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Sample records for resolving reonance-ionization spectroscopy

  1. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT; Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE’s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE’s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  2. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, Franziska; Lübcke, Andrea; Heine, Nadja; Schultz, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    We present a novel setup for the investigation of ultrafast dynamic processes in a liquid jet using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. A magnetic-bottle type spectrometer with a high collection efficiency allows the very sensitive detection of photoelectrons emitted from a 10 μm thick liquid jet. This translates into good signal/noise ratio and rapid data acquisition making femtosecond time-resolved experiments feasible. We describe the experimental setup, a detailed spectrometer characterization based on the spectroscopy of nitric oxide in the gas phase, and results from femtosecond time-resolved experiments on sodium iodide solutions. The latter experiments reveal the formation and evolution of the solvated electron and we characterize two distinct spectral components corresponding to initially thermalized and unthermalized solvated electrons. The absence of dark states in photoionization, the direct measurement of electron binding energies, and the ability to resolve dynamic processes on the femtosecond time scale make time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy from the liquid jet a very promising method for the characterization of photochemical processes in liquids.

  3. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Franziska; Lübcke, Andrea; Heine, Nadja; Schultz, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    We present a novel setup for the investigation of ultrafast dynamic processes in a liquid jet using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. A magnetic-bottle type spectrometer with a high collection efficiency allows the very sensitive detection of photoelectrons emitted from a 10 μm thick liquid jet. This translates into good signal/noise ratio and rapid data acquisition making femtosecond time-resolved experiments feasible. We describe the experimental setup, a detailed spectrometer characterization based on the spectroscopy of nitric oxide in the gas phase, and results from femtosecond time-resolved experiments on sodium iodide solutions. The latter experiments reveal the formation and evolution of the solvated electron and we characterize two distinct spectral components corresponding to initially thermalized and unthermalized solvated electrons. The absence of dark states in photoionization, the direct measurement of electron binding energies, and the ability to resolve dynamic processes on the femtosecond time scale make time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy from the liquid jet a very promising method for the characterization of photochemical processes in liquids. PMID:21133461

  4. Time-resolved multiple probe spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Greetham, G. M.; Sole, D.; Clark, I. P.; Parker, A. W.; Pollard, M. R.; Towrie, M.

    2012-10-15

    Time-resolved multiple probe spectroscopy combines optical, electronic, and data acquisition capabilities to enable measurement of picosecond to millisecond time-resolved spectra within a single experiment, using a single activation pulse. This technology enables a wide range of dynamic processes to be studied on a single laser and sample system. The technique includes a 1 kHz pump, 10 kHz probe flash photolysis-like mode of acquisition (pump-probe-probe-probe, etc.), increasing the amount of information from each experiment. We demonstrate the capability of the instrument by measuring the photolysis of tungsten hexacarbonyl (W(CO){sub 6}) monitored by IR absorption spectroscopy, following picosecond vibrational cooling of product formation through to slower bimolecular diffusion reactions on the microsecond time scale.

  5. Spatially Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy of Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knop, Robert Andrew, Jr.

    This thesis presents infrared spectroscopy of the circumnuclear regions of 23 Seyfert galaxies. Observations are spectrally resolved with a resolution of λΔλ~1000 and spatially resolved to ~1'', corresponding to ~102 pc for the objects in the sample. The instrument used for the observations, the Palomar Near-Infrared Spectrometer, is described, and problems peculiar to reduction of data from it are discussed. The lines observed include Paβ, Brγ, (FeII) (λ=1.2567μm), and H2 (λ=2.1213μm). In nine objects, the coronal line (SIX) (λ=1.2524μm) is also detected. Spatially resolved line emission is clearly visible in approximately half of the objects observed. The data for five of the objects showing the best spatially resolved infrared line emission are analyzed in detail. These objects include Seyfert 1.5 galaxy NGC 4151 and Seyfert 2 galaxies Mk 1066, NGC 2110, NGC 4388, and Mk 3. The data for the remaining objects is presented in tabular form, and each object is discussed briefly. The data argue that processes associated with the Seyfert nucleus are responsible for the bulk of the observed (FeII) emission. Kinematic and spatial associations can be drawn between features in the (FeII) line profiles and other processes associated with the active nucleus, such as outflows seen in ionized optical emission and radio lobes. Most of the (FeII) appears to emerge from partially ionized regions excited by nuclear x-rays, with an additional contribution from fast shocks. Some of the H2 emission also appears to be associated with the nuclear activity. However, in some cases the H2 emission is observed to have a different spatial distribution from (FeII) and the H+ emission. The H2 emission is probably thermally excited. No significant differences are found between the infrared line emission of Seyfert and Seyfert 1.x galaxies.

  6. Phase-resolved cyclotron spectroscopy of polars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Ryan

    In this thesis we use phase-resolved cyclotron spectroscopy to study polars. Polars are a subset of cataclysmic variables where the primary WD is highly magnetic. In this case, the accretion flow is constrained along the magnetic field lines and eventually deposited on the WD, where the accreting material interacts with the atmosphere, forming a standing hydrodynamic shock at a location termed the accretion region, and emitting cyclotron radiation. Due to its field strength, cyclotron radiation from polars falls at either UV, optical or NIR wavelengths. While a substantial amount of optical cyclotron spectra have been published on polars, the NIR remains relatively unstudied. In this thesis, we present NIR spectroscopy for fifteen polars. Additionally, while a single cyclotron spectrum is needed to constrain the shock parameters, phase- resolved spectroscopy allows for a more in-depth analysis of the shock structure and the geometry of the accretion region. Of the fifteen polars observed, eight yielded spectra of adequate quality to be modeled in this manner: EF Eri, EQ Cet, AN UMa, VV Pup, AM Her, ST LMi, MR Ser, and MQ Dra. Initially, we used the industry standard "Constant Lambda (CL)" code to model each object. The code is fast, but produces only globally averaged values of the salient shock parameters: B - the magnetic field strength, kT - the plasma temperature, logL - the "size parameter" of the accretion column, and TH- the viewing angle between the observer and the magnetic field. For each object we present CL models for our NIR phase-resolved cyclotron spectra. Subsequently, we use a more advanced "Structured-Shock" code built by Fischer & Beuermann (2001)("F&B") to remodel three objects: EQ Cet, MQ Dra, and EF Eri. The F&B code allows for input of more physical parameters and most importantly does ray tracing through a simulated one-dimensional accretion column. To determine the outgoing spectrum, temperature and velocity profiles are needed to

  7. Rotationally resolved infrared spectroscopy of adamantane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirali, O.; Boudon, V.; Oomens, J.; Vervloet, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first rotationally resolved spectra of adamantane (C10H16) applying gas-phase Fourier transform infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy. High-resolution IR spectra are recorded in the 33-4500 cm-1range using as source of IR radiation both synchrotron radiation (at the AILES beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron) as well as a classical globar. Adamantane is a spherical top molecule with tetrahedral symmetry (Td point group) and has no permanent dipole moment in its vibronic ground state. Of the 72 fundamental vibrational modes in adamantane, only 11 are IR active. Here we present rotationally resolved spectra for seven of them: ν30, ν28, ν27, ν26, ν25, ν24, and ν23. The typical rotational structure of spherical tops is observed and analyzed using the STDS software developed in the Dijon group, which provides the first accurate energy levels and rotational constants for seven fundamental modes. Rotational levels with quantum numbers as high as J = 107 have been identified and included in the fit leading to a typical standard deviation of about 10-3 cm-1.

  8. Spatially resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybiec, Maciej

    applications was in the scope of this research. Bio-conjugation and functionalization are the fundamental issues for bio-marker tagging application of semiconductor quantum dots. It was discovered that spatially resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy and PL photo-degradation kinetics can confirm the bio-conjugation. Development of a methodology that will allow the spectroscopic confirmation of bio-conjugation of quantum dot fluorescent tags and optimization of their performance was the final goal for this research project.

  9. Position-resolved Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A.; Butterling, M.; Fiedler, F.; Fritz, F.; Kempe, M.; Cowan, T. E.

    2013-06-01

    A new method which allows for position-resolved positron lifetime spectroscopy studies in extended volume samples is presented. In addition to the existing technique of in-situ production of positrons inside large (cm3) bulk samples using high-energy photons up to 16 MeV from bremsstrahlung production, granular position-sensitive photon detectors have been employed. A beam of intense bremsstrahlung is provided by the superconducting electron linear accelerator ELBE (Electron Linear Accelerator with high Brilliance and low Emittance) which delivers electron bunches of less than 10 ps temporal width and an adjustable bunch separation of multiples of 38 ns, average beam currents of 1 mA, and energies up to 40 MeV. Since the generation of bremsstrahlung and the transport to the sample preserves the sharp timing of the electron beam, positrons generated inside the entire sample volume by pair production feature a sharp start time stamp for positron annihilation lifetime studies with high timing resolutions and high signal to background ratios due to the coincident detection of two annihilation photons. Two commercially available detectors from a high-resolution medial positron-emission tomography system are being employed with 169 individual Lu2SiO5:Ce scintillation crystals, each. In first experiments, a positron-lifetime gated image of a planar Si/SiO2 (pieces of 12.5 mm × 25 mm size) sample and a 3-D structured metal in Teflon target could be obtained proving the feasibility of a three dimensional lifetime-gated tomographic system.

  10. Thymine Dimer Formation probed by Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Wolfgang J.; Schrader, Tobias E.; Roller, Florian O.; Gilch, Peter; Zinth, Wolfgang; Kohler, Bern

    Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers are the major photoproducts formed when DNA is exposed to UV light. Femtosecond time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy reveals that thymine dimers are formed in thymidine oligonucleotides in an ultrafast photoreaction.

  11. Time-resolved orbital angular momentum spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Noyan, Mehmet A.; Kikkawa, James M.

    2015-07-20

    We introduce pump-probe magneto-orbital spectroscopy, wherein Laguerre-Gauss optical pump pulses impart orbital angular momentum to the electronic states of a material and subsequent dynamics are studied with 100 fs time resolution. The excitation uses vortex modes that distribute angular momentum over a macroscopic area determined by the spot size, and the optical probe studies the chiral imbalance of vortex modes reflected off the sample. First observations in bulk GaAs yield transients that evolve on time scales distinctly different from population and spin relaxation, as expected, but with surprisingly large lifetimes.

  12. Spatially resolved spectroscopy using tapered stripline NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijssen, Koen C. H.; Bart, Jacob; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; Janssen, J. W. G. (Hans); Kentgens, Arno P. M.; van Bentum, P. Jan M.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic field B0 gradients are essential in modern Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Although RF/B1 gradients can be used to fulfill a similar role, this is not used in common practice because of practical limitations in the design of B1 gradient coils. Here we present a new method to create B1 gradients using stripline RF coils. The conductor-width of a stripline NMR chip and the strength of its radiofrequency field are correlated, so a stripline chip can be tapered to produce any arbitrary shaped B1 field gradient. Here we show the characterization of this tapered stripline configuration and demonstrate three applications: magnetic resonance imaging on samples with nL-μL volumes, reaction monitoring of fast chemical reactions (10-2-101 s) and the compensation of B0 field gradients to obtain high-resolution spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

  13. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H.

    1997-04-01

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  14. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of Eclipsing Polars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Paul

    2005-09-01

    No changes have been made since the last annual progress report was submitted in conjunction with a unilateral NCX. Dr. Barrett was affected by an STScI Reduction in Force (RIF). He is now employed by the Johns Hopkins University and plans to continue his research there. No expenses have been charged to this grant, however the FUSE data for the eclipsing polar V1432 Aql has been received and processed using CALFWSE v3.0.6. The resulting summed spectrum has been used for a preliminary analysis of the interstellar absorption towards V1432 Aql. We find a hydrogen column density of less than 1.5e21 cm^-2. We have used this result in the paper "X-Ray Emission and Optical Polarization of V1432 Aquilae: An Asynchronous Polar" to fix the hydrogen column density in the soft (<0.5 keV) X-ray band when analyzing the XMM-Newton spectra of this polar. This has enabled us to find an accurate temperature for the blackbody component of 88+/-2 eV, which is significantly higher than that of other polars (20 - 40 eV). We hope to complete our analysis of the phase-resolved emission line spectra of V1432 Aql and to prepare the results for publication in a refereed journal. We hope to begin work on this star within the next few months.

  15. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of Eclipsing Polars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Paul

    2005-01-01

    No changes have been made since the last annual progress report was submitted in conjunction with a unilateral NCX. Dr. Barrett was affected by an STScI Reduction in Force (RIF). He is now employed by the Johns Hopkins University and plans to continue his research there. No expenses have been charged to this grant, however the FUSE data for the eclipsing polar V1432 Aql has been received and processed using CALFWSE v3.0.6. The resulting summed spectrum has been used for a preliminary analysis of the interstellar absorption towards V1432 Aql. We find a hydrogen column density of less than 1.5e21 cm^-2. We have used this result in the paper "X-Ray Emission and Optical Polarization of V1432 Aquilae: An Asynchronous Polar" to fix the hydrogen column density in the soft (<0.5 keV) X-ray band when analyzing the XMM-Newton spectra of this polar. This has enabled us to find an accurate temperature for the blackbody component of 88+/-2 eV, which is significantly higher than that of other polars (20 - 40 eV). We hope to complete our analysis of the phase-resolved emission line spectra of V1432 Aql and to prepare the results for publication in a refereed journal. We hope to begin work on this star within the next few months.

  16. [System of ns time-resolved spectroscopy diagnosis and radioprotection].

    PubMed

    Yao, Wei-Bo; Guo, Jian-Ming; Zhang, Yong-min; Tang, Jun-Ping; Cheng, Liang; Xu, Qi-fuo

    2014-06-01

    Cathode plasma of high current electron beam diode is an important research on high power microwave and strong pulsed radio accelerator. It is a reliable method to study cathode plasma by diagnosing the cathode plasma parameters with non-contact spectroscopy measurement system. The present paper introduced the work principle, system composition and performance of the nanosecond (ns) time-resolved spectroscopy diagnosis system. Furthermore, it introduced the implementing method and the temporal relation of lower jitter synchronous trigger system. Simultaneously, the authors designed electromagnetic and radio shield room to protect the diagnosis system due to the high electromagnetic and high X-ray and γ-ray radiation, which seriously interferes with the system. Time-resolved spectroscopy experiment on brass (H62) cathode shows that, the element and matter composition of cathode plasma is clearly increase with the increase in the diode pulsed voltage and current magnitude. The spectroscopy diagnosis system could be of up to 10 ns time resolve capability. It's least is 2 ns. Synchronous trigger system's jitter is less than 4 ns. The spectroscopy diagnosis system will open a new way to study the cathode emission mechanism in depth. PMID:25358142

  17. Spatially resolved tunneling spectroscopy on TTF-TCNQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. Z.; Girard, J. C.; Pasquier, C.; Jérome, D.

    2004-04-01

    Local tunneling spectroscopy has been measured with low temperature UHV-STM on in-situ cleaved ab surface of organic TTF-TCNQ crystal. Due to ultra low image drift and clear molecular resolution, the spectroscopy is performed at specific molecular site either on TCNQ or TTF chains. In normal state (T= 63 K), a large pseudo-gap exists both in TTF and TCNQ chains. Above pseudo-gap local density of states differs for TTF and TCNQ chains that is in good agreement with double band model. By the signature of an anomalous in local spectroscopy measurement, a single impurity has been detected on a TTF chain. Charge density wave fluctuation is pinned by impurity above critical temperature (T=54K). Results obtained show that, Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy can provide spatially resolved spectroscopic information at nanometer scale. Key words. TTF-TCNQ, local tunneling spectroscopy, pseudogap.

  18. Depth-resolved measurements with elliptically polarized reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Maria J.; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    The ability of elliptical polarized reflectance spectroscopy (EPRS) to detect spectroscopic alterations in tissue mimicking phantoms and in biological tissue in situ is demonstrated. It is shown that there is a linear relationship between light penetration depth and ellipticity. This dependence is used to demonstrate the feasibility of a depth-resolved spectroscopic imaging using EPRS. The advantages and drawbacks of EPRS in evaluation of biological tissue are analyzed and discussed. PMID:27446712

  19. Momentum Resolved Radio Frequency Spectroscopy in Trapped Fermi Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qijin; Levin, K.

    2009-05-15

    We address recent momentum-resolved radio frequency (rf) spectroscopy experiments, showing how they yield more stringent tests than other comparisons with theory, associated with the ultracold Fermi gases. We demonstrate that, by providing a clear dispersion signature of pairing, they remove the ambiguity plaguing the interpretation of previous rf experiments. Our calculated spectral intensities are in semiquantitative agreement with the data. Even in the presence of a trap, the spectra are predicted to exhibit two BCS-like branches.

  20. Quantitatively Resolving Multivalent Interactions on Macroscopic Scale Using Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qiongzheng; Yang, Haopeng; Wang, Yuhong; Xu, Shoujun

    2016-01-01

    Multivalent interactions remain difficult to be characterized and consequently controlled, particularly on a macroscopic scale. Using force-induced remnant magnetization spectroscopy (FIRMS), we have resolved the single-, double-, and triple- biotin—streptavidin interactions, multivalent DNA interactions and CXCL12-CXCR4 interactions, on millimetre-scale surfaces. Our results establish FIRMS as a viable method for systematic resolution and controlled formation of multivalent interactions. PMID:26864087

  1. TIMESCALE-RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF Cyg X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y. X.; Li, T. P.; Belloni, T. M.; Wang, T. S.; Liu, H.

    2009-04-20

    We propose the timescale-resolved spectroscopy (TRS) as a new method to combine the timing and spectral study. The TRS is based on the time domain power spectrum and reflects the variable amplitudes of spectral components on different timescales. We produce the TRS with the RXTE PCA data for Cyg X-1 and study the spectral parameters (the power-law photon index and the equivalent width of the iron fluorescent line) as a function of timescale. The results of TRS and frequency-resolved spectra have been compared, and similarities have been found for the two methods with the identical motivations. We also discover the correspondences between the evolution of photon index with timescale and the evolution of the equivalent width with timescale. The observations can be divided into three types according to the correspondences and different type is connected with different spectral state.

  2. Spatially resolved concentration measurements based on backscatter absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ze; Sanders, Scott T.; Robinson, Michael A.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of spatially resolved measurements of gas properties using direct absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with backscattered signals. We report a 1-D distribution of H2O mole fraction with a spatial resolution of 5 mm. The peak and average discrepancy between the measured and expected mole fraction are 21.1 and 8.0 %, respectively. The demonstration experiment is related to a diesel aftertreatment system; a selective catalytic reduction brick made of cordierite is used. The brick causes volume scattering interference; advanced baseline fitting based on a genetic algorithm is used to reduce the effects of this interference by a factor of 2.3.

  3. Resolving multi-exciton generation by attosecond spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Neukirch, A J; Neumark, D M; Kling, M F; Prezhdo, O V

    2014-10-20

    We propose an experimentally viable attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy scheme to resolve controversies regarding multiexciton (ME) generation in nanoscale systems. Absence of oscillations indicates that light excites single excitons, and MEs are created by incoherent impact ionization. An oscillation indicates the coherent mechanism, involving excitation of superpositions of single and MEs. The oscillation decay, ranging from 5 fs at ambient temperature to 20 fs at 100 K, gives the elastic exciton-phonon scattering time. The signal is best observed with multiple-cycle pump pulses. PMID:25401661

  4. Sensitive, time-resolved, broadband spectroscopy of single transient processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjodorow, Peter; Baev, Ivan; Hellmig, Ortwin; Sengstock, Klaus; Baev, Valery M.

    2015-09-01

    Intracavity absorption spectroscopy with a broadband Er3+-doped fiber laser is applied to time-resolved measurements of transient gain and absorption in electrically excited Xe and Kr plasmas. The achieved time resolution for broadband spectral recording of a single process is 25 µs. For pulsed-periodic processes, the time resolution is limited by the laser pulse duration, which is set here to 3 µs. This pulse duration also predefines the effective absorption path length, which amounts to 900 m. The presented technique can be applied to multicomponent analysis of single transient processes such as shock tube experiments, pulse detonation engines, or explosives.

  5. Spectrally resolved photon-echo spectroscopy of Rhodamine-6G

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ajitesh; Karthick, S. K.; Goswami, D.

    2013-01-01

    Wavelength dependent study of a laser dye: Rhodamine-6G (Rh6G) by using spectrally resolved photon-echo spectroscopy is presented. The coherence and population dynamics of Rh6G solution in methanol changes as the excitation wavelength is tuned near its absorption maxima of 528 nm. Specifically, the central wavelength of the femtosecond laser pulse was set to 535 nm and to 560 nm while the respective spectra of the photon-echo signals were collected. This gives information on how the ultrafast dynamics of the Rh6G molecule changes with a change in the excitation wavelength. PMID:24098869

  6. An instrument for the investigation of actinides with spin resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.-W.; Tobin, J. G.; Chung, B. W.

    2011-01-01

    A new system for spin resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy has been built and commissioned at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the investigation of the electronic structure of the actinides.Actinide materials are very toxic and radioactive and therefore cannot be brought to most general user facilities for spectroscopic studies. The technical details of the new system and preliminary data obtained therein will be presented and discussed.

  7. Multidimensional Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Vibrational Coherence in Biopolyenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckup, Tiago; Motzkus, Marcus

    2014-04-01

    Multidimensional femtosecond time-resolved vibrational coherence spectroscopy allows one to investigate the evolution of vibrational coherence in electronic excited states. Methods such as pump-degenerate four-wave mixing and pump-impulsive vibrational spectroscopy combine an initial ultrashort laser pulse with a nonlinear probing sequence to reinduce vibrational coherence exclusively in the excited states. By carefully exploiting specific electronic resonances, one can detect vibrational coherence from 0 cm-1 to over 2,000 cm-1 and map its evolution. This review focuses on the observation and mapping of high-frequency vibrational coherence for all-trans biological polyenes such as β-carotene, lycopene, retinal, and retinal Schiff base. We discuss the role of molecular symmetry in vibrational coherence activity in the S1 electronic state and the interplay of coupling between electronic states and vibrational coherence.

  8. Momentum-resolved spectroscopy of a Fermi liquid.

    PubMed

    Doggen, Elmer V H; Kinnunen, Jami J

    2015-01-01

    We consider a recent momentum-resolved radio-frequency spectroscopy experiment, in which Fermi liquid properties of a strongly interacting atomic Fermi gas were studied. Here we show that by extending the Brueckner-Goldstone model, we can formulate a theory that goes beyond basic mean-field theories and that can be used for studying spectroscopies of dilute atomic gases in the strongly interacting regime. The model hosts well-defined quasiparticles and works across a wide range of temperatures and interaction strengths. The theory provides excellent qualitative agreement with the experiment. Comparing the predictions of the present theory with the mean-field Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory yields insights into the role of pair correlations, Tan's contact, and the Hartree mean-field energy shift. PMID:25941948

  9. Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectroscopy and Energy-Resolving Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhauer, Frank; Raab, Walfried

    2015-08-01

    Imaging spectroscopy has seen rapid progress over the past 25 years, leading to breakthroughs in many fields of astronomy that would not have been otherwise possible. This review overviews the visible/infrared imaging spectroscopy techniques as well as energy-resolving detectors. We introduce the working principle of scanning Fabry-Perot and Fourier transform spectrometers and explain the most common integral field concepts based on mirror slicers, lenslet arrays, and fibers. The main advantage of integral field spectrographs is the simultaneous measurement of spatial and spectral information. Although Fabry-Perot and Fourier transform spectrometers can provide a larger field of view, it is ultimately the higher sensitivity of integral field units that make them the technique of choice. This is arguably the case for image slicers, which make the most efficient use of the available detector pixels and have equal or higher transmission than lenslet arrays and fiber integral field units, respectively. We also address the more specific issues of large étendue operation, focal ratio degradation, anamorphic magnification, and diffraction-limited operation. This review also covers the emerging technology of energy-resolving detectors, which promise very simple and efficient instrument designs. These energy-resolving detectors are based on superconducting thin film technology and exploit either the very small superconducting energy to count the number of quasi-particles excited in the absorption of the photon or the extremely steep phase transition between the normal- and superconducting phase to measure a temperature increase. We have put special emphasis on an overview of the underlying physical phenomena as well as on the recent technological progress and astronomical path finder experiments.

  10. Angle resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebold, U.; Preisinger, A.; Schattschneider, P.; Varga, P.

    We report on angle resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) in reflection mode with low primary energy on a graphite single crystal. Measurements with primary electron energy of 175 eV have been performed in off-Bragg-reflex geometry in two different directions within the (0001) surface plane of the graphite single crystal. In addition, EELS measurements in specular reflection mode with different primary energies and angles of incidence were done in order to distinguish between surface and bulk plasmon losses. The energy losses and the transferred momenta of the losses have been analyzed. The results are compared with the loss functions for bulk and surface excitations calculated from the dielectric function ɛ(ω, q) obtained from TEELS-data (EELS in transmission mode) [Springer Tracts Mod. Phys. 54 (1970) 77].

  11. Nonselective and polarization effects in time-resolved optogalvanic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhechev, D.; Steflekova, V.

    2016-02-01

    Three interfering effects in optogalvanic (OG) spectroscopy are identified in a hollow cathode discharge (HCD) - OG detector. The laser beam is found to generate two nonselective processes, namely photoelectron emission (PE) from the cathode surface with a sub-breakdown bias applied, and nonresonant space ionization. The convolution of these galvanic contributions was determined experimentally as an instrumental function and a deconvolution procedure to determine the actual OG signal was developed. Specific plasma conductance is detected dependent on the polarization of the laser beam irradiating. Linearly/circularly polarized light beam is found to induce OG signals differ in amplitude (and their shape parameters in the time-resolved OG signals (TROGS)). The phenomena coherence and specific conductance are found to be in causal relationship. The additional conductance due to coherent states of atoms manifests itself as an intrinsic instrumental property of OG detector.

  12. Temperature Resolved 3-D Submillimeter Spectroscopy of Astronomical `WEEDs'.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortman, Sarah M.; Medvedev, Ivan R.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2009-06-01

    We have previously reported on the experimental spectroscopic approach that makes possible the calculation of lower state energy levels and transition strengths without the need for spectral assignment. Analysis of the temperature dependent measurements significantly improves the estimate of the lower state energy, recovered by division of temperature dependent spectral intensities. Also, this approach provides results both in the standard astronomical catalog form (frequency, line strength, lower state energy) and as experimental temperature dependent spectra. We are reporting on temperature resolved 3-D spectroscopy of ethyl cyanide -- a well known astronomical `weed'. "An experimental approach to the prediction of complete millimeter and submillimeter spectra at astrophysical temperatures: Applications to confusion-limited astrophysical observations," I. R. Medvedev and F. C. De Lucia, Ap. J. 656, 621-628 (2007).

  13. Diagnosis of meningioma by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Butte, Pramod V; Pikul, Brian K; Hever, Aviv; Yong, William H; Black, Keith L; Marcu, Laura

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the use of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-LIFS) as an adjunctive tool for the intraoperative rapid evaluation of tumor specimens and delineation of tumor from surrounding normal tissue. Tissue autofluorescence is induced with a pulsed nitrogen laser (337 nm, 1.2 ns) and the intensity decay profiles are recorded in the 370 to 500 nm spectral range with a fast digitizer (0.2 ns resolution). Experiments are conducted on excised specimens (meningioma, dura mater, cerebral cortex) from 26 patients (97 sites). Spectral intensities and time-dependent parameters derived from the time-resolved spectra of each site are used for tissue characterization. A linear discriminant analysis algorithm is used for tissue classification. Our results reveal that meningioma is characterized by unique fluorescence characteristics that enable discrimination of tumor from normal tissue with high sensitivity (>89%) and specificity (100%). The accuracy of classification is found to increase (92.8% cases in the training set and 91.8% in the cross-validated set correctly classified) when parameters from both the spectral and the time domain are used for discrimination. Our findings establish the feasibility of using TR-LIFS as a tool for the identification of meningiomas and enables further development of real-time diagnostic tools for analyzing surgical tissue specimens of meningioma or other brain tumors. PMID:16409091

  14. Complete momentum and energy resolved TOF electron spectrometerfor time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Zahid; Lebedev, G.; Tremsin, A.; Siegmund, O.; Chen, Y.; Shen, Z.X.; Hussain, Z.

    2007-08-12

    Over the last decade, high-resolution Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) has emerged as a tool of choice for studying the electronic structure of solids, in particular, strongly correlated complex materials such as cuprate superconductors. In this paper we present the design of a novel time-of-flight based electron analyzer with capability of 2D in momentum space (kx and ky) and all energies (calculated from time of flight) in the third dimension. This analyzer will utilize an improved version of a 2D delay linedetector capable of imaging with<35 mm (700x700 pixels) spatial resolution and better than 120 ps FWHM timing resolution. Electron optics concepts and optimization procedure are considered for achieving an energy resolution less than 1 meV and an angular resolution better than 0.11.

  15. Broadband Mid-Infrared Comb-Resolved Fourier Transform Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kevin; Mills, Andrew; Mohr, Christian; Jiang, Jie; Fermann, Martin; Maslowski, Piotr

    2014-06-01

    We report on a comb-resolved, broadband, direct-comb spectroscopy system in the mid-IR and its application to the detection of trace gases and molecular line shape analysis. By coupling an optical parametric oscillator (OPO), a 100 m multipass cell, and a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS), sensitive, comb-resolved broadband spectroscopy of dilute gases is possible. The OPO has radiation output at 3.1-3.7 and 4.5-5.5 μm. The laser repetition rate is scanned to arbitrary values with 1 Hz accuracy around 417 MHz. The comb-resolved spectrum is produced with an absolute frequency axis depending only on the RF reference (in this case a GPS disciplined oscillator), stable to 1 part in 10^9. The minimum detectable absorption is 1.6x10-6 wn Hz-1/2. The operating range of the experimental setup enables access to strong fundamental transitions of numerous molecular species for applications based on trace gas detection such as environmental monitoring, industrial gas calibration or medical application of human breath analysis. In addition to these capabilities, we show the application for careful line shape analysis of argon-broadened CO band spectra around 4.7 μm. Fits of the obtained spectra clearly illustrate the discrepancy between the measured spectra and the Voigt profile (VP), indicating the need to include effects such as Dicke narrowing and the speed-dependence of the collisional width and shift in the line shape model, as was shown in previous cw-laser studies. In contrast to cw-laser based experiments, in this case the entire spectrum (˜ 250 wn) covering the whole P and R branches can be measured in 16 s with 417 MHz resolution, decreasing the acquisition time by orders of magnitude. The parallel acquisition allows collection of multiple lines simultaneously, removing the correlation of possible temperature and pressure drifts. While cw-systems are capable of measuring spectra with higher precision, this demonstration opens the door for fast

  16. Electron-transfer acceleration investigated by time resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vlček, Antonín; Kvapilová, Hana; Towrie, Michael; Záliš, Stanislav

    2015-03-17

    Ultrafast electron transfer (ET) processes are important primary steps in natural and artificial photosynthesis, as well as in molecular electronic/photonic devices. In biological systems, ET often occurs surprisingly fast over long distances of several tens of angströms. Laser-pulse irradiation is conveniently used to generate strongly oxidizing (or reducing) excited states whose reactions are then studied by time-resolved spectroscopic techniques. While photoluminescence decay and UV-vis absorption supply precise kinetics data, time-resolved infrared absorption (TRIR) and Raman-based spectroscopies have the advantage of providing additional structural information and monitoring vibrational energy flows and dissipation, as well as medium relaxation, that accompany ultrafast ET. We will discuss three cases of photoinduced ET involving the Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) moiety (N,N = polypyridine) that occur much faster than would be expected from ET theories. [Re(4-N-methylpyridinium-pyridine)(CO)3(N,N)](2+) represents a case of excited-state picosecond ET between two different ligands that remains ultrafast even in slow-relaxing solvents, beating the adiabatic limit. This is caused by vibrational/solvational excitation of the precursor state and participation of high-frequency quantum modes in barrier crossing. The case of Re-tryptophan assemblies demonstrates that excited-state Trp → *Re(II) ET is accelerated from nanoseconds to picoseconds when the Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) chromophore is appended to a protein, close to a tryptophan residue. TRIR in combination with DFT calculations and structural studies reveals an interaction between the N,N ligand and the tryptophan indole. It results in partial electronic delocalization in the precursor excited state and likely contributes to the ultrafast ET rate. Long-lived vibrational/solvational excitation of the protein Re(I)(CO)3(N,N)···Trp moiety, documented by dynamic IR band shifts, could be another accelerating factor. The last

  17. Vibrationally resolved anion photoelectron spectroscopy of metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Stephen R.

