Science.gov

Sample records for resonance acoustic radiation

  1. Magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging

    PubMed Central

    McDannold, Nathan; Maier, Stephan E.

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging is an elastography method developed for ultrasound imaging that maps displacements produced by focused ultrasound pulses systematically applied to different locations. The resulting images are “stiffness weighted” and yield information about local mechanical tissue properties. Here, the feasibility of magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) was tested. Quasistatic MR elastography was used to measure focal displacements using a one-dimensional MRI pulse sequence. A 1.63 or 1.5 MHz transducer supplied ultrasound pulses which were triggered by the magnetic resonance imaging hardware to occur before a displacement-encoding gradient. Displacements in and around the focus were mapped in a tissue-mimicking phantom and in an ex vivo bovine kidney. They were readily observed and increased linearly with acoustic power in the phantom (R2=0.99). At higher acoustic power levels, the displacement substantially increased and was associated with irreversible changes in the phantom. At these levels, transverse displacement components could also be detected. Displacements in the kidney were also observed and increased after thermal ablation. While the measurements need validation, the authors have demonstrated the feasibility of detecting small displacements induced by low-power ultrasound pulses using an efficient magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequence that is compatible with tracking of a dynamically steered ultrasound focal spot, and that the displacement increases with acoustic power. MR-ARFI has potential for elastography or to guide ultrasound therapies that use low-power pulsed ultrasound exposures, such as drug delivery. PMID:18777934

  2. Noise control using a plate radiator and an acoustic resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An active noise control subassembly for reducing noise caused by a source (such as an aircraft engine) independent of the subassembly. A noise radiating panel is bendably vibratable to generate a panel noise canceling at least a portion of the source noise. A piezoceramic actuator plate is connected to the panel. A front plate is spaced apart from the panel and the first plate, is positioned generally between the source noise and the panel, and has a sound exit port. A first pair of spaced-apart side walls each generally abut the panel and the front plate so as to generally enclose a front cavity to define a resonator.

  3. On the contribution of circumferential resonance modes in acoustic radiation force experienced by cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, Majid; Behzad, Mehdi

    2014-10-01

    A body insonified by a constant (time-varying) intensity sound field is known to experience a steady (oscillatory) force that is called the steady-state (dynamic) acoustic radiation force. Using the classical resonance scattering theorem (RST) which suggests the scattered field as a superposition of a resonance field and a background (non-resonance) component, we show that the radiation force acting on a cylindrical shell may be synthesized as a composition of three components: background part, resonance part and their interaction. The background component reveals the pure geometrical reflection effects and illustrates a regular behavior with respect to frequency, while the others demonstrate a singular behavior near the resonance frequencies. The results illustrate that the resonance effects associated to partial waves can be isolated by the subtraction of the background component from the total (steady-state or dynamic) radiation force function (i.e., residue component). In the case of steady-state radiation force, the components are exerted on the body as static forces. For the case of oscillatory amplitude excitation, the components are exerted at the modulation frequency with frequency-dependant phase shifts. The results demonstrate the dominant contribution of the non-resonance component of dynamic radiation force at high frequencies with respect to the residue component, which offers the potential application of ultrasound stimulated vibro-acoustic spectroscopy technique in low frequency resonance spectroscopy purposes. Furthermore, the proposed formulation may be useful essentially due to its intrinsic value in physical acoustics. In addition, it may unveil the contribution of resonance modes in the dynamic radiation force experienced by the cylindrical objects and its underlying physics.

  4. Varying the agglomeration position of particles in a micro-channel using Acoustic Radiation Force beyond the resonance condition.

    PubMed

    Dron, Olivier; Aider, Jean-Luc

    2013-09-01

    It is well-known that particles can be focused at mid-height of a micro-channel using Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF) tuned at the resonance frequency (h=λ/2). The resonance condition is a strong limitation to the use of acoustophoresis (particles manipulation using acoustic force) in many applications. In this study we show that it is possible to focus the particles anywhere along the height of a micro-channel just by varying the acoustic frequency, in contradiction with the resonance condition. This result has been thoroughly checked experimentally. The different physical properties as well as wall materials have been changed. The wall materials is finally the only critical parameters. One of the specificity of the micro-channel is the thickness of the carrier and reflector layer. A preliminary analysis of the experimental results suggests that the acoustic focusing beyond the classic resonance condition can be explained in the framework of the multilayered resonator proposed by Hill [1]. Nevertheless, further numerical studies are needed in order to confirm and fully understand how the acoustic pressure node can be moved over the entire height of the micro channel by varying the acoustic frequency. Despite some uncertainties about the origin of the phenomenon, it is robust and can be used for improved acoustic sorting or manipulation of particles or biological cells in confined set-ups. PMID:23628114

  5. Variable ultrasound trigger delay for improved magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougenot, Charles; Waspe, Adam; Looi, Thomas; Drake, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) allows the quantification of microscopic displacements induced by ultrasound pulses, which are proportional to the local acoustic intensity. This study describes a new method to acquire MR-ARFI maps, which reduces the measurement noise in the quantification of displacement as well as improving its robustness in the presence of motion. Two MR-ARFI sequences were compared in this study. The first sequence ‘variable MSG’ involves switching the polarity of the motion sensitive gradient (MSG) between odd and even image frames. The second sequence named ‘static MSG’ involves a variable ultrasound trigger delay to sonicate during the first or second MSG for odd and even image frames, respectively. As previously published, the data acquired with a variable MSG required the use of reference data acquired prior to any sonication to process displacement maps. In contrary, data acquired with a static MSG were converted to displacement maps without using reference data acquired prior to the sonication. Displacement maps acquired with both sequences were compared by performing sonications for three different conditions: in a polyacrylamide phantom, in the leg muscle of a freely breathing pig and in the leg muscle of pig under apnea. The comparison of images acquired at even image frames and odd image frames indicates that the sequence with a static MSG provides a significantly better steady state (p  <  0.001 based on a Student’s t-test) than the images acquired with a variable MSG. In addition no reference data prior to sonication were required to process displacement maps for data acquired with a static MSG. The absence of reference data prior to sonication provided a 41% reduction of the spatial distribution of noise (p  <  0.001 based on a Student’s t-test) and reduced the sensitivity to motion for displacements acquired with a static MSG. No significant differences were expected and

  6. A rapid magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging sequence for ultrasonic refocusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougenot, Charles; Pichardo, Samuel; Engler, Steven; Waspe, Adam; Constanciel Colas, Elodie; Drake, James M.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance guided acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is being used to correct for aberrations induced by tissue heterogeneities when using high intensity focusing ultrasound (HIFU). A compromise between published MR-ARFI adaptive solutions is proposed to achieve efficient refocusing of the ultrasound beam in under 10 min. In addition, an ARFI sequence based on an EPI gradient echo sequence was used to simultaneously monitor displacement and temperature with a large SNR and low distortion. This study was conducted inside an Achieva 3T clinical MRI using a Philips Sonalleve MR-HIFU system to emit a 1 ms pulsed sonication with duty cycle of 2.3% at 300 Wac inside a polymer phantom. Virtual elements defined by a Hadamard array with sonication patterns composed of 6 phase steps were used to characterize 64 groups of 4 elements to find the optimal phase of the 256 elements of the transducer. The 384 sonication patterns were acquired in 580 s to identify the set of phases that maximize the displacement at the focal point. Three aberrators (neonatal skull, 8 year old skull and a checkered pattern) were added to each sonication pattern to evaluate the performance of this refocusing algorithm (n  =  4). These aberrators reduced the relative intensities to 95.3%, 69.6% and 25.5% for the neonatal skull, 8 year old skull, and checkered pattern virtual aberrators respectively. Using a 10 min refocusing algorithm, relative intensities of 101.6%, 91.3% and 93.3% were obtained. Better relative intensities of 103.9%, 94.3% and 101% were achieved using a 25 min refocusing algorithm. An average temperature increase of 4.2 °C per refocusing test was induced for the 10 min refocusing algorithm, resulting in a negligible thermal dose of 2 EM. A rapid refocusing of the beam can be achieved while keeping thermal effects to a minimum.

  7. A rapid magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging sequence for ultrasonic refocusing.

    PubMed

    Mougenot, Charles; Pichardo, Samuel; Engler, Steven; Waspe, Adam; Colas, Elodie Constanciel; Drake, James M

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance guided acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is being used to correct for aberrations induced by tissue heterogeneities when using high intensity focusing ultrasound (HIFU). A compromise between published MR-ARFI adaptive solutions is proposed to achieve efficient refocusing of the ultrasound beam in under 10 min. In addition, an ARFI sequence based on an EPI gradient echo sequence was used to simultaneously monitor displacement and temperature with a large SNR and low distortion. This study was conducted inside an Achieva 3T clinical MRI using a Philips Sonalleve MR-HIFU system to emit a 1 ms pulsed sonication with duty cycle of 2.3% at 300 Wac inside a polymer phantom. Virtual elements defined by a Hadamard array with sonication patterns composed of 6 phase steps were used to characterize 64 groups of 4 elements to find the optimal phase of the 256 elements of the transducer. The 384 sonication patterns were acquired in 580 s to identify the set of phases that maximize the displacement at the focal point. Three aberrators (neonatal skull, 8 year old skull and a checkered pattern) were added to each sonication pattern to evaluate the performance of this refocusing algorithm (n  =  4). These aberrators reduced the relative intensities to 95.3%, 69.6% and 25.5% for the neonatal skull, 8 year old skull, and checkered pattern virtual aberrators respectively. Using a 10 min refocusing algorithm, relative intensities of 101.6%, 91.3% and 93.3% were obtained. Better relative intensities of 103.9%, 94.3% and 101% were achieved using a 25 min refocusing algorithm. An average temperature increase of 4.2 °C per refocusing test was induced for the 10 min refocusing algorithm, resulting in a negligible thermal dose of 2 EM. A rapid refocusing of the beam can be achieved while keeping thermal effects to a minimum. PMID:27401452

  8. Optically selective, acoustically resonant gas detecting transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A gas analyzer is disclosed which responds to the resonant absorption or emission spectrum of a specific gas by producing an acoustic resonance in a chamber containing a sample of that gas, and which measures the amount of that emission or absorption by measuring the strength of that acoustic resonance, e.g., the maximum periodic pressure, velocity or density achieved. In the preferred embodiment, a light beam is modulated periodically at the acoustical resonance frequency of a closed chamber which contains an optically dense sample of the gas of interest. Periodic heating of the absorbing gas by the light beam causes a cyclic expansion, movement, and pressure within the gas. An amplitude is reached where the increased losses were the cyclic radiation energy received. A transducing system is inclined for converting the pressure variations of the resonant gas into electronic readout signals.

  9. Acoustic metasurface with hybrid resonances.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guancong; Yang, Min; Xiao, Songwen; Yang, Zhiyu; Sheng, Ping

    2014-09-01

    An impedance-matched surface has the property that an incident wave generates no reflection. Here we demonstrate that by using a simple construction, an acoustically reflecting surface can acquire hybrid resonances and becomes impedance-matched to airborne sound at tunable frequencies, such that no reflection is generated. Each resonant cell of the metasurface is deep-subwavelength in all its spatial dimensions, with its thickness less than the peak absorption wavelength by two orders of magnitude. As there can be no transmission, the impedance-matched acoustic wave is hence either completely absorbed at one or multiple frequencies, or converted into other form(s) of energy, such as an electrical current. A high acoustic-electrical energy conversion efficiency of 23% is achieved. PMID:24880731

  10. Contour mode resonators with acoustic reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; Fleming, James G.; Tuck, Melanie R.

    2008-06-10

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) resonator is disclosed which has a linear or ring-shaped acoustic resonator suspended above a substrate by an acoustic reflector. The acoustic resonator can be formed with a piezoelectric material (e.g. aluminum nitride, zinc oxide or PZT), or using an electrostatically-actuated material. The acoustic reflector (also termed an acoustic mirror) uses alternating sections of a relatively low acoustic impedance Z.sub.L material and a relatively high acoustic impedance Z.sub.H material to isolate the acoustic resonator from the substrate. The MEM resonator, which can be formed on a silicon substrate with conventional CMOS circuitry, has applications for forming oscillators, rf filters, and acoustic sensors.

  11. Miniature Sapphire Acoustic Resonator - MSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    A room temperature sapphire acoustics resonator incorporated into an oscillator represents a possible opportunity to improve on quartz ultrastable oscillator (USO) performance, which has been a staple for NASA missions since the inception of spaceflight. Where quartz technology is very mature and shows a performance improvement of perhaps 1 dB/decade, these sapphire acoustic resonators when integrated with matured quartz electronics could achieve a frequency stability improvement of 10 dB or more. As quartz oscillators are an essential element of nearly all types of frequency standards and reference systems, the success of MSAR would advance the development of frequency standards and systems for both groundbased and flight-based projects. Current quartz oscillator technology is limited by quartz mechanical Q. With a possible improvement of more than x 10 Q with sapphire acoustic modes, the stability limit of current quartz oscillators may be improved tenfold, to 10(exp -14) at 1 second. The electromagnetic modes of sapphire that were previously developed at JPL require cryogenic temperatures to achieve the high Q levels needed to achieve this stability level. However sapphire fs acoustic modes, which have not been used before in a high-stability oscillator, indicate the required Q values (as high as Q = 10(exp 8)) may be achieved at room temperature in the kHz range. Even though sapphire is not piezoelectric, such a high Q should allow electrostatic excitation of the acoustic modes with a combination of DC and AC voltages across a small sapphire disk (approximately equal to l mm thick). The first evaluations under this task will test predictions of an estimated input impedance of 10 kilohms at Q = 10(exp 8), and explore the Q values that can be realized in a smaller resonator, which has not been previously tested for acoustic modes. This initial Q measurement and excitation demonstration can be viewed similar to a transducer converting electrical energy to

  12. Material fabrication using acoustic radiation forces

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Naveen N.; Sinha, Dipen N.; Goddard, Gregory Russ

    2015-12-01

    Apparatus and methods for using acoustic radiation forces to order particles suspended in a host liquid are described. The particles may range in size from nanometers to millimeters, and may have any shape. The suspension is placed in an acoustic resonator cavity, and acoustical energy is supplied thereto using acoustic transducers. The resulting pattern may be fixed by using a solidifiable host liquid, forming thereby a solid material. Patterns may be quickly generated; typical times ranging from a few seconds to a few minutes. In a one-dimensional arrangement, parallel layers of particles are formed. With two and three dimensional transducer arrangements, more complex particle configurations are possible since different standing-wave patterns may be generated in the resonator. Fabrication of periodic structures, such as metamaterials, having periods tunable by varying the frequency of the acoustic waves, on surfaces or in bulk volume using acoustic radiation forces, provides great flexibility in the creation of new materials. Periodicities may range from millimeters to sub-micron distances, covering a large portion of the range for optical and acoustical metamaterials.

  13. Acoustic resonance frequency locked photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2003-09-09

    A photoacoustic spectroscopy method and apparatus for maintaining an acoustic source frequency on a sample cell resonance frequency comprising: providing an acoustic source to the sample cell, the acoustic source having a source frequency; repeatedly and continuously sweeping the source frequency across the resonance frequency at a sweep rate; and employing an odd-harmonic of the source frequency sweep rate to maintain the source frequency sweep centered on the resonance frequency.

  14. Acoustic resonance techniques for quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, D.N.

    1992-09-01

    Acoustic resonance based nondestructive techniques are described that can be used for both process and quality control in manufacturing. The Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (AS) technique is highlighted for its capability in fluid property (flow, density, viscosity, and speed of sound) monitoring. Possible applications of these noninvasive techniques for textile manufacturing are pointed out.

  15. Acoustic resonance techniques for quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, D.N.

    1992-01-01

    Acoustic resonance based nondestructive techniques are described that can be used for both process and quality control in manufacturing. The Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (AS) technique is highlighted for its capability in fluid property (flow, density, viscosity, and speed of sound) monitoring. Possible applications of these noninvasive techniques for textile manufacturing are pointed out.

  16. Acoustic resonance phase locked photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2003-08-19

    A photoacoustic spectroscopy method and apparatus for maintaining an acoustic source frequency on a sample cell resonance frequency comprising: providing an acoustic source to the sample cell to generate a photoacoustic signal, the acoustic source having a source frequency; continuously measuring detection phase of the photoacoustic signal with respect to source frequency or a harmonic thereof; and employing the measured detection phase to provide magnitude and direction for correcting the source frequency to the resonance frequency.

  17. Acoustic resonance for nonmetallic mine detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-04-01

    The feasibility of acoustic resonance for detection of plastic mines was investigated by researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Instrumentation and Controls Division under an internally funded program. The data reported in this paper suggest that acoustic resonance is not a practical method for mine detection. Representative small plastic anti-personnel mines were tested, and were found to not exhibit detectable acoustic resonances. Also, non-metal objects known to have strong acoustic resonances were tested with a variety of excitation techniques, and no practical non-contact method of exciting a consistently detectable resonance in a buried object was discovered. Some of the experimental data developed in this work may be useful to other researchers seeking a method to detect buried plastic mines. A number of excitation methods and their pitfalls are discussed. Excitation methods that were investigated include swept acoustic, chopped acoustic, wavelet acoustic, and mechanical shaking. Under very contrived conditions, a weak response that could be attributed to acoustic resonance was observed, but it does not appear to be practical as a mine detection feature. Transfer properties of soil were investigated. Impulse responses of several representative plastic mines were investigated. Acoustic leakage coupling, and its implications as a disruptive mechanism were investigated.

  18. Measuring the acoustic response of Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Martín; Marti, Arturo C.; Vogt, Patrik; Kasper, Lutz; Quarthal, Dominik

    2015-04-01

    Many experiments have been proposed to investigate acoustic phenomena in college and early undergraduate levels, in particular the speed of sound,1-9 by means of different methods, such as time of flight, transit time, or resonance in tubes. In this paper we propose to measure the acoustic response curves of a glass beaker filled with different gases, used as an acoustic resonator. We show that these curves expose many interesting peaks and features, one of which matches the resonance peak predicted for a Helmholtz resonator fairly well, and gives a decent estimate for the speed of sound in some cases. The measures are obtained thanks to the capabilities of smartphones.

  19. Turbofan Acoustic Propagation and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter

    2000-01-01

    This document describes progress in the development of finite element codes for the prediction of near and far field acoustic radiation from the inlet and aft fan ducts of turbofan engines. The report consists of nine papers which have appeared in archival journals and conference proceedings, or are presently in review for publication. Topics included are: 1. Aft Fan Duct Acoustic Radiation; 2. Mapped Infinite Wave Envelope Elements for Acoustic Radiation in a Uniformly Moving Medium; 3. A Reflection Free Boundary Condition for Propagation in Uniform Flow Using Mapped Infinite Wave Envelope Elements; 4. A Numerical Comparison Between Multiple-Scales and FEM Solution for Sound Propagation in Lined Flow Ducts; 5. Acoustic Propagation at High Frequencies in Ducts; 6. The Boundary Condition at an Impedance Wall in a Nonuniform Duct with Potential Flow; 7. A Reverse Flow Theorem and Acoustic Reciprocity in Compressible Potential Flows; 8. Reciprocity and Acoustics Power in One Dimensional Compressible Potential Flows; and 9. Numerical Experiments on Acoustic Reciprocity in Compressible Potential Flows.

  20. Humanitarian mine detection by acoustic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-03-01

    The JASON Committee at MITRE Corp. was tasked by DARPA to inquire into suitable technologies for humanitarian mine detection. Acoustic resonance was one of the very few technologies that the JASONs determined might be promising for the task, but was as yet unexplored at the time that they conducted their inquiry. The objective of this Seed Money investigation into acoustic resonance was to determine if it would be feasible to use acoustic resonance to provide an improvement to present methods for humanitarian mine detection. As detailed in this report, acoustic resonance methods do not appear to be feasible for this task. Although acoustic resonant responses are relatively easy to detect when they exist, they are very difficult to excite by the non-contact means that must be used for buried objects. Despite many different attempts, this research did not discover any practical means of using sound to excite resonant responses in objects known to have strong resonances. The shaker table experiments did see an effect that might be attributable to the resonance of the object under test, but the effect was weak, and exploited the a priori knowledge of the resonant frequency of the object under test to distinguish it from the background. If experiments that used objects known to have strong acoustic resonances produced such marginal results, this does not seem to be a practical method to detect objects with weak resonances or non-existent resonances. The results of this work contribute to the ORNL countermine initiative. ORNL is exploring several unconventional mine detection technologies, and is proposed to explore others. Since this research has discovered some major pitfalls in non-metallic mine detection, this experience will add realism to other strategies proposed for mine detection technologies. The experiment provided hands-on experience with inert plastic mines under field conditions, and gives ORNL additional insight into the problems of developing practical

  1. High Q Miniature Sapphire Acoustic Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Tjoelker, R. L.

    2010-01-01

    We have demonstrated high Q measurements in a room temperature Miniature Sapphire Acoustic Resonator (MSAR). Initial measurements of bulk acoustic modes in room temperature sapphire at 39 MHz have demonstrated a Q of 8.8 x 10(exp 6). The long term goal of this work is to integrate such a high Q resonator with small, low noise quartz oscillator electronics, providing a fractional frequency stability better than 1 x 10(exp -14) @ 1s.

  2. Particle manipulation by a non-resonant acoustic levitator

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Pérez, Nicolás; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2015-01-05

    We present the analysis of a non-resonant acoustic levitator, formed by an ultrasonic transducer and a concave reflector. In contrast to traditional levitators, the geometry presented herein does not require the separation distance between the transducer and the reflector to be a multiple of half wavelength. The levitator behavior is numerically predicted by applying a numerical model to calculate the acoustic pressure distribution and the Gor'kov theory to obtain the potential of the acoustic radiation force that acts on a levitated particle. We also demonstrate that levitating particles can be manipulated by controlling the reflector position while maintaining the transducer in a fixed position.

  3. Particle manipulation by a non-resonant acoustic levitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Pérez, Nicolás; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2015-01-01

    We present the analysis of a non-resonant acoustic levitator, formed by an ultrasonic transducer and a concave reflector. In contrast to traditional levitators, the geometry presented herein does not require the separation distance between the transducer and the reflector to be a multiple of half wavelength. The levitator behavior is numerically predicted by applying a numerical model to calculate the acoustic pressure distribution and the Gor'kov theory to obtain the potential of the acoustic radiation force that acts on a levitated particle. We also demonstrate that levitating particles can be manipulated by controlling the reflector position while maintaining the transducer in a fixed position.

  4. Convert Acoustic Resonances to Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xue; Li, Yong; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-chun; Zhang, Likun

    2016-07-01

    We use acoustic resonances in a planar layer of half-wavelength thickness to twist wave vectors of an in-coming plane wave into a spiral phase dislocation of an outgoing vortex beam with orbital angular momentum (OAM). The mechanism is numerically and experimentally demonstrated by producing an airborne Bessel-like vortex beam. Our acoustic resonance-based OAM production differs from existing means for OAM production by enormous phased spiral sources or by elaborate spiral profiles. Our study can advance the capability of generating phase dislocated wave fields for further applications of acoustic OAM.

  5. Convert Acoustic Resonances to Orbital Angular Momentum.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Li, Yong; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun; Zhang, Likun

    2016-07-15

    We use acoustic resonances in a planar layer of half-wavelength thickness to twist wave vectors of an in-coming plane wave into a spiral phase dislocation of an outgoing vortex beam with orbital angular momentum (OAM). The mechanism is numerically and experimentally demonstrated by producing an airborne Bessel-like vortex beam. Our acoustic resonance-based OAM production differs from existing means for OAM production by enormous phased spiral sources or by elaborate spiral profiles. Our study can advance the capability of generating phase dislocated wave fields for further applications of acoustic OAM. PMID:27472113

  6. Acoustic spin pumping in magnetoelectric bulk acoustic wave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polzikova, N. I.; Alekseev, S. G.; Pyataikin, I. I.; Kotelyanskii, I. M.; Luzanov, V. A.; Orlov, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    We present the generation and detection of spin currents by using magnetoelastic resonance excitation in a magnetoelectric composite high overtone bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonator (HBAR) formed by a Al-ZnO-Al-GGG-YIG-Pt structure. Transversal BAW drives magnetization oscillations in YIG film at a given resonant magnetic field, and the resonant magneto-elastic coupling establishes the spin-current generation at the Pt/YIG interface. Due to the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) this BAW-driven spin current is converted to a dc voltage in the Pt layer. The dependence of the measured voltage both on magnetic field and frequency has a resonant character. The voltage is determined by the acoustic power in HBAR and changes its sign upon magnetic field reversal. We compare the experimentally observed amplitudes of the ISHE electrical field achieved by our method and other approaches to spin current generation that use surface acoustic waves and microwave resonators for ferromagnetic resonance excitation, with the theoretically expected values.

  7. Acoustic radiation stress in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the radiation-induced static strains associated with acoustic waves propagating in solids are obtained directly from the virial theorem for an elastic continuum and that the radiation stresses result from combining the virial theorem with the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle of adiabatic invariance. The experimental confirmation of critical theoretical predictions in solids is reported. The implications of the results for the fundamental thermal properties of crystals are addressed.

  8. Extraordinary acoustic transmission mediated by Helmholtz resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Koju, Vijay; Rowe, Ebony; Robertson, William M.

    2014-07-15

    We demonstrate perfect transmission of sound through a rigid barrier embedded with Helmholtz resonators. The resonators are confined within a waveguide and they are oriented such that one neck protrudes onto each side of the barrier. Perfect sound transmission occurs even though the open area of the necks is less than 3% of the barrier area. Maximum transmission occurs at the resonant frequency of the Helmholtz resonator. Because the dimensions of the Helmholtz resonators are much smaller than the resonant wavelength, the transmission is independent of the direction of sound on the barrier and of the relative placement of the necks. Further, we show that the transmitted sound experiences a continuous phase transition of π radians as a function of frequency through resonance. In simulations of adjacent resonators with slightly offset resonance frequencies, the phase difference leads to destructive interference. By expanding the simulation to a linear array of tuned Helmholtz resonators we show that it is possible to create an acoustic lens. The ability of Helmholtz resonator arrays to manipulate the phase of a plane acoustic wave enables a new class of sonic beam-forming devices analogous to diffractive optics.

  9. Acoustic Resonator Optimisation for Airborne Particle Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devendran, Citsabehsan; Billson, Duncan R.; Hutchins, David A.; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    Advances in micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology and biomedical research necessitate micro-machined manipulators to capture, handle and position delicate micron-sized particles. To this end, a parallel plate acoustic resonator system has been investigated for the purposes of manipulation and entrapment of micron sized particles in air. Numerical and finite element modelling was performed to optimise the design of the layered acoustic resonator. To obtain an optimised resonator design, careful considerations of the effect of thickness and material properties are required. Furthermore, the effect of acoustic attenuation which is dependent on frequency is also considered within this study, leading to an optimum operational frequency range. Finally, experimental results demonstrated good particle levitation and capture of various particle properties and sizes ranging to as small as 14.8 μm.

  10. Acoustofluidics 5: Building microfluidic acoustic resonators.

    PubMed

    Lenshof, A; Evander, M; Laurell, T; Nilsson, J

    2012-02-21

    Acoustophoresis is getting more attention as an effective and gentle non-contact method of manipulating cells and particles in microfluidic systems. A key to a successful assembly of an acoustophoresis system is a proper design of the acoustic resonator where aspects of fabrication techniques, material choice, thickness matching of involved components, as well as strategies of actuation, all have to be considered. This tutorial covers some of the basics in designing and building microfluidic acoustic resonators and will hopefully be a comprehensive and advisory document to assist the interested reader in creating a successful acoustophoretic device. PMID:22246532

  11. Wave Phenomena in an Acoustic Resonant Chamber

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mary E.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the design and operation of a high Q acoustical resonant chamber which can be used to demonstrate wave phenomena such as three-dimensional normal modes, Q values, densities of states, changes in the speed of sound, Fourier decomposition, damped harmonic oscillations, sound-absorbing properties, and perturbation and scattering problems.…

  12. Acoustic resonator and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Kline, G.R.; Lakin, K.M.

    1983-10-13

    A method of fabricating an acoustic wave resonator wherein all processing steps are accomplished from a single side of said substrate. The method involves deposition of a multi-layered Al/AlN structure on a GaAs substrate followed by a series of fabrication steps to define a resonator from said composite. The resulting resonator comprises an AlN layer between two Al layers and another layer of AlN on an exterior of one of said Al layers.

  13. Acoustic resonator and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Kline, G.R.; Lakin, K.M.

    1985-03-05

    A method is disclosed of fabricating an acoustic wave resonator wherein all processing steps are accomplished from a single side of said substrate. The method involves deposition of a multi-layered Al/AlN structure on a GaAs substrate followed by a series of fabrication steps to define a resonator from said composite. The resulting resonator comprises an AlN layer between two Al layers and another layer of AlN on an exterior of one of said Al layers. 4 figs.

  14. Acoustic resonator and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Kline, Gerald R.; Lakin, Kenneth M.

    1985-03-05

    A method of fabricating an acoustic wave resonator wherein all processing steps are accomplished from a single side of said substrate. The method involves deposition of a multi-layered Al/AlN structure on a GaAs substrate followed by a series of fabrication steps to define a resonator from said composite. The resulting resonator comprises an AlN layer between two Al layers and another layer of AlN on an exterior of one of said Al layers.

