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Sample records for resonance nqr experiments

  1. Explosives detection by nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garroway, Allen N.; Buess, Michael L.; Yesinowski, James P.; Miller, Joel B.; Krauss, Ronald A.

    1994-10-01

    Pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) of 14N nuclei is quite promising as a method for detecting explosives such as RDX and contraband narcotics such as cocaine and heroin in quantities of interest. Pure NQR is conducted without an external applied magnetic field, so potential concerns about damage to magnetically encoded data or exposure of personnel to large magnetic fields are not relevant. Because NQR frequencies of different compounds are quite distinct, we do not encounter false alarms from the NQR signals of other benign materials. We have constructed a laboratory prototype NQR explosives detector which interrogates a volume of 300 liters (10 ft3). This paper presents abbreviated results from a demonstration of the laboratory prototype NQR explosives detector conducted at the Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center in May 1994 on RDX-based explosives.

  2. Frequency selective detection of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spin echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somasundaram, Samuel D.; Jakobsson, Andreas; Smith, John A. S.; Althoefer, Kaspar A.

    2006-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a radio frequency (RF) technique that can be used to detect the presence of quadrupolar nuclei, such as the 14N nucleus prevalent in many explosives and narcotics. The technique has been hampered by low signal-to-noise ratios and is further aggravated by the presence of RF interference (RFI). To ensure accurate detection, proposed detectors should exploit the rich form of the NQR signal. Furthermore, the detectors should also be robust to any remaining residual interference, left after suitable RFI mitigation has been employed. In this paper, we propose a new NQR data model, particularly for the realistic case where multiple pulse sequences are used to generate trains of spin echoes. Furthermore, we refine two recently proposed approximative maximum likelihood (AML) detectors, enabling the algorithm to optimally exploit the data model of the entire echo train and also incorporate knowledge of the temperature dependent spin-echo decay time. The AML-based detectors ensure accurate detection and robustness against residual RFI, even when the temperature of the sample is not precisely known, by exploiting the dependencies of the NQR resonant lines on temperature. Further robustness against residual interference is gained as the proposed detector is frequency selective; exploiting only those regions of the spectrum where the NQR signal is expected. Extensive numerical evaluations based on both simulated and measured NQR data indicate that the proposed Frequency selective Echo Train AML (FETAML) detector offers a significant improvement as compared to other existing detectors.

  3. Methyl quantum tunneling and nitrogen-14 NQR NMR studies using a SQUID magnetic resonance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Black, B.E. |

    1993-07-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques have been very successful in obtaining molecular conformation and dynamics information. Unfortunately, standard NMR and NQR spectrometers are unable to adequately detect resonances below a few megahertz due to the frequency dependent sensitivity of their Faraday coil detectors. For this reason a new spectrometer with a dc SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) detector, which has no such frequency dependence, has been developed. Previously, this spectrometer was used to observe {sup 11}B and {sup 27}Al NQR resonances. The scope of this study was increased to include {sup 23}Na, {sup 51}V, and {sup 55}Mn NQR transitions. Also, a technique was presented to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances through cross relaxation of the nitrogen polarization to adjacent proton spins. When the proton Zeeman splitting matches one nitrogen quadrupoler transition the remaining two {sup 14}N transitions can be detected by sweeping a saturating rf field through resonance. Additionally, simultaneous excitation of two nitrogen resonances provides signal enhancement which helps to connect transitions from the same site. In this way, nitrogen-14 resonances were observed in several amino acids and polypeptides. This spectrometer has also been useful in the direct detection of methyl quantum tunneling splittings at 4.2 K. Tunneling, frequencies of a homologous series of carboxylic acids were measured and for solids with equivalent crystal structures, an exponential correlation between the tunneling frequency and the enthalpy of fusion is observed. This correlation provides information about the contribution of intermolecular interactions to the energy barrier for methyl rotation.

  4. Z .Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance 11 1998 139156 SQUID detected NMR and NQR

    E-print Network

    Augustine, Mathew P.

    Z .Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance 11 1998 139­156 SQUID detected NMR and NQR Matthew P dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device SQUID is a sensitive detector of magnetic flux to a thin film superconducting coil deposited on the SQUID to form a flux transformer. With this untuned

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with dc SQUID amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Heaney, M.B. . Dept. of Physics Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 {times} 10{sup 17} in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO{sub 3} crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies.

  6. An analytical method for estimating the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance parameters of organic compounds with complex free induction decays for radiation effects studies

    SciTech Connect

    Iselin, L.H.

    1992-12-31

    The use of {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as a radiation dosimetry tool has only recently been explored. An analytical method for analyzing {sup 14}N NQR complex free induction decays is presented with the background necessary to conduct pulsed NQR experiments. The {sup 14}N NQR energy levels and possible transitions are derived in step-by-step detail. The components of a pulsed NQR spectrometer are discussed along with the experimental techniques for conducting radiation effects experiments using the spectrometer. Three data analysis techniques -- the power spectral density Fourier transform, state space singular value decomposition (HSVD), and nonlinear curve fitting (using the downhill simplex method of global optimization and the Levenberg-Marquart method) -- are explained. These three techniques are integrated into an analytical method which uses these numerical techniques in this order to determine the physical NQR parameters. Sample data sets of urea and guanidine sulfate data are used to demonstrate how these methods can be employed to analyze both simple and complex free induction decays. By determining baseline values for biologically significant organics, radiation effects on the NQR parameters can be studied to provide a link between current radiation dosimetry techniques and the biological effects of radiation.

  7. Nuclear quadrupole resonance characterization of carbamazepine cocrystals.

    PubMed

    Seliger, Janez; Žagar, Veselko

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is used as a method for the characterization of cocrystals and crystal polymorphs. (14)N NQR spectra of several cocrystals of carbamazepine have been measured together with the (14)N NQR spectra of cocrystal formers. The results show that the (14)N NQR spectrum of a cocrystal and the (14)N NQR spectra of cocrystal formers differ well outside the experimental resolution. It is further described how the NQDR techniques, that have been used to measure the (14)N NQR frequencies, can be used to check the homogeneity of a polycrystalline sample and to monitor the stability of a metastable crystal polymorph. PMID:23021594

  8. 14N NQR and relaxation in ammonium nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, David

    2015-04-01

    The complete 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectrum of ammonium nitrate is presented recorded using two double resonance techniques - double contact cross relaxation and zero field NQR. The spectra gave the quadrupole coupling constant (Qcc) and asymmetry parameter ( ?) values for the nitro of 611 kHz, 0.229 and that for the ammonium nitrogen of 242 kHz, 0.835. The three relaxation transition probabilities have been determined for both the nitro and ammonium nitrogen atoms. The bi-exponential relaxation times (T 1) were measured at 295 K. The values for nitro are 16.9 s and 10.5 s and that of the ammonium are 23.0 s and 16.4 s.

  9. Measurement of in-situ stress in salt and rock using NQR techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Schempp, E.; Hirschfeld, T.; Klainer, S.

    1980-12-01

    A discussion of how stress and strain affect the quantities which can be measured in an NQR experiment shows that, for stresses of the magnitude to be expected at depths up to about 10,000 feet, quadrupole coupling constants will fall in the range of 1 to 10 kHz for both the sodium and chloride ions in NaCl. The most promising system involves pulsed nuclear double resonance detection; and alterative is to observe the quadrupolar splitting of the NMR signal. Choices to be made in the measurement and mapping techniques are discussed. The well-known perturbation of the homogenous stress field in the neighborhood of a borehole is shown to be advantageous from the point of view of obtaining directional information on the stress. Construction and operation of a borehole stress sensor are considered. The NQR technique seems feasible for measuring the magnitude and direction of underground stress with a resolution of about 25 psi, or 2.5% at 1000 psi. Downhole instrumentation suitable for in-situ determinations of stress appears within the state of the art. Additional tasks required on the project are identified.

  10. Crystal structure and 35Cl NQR of (±) ?- (trichloromethyl) -?-propiolactone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basaran, Reha; Dou, Shi-qi; Weiss, Alarich

    1991-09-01

    The crystal structure of (±) ?- (trichloromethyl) -?-propiolactone, C 4H 3Cl 30 2, is reported ( T=294 K); space group C52hP2 l/ c, a=1002(1) pm, b=565.O(5) pm, c=1225(l) pm, ?=9397 (3)? Z=4, V=691.85(2)×10 6pm 3. A weak hydrogen bond is observed between H (C(3)) and the carbonyl oxygen 0(2). The 35Cl NQR spectrum shows three lines in the range 77? T(K)?310. At 77K the resonance frequencies are observed at 39.822(5) MHz, 38.905(5) MHz and 38.322(5) MHz.

  11. 35Cl NQR frequency and spin lattice relaxation time in 3,4-dichlorophenol as a function of pressure and temperature.

    PubMed

    Ramu, L; Ramesh, K P; Chandramani, R

    2013-01-01

    The pressure dependences of (35)Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) frequency, temperature and pressure variation of spin lattice relaxation time (T(1)) were investigated in 3,4-dichlorophenol. T(1) was measured in the temperature range 77-300?K. Furthermore, the NQR frequency and T(1) for these compounds were measured as a function of pressure up to 5?kbar at 300?K. The temperature dependence of the average torsional lifetimes of the molecules and the transition probabilities W(1) and W(2) for the ?m?=?±1 and ?m?=?±2 transitions were also obtained. A nonlinear variation of NQR frequency with pressure has been observed and the pressure coefficients were observed to be positive. A thermodynamic analysis of the data was carried out to determine the constant volume temperature coefficients of the NQR frequency. An attempt is made to compare the torsional frequencies evaluated from NQR data with those obtained by IR spectra. On selecting the appropriate mode from IR spectra, a good agreement with torsional frequency obtained from NQR data is observed. The previously mentioned approach is a good illustration of the supplementary nature of the data from IR studies, in relation to NQR studies of compounds in solid state. PMID:23161529

  12. A miniaturized NQR spectrometer for a multi-channel NQR-based detection device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beguš, Samo; Jazbinšek, Vojko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko

    2014-10-01

    A low frequency (0.5-5 MHz) battery operated sensitive pulsed NQR spectrometer with a transmitter power up to 5 W and a total mass of about 3 kg aimed at detecting 14N NQR signals, predominantly of illicit materials, was designed and assembled. This spectrometer uses a standard software defined radio (SDR) platform for the data acquisition unit. Signal processing is done with the LabView Virtual instrument on a personal computer. We successfully tested the spectrometer by measuring 14N NQR signals from aminotetrazole monohydrate (ATMH), potassium nitrate (PN), paracetamol (PCM) and trinitrotoluene (TNT). Such a spectrometer is a feasible component of a portable single or multichannel 14N NQR based detection device.

  13. A miniaturized NQR spectrometer for a multi-channel NQR-based detection device.

    PubMed

    Beguš, Samo; Jazbinšek, Vojko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko

    2014-10-01

    A low frequency (0.5-5 MHz) battery operated sensitive pulsed NQR spectrometer with a transmitter power up to 5 W and a total mass of about 3 kg aimed at detecting (14)N NQR signals, predominantly of illicit materials, was designed and assembled. This spectrometer uses a standard software defined radio (SDR) platform for the data acquisition unit. Signal processing is done with the LabView Virtual instrument on a personal computer. We successfully tested the spectrometer by measuring (14)N NQR signals from aminotetrazole monohydrate (ATMH), potassium nitrate (PN), paracetamol (PCM) and trinitrotoluene (TNT). Such a spectrometer is a feasible component of a portable single or multichannel (14)N NQR based detection device. PMID:25233110

  14. Dielectric square resonator investigated with microwave experiments.

    PubMed

    Bittner, S; Bogomolny, E; Dietz, B; Miski-Oglu, M; Richter, A

    2014-11-01

    We present a detailed experimental study of the symmetry properties and the momentum space representation of the field distributions of a dielectric square resonator as well as the comparison with a semiclassical model. The experiments have been performed with a flat ceramic microwave resonator. Both the resonance spectra and the field distributions were measured. The momentum space representations of the latter evidenced that the resonant states are each related to a specific classical torus, leading to the regular structure of the spectrum. Furthermore, they allow for a precise determination of the refractive index. Measurements with different arrangements of the emitting and the receiving antennas were performed and their influence on the symmetry properties of the field distributions was investigated in detail, showing that resonances with specific symmetries can be selected purposefully. In addition, the length spectrum deduced from the measured resonance spectra and the trace formula for the dielectric square resonator are discussed in the framework of the semiclassical model. PMID:25493860

  15. Dielectric square resonator investigated with microwave experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, S.; Bogomolny, E.; Dietz, B.; Miski-Oglu, M.; Richter, A.

    2014-11-01

    We present a detailed experimental study of the symmetry properties and the momentum space representation of the field distributions of a dielectric square resonator as well as the comparison with a semiclassical model. The experiments have been performed with a flat ceramic microwave resonator. Both the resonance spectra and the field distributions were measured. The momentum space representations of the latter evidenced that the resonant states are each related to a specific classical torus, leading to the regular structure of the spectrum. Furthermore, they allow for a precise determination of the refractive index. Measurements with different arrangements of the emitting and the receiving antennas were performed and their influence on the symmetry properties of the field distributions was investigated in detail, showing that resonances with specific symmetries can be selected purposefully. In addition, the length spectrum deduced from the measured resonance spectra and the trace formula for the dielectric square resonator are discussed in the framework of the semiclassical model.

  16. (121,123)Sb and (75)As NMR and NQR investigation of the tetrahedrite (Cu12Sb4S13) - Tennantite (Cu12As4S13) system and other metal arsenides.

    PubMed

    Bastow, T J; Lehmann-Horn, J A; Miljak, D G

    2015-10-01

    This work is motivated by the recent developments in online minerals analysis in the mining and minerals processing industry via nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). Here we describe a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and NQR study of the minerals tennantite (Cu12As4S13) and tetrahedrite (Cu12 Sb4S13). In the first part NQR lines associated with (75)As in tennantite and (121,123)Sb isotopes in tetrahedrite are reported. The spectroscopy has been restricted to an ambient temperature studies in accord with typical industrial conditions. The second part of this contribution reports nuclear quadrupole-perturbed NMR findings on further, only partially characterised, metal arsenides. The findings enhance the detection capabilities of NQR based analysers for online measurement applications and may aid to control arsenic and antimony concentrations in metal processing stages. PMID:26453410

  17. 93Nb- and 27Al-NMR/NQR studies of the praseodymium based PrNb2Al20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Tetsuro; Kotegawa, Hisashi; Tou, Hideki; Higashinaka, Ryuji; Nakama, Akihiro; Aoki, Yuji; Sato, Hideyuki

    2015-03-01

    We report a study of 93Nb- and 27Al-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) in a praseodymium based compound PrNb2Al20. The observed NMR line at around 3 T and 30 K shows a superposition of typical powder patterns of one Nb signal and at least two Al signals. 93Nb-NMR line could be reproduced by using the previously reported NQR frequency ?Q ? 1.8MHz and asymmetry parameter ? ? 0 [Kubo T et al 2014 JPS Conf. Proc. 3 012031]. From 27Al-NMR/NQR, NQR parameters are obtained to be ?Q,A ? 1.53 MHz, and ?A ? 0.20 for the site A, and ?Q,B ? 2.28 MHz, and ?B ? 0.17 for the site B. By comparing this result with the previous 27Al-NMR study of PrT2Al20 (T = Ti, V) [Tokunaga Y et al 2013 Phys. Rev. B 88 085124], these two Al site are assigned to the two of three crystallographycally inequivalent Al sites.

  18. Electron density distribution in cladribine (2-chloro-2?-deoxyadenosine) - A drug against leukemia and multiple sclerosis - Studied by multinuclear NQR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latosi?ska, J. N.; Latosi?ska, M.; Seliger, J.; Žagar, V.; Kazimierczuk, Z.

    2009-07-01

    2-Chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine (Cladribine) chemotherapeutic drug has been studied experimentally in solid state by 35Cl NQR and NMR-NQR double resonance and theoretically by the Density Functional Theory. Fifteen resonance frequencies on 14N have been detected and assigned to particular nitrogen sites in the 2-CdA molecule. The effects of tautomerism, regioisomerism, conformations and molecular aggregations, related to intermolecular hydrogen bond formation, on the NQR parameters have been analysed within the DFT and AIM ( Atoms in Molecules) formalism. The properties of the whole molecule, the so-called global reactivity descriptors, have been calculated for a comparison of both syn and anti conformations of 2-CdA molecule to check the effect of crystal packing on molecular conformation.

  19. NQR Line Broadening Due to Crystal Lattice Imperfections and Its Relationship to Shock Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulder, S. M.; Buess, M. L.; Garroway, A. N.; Miller, P. J.

    2004-07-01

    The hydrodynamic hot spot model is used to explain the difference between shock sensitive and shock insensitive explosives. Among the major factors that influence the shock sensitivity of energetic compounds are the quality and particle size of the energetic crystals used to formulate the cast plastic bonded explosive. As do all energetic compounds, RDX and HMX exhibit internal crystal defects the magnitude and type of which depend on the manufacturing process used to synthesize and re-crystallize the energetic compound. Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) spectroscopy was used to determine the crystal quality of RDX, HMX and CL-20 obtained from various manufacturers. The NQR experimental results are discussed. Cast plastic bonded explosives were made using the RDX and HMX obtained from the various manufacturers and subsequently subjected to the NOL large-scale gap test (LSGT). The results of the LSGT are discussed and correlated with the NQR results. A relationship between the crystal defect density and shock initiation pressure of the plastic bonded explosive is developed and discussed.

  20. Undergraduate Electron-Spin-Resonance Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, James S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the basic procedures for use of an electron-spin resonance spectrometer and potassium azide (KN3) in an experiment which extends from the phase of sample preparation (crystal growth, sample mounting, and orientation) through data taking to the stages of calculation and theoretical explanation. (Author/DS)

  1. Safety Guidelines for Conducting Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Experiments Involving

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    Safety Guidelines for Conducting Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Experiments Involving Human Subjects Center for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging University of California, San Diego July 2007 files at the Center's administrative office. Facilities UCSD's Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

  2. 81Br NQR and crystal structure of 4-bromopyridinium pentabromoantimonate(III); 3c-4e bonding and NQR trans influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terao, Hiromitsu; Ninomiya, Seiko; Hashimoto, Masao; Eda, Kazuo

    2010-02-01

    The crystal structure of (4-BrC 5H 4NH) 2SbBr 5 was determined by a single crystal X-ray diffraction at 193 K. The crystals belong to the triclinic system (P1¯) with a = 9.1861(19) Å, b = 10.622(2) Å, c = 10.703(2) Å, ? = 99.665(3)°, ? = 97.393(3)°, ? = 108.539(3)°, and Z = 2. There exists an anion dimer Sb 2Br 104- in the crystal structure which consists of an edge-sharing between two SbBr 6 octahedra. The inversion center situated at the center of the shared-edge of the dimer relates two asymmetric units, which consist of a SbBr 52- moiety and two nonequivalent cations. Each cation is bound to the apical Br atoms of Sb 2Br 104- through N-H…Br hydrogen bonds. Seven 81Br NQR resonance lines including those for two Br atoms in the nonequivalent cations have been observed in the temperature range of 77 to ca. 360 K in accordance with the crystal structure. The frequencies of each of the respective pairs of NQR lines for the apical Br and for the equatorial Br atoms showed unusual positive temperature dependence with almost linear changes. For these curves, the other lines of pairs showed symmetrical temperature dependence, maintaining the center of mass almost constant in frequency. These observations may indicate the existence of NQR trans influence which were manifested through the occurrence of substantial electronic redistributions in the 3c-4e (Br-Sb-Br) bonds with temperature changes.

  3. Pressure Dependence of the Chlorine NQR in Chloro Pyridines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, K. P.; Ramakrishna, J.; Suresh, K. S.; Rao, C. Raghavendra

    2000-02-01

    The 35CI NQR frequency (?Q) and spin lattice relaxation time (T1 ) in 2,6-dichloropyridine, 2 amino 3,5-dichloropyridine and 6 chloro 2-pyridinol have been measured as a function of pressure up to 5.1 kbar at 300 K, and the data have been analysed to estimate the temperature coefficients of the NQR frequency at constant volume. All the three compounds show a non linear variation of the NQR frequency with pressure which can be described by a 2nd order polynomial in pressure. The rate of change of the NQR frequency with pressure is positive and decreases with increasing pressure. The spin lattice relaxation time T1, in all the three compounds shows a small increase with pressure, indicating that the relaxation is mainly due to the torsional motions.

  4. Bulk Quantum Computation with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Theory and Experiment

    E-print Network

    Bulk Quantum Computation with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Theory and Experiment Isaac L. Chuang1 resonance techniques and veri ed by quantum state tomography. I. INTRODUCTION Quantum computation promise, nuclear magnetic resonance NMR 8,10,16 is particularly at- tractive because of the extremely long

  5. Narcotics and explosives detection by 14N pure nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garroway, Allen N.; Buess, Michael L.; Yesinowski, James P.; Miller, Joel B.

    1994-03-01

    Pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) of 14N nuclei is quite promising as a method for detecting explosives such as RDX and contraband narcotics such as cocaine and heroin in quantities of interest. Pure NQR is conducted without an external applied magnetic field, so potential concerns about damage to magnetically encoded data or exposure of personnel to large magnetic fields are not relevant. Because NQR frequencies of different compounds are quite distinct, we do not encounter false alarms from the NQR signals of other benign materials. We have constructed a proof-of-concept NQR explosives detector which interrogates a volume of 300 liters (10 ft3). With minimal modification to the existing explosives detector, we can detect operationally relevant quantities of (free base) cocaine within the 300-liter inspection volume in 6 seconds. We are presently extending this approach to the detection of heroin base and also examining 14N and 35,37Cl pure NQR for detection of the hydrochloride forms of both materials. An adaptation of this NQR approach may be suitable for scanning personnel for externally carried contraband and explosives. We first outline the basics of the NQR approach, highlighting strengths and weaknesses, and then present representative results for RDX and cocaine detection. We also present a partial compendium of relevant NQR parameters measured for some materials of interest.

  6. Interpretive Experiments: An Interpretive Experiment in Ion Cyclotron Resonance Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnier, R. C.; Freiser, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Provides a discussion which is intended for chemistry college students on the ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) spectroscopy, the physical basis for ion cyclotron resonance, and the experimental methodology employed by ICR spectroscopists. (HM)

  7. Studies of the electronic structure and biological activity of chosen 1,4-benzodiazepines by 35Cl NQR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronisz, K.; Ostafin, M.; Poleshchuk, O. Kh.; Mielcarek, J.; Nogaj, B.

    2006-11-01

    Selected derivatives of 1,4-benzodiazepine: lorazepam, lormetazepam, oxazepam and temazepam, used as active substances in anxiolytic drugs, have been studied by 35Cl NQR method in order to find the correlation between electronic structure and biological activity. The 35Cl NQR resonance frequencies ( ?Q) measured at 77 K have been correlated with the following parameters characterising their biological activity: biological half-life period ( t0.5), affinity to benzodiazepine receptor (IC 50) and mean dose equivalent. The results of experimental study of some benzodiazepine derivatives by nuclear quadrupole resonance of 35Cl nuclei are compared with theoretical results based on DFT calculations which were carried out by means of Gaussian'98 W software.

  8. Charge-inhomogeneity doping relations in YBa2Cu3Oy detected by angle-dependent nuclear quadrupole resonance

    E-print Network

    Keren, Amit

    are close to positive charges their energy is high, and when the poles are close to negative chargesCharge-inhomogeneity doping relations in YBa2Cu3Oy detected by angle-dependent nuclear quadrupole the nuclear quadrupole resonance NQR asymmetry parameter for very wide NQR lines at different positions

  9. Miniature Magnet for Electron Spin Resonance Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupp, L. W.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes commercially available permanent magnets that have been incorporated in a compact and inexpensive structure providing both field sweep and modulation suitable for electron spin resonance at microwave frequencies. (MLH)

  10. Assignment of phycocyanobilin in HMPT using triple resonance experiments.

    PubMed

    Röben, Marco; Schmieder, Peter

    2011-09-01

    A complete assignment of all resonances of a small organic molecule is a prerequisite for a structure determination using NMR spectroscopy. This is conventionally obtained using a well-established strategy based on COSY, HMQC and HMBC spectra. In case of phycocyanobilin (PCB) in HMPT this strategy was unsuccessful due to the symmetry of the molecule and extreme signal overlap. Since (13)C and (15)N labeled material was available, an alternative strategy for resonance assignment was used. Triple resonance experiments derived from experiments conventionally performed for proteins are sensitive and easy to analyze. Their application led to a complete and unambiguous assignment using three types of experiments. PMID:21815209

  11. Rabi resonance in spin systems: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layton, Kelvin J.; Tahayori, Bahman; Mareels, Iven M. Y.; Farrell, Peter M.; Johnston, Leigh A.

    2014-05-01

    The response of a magnetic resonance spin system is predicted and experimentally verified for the particular case of a continuous wave amplitude modulated radiofrequency excitation. The experimental results demonstrate phenomena not previously observed in magnetic resonance systems, including a secondary resonance condition when the amplitude of the excitation equals the modulation frequency. This secondary resonance produces a relatively large steady state magnetisation with Fourier components at harmonics of the modulation frequency. Experiments are in excellent agreement with the theoretical prediction derived from the Bloch equations, which provides a sound theoretical framework for future developments in NMR spectroscopy and imaging.

  12. The single NqrB and NqrC subunits in the Na(+)-translocating NADH: quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR) from Vibrio cholerae each carry one covalently attached FMN.

    PubMed

    Casutt, Marco S; Schlosser, Andreas; Buckel, Wolfgang; Steuber, Julia

    2012-10-01

    The Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR) is the prototype of a novel class of flavoproteins carrying a riboflavin phosphate bound to serine or threonine by a phosphodiester bond to the ribityl side chain. This membrane-bound, respiratory complex also contains one non-covalently bound FAD, one non-covalently bound riboflavin, ubiquinone-8 and a [2Fe-2S] cluster. Here, we report the quantitative analysis of the full set of flavin cofactors in the Na(+)-NQR and characterize the mode of linkage of the riboflavin phosphate to the membrane-bound NqrB and NqrC subunits. Release of the flavin by ?-elimination and analysis of the cofactor demonstrates that the phosphate group is attached at the 5'-position of the ribityl as in authentic FMN and that the Na(+)-NQR contains approximately 1.7mol covalently bound FMN per mol non-covalently bound FAD. Therefore, each of the single NqrB and NqrC subunits in the Na(+)-NQR carries a single FMN. Elimination of the phosphodiester bond yields a dehydro-2-aminobutyrate residue, which is modified with ?-mercaptoethanol by Michael addition. Proteolytic digestion followed by mass determination of peptide fragments reveals exclusive modification of threonine residues, which carry FMN in the native enzyme. The described reactions allow quantification and localization of the covalently attached FMNs in the Na(+)-NQR and in related proteins belonging to the Rhodobacter nitrogen fixation (RNF) family of enzymes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 17th European Bioenergetics Conference (EBEC 2012). PMID:22366169

  13. NMR and NQR study of the thermodynamically stable quasicrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shastri, A.

    1995-02-10

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 61,65}Cu NMR measurements are reported for powder samples of stable AlCuFe and AlCuRu icosahedral quasicrystals and their crystalline approximants, and for a AlPdMn single grain quasicrystal. Furthermore, {sup 27}Al NQR spectra at 4.2 K have been observed in the AlCuFe and AlCuRu samples. From the quadrupole perturbed NMR spectra at different magnetic fields, and from the zero field NQR spectra, a wide distribution of local electric field gradient (EFG) tensor components and principal axis system orientations was found at the Al site. A model EFG calculation based on a 1/1 AlCuFe approximant was successful in explaining the observed NQR spectra. It is concluded that the average local gradient is largely determined by the p-electron wave function at the Al site, while the width of the distribution is due to the lattice contribution to the EFG. Comparison of {sup 63}Cu NMR with {sup 27}Al NMR shows that the EFG distribution at the two sites is similar, but that the electronic contribution to the EFG is considerably smaller at the Cu site, in agreement with a more s-type wave function of the conduction electrons.

  14. Bragg Resonator Cyclotron Resonance Maser Experiments Driven by a Microsecond, Intense Electron Beam Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin Joo

    The cyclotron resonance maser (CRM) has proven to be attractive for many high power microwave applications such as fusion plasma heating, radar/communications, and high gradient RF accelerators. Most of the previous CRM experiments with MV electron beams have been conducted with short (<0.1 musec) pulses. The present work contains the first comprehensive experimental study on mode competition in a high-Q Bragg resonator CRM employing a microsecond, relativistic electron beam. We have designed and fabricated a high-Q sinusoidal Bragg resonator designed to excite high frequency CARM oscillation of the TE_{31} cylindrical cavity mode at 18.9 GHz. The measured reflectivity of the TE_{31} mode is consistent with the prediction of uncoupled single mode theory. A high quality annular electron beam with low velocity spread and energy spread is produced through an apertured mask-anode. The apertured electron beam has been characterized by the use of glass plate diagnostics. The measured beam velocity ratio, v_{| }/v_{|}, was shown to be in agreement with computer simulation results and the theoretical predictions. Experiments have been performed for 4 cases: (1) Bragg resonator with ripples half-inward, (2) large diameter smooth tube without Bragg resonator, (3) Bragg resonator with ripples fully-outward, and (4) small diameter smooth tube without Bragg resonator. The Bragg resonator with ripples half-inward generated high power microwave radiation from TE_ {11} gyro-BWO interactions, TE _{21} absolute instability, and high harmonic gyrotron modes. Considerably less power from the TE_{11} gyro -BWO was observed for the Bragg resonator with ripples fully -outward. The microwave emission from the TE_ {21} absolute instability in the Bragg resonator with ripples fully-outward was successfully suppressed by lowering the cavity magnetic field. These three undesired oscillations, (TE _{21} absolute instability, TE _{11} gyro-BWO, TE _{51} second and third harmonic), were the most serious competing modes in the present Bragg resonator CRM experiments, apparently suppressing the TE _{31} CARM oscillation. For the Bragg resonator with ripples half-inward, we have performed gyrotron experiments with a high current electron beam. In these experiments, we have observed mode competition between the TE_{21 } absolute instability and the TE_ {11} gyro-BWO interaction by the use of frequency measurements and gas breakdown diagnostics.

  15. Closing supersymmetric resonance regions with direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kelso, Chris

    2014-01-01

    One of the few remaining ways that neutralinos could potentially evade constraints from direct detection experiments is if they annihilate through a resonance, as can occur if 2m{sub ??} falls within about ~10% of either m{sub A/H}, m{sub h}, or m{sub Z}. Assuming a future rate of progress among direct detection experiments that is similar to that obtained over the past decade, we project that within 7 years the light Higgs and Z pole regions will be entirely closed, while the remaining parameter space near the A/H resonance will require that 2m{sub ??} be matched to the central value (near m{sub A}) to within less than 4%. At this rate of progress, it will be a little over a decade before multi-ton direct detection experiments will be able to close the remaining, highly-tuned, regions of the A/H resonance parameter space.

  16. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis Using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Trbovich, M J; Barry, D P; Slovacek, R E; Danon, Y; Block, R C; Francis, N C; Lubert, M; Burke, J A; Drindak, N J; Lienweber, G; Ballad, R

    2007-02-06

    The focus of this work is to determine the resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005 - 200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf resonances near 8 eV. Accurate hafnium cross sections and resonance parameters are needed in order to quantify the effects of hafnium found in zirconium, a metal commonly used in reactors. The accuracy of the cross sections and the corresponding resonance parameters used in current nuclear analysis tools are rapidly becoming the limiting factor in reducing the overall uncertainty on reactor physics calculations. Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission are routinely performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) LINAC using the time-of flight technique. {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m, respectively. Capture experiments were performed using a sixteen section NaI multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized several thicknesses of metallic and isotope-enriched liquid Hf samples. The liquid Hf samples were designed to provide information on the {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf contributions to the 8 eV doublet without saturation. Data analyses were performed using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. A combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005 - 200 eV. Additionally, resonance integrals were calculated, along with errors for each hafnium isotope, using the NJOY and INTER codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previous values. The {sup 176}Hf resonance integral, based on this work, is approximately 73% higher than the ENDF/B-VI value. This is due primarily to the changes to resonance parameters in the 8 eV resonance, the neutron width presented in this work is more than twice that of the previous value. The calculated elemental hafnium resonance integral however, changed very little.

  17. I: Low Frequency NMR and NQR Using a dc SQUID. II: Variable-temperature 13C CP/MAS of Organometallics

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegeweid, M.A.

    1995-11-29

    NMR and NQR at low frequencies are difficult prospects due to small nuclear spin polarization. Furthermore, the sensitivity'of the inductive pickup circuitry of standard spectrometers is reduced as the frequency is lowered. I have used a cw-SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) spectrometer, which has no such frequency dependence, to study the local atomic environment of {sup 14}N via the quadrupolar interaction. Because {sup 14}N has spin I = 1 and a 0-6 MHz frequency range, it is not possible to obtain well-resolved spectra in high magnetic fields. I have used a technique to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances via their effect on neighboring protons mediated by the heteronuclear dipolar interaction to study peptides and narcotics. The sensitivity of the SQUID is not enough to measure low-frequency surface (or other low spin density) systems. The application of spin-polarized xenon has been previously used to enhance polarization in conventional NMR experiments. Because xenon only polarizes spins with which it is in contact, it is surface selective. While differences in chemical shifts between surface and bulk spins are not large, it is expected that the differences in quadrupole coupling constant should be very large due to the drastic change of the electric field gradient surrounding spins at the surface. With this in mind, I have taken preliminary steps to measure SQUID detected polarization transfer from Xe to another spin species at 4.2 K and in small magnetic fields (<50 G). In this regime, the spin-lattice relaxation of xenon is dependent on the applied magnetic field. The results of our efforts to characterize the relaxation of xenon are presented. The final section describes the solid-state variable-temperature (VT) one- and two-dimensional {sup 13}C cross polarization (CP)/magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR of Hf({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}({eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}, Zr({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 3}({eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}) and Sn({eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 4}. This work was undertaken in the hope of gaining insight into the intramolecuhrr dynamics, specifically which fluxional processes exist in the solid state, by what mechanism rearrangements are occurring, and the activation energies by which these processes are governed.

  18. Detecting body cavity bombs with nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Michael London

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a technology with great potential for detecting hidden explosives. Past NQR research has studied the detection of land mines and bombs concealed within luggage and packages. This thesis focuses on an NQR application that has received less attention and little or no publicly available research: detecting body cavity bombs (BCBs). BCBs include explosives that have been ingested, inserted into orifices, or surgically implanted. BCBs present a threat to aviation and secure facilities. They are extremely difficult to detect with the technology currently employed at security checkpoints. To evaluate whether or not NQR can be used to detect BCBs, a computational model is developed to assess how the dielectric properties of biological tissue affect the radio frequency magnetic field employed in NQR (0.5-5MHz). The relative permittivity of some biological tissue is very high (over 1,000 at 1MHz), making it conceivable that there is a significant effect on the electromagnetic field. To study this effect, the low-frequency approximation known as the Darwin model is employed. First, the electromagnetic field of a coil is calculated in free space. Second, a dielectric object or set of objects is introduced, and the free-space electric field is modified to accommodate the dielectric object ensuring that the relevant boundary conditions are obeyed. Finally, the magnetic field associated with the corrected electric field is calculated. This corrected magnetic field is evaluated with an NQR simulation to estimate the impact of dielectric tissue on NQR measurements. The effect of dielectric tissue is shown to be small, thus obviating a potential barrier to BCB detection. The NQR model presented may assist those designing excitation and detection coils for NQR. Some general coil design considerations and strategies are discussed.

  19. Mechanical Resonators for Quantum Optomechanics Experiments at Room Temperature

    E-print Network

    Norte, Richard A; Gröblacher, Simon

    2015-01-01

    All quantum optomechanics experiments to date operate at cryogenic temperatures, imposing severe technical challenges and fundamental constraints. Here we present a novel design of on-chip mechanical resonators which exhibit fundamental modes with frequencies $f$ and mechanical quality factors $Q_\\mathrm{m}$ sufficient to enter the optomechanical quantum regime at room temperature. We overcome previous limitations by designing ultra-thin, high-stress silicon nitride membranes, with tensile stress in the resonators' clamps close to the ultimate yield strength of the material. By patterning a photonic crystal on the SiN membranes, we observe reflectivities greater than 99%. These on-chip resonators have remarkably low mechanical dissipation, with $Q_\\mathrm{m}$$\\sim$$10^8$, which makes them a unique platform for experiments towards the observation of massive quantum behavior at room temperature.

  20. Mechanical Resonators for Quantum Optomechanics Experiments at Room Temperature

    E-print Network

    Richard A. Norte; Joao P. Moura; Simon Gröblacher

    2015-11-19

    All quantum optomechanics experiments to date operate at cryogenic temperatures, imposing severe technical challenges and fundamental constraints. Here we present a novel design of on-chip mechanical resonators which exhibit fundamental modes with frequencies $f$ and mechanical quality factors $Q_\\mathrm{m}$ sufficient to enter the optomechanical quantum regime at room temperature. We overcome previous limitations by designing ultra-thin, high-stress silicon nitride membranes, with tensile stress in the resonators' clamps close to the ultimate yield strength of the material. By patterning a photonic crystal on the SiN membranes, we observe reflectivities greater than 99%. These on-chip resonators have remarkably low mechanical dissipation, with $Q_\\mathrm{m}$$\\sim$$10^8$, which makes them a unique platform for experiments towards the observation of massive quantum behavior at room temperature.

  1. An ultra-broadband low-frequency magnetic resonance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, S.; Utsuzawa, S.; Cory, D. G.; Hürlimann, M.; Poitzsch, M.; Song, Y.-Q.

    2014-05-01

    MR probes commonly employ resonant circuits for efficient RF transmission and low-noise reception. These circuits are narrow-band analog devices that are inflexible for broadband and multi-frequency operation at low Larmor frequencies. We have addressed this issue by developing an ultra-broadband MR probe that operates in the 0.1-3 MHz frequency range without using conventional resonant circuits for either transmission or reception. This “non-resonant” approach significantly simplifies the probe circuit and allows robust operation without probe tuning while retaining efficient power transmission and low-noise reception. We also demonstrate the utility of the technique through a variety of NMR and NQR experiments in this frequency range.

  2. Magnetic Field Gradient Calibration as an Experiment to Illustrate Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seedhouse, Steven J.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2008-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory is described that encompasses both qualitative and quantitative pedagogical goals. Qualitatively, the experiment illustrates how images are obtained in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Quantitatively, students experience the…

  3. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trbovich, Michael J.; Barry, Devin P.; Slovacek, Rudy E.; Danon, Yaron; Block, Robert C.; Burke, John A.; Drindak, Noel J.; Leinweber, Greg; Ballad, Robert V.

    2005-05-01

    The focus of this work is to determine resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005-200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping 176Hf and 178Hf resonances near 8 eV. The large neutron cross section of hafnium, combined with its corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties, make it a useful material for controlling nuclear reactions. Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission were performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) electron linear accelerator (LINAC) using the time of flight method. 6Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m. Capture experiments were done using a sixteen-section NaI(Tl) multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized various thicknesses of metallic and isotopically enriched liquid samples. The liquid samples were designed to provide information on the 176Hf and 178Hf contributions to the 8-eV doublet without saturation. Data analysis was done using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M6 beta. SAMMY is able to account for experimental resolution effects for each of the experimental setups at the RPI LINAC, and also can correct for multiple scattering effects in neutron capture yield data. The combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005-200 eV. Resonance integrals were calculated along with errors for each hafnium isotope using the NJOY and INTER codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previously published values; however the calculated elemental hafnium resonance integral changed very little.

  4. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis Using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    MJ Trbovich; DP Barry; RE Slovacck; Y Danon; RC Block; JA Burke; NJ Drindak; G Leinweber; RV Ballad

    2004-10-13

    The focus of this work is to determine resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005-200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf resonances near 8 eV. The large neutron cross section of hafnium, combined with its corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties, make it a useful material for controlling nuclear reactions. Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission were performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) electron linear accelerator (LINAC) using the time of flight method. {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m. Capture experiments were done using a sixteen section NaI(Tl) multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized various thicknesses of metallic and isotopically-enriched liquid samples. The liquid samples were designed to provide information on the {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf contributions to the 8 eV doublet without saturation. Data analysis was done using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M6 beta. SAMMY is able to account for experimental resolution effects for each of the experimental setups at the RPI LINAC, and also can correct for multiple scattering effects in neutron capture yield data. The combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005-200 eV. Resonance integrals were calculated along with errors for each hafnium isotope using the NJOY [1] and INTER [2] codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previously published values; however the calculated elemental hafnium resonance integral changed very little.

  5. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Trbovich, Michael J.; Barry, Devin P.; Burke, John A.; Drindak, Noel J.; Leinweber, Greg; Ballad, Robert V.; Slovacek, Rudy E.; Danon, Yaron; Block, Robert C.

    2005-05-24

    The focus of this work is to determine resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005-200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping 176Hf and 178Hf resonances near 8 eV. The large neutron cross section of hafnium, combined with its corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties, make it a useful material for controlling nuclear reactions.Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission were performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) electron linear accelerator (LINAC) using the time of flight method. 6Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m. Capture experiments were done using a sixteen-section NaI(Tl) multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized various thicknesses of metallic and isotopically enriched liquid samples. The liquid samples were designed to provide information on the 176Hf and 178Hf contributions to the 8-eV doublet without saturation.Data analysis was done using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M6 beta. SAMMY is able to account for experimental resolution effects for each of the experimental setups at the RPI LINAC, and also can correct for multiple scattering effects in neutron capture yield data. The combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005-200 eV. Resonance integrals were calculated along with errors for each hafnium isotope using the NJOY and INTER codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previously published values; however the calculated elemental hafnium resonance integral changed very little.

  6. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiments using Laser-Polarized Noble Gas

    E-print Network

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    Patrick Teen Chung Wong to The Department of Physics in partial fulfillment of the requirements 2001 #12;c 2001 by Glenn Patrick Teen Chung Wong All rights reserved #12;Advisor: Dr. Ronald Walsworth Author: Glenn Patrick Teen Chung Wong Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiments using Laser-Polarized Noble

  7. Ferromagnetic Spin Fluctuation and Unconventional Superconductivity in Rb_{2}Cr_{3}As_{3} Revealed by ^{75}As NMR and NQR.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Tang, Z T; Cao, G H; Zheng, Guo-Qing

    2015-10-01

    We report ^{75}As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies on the superconductor Rb_{2}Cr_{3}As_{3} with a quasi-one-dimensional crystal structure. Below T?100??K, the spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T_{1}) divided by temperature, 1/T_{1}T, increases upon cooling down to T_{c}=4.8??K, showing a Curie-Weiss-like temperature dependence. The Knight shift also increases with decreasing temperature. These results suggest ferromagnetic spin fluctuation. In the superconducting state, 1/T_{1} decreases rapidly below T_{c} without a Hebel-Slichter peak, and follows a T^{5} variation below T?3??K, which points to unconventional superconductivity with point nodes in the gap function. PMID:26551818

  8. Ferromagnetic Spin Fluctuation and Unconventional Superconductivity in Rb2Cr3As3 Revealed by 75As NMR and NQR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Tang, Z. T.; Cao, G. H.; Zheng, Guo-qing

    2015-10-01

    We report 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies on the superconductor Rb2Cr3As3 with a quasi-one-dimensional crystal structure. Below T ˜100 K , the spin-lattice relaxation rate (1 /T1 ) divided by temperature, 1 /T1T , increases upon cooling down to Tc=4.8 K , showing a Curie-Weiss-like temperature dependence. The Knight shift also increases with decreasing temperature. These results suggest ferromagnetic spin fluctuation. In the superconducting state, 1 /T1 decreases rapidly below Tc without a Hebel-Slichter peak, and follows a T5 variation below T ˜3 K , which points to unconventional superconductivity with point nodes in the gap function.

  9. Optimal filtering in multipulse sequences for nuclear quadrupole resonance detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osokin, D. Ya.; Khusnutdinov, R. R.; Mozzhukhin, G. V.; Rameev, B. Z.

    2014-05-01

    The application of the multipulse sequences in nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) detection of explosive and narcotic substances has been studied. Various approaches to increase the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of signal detection are considered. We discussed two modifications of the phase-alternated multiple-pulse sequence (PAMS): the 180° pulse sequence with a preparatory pulse and the 90° pulse sequence. The advantages of optimal filtering to detect NQR in the case of the coherent steady-state precession have been analyzed. It has been shown that this technique is effective in filtering high-frequency and low-frequency noise and increasing the reliability of NQR detection. Our analysis also shows the PAMS with 180° pulses is more effective than PSL sequence from point of view of the application of optimal filtering procedure to the steady-state NQR signal.

  10. Absence of Magnetic Dipolar Phase Transition and Evolution of Low-Energy Excitations in PrNb2Al20 with Crystal Electric Field ?3 Ground State: Evidence from 93Nb-NQR Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Tetsuro; Kotegawa, Hisashi; Tou, Hideki; Higashinaka, Ryuji; Nakama, Akihiro; Aoki, Yuji; Sato, Hideyuki

    2015-07-01

    We report measurements of bulk magnetic susceptibility and 93Nb nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) in the Pr-based caged compound PrNb2Al20. By analyzing the magnetic susceptibility and magnetization, the crystal electric field (CEF) level scheme of PrNb2Al20 is determined to be ?3(0 K)-?4(21.32 K)-?5(43.98 K)-?1(51.16 K) within the framework of the localized 4f electron picture. The 93Nb-NQR spectra exhibit neither spectral broadening nor spectral shift upon cooling down to 75 mK. The 93Nb-NQR spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 at 5 K depends on the frequency and remains almost constant below 5 K. The frequency dependence of 1/T1 is attributed to the magnetic fluctuation due to the hyperfine-enhanced 141Pr nuclear moment inherent in the nonmagnetic ?3 CEF ground state. The present NQR results provide evidence that no symmetry-breaking magnetic dipole order occurs down to 75 mK. Also, considering an invariant form of the quadrupole and octupole couplings between a 93Nb nucleus and Pr 4f electrons, Pr 4f quadrupoles and an octupole can couple with a 93Nb nuclear quadrupole moment and nuclear spin, respectively. Together with the results of bulk measurements, the present NQR results suggest that the possibility of a static quadrupole or octupole ordering can be excluded down to 100 mK. At low temperatures below 500 mK, however, the nuclear spin-echo decay rate gradually increases and the decay curve changes from Gaussian decay to Lorentzian decay, suggesting the evolution of a low-energy excitation.

  11. Nuclear quadrupole resonance lineshape analysis for different motional models: Stochastic Liouville approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Earle, K. A.; Mielczarek, A.; Kubica, A.; Milewska, A.; Moscicki, J.

    2011-12-01

    A general theory of lineshapes in nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), based on the stochastic Liouville equation, is presented. The description is valid for arbitrary motional conditions (particularly beyond the valid range of perturbation approaches) and interaction strengths. It can be applied to the computation of NQR spectra for any spin quantum number and for any applied magnetic field. The treatment presented here is an adaptation of the "Swedish slow motion theory," [T. Nilsson and J. Kowalewski, J. Magn. Reson. 146, 345 (2000), 10.1006/jmre.2000.2125] originally formulated for paramagnetic systems, to NQR spectral analysis. The description is formulated for simple (Brownian) diffusion, free diffusion, and jump diffusion models. The two latter models account for molecular cooperativity effects in dense systems (such as liquids of high viscosity or molecular glasses). The sensitivity of NQR slow motion spectra to the mechanism of the motional processes modulating the nuclear quadrupole interaction is discussed.

  12. Temperature and baric dependence of nuclear quadruple resonance spectra in indium and gallium monoselenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandozhko, Victor; Raranskii, Nikolai; Balazjuk, Vitaly; Samila, Andriy; Kovalyuk, Zahar

    2013-12-01

    Pulsed radiospectroscopy method has been used to study nuclear quadruple resonance (NQR) spectra of 69Ga and 115In isotopes in the layered semiconductors GaSe and InSe. It has been found that in GaSe and InSe there is a considerable temperature dependence of NQR frequency which in the temperature range of 250 to 390 K is practically linear with conversion slope 1.54 kHz/degree for 69Ga and 2.35 kHz/degree for 115In. In the same crystals the effect of uniaxial pressure on NQR spectra applied along the optical axis ? up to the values of 500 kg/?m2 has been studied. A strong attenuation of NQR spectra intensity with increase in pressure on layered crystal package has been established. The unvaried multiplicity of resonance spectra indicates the absence of structural transformations in these layered crystals over the investigated range of temperatures and pressures.

  13. Crystal Structure and 35Cl NQR of ( — ) ?-(trichloromethyl)- ?-propiolactone. Comparison with (±) ?-(trichloromethyl)-?-propiolactone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Shi-qi; Basaran, Reha; Paulus, Helmut; Weiss, Alarich

    1993-03-01

    The crystal structure of(-)?-(trichloromethyl)-?-propiolactone at room temperature is reported, as is the 35Cl NQR spectrum in the range 77 ? T/K ? 323.5. The compound crystallizes with the space group D24-212121, Z = 8, a = 2416.0 (10) pm, b = 975.6 (4) pm, c = 595.0 (2) pm. The intramolecular distances and angles of the two crystallographically independent (-) molecules in the unit cell are equal within the limits of error. The spread of the 35Cl NQR spectrum is within 600 kHz, not changing in the temperature range covered. The crystal structure and 35Cl NQR spectrum are discussed. The results found for the (-) compound are compared with the corresponding ones reported for the (±) compound [1], and the influence of the different intramolecular interactions in the two solid states of the chemically identical compounds on the NQR spectrum is discussed.

  14. Magnetic correlations in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 from NQR relaxation and specific heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsa, F.; Rigamonti, A.

    1991-01-01

    La-139 and Cu-63 Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) relaxation measurements in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 for x ranging from 0 up to 0.3, with particular emphasis on the effect of doping on the Cu(2+) magnetic correlations and dynamics, are reviewed. In the low doping limit, x less than or equal to 0.05, the results can be interpreted consistently in terms of a simple phenomenological 'two-fluids' model whereby the effect of thermally-activated mobile O(2p) holes is the one of disrupting locally the Cu(2+) spin correlations. For x greater than or equal to 0.1, the results indicate the onset, as T approaches T(sub c)(+), of a strong coupling between Cu(2+) spins and the Fermi liquid of O(2p) holes leading to the apparent disappearance of localized Cu(2+) moment in connection with the opening of a superconducting gap.

  15. Experiment study of an electron cyclotron resonant ion source based on a tapered resonance cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Juan; Shi, Feng; Jin, Yizhou; Wang, Yunmin; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2013-12-01

    Electron cyclotron resonant plasma is one type of magnetised plasma generated by continuous microwave energy. It has the property of high degree of ionization and large volume at low gas pressure, which makes it useful for space propulsion and material processing. This article presents the experiment study of the plasma properties and ion beam extraction from an electron cyclotron resonant ion source based on a tapered resonance cavity. Optical emission spectroscopy based on a simple collisional radiation model was used for plasma diagnosis. Experiment results show that, at microwave power setting ranging from 7.06 to 17.40 W and mass flow rate ranging from 1 to 10 sccm, argon gas can be ionized. Ion beam of 109.1 mA from the ion source can be extracted at microwave power of 30 W, mass flow rate of 10 sccm, and accel voltage of 800 V. The diagnosed plasma temperature and density are 2.4-5.2 eV and 2 × 1016-4.8 × 1017 m-3, respectively.

  16. Experiment study of an electron cyclotron resonant ion source based on a tapered resonance cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Juan; Shi, Feng; Jin, Yizhou; Wang, Yunmin; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2013-12-15

    Electron cyclotron resonant plasma is one type of magnetised plasma generated by continuous microwave energy. It has the property of high degree of ionization and large volume at low gas pressure, which makes it useful for space propulsion and material processing. This article presents the experiment study of the plasma properties and ion beam extraction from an electron cyclotron resonant ion source based on a tapered resonance cavity. Optical emission spectroscopy based on a simple collisional radiation model was used for plasma diagnosis. Experiment results show that, at microwave power setting ranging from 7.06 to 17.40 W and mass flow rate ranging from 1 to 10 sccm, argon gas can be ionized. Ion beam of 109.1 mA from the ion source can be extracted at microwave power of 30 W, mass flow rate of 10 sccm, and accel voltage of 800 V. The diagnosed plasma temperature and density are 2.4–5.2 eV and 2 × 10{sup 16}–4.8 × 10{sup 17} m{sup ?3}, respectively.

  17. Ferromagnetic Quantum Critical Fluctuations and Anomalous Coexistence of Ferromagnetism and Superconductivity in UCoGe Revealed by Co-NMR and NQR Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Tetsuya; Nakai, Yusuke; Ihara, Yoshihiko; Ishida, Kenji; Deguchi, Kazuhiko; Sato, Noriaki K.; Satoh, Isamu

    2008-02-01

    Co nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies were carried out for the recently discovered UCoGe, in which the ferromagnetic and superconducting (SC) transitions are reported to occur at TCurie˜ 3 K and TS˜ 0.8 K [Huy et al.: Phys. Rev. Lett. 99 (2007) 067006], in order to investigate the coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity as well as the normal-state and SC properties from a microscopic point of view. From the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 and Knight-shift measurements, we confirm that ferromagnetic fluctuations that possess a quantum critical character are present above TCurie and also the occurrence of a ferromagnetic transition at 2.5 K in our polycrystalline sample. The magnetic fluctuations in the normal state show that UCoGe is an itinerant ferromagnet similar to ZrZn2 and YCo2. The onset SC transition is identified at TS˜ 0.7 K, below which 1/T1 arising from 30% of the volume fraction starts to decrease due to the opening of the SC gap. This component of 1/T1, which follows a T3 dependence in the temperature range 0.3-0.1 K, coexists with the magnetic components of 1/T1 showing a \\sqrt{T} dependence below TS. From the NQR measurements in the SC state, we suggest that the self-induced vortex state is realized in UCoGe.

