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Sample records for resonance imaging study

  1. Magnetic Resonance Perfusion Imaging in the Study of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillis, Argye E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a brief review of various uses of magnetic resonance perfusion imaging in the investigation of brain/language relationships. The reviewed studies illustrate how perfusion imaging can reveal areas of brain where dysfunction due to low blood flow is associated with specific language deficits, and where restoration of blood flow…

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging for the study of mummies.

    PubMed

    Giovannetti, Giulio; Guerrini, Andrea; Carnieri, Emiliano; Salvadori, Piero A

    2016-07-01

    Nondestructive diagnostic imaging for mummies study has a long tradition and high-resolution images of the samples morphology have been extensively acquired by using computed tomography (CT). However, although in early reports no signal or image was obtained because of the low water content, mummy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was demonstrated able to generate images of such ancient specimens by using fast imaging techniques. Literature demonstrated the general feasibility of nonclinical MRI for visualizing historic human tissues, which is particularly interesting for archeology. More recently, multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was demonstrated able to detect numerous organic biochemicals from such remains. Although the quality of these images is not yet comparable to that of clinical magnetic resonance (MR) images, and further research will be needed for determining the full capacity of MR in this topic, the information obtained with MR can be viewed as complementary to the one provided by CT and useful for paleoradiological studies of mummies. This work contains an overview of the state of art of the emerging uses of MRI in paleoradiology. PMID:26979539

  3. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging for the study of fossils.

    PubMed

    Giovannetti, Giulio; Guerrini, Andrea; Salvadori, Piero A

    2016-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has long been used for investigating palaeontological specimens, as it is a nondestructive technique which avoids the need to dissolve or ionize the fossil sample. However, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have recently gained ground as analytical tools for examination of palaeontological samples, by nondestructively providing information about the structure and composition of fossils. While MRI techniques are able to reveal the three-dimensional geometry of the trace fossil, MRS can provide information on the chemical composition of the samples. The multidimensional nature of MR (magnetic resonance) signals has potential to provide rich three-dimensional data on the palaeontological specimens and also to help in elucidating paleopathological and paleoecological questions. In this work the verified applications and the emerging uses of MRI and MRS in paleontology are reviewed, with particular attention to fossil spores, fossil plants, ambers, fossil invertebrates, and fossil vertebrate studies. PMID:26979538

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of bruises: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Neil E I; Ross, Claire G; Byard, Roger W

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be used to image the presence of hemosiderin in bruises and if there was the potential for this technique to be applied as a non-invasive method to estimate the age of bruises. To achieve this aim an animal model to produce lesions resembling bruises was created by injecting blood obtained from the tail vein subcutaneously into an area of the abdominal wall. The animals were euthanized at 3, 6, 12 h, 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 days post injection and the skin of the abdominal wall was excised for MRI scanning and histological examination. The injected blood appeared as hypointense (dark) areas on the T2* MRI at 3 and 6 h. The image of the injected areas became indistinct at 12 h and continued to be indistinct at 1 and 2 days, although there appeared to be transitioning from hypointensity to hyperintensity (light). The magnetic resonance image appeared to better correspond to the histological appearance at 3 and 5 days, with the "bruise" appearing hyperintense (white); however, some hypointense (darker) areas at 3 day possibly corresponded to the development of hemosiderin. At 7 day the injected blood had been converted to hemosiderin with possible correlation between areas of blue staining in Perls' stained histologic sections and areas of extreme hypointensity in the T2* magnetic resonance image. This study has shown that a series of changes occur on MRI of bruises in an animal model that may relate to histological changes. Although variability in the intensity of the MRI signal and considerable soft tissue artifact currently make interpretations difficult, this may be a technique worth pursuing in the non-invasive evaluation of bruises. PMID:23760862

  5. Using surface plasmon resonance imaging to study bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Abadian, Pegah N; Tandogan, Nil; Jamieson, John J; Goluch, Edgar D

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the use of Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) as an emerging technique to study bacterial physiology in real-time without labels. The overwhelming majority of bacteria on earth exist in large multicellular communities known as biofilms. Biofilms are especially problematic because they facilitate the survival of pathogens, leading to chronic and recurring infections as well as costly industrial complications. Monitoring biofilm accumulation and removal is therefore critical in these and other applications. SPRi uniquely provides label-free, high-resolution images of biomass coverage on large channel surfaces up to 1 cm(2) in real time, which allow quantitative assessment of biofilm dynamics. The rapid imaging capabilities of this technique are particularly relevant for multicellular bacterial studies, as these cells can swim several body lengths per second and divide multiple times per hour. We present here the first application of SPRi to image Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells moving, attaching, and forming biofilms across a large surface. This is also the first time that biofilm removal has been visualized with SPRi, which has important implications for monitoring the biofouling and regeneration of fluidic systems. Initial images of the removal process show that the biofilm releases from the surface as a wave along the direction of the fluid flow. PMID:24753735

  6. Methodology to study polymers interaction by surface plasmon resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, N; Trombini, F; Hely, M; Bellon, S; Mercier, K; Cazeneuve, C

    2015-01-01

    The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique has been primarily used in the field of biology, in particular for the study of antibody-antigen interactions. Recently, polymers were introduced to form inclusion complexes. We describe here, a methodology based on surface plasmon resonance imaging to study water-resistant and reversible inclusion complexes using systems which are compatible with a cosmetic use. The purpose of this study is to follow in real time the interaction between two polymers. To carry out this study: •A biochip based on a covalent binding of one "host polymer" on a gold-activated surface was developed.•The binding of the host polymer to a guest polymer was monitored.•The presence of interactions between the β-cyclodextrins groups of the host polymer and the adamantyl functional groups of the guest polymer and the possibility of dissociating the complex were established. This technique allowed carrying out parallel assays for optimizing the amount of complexes formed, the host polymer being spotted at five concentrations. It was then possible to study the influence of the concentration in host system for two concentrations of the guest polymer. The concentration in the host polymer yielding the highest immobilization of the guest system was further determined. PMID:26150967

  7. [Diagnosis. Radiological study. Ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Gallo Vallejo, Francisco Javier; Giner Ruiz, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Because of its low cost, availability in primary care and ease of interpretation, simple X-ray should be the first-line imaging technique used by family physicians for the diagnosis and/or follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. Nevertheless, this technique should only be used if there are sound indications and if the results will influence decision-making. Despite the increase of indications in patients with rheumatological disease, the role of ultrasound in patients with osteoarthritis continues to be limited. Computed tomography (CT) is of some -although limited- use in osteoarthritis, especially in the study of complex joints (such as the sacroiliac joint and facet joints). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has represented a major advance in the evaluation of joint cartilage and subchondral bone in patients with osteoarthritis but, because of its high cost and diagnostic-prognostic yield, this technique should only be used in highly selected patients. The indications for ultrasound, CT and MRI in patients with osteoarthritis continue to be limited in primary care and often coincide with situations in which the patient may require hospital referral. Patient safety should be bourne in mind. Patients should be protected from excessive ionizing radiation due to unnecessary repeat X-rays or inadequate views or to requests for tests such as CT, when not indicated. PMID:24467957

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study on Blebs Morphology of Ahmed Valves

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Joana; Fernandes, Fernando; Patricio, Madalena; Brás, Ana; Rios, Cristina; Stalmans, Ingeborg

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine the morphometric parameters of filtration blebs of a valved aqueous humor drainage device. Materials and methods: Orbital magnetic resonances imaging (MRI) was taken after implantation of an Ahmed valve (FP7 model). Outcomes of the analysis were intraocular pressure (IOP) and the bleb’s morphometric analysis (volume, height, major and minor axis). Associations between IOP and the imaging-related study variables were explored by Spearman’s correlation test. Results: Eleven patients underwent orbital MRI examination. Recordings were taken after a mean of 2.7 months (1-6 months) after surgery. IOP was significantly lower than its preoperative values (17.6 ± 6.4 mm Hg vs 36.1 ± 6.4 mm Hg, p < 0.01). Mean bleb volume was 856.9 ± 261 mm3 and its height, major and minor axis were 5.77 ± 1.9, 14.8 ± 2.9 and 8.14 ± 3.6 mm, respectively. A positive correlation was detected between IOP and mean height (r = 0.77, p = 0.048) and major axis (r = 0.83, p = 0.03). Interestingly, the overall bleb volume was related to IOP levels immediately prior to surgery (r = 0.75, p < 0.01). Additionally, the posterior part of the plate was found to be displaced from the scleral surface in five cases (45%). Conclusion: Ahmed valve’s bleb morphology seems to correlate with both the pre- and postoperative IOP, which might suggest a clinical benefit of administering aqueous suppressants pre- as well as postoperatively. The plate of the device may show a significant dislocation from its initial surgical implantation site. How to cite this article: Ferreira J, Fernandes F, Patricio M, Brás A, Rios C, Stalmans I, Pinto LA. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study on Blebs Morphology of Ahmed Valves. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2015;9(1):1-5. PMID:26997824

  9. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  10. Achromatic synesthesias - a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Melero, H; Ríos-Lago, M; Peña-Melián, A; Álvarez-Linera, J

    2014-09-01

    Grapheme-color synesthetes experience consistent, automatic and idiosyncratic colors associated with specific letters and numbers. Frequently, these specific associations exhibit achromatic synesthetic qualities (e.g. white, black or gray). In this study, we have investigated for the first time the neural basis of achromatic synesthesias, their relationship to chromatic synesthesias and the achromatic congruency effect in order to understand not only synesthetic color but also other components of the synesthetic experience. To achieve this aim, functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments were performed in a group of associator grapheme-color synesthetes and matched controls who were stimulated with real chromatic and achromatic stimuli (Mondrians), and with letters and numbers that elicited different types of grapheme-color synesthesias (i.e. chromatic and achromatic inducers which elicited chromatic but also achromatic synesthesias, as well as congruent and incongruent ones). The information derived from the analysis of Mondrians and chromatic/achromatic synesthesias suggests that real and synesthetic colors/achromaticity do not fully share neural mechanisms. The whole-brain analysis of BOLD signals in response to the complete set of synesthetic inducers revealed that the functional peculiarities of the synesthetic brain are distributed, and reflect different components of the synesthetic experience: a perceptual component, an (attentional) feature binding component, and an emotional component. Additionally, the inclusion of achromatic experiences has provided new evidence in favor of the emotional binding theory, a line of interpretation which constitutes a bridge between grapheme-color synesthesia and other developmental modalities of the phenomenon. PMID:24845620

  11. Mapping Depression in Schizophrenia: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Veena; Peters, Emmanuelle; Guinn, Ashley; Fannon, Dominic; Russell, Tamara; Sumich, Alexander; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Williams, Steven C. R.; ffytche, Dominic H.

    2016-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are common in schizophrenia, often left untreated, and associated with a high relapse rate, suicidal ideation, increased mortality, reduced social adjustment and poor quality of life. The neural mechanisms underlying depression in psychosis are poorly understood. Given reports of altered brain response to negative facial affect in depressive disorders, we examined brain response to emotive facial expressions in relation to levels of depression in people with psychosis. Seventy outpatients (final N = 63) and 20 healthy participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during an implicit affect processing task involving presentation of facial expressions of fear, anger, happiness as well as neutral expressions and a (no face) control condition. All patients completed Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and had their symptoms assessed on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). In patients, depression (BDI-II) scores associated positively with activation of the left thalamus, extending to the putamen-globus pallidus, insula, inferior-middle frontal and para-post-pre-central gyri during fearful expressions. Furthermore, patients with moderate-to-severe depression had significantly higher activity in these brain regions during fearful expressions relative to patients with no, minimal, or mild depression and healthy participants. The study provides first evidence of enhanced brain response to fearful facial expressions, which signal an uncertain source of threat in the environment, in patients with psychosis and a high level of self-reported depression. PMID:26712855

  12. Mapping Depression in Schizophrenia: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Veena; Peters, Emmanuelle; Guinn, Ashley; Fannon, Dominic; Russell, Tamara; Sumich, Alexander; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Williams, Steven C R; Ffytche, Dominic H

    2016-05-01

    Depressive symptoms are common in schizophrenia, often left untreated, and associated with a high relapse rate, suicidal ideation, increased mortality, reduced social adjustment and poor quality of life. The neural mechanisms underlying depression in psychosis are poorly understood. Given reports of altered brain response to negative facial affect in depressive disorders, we examined brain response to emotive facial expressions in relation to levels of depression in people with psychosis. Seventy outpatients (final N= 63) and 20 healthy participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during an implicit affect processing task involving presentation of facial expressions of fear, anger, happiness as well as neutral expressions and a (no face) control condition. All patients completed Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and had their symptoms assessed on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). In patients, depression (BDI-II) scores associated positively with activation of the left thalamus, extending to the putamen-globus pallidus, insula, inferior-middle frontal and para-post-pre-central gyri during fearful expressions. Furthermore, patients with moderate-to-severe depression had significantly higher activity in these brain regions during fearful expressions relative to patients with no, minimal, or mild depression and healthy participants. The study provides first evidence of enhanced brain response to fearful facial expressions, which signal an uncertain source of threat in the environment, in patients with psychosis and a high level of self-reported depression. PMID:26712855

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies of Postpartum Depression: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Fiorelli, Marco; Aceti, Franca; Marini, Isabella; Giacchetti, Nicoletta; Macci, Enrica; Tinelli, Emanuele; Calistri, Valentina; Meuti, Valentina; Caramia, Francesca; Biondi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Postpartum depression is a frequent and disabling condition whose pathophysiology is still unclear. In recent years, the study of the neural correlates of mental disorders has been increasingly approached using magnetic resonance techniques. In this review we synthesize the results from studies on postpartum depression in the context of structural, functional, and spectroscopic magnetic resonance studies of major depression as a whole. Compared to the relative wealth of data available for major depression, magnetic resonance studies of postpartum depression are limited in number and design. A systematic literature search yielded only eleven studies conducted on about one hundred mothers with postpartum depression overall. Brain magnetic resonance findings in postpartum depression appear to replicate those obtained in major depression, with minor deviations that are not sufficient to delineate a distinct neurobiological profile for this condition, due to the small samples used and the lack of direct comparisons with subjects with major depression. However, it seems reasonable to expect that studies conducted in larger populations, and using a larger variety of brain magnetic resonance techniques than has been done so far, might allow for the identification of neuroimaging signatures for postpartum depression. PMID:26347585

  14. Cerebellum and speech perception: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Mathiak, Klaus; Hertrich, Ingo; Grodd, Wolfgang; Ackermann, Hermann

    2002-08-15

    A variety of data indicate that the cerebellum participates in perceptual tasks requiring the precise representation of temporal information. Access to the word form of a lexical item requires, among other functions, the processing of durational parameters of verbal utterances. Therefore, cerebellar dysfunctions must be expected to impair word recognition. In order to specify the topography of the assumed cerebellar speech perception mechanism, a functional magnetic resonance imaging study was performed using the German lexical items "Boden" ([bodn], Engl. "floor") and "Boten" ([botn], "messengers") as test materials. The contrast in sound structure of these two lexical items can be signaled either by the length of the wordmedial pause (closure time, CLT; an exclusively temporal measure) or by the aspiration noise of wordmedial "d" or "t" (voice onset time, VOT; an intrasegmental cue). A previous study found bilateral cerebellar disorders to compromise word recognition based on CLT whereas the encoding of VOT remained unimpaired. In the present study, two series of "Boden - Boten" utterances were resynthesized, systematically varying either in CLT or VOT. Subjects had to identify both words "Boden" and "Boten" by analysis of either the durational parameter CLT or the VOT aspiration segment. In a subtraction design, CLT categorization as compared to VOT identification (CLT - VOT) yielded a significant hemodynamic response of the right cerebellar hemisphere (neocerebellum Crus I) and the frontal lobe (anterior to Broca's area). The reversed contrast ( VOT - CLT) resulted in a single activation cluster located at the level of the supratemporal plane of the dominant hemisphere. These findings provide first evidence for a distinct contribution of the right cerebellar hemisphere to speech perception in terms of encoding of durational parameters of verbal utterances. Verbal working memory tasks, lexical response selection, and auditory imagery of word strings have been

  15. Narrow band deformable registration of prostate magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging, and computed tomography studies

    SciTech Connect

    Schreibmann, Eduard; Xing Lei . E-mail: lei@reyes.stanford.edu

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: Endorectal (ER) coil-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is often used to obtain anatomic and metabolic images of the prostate and to accurately identify and assess the intraprostatic lesions. Recent advancements in high-field (3 Tesla or above) MR techniques affords significantly enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and makes it possible to obtain high-quality MRI data. In reality, the use of rigid or inflatable endorectal probes deforms the shape of the prostate gland, and the images so obtained are not directly usable in radiation therapy planning. The purpose of this work is to apply a narrow band deformable registration model to faithfully map the acquired information from the ER-based MRI/MRSI onto treatment planning computed tomography (CT) images. Methods and Materials: A narrow band registration, which is a hybrid method combining the advantages of pixel-based and distance-based registration techniques, was used to directly register ER-based MRI/MRSI with CT. The normalized correlation between the two input images for registration was used as the metric, and the calculation was restricted to those points contained in the narrow bands around the user-delineated structures. The narrow band method is inherently efficient because of the use of a priori information of the meaningful contour data. The registration was performed in two steps. First, the two input images were grossly aligned using a rigid registration. The detailed mapping was then modeled by free form deformations based on B-spline. The limited memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno algorithm (L-BFGS), which is known for its superior performance in dealing with high-dimensionality problems, was implemented to optimize the metric function. The convergence behavior of the algorithm was studied by self-registering an MR image with 100 randomly initiated relative positions. To evaluate the performance of the algorithm, an MR image was

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Teens > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A Text Size What's ... Exam Safety Getting Your Results What Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of safe, painless testing ...

  17. Radiation-induced optic neuropathy: A magnetic resonance imaging study

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, J.; Mancuso, A.; Beck, R.; Moster, M.L.; Sedwick, L.A.; Quisling, R.G.; Rhoton, A.L. Jr.; Protzko, E.E.; Schiffman, J. )

    1991-03-01

    Optic neuropathy induced by radiation is an infrequent cause of delayed visual loss that may at times be difficult to differentiate from compression of the visual pathways by recurrent neoplasm. The authors describe six patients with this disorder who experienced loss of vision 6 to 36 months after neurological surgery and radiation therapy. Of the six patients in the series, two had a pituitary adenoma and one each had a metastatic melanoma, multiple myeloma, craniopharyngioma, and lymphoepithelioma. Visual acuity in the affected eyes ranged from 20/25 to no light perception. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed sellar and parasellar recurrence of both pituitary adenomas, but the intrinsic lesions of the optic nerves and optic chiasm induced by radiation were enhanced after gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA) administration and were clearly distinguishable from the suprasellar compression of tumor. Repeated MR imaging showed spontaneous resolution of gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of the optic nerve in a patient who was initially suspected of harboring recurrence of a metastatic malignant melanoma as the cause of visual loss. The authors found the presumptive diagnosis of radiation-induced optic neuropathy facilitated by MR imaging with gadolinium-DTPA. This neuro-imaging procedure may help avert exploratory surgery in some patients with recurrent neoplasm in whom the etiology of visual loss is uncertain.

  18. Fetal imaging by nuclear magnetic resonance: a study in goats: work in progress

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, M.A.; Knight, C.H.; Rimmington, J.E.; Mallard, J.R.

    1983-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance proton imaging was used to obtain images of goat fetuses in utero. The long T1 relaxation time of amniotic fluid makes it appear black on proton density images when examined using the Aberdeen imager, and so allows very good discrimination of the position and structure of the fetus. Some fetal internal tissues can be seen on T1 images. These findings suggest that NMR imaging has great potential in pregnancy studies.

  19. [Study of skin markers for magnetic resonance imaging examinations].

    PubMed

    Takatsu, Yasuo; Umezaki, Yoshie; Miyati, Tosiaki; Yamamura, Kenichirou

    2013-03-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), skin markers are used as a landmark in order to make plans for examinations. However, there isn't a lot of research about the material and shape of skin markers. The skin marker's essential elements are safety, good cost performance, high signal intensity for T1 weighted image (T1WI) and T2 weighted image (T2WI), and durable. In order to get a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of T1WI and T2WI, baby oil, salad oil and olive oil were chosen, because these materials were easy to obtain and safe for the skin. The SNR of baby oil was the best. Baby oil was injected into the infusion tube, and the tube was solvent welded and cut by a heat sealer. In order to make ring shaped skin markers, both ends of the tube were stuck with adhesive tape. Three different diameters of markers were made (3, 5, 10 cmψ). Ring shaped skin markers were put on to surround the examination area, therefore, the edge of the examination area could be seen at every cross section. Using baby oil in the ring shaped infusion tube is simple, easy, and a highly useful skin marker. PMID:23514854

  20. Sucrose solution freezing studied by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Mahdjoub, Rachid; Chouvenc, Pierre; Seurin, Marie José; Andrieu, Julien; Briguet, André

    2006-03-20

    Ice formation of a 20% w/v sucrose solution was monitored during the freezing process by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An original experimental setup was designed with oil as a cooling fluid that allows accurate control of the temperature. The NMR signal intensity of particular sampled volumes was observed during the entire cooling period, from 0 to -50 degrees C, showing a peak characteristic to a transition before the loss of the signal. Moreover, spatial ice distribution of the frozen matrix was observed by high resolution MRI with an isotropic resolution of 78x78x78microm(3). MRI has proved to be a novel technique for determining the glass transition temperature of frozen sucrose solutions, in the concentration range where calorimetric measurements are not feasible. PMID:16430876

  1. [Progress of studies for reduction of ghost artifact in magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunxiao; Tao, Hua; Wang, Shijie; Luo, Liming

    2007-04-01

    The popularity of magnetic resonance imaging over other imaging disciplines depends predominantly on its high spatial resolution, soft tissue contrast, no hard fake trace and no radiation injury. However, the ghost artifacts produced during a magnetic resonance imaging would degrade the image badly and affect the precise orientation to focus. This paper introduced the process of studies for reduction of ghost artifact resulting from EPI imaging theory and motion of subject. A lot of researches indicated that how to reduce the ghost effectively is still a challenging task. Researchers should persist in seeking for new method to solve the difficult problem. PMID:17591281

  2. Rapid eye movement-related brain activation in human sleep: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Wehrle, Renate; Czisch, Michael; Kaufmann, Christian; Wetter, Thomas C; Holsboer, Florian; Auer, Dorothee P; Pollmächer, Thomas

    2005-05-31

    In animal models, ponto-geniculo-occipital waves appear as an early sign of rapid eye movement sleep and may be functionally significant for brain plasticity processes. In this pilot study, we use a combined polysomnographic and functional magnetic resonance imaging approach, and show distinct magnetic resonance imaging signal increases in the posterior thalamus and occipital cortex in close temporal relationship to rapid eye movements during human rapid eye movement sleep. These findings are consistent with cell recordings in animal experiments and demonstrate that functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized to detect ponto-geniculo-occipital-like activity in humans. Studying intact neuronal networks underlying sleep regulation is no longer confined to animal models, but has been shown to be feasible in humans by a combined functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalograph approach. PMID:15891584

  3. Manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI): a powerful new imaging method to study tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Cacace, Anthony T; Brozoski, Tom; Berkowitz, Bruce; Bauer, Carol; Odintsov, Boris; Bergkvist, Magnus; Castracane, James; Zhang, Jinsheng; Holt, Avril Genene

    2014-05-01

    Manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) is a method used primarily in basic science experiments to advance the understanding of information processing in central nervous system pathways. With this mechanistic approach, manganese (Mn(2+)) acts as a calcium surrogate, whereby voltage-gated calcium channels allow for activity driven entry of Mn(2+) into neurons. The detection and quantification of neuronal activity via Mn(2+) accumulation is facilitated by "hemodynamic-independent contrast" using high resolution MRI scans. This review emphasizes initial efforts to-date in the development and application of MEMRI for evaluating tinnitus (the perception of sound in the absence of overt acoustic stimulation). Perspectives from leaders in the field highlight MEMRI related studies by comparing and contrasting this technique when tinnitus is induced by high-level noise exposure and salicylate administration. Together, these studies underscore the considerable potential of MEMRI for advancing the field of auditory neuroscience in general and tinnitus research in particular. Because of the technical and functional gaps that are filled by this method and the prospect that human studies are on the near horizon, MEMRI should be of considerable interest to the auditory research community. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled . PMID:24583078

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Bradley, W.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present a review of magnetic resonance imaging. Many topics are explored from instrumentation, spectroscopy, blood flow and sodium imaging to detailed clinical applications such as the differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis or adrenal adenoma. The emphasis throughout is on descriptions of normal multiplanar anatomy and pathology as displayed by MRI.

  5. Retinal microvascular abnormalities and subclinical magnetic resonance imaging brain infarct: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Ning; Mosley, Thomas; Islam, Amirul; Kawasaki, Ryo; Sharrett, A. Richey; Klein, Ronald; Coker, Laura H.; Knopman, David S.; Shibata, Dean K.; Catellier, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Silent brain infarct and white matter lesions are common radiological findings associated with the risk of clinical stroke and dementia; however, our understanding of their underlying pathophysiology and risk factors remains limited. This study aimed to determine whether assessment of retinal microvascular abnormalities could provide prognostic information regarding the risk of brain infarct and white matter lesions on magnetic resonance imaging. This study is based on a subset of 810 middle-aged persons without clinical stroke or baseline magnetic resonance imaging infarct enrolled in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study, a prospective, population-based study. Participants had a baseline magnetic resonance imaging brain examination and retinal photography in 1993–1995, and returned for a repeat magnetic resonance imaging examination in 2004–2006. Magnetic resonance images were graded for presence of any cerebral infarct, infarct with lacunar characteristics and white matter lesions according to standardized protocols. Retinal photographs were graded for presence of retinopathy lesions and retinal arteriolar abnormalities following a standardized protocol. Over a median follow-up of 10.5 years, 164 (20.2%) participants developed cerebral infarct, 131 (16.2%) developed lacunar infarct, 182 (24.2%) developed new white matter lesions and 49 (6.1%) had evidence of white matter lesion progression. After adjusting for age, gender, race, cardiovascular risk factors and carotid intima-media thickness, retinopathy was associated with incident cerebral infarct (odds ratio 2.82; 95% confidence interval 1.42–5.60) and lacunar infarct (odds ratio 3.19; 95% confidence interval: 1.56–6.50). Retinal arteriovenous nicking was associated with incident cerebral infarct (odds ratio 2.82; 95% confidence interval: 1.66–4.76), lacunar infarct (odds ratio 2.48; 95% confidence interval: 1.39–4.40) and white matter lesion incidence (odds

  6. Towards the automatic study of the vocal tract from magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Maria João M; Ventura, Sandra M Rua; Freitas, Diamantino Rui S; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2011-11-01

    Over the last few decades, researchers have been investigating the mechanisms involved in speech production. Image analysis can be a valuable aid in the understanding of the morphology of the vocal tract. The application of magnetic resonance imaging to study these mechanisms has been proven to be reliable and safe. We have applied deformable models in magnetic resonance images to conduct an automatic study of the vocal tract; mainly, to evaluate the shape of the vocal tract in the articulation of some European Portuguese sounds, and then to successfully automatically segment the vocal tract's shape in new images. Thus, a point distribution model has been built from a set of magnetic resonance images acquired during artificially sustained articulations of 21 sounds, which successfully extracts the main characteristics of the movements of the vocal tract. The combination of that statistical shape model with the gray levels of its points is subsequently used to build active shape models and active appearance models. Those models have then been used to segment the modeled vocal tract into new images in a successful and automatic manner. The computational models have thus been revealed to be useful for the specific area of speech simulation and rehabilitation, namely to simulate and recognize the compensatory movements of the articulators during speech production. PMID:20952159

  7. A combined post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging and quantitative histological study of multiple sclerosis pathology

    PubMed Central

    Kolasinski, James; Chance, Steven A.; DeLuca, Gabriele C.; Esiri, Margaret M.; Chang, Eun-Hyuk; Palace, Jacqueline A.; McNab, Jennifer A.; Jenkinson, Mark; Miller, Karla L.; Johansen-Berg, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory neurological condition characterized by focal and diffuse neurodegeneration and demyelination throughout the central nervous system. Factors influencing the progression of pathology are poorly understood. One hypothesis is that anatomical connectivity influences the spread of neurodegeneration. This predicts that measures of neurodegeneration will correlate most strongly between interconnected structures. However, such patterns have been difficult to quantify through post-mortem neuropathology or in vivo scanning alone. In this study, we used the complementary approaches of whole brain post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging and quantitative histology to assess patterns of multiple sclerosis pathology. Two thalamo-cortical projection systems were considered based on their distinct neuroanatomy and their documented involvement in multiple sclerosis: lateral geniculate nucleus to primary visual cortex and mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus to prefrontal cortex. Within the anatomically distinct thalamo-cortical projection systems, magnetic resonance imaging derived cortical thickness was correlated significantly with both a measure of myelination in the connected tract and a measure of connected thalamic nucleus cell density. Such correlations did not exist between these markers of neurodegeneration across different thalamo-cortical systems. Magnetic resonance imaging lesion analysis depicted clearly demarcated subcortical lesions impinging on the white matter tracts of interest; however, quantitation of the extent of lesion-tract overlap failed to demonstrate any appreciable association with the severity of markers of diffuse pathology within each thalamo-cortical projection system. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging metrics in both white matter tracts were correlated significantly with a histologically derived measure of tract myelination. These data demonstrate for the first time the relevance of functional

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of jet height hysteresis in packed beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhl, Maximilian H.; Lu, Guang; Third, James R.; Prüssmann, Klaas P.; Müller, Christoph R.

    2013-06-01

    The jet-spout transition in fluidized beds can show hysteretic behavior. In this study the jet-spout transition was studied as a function of orifice velocity for particles of different size and shape using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The measurements showed that the particle shape primarily affect to the width of the hysteresis loop whereas particle size governs the position of the hysteresis loop with regards to the orifice velocity.

  9. Bipartite Medial Cuneiform: Case Report and Retrospective Review of 1000 Magnetic Resonance (MR) Imaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Geraldine H.; Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B.; Resnick, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To present a unique case report of a Lisfranc fracture in a patient with a bipartite medial cuneiform and to evaluate the prevalence of the bipartite medial cuneiform in a retrospective review of 1000 magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies of the foot. Materials and Methods. Case report followed by a retrospective review of 1000 MR imaging studies of the foot for the presence or absence of a bipartite medial cuneiform. Results. The incidence of the bipartite medial cuneiform is 0.1%. Conclusion. A bipartite medial cuneiform is a rare finding but one with both clinical and surgical implications. PMID:24587806

  10. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Elster, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging is comprehensive, well structured, and well written. The material is current and well referenced. The illustrations are good and complement the text well. The overall quality of publication is above average. The greatest attribute of the book is its readability. The author demonstrates ample skill in making complex subjects, such as MR physics and imaging of cerebral hemorrhage, easy to understand. The book closes with a detailed atlas on the anatomic appearance of the brain on MR images in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes.

  11. Blood-Brain Barrier Experiments with Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging and an Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Woo; Kim, Hak Jin; Han, Hyung Soo

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of study was to evaluate the feasibility of brain magnetic resonance (MR) images of the rat obtained using a 1.5T MR machine in several blood-brain barrier (BBB) experiments. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. MR images were obtained using a clinical 1.5T MR machine. A microcatheter was introduced via the femoral artery to the carotid artery. Normal saline (group 1, n = 4), clotted autologous blood (group 2, n = 4), triolein emulsion (group 3, n = 4), and oleic acid emulsion (group 4, n = 4) were infused into the carotid artery through a microcatheter. Conventional and diffusion-weighted images, the apparent coefficient map, perfusion-weighted images, and contrast-enhanced MR images were obtained. Brain tissue was obtained and triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining was performed in group 2. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextran images and endothelial barrier antigen (EBA) studies were performed in group 4. Results The MR images in group 1 were of good quality. The MR images in group 2 revealed typical findings of acute cerebral infarction. Perfusion defects were noted on the perfusion-weighted images. The MR images in group 3 showed vasogenic edema and contrast enhancement, representing vascular damage. The rats in group 4 had vasogenic edema on the MR images and leakage of dextran on the FITC-labeled dextran image, representing increased vascular permeability. The immune reaction was decreased on the EBA study. Conclusion Clinical 1.5T MR images using a rat depicted many informative results in the present study. These results can be used in further researches of the BBB using combined clinical MR machines and immunohistochemical examinations. PMID:20379473

  12. Experimental Study of Calculated t1 Images Under Flow Conditions Using Protons and FLUORINE-19 in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jie

    A gradient refocused echo (GRE) pulse protocol has been developed and implemented to obtain calculated T1 images under flow conditions. This sequence acquires multiple images with different flip angles and uses a least -square fit to obtain calculated T1 images. A theoretical analysis of imprecision in the calculated T1 images is discussed. In accordance with Wang (49), the optimal parameters as determined by computer simulation were found to be 20 ^circ and 100^ circ for the flip angles in a two point fit for TR falling in the range 0.3 to 1.0 T1. Flow compensation was added to the pulse sequence for imaging flow phantoms containing GD-DTPA doped water and perfluorocarbon (PFC) compounds for a range of flow rates (0-55 cm/s). Flow compensation was found to effectively recover signal loss due to flow related dephasing. Experimental testing of this protocol has been performed on stationary proton and PFC compound phantoms utilizing ^1H and ^{19}F magnetic resonance imaging respectively. There is good agreement between the experimental results and the theoretical predictions about imprecision in the calculated T1 images. Analysis of variance of the mean T1 values of the calculated T1 images of the proton and PFC flow phantoms indicated that for the flow phantom geometry used in this study, there was no statistical difference among these mean T1 values from flow phantoms with different flow rates (including stationary status). It is believed that this protocol may provide an imaging method for mapping the pO _2 distribution in the vascular space in vivo utilizing perfluorocarbon compounds and ^ {19}F magnetic resonance imaging.

  13. Possibility Study of Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) Algorithm Application to Spine Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Do-Wan; Han, Bong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is an application of scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm to stitch the cervical-thoracic-lumbar (C-T-L) spine magnetic resonance (MR) images to provide a view of the entire spine in a single image. All MR images were acquired with fast spin echo (FSE) pulse sequence using two MR scanners (1.5 T and 3.0 T). The stitching procedures for each part of spine MR image were performed and implemented on a graphic user interface (GUI) configuration. Moreover, the stitching process is performed in two categories; manual point-to-point (mPTP) selection that performed by user specified corresponding matching points, and automated point-to-point (aPTP) selection that performed by SIFT algorithm. The stitched images using SIFT algorithm showed fine registered results and quantitatively acquired values also indicated little errors compared with commercially mounted stitching algorithm in MRI systems. Our study presented a preliminary validation of the SIFT algorithm application to MRI spine images, and the results indicated that the proposed approach can be performed well for the improvement of diagnosis. We believe that our approach can be helpful for the clinical application and extension of other medical imaging modalities for image stitching. PMID:27064404

  14. Electron spin resonance studies on reduction process of nitroxyl spin radicals used in molecular imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Jawahar, A.

    2014-04-24

    The Electron spin resonance studies on the reduction process of nitroxyl spin probes were carried out for 1mM {sup 14}N labeled nitroxyl radicals in pure water and 1 mM concentration of ascorbic acid as a function of time. The electron spin resonance parameters such as signal intensity ratio, line width, g-value, hyperfine coupling constant and rotational correlation time were determined. The half life time was estimated for 1mM {sup 14}N labeled nitroxyl radicals in 1 mM concentration of ascorbic acid. The ESR study reveals that the TEMPONE has narrowest line width and fast tumbling motion compared with TEMPO and TEMPOL. From the results, TEMPONE has long half life time and high stability compared with TEMPO and TEMPOL radical. Therefore, this study reveals that the TEMPONE radical can act as a good redox sensitive spin probe for molecular imaging.

  15. Echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging studies of frontal cortex activation during word generation in humans.

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, G; Blamire, A M; Rothman, D L; Gruetter, R; Shulman, R G

    1993-01-01

    Nine subjects were studied by high-speed magnetic resonance imaging while performing language-based tasks. Subjects were asked either to repeat or to generate verbs associated with nouns read by an experimenter while magnetic resonance images were obtained of the left inferior frontal lobe. The echo-planar imaging sequence was used with a gradient echo time of 70 ms to give an apparent transverse relaxation time weighting (T2* that is sensitive to local hemoglobin levels. Images were acquired every 3 s (repetition time) in series of 32. In plane resolution was 6 x 4.5 mm and slice thickness was 10 mm. An increase in signal accompanied performance of the tasks, with significantly more activation for verb generation than for repeating. The activation effect occurred within 3 s after task onset and could be observed in single images from individual subjects. The primary focus of activation appeared in gray matter along a sulcus anterior to the lateral sulcus that included the anterior insula, Brodmann's area 47, and extending to area 10. Little or no activation of this region was found for a passive listening, covert generation, or mouth-movement control tasks. Significant activation was also found for a homologous region in the right frontal cortex but not for control regions in calcarine cortex. These results are consistent with prior studies that have used positron emission tomography imaging with 15O-labeled water as a blood flow tracer. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8506340

  16. Studying Autism Spectrum Disorder with Structural and Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Marwa M. T.; Keynton, Robert S.; Mostapha, Mahmoud M. M. O.; ElTanboly, Ahmed H.; Casanova, Manuel F.; Gimel'farb, Georgy L.; El-Baz, Ayman

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modalities have emerged as powerful means that facilitate non-invasive clinical diagnostics of various diseases and abnormalities since their inception in the 1980s. Multiple MRI modalities, such as different types of the sMRI and DTI, have been employed to investigate facets of ASD in order to better understand this complex syndrome. This paper reviews recent applications of structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), to study autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Main reported findings are sometimes contradictory due to different age ranges, hardware protocols, population types, numbers of participants, and image analysis parameters. The primary anatomical structures, such as amygdalae, cerebrum, and cerebellum, associated with clinical-pathological correlates of ASD are highlighted through successive life stages, from infancy to adulthood. This survey demonstrates the absence of consistent pathology in the brains of autistic children and lack of research investigations in patients under 2 years of age in the literature. The known publications also emphasize advances in data acquisition and analysis, as well as significance of multimodal approaches that combine resting-state, task-evoked, and sMRI measures. Initial results obtained with the sMRI and DTI show good promise toward the early and non-invasive ASD diagnostics. PMID:27242476

  17. A feasibility study of hand kinematics for EVA analysis using magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickenson, Reuben D.; Lorenz, Christine H.; Peterson, Steven W.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Main, John A.

    1992-01-01

    A new method for analyzing the kinematics of joint motion using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The reconstruction of the metacarpalphalangeal joint of the left index finger into a 3D graphic display is shown. From the reconstructed volumetric images, measurements of the angles of movement of the applicable bones are obtained and processed by analyzing the screw motion of the joint. Landmark positions are chosen at distinctive locations of the joint at fixed image threshold intensity levels to ensure repeatability. The primarily 2D planar motion of this joint is then studied using a method of constructing coordinate systems using three or more points. A transformation matrix based on a world coordinate system describes the location and orientation of the local target coordinate system. The findings show the applicability of MRI to joint kinematics for gaining further knowledge of the hand-glove design for EVA.

  18. Multiplane magnetic resonance imaging of the heart and major vessels: studies in normal volunteers

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.B.; Stark, D.; McNamara, M.; Lanzer, P.; Crooks, L.E.; Kaufman, L.

    1984-04-01

    The feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging for defining anatomy of internal cardiac structures and major blood vessels was assessed in 14 normal subjects. Both electrocardiogram-gated and standard spin-echo images were obtained. Gated images provided better visualization of internal cardiac morphology and of upper mediastinal vessels than did nongated images. Trabecular detail and components of the mitral valve could be resolved. All segments of the left ventricular wall could be evaluated by combining axial, coronal, and sagittal images. Gated acquisition of magnetic resonance images did not increase imaging time; five transverse slices of the left ventricle were obtained in 6.0-8.5 min. The good image quality, ease of gated acquisition, large field of view, capability of direct imaging in multiple planes, and noninvasiveness of the technique suggest that it will be an important imaging method in cardiovascular disease.

  19. Velocity and Concentration Studies of Flowing Suspensions by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, E.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) techniques were developed to study concentrated suspension flows. Some of the proposed tasks were completed and others partly completed before the funding was terminated. The tasks completed were (1) materials selection for imaging of both particle and fluid components, (2) pipe flow measurements, and (3) flows in complex geometries. The task tackled with good progress is to develop rapid imaging techniques by analog compensation of eddy currents generated by the gradient pulses and real-time image reconstruction from the rapidly obtained data. The most suitable combination of materials arrived at is pharmaceutical beads in silicon oil. Their relaxation times T, are sufficiently different to permit imaging the two components separately. The pipe flow experiment used 3 mm, neutrally buoyant, plastic particles, up to 40% by volume, in 80-90W transmission oil flowing in a 5 cm diameter pipe. A series of distances ranging from 60 cm to 6 m downstream from a commercial mixer was studied. The flow is fully developed at 6 m and the velocity and concentration profiles agree with the earlier lower resolution experiments. The eddy current compensation scheme works well for two channels and is being extended to eight channels including the uniform field compensation term. In addition, we have implemented a rapid reconstruction hardware that processes and displays images in a fraction of a second.

  20. Acute hypoxia increases the cerebral metabolic rate - a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Mark B; Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob; Lisbjerg, Kristian; Christensen, Søren Just; Law, Ian; Rasmussen, Peter; Olsen, Niels V; Larsson, Henrik Bw

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine changes in cerebral metabolism by magnetic resonance imaging of healthy subjects during inhalation of 10% O2 hypoxic air. Hypoxic exposure elevates cerebral perfusion, but its effect on energy metabolism has been less investigated. Magnetic resonance imaging techniques were used to measure global cerebral blood flow and the venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus. Global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified from cerebral blood flow and arteriovenous oxygen saturation difference. Concentrations of lactate, glutamate, N-acetylaspartate, creatine and phosphocreatine were measured in the visual cortex by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Twenty-three young healthy males were scanned for 60 min during normoxia, followed by 40 min of breathing hypoxic air. Inhalation of hypoxic air resulted in an increase in cerebral blood flow of 15.5% (p = 0.058), and an increase in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen of 8.5% (p = 0.035). Cerebral lactate concentration increased by 180.3% ([Formula: see text]), glutamate increased by 4.7% ([Formula: see text]) and creatine and phosphocreatine decreased by 15.2% (p[Formula: see text]). The N-acetylaspartate concentration was unchanged (p = 0.36). In conclusion, acute hypoxia in healthy subjects increased perfusion and metabolic rate, which could represent an increase in neuronal activity. We conclude that marked changes in brain homeostasis occur in the healthy human brain during exposure to acute hypoxia. PMID:26661163

  1. Acute hypoxia increases the cerebral metabolic rate – a magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob; Lisbjerg, Kristian; Christensen, Søren Just; Law, Ian; Rasmussen, Peter; Olsen, Niels V; Larsson, Henrik BW

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine changes in cerebral metabolism by magnetic resonance imaging of healthy subjects during inhalation of 10% O2 hypoxic air. Hypoxic exposure elevates cerebral perfusion, but its effect on energy metabolism has been less investigated. Magnetic resonance imaging techniques were used to measure global cerebral blood flow and the venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus. Global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified from cerebral blood flow and arteriovenous oxygen saturation difference. Concentrations of lactate, glutamate, N-acetylaspartate, creatine and phosphocreatine were measured in the visual cortex by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Twenty-three young healthy males were scanned for 60 min during normoxia, followed by 40 min of breathing hypoxic air. Inhalation of hypoxic air resulted in an increase in cerebral blood flow of 15.5% (p = 0.058), and an increase in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen of 8.5% (p = 0.035). Cerebral lactate concentration increased by 180.3% (p<10-6), glutamate increased by 4.7% (p<10-4) and creatine and phosphocreatine decreased by 15.2% (p<10-3). The N-acetylaspartate concentration was unchanged (p = 0.36). In conclusion, acute hypoxia in healthy subjects increased perfusion and metabolic rate, which could represent an increase in neuronal activity. We conclude that marked changes in brain homeostasis occur in the healthy human brain during exposure to acute hypoxia. PMID:26661163

  2. Investigating the emotional response to room acoustics: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Lawless, M S; Vigeant, M C

    2015-10-01

    While previous research has demonstrated the powerful influence of pleasant and unpleasant music on emotions, the present study utilizes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess the positive and negative emotional responses as demonstrated in the brain when listening to music convolved with varying room acoustic conditions. During fMRI scans, subjects rated auralizations created in a simulated concert hall with varying reverberation times. The analysis detected activations in the dorsal striatum, a region associated with anticipation of reward, for two individuals for the highest rated stimulus, though no activations were found for regions associated with negative emotions in any subject. PMID:26520354

  3. Cerebral activation focusing on strong tasting food: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Senichiro; Kubota, Fumio; Nisijima, Koichi; Washiya, Sumio; Kato, Satoshi

    2005-02-28

    Very little research has been conducted on taste imagery because of the difficulty of doing so. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging study to observe cerebral activation patterns produced in volunteers concentrating on pickled plums (umeboshi), a traditional Japanese food with a strong and sour taste. Activation was observed in the right insula, the bilateral opercula, the bilateral orbitofrontal cortices and the left Broca's area. Activation in the insula (primary gustatory area) was very weak and limited to one side. The activation pattern was similar to that of taste perception. Our results showed that it is possible for humans to imagine tastes. PMID:15706236

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Duodenoscope.

    PubMed

    Syms, Richard R A; Young, Ian R; Wadsworth, Christopher A; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D; Rea, Marc

    2013-12-01

    A side-viewing duodenoscope capable of both optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The instrument is constructed from MR-compatible materials and combines a coherent fiber bundle for optical imaging, an irrigation channel and a side-opening biopsy channel for the passage of catheter tools with a tip saddle coil for radio-frequency signal reception. The receiver coil is magnetically coupled to an internal pickup coil to provide intrinsic safety. Impedance matching is achieved using a mechanically variable mutual inductance, and active decoupling by PIN-diode switching. (1)H MRI of phantoms and ex vivo porcine liver specimens was carried out at 1.5 T. An MRI field-of-view appropriate for use during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was obtained, with limited artefacts, and a signal-to-noise ratio advantage over a surface array coil was demonstrated. PMID:23807423

  5. Study of miscible and immiscible flows in a microchannel using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Akpa, Belinda S; Matthews, Sinéad M; Sederman, Andrew J; Yunus, Kamran; Fisher, Adrian C; Johns, Michael L; Gladden, Lynn F

    2007-08-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive technique that can be used to visualize mixing processes in optically opaque systems in up to three dimensions. Here, MRI has been used for the first time to obtain both cross-sectional velocity and concentration maps of flow through an optically opaque Y-shaped microfluidic sensor. Images of 23 micromx23 microm resolution were obtained for a channel of rectangular cross section (250 micromx500 microm) fed by two square inlets (250 micromx250 microm). Both miscible and immiscible liquid systems have been studied. These include a system in which the coupling of flow and mass transfer has been observed, as the diffusion of the analyte perturbs local hydrodynamics. MRI has been shown to be a versatile tool for the study of mixing processes in a microfluidic system via the multidimensional spatial resolution of flow and mass transfer. PMID:17630718

  6. Pocket atlas of cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Haughton, V.M.; Daniels, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    This atlas illustrates normal cerebral anatomy in magnetic resonance images. From their studies in cerebral anatomy utilizing cryomicrotome and other techniques, the authors selected more than 100 high-resolution images that represent the most clinically useful scans.

  7. Velocity and Concentration Studies of Flowing Suspensions by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, E.

    1997-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) techniques were developed to study concentrated suspension flows. Some of the proposed tasks were completed and others partly completed before the funding was terminated. The tasks completed were (1) materials selection for imaging of both particle and fluid components, (2) pipe flow measurements, and (3) flows in complex geometries. The task tackled with good progress is to develop rapid imaging techniques by analog compensation of eddy currents generated by the gradient pulses and real-time image reconstruction from the rapidly obtained data. The most suitable combination of materials arrived at is pharmaceutical beads in silicon oil. Their relaxation times T, are sufficiently different to permit imaging the two components separately. The pipe flow experiment used 3 mm, neutrally buoyant, plastic particles, up to 40% by volume, in 80-90W transmission oil flowing in a 5 cm diameter pipe. A series of distances ranging from 60 cm to 6 m downstream from a commercial mixer was studied. The flow is fully developed at 6 m and the velocity and concentration profiles agree with the earlier lower resolution experiments.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research. PMID:25659942

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-02-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research.

  10. The study of pain with blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibinson, James W.

    Using blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD FMRI), the brain areas activated by pain were studied. These initial studies led to interesting new findings about the body's response to pain and to the refinement of one method used in FMRI analysis for correction of physiologic noise (signal fluctuations caused by the cyclic and non-cyclic changes in the cardiovascular and respiratory status of the body). In the first study, evidence was provided suggesting that the multiple painful stimulations used in typical pain FMRI block designs may cause attenuation over time of the BOLD signal within activated areas. The effect this may have on pain investigations using multiple tasks has not been previously investigated. The demonstrated BOLD attenuation seems unique to pain studies. Several possible explanations exist, but two of the most likely are neural activity modulation by descending pain inhibitory mechanisms and changing hemodynamics caused by a physiologic response to pain. The second study began the investigation of hemodynamics by monitoring the physiologic response to pain for eight subjects in two phases. Phase one used a combination of standard operating suite monitors and research equipment to characterizing the physiologic response to pain. Phase two collected magnetic resonance quantitative flow images during painful nerve stimulation to test for changes in global cerebral blood flow. It is well established that changes in respiration and global blood flow can affect the BOLD response, leading to the final investigation of this dissertation. The brain activation induced by pain for the same eight subjects used in the physiologic response experiments described above was then studied by BOLD FMRI. By including the respiration signal and end-tidal carbon dioxide levels in the analysis of the images, the quantification and removal of image intensity variations correlated to breathing and end-tidal carbon dioxide changes could be

  11. Feasibility study of superresolution continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Wakana, Michi; Susaki, Hitoshi

    2006-06-01

    In this letter, we report that superresolution continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (cw-EPR) imaging is feasible for enhancing spatial resolution in images of unpaired electrons. We demonstrate one-dimensional superresolution EPR imaging for phantoms of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) powder with a 650MHz cw-EPR imager. The spatial resolution was improved up to fivefold with iterative deconvolution techniques. Our superresolution EPR imaging includes two-stage postprocessing, i.e., noniterative deconvolution for measured EPR spectra and iterative deconvolution processing for a blurred EPR image profile with the point spread function of the low-pass window function being applied.

  12. Diffusion imaging-based subdivision of the human hypothalamus: a magnetic resonance study with clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Schönknecht, Peter; Anwander, Alfred; Petzold, Friederike; Schindler, Stephanie; Knösche, Thomas R; Möller, Harald E; Hegerl, Ulrich; Turner, Robert; Geyer, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    The hypothalamus and its subdivisions are involved in many neuropsychiatric conditions such as affective disorders, schizophrenia, or narcolepsy, but parcellations of hypothalamic subnuclei have hitherto been feasible only with histological techniques in postmortem brains. In an attempt to map subdivisions of the hypothalamus in vivo, we analyzed the directionality information from high-resolution diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images of healthy volunteers. We acquired T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted scans in ten healthy subjects at 3 T. In the T1-weighted images, we manually delineated an individual mask of the hypothalamus in each subject and computed in the co-registered diffusion-weighted images the similarity of the principal diffusion direction for each pair of mask voxels. By clustering the similarity matrix into three regions with a k-means algorithm, we obtained an anatomically coherent arrangement of subdivisions across hemispheres and subjects. In each hypothalamus mask, we found an anterior region with dorsoventral principal diffusion direction, a posteromedial region with rostro-caudal direction, and a lateral region with mediolateral direction. A comparative analysis with microstructural hypothalamus parcellations from the literature reveals that each of these regions corresponds to a specific group of hypothalamic subnuclei as defined in postmortem brains. This is to our best knowledge the first in vivo study that attempts a delineation of hypothalamic subdivisions by clustering diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging data. When applied in a larger sample of neuropsychiatric patients, a structural analysis of hypothalamic subnuclei should contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric conditions such as affective disorders. PMID:23287964

  13. A comparative study of metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Khademi, Jalil; Alizadeh, Ahmad; Babaei Hemmaty, Yasamin; Atrkar Roushan, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to compare the metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and Methods A dry mandible with 12 intact premolars was prepared, and was scanned ten times with various types of brackets: American, 3M, Dentaurum, and Masel orthodontic brackets were used, together with either stainless steel (SS) or nickel titanium (NiTi) wires. Subsequently, three different sequences of coronal and axial images were obtained: spin-echo T1-weighted images, fast spin-echo T2-weighted images, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. In each sequence, the two sequential axial and coronal images with the largest signal-void area were selected. The largest diameters of the signal voids in the direction of the X-, Y-, and Z-axes were then measured twice. Finally, the mean linear values associated with different orthodontic brackets were analyzed using one-way analysis of variation, and the results were compared using the independent t-test to assess whether the use of SS or NiTi wires had a significant effect on the images. Results Statistically significant differences were only observed along the Z-axis among the four different brands of orthodontic brackets with SS wires. A statistically significant difference was observed along all axes among the brackets with NiTi wires. A statistically significant difference was found only along the Z-axis between nickel-free and nickel-containing brackets. Conclusion With respect to all axes, the 3M bracket was associated with smaller signal-void areas. Overall, the 3M and Dentaurum brackets with NiTi wires induced smaller artifacts along all axes than those with SS wires. PMID:26389058

  14. Enhancement of Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Slobozhanyuk, Alexey P; Poddubny, Alexander N; Raaijmakers, Alexander J E; van den Berg, Cornelis A T; Kozachenko, Alexander V; Dubrovina, Irina A; Melchakova, Irina V; Kivshar, Yuri S; Belov, Pavel A

    2016-03-01

    It is revealed that the unique properties of ultrathin metasurface resonators can improve magnetic resonance imaging dramatically. A metasurface formed when an array of metallic wires is placed inside a scanner under the studied object and a substantial enhancement of the radio-frequency magnetic field is achieved by means of subwavelength manipulation with the metasurface, also allowing improved image resolution. PMID:26754827

  15. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  16. A feasibility study of hand kinematics for EVA analysis using magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickenson, Rueben D.; Lorenz, Christine H.; Peterson, Steven W.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Main, John A.

    1992-01-01

    A new method of analyzing the kinematics of joint motion is developed. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) offers several distinct advantages. Past methods of studying anatomic joint motion have usually centered on four approaches. These methods are x-ray projection, goniometric linkage analysis, sonic digitization, and landmark measurement of photogrammetry. Of these four, only x-ray is applicable for in vivo studies. The remaining three methods utilize other types of projections of inter-joint measurements, which can cause various types of error. MRI offers accuracy in measurement due to its tomographic nature (as opposed to projection) without the problems associated with x-ray dosage. Once the data acquisition of MR images was complete, the images were processed using a 3D volume rendering workstation. The metacarpalphalangeal (MCP) joint of the left index finger was selected and reconstructed into a three-dimensional graphic display. From the reconstructed volumetric images, measurements of the angles of movement of the applicable bones were obtained and processed by analyzing the screw motion of the MCP joint. Landmark positions were chosen at distinctive locations of the joint at fixed image threshold intensity levels to ensure repeatability. The primarily two dimensional planar motion of this joint was then studied using a method of constructing coordinate systems using three (or more) points. A transformation matrix based on a world coordinate system described the location and orientation of a local target coordinate system. Future research involving volume rendering of MRI data focusing on the internal kinematics of the hand's individual ligaments, cartilage, tendons, etc. will follow. Its findings will show the applicability of MRI to joint kinematics for gaining further knowledge of the hand-glove (power assisted) design for extravehicular activity (EVA).

  17. Accessible magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, L; Arakawa, M; Hale, J; Rothschild, P; Carlson, J; Hake, K; Kramer, D; Lu, W; Van Heteren, J

    1989-10-01

    The cost of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is driven by magnetic field strength. Misperceptions as to the impact of field strength on performance have led to systems that are more expensive than they need to be. Careful analysis of all the factors that affect diagnostic quality lead to the conclusion that field strength per se is not a strong determinant of system performance. Freed from the constraints imposed by high-field operation, it is possible to exploit a varied set of opportunities afforded by low-field operation. In addition to lower costs and easier siting, we can take advantage of shortened T1 times, higher contrast, reduced sensitivity to motion, and reduced radiofrequency power deposition. These conceptual advantages can be made to coalesce onto practical imaging systems. We describe a low-cost MRI system that utilizes a permanent magnet of open design. Careful optimization of receiving antennas and acquisition sequences permit performance levels consistent with those needed for an effective diagnostic unit. Ancillary advantages include easy access to the patient, reduced claustrophobia, quiet and comfortable operation, and absence of a missile effect. The system can be sited in 350 sq ft and consumes a modest amount of electricity. MRI equipment of this kind can widen the population base than can access this powerful and beneficial diagnostic modality. PMID:2640910

  18. Autism Spectrum Disorder: Does Neuroimaging Support the DSM-5 Proposal for a Symptom Dyad? A Systematic Review of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Diffusion Tensor Imaging Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina-Camacho, Laura; Villero, Sonia; Fraguas, David; Boada, Leticia; Janssen, Joost; Navas-Sanchez, Francisco J.; Mayoral, Maria; Llorente, Cloe; Arango, Celso; Parellada, Mara

    2012-01-01

    A systematic review of 208 studies comprising functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging data in patients with "autism spectrum disorder" (ASD) was conducted, in order to determine whether these data support the forthcoming DSM-5 proposal of a social communication and behavioral symptom dyad. Studies consistently reported…

  19. A magnetic resonance imaging study on the articulatory and acoustic speech parameters of Malay vowels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The phonetic properties of six Malay vowels are investigated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize the vocal tract in order to obtain dynamic articulatory parameters during speech production. To resolve image blurring due to the tongue movement during the scanning process, a method based on active contour extraction is used to track tongue contours. The proposed method efficiently tracks tongue contours despite the partial blurring of MRI images. Consequently, the articulatory parameters that are effectively measured as tongue movement is observed, and the specific shape of the tongue and its position for all six uttered Malay vowels are determined. Speech rehabilitation procedure demands some kind of visual perceivable prototype of speech articulation. To investigate the validity of the measured articulatory parameters based on acoustic theory of speech production, an acoustic analysis based on the uttered vowels by subjects has been performed. As the acoustic speech and articulatory parameters of uttered speech were examined, a correlation between formant frequencies and articulatory parameters was observed. The experiments reported a positive correlation between the constriction location of the tongue body and the first formant frequency, as well as a negative correlation between the constriction location of the tongue tip and the second formant frequency. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is an effective tool for the dynamic study of speech production. PMID:25060583

  20. Preclinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy Studies of Memory, Aging, and Cognitive Decline

    PubMed Central

    Febo, Marcelo; Foster, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging provides for non-invasive evaluation of brain structure and activity and has been employed to suggest possible mechanisms for cognitive aging in humans. However, these imaging procedures have limits in terms of defining cellular and molecular mechanisms. In contrast, investigations of cognitive aging in animal models have mostly utilized techniques that have offered insight on synaptic, cellular, genetic, and epigenetic mechanisms affecting memory. Studies employing magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy (MRI and MRS, respectively) in animal models have emerged as an integrative set of techniques bridging localized cellular/molecular phenomenon and broader in vivo neural network alterations. MRI methods are remarkably suited to longitudinal tracking of cognitive function over extended periods permitting examination of the trajectory of structural or activity related changes. Combined with molecular and electrophysiological tools to selectively drive activity within specific brain regions, recent studies have begun to unlock the meaning of fMRI signals in terms of the role of neural plasticity and types of neural activity that generate the signals. The techniques provide a unique opportunity to causally determine how memory-relevant synaptic activity is processed and how memories may be distributed or reconsolidated over time. The present review summarizes research employing animal MRI and MRS in the study of brain function, structure, and biochemistry, with a particular focus on age-related cognitive decline. PMID:27468264

  1. Functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Bradley R

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps the spatiotemporal distribution of neural activity in the brain under varying cognitive conditions. Since its inception in 1991, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI has rapidly become a vital methodology in basic and applied neuroscience research. In the clinical realm, it has become an established tool for presurgical functional brain mapping. This chapter has three principal aims. First, we review key physiologic, biophysical, and methodologic principles that underlie BOLD fMRI, regardless of its particular area of application. These principles inform a nuanced interpretation of the BOLD fMRI signal, along with its neurophysiologic significance and pitfalls. Second, we illustrate the clinical application of task-based fMRI to presurgical motor, language, and memory mapping in patients with lesions near eloquent brain areas. Integration of BOLD fMRI and diffusion tensor white-matter tractography provides a road map for presurgical planning and intraoperative navigation that helps to maximize the extent of lesion resection while minimizing the risk of postoperative neurologic deficits. Finally, we highlight several basic principles of resting-state fMRI and its emerging translational clinical applications. Resting-state fMRI represents an important paradigm shift, focusing attention on functional connectivity within intrinsic cognitive networks. PMID:27432660

  2. Accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for measuring maturing cartilage: A phantom study

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, Jennifer R; Sussman, Marshall S; Moineddin, Rahim; Amirabadi, Afsaneh; Rayner, Tammy; Doria, Andrea S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging measurements of cartilage tissue-mimicking phantoms and to determine a combination of magnetic resonance imaging parameters to optimize accuracy while minimizing scan time. METHOD: Edge dimensions from 4 rectangular agar phantoms ranging from 10.5 to 14.5 mm in length and 1.25 to 5.5 mm in width were independently measured by two readers using a steel ruler. Coronal T1 spin echo (T1 SE), fast spoiled gradient-recalled echo (FSPGR) and multiplanar gradient-recalled echo (GRE MPGR) sequences were used to obtain phantom images on a 1.5-T scanner. RESULTS: Inter- and intra-reader reliability were high for both direct measurements and for magnetic resonance imaging measurements of phantoms. Statistically significant differences were noted between the mean direct measurements and the mean magnetic resonance imaging measurements for phantom 1 when using a GRE MPGR sequence (512x512 pixels, 1.5-mm slice thickness, 5:49 min scan time), while borderline differences were noted for T1 SE sequences with the following parameters: 320x320 pixels, 1.5-mm slice thickness, 6:11 min scan time; 320x320 pixels, 4-mm slice thickness, 6:11 min scan time; and 512x512 pixels, 1.5-mm slice thickness, 9:48 min scan time. Borderline differences were also noted when using a FSPGR sequence with 512x512 pixels, a 1.5-mm slice thickness and a 3:36 min scan time. CONCLUSIONS: FSPGR sequences, regardless of the magnetic resonance imaging parameter combination used, provided accurate measurements. The GRE MPGR sequence using 512x512 pixels, a 1.5-mm slice thickness and a 5:49 min scan time and, to a lesser degree, all tested T1 SE sequences produced suboptimal accuracy when measuring the widest phantom. PMID:27464298

  3. Chronic Brain Tissue Remodeling after Stroke in Rat: A One Year Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Kishor; Knight, Robert A.; Shen, Li Hong; Kapke, Alissa; Lu, Mei; Li, Yi; Chopp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Rats subjected to 2 hours of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion were studied temporally over 1 year by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and behavioral testing. Multiparameter MRI measures of T2, T1, T1 in the presence of off-resonance saturation of the bound proton signal (T1sat), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) were obtained at 1 day, 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks, and 3, 6, 9 and 12 months post-ischemia. Regions of interest included: ischemic core (damaged both at 1 day and later); new lesion (normal at 1 day, but damaged later); and recovery (damaged at 1 day, but normal later) areas. Hematoxylin and eosin, Prussian blue and ED-1, a monoclonal antibody murine macrophage marker, stainings were performed for histological assessment. Core area T2 and ADC values increased until ~6 months, and T1 and T1sat until ~12 months. New lesion area MRI parameter values increased until ~6 months (T2, T1 and ADC), or ~1 year (T1sat). Lesion area was largest at 1 day (mean±SD: 37.0±13.7 mm2) and smallest at 1 year (18.1±10.5 mm2). Recovery area was largest at 3 weeks (8.9±3.8 mm2) and smallest at 1 year (6.4±3.3 mm2). The ipsilateral/contralateral ventricle area ratio was 0.7±0.2 at 1 day and increased significantly at 1 year (2.4±0.7). Iron-laden macrophages, histologically confirmed at 1 year, were detected in the lesion borders by SWI at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Our data indicate that MRI detectable changes of ischemia-damaged brain tissue continue for at least 1 year post-ischemia. PMID:20828544

  4. Hypothalamus, sexual arousal and psychosexual identity in human males: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, M; Babiloni, C; Ferretti, A; Del Gratta, C; Merla, A; Olivetti Belardinelli, M; Romani, G L

    2008-06-01

    In a recent functional magnetic resonance imaging study, a complex neural circuit was shown to be involved in human males during sexual arousal [A. Ferretti et al. (2005) Neuroimage, 26, 1086]. At group level, there was a specific correlation between penile erection and activations in anterior cingulate, insula, amygdala, hypothalamus and secondary somatosensory regions. However, it is well known that there are remarkable inter-individual differences in the psychological view and attitude to sex of human males. Therefore, a crucial issue is the relationship among cerebral responses, sexual arousal and psychosexual identity at individual level. To address this issue, 18 healthy male subjects were recruited. Their deep sexual identity (DSI) was assessed following the construct revalidation by M. Olivetti Belardinelli [(1994) Sci. Contrib. Gen. Psychol., 11, 131] of the Franck drawing completion test, a projective test providing, according to this revalidation, quantitative scores on 'accordance/non-accordance' between self-reported and psychological sexual identity. Cerebral activity was evaluated by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging during hard-core erotic movies and sport movies. Results showed a statistically significant positive correlation between the blood oxygen level-dependent signal in bilateral hypothalamus and the Franck drawing completion test score during erotic movies. The higher the blood oxygen level-dependent activation in bilateral hypothalamus, the higher the male DSI profile. These results suggest that, in male subjects, inter-individual differences in the DSI are strongly correlated with blood flow to the bilateral hypothalamus, a dimorphic brain region deeply implicated in instinctual drives including reproduction. PMID:18588532

  5. Numerical study of remote detection outside the magnet with travelling wave Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 3T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, M.; Vázquez, F.; Solís-Nájera, S.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2015-01-01

    The use of the travelling wave approach for high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging has been used recently with very promising results. This approach offer images one with greater field-of-view and a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio using a circular waveguide. This scheme has been proved to be successful at 7 T and 9.4 T with whole-body imager. Images have also been acquired with clinical magnetic resonance imaging systems whose resonant frequencies were 64 MHz and 128 MHz. These results motivated the use of remote detection of the magnetic resonance signal using a parallel-plate waveguide together with 3 T clinical scanners, to acquired human leg images. The cut-off frequency of this waveguide is zero for the principal mode, allowing us to overcome the barrier of transmitting waves at lower frequency than 300 MHz or 7 T for protons. These motivated the study of remote detection outside the actual magnet. We performed electromagnetic field simulations of a parallel-plate waveguide and a phantom. The signal transmission was done at 128 MHz and using a circular surface coil located almost 200 cm away for the magnet isocentre. Numerical simulations demonstrated that the magnetic field of the principal mode propagate inside a waveguide outside the magnet. Numerical results were compared with previous experimental-acquired image data under similar conditions.