    Vibrationally resolved anion photoelectron spectroscopy of metal clusters Vibrationally resolved anion photoelectron spectroscopy (APES) and density functional theory (DFT) are applied to the study of structure and reactivity in small metal containing molecules. The studies described fall into two general categories: the study of bare metal clusters and the study of metal/organic ligand reactions. The current lack of spectroscopic data for small, bare gas-phase metal compounds makes the experimental study of such compounds important for understanding structure and bonding in open-shell metallic species. The heteronuclear diatomic anions MCu- (M = Cr, Mo) were prepared in a flowing afterglow ion-molecule reactor, and studied experimentally with APES. Anion and neutral vibrational frequencies and MCu electron affinities were obtained for both systems. The experiments were supplemented by DFT calculations. The combined use of experiment and theory allows for the assignment of both photoelectron spectra, including a reassignment of the CrCu ground state reported in the literature. Similarly, DFT was used to assign the anionic/neutral electronic states observed in the photoelectron spectra of Al3- and Al3O-. The study of partially ligated organometallic complexes offers a means of examining the interactions between metal atoms and individual ligand molecules. DFT was used to assign electronic states observed in the photoelectron spectra of NbC2H2-, NbC4H4 -NbC6H6- and VC6H 6-. Comparison of the NbnHn - (n = 2, 4, 6) spectra (obtained through the reaction of C2 H4 and Nb) with DFT results provides the first direct spectroscopic evidence of the conversion of ethylene to benzene by a gas phase metal atom. Experiments were used to probe the reactivity of Y with C2H 4 in an effort to examine the generality of the metal induced C 2H4 dehydrogenation/cyclization reactions. Some of the key products in the Y reactions were YC2H-, YC 2H2-, and YC6H5 -. However, the results

  18. A Clinical Tissue Oximeter Using NIR Time-Resolved Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fujisaka, Shin-ichi; Ozaki, Takeo; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Kamada, Tsuyoshi; Kitazawa, Ken; Nishizawa, Mitsunori; Takahashi, Akira; Suzuki, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    The tNIRS-1, a new clinical tissue oximeter using NIR time-resolved spectroscopy (TRS), has been developed. The tNIRS-1 measures oxygenated, deoxygenated and total hemoglobin and oxygen saturation in living tissues. Two-channel TRS measurements are obtained using pulsed laser diodes (LD) at three wavelengths, multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) for light detection, and time-to-digital converters (TDC) for time-of-flight photon measurements. Incorporating advanced semiconductor devices helped to make the design of this small-size, low-cost and low-power TRS instrument possible. In order to evaluate the correctness and reproducibility of measurement data obtained with the tNIRS-1, a study using blood phantoms and healthy volunteers was conducted to compare data obtained from a conventional SRS device and data from an earlier TRS system designed for research purposes. The results of the study confirmed the correctness and reproducibility of measurement data obtained with the tNIRS-1. Clinical evaluations conducted in several hospitals demonstrated a high level of usability in clinical situations and confirmed the efficacy of measurement data obtained with the tNIRS-1. PMID:26782242

  19. Direct chemical characterization of natural wood resins by temperature-resolved and space-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-bo; Zhou, Qun; Sun, Su-qin

    2016-07-01

    Wood resins are valuable natural products with wide utilizations. Either in the form of resin exudates or in the form of resin-containing woods, natural wood resins are usually complex mixtures consisting of various compounds. Therefore, effective chemical characterization methods are necessary for the research and quality control of natural wood resins. No need for separation or labeling, wood resin samples can be measured directly by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, which reduces the testing costs and avoids the possible distortions caused by the pretreatments. However, the absorption bands of various compositions in the resin sample are assembled in a single spectrum by the separation-free measurement, which makes it difficult to identify the compounds of interest and decreases the limits of detection. In this research, the temperature-resolved and space-resolved FT-IR techniques are proposed to resolve the overlapped signals for the direct, selective, and sensitive characterization of natural wood resins. For resin exudates, the temperature-resolved FT-IR spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation analysis can resolve the absorption bands of different compounds according to their responses to the thermal perturbations. For resin-containing woods, the FT-IR microspectroscopic imaging and principal component analysis can resolve the absorption bands of different compounds according to their positions. The study of six kinds of wood resins proves the feasibility of temperature-resolved and space-resolved FT-IR techniques for the direct, selective, and sensitive chemical characterization of natural wood resins.

  20. Angle-resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy At Ultra-low Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Borisenko, Sergey V.; Zabolotnyy, Volodymyr B.; Kordyuk, Alexander A.; Evtushinsky, Danil V.; Kim, Timur K.; Carleschi, Emanuela; Doyle, Bryan P.; Fittipaldi, Rosalba; Cuoco, Mario; Vecchione, Antonio; Berger, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of a material are defined by its electronic structure. Electrons in solids are characterized by energy (ω) and momentum (k) and the probability to find them in a particular state with given ω and k is described by the spectral function A(k, ω). This function can be directly measured in an experiment based on the well-known photoelectric effect, for the explanation of which Albert Einstein received the Nobel Prize back in 1921. In the photoelectric effect the light shone on a surface ejects electrons from the material. According to Einstein, energy conservation allows one to determine the energy of an electron inside the sample, provided the energy of the light photon and kinetic energy of the outgoing photoelectron are known. Momentum conservation makes it also possible to estimate k relating it to the momentum of the photoelectron by measuring the angle at which the photoelectron left the surface. The modern version of this technique is called Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) and exploits both conservation laws in order to determine the electronic structure, i.e. energy and momentum of electrons inside the solid. In order to resolve the details crucial for understanding the topical problems of condensed matter physics, three quantities need to be minimized: uncertainty* in photon energy, uncertainty in kinetic energy of photoelectrons and temperature of the sample. In our approach we combine three recent achievements in the field of synchrotron radiation, surface science and cryogenics. We use synchrotron radiation with tunable photon energy contributing an uncertainty of the order of 1 meV, an electron energy analyzer which detects the kinetic energies with a precision of the order of 1 meV and a He3 cryostat which allows us to keep the temperature of the sample below 1 K. We discuss the exemplary results obtained on single crystals of Sr2RuO4 and some other materials. The electronic structure of this material can be

  1. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy at ultra-low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Borisenko, Sergey V; Zabolotnyy, Volodymyr B; Kordyuk, Alexander A; Evtushinsky, Danil V; Kim, Timur K; Carleschi, Emanuela; Doyle, Bryan P; Fittipaldi, Rosalba; Cuoco, Mario; Vecchione, Antonio; Berger, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of a material are defined by its electronic structure. Electrons in solids are characterized by energy (ω) and momentum (k) and the probability to find them in a particular state with given ω and k is described by the spectral function A(k, ω). This function can be directly measured in an experiment based on the well-known photoelectric effect, for the explanation of which Albert Einstein received the Nobel Prize back in 1921. In the photoelectric effect the light shone on a surface ejects electrons from the material. According to Einstein, energy conservation allows one to determine the energy of an electron inside the sample, provided the energy of the light photon and kinetic energy of the outgoing photoelectron are known. Momentum conservation makes it also possible to estimate k relating it to the momentum of the photoelectron by measuring the angle at which the photoelectron left the surface. The modern version of this technique is called Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) and exploits both conservation laws in order to determine the electronic structure, i.e. energy and momentum of electrons inside the solid. In order to resolve the details crucial for understanding the topical problems of condensed matter physics, three quantities need to be minimized: uncertainty* in photon energy, uncertainty in kinetic energy of photoelectrons and temperature of the sample. In our approach we combine three recent achievements in the field of synchrotron radiation, surface science and cryogenics. We use synchrotron radiation with tunable photon energy contributing an uncertainty of the order of 1 meV, an electron energy analyzer which detects the kinetic energies with a precision of the order of 1 meV and a He(3) cryostat which allows us to keep the temperature of the sample below 1 K. We discuss the exemplary results obtained on single crystals of Sr2RuO4 and some other materials. The electronic structure of this material can be

  2. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of cuprate superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Palczewski, Ari Deibert

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is comprised of three different angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies on cuprate superconductors. The first study compares the band structure from two different single layer cuprates Tl2Ba2CuO6+δ (Tl2201) Tc, max ≈ 95 K and (Bi 1.35Pb0.85)(Sr1.47La0.38)CuO6+δ (Bi2201) Tc, max ≈ 35 K. The aim of the study was to provide some insight into the reasons why single layer cuprate's maximum transition temperatures are so different. The study found two major differences in the band structure. First, the Fermi surface segments close to (π,0) are more parallel in Tl2201 than in Bi2201. Second, the shadow band usually related to crystal structure is only present in Bi2201, but absent in higher Tc Tl2201. The second study looks at the different ways of doping Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) in-situ by only changing the post bake-out vacuum conditions and temperature. The aim of the study is to systematically look into the generally overlooked experimental conditions that change the doping of a cleaved sample in ultra high vacuum (UHV) experiments. The study found two major experimental facts. First, in inadequate UHV conditions the carrier concentration of Bi2212 increases with time, due to the absorption of oxygen from CO2/CO molecules, prime contaminants present in UHV systems. Second, in a very clean UHV system at elevated temperatures (above about 200 K), the carrier concentration decreases due to the loss of oxygen atoms from the Bi-O layer. The final study probed the particle-hole symmetry of the pseudogap phase in high temperature superconducting cuprates by looking at the thermally excited bands above the Fermi level. The data showed a particle-hole symmetric pseudogap which symmetrically closes away from the nested FS before the node. The data is consistent

  3. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    This NASA grant covered EUVE observing and data analysis programs during EUVE Cycle 5 GO observing. The research involved a single Guest Observer project 97-EUVE-061 "Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars". The grant provided funding that covered 1.25 months of the PI's salary. The activities undertaken included observation planning and data analysis (both temporal and spectral). This project was awarded 910 ksec of observing time to study seven active binary stars, all but one of which were actually observed. Lambda-And was observed on 1997 Jul 30 - Aug 3 and Aug 7-14 for a total of 297 ksec; these observations showed two large complex flares that were analyzed by Osten & Brown (1999). AR Psc, observed for 350 ksec on 1997 Aug 27 - Sep 13, showed only relatively small flares that were also discussed by Osten & Brown (1999). EUVE observations of El Eri were obtained on 1994 August 24-28, simultaneous with ASCA X-ray spectra. Four flares were detected by EUVE with one of these also observed simultaneously, by ASCA. The other three EUVE observations were of the stars BY Dra (1997 Sep 22-28), V478 Lyr (1998 May 18-27), and sigma Gem (1998 Dec 10-22). The first two stars showed a few small flares. The sigma Gem data shows a beautiful complete flare with a factor of ten peak brightness compared to quiescence. The flare rise and almost all the decay phase are observed. Unfortunately no observations in other spectral regions were obtained for these stars. Analysis of the lambda-And and AR Psc observations is complete and the results were published in Osten & Brown (1999). Analysis of the BY Dra, V478 Lyr and sigma Gem EUVE data is complete and will be published in Osten (2000, in prep.). The El Eri EUV analysis is also completed and the simultaneous EUV/X-ray study will be published in Osten et al. (2000, in prep.). Both these latter papers will be submitted in summer 2000. All these results will form part of Rachel Osten's PhD thesis.

  4. Ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy of xanthophylls at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Cong, Hong; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Gibson, George N; Frank, Harry A

    2008-03-20

    Many of the spectroscopic features and photophysical properties of xanthophylls and their role in energy transfer to chlorophyll can be accounted for on the basis of a three-state model. The characteristically strong visible absorption of xanthophylls is associated with a transition from the ground state S0 (1(1)Ag-) to the S2 (1(1)Bu+) excited state. The lowest lying singlet state denoted S1 (2(1)Ag-), is a state into which absorption from the ground state is symmetry forbidden. Ultrafast optical spectroscopic studies and quantum computations have suggested the presence of additional excited singlet states in the vicinity of S1 (2(1)Ag-) and S2 (1(1)Bu+). One of these is denoted S* and has been suggested in previous work to be associated with a twisted molecular conformation of the molecule in the S1 (2(1)Ag-) state. In this work, we present the results of a spectroscopic investigation of three major xanthophylls from higher plants: violaxanthin, lutein, and zeaxanthin. These molecules have systematically increasing extents of pi-electron conjugation from nine to eleven conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds. All-trans isomers of the molecules were purified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and studied by steady-state and ultrafast time-resolved optical spectroscopy at 77 K. Analysis of the data using global fitting techniques has revealed the inherent spectral properties and ultrafast dynamics of the excited singlet states of each of the molecules. Five different global fitting models were tested, and it was found that the data are best explained using a kinetic model whereby photoexcitation results in the promotion of the molecule into the S2 (1(1)Bu+) state that subsequently undergoes decay to a vibrationally hot S1 (1(1)Ag-) state and with the exception of violaxanthin also to the S* state. The vibrationally hot S1 (1(1)Ag-) state then cools to a vibrationally relaxed S1 (2(1)Ag-) state in less than a picosecond. It was also found that a portion

  5. Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy of the SNR IC443

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.

    1998-01-01

    investigators examined the spatial structure of the thermal component and analyzed the GIS spectra with a non-equilibrium plasma model, and found no systematic variation of the interstellar absorption across the remnant. Evidence for shock acceleration of cosmic rays to high energies (10 TeV) was found by Keohane. X-ray imaging spectroscopy with ASCA reveals two regions of particularly hard emission: an unresolved source embedded in an extended emission region, and a ridge of emission coincident with the southeastern rim. Both features are located on part of the radio shell where the shock wave is interacting with molecular gas, and together they account for a majority of the emission at 7 keV. Though we would not have noticed it a priori, the unresolved feature is coincident with one resolved by the ROSAT HRI. The ASCA measurements were combined with higher energy data from the XTE and GRO missions and with radio and TeV gamma-ray data to produce a nonthermal multiwavelength spectrum for IC 443 which was fit with a cosmic ray interaction model. This model calculates the cynchrotron, bremsstrahlung, invers Compton, and neutral pion decay emission produced by locally accelerated cosmic ray interacting with ambient matter, soft photon fields, and magnetic fields.

  6. Frequency- and time-resolved coherence transfer spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rickard, Mark A; Pakoulev, Andrei V; Mathew, Nathan A; Kornau, Kathryn M; Wright, John C

    2007-02-22

    Frequency-domain two-color triply vibrational enhanced four-wave mixing using a new phase-matching geometry discriminates against coherent multidimensional spectral features created solely by radiative transitions, spectrally resolves pathways with different numbers of coherence transfer steps, and temporally resolves modulations created by interference between coherence transfer pathways. Coherence transfer is a nonradiative transition where a superposition of quantum states evolves to a different superposition. The asymmetric and symmetric C[triple bond]O stretching modes of rhodium(I) dicarbonyl acetylacetonate are used as a model system for coherence transfer. A simplified theoretical model based on Redfield theory is used to describe the experimental results. PMID:17300169

  7. Spectrally resolved femtosecond photon echo spectroscopy of astaxanthin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajitesh; Karthick Kumar, S. K.; Gupta, Aditya; Goswami, Debabrata

    2010-12-01

    We have studied the coherence and population dynamics of Astaxanthin solution in methanol and acetonitrile by spectrally resolving their photon echo signals. Our experiments indicate that methanol has a much stronger interaction with the ultrafast dynamics of Astaxanthin in comparison to that of acetonitrile.

  8. Spectrally resolved femtosecond photon echo spectroscopy of astaxanthin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajitesh; Karthick Kumar, S. K.; Gupta, Aditya; Goswami, Debabrata

    2011-08-01

    We have studied the coherence and population dynamics of Astaxanthin solution in methanol and acetonitrile by spectrally resolving their photon echo signals. Our experiments indicate that methanol has a much stronger interaction with the ultrafast dynamics of Astaxanthin in comparison to that of acetonitrile.

  9. Ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy of lead halide perovskite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idowu, Mopelola A.; Yau, Sung H.; Varnavski, Oleg; Goodson, Theodore

    2015-09-01

    Recently, lead halide perovskites which are organic-inorganic hybrid structures, have been discovered to be highly efficient as light absorbers. Herein, we show the investigation of the excited state dynamics and emission properties of non-stoichiometric precursor formed lead halide perovskites grown by interdiffusion method using steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic measurements. The influence of the different ratios of the non-stoichiometric precursor solution was examined. The observed photoluminescence properties were correlated with the femtosecond transient absorption measurements.

  10. Time-resolved Hyperspectral Fluorescence Spectroscopy using Frequency Modulated Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    ,; Neill, M

    2012-07-01

    An intensity-modulated excitation light source is used together with a micro channel plate intensified CCD (ICCD) detector gated at a slightly different frequency to generate a beat frequency from a fluorescent sample. The addition of a spectrograph produces a hyperspectral time-resolved data product where the resulting beat frequency is detected with a low frame rate camera. Measuring the beat frequency of the spectrum as a function of time allows separation of the excited fluorescence from ambient constant light sources. The excitation and detector repetition rates are varied over a range of discrete frequencies, and the phase shift of the beat wave maps out the emission decay rate(s).

  11. Resolved spectroscopy of adolescent and infant galaxies (1 < z < 10)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Shelley; IRIS Science Team

    2014-07-01

    The combination of integral field spectroscopy (IFS) and adaptive optics (AO) on TMT will be revolutionary in studying the distant universe. The high angular resolution exploited by an AO system with this large aperture will be essential for studying high-redshift (1 < z < 5) galaxies' kinematics and chemical abundance histories. At even greater distances, TMT will be essential for conducting follow-up spectroscopy of Ly-alpha emission from first lights galaxies (6 < z < 10) and determining their kinematics and morphologies. I will present simulations and sensitivity calculations for high-z and first light galaxies using the diffraction-limited instrument IRIS coupled with NFIRAOS. I will put these simulations in context with current IFS+AO high-z observations and future capabilities with JWST.

  12. Angular-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of corrugated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olejnik, K.; Zemek, J.; Werner, W. S. M.

    2005-12-01

    The influence of surface roughness on angle-resolved photoelectron intensities has been studied by means of a semiempirical method and experimentally. The full three-dimensional information about the surface roughness of real samples measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used as an input for the calculations of the so-called tilt-angle histograms. Both effects of surface roughness, shadowing of photoelectrons and differences between microscopic and macroscopic signal electron emission geometry (true emission angles), are taken into account. Photoelectron current is then calculated using a common formalism XPS/AES valid for ideally flat surfaces, i.e. analytically by the straight-line approximation (SLA) or by Monte Carlo calculations. The approach which can be applied for an arbitrary type of surface roughness is verified on angular-resolved Si 2p photoelectron spectra recorded from model silicon samples with different artificially modified surface roughness, covered by a thin silicon oxide film and a surface contamination. The effect of surface roughness on the Si 2p photoelectron intensities was found to be quite prevalent over electron elastic scattering or surface contamination effects. The so-called magic angle depended on a character of surface roughness.

  13. Fingerprints of Majorana fermions in spin-resolved subgap spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirla, Razvan; Moca, Cǎtǎlin Paşcu

    2016-07-01

    When a strongly correlated quantum dot is tunnel coupled to a superconductor, it leads to the formation of Shiba bound states inside the superconducting gap. They have been measured experimentally in a superconductor-quantum dot-normal lead setup. Side coupling the quantum dot to a topological superconducting wire that supports Majorana bound states at its ends, drastically affects the structure of the Shiba states and induces supplementary in-gap states. The anomalous coupling between the Majorana bound states and the quantum dot gives rise to a characteristic imbalance in the spin-resolved spectral functions for the dot operators. These are clear fingerprints for the existence of Majorana fermions and they can be detected experimentally in transport measurements. In terms of methods employed, we have used analytical approaches combined with the numerical renormalization group approach.

  14. Time-resolved spectroscopy of low-dimensional semiconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Joseph R.

    This dissertation is a survey of ultrafast time-resolved optical measurements conducted on a variety of low-dimensional semiconductor systems to further the understanding of the dynamic behavior in the following systems: ZnMnTe/ZnSe quantum dots, ZnTe/ZnMnSe quantum dots, InGaAs quantum wells, CdMnSe colloidal quantum dots, multi-shell CdSe/CdMnS/CdS colloidal nanoplatelets, and graphene and graphene-related solutions and films. Using time-resolved photoluminescence to study epitaxially-grown ZnTe and ZnMnTe quantum dots in corresponding ZnMnSe and ZnSe matrices, the location dependence of manganese ions in respect to magnetic polaron formation is shown. The structure with manganese ions located in the matrix exhibited magnetic polaron behavior consistent with previous literature, whereas the structure with the magnetic ions located within the quantum dots exhibited unconventional magnetic polaron properties. These properties, including temperature and magnetic field insensitivity, were explained through the use of a model that predicted an increased internal magnetic field due to a decreased effective volume of the magnetic polaron and a higher effective temperature due to laser heating. Magneto-time-resolved photoluminescence measurements on a system of colloidal CdMnSe quantum dots show that the magnetic polaron properties differ significantly from the epitaxially grown quantum dots. First the timescales at which the magnetic polaron forms and the polarization saturates are different by more than an order of magnitude, and second, the magnetic polaron energy exhibited step-like behavior as the strength of the externally applied magnetic field is increased. The field dependent MP formation energy that is observed experimentally is explained as due to the breaking of the antiferromagnetic coupling of Mn dimers within the QDs. This model is further verified by the observation of quantized behavior in the Zeeman energy splitting. Through the use of magneto

  15. Time-resolved air monitoring using Fourier absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Biermann, H.W.

    1995-12-31

    Two categories where spectroscopic techniques excel are the capabilities to perform air analyses in situ and to obtain data at very high time resolutions. Because of these features, the Department of Pesticide Regulation augmented its extensive air monitoring capabilities with a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer using open-path optical systems for time resolved ambient air monitoring. A description of the instrumentation and the data analysis procedures will be presented based on two data sets obtained with this FTIR system. In one case, a 100 m folded optical path was used to measure methyl bromide concentrations after fumigation in a warehouse with a time resolution of 15 min and a detection limit of 0.2 ppm. And trying to assess the capability of this FTIR spectrometer to determine flux, water vapor concentrations were measured with a four-meter path length at a time resolution of 0.6 seconds.

  16. Time-resolved phase-sensitive second harmonic generation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, Paweł J.; Woods, David A.; Bain, Colin D.; Verlet, Jan R. R.

    2015-02-01

    A methodology based on time-resolved, phase-sensitive second harmonic generation (SHG) for probing the excited state dynamics of species at interfaces is presented. It is based on an interference measurement between the SHG from the sample and a local oscillator generated at a reference together with a lock-in measurement to remove the large constant offset from the interference. The technique is characterized by measuring the phase and excited state dynamics of the dye malachite green at the water/air interface. The key attributes of the technique are that the observed signal is directly proportional to sample concentration, in contrast to the quadratic dependence from non-phase sensitive SHG, and that the real and imaginary parts of the 2nd order non-linear susceptibility can be determined independently. We show that the method is highly sensitive and can provide high quality excited state dynamics in short data acquisition times.

  17. Spin- and angle-resolved spectroscopy of S 2p photoionization in the hydrogen sulfide molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Turri, G.; Snell, G.; Canton, S.E.; Bilodeau, R.C.; Langer, B.; Martins, M.; Kukk, E.; Cherepkov, N.; Bozek, J.D.; Kilcoyne, A.L.; Berrah, N.

    2004-08-01

    Angle- and spin-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with circularly and linearly polarized synchrotron radiation were used to study the electronic structure of the hydrogen sulfide molecule. A strong effect of the molecular environment appears in the spin-resolved measurements and, although less clearly, in the angular distribution of the sulfur 2p photoelectrons. The anisotropy and spin parameters of the three main spectral components have been obtained. The validity of simple atomic models in explaining the results is discussed.

  18. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation time structure.

    PubMed

    Bergeard, N; Silly, M G; Krizmancic, D; Chauvet, C; Guzzo, M; Ricaud, J P; Izquierdo, M; Stebel, L; Pittana, P; Sergo, R; Cautero, G; Dufour, G; Rochet, F; Sirotti, F

    2011-03-01

    Synchrotron radiation time structure is becoming a common tool for studying dynamic properties of materials. The main limitation is often the wide time domain the user would like to access with pump-probe experiments. In order to perform photoelectron spectroscopy experiments over time scales from milliseconds to picoseconds it is mandatory to measure the time at which each measured photoelectron was created. For this reason the usual CCD camera-based two-dimensional detection of electron energy analyzers has been replaced by a new delay-line detector adapted to the time structure of the SOLEIL synchrotron radiation source. The new two-dimensional delay-line detector has a time resolution of 5 ns and was installed on a Scienta SES 2002 electron energy analyzer. The first application has been to characterize the time of flight of the photoemitted electrons as a function of their kinetic energy and the selected pass energy. By repeating the experiment as a function of the available pass energy and of the kinetic energy, a complete characterization of the analyzer behaviour in the time domain has been obtained. Even for kinetic energies as low as 10 eV at 2 eV pass energy, the time spread of the detected electrons is lower than 140 ns. These results and the time structure of the SOLEIL filling modes assure the possibility of performing pump-probe photoelectron spectroscopy experiments with the time resolution given by the SOLEIL pulse width, the best performance of the beamline and of the experimental station. PMID:21335912

  19. [Laser-time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy in immunoassays].

    PubMed

    Pan, L; Du, J; Xie, W; Du, Q; Yun, Q

    2000-06-01

    This paper described a laser-excited time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay set. It made lanthanide ion to couple the anhydrde of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPAA) for labeling antibodies. The experiment used polystyrene tap coated with HCV antigen as the solid phase and a chelate of the rare earth metal europium as fluorescent label. A nitrogen laser beam was used to excite the Eu3- chelates and after 60 microseconds delay time, the emission fluorescence was measured. Background fluorescence of short lifetimes caused by serum components and Raman scattering can be eliminated by set the delay time. In the system condition, fluorescent spectra and fluorescent lifetimes of Eu3+ beta-naphthoyltrifluroacetone (NTA) chelates were measured. The fluorescent lifetime value is 650 microseconds. The maximum emission wavelength is 613 nm. The linear range of europium ion concentration is 1 x 10(-7)-1 x 10(-11) g.mL-1 and the detection limit is 1 x 10(-13) g.mL-1. The relative standard deviation of determination (n = 12) for samples at 0.01 ng.mL-1 magnitude is 6.4%. Laser-TRFIA was also found to be suitable for diagnosis of HCV. The sensitivity and specificity were comparable to enzyme immunoassay. The result was obtained with laser-TRFIA for 29 human correlated well with enzyme immunoassay. PMID:12958930

  20. Multispectral scanning time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) technique for intravascular diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hongtao; Bec, Julien; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yang; Lam, Matthew; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Marcu, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a scanning time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) system designed to continuously acquire fluorescence emission and to reconstruct fluorescence lifetime images (FLIM) from a luminal surface by using a catheter-based optical probe with rotary joint and pull-back device. The ability of the system to temporally and spectrally resolve the fluorescence emission from tissue was validated using standard dyes and tissue phantoms (e.g., ex vivo pig aorta phantom). Current results demonstrate that this system is capable to reliably resolve the fluorescence emission of multiple fluorophores located in the lumen; and suggest its potential for intravascular detection of distinct biochemical features of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:22808425

  1. Time-resolved optical spectroscopy of the chest: is it possible to probe the lung?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarto, G.; Farina, A.; Pifferi, A.; Taroni, P.; Miniati, M.

    2013-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulations and preliminary time-resolved spectroscopy measurements were performed to investigate the feasibility of the in vivo optical diagnostics of lung conditions and diseases. Absorption and reduced scattering properties of the chest, arising from in vivo spectral measurements on volunteers are presented.

  2. Time-resolved diffuse spectroscopy measurements using a hybrid Green's function for the radiative transfer equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Emanuel; Foschum, Florian; Kienle, Alwin

    2013-06-01

    Time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy measurements of phantoms at small source-detector separations yield good results for the retrieved coefficients of reduced scattering and absorption when a hybrid Green's function of the radiative transfer equation for semi-infinite media is used.

  3. Resolving stellar populations with crowded field 3D spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamann, S.; Wisotzki, L.; Roth, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new method of extracting the spectra of stars from observations of crowded stellar fields with integral field spectroscopy (IFS). Our approach extends the well-established concept of crowded field photometry in images into the domain of 3-dimensional spectroscopic datacubes. The main features of our algorithm follow. (1) We assume that a high-fidelity input source catalogue already exists, e.g. from HST data, and that it is not needed to perform sophisticated source detection in the IFS data. (2) Source positions and properties of the point spread function (PSF) vary smoothly between spectral layers of the datacube, and these variations can be described by simple fitting functions. (3) The shape of the PSF can be adequately described by an analytical function. Even without isolated PSF calibrator stars we can therefore estimate the PSF by a model fit to the full ensemble of stars visible within the field of view. (4) By using sparse matrices to describe the sources, the problem of extracting the spectra of many stars simultaneously becomes computationally tractable. We present extensive performance and validation tests of our algorithm using realistic simulated datacubes that closely reproduce actual IFS observations of the central regions of Galactic globular clusters. We investigate the quality of the extracted spectra under the effects of crowding with respect to the resulting signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) and any possible changes in the continuum level, as well as with respect to absorption line spectral parameters, radial velocities, and equivalent widths. The main effect of blending between two nearby stars is a decrease in the S/N in their spectra. The effect increases with the crowding in the field in a way that the maximum number of stars with useful spectra is always ~0.2 per spatial resolution element. This balance breaks down when exceeding a total source density of one significantly detected star per resolution element. We also explore the

  4. An inexpensive technique for the time resolved laser induced plasma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Rizwan; Ahmed, Nasar; Iqbal, J.; Aslam Baig, M.

    2016-08-01

    We present an efficient and inexpensive method for calculating the time resolved emission spectrum from the time integrated spectrum by monitoring the time evolution of neutral and singly ionized species in the laser produced plasma. To validate our assertion of extracting time resolved information from the time integrated spectrum, the time evolution data of the Cu II line at 481.29 nm and the molecular bands of AlO in the wavelength region (450-550 nm) have been studied. The plasma parameters were also estimated from the time resolved and time integrated spectra. A comparison of the results clearly reveals that the time resolved information about the plasma parameters can be extracted from the spectra registered with a time integrated spectrograph. Our proposed method will make the laser induced plasma spectroscopy robust and a low cost technique which is attractive for industry and environmental monitoring.

  5. Combined time- and depth-resolved autofluorescence spectroscopy for tissue diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yicong; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2006-02-01

    A fluorescence spectroscopy system combining depth- and time-resolved measurements is developed to investigate the layered fluorescence temporal characteristics of epithelial tissue. It is found that esophageal tissue structure can be resolved well by means of the autofluorescence time-resolved decay process with 375-, 405- and 435- nm excitation. The decay of the autofluorescence signals can be accurately fitted with a dual-exponential function consisting of a short lifetime (0.4 ~ 0.6 ns) and a long lifetime (3 ~ 4 ns) components. The short lifetime component dominates the decay of normal epithelial fluorescence while the decay of the signals from keratinized epithelium and stroma are mainly determined by the long lifetime component. The ratio of the amplitudes of two components provides the information of fine structure of epithelial tissue. This study demonstrates that the combined depth- and time-resolved measurements can potentially provide accurate information for the diagnosis of tissue pathology.

  6. Remote time-resolved filament-induced breakdown spectroscopy of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H. L.; Liu, W.; Chin, S. L.

    2006-05-01

    We report, for what we believe to be the first time, on the feasibility of remote time-resolved filament-induced breakdown spectroscopy (FIBS) of biological materials. The fluorescence from egg white and yeast powder, induced by femtosecond laser pulse filamentation in air, was detected in the backward direction with targets located 3.5 m away from the detection system. The remarkably distinct spectra of egg white and yeast allow us to propose that this technique, time-resolved FIBS, could be potentially useful for remote detection and identification of harmful biological agents.

  7. Angle-Resolved Auger Spectroscopy as a Sensitive Access to Vibronic Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knie, A.; Patanen, M.; Hans, A.; Petrov, I. D.; Bozek, J. D.; Ehresmann, A.; Demekhin, Ph. V.