  18. Optical Resonators in Current and Future Experiments of the ALPS Collaboration

    E-print Network

    T. Meier; for the ALPS collaboration

    2010-03-30

    The ALPS collaboration runs a "light shining through a wall" (LSW) experiment to search for weakly interacting sub-eV particles (WISPs). Its sensitivity is significantly enhanced by the incorporation of a large-scale production resonator and a small-scale high-power resonant second harmonic generator. Here we report on important experimental details and limitations of these resonators and derive recommendations for further experiments. A very promising improvement for a future ALPS experiment is the incorporation of an additional large-scale regeneration resonator. We present a rough sketch of how to combine a regeneration resonator with a single-photon counter (SPC) as detector for regenerated photons.

  19. Optical Resonators in Current and Future Experiments of the ALPS Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, T.

    2010-08-30

    The ALPS collaboration runs a 'light shining through a wall' (LSW) experiment to search for weakly interacting sub-eV particles (WISPs). Its sensitivity is significantly enhanced by the incorporation of a large-scale production resonator and a small-scale high-power resonant second harmonic generator. Here we report on important experimental details and limitations of these resonators and derive recommendations for further experiments. A very promising improvement for a future ALPS experiment is the incorporation of an additional large-scale regeneration resonator. We present a rough sketch of how to combine a regeneration resonator with a single-photon counter (SPC) as detector for regenerated photons.

  20. Suppression of electron correlations in the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 under ambient pressure demonstrated by As75 NMR/NQR measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Yuji; Roy, Beas; Ran, Sheng; Budko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2014-03-20

    The static and the dynamic spin correlations in the low-temperature collapsed tetragonal and the high-temperature tetragonal phase in CaFe2As2 have been investigated by As75 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. Through the temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts, although stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin correlations are realized in the high-temperature tetragonal phase, no trace of the AFM spin correlations can be found in the nonsuperconducting, low-temperature, collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase. Given that there is no magnetic broadening in As75 NMR spectra, together with the T-independent behavior of magnetic susceptibility ? and the T dependence of 1/T1T?, we conclude that Fe spin correlations are completely quenched statically and dynamically in the nonsuperconducting cT phase in CaFe2As2.

  1. Advanced Undergraduate-Laboratory Experiment on Electron Spin Resonance in Single-Crystal Ruby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Lee A.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    An electron-spin-resonance experiment which has been successfully performed in an advanced undergraduate physics laboratory is described. A discussion of that part of the theory of magnetic resonance necessary for the understanding of the experiment is also provided in this article. (DT)

  2. Structural Isomer Identification via NMR: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiment for Organic, Analytical, or Physical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szafran, Zvi

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for an experiment that examines the ability of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to distinguish between structural isomers via resonance multiplicities and chemical shifts. Reasons for incorporating the experiment into organic, analytical, or physical chemistry…

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the female pelvis: initial experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hricak, H.; Alpers, C.; Crooks, L.E.; Sheldon, P.E.

    1983-12-01

    The potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was evaluated in 21 female subjects: seven volunteers, 12 patients scanned for reasons unrelated to the lower genitourinary tract, and two patients referred with gynecologic disease. The uterus at several stages was examined; the premenarcheal uterus (one patient), the uterus of reproductive age (12 patients), the postmenopausal uterus (two patients), and in an 8 week pregnancy (one patient). The myometrium and cyclic endometrium in the reproductive age separated by a low-intensity line (probably stratum basale), which allows recognition of changes in thickness of the cyclic endometrium during the menstrual cycle. The corpus uteri can be distinguished from the cervix by the transitional zone of the isthmus. The anatomic relation of the uterus to bladder and rectum is easily outlined. The vagina can be distinguished from the cervix, and the anatomic display of the closely apposed bladder, vagina, and rectum is clear on axial and coronal images. The ovary is identified; the signal intensity from the ovary depends on the acquisition parameter used. Uterine leiomyoma, endometriosis, and dermoid cyst were depicted, but further experience is needed to ascertain the specificity of the findings.

  4. Electronic properties of Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductors as seen by Cu and O NMR/NQR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinkmann, D.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) allow the investigation of electronic properties at the atomic level. We will report on such studies of typical members of the the Y-Ba-Cu-O family such as YBa2Cu30(6 + x) (1-2-3-(6 + x)), YBa2Cu4O8 (1-2-4) and Y2Ba4Cu7015 (2-4-7) with many examples of recent work performed in our laboratory. In particular, we will deal with Knight shift and relaxation studies of copper and oxygen. We will discuss important issues of current studies such as: (1) Existence of a common electronic spin-susceptibility in the planes (and perhaps in the chains) of 1-2-4; (2) Strong evidence for the existence of a pseudo spin-gap of the antiferromagnetic fluctuations in 1-2-4 and 2-4-7; (3) Evidence for d-wave pairing in 1-2-4; (4) Strong coupling of inequivalent Cu-O planes in 2-4-7 and possible origin for the high Tc value of this compound; and (5) The possibility to describe NMR data in the framework of a charge-excitation picture.

  5. Optical control of nuclear resonant absorption: theory and experiment 

    E-print Network

    Kolesov, Roman L.

    2004-09-30

    Modification of nuclear resonant absorption by means of laser radiation is analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical analysis is done on the basis of four-level model of atom. This model includes both electronic and nuclear...

  6. The Conformational Changes Induced by Ubiquinone Binding in the Na+-pumping NADH:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) Are Kinetically Controlled by Conserved Glycines 140 and 141 of the NqrB Subunit*

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Madeleine; Juárez, Oscar; Neehaul, Yashvin; Cook, Darcie A.; Barquera, Blanca; Hellwig, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Na+-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) is responsible for maintaining a sodium gradient across the inner bacterial membrane. This respiratory enzyme, which couples sodium pumping to the electron transfer between NADH and ubiquinone, is not present in eukaryotes and as such could be a target for antibiotics. In this paper it is shown that the site of ubiquinone reduction is conformationally coupled to the NqrB subunit, which also hosts the final cofactor in the electron transport chain, riboflavin. Previous work showed that mutations in conserved NqrB glycine residues 140 and 141 affect ubiquinone reduction and the proper functioning of the sodium pump. Surprisingly, these mutants did not affect the dissociation constant of ubiquinone or its analog HQNO (2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide) from Na+-NQR, which indicates that these residues do not participate directly in the ubiquinone binding site but probably control its accessibility. Indeed, redox-induced difference spectroscopy showed that these mutations prevented the conformational change involved in ubiquinone binding but did not modify the signals corresponding to bound ubiquinone. Moreover, data are presented that demonstrate the NqrA subunit is able to bind ubiquinone but with a low non-catalytically relevant affinity. It is also suggested that Na+-NQR contains a single catalytic ubiquinone binding site and a second site that can bind ubiquinone but is not active. PMID:25006248

  7. Parametric resonance oscillations of flexible slender cylinders in harmonically perturbed axial flow. Part 2: experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Paidoussis, M.P.; Issid, N.T.; Tsui, M.

    1980-12-01

    The dynamic behavior of a flexible slender cylinder in axial flow, perturbed harmonically in time was examined experimentally. Parametric resonance oscillations were found to exist over certain ranges of frequencies and amplitudes of flow-velocity perturbations. The most prominent of the resonances, in these experiments, was associated with the second-mode principal primary resonance and was studied extensively. Agreement with theory was found to be quite good.

  8. Low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonance with a dc SQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.W.

    1991-07-01

    Conventional pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a technique well suited for the study of very large quadrupolar interactions. Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have been developed for the study of smaller quadrupolar interactions. However, there are many nuclei which have quadrupolar interactions of intermediate strength. Quadrupolar interactions in this region have traditionally been difficult or unfeasible to detect. This work describes the development and application of a SQUID NQR technique which is capable of measuring intermediate strength quadrupolar interactions, in the range of a few hundred kilohertz to several megahertz. In this technique, a dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) is used to monitor the longitudinal sample magnetization, as opposed to the transverse magnetization, as a rf field is swept in frequency. This allows the detection of low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonances over a very wide frequency range with high sensitivity. The theory of this NQR technique is discussed and a description of the dc SQUID system is given. In the following chapters, the spectrometer is discussed along with its application to the study of samples containing half-odd-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei, in particular boron-11 and aluminum-27. The feasibility of applying this NQR technique in the study of samples containing integer spin nuclei is discussed in the last chapter. 140 refs., 46 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Multipole-multimode Floquet theory of rotational resonance width experiments: 13

    E-print Network

    Griffin, Robert G.

    Multipole-multimode Floquet theory of rotational resonance width experiments: 13 C­13 C distance description of zero-quantum ZQ NMR processes using multipole-multimode Floquet theory is proposed for studying in rotational resonance width R2 W ex- periments based on multipole-multimode Floquet theory MMFT . The approach

  10. A Mechanical Analog of the Two-bounce Resonance of Solitary Waves: Modeling and Experiment

    E-print Network

    Goodman, Roy

    a specially-designed landscape, that mimics the dynamics of a well known phenomenon, the two-bounce resonanceA Mechanical Analog of the Two-bounce Resonance of Solitary Waves: Modeling and Experiment Roy H, NJ 07871 (Dated: 28 March 2015) We describe a simple mechanical system, a ball rolling along

  11. Magnetic correlations in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 from NQR relaxation and specific heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsa, F.; Rigamonti, A.

    1990-01-01

    La-139 and Cu-63 Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) relaxation measurements in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 for O = to or less than 0.3 and in the temperature range 1.6 + 450 K are analyzed in terms of Cu(++) magnetic correlations and dynamics. It is described how the magnetic correlations that would result from Cu-Cu exchange are reduced by mobile charge defects related to x-doping. A comprehensive picture is given which explains satisfactorily the x and T dependence of the correlation time, of the correlation length and of the Neel temperature T(sub n)(x) as well as being consistent with known electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. It is discussed how, in the superconducting samples, the mobile defects also cause the decrease, for T yields T(sub c)(+) of the hyperfine Cu electron-nucleus effective interaction, leading to the coexistence of quasi-localized, reduced magnetic moments from 3d Cu electrons and mobile oxygen p-hole carriers. The temperature dependence of the effective hyperfine field around the superconducting transition yields an activation energy which could be related to the pairing energy. New specific heat measurements are also presented and discussed in terms of the above picture.

  12. Laboratory Experiments for Exploring the Surface Plasmon Resonance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pluchery, Olivier; Vayron, Romain; Van, Kha-Man

    2011-01-01

    The surface plasmon wave is a surface wave confined at the interface between a dielectric and a metal. The excitation of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) on a gold thin film is discussed within the Kretschmann configuration, where the coupling with the excitation light is achieved by means of a prism in total reflection. The electromagnetic…

  13. Flow-excited acoustic resonance of a Helmholtz resonator: Discrete vortex model compared to experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Xiwen; Jing, Xiaodong Sun, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-15

    The acoustic resonance in a Helmholtz resonator excited by a low Mach number grazing flow is studied theoretically. The nonlinear numerical model is established by coupling the vortical motion at the cavity opening with the cavity acoustic mode through an explicit force balancing relation between the two sides of the opening. The vortical motion is modeled in the potential flow framework, in which the oscillating motion of the thin shear layer is described by an array of convected point vortices, and the unsteady vortex shedding is determined by the Kutta condition. The cavity acoustic mode is obtained from the one-dimensional acoustic propagation model, the time-domain equivalent of which is given by means of a broadband time-domain impedance model. The acoustic resistances due to radiation and viscous loss at the opening are also taken into account. The physical processes of the self-excited oscillations, at both resonance and off-resonance states, are simulated directly in the time domain. Results show that the shear layer exhibits a weak flapping motion at the off-resonance state, whereas it rolls up into large-scale vortex cores when resonances occur. Single and dual-vortex patterns are observed corresponding to the first and second hydrodynamic modes. The simulation also reveals different trajectories of the two vortices across the opening when the first and second hydrodynamic modes co-exist. The strong modulation of the shed vorticity by the acoustic feedback at the resonance state is demonstrated. The model overestimates the pressure pulsation amplitude by a factor 2, which is expected to be due to the turbulence of the flow which is not taken into account. The model neglects vortex shedding at the downstream and side edges of the cavity. This will also result in an overestimation of the pulsation amplitude.

  14. Flow-excited acoustic resonance of a Helmholtz resonator: Discrete vortex model compared to experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiwen; Jing, Xiaodong; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-01

    The acoustic resonance in a Helmholtz resonator excited by a low Mach number grazing flow is studied theoretically. The nonlinear numerical model is established by coupling the vortical motion at the cavity opening with the cavity acoustic mode through an explicit force balancing relation between the two sides of the opening. The vortical motion is modeled in the potential flow framework, in which the oscillating motion of the thin shear layer is described by an array of convected point vortices, and the unsteady vortex shedding is determined by the Kutta condition. The cavity acoustic mode is obtained from the one-dimensional acoustic propagation model, the time-domain equivalent of which is given by means of a broadband time-domain impedance model. The acoustic resistances due to radiation and viscous loss at the opening are also taken into account. The physical processes of the self-excited oscillations, at both resonance and off-resonance states, are simulated directly in the time domain. Results show that the shear layer exhibits a weak flapping motion at the off-resonance state, whereas it rolls up into large-scale vortex cores when resonances occur. Single and dual-vortex patterns are observed corresponding to the first and second hydrodynamic modes. The simulation also reveals different trajectories of the two vortices across the opening when the first and second hydrodynamic modes co-exist. The strong modulation of the shed vorticity by the acoustic feedback at the resonance state is demonstrated. The model overestimates the pressure pulsation amplitude by a factor 2, which is expected to be due to the turbulence of the flow which is not taken into account. The model neglects vortex shedding at the downstream and side edges of the cavity. This will also result in an overestimation of the pulsation amplitude.

  15. Theory and Experiment of Slow-Light Coupled-Resonator Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hsi-Chun

    Slow light has been an inter-disciplinary topic and a rapidly growing area, especially over the last decade with the improvement of fabrication technology. The ability to slow down and control the group velocity of light may find applications such as optical buffers, optical delay lines, and enhanced light-matter interaction in optical modulator, amplifier, detectors, lasers, and nonlinear optics. The spirit of slow light is to replace a bulky device with a much shorter, compact structure. This thesis explores the design and experiment of coupled-resonator optical waveguides (CROWs), which consist of arrays of optical resonators in which light propagates through the coupling between resonators. The group velocity of light is dictated by the inter-resonator coupling strength. Light can be significantly slowed down if the inter-resonator coupling is weak. CROWs can be realized with various types of resonators. This thesis focuses on grating resonators in silicon waveguides, including grating-defect resonators and bandgap-modulated resonators. With the strong gratings, the grating resonators are only a few microns long. We control the inter-resonator coupling via the number of holes between adjacent resonators. The major limitations in the realization of CROWs have been various kinds of transmission losses, including the resonator losses, the discontinuity between CROWs and the coupling waveguides, and the fabrication disorder. These transmission losses limit the achievable group velocity and the maximum number of resonators. We address these transmission losses throughout this thesis. The resonator losses are overcome with the design and optimized fabrication of tapered grating-defect resonators and bandgap-modulated resonators. The discontinuity between CROWs and waveguides is reduced by tailoring the coupling along the CROW for adiabatic conversion. The optimization of the CROW response leads to the study of filter design based on CROW. Filter design formalism based on coupled-mode theory is presented. The effect of fabrication disorder on CROWs is analyzed, and the Butterworth filters are shown to be more robust against fabrication disorder. The fabrication and measurement of grating CROWs are presented, featuring high-Q (Q=10 5) grating resonators, coupling of up to 50 resonators, control of group velocity between c/13 and c/49, and Butterworth filters. Finally, an optical analog of electromagnetically induced transparency is presented. The structure consists of two co-spatial gratings imposed on a three-mode waveguide. One of the supermodes, the Dark mode, possesses a group velocity which depends on the ratio of the grating strengths. The group velocity can be nearly zero if the two grating strengths are nearly identical.

  16. Part I. Analyzing the distribution of gas law questions in chemistry textbooks. Part II. Chlorine-35 NQR spectra of group 1 and silver dichloromethanesulfonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillette, Gabriel

    Part I. Two studies involving the gas law questions in eight high school and Advanced Placement/college chemistry textbooks were performed using loglinear analysis to look for associations among six variables. These variables included Bloom's Taxonomy (higher-order, lower-order), Book Type (high school, college), Question Format (multiple-choice, problem, short answer), Question Placement (in-chapter, end-of-chapter, test bank), Representation (macroscopic, microscopic, symbolic), and Arkansas Science Standard (conceptual, mathematical; gas laws, pressure conversion, stoichiometry). The first study, involving the conceptual gas law questions, found the Book Type and Question Placement variables had the biggest impact, each appearing in 5 of the 11 significant associations. The second study, involving the mathematical gas law questions, found the Question Placement had the biggest impact, appearing in 7 of the 11 significant associations, followed by Book Type and the Arkansas Science Standard variables, which appeared in 5 of the 11 significant associations. These studies showed that compared to the high school books, college books have fewer multiple-choice questions (compared to short-answer and problem questions), fewer in-chapter questions (compared to end-of-chapter and test bank questions), fewer questions in the chapters and more questions at the end of the chapters and fewer multiple-choice questions in and at the end of the books and more multiple-choice questions in the test banks. Part II. The dichloromethanesulfonate salts of several +1 charged cations, M+Cl2CHSO3 - (M = Li, Na, K, Rb Ag, Cs Tl) were synthesized and studied by 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). Dichloromethanesulfonic acid was prepared by the methanolysis of dichloromethanesulfonyl chloride, which was neutralized with the metal carbonates to produce the corresponding metal dichloromethanesulfonate salts. This study completed the NQR investigation of the family of chloroacetates and chloromethanesulfonates of silver. The study suggests that the ability of organochlorine atoms to coordinate to silver ions decreases as the number of electron-withdrawing groups attached to carbon atom bound to the coordinating chlorine atom increases. The unusually large NQR spectral width found among M+Cl2CHCO2 - salts are not present among M+Cl2CHSO 3- salts and does not appear to be generally characteristic of the dichloromethyl family of salts.

  17. Modern Michelson-Morley experiment using cryogenic optical resonators.

    PubMed

    Müller, Holger; Herrmann, Sven; Braxmaier, Claus; Schiller, Stephan; Peters, Achim

    2003-07-11

    We report on a new test of Lorentz invariance performed by comparing the resonance frequencies of two orthogonal cryogenic optical resonators subject to Earth's rotation over approximately 1 yr. For a possible anisotropy of the speed of light c, we obtain Delta(theta)c/c(0)=(2.6+/-1.7)x10(-15). Within the Robertson-Mansouri-Sexl (RMS) test theory, this implies an isotropy violation parameter beta-delta-1 / 2=(-2.2+/-1.5)x10(-9), about 3 times lower than the best previous result. Within the general extension of the standard model of particle physics, we extract limits on seven parameters at accuracies down to 10(-15), improving the best previous result by about 2 orders of magnitude. PMID:12906465

  18. Modern Michelson-Morley Experiment using Cryogenic Optical Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Holger; Herrmann, Sven; Braxmaier, Claus; Schiller, Stephan; Peters, Achim

    2003-07-01

    We report on a new test of Lorentz invariance performed by comparing the resonance frequencies of two orthogonal cryogenic optical resonators subject to Earth's rotation over ˜1 yr. For a possible anisotropy of the speed of light c, we obtain ??c/c0=(2.6±1.7)×10-15. Within the Robertson-Mansouri-Sexl (RMS) test theory, this implies an isotropy violation parameter ?-?-1/2=(-2.2±1.5)×10-9, about 3 times lower than the best previous result. Within the general extension of the standard model of particle physics, we extract limits on seven parameters at accuracies down to 10-15, improving the best previous result by about 2 orders of magnitude.

  19. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Beta-Carotene and Lycopene: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoskins, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the theory of resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy as it applies to beta-carotene and lycopene pigments (found in tomatoes and carrots, respectively). Also discusses an experiment which demonstrates the theoretical principles involved. The experiment has been tested over a three-year period and has received excellent acceptance by physical…

  20. Neutron-multiwave-interference experiments with many resonance coils

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, S. V.; Chetverikov, Yu. O.; Syromyatnikov, A. V.; Kraan, W. H.; Rekveldt, M. Th.

    2003-09-01

    Neutron-multiwave-interference phenomena based on Ramsey's resonance method of ''separated oscillating fields'' are studied. A neutron passes through N successive resonant coils (({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}{sub 0}=2{mu}{sub n}B{sub 0}), which flip the neutron spin with a probability {rho} smaller than 1. These coils are separated by path lengths L over which a homogeneous field B{sub 1} is present. Because the spin-flip probability {rho} is smaller than 1, the number of waves for a neutron is doubled after each flipper, so as to produce 2{sup N} neutron waves at the end of the setup. The phase difference between any pair of waves is a multiple of a ''phase quantum'' determined by the line integral of the field difference B{sub 1}-B{sub 0} over the length L. Highly regular patterns of the quantum-mechanical probability R in (B{sub 1},{rho}) space appear due to pair interference between individual waves. Possible applications of this phenomenon, such as a direct measurement of n-particle correlation function, are pointed out.

  1. Effect of Geomagnetism on 101Ru Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Measurements of CeRu2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manago, Masahiro; Ishida, Kenji; Matsuda, Tatsuma D.; ?nuki, Yoshichika

    2015-11-01

    We performed 101Ru nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements on the s-wave superconductor CeRu2 and found oscillatory behavior in the spin-echo amplitude at the | ± 1/2> \\leftrightarrow | ± 3/2> transitions but not at the | ± 3/2> \\leftrightarrow | ± 5/2> transitions. The modulation disappears in the superconducting state or in a magnetic shield, which implies a geomagnetic field effect. Our results indicate that the NQR spin-echo decay curve at the | ± 1/2> \\leftrightarrow | ± 3/2> transitions is sensitive to a weak magnetic field.

  2. Subfemtotesla radio-frequency atomic magnetometer for detection of nuclear quadrupole resonance

    E-print Network

    Romalis, Mike

    Subfemtotesla radio-frequency atomic magnetometer for detection of nuclear quadrupole resonance S 20 November 2006 A radio-frequency tunable atomic magnetometer is developed for detection of nuclearHz 14 N NQR frequency of ammonium nitrate. A potential application of the magnetometer is detection

  3. Resonant scattering experiments with radioactive nuclear beams - Recent results and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Teranishi, T.; Sakaguchi, S.; Uesaka, T.; Kubono, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kurihara, Y.; Bihn, D. N.; Kahl, D.; Watanabe, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Khiem, L. H.; Cuong, P. V.; Goto, A.

    2013-04-19

    Resonant scattering with low-energy radioactive nuclear beams of E < 5 MeV/u have been studied at CRIB of CNS and at RIPS of RIKEN. As an extension to the present experimental technique, we will install an advanced polarized proton target for resonant scattering experiments. A Monte-Carlo simulation was performed to study the feasibility of future experiments with the polarized target. In the Monte-Carlo simulation, excitation functions and analyzing powers were calculated using a newly developed R-matrix calculation code. A project of a small-scale radioactive beam facility at Kyushu University is also briefly described.

  4. NQR study of neutral-ionic phase transition and quantum paraelectric state in organic charge-transfer complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, Fumitatsu; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Kanoda, Kazushi; Horiuchi, Sachio; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2008-12-01

    NQR measurements were performed for the charge-transfer complexes DMTTF-QBr nCl n-4 under ambient and hydrostatic pressures in order to understand the neutral-ionic phase transition and the quantum critical behavior. The 35Cl NQR spectrum of DMTTF-QCl 4 showed a splitting and a shift below Tc, indicating the occurrence of dimerization and charge transfer. The spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/ T1 showed a peak anomaly around Tc, reflecting the critical slowing down. The quantum paraelectric states in DMTTF-2,6-QBr 2Cl 2 and pressured DMTTF-QBr 4 were studied by the 79Br NQR. We found the microscopic evidence for the evolution of the critical fluctuations at low temperatures in the temperature dependence of spin-lattice relaxation rate.

  5. A no-tune no-match wideband probe for nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy in the VHF range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharfetter, Hermann; Petrovic, Andreas; Eggenhofer, Heidi; Stollberger, Rudolf

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy is a method for the characterization of chemical compounds containing so-called quadrupolar nuclei. Similar to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the sample under investigation is irradiated with strong radiofrequency (RF) pulses, which stimulate the emission of weak RF signals from the quadrupolar nuclei. The signals are then amplified and Fourier transformed so as to obtain a spectrum. In principle, narrowband NQR spectra can be measured with NMR spectrometers. However, pure NQR signals require the absence of a static magnetic field and several special applications require the characterization of a substance over a large bandwidth, e.g. 50-100% of the central frequency, which is hardly possible with standard NMR equipment. Dedicated zero-field NQR equipment is not widespread and current concepts employ resonating probes which are tuned and matched over a wide range by using mechanical capacitors driven by stepper motors. While providing the highest signal to noise ratio (SNR) such probes are slow in operation and can only be operated from dedicated NMR consoles. We developed a low-cost NQR wideband probe without tuning and matching for applications in the very high frequency (VHF) range below 300?MHz. The probe coil was realized as part of a reactive network which approximates an exponential transmission line. The input reflection coefficient of the two developed prototype probe coils is ? 20?dB between 90-145?MHz and 74.5-99.5?MHz, respectively. Two wideband NQR spectra of published test substances were acquired with an SNR of better than 20?dB after sufficient averaging. The measured signals and the SNR correspond very well to the theoretically expected values and demonstrate the feasibility of the method. Because there is no need for tuning and matching, our probes can be operated easily from any available NMR console.

  6. Batch-specific discrimination using nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kyriakidou, Georgia; Jakobsson, Andreas; Althoefer, Kaspar; Barras, Jamie

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we report on the identification of batches of analgesic paracetamol (acetaminophen) tablets using nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy ((14)N NQR). The high sensitivity of NQR to the electron charge distribution surrounding the quadrupolar nucleus enables the unique characterization of the crystal structure of the material. Two hypothesis were tested on batches of the same brand: the within the same batch variability and the difference between batches that varied in terms of their batch number and expiry date. The multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) did not provide any within-batches variations, indicating the natural deviation of a medicine manufactured under the same conditions. Alternatively, the statistical analysis revealed a significant discrimination between the different batches of paracetamol tablets. Therefore, the NQR signal is an indicator of factors that influence the physical and chemical integrity of the material. Those factors might be the aging of the medicine, the manufacturing, or storage conditions. The results of this study illustrate the potential of NQR as promising technique in applications such as detection and authentication of counterfeit medicines. PMID:25719361

  7. Time-delayed feedback control of coherence resonance near subcritical Hopf bifurcation: Theory versus experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Vladimir; Feoktistov, Alexey; Vadivasova, Tatyana; Schöll, Eckehard; Zakharova, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Using the model of a generalized Van der Pol oscillator in the regime of subcritical Hopf bifurcation, we investigate the influence of time delay on noise-induced oscillations. It is shown that for appropriate choices of time delay, either suppression or enhancement of coherence resonance can be achieved. Analytical calculations are combined with numerical simulations and experiments on an electronic circuit.

  8. Time-delayed feedback control of coherence resonance near subcritical Hopf bifurcation: theory versus experiment.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Vladimir; Feoktistov, Alexey; Vadivasova, Tatyana; Schöll, Eckehard; Zakharova, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Using the model of a generalized Van der Pol oscillator in the regime of subcritical Hopf bifurcation, we investigate the influence of time delay on noise-induced oscillations. It is shown that for appropriate choices of time delay, either suppression or enhancement of coherence resonance can be achieved. Analytical calculations are combined with numerical simulations and experiments on an electronic circuit. PMID:25833433

  9. Nonlinear contact mechanics based on ring-down experiments with quartz crystal resonators

    E-print Network

    Prellberg, Thomas

    - tion of motion corresponds to a damped harmonic oscillator. The fact that the data tracesNonlinear contact mechanics based on ring-down experiments with quartz crystal resonators Steffen the interaction between an oscillating quartz plate and a tip touching its surface. The analysis is based on ring

  10. Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating slot antenna for the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Brooksby, C.A.; Calderson, M.O.; Cummins, W.F.; Ferguson, S.W.; Williamson, V.L.

    1985-11-14

    The Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating (ICRH) slot antenna has been a part of the ion and electron plasma heating system in the central cell region of the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U). This paper presents the mechanical design and arrangement of the antenna, coax feed lines, feedthroughs, and matching network for the slot antenna.

  11. Roles of the sodium-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) on vibrio cholerae metabolism, motility and osmotic stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Minato, Yusuke; Fassio, Sara R; Kirkwood, Jay S; Halang, Petra; Quinn, Matthew J; Faulkner, Wyatt J; Aagesen, Alisha M; Steuber, Julia; Stevens, Jan F; Häse, Claudia C

    2014-01-01

    The Na+ translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) is a unique respiratory enzyme catalyzing the electron transfer from NADH to quinone coupled with the translocation of sodium ions across the membrane. Typically, Vibrio spp., including Vibrio cholerae, have this enzyme but lack the proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I). Thus, Na+-NQR should significantly contribute to multiple aspects of V. cholerae physiology; however, no detailed characterization of this aspect has been reported so far. In this study, we broadly investigated the effects of loss of Na+-NQR on V. cholerae physiology by using Phenotype Microarray (Biolog), transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. We found that the V. cholerae ?nqrA-F mutant showed multiple defects in metabolism detected by Phenotype Microarray. Transcriptome analysis revealed that the V. cholerae ?nqrA-F mutant up-regulates 31 genes and down-regulates 55 genes in both early and mid-growth phases. The most up-regulated genes included the cadA and cadB genes, encoding a lysine decarboxylase and a lysine/cadaverine antiporter, respectively. Increased CadAB activity was further suggested by the metabolomics analysis. The down-regulated genes include sialic acid catabolism genes. Metabolomic analysis also suggested increased reductive pathway of TCA cycle and decreased purine metabolism in the V. cholerae ?nqrA-F mutant. Lack of Na+-NQR did not affect any of the Na+ pumping-related phenotypes of V. cholerae suggesting that other secondary Na+ pump(s) can compensate for Na+ pumping activity of Na+-NQR. Overall, our study provides important insights into the contribution of Na+-NQR to V. cholerae physiology. PMID:24811312

  12. Ga NMR/NQR study of the kagom compound Nd This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud 11, Université de

    29 Si NMR and 69,71 Ga NMR/NQR study of the kagomé compound Nd 3 Ga 5 SiO 14 This article has been Contact us My IOPscience #12;29 Si NMR and 69,71 Ga NMR/NQR study of the kagom´e compound Nd3Ga5SiO14.zorko@ijs.si Abstract. We report a comprehensive 29 Si NMR and 69,71 Ga NMR/NQR study of the large- spin magnetically

  13. Low Threshold Parametric Decay Backscattering Instability in Tokamak Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gusakov, E. Z.; Popov, A. Yu.

    2010-09-10

    The experimental conditions leading to substantial reduction of the backscattering decay instability threshold in electron cyclotron resonance heating experiments in toroidal devices are analyzed. It is shown that a drastic decrease of threshold is provided by the nonmonotonic behavior of plasma density in the vicinity of magnetic island and poloidal magnetic field inhomogeneity making possible localization of ion Bernstein decay waves. The corresponding ion Bernstein wave gain and the parametric decay instability pump power threshold is calculated.

  14. Anomalous echo: Exploring abnormal experience correlates of emotional motor resonance in Schizophrenia Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Sestito, Mariateresa; Raballo, Andrea; Umiltà, Maria Alessandra; Amore, Mario; Maggini, Carlo; Gallese, Vittorio

    2015-09-30

    Anomalous experiences such as Basic Symptoms (BS) are considered the first subjective manifestation of the neurobiological substrate of schizophrenia. The purpose of this study was to explore whether a low or high emotional motor resonance occurring in Schizophrenia Spectrum (SzSp) patients was related to patients? clinical features and to their anomalous subjective experiences as indexed by the Bonn Scale for the Assessment of Basic Symptoms (BSABS). To this aim, we employed a validated paradigm sensitive in evoking a congruent facial mimicry (measured by means of facial electromyographic activity, EMG) through multimodal positive and negative emotional stimuli presentation. Results showed that SzSp patients more resonating with negative emotional stimuli (i.e. Externalizers) had significantly higher scores in BSABS Cluster 3 (Vulnerability) and more psychotic episodes than Internalizers patients. On the other hand, SzSp patients more resonating with positive emotional stimuli (i.e. Externalizers) scored higher in BSABS Cluster 5 (Interpersonal irritation) than Internalizers. Drawing upon a phenomenological-based perspective, we attempted to shed new light on the abnormal experiences characterizing schizophrenia, explaining them in terms of a disruption of the normal self-perception conveyed by the basic, low-level emotional motor mechanisms. PMID:26187341

  15. Circular waveguide systems for electron-cyclotron-resonant heating of the tandem mirror experiment-upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, B.; Calderon, M.O.; Chargin, A.K.; Coffield, F.E.; Gallagher, N.C. Jr.; Lang, D.D.; Pedrotti, L.R.; Rubert, R.R.; Stallard, B.W.; Sweeney, D.W.

    1983-11-18

    Extensive use of electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) in the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) requires continuous development of components to improve efficiency, increase reliability, and deliver power to new locations with respect to the plasma. We have used rectangular waveguide components on the experiment and have developed, tested, and installed circular waveguide components. We replaced the rectangular with the circular components because of the greater transmission efficiency and power-handling capability of the circular ones. Design, fabrication, and testing of all components are complete for all systems. In this paper we describe the design criteria for the system.

  16. Instrument for in-situ orientation of superconducting thin-film resonators used for electron-spin resonance experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mowry, Andrew; Chen, Yiming; Kubasek, James; Friedman, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    When used in electron-spin resonance measurements, superconducting thin-film resonators must be precisely oriented relative to the external magnetic field in order to prevent the trapping of magnetic flux and the associated degradation of resonator performance. We present a compact design solution for this problem that allows in-situ control of the orientation of the resonator at cryogenic temperatures. Tests of the apparatus show that when proper alignment is achieved, there is almost no hysteresis in the field dependence of the resonant frequency.

  17. Instrument for in-situ orientation of superconducting thin-film resonators used for electron-spin resonance experiments

    E-print Network

    Andrew Mowry; Yiming Chen; James Kubasek; Jonathan R. Friedman

    2015-01-16

    When used in Electron-Spin Resonance (ESR) measurements, superconducting thin-film resonators must be precisely oriented relative to the external magnetic field in order to prevent the trapping of magnetic flux and the associated degradation of resonator performance. We present a compact design solution for this problem that allows in-situ control of the orientation of the resonator at cryogenic temperatures. Tests of the apparatus show that when proper alignment is achieved, there is almost no hysteresis in the field dependence of the resonant frequency.

  18. Experiment and simulation of hole-coupled resonator modes with a CW HeNe laser

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, W.P.; Xie, M.; Edighoffer, J.A.; Wallace, E.; Kim, K.J.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    1992-08-01

    The Infrared Free Electron Laser (IRFEL) for the proposed Chemical Dynamics Laboratory at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory will operate from 3 - 50 [mu]m and use all-metal optics. This choice of optics allows for broad tuning and has excellent power-handling capabilities. A hole-coupling approach for the optical resonator was adopted after extensive computer simulations verified that it fully met the design requirements. To bench-test the simulations we have carried out a scaled cavity experiment utilizing a visible (632.8 nm) continuous wave (CW) HeNe laser. Two cases have been studied: (a) a Gaussian near-concentric symmetric resonator and (b) a hole-coupled resonator with degenerate higher order modes. The simple geometry of the former case allows for a direct comparison with analytical theory and is useful for bench marking the diagnostic equipment. Since mode degeneracy should be avoided for good operation of an FEL, gaining an understanding of the latter case is important. Furthermore, it provides a good test case for evaluating the code performance. After discussing the theoretical model used in the simulations, we describe the cavity parameters and the experimental set-up. We proceed by comparing, for both case (a) and (b), the experimental results with theoretical predictions and simulations. This is followed by the summary and conclusions of these experiments.

  19. Experiment and simulation of hole-coupled resonator modes with a CW HeNe laser

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, W.P.; Xie, M.; Edighoffer, J.A.; Wallace, E.; Kim, K.J.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    1992-08-01

    The Infrared Free Electron Laser (IRFEL) for the proposed Chemical Dynamics Laboratory at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory will operate from 3 - 50 {mu}m and use all-metal optics. This choice of optics allows for broad tuning and has excellent power-handling capabilities. A hole-coupling approach for the optical resonator was adopted after extensive computer simulations verified that it fully met the design requirements. To bench-test the simulations we have carried out a scaled cavity experiment utilizing a visible (632.8 nm) continuous wave (CW) HeNe laser. Two cases have been studied: (a) a Gaussian near-concentric symmetric resonator and (b) a hole-coupled resonator with degenerate higher order modes. The simple geometry of the former case allows for a direct comparison with analytical theory and is useful for bench marking the diagnostic equipment. Since mode degeneracy should be avoided for good operation of an FEL, gaining an understanding of the latter case is important. Furthermore, it provides a good test case for evaluating the code performance. After discussing the theoretical model used in the simulations, we describe the cavity parameters and the experimental set-up. We proceed by comparing, for both case (a) and (b), the experimental results with theoretical predictions and simulations. This is followed by the summary and conclusions of these experiments.

  20. Isoscalar giant resonance studies in a stored-beam experiment within EXL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, J. C.; Bagchi, S.; Bönig, S.; Csatlós, M.; Dillmann, I.; Dimopoulou, C.; Egelhof, P.; Eremin, V.; Furuno, T.; Geissel, H.; Gernhäuser, R.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hartig, A.-L.; Ilieva, S.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kiselev, O.; Kollmus, K.; Kozhuharov, C.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kröll, T.; Kuilman, M.; Litvinov, S.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Mahjour-Shafiei, M.; Mutterer, M.; Nagae, D.; Najafi, M. A.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Popp, U.; Rigollet, C.; Roy, S.; Scheidenberger, C.; von Schmid, M.; Steck, M.; Streicher, B.; Stuhl, L.; Thürauf, M.; Uesaka, T.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.; Winters, D.; Woods, P. J.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yue, K.; Zenihiro, J.; for the EXL collaboration

    2015-11-01

    In the first campaign of the exotic nuclei studied with light-ion induced reaction in storage rings (EXL) collaboration at the existing storage ring experimental heavy-ion storage ring (ESR) at Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research (GSI), we performed the first experiments using a stored beam of 58Ni and an internal helium gas-jet target aiming for the investigation of isoscalar giant resonances in inverse kinematics. In this experiment, inelastically scattered recoil particles (at very forward angles, {? }{cm}?slant 1°) were detected with a dedicated setup, including ultra-high vacuum (UHV)-compatible double-sided silicon strip detector (DSSDs). Preliminary results show evidence for the excitation of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR) in the 58Ni nucleus. This opens the opportunity to study in the near future giant resonances also with stored radioactive beams, like 56Ni, and extract important information about the nuclear matter incompressibility. In the present work the current status of the data analysis and results are shown and discussed.

  1. Search for high mass dilepton resonances in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS experiment

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Frank E.

    This Letter presents a search for high mass e[superscript +]e[superscript ?] or ?[superscript +]?[superscript ?] resonances in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV at the LHC. The data were recorded by the ATLAS experiment during ...

  2. A mechanical analog of the two-bounce resonance of solitary waves: Modeling and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Roy H.; Rahman, Aminur; Bellanich, Michael J.; Morrison, Catherine N.

    2015-04-01

    We describe a simple mechanical system, a ball rolling along a specially-designed landscape, which mimics the well-known two-bounce resonance in solitary wave collisions, a phenomenon that has been seen in countless numerical simulations but never in the laboratory. We provide a brief history of the solitary wave problem, stressing the fundamental role collective-coordinate models played in understanding this phenomenon. We derive the equations governing the motion of a point particle confined to such a surface and then design a surface on which to roll the ball, such that its motion will evolve under the same equations that approximately govern solitary wave collisions. We report on physical experiments, carried out in an undergraduate applied mathematics course, that seem to exhibit the two-bounce resonance.

  3. A Mechanical Analog of the Two-bounce Resonance of Solitary Waves: Modeling and Experiment

    E-print Network

    Roy H. Goodman; Aminur Rahman; Michael Bellanich; Catherine Morrision

    2015-03-28

    We describe a simple mechanical system, a ball rolling along a specially-designed landscape, that mimics the dynamics of a well known phenomenon, the two-bounce resonance of solitary wave collisions, that has been seen in countless numerical simulations but never in the laboratory. We provide a brief history of the solitary wave problem, stressing the fundamental role collective-coordinate models played in understanding this phenomenon. We derive the equations governing the motion of a point particle confined to such a surface and then design a surface on which to roll the ball, such that its motion will evolve under the same equations that approximately govern solitary wave collisions. We report on physical experiments, carried out in an undergraduate applied mathematics course, that seem to verify one aspect of chaotic scattering, the so-called two-bounce resonance.

  4. A tapered undulator experiment at the ELBE far infrared hybrid-resonator oscillator free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Asgekar, V.; Lehnert, U.; Michel, P.

    2012-01-15

    A tapered undulator experiment was carried out at the ELBE far-infrared free electron laser (FEL). The oscillator FEL makes use of a hybrid optical resonator. The main motivation was to see whether the presence of a dispersive medium in the form of a waveguide in the resonator has any effect on the outcome. The FEL saturated power and the wavelength shifts have been measured as a function of both positive as well as negative undulator field amplitude tapering. In contrast to the typical high-gain FELs where positive tapering proves beneficial for the output power we observed an improvement of performance at negative taper. During the same experiments we studied the characteristics of the detuning curves. The width of the curves indicates a maximum small signal gain for zero taper while the output peak power increases with negative taper. The saturated power output, the detuning curve characteristics, and the wavelength shifts agrees with the theoretical predictions. Details of the experiment are presented.

  5. Direct current superconducting quantum interference device spectrometer for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance at frequencies up to 5 MHz

    SciTech Connect

    TonThat, D.M.; Clarke, J.

    1996-08-01

    A spectrometer based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) has been developed for the direct detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) at frequencies up to 5 MHz. The sample is coupled to the input coil of the niobium-based SQUID via a nonresonant superconducting circuit. The flux locked loop involves the direct offset integration technique with additional positive feedback in which the output of the SQUID is coupled directly to a low-noise preamplifier. Precession of the nuclear quadrupole spins is induced by a magnetic field pulse with the feedback circuit disabled; subsequently, flux locked operation is restored and the SQUID amplifies the signal produced by the nuclear free induction signal. The spectrometer has been used to detect {sup 27}Al NQR signals in ruby (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}[Cr{sup 3+}]) at 359 and 714 kHz. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Structural and Functional Investigation of Flavin Binding Center of the NqrC Subunit of Sodium-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase from Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Bertsova, Yulia; Polovinkin, Vitaly; Gushchin, Ivan; Ishchenko, Andrii; Kovalev, Kirill; Mishin, Alexey; Kachalova, Galina; Popov, Alexander; Bogachev, Alexander; Gordeliy, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQR) is a redox-driven sodium pump operating in the respiratory chain of various bacteria, including pathogenic species. The enzyme has a unique set of redox active prosthetic groups, which includes two covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) residues attached to threonine residues in subunits NqrB and NqrC. The reason of FMN covalent bonding in the subunits has not been established yet. In the current work, binding of free FMN to the apo-form of NqrC from Vibrio harveyi was studied showing very low affinity of NqrC to FMN in the absence of its covalent bonding. To study structural aspects of flavin binding in NqrC, its holo-form was crystallized and its 3D structure was solved at 1.56 Å resolution. It was found that the isoalloxazine moiety of the FMN residue is buried in a hydrophobic cavity and that its pyrimidine ring is squeezed between hydrophobic amino acid residues while its benzene ring is extended from the protein surroundings. This structure of the flavin-binding pocket appears to provide flexibility of the benzene ring, which can help the FMN residue to take the bended conformation and thus to stabilize the one-electron reduced form of the prosthetic group. These properties may also lead to relatively weak noncovalent binding of the flavin. This fact along with periplasmic location of the FMN-binding domains in the vast majority of NqrC-like proteins may explain the necessity of the covalent bonding of this prosthetic group to prevent its loss to the external medium. PMID:25734798

  7. Detection of {sup 14}N and {sup 35}Cl in cocaine base and hydrochloride using NQR, NMR, and SQUID techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Yesinowski, J.P.; Buess, M.L.; Garroway, A.N.; Ziegeweid, M.; Pines, A. |

    1995-07-01

    Results from {sup 14}N pure NQR of cocaine in the free base form (cocaine base) yield a nuclear quadrupole coupling constant (NQCC) e{sup 2}Qq/h of 5.0229 ({+-}0.0001) MHz and an asymmetry parameter {eta} of 0.0395 ({+-}0.0001) at 295 K, with corresponding values of 5.0460 ({+-}0.0013) MHz and 0.0353 ({+-}0.0008) at 77 K. Both pure NQR (at 295-77 K) and a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detector (at 4.2 K) were used to measure the very low (<1 MHz) {sup 14}N transition frequencies in cocaine hydrochloride; at 295 K the NQCC is 1.1780 ({+-}0.0014) MHz and the asymmetry parameter is 0.2632 ({+-}0.0034). Stepping the carrier frequency enables one to obtain a powder pattern without the severe intensity distortions that otherwise arise from finite pulse power. A powder pattern simulation using an NQCC value of 5.027 MHz and an asymmetry parameter {eta} of 0.2 agrees reasonably well with the experimental stepped-frequency spectrum. The use of pure NQR for providing nondestructive, quantitative, and highly specific detection of crystalline compounds is discussed, as are experimental strategies. 31 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Resonant Frequency Spin Flipper for the nHe3 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    The n3He experiment, currently being installed on beamline-13 at ORNL's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), is designed to measure the proton asymmetry associated with the interaction of neutrons with a gas of 3He via n +23He =13H +11H + 765 KeV . The experiment uses a Resonant Frequency Spin Flipper (RFSF) to flip the neutron spins. The spin flipper is similar to the one described by P.N. Seo et al. (PR ST Accel. Beams 11, 084701 2008) with significant improvements. Most important is the inclusion of a ``double cosine-theta'' winding pattern that provides a highly uniform interior field with no fringing. A critical feature of the coil is complex flux returns whose construction was made possible through the utilization of 3D print technology.

  9. Identification of Copper(II) Complexes in Aqueous Solution by Electron Spin Resonance: An Undergraduate Coordination Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micera, G.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Background, procedures, and results are provided for an experiment which examines, through electron spin resonance spectroscopy, complex species formed by cupric and 2,6-dihydroxybenzoate ions in aqueous solutions. The experiment is illustrative of several aspects of inorganic and coordination chemistry, including the identification of species…

  10. Two-photon finite-pulse model for resonant transitions in attosecond experiments

    E-print Network

    Galán, Álvaro Jiménez; Argenti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytical model capable of describing two-photon ionization of atoms with attosecond pulses in the presence of intermediate and final isolated autoionizing states. The model is based on the finite-pulse formulation of second-order time-dependent perturbation theory. It approximates the intermediate and final states with Fano's theory for resonant continua, and it depends on a small set of atomic parameters that can either be obtained from separate \\emph{ab initio} calculations, or be extracted from few selected experiments. We use the model to compute the two-photon resonant photoelectron spectrum of helium below the N=2 threshold for the RABITT (Reconstruction of Attosecond Beating by Interference of Two-photon Transitions) pump-probe scheme, in which an XUV attosecond pulse train is used in association to a weak IR probe, obtaining results in quantitative agreement with those from accurate \\emph{ab initio} simulations. In particular, we show that: i) Use of finite pulses results in a homogene...

  11. On the Phase Dependence of Double-Resonance Experiments in Rotational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, David; Shubert, V. Alvin; Krin, Anna; Patterson, David; Schnell, Melanie

    2015-06-01

    We report double-resonance experiments using broadband chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy that facilitate spectral assignment and yield information about weak transitions with high resolution and sensitivity. Using the diastereomers menthone and isomenthone as examples, we investigate both the amplitude and the phase dependence of the free-induction decay of the microwave signal transition from pumping a radio frequency transition sharing a common level. We observe a strong phase change when scanning the radio frequency through molecular resonance. The direction of the phase change depends on the energy level arrangement, i.e., if it is progressive or regressive. The experimental results can be simulated using the density-matrix formalism using the three-level Bloch equations and are best described with the AC Stark effect within the dressed-state picture, resulting in an Autler-Townes splitting. The characteristic phase inversion allows for a) the precise frequency determination of the typically weak radio frequency transitions exploiting the high sensitivity of the connected strong microwave signal transition and b) definitive information about the connectivity of the energy levels involved, i.e., progressive vs. regressive arrangements.

  12. Optimization of Capacitive Acoustic Resonant Sensor Using Numerical Simulation and Design of Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Loussert, Christophe; Sergent, Michelle; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Optimization of the acoustic resonant sensor requires a clear understanding of how the output responses of the sensor are affected by the variation of different factors. During this work, output responses of a capacitive acoustic transducer, such as membrane displacement, quality factor, and capacitance variation, are considered to evaluate the sensor design. The six device parameters taken into consideration are membrane radius, backplate radius, cavity height, air gap, membrane tension, and membrane thickness. The effects of factors on the output responses of the transducer are investigated using an integrated methodology that combines numerical simulation and design of experiments (DOE). A series of numerical experiments are conducted to obtain output responses for different combinations of device parameters using finite element methods (FEM). Response surface method is used to identify the significant factors and to develop the empirical models for the output responses. Finally, these results are utilized to calculate the optimum device parameters using multi-criteria optimization with desirability function. Thereafter, the validating experiments are designed and deployed using the numerical simulation to crosscheck the responses. PMID:25894937

  13. Optimization of capacitive acoustic resonant sensor using numerical simulation and design of experiment.

    PubMed

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Loussert, Christophe; Sergent, Michelle; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Optimization of the acoustic resonant sensor requires a clear understanding of how the output responses of the sensor are affected by the variation of different factors. During this work, output responses of a capacitive acoustic transducer, such as membrane displacement, quality factor, and capacitance variation, are considered to evaluate the sensor design. The six device parameters taken into consideration are membrane radius, backplate radius, cavity height, air gap, membrane tension, and membrane thickness. The effects of factors on the output responses of the transducer are investigated using an integrated methodology that combines numerical simulation and design of experiments (DOE). A series of numerical experiments are conducted to obtain output responses for different combinations of device parameters using finite element methods (FEM). Response surface method is used to identify the significant factors and to develop the empirical models for the output responses. Finally, these results are utilized to calculate the optimum device parameters using multi-criteria optimization with desirability function. Thereafter, the validating experiments are designed and deployed using the numerical simulation to crosscheck the responses. PMID:25894937

  14. Detailed design of a resonantly enhanced axion-photon regeneration experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Guido; Sikivie, Pierre; Tanner, D. B.; Bibber, Karl van

    2009-10-01

    A resonantly enhanced photon-regeneration experiment to search for the axion or axionlike particles is described. This experiment is a shining light through walls study, where photons traveling through a strong magnetic field are (in part) converted to axions; the axions can pass through an opaque wall and convert (in part) back to photons in a second region of strong magnetic field. The photon regeneration is enhanced by employing matched Fabry-Perot optical cavities, with one cavity within the axion generation magnet and the second within the photon-regeneration magnet. Compared to simple single-pass photon regeneration, this technique would result in a gain of (F/{pi}){sup 2}, where F is the finesse of each cavity. This gain could feasibly be as high as 10{sup 10}, corresponding to an improvement in the sensitivity to the axion-photon coupling, g{sub a{gamma}}{sub {gamma}}, of order (F/{pi}){sup 1/2}{approx}300. This improvement would enable, for the first time, a purely laboratory experiment to probe axion-photon couplings at a level competitive with, or superior to, limits from stellar evolution or solar axion searches. This report gives a detailed discussion of the scheme for actively controlling the two Fabry-Perot cavities and the laser frequencies, and describes the heterodyne signal detection system, with limits ultimately imposed by shot noise.

  15. A tetrode based fast pulsed microwave source for electron cyclotron resonance breakdown experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Vipin K.; Sathyanarayana, K.; Purohit, D.; Bora, D.

    2007-02-15

    To study electron cylotron resonance (ECR) breakdown and afterglow plasma in an experimental linear plasma system, a pulsed microwave source with rapid rise and fall of microwave power is desired. A pulsed microwave source with fast rise and fall capability for ECR breakdown experiments has been designed and tested for performance in the system. A tetrode, controlled by a modulator card, is used as a fast switch to initiate microwave power from a conventional magnetron operating at 2.45 GHz. The typical rise time of microwave power is {approx}3 {mu}s and a fall time of {approx}10 {mu}s. Using this scheme in a realistic pulsed microwave source at 800 W power, ECR breakdown of neutral gas is achieved and the plasma delay and fall time are observed from the plasma density measurements using a Langmuir probe. The design details of the fast rise pulsed microwave source are presented in this article with initial experimental results.

  16. Robust optimal design of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance experiments for skin microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Raguin, L. G.

    2010-10-01

    Skin microcirculation plays an important role in several diseases including chronic venous insufficiency and diabetes. Magnetic resonance (MR) has the potential to provide quantitative information and a better penetration depth compared with other non-invasive methods such as laser Doppler flowmetry or optical coherence tomography. The continuous progress in hardware resulting in higher sensitivity must be coupled with advances in data acquisition schemes. In this article, we first introduce a physical model for quantifying skin microcirculation using diffusion-weighted MR (DWMR) based on an effective dispersion model for skin leading to a q-space model of the DWMR complex signal, and then design the corresponding robust optimal experiments. The resulting robust optimal DWMR protocols improve the worst-case quality of parameter estimates using nonlinear least squares optimization by exploiting available a priori knowledge of model parameters. Hence, our approach optimizes the gradient strengths and directions used in DWMR experiments to robustly minimize the size of the parameter estimation error with respect to model parameter uncertainty. Numerical evaluations are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach as compared to conventional DWMR protocols.