  15. Flow-excited acoustic resonance of a Helmholtz resonator: Discrete vortex model compared to experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Xiwen; Jing, Xiaodong Sun, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-15

    The acoustic resonance in a Helmholtz resonator excited by a low Mach number grazing flow is studied theoretically. The nonlinear numerical model is established by coupling the vortical motion at the cavity opening with the cavity acoustic mode through an explicit force balancing relation between the two sides of the opening. The vortical motion is modeled in the potential flow framework, in which the oscillating motion of the thin shear layer is described by an array of convected point vortices, and the unsteady vortex shedding is determined by the Kutta condition. The cavity acoustic mode is obtained from the one-dimensional acoustic propagation model, the time-domain equivalent of which is given by means of a broadband time-domain impedance model. The acoustic resistances due to radiation and viscous loss at the opening are also taken into account. The physical processes of the self-excited oscillations, at both resonance and off-resonance states, are simulated directly in the time domain. Results show that the shear layer exhibits a weak flapping motion at the off-resonance state, whereas it rolls up into large-scale vortex cores when resonances occur. Single and dual-vortex patterns are observed corresponding to the first and second hydrodynamic modes. The simulation also reveals different trajectories of the two vortices across the opening when the first and second hydrodynamic modes co-exist. The strong modulation of the shed vorticity by the acoustic feedback at the resonance state is demonstrated. The model overestimates the pressure pulsation amplitude by a factor 2, which is expected to be due to the turbulence of the flow which is not taken into account. The model neglects vortex shedding at the downstream and side edges of the cavity. This will also result in an overestimation of the pulsation amplitude.

  16. Flow-excited acoustic resonance of a Helmholtz resonator: Discrete vortex model compared to experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiwen; Jing, Xiaodong; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-01

    The acoustic resonance in a Helmholtz resonator excited by a low Mach number grazing flow is studied theoretically. The nonlinear numerical model is established by coupling the vortical motion at the cavity opening with the cavity acoustic mode through an explicit force balancing relation between the two sides of the opening. The vortical motion is modeled in the potential flow framework, in which the oscillating motion of the thin shear layer is described by an array of convected point vortices, and the unsteady vortex shedding is determined by the Kutta condition. The cavity acoustic mode is obtained from the one-dimensional acoustic propagation model, the time-domain equivalent of which is given by means of a broadband time-domain impedance model. The acoustic resistances due to radiation and viscous loss at the opening are also taken into account. The physical processes of the self-excited oscillations, at both resonance and off-resonance states, are simulated directly in the time domain. Results show that the shear layer exhibits a weak flapping motion at the off-resonance state, whereas it rolls up into large-scale vortex cores when resonances occur. Single and dual-vortex patterns are observed corresponding to the first and second hydrodynamic modes. The simulation also reveals different trajectories of the two vortices across the opening when the first and second hydrodynamic modes co-exist. The strong modulation of the shed vorticity by the acoustic feedback at the resonance state is demonstrated. The model overestimates the pressure pulsation amplitude by a factor 2, which is expected to be due to the turbulence of the flow which is not taken into account. The model neglects vortex shedding at the downstream and side edges of the cavity. This will also result in an overestimation of the pulsation amplitude.

  17. Power absorption in acoustically driven ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labanowski, D.; Jung, A.; Salahuddin, S.

    2016-01-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) have recently been used to drive ferromagnetic resonance by exploiting the coupling between strain and magnetization in magnetostrictive materials in a technique called acoustically driven ferromagnetic resonance (ADFMR). In this work, we quantitatively examine the power absorbed by the magnetic elements in such systems. We find that power absorption scales exponentially with the length of the magnetic element in the direction of SAW propagation, with the rate of scaling set by the thickness of magnetic material. In addition, we find that ADFMR behaves consistently across a wide range of input power values (>65 dB). Our results indicate that devices such as filters, oscillators, and sensors can be designed that operate with very low power, yet provide high tunability.

  18. Porous silicon bulk acoustic wave resonator with integrated transducer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report that porous silicon acoustic Bragg reflectors and AlN-based transducers can be successfully combined and processed in a commercial solidly mounted resonator production line. The resulting device takes advantage of the unique acoustic properties of porous silicon in order to form a monolithically integrated bulk acoustic wave resonator. PMID:22776697

  19. Coupling between plate vibration and acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1992-01-01

    A detailed numerical investigation of the coupling between the vibration of a flexible plate and the acoustic radiation is performed. The nonlinear Euler equations are used to describe the acoustic fluid while the nonlinear plate equation is used to describe the plate vibration. Linear, nonlinear, and quasi-periodic or chaotic vibrations and the resultant acoustic radiation are analyzed. We find that for the linear plate response, acoustic coupling is negligible. However, for the nonlinear and chaotic responses, acoustic coupling has a significant effect on the vibration level as the loading increases. The radiated pressure from a plate undergoing nonlinear or chaotic vibrations is found to propagate nonlinearly into the far-field. However, the nonlinearity due to wave propagation is much weaker than that due to the plate vibrations. As the acoustic wave propagates into the far-field, the relative difference in level between the fundamental and its harmonics and subharmonics decreases with distance.

  20. Conversion acoustic resonances in orthorhombic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimov, V. N.; Bessonov, D. A.; Alshits, V. I.

    2016-05-01

    A classification of acoustic-beam reflection resonances in orthorhombic crystals under conditions where a proximity to conversion is implemented in the vicinity of total internal reflection is proposed. In this case, the energy from the incident pump beam falls almost entirely into a narrow intense reflected beam propagating at a small angle with respect to the surface. The crystal boundary is parallel to one of the elastic symmetry planes, and the excited beam propagates near one of axes 2 in this plane. Depending on the relations between the elastic moduli and the chosen propagation geometry, 18 types of resonances may occur, but no more than three in each crystal. The developed theory combines an approximate analytical description and accurate computer analysis. The relations between the elastic moduli providing minimum energy loss over the parasite reflected wave are determined. Some crystals with resonant excitation very close to conversion are revealed.

  1. Acoustic radiation from lined, unflanged ducts: Acoustic source distribution program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckemeyer, R. J.; Sawdy, D. T.

    1971-01-01

    An acoustic radiation analysis was developed to predict the far-field characteristics of fan noise radiated from an acoustically lined unflanged duct. This analysis is comprised of three modular digital computer programs which together provide a capability of accounting for the impedance mismatch at the duct exit plane. Admissible duct configurations include circular or annular, with or without an extended centerbody. This variation in duct configurations provides a capability of modeling inlet and fan duct noise radiation. The computer programs are described in detail.

  2. Recent developments of film bulk acoustic resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Junning; Liu, Guorong; Li, Jie; Li, Guoqiang

    2016-06-01

    Film bulk acoustic wave resonator (FBAR) experienced skyrocketing development in the past 15 years, owing to the explosive development of mobile communication. It stands out in acoustic filters mainly because of high quality factor, which enables low insertion loss and sharp roll off. Except for the massive application in wireless communication, FBARs are also promising sensors because of the high sensitivity and readily integration ability to miniaturize circuits. On the ground of summarizing FBAR’s application in wireless communication as filters and in sensors including electronic nose, bio field, and pressure sensing, this paper review the main challenges of each application faced. The number of filters installed in the mobile phone has being grown explosively, which leads to overcrowded bands and put harsh requirements on component size and power consumption control for each unit. Data flow and rate are becoming increasingly demanding as well. This paper discusses three promising technical strategies addressing these issues. Among which coupled resonator filter is given intense attention because it is able to vigorously reduce the filter size by stacking two or more resonators together, and it is a great technique to increase data flow and rate. Temperature compensation methods are discussed considering their vital influence on frequency stability. Finally, materials improvement and novel materials exploration for band width modulation, tunable band acquisition, and quality factor improvement are discussed. The authors appeal attention of the academic society to bring AlN epitaxial thin film into the FBAR fabrication and have proposed a configuration to implement this idea.

  3. Soft resonator of omnidirectional resonance for acoustic metamaterials with a negative bulk modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xiaodong; Meng, Yang; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2015-11-01

    Monopolar resonance is of fundamental importance in the acoustic field. Here, we present the realization of a monopolar resonance that goes beyond the concept of Helmholtz resonators. The balloon-like soft resonator (SR) oscillates omnidirectionally and radiates from all parts of its spherical surface, eliminating the need for a hard wall for the cavity and baffle effects. For airborne sound, such a low-modulus resonator can be made extremely lightweight. Deep subwavelength resonance is achieved when the SR is tuned by adjusting the shell thickness, benefiting from the large density contrast between the shell material and the encapsulated gas. The SR resonates with near-perfect monopole symmetry, as demonstrated by the theoretical and experimental results, which are in excellent agreement. For a lattice of SRs, a band gap occurs and blocks near-total transmission, and the effective bulk modulus exhibits a prominent negative band, while the effective mass density remains unchanged. Our study shows that the SR is suitable for building 3D acoustic metamaterials and provides a basis for constructing left-handed materials as a new means of creating a negative bulk modulus.

  4. Soft resonator of omnidirectional resonance for acoustic metamaterials with a negative bulk modulus.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xiaodong; Meng, Yang; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Monopolar resonance is of fundamental importance in the acoustic field. Here, we present the realization of a monopolar resonance that goes beyond the concept of Helmholtz resonators. The balloon-like soft resonator (SR) oscillates omnidirectionally and radiates from all parts of its spherical surface, eliminating the need for a hard wall for the cavity and baffle effects. For airborne sound, such a low-modulus resonator can be made extremely lightweight. Deep subwavelength resonance is achieved when the SR is tuned by adjusting the shell thickness, benefiting from the large density contrast between the shell material and the encapsulated gas. The SR resonates with near-perfect monopole symmetry, as demonstrated by the theoretical and experimental results, which are in excellent agreement. For a lattice of SRs, a band gap occurs and blocks near-total transmission, and the effective bulk modulus exhibits a prominent negative band, while the effective mass density remains unchanged. Our study shows that the SR is suitable for building 3D acoustic metamaterials and provides a basis for constructing left-handed materials as a new means of creating a negative bulk modulus. PMID:26538085

  5. Soft resonator of omnidirectional resonance for acoustic metamaterials with a negative bulk modulus

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xiaodong; Meng, Yang; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Monopolar resonance is of fundamental importance in the acoustic field. Here, we present the realization of a monopolar resonance that goes beyond the concept of Helmholtz resonators. The balloon-like soft resonator (SR) oscillates omnidirectionally and radiates from all parts of its spherical surface, eliminating the need for a hard wall for the cavity and baffle effects. For airborne sound, such a low-modulus resonator can be made extremely lightweight. Deep subwavelength resonance is achieved when the SR is tuned by adjusting the shell thickness, benefiting from the large density contrast between the shell material and the encapsulated gas. The SR resonates with near-perfect monopole symmetry, as demonstrated by the theoretical and experimental results, which are in excellent agreement. For a lattice of SRs, a band gap occurs and blocks near-total transmission, and the effective bulk modulus exhibits a prominent negative band, while the effective mass density remains unchanged. Our study shows that the SR is suitable for building 3D acoustic metamaterials and provides a basis for constructing left-handed materials as a new means of creating a negative bulk modulus. PMID:26538085

  6. Resonant capacitive MEMS acoustic emission transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozevin, D.; Greve, D. W.; Oppenheim, I. J.; Pessiki, S. P.

    2006-12-01

    We describe resonant capacitive MEMS transducers developed for use as acoustic emission (AE) detectors, fabricated in the commercial three-layer polysilicon surface micromachining process (MUMPs). The 1 cm square device contains six independent transducers in the frequency range between 100 and 500 kHz, and a seventh transducer at 1 MHz. Each transducer is a parallel plate capacitor with one plate free to vibrate, thereby causing a capacitance change which creates an output signal in the form of a current under a dc bias voltage. With the geometric proportions we employed, each transducer responds with two distinct resonant frequencies. In our design the etch hole spacing was chosen to limit squeeze film damping and thereby produce an underdamped vibration when operated at atmospheric pressure. Characterization experiments obtained by capacitance and admittance measurements are presented, and transducer responses to physically simulated AE source are discussed. Finally, we report our use of the device to detect acoustic emissions associated with crack initiation and growth in weld metal.

  7. Acoustic emission sensor radiation damage threshold experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Beeson, K.M.; Pepper, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    Determination of the threshold for damage to acoustic emission sensors exposed to radiation is important in their application to leak detection in radioactive waste transport and storage. Proper response to system leaks is necessary to ensure the safe operation of these systems. A radiation impaired sensor could provide ``false negative or false positive`` indication of acoustic signals from leaks within the system. Research was carried out in the Radiochemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the beta/gamma radiation damage threshold for acoustic emission sensor systems. The individual system consisted of an acoustic sensor mounted with a two part epoxy onto a stainless steel waveguide. The systems were placed in an irradiation fixture and exposed to a Cobalt-60 source. After each irradiation, the sensors were recalibrated by Physical Acoustics Corporation. The results were compared to the initial calibrations performed prior to irradiation and a control group, not exposed to radiation, was used to validate the results. This experiment determines the radiation damage threshold of each acoustic sensor system and verifies its life expectancy, usefulness and reliability for many applications in radioactive environments.

  8. Passive separation control by acoustic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. L.; Spedding, G. R.

    2013-10-01

    At transitional Reynolds numbers, the laminar boundary layer separation and possible reattachment on a smooth airfoil, or wing section, are notoriously sensitive to small variations in geometry or in the fluid environment. We report here on the results of a pilot study that adds to this list of sensitivities. The presence of small holes in the suction surface of an Eppler 387 wing has a transformative effect upon the aerodynamics, by changing the mean chordwise separation line location. These changes are not simply a consequence of the presence of the small cavities, which by themselves have no effect. Acoustic resonance in the backing cavities generates tones that interact with intrinsic flow instabilities. Possible consequences for passive flow control strategies are discussed together with potential problems in measurements through pressure taps in such flow regimes.

  9. Wax Point Determinations Using Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    2002-04-08

    The thermodynamic characterization of the wax point of a given crude is essential in order to maintain flow conditions that prevent plugging of undersea pipelines. This report summarizes the efforts made towards applying an Acoustic Cavity Resonance Spectrometer (ACRS) to the determination of pressures and temperatures at which wax precipitates from crude. Phillips Petroleum Company, Inc., the CRADA participant, supplied the ACRS. The instrumentation was shipped to Dr. Thomas Schmidt of ORNL, the CRADA contractor, in May 2000 after preliminary software development performed under the guidance of Dr. Samuel Colgate and Dr. Evan House of the University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. Upon receipt it became apparent that a number of modifications still needed to be made before the ACRS could be precisely and safely used for wax point measurements. This report reviews the sequence of alterations made to the ACRS, as well as defines the possible applications of the instrumentation once the modifications have been completed.

  10. Characterization of energy trapping in a bulk acoustic wave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkonen, Kimmo; Meltaus, Johanna; Pensala, Tuomas; Kaivola, Matti

    2010-12-01

    Acoustic wave fields both within the active electrode area of a solidly mounted 1.8 GHz bulk acoustic wave resonator, and around it in the surrounding region, are measured using a heterodyne laser interferometer. Plate-wave dispersion diagrams for both regions are extracted from the measurement data. The experimental dispersion data reveal the cutoff frequencies of the acoustic vibration modes in the region surrounding the resonator, and, therefore, the energy trapping range of the resonator can readily be determined. The measured dispersion properties of the surrounding region, together with the abruptly diminishing amplitude of the dispersion curves in the resonator, signal the onset of acoustic leakage from the resonator. This information is important for verifying and further developing the simulation tools used for the design of the resonators. Experimental wave field images, dispersion diagrams for both regions, and the threshold for energy leakage are discussed.

  11. Numerical Investigations of High Pressure Acoustic Waves in Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athavale, Mahesh; Pindera, Maciej; Daniels, Christopher C.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation presents work on numerical investigations of nonlinear acoustic phenomena in resonators that can generate high-pressure waves using acoustic forcing of the flow. Time-accurate simulations of the flow in a closed cone resonator were performed at different oscillation frequencies and amplitudes, and the numerical results for the resonance frequency and fluid pressure increase match the GRC experimental data well. Work on cone resonator assembly simulations has started and will involve calculations of the flow through the resonator assembly with and without acoustic excitation. A new technique for direct calculation of resonance frequency of complex shaped resonators is also being investigated. Script-driven command procedures will also be developed for optimization of the resonator shape for maximum pressure increase.

  12. Acoustic subwavelength imaging of subsurface objects with acoustic resonant metalens

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Ying; Liu, XiaoJun; Zhou, Chen; Wei, Qi; Wu, DaJian

    2013-11-25

    Early research into acoustic metamaterials has shown the possibility of achieving subwavelength near-field acoustic imaging. However, a major restriction of acoustic metamaterials is that the imaging objects must be placed in close vicinity of the devices. Here, we present an approach for acoustic imaging of subsurface objects far below the diffraction limit. An acoustic metalens made of holey-structured metamaterials is used to magnify evanescent waves, which can rebuild an image at the central plane. Without changing the physical structure of the metalens, our proposed approach can image objects located at certain distances from the input surface, which provides subsurface signatures of the objects with subwavelength spatial resolution.

  13. Tunable acoustic radiation pattern assisted by effective impedance boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Feng; Quan, Li; Wang, Li-Wei; Liu, Xiao-Zhou; Gong, Xiu-Fen

    2016-02-01

    The acoustic wave propagation from a two-dimensional subwavelength slit surrounded by metal plates decorated with Helmholtz resonators (HRs) is investigated both numerically and experimentally in this work. Owing to the presence of HRs, the effective impedance of metal surface boundary can be manipulated. By optimizing the distribution of HRs, the asymmetric effective impedance boundary will be obtained, which contributes to generating tunable acoustic radiation pattern such as directional acoustic beaming. These dipole-like radiation patterns have high radiation efficiency, no fingerprint of sidelobes, and a wide tunable range of the radiation pattern directivity angle which can be steered by the spatial displacements of HRs. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2012CB921504 and 2011CB707902), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.11474160), the Fundamental Research Funds for Central Universities, China (Grant No. 020414380001), the State Key Laboratory of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. SKLOA201401), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, and the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry.

  14. Tuning Coler Magnetic Current Apparatus with Magneto-Acoustic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Thorsten

    An attempt was made to tune the Coler magnetic current apparatus with the magneto acoustic resonance of the magnetic rods. Measurements with a replica of the famous Coler "Magnetstromapparat" were conducted. In order to tune the acoustic, magnetic and electric resonance circuits of the Coler device the magneto-acoustic resonance was measured with a frequency scan through a function generator and a lock-in amplifier. The frequency generator was powering a driving coil, while the lock-in was connected to a pickup coil. Both coils were placed on a magnetic rod. Resonances were observed up to the 17th harmonic. The quality Q of the observed resonances was 270. To study the magneto-acoustic resonance in the time domain a pair of Permendur rods were employed. The magneto-acoustic resonances of the Permendur rods were observed with an oscilloscope. Spectra of the magneto acoustic resonance were measured for the Permendur rods and for a Coler replica magnet in the frequency range from 25 kHz to 380 kHz. The next step was to bring the resonances of the Permendur rods close together so that they overlap. The 10thharmonic was chosen because it was close to the 180 kHz that Hans Coler related to ferromagnetism. Further more magneto-acoustic coupling between the Permendur rods was studied. Finally the question was explored if Hans Coler converted vacuum fluctuations via magnetic and acoustic resonance into electricity. There is a strong connection between magnetism and quantum field zero point energy (ZPE). An outlook is given on next steps in the experiments to unveil the working mechanism of the Coler magnetic current apparatus.

  15. Acoustic noise during functional magnetic resonance imaginga)

    PubMed Central

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Melcher, Jennifer R.; Kiang, Nelson Y.-S.

    2007-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For studies of the auditory system, acoustic noise generated during fMRI can interfere with assessments of this activation by introducing uncontrolled extraneous sounds. As a first step toward reducing the noise during fMRI, this paper describes the temporal and spectral characteristics of the noise present under typical fMRI study conditions for two imagers with different static magnetic field strengths. Peak noise levels were 123 and 138 dB re 20 μPa in a 1.5-tesla (T) and a 3-T imager, respectively. The noise spectrum (calculated over a 10-ms window coinciding with the highest-amplitude noise) showed a prominent maximum at 1 kHz for the 1.5-T imager (115 dB SPL) and at 1.4 kHz for the 3-T imager (131 dB SPL). The frequency content and timing of the most intense noise components indicated that the noise was primarily attributable to the readout gradients in the imaging pulse sequence. The noise persisted above background levels for 300-500 ms after gradient activity ceased, indicating that resonating structures in the imager or noise reverberating in the imager room were also factors. The gradient noise waveform was highly repeatable. In addition, the coolant pump for the imager’s permanent magnet and the room air handling system were sources of ongoing noise lower in both level and frequency than gradient coil noise. Knowledge of the sources and characteristics of the noise enabled the examination of general approaches to noise control that could be applied to reduce the unwanted noise during fMRI sessions. PMID:11051496

  16. Coupled resonator filter with single-layer acoustic coupler.

    PubMed

    Jamneala, Tiberiu; Small, Martha; Ruby, Rich; Larson, John D

    2008-10-01

    We discuss the operation of novel coupled-resonator filters with single-layer acoustic couplers. Our analysis employs the physical Mason model for acoustic resonators. Their simpler fabrication process is counterbalanced by the high acoustic attenuation of suitable coupler materials. At high levels of attenuation, both the phase and the acoustic impedance must be treated as complex quantities to accurately predict the filter insertion loss. We demonstrate that the typically poor near-band rejection of coupled resonator filters can be improved at the die level by connecting a small capacitance between the input and output of the filter to produce a pair of tunable transmission minima. We make use of these theoretical findings to fabricate coupled resonators filters operating at 2.45 GHz. PMID:18986880

  17. Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string

    DOEpatents

    Kent, William H.; Mitchell, Peter G.

    1981-01-01

    For use in transmitting acoustic waves propagated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  18. Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string

    DOEpatents

    Nardi, Anthony P.

    1981-01-01

    For use in transmitting acoustic waves propated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting a resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  19. Experimental realization of extraordinary acoustic transmission using Helmholtz resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Crow, Brian C.; Cullen, Jordan M.; McKenzie, William W.; Koju, Vijay; Robertson, William M.

    2015-02-15

    The phenomenon of extraordinary acoustic transmission through a solid barrier with an embedded Helmholtz resonator (HR) is demonstrated. The Helmholtz resonator consists of an embedded cavity and two necks that protrude, one on each side of the barrier. Extraordinary transmission occurs for a narrow spectral range encompassing the resonant frequency of the Helmholtz resonator. We show that an amplitude transmission of 97.5% is achieved through a resonator whose neck creates an open area of 6.25% of the total barrier area. In addition to the enhanced transmission, we show that there is a smooth, continuous phase transition in the transmitted sound as a function of frequency. The frequency dependent phase transition is used to experimentally realize slow wave propagation for a narrow-band Gaussian wave packet centered at the maximum transmission frequency. The use of parallel pairs of Helmholtz resonators tuned to different resonant frequencies is experimentally explored as a means of increasing the transmission bandwidth. These experiments show that because of the phase transition, there is always a frequency between the two Helmholtz resonant frequencies at which destructive interference occurs whether the resonances are close or far apart. Finally, we explain how the phase transition associated with Helmholtz-resonator-mediated extraordinary acoustic transmission can be exploited to produce diffractive acoustic components including sub-wavelength thickness acoustic lenses.

  20. Review on Acoustic Transducers for Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, N.; Ogi, H.; Hirao, M.

    2015-08-01

    Determination of elastic constants using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy requires transducers that can measure resonance frequencies accurately and identify the vibrational mode of each resonance frequency. We developed three transducers, namely an electromagnetic acoustic transducer, a tripod piezoelectric transducer coupled with a laser Doppler interferometer, and an antenna transmission transducer, for use with various materials and in different measurement circumstances. Their capability in resonant ultrasound spectroscopy and their applications are described.

  1. Acoustically induced transparency using Fano resonant periodic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, M.; Elayouch, A.; Farhat, M.; Addouche, M.; Khelif, A.; Baǧcı, H.

    2015-10-01

    A three-dimensional acoustic device, which supports Fano resonance and induced transparency in its response to an incident sound wave, is designed and fabricated. These effects are generated from the destructive interference of closely coupled one broad- and one narrow-band acoustic modes. The proposed design ensures excitation and interference of two spectrally close modes by locating a small pipe inside a wider and longer one. Indeed, numerical simulations and experiments demonstrate that this simple-to-fabricate structure can be used to generate Fano resonance as well as acoustically induced transparency with promising applications in sensing, cloaking, and imaging.

  2. Acoustic control in enclosures using optimally designed Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driesch, Patricia Lynne

    A virtual design methodology is developed to minimize the noise in enclosures with optimally designed, passive, acoustic absorbers (Helmholtz resonators). A series expansion of eigen functions is used to represent the acoustic absorbers as external volume velocities, eliminating the need for a solution of large matrix eigen value problems. A determination of this type (efficient model/reevaluation approach) significantly increases the design possibilities when optimization techniques are implemented. As a benchmarking exercise, this novel methodology was experimentally validated for a narrowband acoustic assessment of two optimally designed Helmholtz resonators coupled to a 2D enclosure. The resonators were tuned to the two lowest resonance frequencies of a 30.5 by 40.6 by 2.5 cm (12 x 16 x 1 inch) cavity with the resonator volume occupying only 2% of the enclosure volume. A maximum potential energy reduction of 12.4 dB was obtained at the second resonance of the cavity. As a full-scale demonstration of the efficacy of the proposed design method, the acoustic response from 90--190 Hz of a John Deere 7000 Ten series tractor cabin was investigated. The lowest cabin mode, referred to as a "boom" mode, proposes a significant challenge to a noise control engineer since its anti-node is located near the head of the operator and often generates unacceptable sound pressure levels. Exploiting the low frequency capability of Helmholtz resonators, lumped parameter models of these resonators were coupled to the enclosure via an experimentally determined acoustic model of the tractor cabin. The virtual design methodology uses gradient optimization techniques as a post processor for the modeling and analysis of the unmodified acoustic interior to determine optimal resonator characteristics. Using two optimally designed Helmholtz resonators; potential energy was experimentally reduced by 3.4 and 10.3 dB at 117 and 167 Hz, respectively.

  3. Acoustic metamaterials: From local resonances to broad horizons.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guancong; Sheng, Ping

    2016-02-01

    Within a time span of 15 years, acoustic metamaterials have emerged from academic curiosity to become an active field driven by scientific discoveries and diverse application potentials. This review traces the development of acoustic metamaterials from the initial findings of mass density and bulk modulus frequency dispersions in locally resonant structures to the diverse functionalities afforded by the perspective of negative constitutive parameter values, and their implications for acoustic wave behaviors. We survey the more recent developments, which include compact phase manipulation structures, superabsorption, and actively controllable metamaterials as well as the new directions on acoustic wave transport in moving fluid, elastic, and mechanical metamaterials, graphene-inspired metamaterials, and structures whose characteristics are best delineated by non-Hermitian Hamiltonians. Many of the novel acoustic metamaterial structures have transcended the original definition of metamaterials as arising from the collective manifestations of constituent resonating units, but they continue to extend wave manipulation functionalities beyond those found in nature. PMID:26933692

  4. Acoustic metamaterials: From local resonances to broad horizons

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Guancong; Sheng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Within a time span of 15 years, acoustic metamaterials have emerged from academic curiosity to become an active field driven by scientific discoveries and diverse application potentials. This review traces the development of acoustic metamaterials from the initial findings of mass density and bulk modulus frequency dispersions in locally resonant structures to the diverse functionalities afforded by the perspective of negative constitutive parameter values, and their implications for acoustic wave behaviors. We survey the more recent developments, which include compact phase manipulation structures, superabsorption, and actively controllable metamaterials as well as the new directions on acoustic wave transport in moving fluid, elastic, and mechanical metamaterials, graphene-inspired metamaterials, and structures whose characteristics are best delineated by non-Hermitian Hamiltonians. Many of the novel acoustic metamaterial structures have transcended the original definition of metamaterials as arising from the collective manifestations of constituent resonating units, but they continue to extend wave manipulation functionalities beyond those found in nature. PMID:26933692

  5. Acoustic resonant spectroscopy for characterization of thin polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohmyoh, Hironori; Imaizumi, Takuya; Saka, Masumi

    2006-10-01

    An acoustic resonant spectroscopy technique for measuring the acoustic impedance, ultrasonic velocity, and density of micron-scale polymer films is developed. The method, which is based on spectral analysis, observes the acoustic resonance between water, the film, and a tungsten plate with high acoustic impedance in the frequency range of 20-70MHz. The interface between the film being examined and the plate is vacuum sealed, enabling us to characterize the low-density polyethylene film with acoustic impedances as low as about 1.9MNm-3s and the poly(vinyl chloride) film as thin as about 8μm. The error in the film density measurements is found to be less than 1%, and the validity of the technique is verified.

  6. Acoustic resonances in cylinder bundles oscillating in a compressibile fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.H.; Raptis, A.C.

    1984-12-01

    This paper deals with an analytical study on acoustic resonances of elastic oscillations of a group of parallel, circular, thin cylinders in an unbounded volume of barotropic, compressible, inviscid fluid. The perturbed motion of the fluid is assumed due entirely to the flexural oscillations of the cylinders. The motion of the fluid disturbances is first formulated in a three-dimensional wave form and then casted into a two-dimensional Helmholtz equation for the harmonic motion in time and in axial space. The acoustic motion in the fluid and the elastic motion in the cylinders are solved simultaneously. Acoustic resonances were approximately determined from the secular (eigenvalue) equation by the method of successive iteration with the use of digital computers for a given set of the fluid properties and the cylinders' geometry and properties. Effects of the flexural wavenumber and the configuration of and the spacing between the cylinders on the acoustic resonances were thoroughly investigated.