    2016-05-01

    In the angle-averaged excitation and decay spectra of molecules, vibronic coupling may induce the usually weak dipole-forbidden transitions by the excitation intensity borrowing mechanism. The present complementary theoretical and experimental study of the resonant Auger decay of core-to-Rydberg excited CH4 and Ne demonstrates that vibronic coupling plays a decisive role in the formation of the angle-resolved spectra by additionally involving the decay rate borrowing mechanism. Thereby, we propose that the angle-resolved Auger spectroscopy can in general provide very insightful information on the strength of the vibronic coupling.

  8. Rapid and economical data acquisition in ultrafast frequency-resolved spectroscopy using choppers and a microcontroller.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liang; Monahan, Daniele M; Fleming, Graham

    2016-08-01

    Spectrometers and cameras are used in ultrafast spectroscopy to achieve high resolution in both time and frequency domains. Frequency-resolved signals from the camera pixels cannot be processed by common lock-in amplifiers, which have only a limited number of input channels. Here we demonstrate a rapid and economical method that achieves the function of a lock-in amplifier using mechanical choppers and a programmable microcontroller. We demonstrate the method's effectiveness by performing a frequency-resolved pump-probe measurement on the dye Nile Blue in solution. PMID:27505778

  9. Resolving molecular vibronic structure using high-sensitivity two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizimana, Laurie A.; Brazard, Johanna; Carbery, William P.; Gellen, Tobias; Turner, Daniel B.

    2015-10-01

    Coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy is an emerging technique for resolving structure and ultrafast dynamics of molecules, proteins, semiconductors, and other materials. A current challenge is the quality of kinetics that are examined as a function of waiting time. Inspired by noise-suppression methods of transient absorption, here we incorporate shot-by-shot acquisitions and balanced detection into coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy. We demonstrate that implementing noise-suppression methods in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy not only improves the quality of features in individual spectra but also increases the sensitivity to ultrafast time-dependent changes in the spectral features. Measurements on cresyl violet perchlorate are consistent with the vibronic pattern predicted by theoretical models of a highly displaced harmonic oscillator. The noise-suppression methods should benefit research into coherent electronic dynamics, and they can be adapted to multidimensional spectroscopies across the infrared and ultraviolet frequency ranges.

  10. Resolving molecular vibronic structure using high-sensitivity two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bizimana, Laurie A.; Brazard, Johanna; Carbery, William P.; Gellen, Tobias; Turner, Daniel B.

    2015-10-28

    Coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy is an emerging technique for resolving structure and ultrafast dynamics of molecules, proteins, semiconductors, and other materials. A current challenge is the quality of kinetics that are examined as a function of waiting time. Inspired by noise-suppression methods of transient absorption, here we incorporate shot-by-shot acquisitions and balanced detection into coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy. We demonstrate that implementing noise-suppression methods in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy not only improves the quality of features in individual spectra but also increases the sensitivity to ultrafast time-dependent changes in the spectral features. Measurements on cresyl violet perchlorate are consistent with the vibronic pattern predicted by theoretical models of a highly displaced harmonic oscillator. The noise-suppression methods should benefit research into coherent electronic dynamics, and they can be adapted to multidimensional spectroscopies across the infrared and ultraviolet frequency ranges.

  11. Following [FeFe] Hydrogenase Active Site Intermediates by Time-Resolved Mid-IR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mirmohades, Mohammad; Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka; Sommer, Constanze; Reijerse, Edward; Lomoth, Reiner; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Hammarström, Leif

    2016-08-18

    Time-resolved nanosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy is for the first time employed to study the [FeFe] hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and to investigate relevant intermediates of the enzyme active site. An actinic 355 nm, 10 ns laser flash triggered photodissociation of a carbonyl group from the CO-inhibited state Hox-CO to form the state Hox, which is an intermediate of the catalytic proton reduction cycle. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy allowed us to directly follow the subsequent rebinding of the carbonyl, re-forming Hox-CO, and determine the reaction half-life to be t1/2 ≈ 13 ± 5 ms at room temperature. This gives direct information on the dynamics of CO inhibition of the enzyme. PMID:27494400

  12. Anisotropy resolved multidimensional emission spectroscopy (ARMES): A new tool for protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Groza, Radu Constantin; Li, Boyan; Ryder, Alan G

    2015-07-30

    Structural analysis of proteins using the emission of intrinsic fluorophores is complicated by spectral overlap. Anisotropy resolved multidimensional emission spectroscopy (ARMES) overcame the overlap problem by the use of anisotropy, with chemometric analysis, to better resolve emission from different fluorophores. Total synchronous fluorescence scan (TSFS) provided information about all the fluorophores that contributed to emission while anisotropy provided information about the environment of each fluorophore. Here the utility of ARMES was demonstrated via study of the chemical and thermal denaturation of human serum albumin (HSA). Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) analysis of the constituent polarized emission ARMES data resolved contributions from four emitters: fluorescence from tryptophan (Trp), solvent exposed tyrosine (Tyr), Tyr in a hydrophobic environment, and room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) from Trp. The MCR scores, anisotropy, and literature validated these assignments and showed all the expected transitions during HSA unfolding. This new methodology for comprehensive intrinsic fluorescence analysis of proteins is applicable to any protein containing multiple fluorophores. PMID:26320645

  13. Phase-resolved emission spectroscopy of a neutraliser-free gridded ion thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedrick, James; Gibson, Andrew; Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane

    2015-09-01

    Power-efficient electric propulsion systems that operate without an external neutraliser have the potential to increase the longevity of traditional concepts. The Neptune gridded-ion thruster prototype, which uses a single radio-requency (rf) power source for plasma generation, ion acceleration and beam neutralisation, is under development. Previous research has suggested that the time-resolved electron dynamics in the plume are important for maintaining charge neutrality and overall performance. In this study, the electron dynamics in the exhaust beam are investigated within the rf cycle using phase-resolved emission spectroscopy. The results are compared with time-resolved and time-integrated electrical diagnostics to investigate the mechanisms behind beam neutralisation. This work received financial support from the York-Paris CIRC and state aid managed by the laboratory of excellence Plas@Par (ANR-11-IDEX-0004-02).

  14. Depth-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of normal and dysplastic cervical tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yicong; Xi, Peng; Qu, Jianan Y.; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Yu, Mei-Yung

    2005-01-01

    A portable confocal system with the excitations at 355nm and 457nm was instrumented to investigate the depth-resolved fluorescence of cervical tissue. The study focused on extracting biochemical and morphological information carried in the depth-resolved signals measured from the normal squamous epithelial tissue and squamous intraepithelial lesions. Strong keratin fluorescence with the spectral characteristics similar to collagen were observed from the topmost keratinizing layer of all tissue samples. It was found that NADH and FAD fluorescence measured from the underlying non-keratinizing epithelial layer were strongly correlated to the tissue pathology. This study demonstrates that the depth-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy can potentially provide more accurate diagnostic information for determining tissue pathology.

  15. Time-resolved emission spectroscopy of gadolinium vanadate ceramics (GdVO4:Bi3+)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppert, J.; Peudenier, S.; Bayer, E.; Grabmaier, B. C.; Blasse, G.

    1994-07-01

    The preparation of GdVO4:Bi3+ ceramics is indicated. Bismuth shows a strong tendency to evaporate during the sintering process. Time-resolved emission spectroscopy shows for sufficiently low Bi3+ concentrations subsequently: blue VO{4/3-}emission with a decay time corresponding to the transfer rate (106 s-1), yellow VO{4/3-}-Bi3+ emission, rare-earth impurity emission and VO{4/3-}-Bi3+ afterglow.

  16. Communication: Broadband and ultrasensitive femtosecond time-resolved circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Kotaro; Nagata, Takashi

    2015-09-28

    We report the development of broadband and sensitive time-resolved circular dichroism (TRCD) spectroscopy by exploiting optical heterodyne detection. Using this method, transient CD signals of submillidegree level can be detected over the spectral range of 415-730 nm. We also demonstrate that the broadband measurement with the aid of singular value decomposition enables the discrimination of genuine TRCD signals from artificial optical-anisotropy, such as linear birefringence and linear dichroism, induced by photoexcitation. PMID:26428989

  17. High-harmonic XUV source for time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dakovski, Georgi L; Li, Yinwan; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Rodriguez, George

    2009-01-01

    We present a laser-based apparatus for visible pump/XUV probe time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TRARPES) utilizing high-harmonic generation from a noble gas. Femtosecond temporal resolution for each selected harmonic is achieved by using a time-delay-compensated monochromator (TCM). The source has been used to obtain photoemission spectra from insulators (UO{sub 2}) and ultrafast pump/probe processes in semiconductors (GaAs).

  18. Development of the Experimental System for Time- and Angle-resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Azuma, Junpei; Tokudomi, Shinji; Kamada, Masao

    2007-01-19

    Experimental system for the time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy have been constructed at BL13 in SAGA Light Source, in order to study the electronic non-equilibrium in the surface layer of laser-excited materials The experimental system is very useful for photoemission spectroscopy in the wide temporal and angular ranges. The time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectra can be obtained with using the gate electronics for the MCP detector of the photoemission spectrometer. The gated MCP detector is synchronized with the laser pulse from Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier with the repetition frequency of 10 to 300 kHz. The time-window of the gated MCP detector can be changed between 10 nano- and 160 micro-second. The time-resolved measurement in pico-second region can be performed with using the pump-probe technique which uses fundamental, second and third harmonics from the Ti:sapphire laser as the excitation source. Using these systems, we can perform the time- and angle-resolved photoemission study for various photo-excited phenomena and surface dynamics.

  19. Probing interfacial electron dynamics with time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neppl, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Time-resolved core-level spectroscopy techniques using laser pulses to initiate and short X-ray pulses to probe photo-induced processes have the potential to provide electronic state- and atomic site-specific insight into fundamental electron dynamics at complex interfaces. We describe the implementation of femto- and picosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in order to follow light-driven electron dynamics at dye-semiconductor interfaces on femto- to nanosecond timescales, and from the perspective of individual atomic sites. A distinct transient binding-energy shift of the Ru3d photoemission lines originating from the metal centers of N3 dye-molecules adsorbed on nanoporous ZnO is observed 500 fs after resonant HOMO-LUMO excitation with a visible laser pulse. This dynamical chemical shift is accompanied by a characteristic surface photo-voltage response of the semiconductor substrate. The two phenomena and their correlation will be discussed in the context of electronic bottlenecks for efficient interfacial charge-transfer and possible charge recombination and relaxation pathways leading to the neutralization of the transiently oxidized dye following ultrafast electron injection. First steps towards in operando time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques to monitor interfacial chemical dynamics will be presented.

  20. A versatile and reconfigurable setup for all-terahertz time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elezzabi, A. Y.; Maraghechi, P.

    2012-05-01

    A versatile optical setup for all-terahertz (THz) time resolved pump-probe spectroscopy was designed and tested. By utilizing a dual THz pulse generator emitter module, independent and synchronized THz radiation pump and probe pulses were produced, thus eliminating the need for THz beam splitters and the limitations associated with their implementation. The current THz setup allows for precise control of the electric fields splitting ratio between the THz radiation pump and probe pulses, as well as in-phase, out-of-phase, and polarization dependent pump-probe spectroscopy. Since the present THz pump-probe setup does not require specialized THz radiation optical components, such as phase shifters, polarization rotators, or wide bandwidth beam splitters, it can be easily implemented with minimal alterations to a conventional THz time domain spectroscopy system. The present setup is valuable for studying the time dynamics of THz coherent phenomena in solid-state, chemical, and biological systems.

  1. Photodissociation of thioglycolic acid studied by femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Attar, Andrew R.; Blumling, Daniel E.; Knappenberger, Kenneth L. Jr.

    2011-01-14

    Steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopies were employed to study the photodissociation of both the neutral (HS-CH{sub 2}-COOH) and doubly deprotonated ({sup -}S-CH{sub 2}-COO{sup -}) forms of thioglycolic acid (TGA), a common surface-passivating ligand used in the aqueous synthesis and organization of semiconducting nanostructures. Room temperature UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy indicated strong absorption by the S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} excited states at 250 nm and 185 nm, respectively. The spectrum also contained a weaker absorption band that extended to approximately 550 nm, which was assigned to the {pi}{sub CO}{sup *}(leftarrow)n{sub O} transition. Femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy was performed on TGA using 400 nm excitation and a white-light continuum probe to provide the temporally and spectrally resolved data. Both forms of TGA underwent a photoinduced dissociation from the excited state to form an {alpha}-thiol-substituted acyl radical ({alpha}-TAR, S-CH{sub 2}-CO). For the acidic form of TGA, radical formation occurred with an apparent time constant of 60 {+-} 5 fs; subsequent unimolecular decay took 400 {+-} 60 fs. Similar kinetics were observed for the deprotonated form of TGA (70 {+-} 10 fs radical formation; 420 {+-} 40 fs decay). The production of the {alpha}-TAR was corroborated by the observation of its characteristic optical absorption. Time-resolved data indicated that the photoinduced dissociation of TGA via cleavage of the C-OH bond occurred rapidly ({<=}100 fs). The prevalence of TGA in aqueous semiconducting nanoparticles makes its absorption in the visible spectral region and subsequent dissociation key to understanding the behavior of nanoscale systems.

  2. Time-resolved FRET fluorescence spectroscopy of visible fluorescent protein pairs.

    PubMed

    Visser, A J W G; Laptenok, S P; Visser, N V; van Hoek, A; Birch, D J S; Brochon, J-C; Borst, J W

    2010-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful method for obtaining information about small-scale lengths between biomacromolecules. Visible fluorescent proteins (VFPs) are widely used as spectrally different FRET pairs, where one VFP acts as a donor and another VFP as an acceptor. The VFPs are usually fused to the proteins of interest, and this fusion product is genetically encoded in cells. FRET between VFPs can be determined by analysis of either the fluorescence decay properties of the donor molecule or the rise time of acceptor fluorescence. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy is the technique of choice to perform these measurements. FRET can be measured not only in solution, but also in living cells by the technique of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), where fluorescence lifetimes are determined with the spatial resolution of an optical microscope. Here we focus attention on time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of purified, selected VFPs (both single VFPs and FRET pairs of VFPs) in cuvette-type experiments. For quantitative interpretation of FRET-FLIM experiments in cellular systems, details of the molecular fluorescence are needed that can be obtained from experiments with isolated VFPs. For analysis of the time-resolved fluorescence experiments of VFPs, we have utilised the maximum entropy method procedure to obtain a distribution of fluorescence lifetimes. Distributed lifetime patterns turn out to have diagnostic value, for instance, in observing populations of VFP pairs that are FRET-inactive. PMID:19693494

  3. Planetary Surface Exploration Using Time-Resolved Laser Spectroscopy on Rovers and Landers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Alerstam, Erik; Maruyama, Yuki; Charbon, Edoardo; Rossman, George

    2013-04-01

    Planetary surface exploration using laser spectroscopy has become increasingly relevant as these techniques become a reality on Mars surface missions. The ChemCam instrument onboard the Curiosity rover is currently using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) on a mast-mounted platform to measure elemental composition of target rocks. The RLS Raman Spectrometer is included on the payload for the ExoMars mission to be launched in 2018 and will identify minerals and organics on the Martian surface. We present a next-generation instrument that builds on these widely used techniques to provide a means for performing both Raman spectroscopy and LIBS in conjunction with microscopic imaging. Microscopic Raman spectroscopy with a laser spot size smaller than the grains of interest can provide surface mapping of mineralogy while preserving morphology. A very small laser spot size (~ 1 µm) is often necessary to identify minor phases that are often of greater interest than the matrix phases. In addition to the difficulties that can be posed by fine-grained material, fluorescence interference from the very same material is often problematic. This is particularly true for many of the minerals of interest that form in environments of aqueous alteration and can be highly fluorescent. We use time-resolved laser spectroscopy to eliminate fluorescence interference that can often make it difficult or impossible to obtain Raman spectra. As an added benefit, we have found that with small changes in operating parameters we can include microscopic LIBS using the same hardware. This new technique relies on sub-ns, high rep-rate lasers with relatively low pulse energy and compact solid state detectors with sub-ns time resolution. The detector technology that makes this instrument possible is a newly developed Single-Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) sensor array based on Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. The use of this solid state time-resolved detector offers a

  4. Conventional and Time-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy of La-1111 Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Xiaoxiang; Dai, Y.; Homes, C.; Kidszun, M.; Haindl, S.; Carr, G.

    2013-03-01

    We have performed both conventional as well as time-resolved far-infrared spectroscopy on LaFeAsO1-xFx pnictide thin films. The conventional spectroscopy results can be fit using a simple gapped superconductor + normal conductor two-component model. Absorption by quasiparticles in a gap system with nodes is a plausible explanation for the normal component [Lobo et al. Phys. Rev. B 82, 100506(R) (2010)]. The time-resolved study is performed by laser-pump, far-IR probe spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation at NSLS beamline U4IR. A laser pulse breaks superconducting pairs and the synchrotron probe is used to sense the recombination process. In contrast to the picosecond response observed for cuprate superconductors, we observe a nanosecond response typical of a fully gapped superconductor where phonon-bottleneck effects slow the effective recombination rate. This result suggests the presence of a full isotropic gap, as might exist at lower energies due to electronic scattering [Carbotte et al. Phys. Rev. B 81, 104510 (2010)]. Supported by the U.S. Dep't. of Energy under contract DE-AC02-98CH10886 at Brookhaven Nat'l Lab.

  5. Time-resolved magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy of photolyzed carbonmonoxy cytochrome c oxidase (cytochrome aa3).

    PubMed Central

    Goldbeck, R A; Dawes, T D; Einarsdóttir, O; Woodruff, W H; Kliger, D S

    1991-01-01

    Nanosecond time-resolved magnetic circular dichroism (TRMCD) and time-resolved natural circular dichroism (TRCD) measurements of photolysis products of the CO complex of eukaryotic cytochrome c oxidase (CcO-CO) are presented. TRMCD spectra obtained at 100 ns and 10 microseconds after photolysis are diagnostic of pentacoordinate cytochrome a3Fe2+, as would be expected for simple photodissociation. Other time-resolved spectroscopies (UV-visible and resonance Raman), however, show evidence for unusual Fea3(2+) coordination after CO photolysis (Woodruff, W. H., O. Einarsdóttir, R. B. Dyer, K. A. Bagley, G. Palmer, S. J. Atherton, R. A. Goldbeck, T. D. Dawes, and D. S. Kliger. 1991. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 88:2588-2592). Furthermore, time-resolved IR experiments have shown that photodissociated CO binds to CuB+ prior to recombining with Fea3(2+) (Dyer, R. B., O. Einarsdóttir, P. M. Killough, J. J. López-Garriga, and W. H. Woodruff. 1989. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 111:7657-7659). A model of the CcO-CO photolysis cycle which is consistent with all of the spectroscopic results is presented. A novel feature of this model is the coordination of a ligand endogenous to the protein to the Fe axial site vacated by the photolyzed CO and the simultaneous breaking of the Fe-imidazole(histidine) bond. PMID:1653049

  6. Resolved Sideband Spectroscopy and Cooling of Strontium in a 532-nm Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aman, James; Hill, Joshua; Killian, T. C.

    2016-05-01

    Resolved sideband cooling is a powerful and well established technique for driving ultracold atoms in optical lattices to the motional ground state of individual lattice sites. Here we present spectroscopy of the narrow 5s21S0 --> 5 s 5 p3P1 transition for neutral strontium-84 in a 532nm optical lattice. Resolved red- and blue-detuned sidebands are observed corresponding to changes in the motional state in the lattice sites. Driving the red sideband, we demonstrate cooling into the ground state, which increases the initial phase-space density before forced evaporative cooling. This is a promising technique for improving the production of strontium quantum degenerate gases. Research supported by the Robert A, Welch Foundation under Grant No. C-1844.

  7. Capturing molecular structural dynamics by 100 ps time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tokushi; Nozawa, Shunsuke; Ichiyanagi, Kohei; Tomita, Ayana; Chollet, Matthieu; Ichikawa, Hirohiko; Fujii, Hiroshi; Adachi, Shin Ichi; Koshihara, Shin Ya

    2009-01-01

    An experimental set-up for time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy with 100 ps time resolution at beamline NW14A at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring is presented. The X-ray positional active feedback to crystals in a monochromator combined with a figure-of-merit scan of the laser beam position has been utilized as an essential tool to stabilize the spatial overlap of the X-ray and laser beams at the sample position. As a typical example, a time-resolved XAFS measurement of a photo-induced spin crossover reaction of the tris(1,10-phenanthrorine)iron(II) complex in water is presented. PMID:19096182

  8. Bogoliubov Angle, Particle-Hole Mixture and Angular Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy in Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Balatsky, A.

    2010-05-04

    Superconducting excitations - Bogoliubov quasiparticles - are the quantum mechanical mixture of negatively charged electron (-e) and positively charged hole (+e). We propose a new observable for Angular Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) studies that is the manifestation of the particle-hole entanglement of the superconducting quasiparticles. We call this observable a Bogoliubov angle. This angle measures the relative weight of particle and hole amplitude in the superconducting (Bogoliubov) quasiparticle. We show how this quantity can be measured by comparing the ratio of spectral intensities at positive and negative energies.

  9. Size Effects in Angle-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Free Rare-Gas Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Rolles, D.; Zhang, H.; Pesic, Z.D.; Bilodeau, R.C.; Wills, A.; Kukk, E.; Rude, B.S.; Ackerman, G.D.; Bozek, J.D.; Muino, R.D.; de Abajo, F.J.G.; Berrah, N.; /Western Michigan U. /LBNL, ALS /Turku U. /SLAC /Basque U., San Sebastian /Madrid, Inst. Optica

    2007-05-23

    The photoionization of free Xe clusters is investigated by angle-resolved time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy. The measurements probe the evolution of the photoelectron angular distribution parameter as a function of photon energy and cluster size. While the overall photon-energy-dependent behavior of the photoelectrons from the clusters is very similar to that of the free atoms, distinct differences in the angular distribution point at cluster-size-dependent effects. Multiple scattering calculations trace their origin to elastic photoelectron scattering.

  10. Polarization and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy of excitons in MoSe2 monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Palleau, E.; Amand, T.; Tongay, S.; Marie, X.; Urbaszek, B.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate valley exciton dynamics in MoSe2 monolayers in polarization- and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy at 4 K. Following circularly polarized laser excitation, we record a low circular polarization degree of the PL of typically ≤5%. This is about 10 times lower than the polarization induced under comparable conditions in MoS2 and WSe2 monolayers. The evolution of the exciton polarization as a function of excitation laser energy and power is monitored in PL excitation experiments. Fast PL emission times are recorded for both the neutral exciton of ≤3 ps and for the charged exciton (trion) of 12 ps.

  11. A CAMAC system controlled by an IBM AT computer for time-resolved spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lindquist, L.O.; Moss, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    An IBM AT computer interfaced to a small CAMAC system offers considerable power without the complexity and expense of a large general-purpose system. Our system for time-resolved spectroscopy features menu-driven FORTRAN-based software; high-resolution and high-speed (8K channels, 5-..mu..s fixed dead time) ADCs; segmentable histogram memories (24-bit counts) with large memory space for many histogram segments; independently variable separate histogram dwell times; remote control via a CAMAC serial highway; and ground isolation between the data acquisition equipment and control computer by means of fiber optics.

  12. Application of time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy to intramolecular electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Schoonover, J.R.; Strouse, G.F.; Chen, P.; Bates, D.; Meyer, T.J. )

    1993-06-09

    Time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy has been applied for the first time to the study of intramolecular electron transfer in a chromophore-quencher complex, based on a metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) excited state. These measurements allow for (1) the identification of redox sites that are reached following excitation and (2) the inferring of structural information in short-lived intermediates. This technique is a more sensitive probe than transient absorption as shown by its application to the redox-separated complex shown below involving a pyridinium acceptor and a phenothiazine donor.

  13. Absorption spectroscopy of powdered materials using time-resolved diffuse optical methods.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Cosimo; Obraztsova, Ekaterina A; Farina, Andrea; Taroni, Paola; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Pifferi, Antonio

    2012-11-10

    In this paper a novel method, based on time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy, is proposed to measure the absorption of small amounts of nanostructured powder materials independent of scattering. Experimental validation, in the visible and near-infrared spectral range, has been carried out on India Inkparticles. The effectiveness of the technique to measure scattering-free absorption is demonstrated on carbon nanotubes. The comparison between the absorption spectra acquired by the proposed method and conventional measurements performed with a commercial spectrophotometer is discussed. PMID:23142900

  14. Time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of hydrated electrons near a liquid water surface.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yo-ichi; Suzuki, Yoshi-Ichi; Tomasello, Gaia; Horio, Takuya; Karashima, Shutaro; Mitríc, Roland; Suzuki, Toshinori

    2014-05-01

    We present time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of trapped electrons near liquid surfaces. Photoemission from the ground state of a hydrated electron at 260 nm is found to be isotropic, while anisotropic photoemission is observed for the excited states of 1,4-diazabicyclo[2,2,2]octane and I- in aqueous solutions. Our results indicate that surface and subsurface species create hydrated electrons in the bulk side. No signature of a surface-bound electron has been observed. PMID:24856723

  15. Phase-resolved optical emission spectroscopy for an electron cyclotron resonance etcher

    SciTech Connect

    Milosavljevic, Vladimir; MacGearailt, Niall; Daniels, Stephen; Turner, Miles M.; Cullen, P. J.

    2013-04-28

    Phase-resolved optical emission spectroscopy (PROES) is used for the measurement of plasma products in a typical industrial electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma etcher. In this paper, the PROES of oxygen and argon atoms spectral lines are investigated over a wide range of process parameters. The PROES shows a discrimination between the plasma species from gas phase and those which come from the solid phase due to surface etching. The relationship between the micro-wave and radio-frequency generators for plasma creation in the ECR can be better understood by the use of PROES.

  16. A CAMAC system controlled by an IBM AT computer for time-resolved spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lindquist, L.O.; Moss, C.E.

    1987-08-01

    An IBM AT computer interfaced to a small CAMAC system offers considerable power without the complexity and expense of a large general-purpose system. The authors' system for time-resolved spectroscopy features menu-driven FORTRAN-based software; high-resolution and high-speed 98K channels, 5-..mu..s fixed dead time) ADCs; segmentable histogram memories (24-bit counts) with large memory space for many histogram segments; independently variable separate histogram dwell times; remote control via a CAMAC serial highway; and ground isolation between the data acquisition equipment and control computer by means of fiber optics.

  17. Band structure parameters of metallic diamond from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyot, H.; Achatz, P.; Nicolaou, A.; Le Fèvre, P.; Bertran, F.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Bustarret, E.

    2015-07-01

    The electronic band structure of heavily boron doped diamond was investigated by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on (100)-oriented epilayers. A unique set of Luttinger parameters was deduced from a comparison of the experimental band structure of metallic diamond along the Δ (Γ X ) and Σ (Γ K ) high-symmetry directions of the reciprocal space, with theoretical band structure calculations performed both within the local density approximation and by an analytical k . p approach. In this way, we were able to describe the experimental band structure over a large three-dimensional region of the reciprocal space and to estimate hole effective masses in agreement with previous theoretical and experimental papers.

  18. Nonlinear Raman Techniques in Femtosecond Time Resolved Spectroscopy for the Analysis and Control of Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Materny, Arnulf; Konradi, Jakow; Namboodiri, Vinu; Namboodiri, Mahesh; Scaria, Abraham

    2008-11-14

    The use of four-wave mixing techniques in femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy has considerable advantages. Due to the many degrees of freedom offered e.g. by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), the dynamics even of complex systems can be analyzed in detail. Using pulse shaping techniques in combination with a self-learning loop approach, molecular mode excitation can be controlled very efficiently in a multi-photon excitation process. Results obtained from the optimal control of CARS on {beta}-carotene are discussed.

  19. Comparison of organic phantom recipes and characterization by time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarto, G.; Pifferi, A.; Bargigia, I.; Farina, A.; Cubeddu, R.; Taroni, P.

    2013-06-01

    Three recipes for tissue constituent-equivalent phantoms of water and lipids are presented. Nature phantoms are made using no emulsifying agent, but just a professional disperser, instead Agar and Triton phantoms are made using agar or Triton X-100, respectively, as agents to emulsify water and lipids. Different water-to-lipid ratios ranging from 30 to 70 percent by mass are proposed and tested. Optical characterization by time-resolved spectroscopy was performed in terms of optical properties, homogeneity, reproducibility and composition retrieval.

  20. Time-Resolved Vibrational and Electronic Spectroscopy in Shocked Ammonium Perchlorate Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruzdkov, Yuri; Winey, Michael; Feng, Ruqiang

    1997-07-01

    Experimental methods to obtain time-resolved Raman and absorption spectroscopy data on shocked ammonium perchlorate (AP) single crystals were developed. These included: (a) target designs for thin sample shock wave reverberation experiments; (b) techniques to perform Raman measurements with non-transparent flyers; and (c) adaptation of a high-velocity, 20 mm powder gun for optical spectroscopy. Good quality Raman and absorption spectra, with 50 ns resolution, have been obtained for shock compression along the [210] and [001] directions. Results for peak pressures up to 18 GPa and calculated temperatures up to 600 K are presented. Pressure/temperature-induced frequency hardening and broadening of the different AP Raman modes is observed. Evidence for shock-induced chemical decomposition is discussed.

  1. ULTRAFAST CHEMISTRY: Using Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy for Interrogation of Structural Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nibbering, Erik T. J.; Fidder, Henk; Pines, Ehud

    2005-05-01

    Time-resolved infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopy elucidates molecular structure evolution during ultrafast chemical reactions. Following vibrational marker modes in real time provides direct insight into the structural dynamics, as is evidenced in studies on intramolecular hydrogen transfer, bimolecular proton transfer, electron transfer, hydrogen bonding during solvation dynamics, bond fission in organometallic compounds and heme proteins, cis-trans isomerization in retinal proteins, and transformations in photochromic switch pairs. Femtosecond IR spectroscopy monitors the site-specific interactions in hydrogen bonds. Conversion between excited electronic states can be followed for intramolecular electron transfer by inspection of the fingerprint IR- or Raman-active vibrations in conjunction with quantum chemical calculations. Excess internal vibrational energy, generated either by optical excitation or by internal conversion from the electronic excited state to the ground state, is observable through transient frequency shifts of IR-active vibrations and through nonequilibrium populations as deduced by Raman resonances.

  2. A tunable low-energy photon source for high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harter, John W.; Monkman, Eric J.; Shai, Daniel E.; Nie Yuefeng; Uchida, Masaki; Burganov, Bulat; Chatterjee, Shouvik; King, Philip D. C.; Shen, Kyle M.

    2012-11-15

    We describe a tunable low-energy photon source consisting of a laser-driven xenon plasma lamp coupled to a Czerny-Turner monochromator. The combined tunability, brightness, and narrow spectral bandwidth make this light source useful in laboratory-based high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy experiments. The source supplies photons with energies up to {approx}7 eV, delivering under typical conditions >10{sup 12} ph/s within a 10 meV spectral bandwidth, which is comparable to helium plasma lamps and many synchrotron beamlines. We first describe the lamp and monochromator system and then characterize its output, with attention to those parameters which are of interest for photoemission experiments. Finally, we present angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data using the light source and compare its performance to a conventional helium plasma lamp.

  3. Multiple spatially resolved reflection spectroscopy for in vivo determination of carotenoids in human skin and blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvin, Maxim E.; Magnussen, Björn; Lademann, Juergen; Köcher, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Non-invasive measurement of carotenoid antioxidants in human skin is one of the important tasks to investigate the skin physiology in vivo. Resonance Raman spectroscopy and reflection spectroscopy are the most frequently used non-invasive techniques in dermatology and skin physiology. In the present study, an improved method based on multiple spatially resolved reflection spectroscopy (MSRRS) was introduced. The results obtained were compared with those obtained using the ‘gold standard’ resonance Raman spectroscopy method and showed strong correlations for the total carotenoid concentration (R  =  0.83) as well as for lycopene (R  =  0.80). The measurement stability was confirmed to be better than 10% within the total temperature range from 5 °C to  +  30 °C and pressure contact between the skin and the MSRRS sensor from 800 Pa to 18 000 Pa. In addition, blood samples taken from the subjects were analyzed for carotenoid concentrations. The MSRRS sensor was calibrated on the blood carotenoid concentrations resulting in being able to predict with a correlation of R  =  0.79. On the basis of blood carotenoids it could be demonstrated that the MSRRS cutaneous measurements are not influenced by Fitzpatrick skin types I–VI. The MSRRS sensor is commercially available under the brand name biozoom.

