Science.gov

Sample records for resonance nqr experiments

  1. Explosives detection by nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garroway, Allen N.; Buess, Michael L.; Yesinowski, James P.; Miller, Joel B.; Krauss, Ronald A.

    1994-10-01

    Pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) of 14N nuclei is quite promising as a method for detecting explosives such as RDX and contraband narcotics such as cocaine and heroin in quantities of interest. Pure NQR is conducted without an external applied magnetic field, so potential concerns about damage to magnetically encoded data or exposure of personnel to large magnetic fields are not relevant. Because NQR frequencies of different compounds are quite distinct, we do not encounter false alarms from the NQR signals of other benign materials. We have constructed a laboratory prototype NQR explosives detector which interrogates a volume of 300 liters (10 ft3). This paper presents abbreviated results from a demonstration of the laboratory prototype NQR explosives detector conducted at the Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center in May 1994 on RDX-based explosives.

  2. Frequency selective detection of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spin echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somasundaram, Samuel D.; Jakobsson, Andreas; Smith, John A. S.; Althoefer, Kaspar A.

    2006-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a radio frequency (RF) technique that can be used to detect the presence of quadrupolar nuclei, such as the 14N nucleus prevalent in many explosives and narcotics. The technique has been hampered by low signal-to-noise ratios and is further aggravated by the presence of RF interference (RFI). To ensure accurate detection, proposed detectors should exploit the rich form of the NQR signal. Furthermore, the detectors should also be robust to any remaining residual interference, left after suitable RFI mitigation has been employed. In this paper, we propose a new NQR data model, particularly for the realistic case where multiple pulse sequences are used to generate trains of spin echoes. Furthermore, we refine two recently proposed approximative maximum likelihood (AML) detectors, enabling the algorithm to optimally exploit the data model of the entire echo train and also incorporate knowledge of the temperature dependent spin-echo decay time. The AML-based detectors ensure accurate detection and robustness against residual RFI, even when the temperature of the sample is not precisely known, by exploiting the dependencies of the NQR resonant lines on temperature. Further robustness against residual interference is gained as the proposed detector is frequency selective; exploiting only those regions of the spectrum where the NQR signal is expected. Extensive numerical evaluations based on both simulated and measured NQR data indicate that the proposed Frequency selective Echo Train AML (FETAML) detector offers a significant improvement as compared to other existing detectors.

  3. Enhancing nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) signature detection leveraging interference suppression algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBardelaben, James A.; Miller, Jeremy K.; Myrick, Wilbur L.; Miller, Joel B.; Gilbreath, G. Charmaine; Bajramaj, Blerta

    2012-06-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a radio frequency (RF) magnetic spectroscopic technique that has been shown to detect and identify a wide range of explosive materials containing quadrupolar nuclei. The NQR response signal provides a unique signature of the material of interest. The signal is, however, very weak and can be masked by non-stationary RF interference (RFI) and thermal noise, limiting detection distance. In this paper, we investigate the bounds on the NQR detection range for ammonium nitrate. We leverage a low-cost RFI data acquisition system composed of inexpensive B-field sensing and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) software-defined radios (SDR). Using collected data as RFI reference signals, we apply adaptive filtering algorithms to mitigate RFI and enable NQR detection techniques to approach theoretical range bounds in tactical environments.

  4. Methyl quantum tunneling and nitrogen-14 NQR NMR studies using a SQUID magnetic resonance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Black, B.E. |

    1993-07-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques have been very successful in obtaining molecular conformation and dynamics information. Unfortunately, standard NMR and NQR spectrometers are unable to adequately detect resonances below a few megahertz due to the frequency dependent sensitivity of their Faraday coil detectors. For this reason a new spectrometer with a dc SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) detector, which has no such frequency dependence, has been developed. Previously, this spectrometer was used to observe {sup 11}B and {sup 27}Al NQR resonances. The scope of this study was increased to include {sup 23}Na, {sup 51}V, and {sup 55}Mn NQR transitions. Also, a technique was presented to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances through cross relaxation of the nitrogen polarization to adjacent proton spins. When the proton Zeeman splitting matches one nitrogen quadrupoler transition the remaining two {sup 14}N transitions can be detected by sweeping a saturating rf field through resonance. Additionally, simultaneous excitation of two nitrogen resonances provides signal enhancement which helps to connect transitions from the same site. In this way, nitrogen-14 resonances were observed in several amino acids and polypeptides. This spectrometer has also been useful in the direct detection of methyl quantum tunneling splittings at 4.2 K. Tunneling, frequencies of a homologous series of carboxylic acids were measured and for solids with equivalent crystal structures, an exponential correlation between the tunneling frequency and the enthalpy of fusion is observed. This correlation provides information about the contribution of intermolecular interactions to the energy barrier for methyl rotation.

  5. 63Cu NQR in copper (II) compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastow, T. J.; Campbell, I. D.; Whitfield, H. J.

    1980-01-01

    We report observations of 63Cu NQR in CuF 2, KCuF 3, and RbCuF 3 in the paramagnetic state, NQR line widths of 63Cu in CuF 2 and CuBr 2 and of 81Br in CuBr 2, SnBr 2 and ZnBr 2. The NQR resonances of certain Cu (II) paramagnetic compounds are exchange-narrowed to values commensurate with linewidths of the diamagnetic infinite-lattice compounds.

  6. Nanoscale NMR and NQR with Nitrogen Vacancy Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, Elana; Lovchinsky, Igor; Sanchez-Yamagishi, Javier; Choi, Soonwon; Bylinskii, Alexei; Dwyer, Bo; Andersen, Trond; Sushkov, Alex; Park, Hongkun; Lukin, Mikhail

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a powerful tool which is used to detect quadrupolar interaction in nuclear spins with I > 1/2. Conventional NQR and NMR technology, however, rely on measuring magnetic fields from a macroscopic number of spins. Extending NMR and NQR techniques to the nanoscale could allow us to learn structural information about interesting materials and biomolecules. We present recent progress on using Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond to perform room temperature nanoscale NMR and NQR spectroscopy on small numbers of nuclear spins in hexagonal boron nitride.

  7. NQR detection of explosive simulants using RF atomic magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, Mark C.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Okamitsu, Jeffrey K.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a highly selective spectroscopic method that can be used to detect and identify a number of chemicals of interest to the defense, national security, and law enforcement community. In the past, there have been several documented attempts to utilize NQR to detect nitrogen bearing explosives using induction sensors to detect the NQR RF signatures. We present here our work on the NQR detection of explosive simulants using optically pumped RF atomic magnetometers. RF atomic magnetometers can provide an order of magnitude (or more) improvement in sensitivity versus induction sensors and can enable mitigation of RF interference, which has classically has been a problem for conventional NQR using induction sensors. We present the theory of operation of optically pumped RF atomic magnetometers along with the result of laboratory work on the detection of explosive simulant material. An outline of ongoing work will also be presented along with a path for a fieldable detection system.

  8. SQUID detected NMR and NQR. Superconducting Quantum Interference Device.

    PubMed

    Augustine, M P; TonThat, D M; Clarke, J

    1998-03-01

    The dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) is a sensitive detector of magnetic flux, with a typical flux noise of the order 1 muphi0 Hz(-1/2) at liquid helium temperatures. Here phi0 = h/2e is the flux quantum. In our NMR or NQR spectrometer, a niobium wire coil wrapped around the sample is coupled to a thin film superconducting coil deposited on the SQUID to form a flux transformer. With this untuned input circuit the SQUID measures the flux, rather than the rate of change of flux, and thus retains its high sensitivity down to arbitrarily low frequencies. This feature is exploited in a cw spectrometer that monitors the change in the static magnetization of a sample induced by radio frequency irradiation. Examples of this technique are the detection of NQR in 27Al in sapphire and 11B in boron nitride, and a level crossing technique to enhance the signal of 14N in peptides. Research is now focused on a SQUID-based spectrometer for pulsed NQR and NMR, which has a bandwidth of 0-5 MHz. This spectrometer is used with spin-echo techniques to measure the NQR longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of 14N in NH4ClO4, 63+/-6 ms and 22+/-2 ms, respectively. With the aid of two-frequency pulses to excite the 359 kHz and 714 kHz resonances in ruby simultaneously, it is possible to obtain a two-dimensional NQR spectrum. As a third example, the pulsed spectrometer is used to study NMR spectrum of 129Xe after polariza-tion with optically pumped Rb. The NMR line can be detected at frequencies as low as 200 Hz. At fields below about 2 mT the longitudinal relaxation time saturates at about 2000 s. Two recent experiments in other laboratories have extended these pulsed NMR techniques to higher temperatures and smaller samples. In the first, images were obtained of mineral oil floating on water at room temperature. In the second, a SQUID configured as a thin film gradiometer was used to detect NMR in a 50 microm particle of 195Pt at 6 mT and 4.2 K. PMID:9650797

  9. NQR Characteristics of an RDX Plastic Explosives Simulant.

    PubMed

    Turecek, J; Schwitter, B; Miljak, D; Stancl, M

    2012-12-01

    For reliable detection of explosives, a combination of methods integrated within a single measurement platform may increase detection performance. However, the efficient field testing of such measurement platforms requires the use of inexplosive simulants that are detectable by a wide range of methods. Physical parameters such as simulant density, elemental composition and crystalline structure must closely match those of the target explosive. The highly discriminating bulk detection characteristics of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) especially constrain simulant design. This paper describes the development of an inexplosive RDX simulant suited to a wide range of measurement methods, including NQR. Measurements are presented that confirm an RDX NQR response from the simulant. The potential use of the simulant for field testing a prototype handheld NQR-based RDX detector is analyzed. Only modest changes in prototype operation during field testing would be required to account for the use of simulant rather than real explosive. PMID:23204647

  10. NQR studies on 2,5-dichlorophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasturi, Alapati; Venkatacharyulu, P.; Premaswarup, D.

    1990-11-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) Zeeman effect studies were carried out on cylindrical single crystals of 2,5-dichlorophenol, using the two 35Cl-NQR frequencies. A self-quenched superregenerative NQR spectrometer was used, and the spectra were analysed ot obtain information on the nature of the crystalline unit cell. An analysis of the experimental data reveals that: (1) the results are in good agreement with the structural reports of Bavoux and Perrin; (2) the crystal unequivocally belongs to the monoclinic system; (3) there are two crystallographically equivalent but physically inequivalent directions for the principal field gradient axes for both the low- and high-frequency resonance lines; (4) as the number of physically inequivalent directions for each of the two resonance lines is two, the minimum number of molecules per unit cell is two; (5) the b axis (90°,90°) is identified as the symmetry axis; (6) the growth axis is slightly inclined to the c axis; (7) the asymmetry parameters obtained for the loci corresponding to the low-frequency line, which is hydrogen bonded, are greater than those for the high-frequency line, which is nonhydrogen bonded; (8) the double-bond character is greater for the hydrogen-bonded chlorine than for the non-hydrogen-bonded chlorine; (9) the ratios of the various bond characters estimated for both the low- and high-frequency resonance lines are 69:24:7 and 74:24:2.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with dc SQUID amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Heaney, M.B. . Dept. of Physics Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 {times} 10{sup 17} in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO{sub 3} crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies.

  12. NQR in tert-butyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetti, Aldo H.

    2004-03-01

    Tert-butyl chloride has been broadly studied experimentally through various techniques such as X-ray crystallography, DTA, and NMR. It was also studied experimentally through nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), but this study was limited and incomplete. In this paper, we present a more detailed study of TBC through the NQR of 35Cl. Our results show that near 120 K, the onset of the CH 3 groups semirotations around symmetry axis C3 takes place with an activation energy U=16.1 kJ mol -1. This intramolecular movement produces a T1 minimum near 148 K and is the dominant mechanism of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in phase III of this compound. In phase II of TBC, we show that there are not only methyl groups semirotations, but also semirotations of the whole molecule around a different axis from the symmetry axis C' 3 (C-Cl bond) with an activation energy of E=10.4 kJ mol -1.

  13. An analytical method for estimating the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance parameters of organic compounds with complex free induction decays for radiation effects studies

    SciTech Connect

    Iselin, L.H.

    1992-12-31

    The use of {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as a radiation dosimetry tool has only recently been explored. An analytical method for analyzing {sup 14}N NQR complex free induction decays is presented with the background necessary to conduct pulsed NQR experiments. The {sup 14}N NQR energy levels and possible transitions are derived in step-by-step detail. The components of a pulsed NQR spectrometer are discussed along with the experimental techniques for conducting radiation effects experiments using the spectrometer. Three data analysis techniques -- the power spectral density Fourier transform, state space singular value decomposition (HSVD), and nonlinear curve fitting (using the downhill simplex method of global optimization and the Levenberg-Marquart method) -- are explained. These three techniques are integrated into an analytical method which uses these numerical techniques in this order to determine the physical NQR parameters. Sample data sets of urea and guanidine sulfate data are used to demonstrate how these methods can be employed to analyze both simple and complex free induction decays. By determining baseline values for biologically significant organics, radiation effects on the NQR parameters can be studied to provide a link between current radiation dosimetry techniques and the biological effects of radiation.

  14. Polymorphism and disorder in natural active ingredients. Low and high-temperature phases of anhydrous caffeine: Spectroscopic ((1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR/(14)N NQR) and solid-state computational modelling (DFT/QTAIM/RDS) study.

    PubMed

    Seliger, Janez; Žagar, Veselko; Apih, Tomaž; Gregorovič, Alan; Latosińska, Magdalena; Olejniczak, Grzegorz Andrzej; Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia

    2016-03-31

    The polymorphism of anhydrous caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine; 1,3,7-trimethyl-1H-purine-2,6-(3H,7H)-dione) has been studied by (1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance) double resonance and pure (14)N NQR (Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance) followed by computational modelling (Density Functional Theory, supplemented Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules with Reduced Density Gradient) in solid state. For two stable (phase II, form β) and metastable (phase I, form α) polymorphs the complete NQR spectra consisting of 12 lines were recorded. The assignment of signals detected in experiment to particular nitrogen sites was verified with the help of DFT. The shifts of the NQR frequencies, quadrupole coupling constants and asymmetry parameters at each nitrogen site due to polymorphic transition were evaluated. The strongest shifts were observed at N(3) site, while the smallest at N(9) site. The commercial pharmaceutical sample was found to contain approximately 20-25% of phase I and 75-80% of phase II. The orientational disorder in phase II with a local molecular arrangement mimics that in phase I. Substantial differences in the intermolecular interaction phases I and II of caffeine were analysed using computational (DFT/QTAIM/RDS) approach. The analysis of local environment of each nitrogen nucleus permitted drawing some conclusions on the topology of interactions in both polymorphs. For the most stable orientations in phase I and phase II the maps of the principal component qz of EFG tensor and its asymmetry parameter at each point of the molecular system were calculated and visualized. The relevant maps calculated for both phases I and II indicates small variation in electrostatic potential upon phase change. Small differences between packings in phases slightly disturb the neighbourhood of the N(1) and N(7) nitrogens, thus are meaningless from the biological point of view. The composition of two phases in pharmaceutical material

  15. FPGA based pulsed NQR spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemnani, Preeti; Rajarajan, A. K.; Joshi, Gopal; Motiwala, Paresh D.; Ravindranath, S. V. G.

    2014-04-01

    An NQR spectrometer for the frequency range of 1 MHz to 5 MHZ has been designed constructed and tested using an FPGA module. Consisting of four modules viz. Transmitter, Probe, Receiver and computer controlled (FPGA & Software) module containing frequency synthesizer, pulse programmer, mixer, detection and display, the instrument is capable of exciting nuclei with a power of 200W and can detect signal of a few microvolts in strength. 14N signal from NaNO2 has been observed with the expected signal strength.

  16. Nuclear quadrupole resonance detection of explosives: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Joel B.

    2011-06-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a spectroscopic technique closely related to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). These techniques, and NQR in particular, induce signals from the material being interrogated that are very specific to the chemical and physical structure of the material, but are relatively insensitive to the physical form of the material. NQR explosives detection exploits this specificity to detect explosive materials, in contrast to other well known techniques that are designed to detect explosive devices. The past two decades have seen a large research and development effort in NQR explosives detection in the United States aimed at transportation security and military applications. Here, I will briefly describe the physical basis for NQR before discussing NQR developments over the past decade, with particular emphasis on landmine detection and the use of NQR in combating IED's. Potential future directions for NQR research and development are discussed.

  17. Temperature dependence of 35Cl NQR in 3,4-Dichlorophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandramani, R.; Devaraj, N.; Indumathy, A.; Ramakrishna, J.

    NQR frequencies in 3,4-dichlorophenol are investigated in the temperature range 77 K to room temperature. Two resonances have been observed throughout the temperature range, corresponding to the two chemically inequivalent chlorine sites. Using Bayer's theory and Brown's method torsional frequencies and their temperature dependence in this range are estimated.

  18. Pulsed Spin Locking in Spin-1 NQR: Broadening Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Michael W.

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a branch of magnetic resonance physics that allows for the detection of spin I > 1/2 nuclei in crystalline and semi-crystalline materials. Through the application of a resonant radio frequency (rf) pulse, the nuclei's response is to create an oscillating magnetic moment at a frequency unique to the target substance. This creates the NQR signal, which is typically weak and rapidly decaying. The decay is due to the various line broadening mechanisms, the relative strengths of which are functions of the specific material, in addition to thermal relaxation processes. Through the application of a series of rf pulses the broadening mechanisms can be refocused, narrowing the linewidth and extending the signal in time. Three line broadening mechanisms are investigated to explain the NQR signal's linewidth and behavior. The first, electric field gradient (EFG) inhomogeneity, is due to variations in the local electric environment among the target nuclei, for instance from crystal imperfections. While EFG inhomogeneity can vary between samples of the same chemical composition and structure, the other broadening mechanisms of homonuclear and heteronuclear dipolar coupling are specific to this composition and structure. Simple analytical models are developed that explain the NQR signal response to pulse sequences by accounting for the behavior of each broadening mechanism. After a general theoretical introduction, a model of pairs of spin-1 nuclei is investigated, and the refocusing behaviors of EFG and homonuclear dipolar coupling are analyzed. This reveals the conditions where EFG is refocused but homonuclear dipolar coupling is not. In this case the resulting signal shows a rapid decay, the rate of which becomes a measure of interatomic distances. This occurs even in the more complex case of a powder sample with its many randomly oriented crystallites, under particular pulsing conditions. Many target NQR compounds are rich in hydrogen

  19. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: New technologies: nuclear quadrupole resonance as an explosive and narcotic detection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechishkin, Vadim S.; Sinyavskii, Nikolai Ya

    1997-04-01

    Possibilities of detecting nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) signals in explosives and drugs are considered. Direct and indirect NQR techniques for searching substances are described and the potentialities of various experimental methods are compared.

  20. 35Cl NQR frequency and spin lattice relaxation time in 3,4-dichlorophenol as a function of pressure and temperature.

    PubMed

    Ramu, L; Ramesh, K P; Chandramani, R

    2013-01-01

    The pressure dependences of (35)Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) frequency, temperature and pressure variation of spin lattice relaxation time (T(1)) were investigated in 3,4-dichlorophenol. T(1) was measured in the temperature range 77-300 K. Furthermore, the NQR frequency and T(1) for these compounds were measured as a function of pressure up to 5 kbar at 300 K. The temperature dependence of the average torsional lifetimes of the molecules and the transition probabilities W(1) and W(2) for the Δm = ±1 and Δm = ±2 transitions were also obtained. A nonlinear variation of NQR frequency with pressure has been observed and the pressure coefficients were observed to be positive. A thermodynamic analysis of the data was carried out to determine the constant volume temperature coefficients of the NQR frequency. An attempt is made to compare the torsional frequencies evaluated from NQR data with those obtained by IR spectra. On selecting the appropriate mode from IR spectra, a good agreement with torsional frequency obtained from NQR data is observed. The previously mentioned approach is a good illustration of the supplementary nature of the data from IR studies, in relation to NQR studies of compounds in solid state. PMID:23161529

  1. A miniaturized NQR spectrometer for a multi-channel NQR-based detection device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beguš, Samo; Jazbinšek, Vojko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko

    2014-10-01

    A low frequency (0.5-5 MHz) battery operated sensitive pulsed NQR spectrometer with a transmitter power up to 5 W and a total mass of about 3 kg aimed at detecting 14N NQR signals, predominantly of illicit materials, was designed and assembled. This spectrometer uses a standard software defined radio (SDR) platform for the data acquisition unit. Signal processing is done with the LabView Virtual instrument on a personal computer. We successfully tested the spectrometer by measuring 14N NQR signals from aminotetrazole monohydrate (ATMH), potassium nitrate (PN), paracetamol (PCM) and trinitrotoluene (TNT). Such a spectrometer is a feasible component of a portable single or multichannel 14N NQR based detection device.

  2. A miniaturized NQR spectrometer for a multi-channel NQR-based detection device.

    PubMed

    Beguš, Samo; Jazbinšek, Vojko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko

    2014-10-01

    A low frequency (0.5-5 MHz) battery operated sensitive pulsed NQR spectrometer with a transmitter power up to 5 W and a total mass of about 3 kg aimed at detecting (14)N NQR signals, predominantly of illicit materials, was designed and assembled. This spectrometer uses a standard software defined radio (SDR) platform for the data acquisition unit. Signal processing is done with the LabView Virtual instrument on a personal computer. We successfully tested the spectrometer by measuring (14)N NQR signals from aminotetrazole monohydrate (ATMH), potassium nitrate (PN), paracetamol (PCM) and trinitrotoluene (TNT). Such a spectrometer is a feasible component of a portable single or multichannel (14)N NQR based detection device. PMID:25233110

  3. Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Study of the Nitrogen Mustards and Local Anesthetics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buess, Michael Lee

    The density matrix description of pulsed nitrogen -14 nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spin-echoes is presented. The parallel between this problem, when formulated in terms of the fictitious spin- 1/2 operators, and that of spin - 1/2 NMR spin-echoes in liquids is discussed along with the complications which arise in multiple-pulse NQR experiments in powders due to the random orientation of the electric field gradient tensors. The equipment and procedures involved in searching for, detecting and identifying NQR resonances using pulsed techniques are described. The ('14)N NQR spectra of several nitrogen mustard compounds in the solid state are reported and analyzed in the framework of the Townes and Dailey theory. For the aniline derivatives, a correlation exists between l -(sigma), l being the nitrogen lone-pair electron density and (sigma) the average N-C sigma bond electron density, and the enhanced Hammett sigma constant (sigma)('-). An improved correlation is obtained between l-(sigma) and (sigma)(,R)('-), which emphasizes the importance of resonance effects in determining l-(sigma). The increase of hydrolysis and alkylation rates with increasing values of l-(sigma) is in agreement with the identification of the cyclic immonium ion as the intermediate in the hydrolysis and alkylation processes of the aromatic nitrogen mustards. A possible correlation is noted between the ('35)Cl NQR spectra for some of the mustards and measures of toxic and antitumor activity. ('14)N NQR spectra for several local anesthetics in the solid state are also reported and analyzed using the Townes and Dailey approach. The changes in the electron distributions at various nitrogen sites, produced by protonating the tertiary amino nitrogen, are discussed and shown to be in general agreement with expectations bases on the increased electrophilic character of the protonated amino group.

  4. Measurement of temperature and temperature gradient in millimeter samples by chlorine NQR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lužnik, Janko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko

    2009-09-01

    A mini-thermometer based on the 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) frequency temperature dependence in the chlorates KClO3 and NaClO3 was built and successfully tested by measuring temperature and temperature gradient at 77 K and higher in about 100 mm3 active volume of a mini Joule-Thomson refrigerator. In the design of the tank-circuit coil, an array of small coils connected in series enabled us (a) to achieve a suitable ratio of inductance to capacity in the NQR spectrometer input tank circuit, (b) to use a single crystal of KClO3 or NaClO3 (of 1-2 mm3 size) in one coil as a mini-thermometer with a resolution of 0.03 K and (c) to construct a system for measuring temperature gradients when the spatial coordinates of each chlorate single crystal within an individual coil are known.

  5. (121,123)Sb and (75)As NMR and NQR investigation of the tetrahedrite (Cu12Sb4S13)--Tennantite (Cu12As4S13) system and other metal arsenides.

    PubMed

    Bastow, T J; Lehmann-Horn, J A; Miljak, D G

    2015-10-01

    This work is motivated by the recent developments in online minerals analysis in the mining and minerals processing industry via nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). Here we describe a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and NQR study of the minerals tennantite (Cu12As4S13) and tetrahedrite (Cu12 Sb4S13). In the first part NQR lines associated with (75)As in tennantite and (121,123)Sb isotopes in tetrahedrite are reported. The spectroscopy has been restricted to an ambient temperature studies in accord with typical industrial conditions. The second part of this contribution reports nuclear quadrupole-perturbed NMR findings on further, only partially characterised, metal arsenides. The findings enhance the detection capabilities of NQR based analysers for online measurement applications and may aid to control arsenic and antimony concentrations in metal processing stages. PMID:26453410

  6. Electron density distribution in cladribine (2-chloro-2‧-deoxyadenosine) - A drug against leukemia and multiple sclerosis - Studied by multinuclear NQR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latosińska, J. N.; Latosińska, M.; Seliger, J.; Žagar, V.; Kazimierczuk, Z.

    2009-07-01

    2-Chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine (Cladribine) chemotherapeutic drug has been studied experimentally in solid state by 35Cl NQR and NMR-NQR double resonance and theoretically by the Density Functional Theory. Fifteen resonance frequencies on 14N have been detected and assigned to particular nitrogen sites in the 2-CdA molecule. The effects of tautomerism, regioisomerism, conformations and molecular aggregations, related to intermolecular hydrogen bond formation, on the NQR parameters have been analysed within the DFT and AIM ( Atoms in Molecules) formalism. The properties of the whole molecule, the so-called global reactivity descriptors, have been calculated for a comparison of both syn and anti conformations of 2-CdA molecule to check the effect of crystal packing on molecular conformation.

  7. Dielectric square resonator investigated with microwave experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, S.; Bogomolny, E.; Dietz, B.; Miski-Oglu, M.; Richter, A.

    2014-11-01

    We present a detailed experimental study of the symmetry properties and the momentum space representation of the field distributions of a dielectric square resonator as well as the comparison with a semiclassical model. The experiments have been performed with a flat ceramic microwave resonator. Both the resonance spectra and the field distributions were measured. The momentum space representations of the latter evidenced that the resonant states are each related to a specific classical torus, leading to the regular structure of the spectrum. Furthermore, they allow for a precise determination of the refractive index. Measurements with different arrangements of the emitting and the receiving antennas were performed and their influence on the symmetry properties of the field distributions was investigated in detail, showing that resonances with specific symmetries can be selected purposefully. In addition, the length spectrum deduced from the measured resonance spectra and the trace formula for the dielectric square resonator are discussed in the framework of the semiclassical model.

  8. Dielectric square resonator investigated with microwave experiments.

    PubMed

    Bittner, S; Bogomolny, E; Dietz, B; Miski-Oglu, M; Richter, A

    2014-11-01

    We present a detailed experimental study of the symmetry properties and the momentum space representation of the field distributions of a dielectric square resonator as well as the comparison with a semiclassical model. The experiments have been performed with a flat ceramic microwave resonator. Both the resonance spectra and the field distributions were measured. The momentum space representations of the latter evidenced that the resonant states are each related to a specific classical torus, leading to the regular structure of the spectrum. Furthermore, they allow for a precise determination of the refractive index. Measurements with different arrangements of the emitting and the receiving antennas were performed and their influence on the symmetry properties of the field distributions was investigated in detail, showing that resonances with specific symmetries can be selected purposefully. In addition, the length spectrum deduced from the measured resonance spectra and the trace formula for the dielectric square resonator are discussed in the framework of the semiclassical model. PMID:25493860

  9. Crystallization and preliminary analysis of the NqrA and NqrC subunits of the Na+-translocating NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Vohl, Georg; Nedielkov, Ruslan; Claussen, Björn; Casutt, Marco S.; Vorburger, Thomas; Diederichs, Kay; Möller, Heiko M.; Steuber, Julia; Fritz, Günter

    2014-01-01

    The Na+-translocating NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) from Vibrio cholerae is a membrane protein complex consisting of six different subunits NqrA–NqrF. The major domains of the NqrA and NqrC subunits were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized. The structure of NqrA1–377 was solved in space groups C2221 and P21 by SAD phasing and molecular replacement at 1.9 and 2.1 Å resolution, respectively. NqrC devoid of the transmembrane helix was co-expressed with ApbE to insert the flavin mononucleotide group covalently attached to Thr225. The structure was determined by molecular replacement using apo-NqrC of Parabacteroides distasonis as search model at 1.8 Å resolution. PMID:25005105

  10. Radiative widths of resonances (experiments)

    SciTech Connect

    Gidal, G.

    1988-07-01

    After a hiatus of several years, this conference brings us considerable new data on resonance production in photon photon interactions. I will first discuss the contributions concerning the tensor, pseudoscalar and scalar mesons, then review the current status of the (c/ovr string/c /eta//sub c/) and finally summarize the exciting new results concerning the spin 1 mesons. 40 refs., 21 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Radio-frequency tunable atomic magnetometer for detection of solid-state NQR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.-K.; Sauer, K. L.; Seltzer, S. J.; Alem, O.; Romalis, M. V.

    2007-06-01

    We constructed a potassium atomic magnetometer which resonantly detects rf magnetic fields with subfemtotesla sensitivity. The resonance frequency is set by the Zeeman resonance of the potassium atoms in a static magnetic field applied to the magnetometer cell. Strong optical pumping of the potassium atoms into a stretched state reduces spin-exchange broadening of the Zeeman resonance, resulting in relatively small linewidth of about 200 Hz (half-width at half-maximum). The magnetometer was used to detect ^14N NQR signal from powdered ammonium nitrate at 423 kHz, with sensitivity an order of magnitude higher than with a conventional room temperature pickup coil with comparable geometry. The demonstrated sensitivity of 0.24 fT/Hz^1/2 can be improved by several means, including use of higher power lasers for pumping and probing. Our technique can potentially be used to develop a mobile, open-access NQR spectrometer for detection of nitrogen-containing solids of interest in security applications.

  12. 63Cu NQR spectra of dicoordinated Cu(I) cations with imidazole and pyrazole ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajenhouri, Fereidoun; Motallebi, Shahrock; Lucken, Edwin A. C.

    1995-02-01

    The 63Cu NQR spectra of five dicoordinated complex cations of Cu(I) with substituted imidazoles as ligands and six analogous complexes with substituted pyrazoles as ligands are reported. The structures of four of these complexes have been previously determined and the relationship of their 63Cu resonance frequency to the average CuN bond length is compared to that of the analogous lutidine or collidine complexes. It is concluded that there are probably significant differences between the electronic structures of the pyridine complexes and those of the pyrazole or imidazole series.

  13. 14N NQR investigation of some thermochromic and photochromic salicylideneanilines and related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjoudis, E.; Milia, F.; Seliger, J.; Zagar, V.; Blinc, R.

    1991-09-01

    The temperature dependence of the 14N NQR frequencies have been measured in a series of thermochromic and photochromic salicylideneanilines and related compounds using nuclear quadrupole double resonance. The results show that, in agreement with previous measurements, there is a fast exchange between inequivalent sites in the OH…N bond. The energy difference Δ E of the two proton sites was calculated for all the compounds and shows that it depends on their thermochromic behavior which is connected with the structure of the compounds.

