radiation sources throughout the world, there is rapidly-growing interest in the exploitation of anomalous dispersion techniques for structural studies of polycrystalline materials. In conjunction with the Rietveld profile method for structure refinement, such studies are especially useful for the determination of the site distributions of two or more atoms which are near neighbors in the periodic table, or atoms which are distributed among partially occupied sites. Additionally, it is possible to (1) determine the mean-square displacements associated with different kinds of atoms distributed over a single set of sites, (2) distinguish between different oxidation states and coordination geometries of a particular atom in a compound and (3) to determine f' for a wide range of atomic species as a function of energy in the vicinity of an absorption edge. Experimental methods for making anomalous dispersion measurements are described in some detail, including data collection strategies, data analysis and correlation problems, possible systematic errors, and the accuracy of the results. Recent work in the field is reviewed, including cation site-distribution studies (e.g. doped high [Tc] superconductors, ternary alloys, FeCo[sub 2](PO[sub 4])[sub 3], FeNi[sub 2]BO[sub 5]), oxidation-state contrast (e.g. YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 6+x], Eu[sub 3]O[sub 4], GaCl[sub 2], Fe[sub 2]PO[sub 5]), and the effect of coordination geometry (e.g. Y[sub 3]Ga[sub 5]O[sub l2]).

  3. Powder Diffraction Simulated by a Polycrystalline Film of Spherical Colloids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dean J.; Xia, Younan

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a simple way to demonstrate powder diffraction in a classroom setting using a dry film of spherical colloids on a glass substrate. Use of transparent, elastomeric poly(dimethylsiloxane) as a supporting substrate for the spheres rather than glass enables demonstration of the reciprocal lattice effect. (Contains 4 figures and…

  4. Angle-resolved diffraction grating biosensor based on porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Changwu; Jia, Zhenhong; Liu, Yajun; Mo, Jiaqing; Li, Peng; Lv, Xiaoyi

    2016-03-01

    In this study, an optical biosensor based on a porous silicon composite structure was fabricated using a simple method. This structure consists of a thin, porous silicon surface diffraction grating and a one-dimensional porous silicon photonic crystal. An angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum was obtained by measuring the diffraction efficiency at a range of incident angles. The angle-resolved diffraction efficiency of the 2nd and 3rd orders was studied experimentally and theoretically. The device was sensitive to the change of refractive index in the presence of a biomolecule indicated by the shift of the diffraction efficiency spectrum. The sensitivity of this sensor was investigated through use of an 8 base pair antifreeze protein DNA hybridization. The shifts of the angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum showed a relationship with the change of the refractive index, and the detection limit of the biosensor reached 41.7 nM. This optical device is highly sensitive, inexpensive, and simple to fabricate. Using shifts in diffraction efficiency spectrum to detect biological molecules has not yet been explored, so this study establishes a foundation for future work.

  5. The MYTHEN detector for X-ray powder diffraction experiments at the Swiss Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Bergamaschi, Anna; Cervellino, Antonio; Dinapoli, Roberto; Gozzo, Fabia; Henrich, Beat; Johnson, Ian; Kraft, Philipp; Mozzanica, Aldo; Schmitt, Bernd; Shi, Xintian

    2010-01-01

    The MYTHEN single-photon-counting silicon microstrip detector has been developed at the Swiss Light Source for time-resolved powder diffraction experiments. An upgraded version of the detector has been installed at the SLS powder diffraction station allowing the acquisition of diffraction patterns over 120° in 2θ in fractions of seconds. Thanks to the outstanding performance of the detector and to the calibration procedures developed, the quality of the data obtained is now comparable with that of traditional high-resolution point detectors in terms of FWHM resolution and peak profile shape, with the additional advantage of fast and simultaneous acquisition of the full diffraction pattern. MYTHEN is therefore optimal for time-resolved or dose-critical measurements. The characteristics of the MYTHEN detector together with the calibration procedures implemented for the optimization of the data are described in detail. The refinements of two known standard powders are discussed together with a remarkable application of MYTHEN to organic compounds in relation to the problem of radiation damage. PMID:20724787

  6. Multiple powder diffraction data for an accurate charge density study using synchrotron radiation x-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Hidetaka; Nishibori, Eiji

    2016-04-01

    In recent years multiple synchrotron radiation (SR) powder x-ray diffraction profiles have been successfully applied to advanced structural studies such as an accurate charge density study and a structure determination from powder diffraction. The results have been presented with several examples. Abilities and future prospects have been discussed using state of the art powder diffraction data.

  7. Feasibility studies for high pressure neutron powder diffraction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Von Dreele, R.B. ); Parise, J. )

    1990-01-01

    We recently performed two neutron powder diffraction experiments on very small samples on the High Intensity Powder Diffractometer (HIPD). These were done to determine the feasibility of performing in situ high pressure/high temperature neutron diffraction experiments on HIPD at pressures which would exceed the previous limit of {approximately}50 kbar achievable in a neutron diffraction experiment. The first experiment consisted of examining the product from a high pressure preparation done at Stony Brook. The sample, which had been prepared at 65 kbar and 1000{degree}C, consisted of a small platinum capsule filled with CaGeO{sub 3} perovskite. The weights of the capsule included 225 mg of platinum and 49 mg of the germanate. A diffraction experiment taking {approximately}8.6 hrs at a LANSCE proton beam current of {approximately}53 {mu}A gave peaks of good intensity from both Pt and CaGeO{sub 3}; we could begin to see them after only 20 min of beam time. The second experiment was to test the possibility of diffraction from a high pressure apparatus. We placed in the HIPD sample position the central assembly from a 100 kbar octahedral press. Four tungsten carbide anvils and a copper block previously pressed to 65 kbar were held in an aluminum frame. The sample consisted of a small bit of nickel foil (175 mg) placed in a 3 mm hole in the copper block. The active sample volume is defined by the gap between the anvils and the length of the sample. A small portion of the copper block is also seen in this arrangement. This is viewed at 90{degree} 2{Theta} through a similar gap between the anvils by 4 1/2 in. {times} 12 in. {sup 3}He counter tubes. This arrangement simulates the operating conditions of a high pressure run at 100 kbar and takes advantage of the fixed instrument geometry possible in time-of-flight neutron diffraction experiments.

  8. A compact electron gun for time-resolved electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Matthew S.; Lane, Paul D.; Wann, Derek A.

    2015-01-01

    A novel compact time-resolved electron diffractometer has been built with the primary goal of studying the ultrafast molecular dynamics of photoexcited gas-phase molecules. Here, we discuss the design of the electron gun, which is triggered by a Ti:Sapphire laser, before detailing a series of calibration experiments relating to the electron-beam properties. As a further test of the apparatus, initial diffraction patterns have been collected for thin, polycrystalline platinum samples, which have been shown to match theoretical patterns. The data collected demonstrate the focusing effects of the magnetic lens on the electron beam, and how this relates to the spatial resolution of the diffraction pattern.

  9. A compact electron gun for time-resolved electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Matthew S.; Lane, Paul D.; Wann, Derek A.

    2015-01-15

    A novel compact time-resolved electron diffractometer has been built with the primary goal of studying the ultrafast molecular dynamics of photoexcited gas-phase molecules. Here, we discuss the design of the electron gun, which is triggered by a Ti:Sapphire laser, before detailing a series of calibration experiments relating to the electron-beam properties. As a further test of the apparatus, initial diffraction patterns have been collected for thin, polycrystalline platinum samples, which have been shown to match theoretical patterns. The data collected demonstrate the focusing effects of the magnetic lens on the electron beam, and how this relates to the spatial resolution of the diffraction pattern.

  10. Advanced Structural Analyses by Third Generation Synchrotron Radiation Powder Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sakata, M.; Aoyagi, S.; Ogura, T.; Nishibori, E.

    2007-01-19

    Since the advent of the 3rd generation Synchrotron Radiation (SR) sources, such as SPring-8, the capabilities of SR powder diffraction increased greatly not only in an accurate structure refinement but also ab initio structure determination. In this study, advanced structural analyses by 3rd generation SR powder diffraction based on the Large Debye-Scherrer camera installed at BL02B2, SPring-8 is described. Because of high angular resolution and high counting statistics powder data collected at BL02B2, SPring-8, ab initio structure determination can cope with a molecular crystals with 65 atoms including H atoms. For the structure refinements, it is found that a kind of Maximum Entropy Method in which several atoms are omitted in phase calculation become very important to refine structural details of fairy large molecule in a crystal. It should be emphasized that until the unknown structure is refined very precisely, the obtained structure by Genetic Algorithm (GA) or some other ab initio structure determination method using real space structural knowledge, it is not possible to tell whether the structure obtained by the method is correct or not. In order to determine and/or refine crystal structure of rather complicated molecules, we cannot overemphasize the importance of the 3rd generation SR sources.

  11. The High Resolution Powder Diffraction Beam Line at ESRF

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, A. N.

    2004-01-01

    The optical design and performance of the high-resolution powder diffraction beam line BM16 at ESRF are discussed and illustrated. Some recent studies carried out on BM16 are described, including crystal structure solution and refinement, anomalous scattering, in situ measurements, residual strain in engineering components, investigation of microstructure, and grazing-incidence diffraction from surface layers. The beam line is built on a bending magnet, and operates in the energy range from 5 keV to 40 keV. After the move to an undulator source in 2002, it will benefit from an extented energy range up to 60 keV and increased flux and resolution. It is anticipated that enhancements to the data quality will be achieved, leading to the solution of larger crystal structures, and improvements in the accuracy of refined structures. The systematic exploitation of anisotropic thermal expansion will help reduce the effects of peak overlap in the analysis of powder diffraction data. PMID:27366602

  12. Structural studies of magnesium nitride fluorides by powder neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Brogan, Michael A.; Hughes, Robert W.; Smith, Ronald I.; Gregory, Duncan H.

    2012-01-15

    Samples of ternary nitride fluorides, Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and Mg{sub 2}NF have been prepared by solid state reaction of Mg{sub 3}N{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2} at 1323-1423 K and investigated by powder X-ray and powder neutron diffraction techniques. Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} is cubic (space group: Pm3m) and has a structure related to rock-salt MgO, but with one cation site vacant. Mg{sub 2}NF is tetragonal (space group: I4{sub 1}/amd) and has an anti-LiFeO{sub 2} related structure. Both compounds are essentially ionic and form structures in which nitride and fluoride anions are crystallographically ordered. The nitride fluorides show temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour between 5 and 300 K. - Graphical abstract: Definitive structures of the ternary magnesium nitride fluorides Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and the lower temperature polymorph of Mg{sub 2}NF have been determined from powder neutron diffraction data. The nitride halides are essentially ionic and exhibit weak temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Definitive structures of Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and Mg{sub 2}NF were determined by neutron diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitride and fluoride anions are crystallographically ordered in both structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both compounds exhibit weak, temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The compounds are essentially ionic with ionicity increasing with F{sup -} content.

  13. Transient electron density maps of ionic materials from femtosecond x-ray powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsaesser, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    X-ray diffraction represents a key method for spatially resolving electron distributions in crystalline materials. So far, electron density maps have been derived from stationary diffraction patterns, providing detailed insight into the equilibrium charge distribution and crystal geometry. Functional processes in condensed matter are frequently connected with nonequilibrium excitations resulting in atomic motions and charge relocations on ultrashort time scales. Transient structures are resolved in space and time by novel x-ray diffraction methods with a femtosecond time resolution, giving access to the driving mechanisms and underlying interactions. In this talk, new results are presented on transient electron distributions of ionic materials mapped with the help of femtosecond x-ray powder diffraction. Experiments are based on a pump-probe approach in which an optical pulse initiates structural dynamics and a hard x-ray pulse from a synchronized laser-driven plasma source is diffracted from the excited powder sample. Such measurements reveal the interplay of lattice and charge motions in the photoexcited prototype material KDP (KH2PO4) which occur on distinctly different length scales. As a second topic, electron relocations induced by strong external optical fields will be discussed. This interaction mechanism allows for generating coherent superpositions of valence and conduction band quantum states and inducing fully reversible charge dynamics. While the materials LiBH4 and NaBH4 display electron relocations from the (BH4)- ions to the neighboring Li+ and Na+ ions, LiH exhibits an electron transfer from Li to H. The latter is a manifestation of electron correlations and in agreement with theoretical calculations.

  14. Spatially resolved scatter measurement of diffractive micromirror arrays.

    PubMed

    Sicker, Cornelius; Heber, Jörg; Berndt, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    Spatial light modulators (SLMs) support flexible system concepts in modern optics and especially phase-only SLMs such as micromirror arrays (MMAs) appear attractive for many applications. In order to achieve a precise phase modulation, which is crucial for optical performance, careful characterization and calibration of SLM devices is required. We examine an intensity-based measurement concept, which promises distinct advantages by means of a spatially resolved scatter measurement that is combined with the MMA's diffractive principle. Measurements yield quantitative results, which are consistent with measurements of micromirror roughness components, by white-light interferometry. They reveal relative scatter as low as 10-4, which corresponds to contrast ratios up to 10,000. The potential of the technique to resolve phase changes in the subnanometer range is experimentally demonstrated. PMID:27411205

  15. A compact electron gun for time-resolved electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Matthew S; Lane, Paul D; Wann, Derek A

    2015-01-01

    A novel compact time-resolved electron diffractometer has been built with the primary goal of studying the ultrafast molecular dynamics of photoexcited gas-phase molecules. Here, we discuss the design of the electron gun, which is triggered by a Ti:Sapphire laser, before detailing a series of calibration experiments relating to the electron-beam properties. As a further test of the apparatus, initial diffraction patterns have been collected for thin, polycrystalline platinum samples, which have been shown to match theoretical patterns. The data collected demonstrate the focusing effects of the magnetic lens on the electron beam, and how this relates to the spatial resolution of the diffraction pattern. PMID:25638074

  16. Femtosecond time-resolved MeV electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Pengfei; Zhu, Y.; Hidaka, Y.; Wu, L.; Cao, J.; Berger, H.; Geck, J.; Kraus, R.; Pjerov, S.; Shen, Y.; Tobey, R. I.; Hill, J. P.; Wang, X. J.

    2015-06-02

    We report the experimental demonstration of femtosecond electron diffraction using high-brightness MeV electron beams. High-quality, single-shot electron diffraction patterns for both polycrystalline aluminum and single-crystal 1T-TaS2 are obtained utilizing a 5 fC (~3 × 104 electrons) pulse of electrons at 2.8 MeV. The high quality of the electron diffraction patterns confirms that electron beam has a normalized emittance of ~50 nm rad. The transverse and longitudinal coherence length is ~11 and ~2.5 nm, respectively. The timing jitter between the pump laser and probe electron beam was found to be ~100 fs (rms). The temporal resolution is demonstrated by observing the evolution of Bragg and superlattice peaks of 1T-TaS2 following an 800 nm optical pump and was found to be 130 fs. Lastly, our results demonstrate the advantages of MeV electrons, including large elastic differential scattering cross-section and access to high-order reflections, and the feasibility of ultimately realizing below 10 fs time-resolved electron diffraction.

  17. Femtosecond time-resolved MeV electron diffraction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, Pengfei; Zhu, Y.; Hidaka, Y.; Wu, L.; Cao, J.; Berger, H.; Geck, J.; Kraus, R.; Pjerov, S.; Shen, Y.; et al

    2015-06-02

    We report the experimental demonstration of femtosecond electron diffraction using high-brightness MeV electron beams. High-quality, single-shot electron diffraction patterns for both polycrystalline aluminum and single-crystal 1T-TaS2 are obtained utilizing a 5 fC (~3 × 104 electrons) pulse of electrons at 2.8 MeV. The high quality of the electron diffraction patterns confirms that electron beam has a normalized emittance of ~50 nm rad. The transverse and longitudinal coherence length is ~11 and ~2.5 nm, respectively. The timing jitter between the pump laser and probe electron beam was found to be ~100 fs (rms). The temporal resolution is demonstrated by observing themore » evolution of Bragg and superlattice peaks of 1T-TaS2 following an 800 nm optical pump and was found to be 130 fs. Lastly, our results demonstrate the advantages of MeV electrons, including large elastic differential scattering cross-section and access to high-order reflections, and the feasibility of ultimately realizing below 10 fs time-resolved electron diffraction.« less

  18. New high temperature furnace for structure refinement by powder diffraction in controlled atmospheres using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Margulies, L.; Kramer, M.J.; McCallum, R.W.; Kycia, S.; Haeffner, D.R.; Lang, J.C.; Goldman, A.I.

    1999-09-01

    A low thermal gradient furnace design is described which utilizes Debye{endash}Scherrer geometry for performing high temperature x-ray powder diffraction with synchrotron radiation at medium and high energies (35{endash}100 keV). The furnace has a maximum operating temperature of 1800 K with a variety of atmospheres including oxidizing, inert, and reducing. The capability for sample rotation, to ensure powder averaging, has been built into the design without compromising thermal stability or atmosphere control. The ability to perform high-resolution Rietveld refinement on data obtained at high temperatures has been demonstrated, and data collected on standard Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder is presented. Time-resolved data on the orthorhombic to rhombohedral solid state phase transformation of SrCO{sub 3} is demonstrated using image plates. Rietveld refinable spectra, collected in as little as 8 s, opens the possibility of performing time-resolved structural refinements of phase transformations. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Powder X-ray diffraction laboratory, Reston, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piatak, Nadine M.; Dulong, Frank T.; Jackson, John C.; Folger, Helen W.

    2014-01-01

    The powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) laboratory is managed jointly by the Eastern Mineral and Environmental Resources and Eastern Energy Resources Science Centers. Laboratory scientists collaborate on a wide variety of research problems involving other U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) science centers and government agencies, universities, and industry. Capabilities include identification and quantification of crystalline and amorphous phases, and crystallographic and atomic structure analysis for a wide variety of sample media. Customized laboratory procedures and analyses commonly are used to characterize non-routine samples including, but not limited to, organic and inorganic components in petroleum source rocks, ore and mine waste, clay minerals, and glassy phases. Procedures can be adapted to meet a variety of research objectives.

  20. Powder neutron diffraction studies of a carbonate fluorapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Leventouri, Th.; Chakoumakos, B. C.; Moghaddam, H. Y.; Perdikatsis, V.

    2000-02-01

    Atomic positional disorder of a single-phase natural carbonate fluorapatite (francolite) is revealed from analysis of the atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) refined from neutron powder diffraction data as a function of temperature and carbonate content. The ADPs of the francolite show a strong disturbance at the P, O3, and F sites. When it is heat treated to partially or completely remove the carbonate, the ADPs as well as the other structural parameters resemble those of a fluorapatite (Harding pegmatite) that was measured under the same conditions. The various structural changes are consistent with a substitution mechanism whereby the planar carbonate group replaces a phosphate group and lies on the mirror plane of the apatite structure. (c) 2000 Materials Research Society.

  1. Powder Neutron Diffraction Study of HoCoGa5

    SciTech Connect

    Kabayashi, Riki; Kaneko, Koji; Wakimoto, Shuichi; Chi, Songxue; Sanada, Naoyuki; Watanuki, Ryuta; Suzuki, Kazuya

    2013-01-01

    We have studied successive magnetic transitions of HoCoGa5 at TN1 = 9.6 K and TN2 = 7.5 K by using powder neutron diffraction. Apparent superlattice peaks were observed at temperatures below TN1. With further decreases temperature, the patterns exhibit a substantial change at temperatures below TN2. The observed magnetic peaks at 8 K (AntiFerromagnetic InCommensurate (AFIC) phase : TN2 < T < TN1) can be represented by the propagation vector qL = (1/2 0 ) with = 0.35(2). In contrast, the magnetic structure becomes commensurate with qC = (1/2 0 1/2) at 4 K (AntiFerromagnetic Commensurate (AFC) phase : T < TN2). The temperature dependence of magnetic intensity shows an apparent temperature hysteresis at TN2, indicates a first-order transition at TN2. Analysis of the integrated intensity at 4 K reveals that the Ho moment with a size of 8.6(2) B, oriented parallel to the c-axis in the AFC phase. While the successive transitions of HoCoGa5 are different from those of TbCoGa5, the magnetic structure in the AFC phase of HoCoGa5 is the same as the AFTb I of TbCoGa5, and may indicate an additional transition at a lower temperature in HoCoGa5.

  2. Ezetimibe anhydrate, determined from laboratory powder diffraction data.

    PubMed

    Brüning, Jürgen; Alig, Edith; Schmidt, Martin U

    2010-07-01

    Ezetimibe {systematic name: (3R,4S)-1-(4-fluorophenyl)-3-[(3S)-3-(4-fluorophenyl)-3-hydroxypropyl]-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)azetidin-2-one}, C(24)H(21)F(2)NO(3), is used to lower cholesterol levels by inhibiting cholesterol resorption in the human intestine. The crystal structure of ezetimibe anhydrate was solved from laboratory powder diffraction data by means of real-space methods using the program DASH [David et al. (2006). J. Appl. Cryst. 39, 910-915]. Subsequent Rietveld refinement with TOPAS Academic [Coelho (2007). TOPAS Academic User Manual. Version 4.1. Coelho Software, Brisbane, Australia] led to a final R(wp) value of 8.19% at 1.75 A resolution. The compound crystallizes in the space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The molecules are closely packed and two intermolecular hydrogen bonds form an extended hydrogen-bond architecture. PMID:20603561

  3. Synchrotron Powder X-ray Diffraction Study of the Structure and Dehydration Behavior of Sepiolite

    SciTech Connect

    Post,J.; Bish, D.; Heaney, P.

    2007-01-01

    Rietveld refinements using synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data were used to study the crystal structure and dehydration behavior of sepiolite from Durango, Mexico. The room-temperature (RT) sepiolite structure in air compares well with previous models but reveals an additional zeolitic H{sub 2}O site. The RT structure under vacuum retained only {approx}1/8 of the zeolitic H{sub 2}O and the volume decreased by 1.3%. Real-time, temperature-resolved synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data and Rietveld refinements were used to investigate the behavior of the sepiolite structure from 300 to 925 K. Rietveld refinements revealed that most of the zeolitic H{sub 2}O is lost by {approx}390 K, accompanied by a decrease in the a and c unit-cell parameters. Above {approx}600 K the sepiolite structure folds as one-half of the crystallographically bound H{sub 2}O is lost. Rietveld refinements of the 'anhydrous' sepiolite structure reveal that, in general, unit-cell parameters a and b and volume steadily decrease with increasing temperature; there is an obvious change in slope at {approx}820 K suggesting a phase transformation coinciding with the loss of the remaining bound H{sub 2}O molecule.

  4. High throughput screening of ligand binding to macromolecules using high resolution powder diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Von Dreele, Robert B.; D'Amico, Kevin

    2006-10-31

    A process is provided for the high throughput screening of binding of ligands to macromolecules using high resolution powder diffraction data including producing a first sample slurry of a selected polycrystalline macromolecule material and a solvent, producing a second sample slurry of a selected polycrystalline macromolecule material, one or more ligands and the solvent, obtaining a high resolution powder diffraction pattern on each of said first sample slurry and the second sample slurry, and, comparing the high resolution powder diffraction pattern of the first sample slurry and the high resolution powder diffraction pattern of the second sample slurry whereby a difference in the high resolution powder diffraction patterns of the first sample slurry and the second sample slurry provides a positive indication for the formation of a complex between the selected polycrystalline macromolecule material and at least one of the one or more ligands.

  5. X-Ray Diffraction Powder Patterns and Thin Section Observations from the Sierra Madera Impact Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huson, S. A.; Foit, F. F.; Watkinson, A. J.; Pope, M. C.

    2006-03-01

    X-Ray powder diffraction analysis and thin section observations of carbonate and siliciclastic samples from the Sierra Madera impact structure indicate moderate shock pressures (8 to 30 GPa) were generated during the formation of this crater.

  6. The Extreme Conditions Beamline at PETRA III, DESY: Possibilities to conduct time resolved monochromatic diffraction experiments in dynamic and laser heated DAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liermann, H.-P.; Morgenroth, W.; Ehnes, A.; Berghäuser, A.; Winkler, B.; Franz, H.; Weckert, E.

    2010-03-01

    We present plans for the new Extreme Conditions Beamline at PETRA III, DESY, Germany. The beamline is being designed and built with the specific goal to explore time resolved high-pressure and -temperature x-ray diffraction experiments in the dynamic and laser heated diamond anvil cell. Within we discuss the conceptual design of the optical components and experimental setup to conduct monochromatic high-pressure powder diffraction experiments in the sub-second time regime.

  7. Powder diffraction in materials science using the KENS cold-neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiyama, T.; Oikawa, K.; Akiba, E.

    1997-12-01

    Since superconductivity fever spread around the world, neutron powder diffraction has become very popular and been widely used by crystallographers, physicists, chemists, mineralogists, and materials scientists. The purpose of present paper is to show, firstly, important characteristics of time-of-flight TOF powder diffraction using cold-neutron source in the study of materials science, and, secondly, recent studies on the structure and function of batteries at the Neutron Science Laboratory (KENS) in the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK).

  8. Monitoring model drug microencapsulation in PLGA scaffolds using X-ray powder diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Aina, Adeyinka; Gupta, Manish; Boukari, Yamina; Morris, Andrew; Billa, Nashiru; Doughty, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The microencapsulation of three model drugs; metronidazole, paracetamol and sulphapyridine into Poly (dl-Lactide-Co-Glycolide) (PLGA) scaffolds were probed using X-ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD). Changes in the diffraction patterns of the PLGA scaffolds after encapsulation was suggestive of a chemical interaction between the pure drugs and the scaffolds and not a physical intermixture. PMID:27013917

  9. Time-Resolved Electron Diffraction from Selectively Aligned Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Reckenthaeler, Peter; Krausz, Ferenc; Centurion, Martin; Fuss, Werner; Trushin, Sergei A.; Fill, Ernst E.

    2009-05-29

    We experimentally demonstrate ultrafast electron diffraction from transiently aligned molecules in the absence of external (aligning) fields. A sample of aligned molecules is generated through photodissociation with femtosecond laser pulses, and the diffraction pattern is captured by probing the sample with picosecond electron pulses shortly after dissociation - before molecular rotation causes the alignment to vanish. In our experiments the alignment decays with a time constant of 2.6{+-}1.2 ps.

  10. Approaches to time-resolved diffraction using an XFEL.

    PubMed

    Spence, John C H

    2014-01-01

    We describe several schemes for time-resolved imaging of molecular motion using a free-electron laser (XFEL), in response to the many challenges and opportunities which XFEL radiation has created for accurate time-resolved measurement of structure. For pump-probe experiments using crystals, the problem of recording full Bragg reflections (not partials) in each shot arises. Two solutions, the use of the large bandwith which necesarily results from using attosecond pulses, and the use the coherent convergent beam mode are suggested. We also show that with attosecond recording times shorter than the temporal coherence time, Bragg reflections excited by different wavelengths from different reflections can interfere, providing structure factor phase information. For slower processes, a mixing jet sample-delivery device is described to allow snapshot solution scattering during molecular reactions on the microsecond scale. For optically excited membrane proteins, we suggest the use of the lipid cubic phase sample delivery device operating at atmospheric pressure. The use of two-color and split-and-delay schemes is suggested for improved accuracy in the Monte-Carlo method of serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX). PMID:25415269

  11. A method for automated determination of the crystal structures from X-ray powder diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, D. W. M. Kuleshova, L. N.

    2006-05-15

    An algorithm is proposed for determining the crystal structure of compounds. In the framework of this algorithm, X-ray powder diffraction patterns are compared using a new similarity index. Unlike the indices traditionally employed in X-ray powder diffraction analysis, the new similarity index can be applied even in the case of overlapping peaks and large differences in unit cell parameters. The capabilities of the proposed procedure are demonstrated by solving the crystal structures of a number of organic pigments (PY111, PR181, Me-PR170)

  12. Beamline I11 at Diamond: A new instrument for high resolution powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. P.; Parker, J. E.; Potter, J.; Hill, T. P.; Birt, A.; Cobb, T. M.; Yuan, F.; Tang, C. C.

    2009-07-01

    The performance characteristics of a new synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction beamline (I11) at the Diamond Light Source are presented. Using an in-vacuum undulator for photon production and deploying simple x-ray optics centered around a double-crystal monochromator and a pair of harmonic rejection mirrors, a high brightness and low bandpass x-ray beam is delivered at the sample. To provide fast data collection, 45 Si(111) analyzing crystals and detectors are installed onto a large and high precision diffractometer. High resolution powder diffraction data from standard reference materials of Si, α-quartz, and LaB6 are used to characterize instrumental performance.

  13. Acquisition of powder diffraction data with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D.E.; Toby, B.H.; Eddy, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    During the past year, a dedicated triple-axis powder diffractometer has been in routine operation at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source as a user-oriented facility. The diffractometer is designed to allow easy interchange between energy-dispersive and monochromatic beam experiments. In the latter mode of operation, high resolution data have been collected for a variety of samples with the use of the crystal-analyzer technique, and in several cases these data sets have been used successfully for structure solution and Rietveld refinement. Several aspects of data acquisition at a synchrotron beam-line are described, and some of the different types of scattering geometry which have been used are discussed. Simple expressions are given for the instrumental resolution function expressed as the angular variation of peak widths for each of these. The peak shapes observed for a reference sample of Si on the present triple-axis instrument are well-described by the convolution of Gaussian and Lorentzian functions, and the angular dependence of the Gaussian component is in excellent agreement with the corresponding calculated instrumental function. One of the most important considerations for each type of experiment is the necessary compromise between intensity and resolution over a wide range of scattering angles, and some of the available options will be discussed. In particular, the use of Ge(440) and LiF(400) analyzer crystals gives a focussing minimum at relatively high angles (2 THETA approx. = 50/sup 0/ at 1.54A), a highly desirable feature for Rietveld analysis of complex structures. Absolute intensities from reference samples of Si and CeO/sub 2/ are calculated for these and several other scattering configurations involving both flat-plate and capillary geometry to illustrate this compromise. 26 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. X-RAY POWDER DIFFRACTION SYSTEM FOR CHEMICAL SPECIATION OF PARTICULATE AEROSOL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An x-ray powder diffraction system has been developed for the automated measurement and analysis of particulate aerosol samples. The system is optimized to process samples with particle loadings of about 100 micrograms/sq cm which are acquired with dichotomous air samplers. A pos...

  15. Incident spectrum determination for time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, J. P.

    1998-08-27

    Accurate characterization of the incident neutron spectrum is an important requirement for precise Rietveld analysis of time-of-flight powder neutron diffraction data. Without an accurate incident spectrum the calculated model for the measured relative intensities of individual Bragg reflections will possess systematic errors. We describe a method for obtaining an accurate numerical incident spectrum using data from a transmitted beam monitor.

  16. Proceedings of the 1986 workshop on advanced time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, A.C.; Smith, K.

    1986-09-01

    This report contains abstracts of talks and summaries of discussions from a small workshop held to discuss the future of time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction and its implementation at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center. 47 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Three-dimensional electron diffraction as a complementary technique to powder X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution of powders

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Yifeng; Zou, Xiaodong; Hovmöller, Sven; Wan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Phase identification and structure determination are important and widely used techniques in chemistry, physics and materials science. Recently, two methods for automated three-dimensional electron diffraction (ED) data collection, namely automated diffraction tomography (ADT) and rotation electron diffraction (RED), have been developed. Compared with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and two-dimensional zonal ED, three-dimensional ED methods have many advantages in identifying phases and determining unknown structures. Almost complete three-dimensional ED data can be collected using the ADT and RED methods. Since each ED pattern is usually measured off the zone axes by three-dimensional ED methods, dynamic effects are much reduced compared with zonal ED patterns. Data collection is easy and fast, and can start at any arbitrary orientation of the crystal, which facilitates automation. Three-dimensional ED is a powerful technique for structure identification and structure solution from individual nano- or micron-sized particles, while powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) provides information from all phases present in a sample. ED suffers from dynamic scattering, while PXRD data are kinematic. Three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD are complementary and their combinations are promising for studying multiphase samples and complicated crystal structures. Here, two three-dimensional ED methods, ADT and RED, are described. Examples are given of combinations of three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD for phase identification and structure determination over a large number of different materials, from Ni–Se–O–Cl crystals, zeolites, germanates, metal–organic frameworks and organic compounds to intermetallics with modulated structures. It is shown that three-dimensional ED is now as feasible as X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution, but still needs further development in order to be as accurate as X-ray diffraction. It is expected that three-dimensional ED

  18. High-temperature structural phase transitions in neighborite: a high-resolution neutron powder diffraction investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Kevin S.; Price, G. David; Stuart, John A.; Wood, Ian G.

    2015-01-01

    The nature of the apparently continuous structural phase transition at 1,049 K in the perovskite-structured, MgSiO3 isomorph, neighborite (NaMgF3), from the orthorhombic ( Pbnm) hettotype phase to the cubic () aristotype structure, has been re-investigated using high-resolution, time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction. Using data collected at 1 K intervals close to the nominal phase transition temperature, the temperature dependence of the intensities of superlattice reflections at the M point and the R point of the pseudocubic Brillouin zone indicate the existence of a new intermediate tetragonal phase in space group P4/ mbm, with a narrow phase field extending from ~1,046.5 to ~1,048.5 K, at ambient pressure. Group theoretical analysis shows that the structural transitions identified in this study, Pbnm- P4/ mbm, and P4/ mbm-, are permitted to be second order. The observation of the tetragonal phase resolves the longstanding issue of why the high-temperature phase transition, previously identified as Pbnm-, and which would be expected to be first order under Landau theory, is in fact found to be continuous. Analysis of the pseudocubic shear strain shows it to vary with a critical exponent of 0.5 implying that the phase transition from Pbnm to P4/ mbm is tricritical in character. The large librational modes that exist in the MgF6 octahedron at high temperature, and the use of Gaussian probability density functions to describe atomic displacements, result in apparent bond shortening in the Mg-F distances, making mode amplitude determination an unreliable method for determination of the critical exponent from internal coordinates. Crystal structures are reported for the three phases of NaMgF3 at 1,033 K ( Pbnm), 1,047 K ( P4/ mbm) and 1,049 K ().

  19. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction study of photostimulated purple membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, R D; Forsyth, J M

    1985-01-01

    A nanosecond resolution laser-driven x-ray source has been used to perform a time-resolved, x-ray diffraction study of the purple membrane of the Halobacterium halobium. Alterations in diffraction patterns have been observed 1 ms after photostimulation, and are interpreted to show disorder of bacteriorhodopsin packing in the plane of the membrane with little bacteriorhodopsin structural change. PMID:3978209

  20. Unmixing 40Ar/39Ar Muscovite Ages Using Powder X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAleer, R. J.; Kunk, M. J.; Valley, P. M.; Walsh, G. J.; Bish, D. L.; Wintsch, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    Whole rock powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments from eight samples collected across a retrograde ductile shear zone in the Devonian Littleton Formation near Claremont, NH, exhibit broad and asymmetric to bimodal muscovite 00l reflections. These composite 00l reflections exhibit a systematic change in shape with increasing retrograde strain. Microtextural relationships, electron microprobe quantitative analyses, and element mapping indicate that the change in peak shape reflects progressive dissolution of metastable Na-rich muscovite and the precipitation of stable Na-poor muscovite. 40Ar/39Ar step heating experiments on muscovite concentrates from these samples show a decrease in total gas age from 274 to 258 Ma as the highest strain zone is approached, and steps within individual spectra range in age by ~20 m.y. The correlation between age and 00l peak shape suggests that the argon isotopic system also tracks the dissolution-precipitation process. Furthermore, the variation in age during step heating indicates that these populations exhibit different in-vacuo degassing behavior. Comparison of whole rock and muscovite concentrate XRD patterns from the same samples shows that the mineral separation process can fractionate these muscovite populations. With this knowledge, four muscovite concentrates were prepared from a single hand sample, analyzed by XRD, and dated. Combining modal estimates from XRD experiments with total gas ages, the four splits narrowly define a mixing line that resolves end-member ages of 250 and 300 Ma for the neocrystallized and earlier high grade populations of muscovite, respectively. These ages are consistent with age data from all other samples. The results show that, in some settings, powder XRD provides a powerful and time effective method to both identify the existence of and establish the proportions of multiple compositional populations of muscovite prior to 40Ar/39Ar analysis. This approach will be especially useful in

  1. MnO spin-wave dispersion curves from neutron powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, Andrew L.; Dove, Martin T.; Tucker, Matthew G.; Keen, David A.

    2007-02-15

    We describe a model-independent approach for the extraction of spin-wave dispersion curves from powder neutron total scattering data. Our approach is based on a statistical analysis of real-space spin configurations to calculate spin-dynamical quantities. The RMCPROFILE implementation of the reverse Monte Carlo refinement process is used to generate a large ensemble of supercell spin configurations from MnO powder diffraction data collected at 100 K. Our analysis of these configurations gives spin-wave dispersion curves for MnO that agree well with those determined independently using neutron triple-axis spectroscopic techniques.

  2. Hydrothermal Transformation of Microporous Lithium Zinc Phosphates; A Kinetic Study using in situ Synchrotron Radiation Powder Diffraction.

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, T.R.; Norby, P.; Hanson, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    The solution mediated phase transformation of a lithium zinc phosphate has been investigated. The zeolite type ABW phase, LiZnPO{sub 4}. H{sub 2}O, suspended in an aqueous solution of LiNO{sub 3}, transforms to the more dense phase, (delta tau) LiZnPO{sub 4} (crystobalite type structure). In situ time resolved powder diffraction using synchrotron radiation, has been utilized to obtain isothermal crystallization curves in the temperature range 179 {degrees} C to 210 {degrees} C. A power law was used for the kinetic analysis, giving an apparent activation energy for the reaction, Ea = 93.1 kJ/mole. The order of the power law varies from 2. 80 to 4.41 in the observed temperature range. This indicates a continuous change in the mechanism of the nucleation.

  3. Effect of microfibril twisting on theoretical powder diffraction patterns of cellulose Iβ

    PubMed

    Hadden, Jodi A; French, Alfred D; Woods, Robert J

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies of calculated diffraction patterns for cellulose crystallites suggest that distortions that arise once models have been subjected to MD simulation are the result of both microfibril twisting and changes in unit cell dimensions induced by the empirical force field; to date, it has not been possible to separate the individual contributions of these effects. To provide a better understanding of how twisting manifests in diffraction data, the present study demonstrates a method for generating twisted and linear cellulose structures that can be compared without the bias of dimensional changes, allowing assessment of the impact of twisting alone. Analysis of unit cell dimensions, microfibril volume, hydrogen bond patterns, glycosidic torsion angles, and hydroxymethyl group orientations confirmed that the twisted and linear structures collected with this method were internally consistent, and theoretical powder diffraction patterns for the two were shown to be effectively indistinguishable. These results indicate that differences between calculated patterns for the crystal coordinates and twisted structures from MD simulation can result entirely from changes in unit cell dimensions, and not from microfibril twisting alone. Although powder diffraction patterns for models in the 81-chain size regime were shown to be unaffected by twisting, suggesting that a modest degree of twist is not inconsistent with experimental data, it may be that other diffraction techniques are capable of detecting this structural difference. Until such time as definitive experimental evidence comes to light, the results of this study suggest that both twisted and linear microfibrils may represent an appropriate model for cellulose Iβ. PMID:24729665

  4. Effect of microfibril twisting on theoretical powder diffraction patterns of cellulose Iβ

    PubMed Central

    Hadden, Jodi A.; French, Alfred D.; Woods, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of calculated diffraction patterns for cellulose crystallites suggest that distortions that arise once models have been subjected to MD simulation are the result of both microfibril twisting and changes in unit cell dimensions induced by the empirical force field; to date, it has not been possible to separate the individual contributions of these effects. To provide a better understanding of how twisting manifests in diffraction data, the present study demonstrates a method for generating twisted and linear cellulose structures that can be compared without the bias of dimensional changes, allowing assessment of the impact of twisting alone. Analysis of unit cell dimensions, microfibril volume, hydrogen bond patterns, glycosidic torsion angles, and hydroxymethyl group orientations confirmed that the twisted and linear structures collected with this method were internally consistent, and theoretical powder diffraction patterns for the two were shown to be effectively indistinguishable. These results indicate that differences between calculated patterns for the crystal coordinates and twisted structures from MD simulation can result entirely from changes in unit cell dimensions, and not from microfibril twisting alone. Although powder diffraction patterns for models in the 81-chain size regime were shown to be unaffected by twisting, suggesting that a modest degree of twist is not inconsistent with experimental data, it may be that other diffraction techniques are capable of detecting this structural difference. Until such time as definitive experimental evidence comes to light, the results of this study suggest that both twisted and linear microfibrils may represent an appropriate model for cellulose Iβ. PMID:24729665

  5. Pulsed neutron powder diffraction at high pressure by a capacity-increased sapphire anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuchi, Takuo; Yoshida, Masashi; Ohno, Yoshiki; Tomioka, Naotaka; Purevjav, Narangoo; Osakabe, Toyotaka; Harjo, Stefanus; Abe, Jun; Aizawa, Kazuya; Sasaki, Shigeo

    2013-12-01

    A new design of opposed anvil cell for time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction was prepared for use at advanced pulsed sources. A couple of single-crystal sapphire sphere anvils and a gasket of fully hardened Ti-Zr null alloy were combined to compress 35 mm3 of sample volume to 1 GPa and 11 mm3 to 2 GPa of pressures, respectively. A very high-quality powder diffraction pattern was obtained at Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex for a controversial high pressure phase of methane hydrate. The counting statistics, resolution, absolute accuracy and d-value range of the pattern were all improved to be best suitable for precise structure refinement. The sample is optically accessible to be measured by Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy during and after compression. The current cell will be an alternative choice to study hydrogenous materials of complex structures that are stable at the described pressure regime.

  6. Development of MnBi permanent magnet: Neutron diffraction of MnBi powder

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, J. Choi, J. P.; Li, G.; Polikarpov, E.; Darsell, J.; Kramer, M. J.; Zarkevich, N. A.; Wang, L. L.; Johnson, D. D.; Marinescu, M.; Huang, Q. Z.; Wu, H.; Vuong, N. V.; Liu, J. P.

    2014-05-07

    MnBi attracts great attention in recent years for its great potential as permanent magnet materials. MnBi phase is difficult to obtain because of the rather drastic peritectic reaction between Mn and Bi. In this paper, we report our effort on synthesizing high purity MnBi compound using conventional powder metallurgical approaches. Neutron diffraction was carried out to investigate the crystal and nuclear structure of the obtained powder. The result shows that the purity of the obtained powder is about 91 wt. % at 300 K, and the magnetic moment of the Mn atom in MnBi lattice is 4.424 and 4.013 μ{sub B} at 50 K and 300 K, respectively.

  7. Development of MnBi permanent magnet: Neutron diffraction of MnBi powder

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, J.; Choi, J. P.; Li, G.; Polikarpov, E.; Darsell, J.; Kramer, M. J.; Zarkevich, N. A.; Wang, L. L.; Johnson, D. D.; Marinescu, M.; Huang, Q. Z.; Wu, H.; Vuong, N. V.; Liu, J. P.

    2014-05-07

    MnBi attracts great attention in recent years for its great potential as permanent magnet materials. MnBi phase is difficult to obtain because of the rather drastic peritectic reaction between Mn and Bi. In this paper, we report our effort on synthesizing high purity MnBi compound using conventional powder metallurgical approaches. Neutron diffraction was carried out to investigate the crystal and nuclear structure of the obtained powder. The result shows that the purity of the obtained powder is about 91 wt. % at 300 K, and the magnetic moment of the Mn atom in MnBi lattice is 4.424 and 4.013 μB at 50 K and 300 K, respectively.

  8. Development of MnBi permanent magnet: Neutron diffraction of MnBi powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, J.; Choi, J. P.; Li, G.; Polikarpov, E.; Darsell, J.; Kramer, M. J.; Zarkevich, N. A.; Wang, L. L.; Johnson, D. D.; Marinescu, M.; Huang, Q. Z.; Wu, H.; Vuong, N. V.; Liu, J. P.

    2014-05-01

    MnBi attracts great attention in recent years for its great potential as permanent magnet materials. MnBi phase is difficult to obtain because of the rather drastic peritectic reaction between Mn and Bi. In this paper, we report our effort on synthesizing high purity MnBi compound using conventional powder metallurgical approaches. Neutron diffraction was carried out to investigate the crystal and nuclear structure of the obtained powder. The result shows that the purity of the obtained powder is about 91 wt. % at 300 K, and the magnetic moment of the Mn atom in MnBi lattice is 4.424 and 4.013 μB at 50 K and 300 K, respectively.

  9. Development of MnBi permanent magnet: Neutron diffraction of MnBi powder

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, J; Choi, JP; Li, G; Polikarpov, E; Darsell, J; Kramer, MJ; Zarkevich, NA; Wang, LL; Johnson, DD; Marinescu, M; Huang, QZ; Wu, H; Vuong, NV; Liu, JP

    2014-05-07

    MnBi attracts great attention in recent years for its great potential as permanent magnet materials. MnBi phase is difficult to obtain because of the rather drastic peritectic reaction between Mn and Bi. In this paper, we report our effort on synthesizing high purity MnBi compound using conventional powder metallurgical approaches. Neutron diffraction was carried out to investigate the crystal and nuclear structure of the obtained powder. The result shows that the purity of the obtained powder is about 91 wt. % at 300 K, and the magnetic moment of the Mn atom in MnBi lattice is 4.424 and 4.013 mu(B) at 50 K and 300 K, respectively. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  10. Implementation and use of Robust Refinement in Powder Diffraction in the Presence of Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, K.; Lapidus, S; Stephens, P

    2009-01-01

    A modification to the usual least-squares analysis is implemented for the robust refinement of structural parameters from powder diffraction data in the presence of unmodeled impurities. This is accomplished in the program TOPAS-Academic by an iterative reweighting of the data as the model is refined. The method is tested and characterized using mixtures of known materials, acetaminophen and ibuprofen. The technique is also used to refine two previously unknown structures.

  11. A portable powder-liquid high corrosion-resistant reaction cell for in situ X-ray diffraction and absorption studies of heterogeneous powder-liquid reactions and phase transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, P.; da Silva, I.; Heyman, C.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Castro, G. R.

    2013-03-01

    A portable powder-liquid high corrosion-resistant reaction cell has been designed to follow in situ reactions by X-ray powder diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques in transmission mode. The cell has been conceived to be mounted on the experimental stations for diffraction and absorption of the Spanish CRG SpLine-BM25 beamline at the ESRF. In the case of the diffraction technique, data can be collected with either a point detector or a two-dimensional CCD detector. Using the 2D-CCD camera, the cell can be used for time-resolved in situ studies of phase transitions and reactions. Powder reactants and/or products are kept at a fixed position in a vertical geometry in the X-ray pathway, which is minimized in order to reduce the X-ray absorption by the reaction bath. Sample is fixed by a porous membrane under forced liquid reflux circulation, assuring total powder-liquid contact, with an accurate temperature control in the range from 20 to 220°C.

  12. Certain features of the preparation of boron powders in x-ray diffraction investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Tsagareishvili, G.V.; Avlokhashvili, D.A.; Bairamashvili, I.A.; Dolidze, T.V.; Gabuniya, D.L.; Nakashidze, T.G.; Oganezov, K.A.; Tabutsidze, M.L.

    1985-05-01

    It is known that elemental boron is characterized by an increased reaction capacity toward oxygen. Boron powders oxidize especially intensely. Under real conditions, boron powders always contain a certain quantity of oxide phase (primarily in the form of B2O3), the quantity of which depends on their degree of dispersion, the method of production, and the storage conditions. In long exposure to air, as the result of its high hygroscopicity, boric anhydride reacts with particles of moisture, as the result of which orthoboric acid is formed. The mass absorption coefficient of x-rays by elemental boron is significantly lower than by its compounds (anhydride and acid). The presence on the surface of particles of boric anhydride and products of its hydration, the total quantity of which in the powder is large, cannot affect the result of x-ray diffraction investigations of the powders. In this work an investigation is made of the possibility of weakening this influence by preliminary treatment of the powders.

  13. An X-ray diffraction analysis of crystallised whey and whey-permeate powders.

    PubMed

    Nijdam, Justin; Ibach, Alexander; Eichhorn, Klaus; Kind, Matthias

    2007-11-26

    Amorphous whey, whey-permeate and lactose powders have been crystallised at various air temperatures and humidities, and these crystallised powders have been examined using X-ray diffraction. The most stable lactose crystal under normal storage conditions, alpha-lactose monohydrate, forms preferentially in whey and whey-permeate powders at 50 degrees C, provided sufficient moisture is available, whereas anhydrous beta-lactose and mixed anhydrous lactose crystals, which are unstable under normal storage conditions, form preferentially at 90 degrees C. Thus, faster crystallisation at higher temperatures is offset by the formation of lactose-crystal forms that are less stable under normal storage conditions. Very little alpha-lactose monohydrate crystallised in the pure lactose powders over the range of temperatures and humidities tested, because the crystallisation of alpha- and beta-lactose is considerably more rapid than the mutarotation of beta- to alpha-lactose in the amorphous phase and the hydration of alpha-lactose during crystallisation. Protein and salts hinder the crystallisation process, which provides more time for mutarotation and crystal hydration in the whey and whey-permeate powders. PMID:17719020

  14. Powder Diffraction Studies in the YONO 3-Y 2O 3 System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelloquin, D.; Louër, M.; Louër, D.

    1994-09-01

    The crystal structure of yttrium oxide nitrate and the microstructure of the oxide obtained from its thermal decomposition have been investigated by modern powder diffraction methods. Sequential high-temperature diffraction studies of the thermal decomposition of two precursors of yttrium oxide nitrate, i.e., neutral yttrium nitrate and yttrium hydroxide nitrate, are reported. The structure of YONO 3 has been determined ab initio from conventional powder diffractometry using monochromatic X-rays. The pattern was indexed by the successive dichotomy method yielding tetragonal unit cell dimensions: a = 3.8590(1) Å and c = 9.7161(6) Å. The space group is P4/ nmm and Z = 2. Most of the atoms were located by direct methods and the remaining ones from a Fourier map. Refinement of the complete diffraction profile parameters converged to final agreement factors Rp = 0.12, Rwp = 0.16 and RF = 0.039. The structure is closely related to the matlockite PbFCl-type structure. The microstructure of ex-oxide-nitrate yttrium oxide has been analysed by total pattern fitting techniques, from which strain-free coherently diffracting nanodomains with a rectangular parallelepipedic shape have been obtained.

  15. CRYSIZ: a program for computing crystallite size and strain from the broadening of powder diffraction lines

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, C.R.; Morosin, B.; Stewart, J.M.

    1996-09-01

    The program CRYSIZ is designed to take the powder diffraction line profiles for a well-crystallized sample, called a reference pattern, and for a sample of the same substance, called a broadened pattern, to produce measures of the mean crystallite size, the distribution of crystallite sizes, and the root mean square residual microstrain in the broadened sample. The data required are the two powder patterns and a series of directives to signal the calculations and plots to be done during the execution of the program. The program loads files containing the background corrected powder diffraction intensity data for both the reference and broadened patterns. Preliminary calculations find the centroids, full width at half maximums, integral breadths, spans over sum, and second moments. Two methods of deconvoluting the profile to calculate size and strain are allowed. Either the direct or the Stokes Fourier coefficient method of deconvolution may be chosen. In the direct method the profiles are extracted by numerical fitting. This method is slower but produces unfolded profiles free of ringing and the ``hook effect``. In this case the Fourier coefficients required for Warren-Averbach analysis are produced from the deconvoluted profile. In the Stokes method the diffraction pattern of each reference and broadened profile is Fourier transformed to produce a set of Fourier coefficients. The Fourier coefficients of the broadened profiles are divided by those of the reference pattern. The resulting coefficients are the Stokes coefficients. The Stokes coefficients are smoothed by a least- squares procedure in order to remove noise and quell ringing and hooking, then used as input to a reverse Fourier transform. This transform produces an ``unfolded powder line,`` which is a best estimate of the broadened profile with the reference profile and noise removed. The deconvolution of the reference profile gives a broadened profile due only to the crystallite size and strain.

  16. Time-resolved coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Jan-David; Reusch, Tobias; Osterhoff, Markus; Sprung, Michael; Schülein, Florian J. R.; Krenner, Hubert J.; Wixforth, Achim; Salditt, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved coherent X-ray diffraction experiments of standing surface acoustic waves, illuminated under grazing incidence by a nanofocused synchrotron beam, are reported. The data have been recorded in stroboscopic mode at controlled and varied phase between the acoustic frequency generator and the synchrotron bunch train. At each time delay (phase angle), the coherent far-field diffraction pattern in the small-angle regime is inverted by an iterative algorithm to yield the local instantaneous surface height profile along the optical axis. The results show that periodic nanoscale dynamics can be imaged at high temporal resolution in the range of 50 ps (pulse length). PMID:25294979

  17. Fast X-ray powder diffraction on I11 at Diamond.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Stephen P; Parker, Julia E; Marchal, Julien; Potter, Jonathan; Birt, Adrian; Yuan, Fajin; Fearn, Richard D; Lennie, Alistair R; Street, Steven R; Tang, Chiu C

    2011-07-01

    The commissioning and performance characterization of a position-sensitive detector designed for fast X-ray powder diffraction experiments on beamline I11 at Diamond Light Source are described. The detecting elements comprise 18 detector-readout modules of MYTHEN-II silicon strip technology tiled to provide 90° coverage in 2θ. The modules are located in a rigid housing custom designed at Diamond with control of the device fully integrated into the beamline data acquisition environment. The detector is mounted on the I11 three-circle powder diffractometer to provide an intrinsic resolution of Δ2θ approximately equal to 0.004°. The results of commissioning and performance measurements using reference samples (Si and AgI) are presented, along with new results from scientific experiments selected to demonstrate the suitability of this facility for powder diffraction experiments where conventional angle scanning is too slow to capture rapid structural changes. The real-time dehydrogenation of MgH(2), a potential hydrogen storage compound, is investigated along with ultrafast high-throughput measurements to determine the crystallite quality of different samples of the metastable carbonate phase vaterite (CaCO(3)) precipitated and stabilized in the presence of amino acid molecules in a biomimetic synthesis process. PMID:21685682

  18. Assessment of the Stoichiometry of Multicomponent Crystals Using Only X-ray Powder Diffraction Data.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Courtney K; Brunskill, Andrew P J

    2015-06-01

    Knowledge of the unit cell volume of a crystalline form and the expected space filling requirements of an API molecule can be used to determine if a crystalline material is likely to be multicomponent, such as a solvate, hydrate, salt, or a co-crystal. The unit cell information can be readily accessed from powder diffraction data alone utilizing powder indexing methodology. If the unit cell has additional space not likely attributable to the API entity, then there is either a void or another component within the crystal lattice. This "leftover" space can be used to determine the likely stoichiometry of the additional component. A simple approach for calculating the expected required volume for a given molecule within a crystal using an atom based additive approach will be discussed. Coupling this estimation with the actual unit cell volumes and space group information obtained from powder indexing allows for the rapid evaluation of the likely stoichiometry of multicomponent crystals using diffraction data alone. This approach is particularly useful for the early assessment of new phases during salt, co-crystal, and polymorph screening, and also for the characterization of stable and unstable solvates. PMID:25872584

  19. Observation of light diffraction by time-resolved femtosecond correlation interferometry.

    PubMed

    Zeylikovich, I; Bai, G; Alfano, R R

    1995-07-15

    We demonstrate time development of the diffraction of light waves from objects for what is to our knowledge the f irst time by using a new femtosecond correlation interferometry. This new dynamical optics method allows for the conversion of temporal information to space information with femtosecond resolution and has the potential to produce a time-resolved femtosecond movie for the visualization of light-wave propagation in space for scientific, biological, and medical applications. PMID:19862089

  20. Neutron and X-ray powder diffraction study of skutterudite thermoelectrics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, H.; Kirkham, M. J.; Watkins, T. R.; Payzant, E. A.; Salvador, J. R.; Thompson, A. J.; Sharp, J.; Brown, D.; Miller, D.

    2016-02-17

    N- and p-type filled-skutterudite materials prepared for thermoelectric power generation modules were analyzed by neutron diffraction at the POWGEN beam line of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The skutterudite powders were processed by melt spinning, followed by ball milling and annealing. The n-type material consists of Ba–Yb–Co–Sb and the p-type material consists of Di–Fe–Ni–Sb or Di–Fe–Co–Sb (Di = didymium, an alloy of Pr and Nd). Powders for prototype module fabrication from General Motors and Marlow Industries were analyzed in this study. XRD and neutron diffraction studies confirm that both the n- and p-type materials have cubicmore » symmetry. Structural Rietveld refinements determined the lattice parameters and atomic parameters of the framework and filler atoms. The cage filling fraction was found to depend linearly on the lattice parameter, which in turn depends on the average framework atom size. Ultimately, this knowledge may allow the filling fraction of these skutterudite materials to be purposefully adjusted, thereby tuning the thermoelectric properties.« less

  1. Measuring the x-ray resolving power of bent potassium acid phthalate diffraction crystalsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugh, M. J.; Wu, M.; Jacoby, K. D.; Loisel, G. P.

    2014-11-01

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals that we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a double crystal diffractometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.

  2. Measuring the x-ray resolving power of bent potassium acid phthalate diffraction crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J. Jacoby, K. D.; Wu, M.; Loisel, G. P.

    2014-11-15

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals that we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a double crystal diffractometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.

  3. Measuring the X-ray Resolving Power of Bent Potassium Acid Phthalate Diffraction Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J.; Wu, M.; Jacoby, K. D.; Loisel, G. P.

    2014-11-01

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals that we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a dual goniometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.

  4. A new approach to calculating powder diffraction patterns based on the Debye scattering equation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Noel William

    2010-01-01

    A new method is defined for the calculation of X-ray and neutron powder diffraction patterns from the Debye scattering equation (DSE). Pairwise atomic interactions are split into two contributions, the first from lattice-pair vectors and the second from cell-pair vectors. Since the frequencies of lattice-pair vectors can be directly related to crystallite size, application of the DSE is thereby extended to crystallites of lengths up to approximately 200 nm. The input data correspond to unit-cell parameters, atomic coordinates and displacement factors. The calculated diffraction patterns are characterized by full backgrounds as well as complete reflection profiles. Four illustrative systems are considered: sodium chloride (NaCl), alpha-quartz, monoclinic lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and kaolinite. The effects of varying crystallite size on diffraction patterns are calculated for NaCl, quartz and kaolinite, and a method of modelling static structural disorder is defined for kaolinite. The idea of partial diffraction patterns is introduced and a treatment of atomic displacement parameters is included. Although the method uses pair distribution functions as an intermediate stage, it is anticipated that further progress in reducing computational times will be made by proceeding directly from crystal structure to diffraction pattern. PMID:20029134

  5. Recent advances in the study of H environments and behavior in minerals using neutron powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, M. D.

    2002-12-01

    It is now possible to probe the structural environments and behavior of H atoms directly in complex minerals such as amphiboles, micas, chlorites and humites using neutron powder diffraction, in some cases as a function of pressure and/or temperature. A combination of high neutron flux and increased detector sensitivity and size offers the chance to see details of H behaviour. In the last year or so the advent of new gasket designs for the Paris-Edinburgh pressure cell allow the use of ethanol/methanol (EtOD/MeOD) as a pressure medium, removing peak broadening arising from deviatoric stress that occurs above 3 GPa for the standard fluorinert pressure medium. Essentially hydrostatic conditions obtain with EtOD/MeOD to 8 GPa at 298 K. A further recent development has been the design of a high P-T module for use with the Paris-Edinburgh cell. These technological improvements in pressure-cell design now allow us to make meaningful correlations between OH vibrational spectra collected at high P and/or T and detailed structural information on H behaviour obtained from neutron diffraction under similar conditions. In this talk I shall discuss recent neutron diffraction experiments on the effect of pressure upon hydrogen bonding in deuterated chlorite to 5 GPa (298 K), and a high P-T study of hydrogen bonding in deuterated brucite to 7 GPa, 1100 K. These two studies illustrate how far high-pressure neutron diffraction has come in the last 5 years. Finally, I shall describe a neutron powder diffraction study (ambient conditions) of leucophoenicite, Mn7Si3O12(OH)2, a close structural analogue of Phase-B and Superhydrous-B: the structure of leucophoenicite is topologically identical to the hydrous sheet of Phase-B and similar to that of Superhydrous-B. For various reasons it was not possible to deuterate the sample. Nonetheless, the two distinct H atoms were approximately located in difference-Fourier maps and then refined isotropically. The H positions in Phase-B were only

  6. Quantification of Pharmaceutical Compounds Based on Powder X-Ray Diffraction with Chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Yuta; Ito, Akira; Matsumura, Saki; Takeuchi, Masaki; Pal, Suvra; Tanaka, Hideji

    2016-01-01

    We propose an approach for the simultaneous determination of multiple components in pharmaceutical mixed powder based on powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) method coupled with chemometrics. Caffeine anhydrate, acetaminophen and lactose monohydrate were mixed at various ratios. The samples were analyzed by PXRD method in the ranges of 2θ=5.00-30.0 and 35.0-45.0 degrees. Obtained diffractograms were analyzed by conventional peak intensity method, multi curve resolution (MCR)-alternating least squares (ALS) method and partial least squares (PLS) method. Constructed PLS models can most accurately predict the concentrations among different methods used. Each regression vector of PLS correlates not only to the compound of interest but also to the coexisting compounds. The combination of PXRD and PLS methods is concluded to be powerful approach for analyzing multi components in pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:27477651

  7. Development of MnBi permanent magnet: neutron diffraction of MnBi powder

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Jun; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Li, Guosheng; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Darsell, Jens T.; Kramer, Matthew J.; Zarkevich, Nikolai; Wang, L. L.; Johnson, D. D.; Marinescu, Melania; Huang, Qingzhen; Wu, Hui; Vuong, Nguyen V.; Liu, J.Ping

    2014-03-05

    MnBi attracts great attention in recent years for its great potential as permanent magnet materials. MnBi phase is difficult to obtain because of the rather drastic peritectic reaction between Mn and Bi. In this paper, we report our effort on synthesizing high purity MnBi compound using conventional powder metallurgical approaches. Neutron diffraction was carried out to investigate the crystal and nuclear structure of the obtained power. The result shows that the purity of the obtained powder is about 91wt.% at 300K, and the magnetic moment of the Mn atom in MnBi lattice is 4.424 and 4.013 μB at 50 K and 300 K respectively.

  8. The ferroelectric phase of CdTiO{sub 3}: A powder neutron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Brendan J.; Zhou Qingdi; Avdeev, Maxim

    2011-11-15

    The synthesis of bulk samples of polycrystalline CdTiO{sub 3} in both the rhombohedral ilmenite and orthorhombic perovskite forms is described and the structures of these have been refined using powder neutron diffraction data. This involved the preparation of samples enriched in {sup 114}Cd. Cooling perovskite-type CdTiO{sub 3} to 4 K induces a ferroelectric phase transition, with the neutron data suggesting the low temperature structure is in Pna2{sub 1}. Mode analysis shows the polar mode to be dominant at low temperatures. The ilmenite-structure of CdTiO{sub 3} is compared with that of ZnTiO{sub 3}. The refined scattering length of the {sup 114}Cd is estimated to be 5.56 fm. Attempts to dope CdTiO{sub 3} with Ca and Sr are described. - Graphical abstract: The structure of three phases of CdTiO{sub 3} have been refined using high resolution powder neutron diffraction data. This involved the preparation of samples enriched in {sup 114}Cd. Cooling perovskite-type CdTiO{sub 3} to 4 K results in a ferroelectric phase in Pna2{sub 1}. Highlights: > Both the ilmenite and perovskite forms of CdTiO{sub 3} have been prepared using {sup 114}Cd. > Cooling the perovskite form results in a ferroelectric phase. > The structures of these are refined from powder neutron diffraction data. > Attempts to dope CdTiO{sub 3} are described.

  9. Neutron powder diffraction studies as a function of temperature of structure II hydrate formed from propane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rawn, C.J.; Rondinone, A.J.; Chakoumakos, B.C.; Circone, S.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Ishii, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction data confirm that hydrate samples synthesized with propane crystallize as structure type II hydrate. The structure has been modeled using rigid-body constraints to describe C3H8 molecules located in the eight larger polyhedral cavities of a deuterated host lattice. Data were collected at 12, 40, 100, 130, 160, 190, 220, and 250 K and used to calculate the thermal expansivity from the temperature dependence of the lattice parameters. The data collected allowed for full structural refinement of atomic coordinates and the atomic-displacement parameters.

  10. Structure and intermolecular interactions of glipizide from laboratory X-ray powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Burley, Jonathan C

    2005-12-01

    The crystal structure of glipizide, used as a major treatment of type-2 diabetes, has been determined ab initio using variable-temperature laboratory X-ray powder diffraction combined with a direct-space Monte Carlo/simulated annealing methodology. The strengths of the intermolecular interactions (van der Waals, pi-pi stacking, hydrogen bonding and steric interlock) were quantitatively estimated using the thermal expansion data, which were collected in the same set of experiments as those used to determine the structure. PMID:16306678

  11. A GUINIER CAMERA FOR SR POWDER DIFFRACTION: HIGH RESOLUTION AND HIGH THROUGHPUT.

    SciTech Connect

    SIDDONS,D.P.; HULBERT, S.L.; STEPHENS, P.W.

    2006-05-28

    The paper describe a new powder diffraction instrument for synchrotron radiation sources which combines the high throughput of a position-sensitive detector system with the high resolution normally only provided by a crystal analyzer. It uses the Guinier geometry which is traditionally used with an x-ray tube source. This geometry adapts well to the synchrotron source, provided proper beam conditioning is applied. The high brightness of the SR source allows a high resolution to be achieved. When combined with a photon-counting silicon microstrip detector array, the system becomes a powerful instrument for radiation-sensitive samples or time-dependent phase transition studies.

  12. TSX-PLUS MULTI-TASKING UPGRADE FOR THE NICOLET L-11 POWDER DIFFRACTION SYSTEM.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzpatrick, J.; Queen, David L.

    1985-01-01

    In August of 1982, a single-user, dual-translator, automated powder diffraction system was purchased by the Denver Research Institute for use on project work in the Chemical and Materials Sciences Division. Within a short period of time, the system had already become saturated with users. Scheduling conflicts arose. In view of these problems, an answer was sought in the form of hardware and software changes which would allow many users access to the system simultaneously. A low-cost, minimum impact solution was eventually found. The elements of the solution are reported.

  13. Characterization of zeolite structure and fluorocarbon reactivity using solid state NMR and x-ray powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciraolo, Michael Frank

    The research presented in this thesis involves a combination of techniques used to study the structure and interactions zeolites adsorbed with fluorocarbons. This research is specifically aimed at understanding the processes of adsorption, binding, and reactivity of fluorocarbons on cation exchanged faujasite type zeolites. The solid state ion exchange process has also been studied since it is one way to obtain materials with higher exchange levels, which has been shown to effect adsorption and catalytic activity. To improve the understanding of the adsorption and separation processes a time resolved in-situ synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction study has been undertaken. Since faujasite type zeolites have been found to be effective in separating mixtures of HFC-134 (CF2HCF2H) and HFC-134a (CFH2CF3) isomers, the adsorption of these fluorocarbons on NaY have been studied. It has been shown that both the extent of loading and the kinetics of the sorption process in molecular sieves can be followed using this technique. A model for the binding of hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) 124a (CF 2HCF2Cl) adsorbed on NaX at 100K has been determined using a combination x-ray and neutron powder diffraction and solid state NMR. Using Rietveld refinement of the diffraction data, the HCFC molecule was found localized in the zeolite cavities bound on either end by sodium cations in the SII and SIII' positions. The model is consistent with hydrogen bonding between the proton of the HCFC and the framework oxygen. The NMR results further confirm the model and are consistent with Na-F binding and HCFC-framework interactions. Solid-state MAS NMR, synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction and a mass spectrometer and gas chromatograph catalysis system have been used to study the reactivity of HCFC-124a (CF2HCF2Cl) on NaX, Zn 2+-exchanged NaX (ZnX) and Rb+-exchanged NaX (RbX). We have chosen to study HCFC-124a (CF2HCF2Cl) since HCFC-124a can undergo both dehydrofluorination and dehydrochlorination

  14. Rietveld refinement with time-of-flight powder diffraction data from pulsed neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    David, W.I.F. ); Jorgensen, J.D. )

    1990-10-01

    The recent development of accelerator-based pulsed neutron sources has led to the widespread use of the time-of-flight technique for neutron powder diffraction. The properties of the pulsed source make possible unusually high resolution over a wide range of d spacings, high count rates, and the ability to collect complete data at fixed scattering angles. The peak shape and other instrument characteristics can be accurately modelled, which make Rietveld refinement possible for complex structures. In this paper we briefly review the development of the Rietveld method for time-of-flight diffraction data from pulsed neutron sources and discuss the latest developments in high resolution instrumentation and advanced Rietveld analysis methods. 50 refs., 12 figs., 14 tabs.

  15. On the reliability of powder diffraction Line Profile Analysis of plastically deformed nanocrystalline systems

    PubMed Central

    Rebuffi, Luca; Troian, Andrea; Ciancio, Regina; Carlino, Elvio; Amimi, Amine; Leonardi, Alberto; Scardi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    An iron-molybdenum alloy powder was extensively deformed by high energy milling, so to refine the bcc iron domain size to nanometer scale (~10 nm) and introduce a strong inhomogeneous strain. Both features contribute to comparable degree to the diffraction peak profile broadening, so that size and strain contributions can be easily separated by exploiting their different dependence on the diffraction angle. To assess the reliability of Line Profile Analysis, results were compared with evidence from other techniques, including scanning and transmission electron microscopy and X-ray small angle scattering. Results confirm the extent of the size broadening effect, whereas molecular dynamics simulations provide insight into the origin of the local atomic, inhomogeneous strain, pointing out the role of dislocations, domain boundaries and interactions among crystalline domains. PMID:26860471

  16. On the reliability of powder diffraction Line Profile Analysis of plastically deformed nanocrystalline systems.

    PubMed

    Rebuffi, Luca; Troian, Andrea; Ciancio, Regina; Carlino, Elvio; Amimi, Amine; Leonardi, Alberto; Scardi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    An iron-molybdenum alloy powder was extensively deformed by high energy milling, so to refine the bcc iron domain size to nanometer scale (~10 nm) and introduce a strong inhomogeneous strain. Both features contribute to comparable degree to the diffraction peak profile broadening, so that size and strain contributions can be easily separated by exploiting their different dependence on the diffraction angle. To assess the reliability of Line Profile Analysis, results were compared with evidence from other techniques, including scanning and transmission electron microscopy and X-ray small angle scattering. Results confirm the extent of the size broadening effect, whereas molecular dynamics simulations provide insight into the origin of the local atomic, inhomogeneous strain, pointing out the role of dislocations, domain boundaries and interactions among crystalline domains. PMID:26860471

  17. Absorption spectroscopy of powdered materials using time-resolved diffuse optical methods.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Cosimo; Obraztsova, Ekaterina A; Farina, Andrea; Taroni, Paola; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Pifferi, Antonio

    2012-11-10

    In this paper a novel method, based on time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy, is proposed to measure the absorption of small amounts of nanostructured powder materials independent of scattering. Experimental validation, in the visible and near-infrared spectral range, has been carried out on India Inkparticles. The effectiveness of the technique to measure scattering-free absorption is demonstrated on carbon nanotubes. The comparison between the absorption spectra acquired by the proposed method and conventional measurements performed with a commercial spectrophotometer is discussed. PMID:23142900

  18. Optimizations in angular dispersive neutron powder diffraction using divergent beam geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchsteiner, Alexandra; Stüßer, Norbert

    2009-01-01

    Angular dispersive neutron powder diffractometers are usually built using beam divergencies defined by Soller type collimators. To account for the needs of resolution for crystal structure refinement a good in-pile collimation α1, a high take-off angle above 90∘ at the monochromator and a good collimation α3 in front of the detector bank are chosen whereas the value of α2 for the collimation between monochromator and sample is less crucial. During the last years new strategies were developed at our institute using wide divergent beam geometries defined by fan collimators or slit-type diaphragms which correlate ray direction and wavelength within the beam. Here we present the performance of a newly developed fan collimator, which enables one to adjust the opening of the collimator channels on both sides independently. This fan collimator is positioned in front of the monochromator at the instrument E6 at the Helmholtz Centre Berlin (formerly Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin). It will be shown that control of the beam divergency allows optimization of the resolution in a large angular diffraction range. Hence the resolution and intensity can be adapted to the needs of powder diffraction. Monte Carlo simulations using McStas are used to check and prove the optimal setting of the instrument. We obtain a very good agreement between experimental and simulated data and demonstrate the superior outcome of the new instrument configuration with respect to Soller type instruments.

  19. Studies of clays and clay minerals using x-ray powder diffraction and the Rietveld method

    SciTech Connect

    Bish, D.L.

    1993-09-01

    The Rietveld method was originally developed (Rietveld, 1967, 1969) to refine crystal structures using neutron powder diffraction data. Since then, the method has been increasingly used with X-ray powder diffraction data, and today it is safe to say that this is the most common application of the method. The method has been applied to numerous natural and synthetic materials, most of which do not usually form crystals large enough for study with single-crystal techniques. It is the ability to study the structures of materials for which sufficiently large single crystals do not exist that makes the method so powerful and popular. It would thus appear that the method is ideal for studying clays and clay minerals. In many cases this is true, but the assumptions implicit in the method and the disordered nature of many clay minerals can limit titsapplicability. This chapter will describe the Rietveld method, emphasizing the assumptions important for the study of disordered materials, and it will outline the potential applications of the method to these minerals. These applications include, in addition to the refinement of crystal structures, quantitative analysis of multicomponent mixtures, analysis of peak broadening, partial structure solution, and refinement of unit-cell parameters.

  20. Concerted electron and proton transfer in ionic crystals mapped by femtosecond x-ray powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Woerner, Michael; Zamponi, Flavio; Ansari, Zunaira; Dreyer, Jens; Freyer, Benjamin; Premont-Schwarz, Mirabelle; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2010-08-14

    X-ray powder diffraction, a fundamental technique of structure research in physics, chemistry, and biology, is extended into the femtosecond time domain of atomic motions. This allows for mapping (macro)molecular structure generated by basic chemical and biological processes and for deriving transient electronic charge density maps. In the experiments, the transient intensity and angular positions of up to 20 Debye Scherrer reflections from a polycrystalline powder are measured and atomic positions and charge density maps are determined with a combined spatial and temporal resolutions of 30 pm and 100 fs. We present evidence for the so far unknown concerted transfer of electrons and protons in a prototype material, the hydrogen-bonded ionic ammonium sulfate [(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}]. Photoexcitation of ammonium sulfate induces a sub-100 fs electron transfer from the sulfate groups into a highly confined electron channel along the c-axis of the unit cell. The latter geometry is stabilized by transferring protons from the adjacent ammonium groups into the channel. Time-dependent charge density maps derived from the diffraction data display a periodic modulation of the channel's charge density by low-frequency lattice motions with a concerted electron and proton motion between the channel and the initial proton binding site. Our results set the stage for femtosecond structure studies in a wide class of (bio)molecular materials.

  1. Model-independent structure factors from powder X-ray diffraction: a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Straasø, Tine; Dippel, Ann-Christin; Becker, Jacob; Als-Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Under the experimental condition that all Bragg peaks in a powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) pattern have the same shape, one can readily obtain the Bragg intensities without fitting any parameters. This condition is fulfilled at the P02.1 beamline at PETRA III using the seventh harmonic from a 23 mm-period undulator (60 keV) at a distance of 65 m. For grain sizes of the order of 1 µm, the Bragg peak shape in the PXRD is entirely determined by the diameter of the capillary containing the powder sample and the pixel size of the image plate detector, and consequently it is independent of the scattering angle. As an example, a diamond powder has been chosen and structure factors derived which are in accordance with those calculated from density functional theory methods of the WIEN2k package to within an accuracy that allows a detailed electron density analysis. PMID:24365925

  2. Insights into Analogue Perovskite Solid Solutions from High-Resolution Neutron Powder Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfern, S. A.; Chaddock, E. H.; Becerro, A. I.

    2002-12-01

    Neutron powder diffraction provides a powerful tool for the study of phase transitions as a function of pressure, temperature, or chemical composition. The structural information obtainable from powders using diffractometers such as HRPD (ISIS, UK) or D2B (ILL, France) rivals, and in some respects exceeds what may be possible using conventional crystallographic techniques reliant on single crystals. We have used both instruments to explore the subtle phase transitions observed in the (CaxSr1-x)TiO3 and (SrxBa1-x)SnO3 solid solutions. We have also used low resolution high flux instruments to explore the thermal dependence of the superlattice behavior below the cubic to tetragonal phase transition in (CaxSr1-x)TiO3. In each case a sequence of phase transitions from Pm-3m through I4/mcm to Pbnm is seen as a function of composition, and is driven by the change in average radius of the B-cation. This sequence of transitions is the same as expected for a magnesium silicate perovskite structure on increasing temperature. It is now recognised that lower mantle perovskite is likely aluminous, with solid solution towards either a stoichiometric or oxygen-defect end-member. The analogue systems we have characterised have been doped with trivalent cations on the B site to explore the effect of such substitution on the sequence of phase transitions. High-temperature neutron diffraction shows that oxygen defects stabilize the higher symmetry structures, lowering Tc for the transition to cubic. New developments in high-T high-P neutron diffraction techniques will allow the extension of these ambient pressure studies to the investigation of the influence of pressure as a variable, and hence the extension of such analogue studies to the whole range of variables experienced in the lower mantle. These will be briefly outlined.

  3. Developments in time-resolved high pressure x-ray diffraction using rapid compression and decompression

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Lin, Chuanlong; Rod, Eric; Bai, Ligang; Shen, Guoyin

    2015-07-15

    Complementary advances in high pressure research apparatus and techniques make it possible to carry out time-resolved high pressure research using what would customarily be considered static high pressure apparatus. This work specifically explores time-resolved high pressure x-ray diffraction with rapid compression and/or decompression of a sample in a diamond anvil cell. Key aspects of the synchrotron beamline and ancillary equipment are presented, including source considerations, rapid (de)compression apparatus, high frequency imaging detectors, and software suitable for processing large volumes of data. A number of examples are presented, including fast equation of state measurements, compression rate dependent synthesis of metastable states in silicon and germanium, and ultrahigh compression rates using a piezoelectric driven diamond anvil cell.

  4. Atomic motion of resonantly vibrating quartz crystal visualized by time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyagi, Shinobu; Osawa, Hitoshi; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Takeda, Shoichi; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2015-11-01

    Transient atomic displacements during a resonant thickness-shear vibration of AT-cut α-quartz are revealed by time-resolved X-ray diffraction under an alternating electric field. The lattice strain resonantly amplified by the alternating electric field is ˜104 times larger than that induced by a static electric field. The resonantly amplified lattice strain is achieved by fast displacements of oxygen anions and collateral resilient deformation of Si-O-Si angles bridging rigid SiO4 tetrahedra, which efficiently transduce electric energy into elastic energy.

  5. Atomic motion of resonantly vibrating quartz crystal visualized by time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyagi, Shinobu; Osawa, Hitoshi; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Fujiwara, Akihiko

    2015-11-16

    Transient atomic displacements during a resonant thickness-shear vibration of AT-cut α-quartz are revealed by time-resolved X-ray diffraction under an alternating electric field. The lattice strain resonantly amplified by the alternating electric field is ∼10{sup 4} times larger than that induced by a static electric field. The resonantly amplified lattice strain is achieved by fast displacements of oxygen anions and collateral resilient deformation of Si−O−Si angles bridging rigid SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra, which efficiently transduce electric energy into elastic energy.

  6. Electro-optic sampling for time resolving relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Scoby, C. M.; Musumeci, P.; Moody, J.; Gutierrez, M.; Tran, T.

    2009-01-22

    The Pegasus laboratory at UCLA features a state-of-the-art electron photoinjector capable of producing ultrashort (<100 fs) high-brightness electron bunches at energies of 3.75 MeV. These beams recently have been used to produce static diffraction patterns from scattering off thin metal foils, and it is foreseen to take advantage of the ultrashort nature of these bunches in future pump-probe time-resolved diffraction studies. In this paper, single shot 2-d electro-optic sampling is presented as a potential technique for time of arrival stamping of electron bunches used for diffraction. Effects of relatively low bunch charge (a few 10's of pC) and modestly relativistic beams are discussed and background compensation techniques to obtain high signal-to-noise ratio are explored. From these preliminary tests, electro-optic sampling is suitable to be a reliable nondestructive time stamping method for relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction at the Pegasus lab.

  7. A wavelet transform algorithm for peak detection and application to powder x-ray diffraction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregoire, John M.; Dale, Darren; van Dover, R. Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Peak detection is ubiquitous in the analysis of spectral data. While many noise-filtering algorithms and peak identification algorithms have been developed, recent work [P. Du, W. Kibbe, and S. Lin, Bioinformatics 22, 2059 (2006); A. Wee, D. Grayden, Y. Zhu, K. Petkovic-Duran, and D. Smith, Electrophoresis 29, 4215 (2008)] has demonstrated that both of these tasks are efficiently performed through analysis of the wavelet transform of the data. In this paper, we present a wavelet-based peak detection algorithm with user-defined parameters that can be readily applied to the application of any spectral data. Particular attention is given to the algorithm's resolution of overlapping peaks. The algorithm is implemented for the analysis of powder diffraction data, and successful detection of Bragg peaks is demonstrated for both low signal-to-noise data from theta-theta diffraction of nanoparticles and combinatorial x-ray diffraction data from a composition spread thin film. These datasets have different types of background signals which are effectively removed in the wavelet-based method, and the results demonstrate that the algorithm provides a robust method for automated peak detection.

  8. Neutron powder-diffraction studies of lithium, sodium, and potassium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Berliner, R.; Fajen, O. ); Smith, H.G. ); Hitterman, R.L. )

    1989-12-15

    Neutron powder-diffraction measurements have been performed on polycrystalline lithium and sodium specimens at 80 and 20 K and on potassium metal at 80 and 10 K. Lithium is bcc (body-centered cubic) at room temperature and undergoes a martensitic structural phase transformation to a 9{ital R} (samarium-type) form at low temperature. This experiment presents evidence that the 9{ital R} phase is present in sodium as well as lithium. No evidence of a transformation was observed in potassium at 10 K. The diffraction lines for both lithium and sodium after the phase transformation exhibit position shifts and broadening characteristic of stacking-fault defects. The line shifts, line broadening, and transformed fraction for the low-temperature phase of lithium and sodium metal are reported. The diffraction peak position shifts are, however, different from those predicted for deformation-type stacking faults alone. Qualitative agreement of the experimental results with stacking-fault-model calculations was obtained for a double-twin'' type of layer defect.

  9. Determination of Complex Structures from Powder Diffraction Data: The Crystal Structure of La 3Ti 5Al 15O 37

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Russell E.; Owen, Jonathan J.; Stalick, Judith K.; Cheetham, Anthony K.

    1994-07-01

    The applicability of powder diffraction techniques to structure determination has improved substantially in recent times, but it has only been successfully utilized in the solution of relatively simple structures of up to 29 atoms in the asymmetric unit. The structure La 3Ti 5Al 15O 37, which has 60 atoms in the asymmetric unit, has been solved using a combination of synchrotron X-ray and neutron powder diffraction. This represents a considerable advance in the size of structure that has been solved using powder diffraction techniques. The structure of La 3Ti 5Al 15O 37 consists of small regions of simpler structure types in the La/Ti/Al/O system, interleaved to form a complex 3D network.

  10. Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Decomposition Studied via in Situ Low Temperature X-ray Powder Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, Susan M; Rawn, Claudia J; Keffer, David J.; Mull, Derek L; Payzant, E Andrew; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrates are known to have a slowed decomposition rate at ambient pressure and temperatures below the melting point of ice termed self-preservation or anomalous preservation. As hydrate exothermically decomposes, gas is released and water of the clathrate cages transforms into ice. Two regions of slowed decomposition for methane hydrate, 180 200 K and 230 260 K, were observed, and the kinetics were studied by in situ low temperature x-ray powder diffraction. The kinetic constants for ice formation from methane hydrate were determined by the Avrami model within each region and activation energies, Ea, were determined by the Arrhenius plot. Ea determined from the data for 180 200 K was 42 kJ/mol and for 230 260 K was 22 kJ/mol. The higher Ea in the colder temperature range was attributed to a difference in the microstructure of ice between the two regions.

  11. X-ray powder diffraction investigations of the composition of uranium-containing precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Ionov, R.A.; Molchanova, T.V.; Rodionov, V.V.; Vodolazov, L.I.; Matyunina, E.N.; Zharova, E.V.

    1988-03-01

    Uranium-containing precipitates which were formed from solutions of uranyl sulfate containing various amounts of ammonium bicarbonate in the pH 2-7 range and which imitate the composition of the uranyl complexes formed in the phase of an ion exchanger at corresponding values of the sorption pH have been investigated by the methods of x-ray powder diffraction analysis, thermal analysis, and chemical analysis. It has been established that uranyl sulfates, basic sulfates, and carbonates of varying composition form as the pH is increased in accordance with the form in which uranium exists in the liquid phase. The formation of polynuclear uranyl complexes in the pH 2-4 range has been postulated.

  12. Applications of pulsed neutron powder diffraction to actinide elements. [Pu-Al

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, A.C.; Richardson, J.W.; Mueller, M.H.; Lander, G.H.; Goldstone, J.A.; Williams, A.; Kwei, G.H.; Von Dreele, R.B.; Faber, J. Jr.; Hitterman, R.L.

    1987-11-01

    We have been using the technique of pulsed neutron powder diffraction to study several problems in the physics and chemistry of the actinide elements. In these elements one often encounters very complex structures resulting from polymorphic transformations presumably induced by the presence of 5f-electrons. For example, at least five distinct structures of plutonium metal are found between room temperature and its melting point of 640/sup 0/C, and two of the structures are monoclinc. The determination of the crystal structure of beta-uranium (tetragonal, 30 atoms per unit cell) which has finnaly been shown to be centrosymmetric, after decades of uncertainty is discussed. Some preliminary results on the structure of alpha-plutonium (which confirm Zachariasen's original determination of the monoclinic structure) are presented. Pu-Al alloys were also studied. 12 refs., 18 figs.

  13. Crystal structure determination of thymoquinone by high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Pagola, S; Benavente, A; Raschi, A; Romano, E; Molina, M A A; Stephens, P W

    2004-01-01

    The crystal structure of 2-isopropyl-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone (thymoquinone) and its thermal behavior--as necessary physical and chemical properties--were determined in order to enhance the current understanding of thymoquinone chemical action by using high resolution x-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and 3 thermo-analytical techniques thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analysis (DTA), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The findings obtained with high-resolution x-ray powder diffraction and molecular location methods based on a simulated annealing algorithm after Rietveld refinement showed that the triclinic unit cell was a = 6.73728(8) A, b = 6.91560(8) A, c = 10.4988(2) A, alpha = 88.864(2) degrees, beta = 82.449(1) degrees, gamma = 77.0299(9) degrees; cell volume = 472.52(1) A3, Z = 2, and space group P1. In addition, FTIR spectrum revealed absorption bands corresponding to the carbonyl and C-H stretching of aliphatic and vinylic groups characteristically observed in such p-benzoquinones. Also, a chemical decomposition process starting at 65 degrees C and ending at 213 degrees C was noted when TGA was used. DSC allowed for the determination of onset at 43.55 degrees C and a melting enthalpy value of DeltaH(m) = 110.6 J/g. The low value obtained for the fusion point displayed a van der Waals pattern for molecular binding, and the thermograms performed evidence that thymoquinone can only be found in crystalline triclinic form, as determined by DRX methods. PMID:15760086

  14. Structure Determination and Refinement of Acid Strontium Oxalate from X-Ray and Neutron Powder Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhoyland, G.; Bourée, F.; Van Bael, M. K.; Mullens, J.; Van Poucke, L. C.

    2001-03-01

    The structure of acid strontium oxalate Sr(HC2O4)·{1}/{2}(C2O4)·H2O has been determined by conventional X-ray powder diffractometry. The diffraction pattern was indexed from a monoclinic unit cell with cell parameters a=6.341(1) Å, b=16.880(2) Å, c=5.7798(8) Å, and β=97.60(1)°; space group, P21/n (No. 14) with Z=4. Final (isotropic) Rietveld refinement of the neutron powder data yielded RB=4.57%, RF=2.87%, and Rwp=7.87% as conventional Rietveld parameters. Strontium is eight-fold coordinated and can be described as a distorted bicapped trigonal prism. The SrO8 polyhedra form one-dimensional chains along the c-axis by sharing edges. In contrast to all other known strontium oxalates, in this compound H2O acts as bridging ligand between two Sr atoms. SDPD-D classification (1): Sr(HC2O4)-{1}/{2}(C2O4)-H2O, P21/n, C1=14, Nc=42, C2=11, XC1+N/TREOR-97 & DICVOL-91, EXTRA, EQUI, SIRPOW-92 (DM), GFOURIER, FULLPROF.

  15. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, P. K.; Hustedt, C. J.; Vecchio, K. S.; Huskins, E. L.; Casem, D. T.; Gruner, S. M.; Tate, M. W.; Philipp, H. T.; Woll, A. R.; Purohit, P.; Weiss, J. T.; Kannan, V.; Ramesh, K. T.; Kenesei, P.; Okasinski, J. S.; Almer, J.; Zhao, M.; Ananiadis, A. G.; Hufnagel, T. C.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ∼103–104 s−1 in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10–20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (∼40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation. PMID:25273733

  16. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading.

    PubMed

    Lambert, P K; Hustedt, C J; Vecchio, K S; Huskins, E L; Casem, D T; Gruner, S M; Tate, M W; Philipp, H T; Woll, A R; Purohit, P; Weiss, J T; Kannan, V; Ramesh, K T; Kenesei, P; Okasinski, J S; Almer, J; Zhao, M; Ananiadis, A G; Hufnagel, T C

    2014-09-01

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ~10(3)-10(4) s(-1) in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10-20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (~40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation. PMID:25273733

  17. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, P. K.; Hustedt, C. J.; Zhao, M.; Ananiadis, A. G.; Hufnagel, T. C.; Vecchio, K. S.; Huskins, E. L.; Casem, D. T.; Gruner, S. M.; Tate, M. W.; Philipp, H. T.; Purohit, P.; Weiss, J. T.; Woll, A. R.; Kannan, V.; Ramesh, K. T.; Kenesei, P.; Okasinski, J. S.; Almer, J.

    2014-09-15

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ∼10{sup 3}–10{sup 4} s{sup −1} in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10–20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (∼40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation.

  18. Powder X-Ray Diffraction of the Grain Components of Carbonaceous Chondrite Meteorites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furton, D. G.; Hurt, Kendra; Bos, Abram

    Carbonaceous chondrite meteorites are thought to bring to Earth samples of primordial interstellar material. Detailed chemical analysis of meteorites representative of this class (i.e., Allende, Murchison, and Orgueil) establish the primordial character of the material they include and, among other things, reveal that nanometer-sized diamond grains are present in the carbonaceous component of these meteorites at about the 1,000 ppm level (Lewis et al. 1987, Nature, 326, 160). The high abundance of nanodiamonds in these meteoritic samples contributes to the hypothesis that nanodiamonds are present in the interstellar medium at relatively high abundance, but direct observational support of this hypothesis is not so conclusive. (It may also be, according to Dai et al. (2002, Nature, 418, 157), that the nanodiamond grains were formed in situ). On the other hand, there is a growing body of observational evidence that indicates nanometer-sized silicon grains are present in the interstellar medium at relatively high abundance (e.g., Smith & Witt 2001, ApJ, 565, 304). But, silicon nanoparticles have yet to be discovered in a sample of carbonaceous chondrite meteorite. It is relevant in this context that the chemical process that has been used to extract nanodiamond grains from meteoritic samples involves dissolving in strong acid the silicate component of the meteorite. The process is ultimately destructive to any silicon grains that may be present and possibly even alters the nanodiamonds it is used to extract (Mutschke et al. 1995, ApJL, 454, L160). There does not appear to be a similar chemical process that could be used to extract silicon nanoparticles from meteoritic samples. We are in the process of establishing to what extent powder X-ray diffraction can be use as a non-destructive analytical tool to examine nanometer-sized grain components of carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. We present powder X-ray diffraction patterns obtained from samples of the Murchison and

  19. High-pressure powder x-ray diffraction study of EuVO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Alka B.; Errandonea, D.

    2015-03-01

    The high-pressure structural behavior of europium orthovanadate has been studied using in-situ, synchrotron based, high-pressure x-ray powder diffraction technique. Angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out at room temperature up to 34.7 GPa using a diamond-anvil cell, extending the pressure range reported in previous experiments. We confirmed the occurrence of zircon-scheelite phase transition at 6.8 GPa and the coexistence of low- and high-pressure phases up to 10.1 GPa. In addition, clear evidence of a scheelite-fregusonite transition is found at 23.4 GPa. The fergusonite structure remains stable up to 34.7 GPa, the highest pressure reached in the present measurements. A partial decomposition of EuVO4 was also observed from 8.1 to 12.8 GPa; however, this fact did not preclude the identification of the different crystal structures of EuVO4. The crystal structures of the different phases have been Rietveld refined and their equations of state (EOS) have been determined. The results are compared with the previous experimental data and theoretical calculations.

  20. In Situ Powder Diffraction Studies of Electrode Materials in Rechargeable Batteries.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neeraj; Pang, Wei Kong; Guo, Zaiping; Peterson, Vanessa K

    2015-09-01

    The ability to directly track the charge carrier in a battery as it inserts/extracts from an electrode during charge/discharge provides unparalleled insight for researchers into the working mechanism of the device. This crystallographic-electrochemical information can be used to design new materials or modify electrochemical conditions to improve battery performance characteristics, such as lifetime. Critical to collecting operando data used to obtain such information in situ while a battery functions are X-ray and neutron diffractometers with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to capture complex and subtle structural changes. The number of operando battery experiments has dramatically increased in recent years, particularly those involving neutron powder diffraction. Herein, the importance of structure-property relationships to understanding battery function, why in situ experimentation is critical to this, and the types of experiments and electrochemical cells required to obtain such information are described. For each battery type, selected research that showcases the power of in situ and operando diffraction experiments to understand battery function is highlighted and future opportunities for such experiments are discussed. The intention is to encourage researchers to use in situ and operando techniques and to provide a concise overview of this area of research. PMID:26223736

  1. High-pressure powder x-ray diffraction study of EuVO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Alka B.; Errandonea, D.

    2015-03-15

    The high-pressure structural behavior of europium orthovanadate has been studied using in-situ, synchrotron based, high-pressure x-ray powder diffraction technique. Angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out at room temperature up to 34.7 GPa using a diamond-anvil cell, extending the pressure range reported in previous experiments. We confirmed the occurrence of zircon–scheelite phase transition at 6.8 GPa and the coexistence of low- and high-pressure phases up to 10.1 GPa. In addition, clear evidence of a scheelite–fregusonite transition is found at 23.4 GPa. The fergusonite structure remains stable up to 34.7 GPa, the highest pressure reached in the present measurements. A partial decomposition of EuVO{sub 4} was also observed from 8.1 to 12.8 GPa; however, this fact did not preclude the identification of the different crystal structures of EuVO{sub 4}. The crystal structures of the different phases have been Rietveld refined and their equations of state (EOS) have been determined. The results are compared with the previous experimental data and theoretical calculations. - Graphical abstract: The high-pressure structural sequence of EuVO{sub 4}. - Highlights: • EuVO{sub 4} is studied under pressure up to 35 GPa using synchrotron XRD. • The zircón–scheelite–fergusonite structural sequence is observed. • Crystal structures are refined and equations of state determined.

  2. Plant powder teabags: a novel and practical approach to resolve culturability and diversity of rhizobacteria.

    PubMed

    Sarhan, Mohamed S; Mourad, Elhussein F; Hamza, Mervat A; Youssef, Hanan H; Scherwinski, Ann-Christin; El-Tahan, Mahmoud; Fayez, Mohamed; Ruppel, Silke; Hegazi, Nabil A

    2016-08-01

    We have developed teabags packed with dehydrated plant powders, without any supplements, for preparation of plant infusions necessary to develop media for culturing rhizobacteria. These bacteria are efficiently cultivated on such plant teabag culture media, with better progressive in situ recoverability compared to standard chemically synthetic culture media. Combining various plant-based culture media and incubation conditions enabled us to resolve unique denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) bands that were not resolved by tested standard culture media. Based on polymerase chain reaction PCR-DGGE of 16S rDNA fingerprints and sequencing, the plant teabag culture media supported higher diversity and significant increases in the richness of endo-rhizobacteria, namely Gammaproteobacteria (Enterobacteriaceae) and predominantly Alphaproteobacteria (Rhizobiaceae). This culminated in greater retrieval of the rhizobacteria taxa associated with the plant roots. We conclude that the plant teabag culture medium by itself, without any nutritional supplements, is sufficient and efficient for recovering and mirroring the complex and diverse communities of rhizobacteria. Our message to fellow microbial ecologists is: simply dehydrate your plant canopy, teabag it and soak it to prepare your culture media, with no need for any additional supplementary nutrients. PMID:27178359

  3. Time-, frequency-, and wavevector-resolved x-ray diffraction from single molecules

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Kochise; Biggs, Jason D.; Zhang, Yu; Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-01-01

    Using a quantum electrodynamic framework, we calculate the off-resonant scattering of a broadband X-ray pulse from a sample initially prepared in an arbitrary superposition of electronic states. The signal consists of single-particle (incoherent) and two-particle (coherent) contributions that carry different particle form factors that involve different material transitions. Single-molecule experiments involving incoherent scattering are more influenced by inelastic processes compared to bulk measurements. The conditions under which the technique directly measures charge densities (and can be considered as diffraction) as opposed to correlation functions of the charge-density are specified. The results are illustrated with time- and wavevector-resolved signals from a single amino acid molecule (cysteine) following an impulsive excitation by a stimulated X-ray Raman process resonant with the sulfur K-edge. Our theory and simulations can guide future experimental studies on the structures of nano-particles and proteins. PMID:24880284

  4. Time-, frequency-, and wavevector-resolved x-ray diffraction from single molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Kochise Biggs, Jason D.; Zhang, Yu; Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-05-28

    Using a quantum electrodynamic framework, we calculate the off-resonant scattering of a broadband X-ray pulse from a sample initially prepared in an arbitrary superposition of electronic states. The signal consists of single-particle (incoherent) and two-particle (coherent) contributions that carry different particle form factors that involve different material transitions. Single-molecule experiments involving incoherent scattering are more influenced by inelastic processes compared to bulk measurements. The conditions under which the technique directly measures charge densities (and can be considered as diffraction) as opposed to correlation functions of the charge-density are specified. The results are illustrated with time- and wavevector-resolved signals from a single amino acid molecule (cysteine) following an impulsive excitation by a stimulated X-ray Raman process resonant with the sulfur K-edge. Our theory and simulations can guide future experimental studies on the structures of nano-particles and proteins.

  5. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction and calorimetric studies at low scan rates

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Haruhiko; Hatta, Ichiro; Koynova, Rumiana; Tenchov, Boris

    1992-01-01

    The phase transitions of dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) in excess water have been examined by low-angle time-resolved x-ray diffraction and calorimetry at low scan rates. The lamellar subgel/lamellar liquid-crystalline (Lc → Lα), lamellar gel/lamellar liquid-crystalline (Lβ → Lα), and lamellar liquid-crystalline/lamellar gel (Lα → Lβ) phase transitions proceed via coexistence of the initial and final phases with no detectable intermediates at scan rates 0.1 and 0.5°C/min. At constant temperature within the region of the Lβ → Lα transition the ratio of the two coexisting phases was found to be stable for over 30 min. The state of stable phase coexistence was preceded by a 150-s relaxation taking place at constant temperature after termination of the heating scan in the transition region. While no intermediate structures were present in the coexistence region, a well reproducible multipeak pattern, with at least four prominent heat capacity peaks separated in temperature by 0.4-0.5°C, has been observed in the cooling transition (Lα → Lβ) by calorimetry. The multipeak pattern became distinct with an increase of incubation time in the liquid-crystalline phase. It was also clearly resolved in the x-ray diffraction intensity versus temperature plots recorded at slow cooling rates. These data suggest that the equilibrium state of the Lα phase of hydrated DPPE is represented by a mixture of domains that differ in thermal behavior, but cannot be distinguished structurally by x-ray scattering. Imagesp689-aFIGURE 9 PMID:19431820

  6. Microelemental and mineral compositions of pathogenic biomineral concrements: SRXFA, X-ray powder diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, T. N.; Palchik, N. A.; Dar'in, A. V.

    2009-05-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis using synchrotron radiation (SRXRF), X-ray powder diffraction, infrared and Raman spectroscopy had been applied for determination of microelemental and mineral composition of the kidney stones, gallstones and salivalities from natives of Novosibirsk and Novosibirsk region, Russia. The relationship between mineral, organic and microelemental composition of pathogenic calcilus was shown.

  7. An Inquiry-Based Project Focused on the X-Ray Powder Diffraction Analysis of Common Household Solids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulien, Molly L.; Lekse, Jonathan W.; Rosmus, Kimberly A.; Devlin, Kasey P.; Glenn, Jennifer R.; Wisneski, Stephen D.; Wildfong, Peter; Lake, Charles H.; MacNeil, Joseph H.; Aitken, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    While X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) is a fundamental analytical technique used by solid-state laboratories across a breadth of disciplines, it is still underrepresented in most undergraduate curricula. In this work, we incorporate XRPD analysis into an inquiry-based project that requires students to identify the crystalline component(s) of…

  8. Using Variable Temperature Powder X-Ray Diffraction to Determine the Thermal Expansion Coefficient of Solid MgO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corsepius, Nicholas C.; DeVore, Thomas C.; Reisner, Barbara A.; Warnaar, Deborah L.

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory exercise was developed by using variable temperature powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) to determine [alpha] for MgO (periclase)and was tested in the Applied Physical Chemistry and Materials Characterization Laboratories at James Madison University. The experiment which was originally designed to provide undergraduate students with a…

  9. Coherent convergent-beam time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Spence, John C. H.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Li, Chufeng

    2014-01-01

    The use of coherent X-ray lasers for structural biology allows the use of nanometre diameter X-ray beams with large beam divergence. Their application to the structure analysis of protein nanocrystals and single particles raises new challenges and opportunities. We discuss the form of these coherent convergent-beam (CCB) hard X-ray diffraction patterns and their potential use for time-resolved crystallography, normally achieved by Laue (polychromatic) diffraction, for which the monochromatic laser radiation of a free-electron X-ray laser is unsuitable. We discuss the possibility of obtaining single-shot, angle-integrated rocking curves from CCB patterns, and the dependence of the resulting patterns on the focused beam coordinate when the beam diameter is larger or smaller than a nanocrystal, or smaller than one unit cell. We show how structure factor phase information is provided at overlapping interfering orders and how a common phase origin between different shots may be obtained. Their use in refinement of the phase-sensitive intensity between overlapping orders is suggested. PMID:24914153

  10. Coherent convergent-beam time-resolved X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Spence, John C H; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Li, Chufeng

    2014-07-17

    The use of coherent X-ray lasers for structural biology allows the use of nanometre diameter X-ray beams with large beam divergence. Their application to the structure analysis of protein nanocrystals and single particles raises new challenges and opportunities. We discuss the form of these coherent convergent-beam (CCB) hard X-ray diffraction patterns and their potential use for time-resolved crystallography, normally achieved by Laue (polychromatic) diffraction, for which the monochromatic laser radiation of a free-electron X-ray laser is unsuitable. We discuss the possibility of obtaining single-shot, angle-integrated rocking curves from CCB patterns, and the dependence of the resulting patterns on the focused beam coordinate when the beam diameter is larger or smaller than a nanocrystal, or smaller than one unit cell. We show how structure factor phase information is provided at overlapping interfering orders and how a common phase origin between different shots may be obtained. Their use in refinement of the phase-sensitive intensity between overlapping orders is suggested. PMID:24914153

  11. X-Ray Powder Diffraction as a Tool for the Identification of Impact Deformed Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huson, S.; Pope, M.; Foit, F.; Watkinson, A.

    2007-12-01

    Previous X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) studies indicated shock deformed minerals have broader XRD peaks when compared to those of unshocked samples. Entire XRD patterns, single peak profiles and Rietveld refined parameters of carbonate samples from the Sierra Madera impact crater, west Texas and the Mission Canyon Formation of southwest Montana and western Wyoming were used to evaluate the use of X-ray powder diffraction as a tool for distinguishing impact deformed rocks from tectonically deformed rocks. Both sample locations contain rocks subjected to varying degrees of deformation. At Sierra Madera dolostone and limestone samples were collected from the crater rim (lower shock intensity) and the central uplift (higher shock intensity). Carbonate rocks of the Mission Canyon Formation were sampled along a transect across the tectonic front of the Sevier and Laramide orogenies. Peaks in the XRD patterns of shocked calcite in samples from Sierra Madera are generally broader than those of calcite samples from the Mission Canyon Formation whereas peak broadening of shocked dolomite in samples from the outer central uplift of Sierra Madera is similar to those of Mission Canyon Formation samples. Single peak profile patterns of calcite and dolomite samples from both locations are complex and their full width half maxima (FWHM) show no relationship to shock intensity, especially above ~80 ° 2θ. Rietveld refinement of peak shape parameters yields a more precise measure of the 2θ angular dependence of peak FWHM and, therefore, the degree of shock deformation. FWHM values obtained from Rietveld crystal structure refinements increase with shock intensity for all Sierra Madera samples. Additionally, FWHM values of some tectonically deformed Mission Canyon Formation calcites overlap with those of weakly shocked calcite from the crater rim of Sierra Madera. FWHM values of shocked dolomite from the central uplift of Sierra Madera are distinctly higher than tectonically

  12. Application of focused-beam flat-sample method to synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction with anomalous scattering effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, M.; Katsuya, Y.; Matsushita, Y.

    2013-03-01

    The focused-beam flat-sample method (FFM), which is a method for high-resolution and rapid synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction measurements by combination of beam focusing optics, a flat shape sample and an area detector, was applied for diffraction experiments with anomalous scattering effect. The advantages of FFM for anomalous diffraction were absorption correction without approximation, rapid data collection by an area detector and good signal-to-noise ratio data by focusing optics. In the X-ray diffraction experiments of CoFe2O4 and Fe3O4 (By FFM) using X-rays near the Fe K absorption edge, the anomalous scattering effect between Fe/Co or Fe2+/Fe3+ can be clearly detected, due to the change of diffraction intensity. The change of observed diffraction intensity as the incident X-ray energy was consistent with the calculation. The FFM is expected to be a method for anomalous powder diffraction.

  13. Combined synchrotron X-ray tomography and X-ray powder diffraction using a fluorescing metal foil

    SciTech Connect

    Kappen, P.; Arhatari, B. D.; Luu, M. B.; Balaur, E.; Caradoc-Davies, T.

    2013-06-15

    This study realizes the concept of simultaneous micro-X-ray computed tomography and X-ray powder diffraction using a synchrotron beamline. A thin zinc metal foil was placed in the primary, monochromatic synchrotron beam to generate a divergent wave to propagate through the samples of interest onto a CCD detector for tomographic imaging, thus removing the need for large beam illumination and high spatial resolution detection. Both low density materials (kapton tubing and a piece of plant) and higher density materials (Egyptian faience) were investigated, and elemental contrast was explored for the example of Cu and Ni meshes. The viability of parallel powder diffraction using the direct beam transmitted through the foil was demonstrated. The outcomes of this study enable further development of the technique towards in situ tomography/diffraction studies combining micrometer and crystallographic length scales, and towards elemental contrast imaging and reconstruction methods using well defined fluorescence outputs from combinations of known fluorescence targets (elements).

  14. Characterization of the Structure of LaD 2.50by Neutron Powder Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udovic, T. J.; Huang, Q.; Rush, JJ

    1996-02-01

    Neutron powder diffraction (NPD) measurements of the rare-earth deuteride LaD2.50were undertaken between 10 and 430 K. Rietveld refinements indicated that, above ∼385 K, the LaD2.50structure is cubic (Fm3m) with deuterium fully occupying the tetrahedral (t) interstices of the fcc La lattice and the excess deuterium occupying a portion of the octahedral (o) interstices with full statistical disorder. As the temperature is decreased below ∼385 K, the LaD2.50structure undergoes a tetragonal distortion concomitant with the onset of deuterium long-range order (I41/amd) in the o sublattice, similar to previous structural results for the light-rare-earth deuteridesRD2+xfor 0.3

  15. Characterization of the intercalate C60(CO2)x by powder neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M.; Kennedy, S. J.; Elcombe, M. M.; Gadd, G. E.

    1998-12-01

    The intercalate compound C60(CO2)x has been synthesized by hot isostatically pressing C60 under 170 MPa of CO2 and 350 °C. Neutron powder diffraction studies conducted on C60(CO2)x between room temperature and 5 K have been analyzed using Rietveld techniques and reveal a structural transition between a high-temperature (>~250 K) face-centered cubic phase [Fm3¯m, a=14.224(2) Å (293 K)] and a low-temperature (<~150 K) monoclinic phase [P21/n, a=9.7438(9) Å, b=9.7473(9) Å, c=14.6121(11) Å, β=90.390(6)° (5 K)]. The CO2 molecules occupy the octahedral interstices between the C60 molecules and are oriented along the body diagonal of the high-temperature phase. In the low-temperature phase they are tilted slightly away from the c axis so as to place the oxygen atoms adjacent to the center of a pentagonal face on the C60 molecules.

  16. In-situ early-age hydration study of sulfobelite cements by synchrotron powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Álvarez-Pinazo, G.; Cuesta, A.; García-Maté, M.; Santacruz, I.; Losilla, E.R.; Fauth, F.; Aranda, M.A.G.; De la Torre, A.G.

    2014-02-15

    Eco-friendly belite calcium sulfoaluminate (BCSA) cement hydration behavior is not yet well understood. Here, we report an in-situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study for the first hours of hydration of BCSA cements. Rietveld quantitative phase analysis has been used to establish the degree of reaction (α). The hydration of a mixture of ye'elimite and gypsum revealed that ettringite formation (α ∼ 70% at 50 h) is limited by ye'elimite dissolution. Two laboratory-prepared BCSA cements were also studied: non-active-BCSA and active-BCSA cements, with β- and α′{sub H}-belite as main phases, respectively. Ye'elimite, in the non-active-BCSA system, dissolves at higher pace (α ∼ 25% at 1 h) than in the active-BCSA one (α ∼ 10% at 1 h), with differences in the crystallization of ettringite (α ∼ 30% and α ∼ 5%, respectively). This behavior has strongly affected subsequent belite and ferrite reactivities, yielding stratlingite and other layered phases in non-active-BCSA. The dissolution and crystallization processes are reported and discussed in detail. -- Highlights: •Belite calcium sulfoaluminate cements early hydration mechanism has been determined. •Belite hydration strongly depends on availability of aluminum hydroxide. •Orthorhombic ye’elimite dissolved at a higher pace than cubic one. •Ye’elimite larger reaction degree yields stratlingite formation by belite reaction. •Rietveld method quantified gypsum, anhydrite and bassanite dissolution rates.

  17. The Crystal Structures of two Anhydrous Magnesium Hydroxychloride Phases from in situ Synchrotron Powder Diffraction Data

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, J.C.; Dinnebier, R.E.; Halasz, I.; Freyer, D.

    2011-07-25

    The crystal structures of two members of the solid solution series Mg(OH){sub x}Cl{sub y}x+y = 2, Mg(OH){sub 1.7}Cl{sub 0.3} (P{sup {bar 3}}m1, a = 3.169(2) {angstrom}, c = 5.530(12), V = 48.1(1) {angstrom}{sup 3} at T = 365 C) and MgOHCl (R{sup {bar 3}}m, a = 3.3877(4) {angstrom}, c = 17.534(4) {angstrom}, V = 174.27(6) {angstrom}{sup 3} at T = 625 C) were determined from in situ synchrotron powder diffraction data at high temperature upon dehydration of 3Mg(OH){sub 2} {center_dot} MgCl{sub 2} {center_dot} 8H{sub 2}O (F3) and 5Mg(OH){sub 2} {center_dot} MgCl{sub 2} {center_dot} 8H{sub 2}O (F5) phases. The crystal structures of Mg(OH){sub 1.7}Cl{sub 0.3} (example of ss-type-OH) and MgOHCl (example of ss-type-Cl) can be related to the C19 (CdCl{sub 2}) and C6 (CdI{sub 2}) structure type, respectively, with the disordered chloride and hydroxide anions occupying the same crystallographic site in layers.

  18. Quantification of febuxostat polymorphs using powder X-ray diffraction technique.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jing-bo; Li, Gang; Sheng, Yue; Zhu, Mu-rong

    2015-03-25

    Febuxostat is a pharmaceutical compound with more than 20 polymorphs of which form A is most widely used and usually exists in a mixed polymorphic form with form G. In the present study, a quantification method for polymorphic form A and form G of febuxostat (FEB) has been developed using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). Prior to development of a quantification method, pure polymorphic form A and form G are characterized. A continuous scan with a scan rate of 3° min(-1) over an angular range of 3-40° 2θ is applied for the construction of the calibration curve using the characteristic peaks of form A at 12.78° 2θ (I/I0100%) and form G at 11.72° 2θ (I/I0100%). The linear regression analysis data for the calibration plots shows good linear relationship with R(2)=0.9985 with respect to peak area in the concentration range 10-60 wt.%. The method is validated for precision, recovery and ruggedness. The limits of detection and quantitation are 1.5% and 4.6%, respectively. The obtained results prove that the method is repeatable, sensitive and accurate. The proposed developed PXRD method can be applied for the quantitative analysis of mixtures of febuxostat polymorphs (forms A and G). PMID:25636167

  19. Structures of six industrial benzimidazolone pigments from laboratory powder diffraction data.

    PubMed

    van de Streek, Jacco; Brüning, Jürgen; Ivashevskaya, Svetlana N; Ermrich, Martin; Paulus, Erich F; Bolte, Michael; Schmidt, Martin U

    2009-04-01

    The crystal structures of six industrially produced benzimidazolone pigments [Pigment Orange 36 (beta phase), Pigment Orange 62, Pigment Yellow 151, Pigment Yellow 154 (alpha phase), Pigment Yellow 181 (beta phase) and Pigment Yellow 194] were determined from laboratory X-ray powder diffraction data by means of real-space methods using the programs DASH and MRIA, respectively. Subsequent Rietveld refinements were carried out with TOPAS. The crystal phases correspond to those produced industrially. Additionally, the crystal structures of the non-commercial compound 'BIRZIL' (a chloro derivative of Pigment Yellow 194) and of a dimethylsulfoxide solvate of Pigment Yellow 154 were determined by single-crystal structure analyses. All eight crystal structures are different; the six industrial pigments even exhibit five different hydrogen-bond topologies. Apparently, the good application properties of the benzimidazolone pigments are not the result of one specific hydrogen-bonding pattern, but are the result of a combination of efficient molecular packing and strong intermolecular hydrogen bonds. PMID:19299876

  20. Versatile in situ powder X-ray diffraction cells for solid–gas investigations

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Torben R.; Nielsen, Thomas K.; Filinchuk, Yaroslav; Jørgensen, Jens-Erik; Cerenius, Yngve; Gray, Evan MacA.; Webb, Colin J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes new sample cells and techniques for in situ powder X-ray diffraction specifically designed for gas absorption studies up to ca 300 bar (1 bar = 100 000 Pa) gas pressure. The cells are for multipurpose use, in particular the study of solid–gas reactions in dosing or flow mode, but can also handle samples involved in solid–liquid–gas studies. The sample can be loaded into a single-crystal sapphire (Al2O3) capillary, or a quartz (SiO2) capillary closed at one end. The advantages of a sapphire single-crystal cell with regard to rapid pressure cycling are discussed, and burst pressures are calculated and measured to be ∼300 bar. An alternative and simpler cell based on a thin-walled silicate or quartz glass capillary, connected to a gas source via a VCR fitting, enables studies up to ∼100 bar. Advantages of the two cell types are compared and their applications are illustrated by case studies. PMID:22477780

  1. Kinetics of methane hydrate decomposition studied via in situ low temperature X-ray powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Everett, S Michelle; Rawn, Claudia J; Keffer, David J; Mull, Derek L; Payzant, E Andrew; Phelps, Tommy J

    2013-05-01

    Gas hydrate is known to have a slowed decomposition rate at ambient pressure and temperatures below the melting point of ice. As hydrate exothermically decomposes, gas is released and water of the clathrate cages transforms into ice. Based on results from the decomposition of three nominally similar methane hydrate samples, the kinetics of two regions, 180-200 and 230-260 K, within the overall decomposition range 140-260 K, were studied by in situ low temperature X-ray powder diffraction. The kinetic rate constants, k(a), and the reaction mechanisms, n, for ice formation from methane hydrate were determined by the Avrami model within each region, and activation energies, E(a), were determined by the Arrhenius plot. E(a) determined from the data for 180-200 K was 42 kJ/mol and for 230-260 K was 22 kJ/mol. The higher E(a) in the colder temperature range was attributed to a difference in the microstructure of ice between the two regions. PMID:23557375

  2. A Powder Neutron Diffraction Study of Structure and Magnetism in NiCr 2S 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Anthony V.; Colgan, Douglas C.; Ritter, Clemens

    1997-11-01

    Powder neutron diffraction data for NiCr 2S 4have been collected over the temperature range 1.8≤ T≤286 K. The Cr 3S 4structure (space group I2/ m) is adopted at all temperatures. Refinement of 286 K data ( a=5.8954(14) Å, b=3.4066(8) Å, c=11.0589(22) Å, β=91.362(4)°) demonstrates that the distribution of nickel and chromium cations between sites in a fully occupied metal layer and sites in an ordered vacancy layer is close to that expected for the normal structure type. Data collected at 1.8 K ( a=5.8621(5) Å, b=3.4051(2) Å, c=11.0297(9) Å, β=91.607(6)°) reveal the presence of long-range magnetic order, involving a doubling of the unit cell in both the aand cdirections. Cations in the fully occupied metal layer possess an ordered magnetic moment of 1.57(6) μBwhich is directed parallel to the cation layers. Cations in the vacancy layer have a moment of 1.36(8) μBwhich is directed toward the anion layers. The magnetic ordering temperature was determined as 180(5) K. These results are correlated with magnetic susceptibility and electrical conductivity data.

  3. Kinetic Analyses of Cation Exchange Rates in Synthetic Birnessite Measured by Time- Resolved Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopano, C. L.; Heaney, P. J.; Post, J. E.; Bandstra, J.; Brantley, S. L.

    2006-05-01

    Birnessite is the most abundant and chemically important layer-structure Mn-oxide phase found in soils, desert varnishes, and ocean nodules. It also is industrially important for use in battery technology and octahedral sieves. Due to the poorly crystalline nature of natural birnessite, synthetic analogues typically have been employed in studies that explore the structural response of birnessite to variations in interlayer composition. For this work, we measured changes in unit-cell parameters over time to quantify the degree of cation exchange as a function of concentration. Aqueous K+, Cs+, and Ba2+ cations at varying concentrations at pH 7 were exchanged for interlayer Na+ in synthetic birnessite (Na0.58(Mn4+1.42,Mn3+0.58)O4·1.5H2O) using a simple flow- through cell, and the exchange products were monitored via time-resolved X-ray powder diffraction at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns were collected every 2-3 minutes. Rietveld analyses of X-ray diffraction patterns for K- and Ba-exchanged birnessite revealed a decrease in unit- cell volume over time. In contrast, Cs+ substitution increased cell volume. For all three cations, the crystallographic data indicate that exchange occurred in two stages. A rapid and dramatic change in unit-cell volume was followed by a modest adjustment over longer timescales. Fourier electron difference syntheses revealed that the rapid, initial stage of exchange was marked by re-configuration of the interlayer species, whereas the second, protracted phase of substitution represented ordering into the newly established interlayer positions. For the first time, we have modeled the kinetics of interlayer substitution in Na-birnessite. For purposes of comparison, we have employed a simple one-stage reaction (i.e., Na-birnessite → K-birnessite) and a two stage reaction (i.e,. Na-birnessite → K-birnessitedisordered → K- birnessiteordered). For exchange with 0.01 M KCl solutions, the single

  4. Hydrothermal synthesis of nanocrystalline ZnSe: An in situ synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, J.-E. Jensen, T.R.; Hanson, J.C.

    2008-08-15

    The hydrothermal synthesis of nanocrystalline ZnSe has been studied by in situ X-ray powder diffraction using synchrotron radiation. The formation of ZnSe was studied using the following starting mixtures: Zn+Se+H{sub 2}O (route A) and ZnCl{sub 2}+Se+H{sub 2}O+Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3} (route B). The route A experiment showed that Zn powder starts reacting with water at 134 deg. C giving ZnO and H{sub 2} followed by the formation of ZnSe which takes place in temperature range from 167 to 195 deg. C. The route B experiment shows a considerably more complex reaction path with several intermediate phases and in this case the formation of ZnSe starts at 141 deg. C and ZnSe and Se were the only crystalline phases observed at the end of the experiment where the temperature was 195 deg. C. The sizes of the nanocrystalline particles were determined to 18 and 9 nm in the route A and B experiments, respectively. Nanocrystalline ZnSe was also synthesized ex situ using the route A and B methods and characterized by conventional X-ray powder diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. An average crystalline domain size of ca. 8 nm was determined by X-ray powder diffraction in fair agreement with TEM images, which showed larger aggregates of nanoparticles having approximate diameters of 10 nm. Furthermore, a method for purification of the ZnSe nanoparticles was developed and the prepared particles showed signs of anisotropic size broadening of the diffraction peaks. - Graphical abstract: Stack of powder diagrams showing the formation of nanocrystalline ZnSe under hydrothermal conditions.

  5. In situ powder diffraction study of belite sulfoaluminate clinkering.

    PubMed

    De la Torre, Angeles G; Cuberos, Antonio J M; Alvarez-Pinazo, Gema; Cuesta, Ana; Aranda, Miguel A G

    2011-05-01

    Belite sulfoaluminate (BSA) cements have been proposed as environmentally friendly building materials, as their production may release up to 35% less CO(2) into the atmosphere when compared with ordinary Portland cement fabrication. However, their formation mechanism has not been studied in detail so far. Here, an in situ high-temperature high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study is reported. Two types of BSA clinkers have been characterized, both containing 50-60 wt% C(2)S and 20-30 wt% C(4)A(3)\\underline{\\rm S} as main phases. One type is iron-rich and a second type (with different phase assemblage) is aluminium-rich. Furthermore, the C(2)S phase reacts slowly with water, thus activation of this compound is desirable in order to enhance the mechanical strength development of the resulting cements. To do so, iron-rich BSA clinkers have been doped with minor amounts of B(2)O(3) and Na(2)O to promote stabilization of α-forms of C(2)S, which are more reactive with water. The decarbonated raw materials were loaded into Pt tubes and heated to between 973 K and 1673 K, and patterns were collected using a high-energy synchrotron beam of wavelength λ = 0.30 Å. The thermal stability of Klein's salt in these clinkers has been clarified. Several reactions have been followed: formation and decomposition of Klein's salt, melting of aluminates and ferrite, and polymorphic transformations of dicalcium silicate: alpha'H-C2S → α-C(2)S. Changes in mineralogical phase assemblages at a given temperature owing to the addition of minor amounts of selected elements have also been determined. PMID:21525661

  6. Locating Organic Guests in Inorganic Host Materials from X-ray Powder Diffraction Data.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Stef; McCusker, Lynne B; Baerlocher, Christian; Elomari, Saleh; Xie, Dan; Zones, Stacey I

    2016-06-01

    Can the location of the organic structure-directing agent (SDA) inside the channel system of a zeolite be determined experimentally in a systematic manner? In an attempt to answer this question, we investigated six borosilicate zeolites of known framework structure (SSZ-53, SSZ-55, SSZ-56, SSZ-58, SSZ-59, and SSZ-60), where the location of the SDA had only been simulated using molecular modeling techniques in previous studies. From synchrotron powder diffraction data, we were able to retrieve reliable experimental positions for the SDA by using a combination of simulated annealing (global optimization) and Rietveld refinement. In this way, problems arising from data quality and only partially compatible framework and SDA symmetries, which can lead to indecipherable electron density maps, can be overcome. Rietveld refinement using geometric restraints were then performed to optimize the positions and conformations of the SDAs. With these improved models, it was possible to go on to determine the location of the B atoms in the framework structure. That is, two pieces of information that are key to the understanding of zeolite synthesis-the location of the organic SDA in the channel system and of the positions adopted by heteroatoms in the silicate framework-can be extracted from experimental data using a systematic strategy. In most cases, the locations of the SDAs determined experimentally compare well with those simulated with molecular modeling, but there are also some clear differences, and the reason for these differences can be understood. The approach is generally applicable, and has also been used to locate organic guests, linkers, and ligands in metal-organic compounds. PMID:27181421

  7. Structural and Thermal Characterization of Zolpidem Hemitartrate Hemihydrate (Form E) and Its Decomposition Products by Laboratory X-Ray Powder Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Halasz, I.; Dinnebier, R

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of zolpidem hemitartrate hemihydrate (I, Form E) has been solved from high-resolution laboratory powder diffraction data. It crystallizes in the orthorhombic P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} space group with a = 22.4664(6) {angstrom}, b = 26.0420(7) {angstrom}, and c = 7.4391(1) {angstrom}. Protonation of zolpidem molecules could not be unambiguously determined. Thermal stability of Form E has been investigated by TG-DTA and in situ by temperature resolved X-ray powder diffraction. Water loss occurs between 50 C {le} t {le} 100 C while structure decomposition commences at approximately 120 C yielding zolpidem tartrate (II) and pure zolpidem base (III) in approximately equimolar amounts. Crystal structures of II and III have been solved simultaneously from a single powder pattern of thermally decomposed I. Zolpidem tartrate crystallizes in the orthorhombic P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} space group with a = 19.9278(8) {angstrom}, b = 15.1345(8) {angstrom}, and c = 7.6246(2) {angstrom} (at 140 C). Zolpidem base crystallizes in the orthorhombic Pcab space group with a = 9.9296(4) {angstrom}, b = 18.4412(9) {angstrom}, and c = 18.6807(9) {angstrom} (at 140 C). In the reported crystal structures zolpidem molecules form stacks through {pi}-{pi} interaction or dipole-dipole interactions while tartrate moieties, if present, form hydrogen bonded chains. Water molecule in I forms a hydrogen bond to the imidazole nitrogen atom of the zolpidem molecule. Free space in the crystal structure of I could allow for the additional water molecules and thus a variable water content.

  8. Synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data of LASSBio-1515: A new N-acylhydrazone derivative compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, F. N.; Braz, D.; Ferreira, F. F.; da Silva, T. F.; Barreiro, E. J.; Lima, L. M.; Colaço, M. V.; Kuplich, L.; Barroso, R. C.

    2014-02-01

    In this work, synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data allowed for a successful indexing of LASSBio-1515 compound, candidate to analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity. X-ray powder diffraction data collected in transmission and high-throughput geometries were used to analyze this compound. The X-ray wavelength of the synchrotron radiation used in this study was determined to be λ=1.55054 Å. LASSBio-1515 was found to be monoclinic with space group P21/c and unit cell parameters a=11.26255(16) Å, b=12.59785(16) Å, c=8.8540(1) Å, β=90.5972(7)° and V=1256.17(3) Å3.

  9. Study of polymorphism of Atenolol and Captopril antihypertensives using x-ray powder diffraction and Rietveld refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Juliana; Ferreira, Fabio

    2013-03-01

    Characterization of bulk drugs has become increasingly important in the pharmaceutical industry. X-ray powder diffractometry is an effective technique for the identification of crystalline solid-phase drugs. The technique is unique, since it combines specificity with a high degree of accuracy for the characterization of pharmaceuticals in solid state and is an especially useful method to describe the possible polymorphic behavior of drugs substances. In this work X-ray diffraction data have been obtained for two well-known antihypertensive drugs currently being administered in tablet form. They include atenolol and captopril. Atenolol and captopril were purchased from drugstore. The characterizations of the atenolol and captopril samples were carried out by FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). We would like to thank the Brazilian agencies CNPq and FAPESP for their financial support.

  10. Characterization of high energy Xe ion irradiation effects in single crystal molybdenum with depth-resolved synchrotron microbeam diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Di; Miao, Yinbin; Xu, Ruqing; Mei, Zhigang; Mo, Kun; Mohamed, Walid; Ye, Bei; Pellin, Michael J.; Yacout, Abdellatif M.

    2016-04-01

    Microbeam X-ray diffraction experiments were conducted at beam line 34-ID of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) on fission fragment energy Xe heavy ion irradiated single crystal Molybdenum (Mo). Lattice strain measurements were obtained with a depth resolution of 0.7 μm, which is critical in resolving the peculiar heterogeneity of irradiation damage associated with heavy ion irradiation. Q-space diffraction peak shift measurements were correlated with lattice strain induced by the ion irradiations. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterizations were performed on the as-irradiated materials as well. Nanometer sized Xe bubble microstructures were observed via TEM. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to help interpret the lattice strain measurement results from the experiment. This study showed that the irradiation effects by fission fragment energy Xe ion irradiations can be collaboratively understood with the depth resolved X-ray diffraction and TEM measurements under the assistance of MD simulations.

  11. Direct Observation of Phase Transformations in Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds Using In-situ Spatially Resolved and Time-resolved X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J.; Wong, J.; Ressler, T.

    1999-09-23

    Spatially resolved x-ray diffraction (SRXRD) and time resolved x-ray diffraction (TRXRD) were used to investigate real time solid state phase transformations and solidification in AISI type 304 stainless steel gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds. These experiments were conducted at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) using a high flux beam line. Spatially resolved observations of {gamma} {leftrightarrow} {delta} solid state phase transformations were performed in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of moving welds and time-resolved observations of the solidification sequence were performed in the fusion zone (FZ) of stationary welds after the arc had been terminated. Results of the moving weld experiments showed that the kinetics of the {gamma}{yields}{delta} phase transformation on heating in the HAZ were sufficiently rapid to transform a narrow region surrounding the liquid weld pool to the {delta} ferrite phase. Results of the stationary weld experiments showed, for the first time, that solidification can occur directly to the {delta} ferrite phase, which persisted as a single phase for 0.5s. Upon solidification to {delta}, the {delta} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation followed and completed in 0.2s as the weld cooled further to room temperature.

  12. Baromagnetic Effect in Antiperovskite Mn3 Ga0.95 N0.94 by Neutron Powder Diffraction Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kewen; Sun, Ying; Yan, Jun; Deng, Sihao; Wang, Lei; Wu, Hui; Hu, Pengwei; Lu, Huiqing; Malik, Muhammad Imran; Huang, Qingzhen; Wang, Cong

    2016-05-01

    A baromagnetic effect in a novel tetragonal magnetic structure is introduced by vacancies in Mn3 Ga0.95 N0.94 , due to the change of the Mn-Mn distance and their spin re-orientation induced by a pressure field. This effect is proven for the first time in antiperovskite compounds by neutron powder diffraction analysis. This feature will enable wide applications in magnetoelectric devices and intelligent instruments. PMID:27007214

  13. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Nanocrystalline ZnSe: An in situ Synchrotron Radiation X-ray Powder Diffraction Study

    SciTech Connect

    Joergensen,J.; Jensen, T.; Hanson, J.

    2008-01-01

    The hydrothermal synthesis of nanocrystalline ZnSe has been studied by in situ X-ray powder diffraction using synchrotron radiation. The formation of ZnSe was studied using the following starting mixtures: Zn+Se+H2O (route A) and ZnCl2+Se+H2O+Na2SO3 (route B). The route A experiment showed that Zn powder starts reacting with water at 134 C giving ZnO and H2 followed by the formation of ZnSe which takes place in temperature range from 167 to 195 C. The route B experiment shows a considerably more complex reaction path with several intermediate phases and in this case the formation of ZnSe starts at 141 C and ZnSe and Se were the only crystalline phases observed at the end of the experiment where the temperature was 195 C. The sizes of the nanocrystalline particles were determined to 18 and 9 nm in the route A and B experiments, respectively. Nanocrystalline ZnSe was also synthesized ex situ using the route A and B methods and characterized by conventional X-ray powder diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. An average crystalline domain size of ca. 8 nm was determined by X-ray powder diffraction in fair agreement with TEM images, which showed larger aggregates of nanoparticles having approximate diameters of 10 nm. Furthermore, a method for purification of the ZnSe nanoparticles was developed and the prepared particles showed signs of anisotropic size broadening of the diffraction peaks.

  14. Effect of Stacking Faults on the X-Ray Diffraction Profiles of Beta-SiC Powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pujar, Vijay V.; Cawley, James D.; Levine, Stanley R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns or beta-SiC (3C or the cubic polytype or sic) powders often exhibit an additional peak at d = 0.266 nm, high background intensity around the (111) peak, and relative intensities for peaks which differ from those predicted from the crystal structure. Computer simulations were used to show that all these features are due to stacking faults in the powders and not due to the presence of other polytypes in the powders. Such simulations allow diffraction patterns to be generated for different types, frequencies, and spatial distribution or faults. Comparison of the simulation results to the XRD data indicates that the B-SiC particles consist either of heavily faulted clusters distributed irregularly between regions that have only occasional faults or twins, or the powders consist of two types of particles with different populations of faults: those with a high density of faults and those with only twins or occasional faults. Additional information is necessary to determine which description is correct. However, the simulation results can be used to rule out certain fault configurations.

  15. Powder diffraction pattern fitting and structure refinement by means of the CPSR v.3.1 software package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Yu. G.; Lundström, T.; Sorokin, N. I.

    1995-02-01

    An updated version of the CPSR software package for powder pattern fitting and structure refinement offers major advantages over previous versions. An optional use of the new figure-of-merit function, that takes into account a systematic behaviour of residuals, allows users to reduce the effect of local correlations at the full-profile fitting stage, thus providing more reliable estimates for integrated intensities and their deviances. The structure refinement stage in such a case yields accurate values for estimated standard deviations of structural parameters since, in addition, model errors affecting calculated integrated intensities are taken into consideration. Furthermore, the new CPSR version is customized for a variety of constant-wavelength neutron and X-ray diffraction techniques and is equipped with an enhanced menu structure. Graphical on-screen-controlled support allows users to follow the progress of a fitting procedure over any region of a powder pattern. The program performance is illustrated using the neutron diffraction data file for PbSO 4 distributed during the Rietveld refinement round robin, organized by the IUCr Commission on Powder Diffraction.

  16. An Implementation of the Fundamental Parameters Approach for Analysis of X-ray Powder Diffraction Line Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Mullen, Katharine; Cline, James P.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents an open implementation of the Fundamental Parameters Approach (FPA) models for analysis of X-ray powder diffraction line profiles. The original literature describing these models was examined and code was developed to allow for their use within a Python based least squares refinement algorithm. The NIST interest in the FPA method is specific to its ability to account for the optical aberrations of the powder diffraction experiment allowing for an accurate assessment of lattice parameter values. Lattice parameters are one of the primary certified measurands of NIST Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) for powder diffraction. Lattice parameter values obtained from analysis of data from SRMs 640e and 660c using both the NIST FPA Python code and the proprietary, commercial code Topas, that constitutes the only other actively supported, complete implementation of FPA models within a least-squares data analysis environment, agreed to within 2 fm. This level of agreement demonstrates that both the NIST code and Topas constitute an accurate implementation of published FPA models. PMID:26958448

  17. An Implementation of the Fundamental Parameters Approach for Analysis of X-ray Powder Diffraction Line Profiles.

    PubMed

    Mendenhall, Marcus H; Mullen, Katharine; Cline, James P

    2015-01-01

    This work presents an open implementation of the Fundamental Parameters Approach (FPA) models for analysis of X-ray powder diffraction line profiles. The original literature describing these models was examined and code was developed to allow for their use within a Python based least squares refinement algorithm. The NIST interest in the FPA method is specific to its ability to account for the optical aberrations of the powder diffraction experiment allowing for an accurate assessment of lattice parameter values. Lattice parameters are one of the primary certified measurands of NIST Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) for powder diffraction. Lattice parameter values obtained from analysis of data from SRMs 640e and 660c using both the NIST FPA Python code and the proprietary, commercial code Topas, that constitutes the only other actively supported, complete implementation of FPA models within a least-squares data analysis environment, agreed to within 2 fm. This level of agreement demonstrates that both the NIST code and Topas constitute an accurate implementation of published FPA models. PMID:26958448

  18. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction and calorimetric studies at low scan rates

    PubMed Central

    Tenchov, Boris G.; Yao, Haruhiko; Hatta, Ichiro

    1989-01-01

    The phase transitions in fully hydrated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and DPPC/water/ethanol phases have been studied by lowangle time-resolved x-ray diffraction under conditions similar to those employed in calorimetry (scan rates 0.05-0.5°C/min and uniform temperature throughout the samples). This approach provides more adequate characterization of the equilibrium transition pathways and allows for close correlations between structural and thermodynamic data. No coexistence of the rippled gel (Pβ') and liquid-crystalline (Lα) phases was found in the main transition of DPPC; rather, a loss of correlation in the lamellar structure, observed as broadening of the lamellar reflections, takes place in a narrow temperature range of ∼100 mK at the transition midpoint. Formation of a long-living metastable phase, denoted by Pβ'(mst), differing from the initial Pβ' was observed in cooling direction by both x-ray diffraction and calorimetry. No direct conversion of Pβ'(mst) into Pβ' occurs for over 24 h but only by way of the phase sequence Pβ'(mst) → Lβ' → Pβ'. According to differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the enthalpy of the Pβ'(mst)-Lα transition is by ∼5% lower than that of the Pβ'-Lα transition. The effects of ethanol (Rowe, E. S. 1983. Biochemistry. 22:3299-3305; Simon, S. A., and T. J. McIntosh. 1984. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 773:169-172) on the mechanism and reversibility of the DPPC main transition were clearly visualized. At ethanol concentrations inducing formation of interdigitated gel phase, the main transition proceeds through a coexistence of the initial and final phases over a finite temperature range. During the subtransition in DPPC recorded at scan rate 0.3°C/min, a smooth monotonic increase of the lamellar spacing from its subgel (Lc) to its gel (Lβ') phase value takes place. The width of the lamellar reflections remains unchanged during this transformation. This provides grounds to propose a

  19. Powder diffraction studies in the YONO{sub 3}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} system

    SciTech Connect

    Pelloquin, D.; Loueer, M.; Loueer, D.

    1994-09-01

    The crystal structure of yttrium oxide nitrate and the microstructure of the oxide obtained from its thermal decomposition have been investigated by modern powder diffraction methods. Sequential high-temperature diffraction studies of the thermal decomposition of two precursors of yttrium oxide nitrate, i.e., neutral yttrium nitrate and yttrium hydroxide nitrate, are reported. The structure of YONO{sub 3} has been determined ab initio from conventional powder diffractometry using monochromatic X-rays. The pattern was indexed by the successive dichotomy method yielding tetragonal unit cell dimensions: a = 3.8590(1) {angstrom} and c = 9.7161(6) {angstrom}. The space group is P4/nmm and Z = 2. Most of the atoms were located by direct methods and the remaining ones from a Fourier map. Refinement of the complete diffraction profile parameters converged to final agreement factors R{sub p} = 0.12, R{sub wp} = 0.16 and R{sub F} = 0.039. The structure is closely related to the matlockite PbFCl-type structure. The microstructure of ex-oxide-nitrate yttrium oxide has been analysed by total pattern fitting techniques, from which strain-free coherently diffracting nanodomains with a rectangular parallelepipedic shape have been obtained.

  20. Examination of Short- and Long-Range Atomic Order Nanocrystalline SiC and Diamond by Powder Diffraction Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Grzanka, E.; Stelmakh, S.; Gierlotka, S.; Weber, H.-P.; Proffen, T.; Palosz, W.

    2002-01-01

    The real atomic structure of nanocrystals determines unique, key properties of the materials. Determination of the structure presents a challenge due to inherent limitations of standard powder diffraction techniques when applied to nanocrystals. Alternate methodology of the structural analysis of nanocrystals (several nanometers in size) based on Bragg-like scattering and called the "apparent lattice parameter" (alp) is proposed. Application of the alp methodology to examination of the core-shell model of nanocrystals will be presented. The results of application of the alp method to structural analysis of several nanopowders were complemented by those obtained by determination of the Atomic Pair Distribution Function, PDF. Based on synchrotron and neutron diffraction data measured in a large diffraction vector of up to Q = 25 Angstroms(exp -1), the surface stresses in nanocrystalline diamond and SiC were evaluated.

  1. A Rietveld refinement method for angular- and wavelength-dispersive neutron time-of-flight powder diffraction data

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Philipp; Houben, Andreas; Schweika, Werner; Tchougréeff, Andrei L.; Dronskowski, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a two-dimensional extension of the well established Rietveld refinement method for modeling neutron time-of-flight powder diffraction data. The novel approach takes into account the variation of two parameters, diffraction angle 2θ and wavelength λ, to optimally adapt to the varying resolution function in diffraction experiments. By doing so, the refinement against angular- and wavelength-dispersive data gets rid of common data-reduction steps and also avoids the loss of high-resolution information typically introduced by integration. In a case study using a numerically simulated diffraction pattern of Rh0.81Fe3.19N taking into account the layout of the future POWTEX instrument, the profile function as parameterized in 2θ and λ is extracted. As a proof-of-concept, the resulting instrument parameterization is then utilized to perform a typical refinement of the angular- and wavelength-dispersive diffraction pattern of CuNCN, yielding excellent residuals within feasible computational efforts. Another proof-of-concept is carried out by applying the same approach to a real neutron diffraction data set of CuNCN obtained from the POWGEN instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge. The paper highlights the general importance of the novel approach for data analysis at neutron time-of-flight diffractometers and its possible inclusion within existing Rietveld software packages. PMID:26664340

  2. New routes to synthesizing an ordered perovskite CaCu3Fe2Sb2O12 and its magnetic structure by neutron powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Larregola, Sebastian A; Zhou, Jianshi; Alonso, Jose A; Pomjakushin, Vladimir; Goodenough, John B

    2014-05-01

    The search for new double-perovskite oxides has grown rapidly in recent years because of their interesting physical properties like ferroelectricity, magnetism, and multiferroics. The synthesis of double perovskites, especially the A-site-ordered perovskites, in most cases needs to be made under high pressure, which is a drawback for applying these materials. Here we have demonstrated synthetic routes at ambient pressure by which we have obtained a high-quality duo-sites-ordered double perovskite, CaCu3Fe2Sb2O12, which has been previously synthesized under high pressure. The availability of a large quantity of the powder sample allows us to determine the crystal and magnetic structures by neutron powder diffraction (NPD) at 300 and 1.3 K. Measurements of the magnetization and heat capacity showed a ferrimagnetic transition at 160 K. A ferrimagnetic structure consisting of the uncompensated antiferromagnetic coupling between neighboring collinear copper and iron spins has been resolved from the low-temperature NPD data. PMID:24716725

  3. In situ X-ray powder diffraction, synthesis, and magnetic properties of InVO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, Rylan J.; Cranswick, Lachlan M.D.; Bieringer, Mario . E-mail: Mario_Bieringer@umanitoba.ca

    2006-12-15

    We report the first synthesis and high-temperature in situ X-ray diffraction study of InVO{sub 3}. Polycrystalline InVO{sub 3} has been prepared via reduction of InVO{sub 4} using a carbon monoxide/carbon dioxide buffer gas. InVO{sub 3} crystallizes in the bixbyite structure in space group Ia-3 (206) with a=9.80636(31) A with In{sup 3+}/V{sup 3+} disorder on the (8b) and (24d) cation sites. In situ powder X-ray diffraction experiments and thermal gravimetric analysis in a CO/CO{sub 2} buffer gas revealed the existence of the metastable phase InVO{sub 3}. Bulk samples with 98.5(2)% purity were prepared using low-temperature reduction methods. The preparative methods limited the crystallinity of this new phase to approximately 225(50) A. Magnetic susceptibility and neutron diffraction experiments suggest a spin-glass ground state for InVO{sub 3}. - Graphical abstract: In situ powder X-ray diffractograms for the reduction of InVO{sub 4} in CO/CO{sub 2}. The three temperature regions show the conversion of InVO{sub 4} to InVO{sub 3} and final decomposition into In{sub 2}O{sub 3} and V{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  4. The use of net analyte signal orthogonalization in the separation of multi-component diffraction patterns obtained from X-ray powder diffraction of intact compacts.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael D; Cogdill, Robert P; Short, Steven M; Hair, Colleen R; Wildfong, Peter L D

    2008-06-01

    X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) analysis of intact multi-component consolidated mixtures has significant potential owing to the ability to non-destructively quantify and discriminate between solid phases in composite bodies with minimal sample preparation. There are, however, limitations to the quantitative power using traditional univariate methods on diffraction data containing features from all components in the system. The ability to separate multi-component diffraction data into patterns representing single constituents allows both composition as well as physical phenomena associated with the individual components of complex systems to be probed. Intact, four-component compacts, consisting of two crystalline and two amorphous constituents were analyzed using XRPD configured in both traditional Bragg-Brentano reflectance geometry and parallel-beam transmission geometry. Two empirical, model-based methods consisting of a multiple step net analyte signal (NAS) orthogonalization are presented as ways to separate multi-component XRPD patterns into single constituent patterns. Multivariate figures of merit (FOM) were calculated for each of the isolated constituents to compare method-specific parameters such as sensitivity, selectivity, and signal-to-noise, enabling quantitative comparisons between the two modes of XRPD analysis. PMID:18294800

  5. Crystal structure of anhydrous tripotassium citrate from laboratory X-ray powder diffraction data and DFT comparison.

    PubMed

    Rammohan, Alagappa; Kaduk, James A

    2016-08-01

    The crystal structure of anhydrous tripotassium citrate, [K3(C6H5O7)] n , has been solved and refined using laboratory X-ray powder diffraction data, and optimized using density functional techniques. The three unique potassium cations are 6-, 8-, and 6-coordinate (all irregular). The [KO n ] coordination polyhedra share edges and corners to form a three-dimensional framework, with channels running parallel to the c axis. The only hydrogen bond is an intra-molecular one involving the hy-droxy group and the central carboxyl-ate group, with graph-set motif S(5). PMID:27536403

  6. Crystal structure of anhydrous tripotassium citrate from laboratory X-ray powder diffraction data and DFT comparison

    PubMed Central

    Rammohan, Alagappa; Kaduk, James A.

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structure of anhydrous tripotassium citrate, [K3(C6H5O7)]n, has been solved and refined using laboratory X-ray powder diffraction data, and optimized using density functional techniques. The three unique potassium cations are 6-, 8-, and 6-coordinate (all irregular). The [KOn] coordination polyhedra share edges and corners to form a three-dimensional framework, with channels running parallel to the c axis. The only hydrogen bond is an intra­molecular one involving the hy­droxy group and the central carboxyl­ate group, with graph-set motif S(5). PMID:27536403

  7. Anisotropic atom displacement in Pd nanocubes resolved by molecular dynamics simulations supported by x-ray diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scardi, P.; Leonardi, A.; Gelisio, L.; Suchomel, M. R.; Sneed, B. T.; Sheehan, M. K.; Tsung, C.-K.

    2015-04-01

    Nearly identical Pd nanocubes yield an x-ray powder diffraction pattern with interference fringes affording access to unprecedented structural details of nanocrystal size, shape, and complex atomic displacement for a billion-sized population. The excellent agreement between diffraction data and molecular dynamics (MD) provides strong experimental validation of MD simulations and the proposed data-interpretation paradigm. These results show that individual atomic displacements within the nanocubes are not only a function of disrupted bonds and the crystallographic plane of the adjacent surface, but are complex strain gradients extending across all surfaces of the particle strongly influenced by atomic displacements. This observation of nonuniform surface strain and the manner in which it is affected by different sizes, shapes, and locations within each facet could be the key to understanding many surface related properties of shaped nanocrystals including those associated with important catalysis applications.

  8. Synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction and convergent beam electron diffraction studies on the cubic phase of MgV{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel

    SciTech Connect

    Niitaka, Seiji; Lee, Soyeon; Oshima, Yoshifumi; Kato, Kenichi; Hashizume, Daisuke; Takata, Masaki; Takagi, Hidenori

    2014-07-01

    The A V{sub 2}O{sub 4} (A=Mg{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}) spinels are three-dimensional spin-1 frustrated systems with orbital degree of freedom, which have been known to possess intriguing orbital states causing releases of spin frustration at low temperatures. We have performed synchrotron X-ray and convergent beam electron diffraction measurements for one of these vanadates, MgV{sub 2}O{sub 4} in order to clarify its crystal structure in the high temperature cubic phase, which is regarded as an important starting point for understanding the details of the low temperature phase. We have successfully observed that the [001] zone axis convergent beam electron diffraction pattern exhibits 4mm symmetry, suggesting the space group of Fd3{sup ¯}m in the cubic MgV{sub 2}O{sub 4}. It has also been demonstrated that the crystal structure of the cubic MgV{sub 2}O{sub 4} contains VO{sub 6} octahedra elongated along the threefold rotation axis. Based on our results, we discuss the orbital states of MgV{sub 2}O{sub 4} as well as the other spinel vanadates. - Graphical abstract: Precise geometry of the VO{sub 6} octahedra in the cubic phase of MgV{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel determined with the synchrotron powder XRD data. - Highlights: • We examined the crystal structure of the cubic phase of MgV{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel. • We prepared the single crystal and powdered sample of MgV{sub 2}O{sub 4} with high quality. • The result of the CBED measurement agrees with the space group of Fd3{sup ¯}m in the phase. • The cubic phase has VO{sub 6} octahedra elongated along the threefold rotation axis.

  9. Comparing ultrafast surface and bulk heating using time-resolved electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Streubühr, C.; Kalus, A.; Zhou, P. Kammler, M.; Linde, D. von der; Ligges, M.; Hanisch-Blicharski, A.; Bovensiepen, U.; Horn-von Hoegen, M.

    2014-04-21

    From measurements of the transient Debye-Waller effect in Bismuth, we determine the buildup time of the random atomic motion resulting from the electronic relaxation after short pulse laser excitation. The surface sensitive reflection high energy electron diffraction and transmission electron diffraction yield a time constant of about 12 ps and 3 ps, respectively. The different energy transfer rates indicate relatively weak coupling between bulk and surface vibrational modes.

  10. In situ energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction system for time-resolved thin-film growth studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellmer, K.; Mientus, R.; Weiß, V.; Rossner, H.

    2003-03-01

    Energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXRD) with synchrotron light can be used for in situ-structural analysis during polycrystalline thin-film growth, due to its fast data collection and the fixed diffraction angle. An in situ deposition and analysis set-up for the investigation of nucleation and growth of thin films during magnetron sputtering was constructed and installed at the synchrotron radiation source Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungs Labor (Hamburg). The polychromatic synchrotron beam passes the sputtering chamber through Kapton windows and hits the substrate with the growing film. The diffracted beam, observed under a fixed diffraction angle of between 1° and 10° was energy-analysed by a high-purity germanium detector. The measurement time for a single XRD spectrum can be as short as 10 s for a beam line at a bending magnet, which allows a time-resolved monitoring of film growth. The performance of the in situ EDXRD set-up is demonstrated for the growth of zinc oxide and tin-doped indium oxide films prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering from ceramic and metallic targets. From the position and the width of the diffraction lines the internal mechanical strain and the grain size of the growing films can be derived. The prospects for thin-film growth investigations using such an instrument are assessed.

  11. Structural analysis of lead magnesium niobate using synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction and the Rietveld method.

    PubMed

    Bhakar, Ashok; Pandey, Adityanarayan H; Singh, M N; Upadhyay, Anuj; Sinha, A K; Gupta, S M; Ganguli, Tapas

    2016-06-01

    The room-temperature synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction pattern of the single phase perovskite lead magnesium niobate (PMN) has shown significant broadening in the q range ∼ 5-7 Å(-1) compared with standard LaB6 synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data, taken under similar conditions. This broadening/asymmetry lies mainly towards the lower 2θ side of the Bragg peaks. Attempts to fit this data with the paraelectric cubic phase (Pm\\bar 3m) and the local rhombohedral phase (R3m) corresponding to polar nanoregions (PNRs) are made using the Rietveld method. Rietveld refinements show that neither cubic (Pm\\bar 3m) nor rhombohedral (R3m) symmetry can fit this XRD pattern satisfactorily. The two-phase refinement fits the experimental data satisfactorily and suggests that the weight percentage of the PNRs is approximately 12-16% at room temperature. The unit-cell volume of these rhombohedral PNRs is approximately 0.15% larger than that of the unit cell volume of the paraelectric cubic phase. PMID:27240772

  12. Local order and orientational correlations in liquid and crystalline phases of carbon tetrabromide from neutron powder diffraction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temleitner, L.; Pusztai, L.

    2010-04-01

    The liquid, plastic crystalline and ordered crystalline phases of CBr4 were studied using neutron-powder diffraction. The measured total scattering differential cross sections were modeled by reverse Monte Carlo simulation techniques ( RMC++ and RMCPOW). Following successful simulations, the single-crystal-diffraction pattern of the plastic phase as well as partial radial distribution functions and orientational correlations for all the three phases have been calculated from the atomic coordinates (particle configurations). The single-crystal pattern, calculated from a configuration that had been obtained from modeling the powder pattern, shows identical behavior to the recent single-crystal data of Folmer [Phys. Rev. B 77, 144205 (2008)]. The BrBr partial radial-distribution functions of the liquid and plastic crystalline phases are almost the same while CC correlations clearly display long-range ordering in the latter phase. Orientational correlations also suggest strong similarities between liquid and plastic crystalline phases whereas the monoclinic phase behaves very differently. Orientations of the molecules are distinct in the ordered phase whereas in the plastic crystal their distribution seems to be isotropic.

  13. Beamline P02.1 at PETRA III for high-resolution and high-energy powder diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Dippel, Ann-Christin; Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Delitz, Jan Torben; Walter, Peter; Schulte-Schrepping, Horst; Seeck, Oliver H.; Franz, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Powder X-ray diffraction techniques largely benefit from the superior beam quality provided by high-brilliance synchrotron light sources in terms of photon flux and angular resolution. The High Resolution Powder Diffraction Beamline P02.1 at the storage ring PETRA III (DESY, Hamburg, Germany) combines these strengths with the power of high-energy X-rays for materials research. The beamline is operated at a fixed photon energy of 60 keV (0.207 Å wavelength). A high-resolution monochromator generates the highly collimated X-ray beam of narrow energy bandwidth. Classic crystal structure determination in reciprocal space at standard and non-ambient conditions are an essential part of the scientific scope as well as total scattering analysis using the real space information of the pair distribution function. Both methods are complemented by in situ capabilities with time-resolution in the sub-second regime owing to the high beam intensity and the advanced detector technology for high-energy X-rays. P02.1’s efficiency in solving chemical and crystallographic problems is illustrated by presenting key experiments that were carried out within these fields during the early stage of beamline operation. PMID:25931084

  14. Azine bridged silver coordination polymers: Powder X-ray diffraction route to crystal structure determination of silver benzotriazole

    SciTech Connect

    Rajeswaran, Manju . E-mail: manju.rajeswaran@kodak.com; Blanton, Thomas N.; Giesen, David J.; Whitcomb, David R.; Zumbulyadis, Nicholas; Antalek, Brian J.; Neumann, Marcus M.; Misture, Scott T.

    2006-04-15

    In continuation of our interest in solid-state structures of silver complexes of photographic importance, the structure for silver benzotriazole (AgBZT), has now been obtained. The preferred method for solving crystal structures is via single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD). However, for some materials, growing single crystals of appropriate size and quality is often difficult or even impossible. AgBZT is an example of such a silver complex with poor solubility. The usual routes to preparing single crystals using recrystallization from a cooperating solvent resulted in polycrystalline powder samples. We propose a crystal structure for AgBZT, solved from synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data, using a direct-space Monte Carlo simulated annealing approach. AgBZT crystals are monoclinic (P2{sub 1} /c), with unit cell dimensions, a=14.8052(3) A, b=3.7498(4) A, c=12.3495(12) A, and {beta}=114.200(6){sup o}. The AgBZT complex is constructed from all three of the Benzotriazole (BZT) nitrogens bonding to a separate silver atom. As a consequence of this bonding mode, the structure is a highly cross-linked, coordination polymer.

  15. Apparatus and Techniques for Time-resolved Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction using Diamond Anvil Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J.; Sinogeikin, S. V.; Lin, C.; Rod, E.; Bai, L.; Shen, G.

    2015-12-01

    Complementary advances in synchrotron sources, x-ray optics, area detectors, and sample environment control have recently made possible many time-resolved experimental techniques for studying materials at extreme pressure and temperature conditions. The High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT) at the Advanced Photon Source has made a sustained effort to assemble a powerful collection of high-pressure apparatus for time-resolved research, and considerable time has been invested in developing techniques for collecting high-quality time-resolved x-ray scattering data. Herein we present key aspects of the synchrotron beamline and ancillary equipment, including source considerations, rapid (de)compression apparatus, high frequency imaging detectors, and software suitable for processing large volumes of data. A number of examples are presented, including fast equation of state measurements, compression rate dependent synthesis of metastable states in silicon and germanium, and ultrahigh compression rates using a piezoelectric driven diamond anvil cell.

  16. Time-resolved measurements with streaked diffraction patterns from electrons generated in laser plasma wakefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alec; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond bunches of electrons with relativistic to ultra-relativistic energies can be robustly produced in laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA). Scaling the electron energy down to sub-relativistic and MeV level using a millijoule laser system will make such electron source a promising candidate for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications due to the intrinsic short bunch duration and perfect synchronization with the optical pump. Recent results of electron diffraction from a single crystal gold foil, using LWFA electrons driven by 8-mJ, 35-fs laser pulses at 500 Hz, will be presented. The accelerated electrons were collimated with a solenoid magnetic lens. By applying a small-angle tilt to the magnetic lens, the diffraction pattern can be streaked such that the temporal evolution is separated spatially on the detector screen after propagation. The observable time window and achievable temporal resolution are studied in pump-probe measurements of photo-induced heating on the gold foil.

  17. Time-Resolved Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction on Pulse Laser Heated Iron in Diamond Anvil Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C S; Wei, H; Dias, R; Shen, G; Smith, J; Chen, J Y; Evans, W

    2011-09-21

    The authors present time-resolved synchrotron x-ray diffraction to probe the {var_epsilon}-{delta} phase transition of iron during pulse-laser heating in a diamond anvil cell. The system utilizes a monochromatic synchrotron x-ray beam, a two-dimensional pixel array x-ray detector and a dual beam, double side laser-heating system. Multiple frames of the diffraction images are obtained in real-time every 22 ms over 500 ms of the entire pulse heating period. The results show the structural evolution of iron phases at 17 GPa, resulting in thermal expansion coefficient 1/V({Delta}V/{Delta}T){sub p} = 7.1 * 10{sup -6}/K for {var_epsilon}-Fe and 2.4 * 10{sup -5}/K for {gamma}-Fe, as well as the evidence for metastability of {gamma}-Fe at low temperatures below the {var_epsilon}-{gamma} phase boundary.

  18. Super-resolving quantum radar: Coherent-state sources with homodyne detection suffice to beat the diffraction limit

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Kebei; Lee, Hwang; Gerry, Christopher C.; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2013-11-21

    There has been much recent interest in quantum metrology for applications to sub-Raleigh ranging and remote sensing such as in quantum radar. For quantum radar, atmospheric absorption and diffraction rapidly degrades any actively transmitted quantum states of light, such as N00N states, so that for this high-loss regime the optimal strategy is to transmit coherent states of light, which suffer no worse loss than the linear Beer's law for classical radar attenuation, and which provide sensitivity at the shot-noise limit in the returned power. We show that coherent radar radiation sources, coupled with a quantum homodyne detection scheme, provide both longitudinal and angular super-resolution much below the Rayleigh diffraction limit, with sensitivity at shot-noise in terms of the detected photon power. Our approach provides a template for the development of a complete super-resolving quantum radar system with currently available technology.

  19. Effect of microfibril twisting in theoretical powder diffraction studies of cellulose Iß

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies of calculated diffraction patterns for cellulose crystallites have suggested that the distortions arising once models have been subjected to MD simulation are likely the result of dimensional changes induced by the empirical force field, but have been unable to determine to what ext...

  20. Development of Powder Diffraction Analysis Tools for aNanocrystalline Specimen: An Emphasis upon NiTi (Nitinol)

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, Erich; /Albion Coll. /SLAC

    2006-08-30

    Powder diffraction is a specialized technique whose investigatory limits are constrained by the scale of the crystallized substance being scanned versus the probe beam used. When disparate in scale, with the photon spot size larger than the crystal being probed, many are employed, the resulting diffraction image being cast from all possible incident angles, constructing {chi}-arcs containing information about the crystalline structure of the material under examination. Of particular interest to our collaboration is the structure of Nitinol, a superelastic Nickel-Titanium alloy, whose phase transformations and load bearing deformations can be studied by usage of diffraction, with wide sweeping biomedical uses. Analysis of this data is complicated by phase transformation and material fluorescence, which make difficult the computational modeling of the peaks within concentric {chi}-arcs. We endeavored to construct a series of computational tools (the amalgamation of them known as 2DPeakFinder) for refining and extracting this relevant data, toward the end of employing previously developed algorithms in the material's structural analysis. We succeeded to a large degree with the use of an iterative algorithm to navigate radial complexity of the signal and manage to retain a distinction between useful signal and superfluous background noise. The tools developed in this project are a small step in readily streamlining the analysis and physical modeling of a Nanocrystalline material's structural properties.

  1. In-Situ Observations of Phase Transformations During Welding of 1045 Steel using Spatially Resolved and Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J; Palmer, T; DebRoy, T

    2005-10-28

    Synchrotron-based methods have been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the direct observation of microstructure evolution during welding. These techniques, known as spatially resolved (SRXRD) and time resolved (TRXRD) x-ray diffraction, allow in-situ experiments to be performed during welding and provide direct observations of high temperature phases that form under the intense thermal cycles that occur. This paper presents observations of microstructural evolution that occur during the welding of a medium carbon AISI 1045 steel, using SRXRD to map the phases that are present during welding, and TRXRD to dynamically observe transformations during rapid heating and cooling. SRXRD was further used to determine the influence of welding heat input on the size of the high temperature austenite region, and the time required to completely homogenize this region during welding. These data can be used to determine the kinetics of phase transformations under the steep thermal gradients of welds, as well as benchmark and verify phase transformation models.

  2. Quantitative determination of mineral composition by powder X-ray diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Pawloski, Gayle A.

    1986-01-01

    An external standard intensity ratio method is used for quantitatively determining mineralogic compositions of samples by x-ray diffraction. The method uses ratios of x-ray intensity peaks from a single run. Constants are previously determined for each mineral which is to be quantitatively measured. Ratios of the highest intensity peak of each mineral to be quantified in the sample and the highest intensity peak of a reference mineral contained in the sample are used to calculate sample composition.

  3. Quantitative determination of mineral composition by powder x-ray diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Pawloski, G.A.

    1984-08-10

    An external standard intensity ratio method is used for quantitatively determining mineralogic compositions of samples by x-ray diffraction. The method uses ratios of x-ray intensity peaks from a single run. Constants are previously determined for each mineral which is to be quantitatively measured. Ratios of the highest intensity peak of each mineral to be quantified in the sample and the highest intensity peak of a reference mineral contained in the sample are used to calculate sample composition.

  4. Early age hydration and pozzolanic reaction in natural zeolite blended cements: Reaction kinetics and products by in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Snellings, R.; Mertens, G.; Cizer, O.; Elsen, J.

    2010-12-15

    The in situ early-age hydration and pozzolanic reaction in cements blended with natural zeolites were investigated by time-resolved synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction with Rietveld quantitative phase analysis. Chabazite and Na-, K-, and Ca-exchanged clinoptilolite materials were mixed with Portland cement in a 3:7 weight ratio and hydrated in situ at 40 {sup o}C. The evolution of phase contents showed that the addition of natural zeolites accelerates the onset of C{sub 3}S hydration and precipitation of CH and AFt. Kinetic analysis of the consumption of C{sub 3}S indicates that the enveloping C-S-H layer is thinner and/or less dense in the presence of alkali-exchanged clinoptilolite pozzolans. The zeolite pozzolanic activity is interpreted to depend on the zeolite exchangeable cation content and on the crystallinity. The addition of natural zeolites alters the structural evolution of the C-S-H product. Longer silicate chains and a lower C/S ratio are deduced from the evolution of the C-S-H b-cell parameter.

  5. Thermal analysis, X-ray powder diffraction and electron microscopy data related with the production of 1:1 Caffeine:Glutaric Acid cocrystals.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Íris; Andrade, Rita; Pinto, João F; Temtem, Márcio

    2016-09-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the production of 1:1 Caffeine:Glutaric Acid cocrystals as part of the research article entitled "Green production of cocrystals using a new solvent-free approach by spray congealing" (Duarte et al., 2016) [1]. More specifically, here we present the thermal analysis and the X-ray powder diffraction data for pure Glutaric Acid, used as a raw material in [1]. We also include the X-ray powder diffraction and electron microscopy data obtained for the 1:1 Caffeine:Glutaric Acid cocrystal (form II) produced using the cooling crystallization method reported in "Operating Regions in Cooling Cocrystallization of Caffeine and Glutaric Acid in Acetonitrile" (Yu et al., 2010) [2]. Lastly, we show the X-ray powder diffraction data obtained for assessing the purity of the 1:1 Caffeine:Glutaric cocrystals produced in [1]. PMID:27331096

  6. Crystal structure and electronic properties of two nimesulide derivatives: A combined X-ray powder diffraction and quantum mechanical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Abir; Ghosh, Soumen; Kankanala, Kavitha; Reddy, Vangala Ranga; Mukkanti, Khagga; Pal, Sarbani; Mukherjee, Alok K.

    2010-06-01

    Crystal structures of two nimesulide derivatives, C 13H 14O 3N 2S ( 2) and C 21H 16O 5N 2S ( 3), have been determined from X-ray powder diffraction data and their electronic structures were calculated at the DFT level. The optimized molecular geometries of 2 and 3 correspond closely to that obtained from the crystallographic analysis. Intermolecular hydrogen bonds and π… π stacking interactions form supramolecular assembly in both compounds. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap (>2.2 eV) indicates a high kinetic stability of both compounds. Although the compound 2 does not exhibit any anti-inflammatory activity, 3 can induce 34% edema inhibition in rat paws.

  7. Neutron Powder Diffraction and Molecular Simulation Study of the Structural Evolution of Ammonia Borane from 15 to 340 K

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Nancy J.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Hartman, Michael R.; Daemen, Luke L.; Proffen, Thomas E.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Hartl, Monika A.; Heldebrant, David J.; Stowe, Ashley C.; Autrey, Thomas

    2009-04-17

    The structural behavior of perdeuterated, 11B-enriched ammonia borane, ND311BD3, was investigated by neutron powder diffraction measurements collected over the temperature range from 15 to 340 K and by molecular dynamics simulation. In the low temperature orthorhombic phase, the progressive displacement of the borane group under the amine group was observed leading to the rotation of the B-N bond parallel to the c-axis. The structural phase transition at 225 K is marked by dramatic change in the dynamics of both the amine and borane group that is problematic to extract from the metrics provided by Rietveld analysis of the NPD data alone but is evident in the molecular dynamics simulation and other spectroscopic evidence. This study highlights the valued added by complimentary experimental approaches and coupled computational studies.

  8. Abinitio powder x-ray diffraction and PIXEL energy calculations on thiophene derived 1,4 dihydropyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthikeyan, N.; Pachamuthu, M. P.; Sivakumar, K.

    2016-05-01

    We focus on the application of powder diffraction data to get abinitio crystal structure determination of thiophene derived 1,4 DHP prepared by cyclocondensation method using solid catalyst. Crystal structure of the compound has been solved by direct-space approach on Monte Carlo search in parallel tempering mode using FOX program. Initial atomic coordinates were derived using Gaussian 09W quantum chemistry software in semi-empirical approach and Rietveld refinement was carried out using GSAS program. The crystal structure of the compound is stabilized by one N-H…O and three C-H…O hydrogen bonds. PIXEL lattice energy calculation was carried out to understand the physical nature of intermolecular interactions in the crystal packing, on which the total lattice energy is contributed into Columbic, polarization, dispersion, and repulsion energies.

  9. Observation of localized heating phenomena during microwave heating of mixed powders using in situ x-ray diffraction technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sabelström, N. Hayashi, M.; Watanabe, T.; Nagata, K.

    2014-10-28

    In materials processing research using microwave heating, there have been several observations of various phenomena occurring known as microwave effects. One significant example of such a phenomenon is increased reaction kinetics. It is believed that there is a possibility that this might be caused by localized heating, were some reactants would attain a higher than apparent temperature. To examine whether such thermal gradients are indeed possible, mixed powders of two microwave non-absorbers, alumina and magnesia, were mixed with graphite, a known absorber, and heated in a microwave furnace. During microwave irradiation, the local temperatures of the respective sample constituents were measured using an in situ x-ray diffraction technique. In the case of the alumina and graphite sample, a temperature difference of around 100 °C could be observed.

  10. Investigation of surface structures by powder diffraction : a differential pair distribution function study on arsenate sorption on ferrihydrite.

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, R.; Hausner, D. B.; Bhandari, N.; Strongin, D. R.; Chapman, K. W.; Chupas, P. J.; Middlemiss, D. S.; Grey, C. P.; Parise, J. B.; X-Ray Science Division; Stony Brook Univ.; Temple Univ.

    2010-01-01

    Differential pair distribution function (d-PDF) analysis of high energy powder X-ray diffraction data was carried out on 2-line ferrihydrite nanoparticles with arsenate oxyanions adsorbed on the surface to investigate the binding mechanism. In this analysis, a PDF of ferrihydrite is subtracted from a PDF of ferrihydrite with arsenate sorbed on the surface, leaving only correlations from within the surface layer and between the surface and the particle. As-O and As-Fe correlations were observed at 1.68 and 3.29 {angstrom}, respectively, in good agreement with previously published EXAFS data, confirming a bidentate binuclear binding mechanism. Further peaks are observed in the d-PDF which are not present in EXAFS, corresponding to correlations between As and O in the particle and As-2nd Fe.

  11. Determining fine-structure parameters for tungsten powder and filings by harmonic analysis of x-ray diffraction lines

    SciTech Connect

    Kravchik, A.E.; Moshkina, T.I.; Osmakov, A.S.

    1986-12-01

    Evidence has been accumulating on determining fine-structure parameters by line shape harmonic analysis (LSHA) although many aspects remain unresolved. In this paper, the authors discuss the interpretations afresh, on-going improvements in x-ray techniques, in recording methods, and in processing the data, as well as in programs for determining the parameters by LSHA. The authors selected tungsten because of its bcc lattice, whose diffraction peaks are widely separated, which almost completely rules out their overlapping even if there is considerable broadening, such as is produced by large plastic strain. The material was produced in two ways: by firing a tungsten single crystal and by grinding VChDK tungsten powder in a laboratory vibration mill for 10, 20, 30, 50, and 100 h.

  12. High-temperature dehydration of talc: a kinetics study using in situ X-ray powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Duojun; Yi, Li; Huang, Bojin; Liu, Chuanjiang

    2015-06-01

    High-temperature in situ X-ray powder diffraction patterns were used to study the dehydration kinetics of natural talc with a size of 10-15 µm. The talc was annealed from 1073 to 1223 K, and the variations in the characteristic peaks corresponding to talc with the time were recorded to determine the reaction progress. The decomposition of talc occurred, and peaks corresponding to talc and peaks corresponding to enstatite and quartz were observed. The enstatite and talc exhibited a topotactic relationship. The dehydration kinetics of talc was studied as a function of temperature between 1073 and 1223 K. The kinetics data could be modeled using an Avrami equation that considers nucleation and growth processes ? where n varies from 0.4 to 0.8. The rate constant (k) equation for the natural talc is ? The reaction mechanism for the dehydration of talc is a heterogeneous nucleation and growth mechanism.

  13. High-temperature powder synchrotron diffraction studies of synthetic cryolite Na 3AlF 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qingdi; Kennedy, Brendan J.

    2004-03-01

    A high-resolution synchrotron diffraction study of the structures of a synthetic sample of cryolite Na 3AlF 6 from room temperature to 800°C is reported. At room temperature Na 3AlF 6 is monoclinic and the structure is described in space group P2 1/n. Heating the sample to 560°C results in only minor changes to the structure. A first-order transition from this monoclinic structure to a high-temperature cubic structure is observed near 567°C. The cubic Fm 3¯m structure is characterized by disorder of the fluoride atoms.

  14. X-ray powder diffraction study of poly/carbon monofluoride/, CF/1.12/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, V. K.; Badachhape, R. B.; Margrave, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Data from X-ray diffraction studies of the poly(carbon monofluoride) with empirical formula CF(1.09-1.15) are reported, and possible intercalation arrangements for the substance are discussed. The data do not conform to true hexagonal symmetry, indicating that the carbon atoms are not coplanar. Each bond angle of carbon is 118.8 deg, and the carbon-carbon distance is 1.47 A. The interlayer distance is 5.76 A. A total absence of (hkl) reflections in the X-ray pattern shows that the separate CF layers are not regularly arranged with respect to one another.

  15. Validation of molecular crystal structures from powder diffraction data with dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D)

    PubMed Central

    van de Streek, Jacco; Neumann, Marcus A.

    2014-01-01

    In 2010 we energy-minimized 225 high-quality single-crystal (SX) structures with dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) to establish a quantitative benchmark. For the current paper, 215 organic crystal structures determined from X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) data and published in an IUCr journal were energy-minimized with DFT-D and compared to the SX benchmark. The on average slightly less accurate atomic coordinates of XRPD structures do lead to systematically higher root mean square Cartesian displacement (RMSCD) values upon energy minimization than for SX structures, but the RMSCD value is still a good indicator for the detection of structures that deserve a closer look. The upper RMSCD limit for a correct structure must be increased from 0.25 Å for SX structures to 0.35 Å for XRPD structures; the grey area must be extended from 0.30 to 0.40 Å. Based on the energy minimizations, three structures are re-refined to give more precise atomic coordinates. For six structures our calculations provide the missing positions for the H atoms, for five structures they provide corrected positions for some H atoms. Seven crystal structures showed a minor error for a non-H atom. For five structures the energy minimizations suggest a higher space-group symmetry. For the 225 SX structures, the only deviations observed upon energy minimization were three minor H-atom related issues. Preferred orientation is the most important cause of problems. A preferred-orientation correction is the only correction where the experimental data are modified to fit the model. We conclude that molecular crystal structures determined from powder diffraction data that are published in IUCr journals are of high quality, with less than 4% containing an error in a non-H atom. PMID:25449625

  16. Field-induced alignment of a smectic-A phase: a time-resolved x-ray diffraction investigation.

    PubMed

    Bras, W; Emsley, J W; Levine, Y K; Luckhurst, G R; Seddon, J M; Timimi, B A

    2004-09-01

    The field-induced alignment of a smectic-A phase is, in principle, a complicated process involving the director rotation via the interaction with the field and the layer rotation via the molecular interactions. Time-resolved nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has revealed this complexity in the case of the director alignment, but provides no direct information on the motion of the layers. Here we describe a time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiment using synchrotron radiation to solve the challenging problem of capturing the diffraction pattern on a time scale which is fast in comparison with that for the alignment of the smectic layers. We have investigated the alignment of the smectic-A phase of 4-octyl-4(')-cyanobiphenyl by a magnetic field. The experiment consists of creating a monodomain sample of the smectic-A phase by slow cooling from the nematic phase in a magnetic field with a flux density of 7 T. The sample is then turned quickly through an angle phi(0) about an axis parallel to the x-ray beam direction but orthogonal to the field. A sequence of two-dimensional small angle x-ray diffraction patterns are then collected at short time intervals. Experiments were carried out for different values of phi(0), and at different temperatures. The results show that the alignment behavior changes fundamentally when phi(0) exceeds 45 degrees, and that there is a sharp change in the alignment process when the temperature is less than 3 degrees C below the smectic-A-nematic transition. The results of the x-ray experiments are in broad agreement with the NMR results, but reveal major phenomena concerning the maintenance of the integrity of the smectic-A layer structure during the alignment process. PMID:15332991

  17. Super-Resolved Digital Holography Based on the Coherent Diffraction Imaging Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bao-Sheng; Pan, Xing-Chen; Wang, Hai-Yan; Cheng, Jun; Gao, Shu-Mei; Liu, Cheng; Zhu, Jian-Qiang

    2013-05-01

    An algorithm is proposed to enhance the resolution of digital holography by retrieving the frequency components lost in common holograms. A pinhole is placed directly behind the specimen to record the hologram, and an iterative scheme commonly used in coherent diffraction imaging is adopted for the reconstruction. Since some of the frequency components lost in common digital holography can be properly retrieved, the resolution of the reconstructed image is remarkably improved. Theoretical analysis and computer simulations are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of this proposed technique.

  18. A neutron powder diffraction study of ND 3 intercalated titanium disulfide, 3 R-TiS 2ND 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwmeester, H. J. M.; Wiegers, G. A.

    1988-10-01

    Neutron powder diffraction of rhombohedral 3 R-TiS 2ND 3 ( a = 3.419 Å, c = 27.03 Å at 300 K, space group R overline3m ) has shown that ND 3 molecules and ND +4 ions, present in a ratio of about 5 to 1 from chemical and physical evidence, occupy statistically the trigonal-prismatic holes between TiS 2 sandwiches. One cannot distinguish between ND 3 and ND +4. Powder intensities calculated for a model with spherically symmetric ND 3 molecules (corresponding to isotropically rotating ND 3 and ND +4) in the trigonal-prismatic holes were in reasonable agreement with the observed intensities. Attempts to obtain information on the precise orientation of ND 3 and ND +4 in the TiS 2 lattice using refinements with structure factors were not successful; the reliability R factor was 0.093 for spherical symmetric ND 3 molecules with nitrogen in the center of the trigonal-prismatic holes.

  19. Electronic structure of cesium butyratouranylate(VI) as derived from DFT-assisted powder X-ray diffraction data.

    PubMed

    Vologzhanina, Anna V; Savchenkov, Anton V; Dmitrienko, Artem O; Korlyukov, Alexander A; Bushmarinov, Ivan S; Pushkin, Denis V; Serezhkina, Larisa B

    2014-10-16

    Investigation of chemical bonding and electronic structure of coordination polymers that do not form high-quality single crystals requires special techniques. Here, we report the molecular and electronic structure of the first cesium butyratouranylate, Cs[UO(2)(n-C(3)H(7)COO)(3)][UO(2)(n-C(3)H(7)COO)(OH)(H2O)], as obtained from DFT-assisted powder X-ray diffraction data because of the low quality of crystalline sample. The topological analysis of the charge distribution within the quantum theory of atoms-in-molecules (QTAIM) space partitioning and the distribution of electron localization function (ELF) is reported. The constancy of atomic domain of the uranium(VI) atom at different coordination numbers (7 and 8) and the presence of three ELF maxima in equatorial plane of an uranyl cation attributed to the 6s and 6p electrons were demonstrated for the first time. Details of methodologies applied for additional verification of the correctness of powder XRD refinement (Voronoi atomic descriptors and the Morse restraints) are discussed. PMID:25289686

  20. Synchrotron powder diffraction simplified: The high-resolution diffractometer at 11-BM at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribaud, Lynn; Suchomel, Matthew; von Dreele, Robert; Toby, Brian

    2013-03-01

    Synchrotrons have revolutionized powder diffraction through higher resolution and sensitivity and much faster data collection. Few scientists beyond the synchrotron community make use of these capabilities. To help address this, the high resolution powder diffractometer beamline 11-BM at the APS offers rapid and easy mail-in access with world-class quality data 1. This instrument offers the highest resolution available in the Americas and is a free service for non-proprietary users 2. The instrument can collect a superb pattern in an hour, has an automated sample changer, and features variable temperature sample environments. Users of the mail-in program often receive their data within two weeks of sample receipt. The instrument is also available for on-site experiments requiring other conditions. Our poster will describe this instrument, highlight its capabilities, explain the types of measurements available, and discuss plans to improve access and available sample environments and collection protocols. More information about the 11-BM instrument and our mail-in program can be found at: http://11bm.xray.aps.anl.gov.

  1. Data collection strategies for time-resolved X-ray free-electron laser diffraction, and 2-color methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Chufeng; Schmidt, Kevin; Spence, John C

    2015-07-01

    We compare three schemes for time-resolved X-ray diffraction from protein nanocrystals using an X-ray free-electron laser. We find expressions for the errors in structure factor measurement using the Monte Carlo pump-probe method of data analysis with a liquid jet, the fixed sample pump-probe (goniometer) method (both diffract-and-destroy, and below the safe damage dose), and a proposed two-color method. Here, an optical pump pulse arrives between X-ray pulses of slightly different energies which hit the same nanocrystal, using a weak first X-ray pulse which does not damage the sample. (Radiation damage is outrun in the other cases.) This two-color method, in which separated Bragg spots are impressed on the same detector readout, eliminates stochastic fluctuations in crystal size, shape, and orientation and is found to require two orders of magnitude fewer diffraction patterns than the currently used Monte Carlo liquid jet method, for 1% accuracy. Expressions are given for errors in structure factor measurement for the four approaches, and detailed simulations provided for cathepsin B and IC3 crystals. While the error is independent of the number of shots for the dose-limited goniometer method, it falls off inversely as the square root of the number of shots for the two-color and Monte Carlo methods, with a much smaller pre-factor for the two-color mode, when the first shot is below the damage threshold. PMID:26798813

  2. A powder X-ray diffraction method for detection of polyprenylated benzophenones in plant extracts associated with HPLC for quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Martins, Felipe T; dos Santos, Marcelo H; Coelho, Carla P; Barbosa, Luiz C A; Dias, Gizelly C; Fracca, Mônica P; Neves, Person P; Stringheta, Paulo C; Doriguetto, Antônio C

    2011-02-20

    A robust, direct, rapid and non-destructive X-ray diffraction crystallography method to detect the polyprenylated benzophenones 7-epi-clusianone (1) and guttiferone A (2) in extracts from Garcinia brasiliensis is presented. Powder samples of benzophenones 1 and 2, dried hexane extracts from G. brasiliensis seeds and fruit's pericarp, and the dried ethanolic extract from G. brasiliensis seeds were unambiguously characterized by powder X-ray diffractometry. The calculated X-ray diffraction peaks from crystal structures of analytes 1 and 2, previously determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction technique, were overlaid to those of the experimental powder diffractograms, providing a practical identification of these compounds in the analyzed material and confirming the pure contents of the powder samples. Using the X-ray diffraction crystallography method, the studied polyprenylated benzophenones were selectively and simultaneously detected in the extracts which were mounted directly on sample holder. In addition, reference materials of the analytes were not required for analyses since the crystal structures of the compounds are known. High performance liquid chromatography analyses also were comparatively carried out to quantify the analytes in the same plant extracts showing to be in agreement with X-ray diffraction crystallography method. PMID:20943341

  3. Complementing high-throughput X-ray powder diffraction data with quantum-chemical calculations: Application to piroxicam form III.

    PubMed

    Naelapää, Kaisa; van de Streek, Jacco; Rantanen, Jukka; Bond, Andrew D

    2012-11-01

    High-throughput crystallisation and characterisation platforms provide an efficient means to carry out solid-form screening during the pre-formulation phase. To determine the crystal structures of identified new solid phases, however, usually requires independent crystallisation trials to produce single crystals or bulk samples of sufficient quantity to carry out high-quality X-ray diffraction measurements. This process could be made more efficient by a robust procedure for crystal structure determination directly from high-throughput X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) data. Quantum-chemical calculations based on dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) have now become feasible for typical small organic molecules used as active pharmaceutical ingredients. We demonstrate how these calculations can be applied to complement high-throughput XRPD data by determining the crystal structure of piroxicam form III. These combined experimental/quantum-chemical methods can provide access to reliable structural information in the course of an intensive experimentally based solid-form screening activity or in other circumstances wherein single crystals might never be viable, for example, for polymorphs obtained only during high-energy processing such as spray drying or milling. PMID:22886472

  4. Calculations of single crystal elastic constants for yttria partially stabilised zirconia from powder diffraction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunt, A. J. G.; Xie, M. Y.; Baimpas, N.; Zhang, S. Y.; Kabra, S.; Kelleher, J.; Neo, T. K.; Korsunsky, A. M.

    2014-08-01

    Yttria Stabilised Zirconia (YSZ) is a tough, phase-transforming ceramic that finds use in a wide range of commercial applications from dental prostheses to thermal barrier coatings. Micromechanical modelling of phase transformation can deliver reliable predictions in terms of the influence of temperature and stress. However, models must rely on the accurate knowledge of single crystal elastic stiffness constants. Some techniques for elastic stiffness determination are well-established. The most popular of these involve exploiting frequency shifts and phase velocities of acoustic waves. However, the application of these techniques to YSZ can be problematic due to the micro-twinning observed in larger crystals. Here, we propose an alternative approach based on selective elastic strain sampling (e.g., by diffraction) of grain ensembles sharing certain orientation, and the prediction of the same quantities by polycrystalline modelling, for example, the Reuss or Voigt average. The inverse problem arises consisting of adjusting the single crystal stiffness matrix to match the polycrystal predictions to observations. In the present model-matching study, we sought to determine the single crystal stiffness matrix of tetragonal YSZ using the results of time-of-flight neutron diffraction obtained from an in situ compression experiment and Finite Element modelling of the deformation of polycrystalline tetragonal YSZ. The best match between the model predictions and observations was obtained for the optimized stiffness values of C11 = 451, C33 = 302, C44 = 39, C66 = 82, C12 = 240, and C13 = 50 (units: GPa). Considering the significant amount of scatter in the published literature data, our result appears reasonably consistent.

  5. Calculations of single crystal elastic constants for yttria partially stabilised zirconia from powder diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Lunt, A. J. G. Xie, M. Y.; Baimpas, N.; Korsunsky, A. M.; Zhang, S. Y.; Kabra, S.; Kelleher, J.; Neo, T. K.

    2014-08-07

    Yttria Stabilised Zirconia (YSZ) is a tough, phase-transforming ceramic that finds use in a wide range of commercial applications from dental prostheses to thermal barrier coatings. Micromechanical modelling of phase transformation can deliver reliable predictions in terms of the influence of temperature and stress. However, models must rely on the accurate knowledge of single crystal elastic stiffness constants. Some techniques for elastic stiffness determination are well-established. The most popular of these involve exploiting frequency shifts and phase velocities of acoustic waves. However, the application of these techniques to YSZ can be problematic due to the micro-twinning observed in larger crystals. Here, we propose an alternative approach based on selective elastic strain sampling (e.g., by diffraction) of grain ensembles sharing certain orientation, and the prediction of the same quantities by polycrystalline modelling, for example, the Reuss or Voigt average. The inverse problem arises consisting of adjusting the single crystal stiffness matrix to match the polycrystal predictions to observations. In the present model-matching study, we sought to determine the single crystal stiffness matrix of tetragonal YSZ using the results of time-of-flight neutron diffraction obtained from an in situ compression experiment and Finite Element modelling of the deformation of polycrystalline tetragonal YSZ. The best match between the model predictions and observations was obtained for the optimized stiffness values of C11 = 451, C33 = 302, C44 = 39, C66 = 82, C12 = 240, and C13 = 50 (units: GPa). Considering the significant amount of scatter in the published literature data, our result appears reasonably consistent.

  6. Multivariate calibration of the degree of crystallinity in intact pellets by X-ray powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Nikowitz, Krisztina; Domján, Attila; Pintye-Hódi, Klára; Regdon, Géza

    2016-04-11

    XRPD is the method of choice to determine crystalline content in an amorphous environment. While several studies describe its use on powders, little information is available on its performance on finished products. The method's use may be limited not only by the need of sample pretreatment and its validation but also by the propensity of some materials to recrystallize when exposed to heat or mechanical stress. In this work the authors describe an attempt at constructing a model based on the XRPD measurement of intact layered pellets using univariate methods based on peak heights and PLS regression. Results indicate that neither the goodness-of-fit (below 0.9 for all tested variables), nor the RMSEC values (above 5 for all tested variables) of any model based on peak height were good enough to consider them for everyday use. PLS regression however provided a model with improved characteristics (R(2)=0.9581, RMSEC=3.04) despite the low API content and individual loading characteristics also reflected the validity of the model. PLS analysis also indicated that a specific sample may be different in some formulation characteristic that did not register on other examinations. This further indicates the method's usefulness in the analysis of intact dosage forms. PMID:26899205

  7. Analysis of heat-affected zone phase transformations using in situ spatially resolved x-ray diffraction with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J.W.; Wong, J.; Froeba, M.; Waide, P.A.; Larson, E.M.

    1996-03-01

    Spatially resolved X-ray diffraction (SRXRD) consists of producing a submillimeter size X-ray beam from an intense synchrotron radiation source to perform real-time diffraction measurements on solid materials. This technique was used int his study to investigate the crystal phases surrounding a liquid weld pool in commercial purity titanium and to determine the location of the phase boundary separating the high-temperature body-centered-cubic (bcc) {beta} phase from the low-temperature hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) {alpha} phase. The experiments were carried out at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) using a 0.25 x 0.50 mm X-ray probe that could be positioned with 10-{micro}m precision on the surface of a quasistationary gas tungsten arc weld (GTAW). The SRXRD results showed characteristic hcp, bcc, and liquid diffraction patterns at various points along the sample, starting from the base metal through the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and into the weld pool, respectively. Analyses of the SRXRD data show the coexistence of bcc and hcp phases in the partially transformed (outer) region of the HAZ and single-phase bcc in the fully transformed (inner) region of the HAZ. Postweld metallographic examinations of the HAZ, combined with a conduction-based thermal model of the weld, were correlated with the SRXRD results. Finally, analysis of the diffraction intensities of the hcp and bcc phases was performed on the SRXRD data to provide additional information about the microstructural conditions that may exist in the HAZ at temperature during welding. This work represents the first direct in situ mapping of phase boundaries in fusion welds.

  8. Sparsity-based super-resolved coherent diffraction imaging of one-dimensional objects

    PubMed Central

    Sidorenko, Pavel; Kfir, Ofer; Shechtman, Yoav; Fleischer, Avner; Eldar, Yonina C.; Segev, Mordechai; Cohen, Oren

    2015-01-01

    Phase-retrieval problems of one-dimensional (1D) signals are known to suffer from ambiguity that hampers their recovery from measurements of their Fourier magnitude, even when their support (a region that confines the signal) is known. Here we demonstrate sparsity-based coherent diffraction imaging of 1D objects using extreme-ultraviolet radiation produced from high harmonic generation. Using sparsity as prior information removes the ambiguity in many cases and enhances the resolution beyond the physical limit of the microscope. Our approach may be used in a variety of problems, such as diagnostics of defects in microelectronic chips. Importantly, this is the first demonstration of sparsity-based 1D phase retrieval from actual experiments, hence it paves the way for greatly improving the performance of Fourier-based measurement systems where 1D signals are inherent, such as diagnostics of ultrashort laser pulses, deciphering the complex time-dependent response functions (for example, time-dependent permittivity and permeability) from spectral measurements and vice versa. PMID:26345495

  9. Sparsity-based super-resolved coherent diffraction imaging of one-dimensional objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorenko, Pavel; Kfir, Ofer; Shechtman, Yoav; Fleischer, Avner; Eldar, Yonina C.; Segev, Mordechai; Cohen, Oren

    2015-09-01

    Phase-retrieval problems of one-dimensional (1D) signals are known to suffer from ambiguity that hampers their recovery from measurements of their Fourier magnitude, even when their support (a region that confines the signal) is known. Here we demonstrate sparsity-based coherent diffraction imaging of 1D objects using extreme-ultraviolet radiation produced from high harmonic generation. Using sparsity as prior information removes the ambiguity in many cases and enhances the resolution beyond the physical limit of the microscope. Our approach may be used in a variety of problems, such as diagnostics of defects in microelectronic chips. Importantly, this is the first demonstration of sparsity-based 1D phase retrieval from actual experiments, hence it paves the way for greatly improving the performance of Fourier-based measurement systems where 1D signals are inherent, such as diagnostics of ultrashort laser pulses, deciphering the complex time-dependent response functions (for example, time-dependent permittivity and permeability) from spectral measurements and vice versa.

  10. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction studies of laser-induced acoustic wave propagation in bilayer metallic thin crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Er, Ali Oguz; Tang, Jau E-mail: prentzepis@ece.tamu.edu; Chen, Jie; Rentzepis, Peter M. E-mail: prentzepis@ece.tamu.edu

    2014-09-07

    Phonon propagation across the interface of a Cu/Ag(111) bilayer and transient lattice disorder, induced by a femtosecond 267 nm pulse, in Ag(111) crystal have been measured by means of time resolved X-ray diffraction. A “blast” force due to thermal stress induced by suddenly heated electrons is formed within two picoseconds after excitation and its “blast wave” propagation through the interface and Ag (111) crystal was monitored by the shift and broadening of the rocking curve, I vs. ω, as a function of time after excitation. Lattice disorder, contraction and expansion as well as thermal strain formation and wave propagation have also been measured. The experimental data and mechanism proposed are supported by theoretical simulations.

  11. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction and electrical resistance measurements of structural phase transitions in zirconium

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Velisavljevic, N.; Sinogeikin, S.; Saavedra, R.; Chellappa, R. S.; Rothkirch, A.; Dattelbaum, D. M.; Konopkova, Z.; Liermann, H. -P.; Bishop, M.; Tsoi, G. M.; et al

    2014-05-07

    Here, we have designed a portable pressure controller module to tune compression rates and maximum pressures attainable in a standard gas-membrane diamond anvil cell (DAC). During preliminary experiments, performed on zirconium (Zr) metal sample, pressure jumps of up to 80 GPa were systematically obtained in less than 0.2s (resulting in compression rate of few GPa/s up to more than 400 GPa/s). In-situ x-ray diffraction and electrical resistance measurements were performed simultaneously during this rapid pressure increase to provide the first time resolved data on α → ω → β structural evolution in Zr at high pressures. Direct control of compressionmore » rates and peak pressures, which can be held for prolonged time, allows for investigation of structural evolution and kinetics of structural phase transitions of materials under previously unexplored compression rate-pressure conditions that bridge traditional static and shock/dynamic experimental platforms.« less

  12. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction and electrical resistance measurements of structural phase transitions in zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Velisavljevic, N.; Sinogeikin, S.; Saavedra, R.; Chellappa, R. S.; Rothkirch, A.; Dattelbaum, D. M.; Konopkova, Z.; Liermann, H. -P.; Bishop, M.; Tsoi, G. M.; Vohra, Y. K.

    2014-05-07

    Here, we have designed a portable pressure controller module to tune compression rates and maximum pressures attainable in a standard gas-membrane diamond anvil cell (DAC). During preliminary experiments, performed on zirconium (Zr) metal sample, pressure jumps of up to 80 GPa were systematically obtained in less than 0.2s (resulting in compression rate of few GPa/s up to more than 400 GPa/s). In-situ x-ray diffraction and electrical resistance measurements were performed simultaneously during this rapid pressure increase to provide the first time resolved data on α → ω → β structural evolution in Zr at high pressures. Direct control of compression rates and peak pressures, which can be held for prolonged time, allows for investigation of structural evolution and kinetics of structural phase transitions of materials under previously unexplored compression rate-pressure conditions that bridge traditional static and shock/dynamic experimental platforms.

  13. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction study of photoinduced strains in h -LuFeO3 thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Kishan; Jiang, Xuanyuan; Wang, Xiao; Dichiara, Anthony; Cheng, Xuemei; Li, Yuelin; Xu, Xiaoshan

    2015-03-01

    We have studied the structural response of epitaxially stabilized h-LuFeO3 (0001) thin film to above-band-gap optical excitation (pump) using time-resolved x-ray diffraction (probe) at picosecond time scale. The shift in (004) Bragg peak induced by a 390 nm excitation (30 ps duration) has been studied as a function of pump fluence and pump-probe time delay. The out-of-plane photoinduced lattice strain (Δc / c) exhibits a non-linear relation with fluence. The relaxation time is on the order of 1 ns. These observations suggest a relaxation mechanism that may be mediated by combined effects of charge recombination and phonon relaxation. This work at is supported by Nebraska EPESCoR (UNL), by NSF CAREER award (No. 1053854) (Bryn Mawr College), and by US-DOE, Office of Science, BES (No. DE-AC02-06CH11357) (ANL).

  14. Generation and Propagation of a Picosecond Acoustic Pulse at a Buried Interface: Time-Resolved X-Ray Diffraction Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.; Cavalieri, A.L.; Fritz, D.M.; Swan, M.C.; Reis, D.A.; Hegde, R.S.; Reason, M.; Goldman, R.S.

    2005-12-09

    We report on the propagation of coherent acoustic wave packets in (001) surface oriented Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As/GaAs heterostructure, generated through localized femtosecond photoexcitation of the GaAs. Transient structural changes in both the substrate and film are measured with picosecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction. The data indicate an elastic response consisting of unipolar compression pulses of a few hundred picosecond duration traveling along [001] and [001] directions that are produced by predominately impulsive stress. The transmission and reflection of the strain pulses are in agreement with an acoustic mismatch model of the heterostructure and free-space interfaces.

  15. Crystal engineering on industrial diaryl pigments using lattice energy minimizations and X-ray powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Martin U; Dinnebier, Robert E; Kalkhof, Holger

    2007-08-23

    Diaryl azo pigments play an important role as yellow pigments for printing inks, with an annual pigment production of more than 50,000 t. The crystal structures of Pigment Yellow 12 (PY12), Pigment Yellow 13 (PY13), Pigment Yellow 14 (PY14), and Pigment Yellow 83 (PY83) were determined from X-ray powder data using lattice energy minimizations and subsequent Rietveld refinements. Details of the lattice energy minimization procedure and of the development of a torsion potential for the biphenyl fragment are given. The Rietveld refinements were carried out using rigid bodies, or constraints. It was also possible to refine all atomic positions individually without any constraint or restraint, even for PY12 having 44 independent non-hydrogen atoms per asymmetric unit. For PY14 (23 independent non-hydrogen atoms), additionally all atomic isotropic temperature factors could be refined individually. PY12 crystallized in a herringbone arrangement with twisted biaryl fragments. PY13 and PY14 formed a layer structure of planar molecules. PY83 showed a herringbone structure with planar molecules. According to quantum mechanical calculations, the twisting of the biaryl fragment results in a lower color strength of the pigments, whereas changes in the substitution pattern have almost no influence on the color strength of a single molecule. Hence, the experimentally observed lower color strength of PY12 in comparison with that of PY13 and PY83 can be explained as a pure packing effect. Further lattice energy calculations explained that the four investigated pigments crystallize in three different structures because these structures are the energetically most favorable ones for each compound. For example, for PY13, PY14, or PY83, a PY12-analogous crystal structure would lead to considerably poorer lattice energies and lower densities. In contrast, lattice energy calculations revealed that PY12 could adopt a PY13-type structure with only slightly poorer energy. This structure was

  16. Crystal Engineering on Industrial Diaryl Pigments Using Lattice Energy Minimizations and X-ray Powder Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt,M.; Dinnebier, R.; Kalkhof, H.

    2007-01-01

    Diaryl azo pigments play an important role as yellow pigments for printing inks, with an annual pigment production of more than 50,000 t. The crystal structures of Pigment Yellow 12 (PY12), Pigment Yellow 13 (PY13), Pigment Yellow 14 (PY14), and Pigment Yellow 83 (PY83) were determined from X-ray powder data using lattice energy minimizations and subsequent Rietveld refinements. Details of the lattice energy minimization procedure and of the development of a torsion potential for the biphenyl fragment are given. The Rietveld refinements were carried out using rigid bodies, or constraints. It was also possible to refine all atomic positions individually without any constraint or restraint, even for PY12 having 44 independent non-hydrogen atoms per asymmetric unit. For PY14 (23 independent non-hydrogen atoms), additionally all atomic isotropic temperature factors could be refined individually. PY12 crystallized in a herringbone arrangement with twisted biaryl fragments. PY13 and PY14 formed a layer structure of planar molecules. PY83 showed a herringbone structure with planar molecules. According to quantum mechanical calculations, the twisting of the biaryl fragment results in a lower color strength of the pigments, whereas changes in the substitution pattern have almost no influence on the color strength of a single molecule. Hence, the experimentally observed lower color strength of PY12 in comparison with that of PY13 and PY83 can be explained as a pure packing effect. Further lattice energy calculations explained that the four investigated pigments crystallize in three different structures because these structures are the energetically most favorable ones for each compound. For example, for PY13, PY14, or PY83, a PY12-analogous crystal structure would lead to considerably poorer lattice energies and lower densities. In contrast, lattice energy calculations revealed that PY12 could adopt a PY13-type structure with only slightly poorer energy. This structure was

  17. First spin-resolved electron distributions in crystals from combined polarized neutron and X-ray diffraction experiments

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Maxime; Gillon, Béatrice; Claiser, Nicolas; Gillet, Jean-Michel; Lecomte, Claude; Souhassou, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1980s it has been possible to probe crystallized matter, thanks to X-ray or neutron scattering techniques, to obtain an accurate charge density or spin distribution at the atomic scale. Despite the description of the same physical quantity (electron density) and tremendous development of sources, detectors, data treatment software etc., these different techniques evolved separately with one model per experiment. However, a breakthrough was recently made by the development of a common model in order to combine information coming from all these different experiments. Here we report the first experimental determination of spin-resolved electron density obtained by a combined treatment of X-ray, neutron and polarized neutron diffraction data. These experimental spin up and spin down densities compare very well with density functional theory (DFT) calculations and also confirm a theoretical prediction made in 1985 which claims that majority spin electrons should have a more contracted distribution around the nucleus than minority spin electrons. Topological analysis of the resulting experimental spin-resolved electron density is also briefly discussed. PMID:25075338

  18. EMCCD-Based Detector for Time-Resolved X-Ray Diffraction and Scattering Studies of Biological Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Singh, Bipin; Guo, Liang; Gore, David; Irving, Thomas C.

    2007-11-26

    Third generation synchrotron sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne, IL, are outstanding tools for X-ray diffraction and scattering studies of non-crystalline biological materials. However, these studies are hindered by the lack of detectors that provide multiple frames of detailed structural information on the millisecond time scale at the required high spatial resolution, and large active areas. Here we report the development of a cost effective detector for time-resolved small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) using a cooled, fiberoptically coupled electron multiplying CCD (EMCCD), whose internal gain is selectable in real-time. The performance of the detector was evaluated using a Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb scintillator and was compared to a current state-of-the-art SAXS detector developed at Brandeis University. We also report our first results on the fabrication of a novel, microcolumnar, ZnSe(Te) scintillator that has a promise to provide very high emission efficiency of over 100,000 photons/MeV, high spatial resolution in excess of 10 lp/mm, and a fast decay time with virtually absent afterglow. Development of this scintillator will complement the EMCCD design, permitting the advances of a high spatial and temporal resolution, large area detector for time resolved applications.

  19. Mesoscopic structural phase progression in photo-excited VO2 revealed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yi; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Pice; Zhang, Qingteng; Highland, Matthew J.; Jung, Il Woong; Walko, Donald A.; Dufresne, Eric M.; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Freeland, John W.; Evans, Paul G.; Wen, Haidan

    2016-02-01

    Dynamical phase separation during a solid-solid phase transition poses a challenge for understanding the fundamental processes in correlated materials. Critical information underlying a phase transition, such as localized phase competition, is difficult to reveal by measurements that are spatially averaged over many phase separated regions. The ability to simultaneously track the spatial and temporal evolution of such systems is essential to understanding mesoscopic processes during a phase transition. Using state-of-the-art time-resolved hard x-ray diffraction microscopy, we directly visualize the structural phase progression in a VO2 film upon photoexcitation. Following a homogenous in-plane optical excitation, the phase transformation is initiated at discrete sites and completed by the growth of one lattice structure into the other, instead of a simultaneous isotropic lattice symmetry change. The time-dependent x-ray diffraction spatial maps show that the in-plane phase progression in laser-superheated VO2 is via a displacive lattice transformation as a result of relaxation from an excited monoclinic phase into a rutile phase. The speed of the phase front progression is quantitatively measured, and is faster than the process driven by in-plane thermal diffusion but slower than the sound speed in VO2. The direct visualization of localized structural changes in the time domain opens a new avenue to study mesoscopic processes in driven systems.

  20. Mesoscopic structural phase progression in photo-excited VO2 revealed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yi; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Pice; Zhang, Qingteng; Highland, Matthew J.; Jung, Il Woong; Walko, Donald A.; Dufresne, Eric M.; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Freeland, John W.; Evans, Paul G.; Wen, Haidan

    2016-01-01

    Dynamical phase separation during a solid-solid phase transition poses a challenge for understanding the fundamental processes in correlated materials. Critical information underlying a phase transition, such as localized phase competition, is difficult to reveal by measurements that are spatially averaged over many phase separated regions. The ability to simultaneously track the spatial and temporal evolution of such systems is essential to understanding mesoscopic processes during a phase transition. Using state-of-the-art time-resolved hard x-ray diffraction microscopy, we directly visualize the structural phase progression in a VO2 film upon photoexcitation. Following a homogenous in-plane optical excitation, the phase transformation is initiated at discrete sites and completed by the growth of one lattice structure into the other, instead of a simultaneous isotropic lattice symmetry change. The time-dependent x-ray diffraction spatial maps show that the in-plane phase progression in laser-superheated VO2 is via a displacive lattice transformation as a result of relaxation from an excited monoclinic phase into a rutile phase. The speed of the phase front progression is quantitatively measured, and is faster than the process driven by in-plane thermal diffusion but slower than the sound speed in VO2. The direct visualization of localized structural changes in the time domain opens a new avenue to study mesoscopic processes in driven systems. PMID:26915398

  1. Mesoscopic structural phase progression in photo-excited VO2 revealed by time-resolved x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, Yi; Cai, Zhonghou; Chen, Pice; Zhang, Qingteng; Highland, Matthew J.; Jung, II Woong; Walko, Donald A.; Dufresne, Eric M.; Jaewoo, Jeong; Samant, Mahesh G.; et al

    2016-02-26

    Dynamical phase separation during a solid-solid phase transition poses a challenge for understanding the fundamental processes in correlated materials. Critical information underlying a phase transition, such as localized phase competition, is difficult to reveal by measurements that are spatially averaged over many phase seperated regions. The ability to simultanousely track the spatial and temporal evolution of such systems is essential to understanding mesoscopic processes during a phase transition. Using state-of- the-art time-resolved hard x-ray diffraction microscopy, we directly visualize the structural phase progression in a VO2 film upon photoexcitation. Following a homogenous in-plane optical excitation, the phase transformation is initiatedmore » at discrete sites and completed by the growth of one lattice structure into the other, instead of a simultaneous isotropic lattice symmetry change. The time-dependent x-ray diffraction spatial maps show that the in-plane phase progression in laser-superheated VO2 is via a displacive lattice transformation as a result of relaxation from an excited monoclinic phase into a rutile phase. The speed of the phase front progression is quantitatively measured, which is faster than the process driven by in-plane thermal diffusion but slower than the sound speed in VO2. Lastly, the direct visualization of localized structural changes in the time domain opens a new avenue to study mesoscopic processes in driven systems.« less

  2. Hydrostatic Compression Curve for Triamino-Trinitrobenzene Determined to 13.0 GPa with Powder X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Lewis L.; Velisavljevic, Nenad; Hooks, Daniel E.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.

    2008-08-22

    Using powder X-ray diffraction in conjunction with a diamond anvil cell (DAC), the unit cell volume of triamino-trinitrobenzene (TATB) has been measured from ambient pressure to 13 GPa. The resultant isotherm is compared with previous theoretical (Byrd and Rice and Pastine and Bernecker) and experimental (Olinger and Cady) works. While all reports are consistent to approximately 2 GPa, our measurements reveal a slightly stiffer TATB material than reported by Olinger and Cady and an intermediate compressibility compared with the isotherms predicted by the two theoretical works. Analysis of the room temperature isotherm using the semi-empirical, Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, and Vinet equations of state (EOS) provided a determination of the isothermal bulk modulus (K{sub 0}) and its pressure-derivative (K{sub 0}') for TATB. From these fits to our P-V isotherm, from ambient pressure to 8 GPa, the average results for the zero-pressure bulk modulus and its pressure derivative were found to be 14.7 GPa and 10.1, respectively. For comparison to shock experiments on pressed TATB powder and its plastic-bonded formulation PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F 800), the isotherm was transformed to the pseudo-velocity U{sub s}-u{sub p} plane using the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. This analysis provides an extrapolated bulk sound speed, c{sub 0}=1.70 km s{sup -1}, for TATB and its agreement with a previous determination (c{sub 0}=1.43 km s{sup -1}) is discussed. Furthermore, our P-V and corresponding U{sub s}-u{sub p} curves reveal a subtle cusp at approximately 8 GPa. This cusp is discussed in relation to similar observations made for the aromatic hydrocarbons anthracene, benzene and toluene, graphite, and trinitrotoluene (TNT).

  3. Microstructure analysis of complex CuO/ZnO@carbon adsorbers: what are the limits of powder diffraction methods?

    PubMed

    Tseng, J C; Schmidt, W; Sager, U; Däuber, E; Pommerin, A; Weidenthaler, C

    2015-05-14

    Activate carbon impregnated with a mixture of copper oxide and zinc oxide performs well as active adsorber for NO2 removal in automotive cabin air filters. The oxide-loaded activated carbon exhibits superior long-term stability in comparison to pure activated carbon as has been shown in previous studies. The carbon material was loaded only with 2.5 wt% of each metal oxide. Characterization of the oxide nanoparticles within the pores of the activated carbon is difficult because of the rather low concentration of the oxides. Therefore, a systematic study was performed to evaluate the limits of line profile analysis of X-ray powder diffraction patterns. The method allows evaluation of crystalline domain size distributions, crystal defect concentrations and twinning probabilities of nanoscopic materials. Here, the analysis is hampered by the presence of several phases including more or less amorphous carbon. By using physical mixtures of defined copper oxide and zinc oxide particles with activated carbon, potential errors and limits could be identified. The contribution of the activated carbon to the scattering curve was modeled with a convolution of an exponential decay curve, a Chebyshev polynomial, and two Lorentzian peaks. With this approach, domain size distributions can be calculated that are shifted only by about 0.5-1.0 nm for very low loadings (≤4 wt%). Oxide loadings of 4 wt% and 5 wt% allow very reliable analyses from diffraction patterns measured in Bragg-Brentano and Debye-Scherrer geometry, respectively. For the real adsorber material, mean domain sizes have been calculated to be 2.8 nm and 2.4 nm before and after the NO2 removal tests. PMID:25892653

  4. Application of Powder Diffraction Methods to the Analysis of the Atomic Structure of Nanocrystals: The Concept of the Apparent Lattice Parameter (ALP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Stelmakh, S.; Pielaszek, R.; Bismayer, U.; Weber, H.-P.; Palosz, W.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The applicability of standard methods of elaboration of powder diffraction data for determination of the structure of nano-size crystallites is analysed. Based on our theoretical calculations of powder diffraction data we show, that the assumption of the infinite crystal lattice for nanocrystals smaller than 20 nm in size is not justified. Application of conventional tools developed for elaboration of powder diffraction data, like the Rietveld method, may lead to erroneous interpretation of the experimental results. An alternate evaluation of diffraction data of nanoparticles, based on the so-called 'apparent lattice parameter' (alp) is introduced. We assume a model of nanocrystal having a grain core with well-defined crystal structure, surrounded by a surface shell with the atomic structure similar to that of the core but being under a strain (compressive or tensile). The two structural components, the core and the shell, form essentially a composite crystal with interfering, inseparable diffraction properties. Because the structure of such a nanocrystal is not uniform, it defies the basic definitions of an unambiguous crystallographic phase. Consequently, a set of lattice parameters used for characterization of simple crystal phases is insufficient for a proper description of the complex structure of nanocrystals. We developed a method of evaluation of powder diffraction data of nanocrystals, which refers to a core-shell model and is based on the 'apparent lattice parameter' methodology. For a given diffraction pattem, the alp values are calculated for every individual Bragg reflection. For nanocrystals the alp values depend on the diffraction vector Q. By modeling different a0tomic structures of nanocrystals and calculating theoretically corresponding diffraction patterns using the Debye functions we showed, that alp-Q plots show characteristic shapes which can be used for evaluation of the atomic structure of the core-shell system. We show, that using a simple

  5. In situ neutron powder diffraction investigation of the hydration of tricalcium aluminate in the presence of gypsum

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, M.R. . E-mail: michael.hartman@nist.gov; Berliner, R.

    2005-11-15

    The hydration of a 1:3 molar ratio of tricalcium aluminate, Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6}, to gypsum, CaSO{sub 4}.2D{sub 2}O, was investigated at temperatures of 25, 50, and 80 deg. C using time-of-flight powder neutron diffraction combined with multiphase Rietveld structural refinement. It was shown that ettringite, Ca{sub 6}[Al(OD){sub 6}]{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}.{approx}26D{sub 2}O, was the first and only hydration product of the system, in contrast to a prior investigation which suggested the occurrence of a precursor phase prior to the formation of ettringite. Kinetics data showed that the hydration reaction is very sensitive to temperature: hydration at 25 deg. C was characterized by a single kinetic regime while hydration at higher temperatures consisted of two distinct kinetic regimes. The presence of two kinetic regimes was attributed to a change in either the dimensionality of the growth process or a change in the rate controlling mechanism in the hydration reaction.

  6. X-ray Powder Diffraction in Conservation Science: Towards Routine Crystal Structure Determination of Corrosion Products on Heritage Art Objects.

    PubMed

    Dinnebier, Robert E; Fischer, Andrea; Eggert, Gerhard; Runčevski, Tomče; Wahlberg, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structure determination and refinement process of corrosion products on historic art objects using laboratory high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) is presented in detail via two case studies. The first material under investigation was sodium copper formate hydroxide oxide hydrate, Cu4Na4O(HCOO)8(OH)2∙4H2O (sample 1) which forms on soda glass/copper alloy composite historic objects (e.g., enamels) in museum collections, exposed to formaldehyde and formic acid emitted from wooden storage cabinets, adhesives, etc. This degradation phenomenon has recently been characterized as "glass induced metal corrosion". For the second case study, thecotrichite, Ca3(CH3COO)3Cl(NO3)2∙6H2O (sample 2), was chosen, which is an efflorescent salt forming needlelike crystallites on tiles and limestone objects which are stored in wooden cabinets and display cases. In this case, the wood acts as source for acetic acid which reacts with soluble chloride and nitrate salts from the artifact or its environment. The knowledge of the geometrical structure helps conservation science to better understand production and decay reactions and to allow for full quantitative analysis in the frequent case of mixtures. PMID:27341300

  7. Using neutron powder diffraction and first-principles calculations to understand the working mechanisms of porous coordination polymer sorbents.

    PubMed

    Chevreau, Hubert; Duyker, Samuel G; Peterson, Vanessa K

    2015-12-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are promising solid sorbents, showing gas selectivity and uptake capacities relevant to many important applications, notably in the energy sector. To improve and tailor the sorption properties of these materials for such applications, it is necessary to gain an understanding of their working mechanisms at the atomic and molecular scale. Specifically, it is important to understand how features such as framework porosity, topology, chemical functionality and flexibility underpin sorbent behaviour and performance. Such information is obtained through interrogation of structure-function relationships, with neutron powder diffraction (NPD) being a particularly powerful characterization tool. The combination of NPD with first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations enables a deep understanding of the sorption mechanisms, and the resulting insights can direct the future development of MOF sorbents. In this paper, experimental approaches and investigations of two example MOFs are summarized, which demonstrate the type of information and the understanding into their functional mechanisms that can be gained. Such information is critical to the strategic design of new materials with targeted gas-sorption properties. PMID:26634721

  8. Phase coexistence in NaTaO3 at room temperature; a high resolution neutron powder diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Kevin S.; Kennedy, Brendan J.

    2015-05-01

    Room temperature high resolution neutron powder diffraction data, measured in time-of-flight, from two independent samples of NaTaO3 shows the presence of phase coexistence of two orthorhombic structures with space groups Pbnm, and Cmcm. The failure of earlier work to recognise the extent of the hysteresis associated with the high temperature (∼763 K on heating) Cmcm - Pbnm phase transition, that extends down to room temperature, and probably to 0 K, is due to data having been collected at too low a real-space resolution to characterise the diagnostic pseudocubic fundamental and superlattice reflection multiplicities. The phase fraction of the Cmcm phase increases with increasing temperature from 45 weight % at 298 K, to 74 weight % at 758 K. Throughout the whole temperature interval 298 K-758 K, the volume per formula unit of the Cmcm phase exceeds that of the Pbnm phase by an almost constant ∼0.01 Å3 suggesting the addition of pressure would supress the volume fraction of the higher temperature phase. The crystal structure of both phases, determined from data collected at 298 K, are reported, with the atomic displacement parameters of the Cmcm phase being significantly larger than those associated with the Pbnm phase, probably reflecting a high degree of thermal and static disorder.

  9. [X-ray powder diffraction of clay minerals of SZK01 core of Zabuye Lake, Tibetan Plateau].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Fei; Zheng, Mian-Ping

    2014-11-01

    The present article chooses the core from the borehole SZK01 in Zabuye Lake as the main research object. According to the results of X-ray powder diffraction of clay minerals, the major components are illite, illite and smectite mixed layer mineral (I/S), kaolinite and chlorite. According to the different species and contents of clay, integration of the characteristics of mineral and the results of Δ18O, we reestablished the evolution process of paleoclimate in Zabuye Lake. In compaison with SZK02 core in Zabuye, Greenland GISP2 and GRIP and Guliya ice core, it contains 5 stages since 115 ka in Zabuye: the last interglacial (15-75.5 ka), the earlier last glacial (75.5-60 ka), the interstage of the last glacial (60-30.1 ka), the last glacial maximum (30.1-16.7 ka) and deglacial-holocene (since 16.7 ka). We also recognized 6 Heinrich events (H1-H6) and warm event in 71 ka. In particular, the content of kaolinite is low, with the negative-skewed value of Δ18O in 52-53 ka, while the value of Δ18O in SZK02 and Guliya ice core is negative-skewed too, indicating the cold event in Tibet plateau, named H5-1. All the above demonstrated that the climate in Tibet plateau is global since the earlier last glacial, and it also has regional characteristics. PMID:25752070

  10. Neutron powder diffraction study of the layer organic-inorganic hybrid iron(II) methylphosphonate-hydrate, Fe[(CD 3PO 3)(D 2O)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léone, Philippe; Bellitto, Carlo; Bauer, Elvira M.; Righini, Guido; André, Gilles; Bourée, Françoise

    2008-11-01

    The crystal and magnetic structures of the hybrid organic-inorganic layer compound Fe[(CD 3PO 3)(D 2O)] have been studied by neutron powder diffraction as a function of temperature down to 1.5 K. The neutron diffraction pattern recorded at 200 K shows that the fully deuterated compound crystallizes in one of the two known forms of the undeuterated Fe[(CH 3PO 3)(H 2O)]. The crystal structure is orthorhombic, space group Pmn2 1, with the following unit-cell parameters: a=5.7095(1) Å, b=8.8053(3) Å and c=4.7987(1) Å; Z=2. The crystal structure remains unchanged on cooling from 200 to 1.5 K. Moreover, at low temperature, Fe[(CD 3PO 3)(D 2O)] shows a commensurate magnetic structure ( k=(0,0,0)). As revealed by bulk susceptibility measurements on Fe[(CH 3PO 3)(H 2O)], the magnetic structure corresponds to a canted antiferromagnet with a critical temperature TN=25 K. Neutron powder diffraction reveals that below TN=23.5 K the iron magnetic moments in Fe[(CD 3PO 3)(D 2O)] are antiferromagnetically coupled and oriented along the b-axis, perpendicular to the inorganic layers. No ferromagnetic component is observable in the neutron powder diffraction experiment, due to its too small value (<0.1 μB).

  11. Comparison of Shock-Deformed Carbonate Samples to Unshocked Carbonate Samples Using X-ray Powder Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huson, S.; Foit, F.; Pope, M.

    2006-12-01

    Previous studies of carbonate minerals from meteorite impact craters have revealed broader X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) peaks when compared to those of unshocked mineral standards. In this study XRD patterns of shocked minerals from an impact crater are compared to those subjected to terrestrial tectonic processes as well as to undeformed mineral standards from our in-house collection. Shocked dolostone and limestone samples were collected from the central uplift and eroded crater rim of Sierra Madera, a well-exposed, complex impact crater located in west Texas. Unshocked samples of dolostone and limestone were collected from the Mission Canyon Formation of the Madison Limestone Group of southwest Montana and western Wyoming. The Mission Canyon Formation was deposited in a shallow shelf environment during the Mississippian, subsequently buried to varying depths, and deformed during the Laramide and Sevier orogenies in the Cretaceous. These samples are therefore excellent representatives for "normal" terrestrial tectonic processes. Samples were powdered, sieved through a 63 μm mesh sieve to ensure a uniform size, and sifted onto a vaseline coated zero background plate to reduce preferred orientation of grains. Patterns were collected over the range from 15° 120° 2θ with a step width of 0.02° 2θ and count-time of 10s per step. All patterns were analyzed using MDI Jade 7.0 software. Generally, samples collected in the field have XRD patterns that are not as sharp as the mineral standard patterns. With both shocked and unshocked samples, those containing dolomite show more XRD peak broadening than those without dolomite and at least one pattern of an unshocked dolostone sample is indistinguishable from a shocked dolostone pattern. However, dolostone samples in general are problematic. Previous researchers reported that the amount of magnesium in calcite may affect grinding properties and, therefore, influence XRD peak broadening. Currently, it is not always

  12. Time-resolved grazing-incidence diffraction studies of thin films using an imaging-plate camera and focusing monochromator.

    PubMed

    Foran, G J; Gentle, I R; Garrett, R F; Creagh, D C; Peng, J B; Barnes, G T

    1998-03-01

    A multiple imaging-plate (IP) detector system and focusing monochromator have been developed and successfully applied to the time-resolved study of phase transitions in Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films by grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD). The first reported application of imaging plates to a GIXD study was carried out by our group and proved to be very successful in the determination of thin-film structure [Foran, Peng, Steitz, Barnes & Gentle (1996). Langmuir, 12, 774-777]. To extend the capabilities of this system, an IP camera was designed and built which can accommodate up to 13 IPs (40 x 20 cm) inside the vacuum chamber of the main diffractometer at the Australian Beamline at the Photon Factory. The camera allows the enclosed IPs to be successively exposed and stored inside the diffractometer for later scanning. The focusing monochromator employed in this technique combines fixed exit-beam height with sagittal focusing of the second crystal and delivers a gain in flux of >/=20 times when measured through a 0.1 x 0.1 mm aperture. The utility of the system incorporating the IP camera and the focusing monochromator has been demonstrated through the study of temperature-dependent phase transitions in LB films of metal fatty acids. PMID:16687811

  13. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction of the photochromic alpha-styrylpyrylium trifluoromethanesulfonate crystal films reveals ultrafast structural switching.

    PubMed

    Hallmann, Jörg; Morgenroth, Wolfgang; Paulmann, Carsten; Davaasambuu, Jav; Kong, Qingyu; Wulff, Michael; Techert, Simone

    2009-10-21

    The ultrafast structural dynamics of the [2+2] photocycloaddition of alpha-styrylpyrylium trifluoromethanesulfonate (TFMS) has been studied in great detail. During the photoreaction, optical and infrared spectroscopy confirms that crystals of alpha-styrylpyrylium change color. Since the reaction is reversible, it has been suggested to be used as an organic holographic storage device. The present photocrystallographic studies (with high spatial resolution) allow for an electron density analysis of the overall reaction kinetics, revealing the mechanism of bond-breaking and bond-formation. It could furthermore be proved how the reaction is influenced by the rearrangement of the surrounding moieties. Picosecond time-resolved X-ray diffraction studies allow for the monitoring the photoreaction in crystalline thin films under experimental conditions where the transformation times are greatly enhanced. These investigations are discussed in the context of the photocrystallographic results. It has been found that alpha-styrylpyrylium TFMS undergoes an ultrafast photoreaction to the dimer product state and back-reaction to the monomer reactant state which is temperature driven. The present experiments indicate that TFMS reacts on time scales which are the fundamental limiting ones of two-quantum systems and therefore has the potential to be used as an ultrafast organic molecular switcher. PMID:19824735

  14. Structural changes in shock compressed silicon observed using time-resolved x-ray diffraction at the Dynamic Compression Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turneaure, Stefan; Zdanowicz, E.; Sinclair, N.; Graber, T.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2015-06-01

    Structural changes in shock compressed silicon were observed directly using time-resolved x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements at the Dynamic Compression Sector at the Advanced Photon Source. The silicon samples were impacted by polycarbonate impactors accelerated to velocities greater than 5 km/s using a two-stage light gas gun resulting in impact stresses of about 25 GPa. The 23.5 keV synchrotron x-ray beam passed through the polycarbonate impactor, the silicon sample, and an x-ray window (polycarbonate or LiF) at an angle of 30 degrees relative to the impact plane. Four XRD frames (~ 100 ps snapshots) were obtained with 153.4 ns between frames near the time of impact. The XRD measurements indicate that in the peak shocked state, the silicon samples completely transformed to a high-pressure phase. XRD results for both shocked polycrystalline silicon and single crystal silicon will be presented and compared. Work supported by DOE/NNSA.

  15. Crystal structures of deuterated sodium molybdate dihydrate and sodium tungstate dihydrate from time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Fortes, A Dominic

    2015-07-01

    Time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data have been measured from ∼90 mol% deuterated isotopologues of Na2MoO4·2H2O and Na2WO4·2H2O at 295 K to a resolution of sin (θ)/λ = 0.77 Å(-1). The use of neutrons has allowed refinement of structural parameters with a precision that varies by a factor of two from the heaviest to the lightest atoms; this contrasts with the X-ray based refinements where precision may be > 20× poorer for O atoms in the presence of atoms such as Mo and W. The accuracy and precision of inter-atomic distances and angles are in excellent agreement with recent X-ray single-crystal structure refinements whilst also completing our view of the hydrogen-bond geometry to the same degree of statistical certainty. The two structures are isotypic, space-group Pbca, with all atoms occupying general positions, being comprised of edge- and corner-sharing NaO5 and NaO6 polyhedra that form layers parallel with (010) inter-leaved with planes of XO4 (X = Mo, W) tetra-hedra that are linked by chains of water mol-ecules along [100] and [001]. The complete structure is identical with the previously described molybdate [Capitelli et al. (2006 ▸). Asian J. Chem. 18, 2856-2860] but shows that the purported three-centred inter-action involving one of the water mol-ecules in the tungstate [Farrugia (2007 ▸). Acta Cryst. E63, i142] is in fact an ordinary two-centred 'linear' hydrogen bond. PMID:26279871

  16. Crystal structures of deuterated sodium molybdate dihydrate and sodium tungstate dihydrate from time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, A. Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data have been measured from ∼90 mol% deuterated isotopologues of Na2MoO4·2H2O and Na2WO4·2H2O at 295 K to a resolution of sin (θ)/λ = 0.77 Å−1. The use of neutrons has allowed refinement of structural parameters with a precision that varies by a factor of two from the heaviest to the lightest atoms; this contrasts with the X-ray based refinements where precision may be > 20× poorer for O atoms in the presence of atoms such as Mo and W. The accuracy and precision of inter­atomic distances and angles are in excellent agreement with recent X-ray single-crystal structure refinements whilst also completing our view of the hydrogen-bond geometry to the same degree of statistical certainty. The two structures are isotypic, space-group Pbca, with all atoms occupying general positions, being comprised of edge- and corner-sharing NaO5 and NaO6 polyhedra that form layers parallel with (010) inter­leaved with planes of XO4 (X = Mo, W) tetra­hedra that are linked by chains of water mol­ecules along [100] and [001]. The complete structure is identical with the previously described molybdate [Capitelli et al. (2006 ▸). Asian J. Chem. 18, 2856–2860] but shows that the purported three-centred inter­action involving one of the water mol­ecules in the tungstate [Farrugia (2007 ▸). Acta Cryst. E63, i142] is in fact an ordinary two-centred ‘linear’ hydrogen bond. PMID:26279871

  17. Neutron and X-Ray Powder Diffraction Study of RBa 2Fe 3O 8+ wPhases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karen, P.; Kjekshus, A.; Huang, Q.; Lynn, J. W.; Rosov, N.; Natali Sora, I.; Karen, V. L.; Mighell, A. D.; Santoro, A.

    1998-02-01

    Compounds of composition RBa 2Fe 3O 8+ w( R=La, Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Yb, Lu, and Y) with variable oxygen content have been synthesized using the liquid mixing technique and have been analyzed by powder X-ray and neutron diffraction methods. A triple perovskite-type structure with ordered Ba and Rcations and having the symmetry of space group P4/ mmmwas obtained only for R=Y, Dy, and Er, whereas the larger Ratoms gave the atomic arrangement of disordered, defective perovskites with average symmetry Pmoverline3m. No perovskite-type phases were obtained when Yb and Lu were tried. The oxygen content of the oxygen-saturated phases was found to increase with increasing size of the cation Rfrom w=0.07 for Er to w=0.83 for La. The Néel temperature (˜650 K) and the magnitude of the Fe magnetic moment (˜3.3 μBat room temperature) are highest when trivalent iron is involved ( w=0), but these quantities are rather insensitive to the nature of Rand to slight variations of oxygen content in the triple perovskite-type structure of the Y, Dy, and Er compounds. In the case of the cubic structures, however, both quantities depend strongly on the oxygen stoichiometry. In the magnetically ordered state, nearest-neighbor iron moments are coupled antiferromagnetically along the three crystallographic directions in all samples, resulting in magnetic structures with symmetry Imm' mand magnetic unit cells related to those of the corresponding nuclear structures by the transformation matrix (1 overline10/110/002).

  18. Additional evidence from x-ray powder diffraction patterns that icosahedral quasi-crystals of intermetallic compounds are twinned cubic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Pauling, L. )

    1988-07-01

    Analysis of the measured values of Q for the weak peaks (small maxima, usually considered to be background fluctuations, noise) on the x-ray powder diffraction curves for 17 rapidly quenched alloys leads directly to the conclusion that they are formed by an 820-atom or 1012-atom primitive cubic structure that by icosahedral twinning produces the so-called icosahedral quasi-crystals.

  19. Investigation of the Surface Stress in SiC and Diamond Nanocrystals by In-situ High Pressure Powder Diffraction Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Stelmakh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Zhao, Y.; Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    The real atomic structure of nanocrystals determines key properties of the materials. For such materials the serious experimental problem lies in obtaining sufficiently accurate measurements of the structural parameters of the crystals, since very small crystals constitute rather a two-phase than a uniform crystallographic phase system. As a result, elastic properties of nanograins may be expected to reflect a dual nature of their structure, with a corresponding set of different elastic property parameters. We studied those properties by in-situ high-pressure powder diffraction technique. For nanocrystalline, even one-phase materials such measurements are particularly difficult to make since determination of the lattice parameters of very small crystals presents a challenge due to inherent limitations of standard elaboration of powder diffractograms. In this investigation we used our methodology of the structural analysis, the 'apparent lattice parameter' (alp) concept. The methodology allowed us to avoid the traps (if applied to nanocrystals) of standard powder diffraction evaluation techniques. The experiments were performed for nanocrystalline Sic and GaN powders using synchrotron sources. We applied both hydrostatic and isostatic pressures in the range of up to 40 GPa. Elastic properties of the samples were examined based on the measurements of a change of the lattice parameters with pressure. The results show a dual nature of the mechanical properties (compressibilities) of the materials, indicating a complex, core-shell structure of the grains.

  20. Structure refinement of sub-cubic-mm volume sample at high pressures by pulsed neutron powder diffraction: application to brucite in an opposed anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuchi, Takuo; Tomioka, Naotaka; Purevjav, Narangoo; Abe, Jun; Harjo, Stefanus; Gong, Wu

    2014-04-01

    Neutron powder diffraction measurements of 0.9 mm3 of mixture of deuterated brucite and pressure medium were conducted at pressures to 2.8 GPa, using an opposed anvil cell and a medium-resolution diffractometer at Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex pulsed neutron source. Spurious-free diffraction patterns were successfully obtained and refined to provide all structural parameters including Debye-Waller factors. Tilting of hydroxyl dipoles of brucite toward one of the three nearest-neighbor oxygen anions was confirmed to be substantial at pressure as low as 1.5 GPa. By this application, technical feasibility to analyze such a small sample has been newly established, which would be useful to extend the applications of neutron diffraction at high pressures.

  1. A flow-through reaction cell for in situ X-ray diffraction and absorption studies of heterogeneous powder-liquid reactions and phase transformations.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Pilar; da Silva, Iván; Rubio-Zuazo, Juan; Alfonso, Belén F; Trobajo, Camino; Khainakov, Sergei; Garcia, Jose R; Garcia-Granda, Santiago; Castro, Germán R

    2012-01-01

    A portable powder-liquid high-corrosion-resistant reaction cell has been designed to follow in situ reactions by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques. The cell has been conceived to be mounted on the experimental stations for diffraction and absorption of the Spanish CRG SpLine-BM25 beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Powder reactants and/or products are kept at a fixed position in a vertical geometry in the X-ray pathway by a porous membrane, under forced liquid reflux circulation. Owing to the short pathway of the X-ray beam through the cell, XRD and XAS measurements can be carried out in transmission configuration/mode. In the case of the diffraction technique, data can be collected with either a point detector or a two-dimensional CCD detector, depending on specific experimental requirements in terms of space or time resolution. Crystallization processes, heterogeneous catalytic processes and several varieties of experiments can be followed by these techniques with this cell. Two experiments were carried out to demonstrate the cell feasibility: the phase transformations of layered titanium phosphates in boiling aqueous solutions of phosphoric acid, and the reaction of copper carbonate and L-isoleucine amino acid powders in boiling aqueous solution. In this last case the shrinking of the solid reactants and the formation of Cu(isoleucine)(2) is observed. The crystallization processes and several phase transitions have been observed during the experiments, as well as an unexpected reaction pathway. PMID:22186649

  2. Testing the limits of sensitivity in a solid-state structural investigation by combined X-ray powder diffraction, solid-state NMR, and molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Filip, Xenia; Borodi, Gheorghe; Filip, Claudiu

    2011-10-28

    A solid state structural investigation of ethoxzolamide is performed on microcrystalline powder by using a multi-technique approach that combines X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) data analysis based on direct space methods with information from (13)C((15)N) solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) and molecular modeling. Quantum chemical computations of the crystal were employed for geometry optimization and chemical shift calculations based on the Gauge Including Projector Augmented-Wave (GIPAW) method, whereas a systematic search in the conformational space was performed on the isolated molecule using a molecular mechanics (MM) approach. The applied methodology proved useful for: (i) removing ambiguities in the XRPD crystal structure determination process and further refining the derived structure solutions, and (ii) getting important insights into the relationship between the complex network of non-covalent interactions and the induced supra-molecular architectures/crystal packing patterns. It was found that ethoxzolamide provides an ideal case study for testing the accuracy with which this methodology allows to distinguish between various structural features emerging from the analysis of the powder diffraction data. PMID:21931906

  3. Penetration route of functional molecules in stratum corneum studied by time-resolved small- and wide-angle x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatta, Ichiro; Nakazawa, Hiromitsu; Obata, Yasuko; Ohta, Noboru; Inoue, Katsuaki; Yagi, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    We studied effects of functional molecules on corneocytes in stratum corneum using time-resolved small- and wide-angle x-ray diffraction after applying a functional molecule. From these results it was revealed that in the stratum corneum a typical hydrophilic molecule, ethanol, penetrates via the transcellular route and on the other hand a typical hydrophobic molecule, d-limonene, penetrates via the intercellular route.

  4. Investigation of phase evolution of CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} (CCTO) by in situ synchrotron high-temperature powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang, Xin; Huang, Saifang; Zhang, Weijun; Cao, Peng; Huang, Zhaohui; Gao, Wei

    2014-03-15

    In situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction was used to study the high-temperature phase evolution of CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} (CCTO) precursors prepared via solid-state and sol–gel methods. After the precursors are heated to 1225 °C, the CCTO phase is the main phase observed in the calcined powder, with the presence of some minor impurities. Comparing the two precursors, we found that the onset temperature for the CCTO phase formation is 800 °C in the sol–gel precursor, lower than that in the solid-state precursor (875 °C). Intermediate phases were only observed in the sol–gel precursor. Both precursors are able to be calcined to sub-micrometric sized powders. Based on the synchrotron data along with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), the phase formation sequence and mechanism during calcination are proposed in this study. -- Graphical abstract: The in situ synchrotron HT-XRD patterns of CCTO sol–gel and solid-state precursor. Highlights: • Phase formation sequence/mechanism in two CCTO precursors has been established. • Formation temperature of CCTO via sol–gel method is lower than solid-state method. • Intermediate phases are only observed in the sol–gel precursor. • Both precursors are able to be calcined into sub-micrometric sized powders.

  5. High-resolution inelastic neutron scattering and neutron powder diffraction study of the adsorption of dihydrogen by the Cu(II) metal-organic framework material HKUST-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callear, Samantha K.; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J.; David, William I. F.; Millange, Franck; Walton, Richard I.

    2013-12-01

    We present new high-resolution inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectra (measured using the TOSCA and MARI instruments at ISIS) and powder neutron diffraction data (measured on the diffractometer WISH at ISIS) from the interaction of the prototypical metal-organic framework HKUST-1 with various dosages of dihydrogen gas. The INS spectra show direct evidence for the sequential occupation of various distinct sites for dihydrogen in the metal-organic framework, whose population is adjusted during increasing loading of the guest. The superior resolution of TOSCA reveals subtle features in the spectra, not previously reported, including evidence for split signals, while complementary spectra recorded on MARI present full information in energy and momentum transfer. The analysis of the powder neutron patterns using the Rietveld method shows a consistent picture, allowing the crystallographic indenisation of binding sites for dihydrogen, thus building a comprehensive picture of the interaction of the guest with the nanoporous host.

  6. A glass capillary cell for in situ powder X-ray diffraction of condensed volatile compounds. Solid HCFC-123a and HCFC-124.

    PubMed

    Brunelli, Michela; Fitch, Andrew N

    2003-07-01

    A rotating glass capillary cell with a gas handling system has been built to allow in situ studies by powder X-ray diffraction. The cell can be used to condense volatile compounds, or to follow solid-state chemical reactions under vacuum or at gas pressures up to around 7 x 10(5) Pa. Using the cell, cooled by a stream of helium gas, the solid phases of 1,2-dichlorotrifluoroethane (HCFC-123a) and 2-chloro-1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HCFC-124) have been investigated using powder synchrotron X-ray radiation. These were found to have disordered hexagonal structures, with a = 4.018 (5), c = 6.553 (1) A and a = 4.048 (1), c = 6.625 (1) A, respectively, at 64 K. PMID:12824935

  7. Neutron powder diffraction study of Ba3ZnRu2-xIrxO9 (x = 0, 1, 2) with 6H-type perovskite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beran, P.; Ivanov, S. A.; Nordblad, P.; Middey, S.; Nag, A.; Sarma, D. D.; Ray, S.; Mathieu, R.

    2015-12-01

    The triple perovskites Ba3ZnRu2-xIrxO9 with x = 0, 1, and 2 are insulating compounds in which Ru(Ir) cations form a dimer state. Polycrystalline samples of these materials were studied using neutron powder diffraction (NPD) at 10 and 295 K. No structural transition nor evidence of long range magnetic order was observed within the investigated temperature range. The results from structural refinements of the NPD data and its polyhedral analysis are presented, and discussed as a function of Ru/Ir content.

  8. Single-crystal and humidity-controlled powder diffraction study of the breathing effect in a metal-organic framework upon water adsorption/desorption.

    PubMed

    Aríñez-Soriano, Javier; Albalad, Jorge; Vila-Parrondo, Christian; Pérez-Carvajal, Javier; Rodríguez-Hermida, Sabina; Cabeza, Aurelio; Juanhuix, Jordi; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2016-05-26

    Herein we report a study on water adsorption/desorption-triggered single-crystal to single-crystal transformations in a MOF, by single-crystal and humidity-controlled powder X-ray diffraction and water-sorption measurements. We identified a gate-opening effect at a relative humidity of 85% upon water adsorption, and a gate-closure effect at a relative humidity of 55 to 77% upon water desorption. This reversible breathing effect between the "open" and the "closed" structures of the MOF involves the cleavage and formation of several coordination bonds. PMID:27228426

  9. Effect of chlorine in clay-mineral specimens prepared on silver metal-membrane mounts for X-ray powder diffraction analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; Commeau, J.A.; Pense, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    Silver metal-membrane filters are commonly used as substrates in the preparation of oriented clay-mineral specimens for X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The silver metal-membrane filters, however, present some problems after heat treatment if either the filters or the samples contain significant amounts of chlorine. At elevated temperature, the chloride ions react with the silver substrate to form crystalline compounds. These compounds change the mass-absorption coefficient of the sample, reducing peak intensities and areas and, therefore, complicating the semiquantitative estimation of clay minerals. A simple procedure that eliminates most of the chloride from a sample and the silver metal-membrane substrate is presented here.

  10. An in situ sample environment reaction cell for spatially resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of powders and small structured reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chu; Gustafson, Johan; Merte, Lindsay R.; Evertsson, Jonas; Norén, Katarina; Carlson, Stefan; Svensson, Hâkan; Carlsson, Per-Anders

    2015-03-01

    An easy-to-use sample environment reaction cell for X-ray based in situ studies of powders and small structured samples, e.g., powder, pellet, and monolith catalysts, is described. The design of the cell allows for flexible use of appropriate X-ray transparent windows, shielding the sample from ambient conditions, such that incident X-ray energies as low as 3 keV can be used. Thus, in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements in either transmission or fluorescence mode are facilitated. Total gas flows up to about 500 mln/min can be fed while the sample temperature is accurately controlled (at least) in the range of 25-500 °C. The gas feed is composed by a versatile gas-mixing system and the effluent gas flow composition is monitored with mass spectrometry (MS). These systems are described briefly. Results from simultaneous XAS/MS measurements during oxidation of carbon monoxide over a 4% Pt/Al2O3 powder catalyst are used to illustrate the system performance in terms of transmission XAS. Also, 2.2% Pd/Al2O3 and 2% Ag - Al2O3 powder catalysts have been used to demonstrate X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy in fluorescence mode. Further, a 2% Pt/Al2O3 monolith catalyst was used ex situ for transmission XANES. The reaction cell opens for facile studies of structure-function relationships for model as well as realistic catalysts both in the form of powders, small pellets, and coated or extruded monoliths at near realistic conditions. The applicability of the cell for X-ray diffraction measurements is discussed.