  4. Differentiation of microstructures of sugar foams by means of spatially resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen Do Trong, Nghia; Watte, Rodrigo; Aernouts, Ben; Verhoelst, Eva; Tsuta, Mizuki; Jakubczyk, Ewa; Gondek, Ewa; Verboven, Pieter; Nicolaï, Bart M.; Saeys, Wouter

    2012-04-01

    Food quality is critically determined by its microstructure and composition. These properties could be quantified noninvasively by means of optical properties (absorption and reduced scattering coefficients) of the food samples. In this research, a spatially-resolved spectroscopy setup based on a fiber-optic probe was developed for acquiring spatiallyresolved diffuse reflectance of three sugar foams with different designed microstructures in the range 500 - 1000 nm. A model for light propagation in turbid media based on diffusion approximation for solving the radiative transport equation was employed to derive optical properties (absorption and reduced scattering coefficients) of these foams. The accuracy of this light propagation model was validated on four liquid phantoms with known optical properties. The obtained results indicated that the optical properties estimation was successfully validated on these liquid phantoms. The estimated reduced scattering coefficients μs' of the foams clearly showed the effect of foaming time on their microstructures. The acquired absorption coefficients μa were also in good agreement with the designed ingredients of these sugar foams. The research results clearly support the potential of spatially-resolved spectroscopy for nondestructive food quality inspection and process monitoring in the food industry.

  5. Fluorescence imaging and time-resolved spectroscopy of steroid using confocal synchrotron radiation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerritsen, Hans C.; van der Oord, C. J. R.; Levine, Yehudi K.; Munro, Ian H.; Jones, Gareth R.; Shaw, D. A.; Rommerts, Fokko F.

    1994-08-01

    The Confocal Synchrotron Radiation Microscope at Daresbury was used in a study of the transport and distribution of the steroid Coumestrol in single Leydig cells. The broad spectrum of synchrotron radiation in combination with UV compatible microscope optics affords the extension of confocal microscopy from the visible to the UV region down to about 200 nm. Consequently fluorescent molecules with absorption bands in the UV can be imaged. In addition the pulsed nature of the light source allows us to perform time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy experiments on microscopic volumes. Coumestrol is a naturally fluorescing plant steroid exhibiting estrogenic activity. In physiological environments it has an absorption peak in the UV at 340 nm and it emits around 440 nm. First results indicate that the Coumestrol transport through the cell membrane is diffusion limited. The weak fluorescence observed in the nuclei of the Leydig cells may be due to fluorescence quenching arising from the interaction of the Coumesterol with nuclear components. However, micro-volume time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy experiments on cell nuclei have revealed the same decay behavior for Coumesterol in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of the cells.

  6. The study of many body physics in high temperature superconductors using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Adam

    Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) is an experimental technique that has greatly contributed to our understanding of the electronic structure of the High Temperature Superconductors (HTSC). Over the last few years, it has provided vital information about the electronic structure, the Fermi Surface, gap anisotropy and it's temperature dependence, and a new phenomena known as the pseudogap. In this thesis we apply Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy to the study of electronic interactions in High Temperature Superconductors. The experimental portion of this thesis comprises three main areas, (i) participation in the construction of a new undulator beamline at the Synchrotron Radiation Center-Madison, Wisconsin, (ii) construction of a new ARPES system and (iii) collection and analysis of the data. The experimental results include precise determination of the Fermi Surface in BISCO 2212 and 2201, first observation of intrinsic ARPES lineshape at the nodal point of the Fermi Surface in BISCO 2212, detailed quantitative study of many body interactions along the nodal direction in normal and superconductive state, precise doping dependence analysis of the lineshape at the antinode.

  7. Disentangling Multichannel Photodissociation Dynamics in Acetone by Time-Resolved Photoelectron-Photoion Coincidence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maierhofer, Paul; Bainschab, Markus; Thaler, Bernhard; Heim, Pascal; Ernst, Wolfgang E; Koch, Markus

    2016-08-18

    For the investigation of photoinduced dynamics in molecules with time-resolved pump-probe photoionization spectroscopy, it is essential to obtain unequivocal information about the fragmentation behavior induced by the laser pulses. We present time-resolved photoelectron-photoion coincidence (PEPICO) experiments to investigate the excited-state dynamics of isolated acetone molecules triggered by two-photon (269 nm) excitation. In the complex situation of different relaxation pathways, we unambiguously identify three distinct pump-probe ionization channels. The high selectivity of PEPICO detection allows us to observe the fragmentation behavior and to follow the time evolution of each channel separately. For channels leading to fragment ions, we quantitatively obtain the fragment-to-parent branching ratio and are able to determine experimentally whether dissociation occurs in the neutral molecule or in the parent ion. These results highlight the importance of coincidence detection for the interpretation of time-resolved photochemical relaxation and dissociation studies if multiple pathways are present. PMID:27459051

  8. Time-resolved spectroscopy using a chopper wheel as a fast shutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shicong; Wendt, Amy E.; Boffard, John B.; Lin, Chun C.

    2015-01-01

    Widely available, small form-factor, fiber-coupled spectrometers typically have a minimum exposure time measured in milliseconds, and thus cannot be used directly for time-resolved measurements at the microsecond level. Spectroscopy at these faster time scales is typically done with an intensified charge coupled device (CCD) system where the image intensifier acts as a "fast" electronic shutter for the slower CCD array. In this paper, we describe simple modifications to a commercially available chopper wheel system to allow it to be used as a "fast" mechanical shutter for gating a fiber-coupled spectrometer to achieve microsecond-scale time-resolved optical measurements of a periodically pulsed light source. With the chopper wheel synchronized to the pulsing of the light source, the time resolution can be set to a small fraction of the pulse period by using a chopper wheel with narrow slots separated by wide spokes. Different methods of synchronizing the chopper wheel and pulsing of the light sources are explored. The capability of the chopper wheel system is illustrated with time-resolved measurements of pulsed plasmas.

  9. Time-resolved spectroscopy using a chopper wheel as a fast shutter

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shicong; Wendt, Amy E.; Boffard, John B.; Lin, Chun C.

    2015-01-15

    Widely available, small form-factor, fiber-coupled spectrometers typically have a minimum exposure time measured in milliseconds, and thus cannot be used directly for time-resolved measurements at the microsecond level. Spectroscopy at these faster time scales is typically done with an intensified charge coupled device (CCD) system where the image intensifier acts as a “fast” electronic shutter for the slower CCD array. In this paper, we describe simple modifications to a commercially available chopper wheel system to allow it to be used as a “fast” mechanical shutter for gating a fiber-coupled spectrometer to achieve microsecond-scale time-resolved optical measurements of a periodically pulsed light source. With the chopper wheel synchronized to the pulsing of the light source, the time resolution can be set to a small fraction of the pulse period by using a chopper wheel with narrow slots separated by wide spokes. Different methods of synchronizing the chopper wheel and pulsing of the light sources are explored. The capability of the chopper wheel system is illustrated with time-resolved measurements of pulsed plasmas.

  10. Frame-Transfer Gating Raman Spectroscopy for Time-Resolved Multiscalar Combustion Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Fischer, David G.; Kojima, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Accurate experimental measurement of spatially and temporally resolved variations in chemical composition (species concentrations) and temperature in turbulent flames is vital for characterizing the complex phenomena occurring in most practical combustion systems. These diagnostic measurements are called multiscalar because they are capable of acquiring multiple scalar quantities simultaneously. Multiscalar diagnostics also play a critical role in the area of computational code validation. In order to improve the design of combustion devices, computational codes for modeling turbulent combustion are often used to speed up and optimize the development process. The experimental validation of these codes is a critical step in accepting their predictions for engine performance in the absence of cost-prohibitive testing. One of the most critical aspects of setting up a time-resolved stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) diagnostic system is the temporal optical gating scheme. A short optical gate is necessary in order for weak SRS signals to be detected with a good signal- to-noise ratio (SNR) in the presence of strong background optical emissions. This time-synchronized optical gating is a classical problem even to other spectroscopic techniques such as laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) or laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Traditionally, experimenters have had basically two options for gating: (1) an electronic means of gating using an image intensifier before the charge-coupled-device (CCD), or (2) a mechanical optical shutter (a rotary chopper/mechanical shutter combination). A new diagnostic technology has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center that utilizes a frame-transfer CCD sensor, in conjunction with a pulsed laser and multiplex optical fiber collection, to realize time-resolved Raman spectroscopy of turbulent flames that is free from optical background noise (interference). The technology permits not only shorter temporal optical gating (down

  11. Quantifying the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen by combining diffuse correlation spectroscopy and time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdecchia, Kyle; Diop, Mamadou; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2013-02-01

    Preterm infants are highly susceptible to ischemic brain injury; consequently, continuous bedside monitoring to detect ischemia before irreversible damage occurs would improve patient outcome. In addition to monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF), assessing the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) would be beneficial considering that metabolic thresholds can be used to evaluate tissue viability. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that changes in absolute CMRO2 could be measured by combining diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) with time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (TR-NIRS). Absolute CBF was determined using bolus-tracking TR-NIRS to calibrate the DCS measurements. Cerebral venous blood oxygenation (SvO2) was determined by multiwavelength TR-NIRS measurements, the accuracy of which was assessed by directly measuring the oxygenation of sagittal sinus blood. In eight newborn piglets, CMRO2 was manipulated by varying the anesthetics and by injecting sodium cyanide. No significant differences were found between the two sets of SvO2 measurements obtained by TR-NIRS or sagittal sinus blood samples and the corresponding CMRO2 measurements. Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean CMRO2 difference of 0.0268±0.8340 mL O2/100 g/min between the two techniques over a range from 0.3 to 4 mL O2/100 g/min.

  12. Capturing interfacial photoelectrochemical dynamics with picosecond time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Neppl, Stefan; Shavorskiy, Andrey; Zegkinoglou, Ioannis; Fraund, Matthew; Slaughter, Daniel S; Troy, Tyler; Ziemkiewicz, Michael P; Ahmed, Musahid; Gul, Sheraz; Rude, Bruce; Zhang, Jin Z; Tremsin, Anton S; Glans, Per-Anders; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Wu, Cheng Hao; Guo, Jinghua; Salmeron, Miquel; Bluhm, Hendrik; Gessner, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved core-level spectroscopy using laser pulses to initiate and short X-ray pulses to trace photoinduced processes has the unique potential to provide electronic state- and atomic site-specific insight into fundamental electron dynamics in complex systems. Time-domain studies using transient X-ray absorption and emission techniques have proven extremely valuable to investigate electronic and structural dynamics in isolated and solvated molecules. Here, we describe the implementation of a picosecond time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (TRXPS) technique at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and its application to monitor photoinduced electron dynamics at the technologically pertinent interface formed by N3 dye molecules anchored to nanoporous ZnO. Indications for a dynamical chemical shift of the Ru3d photoemission line originating from the N3 metal centre are observed ∼30 ps after resonant HOMO-LUMO excitation with a visible laser pump pulse. The transient changes in the TRXPS spectra are accompanied by a characteristic surface photovoltage (SPV) response of the ZnO substrate on a pico- to nanosecond time scale. The interplay between the two phenomena is discussed in the context of possible electronic relaxation and recombination pathways that lead to the neutralisation of the transiently oxidised dye after ultrafast electron injection. A detailed account of the experimental technique is given including an analysis of the chemical modification of the nano-structured ZnO substrate during extended periods of solution-based dye sensitisation and its relevance for studies using surface-sensitive spectroscopy techniques. PMID:25415599

  13. Rotationally-Resolved Spectroscopy of the Bending Modes of Deuterated Water Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Jacob T.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2013-06-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy of small gas-phase water clusters has provided a wealth of information regarding the intermolecular interactions between water molecules. Water dimer is of particular interest because high-resolution spectroscopy can yield detailed information about the water pair potential. While there have been extensive studies of water dimer throughout the microwave and infrared regions of the spectrum, to date there has been no reported high-resolution spectrum of the intramolecular bending modes of water dimer. We have obtained rotationally-resolved spectra of the bending modes of deuterated water dimer (D_2O)_2, which are, to our knowledge, the first reported spectra of the bending modes of water dimer with rotational resolution. Dimers were produced in a supersonic expansion by bubbling Ar or He through D_2O and expanding the mixture through a 150 μm × 12 mm slit. The expansion was then probed using continuous wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy with light generated by a quantum cascade laser (QCL) operating near 8.5 μm. We have assigned the K_a = 1 ← 0 and K_a = 2 ← 1 sub-bands of the bending mode belonging to the hydrogen bond donor and have observed additional transitions which we attribute to the bending mode associated with the hydrogen bond acceptor.

  14. Time-resolved EUV spectroscopy in the early stage of laser ablation of carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiseleur, Pierre; Hansen, Tue N.; Larour, Jean; Lunney, James G.

    2002-09-01

    In the early stages of laser ablation the combination of high density and optical opacity makes it difficult to use visible spectroscopy for plasma diagnosis. However, these problems can be overcome by working at shorter wavelengths in the EUV. We have used time-resolved EUV emission spectroscopy to study the early stages (1-30 ns) of plasma development in the laser ablation of carbon at an irradiance of 5 GW cm -2. The ablation was done using a 6 ns Nd:YAG laser at 1.06 μm. The spectra were recorded using a grazing incidence spectrometer with a 5 ns-gated micro-channel plate (MCP) detector. An ion probe operating in the time-of-flight mode was used to measure the ion velocity distribution of the plasma outflow. In the 10-35 nm region the predominant line emission was due to Li-like carbon. The temporal variation of the electron density and temperature was deduced by fitting the observed spectrum to a synthetic spectrum calculated using the FLY numerical model of the plasma ionisation and excitation. The temperature deduced from spectroscopy was in good agreement with the estimation from the measured ion velocity distribution in the plasma outflow.

  15. Time-resolved spectroscopy of the intrinsic fluorescence of nucleic acid species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Malcolm; Hart, Lucas P.; Ho, Paul S.; Ballini, Jean-Pierre; Vigny, Paul

    1990-05-01

    Polarization and lifetime studies have shown that the fluorescence from nucleic acid species is complex, both at the individual chromophore level and because of the effect of stacking interactions on the electronic states. Recent work aimed at elucidating some aspects of this behavior by decay analysis and time-resolved spectroscopy is surveyed. Experimental work has been carried out using the ACO synchrotron at LURE, France) with time-correlated single photon counting, or a frequency-doubled N2-pumped dye laser, pulse width 700 ps, with fast-gated (100 ps width) analog detection and signal averaging. Decay curves are treated by global analysis using the Marquardt non-linear least-squares algorithm (synchrotron data) or the SPLMOD program (EMBO), which carries out a non-linear leastsquares minimization using cubic splines, for the laser data. Resolution of the decay data gives a model-based estimate of the number of components and their lifetimes. This information is then used to deconvolute timewindowed spectra (time-delayed spectra) into the time-resolved spectra. It is a particular feature of the combination of delayed photon counting with the continuous wavelength distribution of pulsed synchrotron radiation that excitation spectra correlating with emissions of different lifetimes can be obtained by uninterrupted repetitive scanning over a wide range of exciting wavelengths, in the present work from 230 nm to 354 urn. Such time-delayed excitation spectra can also be deconvoluted into components corresponding to the various time-resolved emission spectra. Examples of these three types of information viz resolved lifetimes, time-resolved emission spectra and their excitation spectra are presented and discussed for the following systems. I. adenosine; 6N, 6N-dimethyladenosine; protonated adenosine; this work shows the role of rotamers in the excited state behavior of this chromophore and demonstrates the forbidden nature of the lowest excited state. II. d(AT); d

  16. Bayesian Comparison of Fit Parameters: An Application to Time-Resolved X-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, V.

    Analysis of X-ray data of the stars AD Leo and Wolf 630, obtained with ROSAT provide important clues to the structure of the coronae on these low-mass, main-sequence stars. In particular, time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of these stars allow us to derive estimates for the low- and high-temperature components of the plasma emission measures. Using Bayes' theorem, we show that the high-temperature components are correlated with the X-ray light-curves of the stars, while the low-temperature components are steady. Thus we are able to model the low-temperature emission as relatively compact, quiescent, static coronal loops, and the high-temperature emission as unstable flaring components.

  17. Quantized Electron Accumulation States in Indium Nitride Studied by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colakerol, Leyla; Veal, T. D.; Jeong, Hae-Kyung; Plucinski, Lukasz; Demasi, Alex; Learmonth, Timothy; Glans, Per-Anders; Wang, Shancai; Zhang, Yufeng; Piper, L. F. J.; Jefferson, P. H.; Fedorov, Alexei; Chen, Tai-Chou; Moustakas, T. D.; McConville, C. F.; Smith, Kevin E.

    2006-12-01

    Electron accumulation states in InN have been measured using high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). The electrons in the accumulation layer have been discovered to reside in quantum well states. ARPES was also used to measure the Fermi surface of these quantum well states, as well as their constant binding energy contours below the Fermi level EF. The energy of the Fermi level and the size of the Fermi surface for these quantum well states could be controlled by varying the method of surface preparation. This is the first unambiguous observation that electrons in the InN accumulation layer are quantized and the first time the Fermi surface associated with such states has been measured.

  18. Time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy of structurally disordered K3WO3F3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omelkov, S. I.; Spassky, D. A.; Pustovarov, V. A.; Kozlov, A. V.; Isaenko, L. I.

    2016-08-01

    Three emission centers of exciton-like origin, with distinct relaxation time, emission and excitation spectra were revealed in K3WO3F3 and described taking into account its structural disordering. Low-temperature monoclinic phase of K3WO3F3 features few anion sites with mixed oxygen/fluorine occupancy per [WO3F3] octahedron. Therefore, different kinds of distorted octahedra form, providing different luminescence centers. The time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy technique was applied to distinguish these centers. The simultaneous thermal quenching of them above ∼200 K was qualitatively explained involving dynamic structural disorder of the compound. The energy transfer mechanism between centers was found and tentatively described by the diffusion of excitons. Apart from intrinsic luminescence, the PL of defect-related centers was discovered and the role of shallow charge carrier traps in the low-temperature persistent luminescence was revealed.

  19. Femtosecond time-resolved impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy using sub-7-fs pulses: Apparatus and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramochi, Hikaru; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei

    2016-04-01

    We describe details of the setup for time-resolved impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy (TR-ISRS). In this method, snapshot molecular vibrational spectra of the photoreaction transients are captured via time-domain Raman probing using ultrashort pulses. Our instrument features transform-limited sub-7-fs pulses to impulsively excite and probe coherent nuclear wavepacket motions, allowing us to observe vibrational fingerprints of transient species from the terahertz to 3000-cm-1 region with high sensitivity. Key optical components for the best spectroscopic performance are discussed. The TR-ISRS measurements for the excited states of diphenylacetylene in cyclohexane are demonstrated, highlighting the capability of our setup to track femtosecond dynamics of all the Raman-active fundamental molecular vibrations.

  20. Raman spectroscopy and time-resolved photoluminescence of BN and BxCyNz nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Han, Wei-Qiang; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager III, J.W.; Shan, W.; Haller,E.E.; Zettl, A.

    2004-01-21

    We report Raman and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopic studies of multiwalled BN and B{sub x}C{sub y}N{sub z} nanotubes. The Raman spectroscopy shows that the as-grown B{sub x}C{sub y}N{sub z} charge recombination, respectively. Comparison of the photoluminescence of BN nanotubes to that decay process is characterized by two time constants that are attributed to intra- and inter-BN sheet nanotubes as predicted by theory. nanotubes are radially phase separated into BN shells and carbon shells. The photoluminescence of hexagonal BN is consistent with the existence of a spatially indirect band gap in multi-walled BN.

  1. The Fossil Record of Black Hole Seeds, with Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trump, Jonathan R.; CANDELS, 3D-HST

    2016-01-01

    I will present the first robust measurement of black hole occupation over a wide range of host galaxy mass (8resolved spectroscopy, which reliably distinguishes a nuclear AGN from extended star formation and largely avoids the star-formation dilution bias plaguing traditional low-mass AGN selection. The observations suggest bimodal seed formation: while many low-mass galaxies host massive black holes, their black hole occupation is ~10% that of massive galaxies. The measured black hole occupation qualitatively agrees with theoretical models of black hole formation, with massive direct-collapse seeds forming only in massive halos and black hole formation confined to lower-mass Pop III remnants in small halos.

  2. Muscle oxygenation during exercise under hypoxic conditions assessed by spatially resolved broadband NIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraskin, Dmitri; Platen, Petra; Franke, Julia; Andre, Christiane; Bloch, Wilhelm; Kohl-Bareis, Matthias

    2005-08-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is used for the non-invasive measurement of muscle oxygenation during an incremental cycle test in healthy volunteers. A broad band spatially resolved system is used that allows the reliability of current algorithms to be inspected with the main emphasis on tissue oxygen saturation (SO2) and oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin concentrations. Physiological conditions were modulated by changing oxygen supply from normal (21 % O2 in inspired air) to conditions corresponding to 2000 and 4000 m altitude above sea level (15.4 and 11.9 % O2). Under these hypoxic conditions the decrease in SO2 with increased exercise power is highly correlated with the oxygen content of the inspired air. There is a clear correlation with physiological parameters (heart rate, pulse oxymetry, blood gas, lactate, spirometric data). Skin oxygenation parameters are compared to those of muscle.

  3. Isotope effect on hydrated electron relaxation dynamics studied with time-resolved liquid jet photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins, Madeline H.; Williams, Holly L.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2016-05-01

    The excited state relaxation dynamics of the solvated electron in H2O and D2O are investigated using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy in a liquid microjet. The data show that the initial excited state decays on a time scale of 75 ± 12 fs in H2O and 102 ± 8 fs in D2O, followed by slower relaxation on time scales of 400 ± 70 fs and 390 ± 70 fs that are isotopically invariant within the precision of our measurements. Based on the time evolution of the transient signals, the faster and slower time constants are assigned to p → s internal conversion (IC) of the hydrated electron and relaxation on the ground electronic state, respectively. This assignment is consistent with the non-adiabatic mechanism for relaxation of the hydrated electron and yields an isotope effect of 1.4 ± 0.2 for IC of the hydrated electron.

  4. Spatially resolved spectroscopy analysis of the XMM-Newton large program on SN1006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiang-Tao; Decourchelle, Anne; Miceli, Marco; Vink, Jacco; Bocchino, Fabrizio

    2016-04-01

    We perform analysis of the XMM-Newton large program on SN1006 based on our newly developed methods of spatially resolved spectroscopy analysis. We extract spectra from low and high resolution meshes. The former (3596 meshes) is used to roughly decompose the thermal and non-thermal components and characterize the spatial distributions of different parameters, such as temperature, abundances of different elements, ionization age, and electron density of the thermal component, as well as photon index and cutoff frequency of the non-thermal component. On the other hand, the low resolution meshes (583 meshes) focus on the interior region dominated by the thermal emission and have enough counts to well characterize the Si lines. We fit the spectra from the low resolution meshes with different models, in order to decompose the multiple plasma components at different thermal and ionization states and compare their spatial distributions. In this poster, we will present the initial results of this project.

  5. Dynamics of Molecular Orientation Observed Using Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy during Deposition of Pentacene on Graphite.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Han; Kwon, Soonnam

    2016-04-19

    A real-time method to observe both the structural and the electronic configuration of an organic molecule during deposition is reported for the model system of pentacene on graphite. Structural phase transition of the thin films as a function of coverage is monitored by using in situ angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) results to observe the change of the electronic configuration at the same time. A photoemission theory that uses independent atomic center approximations is introduced to identify the molecular orientation from the ARPES technique. This study provides a practical insight into interpreting ARPES data regarding dynamic changes of molecular orientation during initial growth of molecules on a well-defined surface. PMID:26999332

  6. Accessing Phonon Polaritons in Hyperbolic Crystals by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomadin, Andrea; Principi, Alessandro; Song, Justin C. W.; Levitov, Leonid S.; Polini, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Recently studied hyperbolic materials host unique phonon-polariton (PP) modes. The ultrashort wavelengths of these modes, as well as their low damping, hold promise for extreme subdiffraction nanophotonics schemes. Polar hyperbolic materials such as hexagonal boron nitride can be used to realize long-range coupling between PP modes and extraneous charge degrees of freedom. The latter, in turn, can be used to control and probe PP modes. Here we analyze coupling between PP modes and plasmons in an adjacent graphene sheet, which opens the door to accessing PP modes by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). A rich structure in the graphene ARPES spectrum due to PP modes is predicted, providing a new probe of PP modes and their coupling to graphene plasmons.

  7. Accessing Phonon Polaritons in Hyperbolic Crystals by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tomadin, Andrea; Principi, Alessandro; Song, Justin C W; Levitov, Leonid S; Polini, Marco

    2015-08-21

    Recently studied hyperbolic materials host unique phonon-polariton (PP) modes. The ultrashort wavelengths of these modes, as well as their low damping, hold promise for extreme subdiffraction nanophotonics schemes. Polar hyperbolic materials such as hexagonal boron nitride can be used to realize long-range coupling between PP modes and extraneous charge degrees of freedom. The latter, in turn, can be used to control and probe PP modes. Here we analyze coupling between PP modes and plasmons in an adjacent graphene sheet, which opens the door to accessing PP modes by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). A rich structure in the graphene ARPES spectrum due to PP modes is predicted, providing a new probe of PP modes and their coupling to graphene plasmons. PMID:26340206

  8. A brief update of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on a correlated electron system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.S.

    2010-02-24

    In this paper, we briefly summarize the capabilities of state-of-the-art angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) in the field of experimental condensed matter physics. Due to the advancement of the detector technology and the high flux light sources, ARPES has become a powerful tool to study the low energy excitations of solids, especially those novel quantum materials in which many-body physics are at play. To benchmark today's state-of-the-art ARPES technique, we demonstrate that the precision of today's ARPES has advanced to a regime comparable to the bulk-sensitive de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) measurements. Finally, as an example of new discoveries driven by the advancement of the ARPES technique, we summarize some of our recent ARPES measurements on underdoped high-T{sub c} superconducting cuprates, which have provided further insight into the complex pseudogap problem.

  9. Angle-resolved spectroscopy study of Ni-based superconductor SrNi2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, L.-K.; Richard, P.; van Roekeghem, A.; Yin, J.-X.; Wu, S.-F.; Chen, Z. G.; Wang, N. L.; Biermann, S.; Qian, T.; Ding, H.

    2016-07-01

    We performed an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of the Ni-based superconductor SrNi2As2 . Electron and hole Fermi surface pockets are observed, but their different shapes and sizes lead to very poor nesting conditions. The experimental electronic band structure of SrNi2As2 is in good agreement with first-principles calculations after a slight renormalization (by a factor 1.1), confirming the picture of Hund's exchange-dominated electronic correlations decreasing with increasing filling of the 3 d shell in the Fe-, Co-, and Ni-based compounds. These findings emphasize the importance of Hund's coupling and 3 d -orbital filling as key tuning parameters of electronic correlations in transition-metal pnictides.

  10. Time-resolved spectroscopy of spin-current emission from a magnetic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateno, Yuma; Fukami, Masaya; Tashiro, Takaharu; Ando, Kazuya

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate time-resolved spectroscopy of spin-current emission from a magnetic insulator using the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE). We measured magnetic field dependence of the spin-current emission in the time domain and found that the spectral shape of the ISHE voltage changes with time. The change in the spectral shape is due to field and power dependent temporal oscillation of the spin pumping driven by parametric magnons. The observed oscillating spin-current emission driven by dipole-exchange magnons is well reproduced by a model calculation based on the S theory. In contrast, the spin-current emission driven by short-wavelength exchange magnons cannot be reproduced with this model, illustrating an important role of higher-order nonlinear effects in the spin-current emission.

  11. A high-order harmonic generation apparatus for time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Frietsch, B.; Gahl, C.; Teichmann, M.; Weinelt, M.; Carley, R.; Döbrich, K.; Schwarzkopf, O.; Wernet, Ph.

    2013-07-15

    We present a table top setup for time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy to investigate band structure dynamics of correlated materials driven far from equilibrium by femtosecond laser pulse excitation. With the electron-phonon equilibration time being in the order of 1–2 ps it is necessary to achieve sub-picosecond time resolution. Few techniques provide both the necessary time and energy resolution to map non-equilibrium states of the band structure. Laser-driven high-order harmonic generation is such a technique. In our experiment, a grating monochromator delivers tunable photon energies up to 40 eV. A photon energy bandwidth of 150 meV and a pulse duration of 100 fs FWHM allow us to cover the k-space necessary to map valence bands at different k{sub z} and detect outer core states.

  12. Angularly resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigation of PTFE after prolonged space exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalins, I.; Karimi, M.

    1992-01-01

    Monochromatized angularly resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) was used to study PTFE (Teflon) that had been exposed to an earth orbital environment for approximately six years. The primary interest of the research is on a very reactive component of this environment (atomic oxygen) which, because of the typical orbital velocities of a spacecraft, impinge on exposed surfaces with 5 eV energy. This presentation deals with the method of analysis, the findings as they pertain to a rather complex carbon, oxygen, and fluorine XPS peak analysis, and the character of the valence bands. An improved bias referencing method, based on ARXPS, is also demonstrated for evaluating specimen charging effects. It was found that the polymer molecule tends to resist the atomic oxygen attack by reorienting itself, so that the most electronegative CF3 groups are facing the incoming hyperthermal oxygen atoms. The implications of these findings to ground-based laboratory studies are discussed.

  13. Preparation of layered thin film samples for angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, S. E.; Zhou, B.; Huo, Y.; Harris, J. S.; Pushp, A.; Kellock, A. J.; Parkin, S. S. P.; Chen, Y.; Hesjedal, T.

    2014-09-22

    Materials with layered van der Waals crystal structures are exciting research topics in condensed matter physics and materials science due to outstanding physical properties associated with their strong two dimensional nature. Prominent examples include bismuth tritelluride and triselenide topological insulators (TIs), which are characterized by a bulk bandgap and pairwise counter-propagating spin-polarized electronic surface states. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) of ex-situ grown thin film samples has been limited by the lack of suitable surface preparation techniques. We demonstrate the shortcomings of previously successful conventional surface preparation techniques when applied to ternary TI systems which are susceptible to severe oxidation. We show that in-situ cleaving is a simple and effective technique for preparation of clean surfaces on ex-situ grown thin films for high quality ARPES measurements. The method presented here is universally applicable to other layered van der Waals systems as well.

  14. Pulsation-resolved deep tissue dynamics measured with diffusing-wave spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Jaillon, Franck; Dietsche, Gregor; Maret, Georg; Gisler, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    We present a technique for measuring transient microscopic dynamics within deep tissue with sub-second temporal resolution, using diffusing-wave spectroscopy with gated single-photon avalanche photodiodes (APDs) combined with standard ungated multi-tau correlators. Using the temporal autocorrelation function of a reference signal allows to correct the temporal intensity autocorrelation function of the sample signal for the distortions induced by the non-constant average photon count rate. We apply this technique to pulsation-synchronized measurements of tissue dynamics in humans. Measurements on the forearm show no dependence on the pulsation phase. In contrast, the decay rate of the DWS signal measured on the wrist over the radial artery shows a pulsation-induced modulation of 60-90% consistent with pulsatile variations of arterial erythrocyte flow velocity. This might make time-resolved DWS interesting as a sensitive and fast method for investigating deep tissue perfusion, e.g. in intensive care.

  15. Time-resolved broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy for chemical kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Sheps, Leonid; Chandler, David W.

    2013-04-01

    Experimental measurements of elementary reaction rate coefficients and product branching ratios are essential to our understanding of many fundamentally important processes in Combustion Chemistry. However, such measurements are often impossible because of a lack of adequate detection techniques. Some of the largest gaps in our knowledge concern some of the most important radical species, because their short lifetimes and low steady-state concentrations make them particularly difficult to detect. To address this challenge, we propose a novel general detection method for gas-phase chemical kinetics: time-resolved broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (TR-BB-CEAS). This all-optical, non-intrusive, multiplexed method enables sensitive direct probing of transient reaction intermediates in a simple, inexpensive, and robust experimental package.