  7. Measuring Acoustic-Radiation Stresses in Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    System measures nonlinearity parameters of materials. Uses static strain generated by acoustic wave propagating in material. Since static strain is effectively "dc" component of waveform distortion, problems associated with phase-cancellation artifacts disappear. Further, sign of nonlinearity parameter obtained by simple inspection of measured signal polarity. These features make this system very amenable to use in field. System expected to become standard for acoustic-radiation-stress measurements for solids and liquids and for characterization of material properties related to strength and residual or applied stresses. Also expected to become standard for transducer calibration.

  8. Wax Point Determinations Using Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, D.T.; Jubin, R.T.; Schmidt, T.W.

    2001-06-01

    The thermodynamic characterization of the wax point of a given crude is essential in order to maintain flow conditions that prevent plugging of undersea pipelines. This report summarizes the efforts made towards applying an Acoustic Cavity Resonance Spectrometer (ACRS) to the determination of pressures and temperatures at which wax precipitates from crude. Phillips Petroleum Company, Inc., the CRADA participant, supplied the ACRS. The instrumentation was shipped to Dr. Thomas Schmidt of ORNL, the CRADA contractor, in May 2000 after preliminary software development performed under the guidance of Dr. Samuel Colgate and Dr. Evan House of the University of Florida, Gainesville, Fl. Upon receipt it became apparent that a number of modifications still needed to be made before the ACRS could be precisely and safely used for wax point measurements. This report reviews the sequence of alterations made to the ACRS, as well as defines the possible applications of the instrumentation once the modifications have been completed. The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Phillips Petroleum Company, Inc. (Participant) and Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (Contractor) was the measurement of the formation of solids in crude oils and petroleum products that are commonly transported through pipelines. This information is essential in the proper design, operation and maintenance of the petroleum pipeline system in the United States. Recently, new petroleum discoveries in the Gulf of Mexico have shown that there is a potential for plugging of undersea pipeline because of the precipitation of wax. It is important that the wax points of the expected crude oils be well characterized so that the production facilities for these new wells are capable of properly transporting the expected production. The goal of this work is to perform measurements of solids formation in crude oils and petroleum products supplied by the Participant. It is

  9. Radiation directivity rotation by acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xue; Zhang, Likun; Liang, Bin; Zou, Xin-ye; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2015-08-01

    We use a metamaterial-based scheme to rotate the radiation directivity of sound radiated by a source surrounded by the structure. The rotation is demonstrated through both numerical simulations and experiments. The performance persists within a broadband and is entirely independent of the location and pattern of source inside, suggesting great potential in various practical scenarios where both the signal frequency and source position may vary significantly. We have also investigated the possibility to realize versatile controls of radiation direction by tailoring the structural parameters. Our design with special directivity-steering capability may open route to loudspeaker and auditorium acoustics designs and medical ultrasound applications.

  10. Radiation directivity rotation by acoustic metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xue; Liang, Bin E-mail: jccheng@nju.edu.cn; Zou, Xin-ye; Cheng, Jian-chun E-mail: jccheng@nju.edu.cn; Zhang, Likun

    2015-08-31

    We use a metamaterial-based scheme to rotate the radiation directivity of sound radiated by a source surrounded by the structure. The rotation is demonstrated through both numerical simulations and experiments. The performance persists within a broadband and is entirely independent of the location and pattern of source inside, suggesting great potential in various practical scenarios where both the signal frequency and source position may vary significantly. We have also investigated the possibility to realize versatile controls of radiation direction by tailoring the structural parameters. Our design with special directivity-steering capability may open route to loudspeaker and auditorium acoustics designs and medical ultrasound applications.

  11. Acoustic detection of electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coufal, H.

    1981-07-01

    The ESR-signal of DPPH was recorded by detecting the modulation of the absorbed microwave power with a gas-coupled microphone. This photo-acoustic detection scheme is compared with conventional ESR-detection. Applications of the acoustical detection method to other modulation spectroscopic techniques, particularly NMR, are discussed.

  12. A numerically efficient damping model for acoustic resonances in microfluidic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, P.; Dual, J.

    2015-06-01

    Bulk acoustic wave devices are typically operated in a resonant state to achieve enhanced acoustic amplitudes and high acoustofluidic forces for the manipulation of microparticles. Among other loss mechanisms related to the structural parts of acoustofluidic devices, damping in the fluidic cavity is a crucial factor that limits the attainable acoustic amplitudes. In the analytical part of this study, we quantify all relevant loss mechanisms related to the fluid inside acoustofluidic micro-devices. Subsequently, a numerical analysis of the time-harmonic visco-acoustic and thermo-visco-acoustic equations is carried out to verify the analytical results for 2D and 3D examples. The damping results are fitted into the framework of classical linear acoustics to set up a numerically efficient device model. For this purpose, all damping effects are combined into an acoustofluidic loss factor. Since some components of the acoustofluidic loss factor depend on the acoustic mode shape in the fluid cavity, we propose a two-step simulation procedure. In the first step, the loss factors are deduced from the simulated mode shape. Subsequently, a second simulation is invoked, taking all losses into account. Owing to its computational efficiency, the presented numerical device model is of great relevance for the simulation of acoustofluidic particle manipulation by means of acoustic radiation forces or acoustic streaming. For the first time, accurate 3D simulations of realistic micro-devices for the quantitative prediction of pressure amplitudes and the related acoustofluidic forces become feasible.

  13. A numerically efficient damping model for acoustic resonances in microfluidic cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, P. Dual, J.

    2015-06-15

    Bulk acoustic wave devices are typically operated in a resonant state to achieve enhanced acoustic amplitudes and high acoustofluidic forces for the manipulation of microparticles. Among other loss mechanisms related to the structural parts of acoustofluidic devices, damping in the fluidic cavity is a crucial factor that limits the attainable acoustic amplitudes. In the analytical part of this study, we quantify all relevant loss mechanisms related to the fluid inside acoustofluidic micro-devices. Subsequently, a numerical analysis of the time-harmonic visco-acoustic and thermo-visco-acoustic equations is carried out to verify the analytical results for 2D and 3D examples. The damping results are fitted into the framework of classical linear acoustics to set up a numerically efficient device model. For this purpose, all damping effects are combined into an acoustofluidic loss factor. Since some components of the acoustofluidic loss factor depend on the acoustic mode shape in the fluid cavity, we propose a two-step simulation procedure. In the first step, the loss factors are deduced from the simulated mode shape. Subsequently, a second simulation is invoked, taking all losses into account. Owing to its computational efficiency, the presented numerical device model is of great relevance for the simulation of acoustofluidic particle manipulation by means of acoustic radiation forces or acoustic streaming. For the first time, accurate 3D simulations of realistic micro-devices for the quantitative prediction of pressure amplitudes and the related acoustofluidic forces become feasible.

  14. Auroral resonance line radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Gladstone, G.R. )

    1992-02-01

    A model is developed for simulating the two-dimensional radiative transfer of resonance line emissions in auroras. The method of solution utilizes Fourier decomposition of the horizontal dependence in the intensity field so that the two-dimensional problem becomes a set of one-dimensional problems having different horizontal wavenumbers. The individual one-dimensional problems are solved for using a Feautrier-type solution of the differential-integral form of the radiative transfer equation. In the limit as the horizontal wavenumber becomes much larger than the local line-center extinction coefficient, the scattering integral becomes considerably simplified, and the final source function is evaluated in closed form. The two-dimensional aspects of the model are tested against results for nonresonance radiative transfer studies, and the resonance line part of the model is tested against results of existing plane-parallel resonance line radiative transfer codes. Finally, the model is used to simulate the intensity field of O{sub I} 1,304{angstrom} for hard and soft auroras of various Gaussian horizontal widths. The results demonstrate the importance of considering the effects of two-dimensional radiative transfer when analyzing auroral resonance line data.

  15. Effects of specimen resonances on acoustic-ultrasonic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Kahn, E. B.; Lee, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of specimen resonances on acoustic ultrasonic (AU) nondestructive testing were investigated. Selected resonant frequencies and the corresponding normal mode nodal patterns of the aluminum block are measured up to 75.64 kHz. Prominent peaks in the pencil lead fracture and sphere impact spectra from the two transducer locations corresponded exactly to resonant frequencies of the block. It is established that the resonant frequencies of the block dominated the spectral content of the output signal. The spectral content of the output signals is further influenced by the transducer location relative to the resonant frequency nodal lines. Implications of the results are discussed in relation to AU parameters and measurements.

  16. Acoustic resonance in the combustion conduits of a steam locomotive

    SciTech Connect

    Ziada, S.; Oengoeren, A.; Vogel, H.H.

    1996-12-01

    The sound emission of a modern, oil fired steam rack locomotive increased sharply when the locomotive speed exceeded the design value of 12 km/hr. The results of pressure and noise measurements, together with an acoustical model of the combustion conduits indicated that the acoustic resonance modes of the combustion conduits are excited by the pressure pulsations generated by the exhaust from the steam cylinders at multiples of the piston frequency. Additionally, when the acoustic resonance is initiated, the resulting pulsations trigger the flame instability of the oil burners which, in turn, enhances the resonance. By means of the acoustical model, a Helmholtz resonator has been designed and optimized to reduce the acoustic response such that it does not excite the flame instability. A second set of measurements, after installing the resonator, has shown a reduction in the noise level by an amount exceeding 21 dBA. The paper focuses upon the identification of the excitation source and the implementation of the countermeasure which are of interest to other applications involving combustion oscillations.

  17. Lateral acoustic wave resonator comprising a suspended membrane of low damping resonator material

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady; , Ihab F.; Ziaei-Moayyed, Maryam; Branch; , Darren W.; Su; Mehmet F.,; Reinke; Charles M.,

    2013-09-03

    A very high-Q, low insertion loss resonator can be achieved by storing many overtone cycles of a lateral acoustic wave (i.e., Lamb wave) in a lithographically defined suspended membrane comprising a low damping resonator material, such as silicon carbide. The high-Q resonator can sets up a Fabry-Perot cavity in a low-damping resonator material using high-reflectivity acoustic end mirrors, which can comprise phononic crystals. The lateral overtone acoustic wave resonator can be electrically transduced by piezoelectric couplers. The resonator Q can be increased without increasing the impedance or insertion loss by storing many cycles or wavelengths in the high-Q resonator material, with much lower damping than the piezoelectric transducer material.

  18. Vortex shedding and acoustic resonance of single and tandem finned cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eid, M.; Ziada, S.

    2011-10-01

    The effect of fins on vortex shedding and acoustic resonance is investigated for isolated and two tandem cylinders exposed to cross-flow in a rectangular duct. Three spacing ratios between the tandem cylinders ( S/D e =1.5, 2 and 3) are tested for a Reynolds number range from 1.6×10 4 to 1.1×10 5 . Measurements of sound pressure as well as mean and fluctuating velocities are performed for bare and finned cylinders with three different fin densities. The effect of fins on the sound pressure generated before the onset of acoustic resonance as well as during the pre-coincidence and coincidence resonance is found to be rather complex and depends on the spacing ratio between cylinders, the fin density and the nature of the flow-sound interaction mechanism. For isolated cylinders, the fins reduce the strength of vortex shedding only slightly, but strongly attenuate the radiated sound before and during the occurrence of acoustic resonance. This suggests that the influence of the fins on correlation length is stronger than on velocity fluctuations. In contrast to isolated cylinders, the fins in the tandem cylinder case enhance the vortex shedding process at off-resonant conditions, except for the large spacing case which exhibits a reversed effect at high Reynolds numbers. Regarding the acoustic resonance of the tandem cylinders, the fins promote the onset of the coincidence resonance, but increasing the fin density drastically weakens the intensity of this resonance. The fins are also found to suppress the pre-coincidence resonance for the tandem cylinders with small spacing ratios ( S/D e =1.5, 2 and 2), but for the largest spacing case ( S/D e =3), they are found to have minor effects on the sound pressure and the lock-in range of the pre-coincidence resonance.

  19. Analysis of underwater decoupling properties of a locally resonant acoustic metamaterial coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling-Zhi, Huang; Yong, Xiao; Ji-Hong, Wen; Hai-Bin, Yang; Xi-Sen, Wen

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical solution for the vibration and sound radiation of a semi-infinite plate covered by a decoupling layer consisting of locally resonant acoustic metamaterial. Formulations are derived based on a combination use of effective medium theory and the theory of elasticity for the decoupling material. Theoretical results show good agreements between the method developed in this paper and the conventional finite element method (FEM), but the method of this paper is more efficient than FEM. Numerical results also show that system with acoustic metamaterial decoupling layer exhibits significant noise reduction performance at the local resonance frequency of the acoustic metamaterial, and such performance can be ascribed to the vibration suppression of the base plate. It is demonstrated that the effective density of acoustic metamaterial decoupling layer has a great influence on the mechanical impedance of the system. Furthermore, the resonance frequency of locally resonant structure can be effectively predicted by a simple model, and it can be significantly affected by the material properties of the locally resonant structure. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51305448 and 51275519).

  20. Modeling Nonlinear Acoustic Standing Waves in Resonators: Theory and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Ganesh; Li, Xiaofan; Finkbeiner, Joshua

    2004-01-01

    The overall goal of the cooperative research with NASA Glenn is to fundamentally understand, computationally model, and experimentally validate non-linear acoustic waves in enclosures with the ultimate goal of developing a non-contact acoustic seal. The longer term goal is to transition the Glenn acoustic seal innovation to a prototype sealing device. Lucas and coworkers are credited with pioneering work in Resonant Macrosonic Synthesis (RMS). Several Patents and publications have successfully illustrated the concept of Resonant Macrosonic Synthesis. To utilize this concept in practical application one needs to have an understanding of the details of the phenomenon and a predictive tool that can examine the waveforms produced within resonators of complex shapes. With appropriately shaped resonators one can produce un-shocked waveforms of high amplitude that would result in very high pressures in certain regions. Our goal is to control the waveforms and exploit the high pressures to produce an acoustic seal. Note that shock formation critically limits peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes and also causes excessive energy dissipation. Proper shaping of the resonator is thus critical to the use of this innovation.

  1. Transthoracic Cardiac Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradway, David Pierson

    This dissertation investigates the feasibility of a real-time transthoracic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging system to measure myocardial function non-invasively in clinical setting. Heart failure is an important cardiovascular disease and contributes to the leading cause of death for developed countries. Patients exhibiting heart failure with a low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) can often be identified by clinicians, but patients with preserved LVEF might be undetected if they do not exhibit other signs and symptoms of heart failure. These cases motivate development of transthoracic ARFI imaging to aid the early diagnosis of the structural and functional heart abnormalities leading to heart failure. M-Mode ARFI imaging utilizes ultrasonic radiation force to displace tissue several micrometers in the direction of wave propagation. Conventional ultrasound tracks the response of the tissue to the force. This measurement is repeated rapidly at a location through the cardiac cycle, measuring timing and relative changes in myocardial stiffness. ARFI imaging was previously shown capable of measuring myocardial properties and function via invasive open-chest and intracardiac approaches. The prototype imaging system described in this dissertation is capable of rapid acquisition, processing, and display of ARFI images and shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) movies. Also presented is a rigorous safety analysis, including finite element method (FEM) simulations of tissue heating, hydrophone intensity and mechanical index (MI) measurements, and thermocouple transducer face heating measurements. For the pulse sequences used in later animal and clinical studies, results from the safety analysis indicates that transthoracic ARFI imaging can be safely applied at rates and levels realizable on the prototype ARFI imaging system. Preliminary data are presented from in vivo trials studying changes in myocardial stiffness occurring under normal and abnormal

  2. Triad Resonance in the Gravity-Acoustic Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadri, U.

    2015-12-01

    Resonance interactions of waves play a prominent role in energy share among the different wave types involved. Such interactions may significantly contribute, among others, to the evolution of the ocean energy spectrum by exchanging energy between surface-gravity waves; surface and internal gravity waves; or even surface and compression-type waves, that can transfer energy from the upper ocean through the whole water column reaching down to the seafloor. A resonant triad occurs among a triplet of waves, usually involving interaction of nonlinear terms of second order perturbed equations. Until recently, it has been believed that in a homogeneous fluid a resonant triad is possible only when tension forces are included, or at the limit of a shallow water, and that when the compressibility of water is considered, no resonant triads can occur within the family of gravity-acoustic waves. However, more recently it has been proved that, under some circumstances, resonant triads comprising two opposing surface-gravity waves of similar periods (though not identical) and a much longer acoustic-gravity wave, of almost double the frequency, exist [Kadri and Stiassnie 2013, J. Fluid Mech.735 R6]. Here, I report on a new resonant triad involving a gravity wave and two acoustic waves of almost double the length. Interestingly, the two acoustic waves propagate in the same direction with similar wavelengths, that are almost double of that of the gravity wave. The evolution of the wave triad amplitudes is periodic and it is derived analytically, in terms of Jacobian elliptic functions and elliptic integrals. The physical importance of this type of triad interactions is the modulation of pertinent acoustic signals, leading to inaccurate signal perceptions. Enclosed figure: presents an example spatio-temporal evolution of the wave triad amplitudes. The gravity wave (top) remains almost unaltered, while the envelope slowly displaces to the left. However, the prescribed acoustic

  3. Acoustic superlens using Helmholtz-resonator-based metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xishan; Yin, Jing; Yu, Gaokun Peng, Linhui; Wang, Ning

    2015-11-09

    Acoustic superlens provides a way to overcome the diffraction limit with respect to the wavelength of the bulk wave in air. However, the operating frequency range of subwavelength imaging is quite narrow. Here, an acoustic superlens is designed using Helmholtz-resonator-based metamaterials to broaden the bandwidth of super-resolution. An experiment is carried out to verify subwavelength imaging of double slits, the imaging of which can be well resolved in the frequency range from 570 to 650 Hz. Different from previous works based on the Fabry-Pérot resonance, the corresponding mechanism of subwavelength imaging is the Fano resonance, and the strong coupling between the neighbouring Helmholtz resonators separated at the subwavelength interval leads to the enhanced sound transmission over a relatively wide frequency range.

  4. Validation of an Acoustic Impedance Prediction Model for Skewed Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howerton, Brian M.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2009-01-01

    An impedance prediction model was validated experimentally to determine the composite impedance of a series of high-aspect ratio slot resonators incorporating channel skew and sharp bends. Such structures are useful for packaging acoustic liners into constrained spaces for turbofan noise control applications. A formulation of the Zwikker-Kosten Transmission Line (ZKTL) model, incorporating the Richards correction for rectangular channels, is used to calculate the composite normalized impedance of a series of six multi-slot resonator arrays with constant channel length. Experimentally, acoustic data was acquired in the NASA Langley Normal Incidence Tube over the frequency range of 500 to 3500 Hz at 120 and 140 dB OASPL. Normalized impedance was reduced using the Two-Microphone Method for the various combinations of channel skew and sharp 90o and 180o bends. Results show that the presence of skew and/or sharp bends does not significantly alter the impedance of a slot resonator as compared to a straight resonator of the same total channel length. ZKTL predicts the impedance of such resonators very well over the frequency range of interest. The model can be used to design arrays of slot resonators that can be packaged into complex geometries heretofore unsuitable for effective acoustic treatment.

  5. Nonlinear Resonant Oscillations of Gas in Optimized Acoustical Resonators and the Effect of Central Blockage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiao-Fan; Finkbeiner, Joshua; Raman, Ganesh; Daniels, Christopher; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2003-01-01

    Optimizing resonator shapes for maximizing the ratio of maximum to minimum gas pressure at an end of the resonator is investigated numerically. It is well known that the resonant frequencies and the nonlinear standing waveform in an acoustical resonator strongly depend on the resonator geometry. A quasi-Newton type scheme was used to find optimized axisymmetric resonator shapes achieving the maximum pressure compression ratio with an acceleration of constant amplitude. The acoustical field was solved using a one-dimensional model, and the resonance frequency shift and hysteresis effects were obtained through an automation scheme based on continuation method. Results are presented for optimizing three types of geometry: a cone, a horn-cone and a half cosine- shape. For each type, different optimized shapes were found when starting with different initial guesses. Further, the one-dimensional model was modified to study the effect of an axisymmetric central blockage on the nonlinear standing wave.

  6. Nonlinear Resonant Oscillations of Gas in Optimized Acoustical Resonators and the Effect of Central Blockage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiaofan; Finkbeiner, Joshua; Raman, Ganesh; Daniels, Christopher; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2003-01-01

    Optimizing resonator shapes for maximizing the ratio of maximum to minimum gas pressure at an end of the resonator is investigated numerically. It is well known that the resonant frequencies and the nonlinear standing waveform in an acoustical resonator strongly depend on the resonator geometry. A quasi-Newton type scheme was used to find optimized axisymmetric resonator shapes achieving the maximum pressure compression ratio with an acceleration of constant amplitude. The acoustical field was solved using a one-dimensional model, and the resonance frequency shift and hysteresis effects were obtained through an automation scheme based on continuation method. Results are presented for optimizing three types of geometry: a cone, a horn-cone and a half cosine-shape. For each type, different optimized shapes were found when starting with different initial guesses. Further, the one-dimensional model was modified to study the effect of an axisymmetric central blockage on the nonlinear standing wave.

  7. Quantitative Determination of Lateral Mode Dispersion in Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators through Laser Acoustic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Telschow; John D. Larson III

    2006-10-01

    Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators are useful for many signal processing applications. Detailed knowledge of their operation properties are needed to optimize their design for specific applications. The finite size of these resonators precludes their use in single acoustic modes; rather, multiple wave modes, such as, lateral wave modes are always excited concurrently. In order to determine the contributions of these modes, we have been using a newly developed full-field laser acoustic imaging approach to directly measure their amplitude and phase throughout the resonator. This paper describes new results comparing modeling of both elastic and piezoelectric effects in the active material with imaging measurement of all excited modes. Fourier transformation of the acoustic amplitude and phase displacement images provides a quantitative determination of excited mode amplitude and wavenumber at any frequency. Images combined at several frequencies form a direct visualization of lateral mode excitation and dispersion for the device under test allowing mode identification and comparison with predicted operational properties. Discussion and analysis are presented for modes near the first longitudinal thickness resonance (~900 MHz) in an AlN thin film resonator. Plate wave modeling, taking account of material crystalline orientation, elastic and piezoelectric properties and overlayer metallic films, will be discussed in relation to direct image measurements.

  8. Modeling the acoustic excitation of a resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandre, Shreyas; Mahadevan, Lakshminarayanan

    2007-11-01

    The sounding of a beverage bottle when blown on is a familiar but very little understood phenomenon. A very similar mechanism is used by musical wind instruments, like organ pipes and flutes, for sound production. This phenomenon falls under the general umbrella of flow induced oscillations and is representative of a more generic mechanism. The modeling of this phenomenon essentially involves two components. The first is the resonator, which bears the oscillations and this component is very well understood. The resonator, however, needs an external energy input to sustain the oscillations, which is provided by the jet of air blown. The dynamics of the jet and its interaction with the resonator is the primary focus of this talk. In particular, we provide a linearized model based on first principles to explain the feedback of energy from the jet to the resonator and compare the predictions with experimental results.

  9. Subwavelength total acoustic absorption with degenerate resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Min; Meng, Chong; Fu, Caixing; Li, Yong; Yang, Zhiyu; Sheng, Ping

    2015-09-01

    We report the experimental realization of perfect sound absorption by sub-wavelength monopole and dipole resonators that exhibit degenerate resonant frequencies. This is achieved through the destructive interference of two resonators' transmission responses, while the matching of their averaged impedances to that of air implies no backscattering, thereby leading to total absorption. Two examples, both using decorated membrane resonators (DMRs) as the basic units, are presented. The first is a flat panel comprising a DMR and a pair of coupled DMRs, while the second one is a ventilated short tube containing a DMR in conjunction with a sidewall DMR backed by a cavity. In both examples, near perfect absorption, up to 99.7%, has been observed with the airborne wavelength up to 1.2 m, which is at least an order of magnitude larger than the composite absorber. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment is obtained.

  10. Modal analysis and intensity of acoustic radiation of the kettledrum.

    PubMed

    Tronchin, Lamberto

    2005-02-01

    The acoustical features of kettledrums have been analyzed by means of modal analysis and acoustic radiation (p/v ratio) measurements. Modal analysis of two different kettledrums was undertaken, exciting the system both by a hammer and a shaker. Up to 15 vibrational modes were clearly identified. Acoustic radiation was studied using two ways. Based on previous experiments of other researchers, a new parameter, called intensity of acoustic radiation (IAR), has been defined and measured. Results show a strict relationship between IAR and the frequency response function (FRF, which is the v/F ratio), and IAR also strongly relates the modal pattern to acoustic radiation. Finally, IAR is proposed for vibro-acoustical characterization of kettledrums and other musical instruments such as strings, pianos, and harpsichords. PMID:15759711

  11. Acoustically driven programmable liquid motion using resonance cavities

    PubMed Central

    Langelier, Sean M.; Chang, Dustin S.; Zeitoun, Ramsey I.; Burns, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Performance and utility of microfluidic systems are often overshadowed by the difficulties and costs associated with operation and control. As a step toward the development of a more efficient platform for microfluidic control, we present a distributed pressure generation scheme whereby independently tunable pressure sources can be simultaneously controlled by using a single acoustic source. We demonstrate how this scheme can be used to perform precise droplet positioning as well as merging, splitting, and sorting within open microfluidic networks. We further show how this scheme can be implemented for control of continuous-flow systems, specifically for generation of acoustically tunable liquid gradients. Device operation hinges on a resonance-decoding and rectification mechanism by which the frequency content in a composite acoustic input is decomposed into multiple independently buffered output pressures. The device consists of a bank of 4 uniquely tuned resonance cavities (404, 484, 532, and 654 Hz), each being responsible for the actuation of a single droplet, 4 identical flow-rectification structures, and a single acoustic source. Cavities selectively amplify resonant tones in the input signal, resulting in highly elevated local cavity pressures. Fluidic-rectification structures then serve to convert the elevated oscillating cavity pressures into unidirectional flows. The resulting pressure gradients, which are used to manipulate fluids in a microdevice, are tunable over a range of ≈0–200 Pa with a control resolution of 10 Pa. PMID:19620719

  12. Laser Acoustic Imaging of Film Bulk Acoustic Resonator (FBAR) Lateral Mode Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Ken L. Telschow

    2004-07-01

    A laser acoustic imaging microscope has been developed that measures acoustic motion with high spatial resolution without scanning. Images are recorded at normal video frame rates and heterodyne principles are used to allow operation at any frequency from Hz to GHz. Fourier transformation of the acoustic amplitude and phase displacement images provides a direct quantitative determination of excited mode wavenumbers at any frequency. Results are presented at frequencies near the first longitudinal thickness mode (~ 900 MHz) demonstrating simultaneous excitation of lateral modes with nonzero wavenumbers in an electrically driven AlN thin film acoustic resonator. Images combined at several frequencies form a direct visualization of lateral mode dispersion relations for the device under test allowing mode identification and a direct measure of specific lateral mode properties. Discussion and analysis of the results are presented in comparison with plate wave modeling of these devices taking account for material anisotropy and multilayer films.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of acoustic streaming: absorption coefficient and acoustic field shape estimation.

    PubMed

    Madelin, Guillaume; Grucker, Daniel; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Thiaudiere, Eric

    2006-07-01

    In this study, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to visualize acoustic streaming in liquids. A single-shot spin echo sequence (HASTE) with a saturation band perpendicular to the acoustic beam permits the acquisition of an instantaneous image of the flow due to the application of ultrasound. An average acoustic streaming velocity can be estimated from the MR images, from which the ultrasonic absorption coefficient and the bulk viscosity of different glycerol-water mixtures can be deduced. In the same way, this MRI method could be used to assess the acoustic field and time-average power of ultrasonic transducers in water (or other liquids with known physical properties), after calibration of a geometrical parameter that is dependent on the experimental setup. PMID:16650447

  14. Acoustic swimbladder resonance spectroscopy: Fundamentals in scattering theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, David T. I.; Foote, Kenneth G.

    2003-04-01

    A history of the physics of acoustic resonance is given. The primary, low-frequency, resonant scattering model for air bubbles in water [Minnaert (1933)] is reviewed. Subsequent applications to swimbladdered fish, including models by Andreeva (1964), Love (1978), and Feuillade and Nero (1998), among others, are developed. Reference is made to exemplary measurements of backscattering by Holliday (1972) and Loevik and Hovem (1979), and of forward scattering, or absorption, by Weston (1967) and Diachok (2000), among others. High-frequency resonances are also described, with presentation of both analytical and numerical results for the immersed air bubble. Comparison of these validates the numerical, boundary-element method (BEM). The BEM allows high-frequency resonances to be studied for swimbladders of realistic shapes under pressure and for typical wave-number-swimbladder length products of order 10-40. Implications of high-frequency swimbladder resonance for auditory function in fish are mentioned. [Work supported by ONR.

  15. Investigation of acoustically dead materials for resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, Jonathan; Maiorov, Boris; Ramshaw, Brad; Shehter, Arkady; Migliori, Albert

    2015-03-01

    Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy is used to excite mechanical resonances in solid samples. By precisely knowing the resonant frequency the complete elastic tensor of the sample can be calculated. In practice unwanted resonances are also created in the sample holder structure, these resonances are not related to the sample and can often confuse the measurement. To reduce this problem we have investigated the use of acoustically ``dead'' materials. We present data from various natural and synthetic materials. We also present RUS sample holder designs that can be used from <4K up to 700K and in magnet fields up to 45T. The elastic tensor of poly-crystal beryllium will be presented as a demonstration of the system performance.