  17. Intersegment hydrogen bonds as possible structural determinants of the N/Q/R site in glutamate receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Tikhonov, D B; Zhorov, B S; Magazanik, L G

    1999-01-01

    Specific electrophysiological and pharmacological properties of ionic channels in NMDA, AMPA, and kainate subtypes of ionotropic glutamate receptors (GluRs) are determined by the Asn (N), Gln (Q), and Arg (R) residues located at homologous positions of the pore-lining M2 segments (the N/Q/R site). Presumably, the N/Q/R site is located at the apex of the reentrant membrane loop and forms the narrowest constriction of the pore. Although the shorter Asn residues are expected to protrude in the pore to a lesser extent than the longer Gln residues, the effective dimension of the NMDA channel (corresponding to the size of the largest permeant organic cation) is, surprisingly, smaller than that of the AMPA channel. To explain this paradox, we propose that the N/Q/R residues form macrocyclic structures (rings) stabilized by H-bonds between a NH(2) group in the side chain of a given M2 segment and a C==O group of the main chain in the adjacent M2 segment. Using Monte Carlo minimization, we have explored conformational properties of the rings. In the Asn, but not in the Gln ring, the side-chain oxygens protruding into the pore may facilitate ion permeation and accept H-bonds from the blocking drugs. In this way, the model explains different electrophysiological and pharmacological properties of NMDA and non-NMDA GluR channels. The ring of H-bonded polar residues at the pore narrowing resembles the ring of four Thr(75) residues observed in the crystallographic structure of the KcsA K(+) channel. PMID:10512812

  18. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source experience at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center

    SciTech Connect

    Winkelmann, T.; Cee, R.; Haberer, T.; Naas, B.; Peters, A.; Scheloske, S.; Spaedtke, P.; Tinschert, K.

    2008-02-15

    Radiotherapy with heavy ions is an upcoming cancer treatment method with to date unparalleled precision. It associates higher control rates particularly for radiation resistant tumor species with reduced adverse effects compared to conventional photon therapy. The accelerator beam lines and structures of the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT) have been designed under the leadership of GSI, Darmstadt with contributions of the IAP Frankfurt. Currently, the accelerator is under commissioning, while the injector linac has been completed. When the patient treatment begins in 2008, HIT will be the first medical heavy ion accelerator in Europe. This presentation will provide an overview about the project, with special attention given to the 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources in operation with carbon, hydrogen, helium, and oxygen, and the experience of one year of continuous operation. It also displays examples for beam emittances, measured in the low energy beam transport. In addition to the outlook of further developments at the ECR ion sources for a continuously stable operation, this paper focuses on some of the technical processings of the past year.

  19. PHYSICS 359E: EXPERIMENT 2.2 THE MOSSBAUER EFFECT: RESONANT ABSORPTION OF (-RAYS

    E-print Network

    Landstreet, John D.

    verify that the forced mechanical oscillator with small damping has exactly the response function given: In classical physics resonant phenomena are expected whenever a system can undergo free oscillations/(2B(LC)1/2 ). If a lightly damped resonant system is subjected to an external sinusoidal force

  20. Nuclear quadrupole resonance studies of the SORC sequence and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakody, J.R.P.

    1993-12-31

    The behavior of induction signals during steady-state pulse irradiation in {sup 14}N NQR was investigated experimentally. Because Strong Off-resonance Comb (SORC) signals recur as long as the pulsing continues, very efficient signal-averaging can result. The dependence of these steady-state SORC signals on pulse parameters and on frequency offset are presented, together with a discussion of the applicability of the method. Also as part of the NQR work, cocaine base has been detected using conventional NQR techniques. The experimental results show that SORC detection can be of sufficient sensitivity to form the basis of narcotics screening devices for both mail and airline baggage. A new NMR technique, to obtain the correlation time of the random thermal motion of a polymer at temperatures near the glass transition has been introduced. The temperature dependence is a result of thermal motion. For slow-motion of a polymer chain near the glass transition, the CSA parameter begins to decrease. This motional narrowing can be interpreted to yield the correlation time of the thermal motion. In this work nitrocellulose isotopically highly enriched with {sup 15}N was studied at four different temperatures between 27{degrees} and 120{degrees} Celsius and the correlation times for polymer backbone motions were obtained. Naflon films containing water (D{sub 2}O and H{sub 2} {sup 17}O) and methanol (CH{sub 3}OD, CH{sub 3} {sup 17}OH), have been studied using deuteron and oxygen-17 NMR spectroscopy. Glassy behavior of the water domains at low temperature is evidenced by the specific nature of the {sup 2}H NMR lineshapes. Activation energies extracted from {sup 2}H spin-lattice relaxation data on the high temperature side of the T{sub 1} minimum exhibit a steady increase with increasing water content. In spite of a high degree of molecular mobility, angular-dependent spectra of both unstretched and stretched samples reflect considerable anisotrophy of the host polymer.

  1. Laboratory experiments on the resonance of internal waves on a finite height subcritical topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinhu; Chen, Xu; Wang, Wei; Li, Qiang

    2015-09-01

    We quantitatively study the generation and resonance of internal waves on a finite height subcritical topography in laboratory. The results show that the resonance occurs when two internal wave rays emanating from the two bottom corners overlap each other. The normalized kinetic energy of internal waves increases one order of magnitude, which is four times as large as that predicted by theory. Moreover, the resonant slope of the internal wave is 10 % larger than theoretical value. We also found that the rays are emanated from a finite region near the bottom, in contrast to theory that shows "point" source region.

  2. Hadronic Resonance Production with the ALICE Experiment in pp and Pb-Pb Collisions at Lhc Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, Sergey

    2015-03-01

    Hadronic resonances K*(892)0, ?(1020) and ?(1385)± have been measured by the ALICE experiment in pp collisions at ? s = 7;TeV and in Pb-Pb collisions at ? {s_{NN } = 2.76;TeV. Transverse momentum spectra, particle ratios, nuclear modification factor and comparison with model predictions are discussed. In addition, ALICE results are compared with data obtained at RHIC energy.

  3. Cavity-Enhanced IR Absorption in Planar Chalcogenide Glass Microdisk Resonators: Experiment and Analysis

    E-print Network

    Kimerling, Lionel C.

    Planar microdisk optical resonators fabricated from Ge[subscript 23]Sb[subscript 7]S[subscript 70] chalcogenide glass on a silicon substrate are applied for cavity-enhanced spectroscopic measurement of chemical molecular ...

  4. Simulation Aspects of the Code Benchmarking Based on the CERN-PS ``Montague-resonance''Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, I.; Franchetti, G.; Giovannozzi, M.; Martini, M.; Metral, E.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R. D.

    2005-06-01

    Measurements of emittance exchange due to the Montague resonance in the CERN Proton Synchrotron in 2003 have provided detailed data, which are suitable for benchmarking of different simulation codes for high-intensity accelerators. We present here some characteristic features of the Montague resonance by using first simulations obtained with MICROMAP and IMPACT under simplifying conditions. The challenges for the planned code benchmarking are discussed.

  5. Low-power stimulated emission nuclear quadrupole resonance detection system utilizing Rabi transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolos, John; Mouyos, William; Feng, Judy; Chase, Walter

    2013-06-01

    The application of CW radar techniques to Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) detection of nitrogen based explosives and chlorine based narcotics enables the use of low power levels, in the range of 10's of watts, to yield high signal strengths. By utilizing Rabi transitions the nucleus oscillates between states one and two under the time dependent incident electromagnetic field and alternately absorbs energy from the incident field while emitting coherent energy via stimulated emission. Through the application of a cancellation algorithm the incident field is eliminated from the NQR response, allowing the receive signal to be measured while transmitting. The response signal is processed using matched filters of the NQR response which enables the direct detection of explosives. This technology has applicability to the direct detection of explosives and narcotics for security screening, all at safe low power levels, opposed to the current XRay and Millimeter wave screening systems that detect objects that may contain explosives and utilize high power. The quantum mechanics theoretical basis for the approach and an application for a system for security screening are described with empirical results presented to show the effects observed.

  6. A 4 K cryogenic probe for use in magnetic resonance force microscopy experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Doran D.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Garbini, Joseph L.

    2013-09-15

    The detailed design of a mechanically detected nuclear magnetic resonance probe using the SPAM (Springiness Preservation by Aligning Magnetization) geometry, operating at 4 K, in vacuum, and a several-Tesla magnetic field is described. The probe head is vibration-isolated well enough from the environment by a three-spring suspension system that the cantilever achieves thermal equilibrium with the environment without the aid of eddy current damping. The probe uses an ultra-soft Si cantilever with a Ni sphere attached to its tip, and magnetic resonance is registered as a change in the resonant frequency of the driven cantilever. The RF system uses frequency sweeps for adiabatic rapid passage using a 500 ?m diameter RF coil wound around a sapphire rod. The RF coil and optical fiber of the interferometer used to sense the cantilever's position are both located with respect to the cantilever using a Garbini micropositioner, and the sample stage is mounted on an Attocube nanopositioner.

  7. Theory and experiment on resonant frequencies of liquid-air interfaces trapped in microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Chindam, Chandraprakash; Nama, Nitesh; Ian Lapsley, Michael; Costanzo, Francesco; Jun Huang, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Bubble-based microfluidic devices have been proven to be useful for many biological and chemical studies. These bubble-based microdevices are particularly useful when operated at the trapped bubbles' resonance frequencies. In this work, we present an analytical expression that can be used to predict the resonant frequency of a bubble trapped over an arbitrary shape. Also, the effect of viscosity on the dispersion characteristics of trapped bubbles is determined. A good agreement between experimental data and theoretical results is observed for resonant frequency of bubbles trapped over different-sized rectangular-shaped structures, indicating that our expression can be valuable in determining optimized operational parameters for many bubble-based microfluidic devices. Furthermore, we provide a close estimate for the harmonics and a method to determine the dispersion characteristics of a bubble trapped over circular shapes. Finally, we present a new method to predict fluid properties in microfluidic devices and complement the explanation of acoustic microstreaming. PMID:24343156

  8. Flexural wave band gaps in metamaterial beams with membrane-type resonators: theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Xiao, Yong; Wen, Jihong; Yu, Dianlong; Wen, Xisen

    2015-11-01

    This paper deals with flexural wave band gaps in metamaterial beams with membrane-type resonators. The proposed membrane-type resonator consists of a tensioned elastic membrane and a mass block attached to the center of the membrane. Numerical models based on finite element method are presented to predict the dispersion relation, band gaps and eigen-modes. It has shown that the metamaterial beams exhibit unique wave physics. A broad Bragg band gap (BBG) and two low-frequency locally resonant band gaps (LRBGs) can be observed due to the structural periodicity and locally resonant behavior respectively. The first LRBG can be ascribed to the combined resonance of the membranes and the masses, while the second LRBG is caused by the resonance of the membranes. The study of the effective property shows that negative mass density occurs in the LRBGs. The effects of membrane tension and mass magnitude (the weight of mass block) on the LRBGs are further analyzed. It is shown that both the two LRBGs move to high-frequency with the increase of the membrane tension. However, as the mass magnitude increases, the first LRBG moves to low-frequency and the second LRBG almost remains unchanged. It is further demonstrated that, when a larger unit cell with multiple kinds of masses (a larger unit cell incorporating multiple basic unit cells but with different weights of mass blocks within each basic unit cell) are used, the first LRBG can be broadened, which can be employed to achieve broadband vibration attenuation. Moreover, experimental measurements of vibration transmittance are conducted to validate the theoretical predictions. Good agreements between the experimental results and the theoretical predictions are observed.

  9. Changes and developments in Electron Cyclotron Resonant Heating (ECRH) on the Tandem Mirror Experiment Upgrade (TMX-U)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.T.; Brooksby, C.A.; Calderon, M.O.; Ellis, R.; Felker, B.; Horton, R.D.; Stallard, B.W.; Wash, T.A.

    1985-11-14

    This paper will describe changes to the previously reported Electron Cyclotron Resonant Heating (ECRH) circular waveguide systems that deliver power to the Tandem Mirror Experiment Upgrade (TMX-U) machine. Four gyrotrons and associated waveguide systems, operating at 28-GHz and 200 kW each, helped establish electrostatic plugging in the end cells of TMX-U. A fifth gyrotron has been installed to power two resonant locations in the end plugs. This system and the pair of 10 kG heaters now use a slot radiator to obtain a more uniform coverage of the plasma. In addition, four 18-GHz ECRH systems have been added to the machine. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Bounds on higher-order Lorentz-violating photon sector coefficients from an asymmetric optical ring resonator experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Stephen R.; Mewes, Matthew; Baynes, Fred N.; Tobar, Michael E.

    2015-10-01

    Optical resonators provide a powerful tool for testing aspects of Lorentz invariance. Here, we present a reanalysis of an experiment where a path asymmetry was created in an optical ring resonator by introducing a dielectric prism in one arm. The frequency difference of the two fundamental counter-propagating modes was then recorded as the apparatus was orientation-modulated in the laboratory. By assuming that the minimal Standard-Model Extension coefficients vanish we are able to place bounds on higher-order parity-odd Lorentz-violating coefficients of the Standard-Model Extension. The results presented in this work set the first constraints on two previously unbounded linear combinations of d = 8 parity-odd nonbirefringent nondispersive coefficients of the photon sector.

  11. Experiment on Impulsive Excitation, Resonance, and Fourier Analysis of a Harmonic Oscillator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macomber, Hilliard K.

    1981-01-01

    Describes an electric circuit permitting easy observation and measurement of the response of a damped harmonic oscillator to impulsive excitation. The impulse analysis is carried out and related to experimental observations. The phenomenon of resonance is then interpreted and demonstrated, and through it, contact is made with Fourier analysis.…

  12. Effect of granular media on the vibrational response of a resonant structure: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Valenza, John J; Hsu, Chaur-Jian; Johnson, David Linton

    2010-11-01

    The acoustic response of a structure that contains a cavity filled with a loose granular material is analyzed. The inputs to the theory are the effective masses of each subsystem: that of the empty-cavity resonating structure and that of the granular medium within the cavity. This theory accurately predicts the frequencies, widths, and relative amplitudes of the various flexural mode resonances observed with rectangular bars, each having a cavity filled with loose tungsten granules. Inasmuch as the dominant mechanism for damping is due to adsorbed water at the grain-grain contacts, the significant effects of humidity on both the effective mass of the granular medium as well as on the response of the grain-loaded bars are monitored. Here, depending upon the humidity and the preparation protocol, it is possible to observe one, two, or three distinct resonances in a wide frequency range (1-5 kHz) over which the empty bar has but one resonance. These effects are understood in terms of the theoretical framework, which may simplify in terms of perturbation theories. PMID:21110572

  13. Folded Fabry-Perot quasi-optical ring resonator diplexer Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, H. M.; Chiou, A. E. T.

    1983-01-01

    Performance of folded Fabry-Perot quasi-optical ring resonator diplexers with different geometries of reflecting surfaces is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Design of optimum surface geometry for minimum diffraction, together with the figure of merit indicating improvement in performance, are given.

  14. An Accessible Two-Dimensional Solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiment on Human Ubiquitin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rovnyak, David; Thompson, Laura E.

    2005-01-01

    Solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an invaluable tool in structural and molecular biology research, but may be underutilized in undergraduate laboratories because instrumentation for performing structural studies of macromolecules in aqueous solutions is not yet widely available for use in undergraduate laboratories. We have…

  15. Search for Resonances Decaying to Top and Bottom Quarks with the CDF Experiment

    E-print Network

    Aaltonen, T.

    We report on a search for charged massive resonances decaying to top (t) and bottom (b) quarks in the full data set of proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of ?s = 1.96??TeV collected by the CDF II ...

  16. Gramicidin A Backbone and Side Chain Dynamics Evaluated by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiments. II: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Vostrikov, Vitaly V.; Gu, Hong; Ingólfsson, Helgi I.; Hinton, James F.; Andersen, Olaf S.; Roux, Benoît; Koeppe, Roger E.

    2011-01-01

    Motional properties are important for understanding protein function and are accessible to NMR relaxation measurements. The goal of this study is to investigate the internal dynamics occurring in gramicidin A (gA) channels, in order to provide benchmark experimental data for comparison with the results of molecular dynamics simulations. We therefore synthesized several 15N isotope-enriched gA samples, covering all backbone residues as well as the Trp indole side chains for NMR relaxation experiments. Based on the 15N-NMR spectra for labeled gA samples incorporated in sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) micelles, we have determined T1, T2, and heteronuclear NOE values for backbone and indole 15NH groups. The results indicate that the SDS-incorporated gA channel is a constrained structure, without an especially “floppy” region. The NMR observables, particularly those for backbone groups, are predicted well by the molecular dynamics simulations in the accompanying article. PMID:21574558

  17. Stochastic resonant damping in a noisy monostable system: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, Giovanni; Perrone, Sandro; Rubi, J. Miguel; Petrov, Dmitri

    2008-05-01

    Usually in the presence of a background noise an increased effort put in controlling a system stabilizes its behavior. Rarely it is thought that an increased control of the system can lead to a looser response and, therefore, to a poorer performance. Strikingly there are many systems that show this weird behavior; examples can be drawn form physical, biological, and social systems. Until now no simple and general mechanism underlying such behaviors has been identified. Here we show that such a mechanism, named stochastic resonant damping, can be provided by the interplay between the background noise and the control exerted on the system. We experimentally verify our prediction on a physical model system based on a colloidal particle held in an oscillating optical potential. Our result adds a tool for the study of intrinsically noisy phenomena, joining the many constructive facets of noise identified in the past decades—for example, stochastic resonance, noise-induced activation, and Brownian ratchets.

  18. Stochastic resonant damping in a noisy monostable system: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Giovanni; Perrone, Sandro; Rubi, J Miguel; Petrov, Dmitri

    2008-05-01

    Usually in the presence of a background noise an increased effort put in controlling a system stabilizes its behavior. Rarely it is thought that an increased control of the system can lead to a looser response and, therefore, to a poorer performance. Strikingly there are many systems that show this weird behavior; examples can be drawn form physical, biological, and social systems. Until now no simple and general mechanism underlying such behaviors has been identified. Here we show that such a mechanism, named stochastic resonant damping, can be provided by the interplay between the background noise and the control exerted on the system. We experimentally verify our prediction on a physical model system based on a colloidal particle held in an oscillating optical potential. Our result adds a tool for the study of intrinsically noisy phenomena, joining the many constructive facets of noise identified in the past decades-for example, stochastic resonance, noise-induced activation, and Brownian ratchets. PMID:18643026

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of quadrupolar nuclei and dipolar field effects

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Jeffry Todd

    2004-12-21

    Experimental and theoretical research conducted in two areas in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented: (1) studies of the coherent quantum-mechanical control of the angular momentum dynamics of quadrupolar (spin I > 1/2) nuclei and its application to the determination of molecular structure; and (2) applications of the long-range nuclear dipolar field to novel NMR detection methodologies.The dissertation is organized into six chapters. The first two chapters and associated appendices are intended to be pedagogical and include an introduction to the quantum mechanical theory of pulsed NMR spectroscopy and the time dependent theory of quantum mechanics. The third chapter describes investigations of the solid-state multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) NMR experiment applied to I = 5/2 quadrupolar nuclei. This work reports the use of rotary resonance-matched radiofrequency irradiation for sensitivity enhancement of the I = 5/2 MQMAS experiment. These experiments exhibited certain selective line narrowing effects which were investigated theoretically.The fourth chapter extends the discussion of multiple quantum spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to a mostly theoretical study of the feasibility of enhancing the resolution of nitrogen-14 NMR of large biomolecules in solution via double-quantum spectroscopy. The fifth chapter continues to extend the principles of multiple quantum NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to make analogies between experiments in NMR/nuclear quadrupolar resonance (NQR) and experiments in atomic/molecular optics (AMO). These analogies are made through the Hamiltonian and density operator formalism of angular momentum dynamics in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.The sixth chapter investigates the use of the macroscopic nuclear dipolar field to encode the NMR spectrum of an analyte nucleus indirectly in the magnetization of a sensor nucleus. This technique could potentially serve as an encoding module for the recently developed NMR remote detection experiment. The feasibility of using hyperpolarized xenon-129 gas as a sensor is discussed. This work also reports the use of an optical atomic magnetometer to detect the nuclear magnetization of Xe-129 gas, which has potential applicability as a detection module for NMR remote detection experiments.

  20. Simulation and beamline experiments for the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source VENUS

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, Damon S.; Leitner, Daniela; Lyneis, Claude M.; Grote, David P.

    2008-02-15

    The particle-in-cell code WARP has been enhanced to incorporate both two- and three-dimensional sheath extraction models giving WARP the capability of simulating entire ion beam transport systems including the extraction of beams from plasma sources. In this article, we describe a method of producing initial ion distributions for plasma extraction simulations in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources based on experimentally measured sputtering on the source biased disk. Using this initialization method, we present preliminary results for extraction and transport simulations of an oxygen beam and compare them with experimental beam imaging on a quartz viewing plate for the superconducting ECR ion source VENUS.

  1. Coaxial probe for nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation correlation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yiqiao; Hürlimann, Martin; Mandal, Soumyajit; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-02-21

    A coaxial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is built to measure diffusion and relaxation properties of liquid samples. In particular, we demonstrate the acquisition of two-dimensional (2D) distribution functions (T{sub 1}-T{sub 2} and diffusion–T{sub 2}), essential for fluids characterization. The compact design holds promise for miniaturization, thus enabling the measurement of molecular diffusion that is inaccessible to conventional micro-NMR setups. Potential applications range from crude oil characterization to biomolecular screening and detections.

  2. Using an NMR Spectrometer to Do Magnetic Resonance Imaging: An Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmetz, Wayne E.; Maher, M. Cyrus

    2007-01-01

    A conventional Fourier-transform NMR spectrometer with a triple-axis gradient probe can function as a MRI imager. In this experiment students gain hands-on experience with MRI while they learn about important principles underlying the practice of NMR, such as gradients, multi-dimensional spectroscopy, and relaxation. Students image a biological…

  3. Search for Resonances Decaying to Top and Bottom Quarks with the CDF Experiment

    E-print Network

    CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; F. Anza'; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; T. Bae; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria; P. Bartos; M. Bauce; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; L. Bianchi; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; L. Brigliadori; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; P. Butti; A. Buzatu; A. Calamba; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; F. Canelli; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; A. Clark; C. Clarke; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; M. Cremonesi; D. Cruz; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; N. d'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. de Barbaro; L. Demortier; L. Marchese; M. Deninno; F. Devoto; M. D'Errico; A. Di Canto; B. Di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donati; M. Dorigo; A. Driutti; K. Ebina; R. Edgar; A. Elagin; R. Erbacher; S. Errede; B. Esham; S. Farrington; J. P. Fernández Ramos; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Funakoshi; C. Galloni; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. González López; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; E. Gramellini; C. Grosso-Pilcher; R. C. Group; J. Guimaraes da Costa; S. R. Hahn; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; T. Harrington-Taber; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; A. Hocker; Z. Hong; W. Hopkins; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; U. Husemann; M. Hussein; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; S. Jindariani; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; M. Kambeitz; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; A. Kasmi; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; K. Knoepfel; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; K. Lannon; G. Latino; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; A. Limosani; E. Lipeles; A. Lister; H. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; A. Loginov; A. Lucà; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; P. Maestro; S. Malik; G. Manca; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; F. Margaroli; P. Marino; K. Matera; M. E. Mattson; A. Mazzacane; P. Mazzanti; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; P. Mehtala; C. Mesropian; T. Miao; D. Mietlicki; A. Mitra; H. Miyake; S. Moed; N. Moggi; C. S. Moon; R. Moore; M. J. Morello; A. Mukherjee; Th. Muller; P. Murat; M. Mussini; J. Nachtman; Y. Nagai; J. Naganoma; I. Nakano; A. Napier; J. Nett; C. Neu; T. Nigmanov; L. Nodulman; S. Y. Noh; O. Norniella; L. Oakes; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; I. Oksuzian; T. Okusawa; R. Orava; L. Ortolan; C. Pagliarone; E. Palencia; P. Palni; V. Papadimitriou; W. Parker; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; C. Paus; T. J. Phillips; G. Piacentino; E. Pianori; J. Pilot; K. Pitts; C. Plager; L. Pondrom; S. Poprocki; K. Potamianos; F. Prokoshin; A. Pranko; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; I. Redondo Fernández; P. Renton; M. Rescigno; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; A. Robson; T. Rodriguez; S. Rolli; M. Ronzani; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; F. Ruffini; A. Ruiz; J. Russ; V. Rusu; W. K. Sakumoto; Y. Sakurai; L. Santi; K. Sato; V. Saveliev; A. Savoy-Navarro; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; T. Schwarz; L. Scodellaro; F. Scuri; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; A. Semenov; F. Sforza; S. Z. Shalhout; T. Shears; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; I. Shreyber-Tecker; A. Simonenko; K. Sliwa; J. R. Smith; F. D. Snider; V. Sorin; H. Song; M. Stancari; R. St. Denis; D. Stentz; J. Strologas; Y. Sudo; A. Sukhanov; I. Suslov; K. Takemasa; Y. Takeuchi; J. Tang; M. Tecchio; P. K. Teng; J. Thom; E. Thomson; V. Thukral; D. Toback; S. Tokar; K. Tollefson; T. Tomura; D. Tonelli; S. Torre; D. Torretta; P. Totaro; M. Trovato; F. Ukegawa; S. Uozumi; F. Vázquez; G. Velev; C. Vellidis; C. Vernieri; M. Vidal; R. Vilar; J. Vizán; M. Vogel; G. Volpi; P. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. M. Wang; D. Waters; W. C. Wester III; D. Whiteson; A. B. Wicklund; S. Wilbur; H. H. Williams; J. S. Wilson; P. Wilson; B. L. Winer; P. Wittich; S. Wolbers; H. Wolfe; T. Wright; X. Wu; Z. Wu; K. Yamamoto; D. Yamato; T. Yang; U. K. Yang; Y. C. Yang; W. -M. Yao; G. P. Yeh; K. Yi; J. Yoh; K. Yorita; T. Yoshida; G. B. Yu; I. Yu; A. M. Zanetti; Y. Zeng; C. Zhou; S. Zucchelli

    2015-04-07

    We report on a search for charged massive resonances decaying to top ($t$) and bottom ($b$) quarks in the full data set of proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV collected by the CDF~II detector at the Tevatron, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.5 $fb^{-1}$. No significant excess above the standard model (SM) background prediction is observed. We set 95% Bayesian credibility mass-dependent upper limits on the heavy charged particle production cross section times branching ratio to $t b$. Using a SM extension with a $W^{\\prime}$ and left-right-symmetric couplings as a benchmark model, we constrain the $W^{\\prime}$ mass and couplings in the 300 to 900 GeV/$c^2$ range. The limits presented here are the most stringent for a charged resonance with mass in the range 300 -- 600 GeV/$c^2$ decaying to top and bottom quarks.

  4. Search for Resonances Decaying to Top and Bottom Quarks with the CDF Experiment.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Anzà, F; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bianchi, L; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; D'Errico, M; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Song, H; Sorin, V; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2015-08-01

    We report on a search for charged massive resonances decaying to top (t) and bottom (b) quarks in the full data set of proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of ?[s]=1.96??TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.5??fb(-1). No significant excess above the standard model background prediction is observed. We set 95% Bayesian credibility mass-dependent upper limits on the heavy charged-particle production cross section times branching ratio to tb. Using a standard model extension with a W'?tb and left-right-symmetric couplings as a benchmark model, we constrain the W' mass and couplings in the 300-900??GeV/c(2) range. The limits presented here are the most stringent for a charged resonance with mass in the range 300-600??GeV/c(2) decaying to top and bottom quarks. PMID:26296108

  5. Search for Resonances Decaying to Top and Bottom Quarks with the CDF Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Anzà, F.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bianchi, L.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.

    2015-08-01

    We report on a search for charged massive resonances decaying to top (t ) and bottom (b ) quarks in the full data set of proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of ?{s }=1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.5 fb-1 . No significant excess above the standard model background prediction is observed. We set 95% Bayesian credibility mass-dependent upper limits on the heavy charged-particle production cross section times branching ratio to t b . Using a standard model extension with a W'?t b and left-right-symmetric couplings as a benchmark model, we constrain the W' mass and couplings in the 300 - 900 GeV /c2 range. The limits presented here are the most stringent for a charged resonance with mass in the range 300 - 600 GeV /c2 decaying to top and bottom quarks.

  6. Multi-axis force sensing using a resonant composite piezoelectric plate: model and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaño-Cano, Davinson; Grossard, Mathieu; Hubert, Arnaud

    2015-05-01

    Wrist force/torque sensors used in robotic applications increase the performances and flexibility of the automated tasks. They also offer new possibilities in the manufacturing process, where physical contact between the work-piece and environment is required. The wide spreading of these sensors is for now restricted by their features. As an alternative to the existing strain-gauges force sensors, this paper presents a resonant composite structure, which is sensitive to multiple components of force that are considered via the pre-stress effect. Structurally bonded piezoelectric patches are used to bring the structure to its resonance, which is shifted according to applied forces. The relationship between force and frequency shift is modelled considering the multi-physics of this smart structure. This model is built using Hamilton's principle and takes into account pre-stress phenomena. A finite element model (FEM) based on Mindlin theory for plates, has been derived from the analytical model. The FEM model is implemented in MATLAB and compared with commercial FE software. Finally, an experimental prototype validates the model, and shows that it is possible to measure multiple force-components with one single sensing element such as a plate.

  7. Switching from Visibility to Invisibility via Fano Resonances: Theory and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Rybin, Mikhail V.; Filonov, Dmitry S.; Belov, Pavel A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Limonov, Mikhail F.

    2015-01-01

    Subwavelength structures demonstrate many unusual optical properties which can be employed for engineering of a new generation of functional metadevices, as well as controlled scattering of light and invisibility cloaking. Here we demonstrate that the suppression of light scattering for any direction of observation can be achieved for a uniform dielectric object with high refractive index, in a sharp contrast to the cloaking with multilayered plasmonic structures suggested previously. Our finding is based on the novel physics of cascades of Fano resonances observed in the Mie scattering from a homogeneous dielectric rod. We observe this effect experimentally at microwaves by employing high temperature-dependent dielectric permittivity of a glass cylinder with heated water. Our results open a new avenue in analyzing the optical response of high-index dielectric nanoparticles and the physics of cloaking. PMID:25739324

  8. On the second harmonic electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive experiments on T-10 and DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, J.; Forest, C.B.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Luce, T.C.; Harvey, R.W. ); Downs, E.A. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY ); James, R.A. Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA ); Bagdasarov, A.A.; Borshegovskii, A.A.; Chistyakov, V.V.; Dremin, M.M.; Gors

    1993-02-01

    Studies of electron cyclotron current drive at the second harmonic resonance have been performed both on the DIII-D and T-10 tokamaks at injected power levels of approximately 0.5 MW. The DIII-D experiment used high held launch of the extraordinary mode at an angle of 15[degree] to the radial. In this experiment, with pulse lengths [approx equal] 500 msec, a loop voltage difference, compared to the value expected from the measured profiles, of [approx equal] 50 mV was ascribed to approximately 50 kA of rf-driven current. When dc electric field and trapped particle effects were considered, this was consistent with theoretical predictions. T-10 experiments planned for the fall of 1992 will use low field launch of the extraordinary mode and an injection angle of 21[degree] off-radial. In preliminary experiments with relatively poor machine conditions and pulse lengths [approx equal] 400 msec, rf current drive was not observed despite the fact that driven currents as low as 10 kA, corresponding to a loop voltage difference for co- versus counter-injection of 20 mV, could have been detected. In this paper we examine the T-10 experiments using ray tracing and transport calculations in an attempt to understand the results. The dependence of the current drive efficiency on discharge parameters, flux penetration, and non-linear effects will be discussed. The results show that the launching geometry can have a significant effect on the observation of electron cyclotron current drive using the loop voltage as a diagnostic. In addition, predictions for the next series of experiments on T-10, for which greater than 2 MW of high frequency power should be available, will be presented.

  9. ¹?N Quadrupole Resonance line broadening due to the earth magnetic field, occuring only in the case of an axially symmetric electric field gradient tensor.

    PubMed

    Aissani, Sarra; Guendouz, Laouès; Marande, Pierre-Louis; Canet, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    As demonstrated before, the application of a weak static B0 magnetic field (less than 10 G) may produce definite effects on the ¹?N Quadrupole Resonance line when the electric field gradient tensor at the nitrogen nucleus level is of axial symmetry. Here, we address more precisely the problem of the relative orientation of the two magnetic fields (the static field and the radio-frequency field of the pure NQR experiment). For a field of 6G, the evolution of the signal intensity, as a function of this relative orientation, is in very good agreement with the theoretical predictions. There is in particular an intensity loss by a factor of three when going from the parallel configuration to the perpendicular configuration. By contrast, when dealing with a very weak magnetic field (as the earth field, around 0.5 G), this effect drops to ca. 1.5 in the case Hexamethylenetetramine (HMT).This is explained by the fact that the Zeeman shift (due to the very weak magnetic field) becomes comparable to the natural line-width. The latter can therefore be determined by accounting for this competition. Still in the case of HMT, the estimated natural line-width is half the observed line-width. The extra broadening is thus attributed to earth magnetic field. The latter constitutes therefore the main cause of the difference between the natural transverse relaxation time (T?) and the transverse relaxation time derived from the observed line-width (T?(?)). PMID:25910551

  10. Proton and deuterium NMR experiments in zero field. [Perdeuterated p-demethoxybenzene, perdeuterated malonic acid, diethyl terephthalate-d4, nonadecane-2,2'-D2, sodium propionate-D2

    SciTech Connect

    Millar, J.M.

    1986-02-01

    High field solid-state NMR lineshapes suffer from inhomogeneous broadening since resonance frequencies are a function of molecular orientation. Time domain zero field NMR is a two-dimensional field-cycling technique which removes this broadening by probing the evolution of the spin system under zero applied field. The simplest version, the sudden transition experiment, induces zero field evolution by the sudden removal of the applied magnetic field. Theory and experimental results of this experiment and several variations using pulsed dc magnetic fuelds to initiate zero field evolution are presented. In particular, the pulsed indirect detection method allows detection of the zero field spectrum of one nuclear spin species via another (usually protons) by utilizing the level crossings which occur upon adiabatic demagnetization to zero field. Experimental examples of proton/deuteron systems are presented which demonstrate the method results in enhanced sensitivity relative to that obtained in sudden transition experiments performed directly on deuterium. High resolution /sup 2/H NQR spectra of a series of benzoic acid derivatives are obtained using the sudden transition and indirect detection methods. Librational oscillations in the water molecules of barium chlorate monohydrate are studied using proton and deuterium ZF experiments. 177 refs., 88 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. The effect of rough surfaces on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance relaxation experiments

    E-print Network

    Nordin, Matias

    2015-01-01

    Most theoretical treatments of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) assume ideal smooth geometries (i.e. slabs, spheres or cylinders) with well-defined surface-to-volume ratios (S/V). This same assumption is commonly adopted for naturally occurring materials, where the pore geometry can differ substantially from these ideal shapes. In this paper the effect of surface roughness on the T2 relaxation spectrum is studied. By homogenization of the problem using an electrostatic approach it is found that the effective surface relaxivity can increase dramatically in the presence of rough surfaces. This leads to a situation where the system responds as a smooth pore, but with significantly increased surface relaxivity. As a result: the standard approach of assuming an idealized geometry with known surface-to-volume and inverting the T2 relaxation spectrum to a pore size distribution is no longer valid. The effective relaxivity is found to be fairly insensitive to the shape of roughness but strongly dependent on the width...

  12. Resonant laser power build-up in ALPS - a "light-shining-through-walls" experiment -

    E-print Network

    Ehret, Klaus; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Hildebrandt, Matthias; Knabbe, Ernst-Axel; Kracht, Dietmar; Lindner, Axel; List, Jenny; Meier, Tobias; Meyer, Niels; Notz, D; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas; Wiedemann, Günter; Willke, Benno

    2009-01-01

    The ALPS collaboration runs a light-shining-through-walls (LSW) experiment to search for photon oscillations into "weakly interacting sub-eV particles" (WISPs) inside of a superconducting HERA dipole magnet at the site of DESY. In this paper we report on the first successful integration of a large-scale optical cavity to boost the available power for WISP production in this type of experiments. The key elements are a frequency tunable narrow line-width continuous wave laser acting as the primary light source and an electronic feed-back control loop to stabilize the power build-up. We describe and characterize our apparatus and demonstrate the data analysis procedures on the basis of a brief exemplary run.

  13. Covalency of hydrogen bonds in liquid water can be probed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance experiments

    PubMed Central

    Elgabarty, Hossam; Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of covalency is widely used to describe the nature of intermolecular bonds, to explain their spectroscopic features and to rationalize their chemical behaviour. Unfortunately, the degree of covalency of an intermolecular bond cannot be directly measured in an experiment. Here we established a simple quantitative relationship between the calculated covalency of hydrogen bonds in liquid water and the anisotropy of the proton magnetic shielding tensor that can be measured experimentally. This relationship enabled us to quantify the degree of covalency of hydrogen bonds in liquid water using the experimentally measured anisotropy. We estimated that the amount of electron density transferred between molecules is on the order of 10??m while the stabilization energy due to this charge transfer is ?15?kJ?mol?1. The physical insight into the fundamental nature of hydrogen bonding provided in this work will facilitate new studies of intermolecular bonding in a variety of molecular systems. PMID:26370179

  14. F-resolved magneto-optical resonances in the D1 excitation of cesium: Experiment and theory M. Auzinsh,* R. Ferber, F. Gahbauer, A. Jarmola, and L. Kalvans

    E-print Network

    Auzinsh, Marcis

    F-resolved magneto-optical resonances in the D1 excitation of cesium: Experiment and theory M experimentally and theoretically for D1 excitation of atomic cesium. This system offers the advantage cases. We believe that the transitions of the cesium D1 line offer precisely such an opportunity. We

  15. Switching Reciprocity On and Off in a Magneto-Optical X-Ray Scattering Experiment Using Nuclear Resonance of ?-Fe57 Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deák, L.; Bottyán, L.; Fülöp, T.; Kertész, G.; Nagy, D. L.; Rüffer, R.; Spiering, H.; Tanczikó, F.; Vankó, G.

    2012-12-01

    Reciprocity is when the scattering amplitude of wave propagation satisfies a symmetry property, connecting a scattering process with an appropriate reversed one. We report on an experiment using nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation, which demonstrates that magneto-optical materials do not necessarily violate reciprocity. The setting enables us to switch easily between reciprocity and its violation. In the latter case, the exhibited reciprocity violation is orders of magnitude larger than achieved by previous wave scattering experiments.

  16. Study of plasma start-up initiated by second harmonic electron cyclotron resonance heating on WEGA experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Preynas, M.; Laqua, H. P.; Otte, M.; Stange, T.; Aßmus, D.; Wauters, T.

    2014-02-12

    Although both 1st harmonic ordinary mode (O1) and 2nd harmonic extra-ordinary mode (X2) have been successfully used to initiate pre-ionization and breakdown in many devices, a complete theoretical model is still missing to explain the success of this method. Moreover, some experimental observations are not completely understood, such as what occurs during the delay time between the turn-on of ECRH power and first signals of density or light measurements. Since during this free period the ECRH power has to be absorbed by in-vessel components, it is of prime importance to know what governs this delay time. Recently, dedicated start-up experiments have been performed on WEGA, using a 28 GHz ECRH system in X2-mode. This machine has the interesting capability to be run also as a tokamak allowing comparative experiments between stellarator (?/2? > 0) and tokamak (?/2? = 0) configurations. Different scans in heating power, neutral gas pressure, and rotational transform (?) show clearly that the start-up is a two step process. A first step following the turn-on of the ECRH power during which no measurable electron density (or just above the noise level in some cases), ECE and radiated power is detected. Its duration depends strongly on the level of injected power. The second step corresponds to the gas ionization and plasma expansion phase, with a velocity of density build-up and filling-up of the vessel volume depending mainly on pressure, gas and rotational transform. Moreover, an interesting scenario of ECRH pre-ionization without loop voltage in tokamak configuration by applying a small optimal vertical field is relevant for start-up assistance on future experiments like ITER. The results from this experimental parametric study are useful for the modeling of the start-up assisted by the second harmonic electron cyclotron resonance heating. The aim of this work is to establish predictive scenarios for both ITER and W7-X operation.

  17. Study of plasma start-up initiated by second harmonic electron cyclotron resonance heating on WEGA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preynas, M.; Laqua, H. P.; Otte, M.; Stange, T.; Wauters, T.; Aßmus, D.

    2014-02-01

    Although both 1st harmonic ordinary mode (O1) and 2nd harmonic extra-ordinary mode (X2) have been successfully used to initiate pre-ionization and breakdown in many devices, a complete theoretical model is still missing to explain the success of this method. Moreover, some experimental observations are not completely understood, such as what occurs during the delay time between the turn-on of ECRH power and first signals of density or light measurements. Since during this free period the ECRH power has to be absorbed by in-vessel components, it is of prime importance to know what governs this delay time. Recently, dedicated start-up experiments have been performed on WEGA, using a 28 GHz ECRH system in X2-mode. This machine has the interesting capability to be run also as a tokamak allowing comparative experiments between stellarator (?/2? > 0) and tokamak (?/2? = 0) configurations. Different scans in heating power, neutral gas pressure, and rotational transform (?) show clearly that the start-up is a two step process. A first step following the turn-on of the ECRH power during which no measurable electron density (or just above the noise level in some cases), ECE and radiated power is detected. Its duration depends strongly on the level of injected power. The second step corresponds to the gas ionization and plasma expansion phase, with a velocity of density build-up and filling-up of the vessel volume depending mainly on pressure, gas and rotational transform. Moreover, an interesting scenario of ECRH pre-ionization without loop voltage in tokamak configuration by applying a small optimal vertical field is relevant for start-up assistance on future experiments like ITER. The results from this experimental parametric study are useful for the modeling of the start-up assisted by the second harmonic electron cyclotron resonance heating. The aim of this work is to establish predictive scenarios for both ITER and W7-X operation.

  18. Field experiment provides ground truth for surface nuclear magnetic resonance measurement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knight, R.; Grunewald, E.; Irons, T.; Dlubac, K.; Song, Y.; Bachman, H.N.; Grau, B.; Walsh, D.; Abraham, J.D.; Cannia, J.

    2012-01-01

    The need for sustainable management of fresh water resources is one of the great challenges of the 21st century. Since most of the planet's liquid fresh water exists as groundwater, it is essential to develop non-invasive geophysical techniques to characterize groundwater aquifers. A field experiment was conducted in the High Plains Aquifer, central United States, to explore the mechanisms governing the non-invasive Surface NMR (SNMR) technology. We acquired both SNMR data and logging NMR data at a field site, along with lithology information from drill cuttings. This allowed us to directly compare the NMR relaxation parameter measured during logging, T 2, to the relaxation parameter T 2 * measured using the SNMR method. The latter can be affected by inhomogeneity in the magnetic field, thus obscuring the link between the NMR relaxation parameter and the hydraulic conductivity of the geologic material. When the logging T 2 data were transformed to pseudo-T 2 * data, by accounting for inhomogeneity in the magnetic field and instrument dead time, we found good agreement with T 2 * obtained from the SNMR measurement. These results, combined with the additional information about lithology at the site, allowed us to delineate the physical mechanisms governing the SNMR measurement. Such understanding is a critical step in developing SNMR as a reliable geophysical method for the assessment of groundwater resources. Copyright 2012 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. SU-E-J-181: Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Workflow: Initial Clinical Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Green, O; Kashani, R; Santanam, L; Wooten, H; Li, H; Rodriguez, V; Hu, Y; Mutic, S; Hand, T; Victoria, J; Steele, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aims of this work are to describe the workflow and initial clinical experience treating patients with an MRI-guided radiotherapy (MRIGRT) system. Methods: Patient treatments with a novel MR-IGRT system started at our institution in mid-January. The system consists of an on-board 0.35-T MRI, with IMRT-capable delivery via doubly-focused MLCs on three {sup 60} Co heads. In addition to volumetric MR-imaging, real-time planar imaging is performed during treatment. So far, eleven patients started treatment (six finished), ranging from bladder to lung SBRT. While the system is capable of online adaptive radiotherapy and gating, a conventional workflow was used to start, consisting of volumetric imaging for patient setup using visible tumor, evaluation of tumor motion outside of PTV on cine images, and real-time imaging. Workflow times were collected and evaluated to increase efficiency and evaluate feasibility of adding the adaptive and gating features while maintaining a reasonable patient throughput. Results: For the first month, physicians attended every fraction to provide guidance on identifying the tumor and an acceptable level of positioning and anatomical deviation. Average total treatment times (including setup) were reduced from 55 to 45 min after physician presence was no longer required and the therapists had learned to align patients based on soft-tissue imaging. Presently, the source strengths were at half maximum (7.7K Ci each), therefore beam-on times will be reduced after source replacement. Current patient load is 10 per day, with increase to 25 anticipated in the near future. Conclusion: On-board, real-time MRI-guided RT has been incorporated into clinical use. Treatment times were kept to reasonable lengths while including volumetric imaging, previews of tumor movement, and physician evaluation. Workflow and timing is being continuously evaluated to increase efficiency. In near future, adaptive and gating capabilities of the system will be implemented.

  20. Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Studies of the Sorc Sequence and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Polymers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakody, Jayakody R. Pemadasa

    1993-01-01

    The behavior of induction signals during steady -state pulse irradiation in ^{14} N NQR was investigated experimentally. Because Strong Off-resonance Comb (SORC) signals recur as long as the pulsing continues, very efficient signal-averaging can result. The dependence of these steady-state SORC signals on pulse parameters and on frequency offset are presented, together with a discussion of the applicability of the method. Also as part of the NQR work, Cocaine base has been detected using conventional NQR techniques. The experimental results show that SORC detection can be of sufficient sensitivity to form the basis of narcotics screening devices for both mail and airline baggage. A new NMR technique, to obtain the correlation time of the random thermal motion of a polymer at temperatures near the glass transition has been introduced. The temperature dependence is a result of thermal motion. For slow-motion of a polymer chain near the glass transition, the CSA parameter begins to decrease. This motional narrowing can be interpreted to yield the correlation time of the thermal motion. In this work Nitrocellulose isotopically highly enriched with ^{15}N was studied at four different temperatures between 27^ circ and 120^circ Celsius and the correlation times for polymer backbone motions were obtained. Nafion films containing, water (D_2 O and H_2^{17}O) and methanol (CH_3OD, CH _3^{17}OH), have been studied using Deuteron and Oxygen-17 NMR spectroscopy. Glassy behavior of the water domains at low temperature is evidenced by the specific nature of the ^2H NMR lineshapes. Activation energies extracted from ^2H spin-lattice relaxation data on the high temperature side of the T_1 minimum exhibit a steady increase with increasing water content. In spite of a high degree of molecular mobility, angular-dependent spectra of both unstretched and stretched samples reflect considerable anisotropy of the host polymer. Activation volumes corresponding to a specific dynamical process were obtained from measurements of spin-lattice relaxation vs. pressure. From the NMR measurements of Nafion films containing methanol, it was found that the molecular motion is much more rapid than the molecular motion of water in Nafion membranes.

  1. Theory and experiments of disorder-induced resonance shifts and mode-edge broadening in deliberately disordered photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Nishan; Javadi, Alisa; García, P. D.; Lodahl, Peter; Hughes, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    We study both theoretically and experimentally the effects of introducing deliberate disorder in a slow-light photonic crystal waveguide on the photon density of states. We introduce a theoretical model that includes both deliberate disorder through statistically moving the hole centers in the photonic crystal lattice and intrinsic disorder caused by fabrication imperfections. We demonstrate a disorder-induced mean blueshift and an overall broadening of the photonic density of states for deliberate disorder values ranging 0-12 nm. By comparing with measurements obtained from a GaAs photonic crystal waveguide, we find very good agreement between theory and experiment. These results highlight the importance of carefully including local field effects for modeling high-index contrast perturbations and demonstrate the efficiency of our perturbative approach for modeling disorder-induced changes in the density of states. Our work also demonstrates the importance of using asymmetric dielectric polarizabilities for positive and negative dielectric perturbations when modeling a perturbed dielectric interface in photonic crystal platforms. Finally, we also show examples of disorder-induced resonances that can appear for various instances of disorder.

  2. Design and fabrication of circular and rectangular components for electron-cyclotron-resonant heating of tandem mirror experiment-upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, B.; Calderon, M.O.; Chargin, A.K.; Coffield, F.E.; Lang, D.D.; Rubert, R.R.; Pedrotti, L.R.; Stallard, B.W.; Gallagher, N.C. Jr.; Sweeney, D.W.

    1983-11-18

    The electron-cyclotron-resonant heating (ECRH) systems of rectangular waveguides on Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) operated with a overall efficiency of 50%, each system using a 28-GHz, 200-kW pulsed gyrotron. We designed and built four circular-waveguide systems with greater efficiency and greater power-handling capabilities to replace the rectangular waveguides. Two of these circular systems, at the 5-kG second-harmonic heating locations, have a total transmission efficiency of >90%. The two systems at the 10-kG fundamental heating locations have a total transmission efficiency of 80%. The difference in efficiency is due to the additional components required to launch the microwaves in the desired orientation and polarization with respect to magnetic-field lines at the 10-kG points. These systems handle the total power available from each gyrotron but do not have the arcing limitation problem of the rectangular waveguide. Each system requires several complex components. The overall physical layout and the design considerations for the rectangular and circular waveguide components are described here.

  3. Variation of the resonance width of HOCl(6{nu}{sub OH}) with total angular momentum: Comparison between {ital ab initio} theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Skokov, S.; Bowman, J.M.

    1999-05-01

    Complex L{sup 2} calculations of the variation of (very narrow) resonance widths of the 6{nu}{sub OH} state of HOCl with total angular momentum are reported, using a recently developed, accurate {ital ab initio} potential energy surface [S. Skokov, J. M. Bowman, and K. A. Peterson, J. Chem. Phys. {bold 109}, 2662 (1998)]. The calculations are carried out within the adiabatic rotation approximation for the overall rotation and a truncation/recoupling method for the vibrational states. Comparisons with recent double-resonance experiments of the Rizzo and Sinha groups are made. The variation of resonance width with {ital J} for {ital K}=0 is shown to be due to rotation-induced coupling of the 6{nu}{sub OH} state with a dense set of states with large excitation in the dissociative coordinate. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Space charge effect of the high intensity proton beam during the resonance extraction for the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chong Shik; Amundson, James; Johnstone, John; Michelotti, Leo; Nagaslaev, Vladimir; Werkema, Steve; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The proposed Mu2e experiment to search for direct {mu} {yields} e conversion at Fermilab plans slow, resonant extraction of a beam with 3 x 10{sup 12} protons from the Debuncher ring. Space charge of this high intensity beam is a critical factor, since it induces significant betatron tune spread and consequently affects resonance extraction processes, such as spill uniformity and beam losses. This study shows the multi-particle simulation results in the early stages of resonance extraction and spill uniformity in the presence of 2D and 3D space charge effects. We have presented the results of the third-integer resonance extraction in early stage for the Mu2e experiment in the presence of space charge effects. In order to track particles and to calculate self-consistent space charge effects, Synergia2 was used, which is capable of parallel computing. The space charge tune shift was computed and was reasonable value compared with the analytical calculation. Locations of the septum and Lambertson were chosen so that particles are kicked and extracted efficiently. The spill rates for with and without space charge effects were uniform, but should be improved for the early stage after the sextupole field ramping.

  5. Long-lived frequency shifts observed in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment following microwave irradiation of a nitroxide spin probe

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lei; Longenecker, Jonilyn G.; Moore, Eric W.; Marohn, John A.

    2013-04-01

    We introduce a spin-modulation protocol for force-gradient detection of magnetic resonance that enables the real-time readout of longitudinal magnetization in an electron spin resonance experiment involving fast-relaxing spins. We applied this method to observe a prompt change in longitudinal magnetization following the microwave irradiation of a nitroxide-doped perdeuterated polystyrene film having an electron spin-lattice relaxation time of T{sub 1}{approx}1ms. The protocol allowed us to discover a large, long-lived cantilever frequency shift. Based on its magnitude, lifetime, and field dependence, we tentatively attribute this persistent signal to deuteron spin magnetization created via transfer of polarization from nitroxide spins.

  6. Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering and Visible Extinction Spectroscopy of Copper Chlorophyllin: An Upper Level Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnitzer, Cheryl S.; Reim, Candace Lawson; Sirois, John J.; House, Paul G.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced chemistry students are introduced to surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) by studying how sodium copper chlorophyllin (CuChl) adsorbs onto silver colloids (CuChl/Ag) as a function of pH. Using both SERRS and visible extinction spectroscopy, the extent of CuChl adsorption and colloidal aggregation are monitored. Initially at…

  7. Nondestructive testing of adhesive bonds by nuclear quadrupole resonance method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, R. R.

    1971-01-01

    Inert, strain sensitive tracer, cuprous oxide, added to polymeric adhesive ensures sufficiently large signal to noise ratio in NQR system output. Method is successful, provided that RF-transparent structural materials are used between modified adhesive and probe of NQR spectrometer.

  8. Reduced dimensionality tailored HN(C)N experiments for facile backbone resonance assignment of proteins through unambiguous identification of sequential HSQC peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-12-01

    Two novel reduced dimensionality (RD) tailored HN(C)N [S.C. Panchal, N.S. Bhavesh, R.V. Hosur, Improved 3D triple resonance experiments, HNN and HN(C)N, for HN and 15N sequential correlations in (13C, 15N) labeled proteins: application to unfolded proteins, J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147] experiments are proposed to facilitate the backbone resonance assignment of proteins both in terms of its accuracy and speed. These experiments - referred here as (4,3)D-hNCOcaNH and (4,3)D-hNcoCANH - exploit the linear combination of backbone 15N and 13C?/13C? chemical shifts simultaneously to achieve higher peak dispersion and randomness along their respective F1 dimensions. Simply, this has been achieved by modulating the backbone 15N(i) chemical shifts with that of 13C? (i - 1)/13C? (i - 1) spins following the established reduced dimensionality NMR approach [T. Szyperski, D.C. Yeh, D.K. Sukumaran, H.N. Moseley, G.T. Montelione, Reduced-dimensionality NMR spectroscopy for high-throughput protein resonance assignment, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99 (2002) 8009-8014]. Though the modification is simple it has resulted an ingenious improvement of HN(C)N both in terms of peak dispersion and easiness of establishing the sequential connectivities. The increased dispersion along F1 dimension solves two purposes here: (i) resolves the ambiguities arising because of degenerate 15N chemical shifts and (ii) reduces the signal overlap in F2(15N)-F3(1H) planes (an important requisite in HN(C)N based assignment protocol for facile and unambiguous identification of sequentially connected HSQC peaks). The performance of both these experiments and the assignment protocol has been demonstrated using bovine apo Calbindin-d9k (75 aa) and urea denatured UNC60B (a 152 amino acid ADF/cofilin family protein of Caenorhabditis elegans), as representatives of folded and unfolded protein systems, respectively.