  14. Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved cysteine residues in NqrD and NqrE subunits of Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Fadeeva, M S; Bertsova, Y V; Verkhovsky, M I; Bogachev, A V

    2008-02-01

    Each of two hydrophobic subunits of Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQR), NqrD and NqrE, contain a pair of strictly conserved cysteine residues within their transmembrane alpha-helices. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that substitutions of these residues in NQR of Vibrio harveyi blocked the Na+-dependent and 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide-sensitive quinone reductase activity of the enzyme. However, these mutations did not affect the interaction of NQR with NADH and menadione. It was demonstrated that these conserved cysteine residues are necessary for the correct folding and/or the stability of the NQR complex. Mass and EPR spectroscopy showed that NQR from V. harveyi bears only a 2Fe-2S cluster as a metal-containing prosthetic group. PMID:18298367

  15. Undergraduate Electron-Spin-Resonance Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, James S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the basic procedures for use of an electron-spin resonance spectrometer and potassium azide (KN3) in an experiment which extends from the phase of sample preparation (crystal growth, sample mounting, and orientation) through data taking to the stages of calculation and theoretical explanation. (Author/DS)

  16. Polarization enhanced Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance with an atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Michael W.; Barrall, Geoffrey A.; Espy, Michelle A.; Monti, Mark C.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Okamitsu, Jeffrey K.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) has been demonstrated for the detection of 14-N in explosive compounds. Application of a material specific radio-frequency (RF) pulse excites a response typically detected with a wire- wound antenna. NQR is non-contact and material specific, however fields produced by NQR are typically very weak, making demonstration of practical utility challenging. For certain materials, the NQR signal can be increased by transferring polarization from hydrogen nuclei to nitrogen nuclei using external magnetic fields. This polarization enhancement (PE) can enhance the NQR signal by an order of magnitude or more. Atomic magnetometers (AM) have been shown to improve detection sensitivity beyond a conventional antenna by a similar amount. AM sensors are immune to piezo-electric effects that hamper conventional NQR, and can be combined to form a gradiometer for effective RF noise cancellation. In principle, combining polarization enhancement with atomic magnetometer detection should yield improvement in signal-to-noise ratio that is the product of the two methods, 100-fold or more over conventional NQR. However both methods are even more exotic than traditional NQR, and have never been combined due to challenges in operating a large magnetic field and ultra-sensitive magnetic field sensor in proximity. Here we present NQR with and without PE with an atomic magnetometer, demonstrating signal enhancement greater than 20-fold for ammonium nitrate. We also demonstrate PE for PETN using a traditional coil for detection with an enhancement factor of 10. Experimental methods and future applications are discussed.

  17. Ab initio DFT study of bisphosphonate derivatives as a drug for inhibition of cancer: NMR and NQR parameters.

    PubMed

    Aghabozorg, Hussein; Sohrabi, Beheshteh; Mashkouri, Sara; Aghabozorg, Hamid Reza

    2012-03-01

    DFT computations were carried out to characterize the (17)Oand (2)H electric field gradient, EFG, in various bisphosphonate derivatives. The computations were performed at the B3LYP level with 6-311++G (d,P) standard basis set. Calculated EFG tensors were used to determine the (17)O and (2)H nuclear quadrupole coupling constant, χ and asymmetry parameter, η. For better understanding of the bonding and electronic structure of bisphosphonates, isotropic and anisotropic NMR chemical shieldings were calculated for the (13)C, (17)O and (31)P nuclei using GIAO method for the optimized structure of intermediate bisphosphonates at B3LYP level of theory using 6-311++G (d, p) basis set. The results showed that various substituents have a strong effect on the nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) parameters (χ, η) of (17)O in contrast with (2)H NQR parameters. The NMR and NQR parameters were studied in order to find the correlation between electronic structure and the activity of the desired bisphosphonates. In addition, the effect of substitutions on the bisphosphonates polarity was investigated. Molecular polarity was determined via the DFT calculated dipole moment vectors and the results showed that substitution of bromine atom on the ring would increase the activity of bisphosphonates. PMID:21633790

  18. Resonance Structure with Polarization Experiments at MAMI

    SciTech Connect

    Arends, Hans-Juergen

    2011-10-21

    The Mainz Microtron MAMI is an ideal facility to study the hadron structure with the electromagnetic probe. With the new accelerator stage, the Harmonic Double-Sided Microtron (HDSM), which is in operation since 2007, high-intensity polarized electron and photon beams with energies up to 1.6 GeV are delivered to the experiments. Polarized proton, deuteron, {sup 3}He targets, and recoil proton polarimeters are available to allow a broad range of polarization observables for low-mass nucleon resonances to be measured. In this talk, an overview over selected recent double polarization experiments at MAMI is given.

  19. Single crystal zeeman effect studies on 35Cl NQR lines of 2,6-dichlorophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, N. V. L. N.; Venkatacharyulu, P.; Premaswarup, D.

    1987-10-01

    Zeeman effect studies on the two 35Cl NQR lines in cylindrical single crystals of 2,6-dichlorophenol were carried out using a self-quenched super-regenerative NQR spectrometer to obtain information on the nature of the crystalline unit cell and the effect of hydrogen bonding on the electric field gradient tensor. Analysis of the experimental data reveals: (1) the results are in good agreement with those reported from X-ray studies; (2) the crystal is unequivocally identified as belonging to the orthorhombic system; (3) there are two crystallographically equivalent and four physically nonequivalent directions for the principal field gradients for both the low and high frequency resonance lines; (4) the directions of the crystalline a, b, c axes are uniquely identified as (90°, 0°), (0°, -), and (90°, 90°); (5) the b-axis is identified as the growth axis; (6) there are a minimum of four molecules per unit cell, the four molecules lie in different planes, which are, however, connected by symmetry operations; (7)_there exists a weak intramolecular hydrogen bonding in the crystal; (8) the asymmetry parameters for the loci corresponding to the low frequency resonance line, which is affected by hydrogen bonding, are less than the asymmetry parameters of the loci corresponding to the high frequency resonance line, which is not affected by hydrogen bonding; (9) the single bond and ionic bond characters for the hish frequency line are less than that of the low frequency line, while the double bond character for the low frequency line is less than that of the high frequency line and (10) the small deviation between the single bond and double bond characters of the two resonance lines is attributed to the existence of weak hydrogen bonding in the crystal.

  20. NqrM (DUF539) Protein Is Required for Maturation of Bacterial Na+-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Kostyrko, Vitaly A.; Bertsova, Yulia V.; Serebryakova, Marina V.; Baykov, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) catalyzes electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone in the bacterial respiratory chain, coupled with Na+ translocation across the membrane. Na+-NQR maturation involves covalent attachment of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) residues, catalyzed by flavin transferase encoded by the nqr-associated apbE gene. Analysis of complete bacterial genomes has revealed another putative gene (duf539, here renamed nqrM) that usually follows the apbE gene and is present only in Na+-NQR-containing bacteria. Expression of the Vibrio harveyi nqr operon alone or with the associated apbE gene in Escherichia coli, which lacks its own Na+-NQR, resulted in an enzyme incapable of Na+-dependent NADH or reduced nicotinamide hypoxanthine dinucleotide (dNADH) oxidation. However, fully functional Na+-NQR was restored when these genes were coexpressed with the V. harveyi nqrM gene. Furthermore, nqrM lesions in Klebsiella pneumoniae and V. harveyi prevented production of functional Na+-NQR, which could be recovered by an nqrM-containing plasmid. The Na+-NQR complex isolated from the nqrM-deficient strain of V. harveyi lacks several subunits, indicating that nqrM is necessary for Na+-NQR assembly. The protein product of the nqrM gene, NqrM, contains a single putative transmembrane α-helix and four conserved Cys residues. Mutating one of these residues (Cys33 in V. harveyi NqrM) to Ser completely prevented Na+-NQR maturation, whereas mutating any other Cys residue only decreased the yield of the mature protein. These findings identify NqrM as the second specific maturation factor of Na+-NQR in proteobacteria, which is presumably involved in the delivery of Fe to form the (Cys)4[Fe] center between subunits NqrD and NqrE. IMPORTANCE Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase complex (Na+-NQR) is a unique primary Na+ pump believed to enhance the vitality of many bacteria, including important pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio

  1. Resonance Parameter Adjustment Based on Integral Experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sobes, Vladimir; Leal, Luiz; Arbanas, Goran; Forget, Benoit

    2016-06-02

    Our project seeks to allow coupling of differential and integral data evaluation in a continuous-energy framework and to use the generalized linear least-squares (GLLS) methodology in the TSURFER module of the SCALE code package to update the parameters of a resolved resonance region evaluation. We recognize that the GLLS methodology in TSURFER is identical to the mathematical description of a Bayesian update in SAMMY, the SAMINT code was created to use the mathematical machinery of SAMMY to update resolved resonance parameters based on integral data. Traditionally, SAMMY used differential experimental data to adjust nuclear data parameters. Integral experimental data, suchmore » as in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments Project, remain a tool for validation of completed nuclear data evaluations. SAMINT extracts information from integral benchmarks to aid the nuclear data evaluation process. Later, integral data can be used to resolve any remaining ambiguity between differential data sets, highlight troublesome energy regions, determine key nuclear data parameters for integral benchmark calculations, and improve the nuclear data covariance matrix evaluation. Moreover, SAMINT is not intended to bias nuclear data toward specific integral experiments but should be used to supplement the evaluation of differential experimental data. Using GLLS ensures proper weight is given to the differential data.« less

  2. Volovik effect and Fermi-liquid behavior in the s-wave superconductor CaPd2As2: As75 NMR-NQR measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ding, Q. -P.; Wiecki, P.; Anand, V. K.; Sangeetha, N. S.; Lee, Y.; Johnston, D. C.; Furukawa, Y.

    2016-04-07

    The electronic and magnetic properties of the collapsed-tetragonal CaPd2As2 superconductor (SC) with a transition temperature of 1.27 K have been investigated by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. The temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts indicate the absence of magnetic correlations in the normal state. In the SC state, 1/T1 measured by 75As NQR shows a clear Hebel-Slichter (HS) peak just below Tc and decreases exponentially at lower T, confirming a conventional s-wave SC. Additionally, the Volovik effect, also known as the Doppler shift effect, hasmore » been clearly evidenced by the observation of the suppression of the HS peak with applied magnetic field.« less

  3. Studies of the electronic structure and biological activity of chosen 1,4-benzodiazepines by 35Cl NQR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronisz, K.; Ostafin, M.; Poleshchuk, O. Kh.; Mielcarek, J.; Nogaj, B.

    2006-11-01

    Selected derivatives of 1,4-benzodiazepine: lorazepam, lormetazepam, oxazepam and temazepam, used as active substances in anxiolytic drugs, have been studied by 35Cl NQR method in order to find the correlation between electronic structure and biological activity. The 35Cl NQR resonance frequencies ( νQ) measured at 77 K have been correlated with the following parameters characterising their biological activity: biological half-life period ( t0.5), affinity to benzodiazepine receptor (IC 50) and mean dose equivalent. The results of experimental study of some benzodiazepine derivatives by nuclear quadrupole resonance of 35Cl nuclei are compared with theoretical results based on DFT calculations which were carried out by means of Gaussian'98 W software.

  4. Volovik effect and Fermi-liquid behavior in the s -wave superconductor CaPd2As2: 75As NMR-NQR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Q.-P.; Wiecki, P.; Anand, V. K.; Sangeetha, N. S.; Lee, Y.; Johnston, D. C.; Furukawa, Y.

    2016-04-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties of the collapsed-tetragonal CaPd2As2 superconductor (SC) with a transition temperature of 1.27 K have been investigated by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. The temperature (T ) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1 /T1) and the Knight shifts indicate the absence of magnetic correlations in the normal state. In the SC state, 1 /T1 measured by 75As NQR shows a clear Hebel-Slichter (HS) peak just below Tc and decreases exponentially at lower T , confirming a conventional s -wave SC. In addition, the Volovik effect, also known as the Doppler shift effect, has been clearly evidenced by the observation of the suppression of the HS peak with applied magnetic field.

  5. Narcotics and explosives detection by 14N pure nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garroway, Allen N.; Buess, Michael L.; Yesinowski, James P.; Miller, Joel B.

    1994-03-01

    Pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) of 14N nuclei is quite promising as a method for detecting explosives such as RDX and contraband narcotics such as cocaine and heroin in quantities of interest. Pure NQR is conducted without an external applied magnetic field, so potential concerns about damage to magnetically encoded data or exposure of personnel to large magnetic fields are not relevant. Because NQR frequencies of different compounds are quite distinct, we do not encounter false alarms from the NQR signals of other benign materials. We have constructed a proof-of-concept NQR explosives detector which interrogates a volume of 300 liters (10 ft3). With minimal modification to the existing explosives detector, we can detect operationally relevant quantities of (free base) cocaine within the 300-liter inspection volume in 6 seconds. We are presently extending this approach to the detection of heroin base and also examining 14N and 35,37Cl pure NQR for detection of the hydrochloride forms of both materials. An adaptation of this NQR approach may be suitable for scanning personnel for externally carried contraband and explosives. We first outline the basics of the NQR approach, highlighting strengths and weaknesses, and then present representative results for RDX and cocaine detection. We also present a partial compendium of relevant NQR parameters measured for some materials of interest.

  6. The single NqrB and NqrC subunits in the Na(+)-translocating NADH: quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR) from Vibrio cholerae each carry one covalently attached FMN.

    PubMed

    Casutt, Marco S; Schlosser, Andreas; Buckel, Wolfgang; Steuber, Julia

    2012-10-01

    The Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR) is the prototype of a novel class of flavoproteins carrying a riboflavin phosphate bound to serine or threonine by a phosphodiester bond to the ribityl side chain. This membrane-bound, respiratory complex also contains one non-covalently bound FAD, one non-covalently bound riboflavin, ubiquinone-8 and a [2Fe-2S] cluster. Here, we report the quantitative analysis of the full set of flavin cofactors in the Na(+)-NQR and characterize the mode of linkage of the riboflavin phosphate to the membrane-bound NqrB and NqrC subunits. Release of the flavin by β-elimination and analysis of the cofactor demonstrates that the phosphate group is attached at the 5'-position of the ribityl as in authentic FMN and that the Na(+)-NQR contains approximately 1.7mol covalently bound FMN per mol non-covalently bound FAD. Therefore, each of the single NqrB and NqrC subunits in the Na(+)-NQR carries a single FMN. Elimination of the phosphodiester bond yields a dehydro-2-aminobutyrate residue, which is modified with β-mercaptoethanol by Michael addition. Proteolytic digestion followed by mass determination of peptide fragments reveals exclusive modification of threonine residues, which carry FMN in the native enzyme. The described reactions allow quantification and localization of the covalently attached FMNs in the Na(+)-NQR and in related proteins belonging to the Rhodobacter nitrogen fixation (RNF) family of enzymes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 17th European Bioenergetics Conference (EBEC 2012). PMID:22366169

  7. Quantitative 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance in tablets of the antidiabetic medicine Diabinese.

    PubMed

    Tate, Elizabeth; Althoefer, Kaspar; Barras, Jamie; Rowe, Michael D; Smith, John A S; Pearce, Gareth E S; Wren, Stephen A C

    2009-07-01

    Pulsed (35)Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) experiments have been performed on 250-mg tablets of the antidiabetic medicine Diabinese to establish the conditions needed for noninvasive quantitative analysis of the medicine in standard bottles. One important condition is the generation of a uniform radio-frequency (RF) field over the sample, which has been achieved by two designs of sample coil: one of variable pitch, and the other a resonator that has been fabricated from a single turn of copper sheet with a longitudinal gap bridged by tuning capacitors. The results from blind tests show that the number of tablets in a bottle could be predicted to within +/-3%. PMID:19492808

  8. NMR and NQR study of the thermodynamically stable quasicrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shastri, A.

    1995-02-10

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 61,65}Cu NMR measurements are reported for powder samples of stable AlCuFe and AlCuRu icosahedral quasicrystals and their crystalline approximants, and for a AlPdMn single grain quasicrystal. Furthermore, {sup 27}Al NQR spectra at 4.2 K have been observed in the AlCuFe and AlCuRu samples. From the quadrupole perturbed NMR spectra at different magnetic fields, and from the zero field NQR spectra, a wide distribution of local electric field gradient (EFG) tensor components and principal axis system orientations was found at the Al site. A model EFG calculation based on a 1/1 AlCuFe approximant was successful in explaining the observed NQR spectra. It is concluded that the average local gradient is largely determined by the p-electron wave function at the Al site, while the width of the distribution is due to the lattice contribution to the EFG. Comparison of {sup 63}Cu NMR with {sup 27}Al NMR shows that the EFG distribution at the two sites is similar, but that the electronic contribution to the EFG is considerably smaller at the Cu site, in agreement with a more s-type wave function of the conduction electrons.

  9. Chemical structure and intra-molecular effects on NMR-NQR tensors of harmine and harmaline alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadinejad, Neda; Tahan, Arezoo; Talebi Tari, Mostafa

    2016-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) methods were used to analyze the effects of molecular structure and ring currents on the NMR chemical shielding tensors and NQR frequencies of harmine and harmaline alkaloids in the gas phase. The results demonstrated that NMR tensors and NQR frequencies of 15N nuclei in these compounds depend on chemical environment and resonance interactions. Hence, their values are obviously different in the mentioned structures. The interpretation of natural bond orbital (NBO) data suggests that in harmine structure, the lone pair participation of N9 in π-system electron clouds causes to development of aromaticity nature in pyrrole ring. However, the chemical shielding around N9 atom in harmine structure is higher than in harmaline, while in harmaline structure, lone pair participation of N2 in π-system electron clouds causes to development of aromaticity nature in pyridine ring. Hence, chemical shielding around N2 atom in harmaline structure is higher than in harmine. It can be deduced that by increasing lone pair electrons contribution of nitrogen atoms in ring resonance interactions and aromaticity development, the values of NMR chemical shielding around them increase, while χ and q zz values of these nuclei decrease.

  10. Interpretive Experiments: An Interpretive Experiment in Ion Cyclotron Resonance Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnier, R. C.; Freiser, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Provides a discussion which is intended for chemistry college students on the ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) spectroscopy, the physical basis for ion cyclotron resonance, and the experimental methodology employed by ICR spectroscopists. (HM)

  11. I: Low Frequency NMR and NQR Using a dc SQUID. II: Variable-temperature 13C CP/MAS of Organometallics

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegeweid, M.A.

    1995-11-29

    NMR and NQR at low frequencies are difficult prospects due to small nuclear spin polarization. Furthermore, the sensitivity'of the inductive pickup circuitry of standard spectrometers is reduced as the frequency is lowered. I have used a cw-SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) spectrometer, which has no such frequency dependence, to study the local atomic environment of {sup 14}N via the quadrupolar interaction. Because {sup 14}N has spin I = 1 and a 0-6 MHz frequency range, it is not possible to obtain well-resolved spectra in high magnetic fields. I have used a technique to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances via their effect on neighboring protons mediated by the heteronuclear dipolar interaction to study peptides and narcotics. The sensitivity of the SQUID is not enough to measure low-frequency surface (or other low spin density) systems. The application of spin-polarized xenon has been previously used to enhance polarization in conventional NMR experiments. Because xenon only polarizes spins with which it is in contact, it is surface selective. While differences in chemical shifts between surface and bulk spins are not large, it is expected that the differences in quadrupole coupling constant should be very large due to the drastic change of the electric field gradient surrounding spins at the surface. With this in mind, I have taken preliminary steps to measure SQUID detected polarization transfer from Xe to another spin species at 4.2 K and in small magnetic fields (<50 G). In this regime, the spin-lattice relaxation of xenon is dependent on the applied magnetic field. The results of our efforts to characterize the relaxation of xenon are presented. The final section describes the solid-state variable-temperature (VT) one- and two-dimensional {sup 13}C cross polarization (CP)/magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR of Hf({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}({eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}, Zr({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 3}({eta}{sup 1}-C

  12. 35Cl NQR study of lattice dynamic and magnetic property of a crystalline coordination polymer {CuCA(phz)(H 2O) 2} n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Kazuma; Terao, Takeshi; Asaji, Tetsuo

    2007-01-01

    Copper(II) compounds {CuCA(phz)(H 2O) 2} n (H 2CA = chloranilic acid, phz = phenazine) having a layer structure of -CuCA(H 2O) 2- polymer chains and phenazine were studied by 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). The single NQR line observed at 35.635 MHz at 261.5 K increased to 35.918 MHz at 4.2 K. The degree of reduction of electric field gradient due to lattice vibrations was similar to that of chloranilic acid crystal. Temperature dependence of spin-lattice relaxation time, T1, of the 35Cl NQR signal below 20 K, between 20 and 210 K, and above 210 K, was explained by (1) a decrease of effective electron-spin density caused by antiferromagnetic interaction, (2) a magnetic interaction between Cl nuclear-spin and electron-spins on paramagnetic Cu(II) ions, and (3) an increasing contribution from reorientation of ligand molecules, respectively. The electron spin-exchange parameter ∣ J∣ between the neighboring Cu(II) electrons was estimated to be 0.33 cm -1 from the T1 value of the range 20-210 K. Comparing this value with that of J = -1.84 cm -1 estimated from the magnetic susceptibility, it is suggested that the magnetic dipolar coupling with the electron spins on Cu(II) ions must be the principal mechanism for the 35Cl NQR spin-lattice relaxation of {CuCA(phz)(H 2O) 2} n but a delocalization of electron spin over the chloranilate ligand has to be taken into account.

  13. Ferromagnetic Spin Fluctuation and Unconventional Superconductivity in Rb2Cr3As3 Revealed by 75As NMR and NQR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Tang, Z. T.; Cao, G. H.; Zheng, Guo-qing

    2015-10-01

    We report 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies on the superconductor Rb2Cr3As3 with a quasi-one-dimensional crystal structure. Below T ˜100 K , the spin-lattice relaxation rate (1 /T1 ) divided by temperature, 1 /T1T , increases upon cooling down to Tc=4.8 K , showing a Curie-Weiss-like temperature dependence. The Knight shift also increases with decreasing temperature. These results suggest ferromagnetic spin fluctuation. In the superconducting state, 1 /T1 decreases rapidly below Tc without a Hebel-Slichter peak, and follows a T5 variation below T ˜3 K , which points to unconventional superconductivity with point nodes in the gap function.

  14. Rabi resonance in spin systems: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layton, Kelvin J.; Tahayori, Bahman; Mareels, Iven M. Y.; Farrell, Peter M.; Johnston, Leigh A.

    2014-05-01

    The response of a magnetic resonance spin system is predicted and experimentally verified for the particular case of a continuous wave amplitude modulated radiofrequency excitation. The experimental results demonstrate phenomena not previously observed in magnetic resonance systems, including a secondary resonance condition when the amplitude of the excitation equals the modulation frequency. This secondary resonance produces a relatively large steady state magnetisation with Fourier components at harmonics of the modulation frequency. Experiments are in excellent agreement with the theoretical prediction derived from the Bloch equations, which provides a sound theoretical framework for future developments in NMR spectroscopy and imaging.

  15. Detecting body cavity bombs with nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Michael London

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a technology with great potential for detecting hidden explosives. Past NQR research has studied the detection of land mines and bombs concealed within luggage and packages. This thesis focuses on an NQR application that has received less attention and little or no publicly available research: detecting body cavity bombs (BCBs). BCBs include explosives that have been ingested, inserted into orifices, or surgically implanted. BCBs present a threat to aviation and secure facilities. They are extremely difficult to detect with the technology currently employed at security checkpoints. To evaluate whether or not NQR can be used to detect BCBs, a computational model is developed to assess how the dielectric properties of biological tissue affect the radio frequency magnetic field employed in NQR (0.5-5MHz). The relative permittivity of some biological tissue is very high (over 1,000 at 1MHz), making it conceivable that there is a significant effect on the electromagnetic field. To study this effect, the low-frequency approximation known as the Darwin model is employed. First, the electromagnetic field of a coil is calculated in free space. Second, a dielectric object or set of objects is introduced, and the free-space electric field is modified to accommodate the dielectric object ensuring that the relevant boundary conditions are obeyed. Finally, the magnetic field associated with the corrected electric field is calculated. This corrected magnetic field is evaluated with an NQR simulation to estimate the impact of dielectric tissue on NQR measurements. The effect of dielectric tissue is shown to be small, thus obviating a potential barrier to BCB detection. The NQR model presented may assist those designing excitation and detection coils for NQR. Some general coil design considerations and strategies are discussed.

  16. Local resonance bandgaps in periodic media: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, L; Phani, A Srikantha

    2013-09-01

    Periodic composites such as acoustic metamaterials use local resonance phenomenon in designing low frequency sub-Bragg bandgaps. These bandgaps emerge from a resonant scattering interaction between a propagating wave and periodically arranged resonators. This paper develops a receptance coupling technique to combine the dynamics of the resonator with the unit cell dynamics of the background medium to analyze flexural wave transmission in a periodic structure, involving a single degree of freedom coupling between the medium and the resonator. Receptance techniques allow for a straightforward extension to higher dimensional systems with multiple degrees of freedom coupling and for easier experimental measurements. Closed-form expressions for the location and width of sub-Bragg bandgaps are obtained. Rigid body modes of the unit cell of the background medium are shown to set the bounding frequencies for local resonance bandgaps. Results from the receptance analysis compare well with Bloch wave analysis and experiments performed on a finite structural beam with periodic masses and resonators. Stronger coupling and inertia of the resonator increase the local resonance bandgap width. Two-fold periodicity widens the Bragg bandgap, narrowed by local resonators, thus expanding the design space and highlighting the advantages of hierarchical periodicity. PMID:23967928

  17. Nuclear magnetic and quadrupole resonance studies of the stripes materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafe, H.-J.

    2012-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic and Quadrupole Resonance (NMR/NQR) is a powerful tool to probe electronic inhomogeneities in correlated electron systems. Its local character allows for probing different environments due to spin density modulations or inhomogeneous doping distributions emerging from the correlations in these systems. In fact, NMR/NQR is not only sensitive to magnetic properties through interaction of the nuclear spin, but also allows to probe the symmetry of the charge distribution and its homogeneity, as well as structural modulations, through sensitivity to the electric field gradient (EFG). We review the results of NMR and NQR in the cuprates from intrinsic spatial variations of the hole concentration in the normal state to stripe order at low temperatures, thereby keeping in mind the influence of doping induced disorder and inhomogeneities. Finally, we briefly discuss NQR evidence for local electronic inhomogeneities in the recently discovered iron pnictides, suggesting that electronic inhomogeneities are a common feature of correlated electron systems.

  18. Authentication of Medicines Using Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Zhang, Fengchao; Barras, Jamie; Althoefer, Kaspar; Bhunia, Swarup; Mandal, Soumyajit

    2016-01-01

    The production and sale of counterfeit and substandard pharmaceutical products, such as essential medicines, is an important global public health problem. We describe a chemometric passport-based approach to improve the security of the pharmaceutical supply chain. Our method is based on applying nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy to authenticate the contents of medicine packets. NQR is a non-invasive, non-destructive, and quantitative radio frequency (RF) spectroscopic technique. It is sensitive to subtle features of the solid-state chemical environment and thus generates unique chemical fingerprints that are intrinsically difficult to replicate. We describe several advanced NQR techniques, including two-dimensional measurements, polarization enhancement, and spin density imaging, that further improve the security of our authentication approach. We also present experimental results that confirm the specificity and sensitivity of NQR and its ability to detect counterfeit medicines. PMID:26841409

  19. (14)N NQR, relaxation and molecular dynamics of the explosive TNT.

    PubMed

    Smith, John A S; Rowe, Michael D; Althoefer, Kaspar; Peirson, Neil F; Barras, Jamie

    2015-10-01

    Multiple pulse sequences are widely used for signal enhancement in NQR detection applications. Since the various (14)N NQR relaxation times, signal decay times and frequency of each NQR line have a major influence on detection sequence performance, it is important to characterise these parameters and their temperature variation, as fully as possible. In this paper we discuss such measurements for a number of the ν+ and ν- NQR lines of monoclinic and orthorhombic TNT and relate the temperature variation results to molecular dynamics. The temperature variation of the (14)N spin-lattice relaxation times T1 is interpreted as due to hindered rotation of the NO2 group about the C-NO2 bond with an activation energy of 89 kJ mol(-1) for the ortho and para groups of monoclinic TNT and 70 kJ mol(-1) for the para group of orthorhombic TNT. PMID:26440130

  20. An overview of resonance measurements at the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knospe, A. G.

    2016-05-01

    Resonances play a unique role in the study of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Resonance yields, which may be modified by rescattering and regeneration after hadronization, can be used to study the properties of the hadronic phase of the collision. The transversemomentum spectra of the proton and the ϕ(1020) can be used to study the mechanisms of particle production. In addition, resonance measurements in pp and p-Pb collisions help to distinguish initial-state effects from the effects of the hot and dense final state. The ALICE Collaboration has studied the K*(892)0 and ϕ(1020) mesons in pp, p-Pb, and Pb-Pb collisions. Measurements of many resonance properties, including pT spectra, integrated yields, masses, widths, mean pT values, and the nuclear modification factors RAA and RpPb, are presented and compared to measurements from other experiments, non-resonances, and the predictions of theoretical models.

  1. /sup 127/I NQR spectra of carborane-containing compounds of polycoordinated iodine

    SciTech Connect

    Semin, G.K.; Grushin, V.V.; Gushchin, S.I.; Lisichkina, I.N.; Petokhov, S.A.; Tolstaya, T.P.

    1985-05-20

    The NQR spectra of polycoordinated iodine compounds is studied. A table presents the I 127 NQR spectra of electroneutral PhIC1/sub 2/ derivatives with intermolecular coordination in the solid state and ionic compounds including compounds with interionic coordination. A considerable increase in the quadrupole coupling constants and significant decrease in the asymmetry parameter is found in carborane-containing CBIC1/sub 2/ and PhCBIX compounds in comparison with the corresponding phenyl and diphenyl derivatives.

  2. The application of frequency swept pulses for the acquisition of nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossini, Aaron J.; Hamaed, Hiyam; Schurko, Robert W.

    2010-09-01

    The acquisition of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra with wideband uniform rate and smooth truncation (WURST) pulses is investigated. 75As and 35Cl NQR spectra acquired with the WURST echo sequence are compared to those acquired with standard Hahn-echo sequences and echo sequences which employ composite refocusing pulses. The utility of WURST pulses for locating NQR resonances of unknown frequency is investigated by monitoring the integrated intensity and signal to noise of 35Cl and 75As NQR spectra acquired with transmitter offsets of several hundreds kilohertz from the resonance frequencies. The WURST echo sequence is demonstrated to possess superior excitation bandwidths in comparison to the pulse sequences which employ conventional monochromatic rectangular pulses. The superior excitation bandwidths of the WURST pulses allows for differences in the characteristic impedance of the receiving and excitation circuits of the spectrometer to be detected. Impedance mismatches have previously been reported by Marion and Desvaux [D.J.Y. Marion, H. Desvaux, J. Magn. Reson. (2008) 193(1) 153-157] and Muller et al. [M. Nausner, J. Schlagnitweit, V. Smrecki, X. Yang, A. Jerschow, N. Muller, J. Magn. Reson. (2009) 198(1) 73-79]. In this regard, WURST pulse sequences may afford an efficient new method for experimentally detecting impedance mismatches between receiving and excitation circuits, allowing for the optimization of solids and solution NMR and NQR spectrometer systems. The use of the Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence for signal enhancement of NQR spectra acquired with WURST pulses and conventional pulses is also investigated. Finally, the utility of WURST pulses for the acquisition of wideline NQR spectra is demonstrated by acquiring part of the 63/65Cu NQR spectrum of CuCN.

  3. Magnetic correlations in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 from NQR relaxation and specific heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsa, F.; Rigamonti, A.

    1991-01-01

    La-139 and Cu-63 Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) relaxation measurements in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 for x ranging from 0 up to 0.3, with particular emphasis on the effect of doping on the Cu(2+) magnetic correlations and dynamics, are reviewed. In the low doping limit, x less than or equal to 0.05, the results can be interpreted consistently in terms of a simple phenomenological 'two-fluids' model whereby the effect of thermally-activated mobile O(2p) holes is the one of disrupting locally the Cu(2+) spin correlations. For x greater than or equal to 0.1, the results indicate the onset, as T approaches T(sub c)(+), of a strong coupling between Cu(2+) spins and the Fermi liquid of O(2p) holes leading to the apparent disappearance of localized Cu(2+) moment in connection with the opening of a superconducting gap.

  4. 35C NQR studies in 2,4,6-,2,3,6-, and 2,3,4-trichloro anisoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rukmani, K.; Ramakrishna, J.