  6. Neural correlates of attachment trauma in borderline personality disorder: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Buchheim, Anna; Erk, Susanne; George, Carol; Kächele, Horst; Kircher, Tilo; Martius, Philipp; Pokorny, Dan; Ruchsow, Martin; Spitzer, Manfred; Walter, Henrik

    2008-08-30

    Functional imaging studies have shown that individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) display prefrontal and amygdala dysfunction while viewing or listening to emotional or traumatic stimuli. The study examined for the first time the functional neuroanatomy of attachment trauma in BPD patients using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during the telling of individual stories. A group of 11 female BPD patients and 17 healthy female controls, matched for age and education, told stories in response to a validated set of seven attachment pictures while being scanned. Group differences in narrative and neural responses to "monadic" pictures (characters facing attachment threats alone) and "dyadic" pictures (interaction between characters in an attachment context) were analyzed. Behavioral narrative data showed that monadic pictures were significantly more traumatic for BPD patients than for controls. As hypothesized BPD patients showed significantly more anterior midcingulate cortex activation in response to monadic pictures than controls. In response to dyadic pictures patients showed more activation of the right superior temporal sulcus and less activation of the right parahippocampal gyrus compared to controls. Our results suggest evidence for potential neural mechanisms of attachment trauma underlying interpersonal symptoms of BPD, i.e. fearful and painful intolerance of aloneness, hypersensitivity to social environment, and reduced positive memories of dyadic interactions. PMID:18635342

  7. How I report breast magnetic resonance imaging studies for breast cancer staging and screening.

    PubMed

    Vinnicombe, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast is the most sensitive imaging technique for the diagnosis and local staging of primary breast cancer and yet, despite the fact that it has been in use for 20 years, there is little evidence that its widespread uncritical adoption has had a positive impact on patient-related outcomes.This has been attributed previously to the low specificity that might be expected with such a sensitive modality, but with modern techniques and protocols, the specificity and positive predictive value for malignancy can exceed that of breast ultrasound and mammography. A more likely explanation is that historically, clinicians have acted on MRI findings and altered surgical plans without prior histological confirmation. Furthermore, modern adjuvant therapy for breast cancer has improved so much that it has become a very tall order to show a an improvement in outcomes such as local recurrence rates.In order to obtain clinically useful information, it is necessary to understand the strengths and weaknesses of the technique and the physiological processes reflected in breast MRI. An appropriate indication for the scan, proper patient preparation and good scan technique, with rigorous quality assurance, are all essential prerequisites for a diagnostically relevant study.The use of recognised descriptors from a standardised lexicon is helpful, since assessment can then dictate subsequent recommendations for management, as in the American College of Radiology BI-RADS (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System) lexicon (Morris et al., ACR BI-RADS® Atlas, Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System, 2013). It also enables audit of the service. However, perhaps the most critical factor in the generation of a meaningful report is for the reporting radiologist to have a thorough understanding of the clinical question and of the findings that will influence management. This has never been more important than at present, when we are in the throes of a

  8. Functional imaging of plants: a nuclear magnetic resonance study of a cucumber plant.

    PubMed Central

    Scheenen, Tom; Heemskerk, Anneriet; de Jager, Andrie; Vergeldt, Frank; Van As, Henk

    2002-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to study transients of biophysical parameters in a cucumber plant in response to environmental changes. Detailed flow imaging experiments showed the location of xylem and phloem in the stem and the response of the following flow characteristics to the imposed environmental changes: the total amount of water, the amount of stationary and flowing water, the linear velocity of the flowing water, and the volume flow. The total measured volume flow through the plant stem was in good agreement with the independently measured water uptake by the roots. A separate analysis of the flow characteristics for two vascular bundles revealed that changes in volume flow of the xylem sap were accounted for by a change in linear-flow velocities in the xylem vessels. Multiple-spin echo experiments revealed two water fractions for different tissues in the plant stem; the spin-spin relaxation time of the larger fraction of parenchyma tissue in the center of the stem and the vascular tissue was down by 17% in the period after cooling the roots of the plant. This could point to an increased water permeability of the tonoplast membrane of the observed cells in this period of quick recovery from severe water loss. PMID:11751335

  9. [Skeletal muscle magnetic resonance imaging study in a patient with diabetic lumbosacral radiculoplexus neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Nozomu; Kobayashi, Shunsuke; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    A 63-year-old man with type 2 diabetes mellitus developed deep aching and numbness in the right hip and lower extremity with rapid body weight loss. Neurological examination revealed weakness of the right hamstrings, tibialis anterior, and peroneus longus muscles with diminished ankle tendon reflex. We diagnosed him with diabetic lumbosacral radicuoloplexus neuropathy (DLRPN) based on neurological, radiological, and neurophysiological findings. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of skeletal muscles showed high intensity signals on T2-weighted images in bilateral hamstrings, adductor magnus and right tensor fasciae latae, and lower leg extensor muscles. The MRI findings suggested muscle edema caused by acute denervation. DLRPN, or diabetic amyotrophy, is known to be caused by ischemic axonal degeneration. Our patient showed good functional recovery, and abnormal MRI signals in the involved muscles mostly disappeared in parallel to the clinical course. Distribution of the denervated muscles suggested that our patient had either patchy lesions in the lumbosacaral plexus or mononeuropathy multiplex in the nerve branches. The current study highlights the potential of skeletal muscle MRI for clinical evaluation of DLRPN. PMID:25283832

  10. Removing inter-subject technical variability in magnetic resonance imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Jean-Philippe; Sweeney, Elizabeth M; Muschelli, John; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M; Shinohara, Russell T

    2016-05-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) intensities are acquired in arbitrary units, making scans non-comparable across sites and between subjects. Intensity normalization is a first step for the improvement of comparability of the images across subjects. However, we show that unwanted inter-scan variability associated with imaging site, scanner effect, and other technical artifacts is still present after standard intensity normalization in large multi-site neuroimaging studies. We propose RAVEL (Removal of Artificial Voxel Effect by Linear regression), a tool to remove residual technical variability after intensity normalization. As proposed by SVA and RUV [Leek and Storey, 2007, 2008, Gagnon-Bartsch and Speed, 2012], two batch effect correction tools largely used in genomics, we decompose the voxel intensities of images registered to a template into a biological component and an unwanted variation component. The unwanted variation component is estimated from a control region obtained from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), where intensities are known to be unassociated with disease status and other clinical covariates. We perform a singular value decomposition (SVD) of the control voxels to estimate factors of unwanted variation. We then estimate the unwanted factors using linear regression for every voxel of the brain and take the residuals as the RAVEL-corrected intensities. We assess the performance of RAVEL using T1-weighted (T1-w) images from more than 900 subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI), as well as healthy controls from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. We compare RAVEL to two intensity-normalization-only methods: histogram matching and White Stripe. We show that RAVEL performs best at improving the replicability of the brain regions that are empirically found to be most associated with AD, and that these regions are significantly more present in structures impacted by AD (hippocampus, amygdala

  11. Cardiac Structure and Function in Cushing's Syndrome: A Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Charles; Salenave, Sylvie; Kachenoura, Nadjia; Raissouni, Zainab; Macron, Laurent; Guignat, Laurence; Jublanc, Christel; Azarine, Arshid; Brailly, Sylvie; Young, Jacques; Mousseaux, Elie; Chanson, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with Cushing's syndrome have left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and dysfunction on echocardiography, but echo-based measurements may have limited accuracy in obese patients. No data are available on right ventricular (RV) and left atrial (LA) size and function in these patients. Objectives: The objective of the study was to evaluate LV, RV, and LA structure and function in patients with Cushing's syndrome by means of cardiac magnetic resonance, currently the reference modality in assessment of cardiac geometry and function. Methods: Eighteen patients with active Cushing's syndrome and 18 volunteers matched for age, sex, and body mass index were studied by cardiac magnetic resonance. The imaging was repeated in the patients 6 months (range 2–12 mo) after the treatment of hypercortisolism. Results: Compared with controls, patients with Cushing's syndrome had lower LV, RV, and LA ejection fractions (P < .001 for all) and increased end-diastolic LV segmental thickness (P < .001). Treatment of hypercortisolism was associated with an improvement in ventricular and atrial systolic performance, as reflected by a 15% increase in the LV ejection fraction (P = .029), a 45% increase in the LA ejection fraction (P < .001), and an 11% increase in the RV ejection fraction (P = NS). After treatment, the LV mass index and end-diastolic LV mass to volume ratio decreased by 17% (P < .001) and 10% (P = .002), respectively. None of the patients had late gadolinium myocardial enhancement. Conclusion: Cushing's syndrome is associated with subclinical biventricular and LA systolic dysfunctions that are reversible after treatment. Despite skeletal muscle atrophy, Cushing's syndrome patients have an increased LV mass, reversible upon correction of hypercortisolism. PMID:25093618

  12. Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging studies of older adults: a shrinking brain.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Susan M; Pham, Dzung L; Kraut, Michael A; Zonderman, Alan B; Davatzikos, Christos

    2003-04-15

    Age-related loss of brain tissue has been inferred from cross-sectional neuroimaging studies, but direct measurements of gray and white matter changes from longitudinal studies are lacking. We quantified longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 92 nondemented older adults (age 59-85 years at baseline) in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging to determine the rates and regional distribution of gray and white matter tissue loss in older adults. Using images from baseline, 2 year, and 4 year follow-up, we found significant age changes in gray (p < 0.001) and white (p < 0.001) volumes even in a subgroup of 24 very healthy elderly. Annual rates of tissue loss were 5.4 +/- 0.3, 2.4 +/- 0.4, and 3.1 +/- 0.4 cm3 per year for total brain, gray, and white volumes, respectively, and ventricles increased by 1.4 +/- 0.1 cm3 per year (3.7, 1.3, 2.4, and 1.2 cm3, respectively, in very healthy). Frontal and parietal, compared with temporal and occipital, lobar regions showed greater decline. Gray matter loss was most pronounced for orbital and inferior frontal, cingulate, insular, inferior parietal, and to a lesser extent mesial temporal regions, whereas white matter changes were widespread. In this first study of gray and white matter volume changes, we demonstrate significant longitudinal tissue loss for both gray and white matter even in very healthy older adults. These data provide essential information on the rate and regional pattern of age-associated changes against which pathology can be evaluated and suggest slower rates of brain atrophy in individuals who remain medically and cognitively healthy. PMID:12716936

  13. Love-related changes in the brain: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongwen; Zou, Zhiling; Kou, Juan; Liu, Yang; Yang, Lizhuang; Zilverstand, Anna; d'Oleire Uquillas, Federico; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2015-01-01

    Romantic love is a motivational state associated with a desire to enter or maintain a close relationship with a specific other person. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have found activation increases in brain regions involved in the processing of reward, motivation and emotion regulation, when romantic lovers view photographs of their partners. However, not much is known about whether romantic love affects the brain's functional architecture during rest. In the present study, resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) data was collected to compare the regional homogeneity (ReHo) and functional connectivity (FC) across an "in-love" group (LG, N = 34, currently intensely in love), an "ended-love" group (ELG, N = 34, ended romantic relationship recently), and a "single" group (SG, N = 32, never fallen in love). Results show that: (1) ReHo of the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and the SG); (2) ReHo of the left dACC was positively correlated with length of time in love in the LG, and negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration since breakup in the ELG; (3) FC within the reward, motivation, and emotion regulation network (dACC, insula, caudate, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens) as well as FC in the social cognition network [temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), inferior parietal, precuneus, and temporal lobe] was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and SG); (4) in most regions within both networks FC was positively correlated with the duration of love in the LG but negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration of time since breakup in the ELG. This study provides first empirical evidence of love-related alterations in brain functional architecture. Furthermore, the results shed light on the underlying neural mechanisms of romantic love, and demonstrate the

  14. Love-related changes in the brain: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hongwen; Zou, Zhiling; Kou, Juan; Liu, Yang; Yang, Lizhuang; Zilverstand, Anna; d’Oleire Uquillas, Federico; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2015-01-01

    Romantic love is a motivational state associated with a desire to enter or maintain a close relationship with a specific other person. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have found activation increases in brain regions involved in the processing of reward, motivation and emotion regulation, when romantic lovers view photographs of their partners. However, not much is known about whether romantic love affects the brain’s functional architecture during rest. In the present study, resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) data was collected to compare the regional homogeneity (ReHo) and functional connectivity (FC) across an “in-love” group (LG, N = 34, currently intensely in love), an “ended-love” group (ELG, N = 34, ended romantic relationship recently), and a “single” group (SG, N = 32, never fallen in love). Results show that: (1) ReHo of the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and the SG); (2) ReHo of the left dACC was positively correlated with length of time in love in the LG, and negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration since breakup in the ELG; (3) FC within the reward, motivation, and emotion regulation network (dACC, insula, caudate, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens) as well as FC in the social cognition network [temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), inferior parietal, precuneus, and temporal lobe] was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and SG); (4) in most regions within both networks FC was positively correlated with the duration of love in the LG but negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration of time since breakup in the ELG. This study provides first empirical evidence of love-related alterations in brain functional architecture. Furthermore, the results shed light on the underlying neural mechanisms of romantic love, and demonstrate

  15. Usefulness of data from magnetic resonance imaging to improve prediction of dementia: population based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Blossom C M; Tzourio, Christophe; Auriacombe, Sophie; Amieva, Hélène; Dufouil, Carole; Alpérovitch, Annick

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the addition of data derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain to a model incorporating conventional risk variables improves prediction of dementia over 10 years of follow-up. Design Population based cohort study of individuals aged ≥65. Setting The Dijon magnetic resonance imaging study cohort from the Three-City Study, France. Participants 1721 people without dementia who underwent an MRI scan at baseline and with known dementia status over 10 years’ follow-up. Main outcome measure Incident dementia (all cause and Alzheimer’s disease). Results During 10 years of follow-up, there were 119 confirmed cases of dementia, 84 of which were Alzheimer’s disease. The conventional risk model incorporated age, sex, education, cognition, physical function, lifestyle (smoking, alcohol use), health (cardiovascular disease, diabetes, systolic blood pressure), and the apolipoprotein genotype (C statistic for discrimination performance was 0.77, 95% confidence interval 0.71 to 0.82). No significant differences were observed in the discrimination performance of the conventional risk model compared with models incorporating data from MRI including white matter lesion volume (C statistic 0.77, 95% confidence interval 0.72 to 0.82; P=0.48 for difference of C statistics), brain volume (0.77, 0.72 to 0.82; P=0.60), hippocampal volume (0.79, 0.74 to 0.84; P=0.07), or all three variables combined (0.79, 0.75 to 0.84; P=0.05). Inclusion of hippocampal volume or all three MRI variables combined in the conventional model did, however, lead to significant improvement in reclassification measured by using the integrated discrimination improvement index (P=0.03 and P=0.04) and showed increased net benefit in decision curve analysis. Similar results were observed when the outcome was restricted to Alzheimer’s disease. Conclusions Data from MRI do not significantly improve discrimination performance in prediction of all cause dementia

  16. Alterations in vascular function in primary aldosteronism: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Mark, P B; Boyle, S; Zimmerli, L U; McQuarrie, E P; Delles, C; Freel, E M

    2014-02-01

    Excess aldosterone is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Aldosterone has a permissive effect on vascular fibrosis. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) allows study of vascular function by measuring aortic distensibility. We compared aortic distensibility in primary aldosteronism (PA), essential hypertension (EH) and normal controls and explored the relationship between aortic distensibility and pulse wave velocity (PWV). We studied PA (n=14) and EH (n=33) subjects and age-matched healthy controls (n=17) with CMR, including measurement of aortic distensibility, and measured PWV using applanation tonometry. At recruitment, PA and EH patients had similar blood pressure and left ventricular mass. Subjects with PA had significantly lower aortic distensibility and higher PWV compared with EH and healthy controls. These changes were independent of other factors associated with reduced aortic distensibility, including ageing. There was a significant relationship between increasing aortic stiffness and age in keeping with physical and vascular ageing. As expected, aortic distensibility and PWV were closely correlated. These results demonstrate that PA patients display increased arterial stiffness compared with EH, independent of vascular ageing. The implication is that aldosterone invokes functional impairment of arterial function. The long-term implications of arterial stiffening in aldosterone excess require further study. PMID:23884211

  17. Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) Precentral Corticospinal System Asymmetry and Handedness: A Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Longchuan; Preuss, Todd M.; Rilling, James K.; Hopkins, William D.; Glasser, Matthew F.; Kumar, Bhargav; Nana, Roger; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hu, Xiaoping

    2010-01-01

    Background Most humans are right handed, and most humans exhibit left-right asymmetries of the precentral corticospinal system. Recent studies indicate that chimpanzees also show a population-level right-handed bias, although it is less strong than in humans. Methodology/Principal Findings We used in vivo diffusion-weighted and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study the relationship between the corticospinal tract (CST) and handedness in 36 adult female chimpanzees. Chimpanzees exhibited a hemispheric bias in fractional anisotropy (FA, left>right) and mean diffusivity (MD, right>left) of the CST, and the left CST was centered more posteriorly than the right. Handedness correlated with central sulcus depth, but not with FA or MD. Conclusions/Significance These anatomical results are qualitatively similar to those reported in humans, despite the differences in handedness. The existence of a left>right FA, right>left MD bias in the corticospinal tract that does not correlate with handedness, a result also reported in some human studies, suggests that at least some of the structural asymmetries of the corticospinal system are not exclusively related to laterality of hand preference. PMID:20877630

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging study on near miscible supercritical CO2 flooding in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yongchen; Zhu, Ningjun; Zhao, Yuechao; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Lanlan; Wang, Tonglei

    2013-05-01

    CO2 flooding is one of the most popular secondary or tertiary recoveries for oil production. It is also significant for studying the mechanisms of the two-phase and multiphase flow in porous media. In this study, an experimental study was carried out by using magnetic resonance imaging technique to examine the detailed effects of pressure and rates on CO2/decane flow in a bead-pack porous media. The displacing processes were conducted under various pressures in a region near the minimum miscibility pressure (the system tuned from immiscible to miscible as pressure is increasing in this region) and the temperature of 37.8 °C at several CO2 injection volumetric rates of 0.05, 0.10, and 0.15 ml/min (or linear rates of 3.77, 7.54, and 11.3 ft/day). The evolution of the distribution of decane and the characteristics of the two phase flow were investigated and analyzed by considering the pressure and rate. The area and velocity of the transition zone between the two phases were calculated and analyzed to quantify mixing. The area of transition zone decreased with pressure at near miscible region and a certain injection rate and the velocity of the transition zone was always less than the "volumetric velocity" due to mutual solution and diffusion of the two phases. Therefore, these experimental results give the fundamental understanding of tertiary recovery processes at near miscible condition.

  19. Four dimensional magnetic resonance imaging with retrospective k-space reordering: A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yilin; Yin, Fang-Fang; Cai, Jing; Chen, Nan-kuei; Chu, Mei-Lan

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Current four dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) techniques lack sufficient temporal/spatial resolution and consistent tumor contrast. To overcome these limitations, this study presents the development and initial evaluation of a new strategy for 4D-MRI which is based on retrospective k-space reordering. Methods: We simulated a k-space reordered 4D-MRI on a 4D digital extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) human phantom. A 2D echo planar imaging MRI sequence [frame rate (F) = 0.448 Hz; image resolution (R) = 256 × 256; number of k-space segments (N{sub KS}) = 4] with sequential image acquisition mode was assumed for the simulation. Image quality of the simulated “4D-MRI” acquired from the XCAT phantom was qualitatively evaluated, and tumor motion trajectories were compared to input signals. In particular, mean absolute amplitude differences (D) and cross correlation coefficients (CC) were calculated. Furthermore, to evaluate the data sufficient condition for the new 4D-MRI technique, a comprehensive simulation study was performed using 30 cancer patients’ respiratory profiles to study the relationships between data completeness (C{sub p}) and a number of impacting factors: the number of repeated scans (N{sub R}), number of slices (N{sub S}), number of respiratory phase bins (N{sub P}), N{sub KS}, F, R, and initial respiratory phase at image acquisition (P{sub 0}). As a proof-of-concept, we implemented the proposed k-space reordering 4D-MRI technique on a T2-weighted fast spin echo MR sequence and tested it on a healthy volunteer. Results: The simulated 4D-MRI acquired from the XCAT phantom matched closely to the original XCAT images. Tumor motion trajectories measured from the simulated 4D-MRI matched well with input signals (D = 0.83 and 0.83 mm, and CC = 0.998 and 0.992 in superior–inferior and anterior–posterior directions, respectively). The relationship between C{sub p} and N{sub R} was found best represented by an exponential function

  20. Utility of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in prenatal diagnosis of placenta accreta: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Satija, Bhawna; Kumar, Sanyal; Wadhwa, Leena; Gupta, Taru; Kohli, Supreethi; Chandoke, Rajkumar; Gupta, Pratibha

    2015-01-01

    Context: Placenta accreta is the abnormal adherence of the placenta to the uterine wall and the most common cause for emergency postpartum hysterectomy. Accurate prenatal diagnosis of affected pregnancies allows optimal obstetric management. Aims: To summarize our experience in the antenatal diagnosis of placenta accreta on imaging in a tertiary care setup. To compare the accuracy of ultrasound (USG) with color Doppler (CDUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in prenatal diagnosis of placenta accreta. Settings and Design: Prospective study in a tertiary care setup. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was conducted on pregnant females with high clinical risk of placenta accreta. Antenatal diagnosis was established based on CDUS and MRI. The imaging findings were compared with final diagnosis at the time of delivery and/or pathologic examination. Statistical Analysis Used: The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for both CDUS and MRI. The sensitivity and specificity values of USG and MRI were compared by the McNemar test. Results: Thirty patients at risk of placenta accreta underwent both CDUS and MRI. Eight cases of placenta accreta were identified (3 vera, 4 increta, and 1 percreta). All patients had history of previous cesarean section. Placenta previa was present in seven out of eight patients. USG correctly identified the presence of placenta accreta in seven out of eight patients (87.5% sensitivity) and the absence of placenta accreta in 19 out of 22 patients (86.4% specificity). MRI correctly identified the presence of placenta accreta in 6 out of 8 patients (75.0% sensitivity) and absence of placenta accreta in 17 out of 22 patients (77.3% specificity). There were no statistical differences in sensitivity (P = 1.00) and specificity (P = 0.687) between USG and MRI. Conclusions: Both USG and MRI have fairly good sensitivity for prenatal diagnosis of placenta accreta; however

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Elster, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The author succeeds in making the physical phenomena of MR imaging quite comprehensible. The chapters on imaging sequences and parameters and the effects of pathologic conditions on MR images are written in a way that helps the beginner. MR artifacts are discussed in a special chapter. The atlas, which makes up 60% of the book; includes a detailed imaging guide with protocols concentrating mainly on the head, neck and brain. MR imaging of the chest is discussed as well as abdomen, pelvis and hips, and the spine, breast, and knee. The book ends with a list of MR equipment manufacturers, specifications of nine major commercial MR imagers, and a glossary of MR terminology.

  2. Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Brain and Cerebellum in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Maciorkowska, Elżbieta; Gościk, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies are rarely used in the diagnosis of patients with cerebral palsy. The aim of present study was to assess the relationships between the volumetric MRI and clinical findings in children with cerebral palsy compared to control subjects. Materials and Methods. Eighty-two children with cerebral palsy and 90 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were collected. Results. The dominant changes identified on MRI scans in children with cerebral palsy were periventricular leukomalacia (42%) and posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (21%). The total brain and cerebellum volumes in children with cerebral palsy were significantly reduced in comparison to controls. Significant grey matter volume reduction was found in the total brain in children with cerebral palsy compared with the control subjects. Positive correlations between the age of the children of both groups and the grey matter volumes in the total brain were found. Negative relationship between width of third ventricle and speech development was found in the patients. Positive correlations were noted between the ventricles enlargement and motor dysfunction and mental retardation in children with cerebral palsy. Conclusions. By using the voxel-based morphometry, the total brain, cerebellum, and grey matter volumes were significantly reduced in children with cerebral palsy. PMID:27579318

  3. Altered executive function in the welders: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeehye; Chang, Yongmin; Jang, Kyung Eun; Park, Jang Woo; Kim, Yang-Tae; Park, Sin-Jae; Jeong, Kyoung Sook; Kim, Ahro; Kim, Suk Hwan; Kim, Yangho

    2016-01-01

    Chronic exposure to manganese (Mn) can lead to impairments in motor and cognitive functions. Several recent studies reported Mn-induced executive dysfunction. The present study compared the neural correlates of ongoing executive function of welders and healthy controls. Fifty-three welders and 44 healthy controls were enrolled. Participants were given functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans and performed two modified versions of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task (WCST) that differed in cognitive demand, and a task that established a high-level baseline (HLB) condition. Card Sorting Test and Word-Color Test were also used to assess executive performance. Neural activation of the bilateral superior-frontal cortex, right-inferior parietal cortex, and bilateral insula cortex were greater in healthy controls than in welders when contrasting the difficult version of the WCST with the HLB. There were also correlations between executive functions by the Card Sorting Test and Word-Color Test, and brain activation in the insula cortex using the WCST. Our results indicated that welders had altered neural processing related to executive function in the prefrontal cortex under conditions of high cognitive demand. Welders also had less activation of the insula cortex, a part of a larger network comprising the lateral prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex. PMID:27208889

  4. Neural substrates of shared attention as social memory: A hyperscanning functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Koike, Takahiko; Tanabe, Hiroki C; Okazaki, Shuntaro; Nakagawa, Eri; Sasaki, Akihiro T; Shimada, Koji; Sugawara, Sho K; Takahashi, Haruka K; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Bosch-Bayard, Jorge; Sadato, Norihiro

    2016-01-15

    During a dyadic social interaction, two individuals can share visual attention through gaze, directed to each other (mutual gaze) or to a third person or an object (joint attention). Shared attention is fundamental to dyadic face-to-face interaction, but how attention is shared, retained, and neutrally represented in a pair-specific manner has not been well studied. Here, we conducted a two-day hyperscanning functional magnetic resonance imaging study in which pairs of participants performed a real-time mutual gaze task followed by a joint attention task on the first day, and mutual gaze tasks several days later. The joint attention task enhanced eye-blink synchronization, which is believed to be a behavioral index of shared attention. When the same participant pairs underwent mutual gaze without joint attention on the second day, enhanced eye-blink synchronization persisted, and this was positively correlated with inter-individual neural synchronization within the right inferior frontal gyrus. Neural synchronization was also positively correlated with enhanced eye-blink synchronization during the previous joint attention task session. Consistent with the Hebbian association hypothesis, the right inferior frontal gyrus had been activated both by initiating and responding to joint attention. These results indicate that shared attention is represented and retained by pair-specific neural synchronization that cannot be reduced to the individual level. PMID:26514295

  5. Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Brain and Cerebellum in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Kułak, Piotr; Maciorkowska, Elżbieta; Gościk, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies are rarely used in the diagnosis of patients with cerebral palsy. The aim of present study was to assess the relationships between the volumetric MRI and clinical findings in children with cerebral palsy compared to control subjects. Materials and Methods. Eighty-two children with cerebral palsy and 90 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were collected. Results. The dominant changes identified on MRI scans in children with cerebral palsy were periventricular leukomalacia (42%) and posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (21%). The total brain and cerebellum volumes in children with cerebral palsy were significantly reduced in comparison to controls. Significant grey matter volume reduction was found in the total brain in children with cerebral palsy compared with the control subjects. Positive correlations between the age of the children of both groups and the grey matter volumes in the total brain were found. Negative relationship between width of third ventricle and speech development was found in the patients. Positive correlations were noted between the ventricles enlargement and motor dysfunction and mental retardation in children with cerebral palsy. Conclusions. By using the voxel-based morphometry, the total brain, cerebellum, and grey matter volumes were significantly reduced in children with cerebral palsy. PMID:27579318

  6. Cervical spondylomyelopathy in Great Danes: a magnetic resonance imaging morphometric study.

    PubMed

    Martin-Vaquero, P; da Costa, R C; Lima, C G D

    2014-07-01

    Morphometric investigations comparing normal and affected animals increase our understanding of spinal diseases in dogs. The aim of this study was to generate morphometric data for osseous-associated cervical spondylomyelopathy (CSM) in Great Danes (GDs). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) morphometric features of the cervical vertebral column of GDs with and without clinical signs of CSM were characterized and compared. Thirty client-owned GDs were prospectively enrolled, including 15 clinically normal and 15 CSM-affected GDs. All dogs underwent MRI of the cervical to thoracic vertebral column (C2-C3 through T1-T2). Areas of the cranial and caudal articular processes, and the height, width and areas of the vertebral canal and spinal cord were determined. Middle foraminal heights were measured. Intervertebral disc width was measured before and after traction. Intraobserver and interobserver agreement were calculated. CSM-affected GDs had larger areas of the caudal articular processes from C2-C3 through T1-T2. In CSM-affected GDs, the vertebral canal and spinal cord areas were significantly smaller at C5-C6 and C6-C7, the vertebral canal width was significantly narrower at C6-C7 and C7-T1, and the spinal cord width was significantly narrower at C5-C6 and C6-C7. Middle foraminal height was smaller in CSM-affected GDs from C3-C4 through C7-T1. Neutral intervertebral disc widths were smaller in CSM-affected GDs. It was concluded that the cervical vertebral canal dimensions are significantly different between normal and CSM-affected GDs. Absolute vertebral canal stenosis and severe foraminal stenosis involving the cervical vertebrae distinguish CSM-affected from clinically normal GDs. These findings are relevant to the pathogenesis of osseous-associated CSM and should be taken into consideration when performing imaging studies and planning surgery. PMID:24888675

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance zeugmatographic imaging of the heart: application to the study of ventricular septal defect. [Lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Heneghan, M.A.; Biancaniello, T.M.; Heidel, E.; Peterson, S.B.; Marsh, M.J.; Lauterbur, P.C.

    1982-04-01

    The present work was undertaken to determine the applicability of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging to the study of congenital heart disease. Three-dimensional proton density images of preserved lamb hearts with and without an artificially created ventricular septal defect were reconstructed and displayed in multiple planes. Sections obtained in the sagittal plane through the ventricular septum clearly showed the size, shape, and location of the defect. Results of these experiments suggest that NMR zeugmatography will become a valuable addition to existing imaging techniques for the study of congenital heart disease.

  8. Quantification of Absolute Fat Mass by Magnetic Resonance Imaging: a Validation Study against Chemical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Houchun H.; Li, Yan; Nagy, Tim R.; Goran, Michael I.; Nayak, Krishna S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based approach for quantifying absolute fat mass in organs, muscles, and adipose tissues, and to validate its accuracy against reference chemical analysis (CA). Methods Chemical-shift imaging can accurately decompose water and fat signals from the acquired MRI data. A proton density fat fraction (PDFF) can be computed from the separated images, and reflects the relative fat content on a voxel-by-voxel basis. The PDFF is mathematically closely related to the fat mass fraction and can be converted to absolute fat mass in grams by multiplying by the voxel volume and the mass density of fat. In this validation study, 97 freshly excised and unique samples from four pigs, comprising of organs, muscles, and adipose and lean tissues were imaged by MRI and then analyzed independently by CA. Linear regression was used to assess correlation, agreement, and measurement differences between MRI and CA. Results Considering all 97 samples, a strong correlation and agreement was obtained between MRI and CA-derived fat mass (slope = 1.01, intercept = 1.99g, r2 = 0.98, p < 0.01). The mean difference d between MRI and CA was 2.17±3.40g. MRI did not exhibit any tendency to under or overestimate CA (p > 0.05). When considering samples from each pig separately, the results were (slope = 1.05, intercept = 1.11g, r2 = 0.98, d = 2.66±4.36g), (slope = 0.99, intercept = 2.33g, r2 = 0.99, d = 1.88±2.68g), (slope = 1.07, intercept = 1.52g, r2 = 0.96, d = 2.73±2.50g), and (slope=0.92, intercept=2.84g, r2 = 0.97, d = 1.18±3.90g), respectively. Conclusion Chemical-shift MRI and PDFF provides an accurate means of determining absolute fat mass in organs, muscles, and adipose and lean tissues. PMID:23204926

  9. The Reporting of Observational Clinical Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qing; Parlar, Melissa; Truong, Wanda; Hall, Geoffrey; Thabane, Lehana; McKinnon, Margaret; Goeree, Ron; Pullenayegum, Eleanor

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Complete reporting assists readers in confirming the methodological rigor and validity of findings and allows replication. The reporting quality of observational functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies involving clinical participants is unclear. Objectives We sought to determine the quality of reporting in observational fMRI studies involving clinical participants. Methods We searched OVID MEDLINE for fMRI studies in six leading journals between January 2010 and December 2011.Three independent reviewers abstracted data from articles using an 83-item checklist adapted from the guidelines proposed by Poldrack et al. (Neuroimage 2008; 40: 409–14). We calculated the percentage of articles reporting each item of the checklist and the percentage of reported items per article. Results A random sample of 100 eligible articles was included in the study. Thirty-one items were reported by fewer than 50% of the articles and 13 items were reported by fewer than 20% of the articles. The median percentage of reported items per article was 51% (ranging from 30% to 78%). Although most articles reported statistical methods for within-subject modeling (92%) and for between-subject group modeling (97%), none of the articles reported observed effect sizes for any negative finding (0%). Few articles reported justifications for fixed-effect inferences used for group modeling (3%) and temporal autocorrelations used to account for within-subject variances and correlations (18%). Other under-reported areas included whether and how the task design was optimized for efficiency (22%) and distributions of inter-trial intervals (23%). Conclusions This study indicates that substantial improvement in the reporting of observational clinical fMRI studies is required. Poldrack et al.'s guidelines provide a means of improving overall reporting quality. Nonetheless, these guidelines are lengthy and may be at odds with strict word limits for publication; creation of a

  10. Impact of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging on cardiac device and surgical therapy: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrew J; Ellims, Andris; Lew, Philip J K; Murphy, Bridie; Pally, Suzana; Younie, Sandra

    2013-04-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging may allow more appropriate selection of patients for cardiac device implantation and/or cardiac surgery. In this prospective observational study we evaluated the impact of CMR imaging on cardiac device and surgical therapy. All CMR examinations performed in a single centre over a 2 year period were prospectively recorded in a dedicated database under 4 clinical pathways [cardiomyopathy, viability, tumour/mass and arrythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC)]. Baseline data entered included planned cardiac device implantation and/or cardiac surgical intervention. Patients were contacted 6 months following CMR to evaluate the impact of CMR on planned therapy. Cost savings due to CMR were calculated as the number of surgical or device procedures averted following CMR scanning multiplied by their respective cost weights. Of 732 CMR examinations performed, the clinical pathway was cardiomyopathy in 488 (67 %), ARVC in 118 (16 %), viability in 92 (12 %) and tumour/mass in 34 (5 %). Six month follow-up was available in 666/732 patients. Following CMR, 56/150 (37 %) of patients with an initial plan for device implantation or cardiac surgery, did not undergo the planned intervention (P < 0.001, one-sample exact binomial test). Of 516 patients without an initial device or surgical plan, 33 (6 %) CMR resulted in device implantation or cardiac surgery (P < 0.001, Chi squared). Overall, the estimated saving due to CMR-guided management changes was AUD$737,270. CMR has a significant impact on patient management and offers potential cost savings with respect to selection of device and surgical therapy for cardiac disease. PMID:23592405

  11. Radiation-Induced Liver Damage: Correlation of Histopathology with Hepatobiliary Magnetic Resonance Imaging, a Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Seidensticker, Max; Burak, Miroslaw; Kalinski, Thomas; Garlipp, Benjamin; Koelble, Konrad; Wust, Peter; Antweiler, Kai; Seidensticker, Ricarda; Mohnike, Konrad; Pech, Maciej; Ricke, Jens

    2015-02-15

    PurposeRadiotherapy of liver malignancies shows promising results (radioembolization, stereotactic irradiation, interstitial brachytherapy). Regardless of the route of application, a certain amount of nontumorous liver parenchyma will be collaterally damaged by radiation. The functional reserve may be significantly reduced with an impact on further treatment planning. Monitoring of radiation-induced liver damage by imaging is neither established nor validated. We performed an analysis to correlate the histopathological presence of radiation-induced liver damage with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilizing hepatobiliary contrast media (Gd-BOPTA).MethodsPatients undergoing local high-dose-rate brachytherapy for whom a follow-up hepatobiliary MRI within 120 days after radiotherapy as well as an evaluable liver biopsy from radiation-exposed liver tissue within 7 days before MRI were retrospectively identified. Planning computed tomography (CT)/dosimetry was merged to the CT-documentation of the liver biopsy and to the MRI. Presence/absence of radiation-induced liver damage (histopathology) and Gd-BOPTA uptake (MRI) as well as the dose applied during brachytherapy at the site of tissue sampling was determined.ResultsFourteen biopsies from eight patients were evaluated. In all cases with histopathological evidence of radiation-induced liver damage (n = 11), no uptake of Gd-BOPTA was seen. In the remaining three, cases no radiation-induced liver damage but Gd-BOPTA uptake was seen. Presence of radiation-induced liver damage and absence of Gd-BOPTA uptake was correlated with a former high-dose exposition.ConclusionsAbsence of hepatobiliary MRI contrast media uptake in radiation-exposed liver parenchyma may indicate radiation-induced liver damage. Confirmatory studies are warranted.

  12. Development of vocal tract length during early childhood: A magnetic resonance imaging study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorperian, Houri K.; Kent, Ray D.; Lindstrom, Mary J.; Kalina, Cliff M.; Gentry, Lindell R.; Yandell, Brian S.

    2005-01-01

    Speech development in children is predicated partly on the growth and anatomic restructuring of the vocal tract. This study examines the growth pattern of the various hard and soft tissue vocal tract structures as visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and assesses their relational growth with vocal tract length (VTL). Measurements on lip thickness, hard- and soft-palate length, tongue length, naso-oro-pharyngeal length, mandibular length and depth, and distance of the hyoid bone and larynx from the posterior nasal spine were used from 63 pediatric cases (ages birth to 6 years and 9 months) and 12 adults. Results indicate (a) ongoing growth of all oral and pharyngeal vocal tract structures with no sexual dimorphism, and a period of accelerated growth between birth and 18 months; (b) vocal tract structure's region (oral/anterior versus pharyngeal/posterior) and orientation (horizontal versus vertical) determine its growth pattern; and (c) the relational growth of the different structures with VTL changes with development-while the increase in VTL throughout development is predominantly due to growth of pharyngeal/posterior structures, VTL is also substantially affected by the growth of oral/anterior structures during the first 18 months of life. Findings provide normative data that can be used for modeling the development of the vocal tract. .

  13. Antinociceptive activity of crotoxin in the central nervous system: a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging study.

    PubMed

    Wolz-Richter, S; Esser, K-H; Hess, A

    2013-11-01

    Crotoxin, the main neurotoxic component of the venom of South American rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus), is reported to have potent antinociceptive activity. Several authors have shown mainly in behavioral pain models that crotoxin induces antinociceptive effects, supposed to be mediated by actions on the central nervous system. The antinociceptive effects of crotoxin (45 μg/kg ip) in rats were verified in this study by increased response latencies in a Hargreaves test and tail flick test. In addition, it was demonstrated that crotoxin does not lead to motor impairments during a rotarod test and open field test. The main objective, carried out by blood oxygen level dependent functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (BOLD fMRI) in anesthetized rats, was to determine which specific brain structures are involved in these antinociceptive effects. Moreover, potential antihyperalgesic effects were investigated by inducing a local hyperalgesia on the left hind paw. Therefore, antinociceptive effects (right paw) and antihyperalgesic effects (left paw) of crotoxin were able to be differentiated. As a result, crotoxin exhibited dominant antihyperalgesic but also antinociceptive effects during pain stimulation. Reductions of BOLD signal already occurred in brain input structures but were most prominent in primary and secondary somatosensory cortices. In conclusion, BOLD fMRI in anesthetized rats proved to be a helpful tool in toxinology, particularly in unraveled mechanisms of modulating nociception in the central nervous system by (potential) analgesics like crotoxin. PMID:23916599

  14. Study of atrial arrhythmias in a computer model based on magnetic resonance images of human atria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virag, N.; Jacquemet, V.; Henriquez, C. S.; Zozor, S.; Blanc, O.; Vesin, J.-M.; Pruvot, E.; Kappenberger, L.

    2002-09-01

    The maintenance of multiple wavelets appears to be a consistent feature of atrial fibrillation (AF). In this paper, we investigate possible mechanisms of initiation and perpetuation of multiple wavelets in a computer model of AF. We developed a simplified model of human atria that uses an ionic-based membrane model and whose geometry is derived from a segmented magnetic resonance imaging data set. The three-dimensional surface has a realistic size and includes obstacles corresponding to the location of major vessels and valves, but it does not take into account anisotropy. The main advantage of this approach is its ability to simulate long duration arrhythmias (up to 40 s). Clinically relevant initiation protocols, such as single-site burst pacing, were used. The dynamics of simulated AF were investigated in models with different action potential durations and restitution properties, controlled by the conductance of the slow inward current in a modified Luo-Rudy model. The simulation studies show that (1) single-site burst pacing protocol can be used to induce wave breaks even in tissue with uniform membrane properties, (2) the restitution-based wave breaks in an atrial model with realistic size and conduction velocities are transient, and (3) a significant reduction in action potential duration (even with apparently flat restitution) increases the duration of AF.

  15. How pain empathy depends on ingroup/outgroup decisions: A functional magnet resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Ruckmann, Judith; Bodden, Maren; Jansen, Andreas; Kircher, Tilo; Dodel, Richard; Rief, Winfried

    2015-10-30

    Showing empathy is crucial for social functioning and empathy is related to group membership. The aim of the current study was to investigate the influence of experimentally generated groups on empathy for pain in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigm. Thirty healthy participants underwent a minimal group paradigm to create two groups. While BOLD contrast was measured using fMRI, subjects were instructed to empathize with ingroup and outgroup members, who were depicted in a picture paradigm of painful and neutral situations. Behavioral measure of state empathy was measured using a visual analog scale. Furthermore, self-reported trait empathy measures were obtained. Repeated-measures ANOVAs were conducted for fMRI and behavioral data. In addition to a main effect of pain in pain-related areas, a main effect of group in areas belonging to the visual cortex was found. Although there was no ingroup bias for empathy ratings, subjects showed altered neural activation in regions of the right fusiform gyrus, the cerebellum, the hippocampal and amygdala region during the pain×group interaction. Activation in the preceding structures, revealed by the interaction of pain by group, suggests that activation in the pallidum might reflect specific empathy for pain-related regulation processes. PMID:26323252

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging for prostate cancer: Comparative studies including radical prostatectomy specimens and template transperineal biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Toner, Liam; Weerakoon, Mahesha; Bolton, Damien M.; Ryan, Andrew; Katelaris, Nikolas; Lawrentschuk, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) is an emerging technique aiming to improve upon the diagnostic sensitivity of prostate biopsy. Because of variance in interpretation and application of techniques, results may vary. There is likely a learning curve to establish consistent reporting of mpMRI. This study aims to review current literature supporting the diagnostic utility of mpMRI when compared with radical prostatectomy (RP) and template transperineal biopsy (TTPB) specimens. Methods MEDLINE and PubMed database searches were conducted identifying relevant literature related to comparison of mpMRI with RP or TTPB histology. Results Data suggest that compared with RP and TTPB specimens, the sensitivity of mpMRI for prostate cancer (PCa) detection is 80–90% and the specificity for suspicious lesions is between 50% and 90%. Conclusions mpMRI has an increasing role for PCa diagnosis, staging, and directing management toward improving patient outcomes. Its sensitivity and specificity when compared with RP and TTPB specimens are less than what some expect, possibly reflecting a learning curve for the technique of mpMRI. PMID:26779455

  17. Study of atrial arrhythmias in a computer model based on magnetic resonance images of human atria.

    PubMed

    Virag, N.; Jacquemet, V.; Henriquez, C. S.; Zozor, S.; Blanc, O.; Vesin, J.-M.; Pruvot, E.; Kappenberger, L.

    2002-09-01

    The maintenance of multiple wavelets appears to be a consistent feature of atrial fibrillation (AF). In this paper, we investigate possible mechanisms of initiation and perpetuation of multiple wavelets in a computer model of AF. We developed a simplified model of human atria that uses an ionic-based membrane model and whose geometry is derived from a segmented magnetic resonance imaging data set. The three-dimensional surface has a realistic size and includes obstacles corresponding to the location of major vessels and valves, but it does not take into account anisotropy. The main advantage of this approach is its ability to simulate long duration arrhythmias (up to 40 s). Clinically relevant initiation protocols, such as single-site burst pacing, were used. The dynamics of simulated AF were investigated in models with different action potential durations and restitution properties, controlled by the conductance of the slow inward current in a modified Luo-Rudy model. The simulation studies show that (1) single-site burst pacing protocol can be used to induce wave breaks even in tissue with uniform membrane properties, (2) the restitution-based wave breaks in an atrial model with realistic size and conduction velocities are transient, and (3) a significant reduction in action potential duration (even with apparently flat restitution) increases the duration of AF. (c) 2002 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12779604

  18. Vocal tract length development during the first two decades of life: A magnetic resonance imaging study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorperian, Houri K.; Chung, Moo K.; Gentry, Lindell R.; Kent, Ray D.; Choih, Celia S.; Durtschi, Reid B.; Ziegert, Andrew J.

    2005-09-01

    As the vocal tract length (VTL) increases more than twofold from infancy to adulthood, its geometric proportions change. This study assesses the developmental changes of the various hard and soft tissue structures in the vicinity of the vocal tract (VT), and evaluates the relational growth of the various structures with VTL. Magnetic resonance images from 327 cases, ages birth to age 20, were used to secure quantitative measurements of the various soft, cartilaginous and bony structures in the oral and pharyngeal regions using established procedures [Vorperian et al. (1999), (2005)]. Structures measured include: lip thickness, hard- and soft-palate length, tongue length, naso-oro-pharyngeal length, mandibular length and depth, and distance of the hyoid bone and larynx from the posterior nasal spine. Findings indicate: (a) ongoing growth of all oral and pharyngeal structures with changes in growth rate as a function of age; (b) a strong interdependency between structure orientation and its growth curve; and (c) developmental changes in the relational growth of the different VT structures with VTL. Findings provide normative data on the anatomic changes of the supra-laryngeal speech apparatus, and can be used to model the development of the VT. [Work supported by NIH-NIDCD Grants R03-DC4362 R01-DC006282, and NIH-NICHHD P30-HK03352.

  19. Attentional Modulation of Source Attribution in First-Episode Psychosis: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Kambeitz-Ilankovic, Lana

    2013-01-01

    Background: In patients with schizophrenia, the misattribution of self-generated events to an external source is associated with the presence of psychotic symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate how this misattribution is influenced by dysfunction of attentional processing, which is also impaired in schizophrenia. Methods: Participants underwent functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) while listening to prerecorded speech. Their expectancies were manipulated using visual cues that were either congruent (valid) or incongruent (invalid) with the speech. The source (self/other) and the acoustic quality (undistorted/distorted) of the speech were also manipulated. Twenty patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP) and 20 matched healthy controls (HC) were tested. Results: When listening to self-generated speech preceded by an invalid (other speech) cue, relative to HC, FEP patients showed a trend to misidentify their own speech as that of another person. Analysis of fMRI data showed that FEP patients had reduced activation in the right middle temporal gyrus (MTG) and left precuneus (Pc) relative to HC. Within the FEP group, the level of activation in the right MTG was negatively correlated with the severity of their positive psychotic symptoms. Conclusions: Impaired attentional modulation in schizophrenia may contribute to the tendency for FEP patients to misattribute the source of self-generated material, and this may be mediated by the right MTG and Pc, regions that are involved in both self-referential processing and the integration of sensory information. PMID:22987297

  20. Abnormal affective decision making revealed in adolescent binge drinkers using a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lin; Bechara, Antoine; Gong, Qiyong; Huang, Xiaoqi; Li, Xiangrui; Xue, Gui; Wong, Savio; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Palmer, Paula; Wei, Yonglan; Jia, Yong; Johnson, C Anderson

    2013-06-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the neural correlates of affective decision making, as measured by the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), which are associated with adolescent binge drinking. Fourteen adolescent binge drinkers (16-18 years of age) and 14 age-matched adolescents who had never consumed alcohol--never drinkers--were recruited from local high schools in Chengdu, China. Questionnaires were used to assess academic performance, drinking experience, and urgency. Brain regions activated by the IGT performance were identified with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Results showed that, compared to never drinkers, binge drinkers performed worse on the IGT and showed higher activity in the subcomponents of the decision-making neural circuitry implicated in the execution of emotional and incentive-related behaviors, namely, the left amygdala and insula bilaterally. Moreover, measures of the severity of drinking problems in real life, as well as high urgency scores, were associated with increased activity within the insula, combined with decreased activity within the orbitofrontal cortex. These results suggest that hyperreactivity of a neural system implicated in the execution of emotional and incentive-related behaviors can be associated with socially undesirable behaviors, such as binge drinking, among adolescents. These findings have social implications because they potentially reveal underlying neural mechanisms for making poor decisions, which may increase an individual's risk and vulnerability for alcoholism. PMID:22486330

  1. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  2. Optically detected magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, Aharon; Shapiro, Guy; Fischer, Ran; London, Paz; Gershoni, David

    2015-01-19

    Optically detected magnetic resonance provides ultrasensitive means to detect and image a small number of electron and nuclear spins, down to the single spin level with nanoscale resolution. Despite the significant recent progress in this field, it has never been combined with the power of pulsed magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Here, we demonstrate how these two methodologies can be integrated using short pulsed magnetic field gradients to spatially encode the sample. This result in what we denote as an 'optically detected magnetic resonance imaging' technique. It offers the advantage that the image is acquired in parallel from all parts of the sample, with well-defined three-dimensional point-spread function, and without any loss of spectroscopic information. In addition, this approach may be used in the future for parallel but yet spatially selective efficient addressing and manipulation of the spins in the sample. Such capabilities are of fundamental importance in the field of quantum spin-based devices and sensors.

  3. A magnetic resonance imaging study of adhesio interthalamica in clinical subtypes of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Haghir, Hossein; Mokhber, Naghmeh; Azarpazhooh, Mahmoud-Reza; Haghighi, Mehri Baghban; Radmard, Mahla

    2013-01-01

    Context: Previous studies have suggested subtle anatomical brain differences between patients with schizophrenia and healthy control subjects. However, the results are inconsistent and there is no study investigating the various subtypes of this mental disorder separately. Aim: This study was conducted to compare the rate of absence of adhesio interthalamica (AI), a midline brain structure, between 3 subtypes of schizophrenia (paranoid, undifferentiated, and residual) and healthy control group, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods: A total of 29 schizophrenia patients (21 men, 8 women) of three subtypes (paranoid, undifferentiated, and residual) were compared with 29 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. All subjects underwent 3-D brain MRI of full coronal series, 1.5-mm slices without interslice gaps. If the grey matter band connecting the thalami could not be identified on two or more coronal adjacent slices, the AI was considered as absent. The results were statistically analyzed. Results: The incidence rate of AI absence in patients with heterogenous subtypes of schizophrenia was was similar to control group, even when patients and controls of each gender were compared separately (P>0.05). In residual subtype, patients showed a significant priority in AI absence in comparison with the control group (P=0.041), which was not seen in paranoid and undifferentiated subtypes (P>0.05). Conclusion: Residual subtype of schizophrenia is associated with higher rate of AI absence in this study. Subsequent studies are required to determine if the absence of AI is a cause of residual schizophrenia or an effect. PMID:23825846

  4. Combining Neutron and Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Interaction of Plant Rootsand Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, Sascha E.; Tötzke, Christian; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Pohlmeier, Andreas; Kaestner, Anders P.; Lehmann, Eberhard

    The soil in direct vicinity of the roots, the root-soil interface or so called rhizosphere, is heavily modified by the activity of roots, compared to bulk soil, e.g. in respect to microbiology and soil chemistry. It has turned out that the root-soil interface, though small in size, also plays a decisive role in the hydraulics controlling the water flow from bulk soil into the roots. A promising approach for the non-invasive investigation of water dynamics, water flow and solute transport is the combination of the two imaging techniques magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neutron imaging (NI). Both methods are complementary, because NI maps the total proton density, possibly amplified by NI tracers, which usually corresponds to total water content, and is able to detect changes and spatial patterns with high resolution. On the other side, nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times reflect the interaction between fluid and matrix, while also a mapping of proton spin density and thus water content is possible. Therefore MRI is able to classify different water pools via their relaxation times additionally to the water distribution inside soil as a porous medium. We have started such combined measurements with the approach to use the same samples and perform tomography with each imaging method at different location and short-term sample transfer.

  5. Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging study of cortical development through early childhood in autism.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Cynthia M; Bloss, Cinnamon S; Barnes, Cynthia Carter; Wideman, Graham M; Carper, Ruth A; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Pierce, Karen; Hagler, Donald; Schork, Nicholas; Lord, Catherine; Courchesne, Eric

    2010-03-24

    Cross-sectional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have long hypothesized that the brain in children with autism undergoes an abnormal growth trajectory that includes a period of early overgrowth; however, this has never been confirmed by a longitudinal study. We performed the first longitudinal study of brain growth in toddlers at the time symptoms of autism are becoming clinically apparent using structural MRI scans at multiple time points beginning at 1.5 years up to 5 years of age. We collected 193 scans on 41 toddlers who received a confirmed diagnosis of autistic disorder at approximately 48 months of age and 44 typically developing controls. By 2.5 years of age, both cerebral gray and white matter were significantly enlarged in toddlers with autistic disorder, with the most severe enlargement occurring in frontal, temporal, and cingulate cortices. In the longitudinal analyses, which we accounted for age and gender effect, we found that all regions (cerebral gray, cerebral white, frontal gray, temporal gray, cingulate gray, and parietal gray) except occipital gray developed at an abnormal growth rate in toddlers with autistic disorder that was mainly characterized by a quadratic age effect. Females with autistic disorder displayed a more pronounced abnormal growth profile in more brain regions than males with the disorder. Given that overgrowth clearly begins before 2 years of age, future longitudinal studies would benefit from inclusion of even younger populations as well as further characterization of genetic and other biomarkers to determine the underlying neuropathological processes causing the onset of autistic symptoms. PMID:20335478

  6. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingyuan E.; Glover, Gary H.

    2015-01-01

    Since its inception in 1992, Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has become an indispensible tool for studying cognition in both the healthy and dysfunctional brain. FMRI monitors changes in the oxygenation of brain tissue resulting from altered metabolism consequent to a task-based evoked neural response or from spontaneous fluctuations in neural activity in the absence of conscious mentation (the “resting state”). Task-based studies have revealed neural correlates of a large number of important cognitive processes, while fMRI studies performed in the resting state have demonstrated brain-wide networks that result from brain regions with synchronized, apparently spontaneous activity. In this article, we review the methods used to acquire and analyze fMRI signals. PMID:26248581

  7. Improved dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy using high resolution contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Morancy, Tye; Kaplan, Irving; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Hirsch, Ariel E.; Rofksy, Neil M.; Holupka, Edward; Oismueller, Renee; Hawliczek, Robert; Helbich, Thomas H.; Bloch, B. Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess detailed dosimetry data for prostate and clinical relevant intra- and peri-prostatic structures including neurovascular bundles (NVB), urethra, and penile bulb (PB) from postbrachytherapy computed tomography (CT) versus high resolution contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (HR-CEMRI). Material and methods Eleven postbrachytherapy prostate cancer patients underwent HR-CEMRI and CT imaging. Computed tomography and HR-CEMRI images were randomized and 2 independent expert readers created contours of prostate, intra- and peri-prostatic structures on each CT and HR-CEMRI scan for all 11 patients. Dosimetry data including V100, D90, and D100 was calculated from these contours. Results Mean V100 values from CT and HR-CEMRI contours were as follows: prostate (98.5% and 96.2%, p = 0.003), urethra (81.0% and 88.7%, p = 0.027), anterior rectal wall (ARW) (8.9% and 2.8%, p < 0.001), left NVB (77.9% and 51.5%, p = 0.002), right NVB (69.2% and 43.1%, p = 0.001), and PB (0.09% and 11.4%, p = 0.005). Mean D90 (Gy) derived from CT and HR-CEMRI contours were: prostate (167.6 and 150.3, p = 0.012), urethra (81.6 and 109.4, p = 0.041), ARW (2.5 and 0.11, p = 0.003), left NVB (98.2 and 58.6, p = 0.001), right NVB (87.5 and 55.5, p = 0.001), and PB (11.2 and 12.4, p = 0.554). Conclusions Findings of this study suggest that HR-CEMRI facilitates accurate and meaningful dosimetric assessment of prostate and clinically relevant structures, which is not possible with CT. Significant differences were seen between CT and HR-CEMRI, with volume overestimation of CT derived contours compared to HR-CEMRI. PMID:25834576

  8. Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Summary Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient’s body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients’ bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature. PMID:25745524

  9. Cobalt Zinc Ferrite Nanoparticles as a Potential Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agent: An In vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemian, Zeinab; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Manouchehri, Sohrab

    2015-01-01

    Background: Magnetic Nanoparticles (MNP) have been used for contrast enhancement in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). In recent years, research on the use of ferrite nanoparticles in T2 contrast agents has shown a great potential application in MR imaging. In this work, Co0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 and Co0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4-DMSA magnetic nanoparticles, CZF-MNPs and CZF-MNPs-DMSA, were investigated as MR imaging contrast agents. Methods: Cobalt zinc ferrite nanoparticles and their suitable coating, DMSA, were investigated under in vitro condition. Human prostate cancer cell lines (DU145 and PC3) with bare (uncoated) and coated magnetic nanoparticles were investigated as nano-contrast MR imaging agents. Results: Using T2-weighted MR images identified that signal intensity of bare and coated MNPs was enhanced with increasing concentration of MNPs in water. The values of 1/T2 relaxivity (r2) for bare and coated MNPs were found to be 88.46 and 28.80 (mM−1 s−1), respectively. Conclusion: The results show that bare and coated MNPs are suitable as T2-weighted MR imaging contrast agents. Also, the obtained r2/r1 values (59.3 and 50) for bare and coated MNPs were in agreement with the results of other previous relevant works. PMID:26140183

  10. Neural Correlates of Emotional Personality: A Structural and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Koelsch, Stefan; Skouras, Stavros; Jentschke, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Studies addressing brain correlates of emotional personality have remained sparse, despite the involvement of emotional personality in health and well-being. This study investigates structural and functional brain correlates of psychological and physiological measures related to emotional personality. Psychological measures included neuroticism, extraversion, and agreeableness scores, as assessed using a standard personality questionnaire. As a physiological measure we used a cardiac amplitude signature, the so-called Eκ value (computed from the electrocardiogram) which has previously been related to tender emotionality. Questionnaire scores and Eκ values were related to both functional (eigenvector centrality mapping, ECM) and structural (voxel-based morphometry, VBM) neuroimaging data. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were obtained from 22 individuals (12 females) while listening to music (joy, fear, or neutral music). ECM results showed that agreeableness scores correlated with centrality values in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex, and the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens). Individuals with higher Eκ values (indexing higher tender emotionality) showed higher centrality values in the subiculum of the right hippocampal formation. Structural MRI data from an independent sample of 59 individuals (34 females) showed that neuroticism scores correlated with volume of the left amygdaloid complex. In addition, individuals with higher Eκ showed larger gray matter volume in the same portion of the subiculum in which individuals with higher Eκ showed higher centrality values. Our results highlight a role of the amygdala in neuroticism. Moreover, they indicate that a cardiac signature related to emotionality (Eκ) correlates with both function (increased network centrality) and structure (grey matter volume) of the subiculum of the hippocampal formation, suggesting a role of the hippocampal formation for emotional

  11. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... some MRI exams, intravenous (IV) drugs, such as gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are used to change the contrast of the MR image. Gadolinium-based contrast agents are rare earth metals that ...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of multiple sclerosis: a study of pulse-technique efficacy

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Price, A.C.; Kirshner, H.S.; Allen, J.H.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1984-11-01

    Forty-two patients with the clinical diagnosis of multiple sclerosis were examined by proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 0.5 T. An extensive protocol was used to facilitate a comparison of the efficacy of different pulse techniques. Results were also compared in 39 cases with high-resolution x-ray computed tomography (CT). MRI revealed characteristic abnormalities in each case, whereas CT was positive in only 15 of 33 patients. Cerebral abnormalities were best shown with the T2-weighted spin-echo sequence: brainstem lesions were best defined on the inversion-recovery sequence.

  13. Cervical spondylomyelopathy in Great Danes: A magnetic resonance imaging morphometric study

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Vaquero, P.; da Costa, R.C.; Lima, C.G.D.

    2014-01-01

    Morphometric investigations comparing normal and affected animals increase our understanding of spinal diseases in dogs. The aim of this study was to generate morphometric data for osseous-associated cervical spondylomyelopathy (CSM) in Great Danes (GDs). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) morphometric features of the cervical vertebral column of GDs with and without clinical signs of CSM were characterized and compared. Thirty client-owned GDs were prospectively enrolled, including 15 clinically normal and 15 CSM-affected GDs. All dogs underwent MRI of the cervical to thoracic vertebral column (C2–C3 through T1–T2). Areas of the cranial and caudal articular processes, and the height, width and areas of the vertebral canal and spinal cord were determined. Middle foraminal heights were measured. Intervertebral disc width was measured before and after traction. Intraobserver and interobserver agreement were calculated. CSM-affected GDs had larger areas of the caudal articular processes from C2–C3 through T1–T2. In CSM-affected GDs, the vertebral canal and spinal cord areas were significantly smaller at C5–C6 and C6–C7, the vertebral canal width was significantly narrower at C6–C7 and C7–T1, and the spinal cord width was significantly narrower at C5–C6 and C6–C7. Middle foraminal height was smaller in CSM-affected GDs from C3–C4 through C7-T1. Neutral intervertebral disc widths were smaller in CSM-affected GDs. It was concluded that the cervical vertebral canal dimensions are significantly different between normal and CSM-affected GDs. Absolute vertebral canal stenosis and severe foraminal stenosis involving the cervical vertebrae distinguish CSM-affected from clinically normal GDs. These findings are relevant to the pathogenesis of osseous-associated CSM and should be taken into consideration when performing imaging studies and planning surgery. PMID:24888675

  14. Using 4D Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Validate Computational Fluid Dynamics: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Biglino, Giovanni; Cosentino, Daria; Steeden, Jennifer A.; De Nova, Lorenzo; Castelli, Matteo; Ntsinjana, Hopewell; Pennati, Giancarlo; Taylor, Andrew M.; Schievano, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can have a complementary predictive role alongside the exquisite visualization capabilities of 4D cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. In order to exploit these capabilities (e.g., for decision-making), it is necessary to validate computational models against real world data. In this study, we sought to acquire 4D CMR flow data in a controllable, experimental setup and use these data to validate a corresponding computational model. We applied this paradigm to a case of congenital heart disease, namely, transposition of the great arteries (TGA) repaired with arterial switch operation. For this purpose, a mock circulatory loop compatible with the CMR environment was constructed and two detailed aortic 3D models (i.e., one TGA case and one normal aortic anatomy) were tested under realistic hemodynamic conditions, acquiring 4D CMR flow. The same 3D domains were used for multi-scale CFD simulations, whereby the remainder of the mock circulatory system was appropriately summarized with a lumped parameter network. Boundary conditions of the simulations mirrored those measured in vitro. Results showed a very good quantitative agreement between experimental and computational models in terms of pressure (overall maximum % error = 4.4% aortic pressure in the control anatomy) and flow distribution data (overall maximum % error = 3.6% at the subclavian artery outlet of the TGA model). Very good qualitative agreement could also be appreciated in terms of streamlines, throughout the cardiac cycle. Additionally, velocity vectors in the ascending aorta revealed less symmetrical flow in the TGA model, which also exhibited higher wall shear stress in the anterior ascending aorta. PMID:26697416

  15. Using 4D Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Validate Computational Fluid Dynamics: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Biglino, Giovanni; Cosentino, Daria; Steeden, Jennifer A; De Nova, Lorenzo; Castelli, Matteo; Ntsinjana, Hopewell; Pennati, Giancarlo; Taylor, Andrew M; Schievano, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can have a complementary predictive role alongside the exquisite visualization capabilities of 4D cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. In order to exploit these capabilities (e.g., for decision-making), it is necessary to validate computational models against real world data. In this study, we sought to acquire 4D CMR flow data in a controllable, experimental setup and use these data to validate a corresponding computational model. We applied this paradigm to a case of congenital heart disease, namely, transposition of the great arteries (TGA) repaired with arterial switch operation. For this purpose, a mock circulatory loop compatible with the CMR environment was constructed and two detailed aortic 3D models (i.e., one TGA case and one normal aortic anatomy) were tested under realistic hemodynamic conditions, acquiring 4D CMR flow. The same 3D domains were used for multi-scale CFD simulations, whereby the remainder of the mock circulatory system was appropriately summarized with a lumped parameter network. Boundary conditions of the simulations mirrored those measured in vitro. Results showed a very good quantitative agreement between experimental and computational models in terms of pressure (overall maximum % error = 4.4% aortic pressure in the control anatomy) and flow distribution data (overall maximum % error = 3.6% at the subclavian artery outlet of the TGA model). Very good qualitative agreement could also be appreciated in terms of streamlines, throughout the cardiac cycle. Additionally, velocity vectors in the ascending aorta revealed less symmetrical flow in the TGA model, which also exhibited higher wall shear stress in the anterior ascending aorta. PMID:26697416

  16. A Resting State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Concussion in Collegiate Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Czerniak, Suzanne M; Sikoglu, Elif M; Navarro, Ana A Liso; McCafferty, Joseph; Eisenstock, Jordan; Stevenson, J Herbert; King, Jean A; Moore, Constance M

    2015-01-01

    Sports-related concussions are currently diagnosed through multi-domain assessment by a medical professional and may utilize neurocognitive testing as an aide. However, these tests have only been able to detect differences in the days to week post-concussion. Here, we investigate a measure of brain function, namely resting state functional connectivity, which may detect residual brain differences in the weeks to months after concussion. Twenty-one student athletes (9 concussed within 6 months of enrollment; 12 non-concussed; between ages 18 to 22 years) were recruited for this study. All participants completed the Wisconsin Card Sort Task and the Color-Word Interference Test. Neuroimaging data, specifically resting state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging data, were acquired to examine resting state functional connectivity. Two sample t-tests were used to compare the neurocognitive scores and resting state functional connectivity patterns among concussed and non-concussed participants. Correlations between neurocognitive scores and resting state functional connectivity measures were also determined across all subjects. There were no significant differences in neurocognitive performance between concussed and non-concussed groups. Concussed subjects had significantly increased connections between areas of the brain that underlie executive function. Across all subjects, better neurocognitive performance corresponded to stronger brain connectivity. Even at rest, brains of concussed athletes may have to ‘work harder’ than their healthy peers to achieve similar neurocognitive results. Resting state brain connectivity may be able to detect prolonged brain differences in concussed athletes in a more quantitative manner than neurocognitive test scores. PMID:25112544

  17. Ruptured disc after arthroscopic repositioning in the temporomandibular joint: a retrospective magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Cai, Xieyi; Yang, Chi; Wang, Shaoyi; Huang, Linjian

    2014-07-01

    Our aim was to explore the incidence of rupture after arthroscopic repositioning of the disc of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by reviewing magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the TMJ taken before and after operation, and to investigate correlations retrospectively. We studied 247 patients with anterior disc displacement of the TMJ, and categorised them into 3 groups based on the postoperative MRI. The first group comprised those whose disc ruptured after repositioning, the second those who had a possible rupture of the disc after repositioning, and the third had no rupture of the disc after repositioning. Age, sex, duration of symptoms, maximum incisal mouth opening, whether the anterior disc displacement was unilateral or bilateral, and the Wilkes stage, were included in the analysis. The incidence of rupture (5/247) was 2%. Weak points at the intermediate zone of the disc were found in 4 of the 5 joints. The patients whose discs ruptured were significantly younger than the other 2 groups (p=0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in preoperative duration of symptoms and mouth opening among the groups. The proportions of unilateral and bilateral disc displacement (p=0.047) and Wilkes stage (p=0.027) differed among the 3 groups. The Wilkes stages was significantly more advanced in the ruptured group than in the other 2 groups (p=0.027) with 4/5 being bilateral. The weak point in the intermediate zone of the disc on MRI could be a sign of rupture. Teenagers and young adults with anterior disc displacement without reduction, particularly those in whom it is bilateral, are at a higher risk of a rupture after repositioning of the disc by arthroscopy. PMID:24736122

  18. Writing affects the brain network of reading in Chinese: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fan; Vu, Marianne; Chan, Derek Ho Lung; Lawrence, Jason M; Harris, Lindsay N; Guan, Qun; Xu, Yi; Perfetti, Charles A

    2013-07-01

    We examined the hypothesis that learning to write Chinese characters influences the brain's reading network for characters. Students from a college Chinese class learned 30 characters in a character-writing condition and 30 characters in a pinyin-writing condition. After learning, functional magnetic resonance imaging collected during passive viewing showed different networks for reading Chinese characters and English words, suggesting accommodation to the demands of the new writing system through short-term learning. Beyond these expected differences, we found specific effects of character writing in greater activation (relative to pinyin writing) in bilateral superior parietal lobules and bilateral lingual gyri in both a lexical decision and an implicit writing task. These findings suggest that character writing establishes a higher quality representation of the visual-spatial structure of the character and its orthography. We found a greater involvement of bilateral sensori-motor cortex (SMC) for character-writing trained characters than pinyin-writing trained characters in the lexical decision task, suggesting that learning by doing invokes greater interaction with sensori-motor information during character recognition. Furthermore, we found a correlation of recognition accuracy with activation in right superior parietal lobule, right lingual gyrus, and left SMC, suggesting that these areas support the facilitative effect character writing has on reading. Finally, consistent with previous behavioral studies, we found character-writing training facilitates connections with semantics by producing greater activation in bilateral middle temporal gyri, whereas pinyin-writing training facilitates connections with phonology by producing greater activation in right inferior frontal gyrus. PMID:22378588

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging DTI-FT study on schizophrenic patients with typical negative first symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Chengyu; Zhang, Ying; Wei, Fuquan; Cheng, Yougen; Cao, Yulin; Hou, Hongtao

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) together with a white matter fiber tracking (FT) technique was used to assess different brain white matter structures and functionalities in schizophrenic patients with typical first negative symptoms. In total, 30 schizophrenic patients with typical first negative symptoms, comprising an observation group were paired 1:1 according to gender, age, right-handedness, and education, with 30 healthy individuals in a control group. Individuals in each group underwent routine MRI and DTI examination of the brain, and diffusion-tensor tractography (DTT) data were obtained through whole brain analysis based on voxel and tractography. The results were expressed by fractional anisotropy (FA) values. The schizophrenic patients were evaluated using a positive and negative symptom scale (PANSS) as well as a Global Assessment Scale (GAS). The results of the study showed that routine MRIs identified no differences between the two groups. However, compared with the control group, the FA values obtained by DTT from the deep left prefrontal cortex, the right deep temporal lobe, the white matter of the inferior frontal gyrus and part of the corpus callosum were significantly lower in the observation group (P<0.05). The PANSS positive scale value in the observation group averaged 7.7±1.5, and the negative scale averaged 46.6±5.9, while the general psychopathology scale averaged 65.4±10.3, and GAS averaged 53.8±19.2. The Pearson statistical analysis, the left deep prefrontal cortex, the right deep temporal lobe, the white matter of the inferior frontal gyrus and the FA value of part of the corpus callosum in the observation group was negatively correlated with the negative scale (P<0.05), and positively correlated with GAS (P<0.05). In conclusion, a decrease in the FA values of the left deep prefrontal cortex, the right deep temporal lobe, the white matter of the inferior frontal gyrus and part of the corpus

  20. Pediatric Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Goyal, Ankur; Sharma, Raju; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a radiation-free imaging modality with excellent contrast resolution and multiplanar capabilities. Since ionizing radiation is an important concern in the pediatric population, MRI serves as a useful alternative to computed tomography (CT) and also provides additional clues to diagnosis, not discernible on other investigations. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), urography, angiography, enterography, dynamic multiphasic imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging provide wealth of information. The main limitations include, long scan time, need for sedation/anesthesia, cost and lack of widespread availability. With the emergence of newer sequences and variety of contrast agents, MRI has become a robust modality and may serve as a one-stop shop for both anatomical and functional information. PMID:26916887

  1. Buttock augmentation: case studies of fat injection monitored by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Murillo, William L

    2004-11-01

    This article examines the injection of megavolumes of autologous fat cells as a means of buttock augmentation in 162 patients over a 7-year period. The author documents the use of magnetic resonance imaging in six patients to visualize the intramuscular location, integration, and duration of the injected fat. With the patient under epidural or general anesthesia, fat cells were harvested with a 5-mm blunt cannula and then stored in an empty sterile intravenous bag or bottle trap. Decantation was the only process used to separate the fat cells from the saline and serosanguineous components. Up to 1260 cc of fat cells were been injected into each buttock, the largest amount of fat grafting ever reported. Clinical assessment estimated a 20 percent loss of augmentation effect during the first 4 months. Patients were generally pleased with the final shape and volume of the buttock contour. In follow-up evaluation, magnetic resonance imaging supported the clinical indicators that the injection of large quantities of fat cells appears to be a safe and effective method for buttock enhancement. This process has inherent advantages; nevertheless, further research is required to clarify our understanding of the predictability and longevity of this technique. PMID:15509957

  2. Cavity- and waveguide-resonators in electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Webb, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Cavity resonators are widely used in electron paramagnetic resonance, very high field magnetic resonance microimaging and also in high field human imaging. The basic principles and designs of different forms of cavity resonators including rectangular, cylindrical, re-entrant, cavity magnetrons, toroidal cavities and dielectric resonators are reviewed. Applications in EPR and MRI are summarized, and finally the topic of traveling wave MRI using the magnet bore as a waveguide is discussed. PMID:25456314

  3. Translational Approaches for Studying Neurodevelopmental Disorders Utilizing in Vivo Proton (+H) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, April E.