  9. 63,65Cu Nuclear Resonance Study of the Coupled Spin Dimers and Chains Compound Cu2Fe2Ge4O13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Jun; Nagura, Shiro; Murakami, Kazumasa; Masuda, Takatsugu; Redhammer, Günther J.

    2013-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) of Cu have been measured in a coupled spin dimers and chains compound Cu2Fe2Ge4O13. Cu NQR has also been measured in an isostructural material Cu2Sc2Ge4O13 including only spin dimers. Comparison of the temperature dependence of the 63Cu nuclear spin--lattice relaxation rate between the two compounds reveals that the Fe chains in Cu2Fe2Ge4O13 do not change a spin gap energy of the Cu dimers from that in Cu2Sc2Ge4O13, contributing additionally to the relaxation rate at the Cu site. A modestly large internal field of 3.39 T was observed at the Cu site in the antiferromagnetic state of Cu2Fe2 Ge4O13 at 4.2 K, which is partly because of quantum reduction of the ordered moment of a Cu atom. The internal field and the ordered moment of Cu are noncollinear due to large anisotropy of the hyperfine interaction at the Cu site. A model analysis of the internal field based on the fourfold planar coordination of Cu suggests that a 3d hole of the Cu2+ ion is mainly in the d(x2-y2) orbital state.

  10. Stand-off explosive detection utilizing low power stimulated emission nuclear quadrupole resonance detection and subwavelength focusing wideband super lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolos, John; Mouyos, William; Feng, Judy; Chase, Walter

    2015-05-01

    The need for advanced techniques to detect improvised explosive devices (IED) at stand-off distances greater than ten (10) meters has driven AMI Research and Development (AMI) to develop a solution to detect and identify the threat utilizing a forward looking Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) combined with our CW radar technology Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) detection system. The novel features include a near-field sub-wavelength focusing antenna, a wide band 300 KHz to 300 MHz rapidly scanning CW radar facilitated by a high Q antenna/tuner, and an advanced processor utilizing Rabi transitions where the nucleus oscillates between states under the time dependent incident electromagnetic field and alternately absorbs energy from the incident field while emitting coherent energy via stimulated emission. AMI's Sub-wavelength Focusing Wide Band Super Lens uses a Near-Field SAR, making detection possible at distances greater than ten (10) meters. This super lens is capable of operating on the near-field and focusing electromagnetic waves to resolutions beyond the diffraction limit. When applied to the case of a vehicle approaching an explosive hazard the methodologies of synthetic aperture radar is fused with the array based super resolution and the NQR data processing detecting the explosive hazard.

  11. RCNP E398 16O,12C(p,p') experiment: Measurement of the ?-ray emission probability from giant resonances in relation to 16O,12C(?,?') reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, I.; Yamada, Y.; Mori, T.; Yano, T.; Sakuda, M.; Tamii, A.; Suzuki, T.; Yosoi, M.; Aoi, N.; Ideguchi, E.; Hashimoto, T.; Miki, K.; Ito, T.; Iwamoto, C.; Yamamoto, T.; Akimune, H.

    2015-05-01

    We propose to measure the ?-ray emission probability from excited states above 5 MeV including giant resonance of 16O and 12C as a function of excitation energy in 1-MeV step. Here, we measure both the excitation energy (Ex=5-30MeV) at the forward scattering angles (0°-3°) of the 16O, 12C (p, p') reaction using Grand-Raiden Spectrometer and the energy of ?-rays (E?) using an array of NaI(Tl) counters. The purpose of the experiment is to provide the basic and important information not only for the ?-ray production from primary neutral-current neutrino-oxygen (-carbon) interactions but also for that from the secondary hadronic (neutron-oxygen and -carbon) interactions.

  12. Fast radio-frequency amplitude modulation in multiple-quantum magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance: Theory and experiments

    E-print Network

    Frydman, Lucio

    Fast radio-frequency amplitude modulation in multiple-quantum magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic of this experiment has been the poor efficiency of the radio-frequency pulses used in converting multiple-modulated radio-frequency pulses, and which can yield substantial signal and even resolution enhancements over

  13. Simulation of non-resonant internal kink mode with toroidal rotation in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Feng; Liu, J. Y.; Fu, G. Y.; Breslau, J. A.; Tritz, Kevin

    2013-07-15

    Plasmas in spherical and conventional tokamaks, with weakly reversed shear q profile and minimum q above but close to unity, are susceptible to an non-resonant (m,n) = (1,1) internal kink mode. This mode can saturate and persist and can induce a (2,1) seed island for Neoclassical Tearing Mode. [Breslau et al. Nucl. Fusion 51, 063027 (2011)]. The mode can also lead to large energetic particle transport and significant broadening of beam-driven current. Motivated by these important effects, we have carried out extensive nonlinear simulations of the mode with finite toroidal rotation using parameters and profiles of an NTSX plasma with a weakly reversed shear profile. The numerical results show that, at the experimental level, plasma rotation has little effect on either equilibrium or linear stability. However, rotation can significantly influence the nonlinear dynamics of the (1,1) mode and the induced (2,1) magnetic island. The simulation results show that a rotating helical equilibrium is formed and maintained in the nonlinear phase at finite plasma rotation. In contrast, for non-rotating cases, the nonlinear evolution exhibits dynamic oscillations between a quasi-2D state and a helical state. Furthermore, the effects of rotation are found to greatly suppress the (2,1) magnetic island even at a low level.

  14. Operational experience with the Argonne National Laboratory Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade facility and electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrasek, R.; Clark, J.; Levand, A.; Palchan, T.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.

    2014-02-01

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the Argonne National Laboratory Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) facility provides low-energy and accelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams to address key nuclear physics and astrophysics questions. A 350 mCi 252Cf source produces fission fragments which are thermalized and collected by a helium gas catcher into a low-energy particle beam with a charge of 1+ or 2+. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source functions as a charge breeder in order to raise the ion charge sufficiently for acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The ECR charge breeder has achieved stable beam charge breeding efficiencies of 10.1% for 23Na7+, 17.9% for 39K10+, 15.6% for 84Kr17+, and 12.4% for 133Cs27+. For the radioactive beams, a charge breeding efficiency of 11.7% has been achieved for 143Cs27+ and 14.7% for 143Ba27+. The typical breeding times are 10 ms/charge state, but the source can be tuned such that this value increases to 100 ms/charge state with the best breeding efficiency corresponding to the longest breeding times—the variation of efficiencies with breeding time will be discussed. Efforts have been made to characterize and reduce the background contaminants present in the ion beam through judicious choice of q/m combinations. Methods of background reduction are being investigated based upon plasma chamber cleaning and vacuum practices.

  15. Irreversible transformation of ferromagnetic ordered stripe domains in single-shot infrared-pump/resonant-x-ray-scattering-probe experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeard, Nicolas; Schaffert, Stefan; López-Flores, Víctor; Jaouen, Nicolas; Geilhufe, Jan; Günther, Christian M.; Schneider, Michael; Graves, Catherine; Wang, Tianhan; Wu, Benny; Scherz, Andreas; Baumier, Cédric; Delaunay, Renaud; Fortuna, Franck; Tortarolo, Marina; Tudu, Bharati; Krupin, Oleg; Minitti, Michael P.; Robinson, Joe; Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J.; Lüning, Jan; Eisebitt, Stefan; Boeglin, Christine

    2015-02-01

    The evolution of a magnetic domain structure upon excitation by an intense, femtosecond infrared (IR) laser pulse has been investigated using single-shot based time-resolved resonant x-ray scattering at the x-ray free electron laser LCLS. A well-ordered stripe domain pattern as present in a thin CoPd alloy film has been used as a prototype magnetic domain structure for this study. The fluence of the IR laser pump pulse was sufficient to lead to an almost complete quenching of the magnetization within the ultrafast demagnetization process taking place within the first few hundreds of femtoseconds following the IR laser pump pulse excitation. On longer time scales this excitation gave rise to subsequent irreversible transformations of the magnetic domain structure. Under our specific experimental conditions, it took about 2 ns before the magnetization started to recover. After about 5 ns the previously ordered stripe domain structure had evolved into a disordered labyrinth domain structure. Surprisingly, we observe after about 7 ns the occurrence of a partially ordered stripe domain structure reoriented into a novel direction. It is this domain structure in which the sample's magnetization stabilizes as revealed by scattering patterns recorded long after the initial pump-probe cycle. Using micromagnetic simulations we can explain this observation based on changes of the magnetic anisotropy going along with heat dissipation in the film.

  16. Tracking molecular resonance forms of donor–acceptor push–pull molecules by single-molecule conductance experiments

    PubMed Central

    Lissau, Henriette; Frisenda, Riccardo; Olsen, Stine T.; Jevric, Martyn; Parker, Christian R.; Kadziola, Anders; Hansen, Thorsten; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Brøndsted Nielsen, Mogens; Mikkelsen, Kurt V.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of molecules to change colour on account of changes in solvent polarity is known as solvatochromism and used spectroscopically to characterize charge-transfer transitions in donor–acceptor molecules. Here we report that donor–acceptor-substituted molecular wires also exhibit distinct properties in single-molecule electronics under the influence of a bias voltage, but in absence of solvent. Two oligo(phenyleneethynylene) wires with donor–acceptor substitution on the central ring (cruciform-like) exhibit remarkably broad conductance peaks measured by the mechanically controlled break-junction technique with gold contacts, in contrast to the sharp peak of simpler molecules. From a theoretical analysis, we explain this by different degrees of charge delocalization and hence cross-conjugation at the central ring. Thus, small variations in the local environment promote the quinoid resonance form (off), the linearly conjugated (on) or any form in between. This shows how the conductance of donor–acceptor cruciforms is tuned by small changes in the environment. PMID:26667583

  17. The design of double electrostatic-lens optics for resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization and photoelectron imaging experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Zehua; Li, Chunsheng; Qin, Zhengbo E-mail: xfzheng@mail.ahnu.edu.cn; Zheng, Xianfeng E-mail: xfzheng@mail.ahnu.edu.cn; Yao, Guanxin; Zhang, Xianyi; Cui, Zhifeng

    2015-06-15

    Compared to single ion/electron-optics for velocity-map imaging, a double-focusing lens assembly designed not only allows for mapping velocity imaging of photoelectrons but also allows for investigating the vibrational structure of the intermediate states of neutral species in resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra. In this presentation, in order to record REMPI and photoelectron spectra separately, we have constructed a compact photoelectron velocity-map imaging (VMI) apparatus combined with an opposite linear Wiley-Mclaren time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS). A mass resolution (m/?m) of ?1300 for TOFMS and electron energy resolution (?E/E) of 2.4% for VMI have been achieved upon three-photon ionization of Xe atom at 258.00 nm laser wavelength. As a benchmark, in combination of one-color (1 + 1) REMPI and photoelectron imaging of benzene via 6{sup 1} and 6{sup 1}1{sup 1} vibronic levels in the S{sub 1} state, the vibrational structures of the cation and photoelectron angular anisotropy are unraveled. In addition, two-color (1 + 1?) REMPI and photoelectron imaging of aniline was used to complete the accurate measurement of ionization potential (62 271 ± 3 cm{sup ?1}). The results suggest that the apparatus is a powerful tool for studying photoionization dynamics in the photoelectron imaging using vibrational-state selected excitation to the intermediate states of neutrals based on REMPI technique.

  18. Early detection of cervical spondylotic myelopathy using diffusion tensor imaging: Experiences in 1.5-tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ahmadli, Uzeyir; Ulrich, Nils H; Yuqiang, Yao; Nanz, Daniel; Sarnthein, Johannes; Kollias, Spyros S

    2015-10-01

    *These authors contributed equally to this work.The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for early detection of pathological alterations in the myelon in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) without T2-weighted imaging (T2W) signal abnormalities but with a narrowed spinal canal with corresponding clinical correlation. Axial DTI at 1.5T together with routine magnetic resonance imaging was performed on 18 patients fulfilling above mentioned criteria. Quantitative fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were generated. Values at the narrowest cervical levels were compared to pre- and poststenotic levels and the interindividual means were tested for statistically significant differences by means of paired t-tests. The correlation between the grade and width of canal stenosis in the axial plane was measured. FA was significantly reduced at the stenotic level, compared to prestenotic level, whereas no significant differences were found when compared to poststenotic level. No significant differences between ADC values at stenotic level versus both adjacent non-stenotic levels were found, suggesting very early stage of degeneration. ADC values correlated significantly with the width of the spinal canal at the prestenotic level, but not at the poststenotic level. Findings indicate sufficient robustness of routine implementation of DTI at 1.5T to detect abnormalities in the spinal cord of CSM patients, before apparent T2W signal abnormalities and marked clinical deterioration. Therefore, larger and long-term studies should be conducted to establish the DTI scalar metrics that would indicate early intervention for a better clinical outcome in patients with clinical signs of CSM. PMID:26452521

  19. Operational experience with the Argonne National Laboratory Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade facility and electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder.

    PubMed

    Vondrasek, R; Clark, J; Levand, A; Palchan, T; Pardo, R; Savard, G; Scott, R

    2014-02-01

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the Argonne National Laboratory Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) facility provides low-energy and accelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams to address key nuclear physics and astrophysics questions. A 350 mCi (252)Cf source produces fission fragments which are thermalized and collected by a helium gas catcher into a low-energy particle beam with a charge of 1+ or 2+. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source functions as a charge breeder in order to raise the ion charge sufficiently for acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The ECR charge breeder has achieved stable beam charge breeding efficiencies of 10.1% for (23)Na(7+), 17.9% for (39)K(10+), 15.6% for (84)Kr(17+), and 12.4% for (133)Cs(27+). For the radioactive beams, a charge breeding efficiency of 11.7% has been achieved for (143)Cs(27+) and 14.7% for (143)Ba(27+). The typical breeding times are 10 ms/charge state, but the source can be tuned such that this value increases to 100 ms/charge state with the best breeding efficiency corresponding to the longest breeding times-the variation of efficiencies with breeding time will be discussed. Efforts have been made to characterize and reduce the background contaminants present in the ion beam through judicious choice of q/m combinations. Methods of background reduction are being investigated based upon plasma chamber cleaning and vacuum practices. PMID:24593608

  20. Effect of a weak static magnetic field on nitrogen-14 quadrupole resonance in the case of an axially symmetric electric field gradient tensor.

    PubMed

    Guendouz, Laouès; Aissani, Sarra; Marêché, Jean-François; Retournard, Alain; Marande, Pierre-Louis; Canet, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The application of a weak static B0 magnetic field (less than 1 mT) may produce a well-defined splitting of the (14)N Quadrupole Resonance line when the electric field gradient tensor at the nitrogen nucleus level is of axial symmetry. It is theoretically shown and experimentally confirmed that the actual splitting (when it exists) as well as the line-shape and the signal intensity depends on three factors: (i) the amplitude of B0, (ii) the amplitude and pulse duration of the radio-frequency field, B1, used for detecting the NQR signal, and (iii) the relative orientation of B0 and B1. For instance, when B0 is parallel to B1 and regardless of the B0 value, the signal intensity is three times larger than when B0 is perpendicular to B1. This point is of some importance in practice since NQR measurements are almost always performed in the earth field. Moreover, in the course of this study, it has been recognized that important pieces of information regarding line-shape are contained in data points at the beginning of the free induction decay (fid) which, in practice, are eliminated for avoiding spurious signals due to probe ringing. It has been found that these data points can generally be retrieved by linear prediction (LP) procedures. As a further LP benefit, the signal intensity loss (by about a factor of three) is regained. PMID:24183810

  1. Comparison of particle-in-cell simulation with experiment for thetransport system of the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ionsource VENUS

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, DamonS.; Leitner, Daniela; Leitner, Matthaeus; Lyneis,Claude M.; Qiang, Ji; Grote, Dave P.

    2005-09-19

    The three-dimensional, particle-in-cell code WARP has been enhanced to allow end-to-end beam dynamics simulations of the VENUS beam transport system from the extraction region, through a mass-analyzing magnet, and up to a two-axis emittance scanner. This paper presents first results of comparisons between simulation and experimental data. A helium beam (He+, He2+) is chosen as an initial comparison beam due to its simple mass spectrum. Although a number of simplifications are made for the initial extracted beam, aberration characteristics appear in simulations that are also present in experimental phase space current density measurements. Further, measurements of phase space tilt indicate that simulations must have little or no space charge neutralization along the transport system to best agree with experiment. In addition, recent measurements of triangular beam structure immediately after the source are presented. This beam structure is related to the source magnetic confinement fields and will need to be taken into account as the initial beam approximations are lifted.

  2. Development of a compact fast CCD camera and resonant soft x-ray scattering endstation for time-resolved pump-probe experiments.

    PubMed

    Doering, D; Chuang, Y-D; Andresen, N; Chow, K; Contarato, D; Cummings, C; Domning, E; Joseph, J; Pepper, J S; Smith, B; Zizka, G; Ford, C; Lee, W S; Weaver, M; Patthey, L; Weizeorick, J; Hussain, Z; Denes, P

    2011-07-01

    The designs of a compact, fast CCD (cFCCD) camera, together with a resonant soft x-ray scattering endstation, are presented. The cFCCD camera consists of a highly parallel, custom, thick, high-resistivity CCD, readout by a custom 16-channel application specific integrated circuit to reach the maximum readout rate of 200 frames per second. The camera is mounted on a virtual-axis flip stage inside the RSXS chamber. When this flip stage is coupled to a differentially pumped rotary seal, the detector assembly can rotate about 100°/360° in the vertical/horizontal scattering planes. With a six-degrees-of-freedom cryogenic sample goniometer, this endstation has the capability to detect the superlattice reflections from the electronic orderings showing up in the lower hemisphere. The complete system has been tested at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and has been used in multiple experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. PMID:21806178

  3. Development of a compact fast CCD camera and resonant soft x-ray scattering endstation for time-resolved pump-probe experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doering, D.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Andresen, N.; Chow, K.; Contarato, D.; Cummings, C.; Domning, E.; Joseph, J.; Pepper, J. S.; Smith, B.; Zizka, G.; Ford, C.; Lee, W. S.; Weaver, M.; Patthey, L.; Weizeorick, J.; Hussain, Z.; Denes, P.

    2011-07-01

    The designs of a compact, fast CCD (cFCCD) camera, together with a resonant soft x-ray scattering endstation, are presented. The cFCCD camera consists of a highly parallel, custom, thick, high-resistivity CCD, readout by a custom 16-channel application specific integrated circuit to reach the maximum readout rate of 200 frames per second. The camera is mounted on a virtual-axis flip stage inside the RSXS chamber. When this flip stage is coupled to a differentially pumped rotary seal, the detector assembly can rotate about 100°/360° in the vertical/horizontal scattering planes. With a six-degrees-of-freedom cryogenic sample goniometer, this endstation has the capability to detect the superlattice reflections from the electronic orderings showing up in the lower hemisphere. The complete system has been tested at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and has been used in multiple experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

  4. arXiv:physics/0305117v1[physics.class-ph]28May2003 Modern Michelson-Morley experiment using cryogenic optical resonators

    E-print Network

    Peters, Achim

    cryogenic optical resonators Holger M¨uller1,2 , Sven Herrmann1,2 , Claus Braxmaier2 , Stephan Schiller3 orthogonal cryogenic optical resonators subject to Earth's rotation over 1 year. For a possible anisotropy to unify gravity with the other forces of nature, one of the outstanding open challenges in modern science

  5. Secondary signals in two-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonance on (14)N nuclei with I=1.

    PubMed

    Mozzhukhin, G V; Rameev, B Z; Do?an, N; Akta?, B

    2008-07-01

    Our experimental and theoretical studies show that using two-frequency excitation of (14)N nuclei it is possible to observe secondary NQR signals at one of the three possible transitions due to irradiation of another adjacent transition. As a result of the pulse sequence applied to the adjacent transition the spin-echo signals on the detected transition are observed after essential time interval from the initial single pulse on this frequency. Experiments have been performed on the (14)N nuclei in the sodium nitrite (NaNO(2)) and the military explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-s-triazine C(3)H(6)N(6)O(6) (RDX). PMID:18455453

  6. Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging Measurements of Electrostatic Biopolymer

    E-print Network

    Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging Measurements of Electrostatic Biopolymer Adsorption onto surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging experiments is used to charac- terize the differential/RAS) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) thickness mea- surements. A schematic diagram of the scanning SPR

  7. Optical resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention discloses a semi-ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) optical resonator structure comprising a medium including an edge forming a reflective facet and a waveguide within the medium, the waveguide having opposing ends formed by the reflective facet. The performance of the SRFP resonator can be further enhanced by including a Mach-Zehnder interferometer in the waveguide on one side of the gain medium. The optical resonator can be employed in a variety of optical devices. Laser structures using at least one SRFP resonator are disclosed where the resonators are disposed on opposite sides of a gain medium. Other laser structures employing one or more resonators on one side of a gain region are also disclosed.

  8. Resonance scraping

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1986-06-01

    Protons lost in a ring leave at a few preferred locations, determined by some non-linear property of the dipoles. This paper suggests taking control of lost protons by beating the magnets at their own game - by means of a designed resonance used as a beam scraper. It is a study of suitable resonances, including estimates of the required multipole element strengths. The appropriate resonances are two-dimensional. A large number of figures is included.

  9. Resonant Auger decay of Xe{sup *} 4d{sub 5/2}{sup -1}6p: A contribution to the complete experiment from fluorescence polarization studies

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keeffe, P.; Aloiese, S.; Meyer, M.; Lohmann, B.; Kleiman, U.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A. N.

    2004-07-01

    Fluorescence polarimetry has been used to determine the relative partial-wave Auger decay widths for transitions to states of the Xe II 5p{sup 4}6p multiplet after photoexcitation of the Xe{sup *} 4d{sub 5/2}{sup -1}6p(J{sup *}=1) resonance by linearly and circularly polarized synchrotron radiation. Combination with data on the angular distribution and spin polarization of the Auger electrons, providing information on the relative phases of the amplitudes, constitutes the complete experiment on the Auger decay. Multiconfiguration relativistic calculations of the amplitudes have been performed and compared to the measurements.

  10. Rotary resonance echo double resonance for measuring heteronuclear dipolar coupling under MAS.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zhehong

    2006-12-01

    A rotary resonance echo double resonance (R-REDOR) experiment is described for measuring heteronuclear dipolar coupling under magic-angle spinning. Rotary resonance reintroduces both dipolar coupling and chemical shift anisotropy with an rf field matching the spinning frequency. The resonance effect from chemical shift anisotropy can be refocused with a rotary resonance echo. The R-REDOR experiment thus measures the dephasing of the rotary resonance echo from the heteronuclear dipolar coupling to determine the dipolar coupling constant. The rotary resonance experiment is suitable for measuring dipolar coupling with quadrupolar nuclei because it applies the recoupling rf only to the observed spin-1/2. The rotary resonance scheme has the advantages of a long T2' and susceptible to spinning frequency fluctuation. PMID:16996758

  11. Collider Signal I :. Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Tim M. P.

    2010-08-01

    These TASI lectures were part of the summer school in 2008 and cover the collider signal associated with resonances in models of physics beyond the Standard Model. I begin with a review of the Z boson, one of the best-studied resonances in particle physics, and review how the Breit-Wigner form of the propagator emerges in perturbation theory and discuss the narrow width approximation. I review how the LEP and SLAC experiments could use the kinematics of Z events to learn about fermion couplings to the Z. I then make a brief survey of models of physics beyond the Standard Model which predict resonances, and discuss some of the LHC observables which we can use to discover and identify the nature of the BSM physics. I finish up with a discussion of the linear moose that one can use for an effective theory description of a massive color octet vector particle.

  12. Magnetic Resonance

    Cancer.gov

    Focus Group on Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) in Clinical Oncology(April 1999) To explore the technical requirements for MRS and the application of hydrogen and multinuclear spectroscopy for tumor response to therapy.

  13. Danti with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Machine 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Parallel magnetic resonance (MR) imaging may be used to increase either the throughput or the speed of the MR imaging experiment. As such, parallel imaging may be accomplished either through a "parallelization" of the MR experiment, or by the use...

  14. An Electromagnetic Resonance Circuit for Liquid Level Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauge, B. L.; Helseth, L. E.

    2012-01-01

    Electromagnetic resonators are often used to detect foreign materials. Here we present a simple experiment for the measurement of liquid level. The resonator, consisting of a coil and a capacitor, is brought to resonance by an external magnetic field source, and the corresponding resonance frequency is determined using Fourier analysis combined…

  15. Hexagonal micro-pillar cavities: multimode resonances and open-loop resonance linewidth broadening

    E-print Network

    Poon, Andrew Wing On

    Hexagonal micro-pillar cavities: multimode resonances and open-loop resonance linewidth broadening report our proof-of-principle experiment and modeling of hexagonal micro-pillar (µ-pillar) cavities beam, thus the fiber acted as a µ-pillar cavity. We observed multimode resonances with typical Q 2

  16. Simulating Frequency-Domain Electron Paramagnetic Resonance: Bridging the Gap between Experiment and Magnetic Parameters for High-Spin Transition-Metal Ion Complexes.

    PubMed

    Nehrkorn, Joscha; Telser, Joshua; Holldack, Karsten; Stoll, Stefan; Schnegg, Alexander

    2015-10-29

    We present a comparison of experimental and simulated frequency- and field-domain electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of integer and half-integer high-spin transition-metal ion complexes. For the simulation of EPR spectra a new tool within the EPR simulation software EasySpin is introduced, which allows for field- and frequency-domain EPR simulations with the same theoretical model and the same set of spin Hamiltonian parameters. The utility of this approach is demonstrated on the integer-spin complexes NiBr2(PPh3)2 and [Tp2Mn]SbF6 (both S = 1) and the half-integer-spin Fe(III) porphyrins, hemin (Fe(PPIX)Cl) and Fe(TPP)Cl (both S = 5/2). We demonstrate that the combination of field- and frequency-domain EPR techniques allows the determination of spin Hamiltonian parameters, in particular large zero-field splittings, with high accuracy. PMID:26154490

  17. ADAPT-NMR 3.0: utilization of BEST-type triple-resonance NMR experiments to accelerate the process of data collection and assignment

    PubMed Central

    Dashti, Hesam; Tonelli, Marco

    2015-01-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) is a software package whose Bayesian core uses on-the-fly chemical shift assignments to guide data acquisition by non-uniform sampling from a panel of through-bond NMR experiments. The new version of ADAPT-NMR (ADAPT-NMR v3.0) has the option of utilizing 2D tilted-plane versions of 3D fast spectral acquisition with BEST-type pulse sequences, while also retaining the capability of acquiring and processing data from tilted-plane versions of conventional sensitivity-enhanced experiments. The use of BEST experiments significantly reduces data collection times and leads to enhanced performance by ADAPT-NMR. PMID:26021595

  18. Two-pulse and stimulated nuclear-quadrupole-resonance echoes in YAlO sub 3 :Pr sup 3+

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, L.E. )

    1991-06-01

    The dephasing of trivalent praseodymium dilute in yttrium aluminum oxide (YAlO{sub 3}) in the ground electronic state {sup 3}{ital H}{sub 4} state is evaluated using an optically detected method, to measure two-rf-pulse- and three-rf-pulse-stimulated nuclear quadrupole echoes. The magnitude of the echo is obtained by detecting the weak Raman optical field generated by the interaction of the magnetic moment of the echo and a light beam resonant with the {sup 3}{ital H}{sub 4}(0 cm{sup 1}) to {sup 1}{ital D}{sub 2}(16 374 cm{sup {minus}1}) optical transition. This same light beam is used as an optical pump (37-ms duration) prior the rf-pulse sequence to increase the population difference of the hyperfine energy levels, thereby improving the echo signal. The light is turned off 9 ms before the rf-pulse sequence and remains off until the echo to avoid optical-pumping effects on the measured nuclear-quadrupole-resonance (NQR) echo lifetime. The dephasing time {ital T}{sub 2} from two-pulse nuclear-quadrupole-echo measurement is found to be 366{plus minus}29 {mu}s.

  19. RCNP E398 {sup 16}O,{sup 12}C(p,p’) experiment: Measurement of the ?-ray emission probability from giant resonances in relation to {sup 16}O,{sup 12}C(?,?’) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, I.; Yamada, Y.; Mori, T.; Yano, T.; Sakuda, M.; Tamii, A.; Suzuki, T.; Yosoi, M.; Aoi, N.; Ideguchi, E.; Hashimoto, T.; Miki, K.; Ito, T.; Iwamoto, C.; Yamamoto, T.; Akimune, H.

    2015-05-15

    We propose to measure the ?-ray emission probability from excited states above 5?MeV including giant resonance of {sup 16}O and {sup 12}C as a function of excitation energy in 1-MeV step. Here, we measure both the excitation energy (E{sub x}=5-30MeV) at the forward scattering angles (0°-3°) of the {sup 16}O, {sup 12}C (p, p’) reaction using Grand-Raiden Spectrometer and the energy of ?-rays (E{sub ?}) using an array of NaI(Tl) counters. The purpose of the experiment is to provide the basic and important information not only for the ?-ray production from primary neutral-current neutrino-oxygen (-carbon) interactions but also for that from the secondary hadronic (neutron-oxygen and -carbon) interactions.

  20. Prostate Postbrachytherapy Seed Distribution: Comparison of High-Resolution, Contrast-Enhanced, T1- and T2-Weighted Endorectal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Versus Computed Tomography: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch, B. Nicolas Lenkinski, Robert E.; Helbich, Thomas H.; Ngo, Long; Oismueller, Renee; Jaromi, Silvia; Kubin, Klaus; Hawliczek, Robert; Kaplan, Irving D.; Rofsky, Neil M.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To compare contrast-enhanced, T1-weighted, three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (CEMR) and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2MR) with computed tomography (CT) for prostate brachytherapy seed location for dosimetric calculations. Methods and Materials: Postbrachytherapy prostate MRI was performed on a 1.5 Tesla unit with combined surface and endorectal coils in 13 patients. Both CEMR and T2MR used a section thickness of 3 mm. Spiral CT used a section thickness of 5 mm with a pitch factor of 1.5. All images were obtained in the transverse plane. Two readers using CT and MR imaging assessed brachytherapy seed distribution independently. The dependency of data read by both readers for a specific subject was assessed with a linear mixed effects model. Results: The mean percentage ({+-} standard deviation) values of the readers for seed detection and location are presented. Of 1205 implanted seeds, CEMR, T2MR, and CT detected 91.5% {+-} 4.8%, 78.5% {+-} 8.5%, and 96.1% {+-} 2.3%, respectively, with 11.8% {+-} 4.5%, 8.5% {+-} 3.5%, 1.9% {+-} 1.0% extracapsular, respectively. Assignment to periprostatic structures was not possible with CT. Periprostatic seed assignments for CEMR and T2MR, respectively, were as follows: neurovascular bundle, 3.5% {+-} 1.6% and 2.1% {+-} 0.9%; seminal vesicles, 0.9% {+-} 1.8% and 0.3% {+-} 0.7%; periurethral, 7.1% {+-} 3.3% and 5.8% {+-} 2.9%; penile bulb, 0.6% {+-} 0.8% and 0.3% {+-} 0.6%; Denonvillier's Fascia/rectal wall, 0.5% {+-} 0.6% and 0%; and urinary bladder, 0.1% {+-} 0.3% and 0%. Data dependency analysis showed statistical significance for the type of imaging but not for reader identification. Conclusion: Both enumeration and localization of implanted seeds are readily accomplished with CEMR. Calculations with MRI dosimetry do not require CT data. Dose determinations to specific extracapsular sites can be obtained with MRI but not with CT.

  1. 14 CFR 29.663 - Ground resonance prevention means.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...resonance prevention means. (a) The reliability of the means for preventing ground resonance must be shown either by analysis and tests, or reliable service experience, or by showing through analysis or tests that malfunction or...

  2. 14 CFR 27.663 - Ground resonance prevention means.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...resonance prevention means. (a) The reliability of the means for preventing ground resonance must be shown either by analysis and tests, or reliable service experience, or by showing through analysis or tests that malfunction or...

  3. Humanitarian mine detection by acoustic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-03-01

    The JASON Committee at MITRE Corp. was tasked by DARPA to inquire into suitable technologies for humanitarian mine detection. Acoustic resonance was one of the very few technologies that the JASONs determined might be promising for the task, but was as yet unexplored at the time that they conducted their inquiry. The objective of this Seed Money investigation into acoustic resonance was to determine if it would be feasible to use acoustic resonance to provide an improvement to present methods for humanitarian mine detection. As detailed in this report, acoustic resonance methods do not appear to be feasible for this task. Although acoustic resonant responses are relatively easy to detect when they exist, they are very difficult to excite by the non-contact means that must be used for buried objects. Despite many different attempts, this research did not discover any practical means of using sound to excite resonant responses in objects known to have strong resonances. The shaker table experiments did see an effect that might be attributable to the resonance of the object under test, but the effect was weak, and exploited the a priori knowledge of the resonant frequency of the object under test to distinguish it from the background. If experiments that used objects known to have strong acoustic resonances produced such marginal results, this does not seem to be a practical method to detect objects with weak resonances or non-existent resonances. The results of this work contribute to the ORNL countermine initiative. ORNL is exploring several unconventional mine detection technologies, and is proposed to explore others. Since this research has discovered some major pitfalls in non-metallic mine detection, this experience will add realism to other strategies proposed for mine detection technologies. The experiment provided hands-on experience with inert plastic mines under field conditions, and gives ORNL additional insight into the problems of developing practical field-deployable methods of mine detection.

  4. Our experience in the diagnosis of spinal epidural abscess with the use of new diagnostic methods--computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Aleksi?-Shihabi, Anka; Dubravica, Ivica; Celi?, Sandra; Bili?, Blansa; Knezevi?, Vlatko

    2009-06-01

    A 69-year-old woman, a diabetic, presented to emergency unit for severe back pain that occurred three weeks of her having sustained a fall and blow in the back. Upon admission, she developed elevated body temperature, urinary retention and severe paraparesis of lower extremities. Laboratory testing showed increased levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (93 mm/h), leukocyte count (18.3 x 10(3)/ mL), C-reactive protein (246.5 mg/L) and liver enzymes, and abundant bacteria in urine sediment. Penicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in blood culture. Antibiotic therapy according to the antibiotic sensitivity report was introduced. Magnetic resonance of thoracic spine revealed epidural liquid collection compressing the spinal medulla from Th2 to Th7. The patient was transferred to neurosurgery for posterior laminectomy and decompression, along with antibiotic therapy. Microbiology confirmed Staphylococcus aureus in the intraoperative tissue specimen. The patient was discharged from the hospital with mild paraparesis and continuing antibiotic therapy recommended. PMID:19928416

  5. Fast scintillation timing detector using proportional-mode avalanche photodiode for nuclear resonant scattering experiments in high-energy synchrotron X-ray region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Keisuke; Kishimoto, Shunji

    2016-01-01

    To obtain both a high count rate of >107 s-1 and a detection efficiency sufficient for high-energy X-rays of >30 keV, we propose a scintillation timing detector using a proportional-mode silicon avalanche photodiode (Si-APD) for synchrotron radiation nuclear resonant scattering. We here present results obtained with a prototype detector using a lead-loaded plastic scintillator (EJ-256) mounted on a proportional-mode Si-APD (active area size: 3 mm in diameter). The detector was operated at ?35 °C for a better signal-to-noise ratio. Using synchrotron X-rays of 67.41 keV, which is the same energy as the first excited level of 61Ni, we successfully measured pulse-height and time spectra of the scintillation light. A good time resolution of 0.50±0.06 ns (full width at half-maximum) was obtained for 67.41 keV X-rays with a scintillator 3 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick.

  6. First clinical experience with the magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent and superoxide dismutase mimetic mangafodipir as an adjunct in cancer chemotherapy-a translational study.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Jan Olof G; Adolfsson, Karin; Thelin, Bo; Jynge, Per; Andersson, Rolf Gg; Falkmer, Ursula G

    2012-02-01

    Preclinical research suggests that the clinically approved magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent mangafodipir may protect against adverse events (AEs) caused by chemotherapy, without interfering negatively with the anticancer efficacy. The present translational study tested if pretreatment with mangafodipir lowers AEs during curative (adjuvant) FOLFOX6 chemotherapy in stage III colon cancer (Dukes' C). The study was originally scheduled to include 20 patients, but because of the unforeseen withdrawal of mangafodipir from the market, the study had to be closed after 14 patients had been included. The withdrawal of mangafodipir was purely based on commercial considerations from the producer and not on any safety concerns. The patients were treated throughout the first 3 of 12 scheduled cycles. Patients were randomized to a 5-minute infusion of either mangafodipir or placebo (7 in each group). AEs were evaluated according to the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events and the Sanofi-NCI criteria. The primary end points were neutropenia and neurosensory toxicity. There were four AEs of grade 3 (severe) and one AE of grade 4 (life threatening) in four patients in the placebo group, whereas there were none in the mangafodipir group (P < .05). Of the grade 3 and 4 events, two were neutropenia and one was neurosensory toxicity. Furthermore, white blood cell count was statistically, significantly higher in the mangafodipir group than in the placebo group (P < .01) after treatment with FOLFOX. This small feasibility study seems to confirm what has been demonstrated preclinically, namely, that pretreatment with mangafodipir lowers AEs during adjuvant 5-fluorouracil plus oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in colon cancer patients. PMID:22348174

  7. First Clinical Experience with the Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent and Superoxide Dismutase Mimetic Mangafodipir as an Adjunct in Cancer Chemotherapy—A Translational Study12

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Jan Olof G; Adolfsson, Karin; Thelin, Bo; Jynge, Per; Andersson, Rolf GG; Falkmer, Ursula G

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical research suggests that the clinically approved magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent mangafodipir may protect against adverse events (AEs) caused by chemotherapy, without interfering negatively with the anticancer efficacy. The present translational study tested if pretreatment with mangafodipir lowers AEs during curative (adjuvant) FOLFOX6 chemotherapy in stage III colon cancer (Dukes' C). The study was originally scheduled to include 20 patients, but because of the unforeseen withdrawal of mangafodipir from the market, the study had to be closed after 14 patients had been included. The withdrawal of mangafodipir was purely based on commercial considerations from the producer and not on any safety concerns. The patients were treated throughout the first 3 of 12 scheduled cycles. Patients were randomized to a 5-minute infusion of either mangafodipir or placebo (7 in each group). AEs were evaluated according to the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events and the Sanofi-NCI criteria. The primary end points were neutropenia and neurosensory toxicity. There were four AEs of grade 3 (severe) and one AE of grade 4 (life threatening) in four patients in the placebo group, whereas there were none in the mangafodipir group (P < .05). Of the grade 3 and 4 events, two were neutropenia and one was neurosensory toxicity. Furthermore, white blood cell count was statistically, significantly higher in the mangafodipir group than in the placebo group (P < .01) after treatment with FOLFOX. This small feasibility study seems to confirm what has been demonstrated preclinically, namely, that pretreatment with mangafodipir lowers AEs during adjuvant 5-fluorouracil plus oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in colon cancer patients. PMID:22348174

  8. Gramicidin A Backbone and Side Chain Dynamics Evaluated by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiments. I: Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I.; Li, Yuhui; Vostrikov, Vitaly V.; Gu, Hong; Hinton, James F.; Koeppe, Roger E.; Roux, Benoît; Andersen, Olaf S.

    2011-01-01

    Gramicidin A (gA) channels provide an ideal system to test molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of membrane proteins. The peptide backbone lines a cation-selective pore and, due to the small channel size, the average structure and extent of fluctuations of all atoms in the peptide will influence ion permeation. This raises the question of how well molecular mechanical force fields used in MD simulations and potential of mean force (PMF) calculations can predict structure and dynamics as well as ion permeation. To address this question, we undertook a comparative study of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) observables predicted by fully atomistic MD simulations on a gA dimer embedded in a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelle with measurements of the gA dimer backbone and tryptophan side chain dynamics using solution state 15N-NMR on gA dimers in SDS micelles. This comparison enables us to examine the robustness of the MD simulations done using different force fields, as well as their ability to predict important features of the gA channel. We find that MD is able to predict NMR observables, including the generalized order parameters (S2), the 15N spin-lattice (T1), spin-spin (T2) relaxation times, and the 1H-15N nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE), with remarkable accuracy. To examine further how differences in the force fields can affect the channel conductance, we calculated the PMF for K+ and Na+ permeation through a gA channel in a dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer. In this case, we find that MD is less successful in quantitatively predicting the single-channel conductance. PMID:21574563

  9. Photorefractivity in WGM resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Strekalov, Dmitry; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Maleki, Lute

    2006-01-01

    We report on observation of photorefractive effects in whispering gallery mode resonators made of as-grown and magnesium doped lithium niobate and lithium tantalate in the near as well as far infrared. The effects manifested themselves as dynamic modification of the spectra as well as quality factors of the resonators coupled to the laser radiation. We have observed a significant (exceeding 10-4) change of the ordinary index of refraction of all the materials exposed with 780 nm light. Photorefractive effects have also been detected at 1550 nm. Our experiments support the conclusion that the photorefractivity does not have a distinct red boundary. We show that the maximum saturated refractive index change in the infrared is of the same order of magnitude as in the visible light.

  10. Ringing phenomenon of the fiber ring resonator.

    PubMed

    Ying, Diqing; Ma, Huilian; Jin, Zhonghe

    2007-08-01

    A resonator fiber-optic gyro (R-FOG) is a high-accuracy inertial rotation sensor based on the Sagnac effect. A fiber ring resonator is the core sensing element in the R-FOG. When the frequency of the fiber ring resonator input laser is swept linearly with time, ringing of the output resonance curve is observed. The output field of the fiber ring resonator is derived from the superposition of the light transmitted through the directional coupler directly and the multiple light components circulated in the fiber ring resonator when the frequency of the laser is swept. The amplitude and phase of the output field are analyzed, and it is found that the difference in time for different light components in the fiber ring resonator to reach a point of destructive interference causes the ringing phenomenon. Finally the ringing phenomenon is observed in experiments, and the experimental results agree with the theoretical analysis well. PMID:17676092

  11. Ringing phenomenon of the fiber ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Diqing; Ma, Huilian; Jin, Zhonghe

    2007-08-01

    A resonator fiber-optic gyro (R-FOG) is a high-accuracy inertial rotation sensor based on the Sagnac effect. A fiber ring resonator is the core sensing element in the R-FOG. When the frequency of the fiber ring resonator input laser is swept linearly with time, ringing of the output resonance curve is observed. The output field of the fiber ring resonator is derived from the superposition of the light transmitted through the directional coupler directly and the multiple light components circulated in the fiber ring resonator when the frequency of the laser is swept. The amplitude and phase of the output field are analyzed, and it is found that the difference in time for different light components in the fiber ring resonator to reach a point of destructive interference causes the ringing phenomenon. Finally the ringing phenomenon is observed in experiments, and the experimental results agree with the theoretical analysis well.

  12. Compact electric-LC resonators for metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Withayachumnankul, Withawat; Fumeaux, Christophe; Abbott, Derek

    2010-12-01

    Alternative designs to an electric-LC (ELC) resonator, which is a type of metamaterial inclusion, are presented in this article. Fitting the resonator with an interdigital capacitor (IDC) helps to increase the total capacitance of the structure. In effect, its resonance frequency is shifted downwards. This implies a decreased overall resonator size with respect to its operating wavelength. As a result, the metamaterial, composed of an array of IDC-loaded ELC resonators with their collective electromagnetic response, possesses improved homogeneity and hence is less influenced by diffraction effects of individual cells. The impact of incorporating an IDC into ELC resonators in terms of the electrical size at resonance and other relevant properties are investigated through both simulation and experiment in the microwave regime. The proposed structures can be applied to the terahertz and infrared regimes via appropriate lithographic scaling. PMID:21164937

  13. Hidden Sector Photon Coupling of Resonant Cavities

    E-print Network

    Stephen R. Parker; Gray Rybka; Michael E. Tobar

    2013-04-25

    Many beyond the standard model theories introduce light paraphotons, a hypothetical spin-1 field that kinetically mixes with photons. Microwave cavity experiments have traditionally searched for paraphotons via transmission of power from an actively driven cavity to a passive receiver cavity, with the two cavities separated by a barrier that is impenetrable to photons. We extend this measurement technique to account for two-way coupling between the cavities and show that the presence of a paraphoton field can alter the resonant frequencies of the coupled cavity pair. We propose an experiment that exploits this effect and uses measurements of a cavities resonant frequency to constrain the paraphoton-photon mixing parameter, chi. We show that such an experiment can improve sensitivity to chi over existing experiments for paraphoton masses less than the resonant frequency of the cavity, and eliminate some of the most common systematics for resonant cavity experiments.

  14. Resonance broadening in drift wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, O.; Grabowski, C. ); Hirose, A. )

    1990-02-01

    Turbulent diffusion of electrons in drift modes in a sheared magnetic field is studied by using a test particle numerical experiment. Electrons diffuse across the magnetic field over mode rational surfaces, where electrons interact with waves in resonance. A spatial diffusion coefficient, which describes resonance broadening, is found to be time dependent and departs from quasilinear predictions in stronger turbulence even well before the time when particles hit the resonance boundary of the rational surfaces.

  15. If It's Resonance, What is Resonating?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon under the name "resonance," which, is based on the mathematical analogy between mechanical resonance and the behavior of wave functions in quantum mechanical exchange phenomena was described. The resonating system does not have a structure intermediate between those involved in the resonance, but instead a structure which is further…

  16. Nested Trampoline Resonators for Optomechanics

    E-print Network

    Matthew J. Weaver; Brian Pepper; Fernando Luna; Frank M. Buters; Hedwig J. Eerkens; Gesa Welker; Blaise Perock; Kier Heeck; Sven de Man; Dirk Bouwmeester

    2016-01-06

    Two major challenges in the development of optomechanical devices are achieving a low mechanical and optical loss rate and vibration isolation from the environment. We address both issues by fabricating trampoline resonators made from low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) Si$_3$N$_4$ with a distributed bragg reflector (DBR) mirror. We design a nested double resonator structure with 80 dB of mechanical isolation from the mounting surface at the inner resonator frequency, and we demonstrate up to 45 dB of isolation at lower frequencies in agreement with the design. We reliably fabricate devices with mechanical quality factors of around 400,000 at room temperature. In addition these devices were used to form optical cavities with finesse up to 181,000 $\\pm$ 1,000. These promising parameters will enable experiments in the quantum regime with macroscopic mechanical resonators.

  17. Nested Trampoline Resonators for Optomechanics

    E-print Network

    Matthew J. Weaver; Brian Pepper; Fernando Luna; Frank M. Buters; Hedwig J. Eerkens; Gesa Welker; Blaise Perock; Kier Heeck; Sven de Man; Dirk Bouwmeester

    2015-10-01

    Two major challenges in the development of optomechanical devices are achieving a low mechanical and optical loss rate and vibration isolation from the environment. We address both issues by fabricating novel trampoline resonators made from low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) Si$_3$N$_4$ with a distributed bragg reflector (DBR) mirror. We construct a nested double resonator structure that generates approximately 80 dB of mechanical isolation from the mounting surface, eliminating the strong mounting dependence of the quality factor observed with single resonators. With the consistency provided by this isolation scheme we reliably fabricate devices with mechanical quality factors of around 400,000 at room temperature. In addition these devices were used to form optical cavities with finesse up to 181,000 $\\pm$ 1,000. These promising parameters will enable experiments in the quantum regime with macroscopic mechanical resonators.

  18. Nested Trampoline Resonators for Optomechanics

    E-print Network

    Weaver, Matthew J; Luna, Fernando; Buters, Frank M; Eerkens, Hedwig J; Welker, Gesa; Perock, Blaise; Heeck, Kier; de Man, Sven; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Two major challenges in the development of optomechanical devices are achieving a low mechanical and optical loss rate and vibration isolation from the environment. We address both issues by fabricating novel trampoline resonators made from low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) Si$_3$N$_4$ with a distributed bragg reflector (DBR) mirror. We construct a nested double resonator structure that generates approximately 80 dB of mechanical isolation from the mounting surface, eliminating the strong mounting dependence of the quality factor observed with single resonators. With the consistency provided by this isolation scheme we reliably fabricate devices with mechanical quality factors of around 400,000 at room temperature. In addition these devices were used to form optical cavities with finesse up to 181,000 $\\pm$ 1,000. These promising parameters will enable experiments in the quantum regime with macroscopic mechanical resonators.

  19. Automated Data Reduction for Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Experiments, Enabled by High-Resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kazazic, Sasa; Zhang, Hui-Min; Schaub, Tanner M.; Emmett, Mark R.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Blakney, Gregory T.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2010-01-01

    Mass analysis of proteolytic fragment peptides following hydrogen/deuterium exchange offers a general measure of solvent accessibility/hydrogen bonding (and thus conformation) of solution-phase proteins and their complexes. The primary problem in such mass analyses is reliable and rapid assignment of mass spectral peaks to the correct charge state and degree of deuteration of each fragment peptide, in the presence of substantial overlap between isotopic distributions of target peptides, autolysis products, and other interferant species. Here, we show that at sufficiently high mass resolving power (m/?m50% ? 100,000), it becomes possible to resolve enough of those overlaps so that automated data reduction becomes possible, based on the actual elemental composition of each peptide without the need to deconvolve isotopic distributions. We demonstrate automated, rapid, reliable assignment of peptide masses from H/D exchange experiments, based on electrospray ionization FT-ICR mass spectra from H/D exchange of solution-phase myoglobin. Combined with previously demonstrated automated data acquisition for such experiments, the present data reduction algorithm enhances automation (and thus expands generality and applicability) for high-resolution mass spectrometry- based analysis of H/D exchange of solution-phase proteins. PMID:20116280

  20. Parametric nonfeedback resonance in period doubling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarchik, A. N.; Corbalán, R.

    1999-02-01

    Slow periodic modulation of a control parameter in a period doubling system leads to an interaction between stable and unstable periodic orbits. This causes a resonance in the system response at the modulation frequency. The conditions for this resonance are studied through numerical simulations of quadratic map and laser equations. The results are confirmed by experiments in a CO2 laser with modulated losses.

  1. Sequential resonant tunneling in quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Terazzi, Romain; Gresch, Tobias; Wittmann, Andreas; Faist, Jerome

    2008-10-15

    A model of sequential resonant tunneling transport among two-dimensional subbands that takes into account explicitly elastic scattering is investigated. It is compared to transport measurements performed on quantum cascade lasers, where resonant tunneling processes are known to be dominating. Excellent agreement is found between experiment and theory over a large range of current, temperature, and device structures.

  2. Notes on Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Describes four physics experiments including "Investigation of Box Resonances Using a Micro"; "A Direct Reading Wattmeter, DC or AC"; "Exercises in the Application of Ohm's Law"; and "Hysteresis on Gas Discharges." Discusses procedures, instrumentation, and analysis in each example. (CW)

  3. Extraordinary acoustic transmission mediated by Helmholtz resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Koju, Vijay; Rowe, Ebony; Robertson, William M.

    2014-07-15

    We demonstrate perfect transmission of sound through a rigid barrier embedded with Helmholtz resonators. The resonators are confined within a waveguide and they are oriented such that one neck protrudes onto each side of the barrier. Perfect sound transmission occurs even though the open area of the necks is less than 3% of the barrier area. Maximum transmission occurs at the resonant frequency of the Helmholtz resonator. Because the dimensions of the Helmholtz resonators are much smaller than the resonant wavelength, the transmission is independent of the direction of sound on the barrier and of the relative placement of the necks. Further, we show that the transmitted sound experiences a continuous phase transition of ? radians as a function of frequency through resonance. In simulations of adjacent resonators with slightly offset resonance frequencies, the phase difference leads to destructive interference. By expanding the simulation to a linear array of tuned Helmholtz resonators we show that it is possible to create an acoustic lens. The ability of Helmholtz resonator arrays to manipulate the phase of a plane acoustic wave enables a new class of sonic beam-forming devices analogous to diffractive optics.

  4. Elemental bioimaging of thulium in mouse tissues by laser ablation-ICPMS as a complementary method to heteronuclear proton magnetic resonance imaging for cell tracking experiments.

    PubMed

    Reifschneider, Olga; Wentker, Kristina S; Strobel, Klaus; Schmidt, Rebecca; Masthoff, Max; Sperling, Michael; Faber, Cornelius; Karst, Uwe

    2015-04-21

    Due to the fact that cellular therapies are increasingly finding application in clinical trials and promise success by treatment of fatal diseases, monitoring strategies to investigate the delivery of the therapeutic cells to the target organs are getting more and more into the focus of modern in vivo imaging methods. In order to monitor the distribution of the respective cells, they can be labeled with lanthanide complexes such as thulium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclodoecane-?,?,?,?-tetramethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (Tm(DOTMA)). In this study, experiments on a mouse model with two different cell types, namely, tumor cells and macrophages labeled with Tm(DOTMA), were performed. The systemic distribution of Tm(DOTMA) of both cell types was investigated by means of laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). Using the high resolution of 25 ?m, distribution maps of Tm in different tissues such as tumor, liver, lung, and spleen as well as in explanted gel pellets were generated and the behavior of the labeled cells inside the tissue was investigated. Additionally, quantitative data were obtained using homemade matrix-matched standards based on egg yolk. Using this approach, limits of detection and quantification of 2.2 and 7.4 ng·g(-1), respectively, and an excellent linearity over the concentration range from 0.01 to 46 ?g·g(-1) was achieved. The highest concentration of the label agent, 32.4 ?g·g(-1), in tumor tissue was observed in the area of the injection of the labeled tumor cells. Regarding the second experiment with macrophages for cell tracking, Tm was detected in the explanted biogell pellet with relatively low concentrations below 60 ng·g(-1) and in the liver with a relatively high concentration of 10 ?g·g(-1). Besides thulium, aluminum was detected with equal distribution behavior in the tumor section due to a contamination resulting from the labeling procedure, which includes the usage of an Al electrode. PMID:25791208

  5. Comparison of particle-in-cell simulation with experiment for the transport system of the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source VENUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, D. S.; Leitner, D.; Leitner, M.; Lyneis, C. M.; Qiang, J.; Grote, D. P.