    1985-02-01

    The chlorine-35 NQR frequencies and their temperature variation in 2,4,6-, 2,3,6- and 2,3,4-trichloro anisoles have been studied and compared with the corresponding chlorophenols with a view to studying the effect of hydrogen bonding. The observed frequencies have been assigned to the various chlorines with the help of the additive model of the substituent effect. The temperature dependence has been analysed in terms of the Bayer—Kushida—Brown models. The torsional frequencies and their temperature dependence have been calculated numerically under a two mode approximation. A comparison of the trichloro anisoles with the corresponding trichloro phenols has shown that the resonance frequency decreases due to hydrogen bonding while the torsional frequencies are not affected.

  5. Studies of Ga NMR and NQR in SrGa4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niki, H.; Higa, N.; Nakamura, S.; Kuroshima, H.; Toji, T.; Yogi, M.; Nakamura, A.; Hedo, M.; Nakama, T.; Ōnuki, Y.; Harima, H.

    2015-04-01

    In order to microscopically investigate the properties in SrGa4, the Ga NMR measurements of a powder sample were carried out. The Ga NMR spectra corresponding to Ga(I) and Ga(II) sites are obtained. The NMR spectra of 69&71Ga (a nuclear spin I = 3/2) in the powder sample of SrGa4 do not take a typical powder pattern caused by the NQR interaction, but take the spectra consisting of three well resolved resonance-lines, which indicates that the nonuniform distribution of crystal orientation in the powder sample occurs because of the magnetic anisotropy. From the analysis of the Ga NMR spectrum, it is found that the ab-plane of the crystal is parallel to the external magnetic field, which would be attributed to the anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility with the easy axis parallel to the ab-plane. This result is also confirmed by the 69Ga NQR in SrGa4. The Knight shifts of the 69Ga(I) and 69Ga(II) shift slightly to the negative side with decreasing temperature due to the core polarization of the d-electrons. The values of the Knight shift of the 69Ga(I) and 69Ga(II) are 0.01 and -0.11 % at 4.2 K, and 0.09 and -0.08 % at 300 K, respectively. The values of the 1/ T 1 T of the NMR of both 69Ga(I) and 69Ga(II) are almost constant between 4.2 and 100 K, whose values are 1.5 s -1 K -1 at 69Ga(I) and 0.12 s -1 K -1 at 69Ga(II), while the 1/ T 1 T slightly increase above 100K with increasing temperature. The value of T 1 of 69Ga(I) is one order of magnitude less than that of 69Ga(II).

  6. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis Using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Trbovich, M J; Barry, D P; Slovacek, R E; Danon, Y; Block, R C; Francis, N C; Lubert, M; Burke, J A; Drindak, N J; Lienweber, G; Ballad, R

    2007-02-06

    The focus of this work is to determine the resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005 - 200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf resonances near 8 eV. Accurate hafnium cross sections and resonance parameters are needed in order to quantify the effects of hafnium found in zirconium, a metal commonly used in reactors. The accuracy of the cross sections and the corresponding resonance parameters used in current nuclear analysis tools are rapidly becoming the limiting factor in reducing the overall uncertainty on reactor physics calculations. Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission are routinely performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) LINAC using the time-of flight technique. {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m, respectively. Capture experiments were performed using a sixteen section NaI multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized several thicknesses of metallic and isotope-enriched liquid Hf samples. The liquid Hf samples were designed to provide information on the {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf contributions to the 8 eV doublet without saturation. Data analyses were performed using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. A combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005 - 200 eV. Additionally, resonance integrals were calculated, along with errors for each hafnium isotope, using the NJOY and INTER codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previous values. The {sup 176}Hf resonance integral, based on this work, is approximately 73% higher than the ENDF/B-VI value. This is due primarily to the changes to resonance parameters in the 8 eV resonance, the neutron width presented in this work is more than twice that of the previous value. The calculated elemental

  7. Nuclear quadrupole resonance lineshape analysis for different motional models: Stochastic Liouville approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Earle, K. A.; Mielczarek, A.; Kubica, A.; Milewska, A.; Moscicki, J.

    2011-12-01

    A general theory of lineshapes in nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), based on the stochastic Liouville equation, is presented. The description is valid for arbitrary motional conditions (particularly beyond the valid range of perturbation approaches) and interaction strengths. It can be applied to the computation of NQR spectra for any spin quantum number and for any applied magnetic field. The treatment presented here is an adaptation of the "Swedish slow motion theory," [T. Nilsson and J. Kowalewski, J. Magn. Reson. 146, 345 (2000), 10.1006/jmre.2000.2125] originally formulated for paramagnetic systems, to NQR spectral analysis. The description is formulated for simple (Brownian) diffusion, free diffusion, and jump diffusion models. The two latter models account for molecular cooperativity effects in dense systems (such as liquids of high viscosity or molecular glasses). The sensitivity of NQR slow motion spectra to the mechanism of the motional processes modulating the nuclear quadrupole interaction is discussed.

  8. Mechanical Resonators for Quantum Optomechanics Experiments at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Norte, R A; Moura, J P; Gröblacher, S

    2016-04-01

    All quantum optomechanics experiments to date operate at cryogenic temperatures, imposing severe technical challenges and fundamental constraints. Here, we present a novel design of on-chip mechanical resonators which exhibit fundamental modes with frequencies f and mechanical quality factors Q_{m} sufficient to enter the optomechanical quantum regime at room temperature. We overcome previous limitations by designing ultrathin, high-stress silicon nitride (Si_{3}N_{4}) membranes, with tensile stress in the resonators' clamps close to the ultimate yield strength of the material. By patterning a photonic crystal on the SiN membranes, we observe reflectivities greater than 99%. These on-chip resonators have remarkably low mechanical dissipation, with Q_{m}∼10^{8}, while at the same time exhibiting large reflectivities. This makes them a unique platform for experiments towards the observation of massive quantum behavior at room temperature. PMID:27104723

  9. Mechanical Resonators for Quantum Optomechanics Experiments at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norte, R. A.; Moura, J. P.; Gröblacher, S.

    2016-04-01

    All quantum optomechanics experiments to date operate at cryogenic temperatures, imposing severe technical challenges and fundamental constraints. Here, we present a novel design of on-chip mechanical resonators which exhibit fundamental modes with frequencies f and mechanical quality factors Qm sufficient to enter the optomechanical quantum regime at room temperature. We overcome previous limitations by designing ultrathin, high-stress silicon nitride (Si3 N4 ) membranes, with tensile stress in the resonators' clamps close to the ultimate yield strength of the material. By patterning a photonic crystal on the SiN membranes, we observe reflectivities greater than 99%. These on-chip resonators have remarkably low mechanical dissipation, with Qm˜108, while at the same time exhibiting large reflectivities. This makes them a unique platform for experiments towards the observation of massive quantum behavior at room temperature.

  10. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis Using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    MJ Trbovich; DP Barry; RE Slovacck; Y Danon; RC Block; JA Burke; NJ Drindak; G Leinweber; RV Ballad

    2004-10-13

    The focus of this work is to determine resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005-200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf resonances near 8 eV. The large neutron cross section of hafnium, combined with its corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties, make it a useful material for controlling nuclear reactions. Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission were performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) electron linear accelerator (LINAC) using the time of flight method. {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m. Capture experiments were done using a sixteen section NaI(Tl) multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized various thicknesses of metallic and isotopically-enriched liquid samples. The liquid samples were designed to provide information on the {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf contributions to the 8 eV doublet without saturation. Data analysis was done using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M6 beta. SAMMY is able to account for experimental resolution effects for each of the experimental setups at the RPI LINAC, and also can correct for multiple scattering effects in neutron capture yield data. The combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005-200 eV. Resonance integrals were calculated along with errors for each hafnium isotope using the NJOY [1] and INTER [2] codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previously published values; however the calculated elemental hafnium resonance integral changed very little.

  11. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Trbovich, Michael J.; Barry, Devin P.; Burke, John A.; Drindak, Noel J.; Leinweber, Greg; Ballad, Robert V.; Slovacek, Rudy E.; Danon, Yaron; Block, Robert C.

    2005-05-24

    The focus of this work is to determine resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005-200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping 176Hf and 178Hf resonances near 8 eV. The large neutron cross section of hafnium, combined with its corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties, make it a useful material for controlling nuclear reactions.Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission were performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) electron linear accelerator (LINAC) using the time of flight method. 6Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m. Capture experiments were done using a sixteen-section NaI(Tl) multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized various thicknesses of metallic and isotopically enriched liquid samples. The liquid samples were designed to provide information on the 176Hf and 178Hf contributions to the 8-eV doublet without saturation.Data analysis was done using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M6 beta. SAMMY is able to account for experimental resolution effects for each of the experimental setups at the RPI LINAC, and also can correct for multiple scattering effects in neutron capture yield data. The combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005-200 eV. Resonance integrals were calculated along with errors for each hafnium isotope using the NJOY and INTER codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previously published values; however the calculated elemental hafnium resonance integral changed very little.

  12. Localization and Function of the Membrane-bound Riboflavin in the Na+-translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) from Vibrio cholerae*

    PubMed Central

    Casutt, Marco S.; Huber, Tamara; Brunisholz, René; Tao, Minli; Fritz, Günter; Steuber, Julia

    2010-01-01

    The sodium ion-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) from the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae is a respiratory membrane protein complex that couples the oxidation of NADH to the transport of Na+ across the bacterial membrane. The Na+-NQR comprises the six subunits NqrABCDEF, but the stoichiometry and arrangement of these subunits are unknown. Redox-active cofactors are FAD and a 2Fe-2S cluster on NqrF, covalently attached FMNs on NqrB and NqrC, and riboflavin and ubiquinone-8 with unknown localization in the complex. By analyzing the cofactor content and NADH oxidation activity of subcomplexes of the Na+-NQR lacking individual subunits, the riboflavin cofactor was unequivocally assigned to the membrane-bound NqrB subunit. Quantitative analysis of the N-terminal amino acids of the holo-complex revealed that NqrB is present in a single copy in the holo-complex. It is concluded that the hydrophobic NqrB harbors one riboflavin in addition to its covalently attached FMN. The catalytic role of two flavins in subunit NqrB during the reduction of ubiquinone to ubiquinol by the Na+-NQR is discussed. PMID:20558724

  13. Dynamic nuclear polarization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment.

    PubMed

    Issac, Corinne E; Gleave, Christine M; Nasr, Paméla T; Nguyen, Hoang L; Curley, Elizabeth A; Yoder, Jonilyn L; Moore, Eric W; Chen, Lei; Marohn, John A

    2016-04-01

    We report achieving enhanced nuclear magnetization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment at 0.6 tesla and 4.2 kelvin using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) effect. In our experiments a microwire coplanar waveguide delivered radiowaves to excite nuclear spins and microwaves to excite electron spins in a 250 nm thick nitroxide-doped polystyrene sample. Both electron and proton spin resonance were observed as a change in the mechanical resonance frequency of a nearby cantilever having a micron-scale nickel tip. NMR signal, not observable from Curie-law magnetization at 0.6 T, became observable when microwave irradiation was applied to saturate the electron spins. The resulting NMR signal's size, buildup time, dependence on microwave power, and dependence on irradiation frequency was consistent with a transfer of magnetization from electron spins to nuclear spins. Due to the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field introduced by the cantilever's magnetic tip, the electron spins in the sample were saturated in a microwave-resonant slice 10's of nm thick. The spatial distribution of the nuclear polarization enhancement factor ε was mapped by varying the frequency of the applied radiowaves. The observed enhancement factor was zero for spins in the center of the resonant slice, was ε = +10 to +20 for spins proximal to the magnet, and was ε = -10 to -20 for spins distal to the magnet. We show that this bipolar nuclear magnetization profile is consistent with cross-effect DNP in a ∼10(5) T m(-1) magnetic field gradient. Potential challenges associated with generating and using DNP-enhanced nuclear magnetization in a nanometer-resolution magnetic resonance imaging experiment are elucidated and discussed. PMID:26964007

  14. Long-term operating experience for the ATLAS superconducting resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.; Zinkann, G.

    1999-12-21

    Portions of the ATLAS accelerator have been operating now for over 21 years. The facility has accumulated several million resonator-hours of operation at this point and has demonstrated the long-term reliability of RF superconductivity. The overall operating performance of the ATLAS facility has established a level of beam quality, flexibility, and reliability not previously achieved with heavy-ion accelerator facilities. The actual operating experience and maintenance history of ATLAS are presented for ATLAS resonators and associated electronics systems. Solutions to problems that appeared in early operation as well as current problems needing further development are discussed.

  15. Magnetic Field Gradient Calibration as an Experiment to Illustrate Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seedhouse, Steven J.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2008-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory is described that encompasses both qualitative and quantitative pedagogical goals. Qualitatively, the experiment illustrates how images are obtained in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Quantitatively, students experience the…

  16. Coexistence of multiple charge-density waves and superconductivity in SrPt2As2 revealed by 75As-NMR /NQR and 195Pt-NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Shinji; Tani, Yoshihiko; Mabuchi, Tomosuke; Kudo, Kazutaka; Nishikubo, Yoshihiro; Mitsuoka, Daisuke; Nohara, Minoru; Zheng, Guo-qing

    2015-02-01

    The relationship between charge-density wave (CDW) orders and superconductivity in arsenide superconductor SrPt2As2 with Tc=5.2 K which crystallizes in the CaBe2Ge2 -type structure was studied by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements up to 520 K, and 75As nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) and 195Pt-NMR measurements down to 1.5 K. At high temperature, 75As-NMR spectrum and nuclear-spin-relaxation rate (1 /T1) have revealed two distinct CDW orders, one realized in the As-Pt-As layer below TCDWAs (1 )=410 K and the other in the Pt-As-Pt layer below TCDWAs (2 )=255 K . The 1 /T1 measured by 75As-NQR shows a clear Hebel-Slichter peak just below Tc and decreases exponentially well below Tc. Concomitantly, 195Pt Knight shift decreases below Tc. Our results indicate that superconductivity in SrPt2As2 is in the spin-singlet state with an s -wave gap and is robust under the two distinct CDW orders in different layers.

  17. Ferromagnetic Quantum Critical Fluctuations and Anomalous Coexistence of Ferromagnetism and Superconductivity in UCoGe Revealed by Co-NMR and NQR Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Tetsuya; Nakai, Yusuke; Ihara, Yoshihiko; Ishida, Kenji; Deguchi, Kazuhiko; Sato, Noriaki K.; Satoh, Isamu

    2008-02-01

    Co nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies were carried out for the recently discovered UCoGe, in which the ferromagnetic and superconducting (SC) transitions are reported to occur at TCurie˜ 3 K and TS˜ 0.8 K [Huy et al.: Phys. Rev. Lett. 99 (2007) 067006], in order to investigate the coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity as well as the normal-state and SC properties from a microscopic point of view. From the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 and Knight-shift measurements, we confirm that ferromagnetic fluctuations that possess a quantum critical character are present above TCurie and also the occurrence of a ferromagnetic transition at 2.5 K in our polycrystalline sample. The magnetic fluctuations in the normal state show that UCoGe is an itinerant ferromagnet similar to ZrZn2 and YCo2. The onset SC transition is identified at TS˜ 0.7 K, below which 1/T1 arising from 30% of the volume fraction starts to decrease due to the opening of the SC gap. This component of 1/T1, which follows a T3 dependence in the temperature range 0.3-0.1 K, coexists with the magnetic components of 1/T1 showing a \\sqrt{T} dependence below TS. From the NQR measurements in the SC state, we suggest that the self-induced vortex state is realized in UCoGe.

  18. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Herman

    2016-09-01

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3 / 2 , 5 / 2 , 7 / 2, and 9 / 2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  19. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cho, Herman

    2016-02-28

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3/2,5/2,7/2, and 9/2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Furthermore, applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  20. Experiments on statistical mechanics using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Iturbe, J.; Allman, S.L.; Hurst, G.S.; Payne, M.G.

    1984-04-01

    Five different fluctuation phenomena at the atomic and molecular levels have been studied by resonance ionization spectroscopy techniques with one-atom detection sensitivity. The Poisson distribution described the observed frequency distributions suggesting random behavior. In addition, a gedanken experiment suggested by Einstein and Furth on the diffusion of atoms was performed in order to test the equality between time and ensemble averages. The obtained results confirmed the ergodicity of the studied system.

  1. Closing supersymmetric resonance regions with direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kelso, Chris

    2014-01-01

    One of the few remaining ways that neutralinos could potentially evade constraints from direct detection experiments is if they annihilate through a resonance, as can occur if 2m{sub χ⁰} falls within about ~10% of either m{sub A/H}, m{sub h}, or m{sub Z}. Assuming a future rate of progress among direct detection experiments that is similar to that obtained over the past decade, we project that within 7 years the light Higgs and Z pole regions will be entirely closed, while the remaining parameter space near the A/H resonance will require that 2m{sub χ₀} be matched to the central value (near m{sub A}) to within less than 4%. At this rate of progress, it will be a little over a decade before multi-ton direct detection experiments will be able to close the remaining, highly-tuned, regions of the A/H resonance parameter space.

  2. Thomson’s ring experiment with resonant LC circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidar, Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    Thomson’s jumping ring experiment is conducted using a low voltage (24 V) electronic circuit. A coil (L) is connected with a capacitor (C) in parallel and is driven at its resonant frequency to obtain a high current in the coil. A circuit sends current pulses to the LC tank circuit at around its resonant frequency. The oscillating current in the coil induces a voltage in a copper-loop on top of it. The induced current interacts with the radial part of the coil-magnetic field; the resulting force levitates the loop. In a separate coil, a ferrite core and a copper ring are used to demonstrate the jumping-ring effect. The levitation and the jumping effect can be controlled by changing the duty cycle and frequency. In this report simple formulae and approximations are used to calculate the levitating force on the loop.

  3. Suppression of electron correlations in the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 under ambient pressure demonstrated by As75 NMR/NQR measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Yuji; Roy, Beas; Ran, Sheng; Budko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2014-03-20

    The static and the dynamic spin correlations in the low-temperature collapsed tetragonal and the high-temperature tetragonal phase in CaFe2As2 have been investigated by As75 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. Through the temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts, although stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin correlations are realized in the high-temperature tetragonal phase, no trace of the AFM spin correlations can be found in the nonsuperconducting, low-temperature, collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase. Given that there is no magnetic broadening in As75 NMR spectra, together with the T-independent behavior of magnetic susceptibility χ and the T dependence of 1/T1Tχ, we conclude that Fe spin correlations are completely quenched statically and dynamically in the nonsuperconducting cT phase in CaFe2As2.

  4. Suppression of electron correlations in the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 under ambient pressure demonstrated by As75 NMR/NQR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Y.; Roy, B.; Ran, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2014-03-01

    The static and the dynamic spin correlations in the low-temperature collapsed tetragonal and the high-temperature tetragonal phase in CaFe2As2 have been investigated by As75 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. Through the temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts, although stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin correlations are realized in the high-temperature tetragonal phase, no trace of the AFM spin correlations can be found in the nonsuperconducting, low-temperature, collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase. Given that there is no magnetic broadening in As75 NMR spectra, together with the T-independent behavior of magnetic susceptibility χ and the T dependence of 1/T1Tχ, we conclude that Fe spin correlations are completely quenched statically and dynamically in the nonsuperconducting cT phase in CaFe2As2.

  5. Experiment study of an electron cyclotron resonant ion source based on a tapered resonance cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Juan; Shi, Feng; Jin, Yizhou; Wang, Yunmin; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2013-12-01

    Electron cyclotron resonant plasma is one type of magnetised plasma generated by continuous microwave energy. It has the property of high degree of ionization and large volume at low gas pressure, which makes it useful for space propulsion and material processing. This article presents the experiment study of the plasma properties and ion beam extraction from an electron cyclotron resonant ion source based on a tapered resonance cavity. Optical emission spectroscopy based on a simple collisional radiation model was used for plasma diagnosis. Experiment results show that, at microwave power setting ranging from 7.06 to 17.40 W and mass flow rate ranging from 1 to 10 sccm, argon gas can be ionized. Ion beam of 109.1 mA from the ion source can be extracted at microwave power of 30 W, mass flow rate of 10 sccm, and accel voltage of 800 V. The diagnosed plasma temperature and density are 2.4-5.2 eV and 2 × 1016-4.8 × 1017 m-3, respectively.

  6. Experiment study of an electron cyclotron resonant ion source based on a tapered resonance cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Juan; Shi, Feng; Jin, Yizhou; Wang, Yunmin; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2013-12-15

    Electron cyclotron resonant plasma is one type of magnetised plasma generated by continuous microwave energy. It has the property of high degree of ionization and large volume at low gas pressure, which makes it useful for space propulsion and material processing. This article presents the experiment study of the plasma properties and ion beam extraction from an electron cyclotron resonant ion source based on a tapered resonance cavity. Optical emission spectroscopy based on a simple collisional radiation model was used for plasma diagnosis. Experiment results show that, at microwave power setting ranging from 7.06 to 17.40 W and mass flow rate ranging from 1 to 10 sccm, argon gas can be ionized. Ion beam of 109.1 mA from the ion source can be extracted at microwave power of 30 W, mass flow rate of 10 sccm, and accel voltage of 800 V. The diagnosed plasma temperature and density are 2.4–5.2 eV and 2 × 10{sup 16}–4.8 × 10{sup 17} m{sup −3}, respectively.

  7. Novel 2D Triple-Resonance NMR Experiments for Sequential Resonance Assignments of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Keyang; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    2002-06-01

    We present 2D versions of the popular triple resonance HN(CO) CACB, HN(COCA)CACB, HN(CO)CAHA, and HN(COCA) CAHA experiments, commonly used for sequential resonance assignments of proteins. These experiments provide information about correlations between amino proton and nitrogen chemical shifts and the α- and β-carbon and α-proton chemical shifts within and between amino acid residues. Using these 2D spectra, sequential resonance assignments of H N, N, C α, C β, and H α nuclei are easily achieved. The resolution of these spectra is identical to the well-resolved 2D 15N- 1H HSQC and H(NCO)CA spectra, with slightly reduced sensitivity compared to their 3D and 4D versions. These types of spectra are ideally suited for exploitation in automated assignment procedures and thereby constitute a fast and efficient means for NMR structural determination of small and medium-sized proteins in solution in structural genomics programs.

  8. Electronic properties of Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductors as seen by Cu and O NMR/NQR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinkmann, D.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) allow the investigation of electronic properties at the atomic level. We will report on such studies of typical members of the the Y-Ba-Cu-O family such as YBa2Cu30(6 + x) (1-2-3-(6 + x)), YBa2Cu4O8 (1-2-4) and Y2Ba4Cu7015 (2-4-7) with many examples of recent work performed in our laboratory. In particular, we will deal with Knight shift and relaxation studies of copper and oxygen. We will discuss important issues of current studies such as: (1) Existence of a common electronic spin-susceptibility in the planes (and perhaps in the chains) of 1-2-4; (2) Strong evidence for the existence of a pseudo spin-gap of the antiferromagnetic fluctuations in 1-2-4 and 2-4-7; (3) Evidence for d-wave pairing in 1-2-4; (4) Strong coupling of inequivalent Cu-O planes in 2-4-7 and possible origin for the high Tc value of this compound; and (5) The possibility to describe NMR data in the framework of a charge-excitation picture.

  9. The Conformational Changes Induced by Ubiquinone Binding in the Na+-pumping NADH:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) Are Kinetically Controlled by Conserved Glycines 140 and 141 of the NqrB Subunit*

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Madeleine; Juárez, Oscar; Neehaul, Yashvin; Cook, Darcie A.; Barquera, Blanca; Hellwig, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Na+-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) is responsible for maintaining a sodium gradient across the inner bacterial membrane. This respiratory enzyme, which couples sodium pumping to the electron transfer between NADH and ubiquinone, is not present in eukaryotes and as such could be a target for antibiotics. In this paper it is shown that the site of ubiquinone reduction is conformationally coupled to the NqrB subunit, which also hosts the final cofactor in the electron transport chain, riboflavin. Previous work showed that mutations in conserved NqrB glycine residues 140 and 141 affect ubiquinone reduction and the proper functioning of the sodium pump. Surprisingly, these mutants did not affect the dissociation constant of ubiquinone or its analog HQNO (2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide) from Na+-NQR, which indicates that these residues do not participate directly in the ubiquinone binding site but probably control its accessibility. Indeed, redox-induced difference spectroscopy showed that these mutations prevented the conformational change involved in ubiquinone binding but did not modify the signals corresponding to bound ubiquinone. Moreover, data are presented that demonstrate the NqrA subunit is able to bind ubiquinone but with a low non-catalytically relevant affinity. It is also suggested that Na+-NQR contains a single catalytic ubiquinone binding site and a second site that can bind ubiquinone but is not active. PMID:25006248

  10. Cryogenic resonator design for trapped ion experiments in Paul traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandl, M. F.; Schindler, P.; Monz, T.; Blatt, R.

    2016-06-01

    Trapping ions in Paul traps require high radio frequency voltages, which are generated using resonators. When operating traps in a cryogenic environment, an in-vacuum resonator showing low loss is crucial to limit the thermal load to the cryostat. In this study, we present a guide for the design and production of compact, shielded cryogenic resonators. We produced and characterized three different types of resonators and furthermore demonstrate efficient impedance matching of these resonators at cryogenic temperatures.

  11. Temperature variation of ultralow frequency modes and mean square displacements in solid lasamide (diuretic drug) studied by 35Cl-NQR, X-ray and DFT/QTAIM.

    PubMed

    Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia; Latosińska, Magdalena; Kasprzak, Jerzy; Tomczak, Magdalena; Maurin, Jan Krzysztof

    2012-10-25

    The application of combined (35)Cl-NQR/X-ray/DFT/QTAIM methods to study the temperature variation of anisotropic displacement parameters and ultralow frequency modes of anharmonic torsional vibrations in the solid state is illustrated on the example of 2,4-dichloro-5-sulfamolybenzoic acid (lasamide, DSBA) which is a diuretic and an intermediate in the synthesis of furosemide and thus its common impurity. The crystallographic structure of lasamide is solved by X-ray diffraction and refined to a final R-factor of 3.06% at room temperature. Lasamide is found to crystallize in the triclinic space group P-1, with two equivalent molecules in the unit cell a = 7.5984(3) Å, b = 8.3158(3) Å, c = 8.6892(3) Å; α = 81.212(3)°, β = 73.799(3)°, γ = 67.599(3)°. Its molecules form symmetric dimers linked by two short and linear intermolecular hydrogen bonds O-H···O (O-H···O = 2.648 Å and ∠OHO = 171.5°), which are further linked by weaker and longer intermolecular hydrogen bonds N-H···O (N-H···O = 2.965 Å and ∠NHO = 166.4°). Two (35)Cl-NQR resonance frequencies, 36.899 and 37.129 MHz, revealed at room temperature are assigned to chlorine sites at the ortho and para positions, relative to the carboxyl functional group, respectively. The difference in C-Cl(1) and C-Cl(2) bond lengths only slightly affects the value of (35)Cl-NQR frequencies, which results mainly from chemical inequivalence of chlorine atoms but also involvement in different intermolecular interactions pattern. The smooth decrease in both (35)Cl-NQR frequencies with increasing temperature in the range of 77-300 K testifies to the averaging of EFG tensor at each chlorine site due to anharmonic torsional vibrations. Lasamide is thermally stable; no temperature-induced release of chlorine or decomposition of this compound is detected. The temperature dependence of ultralow frequency modes of anharmonic small-angle internal torsional vibrations averaging EFG tensor and mean square angle

  12. Optical Resonators in Current and Future Experiments of the ALPS Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, T.

    2010-08-30

    The ALPS collaboration runs a 'light shining through a wall' (LSW) experiment to search for weakly interacting sub-eV particles (WISPs). Its sensitivity is significantly enhanced by the incorporation of a large-scale production resonator and a small-scale high-power resonant second harmonic generator. Here we report on important experimental details and limitations of these resonators and derive recommendations for further experiments. A very promising improvement for a future ALPS experiment is the incorporation of an additional large-scale regeneration resonator. We present a rough sketch of how to combine a regeneration resonator with a single-photon counter (SPC) as detector for regenerated photons.

  13. Sb-NQR study on novel superconductivity in (Pr 1-xLa x)Os 4Sb 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Takayuki; Yogi, Mamoru; Imamura, Yoju; Mukuda, Hidekazu; Kitaoka, Yoshio; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Sugawara, Hitoshi; Sato, Hideyuki

    2007-03-01

    We report on superconducting (SC) properties in a series of filled-skutterudite compounds (Pr 1-xLa x)Os 4Sb 12 through the Sb nuclear-quadrupole-resonance (NQR). In the SC state, the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/ T1Pr at Pr-cage decreases exponentially with no coherence peak below TC, consistent with the results for the pure PrOs 4Sb 12. In the Pr-rich compounds of x=0.05 and 0.2, the residual density of states (RDOS) at the Fermi level are induced below TC due to the La substitution. It is concluded that the RDOS is not due to the impurity effect that used to be observed in unconventional superconductors with line-node gap. Rather, a part of the Fermi surface that contributes to 5.5% of the total is suggested to become gapless for x=0.05 and 0.2, yielding the RDOS. For the La-rich compounds of x=0.4, 0.8 and 1, as the Pr-substitution for La increases, TC increases and a size of energy gap increases. The Pr-substitution for La makes the pairing interaction for forming the Cooper pairs strong and causes an anisotropy in its energy-gap structure.

  14. Magnetic correlations in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 from NQR relaxation and specific heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsa, F.; Rigamonti, A.

    1990-01-01

    La-139 and Cu-63 Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) relaxation measurements in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 for O = to or less than 0.3 and in the temperature range 1.6 + 450 K are analyzed in terms of Cu(++) magnetic correlations and dynamics. It is described how the magnetic correlations that would result from Cu-Cu exchange are reduced by mobile charge defects related to x-doping. A comprehensive picture is given which explains satisfactorily the x and T dependence of the correlation time, of the correlation length and of the Neel temperature T(sub n)(x) as well as being consistent with known electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. It is discussed how, in the superconducting samples, the mobile defects also cause the decrease, for T yields T(sub c)(+) of the hyperfine Cu electron-nucleus effective interaction, leading to the coexistence of quasi-localized, reduced magnetic moments from 3d Cu electrons and mobile oxygen p-hole carriers. The temperature dependence of the effective hyperfine field around the superconducting transition yields an activation energy which could be related to the pairing energy. New specific heat measurements are also presented and discussed in terms of the above picture.

  15. Investigation of Wavelet-Based Enhancements to Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Explosives Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, Stephen W.; Dress, William B.; Hibbs, Andrew D.; Barrall, Geoffrey A.

    1998-06-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is effective for the detection and identification of certain types of explosives such as RDX, PETN and TNT. In explosive detection, the NQR response of certain 14N nuclei present in the crystalline material is probed. The 14N nuclei possess a nuclear quadrupole moment which in the presence of an electric field gradient produces an energy level splitting which may be excited by radio-frequency magnetic fields. Pulsing on the sample with a radio signal of the appropriate frequency produces a transient NQR response which may then be detected. Since the resonant frequency is dependent upon both the quadrupole moment of the 14N nucleus and the nature of the local electric field gradients, it is very compound specific. Under DARPA sponsorship, the authors are using multiresolution methods to investigate the enhancement of operation of NQR explosives detectors used for land mine detection. For this application, NQR processing time must be reduced to less than one second. False alarm responses due to acoustic and piezoelectric ringing must be suppressed. Also, as TNT is the most prevalent explosive found in land mines, NQR detection of TNT must be made practical despite unfavorable relaxation tunes. All three issues require improvement in signal-to-noise ratio, and all would benefit from improved feature extraction. This paper reports some of the insights provided by multiresolution methods that can be used to obtain these improvements. It includes results of multiresolution analysis of experimentally observed NQR signatures for RDX responses and various false alarm signatures in the absence of explosive compounds.

  16. Electron cyclotron resonance heating in the microwave tokamak experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.L.; Casper, T.A.; Fenstermacher, M.E.