    2014-01-01

    Intrauterine complications have been implicated in the etiology of neuripsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, autism and ADHD. This presentation will describe new translational studies derived from in vivo magnetic resonance imaging of developing and adult brain following perinatal asphyxia (PA). Our findings reveal significant effects of PA on neurometabolic profiles at one week of age, and significant relationships between early metabolites and later life phenotypes including behavior and brain morphometry

  4. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  5. Apparatus for investigating resonance with application to magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Sytil; Jones, Dyan L.; Gross, Josh; Zollman, Dean

    2015-11-01

    Resonance is typically studied in the context of either a pendulum or a mass on a spring. We have developed an apparatus that enables beginning students to investigate resonant behavior of changing magnetic fields, in addition to the properties of the magnetic field due to a wire and the superposition of magnetic fields. In this resonant system, a compass oscillates at a frequency determined by the compass's physical properties and an external magnetic field. While the analysis is mathematically similar to that of the pendulum, this apparatus has an advantage that the magnetic field is easily controlled, while it is difficult to control the strength of gravity. This apparatus has been incorporated into a teaching module on magnetic resonance imaging.

  6. Working memory network plasticity after anterior temporal lobe resection: a longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Stretton, Jason; Sidhu, Meneka K; Winston, Gavin P; Bartlett, Philippa; McEvoy, Andrew W; Symms, Mark R; Koepp, Matthias J; Thompson, Pamela J; Duncan, John S

    2014-05-01

    Working memory is a crucial cognitive function that is disrupted in temporal lobe epilepsy. It is unclear whether this impairment is a consequence of temporal lobe involvement in working memory processes or due to seizure spread to extratemporal eloquent cortex. Anterior temporal lobe resection controls seizures in 50-80% of patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and the effect of surgery on working memory are poorly understood both at a behavioural and neural level. We investigated the impact of temporal lobe resection on the efficiency and functional anatomy of working memory networks. We studied 33 patients with unilateral medial temporal lobe epilepsy (16 left) before, 3 and 12 months after anterior temporal lobe resection. Fifteen healthy control subjects were also assessed in parallel. All subjects had neuropsychological testing and performed a visuospatial working memory functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm on these three separate occasions. Changes in activation and deactivation patterns were modelled individually and compared between groups. Changes in task performance were included as regressors of interest to assess the efficiency of changes in the networks. Left and right temporal lobe epilepsy patients were impaired on preoperative measures of working memory compared to controls. Working memory performance did not decline following left or right temporal lobe resection, but improved at 3 and 12 months following left and, to a lesser extent, following right anterior temporal lobe resection. After left anterior temporal lobe resection, improved performance correlated with greater deactivation of the left hippocampal remnant and the contralateral right hippocampus. There was a failure of increased deactivation of the left hippocampal remnant at 3 months after left temporal lobe resection compared to control subjects, which had normalized 12 months after surgery. Following right anterior temporal lobe resection there was a

  7. Effect of hydrophobic inclusions on polymer swelling kinetics studied by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Gajdošová, Michaela; Pěček, Daniel; Sarvašová, Nina; Grof, Zdeněk; Štěpánek, František

    2016-03-16

    The rate of drug release from polymer matrix-based sustained release formulations is often controlled by the thickness of a gel layer that forms upon contact with dissolution medium. The effect of formulation parameters on the kinetics of elementary rate processes that contribute to gel layer formation, such as water ingress, polymer swelling and erosion, is therefore of interest. In the present work, gel layer formation has been investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is a non-destructive method allowing direct visualization of effective water concentration inside the tablet and its surrounding. Using formulations with Levetiracetam as the active ingredient, HPMC as a hydrophilic matrix former and carnauba wax (CW) as a hydrophobic component in the matrix system, the effect of different ratios of these two ingredients on the kinetics of gel formation (MRI) and drug release (USP 4 like dissolution test) has been investigated and interpreted using a mathematical model. PMID:26780121

  8. Mapping brain region activity during chewing: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Onozuka, M; Fujita, M; Watanabe, K; Hirano, Y; Niwa, M; Nishiyama, K; Saito, S

    2002-11-01

    Mastication has been suggested to increase neuronal activities in various regions of the human brain. However, because of technical difficulties, the fine anatomical and physiological regions linked to mastication have not been fully elucidated. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging during cycles of rhythmic gum-chewing and no chewing, we therefore examined the interaction between chewing and brain regional activity in 17 subjects (aged 20-31 years). In all subjects, chewing resulted in a bilateral increase in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals in the sensorimotor cortex, supplementary motor area, insula, thalamus, and cerebellum. In addition, in the first three regions, chewing of moderately hard gum produced stronger BOLD signals than the chewing of hard gum. However, the signal was higher in the cerebellum and not significant in the thalamus, respectively. These results suggest that chewing causes regional increases in brain neuronal activities which are related to biting force. PMID:12407087

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Studying Schizophrenia, Negative Symptoms, and the Glutamate System

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Oliver; Chadha Santuccione, Antonella; Aach, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms. While positive symptoms occur periodically during psychotic exacerbations, negative and cognitive symptoms often emerge before the first psychotic episode and persist with low functional outcome and poor prognosis. This review article outlines the importance of modern functional magnetic resonance imaging techniques for developing a stratified therapy of schizophrenic disorders. Functional neuroimaging evidence on the neural correlates of positive and particularly negative symptoms and cognitive deficits in schizophrenic disorders is briefly reviewed. Acute dysregulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission is crucially involved in the occurrence of psychotic symptoms. However, increasing evidence also implicates glutamatergic pathomechanisms, in particular N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor dysfunction in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and in the appearance of negative symptoms and cognitive dysfunctions. In line with this notion, several gene variants affecting the NMDA receptor’s pathway have been reported to increase susceptibility for schizophrenia, and have been investigated using the imaging genetics approach. In recent years, several attempts have been made to develop medications modulating the glutamatergic pathway with modest evidences for efficacy. The most successful approaches were those that aimed at influencing this pathway using compounds that enhance NMDA receptor function. More recently, the selective glycine reuptake inhibitor bitopertin has been shown to improve NMDA receptor hypofunction by increasing glycine concentrations in the synaptic cleft. Further research is required to test whether pharmacological agents with effects on the glutamatergic system can help to improve the treatment of negative symptoms in schizophrenic disorders. PMID:24765078

  10. Neural correlates underlying mental calculation in abacus experts: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Hanakawa, Takashi; Honda, Manabu; Okada, Tomohisa; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Shibasaki, Hiroshi

    2003-06-01

    Experts of abacus operation demonstrate extraordinary ability in mental calculation. There is psychological evidence that abacus experts utilize a mental image of an abacus to remember and manipulate large numbers in solving problems; however, the neural correlates underlying this expertise are unknown. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we compared the neural correlates associated with three mental-operation tasks (numeral, spatial, verbal) among six experts in abacus operations and eight nonexperts. In general, there was more involvement of neural correlates for visuospatial processing (e.g., right premotor and parietal areas) for abacus experts during the numeral mental-operation task. Activity of these areas and the fusiform cortex was correlated with the size of numerals used in the numeral mental-operation task. Particularly, the posterior superior parietal cortex revealed significantly enhanced activity for experts compared with controls during the numeral mental-operation task. Comparison with the other mental-operation tasks indicated that activity in the posterior superior parietal cortex was relatively specific to computation in 2-dimensional space. In conclusion, mental calculation of abacus experts is likely associated with enhanced involvement of the neural resources for visuospatial information processing in 2-dimensional space. PMID:12814580

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of myelin using ultrashort Echo time (UTE) pulse sequences: Phantom, specimen, volunteer and multiple sclerosis patient studies.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Vipul; Shao, Hongda; Chen, Jun; Vandenberg, Scott; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Bydder, Graeme M; Du, Jiang

    2016-08-01

    Clinical magnetic resonance imaging of multiple sclerosis (MS) has focused on indirect imaging of myelin in white matter by detecting signal from protons in the water associated with myelin. Here we show that protons in myelin can be directly imaged using ultrashort echo time (UTE) free induction decay (FID) and imaging sequences on a clinical 3T MR scanner. An adiabatic inversion recovery UTE (IR-UTE) sequence was used to detect signal from myelin and simultaneously suppress signal from water protons. Validation studies were performed on myelin lipid and myelin basic protein (MBP) phantoms in the forms of lyophilized powders as well as suspensions in D2O and H2O. IR-UTE sequences were then used to image MS brain specimens, healthy volunteers, and patients. The T2* of myelin was measured using a UTE FID sequence, as well as UTE and IR-UTE sequences at different TEs. T2* values of ~110-330μs were measured with UTE FID, as well as with UTE and IR-UTE sequences for myelin powders, myelin-D2O and myelin-H2O phantoms, consistent with selective imaging of myelin protons with IR-UTE sequences. Our studies showed myelin selective imaging of white matter in the brains in vitro and in vivo. Complete or partial signal loss was observed in specimens in areas of the brain with histopathologic evidence of myelin loss, and in the brain of patients with MS. PMID:27155128

  12. Autism spectrum disorder: does neuroimaging support the DSM-5 proposal for a symptom dyad? A systematic review of functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Pina-Camacho, Laura; Villero, Sonia; Fraguas, David; Boada, Leticia; Janssen, Joost; Navas-Sánchez, Francisco J; Mayoral, Maria; Llorente, Cloe; Arango, Celso; Parellada, Mara

    2012-07-01

    A systematic review of 208 studies comprising functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging data in patients with 'autism spectrum disorder' (ASD) was conducted, in order to determine whether these data support the forthcoming DSM-5 proposal of a social communication and behavioral symptom dyad. Studies consistently reported abnormal function and structure of fronto-temporal and limbic networks with social and pragmatic language deficits, of temporo-parieto-occipital networks with syntactic-semantic language deficits, and of fronto-striato-cerebellar networks with repetitive behaviors and restricted interests in ASD patients. Therefore, this review partially supports the DSM-5 proposal for the ASD dyad. PMID:21932156

  13. Comparison of the Oswestry Disability Index and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Lumbar Canal Stenosis: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Goni, Vijay G; Hampannavar, Aravind; Singh, Paramjeet; Sudesh, Pebam; Logithasan, Rajesh Kumar; Sharma, Anurag; BK, Shashidhar; Sament, Radheshyam

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study. Purpose The aim of the study was to determine relationship between the degrees of radiologically demonstrated anatomical lumbar canal stenosis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its correlation with the patient's disability level, using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Overview of Literature The relationship between the imaging studies and clinical symptoms has been uncertain in patients suffering from symptomatic lumbar canal stenosis. There is a limited number of studies which correlates the degree of stenosis with simple reproducible scoring methods. Methods Fifty patients were selected from 350 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The patients answered the national-language translated form of ODI. The ratio of disability was interpreted, and the patients were grouped accordingly. They were subjected to MRI; and the anteroposterior diameters of the lumbar intervertebral disc spaces and the thecal sac cross sectional area were measured. Comparison was performed between the subdivisions of the degree of lumbar canal stenosis, based on the following: anteroposterior diameter (three groups: normal, relative stenosis and absolute stenosis); subdivisions of the degree of central canal stenosis, based on the thecal sac cross-sectional area, measured on axial views (three groups: normal, moderately stenotic and severely stenotic); and the ODI outcome, which was also presented in 20 percentiles. Results No significant correlation was established between the radiologically depicted anatomical lumbar stenosis and the Oswestry Disability scores. Conclusions Magnetic resonance imaging alone should not be considered in isolation when assessing and treating patients diagnosed with lumbar canal stenosis. PMID:24596604

  14. Granular convection observed by magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrichs, E. E.; Jaeger, H. M.; Karczmar, Greg S.; Knight, James B.; Kuperman, Vadim Yu.; Nagel, Sidney R.

    1995-03-01

    Vibrations in a granular material can spontaneously produce convection rolls reminiscent of those seen in fluids. Magnetic resonance imaging provides a sensitive and noninvasive probe for the detection of these convection currents, which have otherwise been difficult to observe. A magnetic resonance imaging study of convection in a column of poppy seeds yielded data about the detailed shape of the convection rolls and the depth dependence of the convection velocity. The velocity was found to decrease exponentially with depth; a simple model for this behavior is presented here.

  15. Granular convection observed by magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrichs, E.E.; Jaeger, H.M.; Knight, J.B.; Nagel, S.R.; Karczmar, G.S.; Kuperman, V.Yu.

    1995-03-17

    Vibrations in a granular material can spontaneously produce convection rolls reminiscent of those seen in fluids. Magnetic resonance imaging provides a sensitive and noninvasive probe for the detection of these convection currents, which have otherwise been difficult to observe. A magnetic resonance imaging study of convection in a column of poppy seeds yielded data about the detailed shape of the convection rolls and the depth dependence of the convection velocity. The velocity was found to decrease exponentially with depth; a simple model for this behavior is presented here. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Basics of magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Oldendorf, W.; Oldendorf, W. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Beginning with the behavior of a compass needle in a magnetic field, this text uses analogies from everyday experience to explain the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and how it is used for imaging. Using a minimum of scientific abbreviations and symbols, the basics of tissue visualization and characterization are presented. A description of the various types of magnets and scanners is followed by the practical advantages and limitations of MRI relative to x-ray CT scanning.

  17. Velocity and concentration studies of flowing suspensions by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Final report, October 7, 1994--October 6, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging techniques were developed to study concentrated suspension flows. The tasks completed were: (1) materials selection for imaging of both particle and fluid components, (2) pipe flow measurements, and (3) flows in complex geometries. The partially completed task is the development of rapid imaging techniques by analog compensation of eddy currents, generated by the gradient pulses, and real-time image reconstruction from the data. The best combination of materials found is pharmaceutical beads in silicon oil. Their relaxation times T{sub 1} are sufficiently different to permit imaging the two components separately. The pipe flow experiment used 3 mm, neutrally buoyant, plastic particles, up to 40% by volume, in 80--90W transmission oil flowing in a 5 cm diameter pipe. Distances ranging from 60 cm to 6 m downstream from a commercial mixer was studied. The flow is fully developed at 6 m and the concentration and velocity profiles agree with earlier lower resolution experiments. The eddy current compensation scheme works well for two channels and is being extended to eight channels. The authors have also built a rapid reconstruction hardware that processes and displays images in a fraction of a second. They studied the flow of neutrally buoyant concentrated suspension past a step expansion and contraction in a cylindrical pipe. Interesting transition is observed at the expansion whereby the high fluids-fraction outer layer spreads to become the outer layer in the larger pipe.

  18. Stray field magnetic resonance imaging: a preliminary study of skin hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, M.; Hadgraft, J.; Glover, P. M.; McDonald, P. J.

    2003-02-01

    We report the first use of GARField (STRAFI-like) magnetic resonance profiling (1D-MRI) to study skin hydration, both in vitro and in vivo. It is shown that, for in vitro samples, a high degree of reproducibility is achievable for skin samples from a single donor and that the signal intensity correlates well with equilibrium moisture content in the skin. In vivo, the method allows measurement of the influence of a moisturizer cream on water levels in the skin as a function of time.

  19. A magnetic resonance imaging study on changes in rat mandibular bone marrow and pulp tissue after high-dose irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wan; Lee, Byung-Do; Lee, Kang-Kyoo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to evaluate whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is appropriate for detecting early changes in the mandibular bone marrow and pulp tissue of rats after high-dose irradiation. Materials and Methods The right mandibles of Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated with 10 Gy (Group 1, n=5) and 20 Gy (Group 2, n=5). Five non-irradiated animals were used as controls. The MR images of rat mandibles were obtained before irradiation and once a week until week 4 after irradiation. From the MR images, the signal intensity (SI) of the mandibular bone marrow and pulp tissue of the incisor was interpreted. The MR images were compared with the histopathologic findings. Results The SI of the mandibular bone marrow had decreased on T2-weighted MR images. There was little difference between Groups 1 and 2. The SI of the irradiated groups appeared to be lower than that of the control group. The histopathologic findings showed that the trabecular bone in the irradiated group had increased. The SI of the irradiated pulp tissue had decreased on T2-weighted MR images. However, the SI of the MR images in Group 2 was high in the atrophic pulp of the incisor apex at week 2 after irradiation. Conclusion These patterns seen on MRI in rat bone marrow and pulp tissue were consistent with histopathologic findings. They may be useful to assess radiogenic sclerotic changes in rat mandibular bone marrow. PMID:24701458

  20. Incremental value of magnetic resonance neurography of Lumbosacral plexus over non-contributory lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging in radiculopathy: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Avneesh; Farahani, Sahar J; Thawait, Gaurav K; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Belzberg, Allan J; Carrino, John A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To test the incremental value of 3T magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) in a series of unilateral radiculopathy patients with non-contributory magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS: Ten subjects (3 men, 7 women; mean age 54 year and range 22-74 year) with unilateral lumbar radiculopathy and with previous non-contributory lumbar spine MRI underwent lumbosacral (LS) plexus MRN over a period of one year. Lumbar spine MRI performed as part of the MRN LS protocol as well as bilateral L4-S1 nerves, sciatic, femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous nerves were evaluated in each subject for neuropathy findings on both anatomic (nerve signal, course and caliber alterations) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tensor maps (nerve signal and caliber alterations). Minimum fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean apparent diffusion coeffcient (ADC) of L4-S2 nerve roots, sciatic and femoral nerves were recorded. RESULTS: All anatomic studies and 80% of DTI imaging received a good-excellent imaging quality grading. In a blinded evaluation, all 10 examinations demonstrated neural and/or neuromuscular abnormality corresponding to the site of radiculopathy. A number of contributory neuropathy findings including double crush syndrome were observed. On DTI tensor maps, nerve signal and caliber alterations were more conspicuous. Although individual differences were observed among neuropathic appearing nerve (lower FA and increased ADC) as compared to its contralateral counterpart, there were no significant mean differences on statistical comparison of LS plexus nerves, femoral and sciatic nerves (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: MRN of LS plexus is useful modality for the evaluation of patients with non-contributory MRI of lumbar spine as it can incrementally delineate the etiology and provide direct objective and non-invasive evidence of neuromuscular pathology. PMID:26834949

  1. Review: Magnetic resonance imaging techniques in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging the eye with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved difficult due to the eye’s propensity to move involuntarily over typical imaging timescales, obscuring the fine structure in the eye due to the resulting motion artifacts. However, advances in MRI technology help to mitigate such drawbacks, enabling the acquisition of high spatiotemporal resolution images with a variety of contrast mechanisms. This review aims to classify the MRI techniques used to date in clinical and preclinical ophthalmologic studies, describing the qualitative and quantitative information that may be extracted and how this may inform on ocular pathophysiology. PMID:23112569

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of acquired cardiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Carrol, C L; Higgins, C B; Caputo, G R

    1996-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, advances in magnetic resonance imaging techniques have increased the accuracy and applicability of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. These advances have improved the utility of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating cardiac morphology, blood flow, and myocardial contractility, all significant diagnostic features in the evaluation of the patient with acquired heart disease. Utilization of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging has been limited, primarily due to clinical reliance upon nuclear scintigraphy and echocardiography. Recent developments in fast and ultrafast imaging should continue to enhance the significance of magnetic resonance imaging in this field. Widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the cardiovascular system will ultimately depend upon its maturation into a comprehensive, noninvasive imaging technique for the varying manifestations of acquired heart disease, including cardiomyopathy, ischemic heart disease, and acquired valvular disease. Images PMID:8792545

  3. A magnetic resonance imaging study of prostate deformation relative to implanted gold fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Nichol, Alan M.; Brock, Kristy K.; Lockwood, Gina A.; Moseley, Douglas J.; Rosewall, Tara; Warde, Padraig R.; Catton, Charles N.; Jaffray, David A. . E-mail: david.jaffray@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To describe prostate deformation during radiotherapy and determine the margins required to account for prostate deformation after setup to intraprostatic fiducial markers (FM). Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with T1c-T2c prostate cancer had three gold FMs implanted. The patients presented with a full bladder and empty rectum for two axial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans using a gradient recalled echo (GRE) sequence capable of imaging the FMs. The MRIs were done at the time of radiotherapy (RT) planning and a randomly assigned fraction. A single observer contoured the prostate surfaces. They were entered into a finite element model and aligned using the centroid of the three FMs. Results: During RT, the prostate volume decreased by 0.5%/fraction (p = 0.03) and the FMs in-migrated by 0.05 mm/fraction (p < 0.05). Prostate deformation was unrelated to differential bladder and bowel filling, but was related to a transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) (p = 0.003). The standard deviation for systematic uncertainty of prostate surface contouring was 0.8 mm and for FM centroid localization was 0.4 mm. The standard deviation of random interfraction prostate deformation was 1.5 mm and for FM centroid variability was 1.1 mm. These uncertainties from prostate deformation can be incorporated into a margin recipe to determine the total margins required for RT. Conclusions: During RT, the prostate exhibited: volume decrease, deformation, and in-migration of FMs. Patients with TURPs were prone to prostate deformation.

  4. Do calendrical savants use calculation to answer date questions? A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Richard; Frith, Chris

    2009-05-27

    Calendrical savants can name the weekdays for dates from different years with remarkable speed and accuracy. Whether calculation rather than just memory is involved is disputed. Grounds for doubting whether they can calculate are reviewed and criteria for attributing date calculation skills to them are discussed. At least some calendrical savants possess date calculation skills. A behavioural characteristic observed in many calendrical savants is increased response time for questions about more remote years. This may be because more remote years require more calculation or because closer years are more practised. An experiment is reported that used functional magnetic resonance imaging to attempt to discriminate between these explanations. Only two savants could be scanned and excessive head movement corrupted one savant's mental arithmetic data. Nevertheless, there was increased parietal activation during both mental arithmetic and date questions and this region showed increased activity with more remote dates. These results suggest that the calendrical skills observed in savants result from intensive practice with calculations used in solving mental arithmetic problems. The mystery is not how they solve these problems, but why. PMID:19528025

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging studies of spontaneous capillary water imbibition in aerated gypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kyung-Min; Mitchell, Jonathan; Jaffel, Hamouda; Gladden, Lynn F.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we investigate both capillary water imbibition and the sorptivity of aerated gypsum plaster, and how these sorption characteristics are related to the pore structure of the material. These characteristics are examined by monitoring mass change using the conventional gravimetric method and by obtaining water content profiles using non-destructive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques during capillary imbibition of water. Here, three different gypsum samples are investigated: one non-aerated reference gypsum sample and two aerated gypsum samples produced with different volumetric air fractions. The capillary water absorption into the reference sample follows t1/2 kinetics (Fickian diffusion), where t is the time of ingress. However, in the aerated gypsum samples there are deviations from t1/2 kinetics. The MRI results show unambiguously that two wetting fronts advance through the aerated structure; an observation that cannot be made from the gravimetric data alone. The water content profiles of the aerated gypsum samples are therefore analysed by treating them as the sum of two separate absorption processes using sharp front analysis. The capillary water absorption properties of this material are well described as a parallel combination of fast absorption into fine matrix pores and slow absorption into a modified structure of matrix pores inter-connected to air voids introduced into the slurry by aeration.

  6. Phantom digit somatotopy: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study in forearm amputees.

    PubMed

    Björkman, Anders; Weibull, Andreas; Olsrud, Johan; Ehrsson, H Henrik; Rosén, Birgitta; Björkman-Burtscher, Isabella M

    2012-07-01

    Forearm amputees often experience non-painful sensations in their phantom when the amputation stump is touched. Cutaneous stimulation of specific stump areas may be perceived as stimulation of specific phantom fingers (stump hand map). The neuronal basis of referred phantom limb sensations is unknown. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to demonstrate a somatotopic map of the phantom fingers in the hand region of the primary somatosensory cortex after tactile stump stimulation. The location and extent of phantom finger activation in the primary somatosensory cortex corresponded well to the location of normal fingers in a reference population. Stimulation of the stump hand map resulted in an increased bilateral activation of the primary somatosensory cortex compared with stimulation of forearm regions outside the stump hand map. Increased activation was also seen in contralateral posterior parietal cortex and premotor cortex. Ipsilateral primary somatosensory cortex activation might represent a compensatory mechanism and activation of the non-primary fronto-parietal areas might correspond to awareness of the phantom limb, which is enhanced when experiencing the referred sensations. It is concluded that phantom sensation elicited by stimulation of stump hand map areas is associated with activation of finger-specific somatotopical representations in the primary somatosensory cortex. This suggests that the primary somatosensory cortex could be a neural substrate of non-painful phantom sensations. The stump hand map phenomenon might be useful in the development of prosthetic hand devices. PMID:22537316

  7. Association of Abdominal Obesity with Lumbar Disc Degeneration – A Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Takatalo, Jani; Karppinen, Jaro; Taimela, Simo; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Laitinen, Jaana; Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco; Samartzis, Dino; Korpelainen, Raija; Näyhä, Simo; Remes, Jouko; Tervonen, Osmo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether midsagittal (abdominal) obesity in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), waist circumference (WC) and body fat percentage are associated with lumbar disc degeneration in early adulthood. Methods We obtained the lumbar MRI (1.5-T scanner) of 325 females and 233 males at a mean age of 21 years. Lumbar disc degeneration was evaluated using Pfirrmann classification. We analysed the associations of MRI measures of obesity (abdominal diameter (AD), sagittal diameter (SAD), ventral subcutaneous thickness (VST), and dorsal subcutaneous thickness (DST)), WC and body fat percentage with disc degeneration sum scores using ordinal logistic regression. Results A total of 155 (48%) females and 147 (63%) males had disc degeneration. AD and SAD were associated with a disc degeneration sum score of ≥3 compared to disc degeneration sum score of 0–2 (OR 1.67; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20–2.33 and OR 1.40; 95% CI 1.12–1.75, respectively) among males, but we found no association among females. WC was also associated with disc degeneration among males (OR 1.03 per one cm; 95% CI 1.00–1.05), but not among females. Conclusion Measures of abdominal obesity in MRI and waist circumference were associated with disc degeneration among 21-year-old males. PMID:23418543

  8. Organ perfusion during voluntary pulmonary hyperinflation; a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Kyhl, Kasper; Drvis, Ivan; Barak, Otto; Mijacika, Tanja; Engstrøm, Thomas; Secher, Niels H; Dujic, Zeljko; Buca, Ante; Madsen, Per Lav

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary hyperinflation is used by competitive breath-hold divers and is accomplished by glossopharyngeal insufflation (GPI), which is known to compress the heart and pulmonary vessels, increasing sympathetic activity and lowering cardiac output (CO) without known consequence for organ perfusion. Myocardial, pulmonary, skeletal muscle, kidney, and liver perfusion were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging in 10 elite breath-hold divers at rest and during moderate GPI. Cardiac chamber volumes, stroke volume, and thus CO were determined from cardiac short-axis cine images. Organ volumes were assessed from gradient echo sequences, and organ perfusion was evaluated from first-pass images after gadolinium injection. During GPI, lung volume increased by 5.2 ± 1.5 liters (mean ± SD; P < 0.001), while spleen and liver volume decreased by 46 ± 39 and 210 ± 160 ml, respectively (P < 0.05), and inferior caval vein diameter by 4 ± 3 mm (P < 0.05). Heart rate tended to increase (67 ± 10 to 86 ± 20 beats/min; P = 0.052) as right and left ventricular volumes were reduced (P < 0.05). Stroke volume (107 ± 21 to 53 ± 15 ml) and CO (7.2 ± 1.6 to 4.2 ± 0.8 l/min) decreased as assessed after 1 min of GPI (P < 0.01). Left ventricular myocardial perfusion maximum upslope and its perfusion index decreased by 1.52 ± 0.15 s(-1) (P < 0.001) and 0.02 ± 0.01 s(-1) (P < 0.05), respectively, without transmural differences. Pulmonary tissue, spleen, kidney, and pectoral-muscle perfusion also decreased (P < 0.05), and yet liver perfusion was maintained. Thus, during pulmonary hyperinflation by GPI, CO and organ perfusion, including the myocardium, as well as perfusion of skeletal muscles, are reduced, and yet perfusion of the liver is maintained. Liver perfusion seems to be prioritized when CO decreases during GPI. PMID:26589331

  9. Neural Correlates of Symptom Dimensions in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Andrew R.; Akkal, Dalila; Almeida, Jorge R. C.; Mataix-Cols, David; Kalas, Catherine; Devlin, Bernie; Birmaher, Boris; Phillips, Mary L.

    2009-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging on a group of pediatric subjects with obsessive compulsive disorder reveals that this group has reduced activity in neural regions underlying emotional processing, cognitive processing, and motor performance as compared to control subjects.

  10. The neuroprotective agent CNTF decreases neuronal metabolites in the rat striatum: an in vivo multimodal magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-de Sauvage, Maria-Angeles; Flament, Julien; Bramoulle, Yann; Ben Haim, Lucile; Guillermier, Martine; Berniard, Aurélie; Aurégan, Gwennaëlle; Houitte, Diane; Brouillet, Emmanuel; Bonvento, Gilles; Hantraye, Philippe; Valette, Julien; Escartin, Carole

    2015-06-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is neuroprotective against multiple pathologic conditions including metabolic impairment, but the mechanisms are still unclear. To delineate CNTF effects on brain energy homeostasis, we performed a multimodal imaging study, combining in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, and in situ glutamate imaging by chemical exchange saturation transfer. Unexpectedly, we found that CNTF expression through lentiviral gene transfer in the rat striatum significantly decreased the levels of neuronal metabolites (N-acetyl-aspartate, N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate, and glutamate). This preclinical study shows that CNTF remodels brain metabolism, and suggests that decreased levels of neuronal metabolites may occur in the absence of neuronal dysfunction. PMID:25833344

  11. Neural bases of the foreign accent syndrome: a functional magnetic resonance imaging case study.

    PubMed

    Katz, W F; Garst, D M; Briggs, R W; Cheshkov, S; Ringe, W; Gopinath, K S; Goyal, A; Allen, G

    2012-06-01

    Foreign accent syndrome (FAS) is a rare disorder characterized by the emergence of a perceived foreign accent following brain damage. Despite decades of study, little is known about the neural substrates involved in this disorder. In this case study, MRI images of the brain were obtained during a speech task for an American English-speaking monolingual female who presented with FAS of unknown etiology and was thought to sound 'Swedish' or 'Eastern European'. On the basis of MR structural imaging, the patient was noted to have frontal lobe atrophy. An fMRI picture-naming task designed to broadly engage the speech motor network revealed predominantly left-hemisphere involvement, including activation of the (1) left superior temporal and medial frontal structures, (2) bilateral subcortical structures and thalamus, and (3) left cerebellum. The results suggest an instance of substantial brain reorganization for speech motor control. PMID:22011212

  12. Amphetamine sensitisation and memory in healthy human volunteers: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    O'Daly, Owen G; Joyce, Daniel; Tracy, Derek K; Stephan, Klaas E; Murray, Robin M; Shergill, Sukhwinder

    2014-09-01

    Amphetamine sensitisation (AS) is an established animal model of the hypersensitivity to psychostimulants seen in patients with schizophrenia. AS also models the dysregulation of mesolimbic dopamine signalling which has been implicated in the development of psychotic symptoms. Recent data suggest that the enhanced excitability of mesolimbic dopamine neurons in AS is driven by a hyperactivity of hippocampal (subiculum) neurons, consistent with a strong association between hippocampal dysfunction and schizophrenia. While AS can be modelled in human volunteers, its functional consequences on dopaminoceptive brain regions (i.e. striatum and hippocampus) remains unclear. Here we describe the effects of a sensitising dosage pattern of dextroamphetamine on the neural correlates of motor sequence learning in healthy volunteers, within a randomised, double-blind, parallel-groups design. Behaviourally, sensitisation was characterised by enhanced subjective responses to amphetamine but did not change performance (i.e. learning rate) during an explicit sequence learning task. In contrast, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements showed that repeated intermittent amphetamine exposure was associated with increased blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal within the medial temporal lobe (MTL) (subiculum/entorhinal cortex) and midbrain, in the vicinity of the substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area (SN/VTA) during sequence encoding. Importantly, MTL hyperactivity correlated with the sensitisation of amphetamine-induced attentiveness. The MTL-midbrain hyperactivity reported here mirrors observations in sensitised rodents and is consistent with contemporary models of schizophrenia and behavioural sensitisation. These findings of meso-hippocampal hyperactivity during AS thus link pathophysiological concepts of dopamine dysregulation to cognitive models of psychosis. PMID:24671338

  13. Reduction process of nitroxyl spin probes used in Overhauser-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: An ESR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meenakumari, V.; Jawahar, A.; Premkumar, S.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2016-05-01

    The Electron spin resonance studies on the reduction process of nitroxyl spin probes were carried out for 1mM 14N- labeled nitroxyl radicals in pure water and 1 mM concentration of ascorbic acid as a function of time. The electron spin resonance parameters, such as line width, hyperfine coupling constant, g-factor, signal intensity ratio and rotational correlation time were estimated. The 3-carbamoyl-PROXYL radical has narrowest line width and fast tumbling motion compared with 3-carboxy-PROXYL, 4-methoxy-TEMPO, and 4-acetamido-TEMPO radicals. The half life time and decay rate were estimated for 1mM concentration of 14N- labeled nitroxyl radicals in 1 mM concentration of ascorbic acid. From the results, the 3-carbamoyl-PROXYL has long half life time and high stability compared with 3-carboxy-PROXYL, 4-methoxy-TEMPO and 4-acetamido-TEMPO radicals. Therefore, this study reveals that the 3-carbamoyl-PROXYL radical can act as a good redox sensitive spin probe for Overhauser-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

  14. a Study of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Variations in Vivo Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuder, Michelle Sandy

    We have measured non-invasively the transcapillary transport of water and an extracellular marker, gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (Gd-DTPA) in the living brain using conventional and rapid NMR imaging strategies. Detection of water exchange post-contrast and of Gd-DTPA leakage across an intact and hyperosmotically-disrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB) were investigated in animal models. The development of high speed magnetic resonance imaging methods provides a tool for measuring short-term variations in BBB permeability in vivo over relatively short experimental time periods, and for determining the influence of these permeability changes on other physiologic parameters. The overall aims of this thesis have been to exploit the high temporal resolution available with a fast scanning technique, echo-planar imaging, to (1) quantitate the permeability of the BBB to water before and after altering the exchange capacity of the capillary bed, (2) use these measurements to model small, reversible changes in permeability to Gd-DTPA in terms of the post -contrast relaxation characteristics of the blood and tissue spaces during the first- and multiple-pass phases of transport, and (3) explore the influence of an increased permeability on the first-pass kinetic behavior. We initially present the theory of two-site water exchange, a modification of the Bloch equations used to examine time-dependent changes in the nuclear spin magnetization with time. The solutions of these equations for our particular imaging experiment were initially validated in a well-characterized dialysis chamber in order to demonstrate the sensitivity of the experiment to detecting biexponential signal decay. Upon validating the theory, we measured water exchange times in vivo in rodent and canine brain. A biexponential model of NMR signal decay was used to determine both the intravascular blood volume and intravascular water lifetime. Mannitol, a hyperosmotic solution, which can increase BBB

  15. Molecular and Integrative Physiological Effects of Isoflurane Anesthesia: The Paradigm of Cardiovascular Studies in Rodents using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Constantinides, Christakis; Murphy, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    To-this-date, the exact molecular, cellular, and integrative physiological mechanisms of anesthesia remain largely unknown. Published evidence indicates that anesthetic effects are multifocal and occur in a time-dependent and coordinated manner, mediated via central, local, and peripheral pathways. Their effects can be modulated by a range of variables, and their elicited end-effect on the integrative physiological response is highly variable. This review summarizes the major cellular and molecular sites of anesthetic action with a focus on the paradigm of isoflurane (ISO) – the most commonly used anesthetic nowadays – and its use in prolonged in vivo rodent studies using imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It also presents established evidence for normal ranges of global and regional physiological cardiac function under ISO, proposes optimal, practical methodologies relevant to the use of anesthetic protocols for MRI and outlines the beneficial effects of nitrous oxide supplementation. PMID:27525256

  16. Breast density quantification using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with bias field correction: A postmortem study

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Huanjun; Johnson, Travis; Lin, Muqing; Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Su, Min-Ying; Molloi, Sabee

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Quantification of breast density based on three-dimensional breast MRI may provide useful information for the early detection of breast cancer. However, the field inhomogeneity can severely challenge the computerized image segmentation process. In this work, the effect of the bias field in breast density quantification has been investigated with a postmortem study. Methods: T1-weighted images of 20 pairs of postmortem breasts were acquired on a 1.5 T breast MRI scanner. Two computer-assisted algorithms were used to quantify the volumetric breast density. First, standard fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering was used on raw images with the bias field present. Then, the coherent local intensity clustering (CLIC) method estimated and corrected the bias field during the iterative tissue segmentation process. Finally, FCM clustering was performed on the bias-field-corrected images produced by CLIC method. The left–right correlation for breasts in the same pair was studied for both segmentation algorithms to evaluate the precision of the tissue classification. Finally, the breast densities measured with the three methods were compared to the gold standard tissue compositions obtained from chemical analysis. The linear correlation coefficient, Pearson'sr, was used to evaluate the two image segmentation algorithms and the effect of bias field. Results: The CLIC method successfully corrected the intensity inhomogeneity induced by the bias field. In left–right comparisons, the CLIC method significantly improved the slope and the correlation coefficient of the linear fitting for the glandular volume estimation. The left–right breast density correlation was also increased from 0.93 to 0.98. When compared with the percent fibroglandular volume (%FGV) from chemical analysis, results after bias field correction from both the CLIC the FCM algorithms showed improved linear correlation. As a result, the Pearson'sr increased from 0.86 to 0.92 with the bias field correction

  17. Compressive neuropathy of the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve: a study by magnetic resonance imaging*

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Rogéria Nobre; Lopes, Alexia Abuhid; Torres, Jardélio Mendes; Mundim, Marina Franco; Silva, Lênio Lúcio Gavio; Silva, Breno Rabelo de Carvalho e

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence of isolated findings of abnormalities leading to entrapment of the lateral plantar nerve and respective branches in patients complaining of chronic heel pain, whose magnetic resonance imaging exams have showed complete selective fatty atrophy of the abductor digiti quinti muscle. Materials and Methods Retrospective, analytical, and cross-sectional study. The authors selected magnetic resonance imaging of hindfoot of 90 patients with grade IV abductor digiti quinti muscle atrophy according to Goutallier and Bernageau classification. Patients presenting with minor degrees of fatty muscle degeneration (below grade IV) and those who had been operated on for nerve decompression were excluded. Results A female prevalence (78.8%) was observed, and a strong correlation was found between fatty muscle atrophy and plantar fasciitis in 21.2%, and ankle varices, in 16.8% of the patients. Conclusion Fatty atrophy of the abductor digiti quinti muscle is strongly associated with neuropathic alterations of the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve. The present study showed a significant association between plantar fasciitis and ankle varices with grade IV atrophy of the abductor digiti quinti muscle. PMID:26811554

  18. The Value of Neurosurgical and Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Diffusion Tensor Imaging Tractography in Clinically Integrated Neuroanatomy Modules: A Cross-Sectional Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Familiari, Giuseppe; Relucenti, Michela; Heyn, Rosemarie; Baldini, Rossella; D'Andrea, Giancarlo; Familiari, Pietro; Bozzao, Alessandro; Raco, Antonino

    2013-01-01

    Neuroanatomy is considered to be one of the most difficult anatomical subjects for students. To provide motivation and improve learning outcomes in this area, clinical cases and neurosurgical images from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractographies produced using an intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging apparatus (MRI/DTI) were presented and…

  19. Neural Responses to Visual Food Cues According to Weight Status: A Systematic Review of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Pursey, Kirrilly M.; Stanwell, Peter; Callister, Robert J.; Brain, Katherine; Collins, Clare E.; Burrows, Tracy L.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence from recent neuroimaging studies suggests that specific food-related behaviors contribute to the development of obesity. The aim of this review was to report the neural responses to visual food cues, as assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in humans of differing weight status. Published studies to 2014 were retrieved and included if they used visual food cues, studied humans >18 years old, reported weight status, and included fMRI outcomes. Sixty studies were identified that investigated the neural responses of healthy weight participants (n = 26), healthy weight compared to obese participants (n = 17), and weight-loss interventions (n = 12). High-calorie food images were used in the majority of studies (n = 36), however, image selection justification was only provided in 19 studies. Obese individuals had increased activation of reward-related brain areas including the insula and orbitofrontal cortex in response to visual food cues compared to healthy weight individuals, and this was particularly evident in response to energy dense cues. Additionally, obese individuals were more responsive to food images when satiated. Meta-analysis of changes in neural activation post-weight loss revealed small areas of convergence across studies in brain areas related to emotion, memory, and learning, including the cingulate gyrus, lentiform nucleus, and precuneus. Differential activation patterns to visual food cues were observed between obese, healthy weight, and weight-loss populations. Future studies require standardization of nutrition variables and fMRI outcomes to enable more direct comparisons between studies. PMID:25988110

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging: Principles and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kean, D.; Smith, M.

    1986-01-01

    This text covers the physics underlying magnetic resonance (MR) imaging; pulse sequences; image production; equipment; aspects of clinical imaging; and the imaging of the head and neck, thorax, abdomen and pelvis, and musculoskeletal system; and MR imaging. The book provides about 150 examples of MR images that give an overview of the pathologic conditions imaged. There is a discussion of the physics of MR imaging and also on the spin echo.

  1. Terahertz imaging system with resonant tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Mukai, Toshikazu

    2016-03-01

    We report a feasibility study of a terahertz imaging system with resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) that oscillate at 0.30 THz. A pair of RTDs acted as an emitter and a detector in the system. Terahertz reflection images of opaque samples were acquired with our RTD imaging system. A spatial resolution of 1 mm, which is equal to the wavelength of the RTD emitter, was achieved. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reflection image was improved by 6 dB by using polarization optics that reduced interference effects. Additionally, the coherence of the RTD enabled a depth resolution of less than 3 µm to be achieved by an interferometric technique. Thus, RTDs are an attractive candidate for use in small THz imaging systems.

  2. Common bile duct diameter in an asymptomatic population: A magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Rong; Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Tian-Wu; Yang, Lin; Huang, Xiao-Hua; Zhang, Ze-Ming

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To measure the common bile duct (CBD) diameter by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) in a large asymptomatic population and analyze its some affecting factors. METHODS: This study included 862 asymptomatic subjects who underwent MRCP. The CBD diameter was measured at its widest visible portion on regular end-expiration MRCP for all subjects. Among these 862 subjects, 221 volunteers also underwent end-inspiration MRCP to study the effect of respiration on the CBD diameter. The age, sex, respiration, body length, body weight, body mass index (BMI), portal vein diameter (PVD), length of the extrahepatic duct and CBD, cystic junction radial orientation and location were recorded. The subjects were divided into 7 groups according to age. All of the above factors were compared with the CBD diameter on end-expiration MRCP. RESULTS: Among the 862 subjects, the CBD diameter was 4.13 ± 1.11 mm (range, 1.76-9.45 mm) and was correlated with age (r = 0.484; P < 0.05), with a dilation of 0.033 mm per year. The upper limit of the 95% reference range was 5.95 mm, resulting in a reasonable upper limit of 6 mm for the asymptomatic population. Respiration and other factors, including sex, body length, body weight, BMI, PVD, length of the extrahepatic duct and CBD, cystic junction radial orientation and location, were not related to the CBD diameter. CONCLUSION: We established a reference range for the CBD diameter on MRCP for an asymptomatic population. The CBD diameter is correlated with age. Respiration did not affect the non-dilated CBD diameter. PMID:26753065

  3. Diagnostic imaging of psoriatic arthritis. Part II: magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Pracoń, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Plain radiography reveals specific, yet late changes of advanced psoriatic arthritis. Early inflammatory changes are seen both on magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound within peripheral joints (arthritis, synovitis), tendons sheaths (tenosynovitis, tendovaginitis) and entheses (enthesitis, enthesopathy). In addition, magnetic resonance imaging enables the assessment of inflammatory features in the sacroiliac joints (sacroiliitis), and the spine (spondylitis). In this article, we review current opinions on the diagnostics of some selective, and distinctive features of psoriatic arthritis concerning magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound and present some hypotheses on psoriatic arthritis etiopathogenesis, which have been studied with the use of magnetic resonance imaging. The following elements of the psoriatic arthritis are discussed: enthesitis, extracapsular inflammation, dactylitis, distal interphalangeal joint and nail disease, and the ability of magnetic resonance imaging to differentiate undifferentiated arthritis, the value of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27446601

  4. Thickness of the Ligamentum Flavum: Correlation with Age and Its Asymmetry-An Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Khambatta, Seema; Ambiye, Medha Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective radiological study of the ligamentum flavum (LF). Purpose This study is an attempt to measure and compare the thickening of the LF on both the sides with the use of magnetic resonance imaging, to investigate if there is a predominant tendency to thicken a specific side and also to determine if a correlation between the thickening of the LF and increasing age exists. Overview of Literature Even though many studies measured the thickness of the LF, very few have compared it on each side, or determined its correlation with age. Methods The thickness of LF was measured at the L3-4, L4-5, L5-S1 levels on both sides using the magnetic resonance images of 200 patients (n=1,200). The sample population was divided into three groups: 21-40 years, 41-60 years, and 61-80 years. The data was analyzed statistically, comparing the thickness of LF on both sides and in various age-groups. Results The thickness of the LF was found to increase with age; however, there were several younger instances with thicknesses >4 mm. The mean thickness of the right LF at different spinal levels was measured (L3-L4=3.38±0.94 mm, L4-L5=3.70±1.16 mm, and L5-S1=3.65±1.16 mm) while the mean thickness of the left LF was higher (L3-L4=3.52±0.99 mm, L4-L5=3.84±1.12 mm, and L5-S1=3.78±1.24 mm). Conclusions The LF thickness does not appear to have any side dominance; however, it tends to thicken with increasing age. PMID:25901237

  5. Variability in prostate and seminal vesicle delineations defined on magnetic resonance images, a multi-observer, -center and -sequence study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging as a part of preparation for radiotherapy is increasing. For delineation of the prostate several publications have shown decreased delineation variability using MR compared to computed tomography (CT). The purpose of the present work was to investigate the intra- and inter-physician delineation variability for prostate and seminal vesicles, and to investigate the influence of different MR sequence settings used clinically at the five centers participating in the study. Methods MR series from five centers, each providing five patients, were used. Two physicians from each center delineated the prostate and the seminal vesicles on each of the 25 image sets. The variability between the delineations was analyzed with respect to overall, intra- and inter-physician variability, and dependence between variability and origin of the MR images, i.e. the MR sequence used to acquire the data. Results The intra-physician variability in different directions was between 1.3 - 1.9 mm and 3 – 4 mm for the prostate and seminal vesicles respectively (1 std). The inter-physician variability for different directions were between 0.7 – 1.7 mm and approximately equal for the prostate and seminal vesicles. Large differences in variability were observed for individual patients, and also for individual imaging sequences used at the different centers. There was however no indication of decreased variability with higher field strength. Conclusion The overall delineation variability is larger for the seminal vesicles compared to the prostate, due to a larger intra-physician variability. The imaging sequence appears to have a large influence on the variability, even for different variants of the T2-weighted spin-echo based sequences, which were used by all centers in the study. PMID:23706145

  6. Neural correlates of anxiety sensitivity in panic disorder: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Sara; Radaelli, Daniele; Cucchi, Michele; Ricci, Liana; Vai, Benedetta; Smeraldi, Enrico; Benedetti, Francesco

    2015-08-30

    Panic disorder has been associated with dysfunctional neuropsychological dimensions, including anxiety sensitivity. Brain-imaging studies of the neural correlates of emotional processing have identified a network of structures that constitute the neural circuitry for emotions. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and insula, which are part of this network, are also involved in the processing of threat-related stimuli. The aim of the study was to investigate if neural activity in response to emotional stimuli in the cortico-limbic network is associated to anxiety sensitivity in panic disorder. In a sample of 18 outpatients with panic disorder, we studied neural correlates of implicit emotional processing of facial affect expressions with a face-matching paradigm; correlational analyses were performed between brain activations and anxiety sensitivity. The correlational analyses performed showed a positive correlation between anxiety sensitivity and brain activity during emotional processing in regions encompassing the PFC, ACC and insula. Our data seem to confirm that anxiety sensitivity is an important component of panic disorder. Accordingly, the neural underpinnings of anxiety sensitivity could be an interesting focus for treatment and further research. PMID:26071623

  7. New magnetic resonance imaging methods in nephrology

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jeff L.; Morrell, Glen; Rusinek, Henry; Sigmund, Eric; Chandarana, Hersh; Lerman, Lilach O.; Prasad, Pottumarthi Vara; Niles, David; Artz, Nathan; Fain, Sean; Vivier, Pierre H.; Cheung, Alfred K.; Lee, Vivian S.

    2013-01-01

    Established as a method to study anatomic changes, such as renal tumors or atherosclerotic vascular disease, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to interrogate renal function has only recently begun to come of age. In this review, we briefly introduce some of the most important MRI techniques for renal functional imaging, and then review current findings on their use for diagnosis and monitoring of major kidney diseases. Specific applications include renovascular disease, diabetic nephropathy, renal transplants, renal masses, acute kidney injury and pediatric anomalies. With this review, we hope to encourage more collaboration between nephrologists and radiologists to accelerate the development and application of modern MRI tools in nephrology clinics. PMID:24067433

  8. Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2I: A Multinational Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Coombs, Anna; Sveen, Marie-Louise; Andersen, Soren; Stojkovic, Tanya; Eagle, Michelle; Mayhew, Anna; de Sousa, Paulo Loureiro; Dewar, Liz; Morrow, Jasper M.; Sinclair, Christopher D. J.; Thornton, John S.; Bushby, Kate; Lochmuller, Hanns; Hanna, Michael G.; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Carlier, Pierre G.; Vissing, John; Straub, Volker

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a prospective multinational study of muscle pathology using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I). Thirty eight adult ambulant LGMD2I patients (19 male; 19 female) with genetically identical mutations (c.826C>A) in the fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene were recruited. In each patient, T1-weighted (T1w) imaging was assessed by qualitative grading for 15 individual lower limb muscles and quantitative Dixon imaging was analysed on 14 individual lower limb muscles by region of interest analysis. We described the pattern and appearance of muscle pathology and gender differences, not previously reported for LGMD2I. Diffuse fat infiltration of the gastrocnemii muscles was demonstrated in females, whereas in males fat infiltration was more prominent in the medial than the lateral gastrocnemius (p = 0.05). In the anterior thigh of males, in contrast to females, median fat infiltration in the vastus medialis muscle (45.7%) exceeded that in the vastus lateralis muscle (11.2%) (p<0.005). MRI is non-invasive, objective and does not rely on patient effort compared to clinical and physical measures that are currently employed. We demonstrated (i) that the quantitative Dixon technique is an objective quantitative marker of disease and (ii) new observations of gender specific patterns of muscle involvement in LGMD2I. PMID:24587344

  9. Study of suspending agents for gadolinium(III)-exchanged hectorite. An oral magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent

    SciTech Connect

    Balkus, K.J. Jr.; Shi, J.

    1996-12-25

    Clays modified with paramagnetic ions have been shown to be effective magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents. The efficacy in part relies on the suspension of the small clay particles in aqueous solution. In this study a series of macromolecules were eveluated as suspending agents for Gd(III) ion exchanged hectorite clay in water. The room temperature relaxivities for the Gd-hectorite clays were enhanced by the addition of poly(ethylene oxide), poly(ethylene glycol), cyclodextrins, and cholic acid to aqueous suspensions. Additionally, there was no evidence of free Gd(III) in solution in the presence of these suspending agents. In contrast the combination of alginic acid or poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) with the clays resulted in release of the Gd(III) into solution. Xanthan gum, which is often used as an emulsifier and stabilizer in food products, forms a viscous suspension but also reacts with free Gd(III) ions. 25 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging investigation of the bone conduction implant – a pilot study at 1.5 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Karl-Johan Fredén; Håkansson, Bo; Reinfeldt, Sabine; Rigato, Cristina; Eeg-Olofsson, Måns

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this pilot study was to investigate if an active bone conduction implant (BCI) used in an ongoing clinical study withstands magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 1.5 Tesla. In particular, the MRI effects on maximum power output (MPO), total harmonic distortion (THD), and demagnetization were investigated. Implant activation and image artifacts were also evaluated. Methods and materials One implant was placed on the head of a test person at the position corresponding to the normal position of an implanted BCI and applied with a static pressure using a bandage and scanned in a 1.5 Tesla MRI camera. Scanning was performed both with and without the implant, in three orthogonal planes, and for one spin-echo and one gradient-echo pulse sequence. Implant functionality was verified in-between the scans using an audio processor programmed to generate a sequence of tones when attached to the implant. Objective verification was also carried out by measuring MPO and THD on a skull simulator as well as retention force, before and after MRI. Results It was found that the exposure of 1.5 Tesla MRI only had a minor effect on the MPO, ie, it decreased over all frequencies with an average of 1.1±2.1 dB. The THD remained unchanged above 300 Hz and was increased only at lower frequencies. The retention magnet was demagnetized by 5%. The maximum image artifacts reached a distance of 9 and 10 cm from the implant in the coronal plane for the spin-echo and the gradient-echo sequence, respectively. The test person reported no MRI induced sound from the implant. Conclusion This pilot study indicates that the present BCI may withstand 1.5 Tesla MRI with only minor effects on its performance. No MRI induced sound was reported, but the head image was highly distorted near the implant. PMID:26604836

  11. Where in the brain is nonliteral language? A coordinate-based meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Alexander M; Mutschler, Dorothee E; Erb, Michael

    2012-10-15

    An increasing number of studies have investigated non-literal language, including metaphors, idioms, metonymy, or irony, with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, key questions regarding its neuroanatomy remain controversial. In this work, we used coordinate-based activation-likelihood estimations to merge available fMRI data on non-literal language. A literature search identified 38 fMRI studies on non-literal language (24 metaphor studies, 14 non-salient stimuli studies, 7 idiom studies, 8 irony studies, and 1 metonymy study). Twenty-eight studies with direct comparisons of non-literal and literal studies were included in the main meta-analysis. Sub-analyses for metaphors, idioms, irony, salient metaphors, and non-salient metaphors as well as studies on sentence level were conducted. Studies reported 409 activation foci, of which 129 (32%) were in the right hemisphere. These meta-analyses indicate that a predominantly left lateralised network, including the left and right inferior frontal gyrus; the left, middle, and superior temporal gyrus; and medial prefrontal, superior frontal, cerebellar, parahippocampal, precentral, and inferior parietal regions, is important for non-literal expressions. PMID:22759997

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of radiation optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, C.F.; Schatz, N.J.; Glaser, J.S. )

    1990-10-15

    Three patients with delayed radiation optic neuropathy after radiation therapy for parasellar neoplasms underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The affected optic nerves and chiasms showed enlargement and focal gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement. The magnetic resonance imaging technique effectively detected and defined anterior visual pathway changes of radionecrosis and excluded the clinical possibility of visual loss because of tumor recurrence.

  13. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, A.

    1986-05-01

    During the past year the Woodlands Baylor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) facility became fully operational. A detailed description of this facility is given. One significant instrument addition this year was the 100 MHz, 40cm bore superconducting imaging spectrometer. This instrument gives researchers the capability to acquire high energy phosphate spectra. This will be used to investigate ATP, phosphocreatinine and inorganic phosphate changes in normal and atrophied muscle before, during and after exercise. An exercise device for use within the bore of the imaging magnet is under design/construction. The results of a study of T sub 1 and T sub 2 changes in atrophied muscle in animals and human subjects are given. The imaging and analysis of the lower leg of 15 research subjects before and after 5 weeks of complete bedrest was completed. A compilation of these results are attached.

  14. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion*

    PubMed Central

    Hochhegger, Bruno; de Souza, Vinícius Valério Silveira; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Souza Jr., Arthur Soares; Elias Junior, Jorge; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Araujo Neto, César Augusto; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Nin, Carlos Schuler; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation. PMID:26811555

  15. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.

    1986-01-01

    During the past year the Woodlands Baylor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) facility became fully operational. A detailed description of this facility is given. One significant instrument addition this year was the 100 MHz, 40cm bore superconducting imaging spectrometer. This instrument gives researchers the capability to acquire high energy phosphate spectra. This will be used to investigate ATP, phosphocreatinine and inorganic phosphate changes in normal and atrophied muscle before, during and after exercise. An exercise device for use within the bore of the imaging magnet is under design/construction. The results of a study of T sub 1 and T sub 2 changes in atrophied muscle in animals and human subjects are given. The imaging and analysis of the lower leg of 15 research subjects before and after 5 weeks of complete bedrest was completed. A compilation of these results are attached.

  16. The preliminary study of immune superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for the detection of lung cancer in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xinyuan; Song, Yuanqing; Song, Nijia; Li, Jiehua; Yang, Lie; Li, Yuan; Tan, Hong

    2016-01-01

    To improve the sensitive and specific detection of metastasis of lung cancer, this study fabricated immune superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) used in magnetic resonance (MR) immumoimaging. These SPIONs were coated with oleic acid and carboxymethyl dextran, and then conjugated to mouse anti-CD44v6 monoclonal antibody. The physicochemical properties of magnetic nanoparticles without monoclonal antibody were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The sizes of the nanoparticles were determined by dynamic light scattering measurements (DLS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Coated nanoparticles could well disperse in water with low dosage of CMD as the Fe/CMD ratio is 1/1 and 2/1 (w/w). Importantly, these SPIONs have relatively high saturation magnetization, as measured by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). They could efficiently become the transversal relaxation times (T2) contrast agent to improve detection limit through measured in vitro magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and actively target human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells in vitro cell culture. Thus, these immune SPIONs are potentially useful for lung tumor-targeting diagnosis. PMID:26649917

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Modic, M.

    1988-01-01

    MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF THE SPINE thoroughly demonstrates the advantages of this new radiologic modality in diagnosing spinal disorders. The book begins with an introductory chapter on the basic physics and technical considerations of magnetic resonance in general and magnetic resonance imaging of the spine in particular. The second chapter covers normal spinal anatomy, and features color photos of multi-planar sections of spinal anatomy.

  18. Encoding and Recognition Processing of Chinese Characters: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jinlong; Shu, Siyun; Wang, Bin; Tian, Xiangyang; Bao, Xinmin; Wu, Yongming; Zhang, Zengqiang; Cao, Xiangyang; Ma, Lin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the conceptual memory processes that underlie encoding and recognition processing of Chinese characters. Healthy participants (n = 14) performed a semantic-relatedness paradigm using categorically related logogram pairs from four different categories (fruit, animal, tool, and clothing). During intentional encoding, subjects were instructed to make semantic judgments and select category-correlated features to bind and memorize logogram pairs. During recognition, subjects were asked to recognize the memorized items. The MATLAB software and spatial clustering analysis were used for image data processing. Compared with baseline, encoding mainly activated BA13, with significant effects in BA6/8/9/46/45/47, BA24, BA7/39/40, BA37/20, and BA18/19; meanwhile, recognition mainly activated BA6/8/9/10/13/45/46/47, BA31, BA7/40, and BA18/19. Compared with recognition, encoding activated BA18/19/37/20/36 with a peak activation area in BA18. Compared with encoding, recognition significantly activated BA7, BA31/32, and BA10. In conclusion, distributed networks of discrete cortical regions with distinct roles are active during semantic processing of logograms. The ventral occipitotemporal and inferior frontal regions display increased levels of encoding-related activity. The dorsal medial brain regions, including the superior frontal gyrus and occipitoparietal regions, are associated with recognition-related activity. PMID:26881222

  19. Encoding and Recognition Processing of Chinese Characters: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jinlong; Shu, Siyun; Wang, Bin; Tian, Xiangyang; Bao, Xinmin; Wu, Yongming; Zhang, Zengqiang; Cao, Xiangyang; Ma, Lin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the conceptual memory processes that underlie encoding and recognition processing of Chinese characters. Healthy participants (n = 14) performed a semantic-relatedness paradigm using categorically related logogram pairs from four different categories (fruit, animal, tool, and clothing). During intentional encoding, subjects were instructed to make semantic judgments and select category-correlated features to bind and memorize logogram pairs. During recognition, subjects were asked to recognize the memorized items. The MATLAB software and spatial clustering analysis were used for image data processing. Compared with baseline, encoding mainly activated BA13, with significant effects in BA6/8/9/46/45/47, BA24, BA7/39/40, BA37/20, and BA18/19; meanwhile, recognition mainly activated BA6/8/9/10/13/45/46/47, BA31, BA7/40, and BA18/19. Compared with recognition, encoding activated BA18/19/37/20/36 with a peak activation area in BA18. Compared with encoding, recognition significantly activated BA7, BA31/32, and BA10. In conclusion, distributed networks of discrete cortical regions with distinct roles are active during semantic processing of logograms. The ventral occipitotemporal and inferior frontal regions display increased levels of encoding-related activity. The dorsal medial brain regions, including the superior frontal gyrus and occipitoparietal regions, are associated with recognition-related activity. PMID:26881222

  20. Relationship between Class III malocclusion and hyoid bone displacement during swallowing: a cine-magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Hasan Suat; Gorgulu, Serkan; Karacay, Seniz; Akca, Eralp; Olmez, Huseyin

    2012-01-01

    Objective The displacement of the hyoid bone (HB) is a critical biomechanical component of the swallowing function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the swallowing-induced vertical and horizontal displacements of the HB in subjects with 2 different magnitudes of skeletal Class III malocclusion, by means of real-time, balanced turbo-field-echo (B-TFE) cine-magnetic resonance imaging. Methods The study population comprised 19 patients with mild skeletal Class III malocclusion, 16 with severe skeletal Class III malocclusion, and 20 with a skeletal Class I relationship. Before the commencement of the study, all subjects underwent cephalometric analysis to identify the nature of skeletal malformations. B-TFE images were obtained for the 4 consecutive stages of deglutition as each patient swallowed 10 mL of water, and the vertical and horizontal displacements of the HB were measured at each stage. Results At all stages of swallowing, the vertical position of the HB in the severe Class III malocclusion group was significantly lower than those in the mild Class III and Class I malocclusion groups. Similarly, the horizontal displacement of the HB was found to be significantly associated with the severity of malocclusion, i.e., the degree of Class III malocclusion, while the amount of anterior displacement of the HB decreased with an increase in the severity of the Class III deformity. Conclusions Our findings indicate the existence of a relationship between the magnitude of Class III malocclusion and HB displacement during swallowing. PMID:23112950

  1. Registration of knee joint surfaces for the in vivo study of joint injuries based on magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Rita W. T.; Habib, Ayman F.; Frayne, Richard; Ronsky, Janet L.