    2006-03-01

    The three-dimensional, particle-in-cell code WARP has been enhanced to allow end-to-end beam dynamics simulations of the VENUS beam transport system from the extraction region, through a mass-analyzing magnet, and up to a two-axis emittance scanner. This article presents the first results of comparisons between the simulation and experimental data. A helium beam (He+ and He2+) is chosen as an initial comparison beam due to its simple mass spectrum. Although a number of simplifications are made for the initial extracted beam, aberration characteristics appear in simulations that are also present in experimental phase-space current-density measurements. Further, measurements of phase-space tilt indicate that simulations must have little or no space-charge neutralization along the transport system to best agree with experiment. In addition, recent measurements of triangular beam structure immediately after the source are presented. This beam structure is related to the source magnetic confinement fields and will need to be taken into account as the initial beam approximations are lifted.

  6. Comparison of particle-in-cell simulation with experiment for the transport system of the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source VENUS

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, D.S.; Leitner, D.; Leitner, M.; Lyneis, C.M.; Qiang, J.; Grote, D.P.

    2006-03-15

    The three-dimensional, particle-in-cell code WARP has been enhanced to allow end-to-end beam dynamics simulations of the VENUS beam transport system from the extraction region, through a mass-analyzing magnet, and up to a two-axis emittance scanner. This article presents the first results of comparisons between the simulation and experimental data. A helium beam (He{sup +} and He{sup 2+}) is chosen as an initial comparison beam due to its simple mass spectrum. Although a number of simplifications are made for the initial extracted beam, aberration characteristics appear in simulations that are also present in experimental phase-space current-density measurements. Further, measurements of phase-space tilt indicate that simulations must have little or no space-charge neutralization along the transport system to best agree with experiment. In addition, recent measurements of triangular beam structure immediately after the source are presented. This beam structure is related to the source magnetic confinement fields and will need to be taken into account as the initial beam approximations are lifted.

  7. Relaxation mechanisms affecting magneto-optical resonances in an extremely thin cell: Experiment and theory for the cesium D1 line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzinsh, M.; Berzins, A.; Ferber, R.; Gahbauer, F.; Kalnins, U.; Kalvans, L.; Rundans, R.; Sarkisyan, D.

    2015-02-01

    We have measured magneto-optical signals obtained by exciting the D1 line of cesium atoms confined to an extremely thin cell (ETC), whose walls are separated by less than 1 ? m , and developed an improved theoretical model to describe these signals with experimental precision. The theoretical model was based on the optical Bloch equations and included all neighboring hyperfine transitions, the mixing of the magnetic sublevels in an external magnetic field, and the Doppler effect, as in previous studies. However, in order to model the extreme conditions in the ETC more realistically, the model was extended to include a unified treatment of transit relaxation and wall collisions with relaxation rates that were obtained directly from the thermal velocities of the atoms and the length scales involved. Furthermore, the interactions of the atoms with different regions of the laser beam were modeled separately to account for the varying laser beam intensity over the beam profile as well as saturation effects that become important near the center of the beam at the relatively high laser intensities used during the experiments in order to obtain measurable signals. The model described the experimentally measured signals for laser intensities for magnetic fields up to 55 G and laser intensities up to 1 W/cm2 with excellent agreement.

  8. Nonmonotonic Energy Dissipation in Microfluidic Resonators

    E-print Network

    Manalis, Scott R.

    Nanomechanical resonators enable a range of precision measurements in air or vacuum, but strong viscous damping makes applications in liquid challenging. Recent experiments have shown that fluid damping is greatly reduced ...

  9. Sonic resonance in a sandwiched electrorheological panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hong; Luo, Chunrong; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2005-07-01

    We have studied the sound transmission properties of a flexible sandwiched electrorheological (ER) panel. It shows that, at a frequency range of 80-150Hz, the sound pressure level spectrum exhibits a resonant peak. The resonant peak makes a shift to high frequency and the phase of the transmitted wave changes with an increase of the applied electric field. A vibration-radiation model is set up to simulate the sound radiating process and verifies a resonant effect in the ER panel in qualitative agreement with experiments. The tunable resonance effect in the ER panel would be useful in constructing tunable phononic crystals and other acoustic devices.

  10. Measuring the acoustic response of Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Martín; Marti, Arturo C.; Vogt, Patrik; Kasper, Lutz; Quarthal, Dominik

    2015-04-01

    Many experiments have been proposed to investigate acoustic phenomena in college and early undergraduate levels, in particular the speed of sound,1-9 by means of different methods, such as time of flight, transit time, or resonance in tubes. In this paper we propose to measure the acoustic response curves of a glass beaker filled with different gases, used as an acoustic resonator. We show that these curves expose many interesting peaks and features, one of which matches the resonance peak predicted for a Helmholtz resonator fairly well, and gives a decent estimate for the speed of sound in some cases. The measures are obtained thanks to the capabilities of smartphones.

  11. Stochastic Resonance and Nonlinear Response by NMR Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    L. Viola; E. M. Fortunato; S. Lloyd; C. -H. Tseng; D. G. Cory

    2000-01-26

    We revisit the phenomenon of quantum stochastic resonance in the regime of validity of the Bloch equations. We find that a stochastic resonance behavior in the steady-state response of the system is present whenever the noise-induced relaxation dynamics can be characterized via a single relaxation time scale. The picture is validated by a simple nuclear magnetic resonance experiment in water.

  12. Mechanism of metallization and superconductivity suppression in YBa2(Cu0.97 Zn0.03)3 O6.92 revealed by 67Zn NQR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelc, D.; Požek, M.; Despoja, V.; Sunko, D. K.

    2015-08-01

    We measure the nuclear quadrupole resonance signal on the Zn site in nearly optimally doped YBa2Cu3O6.92, when Cu is substituted by 3% of isotopically pure 67Zn. We observe that Zn creates large insulating islands, confirming two earlier conjectures: that doping provokes an orbital transition in the CuO2 plane, which is locally reversed by Zn substitution, and that the islands are antiferromagnetic. Also, we find that the Zn impurity locally induces a breaking of the D4 symmetry. Cluster and DFT calculations show that the D4 symmetry breaking is due to the same partial lifting of degeneracy of the nearest-neighbor oxygen sites as in the LTT transition in {La}{}2-xBaxCuO4, similarly well-known to strongly suppress superconductivity (SC). These results show that in-plane oxygen 2p5 orbital configurations are principally involved in the metallicity and SC of all high-Tc cuprates, and provide a qualitative symmetry-based constraint on the SC mechanism.

  13. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    DOEpatents

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  14. Resonance in a head massager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Jair Lúcio Prados

    2015-04-01

    Mechanical structures such as pendula, bridges, or buildings always exhibit one (or more) natural oscillation frequency.1 If that structure is subjected to oscillatory forces of this same frequency, resonance occurs, with consequent increase of the structure oscillation amplitude. There is no shortage of simple experiments for demonstrating resonance in high school classes using a variety of materials, such as saw blades,2 guitars,3 pendulums,4 wine glasses,5 bottles,6 Ping-Pong balls,7 and pearl strings.8 We present here an experimental demonstration using only an inexpensive head (or scalp) massager, which can be purchased for less than a dollar.

  15. Cooling of a resonant circuit via laser cooled ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniilidis, Nikos; Moeller, Soenke; Tabakov, Boyan; Bradley, Aaron; Haeffner, Hartmut

    2011-05-01

    We discuss our experimental progress towards coupling strings of trapped ions to an LC-resonator. The goal of our experiments is to cool the resonant mode of a superconducting high-quality resonant circuit to ultra-low temperatures. By continuously laser cooling a crystal of ions coupled to the circuit, energy is removed from the resonator. For quality factors on the order of 105, the time-scale of the environment-to-mode coupling, i.e. the time for the resonant mode of the LC-resonator to thermally equilibrate, can be on the order of a second. Thus, engineering an ion-resonator coupling of 10 kHz results in a reduction of the resonant mode temperature by four orders of magnitude as compared to the ambient temperature of the resonator. The expected temperatures, below 1 mK, approach the vibrational ground state of the oscillator mode.

  16. Persistence, resistance, resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsadka, Maayan

    Sound cannot travel in a vacuum, physically or socially. The ways in which sound operates are a result of acoustic properties, and the ways by which it is considered to be music are a result of social constructions. Therefore, music is always political, regardless of its content: the way it is performed and composed; the choice of instrumentation, notation, tuning; the medium of its distribution; its inherent hierarchy and power dynamics, and more. My compositional praxis makes me less interested in defining a relationship between music and politics than I am in erasing---or at least blurring---the borders between them. In this paper I discuss the aesthetics of resonance and echo in their metaphorical, physical, social, and musical manifestations. Also discussed is a political aesthetic of resonance, manifested through protest chants. I transcribe and analyze common protest chants from around the world, categorizing and unifying them as universal crowd-mobilizing rhythms. These ideas are explored musically in three pieces. Sumud: Rhetoric of Resistance in Three Movements, for two pianos and two percussion players, is a musical interpretation of the political/social concept of sumud, an Arabic word that literally means "steadfastness" and represents Palestinian non-violent resistance. The piece is based on common protest rhythms and uses the acoustic properties inherent to the instruments. The second piece, Three Piano Studies, extends some of the musical ideas and techniques used in Sumud, and explores the acoustic properties and resonance of the piano. The final set of pieces is part of my Critical Mess Music Project. These are site-specific musical works that attempt to blur the boundaries between audience, performers and composer, in part by including people without traditional musical training in the process of music making. These pieces use the natural structure and resonance of an environment, in this case, locations on the UCSC campus, and offer an active form of musical consumption and experience. The three pieces draw lines connecting different aspects of persistence, resistance, and resonance.

  17. Notes on Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Describes: (1) two experiments using a laser (resonant cavity for light and pinhole camera effect with a hologram); (2) optical differaction patterns displayed by microcomputer; and (3) automating the Hall effect (with comments on apparatus needed and computer program used); and (4) an elegant experiment in mechanical equilibrium. (JN)

  18. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvie, T.P.

    1989-10-01

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed.

  19. Electroexcitation of nucleon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Inna Aznauryan, Volker D. Burkert

    2012-01-01

    We review recent progress in the investigation of the electroexcitation of nucleon resonances, both in experiment and in theory. The most accurate results have been obtained for the electroexcitation amplitudes of the four lowest excited states, which have been measured in a range of Q2 up to 8 and 4.5 GeV2 for the Delta(1232)P33, N(1535)S11 and N(1440)P11, N(1520)D13, respectively. These results have been confronted with calculations based on lattice QCD, large-Nc relations, perturbative QCD (pQCD), and QCD-inspired models. The amplitudes for the Delta(1232) indicate large pion-cloud contributions at low Q2 and don't show any sign of approaching the pQCD regime for Q2<7 GeV2. Measured for the first time, the electroexcitation amplitudes of the Roper resonance, N(1440)P11, provide strong evidence for this state as a predominantly radial excitation of a three-quark (3q) ground state, with additional non-3-quark contributions needed to describe the low Q2 behavior of the amplitudes. The longitudinal transition amplitude for the N(1535)S11 was determined and has become a challenge for quark models. Explanations may require large meson-cloud contributions or alternative representations of this state. The N(1520)D13 clearly shows the rapid changeover from helicity-3/2 dominance at the real photon point to helicity-1/2 dominance at Q2 > 0.5 GeV2, confirming a long-standing prediction of the constituent quark model. The interpretation of the moments of resonance transition form factors in terms of transition transverse charge distributions in infinite momentum frame is presented.

  20. Cross-field potential hill arisen eccentrically in toroidal electron cyclotron resonance plasmas in the Low Aspect ratio Torus Experiment device to regulate electron and ion flows from source to boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Kengoh; Wada, Manato; Uchida, Masaki; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Maekawa, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    We have investigated the electron and ion flows in toroidal electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas maintained by a 2.45 GHz microwave power around 1 kW under a simple toroidal field in the low aspect ratio torus experiment (LATE) device. We have found that a vertically uniform ridge of electron pressure that also constitutes the source belt of electron impact ionization is formed along just lower field side of the ECR layer and a cross-field potential hill ({{V}S}\\cong 30?V while {{T}e}\\cong 10?eV), eccentrically shifted toward the corner formed by the top panel and the ECR layer, arises. Combination of the hill-driven E× B drift and the vertical drift due to the field gradient and curvature, being referred to as vacuum toroidal field (VTF) drift, realizes steady flows of electrons and ions from the source to the boundary. In particular, the ions, of which VTF drift velocity is much slower than the electron VTF drift velocity near the source belt, are carried by the E× B drift around the hill to the vicinity of the top panel, where the ion VTF drift is enhanced on the steep down slope of potential toward the top panel. On the other hand the electron temperature strongly decreases in this area. Thus the carrier of VTF drift current is replaced from the electrons to the ions before the top panel, enabling the current circulation through the top and bottom panels and the vessel (electrons mainly to the bottom and ions mainly to the top) that keeps the charge neutrality very high. A few percent of electrons from the source turn around the hill by 360 degree and reentry the source belt from the high field side as seed electrons for the impact ionization, keeping the discharge stable.

  1. X-ray M{sub 4,5} resonant Raman scattering from La metal with a final 4p hole: Calculations with 4p-4d-4f configuration interaction in the final state and comparison to experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, M.; Braicovich, L.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Tagliaferri, A.; Borgatti, F.; Dallera, C.; Giarda, K.; Brookes, N. B.

    2001-06-15

    We consider the x-ray resonant Raman scattering (RRS) in La in the whole M{sub 4,5} region ending with a state with a 4p hole, along the sequence 3d{sup 10}4f{sup 0}{r_arrow}3d{sup 9}4f{sup 1}{r_arrow}3d{sup 10}4p{sup 5}4f{sup 1}. The final state configuration mixes with that with two 4d holes, i.e., 3d{sup 10}4d{sup 8}4f{sup n+2} having almost the same energy. Thus RRS must be described by introducing final-state configuration interaction (CI) between states with one 4p hole and with two 4d holes. This approach allows detailed experimental data on La metal to be interpreted on the basis of a purely ionic approach. It is shown that the inclusion of CI is crucial and has very clear effects. The calculations with the Kramers-Heisenberg formula describe all measured spectral features appearing in the strict Raman regime, i.e., dispersing with the incident photon energy. In the experiment also a nondispersive component is present when the excitation energy is greater than about 2 eV above the M{sub 5} peak. The shape and position of this component is well accounted for by a model based on all possible partitions of the excitation energy between localized and extended states. However the intensity of the nondispersive component is greater in the measurements, suggesting a rearrangement in the intermediate excited state. The comparison of ionic calculations with the metal measurements is legitimate, as shown by the comparison between the measurements on La metal and on LaF{sub 3} with M{sub 5} excitation giving the same spectrum within the experimental accuracy. Moreover the experiment shows that the final lifetime broadening is much greater in the final states corresponding to lower outgoing photon energies than in the states corresponding to higher outgoing photon energies.

  2. Integral data analysis for resonance parameters determination

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Derrien, H.

    1997-09-01

    Neutron time-of-flight experiments have long been used to determine resonance parameters. Those resonance parameters have then been used in calculations of integral quantities such as Maxwellian averages or resonance integrals, and results of those calculations in turn have been used as a criterion for acceptability of the resonance analysis. However, the calculations were inadequate because covariances on the parameter values were not included in the calculations. In this report an effort to correct for that deficiency is documented: (1) the R-matrix analysis code SAMMY has been modified to include integral quantities of importance, (2) directly within the resonance parameter analysis, and (3) to determine the best fit to both differential (microscopic) and integral (macroscopic) data simultaneously. This modification was implemented because it is expected to have an impact on the intermediate-energy range that is important for criticality safety applications.

  3. Composite arrays of superconducting microstrip line resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Mohebbi, H. R. Miao, G. X.; Benningshof, O. W. B.; Taminiau, I. A. J.; Cory, D. G.

    2014-03-07

    A novel design of an array of half-wave superconductive microstrip resonators is described. The resonator is intended to be useful for electron spin resonance studies of thin film samples at cryogenic temperatures. It achieves a high quality factor, has a small mode-volume, and creates a uniform magnetic field in a plane above the resonator. The device is made of thin film Niobium on sapphire wafer and is tested with a static magnetic field. Variation of Q-factor versus the magnetic field's strength at different temperatures is reported and is in a good agreement with simulation when the loss due to the vortices is included. Also, the power-dependence response of the resonator is shown in experiments and is verified by capturing the nonlinearity associated with the surface impedance of the superconducting film into the circuit model of the device.

  4. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    John Bulava; Robert Edwards; George Fleming; K. Jimmy Juge; Adam C. Lichtl; Nilmani Mathur; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Stephen J. Wallace

    2007-06-16

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  5. Confinement-induced resonances in anharmonic waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Shiguo; Hu Hui; Liu Xiaji; Drummond, Peter D.

    2011-10-15

    We develop the theory of anharmonic confinement-induced resonances (ACIRs). These are caused by anharmonic excitation of the transverse motion of the center of mass (c.m.) of two bound atoms in a waveguide. As the transverse confinement becomes anisotropic, we find that the c.m. resonant solutions split for a quasi-one-dimensional (1D) system, in agreement with recent experiments. This is not found in harmonic confinement theories. A new resonance appears for repulsive couplings (a{sub 3D}>0) for a quasi-two-dimensional (2D) system, which is also not seen with harmonic confinement. After inclusion of anharmonic energy corrections within perturbation theory, we find that these ACIRs agree extremely well with anomalous 1D and 2D confinement-induced resonance positions observed in recent experiments. Multiple even- and odd-order transverse ACIRs are identified in experimental data, including up to N=4 transverse c.m. quantum numbers.

  6. Integral resonator gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor); Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Hayworth, Ken J. (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean V. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention discloses an inertial sensor having an integral resonator. A typical sensor comprises a planar mechanical resonator for sensing motion of the inertial sensor and a case for housing the resonator. The resonator and a wall of the case are defined through an etching process. A typical method of producing the resonator includes etching a baseplate, bonding a wafer to the etched baseplate, through etching the wafer to form a planar mechanical resonator and the wall of the case and bonding an end cap wafer to the wall to complete the case.

  7. Alpha resonant scattering for astrophysical reaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Nakao, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kubano, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kawabata, T.; Iwasa, N.; Teranishi, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. G.

    2014-05-02

    Several alpha-induced astrophysical reactions have been studied at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), which is a low-energy RI beam separator at Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. One of the methods to study them is the ? resonant scattering using the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. Among the recent studies at CRIB, the measurement of {sup 7}Be+? resonant scattering is discussed. Based on the result of the experiment, we evaluated the contributions of high-lying resonances for the {sup 7}Be(?,?) reaction, and proposed a new cluster band in {sup 11}C.

  8. Resonances in barred galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceverino, D.; Klypin, A.

    2007-08-01

    The inner parts of many spiral galaxies are dominated by bars. These are strong non-axisymmetric features which significantly affect orbits of stars and dark matter particles. One of the main effects is the dynamical resonances between galactic material and the bar. We detect and characterize these resonances in N-body models of barred galaxies by measuring angular and radial frequencies of individual orbits. We found narrow peaks in the distribution of orbital frequencies with each peak corresponding to a specific resonance. We found five different resonances in the stellar disc and two in the dark matter. The corotation resonance (CR) and the inner and outer Lindblad resonances are the most populated. The spatial distributions of particles near resonances are wide. For example, the inner Lindblad resonance is not localized at a given radius. Particles near this resonance are mainly distributed along the bar and span a wide range of radii. On the other hand, particles near the CR are distributed in two broad areas around the two stable Lagrange points. The distribution resembles a wide ring at the corotation radius. Resonances capture disc and halo material in near-resonant orbits. Our analysis of orbits in both N-body simulations and simple analytical models indicates that resonances tend to prevent the dynamical evolution of this trapped material. Only if the bar evolves as a whole, resonances drift through the phase space. In this case particles anchored near resonant orbits track the resonance shift and evolve. The criteria to ensure a correct resonant behaviour discussed by Weinberg and Katz can be achieved with few millions particles because the regions of trapped orbits near resonances are large and evolving.

  9. Stability Limits in Resonant Planetary Systems

    E-print Network

    Rory Barnes; Richard Greenberg

    2007-06-25

    The relationship between the boundaries for Hill and Lagrange stability in orbital element space is modified in the case of resonantly interacting planets. Hill stability requires the ordering of the planets to remain constant while Lagrange stability also requires all planets to remain bound to the central star. The Hill stability boundary is defined analytically, but no equations exist to define the Lagrange boundary, so we perform numerical experiments to estimate the location of this boundary. To explore the effect of resonances, we consider orbital element space near the conditions in the HD 82943 and 55 Cnc systems. Previous studies have shown that, for non-resonant systems, the two stability boundaries are nearly coincident. However the Hill stability formula are not applicable to resonant systems, and our investigation shows how the two boundaries diverge in the presence of a mean-motion resonance, while confirming that the Hill and Lagrange boundaries are similar otherwise. In resonance the region of stability is larger than the domain defined by the analytic formula for Hill stability. We find that nearly all known resonant interactions currently lie in this extra stable region, i.e. where the orbits would be unstable according to the non-resonant Hill stability formula. This result bears on the dynamical packing of planetary systems, showing how quantifying planetary systems' dynamical interactions (such as proximity to the Hill-stability boundary) provides new constraints on planet formation models.

  10. Tailored Asymmetry for Enhanced Coupling to WGM Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohageg, Makan; Maleki, Lute

    2008-01-01

    Coupling of light into and out of whispering- gallery-mode (WGM) optical resonators can be enhanced by designing and fabricating the resonators to have certain non-axisymmetric shapes (see figure). Such WGM resonators also exhibit the same ultrahigh values of the resonance quality factor (Q) as do prior WGM resonators. These WGM resonators are potentially useful as tunable narrow-band optical filters having throughput levels near unity, high-speed optical switches, and low-threshold laser resonators. These WGM resonators could also be used in experiments to investigate coupling between high-Q and chaotic modes within the resonators. For a WGM resonator made of an optically nonlinear material (e.g., lithium niobate) or another material having a high index of refraction, a prism made of a material having a higher index of refraction (e.g., diamond) must be used as part of the coupling optics. For coupling of a beam of light into (or out of) the high-Q resonator modes, the beam must be made to approach (or recede from) the resonator at a critical angle determined by the indices of refraction of the resonator and prism materials. In the case of a lithium niobate/diamond interface, this angle is approximately 22 .

  11. Crossing simple resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1985-08-01

    A simple criterion governs the beam distortion and/or loss of protons on a fast resonance crossing. Results from numerical integrations are illustrated for simple sextupole, octupole, and 10-pole resonances.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Your Best Self Smart Snacking Losing Weight Safely Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > Teens > Cancer Center > Diagnostic Tests > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A Text Size What's ...

  13. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Radiation-Emitting Products and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... MB) Also available in Other Language versions . Description Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure ...

  14. Nanomechanical resonance detector

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Jeffrey C; Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-10-29

    An embodiment of a nanomechanical frequency detector includes a support structure and a plurality of elongated nanostructures coupled to the support structure. Each of the elongated nanostructures has a particular resonant frequency. The plurality of elongated nanostructures has a range of resonant frequencies. An embodiment of a method of identifying an object includes introducing the object to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the object. An embodiment of a method of identifying a molecular species of the present invention includes introducing the molecular species to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the molecular species.

  15. Molecular resonance phenomena. [Calculation of resonance widths

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A.U.

    1980-01-01

    It is attempted to show that the Stieltjes-moment-theory provides a practical and a reasonably accurate method for calculating the widths of molecular resonances. The method seems to possess a number of advantages for molecular applications, since it avoids the explicit construction of continuum wavefunctions. It is very simple to implement the technique numerically, because it requires only existing bound-state electronic structure codes. Through the use of configuration interaction techniques, many-electron correlation and polarization effects can be included in the description of both the resonance and the non-resonant background continuum. To illustrate the utility and the accuracy of the Stieltjes-moment-theory technique, used in conjunction with configuration interaction (CI) wave functions, recent applications to the /sup 1/..sigma../sub u/(1sigma/sub u/ 2sigma/sub g/) autoionizing resonance state of H/sub 2/ and the well known /sup 2/PI/sub g/ state of N/sub 2//sup -/ are discussed. The choices of the one-electron basis sets and the types of many-electron configurations appropriate for these two cases are described. Also, guidelines for the selection of the projection operators defining the resonant and non-resonant subspaces in the case of both Feshbach and shape-resonances are given. The numerical results indicate that the Stieltjes-moment-theory technique, which employs L/sup 2/ basis functions exclusively, produces as accurate resonance parameters as can be extracted from direct electron-molecule scattering calculations, provided approximately the same approximations are used to describe important physical effects such as target polarization. Furthermore the method provides sufficiently accurate fixed-nuclei electronic resonance parameters to be used in ab initio calculation of resonant vibrational excitation cross sections. (WHK)

  16. Resonant Association of Feshbach Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Thomas M.; Köhler, Thorsten; Burnett, Keith

    2007-06-01

    In recent experiments, Feshbach molecules have been associated using resonant modulation of a magnetic field close to a zero-energy resonance [1, 2]. We analyse the dependence of this process upon the duration, amplitude and frequency of the modulation, as well as the temperature and density of the gas. A modulation of angular frequency ?L resonantly couples a pair of atoms with relative kinetic energy p^2/m = h?L + Eb^av to the molecular state, where Eb^av is the molecular bound state energy. The presence of a continuum of modes around this energy has a strong influence on the final conversion efficiency. Shifts in the modulation frequency giving maximum conversion are created by the amplitude of the modulation and the temperature of the gas. We discuss the importance of mean-field effects at short times, and predict that resonant association can be effective for binding energies of order h x1 MHz. [1] S. T. Thompson, E. Hodby and C. E. Wieman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 190404 (2005). [2] S. B. Papp and C. E. Wieman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 180404 (2006).

  17. N+CPT clock resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Crescimanno, M.; Hohensee, M.

    2008-12-15

    In a typical compact atomic time standard a current modulated semiconductor laser is used to create the optical fields that interrogate the atomic hyperfine transition. A pair of optical sidebands created by modulating the diode laser become the coherent population trapping (CPT) fields. At the same time, other pairs of optical sidebands may contribute to other multiphoton resonances, such as three-photon N-resonance [Phys. Rev. A 65, 043817 (2002)]. We analyze the resulting joint CPT and N-resonance (hereafter N+CPT) analytically and numerically. Analytically we solve a four-level quantum optics model for this joint resonance and perturbatively include the leading ac Stark effects from the five largest optical fields in the laser's modulation comb. Numerically we use a truncated Floquet solving routine that first symbolically develops the optical Bloch equations to a prescribed order of perturbation theory before evaluating. This numerical approach has, as input, the complete physical details of the first two excited-state manifolds of {sup 87}Rb. We test these theoretical approaches with experiments by characterizing the optimal clock operating regimes.

  18. Gallium nitride nanowire electromechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Jason Michael

    Nanoscale mechanical resonators are of great interest for high-resolution sensing applications, where the small resonator mass and high quality factor (Q, defined as resonance frequency f0 over full width at half maximum power) lead to unprecedented sensitivity. Here, we investigate gallium nitride (GaN) nanowire (NW) resonators. The single-crystal, c-axis NWs are 5 mum -- 20 mum long, with diameters from 50 nm -- 500 nm, and grow essentially free of defects. Our initial experiments involve measuring the resonances of as-grown NWs in a scanning electron microscope, where we observe exceptionally high Q values of 10 4 -- 105, one to two orders of magnitude higher than most NWs of comparable size. Using a single NW as a mass sensor, we then demonstrate a sub-attogram mass sensitivity. To provide a more flexible measurement technique that avoids electron-microscope detection, we fabricate doubly clamped NWs with an entirely electronic drive and readout scheme using a combination of lithographic patterning and dielectrophoresis. An electrostatic gate induces vibration, while readout utilizes the piezoresistivity of GaN. Observed resonances range from 9--36 MHz with Q values typically around 103 at room temperature and 10 -4 Pa. We use the behavior of f0 and Q to sense the NW's local environment, such as the additional sources of energy dissipation not present in the as-grown NWs. By cooling the device to 8 K, Q increases by an order of magnitude to above 104, with a highest value to date of 26,000 under vacuum. We explore additional NW properties through the thermal noise in the NW's mechanical motion and the exponential decay of mechanical motion in the presence of burst drive. Finally, we investigate the low-frequency 1/f parameter noise displayed by f0. We show that the noise in f0 is consistent with noise in the NW's resistance leading to temperature noise from local Joule heating, which in turn generates resonance frequency noise. For sensor applications, there will be optimal drive conditions that balance the f 0 noise with the signal-to-noise ratio of the system. With these insights, along with the simple drive and readout technique, these GaN-NW doubly clamped resonators have significant potential for high-resolution sensing applications.

  19. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew, E. R.

    2009-06-01

    Author's preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Basic theory; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Measurement of nuclear properties and general physical applications; 5. Nuclear magnetic resonance in liquids and gases; 6. Nuclear magnetic resonance in non-metallic solids; 7. Nuclear magnetic resonance in metals; 8. Quadrupole effects; Appendices 1-6; Glossary of symbols; Bibliography and author index; Subject index.

  20. ELECTRON PARAMAGNETIC RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY

    E-print Network

    Crofts, Antony R.

    CHAPTER 3 ELECTRON PARAMAGNETIC RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY 1 Sergei A. Dikanov and 2 Antony R. Crofts 1 for the investigation of unpaired electron spins. Two terms are used in the literature: electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron spin resonance (ESR). We will use the first term in this chapter. During the sixty

  1. Ovenized microelectromechanical system (MEMS) resonator

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kim, Bongsang

    2014-03-11

    An ovenized micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) resonator including: a substantially thermally isolated mechanical resonator cavity; a mechanical oscillator coupled to the mechanical resonator cavity; and a heating element formed on the mechanical resonator cavity.

  2. Initial TMX central-cell ICRH experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A.W.; Coffield, F.E.; Falabella, S.; Griffin, D.; McVey, B.; Pickles, W.; Poulsen, P.; Simonen, T.C.; Yugo, J.

    1980-12-09

    Four topics are discussed in this report: the feasibility of applying ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in the TMX central cell, some applications of heating, the results of preliminary experiments, and plans for further ICRH experiments.

  3. Hafnium neutron cross sections and resonance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trbovich, Michael J.

    The focus of this thesis is to determine resonance parameters for the stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005--200 eV region, with emphasis on the overlapping 176Hf and 178Hf resonances near 8 eV. The large neutron cross section of hafnium, combined with its corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties, make it an ideal material for controlling nuclear reactions. Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission were performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) LINAC using the time of flight method. Transmission experiments utilized 6Li glass scintillation detectors at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m. Capture experiments were done using a sixteen section NaI(Tl) multiplicity type detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized various thicknesses of metallic and isotope-enriched liquid samples. The liquid samples were designed to provide information on the 176Hf and 178Hf contributions to the 8 eV doublet without saturation. Data analysis was done using the R-matrix Bayesian fitting code SAMMY version M6 beta. SAMMY is able to account for experimental resolution effects for each of the experimental setups at the RPI LINAC, and also can correct for some of the multiple scattering effects in yield data. The resolution function for specific experimental setups was determined. A method was developed for estimating errors on the fitted resonance parameters due to uncertainties in the resolution function parameters. The combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all stable hafnium isotopes from 0.005--200 eV. Resonance integrals were calculated along with errors for each of the hafnium isotopes using the NJOY and INTER codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than some of the previous values; however the calculated elemental hafnium resonance integral changed very little.

  4. Searches for resonances decaying to top

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Jorg; /Gottingen U.

    2008-04-01

    Searches for resonances decaying to top pairs in p{anti p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV are presented. An upper limit on the production of a narrow width resonance is given using 2.1 fb{sup -1} data collected by the D0 experiment. Limits on the couplings of a massive gluon are given and a measurement of the differential cross section d{sigma}/dM{sub t{anti t}} is presented using 1.9 fb{sup -1} data collected by the CDF experiment.

  5. NMR and NQR parameters of ethanol crystal

    E-print Network

    Milinkovic, M

    2012-01-01

    Electric field gradients and chemical shielding tensors of the stable monoclinic crystal phase of ethanol are computed. The projector-augmented wave (PAW) and gauge-including projector-augmented wave (GIPAW) models in the periodic plane-wave density functional theory are used. The crystal data from X-ray measurements, as well as the structures where either all atomic, or only hydrogen atom positions are optimized in the density functional theory are analyzed. These structural models are also studied by including the semi-empirical Van der Waals correction to the density functional theory. Infrared spectra of these five crystal models are calculated.

  6. Resonances in nonintegrable open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nockel, Jens Uwe

    1997-11-01

    Resonances arising in elastic scattering or emission problems are investigated as a probe of the Kolmogorov- Arnol'd-Moser (KAM) transition to chaos and its wave manifestations. The breaking of symmetries that leads to this transition affects all the intrinsic properties of a resonance, which suggests applications where these properties can be controlled and predicted in parameter ranges beyond the reach of perturbation theory. Convex dielectric optical microcavties are studied which support long-lived 'whispering-gallery' (WG) modes that classically correspond to rays trapped by total internal reflection in orbits close to the interface with the outside lower-index medium. These resonantors with substantial but always convex deformation are termed asymmetric resonant cavities (ARCs). The connection between individual resonances and ray ensembles in an asymmetric billiard is established via a novel application of Einstein-Brillouin-Keller (EBK) quantization, based on the adiabatic approximation of Robnik and Berry which describes WG trajectories even when the deformation exceeds the threshold at which Lazutkin's caustics cease to exist in the relevant regions of phase space. At such strong distortions, resonance lifetimes are determined not by the wavelength as in symmetric cavities, but by the classical diffusion time from the EBK initial condition in phase space to an escape window corresponding to classical violation of the total internal reflection condition. Instead of the isotropic emission from rotationally invariant objects, highly asymmetric resonantors exhibit strongly peaked intensity in directions which can be predicted from the phase space structure near the classical escape window. This creates unambiguous finger- prints of the KAM transition in the emission anisotropy of ARCs, which are universal for all classically chaotic WG modes. Ray calculations are compared to numerical wave solutions as well as to experiments, and good agreement is found especially for the directionality. Ray predictions for the lifetimes fail when wave mechanical corrections such as chaos-assisted tunneling and dynamical localization are important.

  7. Tuning the Resonance in High Temperature Superconducting Terahertz Metamaterials

    E-print Network

    Chen, Hou-Tong; Singh, Ranjan; O'Hara, John F; Azad, Abul K; Trugman, Stuart A; Jia, Q X; Taylor, Antoinette J

    2010-01-01

    In this Letter we present resonance properties in terahertz metamaterials consisting of a split-ring resonator array made from high temperature superconducting films. By varying the temperature, we observed efficient metamaterial resonance switching and frequency tuning with some features not revealed before. The results were well reproduced by numerical simulations of metamaterial resonance using the experimentally measured complex conductivity of the superconducting film. We developed a theoretical model that explains the tuning features, which takes into account the resistive resonance damping and additional split-ring inductance contributed from both the real and imaginary parts of the temperature-dependent complex conductivity. The theoretical model further predicted more efficient resonance switching and frequency shifting in metamaterials consisting of a thinner superconducting split-ring resonator array, which were also verified in experiments.

  8. The Resonator Banjo Resonator, part 2: What makes them really crack?

    E-print Network

    Politzer, David

    2015-01-01

    A simple experiment quantifies the difference between the sound production of a banjo with and without a resonator back. Driven by a small tweeter mounted inside the pot, for frequencies above about 4500 Hz, the produced external sound is 6 to 10 dB louder with the resonator than without. With the banjo played in any normal fashion, this gives a negligible contribution to the overall volume. However, that difference is clearly a reflection of the universally recognized resonator sound, in close analogy to plosive consonants in human speech. No direct correlation is observed between the head-resonator separation and the spectrum of the enhanced response. This suggests that direct reflection off the back is not a primary contributor to the resonator/openback difference, leaving differences in overall absorption as the major suspect.

  9. Miniature Sapphire Acoustic Resonator - MSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    A room temperature sapphire acoustics resonator incorporated into an oscillator represents a possible opportunity to improve on quartz ultrastable oscillator (USO) performance, which has been a staple for NASA missions since the inception of spaceflight. Where quartz technology is very mature and shows a performance improvement of perhaps 1 dB/decade, these sapphire acoustic resonators when integrated with matured quartz electronics could achieve a frequency stability improvement of 10 dB or more. As quartz oscillators are an essential element of nearly all types of frequency standards and reference systems, the success of MSAR would advance the development of frequency standards and systems for both groundbased and flight-based projects. Current quartz oscillator technology is limited by quartz mechanical Q. With a possible improvement of more than x 10 Q with sapphire acoustic modes, the stability limit of current quartz oscillators may be improved tenfold, to 10(exp -14) at 1 second. The electromagnetic modes of sapphire that were previously developed at JPL require cryogenic temperatures to achieve the high Q levels needed to achieve this stability level. However sapphire fs acoustic modes, which have not been used before in a high-stability oscillator, indicate the required Q values (as high as Q = 10(exp 8)) may be achieved at room temperature in the kHz range. Even though sapphire is not piezoelectric, such a high Q should allow electrostatic excitation of the acoustic modes with a combination of DC and AC voltages across a small sapphire disk (approximately equal to l mm thick). The first evaluations under this task will test predictions of an estimated input impedance of 10 kilohms at Q = 10(exp 8), and explore the Q values that can be realized in a smaller resonator, which has not been previously tested for acoustic modes. This initial Q measurement and excitation demonstration can be viewed similar to a transducer converting electrical energy to mechanical energy and back. Such an electrostatic tweeter type excitation of a mechanical resonator will be tested at 5 MHz. Finite element calculation will be applied to resonator design for the desired resonator frequency and optimum configuration. The experiment consists of the sapphire resonator sandwiched between parallel electrodes. A DC+AC voltage can be applied to generate a force to act on a sapphire resonator. With the frequency of the AC voltage tuned to the sapphire resonator frequency, a resonant condition occurs and the sapphire Q can be measured with a high-frequency impedance analyzer. To achieve high Q values, many experimental factors such as vacuum seal, gas damping effects, charge buildup on the sapphire surface, heat dissipation, sapphire anchoring, and the sapphire mounting configuration will need attention. The effects of these parameters will be calculated and folded into the resonator design. It is envisioned that the initial test configuration would allow for movable electrodes to check gap spacing dependency and verify the input impedance prediction. Quartz oscillators are key components in nearly all ground- and space-based communication, tracking, and radio science applications. They play a key role as local oscillators for atomic frequency standards and serve as flywheel oscillators or to improve phase noise in high performance frequency and timing distribution systems. With ultra-stable performance from one to three seconds, an Earth-orbit or moon-based MSAR can enhance available performance options for spacecraft due to elimination of atmospheric path degradation.

  10. Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, C. M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Ng, J. S.T.; Grote, D. P.; Pivi, M. T. F.; Wang, L. F.

    2009-04-29

    A new set of resonances for electron cloud dynamics in the presence of a magnetic field has been found. For short beam bunch lengths and low magnetic fields where lb<< 2pi c/omega c (with lb = bunch length, omega c = non-relativistic cyclotron frequency) resonances between the bunch frequency and harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency cause an increase in the electron cloud density in narrow ranges of magnetic field near the resonances. For ILC parameters the increase in the density is up to a factor ~;;3, and the spatial distribution of the electrons is broader near resonances, lacking the well-defined vertical density"stripes" found for non-resonant cases. Simulations with the 2D computer code POSINST, as well as a single-particle tracking code, were used to elucidate the physics of the dynamics. The existence of the resonances has been confirmed in experiments at PEP-II. The resonances are expected to affect the electron cloud dynamics in the fringe fields of conventional lattice magnets and in wigglers, where the magnetic fields are low. Results of the simulations and experimental observations, the reason for the bunch-length dependence, and details of the dynamics are discussed here.

  11. Subwavelength total acoustic absorption with degenerate resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Min; Meng, Chong; Fu, Caixing; Li, Yong; Yang, Zhiyu; Sheng, Ping

    2015-09-01

    We report the experimental realization of perfect sound absorption by sub-wavelength monopole and dipole resonators that exhibit degenerate resonant frequencies. This is achieved through the destructive interference of two resonators' transmission responses, while the matching of their averaged impedances to that of air implies no backscattering, thereby leading to total absorption. Two examples, both using decorated membrane resonators (DMRs) as the basic units, are presented. The first is a flat panel comprising a DMR and a pair of coupled DMRs, while the second one is a ventilated short tube containing a DMR in conjunction with a sidewall DMR backed by a cavity. In both examples, near perfect absorption, up to 99.7%, has been observed with the airborne wavelength up to 1.2 m, which is at least an order of magnitude larger than the composite absorber. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment is obtained.

  12. Tuning of resonance spacing over whole free spectral range based on Autler-Townes splitting in a single microring resonator.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ge; Li, Danping; Zhang, Yong; Yuan, Shuai; Armghan, Ammar; Huang, Qingzhong; Wang, Yi; Yu, Jinzhong; Xia, Jinsong

    2015-10-19

    In this paper, a single microring resonator structure formed by incorporating a reflectivity-tunable loop mirror is demonstrated for the tuning of resonance spacing. Autler-Townes splitting in the resonator is utilized to tune the spacing between two adjacent resonances by controlling the strength of coupling between the two counter-propagating degenerate modes in the microring resonator. A theoretical model based on the transfer matrix method is built to analyze the device. The theoretical analysis indicates that the resonance spacing can be tuned from zero to one free spectral range (FSR). In experiment, by integrating metallic microheater, the tuning of resonance spacing in the range of the whole FSR (1.17 nm) is achieved within 9.82 mW heating power dissipation. The device has potential for applications in reconfigurable optical filtering and microwave photonics. PMID:26480351

  13. Solar array flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, J.

    1985-01-01

    This is a closed form solution for the longitudinal oscillation of the Solar Array Flight Experiment (SAFE) blanket for all phases of deployment. The frequency response shows that the blanket frequency increases shortly before full deployment. That fact causes a coupling between the mast and the blanket frequency but, because of the relatively high speed of deployment, a buildup of resonance is unlikely.

  14. Notes on Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    An experiment on cooling by convection, holographic processes achieved using optical fibers and observation of magnetic domains are described. Also describes four demonstrations: mechanical resonance on air track, independence of horizontal/vertical motion, motion of sphere in fluid medium, and light scattering near the critical point. (JN)

  15. An NMR Kinetics Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Don; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Outlines advantages of and provides background information, procedures, and typical student data for an experiment determining rate of hydration of p-methyoxyphenylacetylene (III), followed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Reaction rate can be adjusted to meet time framework of a particular laboratory by altering concentration of…

  16. A Vibrating String Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsutsumanova, Gichka; Russev, Stoyan

    2013-01-01

    A simple experiment demonstrating the excitation of a standing wave in a metal string is presented here. Several tasks using the set-up are considered, which help the students to better understand the standing waves, the interaction between electric current and magnetic field and the resonance phenomena. This can serve also as a good lecture…

  17. Abstract-In this study, imaging of electrical current density in conducting objects, which contain nuclear magnetic resonance

    E-print Network

    Eyüboðlu, Murat

    nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) active nuclei is planned using 0.15T Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. Experiments performed on several phantoms and the results are presented. Keywords - Magnetic Resonance Imaging]. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging techniques can be used to image the current density J . Joy et al. [6

  18. Experimental Proof of Resonant Auger Decay Driven Intermolecular Coulombic Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinter, F.; Schöffler, M. S.; Kim, H.-K.; Sturm, F.; Cole, K.; Neumann, N.; Vredenborg, A.; Williams, J.; Bocharova, I.; Guillemin, R.; Simon, M.; Belkacem, A.; Landers, A. L.; Weber, Th; Schmidt-Böcking, H.; Dörner, R.; Jahnke, T.

    2014-04-01

    Resonant Auger decay driven Intermolecular Coulombic Decay through synchrotron radiation in gas phase carbon monoxided dimers and nitrogen dimers has been studied. We report the first experiment where the low-energy ICD-electron has been measured in coincidence with the ionic fragments and Resonant Auger ICD has been proved experimentally.

  19. Observation of Fano resonances in highly doped semiconductors plasmonic resonators (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taliercio, Thierry; Ntsame Guilengui, Vilianne; Rodriguez, Jean-Baptiste; Cerutti, Laurent; Tournié, Eric

    2015-09-01

    All-semiconductor plasmonics gives the opportunity to build new plasmonic structures with embedded resonators of highly doped semiconductor (HDSC) in a matrix of un-doped semiconductor for mid-IR applications. In this work, we report on the excitation of Fano resonances in the mid-infrared range using plasmonic resonators based on HDSC. Using adequate semiconductors, InAsSb and GaSb grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), we have designed the right structure to obtain the expected optical properties. The samples are lattice matched to the GaSb substrate which offers the possibility to integrate the plasmonic resonators at the heart of photonic devices. The embedded nanostructures have been studied by high-resolution transmission electron-microscopy (HR-TEM) to accurately retrieve the geometrical parameters of the resonator. These actual geometrical parameters have then been used to model the optical properties of the HDSC resonators by the FDTD technique and a model based on Fano resonances. Excellent agreement has been achieved between simulation and experiments. We show that it is possible to control the optical properties of the plasmonic resonators by adjusting their geometrical parameters or the doping level of the HDSC. This work demonstrates the possibility to develop all-semiconductor plasmonics for photonic applications in the mid-IR range.

  20. Scattering by coupled resonating elements in air

    E-print Network

    Anton Krynkin; Olga Umnova; Alvin Y. B. Chong; Shahram Taherzadeh; Keith Attenborough

    2011-01-12

    Scattering by (a) a single composite scatterer consisting of a concentric arrangement of an outer N-slit rigid cylinder and an inner cylinder which is either rigid or in the form of a thin elastic shell and (b) by a finite periodic array of these scatterers in air has been investigated analytically and through laboratory experiments. The composite scatterer forms a system of coupled resonators and gives rise to multiple low frequency resonances. The corresponding analytical model employs polar angle dependent boundary conditions on the surface of the N-slit cylinder. The solution inside the slits assumes plane waves. It is shown also that in the low-frequency range the N-slit rigid cylinder can be replaced by an equivalent fluid layer. Further approximations suggest a simple square root dependence of the resonant frequencies on the number of slits and this is confirmed by data. The observed resonant phenomena are associated with Helmholtz-like behaviour of the resonator for which the radius and width of the openings are much smaller than the wavelength. The problem of scattering by a finite periodic array of such coupled resonators in air is solved using multiple scattering techniques. The resulting model predicts band-gap effects resulting from the resonances of the individual composite scatterers below the first Bragg frequency . Predictions and data confirm that use of coupled resonators results in substantial insertion loss peaks related to the resonances within the concentric configuration. In addition, for both scattering problems experimental data, predictions of the analytical approach and predictions of the equivalent fluid layer approximations are compared in the low-frequency interval.

  1. Thermal Resonance Fusion

    E-print Network

    Bao-Guo Dong

    2015-07-07

    We first show a possible mechanism to create a new type of nuclear fusion, thermal resonance fusion, i.e. low energy nuclear fusion with thermal resonance of light nuclei or atoms, such as deuterium or tritium. The fusion of two light nuclei has to overcome the Coulomb barrier between these two nuclei to reach up to the interacting region of nuclear force. We found nuclear fusion could be realized with thermal vibrations of crystal lattice atoms coupling with light atoms at low energy by resonance to overcome this Coulomb barrier. Thermal resonances combining with tunnel effects can greatly enhance the probability of the deuterium fusion to the detectable level. Our low energy nuclear fusion mechanism research - thermal resonance fusion mechanism results demonstrate how these light nuclei or atoms, such as deuterium, can be fused in the crystal of metal, such as Ni or alloy, with synthetic thermal vibrations and resonances at different modes and energies experimentally. The probability of tunnel effect at different resonance energy given by the WKB method is shown that indicates the thermal resonance fusion mode, especially combined with the tunnel effect, is possible and feasible. But the penetrating probability decreases very sharply when the input resonance energy decreases less than 3 keV, so for thermal resonance fusion, the key point is to increase the resonance peak or make the resonance sharp enough to the acceptable energy level by the suitable compound catalysts, and it is better to reach up more than 3 keV to make the penetrating probability larger than 10^{-10}.

  2. Electrodynamics of a ring-shaped spiral resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Maleeva, N.; Karpov, A.; Averkin, A.; Fistul, M. V.; Zhuravel, A. P.; Jung, P.; Ustinov, A. V.

    2014-02-14

    We present analytical, numerical, and experimental investigations of electromagnetic resonant modes of a compact monofilar Archimedean spiral resonator shaped in a ring, with no central part. Planar spiral resonators are interesting as components of metamaterials for their compact deep-subwavelength size. Such resonators couple primarily to the magnetic field component of the incident electromagnetic wave, offering properties suitable for magnetic meta-atoms. Surprisingly, the relative frequencies of the resonant modes follow the sequence of the odd numbers as f{sub 1}:f{sub 2}:f{sub 3}:f{sub 4}…?=?1:3:5:7…, despite the nearly identical boundary conditions for electromagnetic fields at the extremities of the resonator. In order to explain the observed spectrum of resonant modes, we show that the current distribution inside the spiral satisfies a particular Carleman type singular integral equation. By solving this equation, we obtain a set of resonant frequencies. The analytically calculated resonance frequencies and the current distributions are in good agreement with experimental data and the results of numerical simulations. By using low-temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting spiral resonator, we compare the experimentally visualized ac current distributions over the spiral with the calculated ones. Theory and experiment agree well with each other. Our analytical model allows for calculation of a detailed three-dimensional magnetic field structure of the resonators.

  3. Transverse response functions in the $?$-resonance region

    E-print Network

    E. Rost; C. E. Price; J. R. Shepard

    1992-10-22

    We calculate transverse response functions for quasi-elastic electron scattering at high momentum transfers in a relativistic Hartree approximation in configuration space. We treat the excitation of the $\\Delta$ resonance using its free mass and width. Good agreement with experiment is found in the dip region.

  4. After the Standard Model: New Resonances at the LHC

    E-print Network

    G. Brooijmans

    2009-01-25

    Experiments will soon start taking data at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with high expectations for discovery of new physics phenomena. Indeed, the LHC's unprecedented center-of-mass energy will allow the experiments to probe an energy regime where the standard model is known to break down. In this article, the experiments' capability to observe new resonances in various channels is reviewed.

  5. P- and T-violation Tests with Polarized Resonance Neutrons

    E-print Network

    V. Bunakov; Y. Novikov

    1998-11-17

    The enhancements of CP-violating effects in resonance neutron transmissionthrough polarized targets are studied for 2 possible versions of experiment. The importance is stressed of error analysis and of pseudomagnetic effects' compensation.

  6. Neutron Resonance Spin Determination Using Multi-Segmented Detector DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becvar, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Keksis, A. L.; Krticka, M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Walker, C.; Wouters, J. M.

    2011-06-01

    A sensitive method to determine the spin of neutron resonances is introduced based on the statistical pattern recognition technique. The new method was used to assign the spins of s-wave resonances in 155Gd. The experimental neutron capture data for these nuclei were measured with the DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiment) calorimeter at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The highly segmented calorimeter provided detailed multiplicity distributions of the capture ?-rays. Using this information, the spins of the neutron capture resonances were determined. With these new spin assignments, level spacings are determined separately for s-wave resonances with J? = 1- and 2-.

  7. The resonator handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jerry D.; Zhou, Shiliang

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to extend resonator theory into the region in which the planar mirror is quite small. Results of the theoretical description are then extended to resonator design and experimental arrangements as discussed in further sections of this work. Finally, a discussion of dielectric measurements for small samples is included as a specific application of this work.

  8. The Concept of Resonance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truhlar, Donald G.

    2007-01-01

    A general example of a delocalization system associated with a higher energy than the localized one, which suggests that it is wrong to consider delocalization as equivalent to resonance stabilization, is presented. The meaning of resonance energy as it appears in valence bond theory is described as the lowering of the calculated ground-state…

  9. Helioseismology The Resonant Sun

    E-print Network

    Helioseismology The Resonant Sun Professor Bill Chaplin, School of Physics & Astronomy University Eddington #12;The Unseen Interior ''At first sight it would seem that the deep interior of the sun and stars;Overview What are resonant oscillations of the Sun? How do we observe the oscillations? What can we learn

  10. Bayesian Spatiotemporal Modeling using Hierarchical Spatial Priors with Applications to Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-print Network

    Jones, Galin

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging Martin Bezener School of Statistics University of Minnesota, Twin Cities martin@umn.edu December 9, 2014 Abstract Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has recently become a popular tool functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments that consist of presenting tasks to a subject

  11. Resonant snubber inverter

    DOEpatents

    Lai, J.S.; Young, R.W. Sr.; Chen, D.; Scudiere, M.B.; Ott, G.W. Jr.; White, C.P.; McKeever, J.W.

    1997-06-24

    A resonant, snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the main inverter switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter. 14 figs.

  12. Neutrino Production of Resonances

    E-print Network

    Paschos, E A; Yu, J Y; Paschos, Emmanuel A.; Sakuda, Makoto; Yu, Ji--Young

    2004-01-01

    We take a fresh look at the analysis of resonance production by neutrinos. We consider three resonances $P_{33}, P_{11}$ and $S_{11}$ with a detailed discussion of their form factors. The article presents results for free proton and neutron targets and discusses the corrections which appear on nuclear targets. The Pauli suppression factor is derived in the Fermi gas model and shown to apply to resonance production. The importance of the various resonances is demonstrated with numerical calculations. The $\\Delta$-resonance is described by two formfactors and its differential cross sections are compared with experimental data. The article is self-contained and could be helpful to readers who wish to reproduce and use these cross sections.