  16. Simulation and fabrication of thin film bulk acoustic wave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xixi, Han; Yi, Ou; Zhigang, Li; Wen, Ou; Dapeng, Chen; Tianchun, Ye

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present the simulation and fabrication of a thin film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR). In order to improve the accuracy of simulation, an improved Mason model was introduced to design the resonator by taking the coupling effect between electrode and substrate into consideration. The resonators were fabricated by the eight inch CMOS process, and the measurements show that the improved Mason model is more accurate than a simple Mason model. The Q s (Q at series resonance), Q p (Q at parallel resonance), Q max and k t 2 of the FBAR were measured to be 695, 814, 1049, and 7.01% respectively, showing better performance than previous reports. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61274119, 61306141, 61335008) and the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province (No. BK20131099).

  17. Analysis and suppression of side radiation in leaky SAW resonators.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Shogo; Tsutsumi, Jun; Matsuda, Takashi; Ueda, Masanori; Ikata, Osamu; Satoh, Yoshio

    2007-08-01

    This paper discusses side acoustic radiation in leaky surface acoustic wave (LSAW) resonators on rotated Y-cut lithium tantalite substrates. The mechanism behind side radiation, which causes a large insertion loss, is analyzed by using the scalar potential theory. This analysis reveals that side radiation occurs when the guiding condition is not satisfied, and the LSAW most strongly radiates at the frequency in which the LSAW velocities in the grating and busbar regions approximately correspond to each other. Based on these results, we propose a "narrow finger structure," which satisfies the guiding condition and drastically suppresses the side radiation. Experiments show that the resonance Q of the proposed structure drastically improves to over 1000 by suppressing the side radiation, which is three times higher than for a conventional structure. Applying the proposed resonators to the ladder-type SAW filters, ultra-low-loss and steep cut-off characteristics are achieved in the range of 800 MHz and 1.9 GHz. PMID:17703674

  18. Acoustic wave flow sensor using quartz thickness shear mode resonator.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lifeng; Zeng, Zijing; Cheng, Hongbin; Wang, Qing-Ming

    2009-09-01

    A quartz thickness shear mode (TSM) bulk acoustic wave resonator was used for in situ and real-time detection of liquid flow rate in this study. A special flow chamber made of 2 parallel acrylic plates was designed for flow measurement. The flow chamber has a rectangular flow channel, 2 flow reservoirs for stabilizing the fluid flow, a sensor mounting port for resonator holding, one inlet port, and one outlet port for pipe connection. A 5-MHz TSM quartz resonator was edge-bonded to the sensor mounting port with one side exposed to the flowing liquid and other side exposed to air. The electrical impedance spectra of the quartz resonator at different volumetric flow rate conditions were measured by an impedance analyzer for the extraction of the resonant frequency through a data-fitting method. The fundamental, 3rd, 5th, 7th, and 9th resonant frequency shifts were found to be around 920, 3572, 5947, 8228, and 10,300 Hz for flow rate variation from 0 to 3000 mL/min, which had a corresponding Reynolds number change from 0 to 822. The resonant frequency shifts of different modes are found to be quadratic with flow rate, which is attributed to the nonlinear effect of quartz resonator due to the effective normal pressure imposing on the resonator sensor by the flowing fluid. The results indicate that quartz TSM resonators can be used for flow sensors with characteristics of simplicity, fast response, and good repeatability. PMID:19811997

  19. Sound Transmission Loss Through a Corrugated-Core Sandwich Panel with Integrated Acoustic Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Allen, Albert R.; Zalewski, Bart F; Beck, Benjamin S.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study is to better understand the effect of structurally integrated resonators on the transmission loss of a sandwich panel. The sandwich panel has facesheets over a corrugated core, which creates long aligned chambers that run parallel to the facesheets. When ports are introduced through the facesheet, the long chambers within the core can be used as low-frequency acoustic resonators. By integrating the resonators within the structure they contribute to the static load bearing capability of the panel while also attenuating noise. An analytical model of a panel with embedded resonators is derived and compared with numerical simulations. Predictions show that acoustic resonators can significantly improve the transmission loss of the sandwich panel around the natural frequency of the resonators. In one configuration with 0.813 m long internal chambers, the diffuse field transmission loss is improved by more than 22 dB around 104 Hz. The benefit is achieved with no added mass or volume relative to the baseline structure. The embedded resonators are effective because they radiate sound out-of-phase with the structure. This results in destructive interference, which leads to less transmitted sound power.

  20. Acoustic resonance in MEMS scale cylindrical tubes with side branches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schill, John F.; Holthoff, Ellen L.; Pellegrino, Paul M.; Marcus, Logan S.

    2014-05-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a useful monitoring technique that is well suited for trace gas detection. This method routinely exhibits detection limits at the parts-per-million (ppm) or parts-per-billion (ppb) level for gaseous samples. PAS also possesses favorable detection characteristics when the system dimensions are scaled to a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) design. One of the central issues related to sensor miniaturization is optimization of the photoacoustic cell geometry, especially in relationship to high acoustical amplification and reduced system noise. Previous work relied on a multiphysics approach to analyze the resonance structures of the MEMS scale photo acoustic cell. This technique was unable to provide an accurate model of the acoustic structure. In this paper we describe a method that relies on techniques developed from musical instrument theory and electronic transmission line matrix methods to describe cylindrical acoustic resonant cells with side branches of various configurations. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the ease and accuracy of this method. All experimental results were within 2% of those predicted by this theory.

  1. Resonant Acoustic Determination of Complex Elastic Moduli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, David A.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1991-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive, yet accurate method for measuring the dynamic complex modulus of elasticity is described. Using a 'free-free' bar selectively excited in three independent vibrational modes, the shear modulus is obtained by measuring the frequency of the torsional resonant mode and the Young's modulus is determined from measurement of either the longitudinal or flexural mode. The damping properties are obtained by measuring the quality factor (Q) for each mode. The Q is inversely proportional to the loss tangent. The viscoelastic behavior of the sample can be obtained by tracking a particular resonant mode (and thus a particular modulus) using a phase locked loop (PLL) and by changing the temperature of the sample. The change in the damping properties is obtained by measuring the in-phase amplitude of the PLL which is proportional to the Q of the material. The real and imaginary parts or the complex modulus can be obtained continuously as a function of parameters such as temperature, pressure, or humidity. For homogeneous and isotropic samples only two independent moduli are needed in order to characterize the complete set of elastic constants, thus, values can be obtained for the dynamic Poisson's ratio, bulk modulus, Lame constants, etc.

  2. Experimental Robust Control of Structural Acoustic Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, David E.; Gibbs, Gary P.; Clark, Robert L.; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.

    1998-01-01

    This work addresses the design and application of robust controllers for structural acoustic control. Both simulation and experimental results are presented. H(infinity) and mu-synthesis design methods were used to design feedback controllers which minimize power radiated from a panel while avoiding instability due to unmodeled dynamics. Specifically, high order structural modes which couple strongly to the actuator-sensor path were poorly modeled. This model error was analytically bounded with an uncertainty model, which allowed controllers to be designed without artificial limits on control effort. It is found that robust control methods provide the control designer with physically meaningful parameters with which to tune control designs and can be very useful in determining limits of performance. Experimental results also showed, however, poor robustness properties for control designs with ad-hoc uncertainty models. The importance of quantifying and bounding model errors is discussed.

  3. Theory of atomic motion in resonant radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R.J.

    1980-03-01

    Atomic motion in resonant and near resonant electromagnetic radiation is investigated theoretically. The exposition begins with a study of atomic motion in a resonant standing light wave, with a view toward isotope separation by selective photodeflection, and proceeds to the investigation of more general problems of atomic motion in resonant radiation. The body of the work consists of six chapters, each of which was prepared as a manuscript for publication in the open literature.

  4. Acoustic radiation force impulse of the liver

    PubMed Central

    D’Onofrio, Mirko; Crosara, Stefano; De Robertis, Riccardo; Canestrini, Stefano; Demozzi, Emanuele; Gallotti, Anna; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is a new and promising ultrasound-based diagnostic technique that, evaluating the wave propagation speed, allows the assessment of the tissue stiffness. ARFI is implemented in the ultrasound scanner. By short-duration acoustic radiation forces (less than 1 ms), localized displacements are generated in a selected region of interest not requiring any external compression so reducing the operator dependency. The generated wave scan provides qualitative or quantitative (wave velocity values) responses. Several non-invasive methods for assessing the staging of fibrosis are used, in order to avoid liver biopsy. Liver function tests and transient elastography are non-invasive, sensitive and accurate tools for the assessment of liver fibrosis and for the discrimination between cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic liver. Many published studies analyse ARFI performance and feasibility in studying diffuse liver diseases and compare them to other diagnostic imaging modalities such as conventional ultrasonography and transient elastography. Solid focal liver lesions, both benign and malignant, are common findings during abdominal examinations. The accurate characterization and differential diagnosis are important aims of all the imaging modalities available today. Only few papers describe the application of ARFI technology in the study of solid focal liver lesions, with different results. In the present study, the existing literature, to the best of our knowledge, about ARFI application on diffuse and focal liver pathology has been evaluated and results and statistical analyses have been compared, bringing to the conclusion that ARFI can be used in the study of the liver with similar accuracy as transient elastography in diagnosing significant fibrosis or cirrhosis and has got some advantages in respect to transient elastography since it does not require separate equipment, better displays anatomical structures and measurements can be

  5. Active Cancellation of Acoustical Resonances with an FPGA FIR Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryou, Albert; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach to enhancing the closed-loop bandwidth of a feedback-controlled mechanical system by digitally cancelling its acoustical resonances and antiresonances with an FPGA FIR filter. By performing a real-time convolution of the feedback error signal with an arbitrary filter, we can suppress arbitrarily many poles and zeros below 100 kHz, each with a linewidth as small as 10 Hz. We demonstrate the efficacy of this technique by cancelling the six largest resonances and antiresonances of a high-finesse optical resonator piezomechanical transfer function, thereby enhancing the unity gain frequency by more than an order of magnitude. More broadly, this approach is applicable to stabilization of optical resonators, external cavity diode lasers, and scanning tunneling microscopes.

  6. System for Manipulating Drops and Bubbles Using Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The manipulation and control of drops of liquid and gas bubbles is achieved using high intensity acoustics in the form of and/or acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming. generated by a controlled wave emission from a transducer. Acoustic radiation pressure is used to deploy or dispense drops into a liquid or a gas or bubbles into a liquid at zero or near zero velocity from the discharge end of a needle such as a syringe needle. Acoustic streaming is useful in manipulating the drop or bubble during or after deployment. Deployment and discharge is achieved by focusing the acoustic radiation pressure on the discharge end of the needle, and passing the acoustic waves through the fluid in the needle. through the needle will itself, or coaxially through the fluid medium surrounding the needle. Alternatively, the acoustic waves can be counter-deployed by focusing on the discharge end of the needle from a transducer axially aligned with the needle, but at a position opposite the needle, to prevent premature deployment of the drop or bubble. The acoustic radiation pressure can also be used for detecting the presence or absence of a drop or a bubble at the tip of a needle or for sensing various physical characteristics of the drop or bubble such as size or density.

  7. Subwavelength acoustic focusing by surface-wave-resonance enhanced transmission in doubly negative acoustic metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Badreddine Assouar, M. Oudich, Mourad

    2014-11-21

    We present analytical and numerical analyses of a yet unseen lensing paradigm that is based on a solid metamaterial slab in which the wave excitation source is attached. We propose and demonstrate sub-diffraction-limited acoustic focusing induced by surface resonant states in doubly negative metamaterials. The enhancement of evanescent waves across the metamaterial slab produced by their resonant coupling to surface waves is evidenced and quantitatively determined. The effect of metamaterial parameters on surface states, transmission, and wavenumber bandwidth is clearly identified. Based on this concept consisting of a wave source attached on the metamaterial, a high resolution of λ/28.4 is obtained with the optimum effective physical parameters, opening then an exciting way to design acoustic metamaterials for ultrasonic focused imaging.

  8. A new model for film bulk acoustic wave resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Jin; Yuan, Xiu-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Based on cavity resonance and sandwich composite plate theory, this paper presents a universal three-dimensional (3D) theoretical model for frequency dispersion characterization and displacement profile shapes of the film bulk acoustic resonator (FBARs). This model provides results of FBAR excited thickness-extensional and flexure modes, and the result of frequency dispersion is proposed in which the thicknesses and impedance of the electrodes and the piezoelectric material are taken into consideration; its further simplification shows good agreement with the modified Butterworth—Van-Dyke (MBVD) model. The displacement profile reflects the vibration stress distribution of electrode shapes and the lateral resonance effect, which depends on the axis ratio of the electrode shapes a/b. The results are consistent with the 3D finite element method modeling and laser interferometry measurement in general.

  9. Microwave bulk-acoustic-wave reflection-grating resonators.

    PubMed

    Oates, D E; Pan, J Y

    1988-01-01

    A technique for fabrication of bulk-acoustic-wave (BAW) resonators operating at fundamental frequencies between 1 and 10 GHz is presented. The resonators utilize a reflection grating made by optical holographic methods in iron-doped lithium niobate. Q factors of 30000 at 1 GHz have been demonstrated. Extension to Q of 10000 at 10 GHz appears feasible. Projected limitations to performance are discussed. The high Q at the high fundamental frequency directly results in low-phase noise. Phase-noise measurements of BAW resonator-stabilized oscillators operating at 1.14 GHz are presented. The single-sideband noise floor of <-140 dBc/Hz is shown to be in agreement with an analytical model. Projected improvements in the devices and circuits promise performance of <-160 dBc/Hz. PMID:18290157

  10. Dispersion and mirror transmission characteristics of bulk acoustic wave resonators.

    PubMed

    Kokkonen, Kimmo; Pensala, Tuomas; Kaivola, Matti

    2011-01-01

    A heterodyne laser interferometer is used for a detailed study of the acoustic wave fields excited in a 932-MHz solidly mounted ZnO thin-film BAW resonator. The sample is manufactured on a glass substrate, which also allows direct measurement of the vibration fields from the bottom of the acoustic mirror. Vibration fields are measured both on top of the resonator and at the mirror-substrate interface in a frequency range of 350 to 1200 MHz. Plate wave dispersion diagrams are calculated from the experimental data in both cases and the transmission characteristics of the acoustic mirror are determined as a function of both frequency and lateral wave number. The experimental data are compared with 1-D and 2-D simulations to evaluate the validity of the modeling tools commonly used in mirror design. All the major features observed in the 1-D model are identified in the measured dispersion diagrams, and the mirror transmission characteristics predicted for the longitudinal waves, by both the 1-D and the 2-D models, match the measured values well. PMID:21244989

  11. A sound absorptive element comprising an acoustic resonance nanofibrous membrane.

    PubMed

    Kalinova, Klara

    2015-01-01

    As absorption of sound of lower frequencies is quite problematic with fibrous material made up of coarser fibers, development of highly efficient sound absorption material is called for. This is why this work deals with the development of new high sound absorption material. To absorb the low frequencies, especially the structures based on resonance principle of nanofibrous layers are used, when through resonance of some elements the acoustic energy is transferred into thermal energy. The goal of the invention is achieved by a sound absorbing means which contains resonance membrane formed by a layer of polymeric nanofibers, which is attached to a frame. For production of nanofibrous membranes, the cord electrospinning was used. The resonance membrane was then, upon impact of sound waves of low frequency, brought into forced vibrations, whereby the kinetic energy of the membrane was converted into thermal energy by friction of individual nanofibers, by the friction of the membrane with ambient air and possibly with other layers of material arranged in its proximity, and some of the energy was also transmitted to the frame, through which the vibrations of the resonance membrane were damped. The density and shape of the mesh of frame formations determine the resonance frequency of the acoustic means. The goal of the invention is therefore to eliminate or at least reduce the disadvantages of the present state of the art and to propose sound absorbing means that would be capable of absorbing, with good results sounds in as broadest frequency range as possible. Here, we also discussed some patents relevant to the topic. PMID:25986230

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of radiation optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, C.F.; Schatz, N.J.; Glaser, J.S. )

    1990-10-15

    Three patients with delayed radiation optic neuropathy after radiation therapy for parasellar neoplasms underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The affected optic nerves and chiasms showed enlargement and focal gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement. The magnetic resonance imaging technique effectively detected and defined anterior visual pathway changes of radionecrosis and excluded the clinical possibility of visual loss because of tumor recurrence.

  13. Resonant Acoustic Measurement of Vapor Phase Transport Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuhmann, R. J.; Garrett, S. L.; Matson, J. V.

    2002-12-01

    A major impediment to accurate non steady-state diffusion measurements is the ability to accurately measure and track a rapidly changing gas concentration without disturbing the system. Non-destructive methods that do not interfere with system dynamics have been developed in the past. These methods, however, have tended to be cumbersome or inaccurate at low concentrations. A new experimental approach has been developed to measure gaseous diffusion in free air and through porous materials. The method combines the traditional non steady-state laboratory methodology with resonant acoustic gas analysis. A phase-locked-loop (PLL) resonance frequency tracker is combined with a thermally insulated copper resonator. A piston sealed with a metal bellows excites the fundamental standing wave resonance of the resonator. The PLL maintains a constant phase difference (typically 90§) between the accelerometer mounted on the piston and a microphone near the piston to track the resonance frequency in real time. A capillary or glass bead filled core is fitted into an o-ring sealed opening at the end of the resonator opposite the bellows. The rate at which the tracer gas is replaced by air within the resonator is controlled by the diffusion coefficient of the gas in free air through the capillary (DA) or by the effective diffusion coefficient of the gas through the core (De). The mean molecular weight of the gas mixture in the resonator is directly determined six times each minute from the ratio of the absolute temperature to the square of the fundamental acoustic resonance frequency. Average system stability (temperature divided by frequency squared) is better than 350 ppm. DA values for a 0.3-inch diameter capillary were in excellent agreement with published values. De values for porous media samples (0.5 mm glass beads) of four different lengths (1 through 4 inches) using three different tracer gases (He, CH4, Kr) will be reported. Comments will be offered regarding tracer gas

  14. Acoustic agglomeration of fine particles based on a high intensity acoustical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yun; Zeng, Xinwu; Tian, Zhangfu

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic agglomeration (AA) is considered to be a promising method for reducing the air pollution caused by fine aerosol particles. Removal efficiency and energy consuming are primary parameters and generally have a conflict with each other for the industry applications. It was proved that removal efficiency is increased with sound intensity and optimal frequency is presented for certain polydisperse aerosol. As a result, a high efficiency and low energy cost removal system was constructed using acoustical resonance. High intensity standing wave is generated by a tube system with abrupt section driven by four loudspeakers. Numerical model of the tube system was built base on the finite element method, and the resonance condition and SPL increase were confirmd. Extensive tests were carried out to investigate the acoustic field in the agglomeration chamber. Removal efficiency of fine particles was tested by the comparison of filter paper mass and particle size distribution at different operating conditions including sound pressure level (SPL), and frequency. The experimental study has demonstrated that agglomeration increases with sound pressure level. Sound pressure level in the agglomeration chamber is between 145 dB and 165 dB from 500 Hz to 2 kHz. The resonance frequency can be predicted with the quarter tube theory. Sound pressure level gain of more than 10 dB is gained at resonance frequency. With the help of high intensity sound waves, fine particles are reduced greatly, and the AA effect is enhanced at high SPL condition. The optimal frequency is 1.1kHz for aerosol generated by coal ash. In the resonace tube, higher resonance frequencies are not the integral multiplies of the first one. As a result, Strong nonlinearity is avoided by the dissonant characteristic and shock wave is not found in the testing results. The mechanism and testing system can be used effectively in industrial processes in the future.

  15. Resonance compression of an acoustic beam in a crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshits, V. I.; Bessonov, D. A.; Lyubimov, V. N.

    2016-04-01

    The resonance excitation of an intense acoustic beam in a crystal is described for a special geometry of pump-wave reflection from the crystal surface. The resonance appears in the vicinity of the total internal reflection angle under the condition that the wave field in a compressed reflected beam propagating almost parallel to the surface is close to the volume eigenmode satisfying the free boundary condition. Criteria for the existence of such modes are considered in detail. Conversion conditions are analyzed under which a "parasitic" reflected wave of the same branch as the incident wave is absent and entire energy from the incident wave falls within a narrow intense acoustic beam of another branch. It is shown that, when the surface is chosen parallel to the crystal symmetry plane, the conversion criterion is reduced to the sole condition on the elastic moduli of the medium. Analysis is performed by analytic and numerical methods for skew cuts of monoclinic, rhombic, trigonal, and hexagonal crystals, when the boundary is the symmetry plane, while the sagittal plane has no symmetry. A number of crystals are found in which resonance excitation is very close to conversion.

  16. Activation of immobilized enzymes by acoustic wave resonance oscillation.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Tomoya; Inoue, Yasunobu

    2014-12-01

    Acoustic wave resonance oscillation has been used successfully in the development of methods to activate immobilized enzyme catalysts. In this study, resonance oscillation effects were demonstrated for enzyme reactions on galactose oxidase (GAD), D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO), and L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO), all of which were immobilized covalently on a ferroelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) device that could generate thickness-extensional resonance oscillations (TERO) of acoustic waves. For galactose oxidation on immobilized GAD in a microreactor, TERO generation immediately increased enzyme activity 2- to 3-fold. Eliminating TERO caused a slight decrease in the activity, with ∼90% of the enhanced activity retained while the reaction proceeded. Contact of the enhanced enzyme with a galactose-free solution caused almost complete reversion of the activity to the original low level before TERO generation, indicating that, not only TERO-induced GAD activation, but also preservation of the increased activity, required a galactose substrate. Similar activity changes with TERO were observed for enzyme reactions on DAAO and LAAO. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that TERO helped strengthen the interactions of the immobilized enzyme with the reactant substrate and promoted formation of an activation complex. PMID:25442945

  17. Helmholtz Resonator for Lead Zirconate Titanate Acoustic Energy Harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Tomohiro; Tomii, Kazuki; Hagiwara, Saori; Miyake, Shuntaro; Hasegawa, Yuichi; Sato, Takamitsu; Kaneko, Yuta; Nishioka, Yasushiro

    2013-12-01

    Acoustic energy harvesters that function in environments where sound pressure is extremely high (~150 dB), such as in engine rooms of aircrafts, are expected to be capable of powering wireless health monitoring systems. This paper presents the power generation performances of a lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) acoustic energy harvester with a vibrating PZT diaphragm. The diaphragm had a diameter of 2 mm, consisting of Al(0.1 μm)/PZT(1 μm)/Pt(0.1 μm)/Ti(0.1 μm)/SiO2(1.5 μm). The harvester generated a power of 1.7×10-13 W under a sound pressure level of 110 dB at the first resonance frequency of 6.28 kHz. It was found that the generated power was increased to 6.8×10-13 W using a sound-collecting Helmholtz resonator cone with the height of 60 mm. The cone provided a Helmholtz resonance at 5.8 kHz, and the generated power increased from 3.4×10-14 W to 1.4×10-13 W at this frequency. The cone was also effective in increasing the bandwidth of the energy harvester.

  18. A study of the acoustical radiation force considering attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, RongRong; Liu, XiaoZhou; Gong, XiuFen

    2013-07-01

    Acoustical tweezer is a primary application of the radiation force of a sound field. When an ultrasound focused beam passes through a micro-particle, like a cell or living biological specimens, the particle will be manipulated accurately without physical contact and invasion, due to the three-dimensional acoustical trapping force. Based on the Ray acoustics approach in the Mie regime, this work discusses the effects on the particle caused by Gaussian focused ultrasound, studies the acoustical trapping force of spherical Mie particles by ultrasound in any position, and analyzes the numerical calculation on the two-dimensional acoustical radiation force. This article also analyzes the conditions for the acoustical trapping phenomenon, and discusses the impact of the initial position and size of the particle on the magnitude of the acoustical radiation force. Furthermore, this paper considers the ultrasonic attenuation in a particle in the case of two-dimension, studies the attenuation's effects on the acoustical trapping force, and amends the calculation to the ordinary case with attenuation.

  19. Characterization of irradiated and temperature-compensated gallium nitride surface acoustic wave resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Ashwin; Angadi, Chetan; Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Lin, Chih-Ming; Senesky, Debbie G.

    2014-06-01

    Conventional electronic components are prone to failure and drift when exposed to space environments, which contain harsh conditions, such as extreme variation in temperature and radiation exposure. As a result, electronic components are often shielded with heavy and complex packaging. New material platforms that leverage the radiation and temperature tolerance of wide bandgap materials can be used to develop robust electronic components without complex packaging. One such component that is vital for communication, navigation and signal processing on space exploration systems is the on-board timing reference, which is conventionally provided by a quartz crystal resonator and is prone to damage from radiation and temperature fluctuations. As a possible alternative, this paper presents the characterization of microfabricated and wide bandgap gallium nitride (GaN) surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators in radiation environments. Ultimately, in combination with the two-dimensional gas (2DEG) layer at the AlGaN/GaN interface, high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures can provide a monolithic solution for timing electronics on board space systems. One-port SAW resonators are microfabricated on a GaN-on-sapphire substrate are used to explore the impact of irradiation on the device performance. The GaN-based SAW resonator was subjected to extreme temperature conditions to study the change in resonance frequency. Thermal characterization of the resonator has revealed a self-compensating property at cryogenic temperatures. In addition, GaN-on-sapphire samples were irradiated using a Cs-137 source up to 55 krads of total ionizing dose (TID). The measured frequency response and Raman spectroscopy of the GaN/sapphire SAW resonators microfabricated from the irradiated samples are presented.

  20. Identifying Vulnerable Plaques with Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Joshua Ryan

    The rupture of arterial plaques is the most common cause of ischemic complications including stroke, the fourth leading cause of death and number one cause of long term disability in the United States. Unfortunately, because conventional diagnostic tools fail to identify plaques that confer the highest risk, often a disabling stroke and/or sudden death is the first sign of disease. A diagnostic method capable of characterizing plaque vulnerability would likely enhance the predictive ability and ultimately the treatment of stroke before the onset of clinical events. This dissertation evaluates the hypothesis that Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging can noninvasively identify lipid regions, that have been shown to increase a plaque's propensity to rupture, within carotid artery plaques in vivo. The work detailed herein describes development efforts and results from simulations and experiments that were performed to evaluate this hypothesis. To first demonstrate feasibility and evaluate potential safety concerns, finite- element method simulations are used to model the response of carotid artery plaques to an acoustic radiation force excitation. Lipid pool visualization is shown to vary as a function of lipid pool geometry and stiffness. A comparison of the resulting Von Mises stresses indicates that stresses induced by an ARFI excitation are three orders of magnitude lower than those induced by blood pressure. This thesis also presents the development of a novel pulse inversion harmonic tracking method to reduce clutter-imposed errors in ultrasound-based tissue displacement estimates. This method is validated in phantoms and was found to reduce bias and jitter displacement errors for a marked improvement in image quality in vivo. Lastly, this dissertation presents results from a preliminary in vivo study that compares ARFI imaging derived plaque stiffness with spatially registered composition determined by a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) gold standard

  1. Micro acoustic resonant chambers for heating/agitating/mixing (MARCHAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Noell, Aaron C.; Fisher, Anita M.; Takano, Nobuyuki; Grunthaner, Frank

    2016-04-01

    A variety of applications require the mixing and/or heating of a slurry made from a powder/fluid mixture. One of these applications, Sub Critical Water Extraction (SCWE), is a process where water and an environmental powder sample (sieved soil, drill cuttings, etc.) are heated in a sealed chamber to temperatures greater than 200 degrees Celsius by allowing the pressure to increase, but without reaching the critical point of water. At these temperatures, the ability of water to extract organics from solid particulate increases drastically. This paper describes the modeling and experimentation on the use of an acoustic resonant chamber which is part of an amino acid detection instrument called Astrobionibbler [Noell et al. 2014, 2015]. In this instrument we use acoustics to excite a fluid- solid fines mixture in different frequency/amplitude regimes to accomplish a variety of sample processing tasks. Driving the acoustic resonant chamber at lower frequencies can create circulation patterns in the fluid and mixes the liquid and fines, while driving the chamber at higher frequencies one can agitate the fluid and powder and create a suspension. If one then drives the chamber at high amplitude at resonance heating of the slurry occurs. In the mixing and agitating cell the particle levitation force depends on the relative densities and compressibility's of the particulate and fluid and on the kinetic and potential energy densities associated with the velocity and pressure fields [Glynne-Jones, Boltryk and Hill 2012] in the cell. When heating, the piezoelectric transducer and chamber is driven at high power in resonance where the solid/fines region is modelled as an acoustic transmission line with a large loss component. In this regime, heat is pumped into the solution/fines mixture and rapidly heats the sample. We have modeled the piezoelectric transducer/chamber/ sample using Mason's equivalent circuit. In order to assess the validity of the model we have built and

  2. 2-D modeling of laterally acoustically coupled thin film bulk acoustic wave resonator filters.

    PubMed

    Pensala, Tuomas; Meltaus, Johanna; Kokkonen, Kimmo; Ylilammi, Markku

    2010-11-01

    A 2-D model is developed for calculating lateral acoustical coupling between adjacent thin film BAW resonators forming an electrical N-port. The model is based on solution and superposition of lateral eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies in a structure consisting of adjacent regions with known plate wave dispersion properties. Mechanical and electrical response of the device are calculated as a superposition of eigenmodes according to voltage drive at one electrical port at a time while extracting current induced in the other ports, leading to a full Y-parameter description of the device. Exemplary cases are simulated to show the usefulness of the model in the study of the basic design rules of laterally coupled thin film BAW resonator filters. Model predictions are compared to an experimental 1.9-GHz band-pass filter based on aluminum nitride thin film technology and lateral acoustical coupling. Good agreement is obtained in prediction of passband behavior. The eigenmode-based model forms a useful tool for fast simulation of laterally coupled acoustic devices. It allows one to gain insight into basic device physics in a very intuitive fashion compared with more detailed but heavier finite element method. Shortcomings of this model and possible improvements are discussed. PMID:21041141

  3. Multimodal far-field acoustic radiation pattern: An approximate equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    The far-field sound radiation theory for a circular duct was studied for both single mode and multimodal inputs. The investigation was intended to develop a method to determine the acoustic power produced by turbofans as a function of mode cut-off ratio. With reasonable simplifying assumptions the single mode radiation pattern was shown to be reducible to a function of mode cut-off ratio only. With modal cut-off ratio as the dominant variable, multimodal radiation patterns can be reduced to a simple explicit expression. This approximate expression provides excellent agreement with an exact calculation of the sound radiation pattern using equal acoustic power per mode.

