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Sample records for resonance image segmentation

  1. Segmentation of neuroanatomy in magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Andrew; Arridge, Simon R.; Barker, G. J.; Tofts, Paul S.

    1992-06-01

    Segmentation in neurological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is necessary for feature extraction, volume measurement and for the three-dimensional display of neuroanatomy. Automated and semi-automated methods offer considerable advantages over manual methods because of their lack of subjectivity, their data reduction capabilities, and the time savings they give. We have used dual echo multi-slice spin-echo data sets which take advantage of the intrinsically multispectral nature of MRI. As a pre-processing step, a rf non-uniformity correction is applied and if the data is noisy the images are smoothed using a non-isotropic blurring method. Edge-based processing is used to identify the skin (the major outer contour) and the eyes. Edge-focusing has been used to significantly simplify edge images and thus allow simple postprocessing to pick out the brain contour in each slice of the data set. Edge- focusing is a technique which locates significant edges using a high degree of smoothing at a coarse level and tracks these edges to a fine level where the edges can be determined with high positional accuracy. Both 2-D and 3-D edge-detection methods have been compared. Once isolated, the brain is further processed to identify CSF, and, depending upon the MR pulse sequence used, the brain itself may be sub-divided into gray matter and white matter using semi-automatic contrast enhancement and clustering methods.

  2. Segmentation and quantification of adipose tissue by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hu, Houchun Harry; Chen, Jun; Shen, Wei

    2016-04-01

    In this brief review, introductory concepts in animal and human adipose tissue segmentation using proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography are summarized in the context of obesity research. Adipose tissue segmentation and quantification using spin relaxation-based (e.g., T1-weighted, T2-weighted), relaxometry-based (e.g., T1-, T2-, T2*-mapping), chemical-shift selective, and chemical-shift encoded water-fat MRI pulse sequences are briefly discussed. The continuing interest to classify subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue depots into smaller sub-depot compartments is mentioned. The use of a single slice, a stack of slices across a limited anatomical region, or a whole body protocol is considered. Common image post-processing steps and emerging atlas-based automated segmentation techniques are noted. Finally, the article identifies some directions of future research, including a discussion on the growing topic of brown adipose tissue and related segmentation considerations. PMID:26336839

  3. Novel technique in the segmentation of magnetic resonance image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwok-Leung

    1996-04-01

    In this investigation, automatic image segmentation is carried out on magnetic resonance image (MRI). A novel technique based on the maximum minimum measure is devised. The measure is improved by combining the smoothing and counting processes, and then normalizing the number of maximum and minimum positions over the region of interest (ROI). Two parameters (MM_H and MM_V) are generated and used for the segmentation. The technique is tested on some brain MRIs of a human male from the Visible Human Project of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, USA. Preliminary results indicate that the maximum minimum measure can provide effective parameters for human tissue characterization and image segmentation with an added advantage of faster computation.

  4. Applications of magnetic resonance image segmentation in neurology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, Tomi; Lahtinen, Antti J.; Dastidar, Prasun; Ryymin, Pertti; Laarne, Paeivi; Malmivuo, Jaakko; Laasonen, Erkki; Frey, Harry; Eskola, Hannu

    1999-05-01

    After the introduction of digital imagin devices in medicine computerized tissue recognition and classification have become important in research and clinical applications. Segmented data can be applied among numerous research fields including volumetric analysis of particular tissues and structures, construction of anatomical modes, 3D visualization, and multimodal visualization, hence making segmentation essential in modern image analysis. In this research project several PC based software were developed in order to segment medical images, to visualize raw and segmented images in 3D, and to produce EEG brain maps in which MR images and EEG signals were integrated. The software package was tested and validated in numerous clinical research projects in hospital environment.

  5. Fast method for brain image segmentation: application to proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Bonekamp, David; Horská, Alena; Jacobs, Michael A; Arslanoglu, Atilla; Barker, Peter B

    2005-11-01

    The interpretation of brain metabolite concentrations measured by quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is assisted by knowledge of the percentage of gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within each MRSI voxel. Usually, this information is determined from T(1)-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI) that have a much higher spatial resolution than the MRSI data. While this approach works well, it is time-consuming. In this article, a rapid data acquisition and analysis procedure for image segmentation is described, which is based on collection of several, thick slice, fast spin echo images (FSE) of different contrast. Tissue segmentation is performed with linear "Eigenimage" filtering and normalization. The method was compared to standard segmentation techniques using high-resolution 3D T(1)-weighted MRI in five subjects. Excellent correlation between the two techniques was obtained, with voxel-wise regression analysis giving GM: R2 = 0.893 +/- 0.098, WM: R2 = 0.892 +/- 0.089, ln(CSF): R2 = 0.831 +/- 0.082). Test-retest analysis in one individual yielded an excellent agreement of measurements with R2 higher than 0.926 in all three tissue classes. Application of FSE/EI segmentation to a sample proton MRSI dataset yielded results similar to prior publications. It is concluded that FSE imaging in conjunction with Eigenimage analysis is a rapid and reliable way of segmenting brain tissue for application to proton MRSI. PMID:16187272

  6. Cerebral magnetic resonance image segmentation using data fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rajapakse, J.C.; Giedd, J.N.; Krain, A.L.; Hamburger, S.D.; Rapoport, J.L.; DeCarli, C.

    1996-03-01

    A semiautomated method is described for segmenting dual echo MR head scans into gray and white matter and CSF. The method is applied to brain scans of 80 healthy children and adolescents. A probabilistic data fusion equation was used to combine simultaneously acquired T2-weighted and proton density head scans for tissue segmentation. The fusion equation optimizes the probability of a voxel being a particular tissue type, given the corresponding probabilities from both images. The algorithm accounts for the intensity inhomogeneities present in the images by fusion of local regions of the images. The method was validated using a phantom (agarose gel with iron oxide particles) and hand-segmented imager. Gray and white matter volumes for subjects aged 20-30 years were close to those previously published. White matter and CSF volume increased and gray matter volume decreased significantly across ages 4-18 years. White matter, gray matter, and CSF volumes were larger for males than for females. Males and females showed similar change of gray and white matter volumes with age. This simple, reliable, and valid method can be employed in clinical research for quantification of gray and white matter and CSF volumes in MR head scans. Increase in white matter volume may reflect ongoing axonal growth and myelination, and gray matter reductions may reflect synaptic pruning or cell death in the age span of 4-18 years. 41 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Segmenting nonenhancing brain tumors from normal tissues in magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher-Heath, Lynn M.; Hall, Lawrence O.; Goldgof, Dmitry B.

    1998-06-01

    Tumor segmentation from magnetic resonance (MR) images aids in tumor treatment by tracking the progress of tumor growth and/or shrinkage. In this paper we present an automatic segmentation method which separates non-enhancing brain tumors from healthy tissues in MR images. The MR feature images used for the segmentation consist of three weighted images (T1, T2 and proton density) for each axial slice through the head. An initial segmentation is computed using an unsupervised clustering algorithm. Then, integrated domain knowledge and image processing techniques contribute to the final tumor segmentation. The system was trained on two patient volumes and preliminary testing has shown successful tumor segmentations on four patient volumes.

  8. Automated segmentation of in vivo and ex vivo mouse brain magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Scheenstra, Alize E H; van de Ven, Rob C G; van der Weerd, Louise; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Dijkstra, Jouke; Reiber, Johan H C

    2009-01-01

    Segmentation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data is required for many applications, such as the comparison of different structures or time points, and for annotation purposes. Currently, the gold standard for automated image segmentation is nonlinear atlas-based segmentation. However, these methods are either not sufficient or highly time consuming for mouse brains, owing to the low signal to noise ratio and low contrast between structures compared with other applications. We present a novel generic approach to reduce processing time for segmentation of various structures of mouse brains, in vivo and ex vivo. The segmentation consists of a rough affine registration to a template followed by a clustering approach to refine the rough segmentation near the edges. Compared with manual segmentations, the presented segmentation method has an average kappa index of 0.7 for 7 of 12 structures in in vivo MRI and 11 of 12 structures in ex vivo MRI. Furthermore, we found that these results were equal to the performance of a nonlinear segmentation method, but with the advantage of being 8 times faster. The presented automatic segmentation method is quick and intuitive and can be used for image registration, volume quantification of structures, and annotation. PMID:19344574

  9. Ensemble Semi-supervised Frame-work for Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Tissue Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Azmi, Reza; Pishgoo, Boshra; Norozi, Narges; Yeganeh, Samira

    2013-01-01

    Brain magnetic resonance images (MRIs) tissue segmentation is one of the most important parts of the clinical diagnostic tools. Pixel classification methods have been frequently used in the image segmentation with two supervised and unsupervised approaches up to now. Supervised segmentation methods lead to high accuracy, but they need a large amount of labeled data, which is hard, expensive, and slow to obtain. Moreover, they cannot use unlabeled data to train classifiers. On the other hand, unsupervised segmentation methods have no prior knowledge and lead to low level of performance. However, semi-supervised learning which uses a few labeled data together with a large amount of unlabeled data causes higher accuracy with less trouble. In this paper, we propose an ensemble semi-supervised frame-work for segmenting of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tissues that it has been used results of several semi-supervised classifiers simultaneously. Selecting appropriate classifiers has a significant role in the performance of this frame-work. Hence, in this paper, we present two semi-supervised algorithms expectation filtering maximization and MCo_Training that are improved versions of semi-supervised methods expectation maximization and Co_Training and increase segmentation accuracy. Afterward, we use these improved classifiers together with graph-based semi-supervised classifier as components of the ensemble frame-work. Experimental results show that performance of segmentation in this approach is higher than both supervised methods and the individual semi-supervised classifiers. PMID:24098863

  10. Robust kernelized local information fuzzy C-means clustering for brain magnetic resonance image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Elazab, Ahmed; AbdulAzeem, Yousry M; Wu, Shiqian; Hu, Qingmao

    2016-03-17

    Brain tissue segmentation from magnetic resonance (MR) images is an importance task for clinical use. The segmentation process becomes more challenging in the presence of noise, grayscale inhomogeneity, and other image artifacts. In this paper, we propose a robust kernelized local information fuzzy C-means clustering algorithm (RKLIFCM). It incorporates local information into the segmentation process (both grayscale and spatial) for more homogeneous segmentation. In addition, the Gaussian radial basis kernel function is adopted as a distance metric to replace the standard Euclidean distance. The main advantages of the new algorithm are: efficient utilization of local grayscale and spatial information, robustness to noise, ability to preserve image details, free from any parameter initialization, and with high speed as it runs on image histogram. We compared the proposed algorithm with 7 soft clustering algorithms that run on both image histogram and image pixels to segment brain MR images. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed RKLIFCM algorithm is able to overcome the influence of noise and achieve higher segmentation accuracy with low computational complexity. PMID:27257884

  11. Volume quantization of the mouse cerebellum by semiautomatic 3D segmentation of magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijbers, Jan; Van der Linden, Anne-Marie; Scheunders, Paul; Van Audekerke, Johan; Van Dyck, Dirk; Raman, Erik R.

    1996-04-01

    The aim of this work is the development of a non-invasive technique for efficient and accurate volume quantization of the cerebellum of mice. This enables an in-vivo study on the development of the cerebellum in order to define possible alterations in cerebellum volume of transgenic mice. We concentrate on a semi-automatic segmentation procedure to extract the cerebellum from 3D magnetic resonance data. The proposed technique uses a 3D variant of Vincent and Soille's immersion based watershed algorithm which is applied to the gradient magnitude of the MR data. The algorithm results in a partitioning of the data in volume primitives. The known drawback of the watershed algorithm, over-segmentation, is strongly reduced by a priori application of an adaptive anisotropic diffusion filter on the gradient magnitude data. In addition, over-segmentation is a posteriori contingently reduced by properly merging volume primitives, based on the minimum description length principle. The outcome of the preceding image processing step is presented to the user for manual segmentation. The first slice which contains the object of interest is quickly segmented by the user through selection of basic image regions. In the sequel, the subsequent slices are automatically segmented. The segmentation results are contingently manually corrected. The technique is tested on phantom objects, where segmentation errors less than 2% were observed. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the segmented data are shown for the mouse cerebellum and the mouse brains in toto.

  12. The use of atlas registration and graph cuts for prostate segmentation in magnetic resonance images

    SciTech Connect

    Korsager, Anne Sofie Østergaard, Lasse Riis; Fortunati, Valerio; Lijn, Fedde van der; Niessen, Wiro; Walsum, Theo van; Carl, Jesper

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: An automatic method for 3D prostate segmentation in magnetic resonance (MR) images is presented for planning image-guided radiotherapy treatment of prostate cancer. Methods: A spatial prior based on intersubject atlas registration is combined with organ-specific intensity information in a graph cut segmentation framework. The segmentation is tested on 67 axial T{sub 2}-weighted MR images in a leave-one-out cross validation experiment and compared with both manual reference segmentations and with multiatlas-based segmentations using majority voting atlas fusion. The impact of atlas selection is investigated in both the traditional atlas-based segmentation and the new graph cut method that combines atlas and intensity information in order to improve the segmentation accuracy. Best results were achieved using the method that combines intensity information, shape information, and atlas selection in the graph cut framework. Results: A mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 0.88 and a mean surface distance (MSD) of 1.45 mm with respect to the manual delineation were achieved. Conclusions: This approaches the interobserver DSC of 0.90 and interobserver MSD 0f 1.15 mm and is comparable to other studies performing prostate segmentation in MR.

  13. Myocardial Infarct Segmentation from Magnetic Resonance Images for Personalized Modeling of Cardiac Electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Ukwatta, Eranga; Arevalo, Hermenegild; Li, Kristina; Yuan, Jing; Qiu, Wu; Malamas, Peter; Wu, Katherine C.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate representation of myocardial infarct geometry is crucial to patient-specific computational modeling of the heart in ischemic cardiomyopathy. We have developed a methodology for segmentation of left ventricular (LV) infarct from clinically acquired, two-dimensional (2D), late-gadolinium enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR) images, for personalized modeling of ventricular electrophysiology. The infarct segmentation was expressed as a continuous min-cut optimization problem, which was solved using its dual formulation, the continuous max-flow (CMF). The optimization objective comprised of a smoothness term, and a data term that quantified the similarity between image intensity histograms of segmented regions and those of a set of training images. A manual segmentation of the LV myocardium was used to initialize and constrain the developed method. The three-dimensional geometry of infarct was reconstructed from its segmentation using an implicit, shape-based interpolation method. The proposed methodology was extensively evaluated using metrics based on geometry, and outcomes of individualized electrophysiological simulations of cardiac dys(function). Several existing LV infarct segmentation approaches were implemented, and compared with the proposed method. Our results demonstrated that the CMF method was more accurate than the existing approaches in reproducing expert manual LV infarct segmentations, and in electrophysiological simulations. The infarct segmentation method we have developed and comprehensively evaluated in this study constitutes an important step in advancing clinical applications of personalized simulations of cardiac electrophysiology. PMID:26731693

  14. Myocardial Infarct Segmentation From Magnetic Resonance Images for Personalized Modeling of Cardiac Electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Ukwatta, Eranga; Arevalo, Hermenegild; Li, Kristina; Yuan, Jing; Qiu, Wu; Malamas, Peter; Wu, Katherine C; Trayanova, Natalia A; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy

    2016-06-01

    Accurate representation of myocardial infarct geometry is crucial to patient-specific computational modeling of the heart in ischemic cardiomyopathy. We have developed a methodology for segmentation of left ventricular (LV) infarct from clinically acquired, two-dimensional (2D), late-gadolinium enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR) images, for personalized modeling of ventricular electrophysiology. The infarct segmentation was expressed as a continuous min-cut optimization problem, which was solved using its dual formulation, the continuous max-flow (CMF). The optimization objective comprised of a smoothness term, and a data term that quantified the similarity between image intensity histograms of segmented regions and those of a set of training images. A manual segmentation of the LV myocardium was used to initialize and constrain the developed method. The three-dimensional geometry of infarct was reconstructed from its segmentation using an implicit, shape-based interpolation method. The proposed methodology was extensively evaluated using metrics based on geometry, and outcomes of individualized electrophysiological simulations of cardiac dys(function). Several existing LV infarct segmentation approaches were implemented, and compared with the proposed method. Our results demonstrated that the CMF method was more accurate than the existing approaches in reproducing expert manual LV infarct segmentations, and in electrophysiological simulations. The infarct segmentation method we have developed and comprehensively evaluated in this study constitutes an important step in advancing clinical applications of personalized simulations of cardiac electrophysiology. PMID:26731693

  15. Segmentation of tongue muscles from super-resolution magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Ibragimov, Bulat; Prince, Jerry L; Murano, Emi Z; Woo, Jonghye; Stone, Maureen; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2015-02-01

    Imaging and quantification of tongue anatomy is helpful in surgical planning, post-operative rehabilitation of tongue cancer patients, and studying of how humans adapt and learn new strategies for breathing, swallowing and speaking to compensate for changes in function caused by disease, medical interventions or aging. In vivo acquisition of high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) images with clearly visible tongue muscles is currently not feasible because of breathing and involuntary swallowing motions that occur over lengthy imaging times. However, recent advances in image reconstruction now allow the generation of super-resolution 3D MR images from sets of orthogonal images, acquired at a high in-plane resolution and combined using super-resolution techniques. This paper presents, to the best of our knowledge, the first attempt towards automatic tongue muscle segmentation from MR images. We devised a database of ten super-resolution 3D MR images, in which the genioglossus and inferior longitudinalis tongue muscles were manually segmented and annotated with landmarks. We demonstrate the feasibility of segmenting the muscles of interest automatically by applying the landmark-based game-theoretic framework (GTF), where a landmark detector based on Haar-like features and an optimal assignment-based shape representation were integrated. The obtained segmentation results were validated against an independent manual segmentation performed by a second observer, as well as against B-splines and demons atlasing approaches. The segmentation performance resulted in mean Dice coefficients of 85.3%, 81.8%, 78.8% and 75.8% for the second observer, GTF, B-splines atlasing and demons atlasing, respectively. The obtained level of segmentation accuracy indicates that computerized tongue muscle segmentation may be used in surgical planning and treatment outcome analysis of tongue cancer patients, and in studies of normal subjects and subjects with speech and

  16. Three-dimensional brain magnetic resonance imaging segmentation via knowledge-driven decision theory

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Nishant; Muralidhar, Gautam S.; Bovik, Alan C.; Cowperthwaite, Matthew C.; Burnett, Mark G.; Markey, Mia K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Brain tissue segmentation on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a difficult task because of significant intensity overlap between the tissue classes. We present a new knowledge-driven decision theory (KDT) approach that incorporates prior information of the relative extents of intensity overlap between tissue class pairs for volumetric MR tissue segmentation. The proposed approach better handles intensity overlap between tissues without explicitly employing methods for removal of MR image corruptions (such as bias field). Adaptive tissue class priors are employed that combine probabilistic atlas maps with spatial contextual information obtained from Markov random fields to guide tissue segmentation. The energy function is minimized using a variational level-set-based framework, which has shown great promise for MR image analysis. We evaluate the proposed method on two well-established real MR datasets with expert ground-truth segmentations and compare our approach against existing segmentation methods. KDT has low-computational complexity and shows better segmentation performance than other segmentation methods evaluated using these MR datasets. PMID:26158060

  17. Temporal filtering of longitudinal brain magnetic resonance images for consistent segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Snehashis; Carass, Aaron; Pacheco, Jennifer; Bilgel, Murat; Resnick, Susan M.; Prince, Jerry L.; Pham, Dzung L.

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal analysis of magnetic resonance images of the human brain provides knowledge of brain changes during both normal aging as well as the progression of many diseases. Previous longitudinal segmentation methods have either ignored temporal information or have incorporated temporal consistency constraints within the algorithm. In this work, we assume that some anatomical brain changes can be explained by temporal transitions in image intensities. Once the images are aligned in the same space, the intensities of each scan at the same voxel constitute a temporal (or 4D) intensity trend at that voxel. Temporal intensity variations due to noise or other artifacts are corrected by a 4D intensity-based filter that smooths the intensity values where appropriate, while preserving real anatomical changes such as atrophy. Here smoothing refers to removal of sudden changes or discontinuities in intensities. Images processed with the 4D filter can be used as a pre-processing step to any segmentation method. We show that such a longitudinal pre-processing step produces robust and consistent longitudinal segmentation results, even when applying 3D segmentation algorithms. We compare with state-of-the-art 4D segmentation algorithms. Specifically, we experimented on three longitudinal datasets containing 4–12 time-points, and showed that the 4D temporal filter is more robust and has more power in distinguishing between healthy subjects and those with dementia, mild cognitive impairment, as well as different phenotypes of multiple sclerosis. PMID:26958465

  18. Generalized method for partial volume estimation and tissue segmentation in cerebral magnetic resonance images

    PubMed Central

    Khademi, April; Venetsanopoulos, Anastasios; Moody, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. An artifact found in magnetic resonance images (MRI) called partial volume averaging (PVA) has received much attention since accurate segmentation of cerebral anatomy and pathology is impeded by this artifact. Traditional neurological segmentation techniques rely on Gaussian mixture models to handle noise and PVA, or high-dimensional feature sets that exploit redundancy in multispectral datasets. Unfortunately, model-based techniques may not be optimal for images with non-Gaussian noise distributions and/or pathology, and multispectral techniques model probabilities instead of the partial volume (PV) fraction. For robust segmentation, a PV fraction estimation approach is developed for cerebral MRI that does not depend on predetermined intensity distribution models or multispectral scans. Instead, the PV fraction is estimated directly from each image using an adaptively defined global edge map constructed by exploiting a relationship between edge content and PVA. The final PVA map is used to segment anatomy and pathology with subvoxel accuracy. Validation on simulated and real, pathology-free T1 MRI (Gaussian noise), as well as pathological fluid attenuation inversion recovery MRI (non-Gaussian noise), demonstrate that the PV fraction is accurately estimated and the resultant segmentation is robust. Comparison to model-based methods further highlight the benefits of the current approach. PMID:26158022

  19. [A New Method to Segment Multiple Sclerosis Lesions Using Multispectral Magnetic Resonance Images].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yan; He, Jianfeng; Ma, Lei; Xu, Jiaping

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images can be used to detect lesions in the brains of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). An automatic method is presented for segmentation of MS lesions using multispectral MR images in this paper. Firstly, a Pd-w image is subtracted from its corresponding T1-w images to get an image in which the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) is enhanced. Secondly, based on kernel fuzzy c-means clustering (KFCM) algorithm, the enhanced image and the corresponding T2-w image are segmented respectively to extract the CSF region and the CSF-MS lesions combinatoin region. A raw MS lesions image is obtained by subtracting the CSF region from CSF-MS region. Thirdly, based on applying median filter and thresholding to the raw image, the MS lesions were detected finally. Results were tested on BrainWeb images and evaluated with Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), sensitivity (Sens), specificity (Spec) and accuracy (Acc). The testing results were satisfactory. PMID:26211250

  20. A New Method to Segment the Multiple Sclerosis Lesions on Brain Magnetic Resonance Images.

    PubMed

    Karimian, Alireza; Jafari, Simin

    2015-01-01

    Automatic segmentation of multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been widely investigated in the recent years with the goal of helping MS diagnosis and patient follow-up. In this research work, Gaussian mixture model (GMM) has been used to segment the MS lesions in MRIs, including T1-weighted (T1-w), T2-w, and T2-fluid attenuation inversion recovery. Usually, GMM is optimized by using expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. The drawbacks of this optimization method are, it does not converge to optimal maximum or minimum and furthermore, there are some voxels, which do not fit the GMM model and have to be rejected. So, GMM is time-consuming and not too much efficient. To overcome these limitations, in this research study, at the first step, GMM was applied to segment only T1-w images by using 100 various starting points when the maximum number of iterations was considered to be 50. Then segmentation results were used to calculate the parameters of the other two images. Furthermore, FAST-trimmed likelihood estimator algorithm was applied to determine which voxels should be rejected. The output result of the segmentation was classified in three classes; White and Gray matters, cerebrospinal fluid, and some rejected voxels which prone to be MS. In the next phase, MS lesions were detected by using some heuristic rules. This new method was applied on the brain MRIs of 25 patients from two hospitals. The automatic segmentation outputs were scored by two specialists and the results show that our method has the capability to segment the MS lesions with dice similarity coefficient score of 0.82. The results showed a better performance for the proposed approach, in comparison to those of previous works with less time-consuming. PMID:26955567

  1. Segmentation of the left ventricular endocardium from magnetic resonance images by using different statistical shape models.

    PubMed

    Piazzese, Concetta; Carminati, M Chiara; Colombo, Andrea; Krause, Rolf; Potse, Mark; Auricchio, Angelo; Weinert, Lynn; Tamborini, Gloria; Pepi, Mauro; Lang, Roberto M; Caiani, Enrico G

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate in this paper different strategies for the construction of a statistical shape model (SSM) of the left ventricle (LV) to be used for segmentation in cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images. From a large database of LV surfaces obtained throughout the cardiac cycle from 3D echocardiographic (3DE) LV images, different LV shape models were built by varying the considered phase in the cardiac cycle and the registration procedure employed for surface alignment. Principal component analysis was computed to describe the statistical variability of the SSMs, which were then deformed by applying an active shape model (ASM) approach to segment the LV endocardium in CMR images of 45 patients. Segmentation performance was evaluated by comparing LV volumes derived by ASM segmentation with different SSMs and those obtained by manual tracing, considered as a reference. A high correlation (r(2)>0.92) was found in all cases, with better results when using the SSM models comprising more than one frame of the cardiac cycle. PMID:27046100

  2. Atlas-based segmentation of brainstem regions in neuromelanin-sensitive magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puigvert, Marc; Castellanos, Gabriel; Uranga, Javier; Abad, Ricardo; Fernández-Seara, María. A.; Pastor, Pau; Pastor, María. A.; Muñoz-Barrutia, Arrate; Ortiz de Solórzano, Carlos

    2015-03-01

    We present a method for the automatic delineation of two neuromelanin rich brainstem structures -substantia nigra pars compacta (SN) and locus coeruleus (LC)- in neuromelanin sensitive magnetic resonance images of the brain. The segmentation method uses a dynamic multi-image reference atlas and a pre-registration atlas selection strategy. To create the atlas, a pool of 35 images of healthy subjects was pair-wise pre-registered and clustered in groups using an affinity propagation approach. Each group of the atlas is represented by a single exemplar image. Each new target image to be segmented is registered to the exemplars of each cluster. Then all the images of the highest performing clusters are enrolled into the final atlas, and the results of the registration with the target image are propagated using a majority voting approach. All registration processes used combined one two-stage affine and one elastic B-spline algorithm, to account for global positioning, region selection and local anatomic differences. In this paper, we present the algorithm, with emphasis in the atlas selection method and the registration scheme. We evaluate the performance of the atlas selection strategy using 35 healthy subjects and 5 Parkinson's disease patients. Then, we quantified the volume and contrast ratio of neuromelanin signal of these structures in 47 normal subjects and 40 Parkinson's disease patients to confirm that this method can detect neuromelanin-containing neurons loss in Parkinson's disease patients and could eventually be used for the early detection of SN and LC damage.

  3. Automated segmentation and classification of multispectral magnetic resonance images of brain using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Reddick, W E; Glass, J O; Cook, E N; Elkin, T D; Deaton, R J

    1997-12-01

    We present a fully automated process for segmentation and classification of multispectral magnetic resonance (MR) images. This hybrid neural network method uses a Kohonen self-organizing neural network for segmentation and a multilayer backpropagation neural network for classification. To separate different tissue types, this process uses the standard T1-, T2-, and PD-weighted MR images acquired in clinical examinations. Volumetric measurements of brain structures, relative to intracranial volume, were calculated for an index transverse section in 14 normal subjects (median age 25 years; seven male, seven female). This index slice was at the level of the basal ganglia, included both genu and splenium of the corpus callosum, and generally, showed the putamen and lateral ventricle. An intraclass correlation of this automated segmentation and classification of tissues with the accepted standard of radiologist identification for the index slice in the 14 volunteers demonstrated coefficients (ri) of 0.91, 0.95, and 0.98 for white matter, gray matter, and ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), respectively. An analysis of variance for estimates of brain parenchyma volumes in five volunteers imaged five times each demonstrated high intrasubject reproducibility with a significance of at least p < 0.05 for white matter, gray matter, and white/gray partial volumes. The population variation, across 14 volunteers, demonstrated little deviation from the averages for gray and white matter, while partial volume classes exhibited a slightly higher degree of variability. This fully automated technique produces reliable and reproducible MR image segmentation and classification while eliminating intra- and interobserver variability. PMID:9533591

  4. Segmentation of cardiac magnetic resonance cine images of single ventricle: including or excluding the accessorial ventricle?

    PubMed

    Secchi, Francesco; Resta, Elda Chiara; Di Leo, Giovanni; Petrini, Marcello; Messina, Carmelo; Carminati, Mario; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    Our aim was to compare two different approaches for segmentation of single ventricle (SV) on cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) cine images. We retrospectively studied 30 consecutive patients (23 males; aged 27 ± 10 years) with a treated SV who underwent 1.5-T CMR using ECG-triggered axial true-FISP, HASTE and cine true-FISP sequences. We classified patients for visceroatrial situs, cardiac axis orientation, ventricular loop, morphology of SV and position of great arteries. One experienced reader segmented cine images twice, firstly including only the systemic ventricle, secondly including both systemic and accessorial ventricles. Ejection fraction (EF), indexed end-diastolic volume (EDVI), end-systolic volume (ESVI), and stroke volume (SVI) were calculated. Data were presented as medians and interquartile intervals. Four patients presented dextrocardia and one patient mesocardia. Two had situs ambiguus with asplenia and one situs ambiguus with polisplenia. Four patients showed right morphology of the SV and three levo-ventricle loop. We found 14 levo-trasposition of great arteries (TGA), 4 levo-malposition of great arteries (MGA), four dextro-MGA, two dextro-TGA, and one inverted vessel position. When segmenting only the systemic ventricle, EDVI (mL/m2) was 65 (50-91), when segmenting both ventricles 76 (58-110) (P < 0.001); ESVI (mL/m2) was 32 (24-45) and 45 (33-60), respectively (P < 0.001); EF (%) was 49 (43-57) and 33 (24-47), respectively (P = 0.003); SVI (mL/m2) was 34 (17-48) and 33 (24-47) (P = 0.070). The inclusion of the accessorial ventricle in the segmentation of SV produce a biased lower EF showing a very low contribution to the pump function. PMID:24801178

  5. Visual saliency-based active learning for prostate magnetic resonance imaging segmentation.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Dwarikanath; Buhmann, Joachim M

    2016-01-01

    We propose an active learning (AL) approach for prostate segmentation from magnetic resonance images. Our label query strategy is inspired from the principles of visual saliency that have similar considerations for choosing the most salient region. These similarities are encoded in a graph using classification maps and low-level features. Random walks are used to identify the most informative node, which is equivalent to the label query sample in AL. To reduce computation time, a volume of interest (VOI) is identified and all subsequent analysis, such as probability map generation using semisupervised random forest classifiers and label query, is restricted to this VOI. The negative log-likelihood of the probability maps serves as the penalty cost in a second-order Markov random field cost function, which is optimized using graph cuts for prostate segmentation. Experimental results on the Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention (MICCAI) 2012 prostate segmentation challenge show the superior performance of our approach to conventional methods using fully supervised learning. PMID:26958579

  6. Evaluation of multiatlas label fusion for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging orbital segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Swetasudha; Asman, Andrew J.; Khare, Shweta P.; Thompson, Lindsey; Mawn, Louise A.; Smith, Seth A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Multiatlas methods have been successful for brain segmentation, but their application to smaller anatomies remains relatively unexplored. We evaluate seven statistical and voting-based label fusion algorithms (and six additional variants) to segment the optic nerves, eye globes, and chiasm. For nonlocal simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), we evaluate different intensity similarity measures (including mean square difference, locally normalized cross-correlation, and a hybrid approach). Each algorithm is evaluated in terms of the Dice overlap and symmetric surface distance metrics. Finally, we evaluate refinement of label fusion results using a learning-based correction method for consistent bias correction and Markov random field regularization. The multiatlas labeling pipelines were evaluated on a cohort of 35 subjects including both healthy controls and patients. Across all three structures, nonlocal spatial STAPLE (NLSS) with a mixed weighting type provided the most consistent results; for the optic nerve NLSS resulted in a median Dice similarity coefficient of 0.81, mean surface distance of 0.41 mm, and Hausdorff distance 2.18 mm for the optic nerves. Joint label fusion resulted in slightly superior median performance for the optic nerves (0.82, 0.39 mm, and 2.15 mm), but slightly worse on the globes. The fully automated multiatlas labeling approach provides robust segmentations of orbital structures on magnetic resonance imaging even in patients for whom significant atrophy (optic nerve head drusen) or inflammation (multiple sclerosis) is present. PMID:25558466

  7. Fuzzy neural-network-based segmentation of multispectral magnetic-resonance brain images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blonda, Palma N.; Bennardo, A.; Satalino, Giuseppe; Pasquariello, Guido; De Blasi, Roberto A.; Milella, D.

    1996-06-01

    This study investigates the applicability of a multimodular neuro-fuzzy system in the multispectral analysis of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the human brain. The system consists of two components: an unsupervised neural module for image segmentation in tissue regions and a supervised module for tissue labeling. The former is the fuzzy Kohonen clustering network (FKCN). The latter is a feed-forward network based on the back-propagation learning rule. The results obtained with the FKCN have been compared with those extracted by a self organizing map (SOM). The system has been used to analyze the multispectral MR brain images of a healthy volunteer. The data set included the proton density (PD), T2, T1 weighted spin-echo (SE) bands and a new T1- weighted three dimensional sequence, i.e. the magnetization- prepared rapid gradient echo (MP-RAGE). One of the main objectives of this study has been to evaluate the usefulness of brain imaging with the MP-RAGE sequence in view of automatic tissue classification. To this purpose, a quantitative evaluation has been provided on the base of some labeled areas selected interactively by a neuro- radiologist from the input raw images. Quantitative results seem to indicate that the MP-RAGE sequence may provide higher tissue separability than the T1-weighted SE sequence.

  8. Identification of breast contour for nipple segmentation in breast magnetic resonance images

    SciTech Connect

    Gwo, Chih-Ying; Gwo, Allen; Wei, Chia-Hung; Huang, Pai Jung

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a method to simulate the breast contour and segment the nipple in breast magnetic resonance images. Methods: This study first identifies the chest wall and removes the chest part from the breast MR images. Subsequently, the cleavage and its motion artifacts are removed, distinguishing the separate breasts, where the edge points are sampled for curve fitting. Next, a region growing method is applied to find the potential nipple region. Finally, the potential nipple region above the simulated curve can be removed in order to retain the original smooth contour. Results: The simulation methods can achieve the least root mean square error (RMSE) for certain cases. The proposed YBnd and (Dmin+Dmax)/2 methods are significant due toP = 0.000. The breast contour curve detected by the two proposed methods is closer than that determined by the edge detection method. The (Dmin+Dmax)/2 method can achieve the lowest RMSE of 1.1029 on average, while the edge detection method results in the highest RMSE of 6.5655. This is only slighter better than the comparison methods, which implies that the performance of these methods depends upon the conditions of the cases themselves. Under this method, the maximal Dice coefficient is 0.881, and the centroid difference is 0.36 pixels. Conclusions: The contributions of this study are twofold. First, a method was proposed to identify and segment the nipple in breast MR images. Second, a curve-fitting method was used to simulate the breast contour, allowing the breast to retain its original smooth shape.

  9. Improve the image quality of orbital 3 T diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging with readout-segmented echo-planar imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Quan; Liu, Jun; Hu, Hao; Su, Guo-Yi; Zhang, Yu-Dong; Shi, Hai-Bin; Wu, Fei-Yun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study is to compare the image quality of readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (rs-EPI) and that of standard single-shot EPI (ss-EPI) in orbital 3 T diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in healthy subjects. Forty-two volunteers underwent two sets of orbital DW imaging scan at a 3 T MR unit, and image quality was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively. As a result, we found that rs-EPI could provide better image quality than standard ss-EPI, while no significant difference was found on the apparent diffusion coefficient between the two sets of DW images. PMID:27317226

  10. A review of heart chamber segmentation for structural and functional analysis using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Peng, Peng; Lekadir, Karim; Gooya, Ali; Shao, Ling; Petersen, Steffen E; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has become a key imaging modality in clinical cardiology practice due to its unique capabilities for non-invasive imaging of the cardiac chambers and great vessels. A wide range of CMR sequences have been developed to assess various aspects of cardiac structure and function, and significant advances have also been made in terms of imaging quality and acquisition times. A lot of research has been dedicated to the development of global and regional quantitative CMR indices that help the distinction between health and pathology. The goal of this review paper is to discuss the structural and functional CMR indices that have been proposed thus far for clinical assessment of the cardiac chambers. We include indices definitions, the requirements for the calculations, exemplar applications in cardiovascular diseases, and the corresponding normal ranges. Furthermore, we review the most recent state-of-the art techniques for the automatic segmentation of the cardiac boundaries, which are necessary for the calculation of the CMR indices. Finally, we provide a detailed discussion of the existing literature and of the future challenges that need to be addressed to enable a more robust and comprehensive assessment of the cardiac chambers in clinical practice. PMID:26811173

  11. Segmentation of Brain Tissues from Magnetic Resonance Images Using Adaptively Regularized Kernel-Based Fuzzy C-Means Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changmiao; Jia, Fucang; Wu, Jianhuang; Li, Guanglin

    2015-01-01

    An adaptively regularized kernel-based fuzzy C-means clustering framework is proposed for segmentation of brain magnetic resonance images. The framework can be in the form of three algorithms for the local average grayscale being replaced by the grayscale of the average filter, median filter, and devised weighted images, respectively. The algorithms employ the heterogeneity of grayscales in the neighborhood and exploit this measure for local contextual information and replace the standard Euclidean distance with Gaussian radial basis kernel functions. The main advantages are adaptiveness to local context, enhanced robustness to preserve image details, independence of clustering parameters, and decreased computational costs. The algorithms have been validated against both synthetic and clinical magnetic resonance images with different types and levels of noises and compared with 6 recent soft clustering algorithms. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithms are superior in preserving image details and segmentation accuracy while maintaining a low computational complexity. PMID:26793269

  12. Segmentation of Brain Tissues from Magnetic Resonance Images Using Adaptively Regularized Kernel-Based Fuzzy C-Means Clustering.

    PubMed

    Elazab, Ahmed; Wang, Changmiao; Jia, Fucang; Wu, Jianhuang; Li, Guanglin; Hu, Qingmao

    2015-01-01

    An adaptively regularized kernel-based fuzzy C-means clustering framework is proposed for segmentation of brain magnetic resonance images. The framework can be in the form of three algorithms for the local average grayscale being replaced by the grayscale of the average filter, median filter, and devised weighted images, respectively. The algorithms employ the heterogeneity of grayscales in the neighborhood and exploit this measure for local contextual information and replace the standard Euclidean distance with Gaussian radial basis kernel functions. The main advantages are adaptiveness to local context, enhanced robustness to preserve image details, independence of clustering parameters, and decreased computational costs. The algorithms have been validated against both synthetic and clinical magnetic resonance images with different types and levels of noises and compared with 6 recent soft clustering algorithms. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithms are superior in preserving image details and segmentation accuracy while maintaining a low computational complexity. PMID:26793269

  13. Using magnetic resonance imaging to identify the lumbosacral segment in children.

    PubMed

    Milicić, Gordana; Krolo, Ivan; Vrdoljak, Javor; Marotti, Miljenko; Roić, Goran; Hat, Josip

    2006-03-01

    Identification of the lumbosacral (L-S) segment on magnetic resonance (MR) images is important for appropriate treatment of disease in the lumbosacral (L-S) area. In the study, data obtained from plain A-P radiographs of the L-S spine and sagittal MR imaging scans (sagittal T1- and T2-weighted sequences) of the L-S spine and sacrum with the coccygeal bone, are analyzed. Twenty-six children aged 10 to 14 years were examined for back pain. On the standard A-P radiographs of the L-S spine, a L-S transitional vertebra as classified according to the method of Castellvi et al. was found in 17 subjects. The problem arose as to whether this was lumbalisation or sacralisation, and how to determine which vertebra was L5 wich S1. On the sagittal MR imaging studies the same question applied. A need emerged for a simple method which would identify the L-S segment on the sagittal MR imaging studies of the L-S spine in children so that in case of a tumor, inflammation, spondilolystesis, or protrusion of a disc, the level in the L-S spine where the problem is localized can be accurately identified. To this objective we selected the method using detection of the S1 vertebra. This involved that, in addition to the sagittal MR imaging scans of the L-S spine, sagittal images of the sacrum and coccygeal bone be also obtained. on the T2-weighted sequence, the sacrum can be clearly distinquished from the coccygeal bone. By counting from the S5 up, the S1 vertebra can be accurately identified. Determination of the S1 vertebra enables detection of the L5 vertebra and, in turn, of all other lumbar vertebrae. In patients in whom a T2-weighted MR studies were done S1 could be precisely determined and so could the L5 vertebra. In this process, whether the patient had a transitional vertebra or whether there was lumbarisation or sacralisation was irrelevant. PMID:16617576

  14. Automated medical image segmentation techniques

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neeraj; Aggarwal, Lalit M.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate segmentation of medical images is a key step in contouring during radiotherapy planning. Computed topography (CT) and Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are the most widely used radiographic techniques in diagnosis, clinical studies and treatment planning. This review provides details of automated segmentation methods, specifically discussed in the context of CT and MR images. The motive is to discuss the problems encountered in segmentation of CT and MR images, and the relative merits and limitations of methods currently available for segmentation of medical images. PMID:20177565

  15. Automatic Segmentation of Pelvic Structures From Magnetic Resonance Images for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquier, David . E-mail: d-pasquier@o-lambret.fr; Lacornerie, Thomas; Vermandel, Maximilien; Rousseau, Jean; Lartigau, Eric; Betrouni, Nacim

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: Target-volume and organ-at-risk delineation is a time-consuming task in radiotherapy planning. The development of automated segmentation tools remains problematic, because of pelvic organ shape variability. We evaluate a three-dimensional (3D), deformable-model approach and a seeded region-growing algorithm for automatic delineation of the prostate and organs-at-risk on magnetic resonance images. Methods and Materials: Manual and automatic delineation were compared in 24 patients using a sagittal T2-weighted (T2-w) turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence and an axial T1-weighted (T1-w) 3D fast-field echo (FFE) or TSE sequence. For automatic prostate delineation, an organ model-based method was used. Prostates without seminal vesicles were delineated as the clinical target volume (CTV). For automatic bladder and rectum delineation, a seeded region-growing method was used. Manual contouring was considered the reference method. The following parameters were measured: volume ratio (Vr) (automatic/manual), volume overlap (Vo) (ratio of the volume of intersection to the volume of union; optimal value = 1), and correctly delineated volume (Vc) (percent ratio of the volume of intersection to the manually defined volume; optimal value 100). Results: For the CTV, the Vr, Vo, and Vc were 1.13 ({+-}0.1 SD), 0.78 ({+-}0.05 SD), and 94.75 ({+-}3.3 SD), respectively. For the rectum, the Vr, Vo, and Vc were 0.97 ({+-}0.1 SD), 0.78 ({+-}0.06 SD), and 86.52 ({+-}5 SD), respectively. For the bladder, the Vr, Vo, and Vc were 0.95 ({+-}0.03 SD), 0.88 ({+-}0.03 SD), and 91.29 ({+-}3.1 SD), respectively. Conclusions: Our results show that the organ-model method is robust, and results in reproducible prostate segmentation with minor interactive corrections. For automatic bladder and rectum delineation, magnetic resonance imaging soft-tissue contrast enables the use of region-growing methods.

  16. Feedforward and recurrent processing in scene segmentation: electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Scholte, H Steven; Jolij, Jacob; Fahrenfort, Johannes J; Lamme, Victor A F

    2008-11-01

    In texture segregation, an example of scene segmentation, we can discern two different processes: texture boundary detection and subsequent surface segregation [Lamme, V. A. F., Rodriguez-Rodriguez, V., & Spekreijse, H. Separate processing dynamics for texture elements, boundaries and surfaces in primary visual cortex of the macaque monkey. Cerebral Cortex, 9, 406-413, 1999]. Neural correlates of texture boundary detection have been found in monkey V1 [Sillito, A. M., Grieve, K. L., Jones, H. E., Cudeiro, J., & Davis, J. Visual cortical mechanisms detecting focal orientation discontinuities. Nature, 378, 492-496, 1995; Grosof, D. H., Shapley, R. M., & Hawken, M. J. Macaque-V1 neurons can signal illusory contours. Nature, 365, 550-552, 1993], but whether surface segregation occurs in monkey V1 [Rossi, A. F., Desimone, R., & Ungerleider, L. G. Contextual modulation in primary visual cortex of macaques. Journal of Neuroscience, 21, 1698-1709, 2001; Lamme, V. A. F. The neurophysiology of figure ground segregation in primary visual-cortex. Journal of Neuroscience, 15, 1605-1615, 1995], and whether boundary detection or surface segregation signals can also be measured in human V1, is more controversial [Kastner, S., De Weerd, P., & Ungerleider, L. G. Texture segregation in the human visual cortex: A functional MRI study. Journal of Neurophysiology, 83, 2453-2457, 2000]. Here we present electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging data that have been recorded with a paradigm that makes it possible to differentiate between boundary detection and scene segmentation in humans. In this way, we were able to show with EEG that neural correlates of texture boundary detection are first present in the early visual cortex around 92 msec and then spread toward the parietal and temporal lobes. Correlates of surface segregation first appear in temporal areas (around 112 msec) and from there appear to spread to parietal, and back to occipital areas. After 208

  17. A comparison of neural network and fuzzy clustering techniques in segmenting magnetic resonance images of the brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Lawrence O.; Bensaid, Amine M.; Clarke, Laurence P.; Velthuizen, Robert P.; Silbiger, Martin S.; Bezdek, James C.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) brain section images are segmented and then synthetically colored to give visual representations of the original data with three approaches: the literal and approximate fuzzy c-means unsupervised clustering algorithms and a supervised computational neural network, a dynamic multilayered perception trained with the cascade correlation learning algorithm. Initial clinical results are presented on both normal volunteers and selected patients with brain tumors surrounded by edema. Supervised and unsupervised segmentation techniques provide broadly similar results. Unsupervised fuzzy algorithms were visually observed to show better segmentation when compared with raw image data for volunteer studies. However, for a more complex segmentation problem with tumor/edema or cerebrospinal fluid boundary, where the tissues have similar MR relaxation behavior, inconsistency in rating among experts was observed.

  18. Patellar segmentation from 3D magnetic resonance images using guided recursive ray-tracing for edge pattern detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ruida; Jackson, Jennifer N.; McCreedy, Evan S.; Gandler, William; Eijkenboom, J. J. F. A.; van Middelkoop, M.; McAuliffe, Matthew J.; Sheehan, Frances T.

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents an automatic segmentation methodology for the patellar bone, based on 3D gradient recalled echo and gradient recalled echo with fat suppression magnetic resonance images. Constricted search space outlines are incorporated into recursive ray-tracing to segment the outer cortical bone. A statistical analysis based on the dependence of information in adjacent slices is used to limit the search in each image to between an outer and inner search region. A section based recursive ray-tracing mechanism is used to skip inner noise regions and detect the edge boundary. The proposed method achieves higher segmentation accuracy (0.23mm) than the current state-of-the-art methods with the average dice similarity coefficient of 96.0% (SD 1.3%) agreement between the auto-segmentation and ground truth surfaces.

  19. Validation of partial tissue segmentation of single-channel magnetic resonance images of the brain.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, T J; Frank, R J; Szumski, N R; Brown, C K; Damasio, H

    2000-12-01

    We describe and evaluate a practical, automated algorithm based on local statistical mixture modeling for segmenting single-channel, T1-weighted volumetric magnetic resonance images of the brain into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid. We employed a stereological sampling method to assess, prospectively, the performance of the method with respect to human experts on 10 normal T1-weighted brain scans acquired with a three-dimensional gradient echo pulse sequence. The overall kappa statistic for the concordance of the algorithm with the human experts was 0.806, while that among raters, excluding the algorithm, was 0.802. The algorithm had better agreement with the modal expert decision (kappa = 0.878). The algorithm could not be distinguished from the experts by this measure. We also validated the algorithm on a simulated MR scan of a digital brain phantom with known tissue composition. Global gray matter and white matter errors were 1% and <1%, respectively, and correlation coefficients with the underlying tissue model were 0.95 for gray matter, 0.98 for white matter, and 0.95 for cerebrospinal fluid. In both approaches to validation, we evaluated both local and global performance of the algorithm. Human experts generated slightly higher global gray matter proportion estimates on the test brain scans relative to the algorithm (3.7%) and on the simulated MR scan relative to the true tissue model (4.4%). The algorithm underestimated gray in some subcortical nuclei which contain admixed gray and white matter. We demonstrate the reliability of the method on individual 1 NEX data sets of the test subjects, and its insensitivity to the precise values of initial model parameters. The output of this algorithm is suitable for quantifying cerebral cortical tissue, using a commonly performed commercial pulse sequence. PMID:11112396

  20. 3D segmentation of annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus from T2-weighted magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Pozo, Jose M.; Eltes, Peter E.; Del Rio, Luis; Lazary, Aron; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2014-12-01

    Computational medicine aims at employing personalised computational models in diagnosis and treatment planning. The use of such models to help physicians in finding the best treatment for low back pain (LBP) is becoming popular. One of the challenges of creating such models is to derive patient-specific anatomical and tissue models of the lumbar intervertebral discs (IVDs), as a prior step. This article presents a segmentation scheme that obtains accurate results irrespective of the degree of IVD degeneration, including pathological discs with protrusion or herniation. The segmentation algorithm, employing a novel feature selector, iteratively deforms an initial shape, which is projected into a statistical shape model space at first and then, into a B-Spline space to improve accuracy. The method was tested on a MR dataset of 59 patients suffering from LBP. The images follow a standard T2-weighted protocol in coronal and sagittal acquisitions. These two image volumes were fused in order to overcome large inter-slice spacing. The agreement between expert-delineated structures, used here as gold-standard, and our automatic segmentation was evaluated using Dice Similarity Index and surface-to-surface distances, obtaining a mean error of 0.68 mm in the annulus segmentation and 1.88 mm in the nucleus, which are the best results with respect to the image resolution in the current literature.

  1. Spinal Cord Segmentation by One Dimensional Normalized Template Matching: A Novel, Quantitative Technique to Analyze Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data.

    PubMed

    Cadotte, Adam; Cadotte, David W; Livne, Micha; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Fleet, David; Mikulis, David; Fehlings, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord segmentation is a developing area of research intended to aid the processing and interpretation of advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For example, high resolution three-dimensional volumes can be segmented to provide a measurement of spinal cord atrophy. Spinal cord segmentation is difficult due to the variety of MRI contrasts and the variation in human anatomy. In this study we propose a new method of spinal cord segmentation based on one-dimensional template matching and provide several metrics that can be used to compare with other segmentation methods. A set of ground-truth data from 10 subjects was manually-segmented by two different raters. These ground truth data formed the basis of the segmentation algorithm. A user was required to manually initialize the spinal cord center-line on new images, taking less than one minute. Template matching was used to segment the new cord and a refined center line was calculated based on multiple centroids within the segmentation. Arc distances down the spinal cord and cross-sectional areas were calculated. Inter-rater validation was performed by comparing two manual raters (n = 10). Semi-automatic validation was performed by comparing the two manual raters to the semi-automatic method (n = 10). Comparing the semi-automatic method to one of the raters yielded a Dice coefficient of 0.91 +/- 0.02 for ten subjects, a mean distance between spinal cord center lines of 0.32 +/- 0.08 mm, and a Hausdorff distance of 1.82 +/- 0.33 mm. The absolute variation in cross-sectional area was comparable for the semi-automatic method versus manual segmentation when compared to inter-rater manual segmentation. The results demonstrate that this novel segmentation method performs as well as a manual rater for most segmentation metrics. It offers a new approach to study spinal cord disease and to quantitatively track changes within the spinal cord in an individual case and across cohorts of subjects. PMID:26445367

  2. Diffusion maps clustering for magnetic resonance q-ball imaging segmentation.

    PubMed

    Wassermann, Demian; Descoteaux, Maxime; Deriche, Rachid

    2008-01-01

    White matter fiber clustering aims to get insight about anatomical structures in order to generate atlases, perform clear visualizations, and compute statistics across subjects, all important and current neuroimaging problems. In this work, we present a diffusion maps clustering method applied to diffusion MRI in order to segment complex white matter fiber bundles. It is well known that diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is restricted in complex fiber regions with crossings and this is why recent high-angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) such as Q-Ball imaging (QBI) has been introduced to overcome these limitations. QBI reconstructs the diffusion orientation distribution function (ODF), a spherical function that has its maxima agreeing with the underlying fiber populations. In this paper, we use a spherical harmonic ODF representation as input to the diffusion maps clustering method. We first show the advantage of using diffusion maps clustering over classical methods such as N-Cuts and Laplacian eigenmaps. In particular, our ODF diffusion maps requires a smaller number of hypothesis from the input data, reduces the number of artifacts in the segmentation, and automatically exhibits the number of clusters segmenting the Q-Ball image by using an adaptive scale-space parameter. We also show that our ODF diffusion maps clustering can reproduce published results using the diffusion tensor (DT) clustering with N-Cuts on simple synthetic images without crossings. On more complex data with crossings, we show that our ODF-based method succeeds to separate fiber bundles and crossing regions whereas the DT-based methods generate artifacts and exhibit wrong number of clusters. Finally, we show results on a real-brain dataset where we segment well-known fiber bundles. PMID:18317506

  3. Automatic bone segmentation and bone-cartilage interface extraction for the shoulder joint from magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhengyi; Fripp, Jurgen; Chandra, Shekhar S.; Neubert, Aleš; Xia, Ying; Strudwick, Mark; Paproki, Anthony; Engstrom, Craig; Crozier, Stuart

    2015-02-01

    We present a statistical shape model approach for automated segmentation of the proximal humerus and scapula with subsequent bone-cartilage interface (BCI) extraction from 3D magnetic resonance (MR) images of the shoulder region. Manual and automated bone segmentations from shoulder MR examinations from 25 healthy subjects acquired using steady-state free precession sequences were compared with the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). The mean DSC scores between the manual and automated segmentations of the humerus and scapula bone volumes surrounding the BCI region were 0.926  ±  0.050 and 0.837  ±  0.059, respectively. The mean DSC values obtained for BCI extraction were 0.806  ±  0.133 for the humerus and 0.795  ±  0.117 for the scapula. The current model-based approach successfully provided automated bone segmentation and BCI extraction from MR images of the shoulder. In future work, this framework appears to provide a promising avenue for automated segmentation and quantitative analysis of cartilage in the glenohumeral joint.

  4. Segmentation-based method incorporating fractional volume analysis for quantification of brain atrophy on magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Deming; Doddrell, David M.

    2001-07-01

    Partial volume effect is a major problem in brain tissue segmentation on digital images such as magnetic resonance (MR) images. In this paper, special attention has been paid to partial volume effect when developing a method for quantifying brain atrophy. Specifically, partial volume effect is minimized in the process of parameter estimation prior to segmentation by identifying and excluding those voxels with possible partial volume effect. A quantitative measure for partial volume effect was also introduced through developing a model that calculates fractional volumes for voxels with mixtures of two different tissues. For quantifying cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes, fractional volumes are calculated for two classes of mixture involving gray matter and CSF, and white matter and CSF. Tissue segmentation is carried out using 1D and 2D thresholding techniques after images are intensity- corrected. Threshold values are estimated using the minimum error method. Morphological processing and region identification analysis are used extensively in the algorithm. As an application, the method was employed for evaluating rates of brain atrophy based on serially acquired structural brain MR images. Consistent and accurate rates of brain atrophy have been obtained for patients with Alzheimer's disease as well as for elderly subjects due to normal aging process.

  5. Automatic plaque characterization and vessel wall segmentation in magnetic resonance images of atherosclerotic carotid arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adame, Isabel M.; van der Geest, Rob J.; Wasserman, Bruce A.; Mohamed, Mona; Reiber, Johan H. C.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.

    2004-05-01

    Composition and structure of atherosclerotic plaque is a primary focus of cardiovascular research. In vivo MRI provides a meanse to non-invasively image and assess the morphological features of athersclerotic and normal human carotid arteries. To quantitatively assess the vulnerability and the type of plaque, the contours of the lumen, outer boundary of the vessel wall and plaque components, need to be traced. To achieve this goal, we have developed an automated contou detection technique, which consists of three consecutive steps: firstly, the outer boundary of the vessel wall is detected by means of an ellipse-fitting procedure in order to obtain smoothed shapes; secondly, the lumen is segnented using fuzzy clustering. Thre region to be classified is that within the outer vessel wall boundary obtained from the previous step; finally, for plaque detection we follow the same approach as for lumen segmentation: fuzzy clustering. However, plaque is more difficult to segment, as the pixel gray value can differ considerably from one region to another, even when it corresponds to the same type of tissue. That makes further processing necessary. All these three steps might be carried out combining information from different sequences (PD-, T2-, T1-weighted images, pre- and post-contrast), to improve the contour detection. The algorithm has been validated in vivo on 58 high-resolution PD and T1 weighted MR images (19 patients). The results demonstrate excellent correspondence between automatic and manual area measurements: lumen (r=0.94), outer (r=0.92), and acceptable for fibrous cap thickness (r=0.76).

  6. Automatic segmentation of magnetic resonance images of the trans-femoral residual limb.

    PubMed

    Douglas, T S; Solomonidis, S E; Lee, V S; Spence, W D; Sandham, W A; Hadley, D M

    1998-12-01

    An automatic algorithm for the extraction of the skin and bone boundaries from axial magnetic resonance images of the residual limb of trans-femoral amputees is presented. The method makes use of K-means clustering and mathematical morphology. Statistical analysis of the results indicates that the computer-generated boundaries compare favourably to those drawn by human observers. The boundaries may be used in biomechanical modelling of the interaction between the residual limb and the prosthetic socket. The limb/socket interface determines the quality of prosthetic fit, therefore knowledge of this interface is important for the improvement of socket design in order to achieve patient comfort and mobility. PMID:10223645

  7. A novel segmentation method to identify left ventricular infarction in short-axis composite strain-encoded magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algohary, Ahmad O.; Metwally, Muhammad K.; El-Bialy, Ahmed M.; Kandil, Ahmed H.; Osman, Nael F.

    2011-03-01

    Composite Strain Encoding (CSENC) is a new Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technique for simultaneously acquiring cardiac functional and viability images. It combines the use of Delayed Enhancement (DE) and the Strain Encoding (SENC) imaging techniques to identify the infracted (dead) tissue and to image the myocardial deformation inside the heart muscle. In this work, a new unsupervised segmentation method is proposed to identify infarcted left ventricular tissue in the images provided by CSENC MRI. The proposed method is based on the sequential application of Bayesian classifier, Otsu's thresholding, morphological opening, radial sweep boundary tracing and the fuzzy C-means (FCM) clustering algorithm. This method is tested on images of twelve patients with and without myocardial infarction (MI) and on simulated heart images with various levels of superimposed noise. The resulting clustered images are compared with those marked up by an expert cardiologist who assisted in validating results coming from the proposed method. Infarcted myocardium is correctly identified using the proposed method with high levels of accuracy and precision.

  8. Segmentation of brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid in multispectral magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Lundervold, A; Storvik, G

    1995-01-01

    Presents a new method to segment brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid spaces automatically in routine axial spin echo multispectral MR images. The algorithm simultaneously incorporates information about anatomical boundaries (shape) and tissue signature (grey scale) using a priori knowledge. The head and brain are divided into four regions and seven different tissue types. Each tissue type c is modeled by a multivariate Gaussian distribution N(mu(c),Sigma(c)). Each region is associated with a finite mixture density corresponding to its constituent tissue types. Initial estimates of tissue parameters {mu(c),Sigma(c )}(c=1,...,7) are obtained from k-means clustering of a single slice used for training. The first algorithmic step uses the EM-algorithm for adjusting the initial tissue parameter estimates to the MR data of new patients. The second step uses a recently developed model of dynamic contours to detect three simply closed nonintersecting curves in the plane, constituting the arachnoid/dura mater boundary of the brain, the border between the subarachnoid space and brain parenchyma, and the inner border of the parenchyma toward the lateral ventricles. The model, which is formulated by energy functions in a Bayesian framework, incorporates a priori knowledge, smoothness constraints, and updated tissue type parameters. Satisfactory maximum a posteriori probability estimates of the closed contour curves defined by the model were found using simulated annealing. PMID:18215837

  9. Color image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrae, Kimberley A.; Ruck, Dennis W.; Rogers, Steven K.; Oxley, Mark E.

    1994-03-01

    The most difficult stage of automated target recognition is segmentation. Current segmentation problems include faces and tactical targets; previous efforts to segment these objects have used intensity and motion cues. This paper develops a color preprocessing scheme to be used with the other segmentation techniques. A neural network is trained to identify the color of a desired object, eliminating all but that color from the scene. Gabor correlations and 2D wavelet transformations will be performed on stationary images; and 3D wavelet transforms on multispectral data will incorporate color and motion detection into the machine visual system. The paper will demonstrate that color and motion cues can enhance a computer segmentation system. Results from segmenting faces both from the AFIT data base and from video taped television are presented; results from tactical targets such as tanks and airplanes are also given. Color preprocessing is shown to greatly improve the segmentation in most cases.

  10. High-resolution In Vivo Manual Segmentation Protocol for Human Hippocampal Subfields Using 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Winterburn, Julie; Pruessner, Jens C; Sofia, Chavez; Schira, Mark M; Lobaugh, Nancy J; Voineskos, Aristotle N; Chakravarty, M Mallar

    2015-01-01

    The human hippocampus has been broadly studied in the context of memory and normal brain function and its role in different neuropsychiatric disorders has been heavily studied. While many imaging studies treat the hippocampus as a single unitary neuroanatomical structure, it is, in fact, composed of several subfields that have a complex three-dimensional geometry. As such, it is known that these subfields perform specialized functions and are differentially affected through the course of different disease states. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be used as a powerful tool to interrogate the morphology of the hippocampus and its subfields. Many groups use advanced imaging software and hardware (>3T) to image the subfields; however this type of technology may not be readily available in most research and clinical imaging centers. To address this need, this manuscript provides a detailed step-by-step protocol for segmenting the full anterior-posterior length of the hippocampus and its subfields: cornu ammonis (CA) 1, CA2/CA3, CA4/dentate gyrus (DG), strata radiatum/lacunosum/moleculare (SR/SL/SM), and subiculum. This protocol has been applied to five subjects (3F, 2M; age 29-57, avg. 37). Protocol reliability is assessed by resegmenting either the right or left hippocampus of each subject and computing the overlap using the Dice's kappa metric. Mean Dice's kappa (range) across the five subjects are: whole hippocampus, 0.91 (0.90-0.92); CA1, 0.78 (0.77-0.79); CA2/CA3, 0.64 (0.56-0.73); CA4/dentate gyrus, 0.83 (0.81-0.85); strata radiatum/lacunosum/moleculare, 0.71 (0.68-0.73); and subiculum 0.75 (0.72-0.78). The segmentation protocol presented here provides other laboratories with a reliable method to study the hippocampus and hippocampal subfields in vivo using commonly available MR tools. PMID:26575133

  11. Fusing Markov random fields with anatomical knowledge and shape-based analysis to segment multiple sclerosis white matter lesions in magnetic resonance images of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlZubi, Stephan; Toennies, Klaus D.; Bodammer, N.; Hinrichs, Herman

    2002-05-01

    This paper proposes an image analysis system to segment multiple sclerosis lesions of magnetic resonance (MR) brain volumes consisting of 3 mm thick slices using three channels (images showing T1-, T2- and PD -weighted contrast). The method uses the statistical model of Markov Random Fields (MRF) both at low and high levels. The neighborhood system used in this MRF is defined in three types: (1) Voxel to voxel: a low-level heterogeneous neighborhood system is used to restore noisy images. (2) Voxel to segment: a fuzzy atlas, which indicates the probability distribution of each tissue type in the brain, is registered elastically with the MRF. It is used by the MRF as a-priori knowledge to correct miss-classified voxels. (3) Segment to segment: Remaining lesion candidates are processed by a feature based classifier that looks at unary and neighborhood information to eliminate more false positives. An expert's manual segmentation was compared with the algorithm.

  12. Image segmentation using fuzzy LVQ clustering networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsao, Eric Chen-Kuo; Bezdek, James C.; Pal, Nikhil R.

    1992-01-01

    In this note we formulate image segmentation as a clustering problem. Feature vectors extracted from a raw image are clustered into subregions, thereby segmenting the image. A fuzzy generalization of a Kohonen learning vector quantization (LVQ) which integrates the Fuzzy c-Means (FCM) model with the learning rate and updating strategies of the LVQ is used for this task. This network, which segments images in an unsupervised manner, is thus related to the FCM optimization problem. Numerical examples on photographic and magnetic resonance images are given to illustrate this approach to image segmentation.

  13. Image segmentation survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haralick, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    The methodologies and capabilities of image segmentation techniques are reviewed. Single linkage schemes, hybrid linkage schemes, centroid linkage schemes, histogram mode seeking, spatial clustering, and split and merge schemes are addressed.

  14. Segmentation of SAR images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, Ronald

    1989-01-01

    The statistical characteristics of image speckle are reviewed. Existing segmentation techniques that have been used for speckle filtering, edge detection, and texture extraction are sumamrized. The relative effectiveness of each technique is briefly discussed.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging on disc degeneration changes after implantation of an interspinous spacer and fusion of the adjacent segment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaokang; Liu, Yingjie; Lian, Xiaofeng; Xu, Jianguang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the changes of the lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after the implantation of interspinous device and the fusion of the adjacent segment. A total of 62 consecutive patients suffering L5/S1 lumbar disc herniation (LDH) with concomitant disc space narrowing or low-grade instability up to 5 mm translational slip in L5/S1 level were treated with lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) via posterior approach. Thirty-four of these patients (Coflex group) received an additional implantation of the interspinous spacer device (Coflex™) in the level L4/L5, while the rest of 28 patients (fusion group) underwent the fusion surgery alone. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed at pre- and postoperative visits to compare the clinical outcomes and the changes of the L4/L5 vertebral disc degeneration on MRI in both Coflex and fusion group. Although both Coflex and fusion group showed improvements of the clinical outcomes assessed by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) after surgery, patients in Coflex group had more significant amelioration (P < 0.05) compared to fusion group. During follow up, the postoperative disc degeneration changes in Coflex group assessed by the relative signal intensity (RSI) differed from those in fusion group (P < 0.05). The supplemental implantation of Coflex™ after the fusion surgery could delay the disc degeneration of the adjacent segment. PMID:26131210

  16. Scorpion image segmentation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, E.; Aibinu, A. M.; Sadiq, B. A.; Bello Salau, H.; Salami, M. J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Death as a result of scorpion sting has been a major public health problem in developing countries. Despite the high rate of death as a result of scorpion sting, little report exists in literature of intelligent device and system for automatic detection of scorpion. This paper proposed a digital image processing approach based on the floresencing characteristics of Scorpion under Ultra-violet (UV) light for automatic detection and identification of scorpion. The acquired UV-based images undergo pre-processing to equalize uneven illumination and colour space channel separation. The extracted channels are then segmented into two non-overlapping classes. It has been observed that simple thresholding of the green channel of the acquired RGB UV-based image is sufficient for segmenting Scorpion from other background components in the acquired image. Two approaches to image segmentation have also been proposed in this work, namely, the simple average segmentation technique and K-means image segmentation. The proposed algorithm has been tested on over 40 UV scorpion images obtained from different part of the world and results obtained show an average accuracy of 97.7% in correctly classifying the pixel into two non-overlapping clusters. The proposed 1system will eliminate the problem associated with some of the existing manual approaches presently in use for scorpion detection.

  17. Nanofiber-segment ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. E.; Hickman, G. T.; Franson, J. D.; Pittman, T. B.

    2016-08-01

    We describe a fiber ring resonator comprised of a relatively long loop of standard single-mode fiber with a short nanofiber segment. The evanescent mode of the nanofiber segment allows the cavity-enhanced field to interact with atoms in close proximity to the nanofiber surface. We report on an experiment using a warm atomic vapor and low-finesse cavity, and briefly discuss the potential for reaching the strong coupling regime of cavity QED by using trapped atoms and a high-finesse cavity of this kind.

  18. 2D segmentation of intervertebral discs and its degree of degeneration from T2-weighted magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Pozo, José Maria; Lazary, Aron; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2014-03-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a disorder suffered by a large population around the world. A key factor causing this illness is Intervertebral Disc (IVD) degeneration, whose early diagnosis could help in preventing this widespread condition. Clinicians base their diagnosis on visual inspection of 2D slices of Magnetic Resonance (MR) images, which is subject to large interobserver variability. In this work, an automatic classification method is presented, which provides the Pfirrmann degree of degeneration from a mid-sagittal MR slice. The proposed method utilizes Active Contour Models, with a new geometrical energy, to achieve an initial segmentation, which is further improved using fuzzy C-means. Then, IVDs are classified according to their degree of degeneration. This classification is attained by employing Adaboost on five specific features: the mean and the variance of the probability map of the nucleus using two different approaches and the eccentricity of the fitting ellipse to the contour of the IVD. The classification method was evaluated using a cohort of 150 intervertebral discs assessed by three experts, resulting in a mean specificity (93%) and sensitivity (83%) similar to the one provided by every expert with respect to the most voted value. The segmentation accuracy was evaluated using the Dice Similarity Index (DSI) and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of the point-to-contour distance. The mean DSI ± 2 standard deviation was 91:7% ±5:6%, the mean RMSE was 0:82mm and the 95 percentile was 1:36mm. These results were found accurate when compared to the state-of-the-art.

  19. Relaxed image foresting transforms for interactive volume image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmberg, Filip; Nyström, Ingela; Mehnert, Andrew; Engstrom, Craig; Bengtsson, Ewert

    2010-03-01

    The Image Foresting Transform (IFT) is a framework for image partitioning, commonly used for interactive segmentation. Given an image where a subset of the image elements (seed-points) have been assigned correct segmentation labels, the IFT completes the labeling by computing minimal cost paths from all image elements to the seed-points. Each image element is then given the same label as the closest seed-point. Here, we propose the relaxed IFT (RIFT). This modified version of the IFT features an additional parameter to control the smoothness of the segmentation boundary. The RIFT yields more intuitive segmentation results in the presence of noise and weak edges, while maintaining a low computational complexity. We show an application of the method to the refinement of manual segmentations of a thoracolumbar muscle in magnetic resonance images. The performed study shows that the refined segmentations are qualitatively similar to the manual segmentations, while intra-user variations are reduced by more than 50%.

  20. Cooperative processes in image segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L. S.

    1982-01-01

    Research into the role of cooperative, or relaxation, processes in image segmentation is surveyed. Cooperative processes can be employed at several levels of the segmentation process as a preprocessing enhancement step, during supervised or unsupervised pixel classification and, finally, for the interpretation of image segments based on segment properties and relations.

  1. Segmentation of knee cartilage by using a hierarchical active shape model based on multi-resolution transforms in magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, Madeleine; Escalante-Ramirez, Boris

    2013-11-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by the morphological degeneration of cartilage. Efficient segmentation of cartilage is important for cartilage damage diagnosis and to support therapeutic responses. We present a method for knee cartilage segmentation in magnetic resonance images (MRI). Our method incorporates the Hermite Transform to obtain a hierarchical decomposition of contours which describe knee cartilage shapes. Then, we compute a statistical model of the contour of interest from a set of training images. Thereby, our Hierarchical Active Shape Model (HASM) captures a large range of shape variability even from a small group of training samples, improving segmentation accuracy. The method was trained with a training set of 16- MRI of knee and tested with leave-one-out method.

  2. Two and three-dimensional segmentation of hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging of pulmonary gas distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydarian, Mohammadreza; Kirby, Miranda; Wheatley, Andrew; Fenster, Aaron; Parraga, Grace

    2012-03-01

    A semi-automated method for generating hyperpolarized helium-3 (3He) measurements of individual slice (2D) or whole lung (3D) gas distribution was developed. 3He MRI functional images were segmented using two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical K-means clustering of the 3He MRI signal and in addition a seeded region-growing algorithm was employed for segmentation of the 1H MRI thoracic cavity volume. 3He MRI pulmonary function measurements were generated following two-dimensional landmark-based non-rigid registration of the 3He and 1H pulmonary images. We applied this method to MRI of healthy subjects and subjects with chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD). The results of hierarchical K-means 2D and 3D segmentation were compared to an expert observer's manual segmentation results using linear regression, Pearson correlations and the Dice similarity coefficient. 2D hierarchical K-means segmentation of ventilation volume (VV) and ventilation defect volume (VDV) was strongly and significantly correlated with manual measurements (VV: r=0.98, p<.0001 VDV: r=0.97, p<.0001) and mean Dice coefficients were greater than 92% for all subjects. 3D hierarchical K-means segmentation of VV and VDV was also strongly and significantly correlated with manual measurements (VV: r=0.98, p<.0001 VDV: r=0.64, p<.0001) and the mean Dice coefficients were greater than 91% for all subjects. Both 2D and 3D semi-automated segmentation of 3He MRI gas distribution provides a way to generate novel pulmonary function measurements.

  3. Segmentation of stereo terrain images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Debra A.; Privitera, Claudio M.; Blackmon, Theodore T.; Zbinden, Eric; Stark, Lawrence W.

    2000-06-01

    We have studied four approaches to segmentation of images: three automatic ones using image processing algorithms and a fourth approach, human manual segmentation. We were motivated toward helping with an important NASA Mars rover mission task -- replacing laborious manual path planning with automatic navigation of the rover on the Mars terrain. The goal of the automatic segmentations was to identify an obstacle map on the Mars terrain to enable automatic path planning for the rover. The automatic segmentation was first explored with two different segmentation methods: one based on pixel luminance, and the other based on pixel altitude generated through stereo image processing. The third automatic segmentation was achieved by combining these two types of image segmentation. Human manual segmentation of Martian terrain images was used for evaluating the effectiveness of the combined automatic segmentation as well as for determining how different humans segment the same images. Comparisons between two different segmentations, manual or automatic, were measured using a similarity metric, SAB. Based on this metric, the combined automatic segmentation did fairly well in agreeing with the manual segmentation. This was a demonstration of a positive step towards automatically creating the accurate obstacle maps necessary for automatic path planning and rover navigation.

  4. D-Dimer Levels Predict Myocardial Injury in ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young Bin; Lima, Joao A. C.; Guallar, Eliseo; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Hwang, Jin Kyung; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Yang, Jeong Hoon; Hahn, Joo-Yong; Choi, Seung-Hyuk; Lee, Sang-Chol; Lee, Sang Hoon; Gwon, Hyeon-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Elevated D-dimer levels on admission predict prognosis in patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), but the association of D-dimer levels with structural markers of myocardial injury in these patients is unknown. Methods We performed cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging in 208 patients treated with primary PCI for STEMI. CMR was performed a median of 3 days after the index procedure. Of the 208 patients studied, 75 patients had D-dimer levels above the normal range on admission (>0.5 μg/mL; high D-dimer group) while 133 had normal levels (≤0.5 μg/mL; low D-dimer group). The primary outcome was myocardial infarct size assessed by CMR. Secondary outcomes included area at risk (AAR), microvascular obstruction (MVO) area, and myocardial salvage index (MSI). Results In CMR analysis, myocardial infarct size was larger in the high D-dimer group than in the low D-dimer group (22.3% [16.2–30.5] versus 18.8% [10.7–26.7]; p = 0.02). Compared to the low D-dimer group, the high D-dimer group also had a larger AAR (38.1% [31.7–46.9] versus 35.8% [24.2–45.3]; p = 0.04) and a smaller MSI (37.7 [28.2–46.9] versus 47.1 [33.2–57.0]; p = 0.01). In multivariate analysis, high D-dimer levels were significantly associated with larger myocardial infarct (OR 2.59; 95% CI 1.37–4.87; p<0.01) and lower MSI (OR 2.62; 95% CI 1.44–4.78; p<0.01). Conclusions In STEMI patients undergoing primary PCI, high D-dimer levels on admission were associated with a larger myocardial infarct size, a greater extent of AAR, and lower MSI, as assessed by CMR data. Elevated initial D-dimer level may be a marker of advanced myocardial injury in patients treated with primary PCI for STEMI. PMID:27513758

  5. Semi-automatic segmentation and modeling of the cervical spinal cord for volume quantification in multiple sclerosis patients from magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonkova, Pavlina; Evangelou, Iordanis E.; Gallo, Antonio; Cantor, Fredric K.; Ohayon, Joan; McFarland, Henry F.; Bagnato, Francesca

    2008-03-01

    Spinal cord (SC) tissue loss is known to occur in some patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), resulting in SC atrophy. Currently, no measurement tools exist to determine the magnitude of SC atrophy from Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI). We have developed and implemented a novel semi-automatic method for quantifying the cervical SC volume (CSCV) from Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) based on level sets. The image dataset consisted of SC MRI exams obtained at 1.5 Tesla from 12 MS patients (10 relapsing-remitting and 2 secondary progressive) and 12 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers (HVs). 3D high resolution image data were acquired using an IR-FSPGR sequence acquired in the sagittal plane. The mid-sagittal slice (MSS) was automatically located based on the entropy calculation for each of the consecutive sagittal slices. The image data were then pre-processed by 3D anisotropic diffusion filtering for noise reduction and edge enhancement before segmentation with a level set formulation which did not require re-initialization. The developed method was tested against manual segmentation (considered ground truth) and intra-observer and inter-observer variability were evaluated.

  6. Validation and Development of a New Automatic Algorithm for Time-Resolved Segmentation of the Left Ventricle in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tufvesson, Jane; Hedström, Erik; Steding-Ehrenborg, Katarina; Carlsson, Marcus; Arheden, Håkan; Heiberg, Einar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Manual delineation of the left ventricle is clinical standard for quantification of cardiovascular magnetic resonance images despite being time consuming and observer dependent. Previous automatic methods generally do not account for one major contributor to stroke volume, the long-axis motion. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop and validate an automatic algorithm for time-resolved segmentation covering the whole left ventricle, including basal slices affected by long-axis motion. Methods. Ninety subjects imaged with a cine balanced steady state free precession sequence were included in the study (training set n = 40, test set n = 50). Manual delineation was reference standard and second observer analysis was performed in a subset (n = 25). The automatic algorithm uses deformable model with expectation-maximization, followed by automatic removal of papillary muscles and detection of the outflow tract. Results. The mean differences between automatic segmentation and manual delineation were EDV −11 mL, ESV 1 mL, EF −3%, and LVM 4 g in the test set. Conclusions. The automatic LV segmentation algorithm reached accuracy comparable to interobserver for manual delineation, thereby bringing automatic segmentation one step closer to clinical routine. The algorithm and all images with manual delineations are available for benchmarking. PMID:26180818

  7. Automatic Segmentation of the Eye in 3D Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Novel Statistical Shape Model for Treatment Planning of Retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ciller, Carlos; De Zanet, Sandro I.; Rüegsegger, Michael B.; Pica, Alessia; Sznitman, Raphael; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Maeder, Philippe; Munier, Francis L.; Kowal, Jens H.; and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Proper delineation of ocular anatomy in 3-dimensional (3D) imaging is a big challenge, particularly when developing treatment plans for ocular diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is presently used in clinical practice for diagnosis confirmation and treatment planning for treatment of retinoblastoma in infants, where it serves as a source of information, complementary to the fundus or ultrasonographic imaging. Here we present a framework to fully automatically segment the eye anatomy for MRI based on 3D active shape models (ASM), and we validate the results and present a proof of concept to automatically segment pathological eyes. Methods and Materials: Manual and automatic segmentation were performed in 24 images of healthy children's eyes (3.29 ± 2.15 years of age). Imaging was performed using a 3-T MRI scanner. The ASM consists of the lens, the vitreous humor, the sclera, and the cornea. The model was fitted by first automatically detecting the position of the eye center, the lens, and the optic nerve, and then aligning the model and fitting it to the patient. We validated our segmentation method by using a leave-one-out cross-validation. The segmentation results were evaluated by measuring the overlap, using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the mean distance error. Results: We obtained a DSC of 94.90 ± 2.12% for the sclera and the cornea, 94.72 ± 1.89% for the vitreous humor, and 85.16 ± 4.91% for the lens. The mean distance error was 0.26 ± 0.09 mm. The entire process took 14 seconds on average per eye. Conclusion: We provide a reliable and accurate tool that enables clinicians to automatically segment the sclera, the cornea, the vitreous humor, and the lens, using MRI. We additionally present a proof of concept for fully automatically segmenting eye pathology. This tool reduces the time needed for eye shape delineation and thus can help clinicians when planning eye treatment and confirming the extent of the tumor.

  8. Image segmentation using random features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Geoff; Gao, Junbin; Antolovich, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for selecting random features via compressed sensing to improve the performance of Normalized Cuts in image segmentation. Normalized Cuts is a clustering algorithm that has been widely applied to segmenting images, using features such as brightness, intervening contours and Gabor filter responses. Some drawbacks of Normalized Cuts are that computation times and memory usage can be excessive, and the obtained segmentations are often poor. This paper addresses the need to improve the processing time of Normalized Cuts while improving the segmentations. A significant proportion of the time in calculating Normalized Cuts is spent computing an affinity matrix. A new algorithm has been developed that selects random features using compressed sensing techniques to reduce the computation needed for the affinity matrix. The new algorithm, when compared to the standard implementation of Normalized Cuts for segmenting images from the BSDS500, produces better segmentations in significantly less time.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging-based interpretation of degenerative changes in the lower lumbar segments and therapeutic consequences

    PubMed Central

    Maataoui, Adel; Vogl, Thomas J; Khan, M Fawad

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration and facet joint osteoarthritis of the lumbar spine are, among others, well known as a cause of low back and lower extremity pain. Together with their secondary disorders they set a big burden on health care systems and economics worldwide. Despite modern imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging, for a large proportion of patients with low back pain (LBP) it remains difficult to provide a specific diagnosis. The fact that nearly all the lumbar structures are possible sources of LBP, may serve as a possible explanation. Furthermore, our clinical experience confirms, that imaging alone is not a sufficient approach explaining LBP. Here, the Oswestry Disability Index, as the most commonly used measure to quantify disability for LBP, may serve as an easy-to-apply questionnaire to evaluate the patient’s ability to cope with everyday life. For therapeutic purposes, among the different options, the lumbar facet joint intra-articular injection of corticosteroids in combination with an anaesthetic solution is one of the most frequently performed interventional procedures. Although widely used the clinical benefit of intra-articular steroid injections remains controversial. Therefore, prior to therapy, standardized diagnostic algorithms for an accurate assessment, classification and correlation of degenerative changes of the lumbar spine are needed. PMID:26339462

  10. Improved Estimation of Cardiac Function Parameters Using a Combination of Independent Automated Segmentation Results in Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lebenberg, Jessica; Lalande, Alain; Clarysse, Patrick; Buvat, Irene; Casta, Christopher; Cochet, Alexandre; Constantinidès, Constantin; Cousty, Jean; de Cesare, Alain; Jehan-Besson, Stephanie; Lefort, Muriel; Najman, Laurent; Roullot, Elodie; Sarry, Laurent; Tilmant, Christophe; Frouin, Frederique; Garreau, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed at combining different segmentation approaches to produce a robust and accurate segmentation result. Three to five segmentation results of the left ventricle were combined using the STAPLE algorithm and the reliability of the resulting segmentation was evaluated in comparison with the result of each individual segmentation method. This comparison was performed using a supervised approach based on a reference method. Then, we used an unsupervised statistical evaluation, the extended Regression Without Truth (eRWT) that ranks different methods according to their accuracy in estimating a specific biomarker in a population. The segmentation accuracy was evaluated by estimating six cardiac function parameters resulting from the left ventricle contour delineation using a public cardiac cine MRI database. Eight different segmentation methods, including three expert delineations and five automated methods, were considered, and sixteen combinations of the automated methods using STAPLE were investigated. The supervised and unsupervised evaluations demonstrated that in most cases, STAPLE results provided better estimates than individual automated segmentation methods. Overall, combining different automated segmentation methods improved the reliability of the segmentation result compared to that obtained using an individual method and could achieve the accuracy of an expert. PMID:26287691

  11. Bayesian segmentation of hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadpour, Adel; Féron, Olivier; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2004-11-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of joint segmentation of hyperspectral images in the Bayesian framework. The proposed approach is based on a Hidden Markov Modeling (HMM) of the images with common segmentation, or equivalently with common hidden classification label variables which is modeled by a Potts Markov Random Field. We introduce an appropriate Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm to implement the method and show some simulation results.

  12. Segmenting Images for a Better Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Hierarchical Segmentation (HSEG) software has been adapted by Bartron Medical Imaging, LLC, for use in segmentation feature extraction, pattern recognition, and classification of medical images. Bartron acquired licenses from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for application of the HSEG concept to medical imaging, from the California Institute of Technology/Jet Propulsion Laboratory to incorporate pattern-matching software, and from Kennedy Space Center for data-mining and edge-detection programs. The Med-Seg[TM] united developed by Bartron provides improved diagnoses for a wide range of medical images, including computed tomography scans, positron emission tomography scans, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, digitized Z-ray, digitized mammography, dental X-ray, soft tissue analysis, and moving object analysis. It also can be used in analysis of soft-tissue slides. Bartron's future plans include the application of HSEG technology to drug development. NASA is advancing it's HSEG software to learn more about the Earth's magnetosphere.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Teens > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A Text Size What's ... Exam Safety Getting Your Results What Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of safe, painless testing ...

  14. Neurosphere segmentation in brightfield images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jierong; Xiong, Wei; Chia, Shue Ching; Lim, Joo Hwee; Sankaran, Shvetha; Ahmed, Sohail

    2014-03-01

    The challenge of segmenting neurospheres (NSPs) from brightfield images includes uneven background illumination (vignetting), low contrast and shadow-casting appearance near the well wall. We propose a pipeline for neurosphere segmentation in brightfield images, focusing on shadow-casting removal. Firstly, we remove vignetting by creating a synthetic blank field image from a set of brightfield images of the whole well. Then, radial line integration is proposed to remove the shadow-casting and therefore facilitate automatic segmentation. Furthermore, a weighted bi-directional decay function is introduced to prevent undesired gradient effect of line integration on NSPs without shadow-casting. Afterward, multiscale Laplacian of Gaussian (LoG) and localized region-based level set are used to detect the NSP boundaries. Experimental results show that our proposed radial line integration method (RLI) achieves higher detection accuracy over existing methods in terms of precision, recall and F-score with less computational time.

  15. Magnetic resonance segmentation with the bubble wave algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, Harvey E.; Ludke, Siegwalt

    2003-05-01

    A new bubble wave algorithm provides automatic segmentation of three-dimensional magnetic resonance images of both the peripheral vasculature and the brain. Simple connectivity algorithms are not reliable in these medical applications because there are unwanted connections through background noise. The bubble wave algorithm restricts connectivity using curvature by testing spherical regions on a propagating active contour to eliminate noise bridges. After the user places seeds in both the selected regions and in the regions that are not desired, the method provides the critical threshold for segmentation using binary search. Today, peripheral vascular disease is diagnosed using magnetic resonance imaging with a timed contrast bolus. A new blood pool contrast agent MS-325 (Epix Medical) binds to albumen in the blood and provides high-resolution three-dimensional images of both arteries and veins. The bubble wave algorithm provides a means to automatically suppress the veins that obscure the arteries in magnetic resonance angiography. Monitoring brain atrophy is needed for trials of drugs that retard the progression of dementia. The brain volume is measured by placing seeds in both the brain and scalp to find the critical threshold that prevents connections between the brain volume and the scalp. Examples from both three-dimensional magnetic resonance brain and contrast enhanced vascular images were segmented with minimal user intervention.

  16. Image Information Mining Utilizing Hierarchical Segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.; Marchisio, Giovanni; Koperski, Krzysztof; Datcu, Mihai

    2002-01-01

    The Hierarchical Segmentation (HSEG) algorithm is an approach for producing high quality, hierarchically related image segmentations. The VisiMine image information mining system utilizes clustering and segmentation algorithms for reducing visual information in multispectral images to a manageable size. The project discussed herein seeks to enhance the VisiMine system through incorporating hierarchical segmentations from HSEG into the VisiMine system.

  17. Multiresolution segmentation technique for spine MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haiyun; Yan, Chye H.; Ong, Sim Heng; Chui, Cheekong K.; Teoh, Swee H.

    2002-05-01

    In this paper, we describe a hybrid method for segmentation of spinal magnetic resonance imaging that has been developed based on the natural phenomenon of stones appearing as water recedes. The candidate segmentation region corresponds to the stones with characteristics similar to that of intensity extrema, edges, intensity ridge and grey-level blobs. The segmentation method is implemented based on a combination of wavelet multiresolution decomposition and fuzzy clustering. First thresholding is performed dynamically according to local characteristic to detect possible target areas, We then use fuzzy c-means clustering in concert with wavelet multiscale edge detection to identify the maximum likelihood anatomical and functional target areas. Fuzzy C-Means uses iterative optimization of an objective function based on a weighted similarity measure between the pixels in the image and each of c cluster centers. Local extrema of this objective function are indicative of an optimal clustering of the input data. The multiscale edges can be detected and characterized from local maxima of the modulus of the wavelet transform while the noise can be reduced to some extent by enacting thresholds. The method provides an efficient and robust algorithm for spinal image segmentation. Examples are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the technique on some spinal MRI images.

  18. Distribution Metrics and Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Georgiou, Tryphon; Michailovich, Oleg; Rathi, Yogesh; Malcolm, James; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe certain alternative metrics for quantifying distances between distributions, and to explain their use and relevance in visual tracking. Besides the theoretical interest, such metrics may be used to design filters for image segmentation, that is for solving the key visual task of separating an object from the background in an image. The segmenting curve is represented as the zero level set of a signed distance function. Most existing methods in the geometric active contour framework perform segmentation by maximizing the separation of intensity moments between the interior and the exterior of an evolving contour. Here one can use the given distributional metric to determine a flow which minimizes changes in the distribution inside and outside the curve. PMID:18769529

  19. Hybrid image segmentation using watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haris, Kostas; Efstratiadis, Serafim N.; Maglaveras, Nicos; Pappas, Costas

    1996-02-01

    A hybrid image segmentation algorithm is proposed which combines edge- and region-based techniques through the morphological algorithm of watersheds. The algorithm consists of the following steps: (1) edge-preserving statistical noise reduction, (2) gradient approximation, (3) detection of watersheds on gradient magnitude image, and (4) hierarchical region merging (HRM) in order to get semantically meaningful segmentations. The HRM process uses the region adjacency graph (RAG) representation of the image regions. At each step, the most similar pair of regions is determined (minimum cost RAG edge), the regions are merged and the RAG is updated. Traditionally, the above is implemented by storing all the RAG edges in a priority queue (heap). We propose a significantly faster algorithm which maintains an additional graph, the most similar neighbor graph, through which the priority queue size and processing time are drastically reduced. The final segmentation is an image partition which, through the RAG, provides information that can be used by knowledge-based high level processes, i.e. recognition. In addition, this region based representation provides one-pixel wide, closed, and accurately localized contours/surfaces. Due to the small number of free parameters, the algorithm can be quite effectively used in interactive image processing. Experimental results obtained with 2D MR images are presented.

  20. Adaptive image segmentation by quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Yun, David Y.

    1992-12-01

    Segmentation of images into textural homogeneous regions is a fundamental problem in an image understanding system. Most region-oriented segmentation approaches suffer from the problem of different thresholds selecting for different images. In this paper an adaptive image segmentation based on vector quantization is presented. It automatically segments images without preset thresholds. The approach contains a feature extraction module and a two-layer hierarchical clustering module, a vector quantizer (VQ) implemented by a competitive learning neural network in the first layer. A near-optimal competitive learning algorithm (NOLA) is employed to train the vector quantizer. NOLA combines the advantages of both Kohonen self- organizing feature map (KSFM) and K-means clustering algorithm. After the VQ is trained, the weights of the network and the number of input vectors clustered by each neuron form a 3- D topological feature map with separable hills aggregated by similar vectors. This overcomes the inability to visualize the geometric properties of data in a high-dimensional space for most other clustering algorithms. The second clustering algorithm operates in the feature map instead of the input set itself. Since the number of units in the feature map is much less than the number of feature vectors in the feature set, it is easy to check all peaks and find the `correct' number of clusters, also a key problem in current clustering techniques. In the experiments, we compare our algorithm with K-means clustering method on a variety of images. The results show that our algorithm achieves better performance.

  1. Colony image acquisition and segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. X.

    2007-12-01

    For counting of both colonies and plaques, there is a large number of applications including food, dairy, beverages, hygiene, environmental monitoring, water, toxicology, sterility testing, AMES testing, pharmaceuticals, paints, sterile fluids and fungal contamination. Recently, many researchers and developers have made efforts for this kind of systems. By investigation, some existing systems have some problems. The main problems are image acquisition and image segmentation. In order to acquire colony images with good quality, an illumination box was constructed as: the box includes front lightning and back lightning, which can be selected by users based on properties of colony dishes. With the illumination box, lightning can be uniform; colony dish can be put in the same place every time, which make image processing easy. The developed colony image segmentation algorithm consists of the sub-algorithms: (1) image classification; (2) image processing; and (3) colony delineation. The colony delineation algorithm main contain: the procedures based on grey level similarity, on boundary tracing, on shape information and colony excluding. In addition, a number of algorithms are developed for colony analysis. The system has been tested and satisfactory.

  2. Metric Learning to Enhance Hyperspectral Image Segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David R.; Castano, Rebecca; Bue, Brian; Gilmore, Martha S.

    2013-01-01

    Unsupervised hyperspectral image segmentation can reveal spatial trends that show the physical structure of the scene to an analyst. They highlight borders and reveal areas of homogeneity and change. Segmentations are independently helpful for object recognition, and assist with automated production of symbolic maps. Additionally, a good segmentation can dramatically reduce the number of effective spectra in an image, enabling analyses that would otherwise be computationally prohibitive. Specifically, using an over-segmentation of the image instead of individual pixels can reduce noise and potentially improve the results of statistical post-analysis. In this innovation, a metric learning approach is presented to improve the performance of unsupervised hyperspectral image segmentation. The prototype demonstrations attempt a superpixel segmentation in which the image is conservatively over-segmented; that is, the single surface features may be split into multiple segments, but each individual segment, or superpixel, is ensured to have homogenous mineralogy.

  3. Image segmentation via piecewise constant regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acton, Scott T.; Bovik, Alan C.

    1994-09-01

    We introduce a novel unsupervised image segmentation technique that is based on piecewise constant (PICO) regression. Given an input image, a PICO output image for a specified feature size (scale) is computed via nonlinear regression. The regression effectively provides the constant region segmentation of the input image that has a minimum deviation from the input image. PICO regression-based segmentation avoids the problems of region merging, poor localization, region boundary ambiguity, and region fragmentation. Additionally, our segmentation method is particularly well-suited for corrupted (noisy) input data. An application to segmentation and classification of remotely sensed imagery is provided.

  4. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Bradley, W.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present a review of magnetic resonance imaging. Many topics are explored from instrumentation, spectroscopy, blood flow and sodium imaging to detailed clinical applications such as the differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis or adrenal adenoma. The emphasis throughout is on descriptions of normal multiplanar anatomy and pathology as displayed by MRI.

  6. Hierarchical image segmentation for learning object priors

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Lakshman; Yang, Xingwei; Latecki, Longin J; Li, Nan

    2010-11-10

    The proposed segmentation approach naturally combines experience based and image based information. The experience based information is obtained by training a classifier for each object class. For a given test image, the result of each classifier is represented as a probability map. The final segmentation is obtained with a hierarchial image segmentation algorithm that considers both the probability maps and the image features such as color and edge strength. We also utilize image region hierarchy to obtain not only local but also semi-global features as input to the classifiers. Moreover, to get robust probability maps, we take into account the region context information by averaging the probability maps over different levels of the hierarchical segmentation algorithm. The obtained segmentation results are superior to the state-of-the-art supervised image segmentation algorithms.

  7. Unsupervised Performance Evaluation of Image Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabrier, Sebastien; Emile, Bruno; Rosenberger, Christophe; Laurent, Helene

    2006-12-01

    We present in this paper a study of unsupervised evaluation criteria that enable the quantification of the quality of an image segmentation result. These evaluation criteria compute some statistics for each region or class in a segmentation result. Such an evaluation criterion can be useful for different applications: the comparison of segmentation results, the automatic choice of the best fitted parameters of a segmentation method for a given image, or the definition of new segmentation methods by optimization. We first present the state of art of unsupervised evaluation, and then, we compare six unsupervised evaluation criteria. For this comparative study, we use a database composed of 8400 synthetic gray-level images segmented in four different ways. Vinet's measure (correct classification rate) is used as an objective criterion to compare the behavior of the different criteria. Finally, we present the experimental results on the segmentation evaluation of a few gray-level natural images.

  8. Core Recursive Hierarchical Image Segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James

    2011-01-01

    The Recursive Hierarchical Image Segmentation (RHSEG) software has been repackaged to provide a version of the RHSEG software that is not subject to patent restrictions and that can be released to the general public through NASA GSFC's Open Source release process. Like the Core HSEG Software Package, this Core RHSEG Software Package also includes a visualization program called HSEGViewer along with a utility program HSEGReader. It also includes an additional utility program called HSEGExtract. The unique feature of the Core RHSEG package is that it is a repackaging of the RHSEG technology designed to specifically avoid the inclusion of the certain software technology. Unlike the Core HSEG package, it includes the recursive portions of the technology, but does not include processing window artifact elimination technology.

  9. Automatic segmentation of cartilage in high-field magnetic resonance images of the knee joint with an improved voxel-classification-driven region-growing algorithm using vicinity-correlated subsampling.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Ceyda Nur; Albayrak, Songül

    2016-05-01

    Anatomical structures that can deteriorate over time, such as cartilage, can be successfully delineated with voxel-classification approaches in magnetic resonance (MR) images. However, segmentation via voxel-classification is a computationally demanding process for high-field MR images with high spatial resolutions. In this study, the whole femoral, tibial, and patellar cartilage compartments in the knee joint were automatically segmented in high-field MR images obtained from Osteoarthritis Initiative using a voxel-classification-driven region-growing algorithm with sample-expand method. Computational complexity of the classification was alleviated via subsampling of the background voxels in the training MR images and selecting a small subset of significant features by taking into consideration systems with limited memory and processing power. Although subsampling of the voxels may lead to a loss of generality of the training models and a decrease in segmentation accuracies, effective subsampling strategies can overcome these problems. Therefore, different subsampling techniques, which involve uniform, Gaussian, vicinity-correlated (VC) sparse, and VC dense subsampling, were used to generate four training models. The segmentation system was experimented using 10 training and 23 testing MR images, and the effects of different training models on segmentation accuracies were investigated. Experimental results showed that the highest mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) values for all compartments were obtained when the training models of VC sparse subsampling technique were used. Mean DSC values optimized with this technique were 82.6%, 83.1%, and 72.6% for femoral, tibial, and patellar cartilage compartments, respectively, when mean sensitivities were 79.9%, 84.0%, and 71.5%, and mean specificities were 99.8%, 99.9%, and 99.9%. PMID:27017069

  10. Hyperspectral image segmentation using active contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheolha P.; Snyder, Wesley E.

    2004-08-01

    Multispectral or hyperspectral image processing has been studied as a possible approach to automatic target recognition (ATR). Hundreds of spectral bands may provide high data redundancy, compensating the low contrast in medium wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long wavelength infrared (LWIR) images. Thus, the combination of spectral (image intensity) and spatial (geometric feature) information analysis could produce a substantial improvement. Active contours provide segments with continuous boundaries, while edge detectors based on local filtering often provide discontinuous boundaries. The segmentation by active contours depends on geometric feature of the object as well as image intensity. However, the application of active contours to multispectral images has been limited to the cases of simply textured images with low number of frames. This paper presents a supervised active contour model, which is applicable to vector-valued images with non-homogeneous regions and high number of frames. In the training stage, histogram models of target classes are estimated from sample vector-pixels. In the test stage, contours are evolved based on two different metrics: the histogram models of the corresponding segments and the histogram models estimated from sample target vector-pixels. The proposed segmentation method integrates segmentation and model-based pattern matching using supervised segmentation and multi-phase active contour model, while traditional methods apply pattern matching only after the segmentation. The proposed algorithm is implemented with both synthetic and real multispectral images, and shows desirable segmentation and classification results even in images with non-homogeneous regions.

  11. Segmentation of brain magnetic resonance images based on multi-atlas likelihood fusion: testing using data with a broad range of anatomical and photometric profiles

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoying; Crocetti, Deana; Kutten, Kwame; Ceritoglu, Can; Albert, Marilyn S.; Mori, Susumu; Mostofsky, Stewart H.; Miller, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a hierarchical pipeline for skull-stripping and segmentation of anatomical structures of interest from T1-weighted images of the human brain. The pipeline is constructed based on a two-level Bayesian parameter estimation algorithm called multi-atlas likelihood fusion (MALF). In MALF, estimation of the parameter of interest is performed via maximum a posteriori estimation using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. The likelihoods of multiple atlases are fused in the E-step while the optimal estimator, a single maximizer of the fused likelihoods, is then obtained in the M-step. There are two stages in the proposed pipeline; first the input T1-weighted image is automatically skull-stripped via a fast MALF, then internal brain structures of interest are automatically extracted using a regular MALF. We assess the performance of each of the two modules in the pipeline based on two sets of images with markedly different anatomical and photometric contrasts; 3T MPRAGE scans of pediatric subjects with developmental disorders vs. 1.5T SPGR scans of elderly subjects with dementia. Evaluation is performed quantitatively using the Dice overlap as well as qualitatively via visual inspections. As a result, we demonstrate subject-level differences in the performance of the proposed pipeline, which may be accounted for by age, diagnosis, or the imaging parameters (particularly the field strength). For the subcortical and ventricular structures of the two datasets, the hierarchical pipeline is capable of producing automated segmentations with Dice overlaps ranging from 0.8 to 0.964 when compared with the gold standard. Comparisons with other representative segmentation algorithms are presented, relative to which the proposed hierarchical pipeline demonstrates comparative or superior accuracy. PMID:25784852

  12. Metric Learning for Hyperspectral Image Segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Brian D.; Thompson, David R.; Gilmore, Martha S.; Castano, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    We present a metric learning approach to improve the performance of unsupervised hyperspectral image segmentation. Unsupervised spatial segmentation can assist both user visualization and automatic recognition of surface features. Analysts can use spatially-continuous segments to decrease noise levels and/or localize feature boundaries. However, existing segmentation methods use tasks-agnostic measures of similarity. Here we learn task-specific similarity measures from training data, improving segment fidelity to classes of interest. Multiclass Linear Discriminate Analysis produces a linear transform that optimally separates a labeled set of training classes. The defines a distance metric that generalized to a new scenes, enabling graph-based segmentation that emphasizes key spectral features. We describe tests based on data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer (CRISM) in which learned metrics improve segment homogeneity with respect to mineralogical classes.

  13. Iterative Vessel Segmentation of Fundus Images.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, Sohini; Koozekanani, Dara D; Parhi, Keshab K

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a novel unsupervised iterative blood vessel segmentation algorithm using fundus images. First, a vessel enhanced image is generated by tophat reconstruction of the negative green plane image. An initial estimate of the segmented vasculature is extracted by global thresholding the vessel enhanced image. Next, new vessel pixels are identified iteratively by adaptive thresholding of the residual image generated by masking out the existing segmented vessel estimate from the vessel enhanced image. The new vessel pixels are, then, region grown into the existing vessel, thereby resulting in an iterative enhancement of the segmented vessel structure. As the iterations progress, the number of false edge pixels identified as new vessel pixels increases compared to the number of actual vessel pixels. A key contribution of this paper is a novel stopping criterion that terminates the iterative process leading to higher vessel segmentation accuracy. This iterative algorithm is robust to the rate of new vessel pixel addition since it achieves 93.2-95.35% vessel segmentation accuracy with 0.9577-0.9638 area under ROC curve (AUC) on abnormal retinal images from the STARE dataset. The proposed algorithm is computationally efficient and consistent in vessel segmentation performance for retinal images with variations due to pathology, uneven illumination, pigmentation, and fields of view since it achieves a vessel segmentation accuracy of about 95% in an average time of 2.45, 3.95, and 8 s on images from three public datasets DRIVE, STARE, and CHASE_DB1, respectively. Additionally, the proposed algorithm has more than 90% segmentation accuracy for segmenting peripapillary blood vessels in the images from the DRIVE and CHASE_DB1 datasets. PMID:25700436

  14. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Elster, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging is comprehensive, well structured, and well written. The material is current and well referenced. The illustrations are good and complement the text well. The overall quality of publication is above average. The greatest attribute of the book is its readability. The author demonstrates ample skill in making complex subjects, such as MR physics and imaging of cerebral hemorrhage, easy to understand. The book closes with a detailed atlas on the anatomic appearance of the brain on MR images in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes.

  15. Comparison of automated and manual segmentation of hippocampus MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, John W.; Christensen, Gary E.; Miller, Michael I.; Joshi, Sarang C.; Gado, Mokhtar; Csernansky, John G.; Vannier, Michael W.

    1995-05-01

    The precision and accuracy of area estimates from magnetic resonance (MR) brain images and using manual and automated segmentation methods are determined. Areas of the human hippocampus were measured to compare a new automatic method of segmentation with regions of interest drawn by an expert. MR images of nine normal subjects and nine schizophrenic patients were acquired with a 1.5-T unit (Siemens Medical Systems, Inc., Iselin, New Jersey). From each individual MPRAGE 3D volume image a single comparable 2-D slice (matrix equals 256 X 256) was chosen which corresponds to the same coronal slice of the hippocampus. The hippocampus was first manually segmented, then segmented using high dimensional transformations of a digital brain atlas to individual brain MR images. The repeatability of a trained rater was assessed by comparing two measurements from each individual subject. Variability was also compared within and between subject groups of schizophrenics and normal subjects. Finally, the precision and accuracy of automated segmentation of hippocampal areas were determined by comparing automated measurements to manual segmentation measurements made by the trained rater on MR and brain slice images. The results demonstrate the high repeatability of area measurement from MR images of the human hippocampus. Automated segmentation using high dimensional transformations from a digital brain atlas provides repeatability superior to that of manual segmentation. Furthermore, the validity of automated measurements was demonstrated by a high correlation with manual segmentation measurements made by a trained rater. Quantitative morphometry of brain substructures (e.g. hippocampus) is feasible by use of a high dimensional transformation of a digital brain atlas to an individual MR image. This method automates the search for neuromorphological correlates of schizophrenia by a new mathematically robust method with unprecedented sensitivity to small local and regional differences.

  16. Automatic setae segmentation from Chaetoceros microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haiyong; Zhao, Hongmiao; Sun, Xue; Gao, Huihui; Ji, Guangrong

    2014-09-01

    A novel image processing model Grayscale Surface Direction Angle Model (GSDAM) is presented and the algorithm based on GSDAM is developed to segment setae from Chaetoceros microscopic images. The proposed model combines the setae characteristics of the microscopic images with the spatial analysis of image grayscale surface to detect and segment the direction thin and long setae from the low contrast background as well as noise which may make the commonly used segmentation methods invalid. The experimental results show that our algorithm based on GSDAM outperforms the boundary-based and region-based segmentation methods Canny edge detector, iterative threshold selection, Otsu's thresholding, minimum error thresholding, K-means clustering, and marker-controlled watershed on the setae segmentation more accurately and completely. PMID:24913015

  17. Improving image segmentation by learning region affinities

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Lakshman; Yang, Xingwei; Latecki, Longin J

    2010-11-03

    We utilize the context information of other regions in hierarchical image segmentation to learn new regions affinities. It is well known that a single choice of quantization of an image space is highly unlikely to be a common optimal quantization level for all categories. Each level of quantization has its own benefits. Therefore, we utilize the hierarchical information among different quantizations as well as spatial proximity of their regions. The proposed affinity learning takes into account higher order relations among image regions, both local and long range relations, making it robust to instabilities and errors of the original, pairwise region affinities. Once the learnt affinities are obtained, we use a standard image segmentation algorithm to get the final segmentation. Moreover, the learnt affinities can be naturally unutilized in interactive segmentation. Experimental results on Berkeley Segmentation Dataset and MSRC Object Recognition Dataset are comparable and in some aspects better than the state-of-art methods.

  18. A Unified Framework for Brain Segmentation in MR Images.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, S; Yusof, R; Karimian, A; Riazi, A H; Bennamoun, M

    2015-01-01

    Brain MRI segmentation is an important issue for discovering the brain structure and diagnosis of subtle anatomical changes in different brain diseases. However, due to several artifacts brain tissue segmentation remains a challenging task. The aim of this paper is to improve the automatic segmentation of brain into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid in magnetic resonance images (MRI). We proposed an automatic hybrid image segmentation method that integrates the modified statistical expectation-maximization (EM) method and the spatial information combined with support vector machine (SVM). The combined method has more accurate results than what can be achieved with its individual techniques that is demonstrated through experiments on both real data and simulated images. Experiments are carried out on both synthetic and real MRI. The results of proposed technique are evaluated against manual segmentation results and other methods based on real T1-weighted scans from Internet Brain Segmentation Repository (IBSR) and simulated images from BrainWeb. The Kappa index is calculated to assess the performance of the proposed framework relative to the ground truth and expert segmentations. The results demonstrate that the proposed combined method has satisfactory results on both simulated MRI and real brain datasets. PMID:26089978

  19. A Unified Framework for Brain Segmentation in MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, S.; Yusof, R.; Karimian, A.; Riazi, A. H.; Bennamoun, M.

    2015-01-01

    Brain MRI segmentation is an important issue for discovering the brain structure and diagnosis of subtle anatomical changes in different brain diseases. However, due to several artifacts brain tissue segmentation remains a challenging task. The aim of this paper is to improve the automatic segmentation of brain into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid in magnetic resonance images (MRI). We proposed an automatic hybrid image segmentation method that integrates the modified statistical expectation-maximization (EM) method and the spatial information combined with support vector machine (SVM). The combined method has more accurate results than what can be achieved with its individual techniques that is demonstrated through experiments on both real data and simulated images. Experiments are carried out on both synthetic and real MRI. The results of proposed technique are evaluated against manual segmentation results and other methods based on real T1-weighted scans from Internet Brain Segmentation Repository (IBSR) and simulated images from BrainWeb. The Kappa index is calculated to assess the performance of the proposed framework relative to the ground truth and expert segmentations. The results demonstrate that the proposed combined method has satisfactory results on both simulated MRI and real brain datasets. PMID:26089978

  20. Regression Segmentation for M³ Spinal Images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhijie; Zhen, Xiantong; Tay, KengYeow; Osman, Said; Romano, Walter; Li, Shuo

    2015-08-01

    Clinical routine often requires to analyze spinal images of multiple anatomic structures in multiple anatomic planes from multiple imaging modalities (M(3)). Unfortunately, existing methods for segmenting spinal images are still limited to one specific structure, in one specific plane or from one specific modality (S(3)). In this paper, we propose a novel approach, Regression Segmentation, that is for the first time able to segment M(3) spinal images in one single unified framework. This approach formulates the segmentation task innovatively as a boundary regression problem: modeling a highly nonlinear mapping function from substantially diverse M(3) images directly to desired object boundaries. Leveraging the advancement of sparse kernel machines, regression segmentation is fulfilled by a multi-dimensional support vector regressor (MSVR) which operates in an implicit, high dimensional feature space where M(3) diversity and specificity can be systematically categorized, extracted, and handled. The proposed regression segmentation approach was thoroughly tested on images from 113 clinical subjects including both disc and vertebral structures, in both sagittal and axial planes, and from both MRI and CT modalities. The overall result reaches a high dice similarity index (DSI) 0.912 and a low boundary distance (BD) 0.928 mm. With our unified and expendable framework, an efficient clinical tool for M(3) spinal image segmentation can be easily achieved, and will substantially benefit the diagnosis and treatment of spinal diseases. PMID:25361503

  1. Stepped Impedance Resonators for High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Akgun, Can E.; DelaBarre, Lance; Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Sohn, Sung-Min; Snyder, Carl J.; Adriany, Gregor; Ugurbil, Kamil; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multi-element volume radio-frequency (RF) coils are an integral aspect of the growing field of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In these systems, a popular volume coil of choice has become the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) multi-element transceiver coil consisting of microstrip resonators. In this paper, to further advance this design approach, a new microstrip resonator strategy in which the transmission line is segmented into alternating impedance sections referred to as stepped impedance resonators (SIRs) is investigated. Single element simulation results in free space and in a phantom at 7 tesla (298 MHz) demonstrate the rationale and feasibility of the SIR design strategy. Simulation and image results at 7 tesla in a phantom and human head illustrate the improvements in transmit magnetic field, as well as, RF efficiency (transmit magnetic field versus SAR) when two different SIR designs are incorporated in 8-element volume coil configurations and compared to a volume coil consisting of microstrip elements. PMID:23508243

  2. Low level image segmentation: an expert system.

    PubMed

    Nazif, A M; Levine, M D

    1984-05-01

    A major problem in robotic vision is the segmentation of images of natural scenes in order to understand their content. This paper presents a new solution to the image segmentation problem that is based on the design of a rule-based expert system. General knowledge about low level properties of processes employ the rules to segment the image into uniform regions and connected lines. In addition to the knowledge rules, a set of control rules are also employed. These include metarules that embody inferences about the order in which the knowledge rules are matched. They also incorporate focus of attention rules that determine the path of processing within the image. Furthermore, an additional set of higher level rules dynamically alters the processing strategy. This paper discusses the structure and content of the knowledge and control rules for image segmentation. PMID:21869225

  3. Image segmentation based on competitive learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Qun; Baikunth, Nath

    2004-06-01

    Image segment is a primary step in image analysis of unexploded ordnance (UXO) detection by ground penetrating radar (GPR) sensor which is accompanied with a lot of noises and other elements that affect the recognition of real target size. In this paper we bring forward a new theory, that is, we look the weight sets as target vector sets which is the new cues in semi-automatic segmentation to form the final image segmentation. The experiment results show that the measure size of target with our method is much smaller than the size with other methods and close to the real size of target.

  4. Hierarchical Image Segmentation Using Correlation Clustering.

    PubMed

    Alush, Amir; Goldberger, Jacob

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we apply efficient implementations of integer linear programming to the problem of image segmentation. The image is first grouped into superpixels and then local information is extracted for each pair of spatially adjacent superpixels. Given local scores on a map of several hundred superpixels, we use correlation clustering to find the global segmentation that is most consistent with the local evidence. We show that, although correlation clustering is known to be NP-hard, finding the exact global solution is still feasible by breaking the segmentation problem down into subproblems. Each such sub-problem can be viewed as an automatically detected image part. We can further accelerate the process by using the cutting-plane method, which provides a hierarchical structure of the segmentations. The efficiency and improved performance of the proposed method is compared to several state-of-the-art methods and demonstrated on several standard segmentation data sets. PMID:26701901

  5. Segmentation-based CT image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thammineni, Arunoday; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Kamath, Vidya

    2004-04-01

    The existing image compression standards like JPEG and JPEG 2000, compress the whole image as a single frame. This makes the system simple but inefficient. The problem is acute for applications where lossless compression is mandatory viz. medical image compression. If the spatial characteristics of the image are considered, it can give rise to a more efficient coding scheme. For example, CT reconstructed images have uniform background outside the field of view (FOV). Even the portion within the FOV can be divided as anatomically relevant and irrelevant parts. They have distinctly different statistics. Hence coding them separately will result in more efficient compression. Segmentation is done based on thresholding and shape information is stored using 8-connected differential chain code. Simple 1-D DPCM is used as the prediction scheme. The experiments show that the 1st order entropies of images fall by more than 11% when each segment is coded separately. For simplicity and speed of decoding Huffman code is chosen for entropy coding. Segment based coding will have an overhead of one table per segment but the overhead is minimal. Lossless compression of image based on segmentation resulted in reduction of bit rate by 7%-9% compared to lossless compression of whole image as a single frame by the same prediction coder. Segmentation based scheme also has the advantage of natural ROI based progressive decoding. If it is allowed to delete the diagnostically irrelevant portions, the bit budget can go down as much as 40%. This concept can be extended to other modalities.

  6. SAR Image Segmentation Using Morphological Attribute Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldt, M.; Thiele, A.; Schulz, K.; Hinz, S.

    2014-08-01

    In the last years, the spatial resolution of remote sensing sensors and imagery has continuously improved. Focusing on spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors, the satellites of the current generation (TerraSAR-X, COSMO-SykMed) are able to acquire images with sub-meter resolution. Indeed, high resolution imagery is visually much better interpretable, but most of the established pixel-based analysis methods have become more or less impracticable since, in high resolution images, self-sufficient objects (vehicle, building) are represented by a large number of pixels. Methods dealing with Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA) provide help. Objects (segments) are groupings of pixels resulting from image segmentation algorithms based on homogeneity criteria. The image set is represented by image segments, which allows the development of rule-based analysis schemes. For example, segments can be described or categorized by their local neighborhood in a context-based manner. In this paper, a novel method for the segmentation of high resolution SAR images is presented. It is based on the calculation of morphological differential attribute profiles (DAP) which are analyzed pixel-wise in a region growing procedure. The method distinguishes between heterogeneous and homogeneous image content and delivers a precise segmentation result.

  7. Segmentation of white rat sperm image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Weiguo; Liu, Jianguo; Chen, Guoyuan

    2011-11-01

    The segmentation of sperm image exerts a profound influence in the analysis of sperm morphology, which plays a significant role in the research of animals' infertility and reproduction. To overcome the microscope image's properties of low contrast and highly polluted noise, and to get better segmentation results of sperm image, this paper presents a multi-scale gradient operator combined with a multi-structuring element for the micro-spermatozoa image of white rat, as the multi-scale gradient operator can smooth the noise of an image, while the multi-structuring element can retain more shape details of the sperms. Then, we use the Otsu method to segment the modified gradient image whose gray scale processed is strong in sperms and weak in the background, converting it into a binary sperm image. As the obtained binary image owns impurities that are not similar with sperms in the shape, we choose a form factor to filter those objects whose form factor value is larger than the select critical value, and retain those objects whose not. And then, we can get the final binary image of the segmented sperms. The experiment shows this method's great advantage in the segmentation of the micro-spermatozoa image.

  8. FISICO: Fast Image SegmentatIon COrrection

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Waldo; Ferguson, Stephen J.; Ignasiak, Dominika; Diserens, Gaëlle; Häni, Levin; Wiest, Roland; Vermathen, Peter; Boesch, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose In clinical diagnosis, medical image segmentation plays a key role in the analysis of pathological regions. Despite advances in automatic and semi-automatic segmentation techniques, time-effective correction tools are commonly needed to improve segmentation results. Therefore, these tools must provide faster corrections with a lower number of interactions, and a user-independent solution to reduce the time frame between image acquisition and diagnosis. Methods We present a new interactive method for correcting image segmentations. Our method provides 3D shape corrections through 2D interactions. This approach enables an intuitive and natural corrections of 3D segmentation results. The developed method has been implemented into a software tool and has been evaluated for the task of lumbar muscle and knee joint segmentations from MR images. Results Experimental results show that full segmentation corrections could be performed within an average correction time of 5.5±3.3 minutes and an average of 56.5±33.1 user interactions, while maintaining the quality of the final segmentation result within an average Dice coefficient of 0.92±0.02 for both anatomies. In addition, for users with different levels of expertise, our method yields a correction time and number of interaction decrease from 38±19.2 minutes to 6.4±4.3 minutes, and 339±157.1 to 67.7±39.6 interactions, respectively. PMID:27224061

  9. Convergent Coarseness Regulation for Segmented Images

    SciTech Connect

    Paglieroni, D W

    2004-05-27

    In segmentation of remotely sensed images, the number of pixel classes and their spectral representations are often unknown a priori. Even with prior knowledge, pixels with spectral components from multiple classes lead to classification errors and undesired small region artifacts. Coarseness regulation for segmented images is proposed as an efficient novel technique for handling these problems. Beginning with an over-segmented image, perceptually similar connected regions are iteratively merged using a method reminiscent of region growing, except the primitives are regions, not pixels. Interactive coarseness regulation is achieved by specifying the area {alpha} of the largest region eligible for merging. A region with area less than {alpha} is merged with the most spectrally similar connected region, unless the regions are perceived as spectrally dissimilar. In convergent coarseness regulation, which requires no user interaction, {alpha} is specified as the total number of pixels in the image, and the coarseness regulation output converges to a steady-state segmentation that remains unchanged as {alpha} is further increased. By applying convergent coarseness regulation to AVIRIS, IKONOS and DigitalGlobe images, and quantitatively comparing computer-generated segmentations to segmentations generated manually by a human analyst, it was found that the quality of the input segmentations was consistently and dramatically improved.

  10. Medical image segmentation using genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Maulik, Ujjwal

    2009-03-01

    Genetic algorithms (GAs) have been found to be effective in the domain of medical image segmentation, since the problem can often be mapped to one of search in a complex and multimodal landscape. The challenges in medical image segmentation arise due to poor image contrast and artifacts that result in missing or diffuse organ/tissue boundaries. The resulting search space is therefore often noisy with a multitude of local optima. Not only does the genetic algorithmic framework prove to be effective in coming out of local optima, it also brings considerable flexibility into the segmentation procedure. In this paper, an attempt has been made to review the major applications of GAs to the domain of medical image segmentation. PMID:19272859

  11. A summary of image segmentation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spirkovska, Lilly

    1993-01-01

    Machine vision systems are often considered to be composed of two subsystems: low-level vision and high-level vision. Low level vision consists primarily of image processing operations performed on the input image to produce another image with more favorable characteristics. These operations may yield images with reduced noise or cause certain features of the image to be emphasized (such as edges). High-level vision includes object recognition and, at the highest level, scene interpretation. The bridge between these two subsystems is the segmentation system. Through segmentation, the enhanced input image is mapped into a description involving regions with common features which can be used by the higher level vision tasks. There is no theory on image segmentation. Instead, image segmentation techniques are basically ad hoc and differ mostly in the way they emphasize one or more of the desired properties of an ideal segmenter and in the way they balance and compromise one desired property against another. These techniques can be categorized in a number of different groups including local vs. global, parallel vs. sequential, contextual vs. noncontextual, interactive vs. automatic. In this paper, we categorize the schemes into three main groups: pixel-based, edge-based, and region-based. Pixel-based segmentation schemes classify pixels based solely on their gray levels. Edge-based schemes first detect local discontinuities (edges) and then use that information to separate the image into regions. Finally, region-based schemes start with a seed pixel (or group of pixels) and then grow or split the seed until the original image is composed of only homogeneous regions. Because there are a number of survey papers available, we will not discuss all segmentation schemes. Rather than a survey, we take the approach of a detailed overview. We focus only on the more common approaches in order to give the reader a flavor for the variety of techniques available yet present enough

  12. Review methods for image segmentation from computed tomography images

    SciTech Connect

    Mamat, Nurwahidah; Rahman, Wan Eny Zarina Wan Abdul; Soh, Shaharuddin Cik; Mahmud, Rozi

    2014-12-04

    Image segmentation is a challenging process in order to get the accuracy of segmentation, automation and robustness especially in medical images. There exist many segmentation methods that can be implemented to medical images but not all methods are suitable. For the medical purposes, the aims of image segmentation are to study the anatomical structure, identify the region of interest, measure tissue volume to measure growth of tumor and help in treatment planning prior to radiation therapy. In this paper, we present a review method for segmentation purposes using Computed Tomography (CT) images. CT images has their own characteristics that affect the ability to visualize anatomic structures and pathologic features such as blurring of the image and visual noise. The details about the methods, the goodness and the problem incurred in the methods will be defined and explained. It is necessary to know the suitable segmentation method in order to get accurate segmentation. This paper can be a guide to researcher to choose the suitable segmentation method especially in segmenting the images from CT scan.

  13. Automatic image segmentation by dynamic region merging.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, David

    2011-12-01

    This paper addresses the automatic image segmentation problem in a region merging style. With an initially oversegmented image, in which many regions (or superpixels) with homogeneous color are detected, an image segmentation is performed by iteratively merging the regions according to a statistical test. There are two essential issues in a region-merging algorithm: order of merging and the stopping criterion. In the proposed algorithm, these two issues are solved by a novel predicate, which is defined by the sequential probability ratio test and the minimal cost criterion. Starting from an oversegmented image, neighboring regions are progressively merged if there is an evidence for merging according to this predicate. We show that the merging order follows the principle of dynamic programming. This formulates the image segmentation as an inference problem, where the final segmentation is established based on the observed image. We also prove that the produced segmentation satisfies certain global properties. In addition, a faster algorithm is developed to accelerate the region-merging process, which maintains a nearest neighbor graph in each iteration. Experiments on real natural images are conducted to demonstrate the performance of the proposed dynamic region-merging algorithm. PMID:21609885

  14. Identification of High-Risk Patients with Non-ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction using Strain Doppler Echocardiography: Correlation with Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Loutfi, Mohamed; Ashour, Sanaa; El-Sharkawy, Eman; El-Fawal, Sara; El-Touny, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of left ventricular (LV) function is important for decision-making and risk stratification in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Many patients with non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) have substantial infarction, but these patients often do not reveal clinical signs of instability, and they rarely fulfill criteria for acute revascularization therapy. AIM This study evaluated the potential of strain Doppler echocardiography analysis for the assessment of LV infarct size when compared with standard two-dimensional echo and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) data. METHODS Thirty patients with NSTEMI were examined using echocardiography after hospitalization for 1.8 ± 1.1 days for the assessment of left ventricular ejection fraction, wall motion score index (WMSI), and LV global longitudinal strain (GLS). Infarct size was assessed using delayed enhancement CMR 6.97 ± 3.2 days after admission as a percentage of total myocardial volume. RESULTS GLS was performed in 30 patients, and 82.9% of the LV segments were accepted for GLS analysis. Comparisons between patients with a complete set of GLS and standard echo, GLS and CMR were performed. The linear relationship demonstrated moderately strong and significant associations between GLS and ejection fraction (EF) as determined using standard echo (r = 0.452, P = 0.012), WMSI (r = 0.462, P = 0.010), and the gold standard CMR-determined EF (r = 0.57, P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to analyze the ability of GLS to evaluate infarct size. GLS was the best predictor of infarct size in a multivariate linear regression analysis (β = 1.51, P = 0.027). WMSI >1.125 and a GLS cutoff value of −11.29% identified patients with substantial infarction (≥12% of total myocardial volume measured using CMR) with accuracies of 76.7% and 80%, respectively. However, GLS remained the only independent predictor in a multivariate logistic regression analysis to identify an infarct

  15. Magnetic resonance brain tissue segmentation based on sparse representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Segmentation or delineation of specific organs and structures in medical images is an important task in the clinical diagnosis and treatment, since it allows to characterize pathologies through imaging measures (biomarkers). In brain imaging, segmentation of main tissues or specific structures is challenging, due to the anatomic variability and complexity, and the presence of image artifacts (noise, intensity inhomogeneities, partial volume effect). In this paper, an automatic segmentation strategy is proposed, based on sparse representations and coupled dictionaries. Image intensity patterns are singly related to tissue labels at the level of small patches, gathering this information in coupled intensity/segmentation dictionaries. This dictionaries are used within a sparse representation framework to find the projection of a new intensity image onto the intensity dictionary, and the same projection can be used with the segmentation dictionary to estimate the corresponding segmentation. Preliminary results obtained with two publicly available datasets suggest that the proposal is capable of estimating adequate segmentations for gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) tissues, with an average overlapping of 0:79 for GM and 0:71 for WM (with respect to original segmentations).

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Duodenoscope.

    PubMed

    Syms, Richard R A; Young, Ian R; Wadsworth, Christopher A; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D; Rea, Marc

    2013-12-01

    A side-viewing duodenoscope capable of both optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The instrument is constructed from MR-compatible materials and combines a coherent fiber bundle for optical imaging, an irrigation channel and a side-opening biopsy channel for the passage of catheter tools with a tip saddle coil for radio-frequency signal reception. The receiver coil is magnetically coupled to an internal pickup coil to provide intrinsic safety. Impedance matching is achieved using a mechanically variable mutual inductance, and active decoupling by PIN-diode switching. (1)H MRI of phantoms and ex vivo porcine liver specimens was carried out at 1.5 T. An MRI field-of-view appropriate for use during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was obtained, with limited artefacts, and a signal-to-noise ratio advantage over a surface array coil was demonstrated. PMID:23807423

  17. Simplified labeling process for medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingchen; Huang, Junzhou; Huang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Shaoting; Metaxas, Dimitris N

    2012-01-01

    Image segmentation plays a crucial role in many medical imaging applications by automatically locating the regions of interest. Typically supervised learning based segmentation methods require a large set of accurately labeled training data. However, thel labeling process is tedious, time consuming and sometimes not necessary. We propose a robust logistic regression algorithm to handle label outliers such that doctors do not need to waste time on precisely labeling images for training set. To validate its effectiveness and efficiency, we conduct carefully designed experiments on cervigram image segmentation while there exist label outliers. Experimental results show that the proposed robust logistic regression algorithms achieve superior performance compared to previous methods, which validates the benefits of the proposed algorithms. PMID:23286072

  18. Automatic segmentation of cerebral MR images using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Alirezaie, J.; Jernigan, M.E.; Nahmias, C.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper we present an unsupervised clustering technique for multispectral segmentation of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the human brain. Our scheme utilizes the Self Organizing Feature Map (SOFM) artificial neural network for feature mapping and generates a set of codebook vectors. By extending the network with an additional layer the map will be classified and each tissue class will be labelled. An algorithm has been developed for extracting the cerebrum from the head scan prior to the segmentation. Extracting the cerebrum is performed by stripping away the skull pixels from the T2 image. Three tissue types of the brain: white matter, gray matter and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) are segmented accurately. To compare the results with other conventional approaches we applied the c-means algorithm to the problem.

  19. OCT image segmentation of the prostate nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitchian, Shahab; Weldon, Thomas P.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2009-08-01

    The cavernous nerves course along the surface of the prostate and are responsible for erectile function. Improvements in identification, imaging, and visualization of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery may improve nerve preservation and postoperative sexual potency. In this study, 2-D OCT images of the rat prostate were segmented to differentiate the cavernous nerves from the prostate gland. Three image features were employed: Gabor filter, Daubechies wavelet, and Laws filter. The features were segmented using a nearestneighbor classifier. N-ary morphological post-processing was used to remove small voids. The cavernous nerves were differentiated from the prostate gland with a segmentation error rate of only 0.058 +/- 0.019.

  20. Hierarchical Segmentation Enhances Diagnostic Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Bartron Medical Imaging LLC (BMI), of New Haven, Connecticut, gained a nonexclusive license from Goddard Space Flight Center to use the RHSEG software in medical imaging. To manage image data, BMI then licensed two pattern-matching software programs from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory that were used in image analysis and three data-mining and edge-detection programs from Kennedy Space Center. More recently, BMI made NASA history by being the first company to partner with the Space Agency through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement to develop a 3-D version of RHSEG. With U.S. Food and Drug Administration clearance, BMI will sell its Med-Seg imaging system with the 2-D version of the RHSEG software to analyze medical imagery from CAT and PET scans, MRI, ultrasound, digitized X-rays, digitized mammographies, dental X-rays, soft tissue analyses, moving object analyses, and soft-tissue slides such as Pap smears for the diagnoses and management of diseases. Extending the software's capabilities to three dimensions will eventually enable production of pixel-level views of a tumor or lesion, early identification of plaque build-up in arteries, and identification of density levels of microcalcification in mammographies.

  1. Performance evaluation of image segmentation algorithms on microscopic image data.

    PubMed

    Beneš, Miroslav; Zitová, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    In our paper, we present a performance evaluation of image segmentation algorithms on microscopic image data. In spite of the existence of many algorithms for image data partitioning, there is no universal and 'the best' method yet. Moreover, images of microscopic samples can be of various character and quality which can negatively influence the performance of image segmentation algorithms. Thus, the issue of selecting suitable method for a given set of image data is of big interest. We carried out a large number of experiments with a variety of segmentation methods to evaluate the behaviour of individual approaches on the testing set of microscopic images (cross-section images taken in three different modalities from the field of art restoration). The segmentation results were assessed by several indices used for measuring the output quality of image segmentation algorithms. In the end, the benefit of segmentation combination approach is studied and applicability of achieved results on another representatives of microscopic data category - biological samples - is shown. PMID:25233873

  2. Contrast Driven Elastica for Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    El-Zehiry, Noha Youssry; Grady, Leo

    2016-06-01

    Minimization of boundary curvature is a classic regularization technique for image segmentation in the presence of noisy image data. Techniques for minimizing curvature have historically been derived from gradient descent methods which could be trapped by a local minimum and, therefore, required a good initialization. Recently, combinatorial optimization techniques have overcome this barrier by providing solutions that can achieve a global optimum. However, curvature regularization methods can fail when the true object has high curvature. In these circumstances, existing methods depend on a data term to overcome the high curvature of the object. Unfortunately, the data term may be ambiguous in some images, which causes these methods also to fail. To overcome these problems, we propose a contrast driven elastica model (including curvature), which can accommodate high curvature objects and an ambiguous data model. We demonstrate that we can accurately segment extremely challenging synthetic and real images with ambiguous data discrimination, poor boundary contrast, and sharp corners. We provide a quantitative evaluation of our segmentation approach when applied to a standard image segmentation data set. PMID:27019488

  3. Segmentation of dermoscopy images using wavelet networks.

    PubMed

    Sadri, Amir Reza; Zekri, Maryam; Sadri, Saeed; Gheissari, Niloofar; Mokhtari, Mojgan; Kolahdouzan, Farzaneh

    2013-04-01

    This paper introduces a new approach for the segmentation of skin lesions in dermoscopic images based on wavelet network (WN). The WN presented here is a member of fixed-grid WNs that is formed with no need of training. In this WN, after formation of wavelet lattice, determining shift and scale parameters of wavelets with two screening stage and selecting effective wavelets, orthogonal least squares algorithm is used to calculate the network weights and to optimize the network structure. The existence of two stages of screening increases globality of the wavelet lattice and provides a better estimation of the function especially for larger scales. R, G, and B values of a dermoscopy image are considered as the network inputs and the network structure formation. Then, the image is segmented and the skin lesions exact boundary is determined accordingly. The segmentation algorithm were applied to 30 dermoscopic images and evaluated with 11 different metrics, using the segmentation result obtained by a skilled pathologist as the ground truth. Experimental results show that our method acts more effectively in comparison with some modern techniques that have been successfully used in many medical imaging problems. PMID:23193305

  4. Accessible magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, L; Arakawa, M; Hale, J; Rothschild, P; Carlson, J; Hake, K; Kramer, D; Lu, W; Van Heteren, J

    1989-10-01

    The cost of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is driven by magnetic field strength. Misperceptions as to the impact of field strength on performance have led to systems that are more expensive than they need to be. Careful analysis of all the factors that affect diagnostic quality lead to the conclusion that field strength per se is not a strong determinant of system performance. Freed from the constraints imposed by high-field operation, it is possible to exploit a varied set of opportunities afforded by low-field operation. In addition to lower costs and easier siting, we can take advantage of shortened T1 times, higher contrast, reduced sensitivity to motion, and reduced radiofrequency power deposition. These conceptual advantages can be made to coalesce onto practical imaging systems. We describe a low-cost MRI system that utilizes a permanent magnet of open design. Careful optimization of receiving antennas and acquisition sequences permit performance levels consistent with those needed for an effective diagnostic unit. Ancillary advantages include easy access to the patient, reduced claustrophobia, quiet and comfortable operation, and absence of a missile effect. The system can be sited in 350 sq ft and consumes a modest amount of electricity. MRI equipment of this kind can widen the population base than can access this powerful and beneficial diagnostic modality. PMID:2640910

  5. Image texture segmentation using a neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayeh, Mohammed R.; Athinarayanan, Ragu; Dhali, Pushpuak

    1992-09-01

    In this paper we use a neural network called the Lyapunov associative memory (LYAM) system to segment image texture into different categories or clusters. The LYAM system is constructed by a set of ordinary differential equations which are simulated on a digital computer. The clustering can be achieved by using a single tuning parameter in the simplest model. Pattern classes are represented by the stable equilibrium states of the system. Design of the system is based on synthesizing two local energy functions, namely, the learning and recall energy functions. Before the implementation of the segmentation process, a Gauss-Markov random field (GMRF) model is applied to the raw image. This application suitably reduces the image data and prepares the texture information for the neural network process. We give a simple image example illustrating the capability of the technique. The GMRF-generated features are also used for a clustering, based on the Euclidean distance.

  6. Development of representative magnetic resonance imaging-based atlases of the canine brain and evaluation of three methods for atlas-based segmentation.

    PubMed

    Milne, Marjorie E; Steward, Christopher; Firestone, Simon M; Long, Sam N; O'Brien, Terrence J; Moffat, Bradford A

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To develop representative MRI atlases of the canine brain and to evaluate 3 methods of atlas-based segmentation (ABS). ANIMALS 62 dogs without clinical signs of epilepsy and without MRI evidence of structural brain disease. PROCEDURES The MRI scans from 44 dogs were used to develop 4 templates on the basis of brain shape (brachycephalic, mesaticephalic, dolichocephalic, and combined mesaticephalic and dolichocephalic). Atlas labels were generated by segmenting the brain, ventricular system, hippocampal formation, and caudate nuclei. The MRI scans from the remaining 18 dogs were used to evaluate 3 methods of ABS (manual brain extraction and application of a brain shape-specific template [A], automatic brain extraction and application of a brain shape-specific template [B], and manual brain extraction and application of a combined template [C]). The performance of each ABS method was compared by calculation of the Dice and Jaccard coefficients, with manual segmentation used as the gold standard. RESULTS Method A had the highest mean Jaccard coefficient and was the most accurate ABS method assessed. Measures of overlap for ABS methods that used manual brain extraction (A and C) ranged from 0.75 to 0.95 and compared favorably with repeated measures of overlap for manual extraction, which ranged from 0.88 to 0.97. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Atlas-based segmentation was an accurate and repeatable method for segmentation of canine brain structures. It could be performed more rapidly than manual segmentation, which should allow the application of computer-assisted volumetry to large data sets and clinical cases and facilitate neuroimaging research and disease diagnosis. PMID:27027839

  7. Functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Bradley R

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps the spatiotemporal distribution of neural activity in the brain under varying cognitive conditions. Since its inception in 1991, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI has rapidly become a vital methodology in basic and applied neuroscience research. In the clinical realm, it has become an established tool for presurgical functional brain mapping. This chapter has three principal aims. First, we review key physiologic, biophysical, and methodologic principles that underlie BOLD fMRI, regardless of its particular area of application. These principles inform a nuanced interpretation of the BOLD fMRI signal, along with its neurophysiologic significance and pitfalls. Second, we illustrate the clinical application of task-based fMRI to presurgical motor, language, and memory mapping in patients with lesions near eloquent brain areas. Integration of BOLD fMRI and diffusion tensor white-matter tractography provides a road map for presurgical planning and intraoperative navigation that helps to maximize the extent of lesion resection while minimizing the risk of postoperative neurologic deficits. Finally, we highlight several basic principles of resting-state fMRI and its emerging translational clinical applications. Resting-state fMRI represents an important paradigm shift, focusing attention on functional connectivity within intrinsic cognitive networks. PMID:27432660

  8. Hepatic lesions segmentation in ultrasound nonlinear imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissi, Adelaide A.; Cormier, Stephane; Pourcelot, Leandre; Tranquart, Francois

    2005-04-01

    Doppler has been used for many years for cardiovascular exploration in order to visualize the vessels walls and anatomical or functional diseases. The use of ultrasound contrast agents makes it possible to improve ultrasonic information. Nonlinear ultrasound imaging highlights the detection of these agents within an organ and hence is a powerful technique to image perfusion of an organ in real-time. The visualization of flow and perfusion provides important information for the diagnosis of various diseases as well as for the detection of tumors. However, the images are buried in noise, the speckle, inherent in the image formation. Furthermore at portal phase, there is often an absence of clear contrast between lesions and surrounding tissues because the organ is filled with agents. In this context, we propose a new method of automatic liver lesions segmentation in nonlinear imaging sequences for the quantification of perfusion. Our method of segmentation is divided into two stages. Initially, we developed an anisotropic diffusion step which raised the structural characteristics to eliminate the speckle. Then, a fuzzy competitive clustering process allowed us to delineate liver lesions. This method has been used to detect focal hepatic lesions (metastasis, nodular hyperplasia, adenoma). Compared to medical expert"s report obtained on 15 varied lesions, the automatic segmentation allows us to identify and delineate focal liver lesions during the portal phase which high accuracy. Our results show that this method improves markedly the recognition of focal hepatic lesions and opens the way for future precise quantification of contrast enhancement.

  9. Segmentation of prostate cancer tissue microarray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, Harvey E.; Can, Ali; Padfield, Dirk

    2006-02-01

    Prostate cancer is diagnosed by histopathology interpretation of hematoxylin and eosin (H and E)-stained tissue sections. Gland and nuclei distributions vary with the disease grade. The morphological features vary with the advance of cancer where the epithelial regions grow into the stroma. An efficient pathology slide image analysis method involved using a tissue microarray with known disease stages. Digital 24-bit RGB images were acquired for each tissue element on the slide with both 10X and 40X objectives. Initial segmentation at low magnification was accomplished using prior spectral characteristics from a training tissue set composed of four tissue clusters; namely, glands, epithelia, stroma and nuclei. The segmentation method was automated by using the training RGB values as an initial guess and iterating the averaging process 10 times to find the four cluster centers. Labels were assigned to the nearest cluster center in red-blue spectral feature space. An automatic threshold algorithm separated the glands from the tissue. A visual pseudo color representation of 60 segmented tissue microarray image was generated where white, pink, red, blue colors represent glands, epithelia, stroma and nuclei, respectively. The higher magnification images provided refined nuclei morphology. The nuclei were detected with a RGB color space principle component analysis that resulted in a grey scale image. The shape metrics such as compactness, elongation, minimum and maximum diameters were calculated based on the eigenvalues of the best-fitting ellipses to the nuclei.

  10. Image Segmentation With Cage Active Contours.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Lluís; Guerrieri, Marité; Igual, Laura

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present a framework for image segmentation based on parametrized active contours. The evolving contour is parametrized according to a reduced set of control points that form a closed polygon and have a clear visual interpretation. The parametrization, called mean value coordinates, stems from the techniques used in computer graphics to animate virtual models. Our framework allows to easily formulate region-based energies to segment an image. In particular, we present three different local region-based energy terms: 1) the mean model; 2) the Gaussian model; 3) and the histogram model. We show the behavior of our method on synthetic and real images and compare the performance with state-of-the-art level set methods. PMID:26316128

  11. Segmentation of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) lesions in MR images

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Francis K.H. . E-mail: fkhlee@cuhk.edu.hk; Yeung, David K.W.; King, Ann D.; Leung, S.F.; Ahuja, Anil

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: An accurate and reproducible method to delineate tumor margins from uninvolved tissues is of vital importance in guiding radiation therapy (RT). In nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), tumor margin may be difficult to identify in magnetic resonance (MR) images, making the task of optimizing RT treatment more difficult. Our aim in this study is to develop a semiautomatic image segmentation method for NPC that requires minimal human intervention and is capable of delineating tumor margins with good accuracy and reproducibility. Methods and materials: The segmentation algorithm includes 5 stages: masking, Bayesian probability calculation, smoothing, thresholding and seed growing, and finally dilation and overlaying of results with different thresholds. The algorithm is based on information obtained from the contrast enhancement ratio of T1-weighted images and signal intensity of T2-weighted images. The algorithm is initiated by the selection of a valid anatomical seed point within the tumor by the user. The algorithm was evaluated on MR images from 7 NPC patients and was compared against the radiologist's reference outline. Results: The algorithm was successfully implemented on all 7 subjects. With a threshold of 1, the average percent match is 78.5 {+-} 3.86 (standard deviation) %, and the correspondence ratio is 66.5 {+-} 7%. Discussion: The segmentation algorithm presented here may be useful for diagnosing NPC and may guide RT treatment planning. Further improvement will be desirable to improve the accuracy and versatility of the method.

  12. Volume rendering of segmented image objects.

    PubMed

    Bullitt, Elizabeth; Aylward, Stephen R

    2002-08-01

    This paper describes a new method of combining ray-casting with segmentation. Volume rendering is performed at interactive rates on personal computers, and visualizations include both "superficial" ray-casting through a shell at each object's surface and "deep" ray-casting through the confines of each object. A feature of the approach is the option to smoothly and interactively dilate segmentation boundaries along all axes. This ability, when combined with selective "turning off" of extraneous image objects, can help clinicians detect and evaluate segmentation errors that may affect surgical planning. We describe both a method optimized for displaying tubular objects and a more general method applicable to objects of arbitrary geometry. In both cases, select three-dimensional points are projected onto a modified z buffer that records additional information about the projected objects. A subsequent step selectively volume renders only through the object volumes indicated by the z buffer. We describe how our approach differs from other reported methods for combining segmentation with ray-casting, and illustrate how our method can be useful in helping to detect segmentation errors. PMID:12472272

  13. Automatic segmentation of mammogram and tomosynthesis images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Dusty; Park, Sun Young

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is a one of the most common forms of cancer in terms of new cases and deaths both in the United States and worldwide. However, the survival rate with breast cancer is high if it is detected and treated before it spreads to other parts of the body. The most common screening methods for breast cancer are mammography and digital tomosynthesis, which involve acquiring X-ray images of the breasts that are interpreted by radiologists. The work described in this paper is aimed at optimizing the presentation of mammography and tomosynthesis images to the radiologist, thereby improving the early detection rate of breast cancer and the resulting patient outcomes. Breast cancer tissue has greater density than normal breast tissue, and appears as dense white image regions that are asymmetrical between the breasts. These irregularities are easily seen if the breast images are aligned and viewed side-by-side. However, since the breasts are imaged separately during mammography, the images may be poorly centered and aligned relative to each other, and may not properly focus on the tissue area. Similarly, although a full three dimensional reconstruction can be created from digital tomosynthesis images, the same centering and alignment issues can occur for digital tomosynthesis. Thus, a preprocessing algorithm that aligns the breasts for easy side-by-side comparison has the potential to greatly increase the speed and accuracy of mammogram reading. Likewise, the same preprocessing can improve the results of automatic tissue classification algorithms for mammography. In this paper, we present an automated segmentation algorithm for mammogram and tomosynthesis images that aims to improve the speed and accuracy of breast cancer screening by mitigating the above mentioned problems. Our algorithm uses information in the DICOM header to facilitate preprocessing, and incorporates anatomical region segmentation and contour analysis, along with a hidden Markov model (HMM) for

  14. Neutron Resonance Spin Determination Using Multi-Segmented Detector DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Keksis, A. L.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.

    2011-06-01

    A sensitive method to determine the spin of neutron resonances is introduced based on the statistical pattern recognition technique. The new method was used to assign the spins of s-wave resonances in {sup 155}Gd. The experimental neutron capture data for these nuclei were measured with the DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiment) calorimeter at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The highly segmented calorimeter provided detailed multiplicity distributions of the capture {gamma}-rays. Using this information, the spins of the neutron capture resonances were determined. With these new spin assignments, level spacings are determined separately for s-wave resonances with J{sup {pi}} = 1{sup -} and 2{sup -}.

  15. Automatic scale selection for medical image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayram, Ersin; Wyatt, Christopher L.; Ge, Yaorong

    2001-07-01

    The scale of interesting structures in medical images is space variant because of partial volume effects, spatial dependence of resolution in many imaging modalities, and differences in tissue properties. Existing segmentation methods either apply a single scale to the entire image or try fine-to-coarse/coarse-to-fine tracking of structures over multiple scales. While single scale approaches fail to fully recover the perceptually important structures, multi-scale methods have problems in providing reliable means to select proper scales and integrating information over multiple scales. A recent approach proposed by Elder and Zucker addresses the scale selection problem by computing a minimal reliable scale for each image pixel. The basic premise of this approach is that, while the scale of structures within an image vary spatially, the imaging system is fixed. Hence, sensor noise statistics can be calculated. Based on a model of edges to be detected, and operators to be used for detection, one can locally compute a unique minimal reliable scale at which the likelihood of error due to sensor noise is less than or equal to a predetermined threshold. In this paper, we improve the segmentation method based on the minimal reliable scale selection and evaluate its effectiveness with both simulated and actual medical data.

  16. Semi-automatic tool for segmentation and volumetric analysis of medical images.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, T; Dastidar, P; Kauppinen, P; Malmivuo, J; Eskola, H

    1998-05-01

    Segmentation software is described, developed for medical image processing and run on Windows. The software applies basic image processing techniques through a graphical user interface. For particular applications, such as brain lesion segmentation, the software enables the combination of different segmentation techniques to improve its efficiency. The program is applied for magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and optical images of cryosections. The software can be utilised in numerous applications, including pre-processing for three-dimensional presentations, volumetric analysis and construction of volume conductor models. PMID:9747567

  17. Image Segmentation, Registration, Compression, and Matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Wei, Hai; Yadegar, Joseph; Ray, Nilanjan; Zabuawala, Sakina

    2011-01-01

    A novel computational framework was developed of a 2D affine invariant matching exploiting a parameter space. Named as affine invariant parameter space (AIPS), the technique can be applied to many image-processing and computer-vision problems, including image registration, template matching, and object tracking from image sequence. The AIPS is formed by the parameters in an affine combination of a set of feature points in the image plane. In cases where the entire image can be assumed to have undergone a single affine transformation, the new AIPS match metric and matching framework becomes very effective (compared with the state-of-the-art methods at the time of this reporting). No knowledge about scaling or any other transformation parameters need to be known a priori to apply the AIPS framework. An automated suite of software tools has been created to provide accurate image segmentation (for data cleaning) and high-quality 2D image and 3D surface registration (for fusing multi-resolution terrain, image, and map data). These tools are capable of supporting existing GIS toolkits already in the marketplace, and will also be usable in a stand-alone fashion. The toolkit applies novel algorithmic approaches for image segmentation, feature extraction, and registration of 2D imagery and 3D surface data, which supports first-pass, batched, fully automatic feature extraction (for segmentation), and registration. A hierarchical and adaptive approach is taken for achieving automatic feature extraction, segmentation, and registration. Surface registration is the process of aligning two (or more) data sets to a common coordinate system, during which the transformation between their different coordinate systems is determined. Also developed here are a novel, volumetric surface modeling and compression technique that provide both quality-guaranteed mesh surface approximations and compaction of the model sizes by efficiently coding the geometry and connectivity

  18. Cerebral microbleed segmentation from susceptibility weighted images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; Jog, Amod; Magrath, Elizabeth; Butman, John A.; Pham, Dzung L.

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMB) are a common marker of traumatic brain injury. Accurate detection and quantification of the CMBs are important for better understanding the progression and prognosis of the injury. Previous microbleed detection methods have suffered from a high rate of false positives, which is time consuming to manually correct. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic, example-based method to segment CMBs from susceptibility-weighted (SWI) scans, where examples from an already segmented template SWI image are used to detect CMBs in a new image. First, multiple radial symmetry transforms (RST) are performed on the template SWI to detect small ellipsoidal structures, which serve as potential microbleed candidates. Then 3D patches from the SWI and its RSTs are combined to form a feature vector at each voxel of the image. A random forest regression is trained using the feature vectors, where the dependent variable is the binary segmentation voxel of the template. Once the regression is learnt, it is applied to a new SWI scan, whose feature vectors contain patches from SWI and its RSTs. Experiments on 26 subjects with mild to severe brain injury show a CMB detection sensitivity of 85:7%, specificity 99:5%, and a false positive to true positive ratio of 1:73, which is competitive with published methods while providing a significant reduction in computation time.

  19. Fast planar segmentation of depth images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javan Hemmat, Hani; Pourtaherian, Arash; Bondarev, Egor; de With, Peter H. N.

    2015-03-01

    One of the major challenges for applications dealing with the 3D concept is the real-time execution of the algorithms. Besides this, for the indoor environments, perceiving the geometry of surrounding structures plays a prominent role in terms of application performance. Since indoor structures mainly consist of planar surfaces, fast and accurate detection of such features has a crucial impact on quality and functionality of the 3D applications, e.g. decreasing model size (decimation), enhancing localization, mapping, and semantic reconstruction. The available planar-segmentation algorithms are mostly developed using surface normals and/or curvatures. Therefore, they are computationally expensive and challenging for real-time performance. In this paper, we introduce a fast planar-segmentation method for depth images avoiding surface normal calculations. Firstly, the proposed method searches for 3D edges in a depth image and finds the lines between identified edges. Secondly, it merges all the points on each pair of intersecting lines into a plane. Finally, various enhancements (e.g. filtering) are applied to improve the segmentation quality. The proposed algorithm is capable of handling VGA-resolution depth images at a 6 FPS frame-rate with a single-thread implementation. Furthermore, due to the multi-threaded design of the algorithm, we achieve a factor of 10 speedup by deploying a GPU implementation.

  20. Left Ventricle: Fully Automated Segmentation Based on Spatiotemporal Continuity and Myocardium Information in Cine Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (LV-FAST)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijia; Pei, Mengchao; Codella, Noel C. F.; Kochar, Minisha; Weinsaft, Jonathan W.; Li, Jianqi; Prince, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    CMR quantification of LV chamber volumes typically and manually defines the basal-most LV, which adds processing time and user-dependence. This study developed an LV segmentation method that is fully automated based on the spatiotemporal continuity of the LV (LV-FAST). An iteratively decreasing threshold region growing approach was used first from the midventricle to the apex, until the LV area and shape discontinued, and then from midventricle to the base, until less than 50% of the myocardium circumference was observable. Region growth was constrained by LV spatiotemporal continuity to improve robustness of apical and basal segmentations. The LV-FAST method was compared with manual tracing on cardiac cine MRI data of 45 consecutive patients. Of the 45 patients, LV-FAST and manual selection identified the same apical slices at both ED and ES and the same basal slices at both ED and ES in 38, 38, 38, and 41 cases, respectively, and their measurements agreed within −1.6 ± 8.7 mL, −1.4 ± 7.8 mL, and 1.0 ± 5.8% for EDV, ESV, and EF, respectively. LV-FAST allowed LV volume-time course quantitatively measured within 3 seconds on a standard desktop computer, which is fast and accurate for processing the cine volumetric cardiac MRI data, and enables LV filling course quantification over the cardiac cycle. PMID:25738153

  1. Image segmentation by background extraction refinements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Arturo A.; Mitchell, O. Robert

    1990-01-01

    An image segmentation method refining background extraction in two phases is presented. In the first phase, the method detects homogeneous-background blocks and estimates the local background to be extracted throughout the image. A block is classified homogeneous if its left and right standard deviations are small. The second phase of the method refines background extraction in nonhomogeneous blocks by recomputing the shoulder thresholds. Rules that predict the final background extraction are derived by observing the behavior of successive background statistical measurements in the regions under the presence of dark and/or bright object pixels. Good results are shown for a number of outdoor scenes.

  2. Perceived visual speed constrained by image segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verghese, P.; Stone, L. S.

    1996-01-01

    Little is known about how or where the visual system parses the visual scene into objects or surfaces. However, it is generally assumed that the segmentation and grouping of pieces of the image into discrete entities is due to 'later' processing stages, after the 'early' processing of the visual image by local mechanisms selective for attributes such as colour, orientation, depth, and motion. Speed perception is also thought to be mediated by early mechanisms tuned for speed. Here we show that manipulating the way in which an image is parsed changes the way in which local speed information is processed. Manipulations that cause multiple stimuli to appear as parts of a single patch degrade speed discrimination, whereas manipulations that perceptually divide a single large stimulus into parts improve discrimination. These results indicate that processes as early as speed perception may be constrained by the parsing of the visual image into discrete entities.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Elster, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The author succeeds in making the physical phenomena of MR imaging quite comprehensible. The chapters on imaging sequences and parameters and the effects of pathologic conditions on MR images are written in a way that helps the beginner. MR artifacts are discussed in a special chapter. The atlas, which makes up 60% of the book; includes a detailed imaging guide with protocols concentrating mainly on the head, neck and brain. MR imaging of the chest is discussed as well as abdomen, pelvis and hips, and the spine, breast, and knee. The book ends with a list of MR equipment manufacturers, specifications of nine major commercial MR imagers, and a glossary of MR terminology.

  4. Optimal retinal cyst segmentation from OCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguz, Ipek; Zhang, Li; Abramoff, Michael D.; Sonka, Milan

    2016-03-01

    Accurate and reproducible segmentation of cysts and fluid-filled regions from retinal OCT images is an important step allowing quantification of the disease status, longitudinal disease progression, and response to therapy in wet-pathology retinal diseases. However, segmentation of fluid-filled regions from OCT images is a challenging task due to their inhomogeneous appearance, the unpredictability of their number, size and location, as well as the intensity profile similarity between such regions and certain healthy tissue types. While machine learning techniques can be beneficial for this task, they require large training datasets and are often over-fitted to the appearance models of specific scanner vendors. We propose a knowledge-based approach that leverages a carefully designed cost function and graph-based segmentation techniques to provide a vendor-independent solution to this problem. We illustrate the results of this approach on two publicly available datasets with a variety of scanner vendors and retinal disease status. Compared to a previous machine-learning based approach, the volume similarity error was dramatically reduced from 81:3+/-56:4% to 22:2+/-21:3% (paired t-test, p << 0:001).

  5. Theoretical analysis of multispectral image segmentation criteria.

    PubMed

    Kerfoot, I B; Bresler, Y

    1999-01-01

    Markov random field (MRF) image segmentation algorithms have been extensively studied, and have gained wide acceptance. However, almost all of the work on them has been experimental. This provides a good understanding of the performance of existing algorithms, but not a unified explanation of the significance of each component. To address this issue, we present a theoretical analysis of several MRF image segmentation criteria. Standard methods of signal detection and estimation are used in the theoretical analysis, which quantitatively predicts the performance at realistic noise levels. The analysis is decoupled into the problems of false alarm rate, parameter selection (Neyman-Pearson and receiver operating characteristics), detection threshold, expected a priori boundary roughness, and supervision. Only the performance inherent to a criterion, with perfect global optimization, is considered. The analysis indicates that boundary and region penalties are very useful, while distinct-mean penalties are of questionable merit. Region penalties are far more important for multispectral segmentation than for greyscale. This observation also holds for Gauss-Markov random fields, and for many separable within-class PDFs. To validate the analysis, we present optimization algorithms for several criteria. Theoretical and experimental results agree fairly well. PMID:18267494

  6. Embedded Implementation of VHR Satellite Image Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Balla-Arabé, Souleymane; Ginhac, Dominique; Yang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Processing and analysis of Very High Resolution (VHR) satellite images provide a mass of crucial information, which can be used for urban planning, security issues or environmental monitoring. However, they are computationally expensive and, thus, time consuming, while some of the applications, such as natural disaster monitoring and prevention, require high efficiency performance. Fortunately, parallel computing techniques and embedded systems have made great progress in recent years, and a series of massively parallel image processing devices, such as digital signal processors or Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), have been made available to engineers at a very convenient price and demonstrate significant advantages in terms of running-cost, embeddability, power consumption flexibility, etc. In this work, we designed a texture region segmentation method for very high resolution satellite images by using the level set algorithm and the multi-kernel theory in a high-abstraction C environment and realize its register-transfer level implementation with the help of a new proposed high-level synthesis-based design flow. The evaluation experiments demonstrate that the proposed design can produce high quality image segmentation with a significant running-cost advantage. PMID:27240370

  7. Embedded Implementation of VHR Satellite Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Balla-Arabé, Souleymane; Ginhac, Dominique; Yang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Processing and analysis of Very High Resolution (VHR) satellite images provide a mass of crucial information, which can be used for urban planning, security issues or environmental monitoring. However, they are computationally expensive and, thus, time consuming, while some of the applications, such as natural disaster monitoring and prevention, require high efficiency performance. Fortunately, parallel computing techniques and embedded systems have made great progress in recent years, and a series of massively parallel image processing devices, such as digital signal processors or Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), have been made available to engineers at a very convenient price and demonstrate significant advantages in terms of running-cost, embeddability, power consumption flexibility, etc. In this work, we designed a texture region segmentation method for very high resolution satellite images by using the level set algorithm and the multi-kernel theory in a high-abstraction C environment and realize its register-transfer level implementation with the help of a new proposed high-level synthesis-based design flow. The evaluation experiments demonstrate that the proposed design can produce high quality image segmentation with a significant running-cost advantage. PMID:27240370

  8. Optically detected magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, Aharon; Shapiro, Guy; Fischer, Ran; London, Paz; Gershoni, David

    2015-01-19

    Optically detected magnetic resonance provides ultrasensitive means to detect and image a small number of electron and nuclear spins, down to the single spin level with nanoscale resolution. Despite the significant recent progress in this field, it has never been combined with the power of pulsed magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Here, we demonstrate how these two methodologies can be integrated using short pulsed magnetic field gradients to spatially encode the sample. This result in what we denote as an 'optically detected magnetic resonance imaging' technique. It offers the advantage that the image is acquired in parallel from all parts of the sample, with well-defined three-dimensional point-spread function, and without any loss of spectroscopic information. In addition, this approach may be used in the future for parallel but yet spatially selective efficient addressing and manipulation of the spins in the sample. Such capabilities are of fundamental importance in the field of quantum spin-based devices and sensors.

  9. Imaging segmentation along the Cascadia subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. M.; Hawley, W. B.; Martin-Short, R.

    2015-12-01

    As we learn more about the Cascadia subduction zone, there is clear evidence for segmentation in the character of the many physical processes along its 1000 km length. There is segmentation in the arc magmas, in the seismicity, episodic tremor and slip, crustal structure and mantle structure all the way down to ~400 km depth. What is striking is the fact that the segment boundaries for these processes at depths of a few kilometers to hundreds of kilometers align. We must determine if this is coincidence, or if not, what the causative process is. The seismic deployments of the Cascadia Initiative onshore and offshore allow us to image the structure of the subduction zone, including the incoming Juan de Fuca plate, with unprecedented resolution. We use data from three one-year deployments of 70 ocean bottom seismometers across the Juan de Fuca plate, along with hundreds of onshore stations from the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network, the Berkeley Digital Seismic Network, the Earthscope Transportable Array, and smaller temporary seismic deployments. Our 3D tomographic models show significant variation in the structure of the subducting slab along its length. It extends deepest in the south (the Gorda section) where the plate is youngest, and shallows to the north across southern Oregon. There is a gap in the slab beneath northern Oregon, which appears to correlate with the geochemistry of the arc magmas. The slab is then visible again beneath Washington. We also constrain mantle flow paths using shear-wave splitting measurements at the offshore and onshore seismic stations. Beneath the Juan de Fuca plate the flow is sub-parallel to the motion of the plate. However, beneath the Gorda section of the Juan de Fuca place the flow is sub-parallel to the motion of the Pacific plate, not the Juan de Fuca plate. We are thus beginning to image a complex mantle flow pattern that may also play a role in the observed segmentation.

  10. Segmentation of polycystic kidneys from MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racimora, Dimitri; Vivier, Pierre-Hugues; Chandarana, Hersh; Rusinek, Henry

    2010-03-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a disorder characterized by the growth of numerous fluid filled cysts in the kidneys. Measuring cystic kidney volume is thus crucial to monitoring the evolution of the disease. While T2-weighted MRI delineates the organ, automatic segmentation is very difficult due to highly variable shape and image contrast. The interactive stereology methods used currently involve a compromise between segmentation accuracy and time. We have investigated semi-automated methods: active contours and a sub-voxel morphology based algorithm. Coronal T2- weighted images of 17 patients were acquired in four breath-holds using the HASTE sequence on a 1.5 Tesla MRI unit. The segmentation results were compared to ground truth kidney masks obtained as a consensus of experts. Automatic active contour algorithm yielded an average 22% +/- 8.6% volume error. A recently developed method (Bridge Burner) based on thresholding and constrained morphology failed to separate PKD from the spleen, yielding 37.4% +/- 8.7% volume error. Manual post-editing reduced the volume error to 3.2% +/- 0.8% for active contours and 3.2% +/- 0.6% for Bridge Burner. The total time (automated algorithm plus editing) was 15 min +/- 5 min for active contours and 19 min +/- 11 min for Bridge Burner. The average volume errors for stereology method were 5.9%, 6.2%, 5.4% for mesh size 6.6, 11, 16.5 mm. The average processing times were 17, 7, 4 min. These results show that nearly two-fold improvement in PKD segmentation accuracy over stereology technique can be achieved with a combination of active contours and postediting.

  11. Unsupervised texture image segmentation by improved neural network ART2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhiling; Labini, G. Sylos; Mugnuolo, R.; Desario, Marco

    1994-01-01

    We here propose a segmentation algorithm of texture image for a computer vision system on a space robot. An improved adaptive resonance theory (ART2) for analog input patterns is adapted to classify the image based on a set of texture image features extracted by a fast spatial gray level dependence method (SGLDM). The nonlinear thresholding functions in input layer of the neural network have been constructed by two parts: firstly, to reduce the effects of image noises on the features, a set of sigmoid functions is chosen depending on the types of the feature; secondly, to enhance the contrast of the features, we adopt fuzzy mapping functions. The cluster number in output layer can be increased by an autogrowing mechanism constantly when a new pattern happens. Experimental results and original or segmented pictures are shown, including the comparison between this approach and K-means algorithm. The system written in C language is performed on a SUN-4/330 sparc-station with an image board IT-150 and a CCD camera.

  12. Robust vessel segmentation in fundus images.

    PubMed

    Budai, A; Bock, R; Maier, A; Hornegger, J; Michelson, G

    2013-01-01

    One of the most common modalities to examine the human eye is the eye-fundus photograph. The evaluation of fundus photographs is carried out by medical experts during time-consuming visual inspection. Our aim is to accelerate this process using computer aided diagnosis. As a first step, it is necessary to segment structures in the images for tissue differentiation. As the eye is the only organ, where the vasculature can be imaged in an in vivo and noninterventional way without using expensive scanners, the vessel tree is one of the most interesting and important structures to analyze. The quality and resolution of fundus images are rapidly increasing. Thus, segmentation methods need to be adapted to the new challenges of high resolutions. In this paper, we present a method to reduce calculation time, achieve high accuracy, and increase sensitivity compared to the original Frangi method. This method contains approaches to avoid potential problems like specular reflexes of thick vessels. The proposed method is evaluated using the STARE and DRIVE databases and we propose a new high resolution fundus database to compare it to the state-of-the-art algorithms. The results show an average accuracy above 94% and low computational needs. This outperforms state-of-the-art methods. PMID:24416040

  13. Nonlinear image labeling for multivalued segmentation.

    PubMed

    Dellepiane, S G; Fontana, F; Vernazza, G L

    1996-01-01

    We describe a framework for multivalued segmentation and demonstrate that some of the problems affecting common region-based algorithms can be overcome by integrating statistical and topological methods in a nonlinear fashion. We address the sensitivity to parameter setting, the difficulty with handling global contextual information, and the dependence of results on analysis order and on initial conditions. We develop our method within a theoretical framework and resort to the definition of image segmentation as an estimation problem. We show that, thanks to an adaptive image scanning mechanism, there is no need of iterations to propagate a global context efficiently. The keyword multivalued refers to a result property, which spans over a set of solutions. The advantage is twofold: first, there is no necessity for setting a priori input thresholds; secondly, we are able to cope successfully with the problem of uncertainties in the signal model. To this end, we adopt a modified version of fuzzy connectedness, which proves particularly useful to account for densitometric and topological information simultaneously. The algorithm was tested on several synthetic and real images. The peculiarities of the method are assessed both qualitatively and quantitatively. PMID:18285129

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies. PMID:26752822

  15. a Minimum Spanning Tree Based Method for Uav Image Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Wei, Zheng; Cui, Weihong; Lin, Zhiyong

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a Minimum Span Tree (MST) based image segmentation method for UAV images in coastal area. An edge weight based optimal criterion (merging predicate) is defined, which based on statistical learning theory (SLT). And we used a scale control parameter to control the segmentation scale. Experiments based on the high resolution UAV images in coastal area show that the proposed merging predicate can keep the integrity of the objects and prevent results from over segmentation. The segmentation results proves its efficiency in segmenting the rich texture images with good boundary of objects.

  16. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... some MRI exams, intravenous (IV) drugs, such as gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are used to change the contrast of the MR image. Gadolinium-based contrast agents are rare earth metals that ...

  17. Semisupervised synthetic aperture radar image segmentation with multilayer superpixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Can; Su, Weimin; Gu, Hong; Gong, Dachen

    2015-01-01

    Image segmentation plays a significant role in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image processing. However, SAR image segmentation is challenging due to speckle. We propose a semisupervised bipartite graph method for segmentation of an SAR image. First, the multilayer over-segmentation of the SAR image, referred to as superpixels, is computed using existing segmentation algorithms. Second, an unbalanced bipartite graph is constructed in which the correlation between pixels is replaced by the texture similarity between superpixels, to reduce the dimension of the edge matrix. To also improve efficiency, we define a new method, called the combination of the Manhattan distance and symmetric Kullback-Leibler divergence, to measure texture similarity. Third, by the Moore-Penrose inverse matrix and semisupervised learning, we construct an across-affinity matrix. A quantitative evaluation using SAR images shows that the new algorithm produces significantly high-quality segmentations as compared with state-of-the-art segmentation algorithms.

  18. Monitoring Change Through Hierarchical Segmentation of Remotely Sensed Image Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.; Lawrence, William T.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center has developed a fast and effective method for generating image segmentation hierarchies. These segmentation hierarchies organize image data in a manner that makes their information content more accessible for analysis. Image segmentation enables analysis through the examination of image regions rather than individual image pixels. In addition, the segmentation hierarchy provides additional analysis clues through the tracing of the behavior of image region characteristics at several levels of segmentation detail. The potential for extracting the information content from imagery data based on segmentation hierarchies has not been fully explored for the benefit of the Earth and space science communities. This paper explores the potential of exploiting these segmentation hierarchies for the analysis of multi-date data sets, and for the particular application of change monitoring.

  19. Towards Automatic Image Segmentation Using Optimised Region Growing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alazab, Mamoun; Islam, Mofakharul; Venkatraman, Sitalakshmi

    Image analysis is being adopted extensively in many applications such as digital forensics, medical treatment, industrial inspection, etc. primarily for diagnostic purposes. Hence, there is a growing interest among researches in developing new segmentation techniques to aid the diagnosis process. Manual segmentation of images is labour intensive, extremely time consuming and prone to human errors and hence an automated real-time technique is warranted in such applications. There is no universally applicable automated segmentation technique that will work for all images as the image segmentation is quite complex and unique depending upon the domain application. Hence, to fill the gap, this paper presents an efficient segmentation algorithm that can segment a digital image of interest into a more meaningful arrangement of regions and objects. Our algorithm combines region growing approach with optimised elimination of false boundaries to arrive at more meaningful segments automatically. We demonstrate this using X-ray teeth images that were taken for real-life dental diagnosis.

  20. Segmentation Fusion Techniques with Application to Plenoptic Images: A Survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evin, D.; Hadad, A.; Solano, A.; Drozdowicz, B.

    2016-04-01

    The segmentation of anatomical and pathological structures plays a key role in the characterization of clinically relevant evidence from digital images. Recently, plenoptic imaging has emerged as a new promise to enrich the diagnostic potential of conventional photography. Since the plenoptic images comprises a set of slightly different versions of the target scene, we propose to make use of those images to improve the segmentation quality in relation to the scenario of a single image segmentation. The problem of finding a segmentation solution from multiple images of a single scene, is called segmentation fusion. This paper reviews the issue of segmentation fusion in order to find solutions that can be applied to plenoptic images, particularly images from the ophthalmological domain.

  1. Fuzzy watershed segmentation algorithm: an enhanced algorithm for 2D gel electrophoresis image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Rashwan, Shaheera; Sarhan, Amany; Faheem, Muhamed Talaat; Youssef, Bayumy A

    2015-01-01

    Detection and quantification of protein spots is an important issue in the analysis of two-dimensional electrophoresis images. However, there is a main challenge in the segmentation of 2DGE images which is to separate overlapping protein spots correctly and to find the weak protein spots. In this paper, we describe a new robust technique to segment and model the different spots present in the gels. The watershed segmentation algorithm is modified to handle the problem of over-segmentation by initially partitioning the image to mosaic regions using the composition of fuzzy relations. The experimental results showed the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm to overcome the over segmentation problem associated with the available algorithm. We also use a wavelet denoising function to enhance the quality of the segmented image. The results of using a denoising function before the proposed fuzzy watershed segmentation algorithm is promising as they are better than those without denoising. PMID:26510287

  2. Efficient segmentation of skin epidermis in whole slide histopathological images.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongming; Mandal, Mrinal

    2015-08-01

    Segmentation of epidermis areas is an important step towards automatic analysis of skin histopathological images. This paper presents a robust technique for epidermis segmentation in whole slide skin histopathological images. The proposed technique first performs a coarse epidermis segmentation using global thresholding and shape analysis. The epidermis thickness is then estimated by a series of line segments perpendicular to the main axis of the initially segmented epidermis mask. If the segmented epidermis mask has a thickness greater than a predefined threshold, the segmentation is suspected to be inaccurate. A second pass of fine segmentation using k-means algorithm is then carried out over these coarsely segmented result to enhance the performance. Experimental results on 64 different skin histopathological images show that the proposed technique provides a superior performance compared to the existing techniques. PMID:26737135

  3. A Review on Segmentation of Positron Emission Tomography Images

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Brent; Bagci, Ulas; Mansoor, Awais; Xu, Ziyue; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET), a non-invasive functional imaging method at the molecular level, images the distribution of biologically targeted radiotracers with high sensitivity. PET imaging provides detailed quantitative information about many diseases and is often used to evaluate inflammation, infection, and cancer by detecting emitted photons from a radiotracer localized to abnormal cells. In order to differentiate abnormal tissue from surrounding areas in PET images, image segmentation methods play a vital role; therefore, accurate image segmentation is often necessary for proper disease detection, diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-ups. In this review paper, we present state-of-the-art PET image segmentation methods, as well as the recent advances in image segmentation techniques. In order to make this manuscript self-contained, we also briefly explain the fundamentals of PET imaging, the challenges of diagnostic PET image analysis, and the effects of these challenges on the segmentation results. PMID:24845019

  4. Soft-tissues Image Processing: Comparison of Traditional Segmentation Methods with 2D active Contour Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulka, J.; Gescheidtova, E.; Bartusek, K.

    2012-01-01

    The paper deals with modern methods of image processing, especially image segmentation, classification and evaluation of parameters. It focuses primarily on processing medical images of soft tissues obtained by magnetic resonance tomography (MR). It is easy to describe edges of the sought objects using segmented images. The edges found can be useful for further processing of monitored object such as calculating the perimeter, surface and volume evaluation or even three-dimensional shape reconstruction. The proposed solutions can be used for the classification of healthy/unhealthy tissues in MR or other imaging. Application examples of the proposed segmentation methods are shown. Research in the area of image segmentation focuses on methods based on solving partial differential equations. This is a modern method for image processing, often called the active contour method. It is of great advantage in the segmentation of real images degraded by noise with fuzzy edges and transitions between objects. In the paper, results of the segmentation of medical images by the active contour method are compared with results of the segmentation by other existing methods. Experimental applications which demonstrate the very good properties of the active contour method are given.

  5. Pediatric Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Goyal, Ankur; Sharma, Raju; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a radiation-free imaging modality with excellent contrast resolution and multiplanar capabilities. Since ionizing radiation is an important concern in the pediatric population, MRI serves as a useful alternative to computed tomography (CT) and also provides additional clues to diagnosis, not discernible on other investigations. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), urography, angiography, enterography, dynamic multiphasic imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging provide wealth of information. The main limitations include, long scan time, need for sedation/anesthesia, cost and lack of widespread availability. With the emergence of newer sequences and variety of contrast agents, MRI has become a robust modality and may serve as a one-stop shop for both anatomical and functional information. PMID:26916887

  6. Image enhancement and segmentation using weighted morphological connected slope filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendiola-Santibañez, Jorge D.; Terol-Villalobos, Iván R.

    2013-04-01

    The morphological connected slope filters (MCSFs) are studied as gray level transformations, and two contributions are made on these operators with the purpose of modifying the gradient criterion performance. The proposals consist of: (a) the introduction of three weighting functions and (b) the application of a displacement parameter. The displacement parameter will permit the image segmentation in a certain intensity interval and the contrast improvement at the same time. This characteristic is an important difference among the MCSFs introduced previously, together with the other transformations defined in the current literature utilized uniquely to enhance contrast. Also, an application example of the weighted morphological slope filters is provided. In such an example, white matter is separated from brain magnetic resonance images T1.

  7. Cavity- and waveguide-resonators in electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Webb, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Cavity resonators are widely used in electron paramagnetic resonance, very high field magnetic resonance microimaging and also in high field human imaging. The basic principles and designs of different forms of cavity resonators including rectangular, cylindrical, re-entrant, cavity magnetrons, toroidal cavities and dielectric resonators are reviewed. Applications in EPR and MRI are summarized, and finally the topic of traveling wave MRI using the magnet bore as a waveguide is discussed. PMID:25456314

  8. Microscopy image segmentation tool: Robust image data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Valmianski, Ilya Monton, Carlos; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2014-03-15

    We present a software package called Microscopy Image Segmentation Tool (MIST). MIST is designed for analysis of microscopy images which contain large collections of small regions of interest (ROIs). Originally developed for analysis of porous anodic alumina scanning electron images, MIST capabilities have been expanded to allow use in a large variety of problems including analysis of biological tissue, inorganic and organic film grain structure, as well as nano- and meso-scopic structures. MIST provides a robust segmentation algorithm for the ROIs, includes many useful analysis capabilities, and is highly flexible allowing incorporation of specialized user developed analysis. We describe the unique advantages MIST has over existing analysis software. In addition, we present a number of diverse applications to scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  9. Image segmentation using trainable fuzzy set classifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schalkoff, Robert J.; Carver, Albrecht E.; Gurbuz, Sabri

    1999-07-01

    A general image analysis and segmentation method using fuzzy set classification and learning is described. The method uses a learned fuzzy representation of pixel region characteristics, based upon the conjunction and disjunction of extracted and derived fuzzy color and texture features. Both positive and negative exemplars of some visually apparent characteristic which forms the basis of the inspection, input by a human operator, are used together with a clustering algorithm to construct positive similarity membership functions and negative similarity membership functions. Using these composite fuzzified images, P and N, are produced using fuzzy union. Classification is accomplished via image defuzzification, whereby linguistic meaning is assigned to each pixel in the fuzzy set using a fuzzy inference operation. The technique permits: (1) strict color and texture discrimination, (2) machine learning of color and texture characteristics of regions, (3) and judicious labeling of each pixel based upon leaned fuzzy representation and fuzzy classification. This approach appears ideal for applications involving visual inspection and allows the development of image-based inspection systems which may be trained and used by relatively unskilled workers. We show three different examples involving the visual inspection of mixed waste drums, lumber and woven fabric.

  10. Automatic three-dimensional segmentation of MR images applied to the rat uterus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akselrod-Ballin, Ayelet; Eyal, Erez; Galun, Meirav; Furman-Haran, Edna; Gomori, John M.; Basri, Ronen; Degani, Hadassa; Brandt, Achi

    2006-03-01

    We introduce an automatic 3D multiscale automatic segmentation algorithm for delineating specific organs in Magnetic Resonance images (MRI). The algorithm can process several modalities simultaneously, and handle both isotropic and anisotropic data in only linear time complexity. It produces a hierarchical decomposition of MRI scans. During this segmentation process a rich set of features describing the segments in terms of intensity, shape and location are calculated, reflecting the formation of the hierarchical decomposition. We show that this method can delineate the entire uterus of the rat abdomen in 3D MR images utilizing a combination of scanning protocols that jointly achieve high contrast between the uterus and other abdominal organs and between inner structures of the rat uterus. Both single and multi-channel automatic segmentation demonstrate high correlation to a manual segmentation. While the focus here is on the rat uterus, the general approach can be applied to recognition in 2D, 3D and multi-channel medical images.

  11. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  12. Colorization and Automated Segmentation of Human T2 MR Brain Images for Characterization of Soft Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Attique, Muhammad; Gilanie, Ghulam; Hafeez-Ullah; Mehmood, Malik S.; Naweed, Muhammad S.; Ikram, Masroor; Kamran, Javed A.; Vitkin, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of tissues like brain by using magnetic resonance (MR) images and colorization of the gray scale image has been reported in the literature, along with the advantages and drawbacks. Here, we present two independent methods; (i) a novel colorization method to underscore the variability in brain MR images, indicative of the underlying physical density of bio tissue, (ii) a segmentation method (both hard and soft segmentation) to characterize gray brain MR images. The segmented images are then transformed into color using the above-mentioned colorization method, yielding promising results for manual tracing. Our color transformation incorporates the voxel classification by matching the luminance of voxels of the source MR image and provided color image by measuring the distance between them. The segmentation method is based on single-phase clustering for 2D and 3D image segmentation with a new auto centroid selection method, which divides the image into three distinct regions (gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using prior anatomical knowledge). Results have been successfully validated on human T2-weighted (T2) brain MR images. The proposed method can be potentially applied to gray-scale images from other imaging modalities, in bringing out additional diagnostic tissue information contained in the colorized image processing approach as described. PMID:22479421

  13. 3D segmentation of masses in DCE-MRI images using FCM and adaptive MRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chengjie; Li, Lihua

    2014-03-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a sensitive imaging modality for the detection of breast cancer. Automated segmentation of breast lesions in DCE-MRI images is challenging due to inherent signal-to-noise ratios and high inter-patient variability. A novel 3D segmentation method based on FCM and MRF is proposed in this study. In this method, a MRI image is segmented by spatial FCM, firstly. And then MRF segmentation is conducted to refine the result. We combined with the 3D information of lesion in the MRF segmentation process by using segmentation result of contiguous slices to constraint the slice segmentation. At the same time, a membership matrix of FCM segmentation result is used for adaptive adjustment of Markov parameters in MRF segmentation process. The proposed method was applied for lesion segmentation on 145 breast DCE-MRI examinations (86 malignant and 59 benign cases). An evaluation of segmentation was taken using the traditional overlap rate method between the segmented region and hand-drawing ground truth. The average overlap rates for benign and malignant lesions are 0.764 and 0.755 respectively. Then we extracted five features based on the segmentation region, and used an artificial neural network (ANN) to classify between malignant and benign cases. The ANN had a classification performance measured by the area under the ROC curve of AUC=0.73. The positive and negative predictive values were 0.86 and 0.58, respectively. The results demonstrate the proposed method not only achieves a better segmentation performance in accuracy also has a reasonable classification performance.

  14. CALM: cascading system with leaking detection mechanism for medical image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiang; Lim, Joo Hwee; Li, Huiqi

    2008-03-01

    Medical image segmentation is a challenging process due to possible image over-segmentation and under-segmentation (leaking). The CALM medical image segmentation system is constructed with an innovative scheme that cascades threshold level-set and region-growing segmentation algorithms using Union and Intersection set operators. These set operators help to balance the over-segmentation rate and under-segmentation rate of the system respectively. While adjusting the curvature scalar parameter in the threshold level-set algorithm, we observe that the abrupt change in the size of the segmented areas coincides with the occurrences of possible leaking. Instead of randomly choose a value or use the system default curvature scalar values, this observation prompts us to use the following formula in CALM to automatically decide the optimal curvature values γ to prevent the occurrence of leaking : δ2S/δγ2 >= M, where S is the size of the segmented area and M is a large positive number. Motivated for potential applications in organ transplant and analysis, the CALM system is tested on the segmentation of the kidney regions from the Magnetic Resonance images taken from the National University Hospital of Singapore. Due to the nature of MR imaging, low-contrast, weak edges and overlapping regions of adjacent organs at kidney boundaries are frequently seen in the datasets and hence kidney segmentation is prone to leaking. The kidney segmentation accuracy rate achieved by CALM is 22% better compared with those achieved by the component algorithms or the system without leaking detection mechanism. CALM is easy-to-implement and can be applied to many applications besides kidney segmentation.

  15. An image fusion method based region segmentation and complex wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junju; Yuan, Yihui; Chang, Benkang; Han, Yiyong; Liu, Lei; Qiu, Yafeng

    2009-07-01

    A fusion algorithm for infrared and visible light images based on region segmentation and the dual-tree complex wavelet transform. Before image segmentation, morphological top-hat filtering is firstly performed on the IR image and visual images respectively and the details of the luminous area are eliminated. Morphological bottom-hat filtering is then performed on the two kinds of images respectively and the details of the dark area are eliminated. Make the top-hat filtered image subtract the bottom-hat filtered image and obtain the enhanced images. Then the threshold method is used to segment the enhanced images. After image segmentation, the DTCWT coefficients from different regions are merged separately. Finally the fused image is obtained by performing inverse DTCWT. The evaluation results show the validity of the presented algorithm.

  16. Building roof segmentation from aerial images using a lineand region-based watershed segmentation technique.

    PubMed

    El Merabet, Youssef; Meurie, Cyril; Ruichek, Yassine; Sbihi, Abderrahmane; Touahni, Raja

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel strategy for roof segmentation from aerial images (orthophotoplans) based on the cooperation of edge- and region-based segmentation methods. The proposed strategy is composed of three major steps. The first one, called the pre-processing step, consists of simplifying the acquired image with an appropriate couple of invariant and gradient, optimized for the application, in order to limit illumination changes (shadows, brightness, etc.) affecting the images. The second step is composed of two main parallel treatments: on the one hand, the simplified image is segmented by watershed regions. Even if the first segmentation of this step provides good results in general, the image is often over-segmented. To alleviate this problem, an efficient region merging strategy adapted to the orthophotoplan particularities, with a 2D modeling of roof ridges technique, is applied. On the other hand, the simplified image is segmented by watershed lines. The third step consists of integrating both watershed segmentation strategies into a single cooperative segmentation scheme in order to achieve satisfactory segmentation results. Tests have been performed on orthophotoplans containing 100 roofs with varying complexity, and the results are evaluated with the VINETcriterion using ground-truth image segmentation. A comparison with five popular segmentation techniques of the literature demonstrates the effectiveness and the reliability of the proposed approach. Indeed, we obtain a good segmentation rate of 96% with the proposed method compared to 87.5% with statistical region merging (SRM), 84% with mean shift, 82% with color structure code (CSC), 80% with efficient graph-based segmentation algorithm (EGBIS) and 71% with JSEG. PMID:25648706

  17. Image segmentation using an improved differential algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hao; Shi, Yujiao; Wu, Dongmei

    2014-10-01

    Among all the existing segmentation techniques, the thresholding technique is one of the most popular due to its simplicity, robustness, and accuracy (e.g. the maximum entropy method, Otsu's method, and K-means clustering). However, the computation time of these algorithms grows exponentially with the number of thresholds due to their exhaustive searching strategy. As a population-based optimization algorithm, differential algorithm (DE) uses a population of potential solutions and decision-making processes. It has shown considerable success in solving complex optimization problems within a reasonable time limit. Thus, applying this method into segmentation algorithm should be a good choice during to its fast computational ability. In this paper, we first propose a new differential algorithm with a balance strategy, which seeks a balance between the exploration of new regions and the exploitation of the already sampled regions. Then, we apply the new DE into the traditional Otsu's method to shorten the computation time. Experimental results of the new algorithm on a variety of images show that, compared with the EA-based thresholding methods, the proposed DE algorithm gets more effective and efficient results. It also shortens the computation time of the traditional Otsu method.

  18. Automatic bone segmentation in knee MR images using a coarse-to-fine strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Hyun; Lee, Soochahn; Yun, Il Dong; Lee, Sang Uk

    2012-02-01

    Segmentation of bone and cartilage from a three dimensional knee magnetic resonance (MR) image is a crucial element in monitoring and understanding of development and progress of osteoarthritis. Until now, various segmentation methods have been proposed to separate the bone from other tissues, but it still remains challenging problem due to different modality of MR images, low contrast between bone and tissues, and shape irregularity. In this paper, we present a new fully-automatic segmentation method of bone compartments using relevant bone atlases from a training set. To find the relevant bone atlases and obtain the segmentation, a coarse-to-fine strategy is proposed. In the coarse step, the best atlas among the training set and an initial segmentation are simultaneously detected using branch and bound tree search. Since the best atlas in the coarse step is not accurately aligned, all atlases from the training set are aligned to the initial segmentation, and the best aligned atlas is selected in the middle step. Finally, in the fine step, segmentation is conducted as adaptively integrating shape of the best aligned atlas and appearance prior based on characteristics of local regions. For experiment, femur and tibia bones of forty test MR images are segmented by the proposed method using sixty training MR images. Experimental results show that a performance of the segmentation and the registration becomes better as going near the fine step, and the proposed method obtain the comparable performance with the state-of-the-art methods.

  19. Segmentation of multispectral bladder MR images with inhomogeneity correction for virtual cystoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lihong; Liang, Zhengrong; Wang, Su; Lu, Hongyu; Wei, Xinzhou; Wagshul, Mark; Zawin, Marlene; Posniak, Erica J.; Lee, Christopher S.

    2008-03-01

    Virtual cystoscopy (VC) is a developing noninvasive, safe, and low-cost technique for bladder cancer screening. Multispectral (T I- and T II-weighted) magnetic resonance (MR) images provide a better tissue contrast between bladder wall and bladder lumen comparing with computed tomography (CT) images. The intrinsic T I and T II contrast of the urine against the bladder wall eliminates the invasive air insufflation procedure which is often used in CT-based VC. We propose a new partial volume (PV) segmentation scheme with inhomogeneity correction to segment multispectral MR images for tumor screening by virtual cystoscopy. The proposed PV segmentation algorithm automatically estimates the bias field and segments tissue mixtures inside each voxel of MR images, thus preserving texture information. Experimental results indicate that the present scheme is promising towards mass screening by virtual cystoscopy means.

  20. Multiple Active Contours Guided by Differential Evolution for Medical Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Aceves, I.; Avina-Cervantes, J. G.; Lopez-Hernandez, J. M.; Rostro-Gonzalez, H.; Garcia-Capulin, C. H.; Torres-Cisneros, M.; Guzman-Cabrera, R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new image segmentation method based on multiple active contours guided by differential evolution, called MACDE. The segmentation method uses differential evolution over a polar coordinate system to increase the exploration and exploitation capabilities regarding the classical active contour model. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, a set of synthetic images with complex objects, Gaussian noise, and deep concavities is introduced. Subsequently, MACDE is applied on datasets of sequential computed tomography and magnetic resonance images which contain the human heart and the human left ventricle, respectively. Finally, to obtain a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the medical image segmentations compared to regions outlined by experts, a set of distance and similarity metrics has been adopted. According to the experimental results, MACDE outperforms the classical active contour model and the interactive Tseng method in terms of efficiency and robustness for obtaining the optimal control points and attains a high accuracy segmentation. PMID:23983809

  1. Perceptual segmentation: combining image segmentation with object tagging.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Ruth; Nachlieli, Hila

    2011-06-01

    Human observers understand the content of an image intuitively. Based upon image content, they perform many image-related tasks, such as creating slide shows and photo albums, and organizing their image archives. For example, to select photos for an album, people assess image quality based upon the main objects in the image. They modify colors in an image based upon the color of important objects, such as sky, grass or skin. Serious photographers might modify each object separately. Photo applications, in contrast, use low-level descriptors to guide similar tasks. Typical descriptors, such as color histograms, noise level, JPEG artifacts and overall sharpness, can guide an imaging application and safeguard against blunders. However, there is a gap between the outcome of such operations and the same task performed by a person. We believe that the gap can be bridged by automatically understanding the content of the image. This paper presents algorithms for automatic tagging of perceptual objects in images, including sky, skin, and foliage, which constitutes an important step toward this goal. PMID:21592914

  2. A method for scale parameter selection and segments refinement for multi-resolution image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Tang, Yunwei; Liu, Qingjie; Ding, Haifeng; Chen, Yu; Jing, Linhai

    2014-11-01

    Image segmentation is the basis of object-based information extraction from remote sensing imagery. Image segmentation based on multiple features, multi-scale, and spatial context is one current research focus. The scale parameters selected in the segmentation severely impact on the average size of segments obtained by multi-scale segmentation method, such as the Fractal Network Evolution Approach (FNEA) employed in the eCognition software. It is important for the FNEA method to select an appropriate scale parameter that causes no neither over- nor undersegmentation. A method for scale parameter selection and segments refinement is proposed in this paper by modifying a method proposed by Johnson. In a test on two images, the segmentation maps obtained using the proposed method contain less under-segmentation and over-segmentation than that generated by the Johnson's method. It was demonstrated that the proposed method is effective in scale parameter selection and segment refinement for multi-scale segmentation algorithms, such as the FNEA method.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research. PMID:25659942

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-02-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research.

  5. Hybrid segmentation framework for 3D medical image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ting; Metaxas, Dimitri N.

    2003-05-01

    Medical image segmentation is the process that defines the region of interest in the image volume. Classical segmentation methods such as region-based methods and boundary-based methods cannot make full use of the information provided by the image. In this paper we proposed a general hybrid framework for 3D medical image segmentation purposes. In our approach we combine the Gibbs Prior model, and the deformable model. First, Gibbs Prior models are applied onto each slice in a 3D medical image volume and the segmentation results are combined to a 3D binary masks of the object. Then we create a deformable mesh based on this 3D binary mask. The deformable model will be lead to the edge features in the volume with the help of image derived external forces. The deformable model segmentation result can be used to update the parameters for Gibbs Prior models. These methods will then work recursively to reach a global segmentation solution. The hybrid segmentation framework has been applied to images with the objective of lung, heart, colon, jaw, tumor, and brain. The experimental data includes MRI (T1, T2, PD), CT, X-ray, Ultra-Sound images. High quality results are achieved with relatively efficient time cost. We also did validation work using expert manual segmentation as the ground truth. The result shows that the hybrid segmentation may have further clinical use.

  6. Physiological basis and image processing in functional magnetic resonance imaging: Neuronal and motor activity in brain

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rakesh; Sharma, Avdhesh

    2004-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is recently developing as imaging modality used for mapping hemodynamics of neuronal and motor event related tissue blood oxygen level dependence (BOLD) in terms of brain activation. Image processing is performed by segmentation and registration methods. Segmentation algorithms provide brain surface-based analysis, automated anatomical labeling of cortical fields in magnetic resonance data sets based on oxygen metabolic state. Registration algorithms provide geometric features using two or more imaging modalities to assure clinically useful neuronal and motor information of brain activation. This review article summarizes the physiological basis of fMRI signal, its origin, contrast enhancement, physical factors, anatomical labeling by segmentation, registration approaches with examples of visual and motor activity in brain. Latest developments are reviewed for clinical applications of fMRI along with other different neurophysiological and imaging modalities. PMID:15125779

  7. Atlas-registration based image segmentation of MRI human thigh muscles in 3D space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Ezak; Yap, Moi Hoon; Degens, Hans; McPhee, Jamie S.

    2014-03-01

    Automatic segmentation of anatomic structures of magnetic resonance thigh scans can be a challenging task due to the potential lack of precisely defined muscle boundaries and issues related to intensity inhomogeneity or bias field across an image. In this paper, we demonstrate a combination framework of atlas construction and image registration methods to propagate the desired region of interest (ROI) between atlas image and the targeted MRI thigh scans for quadriceps muscles, femur cortical layer and bone marrow segmentations. The proposed system employs a semi-automatic segmentation method on an initial image in one dataset (from a series of images). The segmented initial image is then used as an atlas image to automate the segmentation of other images in the MRI scans (3-D space). The processes include: ROI labeling, atlas construction and registration, and morphological transform correspondence pixels (in terms of feature and intensity value) between the atlas (template) image and the targeted image based on the prior atlas information and non-rigid image registration methods.

  8. Rough-Fuzzy Clustering and Unsupervised Feature Selection for Wavelet Based MR Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Maji, Pradipta; Roy, Shaswati

    2015-01-01

    Image segmentation is an indispensable process in the visualization of human tissues, particularly during clinical analysis of brain magnetic resonance (MR) images. For many human experts, manual segmentation is a difficult and time consuming task, which makes an automated brain MR image segmentation method desirable. In this regard, this paper presents a new segmentation method for brain MR images, integrating judiciously the merits of rough-fuzzy computing and multiresolution image analysis technique. The proposed method assumes that the major brain tissues, namely, gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid from the MR images are considered to have different textural properties. The dyadic wavelet analysis is used to extract the scale-space feature vector for each pixel, while the rough-fuzzy clustering is used to address the uncertainty problem of brain MR image segmentation. An unsupervised feature selection method is introduced, based on maximum relevance-maximum significance criterion, to select relevant and significant textural features for segmentation problem, while the mathematical morphology based skull stripping preprocessing step is proposed to remove the non-cerebral tissues like skull. The performance of the proposed method, along with a comparison with related approaches, is demonstrated on a set of synthetic and real brain MR images using standard validity indices. PMID:25848961

  9. Robust image segmentation using local robust statistics and correntropy-based K-means clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chencheng; Zeng, Li

    2015-03-01

    It is an important work to segment the real world images with intensity inhomogeneity such as magnetic resonance (MR) and computer tomography (CT) images. In practice, such images are often polluted by noise which make them difficult to be segmented by traditional level set based segmentation models. In this paper, we propose a robust level set image segmentation model combining local with global fitting energies to segment noised images. In the proposed model, the local fitting energy is based on the local robust statistics (LRS) information of an input image, which can efficiently reduce the effects of the noise, and the global fitting energy utilizes the correntropy-based K-means (CK) method, which can adaptively emphasize the samples that are close to their corresponding cluster centers. By integrating the advantages of global information and local robust statistics characteristics, the proposed model can efficiently segment images with intensity inhomogeneity and noise. Then, a level set regularization term is used to avoid re-initialization procedures in the process of curve evolution. In addition, the Gaussian filter is utilized to keep the level set smoothing in the curve evolution process. The proposed model first appeared as a two-phase model and then extended to a multi-phase one. Experimental results show the advantages of our model in terms of accuracy and robustness to the noise. In particular, our method has been applied on some synthetic and real images with desirable results.

  10. An effective method for segmentation of MR brain images using the ant colony optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Taherdangkoo, Mohammad; Bagheri, Mohammad Hadi; Yazdi, Mehran; Andriole, Katherine P

    2013-12-01

    Since segmentation of magnetic resonance images is one of the most important initial steps in brain magnetic resonance image processing, success in this part has a great influence on the quality of outcomes of subsequent steps. In the past few decades, numerous methods have been introduced for classification of such images, but typically they perform well only on a specific subset of images, do not generalize well to other image sets, and have poor computational performance. In this study, we provided a method for segmentation of magnetic resonance images of the brain that despite its simplicity has a high accuracy. We compare the performance of our proposed algorithm with similar evolutionary algorithms on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Our algorithm is tested across varying sets of magnetic resonance images and demonstrates high speed and accuracy. It should be noted that in initial steps, the algorithm is computationally intensive requiring a large number of calculations; however, in subsequent steps of the search process, the number is reduced with the segmentation focused only in the target area. PMID:23563793

  11. Multimodal Correlative Preclinical Whole Body Imaging and Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Akselrod-Ballin, Ayelet; Dafni, Hagit; Addadi, Yoseph; Biton, Inbal; Avni, Reut; Brenner, Yafit; Neeman, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Segmentation of anatomical structures and particularly abdominal organs is a fundamental problem for quantitative image analysis in preclinical research. This paper presents a novel approach for whole body segmentation of small animals in a multimodal setting of MR, CT and optical imaging. The algorithm integrates multiple imaging sequences into a machine learning framework, which generates supervoxels by an efficient hierarchical agglomerative strategy and utilizes multiple SVM-kNN classifiers each constrained by a heatmap prior region to compose the segmentation. We demonstrate results showing segmentation of mice images into several structures including the heart, lungs, liver, kidneys, stomach, vena cava, bladder, tumor, and skeleton structures. Experimental validation on a large set of mice and organs, indicated that our system outperforms alternative state of the art approaches. The system proposed can be generalized to various tissues and imaging modalities to produce automatic atlas-free segmentation, thereby enabling a wide range of applications in preclinical studies of small animal imaging. PMID:27325178

  12. Multimodal Correlative Preclinical Whole Body Imaging and Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Akselrod-Ballin, Ayelet; Dafni, Hagit; Addadi, Yoseph; Biton, Inbal; Avni, Reut; Brenner, Yafit; Neeman, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Segmentation of anatomical structures and particularly abdominal organs is a fundamental problem for quantitative image analysis in preclinical research. This paper presents a novel approach for whole body segmentation of small animals in a multimodal setting of MR, CT and optical imaging. The algorithm integrates multiple imaging sequences into a machine learning framework, which generates supervoxels by an efficient hierarchical agglomerative strategy and utilizes multiple SVM-kNN classifiers each constrained by a heatmap prior region to compose the segmentation. We demonstrate results showing segmentation of mice images into several structures including the heart, lungs, liver, kidneys, stomach, vena cava, bladder, tumor, and skeleton structures. Experimental validation on a large set of mice and organs, indicated that our system outperforms alternative state of the art approaches. The system proposed can be generalized to various tissues and imaging modalities to produce automatic atlas-free segmentation, thereby enabling a wide range of applications in preclinical studies of small animal imaging. PMID:27325178

  13. Basics of magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Oldendorf, W.; Oldendorf, W. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Beginning with the behavior of a compass needle in a magnetic field, this text uses analogies from everyday experience to explain the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and how it is used for imaging. Using a minimum of scientific abbreviations and symbols, the basics of tissue visualization and characterization are presented. A description of the various types of magnets and scanners is followed by the practical advantages and limitations of MRI relative to x-ray CT scanning.

  14. Segmentation and learning in the quantitative analysis of microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Christy; Ross, Amy; Porter, Reid

    2015-02-01

    In material science and bio-medical domains the quantity and quality of microscopy images is rapidly increasing and there is a great need to automatically detect, delineate and quantify particles, grains, cells, neurons and other functional "objects" within these images. These are challenging problems for image processing because of the variability in object appearance that inevitably arises in real world image acquisition and analysis. One of the most promising (and practical) ways to address these challenges is interactive image segmentation. These algorithms are designed to incorporate input from a human operator to tailor the segmentation method to the image at hand. Interactive image segmentation is now a key tool in a wide range of applications in microscopy and elsewhere. Historically, interactive image segmentation algorithms have tailored segmentation on an image-by-image basis, and information derived from operator input is not transferred between images. But recently there has been increasing interest to use machine learning in segmentation to provide interactive tools that accumulate and learn from the operator input over longer periods of time. These new learning algorithms reduce the need for operator input over time, and can potentially provide a more dynamic balance between customization and automation for different applications. This paper reviews the state of the art in this area, provides a unified view of these algorithms, and compares the segmentation performance of various design choices.

  15. Unsupervised learning of categorical segments in image collections.

    PubMed

    Andreetto, Marco; Zelnik-Manor, Lihi; Perona, Pietro

    2012-09-01

    Which one comes first: segmentation or recognition? We propose a unified framework for carrying out the two simultaneously and without supervision. The framework combines a flexible probabilistic model, for representing the shape and appearance of each segment, with the popular “bag of visual words” model for recognition. If applied to a collection of images, our framework can simultaneously discover the segments of each image and the correspondence between such segments, without supervision. Such recurring segments may be thought of as the “parts” of corresponding objects that appear multiple times in the image collection. Thus, the model may be used for learning new categories, detecting/classifying objects, and segmenting images, without using expensive human annotation. PMID:22201050

  16. Semantic image retrieval through human subject segmentation and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanbing; Tao, Bo; Kei, Shun; Wolf, Wayne H.

    1997-01-01

    Video databases can be searched for visual content by searching over automatically extracted key frames rather than the complete video sequence. Many video materials used in the humanities and social sciences contain a preponderance of shots of people. In this paper, we describe our work in semantic image retrieval of person-rich scenes (key frames) for video databases and libraries. We use an approach called retrieval through segmentation. A key-frame image is first segmented into human subjects and background. We developed a specialized segmentation technique that utilizes both human flesh-tone detection and contour analysis. Experimental results show that this technique can effectively segment images in a low time complexity. Once the image has been segmented, we can then extract features or pose queries about both the people and the background. We propose a retrieval framework that is based on the segmentation results and the extracted features of people and background.

  17. Segmentation of knee injury swelling on infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puentes, John; Langet, Hélène; Herry, Christophe; Frize, Monique

    2011-03-01

    Interpretation of medical infrared images is complex due to thermal noise, absence of texture, and small temperature differences in pathological zones. Acute inflammatory response is a characteristic symptom of some knee injuries like anterior cruciate ligament sprains, muscle or tendons strains, and meniscus tear. Whereas artificial coloring of the original grey level images may allow to visually assess the extent inflammation in the area, their automated segmentation remains a challenging problem. This paper presents a hybrid segmentation algorithm to evaluate the extent of inflammation after knee injury, in terms of temperature variations and surface shape. It is based on the intersection of rapid color segmentation and homogeneous region segmentation, to which a Laplacian of a Gaussian filter is applied. While rapid color segmentation enables to properly detect the observed core of swollen area, homogeneous region segmentation identifies possible inflammation zones, combining homogeneous grey level and hue area segmentation. The hybrid segmentation algorithm compares the potential inflammation regions partially detected by each method to identify overlapping areas. Noise filtering and edge segmentation are then applied to common zones in order to segment the swelling surfaces of the injury. Experimental results on images of a patient with anterior cruciate ligament sprain show the improved performance of the hybrid algorithm with respect to its separated components. The main contribution of this work is a meaningful automatic segmentation of abnormal skin temperature variations on infrared thermography images of knee injury swelling.

  18. Automated image segmentation using support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Stephanie; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Andreasen, Nancy C.

    2007-03-01

    Neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases demonstrate problems associated with brain maturation and aging. Automated methods to delineate brain structures of interest are required to analyze large amounts of imaging data like that being collected in several on going multi-center studies. We have previously reported on using artificial neural networks (ANN) to define subcortical brain structures including the thalamus (0.88), caudate (0.85) and the putamen (0.81). In this work, apriori probability information was generated using Thirion's demons registration algorithm. The input vector consisted of apriori probability, spherical coordinates, and an iris of surrounding signal intensity values. We have applied the support vector machine (SVM) machine learning algorithm to automatically segment subcortical and cerebellar regions using the same input vector information. SVM architecture was derived from the ANN framework. Training was completed using a radial-basis function kernel with gamma equal to 5.5. Training was performed using 15,000 vectors collected from 15 training images in approximately 10 minutes. The resulting support vectors were applied to delineate 10 images not part of the training set. Relative overlap calculated for the subcortical structures was 0.87 for the thalamus, 0.84 for the caudate, 0.84 for the putamen, and 0.72 for the hippocampus. Relative overlap for the cerebellar lobes ranged from 0.76 to 0.86. The reliability of the SVM based algorithm was similar to the inter-rater reliability between manual raters and can be achieved without rater intervention.

  19. Automatic registration and segmentation algorithm for multiple electrophoresis images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Matthew S.; Busse, Harald; Vogt, Martin

    2000-06-01

    We present an algorithm for registering, segmenting and quantifying multiple scanned electrophoresis images. (2D gel) Electrophoresis is a technique for separating proteins or other macromolecules in organic material according to net charge and molecular mass and results in scanned grayscale images with dark spots against a light background marking the presence of such macromolecules. The algorithm begins by registering each of the images using a non-rigid registration algorithm. The registered images are then jointly segmented using a Markov random field approach to obtain a single segmentation. By using multiple images, the effect of noise is greatly reduced. We demonstrate the algorithm on several sets of real data.

  20. An improved variational level set method for MR image segmentation and bias field correction.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Tianming; Zhang, Jun; Xiao, Liang; Chen, Yunjie; Wei, Zhihui

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we propose an improved variational level set approach to correct the bias and to segment the magnetic resonance (MR) images with inhomogeneous intensity. First, we use a Gaussian distribution with bias field as a local region descriptor in two-phase level set formulation for segmentation and bias field correction of the images with inhomogeneous intensities. By using the information of the local variance in this descriptor, our method is able to obtain accurate segmentation results. Furthermore, we extend this method to three-phase level set formulation for brain MR image segmentation and bias field correction. By using this three-phase level set function to replace the four-phase level set function, we can reduce the number of convolution operations in each iteration and improve the efficiency. Compared with other approaches, this algorithm demonstrates a superior performance. PMID:23219273

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of acquired cardiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Carrol, C L; Higgins, C B; Caputo, G R

    1996-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, advances in magnetic resonance imaging techniques have increased the accuracy and applicability of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. These advances have improved the utility of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating cardiac morphology, blood flow, and myocardial contractility, all significant diagnostic features in the evaluation of the patient with acquired heart disease. Utilization of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging has been limited, primarily due to clinical reliance upon nuclear scintigraphy and echocardiography. Recent developments in fast and ultrafast imaging should continue to enhance the significance of magnetic resonance imaging in this field. Widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the cardiovascular system will ultimately depend upon its maturation into a comprehensive, noninvasive imaging technique for the varying manifestations of acquired heart disease, including cardiomyopathy, ischemic heart disease, and acquired valvular disease. Images PMID:8792545

  2. Analysis of image thresholding segmentation algorithms based on swarm intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Lu, Kai; Gao, Yinghui; Yang, Bo

    2013-03-01

    Swarm intelligence-based image thresholding segmentation algorithms are playing an important role in the research field of image segmentation. In this paper, we briefly introduce the theories of four existing image segmentation algorithms based on swarm intelligence including fish swarm algorithm, artificial bee colony, bacteria foraging algorithm and particle swarm optimization. Then some image benchmarks are tested in order to show the differences of the segmentation accuracy, time consumption, convergence and robustness for Salt & Pepper noise and Gaussian noise of these four algorithms. Through these comparisons, this paper gives qualitative analyses for the performance variance of the four algorithms. The conclusions in this paper would give a significant guide for the actual image segmentation.

  3. Segmentation of medical images using explicit anatomical knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Laurie S.; Brown, Stephen; Brown, Matthew S.; Young, Jeanne; Li, Rongxin; Luo, Suhuai; Brandt, Lee

    1999-07-01

    Knowledge-based image segmentation is defined in terms of the separation of image analysis procedures and representation of knowledge. Such architecture is particularly suitable for medical image segmentation, because of the large amount of structured domain knowledge. A general methodology for the application of knowledge-based methods to medical image segmentation is described. This includes frames for knowledge representation, fuzzy logic for anatomical variations, and a strategy for determining the order of segmentation from the modal specification. This method has been applied to three separate problems, 3D thoracic CT, chest X-rays and CT angiography. The application of the same methodology to such a range of applications suggests a major role in medical imaging for segmentation methods incorporating representation of anatomical knowledge.

  4. Cellular image segmentation using n-agent cooperative game theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimock, Ian B.; Wan, Justin W. L.

    2016-03-01

    Image segmentation is an important problem in computer vision and has significant applications in the segmentation of cellular images. Many different imaging techniques exist and produce a variety of image properties which pose difficulties to image segmentation routines. Bright-field images are particularly challenging because of the non-uniform shape of the cells, the low contrast between cells and background, and imaging artifacts such as halos and broken edges. Classical segmentation techniques often produce poor results on these challenging images. Previous attempts at bright-field imaging are often limited in scope to the images that they segment. In this paper, we introduce a new algorithm for automatically segmenting cellular images. The algorithm incorporates two game theoretic models which allow each pixel to act as an independent agent with the goal of selecting their best labelling strategy. In the non-cooperative model, the pixels choose strategies greedily based only on local information. In the cooperative model, the pixels can form coalitions, which select labelling strategies that benefit the entire group. Combining these two models produces a method which allows the pixels to balance both local and global information when selecting their label. With the addition of k-means and active contour techniques for initialization and post-processing purposes, we achieve a robust segmentation routine. The algorithm is applied to several cell image datasets including bright-field images, fluorescent images and simulated images. Experiments show that the algorithm produces good segmentation results across the variety of datasets which differ in cell density, cell shape, contrast, and noise levels.

  5. Dental x-ray image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Eyad; Fahmy, Gamal F.; Nassar, Diaa; Ammar, Hany

    2004-08-01

    Law enforcement agencies have been exploiting biometric identifiers for decades as key tools in forensic identification. With the evolution in information technology and the huge volume of cases that need to be investigated by forensic specialists, it has become important to automate forensic identification systems. While, ante mortem (AM) identification, that is identification prior to death, is usually possible through comparison of many biometric identifiers, postmortem (PM) identification, that is identification after death, is impossible using behavioral biometrics (e.g. speech, gait). Moreover, under severe circumstances, such as those encountered in mass disasters (e.g. airplane crashers) or if identification is being attempted more than a couple of weeks postmortem, under such circumstances, most physiological biometrics may not be employed for identification, because of the decay of soft tissues of the body to unidentifiable states. Therefore, a postmortem biometric identifier has to resist the early decay that affects body tissues. Because of their survivability and diversity, the best candidates for postmortem biometric identification are the dental features. In this paper we present an over view about an automated dental identification system for Missing and Unidentified Persons. This dental identification system can be used by both law enforcement and security agencies in both forensic and biometric identification. We will also present techniques for dental segmentation of X-ray images. These techniques address the problem of identifying each individual tooth and how the contours of each tooth are extracted.

  6. Anterior segment imaging in glaucoma: An updated review

    PubMed Central

    Maslin, Jessica S; Barkana, Yaniv; Dorairaj, Syril K

    2015-01-01

    Anterior segment imaging allows for an objective method of visualizing the anterior segment angle. Two of the most commonly used devices for anterior segment imaging include the anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) and the ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). AS-OCT technology has several types, including time-domain, swept-source, and spectral-domain-based configurations. We performed a literature search on PubMed for articles containing the text “anterior segment OCT,” “ultrasound biomicroscopy,” and “anterior segment imaging” since 2004, with some pertinent references before 2004 included for completeness. This review compares the advantages and disadvantages of AS-OCT and UBM, and summarizes the most recent literature regarding the importance of these devices in glaucoma diagnosis and management. These devices not only aid in visualization of the angle, but also have important postsurgical applications in bleb and tube imaging. PMID:26576519

  7. Outstanding-objects-oriented color image segmentation using fuzzy logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayasaka, Rina; Zhao, Jiying; Matsushita, Yutaka

    1997-10-01

    This paper presents a novel fuzzy-logic-based color image segmentation scheme focusing on outstanding objects to human eyes. The scheme first segments the image into rough fuzzy regions, chooses visually significant regions, and conducts fine segmentation on the chosen regions. It can not only reduce the computational load, but also make contour detection easy because the brief object externals has been previously determined. The scheme reflects human sense, and it can be sued efficiently in automatic extraction of image retrieval key, robot vision and region-adaptive image compression.

  8. Improved document image segmentation algorithm using multiresolution morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukhari, Syed Saqib; Shafait, Faisal; Breuel, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Page segmentation into text and non-text elements is an essential preprocessing step before optical character recognition (OCR) operation. In case of poor segmentation, an OCR classification engine produces garbage characters due to the presence of non-text elements. This paper describes modifications to the text/non-text segmentation algorithm presented by Bloomberg,1 which is also available in his open-source Leptonica library.2The modifications result in significant improvements and achieved better segmentation accuracy than the original algorithm for UW-III, UNLV, ICDAR 2009 page segmentation competition test images and circuit diagram datasets.

  9. Single 3D cell segmentation from optical CT microscope images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2014-03-01

    The automated segmentation of the nucleus and cytoplasm regions in 3D optical CT microscope images has been achieved with two methods, a global threshold gradient based approach and a graph-cut approach. For the first method, the first two peaks of a gradient figure of merit curve are selected as the thresholds for cytoplasm and nucleus segmentation. The second method applies a graph-cut segmentation twice: the first identifies the nucleus region and the second identifies the cytoplasm region. Image segmentation of single cells is important for automated disease diagnostic systems. The segmentation methods were evaluated with 200 3D images consisting of 40 samples of 5 different cell types. The cell types consisted of columnar, macrophage, metaplastic and squamous human cells and cultured A549 cancer cells. The segmented cells were compared with both 2D and 3D reference images and the quality of segmentation was determined by the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). In general, the graph-cut method had a superior performance to the gradient-based method. The graph-cut method achieved an average DSC of 86% and 72% for nucleus and cytoplasm segmentations respectively for the 2D reference images and 83% and 75% for the 3D reference images. The gradient method achieved an average DSC of 72% and 51% for nucleus and cytoplasm segmentation for the 2D reference images and 71% and 51% for the 3D reference images. The DSC of cytoplasm segmentation was significantly lower than for the nucleus since the cytoplasm was not differentiated as well by image intensity from the background.

  10. Robust image modeling technique with a bioluminescence image segmentation application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jianghong; Wang, Ruiping; Tian, Jie

    2009-02-01

    A robust pattern classifier algorithm for the variable symmetric plane model, where the driving noise is a mixture of a Gaussian and an outlier process, is developed. The veracity and high-speed performance of the pattern recognition algorithm is proved. Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has recently gained wide acceptance in the field of in vivo small animal molecular imaging. So that it is very important for BLT to how to acquire the highprecision region of interest in a bioluminescence image (BLI) in order to decrease loss of the customers because of inaccuracy in quantitative analysis. An algorithm in the mode is developed to improve operation speed, which estimates parameters and original image intensity simultaneously from the noise corrupted image derived from the BLT optical hardware system. The focus pixel value is obtained from the symmetric plane according to a more realistic assumption for the noise sequence in the restored image. The size of neighborhood is adaptive and small. What's more, the classifier function is base on the statistic features. If the qualifications for the classifier are satisfied, the focus pixel intensity is setup as the largest value in the neighborhood.Otherwise, it will be zeros.Finally,pseudo-color is added up to the result of the bioluminescence segmented image. The whole process has been implemented in our 2D BLT optical system platform and the model is proved.

  11. On the Performance of Stochastic Model-Based Image Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Tianhu; Sewchand, Wilfred

    1989-11-01

    A new stochastic model-based image segmentation technique for X-ray CT image has been developed and has been extended to the more general nondiffraction CT images which include MRI, SPELT, and certain type of ultrasound images [1,2]. The nondiffraction CT image is modeled by a Finite Normal Mixture. The technique utilizes the information theoretic criterion to detect the number of the region images, uses the Expectation-Maximization algorithm to estimate the parameters of the image, and uses the Bayesian classifier to segment the observed image. How does this technique over/under-estimate the number of the region images? What is the probability of errors in the segmentation of this technique? This paper addresses these two problems and is a continuation of [1,2].

  12. Multiscale Segmentation of Polarimetric SAR Image Based on Srm Superpixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, F.; Yang, J.; Wu, L.; Li, D.

    2016-06-01

    Multi-scale segmentation of remote sensing image is more systematic and more convenient for the object-oriented image analysis compared to single-scale segmentation. However, the existing pixel-based polarimetric SAR (PolSAR) image multi-scale segmentation algorithms are usually inefficient and impractical. In this paper, we proposed a superpixel-based binary partition tree (BPT) segmentation algorithm by combining the generalized statistical region merging (GSRM) algorithm and the BPT algorithm. First, superpixels are obtained by setting a maximum region number threshold to GSRM. Then, the region merging process of the BPT algorithm is implemented based on superpixels but not pixels. The proposed algorithm inherits the advantages of both GSRM and BPT. The operation efficiency is obviously improved compared to the pixel-based BPT segmentation. Experiments using the Lband ESAR image over the Oberpfaffenhofen test site proved the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Progress in the robust automated segmentation of real cell images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamford, P.; Jackway, P.; Lovell, Brian

    1999-07-01

    We propose a collection of robust algorithms for the segmentation of cell images from Papanicolaou stained cervical smears (`Pap' smears). This problem is deceptively difficult and often results on laboratory datasets do not carry over to real world data. Our approach is in 3 parts. First, we segment the cytoplasm from the background using a novel method based on the Wilson and Spann multi-resolution framework. Second, we segment the nucleus from the cytoplasm using an active contour method, where the best contour is found by a global minimization method. Third, we implement a method to determine a confidence measure for the segmentation of each object. This uses a stability criterion over the regularization parameter (lambda) in the active contour. We present the results of thorough testing of the algorithms on large numbers of cell images. A database of 20,120 images is used for the segmentation tests and 18,718 images for the robustness tests.

  14. Segmenting images analytically in shape space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathi, Yogesh; Dambreville, Samuel; Niethammer, Marc; Malcolm, James; Levitt, James; Shenton, Martha E.; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents a novel analytic technique to perform shape-driven segmentation. In our approach, shapes are represented using binary maps, and linear PCA is utilized to provide shape priors for segmentation. Intensity based probability distributions are then employed to convert a given test volume into a binary map representation, and a novel energy functional is proposed whose minimum can be analytically computed to obtain the desired segmentation in the shape space. We compare the proposed method with the log-likelihood based energy to elucidate some key differences. Our algorithm is applied to the segmentation of brain caudate nucleus and hippocampus from MRI data, which is of interest in the study of schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Our validation (we compute the Hausdorff distance and the DICE coefficient between the automatic segmentation and ground-truth) shows that the proposed algorithm is very fast, requires no initialization and outperforms the log-likelihood based energy.

  15. A magnetic resonance spectroscopy driven initialization scheme for active shape model based prostate segmentation.

    PubMed

    Toth, Robert; Tiwari, Pallavi; Rosen, Mark; Reed, Galen; Kurhanewicz, John; Kalyanpur, Arjun; Pungavkar, Sona; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-04-01

    Segmentation of the prostate boundary on clinical images is useful in a large number of applications including calculation of prostate volume pre- and post-treatment, to detect extra-capsular spread, and for creating patient-specific anatomical models. Manual segmentation of the prostate boundary is, however, time consuming and subject to inter- and intra-reader variability. T2-weighted (T2-w) magnetic resonance (MR) structural imaging (MRI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) have recently emerged as promising modalities for detection of prostate cancer in vivo. MRS data consists of spectral signals measuring relative metabolic concentrations, and the metavoxels near the prostate have distinct spectral signals from metavoxels outside the prostate. Active Shape Models (ASM's) have become very popular segmentation methods for biomedical imagery. However, ASMs require careful initialization and are extremely sensitive to model initialization. The primary contribution of this paper is a scheme to automatically initialize an ASM for prostate segmentation on endorectal in vivo multi-protocol MRI via automated identification of MR spectra that lie within the prostate. A replicated clustering scheme is employed to distinguish prostatic from extra-prostatic MR spectra in the midgland. The spatial locations of the prostate spectra so identified are used as the initial ROI for a 2D ASM. The midgland initializations are used to define a ROI that is then scaled in 3D to cover the base and apex of the prostate. A multi-feature ASM employing statistical texture features is then used to drive the edge detection instead of just image intensity information alone. Quantitative comparison with another recent ASM initialization method by Cosio showed that our scheme resulted in a superior average segmentation performance on a total of 388 2D MRI sections obtained from 32 3D endorectal in vivo patient studies. Initialization of a 2D ASM via our MRS-based clustering scheme resulted in an average

  16. Live minimal path for interactive segmentation of medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartrand, Gabriel; Tang, An; Chav, Ramnada; Cresson, Thierry; Chantrel, Steeve; De Guise, Jacques A.

    2015-03-01

    Medical image segmentation is nowadays required for medical device development and in a growing number of clinical and research applications. Since dedicated automatic segmentation methods are not always available, generic and efficient interactive tools can alleviate the burden of manual segmentation. In this paper we propose an interactive segmentation tool based on image warping and minimal path segmentation that is efficient for a wide variety of segmentation tasks. While the user roughly delineates the desired organs boundary, a narrow band along the cursors path is straightened, providing an ideal subspace for feature aligned filtering and minimal path algorithm. Once the segmentation is performed on the narrow band, the path is warped back onto the original image, precisely delineating the desired structure. This tool was found to have a highly intuitive dynamic behavior. It is especially efficient against misleading edges and required only coarse interaction from the user to achieve good precision. The proposed segmentation method was tested for 10 difficult liver segmentations on CT and MRI images, and the resulting 2D overlap Dice coefficient was 99% on average..

  17. From image segmentation to anti-textons.

    PubMed

    van Tonder, G J; Ejima, Y

    2000-01-01

    We apply the 'patchwork engine' (PE; van Tonder and Ejima, 2000 Neural Networks forthcoming) to encode spaces between textons in an attempt to find a suitable feature representation of anti-textons [Williams and Julesz, 1991, in Neural Networks for Perception volume 1: Human and Machine Perception Ed. H Wechsler (San Diego, CA: Academic Press); 1992, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA 89 6531-6534]. With computed anti-textons it is possible to show that tessellation and distribution of anti-textons can differ from that of textons depending on the ratio of texton size to anti-texton size. From this we hypothesise that variability of anti-textons can enhance texture segregation, and test our hypothesis in two psychophysical experiments. Texture segregation asymmetry is the topic of the first test. We found that targets on backgrounds with regular anti-textons segregate more strongly than on backgrounds with highly variable anti-textons. This neatly complements other explanations for texture segregation asymmetry (e.g. Rubenstein and Sagi, 1990 Journal of the Optical Society of America A 7 1632-1643). Second the relative significance of textons and anti-textons in human texture segregation is investigated for a limited set of texture patterns. Subjects consistently judged a combination of texton and anti-texton gradients as more conspicuous than texton-only gradients, and judged texton-only gradients as being more conspicuous than anti-texton-only gradients. In the absence of strong texton gradients the regularity versus irregularity of anti-textons agrees with perceived texture segregation. Using PE outputs as anti-texton features thus enabled the conception of various useful tests on texture segregation. The PE is originally intended as a general image segmentation method based on symmetry axes. With this paper we therefore hope to relate anti-textons with visual processing in a wider sense. PMID:11220214

  18. Pixel classification based color image segmentation using quaternion exponent moments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang-Yang; Wu, Zhi-Fang; Chen, Liang; Zheng, Hong-Liang; Yang, Hong-Ying

    2016-02-01

    Image segmentation remains an important, but hard-to-solve, problem since it appears to be application dependent with usually no a priori information available regarding the image structure. In recent years, many image segmentation algorithms have been developed, but they are often very complex and some undesired results occur frequently. In this paper, we propose a pixel classification based color image segmentation using quaternion exponent moments. Firstly, the pixel-level image feature is extracted based on quaternion exponent moments (QEMs), which can capture effectively the image pixel content by considering the correlation between different color channels. Then, the pixel-level image feature is used as input of twin support vector machines (TSVM) classifier, and the TSVM model is trained by selecting the training samples with Arimoto entropy thresholding. Finally, the color image is segmented with the trained TSVM model. The proposed scheme has the following advantages: (1) the effective QEMs is introduced to describe color image pixel content, which considers the correlation between different color channels, (2) the excellent TSVM classifier is utilized, which has lower computation time and higher classification accuracy. Experimental results show that our proposed method has very promising segmentation performance compared with the state-of-the-art segmentation approaches recently proposed in the literature. PMID:26618250

  19. Automatic magnetic resonance spinal cord segmentation with topology constraints for variable fields of view.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Carass, Aaron; Oh, Jiwon; Nair, Govind; Pham, Dzung L; Reich, Daniel S; Prince, Jerry L

    2013-12-01

    Spinal cord segmentation is an important step in the analysis of neurological diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Several studies have shown correlations between disease progression and metrics relating to spinal cord atrophy and shape changes. Current practices primarily involve segmenting the spinal cord manually or semi-automatically, which can be inconsistent and time-consuming for large datasets. An automatic method that segments the spinal cord and cerebrospinal fluid from magnetic resonance images is presented. The method uses a deformable atlas and topology constraints to produce results that are robust to noise and artifacts. The method is designed to be easily extended to new data with different modalities, resolutions, and fields of view. Validation was performed on two distinct datasets. The first consists of magnetization transfer-prepared T2*-weighted gradient-echo MRI centered only on the cervical vertebrae (C1-C5). The second consists of T1-weighted MRI that covers both the cervical and portions of the thoracic vertebrae (C1-T4). Results were found to be highly accurate in comparison to manual segmentations. A pilot study was carried out to demonstrate the potential utility of this new method for research and clinical studies of multiple sclerosis. PMID:23927903

  20. A Novel Statistical Approach for Brain MR Images Segmentation Based on Relaxation Times

    PubMed Central

    Ferraioli, Giampaolo; Pascazio, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Brain tissue segmentation in Magnetic Resonance Imaging is useful for a wide range of applications. Classical approaches exploit the gray levels image and implement criteria for differentiating regions. Within this paper a novel approach for brain tissue joint segmentation and classification is presented. Starting from the estimation of proton density and relaxation times, we propose a novel method for identifying the optimal decision regions. The approach exploits the statistical distribution of the involved signals in the complex domain. The technique, compared to classical threshold based ones, is able to globally improve the classification rate. The effectiveness of the approach is evaluated on both simulated and real datasets. PMID:26798631

  1. Automated ventricular systems segmentation in brain CT images by combining low-level segmentation and high-level template matching

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenan; Smith, Rebecca; Ji, Soo-Yeon; Ward, Kevin R; Najarian, Kayvan

    2009-01-01

    method lies in its incorporation of anatomical features for ideal midline detection and the two-step ventricle segmentation method. Our method offers the following improvements over existing approaches: accurate detection of the ideal midline and accurate recognition of ventricles using both anatomical features and spatial templates derived from Magnetic Resonance Images. PMID:19891798

  2. Image segmentation in wavelet transform space implemented on DSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomaryov, Volodymyr I.; Castillejos, Heydy; Peralta-Fabi, Ricardo

    2012-06-01

    A novel approach in the segmentation for the images of different nature employing the feature extraction in WT space before the segmentation process is presented. The designed frameworks (W-FCM, W-CPSFCM and WK-Means) according to AUC analysis have demonstrated better performance novel frameworks against other algorithms existing in literature during numerous simulation experiments with synthetic and dermoscopic images. The novel W-CPSFCM algorithm estimates a number of clusters in automatic mode without the intervention of a specialist. The implementation of the proposed segmentation algorithms on the Texas Instruments DSP TMS320DM642 demonstrates possible real time processing mode for images of different nature.

  3. Adaptive automatic segmentation of Leishmaniasis parasite in Indirect Immunofluorescence images.

    PubMed

    Ouertani, F; Amiri, H; Bettaib, J; Yazidi, R; Ben Salah, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the first steps for the automation of the serum titration process. In fact, this process requires an Indirect Immunofluorescence (IIF) diagnosis automation. We deal with the initial phase that represents the fluorescence images segmentation. Our approach consists of three principle stages: (1) a color based segmentation which aims at extracting the fluorescent foreground based on k-means clustering, (2) the segmentation of the fluorescent clustered image, and (3) a region-based feature segmentation, intended to remove the fluorescent noisy regions and to locate fluorescent parasites. We evaluated the proposed method on 40 IIF images. Experimental results show that such a method provides reliable and robust automatic segmentation of fluorescent Promastigote parasite. PMID:25571049

  4. A Bayesian Approach for Image Segmentation with Shape Priors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Hang; Yang, Qing; Parvin, Bahram

    2008-06-20

    Color and texture have been widely used in image segmentation; however, their performance is often hindered by scene ambiguities, overlapping objects, or missingparts. In this paper, we propose an interactive image segmentation approach with shape prior models within a Bayesian framework. Interactive features, through mouse strokes, reduce ambiguities, and the incorporation of shape priors enhances quality of the segmentation where color and/or texture are not solely adequate. The novelties of our approach are in (i) formulating the segmentation problem in a well-de?ned Bayesian framework with multiple shape priors, (ii) ef?ciently estimating parameters of the Bayesian model, and (iii) multi-object segmentation through user-speci?ed priors. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on a set of natural and synthetic images.

  5. A Coupled Global Registration and Segmentation Framework With Application to Magnetic Resonance Prostate Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Romeil; Fichtinger, Gabor; Tannenbaum, Allen Robert

    2010-01-01

    Extracting the prostate from magnetic resonance (MR) imagery is a challenging and important task for medical image analysis and surgical planning. We present in this work a unified shape-based framework to extract the prostate from MR prostate imagery. In many cases, shape-based segmentation is a two-part problem. First, one must properly align a set of training shapes such that any variation in shape is not due to pose. Then segmentation can be performed under the constraint of the learnt shape. However, the general registration task of prostate shapes becomes increasingly difficult due to the large variations in pose and shape in the training sets, and is not readily handled through existing techniques. Thus, the contributions of this paper are twofold. We first explicitly address the registration problem by representing the shapes of a training set as point clouds. In doing so, we are able to exploit the more global aspects of registration via a certain particle filtering based scheme. In addition, once the shapes have been registered, a cost functional is designed to incorporate both the local image statistics as well as the learnt shape prior. We provide experimental results, which include several challenging clinical data sets, to highlight the algorithm’s capability of robustly handling supine/prone prostate registration and the overall segmentation task. PMID:20529727

  6. 3D prostate segmentation of ultrasound images combining longitudinal image registration and machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Fei, Baowei

    2012-02-01

    We developed a three-dimensional (3D) segmentation method for transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images, which is based on longitudinal image registration and machine learning. Using longitudinal images of each individual patient, we register previously acquired images to the new images of the same subject. Three orthogonal Gabor filter banks were used to extract texture features from each registered image. Patient-specific Gabor features from the registered images are used to train kernel support vector machines (KSVMs) and then to segment the newly acquired prostate image. The segmentation method was tested in TRUS data from five patients. The average surface distance between our and manual segmentation is 1.18 +/- 0.31 mm, indicating that our automatic segmentation method based on longitudinal image registration is feasible for segmenting the prostate in TRUS images.

  7. Optoelectronic complex inner product for evaluating quality of image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Gregory J.; Awwal, Abdul Ahad S.

    2000-11-01

    In automatic target recognition and machine vision applications, segmentation of the images is a key step. Poor segmentation reduces the recognition performance. For some imaging systems such as MRI and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) it is difficult even for humans to agree on the location of the edge which allows for segmentation. A real- time dynamic approach to determine the quality of segmentation can enable vision systems to refocus of apply appropriate algorithms to ensure high quality segmentation for recognition. A recent approach to evaluate the quality of image segmentation uses percent-pixels-different (PPD). For some cases, PPD provides a reasonable quality evaluation, but it has a weakness in providing a measure for how well the shape of the segmentation matches the true shape. This paper introduces the complex inner product approach for providing a goodness measure for evaluating the segmentation quality based on shape. The complex inner product approach is demonstrated on SAR target chips obtained from the Moving and Stationary Target Acquisition and Recognition (MSTAR) program sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). The results are compared to the PPD approach. A design for an optoelectronic implementation of the complex inner product for dynamic segmentation evaluation is introduced.

  8. Template-driven segmentation of confocal microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Cheng; Chen, Yung-Chang; Chiang, Ann-Shyn

    2008-03-01

    High quality 3D visualization of anatomic structures is necessary for many applications. The anatomic structures first need to be segmented. A variety of segmentation algorithms have been developed for this purpose. For confocal microscopy images, the noise introduced during the specimen preparation process, such as the procedure of penetration or staining, may cause images to be of low contrast in some regions. This property will make segmentation difficult. Also, the segmented structures may have rugged surfaces in 3D visualization. In this paper, we present a hybrid method that is suitable for segmentation of confocal microscopy images. A rough segmentation result is obtained from the atlas-based segmentation via affine registration. The boundaries of the segmentation result are close to the object boundaries, and are regarded as the initial contours of the active contour models. After convergence of the snake algorithm, the resulting contours in regions of low contrast are locally refined by parametric bicubic surfaces to alleviate the problem of incorrect convergence. The proposed method increases the accuracy of the snake algorithm because of better initial contours. Besides, it can provide smoother segmented results in 3D visualization. PMID:18178286

  9. Optimized mean shift algorithm for color segmentation in image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailer, Werner; Schallauer, Peter; Haraldsson, Harald B.; Rehatschek, Herwig

    2005-03-01

    The application of the mean shift algorithm to color image segmentation has been proposed in 1997 by Comaniciu and Meer. We apply the mean shift color segmentation to image sequences, as the first step of a moving object segmentation algorithm. Previous work has shown that it is well suited for this task, because it provides better temporal stability of the segmentation result than other approaches. The drawback is higher computational cost. For speed up of processing on image sequences we exploit the fact that subsequent frames are similar and use the cluster centers of previous frames as initial estimates, which also enhances spatial segmentation continuity. In contrast to other implementations we use the originally proposed CIE LUV color space to ensure high quality segmentation results. We show that moderate quantization of the input data before conversion to CIE LUV has little influence on the segmentation quality but results in significant speed up. We also propose changes in the post-processing step to increase the temporal stability of border pixels. We perform objective evaluation of the segmentation results to compare the original algorithm with our modified version. We show that our optimized algorithm reduces processing time and increases the temporal stability of the segmentation.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with unstable angina: comparison with acute myocardial infarction and normals

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, M.; Johnson, R.F. Jr.; Fawcett, H.D.; Schreiber, M.H.

    1988-09-01

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging in characterizing normal, ischemic and infarcted segments of myocardium was examined in 8 patients with unstable angina, 11 patients with acute myocardial infarction, and 7 patients with stable angina. Eleven normal volunteers were imaged for comparison. Myocardial segments in short axis magnetic resonance images were classified as normal or abnormal on the basis of perfusion changes observed in thallium-201 images in 22 patients and according to the electrocariographic localization of infarction in 4 patients. T2 relaxation time was measured in 57 myocardial segments with abnormal perfusion (24 with reversible and 33 with irreversible perfusion changes) and in 25 normally perfused segments. T2 measurements in normally perfused segments of patients with acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina and stable angina were within normal range derived from T2 measurements in 48 myocardial segments of 11 normal volunteers (42 +/- 10 ms). T2 in abnormal myocardial segments of patients with stable angina also was not significantly different from normal. T2 of abnormal segments in patients with unstable angina (64 +/- 14 in reversibly ischemic and 67 +/- 21 in the irreversibly ischemic segments) was prolonged when compared to normal (p less than 0.0001) and was not significantly different from T2 in abnormal segments of patients with acute myocardial infarction (62 +/- 18 for reversibly and 66 +/- 11 for irreversibly ischemic segments). The data indicate that T2 prolongation is not specific for acute myocardial infarction and may be observed in abnormally perfused segments of patients with unstable angina.

  11. Image segmentation by iterative parallel region growing with application to data compression and image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.

    1988-01-01

    Image segmentation can be a key step in data compression and image analysis. However, the segmentation results produced by most previous approaches to region growing are suspect because they depend on the order in which portions of the image are processed. An iterative parallel segmentation algorithm avoids this problem by performing globally best merges first. Such a segmentation approach, and two implementations of the approach on NASA's Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) are described. Application of the segmentation approach to data compression and image analysis is then described, and results of such application are given for a LANDSAT Thematic Mapper image.

  12. Comparison of several approaches for the segmentation of texture images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiling; Guerriero, Andrea; De Sario, Marco

    1995-03-01

    In this paper, several approaches including K-means, fuzzy K-means (FKM), fuzzy adaptive resonance theory (ART2) and fuzzy Kohonen self-organizing feature mapping (SOFM) are adapted to segment the texture image. In our tests five features, energy, entropy, correlation, homogeneity, and inertia, are used in texture analysis. The K-means algorithm has the following disadvantages: (1) supervised learning mode, (2) slow real-time ability, (3) instability. The FKM algorithm has improved the performance of the instability by means of the introduction of fuzzy distribution functions. The fuzzy ART2 has advantages, such as unsupervised training, high computation rates, and a great degree of fault tolerance (stability/plasticity). Fuzzy operator and mapping functions are added in the network to improve the generality. The fuzzy SOFM integrates the FKM algorithm into fuzzy membership value as a learning rate and updates stratifies of the Kohonen network. This yields automatic adjustment of both the learning rate distribution and update neighborhood, and has an optimization problem related to FKM. Therefore, the fuzzy SOFM is independent of the sequence of feed of input patterns whereas final weight vectors by the Kohonen method depend on the sequence. The fuzzy SOFM is `self-organizing' since the `size' of the update neighborhood and learning rate are automatically adjusted during learning. Clustering errors are reduced by fuzzy SOFM as well as better convergence. The numerical results show that fuzzy ART2 and fuzzy SOFM are better than K-means algorithms. The images segmented by the algorithms are given to prove their performances.

  13. Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Summary Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient’s body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients’ bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature. PMID:25745524

  14. A translational registration system for LANDSAT image segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Erthal, G. J.; Velasco, F. R. D.; Mascarenhas, N. D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The use of satellite images obtained from various dates is essential for crop forecast systems. In order to make possible a multitemporal analysis, it is necessary that images belonging to each acquisition have pixel-wise correspondence. A system developed to obtain, register and record image segments from LANDSAT images in computer compatible tapes is described. The translational registration of the segments is performed by correlating image edges in different acquisitions. The system was constructed for the Burroughs B6800 computer in ALGOL language.

  15. Design and validation of Segment - freely available software for cardiovascular image analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Commercially available software for cardiovascular image analysis often has limited functionality and frequently lacks the careful validation that is required for clinical studies. We have already implemented a cardiovascular image analysis software package and released it as freeware for the research community. However, it was distributed as a stand-alone application and other researchers could not extend it by writing their own custom image analysis algorithms. We believe that the work required to make a clinically applicable prototype can be reduced by making the software extensible, so that researchers can develop their own modules or improvements. Such an initiative might then serve as a bridge between image analysis research and cardiovascular research. The aim of this article is therefore to present the design and validation of a cardiovascular image analysis software package (Segment) and to announce its release in a source code format. Results Segment can be used for image analysis in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Some of its main features include loading of DICOM images from all major scanner vendors, simultaneous display of multiple image stacks and plane intersections, automated segmentation of the left ventricle, quantification of MRI flow, tools for manual and general object segmentation, quantitative regional wall motion analysis, myocardial viability analysis and image fusion tools. Here we present an overview of the validation results and validation procedures for the functionality of the software. We describe a technique to ensure continued accuracy and validity of the software by implementing and using a test script that tests the functionality of the software and validates the output. The software has been made freely available for research purposes in a source code format on the project home page http://segment

  16. Renal compartment segmentation in DCE-MRI images.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Le Minh, Hung; Tim Cheng, Kwang-Ting; Sung, Kyung Hyun; Liu, Wenyu

    2016-08-01

    Renal compartment segmentation from Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) images is an important task for functional kidney evaluation. Despite advancement in segmentation methods, most of them focus on segmenting an entire kidney on CT images, there still lacks effective and automatic solutions for accurate segmentation of internal renal structures (i.e. cortex, medulla and renal pelvis) from DCE-MRI images. In this paper, we introduce a method for renal compartment segmentation which can robustly achieve high segmentation accuracy for a wide range of DCE-MRI data, and meanwhile requires little manual operations and parameter settings. The proposed method consists of five main steps. First, we pre-process the image time series to reduce the motion artifacts caused by the movement of the patients during the scans and enhance the kidney regions. Second, the kidney is segmented as a whole based on the concept of Maximally Stable Temporal Volume (MSTV). The proposed MSTV detects anatomical structures that are homogeneous in the spatial domain and stable in terms of temporal dynamics. MSTV-based kidney segmentation is robust to noises and does not require a training phase. It can well adapt to kidney shape variations caused by renal dysfunction. Third, voxels in the segmented kidney are described by principal components (PCs) to remove temporal redundancy and noises. And then k-means clustering of PCs is applied to separate voxels into multiple clusters. Fourth, the clusters are automatically labeled as cortex, medulla and pelvis based on voxels' geometric locations and intensity distribution. Finally, an iterative refinement method is introduced to further remove noises in each segmented compartment. Experiments on 14 real clinical kidney datasets and 12 synthetic dataset demonstrate that results produced by our method match very well with those segmented manually and the performance of our method is superior to the other five existing methods. PMID:27236222

  17. A comparative study of automatic image segmentation algorithms for target tracking in MR-IGRT.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuan; Kawrakow, Iwan; Olsen, Jeff; Parikh, Parag J; Noel, Camille; Wooten, Omar; Du, Dongsu; Mutic, Sasa; Hu, Yanle

    2016-01-01

    On-board magnetic resonance (MR) image guidance during radiation therapy offers the potential for more accurate treatment delivery. To utilize the real-time image information, a crucial prerequisite is the ability to successfully segment and track regions of interest (ROI). The purpose of this work is to evaluate the performance of different segmentation algorithms using motion images (4 frames per second) acquired using a MR image-guided radiotherapy (MR-IGRT) system. Manual con-tours of the kidney, bladder, duodenum, and a liver tumor by an experienced radiation oncologist were used as the ground truth for performance evaluation. Besides the manual segmentation, images were automatically segmented using thresholding, fuzzy k-means (FKM), k-harmonic means (KHM), and reaction-diffusion level set evolution (RD-LSE) algorithms, as well as the tissue tracking algorithm provided by the ViewRay treatment planning and delivery system (VR-TPDS). The performance of the five algorithms was evaluated quantitatively by comparing with the manual segmentation using the Dice coefficient and target registration error (TRE) measured as the distance between the centroid of the manual ROI and the centroid of the automatically segmented ROI. All methods were able to successfully segment the bladder and the kidney, but only FKM, KHM, and VR-TPDS were able to segment the liver tumor and the duodenum. The performance of the thresholding, FKM, KHM, and RD-LSE algorithms degraded as the local image contrast decreased, whereas the performance of the VP-TPDS method was nearly independent of local image contrast due to the reference registration algorithm. For segmenting high-contrast images (i.e., kidney), the thresholding method provided the best speed (< 1 ms) with a satisfying accuracy (Dice = 0.95). When the image contrast was low, the VR-TPDS method had the best automatic contour. Results suggest an image quality determination procedure before segmentation and a combination of

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging: Principles and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kean, D.; Smith, M.

    1986-01-01

    This text covers the physics underlying magnetic resonance (MR) imaging; pulse sequences; image production; equipment; aspects of clinical imaging; and the imaging of the head and neck, thorax, abdomen and pelvis, and musculoskeletal system; and MR imaging. The book provides about 150 examples of MR images that give an overview of the pathologic conditions imaged. There is a discussion of the physics of MR imaging and also on the spin echo.

  19. Neural cell image segmentation method based on support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Shiwei; Ren, Kan

    2015-10-01

    In the analysis of neural cell images gained by optical microscope, accurate and rapid segmentation is the foundation of nerve cell detection system. In this paper, a modified image segmentation method based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) is proposed to reduce the adverse impact caused by low contrast ratio between objects and background, adherent and clustered cells' interference etc. Firstly, Morphological Filtering and OTSU Method are applied to preprocess images for extracting the neural cells roughly. Secondly, the Stellate Vector, Circularity and Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) features are computed to train SVM model. Finally, the incremental learning SVM classifier is used to classify the preprocessed images, and the initial recognition areas identified by the SVM classifier are added to the library as the positive samples for training SVM model. Experiment results show that the proposed algorithm can achieve much better segmented results than the classic segmentation algorithms.

  20. Skin lesion image segmentation using Delaunay Triangulation for melanoma detection.

    PubMed

    Pennisi, Andrea; Bloisi, Domenico D; Nardi, Daniele; Giampetruzzi, Anna Rita; Mondino, Chiara; Facchiano, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Developing automatic diagnostic tools for the early detection of skin cancer lesions in dermoscopic images can help to reduce melanoma-induced mortality. Image segmentation is a key step in the automated skin lesion diagnosis pipeline. In this paper, a fast and fully-automatic algorithm for skin lesion segmentation in dermoscopic images is presented. Delaunay Triangulation is used to extract a binary mask of the lesion region, without the need of any training stage. A quantitative experimental evaluation has been conducted on a publicly available database, by taking into account six well-known state-of-the-art segmentation methods for comparison. The results of the experimental analysis demonstrate that the proposed approach is highly accurate when dealing with benign lesions, while the segmentation accuracy significantly decreases when melanoma images are processed. This behavior led us to consider geometrical and color features extracted from the binary masks generated by our algorithm for classification, achieving promising results for melanoma detection. PMID:27215953

  1. Bayesian Analysis and Segmentation of Multichannel Image Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Michael Ming Hsin

    This thesis is concerned with the segmentation and analysis of multichannel image sequence data. In particular, we use maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) criterion and Gibbs random fields (GRF) to formulate the problems. We start by reviewing the significance of MAP estimation with GRF priors and study the feasibility of various optimization methods for implementing the MAP estimator. We proceed to investigate three areas where image data and parameter estimates are present in multichannels, multiframes, and interrelated in complicated manners. These areas of study include color image segmentation, multislice MR image segmentation, and optical flow estimation and segmentation in multiframe temporal sequences. Besides developing novel algorithms in each of these areas, we demonstrate how to exploit the potential of MAP estimation and GRFs, and we propose practical and efficient implementations. Illustrative examples and relevant experimental results are included.

  2. Spectral segmentation of polygonized images with normalized cuts

    SciTech Connect

    Matsekh, Anna; Skurikhin, Alexei; Rosten, Edward

    2009-01-01

    We analyze numerical behavior of the eigenvectors corresponding to the lowest eigenvalues of the generalized graph Laplacians arising in the Normalized Cuts formulations of the image segmentation problem on coarse polygonal grids.

  3. 3CCD image segmentation and edge detection based on MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yong; Pan, Jiazhi; Zhang, Yun

    2006-09-01

    This research aimed to identify weeds from crops in early stage in the field operation by using image-processing technology. As 3CCD images offer greater binary value difference between weed and crop section than ordinary digital images taken by common cameras. It has 3 channels (green, red, ifred) which takes a snap-photo of the same area, and the three images can be composed into one image, which facilitates the segmentation of different areas. By the application of image-processing toolkit on MATLAB, the different areas in the image can be segmented clearly. As edge detection technique is the first and very important step in image processing, The different result of different processing method was compared. Especially, by using the wavelet packet transform toolkit on MATLAB, An image was preprocessed and then the edge was extracted, and getting more clearly cut image of edge. The segmentation methods include operations as erosion, dilation and other algorithms to preprocess the images. It is of great importance to segment different areas in digital images in field real time, so as to be applied in precision farming, to saving energy and herbicide and many other materials. At present time Large scale software as MATLAB on PC was used, but the computation can be reduced and integrated into a small embed system, which means that the application of this technique in agricultural engineering is feasible and of great economical value.

  4. Automatic segmentation of MR images using self-organizing feature mapping and neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alirezaie, Javad; Jernigan, M. Ed; Nahmias, Claude

    1997-04-01

    In this paper we present an unsupervised clustering technique for multispectral segmentation of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the human brain. Our scheme utilizes the self-organizing feature map (SOFM) artificial neural network (ANN) for feature mapping and generates a set of codebook vectors for each tissue class. Features are selected from three image spectra: T1, T2 and proton density (PD) weighted images. An algorithm has been developed for isolating the cerebrum from the head scan prior to the segmentation. To classify the map, we extend the network by adding an associative layer. Three tissue types of the brain: white matter, gray matter and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) are segmented accurately. Any unclassified tissues were remained as unknown tissue class.

  5. Implementation and assessment of diffusion-weighted partial Fourier readout-segmented echo-planar imaging.

    PubMed

    Frost, Robert; Porter, David A; Miller, Karla L; Jezzard, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Single-shot echo-planar imaging has been used widely in diffusion magnetic resonance imaging due to the difficulties in correcting motion-induced phase corruption in multishot data. Readout-segmented EPI has addressed the multishot problem by introducing a two-dimensional nonlinear navigator correction with online reacquisition of uncorrectable data to enable acquisition of high-resolution diffusion data with reduced susceptibility artifact and T*(2) blurring. The primary shortcoming of readout-segmented EPI in its current form is its long acquisition time (longer than similar resolution single-shot echo-planar imaging protocols by approximately the number of readout segments), which limits the number of diffusion directions. By omitting readout segments at one side of k-space and using partial Fourier reconstruction, readout-segmented EPI imaging times could be reduced. In this study, the effects of homodyne and projection onto convex sets reconstructions on estimates of the fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and diffusion orientation in fiber tracts and raw T(2)- and trace-weighted signal are compared, along with signal-to-noise ratio results. It is found that projections onto convex sets reconstruction with 3/5 segments in a 2 mm isotropic diffusion tensor image acquisition and 9/13 segments in a 0.9 × 0.9 × 4.0 mm(3) diffusion-weighted image acquisition provide good fidelity relative to the full k-space parameters. This allows application of readout-segmented EPI to tractography studies, and clinical stroke and oncology protocols. PMID:22535706

  6. Object segmentation based on guided layering from video image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guangfeng; Zhu, Hong; Fan, Caixia; Zhang, Erhu

    2011-09-01

    When the object is similar to the background, it is difficult to segment the completed human body object from video images. To solve the problem, this paper proposes an object segmentation algorithm based on guided layering from video images. This algorithm adopts the structure of advance by degrees, including three parts altogether. Each part constructs the different energy function in terms of the spatiotemporal information to maximize the posterior probability of segmentation label. In part one, the energy functions are established, respectively, with the frame difference information in the first layer and second layer. By optimization, the initial segmentation is solved in the first layer, and then the amended segmentation is obtained in the second layer. In part two, the energy function is built in the interframe with the shape feature as the prior guiding to eliminate the interframe difference of the segmentation result. In art three, the segmentation results in the previous two parts are fused to suppress or inhibit the over-repairing segmentation and the object shape variations in the adjacent two-frame. The results from the compared experiment indicate that this algorithm can obtain the completed human body object in the case of the video image with similarity between object and background.

  7. Watershed Merge Tree Classification for Electron Microscopy Image Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, TIng; Jurrus, Elizabeth R.; Seyedhosseini, Mojtaba; Ellisman, Mark; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2012-11-11

    Automated segmentation of electron microscopy (EM) images is a challenging problem. In this paper, we present a novel method that utilizes a hierarchical structure and boundary classification for 2D neuron segmentation. With a membrane detection probability map, a watershed merge tree is built for the representation of hierarchical region merging from the watershed algorithm. A boundary classifier is learned with non-local image features to predict each potential merge in the tree, upon which merge decisions are made with consistency constraints in the sense of optimization to acquire the final segmentation. Independent of classifiers and decision strategies, our approach proposes a general framework for efficient hierarchical segmentation with statistical learning. We demonstrate that our method leads to a substantial improvement in segmentation accuracy.

  8. An enhanced fast scanning algorithm for image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismael, Ahmed Naser; Yusof, Yuhanis binti

    2015-12-01

    Segmentation is an essential and important process that separates an image into regions that have similar characteristics or features. This will transform the image for a better image analysis and evaluation. An important benefit of segmentation is the identification of region of interest in a particular image. Various algorithms have been proposed for image segmentation and this includes the Fast Scanning algorithm which has been employed on food, sport and medical images. It scans all pixels in the image and cluster each pixel according to the upper and left neighbor pixels. The clustering process in Fast Scanning algorithm is performed by merging pixels with similar neighbor based on an identified threshold. Such an approach will lead to a weak reliability and shape matching of the produced segments. This paper proposes an adaptive threshold function to be used in the clustering process of the Fast Scanning algorithm. This function used the gray'value in the image's pixels and variance Also, the level of the image that is more the threshold are converted into intensity values between 0 and 1, and other values are converted into intensity values zero. The proposed enhanced Fast Scanning algorithm is realized on images of the public and private transportation in Iraq. Evaluation is later made by comparing the produced images of proposed algorithm and the standard Fast Scanning algorithm. The results showed that proposed algorithm is faster in terms the time from standard fast scanning.

  9. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingyuan E.; Glover, Gary H.

    2015-01-01

    Since its inception in 1992, Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has become an indispensible tool for studying cognition in both the healthy and dysfunctional brain. FMRI monitors changes in the oxygenation of brain tissue resulting from altered metabolism consequent to a task-based evoked neural response or from spontaneous fluctuations in neural activity in the absence of conscious mentation (the “resting state”). Task-based studies have revealed neural correlates of a large number of important cognitive processes, while fMRI studies performed in the resting state have demonstrated brain-wide networks that result from brain regions with synchronized, apparently spontaneous activity. In this article, we review the methods used to acquire and analyze fMRI signals. PMID:26248581

  10. Fuzzy fusion of results of medical image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guliato, Denise; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.; Carnielli, Walter A.; Zuffo, Joao A.; Desautels, J. E. Leo

    1999-05-01

    We propose an abstract concept of data fusion based on finite automata and fuzzy sets to integrate and evaluate different sources of information, in particular results of multiple image segmentation procedures. We give an example of how the method may be applied to the problem of mammographic image segmentation to combine results of region growing and closed- contour detection techniques. We further propose a measure of fuzziness to assess the agreement between a segmented region and a reference contour. Results of application to breast tumor detection in mammograms indicate that the fusion results agree with reference contours provided by a radiologist to a higher extent than the results of the individual methods.