    1992-09-01

    This paper presents the results from a series of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) experiments on the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX). On-axis heating at B{sub T} = 5T (f{sub ce} = 140 GHz) has been performed at electron densities up to cutoff. We have used both a long-pulse gryotron ({approximately}200 kW, {approximately}0.1s) and a pulsed Free Electron Laser (FEL) as microwave sources. Gyrotron experiments with power densities corresponding to 4 MW m{sup {minus}3}. A far infrared (FIR) polarimeter measured peaking of plasma current profiles in some discharges during the ECRH pulse. During high-power single-pulse FEL experiments, single-pass microwave !transmission measurements show nonlinear effects; i.e., higher transmission than predicted by linear theory. A corrugated-wall duct was used in the tokamak port to increase the gradient of the parallel refractive index n{sub parallel} of the incident wave, and increased absorption was observed. Evidence of electron tail heating during FEL pulses was observed on soft x-ray and ECE diagnostics. These results are in agreement with predictions of nonlinear theory; extrapolation of this theory to reactor-like conditions indicates efficient absorption and heating. A Laser Assisted Particle Probe Spectroscopy (LAPPS) diagnostic provided estimates of the vacuum electric field of the FEL which were consistent with the measured power. Multiple pulse operation of the ETA-II accelerator for the FEL has also been demonstrated, indicating the feasibility of high-average power FEL operation.

  17. NQR application to the study of hydrogen dynamics in hydrogen-bonded molecular dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaji, Tetsuo

    2016-12-01

    The temperature dependences of 1H NMR as well as 35Cl NQR spin-lattice relaxation times T 1 were investigated in order to study the hydrogen transfer dynamics in carboxylic acid dimers in 3,5-dichloro- and 2,6-dichlorobenzoic acids. The asymmetry energy A/ k B and the activation energy V/ k B for the hydrogen transfer were estimated to be 240 K and 900 K, and 840 K and 2500 K, respectively, for these compounds. In spite of a large asymmetric potential the quantum nature of hydrogen transfer is recognized in the slope of the temperature dependence of T 1 on the low-temperature side of the T 1 minimum. The NQR T 1 measurements was revealed to be a good probe for the hydrogen transfer dynamics.

  18. Low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonance with a dc SQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.W.

    1991-07-01

    Conventional pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a technique well suited for the study of very large quadrupolar interactions. Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have been developed for the study of smaller quadrupolar interactions. However, there are many nuclei which have quadrupolar interactions of intermediate strength. Quadrupolar interactions in this region have traditionally been difficult or unfeasible to detect. This work describes the development and application of a SQUID NQR technique which is capable of measuring intermediate strength quadrupolar interactions, in the range of a few hundred kilohertz to several megahertz. In this technique, a dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) is used to monitor the longitudinal sample magnetization, as opposed to the transverse magnetization, as a rf field is swept in frequency. This allows the detection of low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonances over a very wide frequency range with high sensitivity. The theory of this NQR technique is discussed and a description of the dc SQUID system is given. In the following chapters, the spectrometer is discussed along with its application to the study of samples containing half-odd-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei, in particular boron-11 and aluminum-27. The feasibility of applying this NQR technique in the study of samples containing integer spin nuclei is discussed in the last chapter. 140 refs., 46 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the female pelvis: initial experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hricak, H.; Alpers, C.; Crooks, L.E.; Sheldon, P.E.

    1983-12-01

    The potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was evaluated in 21 female subjects: seven volunteers, 12 patients scanned for reasons unrelated to the lower genitourinary tract, and two patients referred with gynecologic disease. The uterus at several stages was examined; the premenarcheal uterus (one patient), the uterus of reproductive age (12 patients), the postmenopausal uterus (two patients), and in an 8 week pregnancy (one patient). The myometrium and cyclic endometrium in the reproductive age separated by a low-intensity line (probably stratum basale), which allows recognition of changes in thickness of the cyclic endometrium during the menstrual cycle. The corpus uteri can be distinguished from the cervix by the transitional zone of the isthmus. The anatomic relation of the uterus to bladder and rectum is easily outlined. The vagina can be distinguished from the cervix, and the anatomic display of the closely apposed bladder, vagina, and rectum is clear on axial and coronal images. The ovary is identified; the signal intensity from the ovary depends on the acquisition parameter used. Uterine leiomyoma, endometriosis, and dermoid cyst were depicted, but further experience is needed to ascertain the specificity of the findings.

  20. Broadband echo sequence using a pi composite pulse for the pure NQR of a spin I = 32 powder sample

    PubMed

    Odin

    2000-04-01

    This work presents a numerical approach to optimizing sequences with composite pulses for the pure NQR of a spin I = 32 powder sample. The calculations are based on a formalism developed in a previous paper, which allows a fast powder-averaging procedure to be implemented. The framework of the Cayley-Klein matrices to describe space rotations by 2 x 2 unitary and unimodular complex matrices is used to calculate the pulse propagators. The object of such a study is to design a high-performance echo sequence composed of a single preparation pulse and a three-pulse composite transfer pulse. We mean a sequence leading to a large excitation bandwidth with a good signal-to-noise ratio, a flat excitation profile near the irradiation frequency, and a good linearity of the phase as a function of frequency offset. Such a composite echo sequence is intended to give a better excitation profile than the classical Hahn (θ)-tau-(2θ) echo sequence. It is argued that in pure NQR of a powder sample, the sequence must be optimized as a whole since both the excitation and the reception of the signal depend on the relative orientation of the crystallites with respect to the coil axis. To our knowledge, this is the first time such a global approach is presented. An extensive numerical study of the composite echo sequence described above is performed in this article. The key of the discrimination between the sequences lies in using the first five reduced moments of the excitation profile as well as an estimator of the phase linearity. Based on such information, we suggest that the echo sequence that best fulfills our criterion is (1)(0)-tau-(0.35)(0)(2.1)(pi)(0.35)(0), the pulse angles omega(RF)t(p) being in radians. The subscripts are the relative pulse phases. We outlined the way to implement the spin echo mapping method to reconstruct large spectra with this sequence, and it is shown that it reduces the acquisition time by a factor of 1.7 if compared to the classical Hahn echo. Some

  1. Advanced Undergraduate-Laboratory Experiment on Electron Spin Resonance in Single-Crystal Ruby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Lee A.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    An electron-spin-resonance experiment which has been successfully performed in an advanced undergraduate physics laboratory is described. A discussion of that part of the theory of magnetic resonance necessary for the understanding of the experiment is also provided in this article. (DT)

  2. Structural Isomer Identification via NMR: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiment for Organic, Analytical, or Physical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szafran, Zvi

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for an experiment that examines the ability of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to distinguish between structural isomers via resonance multiplicities and chemical shifts. Reasons for incorporating the experiment into organic, analytical, or physical chemistry…

  3. Isotope effect on the temperature dependence of the 35Cl NQR frequency in (NH4)2RuCl6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kume, Yoshio; Amino, Daiki; Asaji, Tetsuo

    2013-07-01

    The 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance frequencies and spin-lattice relaxation times for (NH4)2RuCl6, (ND4)2RuCl6, (NH4)2SnCl6, and (ND4)2SnCl6 were measured in the temperature range 4.2-300 K. In these four compounds, it was confirmed that no phase transition occurs in the observed temperature range. At 4.2 K, discrepancies of the NQR frequency between non-deuterated and deuterated compounds, which are attributed to the difference in the spatial distributions of hydrogen (deuterium) atoms in the ground states of the rotational motion of ammonium ion, reached to 24 kHz and 23 kHz for the ruthenate compounds and the stannate compounds, respectively. The separation between the ground and the first excited states of the rotational motion of the ammonium ion was estimated to be 466 J mol-1 and 840 J mol-1 for (ND4)2RuCl6 and (NH4)2RuCl6, respectively, by least-square fitting calculations of temperature dependence of the NQR frequency. For (ND4)2SnCl6 and (NH4)2SnCl6, these quantities were estimated to be 501 J mol-1 and 1544 J mol-1, respectively. It was clarified that the T1 minimum, which has been observed for the stannate compounds at around 60 K as a feature of the temperature dependence, was dependent on a method of sample preparation. It is concluded that the minimum is not an essential character of the ammonium hexachlorostannate(IV) since the crystals prepared in strong acid condition to prevent a partial substitution of chlorine atoms by hydroxyl groups, did not show such T1 minimum.

  4. Nuclear quadrupole resonance single-pulse echoes.

    PubMed

    Prescott, David W; Miller, Joel B; Tourigny, Chris; Sauer, Karen L

    2008-09-01

    We report the first detection of a spin echo after excitation of a powder sample by a single pulse at the resonance frequency during nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). These echoes can occur in samples that have an inhomogeneously broadened line, in this case due to the distribution of electric field gradients. The echoes are easily detectable when the Rabi frequency approaches the linewidth and the average effective tipping angle is close to 270 degrees. When limited by a weak radio-frequency field, the single-pulse echo can be used to increase the signal to noise ratio over conventional techniques. These effects can be used to optimize the NQR detection of contraband containing quadrupole nuclei and they are demonstrated with glycine hemihydrochloride and hexhydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). PMID:18571445

  5. Liquid contact resonance AFM: analytical models, experiments, and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlak, Zehra; Tu, Qing; Zauscher, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Contact resonance AFM (CR-AFM) is a scanning probe microscopy technique that utilizes the contact resonances of the AFM cantilever for concurrent imaging of topography and surface stiffness. The technique has not been used in liquid until recently due to analytical and experimental difficulties, associated with viscous damping of cantilever vibrations and fluid loading effects. To address these difficulties, (i) an analytical approach for contact resonances in liquid is developed, and (ii) direct excitation of the contact resonances is demonstrated by actuating the cantilever directly in a magnetic field. By implementing the analytical approach and the direct actuation through magnetic particles, quantitative stiffness imaging on surfaces with a wide range of stiffness can be achieved in liquid with soft cantilevers and low contact forces.

  6. (14) N nuclear quadrupole resonance study of piroxicam: confirmation of new polymorphic form V.

    PubMed

    Lavrič, Zoran; Pirnat, Janez; Lužnik, Janko; Puc, Uroš; Trontelj, Zvonko; Srčič, Stane

    2015-06-01

    A new polymorphic crystal form of piroxicam was discovered while preparing crystalline samples of piroxicam for (14) N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) analysis. The new crystal form, designated as V, was prepared by evaporative recrystallization from dichloromethane. Three known polymorphic forms (I, II, and III) were also prepared. Our aim was to apply (14) N NQR to characterize the new polymorphic form of piroxicam and compare the results with those of the other known polymorphic forms. Additional analytical methods used for characterization were X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), thermal analysis, and vibrational spectroscopy. For the first time, a complete set of nine characteristic (14) N NQR frequencies was found for each prepared polymorph of piroxicam. The consistent set of measured frequencies and calculated characteristic quadrupole parameters found for the new polymorphic form V is a convincing evidence that we are dealing with a new form. The already known piroxicam polymorphic forms were characterized similarly. The XRPD results were in accordance with the conclusions of (14) N NQR analysis. The performed study clearly demonstrates a strong potential of (14) N NQR method to be applied as a highly discriminative spectroscopic analytical tool to characterize polymorphic forms. PMID:25776345

  7. Modeling Nonlinear Acoustic Standing Waves in Resonators: Theory and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Ganesh; Li, Xiaofan; Finkbeiner, Joshua

    2004-01-01

    The overall goal of the cooperative research with NASA Glenn is to fundamentally understand, computationally model, and experimentally validate non-linear acoustic waves in enclosures with the ultimate goal of developing a non-contact acoustic seal. The longer term goal is to transition the Glenn acoustic seal innovation to a prototype sealing device. Lucas and coworkers are credited with pioneering work in Resonant Macrosonic Synthesis (RMS). Several Patents and publications have successfully illustrated the concept of Resonant Macrosonic Synthesis. To utilize this concept in practical application one needs to have an understanding of the details of the phenomenon and a predictive tool that can examine the waveforms produced within resonators of complex shapes. With appropriately shaped resonators one can produce un-shocked waveforms of high amplitude that would result in very high pressures in certain regions. Our goal is to control the waveforms and exploit the high pressures to produce an acoustic seal. Note that shock formation critically limits peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes and also causes excessive energy dissipation. Proper shaping of the resonator is thus critical to the use of this innovation.

  8. Buffer-gas effects on dark resonances: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erhard, Michael; Helm, Hanspeter

    2001-04-01

    Dark resonances with widths below 30 Hz have been observed in a rubidium cell filled with neon as buffer gas at room temperature. We compare an approximate analytic solution of a Λ system to our data and show that under our experimental conditions the presence of the buffer gas reduces the power broadening of the dark resonances by two orders of magnitude. We also present numerical calculations that take into account the thermal motion and velocity-changing collisions with the buffer-gas atoms. The resulting dark-resonance features exhibit strong Dicke-type narrowing effects and thereby explain the elimination of Doppler shifts and Doppler broadening, leading to observation of a single ultranarrow dark line.

  9. Low latitude geomagnetic field line resonance: Experiment and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, C.L.; Menk, F.W.; Fraser, B.J.

    1994-09-01

    The authors describe work to detect field line resonances, or the observation of Pc 3-5 geomagnetic pulsation events, at low latitude sites. These signals are extracted from ground based magnetometer arrays. The authors found one field line resonance structure in 5 weeks of data at L=1.8. At L=2.8 they were able to observe up to 4 harmonics concurrently. They compare these frequency spectra with the results of two different models of the plasma density in the lower ionosphere.

  10. Flow-excited acoustic resonance of a Helmholtz resonator: Discrete vortex model compared to experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Xiwen; Jing, Xiaodong Sun, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-15

    The acoustic resonance in a Helmholtz resonator excited by a low Mach number grazing flow is studied theoretically. The nonlinear numerical model is established by coupling the vortical motion at the cavity opening with the cavity acoustic mode through an explicit force balancing relation between the two sides of the opening. The vortical motion is modeled in the potential flow framework, in which the oscillating motion of the thin shear layer is described by an array of convected point vortices, and the unsteady vortex shedding is determined by the Kutta condition. The cavity acoustic mode is obtained from the one-dimensional acoustic propagation model, the time-domain equivalent of which is given by means of a broadband time-domain impedance model. The acoustic resistances due to radiation and viscous loss at the opening are also taken into account. The physical processes of the self-excited oscillations, at both resonance and off-resonance states, are simulated directly in the time domain. Results show that the shear layer exhibits a weak flapping motion at the off-resonance state, whereas it rolls up into large-scale vortex cores when resonances occur. Single and dual-vortex patterns are observed corresponding to the first and second hydrodynamic modes. The simulation also reveals different trajectories of the two vortices across the opening when the first and second hydrodynamic modes co-exist. The strong modulation of the shed vorticity by the acoustic feedback at the resonance state is demonstrated. The model overestimates the pressure pulsation amplitude by a factor 2, which is expected to be due to the turbulence of the flow which is not taken into account. The model neglects vortex shedding at the downstream and side edges of the cavity. This will also result in an overestimation of the pulsation amplitude.

  11. Flow-excited acoustic resonance of a Helmholtz resonator: Discrete vortex model compared to experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiwen; Jing, Xiaodong; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-01

    The acoustic resonance in a Helmholtz resonator excited by a low Mach number grazing flow is studied theoretically. The nonlinear numerical model is established by coupling the vortical motion at the cavity opening with the cavity acoustic mode through an explicit force balancing relation between the two sides of the opening. The vortical motion is modeled in the potential flow framework, in which the oscillating motion of the thin shear layer is described by an array of convected point vortices, and the unsteady vortex shedding is determined by the Kutta condition. The cavity acoustic mode is obtained from the one-dimensional acoustic propagation model, the time-domain equivalent of which is given by means of a broadband time-domain impedance model. The acoustic resistances due to radiation and viscous loss at the opening are also taken into account. The physical processes of the self-excited oscillations, at both resonance and off-resonance states, are simulated directly in the time domain. Results show that the shear layer exhibits a weak flapping motion at the off-resonance state, whereas it rolls up into large-scale vortex cores when resonances occur. Single and dual-vortex patterns are observed corresponding to the first and second hydrodynamic modes. The simulation also reveals different trajectories of the two vortices across the opening when the first and second hydrodynamic modes co-exist. The strong modulation of the shed vorticity by the acoustic feedback at the resonance state is demonstrated. The model overestimates the pressure pulsation amplitude by a factor 2, which is expected to be due to the turbulence of the flow which is not taken into account. The model neglects vortex shedding at the downstream and side edges of the cavity. This will also result in an overestimation of the pulsation amplitude.

  12. Laboratory Experiments for Exploring the Surface Plasmon Resonance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pluchery, Olivier; Vayron, Romain; Van, Kha-Man

    2011-01-01

    The surface plasmon wave is a surface wave confined at the interface between a dielectric and a metal. The excitation of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) on a gold thin film is discussed within the Kretschmann configuration, where the coupling with the excitation light is achieved by means of a prism in total reflection. The electromagnetic…

  13. Persistence of singlet fluctuations in the coupled spin tetrahedra system Cu2Te2O5Br2 revealed by high-field magnetization, 79Br NQR, and 125Te NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, S.-H.; Choi, K.-Y.; Berger, H.; Büchner, B.; Grafe, H.-J.

    2012-11-01

    We present high-field magnetization and 79Br nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) and 125Te nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies in the weakly coupled Cu2+ (S=1/2) tetrahedral system Cu2Te2O5Br2. The field-induced level crossing effects were observed by the magnetization measurements in a long-ranged magnetically ordered state which was confirmed by a strong divergence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate T1-1 at T0=13.5 K. In the paramagnetic state, T1-1 reveals an effective singlet-triplet spin gap much larger than that observed by static bulk measurements. Our results imply that the inter- and the intratetrahedral interactions compete, but at the same time they cooperate strengthening effectively the local intratetrahedral exchange couplings. We discuss that the unusual feature originates from the frustrated intertetrahedral interactions.

  14. Roles of the Sodium-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) on Vibrio cholerae Metabolism, Motility and Osmotic Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Minato, Yusuke; Halang, Petra; Quinn, Matthew J.; Faulkner, Wyatt J.; Aagesen, Alisha M.; Steuber, Julia; Stevens, Jan F.; Häse, Claudia C.

    2014-01-01

    The Na+ translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) is a unique respiratory enzyme catalyzing the electron transfer from NADH to quinone coupled with the translocation of sodium ions across the membrane. Typically, Vibrio spp., including Vibrio cholerae, have this enzyme but lack the proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I). Thus, Na+-NQR should significantly contribute to multiple aspects of V. cholerae physiology; however, no detailed characterization of this aspect has been reported so far. In this study, we broadly investigated the effects of loss of Na+-NQR on V. cholerae physiology by using Phenotype Microarray (Biolog), transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. We found that the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant showed multiple defects in metabolism detected by Phenotype Microarray. Transcriptome analysis revealed that the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant up-regulates 31 genes and down-regulates 55 genes in both early and mid-growth phases. The most up-regulated genes included the cadA and cadB genes, encoding a lysine decarboxylase and a lysine/cadaverine antiporter, respectively. Increased CadAB activity was further suggested by the metabolomics analysis. The down-regulated genes include sialic acid catabolism genes. Metabolomic analysis also suggested increased reductive pathway of TCA cycle and decreased purine metabolism in the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant. Lack of Na+-NQR did not affect any of the Na+ pumping-related phenotypes of V. cholerae suggesting that other secondary Na+ pump(s) can compensate for Na+ pumping activity of Na+-NQR. Overall, our study provides important insights into the contribution of Na+-NQR to V. cholerae physiology. PMID:24811312

  15. Hadronic resonance production measured by the ALICE experiment at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaev, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Hadronic resonances are among the most interesting probes of the hot and dense matter created in Pb-Pb collisions. Due to their short lifetime, they are sensitive to the anticipated chiral symmetry restoration as well as to suppression and regeneration due to hadronic interactions in the final state. At intermediate and high transverse momenta the hadron resonances, which cover the range of masses between the light pions and heavier protons, contribute to the systematic study of the baryon anomaly and parton energy loss in the dense medium. Measurements in pp collisions are used as a reference for collision of heavier systems and contribute to precision tests of pQCD and of the currently available parameterizations of fragmentation functions. Studies in p-Pb collisions are important for the interpretation of heavy ion results as they allow the decoupling of the initial nuclear effects from hot matter final state effects.

  16. Whispering gallery resonators with broken axial symmetry: Theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Fürst, J; Sturman, B; Buse, K; Breunig, I

    2016-09-01

    Axial symmetry is the cornerstone for theory and applications of high-Q optical whispering gallery resonators (WGRs). Nevertheless, research on birefringent crystalline material persistently pushes towards breaking this symmetry. We show theoretically and experimentally that the effect of broken axial symmetry, caused by optical anisotropy, is modest for the resonant frequencies and Q-factors of the WGR modes. Thus, the most important equatorial whispering gallery modes can be quantitatively described and experimentally identified. At the same time, the effect of broken axial symmetry on the light field distribution of the whispering gallery modes is typically very strong. This qualitatively modifies the phase-matching for the χ(2) nonlinear processes and enables broad-band second harmonic generation and optical parametric oscillation. The effect of weak geometric ellipticity in nominally symmetric WGRs is also considered. Altogether our findings pave the way for an extensive use of numerous birefringent (uniaxial and biaxial) crystals with broad transparency window and large χ(2) coefficients in nonlinear optics with WGRs. PMID:27607622

  17. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Beta-Carotene and Lycopene: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoskins, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the theory of resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy as it applies to beta-carotene and lycopene pigments (found in tomatoes and carrots, respectively). Also discusses an experiment which demonstrates the theoretical principles involved. The experiment has been tested over a three-year period and has received excellent acceptance by physical…

  18. Triple Resonance Solid State NMR Experiments with Reduced Dimensionality Evolution Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrof, Nathan S.; Lyon, Charles E.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2001-10-01

    Two solid state NMR triple resonance experiments which utilize the simultaneous incrementation of two chemical shift evolution periods to obtain a spectrum with reduced dimensionality are described. The CON CA experiment establishes the correlation of 13Ci-1 to 13Cαi and 15Ni by simultaneously encoding the 13COi-1 and 15Ni chemical shifts. The CAN COCA experiment establishes the correlation 13Cai and 15COi to 13Cαi-1 and 15Ni-1 within a single experiment by simultaneous encoding of the 13Cαi and 15Ni chemical shifts. This experiment establishes sequential amino acid correlations in close analogy to the solution state HNCA experiment. Reduced dimensionality 2D experiments are a practical alternative to recording multiple 3D data sets for the purpose of obtaining sequence-specific resonance assignments of peptides and proteins in the solid state.

  19. γ-aminobutyric acid as a metabolite: Interpreting magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments.

    PubMed

    Myers, James Fm; Nutt, David J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R

    2016-05-01

    The current rise in the prevalence of magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments to measure γ-aminobutyric acid in the living human brain is an exciting and productive area of research. As research spreads into clinical populations and cognitive research, it is important to fully understand the source of the magnetic resonance spectroscopy signal and apply appropriate interpretation to the results of the experiments. γ-aminobutyric acid is present in the brain not only as a neurotransmitter, but also in high intracellular concentrations, both as a transmitter precursor and a metabolite. γ-aminobutyric acid concentrations measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy are not necessarily implicated in neurotransmission and therefore may reflect a very different brain activity to that commonly suggested. In this perspective, we examine some of the considerations to be taken in the interpretation of any γ-aminobutyric acid signal measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. PMID:27005308

  20. A resonance phenomenon observed in a swept frequency experiment on a mother-daughter ionospheric rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkestad, K.; Troim, J.

    1974-01-01

    The report presents observations obtained in a swept frequency experiment conducted in a mother-daughter rocket flight at auroral latitudes. The discussion is essentially restricted to the possible interpretation of the experimental signal structures noted at and in the vicinity of a resonance frequency where signal components apparently are generated by nonlinear mechanisms. Various resonance frequencies have been considered in attempts to identify this multichannel response frequency. It is concluded that of all the possibilities invoked, the best consistency is provided by identifying the frequency concerned with the cone resonance frequency demonstrated experimentally in the case of a laboratory plasma by Fisher and Gould (1971).

  1. Resonant Discharge Simulations; Comparisons with Theory and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsall, C. K.; Bowers, K. J.

    1998-10-01

    Discharges driven at the series resonance frequency have a small input resistance. The voltage drive is small (like Te), and the average plasma potential is low (like 10Te). Such were observed experimentally by Godyak et al. (paper 3C9, IEEE ICOPS, Santa Fe NM, 6-8 June 1994). Our PIC-MCC simulations and theory [K. Bowers, accompanying paper, and Cooperberg and Birdsall (PSST, Vol. 7, Feb and May 1998)], show similar results. The electron heating profile (J.E) is different from that of a low pressure capacitive discharge. Our scaling laws, at fixed pressure, show peak electron density proportional to the cube of the drive frequency (cap. have as the square), as derived by Godyak (Sov. J. Plasma Phys. Vol. 2, p.78 1976). The electron energy distribution in the bulk is bi-maxwellian. The ion energy distribution at the target (wall) has a peak at the peak average potential, with a narrow ion angular spread about the normal, at low pressures. Results will be shown for a range of pressures from collisionless to collisional. We are supported by DOE DE-FG03-97ER54446 and AFOSR FDF 49620-96-1-0154.

  2. Acoustic resonances of fluid-immersed elastic cylinders and spheroids: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemiec, Jan; Überall, Herbert; Bao, X. L.

    2002-05-01

    Frequency resonances in the scattering of acoustic waves from a target object are caused by the phase matching of surface waves repeatedly encircling the object. This is exemplified here by considering elastic finite cylinders and spheroids, and the phase-matching condition provides a means of calculating the complex resonance frequencies of such objects. Tank experiments carried out at Catholic University, or at the University of Le Havre, France by G. Maze and J. Ripoche, have been interpreted using this approach. The experiments employed sound pulses to measure arrival times, which allowed identification of the surface paths taken by the surface waves, thus giving rise to resonances in the scattering amplitude. A calculation of the resonance frequencies using the T-matrix approach showed satisfactory agreement with the experimental resonance frequencies that were either measured directly (as at Le Havre), or that were obtained by the interpretation of measured arrival times (at Catholic University) using calculated surface wave paths, and the extraction of resonance frequencies therefrom, on the basis of the phase-matching condition. Results for hemispherically endcapped, evacuated steel cylinders obtained in a lake experiment carried out by the NSWC were interpreted in the same fashion.

  3. Vibrate... Resonate... Quicken the Educational Experience into Intensest Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chin, Christina

    2011-01-01

    In the quest for more effective education, how can direct personal engagement with actual aesthetic experiences--attendance of performances, participation in artistic workshops and activities, and viewing of actual artworks--play an important role? Art educators have a tremendous opportunity to guide students to engage mind, body, and soul--until…

  4. Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Studies of Charge Distributions in Molecular Solids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenbaum, Steven Garry

    A detailed description of an NMR-NQR double resonance spectrometer designed and constructed in this laboratory is given, including some instruction on its use. ('14)N NQR data obtained by pulse methods for six classes of nitrogen-containing compounds are presented and analyzed in the framework of the Townes and Dailey theory. A study of the anti-cancer drugs cyclophosphamide, isophosphamide and triphosphamide suggests the existence of a correlation between the substance's chemotherapeutic efficacy and the (pi) - (sigma)(,NP) charge density at the trigonal nitrogen. Satisfactory correlations of the NQR spectra of 22 monosubstituted anilines with both the Hammett (sigma) parameters and the in vitro biological activities of the corresponding sulfanilamides have been found, indicating that the nitrogen lone-pair orbital is more sensitive than the nitrogen-carbon sigma orbital is to substituent effects. NQR spectra of several N-acetyl amino acids and related compounds are reported. The inductive effect of the chloroacetyl group on the nitrogen is discussed. A positive correlation between the (pi) - (sigma)(,NC) electron density at the nitrogen and the Taft inductive parameter (sigma)* is observed, suggesting that the nitrogen (pi) -charge density in the N-acetyl amino acids does not vary appreciably. Both ('14)N and ('35)Cl NQR data have been obtained for a series of compounds containing nitrogen directly bonded to chlorine. The existence of a linear correlation between the ('14)N and ('35)Cl quadrupole coupling constants is interpreted in terms of a simple model dealing with charge excesses and deficiencies at the respective nuclei. A study of two complexes of 4-aminopyridine (4AP) addresses the loss of pyridine nitrogen lone-pair charge upon formation of the strong and asymmetric N-H-N bond characteristic of these complexes. Evidence of hydrogen bonding interactions involving the amino nitrogens is found to be in agreement with a published neutron diffraction study

  5. Temperature and baric dependence of nuclear quadruple resonance spectra in indium and gallium monoselenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandozhko, Victor; Raranskii, Nikolai; Balazjuk, Vitaly; Samila, Andriy; Kovalyuk, Zahar

    2013-12-01

    Pulsed radiospectroscopy method has been used to study nuclear quadruple resonance (NQR) spectra of 69Ga and 115In isotopes in the layered semiconductors GaSe and InSe. It has been found that in GaSe and InSe there is a considerable temperature dependence of NQR frequency which in the temperature range of 250 to 390 K is practically linear with conversion slope 1.54 kHz/degree for 69Ga and 2.35 kHz/degree for 115In. In the same crystals the effect of uniaxial pressure on NQR spectra applied along the optical axis с up to the values of 500 kg/сm2 has been studied. A strong attenuation of NQR spectra intensity with increase in pressure on layered crystal package has been established. The unvaried multiplicity of resonance spectra indicates the absence of structural transformations in these layered crystals over the investigated range of temperatures and pressures.

  6. 14N NQR and the Molecular Charge Topology in Coordinated Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgich, Juan; Aray, Yosslen; Ospina, Edgar

    1992-02-01

    14N NQR spectra of [Co(NH3 ) 6 ] • 3Cl, [Co(NH3 ) 5CO3 ] • NO 3 , [Zn(NH3 ) 4 ] • 2Cl, [Zn(NH3 ) 4 ] •(BF4)2, and [Ag(NH3) 4 ] • NO 3 were obtained at 77 K. The results, analyzed by means of the topology of the charge distribution obtained from ab-initio MO calculations of free and of a model of coordinated NH3 , showed that bonding to the metal-ion produces a strong decrease (Co ≫ Zn ≈Ag) in the N nonbonded density ("lone pair") and an increase in the bonded maxima found in the N - H bond direction of the N valence shell.

  7. Resonating with the ghost of a hand: A TMS experiment.

    PubMed

    Craighero, Laila; Jacono, Marco; Mele, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    An impressive body of literature in the past 20 years has revealed a possible role played by cortical motor areas in action perception. One question that has been of interest is whether these areas are selectively tuned to process the actions of biological agents. However, no experiments directly testing the effects of the main characteristics identifying a biological agent (physical appearance and movement kinematics) on corticospinal excitability (CS) are present in literature. To fill this gap, we delivered single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation to the primary motor cortex and we recorded motor evoked potentials from contralateral hand muscles during observation of point-light-displays stimuli representing a hand having lost its physical appearance (Experiment 1) and kinematics characteristics (Experiment 2). Results showed that physical appearance, natural kinematics, and the possibility to identify the action behind the stimulus are not necessary conditions to modulate CS excitability during stimuli observation. We propose that the involvement of the motor system can be mandatory whenever the perceived movement, executed by a human, by an animal or by an object, is recognized as reproducible in its final outcome (e.g., position in space, direction of movement, posture of a body part, to-be-produced sound, specific interaction with an object, etc.), and that the peculiar relationship existing between others' actions and the actions executed by the observer could just represent the extreme in which the motor system is able to almost perfectly reproduce the observed stimulus as it unfolds and, consequently, contribute to stimulus perception in the most efficient way. PMID:26902157

  8. Resonant scattering experiments with radioactive nuclear beams - Recent results and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Teranishi, T.; Sakaguchi, S.; Uesaka, T.; Kubono, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Kurihara, Y.; Bihn, D. N.; Kahl, D.; Watanabe, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Khiem, L. H.; Cuong, P. V.; Goto, A.

    2013-04-19

    Resonant scattering with low-energy radioactive nuclear beams of E < 5 MeV/u have been studied at CRIB of CNS and at RIPS of RIKEN. As an extension to the present experimental technique, we will install an advanced polarized proton target for resonant scattering experiments. A Monte-Carlo simulation was performed to study the feasibility of future experiments with the polarized target. In the Monte-Carlo simulation, excitation functions and analyzing powers were calculated using a newly developed R-matrix calculation code. A project of a small-scale radioactive beam facility at Kyushu University is also briefly described.