    2006-03-01

    In-vivo quantitative assessments of joint conditions and health status can help to increase understanding of the pathology of osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease that affects a large population each year. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a non-invasive and accurate means to assess and monitor joint properties, and has become widely used for diagnosis and biomechanics studies. Quantitative analyses and comparisons of MR datasets require accurate alignment of anatomical structures, thus image registration becomes a necessary procedure for these applications. This research focuses on developing a registration technique for MR knee joint surfaces to allow quantitative study of joint injuries and health status. It introduces a novel idea of translating techniques originally developed for geographic data in the field of photogrammetry and remote sensing to register 3D MR data. The proposed algorithm works with surfaces that are represented by randomly distributed points with no requirement of known correspondences. The algorithm performs matching locally by identifying corresponding surface elements, and solves for the transformation parameters relating the surfaces by minimizing normal distances between them. This technique was used in three applications to: 1) register temporal MR data to verify the feasibility of the algorithm to help monitor diseases, 2) quantify patellar movement with respect to the femur based on the transformation parameters, and 3) quantify changes in contact area locations between the patellar and femoral cartilage at different knee flexion angles. The results indicate accurate registration and the proposed algorithm can be applied for in-vivo study of joint injuries with MRI.

  2. Altered Spontaneous Brain Activity in Betel Quid Dependence: A Resting-state Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Li, Jian-Jun; Zhao, Zhong-Yan; Yang, Guo-Shuai; Pan, Meng-Jie; Li, Chang-Qing; Pan, Su-Yue; Chen, Feng

    2016-02-01

    It has been suggested by the first voxel-based morphometry investigation that betel quid dependence (BQD) individuals are presented with brain structural changes in previous reports, and there may be a neurobiological basis for BQD individuals related to an increased risk of executive dysfunction and disinhibition, subjected to the reward system, cognitive system, and emotion system. However, the effects of BQD on neural activity remain largely unknown. Individuals with impaired cognitive control of behavior often reveal altered spontaneous cerebral activity in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and those changes are usually earlier than structural alteration.Here, we examined BQD individuals (n = 33) and age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy control participants (n = 32) in an resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study to observe brain function alterations associated with the severity of BQD. Amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and regional homogeneity (ReHo) values were both evaluated to stand for spontaneous cerebral activity. Gray matter volumes of these participants were also calculated for covariate.In comparison with healthy controls, BQD individuals demonstrated dramatically decreased ALFF and ReHo values in the prefrontal gurus along with left fusiform, and increased ALFF and ReHo values in the primary motor cortex area, temporal lobe as well as some regions of occipital lobe. The betel quid dependence scores (BQDS) were negatively related to decreased activity in the right anterior cingulate.The abnormal spontaneous cerebral activity revealed by ALFF and ReHo calculation excluding the structural differences in patients with BQD may help us probe into the neurological pathophysiology underlying BQD-related executive dysfunction and disinhibition. Diminished spontaneous brain activity in the right anterior cingulate cortex may, therefore, represent a biomarker of BQD individuals. PMID:26844480

  3. The Effect of Oral Morphine on Pain-Related Brain Activation - An Experimental Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Tine Maria; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Graversen, Carina; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Frøkjaer, Jens Brøndum

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge about cerebral mechanisms underlying pain perception and effect of analgesic drugs is important for developing methods for diagnosis and treatment of pain. The aim was to explore altered brain activation before and after morphine treatment using functional magnetic resonance imaging recorded during experimental painful heat stimulation. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data were recorded and analysed in 20 healthy volunteers (13 men and 7 women, 24.9 ± 2.6 years) in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. Painful stimulations were applied to the right forearm using a contact heat evoked potential stimulator (CHEPS) before and after treatment with 30 mg oral morphine and placebo. CHEPS stimulations before treatment induced activation in the anterior cingulate cortex, secondary somatosensory cortex/insula, thalamus and cerebellum (n = 16, p < 0.05). In response to morphine treatment, the spatial extent of these pain-specific areas decreased (n = 20). Reduced pain-induced activation was seen in the right insula, anterior cingulate cortex and inferior parietal cortex after morphine treatment compared to before treatment (n = 16, p < 0.05), and sensory ratings of pain perception were significantly reduced after morphine treatment (p = 0.02). No effect on pain-induced brain activation was seen after placebo treatment compared to before treatment (n = 12, p > 0.05). In conclusion, heat stimulation activated areas in the 'pain matrix' and a clinically relevant dose of orally administered morphine revealed significant changes in brain areas where opioidergic pathways are predominant. The method may be useful to investigate the mechanisms of analgesics. PMID:25924691

  4. Apolipoprotein E polymorphism and acute ischemic stroke: a diffusion- and perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yawu; Laakso, Mikko P; Karonen, Jari O; Vanninen, Ritva L; Nuutinen, Juho; Soimakallio, Seppo; Aronen, Hannu J

    2002-11-01

    Diffusion- and perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to study the putative effects of apolipoprotein E (ApoE) polymorphism in stroke. Thirty-one patients with acute stroke, comparative for age and gender were scanned, nine of whom were ApoE allele epsilon 4 carriers. Initially, less than 24 hours from the onset of stroke, the epsilon 4 carriers had significantly smaller volumes of hypoperfusion on relative cerebral blood volume map (P = 0.001), and smaller infarct volumes (P = 0.008) compared with the noncarriers. By day 8, this difference in the infarct volumes had disappeared, suggesting relatively enhanced infarct growth. On average, the total infarct volume increased 145% of the initial infarct volume in the epsilon 4 carriers, and 84% in the noncarriers. There were strong correlations between the imaging findings and clinical status initially and with the outcome 3 months after the stroke in the epsilon 4 noncarriers, but, with a single exception at acute phase, a lack thereof in the epsilon 4 carriers. These patterns were virtually similar in a subgroup of patients with middle cerebral artery stroke. These data support the hypothesis of increased general vulnerability of the brain in the epsilon 4 carriers. Thus, the effects of ApoE polymorphism should be accounted for when interpreting diffusion- and perfusion-weighted MRI studies, particularly if predicting lesion growth. PMID:12439291

  5. Correlation of brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging of spontaneously lead poisoned bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) with histological lesions: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    de Francisco, Olga Nicolas; Feeney, Daniel; Armién, Anibal G; Wuenschmann, Arno; Redig, Patrick T

    2016-04-01

    Six bald eagles with severe, acute lead poisoning based on blood lead values were analyzed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the brain and histopathology. The aims of the study were to use MRI to locate brain lesions and correlate the changes in MRI signal with the histological character of the lesions at necropsy. All of the bald eagles presented with neurologic and non-neurologic signs suggestive of severe lead poisoning and had blood lead levels in excess of 1.0 ppm. Areas of change in image intensity in the brainstem, midbrain and cerebellum were detected in the MRI scans. Histopathology confirmed the presence of all suspected lesions. The character of the lesions suggested vascular damage as the primary insult. MRI was useful for detecting lesions and defining their three-dimensional distribution and extent. Future studies are needed to evaluate the utility of MRI for detection of lesions in less severely lead poisoned eagles and determining prognosis for treatment. PMID:27033939

  6. Endocardial Remodeling in Heart Failure Patients with Impaired and Preserved Left Ventricular Systolic Function-A Magnetic Resonance Image Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lian-Yu; Su, Mao-Yuan M.; Pham, Van-Truong; Tran, Thi-Thao; Wang, Yung-Hung; Tseng, Wen-Yih I.; Lo, Men-Tzung; Lin, Jiunn-Lee

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) trabeculation has been studied in certain forms of cardiomyopathy. However, the changes of LV endocardial trabeculation during the remodeling process leading to heart failure (HF) are unclear. Seventy-four patients with systolic heart failure (SHF), 65 with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and 61 without HF were prospectively enrolled. All subjects received magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study including cine, T1 and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) images. Trabecular-papillary muscle (TPM) mass, fractal dimension (FD) and extracellular volume (ECV) were derived. The results showed that TPM mass index was higher in patients with SHF than that in patients with HFpEF and non-HF. The TPM mass-LV mass ratio (TPMm/LVM) was higher in SHF group than that in HFpEF and non-HF. FD was not different among groups. The presence of LGE was inversely associated with TPM mass index and TPMm/LVM while the ECV were positively associated with TPMm/LVM. The FD was positively associated with LV chamber size. In conclusion, TPM increases in patients with SHF and are probably related to myocardial cell hypertrophy and fibrotic repair during remodeling. The FD increases with the dilatation of LV chamber but remain unchanged with the deterioration of LV function. PMID:26876005

  7. Endocardial Remodeling in Heart Failure Patients with Impaired and Preserved Left Ventricular Systolic Function--A Magnetic Resonance Image Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lian-Yu; Su, Mao-Yuan M; Pham, Van-Truong; Tran, Thi-Thao; Wang, Yung-Hung; Tseng, Wen-Yih I; Lo, Men-Tzung; Lin, Jiunn-Lee

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) trabeculation has been studied in certain forms of cardiomyopathy. However, the changes of LV endocardial trabeculation during the remodeling process leading to heart failure (HF) are unclear. Seventy-four patients with systolic heart failure (SHF), 65 with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and 61 without HF were prospectively enrolled. All subjects received magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study including cine, T1 and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) images. Trabecular-papillary muscle (TPM) mass, fractal dimension (FD) and extracellular volume (ECV) were derived. The results showed that TPM mass index was higher in patients with SHF than that in patients with HFpEF and non-HF. The TPM mass-LV mass ratio (TPMm/LVM) was higher in SHF group than that in HFpEF and non-HF. FD was not different among groups. The presence of LGE was inversely associated with TPM mass index and TPMm/LVM while the ECV were positively associated with TPMm/LVM. The FD was positively associated with LV chamber size. In conclusion, TPM increases in patients with SHF and are probably related to myocardial cell hypertrophy and fibrotic repair during remodeling. The FD increases with the dilatation of LV chamber but remain unchanged with the deterioration of LV function. PMID:26876005

  8. Child Psychiatry Branch of the National Institute of Mental Health Longitudinal Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Human Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Giedd, Jay N; Raznahan, Armin; Alexander-Bloch, Aaron; Schmitt, Eric; Gogtay, Nitin; Rapoport, Judith L

    2015-01-01

    The advent of magnetic resonance imaging, which safely allows in vivo quantification of anatomical and physiological features of the brain, has revolutionized pediatric neuroscience. Longitudinal studies are useful for the characterization of developmental trajectories (ie, changes in imaging measures by age). Developmental trajectories (as opposed to static measures) have proven to have greater power in discriminating healthy from clinical groups and in predicting cognitive/behavioral measures, such as IQ. Here we summarize results from an ongoing longitudinal pediatric neuroimaging study that has been conducted at the Child Psychiatry Branch of the National Institute of Mental Health since 1989. Developmental trajectories of structural MRI brain measures from healthy youth are compared and contrasted with trajectories in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and childhood-onset schizophrenia. Across ages 5–25 years, in both healthy and clinical populations, white matter volumes increase and gray matter volumes follow an inverted U trajectory, with peak size occurring at different times in different regions. At a group level, differences related to psychopathology are seen for gray and white matter volumes, rates of change, and for interconnectedness among disparate brain regions. PMID:25195638

  9. The value of neurosurgical and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging tractography in clinically integrated neuroanatomy modules: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Familiari, Giuseppe; Relucenti, Michela; Heyn, Rosemarie; Baldini, Rossella; D'Andrea, Giancarlo; Familiari, Pietro; Bozzao, Alessandro; Raco, Antonino

    2013-01-01

    Neuroanatomy is considered to be one of the most difficult anatomical subjects for students. To provide motivation and improve learning outcomes in this area, clinical cases and neurosurgical images from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractographies produced using an intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging apparatus (MRI/DTI) were presented and discussed during integrated second-year neuroanatomy, neuroradiology, and neurosurgery lectures over the 2008-2011 period. Anonymous questionnaires, evaluated according to the Likert scale, demonstrated that students appreciated this teaching procedure. Academic performance (examination grades for neuroanatomy) of the students who attended all integrated lectures of neuroanatomy, was slightly though significantly higher compared to that of students who attended these lectures only occasionally or not at all (P=0.04). Significantly better results were obtained during the national progress test (focusing on morphology) by students who attended the MRI/DTI-assisted lectures, compared to those who did so only in part or not at all, compared to the average student participating in the national test. These results were obtained by students attending the second, third and, in particular, the fourth year (P≤0.0001) courses during the three academic years mentioned earlier. This integrated neuroanatomy model can positively direct students in the direction of their future professional careers without any extra expense to the university. In conclusion, interactive learning tools, such as lectures integrated with intraoperative MRI/DTI images, motivate students to study and enhance their neuroanatomy education. PMID:23509097

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in dementia. A study of brain white matter changes.

    PubMed

    Bronge, Lena

    2002-07-01

    Non-specific white matter changes (WMC) in the brain are common findings in the elderly population. Although they are frequently seen in non-demented persons, WMC seem to be more common in demented patients. The significance of these changes, as well as their pathophysiological background, is incompletely understood. The aim of this thesis was to study different aspects of WMC using MR imaging (MRI) and to investigate the clinical significance of such changes in subjects with mild cognitive impairment or dementia. In study I post-mortem MRI of the brain was compared to corresponding neuropathology slices. WMC were quantified and found to be more extensive on neuropathology. The areas that appeared normal on MRI but not on histopathology represented only minor changes with increased distance between the myelinated fibres but with preserved axonal network and glial cell density. Study II evaluated the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity to investigate if an increased permeability could be shown in WMC. A contrast-enhanced MRI technique was used to detect small degrees of enhancement. No general increase in BBB could be detected in the WMC areas. In study III the relation between WMC and apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype was explored in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Results showed that AD patients, who were homozygous for the APOE epsilon 4 allele had more WMC than patients with other genotypes. This was most significant for changes in the deep white matter. Results also indicated that in AD patients carrying the epsilon 4 allele, WMC are not age-related phenomena, but might be related to the aetiology of the disease. Study IV aimed to investigate if WMC in a specific brain region affect cognitive functions related to that area. Periventricular WMC in the left frontal lobe predicted a decrease in initial word fluency, a test though to reflect left frontal lobe functioning. This indicates that WMC might have specific effects in different brain regions. In

  11. Serum Neuron-Specific Enolase Is Related to Cerebellar Connectivity: A Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, Matthias L; Mueller, Karsten; Arelin, Katrin; Sacher, Julia; Holiga, Štefan; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Luck, Tobias; Riedel-Heller, Steffi; Villringer, Arno

    2015-09-01

    Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) has been suggested as a prognostic biomarker for neuronal alterations resulting from conditions such as traumatic brain injury (TBI), neurodegenerative disease, or cardiac arrest. To validate serum NSE (sNSE) as a brain-specific biomarker, we related it to functional brain imaging data in 38 healthy adults to create a physiological framework for future studies in neuropsychiatric diseases. sNSE was measured by monoclonal two-site immunoluminometric assays, and functional connectivity was investigated with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rfMRI). To identify neural hubs most essentially related to sNSE, we applied graph theory approaches, namely, the new data-driven and parameter-free approach, eigenvector centrality mapping. sNSE and eigenvector centrality were negatively correlated in the female cerebellum, without any effects in male subjects. In cerebellar cortex, NSE expression was significantly higher than whole-brain expression as investigated in the whole brain and whole genome-wide atlas of the Allen Institute for Brain Sciences (Seattle, WA). Our study shows a specific linkage between the neuronal marker protein, sNSE, and cerebellar connectivity as measured with rfMRI in the female human brain, although this finding shall be proven in future studies including more subjects. Results suggest that the inclusion of sNSE in the analysis of imaging data is a useful approach to obtain more-specific information on the neuronal mechanisms that underlie functional connectivity at rest. Establishing such a baseline resting-state pattern that is tied to a neuronal serum marker opens new perspectives in the characterization of neuropsychiatric disorders as disconnective syndromes or nexopathies, in particular, resulting from TBI, neurodegenerative disease, or cardiac arrest, in the future. PMID:24844267

  12. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in pregnancy: Insights from the cardiac hemodynamic imaging and remodeling in pregnancy (CHIRP) study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease in pregnancy is the leading cause of maternal mortality in North America. Although transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is the most widely used imaging modality for the assessment of cardiovascular function during pregnancy, little is known on the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). The objective of the Cardiac Hemodynamic Imaging and Remodeling in Pregnancy (CHIRP) study was to compare TTE and CMR in the non-invasive assessment of maternal cardiac remodeling during the peripartum period. Methods Between 2010–2012, healthy pregnant women aged 18 to 35 years were prospectively enrolled. All women underwent TTE and CMR during the third trimester and at least 3 months postpartum (surrogate for non-pregnant state). Results The study population included a total of 34 women (mean age 29 ± 3 years). During the third trimester, TTE and CMR demonstrated an increase in left ventricular end-diastolic volume from 95 ± 11 mL to 115 ± 14 mL and 98 ± 6 mL to 125 ± 5 mL, respectively (p < 0.05). By TTE and CMR, there was also an increase in left ventricular (LV) mass during pregnancy from 111 ± 10 g to 163 ± 11 g and 121 ± 5 g to 179 ± 5 g, respectively (p < 0.05). Although there was good correlation between both imaging modalities for LV mass, stroke volume, and cardiac output, the values were consistently underestimated by TTE. Conclusion This CMR study provides reference values for cardiac indices during normal pregnancy and the postpartum state. PMID:24387349

  13. Abnormal spontaneous regional brain activity in primary insomnia: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Ma, Xiaofen; Dong, Mengshi; Yin, Yi; Hua, Kelei; Li, Meng; Li, Changhong; Zhan, Wenfeng; Li, Cheng; Jiang, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    Objective Investigating functional specialization is crucial for a complete understanding of the neural mechanisms of primary insomnia (PI). Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a useful tool to explore the functional specialization of PI. However, only a few studies have focused on the functional specialization of PI using resting-state fMRI and results of these studies were far from consistent. Thus, the current study aimed to investigate functional specialization of PI using resting-state fMRI with amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFFs) algorithm. Methods In this study, 55 PI patients and 44 healthy controls were included. ALFF values were compared between the two groups using two-sample t-test. The relationship of abnormal ALFF values with clinical characteristics and duration of insomnia was investigated using Pearson’s correlation analysis. Results PI patients showed lower ALFF values in the left orbitofrontal cortex/inferior frontal gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus, left inferior parietal lobule, and bilateral cerebellum posterior lobes, while higher ALFF values in the right middle/inferior temporal that extended to the right occipital lobe. In addition, we found that the duration of PI negatively correlated with ALFF values in the left orbitofrontal cortex/inferior frontal gyrus, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score negatively correlated with ALFF values in the left inferior parietal lobule. Conclusion The present study added information to limited studies on functional specialization and provided evidence for hyperarousal hypothesis in PI. PMID:27366068

  14. Reliability of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of Rotator Cuff: The ROW Study

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nitin B.; Collins, Jamie; Newman, Joel S.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Losina, Elena; Higgins, Laurence D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Physiatrists encounter patients with rotator cuff disorders and imaging is frequently an important component of their diagnostic assessment. However, there is paucity of literature on reliability of MRI assessment between shoulder specialists and musculoskeletal radiologists. Objective We assessed inter- and intra-rater reliability of MRI characteristics of the rotator cuff. Design Cross-sectional secondary analyses in a prospective cohort study Setting Academic tertiary care centers Patients Subjects with shoulder pain recruited from orthopedic and physiatry clinics Methods Two shoulder fellowship trained physicians (a physiatrist and a shoulder surgeon) jointly performed a blinded composite MRI review by consensus on 31 subjects with shoulder pain. Subsequently, MRI was reviewed by one fellowship trained musculoskeletal radiologist. Main Outcome Measures We calculated Cohen’s kappa coefficients and percent agreement among the two reviews (composite review of two shoulder specialists versus that of the musculoskeletal radiologist). Intra-rater reliability was assessed among the shoulder specialists by performing a repeat blinded composite MRI review. In addition to this repeat composite review, only one of the physiatry shoulder specialists performed an additional review. Results Inter-rater reliability (shoulder specialists versus musculoskeletal radiologist) was substantial for the presence or absence of tear (kappa=0.90; 95% CI=0.72, 1.00), tear-thickness (kappa=0.84;95% CI=0.70, 0.99), longitudinal size of tear (kappa=0.75;95% CI=0.44, 1.00), fatty infiltration (kappa=0.62; 95% CI=0.45, 0.79), and muscle atrophy (kappa=0.68; 95% CI=0.50, 0.86). There was only fair inter-rater reliability of transverse size of tear (kappa=0.20; 95% CI=0.00, 0.51). The kappa for intra-rater reliability was high for tear thickness (0.88; 95% CI=0.72, 1.00), longitudinal tear size (0.61; 95% CI=0.22, 0.99), fatty infiltration (0.89; 95% CI=0.80, 0.98), and muscle

  15. Brain Changes in Long-Term Zen Meditators Using Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Diffusion Tensor Imaging: A Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Fayed, Nicolás; Lopez del Hoyo, Yolanda; Andres, Eva; Serrano-Blanco, Antoni; Bellón, Juan; Aguilar, Keyla; Cebolla, Ausias; Garcia-Campayo, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This work aimed to determine whether 1H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are correlated with years of meditation and psychological variables in long-term Zen meditators compared to healthy non-meditator controls. Materials and Methods Design. Controlled, cross-sectional study. Sample. Meditators were recruited from a Zen Buddhist monastery. The control group was recruited from hospital staff. Meditators were administered questionnaires on anxiety, depression, cognitive impairment and mindfulness. 1H-MRS (1.5 T) of the brain was carried out by exploring four areas: both thalami, both hippocampi, the posterior superior parietal lobule (PSPL) and posterior cingulate gyrus. Predefined areas of the brain were measured for diffusivity (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) by MR-DTI. Results Myo-inositol (mI) was increased in the posterior cingulate gyrus and Glutamate (Glu), N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) and N-acetyl-aspartate/Creatine (NAA/Cr) was reduced in the left thalamus in meditators. We found a significant positive correlation between mI in the posterior cingulate and years of meditation (r = 0.518; p = .019). We also found significant negative correlations between Glu (r = −0.452; p = .045), NAA (r = −0.617; p = .003) and NAA/Cr (r = −0.448; P = .047) in the left thalamus and years of meditation. Meditators showed a lower Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) in the left posterior parietal white matter than did controls, and the ADC was negatively correlated with years of meditation (r = −0.4850, p = .0066). Conclusions The results are consistent with the view that mI, Glu and NAA are the most important altered metabolites. This study provides evidence of subtle abnormalities in neuronal function in regions of the white matter in meditators. PMID:23536796

  16. A prospective study of the value of pre- and post-treatment magnetic resonance imaging examinations for advanced cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    CSUTAK, CSABA; ORDEANU, CLAUDIA; NAGY, VIORICA MAGDALENA; POP, DIANA CRISTINA; BOLBOACA, SORANA DANIELA; BADEA, RADU; CHIOREAN, LILIANA; DUDEA, SORIN MARIAN

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Cervical cancer has high incidence and mortality in developing countries. It is the only gynecological malignancy that is clinically staged. Staging at the time of diagnosis is crucial for treatment planning. After radiation therapy, clinical examination is limited because of radiation changes. An imaging method relatively unaffected by radiation changes would be useful for the assessment of therapy results and for management. We sought to demonstrate the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the pre- and post-treatment assessment of cervical cancer. Methods This was a prospective study, carried out between November 2012 and October 2014 on 18 subjects with advanced-stage cervical cancer diagnosed by colposcopy. The disease stage was determined clinically according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) criteria. Only patients with disease stage ≥ IIB or IIA with one of the tumor dimensions > 4 cm were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent abdominal-pelvic contrast-enhanced MRI as part of the workup. Tumor size, local invasion, involved pelvic lymph nodes, and staging according to MRI criteria were evaluated. Clinical and MRI examinations were also performed after chemoradiotherapy. After chemoradiotherapy, 94% of the patients (17 of 18) were treated surgically. Results Eighteen patients aged 32–67 met the inclusion criteria and were enrolled: 10 stage IIB, 6 stage IIIA, 1 stage IIA and 1 stage IIIB, according to clinical staging. Using histopathological findings as a reference, MRI staging accuracy was 83.3%. The concordance of the clinical stage with MRI stage at the first examination was 56%. Parametrial involvement was assessed on pretreatment and post-treatment MRI, with post-treatment MRI compared with histology. There was no statistically significant difference between the pre- and post-therapy gynecological examinations (GYN) and the corresponding MRI assessments as to tumor size

  17. Multimodal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Treatment-Naïve Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chaim, Tiffany M.; Zhang, Tianhao; Zanetti, Marcus V.; da Silva, Maria Aparecida; Louzã, Mário R.; Doshi, Jimit; Serpa, Mauricio H.; Duran, Fabio L. S.; Caetano, Sheila C.; Davatzikos, Christos; Busatto, Geraldo F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Attention-Deficit/Hiperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a prevalent disorder, but its neuroanatomical circuitry is still relatively understudied, especially in the adult population. The few morphometric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies available to date have found heterogeneous results. This may be at least partly attributable to some well-known technical limitations of the conventional voxel-based methods usually employed to analyze such neuroimaging data. Moreover, there is a great paucity of imaging studies of adult ADHD to date that have excluded patients with history of use of stimulant medication. Methods A newly validated method named optimally-discriminative voxel-based analysis (ODVBA) was applied to multimodal (structural and DTI) MRI data acquired from 22 treatment-naïve ADHD adults and 19 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HC). Results Regarding DTI data, we found higher fractional anisotropy in ADHD relative to HC encompassing the white matter (WM) of the bilateral superior frontal gyrus, right middle frontal left gyrus, left postcentral gyrus, bilateral cingulate gyrus, bilateral middle temporal gyrus and right superior temporal gyrus; reductions in trace (a measure of diffusivity) in ADHD relative to HC were also found in fronto-striatal-parieto-occipital circuits, including the right superior frontal gyrus and bilateral middle frontal gyrus, right precentral gyrus, left middle occipital gyrus and bilateral cingulate gyrus, as well as the left body and right splenium of the corpus callosum, right superior corona radiata, and right superior longitudinal and fronto-occipital fasciculi. Volumetric abnormalities in ADHD subjects were found only at a trend level of significance, including reduced gray matter (GM) in the right angular gyrus, and increased GM in the right supplementary motor area and superior frontal gyrus. Conclusions Our results suggest that adult ADHD is associated with

  18. Reading in the brain of children and adults: A meta‐analysis of 40 functional magnetic resonance imaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Anna; Schurz, Matthias; Kronbichler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We used quantitative, coordinate‐based meta‐analysis to objectively synthesize age‐related commonalities and differences in brain activation patterns reported in 40 functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of reading in children and adults. Twenty fMRI studies with adults (age means: 23–34 years) were matched to 20 studies with children (age means: 7–12 years). The separate meta‐analyses of these two sets showed a pattern of reading‐related brain activation common to children and adults in left ventral occipito‐temporal (OT), inferior frontal, and posterior parietal regions. The direct statistical comparison between the two meta‐analytic maps of children and adults revealed higher convergence in studies with children in left superior temporal and bilateral supplementary motor regions. In contrast, higher convergence in studies with adults was identified in bilateral posterior OT/cerebellar and left dorsal precentral regions. The results are discussed in relation to current neuroanatomical models of reading and tentative functional interpretations of reading‐related activation clusters in children and adults are provided. Hum Brain Mapp 36:1963–1981, 2015. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.. PMID:25628041

  19. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Engelstad, B.L.; Raymond, K.N.; Huberty, J.P.; White, D.L.

    1991-04-23

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided. No Drawings

  20. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Engelstad, Barry L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Huberty, John P.; White, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of experimental cerebral oedema.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, D; McDonald, W I; Tofts, P S; Johnson, G; Landon, D N

    1986-01-01

    Triethyl tin(TET)-induced cerebral oedema has been studied in cats by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the findings correlated with the histology and fine structure of the cerebrum following perfusion-fixation. MRI is a sensitive technique for detecting cerebral oedema, and the distribution and severity of the changes correlate closely with the morphological abnormalities. The relaxation times, T1 and T2 increase progressively as the oedema develops, and the proportional increase in T2 is approximately twice that in T1. Analysis of the magnetisation decay curves reveals slowly-relaxing and rapidly-relaxing components which probably correspond to oedema fluid and intracellular water respectively. The image appearances taken in conjunction with relaxation data provide a basis for determining the nature of the oedema in vivo. Images PMID:3806109

  2. Review of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy studies in children with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Adleman, Nancy E; Barnea-Goraly, Naama; Chang, Kiki D

    2004-01-01

    Pediatric bipolar disorder is a serious condition that affects a child's ability to function normally during important developmental stages. Pediatric bipolar disorder often presents with a different symptom complex than adult-onset bipolar disorder, including higher rates of irritability and rapid cycling. Due to these differences, it is important to understand the neural substrates of the disease as it presents in children, especially when compared with adults. Understanding the brain abnormalities associated with pediatric bipolar disorder may provide much needed markers useful in diagnosing childhood-onset bipolar disorder, give insight into the neurobiological etiology of the disorder and lead to more effective treatments. Currently, there has been little neuroimaging research into pediatric bipolar disorder, specifically with regards to brain function. This review summarizes the neurobiological research that has been conducted on childhood- and adolescent-onset bipolar disorder using magnetic resonance technology. Future directions of research needed in this area also are discussed in the context of the existing literature. PMID:15853617

  3. Working Memory in Unaffected Relatives of Patients With Schizophrenia: A Meta-Analysis of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruibin; Picchioni, Marco; Allen, Paul; Toulopoulou, Timothea

    2016-07-01

    Working memory deficits, a core cognitive feature of schizophrenia may arise from dysfunction in the frontal and parietal cortices. Numerous studies have also found abnormal neural activation during working memory tasks in patients' unaffected relatives. The aim of this study was to systematically identify and anatomically localize the evidence for those activation differences across all eligible studies. Fifteen functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) manuscripts, containing 16 samples of 289 unaffected relatives of patients with schizophrenia, and 358 healthy controls were identified that met our inclusion criteria: (1) used a working memory task; and (2) reported standard space coordinates. Activation likelihood estimation (ALE) identified convergence across studies. Compared to healthy controls, patients' unaffected relatives showed decreases in neural activation in the right middle frontal gyrus (BA9), as well as right inferior frontal gyrus (BA44). Increased activation was seen in relatives in the right frontopolar (BA10), left inferior parietal lobe (BA40), and thalamus bilaterally. These results suggest that the familial risk of schizophrenia is expressed in changes in neural activation in the unaffected relatives in the cortical-subcortical working memory network that includes, but is not restricted to the middle prefrontal cortex. PMID:26738528

  4. The prefrontal dysfunction in individuals with Internet gaming disorder: a meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yajing; Deng, Wei; Wang, Huiyao; Guo, Wanjun; Li, Tao

    2015-07-01

    With the advancement in high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology and automated analysis, studies on functional MRI (fMRI) made it possible to identify the functional activity of brain in vivo in individuals with Internet gaming disorder (IGD), and to explore the underpinning neuroscience basis of IGD. Yet, no available literature has systemically reviewed the fMRI studies of IGD using meta-analyses. This study reviewed 61 candidate articles and finally selected 10 qualified voxel-wise whole-brain analysis studies for performing a comprehensive series of meta-analyses employing effect size signed differential mapping approach. Compared with healthy controls, subjects with IGD showed a significant activation in the bilateral medial frontal gyrus (MFG) and the left cingulate gyrus, as well as the left medial temporal gyrus and fusiform gyrus. Furthermore, the on-line time of IGD subjects was positively correlated with activations in the left MFG and the right cingulated gyrus. These findings implicate the important role of dysfunctional prefrontal lobe in the neuropathological mechanism of IGD. Considering the overlapped role of prefrontal lobe in the reward and self-regulatory system, our results provided supportive evidence for the reclassification of IGD as a behavioural addiction. PMID:24889021

  5. Stepped Impedance Resonators for High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Akgun, Can E.; DelaBarre, Lance; Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Sohn, Sung-Min; Snyder, Carl J.; Adriany, Gregor; Ugurbil, Kamil; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multi-element volume radio-frequency (RF) coils are an integral aspect of the growing field of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In these systems, a popular volume coil of choice has become the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) multi-element transceiver coil consisting of microstrip resonators. In this paper, to further advance this design approach, a new microstrip resonator strategy in which the transmission line is segmented into alternating impedance sections referred to as stepped impedance resonators (SIRs) is investigated. Single element simulation results in free space and in a phantom at 7 tesla (298 MHz) demonstrate the rationale and feasibility of the SIR design strategy. Simulation and image results at 7 tesla in a phantom and human head illustrate the improvements in transmit magnetic field, as well as, RF efficiency (transmit magnetic field versus SAR) when two different SIR designs are incorporated in 8-element volume coil configurations and compared to a volume coil consisting of microstrip elements. PMID:23508243

  6. Effect of propofol on the medial temporal lobe emotional memory system: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study in human subjects

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, K. O.; Root, J. C.; Mehta, M.; Stern, E.; Pan, H.; Veselis, R. A.; Silbersweig, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Subclinical doses of propofol produce anterograde amnesia, characterized by an early failure of memory consolidation. It is unknown how propofol affects the amygdala-dependent emotional memory system, which modulates consolidation in the hippocampus in response to emotional arousal and neurohumoral stress. We present an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging study of the effects of propofol on the emotional memory system in human subjects. Methods Thirty-five healthy subjects were randomized to receive propofol, at an estimated brain concentration of 0.90 μg ml−1, or placebo. During drug infusion, emotionally arousing and neutral images were presented in a continuous recognition task, while blood-oxygen-level-dependent activation responses were acquired. After a drug-free interval of 2 h, subsequent memory for successfully encoded items was assessed. Imaging analysis was performed using statistical parametric mapping and behavioural analysis using signal detection models. Results Propofol had no effect on the stereotypical amygdalar response to emotional arousal, but caused marked suppression of the hippocampal response. Propofol caused memory performance to become uncoupled from amygdalar activation, but it remained correlated with activation in the posterior hippocampus, which decreased in proportion to amnesia. Conclusions Propofol is relatively ineffective at suppressing amygdalar activation at sedative doses, but abolishes emotional modulation and causes amnesia via mechanisms that commonly involve hyporesponsiveness of the hippocampus. These findings raise the possibility that amygdala-dependent fear systems may remain intact even when a patient has diminished memory of events. This may be of clinical importance in the perioperative development of fear-based psychopathologies, such as post-traumatic stress disorder. Clinical trial registration NCT00504894. PMID:26174294

  7. A pilot study of functional magnetic resonance imaging brain correlates of deception in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Kozel, F Andrew; Revell, Letty J; Lorberbaum, Jeffrey P; Shastri, Ananda; Elhai, Jon D; Horner, Michael David; Smith, Adam; Nahas, Ziad; Bohning, Daryl E; George, Mark S

    2004-01-01

    We hypothesized that specific brain regions would activate during deception, and these areas would correlate with changes in electrodermal activity (EDA). Eight men were asked to find money hidden under various objects. While functional MRI images were acquired and EDA was recorded, the subjects gave both truthful and deceptive answers regarding the money's location. The group analysis revealed significant activation during deception in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFCx) and anterior cingulate (AC), but individual results were not consistent. Individually and as a group, EDA correlated with blood flow changes in the OFCx and AC. Specific brain regions were activated during deception, but the present technique lacks good predictive power for individuals. PMID:15377736

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of diabetic foot complications

    PubMed Central

    Low, Keynes TA; Peh, Wilfred CG

    2015-01-01

    This pictorial review aims to illustrate the various manifestations of the diabetic foot on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The utility of MR imaging and its imaging features in the diagnosis of pedal osteomyelitis are illustrated. There is often difficulty encountered in distinguishing osteomyelitis from neuroarthropathy, both clinically and on imaging. By providing an accurate diagnosis based on imaging, the radiologist plays a significant role in the management of patients with complications of diabetic foot. PMID:25640096

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of diabetic foot complications.

    PubMed

    Low, Keynes T A; Peh, Wilfred C G

    2015-01-01

    This pictorial review aims to illustrate the various manifestations of the diabetic foot on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The utility of MR imaging and its imaging features in the diagnosis of pedal osteomyelitis are illustrated. There is often difficulty encountered in distinguishing osteomyelitis from neuroarthropathy, both clinically and on imaging. By providing an accurate diagnosis based on imaging, the radiologist plays a significant role in the management of patients with complications of diabetic foot. PMID:25640096

  10. [Indications for magnetic resonance imaging in pneumology].

    PubMed

    Arrivé, L

    1997-04-19

    Tissue mobilization caused by respiration and heart beat and lower spacial resolution than with computed tomography has limited use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in pneumology. Nevertheless, because of the high-quality of spontaneous contrast and the non irradiation nature of the examination, there are selected indications. For bronchogenic cancer, MRI is reserved for selected cases to evaluate tumor extension. For tumors of the mediastinum, MRI is particularly useful for evaluating extension of neurogenic tumors. MRI also gives a better visualization of processes involving the diaphragm than computed tomography. The development of magnetic resonance angiography is a major progress for exploration of pulmonary embolism as repeated acquisitions can be obtained without injection of a contrast medium. Several studies have shown that MRI visualizes well solitary lung nodules, clearly distinguishing fat content from vascularized nodules. For the pulmonary parenchyma, further advances are necessary before MRI can become a routine exploration technique. PMID:9180867

  11. Failure of stop and go in de novo Parkinson's disease--a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Vriend, Chris; Gerrits, Niels J H M; Berendse, Henk W; Veltman, Dick J; van den Heuvel, Odile A; van der Werf, Ysbrand D

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral impairments in response inhibition and initiation are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and are associated with reduced impulse control. No prior study, however, has investigated the functional correlates of response inhibition in de novo PD. Twenty-one de novo PD patients and 37 matched healthy controls performed a stop-signal task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. The results showed that PD patients, compared with healthy controls, were slower on response initiation but not inhibition. Task-related activation of the response inhibition network, including the inferior frontal gyrus, was reduced in PD patients, and the activity in the inferior frontal gyrus correlated negatively with motor symptom severity. These findings show that de novo PD patients exhibit functional deficits in the response inhibition network, which are partly related to disease pathology and already evident before commencing dopamine replacement therapy. This study provides insights into the neural underpinnings of impulse control deficits, relevant for the study of the neural vulnerability factors involved in the development of impulse control disorders in PD. PMID:25150576

  12. Involvement of the Extrageniculate System in the Perception of Optical Illusions: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Tabei, Ken-ichi; Satoh, Masayuki; Kida, Hirotaka; Kizaki, Moeni; Sakuma, Haruno; Sakuma, Hajime; Tomimoto, Hidekazu

    2015-01-01

    Research on the neural processing of optical illusions can provide clues for understanding the neural mechanisms underlying visual perception. Previous studies have shown that some visual areas contribute to the perception of optical illusions such as the Kanizsa triangle and Müller-Lyer figure; however, the neural mechanisms underlying the processing of these and other optical illusions have not been clearly identified. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we determined which brain regions are active during the perception of optical illusions. For our study, we enrolled 18 participants. The illusory optical stimuli consisted of many kana letters, which are Japanese phonograms. During the shape task, participants stated aloud whether they perceived the shapes of two optical illusions as being the same or not. During the word task, participants read aloud the kana letters in the stimuli. A direct comparison between the shape and word tasks showed activation of the right inferior frontal gyrus, left medial frontal gyrus, and right pulvinar. It is well known that there are two visual pathways, the geniculate and extrageniculate systems, which belong to the higher-level and primary visual systems, respectively. The pulvinar belongs to the latter system, and the findings of the present study suggest that the extrageniculate system is involved in the cognitive processing of optical illusions. PMID:26083375

  13. Longitudinal and transverse right ventricular function in pulmonary hypertension: cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging study from the ASPIRE registry

    PubMed Central

    Rajaram, Smitha; Capener, Dave; Elliot, Charlie; Condliffe, Robin; Wild, Jim M.; Kiely, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Right ventricular (RV) function is a strong predictor of outcome in cardiovascular diseases. Two components of RV function, longitudinal and transverse motion, have been investigated in pulmonary hypertension (PH). However, their individual clinical significance remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to determine the factors associated with transverse and longitudinal RV motion in patients with PH. In 149 treatment-naive patients with PH and 16 patients with suspected PH found to have mean pulmonary arterial pressure of <20 mmHg, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging was performed within 24 hours of right heart catheterization. In patients with PH, fractional longitudinal motion (fractional tricuspid annulus to apex distance [f-TAAD]) was significantly greater than fractional transverse motion (fractional septum to free wall distance [f-SFD]; P = 0.002). In patients without PH, no significant difference between f-SFD and f-TAAD was identified (P = 0.442). Longitudinal RV motion was singularly associated with RV ejection fraction independent of age, invasive hemodynamics, and cardiac magnetic resonance measurements (P = 0.024). In contrast, transverse RV motion was independently associated with left ventricular eccentricity (P = 0.036) in addition to RV ejection fraction (P = 0.014). In conclusion, RV motion is significantly greater in the longitudinal direction in patients with PH, whereas patients without PH have equal contributions of transverse and longitudinal motion. Longitudinal RV motion is primarily associated with global RV pump function in PH. Transverse RV motion not only reflects global pump function but is independently influenced by ventricular interaction in patients with PH. PMID:26401257

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacing devices.

    PubMed

    Buendía, Francisco; Sánchez-Gómez, Juan M; Sancho-Tello, María J; Olagüe, José; Osca, Joaquín; Cano, Oscar; Arnau, Miguel A; Igual, Begoña

    2010-06-01

    Currently, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging is contraindicated in patients with a pacemaker or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. This study was carried out because the potential risks in this situation need to be clearly defined. This prospective study evaluated clinical and electrical parameters before and after magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 33 patients (five with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and 28 with pacemakers). In these patients, magnetic resonance imaging was considered clinically essential. There were no clinical complications. There was a temporary communication failure in two cases, sensing errors during imaging in two cases, and a safety signal was generated in one pacemaker at the maximum magnetic resonance frequency and output level. There were no technical restrictions on imaging nor were there any permanent changes in the performance of the cardiac pacing device. PMID:20515632

  15. Water transport in cement-in-polymer dispersions at variable temperature studied by magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Olaru, A.M. Bluemich, B.; Adams, A.

    2013-02-15

    The hydration of recently developed cement-in-polymer dispersions (c/p) containing 30% and 40% poly (vinyl acetate) [PVAc] and 30% poly(vinyl alcohol) [PVA] was monitored on-line at various temperatures using {sup 1}H Single Point Imaging (SPI). The physical changes undergone by the materials as well as the complex manner in which the absorption process takes place and the evolution of the spin density were characterized and were found to be strongly dependent on the nature and amount of polymer and on the temperature. Based on the results obtained we propose a simple mathematical model which can be used to characterize the behaviour of the c/p dispersions exposed to hydration at variable temperature.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Hricak, H.; Crooks, L.; Sheldon, P.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-02-01

    The role of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of the kidney was analyzed in 18 persons (6 normal volunteers, 3 patients with pelvocaliectasis, 2 with peripelvic cysts, 1 with renal sinus lipomatosis, 3 with renal failure, 1 with glycogen storage disease, and 2 with polycystic kidney disease). Ultrasound and/or computed tomography (CT) studies were available for comparison in every case. In the normal kidney distinct anatomical structures were clearly differentiated by NMR. The best anatomical detail ws obtained with spin echo (SE) imaging, using a pulse sequence interval of 1,000 msec and an echo delay time of 28 msec. However, in the evaluation of normal and pathological conditions, all four intensity images (SE 500/28, SE 500/56, SE 1,000/28, and SE 1,000/56) have to be analyzed. No definite advantage was found in using SE imaging with a pulse sequence interval of 1,500 msec. Inversion recovery imaging enhanced the differences between the cortex and medulla, but it had a low signal-to-noise level and, therefore, a suboptimal overall resolution. The advantages of NMR compared with CT and ultrasound are discussed, and it is concluded that NMR imaging will prove to be a useful modality in the evaluation of renal disease.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging at Ultrahigh Fields

    PubMed Central

    Uğurbil, Kamil

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of 4 T human systems in three academic laboratories circa 1990, rapid progress in imaging and spectroscopy studies in humans at 4 T and animal model systems at 9.4 T have led to the introduction of 7 T and higher magnetic fields for human investigation at about the turn of the century. Work conducted on these platforms has demonstrated the existence of significant advantages in SNR and biological information content at these ultrahigh fields, as well as the presence of numerous challenges. Primary difference from lower fields is the deviation from the near field regime; at the frequencies corresponding to hydrogen resonance conditions at ultrahigh fields, the RF is characterized by attenuated traveling waves in the human body, which leads to image nonuniformities for a given sample-coil configuration because of interferences. These nonuniformities were considered detrimental to the progress of imaging at high field strengths. However, they are advantageous for parallel imaging for signal reception and parallel transmission, two critical technologies that account, to a large extend, for the success of ultrahigh fields. With these technologies, and improvements in instrumentation and imaging methods, ultra-high fields have provided unprecedented gains in imaging of brain function and anatomy, and started to make inroads into investigation of the human torso and extremities. As extensive as they are, these gains still constitute a prelude to what is to come given the increasingly larger effort committed to ultrahigh field research and development of ever better instrumentation and techniques. PMID:24686229

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of intramammary metastases.

    PubMed

    Wienbeck, Susanne; Herzog, Aimee; Kinner, Sonja; Surov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of intramammary metastases (IM). We identified 8 cases with IM, which were investigated by breast MRI (1.5T). In every case, the diagnosis of IM was proven histopathologically on breast biopsy specimens. Overall, 187 IM were identified. IM had inconsistent MRI features, which cannot be clearly classify as benign or malignant. IM should be taken into consideration in the differential diagnosis of breast lesions to avoid possible misinterpretations. PMID:27133668

  19. Capsaicin-evoked brain activation and central sensitization in anaesthetised rats: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Moylan Governo, Ricardo Jose; Morris, Peter Gordon; Prior, Malcolm John William; Marsden, Charles Alexander; Chapman, Victoria

    2006-12-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) haemodynamic responses was used to study the effects of the noxious substance capsaicin on whole brain activation in isofluorane anaesthetised rats. Rats (n=8) received intradermal injection of capsaicin (30 microg/5 microl), or topical cream (0.1%) capsaicin and BOLD responses were acquired for up to 120 min. Effects of capsaicin versus placebo cream treatment on the BOLD response to a 15 g mechanical stimulus applied adjacent to the site of cream application were also studied. Both injection and cream application of capsaicin activated brain areas involved in pain processing, including the thalamus and periaqueductal grey (PAG) (p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons). Capsaicin also produced increases in BOLD signal intensity in other regions that contribute to pain processing, such as the parabrachial nucleus and superior colliculus. Mechanical stimulation in capsaicin-treated rats, but not placebo-treated rats, induced a significant decrease in BOLD signal intensity in the PAG (p<0.001). These data demonstrate that the noxious substance capsaicin produces brain activation in the midbrain regions and reveals the importance of the PAG in central sensitization. PMID:16843597

  20. Connectivity Analysis and Feature Classification in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Sub-Types: A Task Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Bo-Yong; Kim, Mansu; Seo, Jongbum; Lee, Jong-Min; Park, Hyunjin

    2016-05-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a pervasive neuropsychiatric disorder. Patients with different ADHD subtypes show different behaviors under different stimuli and thus might require differential approaches to treatment. This study explores connectivity differences between ADHD subtypes and attempts to classify these subtypes based on neuroimaging features. A total of 34 patients (13 ADHD-IA and 21 ADHD-C subtypes) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with six task paradigms. Connectivity differences between ADHD subtypes were assessed for the whole brain in each task paradigm. Connectivity measures of the identified regions were used as features for the support vector machine classifier to distinguish between ADHD subtypes. The effectiveness of connectivity measures of the regions were tested by predicting ADHD-related Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) scores. Significant connectivity differences between ADHD subtypes were identified mainly in the frontal, cingulate, and parietal cortices and partially in the temporal, occipital cortices and cerebellum. Classifier accuracy for distinguishing between ADHD subtypes was 91.18 % for both gambling punishment and emotion task paradigms. Linear prediction under the two task paradigms showed significant correlation with DSM hyperactive/impulsive score. Our study identified important brain regions from connectivity analysis based on an fMRI paradigm using gambling punishment and emotion task paradigms. The regions and associated connectivity measures could serve as features to distinguish between ADHD subtypes. PMID:26602102

  1. Arthroscopic verification of objectivity of the orthopaedic examination and magnetic resonance imaging in intra-articular knee injury. Retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Skowronek, Michał; Skowronek, Paweł; Dutka, Łukasz

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Arthroscopy of the knee joint is regarded as the most objective diagnostic method in intra-articular knee joint lesions. Aim The purpose of this study was to assess the objectivity and diagnostic value of orthopaedic examination (OE) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in reference to the arthroscopic result. Material and methods In a group of 113 patients treated by arthroscopic surgery for post-traumatic knee pathology between 2008 and 2010 in our department, accuracy of clinical and MRI findings that preceded surgery were studied retrospectively using a statistical method. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and predictive negative and positive values were the subject of analysis. Results In the presented trial, sensitivity values of the orthopaedic examination for injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), meniscus medialis (MM), meniscus lateralis (ML) and chondral injuries (ChI) were 86%, 65%, 38% and 51%, respectively. Specificity values were 90%, 65%, 100% and 100%, respectively. The MR sensitivity and specificity values were 80%, 88%, 44% and 32%, and 86%, 64%, 93% and 97%, respectively. Conclusions Assessment of intra-articular knee joint lesions is a difficult diagnostic problem. In making a decision about arthroscopy of the knee joint, an appropriate sequence of examinations should be carried out: OE, MRI and arthroscopy. The improvement in the effectiveness of the orthopaedic examination and MRI can limit the too high frequency of diagnostic arthroscopies, which generates the risk of operation treatment and costs. PMID:23255995

  2. Different neural pathways linking personality traits and eudaimonic well-being: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Kong, Feng; Liu, Ling; Wang, Xu; Hu, Siyuan; Song, Yiying; Liu, Jia

    2015-06-01

    Eudaimonic well-being (EWB) is the fulfillment of human potential and a meaningful life. Previous studies have shown that personality traits, especially extraversion, neuroticism, and conscientiousness, significantly contribute to EWB. However, the neurobiological pathways linking personality and EWB are not understood. Here, we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) to investigate this issue. Specifically, we correlated individuals' EWB scores with the regional fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (fALFF) of the brain, and then examined how personality traits predicted EWB-related spontaneous brain activity. We found that EWB was positively correlated with the fALFF in the right posterior superior temporal gyrus (pSTG) and thalamus, and negatively correlated with the strength of the thalamic-insular connectivity. More importantly, we found that personality traits influenced EWB in different ways. At the regional level, the fALFF in the pSTG and thalamus mediated the effects of neuroticism and extraversion on EWB, whereas the thalamus mediated the effect of conscientiousness on EWB. At the functional connectivity level, the thalamic-insular connectivity only mediated the effect of neuroticism on EWB. Taken together, our study provides the first evidence that EWB is associated with personality traits through different neural substrates. PMID:25413497

  3. Structural connectivity of the human anterior temporal lobe: A diffusion magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Papinutto, Nico; Galantucci, Sebastiano; Mandelli, Maria Luisa; Gesierich, Benno; Jovicich, Jorge; Caverzasi, Eduardo; Henry, Roland G; Seeley, William W; Miller, Bruce L; Shapiro, Kevin A; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa

    2016-06-01

    The anterior temporal lobes (ATL) have been implicated in a range of cognitive functions including auditory and visual perception, language, semantic knowledge, and social-emotional processing. However, the anatomical relationships between the ATLs and the broader cortical networks that subserve these functions have not been fully elucidated. Using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and probabilistic tractography, we tested the hypothesis that functional segregation of information in the ATLs is reflected by distinct patterns of structural connectivity to regions outside the ATLs. We performed a parcellation of the ATLs bilaterally based on the degree of connectivity of each voxel with eight ipsilateral target regions known to be involved in various cognitive networks. Six discrete segments within each ATL showed preferential connectivity to one of the ipsilateral target regions, via four major fiber tracts (uncinate, inferior longitudinal, middle longitudinal, and arcuate fasciculi). Two noteworthy interhemispheric differences were observed: connections between the ATL and orbito-frontal areas were stronger in the right hemisphere, while the consistency of the connection between the ATL and the inferior frontal gyrus through the arcuate fasciculus was greater in the left hemisphere. Our findings support the hypothesis that distinct regions within the ATLs have anatomical connections to different cognitive networks. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2210-2222, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26945805

  4. Stimulus set meaningfulness and neurophysiological differentiation: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Boly, Melanie; Sasai, Shuntaro; Gosseries, Olivia; Oizumi, Masafumi; Casali, Adenauer; Massimini, Marcello; Tononi, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    A meaningful set of stimuli, such as a sequence of frames from a movie, triggers a set of different experiences. By contrast, a meaningless set of stimuli, such as a sequence of 'TV noise' frames, triggers always the same experience--of seeing 'TV noise'--even though the stimuli themselves are as different from each other as the movie frames. We reasoned that the differentiation of cortical responses underlying the subject's experiences, as measured by Lempel-Ziv complexity (incompressibility) of functional MRI images, should reflect the overall meaningfulness of a set of stimuli for the subject, rather than differences among the stimuli. We tested this hypothesis by quantifying the differentiation of brain activity patterns in response to a movie sequence, to the same movie scrambled in time, and to 'TV noise', where the pixels from each movie frame were scrambled in space. While overall cortical activation was strong and widespread in all conditions, the differentiation (Lempel-Ziv complexity) of brain activation patterns was correlated with the meaningfulness of the stimulus set, being highest in the movie condition, intermediate in the scrambled movie condition, and minimal for 'TV noise'. Stimulus set meaningfulness was also associated with higher information integration among cortical regions. These results suggest that the differentiation of neural responses can be used to assess the meaningfulness of a given set of stimuli for a given subject, without the need to identify the features and categories that are relevant to the subject, nor the precise location of selective neural responses. PMID:25970444

  5. Cine and tagged cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in normal rat at 1.5 T: a rest and stress study

    PubMed Central

    Daire, Jean-Luc; Jacob, Jean-Pascal; Hyacinthe, Jean-Noel; Croisille, Pierre; Montet-Abou, Karin; Richter, Sophie; Botsikas, Diomidis; Lepetit-Coiffé, Matthieu; Morel, Denis; Vallée, Jean-Paul

    2008-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to measure regional contractile function in the normal rat using cardiac cine and tagged cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) during incremental low doses of dobutamine and at rest. Methods Five rats were investigated for invasive left ventricle pressure measurements and five additional rats were imaged on a clinical 1.5 T MR system using a cine sequence (11–20 phases per cycle, 0.28/0.28/2 mm) and a C-SPAMM tag sequence (18–25 phases per cycle, 0.63/1.79/3 mm, tag spacing 1.25 mm). For each slice, wall thickening (WT) and circumferential strains (CS) were calculated at rest and at stress (2.5, 5 and 10 μg/min/kg of dobutamine). Results Good cine and tagged images were obtained in all the rats even at higher heart rate (300–440 bpm). Ejection fraction and left ventricular (LV) end-systolic volume showed significant changes after each dobutamine perfusion dose (p < 0.001). Tagged CMR had the capacity to resolve the CS transmural gradient and showed a significant increase of both WT and CS at stress compared to rest. Intra and interobserver study showed less variability for the tagged technique. In rats in which a LV catheter was placed, dobutamine produced a significant increase of heart rate, LV dP/dtmax and LV pressure significantly already at the lowest infusion dose. Conclusion Robust cardiac cine and tagging CMR measurements can be obtained in the rat under incremental dobutamine stress using a clinical 1.5 T MR scanner. PMID:18980685

  6. Coronary Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Birgit; Nagel, Eike; Schoenhagen, Paul; Barkhausen, Jörg; Gerber, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography and magnetic resonance are relatively new imaging modalities that can exceed the ability of established imaging modalities to detect present pathology or predict patient outcomes. Coronary calcium scoring may be useful in asymptomatic patients at intermediate risk. Computed tomographic coronary angiography is a first-line indication to evaluate congenitally abnormal coronary arteries and, along with stress magnetic resonance myocardial perfusion imaging, is useful in symptomatic patients with nondiagnostic conventional stress tests. Cardiac magnetic resonance is indicated for visualizing cardiac structure and function, and delayed enhancement magnetic resonance is a first-line indication for assessing myocardial viability. Imaging plaque and molecular mechanisms related to plaque rupture holds great promise for the presymptomatic detection of patients at risk for coronary events but is not yet suitable for routine clinical use. PMID:19269527

  7. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.; Evans, H.; Bryan, R. N.; Johnson, P.; Schonfeld, E.; Jhingran, S. G.

    1984-01-01

    A number of physiological changes have been demonstrated in bone, muscle and blood after exposure of humans and animals to microgravity. Determining mechanisms and the development of effective countermeasures for long duration space missions is an important NASA goal. The advent of tomographic nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR or MRI) gives NASA a way to greatly extend early studies of this phenomena in ways not previously possible; NMR is also noninvasive and safe. NMR provides both superb anatomical images for volume assessments of individual organs and quantification of chemical/physical changes induced in the examined tissues. The feasibility of NMR as a tool for human physiological research as it is affected by microgravity is demonstrated. The animal studies employed the rear limb suspended rat as a model of mucle atrophy that results from microgravity. And bedrest of normal male subjects was used to simulate the effects of microgravity on bone and muscle.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging after exposure to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, Adrian

    1993-01-01

    A number of physiological changes were demonstrated in bone, muscle, and blood from exposure of humans and animals to microgravity. Determining mechanisms and the development of effective countermeasures for long-duration space missions is an important NASA goal. Historically, NASA has had to rely on tape measures, x-ray, and metabolic balance studies with collection of excreta and blood specimens to obtain this information. The development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the possibility of greatly extending these early studies in ways not previously possible; MRI is also non-invasive and safe; i.e., no radiation exposure. MRI provides both superb anatomical images for volume measurements of individual structures and quantification of chemical/physical changes induced in the examined tissues. This investigation will apply MRI technology to measure muscle, intervertebral disc, and bone marrow changes resulting from exposure to microgravity.

  9. Stimulus Set Meaningfulness and Neurophysiological Differentiation: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Boly, Melanie; Sasai, Shuntaro; Gosseries, Olivia; Oizumi, Masafumi; Casali, Adenauer; Massimini, Marcello; Tononi, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    A meaningful set of stimuli, such as a sequence of frames from a movie, triggers a set of different experiences. By contrast, a meaningless set of stimuli, such as a sequence of ‘TV noise’ frames, triggers always the same experience—of seeing ‘TV noise’—even though the stimuli themselves are as different from each other as the movie frames. We reasoned that the differentiation of cortical responses underlying the subject’s experiences, as measured by Lempel-Ziv complexity (incompressibility) of functional MRI images, should reflect the overall meaningfulness of a set of stimuli for the subject, rather than differences among the stimuli. We tested this hypothesis by quantifying the differentiation of brain activity patterns in response to a movie sequence, to the same movie scrambled in time, and to ‘TV noise’, where the pixels from each movie frame were scrambled in space. While overall cortical activation was strong and widespread in all conditions, the differentiation (Lempel-Ziv complexity) of brain activation patterns was correlated with the meaningfulness of the stimulus set, being highest in the movie condition, intermediate in the scrambled movie condition, and minimal for ‘TV noise’. Stimulus set meaningfulness was also associated with higher information integration among cortical regions. These results suggest that the differentiation of neural responses can be used to assess the meaningfulness of a given set of stimuli for a given subject, without the need to identify the features and categories that are relevant to the subject, nor the precise location of selective neural responses. PMID:25970444

  10. Cortical Gray Matter in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batty, Martin J.; Liddle, Elizabeth B.; Pitiot, Alain; Toro, Roberto; Groom, Madeleine J.; Scerif, Gaia; Liotti, Mario; Liddle, Peter F.; Paus, Tomas; Hollis, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Previous studies have shown smaller brain volume and less gray matter in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Relatively few morphological studies have examined structures thought to subserve inhibitory control, one of the diagnostic features of ADHD. We examined one such region, the pars opercularis,…

  11. Neurobiology of Decision Making in Depressed Adolescents: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shad, Mujeeb U.; Bidesi, Anup P.; Chen, Li-Ann; Ernst, Monique; Rao, Uma

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Despite evidence that impaired reward- and risk-related behavior during adolescence can have potentially serious short- and long-term consequences, few studies have investigated the impact of depression on reward-related selection in adolescents. This study examined the relationship between reward-related behavior and prefrontal…

  12. A Prospective Study of the Utility of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Determining Candidacy for Partial Breast Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Paige L.; Al-Hallaq, Hania A.; Haq, Farah; Goldberg, Mira; Abe, Hiroyuki; Hasan, Yasmin; Chmura, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Retrospective data have demonstrated that breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may change a patient's eligibility for partial breast irradiation (PBI) by identifying multicentric, multifocal, or contralateral disease. The objective of the current study was to prospectively determine the frequency with which MRI identifies occult disease and to establish clinical factors associated with a higher likelihood of MRI prompting changes in PBI eligibility. Methods and Materials At The University of Chicago, women with breast cancer uniformly undergo MRI in addition to mammography and ultrasonography. From June 2009 through May 2011, all patients were screened prospectively in a multidisciplinary conference for PBI eligibility based on standard imaging, and the impact of MRI on PBI eligibility according to National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project protocol B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0413 entry criteria was recorded. Univariable analysis was performed using clinical characteristics in both the prospective cohort and in a separate cohort of retrospectively identified patients. Pooled analysis was used to derive a scoring index predictive of the risk that MRI would identify additional disease. Results A total of 521 patients were screened for PBI eligibility, and 124 (23.8%) patients were deemed eligible for PBI based on standard imaging. MRI findings changed PBI eligibility in 12.9% of patients. In the pooled univariable analysis, tumor size ≥2 cm on mammography or ultrasonography (P=.02), age <50 years (P=.01), invasive lobular histology (P=.01), and HER-2/neu amplification (P=.01) were associated with a higher likelihood of MRI changing PBI eligibility. A predictive score was generated by summing the number of significant risk factors. Patients with a score of 0, 1, 2, and 3 had changes to eligibility based on MRI findings in 2.8%, 13.2%, 38.1%, and 100%, respectively (P<.0001). Conclusions MRI identified additional disease in a

  13. A Prospective Study of the Utility of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Determining Candidacy for Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, Paige L.; Al-Hallaq, Hania A.; Haq, Farah; Goldberg, Mira; Abe, Hiroyuki; Hasan, Yasmin; Chmura, Steven J.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Retrospective data have demonstrated that breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may change a patient's eligibility for partial breast irradiation (PBI) by identifying multicentric, multifocal, or contralateral disease. The objective of the current study was to prospectively determine the frequency with which MRI identifies occult disease and to establish clinical factors associated with a higher likelihood of MRI prompting changes in PBI eligibility. Methods and Materials: At The University of Chicago, women with breast cancer uniformly undergo MRI in addition to mammography and ultrasonography. From June 2009 through May 2011, all patients were screened prospectively in a multidisciplinary conference for PBI eligibility based on standard imaging, and the impact of MRI on PBI eligibility according to National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project protocol B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0413 entry criteria was recorded. Univariable analysis was performed using clinical characteristics in both the prospective cohort and in a separate cohort of retrospectively identified patients. Pooled analysis was used to derive a scoring index predictive of the risk that MRI would identify additional disease. Results: A total of 521 patients were screened for PBI eligibility, and 124 (23.8%) patients were deemed eligible for PBI based on standard imaging. MRI findings changed PBI eligibility in 12.9% of patients. In the pooled univariable analysis, tumor size ≥2 cm on mammography or ultrasonography (P=.02), age <50 years (P=.01), invasive lobular histology (P=.01), and HER-2/neu amplification (P=.01) were associated with a higher likelihood of MRI changing PBI eligibility. A predictive score was generated by summing the number of significant risk factors. Patients with a score of 0, 1, 2, and 3 had changes to eligibility based on MRI findings in 2.8%, 13.2%, 38.1%, and 100%, respectively (P<.0001). Conclusions: MRI identified additional disease in

  14. Neural correlates of conceptual object priming in young and older adults: an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Soledad; Bischof, Gérard N; Goh, Joshua O; Park, Denise C

    2013-04-01

    In this event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we investigated age-related differences in brain activity associated with conceptual repetition priming in young and older adults. Participants performed a speeded "living/nonliving" classification task with 3 repetitions of familiar objects. Both young and older adults showed a similar magnitude of behavioral priming to repeated objects and evidenced repetition-related activation reductions in fusiform gyrus, superior occipital, middle, and inferior temporal cortex, and inferior frontal and insula regions. The neural priming effect in young adults was extensive and continued through both the second and third stimulus repetitions, and neural priming in older adults was markedly attenuated and reached floor at the second repetition. In young adults, greater neural priming in multiple brain regions correlated with greater behavioral facilitation and in older adults, only activation reduction in the left inferior frontal correlated with faster behavioral responses. These findings provide evidence for altered neural priming in older adults despite preserved behavioral priming, and suggest the possibility that age-invariant behavioral priming is observed as a result of more sustained neural processing of stimuli in older adults which might be a form of compensatory neural activity. PMID:23102512

  15. Paralinguistic mechanisms of production in human “beatboxing”: A real-time magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Proctor, Michael; Bresch, Erik; Byrd, Dani; Nayak, Krishna; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2013-01-01

    Real-time Magnetic Resonance Imaging (rtMRI) was used to examine mechanisms of sound production by an American male beatbox artist. rtMRI was found to be a useful modality with which to study this form of sound production, providing a global dynamic view of the midsagittal vocal tract at frame rates sufficient to observe the movement and coordination of critical articulators. The subject's repertoire included percussion elements generated using a wide range of articulatory and airstream mechanisms. Many of the same mechanisms observed in human speech production were exploited for musical effect, including patterns of articulation that do not occur in the phonologies of the artist's native languages: ejectives and clicks. The data offer insights into the paralinguistic use of phonetic primitives and the ways in which they are coordinated in this style of musical performance. A unified formalism for describing both musical and phonetic dimensions of human vocal percussion performance is proposed. Audio and video data illustrating production and orchestration of beatboxing sound effects are provided in a companion annotated corpus. PMID:23363120

  16. Study of Immobilization Procedure on Silver Nanolayers and Detection of Estrone with Diverged Beam Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Karabchevsky, Alina; Tsapovsky, Lev; Marks, Robert S.; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    An immobilization protocol was developed to attach receptors on smooth silver thin films. Dense and packed 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (11-MUA) was used to avoid uncontrolled sulfidization and harmful oxidation of silver nanolayers. N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) were added to make the silver surfaces reactive. A comparative study was carried out with different immersion times of silver samples in 11-MUA solutions with different concentrations to find the optimum conditions for immobilization. The signals, during each step of the protocol, were analyzed with a refractometer based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect and luminescence techniques. Molecular interactions at the surfaces between the probe and target at the surface nanolayer shift the SPR signal, thus indicating the presence of the substance. To demonstrate specific biosensing, rabbit anti-estrone polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody was immobilized through a linker on 47 nm silver layer deposited on SF11 glass. At the final stage, the representative endocrine disruptor—estrone—was attached and detected in deionized water with a diverging beam SPR imaging sensor. PMID:25587405

  17. Segregation in horizontal rotating cylinders: radial and axial band formation, band traveling and merging studied by Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thoa; Sederman, Andrew; Gladden, Lynn

    2007-03-01

    Radial and axial segregations are investigated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). For the first time, full 3D structures and real-time 2D MRI movies showing the progress of segregation over many hours are reported. Data were acquired with high temporal (74 ms) and in-plane spatial resolutions (1 mm x 1 mm), giving new insights into the underlying mechanisms. The mixture composition can be quantified throughout segregation. The cylinder to be considered is 48 mm in diameter, up to 50 cm long and filled to 50 -- 82% by volume with millet and poppy seeds at a 3:1 ratio. In particular, the effects of filling fraction, cylinder length and rotational speed on segregation are addressed. Radial segregation is found to be driven by both core diffusion and the free surface. The former is dominant in the cylindrical core buried under the avalanche layer in systems over 75% full while the latter is significant at lower filling levels. Axial segregation is characterized by band formation, traveling, and merging. In all cases studied, the formation of poppy-rich bands is observed, after which individual bands start to travel at ˜3 μm s-1 until they are within ˜3 cm of a stationary band. Adjacent bands then merge into a single, enlarged poppy band as millet seeds move out of the merging region.