  13. Narrowband resonant transmitter

    DOEpatents

    Hutchinson, Donald P.; Simpson, Marcus L.; Simpson, John T.

    2004-06-29

    A transverse-longitudinal integrated optical resonator (TLIR) is disclosed which includes a waveguide, a first and a second subwavelength resonant grating in the waveguide, and at least one photonic band gap resonant structure (PBG) in the waveguide. The PBG is positioned between the first and second subwavelength resonant gratings. An electro-optic waveguide material may be used to permit tuning the TLIR and to permit the TLIR to perform signal modulation and switching. The TLIR may be positioned on a bulk substrate die with one or more electronic and optical devices and may be communicably connected to the same. A method for fabricating a TLIR including fabricating a broadband reflective grating is disclosed. A method for tuning the TLIR's transmission resonance wavelength is also disclosed.

  14. Resonant snubber inverter

    DOEpatents

    Lai, Jih-Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Young, Sr., Robert W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Chen, Daoshen (Knoxville, TN); Scudiere, Matthew B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ott, Jr., George W. (Knoxville, TN); White, Clifford P. (Knoxville, TN); McKeever, John W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1997-01-01

    A resonant, snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the main inverter switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter.

  15. Resonance phenomena in Macroscopic Quantum Tunneling: the small viscosity limit

    E-print Network

    Yu. N. Ovchinnikov; S. Rombetto; B. Ruggiero; V. Corato; P. Silvestrini

    2006-11-25

    We present a new theoretical approach to describe the quantum behavior of a macroscopic system interacting with an external irradiation field, close to the resonant condition. Here we consider the extremely underdamped regime for a system described by a double well potential. The theory includes both: transitions from one well to the other and relaxation processes. We simulate resonant phenomena in a rf-SQUID, whose parameters lie in the range typically used in the experiments. The dependence of the transition probability W on the external drive of the system $\\phi_x$ shows three resonance peaks. One peak is connected with the resonant tunneling and the two others with the resonant pumping. The relative position of the two peaks correlated to the resonant pumping depends on the pumping frequency $\

  16. Magnetic levitation of metamaterial bodies enhanced with magnetostatic surface resonances

    E-print Network

    Urzhumov, Yaroslav; Bingham, Chris; Padilla, Willie; Smith, David R

    2011-01-01

    We propose that macroscopic objects built from negative-permeability metamaterials may experience resonantly enhanced magnetic force in low-frequency magnetic fields. Resonant enhancement of the time-averaged force originates from magnetostatic surface resonances (MSR) which are analogous to the electrostatic resonances of negative-permittivity particles, well known as surface plasmon resonances in optics. We generalize the classical problem of MSR of a homogeneous object to include anisotropic metamaterials, and consider the most extreme case of anisotropy where the permeability is negative in one direction but positive in the others. It is shown that deeply subwavelength objects made of such indefinite (hyperbolic) media exhibit a pronounced magnetic dipole resonance that couples strongly to uniform or weakly inhomogeneous magnetic field and provides strong enhancement of the magnetic force, enabling applications such as enhanced magnetic levitation.

  17. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-03-22

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom's stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and--by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen--the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave radiation to flip the spin of the positron in antihydrogen atoms that were magnetically trapped in the ALPHA apparatus. The spin flip causes trapped anti-atoms to be ejected from the trap. We look for evidence of resonant interaction by comparing the survival rate of trapped atoms irradiated with microwaves on-resonance to that of atoms subjected to microwaves that are off-resonance. In one variant of the experiment, we detect 23 atoms that survive in 110 trapping attempts with microwaves off-resonance (0.21 per attempt), and only two atoms that survive in 103 attempts with microwaves on-resonance (0.02 per attempt). We also describe the direct detection of the annihilation of antihydrogen atoms ejected by the microwaves. PMID:22398451

  18. Suppression of Helmholtz resonance using inside acoustic liner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Zhiliang; Dai, Xiwen; Zhou, Nianfa; Sun, Xiaofeng; Jing, Xiaodong

    2014-08-01

    When a Helmholtz resonator is exposed to grazing flow, an unstable shear layer at the opening can cause the occurrence of acoustic resonance under appropriate conditions. In this paper, in order to suppress the flow-induced resonance, the effects of inside acoustic liners placed on the side wall or the bottom of a Helmholtz resonator are investigated. Based on the one-dimensional sound propagation theory, the time domain impedance model of a Helmholtz resonator with inside acoustic liner is derived, and then combined with a discrete vortex model the resonant behavior of the resonator under grazing flow is simulated. Besides, an experiment is conducted to validate the present model, showing significant reduction of the peak sound pressure level achieved by the use of the side-wall liners. And the simulation results match reasonably well with the experimental data. The present results reveal that the inside acoustic liner can not only absorb the resonant sound pressure, but also suppress the fluctuation motion of the shear layer over the opening of the resonator. In all, the impact of the acoustic liners is to dampen the instability of the flow-acoustic coupled system. This demonstrates that it is a convenient and effective method for suppressing Helmholtz resonance by using inside acoustic liner.

  19. Imbalanced Feshbach-resonant Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzihovsky, Leo; Sheehy, Daniel E.

    2010-07-01

    We present an overview of recent developments in species-imbalanced ('polarized') Feshbach-resonant Fermi gases. We summarize the current status of thermodynamics of these systems in terms of a phase diagram as a function of the Feshbach resonance detuning, polarization and temperature. We review instabilities of the s-wave superfluidity across the Bose-Einstein condensation-to-Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer crossover to phase separation, Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov states, polarized molecular superfluidity and the normal state, driven by the species imbalance. We discuss different models and approximations of this system and compare their predictions with current experiments.

  20. Baryon resonances in the strangeness production

    E-print Network

    Xie, Ju-Jun; Wu, Jia-Jun

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the $N^*(2120)$, $\\Delta^*(1940)$, and the possible $\\Sigma^*(1380)$ resonances in the $\\gamma p \\to K^+ \\Lambda(1520)$, $pp \\to n K^+ \\Sigma(1385)$, and $\\Lambda p \\to \\Lambda p \\pi^0$ reactions within the resonance model and the effective Lagrangian approach. It is shown that when the contributions from these baryonic states were considered, the current experimental measurement could be well reproduced. In addition, we also demonstrate that the angular distributions provide direct information of these reactions, which could be useful for the investigation of those states and may be tested by future experiments.

  1. Resonant Auger studies of metallic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Coulthard, I.; Antel, W. J., Jr.; Frigo, S. P.; Freeland, J. W.; Moore, J.; Calaway, W. S.; Pellin, M. J.; Mendelsohn, M.; Sham, T. K.; Naftel, S. J.; Stampfl, A. P. J.

    1999-10-21

    Results of resonant Auger spectroscopy experiments are presented for Cu, Co, and oxidized Al. Sub-lifetime narrowing of Auger spectra and generation of sub-lifetime narrowed absorption spectra constructed from Auger yield measurements, were observed. Resonant Auger yields are used to identify three valence states of oxidized Al. Partial absorption yield spectra were derived giving detailed electronic information and thickness information for the various chemical states of the bulk metal, the passivating aluminum oxide layer, and the metal-oxide interface region. In addition, the total absorption yield spectrum for the oxidized Al sample was constructed from the partial yield data, supporting the consistency of the authors method.

  2. Magnetic resonance neurography of the brachial plexus

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Vaishali; Upadhyaya, Divya Narain; Kumar, Adarsh; Pandey, Ashok Kumar; Gujral, Ratni; Singh, Arun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is being increasingly recognised all over the world as the imaging modality of choice for brachial plexus and peripheral nerve lesions. Recent refinements in MRI protocols have helped in imaging nerve tissue with greater clarity thereby helping in the identification, localisation and classification of nerve lesions with greater confidence than was possible till now. This article on Magnetic Resonance Neurography (MRN) is based on the authors’ experience of imaging the brachial plexus and peripheral nerves using these protocols over the last several years. PMID:26424974

  3. Microwave Oscillators Based on Nonlinear WGM Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute; Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2006-01-01

    Optical oscillators that exploit resonantly enhanced four-wave mixing in nonlinear whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonators are under investigation for potential utility as low-power, ultra-miniature sources of stable, spectrally pure microwave signals. There are numerous potential uses for such oscillators in radar systems, communication systems, and scientific instrumentation. The resonator in an oscillator of this type is made of a crystalline material that exhibits cubic Kerr nonlinearity, which supports the four-photon parametric process also known as four-wave mixing. The oscillator can be characterized as all-optical in the sense that the entire process of generation of the microwave signal takes place within the WGM resonator. The resonantly enhanced four-wave mixing yields coherent, phase-modulated optical signals at frequencies governed by the resonator structure. The frequency of the phase-modulation signal, which is in the microwave range, equals the difference between the frequencies of the optical signals; hence, this frequency is also governed by the resonator structure. Hence, further, the microwave signal is stable and can be used as a reference signal. The figure schematically depicts the apparatus used in a proof-of-principle experiment. Linearly polarized pump light was generated by an yttrium aluminum garnet laser at a wavelength of 1.32 microns. By use of a 90:10 fiber-optic splitter and optical fibers, some of the laser light was sent into a delay line and some was transmitted to one face of glass coupling prism, that, in turn, coupled the laser light into a crystalline CaF2 WGM disk resonator that had a resonance quality factor (Q) of 6x10(exp 9). The output light of the resonator was collected via another face of the coupling prism and a single-mode optical fiber, which transmitted the light to a 50:50 fiber-optic splitter. One output of this splitter was sent to a slow photodiode to obtain a DC signal for locking the laser to a particular resonator mode. The other output of this splitter was combined with the delayed laser signal in another 50:50 fiber-optic splitter used as a combiner. The output.of the combiner was fed to a fast photodiode that demodulated light and generated microwave signal. In this optical configuration, the resonator was incorporated into one arm of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, which was necessary for the following reasons: It was found that when the output of the resonator was sent directly to a fast photodiode, the output of the photodiode did not include a measurable microwave signal. However, when the resonator was placed in an arm of the interferometer and the delay in the other arm was set at the correct value, the microwave signal appeared. Such behavior is distinctly characteristic of phase-modulated light. The phase-modulation signal had a frequency of about 8 GHz, corresponding to the free spectral range of the resonator. The spectral width of this microwave signal was less than 200 Hz. The threshold pump power for generating the microwave signal was about 1 mW. It would be possible to reduce the threshold power by several orders of magnitude if resonators could be made from crystalline materials in dimensions comparable to those of micro-resonators heretofore made from fused silica.

  4. Plasmon Resonance in Multilayer Graphene Nanoribbons

    E-print Network

    Emani, Naresh Kumar; Chung, Ting-Fung; Prokopeva, Ludmila J; Kildishev, Alexander V; Shalaev, Vladimir M; Chen, Yong P; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Plasmon resonance in nanopatterned single layer graphene nanoribbon (SL-GNR), double layer graphene nanoribbon (DL-GNR) and triple layer graphene nanoribbon (TL-GNR) structures is studied both experimentally and by numerical simulations. We use 'realistic' graphene samples in our experiments to identify the key bottle necks in both experiments and theoretical models. The existence of electrical tunable plasmons in such stacked multilayer GNRs was first experimentally verified by infrared microscopy. We find that the strength of the plasmonic resonance increases in DL-GNR when compared to SL-GNRs. However, we do not find a further such increase in TL-GNRs compared to DL-GNRs. We carried out systematic full wave simulations using finite element technique to validate and fit experimental results, and extract the carrier scattering rate as a fitting parameter. The numerical simulations show remarkable agreement with experiments for unpatterned SLG sheet, and a qualitative agreement for patterned graphene sheet. W...

  5. Artificial Excitation of Schumann Resonance with HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streltsov, A. V.; Chang, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    We report results from the experiment aimed at the artificial excitation of extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic waves with frequencies corresponding to the frequency of Schumann resonance (typically, 7.5 - 8.0 Hz frequency range). Electromagnetic waves with these frequencies can form a standing pattern inside the spherical cavity formed by the surface of the earth and the ionosphere. In the experiment the ELF waves were excited by heating the ionosphere with X-mode HF electromagnetic waves generated by the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska. The experiment demonstrates that heating of the ionosphere can excite relatively large-amplitude electromagnetic waves with frequencies in the range of the Schumann resonance, when the ionosphere has a strong F-layer and an electric field greater than 5 mV/m is present in the E-region.

  6. LABCOM resonator Phase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Keres, L.J.

    1990-11-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop quartz crystal resonator designs, production processes, and test capabilities for 5-MHz, 6.2-MHz, and 10-MHz resonators for Tactical Miniature Crystal Oscillator (TMXO) applications. GE Neutron Devices (GEND) established and demonstrated the capability to produce and test quartz crystal resonators for use in the TMXO developed by the US Army ERADCOM (now LABCOM). The goals in this project were based on the ERADCOM statement of work. The scope of work indicated that the resonator production facilities for this project would not be completely independent, but that they would be supported in part by equipment and processes in place at GEND used in US Department of Energy (DOE) work. In addition, provisions for production test equipment or or eventual technology transfer costs to a commercial supplier were clearly excluded from the scope of work. The demonstrated technical capability of the deep-etched blank design is feasible and practical. It can be manufactured in quantity with reasonable yield, and its performance is readily predictable. The ceramic flatpack is a very strong package with excellent hermeticity. The four-point mount supports the crystal to reasonable shock levels and does not perturb the resonator's natural frequency-temperature behavior. The package can be sealed with excellent yields. The high-temperature, high-vacuum processing developed for the TMXO resonator, including bonding the piezoid to its mount with conductive polyimide adhesive, is consistent with precision resonator fabrication. 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  7. Spin dynamics in CuO and Cu[sub 1[minus][ital x

    SciTech Connect

    Carretta, P.; Corti, M.; Rigamonti, A. )

    1993-08-01

    [sup 63]Cu nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), nuclear antiferromagnetic resonance (AFNMR), and spin-lattice relaxation, as well as [sup 7]Li NMR and relaxation measurements in CuO and in Cu[sub 1[minus][ital x

  8. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alex K. (Kensington, CA); Jensen, Kenneth J. (Berkeley, CA); Girit, Caglar (Albany, CA); Mickelson, William E. (San Francisco, CA); Grossman, Jeffrey C. (Berkeley, CA)

    2011-03-29

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  9. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Girit, Caglar O; Mickelson, William E; Zettl, Alexander K; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2013-11-05

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  10. Spin resonance strength calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Courant,E.D.

    2008-10-06

    In calculating the strengths of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  11. Perspective on resonances of metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Min, Li; Huang, Lirong

    2015-07-27

    Electromagnetic resonance as the most important characteristic of metamaterials enables lots of exotic phenomena, such as invisible, negative refraction, man-made magnetism, etc. Conventional LC-resonance circuit model as the most authoritative and classic model is good at explaining and predicting the fundamental resonance wavelength of a metamaterial, while feels hard for high-order resonances, especially for resonance intensity (strength of resonance, determining on the performance and efficiency of metamaterial-based devices). In present work, via an easy-to-understand mass-spring model, we present a different and comprehensive insight for the resonance mechanism of metamaterials, through which both the resonance wavelengths (including the fundamental and high-order resonance wavelengths) and resonance intensities of metamaterials can be better understood. This developed theory has been well verified by different-material and different-structure resonators. This perspective will provide a broader space for exploring novel optical devices based on metamaterials (or metasurfaces). PMID:26367565

  12. Evaluations of Resonance Parameters and Resonance Integral of Tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moinul Haque Meaze, A. K. M.

    2007-03-01

    I present evaluated values of resonance parameters and resonance integral for natural tungsten on the basis of experimental transmissions data obtained at the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF), Republic of Korea. Resonance parameters were obtained by using the Bayesian code SAMMY. The output values of SAMMY were used to evaluate the resonance integral for the capture cross-section.

  13. Fabry-Perot resonance of water waves.

    PubMed

    Couston, Louis-Alexandre; Guo, Qiuchen; Chamanzar, Maysamreza; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-10-01

    We show that significant water wave amplification is obtained in a water resonator consisting of two spatially separated patches of small-amplitude sinusoidal corrugations on an otherwise flat seabed. The corrugations reflect the incident waves according to the so-called Bragg reflection mechanism, and the distance between the two sets controls whether the trapped reflected waves experience constructive or destructive interference within the resonator. The resulting amplification or suppression is enhanced with increasing number of ripples and is most effective for specific resonator lengths and at the Bragg frequency, which is determined by the corrugation period. Our analysis draws on the analogous mechanism that occurs between two partially reflecting mirrors in optics, a phenomenon named after its discoverers Charles Fabry and Alfred Perot. PMID:26565340

  14. Fabry-Perot resonance of water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couston, Louis-Alexandre; Guo, Qiuchen; Chamanzar, Maysamreza; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-10-01

    We show that significant water wave amplification is obtained in a water resonator consisting of two spatially separated patches of small-amplitude sinusoidal corrugations on an otherwise flat seabed. The corrugations reflect the incident waves according to the so-called Bragg reflection mechanism, and the distance between the two sets controls whether the trapped reflected waves experience constructive or destructive interference within the resonator. The resulting amplification or suppression is enhanced with increasing number of ripples and is most effective for specific resonator lengths and at the Bragg frequency, which is determined by the corrugation period. Our analysis draws on the analogous mechanism that occurs between two partially reflecting mirrors in optics, a phenomenon named after its discoverers Charles Fabry and Alfred Perot.

  15. The LHC diphoton resonance and dark matter

    E-print Network

    Mambrini, Yann; Djouadi, Abdelhak

    2015-01-01

    A Higgs-like resonance with a mass of approximately 750 GeV has recently been observed at the LHC in its diphoton decay. If this state is not simply a statistical fluctuation which will disappear with more data, it will have important implications not only for particle physics but also for cosmology. In this note, we analyze the implications of such a resonance for the dark matter (DM). Assuming a spin 1/2 DM particle, we first verify that indeed the correct relic density can be obtain for a wide range of the particle mass and weak scale coupling that are compatible with present data. We then show that the combination of near future direct and indirect detection experiments will allow to probe the CP-nature of the mediator resonance, i.e. check whether it is a scalar or a pseudoscalar like particle.

  16. Astatine and Yttrium Resonant Ionization Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teigelhoefer, Andrea

    Providing intense, contamination-free beams of rare isotopes to experiments is a challenging task. At isotope separator on-line facilities such as ISAC at TRIUMF, the choice of production target and ion source are key to the successful beam delivery. Due to their element-selectivity, high efficiency and versatility, resonant ionization laser ion sources (RILIS) gain increasingly in importance. The spectroscopic data available are typically incomplete in the region of excited- and autoionizing atomic states. In order to find the most efficient ionization scheme for a particular element, further spectroscopy is often required. The development of efficient laser resonant ionization schemes for yttrium and astatine is presented in this thesis. For yttrium, two ionization schemes with comparable relative intensities were found. Since for astatine, only two transitions were known, the focus was to provide data on atomic energy levels using resonance ionization spectroscopy. Altogether 41 previously unknown astatine energy levels were found.

  17. Micro-machined resonator

    DOEpatents

    Godshall, N.A.; Koehler, D.R.; Liang, A.Y.; Smith, B.K.

    1993-03-30

    A micro-machined resonator, typically quartz, with upper and lower micro-machinable support members, or covers, having etched wells which may be lined with conductive electrode material, between the support members is a quartz resonator having an energy trapping quartz mesa capacitively coupled to the electrode through a diaphragm; the quartz resonator is supported by either micro-machined cantilever springs or by thin layers extending over the surfaces of the support. If the diaphragm is rigid, clock applications are available, and if the diaphragm is resilient, then transducer applications can be achieved. Either the thin support layers or the conductive electrode material can be integral with the diaphragm. In any event, the covers are bonded to form a hermetic seal and the interior volume may be filled with a gas or may be evacuated. In addition, one or both of the covers may include oscillator and interface circuitry for the resonator.

  18. Resonances in QCD

    E-print Network

    Lutz, Matthias F M; Pennington, Michael; Bettoni, Diego; Brambilla, Nora; Crede, Volker; Eidelman, Simon; Gillitzer, Albrecht; Gradl, Wolfgang; Lang, Christian B; Metag, Volker; Nieves, Juan; Neubert, Sebastian; Oka, Makoto; Olsen, Steve L; Pappagallo, Marco; Paul, Stephan; Pelizäus, Marc; Pilloni, Alessandro; Prencipe, Elisabetta; Ritman, Jim; Ryan, Sinead; Thoma, Ulrike; Uwer, Ulrich; Weise, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    We report on the EMMI Rapid Reaction Task Force meeting 'Resonances in QCD', which took place at GSI October 12-14, 2015. A group of 26 people met to discuss the physics of resonances in QCD. The aim of the meeting was defined by the following three key questions: What is needed to understand the physics of resonances in QCD? Where does QCD lead us to expect resonances with exotic quantum numbers? What experimental efforts are required to arrive at a coherent picture? For light mesons and baryons only those with ${\\it up}$, ${\\it down}$ and ${\\it strange}$ quark content were considered. For heavy-light and heavy-heavy meson systems, those with ${\\it charm}$ quarks were the focus. This document summarizes the discussions by the participants, which in turn led to the coherent conclusions we present here.

  19. Resonances in QCD

    E-print Network

    Matthias F. M. Lutz; Jens Sören Lange; Michael Pennington; Diego Bettoni; Nora Brambilla; Volker Crede; Simon Eidelman; Albrecht Gillitzer; Wolfgang Gradl; Christian B. Lang; Volker Metag; Juan Nieves; Sebastian Neubert; Makoto Oka; Steve L. Olsen; Marco Pappagallo; Stephan Paul; Marc Pelizäus; Alessandro Pilloni; Elisabetta Prencipe; Jim Ritman; Sinead Ryan; Ulrike Thoma; Ulrich Uwer; Wolfram Weise

    2015-11-30

    We report on the EMMI Rapid Reaction Task Force meeting 'Resonances in QCD', which took place at GSI October 12-14, 2015. A group of 26 people met to discuss the physics of resonances in QCD. The aim of the meeting was defined by the following three key questions: What is needed to understand the physics of resonances in QCD? Where does QCD lead us to expect resonances with exotic quantum numbers? What experimental efforts are required to arrive at a coherent picture? For light mesons and baryons only those with ${\\it up}$, ${\\it down}$ and ${\\it strange}$ quark content were considered. For heavy-light and heavy-heavy meson systems, those with ${\\it charm}$ quarks were the focus. This document summarizes the discussions by the participants, which in turn led to the coherent conclusions we present here.

  20. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method provides a unique characterization of an object for use in distinguishing similar objects having physical differences greater than a predetermined tolerance. A resonant response spectrum is obtained for a reference object by placing excitation and detection transducers at any accessible location on the object. The spectrum is analyzed to determine the number of resonant response peaks in a predetermined frequency interval. The distribution of the resonance frequencies is then characterized in a manner effective to form a unique signature of the object. In one characterization, a small frequency interval is defined and stepped though the spectrum frequency range. Subsequent objects are similarly characterized where the characterizations serve as signatures effective to distinguish objects that differ from the reference object by more than the predetermined tolerance.

  1. Chemical resonant sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter R.

    1993-03-01

    Resonant sensors designed to have a mechanical resonance frequency are a subject of special practical interest. They are sensors with outputs based on a quasi-digital frequency signal which is a great advantage over conventional analog sensors. Micromachined mechanical resonant sensors can be used to replace conventional piezoresistors in precision sensor applications such as pressure sensors and accelerometers. For the detecting of chemical species, only a part of known resonant sensor principles can be used for practical aims. Ultrasonic sensors can be classified in this category. They include BAW-, SAW-, APM-, and FPW-sensors. The theoretical concepts for their behavior and the advantages and disadvantages in comparison with other chemical sensors are discussed. Experimental results with BAW-sensors for gas and under-liquid sensing are given. Finally, the actual situation in research and industrial application of this sensor class is reviewed.

  2. Micro-machined resonator

    DOEpatents

    Godshall, Ned A. (Albuquerque, NM); Koehler, Dale R. (Albuquerque, NM); Liang, Alan Y. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Bradley K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01

    A micro-machined resonator, typically quartz, with upper and lower micro-machinable support members, or covers, having etched wells which may be lined with conductive electrode material, between the support members is a quartz resonator having an energy trapping quartz mesa capacitively coupled to the electrode through a diaphragm; the quartz resonator is supported by either micro-machined cantilever springs or by thin layers extending over the surfaces of the support. If the diaphragm is rigid, clock applications are available, and if the diaphragm is resilient, then transducer applications can be achieved. Either the thin support layers or the conductive electrode material can be integral with the diaphragm. In any event, the covers are bonded to form a hermetic seal and the interior volume may be filled with a gas or may be evacuated. In addition, one or both of the covers may include oscillator and interface circuitry for the resonator.

  3. Electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Goennenwein, S. T. B.; Schink, S. W.; Brandlmaier, A.; Boger, A.; Opel, M.; Gross, R.; Keizer, R. S.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Gupta, A.; Huebl, H.; Bihler, C.; Brandt, M. S.

    2007-04-16

    We study the magnetoresistance properties of thin ferromagnetic CrO{sub 2} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films under microwave irradiation. Both the sheet resistance {rho} and the Hall voltage V{sub Hall} characteristically change when a ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) occurs in the film. The electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance (EDFMR) signals closely match the conventional FMR, measured simultaneously, in both resonance fields and line shapes. The sign and the magnitude of the resonant changes {delta}{rho}/{rho} and {delta}V{sub Hall}/V{sub Hall} can be consistently described in terms of a Joule heating effect. Bolometric EDFMR thus is a powerful tool for the investigation of magnetic anisotropy and magnetoresistive phenomena in ferromagnetic micro- or nanostructures.

  4. Resonances in Positronium Hydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiRienzi, Joseph; Drachman, Richard J.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We re-examine the problem of calculating the positions and widths of the lowest-lying resonances in the Ps + H scattering system which consists of two electrons, one positron and one proton. The first of these resonances, for L=0, was found by the methods of complex rotation and stabilization, and later described as a Feshbach resonance lying close to a bound state in the closed-channel e (+) + H (-) system. Recently, results for the L=1 and 2 scattering states were published, and it was found, surprisingly, that there is a larae shift in the positions of these resonances. In this work we repeat the analysis for L=1 and find an unexpected explanation for the shift.

  5. Resonance searches with the $t\\overline{t}$ Invariant Mass Distribution measured with the D\\O\\, Experiment at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\,\\textrm{TeV}

    SciTech Connect

    Schliephake, Thorsten Dirk; /Wuppertal U.

    2010-06-01

    Understanding the universe, its birth and its future is one of the biggest motivations in physics. In order to understand the cosmos, the fundamental particles forming the universe, the components our matter is built of need to be known and understood. Over time physicists have built a theory which describes the physics of the known fundamental particles very well: the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. The SM describes the particles, their interactions and phenomena with high precision. So far no proven deviations from the SM have been found, though recently evidence for possible physics beyond the SM has been observed. The SM is not describing the mass of the elementary particles however and even with the addition of the Higgs mechanism giving mass to the particles, we have no full theory for all four fundamental forces. We know the model needs to be extended or replaced by another one, as gravitation is not included in the SM. Having a theory which describes all fundamental particles found so far and all but one fundamental interaction is a great success. However, all this describes about 4% of the universe we live in. 23% is dark matter and 73% is dark energy. Dark matter is believed to interact only through gravity and maybe the weak force, which makes it hardly observable. Dark energy is even more elusive. Among other theories the cosmologic constant and scalar fields are discussed to describe it. One should also note that other models exist which for example modify the Newtonian law of gravity. The Higgs mechanism has become the most popular model for mass generation. Alternative theories like Super Symmetry (SUSY), large Extra Dimensions, Technicolor, String Theory, to name just a few, have spread to describe the necessary mass generation or new particles. As proof for new physics beyond the SM has not been found yet, one assumes that new physics will manifest itself at a larger energy scale and therefore a higher particle mass. Particles with high masses are therefore presumed to be a window to test the SM for deviations caused by new physics. The heaviest fundamental particle which is in our reach is the top quark. Its mass is almost as large as that of a complete tungsten atom. It is so heavy, that it decays faster than it can hadronize. It seems the perfect probe to study new physics at the moment. In this analysis the top quark is used as a probe to search for a new resonance, whose properties are similar to a SM Z boson but is much more massive. This analysis will study t{bar t} decays to search for an excess in the invariant mass distribution of the t{bar t} pairs. Resonant states are suggested for massive Z-like bosons in extended gauge theories, Kaluza Klein states of the gluon or Z, axigluons, topcolor, and other beyond the Standard Model theories. Independent of the exact model a resonant production mechanism should be visible in the t{bar t} invariant mass distribution. In this thesis a model-independent search for a narrow-width heavy resonance X decaying into t{bar t} is performed. In the SM, the top quark decays into a W boson and a b quark nearly 100% of the time, which has been proven experimentally, too. The t{bar t} event signature is fully determined by the W boson decay modes. In this analysis, only the lepton+jets final state, which results from the leptonic decay of one of the W bosons and the hadronic decay of the other, is considered. The event signature is an isolated electron or muon with high transverse momentum, large transverse energy imbalance due to the undetected neutrino, and at least three jets, two of which result from the hadronization of b quarks.

  6. Effect of Angular Velocity on Sensors Based on Morphology Dependent Resonances

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Amir R.; Ioppolo, Tindaro

    2014-01-01

    We carried out an analysis to investigate the morphology dependent optical resonances shift (MDR) of a rotating spherical resonator. The spinning resonator experiences an elastic deformation due to the centrifugal force acting on it, leading to a shift in its MDR. Experiments are also carried out to demonstrate the MDR shifts of a spinning polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microsphere. The experimental results agree well with the analytical prediction. These studies demonstrated that spinning sensor based on MDR may experience sufficient shift in the optical resonances, therefore interfering with its desirable operational sensor design. Also the results show that angular velocity sensors could be designed using this principle. PMID:24759108

  7. Introduction: quantum resonances Classical and quantum mechanics

    E-print Network

    Ramond, Thierry

    : quantum resonances Classical and quantum mechanics Microlocal analysis Resonances associated;..... . .... . .... . ..... . .... . .... . .... . ..... . .... . .... . .... . ..... . .... . .... . .... . ..... . .... . ..... . .... . .... . Introduction: quantum resonances Classical and quantum mechanics Microlocal analysis Resonances associated with homoclinic orbits Outline Introduction: quantum resonances Classical and quantum mechanics Microlocal

  8. Injector with integrated resonator

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; York, William David; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2014-07-29

    The system may include a turbine engine. The turbine engine may include a fuel nozzle. The fuel nozzle may include an air path. The fuel nozzle may also include a fuel path such that the fuel nozzle is in communication with a combustion zone of the turbine engine. Furthermore, the fuel nozzle may include a resonator. The resonator may be disposed in the fuel nozzle directly adjacent to the combustion zone.

  9. Resonant dielectric metamaterials

    DOEpatents

    Loui, Hung; Carroll, James; Clem, Paul G; Sinclair, Michael B

    2014-12-02

    A resonant dielectric metamaterial comprises a first and a second set of dielectric scattering particles (e.g., spheres) having different permittivities arranged in a cubic array. The array can be an ordered or randomized array of particles. The resonant dielectric metamaterials are low-loss 3D isotropic materials with negative permittivity and permeability. Such isotropic double negative materials offer polarization and direction independent electromagnetic wave propagation.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, B.C.

    1984-02-07

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyro using two nuclear magnetic resonance gases, preferably xenon 129 and xenon 131, together with two alkaline metal vapors, preferably rubidium, potassium or cesium, one of the two alkaline metal vapors being pumped by light which has the wavelength of that alkaline metal vapor, and the other alkaline vapor being illuminated by light which has the wavelength of that other alkaline vapor.

  11. Hexagonal quartz resonator

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Roswell D. M. (Rustburg, VA)

    1982-01-01

    A generally flat, relatively thin AT-cut piezoelectric resonator element structured to minimize the force-frequency effect when mounted and energized in a housing. The resonator is in the form of an equilateral hexagon with the X crystallographic axis of the crystal passing through one set of opposing corners with mounting being effected at an adjacent set of corners respectively .+-.60.degree. away from the X axis which thereby results in a substantially zero frequency shift of the operating frequency.

  12. Resonant nonlinear ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Paul A. (Santa Fe, NM); TenCate, James A. (Los Alamos, NM); Guyer, Robert A. (Amherst, MA); Van Den Abeele, Koen E. A. (Sint-Niklaas, BE)

    2001-01-01

    Components with defects are identified from the response to strains applied at acoustic and ultrasound frequencies. The relative resonance frequency shift .vertline..DELTA..function./.function..sub.0.vertline., is determined as a function of applied strain amplitude for an acceptable component, where .function..sub.0 is the frequency of the resonance peak at the lowest amplitude of applied strain and .DELTA..function. is the frequency shift of the resonance peak of a selected mode to determine a reference relationship. Then, the relative resonance frequency shift .vertline..DELTA..function./.function..sub.0 is determined as a function of applied strain for a component under test, where fo .function..sub.0 the frequency of the resonance peak at the lowest amplitude of applied strain and .DELTA..function. is the frequency shift of the resonance peak to determine a quality test relationship. The reference relationship is compared with the quality test relationship to determine the presence of defects in the component under test.

  13. Thermal Resonance Fusion

    E-print Network

    Dong, Bao-Guo

    2015-01-01

    We first show a possible mechanism to create a new type of nuclear fusion, thermal resonance fusion, i.e. low energy nuclear fusion with thermal resonance of light nuclei or atoms, such as deuterium or tritium. The fusion of two light nuclei has to overcome the Coulomb barrier between these two nuclei to reach up to the interacting region of nuclear force. We found nuclear fusion could be realized with thermal vibrations of crystal lattice atoms coupling with light atoms at low energy by resonance to overcome this Coulomb barrier. Thermal resonances combining with tunnel effects can greatly enhance the probability of the deuterium fusion to the detectable level. Our low energy nuclear fusion mechanism research - thermal resonance fusion mechanism results demonstrate how these light nuclei or atoms, such as deuterium, can be fused in the crystal of metal, such as Ni or alloy, with synthetic thermal vibrations and resonances at different modes and energies experimentally. The probability of tunnel effect at dif...

  14. Anomalous Diffusion Near Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Synchro-betatron resonances can lead to emittance growth and the loss of luminosity. We consider the detailed dynamics of a bunch near such a low order resonance driven by crossing angles at the collision points. We characterize the nature of diffusion and find that it is anomalous and sub-diffusive. This affects both the shape of the beam distribution and the time scales for growth. Predictions of a simplified anomalous diffusion model are compared with direct simulations. Transport of particles near resonances is still not a well understood phenomenon. Often, without justification, phase space motion is assumed to be a normal diffusion process although at least one case of anomalous diffusion in beam dynamics has been reported [1]. Here we will focus on the motion near synchro-betatron resonances which can be excited by several means, including beams crossing at an angle at the collision points as in the LHC. We will consider low order resonances which couple the horizontal and longitudinal planes, both for simplicity and to observe large effects over short time scales. While the tunes we consider are not practical for a collider, nonetheless the transport mechanisms we uncover are also likely to operate at higher order resonances.

  15. Electromagnetic resonant modes of dielectric sphere bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Andueza, A. Pérez-Conde, J.; Sevilla, J.

    2015-05-28

    Sphere bilayers have been proposed as promising structures for electromagnetic management in photonic crystal devices. These arrangements are made of two intertwined subsets of spheres of different size and refractive index, one subset filling the interstitial sites of the other. We present a systematic study of the electromagnetic resonant modes of the bilayers, in comparison with those of the constituent subsets of spheres. Three samples were built with glass and Teflon spheres and their transmission spectra measured in the microwave range (10–25?GHz). Simulations with finite integration time-domain method are in good agreement with experiments. Results show that the bilayer presents the same resonances as one of the subsets but modified by the presence of the other in its resonant frequencies and in the electric field distributions. As this distortion is not very large, the number of resonances in a selected spectral region is determined by the dominant subset. The degree of freedom that offers the bilayer could be useful to fine tune the resonances of the structure for different applications. A map of modes useful to guide this design is also presented. Scale invariance of Maxwell equations allows the translation of these results in the microwave range to the visible region; hence, some possible applications are discussed in this framework.

  16. Image restoration using fast Fourier and wavelet transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrod, William J.; Nagy, James G.; Plemmons, Robert J.

    1994-02-01

    Pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) of 14N nuclei is quite promising as a method for detecting explosives such as RDX and contraband narcotics such as cocaine and heroin in quantities of interest. Pure NQR is conducted without an external applied magnetic field, so potential concerns about damage to magnetically encoded data or exposure of personnel to large magnetic fields are not relevant. Because NQR frequencies of different compounds are quite distinct, we do not encounter false alarms from the NQR signals of other benign materials. We have constructed a proof-of-concept NQR explosives detector which interrogates a volume of 300 liters (10 ft3). With minimal modification to the existing explosives detector, we can detect operationally relevant quantities of (free base) cocaine within the 300-liter inspection volume in 6 seconds. We are presently extending this approach to the detection of heroin base and also examining 14N and 35,37Cl pure NQR for detection of the hydrochloride forms of both materials. An adaptation of this NQR approach may be suitable for scanning personnel for externally carried contraband and explosives. We first outline the basics of the NQR approach, highlighting strengths and weaknesses, and then present representative results for RDX and cocaine detection. We also present a partial compendium of relevant NQR parameters measured for some materials of interest.

  17. Hyperbolic Resonances of Metasurface Cavities

    E-print Network

    Keene, David

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new class of optical resonator structures featuring one or two metasurface reflectors or metacavities and predict that such resonators support novel hyperbolic resonances. As an example of such resonances we introduce hyperbolic Tamm plasmons (HTPs) and hyperbolic Fabry-Perot resonances (HFPs). The hyperbolic optical modes feature low-loss incident power re-distribution over TM and TE polarization output channels, clover-leaf anisotropic dispersion, and other unique properties which are tunable and are useful for multiple applications.

  18. Cyclotron Resonance of Electrons Trapped in a Microwave Cavity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which the free-electron cyclotron resonance of electrons trapped in a microwave cavity by a Penning trap is observed. The experiment constitutes an attractive alternative to one of the Gardner-Purcell variety. (Author/GS)

  19. Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Measuring Ternary Phase Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodworth, Jennifer K.; Terrance, Jacob C.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is presented for the upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry curriculum in which the ternary phase diagram of water, 1-propanol and n-heptane is measured using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The experiment builds upon basic concepts of NMR spectral analysis, typically taught in the undergraduate…

  20. Magnetic Resonance Elastography of Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Sudhakar K.; Ehman, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases cause substantial changes in the mechanical properties of tissue and this provides motivation for developing methods to non-invasively assess the stiffness of tissue using imaging technology. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has emerged as a versatile MRI-based technique, based on direct visualization of propagating shear waves in the tissues. The most established clinical application of MRE in the abdomen is in chronic liver disease. MRE is currently regarded as the most accurate non-invasive technique for detection and staging of liver fibrosis. Increasing experience and ongoing research is leading to exploration of applications in other abdominal organs. In this review article, the current use of MRE in liver disease and the potential future applications of this technology in other parts of the abdomen are surveyed. PMID:25488346

  1. Astrophysically Interesting Resonances; Another Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Roby; Jenkins, David

    2008-10-01

    R.A.E. Austin, R. Kanungo, A. Campbell, S. Colosimo, S. Reeve Saint Mary's University; D.G. Jenkins, C.Aa.Diget, A. Robinson, University of York, UK; P.J. Woods T. Davinson University of Edinburgh; C.-Y. Wu A. Hurst J.A. Becker Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; G.C. Ball M. Djongolov G. Hackman A.C. Morton, C. Pearson, S.J. Williams TRIUMF; A.A. Phillips, M. Schumaker, University of Guelph H.Boston, A. Grint, D. Oxley, University of Liverpool; D. Cline, A. Hayes, University of Rochester; We describe a prototype experiment to measure resonances of interest in astrophysical reactions. We use the TIGRESS to detect gamma rays in coincidence with charged particles, inelastically scattered in inverse kinematics. The particles are detected with the Bambino detector modified to a ?E-E silicon telescope spanning 15-40 degrees in the lab.

  2. Electron nuclear double resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eachus, R. S.; Olm, M. T.

    1985-10-01

    Precise information about the molecular structure, stereochemistry, and environment of paramagnetic species can be obtained by electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy. This technique has been applied in a wide range of disciplines to liquid-phase, single-crystal, and powder samples. In some cases - the study of defects in ionic single crystals, for instance - the volume and complexity of data obtained by ENDOR can hinder interpretation. Such difficulties have been overcome by the use of supplemental ENDOR techniques that simplify the assignment of ENDOR lines. The increased use of computers for the automation of instrumentation, the design of experiments, and the analysis of data has made possible the study of a wider range of problems. With these improvements, as well as with the increased sensitivity provided by optically detected ENDOR, it is now feasible to study polycrystalline and amorphous materials, such as thin-film semiconductors and biological samples in vivo.

  3. The Archimedes experiment

    E-print Network

    Calloni, Enrico; De Laurentis, Martina; Esposito, Giampiero; Grilli, M; Majorana, Ettore; Pepe, G P; Petrarca, S; Puppo, Paola; Rapagnini, P; Ricci, F; Rosa, Luigi; Rovelli, Carlo; Ruggi, P; Saini, N L; Stornaiolo, Cosimo; Tafuri, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Archimedes is an INFN-funded pathfinder experiment aimed at verifying the feasibility of measuring the interaction of vacuum fluctuations with gravity. The final experiment will measure the force exerted by the gravitational field on a Casimir cavity whose vacuum energy is modulated with a superconductive transition, by using a balance as a small force detector. Archimedes is a two-year project devoted to test the most critical experimental aspects, in particular the balance resonance frequency and quality factor, the thermal modulation efficiency and the superconductive sample realization.

  4. The Archimedes experiment

    E-print Network

    Enrico Calloni; S. Caprara; Martina De Laurentis; Giampiero Esposito; M. Grilli; Ettore Majorana; G. P. Pepe; S. Petrarca; Paola Puppo; P. Rapagnini; F. Ricci; Luigi Rosa; Carlo Rovelli; P. Ruggi; N. L. Saini; Cosimo Stornaiolo; Francesco Tafuri

    2015-11-02

    Archimedes is an INFN-funded pathfinder experiment aimed at verifying the feasibility of measuring the interaction of vacuum fluctuations with gravity. The final experiment will measure the force exerted by the gravitational field on a Casimir cavity whose vacuum energy is modulated with a superconductive transition, by using a balance as a small force detector. Archimedes is a two-year project devoted to test the most critical experimental aspects, in particular the balance resonance frequency and quality factor, the thermal modulation efficiency and the superconductive sample realization.

  5. Resonant ultrasound spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM); Visscher, William M. (Los Alamos, NM); Fisk, Zachary (Santa Fe, NM)

    1990-01-01

    An ultrasound resonant spectrometer determines the resonant frequency spectrum of a rectangular parallelepiped sample of a high dissipation material over an expected resonant response frequency range. A sample holder structure grips corners of the sample between piezoelectric drive and receive transducers. Each transducer is mounted on a membrane for only weakly coupling the transducer to the holder structure and operatively contacts a material effective to remove system resonant responses at the transducer from the expected response range. i.e., either a material such as diamond to move the response frequencies above the range or a damping powder to preclude response within the range. A square-law detector amplifier receives the response signal and retransmits the signal on an isolated shield of connecting cabling to remove cabling capacitive effects. The amplifier also provides a substantially frequency independently voltage divider with the receive transducer. The spectrometer is extremely sensitive to enable low amplitude resonance to be detected for use in calculating the elastic constants of the high dissipation sample.

  6. Resonances in Positronium Hydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, Richard J.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recently, Ho and his colleagues have calculated the positions and widths of a series of resonances in the Ps+H scattering system, using the complex -rotation method and have compared them with estimates that I made many years ago using a quite different technique. I assumed that the resonance mechanism was the existence in the rearrangement channel [e+ + H-] of an infinite series of perturbed Coulomb bound states. Although these must be broadened and shifted by coupling with the open scattering channel, I expected them to lie very close to the actual resonance positions. To verify this, I did a model calculation for S-waves, including the coupling, and found that the first two resonances were not shifted very far from their unperturbed position. The new, detailed calculation agrees with this result, but when the P-wave was examined it was found, surprisingly, that the lowest resonance indeed moved up in energy by a large amount. With the help of Joseph DiRienzi of the College of Notre Dame of Maryland I am now extending the old calculation to P- and D-waves, in an attempt to understand this unexpected energy shift. Results will be presented at the Workshop.

  7. MACHINERY RESONANCE AND DRILLING

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R.; Fowley, M.

    2010-01-23

    New developments in vibration analysis better explain machinery resonance, through an example of drill bit chattering during machining of rusted steel. The vibration of an operating drill motor was measured, the natural frequency of an attached spring was measured, and the two frequencies were compared to show that the system was resonant. For resonance to occur, one of the natural frequencies of a structural component must be excited by a cyclic force of the same frequency. In this case, the frequency of drill bit chattering due to motor rotation equaled the spring frequency (cycles per second), and the system was unstable. A soft rust coating on the steel to be drilled permitted chattering to start at the drill bit tip, and the bit oscillated on and off of the surface, which increased the wear rate of the drill bit. This resonant condition is typically referred to as a motor critical speed. The analysis presented here quantifies the vibration associated with this particular critical speed problem, using novel techniques to describe resonance.

  8. Nonlinear mechanical resonators for ultra-sensitive mass detection

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, Panos G; Lavrik, Nickolay V

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental sensitivity limit of an appropriately scaled down mechanical resonator can approach one atomic mass unit when only thermal noise is present in the system. However, operation of such nanoscale mechanical resonators is very challenging due to minuteness of their oscillation amplitudes and presence of multiple noise sources in real experimental environments. In order to surmount these challenges, we use microscale cantilever resonators driven to large amplitudes, far beyond their nonlinear instability onset. Our experiments show that such a nonlinear cantilever resonator, described analytically as a Duffing oscillator, has mass sensing performance comparable to that of much smaller resonators operating in a linear regime. We demonstrate femtogram level mass sensing that relies on a bifurcation point tracking that does not require any complex readout means. Our approaches enable straightforward detection of mass changes that are near the fundamental limit imposed by thermo-mechanical fluctuations.

  9. Resonant acoustic nonlinearity for defect-selective imaging and NDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, Igor

    2015-10-01

    The bottleneck problem of nonlinear NDT is a low efficiency of conversion from fundamental frequency to nonlinear frequency components. In this paper, it is proposed to use a combination of mechanical resonance and nonlinearity of defects to enhance the input-output conversion. The concept of the defect as a nonlinear oscillator brings about new dynamic and frequency scenarios characteristic of parametric oscillations. The modes observed in experiment include sub- and superharmonic resonances with anomalously efficient generation of the higher harmonics and subharmonics. A modified version of the superharmonic resonance (combination frequency resonance) is used to enhance the efficiency of frequency mixing mode of nonlinear NDT. All the resonant nonlinear modes are strongly localized in the defect area that provides a background for high-contrast highly-sensitive defect- and frequency-selective imaging.

  10. Isotopic Resonance Hypothesis: Experimental Verification by Escherichia coli Growth Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xueshu; Zubarev, Roman A.

    2015-03-01

    Isotopic composition of reactants affects the rates of chemical and biochemical reactions. As a rule, enrichment of heavy stable isotopes leads to progressively slower reactions. But the recent isotopic resonance hypothesis suggests that the dependence of the reaction rate upon the enrichment degree is not monotonous. Instead, at some ``resonance'' isotopic compositions, the kinetics increases, while at ``off-resonance'' compositions the same reactions progress slower. To test the predictions of this hypothesis for the elements C, H, N and O, we designed a precise (standard error +/-0.05%) experiment that measures the parameters of bacterial growth in minimal media with varying isotopic composition. A number of predicted resonance conditions were tested, with significant enhancements in kinetics discovered at these conditions. The combined statistics extremely strongly supports the validity of the isotopic resonance phenomenon (p << 10-15). This phenomenon has numerous implications for the origin of life studies and astrobiology, and possible applications in agriculture, biotechnology, medicine, chemistry and other areas.

  11. Stabilization of electrostatic MEMS resonators using a delayed feedback controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsaleem, Fadi M.; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2010-03-01

    We present a study for the stabilization of a MEMS resonator actuated with DC and AC voltages using a delayed feedback controller. We show that the delayed feedback controller, with a careful selection of its parameters, can be used to stabilize an originally unstable resonator operating in the dynamic pull-in frequency band. Also, the controller is shown to enhance the stability of the resonator near pull-in, where it experiences a strong fractal behavior. In both cases, the controller shows superior performance in rejecting disturbances. Experimental and theoretical results are presented to demonstrate the capability of the feedback controller to stabilize the performance of a capacitive resonator. Good agreement between simulation and experiment is demonstrated.

  12. Nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Degen, C. L.; Poggio, M.; Mamin, H. J.; Rettner, C. T.; Rugar, D.

    2009-01-01

    We have combined ultrasensitive magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) with 3D image reconstruction to achieve magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with resolution <10 nm. The image reconstruction converts measured magnetic force data into a 3D map of nuclear spin density, taking advantage of the unique characteristics of the “resonant slice” that is projected outward from a nanoscale magnetic tip. The basic principles are demonstrated by imaging the 1H spin density within individual tobacco mosaic virus particles sitting on a nanometer-thick layer of adsorbed hydrocarbons. This result, which represents a 100 million-fold improvement in volume resolution over conventional MRI, demonstrates the potential of MRFM as a tool for 3D, elementally selective imaging on the nanometer scale. PMID:19139397

  13. Magnetostrictive resonance excitation

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Ricardo B. (Los Alamos, NM); Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani (Tampere, FI)

    1992-01-01

    The resonance frequency spectrum of a magnetostrictive sample is remotely determined by exciting the magnetostrictive property with an oscillating magnetic field. The permeability of a magnetostrictive material and concomitant coupling with a detection coil varies with the strain in the material whereby resonance responses of the sample can be readily detected. A suitable sample may be a magnetostrictive material or some other material having at least one side coated with a magnetostrictive material. When the sample is a suitable shape, i.e., a cube, rectangular parallelepiped, solid sphere or spherical shell, the elastic moduli or the material can be analytically determined from the measured resonance frequency spectrum. No mechanical transducers are required and the sample excitation is obtained without contact with the sample, leading to highly reproducible results and a measurement capability over a wide temperature range, e.g. from liquid nitrogen temperature to the Curie temperature of the magnetostrictive material.

  14. Quartz resonator processing system

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Roswell D. M. (Rustburg, VA)

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is a single chamber ultra-high vacuum processing system for the oduction of hermetically sealed quartz resonators wherein electrode metallization and sealing are carried out along with cleaning and bake-out without any air exposure between the processing steps. The system includes a common vacuum chamber in which is located a rotatable wheel-like member which is adapted to move a plurality of individual component sets of a flat pack resonator unit past discretely located processing stations in said chamber whereupon electrode deposition takes place followed by the placement of ceramic covers over a frame containing a resonator element and then to a sealing stage where a pair of hydraulic rams including heating elements effect a metallized bonding of the covers to the frame.

  15. Fano resonance in a normal metal/ferromagnet-quantum dot-superconductor device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Cao, Zhan; Luo, Hong-Gang; Zhang, Fu-Chun; Chen, Wei-Qiang

    2015-11-01

    We investigate theoretically the Andreev transport through a quantum dot strongly coupled with a normal metal/ferromagnet and a superconductor (N/F-QD-S), in which the interplay between the Kondo resonance and the Andreev bound states (ABSs) has not been clearly clarified yet. Here we show that the interference between the Kondo resonance and the ABSs modifies seriously the line shape of the Kondo resonance, which manifests as a Fano resonance. The ferromagnetic lead with spin polarization induces an effective field, which leads to splitting of both the Kondo resonance and the ABSs. The spin polarization together with the magnetic field applied provides an alternative way to tune the line shape of the Kondo resonances, which is dependent of the relative positions of the Kondo resonance and the ABSs. These results indicate that the interplay between the Kondo resonance and the ABSs can significantly affect the Andreev transport, which could be tested by experiments.

  16. Sensitive metal layer assisted guided mode resonance biosensor with a spectrum inversed response and strong asymmetric resonance field distribution.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sheng-Fu; Wang, Chih-Ming; Ding, Ting-Jou; Tsai, Ya-Lun; Yang, Tsung-Hsun; Chen, Wen-Yih; Chang, Jenq-Yang

    2012-06-18

    In this paper, a metal layer assisted guide mode resonance (MaGMR) device with high sensitivity is proposed for bioanalytical applications and its functioning is experimentally proved. We find that the reflection spectra present a unique inversed response. The resonance mechanism is also discussed. Numerical calculation results indicate that the high sensitivity performance of MaGMR comes from the strongly asymmetric resonance modal profile and low propagation angle inside the waveguide. There is a one-fold enhancement of the evanescent wave in the analytes region compared to typical GMR. According to the experimental results, the proposed MaGMR achieved a bulk sensitivity of 376.78 nm/RIU in fundamental TM mode resonating at 0.809 ?m with the first diffraction angle. Experiment results show a 264.78% enhancement in the sensitivity compared to that of the typical GMR sensor in the same resonance conditions of TM mode. PMID:22714520

  17. Method for resonant measurement

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, G.W.; Migliori, A.; Dixon, R.D.

    1996-03-05

    A method of measurement of objects to determine object flaws, Poisson`s ratio ({sigma}) and shear modulus ({mu}) is shown and described. First, the frequency for expected degenerate responses is determined for one or more input frequencies and then splitting of degenerate resonant modes are observed to identify the presence of flaws in the object. Poisson`s ratio and the shear modulus can be determined by identification of resonances dependent only on the shear modulus, and then using that shear modulus to find Poisson`s ratio using other modes dependent on both the shear modulus and Poisson`s ratio. 1 fig.