  9. Solid-state NMR/NQR and first-principles study of two niobium halide cluster compounds.

    PubMed

    Perić, Berislav; Gautier, Régis; Pickard, Chris J; Bosiočić, Marko; Grbić, Mihael S; Požek, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Two hexanuclear niobium halide cluster compounds with a [Nb6X12](2+) (X=Cl, Br) diamagnetic cluster core, have been studied by a combination of experimental solid-state NMR/NQR techniques and PAW/GIPAW calculations. For niobium sites the NMR parameters were determined by using variable Bo field static broadband NMR measurements and additional NQR measurements. It was found that they possess large positive chemical shifts, contrary to majority of niobium compounds studied so far by solid-state NMR, but in accordance with chemical shifts of (95)Mo nuclei in structurally related compounds containing [Mo6Br8](4+) cluster cores. Experimentally determined δiso((93)Nb) values are in the range from 2,400 to 3,000 ppm. A detailed analysis of geometrical relations between computed electric field gradient (EFG) and chemical shift (CS) tensors with respect to structural features of cluster units was carried out. These tensors on niobium sites are almost axially symmetric with parallel orientation of the largest EFG and the smallest CS principal axes (Vzz and δ33) coinciding with the molecular four-fold axis of the [Nb6X12](2+) unit. Bridging halogen sites are characterized by large asymmetry of EFG and CS tensors, the largest EFG principal axis (Vzz) is perpendicular to the X-Nb bonds, while intermediate EFG principal axis (Vyy) and the largest CS principal axis (δ11) are oriented in the radial direction with respect to the center of the cluster unit. For more symmetrical bromide compound the PAW predictions for EFG parameters are in better correspondence with the NMR/NQR measurements than in the less symmetrical chlorine compound. Theoretically predicted NMR parameters of bridging halogen sites were checked by (79/81)Br NQR and (35)Cl solid-state NMR measurements. PMID:24581866

  10. Time-delayed feedback control of coherence resonance near subcritical Hopf bifurcation: Theory versus experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, Vladimir; Feoktistov, Alexey; Vadivasova, Tatyana; Schöll, Eckehard Zakharova, Anna

    2015-03-15

    Using the model of a generalized Van der Pol oscillator in the regime of subcritical Hopf bifurcation, we investigate the influence of time delay on noise-induced oscillations. It is shown that for appropriate choices of time delay, either suppression or enhancement of coherence resonance can be achieved. Analytical calculations are combined with numerical simulations and experiments on an electronic circuit.

  11. Time-delayed feedback control of coherence resonance near subcritical Hopf bifurcation: theory versus experiment.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Vladimir; Feoktistov, Alexey; Vadivasova, Tatyana; Schöll, Eckehard; Zakharova, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Using the model of a generalized Van der Pol oscillator in the regime of subcritical Hopf bifurcation, we investigate the influence of time delay on noise-induced oscillations. It is shown that for appropriate choices of time delay, either suppression or enhancement of coherence resonance can be achieved. Analytical calculations are combined with numerical simulations and experiments on an electronic circuit. PMID:25833433

  12. Time-delayed feedback control of coherence resonance near subcritical Hopf bifurcation: Theory versus experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Vladimir; Feoktistov, Alexey; Vadivasova, Tatyana; Schöll, Eckehard; Zakharova, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Using the model of a generalized Van der Pol oscillator in the regime of subcritical Hopf bifurcation, we investigate the influence of time delay on noise-induced oscillations. It is shown that for appropriate choices of time delay, either suppression or enhancement of coherence resonance can be achieved. Analytical calculations are combined with numerical simulations and experiments on an electronic circuit.

  13. Structural and functional investigation of flavin binding center of the NqrC subunit of sodium-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Borshchevskiy, Valentin; Round, Ekaterina; Bertsova, Yulia; Polovinkin, Vitaly; Gushchin, Ivan; Ishchenko, Andrii; Kovalev, Kirill; Mishin, Alexey; Kachalova, Galina; Popov, Alexander; Bogachev, Alexander; Gordeliy, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQR) is a redox-driven sodium pump operating in the respiratory chain of various bacteria, including pathogenic species. The enzyme has a unique set of redox active prosthetic groups, which includes two covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) residues attached to threonine residues in subunits NqrB and NqrC. The reason of FMN covalent bonding in the subunits has not been established yet. In the current work, binding of free FMN to the apo-form of NqrC from Vibrio harveyi was studied showing very low affinity of NqrC to FMN in the absence of its covalent bonding. To study structural aspects of flavin binding in NqrC, its holo-form was crystallized and its 3D structure was solved at 1.56 Å resolution. It was found that the isoalloxazine moiety of the FMN residue is buried in a hydrophobic cavity and that its pyrimidine ring is squeezed between hydrophobic amino acid residues while its benzene ring is extended from the protein surroundings. This structure of the flavin-binding pocket appears to provide flexibility of the benzene ring, which can help the FMN residue to take the bended conformation and thus to stabilize the one-electron reduced form of the prosthetic group. These properties may also lead to relatively weak noncovalent binding of the flavin. This fact along with periplasmic location of the FMN-binding domains in the vast majority of NqrC-like proteins may explain the necessity of the covalent bonding of this prosthetic group to prevent its loss to the external medium. PMID:25734798

  14. Structural and Functional Investigation of Flavin Binding Center of the NqrC Subunit of Sodium-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase from Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Bertsova, Yulia; Polovinkin, Vitaly; Gushchin, Ivan; Ishchenko, Andrii; Kovalev, Kirill; Mishin, Alexey; Kachalova, Galina; Popov, Alexander; Bogachev, Alexander; Gordeliy, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQR) is a redox-driven sodium pump operating in the respiratory chain of various bacteria, including pathogenic species. The enzyme has a unique set of redox active prosthetic groups, which includes two covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) residues attached to threonine residues in subunits NqrB and NqrC. The reason of FMN covalent bonding in the subunits has not been established yet. In the current work, binding of free FMN to the apo-form of NqrC from Vibrio harveyi was studied showing very low affinity of NqrC to FMN in the absence of its covalent bonding. To study structural aspects of flavin binding in NqrC, its holo-form was crystallized and its 3D structure was solved at 1.56 Å resolution. It was found that the isoalloxazine moiety of the FMN residue is buried in a hydrophobic cavity and that its pyrimidine ring is squeezed between hydrophobic amino acid residues while its benzene ring is extended from the protein surroundings. This structure of the flavin-binding pocket appears to provide flexibility of the benzene ring, which can help the FMN residue to take the bended conformation and thus to stabilize the one-electron reduced form of the prosthetic group. These properties may also lead to relatively weak noncovalent binding of the flavin. This fact along with periplasmic location of the FMN-binding domains in the vast majority of NqrC-like proteins may explain the necessity of the covalent bonding of this prosthetic group to prevent its loss to the external medium. PMID:25734798

  15. Detection of {sup 14}N and {sup 35}Cl in cocaine base and hydrochloride using NQR, NMR, and SQUID techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Yesinowski, J.P.; Buess, M.L.; Garroway, A.N.; Ziegeweid, M.; Pines, A. |

    1995-07-01

    Results from {sup 14}N pure NQR of cocaine in the free base form (cocaine base) yield a nuclear quadrupole coupling constant (NQCC) e{sup 2}Qq/h of 5.0229 ({+-}0.0001) MHz and an asymmetry parameter {eta} of 0.0395 ({+-}0.0001) at 295 K, with corresponding values of 5.0460 ({+-}0.0013) MHz and 0.0353 ({+-}0.0008) at 77 K. Both pure NQR (at 295-77 K) and a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detector (at 4.2 K) were used to measure the very low (<1 MHz) {sup 14}N transition frequencies in cocaine hydrochloride; at 295 K the NQCC is 1.1780 ({+-}0.0014) MHz and the asymmetry parameter is 0.2632 ({+-}0.0034). Stepping the carrier frequency enables one to obtain a powder pattern without the severe intensity distortions that otherwise arise from finite pulse power. A powder pattern simulation using an NQCC value of 5.027 MHz and an asymmetry parameter {eta} of 0.2 agrees reasonably well with the experimental stepped-frequency spectrum. The use of pure NQR for providing nondestructive, quantitative, and highly specific detection of crystalline compounds is discussed, as are experimental strategies. 31 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Third interger resonance slow extraction schemem for a mu->e experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaslaev, V.; Amundson, J.; Johnstone, J.; Michelotti, L.; Park, C.S.; Werkema, S.; Syphers, M.; /Michigan State U.

    2010-09-01

    The current design of beam preparation for a proposed mu->e conversion experiment at Fermilab is based on slow resonant extraction of protons from the Debuncher. The Debuncher ring will have to operate with beam intensities of 3 x 10{sup 12} particles, approximately four orders of magnitude larger than its current value. The most challenging requirements on the beam quality are the spill uniformity and low losses in the presence of large space charge and momentum spread. We present results from simulations of third integer resonance extraction assisted by RF knock-out (RFKO), a technique developed for medical accelerators. Tune spreads up to 0.05 have been considered.

  17. A 15N CPMG relaxation dispersion experiment more resistant to resonance offset and pulse imperfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bin; Yu, Binhan; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Maili; Yang, Daiwen

    2015-08-01

    Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion is a powerful NMR method to study protein dynamics on the microsecond-millisecond time scale. J-coupling, resonance offset, radio frequency field inhomogeneity, and pulse imperfection often introduce systematic errors into the measured transverse relaxation rates. Here we proposed a modified continuous wave decoupling CPMG experiment, which is more unaffected by resonance offset and pulse imperfection. We found that it is unnecessary to match the decoupling field strength with the delay between CPMG refocusing pulses, provided that decoupling field is strong enough. The performance of the scheme proposed here was shown by simulations and further demonstrated experimentally on a fatty acid binding protein.

  18. Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perozzi, E.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A resonance in CELESTIAL MECHANICS occurs when some of the quantities characterizing the motion of two or more celestial bodies can be considered as commensurable, i.e. their ratio is close to an integer fraction. In a simplified form, this can be expressed as ...

  19. Generation of energetic electrons at second harmonic cyclotron resonance in ionospheric HF heating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Rubinraut, M.

    2005-10-01

    The theory of electron acceleration by upper hybrid waves at second harmonic cyclotron resonance is presented. The results show that the meter-scale upper hybrid waves can incorporate the finite Larmour radius effect to make a second harmonic cyclotron resonance interaction effective. The finite Larmour radius effect provides a positive feedback to the interaction, thus the energies of the accelerated electrons increase in time exponentially, rather than linearly as in the case of fundamental cyclotron resonance. Consequently, energetic electrons (having energies larger than 10.7 eV) can be generated even at very low upper hybrid wave intensities. The threshold field for parametric excitation of meter-scale upper hybrid waves by O-mode HF heating wave is shown to be very low. The theory can be a reasonable basis for explaining the enhancement of airglow at 777.4 nm observed in recent low-heating-power experiment at HAARP.

  20. Results of Resonant Activation and Macroscopic Quantum Tunneling Experiments in Magnesium Diboride Thin Film Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Roberto; Carabello, Steve; Lambert, Joseph; Mlack, Jerome; Dai, Wenqing; Shen, Yi.; Li, Qi; Cunnane, Daniel; Zhuang, C. G.; Chen, Ke; Xi, X. X.

    2012-02-01

    The Josephson junction is an experimental testbed widely used to study resonant activation and macroscopic quantum tunneling. These phenomena have been observed in junctions based on conventional low-temperature superconductors such as Nb and Al, and even in high-Tc, intrinsic superconductors. We report results of superconducting-to normal state switching experiments below 1 K using MgB2-based Josephson heterojunctions with Pb and Nb counter-electrodes. Measurements were made with and without RF excitation. With microwaves, we see evidence of a resonant peak, in addition to the primary escape (from ground state) peak -- consistent with resonant activation. We also observe features suggestive of macroscopic quantum tunneling including peaks in the escape rate enhancements and an ``elbow'' in the graph of calculated escape temperatures Tesc versus sample temperature.

  1. Two-photon finite-pulse model for resonant transitions in attosecond experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Galán, Álvaro; Martín, Fernando; Argenti, Luca

    2016-02-01

    We present an analytical model capable of describing two-photon ionization of atoms with attosecond pulses in the presence of intermediate and final isolated autoionizing states. The model is based on the finite-pulse formulation of second-order time-dependent perturbation theory. It approximates the intermediate and final states with Fano's theory for resonant continua, and it depends on a small set of atomic parameters that can either be obtained from separate ab initio calculations or be extracted from a few selected experiments. We use the model to compute the two-photon resonant photoelectron spectrum of helium below the N =2 threshold for the RABITT (reconstruction of attosecond beating by interference of two-photon transitions) pump-probe scheme, in which an XUV attosecond pulse train is used in association with a weak IR probe, obtaining results in quantitative agreement with those from accurate ab initio simulations. In particular, we show that (i) the use of finite pulses results in a homogeneous redshift of the RABITT beating frequency, as well as a resonant modulation of the beating frequency in proximity to intermediate autoionizing states; (ii) the phase of resonant two-photon amplitudes generally experiences a continuous excursion as a function of the intermediate detuning, with either zero or 2 π overall variation.

  2. Instrument for in-situ orientation of superconducting thin-film resonators used for electron-spin resonance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mowry, Andrew; Kubasek, James; Friedman, Jonathan R.; Chen, Yiming

    2015-01-15

    When used in electron-spin resonance measurements, superconducting thin-film resonators must be precisely oriented relative to the external magnetic field in order to prevent the trapping of magnetic flux and the associated degradation of resonator performance. We present a compact design solution for this problem that allows in-situ control of the orientation of the resonator at cryogenic temperatures. Tests of the apparatus show that when proper alignment is achieved, there is almost no hysteresis in the field dependence of the resonant frequency.

  3. Direct current superconducting quantum interference device spectrometer for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance at frequencies up to 5 MHz

    SciTech Connect

    TonThat, D.M.; Clarke, J. |

    1996-08-01

    A spectrometer based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) has been developed for the direct detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) at frequencies up to 5 MHz. The sample is coupled to the input coil of the niobium-based SQUID via a nonresonant superconducting circuit. The flux locked loop involves the direct offset integration technique with additional positive feedback in which the output of the SQUID is coupled directly to a low-noise preamplifier. Precession of the nuclear quadrupole spins is induced by a magnetic field pulse with the feedback circuit disabled; subsequently, flux locked operation is restored and the SQUID amplifies the signal produced by the nuclear free induction signal. The spectrometer has been used to detect {sup 27}Al NQR signals in ruby (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}[Cr{sup 3+}]) at 359 and 714 kHz. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. The 7-gap-resonator-accelerator for the REX-ISOLDE-experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podlech, H.; Grieser, M.; von Hahn, R.; Papureanu, S.; Repnow, R.; Schwalm, D.

    1998-04-01

    The Radioactive Beam Experiment at ISOLDE (REX-ISOLDE-Experiment) which presently is being developed and under construction at CERN serves to investigate exotic, very neutron rich, radioactive nuclei [1](Radioactive beam EXperiment at ISOLDE: Coloumb Excitation and Neutron Transfer Reactions of Exotic Nuclei, Proposal to the ISOLDE commitee, CERNSIC94-25). A linear accelerator delivers radioactive ions which are produced by the isotope separator ISOLDE with energies between 0.85 and 2.2 MeV/u. The Linac will consist of a RFQ-accelerator, an interdigital H-Structure (IH) and three 7-gap-resonators with variable energy. While the LMU Munich is responsible for the frontpart of the accelerator, the backpart is being built by the MPI [2](H. Podlech, Master Thesis, MPI-H-V21-1997, Heidelburg, 1997). After estimation of the voltage of one resonator to 1.75 MV at 90 kW, the design velocities were fixed to 5.4%, 6.0% and 6.6% of the velocity of light. Three downscaled models (1:2.5) were built in order to optimize the shuntimpedance and the field-distribution at the operation frequency of the amplifiers of 101.28 MHz. The optimization of all low power resonators is now successfully finished. Extensive beam dynamic calculations were made in order to optimize the transmission of the beam up to the target. It turned out that final energies between 0.85 and 2.2 MeV/u with nearly 100% transmission can be achieved. The acceptance in the x-plane is 1.2π mm mrad (norm.) and in the y-plane 3.0π mm mrad (norm.). The bunchlength of the fully accelerated beam (2.2 MeV/u) is 2.4 ns at the target. The development of the resonators was accompanied by extensive MAFIA calculations. It could be demonstrated that spiral-resonators like 7-gap-resonators can be calculated with MAFIA with an accuracy of 1% in comparison with experimental results. Presently, the tanks and the half shells of the power type resonators are manufactured in the workshops of the MPI.

  5. MUSIC in Triple-Resonance Experiments: Amino Acid Type-Selective 1H- 15N Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Mario; Smalla, Maika; Schmieder, Peter; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    1999-11-01

    Amino acid type-selective triple-resonance experiments can be of great help for the assignment of protein spectra, since they help to remove ambiguities in either manual or automated assignment procedures. Here, modified triple-resonance experiments that yield amino acid type-selective 1H-15N correlations are presented. They are based on novel coherence transfer schemes, the MUSIC pulse sequence elements, that replace the initial INEPT transfer and are selective for XH2 or XH3 (X can be 15N or 13C). The desired amino acid type is thereby selected based on the topology of the side chain. Experiments for Gly (G-HSQC); Ala (A-HSQC); Thr, Val, Ile, and Ala (TAVI-HSQC); Thr and Ala (TA-HSQC), as well as Asn and Gln (N-HSQC and QN-HSQC), are described. The new experiments are recorded as two-dimensional experiments and therefore need only small amounts of spectrometer time. The performance of the experiments is demonstrated with the application to two protein domains.

  6. MUSIC in triple-resonance experiments: amino acid type-selective (1)H-(15)N correlations

    PubMed

    Schubert; Smalla; Schmieder; Oschkinat

    1999-11-01

    Amino acid type-selective triple-resonance experiments can be of great help for the assignment of protein spectra, since they help to remove ambiguities in either manual or automated assignment procedures. Here, modified triple-resonance experiments that yield amino acid type-selective (1)H-(15)N correlations are presented. They are based on novel coherence transfer schemes, the MUSIC pulse sequence elements, that replace the initial INEPT transfer and are selective for XH(2) or XH(3) (X can be (15)N or (13)C). The desired amino acid type is thereby selected based on the topology of the side chain. Experiments for Gly (G-HSQC); Ala (A-HSQC); Thr, Val, Ile, and Ala (TAVI-HSQC); Thr and Ala (TA-HSQC), as well as Asn and Gln (N-HSQC and QN-HSQC), are described. The new experiments are recorded as two-dimensional experiments and therefore need only small amounts of spectrometer time. The performance of the experiments is demonstrated with the application to two protein domains. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10527741

  7. Circular waveguide systems for electron-cyclotron-resonant heating of the tandem mirror experiment-upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, B.; Calderon, M.O.; Chargin, A.K.; Coffield, F.E.; Gallagher, N.C. Jr.; Lang, D.D.; Pedrotti, L.R.; Rubert, R.R.; Stallard, B.W.; Sweeney, D.W.

    1983-11-18

    Extensive use of electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) in the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) requires continuous development of components to improve efficiency, increase reliability, and deliver power to new locations with respect to the plasma. We have used rectangular waveguide components on the experiment and have developed, tested, and installed circular waveguide components. We replaced the rectangular with the circular components because of the greater transmission efficiency and power-handling capability of the circular ones. Design, fabrication, and testing of all components are complete for all systems. In this paper we describe the design criteria for the system.

  8. Studies of Structure and Phase Transition in [C(NH2)3]HgBr3 and [C(NH2)3]HgI3 by Means of Halogen NQR, 1H NMR, and Single Crystal X-Ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terao, Hiromitsu; Hashimoto, Masao; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Furukawa, Yoshihiro

    2000-02-01

    The crystal structure of [C(NH2)3]HgBr3 was determined at room temperature: monoclinic, space group C2/c, Z = 4, a = 775.0(2), b = 1564.6(2), c = 772.7(2) pm, β = 109.12(2)°. In the crystal, almost planar HgBr3- ions are connected via Hg ··· Br bonds, resulting in single chains of trigonal bipyramidal HgBr5 units which run along the c direction. [C(NH2)3]HgI3 was found to be isomorphous with the bromide at room temperature. The temperature dependence of the halogen NQR frequencies (77 < 77K < ca. 380) and the DTA measurements evidenced no phase transition for the bromide, but a second-order phase transition at (251 ± 1) K (Tc1) and a first-order one at (210 ± 1) K for the iodide. The transitions at Tc2are accompanied with strong supercooling and significant superheating. The room temperature phase (RTP) and the intermediate temperature phase (ITP) of the iodide are characterized by two 127I(m=1/2↔3/2) NQR lines which are assigned to the terminal and the bridging I atoms, respectively. There exist three lines in the lowest temperature phase (LTP), indicating that the resonance line of the bridging atom splits into two. The signal intensities of the 127I(m =1/2↔3/2) NQR lines in the LTP decrease with decreasing temperature resulting in no detection below ca. 100 K. The 127I(m=1/2↔3/2) NQR frequency vs. temperature curves are continuous at Tcl, but they are unusual in the LTP. The T1vs. Tcurves of 1H NMR for the bromide and iodide are explainable by the reorientational motions of the cations about their pseudo three-fold axes. The estimated activation energies of the motions are 35.0 kJ/mol for the bromide, and 24.1, 30.1, and 23.0 kJ/mol for the RTP, FTP, and LTP of the iodide, respectively

  9. An accessible two-dimensional solution nuclear magnetic resonance experiment on human ubiquitin*.

    PubMed

    Rovnyak, David; Thompson, Laura E

    2005-03-01

    Solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an invaluable tool in structural and molecular biology research, but may be underutilized in undergraduate laboratories because instrumentation for performing structural studies of macromolecules in aqueous solutions is not yet widely available for use in undergraduate laboratories. We have implemented an experiment that is ideal for more commonly available 4.8-7.0 Tesla, double-channel NMR instruments that would not usually be used for biomolecular NMR work. We analyzed a commercially available, (15) N-enriched human ubiquitin sample with a two-dimensional correlation experiment using indirect (1) H evolution and direct (15) N detection, which produced spectra with high resolution on a spectrometer operating at 7.0 Tesla (300 MHz (1) H resonance frequency). The simplicity of the experiment makes it possible to be configured by undergraduate students with minimal supervision from the instructor. Students gain experience in acquiring multidimensional biomolecular NMR experiments, confirm that ubiquitin is stably folded, and observe the correspondence between specific signals and individual amino acids in ubiquitin. PMID:21638557

  10. Isoscalar giant resonance studies in a stored-beam experiment within EXL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, J. C.; Bagchi, S.; Bönig, S.; Csatlós, M.; Dillmann, I.; Dimopoulou, C.; Egelhof, P.; Eremin, V.; Furuno, T.; Geissel, H.; Gernhäuser, R.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hartig, A.-L.; Ilieva, S.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kiselev, O.; Kollmus, K.; Kozhuharov, C.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kröll, T.; Kuilman, M.; Litvinov, S.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Mahjour-Shafiei, M.; Mutterer, M.; Nagae, D.; Najafi, M. A.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Popp, U.; Rigollet, C.; Roy, S.; Scheidenberger, C.; von Schmid, M.; Steck, M.; Streicher, B.; Stuhl, L.; Thürauf, M.; Uesaka, T.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.; Winters, D.; Woods, P. J.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yue, K.; Zenihiro, J.; the EXL Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    In the first campaign of the exotic nuclei studied with light-ion induced reaction in storage rings (EXL) collaboration at the existing storage ring experimental heavy-ion storage ring (ESR) at Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research (GSI), we performed the first experiments using a stored beam of 58Ni and an internal helium gas-jet target aiming for the investigation of isoscalar giant resonances in inverse kinematics. In this experiment, inelastically scattered recoil particles (at very forward angles, {θ }{cm}≤slant 1°) were detected with a dedicated setup, including ultra-high vacuum (UHV)-compatible double-sided silicon strip detector (DSSDs). Preliminary results show evidence for the excitation of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR) in the 58Ni nucleus. This opens the opportunity to study in the near future giant resonances also with stored radioactive beams, like 56Ni, and extract important information about the nuclear matter incompressibility. In the present work the current status of the data analysis and results are shown and discussed.

  11. Dynamic field-frequency lock for tracking magnetic field fluctuations in electron spin resonance experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfaw, Abraham; Tyryshkin, Alexei; Lyon, Stephen

    Global magnetic field fluctuations present significant challenges to pulsed electron spin resonance experiments on systems with long spin coherence times. We will discuss results from experiments in which we follow instantaneous changes in magnetic field by locking to the free induction decay of a proton NMR signal using a phase-locked loop. We extend conventional field-frequency locking techniques used in NMR to follow slow magnetic field drifts by using a modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence in which the phase of the pi-pulses follows the phase of the proton spins at all times. Hence, we retain the ability of the CPMG pulse sequence to refocus local magnetic field inhomogeneities without refocusing global magnetic field fluctuations. In contrast with conventional field-frequency locking techniques, our experiments demonstrate the potential of this method to dynamically track global magnetic field fluctuations on timescales of about 2 seconds and with rates faster than a kHz. This frequency range covers the dominant noise frequencies in our electron spin resonance experiments as previously reported.

  12. A mechanical analog of the two-bounce resonance of solitary waves: Modeling and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Roy H.; Rahman, Aminur; Bellanich, Michael J.; Morrison, Catherine N.

    2015-04-01

    We describe a simple mechanical system, a ball rolling along a specially-designed landscape, which mimics the well-known two-bounce resonance in solitary wave collisions, a phenomenon that has been seen in countless numerical simulations but never in the laboratory. We provide a brief history of the solitary wave problem, stressing the fundamental role collective-coordinate models played in understanding this phenomenon. We derive the equations governing the motion of a point particle confined to such a surface and then design a surface on which to roll the ball, such that its motion will evolve under the same equations that approximately govern solitary wave collisions. We report on physical experiments, carried out in an undergraduate applied mathematics course, that seem to exhibit the two-bounce resonance.

  13. A (15)N CPMG relaxation dispersion experiment more resistant to resonance offset and pulse imperfection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Yu, Binhan; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Maili; Yang, Daiwen

    2015-08-01

    Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion is a powerful NMR method to study protein dynamics on the microsecond-millisecond time scale. J-coupling, resonance offset, radio frequency field inhomogeneity, and pulse imperfection often introduce systematic errors into the measured transverse relaxation rates. Here we proposed a modified continuous wave decoupling CPMG experiment, which is more unaffected by resonance offset and pulse imperfection. We found that it is unnecessary to match the decoupling field strength with the delay between CPMG refocusing pulses, provided that decoupling field is strong enough. The performance of the scheme proposed here was shown by simulations and further demonstrated experimentally on a fatty acid binding protein. PMID:26037134

  14. Limiting effects on laser compression by resonant backward Raman scattering in modern experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Yampolsky, Nikolai A.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2011-05-15

    Through resonant backward Raman scattering, the plasma wave mediates the energy transfer between long pump and short seed laser pulses. These mediations can result in pulse compression at extraordinarily high powers. However, both the overall efficiency of the energy transfer and the duration of the amplified pulse depend upon the persistence of the plasma wave excitation. At least with respect to the recent state-of-the-art experiments, it is possible to deduce that at present the experimentally realized efficiency of the amplifier is likely constrained mainly by two effects, namely, the pump chirp and the plasma wave wavebreaking.

  15. Initial Experience with the Resonance Metallic Stent for Antegrade Ureteric Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Wah, Tze M. Irving, Henry C.; Cartledge, Jon

    2007-07-15

    Background and purpose. We describe our initial experience with a new metallic ureteric stent which has been designed to provide long-term urinary drainage in patients with malignant ureteric strictures. The aim is to achieve longer primary patency rates than conventional polyurethane ureteric stents, where encrustation and compression by malignant masses limit primary patency. The Resonance metallic double-pigtail ureteric stent (Cook, Ireland) is constructed from coiled wire spirals of a corrosion-resistant alloy designed to minimize tissue in-growth and resist encrustation, and the manufacturer recommends interval stent change at 12 months. Methods. Seventeen Resonance stents were inserted via an antegrade approach into 15 patients between December 2004 and March 2006. The causes of ureteric obstruction were malignancies of the bladder (n = 4), colon (n = 3), gynecologic (n = 5), and others (n = 3). Results. One patient had the stent changed after 12 months, and 3 patients had their stents changed at 6 months. These stents were draining adequately with minimal encrustation. Four patients are still alive with functioning stents in situ for 2-10 months. Seven patients died with functioning stents in place (follow-up periods of 1 week to 8 months). Three stents failed from the outset due to bulky pelvic malignancy resulting in high intravesical pressure, as occurs with conventional plastic stents. Conclusion. Our initial experience with the Resonance metallic ureteric stent indicates that it may provide adequate long-term urinary drainage (up to 12 months) in patients with malignant ureteric obstruction but without significantly bulky pelvic disease. This obviates the need for regular stent changes and would offer significant benefit for these patients with limited life expectancy.

  16. Optimization of surface plasmon resonance experiments: Case of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) interactions.

    PubMed

    Anggayasti, Wresti L; Mancera, Ricardo L; Bottomley, Steven; Helmerhorst, Erik

    2016-04-15

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a powerful technique for evaluating protein-protein interactions in real time. However, inappropriately optimized experiments can often lead to problems in the interpretation of data, leading to unreliable kinetic constants and binding models. Optimization of SPR experiments involving "sticky" proteins, or proteins that tend to aggregate, represents a typical scenario where it is important to minimize errors in the data and the kinetic analysis of those data. This is the case of High Mobility Group Box 1 and the receptor of advanced glycation end products. A number of improvements in protein purification, buffer composition, immobilization conditions, and the choice of flow rate are shown to result in substantial improvements in the accurate characterization of the interactions of these proteins and the derivation of the corresponding kinetic constants. PMID:26869083

  17. Resonant Frequency Spin Flipper for the nHe3 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    The n3He experiment, currently being installed on beamline-13 at ORNL's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), is designed to measure the proton asymmetry associated with the interaction of neutrons with a gas of 3He via n +23He =13H +11H + 765 KeV . The experiment uses a Resonant Frequency Spin Flipper (RFSF) to flip the neutron spins. The spin flipper is similar to the one described by P.N. Seo et al. (PR ST Accel. Beams 11, 084701 2008) with significant improvements. Most important is the inclusion of a ``double cosine-theta'' winding pattern that provides a highly uniform interior field with no fringing. A critical feature of the coil is complex flux returns whose construction was made possible through the utilization of 3D print technology.

  18. Evaluation of Possible Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Diagnostic Techniques for Tokamak Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Zweben; T.W. Kornack; D. Majeski; G. Schilling; C.H. Skinner; R. Wilson

    2002-08-05

    Potential applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diagnostic techniques to tokamak experiments are evaluated. NMR frequencies for hydrogen isotopes and low-Z nuclei in such experiments are in the frequency range approximately equal to 20-200 MHz, so existing RF [radio-frequency] antennas could be used to rotate the spin polarization and to make the NMR measurements. Our tentative conclusion is that such measurements are possible if highly spin polarized H or (superscript)3He gas sources (which exist) are used to fuel these plasmas. In addition, NMR measurements of the surface layers of the first wall (without plasma) may also be possible, e.g., to evaluate the inventory of tritium inside the vessel.

  19. Measurement of the 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance frequencies by the solid effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliger, J.; Žagar, V.

    2008-07-01

    1H- 14N nuclear quadrupole double resonance using magnetic field cycling between high and low magnetic field and solid effect in the low magnetic field is analyzed in details. The transition probabilities per unit time for the solid-effect transitions are calculated. The double resonance spectra are calculated in the limiting cases of fast and slow nitrogen spin-lattice relaxation. The double resonance spectra are measured in histamine and quinolinic acid. The experimental spectra are analyzed and the 14N NQR frequencies are determined.

  20. Ferromagnetic resonance experiments in an obliquely deposited FeCo-Al2O3 film system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesnik, N. A.; Oates, C. J.; Smith, G. M.; Riedi, P. C.; Kakazei, G. N.; Kravets, A. F.; Wigen, P. E.