  18. A Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Intestinal Dilation in Trypanosoma cruzi–infected Mice Deficient in Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Ny, Lars; Li, Hua; Mukherjee, Shankar; Persson, Katarina; Holmqvist, Bo; Zhao, Dazhi; Shtutin, Vitaliy; Huang, Huan; Weiss, Louis M.; Machado, Fabiana S.; Factor, Stephen M.; Chan, John; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Jelicks, Linda A.

    2009-01-01

    Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi causes megasyndromes of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to monitor alterations in the GI tract of T. cruzi–infected mice, and to assess the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the development of intestinal dilation. Brazil strain–infected C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice exhibited dilatation of the intestines by 30 days post-infection. Average intestine lumen diameter increased by 72%. Levels of intestinal NO synthase (NOS) isoforms, NOS2 and NOS3, were elevated in infected WT mice. Inflammation and ganglionitis were observed in all infected mice. Intestinal dilation was observed in infected WT, NOS1, NOS2, and NOS3 null mice. This study demonstrates that MRI is a useful tool to monitor intestinal dilation in living mice and that these alterations may begin during acute infection. Furthermore, our data strongly suggests that NO may not be the sole contributor to intestinal dysfunction resulting from this infection. PMID:18981519

  19. The neural basis of hand gesture comprehension: A meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Andric, Michael; Mathew, Mili M

    2015-10-01

    Gestures play an important role in face-to-face communication and have been increasingly studied via functional magnetic resonance imaging. Although a large amount of data has been provided to describe the neural substrates of gesture comprehension, these findings have never been quantitatively summarized and the conclusion is still unclear. This activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis investigated the brain networks underpinning gesture comprehension while considering the impact of gesture type (co-speech gestures vs. speech-independent gestures) and task demand (implicit vs. explicit) on the brain activation of gesture comprehension. The meta-analysis of 31 papers showed that as hand actions, gestures involve a perceptual-motor network important for action recognition. As meaningful symbols, gestures involve a semantic network for conceptual processing. Finally, during face-to-face interactions, gestures involve a network for social emotive processes. Our finding also indicated that gesture type and task demand influence the involvement of the brain networks during gesture comprehension. The results highlight the complexity of gesture comprehension, and suggest that future research is necessary to clarify the dynamic interactions among these networks. PMID:26271719

  20. Disrupted Brain Functional Network in Internet Addiction Disorder: A Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Pew-Thian; Wu, Guorong; Shi, Feng; Price, True; Du, Yasong; Xu, Jianrong; Zhou, Yan; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    Internet addiction disorder (IAD) is increasingly recognized as a mental health disorder, particularly among adolescents. The pathogenesis associated with IAD, however, remains unclear. In this study, we aim to explore the encephalic functional characteristics of IAD adolescents at rest using functional magnetic resonance imaging data. We adopted a graph-theoretic approach to investigate possible disruptions of functional connectivity in terms of network properties including small-worldness, efficiency, and nodal centrality on 17 adolescents with IAD and 16 socio-demographically matched healthy controls. False discovery rate-corrected parametric tests were performed to evaluate the statistical significance of group-level network topological differences. In addition, a correlation analysis was performed to assess the relationships between functional connectivity and clinical measures in the IAD group. Our results demonstrate that there is significant disruption in the functional connectome of IAD patients, particularly between regions located in the frontal, occipital, and parietal lobes. The affected connections are long-range and inter-hemispheric connections. Although significant alterations are observed for regional nodal metrics, there is no difference in global network topology between IAD and healthy groups. In addition, correlation analysis demonstrates that the observed regional abnormalities are correlated with the IAD severity and behavioral clinical assessments. Our findings, which are relatively consistent between anatomically and functionally defined atlases, suggest that IAD causes disruptions of functional connectivity and, importantly, that such disruptions might link to behavioral impairments. PMID:25226035

  1. Neural Correlates of Phonological Processing in Speech Sound Disorder: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tkach, Jean A.; Chen, Xu; Freebairn, Lisa A.; Schmithorst, Vincent J.; Holland, Scott K.; Lewis, Barbara A.

    2011-01-01

    Speech sound disorders (SSD) are the largest group of communication disorders observed in children. One explanation for these disorders is that children with SSD fail to form stable phonological representations when acquiring the speech sound system of their language due to poor phonological memory (PM). The goal of this study was to examine PM in…

  2. Reduced Integration and Differentiation of the Imitation Network in Autism: A Combined Functional Connectivity Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, Inna; Datko, Michael; Cabrera, Yuliana; Carper, Ruth A.; Müller, Ralph-Axel

    2016-01-01

    Objective Converging evidence indicates that brain abnormalities in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) involve atypical network connectivity, but few studies have integrated functional with structural connectivity measures. This multimodal investigation examined functional and structural connectivity of the imitation network in children and adolescents with ASD, and its links with clinical symptoms. Methods Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging were performed in 35 participants with ASD and 35 typically developing controls, aged 8 to 17 years, matched for age, gender, intelligence quotient, and head motion. Results Within-network analyses revealed overall reduced functional connectivity (FC) between distributed imitation regions in the ASD group. Whole brain analyses showed that underconnectivity in ASD occurred exclusively in regions belonging to the imitation network, whereas overconnectivity was observed between imitation nodes and extraneous regions. Structurally, reduced fractional anisotropy and increased mean diffusivity were found in white matter tracts directly connecting key imitation regions with atypical FC in ASD. These differences in microstructural organization of white matter correlated with weaker FC and greater ASD symptomatology. Interpretation Findings demonstrate atypical connectivity of the brain network supporting imitation in ASD, characterized by a highly specific pattern. This pattern of underconnectivity within, but overconnectivity outside the functional network is in contrast with typical development and suggests reduced network integration and differentiation in ASD. Our findings also indicate that atypical connectivity of the imitation network may contribute to ASD clinical symptoms, highlighting the role of this fundamental social cognition ability in the pathophysiology of ASD. PMID:26418284

  3. Tools for cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar; Cheong, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    In less than fifteen years, as a non-invasive imaging option, cardiovascular MR has grown from a being a mere curiosity to becoming a widely used clinical tool for evaluating cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) is now routinely used to study myocardial structure, cardiac function, macro vascular blood flow, myocardial perfusion, and myocardial viability. For someone entering the field of cardiac MR, this rapid pace of development in the field of CMRI might make it difficult to identify a cohesive starting point. In this brief review, we have attempted to summarize the key cardiovascular imaging techniques that have found widespread clinical acceptance. In particular, we describe the essential cardiac and respiratory gating techniques that form the backbone of all cardiovascular imaging methods. It is followed by four sections that discuss: (I) the gradient echo techniques that are used to assess ventricular function; (II) black-blood turbo spin echo (SE) methods used for morphologic assessment of the heart; (III) phase-contrast based techniques for the assessment of blood flow; and (IV) CMR methods for the assessment of myocardial ischemia and viability. In each section, we briefly summarize technical considerations relevant to the clinical use of these techniques, followed by practical information for its clinical implementation. In each of those four areas, CMRI is considered either as the benchmark imaging modality against which the diagnostic performance of other imaging modalities are compared against, or provides a complementary capability to existing imaging techniques. We have deliberately avoided including cutting-edge CMR imaging techniques practiced at few academic centers, and restricted our discussion to methods that are widely used and are likely to be available in a clinical setting. Our hope is that this review would propel an interested reader toward more comprehensive reviews in the literature. PMID:24834409

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Modic, M.T.; Weinstein, M.A.; Pavlicek, W.; Starnes, D.L.; Duchesneau, P.M.; Boumphrey, F.; Hardy, R.J. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Forty subjects were examined to determine the accuracy and clinical usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) examination of the spine. The NMR images were compared with plain radiographs, high-resolution computed tomograms, and myelograms. The study included 15 patients with normal spinal cord anatomy and 25 patients whose pathological conditions included canal stenosis, herniated discs, metastatic tumors, primary cord tumor, trauma, Chiari malformations, syringomyelia, and developmental disorders. Saturation recovery images were best in differentiating between soft tissue and cerebrospinal fluid. NMR was excellent for the evaluation of the foramen magnum region and is presently the modality of choice for the diagnosis of syringomyelia and Chiari malformation. NMR was accurate in diagnosing spinal cord trauma and spinal canal block.

  5. Volumetric breast density evaluation by ultrasound tomography and magnetic resonance imaging: a preliminary comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myc, Lukasz; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Li, Cuiping; Ranger, Bryan; Lupinacci, Jessica; Schmidt, Steven; Rama, Olsi; Bey-Knight, Lisa

    2010-03-01

    Since a 1976 study by Wolfe, high breast density has gained recognition as a factor strongly correlating with an increased incidence of breast cancer. These observations have led to mammographic density being designated a "risk factor" for breast cancer. Clinically, the exclusive reliance on mammography for breast density measurement has forestalled the inclusion of breast density into statistical risk models. This exclusion has in large part been due to the ionizing radiation associated with the method. Additionally, the use of mammography as valid tool for measuring a three dimensional characteristic (breast density) has been criticized for its prima facie incongruity. These shortfalls have prompted MRI studies of breast density as an alternative three-dimensional method of assessing breast density. Although, MRI is safe and can be used to measure volumetric density, its cost has prohibited its use in screening. Here, we report that sound speed measurements using a prototype ultrasound tomography device have potential for use as surrogates for breast density measurement. Accordingly, we report a strong positive linear correlation between volume-averaged sound speed of the breast and percent glandular tissue volume as assessed by MR.

  6. An illustrated heuristic prototype facilitates scientific inventive problem solving: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Tong, Dandan; Li, Wenfu; Tang, Chaoying; Yang, Wenjing; Tian, Yan; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Meng; Qiu, Jiang; Liu, Yijun; Zhang, Qinglin

    2015-07-01

    Many scientific inventions (SI) throughout history were inspired by heuristic prototypes (HPs). For instance, an event or piece of knowledge similar to displaced water from a tub inspired Archimedes' principle. However, the neural mechanisms underlying this insightful problem solving are not very clear. Thus, the present study explored the neural correlates used to solve SI problems facilitated by HPs. Each HP had two versions: a literal description with an illustration (LDI) and a literal description with no illustration (LDNI). Thirty-two participants were divided randomly into these two groups. Blood oxygenation level-dependent fMRI contrasts between LDI and LDNI groups were measured. Greater activity in the right middle occipital gyrus (RMOG, BA19), right precentral gyrus (RPCG, BA4), and left middle frontal gyrus (LMFG, BA46) were found within the LDI group as compared to the LDNI group. We discuss these results in terms cognitive functions within these regions related to problem solving and memory retrieval. PMID:25840359

  7. Preoperative assessment of femoral rotation and its relationship with coronal alignment: A magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Catherine J; Gallie, Price; Whitehouse, Sarah L

    2016-12-01

    This MRI study explores the individual variation of the rotational axes of the distal femur, and investigate the relationship of this variation with overall coronal alignment in the osteoarthritic knee,The mean surgical epicondylar axis (SEA) was 1.7°, anatomical epicondylar axis (AEA) 5.6° and AP trochlea axis (APA) 94.3° external rotation, compared to the posterior condylar line. Investigating this relationship between different coronal alignment groups, there were statistically significant differences between excessive varus and excessive valgus knees for SEA (0.9:3.0 p < 0.001) and AEA (4.7:7.0 p < 0.001). There was no statistical difference for APA (93.9:95.3 p = 0.238). PMID:27408506

  8. Voxel-based structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of patients with early onset schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihara, Yujiro; Sugihara, Genichi; Matsumoto, Hideo; Suckling, John; Nishimura, Katsuhiko; Toyoda, Takao; Isoda, Haruo; Tsuchiya, Kenji J; Takebayashi, Kiyokazu; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Sakahara, Harumi; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Mori, Norio; Takei, Nori

    2008-01-01

    Background Investigation into the whole brain morphology of early onset schizophrenia (EOS) to date has been sparse. We studied the regional brain volumes in EOS patients, and the correlations between regional volume measures and symptom severity. Methods A total of 18 EOS patients (onset under 16 years) and 18 controls matched for age, gender, parental socioeconomic status, and height were examined. Voxel-based morphometric analysis using the Brain Analysis Morphological Mapping (BAMM) software package was employed to explore alterations of the regional grey (GM) and white matter (WM) volumes in EOS patients. Symptoms were assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Results EOS patients had significantly reduced GM volume in the left parahippocampal, inferior frontal, and superior temporal gyri, compared with the controls. They also had less WM volume in the left posterior limb of the internal capsule and the left inferior longitudinal fasciculus. The positive symptom score of PANSS (higher values corresponding to more severe symptoms) was negatively related to GM volume in the bilateral posterior cingulate gyrus. The negative symptom score was positively correlated with GM volume in the right thalamus. As for the association with WM volume, the positive symptom score of PANSS was positively related to cerebellar WM (vermis region), and negatively correlated with WM in the brain stem (pons) and in the bilateral cerebellum (hemisphere region). Conclusion Our findings of regional volume alterations of GM and WM in EOS patients coincide with those of previous studies of adult onset schizophrenia patients. However, in brain regions that had no overall structural differences between EOS patients and controls (that is, the bilateral posterior cingulate gyrus, the right thalamus, the cerebellum, and the pons), within-subject analysis of EOS patients alone revealed that there were significant associations of the volume in these areas and the symptom

  9. Neural Substrates for Head Movements in Humans: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Prudente, Cecilia N; Stilla, Randall; Buetefisch, Cathrin M; Singh, Shivangi; Hess, Ellen J; Hu, Xiaoping; Sathian, Krish; Jinnah, H A

    2015-06-17

    The neural systems controlling head movements are not well delineated in humans. It is not clear whether the ipsilateral or contralateral primary motor cortex is involved in turning the head right or left. Furthermore, the exact location of the neck motor area in the somatotopic organization of the motor homunculus is still debated and evidence for contributions from other brain regions in humans is scarce. Because currently available neuroimaging methods are not generally suitable for mapping brain activation patterns during head movements, we conducted fMRI scans during isometric tasks of the head. During isometric tasks, muscle contractions occur without an actual movement and they have been used to delineate patterns of brain activity related to movements of other body parts such as the hands. Healthy individuals were scanned during isometric head rotation or wrist extension. Isometric wrist extension was examined as a positive control and to establish the relative locations of head and hand regions in the motor cortex. Electromyographic recordings of neck and hand muscles during scanning ensured compliance with the tasks. Increased brain activity during isometric head rotation was observed bilaterally in the precentral gyrus, both medial and lateral to the hand area, as well the supplementary motor area, insula, putamen, and cerebellum. These findings clarify the location of the neck region in the motor homunculus and help to reconcile some of the conflicting results obtained in earlier studies. PMID:26085638

  10. Image fusion for dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Twellmann, Thorsten; Saalbach, Axel; Gerstung, Olaf; Leach, Martin O; Nattkemper, Tim W

    2004-01-01

    Background Multivariate imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been shown to provide valuable information for medical diagnosis. Even though these techniques provide new information, integrating and evaluating the much wider range of information is a challenging task for the human observer. This task may be assisted with the use of image fusion algorithms. Methods In this paper, image fusion based on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) is proposed for the first time. It is demonstrated that a priori knowledge about the data domain can be easily incorporated into the parametrisation of the KPCA, leading to task-oriented visualisations of the multivariate data. The results of the fusion process are compared with those of the well-known and established standard linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA) by means of temporal sequences of 3D MRI volumes from six patients who took part in a breast cancer screening study. Results The PCA and KPCA algorithms are able to integrate information from a sequence of MRI volumes into informative gray value or colour images. By incorporating a priori knowledge, the fusion process can be automated and optimised in order to visualise suspicious lesions with high contrast to normal tissue. Conclusion Our machine learning based image fusion approach maps the full signal space of a temporal DCE-MRI sequence to a single meaningful visualisation with good tissue/lesion contrast and thus supports the radiologist during manual image evaluation. PMID:15494072

  11. Hypertension and cerebral vasoreactivity: a continuous arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Hajjar, Ihab; Zhao, Peng; Alsop, David; Novak, Vera

    2010-11-01

    Hypertension is associated with microvascular and macrovascular brain injury but its direct influence on the cerebral circulation is not fully clear. Our objective was to investigate the association of hypertension with global and regional cerebral vasoreactivity to CO(2) using continuous arterial spin labeling MRI, independent of stroke and white matter hyperintensities. Participants (n=62; mean age: 66.7±1.0 years, 55% women, 84% white, 65% hypertension, 47% stroke) underwent arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI during normal breathing, 5% CO(2) rebreathing, and hyperventilation, as well as 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Vasoreactivity was the slope of the regression between cerebral perfusion and end-tidal CO(2). White matter hyperintensity volumes were quantified. Nighttime dipping was calculated as the percentage decline in nighttime/daytime blood pressure. After accounting for stroke and white matter hyperintensity volume, hypertensive participants had lower global vasoreactivity (1.11±0.13 versus 0.43±0.1 mL/100 g per minute per millimeter of mercury; P=0.0012). Regionally, this was significant in the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes. Higher mean systolic blood pressure was associated with lower vasoreactivity (decreased by 0.11 U/10-mm Hg increase in systolic blood pressure; P=0.04), but nighttime dipping was not (P=0.2). The magnitude of decrease in vasoreactivity in hypertension without stroke was comparable to the magnitude of decrease in vasoreactivity in stroke without hypertension. Hypertension has a direct negative effect on the cerebrovascular circulation independent of white matter hyperintensities and stroke that is comparable to that seen with stroke. Because lower vasoreactivity is associated with poor outcomes, studies of the impact of antihypertensive on vasoreactivity are important. PMID:20876450

  12. Approach to breast magnetic resonance imaging interpretation.

    PubMed

    Palestrant, Sarah; Comstock, Christopher E; Moy, Linda

    2014-05-01

    With the increasing use of breast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging comes the expectation that the breast radiologist is as fluent in its interpretation as in that of mammography and breast ultrasonography. Knowledge of who should be included for imaging and how to perform the imaging are as essential as interpreting the images. When reading the examination, the radiologist should approach the images from both a global and focused perspective, synthesizing findings into a report that includes a management plan. This article reviews a systematic and organized approach to breast MR imaging interpretation. PMID:24792657

  13. Diagnostic reliability of magnetic resonance imaging for central nervous system syndromes in systemic lupus erythematosus: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous studies of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a diagnostic tool for central nervous system (CNS) syndromes in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) contained several limitations such as study design, number of enrolled patients, and definition of CNS syndromes. We overcame these problems and statistically evaluated the diagnostic values of abnormal MRI signals and their chronological changes in CNS syndromes of SLE. Methods We prospectively studied 191 patients with SLE, comparing those with (n = 57) and without (n = 134) CNS syndrome. CNS syndromes were characterized using the American College of Rheumatology case definitions. Results Any abnormal MRI signals were more frequently observed in subjects in the CNS group (n = 25) than in the non-CNS group (n = 32) [relative risk (RR), 1.7; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1-2.7; p = 0.016] and the positive and negative predictive values for the diagnosis of CNS syndrome were 42% and 76%, respectively. Large abnormal MRI signals (ø ≥ 10 mm) were seen only in the CNS group (n = 7; RR, 3.7; CI, 2.9-4.7; p = 0.0002), whereas small abnormal MRI signals (ø < 10 mm) were seen in both groups with no statistical difference. Large signals always paralleled clinical outcome (p = 0.029), whereas small signals did not (p = 1.000). Conclusions Abnormal MRI signals, which showed statistical associations with CNS syndrome, had insufficient diagnostic values. A large MRI signal was, however, useful as a diagnostic and surrogate marker for CNS syndrome of SLE, although it was less common. PMID:20096132

  14. Simple and Inexpensive Classroom Demonstrations of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Joel A.; Nordell, Karen J.; Chesnik, Marla A.; Landis, Clark R.; Ellis, Arthur B.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Condren, S. Michael; Lisensky, George C.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a set of simple, inexpensive, classical demonstrations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) principles that illustrate the resonance condition associated with magnetic dipoles and the dependence of the resonance frequency on environment. (WRM)

  15. Artifacts in Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Marina-Portia; Nguyen, Dustin; Friedlander, Lauren; Mango, Victoria; Wynn, Ralph; Ha, Richard

    2016-01-01

    As breast magnetic resonance imaging has evolved to become a routine part of clinical practice, so too has the need for radiologists to be aware of its potential pitfalls and limitations. Unique challenges arise in the identification and remedy of artifacts in breast magnetic resonance imaging, and it is important that radiologists and technicians work together to optimize protocols and monitor examinations such that these may be minimized or avoided entirely. This article presents patient-related and technical artifacts that may give rise to reduced image quality and ways to recognize and reduce them. PMID:26343534

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in entomology: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Hart, A.G.; Bowtell, R.W.; Köckenberger, W.; Wenseleers, T.; Ratnieks, F.L.W.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables in vivo imaging of organisms. The recent development of the magnetic resonance microscope (MRM) has enabled organisms within the size range of many insects to be imaged. Here, we introduce the principles of MRI and MRM and review their use in entomology. We show that MRM has been successfully applied in studies of parasitology, development, metabolism, biomagnetism and morphology, and the advantages and disadvantages relative to other imaging techniques are discussed. In addition, we illustrate the images that can be obtained using MRM. We conclude that although MRM has significant potential, further improvements to the technique are still desirable if it is to become a mainstream imaging technology in entomology. Abbreviation: CSI chemical shift imaging. The dependence of the resonance frequency of a nucleus on the chemical binding of the atom or molecule in which it is contained. (N)MRI (nuclear) magnetic resonance imaging MRM magnetic resonance microscopy Voxel A contraction for volume element, which is the basic unit of MR reconstruction; represented as a pixel in the display of the MR image. PMID:15841222

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of the body

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.B.; Hricak, H.

    1987-01-01

    This text provides reference to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the body. Beginning with explanatory chapters on the physics, instrumentation, and interpretation of MRI, it proceeds to the normal anatomy of the neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Other chapters cover magnetic resonance imaging of blood flow, the larynx, the lymph nodes, and the spine, as well as MRI in obstetrics. The text features detailed coverage of magnetic resonance imaging of numerous disorders and disease states, including neck disease, thoracic disease; breast disease; congenital and acquired heart disease; vascular disease; diseases of the liver, pancreas, and spleen; diseases of the kidney, adrenals, and retroperitoneum; diseases of the male and female pelvis; and musculoskeletal diseases. Chapters on the biological and environmental hazards of MRI, the current clinical status of MRI in comparison to other imaging modalities, and economic considerations are also included.

  18. Tutte polynomial in functional magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Castillón, Marlly V.

    2015-09-01

    Methods of graph theory are applied to the processing of functional magnetic resonance images. Specifically the Tutte polynomial is used to analyze such kind of images. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging provide us connectivity networks in the brain which are represented by graphs and the Tutte polynomial will be applied. The problem of computing the Tutte polynomial for a given graph is #P-hard even for planar graphs. For a practical application the maple packages "GraphTheory" and "SpecialGraphs" will be used. We will consider certain diagram which is depicting functional connectivity, specifically between frontal and posterior areas, in autism during an inferential text comprehension task. The Tutte polynomial for the resulting neural networks will be computed and some numerical invariants for such network will be obtained. Our results show that the Tutte polynomial is a powerful tool to analyze and characterize the networks obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Olgunturk, Rana; Cevik, Ayhan; Terlemez, Semiha; Kacar, Emre; Oner, Yusuf Ali

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to determine the efficacy and reliability of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in establishing the diagnosis and prognosis of pulmonary hypertension in children. This is a retrospective comparison of 25 children with pulmonary hypertension and a control group comprising 19 healthy children. The diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension was made when the mean pulmonary artery pressure was ≥25 mmHg by catheter angiography. The children with pulmonary hypertension had significantly lower body mass indices than did the healthy children (P=0.048). In addition, the children with pulmonary hypertension had significantly larger main pulmonary artery diameters and ascending aortic diameters (both P=0.001) but statistically similar ratios of main pulmonary artery diameter-to-ascending aortic diameter. If the main pulmonary artery diameter was ≥25 mm, pediatric pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed with 72% sensitivity and 84% specificity. In the event that the ratio of main pulmonary artery diameter-to-ascending aorta diameter was ≥1, pediatric pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed with 60% sensitivity and 53% specificity. When compared with children who had New York Heart Association functional class II pulmonary hypertension, the children with functional class III pulmonary hypertension had significantly larger main (P=0.046), right (P=0.036), and left (P=0.003) pulmonary arteries. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is useful in the diagnosis of children with pulmonary hypertension. Pediatric pulmonary hypertension can be diagnosed with high sensitivity and specificity when the main pulmonary artery diameter measures ≥25 mm. PMID:26175631

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pektas, Ayhan; Olgunturk, Rana; Cevik, Ayhan; Terlemez, Semiha; Kacar, Emre; Oner, Yusuf Ali

    2015-06-01

    The present study aims to determine the efficacy and reliability of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in establishing the diagnosis and prognosis of pulmonary hypertension in children. This is a retrospective comparison of 25 children with pulmonary hypertension and a control group comprising 19 healthy children. The diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension was made when the mean pulmonary artery pressure was ≥25 mmHg by catheter angiography. The children with pulmonary hypertension had significantly lower body mass indices than did the healthy children (P=0.048). In addition, the children with pulmonary hypertension had significantly larger main pulmonary artery diameters and ascending aortic diameters (both P=0.001) but statistically similar ratios of main pulmonary artery diameter-to-ascending aortic diameter. If the main pulmonary artery diameter was ≥25 mm, pediatric pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed with 72% sensitivity and 84% specificity. In the event that the ratio of main pulmonary artery diameter-to-ascending aorta diameter was ≥1, pediatric pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed with 60% sensitivity and 53% specificity. When compared with children who had New York Heart Association functional class II pulmonary hypertension, the children with functional class III pulmonary hypertension had significantly larger main (P=0.046), right (P=0.036), and left (P=0.003) pulmonary arteries. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is useful in the diagnosis of children with pulmonary hypertension. Pediatric pulmonary hypertension can be diagnosed with high sensitivity and specificity when the main pulmonary artery diameter measures ≥25 mm. PMID:26175631

  1. Quantitative 3D breast magnetic resonance imaging fibroglandular tissue analysis and correlation with qualitative assessments: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Mema, Eralda; Guo, Xiaotao; Mango, Victoria; Desperito, Elise; Ha, Jason; Wynn, Ralph; Zhao, Binsheng

    2016-01-01

    Background The amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT) has been linked to breast cancer risk based on mammographic density studies. Currently, the qualitative assessment of FGT on mammogram (MG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is prone to intra and inter-observer variability. The purpose of this study is to develop an objective quantitative FGT measurement tool for breast MRI that could provide significant clinical value. Methods An IRB approved study was performed. Sixty breast MRI cases with qualitative assessment of mammographic breast density and MRI FGT were randomly selected for quantitative analysis from routine breast MRIs performed at our institution from 1/2013 to 12/2014. Blinded to the qualitative data, whole breast and FGT contours were delineated on T1-weighted pre contrast sagittal images using an in-house, proprietary segmentation algorithm which combines the region-based active contours and a level set approach. FGT (%) was calculated by: [segmented volume of FGT (mm3)/(segmented volume of whole breast (mm3)] ×100. Statistical correlation analysis was performed between quantified FGT (%) on MRI and qualitative assessments of mammographic breast density and MRI FGT. Results There was a significant positive correlation between quantitative MRI FGT assessment and qualitative MRI FGT (r=0.809, n=60, P<0.001) and mammographic density assessment (r=0.805, n=60, P<0.001). There was a significant correlation between qualitative MRI FGT assessment and mammographic density assessment (r=0.725, n=60, P<0.001). The four qualitative assessment categories of FGT correlated with the calculated mean quantitative FGT (%) of 4.61% (95% CI, 0–12.3%), 8.74% (7.3–10.2%), 18.1% (15.1–21.1%), 37.4% (29.5–45.3%). Conclusions Quantitative measures of FGT (%) were computed with data derived from breast MRI and correlated significantly with conventional qualitative assessments. This quantitative technique may prove to be a valuable tool in clinical use by

  2. Abnormal degree centrality in Alzheimer's disease patients with depression: A resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhongwei; Liu, Xiaozheng; Hou, Hongtao; Wei, Fuquan; Liu, Jian; Chen, Xingli

    2016-06-15

    Depression is common in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and occurs in AD patients with a prevalence of up to 40%. It reduces cognitive function and increases the burden on caregivers. Currently, there are very few medications that are useful for treating depression in AD patients. Therefore, understanding the brain abnormalities in AD patients with depression (D-AD) is crucial for developing effective interventions. The aim of this study was to investigate the intrinsic dysconnectivity pattern of whole-brain functional networks at the voxel level in D-AD patients based on degree centrality (DC) as measured by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI). Our study included 32 AD patients. All patients were evaluated using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and further divided into two groups: 15 D-AD patients and 17 non-depressed AD (nD-AD) patients. R-fMRI datasets were acquired from these D-AD and nD-AD patients. First, we performed a DC analysis to identify voxels that showed altered whole brain functional connectivity (FC) with other voxels. We then further investigated FC using the abnormal DC regions to examine in more detail the connectivity patterns of the identified DC changes. D-AD patients had lower DC values in the right middle frontal, precentral, and postcentral gyrus than nD-AD patients. Seed-based analysis revealed decreased connectivity between the precentral and postcentral gyrus to the supplementary motor area and middle cingulum. FC also decreased in the right middle frontal, precentral, and postcentral gyrus. Thus, AD patients with depression fit a 'network dysfunction model' distinct from major depressive disorder and AD. PMID:27079332

  3. Usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy in Korean women: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy is the technique of choice for lesions that are visible only with breast MRI. The purpose of this study was to report our clinical experience with MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy in Korean women. Methods A total of 13 patients with 15 lesions for MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy were prospectively entered into this study between September 2009 and November 2011. Biopsy samples were obtained in a 3-T magnet using a 9-guage MRI-compatible vacuum-assisted biopsy device. We evaluated clinical indications for biopsy, lesion characteristics on prebiopsy MRI, pathologic results, and postbiopsy complication status. Results The clinical indications for MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy were as follows: abnormalities in patients with interstitial mammoplasty on screening MRI (n = 10); preoperative evaluation of patients with a recently diagnosed cancer (n = 3); and suspicious recurrence on follow-up MRI after cancer surgery (n = 1) or chemotherapy (n = 1). All lesions have morphologic features suspicious or highly suggestive of malignancy by the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System category of MRI (C4a = 12, C4b = 2, C5 = 1). In two of the 15 lesions (13.3%, <6 mm), MRI-guided 9-gauge vacuum-assisted breast biopsy was deferred due to nonvisualization of the MRI findings that led to biopsy and the lesions were stable or disappeared on follow up so were considered benign. Of 13 biopsied lesions, pathology revealed four malignancies (4/13, 30.8%; mean size 15.5 mm) and nine benign lesions (9/13, 69.2%; size 14.2 mm). Immediate postprocedural hematoma (mean size 23.5 mm) was observed in eight out of 13 patients (61.5%) and was controlled conservatively. Conclusions Our initial experience of MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy showed a success rate of 86.7% and a cancer diagnosis rate of 30.8%, which was quite satisfactory. MRI-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy is a

  4. Persistent Differences in Patterns of Brain Activation after Sports-Related Concussion: A Longitudinal Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Murugavel, Murali; Putukian, Margot; Cubon, Valerie; Furtado, John; Osherson, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Avoiding recurrent injury in sports-related concussion (SRC) requires understanding the neural mechanisms involved during the time of recovery after injury. The decision for return-to-play is one of the most difficult responsibilities facing the physician, and so far this decision has been based primarily on neurological examination, symptom checklists, and neuropsychological (NP) testing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) may be an additional, more objective tool to assess the severity and recovery of function after concussion. The purpose of this study was to define neural correlates of SRC during the 2 months after injury in varsity contact sport athletes who suffered a SRC. All athletes were scanned as they performed an n-back task, for n=1, 2, 3. Subjects were scanned within 72 hours (session one), at 2 weeks (session two), and 2 months (session three) post-injury. Compared with age and sex matched normal controls, concussed subjects demonstrated persistent, significantly increased activation for the 2 minus 1 n-back contrast in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in all three sessions and in the inferior parietal lobe in session one and two (α≤0.01 corrected). Measures of task performance revealed no significant differences between concussed versus control groups at any of the three time points with respect to any of the three n-back tasks. These findings suggest that functional brain activation differences persist at 2 months after injury in concussed athletes, despite the fact that their performance on a standard working memory task is comparable to normal controls and normalization of clinical and NP test results. These results might indicate a delay between neural and behaviorally assessed recovery after SRC. PMID:23914845

  5. Persistent differences in patterns of brain activation after sports-related concussion: a longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Dettwiler, Annegret; Murugavel, Murali; Putukian, Margot; Cubon, Valerie; Furtado, John; Osherson, Daniel

    2014-01-15

    Avoiding recurrent injury in sports-related concussion (SRC) requires understanding the neural mechanisms involved during the time of recovery after injury. The decision for return-to-play is one of the most difficult responsibilities facing the physician, and so far this decision has been based primarily on neurological examination, symptom checklists, and neuropsychological (NP) testing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) may be an additional, more objective tool to assess the severity and recovery of function after concussion. The purpose of this study was to define neural correlates of SRC during the 2 months after injury in varsity contact sport athletes who suffered a SRC. All athletes were scanned as they performed an n-back task, for n=1, 2, 3. Subjects were scanned within 72 hours (session one), at 2 weeks (session two), and 2 months (session three) post-injury. Compared with age and sex matched normal controls, concussed subjects demonstrated persistent, significantly increased activation for the 2 minus 1 n-back contrast in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in all three sessions and in the inferior parietal lobe in session one and two (α≤0.01 corrected). Measures of task performance revealed no significant differences between concussed versus control groups at any of the three time points with respect to any of the three n-back tasks. These findings suggest that functional brain activation differences persist at 2 months after injury in concussed athletes, despite the fact that their performance on a standard working memory task is comparable to normal controls and normalization of clinical and NP test results. These results might indicate a delay between neural and behaviorally assessed recovery after SRC. PMID:23914845

  6. Pelvic applications of diffusion magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Antonio C; Krishnaraj, Arun; Pires, Cintia E; Bittencourt, Leonardo K; Guimarães, Alexander R

    2011-02-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a powerful imaging technique in neuroimaging; its value in abdominal and pelvic imaging has only recently been appreciated as a result of improvements in magnetic resonance imaging technology. There is growing interest in the use of DWI for evaluating pathology in the pelvis. Its ability to noninvasively characterize tissues and to depict changes at a cellular level allows DWI to be an effective complement to conventional sequences of pelvic imaging, especially in oncologic patients. The addition of DWI may obviate contrast material in those with renal insufficiency or contrast material allergy. PMID:21129639

  7. Fabrication of vascular replicas from magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M H; Kuban, B D; Schmalbrock, P; Smith, K; Altan, T

    1995-08-01

    Image processing and Computer Numerical Controlled (CNC) machining techniques have been used to prepare a large-than-life investment cast of an aortic bifurcation from magnetic resonance images of a replica of the vessel. The technique will facilitate experimental studies of vascular fluid dynamics and permit the in vitro reproduction of flows in living subjects. PMID:8618391

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging as a tool for extravehicular activity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickenson, R.; Lorenz, C.; Peterson, S.; Strauss, A.; Main, J.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a means of conducting kinematic studies of the hand for the purpose of EVA capability enhancement. After imaging the subject hand using a magnetic resonance scanner, the resulting 2D slices were reconstructed into a 3D model of the proximal phalanx of the left hand. Using the coordinates of several landmark positions, one is then able to decompose the motion of the rigid body. MRI offers highly accurate measurements due to its tomographic nature without the problems associated with other imaging modalities for in vivo studies.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging structured reporting in infertility.

    PubMed

    Montoliu-Fornas, Guillermina; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis

    2016-06-01

    Our objective was to define and propose a standardized magnetic resonance (MR) imaging structured report in patients with infertility to have clinical completeness on possible diagnosis and severity. Patients should be studied preferable on 3T equipment with a surface coil. Standard MR protocol should include high-resolution fast spin-echo T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted images and gradient-echo T1-weighted fat suppression images. The report should include ovaries (polycystic, endometrioma, tumor), oviduct (hydrosalpinx, hematosalpinx, pyosalpinx, peritubal anomalies), uterus (agenesia, hypoplasia, unicornuate, uterus didelphys, bicornuate, septate uterus), myometrium (leiomyomas, adenomyosis), endometrium (polyps, synechia, atrophy, neoplasia), cervix and vagina (isthmoceles, mucosal-parietal irregularity, stenosis, neoplasia), peritoneum (deep endometriosis), and urinary system-associated abnormalities. To be clinically useful, radiology reports must be structured, use standardized terminology, and convey actionable information. The structured report must comprise complete, comprehensive, and accurate information, allowing radiologists to continuously interact with patients and referring physicians to confirm that the information is used properly to affect the decision making process. PMID:27105717

  10. Stereotactic localization using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Walton, L; Hampshire, A; Forster, D M; Kemeny, A A

    1995-01-01

    A phantom study has been carried out to assess the accuracy of stereotactic localisation, using magnetic resonance imaging. The stereotactic coordinates of an array of Perspex rods within the phantom were determined and compared with measured values, in a series of transverse, coronal and sagittal images. In the transverse plane, the maximum errors experienced were X = 2.3 mm and Y = 10.7 mm. If the third fiducial plate, at the front of the frame, were not used in the scaling of the images, there was considerable improvement in the Y direction (maximum error Y = 2.1 mm). However, some deterioration in the accuracy in the X direction resulted, particularly at the extremes of Z (maximum error X = 3.5 mm). In the coronal plane, the maximum errors were X = 1.8 mm and Z = 8.0 mm. With the third plate off, the errors decreased to X = 1.9 mm and Z = 3.3 mm. In the sagittal plane, the maximum errors recorded were Y = 1.1 mm and Z = 7.5 mm. It is not possible to calibrate in this plane without the third plate. PMID:8584823

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of heterotaxis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stoeckelhuber, Beate M; Eckey, Thomas; Buchholz, Michael; Kapsimalakou, Smaragda; Stoeckelhuber, Mechthild

    2008-12-20

    Failure to establish normal left-right body axis (LRA) formation during embryogenesis results in heterotaxis, a multi-malformation syndrome. We report on a 20-year-old young woman who presented to the emergency room with upper abdominal pain. On chest X-ray, dextrocardia was noted. Ultrasound was inconclusive. Barium studies demonstrated non-rotation of the intestine. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the abdomen confirmed heterotaxis with abnormal arrangement of abdominal organs and vasculature. This is the first radiographic description of LRA in MRI. It provides a unique contribution to the wide morphological variety of lateralization defects in a single examination within 15 min and without the risks of ionizing radiation. In addition, a literature overview over the genetic aspects, broad morphological spectrum, and possible therapeutic consequences is given. PMID:18835766

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, A. O.; Rojas, R.; Barrios, F. A.

    2001-10-01

    MR imaging has experienced an important growth worldwide and in particular in the USA and Japan. This imaging technique has also shown an important rise in the number of MR imagers in Mexico. However, the development of MRI has followed a typical way of Latin American countries, which is very different from the path shown in the industrialised countries. Despite the fact that Mexico was one the very first countries to install and operate MR imagers in the world, it still lacks of qualified clinical and technical personnel. Since the first MR scanner started to operate, the number of units has grown at a moderate space that now sums up approximately 60 system installed nationwide. Nevertheless, there are no official records of the number of MR units operating, physicians and technicians involved in this imaging modality. The MRI market is dominated by two important companies: General Electric (approximately 51%) and Siemens (approximately 17.5%), the rest is shared by other five companies. According to the field intensity, medium-field systems (0.5 Tesla) represent 60% while a further 35% are 1.0 T or higher. Almost all of these units are in private hospitals and clinics: there is no high-field MR imagers in any public hospital. Because the political changes in the country, a new public plan for health care is still in the process and will be published soon this year. This plan will be determined by the new Congress. North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and president Fox. Experience acquired in the past shows that the demand for qualified professionals will grow in the new future. Therefore, systematic training of clinical and technical professionals will be in high demand to meet the needs of this technique. The National University (UNAM) and the Metropolitan University (UAM-Iztapalapa) are collaborating with diverse clinical groups in private facilities to create a systematic training program and carry out research and development in MRI

  13. Emergency Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Musculoskeletal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kumaravel, Manickam; Weathers, William M

    2016-05-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) trauma is commonly encountered in the emergency department. Computed tomography and radiography are the main forms of imaging assessment, but the use of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has become more common in the emergency room (ER) setting for evaluation of low-velocity/sports-related injury and high-velocity injury. The superior soft tissue contrast and detail provided by MR imaging gives clinicians a powerful tool in the management of acute MSK injury in the ER. This article provides an overview of techniques and considerations when using MR imaging in the evaluation of some of the common injuries seen in the ER setting. PMID:27150325

  14. 2D-1H proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging study on brain metabolite alterations in patients with diabetic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhen; Ye, Bi-Di; Shen, Zhi-Wei; Cheng, Xiao-Fang; Yang, Zhong-Xian; Liu, Yan-Yan; Wu, Ren-Hua; Geng, Kuan; Xiao, Ye-Yu

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible metabolic alterations in the frontal cortex and parietal white matter in patients with diabetic hypertension (DHT) using proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopic imaging. A total of 33 DHT patients and 30 healthy control subjects aged between 45 and 75 were included in the present study. All subjects were right‑handed. The spectroscopy data were collected using a GE Healthcare 1.5T MR scanner. The multi‑voxels were located in the semioval center (repetition time/echo time=1,500 ms/35 ms). The area of interest was 8x10x2 cm in volume and contained the two sides of the frontal cortex and the parietal white matter. The spectra data were processed using SAGE software. The ratios of brain metabolite concentrations, particularly for N‑acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine (Cr) and Choline (Cho)/Cr were calculated and analyzed. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 17.0. The NAA/Cr ratio of the bilateral prefrontal cortex of the DHT group was significantly lower than that of the control group (left t=‑7.854, P=0.000 and right t=‑5.787, P=0.000), The Cho/Cr ratio was also much lower than the control group (left t=2.422, P=0.024 and right t=2.920, P=0.007). NAA/Cr ratio of the left parietal white matter of the DHT group was extremely lower than that of the control group (t=‑4.199, P=0.000). Therefore, DHT may result in metabolic disorders in the frontal cortex and parietal white matter but the metabolic alterations are different in various regions of the brain. The alteration in cerebral metabolism is associated with diabetes and hypertension. The ratios of NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr are potential metabolic markers for the brain damage induced by DHT. PMID:25652580

  15. A study of the diffusion characteristics of normal, delipidized and relipidized articular cartilage using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, K Q; Momot, K I; Wellard, R M; Oloyede, A

    2013-04-01

    This paper assesses the capacity to provide semipermeability of the synthetic layer of surface-active phospholipids created to replace the depleted surface amorphous layer of articular cartilage. The surfaces of articular cartilage specimens in normal, delipidized, and relipidized conditions following incubation in dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine and palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine components of the joint lipid mixture were characterized nanoscopically with the atomic force microscope and also imaged as deuterium oxide (D2O) diffused transiently through these surfaces in a magnetic resonance imaging enclosure. The MR images were then used to determine the apparent diffusion coefficients in a purpose-built MATLAB(®)-based algorithm. Our results revealed that all surfaces were permeable to D2O, but that there was a significant difference in the semipermeability of the surfaces under the different conditions, relative to the apparent diffusion coefficients. Based on the results and observations, it can be concluded that the synthetic lipid that is deposited to replace the depleted SAL of articular cartilage is capable of inducing some level of semipermeability. PMID:23404060

  16. Fetal Cerebral Magnetic Resonance Imaging Beyond Morphology.

    PubMed

    Jakab, András; Pogledic, Ivana; Schwartz, Ernst; Gruber, Gerlinde; Mitter, Christian; Brugger, Peter C; Langs, Georg; Schöpf, Veronika; Kasprian, Gregor; Prayer, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    The recent technological advancement of fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences allowed the inclusion of diffusion tensor imaging, functional MRI, and proton MR spectroscopy in prenatal imaging protocols. These methods provide information beyond morphology and hold the key to improving several fields of human neuroscience and clinical diagnostics. Our review introduces the fundamental works that enabled these imaging techniques, and also highlights the most recent contributions to this emerging field of prenatal diagnostics, such as the structural and functional connectomic approach. We introduce the advanced image processing approaches that are extensively used to tackle fetal or maternal movement-related image artifacts, and which are necessary for the optimal interpretation of such imaging data. PMID:26614130

  17. Neurosurgical uses for intraprocedural magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Mutchnick, Ian S; Moriarty, Thomas M

    2005-10-01

    Neurosurgical procedures demand precision, and efforts to create accurate neurosurgical navigation have been central to the profession through its history. Magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided navigation offers the possibility of real-time, image-based stereotactic information for the neurosurgeon, which makes possible a number of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. This article will review both current options for intraoperative MRI operative suite arrangements and the current therapeutic/diagnostic uses of intraoperative MRI. PMID:16924171

  18. D-Dimer Levels Predict Myocardial Injury in ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young Bin; Lima, Joao A. C.; Guallar, Eliseo; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Hwang, Jin Kyung; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Yang, Jeong Hoon; Hahn, Joo-Yong; Choi, Seung-Hyuk; Lee, Sang-Chol; Lee, Sang Hoon; Gwon, Hyeon-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Elevated D-dimer levels on admission predict prognosis in patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), but the association of D-dimer levels with structural markers of myocardial injury in these patients is unknown. Methods We performed cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging in 208 patients treated with primary PCI for STEMI. CMR was performed a median of 3 days after the index procedure. Of the 208 patients studied, 75 patients had D-dimer levels above the normal range on admission (>0.5 μg/mL; high D-dimer group) while 133 had normal levels (≤0.5 μg/mL; low D-dimer group). The primary outcome was myocardial infarct size assessed by CMR. Secondary outcomes included area at risk (AAR), microvascular obstruction (MVO) area, and myocardial salvage index (MSI). Results In CMR analysis, myocardial infarct size was larger in the high D-dimer group than in the low D-dimer group (22.3% [16.2–30.5] versus 18.8% [10.7–26.7]; p = 0.02). Compared to the low D-dimer group, the high D-dimer group also had a larger AAR (38.1% [31.7–46.9] versus 35.8% [24.2–45.3]; p = 0.04) and a smaller MSI (37.7 [28.2–46.9] versus 47.1 [33.2–57.0]; p = 0.01). In multivariate analysis, high D-dimer levels were significantly associated with larger myocardial infarct (OR 2.59; 95% CI 1.37–4.87; p<0.01) and lower MSI (OR 2.62; 95% CI 1.44–4.78; p<0.01). Conclusions In STEMI patients undergoing primary PCI, high D-dimer levels on admission were associated with a larger myocardial infarct size, a greater extent of AAR, and lower MSI, as assessed by CMR data. Elevated initial D-dimer level may be a marker of advanced myocardial injury in patients treated with primary PCI for STEMI. PMID:27513758

  19. Fundamental Studies on the Enzymatic Liquefaction and Rheology of Cellulosic Biomass viaMagnetic Resonance Imaging Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Maria Jose

    Worldwide need for alternatives to fossil fuels has driven significant research effort toward the development and scale-up of sustainable forms of energy. Second-generation biofuels, obtained from the breakdown of lignocellulosic biomass (e.g., agricultural residues), present a promising alternative. In biofuel production, the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose is currently one of the most expensive steps in the biochemical breakdown of lignocellulosic biomass. Economic considerations for large-scale implementation of this process demand operation at high solids loadings of biomass (>15% (w/w)) due to potential for higher product concentrations and reduction of water usage throughout the biorefining process. In the high-solids regime, however, biomass slurries form a high viscosity, non-Newtonian slurry that introduces processing challenges, especially during the initial stages of hydrolysis (liquefaction), due to the low availability of water in the bulk phase. Furthermore, a concomitant reduction in glucose yields with increase in solids loadings has been observed, a phenomenon that is not well understood, but if overcome could hold the key to achieving desirable yields during hydrolysis. In order to better understand liquefaction, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) rheometer was used to perform in-line, in situ, real-time, and noninvasive studies on biomass slurries undergoing enzymatic hydrolysis. Batch and fed-batch experiments were done on lignocellulosic and cellulosic substrates with both purified and mixtures of enzymes, under various reaction conditions. The mechanism of liquefaction was found to be decoupled from the mechanism of saccharification. In addition, end product inhibition was found to have an impact on both saccharification and liquefaction during the initial stage of hydrolysis, which has an impact on scale-up of hydrolysis processes. Lastly, to address and overcome high-solids limitations, a fed-batch liquefaction process based on

  20. Artificial sensibility of the hand based on cortical audiotactile interaction: a study using functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lundborg, Göran; Björkman, Anders; Hansson, Thomas; Nylander, Lotta; Nyman, Torbjörn; Rosén, Birgitta

    2005-01-01

    The capacity of the central nervous system for plastic alterations is the base for our ability to adapt to environmental needs. The crossmodal capacity of the brain makes interaction between senses possible, and deprivation of one sense leads to compensatory changes in other senses. We have recently shown how hearing can substitute for sensation in a transplanted insensitive hand by using a sensor glove equipped with small microphones that pick up the sound of friction, which is elicited by active touch. Here we have used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in healthy people to illustrate their capacity for cortical audiotactile interaction with activation of the somatosensory cortex induced by auditory stimuli. The phenomenon occurred only in subjects trained to substitute sensibility by hearing, and no audiotactile interaction was found in untrained subjects. PMID:16298810

  1. Research design issues for the use of magnetic resonance imaging machines in brain studies of psychological/psychiatric variables.

    PubMed

    Czarnolewski, Mark Y

    2009-11-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine itself has an impact on the likelihood of obtaining successful measurements of brain size in certain groups of subjects. The differential selection and attrition in both cross-sectional and longitudinal designs, therefore, indicate that the MRI coincidentally serves as a screen for the anatomical structure of the brains that are successfully scanned. This screening effect introduces confounds in experiments whose very hypotheses are focused on comparing anatomical differences in subjects who differ, for example, in their reactions to anxiety-inducing situations. Here, behavioral interventions and possible statistical models are presented in order to reduce attrition and other effects of the confounds introduced by the MRI measurement process in research. Child and adolescent research-particularly in the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder research area-is used as an example to clarify and delineate the general research principles presented in the present article. PMID:19897814

  2. Postmortem Study of Validation of Low Signal on Fat-Suppressed T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging as Marker of Lipid Core in Middle Cerebral Artery Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Jie; Zhao, Hai-Lu; Niu, Chun-Bo; Zhang, Bing; Xu, Yun; Wong, Ka-Sing; Ng, Ho-Keung

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— High signal on T1-weighted fat-suppressed images in middle cerebral artery plaques on ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging was verified to be intraplaque hemorrhage histologically. However, the underlying plaque component of low signal on T1-weighted fat-suppressed images (LST1) has never been explored. Based on our experience, we hypothesized that LST1 might indicate the presence of lipid core within intracranial plaques. Methods— 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging was performed in the postmortem brains to scan the cross sections of bilateral middle cerebral arteries. Then middle cerebral artery specimens were removed for histology processing. LST1 presence was identified on magnetic resonance images, and lipid core areas were measured on the corresponding histology sections. Results— Total 76 middle cerebral artery locations were included for analysis. LST1 showed a high specificity (96.9%; 95% confidence interval, 82.0%–99.8%) but a low sensitivity (38.6%; 95% confidence interval, 24.7%–54.5%) for detecting lipid core of all areas. However, the sensitivity increased markedly (81.2%; 95% confidence interval, 53.7%–95.0%) when only lipid cores of area ≥0.80 mm2 were included. Mean lipid core area was 5× larger in those with presence of LST1 than in those without (1.63±1.18 mm2 versus 0.32±0.31 mm2; P=0.003). Conclusions— LST1 is a promising imaging biomarker of identifying intraplaque lipid core, which may be useful to distinguish intracranial atherosclerotic disease from other intracranial vasculopathies and to assess plaque vulnerability for risk stratification of patients with intracranial atherosclerotic disease. In vivo clinical studies are required to explore the correlation between LST1 and clinical outcomes of patients with intracranial atherosclerotic disease. PMID:27462119

  3. Sports Health Magnetic Resonance Imaging Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Gary A.; Stadnick, Michael E.; Awh, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    Injuries to the Lisfranc ligament complex are often suspected, particularly in the setting of midfoot pain without radiographic abnormality. Knowledge of the anatomy and magnetic resonance imaging findings of injuries to this region is helpful for the diagnosing and treating physicians. PMID:23015984

  4. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of immiscible fluid displacement in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing-Den; Dias, Madalena M.; Patz, Samuel; Schwartz, Lawrence M.

    1988-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is used to study oil and water invasion in a model porous medium. Images taken normal to the flow direction are processed to give both the oil saturation and the fractal character of the oil distribution. These images reveal qualitative differences between the cases of invasion by the wetting (water) and nonwetting (oil) fluids. We have also found large saturation fluctuations in the residual oil state in which the oil consists entirely of disconnected blobs.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Norman, D.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers on technological advancement and diagnostic uses g magnetic resonance imaging. A comparative evaluation with computerized tomography is presented. Topics covered are imaging principles g magnetic resonance;instrumentation of magnetic resonance (MR);pathophysiology;quality and limitations g images;NMR imaging of brain and spinal cord;MR spectroscopy and its applications;neuroanatomy;Congenital malformations of brain and MR imaging;planning g MR imaging of spine and head and neck imaging.

  7. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging in obstetric practice

    PubMed Central

    Köşüş, Aydın; Köşüş, Nermin; Usluoğulları, Betül; Duran, Müzeyyen; Turhan, Nilgün Öztürk; Tekşam, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonography (USG) is the primary imaging method for prenatal diagnosis of fetal abnormalities since its discovery. Although it is the primary method of fetal imaging, it cannot provide sufficient information about the fetus in some conditions such as maternal obesity, oligohydramnios and engagement of the fetal head. At this stage, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) facilitates examination by providing more specific information. The need and importance of fetal MRI applications further increased by the intrauterine surgery which is currently gaining popularity. Some advantages of fetal MRI over USG are the good texture of contrast, a greater study area and visualization of the lesion and neighbourhood relations, independence of the operators. Also it is not affected by maternal obesity and severe oligohydramnios. However, MRI is inadequate in detecting fetal limb and cardiac abnormalities when compared to USG. MRI is not used routinely in pregnancy. It is used in situations where nonionizing imaging methods are inadequate or ionizing radiation is required in pregnant women. It is not recommended during the first trimester. Contrast agent (Godalinium) is not used during pregnancy. It is believed that MRI is not harmful to the fetus, although the biological risk of MRI application is not known. MRI technique is superior to USG in the detection of corpus callosum dysgenesis, third-trimester evaluation of posterior fossa malformations, bilateral renal agenesis, diaphragmatic hernia and assessment of lung maturation. Especially, it is the method of choice for evaluation of central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities. Fetal MRI has a complementary role with USG. It provides important information for prenatal diagnosis, increases diagnostic accuracy, and in turn affects the prenatal treatment, prenatal interventions and birth plan. PMID:24591956

  8. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging in obstetric practice.

    PubMed

    Köşüş, Aydın; Köşüş, Nermin; Usluoğulları, Betül; Duran, Müzeyyen; Turhan, Nilgün Öztürk; Tekşam, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonography (USG) is the primary imaging method for prenatal diagnosis of fetal abnormalities since its discovery. Although it is the primary method of fetal imaging, it cannot provide sufficient information about the fetus in some conditions such as maternal obesity, oligohydramnios and engagement of the fetal head. At this stage, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) facilitates examination by providing more specific information. The need and importance of fetal MRI applications further increased by the intrauterine surgery which is currently gaining popularity. Some advantages of fetal MRI over USG are the good texture of contrast, a greater study area and visualization of the lesion and neighbourhood relations, independence of the operators. Also it is not affected by maternal obesity and severe oligohydramnios. However, MRI is inadequate in detecting fetal limb and cardiac abnormalities when compared to USG. MRI is not used routinely in pregnancy. It is used in situations where nonionizing imaging methods are inadequate or ionizing radiation is required in pregnant women. It is not recommended during the first trimester. Contrast agent (Godalinium) is not used during pregnancy. It is believed that MRI is not harmful to the fetus, although the biological risk of MRI application is not known. MRI technique is superior to USG in the detection of corpus callosum dysgenesis, third-trimester evaluation of posterior fossa malformations, bilateral renal agenesis, diaphragmatic hernia and assessment of lung maturation. Especially, it is the method of choice for evaluation of central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities. Fetal MRI has a complementary role with USG. It provides important information for prenatal diagnosis, increases diagnostic accuracy, and in turn affects the prenatal treatment, prenatal interventions and birth plan. PMID:24591956

  9. Travelling wave magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, F.; Martin, R.; Marrufo, O.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2013-08-01

    Waveguides have been successfully used to generate magnetic resonance images at 7 T with whole-body systems. The bore diameter limits the magnetic resonance signal transmitted because its specific cut-off frequency is greater than the majority of resonant frequencies in magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. This restriction can be overcome by using a parallel-plate waveguide whose cut-off frequency is zero for the transverse electromagnetic modes and it can propagate any frequency. To study the potential benefits of travelling-wave excitation for whole-body imaging at 3 T, we compare numerical simulations of the principal mode propagation for a parallel-plate waveguide filled with a cylindrical phantom and two surface coils for all simulations at 1.5 T, 3 T, 4.7, 7 T, and 9.4 T. The principal mode shows very little variation of the field magnitude along the propagation direction at 3 T when compared to other higher resonant frequencies. Unlike the standard method for travelling-wave magnetic resonance imaging, a parallel-plate waveguide prototype was built and used together with a whole-body birdcage coil for signal transmission and a pair of circular coils for reception. Experimental B1 mapping was computed to investigate the feasibility of this approach and, the point spread function method was used to measure the imager performance. Human leg images were acquired to experimentally validate this approach. The numerical magnetic field and specific absorption rate of a simulated leg were computed and results are within the safety limits. The B1 mapping and point spread function results showed that it is possible to conduct travelling-wave imaging experiments with good imager performance. Human leg images were also obtained with the whole-body birdcage coil for comparison purposes. The simulated and in vivo travelling-wave results of the human leg correspond very well for the signal received. A similar image signal-to-noise ratio was observed for the

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging: From Spin Physics to Medical Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacher, Pierre-Jean

    Two rather similar historical evolutions are evoked, each one originating in fundamental spin studies by physicists, and ending as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a set of invaluable tools for clinical diagnosis in the hands of medical doctors. The first one starts with the early work on nuclear magnetic resonance, the founding stone of the usual proton-based MRI, of which the basic principles are described. The second one starts with the optical pumping developments made to study the effects of spin polarization in various fundamental problems. Its unexpected outcome is a unique imaging modality, also based on MRI, for the study of lung physiology and pathologies.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Guneyli, Serkan; Erdem, Cemile Zuhal; Erdem, Lutfi Oktay

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the causes of cancer-related deaths. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides the best soft tissue resolution and plays an important role in the management of prostate cancer patients. It is the recommended imaging modality for patients with prostate cancer, and it is clinically indicated for diagnosis, staging, tumor localization, detection of tumor aggressiveness, follow-up, and MRI-guided interventions. Multiparametric MRI includes T1- and high-resolution T2-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. We evaluated MR images of patients with prostate cancer who underwent multiparametric endorectal MRI on a 3.0-T scanner and presented demonstrative images. PMID:27317204

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in cardiac amyloidosis

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donnell, J.K.; Go, R.T.; Bott-Silverman, C.; Feiglin, D.H.; Salcedo, E.; MacIntyre, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    Primary amyloidosis (AL) involves the myocardium in 90% of cases and may present as apparent ischemia, vascular disease, or congestive heart failure. Two-dimensional echocardiography (echo) has proven useful in the diagnosis, particularly in differentiating AL from constrictive pericarditis. The findings of thickened RV and LV myocardium, normal LV cavity dimension, and a diffuse hyperrefractile ''granular sparkling'' appearance are virtually diagnostic. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging may improve the resolution of anatomic changes seen in cardiac AL and has the potential to provide more specific information based on biochemical tissue alterations. In this preliminary study, the authors obtained both MR and echo images in six patients with AL and biopsy-proven myocardial involvement. 5/6 patients also had Tc-99 PYP myocardial studies including emission tomography (SPECT). MR studies utilized a 0.6 Tesla superconductive magnet. End diastolic gated images were obtained with TE=30msec and TR=R-R interval on the ECG. 6/6 pts. showed LV wall thickening which was concentric and included the septum. Papillary muscles were identified in all and were enlarged in 3/6. 4/6 pts. showed RV wall thickening but to a lesser degree than LV. Pericardial effusions were present in 4 cases. These findings correlated well with the results of echo although MR gave better RV free wall resolution. PYP scans were positive in 3 pts. but there was no correlation with degree of LV thickening. The authors conclude that there are no identifiable MR findings in patients with cardiac AL which encourage further attempts to characterize myocardial involvement by measurement of MR relaxation times in vivo.

  13. Cerebral hemodynamics in human acute ischemic stroke: a study with diffusion- and perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and SPECT.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Karonen, J O; Vanninen, R L; Ostergaard, L; Roivainen, R; Nuutinen, J; Perkiö, J; Könönen, M; Hämäläinen, A; Vanninen, E J; Soimakallio, S; Kuikka, J T; Aronen, H J

    2000-06-01

    Nineteen patients with acute ischemic stroke (<24 hours) underwent diffusion-weighted and perfusion-weighted (PWI) magnetic resonance imaging at the acute stage and 1 week later. Eleven patients also underwent technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) at the acute stage. Relative (ischemic vs. contralateral control) cerebral blood flow (relCBF), relative cerebral blood volume, and relative mean transit time were measured in the ischemic core, in the area of infarct growth, and in the eventually viable ischemic tissue on PWI maps. The relCBF was also measured from SPECT. There was a curvilinear relationship between the relCBF measured from PWI and SPECT (r = 0.854; P < 0.001). The tissue proceeding to infarction during the follow-up had significantly lower initial CBF and cerebral blood volume values on PWI maps (P < 0.001) than the eventually viable ischemic tissue had. The best value for discriminating the area of infarct growth from the eventually viable ischemic tissue was 48% for PWI relCBF and 87% for PWI relative cerebral blood volume. Combined diffusion and perfusion-weighted imaging enables one to detect hemodynamically different subregions inside the initial perfusion abnormality. Tissue survival may be different in these subregions and may be predicted. PMID:10894174

  14. Safety and Efficacy of Gadobutrol for Contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Central Nervous System: Results from a Multicenter, Double-blind, Randomized, Comparator Study

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Juan E; Rosenberg, Martin; Seemann, Jörg; Breuer, Josy; Haverstock, Daniel; Agris, Jacob; Balzer, Thomas; Anzalone, Nicoletta

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the central nervous system (CNS) with gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) is standard of care for CNS imaging and diagnosis because of the visualization of lesions that cause blood–brain barrier breakdown. Gadobutrol is a macrocyclic GBCA with high concentration and high relaxivity. The objective of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of gadobutrol 1.0 M vs unenhanced imaging and vs the approved macrocyclic agent gadoteridol 0.5 M at a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight. MATERIALS AND METHODS Prospective, multicenter, double-blind, crossover trial in patients who underwent unenhanced MRI followed by enhanced imaging with gadobutrol or gadoteridol. Three blinded readers assessed the magnetic resonance images. The primary efficacy variables included number of lesions detected, degree of lesion contrast-enhancement, lesion border delineation, and lesion internal morphology. RESULTS Of the 402 treated patients, 390 patients received study drugs. Lesion contrast-enhancement, lesion border delineation, and lesion internal morphology were superior for combined unenhanced/gadobutrol-enhanced imaging vs unenhanced imaging (P < 0.0001 for all). Compared with gadoteridol, gadobutrol was non-inferior for all primary variables and superior for lesion contrast-enhancement, as well as sensitivity and accuracy for detection of malignant disease. The percentage of patients with at least one drug-related adverse event was similar for gadobutrol (10.0%) and gadoteridol (9.7%). CONCLUSION Gadobutrol is an effective and well-tolerated macrocyclic contrast agent for MRI of the CNS. Gadobutrol demonstrates greater contrast-enhancement and improved sensitivity and accuracy for detection of malignant disease than gadoteridol, likely because of its higher relaxivity. PMID:25922578

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in ADNI

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Clifford R.; Barnes, Josephine; Bernstein, Matt A.; Borowski, Bret J.; Brewer, James; Clegg, Shona; Dale, Anders M.; Carmichael, Owen; Ching, Christopher; DeCarli, Charles; Desikan, Rahul S.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Fjell, Anders M.; Fletcher, Evan; Fox, Nick C.; Gunter, Jeff; Gutman, Boris A.; Holland, Dominic; Hua, Xue; Insel, Philip; Kantarci, Kejal; Killiany, Ron J.; Krueger, Gunnar; Leung, Kelvin K.; Mackin, Scott; Maillard, Pauline; Molone, Ian; Mattsson, Niklas; McEvoy, Linda; Modat, Marc; Mueller, Susanne; Nosheny, Rachel; Ourselin, Sebastien; Schuff, Norbert; Senjem, Matthew L.; Simonson, Alix; Thompson, Paul M.; Rettmann, Dan; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Walhovd, Kristine; Zhao, Yansong; Zuk, Samantha; Weiner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION ADNI is now in its 10th year. The primary objective of the MRI core of ADNI has been to improve methods for clinical trials in Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders. METHODS We review the contributions of the MRI core from present and past cycles of ADNI (ADNI 1, GO and 2). We also review plans for the future – ADNI 3. RESULTS Contributions of the MRI core include creating standardized acquisition protocols and quality control methods; examining the effect of technical features of image acquisition and analysis on outcome metrics; deriving sample size estimates for future trials based on those outcomes; and piloting the potential utility of MR perfusion, diffusion, and functional connectivity measures in multicenter clinical trials. DISCUSSION Over the past decade the MRI core of ADNI has fulfilled its mandate of improving methods for clinical trials in Alzheimer’s disease and will continue to do so in the future. PMID:26194310

  16. Magnetic resonance microscopy of prostate tissue: How basic science can inform clinical imaging development

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, Roger

    2013-03-15

    This commentary outlines how magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) microscopy studies of prostate tissue samples and whole organs have shed light on a number of clinical imaging mysteries and may enable more effective development of new clinical imaging methods.