  4. Cryogenic resonant acoustic spectroscopy of bulk materials (CRA spectroscopy).

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Anja; Nawrodt, Ronny; Koettig, Torsten; Neubert, Ralf; Thürk, Matthias; Vodel, Wolfgang; Seidel, Paul; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2007-06-01

    The capability to measure Q factors at cryogenic temperatures enhances the ability to study relaxation processes in solids. Here we present a high-precision cryogenic setup with the ability to measure Q factors of at least 10(9). This level of sensitivity offers new potential for analyzing relaxation processes in solids and for correlating mode shape and relaxation strength. Our improved method of mechanical spectroscopy, cryogenic resonant acoustic spectroscopy of bulk materials, is verified by identifying relaxation processes in low-loss quartz crystals. For the first time, we observe additional damping peaks. The mechanical Q factors of different modes of cylindrical crystalline quartz substrates were measured from 300 down to 6 K. Resonant modes with frequencies between 10 and 325 kHz were excited without contact to the substrates and the ring down of the amplitudes was recorded using an interferometric vibration readout. PMID:17614624

  5. Acoustic radiation force-based elasticity imaging methods

    PubMed Central

    Palmeri, Mark L.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional diagnostic ultrasound images portray differences in the acoustic properties of soft tissues, whereas ultrasound-based elasticity images portray differences in the elastic properties of soft tissues (i.e. stiffness, viscosity). The benefit of elasticity imaging lies in the fact that many soft tissues can share similar ultrasonic echogenicities, but may have different mechanical properties that can be used to clearly visualize normal anatomy and delineate pathological lesions. Acoustic radiation force-based elasticity imaging methods use acoustic radiation force to transiently deform soft tissues, and the dynamic displacement response of those tissues is measured ultrasonically and is used to estimate the tissue's mechanical properties. Both qualitative images and quantitative elasticity metrics can be reconstructed from these measured data, providing complimentary information to both diagnose and longitudinally monitor disease progression. Recently, acoustic radiation force-based elasticity imaging techniques have moved from the laboratory to the clinical setting, where clinicians are beginning to characterize tissue stiffness as a diagnostic metric, and commercial implementations of radiation force-based ultrasonic elasticity imaging are beginning to appear on the commercial market. This article provides an overview of acoustic radiation force-based elasticity imaging, including a review of the relevant soft tissue material properties, a review of radiation force-based methods that have been proposed for elasticity imaging, and a discussion of current research and commercial realizations of radiation force based-elasticity imaging technologies. PMID:22419986

  6. Parallel Helmholtz resonators for a planar acoustic notch filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isozaki, Akihiro; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Tamura, Hiroto; Takahata, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports on an acoustic planar notch filter with a sub-wavelength thickness at the notch frequency. The developed notch filter consists of a number of spherical Helmholtz resonators (HRs) connected to a hole created in a plate. The HRs were placed at the in-plane vertices of a regular polygon. A simulated pressure distribution revealed that this uniform arrangement of HRs improves the silencing effect because the uniform applied waves emitted from the HRs act as canceling waves to the cross-section of the short hole (in this case, the length of the hole is sub-wavelength). The total pressure emitted from the HRs is equal regardless of the number of HRs connected to the hole. Therefore, the arrangement of HRs is essential for realizing a planar notch filter. Simulated transmittance spectra showed that the depth of the dip in the transmittance increased with the number of uniformly arranged HRs. We confirmed that the experimental transmittance spectra of fabricated notch filters, which consisted of between one and six HRs, agreed with the simulated transmittance spectra. The design of the acoustic filter presented in this study and the corresponding analysis should motivate further development of thin acoustic filters.

  7. Random acoustic metamaterial with a subwavelength dipolar resonance.

    PubMed

    Duranteau, Mickaël; Valier-Brasier, Tony; Conoir, Jean-Marc; Wunenburger, Régis

    2016-06-01

    The effective velocity and attenuation of longitudinal waves through random dispersions of rigid, tungsten-carbide beads in an elastic matrix made of epoxy resin in the range of beads volume fraction 2%-10% are determined experimentally. The multiple scattering model proposed by Luppé, Conoir, and Norris [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 131(2), 1113-1120 (2012)], which fully takes into account the elastic nature of the matrix and the associated mode conversions, accurately describes the measurements. Theoretical calculations show that the rigid particles display a local, dipolar resonance which shares several features with Minnaert resonance of bubbly liquids and with the dipolar resonance of core-shell particles. Moreover, for the samples under study, the main cause of smoothing of the dipolar resonance of the scatterers and the associated variations of the effective mass density of the dispersions is elastic relaxation, i.e., the finite time required for the shear stresses associated to the translational motion of the scatterers to propagate through the matrix. It is shown that its influence is governed solely by the value of the particle to matrix mass density contrast. PMID:27369160

  8. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Resonators for Monitoring Conditioning Film Formation.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Siegfried; Kögel, Svea; Brunner, Yvonne; Schmieg, Barbara; Ewald, Christina; Kirschhöfer, Frank; Brenner-Weiß, Gerald; Länge, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    We propose surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators as a complementary tool for conditioning film monitoring. Conditioning films are formed by adsorption of inorganic and organic substances on a substrate the moment this substrate comes into contact with a liquid phase. In the case of implant insertion, for instance, initial protein adsorption is required to start wound healing, but it will also trigger immune reactions leading to inflammatory responses. The control of the initial protein adsorption would allow to promote the healing process and to suppress adverse immune reactions. Methods to investigate these adsorption processes are available, but it remains difficult to translate measurement results into actual protein binding events. Biosensor transducers allow user-friendly investigation of protein adsorption on different surfaces. The combination of several transduction principles leads to complementary results, allowing a more comprehensive characterization of the adsorbing layer. We introduce SAW resonators as a novel complementary tool for time-resolved conditioning film monitoring. SAW resonators were coated with polymers. The adsorption of the plasma proteins human serum albumin (HSA) and fibrinogen onto the polymer-coated surfaces were monitored. Frequency results were compared with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor measurements, which confirmed the suitability of the SAW resonators for this application. PMID:26007735

  9. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Resonators for Monitoring Conditioning Film Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hohmann, Siegfried; Kögel, Svea; Brunner, Yvonne; Schmieg, Barbara; Ewald, Christina; Kirschhöfer, Frank; Brenner-Weiß, Gerald; Länge, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    We propose surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators as a complementary tool for conditioning film monitoring. Conditioning films are formed by adsorption of inorganic and organic substances on a substrate the moment this substrate comes into contact with a liquid phase. In the case of implant insertion, for instance, initial protein adsorption is required to start wound healing, but it will also trigger immune reactions leading to inflammatory responses. The control of the initial protein adsorption would allow to promote the healing process and to suppress adverse immune reactions. Methods to investigate these adsorption processes are available, but it remains difficult to translate measurement results into actual protein binding events. Biosensor transducers allow user-friendly investigation of protein adsorption on different surfaces. The combination of several transduction principles leads to complementary results, allowing a more comprehensive characterization of the adsorbing layer. We introduce SAW resonators as a novel complementary tool for time-resolved conditioning film monitoring. SAW resonators were coated with polymers. The adsorption of the plasma proteins human serum albumin (HSA) and fibrinogen onto the polymer-coated surfaces were monitored. Frequency results were compared with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor measurements, which confirmed the suitability of the SAW resonators for this application. PMID:26007735

  10. A study of acoustic resonance in a low-speed multistage compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, T.R.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements are presented of a resonant acoustic phenomenon occurring in a low-speed multistage compressor. The results show that this phenomenon shares many characteristics with acoustic resonance as measured in high-speed compressors. These similarities include a rotating pressure field, several acoustic frequencies corresponding to different circumferential modes, step changes in frequency as the flow rate is increased, and acoustic frequencies that are independent of flow coefficient, shaft speed, and the axial length of the compression system. The paper includes measurements of the helical structure of the rotating pressure field and of the variation in amplitude of the acoustic signal over a stator exit plane.

  11. Chromospheric Heating by Acoustic Waves Compared to Radiative Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobotka, M.; Heinzel, P.; Švanda, M.; Jurčák, J.; del Moro, D.; Berrilli, F.

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic and magnetoacoustic waves are among the possible candidate mechanisms that heat the upper layers of the solar atmosphere. A weak chromospheric plage near the large solar pore NOAA 11005 was observed on 2008 October 15, in the Fe i 617.3 nm and Ca ii 853.2 nm lines of the Interferometric Bidimemsional Spectrometer attached to the Dunn Solar Telescope. In analyzing the Ca ii observations (with spatial and temporal resolutions of 0.″4 and 52 s) the energy deposited by acoustic waves is compared to that released by radiative losses. The deposited acoustic flux is estimated from the power spectra of Doppler oscillations measured in the Ca ii line core. The radiative losses are calculated using a grid of seven one-dimensional hydrostatic semi-empirical model atmospheres. The comparison shows that the spatial correlation of the maps of radiative losses and acoustic flux is 72%. In a quiet chromosphere, the contribution of acoustic energy flux to radiative losses is small, only about 15%. In active areas with a photospheric magnetic-field strength between 300 and 1300 G and an inclination of 20°–60°, the contribution increases from 23% (chromospheric network) to 54% (a plage). However, these values have to be considered as lower limits and it might be possible that the acoustic energy flux is the main contributor to the heating of bright chromospheric network and plages.

  12. Acoustic radiation from lifting airfoils in compressible subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, Hafiz M.; Subramaniam, Shankar; Scott, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The far field acoustic radiation from a lifting airfoil in a three-dimensional gust is studied. The acoustic pressure is calculated using the Kirchhoff method, instead of using the classical acoustic analogy approach due to Lighthill. The pressure on the Kirchhoff surface is calculated using an existing numerical solution of the unsteady flow field. The far field acoustic pressure is calculated in terms of these values using Kirchhoff's formula. The method is validated against existing semi-analytical results for a flat plate. The method is then used to study the problem of an airfoil in a harmonic three-dimensional gust, for a wide range of Mach numbers. The effect of variation of the airfoil thickness and angle of attack on the acoustic far field is studied. The changes in the mechanism of sound generation and propagation due to the presence of steady loading and nonuniform mean flow are also studied.

  13. Acoustic radiation from lifting airfoils in compressible subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, Hafiz M.; Subramaniam, Shankar; Scott, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The far field acoustic radiation from a lifting airfoil in a three-dimensional gust is studied. The acoustic pressure is calculated using the Kirchhoff method, instead of using the classical acoustic analogy approach due to Lighthill. The pressure on the Kirchhoff surface is calculated using an existing numerical solution of the unsteady flow field. The far field acoustic pressure is calculated in terms of these values using Kirchhoff's formula. The method is validated against existing semi-analytical results for a flat plate. The method is then used to study the problem of an airfoil in a harmonic three-dimensional gust, for a wide range of Mach numbers. The effect of variation of the airfoil thickness and angle of attack on the acoustic far field is studied. The changes in the mechanism of sound generation and propagation due to the presence of steady loading and non-uniform mean flow are also studied.

  14. Acoustic radiation torque and the conservation of angular momentum (L).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Likun; Marston, Philip L

    2011-04-01

    This note concerns the evaluation of the static acoustic radiation torque exerted by an acoustic field on a scatterer immersed in a nonviscous fluid based on far-field scattering. The radiation torque is expressed as the integral of the time-averaged flux of angular momentum over a spherical surface far removed from the scattering object with its center at the centroid of the object. That result was given previously [G. Maidanik, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 30, 620-623 (1956)]. Another expression given recently [Z. W. Fan et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 124, 2727-2732 (2008)] is simplified to this formula. Comments are made on obtaining it directly from the general theorem of angular momentum conservation in the integral form. PMID:21476624

  15. A Spectral Analysis Approach for Acoustic Radiation from Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Singh, Mahendra P.; Mei, Chuh

    2004-01-01

    A method is developed to predict the vibration response of a composite panel and the resulting far-field acoustic radiation due to acoustic excitation. The acoustic excitation is assumed to consist of obliquely incident plane waves. The panel is modeled by a finite element analysis and the radiated field is predicted using Rayleigh's integral. The approach can easily include other effects such as shape memory alloy (SMA) ber reinforcement, large detection thermal postbuckling, and non-symmetric SMA distribution or lamination. Transmission loss predictions for the case of an aluminum panel excited by a harmonic acoustic pressure are shown to compare very well with a classical analysis. Results for a composite panel with and without shape memory alloy reinforcement are also presented. The preliminary results demonstrate that the transmission loss can be significantly increased with shape memory alloy reinforcement. The mechanisms for further transmission loss improvement are identified and discussed.

  16. Resonant interaction of acoustic waves with subaqueous bedforms: Sand dunes in the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Linus Y S; Chang, Andrea Y Y; Reeder, D Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    The large subaqueous sand dunes in the South China Sea are expected to produce the coupling of energy between acoustic normal modes. In this letter, resonant interaction between acoustic propagating modes and subaqueous bedforms are numerically investigated as a function of bedform wavelength, acoustic frequency and bedform packet length. The results demonstrate that bedform wavelength impacts acoustic mode coupling behavior, with the principal transfer of energy occurring between acoustic modes whose eigenvalue difference is equal to the peak value in the bedform wavenumber spectrum. The observed effect of wavelength is greater than that of acoustic frequency and bedform packet length. PMID:26723360

  17. Manipulating Liquids With Acoustic Radiation Pressure Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.

    1999-01-01

    High-intensity ultrasound waves can produce the effects of "Acoustic Radiation Pressure" (ARP) and "acoustic streaming." These effects can be used to propel liquid flows and to apply forces that can be used to move or manipulate floating objects or liquid surfaces. NASA's interest in ARP includes the remote-control agitation of liquids and the manipulation of bubbles and drops in liquid experiments and propellant systems. A high level of flexibility is attained by using a high-power acoustic phased array to generate, steer, and focus a beam of acoustic waves. This is called an Acoustic Radiation Pressure Phased Array, or ARPPA. In this approach, many acoustic transducer elements emit wavelets that converge into a single beam of sound waves. Electronically coordinating the timing, or "phase shift," of the acoustic waves makes it possible to form a beam with a predefined direction and focus. Therefore, a user can direct the ARP force at almost any desired point within a liquid volume. ARPPA lets experimenters manipulate objects anywhere in a test volume. This flexibility allow it to be used for multiple purposes, such as to agitate liquids, deploy and manipulate drops or bubbles, and even suppress sloshing in spacecraft propellant tanks.

  18. Axial acoustic radiation force on a sphere in Gaussian field

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Rongrong; Liu, Xiaozhou Gong, Xiufen

    2015-10-28

    Based on the finite series method, the acoustical radiation force resulting from a Gaussian beam incident on a spherical object is investigated analytically. When the position of the particles deviating from the center of the beam, the Gaussian beam is expanded as a spherical function at the center of the particles and the expanded coefficients of the Gaussian beam is calculated. The analytical expression of the acoustic radiation force on spherical particles deviating from the Gaussian beam center is deduced. The acoustic radiation force affected by the acoustic frequency and the offset distance from the Gaussian beam center is investigated. Results have been presented for Gaussian beams with different wavelengths and it has been shown that the interaction of a Gaussian beam with a sphere can result in attractive axial force under specific operational conditions. Results indicate the capability of manipulating and separating spherical spheres based on their mechanical and acoustical properties, the results provided here may provide a theoretical basis for development of single-beam acoustical tweezers.

  19. Control of acoustic absorption in one-dimensional scattering by resonant scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, A.; Theocharis, G.; Richoux, O.; Romero-García, V.; Pagneux, V.

    2015-12-01

    We experimentally report perfect acoustic absorption through the interplay of the inherent losses and transparent modes with high Q factor. These modes are generated in a two-port, one-dimensional waveguide, which is side-loaded by isolated resonators of moderate Q factor. In symmetric structures, we show that in the presence of small inherent losses, these modes lead to coherent perfect absorption associated with one-sided absorption slightly larger than 0.5. In asymmetric structures, near perfect one-sided absorption is possible (96%) with a deep sub-wavelength sample ( λ / 28 , where λ is the wavelength of the sound wave in the air). The control of strong absorption by the proper tuning of the radiation leakage of few resonators with weak losses will open possibilities in various wave-control devices.

  20. Intravascular Ultrasound Catheter to Enhance Microbubble-Based Drug Delivery via Acoustic Radiation Force

    PubMed Central

    Kilroy, Joseph P.; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Wamhoff, Brian R.; Hossack, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that acoustic radiation force enhances intravascular microbubble adhesion to blood vessels in the presence of flow for molecular-targeted ultrasound imaging and drug delivery. A prototype acoustic radiation force intravascular ultrasound (ARFIVUS) catheter was designed and fabricated to displace a microbubble contrast agent in flow representative of conditions encountered in the human carotid artery. The prototype ARFIVUS transducer was designed to match the resonance frequency of 1.4- to 2.6-μm-diameter microbubbles modeled by an experimentally verified 1-D microbubble acoustic radiation force translation model. The transducer element was an elongated Navy Type I (hard) lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic designed to operate at 3 MHz. Fabricated devices operated with center frequencies of 3.3 and 3.6 MHz with −6-dB fractional bandwidths of 55% and 50%, respectively. Microbubble translation velocities as high as 0.86 m/s were measured using a high-speed streak camera when insonating with the ARFIVUS transducer. Finally, the prototype was used to displace microbubbles in a flow phantom while imaging with a commercial 45-MHz imaging IVUS transducer. A sustained increase of 31 dB in average video intensity was measured following insonation with the ARFIVUS, indicating microbubble accumulation resulting from the application of acoustic radiation force. PMID:23143566

  1. Acoustic Radiation Force Elasticity Imaging in Diagnostic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Joshua R.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Palmeri, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    The development of ultrasound-based elasticity imaging methods has been the focus of intense research activity since the mid-1990s. In characterizing the mechanical properties of soft tissues, these techniques image an entirely new subset of tissue properties that cannot be derived with conventional ultrasound techniques. Clinically, tissue elasticity is known to be associated with pathological condition and with the ability to image these features in vivo, elasticity imaging methods may prove to be invaluable tools for the diagnosis and/or monitoring of disease. This review focuses on ultrasound-based elasticity imaging methods that generate an acoustic radiation force to induce tissue displacements. These methods can be performed non-invasively during routine exams to provide either qualitative or quantitative metrics of tissue elasticity. A brief overview of soft tissue mechanics relevant to elasticity imaging is provided, including a derivation of acoustic radiation force, and an overview of the various acoustic radiation force elasticity imaging methods. PMID:23549529

  2. Acoustic solitons in waveguides with Helmholtz resonators: transmission line approach.

    PubMed

    Achilleos, V; Richoux, O; Theocharis, G; Frantzeskakis, D J

    2015-02-01

    We report experimental results and study theoretically soliton formation and propagation in an air-filled acoustic waveguide side loaded with Helmholtz resonators. We propose a theoretical modeling of the system, which relies on a transmission-line approach, leading to a nonlinear dynamical lattice model. The latter allows for an analytical description of the various soliton solutions for the pressure, which are found by means of dynamical systems and multiscale expansion techniques. These solutions include Boussinesq-like and Korteweg-de Vries pulse-shaped solitons that are observed in the experiment, as well as nonlinear Schrödinger envelope solitons, that are predicted theoretically. The analytical predictions are in excellent agreement with direct numerical simulations and in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. PMID:25768623

  3. Monaural sound localization based on structure-induced acoustic resonance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keonwook; Kim, Youngwoong

    2015-01-01

    A physical structure such as a cylindrical pipe controls the propagated sound spectrum in a predictable way that can be used to localize the sound source. This paper designs a monaural sound localization system based on multiple pyramidal horns around a single microphone. The acoustic resonance within the horn provides a periodicity in the spectral domain known as the fundamental frequency which is inversely proportional to the radial horn length. Once the system accurately estimates the fundamental frequency, the horn length and corresponding angle can be derived by the relationship. The modified Cepstrum algorithm is employed to evaluate the fundamental frequency. In an anechoic chamber, localization experiments over azimuthal configuration show that up to 61% of the proper signal is recognized correctly with 30% misfire. With a speculated detection threshold, the system estimates direction 52% in positive-to-positive and 34% in negative-to-positive decision rate, on average. PMID:25668214

  4. Monaural Sound Localization Based on Structure-Induced Acoustic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Keonwook; Kim, Youngwoong

    2015-01-01

    A physical structure such as a cylindrical pipe controls the propagated sound spectrum in a predictable way that can be used to localize the sound source. This paper designs a monaural sound localization system based on multiple pyramidal horns around a single microphone. The acoustic resonance within the horn provides a periodicity in the spectral domain known as the fundamental frequency which is inversely proportional to the radial horn length. Once the system accurately estimates the fundamental frequency, the horn length and corresponding angle can be derived by the relationship. The modified Cepstrum algorithm is employed to evaluate the fundamental frequency. In an anechoic chamber, localization experiments over azimuthal configuration show that up to 61% of the proper signal is recognized correctly with 30% misfire. With a speculated detection threshold, the system estimates direction 52% in positive-to-positive and 34% in negative-to-positive decision rate, on average. PMID:25668214

  5. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Imaging: a Review

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force based elasticity imaging methods are under investigation by many groups. These methods differ from traditional ultrasonic elasticity imaging methods in that they do not require compression of the transducer, and are thus expected to be less operator dependent. Methods have been developed that utilize impulsive (i.e. < 1 ms), harmonic (pulsed), and steady state radiation force excitations. The work discussed herein utilizes impulsive methods, for which two imaging approaches have been pursued: 1) monitoring the tissue response within the radiation force region of excitation (ROE) and generating images of relative differences in tissue stiffness (Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging); and 2) monitoring the speed of shear wave propagation away from the ROE to quantify tissue stiffness (Shear Wave Elasticity Imaging (SWEI)). For these methods, a single ultrasound transducer on a commercial ultrasound system can be used to both generate acoustic radiation force in tissue, and to monitor the tissue displacement response. The response of tissue to this transient excitation is complicated and depends upon tissue geometry, radiation force field geometry, and tissue mechanical and acoustic properties. Higher shear wave speeds and smaller displacements are associated with stiffer tissues, and slower shear wave speeds and larger displacements occur with more compliant tissues. ARFI images have spatial resolution comparable to that of B-mode, often with greater contrast, providing matched, adjunctive information. SWEI images provide quantitative information about the tissue stiffness, typically with lower spatial resolution. A review these methods and examples of clinical applications are presented herein. PMID:22545033

  6. Ducted fan acoustic radiation including the effects of nonuniform mean flow and acoustic treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter; Roy, Indranil Danda

    1993-01-01

    Forward and aft acoustic propagation and radiation from a ducted fan is modeled using a finite element discretization of the acoustic field equations. The fan noise source is introduced as equivalent body forces representing distributed blade loading. The flow in and around the nacelle is assumed to be nonuniform, reflecting the effects of forward flight and flow into the inlet. Refraction due to the fan exit jet shear layer is not represented. Acoustic treatment on the inlet and exhaust duct surfaces provides a mechanism for attenuation. In a region enclosing the fan a pressure formulation is used with the assumption of locally uniform flow. Away from the fan a velocity potential formulation is used and the flow is assumed nonuniform but irrotational. A procedure is developed for matching the two regions by making use of local duct modal amplitudes as transition state variables and determining the amplitudes by enforcing natural boundary conditions at the interface between adjacent regions in which pressure and velocity potential are used. Simple models of rotor alone and rotor/exit guide vane generated noise are used to demonstrate the calculation of the radiated acoustic field and to show the effect of acoustic treatment. The model has been used to assess the success of four techniques for acoustic lining optimization in reducing far field noise.

  7. Evaluation of the applicability of Helmholtz resonators for low frequency acoustic liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderwal, J. M. M.

    1988-09-01

    A literature study was performed on the acoustic behavior of those Helmholtz resonator type liners which are most promising for low frequency sound absorption in aero-engine applications. The equations for the acoustic impedance of various types of Helmholtz resonators were analyzed as well as the conditions for the validity of these equations. An experimental program is defined for a further analysis of various types of resonators.

  8. Acoustic radiation of a submerged cylindrical shell in low frequency.

    PubMed

    Van de Loock, Julien; Décultot, Dominique; Léon, Fernand; Chati, Farid; Maze, Gérard; Rajaona, Dominique Raphael; Klauson, Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    The evaluation of sound pressure levels produced by submerged structures is a part of regulations on underwater noise pollution. The purpose of this work is the study of the underwater acoustic radiation of a stainless steel tube subjected to vibrations generated by a shock obtained by using a hammer. The vibrations of the tube, placed successively in air and in water, are measured by using accelerometers. In water, the acoustic radiation measurements are performed by using a hydrophone. Results are presented as frequency spectra and are confronted with results of the elastic theory. PMID:23298014

  9. Fissile and Non-Fissile Material Detection using Nuclear Acoustic Resonance Signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Herberg, J; Maxwell, R; Tittmann, B R; Lenahan, P M; Yerkes, S; Jayaraman, S

    2005-10-04

    This report reviews progress made on NA22 project LL251DP to develop a novel technique, Nuclear Acoustic Resonance (NAR), for remote, non-destructive, nonradiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs, including {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. We have met all milestones and deliverables for FY05, as shown in Table 1. In short, we have developed a magnetic shield chamber and magnetic field, develop a digital lock-in amplifier computer to integrate both the ultrasound radiation with the detector, developed strain measurements, and begin to perform initial measurements to obtain a NAR signal from aluminum at room temperature and near the earth's magnetic field. The results obtained in FY05 further support the feasibility of successful demonstration of an NAR experiment for remote, non-destructive, non-radiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs.

  10. Reconstruction of transient acoustic radiation from a sphere.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sean F; Lu, Huancai; Bajwa, Manjit S

    2005-04-01

    Transient near-field acoustical holography (NAH) formulation is derived from the Helmholtz equation least squares (HELS) method to reconstruct acoustic radiation from a spherical surface subject to transient excitations in a free field. To facilitate derivations of temporal solutions, we make use of the Laplace transform and expansion in terms of the spherical Hankel functions and spherical harmonics, with their coefficients settled by solving a system of equations obtained by matching an assumed-form solution to the measured acoustic pressure. To derive a general form of solution for a temporal kernel, we replace the spherical Hankel functions and their derivatives by polynomials, recast infinite integrals in the inverse Laplace transform as contour integrals in a complex s-plane, and evaluate it via the residue theorem. The transient acoustic quantities anywhere including the source surface are then obtained by convoluting the temporal kernels with respect to the measured acoustic pressure. Numerical examples of reconstructing transient acoustic fields from explosively expanding, impulsively accelerating, and partially accelerating spheres, and that from a sphere subject to an arbitrarily time-dependent excitation are depicted. To illustrate the effectiveness of HELS-based transient NAH formulations, all input data are collected along an arbitrarily selected line segment and used to reconstruct transient acoustic quantities everywhere. PMID:15898648

  11. Acoustic-radiation stress in solids. I - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, J. H., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The general case of acoustic-radiation stress associated with quasi-compressional and quasi-shear waves propagating in infinite and semiinfinite lossless solids of arbitrary crystalline symmetry is studied. The Boussinesq radiation stress is defined and found to depend directly on an acoustic nonlinearity parameter which characterizes the radiation-induced static strain, a stress-generalized nonlinearity parameter which characterizes the stress nonlinearity, and the energy density of the propagating wave. Application of the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle of adiabatic invariance to a self-constrained system described by the nonlinear equations of motion allows the acoustic-radiation-induced static strain to be identified with a self-constrained variation in the time-averaged product of the internal energy density and displacement gradient. The time-averaged product is scaled by the acoustic nonlinearity parameter and represents the first-order nonlinearity in the virial theorem. Finally, the relationship between the Boussinesq and the Cauchy radiation stress is obtained in a closed three-dimensional form.

  12. Effects of acoustic wave resonance oscillation on immobilized enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Tomoya; Inoue, Yasunobu

    2014-03-01

    In aiming at developing a new method to artificially activate enzyme catalysts immobilized on surface, the effects of resonance oscillation of bulk acoustic waves were studied. Glucose oxidase (GOD) was immobilized by a covalent coupling method on a ferroelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) device that was able to generate thickness-extensional resonance oscillation (TERO). Glucose oxidation by the GOD enzyme was studied in a microreactor. The generation of TERO immediately increased the catalytic activity of immobilized GOD by a factor of 2-3. With turn-off of TERO, no significant activity decrease occurred, and 80-90% of the enhanced activity was maintained while the reaction proceeded. The almost complete reversion of the activity to the original low level before TERO generation was observed when the immobilized GOD was exposed to a glucose substrate-free solution. These results indicated that the presence of glucose substrate was essential for TERO-induced GOD activation and preservation of the increased activity level. The influences of reaction temperature, glucose concentration, pH, and rf electric power on the TERO activation showed that TERO strengthened the interactions of the immobilized enzyme with glucose substrate and hence promoted the formation of an activation complex.

  13. Backscatter of solar resonance radiation. I.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. E.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the angular dependence of the intensity of solar Lyman alpha resonantly scattered from neutral interstellar hydrogen which has penetrated the solar system. A simple model which essentially neglects temperature effects, but which includes gravity, radiation pressure, photoionization and charge exchange is used for this calculation. The results are then compared with the observations. The resonant scattering of He I 584 A is also treated.

  14. Radiative widths of resonances (experiments)

    SciTech Connect

    Gidal, G.

    1988-07-01

    After a hiatus of several years, this conference brings us considerable new data on resonance production in photon photon interactions. I will first discuss the contributions concerning the tensor, pseudoscalar and scalar mesons, then review the current status of the (c/ovr string/c /eta//sub c/) and finally summarize the exciting new results concerning the spin 1 mesons. 40 refs., 21 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Numerics of surface acoustic wave (SAW) driven acoustic streaming and radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nama, Nitesh; Barnkob, Rune; Kahler, Christian; Costanzo, Francesco; Jun Huang, Tony

    2015-11-01

    Recently, surface acoustic wave (SAW) based systems have shown great potential for various lab-on-a-chip applications. However, the physical understanding of the precise acoustic fields and associated acoustophoresis is rather limited. In this work, we present a numerical study of the acoustophoretic particle motion inside a SAW-actuated, liquid-filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel. We utilize a perturbation approach to divide the flow variables into first- and second-order components. The first-order fields result in a time-averaged acoustic radiation force on suspended particles, as well as the time-averaged body force terms that drive the second-order fields. We model the SAW actuation by a displacement function while we utilize impedance boundary conditions to model the PDMS walls. We identify the precise acoustic fields generated inside the microchannel and investigate a range of particle sizes to characterize the transition from streaming-dominated acoustophoresis to radiation-force-dominated acoustophoresis. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability of SAW devices to tune the position of vertical pressure node inside the microchannel by tuning the phase difference between the two incoming surface acoustic waves.

  16. Precise rainbow trapping for low-frequency acoustic waves with micro Mie resonance-based structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen; Yuan, Baoguo; Cheng, Ying; Liu, Xiaojun

    2016-02-01

    We have realized the acoustic rainbow trapping in the low frequency region (200-500 Hz) through micro Mie resonance-based structures. The structure has eight channels with a high refractive index obtained by coiling space, that can excite strong interactions with incident waves and support various orders of multipoles due to the Mie resonances of the microstructure. By utilizing the structure, the precise spatial modulation of the acoustic wave is demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. The effect of trapping broadband acoustic waves and spatially separating different frequency components are ascribed to the monopolar Mie resonances of the structures. The trapping frequency is derived and the trapping positions can be tuned arbitrarily. With enhanced wave-structure interactions and tailored frequency responses, such micro structures show precise spectral-spatial control of acoustic waves and open a diverse venue for high performance acoustic wave detection, sensing, filtering, and a nondestructive test.

  17. Resonant acoustic transducer and driver system for a well drilling string communication system

    DOEpatents

    Chanson, Gary J.; Nicolson, Alexander M.

    1981-01-01

    The acoustic data communication system includes an acoustic transmitter and receiver wherein low frequency acoustic waves, propagating in relatively loss free manner in well drilling string piping, are efficiently coupled to the drill string and propagate at levels competitive with the levels of noise generated by drilling machinery also present in the drill string. The transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring piezoelectric transmitter and amplifier combination that permits self-oscillating resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  18. Physics of Acoustic Radiation from Jet Engine Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Parrish, Sarah A.; Envia, Edmane; Chien, Eugene W.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of acoustic radiation from a jet engine inlet are performed using advanced computational aeroacoustics (CAA) algorithms and high-quality numerical boundary treatments. As a model of modern commercial jet engine inlets, the inlet geometry of the NASA Source Diagnostic Test (SDT) is used. Fan noise consists of tones and broadband sound. This investigation considers the radiation of tones associated with upstream propagating duct modes. The primary objective is to identify the dominant physical processes that determine the directivity of the radiated sound. Two such processes have been identified. They are acoustic diffraction and refraction. Diffraction is the natural tendency for an acoustic wave to follow a curved solid surface as it propagates. Refraction is the turning of the direction of propagation of sound waves by mean flow gradients. Parametric studies on the changes in the directivity of radiated sound due to variations in forward flight Mach number and duct mode frequency, azimuthal mode number, and radial mode number are carried out. It is found there is a significant difference in directivity for the radiation of the same duct mode from an engine inlet when operating in static condition and in forward flight. It will be shown that the large change in directivity is the result of the combined effects of diffraction and refraction.

  19. Acoustic resonance in tube bundles -- Comparison of full scale and laboratory test results

    SciTech Connect

    Eisinger, F.L.

    1995-12-01

    Full scale operational data from steam generator tube bundles exposed to hot gases in crossflow are compared with small scale laboratory test results with cold air. Vibration thresholds based on input energy, acoustic particle velocity and effective damping are evaluated and compared. It is shown that these parameters play an important role in the development, or suppression of acoustic resonance.

  20. Towards optimal design of locally resonant acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krushynska, A. O.; Kouznetsova, V. G.; Geers, M. G. D.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents an in-depth analysis of solid locally resonant acoustic metamaterials (LRAMs) consisting of rubber-coated inclusions. Dispersion properties of two-dimensional LRAMs are studied by means of finite-element modal analysis. For an incompressible rubber, only one practically important spectral band gap is found for in-plane modes in a low-frequency range. This result is in striking contrast with the compressible coating case, previously studied in the literature. For inclusions with a circular cross-section, the lower bound of the band gap can be evaluated exactly by means of the derived analytical solution, which is also valid for compressible coatings and can therefore be used to determine lower bounds of higher band gaps as well. The influence of geometric and material parameters, filling fraction and inclusion shape on the width of the lowest band gap is investigated in detail. Based on the results of this analysis, an optimal microstructure of LRAMs yielding the widest low-frequency band gap is proposed. To achieve the band gap at the lowest possible frequencies in LRAMs suitable for practical applications, the use of the tungsten core material is advised, as a safe and economically viable alternative to commonly considered lead and gold. Two configurations of LRAM with various sizes of coated tungsten cylindrical inclusions with circular cross-section are considered. The evolution of dispersion spectra due to the presence of different inclusions is investigated, and the parameters for optimal design of LRAMs are determined.

  1. Apparatus and method for comparing corresponding acoustic resonances in liquids

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, D.N.

    1999-03-23

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for comparing corresponding acoustic resonances in liquids. The present invention permits the measurement of certain characteristics of liquids which affect the speed of sound therein. For example, a direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the speed of sound in a gasoline sample has been experimentally observed. Therefore, changes in the speed of sound therein can be utilized as a sensitive parameter for determining changes in composition of a liquid sample. The present apparatus establishes interference patterns inside of a liquid without requiring the use of very thin, rigorously parallel ceramic discs, but rather uses readily available piezoelectric transducers attached to the outside surface of the usual container for the liquid and located on the same side thereof in the vicinity of one another. That is, various receptacle geometries may be employed, and the driving and receiving transducers may be located on the same side of the receptacle. The cell may also be constructed of any material that is inert to the liquid under investigation. A single-transducer embodiment, where the same transducer provides the excitation to the sample container and receives signals impressed therein, is also described. 5 figs.

  2. Apparatus and method for comparing corresponding acoustic resonances in liquids

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    1999-01-01

    Apparatus and method for comparing corresponding acoustic resonances in liquids. The present invention permits the measurement of certain characteristics of liquids which affect the speed of sound therein. For example, a direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the speed of sound in a gasoline sample has been experimentally observed. Therefore, changes in the speed of sound therein can be utilized as a sensitive parameter for determining changes in composition of a liquid sample. The present apparatus establishes interference patterns inside of a liquid without requiring the use of very thin, rigorously parallel ceramic discs, but rather uses readily available piezoelectric transducers attached to the outside surface of the usual container for the liquid and located on the same side thereof in the vicinity of one another. That is, various receptacle geometries may be employed, and the driving and receiving transducers may be located on the same side of the receptacle. The cell may also be constructed of any material that is inert to the liquid under investigation. A single-transducer embodiment, where the same transducer provides the excitation to the sample container and receives signals impressed therein, is also described.

  3. Coupling of Acoustic Vibrations to Plasmon Resonances in Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Aftab; Pelton, Matthew; Guest, Jeffrey

    Measurements of acoustic vibrations in nanoparticles provide a unique opportunity to study mechanical phenomena at nanometer length scales and picosecond time scales. Phonon vibrations of plasmonic nanoparticles are of particular interest, due to their large extinction efficiencies, and high sensitivity to surrounding medium. There are two mechanisms that transduce the mechanical oscillations into plasmon resonance shift: (1) changes in polarizability; and (2) changes in electron density. These mechanisms have been used to explain qualitatively the origin of the transient-absorption signals, however, a quantitative connection has not yet been made except for simple geometries. Here, we present a method to quantitatively determine the coupling between vibrational modes and plasmon modes in noble-metal nanoparticles including spheres, shells, rods and cubes. We separately determine the parts of the optical response that are due to shape changes and to changes in electron density, and we relate the optical signals to the symmetries of the vibrational and plasmon modes. These results clarify reported experimental results, and should help guide the optimization of future experiments.

  4. Contactless transport of matter in the first five resonance modes of a line-focused acoustic manipulator.

    PubMed

    Foresti, Daniele; Nabavi, Majid; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2012-02-01

    The first five resonance modes for transport of matter in a line-focused acoustic levitation system are investigated. Contactless transport was achieved by varying the height between the radiating plate and the reflector. Transport and levitation of droplets in particular involve two limits of the acoustic forces. The lower limit corresponds to the minimum force required to overcome the gravitational force. The upper limit corresponds to the maximum acoustic pressure beyond which atomization of the droplet occurs. As the droplet size increases, the lower limit increases and the upper limit decreases. Therefore to have large droplets levitated, relatively flat radiation pressure amplitude during the translation is needed. In this study, using a finite element model, the Gor'kov potential was calculated for different heights between the reflector and the radiating plate. The application of the Gor'kov potential was extended to study the range of droplet sizes for which the droplets can be levitated and transported without atomization. It was found that the third resonant mode (H(3)-mode) represents the best compromise between high levitation force and smooth pattern transition, and water droplets of millimeter radius can be levitated and transported. The H(3)-mode also allows for three translation lines in parallel. PMID:22352478

  5. Recoilless Nuclear Resonance Absorption of Gamma Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mössbauer, Rudolf L.

    It is a high distinction to be permitted to address you on the subject of recoilless nuclear resonance absorption of gamma radiation. The methods used in this special branch of experimental physics have recently found acceptance in many areas of science. I take the liberty to confine myself essentially to the work which I was able to carry out in the years 1955-1958 at the Max Planck Institute in Heidelberg, and which finally led to establishment of the field of recoilless nuclear resonance absorption. Many investigators shared in the preparations of the basis for the research we are concerned with in this lecture. As early as the middle of the last century Stokes observed, in the case of fluorite, the phenomenon now known as fluorescence - namely, that solids, liquids, and gases under certain conditions partially absorb incident electromagnetic radiation which immediately is reradiated. A special case is the so-called resonance fluorescence, a phenomenon in which the re-emitted and the incident radiation both are of the same wavelength. The resonance fluorescence of the yellow D lines of sodium in sodium vapour is a particularly notable and exhaustively studied example. In this optical type of resonance fluorescence, light sources are used in which the atoms undergo transitions from excited states to their ground states (Fig. 1.1). The light quanta emitted in these transitions (A → B) are used to initiate the inverse process of resonance absorption in the atoms of an absorber which are identical with the radiating atoms. The atoms of the absorber undergo a transition here from the ground state (B) to the excited state (A), from which they again return to the ground state, after a certain time delay, by emission of fluorescent light.

  6. Fissile and Non-Fissile Material Detection using Nuclear Acoustic Resonance Signatures: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Herberg, J; Maxwell, R; Tittmann, B R; Lenahan, P M; Yerkes, S; Jayaraman, S B

    2006-11-02

    This is final report on NA-22 project LL251DP, where the goal was to develop a novel technique, Nuclear Acoustic Resonance (NAR), for remote, non-destructive, nonradiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs, including {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. In short, we have developed a magnetic shield chamber and magnetic field, develop a digital lock-in amplifier computer to integrate both the ultrasound radiation with the detector, developed strain measurements, and begun to perform initial measurements to obtain a NAR signal from aluminum at room temperature and near the earth's magnetic field. Since our funding was cut in FY06, I will discuss where this project can go in the future with this technology.

  7. Spinning mode acoustic radiation from the flight inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, W. F.

    1983-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed for spinning mode acoustic radiation from a thick wall duct without flow. This model is based on a series of experiments (with and without flow). A nearly pure azimuthal spinning mode was isolated and then reflection coefficients and far field pressure (amplitude and phase) were measured. In our model the governing boundary value problem for the Helmholtz equation is first converted into an integral equation for the unknown acoustic pressure over a disk, S1, near the mouth of the duct and over the exterior surface, S2, of the duct. Assuming a pure azimuthal mode excitation, the azimuthal dependence is integrated out which yields an integral equation over the generator C1 of S1 and the generator C2 of S2. The sound pressure on C1 was approximated by a truncated modal expansion of the interior acoustic pressure. Piecewise linear spline approximation on C2 was used.

  8. An intermode-coupled thin-film micro-acoustic resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arapan, Lilia; Katardjiev, Ilia; Yantchev, Ventsislav

    2012-08-01

    A novel concept for the development of thin-film micro-acoustic resonators based on the coupling between different plate acoustic modes is demonstrated. The basic principles for the design and fabrication of intermode-coupled plate acoustic wave resonators on c-textured thin aluminum nitride films are presented. More specifically, the lowest order symmetric S0 Lamb wave is excited and then coupled to the fundamental thickness shear bulk resonance by means of a metal strip grating with specific periodicity. The experimental results demonstrate that the grating-assisted intermode coupling can be employed in high-frequency resonators inheriting the low dispersive nature of the S0 mode in combination with the energy localization in the plate bulk typical for the fundamental thickness shear resonance.

  9. Radiation dominated acoustophoresis driven by surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinhong; Kang, Yuejun; Ai, Ye

    2015-10-01

    Acoustophoresis-based particle manipulation in microfluidics has gained increasing attention in recent years. Despite the fact that experimental studies have been extensively performed to demonstrate this technique for various microfluidic applications, numerical simulation of acoustophoresis driven by surface acoustic waves (SAWs) has still been largely unexplored. In this work, a numerical model taking into account the acoustic-piezoelectric interaction was developed to simulate the generation of a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW) field and predict the acoustic pressure field in the liquid. Acoustic radiation dominated particle tracing was performed to simulate acoustophoresis of particles with different sizes undergoing a SSAW field. A microfluidic device composed of two interdigital transducers (IDTs) for SAW generation and a microfluidic channel was fabricated for experimental validation. Numerical simulations could well capture the focusing phenomenon of particles to the pressure nodes in the experimental observation. Further comparison of particle trajectories demonstrated considerably quantitative agreement between numerical simulations and experimental results with fitting in the applied voltage. Particle switching was also demonstrated using the fabricated device that could be further developed as an active particle sorting device. PMID:26070191

  10. Acoustofluidics 9: Modelling and applications of planar resonant devices for acoustic particle manipulation.

    PubMed

    Glynne-Jones, Peter; Boltryk, Rosemary J; Hill, Martyn

    2012-04-21

    This article introduces the design, construction and applications of planar resonant devices for particle and cell manipulation. These systems rely on the pistonic action of a piezoelectric layer to generate a one dimensional axial variation in acoustic pressure through a system of acoustically tuned layers. The resulting acoustic standing wave is dominated by planar variations in pressure causing particles to migrate to planar pressure nodes (or antinodes depending on particle and fluid properties). The consequences of lateral variations in the fields are discussed, and rules for designing resonators with high energy density within the appropriate layer for a given drive voltage presented. PMID:22402608

  11. Deformation of red blood cells using acoustic radiation forces

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Puja; Hill, Martyn; Glynne-Jones, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic radiation forces have been used to manipulate cells and bacteria in a number of recent microfluidic applications. The net force on a cell has been subject to careful investigation over a number of decades. We demonstrate that the radiation forces also act to deform cells. An ultrasonic standing wave field is created in a 0.1 mm glass capillary at a frequency of 7.9 MHz. Using osmotically swollen red-blood cells, we show observable deformations up to an aspect ratio of 1.35, comparable to deformations created by optical tweezing. In contrast to optical technologies, ultrasonic devices are potentially capable of deforming thousands of cells simultaneously. We create a finite element model that includes both the acoustic environment of the cell, and a model of the cell membrane subject to forces resulting from the non-linear aspects of the acoustic field. The model is found to give reasonable agreement with the experimental results, and shows that the deformation is the result of variation in an acoustic force that is directed outwards at all points on the cell membrane. We foresee applications in diagnostic devices, and in the possibility of mechanically stimulating cells to promote differentiation and physiological effects. PMID:25379070

  12. Numerical derivation of forces on particles and agglomerates in a resonant acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoop, Claas; Fritsching, Udo

    2013-10-01

    Particles and agglomerates are investigated in gaseous acoustic flow fields. Acoustic fields exert forces on solid objects, which can influence the shape of the exposed bodies, even to the point of breakage of the structures. Motivated by experimentally observed breakage of agglomerates in an acoustic levitator (f = 20 kHz), a numerical study is presented that derives the acoustic forces on a complex model agglomerate from the pressure and velocity fields of a resonant standing ultrasound wave, calculated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It is distinguished between the drag and lift/lateral forces on the overall agglomerate and on the different primary particles of the model.

  13. Effect of grazing flow on the acoustic impedance of Helmholtz resonators consisting of single and clustered orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersch, A. S.; Walker, B.

    1979-01-01

    A semiempirical fluid mechanical model is derived for the acoustic behavior of thin-walled single orifice Helmholtz resonators in a grazing flow environment. The incident and cavity sound fields are connected in terms of an orifice discharge coefficient whose values are determined experimentally using the two-microphone method. Measurements show that at high grazing flow speeds, acoustical resistance is almost linearly proportional to the grazing flow speed and almost independent of incident sound pressure. The corresponding values of reactance are much smaller and tend towards zero. For thicker-walled orifice plates, resistance and reactance were observed to be less sensitive to grazing flow as the ratio of plate thickness to orifice diameter increased. Loud tones were observed to radiate from a single orifice Helmholtz resonator due to interaction between the grazing flow shear layer and the resonator cavity. Measurements showed that the tones radiated at a Strouhal number equal to 0.26. The effects of grazing flow on the impedance of Helmholtz resonators consisting of clusters of orifices was also studied. In general, both resistance and reaction were found to be virtually independent of orifice relative spacing and number. These findings are valid with and without grazing flow.

  14. Grazing incidence modeling of a metamaterial-inspired dual-resonance acoustic liner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Benjamin S.

    2014-03-01

    To reduce the noise emitted by commercial aircraft turbofan engines, the inlet and aft nacelle ducts are lined with acoustic absorbing structures called acoustic liners. Traditionally, these structures consist of a perforated facesheet bonded on top of a honeycomb core. These traditional perforate over honeycomb core (POHC) liners create an absorption spectra where the maximum absorption occurs at a frequency that is dictated by the depth of the honeycomb core; which acts as a quarter-wave resonator. Recent advances in turbofan engine design have increased the need for thin acoustic liners that are effective at low frequencies. One design that has been developed uses an acoustic metamaterial architecture to improve the low frequency absorption. Specifically, the liner consists of an array of Helmholtz resonators separated by quarter-wave volumes to create a dual-resonance acoustic liner. While previous work investigated the acoustic behavior under normal incidence, this paper outlines the modeling and predicted transmission loss and absorption of a dual-resonance acoustic metamaterial when subjected to grazing incidence sound.

  15. Coherent acoustic phonon oscillation accompanied with backward acoustic pulse below exciton resonance in a ZnO epifilm on oxide-buffered Si(1 1 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ja-Hon; Shen, Yu-Kai; Liu, Wei-Rein; Lu, Chia-Hui; Chen, Yao-Hui; Chang, Chun-peng; Lee, Wei-Chin; Hong, Minghwei; Kwo, Jueinai-Raynien; Hsu, Chia-Hung; Hsieh, Wen-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Unlike coherent acoustic phonons (CAPs) generated from heat induced thermal stress by the coated Au film, we demonstrated the oscillation from c-ZnO epitaxial film on oxide buffered Si through a degenerate pump–probe technique. As the excited photon energy was set below the exciton resonance, the electronic stress that resulted from defect resonance was used to induce acoustic wave. The damped oscillation revealed a superposition of a high frequency and long decay CAP signal with a backward propagating acoustic pulse which was generated by the absorption of the penetrated pump beam at the Si surface and selected by the ZnO layer as the acoustic resonator.

  16. Condition of resonant break-up of gas bubbles by an acoustic wave in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanovskiy, V. V.; Petrov, A. G.

    2016-07-01

    The linear theory of damping of radial vibrations of a bubble in a liquid is constructed by taking into account the key dissipative mechanisms: thermal, viscous, and acoustic. The basic approximation of homobaricity made helps to obtain the results in a convenient and simple form. The results obtained for damping are used further in the description of the forced resonant oscillations of a bubble in an acoustic wave with the frequency equal to the eigenfrequency of the radial oscillation mode and twice as high as the frequency of the deformation oscillation mode (resonance 2:2:1). It is shown that the amplitude of deformation oscillations, which is reasonably large for breaking, is developed at a relatively small pressure amplitude of the exciting acoustic wave, and subharmonics arise in the acoustic-emission spectrum. The condition of bubble break-up is obtained for a fast and slow start of the acoustic wave.

  17. Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) Munition Classification System enhancements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vela, O.A.; Huggard, J.C.

    1997-09-18

    Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) is a non-destructive evaluation technology developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This technology has resulted in three generations of instrumentation, funded by the Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA), specifically designed for field identification of chemical weapon (CW) munitions. Each generation of ARS instrumentation was developed with a specific user in mind. The ARS1OO was built for use by the U.N. Inspection Teams going into Iraq immediately after the Persian Gulf War. The ARS200 was built for use in the US-Russia Bilateral Chemical Weapons Treaty (the primary users for this system are the US Onsite Inspection Agency (OSIA) and their Russian counterparts). The ARS300 was built with the requirements of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in mind. Each successive system is an improved version of the previous system based on learning the weaknesses of each and, coincidentally, on the fact that more time was available to do a requirements analysis and the necessary engineering development. The ARS300 is at a level of development that warrants transferring the technology to a commercial vendor. Since LANL will supply the computer software to the selected vendor, it is possible for LANL to continue to improve the decision algorithms, add features where necessary, and adjust the user interface before the final transfer occurs. This paper describes the current system, ARS system enhancements, and software enhancements. Appendices contain the Operations Manual (software Version 3.01), and two earlier reports on enhancements.

  18. Passive control of flow-excited acoustic resonance in rectangular cavities using upstream mounted blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaaban, Mahmoud; Mohany, Atef

    2015-04-01

    A passive method for controlling the flow-excited acoustic resonance resulting from subsonic flows over rectangular cavities in channels is investigated. A cavity with length to depth ratio of is tested in air flow of Mach number up to 0.45. When the acoustic resonance is excited, the sound pressure level in the cavity reaches 162 dB. Square blocks are attached to the surface of the channel and centred upstream of the cavity leading edge to suppress the flow-excited acoustic resonance in the cavity. Six blocks of different widths are tested at three different upstream distances. The results show that significant attenuation of up to 30 dB of the excited sound pressure level is achieved using a block with a width to height ratio of 3, while blocks that fill the whole width of the channel amplify the pressure of the excited acoustic resonance. Moreover, it is found that placing the block upstream of the cavity causes the onset of the acoustic resonance to occur at higher flow velocities. In order to investigate the nature of the interactions that lead to suppression of the acoustic resonance and to identify the changes in flow patterns due to the placement of the block, 2D measurements of turbulence intensity in the shear layer and the block wake region are performed. The location of the flow reattachment point downstream of the block relative to the shear layer separation point has a major influence on the suppression level of the excited acoustic resonance. Furthermore, higher attenuation of noise is related to lower span-wise correlation of the shear-layer perturbation.

  19. Study of the onset of the acoustic streaming in parallel plate resonators with pulse ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Castro, Angelica; Hoyos, Mauricio

    2016-03-01

    In a previous study, we introduced pulse mode ultrasound as a new method for reducing and controlling the acoustic streaming in parallel plate resonators (Hoyos and Castro, 2013). Here, by modifying other parameters such as the resonator geometry and the particle size, we have found a threshold for particle manipulation with ultrasonic standing waves in confined resonators without the influence of the acoustic streaming. We demonstrate that pulse mode ultrasound open the possibility of manipulating particles smaller than 1 μm size. PMID:26705604

  20. Enhanced acoustoelectric coupling in acoustic energy harvester using dual Helmholtz resonators.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiao; Wen, Yumei; Li, Ping; Yang, Aichao; Bai, Xiaoling

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, enhanced acoustoelectric transduction in an acoustic energy harvester using dual Helmholtz resonators has been reported. The harvester uses a pair of cavities mechanically coupled with a compliant perforated plate to enhance the acoustic coupling between the cavity and the plate. The experimental results show that the volume optimization of the second cavity can significantly increase the generated electric voltage up to 400% and raise the output power to 16 times as large as that of a harvester using a single Helmholtz resonator at resonant frequencies primarily related to the plate. PMID:24081260

  1. Investigations of High Pressure Acoustic Waves in Resonators with Seal-Like Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Christopher C.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Finkbeiner, Joshua R.; Li, Xiao-Fan; Raman, Ganesh

    2004-01-01

    1) Standing waves with maximum pressures of 188 kPa have been produced in resonators containing ambient pressure air; 2) Addition of structures inside the resonator shifts the fundamental frequency and decreases the amplitude of the generated pressure waves; 3) Addition of holes to the resonator does reduce the magnitude of the acoustic waves produced, but their addition does not prohibit the generation of large magnitude non-linear standing waves; 4) The feasibility of reducing leakage using non-linear acoustics has been confirmed.

  2. A general low frequency acoustic radiation capability for NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everstine, G. C.; Henderson, F. M.; Schroeder, E. A.; Lipman, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    A new capability called NASHUA is described for calculating the radiated acoustic sound pressure field exterior to a harmonically-excited arbitrary submerged 3-D elastic structure. The surface fluid pressures and velocities are first calculated by coupling a NASTRAN finite element model of the structure with a discretized form of the Helmholtz surface integral equation for the exterior fluid. After the fluid impedance is calculated, most of the required matrix operations are performed using the general matrix manipulation package (DMAP) available in NASTRAN. Far field radiated pressures are then calculated from the surface solution using the Helmholtz exterior integral equation. Other output quantities include the maximum sound pressure levels in each of the three coordinate planes, the rms and average surface pressures and normal velocities, the total radiated power and the radiation efficiency. The overall approach is illustrated and validated using known analytic solutions for submerged spherical shells subjected to both uniform and nonuniform applied loads.

  3. Intrinsically tunable bulk acoustic wave resonators based on sol-gel grown PMN-PT films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobiev, A.; Spreitzer, M.; Veber, A.; Suvorov, D.; Gevorgian, S.

    2014-08-01

    Intrinsically tunable bulk acoustic wave resonators, based on sol-gel 0.70Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.30PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) thin films, with high effective electromechanical coupling coefficient of 13% and tunability of the series resonance frequency up to 4.0% are fabricated and characterized. The enhanced electroacoustic properties of the PMN-PT resonators are attributed to the mechanism of polarization rotation occurring in the region of the morphotropic phase boundary. Electroacoustic performance of the PMN-PT resonators is analyzed using the theory of dc field-induced piezoelectric effect in ferroelectrics. Extrinsic acoustic loss in the PMN-PT resonators is analyzed using the model of the wave scattering at reflections from rough interfaces. Mechanical Q-factor of the resonators is up to 70 at 4.1 GHz and limited mainly by losses in the PMN-PT film.

  4. Characterizing the stiffness of Human Prostates using Acoustic Radiation Force

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Liang; Madden, John; Foo, Wen-Chi; Mouraviev, Vladimir; Polascik, Thomas J.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging has been previously reported to portray normal anatomic structures and pathologies in ex vivo human prostates with good contrast and resolution. These findings were based on comparison with histological slides and McNeal’s zonal anatomy. In ARFI images, the central zone (CZ) appears darker (smaller displacement) than other anatomic zones, and prostate cancer (PCa) is darker than normal tissue in the peripheral zone (PZ). Since displacement amplitudes in ARFI images are determined by both the underlying tissue stiffness and the amplitude of acoustic radiation force which varies with acoustic attenuation, one question that arises is: how are the relative displacements in prostate ARFI images related to the underlying prostatic tissue stiffness? In linear, isotropic elastic materials and in tissues that are relatively uniform in acoustic attenuation (e.g. liver), relative displacement in ARFI images has been shown to be correlated with underlying tissue stiffness. However, the prostate is known to be heterogeneous. Variations in acoustic attenuation of prostatic structures could confound the interpretation of ARFI images due to the associated variations in the applied acoustic radiation force. Therefore, in this study, co-registered three-dimensional (3D) ARFI datasets and quantitative shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) datasets were acquired in freshly excised human prostates to investigate the relationship between displacement amplitudes in ARFI prostate images and the matched reconstructed shear moduli. The lateral time-to-peak (LTTP) algorithm was applied to the SWEI data to compute the shear wave speed and reconstruct the shear moduli. Five types of prostatic tissue (PZ, CZ, transition zone (TZ) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), PCa, and atrophy) were identified, whose shear moduli were quantified to be 4.1±0.8 kPa, 9.9±0.9 kPa, 4.8±0.6 kPa, 10.0±1.0 kPa and 8.0 kPa, respectively. Linear regression was

  5. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS. GENERATION OF ULTRASHORT PULSES: Analysis of mode locking in a laser with a traveling-acoustic-wave modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovskaya, T. V.; Klochan, E. L.; Lariontsev, E. G.

    1990-12-01

    A theoretical analysis is made of active mode locking in a solid-state laser with an acoustooptic modulator based on traveling acoustic waves. It is postulated that the acoustooptic modulator is placed in a V-shaped resonator so that diffraction feedback is established in the modulator. It is found that the transmission coefficient of the acoustooptic modulator is a function of time. The mode locking achieved in a V-shaped resonator is equivalent to that observed in lasers with intracavity frequency modulation of the radiation. An investigation is made of the stability of mode locking in a resonator with a traveling-acoustic-wave acoustooptic modulator.

  6. Optimal shaping of acoustic resonators for the generation of high-amplitude standing waves.

    PubMed

    Červenka, Milan; Šoltés, Martin; Bednařík, Michal

    2014-09-01

    Within this paper, optimal shaping of acoustic resonators for the generation of high-amplitude standing waves through the use of evolutionary algorithms is discussed. The resonator shapes are described using sets of control points interconnected with cubic-splines. Positions of the control points are calculated by means of an evolutionary algorithm in order to maximize acoustic pressure amplitude at a given point of the resonator cavity. As an objective function for the optimization procedure, numerical solution of one-dimensional linear wave equation taking into account boundary-layer dissipation is used. Resonator shapes maximizing acoustic pressure amplitude are found in case of a piston, shaker, or loudspeaker driving. It is shown that the optimum resonator shapes depend on the method of driving. In all the cases, acoustic field attains higher amplitude in the optimized resonators than in simple-shaped non-optimized resonators of similar dimensions. Theoretical results are compared with experimental data in the case of a loudspeaker driving, good agreement of which is achieved. PMID:25190376

  7. Acoustic Radiation Force on a Finite-Sized Particle due to an Acoustic Field in a Viscous Compressible Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annamalai, Subramanian; Parmar, Manoj; Balachandar, S.

    2013-11-01

    Particles when subjected to acoustic waves experience a time-averaged second-order force known as the acoustic radiation force, which is of prime importance in the fields of microfluidics and acoustic levitation. Here, the acoustic radiation force on a rigid spherical particle in a viscous compressible medium due to progressive and standing waves is considered. The relevant length scales include: particle radius (a), acoustic wavelength (λ) and viscous penetration depth (δ). While a / λ and a / δ are arbitrary, δ << λ . A farfield derivation approach has been used in determining the radiated force. Expressing the flow-field as a sum of the incident and scattered fields, an analytical expression for the force is obtained as a summation over infinite series (monopole, dipole and higher sources). These results indicate that the contributions from monopole, dipole and their cross-interaction are sufficient to describe the acoustic radiation force. Subsequently, the monopole and dipole strengths are represented in terms of the particle surface and volume averages of the incoming velocity. This generalization allows one to evaluate the radiation force for an incoming wave of any functional form. However acoustic streaming effects are neglected.

  8. Acoustic control in a tractor cabin using two optimally designed Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driesch, Patricia L.; Koopmann, Gary H.

    2003-10-01

    A virtual design methodology is developed to minimize the noise in enclosures with optimally designed, passive, 20 acoustic absorbers (Helmholtz resonators). A series expansion of eigenfunctions is used to represent the acoustic=20 absorbers as external volume velocities, eliminating the need for a solution of large matrix eigenvalue problems. A determination of this type (efficient model/reevaluation approach) significantly increases the design possibilities when optimization techniques are implemented. As a full-scale demonstration, the acoustic response from 90-190 Hz of a tractor cabin was investigated. The lowest cabin mode proposes a significant challenge to a noise control engineer since its anti-node is located near the head of the operator and often generates unacceptable sound-pressure levels. Exploiting the low-frequency capability of Helmholtz resonators, lumped parameter models of these resonators were coupled to the enclosure via an experimentally determined acoustic model of the tractor cabin. The virtual design methodology uses gradient optimization techniques as a post-processor for the modeling and analysis of the unmodified acoustic interior to determine optimal resonator characteristics. Using two optimally designed Helmholtz resonators, potential energy was experimentally reduced by 3.4 and 10.3 dB at 117 and 167 Hz, respectively.

  9. Acoustic centering of sources with high-order radiation patterns.

    PubMed

    Shabtai, Noam R; Vorländer, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Surrounding spherical microphone arrays have recently been used in order to model the radiation pattern of acoustic sources that are assumed to be at the center of the array. Source centering algorithms are applied to the measurements in order to reduce the negative effect of acoustic source misalignment with regard to the physical center of the microphone array. Recent works aim to minimize the energy that is contained in the high-order coefficients of the radiation pattern in the spherical harmonics domain, in order to directly address the problem of increased order and spatial aliasing resulted by this misalignment. However, objective functions which directly minimize the norm of these coefficients were shown to be convex only when employed on sources with low-order radiation patterns. This work presents a source centering algorithm that operates on plane sections and aims to achieve a convex objective function on every plane section. The results of the proposed algorithm are shown to be more convex than the previous algorithms for sources with higher-order radiation pattern, usually at higher frequencies. PMID:25920846

  10. RADIATIVE HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF ACOUSTIC WAVES IN SUNSPOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, S.; Carlsson, M.

    2010-10-10

    We investigate the formation and evolution of the Ca II H line in a sunspot. The aim of our study is to establish the mechanisms underlying the formation of the frequently observed brightenings of small regions of sunspot umbrae known as 'umbral flashes'. We perform fully consistent NLTE radiation hydrodynamic simulations of the propagation of acoustic waves in sunspot umbrae and conclude that umbral flashes result from increased emission of the local solar material during the passage of acoustic waves originating in the photosphere and steepening to shock in the chromosphere. To quantify the significance of possible physical mechanisms that contribute to the formation of umbral flashes, we perform a set of simulations on a grid formed by different wave power spectra, different inbound coronal radiation, and different parameterized chromospheric heating. Our simulations show that the waves with frequencies in the range 4.5-7.0 mHz are critical to the formation of the observed blueshifts of umbral flashes while waves with frequencies below 4.5 mHz do not play a role despite their dominance in the photosphere. The observed emission in the Ca II H core between flashes only occurs in the simulations that include significant inbound coronal radiation and/or extra non-radiative chromospheric heating in addition to shock dissipation.

  11. Acoustic Radiation from a Mach 14 Turbulent Boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan

    2015-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to examine the pressure fluctuations generated by a high-speed turbulent boundary layer with a nominal freestream Mach number of 14 and wall temperature of 0.18 times the recovery temperature. The emphasis is on characterizing the acoustic radiation from the turbulent boundary layer and comparing it with previous simulations at Mach 2.5 and Mach 6 to assess the Mach-number dependence of the freestream pressure fluctuations. In particular, the numerical database is used to provide insights into the pressure disturbance spectrum and amplitude scaling with respect to the freestream Mach number as well as to understand the acoustic source mechanisms at very high Mach numbers. Such information is important for characterizing the freestream disturbance environment in conventional (i.e., noisy) hypersonic wind tunnels. Spectral characteristics of pressure fluctuations at the surface are also investigated. Sponsored by Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  12. Application of the Spectral Element Method to Acoustic Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, James F.; Rizzi, Stephen A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes research to develop a capability for analysis of interior noise in enclosed structures when acoustically excited by an external random source. Of particular interest was the application to the study of noise and vibration transmission in thin-walled structures as typified by aircraft fuselages. Three related topics are focused upon. The first concerns the development of a curved frame spectral element, the second shows how the spectral element method for wave propagation in folded plate structures is extended to problems involving curved segmented plates. These are of significance because by combining these curved spectral elements with previously presented flat spectral elements, the dynamic response of geometrically complex structures can be determined. The third topic shows how spectral elements, which incorporate the effect of fluid loading on the structure, are developed for analyzing acoustic radiation from dynamically loaded extended plates.

  13. Tracheo-bronchial soft tissue and cartilage resonances in the subglottal acoustic input impedance.

    PubMed

    Lulich, Steven M; Arsikere, Harish

    2015-06-01

    This paper offers a re-evaluation of the mechanical properties of the tracheo-bronchial soft tissues and cartilage and uses a model to examine their effects on the subglottal acoustic input impedance. It is shown that the values for soft tissue elastance and cartilage viscosity typically used in models of subglottal acoustics during phonation are not accurate, and corrected values are proposed. The calculated subglottal acoustic input impedance using these corrected values reveals clusters of weak resonances due to soft tissues (SgT) and cartilage (SgC) lining the walls of the trachea and large bronchi, which can be observed empirically in subglottal acoustic spectra. The model predicts that individuals may exhibit SgT and SgC resonances to variable degrees, depending on a number of factors including tissue mechanical properties and the dimensions of the trachea and large bronchi. Potential implications for voice production and large pulmonary airway tissue diseases are also discussed. PMID:26093432

  14. Evidence of Longitudinal Acoustic Phonon Generation in Si Doping Superlattices by Ge Prism-Coupled THz Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, T.; Kasper, E.; Oehme, M.; Schulze, J.; Korolev, K.

    2014-11-01

    We report on the direct excitation of 246 GHz longitudinal acoustic phonons in silicon doping superlattices by the resonant absorption of nanosecond-pulsed far-infrared laser radiation of the same frequency. A longitudinally polarized evanescent laser light field is coupled to the superlattice through a germanium prism providing total internal reflection at the superlattice interface. The ballistic phonon signal is detected by a superconducting aluminum bolometer. The sample is immersed in low-temperature liquid helium.

  15. Radiation and propagation of short acoustical pulses from underground explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Banister, J.R.

    1982-06-01

    Radiation and propagation of short acoustical pulses from underground nuclear explosions were analyzed. The cone of more intense radiation is defined by the ratio of sound speeds in the ground and air. The pressure history of the radiated pulse is a function of the vertical ground-motion history, the range, the burial depth, and the velocity of longitudinal seismic waves. The analysis of short-pulse propagation employed an N-wave model with and without enegy conservation. Short pulses with initial wave lengths less than 100 m are severely attenuated by the energy loss in shocks and viscous losses in the wave interior. The methods developed in this study should be useful for system analysis.

  16. Effects of relevant parameters on the bandgaps of acoustic metamaterials with multi-resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Rongqi; Lin, Jieqiong

    2016-04-01

    Locally resonant acoustic metamaterials with multi-resonators are generally regarded as a fine trend for managing the bandgaps, the different effects of relevant structural parameters on the bandgaps, which will be numerically investigated in this paper. A two-step homogenization method is extended to achieve the effective mass of multi-resonators metamaterial in the lattice system. As comparison, the dispersive wave propagation in lattice system and continuum model is studied. Then, the different effects of relevant parameters on the center frequencies and bandwidth of bandgaps are perfectly revealed, and the steady-state responses in the continuum models with purposed relevant parameters are additionally clarified. The related results can well confirm that the bandgaps exist around the undamped natural frequencies of internal resonators, and also their bandwidth can be efficiently controlled with the ensured center frequencies. Moreover, the design of purposed multi-resonators acoustic metamaterial in vibration control is presented and discussed by an example.

  17. Resonant attenuation of surface acoustic waves by a disordered monolayer of microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliason, J. K.; Vega-Flick, A.; Hiraiwa, M.; Khanolkar, A.; Gan, T.; Boechler, N.; Fang, N.; Nelson, K. A.; Maznev, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    Attenuation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by a disordered monolayer of polystyrene microspheres is investigated. Surface acoustic wave packets are generated by a pair of crossed laser pulses in a glass substrate coated with a thin aluminum film and detected via the diffraction of a probe laser beam. When a 170 μm-wide strip of micron-sized spheres is placed on the substrate between the excitation and detection spots, strong resonant attenuation of SAWs near 240 MHz is observed. The attenuation is caused by the interaction of SAWs with a contact resonance of the microspheres, as confirmed by acoustic dispersion measurements on the microsphere-coated area. Frequency-selective attenuation of SAWs by such a locally resonant metamaterial may lead to reconfigurable SAW devices and sensors, which can be easily manufactured via self-assembly techniques.

  18. Micro- and Macro-Fluid Dynamics and Acoustics of Resonant Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Watson, Willie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to perform direct numerical simulation of the micro-fluid and acoustic fields of a resonant acoustic liner and to investigate the physical processes by which incident sound waves are damped by the acoustic liner. We would like to report that our research work and results have fulfilled both objectives of the grant. The following is a summary of the important accomplishments: (1) Two dimensional direct numerical simulation of the flow and acoustic field around the cavity of resonant liner were successfully carried out; (2) The simulations of (1) were extended to include a laminar grazing flow; (3) The numerical simulations provided strong evidence that there are two principal mechanisms by which a resonant liner damps out an incident acoustic wave; (4) A validation test was performed by comparing the computed dissipation coefficients (not impedance) with impedance tube measurements done at GTRI; and (5) Some resources of this grant were used to support the development of new CAA methods. (Our work on numerical simulation of acoustic liners has benefited by the availability of these improved methods).

  19. Nonlinear aspects of acoustic radiation force in biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrovsky, Lev; Tsyuryupa, Sergey; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2015-10-28

    In the past decade acoustic radiation force (ARF) became a powerful tool in numerous biomedical applications. ARF from a focused ultrasound beam acts as a virtual “finger” for remote probing of internal anatomical structures and obtaining diagnostic information. This presentation deals with generation of shear waves by nonlinear focused beams. Albeit the ARF has intrinsically nonlinear origin, in most cases the primary ultrasonic wave was considered in the linear approximation. In this presentation, we consider the effects of nonlinearly distorted beams on generation of shear waves by such beams.

  20. Material selection for acoustic radiators that are light and stiff.

    PubMed

    Porter, S P; Markley, D C; Van Tol, D J; Meyer, R J

    2011-01-01

    The headmass is a key element in tonpilz transducer design. As an acoustic radiator, a successful headmass must be built from a material that is both light and stiff. To assess the suitability of ceramics for this application, the authors used the mechanical properties of candidate materials to perform a theoretical comparison based on the flexural behavior of square plates. Although not a comprehensive metric for identifying the best headmass materials, the headmass flexure may be usefully employed as a first-level selection criteria. A software routine based on thin plate and thick plate theory was created to evaluate the flexural behavior in candidate materials. PMID:21302996

  1. Acoustic resonance in centrifugal compressors induced by interaction between rotor and stator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzin, V. B.; Izmailov, R. A.; Okulov, V. L.

    An experimental investigation is conducted of acoustic resonance phenomena generated in centrifugal compressors by the interaction between rotor and stator, with a view to the theoretical characterization of the conditions under which the excitation of resonance occurs. The theoretical model used assumes that the velocity of a basic stationary airflow representing the spiral flow is comparatively low, that the airfoils in question are thin, and that the sources of acoustic disturbances are absent outside the outer cascade radius. Good agreement is obtained between computational and experimental results.

  2. Method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.; Anthony, Brian W.

    1997-01-01

    A method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein. A direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the frequency of corresponding acoustic resonances therein has been experimentally observed. Therefore, the octane rating of a gasoline sample can be directly determined through speed of sound measurements instead of by the cumbersome process of quantifying the knocking quality of the gasoline. Various receptacle geometries and construction materials may be employed. Moreover, it is anticipated that the measurements can be performed on flowing samples in pipes, thereby rendering the present method useful in refineries and distilleries.

  3. Method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, D.N.; Anthony, B.W.

    1997-02-25

    A method is described for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein. A direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the frequency of corresponding acoustic resonances therein has been experimentally observed. Therefore, the octane rating of a gasoline sample can be directly determined through speed of sound measurements instead of by the cumbersome process of quantifying the knocking quality of the gasoline. Various receptacle geometries and construction materials may be employed. Moreover, it is anticipated that the measurements can be performed on flowing samples in pipes, thereby rendering the present method useful in refineries and distilleries. 3 figs.

  4. An acoustic dual filter in the audio frequencies with two local resonant systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhao-qun; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Shu-yi; Fan, Li

    2014-08-01

    We report an acoustic dual filter to realize the sound regulation in the audio frequency range, in which resonant vibrations of two membrane-air and metal-elastomer systems generate two sound transmission peaks and a sound blocking below 3000 Hz. The local vibrational profiles manifest that the transmission peak at lower frequency is mainly dependent on the resonant vibration of the membrane-air system, and the coupling vibrations of two systems generate the blocking frequency and transmission peak at higher frequency. Importantly, two transmission peaks can be controlled independently. It is feasible to realize the acoustic device in sound shield and dual filters.

  5. Extremely high Q-factor mechanical modes in quartz bulk acoustic wave resonators at millikelvin temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Goryachev, M.; Creedon, D. L.; Ivanov, E. N.; Tobar, M. E.; Galliou, S.; Bourquin, R.

    2014-12-04

    We demonstrate that Bulk Acoustic Wave (BAW) quartz resonator cooled down to millikelvin temperatures are excellent building blocks for hybrid quantum systems with extremely long coherence times. Two overtones of the longitudinal mode at frequencies of 15.6 and 65.4 MHz demonstrate a maximum f.Q product of 7.8×10{sup 16} Hz. With this result, the Q-factor in such devices near the quantum ground state can be four orders of magnitude better than previously attained in other mechanical systems. Tested quartz resonators possess the ultra low acoustic losses crucial for electromagnetic cooling to the phonon ground state.

  6. Relationship between acoustic power and acoustic radiation force on absorbing and reflecting targets for spherically focusing radiators.

    PubMed

    Gélat, Pierre; Shaw, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Total acoustic output power is an important parameter required by standards for most ultrasonic medical equipment including high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) systems. Radiation force balances are routinely used; however, radiation force is not strictly dependent on the ultrasound power but, rather, on the wave momentum resolved in one direction. Consequently, measurements based on radiation force become progressively less accurate as the ultrasound wave deviates further from a true plane wave. HIFU transducers can be very strongly focused with F-numbers less than one: under these conditions, the uncertainty associated with use of the radiation force method becomes very significant. International Standards IEC 61161 and IEC 62555 suggest plane-wave correction factors for unfocused transducers radiating onto an ideal absorbing target and focusing corrections for focused transducers radiating onto ideal absorbing targets and onto conical reflecting targets (IEC 61161). Previous models have relied on calculations based on the Rayleigh integral, which is not strictly correct for curved sources. In the work described here, an approach combining finite element methods with a discretization of the Helmholtz equation was developed, making it possible to model the boundary condition at the structure/fluid interface more correctly. This has been used to calculate the relationship between radiation force and total power for both absorbing and conical reflecting targets for transducers ranging from planar to an F-number of 0.5 (hemispherical) and to compare with the recommendations of IEC 61161 and IEC 62555. PMID:25683223

  7. A Study of Standing Pressure Waves Within Open and Closed Acoustic Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, C.; Steinetz, B.; Finkbeiner, J.; Raman, G.; Li, X.

    2002-01-01

    The first section of the results presented herein was conducted on an axisymmetric resonator configured with open ventilation ports on either end of the resonator, but otherwise closed and free from obstruction. The remaining section presents the results of a similar resonator shape that was closed, but contained an axisymmetric blockage centrally located through the axis of the resonator. Ambient air was used as the working fluid. In each of the studies, the resonator was oscillated at the resonant frequency of the fluid contained within the cavity while the dynamic pressure, static pressure, and temperature of the fluid were recorded at both ends of the resonator. The baseline results showed a marked reduction in the amplitude of the dynamic pressure waveforms over previous studies due to the use of air instead of refrigerant as the working fluid. A sharp reduction in the amplitude of the acoustic pressure waves was expected and recorded when the configuration of the resonators was modified from closed to open. A change in the resonant frequency was recorded when blockages of differing geometries were used in the closed resonator, while acoustic pressure amplitudes varied little from baseline measurements.

  8. Photonic superdiffusive motion in resonance radiation trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Berberan-Santos, M. N.; Nunes-Pereira, E. J.; Martinho, J. M. G.

    2006-11-07

    In this work we consider the relation between the jump length probability density function and the line shape function in resonance radiation trapping in atomic vapors. The two-sided jump length probability density function suitable for a unidimensional formulation of radiative transfer is also derived. As a side result, a procedure to obtain the Maxwell distribution of velocities from the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of speeds was obtained. General relations that give the asymptotic jump length behavior and the Levy flight parameter {mu} for any line shape are obtained. The results are applied to generalized Doppler, generalized Lorentz, and Voigt line shape functions. It is concluded that the lighter the tail of the line shape function, the less heavy the tail of the jump length probability density function, although this tail is always heavy, with {mu}{<=}1.

  9. Equivalent circuit of a composite acoustic resonator for microwave radioelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfel'D, G. D.; Alekseev, S. G.; Polzikova, N. I.

    2008-07-01

    On the basis of analyzing the expression for the input electric impedance of a composite microwave acoustic resonator, its equivalent electric circuit is constructed. It is shown that, for high-order harmonics, the difference between the antiresonance and resonance frequencies is determined not only by the electromechanical coupling coefficient, but also by the loss in the structure. The conditions under which this difference corresponds to the bandwidth of the equivalent parallel electric oscillatory circuit are formulated. Expressions for the resonance and antiresonance frequencies are derived. The procedures of determining the Q factor and the electromechanical coupling coefficient from the measured resonance and antiresonance frequencies of the structure are justified.

  10. Flow-excited acoustic resonance of two tandem cylinders in cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohany, A.; Ziada, S.

    2005-11-01

    The aeroacoustic response of two tandem cylinders in cross-flow is investigated experimentally. Eleven spacing ratios between the cylinders, in the range of L/D=1.2 4.5, have been tested to investigate the effect of the gap between the cylinders on the excitation mechanism of acoustic resonance. During the tests, the acoustic cross-modes of the duct housing the cylinders are self-excited. Similar tests are performed on isolated cylinders. The aeroacoustic response of the tandem cylinders is found to be considerably different from that of isolated cylinders. For isolated cylinders, acoustic resonance of a given mode occurs over a single range of flow velocity and is excited by the natural vortex shedding process observed in the absence of acoustic resonance. In the case of tandem cylinders with a spacing ratio inside the proximity region, L/D is less than 3.5, the resonance occurs over two different ranges of flow velocity. One of these ranges is similar to that observed for isolated cylinders and the other occurs at much lower flow velocities. The latter resonance range seems to be triggered by the instability of the separated flow in the gap between the cylinders. Outside the proximity region, the aeroacoustic response of the two tandem cylinders is similar to that of isolated cylinder.

  11. Experimental and numerical investigations of resonant acoustic waves in near-critical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Nusair; Farouk, Bakhtier

    2015-10-01

    Flow and transport induced by resonant acoustic waves in a near-critical fluid filled cylindrical enclosure is investigated both experimentally and numerically. Supercritical carbon dioxide (near the critical or the pseudo-critical states) in a confined resonator is subjected to acoustic field created by an electro-mechanical acoustic transducer and the induced pressure waves are measured by a fast response pressure field microphone. The frequency of the acoustic transducer is chosen such that the lowest acoustic mode propagates along the enclosure. For numerical simulations, a real-fluid computational fluid dynamics model representing the thermo-physical and transport properties of the supercritical fluid is considered. The simulated acoustic field in the resonator is compared with measurements. The formation of acoustic streaming structures in the highly compressible medium is revealed by time-averaging the numerical solutions over a given period. Due to diverging thermo-physical properties of supercritical fluid near the critical point, large scale oscillations are generated even for small sound field intensity. The strength of the acoustic wave field is found to be in direct relation with the thermodynamic state of the fluid. The effects of near-critical property variations and the operating pressure on the formation process of the streaming structures are also investigated. Irregular streaming patterns with significantly higher streaming velocities are observed for near-pseudo-critical states at operating pressures close to the critical pressure. However, these structures quickly re-orient to the typical Rayleigh streaming patterns with the increase operating pressure. PMID:26520322

  12. Opto-acoustic phenomena in whispering gallery mode resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoping; Chembo, Yanne K.

    2016-01-01

    Optical whispering gallery mode resonators are important platforms to enhance and study various nonlinear frequency conversion processes. Stimulated Brillouin scattering is one of the strongest nonlinear effects, and can be successfully investigated using these platforms. In this article, we study the phenomenon of stimulated Brillouin scattering using a crystalline disk resonator. A fast scanning ringdown spectroscopy technique is used to characterize the optical modes featuring quality factors of the order of one billion at telecom wavelengths. The mW scale threshold power in a centimeter disk resonator is observed and found to be strongly dependent on the gap between the resonator and the prism coupler.

  13. Whispering gallery mode resonators based on radiation-sensitive materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor); Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor); Handley, Timothy A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonators formed of radiation-sensitive materials to allow for permanent tuning of their resonance frequencies in a controlled manner. Two WGM resonators may be cascaded to form a composite filter to produce a second order filter function where at least one WGM resonator is formed a radiation-sensitive material to allow for proper control in the overlap of the two filter functions.

  14. Considerations on the acoustic energy radiated by toothed gears. [model for calculating noise intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popinceanu, N. G.; Kremmer, I.

    1974-01-01

    A mechano-acoustic model is reported for calculating acoustic energy radiated by a working gear. According to this model, a gear is an acoustic coublet formed of the two wheels. The wheel teeth generate cylindrical acoustic waves while the front surfaces of the teeth behave like vibrating pistons. Theoretical results are checked experimentally and good agreement is obtained with open gears. The experiments show that the air noise effect is negligible as compared with the structural noise transmitted to the gear box.

  15. Acoustic Radiation Optimization Using the Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jin-Young; Okuma, Masaaki

    The present paper describes a fundamental study on structural bending design to reduce noise using a new evolutionary population-based heuristic algorithm called the particle swarm optimization algorithm (PSOA). The particle swarm optimization algorithm is a parallel evolutionary computation technique proposed by Kennedy and Eberhart in 1995. This algorithm is based on the social behavior models for bird flocking, fish schooling and other models investigated by zoologists. Optimal structural design problems to reduce noise are highly nonlinear, so that most conventional methods are difficult to apply. The present paper investigates the applicability of PSOA to such problems. Optimal bending design of a vibrating plate using PSOA is performed in order to minimize noise radiation. PSOA can be effectively applied to such nonlinear acoustic radiation optimization.

  16. Streptavidin Modified ZnO Film Bulk Acoustic Resonator for Detection of Tumor Marker Mucin 1.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dan; Guo, Peng; Xiong, Juan; Wang, Shengfu

    2016-12-01

    A ZnO-based film bulk acoustic resonator has been fabricated using a magnetron sputtering technology, which was employed as a biosensor for detection of mucin 1. The resonant frequency of the thin-film bulk acoustic resonator was located near at 1503.3 MHz. The average electromechanical coupling factor [Formula: see text] and quality factor Q were 2.39 % and 224, respectively. Using the specific binding system of avidin-biotin, the streptavidin was self-assembled on the top gold electrode as the sensitive layer to indirectly test the MUC1 molecules. The resonant frequency of the biosensor decreases in response to the mass loading in range of 20-500 nM. The sensor modified with the streptavidin exhibits a high sensitivity of 4642.6 Hz/nM and a good selectivity. PMID:27624339

  17. Acoustical “transparency” induced by local resonance in Bragg bandgaps

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Gaokun; Wang, Xinlong

    2014-01-28

    We show that sound waves can resonantly transmit through Bragg bandgaps in an acoustical duct periodically attached with an array of Helmholtz resonators, forming within the normally forbidden band a transparency window with group velocity smaller than the normal speed of sound. The transparency occurs for the locally resonant frequency so much close to the Bragg one that both the local-resonance-induced bandgap and the Bragg one heavily overlap with each other. The phenomenon seems an acoustical analog of the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency by quantum interference. Different from the Fano-like interference explanation, we also provide a mechanism for the transparency window phenomenon which makes it possible to extend the phenomenon in general.

  18. ISS Radiation Shielding and Acoustic Simulation Using an Immersive Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhage, Joshua E.; Sandridge, Chris A.; Qualls, Garry D.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2002-01-01

    The International Space Station Environment Simulator (ISSES) is a virtual reality application that uses high-performance computing, graphics, and audio rendering to simulate the radiation and acoustic environments of the International Space Station (ISS). This CAVE application allows the user to maneuver to different locations inside or outside of the ISS and interactively compute and display the radiation dose at a point. The directional dose data is displayed as a color-mapped sphere that indicates the relative levels of radiation from all directions about the center of the sphere. The noise environment is rendered in real time over headphones or speakers and includes non-spatial background noise, such as air-handling equipment, and spatial sounds associated with specific equipment racks, such as compressors or fans. Changes can be made to equipment rack locations that produce changes in both the radiation shielding and system noise. The ISSES application allows for interactive investigation and collaborative trade studies between radiation shielding and noise for crew safety and comfort.

  19. Theoretical models for duct acoustic propagation and radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter

    1991-01-01

    The development of computational methods in acoustics has led to the introduction of analysis and design procedures which model the turbofan inlet as a coupled system, simultaneously modeling propagation and radiation in the presence of realistic internal and external flows. Such models are generally large, require substantial computer speed and capacity, and can be expected to be used in the final design stages, with the simpler models being used in the early design iterations. Emphasis is given to practical modeling methods that have been applied to the acoustical design problem in turbofan engines. The mathematical model is established and the simplest case of propagation in a duct with hard walls is solved to introduce concepts and terminologies. An extensive overview is given of methods for the calculation of attenuation in uniform ducts with uniform flow and with shear flow. Subsequent sections deal with numerical techniques which provide an integrated representation of duct propagation and near- and far-field radiation for realistic geometries and flight conditions.

  20. Resonant-type MEMS transducers excited by two acoustic emission simulation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozevin, Didem; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.; Pessiki, Stephen

    2004-07-01

    Acoustic emission testing is a passive nondestructive testing technique used to identify the onset and characteristics of damage through the detection and analysis of transient stress waves. Successful detection and implementation of acoustic emission requires good coupling, high transducer sensitivity and ability to discriminate noise from real signals. We report here detection of simulated acoustic emission signals using a MEMS chip fabricated in the multi-user polysilicon surface micromachining (MUMPs) process. The chip includes 18 different transducers with 10 different resonant frequencies in the range of 100 kHz to 1 MHz. It was excited by two different source simulation techniques; pencil lead break and impact loading. The former simulation was accomplished by breaking 0.5 mm lead on the ceramic package. Four transducer outputs were collected simultaneously using a multi-channel oscilloscope. The impact loading was repeated for five different diameter ball bearings. Traditional acoustic emission waveform analysis methods were applied to both data sets to illustrate the identification of different source mechanisms. In addition, a sliding window Fourier transform was performed to differentiate frequencies in time-frequency-amplitude domain. The arrival and energy contents of each resonant frequency were investigated in time-magnitude plots. The advantages of the simultaneous excitation of resonant transducers on one chip are discussed and compared with broadband acoustic emission transducers.

  1. Self-heating study of bulk acoustic wave resonators under high RF power.

    PubMed

    Ivira, Brice; Fillit, René-Yves; Ndagijimana, Fabien; Benech, Philippe; Parat, Guy; Ancey, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    The present work first provides an experimental technique to study self-heating of bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonators under high RF power in the gigahertz range. This study is specially focused on film bulk acoustic wave resonators and solidly mounted resonators processed onto silicon wafers and designed for wireless systems. Precisely, the reflection coefficient of a one-port device is measured while up to several watts are applied and power leads to electrical drifts of impedances. In the following, we describe how absorbed power can be determined from the incident one in real time. Therefore, an infrared camera held over the radio frequency micro electromechanical system (RF-MEMS) surface with an exceptional spatial resolution reaching up to 2 microm/pixels gives accurate temperature mapping of resonators after emissivity correction. From theoretical point of view, accurate three-dimensional (3-D) structures for finite-element modeling analyses are carried out to know the best materials and architectures to use for enhancing power handling. In both experimental and theoretical investigations, comparison is made between film bulk acoustic wave resonators and solidly mounted resonators. Thus, the trend in term of material, architecture, and size of device for power application such as in transmission path of a transceiver is clearly identified. PMID:18334320

  2. Tunneling effects in resonant acoustic scattering of an air bubble in unbounded water.

    PubMed

    Simão, André G; Guimarães, Luiz G

    2016-01-01

    The problem of acoustic scattering of a gaseous spherical bubble immersed within unbounded liquid surrounding is considered in this work. The theory of partial wave expansion related to this problem is revisited. A physical model based on the analogy between acoustic scattering and potential scattering in quantum mechanics is proposed to describe and interpret the acoustical natural oscillation modes of the bubble, namely, the resonances. In this context, a physical model is devised in order to describe the air water interface and the implications of the high density contrast on the various regimes of the scattering resonances. The main results are presented in terms of resonance lifetime periods and quality factors. The explicit numerical calculations are undertaken through an asymptotic analysis considering typical bubble dimensions and underwater sound wavelengths. It is shown that the resonance periods are scaled according to the Minnaert's period, which is the short lived resonance mode, called breathing mode of the bubble. As expected, resonances with longer lifetimes lead to impressive cavity quality Q-factor ranging from 1010 to 105. The present theoretical findings lead to a better understanding of the energy storage mechanism in a bubbly medium. PMID:27331803

  3. Mode-locking of acoustic resonators and its application to vibration cancellation in acoustic heat engines

    SciTech Connect

    Spoor, P.S.; Swift, G.W. )

    1999-09-01

    Vibration induced in engine hardware by a working fluid can be very significant in high-power, high-amplitude acoustic heat engines, and is a serious impediment to their practical use. This vibration can cause fatigue and destruction of engine components as well as fuel lines, cooling lines, and sensor wires. The forces involved make anchoring such an engine to an [open quotes]immovable[close quotes] object impractical. Rigidly attaching two such engines together, and acoustically coupling them with a duct of such a length and diameter that the two engines mode-lock in antiphase (thus canceling the longitudinal vibration) appears to be an inexpensive, viable solution. This paper describes in detail experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this idea, and the underlying theory. [copyright] [ital 1999 Acoustical Society of America.] < --[HEB] -->

  4. Dielectric Resonators as Radiation Detectors at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, N. Y.; Sekiya, N.; Kikuchi, T.; Hoshino, M.; Mitsuda, K.; Sato, K.

    2015-10-01

    GHz LC resonators whose resonance frequency depends on temperature may be put to use as radiation detectors. We have demonstrated that a resonator utilizing STO (SrTiO) at 4 and 2 K detected infrared light emitting diode (LED) light, by a shift of resonance frequency around 2 GHz. A suitable design of a resonator array with temperature-dependent dielectric material will be used as a large-format microcalorimeter array without or with only very small Johnson noise.

  5. Acoustic black holes: massless scalar field analytic solutions and analogue Hawking radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, H. S.; Bezerra, V. B.

    2016-07-01

    We obtain the analytic solutions of the radial part of the massless Klein-Gordon equation in the spacetime of both three dimensional rotating and four dimensional canonical acoustic black holes, which are given in terms of the confluent Heun functions. From these solutions, we obtain the scalar waves near the acoustic horizon. We discuss the analogue Hawking radiation of massless scalar particles and the features of the spectrum associated with the radiation emitted by these acoustic black holes.

  6. Subterahertz acoustical pumping of electronic charge in a resonant tunneling device.

    PubMed

    Young, E S K; Akimov, A V; Henini, M; Eaves, L; Kent, A J

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate that controlled subnanosecond bursts of electronic charge can be transferred through a resonant tunneling diode by successive picosecond acoustic pulses. The effect exploits the nonlinear current-voltage characteristics of the device and its asymmetric response to the compressive and tensile components of the strain pulse. This acoustoelectronic pump opens new possibilities for the control of quantum phenomena in nanostructures. PMID:23003634

  7. Improvements to the methods used to measure bubble attenuation using an underwater acoustical resonator.

    PubMed

    Czerski, Helen; Vagle, Svein; Farmer, David M; Hall-Patch, Nick

    2011-11-01

    Active acoustic techniques are commonly used to measure oceanic bubble size distributions, by inverting the bulk acoustical properties of the water (usually the attenuation) to infer the bubble population. Acoustical resonators have previously been used to determine attenuation over a wide range of frequencies (10-200 kHz) in a single measurement, corresponding to the simultaneous measurement of a wide range of bubble sizes (20-300 μm radii). However, there is now also considerable interest in acquiring measurements of bubbles with radii smaller than 16 μm, since these are thought to be important for ocean optics and as tracers for near-surface flow. To extend the bubble population measurement to smaller radii, it is necessary to extend the attenuation measurements to higher frequencies. Although the principles of resonator operation do not change as the frequency increases, the assumptions previously made during the spectral analysis may no longer be valid. In order to improve the methods used to calculate attenuation from acoustical resonator outputs, a more complete analysis of the resonator operation is presented here than has been published previously. This approach allows for robust attenuation measurements over a much wider frequency range and enables accurate measurements from lower-quality spectral peaks. PMID:22088016

  8. Study on the radial vibration and acoustic field of an isotropic circular ring radiator.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuyu; Xu, Long

    2012-01-01

    Based on the exact analytical theory, the radial vibration of an isotropic circular ring is studied and its electro-mechanical equivalent circuit is obtained. By means of the equivalent circuit model, the resonance frequency equation is derived; the relationship between the radial resonance frequency, the radial displacement amplitude magnification and the geometrical dimensions, the material property is analyzed. For comparison, numerical method is used to simulate the radial vibration of isotropic circular rings. The resonance frequency and the radial vibrational displacement distribution are obtained, and the radial radiation acoustic field of the circular ring in radial vibration is simulated. It is illustrated that the radial resonance frequencies from the analytical method and the numerical method are in good agreement when the height is much less than the radius. When the height becomes large relative to the radius, the frequency deviation from the two methods becomes large. The reason is that the exact analytical theory is limited to thin circular ring whose height must be much less than its radius. PMID:21802702

  9. Experimental verification of theoretical equations for acoustic radiation force on compressible spherical particles in traveling waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kennita A.; Vormohr, Hannah R.; Doinikov, Alexander A.; Bouakaz, Ayache; Shields, C. Wyatt; López, Gabriel P.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-05-01

    Acoustophoresis uses acoustic radiation force to remotely manipulate particles suspended in a host fluid for many scientific, technological, and medical applications, such as acoustic levitation, acoustic coagulation, contrast ultrasound imaging, ultrasound-assisted drug delivery, etc. To estimate the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces, equations derived for an inviscid host fluid are commonly used. However, there are theoretical predictions that, in the case of a traveling wave, viscous effects can dramatically change the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces, which make the equations obtained for an inviscid host fluid invalid for proper estimation of acoustic radiation forces. To date, experimental verification of these predictions has not been published. Experimental measurements of viscous effects on acoustic radiation forces in a traveling wave were conducted using a confocal optical and acoustic system and values were compared with available theories. Our results show that, even in a low-viscosity fluid such as water, the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces is increased manyfold by viscous effects in comparison with what follows from the equations derived for an inviscid fluid.

  10. Experimental verification of theoretical equations for acoustic radiation force on compressible spherical particles in traveling waves.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kennita A; Vormohr, Hannah R; Doinikov, Alexander A; Bouakaz, Ayache; Shields, C Wyatt; López, Gabriel P; Dayton, Paul A

    2016-05-01

    Acoustophoresis uses acoustic radiation force to remotely manipulate particles suspended in a host fluid for many scientific, technological, and medical applications, such as acoustic levitation, acoustic coagulation, contrast ultrasound imaging, ultrasound-assisted drug delivery, etc. To estimate the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces, equations derived for an inviscid host fluid are commonly used. However, there are theoretical predictions that, in the case of a traveling wave, viscous effects can dramatically change the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces, which make the equations obtained for an inviscid host fluid invalid for proper estimation of acoustic radiation forces. To date, experimental verification of these predictions has not been published. Experimental measurements of viscous effects on acoustic radiation forces in a traveling wave were conducted using a confocal optical and acoustic system and values were compared with available theories. Our results show that, even in a low-viscosity fluid such as water, the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces is increased manyfold by viscous effects in comparison with what follows from the equations derived for an inviscid fluid. PMID:27300980

  11. Full-Field Imaging of GHz Film Bulk Acoustic Resonator Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Deason, Vance Albert; Cottle, David Lynn; Larson III, J. D.

    2003-10-01

    A full-field view laser ultrasonic imaging method has been developed that measures acoustic motion at a surface without scanning. Images are recorded at normal video frame rates by using dynamic holography with photorefractive interferometric detection. By extending the approach to ultra high frequencies, an acoustic microscope has been developed that is capable of operation at gigahertz frequency and micron length scales. Both acoustic amplitude and phase are recorded, allowing full calibration and determination of phases to within a single arbitrary constant. Results are presented of measurements at frequencies of 800-900 MHz, illustrating a multitude of normal mode behavior in electrically driven thin film acoustic resonators. Coupled with microwave electrical impedance measurements, this imaging mode provides an exceptionally fast method for evaluation of electric-to-acoustic coupling of these devices and their performance. Images of 256 /spl times/ 240 pixels are recorded at 18 fps rates synchronized to obtain both in-phase and quadrature detection of the acoustic motion. Simple averaging provides sensitivity to the subnanometer level at each pixel calibrated over the image using interferometry. Identification of specific acoustic modes and their relationship to electrical impedance characteristics show the advantages and overall high speed of the technique.

  12. Resonant coupling of ionization waves and acoustic gravity waves in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eun, H.; Gross, S. H.

    1976-01-01

    The nature of the two resonant directions that occur for a single frequency in the presence of a magnetic field is demonstrated, along with the manner in which the resonances change with the dip angle and the angle of propagation from the meridian plane. The conditions under which acoustic branch resonances may occur are outlined. It is found that the calculated frequencies and directions for resonance are in the range of observed values for TID's obtained from ground and satellite measurements. This result is indicative of a possible connection between TID's and the resonance phenomenon. It is shown that a strong resonance type of response may be possible in the F region at a particular frequency from a region that can be as great as 100 km in altitude.

  13. Radiation belts study in RESONANCE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogilevsky, Mikhail; Demekhov, Andrei; Zelenyi, Lev; Petrukovich, Anatoly; Shklyar, David

    The Earth’s inner magnetosphere is an important part of space weather framework. Outer radiation belt is a home for numerous communication and navigation satellites. But besides this practical problem, this region is a theoretical nugget. Hot magnetospheric, cold plas¬mospheric, and, in contrast, high energy plasma coexist here. Such non-equilibrium state of plasma is glued by various plasma oscillations actively interacting with particles and resulting, in particular, in spatial and velocity diffusion. Diffusion influences acceleration and precipitation of particles and defines their life¬time in the Earth’s magnetosphere. The project RESONANCE is aimed to study the whole complex of these issues, both practical (space weather), and fundamental (nonlinear plasma dynamics). The project RESONANCE is a part of the Russian Federal State Program. Lavochkin Association is responsi¬ble for preparation and testing of the satellites. Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences is a leading scientific organization. Besides Russian scientists, specialists from Austria, Bulgaria, Czech Re¬public, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Poland, Slovakia, Ukraine, USA take part.

  14. Note: A frequency modulated wireless interrogation system exploiting narrowband acoustic resonator for remote physical quantity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droit, C.; Martin, G.; Ballandras, S.; Friedt, J.-M.

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate the wireless conversion of frequency modulation to amplitude modulation by radio frequency resonators as means of accurately determining the resonance frequency of passive acoustoelectronic sensors. The emitted frequency modulated radio frequency pulses are generated by a pulsed radar for probing a surface acoustic wave based sensor. The sharp sign transition of the amplitude modulated received signal provides a signal on which a feedback loop is locked to monitor the resonance signal. The strategy is demonstrated using a full software implementation on a generic hardware, resulting in 2 Hz resolution at 1 s integration time limited by the proportional feedback loop.

  15. Resonant Transition Radiation and Solar Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasnov, L. V.; Karlický, M.; Modin, E. V.

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents general relations for the intensity of the resonant transition radiation (RTR) and their detailed analysis. This analysis shows that the spectrum amplitude of the x-mode at some frequencies for high-energy electrons can grow with the magnetic field increase in some interval from zero value; it can even dominate over that for the o-mode. With further magnetic field increase, the intensity of the RTR x-mode decreases in comparison with the intensity of the o-mode and this decrease is higher for higher velocities of energetic electrons. The polarization of the RTR depends on the velocity of energetic electrons, too. For velocities lower than some velocity limit v< v i the RTR emission is unpolarized in a broad interval of magnetic field intensities in the radio source. For reasonable values of indices of the power-law distribution functions of energetic electrons, the RTR is broadband in frequencies ( df/ f≈0.2-0.4). Furthermore, we show various dependencies of the RTR and its spectral characteristics. Assuming the same radio flux of the transition radiation and the gyro-synchrotron one at the Razin frequency, we estimate the limit magnetic field in the radio source of the transition radiation. Then, we analyze possible sources of small-scale inhomogeneities (thermal density fluctuations, Langmuir and ion-sound waves), which are necessary for the transition radiation. Although the small-scale inhomogeneities connected with the Langmuir waves lead to the plasma radiation, which is essentially stronger than RTR, the inhomogeneities of the ion-sound waves are suitable for the RTR without any other radiation. We present the relations describing the RTR for anisotropic distribution functions of fast electrons. We consider the distribution functions of fast electrons in the form of the Legendre polynomials which depend on the pitch-angle. We analyze the influence of the degree of the anisotropy (an increase of the number of terms in the Legendre

  16. Phonon-Electron Interactions in Piezoelectric Semiconductor Bulk Acoustic Wave Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Vikrant J.; Rais-Zadeh, Mina

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the first comprehensive investigation of phonon-electron interactions in bulk acoustic standing wave (BAW) resonators made from piezoelectric semiconductor (PS) materials. We show that these interactions constitute a significant energy loss mechanism and can set practical loss limits lower than anharmonic phonon scattering limits or thermoelastic damping limits. Secondly, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that phonon-electron interactions, under appropriate conditions, can result in a significant acoustic gain manifested as an improved quality factor (Q). Measurements on GaN resonators are consistent with the presented interaction model and demonstrate up to 35% dynamic improvement in Q. The strong dependencies of electron-mediated acoustic loss/gain on resonance frequency and material properties are investigated. Piezoelectric semiconductors are an extremely important class of electromechanical materials, and this work provides crucial insights for material choice, material properties, and device design to achieve low-loss PS-BAW resonators along with the unprecedented ability to dynamically tune resonator Q. PMID:25001100

  17. All-fiber photoacoustic gas sensor with graphene nano-mechanical resonator as the acoustic detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanzhen, Tan; Fan, Yang; Jun, Ma; Hoi Lut, Ho; Wei, Jin

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate an all-optical-fiber photoacoustic (PA) spectrometric gas sensor with a graphene nano-mechanical resonator as the acoustic detector. The acoustic detection is performed by a miniature ferrule-top nano-mechanical resonator with a ˜100-nm-thick, 2.5-mm-diameter multilayer graphene diaphragm. Experimental investigation showed that the performance of the PA gas sensor can be significantly enhanced by operating at the resonance of the grapheme diaphragm where a lower detection limit of 153 parts-per-billion (ppb) acetylene is achieved. The all-fiber PA sensor which is immune to electromagnetic interference and safe in explosive environments is ideally suited for real-world remote, space-limited applications and for multipoint detection in a multiplexed fiber optic sensor network.

  18. Nondestructive evaluation of explosively welded clad rods by resonance acoustic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Y; Tysoe, B; Sim, J; Mirkhani, K; Sinclair, A N; Honarvar, F; Sildva, Harry; Szecket, Alexander; Hardwick, Roy

    2003-07-01

    A resonance acoustic spectroscopy technique is assessed for nondestructive evaluation of explosively welded clad rods. Each rod is modeled as a two-layered cylinder with a spring-mass system to represent a thin interfacial layer containing the weld. A range of interfacial profiles is generated in a set of experimental samples by varying the speed of the explosion that drives the copper cladding into the aluminum core. Excellent agreement is achieved between measured and calculated values of the resonant frequencies of the system, through appropriate adjustment of the interfacial mass and spring constants used in the wave scattering calculations. Destructive analysis of the interface in the experimental specimens confirms that key features of the interfacial profile may be inferred from resonance acoustic spectroscopy analysis applied to ultrasonic measurements. PMID:12788219

  19. Film bulk acoustic resonators integrated on arbitrary substrates using a polymer support layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guohao; Zhao, Xinru; Wang, Xiaozhi; Jin, Hao; Li, Shijian; Dong, Shurong; Flewitt, A. J.; Milne, W. I.; Luo, J. K.

    2015-03-01

    The film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) is a widely-used MEMS device which can be used as a filter, or as a gravimetric sensor for biochemical or physical sensing. Current device architectures require the use of an acoustic mirror or a freestanding membrane and are fabricated as discrete components. A new architecture is demonstrated which permits fabrication and integration of FBARs on arbitrary substrates. Wave confinement is achieved by fabricating the resonator on a polyimide support layer. Results show when the polymer thickness is greater than a critical value, d, the FBARs have similar performance to devices using alternative architectures. For ZnO FBARs operating at 1.3-2.2 GHz, d is ~9 μm, and the devices have a Q-factor of 470, comparable to 493 for the membrane architecture devices. The polymer support makes the resonators insensitive to the underlying substrate. Yields over 95% have been achieved on roughened silicon, copper and glass.

  20. Effects of Acoustic and Fluid Dynamic Interactions in Resonators: Applications in Thermoacoustic Refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antao, Dion Savio

    Thermoacoustic refrigeration systems have gained increased importance in cryogenic cooling technologies and improvements are needed to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the current cryogenic refrigeration devices. These improvements in performance require a re-examination of the fundamental acoustic and fluid dynamic interactions in the acoustic resonators that comprise a thermoacoustic refrigerator. A comprehensive research program of the pulse tube thermoacoustic refrigerator (PTR) and arbitrarily shaped, circular cross-section acoustic resonators was undertaken to develop robust computational models to design and predict the transport processes in these systems. This effort was divided into three main focus areas: (a) studying the acoustic and fluid dynamic interactions in consonant and dissonant acoustic resonators, (b) experimentally investigating thermoacoustic refrigeration systems attaining cryogenic levels and (c) computationally studying the transport processes and energy conversion through fluid-solid interactions in thermoacoustic pulse tube refrigeration devices. To investigate acoustic-fluid dynamic interactions in resonators, a high fidelity computational fluid dynamic model was developed and used to simulate the flow, pressure and temperature fields generated in consonant cylindrical and dissonant conical resonators. Excitation of the acoustic resonators produced high-amplitude standing waves in the conical resonator. The generated peak acoustic overpressures exceeded the initial undisturbed pressure by two to three times. The harmonic response in the conical resonator system was observed to be dependent on the piston amplitude. The resultant strong acoustic streaming structures in the cone resonator highlighted its potential over a cylindrical resonator as an efficient mixer. Two pulse tube cryogenic refrigeration (PTR) devices driven by a linear motor (a pressure wave generator) were designed, fabricated and tested. The characterization

  1. Electro-thermo-mechanical model for bulk acoustic wave resonators.

    PubMed

    Rocas, Eduard; Collado, Carlos; Mateu, Jordi; Orloff, Nathan D; Aigner, Robert; Booth, James C

    2013-11-01

    We present the electro-thermo-mechanical constitutive relations, expanded up to the third order, for a BAW resonator. The relations obtained are implemented into a circuit model, which is validated with extensive linear and nonlinear measurements. The mathematical analysis, along with the modeling, allows us to identify the dominant terms, which are the material temperature derivatives and two intrinsic nonlinear terms, and explain, for the first time, all observable effects in a BAW resonator by use of a unified physical description. Moreover, the terms that are responsible for the second-harmonic generation and the frequency shift with dc voltage are shown to be the same. PMID:24158294

  2. Flow-excited acoustic resonances of coaxial side-branches in an annular duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthurs, D.; Ziada, S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the aeroacoustic response of an annular duct with closed coaxial side-branches, and examines the effect of several passive countermeasures on the resonance intensity. The investigated geometry is inspired by the design of the Roll-Posts in the Rolls-Royce LiftSystem® engine, which is currently being developed for the Lockheed Martin Joint Strike Fighter (JSF®) aircraft. The effects of design parameters, such as diameter ratio, branch length ratio and thickness of the annular flow on the frequency and resonance intensity of the first acoustic mode are studied experimentally. Numerical simulations of the acoustic mode shapes and frequencies are also performed. The annular flow has been found to excite several acoustic modes, the strongest in all cases being the first acoustic mode, which consists of a quarter wavelength along the length of each branch. The ratios of the branch length and diameter, with respect to the main duct diameter, have been found to have strong effects on the frequency of the acoustic modes.

  3. Acoustic Eigenvalues of a Quasispherical Resonator: Second Order Shape Perturbation Theory for Arbitrary Modes

    PubMed Central

    Mehl, James B.

    2007-01-01

    The boundary-shape formalism of Morse and Ingard is applied to the acoustic modes of a deformed spherical resonator (quasisphere) with rigid boundaries. For boundary shapes described by r = a [1 − ε ℱ(θ, ϕ)], where ε is a small scale parameter and ℱ is a function of order unity, the frequency perturbation is calculated to order ε2. The formal results apply to acoustic modes whose angular dependence is designated by the indices ℓ and m. Specific examples are worked out for the radial (ℓ = 0) and triplet (ℓ = 1) modes, for prolate and oblate spheroids, and for triaxial ellipsoids. The exact eigenvalues for the spheroids, and eigenvalue determined with finite-element calculations, are shown to agree with perturbation theory through terms of order ε2. This work is an extension of the author’s previous papers on the acoustic eigenfrequencies of deformed spherical resonators, which were limited to the second-order perturbation for radial modes [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 71, 1109-1113 (1982)] and the first order-perturbation for arbitrary modes [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 79, 278–285 (1986)]. PMID:27110463

  4. Material properties from acoustic radiation force step response

    PubMed Central

    Orescanin, Marko; Toohey, Kathleen S.; Insana, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    An ultrasonic technique for estimating viscoelastic properties of hydrogels, including engineered biological tissues, is being developed. An acoustic radiation force is applied to deform the gel locally while Doppler pulses track the induced movement. The system efficiently couples radiation force to the medium through an embedded scattering sphere. A single-element, spherically-focused, circular piston element transmits a continuous-wave burst to suddenly apply and remove a radiation force to the sphere. Simultaneously, a linear array and spectral Doppler technique are applied to track the position of the sphere over time. The complex shear modulus of the gel was estimated by applying a harmonic oscillator model to measurements of time-varying sphere displacement. Assuming that the stress-strain response of the surrounding gel is linear, this model yields an impulse response function for the gel system that may be used to estimate material properties for other load functions. The method is designed to explore the force-frequency landscape of cell-matrix viscoelasticity. Reported measurements of the shear modulus of gelatin gels at two concentrations are in close agreement with independent rheometer measurements of the same gels. Accurate modulus measurements require that the rate of Doppler-pulse transmission be matched to a priori estimates of gel properties. PMID:19425636

  5. Structural acoustics model of the violin radiativity profile.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, George

    2008-12-01

    Violin radiativity profiles are dominated by the Helmholtz-like A0 cavity mode ( approximately 280 Hz), first corpus bending modes B1(-) and B1(+) ( approximately 500 Hz), and BH and bridge-filter peaks ( approximately 2.4 kHz and approximately 3.5 kHz, respectively), with falloff above approximately 4 kHz. The B1 modes-dependent on two low-lying free-plate modes--are proposed to excite A0 via coupling to B1-driven in-phase f-hole volume flows. VIOCADEAS data show that A0 radiativity increases primarily as A0-B1(-) frequency difference decreases, consistent with Meinel's 1937 experiment for too-thick/too-thin plate thicknesses, plus sound post removal and violin octet baritone results. The vibration-->acoustic energy filter, F(RAD), computed from shape-material-independent radiation and total damping, peaks at the critical frequency f(crit), estimated from a free-plate mode by analogy to flat-plate bending. Experimentally, f(crit) decreased as this plate mode (and B1(+)) frequency increased. Simulations show that increasing plate thicknesses lowers f(crit), reduces F(RAD), and moves the spectral balance toward lower frequencies. Incorporating string-->corpus filters (including bridge versus bridge-island impedances) provides a model for overall violin radiativity. This model-with B1 and A0-B1 couplings, and f(crit) (computed from a free-plate mode important to B1) strongly affecting the lowest and highest parts of the radiativity profile-substantiates prior empirical B1--sound quality linkages. PMID:19206824

  6. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  7. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  8. Low frequency acoustic energy harvesting using PZT piezoelectric plates in a straight tube resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; You, Jeong Ho; Kim, Yong-Joe

    2013-05-01

    A novel and practical acoustic energy harvesting mechanism to harvest traveling sound at low audible frequency is introduced and studied both experimentally and numerically. The acoustic energy harvester in this study contains a quarter-wavelength straight tube resonator with lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoelectric cantilever plates placed inside the tube. When the tube resonator is excited by an incident sound at its acoustic resonance frequency, the amplified acoustic pressure inside the tube drives the vibration motions of piezoelectric plates, resulting in the generation of electricity. To increase the total voltage and power, multiple PZT plates were placed inside the tube. The number of PZT plates to maximize the voltage and power is limited due to the interruption of air particle motion by the plates. It has been found to be more beneficial to place the piezoelectric plates in the first half of the tube rather than along the entire tube. With an incident sound pressure level of 100 dB, an output voltage of 5.089 V was measured. The output voltage increases linearly with the incident sound pressure. With an incident sound pressure of 110 dB, an output voltage of 15.689 V and a power of 12.697 mW were obtained. The corresponding areal and volume power densities are 0.635 mW cm-2 and 15.115 μW cm-3, respectively.

  9. Experimental study of acoustic radiation force of an ultrasound beam on absorbing and scattering objects

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaeva, Anastasiia V. Kryzhanovsky, Maxim A.; Tsysar, Sergey A.; Kreider, Wayne; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2015-10-28

    Acoustic radiation force is a nonlinear acoustic effect caused by the transfer of wave momentum to absorbing or scattering objects. This phenomenon is exploited in modern ultrasound metrology for measurement of the acoustic power radiated by a source and is used for both therapeutic and diagnostic sources in medical applications. To calculate radiation force an acoustic hologram can be used in conjunction with analytical expressions based on the angular spectrum of the measured field. The results of an experimental investigation of radiation forces in two different cases are presented in this paper. In one case, the radiation force of an obliquely incident ultrasound beam on a large absorber (which completely absorbs the beam) is considered. The second case concerns measurement of the radiation force on a spherical target that is small compared to the beam diameter.

  10. Experimental Study of Acoustic Radiation Force of an Ultrasound Beam on Absorbing and Scattering Objects

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaeva, Anastasiia V.; Kryzhanovsky, Maxim A.; Tsysar, Sergey A.; Kreider, Wayne; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force is a nonlinear acoustic effect caused by the transfer of wave momentum to absorbing or scattering objects. This phenomenon is exploited in modern ultrasound metrology for measurement of the acoustic power radiated by a source and is used for both therapeutic and diagnostic sources in medical applications. To calculate radiation force an acoustic hologram can be used in conjunction with analytical expressions based on the angular spectrum of the measured field. The results of an experimental investigation of radiation forces in two different cases are presented in this paper. In one case, the radiation force of an obliquely incident ultrasound beam on a large absorber (which completely absorbs the beam) is considered. The second case concerns measurement of the radiation force on a spherical target that is small compared to the beam diameter. PMID:27147775