  16. Revealing the photophysics of gold-nanobeacons via time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guoke; Simionesie, Dorin; Sefcik, Jan; Sutter, Jens U; Xue, Qingjiang; Yu, Jun; Wang, Jinliang; Birch, David J S; Chen, Yu

    2015-12-15

    We demonstrate that time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful tool to investigate the conformation states of hairpin DNA on the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and energy transfer processes in Au-nanobeacons. Long-range fluorescence quenching of Cy5 by AuNPs has been found to be in good agreement with electrodynamics modeling. Moreover, time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) is shown to be promising for real-time monitoring of the hybridization kinetics of Au-nanobeacons, with up to 60% increase in decay time component and 300% increase in component fluorescence fraction observed. Our results also indicate the importance of the stem and spacer designs for the performance of Au-nanobeacons. PMID:26670500

  17. Time-resolved spectroscopy of mitochondria, cells, and rat tissues under normal and pathological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauvoit, Bertrand; Kitai, Toshiyuki; Liu, Hanli; Chance, Britton

    1995-01-01

    In this study, the detailed dependence of the light scattering on the tissue architecture and intracellular composition was investigated. The reduced scattering coefficient ((mu) s') of isolated rat liver mitochondria, isolated liver cells and various rat tissues was measured at 780 nm by using time-resolved spectroscopy and a sample-substitution protocol. In a first part, extrapolations of the in vitro data to the in vivo situation showed that the mitochondrial compartment contributes for 73% of the scattering of the hepatocytes and about 100% of that of the whole liver. Finally, by analyzing different normal rat tissues and tumors, we have shown that the tissue (mu) s' is independent on the cell concentration in the tissue but is roughly proportional to the tissue mitochondrial content.

  18. Label-Free Toxin Detection by Means of Time-Resolved Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Changhoon; Takhistov, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The real-time detection of trace concentrations of biological toxins requires significant improvement of the detection methods from those reported in the literature. To develop a highly sensitive and selective detection device it is necessary to determine the optimal measuring conditions for the electrochemical sensor in three domains: time, frequency and polarization potential. In this work we utilized a time-resolved electrochemical impedance spectroscopy for the detection of trace concentrations of Staphylococcus enterotoxin B (SEB). An anti-SEB antibody has been attached to the nano-porous aluminum surface using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane/glutaraldehyde coupling system. This immobilization method allows fabrication of a highly reproducible and stable sensing device. Using developed immobilization procedure and optimized detection regime, it is possible to determine the presence of SEB at the levels as low as 10 pg/mL in 15 minutes. PMID:22315560

  19. Substrate interactions with suspended and supported monolayer MoS2: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jin, Wencan; Yeh, Po -Chun; Zaki, Nader; Zhang, Datong; Liou, Jonathan T.; Dadap, Jerry I.; Barinov, Alexey; Yablonskikh, Mikhail; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Sutter, Peter; et al

    2015-03-17

    We report the directly measured electronic structure of exfoliated monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) using micrometer-scale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Measurements of both suspended and supported monolayer MoS₂ elucidate the effects of interaction with a substrate. Thus, a suggested relaxation of the in-plane lattice constant is found for both suspended and supported monolayer MoS₂ crystals. For suspended MoS₂, a careful investigation of the measured uppermost valence band gives an effective mass at Γ¯ and Κ¯ of 2.00m₀ and 0.43m₀, respectively. We also measure an increase in the band linewidth from the midpoint of Γ¯Κ¯ to the vicinity of Κ¯ and briefly discussmore » its possible origin.« less

  20. Field-resolved measurement of reaction-induced spectral densities by polarizability response spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Andrew M.; Nome, Rene A.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2007-11-01

    The experimental design and theoretical description of a novel five-pulse laser spectroscopy is presented with an application to a pyridinium charge transfer complex in acetonitrile and methanol. In field-resolved polarizability response spectroscopy (PORS), an electronically resonant laser pulse first excites a solvated chromophore (reactant) and off-resonant Raman spectra of the resulting nuclear motions are measured as a function of the reaction time. The present apparatus differs from our earlier design by performing the Raman probe measurement (with fixed pulse delays) in the frequency domain. In addition, the full electric fields of the signals are measured by spectral interferometry to separate nonresonant and Raman responses. Our theoretical model shows how the PORS signal arises from nuclear motions that are displaced/driven by the photoinduced reaction. The field-resolved off-resonant (of the solute's electronic transitions) probing favors detection of solvent (as opposed to solute) dynamics coupled to the reaction. The sign of the signal represents the relative strengths of polarization responses associated with the ground and photoexcited solutions. Signatures of nonresonant and PORS signal contributions to the experimental results are analyzed with numerical calculations based on a theoretical model we have developed for reaction-induced PORS. Our model identifies two mechanisms of PORS signal generation: (i) structural relaxation induced resonance; (ii) dephasing induced resonance. In the charge transfer reaction investigated, the solvent-dependent and time-evolving (solvent) polarizability spectral density (PSD) is readily obtained. The general trend of an initial broadband inertial nuclear response followed by a decrease in the linewidth of the PSD establishes that the measured PSD is inconsistent with the approximation of a linear response. Furthermore, the explicit time evolution of the PSD is important for properly describing solvent control of

  1. Field-resolved measurement of reaction-induced spectral densities by polarizability response spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, Andrew M.; Nome, Rene A.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2007-11-14

    The experimental design and theoretical description of a novel five-pulse laser spectroscopy is presented with an application to a pyridinium charge transfer complex in acetonitrile and methanol. In field-resolved polarizability response spectroscopy (PORS), an electronically resonant laser pulse first excites a solvated chromophore (reactant) and off-resonant Raman spectra of the resulting nuclear motions are measured as a function of the reaction time. The present apparatus differs from our earlier design by performing the Raman probe measurement (with fixed pulse delays) in the frequency domain. In addition, the full electric fields of the signals are measured by spectral interferometry to separate nonresonant and Raman responses. Our theoretical model shows how the PORS signal arises from nuclear motions that are displaced/driven by the photoinduced reaction. The field-resolved off-resonant (of the solute's electronic transitions) probing favors detection of solvent (as opposed to solute) dynamics coupled to the reaction. The sign of the signal represents the relative strengths of polarization responses associated with the ground and photoexcited solutions. Signatures of nonresonant and PORS signal contributions to the experimental results are analyzed with numerical calculations based on a theoretical model we have developed for reaction-induced PORS. Our model identifies two mechanisms of PORS signal generation: (i) structural relaxation induced resonance; (ii) dephasing induced resonance. In the charge transfer reaction investigated, the solvent-dependent and time-evolving (solvent) polarizability spectral density (PSD) is readily obtained. The general trend of an initial broadband inertial nuclear response followed by a decrease in the linewidth of the PSD establishes that the measured PSD is inconsistent with the approximation of a linear response. Furthermore, the explicit time evolution of the PSD is important for properly describing solvent control of

  2. Design and evaluation of a device for fast multispectral time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Yankelevich, Diego R.; Ma, Dinglong; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yang; Sun, Yinghua; Bec, Julien; Marcu, Laura; Elson, Daniel S.

    2014-03-15

    The application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) to in vivo tissue diagnosis requires a method for fast acquisition of fluorescence decay profiles in multiple spectral bands. This study focusses on development of a clinically compatible fiber-optic based multispectral TRFS (ms-TRFS) system together with validation of its accuracy and precision for fluorescence lifetime measurements. It also presents the expansion of this technique into an imaging spectroscopy method. A tandem array of dichroic beamsplitters and filters was used to record TRFS decay profiles at four distinct spectral bands where biological tissue typically presents fluorescence emission maxima, namely, 390, 452, 542, and 629 nm. Each emission channel was temporally separated by using transmission delays through 200 μm diameter multimode optical fibers of 1, 10, 19, and 28 m lengths. A Laguerre-expansion deconvolution algorithm was used to compensate for modal dispersion inherent to large diameter optical fibers and the finite bandwidth of detectors and digitizers. The system was found to be highly efficient and fast requiring a few nano-Joule of laser pulse energy and <1 ms per point measurement, respectively, for the detection of tissue autofluorescent components. Organic and biological chromophores with lifetimes that spanned a 0.8–7 ns range were used for system validation, and the measured lifetimes from the organic fluorophores deviated by less than 10% from values reported in the literature. Multi-spectral lifetime images of organic dye solutions contained in glass capillary tubes were recorded by raster scanning the single fiber probe in a 2D plane to validate the system as an imaging tool. The lifetime measurement variability was measured indicating that the system provides reproducible results with a standard deviation smaller than 50 ps. The ms-TRFS is a compact apparatus that makes possible the fast, accurate, and precise multispectral time-resolved fluorescence

  3. Time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: Application to pulsed discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Kentarou; Hama, Yoichi; Nishida, Shigeki

    2005-07-01

    Time-resolved Fourier transform spectroscopy (TR-FTS) is reviewed, with emphasis on synchronous FTS using continuously scanning interferometers. By using a high-resolution Bruker IFS 120 HR, a TR-FTS method has been developed with the help of a microcontroller SX, where a maximum of 64 time-resolved data are recorded with a preset time interval in a single scan of the interferometer. The time resolution is 1 μs, limited by the response time of the detector system used. This method has been applied to a pulsed discharge in an Ar and H 2 mixture to observe time profiles of ArH + and ArH emission spectra. Electronic transitions of He 2 have been observed in the infrared region with this method, and from the time profiles, He 2 in Rydberg states with higher energy than the b3Π state is found to be produced efficiently in afterglow plasma. Fifteen bands in the 2300-8000 cm -1 region have been assigned by using previously reported data from the optical region. A new band from the 5 f state has been assigned for the first time through the 5 f-4 d band in the 2600 cm -1 region.

  4. Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy study on the non-saturate magnetoresistance material WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Juan; Niu, Xiaohai; Xie, Binping; Zhang, Tong; Feng, Donglai

    2015-03-01

    By performing high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we obtain the detailed electronic structure of WTe2, which has an extremely large non-saturated magnetoresistance. Unlike the simple one electron and one hole pocket as expected, we resolved a rather complicated Fermi surface in WTe2. There is a hole pocket around the Brillouin zone center Γ, two hole pockets and two electron pockets along the tungsten chain direction. Thus the large magnetoresistance cannot be simply attributed to the electron-hole compensation, since this is based on a two carrier assumption model, the real case in WTe2 should be more complicated. Surprisingly, the circular dichroism ARPES result shows a strong intensity inversion between the data under the right-circular polarized light and the left-circular polarized light. This, indicates a proper different orbital angular momentum along the tungsten chain direction, which might also related to the different spin angular momentum since there're coupled with each other. Therefore, we propose that to fully understand the large magnetoresistance in WTe2, spin channel should also be involved where backscattering are forbidden under zero field.

  5. Use of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to evaluate diagnostic value of collagen degradation products.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Joanna; Cyrankiewicz, Michał; Wybranowski, Tomasz; Ziomkowska, Blanka; Ośmiałowski, Borys; Obońska, Ewa; Augustyńska, Beata; Kruszewski, Stefan; Kubica, Jacek

    2015-05-01

    The concentration of collagen degradation products (CDPs) may reflect the process of left ventricular remodeling (LVR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential diagnostic usefulness of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) in assessment of CDPs. The preliminary experiment was designed to establish if CDPs’ characteristics might be visible by mean fluorescence lifetime (FLT) in determined conditions. The in vitro model of CDPs was prepared by conducting the hydrolysis of type III collagen. The FLT of samples was measured by the time-resolved spectrometer Life Spec II with the subnanosecond pulsed 360-nm EPLED diode. The FLTs were obtained by deconvolution analysis of the data using a multiexponential model of fluorescence decay. In order to determine the limit of traceability of CDPs, a comparison of different collagen/plasma ratio in samples was performed. The results of our study showed that the increase of added plasma to hydrolyzed collagen extended the mean FLT. Thus, the diagnosis of LVR based on measurements using TRFS is possible. However, it is important to point out the experiment was preliminary and further investigation in this field of research is crucial. PMID:25764396

  6. Distinction of brain tissue, low grade and high grade glioma with time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yong, William H; Butte, Pramod V; Pikul, Brian K; Jo, Javier A; Fang, Qiyin; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Black, Keith; Marcu, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Neuropathology frozen section diagnoses are difficult in part because of the small tissue samples and the paucity of adjunctive rapid intraoperative stains. This study aims to explore the use of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy as a rapid adjunctive tool for the diagnosis of glioma specimens and for distinction of glioma from normal tissues intraoperatively. Ten low grade gliomas, 15 high grade gliomas without necrosis, 6 high grade gliomas with necrosis and/or radiation effect, and 14 histologically uninvolved "normal" brain specimens are spectroscopicaly analyzed and contrasted. Tissue autofluorescence was induced with a pulsed Nitrogen laser (337 nm, 1.2 ns) and the transient intensity decay profiles were recorded in the 370-500 nm spectral range with a fast digitized (0.2 ns time resolution). Spectral intensities and time-dependent parameters derived from the time-resolved spectra of each site were used for tissue characterization. A linear discriminant analysis diagnostic algorithm was used for tissue classification. Both low and high grade gliomas can be distinguished from histologically uninvolved cerebral cortex and white matter with high accuracy (above 90%). In addition, the presence or absence of treatment effect and/or necrosis can be identified in high grade gliomas. Taking advantage of tissue autofluorescence, this technique facilitates a direct and rapid investigation of surgically obtained tissue. PMID:16368511

  7. Phase-resolved spectroscopy of Type B quasi-periodic oscillations in GX 339-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Abigail L.; Uttley, Phil

    2016-08-01

    We present a new spectral-timing technique for phase-resolved spectroscopy and apply it to the low-frequency Type B quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) from the black hole X-ray binary GX 339-4. We show that on the QPO time-scale the spectrum changes not only in normalization, but also in spectral shape. Using several different spectral models which parametrize the blackbody and power-law components seen in the time-averaged spectrum, we find that both components are required to vary, although the fractional rms amplitude of blackbody emission is small, ˜1.4 per cent compared to ˜25 per cent for the power-law emission. However, the blackbody variation leads the power-law variation by ˜0.3 in relative phase (˜110°), giving a significant break in the Fourier lag-energy spectrum that our phase-resolved spectral models are able to reproduce. Our results support a geometric interpretation for the QPO variations where the blackbody variation and its phase relation to the power-law are explained by quasi-periodic heating of the approaching and receding sides of the disc by a precessing Comptonizing region. The small amplitude of blackbody variations suggests that the Comptonizing region producing the QPO has a relatively large scaleheight, and may be linked to the base of the jet, as has previously been suggested to explain the binary orbit inclination-dependence of Type B QPO amplitudes.

  8. Phase-Resolved Spectroscopy of Type B Quasi-Periodic Oscillations in GX 339-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Abigail L.; Uttley, Phil

    2016-05-01

    We present a new spectral-timing technique for phase-resolved spectroscopy and apply it to the low-frequency Type B quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) from the black hole X-ray binary GX 339-4. We show that on the QPO time-scale the spectrum changes not only in normalisation, but also in spectral shape. Using several different spectral models which parameterise the blackbody and power-law components seen in the time-averaged spectrum, we find that both components are required to vary, although the fractional rms amplitude of blackbody emission is small, ˜ 1.4 per cent compared to ˜ 25 per cent for the power-law emission. However the blackbody variation leads the power-law variation by ˜ 0.3 in relative phase (˜ 110 degrees), giving a significant break in the Fourier lag-energy spectrum that our phase-resolved spectral models are able to reproduce. Our results support a geometric interpretation for the QPO variations where the blackbody variation and its phase relation to the power-law are explained by quasi-periodic heating of the approaching and receding sides of the disk by a precessing Comptonising region. The small amplitude of blackbody variations suggests that the Comptonising region producing the QPO has a relatively large scale-height, and may be linked to the base of the jet, as has previously been suggested to explain the binary orbit inclination-dependence of Type B QPO amplitudes.

  9. Microcontroller based resonance tracking unit for time resolved continuous wave cavity-ringdown spectroscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votava, Ondrej; Mašát, Milan; Parker, Alexander E.; Jain, Chaithania; Fittschen, Christa

    2012-04-01

    We present in this work a new tracking servoloop electronics for continuous wave cavity-ringdown absorption spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) and its application to time resolved cw-CRDS measurements by coupling the system with a pulsed laser photolysis set-up. The tracking unit significantly increases the repetition rate of the CRDS events and thus improves effective time resolution (and/or the signal-to-noise ratio) in kinetics studies with cw-CRDS in given data acquisition time. The tracking servoloop uses novel strategy to track the cavity resonances that result in a fast relocking (few ms) after the loss of tracking due to an external disturbance. The microcontroller based design is highly flexible and thus advanced tracking strategies are easy to implement by the firmware modification without the need to modify the hardware. We believe that the performance of many existing cw-CRDS experiments, not only time-resolved, can be improved with such tracking unit without any additional modification to the experiment.

  10. Modelling Time-Resolved Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy of the Primary Photoisomerization Event in Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Time-resolved two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra (ES) tracking the evolution of the excited state manifolds of the retinal chromophore have been simulated along the photoisomerization pathway in bovine rhodopsin, using a state-of-the-art hybrid QM/MM approach based on multiconfigurational methods. Simulations of broadband 2D spectra provide a useful picture of the overall detectable 2D signals from the near-infrared (NIR) to the near-ultraviolet (UV). Evolution of the stimulated emission (SE) and excited state absorption (ESA) 2D signals indicates that the S1 → SN (with N ≥ 2) ESAs feature a substantial blue-shift only after bond inversion and partial rotation along the cis → trans isomerization angle, while the SE rapidly red-shifts during the photoinduced skeletal relaxation of the polyene chain. Different combinations of pulse frequencies are proposed in order to follow the evolution of specific ESA signals. These include a two-color 2DVis/NIR setup especially suited for tracking the evolution of the S1 → S2 transitions that can be used to discriminate between different photochemical mechanisms of retinal photoisomerization as a function of the environment. The reported results are consistent with the available time-resolved pump–probe experimental data, and may be used for the design of more elaborate transient 2D electronic spectroscopy techniques. PMID:24794143

  11. Simple photomultiplier tube internal-gating method for use in subnanosecond time-resolved spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Tetsuo; Takasu, Tsuyoshi; Araki, Tsutomu

    2003-09-01

    We propose a simple photomultiplier tube (PMT) internal-gating method for use in the field of subnanosecond time-resolved spectroscopy. In the proposed method, we control two dynodes in the PMT by applying a gate signal whose pulse width is Tg. When controlling the mth and the n(> m)th dynodes, a resolution time delta t is approximately given by delta t = Tg-(n-m) tau, where tau is a transit time of a lump of secondary electrons traveling between the two dynodes in the PMT. In principle, the resolution time delta t shorter than the pulse width Tg of the gate signal can be easily obtained. From a fundamental performance test, we found that a subnanosecond resolution time delta t = 0.31 ns was obtained for the case of m = 2 and n = 5. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method, we carried out a time-resolved spectroscopic measurement of emission obtained from a white-light-emitting diode (LED) driven by a nanosecond current pulse. PMID:14611045

  12. Phase-resolved spectroscopy of Type B quasi-periodic oscillations in GX 339-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Abigail L.; Uttley, Phil

    2016-08-01

    We present a new spectral-timing technique for phase-resolved spectroscopy and apply it to the low-frequency Type B quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) from the black hole X-ray binary GX 339-4. We show that on the QPO time-scale the spectrum changes not only in normalisation, but also in spectral shape. Using several different spectral models which parameterise the blackbody and power-law components seen in the time-averaged spectrum, we find that both components are required to vary, although the fractional rms amplitude of blackbody emission is small, ~1.4 per cent compared to ~25 per cent for the power-law emission. However the blackbody variation leads the power-law variation by ~0.3 in relative phase (~110 degrees), giving a significant break in the Fourier lag-energy spectrum that our phase-resolved spectral models are able to reproduce. Our results support a geometric interpretation for the QPO variations where the blackbody variation and its phase relation to the power-law are explained by quasi-periodic heating of the approaching and receding sides of the disc by a precessing Comptonising region. The small amplitude of blackbody variations suggests that the Comptonising region producing the QPO has a relatively large scale-height, and may be linked to the base of the jet, as has previously been suggested to explain the binary orbit inclination-dependence of Type B QPO amplitudes.

  13. Quantitatively Resolving Ligand–Receptor Bonds on Cell Surfaces Using Force-Induced Remnant Magnetization Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Molecule-specific noncovalent bonding on cell surfaces is the foundation for cellular recognition and functioning. A major challenge in probing these bonds is to resolve the specific bonds quantitatively and efficiently from the nonspecific interactions in a complex environment. Using force-induced remnant magnetization spectroscopy (FIRMS), we were able to resolve quantitatively three different interactions for magnetic beads bearing anti-CD4 antibodies with CD4+ T cell surfaces based upon their binding forces. The binding force of the CD4 antibody–antigen bonds was determined to be 75 ± 3 pN. For comparison, the same bonds were also studied on a functionalized substrate surface, and the binding force was determined to be 90 ± 6 pN. The 15 pN difference revealed by high-resolution FIRMS illustrates the significant impact of the bonding environment. Because the force difference was unaffected by the cell number or the receptor density on the substrate, we attributed it to the possible conformational or local environmental differences of the CD4 antigens between the cell surface and substrate surface. Our results show that the high force resolution and detection efficiency afforded by FIRMS are valuable for studying protein–protein interactions on cell surfaces. PMID:27163031

  14. Probing Kinetic Mechanisms of Protein Function and Folding with Time-Resolved Natural and Magnetic Chiroptical Spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    Kliger, David S.; Chen, Eefei; Goldbeck, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent and ongoing developments in time-resolved spectroscopy have made it possible to monitor circular dichroism, magnetic circular dichroism, optical rotatory dispersion, and magnetic optical rotatory dispersion with nanosecond time resolution. These techniques have been applied to determine structural changes associated with the function of several proteins as well as to determine the nature of early events in protein folding. These studies have required new approaches in triggering protein reactions as well as the development of time-resolved techniques for polarization spectroscopies with sufficient time resolution and sensitivity to probe protein structural changes. PMID:22312279

  15. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy: I. Semimetals and Semiconductors. I. Atom-Resolved Imaging of DNA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Robert James

    1993-01-01

    The topographic and electronic structure of semimetal and semiconductor surfaces were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), respectively. The long-range morphology and atomic -scale characteristics of cleaved materials, including highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG), boronated pyrolitic graphite (BPG), titanium disulfide, and gallium arsenide (GaAs), were revealed by STM performed in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Atom-resolved constant current topographs and current -imaging data, as well as barrier height information, are presented. Both point and line defects were observed on these surfaces. Visual evidence of coulombic screening caused by adsorption of charged species on n-GaAs(110) is provided. On BPG samples, containing up to 0.5% boron, boron substituent atoms appeared as protrusions approximately 3 A in diameter, with a density consistent with the known concentration. The BPG surface contained numerous line defects, including large-angle grain boundaries, and monolayer -deep etch pits. The effects of stress on the morphology of an annealed vicinal Si(111) wafer were explored. The height and orientation of step bunches, as well as terrace widths, on the (7 x 7) surface were determined. Line fault defects at step kinks were observed; theories for the origin and structure of these features based on stress relief are proposed. Current imaging tunneling spectroscopy (CITS) revealed differences between the adatom sites of the (7 x 7) surface. Atom-resolved barrier height images were also obtained. The measured barrier height was seen to depend strongly on the "cleanliness" of the STM tip. In addition, atom-resolved STM images of duplex DNA supported on a HOPG surface were obtained in UHV. These images revealed double-helical structure, major and minor groove alternation, base pairs, and atomic-scale substructure. The DNA dimensions derived from the STM data were in agreement with dimensions from x

  16. Time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy for nondestructive assessment of fruit and vegetable quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torricelli, Alessandro; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Vanoli, Maristella; Rizzolo, Anna; Eccher Zerbini, Paola

    2007-09-01

    In the majority of food and feed, due to the microscopic spatial changes in the refractive index, visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) light undergoes multiple scattering events and the overall light distribution is determined more by scattering rather than absorption. Conventional steady state VIS/NIR reflectance spectroscopy can provide information on light attenuation, which depends both on light absorption and light scattering, but cannot discriminate these two effects. On the contrary, time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy (TRS) provides a complete optical characterisation of diffusive media in terms of their absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient. From the assessment of the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients, information can then be derived on the composition and internal structure of the medium. Main advantages of the technique are the absolute non-invasiveness, the potentiality for non-contact measurements, and the capacity to probe internal properties with no influence from the skin. In this work we review the physical and technical issues related to the use of TRS for nondestructive quality assessment of fruit and vegetable. A laboratory system for broadband TRS, based on tunable mode-locked lasers and fast microchannel plate photomultiplier, and a portable setup for TRS measurements, based on pulsed diode lasers and compact metal-channel photomultiplier, will be described. Results on broadband optical characterisation of fruits and applications of TRS to the detection of internal defects in pears and to maturity assessment in nectarines will be presented.

  17. Cyclohexene Photo-oxidation over Vanadia Catalyst Analyzed by Time Resolved ATR-FT-IR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, Heinz; Mul, Guido; Wasylenko, Walter; Hamdy, M. Sameh; Frei, Heinz

    2008-06-04

    Vanadia was incorporated in the 3-dimensional mesoporous material TUD-1 with a loading of 2percent w/w vanadia. The performance in the selective photo-oxidation of liquid cyclohexene was investigated using ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy. Under continuous illumination at 458 nm a significant amount of product, i.e. cyclohexenone, was identified. This demonstrates for the first time that hydroxylated vanadia centers in mesoporous materials can be activated by visible light to induce oxidation reactions. Using the rapid scan method, a strong perturbation of the vanadyl environment could be observed in the selective oxidation process induced by a 458 nm laser pulse of 480 ms duration. This is proposed to be caused by interaction of the catalytic centre with a cyclohexenyl hydroperoxide intermediate. The restoration of the vanadyl environment could be kinetically correlated to the rate of formation of cyclohexenone, and is explained by molecular rearrangement and dissociation of the peroxide to ketone and water. The ketone diffuses away from the active center and ATR infrared probing zone, resulting in a decreasing ketone signal on the tens of seconds time scale after initiation of the photoreaction. This study demonstrates the high potential of time resolved ATR FT-IR spectroscopy for mechanistic studies of liquid phase reactions by monitoring not only intermediates and products, but by correlating the temporal behavior of these species to molecular changes of the vanadyl catalytic site.

  18. Time-resolved X-ray spectroscopies of chemical systems: New perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Chergui, Majed

    2016-01-01

    The past 3–5 years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of time-resolved X-ray spectroscopic studies, mainly driven by novel technical and methodological developments. The latter include (i) the high repetition rate optical pump/X-ray probe studies, which have greatly boosted the signal-to-noise ratio for picosecond (ps) X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies, while enabling ps X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at synchrotrons; (ii) the X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are a game changer and have allowed the first femtosecond (fs) XES and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering experiments to be carried out; (iii) XFELs are also opening the road to the development of non-linear X-ray methods. In this perspective, I will mainly focus on the most recent technical developments and briefly address some examples of scientific questions that have been addressed thanks to them. I will look at the novel opportunities in the horizon. PMID:27376102

  19. Time-resolved X-ray spectroscopies of chemical systems: New perspectives.

    PubMed

    Chergui, Majed

    2016-05-01

    The past 3-5 years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of time-resolved X-ray spectroscopic studies, mainly driven by novel technical and methodological developments. The latter include (i) the high repetition rate optical pump/X-ray probe studies, which have greatly boosted the signal-to-noise ratio for picosecond (ps) X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies, while enabling ps X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at synchrotrons; (ii) the X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are a game changer and have allowed the first femtosecond (fs) XES and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering experiments to be carried out; (iii) XFELs are also opening the road to the development of non-linear X-ray methods. In this perspective, I will mainly focus on the most recent technical developments and briefly address some examples of scientific questions that have been addressed thanks to them. I will look at the novel opportunities in the horizon. PMID:27376102

  20. Energy resolved electrochemical impedance spectroscopy for electronic structure mapping in organic semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Nádaždy, V. Gmucová, K.; Schauer, F.

    2014-10-06

    We introduce an energy resolved electrochemical impedance spectroscopy method to map the electronic density of states (DOS) in organic semiconductor materials. The method consists in measurement of the charge transfer resistance of a semiconductor/electrolyte interface at a frequency where the redox reactions determine the real component of the impedance. The charge transfer resistance value provides direct information about the electronic DOS at the energy given by the electrochemical potential of the electrolyte, which can be adjusted using an external voltage. A simple theory for experimental data evaluation is proposed, along with an explanation of the corresponding experimental conditions. The method allows mapping over unprecedentedly wide energy and DOS ranges. Also, important DOS parameters can be determined directly from the raw experimental data without the lengthy analysis required in other techniques. The potential of the proposed method is illustrated by tracing weak bond defect states induced by ultraviolet treatment above the highest occupied molecular orbital in a prototypical σ-conjugated polymer, poly[methyl(phenyl)silylene]. The results agree well with those of our previous DOS reconstruction by post-transient space-charge-limited-current spectroscopy, which was, however, limited to a narrow energy range. In addition, good agreement of the DOS values measured on two common π-conjugated organic polymer semiconductors, polyphenylene vinylene and poly(3-hexylthiophene), with the rather rare previously published data demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method.

  1. Dirac Fermions in graphene and graphite---a view from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shuyun

    The research in graphene has exploded in the past few years, due to its intriguing physics as an emerging paradigm for relativistic condensed matter physics as well as its great promise for application in next generation electronics. Understanding the low energy electronic structure of graphene is fundamental as most of the intriguing properties of graphene arise from its peculiar electronic dispersion, which resembles that of relativistic Dirac Fermions. This thesis presents a detailed study of the low energy electronic structure of graphene and its related three dimensional material - graphite - by using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), a direct probe of the electronic structure. In particular, the evolution of the Dirac Fermions in graphene and graphite as well as the effect of impurities is the focus of this thesis. This thesis is organized as follows. The first chapter is an introduction of the electronic structure of graphene and graphite, and the specialty of Dirac fermions compared to quasiparticles in conventional condensed matter systems. Chapter 2 is an introduction of the techniques used throughout this thesis - angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). Chapter 3 discusses the growth and characterization of epitaxial graphene on SiC wafers. Chapters 4 and 5 present the ARPES results on epitaxial graphene, the evolution of the low energy electronic dynamics as a function of sample thickness and how to make graphene a finite band gap semiconductor. More specifically, chapter 4 discusses how a gap is induced between the valence and conduction bands by graphene-substrate interaction and chapter 6 shows how a reversible metal-insulator transition can be possibly induced in epitaxial graphene by hole doping. Chapters 6 and 7 show the ARPES results on three dimensional graphite samples. Chapter 6 shows the coexistence of Dirac fermions with massive

  2. Gauge invariance in the theoretical description of time-resolved angle-resolved pump/probe photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Freericks, J. K.; Krishnamurthy, H. R.; Sentef, M. A.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2015-10-01

    Nonequilibrium calculations in the presence of an electric field are usually performed in a gauge, and need to be transformed to reveal the gauge-invariant observables. In this work, we discuss the issue of gauge invariance in the context of time-resolved angle-resolved pump/probe photoemission. If the probe is applied while the pump is still on, one must ensure that the calculations of the observed photocurrent are gauge invariant. We also discuss the requirement of the photoemission signal to be positive and the relationship of this constraint to gauge invariance. We end by discussing some technical details related to the perturbative derivation of the photoemission spectra, which involve processes where the pump pulse photoexcites electrons due to nonequilibrium effects.

  3. Probing Reaction Dynamics of Transition-Metal Complexes in Solution via Time-Resolved Soft X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Huse, Nils; Kim, Tae Kyu; Khalil, Munira; Jamula, Lindsey; McCusker, James K.; Schoenlein, Robert W.

    2010-05-02

    We report the first time-resolved soft x-ray measurements of solvated transition-metal complexes. L-edge spectroscopy directly probes dynamic changes in ligand-field splitting of 3d orbitals associated with the spin transition, and mediated by changes in ligand-bonding.

  4. SPATIALLY RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF SDSS J0952+2552: A CONFIRMED DUAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS

    SciTech Connect

    McGurk, R. C.; Max, C. E.; Rosario, D. J.; Shields, G. A.; Smith, K. L.; Wright, S. A. E-mail: max@ucolick.org E-mail: shieldsga@mail.utexas.edu E-mail: saw@astro.berkeley.edu

    2011-09-01

    Most massive galaxies contain supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in their cores. When galaxies merge, gas is driven to nuclear regions and can accrete onto the central black hole. Thus, one expects to see dual active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in a fraction of galaxy mergers. Candidates for galaxies containing dual AGNs have been identified by the presence of double-peaked narrow [O III] emission lines and by high spatial resolution images of close galaxy pairs. Spatially resolved spectroscopy is needed to confirm these galaxy pairs as systems with spatially separated double SMBHs. With the Keck 2 Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system and the OH Suppressing InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph near-infrared integral field spectrograph, we obtained spatially resolved spectra for SDSS J09527.62+255257.2, a radio-quiet quasar shown by previous imaging to consist of a galaxy and its close (1.''0) companion. We find that the main galaxy is a Type 1 AGN with both broad and narrow AGN emission lines in its spectrum, while the companion galaxy is a Type 2 AGN with narrow emission lines only. The two AGNs are separated by 4.8 kpc, and their redshifts correspond to those of the double peaks of the [O III] emission line seen in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum. Line diagnostics indicate that both components of the double emission lines are due to AGN photoionization. These results confirm that J0952+2552 contains two spatially separated AGNs. As one of the few confirmed dual AGNs at an intermediate separation of <10 kpc, this system offers a unique opportunity to study galaxy mergers and their effect on black hole growth.