  17. Residual analysis of the water resonance signal in breast lesions imaged with high spectral and spatial resolution (HiSS) MRI: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, William A. Medved, Milica; Karczmar, Gregory S.; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: High spectral and spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HiSS MRI) yields information on the local environment of suspicious lesions. Previous work has demonstrated the advantages of HiSS (complete fat-suppression, improved image contrast, no required contrast agent, etc.), leading to initial investigations of water resonance lineshape for the purpose of breast lesion classification. The purpose of this study is to investigate a quantitative imaging biomarker, which characterizes non-Lorentzian components of the water resonance in HiSS MRI datasets, for computer-aided diagnosis (CADx). Methods: The inhomogeneous broadening and non-Lorentzian or “off-peak” components seen in the water resonance of proton spectra of breast HiSS images are analyzed by subtracting a Lorentzian fit from the water peak spectra and evaluating the difference spectrum or “residual.” The maxima of these residuals (referred to hereafter as “off-peak components”) tend to be larger in magnitude in malignant lesions, indicating increased broadening in malignant lesions. The authors considered only those voxels with the highest magnitude off-peak components in each lesion, with the number of selected voxels dependent on lesion size. Our voxel-based method compared the magnitudes and frequencies of off-peak components of all voxels from all lesions in a database that included 15 malignant and 8 benign lesions (yielding ∼3900 voxels) based on the lesions’ biopsy-confirmed diagnosis. Lesion classification was accomplished by comparing the average off-peak component magnitudes and frequencies in malignant and benign lesions. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was used as a figure of merit for both the voxel-based and lesion-based methods. Results: In the voxel-based task of distinguishing voxels from malignant and benign lesions, off-peak magnitude yielded an AUC of 0.88 (95% confidence interval [0.84, 0.91]). In the lesion-based task of distinguishing malignant and

  18. Central Motor Conduction Studies and Diagnostic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Children with Severe Primary and Secondary Dystonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, Verity; Mills, Kerry; Siddiqui, Ata; Selway, Richard; Lin, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Dystonia in childhood has many causes. Imaging may suggest corticospinal tract dysfunction with or without coexistent basal ganglia damage. There are very few published neurophysiological studies on children with dystonia; one previous study has focused on primary dystonia. We investigated central motor conduction in 62 children (34 males, 28…

  19. Feasibility of studying brain morphology in major depressive disorder with structural magnetic resonance imaging and clinical data from the electronic medical record: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Hoogenboom, Wouter S.; Perlis, Roy H.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Zeng-Treitler, Qing; Gainer, Vivian S.; Murphy, Shawn N.; Churchill, Susanne E.; Kohane, Isaac S.; Shenton, Martha E.; Iosifescu, Dan V.

    2012-01-01

    For certain research questions related to long-term outcomes or to rare disorders, designing prospective studies is impractical or prohibitively expensive. Such studies could instead utilize clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data (MRI) collected as part of routine clinical care, stored in the electronic medical record (EMR). Using major depressive disorder (MDD) as a disease model, we examined the feasibility of studying brain morphology and associations with remission using clinical and MRI data exclusively drawn from the EMR. Advanced automated tools were used to select MDD patients and controls from the EMR who had brain MRI data, but no diagnosed brain pathology. MDD patients were further assessed for remission status by review of clinical charts. Twenty MDD patients (eight full-remitters, six partial-remitters, and six non-remitters), and fifteen healthy control subjects met all study criteria for advanced morphometric analyses. Compared to controls, MDD patients had significantly smaller right rostral-anterior cingulate volume, and level of non-remission was associated with smaller left hippocampus and left rostral-middle frontal gyrus volume. The use of EMR data for psychiatric research may provide a timely and cost-effective approach with the potential to generate large study samples reflective of the real population with the illness studied. PMID:23149041

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Other Imaging Modalities in Diagnostic and Tumor Response Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lambregts, Doenja M J; Maas, Monique; Stokkel, Marcel P M; Beets-Tan, Regina G H

    2016-07-01

    Functional imaging is emerging as a valuable contributor to the clinical management of patients with rectal cancer. Techniques such as diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, perfusion imaging, and positron emission tomography can offer meaningful insights into tissue architecture, vascularity, and metabolism. Moreover, new techniques targeting other aspects of tumor biology are now being developed and studied. This study reviews the potential role of functional imaging for the diagnosis, treatment monitoring, and assessment of prognosis in patients with rectal cancer. PMID:27238470

  1. Volume coil based on hybridized resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouvaud, C.; Abdeddaim, R.; Larrat, B.; de Rosny, J.

    2016-01-01

    We present an electromagnetic device based on hybridization of four half-wavelength dipoles which increases the uniformity and the strength of the radio-frequency (RF) field of a Magnetic Resonant Imaging (MRI) apparatus. Numerical results show that this Hybridized Coil (HC) excited with a classical loop coil takes advantage of the magnetic hybrid modes. The distribution of the RF magnetic field is experimentally confirmed on a 7-T MRI with a gelatin phantom. Finally, the HC is validated in vivo by imaging the head of an anesthetized rat. We measure an overall increase of the signal to noise ratio with up to 2.4 fold increase in regions of interest far from the active loop coil.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging--first human images in Australia.

    PubMed

    Baddeley, H; Doddrell, D M; Brooks, W M; Field, J; Irving, M; Williams, J E

    1986-10-20

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging, in the demonstration of internal human anatomy and in the diagnosis of disease, has the major advantages that the technique is noninvasive, does not require the use of ionizing radiation and that it can demonstrate neurological and cardiovascular lesions that cannot be diagnosed easily by other imaging methods. Magnetic resonance imaging is derived from the principle that certain atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field will absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy; when the pulse is finished the nuclei will emit radiowaves at the same frequency. These radiowaves are received by specially designed aerials or coils and the information is collected by a computer which reconstructs an image of internal anatomy in a similar way to that of x-ray computed tomography (CT). By changing the strength of the magnetic fields and the frequency of the radiowave pulses, it is possible to examine different sections within the body. The first magnetic resonance images of humans were obtained in Australia in October 1985 on the research instrument of the Queensland Medical Magnetic Resonance Research Centre, which is based at the Mater Hospital in Brisbane, and is part of the University of Queensland's Department of Radiology. PMID:3020385

  3. Quantitative simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Petibon, Yoann; Huang, Chuan; Reese, Timothy G.; Kolnick, Aleksandra L.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MR) is an innovative and promising imaging modality that is generating substantial interest in the medical imaging community, while offering many challenges and opportunities. In this study, we investigated whether MR surface coils need to be accounted for in PET attenuation correction. Furthermore, we integrated motion correction, attenuation correction, and point spread function modeling into a single PET reconstruction framework. We applied our reconstruction framework to in vivo animal and patient PET-MR studies. We have demonstrated that our approach greatly improved PET image quality. PMID:26158055

  4. Quantitative simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Petibon, Yoann; Huang, Chuan; Reese, Timothy G; Kolnick, Aleksandra L; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-10-01

    Simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MR) is an innovative and promising imaging modality that is generating substantial interest in the medical imaging community, while offering many challenges and opportunities. In this study, we investigated whether MR surface coils need to be accounted for in PET attenuation correction. Furthermore, we integrated motion correction, attenuation correction, and point spread function modeling into a single PET reconstruction framework. We applied our reconstruction framework to in vivo animal and patient PET-MR studies. We have demonstrated that our approach greatly improved PET image quality. PMID:26158055

  5. A Cinematic Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Milk of Magnesia Laxative and an Antiflatulent Diet to Reduce Intrafraction Prostate Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Nichol, Alan M.; Warde, Padraig R.; Lockwood, Gina A.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the reduction of prostate motion during a typical radiotherapy (RT) fraction from a bowel regimen comprising an antiflatulent diet and daily milk of magnesia. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients with T1c-T2c prostate cancer voided the bladder and rectum before three cinematic magnetic resonance imaging scans obtained every 9 s for 9 min in a vacuum immobilization device. The MRIs were at baseline without bowel regimen (MRI-BL), before CT planning with bowel regimen (MRI-CT), and before a randomly assigned RT fraction (1-42) with bowel regimen (MRI-RT). A single observer tracked displacement of the posterior midpoint (PM) of the prostate. The primary endpoints were comparisons of the proportion of time that the PM was displaced >3 mm (PTPM3) from its initial position, and the secondary endpoints were comparisons of the reduction of initial rectal area, with and without the bowel regimen. Results: The mean rectal area was: 13.5 cm{sup 2} at MRI-BL, 12.7 cm{sup 2} at MRI-CT, and 12.3 cm{sup 2} at MRI-RT (MRI-BL vs. MRI-CT, p = 0.11; MRI-BL vs. MRI-CT, p = 0.07). Moving rectal gas alone (56%) and moving gas and stool (18%) caused 74% of intrafraction prostate motion. The PTPM3 was 11.3% at MRI-BL, 4.8% at MRI-CT, and 12.0% at MRI-RT (MRI-BL vs. MRI-CT, p = 0.12; MRI-BL vs. MRI-RT, p = 0.89). Conclusion: For subjects voiding their rectum before imaging, an antiflatulent diet and milk of magnesia laxative did not significantly reduce initial rectal area or intrafraction prostate motion.

  6. A prospective study of the efficacy of magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging for predicting locally advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Razi, Ali; Parizi, Mehdi Kardoust; Kazemeini, Seid Mohammad; Abedi, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) for predicting locally advanced prostate cancer (PC). Materials and methods: Between April 2009 and July 2012, 80 consecutive patients with clinically localized PC had undergone endorectal MRSI before radical retropubic prostatectomy. Clinicopathological parameters, including age, preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score (GS) at biopsy, perinural invasion at biopsy, prostate weight at surgery, GS of surgical specimen, and pathological staging were recorded. The MRSI findings were compared with the histopathological findings of the radical prostatectomy. The diagnostic accuracy measures consisting of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) of MRSI, and other variables in the diagnosis of locally advanced PC (Pathology Stages pT3a, pT3b, or pT4) were evaluated. Results: Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRSI in detecting locally advanced PC is 42.4%, 93.6%, 82.3%, and 69.8%, respectively [area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve=0.658, p value <0.0001]. MRSI, cancer-positive core percentage at biopsy, and GS at biopsy are more accurate factors among all the predictive variables in predicting locally advanced PC. Conclusion: MRSI may be considered as a complementary diagnostic modality with high specificity and moderate sensitivity in predicting locally advanced PC. Combination of this modality with other predictive factors helps the surgeon and patient to select an appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26328204

  7. Time series analysis in the time domain and resampling methods for studies of functional magnetic resonance brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Locascio, J J; Jennings, P J; Moore, C I; Corkin, S

    1997-01-01

    Although functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) methods yield rich temporal and spatial data for even a single subject, universally accepted data analysis techniques have not been developed that use all the potential information from fMRI of the brain. Specifically, temporal correlations and confounds are a problem in assessing change within pixels. Spatial correlations across pixels are a problem in determining regions of activation and in correcting for multiple significance tests. We propose methods that address these issues in the analysis of task-related changes in mean signal intensity for individual subjects. Our approach to temporally based problems within pixels is to employ a model based on autoregressive-moving average (ARMA or "Box-Jenkins") time series methods, which we call CARMA (Contrasts and ARMA). To adjust for performing multiple significance tests across pixels, taking into account between-pixel correlations, we propose adjustment of P values with "resampling methods." Our objective is to produce two- or three-dimensional brain maps that provide, at each pixel in the map, an estimated P value with absolute meaning. That is, each P value approximates the probability of having obtained by chance the observed signal effect at that pixel, given that the null hypothesis is true. Simulated and real data examples are provided. PMID:20408214

  8. A visualization study on two-phase gravity drainage in porous media by using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Teng, Ying; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Lanlan; Song, Yongchen; Zhao, Jiafei; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Dayong

    2016-09-01

    Gravity drainage characteristics are important to improve our understanding of gas-liquid or liquid-liquid two-phase flow in porous media. Stable or unstable displacement fronts that controlled by the capillary force, viscous force, gravitational force, etc., are relevant features of immiscible two-phase flow. In this paper, three dimensionless parameters, namely, the gravity number, the capillary number and the Bond number, were used to describe the effect of the above mentioned forces on two-phase drainage features, including the displacement front and final displacing-phase saturation. A series of experiments on the downward displacement of a viscous fluid by a less viscous fluid in a vertical vessel that is filled with quartz beads are performed by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The experimental results indicate that the wetting properties at both high and low capillary numbers exert remarkable control on the fluid displacement. When the contact angle is lower than 90°, i.e., the displaced phase is the wetting phase, the average velocity Vf of the interface of the two phases (displacement front velocity) is observably lower than when the displaced phase is the non-wetting phase (contact angle higher than 90°). The results show that a fingering phenomenon occurs when the gravity number G is less than the critical gravity number G'=Δμ/μg. Moreover, the higher Bond number results in higher final displacing-phase saturation, whereas the capillary number has an opposite effect. PMID:26968140

  9. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study of visuomotor processing in a virtual reality-based paradigm: Rehabilitation Gaming System.

    PubMed

    Prochnow, D; Bermúdez i Badia, S; Schmidt, J; Duff, A; Brunheim, S; Kleiser, R; Seitz, R J; Verschure, P F M J

    2013-05-01

    The Rehabilitation Gaming System (RGS) has been designed as a flexible, virtual-reality (VR)-based device for rehabilitation of neurological patients. Recently, training of visuomotor processing with the RGS was shown to effectively improve arm function in acute and chronic stroke patients. It is assumed that the VR-based training protocol related to RGS creates conditions that aid recovery by virtue of the human mirror neuron system. Here, we provide evidence for this assumption by identifying the brain areas involved in controlling the catching of approaching colored balls in the virtual environment of the RGS. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging of 18 right-handed healthy subjects (24 ± 3 years) in both active and imagination conditions. We observed that the imagery of target catching was related to activation of frontal, parietal, temporal, cingulate and cerebellar regions. We interpret these activations in relation to object processing, attention, mirror mechanisms, and motor intention. Active catching followed an anticipatory mode, and resulted in significantly less activity in the motor control areas. Our results provide preliminary support for the hypothesis underlying RGS that this novel neurorehabilitation approach engages human mirror mechanisms that can be employed for visuomotor training. PMID:23414211

  10. Postnatal development of the hippocampus in the Rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta): a longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Hunsaker, Michael R; Scott, Julia A; Bauman, Melissa D; Schumann, Cynthia M; Amaral, David G

    2014-07-01

    Nonhuman primates are widely used models to investigate the neural substrates of human behavior, including the development of higher cognitive and affective function. Due to their neuroanatomical and behavioral homologies with humans, the rhesus macaque monkey (Macaca mulatta) provides an excellent animal model in which to characterize the maturation of brain structures from birth through adulthood and into senescence. To evaluate hippocampal development in rhesus macaques, structural magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained longitudinally at 9 time points between 1 week and 260 weeks (5 years) of age on 24 rhesus macaque monkeys (12 males, 12 females). In our sample, the hippocampus reaches 50% of its adult volume by 13 weeks of age and reaches an adult volume by 52 weeks in both males and females. The hippocampus appears to be slightly larger at 3 years than at 5 years of age. Male rhesus macaques have larger hippocampi than females from 8 weeks onward by approximately 5%. Interestingly, there was increased variability in hemispheric asymmetry for hippocampus volumes at younger ages than at later ages. These data provide a comprehensive evaluation of the longitudinal development of male and female rhesus macaque hippocampus across development from 1 week to 5 years of age. PMID:24648155

  11. Postnatal Development of the Hippocampus in the Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta): A Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Hunsaker, Michael R.; Scott, Julia A.; Bauman, Melissa D.; Schumann, Cynthia M.; Amaral, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Nonhuman primates are widely used models to investigate the neural substrates of human behavior, including the development of higher cognitive and affective function. Due to their neuroanatomical and behavioral homologies with humans, the rhesus macaque monkey (Macaca mulatta) provides an excellent animal model in which to characterize the maturation of brain structures from birth through adulthood and into senescence. To evaluate hippocampal development in rhesus macaques, structural magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained longitudinally at 9 time points between 1 week and 260 weeks (5 years) of age on 24 rhesus macaque monkeys (12 male, 12 female). In our sample, the hippocampus reaches 50% of its adult volume by 13 weeks of age and reaches an adult volume by 52 weeks in both males and females. The hippocampus appears to be slightly larger at 3 years than at 5 years of age. Male rhesus macaques have larger hippocampi than females from 8 weeks onward by approximately 5%. Interestingly, there was increased variability in hemispheric asymmetry for hippocampus volumes at younger ages than at later ages. These data provide a comprehensive evaluation of the longitudinal development of male and female rhesus macaque hippocampus across development from 1 week to 5 years of age. PMID:24648155

  12. Magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging

    PubMed Central

    McDannold, Nathan; Maier, Stephan E.

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging is an elastography method developed for ultrasound imaging that maps displacements produced by focused ultrasound pulses systematically applied to different locations. The resulting images are “stiffness weighted” and yield information about local mechanical tissue properties. Here, the feasibility of magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) was tested. Quasistatic MR elastography was used to measure focal displacements using a one-dimensional MRI pulse sequence. A 1.63 or 1.5 MHz transducer supplied ultrasound pulses which were triggered by the magnetic resonance imaging hardware to occur before a displacement-encoding gradient. Displacements in and around the focus were mapped in a tissue-mimicking phantom and in an ex vivo bovine kidney. They were readily observed and increased linearly with acoustic power in the phantom (R2=0.99). At higher acoustic power levels, the displacement substantially increased and was associated with irreversible changes in the phantom. At these levels, transverse displacement components could also be detected. Displacements in the kidney were also observed and increased after thermal ablation. While the measurements need validation, the authors have demonstrated the feasibility of detecting small displacements induced by low-power ultrasound pulses using an efficient magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequence that is compatible with tracking of a dynamically steered ultrasound focal spot, and that the displacement increases with acoustic power. MR-ARFI has potential for elastography or to guide ultrasound therapies that use low-power pulsed ultrasound exposures, such as drug delivery. PMID:18777934

  13. Fundamental physics of magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Villafana, T

    1988-07-01

    Although similar to computerized tomography, in that cross-sectional images are produced, the physical principles underlying magnetic resonance are entirely different. The MRI process, as commonly implemented, involves the excitation of hydrogen nuclei and the analysis of how these nuclei recover to the original equilibrium steady states that they had prior to excitation. This article discusses that process, that is, preparatory alignment, RF excitation, relaxation and signal measurement, and spatial localization. PMID:3380941

  14. Progesterone-Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Determination of progesterone receptor (PR) status in hormone-dependent diseases is essential in ascertaining disease prognosis and monitoring treatment response. The development of a noninvasive means of monitoring these processes would have significant impact on early detection, cost, repeated measurements, and personalized treatment options. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely recognized as a technique that can produce longitudinal studies, and PR-targeted MR probes may address a clinical problem by providing contrast enhancement that reports on PR status without biopsy. Commercially available MR contrast agents are typically delivered via intravenous injection, whereas steroids are administered subcutaneously. Whether the route of delivery is important for tissue accumulation of steroid-modified MRI contrast agents to PR-rich tissues is not known. To address this question, modification of the chemistry linking progesterone with the gadolinium chelate led to MR probes with increased water solubility and lower cellular toxicity and enabled administration through the blood. This attribute came at a cost through lower affinity for PR and decreased ability to cross the cell membrane, and ultimately it did not improve delivery of the PR-targeted MR probe to PR-rich tissues or tumors in vivo. Overall, these studies are important, as they demonstrate that targeted contrast agents require optimization of delivery and receptor binding of the steroid and the gadolinium chelate for optimal translation in vivo. PMID:25019183

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in central pontine myelinolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, P D; Miller, D; Gledhill, R F; Rossor, M N

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in two patients in whom a clinical diagnosis of central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) had been made. MRI showed lesions in the pons in both cases about 2 years after the illness, at a time when the spastic quadriparesis and pseudobulbar palsy had recovered. The persisting abnormal signals in CPM are likely to be due to fibrillary gliosis. Persistence of lesions on MRI means that the diagnosis of CPM may be electively, after the acute illness has resolved. Images PMID:2732743

  16. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hedgire, Sandeep S; Oei, Tamara N; McDermott, Shaunagh; Cao, Kai; Patel M, Zena; Harisinghani, Mukesh G

    2012-07-01

    In India, prostate cancer has an incidence rate of 3.9 per 100,000 men and is responsible for 9% of cancer-related mortality. It is the only malignancy that is diagnosed with an apparently blind technique, i.e., transrectal sextant biopsy. With increasing numbers of high-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment being installed in India, the radiologist needs to be cognizant about endorectal MRI and multiparametric imaging for prostate cancer. In this review article, we aim to highlight the utility of multiparamteric MRI in prostate cancer. It plays a crucial role, mainly in initial staging, restaging, and post-treatment follow-up. PMID:23599562

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Nael, Kambiz; Kubal, Wayne

    2016-05-01

    Neuroimaging plays a critical role in the management of patients with acute stroke syndrome, with diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic implications. A multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol in the emergency setting can address both primary goals of neuroimaging (ie, detection of infarction and exclusion of hemorrhage) and secondary goals of neuroimaging (ie, identifying the site of arterial occlusion, tissue characterization for defining infarct core and penumbra, and determining stroke cause/mechanism). MR imaging provides accurate diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and can differentiate AIS from other potential differential diagnoses. PMID:27150320

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: An update

    PubMed Central

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

  19. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging in cancer.

    PubMed

    Haris, Mohammad; Yadav, Santosh K; Rizwan, Arshi; Singh, Anup; Wang, Ena; Hariharan, Hari; Reddy, Ravinder; Marincola, Francesco M

    2015-01-01

    The ability to identify key biomolecules and molecular changes associated with cancer malignancy and the capacity to monitor the therapeutic outcome against these targets is critically important for cancer treatment. Recent developments in molecular imaging based on magnetic resonance (MR) techniques have provided researchers and clinicians with new tools to improve most facets of cancer care. Molecular imaging is broadly described as imaging techniques used to detect molecular signature at the cellular and gene expression levels. This article reviews both established and emerging molecular MR techniques in oncology and discusses the potential of these techniques in improving the clinical cancer care. It also discusses how molecular MR, in conjunction with other structural and functional MR imaging techniques, paves the way for developing tailored treatment strategies to enhance cancer care. PMID:26394751

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: an update.

    PubMed

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-10-28

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

  1. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging: Current role in prostate cancer management.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Yoshiko; Tamada, Tsutomu; Bist, Vipul; Reinhold, Caroline; Miyake, Hideaki; Tanaka, Utaru; Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Sugimura, Kazuro; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-07-01

    Digital rectal examination, serum prostate-specific antigen screening and transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy are conventionally used as screening, diagnostic and surveillance tools for prostate cancer. However, they have limited sensitivity and specificity. In recent years, the role of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging has steadily grown, and is now part of the standard clinical management in many institutions. In multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, the morphological assessment of T2-weighted imaging is correlated with diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging perfusion and/or magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging is currently regarded as the most sensitive and specific imaging technique for the evaluation of prostate cancer, including detection, staging, localization and aggressiveness evaluation. This article presents an overview of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, and discusses the current role of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging in the different fields of prostate cancer management. PMID:27184019

  2. Imaging by electromagnetic induction with resonant circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilizzoni, Roberta; Watson, Joseph C.; Bartlett, Paul; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2015-05-01

    A new electromagnetic induction imaging system is presented which is capable of imaging metallic samples of different conductivities. The system is based on a parallel LCR circuit made up of a cylindrical ferrite-cored coil and a capacitor bank. An AC current is applied to the coil, thus generating an AC magnetic field. This field is modified when a conductive sample is placed within the magnetic field, as a consequence of eddy current induction inside the sample. The electrical properties of the LCR circuit, including the coil inductance, are modified due to the presence of this metallic sample. Position-resolved measurements of these modifications should then allow imaging of conductive objects as well as enable their characterization. A proof-of-principle system is presented in this paper. Two imaging techniques based on Q-factor and resonant frequency measurements are presented. Both techniques produced conductivity maps of 14 metallic objects with different geometries and values of conductivity ranging from 0.54х106 to 59.77х106 S/m. Experimental results highlighted a higher sensitivity for the Q-factor technique compared to the resonant frequency one; the respective measurements were found to vary within the following ranges: ΔQ=[-11,-2]%, Δf=[-0.3,0.7]%. The analysis of the images, conducted using a Canny edge detection algorithm, demonstrated the suitability of the Q-factor technique for accurate edge detection of both magnetic and non-magnetic metallic samples.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging. Application to family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, R. H.; Somers, S.; Jurriaans, E.; Yu, J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review indications, contraindications, and risks of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to help primary care physicians refer patients appropriately for MRI, screen for contraindications to using MRI, and educate patients about MRI. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Recommendations are based on classic textbooks, the policies of our MRI group, and a literature search using MEDLINE with the MeSH headings magnetic resonance imaging, brain, musculoskeletal, and spine. The search was limited to human, English-language, and review articles. Evidence in favour of using MRI for imaging the head, spine, and joints is well established. For cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic conditions, MRI has been shown useful for certain indications, usually to complement other modalities. MAIN MESSAGE: For demonstrating soft tissue conditions, MRI is better than computed tomography (CT), but CT shows bone and acute bleeding better. Therefore, patients with trauma or suspected intracranial bleeding should have CT. Tumours, congenital abnormalities, vascular structures, and the cervical or thoracic spine show better on MRI. Either modality can be used for lower back pain. Cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic abnormalities should be imaged with ultrasound or CT before MRI. Contraindications for MRI are mainly metallic implants or shrapnel, severe claustrophobia, or obesity. CONCLUSIONS: With the increasing availability of MRI scanners in Canada, better understanding of the indications, contraindications, and risks will be helpful for family physicians and their patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:10509224

  4. Quantitative Perfusion- and Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Gastrointestinal Cancers Treated With Multikinase Inhibitors: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Keene, Kimberly S.; Sarver, David B.; Lee, S. Kyle; Beasley, T. Mark; Morgan, Desiree E.; Posey, James A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) are often used to detect the early response of solid tumors to an effective therapy. The early changes in intratumoral physiological parameters measured by DCE-MRI/DWI have been evaluated as surrogate biomarkers allowing a tailored treatment for the individual patient. METHODS: Patients with newly diagnosed, biopsy-proven, treatment-naïve gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were enrolled prospectively after institutional review board (IRB)–approved informed consent (5 patients per tumor type). Patients with GIST were treated with sunitinib over 6 weeks. DCE-MRI/DWI was applied before therapy (baseline imaging) and at 2 and 6 weeks after therapy initiation. Patients with HCC were treated with radiation during the first 2 weeks and then with sorafenib for the next 6 weeks. DCE-MRI/DWI was applied in all patients with HCC before and after radiation therapy and at the end of sorafenib therapy. Tumor volume, perfusion parameters (Ktrans, the forward volume-transfer constant, and kep, the reverse reflux-rate constant) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were measured. RESULTS: During 2 weeks of sunitinib therapy, GIST volume, Ktrans, and kep decreased 32 ± 13, 45 ± 24, and 42 ± 15%, respectively, whereas ADC increased 76 ± 24%. After 6 weeks of sunitinib therapy, GIST volume, Ktrans, and kep decreased 56 ± 7, 70 ± 7, and 50 ± 12%, respectively, whereas ADC increased 85 ± 33%. After completion of radiation therapy, HCC volume, Ktrans, and kep decreased 34 ± 14, 35 ± 12, and 4 ± 21%, respectively, but ADC increased 21 ± 9%. During the entire 10-week therapeutic period, HCC volume, Ktrans, and kep decreased 65 ± 15, 40 ± 9, and 26 ± 2%, respectively, whereas ADC increased 28 ± 10%. CONCLUSION: DCE-MRI/DWI can measure the perfusion and diffusion changes in GISTs or HCCs treated with

  5. Multi-dimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here we propose the multi-dimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel RF coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. PMID:22926830

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging: present and future applications

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Donald L.; Liu, Peter; Wismer, Gary L.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Stark, David D.; New, Paul F.J.; Okada, Robert D.; Brady, Thomas J.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has created considerable excitement in the medical community, largely because of its great potential to diagnose and characterize many different disease processes. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that, because MR imaging is similar to computed tomography (CT) scanning in identifying structural disorders and because it is more costly and difficult to use, this highly useful technique must be judged against CT before it can become an accepted investigative tool. At present MR imaging has demonstrated diagnostic superiority over CT in a limited number of important, mostly neurologic, disorders and is complementary to CT in the diagnosis of certain other disorders. For most of the remaining organ systems its usefulness is not clear, but the lack of ionizing radiation and MR's ability to produce images in any tomographic plane may eventually prove to be advantageous. The potential of MR imaging to display in-vivo spectra, multinuclear images and blood-flow data makes it an exciting investigative technique. At present, however, MR imaging units should be installed only in medical centres equipped with the clinical and basic research facilities that are essential to evaluate the ultimate role of this technique in the care of patients. ImagesFig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14 PMID:3884120

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Postprostatectomy Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Sefrova, Jana; Odrazka, Karel; Paluska, Petr; Belobradek, Zdenek; Brodak, Milos; Dolezel, Martin; Prosvic, Petr; Macingova, Zuzana; Vosmik, Milan; Hoffmann, Petr; Louda, Miroslav; Nejedla, Anna

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in prostate bed treatment planning could influence definition of the clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk. Methods and Materials: A total of 21 consecutive patients referred for prostate bed radiotherapy were included in the present retrospective study. The CTV was delineated according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer recommendations on computed tomography (CT) and T{sub 1}-weighted (T{sub 1}w) and T{sub 2}-weighted (T{sub 2}w) MRI. The CTV magnitude, agreement, and spatial differences were evaluated on the planning CT scan after registration with the MRI scans. Results: The CTV was significantly reduced on the T{sub 1}w and T{sub 2}w MRI scans (13% and 9%, respectively) compared with the CT scans. The urinary bladder was drawn smaller on the CT scans and the rectum was smaller on the MRI scans. On T{sub 1}w MRI, the rectum and urinary bladder were delineated larger than on T{sub 2}w MRI. Minimal agreement was observed between the CT and T{sub 2}w images. The main spatial differences were measured in the superior and superolateral directions in which the CTV on the MRI scans was 1.8-2.9 mm smaller. In the posterior and inferior border, no difference was seen between the CT and T{sub 1}w MRI scans. On the T{sub 2}w MRI scans, the CTV was larger in these directions (by 1.3 and 1.7 mm, respectively). Conclusions: The use of MRI in postprostatectomy radiotherapy planning resulted in a reduction of the CTV. The main differences were found in the superior part of the prostate bed. We believe T{sub 2}w MRI enables more precise definition of prostate bed CTV than conventional planning CT.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of the kidneys

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, A.W.L.; Bydder, G.M.; Steinter, R.E.; Bryant, D.J.; Young, I.R.

    1984-12-01

    A study of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the kidneys in six normal volunteers and 52 patients is reported. Corticomedullary differentiation was seen with the inversion-recovery (IR 1400/400) sequence in the normal volunteers and in patients with functioning transplanted kidneys and acute tubular necrosis. Partial or total loss of corticomedullary differentiation was seen in glomerulonephritis, acute and chronic renal failure, renal artery stenosis, and transplant rejection. The T1 of the kidneys was increased in glomerulonephritis with neuphrotic syndrome, but the T1 was within the normal range for renal medulla in glomerulonephritis without nephrotic syndrome, renal artery stenosis, and chronic renal failure. A large staghorn calculus was demonstrated with MRI, but small calculi were not seen. Fluid within the hydonephrosis, simple renal cysts, and polycystic kidneys displayed very low signal intensity and long T1 values. Tumors displayed varied appearances. Hypernephromas were shown to be hypo- or hyperintense with the renal medulla on the IR 1400/400 sequence. After intravenous injection of gadolinium-DTPA, there was marked decrease in the tumor T1.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Trattnig, Siegfried; Winalski, Carl S.; Marlovits, Stephan; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Welsch, Goetz H.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions are a common pathology of the knee joint, and many patients may benefit from cartilage repair surgeries that offer the chance to avoid the development of osteoarthritis or delay its progression. Cartilage repair surgery, no matter the technique, requires a noninvasive, standardized, and high-quality longitudinal method to assess the structure of the repair tissue. This goal is best fulfilled by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The present article provides an overview of the current state of the art of MRI of cartilage repair. In the first 2 sections, preclinical and clinical MRI of cartilage repair tissue are described with a focus on morphological depiction of cartilage and the use of functional (biochemical) MR methodologies for the visualization of the ultrastructure of cartilage repair. In the third section, a short overview is provided on the regulatory issues of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) regarding MR follow-up studies of patients after cartilage repair surgeries. PMID:26069565

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging-based anatomical study of the multifidus-longissimus cleavage planes in the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haijun; Yang, Lei; Chen, Jinhua; Xie, Hao; Tian, Weizhong; Cao, Xiaojian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The Wiltse approach allows spinal surgeries to be performed with minimal soft tissue trauma. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anatomy of the natural cleavage plane between multifidus and longissimus at different levels based on MRI images. Methods: MRI cross-sectional scans from L1 to S1 were collected from 205 out patients (103 males, 102 females). Based on the images, some parameters were defined and measured to describe the locations, curvature and directions of Wiltse approach. Besides, differences of these parameters between genders and segments were compared. Results: Among the total of 2460 one-sided images, cleavage planes between multifidus and longissimus were not able to be identified in 105 images. The locations, directions and curvature of the cleavage plane differed significantly among different segments but followed some regular pattern from L1-S1. The simultaneous rotation of the plane around its deepest points to the midline from S1 to L1 and the plane seemed to be the most curved at L3 and relatively straight for L5 and S1. Conclusions: With a better understanding of the natural cleavage plane between multifidus and longissimus, performers can correctly plan the distance of skin incisions from the midline and the direction of muscle dissection at each vertebral level, thus reducing trauma in the operation. PMID:27069544

  11. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study of cognitive control and neurosensory deficits in mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Andrew R; Hanlon, Faith M; Dodd, Andrew B; Ling, Josef M; Klimaj, Stefan D; Meier, Timothy B

    2015-11-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury patients (mTBI) frequently report symptoms of increased distractability and sensory disturbances during mutisensory stimulation. These common post-concussive symptoms could putatively result from dysfunction within the cognitive control network (CCN; top-down) or from unisensory cortex (bottom-up) itself. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and high-resolution structural data were therefore prospectively collected during a multisensory (audio-visual) cognitive control task from 46 mTBI patients within 3 weeks of injury and 46 matched healthy controls (HC), with a subset of participants returning at 4 months. Multisensory stimuli were presented at two frequencies to manipulate cognitive and perceptual load. Patients self-reported more cognitive, emotional, somatic, vestibular and visual symptoms relative to HC, which improved, but did not entirely resolve, over the 4 month follow-up period. There were no group differences in behavior or functional activation during cognitive control (incongruent--congruent trials). In contrast, patients exhibited abnormal activation within different regions of visual cortex that depended on whether attention was focused on auditory or visual information streams. Patients also exhibited increased activation within bilateral inferior parietal lobules during higher cognitive/perceptual loads, suggesting a compensatory mechanism to achieve similar levels of behavioral performance. Functional abnormalities within the visual cortex and inferior parietal lobules were only partially resolved at 4 months post-injury, suggesting that neural abnormalities may take longer to resolve than behavioral measures used in most clinical settings. In summary, current results indicate that abnormalities within unisensory cortex (particularly visual areas) following mTBI, which likely contribute to deficits commonly reported during multisensory stimulation. PMID:26493161

  12. Efficacy of recombinant annexin 2 for fibrinolytic therapy in a rat embolic stroke model: A magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yoji; Ishii, Hideto; Hiraoka, Megumi; Miyasaka, Naoyuki; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Hajjar, Katherine A.; Nagaoka, Tsukasa; Duong, Timothy Q.; Ohno, Kikuo; Yoshida, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    Efficacy of recombinant annexin 2 (rAN II) in a rat model of embolic stroke was examined using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology. The right middle cerebral artery of male Wistar rats was occluded by autologous clots under anesthesia. Four doses of rAN II (0.125, 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg, n = 10 for each group) or saline (1 ml/kg, n = 10) were administrated intravenously within 5 min before clot infusion. Serial changes in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and relative blood flow (CBF) were measured with the use of MRI in half of the animals in each group. The remaining half of the animals in each group was evaluated for hemorrhage and final infarct size by histology at 48 h after embolization. At 3 h after embolization, lesion volumes with ADC were abnormality and CBF in the peripheral lesion was improved in groups treated with 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg, but not 0.125 mg/kg, of rAN II in comparison with the saline-treated group (P < 0.05). Histological analyses were consistent with MRI findings. More importantly, no hemorrhagic transformation was documented in rats treated with 0.125 and 0.25 mg/kg of rAN II, whereas it was observed at higher doses. We concluded that rAN II at 0.25 mg/kg significantly reduced infarct size and improved CBF without hemorrhagic complications. rAN II is a novel compound that has the potential to be a promising fibrinolytic agent to treat embolic stroke. PMID:17651708

  13. Altered intrinsic regional spontaneous brain activity in patients with optic neuritis: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yi; Cai, Feng-Qin; Zhong, Yu-Lin; Huang, Xin; Zhang, Ying; Hu, Pei-Hong; Pei, Chong-Gang; Zhou, Fu-Qing; Zeng, Xian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the underlying regional homogeneity (ReHo) in brain-activity deficit in patients with optic neuritis (ON) and its relationship with behavioral performance. Materials and methods In total, twelve patients with ON (four males and eight females) and twelve (four males and eight females) age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. The ReHo method was used to assess the local features of spontaneous brain activity. Correlation analysis was used to explore the relationship between the observed mean ReHo values of the different brain areas and the visual evoked potential (VEP) in patients with ON. Results Compared with the healthy controls, patients with ON showed lower ReHo in the left cerebellum, posterior lobe, left middle temporal gyrus, right insula, right superior temporal gyrus, left middle frontal gyrus, bilateral anterior cingulate cortex, left superior frontal gyrus, right superior frontal gyrus, and right precentral gyrus, and higher ReHo in the cluster of the left fusiform gyrus and right inferior parietal lobule. Meanwhile, we found that the VEP amplitude of the right eye in patients with ON showed a positive correlation with the ReHo signal value of the left cerebellum posterior lobe (r=0.701, P=0.011), the right superior frontal gyrus (r=0.731, P=0.007), and the left fusiform gyrus (r=0.644, P=0.024). We also found that the VEP latency of the right eye in ON showed a positive correlation with the ReHo signal value of the right insula (r=0.595, P=0.041). Conclusion ON may involve dysfunction in the default-mode network, which may reflect the underlying pathologic mechanism. PMID:26715848

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Volumetric Analysis: Novel Tools to Study the Effects of Thyroid Hormone Disruption on White Matter Development

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Michael H.; Van Nguyen, Hao; Gilbert, Mary; Parekh, Mansi; Colon-Perez, Luis M.; Mareci, Thomas H.; Montie, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Humans and wildlife are exposed to environmental pollutants that have been shown to interfere with the thyroid hormone system and thus may affect brain development. Our goal was to expose pregnant rats to propylthiouracil (PTU) to measure the effects of a goitrogen on white matter development in offspring using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and volumetric analysis. We exposed pregnant Sprague Dawley (SD) rats to 3 or 10 ppm PTU from gestation day 7 (GD7) until postnatal day 25 (P25) to determine the effects on white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and hippocampus volumes in offspring. We sacrificed offspring at P25 but continued the life of some offspring to P90 to measure persistent effects in adult animals. P25 offspring exposed to 10 ppm PTU displayed lowered levels of triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4); cerebral WM, GM, and total brain volumes were significantly lower than the volumes in control animals. P90 adults exposed to 10 ppm PTU displayed normal T3 levels but lowered T4 levels; WM, GM, total brain, and hippocampal volumes were significantly lower than the volumes in control adults. Both P25 and P90 rats exposed to 10 ppm PTU displayed significant reductions in percent WM as well as heterotopias in the corpus callosum. Exposure to 3 ppm PTU did not produce any significant effects. These results suggest that MRI coupled with volumetric analysis is a powerful tool in assessing the effects of thyroid hormone disruption on white matter development and brain structure. This approach holds great promise in assessing neurotoxicity of xenobiotics in humans and wildlife. PMID:22975424

  15. Reliability of functional magnetic resonance imaging activation during working memory in a multi-site study: analysis from the North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Jennifer K; McEwen, Sarah C; Gee, Dylan G; Bearden, Carrie E; Addington, Jean; Goodyear, Brad; Cadenhead, Kristin S; Mirzakhanian, Heline; Cornblatt, Barbara A; Olvet, Doreen M; Mathalon, Daniel H; McGlashan, Thomas H; Perkins, Diana O; Belger, Aysenil; Seidman, Larry J; Thermenos, Heidi W; Tsuang, Ming T; van Erp, Theo G M; Walker, Elaine F; Hamann, Stephan; Woods, Scott W; Qiu, Maolin; Cannon, Tyrone D

    2014-08-15

    Multi-site neuroimaging studies offer an efficient means to study brain functioning in large samples of individuals with rare conditions; however, they present new challenges given that aggregating data across sites introduces additional variability into measures of interest. Assessing the reliability of brain activation across study sites and comparing statistical methods for pooling functional data are critical to ensuring the validity of aggregating data across sites. The current study used two samples of healthy individuals to assess the feasibility and reliability of aggregating multi-site functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from a Sternberg-style verbal working memory task. Participants were recruited as part of the North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study (NAPLS), which comprises eight fMRI scanning sites across the United States and Canada. In the first study sample (n=8), one participant from each home site traveled to each of the sites and was scanned while completing the task on two consecutive days. Reliability was examined using generalizability theory. Results indicated that blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal was reproducible across sites and was highly reliable, or generalizable, across scanning sites and testing days for core working memory ROIs (generalizability ICCs=0.81 for left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, 0.95 for left superior parietal cortex). In the second study sample (n=154), two statistical methods for aggregating fMRI data across sites for all healthy individuals recruited as control participants in the NAPLS study were compared. Control participants were scanned on one occasion at the site from which they were recruited. Results from the image-based meta-analysis (IBMA) method and mixed effects model with site covariance method both showed robust activation in expected regions (i.e. dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, supplementary motor cortex, superior parietal cortex, inferior

  16. Towards Single Biomolecule Imaging via Optical Nanoscale Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Boretti, Alberto; Rosa, Lorenzo; Castelletto, Stefania

    2015-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a physical marvel in which electromagnetic radiation is charged and discharged by nuclei in a magnetic field. In conventional NMR, the specific nuclei resonance frequency depends on the strength of the magnetic field and the magnetic properties of the isotope of the atoms. NMR is routinely utilized in clinical tests by converting nuclear spectroscopy in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and providing 3D, noninvasive biological imaging. While this technique has revolutionized biomedical science, measuring the magnetic resonance spectrum of single biomolecules is still an intangible aspiration, due to MRI resolution being limited to tens of micrometers. MRI and NMR have, however, recently greatly advanced, with many breakthroughs in nano-NMR and nano-MRI spurred by using spin sensors based on an atomic impurities in diamond. These techniques rely on magnetic dipole-dipole interactions rather than inductive detection. Here, novel nano-MRI methods based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond are highlighted, that provide a solution to the imaging of single biomolecules with nanoscale resolution in-vivo and in ambient conditions. PMID:26113221

  17. Clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging - current status

    SciTech Connect

    Cammoun, D.; Hendee, W.R.; Davis, K.A.

    1985-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has far-reaching real and possible clinical applications. Its usefulness has been best explored and realized in the central nervous system, especially the posterior fossa and brain stem, where most abnormalities are better identified than with computed tomography. Its lack of ionizing radiation and extreme sensitivity to normal and abnormal patterns of myelination make magnetic resonance imaging advantageous for diagnosing many neonatal and pediatric abnormalities. New, reliable cardiac gating techniques open the way for promising studies of cardiac anatomy and function. The ability to image directly in three orthogonal planes gives us new insight into staging and follow-up of pelvic tumors and other pelvic abnormalities. Exquisite soft tissue contrast, far above that attainable by other imaging modalities, has made possible the early diagnosis of traumatic ligamentous knee injury, avascular necrosis of the hip and diagnosis, treatment planning and follow-up of musculoskeletal neoplasms. 59 references, 9 figures.

  18. Efficient bias correction for magnetic resonance image denoising.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi; Qiu, Peihua

    2013-05-30

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a popular radiology technique that is used for visualizing detailed internal structure of the body. Observed MRI images are generated by the inverse Fourier transformation from received frequency signals of a magnetic resonance scanner system. Previous research has demonstrated that random noise involved in the observed MRI images can be described adequately by the so-called Rician noise model. Under that model, the observed image intensity at a given pixel is a nonlinear function of the true image intensity and of two independent zero-mean random variables with the same normal distribution. Because of such a complicated noise structure in the observed MRI images, denoised images by conventional denoising methods are usually biased, and the bias could reduce image contrast and negatively affect subsequent image analysis. Therefore, it is important to address the bias issue properly. To this end, several bias-correction procedures have been proposed in the literature. In this paper, we study the Rician noise model and the corresponding bias-correction problem systematically and propose a new and more effective bias-correction formula based on the regression analysis and Monte Carlo simulation. Numerical studies show that our proposed method works well in various applications. PMID:23074149

  19. Metabolite specific proton magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, R.E.; Freeman, D.M.

    1989-06-01

    An imaging method is described that makes use of proton double quantum nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to construct images based on selected metabolites such as lactic acid. The optimization of the method is illustrated in vitro, followed by in vivo determination of lactic acid distribution in a solid tumor model. Water suppression and editing of lipid signals are such that two-dimensional spectra of lactic acid may be obtained from a radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) tumor in under 1 min and lactic acid images from the same tumor in under 1 hr at 2.0 T. This technique provides a fast and reproducible method at moderate magnetic field strength for mapping biologically relevant metabolites.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in Leber's optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Kermode, A G; Moseley, I F; Kendall, B E; Miller, D H; MacManus, D G; McDonald, W I

    1989-01-01

    Thirteen males with Leber's optic neuropathy had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, and in eight the optic nerves were imaged using STIR (Short Time Inversion Recovery) sequences. All optic nerve scans were abnormal. In seven with bilateral visual loss four showed bilateral increased optic nerve signal and three unilateral increase. The involvement was of the mid and posterior intra-orbital sections over three 5 mm slices or more with sparing of the anterior portion. One patient with unilateral visual loss had increased signal only on the affected side. Brain MRI was normal, in marked contrast to the findings in clinically isolated optic neuritis in which multiple white matter lesions are seen in the majority. Images PMID:2732742

  1. Ultrafast Imaging using Spectral Resonance Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Eric; Ma, Qian; Liu, Zhaowei

    2016-04-01

    CCD cameras are ubiquitous in research labs, industry, and hospitals for a huge variety of applications, but there are many dynamic processes in nature that unfold too quickly to be captured. Although tradeoffs can be made between exposure time, sensitivity, and area of interest, ultimately the speed limit of a CCD camera is constrained by the electronic readout rate of the sensors. One potential way to improve the imaging speed is with compressive sensing (CS), a technique that allows for a reduction in the number of measurements needed to record an image. However, most CS imaging methods require spatial light modulators (SLMs), which are subject to mechanical speed limitations. Here, we demonstrate an etalon array based SLM without any moving elements that is unconstrained by either mechanical or electronic speed limitations. This novel spectral resonance modulator (SRM) shows great potential in an ultrafast compressive single pixel camera.

  2. Ultrafast Imaging using Spectral Resonance Modulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Eric; Ma, Qian; Liu, Zhaowei

    2016-01-01

    CCD cameras are ubiquitous in research labs, industry, and hospitals for a huge variety of applications, but there are many dynamic processes in nature that unfold too quickly to be captured. Although tradeoffs can be made between exposure time, sensitivity, and area of interest, ultimately the speed limit of a CCD camera is constrained by the electronic readout rate of the sensors. One potential way to improve the imaging speed is with compressive sensing (CS), a technique that allows for a reduction in the number of measurements needed to record an image. However, most CS imaging methods require spatial light modulators (SLMs), which are subject to mechanical speed limitations. Here, we demonstrate an etalon array based SLM without any moving elements that is unconstrained by either mechanical or electronic speed limitations. This novel spectral resonance modulator (SRM) shows great potential in an ultrafast compressive single pixel camera. PMID:27122101

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies. PMID:26752822

  4. Ultrafast Imaging using Spectral Resonance Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Eric; Ma, Qian; Liu, Zhaowei

    2016-01-01

    CCD cameras are ubiquitous in research labs, industry, and hospitals for a huge variety of applications, but there are many dynamic processes in nature that unfold too quickly to be captured. Although tradeoffs can be made between exposure time, sensitivity, and area of interest, ultimately the speed limit of a CCD camera is constrained by the electronic readout rate of the sensors. One potential way to improve the imaging speed is with compressive sensing (CS), a technique that allows for a reduction in the number of measurements needed to record an image. However, most CS imaging methods require spatial light modulators (SLMs), which are subject to mechanical speed limitations. Here, we demonstrate an etalon array based SLM without any moving elements that is unconstrained by either mechanical or electronic speed limitations. This novel spectral resonance modulator (SRM) shows great potential in an ultrafast compressive single pixel camera. PMID:27122101

  5. The magnetic resonance imaging-linac system.

    PubMed

    Lagendijk, Jan J W; Raaymakers, Bas W; van Vulpen, Marco

    2014-07-01

    The current image-guided radiotherapy systems are suboptimal in the esophagus, pancreas, kidney, rectum, lymph node, etc. These locations in the body are not easily accessible for fiducials and cannot be visualized sufficiently on cone-beam computed tomographies, making daily patient set-up prone to geometrical uncertainties and hinder dose optimization. Additional interfraction and intrafraction uncertainties for those locations arise from motion with breathing and organ filling. To allow real-time imaging of all patient tumor locations at the actual treatment position a fully integrated 1.5-T, diagnostic quality, magnetic resonance imaging with a 6-MV linear accelerator is presented. This system must enable detailed dose painting at all body locations. PMID:24931095

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in medicine

    PubMed Central

    McKinstry, C S

    1986-01-01

    Using the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, MR, MRI), the first images displaying pathology in humans were published in 1980.1 Since then, there has been a rapid extension in the use of the technique, with an estimated 225 machines in use in the USA at the end of 1985.2 Considerable enthusiasm has been expressed for this new imaging technique,3 although awareness of its high cost in the present economic climate has led to reservations being expressed in other quarters.2 The aim of this article is to give an outline of the present state of NMR, and indicate some possible future developments. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Fig 3(a)Fig 3 (b)Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7 (a)Fig 7 (b)Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10 PMID:3811023

  7. Stem cell labeling for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Himmelreich, Uwe; Hoehn, Mathias

    2008-01-01

    In vivo applications of cells for the monitoring of their cell dynamics increasingly use non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging. This imaging modality allows in particular to follow the migrational activity of stem cells intended for cell therapy strategies. All these approaches require the prior labeling of the cells under investigation for excellent contrast against the host tissue background in the imaging modality. The present review discusses the various routes of cell labeling and describes the potential to observe both cell localization and their cell-specific function in vivo. Possibilities for labeling strategies, pros and cons of various contrast agents are pointed out while potential ambiguities or problems of labeling strategies are emphasized. PMID:18465447

  8. Superconducting Magnets for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feenan, Peter

    2000-03-01

    MRI is now a well established diagnostic technique in medicine. The richness of information provided by magnetic resonance gives rise to a variety of techniques which in turn leads to a variety of magnet designs. Magnet designers must consider suitable superconduting materials for the magnet, but need also to consider the overall fomat of the magnet to maximise patient comfort, access for clinicians and convenience of use - in some examples magnets are destined for use within the operating theatre and special considerations are required for this. Magnet types include; (1) low-field general purpose imagers, (2) extremity imaging, (3) open magnets with exellent all-round access often employing iron or permanent magnetic materials, (4) high-field magnets, and (5) very high-field (7 Tesla and more) magnets for spectroscopy and functional imaging research. Examples of these magnet varieties will be shown and some of the design challenges discussed.

  9. Medical Imaging Field of Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Identification of Specialties within the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grey, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine if specialty areas are emerging in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) profession due to advancements made in the medical sciences, imaging technology, and clinical applications used in MRI that would require new developments in education/training programs and national registry examinations. In this…

  10. A Virtual Radial Arm Maze for the Study of Multiple Memory Systems in a Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Environment

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dongrong; Hao, Xuejun; Wang, Zhishun; Duan, Yunsuo; Liu, Feng; Marsh, Rachel; Yu, Shan; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of functional brain imaging studies are employing computer-based virtual reality (VR) to study changes in brain activity during the performance of high-level psychological and cognitive tasks. We report the development of a VR radial arm maze that adapts for human use in a scanning environment with the same general experimental design of behavioral tasks as that has been used with remarkable effectiveness for the study of multiple memory systems in rodents. The software platform is independent of specific computer hardware and operating systems, as we aim to provide shared access to this technology by the research community. We hope that doing so will provide greater standardization of software platform and study paradigm that will reduce variability and improve the comparability of findings across studies. We report the details of the design and implementation of this platform and provide information for downloading of the system for demonstration and research applications. PMID:26366052

  11. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technology for Medical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinger, Thomas F.; Lauterbur, Paul C.

    1984-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance proton imaging provides anatomical definition of normal and abnormal tissues with a contrast and detection sensitivity superior to those of x-ray computed tomography in the human head and pelvis and parts of the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems. Recent improvements in technology should lead to advances in diagnostic imaging of the breast and regions of the abdomen. Selected-region nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of protons, carbon-13, and phosphorus-31 has developed into a basic science tool for in vivo studies on man and a unique tool for clinical diagnoses of metabolic disorders. At present, nuclear magnetic resonance is considered safe if access to the magnet environment is controlled. Technological advances employing field strengths over 2 teslas will require biophysical studies of heating and static field effects.

  12. Wavelet smoothing of functional magnetic resonance images: a preliminary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucier, Bradley J.

    2003-11-01

    Functional (time-dependent) Magnetic Resonance Imaging can be used to determine which parts of the brain are active during various limited activities; these parts of the brain are called activation regions. In this preliminary study we describe some experiments that are suggested from the following questions: Does one get improved results by analyzing the complex image data rather than just the real magnitude image data? Does wavelet shrinkage smoothing improve images? Should one smooth in time as well as within and between slices? If so, how should one model the relationship between time smoothness (or correlations) and spatial smoothness (or correlations). The measured data is really the Fourier coefficients of the complex image---should we remove noise in the Fourier domain before computing the complex images? In this preliminary study we describe some experiments related to these questions.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal injury.

    PubMed

    Tracy, P T; Wright, R M; Hanigan, W C

    1989-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 30 patients following spinal injury (SI). Spin-echo sequences and surface coils were used for all patients. Plain radiographs, high-resolution computed tomography (CT), and MRI were compared for the delineation of bone, disc, and ligament injury, measurement of sagittal spinal canal diameter and subluxation, epidural hematoma, and spinal cord structure. Myelography or intrathecal contrast-enhanced CT were not performed on any of these patients. Magnetic resonance imaging accurately delineated intraspinal pathology in two of four patients with acute penetrating SI, and was normal in the other two patients. In 16 patients with acute nonpenetrating SI, MRI was superior to CT for visualizing injuries to discs, ligaments, and the spinal cord, while CT was superior to MRI in characterizing bony injury. Computed tomography and MRI provided similar measurements of subluxation in six of six patients and of sagittal spinal canal diameter in three of four patients. In ten patients with chronic SI, MRI demonstrated post-traumatic cysts, myelomalacia, spinal cord edema, and the presence or absence of spinal cord compression. In patients with acute penetrating SI and chronic SI, MRI provided comprehensive clinical information. In patients with acute nonpenetrating SI, the information obtained by MRI complemented the data given by plain radiographs and CT, allowing clinical decisions to be made without the need of invasive imaging modalities. PMID:2711244

  14. Narrowing of lumbar spinal canal predicts chronic low back pain more accurately than intervertebral disc degeneration: a magnetic resonance imaging study in young Finnish male conscripts.

    PubMed

    Visuri, Tuomo; Ulaska, Jaana; Eskelin, Marja; Pulkkinen, Pekka

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this magnetic resonance imaging study was to evaluate the role of degenerative changes, developmental spinal stenosis, and compression of spinal nerve roots in chronic low back (CLBP) and radicular pain in Finnish conscripts. The degree of degeneration, protrusion, and herniation of the intervertebral discs and stenosis of the nerve root canals was evaluated, and the midsagittal diameter and cross-sectional area of the lumbar vertebrae canal were measured in 108 conscripts with CLBP and 90 asymptomatic controls. The midsagittal diameters at L1-L4 levels were significantly smaller in the patients with CLBP than in the controls. Moreover, degeneration of the L4/5 disc and protrusion or herniation of the L5/S1 disc and stenosis of the nerve root canals at level L5/S1 were more frequent among the CLBP patients. Multifactorial analysis of the magnetic resonance imaging findings provided a total explanatory rate of only 33%. Narrowing of the vertebral canal in the anteroposterior direction was more likely to produce CLBP and radiating pain than intervertebral disc degeneration or narrowing of the intervertebral nerve root canals. PMID:16450819

  15. Acupuncture-Related Modulation of Pain-Associated Brain Networks During Electrical Pain Stimulation: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyung-Eun; Gizewski, Elke R.; Wen, Ming; Rampp, Thomas; Gasser, Thomas; Dobos, Gustav J.; Forsting, Michael; Musial, Frauke

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Findings of existing functional MRI (fMRI) studies on the neural mechanisms that mediate effects of acupuncture analgesia are inconsistent. This study analyzes the effects of manual acupuncture on pain ratings and brain activation in response to experimental, electrical pain stimuli. Design: Fourteen healthy volunteers were examined by using a 1.5-T MRI scanner. The intensity of pain stimuli was adjusted to individual pain ratings on a numeric rating scale. Baseline fMRI was performed during electrical pain stimulation in a blocked design. For the second session, manual acupuncture with repeated stimulation was performed on contralateral acupoints—large intestine 4, liver 3, and stomach 36—before imaging. After imaging, subjective pain ratings and ratings of the de qi sensation were assessed. Results: Compared with baseline, volunteers showed modulated brain activity under pain conditions in the cingulate gyrus, insula, primary somatosensory cortex, and prefrontal areas after the acupuncture session. In accordance with the literature, anterior insular and prefrontal activity seemed to be correlated with acupuncture treatment. Conclusion: This study supports the existence of analgesic acupuncture effects that outlast the needling period. Pain-associated brain areas were modulated in direct response to a preceding acupuncture treatment. PMID:25389905

  16. Developments in boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year on maturing Boron-11 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology for noninvasive determination of BNCT agents (BSH) spatially in time. Three major areas are excerpted: (1) Boron-11 MRI of BSH distributions in a canine intracranial tumor model and the first human glioblastoma patient, (2) whole body Boron-11 MRI of BSH pharmacokinetics in a rat flank tumor model, and (3) penetration of gadolinium salts through the BBB as a function of tumor growth in the canine brain.

  17. Foundations of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bammer, Roland; Skare, Stefan; Newbould, Rexford; Liu, Chunlei; Thijs, Vincent; Ropele, Stefan; Clayton, David B.; Krueger, Gunnar; Moseley, Michael E.; Glover, Gary H.

    2005-01-01

    Summary: During the past decade, major breakthroughs in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) quality were made by means of quantum leaps in scanner hardware and pulse sequences. Some advanced MRI techniques have truly revolutionized the detection of disease states and MRI can now—within a few minutes—acquire important quantitative information noninvasively from an individual in any plane or volume at comparatively high resolution. This article provides an overview of the most common advanced MRI methods including diffusion MRI, perfusion MRI, functional MRI, and the strengths and weaknesses of MRI at high magnetic field strengths. PMID:15897944

  18. Clinical examination or whole-body magnetic resonance imaging: the Holy Grail of spondyloarthritis imaging

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging allows acquisition of diagnostic images in the shortest scan time, leading to better patient compliance and artifact-free images. Methods of clinical examination of the anterior chest wall joints vary between physician groups and consideration of the rules of rib motion is suggested. The type of joint and its synovial lining may also aid imaging/clinical correlation. This well-written study by experts in the field with a standardized design and methodology allows good scientific analysis and suggests the advantages of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in anterior chest wall imaging. Selection of clinical examination criteria and specific joints may have had an influence on the study results and the lack of association reported. PMID:22380535

  19. Cardiac imaging using gated magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzer, P.; Botvinick, E.H.; Schiller, N.B.

    1984-01-01

    To overcome the limitations of magnetic resonance (MR) cardiac imaging using nongated data acquisition, three methods for acquiring a gating signal, which could be applied in the presence of a magnetic field, were tested; an air-filled plethysmograph, a laser-Doppler capillary perfusion flowmeter, and an electrocardiographic gating device. The gating signal was used for timing of MR imaging sequences (IS). Application of each gating method yielded significant improvements in structural MR image resolution of the beating heart, although with both plethysmography and laser-Doppler velocimetry it was difficult to obtain cardiac images from the early portion of the cardiac cycle due to an intrinsic delay between the ECG R wave and peripheral detection of the gating signal. Variations in the temporal relationship between the R wave and plethysmographic and laser-Doppler signals produced inconsistencies in the timing of IS. Since the ECG signal is virtually free of these problems, the preferable gating technique is IS synchronization with an electrocardiogram. The gated images acquired with this method provide sharp definition of internal cardiac morphology and can be temporarily referenced to end diastole and end systole or intermediate points.

  20. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Magnetic resonance imaging inside metallic vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hui; Balcom, Bruce J.

    2010-10-01

    We introduce magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements inside metallic vessels. Until now, MRI has been unusable inside metallic vessels because of eddy currents in the walls. We have solved the problem and generated high quality images by employing a magnetic field gradient monitoring method. The ability to image within metal enclosures and structures means many new samples and systems are now amenable to MRI. Most importantly this study will form the basis of new MRI-compatible metallic pressure vessels, which will permit MRI of macroscopic systems at high pressure.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of pediatric soft-tissue vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Oscar M

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be used in the management of pediatric soft-tissue vascular anomalies for diagnosing and assessing extent of lesions and for evaluating response to therapy. MR imaging studies often involve a combination of T1- and T2-weighted images in addition to MR angiography and fat-suppressed post-contrast sequences. The MR imaging features of these vascular anomalies when combined with clinical findings can aid in diagnosis. In cases of complex vascular malformations and syndromes associated with vascular anomalies, MR imaging can be used to evaluate accompanying soft-tissue and bone anomalies. This article reviews the MR imaging protocols and appearances of the most common pediatric soft-tissue vascular anomalies. PMID:27229506

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Biomarker for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Kwon, Young Suk; Labib, Mina; Foran, David J.; Singer, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    As the most common neoplasm arising from the kidney, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) continues to have a significant impact on global health. Conventional cross-sectional imaging has always served an important role in the staging of RCC. However, with recent advances in imaging techniques and postprocessing analysis, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) now has the capability to function as a diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic biomarker for RCC. For this narrative literature review, a PubMed search was conducted to collect the most relevant and impactful studies from our perspectives as urologic oncologists, radiologists, and computational imaging specialists. We seek to cover advanced MR imaging and image analysis techniques that may improve the management of patients with small renal mass or metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26609190

  3. Imaging Intelligence with Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Rex E.; Gasparovic, Charles; Chavez, Robert S.; Caprihan, Arvind; Barrow, Ranee; Yeo, Ronald A.

    2009-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([to the first power]H-MRS) is a technique for the assay of brain neurochemistry "in vivo." N-acetylaspartate (NAA), the most prominent metabolite visible within the [to the first power]H-MRS spectrum, is found primarily within neurons. The current study was designed to further elucidate NAA-cognition…

  4. Appearance of the canine meninges in subtraction magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Christopher R; Lam, Richard; Keenihan, Erin K; Frean, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The canine meninges are not visible as discrete structures in noncontrast magnetic resonance (MR) images, and are incompletely visualized in T1-weighted, postgadolinium images, reportedly appearing as short, thin curvilinear segments with minimal enhancement. Subtraction imaging facilitates detection of enhancement of tissues, hence may increase the conspicuity of meninges. The aim of the present study was to describe qualitatively the appearance of canine meninges in subtraction MR images obtained using a dynamic technique. Images were reviewed of 10 consecutive dogs that had dynamic pre- and postgadolinium T1W imaging of the brain that was interpreted as normal, and had normal cerebrospinal fluid. Image-anatomic correlation was facilitated by dissection and histologic examination of two canine cadavers. Meningeal enhancement was relatively inconspicuous in postgadolinium T1-weighted images, but was clearly visible in subtraction images of all dogs. Enhancement was visible as faint, small-rounded foci compatible with vessels seen end on within the sulci, a series of larger rounded foci compatible with vessels of variable caliber on the dorsal aspect of the cerebral cortex, and a continuous thin zone of moderate enhancement around the brain. Superimposition of color-encoded subtraction images on pregadolinium T1- and T2-weighted images facilitated localization of the origin of enhancement, which appeared to be predominantly dural, with relatively few leptomeningeal structures visible. Dynamic subtraction MR imaging should be considered for inclusion in clinical brain MR protocols because of the possibility that its use may increase sensitivity for lesions affecting the meninges. PMID:24833219

  5. Normal feline brain: clinical anatomy using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Mogicato, G; Conchou, F; Layssol-Lamour, C; Raharison, F; Sautet, J

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a clinical anatomy atlas of the feline brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Brains of twelve normal cats were imaged using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance unit and an inversion/recovery sequence (T1). Fourteen relevant MRI sections were chosen in transverse, dorsal, median and sagittal planes. Anatomic structures were identified and labelled using anatomical texts and Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria, sectioned specimen heads, and previously published articles. The MRI sections were stained according to the major embryological and anatomical subdivisions of the brain. The relevant anatomical structures seen on MRI will assist clinicians to better understand MR images and to relate this neuro-anatomy to clinical signs. PMID:21919951

  6. Principles of functional magnetic resonance imaging: application to auditory neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Cacace, A T; Tasciyan, T; Cousins, J P

    2000-05-01

    Functional imaging based on magnetic resonance methods is a new research frontier for exploring a wide range of central nervous system (CNS) functions, including information processing in sensory, motor, cognitive, and linguistic systems. Being able to localize and study human brain function in vivo, in relatively high resolution and in a noninvasive manner, makes this a technique of unparalleled importance. In order to appreciate and fully understand this area of investigation, a tutorial covering basic aspects of this methodology is presented. We introduce functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) by providing an overview of the studies of different sensory systems in response to modality-specific stimuli, followed by an outline of other areas that have potential clinical relevance to the medical, cognitive, and communicative sciences. The discussion then focuses on the basic principles of magnetic resonance methods including magnetic resonance imaging, MR spectroscopy, fMRI, and the potential role that MR technology may play in understanding a wide range of auditory functions within the CNS, including tinnitus-related activity. Because the content of the material found herein might be unfamiliar to some, we provide a broad range of background and review articles to serve as a technical resource. PMID:10821504

  7. PLANTAR THROMBOPHLEBITIS: MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FINDINGS

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Frederico Celestino; Carneiro, Renato Duarte; Longo, Carlos Henrique; Fernandes, Túlio Diniz; Rosemberg, Laércio Alberto; de Gusmão Funari, Marcelo Buarque

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Demonstrate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in plantar thrombophlebitis. Methods: Retrospective review of twenty patients with pain in the plantar region of the foot, in which the MRI findings indicated plantar thrombophlebitis. Results: A total of fourteen men and six women, mean age 46.7 years were evaluated. Eight of these patients also underwent Doppler ultrasonography, which confirmed the thrombophlebitis. The magnetic resonance images were evaluated in consensus by two radiologists with experience in musculoskeletal radiology (more than 10 years each), showing perivascular edema in all twenty patients (100%) and muscle edema in nineteen of the twenty patients (95%). All twenty patients had intraluminal intermediate signal intensity on T2-weighted (100%) and venous ectasia was present in seventeen of the twenty cases (85%). Collateral veins were visualized in one of the twenty patients (5%). All fourteen cases (100%), in which intravenous contrast was administered, showed perivenular tissues enhancement and intraluminal filling defect. Venous ectasia, loss of compressibility and no flow on Doppler ultrasound were also observed in all eight cases examined by the method. Conclusion: MRI is a sensitive in the evaluation of plant thrombophlebitis in patients with plantar foot pain. PMID:27047898

  8. Image Guided Focal Therapy of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Visible Prostate Cancer: Defining a 3-Dimensional Treatment Margin Based on Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Histology Co-Registration Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Le Nobin, Julien; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Villers, Arnauld; Orczyk, Clément; Deng, Fang-Ming; Melamed, Jonathan; Mikheev, Artem; Rusinek, Henry; Taneja, Samir S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We compared prostate tumor boundaries on magnetic resonance imaging and radical prostatectomy histological assessment using detailed software assisted co-registration to define an optimal treatment margin for achieving complete tumor destruction during image guided focal ablation. Materials and Methods Included in study were 33 patients who underwent 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging before radical prostatectomy. A radiologist traced lesion borders on magnetic resonance imaging and assigned a suspicion score of 2 to 5. Three-dimensional reconstructions were created from high resolution digitalized slides of radical prostatectomy specimens and co-registered to imaging using advanced software. Tumors were compared between histology and imaging by the Hausdorff distance and stratified by the magnetic resonance imaging suspicion score, Gleason score and lesion diameter. Cylindrical volume estimates of treatment effects were used to define the optimal treatment margin. Results Three-dimensional software based registration with magnetic resonance imaging was done in 46 histologically confirmed cancers. Imaging underestimated tumor size with a maximal discrepancy between imaging and histological boundaries for a given tumor of an average ± SD of 1.99 ± 3.1 mm, representing 18.5% of the diameter on imaging. Boundary underestimation was larger for lesions with an imaging suspicion score 4 or greater (mean 3.49 ± 2.1 mm, p <0.001) and a Gleason score of 7 or greater (mean 2.48 ± 2.8 mm, p = 0.035). A simulated cylindrical treatment volume based on the imaging boundary missed an average 14.8% of tumor volume compared to that based on the histological boundary. A simulated treatment volume based on a 9 mm treatment margin achieved complete histological tumor destruction in 100% of patients. Conclusions Magnetic resonance imaging underestimates histologically determined tumor boundaries, especially for lesions with a high imaging suspicion score and a high Gleason

  9. Hemispheric prevalence during chewing in normal right-handed and left-handed subjects: a functional magnetic resonance imaging preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Bracco, Pietro; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Piancino, Maria Grazia; Frongia, Gianluigi; Milardi, Demetrio; Favaloro, Angelo; Bramanti, Placido

    2010-04-01

    This study evaluated the activation of different cortical areas during nondeliberate chewing of soft and hard boluses in five right-handed and five left-handed subjects with normal occlusion, to determine different hemispheric prevalences. The study was conducted with a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (1.5 T Magnetom Vision - Siemens Medical, Germany) using a head coil. The results showed that the most frequently activated areas were Brodmann's areas four and six in the primary motor and premotor cortex, the insula and Broca's area and, overall, showed greater activity of the cortical mastication area (CMA) in the right hemisphere for right-handed and in the left hemisphere for left-handed subjects. PMID:20491233

  10. Functional magnetic resonance imaging study of Piaget's conservation-of-number task in preschool and school-age children: a neo-Piagetian approach.