    2003-11-01

    Granular cermet films (Fe50Co50)x-(Al2O3)1-x fabricated using the electron-beam coevaporation technique at oblique incidence of FeCo and alumina atom fluxes have been found to exhibit both oblique and in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy. This anisotropy first appears just below the percolation threshold due to a magnetic coupling of particles taking place at a certain stage of their growth and coalescence. The FeCo content x varied from 0.07 to 0.49. A simple model of the film microstructure is presented based on the results of magnetization measurements and ferromagnetic resonance at intermediate (9.4 GHz) and high (94 GHz) frequencies. At 94 GHz the concentration dependence of the effective anisotropy field follows the solid solution law, since then the magnetic field is sufficient to magnetize the films close to saturation. The 9.4 GHz data points deviate from the solid solution line below the percolation threshold due to both modification of the resonance fields by intergranular interactions in nonsaturated films and the reduction of the average magnetization of granules, comparing to the saturation magnetization, at room temperature. Different mechanisms of line broadening observed at frequencies used in experiments are also discussed.

  1. Extracting paramagnon excitations from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamsal, Jagat; Montfrooij, Wouter

    2016-06-01

    Resonant x-ray scattering experiments on high-temperature superconductors and related cuprates have revealed the presence of intense paramagnon scattering at high excitation energies, of the order of several hundred meV. The excitation energies appear to show very similar behavior across all compounds, ranging from magnetically ordered, via superconductors, to heavy fermion systems. However, we argue that this apparent behavior has been inferred from the data through model fitting which implicitly imposes such similarities. Using model fitting that is free from such restrictions, we show that the paramagnons are not nearly as well defined as has been asserted previously, and that some paramagnons might not represent propagating excitations at all. Our work indicates that the data published previously in the literature will need to be reanalyzed with proper models.

  2. Space Time Reversal Experiment by Use of Pulsed Neutron Ramsey Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Y.; Jeong, S. C.; Watanabe, Y.; Skoy, V.; Ino, T.

    2007-06-13

    We have developed a pulsed neutron Ramsey resonance for a T-violation experiment on polarized neutron transmission through a polarized nuclear target. Two separated oscillatory fields were placed in a pulsed neutron beam line, which were synchronized with a neutron pulse for precision neutron spin manipulation. We observed neutron Larmor precession between the two oscillatory fields as a function of a neutron time of flight (TOF). We modulated the phase of the second oscillatory field with respect to the first oscillatory field. The effect of the phase modulation was found in a neutron intensity modulation as a function of the TOF. From the neutron intensity modulation, the neutron spin direction as well as the neutron velocity between the two oscillatory fields was precisely obtained.

  3. Absolute measurement of thermal noise in a resonant short-range force experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, H.; Housworth, E. A.; Meyer, H. O.; Visser, G.; Weisman, E.; Long, J. C.

    2014-10-01

    Planar, double-torsional oscillators are especially suitable for short-range macroscopic force search experiments, since they can be operated at the limit of instrumental thermal noise. As a study of this limit, we report a measurement of the noise kinetic energy of a polycrystalline tungsten oscillator in thermal equilibrium at room temperature. The fluctuations of the oscillator in a high-Q torsional mode with a resonance frequency near 1 kHz are detected with capacitive transducers coupled to a sensitive differential amplifier. The electronic processing is calibrated by means of a known electrostatic force and input from a finite-element model. The measured average kinetic energy, Eexp = (2.0 ± 0.3) × 10-21 J, is in agreement with the expected value of 1/2{{k}B}T.

  4. Detailed design of a resonantly enhanced axion-photon regeneration experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Guido; Sikivie, Pierre; Tanner, D. B.; Bibber, Karl van

    2009-10-01

    A resonantly enhanced photon-regeneration experiment to search for the axion or axionlike particles is described. This experiment is a shining light through walls study, where photons traveling through a strong magnetic field are (in part) converted to axions; the axions can pass through an opaque wall and convert (in part) back to photons in a second region of strong magnetic field. The photon regeneration is enhanced by employing matched Fabry-Perot optical cavities, with one cavity within the axion generation magnet and the second within the photon-regeneration magnet. Compared to simple single-pass photon regeneration, this technique would result in a gain of (F/{pi}){sup 2}, where F is the finesse of each cavity. This gain could feasibly be as high as 10{sup 10}, corresponding to an improvement in the sensitivity to the axion-photon coupling, g{sub a{gamma}}{sub {gamma}}, of order (F/{pi}){sup 1/2}{approx}300. This improvement would enable, for the first time, a purely laboratory experiment to probe axion-photon couplings at a level competitive with, or superior to, limits from stellar evolution or solar axion searches. This report gives a detailed discussion of the scheme for actively controlling the two Fabry-Perot cavities and the laser frequencies, and describes the heterodyne signal detection system, with limits ultimately imposed by shot noise.

  5. Anvil cell gasket design for high pressure nuclear magnetic resonance experiments beyond 30 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Thomas; Haase, Jürgen

    2015-12-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments are reported at up to 30.5 GPa of pressure using radiofrequency (RF) micro-coils with anvil cell designs. These are the highest pressures ever reported with NMR, and are made possible through an improved gasket design based on nano-crystalline powders embedded in epoxy resin. Cubic boron-nitride (c-BN), corundum (α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), or diamond based composites have been tested, also in NMR experiments. These composite gaskets lose about 1/2 of their initial height up to 30.5 GPa, allowing for larger sample quantities and preventing damages to the RF micro-coils compared to precipitation hardened CuBe gaskets. It is shown that NMR shift and resolution are less affected by the composite gaskets as compared to the more magnetic CuBe. The sensitivity can be as high as at normal pressure. The new, inexpensive, and simple to engineer gaskets are thus superior for NMR experiments at high pressures.

  6. Anvil cell gasket design for high pressure nuclear magnetic resonance experiments beyond 30 GPa.

    PubMed

    Meier, Thomas; Haase, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments are reported at up to 30.5 GPa of pressure using radiofrequency (RF) micro-coils with anvil cell designs. These are the highest pressures ever reported with NMR, and are made possible through an improved gasket design based on nano-crystalline powders embedded in epoxy resin. Cubic boron-nitride (c-BN), corundum (α-Al2O3), or diamond based composites have been tested, also in NMR experiments. These composite gaskets lose about 1/2 of their initial height up to 30.5 GPa, allowing for larger sample quantities and preventing damages to the RF micro-coils compared to precipitation hardened CuBe gaskets. It is shown that NMR shift and resolution are less affected by the composite gaskets as compared to the more magnetic CuBe. The sensitivity can be as high as at normal pressure. The new, inexpensive, and simple to engineer gaskets are thus superior for NMR experiments at high pressures. PMID:26724046

  7. Anvil cell gasket design for high pressure nuclear magnetic resonance experiments beyond 30 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Thomas; Haase, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments are reported at up to 30.5 GPa of pressure using radiofrequency (RF) micro-coils with anvil cell designs. These are the highest pressures ever reported with NMR, and are made possible through an improved gasket design based on nano-crystalline powders embedded in epoxy resin. Cubic boron-nitride (c-BN), corundum (α-Al2O3), or diamond based composites have been tested, also in NMR experiments. These composite gaskets lose about 1/2 of their initial height up to 30.5 GPa, allowing for larger sample quantities and preventing damages to the RF micro-coils compared to precipitation hardened CuBe gaskets. It is shown that NMR shift and resolution are less affected by the composite gaskets as compared to the more magnetic CuBe. The sensitivity can be as high as at normal pressure. The new, inexpensive, and simple to engineer gaskets are thus superior for NMR experiments at high pressures.

  8. Optimization of Capacitive Acoustic Resonant Sensor Using Numerical Simulation and Design of Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Loussert, Christophe; Sergent, Michelle; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Optimization of the acoustic resonant sensor requires a clear understanding of how the output responses of the sensor are affected by the variation of different factors. During this work, output responses of a capacitive acoustic transducer, such as membrane displacement, quality factor, and capacitance variation, are considered to evaluate the sensor design. The six device parameters taken into consideration are membrane radius, backplate radius, cavity height, air gap, membrane tension, and membrane thickness. The effects of factors on the output responses of the transducer are investigated using an integrated methodology that combines numerical simulation and design of experiments (DOE). A series of numerical experiments are conducted to obtain output responses for different combinations of device parameters using finite element methods (FEM). Response surface method is used to identify the significant factors and to develop the empirical models for the output responses. Finally, these results are utilized to calculate the optimum device parameters using multi-criteria optimization with desirability function. Thereafter, the validating experiments are designed and deployed using the numerical simulation to crosscheck the responses. PMID:25894937

  9. Optimization of capacitive acoustic resonant sensor using numerical simulation and design of experiment.

    PubMed

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Loussert, Christophe; Sergent, Michelle; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Optimization of the acoustic resonant sensor requires a clear understanding of how the output responses of the sensor are affected by the variation of different factors. During this work, output responses of a capacitive acoustic transducer, such as membrane displacement, quality factor, and capacitance variation, are considered to evaluate the sensor design. The six device parameters taken into consideration are membrane radius, backplate radius, cavity height, air gap, membrane tension, and membrane thickness. The effects of factors on the output responses of the transducer are investigated using an integrated methodology that combines numerical simulation and design of experiments (DOE). A series of numerical experiments are conducted to obtain output responses for different combinations of device parameters using finite element methods (FEM). Response surface method is used to identify the significant factors and to develop the empirical models for the output responses. Finally, these results are utilized to calculate the optimum device parameters using multi-criteria optimization with desirability function. Thereafter, the validating experiments are designed and deployed using the numerical simulation to crosscheck the responses. PMID:25894937

  10. Theory and Experiments on Unstable Resonator and Quantum Well Gallium Arsenide/gallium Aluminum Arsenide Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelstein, Michael

    Structures of GaAs/GaAlAs lasers and their performance characteristics are investigated experimentally and theoretically. A self-consistent model for the longitudinal gain and intensity distribution in injection lasers is introduced. The model is applied to unstable-resonator semiconductor lasers to evaluate their lateral losses and quantum efficiencies, and an advanced design is presented. Symmetric, unstable -resonator semiconductor lasers are manufactured and a virtual source point inside the laser more than an order of magnitude narrower than the width of the near field is demonstrated. Young's double-slit experiment is adopted for lateral coherence measurements in semiconductor lasers. A high degree of lateral coherence is found, indicating operation of the unstable-resonator lasers in predominantly one mode. In the pulsed measurements on broad-area, single -quantum-well, graded-index wave-guide, separate-confinement -heterostructure lasers, very high quantum efficiencies, very low losses, and very high output powers are observed. The devices are found to exhibit beam divergence narrower than two times the diffraction limit in single-lobed, far-field patterns. Using these single-quantum-well lasers, the "second quantized-state lasing" is found experimentally, and a simple model is developed to explain it. A general model for the gain spectrum and required current density of quantum-well lasers is introduced. The eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the charge carriers and optical mode of the transverse structure are used to derive the gain spectrum and current density from the Einstein coefficients. The two-dimensional density of states for the charge carriers and the effective width of the optical mode (not the width of the quantum well) are identified as the dominant parameters. The model includes a new heuristic approach to account for the observed smeared onset of subbands, eliminating convolution calculations. Applications of the model for a typical

  11. Robust optimal design of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance experiments for skin microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Raguin, L. G.

    2010-10-01

    Skin microcirculation plays an important role in several diseases including chronic venous insufficiency and diabetes. Magnetic resonance (MR) has the potential to provide quantitative information and a better penetration depth compared with other non-invasive methods such as laser Doppler flowmetry or optical coherence tomography. The continuous progress in hardware resulting in higher sensitivity must be coupled with advances in data acquisition schemes. In this article, we first introduce a physical model for quantifying skin microcirculation using diffusion-weighted MR (DWMR) based on an effective dispersion model for skin leading to a q-space model of the DWMR complex signal, and then design the corresponding robust optimal experiments. The resulting robust optimal DWMR protocols improve the worst-case quality of parameter estimates using nonlinear least squares optimization by exploiting available a priori knowledge of model parameters. Hence, our approach optimizes the gradient strengths and directions used in DWMR experiments to robustly minimize the size of the parameter estimation error with respect to model parameter uncertainty. Numerical evaluations are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach as compared to conventional DWMR protocols.

  12. Nuclear quadrupole resonance studies of the SORC sequence and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakody, J.R.P.

    1993-12-31

    The behavior of induction signals during steady-state pulse irradiation in {sup 14}N NQR was investigated experimentally. Because Strong Off-resonance Comb (SORC) signals recur as long as the pulsing continues, very efficient signal-averaging can result. The dependence of these steady-state SORC signals on pulse parameters and on frequency offset are presented, together with a discussion of the applicability of the method. Also as part of the NQR work, cocaine base has been detected using conventional NQR techniques. The experimental results show that SORC detection can be of sufficient sensitivity to form the basis of narcotics screening devices for both mail and airline baggage. A new NMR technique, to obtain the correlation time of the random thermal motion of a polymer at temperatures near the glass transition has been introduced. The temperature dependence is a result of thermal motion. For slow-motion of a polymer chain near the glass transition, the CSA parameter begins to decrease. This motional narrowing can be interpreted to yield the correlation time of the thermal motion. In this work nitrocellulose isotopically highly enriched with {sup 15}N was studied at four different temperatures between 27{degrees} and 120{degrees} Celsius and the correlation times for polymer backbone motions were obtained. Naflon films containing water (D{sub 2}O and H{sub 2} {sup 17}O) and methanol (CH{sub 3}OD, CH{sub 3} {sup 17}OH), have been studied using deuteron and oxygen-17 NMR spectroscopy. Glassy behavior of the water domains at low temperature is evidenced by the specific nature of the {sup 2}H NMR lineshapes. Activation energies extracted from {sup 2}H spin-lattice relaxation data on the high temperature side of the T{sub 1} minimum exhibit a steady increase with increasing water content. In spite of a high degree of molecular mobility, angular-dependent spectra of both unstretched and stretched samples reflect considerable anisotrophy of the host polymer.

  13. NQR-NMR studies of higher alcohol synthesis Cu-Co catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-17

    The primary objective of the project is to examine the relations between the catalytic and magnetic properties of the copper-cobalt higher alcohol synthesis catalysts. We have undertaken to investigate the magnetic character by studying the Nuclear Quadrupole resonance of copper and (Zerofield) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of cobalt in copper cobalt catalysts.

  14. Nuclear magnetic and quadrupole resonance in metallic powders in the presence of strong quadrupole interaction: Rhenium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitropoulos, C.; Maglione, M.; Borsa, F.

    1988-03-01

    The nuclear-magnetic-resonance and nuclear-quadrupole-resonance (NQR-NMR) spectra of /sup 187/Re and /sup 185/Re in a powder of rhenium metal were measured in the temperature range 5--10 K both in zero field and with an external magnetic field. The zero-field NQR spectrum is severely broadened by a nonuniform distribution of quadrupole interactions. The average quadrupole coupling frequencies measured at 5 K are, for the two isotopes, ..nu../sub Q/ = 39 +- 0.2 MHz (/sup 187/Re) and ..nu../sub Q/ = 40.8 +- 0.3 MHz (/sup 185/Re). The spectra obtained in the presence of an external magnetic field can be interpreted satisfactorily in terms of transitions among the eigenstates of the full Hamiltonian (Zeeman plus quadrupolar). Measurements of relaxation rates yield T/sub 1/T = 0.03 sK, indicating a relaxation mechanism driven by the hyperfine interaction with the conduction electrons. The feasibility of NQR-NMR studies in small metal particles in the presence of strong inhomogeneous quadrupole interactions is assessed

  15. Low-power stimulated emission nuclear quadrupole resonance detection system utilizing Rabi transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolos, John; Mouyos, William; Feng, Judy; Chase, Walter

    2013-06-01

    The application of CW radar techniques to Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) detection of nitrogen based explosives and chlorine based narcotics enables the use of low power levels, in the range of 10's of watts, to yield high signal strengths. By utilizing Rabi transitions the nucleus oscillates between states one and two under the time dependent incident electromagnetic field and alternately absorbs energy from the incident field while emitting coherent energy via stimulated emission. Through the application of a cancellation algorithm the incident field is eliminated from the NQR response, allowing the receive signal to be measured while transmitting. The response signal is processed using matched filters of the NQR response which enables the direct detection of explosives. This technology has applicability to the direct detection of explosives and narcotics for security screening, all at safe low power levels, opposed to the current XRay and Millimeter wave screening systems that detect objects that may contain explosives and utilize high power. The quantum mechanics theoretical basis for the approach and an application for a system for security screening are described with empirical results presented to show the effects observed.

  16. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source experience at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, T; Cee, R; Haberer, T; Naas, B; Peters, A; Scheloske, S; Spädtke, P; Tinschert, K

    2008-02-01

    Radiotherapy with heavy ions is an upcoming cancer treatment method with to date unparalleled precision. It associates higher control rates particularly for radiation resistant tumor species with reduced adverse effects compared to conventional photon therapy. The accelerator beam lines and structures of the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT) have been designed under the leadership of GSI, Darmstadt with contributions of the IAP Frankfurt. Currently, the accelerator is under commissioning, while the injector linac has been completed. When the patient treatment begins in 2008, HIT will be the first medical heavy ion accelerator in Europe. This presentation will provide an overview about the project, with special attention given to the 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources in operation with carbon, hydrogen, helium, and oxygen, and the experience of one year of continuous operation. It also displays examples for beam emittances, measured in the low energy beam transport. In addition to the outlook of further developments at the ECR ion sources for a continuously stable operation, this paper focuses on some of the technical processings of the past year. PMID:18315121

  17. Rapid estimation of nuclear magnetic resonance experiment time in low-concentration environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Masoom, Hussain; Courtier-Murias, Denis; Farooq, Hashim; Soong, Ronald; Simpson, Myrna J; Maas, Werner; Kumar, Rajeev; Monette, Martine; Stronks, Henry; Simpson, André J

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is an essential tool for studying environmental samples but is often hindered by low sensitivity, especially for the direct detection of nuclei such as(13) C. In very heterogeneous samples with NMR nuclei at low abundance, such as soils, sediments, and air particulates, it can take days to acquire a conventional(13) C spectrum. The present study describes a prescreening method that permits the rapid prediction of experimental run time in natural samples. The approach focuses the NMR chemical shift dispersion into a single spike, and, even in samples with extremely low carbon content, the spike can be observed in two to three minutes, or less. The intensity of the spike is directly proportional to the total concentration of nuclei of interest in the sample. Consequently, the spike intensity can be used as a powerful prescreening method that answers two key questions: (1) Will this sample produce a conventional NMR spectrum? (2) How much instrument time is required to record a spectrum with a specific signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio? The approach identifies samples to avoid (or pretreat) and permits additional NMR experiments to be performed on samples producing high-quality NMR data. Applications in solid- and liquid-state(13) C NMR are demonstrated, and it is shown that the technique is applicable to a range of nuclei. PMID:23065696

  18. Anesthesia during high-field intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging experience with 80 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Bernd; Nimsky, Christopher; Wendel, Georg; Wienerl, Juergen; Ganslandt, Oliver; Jacobi, Klaus; Fahlbusch, Rudolf; Schüttler, Juergen

    2003-07-01

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used for years to update neuronavigation and for intraoperative resection control. For this purpose, low-field (0.1-0.2 T) MR scanners have been installed in the operating room, which, in contrast to machines using higher magnetic field strength, allowed the use of standard anesthetic and surgical equipment. However, these low-field MR systems provided only minor image quality and a limited battery of MR sequences, excluding functional MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI, or MR angiography and spectroscopy. Based on these advantages, a concept using high-field MRI (1.5 T) with intraoperative functional neuronavigational guidance has been developed that required adaptation of the anesthetic regimen to working in the close vicinity to the strong magnetic field. In this paper the authors present their experience with the first 80 consecutive patients who received anesthesia in a specially designed radio frequency-shielded operating room equipped with a high-field (1.5 T) MR scanner. We describe the MR-compatible anesthesia equipment used including ventilator, monitoring, and syringe pumps, which allow standard neuroanesthesia in this new and challenging environment. This equipment provides the use of total intravenous anesthesia with propofol and remifentanil allowing rapid extubation and neurologic examination following surgery. In addition, extended intraoperative monitoring including EEG monitoring required for intracranial surgery is possible. Moreover, problems and dangers related to the effects of the strong magnetic field are discussed. PMID:12826974

  19. Tracking Simulation of Third-Integer Resonant Extraction for Fermilab's Mu2e Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chong Shik; Amundson, James; Michelotti, Leo

    2015-02-13

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab requires acceleration and transport of intense proton beams in order to deliver stable, uniform particle spills to the production target. To meet the experimental requirement, particles will be extracted slowly from the Delivery Ring to the external beamline. Using Synergia2, we have performed multi-particle tracking simulations of third-integer resonant extraction in the Delivery Ring, including space charge effects, physical beamline elements, and apertures. A piecewise linear ramp profile of tune quadrupoles was used to maintain a constant averaged spill rate throughout extraction. To study and minimize beam losses, we implemented and introduced a number of features, beamline element apertures, and septum plane alignments. Additionally, the RF Knockout (RFKO) technique, which excites particles transversely, is employed for spill regulation. Combined with a feedback system, it assists in fine-tuning spill uniformity. Simulation studies were carried out to optimize the RFKO feedback scheme, which will be helpful in designing the final spill regulation system.

  20. NMR Backbone Assignment of Large Proteins by Using (13) Cα -Only Triple-Resonance Experiments.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingtao; Chen, Jiajing; Mi, Juan; Zhang, Jiahai; Ruan, Ke; Wu, Jihui

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to interrogate protein structure and dynamics residue by residue. However, the prerequisite chemical-shift assignment remains a bottleneck for large proteins due to the fast relaxation and the frequency degeneracy of the (13) Cα nuclei. Herein, we present a covariance NMR strategy to assign the backbone chemical shifts by using only HN(CO)CA and HNCA spectra that has a high sensitivity even for large proteins. By using the peak linear correlation coefficient (LCC), which is a sensitive probe even for tiny chemical-shift displacements, we correctly identify the fidelity of approximately 92 % cross-peaks in the covariance spectrum, which is thus a significant improvement on the approach developed by Snyder and Brüschweiler (66 %) and the use of spectral derivatives (50 %). Thus, we calculate the 4D covariance spectrum from HN(CO)CA and HNCA experiments, in which cross-peaks with LCCs above a universal threshold are considered as true correlations. This 4D covariance spectrum enables the sequential assignment of a 42 kDa maltose binding protein (MBP), in which about 95 % residues are successfully assigned with a high accuracy of 98 %. Our LCC approach, therefore, paves the way for a residue-by-residue study of the backbone structure and dynamics of large proteins. PMID:27276173

  1. Measurements of radial profiles of ion cyclotron resonance heating on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Falabella, S.

    1988-05-11

    A small Radial Energy Analyzer (REA) was used on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), at Lawerence Livermore National Laboratory, to investigate the radial profiles of ion temperature, density, and plasma potential during Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH). The probe has been inserted into the central-cell plasma at temperatures of 200 eV and densities of 3 x 10/sup 12/cm/sup /minus 3// without damage to the probe, or major degradation of the plasma. This analyzer has indicated an increase in ion temperature from near 20 eV before ICRH to near 150 eV during ICRH, with about 60 kW of broadcast power. The REA measurements were cross-checked against other diagnostics on TMX-U and found to be consistent. The ion density measurement was compared to the line-density measured by microwave interferometry and found to agree within 10 to 20%. A radial intergral of n/sub i/T/sub i/ as measured by the REA shows good agreement with the diamagnetic loop measurement of plasma energy. The radial density profile is observed to broaden during the RF heating pulses, without inducing additional radial losses in the core plasma. The radial profile of plasma is seen to vary from axially peaked, to nearly flat as the plasma conditions carried over the series of experiments. To relate the increase in ion temperature to power absorbed by the plasma, a power balance as a function of radius was performed. The RF power absorbed is set equal to the sum of the losses during ICRH, minus those without ICRH. This method accounts for more than 70% of the broadcast power using a simple power balance model. The measured radial profile of the RF heating was compared to the calculations of two codes, ANTENA and GARFIELD, to test their effectiveness as predictors of power absorption profiles for TMX-U. 62 refs., 63 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. High-resolution laser spectroscopy with the Collinear Resonance Ionisation Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at CERN-ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocolios, T. E.; de Groote, R. P.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Budinčević, I.; Day Goodacre, T.; Farooq-Smith, G. J.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Flanagan, K. T.; Franchoo, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Gins, W.; Heylen, H.; Kron, T.; Li, R.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Neyens, G.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Smith, A. J.; Stroke, H. H.; Wendt, K. D. A.; Wilkins, S. G.; Yang, X.

    2016-06-01

    The Collinear Resonance Ionisation Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at CERN has achieved high-resolution resonance ionisation laser spectroscopy with a full width at half maximum linewidth of 20(1) MHz for 219,221 Fr, and has measured isotopes as short lived as 5 ms with 214 Fr. This development allows for greater precision in the study of hyperfine structures and isotope shifts, as well as a higher selectivity of single-isotope, even single-isomer, beams. These achievements are linked with the development of a new laser laboratory and new data-acquisition systems.

  3. WURST-QCPMG sequence and "spin-lock" in 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorovič, Alan; Apih, Tomaž

    2013-08-01

    14N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a promising method for the analysis of pharmaceuticals or for the detection of nitrogen based illicit compounds, but so far, the technique is still not widely used, mostly due to the very low sensitivity. This problem is already acute in the preliminary NQR stage, when a compound is being examined for the first time and the NQR frequencies are being searched for, by scanning a wide frequency range step-by-step. In the present work, we experimentally show how to increase the efficiency of this initial stage by using a combination of a wideband excitation achieved with frequency swept pulses (WURST) and a "spin-lock" state obtained with a quadrupolar-CPMG (QCPMG) sequence. In the first part we show that WURST pulses provide a much larger excitation bandwidth compared to common rectangular pulses. This increased bandwidth allows to increase the frequency step and reduces the total number of steps in a scanning stage. In the second part we show that the "spin-lock" decay time T2eff obtained with the WURST-QCPMG combination is practically identical with the T2eff obtained with the most common "spin-lock" sequence, the SLSE, despite a very different nature and length of excitation pulses. This allows for a substantial S/N increase through echo averaging in every individual step and really allows to exploit all the advantages of the wider excitation in the NQR frequency scanning stage. Our experimental results were obtained on a sample of trinitrotoluene, but identical behavior is expected for all compounds where a "spin-lock" state can be created.

  4. Injection Seeding of Ti:Al2O3 in an unstable resonator theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. C.; Wang, L. G.; Barnes, N. P.; Edwards, W. C.; Cheng, W. A.; Hess, R. V.; Lockard, G. E.; Ponsardin, P. L.

    1991-01-01

    Injection Seeding of a Ti:Al2O3 unstable resonator using both a pulsed single-mode Ti:Al2O3 laser and a continuous wave laser diode has been characterized. Results are compared with a theory which calculates injection seeding as function of seed and resonator alignment, beam profiles, and power.

  5. Using nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance and electric field gradient information for the study of radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Iselin, L.H.

    1995-12-01

    Nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) was used in an attempt to detect the effects of ionizing radiation on organic material. Previously reported resonances for urea were detected at 2,913.32 {+-} 0.01 kHz and 2,347.88 {+-} 0.08 kHz with associated T{sub 2}* values 780 {+-} 20 {micro}s and 523 {+-} 24 {micro}s, respectively. The previously unreported {nu}{sub {minus}} line for urea-d{sup 4} was detected at 2,381 {+-} 0.04 Khz and used to determine accurately for the first time the values for the nuclear quadrupole coupling constant {chi} (3,548.74 {+-} 0.03 kHz) and the asymmetry parameter {eta} (0.31571 {+-} 0.00007) for urea-d{sup 4}. The inverse linewidth parameter T{sub 2}* for {nu}{sub +} was measured at 928 {+-} 23 {micro}s and for {nu}{sub {minus}} at 721 {+-} 12 {micro}s. Townes and Dailey analysis was performed and urea-d{sup 4} exhibits a 0.004 increase in lone pair electronic density and a slight decrease in N-H bond electronic density, as compared to urea, probably due to the mass difference. A relationship is proposed, referred to as NQR linewidth analysis, between the dynamic spin relaxation times T{sub 2} and T{sub 2}* and the widths of the distributions of the NQR parameters. Linewidth analysis is presented as a tool for possible use in future NQR work in all area, not just radiation effects. This relationship is tested using sodium nitrite T{sub 2} and T{sub 2}* values for {nu}{sub {minus}} and {nu}{sub {minus}} as a function of temperature.

  6. Using split-ring resonators to measure the electromagnetic properties of materials: An experiment for senior physics undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobowski, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    A spilt-ring resonator experiment suitable for senior physics undergraduates is described and demonstrated in detail. The apparatus consists of a conducting hollow cylinder with a narrow slit along its length and can be accurately modelled as a series LRC circuit. The resonance frequency and quality factor of the split-ring resonator are measured when the apparatus is suspended in air, submerged in water, and submerged in an aqueous solution of various concentrations of NaCl. The experimental results are used to extract the dielectric constant of water and to investigate the dependence of the resonator quality factor on the conductivity of the NaCl solution. The apparatus provides opportunities to experimentally examine radiative losses, complex permittivity, the electromagnetic skin depth, and cutoff frequencies of rf propagation in cylindrical waveguides, which are all concepts introduced in an undergraduate course in electrodynamics. To connect with current research, the use of split-ring resonators as a tool to precisely measure the electromagnetic properties of materials is emphasized.

  7. Microwave bandpass filters based on thin-film acoustic resonators: theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvoesherstov, M. Yu.; Cherednik, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    We theoretically and experimentally analyze microwave thin-film acoustoelectronic bandpass ladder filters built on AlN-based thin-film acoustoelectronic microwave resonators operating in the frequency range 4.6-5 GHz and describe the technology of their fabrication. We demonstrate that the parameters of filters are mainly determined by the characteristics of resonators that make up the filter and show that the characteristics of a three-section ladder filter can be significantly improved by optimizing the areas of the upper electrodes of the series and parallel resonators contained in it.

  8. Blood-Brain Barrier Experiments with Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging and an Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Woo; Kim, Hak Jin; Han, Hyung Soo

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of study was to evaluate the feasibility of brain magnetic resonance (MR) images of the rat obtained using a 1.5T MR machine in several blood-brain barrier (BBB) experiments. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. MR images were obtained using a clinical 1.5T MR machine. A microcatheter was introduced via the femoral artery to the carotid artery. Normal saline (group 1, n = 4), clotted autologous blood (group 2, n = 4), triolein emulsion (group 3, n = 4), and oleic acid emulsion (group 4, n = 4) were infused into the carotid artery through a microcatheter. Conventional and diffusion-weighted images, the apparent coefficient map, perfusion-weighted images, and contrast-enhanced MR images were obtained. Brain tissue was obtained and triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining was performed in group 2. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextran images and endothelial barrier antigen (EBA) studies were performed in group 4. Results The MR images in group 1 were of good quality. The MR images in group 2 revealed typical findings of acute cerebral infarction. Perfusion defects were noted on the perfusion-weighted images. The MR images in group 3 showed vasogenic edema and contrast enhancement, representing vascular damage. The rats in group 4 had vasogenic edema on the MR images and leakage of dextran on the FITC-labeled dextran image, representing increased vascular permeability. The immune reaction was decreased on the EBA study. Conclusion Clinical 1.5T MR images using a rat depicted many informative results in the present study. These results can be used in further researches of the BBB using combined clinical MR machines and immunohistochemical examinations. PMID:20379473

  9. Sapphire hard X-ray Fabry-Perot resonators for synchrotron experiments.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi Wei; Wu, Yu Hsin; Chang, Ying Yi; Liu, Wen Chung; Liu, Hong Lin; Chu, Chia Hong; Chen, Pei Chi; Lin, Pao Te; Fu, Chien Chung; Chang, Shih Lin

    2016-05-01

    Hard X-ray Fabry-Perot resonators (FPRs) made from sapphire crystals were constructed and characterized. The FPRs consisted of two crystal plates, part of a monolithic crystal structure of Al2O3, acting as a pair of mirrors, for the backward reflection (0 0 0 30) of hard X-rays at 14.3147 keV. The dimensional accuracy during manufacturing and the defect density in the crystal in relation to the resonance efficiency of sapphire FPRs were analyzed from a theoretical standpoint based on X-ray cavity resonance and measurements using scanning electron microscopic and X-ray topographic techniques for crystal defects. Well defined resonance spectra of sapphire FPRs were successfully obtained, and were comparable with the theoretical predictions. PMID:27140144

  10. A finite difference method with periodic boundary conditions for simulations of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance experiments in tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Greg; Harkins, Kevin D.; Secomb, Timothy W.; Galons, Jean-Philippe; Trouard, Theodore P.