  18. Physics of Sports: Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, David

    2000-04-01

    When force is applied by an athlete to sports equipment resonances can occur. Just a few examples are: the ringing of a spiked volleyball, the strumming of a golf club shaft during a swing, and multiple modes induced in an aluminum baseball bat when striking a ball. Resonances produce acoustic waves which, if conditions are favorable, can be detected off the playing field. This can provide a means to evaluate athletic performance during game conditions. Results are given from the use of a simple hand-held acoustic detector - by a spectator sitting in the stands - to determine how hard volleyballs were spiked during college and high school games.

  19. Hexagonal quartz resonator

    DOEpatents

    Peters, R.D.M.

    1982-11-02

    A generally flat, relatively thin AT-cut piezoelectric resonator element structured to minimize the force-frequency effect when mounted and energized in a housing. The resonator is in the form of an equilateral hexagon with the X crystallographic axis of the crystal passing through one set of opposing corners with mounting being effected at an adjacent set of corners respectively [+-]60[degree] away from the X axis which thereby results in a substantially zero frequency shift of the operating frequency. 3 figs.

  20. Pygmy resonances and nucleosynthesis

    E-print Network

    Nadia Tsoneva; Horst Lenske

    2014-11-14

    A microscopic theoretical approach based on a self-consistent density functional theory for the nuclear ground state and QRPA formalism extended with multi-phonon degrees of freedom for the nuclear excited states is implemented in investigations of new low-energy modes called pygmy resonances. Advantage of the method is the unified description of low-energy multiphonon excitations, pygmy resonances and core polarization effects. This is found of crucial importance for the understanding of the fine structure of nuclear response functions at low energies. Aspects of the precise knowledge of nuclear response functions around the neutron threshold are discussed in a connection to nucleosynthesis.

  1. Pygmy resonances and nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoneva, Nadia; Lenske, Horst

    2015-05-01

    A microscopic theoretical approach based on a self-consistent density functional theory for the nuclear ground state and QRPA formalism extended with multi-phonon degrees of freedom for the nuclear excited states is implemented in investigations of new low-energy modes called pygmy resonances. Advantage of the method is the unified description of low-energy multiphonon excitations, pygmy resonances and core polarization effects. This is found of crucial importance for the understanding of the fine structure of nuclear response functions at low energies. Aspects of the precise knowledge of nuclear response functions around the neutron threshold are discussed in a connection to nucleosynthesis.

  2. Method for resonant measurement

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, George W. (5201 Rio Grande Blvd., N.W., Albuquerque, NM 87107); Migliori, Albert (Rte. 4, Box 258 Tano Rd., Sante Fe, NM 87501); Dixon, Raymond D. (396 Connie Ave., White Rock, NM 87544)

    1996-01-01

    A method of measurement of objects to determine object flaws, Poisson's ratio (.sigma.) and shear modulus (.mu.) is shown and described. First, the frequency for expected degenerate responses is determined for one or more input frequencies and then splitting of degenerate resonant modes are observed to identify the presence of flaws in the object. Poisson's ratio and the shear modulus can be determined by identification of resonances dependent only on the shear modulus, and then using that shear modulus to find Poisson's ratio using other modes dependent on both the shear modulus and Poisson's ratio.

  3. Field resonance propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, A. C.

    1979-01-01

    A propulsion concept was developed based on a proposed resonance between coherent, pulsed electromagnetic wave forms, and gravitational wave forms (or space-time metrics). Using this concept a spacecraft propulsion system potentially capable of galactic and intergalactic travel without prohibitive travel times was designed. The propulsion system utilizes recent research associated with magnetic field line merging, hydromagnetic wave effects, free-electron lasers, laser generation of megagauss fields, and special structural and containment metals. The research required to determine potential, field resonance characteristics and to evaluate various aspects of the spacecraft propulsion design is described.

  4. Magnetic resonance annual, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1987-01-01

    This book features reviews of high-resolution MRI of the knee, MRI of the normal and ischmeic hip, MRI of the heart, and temporomandibular joint imaging, as well as thorough discussion on artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging. Contributors consider the clinical applications of gadolinium-DTPA in magnetic resonance imaging and the clinical use of partial saturation and saturation recovery sequences. Timely reports assess the current status of rapid MRI and describe a new rapid gated cine MRI technique. Also included is an analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow effects during MRI of the central nervous system.

  5. The 5:1 Neptune Resonance as Probed by CFEPS: Dynamics and Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, R. E.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Petit, J. M.; Gladman, B. J.; Alexandersen, M.; Volk, K.; Shankman, C. J.

    2015-06-01

    The Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey discovered four trans-Neptunian objects with semimajor axes near the 5:1 resonance, revealing a large and previously undetected intrinsic population. Three of these objects are currently resonant with Neptune, and the fourth is consistent with being an object that escaped the resonance at some point in the past. The non-resonant object may be representative of a detached population that is stable at slightly lower semimajor axes than the 5:1 resonance. We generated clones of these objects by resampling the astrometric uncertainty and examined their behavior over a 4.5 Gyr numerical simulation. The majority of the clones of the three resonant objects (\\gt 90%) spend a total of 107 years in resonance during their 4.5 Gyr integrations; most clones experience multiple periods of resonance capture. Our dynamical integrations reveal an exchange between the 5:1 resonance, the scattering objects, and other large semimajor axis resonances, especially the 4:1, 6:1, and 7:1 resonances. The multiple capture events and relatively short resonance lifetimes after capture suggest that these objects are captured scattering objects that stick in the 5:1 resonance. These 5:1 resonators may be representative of a temporary population, requiring regular contributions from a source population. We examined the dynamical characteristics (inclination, eccentricity, resonant island, libration amplitude) of the detected objects and their clones in order to provide an empirical model of the orbit structure of the 5:1 resonance. This resonance is dynamically hot and includes primarily symmetric librators. Given our orbit model, the intrinsic population necessary for the detection of these three objects in the 5:1 resonance is 1900-1400+3300 (95% confidence) objects with {{H}g} \\lt 8 and e\\gt 0.5.

  6. Topical applications of resonance internal conversion in laser produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpeshin, F. F.

    2007-04-01

    Physical aspects of resonance effects arising in plasma due to interactions of nuclei with the electrons are considered. Among them are resonance conversion (TEEN) and the reverse process of NEET. These processes are of great importance for pumping the excited nuclear states (isomers) and for accelerating their decay. Experiment is discussed on studying the unique 3.5-eV 229m Th nuclide.

  7. Low-Lying "Pygmy" Dipole Resonances and Strength Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, V.; Cooper, N.; Goddard, P. M.; Ilieva, R. S.; Humby, P.; Pietralla, N.

    2015-10-01

    Recent investigations into dipole resonances below the neutron separation threshold have focused on characterizing the properties of the so-called Pygmy Dipole Resonance. The amount of extra PDR strength on top of a GDR tail depends largely on the choice, or the method of extraction of photon strength functions. Whereas most experimental searches for the PDR were performed on spherical nuclei, the present work focuses on recent experiments on 76Se and 76Ge, on the virge of deformation.

  8. Resonantly-enhanced axion-photon regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Guido; Sikivie, Pierre; Tanner, David B.; Bibber, Karl van

    2010-08-30

    A resonantly-enhanced photon-regeneration experiment to search for the axion or axion-like particles is discussed. Photons enter a strong magnetic field and some are converted to axions; the axions can pass through an opaque wall and some may convert back to photons in a second high-field region. The photon regeneration is enhanced by employing matched Fabry-Perot optical cavities, with one cavity within the axion generation magnet and the second within the photon regeneration magnet. The optics for this experiment are discussed, with emphasis on the alignment of the two cavities.

  9. Lorentz resonances and the structure of the Jovian ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.; Schaffer, L. E.; Showalter, M. R.; Greenberg, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Charged dust orbiting through spatially periodic planetary magnetic fields will experience time-variable electromagnetic forces. When the forcing frequencies are nearly commensurate with the particle's orbital frequency, the particle undergoes large out-of-plane and radial excursions. Specific 'Lorentz' resonances, corresponding to particular spatial periodicities in the magnetic field, occur on either side of synchronous orbit. Lorentz resonance locations and strengths for the Jovian and Saturnian rings are described. The boundaries of the halo of the Jovian ring, and perhaps other ring structures, are near resonances.

  10. Second-harmonic generation from complementary split-ring resonators.

    PubMed

    Feth, N; Linden, S; Klein, M W; Decker, M; Niesler, F B P; Zeng, Y; Hoyer, W; Liu, J; Koch, S W; Moloney, J V; Wegener, M

    2008-09-01

    We present experiments on second-harmonic generation from arrays of magnetic split-ring resonators and arrays of complementary split-ring resonators. In both cases, the fundamental resonance is excited by the incident femtosecond laser pulses under normal incidence, leading to comparably strong second-harmonic signals. These findings are discussed in terms of Babinet's principle and in terms of a recently developed microscopic classical theory that leads to good agreement regarding the relative and the absolute nonlinear signal strengths. The hydrodynamic convective contribution is found to be the dominant source of second-harmonic generation--in contrast to a previous assignment [Science 313, 502 (2006)]. PMID:18758583

  11. Off-resonant Raman transitions impact in an atom interferometer

    E-print Network

    Gauguet, A; Lévèque, Thomas; Gouët, J Le; Chaibi, Oualid; Canuel, B; Clairon, Andre; Santos, Franck Pereira Dos; Landragin, Arnaud

    2008-01-01

    We study the influence of off-resonant two photon transitions on high precision measurements with atom interferometers based on stimulated Raman transitions. These resonances induce a two photon light shift on the resonant Raman condition. The impact of this effect is investigated in two highly sensitive experiments: a gravimeter and a gyroscope-accelerometer. We show that it can lead to significant systematic phase shifts, which have to be taken into account in order to achieve best performances in term of accuracy and stability.

  12. The spectrum of charmonium in the Resonance-Spectrum Expansion

    E-print Network

    Eef van Beveren; George Rupp

    2008-11-11

    We argue that the resonance-like structures Y(4260) (arXiv:hep-ex/0506081,arXiv:0707.2541), Y(4360), Y(4660) (arXiv:0707.3699) and Y(4635) (arXiv:0807.4458), which were recently reported to have been observed in experiment, are non-resonant manifestations of the Regge zeros that appear in the production amplitude of the Resonance-Spectrum Expansion. Charmonium c-cbar states are visible on the slopes of these enhancements.

  13. Dynamic resonance characteristic analysis of fiber ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Diqing; Ma, Huilian; Jin, Zhonghe

    2009-01-01

    A resonator fiber optic gyro is a high accuracy inertial rotation sensor based on the Sagnac effect. Fiber ring resonator is the core-sensing element in the resonator fiber optic gyro. The dynamic response of the resonator has been studied, and the ringing phenomenon is observed when sweeping the laser frequency. The dynamic characteristics of the resonator, which are related with the frequency sweep rate, have a decisive effect on the dynamic performance of the gyro system. In order to further analyze and better design the gyro system, deep analysis of the dynamic resonance characteristics is in urgent need. This paper gives out the condition for the ringing phenomenon, and analyzes the parameters for the ringing and the dynamic resonance curve through simulation. It is concluded that increasing the sweep rate will lift the ringing and deteriorate the parameters of the resonance curve, and finally have negative effects on the performance of the gyro system.

  14. A Resonance Approach to Cochlear Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Background How does the cochlea analyse sound into its component frequencies? In the 1850s Helmholtz thought it occurred by resonance, whereas a century later Békésy's work indicated a travelling wave. The latter answer seemed to settle the question, but with the discovery in 1978 that the cochlea emits sound, the mechanics of the cochlea was back on the drawing board. Recent studies have raised questions about whether the travelling wave, as currently understood, is adequate to explain observations. Approach Applying basic resonance principles, this paper revisits the question. A graded bank of harmonic oscillators with cochlear-like frequencies and quality factors is simultaneously excited, and it is found that resonance gives rise to similar frequency responses, group delays, and travelling wave velocities as observed by experiment. The overall effect of the group delay gradient is to produce a decelerating wave of peak displacement moving from base to apex at characteristic travelling wave speeds. The extensive literature on chains of coupled oscillators is considered, and the occurrence of travelling waves, pseudowaves, phase plateaus, and forced resonance in such systems is noted. Conclusion and significance This alternative approach to cochlear mechanics shows that a travelling wave can simply arise as an apparently moving amplitude peak which passes along a bank of resonators without carrying energy. This highlights the possible role of the fast pressure wave and indicates how phase delays and group delays of a set of driven harmonic oscillators can generate an apparent travelling wave. It is possible to view the cochlea as a chain of globally forced coupled oscillators, and this model incorporates fundamental aspects of both the resonance and travelling wave theories. PMID:23144835

  15. A comparison of Lorentz, planetary gravitational, and satellite gravitational resonances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    1994-01-01

    We consider a charged dust grain whose orbital motion is dominated by a planet's point-source gravity, but perturbed by higher-order terms in the planet's gravity field as well as by the Lorentz force arising from an asymmetric planetary magnetic field. Perturbations to Keplerian orbits due to a nonspherical gravity field are expressed in the traditional way: in terms of a disturbing function which can be expanded in a series of spherical harmonics (W. M. Kaula, 1966). In order to calculate the electromagnetic perturbation, we first write the Lorentz force in terms of the orbital elements and then substitute it into Gauss' perturbation equations. We use our result to derive strengths of Lorentz resonances and elucidate their properties. In particular, we compare Lorentz resonances to two types of gravitational resonances: those arising from periodic tugs of a satellite and those due to the attraction of an arbitrarily shaped planet. We find that Lorentz resonances share numerous properties with their gravitational counterparts and show, using simple physical arguments, that several of these patterns are fundamental, applying not only to our expansions, but to all quantities expressed in terms of orbital elements. Some of these patterns have been previously called 'd'Alembert rules' for satellite resonances. Other similarities arise because, to first-order in the perturbing force, the three problems share an integral of the motion. Yet there are also differences; for example, first-order inclination resonances exist for perturbations arising from planetary gravity and from the Lorentz force, but not for those due to an orbiting satellite. Finally, we provide a heuristic treatment of a particle's orbital evolution under the influence of drag and resonant forces. Particles brought into mean-motion resonances experience either trapping or resonant 'jumps,' depending on the direction from which the resonance is approached. We show that this behavior does not depend on the details of the perturbing force but rather is fundamental to all mean-motion resonances.

  16. Toward broadband electroacoustic resonators through optimized feedback control strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulandet, R.; Lissek, H.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the design of broadband electroacoustic resonators for low-frequency room equalization. An electroacoustic resonator denotes a loudspeaker used as a membrane resonator, the acoustic impedance of which can be modified through proportional feedback control, to match a target impedance. However, such impedance matching only occurs over a limited bandwidth around resonance, which can limit its use for the low-frequency equalization of rooms, requiring an effective control at least up to the Schroeder frequency. Previous experiments have shown that impedance matching can be achieved over a range of a few octaves using a simple proportional control law. But there is still a limit to the feedback gain, beyond which the feedback-controlled loudspeaker becomes non-dissipative. This paper evaluates the benefits of using PID control and phase compensation techniques to improve the overall performance of the electroacoustic resonator. More specifically, it is shown that some adverse effects due to high-order dynamics in the moving-coil transducer can be mitigated. The corresponding control settings are also identified with equivalent electroacoustic resonator parameters, allowing a straightforward design of the controller. Experimental results using PID control and phase compensation are finally compared in terms of sound absorption performances. As a conclusion the overall performances of electroacoustic resonators for damping the modal resonances inside a duct are presented, along with general discussions on practical implementation and the extension to actual room modes damping.

  17. STOCHASTIC RESONANCE IN THALAMIC NEURONS AND RESONANT NEURON MODELS

    E-print Network

    Fournier, John J.F.

    subsystem. We develop a simple linear integrate-and-fire model with subthreshold resonance, which retains demonstrate that preferred stochastic firing in the single neuron model translates into syn- chronizedSTOCHASTIC RESONANCE IN THALAMIC NEURONS AND RESONANT NEURON MODELS by STEFAN REINKER Diplom

  18. Magnetic Resonance Annual, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1985-01-01

    The inaugural volume of Magnetic Resonance Annual includes reviews of MRI of the posterior fossa, cerebral neoplasms, and the cardiovascular and genitourinary systems. A chapter on contrast materials outlines the mechanisms of paramagnetic contrast enhancement and highlights several promising contrast agents.

  19. Double resonator cantilever accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1984-01-01

    A digital quartz accelerometer includes a pair of spaced double-ended tuning forks fastened at one end to a base and at the other end through a spacer mass. Transverse movement of the resonator members stresses one and compresses the other, providing a differential frequency output which is indicative of acceleration.

  20. Micromachined double resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Roman (Inventor); Tang, Tony K. (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A micromachined resonator mountable to an external support structure has a proof mass coupled to a base structure by a first spring structure, the base structure having a plurality of electrodes, and a second spring structure coupling the base structure to the external support structure.

  1. Width of nonlinear resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuma, S.

    1984-03-01

    Two approximations are made, one essential and the other not so essential but convenient to keep the analytical treatment manageable: (1) Only one nonlinear resonance is considered at a time so that the treatment is best suited when the tune is close to one resonance only. To improve this approximation, one must go to the next order which involves a canonical transformation of dynamical variables. Analytical treatment of more than one resonance is not possible for general cases. (2) In the formalism using the action-angle variables, the Hamiltonian can have terms which are independent of the angle variables. These terms are called phase-independent terms or shear terms. The tune is then a function of the oscillation amplitudes. In the lowest-order treatment, the (4N)-pole components but not the (4N + 2)-pole components contribute to this dependence. In deriving the resonance width analytically, one ignores these terms in the Hamiltonian for the sake of simplicity. If these are retained, one needs at least three extra parameters and the analytical treatment becomes rather unwieldy.

  2. Theories for multiple resonances

    E-print Network

    D. Klakow; M. Weber; P. -G. Reinhard

    1995-02-09

    Two microscopic theories for multiple resonances in nuclei are compared, n-particle-hole RPA and quantized Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF). The Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model is used as test case. We find that quantized TDHF is superior in many respects, except for very small systems.

  3. Highly Stable Microwave Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, Donald M.; Thakoor, Sarita; Dick, G. John; Mercereau, James E.

    1987-01-01

    Superconducting walls on sapphire-filled cavity make low-loss device. Improved microwave resonant cavity consists of sapphire cylinder coated with thin film of superconducting lead. Operated well below superconducting transition temperature at 1.5K, cavity demonstrated superior frequency stability and quality factor. Cavity frequency highly stable and therefore suitable for use in standard frequency generators and filters.

  4. Resonance Ionization, Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, J. P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is an analytical technique that uses photons from lasers to resonantly excite an electron from some initial state of a gaseous atom through various excited states of the atom or molecule. Described are the apparatus, some analytical applications, and the precision and accuracy of the technique. Lists 26 references. (CW)

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Bradley, W.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present a review of magnetic resonance imaging. Many topics are explored from instrumentation, spectroscopy, blood flow and sodium imaging to detailed clinical applications such as the differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis or adrenal adenoma. The emphasis throughout is on descriptions of normal multiplanar anatomy and pathology as displayed by MRI.

  6. Screening Resonances In Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, P.

    1998-12-01

    When it was suggested that a new recombination mechanism (Resonant Radiative Recombination (RRR)) which, based on very general physical arguments, should happen in dense plasmas and promises to provide useful information for the local temperature and density diagnostics of plasmas, they assumed the existence of screening resonances. For model potentials the existence of screening resonances has been demonstrated beyond reasonable doubt in a number of calculations. The key question, how well those potentials describe the dominant effects of a real plasma remains open. The relation of theoretical predictions to experimentally measurable effects is an important issue at the present stage of their research. In particular, RRR is expected to account for enhanced recombination rates of low energetic electrons with their ions, since the first stage is the resonant capture of a slow electron by an atom or ion. The mechanism that traps an electron is a combination of complicated many-body interactions of the ions and electrons. For clarity they start here, however, with a discussion in terms of local potential traps the shapes of which are determined predominantly and in an average way by two factors: the degree of screening present at the ionic site and the degree of short-range order in the immediate neighborhood of this ion.

  7. Double resonator cantilever accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, D.R.

    1982-09-23

    A digital quartz accelerometer includes a pair of spaced double-ended tuning forks fastened at one end to a base and at the other end through a spacer mass. Transverse movement of the resonator members stresses one and compresses the other, providing a differential frequency output which is indicative of acceleration.

  8. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  9. A multifrequency high-field pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance/electron-nuclear double resonance spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Morley, Gavin W; Brunel, Louis-Claude; van Tol, Johan

    2008-06-01

    We describe a pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer operating at several frequencies in the range of 110-336 GHz. The microwave source at all frequencies consists of a multiplier chain starting from a solid state synthesizer in the 12-15 GHz range. A fast p-i-n-switch at the base frequency creates the pulses. At all frequencies a Fabry-Perot resonator is employed and the pi/2 pulse length ranges from approximately 100 ns at 110 GHz to approximately 600 ns at 334 GHz. Measurements of a single crystal containing dilute Mn(2+) impurities at 12 T illustrate the effects of large electron spin polarizations. The capabilities also allow for pulsed electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) experiments as demonstrated by Mims ENDOR of (39)K nuclei in Cr:K(3)NbO(8). PMID:18601425

  10. Infrared cubic dielectric resonator metamaterial.

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Brener, Igal; Peters, David William; Ginn, James Cleveland, III; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.

    2010-06-01

    Dielectric resonators are an effective means to realize isotropic, low-loss optical metamaterials. As proof of this concept, a cubic resonator is analytically designed and then tested in the long-wave infrared.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kids Deal With Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain KidsHealth > Parents > Doctors & Hospitals > Medical Tests & Exams > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain Print A A A ...

  12. Microwave Resonators Containing Diamond Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John; Maleki, Lutfollah; Wang, Rabi T.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic diamond dielectric bodies proposed for use in cylindrical resonators helping to stabilize frequencies of some microwave oscillators. Acting in conjunction with metal resonator cavities in which mounted, such dielectric bodies support "whispering-gallery" waveguide modes characterized by desired frequencies of resonance and by electro-magnetic-field configurations limiting dissipation of power on metal surfaces outside dielectric bodies. Performances at room temperature might exceed those of liquid-nitrogen-cooled sapphire-based resonators.

  13. Repetitive resonant railgun power supply

    DOEpatents

    Honig, E.M.; Nunnally, W.C.

    1985-06-19

    A repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. The supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles.

  14. Repetitive resonant railgun power supply

    DOEpatents

    Honig, Emanuel M. (Los Alamos, NM); Nunnally, William C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1988-01-01

    A repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. The supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Facility (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Magnetic Resonance Facility capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. Liquid and solid-state analysis capability for a variety of biomass, photovoltaic, and materials characterization applications across NREL. NREL scientists analyze solid and liquid samples on three nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers as well as an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer.

  16. Eigenproblems in Resonant MEMS Design

    E-print Network

    California at Davis, University of

    Eigenproblems in Resonant MEMS Design David Bindel UC Berkeley, CS Division Eigenproblems inResonant MEMS Design ­ p.1/21 #12;What are MEMS? Eigenproblems inResonant MEMS Design ­ p.2/21 #12;RF MEMSResonant MEMS Design ­ p.3/21 #12;Micromechanical filters Filtered signal Mechanical filter Capacitive sense

  17. Introduction Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    E-print Network

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Introduction Statistics Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Statistics in the UK Statistics at UCL and Beyond #12;Introduction Statistics Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Statistics in the UK Statistics Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Statistics in the UK Statistics at UCL Outline Why do Statistics? Some

  18. Multidimensionally Encoded Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-print Network

    Multidimensionally Encoded Magnetic Resonance Imaging Fa-Hsuan Lin1,2 * Magnetic resonance imaging-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spa- tial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strat- egies gradients INTRODUCTION The spatial localization of magnetic resonance (MR) sig- nals has been commonly

  19. Chapter 1 Magnetic Resonance Contributions to Other Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Norman F.

    In 1947, I.I. Rabi invented the molecular beam magnetic resonance method for the important, but limited purpose, of measuring nuclear magnetic moments and five of us working in his laboratory immediately began such experiments. The first experiments with LiCl gave the expected single resonance for each nucleus, but we were surprised to discover six resonances for the proton in H2, which we soon showed was due to the magnetic effects of the other proton and the rotating charged molecule: from these measurements we could also obtain new information on molecular structure. We had another shock when we studied D2 and found the resonance curves were spread more widely for D2 than H2 even though the magnetic interactions should have been much smaller. We found we could explain this by assuming that the deuteron had an electric quadrupole moment and J. Schwinger pointed out that this would require the existence of a previously unsuspected electric tensor force between the neutron and the proton. With this, the resonance method was giving new fundamental information about nuclear forces. In 1944, Rabi and I pointed out that it should be possible by the Dirac theory and our past resonance experiments to calculate exactly the hyperfine interaction between the electron and the proton in the hydrogen atom and we had two graduate students, Nafe and Nelson do the experiment and they found a disagreement which led J. Schwinger to develop the first successful relativistic quantum field theory and QED. In 1964, Purcell, Bloch and others detected magnetic resonance transitions by the effect of the transition on the oscillator, called NMR, making possible measurements on liquids, solids and gases and giving information on chemical shifts and thermal relaxation times T1 and T2. I developed a magnetic resonance method for setting a limit to the EDM of a neutron in a beam and with others for neutrons stored in a suitably coated bottle. Magnetic resonance measurements provide high stability atomic clocks. Both the second and the meter are now defined in terms of atomic clocks. Lauterbuhr, Mansfield, Damadian and others developed the important methods of using inhomogeneous magnetic fields to localize the magnetic resonance in a tissue sample producing beautiful and valuable magnetic resonance images, MRI's, and fMRI's.

  20. Nonlinear dynamics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of nonlinear dynamics experiments is to improve the understanding of single particle effects that increase the particle amplitude and lead to loss. Particle motion in storage rings is nearly conservative and for transverse dynamics the Hamiltonian in action angle variables (I{sub x},I{sub y},{phi}{sub x},{phi}{sub y}) near an isolated resonance k{nu}{sub x} + l{nu}{sub y} {approx} p is H = I{sub x}{nu}{sub x0} + I{sub y}{nu}{sub y0} + g(I{sub x}, I{sub y}) + h(I{sub x}, I{sub y})cos(k{phi}{sub x} + l{phi}{sub y} - p{theta}), (1) where k, l, p are integers, {theta} = 2{pi}s/L is the azimuth, and s and L are the path length and circumference respectively. The amplitude dependent tunes are given by {nu}{sub x,y}(I{sub x},I{sub y}) = {nu}{sub x0,y0} + {partial_derivative}g(I{sub x},I{sub y})/{partial_derivative}I{sub x,y} (2) and h(I{sub x},I{sub y}) is the resonance driving term (RDT). If the motion is governed by multiple resonances, h(I{sub x},I{sub y}) has to be replace by a series of terms. The particle motion is completely determined by the terms g and h, which can be calculated from higher order multipoles (Sec. ??), or obtained from simulations. Deviations from pure Hamiltonian motion occur due to synchrotron radiation damping (Sec. ??) in lepton or very high energy hadron rings, parameter variations, and diffusion processes such as residual gas and intrabeam scattering. The time scale of the non-Hamiltonian process determines the applicability of the Hamiltonian analysis. Transverse nonlinearities are introduced through sextupoles or higher order multipoles and magnetic field errors in dipoles and quadrupoles. Sextupoles can already drive all resonances. The beam-beam interaction and space charge also introduce nonlinear fields. Intentionally introduced nonlinearities are used to extract beam on a resonance or through capture in stable islands. Localization and minimization of nonlinearities in a ring is a general strategy to decrease emittance growth and increase the beam lifetime. The minimization of nonlinear effects can be done locally or globally. Except for resonant extraction, amplitude increase and particle loss is the result of chaotic particle motion. Large chaotic regions allow particles to increase their amplitudes, and ensures their ultimate loss. However, chaotic particles can, on average, still survive the time period of interest, i.e. the storage time. Nonlinear dynamics experiments aim to determine either the detuning and driving terms g and h directly, or their effect on other quantities. Nonlinear phenomena observed in experiments include phase space deformations and resonant islands in Poincare surfaces of section, nonlinear phase advances, amplitude detuning g, decoherence (Sec. ??), resonance driving terms h, smear, halo formation, echoes (Sec. ??), the tune response matrix, dynamic aperture (Sec. ??), emittance growth, and particle loss. Nonlinear experiments can also be done in the longitudinal plane.

  1. Determination of the sign of the electric field gradient in indium by nuclear resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, L.; Smith, E.N.; Richardson, R.C.

    1997-01-01

    The authors have studied the temperature dependence of two of the four magnetic-field perturbed NQR lines in indium. Their results indicate that the sign of the internal electric field gradient (EFG) is positive, in accord with the recent heat capacity measurements of the ISSP group and one recent theoretical prediction. They also discuss the implications of the sign of the EFG on the use of indium as an absolute thermometer below 1 mK.

  2. Ultrasonic wave transport in a system of disordered resonant scatterers: Propagating resonant modes and hybridization gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, M. L.; Page, J. H.; Sheng, Ping

    2011-09-01

    We present the results of ultrasonic pulse propagation experiments on suspensions of plastic spherical scatterers immersed in water. This system was selected to study the effects of scattering resonances on wave transport. By separating the coherent ballistic component from the multiply scattered wave field, both the dispersion relations and the diffusive propagation of ultrasound were investigated. We show that the dispersion relation is marked by a series of hybridization gaps due to the coupling between the propagating modes of surrounding fluid and the scattering resonances. Effects of dissipation on the formation of the gaps were investigated. We find evidence in our ultrasonic data for the existence of a (slowly propagating) second longitudinal mode, also seen in Brillouin scattering experiments, that arises from the coupling between the resonant scatterers. These results are interpreted with an effective medium model based on the spectral function approach, which gives an excellent description of the dispersion relations in this system. Measurements of the multiply scattered ultrasound allow both the diffusion coefficient and the absorption time to be measured as a function of frequency. The relationship between the diffusion coefficient and the ballistic data is discussed, while the measurement of the absorption time from the decay of the multiply scattered coda enables the absorption and scattering lengths to be separated. These ultrasonic measurements and their interpretation based on the spectral function approach give a very complete picture of wave transport in this strongly scattering resonant system.

  3. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    DOEpatents

    Chang, J.J.

    1995-07-18

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality. 5 figs.

  4. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jim J. (Dublin, CA)

    1995-07-18

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality.

  5. Non-resonant triple alpha reaction rate at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, T.; Tamii, A.; Aoi, N.; Fujita, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Miki, K.; Ogata, K.; Carter, J.; Donaldson, L.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Furuno, T.; Kawabata, T.; Kamimura, M.; Nemulodi, F.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Swarts, C.

    2014-05-02

    Our experimental goal is to study the non-resonant triple alpha reaction rate at low temperture (T < 10{sup 8} K). The {sup 13}C(p,d) reaction at 66 MeV has been used to probe the alpha-unbound continuum state in {sup 12}C just below the 2{sup nd} 0{sup +} state at 7.65 MeV. The transition strength to the continuum state is predicted to be sensitive to the non-resonant triple alpha reaction rate. The experiment has been performed at iThemba LABS. We report the present status of the experiment.

  6. Quantum Mechanical Reflection Resonances

    E-print Network

    Erica Caden; Robert Gilmore

    2006-10-27

    Resonances in the reflection probability amplitude r(E) can occur in energy ranges in which the reflection probability R(E)=|r(E)|^2 is 1. They occur as the phase phi(E) defined by r(E) = t*(E)/t(E) = 1e^{i 2phi(E)} undergoes a rapid change of pi radians. During this transition the phase angle exhibits a Lorentzian profile in that d(phi(E))/dE ~= 1/[(E-E_0)^2+(hbar*gamma/2)^2]. The energy E_0 identifies the location of a quasi-bound state, gamma measures the lifetime of this state, and t(E) is a matrix element of the transfer operator. Methods for computing and measuring these resonances are proposed.

  7. A mirrorless spinwave resonator

    PubMed Central

    Pinel, Olivier; Everett, Jesse L.; Hosseini, Mahdi; Campbell, Geoff T.; Buchler, Ben C.; Lam, Ping Koy

    2015-01-01

    Optical resonance is central to a wide range of optical devices and techniques. In an optical cavity, the round-trip length and mirror reflectivity can be chosen to optimize the circulating optical power, linewidth, and free-spectral range (FSR) for a given application. In this paper we show how an atomic spinwave system, with no physical mirrors, can behave in a manner that is analogous to an optical cavity. We demonstrate this similarity by characterising the build-up and decay of the resonance in the time domain, and measuring the effective optical linewidth and FSR in the frequency domain. Our spinwave is generated in a 20?cm long Rb gas cell, yet it facilitates an effective FSR of 83?kHz, which would require a round-trip path of 3.6?km in a free-space optical cavity. Furthermore, the spinwave coupling is controllable enabling dynamic tuning of the effective cavity parameters. PMID:26655839

  8. Parallel Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-print Network

    Uecker, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The main disadvantage of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are its long scan times and, in consequence, its sensitivity to motion. Exploiting the complementary information from multiple receive coils, parallel imaging is able to recover images from under-sampled k-space data and to accelerate the measurement. Because parallel magnetic resonance imaging can be used to accelerate basically any imaging sequence it has many important applications. Parallel imaging brought a fundamental shift in image reconstruction: Image reconstruction changed from a simple direct Fourier transform to the solution of an ill-conditioned inverse problem. This work gives an overview of image reconstruction from the perspective of inverse problems. After introducing basic concepts such as regularization, discretization, and iterative reconstruction, advanced topics are discussed including algorithms for auto-calibration, the connection to approximation theory, and the combination with compressed sensing.

  9. [Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Teraoka, Kunihiko; Suzuki, Yoshinori; Yamashina, Akira

    2014-07-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) evolves and is occupying an important status in cardiovascular diagnostic imaging. In particular, in the estimation of the cause of heart failure, or evaluation of severity-of-illness and prognostic presumption, utility is high clinically. In this chapter, about a selection sequence for taking image according to the purpose, description of findings, and its clinical utility are introduced. And the role which this imaging plays will be discussed in the near future. PMID:25138928

  10. Tandem resonator reflectance modulator

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Ian J. (Albuquerque, NM); Wendt, Joel R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01

    A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors.

  11. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  12. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wolinsky, J.S.; Narayana, P.A.; Fenstermacher, M.J. )

    1990-11-01

    Regional in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides quantitative data on selected chemical constituents of brain. We imaged 16 volunteers with clinically definite multiple sclerosis on a 1.5 tesla magnetic resonance scanner to define plaque-containing volumes of interest, and obtained localized water-suppressed proton spectra using a stimulated echo sequence. Twenty-five of 40 plaque-containing regions provided spectra of adequate quality. Of these, 8 spectra from 6 subjects were consistent with the presence of cholesterol or fatty acids; the remainder were similar to those obtained from white matter of normal volunteers. This early experience with regional proton spectroscopy suggests that individual plaques are distinct. These differences likely reflect dynamic stages of the evolution of the demyelinative process not previously accessible to in vivo investigation.

  13. Stochastic resonance at nonequilibrium phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skokov, V. N.; Koverda, V. P.; Vinogradov, A. V.; Reshetnikov, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    Thermal pulsations in a transition from a nucleate to a film regime of water boiling on a wire heater with a periodic Joule heat release have been studied experimentally. At frequencies of the periodic action smaller than 0.1 Hz the intermittency of the nucleate and film boiling regimes was observed. In this case the amplitude of thermal pulsations increased. The experiments with an additional noise source were carried out. With an increase in the intensity of the noise the power of the output periodic mode increased and reaching the maximum began to decrease. The results are interpreted as stochastic resonance when the periodic component of pulsations increases in the presence of noise. The results show that in a complex system with nonequilibrium phase transitions there can occur both the extreme fluctuations with 1 / f power spectrum and stochastic resonance under external periodic action.

  14. Magnetorheological polydimethylsiloxane micro-optical resonator.

    PubMed

    Ioppolo, Tindaro; Otügen, M Volkan

    2010-06-15

    We investigate the possibility of using magnetorheological polydimethylsiloxane (MR-PDMS) spheres as micro-optical resonators. In particular, the effect of a magnetic field on the whispering gallery modes (WGM) of these resonators is studied. The applied field induces mechanical deformation, causing shifts in the WGM. The microspheres are made of PDMS with embedded magnetically polarizable particles. An analysis is carried out to estimate the WGM shifts induced by an external magnetic field. An experiment is also carried out to demonstrate the magnetic field-induced WGM shifts in an MR-PDMS microsphere. The results indicate that MR-PDMS microspheres can be used as high-Q-factor tunable optical cavities with potential applications in sensing. PMID:20548378

  15. Multiple resonance and anti-resonance in coupled Duffing oscillators

    E-print Network

    R. Jothimurugan; K. Thamilmaran; S. Rajasekar; M. A. F. Sanjuan

    2015-10-06

    We investigate the resonance behaviour in a system composed by n-coupled Duffing oscillators where only the first oscillator is driven by a periodic force, assuming a nearest neighbour coupling. We have derived the frequency-response equations for a system composed of two-coupled oscillators by using a theoretical approach. Interestingly, the frequency-response curve displays two resonance peaks and one anti-resonance. A theoretical prediction of the response amplitudes of two oscillators closely match with the numerically computed amplitudes. We analyse the effect of the coupling strength on the resonance and anti-resonance frequencies and the response amplitudes at these frequencies. For the n-coupled oscillators system, in general, there are n-resonant peaks and (n-1) anti-resonant peaks. For large values of n, except for the first resonance, other resonant peaks are weak due to linear damping. The resonance behaviours observed in the n-coupled Duffing oscillators are also realized in an electronic analog circuit simulation of the equations. Understanding the role of coupling and system size has the potential applications in music, structural engineering, power systems, biological networks, electrical and electronic systems.

  16. Protein Sensors Based on Optical Ring Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ying; Ksendzov, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Prototype transducers based on integrated optical ring resonators have been demonstrated to be useful for detecting the protein avidin in extremely dilute solutions. In an experiment, one of the transducers proved to be capable of indicating the presence of avidin at a concentration of as little as 300 pM in a buffer solution a detection sensitivity comparable to that achievable by previously reported protein-detection techniques. These transducers are serving as models for the further development of integrated-optics sensors for detecting small quantities of other proteins and protein-like substances. The basic principle of these transducers was described in Chemical Sensors Based on Optical Ring Resonators (NPO-40601), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 10 (October 2005), page 32. The differences between the present transducers and the ones described in the cited prior article lie in details of implementation of the basic principle. As before, the resonator in a transducer of the present type is a closed-circuit dielectric optical waveguide. The outermost layer of this waveguide, analogous to the optical cladding layer on an optical fiber, consists of a layer comprising sublayers having indices of refraction lower than that of the waveguide core. The outermost sublayer absorbs the chemical of interest (in this case, avidin). The index of refraction of the outermost sublayer changes with the concentration of absorbed avidin. The resonator is designed to operate with relatively strong evanescent-wave coupling between the outer sublayer and the electromagnetic field propagating along the waveguide core. By virtue of this coupling, the chemically induced change in the index of refraction of the outermost sublayer causes a measurable change in the spectrum of the resonator output.

  17. Magnetic field tunable acoustic resonator with ferromagnetic-ferroelectric layered structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polzikova, Natalia; Alekseev, Sergey; Kotelyanskii, Iosif; Raevskiy, Alexander; Fetisov, Yuri

    2013-05-01

    High overtone acoustic resonator with yttrium iron garnet/zinc oxide layered structure was theoretically considered, fabricated, and experimentally investigated. The theory of the resonator, containing an arbitrary number of magnetic and nonmagnetic dielectric/ferroelectric layers, placed in a transverse magnetic field is presented. The simulation shows the possibility to tune the resonant frequency in the range of ±1 MHz by magnetic field. This tuning is due to the resonance magnetoelastic interaction in the saturated ferrite film and the total phase shift of acoustic wave in the structure. The experiment proves the magnetic field influence on resonance frequencies and attenuation of transverse wave with polarization vector quasicollinear with the field direction. The tuning about 0.25 MHz near the acoustic resonant frequency 2 GHz was obtained in the field 260 Oe. This frequency is close to the ferromagnetic resonance frequency in ferrite film, corresponding to the field applied.

  18. Resonant tunneling IR detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodall, Jerry M.; Smith, T. P., III

    1990-07-01

    Researchers propose a novel semiconductor heterojunction photodetector which would have a very low dark current and would be voltage tunable. A schematic diagram of the device and its band structure are shown. The two crucial components of the device are a cathode (InGaAs) whose condition band edge is below the conduction band edge of the quantum wells and a resonant tunneling filter (GaAs-AlGaAs). In a standard resonant tunneling device the electrodes are made of the same material as the quantum wells, and this device becomes highly conducting when the quantum levels in the wells are aligned with the Fermi level in the negatively biased electrode. In contrast, the researchers device is essentially non-conducting under the same bias conditions. This is because the Fermi Level of the cathode (InGaAs) is still well below the quantum levels so that no resonant transport occurs and the barriers (AlGaAs) effectively block current flow through the device. However, if light with the same photon energy as the conduction-band discontinuity between the cathode and the quantum wells, E sub c3-E sub c1, is shone on the sample, free carriers will be excited to an energy corresponding to the lowest quantum level in the well closest to the cathode (hv plue E sub c1 = E sub o). These electrons will resonantly tunnel through the quantum wells and be collected as a photocurrent in the anode (GaAs). To improve the quantum efficiency, the cathode (InGaAs) should be very heavily doped and capped with a highly reflective metal ohmic contact. The thickness of the device should be tailored to optimize thin film interference effects and afford the maximum absorption of light. Because the device relies on resonant tunneling, its response should be very fast, and the small voltages needed to change the responsivity should allow for very high frequency modulation of the photocurrent. In addition, the device is tuned to a specific photon energy so that it can be designed to detect a fairly narrow range of wavelengths. This selectivity is important for reducing the photocurrent due to spurious light sources.

  19. Broadband architecture for galvanically accessible superconducting microwave resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosman, Sal J.; Singh, Vibhor; Bruno, Alessandro; Steele, Gary A.

    2015-11-01

    In many hybrid quantum systems, a superconducting circuit is required, which combines DC-control with a coplanar waveguide (CPW) microwave resonator. The strategy thus far for applying a DC voltage or current bias to microwave resonators has been to apply the bias through a symmetry point in such a way that it appears as an open circuit for certain frequencies. Here, we introduce a microwave coupler for superconducting CPW cavities in the form of a large shunt capacitance to ground. Such a coupler acts as a broadband mirror for microwaves while providing galvanic connection to the center conductor of the resonator. We demonstrate this approach with a two-port ?/4-transmission resonator with linewidths in the MHz regime ( Q ˜103 ) that shows no spurious resonances and apply a voltage bias up to 80 V without affecting the quality factor of the resonator. This resonator coupling architecture, which is simple to engineer, fabricate, and analyse, could have many potential applications in experiments involving superconducting hybrid circuits.

  20. Influence of resonance tube geometry shape on performance of thermoacoustic engine.

    PubMed

    Bao, Rui; Chen, Guobang; Tang, Ke; Jia, Zhengzhong; Cao, Weihua

    2006-12-22

    Based on the linear thermoacoustics, a symmetrical standing-wave thermoacoustic engine is simulated with a cylindrical tube and a tapered one as the resonance tube, respectively. The experiments with both cylindrical and tapered tubes are carried out. The suppression of nonlinear effects due to tapered tube as the resonance tube is discussed. Both simulation and experimental results show that the performance of the tapered tube is better than cylindrical one as the resonance tube. PMID:17056084

  1. Individual and Collective Behavior of Small Vibrating Motors Interacting Through a Resonant Plate

    E-print Network

    David Mertens; Richard Weaver

    2010-05-03

    We report on experiments of many small motors -- cell phone vibrators -- glued to and interacting through a resonant plate. We find that individual motors interacting with the plate demonstrate hysteresis in their steady-state frequency due to interactions with plate resonances. For multiple motors running simultaneously, the degree of synchronization between motors increases when the motors' frequencies are near a resonance of the plate, and the frequency at which the motors synchronize shows a history dependence.

  2. Electron spin echo envelope modulation of molecular motions of deuterium nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syryamina, V. N.; Maryasov, A. G.; Bowman, M. K.; Dzuba, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy is a powerful technique for the study of hyperfine interactions between an unpaired electron and nearby nuclei in solids, and is employed in quantitative structural studies. Here, we describe the use of ESEEM to study the slow motion of deuterium nuclei using their nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) line shapes. Two ESEEM techniques were employed: the conventional three-pulse ESEEM experiment, ?/2 - ? - ?/2 - T- ?/2 - ? - echo, and the four-pulse ESEEM, ?/2 - ? - ?/2 - T/2 - ? - T/2 - ?/2 - ? - echo, with the time variable T scanned in both cases. The nitroxide free radical 4-tert-butyliminomethyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl(d12)-3-imidazoline-1-oxyl with four deuterated methyl groups was investigated in a glassy ortho-terphenyl matrix over a wide temperature range. It was shown that four-pulse ESEEM allowed measurement of the nearly pure 2H NQR line shape. Between 90 K and 120 K, the ESEEM spectra change drastically. At low temperatures, four-pulse ESEEM spectra show a Pake-like pattern, which evolves into a single line at higher temperatures, which is typical for NQR of rotating methyl CD3 groups. Comparison with literature data on NQR allows estimation of the reorientation rate, k. At ?100 K, where the spectral changes are most pronounced, k was found to be ?105 s-1. The spectral linewidths for the three-pulse ESEEM were found to decrease similarly with increasing temperature; so the three-pulse technique is also capable to detect motion of this type. The ESEEM approach, along with site-directed spin labeling, may be useful for detection of motional transitions near the spin labels in biological systems, when information on motion is required in a wide temperature range.

  3. Electron spin echo envelope modulation of molecular motions of deuterium nuclei.

    PubMed

    Syryamina, V N; Maryasov, A G; Bowman, M K; Dzuba, S A

    2015-12-01

    Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy is a powerful technique for the study of hyperfine interactions between an unpaired electron and nearby nuclei in solids, and is employed in quantitative structural studies. Here, we describe the use of ESEEM to study the slow motion of deuterium nuclei using their nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) line shapes. Two ESEEM techniques were employed: the conventional three-pulse ESEEM experiment, ?/2 - ? - ?/2 - T- ?/2 - ? - echo, and the four-pulse ESEEM, ?/2 - ? - ?/2 - T/2 - ? - T/2 - ?/2 - ? - echo, with the time variable T scanned in both cases. The nitroxide free radical 4-tert-butyliminomethyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl(d12)-3-imidazoline-1-oxyl with four deuterated methyl groups was investigated in a glassy ortho-terphenyl matrix over a wide temperature range. It was shown that four-pulse ESEEM allowed measurement of the nearly pure (2)H NQR line shape. Between 90K and 120K, the ESEEM spectra change drastically. At low temperatures, four-pulse ESEEM spectra show a Pake-like pattern, which evolves into a single line at higher temperatures, which is typical for NQR of rotating methyl CD3 groups. Comparison with literature data on NQR allows estimation of the reorientation rate, k. At ?100K, where the spectral changes are most pronounced, k was found to be ?10(5)s(-1). The spectral linewidths for the three-pulse ESEEM were found to decrease similarly with increasing temperature; so the three-pulse technique is also capable to detect motion of this type. The ESEEM approach, along with site-directed spin labeling, may be useful for detection of motional transitions near the spin labels in biological systems, when information on motion is required in a wide temperature range. PMID:26583529

  4. Nonlinear wave-particle resonant interaction in the radiation belts: Landau resonance vs. fundamental cyclotron resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnoselskikh, V.; Artemyev, A.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mourenas, D.

    2013-12-01

    We present selected THEMIS observations of highly-oblique and large amplitude chorus waves at medium latitudes. The major part of observed waves propagates at nearly-electrostatic mode with normal angles close to resonance cone. We use test particle simulations and analytical theory to estimate efficiency of nonlinear particle acceleration by these waves via Landau and fundamental cyclotron resonances. We show that trapping into the Landau resonance corresponds to a decrease of electron equatorial pitch-angles, while trapping into the first cyclotron resonance increases electron equatorial pitch-angles. For 100 keV electrons, the energy gain is larger for the trapping due to Landau resonance. Moreover, trapping into the Landau resonance is accessible for a wider range of initial pitch-angles in comparison with the fundamental resonance.

  5. Tunable resonant and non-resonant interactions between a phase qubit and LC resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allman, Michael Shane; Whittaker, Jed D.; Castellanos-Beltran, Manuel; Cicak, Katarina; da Silva, Fabio; Defeo, Michael; Lecocq, Florent; Sirois, Adam; Teufel, John; Aumentado, Jose; Simmonds, Raymond W.

    2014-03-01

    We use a flux-biased radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device (rf SQUID) with an embedded flux-biased direct current (dc) SQUID to generate strong resonant and non-resonant tunable interactions between a phase qubit and a lumped-element resonator. The rf-SQUID creates a tunable magnetic susceptibility between the qubit and resonator providing resonant coupling rates from zero to near the ultra-strong coupling regime. By modulating the magnetic susceptibility, non-resonant parametric coupling achieves rates > 100 MHz . Nonlinearity of the magnetic susceptibility also leads to parametric coupling at subharmonics of the qubit-resonator detuning. Controllable coupling is generically important for constructing coupled-mode systems ubiquitous in physics, useful for both, quantum information architectures and quantum simulators. This work supported by NIST and NSA grant EAO140639.

  6. Acoustic superlens using Helmholtz-resonator-based metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xishan; Yin, Jing; Yu, Gaokun; Peng, Linhui; Wang, Ning

    2015-11-01

    Acoustic superlens provides a way to overcome the diffraction limit with respect to the wavelength of the bulk wave in air. However, the operating frequency range of subwavelength imaging is quite narrow. Here, an acoustic superlens is designed using Helmholtz-resonator-based metamaterials to broaden the bandwidth of super-resolution. An experiment is carried out to verify subwavelength imaging of double slits, the imaging of which can be well resolved in the frequency range from 570 to 650 Hz. Different from previous works based on the Fabry-Pérot resonance, the corresponding mechanism of subwavelength imaging is the Fano resonance, and the strong coupling between the neighbouring Helmholtz resonators separated at the subwavelength interval leads to the enhanced sound transmission over a relatively wide frequency range.

  7. Neutron Resonance Spin Determination Using Multi-Segmented Detector DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Keksis, A. L.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.

    2011-06-01

    A sensitive method to determine the spin of neutron resonances is introduced based on the statistical pattern recognition technique. The new method was used to assign the spins of s-wave resonances in {sup 155}Gd. The experimental neutron capture data for these nuclei were measured with the DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiment) calorimeter at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The highly segmented calorimeter provided detailed multiplicity distributions of the capture {gamma}-rays. Using this information, the spins of the neutron capture resonances were determined. With these new spin assignments, level spacings are determined separately for s-wave resonances with J{sup {pi}} = 1{sup -} and 2{sup -}.

  8. Resonance Analysis in the Region of Unresolved Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Lukyanov, A.A.; Janeva, N.B.; Koyumdjieva, N.T.; Volev, K.N.; Schillebeeckx, P.

    2005-05-24

    The independent analysis of new experimental data for 232Th cross sections in the unresolved region performed on the basis of the existing scheme and method of evaluation confirm the previously obtained average resonance parameters. The method of statistical modeling of the resonant cross-section structure in the unresolved resonance region, proposed and developed earlier by introducing the characteristic function of R-matrix elements distribution and the presentation of this by a ladder of fixed 'resonances', is used for calculation of the self-shielding factors of 232Th. The results are given in comparison with those of the code NJOY and experimental data.

  9. Resonance Analysis in the Region of Unresolved Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukyanov, A. A.; Koyumdjieva, N. T.; Janeva, N. B.; Volev, K. N.; Schillebeeckx, P.

    2005-05-01

    The independent analysis of new experimental data for 232Th cross sections in the unresolved region performed on the basis of the existing scheme and method of evaluation confirm the previously obtained average resonance parameters. The method of statistical modeling of the resonant cross-section structure in the unresolved resonance region, proposed and developed earlier by introducing the characteristic function of R-matrix elements distribution and the presentation of this by a ladder of fixed "resonances," is used for calculation of the self-shielding factors of 232Th. The results are given in comparison with those of the code NJOY and experimental data.

  10. Pressure dependent resonant frequency of micromechanical drumhead resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, D. R.; Craighead, H. G.; Parpia, J. M.

    2009-05-25

    We examine the relationship between squeeze film effects and resonance frequency in drum-type resonators. We find that the resonance frequency increases linearly with pressure as a result of the additional restoring force contribution from compression of gas within the drum cavity. We demonstrate trapping of the gas by squeeze film effects and geometry. The pressure sensitivity is shown to scale inversely with cavity height and sound radiation is found to be the predominant loss mechanism near and above atmospheric pressure. Drum resonators exhibit linearity and sensitivity suitable to barometry from below 10 Torr up to several atmospheres.

  11. Can Centre Surround Model Explain the Enhancement of Visual Perception through Stochastic Resonance?

    E-print Network

    Kundu, Ajanta

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the ability of centre surround model for simulating the enhancement of contrast sensitivity through stochastic resonance observed in psychophysical experiments. We also show that this model could be used to simulate the contrast sensitivity function through stochastic resonance. The quality of the fit of measured contrast sensitivity function to the simulated data is very good.

  12. Micromachined magnetoflexoelastic resonator based magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatipoglu, Gokhan; Tadigadapa, Srinivas

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the performance of a magnetoflexoelastic magnetometer consisting of a micromachined ultra-thin (7.5 ?m) quartz bulk acoustic resonator on which 500 nm thick magnetostrictive Metglas® (Fe85B5Si10) film is deposited. The resonance frequency of the unimorph resonator structure is sensitively affected by the magnetostrictively induced flexoelastic effect in quartz and is exploited to detect low frequency (<100 Hz) and nanoTesla magnetic fields. The resonance frequency shift is measured by tracking the at-resonance admittance of the resonator as a function of the applied magnetic field. The frequency shifts are linearly correlated to the magnetic field strength. A minimum detectable magnetic flux density of ˜79 nT has been measured for 10 Hz modulated magnetic field input signals which corresponds to a frequency sensitivity of 0.883 Hz/?T.

  13. Fermi resonance in optical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Chang-Hwan; Yu, Hyeon-Hye; Lee, Ji-Won; Kim, Chil-Min

    2015-04-01

    Fermi resonance is a phenomenon of quantum mechanical superposition, which most often occurs between normal and overtone modes in molecular systems that are nearly coincident in energy. We find that scarred resonances in deformed dielectric microcavities are the very phenomenon of Fermi resonance, that is, a pair of quasinormal modes interact with each other due to coupling and a pair of resonances are generated through an avoided resonance crossing. Then the quantum number difference of a pair of quasinormal modes, which is a consequence of quantum mechanical superposition, equals periodic orbits, whereby the resonances are localized on the periodic orbits. We derive the relation between the quantum number difference and the periodic orbits and confirm it in an elliptic, a rectangular, and a stadium-shaped dielectric microcavity.

  14. DISSIPATIVE DIVERGENCE OF RESONANT ORBITS

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Konstantin; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    A considerable fraction of multi-planet systems discovered by the observational surveys of extrasolar planets reside in mild proximity to first-order mean-motion resonances. However, the relative remoteness of such systems from nominal resonant period ratios (e.g., 2:1, 3:2, and 4:3) has been interpreted as evidence for lack of resonant interactions. Here, we show that a slow divergence away from exact commensurability is a natural outcome of dissipative evolution and demonstrate that libration of critical angles can be maintained tens of percent away from nominal resonance. We construct an analytical theory for the long-term dynamical evolution of dissipated resonant planetary pairs and confirm our calculations numerically. Collectively, our results suggest that a significant fraction of the near-commensurate extrasolar planets are in fact resonant and have undergone significant dissipative evolution.

  15. Bistability in Feshbach Resonance

    E-print Network

    Hong Y. Ling

    2010-03-11

    A coupled atom-molecule condensate with an intraspecies Feshbach resonance is employed to explore matter wave bistability both in the presence and in the absence of a unidirectional optical ring cavity. In particular, a set of conditions are derived that allow the threshold for bistability, due both to two-body s-wave scatterings and to cavity-mediated two-body interactions, to be determined analytically. The latter bistability is found to support, not only transitions between a mixed (atom-molecule) state and a pure molecular state as in the former bistability, but also transitions between two distinct mixed states.

  16. Resonance test system

    DOEpatents

    Musial, Walter (Boulder, CO); White, Darris (Superior, CO)

    2011-05-31

    An apparatus (10) for applying at least one load to a specimen (12) according to one embodiment of the invention may comprise a mass (18). An actuator (20) mounted to the specimen (12) and operatively associated with the mass (18) moves the mass (18) along a linear displacement path (22) that is perpendicular to a longitudinal axis of the specimen (12). A control system (26) operatively associated with the actuator (20) operates the actuator (20) to reciprocate the mass (18) along the linear displacement path (22) at a reciprocating frequency, the reciprocating frequency being about equal to a resonance frequency of the specimen (12) in a test configuration.

  17. Nanotube resonator devices

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Zettl, Alexander K; Weldon, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-06

    A fully-functional radio receiver fabricated from a single nanotube is being disclosed. Simultaneously, a single nanotube can perform the functions of all major components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A DC voltage source, as supplied by a battery, can power the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, successful music and voice reception has been demonstrated. Also disclosed are a radio transmitter and a mass sensor using a nanotube resonator device.

  18. GAUSSIAN BEAM LASER RESONATOR PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    In designing a laser cavity, the laser engineer is frequently concerned with more than the stability of the resonator. Other considerations include the size of the beam at various optical surfaces within the resonator or the performance of intracavity line-narrowing or other optical elements. Laser resonators obey the laws of Gaussian beam propagation, not geometric optics. The Gaussian Beam Laser Resonator Program models laser resonators using Gaussian ray trace techniques. It can be used to determine the propagation of radiation through laser resonators. The algorithm used in the Gaussian Beam Resonator program has three major components. First, the ray transfer matrix for the laser resonator must be calculated. Next calculations of the initial beam parameters, specifically, the beam stability, the beam waist size and location for the resonator input element, and the wavefront curvature and beam radius at the input surface to the first resonator element are performed. Finally the propagation of the beam through the optical elements is computed. The optical elements can be modeled as parallel plates, lenses, mirrors, dummy surfaces, or Gradient Index (GRIN) lenses. A Gradient Index lens is a good approximation of a laser rod operating under a thermal load. The optical system may contain up to 50 elements. In addition to the internal beam elements the optical system may contain elements external to the resonator. The Gaussian Beam Resonator program was written in Microsoft FORTRAN (Version 4.01). It was developed for the IBM PS/2 80-071 microcomputer and has been implemented on an IBM PC compatible under MS DOS 3.21. The program was developed in 1988 and requires approximately 95K bytes to operate.

  19. Resonance capture and Saturn's rings

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, C.W.

    1986-05-01

    We have assigned the resonances apparently responsible for the stabilization of the Saturn's shepherd satellites and for the substructure seen in the F-ring and the ringlets in the C-ring. We show that Saturn's narrow ringlets have a substructure determined by three-body resonances with Saturn's ringmoons and the sun. We believe such resonances have important implications to satellite formation. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Interpreting the behavior of a quarter-wave transmission line resonator in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gogna, G. S. Turner, M. M.; Karkari, S. K.

    2014-12-15

    The quarter wave resonator immersed in a strongly magnetized plasma displays two possible resonances occurring either below or above its resonance frequency in vacuum, f{sub o}. This fact was demonstrated in our recent articles [G. S. Gogna and S. K. Karkari, Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 151503 (2010); S. K. Karkari, G. S. Gogna, D. Boilson, M. M. Turner, and A. Simonin, Contrib. Plasma Phys. 50(9), 903 (2010)], where the experiments were carried out over a limited range of magnetic fields at a constant electron density, n{sub e}. In this paper, we present the observation of dual resonances occurring over the frequency scan and find that n{sub e} calculated by considering the lower resonance frequency is 25%–30% smaller than that calculated using the upper resonance frequency with respect to f{sub o}. At a given magnetic field strength, the resonances tend to shift away from f{sub o} as the background density is increased. The lower resonance tends to saturate when its value approaches electron cyclotron frequency, f{sub ce}. Interpretation of these resonance conditions are revisited by examining the behavior of the resonance frequency response as a function of n{sub e}. A qualitative discussion is presented which highlights the practical application of the hairpin resonator for interpreting n{sub e} in a strongly magnetized plasma.

  1. Long-lived resonances at mirrors

    E-print Network

    Friedemann Queisser; William G. Unruh

    2015-03-30

    Motivated by realistic scattering processes of composite systems, we study the dynamics of a two-particle bound system which is scattered at a mirror. The physics of the scattering process will be discussed in the cases when only one particle interacts directly with the mirror and when both particles are scattered directly. It is shown that the coherence between the transmitted and the reflected wave-packet becomes reduced due to the scattering process. When both particles interact directly with the mirror, the system exhibits long-lived resonances. The results should be of interest for interference experiments with composite systems.

  2. QRPA calculations of Giant Monopole Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avogadro, Paolo; Bertulani, Carlos; Nakatsukasa, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    We present calculations of giant monopole resonances obtained with a fully self consistent spherical quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA) on top of a Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) code. These results are compared with the most recent experiments on Sn and Cd isotopes to try to shed light on the abnormal softness of these isotopes. In the particle hole channel we use Skryme functionals while in the pairing channel we make use of density dependent contact interactions. The density dependence of the pairing interaction is explicitly taken into account.

  3. Stochastic resonance in mammalian neuronal networks

    SciTech Connect

    Gluckman, B.J.; So, P.; Netoff, T.I.; Spano, M.L.; Schiff, S.J.

    1998-09-01

    We present stochastic resonance observed in the dynamics of neuronal networks from mammalian brain. Both sinusoidal signals and random noise were superimposed into an applied electric field. As the amplitude of the noise component was increased, an optimization (increase then decrease) in the signal-to-noise ratio of the network response to the sinusoidal signal was observed. The relationship between the measures used to characterize the dynamics is discussed. Finally, a computational model of these neuronal networks that includes the neuronal interactions with the electric field is presented to illustrate the physics behind the essential features of the experiment. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Generating Second Harmonics In Nonlinear Resonant Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlovsky, William J.; Nabors, C. David; Byer, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    Single-axial-mode lasers pump very-low-loss doubling crystals. Important advance in making resonant generation of second harmonics possible for diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers is recent development of monolithic nonplanar ring geometries in neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) lasers that produce frequency-stable single-mode outputs. Other advance is development of high-quality MgO:LiNbO3 as electro-optically nonlinear material. Series of experiments devised to improve doubling efficiency of low-power lasers, and particularly of diode-laser-pumped continuous-wave Nd:YAG lasers.

  5. Orbital resonances around black holes.

    PubMed

    Brink, Jeandrew; Geyer, Marisa; Hinderer, Tanja

    2015-02-27

    We compute the length and time scales associated with resonant orbits around Kerr black holes for all orbital and spin parameters. Resonance-induced effects are potentially observable when the Event Horizon Telescope resolves the inner structure of Sgr A*, when space-based gravitational wave detectors record phase shifts in the waveform during the resonant passage of a compact object spiraling into the black hole, or in the frequencies of quasiperiodic oscillations for accreting black holes. The onset of geodesic chaos for non-Kerr spacetimes should occur at the resonance locations quantified here. PMID:25768747

  6. Superconducting Resonators: Protecting Schrodinger's Cat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, Jose; Mauskopf, Philip

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade, superconducting resonators have played a fundamental role in various novel astronomical detectors and quantum information processors. One example is the microwave kinetic inductance detector that is able to resolve photon energies by measuring shifts in its resonant frequency. Similar resonators have been integrated with superconducting qubits, specifically the transmon, to substantially improve quantum coherence times. The purpose of this investigation is to survey various resonant structures within the requirements of circuit quantum electrodynamics giving special attention to quality factors, TLS noise, and quasi-particle generation. Specifically, planar and three dimensional cavities with varying geometries and materials are characterized - primarily focusing on NbTiN and Nb.

  7. Electromagnetic production of hyperon resonances

    E-print Network

    K. Hicks; D. Keller; W. Tang

    2010-12-14

    The study of hyperon resonances has entered a new era of precision with advent of high-statistics photoproduction data from the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. These data have multi-particle final states, allowing clean identification of exclusive reactions associated with strange mesons and baryons. Examples of physics results are: evidence for isospin interference in the decay of the $\\Lambda(1405)$ resonance; a strong suggestion of meson cloud effects in the structure of the $\\Sigma(1385)$ resonance; data from $K^*$ photoproduction that will test the existence of the purported $K_0(800)$ meson. Properties of other hyperon resonances will also be studied in the near future.

  8. Hyperon Resonance Photoproduction at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    K. Hicks, D. Keller, W. Tang

    2011-02-01

    The study of hyperon resonances has entered a new era of precision with advent of high-statistics photoproduction data from the CLAS detector at Jeffersonnext term Lab. These data have multi-particle final states, allowing clean identification of exclusive reactions associated with strange mesons and baryons. Examples of physics results are: evidence for isospin interference in the decay of the ?(1405) resonance; a strong suggestion of meson cloud effects in the structure of the Sigma (1385) resonance; data from Klow asterisk photoproduction that will test the existence of the purported K0(800) meson. Properties of other hyperon resonances will also be studied in the near future.

  9. Electromagnetic production of hyperon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    K. Hicks, D. Keller, W. Tang

    2011-10-01

    The study of hyperon resonances has entered a new era of precision with advent of high-statistics photoproduction data from the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. These data have multi-particle final states, allowing clean identification of exclusive reactions associated with strange mesons and baryons. Examples of physics results are: evidence for isospin interference in the decay of the {Lambda}(1405) resonance; a strong suggestion of meson cloud effects in the structure of the {Sigma}(1385) resonance; data from K* photoproduction that will test the existence of the purported K{sub 0}(800)$ meson. Properties of other hyperon resonances will also be studied in the near future.

  10. Properties of resonance wave functions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    More, R. M.; Gerjuoy, E.

    1973-01-01

    Construction and study of resonance wave functions corresponding to poles of the Green's function for several illustrative models of theoretical interest. Resonance wave functions obtained from the Siegert and Kapur-Peierls definitions of the resonance energies are compared. The comparison especially clarifies the meaning of the normalization constant of the resonance wave functions. It is shown that the wave functions may be considered renormalized in a sense analogous to that of quantum field theory. However, this renormalization is entirely automatic, and the theory has neither ad hoc procedures nor infinite quantities.

  11. Fano resonances in magnetic metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Naether, Uta; Molina, Mario I.

    2011-10-15

    We study the scattering of magnetoinductive plane waves by internal (external) capacitive (inductive) defects coupled to a one-dimensional split-ring resonator array. We examine a number of simple defect configurations where Fano resonances occur and study the behavior of the transmission coefficient as a function of the controllable external parameters. We find that for embedded capacitive defects, the addition of a small amount of coupling to second neighbors is necessary for the occurrence of Fano resonance. For external inductive defects, Fano resonances are commonplace, and they can be tuned by changing the relative orientation or distance between the defect and the SSR array.

  12. A Qualitative-Quantitative H-NMR Experiment for the Instrumental Analysis Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, John S.; Leary, James J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an experiment combining qualitative and quantitative information from hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. Reviews theory, discusses the experimental approach, and provides sample results. (JM)

  13. Concepts in Biochemistry: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Biochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheatham, Steve

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the nature of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment, the techniques used, the types of structural and dynamic information obtained, and how one can view and refine structures using computer graphics techniques in combination with NMR data. Provides several spectra and a computer graphics image from B-form DNA. (MVL)

  14. Parametric resonance induced chaos in magnetic damped driven pendulum

    E-print Network

    Giorgi Khomeriki

    2015-11-14

    A damped driven pendulum with a magnetic driving force, appearing from a solenoid, where ac current flows is considered. The solenoid acts on the magnet, which is located at the free end of the pendulum. In this system, the existence and interrelation of chaos and parametric resonance is theoretically examined. Derived analytical results are supported by numerical simulations and conducted experiments.

  15. Parametric resonance induced chaos in magnetic damped driven pendulum

    E-print Network

    Khomeriki, Giorgi

    2015-01-01

    A damped driven pendulum with a magnetic driving force, appearing from a solenoid, where ac current flows is considered. The solenoid acts on the magnet, which is located at the free end of the pendulum. In this system, the existence and interrelation of chaos and parametric resonance is theoretically examined. Derived analytical results are supported by numerical simulations and conducted experiments.

  16. Resonance Point Interactions

    E-print Network

    C. J. Fewster

    1993-09-01

    A new construction is presented for point interactions (PI) and generalised point interactions (GPI). The construction is an inverse scattering procedure, using integral transforms suggested by the required scattering theory. The usual class of PI in 3 dimensions (i.e. the self adjoint extensions of the Laplacian on the domain of smooth functions compactly supported away from the origin) is reconstructed. In addition a 1-parameter family of GPI models termed resonance point interactions (RPI) is constructed, labelled by $M$. The case $M0$ appears to be new. In both cases, the Hilbert space of states must be extended, for $M0$, the Hilbert space is extended to a Pontryagin space. In the latter case, the space of physical states is identified as a positive definite invariant subspace. Complete M{\\o}ller wave operators are constructed for the models considered, using a two space formalism where necessary, which confirm that the PI and RPI models exhibit the required scattering theory. The physical interpretation of RPI as models for quantum mechanical systems exhibiting zero energy resonances is described.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Litwiller, Daniel V.; Mariappan, Yogesh K.; Ehman, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Often compared to the practice of manual palpation, magnetic resonance elastography is an emerging technology for quantitatively assessing the mechanical properties of tissue as a basis for characterizing disease. The potential of MRE as a diagnostic tool is rooted in the fact that normal and diseased tissues often differ significantly in terms of their intrinsic mechanical properties. MRE uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in conjunction with the application of mechanical shear waves to probe tissue mechanics. This process can be broken down into three essential steps: inducing shear waves in the tissue,imaging the propagating shear waves with MRI, andanalyzing the wave data to generate quantitative images of tissue stiffness MRE has emerged as a safe, reliable and noninvasive method for staging hepatic liver fibrosis, and is now used in some locations as an alternative to biopsy. MRE is also being used in the ongoing investigations of numerous other organs and tissues, including, for example, the spleen, kidney, pancreas, brain, heart, breast, skeletal muscle, prostate, vasculature, lung, spinal cord, eye, bone, and cartilage. In the article that follows, some fundamental techniques and applications of MRE are summarized. PMID:26361467

  18. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, R.R.

    1995-02-14

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell is disclosed having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions. 5 figs.

  19. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, Robert R. (Aiken, SC)

    1995-01-01

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions.

  20. nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Karwacki, F. A.; Griffin, J.

    1985-04-02

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope which derives angular rotation thereof from the phases of precessing nuclear moments utilizes a single-resonance cell situated in the center of a uniform DC magnetic field. The field is generated by current flow through a circular array of coils between parallel plates. It also utilizes a pump and read-out beam and associated electronics for signal processing and control. Encapsulated in the cell for sensing rotation are odd isotopes of Mercury Hg/sup 199/ and Hg/sup 201/. Unpolarized intensity modulated light from a pump lamp is directed by lenses to a linear polarizer, quarter wave plate combination producing circularly polarized light. The circularly polarized light is reflected by a mirror to the cell transverse to the field for optical pumping of the isotopes. Unpolarized light from a readout lamp is directed by lenses to another linear polarizer. The linearly polarized light is reflected by another mirror to the cell transverse to the field and orthogonal to the pump lamp light. The linear light after transversing the cell strikes an analyzer where it is converted to an intensity-modulated light. The modulated light is detected by a photodiode processed and utilized as feedback to control the field and pump lamp excitation and readout of angular displacement.

  1. Electromagnetic excitation of the Delta(1232) resonance

    SciTech Connect

    V. Pascalutsa; M. Vanderhaeghen; Shin Nan Yang

    2006-09-05

    We review the description of the lowest-energy nucleon excitation--the Delta(1232)-resonance. Much of the recent effort has been focused on the precision measurements of the nucleon to Delta transition by means of electromagnetic probes. We review the results of those measurements and confront them with the state-of-the-art calculations based on chiral effective-field theories (EFT), lattice QCD, and QCD-inspired models. Some of the theoretical approaches are reviewed in detail. In particular, we describe the chiral EFT of QCD in the energy domain of the Delta-resonance, and its applications to the electromagnetic nucleon-to-Delta transition (gamma N Delta). We also describe the recent dynamical and unitary-isobar models of pion electroproduction which are extensively used in the extraction of the gamma* N Delta form factors from experiment. Furthermore, we discuss the link of the gamma* N Delta form factors to generalized parton distributions (GPDs), as well as the predictions of perturbative QCD for these transition form factors. The present status of understanding the Delta-resonance properties and the nature of its excitation is summarized.

  2. Ion-ion Hybrid Alfven Wave Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, J. E.; Vincena, S. T.; Morales, G. J.; Farmer, W. A.

    2010-11-01

    In a magnetized plasma consisting of two ion species, the perpendicular dielectric coefficient vanishes at the ion-ion hybrid frequency, where shear Alfven waves have zero parallel group velocity and experience a cut-off. Since the ion-ion hybrid frequency is proportional to the magnetic field, it is possible for propagating shear waves to be reflected in regions of increasing magnetic field. Thus, in principle, it is possible for a magnetic well configuration in a two ion plasma to behave as an Alfven wave resonator, as may be encountered in a tokamak or a planetary magnetosphere. This study explores the possibility of establishing such a resonator in the linear plasma column generated in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA using H-He and He-Ne mixtures. The resonator response is investigated by launching monochromatic waves or sharp tone bursts from a rectangular magnetic loop antenna. In a magnetic well, the radial profiles of the wave magnetic field broaden and a line structure emerges in the power spectrum. The profiles of the lines in the spectra resemble global radial modes rather than waves launched from a localized source. The observations are compared to predictions of a square wave model of the well and the Budden transmission model.

  3. Resonances in the ? n n system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afnan, Iraj R.; Gibson, Benjamin F.

    2015-11-01

    Background: A bound state of the ? n n system has been reported, but at least three theoretical papers question the existence of such a bound state. Purpose: We address the alternative question of whether there might exist a resonance in the ? n n system, using a rank-one separable potential formulation of the Hamiltonian. Methods: We examine the eigenvalues of the kernel of the Faddeev equation in the complex energy plane using contour rotation to allow us to analytically continue the kernel onto the second energy sheet. The model ? n interaction is fitted to the ? p scattering length and effective range. Results: We follow the largest eigenvalue as the ? n potentials are scaled and the ? n n continuum is turned first into a resonance, and then into a bound state of the system. Conclusions: Because a change in the strength of the ? n potential of as little as 5% will produce a ? n n resonance, we infer that an experiment of the H3 (e,e'K+)3n? type at JLAB could be used to constrain the properties of the ? n interaction.

  4. Nonlinear Fano-Resonant Dielectric Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuanmu; Wang, Wenyi; Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Briggs, Dayrl P; Puretzky, Alexander; Geohegan, David; Valentine, Jason

    2015-11-11

    Strong nonlinear light-matter interaction is highly sought-after for a variety of applications including lasing and all-optical light modulation. Recently, resonant plasmonic structures have been considered promising candidates for enhancing nonlinear optical processes due to their ability to greatly enhance the optical near-field; however, their small mode volumes prevent the inherently large nonlinear susceptibility of the metal from being efficiently exploited. Here, we present an alternative approach that utilizes a Fano-resonant silicon metasurface. The metasurface results in strong near-field enhancement within the volume of the silicon resonator while minimizing two photon absorption. We measure a third harmonic generation enhancement factor of 1.5 × 10(5) with respect to an unpatterned silicon film and an absolute conversion efficiency of 1.2 × 10(-6) with a peak pump intensity of 3.2 GW cm(-2). The enhanced nonlinearity, combined with a sharp linear transmittance spectrum, results in transmission modulation with a modulation depth of 36%. The modulation mechanism is studied by pump-probe experiments. PMID:26501777

  5. Control of Cavity Resonance Using Oscillatory Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarfe, Alison Lamp; Chokani, Ndaona

    2000-01-01

    The near-zero net mass oscillatory blowing control of a subsonic cavity flow has been experimentally investigated. An actuator was designed and fabricated to provide both steady and oscillatory blowing over a range of blowing amplitudes and forcing frequencies. The blowing was applied just upstream of the cavity front Wall through interchangeable plate configurations These configurations enabled the effects of hole size, hole shape, and blowing angle to be examined. A significant finding is that in terms of the blowing amplitude, the near zero net mass oscillatory blowing is much more effective than steady blowing; momentum coefficients Lip two orders of magnitude smaller than those required for steady blowing are sufficient to accomplish the same control of cavity resonance. The detailed measurements obtained in the experiment include fluctuating pressure data within the cavity wall, and hot-wire measurements of the cavity shear layer. Spectral and wavelet analysis techniques are applied to understand the dynamics and mechanisms of the cavity flow with control. The oscillatory blowing, is effective in enhancing the mixing in the cavity shear layer and thus modifying the feedback loop associated with the cavity resonance. The nonlinear interactions in the cavity flow are no longer driven by the resonant cavity modes but by the forcing associated with the oscillatory blowing. The oscillatory blowing does not suppress the mode switching behavior of the cavity flow, but the amplitude modulation is reduced.

  6. Bounds on the entanglability of thermal states in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    E-print Network

    Yu, Terri M. (Terri Mak), 1981-

    2003-01-01

    Theorists have recently shown that the states used in current nuclear magnetic resonance (NMIR) quantum computing experiments are not entangled. Yet it is widely believed that entanglement is a necessary resource in the ...

  7. PHYSICAL REVIEW C 85, 064331 (2012) Structure of the pygmy dipole resonance in 124

    E-print Network

    Zilges, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    L69 7ZE, United Kingdom 5 Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, 9747 AA observed in experiments on N = 82 nuclei. Method: The pygmy dipole resonance has been studied in the semi-magic

  8. Experimental study of the influence of different resonators on thermoacoustic conversion performance of a thermoacoustic-Stirling heat engine.

    PubMed

    Luo, E C; Ling, H; Dai, W; Yu, G Y

    2006-12-22

    In this paper, an experimental study of the effect of the resonator shape on the performance of a traveling-wave thermoacoustic engine is presented. Two different resonators were tested in the thermoacoustic-Stirling heat. One resonator is an iso-diameter one, and the other is a tapered one. To have a reasonable comparison reference, we keep the same traveling-wave loop, the same resonant frequency and the same operating pressure. The experiment showed that the resonator shape has significant influence on the global performance of the thermoacoustic-Stirling heat engine. The tapered resonator gives much better performance than the iso-diameter resonator. The tapered resonator system achieved a maximum pressure ratio of about 1.3, a maximum net acoustical power output of about 450 W and a highest thermoacoustic efficiency of about 25%. PMID:16996100

  9. Bayesian Optimization of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sequences

    E-print Network

    Seeger, Matthias

    Bayesian Optimization of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sequences Matthias Seeger MMCI Cluster) Bayesian MRI Optimization 28 November 2008 2 / 19 #12;Magnetic Resonance Imaging Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Bayesian MRI Optimization 28 November 2008 3 / 19 #12;Magnetic Resonance Imaging Magnetic Resonance Imaging

  10. Simple and Inexpensive Classroom Demonstrations of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Joel A.; Nordell, Karen J.; Chesnik, Marla A.; Landis, Clark R.; Ellis, Arthur B.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Condren, S. Michael; Lisensky, George C.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a set of simple, inexpensive, classical demonstrations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) principles that illustrate the resonance condition associated with magnetic dipoles and the dependence of the resonance frequency on environment. (WRM)

  11. Building a Birdcage Resonator for Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies of CNS Disorders

    E-print Network

    Martin, Jeff

    Building a Birdcage Resonator for Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies of CNS Disorders Michael Lang Winnipeg, MB Canada April 20, 2011 #12;Abstract Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies are currently use Magnetic Resonance Imaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 Nuclear Magnetic

  12. Functional cardiac magnetic resonance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brau, Anja Christina Sophie

    2003-07-01

    The study of small animal models of human cardiovascular disease is critical to our understanding of the origin, progression, and treatment of this pervasive disease. Complete analysis of disease pathophysiology in these animal models requires measuring structural and functional changes at the level of the whole heart---a task for which an appropriate non-invasive imaging method is needed. The purpose of this work was thus to develop an imaging technique to support in vivo characterization of cardiac structure and function in rat and mouse models of cardiovascular disease. Whereas clinical cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides accurate assessment of the human heart, the extension of cardiac MRI from humans to rodents presents several formidable scaling challenges. Acquiring images of the mouse heart with organ definition and fluidity of contraction comparable to that achieved in humans requires an increase in spatial resolution by a factor of 3000 and an increase in temporal resolution by a factor of ten. No single technical innovation can meet the demanding imaging requirements imposed by the small animal. A functional cardiac magnetic resonance microscopy technique was developed by integrating improvements in physiological control, imaging hardware, biological synchronization of imaging, and pulse sequence design to achieve high-quality images of the murine heart with high spatial and temporal resolution. The specific methods and results from three different sets of imaging experiments are presented: (1) 2D functional imaging in the rat with spatial resolution of 175 mum2 x 1 mm and temporal resolution of 10 ms; (2) 3D functional imaging in the rat with spatial resolution of 100 mum 2 x 500 mum and temporal resolution of 30 ms; and (3) 2D functional imaging in the mouse with spatial resolution down to 100 mum2 x 1 mm and temporal resolution of 10 ms. The cardiac microscopy technique presented here represents a novel collection of technologies capable of acquiring routine high-quality images of murine cardiac structure and function with minimal artifacts and markedly higher spatial resolution compared to conventional techniques. This work is poised to serve a valuable role in the evaluation of cardiovascular disease and should find broad application in studies ranging from basic pathophysiology to drug discovery.

  13. Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland P.

    2008-06-07

    Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances was an SBIR project begun in July 2004 and ended in January 2008 with Muons, Inc., (Dr. Rolland Johnson, PI), and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) (Dr. Yaroslav Derbenev, Subcontract PI). The project was to develop the theory and simulations of Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) so that it could be used to provide the extra transverse cooling needed for muon colliders in order to relax the requirements on the proton driver, reduce the site boundary radiation, and provide a better environment for experiments. During the course of the project, the theoretical understanding of PIC was developed and a final exposition is ready for publication. Workshops were sponsored by Muons, Inc. in May and September of 2007 that were devoted to the PIC technique. One outcome of the workshops was the interesting and somewhat unexpected realization that the beam emittances using the PIC technique can get small enough that space charge forces can be important. A parallel effort to develop our G4beamline simulation program to include space charge effects was initiated to address this problem. A method of compensating for chromatic aberrations by employing synchrotron motion was developed and simulated. A method of compensating for spherical aberrations using beamline symmetry was also developed and simulated. Different optics designs have been developed using the OptiM program in preparation for applying our G4beamline simulation program, which contains all the power of the Geant4 toolkit. However, no PIC channel design that has been developed has had the desired cooling performance when subjected to the complete G4beamline simulation program. This is believed to be the consequence of the difficulties of correcting the aberrations associated with the naturally large beam angles and beam sizes of the PIC method that are exacerbated by the fringe fields of the rather complicated channel designs that have been attempted. That is, while the designs developed and tested using the matrix program OptiM can work well, a real simulation with lumped dipoles, quadrupoles, and solenoids and their associated fringe fields has not succeeded. As a consequence of this realization, a new approach is being attempted that is based on the use of a helical solenoid (HS) channel that is made of simple coils that provide a much more homogeneous magnetic field. However, in order to use the HS a new approach was required to generate a variable dispersion that is needed according to the PIC theory described above. This approach and its first implementation will be described at EPAC08 in June, 2008.

  14. CARBON-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in Solids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Zhehong

    The rotational resonance phenomena induced by the modulation of the interactions in magnetic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments have been demonstrated for the first time. In the study of chemical shielding, the rotational resonance occurs when a spin-lock field with an amplitude of nomega _{rm r} (n = 1,2) is applied where omega_{rm r} is the spinning speed. The magnetization, which nutates in the rotating frame at a frequency related to the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), allows for the retrieval of the CSA from MAS NMR spectra at a high spinning speed. In addition, a similar rotational resonance phenomenon was studied in a homonuclear spin coupled system. The resonance occurs when the separation of the isotropic chemical shifts of the two spins equal omega_{ rm r}. The rotational resonance restores a splitting pattern in the MAS spectra and enhances the flip-flop motion of the two spins. Also, the sample spinning NMR of homonuclear coupled systems has been analyzed by a pseudo-spin model. In the case of the ^ {13}C dilabelled phthalic anhydride, the analyses at different spinning speeds lead to the determination of the orientation of the chemical shielding tensor. The quadrupolar effect in ^{13 }C-^{14}N coupled spins is manifested in the ^{13 }C MAS spectra by the appearance of an asymmetric doublet. A simple analytical solution to this quadrupolar effect was developed to study ^{13 }C-^{14}N systems for information on both the electric field gradient (EFG) tensor of the nitrogen and the ^{13 }C-^{14}N bond distance. Furthermore, the variable angle sample spinning technique has been applied to determine of the chemical shielding tensors with their orientation for these systems. The molecules studied include tetramethyl-pyrazine, dimethylglyoxime and triethylenediamine. The effect of relaxation in solid state NMR dipolar spectra was studied. The cross relaxation terms introduce a peak in the center of the expected Pake doublet. The dipolar spectra of methyl phosphonic acid at room temperature and methyl fluoride at low temperature (25 K) were used to study this effect.

  15. Experimental investigations of toric resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Keming; Flieger, Ranier; Loosen, Peter

    1993-08-01

    There is much work devoted to the design of new resonator configurations which could optimize efficiency of energy extraction and beam quality of high-power lasers with large- volume gain media. In general, operation with stable resonators at high beam quality limits filling of the gain volume and leads to a reduced efficiency. Unstable resonators exhibit large modal volume and excellent transverse mode discrimination. These are of primary concern in high-power laser systems. Output beams from unstable resonators with spheric mirrors have an annular intensity profile. Beam quality as well as the outcoupling increase as magnification increases. If the gain is not sufficiently high, the increase in the outcoupling reduces laser efficiency. From this it turns out, that in general the maximum beam quality and the maximum efficiency cannot be reached at the same time. This limits the use of these unstable resonators in lasers with low or medium gain. The problem can be overcome using the toric resonators. The beam quality of toric resonators is higher than in the case of unstable resonators with spheric mirrors and is not influenced by the magnification. Therefore, in the case of toric resonators the outcoupling can be matched to the gain in order to optimize the efficiency of energy extraction at high beam quality. Following theoretical analyses and design considerations, different configurations of toric unstable resonators were established for a fast axial flow CO2 laser with two rf-discharge tubes. The efficiency, the beam quality and the alignment sensitivity of toric resonators with different configurations were studied.

  16. Characteristics of vibration energy harvesting using giant magnetostrictive cantilevers with resonant tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kotaro; Horibe, Tadashi; Ishikawa, Shigekazu; Shindo, Yasuhide; Narita, Fumio

    2015-12-01

    This work deals with the dynamic bending and energy harvesting characteristics of giant magnetostrictive cantilevers with resonant tuning both numerically and experimentally. The giant magnetostrictive cantilever is fabricated using a thin Terfenol-D layer, SUS layer, movable proof mass, etc, and, is designed to automatically adjust its own resonant frequency to match the external vibration frequency in real time. Three-dimensional finite element analysis was conducted, and the resonant frequency, induced voltage and stress in the magnetostrictive cantilevers were predicted. The resonant frequency and induced voltage were also measured, and comparison was made between simulation and experiment. The time-varying behavior and self-tuning ability are discussed in detail.

  17. Narrow Resonances in Light Heavy-Ion Collisions: Formation and Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, F.; Courtin, S.; Lebhertz, D.; Salsac, M.-D.

    2009-03-04

    Resonances in light heavy-ion collisions have been observed in systems with a small number of open channels. Very narrow resonances have been reported in the {sup 24}Mg+{sup 24}Mg and {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C cases for which the results of recent experiments on their decay modes will be presented. Special emphasis will be given to the {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C reaction where weak absorption allows the observation of resonant and refractive effects over a large bombarding energy range. The nature of recently observed sub-coulomb resonances will also be raised.

  18. Combining synaptic and cellular resonance in a feed-forward neuronal network.

    PubMed

    Drover, Jonathan D; Tohidi, Vahid; Bose, Amitabha; Nadim, Farzan

    2007-06-01

    We derive a mathematical theory to explain the subthreshold resonance response of a neuron to synaptic input. The theory shows how a neuron combines information from its intrinsic resonant properties with those of the synapse to determine the neuron's generalized resonance response. Our results show that the maximal response of a postsynaptic neuron can lie between the preferred intrinsic frequency of the neuron and the synaptic resonance frequency. We compare our theoretical results to parallel findings on experiments of the crab pyloric central pattern generator. PMID:19079739

  19. Combining synaptic and cellular resonance in a feed-forward neuronal network

    PubMed Central

    Drover, Jonathan D.; Tohidi, Vahid; Bose, Amitabha; Nadim, Farzan

    2008-01-01

    We derive a mathematical theory to explain the subthreshold resonance response of a neuron to synaptic input. The theory shows how a neuron combines information from its intrinsic resonant properties with those of the synapse to determine the neuron’s generalized resonance response. Our results show that the maximal response of a postsynaptic neuron can lie between the preferred intrinsic frequency of the neuron and the synaptic resonance frequency. We compare our theoretical results to parallel findings on experiments of the crab pyloric central pattern generator. PMID:19079739

  20. Resonant excitation of plasma wakefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yun

    Particle accelerators are the main tool for discovering new elementary particles. Plasma based accelerator (PWFA) has been proven a very attractive new acceleration technique due to the large acceleration gradient it has reached (>50GV/m), which is two to three orders higher than the conventional radio frequency accelerators. PWFA is essentially an energy transformer transferring the energy from the drive bunches to witness bunches. For a future more compact and more affordable linear electron/positron collider, such an accelerator will require drive bunches with small longitudinal size (on the order of 100 um) and multi-kilojules of energy to access the new physics at the energy frontier. However, present relativistic electron bunch drivers carry less than 100Joules, thereby limiting the energy gain by the accelerated bunch to less than 100Joules. Proton bunches produced at CERN have been proven as potential drivers for PWFA due to the many tens of kilojules energy they carry (1e11 particles, 3.5-7TeV per particle). However, the CERN proton bunches are too long (approximately 12cm) to drive the wakefield efficiently. It has been proposed that a long particle bunch (protons, electrons, positrons, ... ) traveling in dense plasmas is subject to self-modulation instability (SMI), which transversely modulates a long bunch into multiple short bunches (on the scale of plasma wavelength) and therefore results in high acceleration amplitudes through resonant excitation. In this thesis, we demonstrate the first experimental evidence for the seeding of SMI with an electron bunch. We also use numerical simulations to study the SMI development with a higher-charge electron bunch and propose a possible experiment to demonstrate the transverse modulation directly in experiments. Moreover, we investigate with simulations the effect of transverse plasma radius on the SMI development, which is an important factor to consider when designing plasmas for future SMI and SMI-based experiments. Besides efficient drivers such as high-energy proton bunches, the PWFA also requires high transformer ratio (an indication of energy transfer efficiency) so that the witness bunch can gain energy efficiently from the drive bunch. In this thesis, we explore the possibility of reaching high transformer ratio in the weakly nonlinear PWFA regime so that the witness bunch particles can gain many times the energy of the drive bunch particles in a single acceleration stage.

  1. Vector and scalar charmonium resonances with lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C. B.; Leskovec, Luka; Mohler, Daniel; Prelovsek, Sasa

    2015-09-15

    We perform an exploratory lattice QCD simulation of DD¯ scattering, aimed at determining the masses as well as the decay widths of charmonium resonances above open charm threshold. Neglecting coupling to other channels, the resulting phase shift for DD¯ scattering in p-wave yields the well-known vector resonance ?(3770). For m? = 156 MeV, the extracted resonance mass and the decay width agree with experiment within large statistical uncertainty. The scalar charmonium resonances present a puzzle, since only the ground state ?c0(1P) is well understood, while there is no commonly accepted candidate for its first excitation. We simulate DD¯ scattering in s-wave in order to shed light on this puzzle. The resulting phase shift supports the existence of a yet-unobserved narrow resonance with a mass slightly below 4 GeV. A scenario with this narrow resonance and a pole at ?c0(1P) agrees with the energy-dependence of our phase shift. In addition, further lattice QCD simulations and experimental efforts are needed to resolve the puzzle of the excited scalar charmonia.

  2. Non-resonant multipactor-A statistical model

    SciTech Connect

    Rasch, J.; Johansson, J. F.

    2012-12-15

    High power microwave systems operating in vacuum or near vacuum run the risk of multipactor breakdown. In order to avoid multipactor, it is necessary to make theoretical predictions of critical parameter combinations. These treatments are generally based on the assumption of electrons moving in resonance with the electric field while traversing the gap between critical surfaces. Through comparison with experiments, it has been found that only for small system dimensions will the resonant approach give correct predictions. Apparently, the resonance is destroyed due to the statistical spread in electron emission velocity, and for a more valid description it is necessary to resort to rather complicated statistical treatments of the electron population, and extensive simulations. However, in the limit where resonance is completely destroyed it is possible to use a much simpler treatment, here called non-resonant theory. In this paper, we develop the formalism for this theory, use it to calculate universal curves for the existence of multipactor, and compare with previous results. Two important effects that leads to an increase in the multipactor threshold in comparison with the resonant prediction are identified. These are the statistical spread of impact speed, which leads to a lower average electron impact speed, and the impact of electrons in phase regions where the secondary electrons are immediately reabsorbed, leading to an effective removal of electrons from the discharge.

  3. Tunability of aluminum nitride acoustic resonators: a phenomenological approach.

    PubMed

    Defay, Emmanuel; Ben Hassine, Nizar; Emery, Patrick; Parat, Guy; Abergel, Julie; Devos, Arnaud

    2011-12-01

    A phenomenological approach is developed to identify the physical parameters causing the dc-voltage-induced tunability of aluminum nitride (AlN) acoustic resonators, widely used for RF filters. The typical resonance frequency of these resonators varies from 2.038 GHz at -200 V to 2.062 GHz at +200 V. This indicates, based on these RF measurements versus dc bias and the model used, that the AlN stiffness variation versus dc bias is the prominent effect because both resonance and antiresonance experience a similar variation, respectively, 24 MHz and 19 MHz at 400 V. Picosecond ultrasonics were also used to prove independently that the acoustic velocity (and therefore AlN stiffness) is sensitive to dc bias and that the variation induced is comparable to that extracted from the resonance measurements. It turned out that the stiffness relative variation for an electric field of 1 V/?m extracted from picosecond ultrasonics is 54 ppm-?m/V. This is in good agreement with the value extracted from the RF measurements, namely 57.2 ppm-?m/V. The overall tunability of these AlN resonators reaches 1.1%, which is an interesting figure, although probably not high enough for genuine applications. PMID:23443687

  4. Vector and scalar charmonium resonances with lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lang, C. B.; Leskovec, Luka; Mohler, Daniel; Prelovsek, Sasa; Univ. of Ljubljana, Ljubljana; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA

    2015-09-15

    We perform an exploratory lattice QCD simulation of DD¯ scattering, aimed at determining the masses as well as the decay widths of charmonium resonances above open charm threshold. Neglecting coupling to other channels, the resulting phase shift for DD¯ scattering in p-wave yields the well-known vector resonance ?(3770). For m? = 156 MeV, the extracted resonance mass and the decay width agree with experiment within large statistical uncertainty. The scalar charmonium resonances present a puzzle, since only the ground state ?c0(1P) is well understood, while there is no commonly accepted candidate for its first excitation. We simulate DD¯ scattering inmore »s-wave in order to shed light on this puzzle. The resulting phase shift supports the existence of a yet-unobserved narrow resonance with a mass slightly below 4 GeV. A scenario with this narrow resonance and a pole at ?c0(1P) agrees with the energy-dependence of our phase shift. In addition, further lattice QCD simulations and experimental efforts are needed to resolve the puzzle of the excited scalar charmonia.« less

  5. High-sensitivity optical monitoring of a micro-mechanical resonator with a quantum-limited optomechanical sensor

    E-print Network

    O. Arcizet; P. -F. Cohadon; T. Briant; M. Pinard; A. Heidmann; J. -M. Mackowski; C. Michel; L. Pinard; O. Francais; L. Rousseau

    2006-05-19

    We experimentally demonstrate the high-sensitivity optical monitoring of a micro-mechanical resonator and its cooling by active control. Coating a low-loss mirror upon the resonator, we have built an optomechanical sensor based on a very high-finesse cavity (30000). We have measured the thermal noise of the resonator with a quantum-limited sensitivity at the 10^-19 m/rootHz level, and cooled the resonator down to 5K by a cold-damping technique. Applications of our setup range from quantum optics experiments to the experimental demonstration of the quantum ground state of a macroscopic mechanical resonator.

  6. Giant resonances in Mg-24 

    E-print Network

    Youngblood, David H.; Lui, YW; Clark, HL.

    1999-01-01

    The giant resonance region in Mg-24 was studied with inelastic scattering of 240 MeV alpha particles at small angles including 0 degrees. The giant resonance peak was found to extend up to E-X = 41 MeV. Isoscalar E0, E1, and E2 strength...

  7. Scattering resonances as viscosity limits

    E-print Network

    Maciej Zworski

    2015-05-04

    Using the method of complex scaling we show that scattering resonances of $ - \\Delta + V $, $ V \\in L^\\infty_{\\rm{c}} ( \\mathbb R^n ) $, are limits of eigenvalues of $ - \\Delta + V - i \\epsilon x^2 $ as $ \\epsilon \\to 0+ $. That justifies a method proposed in computational chemistry and reflects a general principle for resonances in other settings.

  8. Electromagnetic Couplings of Nucleon Resonances

    E-print Network

    T. Feuster; U. Mosel

    1996-07-16

    An effective Lagrangian calculation of pion photoproduction including all nucleon resonances up to $\\sqrt s = 1.7$ GeV is presented. We compare our results to recent calculations and show the influence of different width parametrizations and offshell cutoffs on the photoproduction multipoles. We determine the electromagnetic couplings of the resonances from a new fit to the multipole data.

  9. Whispering Gallery Mode Optomechanical Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aveline, David C.; Strekalov, Dmitry V.; Yu, Nan; Yee, Karl Y.

    2012-01-01

    Great progress has been made in both micromechanical resonators and micro-optical resonators over the past decade, and a new field has recently emerged combining these mechanical and optical systems. In such optomechanical systems, the two resonators are strongly coupled with one influencing the other, and their interaction can yield detectable optical signals that are highly sensitive to the mechanical motion. A particularly high-Q optical system is the whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator, which has many applications ranging from stable oscillators to inertial sensor devices. There is, however, limited coupling between the optical mode and the resonator s external environment. In order to overcome this limitation, a novel type of optomechanical sensor has been developed, offering great potential for measurements of displacement, acceleration, and mass sensitivity. The proposed hybrid device combines the advantages of all-solid optical WGM resonators with high-quality micro-machined cantilevers. For direct access to the WGM inside the resonator, the idea is to radially cut precise gaps into the perimeter, fabricating a mechanical resonator within the WGM. Also, a strategy to reduce losses has been developed with optimized design of the cantilever geometry and positions of gap surfaces.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fache, J. Stephen

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important new imaging modality just arriving on the clinical scene in Canada. MRI uses no ionizing radiation; images are derived from the interaction of hydrogen nuclei, a powerful magnetic field, and radio waves. Images are displayed as tomographic slices, much like CT. Direct transverse, sagittal, coronal or oblique slices can be obtained. Unlike CT, the MRI image does not reflect varying tissue densities. In MRI, tissues are differentiated by variation in the amount of hydrogen they contain and by differences in the magnetic environment at a molecular level. All parts of the body can be examined with MRI, although the CNS is particularly well visualized. In addition to providing high resolution images, MRI has the potential for performing non-invasive angiography and biochemical analysis through spectroscopy. To date, there are no known harmful effects of MRI. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:21267205

  11. Innovative Use of Smartphones for a Sound Resonance Tube Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tho, Siew Wei; Yeung, Yau Yuen

    2014-01-01

    A Smartphone is not only a mobile device that is used for communication but is also integrated with a personal digital assistant (PDA) and other technological capabilities such as built-in acceleration, magnetic and light sensors, microphone, camera and Global Positioning System (GPS) unit. This handheld device has become very popular with the…

  12. Transverse-longitudinal integrated resonator

    DOEpatents

    Hutchinson, Donald P. (Knoxville, TN); Simpson, Marcus L. (Knoxville, TN); Simpson, John T. (Knoxville, TN)

    2003-03-11

    A transverse-longitudinal integrated optical resonator (TLIR) is disclosed which includes a waveguide, a first and a second subwavelength resonant grating in the waveguide, and at least one photonic band gap resonant structure (PBG) in the waveguide. The PBG is positioned between the first and second subwavelength resonant gratings. An electro-optic waveguide material may be used to permit tuning the TLIR and to permit the TLIR to perform signal modulation and switching. The TLIR may be positioned on a bulk substrate die with one or more electronic and optical devices and may be communicably connected to the same. A method for fabricating a TLIR including fabricating a broadband reflective grating is disclosed. A method for tuning the TLIR's transmission resonance wavelength is also disclosed.

  13. Delta connected resonant snubber circuit

    DOEpatents

    Lai, J.S.; Peng, F.Z.; Young, R.W. Sr.; Ott, G.W. Jr.

    1998-01-20

    A delta connected, resonant snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the dc supply voltage through the main inverter switches and the auxiliary switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter. 36 figs.

  14. Delta connected resonant snubber circuit

    DOEpatents

    Lai, Jih-Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Peng, Fang Zheng (Oak Ridge, TN); Young, Sr., Robert W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ott, Jr., George W. (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A delta connected, resonant snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the dc supply voltage through the main inverter switches and the auxiliary switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter.

  15. Matryoshka Locally Resonant Sonic Crystal

    E-print Network

    Elford, Daniel P; Kusmartsev, Feodor V; Swallowe, Gerry M

    2011-01-01

    The results of numerical modelling of sonic crystals with resonant array elements are reported. The investigated resonant elements include plain slotted cylinders as well as various their combinations, in particular, Russian doll or Matryoshka configurations. The acoustic band structure and transmission characteristics of such systems have been computed with the use of finite element methods. The general concept of a locally resonant sonic crystal is proposed, which utilises acoustic resonances to form additional band gaps that are decoupled from Bragg gaps. An existence of a separate attenuation mechanism associated with the resonant elements, which increases performance in the lower frequency regime has been identified. The results show a formation of broad band gaps positioned significantly below the first Bragg frequency. For low frequency broadband attenuation a most optimal configuration is the Matryoshka sonic crystal, where each scattering unit is composed of multiple concentric slotted cylinders. Thi...

  16. Baryon Spectroscopy and Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Edwards

    2011-12-01

    A short review of current efforts to determine the highly excited state spectrum of QCD, and in particular baryons, using lattice QCD techniques is presented. The determination of the highly excited spectrum of QCD is a major theoretical and experimental challenge. The experimental investigation of the excited baryon spectrum has been a long-standing element of the hadronic-physics program, an important component of which is the search for so-called 'missing resonances', baryonic states predicted by the quark model based on three constituent quarks but which have not yet been observed experimentally. Should such states not be found, it may indicate that the baryon spectrum can be modeled with fewer effective degrees of freedom, such as in quark-diquark models. In the past decade, there has been an extensive program to collect data on electromagnetic production of one and two mesons at Jefferson Lab, MIT-Bates, LEGS, MAMI, ELSA, and GRAAL. To analyze these data, and thereby refine our knowledge of the baryon spectrum, a variety of physics analysis models have been developed at Bonn, George Washington University, Jefferson Laboratory and Mainz. To provide a theoretical determination and interpretation of the spectrum, ab initio computations within lattice QCD have been used. Historically, the calculation of the masses of the lowest-lying states, for both baryons and mesons, has been a benchmark calculation of this discretized, finite-volume computational approach, where the aim is well-understood control over the various systematic errors that enter into a calculation; for a recent review. However, there is now increasing effort aimed at calculating the excited states of the theory, with several groups presenting investigations of the low-lying excited baryon spectrum, using a variety of discretizations, numbers of quark flavors, interpolating operators, and fitting methodologies. Some aspects of these calculations remain unresolved and are the subject of intense effort, notably the ordering of the Roper resonance in the low-lying Nucleon spectrum.

  17. Cascaded resonant bridge converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, Thomas A. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A converter for converting a low voltage direct current power source to a higher voltage, high frequency alternating current output for use in an electrical system where it is desired to use low weight cables and other circuit elements. The converter has a first stage series resonant (Schwarz) converter which converts the direct current power source to an alternating current by means of switching elements that are operated by a variable frequency voltage regulator, a transformer to step up the voltage of the alternating current, and a rectifier bridge to convert the alternating current to a direct current first stage output. The converter further has a second stage series resonant (Schwarz) converter which is connected in series to the first stage converter to receive its direct current output and convert it to a second stage high frequency alternating current output by means of switching elements that are operated by a fixed frequency oscillator. The voltage of the second stage output is controlled at a relatively constant value by controlling the first stage output voltage, which is accomplished by controlling the frequency of the first stage variable frequency voltage controller in response to second stage voltage. Fault tolerance in the event of a load short circuit is provided by making the operation of the first stage variable frequency voltage controller responsive to first and second stage current limiting devices. The second stage output is connected to a rectifier bridge whose output is connected to the input of the second stage to provide good regulation of output voltage wave form at low system loads.

  18. Resonantly Enhanced Axion-Photon Regeneration

    E-print Network

    P. Sikivie; D. B. Tanner; Karl van Bibber

    2007-01-23

    We point out that photon regeneration-experiments that search for the axion, or axion-like particles, may be resonantly enhanced by employing matched Fabry-Perot optical cavities encompassing both the axion production and conversion magnetic field regions. Compared to a simple photon regeneration experiment, which uses the laser in a single-pass geometry, this technique can result in a gain in rate of order ${\\cal F}^2$, where ${\\cal F}$ is the finesse of the cavities. This gain could feasibly be $10^{(10-12)}$, corresponding to an improvement in sensitivity in the axion-photon coupling, $g_{a\\gamma\\gamma}$ , of order ${\\cal F}^{1/2} \\sim 10^{(2.5-3)}$, permitting a practical purely laboratory search to probe axion-photon couplings not previously excluded by stellar evolution limits, or solar axion searches.

  19. Nonlinear optical whispering gallery mode resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor); Matsko, Andrey B. (Inventor); Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonators comprising nonlinear optical materials, where the nonlinear optical material of a WGM resonator includes a plurality of sectors within the optical resonator and nonlinear coefficients of two adjacent sectors are oppositely poled.

  20. Auxiliary resonant DC tank converter

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Fang Z. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01

    An auxiliary resonant dc tank (ARDCT) converter is provided for achieving soft-switching in a power converter. An ARDCT circuit is coupled directly across a dc bus to the inverter to generate a resonant dc bus voltage, including upper and lower resonant capacitors connected in series as a resonant leg, first and second dc tank capacitors connected in series as a tank leg, and an auxiliary resonant circuit comprising a series combination of a resonant inductor and a pair of auxiliary switching devices. The ARDCT circuit further includes first clamping means for holding the resonant dc bus voltage to the dc tank voltage of the tank leg, and second clamping means for clamping the resonant dc bus voltage to zero during a resonant period. The ARDCT circuit resonantly brings the dc bus voltage to zero in order to provide a zero-voltage switching opportunity for the inverter, then quickly rebounds the dc bus voltage back to the dc tank voltage after the inverter changes state. The auxiliary switching devices are turned on and off under zero-current conditions. The ARDCT circuit only absorbs ripples of the inverter dc bus current, thus having less current stress. In addition, since the ARDCT circuit is coupled in parallel with the dc power supply and the inverter for merely assisting soft-switching of the inverter without participating in real dc power transmission and power conversion, malfunction and failure of the tank circuit will not affect the functional operation of the inverter; thus a highly reliable converter system is expected.