    PubMed

    Houdé, Olivier; Pineau, Arlette; Leroux, Gaëlle; Poirel, Nicolas; Perchey, Guy; Lanoë, Céline; Lubin, Amélie; Turbelin, Marie-Renée; Rossi, Sandrine; Simon, Grégory; Delcroix, Nicolas; Lamberton, Franck; Vigneau, Mathieu; Wisniewski, Gabriel; Vicet, Jean-René; Mazoyer, Bernard

    2011-11-01

    Jean Piaget's theory is a central reference point in the study of logico-mathematical development in children. One of the most famous Piagetian tasks is number conservation. Failures and successes in this task reveal two fundamental stages in children's thinking and judgment, shifting at approximately 7 years of age from visuospatial intuition to number conservation. In the current study, preschool children (nonconservers, 5-6 years of age) and school-age children (conservers, 9-10 years of age) were presented with Piaget's conservation-of-number task and monitored by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The cognitive change allowing children to access conservation was shown to be related to the neural contribution of a bilateral parietofrontal network involved in numerical and executive functions. These fMRI results highlight how the behavioral and cognitive stages Piaget formulated during the 20th century manifest in the brain with age. PMID:21636095

  11. High-resolution breath-hold cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yu.

    1993-01-01

    This dissertation work is composed of investigations of three methods for fast cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These methods include (1) 2D breath-hold magnetization prepared gradient echo and fast spin-echo (FSE) cardiac imaging, (2) 3D breath-hold magnetization prepared gradient echo cardiac imaging, and (3) real-time monitoring, feedback, and triggering for breath-hold MRI. The hypothesis of this work is that high resolution 2D and 3D magnetic resonance data sets for the heart can be acquired with the combination of magnetization prepared blood suppression for gradient echo techniques and accurate breath-holding methods. The 2D method included development of magnetic resonance data acquisition for cardiac imaging. The acquisition time is within a single breath-hold of 16 seconds (assuming heart 60/min). The data acquisition is synchronized with the electrocardiogram signal. Based on consistent observations of specific small cardiac structures like the papillary muscle, trabeculae, moderator band, and coronary vessels in studies of normal volunteers, the image quality represents a significant improvement over that obtained with fast imaging methods previously. To further improve the image quality provided by the 2D method, the first 3D cardiac MRI technique was developed. This method provides even better spatial resolution for cardiac images, with a voxel size of 1.09 [times] 2.19 [times] 4 mm[sup 3]. A 3D acquisition is completed in 8 breath-holds. The data acquisition for 3D cardiac imaging requires a consistent breath-hold position to avoid respiratory artifacts. To improve the reliability of the 3DFT acquisition, a new technique called MR breath-hold feedback was developed to provide reproducible breathholding. The diaphragm location is used as the index for breath-hold reproducibility measurement. The range of the diaphragm displacement in different breath-hold is reduced from 8.3 mm without the technique, to 1.3 mm with the technique.

  12. The impact of infarct size on regional and global left ventricular systolic function: a cardiac magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Palazzuoli, Alberto; Beltrami, Matteo; Gennari, Luigi; Dastidar, A Ghosh; Nuti, Ranuccio; McAlindon, Elisa; Angelini, Gianni D; Bucciarelli-Ducci, Chiara

    2015-06-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) results in myocardial scarring which can have an impact on left ventricular (LV) stiffness and contractile function, ultimately leading to reduced LV systolic function and LV remodelling, However some concerns about the relation between scar extension and segmental wall motion contractility is not enough clear. Thus, the association between myocardial scar, LV regional and global function and LV remodeling should be investigated. We studied the relationship between scar extension, wall motion score index (WMSI), LV dimensions and systolic function in a group of patients with previous MI by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). 133 patients with previous (>6 month) MI were retrospectively enrolled in the study. Indexed end-systolic volume (ESVi), indexed end-diastolic volume (EDVi), LV ejection fraction (EF), stroke volume (SV), LV mass were measured using CMR. WMSI and sum scar score (SSS) were also measured following AHA\\ACC criteria giving an arbitrary cut-off to distinguish larger from restricted late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) area. A total of 2261 segments were studied: regional wall motion abnormalities were present in 1032 segments (45%) and 724 (32%) showed presence of MI (LGE). WMSI correlated significantly with EF (r = -0.87, p < 0.0001) in all patients and in both patients with EF ≥ 40% (r = -0.77, p < 0.0001) and EF < 40% (r = -0.68, p < 0.0001). WMSI also correlated significantly with SSS (r = 0.57, p < 0.0001). The correlation between WMSI and SSS was more significant in patients with transmural MI (WMSI 2.1 ± 0.5 and SSS 17 ± 8; r = 0.55, p < 0.0001) than with non transmural MI (WMSI 1.6 ± 0.7 and SSS 6 ± 4; r = 0.34 and p = 0.02). A significant correlation was also found between EF and SSS (r = -0.55 and p < 0.0001) and between SSS and LV indexed volumes (EDVi; r = 0.44, p < 0.0001 and ESVi; r = 0.51, p < 0.0001). Infarct transmurality and extension as expressed as SSS assessed with cardiac MRI has an impact on global

  13. Cortical thinning of the right anterior cingulate cortex in spider phobia: a magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Linares, I M P; Jackowski, A P; Trzesniak, C M F; Arrais, K C; Chagas, M H N; Sato, J R; Santos, A C; Hallak, J E C; Zuardi, A W; Nardi, A E; Coimbra, N C; Crippa, J A S

    2014-08-12

    There a lack of consistent neuroimaging data on specific phobia (SP) and a need to assess volumetric and metabolic differences in structures implicated in this condition. The aim of this study is investigate possible metabolic (via (1)H MRS) and cortical thickness abnormalities in spider-phobic patients compared to healthy volunteers. Participants were recruited via public advertisement and underwent clinical evaluations and MRI scans. The study started in 2010 and the investigators involved were not blind in respect to patient groupings. The study was conducted at the Ribeirão Preto Medical School University Hospital of the University of São Paulo, Brazil. Patients with spider phobia (n=19) were matched to 17 healthy volunteers with respect to age, education and socio-economic status. The spider SP group fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for spider phobia according to the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. None of the participants had a history of neurological, psychiatric or other relevant organic diseases, use of prescribed psychotropic medication or substance abuse. All imaging and spectroscopy data were collected with a 3 T MRI scanner equipped with 25 mT gradient coils in 30-minute scans. The Freesurfer image analysis package and LC Model software were used to analyze data. The hypothesis being tested was formulated before the data collection (neural correlates of SP would include the amygdala, insula, anterior cingulate gyrus and others). The results indicated the absence of metabolic alterations, but thinning of the right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in the SP group when compared to the healthy control group (mean cortical thickness±SD: SP=2.11±0.45 mm; HC=2.16±0.42 mm; t (34)=3.19, p=0.001 [-35.45, 71.00, -23.82]). In spectroscopy, the ratios between N-acetylaspartate and creatine and choline levels were measured. No significant effect or correlation was found between MRS metabolites and scores in the Spider Phobia Questionnaire and Beck

  14. Massive subchorionic thrombosis followed by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Himoto, Yuki; Okumura, Ryosuke; Tsuji, Natsuki; Nagano, Tadayoshi; Fujimoto, Masakazu; Yamaoka, Toshihide; Kohno, Shigene

    2012-01-01

    Massive subchorionic thrombosis is a rare condition, defined as a large thrombus confined to the subchorionic space. It is associated with poor perinatal prognosis. However, prenatal diagnosis by ultrasonography is often difficult. We report a case of massive subchorionic thrombosis developing dermatomyositis after the delivery, followed by magnetic resonance imaging. Moreover, we review other 4 cases assessed with magnetic resonance imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging is very useful for confirmation of diagnosis and follow-up in combination with ultrasonography. PMID:22592619

  15. The relationship between partial pressure of oxygen and perfusion in two murine tumors after X-ray irradiation: a combined gadopentetate dimeglumine dynamic magnetic resonance imaging and in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry study.

    PubMed

    Goda, F; Bacic, G; O'Hara, J A; Gallez, B; Swartz, H M; Dunn, J F

    1996-07-15

    Changes of partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) and blood perfusion were studied in MTG-B and RIF-1 tumors (n = 5 each) before and after a single 20-Gy dose of X-ray irradiation. Using electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry, we have observed an initial fast decrease of pO2 after irradiation, followed by a slow increase. The time course of these changes was faster in the MTG-B tumors than in the RIF-1 tumors. Gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA) dynamic magnetic resonance imaging studies showed a reduction in uptake of Gd-DTPA at the time of minimum pO2 and a recovery at the time of maximum pO2 in each tumor. Previous work indicates that there is microscopic heterogeneity in tumors, with well-vascularized "capillary regions" being closer to capillaries than poorly vascularized "noncapillary regions." We propose a two-component (slow and fast) model of Gd-DTPA uptake that is designed to quantify the kinetics of these two compartments by analyzing the total tumor uptake kinetics without having to identify specific regions of interest. Total perfusion in the tumors was greatly reduced at the time of minimum oxygenation, and the volume of the slow component increased after irradiation. We conclude that a decrease in blood perfusion is one of the main causes of the decline in pO2 observed after irradiation. PMID:8764132

  16. Periodicity in tumor vasculature targeting kinetics of ligand-functionalized nanoparticles studied by dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cebulla, Jana; Huuse, Else Marie; Davies, Catharina de L.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Larsson, Henrik B.W.; Haraldseth, Olav

    2014-01-01

    In the past two decades advances in the development of targeted nanoparticles have facilitated their application as molecular imaging agents and targeted drug delivery vehicles. Nanoparticle-enhanced molecular imaging of the angiogenic tumor vasculature has been of particular interest. Not only because angiogenesis plays an important role in various pathologies, but also since endothelial cell surface receptors are directly accessible for relatively large circulating nanoparticles. Typically, nanoparticle targeting towards these receptors is studied by analyzing the contrast distribution on tumor images acquired before and at set time points after administration. Although several exciting proof-of-concept studies demonstrated qualitative assessment of relative target concentration and distribution, these studies did not provide quantitative information on the nanoparticle targeting kinetics. These kinetics will not only depend on nanoparticle characteristics, but also on receptor binding and recycling. In this study, we monitored the in vivo targeting kinetics of αvβ3-integrin specific nanoparticles with intravital microscopy and dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and using compartment modeling we were able to quantify nanoparticle targeting rates. As such, this approach can facilitate optimization of targeted nanoparticle design and it holds promise for providing more quantitative information on in vivo receptor levels. Interestingly, we also observed a periodicity in the accumulation kinetics of αvβ3-integrin targeted nanoparticles and hypothesize that this periodicity is caused by receptor binding, internalization and recycling dynamics. Taken together, this demonstrates that our experimental approach provides new insights in in vivo nanoparticle targeting, which may proof useful for vascular targeting in general. PMID:23982332

  17. Elbow magnetic resonance imaging: imaging anatomy and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hauptfleisch, Jennifer; English, Collette; Murphy, Darra

    2015-04-01

    The elbow is a complex joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often the imaging modality of choice in the workup of elbow pain, especially in sports injuries and younger patients who often have either a history of a chronic repetitive strain such as the throwing athlete or a distinct traumatic injury. Traumatic injuries and alternative musculoskeletal pathologies can affect the ligaments, musculotendinous, cartilaginous, and osseous structures of the elbow as well as the 3 main nerves to the upper limb, and these structures are best assessed with MRI.Knowledge of the complex anatomy of the elbow joint as well as patterns of injury and disease is important for the radiologist to make an accurate diagnosis in the setting of elbow pain. This chapter will outline elbow anatomy, basic imaging parameters, compartmental pathology, and finally applications of some novel MRI techniques. PMID:25835585

  18. Towards Human Oxygen Images with Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Epel, Boris; Redler, Gage; Tormyshev, Victor; Halpern, Howard J.

    2016-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) has been used to noninvasively provide 3D images of absolute oxygen concentration (pO2) in small animals. These oxygen images are well resolved both spatially (∼1mm) and in pO2 (1-3 torr). EPRI preclinical images of pO2 have demonstrated extremely promising results for various applications investigating oxygen related physiologic and biologic processes as well as the dependence of various disease states on pO2, such as the role of hypoxia in cancer. Recent developments have been made that help to progress EPRI towards the eventual goal of human application. For example, a bimodal crossed-wire surface coil has been developed. Very preliminary tests demonstrated a 20 dB isolation between transmit and receive for this coil, with an anticipated additional 20dB achievable. This could potentially be used to image local pO2 in human subjects with superficial tumors with EPRI. Local excitation and detection will reduce the specific absorption rate limitations on images and eliminate any possible power deposition concerns. Additionally, a large 9 mT EPRI magnet has been constructed which can fit and provide static main and gradient fields for imaging local anatomy in an entire human. One potential obstacle that must be overcome in order to use EPRI to image humans is the approved use of the requisite EPRI spin probe imaging agent (trityl). While nontoxic, EPRI trityl spin probes have been injected intravenously when imaging small animals, which results in relatively high total body injection doses that would not be suitable for human imaging applications. Work has been done demonstrating the alternative use of intratumoral (IT) injections, which can reduce the amount of trityl required for imaging by a factor of 2000- relative to a whole body intravenous injection. The development of a large magnet that can accommodate human subjects, the design of a surface coil for imaging of superficial pO2, and the reduction of required

  19. Evaluation of sub-microsecond recovery resonators for in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyodo, F.; Subramanian, S.; Devasahayam, N.; Murugesan, R.; Matsumoto, K.; Mitchell, J. B.; Krishna, M. C.

    2008-02-01

    Time-domain (TD) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging at 300 MHz for in vivo applications requires resonators with recovery times less than 1 μs after pulsed excitation to reliably capture the rapidly decaying free induction decay (FID). In this study, we tested the suitability of the Litz foil coil resonator (LCR), commonly used in MRI, for in vivo EPR/EPRI applications in the TD mode and compared with parallel coil resonator (PCR). In TD mode, the sensitivity of LCR was lower than that of the PCR. However, in continuous wave (CW) mode, the LCR showed better sensitivity. The RF homogeneity was similar in both the resonators. The axis of the RF magnetic field is transverse to the cylindrical axis of the LCR, making the resonator and the magnet co-axial. Therefore, the loading of animals, and placing of the anesthesia nose cone and temperature monitors was more convenient in the LCR compared to the PCR whose axis is perpendicular to the magnet axis.

  20. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the lung.

    PubMed

    Biederer, J; Heussel, C P; Puderbach, M; Wielpuetz, M O

    2014-02-01

    Beyond being a substitute for X-ray, computed tomography, and scintigraphy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inherently combines morphologic and functional information more than any other technology. Lung perfusion: The most established method is first-pass contrast-enhanced imaging with bolus injection of gadolinium chelates and time-resolved gradient-echo (GRE) sequences covering the whole lung (1 volume/s). Images are evaluated visually or semiquantitatively, while absolute quantification remains challenging due to the nonlinear relation of T1-shortening and contrast material concentration. Noncontrast-enhanced perfusion imaging is still experimental, either based on arterial spin labeling or Fourier decomposition. The latter is used to separate high- and low-frequency oscillations of lung signal related to the effects of pulsatile blood flow. Lung ventilation: Using contrast-enhanced first-pass perfusion, lung ventilation deficits are indirectly identified by hypoxic vasoconstriction. More direct but still experimental approaches use either inhalation of pure oxygen, an aerosolized contrast agent, or hyperpolarized noble gases. Fourier decomposition MRI based on the low-frequency lung signal oscillation allows for visualization of ventilation without any contrast agent. Respiratory mechanics: Time-resolved series with high background signal such as GRE or steady-state free precession visualize the movement of chest wall, diaphragm, mediastinum, lung tissue, tracheal wall, and tumor. The assessment of volume changes allows drawing conclusions on regional ventilation. With this arsenal of functional imaging capabilities at high spatial and temporal resolution but without radiation burden, MRI will find its role in regional functional lung analysis and will therefore overcome the sensitivity of global lung function analysis for repeated short-term treatment monitoring. PMID:24481761

  1. Segmentation of neuroanatomy in magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Andrew; Arridge, Simon R.; Barker, G. J.; Tofts, Paul S.

    1992-06-01

    Segmentation in neurological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is necessary for feature extraction, volume measurement and for the three-dimensional display of neuroanatomy. Automated and semi-automated methods offer considerable advantages over manual methods because of their lack of subjectivity, their data reduction capabilities, and the time savings they give. We have used dual echo multi-slice spin-echo data sets which take advantage of the intrinsically multispectral nature of MRI. As a pre-processing step, a rf non-uniformity correction is applied and if the data is noisy the images are smoothed using a non-isotropic blurring method. Edge-based processing is used to identify the skin (the major outer contour) and the eyes. Edge-focusing has been used to significantly simplify edge images and thus allow simple postprocessing to pick out the brain contour in each slice of the data set. Edge- focusing is a technique which locates significant edges using a high degree of smoothing at a coarse level and tracks these edges to a fine level where the edges can be determined with high positional accuracy. Both 2-D and 3-D edge-detection methods have been compared. Once isolated, the brain is further processed to identify CSF, and, depending upon the MR pulse sequence used, the brain itself may be sub-divided into gray matter and white matter using semi-automatic contrast enhancement and clustering methods.

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW: Endovascular interventional magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, L. W.; Bakker, C. J. G.

    2003-07-01

    Minimally invasive interventional radiological procedures, such as balloon angioplasty, stent placement or coiling of aneurysms, play an increasingly important role in the treatment of patients suffering from vascular disease. The non-destructive nature of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), its ability to combine the acquisition of high quality anatomical images and functional information, such as blood flow velocities, perfusion and diffusion, together with its inherent three dimensionality and tomographic imaging capacities, have been advocated as advantages of using the MRI technique for guidance of endovascular radiological interventions. Within this light, endovascular interventional MRI has emerged as an interesting and promising new branch of interventional radiology. In this review article, the authors will give an overview of the most important issues related to this field. In this context, we will focus on the prerequisites for endovascular interventional MRI to come to maturity. In particular, the various approaches for device tracking that were proposed will be discussed and categorized. Furthermore, dedicated MRI systems, safety and compatibility issues and promising applications that could become clinical practice in the future will be discussed.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Guneyli, Serkan; Ward, Emily; Thomas, Stephen; Yousuf, Ambereen Nehal; Trilisky, Igor; Peng, Yahui; Antic, Tatjana; Oto, Aytekin

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common condition in middle-aged and older men and negatively affects the quality of life. An ultrasound classification for BPH based on a previous pathologic classification was reported, and the types of BPH were classified according to different enlargement locations in the prostate. Afterwards, this classification was demonstrated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The classification of BPH is important, as patients with different types of BPH can have different symptoms and treatment options. BPH types on MRI are as follows: type 0, an equal to or less than 25 cm3 prostate showing little or no zonal enlargements; type 1, bilateral transition zone (TZ) enlargement; type 2, retrourethral enlargement; type 3, bilateral TZ and retrourethral enlargement; type 4, pedunculated enlargement; type 5, pedunculated with bilateral TZ and/or retrourethral enlargement; type 6, subtrigonal or ectopic enlargement; type 7, other combinations of enlargements. We retrospectively evaluated MRI images of BPH patients who were histologically diagnosed and presented the different types of BPH on MRI. MRI, with its advantage of multiplanar imaging and superior soft tissue contrast resolution, can be used in BPH patients for differentiation of BPH from prostate cancer, estimation of zonal and entire prostatic volumes, determination of the stromal/glandular ratio, detection of the enlargement locations, and classification of BPH types which may be potentially helpful in choosing the optimal treatment. PMID:27015442

  4. SALINE ARTHROGRAPHY OF THE DISTAL INTERPHALANGEAL JOINT FOR LOW-FIELD MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF THE EQUINE PODOTROCHLEAR BURSA: FEASIBILITY STUDY.

    PubMed

    McGill, Shannon L; Gutierrez-Nibeyro, Santiago D; Schaeffer, David J; Hartman, Susan K; O'Brien, Robert T; Joslyn, Stephen K

    2015-01-01

    Abnormalities of the deep digital flexor tendon, navicular bone, and collateral sesamoidean ligament can be difficult to visualize using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) if bursal fluid is absent. The use of saline podotrochlear bursography improves podotrochlear apparatus evaluation, however, the technique has disadvantages. The objective of this prospective feasibility study was to describe saline arthrography of the distal interphalangeal joint as an alternative technique for improving MRI visualization of the deep digital flexor tendon, navicular bone, collateral sesamoidean ligament, and podotrochlear bursa, and to compare this technique with saline podotrochlear bursography. Eight paired cadaver forelimbs were sampled. Saline podotrochlear bursography or saline arthrography techniques were randomly assigned to one limb, with the alternate technique performed on the contralateral limb. For precontrast and postcontrast studies using each technique, independent observers scored visualization of the dorsal aspect of the deep digital flexor tendon, palmar aspect of the navicular bone, collateral sesamoidean ligament, and podotrochlear bursa. Both contrast techniques improved visualization of structures over precontrast MR images and visualization scores for both techniques were similar. Findings from this study demonstrated that saline arthrography is feasible and comparable to saline podotrochlear bursography for producing podotrochlear bursa distension and separation of the structures of the podotrochlear apparatus on nonweight bearing limbs evaluated with low-field MRI. Clinical evaluation of saline arthrography on live animals is needed to determine if this technique is safe and effective as an alternative to saline podotrochlear bursography in horses with suspected pathology of the podotrochlear apparatus. PMID:25857430

  5. A study of the relationship between gender/age and apparent diffusion coefficient values in spleen of healthy adults using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nazarlou, Ali Kiani; Abdolmohammadi, Jamil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) systems are very effective in detecting strokes, and they also have shown significant promise in the detection of fibrosis and cirrhosis of the liver. However, such systems have the disadvantages of poor reproducibility and noise, which can diminish the accuracy of the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) provided by the DWI process. The main aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the age and gender of healthy adults in terms of the ADC values of the spleen measured by DWI. Methods: Sixty-nine subjects selected for this study from people who were referred to the Tabesh Medical Imaging Center in Tabriz, Iran, in 2013. Each subject underwent echo-planar DWI for her or his ADC values of the spleen with b-values of 50, 400, and 800 s/mm2, and the resulting ADC values were evaluated. Results: No significant differences were observed in ADC values of the spleen among the female and male participants or those from various ages (P>0.05). Conclusions: Based on the findings of this study, it was concluded that the effect of age and gender on the spleen’s ADC values can be omitted from the spleen-diagnosis procedure. In other words, the spleen’s ADC values are not related to the age or the gender of healthy adults. PMID:26052412

  6. Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings between Pathologically Proven Cases of Atypical Tubercular Spine and Tumour Metastasis: A Retrospective Study in 40 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Mohd; Sabir, Aamir Bin; Khalid, Saifullah

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To note the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) differences between pathologically proven cases of atypical spinal tuberculosis and spinal metastasis in 40 cases. Overview of Literature Spinal tuberculosis, or Pott's spine, constitutes less than 1% of all cases of tuberculosis and can be associated with a neurologic deficit. Breast, prostate and lung cancer are responsible for more than 80% of metastatic bone disease cases, and spine is the most common site of bone metastasis. Thus, early diagnosis and prompt management of these pathologies are essential in preventing various complications. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 40 cases of atypical tuberculosis and metastasis affecting the spine from the year 2012 to 2014, with 20 cases each that were proven by histopathological examination. MR imaging was performed on 1.5 T MR-Scanner (Magnetom Avanto, Siemens) utilizing standard surface coils of spine with contrast injection. Chi-square test was used for determining the statistical significance and p-values were calculated. Results The most common site of involvement was the thoracic spine, seen in 85% cases of metastasis and 65% cases of Pott's spine (p=0.144). The mean age of patients with tubercular spine was found to be 40 years and that of metastatic spine was 56 years. The following MR imaging findings showed statistical significance (p<0.05): combined vertebral body and posterior elements involvement, skip lesions, solitary lesion, intra-spinal lesions, concentric collapse, abscess formation and syrinx formation. Conclusions Tuberculosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of various spinal lesions including metastasis, fungal spondylodiskitis, sarcoidosis and lymphoma, particularly in endemic countries. Spinal tuberculosis is considered one of the great mimickers of disease as it could present in a variety of typical and atypical patterns, so proper imaging must be performed in order to facilitate

  7. Characterization of Regional Left Ventricular Function in Nonhuman Primates Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Biomarkers: A Test-Retest Repeatability and Inter-Subject Variability Study

    PubMed Central

    Sampath, Smita; Klimas, Michael; Feng, Dai; Baumgartner, Richard; Manigbas, Elaine; Liang, Ai-Leng; Evelhoch, Jeffrey L.; Chin, Chih-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Pre-clinical animal models are important to study the fundamental biological and functional mechanisms involved in the longitudinal evolution of heart failure (HF). Particularly, large animal models, like nonhuman primates (NHPs), that possess greater physiological, biochemical, and phylogenetic similarity to humans are gaining interest. To assess the translatability of these models into human diseases, imaging biomarkers play a significant role in non-invasive phenotyping, prediction of downstream remodeling, and evaluation of novel experimental therapeutics. This paper sheds insight into NHP cardiac function through the quantification of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging biomarkers that comprehensively characterize the spatiotemporal dynamics of left ventricular (LV) systolic pumping and LV diastolic relaxation. MR tagging and phase contrast (PC) imaging were used to quantify NHP cardiac strain and flow. Temporal inter-relationships between rotational mechanics, myocardial strain and LV chamber flow are presented, and functional biomarkers are evaluated through test-retest repeatability and inter subject variability analyses. The temporal trends observed in strain and flow was similar to published data in humans. Our results indicate a dominant dimension based pumping during early systole, followed by a torsion dominant pumping action during late systole. Early diastole is characterized by close to 65% of untwist, the remainder of which likely contributes to efficient filling during atrial kick. Our data reveal that moderate to good intra-subject repeatability was observed for peak strain, strain-rates, E/circumferential strain-rate (CSR) ratio, E/longitudinal strain-rate (LSR) ratio, and deceleration time. The inter-subject variability was high for strain dyssynchrony, diastolic strain-rates, peak torsion and peak untwist rate. We have successfully characterized cardiac function in NHPs using MR imaging. Peak strain, average systolic strain-rate, diastolic E

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging with an optical atomicmagnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shoujun; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Donaldson, Marcus H.; Rochester, Simon M.; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander

    2006-05-09

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive andversatile methodology that has been applied in many disciplines1,2. Thedetection sensitivity of conventional Faraday detection of MRI depends onthe strength of the static magnetic field and the sample "fillingfactor." Under circumstances where only low magnetic fields can be used,and for samples with low spin density or filling factor, the conventionaldetection sensitivity is compromised. Alternative detection methods withhigh sensitivity in low magnetic fields are thus required. Here we showthe first use of a laser-based atomic magnetometer for MRI detection inlow fields. Our technique also employs remote detection which physicallyseparates the encoding and detection steps3-5, to improve the fillingfactor of the sample. Potentially inexpensive and using a compactapparatus, our technique provides a novel alternative for MRI detectionwith substantially enhanced sensitivity and time resolution whileavoiding the need for cryogenics.

  9. [Prostate biopsy under magnetic resonance imaging guidance].

    PubMed

    Kuplevatskiy, V I; CherkashiN, M A; Roshchin, D A; Berezina, N A; Vorob'ev, N A

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is one of the most important problems in modern oncology. According to statistical data, PC ranks second in the cancer morbidity structure in the Russian Federation and developed countries and its prevalence has been progressively increasing over the past decade. A need for early diagnosis and maximally accurate morphological verification of the diagnosis in difficult clinical cases (inconvenient tumor location for standard transrectal biopsy; gland scarring changes concurrent with prostatitis and hemorrhage; threshold values of prostate-specific antigen with unclear changes in its doubling per unit time; suspicion of biochemical recurrence or clinical tumor progression after special treatment) leads to revised diagnostic algorithms and clinically introduced new high-tech invasive diagnostic methods. This paper gives the first analysis of literature data on Russian practice using one of the new methods to verify prostate cancer (transrectal prostate cancer under magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance). The have sought the 1995-2015 data in the MEDLINE and Pubmed. PMID:27192773

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Perianal Fistula.

    PubMed

    Tolan, Damian J M

    2016-08-01

    Perianal fistulas and other inflammatory diseases of the anus and perianal soft tissues are a cause of substantial morbidity, and are a major part of the practice of any colorectal surgeon. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has a key role in the assessment of patients for the extent of fistulizing Crohn disease, complications related to fistulas, and to assist in confirming the diagnosis or proposing an alternative. Technique is critical and in particular, the selection of sequences for diagnosis and characterization of abnormalities with the main choices being between standard anatomical sequences (T1 or T2), assessing for edema (FS T2 or STIR), assessing abnormal contrast enhancement (FS T1), and assessing for abnormal diffusion or a combination of these. Guidance on MRI sequence selection, classification of fistulas, the current guidance on the role of MRI in assessing patients, and advice on how to provide useful structured reports, as well as how to detect complications of perianal sepsis are included. PMID:27342895

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Hash, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) affords high-resolution visualization of the soft tissue structures (menisci, ligaments, cartilage, etc) and bone marrow of the knee. Evidence Acquisition: Pertinent clinical and research articles in the orthopaedic and radiology literature over the past 30 years using PubMed. Results: Ligament tears can be accurately assessed with MRI, but distinguishing partial tears from ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) can be challenging. Determining the extent of a partial tear is often extremely difficult to accurately assess. The status of the posterolateral corner structures, menisci, and cartilage can be accurately evaluated, although limitations in the evaluation of certain structures exist. Patellofemoral joint, marrow, tibiofibular joint, and synovial pathology can supplement physical examination findings and provide definitive diagnosis. Conclusions: MRI provides an accurate noninvasive assessment of knee pathology. PMID:24381701

  12. Baseline brain perfusion and brain structure in patients with major depression: a multimodal magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Vasic, Nenad; Wolf, Nadine D.; Grön, Georg; Sosic-Vasic, Zrinka; Connemann, Bernhard J.; Sambataro, Fabio; von Strombeck, Anna; Lang, Dirk; Otte, Stefanie; Dudek, Manuela; Wolf, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Abnormal regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and grey matter volume have been frequently reported in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). However, it is unclear to what extent structural and functional change co-occurs in patients with MDD and whether markers of neural activity, such as rCBF, can be predicted by structural change. Methods Using MRI, we investigated resting-state rCBF and brain structure in patients with MDD and healthy controls between July 2008 and January 2013. We acquired perfusion images obtained with continuous arterial spin labelling, used voxel-based morphometry to assess grey matter volume and integrated biological parametric mapping analyses to investigate the impact of brain atrophy on rCBF. Results We included 43 patients and 29 controls in our study. Frontotemporal grey matter volume was reduced in patients compared with controls. In patients, rCBF was reduced in the anterior cingulate and bilateral parahippocampal areas and increased in frontoparietal and striatal regions. These abnormalities were confirmed by analyses with brain volume as a covariate. In patients with MDD there were significant negative correlations between the extent of depressive symptoms and bilateral parahippocampal rCBF. We found a positive correlation between depressive symptoms and rCBF for right middle frontal cortical blood flow. Limitations Medication use in patients has to be considered as a limitation of our study. Conclusion Our data suggest that while changes of cerebral blood flow and brain volume co-occur in patients with MDD, structural change is not sufficient to explain altered neural activity in patients at rest. Abnormal brain structure and function in patients with MDD appear to reflect distinct levels of neuropathology. PMID:26125119

  13. Water mobility in the endosperm of high beta-glucan barley mutants as studied by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Fast Seefeldt, Helene; van den Berg, Frans; Köckenberger, Walter; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Wollenweber, Bernd

    2007-04-01

    (1)H NMR imaging (MRI) was used as a noninvasive technique to study water distribution and mobility in hydrated barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seeds of accessions with varying content of beta glucan (BG), a highly hygroscopic cell wall component. High contents of BG in barley are unfavorable in malting where it leads to clotting of filters and hazing of beer as well as in animal feed where it hinders the rapid uptake of energy. However, a high content of BG has a positive nutritional effect, as it lowers the cholesterol and the glycaemic index. It was studied whether water distribution and mobility were related to content and location of BG. Water mobility was investigated by following the rate and mode of desiccation in hydrated single seeds. In order to determine the different water components, a multispin echo experiment was set up to reveal the T(2) transverse relaxation rates of water within the seeds. A principal component analysis (PCA) discriminated control seeds from the high-BG mutant seeds. MRI proved efficient in tracing the differences in water-holding capacity of contrasting barley seeds. All accessions showed nonuniform distribution of water at full hydration as well as during desiccation. The embryo retained water even after 36 h of drying, whereas the endosperm showed low and heterogeneous mobility of the water after drying. The relaxation time constants indicated that the BG mutants had regions of much higher water mobility around the ventral crease compared to the control. It is concluded that MRI can be applied to investigate temporal and spatial differences in the location of specific chemical compounds in single seeds. PMID:17371735

  14. Protocol for a prospective magnetic resonance imaging study on supraspinal lower urinary tract control in healthy subjects and spinal cord injury patients undergoing intradetrusor onabotulinumtoxinA injections for treating neurogenic detrusor overactivity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The control of the lower urinary tract is a complex, multilevel process involving both the peripheral and central nervous system. Due to lesions of the neuraxis, most spinal cord injury patients suffer from neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, which may jeopardise upper urinary tract function and has a negative impact on health-related quality of life. However, the alterations to the nervous system following spinal cord injury causing neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction and potential effects of treatments such as intradetrusor onabotulinumtoxinA injections on lower urinary tract control are poorly understood. Methods/Design This is a prospective structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging study investigating the supraspinal lower urinary tract control in healthy subjects and spinal cord injury patients undergoing intradetrusor onabotulinumtoxinA injections for treating neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Neuroimaging data will include structural magnetic resonance imaging (T1-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging) as well as functional, i.e. blood oxygen level-dependent sensitive magnetic resonance imaging using a 3 T magnetic resonance scanner. The functional magnetic resonance imaging will be performed simultaneously to three different bladder stimulation paradigms using an automated magnetic resonance compatible and synchronised pump system. All subjects will undergo two consecutive and identical magnetic resonance imaging measurements. Healthy subjects will not undergo any intervention between measurements but spinal cord injury patients will receive intradetrusor onabotulinumtoxinA injections for treating neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Parameters of the clinical assessment including bladder diary, urinalysis, medical history, neuro-urological examination, urodynamic investigation as well as standardised questionnaires regarding lower urinary tract function and quality of life will serve as co-variates in the magnetic

  15. Alterations in brain metabolism and function following administration of low-dose codeine phosphate: 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhen; Lin, Pei-Yin; Shen, Zhi-Wei; Wu, Ren-Hua; Xiao, Ye-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify alterations in brain function following administration of a single, low-dose of codeine phosphate in healthy volunteers using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In addition, the metabolic changes in the two sides of the frontal lobe were identified using 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). A total of 20 right-handed healthy participants (10 males, 10 females) were evaluated, and a Signa HDx 1.5T MRI scanner was used for data acquisition. An echo planar imaging sequence was used for resting-state fMRI, whereas a point resolved spectroscopy sequence was used for 1H-MRS. Regional Saturation Technique, Data Processing Assistant for Resting-State fMRI, and Statistical Parameter Mapping 8 were used to analyze the fMRI data. The 1H-MRS data were analyzed using LCModel software. At 1 h after oral administration of codeine phosphate (1.0 mg/kg), the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and regional homogeneity were altered in different brain areas. The choline content was significantly increased in the right and left frontal lobes following codeine phosphate administration (P=0.02 and P=0.03, respectively), whereas the inositol content was significantly decreased in the left frontal lobe (P=0.02). There was no change in the glutamic acid content in the frontal lobes. In conclusion, the functions of different brain regions can be affected by a single, low-dose administration of codeine phosphate. The alterations in metabolite content in the two frontal lobes may be associated with changes in brain function, whereas the ALFF in the globus pallidus may have an effect on codeine phosphate addiction. Finally, glutamic acid may be useful in the estimation of codeine dependence. PMID:27446252

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of glioblastoma using aptamer conjugated magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bongjune; Yang, Jaemoon; Hwang, Myeonghwan; Suh, Jin-Suck; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo

    2012-10-01

    Here we introduce a new class of smart imaging probes hybridizing polysorbate 80 coated-magnetic nanoparticles with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2)-targetable aptamer for specific magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of angiogenesis from glioblastoma.

  17. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma: Predictive Value for the Site of Postradiotherapy Relapse in a Prospective Longitudinal Study

    SciTech Connect

    Laprie, Anne Catalaa, Isabelle; Cassol, Emmanuelle; McKnight, Tracy R.; Berchery, Delphine; Marre, Delphine; Bachaud, Jean-Marc; Berry, Isabelle; Moyal, Elizabeth Cohen-Jonathan

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI)-defined, metabolically abnormal tumor regions and subsequent sites of relapse in data from patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) in a prospective clinical trial. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three examinations were performed prospectively for 9 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme studied in a Phase I trial combining Tipifarnib and RT. The patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRSI before treatment and every 2 months until relapse. The MRSI data were categorized by the choline (Cho)/N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) ratio (CNR) as a measure of spectroscopic abnormality. CNRs corresponding to T1 and T2 MRI for 1,207 voxels were evaluated before RT and at recurrence. Results: Before treatment, areas of CNR2 (CNR {>=}2) represented 25% of the contrast-enhancing (T1CE) regions and 10% of abnormal T2 regions outside T1CE (HyperT2). The presence of CNR2 was often an early indicator of the site of relapse after therapy. In fact, 75% of the voxels within the T1CE+CNR2 before therapy continued to exhibit CNR2 at relapse, compared with 22% of the voxels within the T1CE with normal CNR (p < 0.05). The location of new contrast enhancement with CNR2 corresponded in 80% of the initial HyperT2+CNR2 vs. 20.7% of the HyperT2 voxels with normal CNR (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Metabolically active regions represented a small percentage of pretreatment MRI abnormalities and were predictive for the site of post-RT relapse. The incorporation of MRSI data in the definition of RT target volumes for selective boosting may be a promising avenue leading to increased local control of glioblastomas.

  18. A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Foreign-Language Vocabulary Learning Enhanced by Phonological Rehearsal: The Role of the Right Cerebellum and Left Fusiform Gyrus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makita, Kai; Yamazaki, Mika; Tanabe, Hiroki C.; Koike, Takahiko; Kochiyama, Takanori; Yokokawa, Hirokazu; Yoshida, Haruyo; Sadato, Norihiro

    2013-01-01

    Psychological research suggests that foreign-language vocabulary acquisition recruits the phonological loop for verbal working memory. To depict the neural underpinnings and shed light on the process of foreign language learning, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging of Japanese participants without previous exposure to the Uzbek…

  19. Small Animal Imaging with Magnetic Resonance Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Driehuys, Bastiaan; Nouls, John; Badea, Alexandra; Bucholz, Elizabeth; Ghaghada, Ketan; Petiet, Alexandra; Hedlund, Laurence W.

    2009-01-01

    Small animal magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) has evolved significantly from testing the boundaries of imaging physics to its expanding use today as a tool in non-invasive biomedical investigations. This review is intended to capture the state-of-the-art in MRM for scientists who may be unfamiliar with this modality, but who want to apply its capabilities to their research. We therefore include a brief review of MR concepts and methods of animal handling and support before covering a range of MRM applications including the heart, lung, brain, and the emerging field of MR histology. High-resolution anatomical imaging reveals increasingly exquisite detail in healthy animals and subtle architectural aberrations that occur in genetically altered models. Resolution of 100 µm in all dimensions is now routinely attained in living animals, and 10 µm3 is feasible in fixed specimens. Such images almost rival conventional histology while allowing the object to be viewed interactively in any plane. MRM is now increasingly used to provide functional information in living animals. Images of the beating heart, breathing lung, and functioning brain can be recorded. While clinical MRI focuses on diagnosis, MRM is used to reveal fundamental biology or to non-invasively measure subtle changes in the structure or function of organs during disease progression or in response to experimental therapies. The ability of MRM to provide a detailed functional and anatomical picture in rats and mice, and to track this picture over time, makes it a promising platform with broad applications in biomedical research. PMID:18172332

  20. Molecular Imaging of Activated Platelets Allows the Detection of Pulmonary Embolism with Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Heidt, Timo; Ehrismann, Simon; Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Neudorfer, Irene; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Reisert, Marco; Hagemeyer, Christoph E.; Zirlik, Andreas; Reinöhl, Jochen; Bode, Christoph; Peter, Karlheinz; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; von zur Muhlen, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    Early and reliable detection of pulmonary embolism (PE) is critical for improving patient morbidity and mortality. The desire for low-threshold screening for pulmonary embolism is contradicted by unfavorable radiation of currently used computed tomography or nuclear techniques, while standard magnetic resonance imaging still struggles to provide sufficient diagnostic sensitivity in the lung. In this study we evaluate a molecular-targeted contrast agent against activated platelets for non-invasive detection of murine pulmonary thromboembolism using magnetic resonance imaging. By intravenous injection of human thrombin, pulmonary thromboembolism were consistently induced as confirmed by immunohistochemistry of the lung. Magnetic resonance imaging after thrombin injection showed local tissue edema in weighted images which co-localized with the histological presence of pulmonary thromboembolism. Furthermore, injection of a functionalized contrast agent targeting activated platelets provided sensitive evidence of focal accumulation of activated platelets within the edematous area, which, ex vivo, correlated well with the size of the pulmonary embolism. In summary, we here show delivery and specific binding of a functionalized molecular contrast agent against activated platelets for targeting pulmonary thromboembolism. Going forward, molecular imaging may provide new opportunities to increase sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging for detection of pulmonary embolism. PMID:27138487

  1. Molecular Imaging of Activated Platelets Allows the Detection of Pulmonary Embolism with Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Heidt, Timo; Ehrismann, Simon; Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Neudorfer, Irene; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Reisert, Marco; Hagemeyer, Christoph E; Zirlik, Andreas; Reinöhl, Jochen; Bode, Christoph; Peter, Karlheinz; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; von Zur Muhlen, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    Early and reliable detection of pulmonary embolism (PE) is critical for improving patient morbidity and mortality. The desire for low-threshold screening for pulmonary embolism is contradicted by unfavorable radiation of currently used computed tomography or nuclear techniques, while standard magnetic resonance imaging still struggles to provide sufficient diagnostic sensitivity in the lung. In this study we evaluate a molecular-targeted contrast agent against activated platelets for non-invasive detection of murine pulmonary thromboembolism using magnetic resonance imaging. By intravenous injection of human thrombin, pulmonary thromboembolism were consistently induced as confirmed by immunohistochemistry of the lung. Magnetic resonance imaging after thrombin injection showed local tissue edema in weighted images which co-localized with the histological presence of pulmonary thromboembolism. Furthermore, injection of a functionalized contrast agent targeting activated platelets provided sensitive evidence of focal accumulation of activated platelets within the edematous area, which, ex vivo, correlated well with the size of the pulmonary embolism. In summary, we here show delivery and specific binding of a functionalized molecular contrast agent against activated platelets for targeting pulmonary thromboembolism. Going forward, molecular imaging may provide new opportunities to increase sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging for detection of pulmonary embolism. PMID:27138487

  2. Correlation between the Effects of Acupuncture at Taichong (LR3) and Functional Brain Areas: A Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study Using True versus Sham Acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunxiao; Qu, Shanshan; Zhang, Jiping; Chen, Junqi; Zhang, Shaoqun; Li, Zhipeng; Chen, Jiarong; Ouyang, Huailiang; Huang, Yong; Tang, Chunzhi

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been shown to detect the specificity of acupuncture points, as proved by numerous studies. In this study, resting-state fMRI was used to observe brain areas activated by acupuncture at the Taichong (LR3) acupoint. A total of 15 healthy subjects received brain resting-state fMRI before acupuncture and after sham and true acupuncture, respectively, at LR3. Image data processing was performed using Data Processing Assistant for Resting-State fMRI and REST software. The combination of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and regional homogeneity (ReHo) was used to analyze the changes in brain function during sham and true acupuncture. Acupuncture at LR3 can specifically activate or deactivate brain areas related to vision, movement, sensation, emotion, and analgesia. The specific alterations in the anterior cingulate gyrus, thalamus, and cerebellar posterior lobe have a crucial effect and provide a valuable reference. Sham acupuncture has a certain effect on psychological processes and does not affect brain areas related to function. PMID:24963329

  3. Resonance tube phonation in water: High-speed imaging, electroglottographic and oral pressure observations of vocal fold vibrations--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Granqvist, Svante; Simberg, Susanna; Hertegård, Stellan; Holmqvist, Sofia; Larsson, Hans; Lindestad, Per-Åke; Södersten, Maria; Hammarberg, Britta

    2015-10-01

    Phonation into glass tubes ('resonance tubes'), keeping the free end of the tube in water, has been a frequently used voice therapy method in Finland and more recently also in other countries. The purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate what effects tube phonation with and without water has on the larynx. Two participants were included in the study. The methods used were high-speed imaging, electroglottographic observations of vocal fold vibrations, and measurements of oral pressure during tube phonation. Results showed that the fluctuation in the back pressure during tube phonation in water altered the vocal fold vibrations. In the high-speed imaging, effects were found in the open quotient and amplitude variation of the glottal opening. The open quotient increased with increasing water depth (from 2 cm to 6 cm). A modulation effect by the water bubbles on the vocal fold vibrations was seen both in the high-speed glottal area tracings and in the electroglottography signal. A second experiment revealed that the increased average oral pressure was largely determined by the water depth. The increased open quotient can possibly be explained by an increased abduction of the vocal folds and/or a reduced transglottal pressure. The back pressure of the bubbles also modulates glottal vibrations with a possible 'massage' effect on the vocal folds. This effect and the well-defined average pressure increase due to the known water depth are different from those of other methods using a semi-occluded vocal tract. PMID:24865620

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Gel-cast Ceramic Composites

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Dieckman, S. L.; Balss, K. M.; Waterfield, L. G.; Jendrzejczyk, J. A.; Raptis, A. C.

    1997-01-16

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are being employed to aid in the development of advanced near-net-shape gel-cast ceramic composites. MRI is a unique nondestructive evaluation tool that provides information on both the chemical and physical properties of materials. In this effort, MRI imaging was performed to monitor the drying of porous green-state alumina - methacrylamide-N.N`-methylene bisacrylamide (MAM-MBAM) polymerized composite specimens. Studies were performed on several specimens as a function of humidity and time. The mass and shrinkage of the specimens were also monitored and correlated with the water content.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of gel-cast ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Dieckman, S.L.; Balss, K.M.; Waterfield, L.G.

    1997-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are being employed to aid in the development of advanced near-net-shape gel-cast ceramic composites. MRI is a unique nondestructive evaluation tool that provides information on both the chemical and physical properties of materials. In this effort, MRI imaging was performed to monitor the drying of porous green-state alumina - methacrylamide-N.N`-methylene bisacrylamide (MAM-MBAM) polymerized composite specimens. Studies were performed on several specimens as a function of humidity and time. The mass and shrinkage of the specimens were also monitored and correlated with the water content.

  6. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Amanda

    2016-07-01

    Although post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is not fully understood, considerable research has gone into studying anatomical changes in the brain that take place with this condition. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can demonstrate changes in the volume of numerous brain regions, and functional MR imaging shows changes in activation when subjects are exposed to trauma-related stimuli. This article reviews current research findings on PTSD-associated brain changes and behavioral effects and discusses how PTSD affects patients of different ages. PMID:27390232

  7. The utility of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in Kounis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Okur, Aylin; Karaca, Leyla; Ogul, Hayri; Aköz, Ayhan; Kızrak, Yesim; Aslan, Sahin; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Aksakal, Enbiya; Emet, Mucahit

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Current diagnostic measurements used to assess myocardial involvement in Kounis syndrome, such as electrocardiography (ECG), cardiac enzymes, and troponin levels, are relatively insensitive to small but potentially significant functional change. According to our review of the literature, there has been no study using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on Kounis syndrome except for one case report. Aim To identify the findings of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) in patients with Kounis syndrome (KS) type 1. Material and methods We studied 26 patients (35 ±11.5 years, 53.8% male) with known or suspected KS type 1. The patients underwent precontrast, first-pass, and delayed enhancement cardiac MRI (DE-MRI). Contrast enhancement patterns, edema, hypokinesia, and localization for myocardial lesions were evaluated in all KS type 1 patients. Results Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an early-phase subendocardial contrast defect, and T2-weighted images showed high-signal intensity consistent with edema in lesion areas. None of the lesion areas was found upon contrast enhancement on DE-MRI. The area of early-phase subendocardial contrast defect was reported as follows: the interventricular septum in 14 (53.8%) patients, the left ventricular lateral wall in 8 (30.7%), and the left ventricular apex in 4 (15.4%). Conclusions Dynamic cardiac MR imaging is a reliable tool for assessing cardiac involvement in Kounis syndrome. Delayed contrast-enhanced images show normal washout in the subendocardial lesion area in patients with Kounis syndrome type 1. PMID:26677363

  8. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in 49,XXXXY Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Trevor L.; Vossough, Arastoo; Ficicioglu, Can; Visootsak, Jeannie

    2015-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome is a chromosomal disorder characterized by one or more supernumerary X chromosomes, in addition to the normal 46,XY male karyotype. Whereas classic Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) occurs in 1:400 births, the most severe Klinefelter variant (49,XXXXY) occurs in only 1:85,000 births. The degree of cognitive impairment, specific skeletal changes, and genital abnormalities in Klinefelter syndrome variants is thought to correlate with the number of additional X-chromosomes present. Magnetic resonance imaging studies in individuals with classic Klinefelter syndrome show smaller brain volumes, but magnetic resonance imaging data are lacking for individuals with rarer and more severe Klinefelter variants. We present case reports and magnetic resonance imaging studies on 3 individuals with 49,XXXXY. All 3 patients exhibited varying degrees of volume loss and abnormalities in white matter. Changes in white matter may represent a specific finding in patients with severe Klinefelter variants such as 49,XXXXY, and karyotype analysis should be considered in patients with unexplained white-matter disease, especially when developmental delay or genital abnormalities are present. PMID:18486832

  9. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wataganara, Tuangsit; Ebrashy, Alaa; Aliyu, Labaran Dayyabu; Moreira de Sa, Renato Augusto; Pooh, Ritsuko; Kurjak, Asim; Sen, Cihat; Adra, Abdallah; Stanojevic, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been increasingly adopted in obstetrics practice in the past three decades. MRI aids prenatal ultrasound and improves diagnostic accuracy for selected maternal and fetal conditions. However, it should be considered only when high-quality ultrasound cannot provide certain information that affects the counseling, prenatal intervention, pregnancy course, and delivery plan. Major indications of fetal MRI include, but are not restricted to, morbidly adherent placenta, selected cases of fetal brain anomalies, thoracic lesions (especially in severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia), and soft tissue tumors at head and neck regions of the fetus. For fetal anatomy assessment, a 1.5-Tesla machine with a fast T2-weighted single-shot technique is recommended for image requisition of common fetal abnormalities. Individual judgment needs to be applied when considering usage of a 3-Tesla machine. Gadolinium MRI contrast is not recommended during pregnancy. MRI should be avoided in the first half of pregnancy due to small fetal structures and motion artifacts. Assessment of fetal cerebral cortex can be achieved with MRI in the third trimester. MRI is a viable research tool for noninvasive interrogation of the fetus and the placenta. PMID:27092644

  10. Resonant Doppler imaging with common path OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Edmund; Hammer, Daniel; Wang, Siqian; Cuevas, Maximiliano; Walther, Julia

    2009-07-01

    Resonant Doppler flow imaging based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a recently developed imaging modality that provides, besides the structural information, dynamic blood flow information. We show that this method can be applied to a common path OCT system by mounting the mirror in the reference arm on a small piezo actor leading to a simpler and more stable system design. Besides the known 3 state cycle, we describe other cycles with any number of states leading to higher measurement speed or larger velocity range. The hysteresis of the piezo actor is compensated by applying an optimized electrical signal. Two different approaches, one using a Levenberg-Marquardt optimization, the other using the Prandtl-Ishlinskii model for compensation of hysteresis, are applied to generate the optimized control signal. Besides providing an analytical formula for the calculation of the axial velocity for cycles having certain spacings in the reference velocity, we describe deviations from the signal degradation caused by the transversal part of the motion causing errors in the velocity estimation. The performance of the system with two and three states is first evaluated with a mirror on a loud speaker. Measurements with a flow phantom consisting of 1 % Intralipid dilution flowing through small diameter capillaries show the suitability of the system and the expected deviations at high velocities.

  11. In vitro study of novel gadolinium-loaded liposomes guided by GBI-10 aptamer for promising tumor targeting and tumor diagnosis by magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Meng-Jie; Li, Kun-Feng; Zhang, Lan-Xin; Wang, Huan; Liu, Li-Si; Zheng, Zhuo-Zhao; Han, Nan-Yin; Yang, Zhen-Jun; Fan, Tian-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Novel gadolinium-loaded liposomes guided by GBI-10 aptamer were developed and evaluated in vitro to enhance magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis of tumor. Nontargeted gadolinium-loaded liposomes were achieved by incorporating amphipathic material, Gd (III) [N,N-bis-stearylamidomethyl-N′-amidomethyl] diethylenetriamine tetraacetic acid, into the liposome membrane using lipid film hydration method. GBI-10, as the targeting ligand, was then conjugated onto the liposome surface to get GBI-10-targeted gadolinium-loaded liposomes (GTLs). Both nontargeted gadolinium-loaded liposomes and GTLs displayed good dispersion stability, optimal size, and zeta potential for tumor targeting, as well as favorable imaging properties with enhanced relaxivity compared with a commercial MRI contrast agent (CA), gadopentetate dimeglumine. The use of GBI-10 aptamer in this liposomal system was intended to result in increased accumulation of gadolinium at the periphery of C6 glioma cells, where the targeting extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C is overexpressed. Increased cellular binding of GTLs to C6 cells was confirmed by confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, and MRI, demonstrating the promise of this novel delivery system as a carrier of MRI contrast agent for the diagnosis of tumor. These studies provide a new strategy furthering the development of nanomedicine for both diagnosis and therapy of tumor. PMID:26316749

  12. The prevalence of anatomical variations that can cause inadvertent dural puncture when performing caudal block in Koreans: a study using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Joo, J; Kim, J; Lee, J

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of the anatomical abnormalities that can induce inadvertent dural puncture when performing caudal block. The anatomy of the lumbo-sacral area was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging. In 2462 of the 2669 patients imaged, the dural sac terminal was located between the upper half of the 1st sacral vertebra and the lower half of the 2nd sacral vertebra. In 22 cases (0.8%), the dural sac terminal and the spinal canal were located at or below the 3rd sacral vertebra, and these were cases of simple anatomical variations. As regards pathologic conditions, there was one case of sacral meningocoele and 46 cases of sacral perineural cyst. In 21 cases (0.8%) out of the 46 perineural cyst cases, the cyst could be found at or below the 3rd sacral vertebra level. Inadvertent dural puncture may happen when performing caudal block in patients with such abnormal anatomy. PMID:19922508

  13. Diagnostic Value of Semiquantitative Analysis of Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging with GD-EOB-DTPA in Focal Liver Lesions Characterization: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Maddalena; Trattenero, Chiara; Bonaffini, Pietro Andrea; Talei Franzesi, Cammillo; Sironi, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the diagnostic accuracy of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSCE-MRI) in differentiation between benign and malignant liver lesions by assessment of tumoral perfusion parameters. Methods Materials. Seventy-three patients with known focal liver lesions, including 45 benign (16 FNH, 27 angiomas, and 2 abscesses) and 28 malignant ones (17 metastases, 9 HCCs, and 2 cholangiocarcinoma) underwent 1.5 T MRI upper abdominal study, with standard protocol that included dynamic contrast-enhanced sequences. On dedicated workstation, time-intensity curves were determined and the following perfusion parameters were calculated: relative arterial, venous and late enhancement (RAE, RVE, RLE), maximum enhancement (ME), relative enhancement (RE), and time to peak (TTP). Results. All diagnoses were established either by histopathology or imaging follow-up. Perfusion mean values calculated in benign lesions were RAE 33.8%, RVE 66.03%, RLE 80.63%, ME 776.00%, MRE 86.27%, and TTP 146.95 sec. Corresponding perfusion values calculated in malignant lesions were RAE 22.47%, RVE 40.54%, RLE 47.52%, ME 448.78%, MRE 49.85%, and TTP 183.79 sec. Statistical difference (p < 0.05) was achieved in all the perfusion parameters calculated, obtaining different cluster of perfusion kinetics between benign and malignant lesions. Conclusions. DSCE-MRI depicts kinetic differences in perfusion parameters among the different common liver lesions, related to tumour supply and microvascular characteristics. PMID:26064093

  14. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging investigation of resonance tuning in soprano singing.

    PubMed

    Bresch, Erik; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2010-11-01

    This article investigates using real-time magnetic resonance imaging the vocal tract shaping of 5 soprano singers during the production of two-octave scales of sung vowels. A systematic shift of the first vocal tract resonance frequency with respect to the fundamental is shown to exist for high vowels across all subjects. No consistent systematic effect on the vocal tract resonance could be shown across all of the subjects for other vowels or for the second vocal tract resonance. PMID:21110548

  15. Far-field super-resolution imaging of resonant multiples

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Bowen; Huang, Yunsong; Røstad, Anders; Schuster, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that seismic resonant multiples, usually considered as noise, can be used for super-resolution imaging in the far-field region of sources and receivers. Tests with both synthetic data and field data show that resonant multiples can image reflector boundaries with resolutions more than twice the classical resolution limit. Resolution increases with the order of the resonant multiples. This procedure has important applications in earthquake and exploration seismology, radar, sonar, LIDAR (light detection and ranging), and ultrasound imaging, where the multiples can be used to make high-resolution images. PMID:27386521

  16. Far-field super-resolution imaging of resonant multiples.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bowen; Huang, Yunsong; Røstad, Anders; Schuster, Gerard

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that seismic resonant multiples, usually considered as noise, can be used for super-resolution imaging in the far-field region of sources and receivers. Tests with both synthetic data and field data show that resonant multiples can image reflector boundaries with resolutions more than twice the classical resolution limit. Resolution increases with the order of the resonant multiples. This procedure has important applications in earthquake and exploration seismology, radar, sonar, LIDAR (light detection and ranging), and ultrasound imaging, where the multiples can be used to make high-resolution images. PMID:27386521

  17. Simultaneous in vivo positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Catana, Ciprian; Procissi, Daniel; Wu, Yibao; Judenhofer, Martin S; Qi, Jinyi; Pichler, Bernd J; Jacobs, Russell E; Cherry, Simon R

    2008-03-11

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used in vivo imaging technologies with both clinical and biomedical research applications. The strengths of MRI include high-resolution, high-contrast morphologic imaging of soft tissues; the ability to image physiologic parameters such as diffusion and changes in oxygenation level resulting from neuronal stimulation; and the measurement of metabolites using chemical shift imaging. PET images the distribution of biologically targeted radiotracers with high sensitivity, but images generally lack anatomic context and are of lower spatial resolution. Integration of these technologies permits the acquisition of temporally correlated data showing the distribution of PET radiotracers and MRI contrast agents or MR-detectable metabolites, with registration to the underlying anatomy. An MRI-compatible PET scanner has been built for biomedical research applications that allows data from both modalities to be acquired simultaneously. Experiments demonstrate no effect of the MRI system on the spatial resolution of the PET system and <10% reduction in the fraction of radioactive decay events detected by the PET scanner inside the MRI. The signal-to-noise ratio and uniformity of the MR images, with the exception of one particular pulse sequence, were little affected by the presence of the PET scanner. In vivo simultaneous PET and MRI studies were performed in mice. Proof-of-principle in vivo MR spectroscopy and functional MRI experiments were also demonstrated with the combined scanner. PMID:18319342

  18. Simultaneous in vivo positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Catana, Ciprian; Procissi, Daniel; Wu, Yibao; Judenhofer, Martin S.; Qi, Jinyi; Pichler, Bernd J.; Jacobs, Russell E.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2008-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used in vivo imaging technologies with both clinical and biomedical research applications. The strengths of MRI include high-resolution, high-contrast morphologic imaging of soft tissues; the ability to image physiologic parameters such as diffusion and changes in oxygenation level resulting from neuronal stimulation; and the measurement of metabolites using chemical shift imaging. PET images the distribution of biologically targeted radiotracers with high sensitivity, but images generally lack anatomic context and are of lower spatial resolution. Integration of these technologies permits the acquisition of temporally correlated data showing the distribution of PET radiotracers and MRI contrast agents or MR-detectable metabolites, with registration to the underlying anatomy. An MRI-compatible PET scanner has been built for biomedical research applications that allows data from both modalities to be acquired simultaneously. Experiments demonstrate no effect of the MRI system on the spatial resolution of the PET system and <10% reduction in the fraction of radioactive decay events detected by the PET scanner inside the MRI. The signal-to-noise ratio and uniformity of the MR images, with the exception of one particular pulse sequence, were little affected by the presence of the PET scanner. In vivo simultaneous PET and MRI studies were performed in mice. Proof-of-principle in vivo MR spectroscopy and functional MRI experiments were also demonstrated with the combined scanner. PMID:18319342

  19. The Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Investigation and Management of Invasive Lobular Carcinoma-A 3-Year Retrospective Study in Two District General Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Derias, Mina; Subramanian, Ashok; Allan, Simon; Shah, Elizabeth; Teraifi, Hassan El; Howlett, David

    2016-07-01

    Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) accounts for 5-15% of breast cancers. In comparison to other types of breast cancer, ILC is more likely to be associated with multifocal and contralateral breast involvement as well as a tendency to a diffuse infiltrative growth pattern which can represent a diagnostic challenge. The National Institute of Clinical Excellence guidelines in 2009 recommended the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the preoperative assessment of ILC. This study aims to assess compliance with the guidelines in two District General Hospitals and the utility of MRI in the investigation of ILC. All cases of ILC between 2011 and 2013 were retrospectively identified from the pathology database and their breast imaging findings, pathology report, and operative intervention were reviewed. A total of 126 patients were identified with ILC, of these 46 had MRI preoperatively (36.5%). MRI upgraded mammography/ultrasound diagnoses in 10 patients (21.7%). MRI showed multicentric unilateral disease in 17 patients (37.0%) occult on ultrasound/mammogram, with these patients undergoing mastectomy and 16/17 (94.1%) confirmed multifocality on pathology. MRI showed a contralateral lesion in 9 patients (19.6%), four (8.7%) of which were malignant and had bilateral surgery, and five (10.9%) were benign on further imaging/biopsy. MRI also downgraded three patients (6.5%) to unifocal disease with reported multifocal appearances on mammography/ultrasound, and these patients underwent breast-conserving surgery. MRI adds significant additional information to mammograms/ultrasound in ILC and should be undertaken in all such cases preoperatively assuming no contraindication. PMID:27265271

  20. Diagnosis of hematogenous pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis by magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, S.P.; Wiener, S.N. )

    1991-04-01

    The clinical information and imaging data from 27 patients with hematogenous pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis were reviewed. All patients had roentgenographic and magnetic resonance imaging examinations. Seventeen patients had computed tomograms; 17 had technetium Tc 99m medronate bone scans; and seven had gallium citrate Ga 67 scans. Magnetic resonance imaging, when used as a part of the initial radiologic evaluation, detected abnormalities consistent with osteomyelitis in all 27 patients. Magnetic resonance imaging also demonstrated paravertebral and/or epidural extension of infection in 14 patients, including seven patients who had neurologic signs of lower-extremity weakness. Roentgenograms, computed tomograms, technetium bone scans, and gallium scans had findings suggestive of the diagnosis in 48%, 65%, 71%, and 86% of the patients, respectively. We recommend magnetic resonance imaging as an important and perhaps critical imaging modality for detection of pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis.