  5. Studies of Minerals, Organic and Biogenic Materials through Time-Resolved Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Christopher S.; Abedin, M. Nurul; Ismail, Syed; Sharma, Shiv K.; Misra, Anupam K.; Nyugen, Trac; Elsayed-Ali, hani

    2009-01-01

    A compact remote Raman spectroscopy system was developed at NASA Langley Research center and was previously demonstrated for its ability to identify chemical composition of various rocks and minerals. In this study, the Raman sensor was utilized to perform time-resolved Raman studies of various samples such as minerals and rocks, Azalea leaves and a few fossil samples. The Raman sensor utilizes a pulsed 532 nm Nd:YAG laser as excitation source, a 4-inch telescope to collect the Raman-scattered signal from a sample several meters away, a spectrograph equipped with a holographic grating, and a gated intensified CCD (ICCD) camera system. Time resolved Raman measurements were carried out by varying the gate delay with fixed short gate width of the ICCD camera, allowing measurement of both Raman signals and fluorescence signals. Rocks and mineral samples were characterized including marble, which contain CaCO3. Analysis of the results reveals the short (approx.10-13 s) lifetime of the Raman process, and shows that Raman spectra of some mineral samples contain fluorescence emission due to organic impurities. Also analyzed were a green (pristine) and a yellow (decayed) sample of Gardenia leaves. It was observed that the fluorescence signals from the green and yellow leaf samples showed stronger signals compared to the Raman lines. Moreover, it was also observed that the fluorescence of the green leaf was more intense and had a shorter lifetime than that of the yellow leaf. For the fossil samples, Raman shifted lines could not be observed due the presence of very strong short-lived fluorescence.

  6. Catalysts at work: From integral to spatially resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Kimmerle, Bertram; Baiker, Alfons; Boye, Pit; Schroer, Christian G.; Glatzel, Pieter; Borca, Camelia N.; Beckmann, Felix

    2009-09-25

    Spectroscopic studies on heterogeneous catalysts have mostly been done in an integral mode. However, in many cases spatial variations in catalyst structure can occur, e.g. during impregnation of pre-shaped particles, during reaction in a catalytic reactor, or in microstructured reactors as the present overview shows. Therefore, spatially resolved molecular information on a microscale is required for a comprehensive understanding of theses systems, partly in ex situ studies, partly under stationary reaction conditions and in some cases even under dynamic reaction conditions. Among the different available techniques, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a well-suited tool for this purpose as the different selected examples highlight. Two different techniques, scanning and full-field X-ray microscopy/tomography, are described and compared. At first, the tomographic structure of impregnated alumina pellets is presented using full-field transmission microtomography and compared to the results obtained with a scanning X-ray microbeam technique to analyse the catalyst bed inside a catalytic quartz glass reactor. On the other hand, by using XAS in scanning microtomography, the structure and the distribution of Cu(0), Cu(I), Cu(II) species in a Cu/ZnO catalyst loaded in a quartz capillary microreactor could be reconstructed quantitatively on a virtual section through the reactor. An illustrating example for spatially resolved XAS under reaction conditions is the partial oxidation of methane over noble metal-based catalysts. In order to obtain spectroscopic information on the spatial variation of the oxidation state of the catalyst inside the reactor XAS spectra were recorded by scanning with a micro-focussed beam along the catalyst bed. Alternatively, full-field transmission imaging was used to efficiently determine the distribution of the oxidation state of a catalyst inside a reactor under reaction conditions. The new technical approaches together with quantitative data

  7. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26798792

  8. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also presentmore » data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.« less

  9. Cerebral oxygenation monitoring during cardiac bypass surgery in infants with broad band spatially resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soschinski, Jan; Ben Mine, Lofti; Geraskin, Dmitri; Bennink, Gerardus; Kohl-Bareis, Matthias

    2007-07-01

    Neurological impairments following cardio-pulmonary bypass (CPB) during open heart surgery can result from microembolism and ischaemia. Here we present results from monitoring cerebral haemodynamics during CPB with near infrared spatially resolved broadband spectroscopy. In particular, the study has the objective (a) to monitor oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations (oxy-Hb, deoxy-Hb) and their changes as well as oxygen saturation during CPB surgery and (b) to develop and test algorithms for the calculation of these parameters from broad band spectroscopy. For this purpose a detection system was developed based on an especially designed lens imaging spectrograph with optimised sensitivity of recorded reflectance spectra for wavelengths between 600 and 1000 nm. The high f/#-number of 1:1.2 of the system results in about a factor of 10 higher light throughput combined with a lower astigmatism and crosstalk between channels when compared with a commercial mirror spectrometers (f/# = 1:4). For both hemispheres two independent channels each with three source-detector distances (ρ = 25 . 35 mm) were used resulting in six spectra. The broad band approach allows to investigate the influence of the wavelength range on the calculated haemoglobin concentrations and their changes and oxygen saturation when the attenuation A(λ) and its slope ΔA(λ)/Δρ are evaluated. Furthermore, the different depth sensitivities of these measurement parameters are estimated from Monte Carlo simulations and exploited for an optimization of the cerebral signals. It is demonstrated that the system does record cerebral oxygenation parameters during CPB in infants. In particular, the correlation of haemoglobin concentrations with blood supply (flow, pressure) by the heart-lung machine and the significant decreases in oxygen saturation during cardiac arrest is discussed.

  10. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26798792

  11. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  12. Real-time TDDFT simulations of time-resolved core-level spectroscopies in solid state systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pemmaraju, Sri Chaitanya Das; Prendergast, David; Theory of Nanostructured Materials Facility Team

    The advent of sub-femtosecond time-resolved core-level spectroscopies based on high harmonic generated XUV pulses has enabled the study of electron dyanamics on characteristic femtosecond time-scales. Unambiguous interpretation of these powerful yet complex spectroscopies however requires the development of theoretical algorithms capable of modeling light-matter interaction across a wide energy range spanning both valence and core orbitals. In this context we present a recent implementation of the velocity-gauge formalism of real-time TDDFT within a linear combination of atomic orbital (LCAO) framework, which facilitates efficient numerical treatment of localized semi-core orbitals. Dynamics and spectra obtained from LCAO based simulations are compared to those from a real-space grid implementation. Potential applications are also illustrated by applying the method towards interpreting recent atto-second time-resolved IR-pump XUV-probe spectroscopies investigating sub-cycle excitation dynamics in bulk silicon.

  13. Resolving dual binding conformations of cellulosome cohesin-dockerin complexes using single-molecule force spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jobst, Markus A; Milles, Lukas F; Schoeler, Constantin; Ott, Wolfgang; Fried, Daniel B; Bayer, Edward A; Gaub, Hermann E; Nash, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Receptor-ligand pairs are ordinarily thought to interact through a lock and key mechanism, where a unique molecular conformation is formed upon binding. Contrary to this paradigm, cellulosomal cohesin-dockerin (Coh-Doc) pairs are believed to interact through redundant dual binding modes consisting of two distinct conformations. Here, we combined site-directed mutagenesis and single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) to study the unbinding of Coh:Doc complexes under force. We designed Doc mutations to knock out each binding mode, and compared their single-molecule unfolding patterns as they were dissociated from Coh using an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever. Although average bulk measurements were unable to resolve the differences in Doc binding modes due to the similarity of the interactions, with a single-molecule method we were able to discriminate the two modes based on distinct differences in their mechanical properties. We conclude that under native conditions wild-type Doc from Clostridium thermocellum exocellulase Cel48S populates both binding modes with similar probabilities. Given the vast number of Doc domains with predicteddual binding modes across multiple bacterial species, our approach opens up newpossibilities for understanding assembly and catalytic properties of a broadrange of multi-enzyme complexes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10319.001 PMID:26519733

  14. Fast Pyrolysis of Wood for Biofuels: Spatiotemporally Resolved Diffuse Reflectance In situ Spectroscopy of Particles.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Alex D; Hough, Blake R; Williams, C Luke; Teixeira, Andrew R; Schwartz, Daniel T; Pfaendtner, Jim; Dauenhauer, Paul J

    2014-02-20

    Fast pyrolysis of woody biomass is a promising process capable of producing renewable transportation fuels to replace gasoline, diesel, and chemicals currently derived from nonrenewable sources. However, biomass pyrolysis is not yet economically viable and requires significant optimization before it can contribute to the existing oil-based transportation system. One method of optimization uses detailed kinetic models for predicting the products of biomass fast pyrolysis, which serve as the basis for the design of pyrolysis reactors capable of producing the highest value products. The goal of this work is to improve upon current pyrolysis models, usually derived from experiments with low heating rates and temperatures, by developing models that account for both transport and pyrolysis decomposition kinetics at high heating rates and high temperatures (>400 °C). A new experimental technique is proposed herein: spatiotemporally resolved diffuse reflectance in situ spectroscopy of particles (STR-DRiSP), which is capable of measuring biomass composition during fast pyrolysis with high spatial (10 μm) and temporal (1 ms) resolution. Compositional data were compared with a comprehensive 2D single-particle model, which incorporated a multistep, semiglobal reaction mechanism, prescribed particle shrinkage, and thermophysical properties that varied with temperature, composition, and orientation. The STR-DRiSP technique can be used to determine the transport-limited kinetic parameters of biomass decomposition for a wide variety of biomass feedstocks. PMID:24678023

  15. [Photodissociation of Acetylene and Acetone using Step-Scan Time-Resolved FTIR Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLaren, Ian A.; Wrobel, Jacek D.

    1997-01-01

    The photodissociation of acetylene and acetone was investigated as a function of added quenching gas pressures using step-scan time-resolved FTIR emission spectroscopy. Its main components consist of Bruker IFS88, step-scan Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer coupled to a flow cell equipped with Welsh collection optics. Vibrationally excited C2H radicals were produced from the photodissociation of acetylene in the unfocused experiments. The infrared (IR) emission from these excited C2H radicals was investigated as a function of added argon pressure. Argon quenching rate constants for all C2H emission bands are of the order of 10(exp -13)cc/molecule.sec. Quenching of these radicals by acetylene is efficient, with a rate constant in the range of 10(exp -11) cc/molecule.sec. The relative intensity of the different C2H emission bands did not change with the increasing argon or acetylene pressure. However, the overall IR emission intensity decreased, for example, by more than 50% when the argon partial pressure was raised from 0.2 to 2 Torr at fixed precursor pressure of 160mTorr. These observations provide evidence for the formation of a metastable C2H2 species, which are collisionally quenched by argon or acetylene. Problems encountered in the course of the experimental work are also described.

  16. Optical analysis of cirrhotic liver by near infrared time resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Toshihiro; Kitai, Toshiyuki; Miwa, Mitsuharu; Takahashi, Rei; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    1999-10-01

    The severity of liver cirrhosis was related with the optical properties of liver tissue. Various grades of liver cirrhosis were produced in rats by intraperitoneal injection of thioacetamide (TAA) for different periods: 4 weeks, 8 weeks, 12 weeks, and 16 weeks. Optical properties of the liver, absorption, coefficient ((mu) a) and scattering coefficient (microsecond(s) '), were measured by near-infrared time- resolved spectroscopy. Histological examination confirmed cirrhotic changes in the liver, which were more severe in rats with TAA administration for longer periods. The (mu) a increased in 4- and 8-week rats, and then decreased in 12- and 16-week rats. The (mu) a of blood-free liver decreased as liver cirrhosis progressed. The hemoglobin content in the liver calculated from the (mu) a values increased in 4- and 8-week rats and decreased in 12- and 16-week rats. The microsecond(s) ' decreased in the cirrhotic liver, probably reflecting the decrease in the mitochondria content. It was shown that (mu) a and microsecond(s) ' determination is useful to assess the severity of liver cirrhosis.

  17. Time-resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy for Electron Transport Study in Warm Dense Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Won; Bae, Leejin; Engelhorn, Kyle; Heimann, Philip; Ping, Yuan; Barbrel, Ben; Fernandez, Amalia; Beckwith, Martha Anne; Cho, Byoung-Ick; GIST Team; IBS Team; LBNL Collaboration; SLAC Collaboration; LLNL Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The warm dense Matter represents states of which the temperature is comparable to Fermi energy and ions are strongly coupled. One of the experimental techniques to create such state in the laboratory condition is the isochoric heating of thin metal foil with femtosecond laser pulses. This concept largely relies on the ballistic transport of electrons near the Fermi-level, which were mainly studied for the metals in ambient conditions. However, they were barely investigated in warm dense conditions. We present a time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy measured for the Au/Cu dual layered sample. The front Au layer was isochorically heated with a femtosecond laser pulse, and the x-ray absorption changes around L-edge of Cu, which was attached on the backside of Au, was measured with a picosecond resolution. Time delays between the heating of the `front surface' of Au layer and the alternation of x-ray spectrum of Cu attached on the `rear surface' of Au indicate the energetic electron transport mechanism through Au in the warm dense conditions. IBS (IBS-R012-D1) and the NRF (No. 2013R1A1A1007084) of Korea.

  18. Time-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Dissociating 1,2-Butadiene Molecules by High Harmonic Pulses.

    PubMed

    Iikubo, Ryo; Fujiwara, Takehisa; Sekikawa, Taro; Harabuchi, Yu; Satoh, Sota; Taketsugu, Tetsuya; Kayanuma, Yosuke

    2015-07-01

    Using 42 nm high harmonic pulses, the dissociation dynamics of 1,2-butadiene was investigated by time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES), enabling us to observe dynamical changes of multiple molecular orbitals (MOs) with higher temporal resolution than conventional light sources. Because each lower-lying occupied MO has particular spatial electron distribution, the structural dynamics of photochemical reaction can be revealed. On the femtosecond time scale, a short-lived excited state with a lifetime of 37 ± 15 fs and the coherent oscillation of the photoelectron yield stimulated by Hertzberg-Teller coupling were observed. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations in the electronically excited state find three relaxation pathways from the vertically excited structure in S1 to the ground state, and one of them is the dominant relaxation pathway, observed as the short-lived excited state. On the picosecond time scale, the photoelectron yields related to the C-C bond decreased upon photoexcitation, indicating C-C bond cleavage. PMID:26266720

  19. Lasing dynamics study by femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence non-collinear optical parametric amplification spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Dang; Qing, Liao; Peng-Cheng, Mao; Hong-Bing, Fu; Yu-Xiang, Weng

    2016-05-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence non-collinear optical parametric amplification spectroscopy (FNOPAS) is a versatile technique with advantages of high sensitivity, broad detection bandwidth, and intrinsic spectrum correction function. These advantages should benefit the study of coherent emission, such as measurement of lasing dynamics. In this letter, the FNOPAS was used to trace the lasing process in Rhodamine 6G (R6G) solution and organic semiconductor nano-wires. High-quality transient emission spectra and lasing dynamic traces were acquired, which demonstrates the applicability of FNOPAS in the study of lasing dynamics. Our work extends the application scope of the FNOPAS technique. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 20925313 and 21503066), the Innovation Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. KJCX2-YW-W25), the Postdoctoral Project of Hebei University, China, and the Project of Science and Technology Bureau of Baoding City, China (Grant No. 15ZG029).

  20. Toward reliable retrieval of functional information of papillary dermis using spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Guo, Jun-Yen; Tzeng, Shih-Yu; Chou, Ting-Chun; Lin, Ming-Jen; Huang, Lynn Ling-Huei; Yang, Chao-Chun; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2016-02-01

    Spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (SRDRS) has been employed to quantify tissue optical properties and its interrogation volume is majorly controlled by the source-to-detector separations (SDSs). To noninvasively quantify properties of dermis, a SRDRS setup that includes SDS shorter than 1 mm is required. It will be demonstrated in this study that Monte Carlo simulations employing the Henyey-Greenstein phase function cannot always precisely predict experimentally measured diffuse reflectance at such short SDSs, and we speculated this could be caused by the non-negligible backward light scattering at short SDSs that cannot be properly modeled by the Henyey-Greenstein phase function. To accurately recover the optical properties and functional information of dermis using SRDRS, we proposed the use of the modified two-layer (MTL) geometry. Monte Carlo simulations and phantom experiment results revealed that the MTL probing geometry was capable of faithfully recovering the optical properties of upper dermis. The capability of the MTL geometry in probing the upper dermis properties was further verified through a swine study, and it was found that the measurement results were reasonably linked to histological findings. Finally, the MTL probe was utilized to study psoriatic lesions. Our results showed that the MTL probe was sensitive to the physiological condition of tissue volumes within the papillary dermis and could be used in studying the physiology of psoriasis. PMID:26977361

  1. Reactivity of Binuclear Tantalum Clusters on Silica: Characterization by Transient Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nemana, Sailendra; Sun, Junming; Gates, Bruce C.

    2008-05-08

    Binuclear tantalum clusters were synthesized from Ta(CH{sub 2}Ph){sub 5} (Ph is phenyl) on the surface of nonporous SiO{sub 2} (Aerosil), and their reactions with H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and ethylene were characterized by time-resolved infrared (IR), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopies. The EXAFS data indicate the formation in H{sub 2} of clusters with a Ta-Ta coordination number of approximately 1 and a bonding distance of 2.74 {angstrom}. Reactions of the supported clusters with D{sub 2} and H{sub 2} facilitate the interconversion of O-H and O-D groups on the SiO{sub 2} surface. Reaction of these clusters with ethylene led to their rapid fragmentation to give mononuclear tantalum complexes, as the tantalum was oxidized and new ligands formed, suggested by IR spectra to be ethyl. The results demonstrate a rough analogy between the chemistry of tantalum clusters on the SiO{sub 2} surface and their chemistry in solution. Because alkenes are suggested intermediates in the catalytic disproportionation of alkanes on supported tantalum, our results indicate how these intermediates might influence the nature of the catalytically active species.

  2. A compact time-resolved system for near infrared spectroscopy based on wavelength space multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re, Rebecca; Contini, Davide; Caffini, Matteo; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Torricelli, Alessandro

    2010-11-01

    We designed and developed a compact dual-wavelength and dual-channel time-resolved system for near-infrared spectroscopy studies of muscle and brain. The system employs pulsed diode lasers as sources, compact photomultipliers, and time-correlated single photon counting boards for detection. To exploit the full temporal and dynamic range of the acquisition technique, we implemented an approach based on wavelength space multiplexing: laser pulses at the two wavelengths are alternatively injected into the two channels by means of an optical 2×2 switch. In each detection line (i.e., in each temporal window), the distribution of photon time-of-flights at one wavelength is acquired. The proposed approach increases the signal-to-noise ratio and avoids wavelength cross-talk with respect to the typical approach based on time multiplexing. The instrument was characterized on tissue phantoms to assess its properties in terms of linearity, stability, noise, and reproducibility. Finally, it was successfully tested in preliminary in vivo measurements on muscle during standard cuff occlusion and on the brain during a motor cortex response due to hand movements.

  3. Spatially resolved spectroscopy for nondestructive quality measurements of Braeburn apples cultivated in sub-fertilization condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen Do Trong, Nghia; Erkinbaev, Chyngyz; Nicolaï, Bart; Saeys, Wouter; Tsuta, Mizuki; De Baerdemaeker, Josse

    2013-05-01

    A contact spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS) setup based on a fiber-optics probe in the Vis/NIR range (400-1000 nm) was developed, calibrated, and validated for its measurements and optical properties estimation by means of a metamodeling method on a set of liquid optical phantoms. Thirty Braeburn apples cultivated in sub-fertilization condition were harvested and measured before and after shelf-life storage (2 weeks at 18 °C) by the setup and were analyzed for quality attributes (firmness and soluble solids contents (SSC)) by destructive reference methods. Estimated optical properties (absorption and reduced scattering coefficients) acquired from SRS measurements at the beginning and the end of the shelf-life indicated changes in chemical composition of the apples. Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR) was employed to construct calibration models relating the estimated optical properties to the reference quality attributes. The constructed PLS models based on the absorption coefficient spectra gave good prediction performance for the quality attributes of the apples in the validation set with correlation coefficients r of 0.901 and r of 0.844, respectively for SSC and firmness. The obtained results clearly show the potential of the SRS measurements for nondestructive quality evaluation of apples.

  4. Time-Resolved Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of the Missing Link Pulsar/LMXB PSR J1023

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knigge, Christian

    2013-10-01

    PSR J1023 is one of only three known ''missing link'' binary pulsars. These systems have been observed to switch at least once between a milli-second pulsar {MSP} state and a low-mass X-ray binary {LMXB} state. PSR J1023, in particular, was originally classified as an LMXB, but later {re-}discovered as a diskless 1.7 ms MSP. In June 2013, the system transitioned back to its X-ray- and optically bright LMXB state. There is an ongoing extensive X-ray, radio and optical monitoring campaign, but the critical ultraviolet {UV} waveband has so far remained largely unexplored. Since the system could return to a long-lasting low state at any time, and since the UV capability offered by HST may not be available for much longer, we here request DD time to obtain time-resolved UV spectroscopy of this system before it fades into the MSP state again. These observations will allow us to: {i} measure the spectral energy distribution of the accretion disk; {ii} search for evidence of an accretion disk wind; {iii} search for UV variability, including UV pulsations on the neutron star spin period; {iv} determine the reddening and extinction towards the system, and hence its luminosity and mass accretion rate.

  5. Noninvasive detection of concealed explosives: depth profiling through opaque plastics by time-resolved Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Petterson, Ingeborg E Iping; López-López, María; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Gooijer, Cees; Buijs, Joost B; Ariese, Freek

    2011-11-15

    The detection of explosives concealed behind opaque, diffusely scattering materials is a challenge that requires noninvasive analytical techniques for identification without having to manipulate the package. In this context, this study focuses on the application of time-resolved Raman spectroscopy (TRRS) with a picosecond pulsed laser and an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) detector for the noninvasive identification of explosive materials through several millimeters of opaque polymers or plastic packaging materials. By means of a short (250 ps) gate which can be delayed several hundred picoseconds after the laser pulse, the ICCD detector allows for the temporal discrimination between photons from the surface of a sample and those from deeper layers. TRRS was applied for the detection of the two main isomers of dinitrotoluene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, and 2,6-dinitrotoluene as well as for various other components of explosive mixtures, including akardite II, diphenylamine, and ethyl centralite. Spectra were obtained through different diffuse scattering white polymer materials: polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polyoxymethylene (POM), and polyethylene (PE). Common packaging materials of various thicknesses were also selected, including polystyrene (PS) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). With the demonstration of the ability to detect concealed, explosives-related compounds through an opaque first layer, this study may have important applications in the security and forensic fields. PMID:21967622

  6. Adsorption of Uranyl on Gibbsite: A Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Hyun-shik; Korshin, Gregory V.; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.

    2006-02-15

    Uranyl adsorbed on gibbsite at pH 4.0-8.0 and ionic strengths (ISs) 0.001-0.4 M (NaClO4) in the absence of carbonate was studied using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLIFS) under cryogenic conditions. TRLIFS data showed the presence of several distinct emission components. Their contributions were determined using the evolving factor analysis approach. Four components denoted as species A, B, C, and D were discerned. Each of them was characterized by a characteristic response to pH and IS changes and also by a unique combination of the values of the fundamental transition energy E0,0, vibronic spacing E, and half-width of the vibronic lines W. Species A and B were major contributors to the overall emission. They were mainly affected by the pH and predominated below and above pH 5.0, respectively. In contrast with that, the contribution of species C was noticeable only at IS = 0.001 M, while it was suppressed or absent at high IS values. It was concluded that species A and B are likely to correspond to inner-sphere surface aluminol complexes AlO-(UO2)+ and AlO-(UO2)OH, while species C was hypothesized to correspond to electrostatically bound uranyl complexes (predominantly [UO2(OH)3]-).

  7. DARK MATTER SUBSTRUCTURE DETECTION USING SPATIALLY RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF LENSED DUSTY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hezaveh, Yashar; Holder, Gilbert; Dalal, Neal; Kuhlen, Michael; Marrone, Daniel; Murray, Norman; Vieira, Joaquin

    2013-04-10

    We investigate how strong lensing of dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) by foreground galaxies can be used as a probe of dark matter halo substructure. We find that spatially resolved spectroscopy of lensed sources allows dramatic improvements to measurements of lens parameters. In particular, we find that modeling of the full, three-dimensional (angular position and radial velocity) data can significantly facilitate substructure detection, increasing the sensitivity of observables to lower mass subhalos. We carry out simulations of lensed dusty sources observed by early ALMA (Cycle 1) and use a Fisher matrix analysis to study the parameter degeneracies and mass detection limits of this method. We find that even with conservative assumptions, it is possible to detect galactic dark matter subhalos of {approx}10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} with high significance in most lensed DSFGs. Specifically, we find that in typical DSFG lenses, there is a {approx}55% probability of detecting a substructure with M > 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} with more than 5{sigma} detection significance in each lens, if the abundance of substructure is consistent with previous lensing results. The full ALMA array, with its significantly enhanced sensitivity and resolution, should improve these estimates considerably. Given the sample of {approx}100 lenses provided by surveys such as the South Pole Telescope, our understanding of dark matter substructure in typical galaxy halos is poised to improve dramatically over the next few years.

  8. Ultrafast protein dynamics of hemoglobin as studied by picosecond time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Yasuhisa; Nagai, Masako

    2012-03-01

    Time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy on human adult hemoglobin (HbA) following ligand photolysis revealed that the frequency of the iron-histidine stretching [ν(Fe-His)] mode exhibited a 2-cm-1 downshift with a time constant of about 300 ps, suggesting a structural change in the heme pocket following the ligand photolysis. Low-frequency heme modes suggested that the primary metastable form of HbA has a more disordered orientation of propionates and a less strained environment than the deoxy form. The latter fact is consistent with the experimental observation that the ν(Fe-His) frequency of the metastable form is higher than the deoxy form. The present study shows that HbA adopts a metastable structure within the instrument response time and remains little changed in the subnanosecond to nanosecond time regime. Characteristics of the primary protein response of HbA based on the comparison of the results of HbA with those of the isolated chains and myoglobin are discussed.

  9. Investigation of microstructure in additive manufactured Inconel 625 by spatially resolved neutron transmission spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tremsin, Anton S.; Gao, Yan; Dial, Laura C.; Grazzi, Francesco; Shinohara, Takenao

    2016-07-08

    Non-destructive testing techniques based on neutron imaging and diffraction can provide information on the internal structure of relatively thick metal samples (up to several cm), which are opaque to other conventional non-destructive methods. Spatially resolved neutron transmission spectroscopy is an extension of traditional neutron radiography, where multiple images are acquired simultaneously, each corresponding to a narrow range of energy. The analysis of transmission spectra enables studies of bulk microstructures at the spatial resolution comparable to the detector pixel. In this study we demonstrate the possibility of imaging (with ~100 μm resolution) distribution of some microstructure properties, such as residual strain,more » texture, voids and impurities in Inconel 625 samples manufactured with an additive manufacturing method called direct metal laser melting (DMLM). Although this imaging technique can be implemented only in a few large-scale facilities, it can be a valuable tool for optimization of additive manufacturing techniques and materials and for correlating bulk microstructure properties to manufacturing process parameters. Additionally, the experimental strain distribution can help validate finite element models which many industries use to predict the residual stress distributions in additive manufactured components.« less

  10. Time-resolved spectroscopy of mitochondria, cells and tissues under normal and pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Beauvoit, B; Chance, B

    1998-07-01

    In this study, the detailed dependence of light scattering on tissue architecture and intracellular composition has been investigated. Firstly, we simulated the reduced scattering coefficient (mu(s)') of the rat liver using the Mie theory, the Rayleigh-Debye-Gans approximation and electron microscopy data. Then, the reduced scattering coefficient of isolated rat liver mitochondria, isolated hepatocytes and various rat tissues (i.e. perfused liver, brain, muscle, tumors) was measured at 780 nm by using time-resolved spectroscopy and a sample-substitution protocol. The comparison of the isolated mitochondria data with the isolated hepatocyte and whole liver measurements suggests that the mitochondrial compartment is the primary factor for light propagation in hepatic tissue, thus strengthening the relevance of the preliminary theoretical study. Nevertheless, the possibility that other intracellular components, such as peroxisomes and lysosomes, interfere with light propagation in rat liver is discussed. Finally, we demonstrate that light scattering in normal rat tissues and tumors is roughly proportional to the mitochondrial content, according to estimates of the mitochondrial protein content of the tissues. PMID:9746339

  11. Lifetime-resolved photoacoustic (LPA) spectroscopy for monitoring oxygen change and photodynamic therapy (PDT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Janggun; Lee, Chang Heon; Kopelman, Raoul; Wang, Xueding

    2016-03-01

    The Methylene Blue loaded Polyacrylamide Nanoparticles (MB-PAA NPs) are used for oxygen sensing and Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a promising therapeutic modality employed for various tumors, with distinct advantages of delivery of biomedical agents and protection from other bio-molecules overcoming inherent limitations of molecular dyes. Lifetime-resolved photoacoustic spectroscopy using quenched-phosphorescence method is applied with MB-PAA NPs so as to sense oxygen, while the same light source is used for PDT. The dye is excited by absorbing 650 nm wavelength light from a pump laser to reach triplet state. The probe laser at 810 nm wavelength is used to excite the first triplet state at certain delayed time to measure the dye lifetime which indicates oxygen concentration. The 9L cells (106 cells/ml) incubated with MB-PAA NP solution are used for monitoring oxygen level change during PDT in situ test. The oxygen level and PDT efficacy are confirmed with a commercial oximeter, and fluorescence microscope imaging and flow cytometry results. This technique with the MB-PAA NPs allowed us to demonstrate a potential non-invasive theragnostic operation, by monitoring oxygen depletion during PDT in situ, without the addition of secondary probes. Here, we demonstrate this theragnostic operation, in vitro, performing PDT while monitoring oxygen depletion. We also show the correlation between O2 depletion and cell death.

  12. RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF A BROWN DWARF BINARY AT THE T DWARF/Y DWARF TRANSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Burgasser, Adam J.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Cushing, Michael C.

    2012-01-20

    We report resolved near-infrared imaging and spectroscopic observations of the T8.5 binary WISEP J045853.90+643452.6AB obtained with Keck/NIRC2, Keck/OSIRIS, and the Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system. These data confirm common proper and radial motion for the two components, and we see the first indications of orbital motion (mostly radial) for this system. H-band spectroscopy identifies both components as very late type brown dwarfs with strong H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} absorption. The spectrum of WISE J0458+6434B also exhibits a compelling signature of NH{sub 3} absorption over 1.52-1.54 {mu}m when compared to the T9 dwarf UGPS J072227.51-054031.2. Comparison to T8-Y0 spectral standards and H-band spectral indices indicate classifications of T8.5 and T9.5 for these two components, approaching the boundary between the T dwarf and Y dwarf spectral classes.

  13. Spatially resolved spectroscopy of WR ring nebulae. I - NGC 2359 and RCW 78

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, C.; Vilchez, J. M.; Manchado, A.; Edmunds, M. G.

    1990-01-01

    We report detailed spatially resolved spectroscopy of the WR nebulae NGC 2359 and RCW 78 surrounding the WN 5 HD 56925 and WN 8 HD 117688 stars. The aim of this work has been to study possible abundance inhomogeneities and the ionization structure of the nebulae, as well as to derive reliable values for the degree of self-enrichment. In NGC 2359 the derived ratio O2+/O+ shows localized variations resulting from the compression of the gas in the filaments with respect to the shell gas. Effective temperatures for the central stars of both nebulae have been estimated on the basis of the ionization structure; the values found appear appropriate for their spectral types. Abundances of O/H, NIH, Ne/H, and He/H have been determined in twelve different positions in NGC 2359, covering its different morphological zones. No significant differences in the N/H and O/H abundances across the nebula have been found, although He/H shows marginal evidence for localized enhancements. In the case of RCW 78 the derived value of O/H is roughly solar, but He/H and NIH may be slightly overabundant. The results suggest that the amount of chemical self-enrichment of these WR nebulae is, at most, small.

  14. Quantification of ischemic muscle deoxygenation by near infrared time-resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaoka, Takatumi; Katsumura, Toshihito; Murase, Norio; Nishio, Shinya; Osada, Takuya; Sako, Takayuki; Higuchi, Hiroyuki; Kurosawa, Yuko; Shimomitsu, Teruichi; Miwa, Mitsuharu; Chance, Britton

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify muscle deoxygenation in human skeletal muscles using near infrared time-resolved spectroscopy (NIRTRS) and compare NIRTRS indicators and blood saturation. The forearm muscles of five healthy males (aged 27 - 32 yrs.) were monitored for changes in hemoglobin saturation (SO2) during 12 min of arterial occlusion and recovery. SO2 was determined by measuring the temporal profile of photon diffusion at 780 and 830 nm using NIRTRS, and was defined as SO2-TRS. Venous blood samples were also obtained for measurements of SvO2, and PvO2. Interstitial PO2(PintO2) was monitored by placing an O2 electrode directly into the muscle tissue. Upon the initiation of occlusion, all parameters fell progressively until reaching a plateau in the latter half of occlusion. It was observed at the end of occlusion that SO2-TRS (24.1 +/- 5.6%) agreed with SvO2 (26.2 +/- 6.4) and that PintO2 (14.7 +/- 1.0 Torr) agreed with PvO2 (17.3 +/- 2.2 Torr). The resting O2 store (oxygenated hemoglobin) and O2 consumption rate were 290 (mu) M and 0.82 (mu) Ms-1, respectively, values which reasonably agree with the reported results. These results indicate that there was no O2 gradient between vessels and interstisium at the end of occlusion.

  15. Time-resolved fluorescence polarization spectroscopy of visible and near infrared dyes in picosecond dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) dyes absorb and emit light within the range from 700 to 900 nm have several benefits in biological studies for one- and/or two-photon excitation for deeper penetration of tissues. These molecules undergo vibrational and rotational motion in the relaxation of the excited electronic states, Due to the less than ideal anisotropy behavior of NIR dyes stemming from the fluorophores elongated structures and short fluorescence lifetime in picosecond range, no significant efforts have been made to recognize the theory of these dyes in time-resolved polarization dynamics. In this study, the depolarization of the fluorescence due to emission from rotational deactivation in solution will be measured with the excitation of a linearly polarized femtosecond laser pulse and a streak camera. The theory, experiment and application of the ultrafast fluorescence polarization dynamics and anisotropy are illustrated with examples of two of the most important medical based dyes. One is NIR dye, namely Indocyanine Green (ICG) and is compared with Fluorescein which is in visible range with much longer lifetime. A set of first-order linear differential equations was developed to model fluorescence polarization dynamics of NIR dye in picosecond range. Using this model, the important parameters of ultrafast polarization spectroscopy were identified: risetime, initial time, fluorescence lifetime, and rotation times.

  16. Local resolved spectroscopy at the human ocular fundus in vivo: technique and clinical examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Martin; Schweitzer, Dietrich; Scibor, Mateusz

    1996-01-01

    Ocular fundus reflectometry is known as a method for the determination of the optical density of pigments at the eye ground. This has been described for diagnostic investigations at single locations. The new technique of imaging spectroscopy enables the recording of one dimensional local distribution of spectra from the fundus which is illuminated confocal to the entrance slit of a spectrograph. A fundus reflectometer consisting of a Zeiss fundus camera, an imaging spectrograph, and an intensified CCD-camera are presented. The local resolved spectra gained by this apparatus are approximated by a mathematical model on the basis of the anatomy of the fundus as a structure of layers with different optical properties. Each spectrum is assumed to be described by a function of the absorption spectra of the pigments found in the retinal and choroidal tissue. Assuming the existence of parameters which are independent from the fundus location we have to approximate the measured local distribution of spectra by a system of coupled non-linear equations. By a least square fit the local distribution of the extinction of melanin, xantophyll and hemoglobin may be obtained as well as the extension of pathologic alterations at the fundus. The benefits of the method for clinical diagnostics are discussed at first measurements from physiological and pathological examples.

  17. Spatially resolved Brillouin spectroscopy for in vivo determination of the biomechanical properties of the crystalline lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachs, Oliver; Reiß, Stephan; Guthoff, Rudolf; Stolz, Heinrich

    2012-03-01

    Confocal Brillouin spectroscopy is an innovative measurement method for the noninvasive determination of rheological tissue properties. Its application in ophthalmology can offer the possibility to determine in vivo the deformation properties of eye lens with spatial resolution. This seems to be a promising approach concerning current presbyopia research. Due to the spatially resolved detection of the viscoelastic lens properties, a better understanding of the natural aging process of the lens and the influences of different lens opacities on the stiffness is expected. Based on spectral data the refractive index profile, the protein concentration and the density profile within the lens tissue can be derived. A measurement set-up for confocal Brillouin microscopy based on spectral analysis of spontaneous Brillouin scattering signals by using a high-resolution dispersive device is presented. First in vivo measurements results on rabbit eyes are presented and evaluated concerning refractive index distribution, protein concentration, density and rheological significance. These data are compared with known research results of ex vivo lenses.

  18. Time-resolved four-wave-mixing spectroscopy for inner-valence transitions.

    PubMed

    Ding, Thomas; Ott, Christian; Kaldun, Andreas; Blättermann, Alexander; Meyer, Kristina; Stooss, Veit; Rebholz, Marc; Birk, Paul; Hartmann, Maximilian; Brown, Andrew; Van Der Hart, Hugo; Pfeifer, Thomas

    2016-02-15

    Noncollinear four-wave-mixing (FWM) techniques at near-infrared (NIR), visible, and ultraviolet frequencies have been widely used to map vibrational and electronic couplings, typically in complex molecules. However, correlations between spatially localized inner-valence transitions among different sites of a molecule in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range have not been observed yet. As an experimental step toward this goal, we perform time-resolved FWM spectroscopy with femtosecond NIR and attosecond XUV pulses. The first two pulses (XUV-NIR) coincide in time and act as coherent excitation fields, while the third pulse (NIR) acts as a probe. As a first application, we show how coupling dynamics between odd- and even-parity, inner-valence excited states of neon can be revealed using a two-dimensional spectral representation. Experimentally obtained results are found to be in good agreement with ab initio time-dependent R-matrix calculations providing the full description of multielectron interactions, as well as few-level model simulations. Future applications of this method also include site-specific probing of electronic processes in molecules. PMID:26872169

  19. Host Sensitized Luminescence and Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of YVO4: Ho3+ Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahata, Manoj Kumar; Koppe, Tristan; Hofsäss, Hans; Kumar, Kaushal; Vetter, Ulrich

    Rare earth doped phosphors have attracted much interest because of their high chemical durability and wide range of attractive applications. In this work, Ho3+ doped tetragonal YVO4 nanocrystals have been synthesized via a facile co-precipitation method. The phosphor was characterized by various methods including X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, cathodoluminescence, time-resolved spectroscopy measurements. The frequency upconversion emission in the synthesized phosphor has been investigated under 800 nm laser excitation. UV-excited photoluminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements were performed at room temperature (300 K). A broad band which arises at ∼ 370-600 nm is attributed to the relaxation of VO43- groups from conduction band to valence band. Under UV-excitation, the presence of a sharp band at 550 nm due to the intra-4f transitions of the trivalent holmium ions suggests energy transfer from YVO4 host to RE ions. Luminescence measurements show that this material is suitable for field emission displays (FED) and fluorescent lamps. Also the conversion of UV radiation as well as IR radiation into the visible region suggests the application of this material for photon harvesting in solar cells.

  20. Time-resolved spectroscopy of LiF:Mg,Cu,P.

    PubMed

    Mathur, V K; Barkyoumb, J H; Jarrett, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopy measurements of LiF:Mg,Cu,P luminescence are presented to obtain a better understanding of the emission characteristics of this material. The intensities and decay of the emission bands were studied as a function of annealing temperature and ionising radiation (gamma) dose. Two peaks in the emission were observed at 367 and 466 nm when excited by the 266 nm laser radiation. The luminescence spectrum under band-to-band X-ray excitation shows a dominant emission approximately 390-400 nm, which resembles the reported thermoluminescence emission and is clearly different from the spectrum obtained using the 266 nm pulsed laser excitation. Annealing of the material to 300 degrees C increases the intensity of the 367 and 466 nm emission bands by an order of magnitude as well as changes the relative intensity of the bands. Additional emission bands, which are not evident in the thermoluminescence emission spectra, are seen at longer wavelengths that also increase with dose. Possible explanations for the observed emission spectra are discussed in this paper. PMID:16644981

  1. Toward reliable retrieval of functional information of papillary dermis using spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Guo, Jun-Yen; Tzeng, Shih-Yu; Chou, Ting-Chun; Lin, Ming-Jen; Huang, Lynn Ling-Huei; Yang, Chao-Chun; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (SRDRS) has been employed to quantify tissue optical properties and its interrogation volume is majorly controlled by the source-to-detector separations (SDSs). To noninvasively quantify properties of dermis, a SRDRS setup that includes SDS shorter than 1 mm is required. It will be demonstrated in this study that Monte Carlo simulations employing the Henyey-Greenstein phase function cannot always precisely predict experimentally measured diffuse reflectance at such short SDSs, and we speculated this could be caused by the non-negligible backward light scattering at short SDSs that cannot be properly modeled by the Henyey-Greenstein phase function. To accurately recover the optical properties and functional information of dermis using SRDRS, we proposed the use of the modified two-layer (MTL) geometry. Monte Carlo simulations and phantom experiment results revealed that the MTL probing geometry was capable of faithfully recovering the optical properties of upper dermis. The capability of the MTL geometry in probing the upper dermis properties was further verified through a swine study, and it was found that the measurement results were reasonably linked to histological findings. Finally, the MTL probe was utilized to study psoriatic lesions. Our results showed that the MTL probe was sensitive to the physiological condition of tissue volumes within the papillary dermis and could be used in studying the physiology of psoriasis. PMID:26977361

  2. The vinyl + NO reaction : determining the products with time-resolved Fourier transform spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, David L; Zou, Peng; Klippenstein, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the vinyl + NO reaction using time-resolved Fourier transform emission spectroscopy, complemented by electronic structure and microcanonical RRKM rate coefficient calculations. To unambiguously determine the reaction products, three precursors are used to produce the vinyl radical by laser photolysis: vinyl bromide, methyl vinyl ketone, and vinyl iodide. The emission spectra and theoretical calculations indicate that HCN + CH{sub 2}O is the only significant product channel for the C{sub 2}H{sub 3} + NO reaction near room temperature, in contradiction to several reports in the literature. Although CO emission is observed when vinyl bromide is used as the precursor, it arises from the reaction of NO with photofragments other than vinyl. This conclusion is supported by the absence of CO emission when vinyl iodide or methyl vinyl ketone is used. Prompt emission from vibrationally excited NO is evidence of the competition between back dissociation and isomerization of the initially formed nitrosoethylene adduct, consistent with previous work on the pressure dependence of this reaction. Our calculations indicate that production of products is dominated by the low energy portion of the energy distribution. The calculation also predicts an upper bound of 0.19% for the branching ratio of the H{sub 2}CNH + CO channel, which is consistent with our experimental results.

  3. Probing Ternary Complex Equilibria of Crown Ether Ligands by Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ternary complex formation with solvent molecules and other adventitious ligands may compromise the performance of metal-ion-selective fluorescent probes. As Ca(II) can accommodate more than 6 donors in the first coordination sphere, commonly used crown ether ligands are prone to ternary complex formation with this cation. The steric strain imposed by auxiliary ligands, however, may result in an ensemble of rapidly equilibrating coordination species with varying degrees of interaction between the cation and the specific donor atoms mediating the fluorescence response, thus diminishing the change in fluorescence properties upon Ca(II) binding. To explore the influence of ligand architecture on these equilibria, we tethered two structurally distinct aza-15-crown-5 ligands to pyrazoline fluorophores as reporters. Due to ultrafast photoinduced electron-transfer (PET) quenching of the fluorophore by the ligand moiety, the fluorescence decay profile directly reflects the species composition in the ground state. By adjusting the PET driving force through electronic tuning of the pyrazoline fluorophores, we were able to differentiate between species with only subtle variations in PET donor abilities. Concluding from a global analysis of the corresponding fluorescence decay profiles, the coordination species composition was indeed strongly dependent on the ligand architecture. Altogether, the combination of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy with selective tuning of the PET driving force represents an effective analytical tool to study dynamic coordination equilibria and thus to optimize ligand architectures for the design of high-contrast cation-responsive fluorescence switches. PMID:25313708

  4. New Insights from Phase-Resolved Spectroscopy of QPOs in GX 339—4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Abigail L.; Uttley, Phil; van der Klis, Michiel

    2016-04-01

    We present a new spectral-timing technique for phase-resolved spectroscopy of low-frequency Type B quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) from the black hole X-ray binary GX 339--4. Evidence suggests that low-frequency QPOs originate from near-periodic geometric changes in the inner accretion flow, possibly due to general relativistic precession. The physical model predicts spectral energy distribution changes on the QPO timescale, but it is not possible to probe these changes using strictly spectral or timing analysis. Our new technique shows that for these data, the spectral energy distribution changes not only in normalization, but in spectral shape also, on the QPO timescale. We find that a blackbody spectral component and power law spectral component are both required to vary on the QPO timescale, and the blackbody variations are out of phase with the power law. With these findings we suggest a geometry for the precessing flow in the strong-gravity regime close to black holes.

  5. Nonadiabatic Dynamics May Be Probed through Electronic Coherence in Time-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Kochise; Kowalewski, Markus; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-02-01

    We present a hierarchy of Fermi golden rules (FGRs) that incorporate strongly coupled electronic/nuclear dynamics in time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) signals at different levels of theory. Expansion in the joint electronic and nuclear eigenbasis yields the numerically most challenging exact FGR (eFGR). The quasistatic Fermi Golden Rule (qsFGR) neglects nuclear motion during the photoionization process but takes into account electronic coherences as well as populations initially present in the pumped matter as well as those generated internally by coupling between electronic surfaces. The standard semiclassical Fermi Golden Rule (scFGR) neglects the electronic coherences and the nuclear kinetic energy during the ionizing pulse altogether, yielding the classical Condon approximation. The coherence contributions depend on the phase-profile of the ionizing field, allowing coherent control of TRPES signals. The photoelectron spectrum from model systems is simulated using these three levels of theory. The eFGR and the qsFGR show temporal oscillations originating from the electronic or vibrational coherences generated as the nuclear wave packet traverses a conical intersection. These oscillations, which are missed by the scFGR, directly reveal the time-evolving splitting between electronic states of the neutral molecule in the curve-crossing regime. PMID:26691822

  6. A split imaging spectrometer for temporally and spatially resolved titanium absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hager, J D; Lanier, N E; Kline, J L; Flippo, K A; Bruns, H C; Schneider, M; Saculla, M; McCarville, T

    2014-11-01

    We present a temporally and a spatially resolved spectrometer for titanium x-ray absorption spectroscopy along 2 axial symmetric lines-of-sight. Each line-of-sight of the instrument uses an elliptical crystal to acquire both the 2p and 3p Ti absorption lines on a single, time gated channel of the instrument. The 2 axial symmetric lines-of-sight allow the 2p and 3p absorption features to be measured through the same point in space using both channels of the instrument. The spatially dependent material temperature can be inferred by observing the 2p and the 3p Ti absorption features. The data are recorded on a two strip framing camera with each strip collecting data from a single line-of-sight. The design is compatible for use at both the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility. The spectrometer is intended to measure the material temperature behind a Marshak wave in a radiatively driven SiO2 foam with a Ti foam tracer. In this configuration, a broad band CsI backlighter will be used for a source and the Ti absorption spectrum measured. PMID:25430177

  7. Electronic structure dynamics in a low bandgap polymer studied by time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cappel, Ute B; Plogmaker, Stefan; Terschlüsen, Joachim A; Leitner, Torsten; Johansson, Erik M J; Edvinsson, Tomas; Sandell, Anders; Karis, Olof; Siegbahn, Hans; Svensson, Svante; Mårtensson, Nils; Rensmo, Håkan; Söderström, Johan

    2016-08-01

    Means to measure the temporal evolution following a photo-excitation in conjugated polymers are a key for the understanding and optimization of their function in applications such as organic solar cells. In this paper we study the electronic structure dynamics by direct pump-probe measurements of the excited electrons in such materials. Specifically, we carried out a time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) study of the polymer PCPDTBT by combining an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) high harmonic generation source with a time-of-flight spectrometer. After excitation to either the 1st excited state or to a higher excited state, we follow how the electronic structure develops and relaxes on the electron binding energy scale. Specifically, we follow a less than 50 fs relaxation of the higher exited state and a 10 times slower relaxation of the 1st excited state. We corroborate the results using DFT calculations. Our study demonstrates the power of TRPES for studying photo-excited electron energetics and dynamics of solar cell materials. PMID:27440450

  8. Nanosecond Time-Resolved Polarization Spectroscopies: Tools for Probing Protein Reaction Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Eefei; Goldbeck, Robert A.; Kliger, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Polarization methods, introduced in the 1800’s, offered one of the earliest ways to examine protein structure. Since then, many other structure-sensitive probes have been developed, but circular dichroism (CD) remains a powerful technique because of its versatility and the specificity of protein structural information that can be explored. With improvements in time-resolution, from millisecond to picosecond CD measurements, it has proven to be an important tool for studying the mechanism of folding and function in many biomolecules. For example, nanosecond time-resolved CD (TRCD) studies of the sub-microsecond events of reduced cytochrome c folding have provided direct experimental evidence of kinetic heterogeneity, which is an inherent property of the diffusional nature of early folding dynamics on the energy landscape. In addition, TRCD has been applied to the study of many biochemical processes, such as ligand rebinding in hemoglobin and myoglobin and signaling state formation in photoactive yellow protein and prototropin 1 LOV2. The basic approach to TRCD has also been extended to include a repertoire of nanosecond polarization spectroscopies: optical rotatory dispersion (ORD), magnetic CD and ORD, and linear dichroism. This article will discuss the details of the polarization methods used in this laboratory, as well as the coupling of timeresolved ORD with the temperature-jump trigger so that protein folding can be studied in a larger number of proteins. PMID:20438842

  9. Light adaptation of the unicellular red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, probed by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Yoshifumi; Aikawa, Shimpei; Kondo, Akihiko; Akimoto, Seiji

    2015-08-01

    Photosynthetic organisms change the quantity and/or quality of their pigment-protein complexes and the interactions among these complexes in response to light conditions. In the present study, we analyzed light adaptation of the unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, whose pigment composition is similar to that of cyanobacteria because its phycobilisomes (PBS) lack phycoerythrin. C. merolae were grown under different light qualities, and their responses were measured by steady-state absorption, steady-state fluorescence, and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies. Cells were cultivated under four monochromatic light-emitting diodes (blue, green, yellow, and red), and changes in pigment composition and energy transfer were observed. Cells grown under blue and green light increased their relative phycocyanin levels compared with cells cultured under white light. Energy-transfer processes to photosystem I (PSI) were sensitive to yellow and red light. The contribution of direct energy transfer from PBS to PSI increased only under yellow light, while red light induced a reduction in energy transfer from photosystem II to PSI and an increase in energy transfer from light-harvesting chlorophyll protein complex I to PSI. Differences in pigment composition, growth, and energy transfer under different light qualities are discussed. PMID:25577254

  10. A split imaging spectrometer for temporally and spatially resolved titanium absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, J. D. Lanier, N. E.; Kline, J. L.; Flippo, K. A.; Bruns, H. C.; Schneider, M.; Saculla, M.; McCarville, T.

    2014-11-15

    We present a temporally and a spatially resolved spectrometer for titanium x-ray absorption spectroscopy along 2 axial symmetric lines-of-sight. Each line-of-sight of the instrument uses an elliptical crystal to acquire both the 2p and 3p Ti absorption lines on a single, time gated channel of the instrument. The 2 axial symmetric lines-of-sight allow the 2p and 3p absorption features to be measured through the same point in space using both channels of the instrument. The spatially dependent material temperature can be inferred by observing the 2p and the 3p Ti absorption features. The data are recorded on a two strip framing camera with each strip collecting data from a single line-of-sight. The design is compatible for use at both the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility. The spectrometer is intended to measure the material temperature behind a Marshak wave in a radiatively driven SiO{sub 2} foam with a Ti foam tracer. In this configuration, a broad band CsI backlighter will be used for a source and the Ti absorption spectrum measured.

  11. Standoff Time-Resolved Laser-Based Spectroscopy Tools for Sample Characterization and Biosignature Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasda, P. J.; Acosta-Maeda, T.; Lucey, P. G.; Misra, A. K.; Sharma, S. K.; Taylor, J.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Mars2020 rover will be searching for signs of past habitability and past life on Mars. Additionally, the rover mission will prepare a cache of highly significant samples for a future sample return mission. NASA requires these samples to be well characterized; the instruments on the rover must be capable of fine-scale in situ mineralogical or elemental analysis with emphasis on biosignature detection or characterization. We have been developing multiple standoff laser-based instruments at the University of Hawaii, Manoa that are capable of fine-scale in situ chemical analysis and biosignatures detection. By employing a time-resolved spectroscopy, we can perform elemental analysis with Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), mineral and organic analysis with Raman spectroscopy, and biosignature detection with Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF). Each of these techniques share the same optics and detection equipment, allowing us to integrate them into a single, compact instrument. High time-resolution (~100 ns/pulse) is the key to this instrument; with it, the detector only records data when the signal is the brightest. Spectra can be taken during the day, LIBS can be measured without a plasma light background, and the Raman signal can be separated from the mineral fluorescence signal. Since bio-organics have very short fluorescence lifetimes, the new instrument can be used to unambiguously detect bio-organics. The prototype uses a low power (0.5 mJ/pulse) 532 nm laser with a detection limit of < 30 ppm of organics in a sample of Antarctica Dry Valley soil measured from 8 m. Another LIF instrument under development in our lab, called the Biofinder, takes advantage of the extremely intense fluorescence signal produced by organics by using a wide laser spot and a camera to produce LIF images of wide area (25 cm area from 2 m distance with 2 mm/pixel resolution). The Biofinder can quickly assess the area around the rover (at 10 frames/s) by imaging sample

  12. Vacuum ultraviolet luminescence of wide band-gap solids studied using time-resolved spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhov, V. N.

    2014-04-01

    Some highlights of the time-resolved vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) luminescence spectroscopy of solids using synchrotron radiation (SR) are outlined, including studies of the unique phenomenon crossluminescence (CL) and the contribution of time-resolved VUV spectroscopy to the understanding of 5d-4f transitions of rare earth ions in solids. The main properties of CL studied at different SR sources are described and some unclear aspects of CL are pointed out. The results of recent studies of some CL-active nanosize materials are presented. We describe the time-resolved experiments which led to the discovery of 5d-4f luminescence in the deep VUV region (near 10 eV) of Gd3+ and Lu3+ ions incorporated into some wide band-gap fluoride hosts. The results of high-resolution (Δλ ˜ 0.5 Å) studies of 5d-4f emission and 4f-5d excitation spectra of Gd3+ and Lu3+, which allowed the detailed analysis of electron-lattice coupling in these systems, are presented. Possible new developments in the femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy of solids with a free electron laser are discussed.

  13. Time-Resolved Light Scattering and Fluorescence Spectroscopy in Biomedical and Model Random Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Bidyut Baran

    Optical spectroscopy, light scattering and ultrafast time-gated imaging have been shown to offer novel approaches to study the optical characteristics of various biomedical and other random media. Fluorescence spectra from human malignant and nonmalignant breast tissues were measured at 300 nm excitation and a significant spectral difference was found between the two tissue types by using the ratio of fluorescence intensities at 340 and 440 nm. Optical density measurements on thin breast tissues show that the scattering cross-sections of breast tissues are relatively constant over the visible and the uv region. Transport mean free paths and the absorption lengths for various tissues and model random media were measured using time-resolved transmission. The scattering coefficients for human breast and chicken tissues were found to remain relatively constant in 570-630 nm wavelength region while they change significantly at 1064 nm. Chicken breast and fat tissues were found to be good models for human breast tissues as the values of the optical parameters of the two tissue types are about the same. The less scattering observed at 1064 nm makes tissues more transparent in the NIR region making it easier to image in thick tissues. Time-resolved backscattering measurements show that the scattering and the absorption parameters of a random medium can be obtained accurately in a two-fiber configuration as long as the radial distance is more than about seven times the transport mean free path of the sample. The single point source-detection configuration provides a tool to diagnose breast malignancy though it fails to give accurate values of the optical parameters of tissues. This failure is attributed to the invalidity of the diffusion approximation in this experimental configuration. A 2.5 mm thin chicken fat strip was imaged inside a 40 mm thick chicken breast tissue using snake photons at 625 nm with ultrafast time-gated detection. A simple model to describe the effect

  14. Proton uptake mechanism of bacteriorhodopsin as determined by time-resolved stroboscopic-FTIR-spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Souvignier, G; Gerwert, K

    1992-11-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin's proton uptake reaction mechanism in the M to BR reaction pathway was investigated by time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy under physiological conditions (293 K, pH 6.5, 1 M KCl). The time resolution of a conventional fast-scan FTIR spectrometer was improved from 10 ms to 100 mus, using the stroboscopic FTIR technique. Simultaneously, absorbance changes at 11 wavelengths in the visible between 410 and 680 nm were recorded. Global fit analysis with sums of exponentials of both the infrared and visible absorbance changes yields four apparent rate constants, k(7) = 0.3 ms, k(4) = 2.3 ms, k(3) = 6.9 ms, k(6) = 30 ms, for the M to BR reaction pathway. Although the rise of the N and O intermediates is dominated by the same apparent rate constant (k(4)), protein reactions can be attributed to either the N or the O intermediate by comparison of data sets taken at 273 and 293 K. Conceptionally, the Schiff base has to be oriented in its deprotonated state from the proton donor (asp 85) to the proton acceptor (asp 96) in the M(1) to M(2) transition. However, experimentally two different M intermediates are not resolved, and M(2) and N are merged. From the results the following conclusions are drawn: (a) the main structural change of the protein backbone, indicated by amide I, amide II difference bands, takes place in the M to N (conceptionally M(2)) transition. This reaction is proposed to be involved in the "reset switch" of the pump, (b) In the M to N (conceptionally M(2)) transition, most likely, asp-85's carbonyl frequency shifts from 1,762 to 1,753 cm(-1) and persists in O. Protonation of asp-85 explains the red-shift of the absorbance maximum in O. (c) The catalytic proton uptake binding site asp-96 is deprotonated in the M to N transition and is reprotonated in O. PMID:19431858

  15. Computational optimization of the configuration of a spatially resolved spectroscopy sensor for milk analysis.

    PubMed

    Watté, Rodrigo; Aernouts, Ben; Van Beers, Robbe; Postelmans, Annelies; Saeys, Wouter

    2016-04-21

    A global optimizer has been developed, capable of computing the optimal configuration in a probe for spatially resolved reflectance spectroscopy (SRS). The main objective is to minimize the number of detection fibers, while maintaining an accurate estimation of both absorption and scattering profiles. Multiple fibers are necessary to robustify the estimation of optical properties against noise, which is typically present in the measured signals and influences the accuracy of the inverse estimation. The optimizer is based on a robust metamodel-based inverse estimation of the absorption coefficient and a reduced scattering coefficient from the acquired SRS signals. A genetic algorithm is used to evaluate the effect of the fiber placement on the performance of the inverse estimator to find the bulk optical properties of raw milk. The algorithm to find the optimal fiber placement was repeatedly executed for cases with a different number of detection fibers, ranging from 3 to 30. Afterwards, the optimal designs for each considered number of fibers were compared based on their performance in separating the absorption and scattering properties, and the significance of the differences was tested. A sensor configuration with 13 detection fibers was found to be the combination with the lowest number of fibers which provided an estimation performance which was not significantly worse than the one obtained with the best design (30 detection fibers). This design resulted in the root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP) of 1.411 cm(-1) (R(2) = 0.965) for the estimation of the bulk absorption coefficient values, and 0.382 cm(-1) (R(2) = 0.996) for the reduced scattering coefficient values. PMID:27026600

  16. High Resolution Time-resolved UCLES Spectroscopy of AE Aqr: I. The Secondary Star Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echevarria, J.; Diego, F.; Mills, D.; Connon Smith, R.

    2006-06-01

    High-dispersion time-resolved spectroscopy of the cataclysmic variable AE Aqr has been obtained. The emission lines have a complex structure that make difficult to measure the motion of the white dwarf. The cross correlation for the absorption lines shows a clear asymmetric profile as expected from a heated side of the red star. The spectral type for the secondary star varies from K2 to K5; there are clear indications that the temperature varies as a function of star longitude. The radial velocity analysis yield Kab = 165.2 ± 0.6 Km s-1 for the cross-correlated secondary star. The rotational velocity of the red star has been measured as a function of orbital period. It shows ellipsoidal variations with a period half the orbital period. The rotational velocities vary within the range Vrot sin i = 105 ± 3 Km s-1 and Vrot sin i = 130 ± 3 Km s-1. The former can be used to constrain the white dwarf semi-amplitude value to yield Kem = 139 ± 4 Km s-1 consistent with derived values from published radial velocity measurements. From a variation in the absorption line strength of 30%, we constrain the inclination angle to i = 58° ± 3. The estimated masses of the binary are: Mw = 1.07 ± 0.07 M? and Mr = 0.90 ± 0.05 M?. If this is correct we should expect a spectral type of G5 if the secondary star is a main sequence star. We suggest that the discrepancy is explained if the star has a radius 40% greater than a main sequence star for a mass of 0.90 M?.

  17. Tubulin equilibrium unfolding followed by time-resolved fluorescence and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Susana A.; Brunet, Juan E.; Jameson, David M.; Lagos, Rosalba; Monasterio, Octavio

    2004-01-01

    The pathway for the in vitro equilibrium unfolding of the tubulin heterodimer by guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) has been studied using several spectroscopic techniques, specifically circular dichroism (CD), two-photon Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS), and time-resolved fluorescence, including lifetime and dynamic polarization. The results show that tubulin unfolding is characterized by distinct processes that occur in different GdmCl concentration ranges. From 0 to 0.5 M GdmCl, a slight alteration of the tubulin heterodimer occurs, as evidenced by a small, but reproducible increase in the rotational correlation time of the protein and a sharp decrease in the secondary structure monitored by CD. In the range 0.5–1.5 M GdmCl, significant decreases in the steady-state anisotropy and average lifetime of the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence occur, as well as a decrease in the rotational correlation time, from 48 to 26 nsec. In the same GdmCl range, the number of protein molecules (labeled with Alexa 488), as determined by two-photon FCS measurements, increases by a factor of two, indicating dissociation of the tubulin dimer into monomers. From 1.5 to 4 M GdmCl, these monomers unfold, as evidenced by the continual decrease in the tryptophan steady-state anisotropy, average lifetime, and rotational correlation time, concomitant with secondary structural changes. These results help to elucidate the unfolding pathway of the tubulin heterodimer and demonstrate the value of FCS measurements in studies on oligomeric protein systems. PMID:14691224

  18. Intraoperative delineation of primary brain tumors using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Butte, Pramod V; Fang, Qiyin; Jo, Javier A; Yong, William H; Pikul, Brian K; Black, Keith L; Marcu, Laura

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study is to determine the potential of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-LIFS) as an adjunctive tool for delineation of brain tumor from surrounding normal tissue in order to assist the neurosurgeon in near-complete tumor excision. A time-domain TR-LIFS prototype apparatus (gated photomultiplier detection, fast digitizer) was used for recording tissue autofluorescence in normal cortex (NC), normal white matter (NWM), and various grades of gliomas intraoperatively. Tissue fluorescence was induced with a pulsed nitrogen laser (337 nm, 700 ps), and the intensity decay profiles were recorded in the 360- to 550-nm spectral range (10-nm interval). Histopathological analysis (hematoxylin & eosin) of the biopsy samples taken from the site of TR-LIFS measurements was used for validation of spectroscopic results. Preliminary results on 17 patients demonstrate that normal cortex (N=16) and normal white matter (N=3) show two peaks of fluorescence emission at 390 nm (lifetime=1.8+/-0.3 ns) and 460 nm (lifetime=0.8+/-0.1 ns). The 390-nm emission peak is absent in low-grade glioma (N=5; lifetime=1.1 ns) and reduced in high-grade glioma (N=9; lifetime=1.7+/-0.4 ns). The emission characteristics at 460 nm in all tissues correlated with the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide fluorescence (peak: 440 to 460 nm; lifetime: 0.8 to 1.0 ns). These findings demonstrate the potential of using TR-LIFS as a tool for enhanced delineation of brain tumors during surgery. In addition, this study evaluates similarities and differences between TR-LIFS signatures of brain tumors obtained in vivo and those previously reported in ex vivo brain tumor specimens. PMID:20459282

  19. Intraoperative delineation of primary brain tumors using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butte, Pramod V.; Fang, Qiyin; Jo, Javier A.; Yong, William H.; Pikul, Brian K.; Black, Keith L.; Marcu, Laura

    2010-03-01

    The goal of this study is to determine the potential of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-LIFS) as an adjunctive tool for delineation of brain tumor from surrounding normal tissue in order to assist the neurosurgeon in near-complete tumor excision. A time-domain TR-LIFS prototype apparatus (gated photomultiplier detection, fast digitizer) was used for recording tissue autofluorescence in normal cortex (NC), normal white matter (NWM), and various grades of gliomas intraoperatively. Tissue fluorescence was induced with a pulsed nitrogen laser (337 nm, 700 ps), and the intensity decay profiles were recorded in the 360- to 550-nm spectral range (10-nm interval). Histopathological analysis (hematoxylin & eosin) of the biopsy samples taken from the site of TR-LIFS measurements was used for validation of spectroscopic results. Preliminary results on 17 patients demonstrate that normal cortex (N=16) and normal white matter (N=3) show two peaks of fluorescence emission at 390 nm (lifetime=1.8+/-0.3 ns) and 460 nm (lifetime=0.8+/-0.1 ns). The 390-nm emission peak is absent in low-grade glioma (N=5; lifetime=1.1 ns) and reduced in high-grade glioma (N=9; lifetime=1.7+/-0.4 ns). The emission characteristics at 460 nm in all tissues correlated with the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide fluorescence (peak: 440 to 460 nm lifetime: 0.8 to 1.0 ns). These findings demonstrate the potential of using TR-LIFS as a tool for enhanced delineation of brain tumors during surgery. In addition, this study evaluates similarities and differences between TR-LIFS signatures of brain tumors obtained in vivo and those previously reported in ex vivo brain tumor specimens.

  20. Spectral properties of transition metal pnictides and chalcogenides: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and dynamical mean-field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Roekeghem, Ambroise; Richard, Pierre; Ding, Hong; Biermann, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Electronic Coulomb correlations lead to characteristic signatures in the spectroscopy of transition metal pnictides and chalcogenides: quasi-particle renormalizations, lifetime effects or incoherent badly metallic behavior above relatively low coherence temperatures are measures of many-body effects due to local Hubbard and Hund's couplings. We review and compare the results of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments (ARPES) and of combined density functional/dynamical mean-field theory (DFT+DMFT) calculations. We emphasize the doping-dependence of the quasi-particle mass renormalization and coherence properties.

  1. Time-resolved spectroscopy and near infrared imaging enhanced by receptor-targeted contrast agents for prostate cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Y.; Wang, W. B.; Tang, G. C.; Achilefu, S.; Alfano, R. R.

    2011-03-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopy and near infrared imaging enhanced by receptor-targeted contrast agents for prostate cancer detection will be presented. Two contrast agents, Cybesin and Cytate, were investigated using time-resolved spectroscopy in aqueous solution and cancerous and normal prostate tissues. The time evolution of the fluorescent dipole in solution was studied using a system of first-order linear differential equations containing two main parameters: the decay rate of emission and the rate of one orthogonal emission component transferring to another. An analytical polarization model was developed and used to extract rotational times and fluorescence anisotropies of the contrast agents in prostate tissues. The differences of rotational times and polarization anisotropies were observed for Cybesin (Cytate) in cancerous and normal prostate tissue, which reflect preferred bond of contrast agents and cancerous tissue cells. The conjugation of Cybesin (Cytate) to prostate cancerous cells offers high contrast between normal and cancerous tissues.

  2. Ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy of the light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from the photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum

    SciTech Connect

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M.; Fuciman, Marcel; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Frank, Harry A.; Blankenship, Robert E.

    2011-10-08

    The light-harvesting complex 2 from the thermophilic purple bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum was purified and studied by steady-state absorption and fluorescence, sub-nanosecond-time-resolved fluorescence and femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. The measurements were performed at room temperature and at 10 K. The combination of both ultrafast and steady-state optical spectroscopy methods at ambient and cryogenic temperatures allowed the detailed study of carotenoid (Car)-to-bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) as well BChl-to-BChl excitation energy transfer in the complex. The studies show that the dominant Cars rhodopin (N = 11) and spirilloxanthin (N = 13) do not play a significant role as supportive energy donors for BChl a. This is related with their photophysical properties regulated by long π-electron conjugation. On the other hand, such properties favor some of the Cars, particularly spirilloxanthin (N = 13) to play the role of the direct quencher of the excited singlet state of BChl.

  3. Charge carrier mobility in poly[methyl(phenyl)silylene] studied by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy and molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Němec, Hynek; Kratochvílová, Irena; Kužel, Petr; Šebera, Jakub; Kochalska, Anna; Nožár, Juraj; Nešpůrek, Stanislav

    2011-02-21

    Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy and combination of quantum chemistry modeling and molecular dynamics simulations were used for the determination of charge carrier mobility in poly[methyl(phenyl)silylene]. Using time-resolved THz spectroscopy we established the on-chain charge carrier drift mobility in PMPSi as 0.02 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). This value is low due to the formation of polarons: the hole is self-trapped in a potential formed by local chain distortion and the transient THz conductivity spectra show signatures of its oscillations within this potential well. This view is supported by the agreement between experimental and calculated values of the on-chain charge carrier mobility. PMID:21305068

  4. Quantification of joint inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis by time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy and tracer kinetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioussoufovitch, Seva; Morrison, Laura B.; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith; Diop, Mamadou

    2015-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by chronic synovial inflammation, which can cause progressive joint damage and disability. Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and imaging have the potential to become potent monitoring tools for RA. We devised a method that combined time-resolved DOS and tracer kinetics modeling to rapidly and reliably quantify blood flow in the joint. Preliminary results obtained from two animals show that the technique can detect joint inflammation as early as 5 days after onset.

  5. Hot photocarrier dynamics in organic solar cells measured by transient absorption and time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Paul A.; Cunningham, Paul D.; Melinger, Joseph S.; Heilweil, Edwin J.

    2014-10-01

    We present a study of charge transfer and carrier dynamics in films of zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and buckmisnsterfullerene (C60) by investigated by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy (TRTS). We compare terahertz photoconductivity dynamics in composite and multi-layered films of C60 and ZnPc. The few picosecond terahertz photoconductivity dynamics arise from autoionization and recombination between C60 molecules and cooling of hot photocarriers following from charge transfer between C60 and ZnPc.

  6. Chemical state of Ag in Conducting Bridge Random Access Memory cells: a depth resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy investigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Acapito, F.; Souchier, E.; Noe, P.; Blaise, P.; Bernard, M.; Jousseaume, V.

    2016-05-01

    Conducting Bridge Random Access Memories (CBRAM) are a promising substitute for FLASH technology but problems with limited retention of the low resistance ON state still hamper their massive deployment. Depth resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy has been used to describe the chemical state of the atoms of the active electrode (in this case Ag) and to reveal the role of Sb as stabilizer of the metallic state.

  7. Time-resolved spectroscopy of nucleic acid systems using synchrotron radiation from 230 nm to 354 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Malcolm; Ballini, Jean-Pierre; Vigny, Paul

    1992-07-01

    The excited states of nucleic acids are complex, both at the individual chromophore level and because of the effect of stacking interactions on the electronic states. Considerable progress has been made recently by studying the lifetimes of the stacked states and by utilizing the technique of time-resolved spectroscopy. Experimental results obtained using the ACO synchrotron at LURE, Orsay, will be presented. Resolution of the decay data gives a model-based estimate of the number of emitting species and their lifetimes, and this information is then used to deconvolate experimental time-windowed spectra (time-delayed spectra) to give true time-resolved spectra. It is a unique feature of the synchrotron, compared with the laser, that the combination of delayed detection (photon counting) with the continuous wavelength distribution of the synchrotron allows the acquisition of excitation spectra by uninterrupted repetitive scanning over a wide range of UV exciting wavelengths, in the present work from 230 nm to 354 nm. Such time-delayed excitation spectra can also be deconvoluted into components corresponding to the various time-resolved emission spectra. In this way we are able to demonstrate for the first time that ground state stacking interactions are directly responsible for excimer-like emissions. Time-resolved emission spectra and time-resolved excitation spectra will be presented for the dinucleoside phosphate d(CG) and the synthetic alternating polynucleotide poly d(GC), a `B-type' DNA structure.

  8. Dynamics and Flexibility of Human Aromatase Probed by FTIR and Time Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Sheila J.; Castrignanò, Silvia; Mei, Giampiero; Di Venere, Almerinda; Nicolai, Eleonora; Allegra, Paola; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Human aromatase (CYP19A1) is a steroidogenic cytochrome P450 converting androgens into estrogens. No ligand-free crystal structure of the enzyme is available to date. The crystal structure in complex with the substrate androstenedione and the steroidal inhibitor exemestane shows a very compact conformation of the enzyme, leaving unanswered questions on the conformational changes that must occur to allow access of the ligand to the active site. As H/D exchange kinetics followed by FTIR spectroscopy can provide information on the conformational changes in proteins where solvent accessibility is affected, here the amide I region was used to measure the exchange rates of the different elements of the secondary structure for aromatase in the ligand-free form and in the presence of the substrate androstenedione and the inhibitor anastrozole. Biphasic exponential functions were found to fit the H/D exchange data collected as a function of time. Two exchange rates were assigned to two populations of protons present in different flexible regions of the protein. The addition of the substrate androstenedione and the inhibitor anastrozole lowers the H/D exchange rates of the α-helices of the enzyme when compared to the ligand-free form. Furthermore, the presence of the inhibitor anastrozole lowers exchange rate constant (k1) for β-sheets from 0.22±0.06 min−1 for the inhibitor-bound enzyme to 0.12±0.02 min−1 for the free protein. Dynamics effects localised in helix F were studied by time resolved fluorescence. The data demonstrate that the fluorescence lifetime component associated to Trp224 emission undergoes a shift toward longer lifetimes (from ≈5.0 to ≈5.5 ns) when the substrate or the inhibitor are present, suggesting slower dynamics in the presence of ligands. Together the results are consistent with different degrees of flexibility of the access channel and therefore different conformations adopted by the enzyme in the free, substrate- and inhibitor

  9. Band structures of 4f and 5f materials studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi

    2016-04-01

    Recent remarkable progress in angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) has enabled the direct observation of the band structures of 4f and 5f materials. In particular, ARPES with various light sources such as lasers (hν ∼ 7~\\text{eV} ) or high-energy synchrotron radiations (hν ≳ 400~\\text{eV} ) has shed light on the bulk band structures of strongly correlated materials with energy scales of a few millielectronvolts to several electronvolts. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the behaviors of 4f and 5f band structures of various rare-earth and actinide materials observed by modern ARPES techniques, and understand how they can be described using various theoretical frameworks. For 4f-electron materials, ARPES studies of \\text{Ce}M\\text{I}{{\\text{n}}5} (M=\\text{Rh} , \\text{Ir} , and \\text{Co} ) and \\text{YbR}{{\\text{h}}2}\\text{S}{{\\text{i}}2} with various incident photon energies are summarized. We demonstrate that their 4f electronic structures are essentially described within the framework of the periodic Anderson model, and that the band-structure calculation based on the local density approximation cannot explain their low-energy electronic structures. Meanwhile, electronic structures of 5f materials exhibit wide varieties ranging from itinerant to localized states. For itinerant \\text{U}~5f compounds such as \\text{UFeG}{{\\text{a}}5} , their electronic structures can be well-described by the band-structure calculation assuming that all \\text{U}~5f electrons are itinerant. In contrast, the band structures of localized \\text{U}~5f compounds such as \\text{UP}{{\\text{d}}3} and \\text{U}{{\\text{O}}2} are essentially explained by the localized model that treats \\text{U}~5f electrons as localized core states. In regards to heavy fermion \\text{U} -based compounds such as the hidden-order compound \\text{UR}{{\\text{u}}2}\\text{S}{{\\text{i}}2} , their electronic structures exhibit complex behaviors. Their overall band structures

  10. Spatially Resolved Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of the Nuclear Region of NGC 1068

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei; Wang, Jun-Xian; Kriss, Gerard A.; Sahnow, David; Allen, Mark; Dopita, Michael; Tsvetanov, Zlatan; Bicknell, Geoffrey

    2008-10-01

    We carry out high-resolution FUSE spectroscopy of the nuclear region of NGC 1068. The first set of spectra was obtained with a 30'' square aperture that collected all emission from the narrow-line region. The data reveal a strong broad O VI component of FWHM ~3500 km s-1 and two narrow O VI λλ1031, 1037 components of ~350 km s-1. The C III λ977 and N III λ991 emission lines in this spectrum can be fitted with a narrow component of FWHM ~1000 km s-1 and a broad one of ~2500 km s-1. Another set of seven spatially resolved spectra was made using a long slit of 1.25'' × 20'' at steps of ~1'' along the axis of the emission-line cone. We find the following: (1) Major emission lines in the FUSE wavelength range consist of a broad and a narrow component. (2) There is a gradient in the velocity field for the narrow O VI component of ~200 km s-1 from ~2'' southwest of the nucleus to ~4'' northeast. A similar pattern is also observed with the broad O VI component, with a gradient of ~3000 km s-1. These are consistent with the HST STIS findings and suggest a biconical structure in which the velocity field is mainly radial outflow. (3) A major portion of the C III and N III line flux is produced in the compact core. They are therefore not effective temperature diagnostics for the conical region. (4) The best-fit UV continuum suggests virtually no reddening, and the He II I(λ1640)/I(λ1085) ratio suggests a consistently low extinction factor across the cone. At ~2'' northeast of the nucleus there is a region characterized by (a) a strong Lyα flux but normal C IV flux, (b) a broad O VI line, and (c) a significantly enhanced C III flux. Based on observations made with the NASA-CNES-CSA Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), which is operated for NASA by The Johns Hopkins University under NASA contract NAS5-32985, and observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of

  11. Far-field infrared super-resolution microscopy using picosecond time-resolved transient fluorescence detected IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Makoto; Kawashima, Yasutake; Takeda, Akihiro; Ohmori, Tsutomu; Fujii, Masaaki

    2007-05-01

    A new far-field infrared super-resolution microscopy combining laser fluorescence microscope and picosecond time-resolved transient fluorescence detected IR (TFD-IR) spectroscopy is proposed. TFD-IR spectroscopy is a kind of IR-visible/UV double resonance spectroscopy, and detects IR transitions by the transient fluorescence due to electronic transition originating from vibrationally excited level populated by IR light. IR images of rhodamine-6G solution and of fluorescent beads were clearly observed by monitoring the transient fluorescence. Super-resolution twice higher than the diffraction limit for IR light was achieved. The IR spectrum due to the transient fluorescence was also measured from spatial domains smaller than the diffraction limit.

  12. Cerebral and Muscle Tissue Oxygenation During Incremental Cycling in Male Adolescents Measured by Time-Resolved Near-Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Goutham; Leu, Szu-Yun; Cerussi, Albert; Tromberg, Bruce; Cooper, Dan M; Galassetti, Pietro

    2016-05-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy has long been used to measure tissue-specific O2 dynamics in exercise, but most published data have used continuous wave devices incapable of quantifying absolute Hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations. We used time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy to study exercising muscle (Vastus Lateralis, VL) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) Hb oxygenation in 11 young males (15.3 ± 2.1 yrs) performing incremental cycling until exhaustion (peak VO2 = 42.7 ± 6.1 ml/min/kg, mean peak power = 181 ± 38 W). Time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy measurements of reduced scattering (μs´) and absorption (μa) at three wavelengths (759, 796, and 833 nm) were used to calculate concentrations of oxyHb ([HbO2]), deoxy Hb ([HbR]), total Hb ([THb]), and O2 saturation (stO2). In PFC, significant increases were observed in both [HbO2] and [HbR] during intense exercise. PFC stO2% remained stable until 80% of total exercise time, then dropped (-2.95%, p = .0064). In VL, stO2% decreased until peak time (-6.8%, p = .01). Segmented linear regression identified thresholds for PFC [HbO2], [HbR], VL [THb]. There was a strong correlation between timing of second ventilatory threshold and decline in PFC [HbO2] (r = .84). These findings show that time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy can be used to study physiological threshold phenomena in children during maximal exercise, providing insight into tissue specific hemodynamics and metabolism. PMID:26451845

  13. Time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy of radiation-chemical processes. [Pulsed irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, G.N.R.

    1983-01-01

    A tunable pulsed laser Raman spectrometer for time resolved Raman studies of radiation-chemical processes is described. This apparatus utilizes the state of art optical multichannel detection and analysis techniques for data acquisition and electron pulse radiolysis for initiating the reactions. By using this technique the resonance Raman spectra of intermediates with absorption spectra in the 248-900 nm region, and mean lifetimes > 30 ns can be examined. This apparatus can be used to time resolve the vibrational spectral overlap between transients absorbing in the same region, and to follow their decay kinetics by monitoring the well resolved Raman peaks. For kinetic measurements at millisecond time scale, the Raman technique is preferable over optical absorption method where low frequency noise is quite bothersome. A time resolved Raman study of the pulse radiolytic oxidation of aqueous tetrafluorohydroquinone and p-methoxyphenol is briefly discussed. 15 references, 5 figures.

  14. Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy on Electronic Structure and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Cuprate Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.J.

    2010-04-30

    In addition to the record high superconducting transition temperature (T{sub c}), high temperature cuprate superconductors are characterized by their unusual superconducting properties below T{sub c}, and anomalous normal state properties above T{sub c}. In the superconducting state, although it has long been realized that superconductivity still involves Cooper pairs, as in the traditional BCS theory, the experimentally determined d-wave pairing is different from the usual s-wave pairing found in conventional superconductors. The identification of the pairing mechanism in cuprate superconductors remains an outstanding issue. The normal state properties, particularly in the underdoped region, have been found to be at odd with conventional metals which is usually described by Fermi liquid theory; instead, the normal state at optimal doping fits better with the marginal Fermi liquid phenomenology. Most notable is the observation of the pseudogap state in the underdoped region above T{sub c}. As in other strongly correlated electrons systems, these unusual properties stem from the interplay between electronic, magnetic, lattice and orbital degrees of freedom. Understanding the microscopic process involved in these materials and the interaction of electrons with other entities is essential to understand the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity. Since the discovery of high-T{sub c} superconductivity in cuprates, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has provided key experimental insights in revealing the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors. These include, among others, the earliest identification of dispersion and a large Fermi surface, an anisotropic superconducting gap suggestive of a d-wave order parameter, and an observation of the pseudogap in underdoped samples. In the mean time, this technique itself has experienced a dramatic improvement in its energy and momentum resolutions, leading to a series of new discoveries not

  15. Direct Imaging of Transient Fano Resonances in N_{2} Using Time-, Energy-, and Angular-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Martin; Yang, Chung-Hsin; Frassetto, Fabio; Poletto, Luca; Sansone, Giuseppe; Vrakking, Marc J J; Kornilov, Oleg

    2016-04-22

    Autoionizing Rydberg states of molecular N_{2} are studied using time-, energy-, and angular-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. A femtosecond extreme ultraviolet pulse with a photon energy of 17.5 eV excites the resonance and a subsequent IR pulse ionizes the molecule before the autoionization takes place. The angular-resolved photoelectron spectra depend on pump-probe time delay and allow for the distinguishing of two electronic states contributing to the resonance. The lifetime of one of the contributions is determined to be 14±1  fs, while the lifetime of the other appears to be significantly shorter than the time resolution of the experiment. These observations suggest that the Rydberg states in this energy region are influenced by the effect of interference stabilization and merge into a complex resonance. PMID:27152799

  16. Experimental station for laser-based picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorchies, F.; Fedorov, N.; Lecherbourg, L.

    2015-07-01

    We present an experimental station designed for time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). It is based on ultrashort laser-plasma x-ray pulses generated from a table-top 100 mJ-class laser at 10 Hz repetition rate. A high transmission (10%-20%) x-ray beam line transport using polycapillary optics allows us to set the sample in an independent vacuum chamber, providing high flexibility over a wide spectral range from 0.5 up to 4 keV. Some XANES spectra are presented, demonstrating 1% noise level in only ˜1 mn and ˜100 cumulated laser shots. Time-resolved measurements are reported, indicating that the time resolution of the entire experimental station is 3.3 ± 0.6 ps rms.

  17. Experimental station for laser-based picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dorchies, F. Fedorov, N.; Lecherbourg, L.

    2015-07-15

    We present an experimental station designed for time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). It is based on ultrashort laser-plasma x-ray pulses generated from a table-top 100 mJ-class laser at 10 Hz repetition rate. A high transmission (10%–20%) x-ray beam line transport using polycapillary optics allows us to set the sample in an independent vacuum chamber, providing high flexibility over a wide spectral range from 0.5 up to 4 keV. Some XANES spectra are presented, demonstrating 1% noise level in only ∼1 mn and ∼100 cumulated laser shots. Time-resolved measurements are reported, indicating that the time resolution of the entire experimental station is 3.3 ± 0.6 ps rms.

  18. Direct Imaging of Transient Fano Resonances in N2 Using Time-, Energy-, and Angular-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckstein, Martin; Yang, Chung-Hsin; Frassetto, Fabio; Poletto, Luca; Sansone, Giuseppe; Vrakking, Marc J. J.; Kornilov, Oleg

    2016-04-01

    Autoionizing Rydberg states of molecular N2 are studied using time-, energy-, and angular-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. A femtosecond extreme ultraviolet pulse with a photon energy of 17.5 eV excites the resonance and a subsequent IR pulse ionizes the molecule before the autoionization takes place. The angular-resolved photoelectron spectra depend on pump-probe time delay and allow for the distinguishing of two electronic states contributing to the resonance. The lifetime of one of the contributions is determined to be 14 ±1 fs , while the lifetime of the other appears to be significantly shorter than the time resolution of the experiment. These observations suggest that the Rydberg states in this energy region are influenced by the effect of interference stabilization and merge into a complex resonance.

  19. Chiral-index resolved length mapping of carbon nanotubes in solution using electric-field induced differential absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenshan; Hennrich, Frank; Flavel, Benjamin S.; Kappes, Manfred M.; Krupke, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    The length of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is an important metric for the integration of SWCNTs into devices and for the performance of SWCNT-based electronic or optoelectronic applications. In this work we propose a rather simple method based on electric-field induced differential absorption spectroscopy to measure the chiral-index-resolved average length of SWCNTs in dispersions. The method takes advantage of the electric-field induced length-dependent dipole moment of nanotubes and has been verified and calibrated by atomic force microscopy. This method not only provides a low cost, in situ approach for length measurements of SWCNTs in dispersion, but due to the sensitivity of the method to the SWCNT chiral index, the chiral index dependent average length of fractions obtained by chromatographic sorting can also be derived. Also, the determination of the chiral-index resolved length distribution seems to be possible using this method.

  20. Nonlinear spectroscopy in the near-field: time resolved spectroscopy and subwavelength resolution non-invasive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namboodiri, Mahesh; Khan, Tahirzeb; Karki, Khadga; Kazemi, Mehdi Mohammad; Bom, Sidhant; Flachenecker, Günter; Namboodiri, Vinu; Materny, Arnulf

    2014-04-01

    The combination of near-field microscopy along with nonlinear optical spectroscopic techniques is presented here. The scanning near-field imaging technique can be integrated with nonlinear spectroscopic techniques to improve spatial and axial resolution of the images. Additionally, ultrafast dynamics can be probed down to nano-scale dimension. The review shows some examples for this combination, which resulted in an exciton map and vibrational contrast images with sub-wavelength resolution. Results of two-color femtosecond time-resolved pump-probe experiments using scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) on thin films of the organic semiconductor 3,4,9,10 Perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) are presented. While nonlinear Raman techniques have been used to obtain highly resolved images in combination with near-field microscopy, the use of femtosecond laser pulses in electronic resonance still constitutes a big challenge. Here, we present our first results on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) with femtosecond laser pulses detected in the near-field using SNOM. We demonstrate that highly spatially resolved images can be obtained from poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) nano-structures where the fs-CARS process was in resonance with the P3HT absorption and with characteristic P3HT vibrational modes without destruction of the samples. Sub-diffraction limited lateral resolution is achieved. Especially the height resolution clearly surpasses that obtained with standard microCARS. These results will be the basis for future investigations of mode-selective dynamics in the near-field.

  1. Ultrahigh-throughput single-molecule spectroscopy and spectrally resolved super-resolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengyang; Kenny, Samuel J; Hauser, Margaret; Li, Wan; Xu, Ke

    2015-10-01

    By developing a wide-field scheme for spectral measurement and implementing photoswitching, we synchronously obtained the fluorescence spectra and positions of ∼10(6) single molecules in labeled cells in minutes, which consequently enabled spectrally resolved, 'true-color' super-resolution microscopy. The method, called spectrally resolved stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (SR-STORM), achieved cross-talk-free three-dimensional (3D) imaging for four dyes 10 nm apart in emission spectrum. Excellent resolution was obtained for every channel, and 3D localizations of all molecules were automatically aligned within one imaging path. PMID:26280329

  2. Interfacing a transient digitizer to a step-scan Fourier transform spectrometer for nanosecond time resolved spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Letendre, L.T.; Dai, H.; McLaren, I.A.; Johnson, T.J.

    1999-01-01

    A new signal processing and data acquisition system has been developed that allows a Fourier transform spectrometer to be interfaced to external transient digitizers for time-resolved spectroscopy. Time resolution is limited only by the transient digitizer and detection system response time. For the present system it is about 1 ns. The capabilities of this system are demonstrated with visible Fourier transform spectra of both scattered laser light and fluorescence from electronically excited NO{sub 2} gas. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Highly polarized emission in spin resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of alpha-Fe(001)/GaAs(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, James; Yu, Sung Woo; Morton, Simon; Waddill, George; Thompson, Jamie; Neal, James; Spangenberg, Matthais; Shen, T.H.

    2009-05-19

    Highly spin-polarized sources of electrons, Integrated into device design, remain of great interest to the spintronic and magneto-electronic device community Here, the growth of Fe upon GaAs(001) has been studied with photoelectron spectroscopy (PES), including Spin Resolved PES. Despite evidence of atomic level disorder such as intermixing, an over-layer with the spectroscopic signature of alpha-Fe(001), with a bcc real space ordering, Is obtained The results will be discussed in light of the possibility of using such films as a spin-polarized source in device applications.

  4. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of matrix-isolated silver atoms after pulsed excitation of inner-shell transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebert, T.; Wiggenhauser, H.; Schriever, U.; Kolb, D. M.

    1990-02-01

    The energy dissipation in matrix-isolated silver atoms after pulsed vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) excitation of 4d-5p transitions has been studied by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The decay behavior of the various fluorescence bands has been analyzed and a model for the relaxation process proposed within the framework of a two-dimensional configuration-coordinate diagram. If minute quantities of Ag2 are present in the matrix, the analysis requires consideration of energy transfer between silver atoms and dimers.

  5. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of the insulating NaxWO3: Anderson localization, polaron formation, and remnant Fermi surface.

    PubMed

    Raj, S; Hashimoto, D; Matsui, H; Souma, S; Sato, T; Takahashi, T; Sarma, D D; Mahadevan, Priya; Oishi, S

    2006-04-14

    The electronic structure of the insulating sodium tungsten bronze, Na(0.025)WO(3), is investigated by high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We find that near-E(F) states are localized due to the strong disorder arising from random distribution of Na+ ions in the WO(3) lattice, which makes the system insulating. The temperature dependence of photoemission spectra provides direct evidence for polaron formation. The remnant Fermi surface of the insulator is found to be the replica of the real Fermi surface in the metallic system. PMID:16712121

  6. Hydrogenic Rydberg States of Molecular van der Waals Complexes: Resolved Rydberg Spectroscopy of DABCO-N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockett, Martin C.; Watkins, Mark J.

    2004-01-01

    The complementary threshold ionization techniques of MATI and ZEKE spectroscopy have been used to reveal well-resolved, long-lived (>10 μs) hydrogenic Rydberg series (50≤n≤98) in a van der Waals complex formed between a polyatomic molecule and a diatomic molecule for the first time. The series are observed within 50 cm-1 of the adiabatic ionization threshold as well as two core-excited thresholds corresponding to excitation of up to two quanta in the van der Waals vibra­tional mode.

  7. Time-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Coupled Nuclear-Electronic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falge, M.; Engel, V.; Gräfe, S.

    2013-03-01

    We study the effect of nuclear-electron coupling on time-resolved photo-electron spectra, employing a model system which allows to directly comparing spectra resulting from the adiabatic approximation with those obtained within a non-Born-Oppenheimer description.

  8. Rate constant of exciton quenching of Ir(ppy)3 with hole measured by time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Shiho; Sakai, Heisuke; Murata, Hideyuki

    2016-03-01

    We observed the quenching of tris(2-phenylpyridinato)iridium(III) [Ir(ppy)3] excitons by polarons (holes or electrons) by time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy to clarify the dynamics of the triplet-polaron quenching of excitons. We employed a hole-only device (HOD) and an electron-only device (EOD), where the emitting layer consists of Ir(ppy)3 doped in 4,4‧-bis(carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl. Time-resolved PL spectroscopy of the EOD and HOD were measured under a constant current density. The results showed that the excitons of Ir(ppy)3 were significantly quenched only by holes. The PL decay curves of HOD were well fitted by the biexponential function, where lifetimes (τ1 and τ2) remain unchanged but the coefficient of each exponential term depends on hole current density. From the results, we proposed a model of exciton quenching where the exciton-hole quenching area expands with increasing hole current density. On the basis of the model, the triplet-polaron quenching rate constant Kq was determined.

  9. Quantitative measurement of optical parameters in normal breasts using time-resolved spectroscopy: in vivo results of 30 Japanese women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kazunori; Yamashita, Yutaka; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Kaneko, Masao; Yoshida, Masayuki; Chance, Britton

    1996-07-01

    Previous investigation has proved time-resolved spectroscopy to be applicable to measurement of optical parameters in the human breast. To increase knowledge of these properties in vivo, the optical parameters of healthy breasts were measured using time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy. A time-correlated single-photon counting method was used to obtain time-response curves for the breasts of 30 Japanese women. Values of (mu) a and (mu) s$' were analyzed by fitting the curves to the diffusion equation. The relationships of optical parameters to age, body mass index, thickness of the breast, number of pregnancies, and menstrual status were examined. The (mu) a and (mu) s' ranged from 0.0024 to 0.0078/mm and from 0.63 to 1.08/mm, respectively. The values of (mu) a and (mu) s' showed a high correlation with properties may be strongly influenced by changes in tissue components related to aging, menstrual status, and so on. This optical information will contribute to the investigation of photon migration in the human breast.

  10. Diagnosing the plasma nonuniformity in an iron opacity experiment by spatially resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoding, Zhang; Jiyan, Zhang; Yang, Zhao; Gang, Xiong; Bin, Zhao; Guohong, Yang; Jian, Zheng; Jiamin, Yang

    2012-12-01

    Generating a well-characterized hot-dense sample is of great importance to high quality opacity measurements. In this paper, we report on an experimental investigation of the plasma nonuniformity in a radiatively heated iron opacity sample by spatially resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy. The iron sample was tamped by plastic at both sides and was heated by thermal x-ray radiation generated in a gold Hohlraum, and an Al layer attached to it was used as a tracer for temperature diagnosis. Spatially resolved 1s-2p transition absorption spectra of the Al tracer were measured by the technique of point-projection-spectroscopy, and temperatures in the sample were obtained by comparing the measured spectra with detailed-term-accounting model calculations, with the density of the sample deduced using a combination of side-on radiography and radiative hydrodynamic simulation. The results showed the existence of axial temperature nonuniformity in the sample, and these temperature variations have been used to explain the shift of iron 2p-3d transition absorption feature along the axial direction of the Hohlraum used to heat the sample successfully.