    2012-02-01

    A new finite difference (FD) method for calculating the time evolution of complex transverse magnetization in diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy experiments is described that incorporates periodic boundary conditions. The new FD method relaxes restrictions on the allowable time step size employed in modeling which can significantly reduce computation time for simulations of large physical extent and allow for more complex, physiologically relevant, geometries to be simulated.

  11. An ultrahigh-vacuum apparatus for resonant diffraction experiments using soft x rays (hnu=300-2000 eV).

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T; Chainani, A; Takata, Y; Tanaka, Y; Oura, M; Tsubota, M; Senba, Y; Ohashi, H; Mochiku, T; Hirata, K; Shin, S

    2009-02-01

    We have developed an ultrahigh-vacuum instrument for resonant diffraction experiments using polarized soft x rays in the energy range of hnu=300-2000 eV at beamline BL17SU of SPring-8. The diffractometer consists of modified differentially pumped rotary feedthroughs for theta-2theta stages, a sample manipulator with motor-controlled x-y-z-, tilt (chi)-, and azimuth (phi)-axes, and a liquid helium flow-type cryostat for temperature dependent measurements between 30 and 300 K. Test results indicate that the diffractometer exhibits high reproducibility (better than 0.001 degrees ) for a Bragg reflection of alpha-quartz 100 at a photon energy of hnu=1950 eV. Typical off- and on-resonance Bragg reflections in the energy range of 530-1950 eV could be measured using the apparatus. The results show that x-ray diffraction experiments with energy-, azimuth-, and incident photon polarization-dependence can be reliably measured using soft x rays in the energy range of approximately 300-2000 eV. The facility can be used for resonant diffraction experiments across the L-edge of transition metals, M-edge of lanthanides, and up to the Si K-edge of materials. PMID:19256660

  12. Ferromagnetic critical behavior in U(Co1-xFex)Al (0 ≤x ≤0.02 ) studied by 59Co nuclear quadrupole resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karube, K.; Hattori, T.; Ishida, K.; Kimura, N.

    2015-02-01

    In order to investigate physical properties around a ferromagnetic (FM) quantum transition point and a tricritical point (TCP) in the itinerant-electron metamagnetic compound UCoAl, we have performed the 59Co nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurement for the Fe-substituted U(Co1-xFex)Al(x =0 ,0.5 ,1 ,and2 %) in zero external magnetic field. The Fe concentration dependence of 59Co -NQR spectra at low temperatures indicates that the first-order FM transition occurs at least above x =1 % . The magnetic fluctuations along the c axis detected by the nuclear spin-spin relaxation rate 1 /T2 exhibit an anomaly at Tmax˜20 K and enhance with increasing x . These results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions and indicate the presence of prominent critical fluctuations at the TCP in this system.

  13. A novel method of studying total body water content using a resonant cavity: experiments and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Martin P.; Clegg, Janet; Stone, Darren A.

    2003-01-01

    A novel electromagnetic method of obtaining total body water is proposed, in which the water content is obtained from the dielectric properties as measured by a resonant perturbation technique. A screened room acts as a radio-frequency cavity, in our case resonating at 59 MHz, a frequency at which both real and imaginary parts of the complex permittivity of tissues are correlated to their moisture content. The presence of a human subject in the room leads to both a negative shift in the room's resonant frequency and a reduction in its Q-factor. We simulated the room and the body using the transmission line matrix (TLM) method, a computational electromagnetic code which models the problem in the time domain. Experiment and numerical model showed good agreement for two orientations of the subject. The sensitivity of the technique was investigated by measuring the response before and after the subject drank a small quantity of water, less than 2% of body mass. The resulting change in the resonant frequency was significant, and was also predicted by the numerical model. The proposed technique for studying body composition is simple, non-invasive and employs non-ionizing radio waves at low power.

  14. Search for narrow resonances in π p elastic scattering from the EPECUR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gridnev, A.; Alekseev, I. G.; Andreev, V. A.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Briscoe, W. J.; Filimonov, Ye. A.; Golubev, V. V.; Kalinkin, D. V.; Koroleva, L. I.; Kozlenko, N. G.; Kozlov, V. S.; Krivshich, A. G.; Kuznetsov, V. A.; Morozov, B. V.; Nesterov, V. M.; Novinsky, D. V.; Ryltsov, V. V.; Sadler, M.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Sulimov, A. D.; Sumachev, V. V.; Svirida, D. N.; Tarakanov, V. I.; Trautman, V. Yu.; Workman, R. L.

    2016-06-01

    The analysis of high-precision π±p →π±p cross-sectional data from the EPECUR Collaboration based on the multichannel K -matrix approach is presented. The sharp structures seen in these data are studied in terms of both opening thresholds and new resonance contributions. Some prominent features are found to be due to the opening K Σ channel. However, a complete description of the data is improved with the addition of two narrow resonant structures at W ˜1.686 and W ˜1.720 GeV . These structures are interpreted as manifestations of S11 and P11 resonances. The underlying nature of the observed phenomena is discussed.

  15. Theory and experiment on resonant frequencies of liquid-air interfaces trapped in microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chindam, Chandraprakash; Nama, Nitesh; Ian Lapsley, Michael; Costanzo, Francesco; Jun Huang, Tony

    2013-11-01

    Bubble-based microfluidic devices have been proven to be useful for many biological and chemical studies. These bubble-based microdevices are particularly useful when operated at the trapped bubbles' resonance frequencies. In this work, we present an analytical expression that can be used to predict the resonant frequency of a bubble trapped over an arbitrary shape. Also, the effect of viscosity on the dispersion characteristics of trapped bubbles is determined. A good agreement between experimental data and theoretical results is observed for resonant frequency of bubbles trapped over different-sized rectangular-shaped structures, indicating that our expression can be valuable in determining optimized operational parameters for many bubble-based microfluidic devices. Furthermore, we provide a close estimate for the harmonics and a method to determine the dispersion characteristics of a bubble trapped over circular shapes. Finally, we present a new method to predict fluid properties in microfluidic devices and complement the explanation of acoustic microstreaming.

  16. Resonance effects in elastic cross sections for electron scattering on pyrimidine: Experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Regeta, Khrystyna; Allan, Michael; Winstead, Carl; McKoy, Vincent; Mašín, Zdeněk; Gorfinkiel, Jimena D

    2016-01-14

    We measured differential cross sections for elastic (rotationally integrated) electron scattering on pyrimidine, both as a function of angle up to 180(∘) at electron energies of 1, 5, 10, and 20 eV and as a function of electron energy in the range 0.1-14 eV. The experimental results are compared to the results of the fixed-nuclei Schwinger variational and R-matrix theoretical methods, which reproduce satisfactorily the magnitudes and shapes of the experimental cross sections. The emphasis of the present work is on recording detailed excitation functions revealing resonances in the excitation process. Resonant structures are observed at 0.2, 0.7, and 4.35 eV and calculations for different symmetries confirm their assignment as the X̃(2)A2, Ã(2)B1, and B̃(2)B1 shape resonances. As a consequence of superposition of coherent resonant amplitudes with background scattering the B̃(2)B1 shape resonance appears as a peak, a dip, or a step function in the cross sections recorded as a function of energy at different scattering angles and this effect is satisfactorily reproduced by theory. The dip and peak contributions at different scattering angles partially compensate, making the resonance nearly invisible in the integral cross section. Vibrationally integrated cross sections were also measured at 1, 5, 10 and 20 eV and the question of whether the fixed-nuclei cross sections should be compared to vibrationally elastic or vibrationally integrated cross section is discussed. PMID:26772565

  17. Resonance effects in elastic cross sections for electron scattering on pyrimidine: Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regeta, Khrystyna; Allan, Michael; Winstead, Carl; McKoy, Vincent; Mašín, Zdeněk; Gorfinkiel, Jimena D.

    2016-01-01

    We measured differential cross sections for elastic (rotationally integrated) electron scattering on pyrimidine, both as a function of angle up to 180∘ at electron energies of 1, 5, 10, and 20 eV and as a function of electron energy in the range 0.1-14 eV. The experimental results are compared to the results of the fixed-nuclei Schwinger variational and R-matrix theoretical methods, which reproduce satisfactorily the magnitudes and shapes of the experimental cross sections. The emphasis of the present work is on recording detailed excitation functions revealing resonances in the excitation process. Resonant structures are observed at 0.2, 0.7, and 4.35 eV and calculations for different symmetries confirm their assignment as the X˜ 2A2, A˜ 2B1, and B˜ 2B1 shape resonances. As a consequence of superposition of coherent resonant amplitudes with background scattering the B˜ 2B1 shape resonance appears as a peak, a dip, or a step function in the cross sections recorded as a function of energy at different scattering angles and this effect is satisfactorily reproduced by theory. The dip and peak contributions at different scattering angles partially compensate, making the resonance nearly invisible in the integral cross section. Vibrationally integrated cross sections were also measured at 1, 5, 10 and 20 eV and the question of whether the fixed-nuclei cross sections should be compared to vibrationally elastic or vibrationally integrated cross section is discussed.

  18. Pulsed Fourier-transform NQR of 14N with a dc SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hürlimann, M. D.; Pennington, C. H.; Fan, N. Q.; Clarke, John; Pines, A.; Hahn, E. L.

    1992-07-01

    The zero-field free induction decay of solid ammonium perchlorate at 1.5 K has been directly detected with a dc superconducting quantum interference device. The Fourier-transform spectrum consists of three sharp lines at 17.4, 38.8, and 56.2 kHz arising from pure 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions. The absence of splittings and resonance transitions from dipolar-coupled proton spins is attributed to reorientation of the ammonium groups by quantum tunneling in combination with motional averaging in the three proton levels characterized by the irreducible representation T. The measured 14N spin-spin relaxation time is 22+/-2 ms and the spin-lattice relaxation time is 63+/-6 ms.

  19. Effect of granular media on the vibrational response of a resonant structure: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Valenza, John J; Hsu, Chaur-Jian; Johnson, David Linton

    2010-11-01

    The acoustic response of a structure that contains a cavity filled with a loose granular material is analyzed. The inputs to the theory are the effective masses of each subsystem: that of the empty-cavity resonating structure and that of the granular medium within the cavity. This theory accurately predicts the frequencies, widths, and relative amplitudes of the various flexural mode resonances observed with rectangular bars, each having a cavity filled with loose tungsten granules. Inasmuch as the dominant mechanism for damping is due to adsorbed water at the grain-grain contacts, the significant effects of humidity on both the effective mass of the granular medium as well as on the response of the grain-loaded bars are monitored. Here, depending upon the humidity and the preparation protocol, it is possible to observe one, two, or three distinct resonances in a wide frequency range (1-5 kHz) over which the empty bar has but one resonance. These effects are understood in terms of the theoretical framework, which may simplify in terms of perturbation theories. PMID:21110572

  20. The use of magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosing equine deep digital flexor tendinopathies--own experience.

    PubMed

    Jaskólska, M; Adamiak, Z; Zhalniarovich, Y; Przyborowska, P; Peczyński, Z

    2014-01-01

    Deep digital flexor tendinopathy is a common problem in horses of different athletic disciplines. Nowadays, the use of magnetic resonance imaging is considered to be a noninvasive and superior choice for recognizing bone and soft tissue pathologies especially related to difficult to access structures within the hoof capsule. PMID:25286667

  1. An Accessible Two-Dimensional Solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiment on Human Ubiquitin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rovnyak, David; Thompson, Laura E.

    2005-01-01

    Solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an invaluable tool in structural and molecular biology research, but may be underutilized in undergraduate laboratories because instrumentation for performing structural studies of macromolecules in aqueous solutions is not yet widely available for use in undergraduate laboratories. We have…

  2. Toward Resonant, Imaginative Experiences in Ecological and Democratic Education. A Response to "Imagination and Experience: An Integrative Framework"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derby, Michael; Blenkinsop, Sean; Telford, John; Piersol, Laura; Caulkins, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In this response to Fettes's "Imagination and Experience," the authors further consider the varieties of educational experience that inspire ecological flourishing and a living democracy. The essential interconnectedness of encounter-driven and language-driven ways of knowing are explored with particular reference to the…

  3. H(C)Ag: a triple resonance NMR experiment for (109) Ag detection in labile silver-carbene complexes.

    PubMed

    Weske, Sebastian; Li, Yingjia; Wiegmann, Sara; John, Michael

    2015-04-01

    In silver complexes, indirect detection of (109) Ag resonances via (1) H,(109) Ag-HMQC frequently suffers from small or absent JHAg couplings or rapid ligand dissociation. In these cases, it would be favourable to employ H(X)Ag triple resonance spectroscopy that uses the large one-bond JXAg coupling (where the donor atom of the ligand X is the relay nucleus). We have applied an HMQC-based version of the H(C)Ag experiment to a labile silver-NHC complex (NHC=N-heterocyclic carbene) at natural (13) C isotopic abundance and variable temperature. In agreement with simulations, H(C)Ag detection became superior to (1) H,(109) Ag-HMQC detection above -20 °C. PMID:25641122

  4. HCCCH Experiment for Through-Bond Correlation of Thymine Resonances in 13C-Labeled DNA Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklenář, Vladimír.; Masse, James E.; Feigon, Juli

    1999-04-01

    Application of heteronuclear magnetic resonance pulse methods to13C,15N-labeled nucleic acids is important for the accurate structure determination of larger RNA and DNA oligonucleotides and protein-nucleic acid complexes. These methods have been applied primarily to RNA, due to the availability of labeled samples. The two major differences between DNA and RNA are at the C2‧ of the ribose and deoxyribose and the additional methyl group on thymine versus uracil. We have enzymatically synthesized a13C,15N-labeled 32 base DNA oligonucleotide that folds to form an intramolecular triplex. We present two- and three-dimensional versions of a new HCCCH-TOCSY experiment that provides intraresidue correlation between the thymine H6 and methyl resonances via the intervening carbons (H6-C6-C5-Cme-Hme).

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of quadrupolar nuclei and dipolar field effects

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Jeffry Todd

    2004-12-21

    Experimental and theoretical research conducted in two areas in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented: (1) studies of the coherent quantum-mechanical control of the angular momentum dynamics of quadrupolar (spin I > 1/2) nuclei and its application to the determination of molecular structure; and (2) applications of the long-range nuclear dipolar field to novel NMR detection methodologies.The dissertation is organized into six chapters. The first two chapters and associated appendices are intended to be pedagogical and include an introduction to the quantum mechanical theory of pulsed NMR spectroscopy and the time dependent theory of quantum mechanics. The third chapter describes investigations of the solid-state multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) NMR experiment applied to I = 5/2 quadrupolar nuclei. This work reports the use of rotary resonance-matched radiofrequency irradiation for sensitivity enhancement of the I = 5/2 MQMAS experiment. These experiments exhibited certain selective line narrowing effects which were investigated theoretically.The fourth chapter extends the discussion of multiple quantum spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to a mostly theoretical study of the feasibility of enhancing the resolution of nitrogen-14 NMR of large biomolecules in solution via double-quantum spectroscopy. The fifth chapter continues to extend the principles of multiple quantum NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to make analogies between experiments in NMR/nuclear quadrupolar resonance (NQR) and experiments in atomic/molecular optics (AMO). These analogies are made through the Hamiltonian and density operator formalism of angular momentum dynamics in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.The sixth chapter investigates the use of the macroscopic nuclear dipolar field to encode the NMR spectrum of an analyte nucleus indirectly in the magnetization of a sensor nucleus. This technique could potentially serve as an

  6. Nucleon Resonances Spin Structure - RSS: Experiment 01-006 at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Rondon-Aramayo, Oscar

    2006-07-01

    We have measured the spin structure of the nucleon in the region of the resonances (final state mass W <~ 2 GeV) at intermediate four-momentum transfer Q^2 ~ 1.3 (GeV/c)^2. Double-spin inclusive asymmetries for longitudinally polarized 5.75 GeV electrons incident on longitudinal and transverse solid polarized targets were measured in Jefferson Lab's Hall C. Frozen ammonia and deuterated ammonia were used as the polarized materials. The neutron spin structure is extracted from the proton and deuteron asymmetries. We present new results for the proton measured asymmetries A|| and A[perpendicular] and spin structure functions g_1 and g_2, and preliminary results for the deuteron asymmetries. These are the first measurements of the transverse proton and deuteron spin structure in the resonances. We also report on our measurement of the ratio of the proton electromagnetic form factors with our polarized target.

  7. Nucleon Resonances Spin Structure - RSS: Experiment 01-006 at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Rondon, Oscar A.

    2006-07-11

    We have measured the spin structure of the nucleon in the region of the resonances (final state mass W <{approx} 2 GeV) at intermediate four-momentum transfer Q2 {approx} 1.3 (GeV/c)2. Double-spin inclusive asymmetries for longitudinally polarized 5.75 GeV electrons incident on longitudinal and transverse solid polarized targets were measured in Jefferson Lab's Hall C. Frozen ammonia and deuterated ammonia were used as the polarized materials. The neutron spin structure is extracted from the proton and deuteron asymmetries. We present new results for the proton measured asymmetries A parallel and A perpendicular and spin structure functions g1 and g2, and preliminary results for the deuteron asymmetries. These are the first measurements of the transverse proton and deuteron spin structure in the resonances. We also report on our measurement of the ratio of the proton electromagnetic form factors with our polarized target.

  8. Coaxial probe for nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation correlation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yiqiao; Hürlimann, Martin; Mandal, Soumyajit; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-02-01

    A coaxial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is built to measure diffusion and relaxation properties of liquid samples. In particular, we demonstrate the acquisition of two-dimensional (2D) distribution functions (T1-T2 and diffusion-T2), essential for fluids characterization. The compact design holds promise for miniaturization, thus enabling the measurement of molecular diffusion that is inaccessible to conventional micro-NMR setups. Potential applications range from crude oil characterization to biomolecular screening and detections.

  9. Resonant discharges: Initiation and steady state. Comparisons with theory, simulation and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, K.J.; Qiu, D.W.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1999-07-01

    Discharges driven at the series resonance frequency have many desirable properties. The input resistance is small, and the voltage and current are in phase. The voltage drive is small ({approximately} Te) and the average plasma potential is low ({approximately} 10 Te). Such is observed experimentally in [1] and in the PIC-MCC simulations. Scaling laws at fixed pressure show peak electron density proportional to the cube of the drive frequency (capacitive discharge is as the square), permitting the density to be controlled. Simulation results show at low pressure, the ion energy distribution at the target has a sharp peak at the plasma potential with narrow angular spread about the normal. The V-I phase angle versus I curve is measured in simulation and compared with experimental results and the theoretical scaling laws are compared with simulation results and the transition of a capacitively coupled plasma to a resonantly sustained plasma is discussed. During this transition or lock-on (which occurs in a few RF cycles, a time scale much faster then ion related frequencies), the plasma changes dramatically: the electron kinetic energy and the plasma potential more than doubles; the circuit impedance of the discharge goes from capacitive to resistive; the motion of bulk plasma changes from nearly in phase to nearly out of phase with the voltage drive; and the characteristic heating pattern of these discharges takes shape. In these discharges, the formation of high velocity electron bunches in the sheath regions is seen. During an RF cycle, these bunches are alternately accelerated from each sheath into the bulk plasma. The authors speculate these bunches provide the ionization in resonantly sustained discharges. They also speculate that the lock-on process is similar to the mode-jumping seen in other resonantly and surface wave sustained discharges.

  10. A 4 K cryogenic probe for use in magnetic resonance force microscopy experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Doran D.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Garbini, Joseph L.

    2013-09-15

    The detailed design of a mechanically detected nuclear magnetic resonance probe using the SPAM (Springiness Preservation by Aligning Magnetization) geometry, operating at 4 K, in vacuum, and a several-Tesla magnetic field is described. The probe head is vibration-isolated well enough from the environment by a three-spring suspension system that the cantilever achieves thermal equilibrium with the environment without the aid of eddy current damping. The probe uses an ultra-soft Si cantilever with a Ni sphere attached to its tip, and magnetic resonance is registered as a change in the resonant frequency of the driven cantilever. The RF system uses frequency sweeps for adiabatic rapid passage using a 500 μm diameter RF coil wound around a sapphire rod. The RF coil and optical fiber of the interferometer used to sense the cantilever's position are both located with respect to the cantilever using a Garbini micropositioner, and the sample stage is mounted on an Attocube nanopositioner.

  11. A 4 K cryogenic probe for use in magnetic resonance force microscopy experiments.

    PubMed

    Smith, Doran D; Alexson, Dimitri A; Garbini, Joseph L

    2013-09-01

    The detailed design of a mechanically detected nuclear magnetic resonance probe using the SPAM (Springiness Preservation by Aligning Magnetization) geometry, operating at 4 K, in vacuum, and a several-Tesla magnetic field is described. The probe head is vibration-isolated well enough from the environment by a three-spring suspension system that the cantilever achieves thermal equilibrium with the environment without the aid of eddy current damping. The probe uses an ultra-soft Si cantilever with a Ni sphere attached to its tip, and magnetic resonance is registered as a change in the resonant frequency of the driven cantilever. The RF system uses frequency sweeps for adiabatic rapid passage using a 500 μm diameter RF coil wound around a sapphire rod. The RF coil and optical fiber of the interferometer used to sense the cantilever's position are both located with respect to the cantilever using a Garbini micropositioner, and the sample stage is mounted on an Attocube nanopositioner. PMID:24089869

  12. A 4 K cryogenic probe for use in magnetic resonance force microscopy experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Doran D.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Garbini, Joseph L.

    2013-09-01

    The detailed design of a mechanically detected nuclear magnetic resonance probe using the SPAM (Springiness Preservation by Aligning Magnetization) geometry, operating at 4 K, in vacuum, and a several-Tesla magnetic field is described. The probe head is vibration-isolated well enough from the environment by a three-spring suspension system that the cantilever achieves thermal equilibrium with the environment without the aid of eddy current damping. The probe uses an ultra-soft Si cantilever with a Ni sphere attached to its tip, and magnetic resonance is registered as a change in the resonant frequency of the driven cantilever. The RF system uses frequency sweeps for adiabatic rapid passage using a 500 μm diameter RF coil wound around a sapphire rod. The RF coil and optical fiber of the interferometer used to sense the cantilever's position are both located with respect to the cantilever using a Garbini micropositioner, and the sample stage is mounted on an Attocube nanopositioner.

  13. 93Nb Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance in Orthorhombic Phase of Niobium Pentabromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Noriaki; Abe, Yoshihito

    1982-05-01

    The 93Nb NQR has been investigated in one phase of NbBr5 which was identified to be orthorhombic by the X-ray analysis. The resonance frequencies have been measured between 4.2 K and 423 K, its melting point. The coupling constant showed a positive temperature dependence up to melting point. The temperature dependence of the coupling constant is compared between NbBr5 and NbCl5 from the view point of π-bond character.

  14. A Ku band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer using an arbitrary waveform generator for quantum control experiments at millikelvin temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Yung Szen; Tabuchi, Yutaka; Negoro, Makoto; Kagawa, Akinori; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    We present a 17 GHz (Ku band) arbitrary waveform pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer for experiments down to millikelvin temperatures. The spectrometer is located at room temperature, while the resonator is placed either in a room temperature magnet or inside a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator; the operating temperature range of the dilution unit is from ca. 10 mK to 8 K. This combination provides the opportunity to perform quantum control experiments on electron spins in the pure-state regime. At 0.6 T, spin echo experiments were carried out using γ-irradiated quartz glass from 1 K to 12.3 mK. With decreasing temperatures, we observed an increase in spin echo signal intensities due to increasing spin polarizations, in accordance with theoretical predictions. Through experimental data fitting, thermal spin polarization at 100 mK was estimated to be at least 99%, which was almost pure state. Next, to demonstrate the ability to create arbitrary waveform pulses, we generate a shaped pulse by superposing three Gaussian pulses of different frequencies. The resulting pulse was able to selectively and coherently excite three different spin packets simultaneously—a useful ability for analyzing multi-spin system and for controlling a multi-qubit quantum computer. By applying this pulse to the inhomogeneously broadened sample, we obtain three well-resolved excitations at 8 K, 1 K, and 14 mK.

  15. A Ku band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer using an arbitrary waveform generator for quantum control experiments at millikelvin temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yap, Yung Szen; Tabuchi, Yutaka; Negoro, Makoto; Kagawa, Akinori; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    We present a 17 GHz (Ku band) arbitrary waveform pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer for experiments down to millikelvin temperatures. The spectrometer is located at room temperature, while the resonator is placed either in a room temperature magnet or inside a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator; the operating temperature range of the dilution unit is from ca. 10 mK to 8 K. This combination provides the opportunity to perform quantum control experiments on electron spins in the pure-state regime. At 0.6 T, spin echo experiments were carried out using γ-irradiated quartz glass from 1 K to 12.3 mK. With decreasing temperatures, we observed an increase in spin echo signal intensities due to increasing spin polarizations, in accordance with theoretical predictions. Through experimental data fitting, thermal spin polarization at 100 mK was estimated to be at least 99%, which was almost pure state. Next, to demonstrate the ability to create arbitrary waveform pulses, we generate a shaped pulse by superposing three Gaussian pulses of different frequencies. The resulting pulse was able to selectively and coherently excite three different spin packets simultaneously-a useful ability for analyzing multi-spin system and for controlling a multi-qubit quantum computer. By applying this pulse to the inhomogeneously broadened sample, we obtain three well-resolved excitations at 8 K, 1 K, and 14 mK. PMID:26133831

  16. A Ku band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer using an arbitrary waveform generator for quantum control experiments at millikelvin temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, Yung Szen; Tabuchi, Yutaka; Negoro, Makoto; Kagawa, Akinori; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2015-06-15

    We present a 17 GHz (Ku band) arbitrary waveform pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer for experiments down to millikelvin temperatures. The spectrometer is located at room temperature, while the resonator is placed either in a room temperature magnet or inside a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator; the operating temperature range of the dilution unit is from ca. 10 mK to 8 K. This combination provides the opportunity to perform quantum control experiments on electron spins in the pure-state regime. At 0.6 T, spin echo experiments were carried out using γ-irradiated quartz glass from 1 K to 12.3 mK. With decreasing temperatures, we observed an increase in spin echo signal intensities due to increasing spin polarizations, in accordance with theoretical predictions. Through experimental data fitting, thermal spin polarization at 100 mK was estimated to be at least 99%, which was almost pure state. Next, to demonstrate the ability to create arbitrary waveform pulses, we generate a shaped pulse by superposing three Gaussian pulses of different frequencies. The resulting pulse was able to selectively and coherently excite three different spin packets simultaneously—a useful ability for analyzing multi-spin system and for controlling a multi-qubit quantum computer. By applying this pulse to the inhomogeneously broadened sample, we obtain three well-resolved excitations at 8 K, 1 K, and 14 mK.

  17. A 250-GHz CARM (Cyclotron Auto Resonance Maser) oscillator experiment driven by an induction linac

    SciTech Connect

    Caplan, M.; Kulke, B.; Bubp, D.G. ); McDermott, D.; Luhmann, N. )

    1990-09-14

    A 250-GHz Cyclotron Auto Resonance Maser (CARM) oscillator has been designed and constructed and will be tested using a 1-kA, 2-MeV electron beam produced by the induction linac at the Accelerator Research Center (ARC) facility of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The oscillator circuit was made to operate in the TE{sub 11} mode at ten times cutoff using waveguide Bragg reflectors to create an external cavity Q of 8000. Theory predicts cavity fill times of less than 30 ns (pulse length) and efficiencies approaching 20% is sufficiently low transverse electron velocity spreads are maintained (2%).

  18. Coaxial probe for nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation correlation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yiqiao; Hürlimann, Martin; Mandal, Soumyajit; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-02-21

    A coaxial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is built to measure diffusion and relaxation properties of liquid samples. In particular, we demonstrate the acquisition of two-dimensional (2D) distribution functions (T{sub 1}-T{sub 2} and diffusion–T{sub 2}), essential for fluids characterization. The compact design holds promise for miniaturization, thus enabling the measurement of molecular diffusion that is inaccessible to conventional micro-NMR setups. Potential applications range from crude oil characterization to biomolecular screening and detections.

  19. NMR and NQR study of Si-doped (6,0) zigzag single-walled aluminum nitride nanotube as n or P-semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Baei, Mohammad T; Peyghan, Ali Ahmadi; Tavakoli, Khadijeh; Babaheydari, Ali Kazemi; Moghimi, Masoumeh

    2012-09-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to investigate the electronic structure properties of pristine and Si-doped aluminum nitride nanotubes as n or P-semiconductors at the B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory in order to evaluate the influence of Si-doped in the (6,0) zigzag AlNNTs. We extended the DFT calculation to predict the electronic structure properties of Si-doped aluminum nitride nanotubes, which are very important for production of solid-state devices and other applications. To this aim, pristine and Si-doped AlNNT structures in two models (Si(N) and Si(Al)) were optimized, and then the electronic properties, the isotropic (CS(I)) and anisotropic (CS(A)) chemical shielding parameters for the sites of various (27)Al and (14)N atoms, NQR parameters for the sites of various of (27)Al and (14)N atoms, and quantum molecular descriptors were calculated in the optimized structures. The optimized structures, the electronic properties, NMR and NQR parameters, and quantum molecular descriptors for the Si(N) and Si(Al) models show that the Si(N) model is a more reactive material than the pristine or Si(Al) model. PMID:22588584

  20. Search for resonances decaying to top and bottom quarks with the CDF experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero

    2015-08-03

    We report on a search for charged massive resonances decaying to top (t) and bottom (b) quarks in the full data set of proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.5 fb–1. No significant excess above the standard model background prediction is observed. We set 95% Bayesian credibility mass-dependent upper limits on the heavy charged-particle production cross section times branching ratio to tb. Using a standard model extension with a W' → tb and left-right-symmetric couplings as a benchmark model, we constrain the W' mass and couplings in the 300–900 GeV/c2 range. As a result, the limits presented here are the most stringent for a charged resonance with mass in the range 300–600 GeV/c2 decaying to top and bottom quarks.

  1. Dynamics of firing patterns, synchronization and resonances in neuronal electrical activities: experiments and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qishao; Gu, Huaguang; Yang, Zhuoqin; Shi, Xia; Duan, Lixia; Zheng, Yanhong

    2008-12-01

    Recent advances in the experimental and theoretical study of dynamics of neuronal electrical firing activities are reviewed. Firstly, some experimental phenomena of neuronal irregular firing patterns, especially chaotic and stochastic firing patterns, are presented, and practical nonlinear time analysis methods are introduced to distinguish deterministic and stochastic mechanism in time series. Secondly, the dynamics of electrical firing activities in a single neuron is concerned, namely, fast-slow dynamics analysis for classification and mechanism of various bursting patterns, one- or two-parameter bifurcation analysis for transitions of firing patterns, and stochastic dynamics of firing activities (stochastic and coherence resonances, integer multiple and other firing patterns induced by noise, etc.). Thirdly, different types of synchronization of coupled neurons with electrical and chemical synapses are discussed. As noise and time delay are inevitable in nervous systems, it is found that noise and time delay may induce or enhance synchronization and change firing patterns of coupled neurons. Noise-induced resonance and spatiotemporal patterns in coupled neuronal networks are also demonstrated. Finally, some prospects are presented for future research. In consequence, the idea and methods of nonlinear dynamics are of great significance in exploration of dynamic processes and physiological functions of nervous systems.

  2. Search for Resonances Decaying to Top and Bottom Quarks with the CDF Experiment.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Anzà, F; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bianchi, L; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; D'Errico, M; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Song, H; Sorin, V; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2015-08-01

    We report on a search for charged massive resonances decaying to top (t) and bottom (b) quarks in the full data set of proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √[s]=1.96  TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.5  fb(-1). No significant excess above the standard model background prediction is observed. We set 95% Bayesian credibility mass-dependent upper limits on the heavy charged-particle production cross section times branching ratio to tb. Using a standard model extension with a W'→tb and left-right-symmetric couplings as a benchmark model, we constrain the W' mass and couplings in the 300-900  GeV/c(2) range. The limits presented here are the most stringent for a charged resonance with mass in the range 300-600  GeV/c(2) decaying to top and bottom quarks. PMID:26296108

  3. Multi-axis force sensing using a resonant composite piezoelectric plate: model and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaño-Cano, Davinson; Grossard, Mathieu; Hubert, Arnaud

    2015-05-01

    Wrist force/torque sensors used in robotic applications increase the performances and flexibility of the automated tasks. They also offer new possibilities in the manufacturing process, where physical contact between the work-piece and environment is required. The wide spreading of these sensors is for now restricted by their features. As an alternative to the existing strain-gauges force sensors, this paper presents a resonant composite structure, which is sensitive to multiple components of force that are considered via the pre-stress effect. Structurally bonded piezoelectric patches are used to bring the structure to its resonance, which is shifted according to applied forces. The relationship between force and frequency shift is modelled considering the multi-physics of this smart structure. This model is built using Hamilton's principle and takes into account pre-stress phenomena. A finite element model (FEM) based on Mindlin theory for plates, has been derived from the analytical model. The FEM model is implemented in MATLAB and compared with commercial FE software. Finally, an experimental prototype validates the model, and shows that it is possible to measure multiple force-components with one single sensing element such as a plate.

  4. Search for Resonances Decaying to Top and Bottom Quarks with the CDF Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Anzà, F.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bianchi, L.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    We report on a search for charged massive resonances decaying to top (t ) and bottom (b ) quarks in the full data set of proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √{s }=1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.5 fb-1 . No significant excess above the standard model background prediction is observed. We set 95% Bayesian credibility mass-dependent upper limits on the heavy charged-particle production cross section times branching ratio to t b . Using a standard model extension with a W'→t b and left-right-symmetric couplings as a benchmark model, we constrain the W' mass and couplings in the 300 - 900 GeV /c2 range. The limits presented here are the most stringent for a charged resonance with mass in the range 300 - 600 GeV /c2 decaying to top and bottom quarks.

  5. Neutron emission spectroscopy results for internal transport barrier and mode conversion ion cyclotron resonance heating experiments at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Hellesen, C.; Conroy, S.; Sunden, E. Andersson; Ericsson, G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sjoestrand, H.; Weiszflog, M.; Kaellne, J.; Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.

    2008-10-15

    The effect of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) on ({sup 3}He)D plasmas at JET was studied with the time of flight optimized rate (TOFOR) spectrometer dedicated to 2.5 MeV dd neutron measurements. In internal transport barrier (ITB) plasma experiments with large {sup 3}He concentrations (X({sup 3}He)>15%) an increase in neutron yield was observed after the ITB disappeared but with the auxiliary neutral beam injection and ICRH power still applied. The analysis of the TOFOR data revealed the formation of a high energy (fast) D population in this regime. The results were compared to other mode conversion experiments with similar X({sup 3}He) but slightly different heating conditions. In this study we report on the high energy neutron tails originating from the fast D ions and their correlation with X({sup 3}He) and discuss the light it can shed on ICRH-plasma power coupling mechanisms.

  6. A p-spin high-pass filter using radiofrequency field gradients for homonuclear magnetic resonance experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canet, Daniel; Mutzenhardt, Pierre; Brondeau, Jean

    Traditional multiple-quantum filtering in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy relies on the acquisition of several transients along with appropriate phase cycling. It is shown that similar results can be obtained in one transient by using a cluster of two radiofrequency field (B1) gradient pulses (g1)x(rg1)y where g1 and rg1 denote the durations of the B1 gradient pulses and the subscripts x and y the transmitter phases. This filter acts on single-quantum antiphase coherences and is of high-pass nature. The choice of r determines the order of the filter (according to the number of spins belonging to the system considered). This property is demonstrated theoretically and verified experimentally by dedicated one-dimensional experiments and COSY-type two-dimensional experiments.

  7. Using an NMR Spectrometer to Do Magnetic Resonance Imaging: An Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmetz, Wayne E.; Maher, M. Cyrus

    2007-01-01

    A conventional Fourier-transform NMR spectrometer with a triple-axis gradient probe can function as a MRI imager. In this experiment students gain hands-on experience with MRI while they learn about important principles underlying the practice of NMR, such as gradients, multi-dimensional spectroscopy, and relaxation. Students image a biological…

  8. Switching from visibility to invisibility via Fano resonances: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Rybin, Mikhail V; Filonov, Dmitry S; Belov, Pavel A; Kivshar, Yuri S; Limonov, Mikhail F

    2015-01-01

    Subwavelength structures demonstrate many unusual optical properties which can be employed for engineering of a new generation of functional metadevices, as well as controlled scattering of light and invisibility cloaking. Here we demonstrate that the suppression of light scattering for any direction of observation can be achieved for a uniform dielectric object with high refractive index, in a sharp contrast to the cloaking with multilayered plasmonic structures suggested previously. Our finding is based on the novel physics of cascades of Fano resonances observed in the Mie scattering from a homogeneous dielectric rod. We observe this effect experimentally at microwaves by employing high temperature-dependent dielectric permittivity of a glass cylinder with heated water. Our results open a new avenue in analyzing the optical response of high-index dielectric nanoparticles and the physics of cloaking. PMID:25739324

  9. Switching from Visibility to Invisibility via Fano Resonances: Theory and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, Mikhail V.; Filonov, Dmitry S.; Belov, Pavel A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Limonov, Mikhail F.

    2015-03-01

    Subwavelength structures demonstrate many unusual optical properties which can be employed for engineering of a new generation of functional metadevices, as well as controlled scattering of light and invisibility cloaking. Here we demonstrate that the suppression of light scattering for any direction of observation can be achieved for a uniform dielectric object with high refractive index, in a sharp contrast to the cloaking with multilayered plasmonic structures suggested previously. Our finding is based on the novel physics of cascades of Fano resonances observed in the Mie scattering from a homogeneous dielectric rod. We observe this effect experimentally at microwaves by employing high temperature-dependent dielectric permittivity of a glass cylinder with heated water. Our results open a new avenue in analyzing the optical response of high-index dielectric nanoparticles and the physics of cloaking.

  10. Switching from Visibility to Invisibility via Fano Resonances: Theory and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Rybin, Mikhail V.; Filonov, Dmitry S.; Belov, Pavel A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Limonov, Mikhail F.

    2015-01-01

    Subwavelength structures demonstrate many unusual optical properties which can be employed for engineering of a new generation of functional metadevices, as well as controlled scattering of light and invisibility cloaking. Here we demonstrate that the suppression of light scattering for any direction of observation can be achieved for a uniform dielectric object with high refractive index, in a sharp contrast to the cloaking with multilayered plasmonic structures suggested previously. Our finding is based on the novel physics of cascades of Fano resonances observed in the Mie scattering from a homogeneous dielectric rod. We observe this effect experimentally at microwaves by employing high temperature-dependent dielectric permittivity of a glass cylinder with heated water. Our results open a new avenue in analyzing the optical response of high-index dielectric nanoparticles and the physics of cloaking. PMID:25739324

  11. Proton and deuterium NMR experiments in zero field. [Perdeuterated p-demethoxybenzene, perdeuterated malonic acid, diethyl terephthalate-d4, nonadecane-2,2'-D2, sodium propionate-D2

    SciTech Connect

    Millar, J.M.

    1986-02-01

    High field solid-state NMR lineshapes suffer from inhomogeneous broadening since resonance frequencies are a function of molecular orientation. Time domain zero field NMR is a two-dimensional field-cycling technique which removes this broadening by probing the evolution of the spin system under zero applied field. The simplest version, the sudden transition experiment, induces zero field evolution by the sudden removal of the applied magnetic field. Theory and experimental results of this experiment and several variations using pulsed dc magnetic fuelds to initiate zero field evolution are presented. In particular, the pulsed indirect detection method allows detection of the zero field spectrum of one nuclear spin species via another (usually protons) by utilizing the level crossings which occur upon adiabatic demagnetization to zero field. Experimental examples of proton/deuteron systems are presented which demonstrate the method results in enhanced sensitivity relative to that obtained in sudden transition experiments performed directly on deuterium. High resolution /sup 2/H NQR spectra of a series of benzoic acid derivatives are obtained using the sudden transition and indirect detection methods. Librational oscillations in the water molecules of barium chlorate monohydrate are studied using proton and deuterium ZF experiments. 177 refs., 88 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. On the second harmonic electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive experiments on T-10 and DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, J.; Forest, C.B.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Luce, T.C.; Harvey, R.W. ); Downs, E.A. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY ); James, R.A. Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA ); Bagdasarov, A.A.; Borshegovskii, A.A.; Chistyakov, V.V.; Dremin, M.M.; Gors

    1993-02-01

    Studies of electron cyclotron current drive at the second harmonic resonance have been performed both on the DIII-D and T-10 tokamaks at injected power levels of approximately 0.5 MW. The DIII-D experiment used high held launch of the extraordinary mode at an angle of 15[degree] to the radial. In this experiment, with pulse lengths [approx equal] 500 msec, a loop voltage difference, compared to the value expected from the measured profiles, of [approx equal] 50 mV was ascribed to approximately 50 kA of rf-driven current. When dc electric field and trapped particle effects were considered, this was consistent with theoretical predictions. T-10 experiments planned for the fall of 1992 will use low field launch of the extraordinary mode and an injection angle of 21[degree] off-radial. In preliminary experiments with relatively poor machine conditions and pulse lengths [approx equal] 400 msec, rf current drive was not observed despite the fact that driven currents as low as 10 kA, corresponding to a loop voltage difference for co- versus counter-injection of 20 mV, could have been detected. In this paper we examine the T-10 experiments using ray tracing and transport calculations in an attempt to understand the results. The dependence of the current drive efficiency on discharge parameters, flux penetration, and non-linear effects will be discussed. The results show that the launching geometry can have a significant effect on the observation of electron cyclotron current drive using the loop voltage as a diagnostic. In addition, predictions for the next series of experiments on T-10, for which greater than 2 MW of high frequency power should be available, will be presented.

  13. On the second harmonic electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive experiments on T-10 and DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, J.; Forest, C.B.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Luce, T.C.; Harvey, R.W.; Downs, E.A. |; James, R.A. |; Bagdasarov, A.A.; Borshegovskii, A.A.; Chistyakov, V.V.; Dremin, M.M.; Gorshkov, A.V.; Gorelov, Y.A.; Esipchuk, Y.V.; Ivanov, N.V.; Kislov, A.Y.; Kislov, D.A.; Lysenko, S.E.; Medvedev, A.A.; Mirenskii, V.Y.; Notkin, G.E.; Parail, V.V.; Pavlov, Y.D.; Razumova, K.A.; Roi, I.N.; Savrukhin, P.V.; Sannikov, V.V.; Sushkov, A.V.; Trukhin, V.M.; Vasin, N.L.; Volkov, V.V.; Denisov, G.G.; Petelin, M.I.; Flyagin, V.A.

    1993-02-01

    Studies of electron cyclotron current drive at the second harmonic resonance have been performed both on the DIII-D and T-10 tokamaks at injected power levels of approximately 0.5 MW. The DIII-D experiment used high held launch of the extraordinary mode at an angle of 15{degree} to the radial. In this experiment, with pulse lengths {approx_equal} 500 msec, a loop voltage difference, compared to the value expected from the measured profiles, of {approx_equal} 50 mV was ascribed to approximately 50 kA of rf-driven current. When dc electric field and trapped particle effects were considered, this was consistent with theoretical predictions. T-10 experiments planned for the fall of 1992 will use low field launch of the extraordinary mode and an injection angle of 21{degree} off-radial. In preliminary experiments with relatively poor machine conditions and pulse lengths {approx_equal} 400 msec, rf current drive was not observed despite the fact that driven currents as low as 10 kA, corresponding to a loop voltage difference for co- versus counter-injection of 20 mV, could have been detected. In this paper we examine the T-10 experiments using ray tracing and transport calculations in an attempt to understand the results. The dependence of the current drive efficiency on discharge parameters, flux penetration, and non-linear effects will be discussed. The results show that the launching geometry can have a significant effect on the observation of electron cyclotron current drive using the loop voltage as a diagnostic. In addition, predictions for the next series of experiments on T-10, for which greater than 2 MW of high frequency power should be available, will be presented.

  14. Accurate protein-peptide titration experiments by nuclear magnetic resonance using low-volume samples.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Christian; Recht, Raphaël; Quinternet, Marc; de Lamotte, Frederic; Delsuc, Marc-André; Kieffer, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy allows measurements of very accurate values of equilibrium dissociation constants using chemical shift perturbation methods, provided that the concentrations of the binding partners are known with high precision and accuracy. The accuracy and precision of these experiments are improved if performed using individual capillary tubes, a method enabling full automation of the measurement. We provide here a protocol to set up and perform these experiments as well as a robust method to measure peptide concentrations using tryptophan as an internal standard. PMID:25749962

  15. Quantitative resonant soft x-ray reflectivity of ultrathin anisotropic organic layers: Simulation and experiment of PTCDA on Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, R.; Mahne, N.; Koshmak, K.; Giglia, A.; Doyle, B. P.; Mukherjee, S.; Nannarone, S.; Pasquali, L.

    2016-07-01

    Resonant soft X-ray reflectivity at the carbon K edge, with linearly polarized light, was used to derive quantitative information of film morphology, molecular arrangement, and electronic orbital anisotropies of an ultrathin 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) film on Au(111). The experimental spectra were simulated by computing the propagation of the electromagnetic field in a trilayer system (vacuum/PTCDA/Au), where the organic film was treated as an anisotropic medium. Optical constants were derived from the calculated (through density functional theory) absorption cross sections of the single molecule along the three principal molecular axes. These were used to construct the dielectric tensor of the film, assuming the molecules to be lying flat with respect to the substrate and with a herringbone arrangement parallel to the substrate plane. Resonant soft X-ray reflectivity proved to be extremely sensitive to film thickness, down to the single molecular layer. The best agreement between simulation and experiment was found for a film of 1.6 nm, with flat laying configuration of the molecules. The high sensitivity to experimental geometries in terms of beam incidence and light polarization was also clarified through simulations. The optical anisotropies of the organic film were experimentally determined and through the comparison with calculations, it was possible to relate them to the orbital symmetry of the empty electronic states.

  16. Resonant infrared laser-induced desorption of methane condensed on NaCl(100): isotope mixture experiments.

    PubMed

    Redlich, Britta; Zacharias, Helmut; Meijer, Gerard; von Helden, Gert

    2006-01-28

    Resonantly enhanced infrared laser-induced desorption of methane condensed on a single-crystal NaCl(100) surface is observed after excitation with the widely tunable infrared laser output of the free-electron laser at the free-electron laser for infrared experiments facility using mass spectroscopic detection and time-of-flight analysis. Desorption of methane is observed only when the exciting light is in resonance with an internal vibrational mode of the molecule. Different intramolecular modes of the three methane isotopologues under study--CH(4), CD(4), and CD(3)H--are excited; the degenerate deformation mode nu(4) is observed for CH(4) and CD(4) at 7.69 and 10.11 microm, respectively, as well as the nu(2) and nu(4) modes of CD(3)H at 7.79, 9.75, and 9.98 microm. The desorption signals for the pure layers of these different methane isotopologues as well as for different mixtures of two of these are investigated as a function of the infrared wavelength and the laser fluence. The desorption behavior for pure and mixed layers is compared and the underlying desorption mechanism is discussed. PMID:16460197

  17. Development of Low Temperature Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (NMRFM) Experiments for Probing Nanoscale Films and Microcrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paster, Jeremy; Tennant, Daniel; Mozaffari, Shirin; Markert, John

    2014-03-01

    Force detection of nuclear spins is accomplished by coupling NMR spin-flip sequences to a mechanical oscillator. A thin ferromagnet deposited on the tip of the oscillator sets up a large gradient magnetic field in the vicinity of the spins. This provides a magnetic force signature which we can distinguish from the thermal noise of the oscillator. The gradient field also traces out a slice in space in which spins are resonantly tuned to the RF field. We review the advantages of various strategies for inducing nuclear spin flips including cantilever-driven and RF-modulation techniques. We also report on the current state of the project, highlighting important developments and experimental results. In particular, we've adapted a low temperature NMRFM probe for easy transition between thin-film and microcrystal experiments. In one configuration, we orient the oscillator perpendicular to the sample plane so we can work in the region where the ferromagnet's field gradient is largest. Conversely, we can rotate the oscillator 90 degrees to change the geometry of the gradient field. With this orientation we maximize resolution in one dimension by using the flat part of the resonance slice to pick up as many in-plane nuclei as we can.

  18. Quantitative resonant soft x-ray reflectivity of ultrathin anisotropic organic layers: Simulation and experiment of PTCDA on Au.

    PubMed

    Capelli, R; Mahne, N; Koshmak, K; Giglia, A; Doyle, B P; Mukherjee, S; Nannarone, S; Pasquali, L

    2016-07-14

    Resonant soft X-ray reflectivity at the carbon K edge, with linearly polarized light, was used to derive quantitative information of film morphology, molecular arrangement, and electronic orbital anisotropies of an ultrathin 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) film on Au(111). The experimental spectra were simulated by computing the propagation of the electromagnetic field in a trilayer system (vacuum/PTCDA/Au), where the organic film was treated as an anisotropic medium. Optical constants were derived from the calculated (through density functional theory) absorption cross sections of the single molecule along the three principal molecular axes. These were used to construct the dielectric tensor of the film, assuming the molecules to be lying flat with respect to the substrate and with a herringbone arrangement parallel to the substrate plane. Resonant soft X-ray reflectivity proved to be extremely sensitive to film thickness, down to the single molecular layer. The best agreement between simulation and experiment was found for a film of 1.6 nm, with flat laying configuration of the molecules. The high sensitivity to experimental geometries in terms of beam incidence and light polarization was also clarified through simulations. The optical anisotropies of the organic film were experimentally determined and through the comparison with calculations, it was possible to relate them to the orbital symmetry of the empty electronic states. PMID:27421398

  19. Magnetic Resonance-Guided Percutaneous Cryoablation of Uterine Fibroids: Early Clinical Experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Sakuhara, Yusuke Shimizu, Tadashi; Kodama, Yoshihisa; Sawada, Akihiro; Endo, Hideho; Abo, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Tenshu; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. Uterine fibroids (leiomyomas) are the most common tumors of the uterus. The present study evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of magnetic resonance (MR)-guided percutaneous cryoablation for uterine fibroids as a minimally invasive treatment alternative. Methods. From August 2001 to June 2002, MR-guided percutaneous cryoablation was performed on seven uterine fibroids in 6 patients who displayed clinical symptoms related to tumors. Using a horizontal-type open MR system, cryoablation probes were percutaneously placed in fibroids. Fibroids were ablated, and the site and size of ice balls were monitored on MR imaging. Postoperatively, patients completed a questionnaire to assess changes in presenting clinical symptoms, and MR images were obtained for all patients at follow-up. Changes in clinical symptoms and tumor volume were evaluated in each patient. Results. All treated patients showed reductions in tumor size. Mean volume reduction rate was 40.3% at 6 weeks postoperatively, and 79.4% at 9-12 months. All patients reported fever after treatment. Surgical drainage was required for abscess in the probe channel in one patient, and transient liver damage occurred in another. Subjective symptoms improved in all patients except one who had multiple tumors, and no patient complained of new symptoms after cryoablation during follow-up. Conclusion. MR-guided percutaneous cryoablation represents a feasible and effective treatment for uterine fibroids.

  20. Focusing twist reflector for electron-cyclotron resonance heating in the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Stallard, B.W.; Coffield, F.E.; Felker, B.; Taska, J.; Christensen, T.E.; Gallagher, N.C. Jr.; Sweeney, D.W.

    1984-05-01

    A twist reflector plate is described that linearly polarizes and focuses the TE/sub O/sub 1// circular waveguide mode for heating hot electrons in the thermal barrier of the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U). The plate polarizing efficiency is 95%, and it has operated satisfactorily at 150 kW power level.

  1. Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Studies of the Sorc Sequence and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Polymers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakody, Jayakody R. Pemadasa

    1993-01-01

    The behavior of induction signals during steady -state pulse irradiation in ^{14} N NQR was investigated experimentally. Because Strong Off-resonance Comb (SORC) signals recur as long as the pulsing continues, very efficient signal-averaging can result. The dependence of these steady-state SORC signals on pulse parameters and on frequency offset are presented, together with a discussion of the applicability of the method. Also as part of the NQR work, Cocaine base has been detected using conventional NQR techniques. The experimental results show that SORC detection can be of sufficient sensitivity to form the basis of narcotics screening devices for both mail and airline baggage. A new NMR technique, to obtain the correlation time of the random thermal motion of a polymer at temperatures near the glass transition has been introduced. The temperature dependence is a result of thermal motion. For slow-motion of a polymer chain near the glass transition, the CSA parameter begins to decrease. This motional narrowing can be interpreted to yield the correlation time of the thermal motion. In this work Nitrocellulose isotopically highly enriched with ^{15}N was studied at four different temperatures between 27^ circ and 120^circ Celsius and the correlation times for polymer backbone motions were obtained. Nafion films containing, water (D_2 O and H_2^{17}O) and methanol (CH_3OD, CH _3^{17}OH), have been studied using Deuteron and Oxygen-17 NMR spectroscopy. Glassy behavior of the water domains at low temperature is evidenced by the specific nature of the ^2H NMR lineshapes. Activation energies extracted from ^2H spin-lattice relaxation data on the high temperature side of the T_1 minimum exhibit a steady increase with increasing water content. In spite of a high degree of molecular mobility, angular-dependent spectra of both unstretched and stretched samples reflect considerable anisotropy of the host polymer. Activation volumes corresponding to a specific dynamical

  2. Construction of a 100kW Electron Cyclotron Resonant Heating (ECRH) system on the Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment (MPDX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, M. M.; Milhone, J.; Nonn, P.; Wallace, J. P.; Forest, C. B.; WiPAL Team

    2015-11-01

    A system of five 20 kW magnetrons is being installed for the Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment (MPDX) to produce and heat the plasma with RF energy. Each magnetron will receive 2.5A of 14kV DC power. The source of the DC power is from a 240V three phase line which is transformed to high voltage, rectified, and processed through a series modulator regulator circuit. The RF is transmitted to the vessel via WR284 waveguide. The actions taken to develop the DC power source will be discussed and illustrated. The vessel of MPDX is a 3 meter diameter sphere comprised of two nearly identical hemispherical shells of 1.25'' thick cast aluminum. 36 Rings of SmCo magnets attached to the inner vessel surface create a cusp field to contain the plasma and provide a resonance surface for the RF.

  3. Geomagnetic field-line resonant harmonics measured by the Viking and AMPTE/CCE magnetic field experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanetti, L. J.; Potemra, T. A.; Erlandson, R. E.; Engebretson, M. J.; Acuna, M. H.

    1987-01-01

    The first simultaneous observations of multiple harmonic, azimuthally polarized, ULF pulsations at two points along a geomagnetic flux tube in space are reported. In March 1986, the elliptically orbiting equatorial AMPTE/CCE satellite was oriented with the apogee near 0830 h MLT, and the orbital plane of the polar-orbiting Viking satellite was at 1000 MLT. The satellites were situated within approximately the same flux tube but with an effective separation of approximately 10 R(e) near L = 8 on the inbound pass of the AMPTE/CCE orbit. Structured harmonic pulsations were observed by the magnetic field experiments on both spacecraft, and they appeared to turn off and on simultaneously at both locations. Both the observations and the relative amplitudes along the magnetic field lines support recent ideas of multiple field-line resonances of Alfven waves.

  4. High-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance experiments on highly radioactive ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnan, Ian; Cho, Herman; Weber, William J.; Scheele, Randall D.; Johnson, Nigel R.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

    2004-12-01

    A triple-containment magic-angle spinning rotor insert system has been developed and a sample handling procedure formulated for safely analyzing highly radioactive solids by high-resolution solid-state NMR. The protocol and containment system have been demonstrated for magic-angle spinning (MAS) experiments on ceramic samples containing 5-10 wt % 239Pu and 238Pu at rotation speeds of 3500 Hz. The technique has been used to demonstrate that MAS NMR experiments can be used to measure amorphous atomic number fractions produced by accelerated internal radiation damage. This will allow incorporated α-emitters with short half-lives to be used to model the long-term radiation tolerance of potential ceramic radioactive waste forms. This is an example of MAS NMR spectroscopy on samples containing fissionable isotopes.

  5. A tunable general purpose Q-band resonator for CW and pulse EPR/ENDOR experiments with large sample access and optical excitation.

    PubMed

    Reijerse, Edward; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Isaacson, Roger; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    We describe a frequency tunable Q-band cavity (34 GHz) designed for CW and pulse Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) as well as Electron Nuclear Double Resonance (ENDOR) and Electron Electron Double Resonance (ELDOR) experiments. The TE(011) cylindrical resonator is machined either from brass or from graphite (which is subsequently gold plated), to improve the penetration of the 100 kHz field modulation signal. The (self-supporting) ENDOR coil consists of four 0.8mm silver posts at 2.67 mm distance from the cavity center axis, penetrating through the plunger heads. It is very robust and immune to mechanical vibrations. The coil is electrically shielded to enable CW ENDOR experiments with high RF power (500 W). The top plunger of the cavity is movable and allows a frequency tuning of ±2 GHz. In our setup the standard operation frequency is 34.0 GHz. The microwaves are coupled into the resonator through an iris in the cylinder wall and matching is accomplished by a sliding short in the coupling waveguide. Optical excitation of the sample is enabled through slits in the cavity wall (transmission ∼60%). The resonator accepts 3mm o.d. sample tubes. This leads to a favorable sensitivity especially for pulse EPR experiments of low concentration biological samples. The probehead dimensions are compatible with that of Bruker flexline Q-band resonators and it fits perfectly into an Oxford CF935 Helium flow cryostat (4-300 K). It is demonstrated that, due to the relatively large active sample volume (20-30 μl), the described resonator has superior concentration sensitivity as compared to commercial pulse Q-band resonators. The quality factor (Q(L)) of the resonator can be varied between 2600 (critical coupling) and 1300 (over-coupling). The shortest achieved π/2-pulse durations are 20 ns using a 3 W microwave amplifier. ENDOR (RF) π-pulses of 20 μs ((1)H @ 51 MHz) were obtained for a 300 W amplifier and 7 μs using a 2500 W amplifier. Selected applications of the

  6. A tunable general purpose Q-band resonator for CW and pulse EPR/ENDOR experiments with large sample access and optical excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijerse, Edward; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Isaacson, Roger; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    We describe a frequency tunable Q-band cavity (34 GHz) designed for CW and pulse Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) as well as Electron Nuclear Double Resonance (ENDOR) and Electron Electron Double Resonance (ELDOR) experiments. The TE 011 cylindrical resonator is machined either from brass or from graphite (which is subsequently gold plated), to improve the penetration of the 100 kHz field modulation signal. The (self-supporting) ENDOR coil consists of four 0.8 mm silver posts at 2.67 mm distance from the cavity center axis, penetrating through the plunger heads. It is very robust and immune to mechanical vibrations. The coil is electrically shielded to enable CW ENDOR experiments with high RF power (500 W). The top plunger of the cavity is movable and allows a frequency tuning of ±2 GHz. In our setup the standard operation frequency is 34.0 GHz. The microwaves are coupled into the resonator through an iris in the cylinder wall and matching is accomplished by a sliding short in the coupling waveguide. Optical excitation of the sample is enabled through slits in the cavity wall (transmission ˜60%). The resonator accepts 3 mm o.d. sample tubes. This leads to a favorable sensitivity especially for pulse EPR experiments of low concentration biological samples. The probehead dimensions are compatible with that of Bruker flexline Q-band resonators and it fits perfectly into an Oxford CF935 Helium flow cryostat (4-300 K). It is demonstrated that, due to the relatively large active sample volume (20-30 μl), the described resonator has superior concentration sensitivity as compared to commercial pulse Q-band resonators. The quality factor ( Q L) of the resonator can be varied between 2600 (critical coupling) and 1300 (over-coupling). The shortest achieved π/2-pulse durations are 20 ns using a 3 W microwave amplifier. ENDOR (RF) π-pulses of 20 μs ( 1H @ 51 MHz) were obtained for a 300 W amplifier and 7 μs using a 2500 W amplifier. Selected applications of the

  7. Covalency of hydrogen bonds in liquid water can be probed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance experiments.

    PubMed

    Elgabarty, Hossam; Khaliullin, Rustam Z; Kühne, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    The concept of covalency is widely used to describe the nature of intermolecular bonds, to explain their spectroscopic features and to rationalize their chemical behaviour. Unfortunately, the degree of covalency of an intermolecular bond cannot be directly measured in an experiment. Here we established a simple quantitative relationship between the calculated covalency of hydrogen bonds in liquid water and the anisotropy of the proton magnetic shielding tensor that can be measured experimentally. This relationship enabled us to quantify the degree of covalency of hydrogen bonds in liquid water using the experimentally measured anisotropy. We estimated that the amount of electron density transferred between molecules is on the order of 10  m while the stabilization energy due to this charge transfer is ∼15 kJ mol(-1). The physical insight into the fundamental nature of hydrogen bonding provided in this work will facilitate new studies of intermolecular bonding in a variety of molecular systems. PMID:26370179

  8. Covalency of hydrogen bonds in liquid water can be probed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance experiments

    PubMed Central

    Elgabarty, Hossam; Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of covalency is widely used to describe the nature of intermolecular bonds, to explain their spectroscopic features and to rationalize their chemical behaviour. Unfortunately, the degree of covalency of an intermolecular bond cannot be directly measured in an experiment. Here we established a simple quantitative relationship between the calculated covalency of hydrogen bonds in liquid water and the anisotropy of the proton magnetic shielding tensor that can be measured experimentally. This relationship enabled us to quantify the degree of covalency of hydrogen bonds in liquid water using the experimentally measured anisotropy. We estimated that the amount of electron density transferred between molecules is on the order of 10  m while the stabilization energy due to this charge transfer is ∼15 kJ mol−1. The physical insight into the fundamental nature of hydrogen bonding provided in this work will facilitate new studies of intermolecular bonding in a variety of molecular systems. PMID:26370179

  9. Beam experiments with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS.

    PubMed

    Thomae, R; Conradie, J; Fourie, D; Mira, J; Nemulodi, F; Kuechler, D; Toivanen, V

    2016-02-01

    At iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences (iThemba LABS) an electron cyclotron ion source was installed and commissioned. This source is a copy of the Grenoble Test Source (GTS) for the production of highly charged ions. The source is similar to the GTS-LHC at CERN and named GTS2. A collaboration between the Accelerators and Beam Physics Group of CERN and the Accelerator and Engineering Department of iThemba LABS was proposed in which the development of high intensity argon and xenon beams is envisaged. In this paper, we present beam experiments with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS, in which the results of continuous wave and afterglow operation of xenon ion beams with oxygen as supporting gases are presented. PMID:26931949

  10. Beam experiments with the Grenoble test electron cyclotron resonance ion source at iThemba LABS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomae, R.; Conradie, J.; Fourie, D.; Mira, J.; Nemulodi, F.; Kuechler, D.; Toivanen, V.

    2016-02-01

    At iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Sciences (iThemba LABS) an electron cyclotron ion source was installed and commissioned. This source is a copy of the Grenoble Test Source (GTS) for the production of highly charged ions. The source is similar to the GTS-LHC at CERN and named GTS2. A collaboration between the Accelerators and Beam Physics Group of CERN and the Accelerator and Engineering Department of iThemba LABS was proposed in which the development of high intensity argon and xenon beams is envisaged. In this paper, we present beam experiments with the GTS2 at iThemba LABS, in which the results of continuous wave and afterglow operation of xenon ion beams with oxygen as supporting gases are presented.