  1. Respiratory Amplitude Guided 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yanle; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Low, Daniel A.; Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of prospectively guiding 4-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image acquisition using triggers at preselected respiratory amplitudes to achieve T{sub 2} weighting for abdominal motion tracking. Methods and Materials: A respiratory amplitude-based triggering system was developed and integrated into a commercial turbo spin echo MRI sequence. Initial feasibility tests were performed on healthy human study participants. Four respiratory states, the middle and the end of inhalation and exhalation, were used to trigger 4D MRI image acquisition of the liver. To achieve T{sub 2} weighting, the echo time and repetition time were set to 75 milliseconds and 4108 milliseconds, respectively. Single-shot acquisition, together with parallel imaging and partial k-space imaging techniques, was used to improve image acquisition efficiency. 4D MRI image sets composed of axial or sagittal slices were acquired. Results: Respiratory data measured and logged by the MRI scanner showed that the triggers occurred at the appropriate respiratory levels. Liver motion could be easily observed on both 4D MRI image datasets by sensing either the change of liver in size and shape (axial) or diaphragm motion (sagittal). Both 4D MRI image datasets were T{sub 2}-weighted as expected. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility of achieving T{sub 2}-weighted 4D MRI images using amplitude-based respiratory triggers. With the aid of the respiratory amplitude-based triggering system, the proposed method is compatible with most MRI sequences and therefore has the potential to improve tumor-tissue contrast in abdominal tumor motion imaging.

  2. The Effect of Study Design Biases on the Diagnostic Accuracy of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Detect Silicone Breast Implant Ruptures: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jae W.; Kim, Hyungjin Myra; Bellfi, Lillian T.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2010-01-01

    Background All silicone breast implant recipients are recommended by the US Food and Drug Administration to undergo serial screening to detect implant rupture with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We performed a systematic review of the literature to assess the quality of diagnostic accuracy studies utilizing MRI or ultrasound to detect silicone breast implant rupture and conducted a meta-analysis to examine the effect of study design biases on the estimation of MRI diagnostic accuracy measures. Method Studies investigating the diagnostic accuracy of MRI and ultrasound in evaluating ruptured silicone breast implants were identified using MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science, and Cochrane library databases. Two reviewers independently screened potential studies for inclusion and extracted data. Study design biases were assessed using the QUADAS tool and the STARDS checklist. Meta-analyses estimated the influence of biases on diagnostic odds ratios. Results Among 1175 identified articles, 21 met the inclusion criteria. Most studies using MRI (n= 10 of 16) and ultrasound (n=10 of 13) examined symptomatic subjects. Meta-analyses revealed that MRI studies evaluating symptomatic subjects had 14-fold higher diagnostic accuracy estimates compared to studies using an asymptomatic sample (RDOR 13.8; 95% CI 1.83–104.6) and 2-fold higher diagnostic accuracy estimates compared to studies using a screening sample (RDOR 1.89; 95% CI 0.05–75.7). Conclusion Many of the published studies utilizing MRI or ultrasound to detect silicone breast implant rupture are flawed with methodological biases. These methodological shortcomings may result in overestimated MRI diagnostic accuracy measures and should be interpreted with caution when applying the data to a screening population. PMID:21364405

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Caranci, F; Briganti, F; La Porta, M; Antinolfi, G; Cesarano, E; Fonio, P; Brunese, L; Coppolino, F

    2013-08-01

    Brachial plexus injury represents the most severe nerve injury of the extremities. While obstetric brachial plexus injury has showed a reduction in the number of cases due to the improvements in obstetric care, brachial plexus injury in the adult is an increasingly common clinical problem. The therapeutic measures depend on the pathologic condition and the location of the injury: Preganglionic avulsions are usually not amenable to surgical repair; function of some denervated muscles can be restored with nerve transfers from intercostals or accessory nerves and contralateral C7 transfer. Postganglionic avulsions are repaired with excision of the damaged segment and nerve autograft between nerve ends or followed up conservatively. Magnetic resonance imaging is the modality of choice for depicting the anatomy and pathology of the brachial plexus: It demonstrates the location of the nerve damage (crucial for optimal treatment planning), depicts the nerve continuity (with or without neuroma formation), or may show a completely disrupted/avulsed nerve, thereby aiding in nerve-injury grading for preoperative planning. Computed tomography myelography has the advantage of a higher spatial resolution in demonstration of nerve roots compared with MR myelography; however, it is invasive and shows some difficulties in the depiction of some pseudomeningoceles with little or no communication with the dural sac. PMID:23949940

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Pituitary Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bonneville, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is currently considered a major keystone of the diagnosis of diseases of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal region. However, the relatively small size of the pituitary gland, its location deep at the skull base and the numerous physiological variants present in this area impede the precise assessment of the anatomical structures and, particularly, of the pituitary gland itself. The diagnosis of the often tiny lesions of this region--such as pituitary microadenomas--is then difficult if the MRI technology is not optimized and if potential artifacts and traps are not recognized. Advanced MRI technology can not only depict small lesions with greater reliability, but also help in the differential diagnosis of large tumors. In these, defining the presence or absence of invasion is a particularly important task. This review describes and illustrates the radiological diagnosis of the different tumors of the sellar region, from the common prolactinomas, nonfunctioning adenomas and Rathke's cleft cysts, to the less frequent and more difficult to detect corticotroph pituitary adenomas in Cushing's disease, and other neoplastic and nonneoplastic entities. Finally, some hints are given to facilitate the differential diagnosis of sellar lesions. PMID:27003878

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pediatric brain

    SciTech Connect

    Salamon, G.; Raynaud, C.; Regis, J.; Rumeau, C.

    1990-01-01

    The atlas presents sequences of MRI sections parallel to the orbito-meatal plane in children from birth through the age of sixteen years. Each child was studied horizontally and sagitally and three-dimensional brain images were reconstructed to facilitate accurate identification of sulci and gyri. The images show crucial aspects of brain development such as the constancy of the brain stem and primitive brain from birth onward; the development of the telencephalon, characterized by deepening of sulci and growth of the cerebral cortex surface; and the different stages of white matter myelinization.

  6. Clinical and in vitro magnetic resonance imaging of prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Buonocore, E.; Hesemann, C.; Pavlicek, W.; Montie, J.E.

    1984-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate was accomplished in 10 patients who subsequently had surgical exploration for histological confirmation and tumor staging. Eight patients were found to have carcinoma of the prostate. Two resected prostates with carcinoma and one normal prostate were available for in vitro MRI in a clinical magnetic resonance unit. The MRI finding of prostatic carcinoma was heterogeneous signal patterns, seen best on T2-weighted studies. There was a homogeneous MRI signal pattern of the normal prostate gland examined in vitro. In two instances, the MRI studies were accurate for the identification of tumor spread to the seminal vesicles, not diagnosed at the time of surgical resection. Microscopic metastatic disease of the lymph nodes in four patients was not identified by MRI.

  7. High pressure magnetic resonance imaging with metallic vessels.

    PubMed

    Han, Hui; Ouellette, Matthew; MacMillan, Bryce; Goora, Frederic; MacGregor, Rodney; Green, Derrick; Balcom, Bruce J

    2011-12-01

    High pressure measurements in most scientific fields rely on metal vessels given the superior tensile strength of metals. We introduce high pressure magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements with metallic vessels. The developed MRI compatible metallic pressure vessel concept is very general in application. Macroscopic physical systems are now amenable to spatially resolved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study at variable pressure and temperature. Metallic pressure vessels not only provide inherently high tensile strengths and efficient temperature control, they also permit optimization of the MRI RF probe sensitivity. An MRI compatible pressure vessel is demonstrated with a rock core holder fabricated using non-magnetic stainless steel. Water flooding through a porous rock under pressure is shown as an example of its applications. High pressure NMR spectroscopy plays an indispensable role in several science fields. This work will open new vistas of study for high pressure material science MRI and MR. PMID:21962929

  8. The influence of motor expertise on the brain activity of motor task performance: A meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie

    2015-06-01

    Previous research has investigated the influence of long-term motor training on the brain activity of motor processes, but the findings are inconsistent. To clarify how acquiring motor expertise induces cortical reorganization during motor task performance, the current study conducted a quantitative meta-analysis on 26 functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies that investigate motor task performance in people with long-term motor training experience (e.g., athletes, musicians, and dancers) and control participants. Meta-analysis of the brain activation in motor experts and novices showed similar effects in the bilateral frontal and parietal regions. The meta-analysis on the contrast between motor experts and novices indicated that experts showed stronger effects in the left inferior parietal lobule (BA 40) than did novices in motor execution and prediction tasks. In motor observation tasks, experts showed stronger effects in the left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 9) and left precentral gyrus (BA 6) than novices. On the contrary, novices had stronger effects in the right motor areas and basal ganglia as compared with motor experts. These results indicate that motor experts have effect increases in brain areas involved in action planning and action comprehension, and suggest that intensive motor training might elaborate the motor representation related to the task performance. PMID:25450866

  9. The neuronal correlates of mirror therapy: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study on mirror-induced visual illusions of ankle movements.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Xu, Qun; Abo Salem, Hassan M; Yao, Yihao; Lou, Jicheng; Huang, Xiaolin

    2016-05-15

    Recovery in stroke is mediated by neural plasticity. Mirror therapy is an effective method in the rehabilitation of stroke patients, but the mechanism is still obscure. To identify the neural networks associated with the effect of lower-limbs mirror therapy, we investigated a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study of mirror-induced visual illusion of ankle movements. Five healthy controls and five left hemiplegic stroke patients performed tasks related to mirror therapy in the fMRI study. Neural activation was compared in a no-mirror condition and a mirror condition. All subjects in the experiment performed the task of flexing and extending the right ankle. In a mirror condition, movement of the left ankle was simulated by mirror reflection of right ankle movement. Changes in neural activation in response to mirror therapy were assessed both in healthy controls and stroke patients. We found strong activation of the motor cortex bilaterally in healthy controls, as well as significant activation of the ipsilateral sensorimotor cortex, the occipital gyrus, and the anterior prefrontal gyrus in stroke patients with respect to the non-mirror condition. We concluded that mirror therapy of ankle movements may induce neural activation of the ipsilesional sensorimotor cortex, and that cortical reorganization may be useful for motor rehabilitation in stroke. PMID:26972531

  10. Does condylar height decrease more in temporomandibular joint nonreducing disc displacement than reducing disc displacement?: A magnetic resonance imaging retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying-Kai; Yang, Chi; Cai, Xie-Yi; Xie, Qian-Yang

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to compare condylar height changes of anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDwR) and anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDwoR) in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) quantitatively, to get a better understanding of the changes in condylar height of patients with anterior disc displacement who had received no treatment, and to provide useful information for treatment protocol. This longitudinal retrospective study enrolled 206 joints in 156 patients, which were divided into ADDWR group and ADDwoR group based on magnetic resonance imaging examination. The joints were assessed quantitatively for condylar height at initial and follow-up visits. Also, both groups were further divided into 3 subgroups according to age: <15 years group, 15 to 21 years group, and 22 to 35 years group. Paired t test and independent t test were used to assess intra- and intergroup differences. The average age of the ADDwR group was 19.65 years with a mean of 9.47 months' follow-up. The follow-up interval of the patients with ADDwoR was 7.96 months, with a mean age of 18.51 years. Condylar height in ADDwoR tended to decrease more than those in ADDwR, especially during the pubertal growth spurt and with the presence of osteoarthrosis, meaning ADDwoR could cause a severe disturbance in mandibular development. Thus, an early disc repositioning was suggested to avoid decrease in condylar height. PMID:27583909

  11. Quantifying mixing using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Emilio J; McCarthy, Kathryn L; Bacca, Lori A; Hartt, William H; McCarthy, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Mixing is a unit operation that combines two or more components into a homogeneous mixture. This work involves mixing two viscous liquid streams using an in-line static mixer. The mixer is a split-and-recombine design that employs shear and extensional flow to increase the interfacial contact between the components. A prototype split-and-recombine (SAR) mixer was constructed by aligning a series of thin laser-cut Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates held in place in a PVC pipe. Mixing in this device is illustrated in the photograph in Fig. 1. Red dye was added to a portion of the test fluid and used as the minor component being mixed into the major (undyed) component. At the inlet of the mixer, the injected layer of tracer fluid is split into two layers as it flows through the mixing section. On each subsequent mixing section, the number of horizontal layers is duplicated. Ultimately, the single stream of dye is uniformly dispersed throughout the cross section of the device. Using a non-Newtonian test fluid of 0.2% Carbopol and a doped tracer fluid of similar composition, mixing in the unit is visualized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is a very powerful experimental probe of molecular chemical and physical environment as well as sample structure on the length scales from microns to centimeters. This sensitivity has resulted in broad application of these techniques to characterize physical, chemical and/or biological properties of materials ranging from humans to foods to porous media (1, 2). The equipment and conditions used here are suitable for imaging liquids containing substantial amounts of NMR mobile (1)H such as ordinary water and organic liquids including oils. Traditionally MRI has utilized super conducting magnets which are not suitable for industrial environments and not portable within a laboratory (Fig. 2). Recent advances in magnet technology have permitted the construction of large volume industrially compatible magnets suitable for

  12. Quantifying Mixing using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tozzi, Emilio J.; McCarthy, Kathryn L.; Bacca, Lori A.; Hartt, William H.; McCarthy, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Mixing is a unit operation that combines two or more components into a homogeneous mixture. This work involves mixing two viscous liquid streams using an in-line static mixer. The mixer is a split-and-recombine design that employs shear and extensional flow to increase the interfacial contact between the components. A prototype split-and-recombine (SAR) mixer was constructed by aligning a series of thin laser-cut Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates held in place in a PVC pipe. Mixing in this device is illustrated in the photograph in Fig. 1. Red dye was added to a portion of the test fluid and used as the minor component being mixed into the major (undyed) component. At the inlet of the mixer, the injected layer of tracer fluid is split into two layers as it flows through the mixing section. On each subsequent mixing section, the number of horizontal layers is duplicated. Ultimately, the single stream of dye is uniformly dispersed throughout the cross section of the device. Using a non-Newtonian test fluid of 0.2% Carbopol and a doped tracer fluid of similar composition, mixing in the unit is visualized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is a very powerful experimental probe of molecular chemical and physical environment as well as sample structure on the length scales from microns to centimeters. This sensitivity has resulted in broad application of these techniques to characterize physical, chemical and/or biological properties of materials ranging from humans to foods to porous media 1, 2. The equipment and conditions used here are suitable for imaging liquids containing substantial amounts of NMR mobile 1H such as ordinary water and organic liquids including oils. Traditionally MRI has utilized super conducting magnets which are not suitable for industrial environments and not portable within a laboratory (Fig. 2). Recent advances in magnet technology have permitted the construction of large volume industrially compatible magnets suitable for

  13. Evaluation of muscle injury using magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBlanc, A. D.; Jaweed, M.; Evans, H.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate spin echo T2 relaxation time changes in thigh muscles after intense eccentric exercise in healthy men. Spin echo and calculated T2 relaxation time images of the thighs were obtained on several occasions after exercise of one limb; the contralateral limb served as control. Muscle damage was verified by elevated levels of serum creatine kinase (CK). Thirty percent of the time no exercise effect was discernible on the magnetic resonance (MR) images. In all positive MR images (70%) the semitendinosus muscle was positive, while the biceps femoris, short head, and gracilis muscles were also positive in 50% and 25% of the total cases, respectively. The peak T2 relaxation time and serum CK were correlated (r = 0.94, p<0.01); temporal changes in muscle T2 relaxation time and serum CK were similar, although T2 relaxation time remained positive after serum CK returned to background levels. We conclude that magnetic resonance imaging can serve as a useful tool in the evaluation of eccentric exercise muscle damage by providing a quantitative indicator of damage and its resolution as well as the specific areas and muscles.

  14. A prospective study of magnetic resonance imaging patterns of central nervous system infections in pediatric age group and young adults and their clinico-biochemical correlation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kamini; Banerjee, Avik; Saggar, Kavita; Ahluwalia, Archana; Saggar, Karan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are common and routinely encountered. Our aim was to evaluate the neuroimaging features of the various infections of the CNS so as to differentiate them from tumoral, vascular, and other entities that warrant a different line of therapy. Aims: Our aim was to analyze the biochemical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features in CNS infections. Settings and Design: This was a longitudinal, prospective study over a period of 1½ years. Subjects and Methods: We studied cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings and MRI patterns in 27 patients of 0–20 years age group with clinical features of CNS infections. MRI was performed on MAGNETOM Avanto 18 Channel 1.5 Tesla MR machine by Siemens India Ltd. The MRI protocol consisted of diffusion-weighted and apparent diffusion coefficient imaging, turbo spin echo T2-weighted, spin echo T1-weighted, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), and gradient-echo in axial, FLAIR in coronal, and T2-weighted in sagittal plane. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequence and MR spectroscopy were done whenever indicated. Results and Conclusions: We found that most of the children belong to 1–10 years age group. Fungal infections were uncommon, mean CSF adenosine deaminase values specific for tuberculosis and mean CSF glucose-lowered in pyogenic. Hemorrhagic involvement of thalamus with/without basal ganglia and brainstem involvement may indicate Japanese encephalitis or dengue encephalitis. Diffusion restriction or hemorrhage in not expected in the brainstem afflicted lesions of rabies. Congenital cytomegalovirus can cause cortical malformations. T1 hyperintensities with diffusion restriction may represent viral encephalitis. Lesions of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) may mimic viral encephalitis. Leptomeningeal enhancement is predominant in pyogenic meningitis. Basilar meningitis in the presence of tuberculomas is highly sensitive and specific for tuberculosis. PMID

  15. Current role of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chevallier, Olivier; Moulin, Morgan; Favelier, Sylvain; Genson, Pierre-Yves; Pottecher, Pierre; Crehange, Gilles; Cochet, Alexandre; Cormier, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) has shown promising results in diagnosis, localization, risk stratification and staging of clinically significant prostate cancer, and targeting or guiding prostate biopsy. mp-MRI consists of T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) combined with several functional sequences including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion or dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging (DCEI) and spectroscopic imaging. Recently, mp-MRI has been used to assess prostate cancer aggressiveness and to identify anteriorly located tumors before and during active surveillance. Moreover, recent studies have reported that mp-MRI is a reliable imaging modality for detecting local recurrence after radical prostatectomy or external beam radiation therapy. Because assessment on mp-MRI can be subjective, use of the newly developed standardized reporting Prostate Imaging and Reporting Archiving Data System (PI-RADS) scoring system and education of specialist radiologists are essential for accurate interpretation. This review focuses on the current place of mp-MRI in prostate cancer and its evolving role in the management of prostate cancer. PMID:26682144

  16. Development of a Hybrid Magnetic Resonance and Ultrasound Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Victoria; Rivens, Ian; Collins, David J.; Leach, Martin O.; ter Haar, Gail R.

    2014-01-01

    A system which allows magnetic resonance (MR) and ultrasound (US) image data to be acquired simultaneously has been developed. B-mode and Doppler US were performed inside the bore of a clinical 1.5 T MRI scanner using a clinical 1–4 MHz US transducer with an 8-metre cable. Susceptibility artefacts and RF noise were introduced into MR images by the US imaging system. RF noise was minimised by using aluminium foil to shield the transducer. A study of MR and B-mode US image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as a function of transducer-phantom separation was performed using a gel phantom. This revealed that a 4 cm separation between the phantom surface and the transducer was sufficient to minimise the effect of the susceptibility artefact in MR images. MR-US imaging was demonstrated in vivo with the aid of a 2 mm VeroWhite 3D-printed spherical target placed over the thigh muscle of a rat. The target allowed single-point registration of MR and US images in the axial plane to be performed. The system was subsequently demonstrated as a tool for the targeting and visualisation of high intensity focused ultrasound exposure in the rat thigh muscle. PMID:25177702

  17. Single Acquisition Quantitative Single Point Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyungseok; Subramanian, Sankaran; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Saito, Keita; Matsumoto, Shingo; Krishna, Murali C; McMillan, Alan B

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) has emerged as a promising non-invasive technology to dynamically image tissue oxygenation. Due to its extremely short spin-spin relaxation times, EPRI benefits from a single-point imaging (SPI) scheme where the entire FID signal is captured using pure phase encoding. However, direct T2*/pO2 quantification is inhibited due to constant magnitude gradients which result in time-decreasing FOV. Therefore, conventional acquisition techniques require repeated imaging experiments with differing gradient amplitudes (typically 3), which results in long acquisition time. Methods In this study, gridding was evaluated as a method to reconstruct images with equal FOV to enable direct T2*/pO2 quantification within a single imaging experiment. Additionally, an enhanced reconstruction technique that shares high spatial k-space regions throughout different phase encoding time delays was investigated (k-space extrapolation). Results The combined application of gridding and k-space extrapolation enables pixelwise quantification of T2* from a single acquisition with improved image quality across a wide range of phase encoding delay times. The calculated T2*/pO2 does not vary across this time range. Conclusion By utilizing gridding and k-space extrapolation, accurate T2*/pO2 quantification can be achieved within a single dataset to allow enhanced temporal resolution (by a factor of 3). PMID:23913515

  18. Development of a hybrid magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging system.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Victoria; Civale, John; Rivens, Ian; Collins, David J; Leach, Martin O; ter Haar, Gail R

    2014-01-01

    A system which allows magnetic resonance (MR) and ultrasound (US) image data to be acquired simultaneously has been developed. B-mode and Doppler US were performed inside the bore of a clinical 1.5 T MRI scanner using a clinical 1-4 MHz US transducer with an 8-metre cable. Susceptibility artefacts and RF noise were introduced into MR images by the US imaging system. RF noise was minimised by using aluminium foil to shield the transducer. A study of MR and B-mode US image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as a function of transducer-phantom separation was performed using a gel phantom. This revealed that a 4 cm separation between the phantom surface and the transducer was sufficient to minimise the effect of the susceptibility artefact in MR images. MR-US imaging was demonstrated in vivo with the aid of a 2 mm VeroWhite 3D-printed spherical target placed over the thigh muscle of a rat. The target allowed single-point registration of MR and US images in the axial plane to be performed. The system was subsequently demonstrated as a tool for the targeting and visualisation of high intensity focused ultrasound exposure in the rat thigh muscle. PMID:25177702

  19. The Spleen Revisited: An Overview on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Palas, João; Matos, António P.; Ramalho, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Despite being well visualized by different cross-sectional imaging techniques, the spleen is many times overlooked during the abdominal examination. The major reason is the low frequency of splenic abnormalities, the majority consisting of incidental findings. There has been a steady increase in the number of performed abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies; therefore, it is important to be familiar to the major MRI characteristics of disease processes involving the spleen, in order to interpret the findings correctly, reaching whenever possible the appropriate diagnosis. The spleen may be involved in several pathologic conditions like congenital diseases, trauma, inflammation, vascular disorders and hematologic disorders, benign and malignant tumors, and other disease processes that focally or diffusely affect the spleen. This paper presents a description and representative MRI images for many of these disorders. PMID:24377046

  20. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in process engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladden, Lynn F.; Alexander, Paul

    1996-03-01

    During the past decade, the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging techniques to problems of relevance to the process industries has been identified. The particular strengths of NMR techniques are their ability to distinguish between different chemical species and to yield information simultaneously on the structure, concentration distribution and flow processes occurring within a given process unit. In this paper, examples of specific applications in the areas of materials and food processing, transport in reactors and two-phase flow are discussed. One specific study, that of the internal structure of a packed column, is considered in detail. This example is reported to illustrate the extent of new, quantitative information of generic importance to many processing operations that can be obtained using NMR imaging in combination with image analysis.

  1. Experimental epiphysiodesis: magnetic resonance imaging evaluation with histopathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Synder, M; Harcke, H T; Conard, K; Bowen, J R

    2001-01-01

    We performed an experimental epiphysiodesis on the tibia in 16 immature New Zealand white rabbits. The purpose was to study the process of trauma-induced growth plate closure. The animals were killed at weekly intervals over 8 weeks. We correlated the histological findings with serial magnetic resonance images. The undamaged, central part of the growth plate became histologically abnormal within 1 week. Mature bone bridge formation in the area of the epiphysiodesis was seen after 3 to 4 weeks. The study suggests that growth arrest starts before the bone bridge formation. Factors regulating cartilage growth may also play a role. PMID:11820437

  2. Biological Effects and Safety in Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Valentina; Giovannetti, Giulio; Vanello, Nicola; Lombardi, Massimo; Landini, Luigi; Simi, Silvana

    2009-01-01

    Since the introduction of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) as a diagnostic technique, the number of people exposed to electromagnetic fields (EMF) has increased dramatically. In this review, based on the results of a pioneer study showing in vitro and in vivo genotoxic effects of MRI scans, we report an updated survey about the effects of non-ionizing EMF employed in MRI, relevant for patients’ and workers’ safety. While the whole data does not confirm a risk hypothesis, it suggests a need for further studies and prudent use in order to avoid unnecessary examinations, according to the precautionary principle. PMID:19578460

  3. Imaging spectrum of breast implant complications: mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, M; Caskey, C I

    2000-10-01

    Knowledge of the various complications resulting from breast implants and the ways in which they can present radiographically is useful so that a complete evaluation can be made, thus, increasing the accuracy of diagnosis. In this article, a working knowledge of the more common breast implant types, essential to the accurate interpretation of breast implant imaging studies, is presented. In addition, imaging techniques and normal appearances of breast prostheses are described by using mammographic, sonographic, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The findings of breast implant complications by using these modalities are described, including rupture, silicone extravasation, gel bleed, polyurethane breakdown, and peri-implant fluid collections. PMID:11071616

  4. Maximally spaced projection sequencing in electron paramagnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Redler, Gage; Epel, Boris; Halpern, Howard J.

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) provides 3D images of absolute oxygen concentration (pO2) in vivo with excellent spatial and pO2 resolution. When investigating such physiologic parameters in living animals, the situation is inherently dynamic. Improvements in temporal resolution and experimental versatility are necessary to properly study such a system. Uniformly distributed projections result in efficient use of data for image reconstruction. This has dictated current methods such as equal-solid-angle (ESA) spacing of projections. However, acquisition sequencing must still be optimized to achieve uniformity throughout imaging. An object-independent method for uniform acquisition of projections, using the ESA uniform distribution for the final set of projections, is presented. Each successive projection maximizes the distance in the gradient space between itself and prior projections. This maximally spaced projection sequencing (MSPS) method improves image quality for intermediate images reconstructed from incomplete projection sets, enabling useful real-time reconstruction. This method also provides improved experimental versatility, reduced artifacts, and the ability to adjust temporal resolution post factum to best fit the data and its application. The MSPS method in EPRI provides the improvements necessary to more appropriately study a dynamic system. PMID:26185490

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of transplanted stem cell fate in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Aghayan, Hamid Reza; Soleimani, Masoud; Goodarzi, Parisa; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Emami-Razavi, Seyed Hasan; Larijani, Bagher; Arjmand, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, scientific findings in the field of regeneration of nervous system have revealed the possibility of stem cell based therapies for damaged brain tissue related disorders like stroke. Furthermore, to achieve desirable outcomes from cellular therapies, one needs to monitor the migration, engraftment, viability, and also functional fate of transplanted stem cells. Magnetic resonance imaging is an extremely versatile technique for this purpose, which has been broadly used to study stroke and assessment of therapeutic role of stem cells. In this review we searched in PubMed search engine by using following keywords; “Stem Cells”, “Cell Tracking”, “Stroke”, “Stem Cell Transplantation”, “Nanoparticles”, and “Magnetic Resonance Imaging” as entry terms and based on the mentioned key words, the search period was set from 1976 to 2012. The main purpose of this article is describing various advantages of molecular and magnetic resonance imaging of stem cells, with focus on translation of stem cell research to clinical research. PMID:25097631

  6. Association between abnormal kinematics and degenerative change in knees of people with chronic anterior cruciate ligament deficiency: a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Scarvell, Jennifer M; Smith, Paul N; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Galloway, Howard R; Woods, Kevin R

    2005-01-01

    Progressive degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficient knee may be partly due to chondral trauma at the time of ACL rupture and repeat episodes of subluxation, but also due to aberrant kinematics altering the wear pattern at the tibiofemoral interface. The hypothesis that altered kinematics, represented by the tibiofemoral contact pattern, would be associated with articular cartilage degeneration in ACL-deficient knees was tested in a cross-sectional study of 23 subjects with a history of > 10 years ACL deficiency without knee reconstruction. Subjects were aged 31 to 67 years. Eleven were male, 12 were female. Sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans enabled tibiofemoral contact mapping as subjects performed a closed-chain leg-press. Images were acquired at 15 degree intervals from 0 degrees to 90 degrees knee flexion. Articular cartilage degeneration was assessed by diagnostic MRI and where possible, arthroscopy. The ACL-deficient knees had a posterior tibiofemoral contact pattern on the tibial plateau compared to the healthy knees (F((1,171)) = 9.2, p = 0.003). The difference appeared to be seen in the medial compartment (F((1,171)) = 3.2, p = 0.07), though this failed to reach significance. Articular cartilage degeneration in the medial compartment was related to the variation of the tibiofemoral contact pattern (r = -0.53, p = 0.01). Articular cartilage degeneration was not related to time since injury (r = -0.16, p = 0.65). The association between aberrant kinematics and degenerative change may stimulate thinking on the role of dynamic stability and neuromuscular co-ordination in joint protection. PMID:16321130

  7. Abnormal Degree Centrality of Bilateral Putamen and Left Superior Frontal Gyrus in Schizophrenia with Auditory Hallucinations: A Resting-state Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng; Wang, Hui-Ling; Wu, Shi-Hao; Huang, Huan; Zou, Ji-Lin; Chen, Jun; Jiang, Tian-Zi; Zhou, Yuan; Wang, Gao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dysconnectivity hypothesis of schizophrenia has been increasingly emphasized. Recent researches showed that this dysconnectivity might be related to occurrence of auditory hallucination (AH). However, there is still no consistent conclusion. This study aimed to explore intrinsic dysconnectivity pattern of whole-brain functional networks at voxel level in schizophrenic with AH. Methods: Auditory hallucinated patients group (n = 42 APG), no hallucinated patients group (n = 42 NPG) and normal controls (n = 84 NCs) were analyzed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. The functional connectivity metrics index (degree centrality [DC]) across the entire brain networks was calculated and evaluated among three groups. Results: DC decreased in the bilateral putamen and increased in the left superior frontal gyrus in all the patients. However, in APG, the changes of DC were more obvious compared with NPG. Symptomology scores were negatively correlated with the DC of bilateral putamen in all patients. AH score of APG positively correlated with the DC in left superior frontal gyrus but negatively correlated with the DC in bilateral putamen. Conclusion: Our findings corroborated that schizophrenia was characterized by functional dysconnectivity, and the abnormal DC in bilateral putamen and left superior frontal gyrus might be crucial in the occurrence of AH. PMID:26612293

  8. Hemispheric asymmetry of frequency-dependent suppression in the ipsilateral primary motor cortex during finger movement: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masamichi J; Saito, Daisuke N; Aramaki, Yu; Asai, Tatsuya; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Sadato, Norihiro

    2008-12-01

    Electrophysiological studies have suggested that the activity of the primary motor cortex (M1) during ipsilateral hand movement reflects both the ipsilateral innervation and the transcallosal inhibitory control from its counterpart in the opposite hemisphere, and that their asymmetry might cause hand dominancy. To examine the asymmetry of the involvement of the ipsilateral motor cortex during a unimanual motor task under frequency stress, we conducted block-design functional magnetic resonance imaging with 22 normal right-handed subjects. The task involved visually cued unimanual opponent finger movement at various rates. The contralateral M1 showed symmetric frequency-dependent activation. The ipsilateral M1 showed task-related deactivation at low frequencies without laterality. As the frequency of the left-hand movement increased, the left M1 showed a gradual decrease in the deactivation. This data suggests a frequency-dependent increased involvement of the left M1 in ipsilateral hand control. By contrast, the right M1 showed more prominent deactivation as the frequency of the right-hand movement increased. This suggests that there is an increased transcallosal inhibition from the left M1 to the right M1, which overwhelms the right M1 activation during ipsilateral hand movement. These results demonstrate the dominance of the left M1 in both ipsilateral innervation and transcallosal inhibition in right-handed individuals. PMID:18413350

  9. Most Water in the Tomato Truss Is Imported through the Xylem, Not the Phloem: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Flow Imaging Study[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Windt, Carel W.; Gerkema, Edo; Van As, Henk

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate nuclear magnetic resonance flow imaging of xylem and phloem transport toward a developing tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) truss. During an 8-week period of growth, we measured phloem and xylem fluxes in the truss stalk, aiming to distinguish the contributions of the two transport tissues and draw up a balance between influx and efflux. It is commonly estimated that about 90% of the water reaches the fruit by the phloem and the remaining 10% by the xylem. The xylem is thought to become dysfunctional at an early stage of fruit development. However, our results do not corroborate these findings. On the contrary, we found that xylem transport into the truss remained functional throughout the 8 weeks of growth. During that time, at least 75% of the net influx into the fruit occurred through the external xylem and about 25% via the perimedullary region, which contains both phloem and xylem. About one-half of the net influx was lost due to evaporation. Halfway through truss development, a xylem backflow appeared. As the truss matured, the percentage of xylem water that circulated into the truss and out again increased in comparison with the net uptake, but no net loss of water from the truss was observed. The circulation of xylem water continued even after the fruits and pedicels were removed. This indicates that neither of them was involved in generating or conducting the circulation of sap. Only when the main axis of the peduncle was cut back did the circulation stop. PMID:19710234

  10. Right Ventricular Sex Differences in Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Characterised by Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Pair-Matched Case Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Andrew J.; Capener, Dave; Hammerton, Charlotte; Thomas, Steven M.; Elliot, Charlie; Condliffe, Robin; Wild, Jim M.; Kiely, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Sex differences exist in both the prevalence and survival of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). Men are less frequently affected by the condition but have worse outcome as compared to females. We sought to characterise the sex related differences in right ventricular remodelling in age matched male and female patients with IPAH using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods A case controlled pair-matched study was conducted with patients matched by age and sex. Steady state free precession (SSFP) MRI of the heart was performed at 1.5T. Cardiac volume, function and mass measurements were corrected for age, sex and BSA according to reference data. Results 40 age and sex matched patients with IPAH were identified. The mean age was 57 (SD 17) in both male and female cohorts. Men had proportionally lower right ventricular (RV) ejection fraction, RV stroke volume and LV stroke volume than females, p=0.028, p=0.007 and p=0.013, respectively. However, there was no significant difference in RV mass or haemodynamic indices of mPAP and PVR between males and females. Conclusion Male patients with IPAH have proportionally worse RV function despite similar afterload. We hypothesise that adaptive remodelling of the RV in response to increased afterload in IPAH is more effective in females. PMID:25996939

  11. [A study on the neuronal mechanism of retrieval of long-term digital memory in human by functional magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong-Ming; Bai, Lin; Zhang, Zeng-Qiang; Zheng, Jin-Long; Han, Li-Xin; Shu, Si-Yun

    2011-08-25

    To investigate the neuronal mechanism of retrieval of long-term digital memory in healthy volunteers, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique was used in the study. Twenty-two right-handed volunteers were subjected to a long-term digital memory test with block-design. The memory task and control task were adopted in the experiment alternatively. The fMRI data were recorded by a Siemens 1.5T MR machine and analyzed by SPM99. The activated brain regions were shown in the Talairach coordinate. The results showed that the Brodmann's area (BA) 9 region in left middle frontal gyrus was the most activated cortex during the long-term digital memory task. The left medial frontal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus, right inferior frontal gyrus, cingulate gyrus, left inferior parietal lobule, left superior parietal lobule, right superior parietal lobule, right middle temporal gyrus, left lingual gyrus, left middle occipital gyrus, right middle brain, cerebellum and right caudate nucleus tail were also involved. The activation in cortices showed obvious left predominance. It is suggested that a series of brain regions with left predominance are involved in long-term digital memory. Left lateral frontal cortex would be the most important structure for information extraction, while the other cortices and their connections may be important for processing and long-term storage of digital information. PMID:21861050

  12. Ferromagnetic resonance phase imaging in spin Hall multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng; Bartell, Jason M.; Fuchs, Gregory D.

    2016-04-01

    We experimentally image the magnetic precession phase of patterned spin Hall multilayer samples to study the rf driving field vector using time-resolved anomalous Nernst effect microscopy. Our ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements quantify the phase and amplitude for both the magnetic precession and the electric current, which allows us to establish the total driving field orientation and the strength of the spin Hall effect. In a channel of uniform width, we observe a large spatial variation of the FMR phase laterally across the channel. We interpret our findings in the context of electrical measurement using the spin transfer torque ferromagnetic resonance technique and show that observed phase variation introduces a systematic correction into the spin Hall efficiency if spatial phase and amplitude variations are not taken into account.

  13. Resonant marker design and fabrication techniques for device visualization during interventional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Mandy; Detert, Markus; Rube, Martin A; El-Tahir, Abubakr; Elle, Ole Jakob; Melzer, Andreas; Schmidt, Bertram; Rose, Georg H

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has great potential as an imaging modality for guiding minimally invasive interventions because of its superior soft tissue contrast and the possibility of arbitrary slice positioning while avoiding ionizing radiation and nephrotoxic iodine contrast agents. The major constraints are: limited patient access, the insufficient assortment of compatible instruments and the difficult device visualization compared to X-ray based techniques. For the latter, resonant MRI markers, fabricated by using the wire-winding technique, have been developed. This fabrication technique serves as a functional model but has no clinical use. Thus, the aim of this study is to illustrate a four-phase design process of resonant markers involving microsystems technologies. The planning phase comprises the definition of requirements and the simulation of electromagnetic performance of the MRI markers. The following technologies were considered for the realization phase: aerosol-deposition process, hot embossing technology and thin film technology. The subsequent evaluation phase involves several test methods regarding electrical and mechanical characterization as well as MRI visibility aspects. The degree of fulfillment of the predefined requirements is determined within the analysis phase. Furthermore, an exemplary evaluation of four realized MRI markers was conducted, focusing on the performance within the MRI environment. PMID:25460277

  14. Neuroanatomical Correlates of Executive Functions in Children and Adolescents: A Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Study of Cortical Thickness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamnes, Christian K.; Ostby, Ylva; Walhovd, Kristine B.; Westlye, Lars T.; Due-Tonnessen, Paulina; Fjell, Anders M.

    2010-01-01

    A range of cognitive abilities improves in childhood and adolescence. It has been proposed that the protracted development of executive functions is related to the relatively late maturation of the prefrontal cortex. However, this has rarely been directly investigated. In this cross-sectional study, 98 healthy children and adolescents (8-19 years…

  15. Dual-domain denoising in three dimensional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jing; Zhou, Jiliu; Wu, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Denoising is a crucial preprocessing procedure for three dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D MRI). Existing denoising methods are predominantly implemented in a single domain, ignoring information in other domains. However, denoising methods are becoming increasingly complex, making analysis and implementation challenging. The present study aimed to develop a dual-domain image denoising (DDID) algorithm for 3D MRI that encapsulates information from the spatial and transform domains. In the present study, the DDID method was used to distinguish signal from noise in the spatial and frequency domains, after which robust accurate noise estimation was introduced for iterative filtering, which is simple and beneficial for computation. In addition, the proposed method was compared quantitatively and qualitatively with existing methods for synthetic and in vivo MRI datasets. The results of the present study suggested that the novel DDID algorithm performed well and provided competitive results, as compared with existing MRI denoising filters. PMID:27446257

  16. Simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging and consolidation measurement of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Wellard, Robert Mark; Ravasio, Jean-Philippe; Guesne, Samuel; Bell, Christopher; Oloyede, Adekunle; Tevelen, Greg; Pope, James M; Momot, Konstantin I

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the opportunity to study biological tissues and processes in a non-disruptive manner. The technique shows promise for the study of the load-bearing performance (consolidation) of articular cartilage and changes in articular cartilage accompanying osteoarthritis. Consolidation of articular cartilage involves the recording of two transient characteristics: the change over time of strain and the hydrostatic excess pore pressure (HEPP). MRI study of cartilage consolidation under mechanical load is limited by difficulties in measuring the HEPP in the presence of the strong magnetic fields associated with the MRI technique. Here we describe the use of MRI to image and characterize bovine articular cartilage deforming under load in an MRI compatible consolidometer while monitoring pressure with a Fabry-Perot interferometer-based fiber-optic pressure transducer. PMID:24803188

  17. Simultaneous Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Consolidation Measurement of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Wellard, Robert Mark; Ravasio, Jean-Philippe; Guesne, Samuel; Bell, Christopher; Oloyede, Adekunle; Tevelen, Greg; Pope, James M.; Momot, Konstantin I.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the opportunity to study biological tissues and processes in a non-disruptive manner. The technique shows promise for the study of the load-bearing performance (consolidation) of articular cartilage and changes in articular cartilage accompanying osteoarthritis. Consolidation of articular cartilage involves the recording of two transient characteristics: the change over time of strain and the hydrostatic excess pore pressure (HEPP). MRI study of cartilage consolidation under mechanical load is limited by difficulties in measuring the HEPP in the presence of the strong magnetic fields associated with the MRI technique. Here we describe the use of MRI to image and characterize bovine articular cartilage deforming under load in an MRI compatible consolidometer while monitoring pressure with a Fabry-Perot interferometer-based fiber-optic pressure transducer. PMID:24803188

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging for image-guided implantology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggers, Georg; Kress, Bodo; Fiebach, Jochen; Rieker, Marcus; Spitzenberg, Doreen; Marmulla, Rüdiger; Dickhaus, Hartmut; Mühling, Joachim

    2006-03-01

    Image guided implantology using navigation systems is more accurate than manual dental implant insertion. The underlying image data are usually derived from computer tomography. The suitability of MR imaging for dental implant planning is a marginal issue so far. MRI data from cadaver heads were acquired using various MRI sequences. The data were assessed for the quality of anatomical imaging, geometric accuracy and susceptibility to dental metal artefacts. For dental implant planning, 3D models of the jaws were created. A software system for segmentation of the mandible and maxilla MRI data was implemented using c++, mitk, and qt. With the VIBE_15 sequence, image data with high geometric accuracy were acquired. Dental metal artefacts were lower than in CT data of the same heads. The segmentation of the jaws was feasible, in contrast to the segmentation of the dentition, since there is a lack of contrast to the intraoral soft tissue structures. MRI is a suitable method for imaging of the region of mouth and jaws. The geometric accuracy is excellent and the susceptibility to artefacts is low. However, there are yet two limitations: Firstly, the imaging of the dentition needs further improvement to allow accurate segmentation of these regions. Secondly, the sequence used in this study takes several minutes and hence is susceptible to motion artefacts.

  19. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: definitive imaging of placental function?

    PubMed

    Chalouhi, G E; Deloison, B; Siauve, N; Aimot, S; Balvay, D; Cuenod, C A; Ville, Y; Clément, O; Salomon, L J

    2011-02-01

    The placenta constitutes a complex circulatory interface between the mother and fetus, but the relationship between the maternal and fetal circulation is still very difficult to study in vivo. There is growing evidence that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful and safe during pregnancy, and MRI is increasingly used for fetal and placental anatomical imaging. MRI functional imaging is now a modern obstetric tool and has the potential to provide new insights into the physiology of the human placenta. Placental perfusion has been studied during the first pass of an MR contrast agent, by arterial spin labeling, diffusion imaging, T1 and T2 relaxation time measurement using echo-planar imaging, and by a combination of magnetization transfer with established stereological methods. The BOLD (blood oxygen level-dependent) effect offers new perspectives for functional MRI evaluation of the placenta. PMID:20851065

  20. Patellar tendinitis: the significance of magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, M; Almekinders, L C

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the significance of magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with patellar tendinitis. Midline sagittal magnetic resonance images were taken of 12 knees from 10 patients and of 17 knees from 15 age- and activity-matched subjects who underwent imaging for reasons other than patellar tendinitis. Of the 12 magnetic resonance imaging scans of knees with clinical patellar tendinitis, 3 (25%) exhibited no defect and only 7 (58%) had unequivocal intratendinous lesions. Among the 17 scans of subjects without clinical patellar tendinitis, 5 (34%) showed no defect and 4 (24%) had unequivocal intratendinous lesions. Proximal tendon width was significantly larger for the tendinitis patient group (5.0 +/- 1.7 mm versus 3.9 +/- 1.0 mm), although considerable overlap was present. All subjects with unequivocal intratendinous signal changes had a significantly longer nonarticular inferior patellar pole and were significantly older (38.1 years versus 26.8 years). Only Blazina stage III lesions were associated with abnormal findings on magnetic resonance imaging. As a whole, the sensitivity and specificity of magnetic resonance imaging was 75% and 29%, respectively. In younger patients with relatively mild symptoms, magnetic resonance imaging did not show significant changes; in older, active patients changes may be present in asymptomatic knees. PMID:10352771

  1. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Kidney Injury: Present Status

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hai Ying; Chen, Tian Wu; Zhang, Xiao Ming

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of hospitalization that is characterized by a sudden loss of renal excretory function and associated with the subsequent development of chronic kidney disease, poor prognosis, and increased mortality. Although the pathophysiology of renal functional impairment in the setting of AKI remains poorly understood, previous studies have identified changes in renal hemodynamics, perfusion, and oxygenation as key factors in the development and progression of AKI. The early assessment of these changes remains a challenge. Many established approaches are not applicable to humans because of their invasiveness. Functional renal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers an alternative assessment tool that could be used to evaluate renal morphology and function noninvasively and simultaneously. Thus, the purpose of this review is to illustrate the principle, application, and role of the techniques of functional renal MR imaging, including blood oxygen level-dependent imaging, arterial spin labeling, and diffusion-weighted MR imaging, in the management of AKI. The use of gadolinium in MR imaging may exacerbate renal impairment and cause nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. Therefore, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging will not be discussed in this paper. PMID:26925411

  2. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Kidney Injury: Present Status.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai Ying; Chen, Tian Wu; Zhang, Xiao Ming

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of hospitalization that is characterized by a sudden loss of renal excretory function and associated with the subsequent development of chronic kidney disease, poor prognosis, and increased mortality. Although the pathophysiology of renal functional impairment in the setting of AKI remains poorly understood, previous studies have identified changes in renal hemodynamics, perfusion, and oxygenation as key factors in the development and progression of AKI. The early assessment of these changes remains a challenge. Many established approaches are not applicable to humans because of their invasiveness. Functional renal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers an alternative assessment tool that could be used to evaluate renal morphology and function noninvasively and simultaneously. Thus, the purpose of this review is to illustrate the principle, application, and role of the techniques of functional renal MR imaging, including blood oxygen level-dependent imaging, arterial spin labeling, and diffusion-weighted MR imaging, in the management of AKI. The use of gadolinium in MR imaging may exacerbate renal impairment and cause nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. Therefore, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging will not be discussed in this paper. PMID:26925411

  3. New applications of magnetic resonance imaging for thoracic oncology.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoshiharu

    2014-02-01

    Since the clinical introduction of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the chest has been one of its most challenging applications, and since the 1980s many physicists and radiologists have been trying to evaluate images for various lung diseases as well as mediastinal and pleural diseases. However, thoracic MRI could not yield image quality sufficient for a convincing diagnosis within an acceptable examination time, so MRI did not find acceptance as a substitute for computed tomography (CT) and other modalities. Until the 2000, thoracic MRI was generally used only for select, minor clinical indications. Within the past decade, however, technical advances in sequencing, scanners and coils, adaptation of parallel imaging techniques, utilization of contrast media, and development of postprocessing tools have been developed. In addition, pulmonary functional MRI has been extensively researched, and MR is being assessed as a new research and diagnostic tool for pulmonary diseases. State-of-the art thoracic MRI now has the potential as a substitute for traditional imaging techniques and/or to play a complimentary role in patient management. In this review, we focus on these advances in MRI for thoracic oncologic imaging, especially for pulmonary nodule assessment, lung cancer staging, mediastinal tumor diagnosis and malignant mesothelioma evaluation, prediction of postoperative lung function, and prediction or evaluation of therapeutic effectiveness. We also discuss the potential and limitations of these advances for routine clinical practice in comparison with other modalities such as CT, positron emission tomography (PET), PET/CT, or nuclear medicine studies. PMID:24481757

  4. First clinical experience with the magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent and superoxide dismutase mimetic mangafodipir as an adjunct in cancer chemotherapy-a translational study.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Jan Olof G; Adolfsson, Karin; Thelin, Bo; Jynge, Per; Andersson, Rolf Gg; Falkmer, Ursula G

    2012-02-01

    Preclinical research suggests that the clinically approved magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent mangafodipir may protect against adverse events (AEs) caused by chemotherapy, without interfering negatively with the anticancer efficacy. The present translational study tested if pretreatment with mangafodipir lowers AEs during curative (adjuvant) FOLFOX6 chemotherapy in stage III colon cancer (Dukes' C). The study was originally scheduled to include 20 patients, but because of the unforeseen withdrawal of mangafodipir from the market, the study had to be closed after 14 patients had been included. The withdrawal of mangafodipir was purely based on commercial considerations from the producer and not on any safety concerns. The patients were treated throughout the first 3 of 12 scheduled cycles. Patients were randomized to a 5-minute infusion of either mangafodipir or placebo (7 in each group). AEs were evaluated according to the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events and the Sanofi-NCI criteria. The primary end points were neutropenia and neurosensory toxicity. There were four AEs of grade 3 (severe) and one AE of grade 4 (life threatening) in four patients in the placebo group, whereas there were none in the mangafodipir group (P < .05). Of the grade 3 and 4 events, two were neutropenia and one was neurosensory toxicity. Furthermore, white blood cell count was statistically, significantly higher in the mangafodipir group than in the placebo group (P < .01) after treatment with FOLFOX. This small feasibility study seems to confirm what has been demonstrated preclinically, namely, that pretreatment with mangafodipir lowers AEs during adjuvant 5-fluorouracil plus oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in colon cancer patients. PMID:22348174

  5. Detection of lymph node metastases with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in oesophageal cancer: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    van der Jagt, E.J.; van Westreenen, H.L.; van Dullemen, H.M.; Kappert, P.; Groen, H.; Sietsma, J.; Oudkerk, M.; Plukker, J.Th.M.; van Dam, G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Aim: In this feasibility study we investigated whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) can be used to identify regional and distant lymph nodes, including mediastinal and celiac lymph node metastases in patients with oesophageal cancer. Patients and methods: Ten patients with a potentially curative resectable cancer of the oesophagus were eligible for this study. All patients included in the study had positive lymph nodes on conventional staging (including endoscopic ultrasound, computed tomography and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography). Nine patients underwent MRI + USPIO before surgery. Results were restricted to those patients who had both MRI + USPIO and histological examination. Results were compared with conventional staging and histopathologic findings. Results: One patient was excluded due to expired study time. Five out of 9 patients underwent an exploration; in 1 patient prior to surgery MRI + USPIO diagnosed liver metastases and in 3 patients an oesophageal resection was performed. USPIO uptake in mediastinal lymph nodes was seen in 6 out of 9 patients; in 3 patients non-malignant nodes were not visible. In total, 9 lymph node stations (of 6 patients) were separately analysed; 7 lymph node stations were assessed as positive (N1) on MRI+USPIO compared with 9 by conventional staging. According to histology findings, there was one false-positive and one false-negative result in MRI + USPIO. Also, conventional staging modalities had one false-positive and one false-negative result. MRI + USPIO had surplus value in one patient. Not all lymph node stations could be compared due to unforeseen explorations. No adverse effects occurred after USPIO infusion. Conclusion: MRI+USPIO identified the majority of mediastinal and celiac (suspect) lymph nodes in 9 patients with oesophageal cancer. MRI+USPIO could have an additional value in loco-regional staging; however, more

  6. Anatomical Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Typically Developing Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giedd, Jay N.; Lalonde, Francois M.; Celano, Mark J.; White, Samantha L.; Wallace, Gregory L.; Lee, Nancy R.; Lenroot, Rhoshel K.

    2009-01-01

    Methodological issues relevant to magnetic resonance imaging studies of brain anatomy are discussed along with the findings on the neuroanatomic changes during childhood and adolescence. The development of the brain is also discussed.

  7. Brain functional magnetic resonance imaging response to glucose and fructose infusions in humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: In animals, intracerebroventricular glucose and fructose have opposing effects on appetite and weight regulation. In humans, functional brain magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies during carbohydrate ingestion suggest that glucose may regulate HT signaling but are potentially confoun...

  8. FY08 Annual Report for Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Caggiano, Joseph A.

    2009-01-06

    FY08 annual report for project the "Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Imaging" project. Reviews accomplishments of last 3 years, including U-235 signature search, comparison of different photon sources, and examination of NRF measurements using monochromatic photon source.

  9. 76 FR 58281 - Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... the safe use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and approaches to mitigate risks. The overall goal is... overview of the Connect Pro program, visit: http://www.adobe.com/go/connectpro_overview . (FDA has...

  10. Sleep deprivation disturbed regional brain activity in healthy subjects: evidence from a functional magnetic resonance-imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Chen, Yin; Yao, Ying; Pan, Yu; Sun, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to use amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) to explore regional brain activities in healthy subjects after sleep deprivation (SD). Materials and methods A total of 16 healthy subjects (eight females, eight males) underwent the session twice: once was after normal sleep (NS), and the other was after SD. ALFF was used to assess local brain features. The mean ALFF-signal values of the different brain areas were evaluated to investigate relationships with clinical features and were analyzed with a receiver-operating characteristic curve. Results Compared with NS subjects, SD subjects showed a lower response-accuracy rate, longer response time, and higher lapse rate. Compared with NS subjects, SD subjects showed higher ALFF area in the right cuneus and lower ALFF area in the right lentiform nucleus, right claustrum, left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and left inferior parietal cortex. ALFF differences in regional brain areas showed high sensitivity and specificity. In the SD group, mean ALFF of the right claustrum showed a significant positive correlation with accuracy rate (r=0.687, P=0.013) and a negative correlation with lapse rate (r=−0.706, P=0.01). Mean ALFF of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex showed a significant positive correlation with response time (r=0.675, P=0.016). Conclusion SD disturbed the regional brain activity of the default-mode network, its anticorrelated “task-positive” network, and the advanced cognitive function brain areas. PMID:27110113

  11. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technology for Medical Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budinger, Thomas F.; Lauterbur, Paul C.

    1984-01-01

    Reports on the status of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from theoretical and clinical perspectives, reviewing NMR theory and relaxation parameters relevant to NMR imaging. Also reviews literature related to modern imaging strategies, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast agents, in vivo spectroscopy, spectroscopic imaging, clinical applications, and…

  12. [Functional magnetic resonance imaging in psychiatry and psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Derntl, B; Habel, U; Schneider, F

    2010-01-01

    technical improvements, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become the most popular and versatile imaging method in psychiatric research. The scope of this manuscript is to briefly introduce the basics of MR physics, the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast as well as the principles of MR study design and functional data analysis. The presentation of exemplary studies on emotion recognition and empathy in schizophrenia patients will highlight the importance of MR methods in psychiatry. Finally, we will demonstrate insights into new developments that will further boost MR techniques in clinical research and will help to gain more insight into dysfunctional neural networks underlying cognitive and emotional deficits in psychiatric patients. Moreover, some techniques such as neurofeedback seem promising for evaluation of therapy effects on a behavioral and neural level. PMID:20057981

  13. Applications of Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCreary, J. Keiko

    Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MEMRI) has proven itself to be a beneficial technique in the field of Neuroscience. This thesis applies MEMRI to studies in neuroscience by first establishing the limitations concerning the use of MEMRI in live rats. Experiment 1 used an osmotic pump for manganese (Mn) delivery to the lateral ventricles for acquisition of anatomical images using MEMRI. From my knowledge, this was the first method demonstrating slow infusion of Mn to the lateral ventricles. In Experiment 2, MEMRI was used for volumetric analysis the whole brain and hippocampus of prenatally stressed rats. To my knowledge, this study was the first to investigate the effect of generational prenatal stress on the structure of a rat's brain using MEMRI and histology. Additionally, Experiment 2 investigated the use of a subcutaneous osmotic pump to deliver Mn for MEMRI. A summary on the use of MEMRI in Neuroscience concludes this thesis, with a discussion on the methods used and related technical considerations.

  14. Extrafetal Findings on Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Pictorial Essay.

    PubMed

    Epelman, Monica; Merrow, Arnold C; Guimaraes, Carolina V; Victoria, Teresa; Calvo-Garcia, Maria A; Kline-Fath, Beth M

    2015-12-01

    Although US is the mainstay of fetal imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an invaluable adjunct in recent years. MRI offers superb soft tissue contrast that allows for detailed evaluation of fetal organs, particularly the brain, which enhances understanding of disease severity. MRI can yield results that are similar to or even better than those of US, particularly in cases of marked oligohydramnios, maternal obesity, or adverse fetal positioning. Incidentally detected extrafetal MRI findings are not uncommon and may affect clinical care. Physicians interpreting fetal MRI studies should be aware of findings occurring outside the fetus, including those structures important for the pregnancy. A systematic approach is necessary in the reading of such studies. This helps to ensure that important findings are not missed, appropriate clinical management is implemented, and unnecessary follow-up examinations are avoided. In this pictorial essay, the most common extrafetal abnormalities are described and illustrated. PMID:26614136

  15. Evaluating changes in tumor volume using magnetic resonance imaging during the course of radiotherapy treatment of high-grade gliomas: Implications for conformal dose-escalation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tsien, Christina . E-mail: ctsien@umich.edu; Gomez-Hassan, Diana; Haken, Randall K. ten; Tatro, Daniel C.; Junck, L.; Chenevert, T.L.; Lawrence, T.

    2005-06-01

    Objective: To determine whether changes in tumor volume occur during the course of conformal 3D radiotherapy of high-grade gliomas by use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during treatment and whether these changes had an impact on tumor coverage. Methods and Materials: Between December 2000 and January 2004, 21 patients with WHO Grades 3 to 4 supratentorial malignant gliomas treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy (median dose, 70 Gy) were enrolled in a prospective clinical study. All patients underwent T1-weighted contrast-enhancing and T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging at approximately 1 to 2 weeks before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy (Weeks 1 and 3), and at routine intervals thereafter. All MRI scans were coregistered to the treatment-planning CT. Gross tumor volume (GTV Pre-Rx) was defined from a postoperative T1-weighted contrast-enhancing MRI performed 1 to 2 weeks before start of radiotherapy. A second GTV (GTV Week 3) was defined by use of an MRI performed during Week 3 of radiotherapy. A uniform 0.5 cm expansion of the respective GTV, PTV (Pre-Rx), and PTV (Week 3) was applied to the final boost plan. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were used to analyze any potential adverse changes in tumor coverage based on Week 3 MRI. Results: All MRI scans were reviewed independently by a neuroradiologist (DGH). Two patients were noted to have multifocal disease at presentation and were excluded from analysis. In 19 cases, changes in the GTV based on MRI at Week 3 during radiotherapy were as follows: 2 cases had an objective decrease in GTV ({>=}50%); 12 cases revealed a slight decrease in the rim enhancement or changes in cystic appearance of the GTV; 2 cases showed no change in GTV; and 3 cases demonstrated an increase in tumor volume. Both cases with objective decreases in GTV during treatment were Grade 3 tumors. No cases of tumor progression were noted in Grade 3 tumors during treatment. In comparison, three of 12 Grade 4

  16. Pharmacologic Modulation of Hand Pain in Osteoarthritis: A Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study Using Naproxen

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Duncan; Krause, Kristina; O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan; Thacker, Michael A; Huggins, John P; Vennart, William; Massat, Nathalie J; Choy, Ernest; Williams, Steven C R; Howard, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    Objective In an attempt to shed light on management of chronic pain conditions, there has long been a desire to complement behavioral measures of pain perception with measures of underlying brain mechanisms. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we undertook this study to investigate changes in brain activity following the administration of naproxen or placebo in patients with pain related to osteoarthritis (OA) of the carpometacarpal (CMC) joint. Methods A placebo-controlled, double-blind, 2-period crossover study was performed in 19 individuals with painful OA of the CMC joint of the right hand. Following placebo or naproxen treatment periods, a functionally relevant task was performed, and behavioral measures of the pain experience were collected in identical fMRI examinations. Voxelwise and a priori region of interest analyses were performed to detect between-period differences in brain activity. Results Significant reductions in brain activity following treatment with naproxen, compared to placebo, were observed in brain regions commonly associated with pain perception, including the bilateral primary somatosensory cortex, thalamus, and amygdala. Significant relationships between changes in perceived pain intensity and changes in brain activity were also observed in brain regions previously associated with pain intensity. Conclusion This study demonstrates the sensitivity of fMRI to detect the mechanisms underlying treatments of known efficacy. The data illustrate the enticing potential of fMRI as an adjunct to self-report for detecting early signals of efficacy of novel therapies, both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic, in small numbers of individuals with persistent pain. PMID:25533872

  17. Disappointing reliability of pulsatility indices to identify candidates for magnetic resonance imaging screening in population-based studies assessing prevalence of cerebral small vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Del Brutto, Oscar H.; Mera, Robertino M.; Andrade, María de la Luz; Castillo, Pablo R.; Zambrano, Mauricio; Nader, Juan A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diagnosis of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a challenge in remote areas where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not available. Hospital-based studies in high-risk or stroke patients have found an association between the pulsatility index (PI) of intracranial arteries – as derived from transcranial Doppler (TCD) – and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) of presumed vascular origin. We aimed to assess the reliability of cerebral pulsatility indices to identify candidates for MRI screening in population-based studies assessing prevalence of SVD. Methods: A representative sample of stroke-free Atahualpa residents aged ≥65 years investigated with MRI underwent TCD. Using generalized linear models, we evaluated whether the PI of major intracranial arteries correlate with WMH (used as a proxy of diffuse SVD), after adjusting for demographics and cardiovascular risk factors. Results: Out of 70 participants (mean age 70.6 ± 4.6 years, 57% women), 28 (40%) had moderate-to-severe WMH. In multivariate models, there were no differences across categories of WMH in the mean PI of middle cerebral arteries (1.10 ± 0.16 vs. 1.22 ± 0.24, β: 0.065, 95% confidence interval (CI): −0.084–0.177, P = 0.474) or vertebrobasilar arteries (1.11 ± 0.16 vs. 1.29 ± 0.27, β: 0.066, 95% CI: −0.0024–0.156, P = 0.146). Conclusions: Cerebral PI should not be used to identify candidates for MRI screening in population-based studies assessing the burden of SVD. PMID:26167015

  18. Anterior cingulate cortex-related connectivity in first-episode schizophrenia: a spectral dynamic causal modeling study with functional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Long-Biao; Liu, Jian; Wang, Liu-Xian; Li, Chen; Xi, Yi-Bin; Guo, Fan; Wang, Hua-Ning; Zhang, Lin-Chuan; Liu, Wen-Ming; He, Hong; Tian, Ping; Yin, Hong; Lu, Hongbing

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the neural basis of schizophrenia (SZ) is important for shedding light on the neurobiological mechanisms underlying this mental disorder. Structural and functional alterations in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), hippocampus, and medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) have been implicated in the neurobiology of SZ. However, the effective connectivity among them in SZ remains unclear. The current study investigated how neuronal pathways involving these regions were affected in first-episode SZ using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Forty-nine patients with a first-episode of psychosis and diagnosis of SZ—according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision—were studied. Fifty healthy controls (HCs) were included for comparison. All subjects underwent resting state fMRI. We used spectral dynamic causal modeling (DCM) to estimate directed connections among the bilateral ACC, DLPFC, hippocampus, and MPFC. We characterized the differences using Bayesian parameter averaging (BPA) in addition to classical inference (t-test). In addition to common effective connectivity in these two groups, HCs displayed widespread significant connections predominantly involved in ACC not detected in SZ patients, but SZ showed few connections. Based on BPA results, SZ patients exhibited anterior cingulate cortico-prefrontal-hippocampal hyperconnectivity, as well as ACC-related and hippocampal-dorsolateral prefrontal-medial prefrontal hypoconnectivity. In summary, spectral DCM revealed the pattern of effective connectivity involving ACC in patients with first-episode SZ. This study provides a potential link between SZ and dysfunction of ACC, creating an ideal situation to associate mechanisms behind SZ with aberrant connectivity among these cognition and emotion-related regions. PMID:26578933

  19. Comparison of visceral fat mass measurement by dual-X-ray absorptiometry and magnetic resonance imaging in a multiethnic cohort: the Dallas Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Neeland, I J; Grundy, S M; Li, X; Adams-Huet, B; Vega, G L

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) mass, a risk factor for cardiometabolic complications of obesity, is usually measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) but this method is not practical in a clinical setting. In contrast, measurement of VAT by dual-x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) appears to circumvent the limitations of MRI. In this study, we compared measurements of VAT mass by MRI and DXA in the large, multiethnic cohort of the Dallas Heart Study (DHS). Subjects/Methods: About 2689 DHS participants underwent paired measurement of VAT by MRI and DXA. Sex-stratified analyses were performed to evaluate the correlation and agreement between DXA and MRI. Model validation was performed using bootstrapping and inter-reader variability was assessed. Results: Mean age of the cohort was 44 years, with 55% female, 48% Black and 75% overweight/obese participants. Regression analysis showed a linear relationship between DXA and MRI with R2=0.82 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.81–0.84) for females and R2=0.86 (95% CI 0.85–0.88) for males. Mean difference between methods was 0.01 kg for females and 0.09 kg for males. Bland–Altman analysis showed that DXA tended to modestly underestimate VAT compared with MRI at lower VAT levels and overestimate it compared with MRI at higher VAT levels. Results were consistent in analyses stratified by race, body mass index status, waist girth and body fat. Inter-individual reader correlation among 50 randomly selected scans was excellent (inter-class correlation coefficient=0.997). Conclusions: VAT mass quantification by DXA was both accurate and valid among a large, multiethnic cohort within a wide range of body fatness. Further studies including repeat assessments over time will help determine its long-term applicability. PMID:27428873

  20. A bisphosphonate for 19F-magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Gavin D.; Shaw, Karen P.; Sivachelvam, Saranja; White, Andrew J.P.; Botnar, Rene M.; T.M. de Rosales, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    19F-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a promising technique that may allow us to measure the concentration of exogenous fluorinated imaging probes quantitatively in vivo. Here, we describe the synthesis and characterisation of a novel geminal bisphosphonate (19F-BP) that contains chemically-equivalent fluorine atoms that show a single and narrow 19F resonance and a bisphosphonate group that may be used for labelling inorganic materials based in calcium phosphates and metal oxides. The potential of 19F-BP to provide contrast was analysed in vitro and in vivo using 19F-MRI. In vitro studies demonstrated the potential of 19F-BP as an MRI contrast agent in the millimolar concentration range with signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) comparable to previously reported fluorinated probes. The preliminary in vivo MRI study reported here allowed us to visualise the biodistribution of 19F-BP, showing uptake in the liver and in the bladder/urinary system areas. However, bone uptake was not observed. In addition, 19F-BP showed undesirable toxicity effects in mice that prevent further studies with this compound at the required concentrations for MRI contrast. This study highlights the importance of developing 19F MRI probes with the highest signal intensity achievable. PMID:27110036

  1. Cranial and spinal magnetic resonance imaging: A guide and atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1987-01-01

    This atlas provides a clinical guide to interpreting cranial and spinal magnetic resonance images. The book includes coverage of the cerebrum, temporal bone, and cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, with more than 400 scan images depicting both normal anatomy and pathologic findings. Introductory chapters review the practical physics of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, offer guidelines for interpreting cranial MR scans, and provide coverage of each anatomic region of the cranium and spine. For each region, scans accompanied by captions, show normal anatomic sections matched with MR images. These are followed by MR scans depicting various disease states.

  2. Unilateral symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis and myopathy in an adolescent with Graves disease: a case report of an high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging study