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Sample records for resonance nqr techniques

  1. Explosives detection by nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garroway, Allen N.; Buess, Michael L.; Yesinowski, James P.; Miller, Joel B.; Krauss, Ronald A.

    1994-10-01

    Pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) of 14N nuclei is quite promising as a method for detecting explosives such as RDX and contraband narcotics such as cocaine and heroin in quantities of interest. Pure NQR is conducted without an external applied magnetic field, so potential concerns about damage to magnetically encoded data or exposure of personnel to large magnetic fields are not relevant. Because NQR frequencies of different compounds are quite distinct, we do not encounter false alarms from the NQR signals of other benign materials. We have constructed a laboratory prototype NQR explosives detector which interrogates a volume of 300 liters (10 ft3). This paper presents abbreviated results from a demonstration of the laboratory prototype NQR explosives detector conducted at the Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center in May 1994 on RDX-based explosives.

  2. Frequency selective detection of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spin echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somasundaram, Samuel D.; Jakobsson, Andreas; Smith, John A. S.; Althoefer, Kaspar A.

    2006-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a radio frequency (RF) technique that can be used to detect the presence of quadrupolar nuclei, such as the 14N nucleus prevalent in many explosives and narcotics. The technique has been hampered by low signal-to-noise ratios and is further aggravated by the presence of RF interference (RFI). To ensure accurate detection, proposed detectors should exploit the rich form of the NQR signal. Furthermore, the detectors should also be robust to any remaining residual interference, left after suitable RFI mitigation has been employed. In this paper, we propose a new NQR data model, particularly for the realistic case where multiple pulse sequences are used to generate trains of spin echoes. Furthermore, we refine two recently proposed approximative maximum likelihood (AML) detectors, enabling the algorithm to optimally exploit the data model of the entire echo train and also incorporate knowledge of the temperature dependent spin-echo decay time. The AML-based detectors ensure accurate detection and robustness against residual RFI, even when the temperature of the sample is not precisely known, by exploiting the dependencies of the NQR resonant lines on temperature. Further robustness against residual interference is gained as the proposed detector is frequency selective; exploiting only those regions of the spectrum where the NQR signal is expected. Extensive numerical evaluations based on both simulated and measured NQR data indicate that the proposed Frequency selective Echo Train AML (FETAML) detector offers a significant improvement as compared to other existing detectors.

  3. Enhancing nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) signature detection leveraging interference suppression algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBardelaben, James A.; Miller, Jeremy K.; Myrick, Wilbur L.; Miller, Joel B.; Gilbreath, G. Charmaine; Bajramaj, Blerta

    2012-06-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a radio frequency (RF) magnetic spectroscopic technique that has been shown to detect and identify a wide range of explosive materials containing quadrupolar nuclei. The NQR response signal provides a unique signature of the material of interest. The signal is, however, very weak and can be masked by non-stationary RF interference (RFI) and thermal noise, limiting detection distance. In this paper, we investigate the bounds on the NQR detection range for ammonium nitrate. We leverage a low-cost RFI data acquisition system composed of inexpensive B-field sensing and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) software-defined radios (SDR). Using collected data as RFI reference signals, we apply adaptive filtering algorithms to mitigate RFI and enable NQR detection techniques to approach theoretical range bounds in tactical environments.

  4. Methyl quantum tunneling and nitrogen-14 NQR NMR studies using a SQUID magnetic resonance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Black, B.E. |

    1993-07-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques have been very successful in obtaining molecular conformation and dynamics information. Unfortunately, standard NMR and NQR spectrometers are unable to adequately detect resonances below a few megahertz due to the frequency dependent sensitivity of their Faraday coil detectors. For this reason a new spectrometer with a dc SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) detector, which has no such frequency dependence, has been developed. Previously, this spectrometer was used to observe {sup 11}B and {sup 27}Al NQR resonances. The scope of this study was increased to include {sup 23}Na, {sup 51}V, and {sup 55}Mn NQR transitions. Also, a technique was presented to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances through cross relaxation of the nitrogen polarization to adjacent proton spins. When the proton Zeeman splitting matches one nitrogen quadrupoler transition the remaining two {sup 14}N transitions can be detected by sweeping a saturating rf field through resonance. Additionally, simultaneous excitation of two nitrogen resonances provides signal enhancement which helps to connect transitions from the same site. In this way, nitrogen-14 resonances were observed in several amino acids and polypeptides. This spectrometer has also been useful in the direct detection of methyl quantum tunneling splittings at 4.2 K. Tunneling, frequencies of a homologous series of carboxylic acids were measured and for solids with equivalent crystal structures, an exponential correlation between the tunneling frequency and the enthalpy of fusion is observed. This correlation provides information about the contribution of intermolecular interactions to the energy barrier for methyl rotation.

  5. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: New technologies: nuclear quadrupole resonance as an explosive and narcotic detection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechishkin, Vadim S.; Sinyavskii, Nikolai Ya

    1997-04-01

    Possibilities of detecting nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) signals in explosives and drugs are considered. Direct and indirect NQR techniques for searching substances are described and the potentialities of various experimental methods are compared.

  6. Nanoscale NMR and NQR with Nitrogen Vacancy Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, Elana; Lovchinsky, Igor; Sanchez-Yamagishi, Javier; Choi, Soonwon; Bylinskii, Alexei; Dwyer, Bo; Andersen, Trond; Sushkov, Alex; Park, Hongkun; Lukin, Mikhail

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a powerful tool which is used to detect quadrupolar interaction in nuclear spins with I > 1/2. Conventional NQR and NMR technology, however, rely on measuring magnetic fields from a macroscopic number of spins. Extending NMR and NQR techniques to the nanoscale could allow us to learn structural information about interesting materials and biomolecules. We present recent progress on using Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond to perform room temperature nanoscale NMR and NQR spectroscopy on small numbers of nuclear spins in hexagonal boron nitride.

  7. Nuclear quadrupole resonance detection of explosives: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Joel B.

    2011-06-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a spectroscopic technique closely related to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). These techniques, and NQR in particular, induce signals from the material being interrogated that are very specific to the chemical and physical structure of the material, but are relatively insensitive to the physical form of the material. NQR explosives detection exploits this specificity to detect explosive materials, in contrast to other well known techniques that are designed to detect explosive devices. The past two decades have seen a large research and development effort in NQR explosives detection in the United States aimed at transportation security and military applications. Here, I will briefly describe the physical basis for NQR before discussing NQR developments over the past decade, with particular emphasis on landmine detection and the use of NQR in combating IED's. Potential future directions for NQR research and development are discussed.

  8. 63Cu NQR in copper (II) compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastow, T. J.; Campbell, I. D.; Whitfield, H. J.

    1980-01-01

    We report observations of 63Cu NQR in CuF 2, KCuF 3, and RbCuF 3 in the paramagnetic state, NQR line widths of 63Cu in CuF 2 and CuBr 2 and of 81Br in CuBr 2, SnBr 2 and ZnBr 2. The NQR resonances of certain Cu (II) paramagnetic compounds are exchange-narrowed to values commensurate with linewidths of the diamagnetic infinite-lattice compounds.

  9. NQR in tert-butyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetti, Aldo H.

    2004-03-01

    Tert-butyl chloride has been broadly studied experimentally through various techniques such as X-ray crystallography, DTA, and NMR. It was also studied experimentally through nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), but this study was limited and incomplete. In this paper, we present a more detailed study of TBC through the NQR of 35Cl. Our results show that near 120 K, the onset of the CH 3 groups semirotations around symmetry axis C3 takes place with an activation energy U=16.1 kJ mol -1. This intramolecular movement produces a T1 minimum near 148 K and is the dominant mechanism of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in phase III of this compound. In phase II of TBC, we show that there are not only methyl groups semirotations, but also semirotations of the whole molecule around a different axis from the symmetry axis C' 3 (C-Cl bond) with an activation energy of E=10.4 kJ mol -1.

  10. NQR detection of explosive simulants using RF atomic magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, Mark C.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Okamitsu, Jeffrey K.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a highly selective spectroscopic method that can be used to detect and identify a number of chemicals of interest to the defense, national security, and law enforcement community. In the past, there have been several documented attempts to utilize NQR to detect nitrogen bearing explosives using induction sensors to detect the NQR RF signatures. We present here our work on the NQR detection of explosive simulants using optically pumped RF atomic magnetometers. RF atomic magnetometers can provide an order of magnitude (or more) improvement in sensitivity versus induction sensors and can enable mitigation of RF interference, which has classically has been a problem for conventional NQR using induction sensors. We present the theory of operation of optically pumped RF atomic magnetometers along with the result of laboratory work on the detection of explosive simulant material. An outline of ongoing work will also be presented along with a path for a fieldable detection system.

  11. Detection of {sup 14}N and {sup 35}Cl in cocaine base and hydrochloride using NQR, NMR, and SQUID techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Yesinowski, J.P.; Buess, M.L.; Garroway, A.N.; Ziegeweid, M.; Pines, A. |

    1995-07-01

    Results from {sup 14}N pure NQR of cocaine in the free base form (cocaine base) yield a nuclear quadrupole coupling constant (NQCC) e{sup 2}Qq/h of 5.0229 ({+-}0.0001) MHz and an asymmetry parameter {eta} of 0.0395 ({+-}0.0001) at 295 K, with corresponding values of 5.0460 ({+-}0.0013) MHz and 0.0353 ({+-}0.0008) at 77 K. Both pure NQR (at 295-77 K) and a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detector (at 4.2 K) were used to measure the very low (<1 MHz) {sup 14}N transition frequencies in cocaine hydrochloride; at 295 K the NQCC is 1.1780 ({+-}0.0014) MHz and the asymmetry parameter is 0.2632 ({+-}0.0034). Stepping the carrier frequency enables one to obtain a powder pattern without the severe intensity distortions that otherwise arise from finite pulse power. A powder pattern simulation using an NQCC value of 5.027 MHz and an asymmetry parameter {eta} of 0.2 agrees reasonably well with the experimental stepped-frequency spectrum. The use of pure NQR for providing nondestructive, quantitative, and highly specific detection of crystalline compounds is discussed, as are experimental strategies. 31 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. SQUID detected NMR and NQR. Superconducting Quantum Interference Device.

    PubMed

    Augustine, M P; TonThat, D M; Clarke, J

    1998-03-01

    The dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) is a sensitive detector of magnetic flux, with a typical flux noise of the order 1 muphi0 Hz(-1/2) at liquid helium temperatures. Here phi0 = h/2e is the flux quantum. In our NMR or NQR spectrometer, a niobium wire coil wrapped around the sample is coupled to a thin film superconducting coil deposited on the SQUID to form a flux transformer. With this untuned input circuit the SQUID measures the flux, rather than the rate of change of flux, and thus retains its high sensitivity down to arbitrarily low frequencies. This feature is exploited in a cw spectrometer that monitors the change in the static magnetization of a sample induced by radio frequency irradiation. Examples of this technique are the detection of NQR in 27Al in sapphire and 11B in boron nitride, and a level crossing technique to enhance the signal of 14N in peptides. Research is now focused on a SQUID-based spectrometer for pulsed NQR and NMR, which has a bandwidth of 0-5 MHz. This spectrometer is used with spin-echo techniques to measure the NQR longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of 14N in NH4ClO4, 63+/-6 ms and 22+/-2 ms, respectively. With the aid of two-frequency pulses to excite the 359 kHz and 714 kHz resonances in ruby simultaneously, it is possible to obtain a two-dimensional NQR spectrum. As a third example, the pulsed spectrometer is used to study NMR spectrum of 129Xe after polariza-tion with optically pumped Rb. The NMR line can be detected at frequencies as low as 200 Hz. At fields below about 2 mT the longitudinal relaxation time saturates at about 2000 s. Two recent experiments in other laboratories have extended these pulsed NMR techniques to higher temperatures and smaller samples. In the first, images were obtained of mineral oil floating on water at room temperature. In the second, a SQUID configured as a thin film gradiometer was used to detect NMR in a 50 microm particle of 195Pt at 6 mT and 4.2 K. PMID:9650797

  13. NQR Characteristics of an RDX Plastic Explosives Simulant.

    PubMed

    Turecek, J; Schwitter, B; Miljak, D; Stancl, M

    2012-12-01

    For reliable detection of explosives, a combination of methods integrated within a single measurement platform may increase detection performance. However, the efficient field testing of such measurement platforms requires the use of inexplosive simulants that are detectable by a wide range of methods. Physical parameters such as simulant density, elemental composition and crystalline structure must closely match those of the target explosive. The highly discriminating bulk detection characteristics of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) especially constrain simulant design. This paper describes the development of an inexplosive RDX simulant suited to a wide range of measurement methods, including NQR. Measurements are presented that confirm an RDX NQR response from the simulant. The potential use of the simulant for field testing a prototype handheld NQR-based RDX detector is analyzed. Only modest changes in prototype operation during field testing would be required to account for the use of simulant rather than real explosive. PMID:23204647

  14. Pulsed Spin Locking in Spin-1 NQR: Broadening Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Michael W.

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a branch of magnetic resonance physics that allows for the detection of spin I > 1/2 nuclei in crystalline and semi-crystalline materials. Through the application of a resonant radio frequency (rf) pulse, the nuclei's response is to create an oscillating magnetic moment at a frequency unique to the target substance. This creates the NQR signal, which is typically weak and rapidly decaying. The decay is due to the various line broadening mechanisms, the relative strengths of which are functions of the specific material, in addition to thermal relaxation processes. Through the application of a series of rf pulses the broadening mechanisms can be refocused, narrowing the linewidth and extending the signal in time. Three line broadening mechanisms are investigated to explain the NQR signal's linewidth and behavior. The first, electric field gradient (EFG) inhomogeneity, is due to variations in the local electric environment among the target nuclei, for instance from crystal imperfections. While EFG inhomogeneity can vary between samples of the same chemical composition and structure, the other broadening mechanisms of homonuclear and heteronuclear dipolar coupling are specific to this composition and structure. Simple analytical models are developed that explain the NQR signal response to pulse sequences by accounting for the behavior of each broadening mechanism. After a general theoretical introduction, a model of pairs of spin-1 nuclei is investigated, and the refocusing behaviors of EFG and homonuclear dipolar coupling are analyzed. This reveals the conditions where EFG is refocused but homonuclear dipolar coupling is not. In this case the resulting signal shows a rapid decay, the rate of which becomes a measure of interatomic distances. This occurs even in the more complex case of a powder sample with its many randomly oriented crystallites, under particular pulsing conditions. Many target NQR compounds are rich in hydrogen

  15. NQR studies on 2,5-dichlorophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasturi, Alapati; Venkatacharyulu, P.; Premaswarup, D.

    1990-11-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) Zeeman effect studies were carried out on cylindrical single crystals of 2,5-dichlorophenol, using the two 35Cl-NQR frequencies. A self-quenched superregenerative NQR spectrometer was used, and the spectra were analysed ot obtain information on the nature of the crystalline unit cell. An analysis of the experimental data reveals that: (1) the results are in good agreement with the structural reports of Bavoux and Perrin; (2) the crystal unequivocally belongs to the monoclinic system; (3) there are two crystallographically equivalent but physically inequivalent directions for the principal field gradient axes for both the low- and high-frequency resonance lines; (4) as the number of physically inequivalent directions for each of the two resonance lines is two, the minimum number of molecules per unit cell is two; (5) the b axis (90°,90°) is identified as the symmetry axis; (6) the growth axis is slightly inclined to the c axis; (7) the asymmetry parameters obtained for the loci corresponding to the low-frequency line, which is hydrogen bonded, are greater than those for the high-frequency line, which is nonhydrogen bonded; (8) the double-bond character is greater for the hydrogen-bonded chlorine than for the non-hydrogen-bonded chlorine; (9) the ratios of the various bond characters estimated for both the low- and high-frequency resonance lines are 69:24:7 and 74:24:2.

  16. Authentication of Medicines Using Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Zhang, Fengchao; Barras, Jamie; Althoefer, Kaspar; Bhunia, Swarup; Mandal, Soumyajit

    2016-01-01

    The production and sale of counterfeit and substandard pharmaceutical products, such as essential medicines, is an important global public health problem. We describe a chemometric passport-based approach to improve the security of the pharmaceutical supply chain. Our method is based on applying nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy to authenticate the contents of medicine packets. NQR is a non-invasive, non-destructive, and quantitative radio frequency (RF) spectroscopic technique. It is sensitive to subtle features of the solid-state chemical environment and thus generates unique chemical fingerprints that are intrinsically difficult to replicate. We describe several advanced NQR techniques, including two-dimensional measurements, polarization enhancement, and spin density imaging, that further improve the security of our authentication approach. We also present experimental results that confirm the specificity and sensitivity of NQR and its ability to detect counterfeit medicines. PMID:26841409

  17. Radio-frequency tunable atomic magnetometer for detection of solid-state NQR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.-K.; Sauer, K. L.; Seltzer, S. J.; Alem, O.; Romalis, M. V.

    2007-06-01

    We constructed a potassium atomic magnetometer which resonantly detects rf magnetic fields with subfemtotesla sensitivity. The resonance frequency is set by the Zeeman resonance of the potassium atoms in a static magnetic field applied to the magnetometer cell. Strong optical pumping of the potassium atoms into a stretched state reduces spin-exchange broadening of the Zeeman resonance, resulting in relatively small linewidth of about 200 Hz (half-width at half-maximum). The magnetometer was used to detect ^14N NQR signal from powdered ammonium nitrate at 423 kHz, with sensitivity an order of magnitude higher than with a conventional room temperature pickup coil with comparable geometry. The demonstrated sensitivity of 0.24 fT/Hz^1/2 can be improved by several means, including use of higher power lasers for pumping and probing. Our technique can potentially be used to develop a mobile, open-access NQR spectrometer for detection of nitrogen-containing solids of interest in security applications.

  18. An analytical method for estimating the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance parameters of organic compounds with complex free induction decays for radiation effects studies

    SciTech Connect

    Iselin, L.H.

    1992-12-31

    The use of {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as a radiation dosimetry tool has only recently been explored. An analytical method for analyzing {sup 14}N NQR complex free induction decays is presented with the background necessary to conduct pulsed NQR experiments. The {sup 14}N NQR energy levels and possible transitions are derived in step-by-step detail. The components of a pulsed NQR spectrometer are discussed along with the experimental techniques for conducting radiation effects experiments using the spectrometer. Three data analysis techniques -- the power spectral density Fourier transform, state space singular value decomposition (HSVD), and nonlinear curve fitting (using the downhill simplex method of global optimization and the Levenberg-Marquart method) -- are explained. These three techniques are integrated into an analytical method which uses these numerical techniques in this order to determine the physical NQR parameters. Sample data sets of urea and guanidine sulfate data are used to demonstrate how these methods can be employed to analyze both simple and complex free induction decays. By determining baseline values for biologically significant organics, radiation effects on the NQR parameters can be studied to provide a link between current radiation dosimetry techniques and the biological effects of radiation.

  19. FPGA based pulsed NQR spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemnani, Preeti; Rajarajan, A. K.; Joshi, Gopal; Motiwala, Paresh D.; Ravindranath, S. V. G.

    2014-04-01

    An NQR spectrometer for the frequency range of 1 MHz to 5 MHZ has been designed constructed and tested using an FPGA module. Consisting of four modules viz. Transmitter, Probe, Receiver and computer controlled (FPGA & Software) module containing frequency synthesizer, pulse programmer, mixer, detection and display, the instrument is capable of exciting nuclei with a power of 200W and can detect signal of a few microvolts in strength. 14N signal from NaNO2 has been observed with the expected signal strength.

  20. Low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonance with a dc SQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.W.

    1991-07-01

    Conventional pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a technique well suited for the study of very large quadrupolar interactions. Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have been developed for the study of smaller quadrupolar interactions. However, there are many nuclei which have quadrupolar interactions of intermediate strength. Quadrupolar interactions in this region have traditionally been difficult or unfeasible to detect. This work describes the development and application of a SQUID NQR technique which is capable of measuring intermediate strength quadrupolar interactions, in the range of a few hundred kilohertz to several megahertz. In this technique, a dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) is used to monitor the longitudinal sample magnetization, as opposed to the transverse magnetization, as a rf field is swept in frequency. This allows the detection of low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonances over a very wide frequency range with high sensitivity. The theory of this NQR technique is discussed and a description of the dc SQUID system is given. In the following chapters, the spectrometer is discussed along with its application to the study of samples containing half-odd-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei, in particular boron-11 and aluminum-27. The feasibility of applying this NQR technique in the study of samples containing integer spin nuclei is discussed in the last chapter. 140 refs., 46 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Temperature dependence of 35Cl NQR in 3,4-Dichlorophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandramani, R.; Devaraj, N.; Indumathy, A.; Ramakrishna, J.

    NQR frequencies in 3,4-dichlorophenol are investigated in the temperature range 77 K to room temperature. Two resonances have been observed throughout the temperature range, corresponding to the two chemically inequivalent chlorine sites. Using Bayer's theory and Brown's method torsional frequencies and their temperature dependence in this range are estimated.

  2. Acoustic resonance techniques for quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, D.N.

    1992-09-01

    Acoustic resonance based nondestructive techniques are described that can be used for both process and quality control in manufacturing. The Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (AS) technique is highlighted for its capability in fluid property (flow, density, viscosity, and speed of sound) monitoring. Possible applications of these noninvasive techniques for textile manufacturing are pointed out.

  3. Acoustic resonance techniques for quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, D.N.

    1992-01-01

    Acoustic resonance based nondestructive techniques are described that can be used for both process and quality control in manufacturing. The Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (AS) technique is highlighted for its capability in fluid property (flow, density, viscosity, and speed of sound) monitoring. Possible applications of these noninvasive techniques for textile manufacturing are pointed out.

  4. 35Cl NQR frequency and spin lattice relaxation time in 3,4-dichlorophenol as a function of pressure and temperature.

    PubMed

    Ramu, L; Ramesh, K P; Chandramani, R

    2013-01-01

    The pressure dependences of (35)Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) frequency, temperature and pressure variation of spin lattice relaxation time (T(1)) were investigated in 3,4-dichlorophenol. T(1) was measured in the temperature range 77-300 K. Furthermore, the NQR frequency and T(1) for these compounds were measured as a function of pressure up to 5 kbar at 300 K. The temperature dependence of the average torsional lifetimes of the molecules and the transition probabilities W(1) and W(2) for the Δm = ±1 and Δm = ±2 transitions were also obtained. A nonlinear variation of NQR frequency with pressure has been observed and the pressure coefficients were observed to be positive. A thermodynamic analysis of the data was carried out to determine the constant volume temperature coefficients of the NQR frequency. An attempt is made to compare the torsional frequencies evaluated from NQR data with those obtained by IR spectra. On selecting the appropriate mode from IR spectra, a good agreement with torsional frequency obtained from NQR data is observed. The previously mentioned approach is a good illustration of the supplementary nature of the data from IR studies, in relation to NQR studies of compounds in solid state. PMID:23161529

  5. A miniaturized NQR spectrometer for a multi-channel NQR-based detection device.

    PubMed

    Beguš, Samo; Jazbinšek, Vojko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko

    2014-10-01

    A low frequency (0.5-5 MHz) battery operated sensitive pulsed NQR spectrometer with a transmitter power up to 5 W and a total mass of about 3 kg aimed at detecting (14)N NQR signals, predominantly of illicit materials, was designed and assembled. This spectrometer uses a standard software defined radio (SDR) platform for the data acquisition unit. Signal processing is done with the LabView Virtual instrument on a personal computer. We successfully tested the spectrometer by measuring (14)N NQR signals from aminotetrazole monohydrate (ATMH), potassium nitrate (PN), paracetamol (PCM) and trinitrotoluene (TNT). Such a spectrometer is a feasible component of a portable single or multichannel (14)N NQR based detection device. PMID:25233110

  6. A miniaturized NQR spectrometer for a multi-channel NQR-based detection device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beguš, Samo; Jazbinšek, Vojko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko

    2014-10-01

    A low frequency (0.5-5 MHz) battery operated sensitive pulsed NQR spectrometer with a transmitter power up to 5 W and a total mass of about 3 kg aimed at detecting 14N NQR signals, predominantly of illicit materials, was designed and assembled. This spectrometer uses a standard software defined radio (SDR) platform for the data acquisition unit. Signal processing is done with the LabView Virtual instrument on a personal computer. We successfully tested the spectrometer by measuring 14N NQR signals from aminotetrazole monohydrate (ATMH), potassium nitrate (PN), paracetamol (PCM) and trinitrotoluene (TNT). Such a spectrometer is a feasible component of a portable single or multichannel 14N NQR based detection device.

  7. Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Study of the Nitrogen Mustards and Local Anesthetics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buess, Michael Lee

    The density matrix description of pulsed nitrogen -14 nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spin-echoes is presented. The parallel between this problem, when formulated in terms of the fictitious spin- 1/2 operators, and that of spin - 1/2 NMR spin-echoes in liquids is discussed along with the complications which arise in multiple-pulse NQR experiments in powders due to the random orientation of the electric field gradient tensors. The equipment and procedures involved in searching for, detecting and identifying NQR resonances using pulsed techniques are described. The ('14)N NQR spectra of several nitrogen mustard compounds in the solid state are reported and analyzed in the framework of the Townes and Dailey theory. For the aniline derivatives, a correlation exists between l -(sigma), l being the nitrogen lone-pair electron density and (sigma) the average N-C sigma bond electron density, and the enhanced Hammett sigma constant (sigma)('-). An improved correlation is obtained between l-(sigma) and (sigma)(,R)('-), which emphasizes the importance of resonance effects in determining l-(sigma). The increase of hydrolysis and alkylation rates with increasing values of l-(sigma) is in agreement with the identification of the cyclic immonium ion as the intermediate in the hydrolysis and alkylation processes of the aromatic nitrogen mustards. A possible correlation is noted between the ('35)Cl NQR spectra for some of the mustards and measures of toxic and antitumor activity. ('14)N NQR spectra for several local anesthetics in the solid state are also reported and analyzed using the Townes and Dailey approach. The changes in the electron distributions at various nitrogen sites, produced by protonating the tertiary amino nitrogen, are discussed and shown to be in general agreement with expectations bases on the increased electrophilic character of the protonated amino group.

  8. Nuclear quadrupole resonance single-pulse echoes.

    PubMed

    Prescott, David W; Miller, Joel B; Tourigny, Chris; Sauer, Karen L

    2008-09-01

    We report the first detection of a spin echo after excitation of a powder sample by a single pulse at the resonance frequency during nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). These echoes can occur in samples that have an inhomogeneously broadened line, in this case due to the distribution of electric field gradients. The echoes are easily detectable when the Rabi frequency approaches the linewidth and the average effective tipping angle is close to 270 degrees. When limited by a weak radio-frequency field, the single-pulse echo can be used to increase the signal to noise ratio over conventional techniques. These effects can be used to optimize the NQR detection of contraband containing quadrupole nuclei and they are demonstrated with glycine hemihydrochloride and hexhydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). PMID:18571445

  9. Measurement of temperature and temperature gradient in millimeter samples by chlorine NQR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lužnik, Janko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko

    2009-09-01

    A mini-thermometer based on the 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) frequency temperature dependence in the chlorates KClO3 and NaClO3 was built and successfully tested by measuring temperature and temperature gradient at 77 K and higher in about 100 mm3 active volume of a mini Joule-Thomson refrigerator. In the design of the tank-circuit coil, an array of small coils connected in series enabled us (a) to achieve a suitable ratio of inductance to capacity in the NQR spectrometer input tank circuit, (b) to use a single crystal of KClO3 or NaClO3 (of 1-2 mm3 size) in one coil as a mini-thermometer with a resolution of 0.03 K and (c) to construct a system for measuring temperature gradients when the spatial coordinates of each chlorate single crystal within an individual coil are known.

  10. (121,123)Sb and (75)As NMR and NQR investigation of the tetrahedrite (Cu12Sb4S13)--Tennantite (Cu12As4S13) system and other metal arsenides.

    PubMed

    Bastow, T J; Lehmann-Horn, J A; Miljak, D G

    2015-10-01

    This work is motivated by the recent developments in online minerals analysis in the mining and minerals processing industry via nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). Here we describe a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and NQR study of the minerals tennantite (Cu12As4S13) and tetrahedrite (Cu12 Sb4S13). In the first part NQR lines associated with (75)As in tennantite and (121,123)Sb isotopes in tetrahedrite are reported. The spectroscopy has been restricted to an ambient temperature studies in accord with typical industrial conditions. The second part of this contribution reports nuclear quadrupole-perturbed NMR findings on further, only partially characterised, metal arsenides. The findings enhance the detection capabilities of NQR based analysers for online measurement applications and may aid to control arsenic and antimony concentrations in metal processing stages. PMID:26453410

  11. Electron density distribution in cladribine (2-chloro-2‧-deoxyadenosine) - A drug against leukemia and multiple sclerosis - Studied by multinuclear NQR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latosińska, J. N.; Latosińska, M.; Seliger, J.; Žagar, V.; Kazimierczuk, Z.

    2009-07-01

    2-Chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine (Cladribine) chemotherapeutic drug has been studied experimentally in solid state by 35Cl NQR and NMR-NQR double resonance and theoretically by the Density Functional Theory. Fifteen resonance frequencies on 14N have been detected and assigned to particular nitrogen sites in the 2-CdA molecule. The effects of tautomerism, regioisomerism, conformations and molecular aggregations, related to intermolecular hydrogen bond formation, on the NQR parameters have been analysed within the DFT and AIM ( Atoms in Molecules) formalism. The properties of the whole molecule, the so-called global reactivity descriptors, have been calculated for a comparison of both syn and anti conformations of 2-CdA molecule to check the effect of crystal packing on molecular conformation.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary analysis of the NqrA and NqrC subunits of the Na+-translocating NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Vohl, Georg; Nedielkov, Ruslan; Claussen, Björn; Casutt, Marco S.; Vorburger, Thomas; Diederichs, Kay; Möller, Heiko M.; Steuber, Julia; Fritz, Günter

    2014-01-01

    The Na+-translocating NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) from Vibrio cholerae is a membrane protein complex consisting of six different subunits NqrA–NqrF. The major domains of the NqrA and NqrC subunits were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized. The structure of NqrA1–377 was solved in space groups C2221 and P21 by SAD phasing and molecular replacement at 1.9 and 2.1 Å resolution, respectively. NqrC devoid of the transmembrane helix was co-expressed with ApbE to insert the flavin mononucleotide group covalently attached to Thr225. The structure was determined by molecular replacement using apo-NqrC of Parabacteroides distasonis as search model at 1.8 Å resolution. PMID:25005105

  13. Review: Magnetic resonance imaging techniques in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging the eye with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved difficult due to the eye’s propensity to move involuntarily over typical imaging timescales, obscuring the fine structure in the eye due to the resulting motion artifacts. However, advances in MRI technology help to mitigate such drawbacks, enabling the acquisition of high spatiotemporal resolution images with a variety of contrast mechanisms. This review aims to classify the MRI techniques used to date in clinical and preclinical ophthalmologic studies, describing the qualitative and quantitative information that may be extracted and how this may inform on ocular pathophysiology. PMID:23112569

  14. A Technique for Adjusting Eigenfrequencies of WGM Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Maleki, Lute; Matsko, Andrey; Iltchenko, Vladimir; Martin, Jan

    2009-01-01

    A simple technique has been devised for making small, permanent changes in the eigenfrequencies (resonance frequencies) of whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) dielectric optical resonators that have high values of the resonance quality factor (Q). The essence of the technique is to coat the resonator with a thin layer of a transparent polymer having an index of refraction close to that of the resonator material. Successive small frequency adjustments can be made by applying successive coats. The technique was demonstrated on a calcium fluoride resonator to which successive coats of a polymer were applied by use of a hand-made wooden brush. To prevent temperature- related frequency shifts that could interfere with the verification of the effectiveness of this technique, the temperature of the resonator was stabilized by means of a three-stage thermoelectric cooler. Measurements of the resonator spectrum showed the frequency shifts caused by the successive coating layers.

  15. 14N NQR investigation of some thermochromic and photochromic salicylideneanilines and related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjoudis, E.; Milia, F.; Seliger, J.; Zagar, V.; Blinc, R.

    1991-09-01

    The temperature dependence of the 14N NQR frequencies have been measured in a series of thermochromic and photochromic salicylideneanilines and related compounds using nuclear quadrupole double resonance. The results show that, in agreement with previous measurements, there is a fast exchange between inequivalent sites in the OH…N bond. The energy difference Δ E of the two proton sites was calculated for all the compounds and shows that it depends on their thermochromic behavior which is connected with the structure of the compounds.

  16. 63Cu NQR spectra of dicoordinated Cu(I) cations with imidazole and pyrazole ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajenhouri, Fereidoun; Motallebi, Shahrock; Lucken, Edwin A. C.

    1995-02-01

    The 63Cu NQR spectra of five dicoordinated complex cations of Cu(I) with substituted imidazoles as ligands and six analogous complexes with substituted pyrazoles as ligands are reported. The structures of four of these complexes have been previously determined and the relationship of their 63Cu resonance frequency to the average CuN bond length is compared to that of the analogous lutidine or collidine complexes. It is concluded that there are probably significant differences between the electronic structures of the pyridine complexes and those of the pyrazole or imidazole series.

  17. Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved cysteine residues in NqrD and NqrE subunits of Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Fadeeva, M S; Bertsova, Y V; Verkhovsky, M I; Bogachev, A V

    2008-02-01

    Each of two hydrophobic subunits of Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQR), NqrD and NqrE, contain a pair of strictly conserved cysteine residues within their transmembrane alpha-helices. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that substitutions of these residues in NQR of Vibrio harveyi blocked the Na+-dependent and 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide-sensitive quinone reductase activity of the enzyme. However, these mutations did not affect the interaction of NQR with NADH and menadione. It was demonstrated that these conserved cysteine residues are necessary for the correct folding and/or the stability of the NQR complex. Mass and EPR spectroscopy showed that NQR from V. harveyi bears only a 2Fe-2S cluster as a metal-containing prosthetic group. PMID:18298367

  18. Direct current superconducting quantum interference device spectrometer for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance at frequencies up to 5 MHz

    SciTech Connect

    TonThat, D.M.; Clarke, J. |

    1996-08-01

    A spectrometer based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) has been developed for the direct detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) at frequencies up to 5 MHz. The sample is coupled to the input coil of the niobium-based SQUID via a nonresonant superconducting circuit. The flux locked loop involves the direct offset integration technique with additional positive feedback in which the output of the SQUID is coupled directly to a low-noise preamplifier. Precession of the nuclear quadrupole spins is induced by a magnetic field pulse with the feedback circuit disabled; subsequently, flux locked operation is restored and the SQUID amplifies the signal produced by the nuclear free induction signal. The spectrometer has been used to detect {sup 27}Al NQR signals in ruby (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}[Cr{sup 3+}]) at 359 and 714 kHz. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Ultrasonic signal enhancement by resonator techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    Ultrasonic resonators increase experimental sensitivity to acoustic dispersion and changes in attenuation. Experimental sensitivity enhancement line shapes are presented which were obtained by modulating the acoustic properties of a CdS resonator with a light beam. Small changes in light level are made to produce almost pure absorptive or dispersive changes in the resonator signal. This effect is due to the coupling of the ultrasonic wave to the CdS conductivity which is proportional to incident light intensity. The resonator conductivity is adjusted in this manner to obtain both dispersive and absorptive sensitivity enhancement line shapes. The data presented verify previous thoretical calculations based on a propagating wave model.

  20. Polarization enhanced Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance with an atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Michael W.; Barrall, Geoffrey A.; Espy, Michelle A.; Monti, Mark C.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Okamitsu, Jeffrey K.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) has been demonstrated for the detection of 14-N in explosive compounds. Application of a material specific radio-frequency (RF) pulse excites a response typically detected with a wire- wound antenna. NQR is non-contact and material specific, however fields produced by NQR are typically very weak, making demonstration of practical utility challenging. For certain materials, the NQR signal can be increased by transferring polarization from hydrogen nuclei to nitrogen nuclei using external magnetic fields. This polarization enhancement (PE) can enhance the NQR signal by an order of magnitude or more. Atomic magnetometers (AM) have been shown to improve detection sensitivity beyond a conventional antenna by a similar amount. AM sensors are immune to piezo-electric effects that hamper conventional NQR, and can be combined to form a gradiometer for effective RF noise cancellation. In principle, combining polarization enhancement with atomic magnetometer detection should yield improvement in signal-to-noise ratio that is the product of the two methods, 100-fold or more over conventional NQR. However both methods are even more exotic than traditional NQR, and have never been combined due to challenges in operating a large magnetic field and ultra-sensitive magnetic field sensor in proximity. Here we present NQR with and without PE with an atomic magnetometer, demonstrating signal enhancement greater than 20-fold for ammonium nitrate. We also demonstrate PE for PETN using a traditional coil for detection with an enhancement factor of 10. Experimental methods and future applications are discussed.

  1. Analysis and calibration techniques for superconducting resonators.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Wollack, Edward J; Barrentine, Emily M; Brown, Ari D; Moseley, S Harvey; U-Yen, Kongpop

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed and experimentally explored for in-situ calibration of complex transmission data for superconducting microwave resonators. This cryogenic calibration method accounts for the instrumental transmission response between the vector network analyzer reference plane and the device calibration plane. Once calibrated, the observed resonator response is analyzed in detail by two approaches. The first, a phenomenological model based on physically realizable rational functions, enables the extraction of multiple resonance frequencies and widths for coupled resonators without explicit specification of the circuit network. In the second, an ABCD-matrix representation for the distributed transmission line circuit is used to model the observed response from the characteristic impedance and propagation constant. When used in conjunction with electromagnetic simulations, the kinetic inductance fraction can be determined with this method with an accuracy of 2%. Datasets for superconducting microstrip and coplanar-waveguide resonator devices were investigated and a recovery within 1% of the observed complex transmission amplitude was achieved with both analysis approaches. The experimental configuration used in microwave characterization of the devices and self-consistent constraints for the electromagnetic constitutive relations for parameter extraction are also presented. PMID:25638068

  2. Analysis and calibration techniques for superconducting resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Wollack, Edward J.; Barrentine, Emily M.; Brown, Ari D.; Moseley, S. Harvey; U-Yen, Kongpop

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed and experimentally explored for in-situ calibration of complex transmission data for superconducting microwave resonators. This cryogenic calibration method accounts for the instrumental transmission response between the vector network analyzer reference plane and the device calibration plane. Once calibrated, the observed resonator response is analyzed in detail by two approaches. The first, a phenomenological model based on physically realizable rational functions, enables the extraction of multiple resonance frequencies and widths for coupled resonators without explicit specification of the circuit network. In the second, an ABCD-matrix representation for the distributed transmission line circuit is used to model the observed response from the characteristic impedance and propagation constant. When used in conjunction with electromagnetic simulations, the kinetic inductance fraction can be determined with this method with an accuracy of 2%. Datasets for superconducting microstrip and coplanar-waveguide resonator devices were investigated and a recovery within 1% of the observed complex transmission amplitude was achieved with both analysis approaches. The experimental configuration used in microwave characterization of the devices and self-consistent constraints for the electromagnetic constitutive relations for parameter extraction are also presented.

  3. Ab initio DFT study of bisphosphonate derivatives as a drug for inhibition of cancer: NMR and NQR parameters.

    PubMed

    Aghabozorg, Hussein; Sohrabi, Beheshteh; Mashkouri, Sara; Aghabozorg, Hamid Reza

    2012-03-01

    DFT computations were carried out to characterize the (17)Oand (2)H electric field gradient, EFG, in various bisphosphonate derivatives. The computations were performed at the B3LYP level with 6-311++G (d,P) standard basis set. Calculated EFG tensors were used to determine the (17)O and (2)H nuclear quadrupole coupling constant, χ and asymmetry parameter, η. For better understanding of the bonding and electronic structure of bisphosphonates, isotropic and anisotropic NMR chemical shieldings were calculated for the (13)C, (17)O and (31)P nuclei using GIAO method for the optimized structure of intermediate bisphosphonates at B3LYP level of theory using 6-311++G (d, p) basis set. The results showed that various substituents have a strong effect on the nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) parameters (χ, η) of (17)O in contrast with (2)H NQR parameters. The NMR and NQR parameters were studied in order to find the correlation between electronic structure and the activity of the desired bisphosphonates. In addition, the effect of substitutions on the bisphosphonates polarity was investigated. Molecular polarity was determined via the DFT calculated dipole moment vectors and the results showed that substitution of bromine atom on the ring would increase the activity of bisphosphonates. PMID:21633790

  4. Single crystal zeeman effect studies on 35Cl NQR lines of 2,6-dichlorophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, N. V. L. N.; Venkatacharyulu, P.; Premaswarup, D.

    1987-10-01

    Zeeman effect studies on the two 35Cl NQR lines in cylindrical single crystals of 2,6-dichlorophenol were carried out using a self-quenched super-regenerative NQR spectrometer to obtain information on the nature of the crystalline unit cell and the effect of hydrogen bonding on the electric field gradient tensor. Analysis of the experimental data reveals: (1) the results are in good agreement with those reported from X-ray studies; (2) the crystal is unequivocally identified as belonging to the orthorhombic system; (3) there are two crystallographically equivalent and four physically nonequivalent directions for the principal field gradients for both the low and high frequency resonance lines; (4) the directions of the crystalline a, b, c axes are uniquely identified as (90°, 0°), (0°, -), and (90°, 90°); (5) the b-axis is identified as the growth axis; (6) there are a minimum of four molecules per unit cell, the four molecules lie in different planes, which are, however, connected by symmetry operations; (7)_there exists a weak intramolecular hydrogen bonding in the crystal; (8) the asymmetry parameters for the loci corresponding to the low frequency resonance line, which is affected by hydrogen bonding, are less than the asymmetry parameters of the loci corresponding to the high frequency resonance line, which is not affected by hydrogen bonding; (9) the single bond and ionic bond characters for the hish frequency line are less than that of the low frequency line, while the double bond character for the low frequency line is less than that of the high frequency line and (10) the small deviation between the single bond and double bond characters of the two resonance lines is attributed to the existence of weak hydrogen bonding in the crystal.

  5. NqrM (DUF539) Protein Is Required for Maturation of Bacterial Na+-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Kostyrko, Vitaly A.; Bertsova, Yulia V.; Serebryakova, Marina V.; Baykov, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) catalyzes electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone in the bacterial respiratory chain, coupled with Na+ translocation across the membrane. Na+-NQR maturation involves covalent attachment of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) residues, catalyzed by flavin transferase encoded by the nqr-associated apbE gene. Analysis of complete bacterial genomes has revealed another putative gene (duf539, here renamed nqrM) that usually follows the apbE gene and is present only in Na+-NQR-containing bacteria. Expression of the Vibrio harveyi nqr operon alone or with the associated apbE gene in Escherichia coli, which lacks its own Na+-NQR, resulted in an enzyme incapable of Na+-dependent NADH or reduced nicotinamide hypoxanthine dinucleotide (dNADH) oxidation. However, fully functional Na+-NQR was restored when these genes were coexpressed with the V. harveyi nqrM gene. Furthermore, nqrM lesions in Klebsiella pneumoniae and V. harveyi prevented production of functional Na+-NQR, which could be recovered by an nqrM-containing plasmid. The Na+-NQR complex isolated from the nqrM-deficient strain of V. harveyi lacks several subunits, indicating that nqrM is necessary for Na+-NQR assembly. The protein product of the nqrM gene, NqrM, contains a single putative transmembrane α-helix and four conserved Cys residues. Mutating one of these residues (Cys33 in V. harveyi NqrM) to Ser completely prevented Na+-NQR maturation, whereas mutating any other Cys residue only decreased the yield of the mature protein. These findings identify NqrM as the second specific maturation factor of Na+-NQR in proteobacteria, which is presumably involved in the delivery of Fe to form the (Cys)4[Fe] center between subunits NqrD and NqrE. IMPORTANCE Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase complex (Na+-NQR) is a unique primary Na+ pump believed to enhance the vitality of many bacteria, including important pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio

  6. Solid-state NMR/NQR and first-principles study of two niobium halide cluster compounds.

    PubMed

    Perić, Berislav; Gautier, Régis; Pickard, Chris J; Bosiočić, Marko; Grbić, Mihael S; Požek, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Two hexanuclear niobium halide cluster compounds with a [Nb6X12](2+) (X=Cl, Br) diamagnetic cluster core, have been studied by a combination of experimental solid-state NMR/NQR techniques and PAW/GIPAW calculations. For niobium sites the NMR parameters were determined by using variable Bo field static broadband NMR measurements and additional NQR measurements. It was found that they possess large positive chemical shifts, contrary to majority of niobium compounds studied so far by solid-state NMR, but in accordance with chemical shifts of (95)Mo nuclei in structurally related compounds containing [Mo6Br8](4+) cluster cores. Experimentally determined δiso((93)Nb) values are in the range from 2,400 to 3,000 ppm. A detailed analysis of geometrical relations between computed electric field gradient (EFG) and chemical shift (CS) tensors with respect to structural features of cluster units was carried out. These tensors on niobium sites are almost axially symmetric with parallel orientation of the largest EFG and the smallest CS principal axes (Vzz and δ33) coinciding with the molecular four-fold axis of the [Nb6X12](2+) unit. Bridging halogen sites are characterized by large asymmetry of EFG and CS tensors, the largest EFG principal axis (Vzz) is perpendicular to the X-Nb bonds, while intermediate EFG principal axis (Vyy) and the largest CS principal axis (δ11) are oriented in the radial direction with respect to the center of the cluster unit. For more symmetrical bromide compound the PAW predictions for EFG parameters are in better correspondence with the NMR/NQR measurements than in the less symmetrical chlorine compound. Theoretically predicted NMR parameters of bridging halogen sites were checked by (79/81)Br NQR and (35)Cl solid-state NMR measurements. PMID:24581866

  7. Volovik effect and Fermi-liquid behavior in the s-wave superconductor CaPd2As2: As75 NMR-NQR measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ding, Q. -P.; Wiecki, P.; Anand, V. K.; Sangeetha, N. S.; Lee, Y.; Johnston, D. C.; Furukawa, Y.

    2016-04-07

    The electronic and magnetic properties of the collapsed-tetragonal CaPd2As2 superconductor (SC) with a transition temperature of 1.27 K have been investigated by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. The temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts indicate the absence of magnetic correlations in the normal state. In the SC state, 1/T1 measured by 75As NQR shows a clear Hebel-Slichter (HS) peak just below Tc and decreases exponentially at lower T, confirming a conventional s-wave SC. Additionally, the Volovik effect, also known as the Doppler shift effect, hasmore » been clearly evidenced by the observation of the suppression of the HS peak with applied magnetic field.« less

  8. Studies of the electronic structure and biological activity of chosen 1,4-benzodiazepines by 35Cl NQR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronisz, K.; Ostafin, M.; Poleshchuk, O. Kh.; Mielcarek, J.; Nogaj, B.

    2006-11-01

    Selected derivatives of 1,4-benzodiazepine: lorazepam, lormetazepam, oxazepam and temazepam, used as active substances in anxiolytic drugs, have been studied by 35Cl NQR method in order to find the correlation between electronic structure and biological activity. The 35Cl NQR resonance frequencies ( νQ) measured at 77 K have been correlated with the following parameters characterising their biological activity: biological half-life period ( t0.5), affinity to benzodiazepine receptor (IC 50) and mean dose equivalent. The results of experimental study of some benzodiazepine derivatives by nuclear quadrupole resonance of 35Cl nuclei are compared with theoretical results based on DFT calculations which were carried out by means of Gaussian'98 W software.

  9. Volovik effect and Fermi-liquid behavior in the s -wave superconductor CaPd2As2: 75As NMR-NQR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Q.-P.; Wiecki, P.; Anand, V. K.; Sangeetha, N. S.; Lee, Y.; Johnston, D. C.; Furukawa, Y.

    2016-04-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties of the collapsed-tetragonal CaPd2As2 superconductor (SC) with a transition temperature of 1.27 K have been investigated by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. The temperature (T ) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1 /T1) and the Knight shifts indicate the absence of magnetic correlations in the normal state. In the SC state, 1 /T1 measured by 75As NQR shows a clear Hebel-Slichter (HS) peak just below Tc and decreases exponentially at lower T , confirming a conventional s -wave SC. In addition, the Volovik effect, also known as the Doppler shift effect, has been clearly evidenced by the observation of the suppression of the HS peak with applied magnetic field.

  10. Narcotics and explosives detection by 14N pure nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garroway, Allen N.; Buess, Michael L.; Yesinowski, James P.; Miller, Joel B.

    1994-03-01

    Pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) of 14N nuclei is quite promising as a method for detecting explosives such as RDX and contraband narcotics such as cocaine and heroin in quantities of interest. Pure NQR is conducted without an external applied magnetic field, so potential concerns about damage to magnetically encoded data or exposure of personnel to large magnetic fields are not relevant. Because NQR frequencies of different compounds are quite distinct, we do not encounter false alarms from the NQR signals of other benign materials. We have constructed a proof-of-concept NQR explosives detector which interrogates a volume of 300 liters (10 ft3). With minimal modification to the existing explosives detector, we can detect operationally relevant quantities of (free base) cocaine within the 300-liter inspection volume in 6 seconds. We are presently extending this approach to the detection of heroin base and also examining 14N and 35,37Cl pure NQR for detection of the hydrochloride forms of both materials. An adaptation of this NQR approach may be suitable for scanning personnel for externally carried contraband and explosives. We first outline the basics of the NQR approach, highlighting strengths and weaknesses, and then present representative results for RDX and cocaine detection. We also present a partial compendium of relevant NQR parameters measured for some materials of interest.

  11. The future of magnetic resonance-based techniques in neurology.

    PubMed

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance techniques have become increasingly important in neurology for defining: 1. brain, spinal cord and peripheral nerve or muscle structure; 2. pathological changes in tissue structures and properties; and 3. dynamic patterns of functional activation of the brain. New applications have been driven in part by advances in hardware, particularly improvements in magnet and gradient coil design. New imaging strategies allow novel approaches to contrast with, for example, diffusion imaging, magnetization transfer imaging, perfusion imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging. In parallel with developments in hardware and image acquisition have been new approaches to image analysis. These have allowed quantitative descriptions of the image changes to be used for a precise, non-invasive definition of pathology. With the increasing capabilities and specificity of magnetic resonance techniques it is becoming more important that the neurologist is intimately involved in both the selection of magnetic resonance studies for patients and their interpretation. There is a need for considerably improved access to magnetic resonance technology, particularly in the acute or intensive care ward and in the neurosurgical theatre. This report illustrates several key developments. The task force concludes that magnetic resonance imaging is a major clinical tool of growing significance and offers recommendations for maximizing the potential future for magnetic resonance techniques in neurology. PMID:11509077

  12. Polymorphism and disorder in natural active ingredients. Low and high-temperature phases of anhydrous caffeine: Spectroscopic ((1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR/(14)N NQR) and solid-state computational modelling (DFT/QTAIM/RDS) study.

    PubMed

    Seliger, Janez; Žagar, Veselko; Apih, Tomaž; Gregorovič, Alan; Latosińska, Magdalena; Olejniczak, Grzegorz Andrzej; Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia

    2016-03-31

    The polymorphism of anhydrous caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine; 1,3,7-trimethyl-1H-purine-2,6-(3H,7H)-dione) has been studied by (1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance) double resonance and pure (14)N NQR (Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance) followed by computational modelling (Density Functional Theory, supplemented Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules with Reduced Density Gradient) in solid state. For two stable (phase II, form β) and metastable (phase I, form α) polymorphs the complete NQR spectra consisting of 12 lines were recorded. The assignment of signals detected in experiment to particular nitrogen sites was verified with the help of DFT. The shifts of the NQR frequencies, quadrupole coupling constants and asymmetry parameters at each nitrogen site due to polymorphic transition were evaluated. The strongest shifts were observed at N(3) site, while the smallest at N(9) site. The commercial pharmaceutical sample was found to contain approximately 20-25% of phase I and 75-80% of phase II. The orientational disorder in phase II with a local molecular arrangement mimics that in phase I. Substantial differences in the intermolecular interaction phases I and II of caffeine were analysed using computational (DFT/QTAIM/RDS) approach. The analysis of local environment of each nitrogen nucleus permitted drawing some conclusions on the topology of interactions in both polymorphs. For the most stable orientations in phase I and phase II the maps of the principal component qz of EFG tensor and its asymmetry parameter at each point of the molecular system were calculated and visualized. The relevant maps calculated for both phases I and II indicates small variation in electrostatic potential upon phase change. Small differences between packings in phases slightly disturb the neighbourhood of the N(1) and N(7) nitrogens, thus are meaningless from the biological point of view. The composition of two phases in pharmaceutical material

  13. The single NqrB and NqrC subunits in the Na(+)-translocating NADH: quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR) from Vibrio cholerae each carry one covalently attached FMN.

    PubMed

    Casutt, Marco S; Schlosser, Andreas; Buckel, Wolfgang; Steuber, Julia

    2012-10-01

    The Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR) is the prototype of a novel class of flavoproteins carrying a riboflavin phosphate bound to serine or threonine by a phosphodiester bond to the ribityl side chain. This membrane-bound, respiratory complex also contains one non-covalently bound FAD, one non-covalently bound riboflavin, ubiquinone-8 and a [2Fe-2S] cluster. Here, we report the quantitative analysis of the full set of flavin cofactors in the Na(+)-NQR and characterize the mode of linkage of the riboflavin phosphate to the membrane-bound NqrB and NqrC subunits. Release of the flavin by β-elimination and analysis of the cofactor demonstrates that the phosphate group is attached at the 5'-position of the ribityl as in authentic FMN and that the Na(+)-NQR contains approximately 1.7mol covalently bound FMN per mol non-covalently bound FAD. Therefore, each of the single NqrB and NqrC subunits in the Na(+)-NQR carries a single FMN. Elimination of the phosphodiester bond yields a dehydro-2-aminobutyrate residue, which is modified with β-mercaptoethanol by Michael addition. Proteolytic digestion followed by mass determination of peptide fragments reveals exclusive modification of threonine residues, which carry FMN in the native enzyme. The described reactions allow quantification and localization of the covalently attached FMNs in the Na(+)-NQR and in related proteins belonging to the Rhodobacter nitrogen fixation (RNF) family of enzymes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 17th European Bioenergetics Conference (EBEC 2012). PMID:22366169

  14. In vivo studies of brain development by magnetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Inder, T E; Huppi, P S

    2000-01-01

    Understanding of the morphological development of the human brain has largely come from neuropathological studies obtained postmortem. Magnetic resonance (MR) techniques have recently allowed the provision of detailed structural, metabolic, and functional information in vivo on the human brain. These techniques have been utilized in studies from premature infants to adults and have provided invaluable data on the sequence of normal human brain development. This article will focus on MR techniques including conventional structural MR imaging techniques, quantitative morphometric MR techniques, diffusion weighted MR techniques, and MR spectroscopy. In order to understand the potential applications and limitations of MR techniques, relevant physical and biological principles for each of the MR techniques are first reviewed. This is followed by a review of the understanding of the sequence of normal brain development utilizing these techniques. MRDD Research Reviews 6:59-67, 2000. PMID:10899798

  15. NMR and NQR study of the thermodynamically stable quasicrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shastri, A.

    1995-02-10

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 61,65}Cu NMR measurements are reported for powder samples of stable AlCuFe and AlCuRu icosahedral quasicrystals and their crystalline approximants, and for a AlPdMn single grain quasicrystal. Furthermore, {sup 27}Al NQR spectra at 4.2 K have been observed in the AlCuFe and AlCuRu samples. From the quadrupole perturbed NMR spectra at different magnetic fields, and from the zero field NQR spectra, a wide distribution of local electric field gradient (EFG) tensor components and principal axis system orientations was found at the Al site. A model EFG calculation based on a 1/1 AlCuFe approximant was successful in explaining the observed NQR spectra. It is concluded that the average local gradient is largely determined by the p-electron wave function at the Al site, while the width of the distribution is due to the lattice contribution to the EFG. Comparison of {sup 63}Cu NMR with {sup 27}Al NMR shows that the EFG distribution at the two sites is similar, but that the electronic contribution to the EFG is considerably smaller at the Cu site, in agreement with a more s-type wave function of the conduction electrons.

  16. Resonance technique to probe 129Xe surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, K. L.; Fitzgerald, R. J.; Happer, W.

    1999-03-01

    We describe a resonance technique to probe the coupling between two spin systems at low magnetic fields. With the use of a single rotating magnetic field we match the Rabi frequency of one spin to the Larmor frequency of a second, thereby affecting the T1 of the second spin species. We have used this technique to demonstrate the contribution of coupling to surface protons to the relaxation of gaseous and liquid laser-polarized 129Xe.

  17. Low-power stimulated emission nuclear quadrupole resonance detection system utilizing Rabi transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolos, John; Mouyos, William; Feng, Judy; Chase, Walter

    2013-06-01

    The application of CW radar techniques to Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) detection of nitrogen based explosives and chlorine based narcotics enables the use of low power levels, in the range of 10's of watts, to yield high signal strengths. By utilizing Rabi transitions the nucleus oscillates between states one and two under the time dependent incident electromagnetic field and alternately absorbs energy from the incident field while emitting coherent energy via stimulated emission. Through the application of a cancellation algorithm the incident field is eliminated from the NQR response, allowing the receive signal to be measured while transmitting. The response signal is processed using matched filters of the NQR response which enables the direct detection of explosives. This technology has applicability to the direct detection of explosives and narcotics for security screening, all at safe low power levels, opposed to the current XRay and Millimeter wave screening systems that detect objects that may contain explosives and utilize high power. The quantum mechanics theoretical basis for the approach and an application for a system for security screening are described with empirical results presented to show the effects observed.

  18. Chemical structure and intra-molecular effects on NMR-NQR tensors of harmine and harmaline alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadinejad, Neda; Tahan, Arezoo; Talebi Tari, Mostafa

    2016-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) methods were used to analyze the effects of molecular structure and ring currents on the NMR chemical shielding tensors and NQR frequencies of harmine and harmaline alkaloids in the gas phase. The results demonstrated that NMR tensors and NQR frequencies of 15N nuclei in these compounds depend on chemical environment and resonance interactions. Hence, their values are obviously different in the mentioned structures. The interpretation of natural bond orbital (NBO) data suggests that in harmine structure, the lone pair participation of N9 in π-system electron clouds causes to development of aromaticity nature in pyrrole ring. However, the chemical shielding around N9 atom in harmine structure is higher than in harmaline, while in harmaline structure, lone pair participation of N2 in π-system electron clouds causes to development of aromaticity nature in pyridine ring. Hence, chemical shielding around N2 atom in harmaline structure is higher than in harmine. It can be deduced that by increasing lone pair electrons contribution of nitrogen atoms in ring resonance interactions and aromaticity development, the values of NMR chemical shielding around them increase, while χ and q zz values of these nuclei decrease.

  19. Surface Plasmon Resonance: A Versatile Technique for Biosensor Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hoang Hiep; Park, Jeho; Kang, Sebyung; Kim, Moonil

    2015-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a label-free detection method which has emerged during the last two decades as a suitable and reliable platform in clinical analysis for biomolecular interactions. The technique makes it possible to measure interactions in real-time with high sensitivity and without the need of labels. This review article discusses a wide range of applications in optical-based sensors using either surface plasmon resonance (SPR) or surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI). Here we summarize the principles, provide examples, and illustrate the utility of SPR and SPRI through example applications from the biomedical, proteomics, genomics and bioengineering fields. In addition, SPR signal amplification strategies and surface functionalization are covered in the review. PMID:25951336

  20. WURST-QCPMG sequence and "spin-lock" in 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorovič, Alan; Apih, Tomaž

    2013-08-01

    14N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a promising method for the analysis of pharmaceuticals or for the detection of nitrogen based illicit compounds, but so far, the technique is still not widely used, mostly due to the very low sensitivity. This problem is already acute in the preliminary NQR stage, when a compound is being examined for the first time and the NQR frequencies are being searched for, by scanning a wide frequency range step-by-step. In the present work, we experimentally show how to increase the efficiency of this initial stage by using a combination of a wideband excitation achieved with frequency swept pulses (WURST) and a "spin-lock" state obtained with a quadrupolar-CPMG (QCPMG) sequence. In the first part we show that WURST pulses provide a much larger excitation bandwidth compared to common rectangular pulses. This increased bandwidth allows to increase the frequency step and reduces the total number of steps in a scanning stage. In the second part we show that the "spin-lock" decay time T2eff obtained with the WURST-QCPMG combination is practically identical with the T2eff obtained with the most common "spin-lock" sequence, the SLSE, despite a very different nature and length of excitation pulses. This allows for a substantial S/N increase through echo averaging in every individual step and really allows to exploit all the advantages of the wider excitation in the NQR frequency scanning stage. Our experimental results were obtained on a sample of trinitrotoluene, but identical behavior is expected for all compounds where a "spin-lock" state can be created.

  1. Nuclear quadrupole resonance studies of the SORC sequence and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakody, J.R.P.

    1993-12-31

    The behavior of induction signals during steady-state pulse irradiation in {sup 14}N NQR was investigated experimentally. Because Strong Off-resonance Comb (SORC) signals recur as long as the pulsing continues, very efficient signal-averaging can result. The dependence of these steady-state SORC signals on pulse parameters and on frequency offset are presented, together with a discussion of the applicability of the method. Also as part of the NQR work, cocaine base has been detected using conventional NQR techniques. The experimental results show that SORC detection can be of sufficient sensitivity to form the basis of narcotics screening devices for both mail and airline baggage. A new NMR technique, to obtain the correlation time of the random thermal motion of a polymer at temperatures near the glass transition has been introduced. The temperature dependence is a result of thermal motion. For slow-motion of a polymer chain near the glass transition, the CSA parameter begins to decrease. This motional narrowing can be interpreted to yield the correlation time of the thermal motion. In this work nitrocellulose isotopically highly enriched with {sup 15}N was studied at four different temperatures between 27{degrees} and 120{degrees} Celsius and the correlation times for polymer backbone motions were obtained. Naflon films containing water (D{sub 2}O and H{sub 2} {sup 17}O) and methanol (CH{sub 3}OD, CH{sub 3} {sup 17}OH), have been studied using deuteron and oxygen-17 NMR spectroscopy. Glassy behavior of the water domains at low temperature is evidenced by the specific nature of the {sup 2}H NMR lineshapes. Activation energies extracted from {sup 2}H spin-lattice relaxation data on the high temperature side of the T{sub 1} minimum exhibit a steady increase with increasing water content. In spite of a high degree of molecular mobility, angular-dependent spectra of both unstretched and stretched samples reflect considerable anisotrophy of the host polymer.

  2. I: Low Frequency NMR and NQR Using a dc SQUID. II: Variable-temperature 13C CP/MAS of Organometallics

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegeweid, M.A.

    1995-11-29

    NMR and NQR at low frequencies are difficult prospects due to small nuclear spin polarization. Furthermore, the sensitivity'of the inductive pickup circuitry of standard spectrometers is reduced as the frequency is lowered. I have used a cw-SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) spectrometer, which has no such frequency dependence, to study the local atomic environment of {sup 14}N via the quadrupolar interaction. Because {sup 14}N has spin I = 1 and a 0-6 MHz frequency range, it is not possible to obtain well-resolved spectra in high magnetic fields. I have used a technique to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances via their effect on neighboring protons mediated by the heteronuclear dipolar interaction to study peptides and narcotics. The sensitivity of the SQUID is not enough to measure low-frequency surface (or other low spin density) systems. The application of spin-polarized xenon has been previously used to enhance polarization in conventional NMR experiments. Because xenon only polarizes spins with which it is in contact, it is surface selective. While differences in chemical shifts between surface and bulk spins are not large, it is expected that the differences in quadrupole coupling constant should be very large due to the drastic change of the electric field gradient surrounding spins at the surface. With this in mind, I have taken preliminary steps to measure SQUID detected polarization transfer from Xe to another spin species at 4.2 K and in small magnetic fields (<50 G). In this regime, the spin-lattice relaxation of xenon is dependent on the applied magnetic field. The results of our efforts to characterize the relaxation of xenon are presented. The final section describes the solid-state variable-temperature (VT) one- and two-dimensional {sup 13}C cross polarization (CP)/magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR of Hf({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}({eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}, Zr({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 3}({eta}{sup 1}-C

  3. Double-incident angle technique for surface plasmon resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Wang, Keyi

    2015-09-01

    A new double-incident angle technique for surface plasmon resonance measurement is described. It is based on differential measurements at two chosen incident angles where the slopes are steepest and the reflectance changes are the biggest. The technique is as simple and robust as the conventional SPR detection measuring the reflected intensities using convergent light beam, but it has the advantage of being nonsensitive to variations of the resonance width and providing a higher sensitivity. Different concentrations of NaCl solutions are used to test the method. Compared with traditional single-incident angle method, sensitivity of this new method is improved by approximately 59%. It can be applied in genomics, proteomics, medical diagnostics, and many other fields of science and industry where a real time ultra-sensitive analysis of adsorption or of analyte-receptor binding is of interest.

  4. Total body water measurements using resonant cavity perturbation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Darren A.; Robinson, Martin P.

    2004-05-01

    A recent paper proposed a novel technique for determining the total body water (TBW) of patients suffering with abnormal hydration levels, using a resonant cavity perturbation method. Current techniques to measure TBW are limited by resolution and technical constraints. However, this new method involves measuring the dielectric properties of the body, by placing a subject in a large cavity resonator and measuring the subsequent change in its resonant frequency, fres and its Q-factor. Utilizing the relationship that water content correlates to these dielectric properties, it has been shown that the measured response of these parameters enables determination of TBW. Results are presented for a preliminary study using data estimated from anthropometric measurements, where volunteers were asked to lie and stand in an electromagnetic screened room, before and after drinking between 1 and 2 l of water, and in some cases, after voiding the bladder. Notable changes in the parameters were observed; fres showed a negative shift and Q was reduced. Preliminary calibration curves using estimated values of water content have been developed from these results, showing that for each subject the measured resonant frequency is a linear function of TBW. Because the gradients of these calibration curves correlate to the mass-to-height-ratio of the volunteers, it has proved that a system in which TBW can be unequivocally obtained is possible. Measured values of TBW have been determined using this new pilot-technique, and the values obtained correlate well with theoretical values of body water (r = 0.87) and resolution is very good (750 ml). The results obtained are measurable, repeatable and statistically significant. This leads to confidence in the integrity of the proposed technique.

  5. 35Cl NQR study of lattice dynamic and magnetic property of a crystalline coordination polymer {CuCA(phz)(H 2O) 2} n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Kazuma; Terao, Takeshi; Asaji, Tetsuo

    2007-01-01

    Copper(II) compounds {CuCA(phz)(H 2O) 2} n (H 2CA = chloranilic acid, phz = phenazine) having a layer structure of -CuCA(H 2O) 2- polymer chains and phenazine were studied by 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). The single NQR line observed at 35.635 MHz at 261.5 K increased to 35.918 MHz at 4.2 K. The degree of reduction of electric field gradient due to lattice vibrations was similar to that of chloranilic acid crystal. Temperature dependence of spin-lattice relaxation time, T1, of the 35Cl NQR signal below 20 K, between 20 and 210 K, and above 210 K, was explained by (1) a decrease of effective electron-spin density caused by antiferromagnetic interaction, (2) a magnetic interaction between Cl nuclear-spin and electron-spins on paramagnetic Cu(II) ions, and (3) an increasing contribution from reorientation of ligand molecules, respectively. The electron spin-exchange parameter ∣ J∣ between the neighboring Cu(II) electrons was estimated to be 0.33 cm -1 from the T1 value of the range 20-210 K. Comparing this value with that of J = -1.84 cm -1 estimated from the magnetic susceptibility, it is suggested that the magnetic dipolar coupling with the electron spins on Cu(II) ions must be the principal mechanism for the 35Cl NQR spin-lattice relaxation of {CuCA(phz)(H 2O) 2} n but a delocalization of electron spin over the chloranilate ligand has to be taken into account.

  6. Various diffusion magnetic resonance imaging techniques for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Meng-Yue; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Tian-Wu; Huang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors and remains a treatment-refractory cancer with a poor prognosis. Currently, the diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasm depends mainly on imaging and which methods are conducive to detecting small lesions. Compared to the other techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has irreplaceable advantages and can provide valuable information unattainable with other noninvasive or minimally invasive imaging techniques. Advances in MR hardware and pulse sequence design have particularly improved the quality and robustness of MRI of the pancreas. Diffusion MR imaging serves as one of the common functional MRI techniques and is the only technique that can be used to reflect the diffusion movement of water molecules in vivo. It is generally known that diffusion properties depend on the characterization of intrinsic features of tissue microdynamics and microstructure. With the improvement of the diffusion models, diffusion MR imaging techniques are increasingly varied, from the simplest and most commonly used technique to the more complex. In this review, the various diffusion MRI techniques for pancreatic cancer are discussed, including conventional diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), multi-b DWI based on intra-voxel incoherent motion theory, diffusion tensor imaging and diffusion kurtosis imaging. The principles, main parameters, advantages and limitations of these techniques, as well as future directions for pancreatic diffusion imaging are also discussed. PMID:26753059

  7. Ferromagnetic Spin Fluctuation and Unconventional Superconductivity in Rb2Cr3As3 Revealed by 75As NMR and NQR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Tang, Z. T.; Cao, G. H.; Zheng, Guo-qing

    2015-10-01

    We report 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies on the superconductor Rb2Cr3As3 with a quasi-one-dimensional crystal structure. Below T ˜100 K , the spin-lattice relaxation rate (1 /T1 ) divided by temperature, 1 /T1T , increases upon cooling down to Tc=4.8 K , showing a Curie-Weiss-like temperature dependence. The Knight shift also increases with decreasing temperature. These results suggest ferromagnetic spin fluctuation. In the superconducting state, 1 /T1 decreases rapidly below Tc without a Hebel-Slichter peak, and follows a T5 variation below T ˜3 K , which points to unconventional superconductivity with point nodes in the gap function.

  8. Detecting body cavity bombs with nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Michael London

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a technology with great potential for detecting hidden explosives. Past NQR research has studied the detection of land mines and bombs concealed within luggage and packages. This thesis focuses on an NQR application that has received less attention and little or no publicly available research: detecting body cavity bombs (BCBs). BCBs include explosives that have been ingested, inserted into orifices, or surgically implanted. BCBs present a threat to aviation and secure facilities. They are extremely difficult to detect with the technology currently employed at security checkpoints. To evaluate whether or not NQR can be used to detect BCBs, a computational model is developed to assess how the dielectric properties of biological tissue affect the radio frequency magnetic field employed in NQR (0.5-5MHz). The relative permittivity of some biological tissue is very high (over 1,000 at 1MHz), making it conceivable that there is a significant effect on the electromagnetic field. To study this effect, the low-frequency approximation known as the Darwin model is employed. First, the electromagnetic field of a coil is calculated in free space. Second, a dielectric object or set of objects is introduced, and the free-space electric field is modified to accommodate the dielectric object ensuring that the relevant boundary conditions are obeyed. Finally, the magnetic field associated with the corrected electric field is calculated. This corrected magnetic field is evaluated with an NQR simulation to estimate the impact of dielectric tissue on NQR measurements. The effect of dielectric tissue is shown to be small, thus obviating a potential barrier to BCB detection. The NQR model presented may assist those designing excitation and detection coils for NQR. Some general coil design considerations and strategies are discussed.

  9. Complex permittivity measurements of ferroelectrics employing composite dielectric resonator technique.

    PubMed

    Krupka, Jerzy; Zychowicz, Tomasz; Bovtun, Viktor; Veljko, Sergiy

    2006-10-01

    Composite cylindrical TE(0n1) mode dielectric resonator has been used for the complex permittivity measurements of ferroelectrics at frequency about 8.8 GHz. Rigorous equations have been derived that allowed us to find a relationship between measured resonance frequency and Q-factor and the complex permittivity. It has been shown that the choice of appropriate diameter of a sample together with rigorous complex angular frequency analysis allows precise measurements of various ferroelectric. Proposed technique can be used for materials having both real and imaginary part of permittivity as large as a few thousand. Variable temperature measurements were performed on a PbMg(1/3)Nb(2/3)O3 (PMN) ceramic sample, and the measured complex permittivity have shown good agreement with the results of measurements obtained on the same sample at lower frequencies (0.1-1.8 GHz). PMID:17036796

  10. Resonant marker design and fabrication techniques for device visualization during interventional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Mandy; Detert, Markus; Rube, Martin A; El-Tahir, Abubakr; Elle, Ole Jakob; Melzer, Andreas; Schmidt, Bertram; Rose, Georg H

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has great potential as an imaging modality for guiding minimally invasive interventions because of its superior soft tissue contrast and the possibility of arbitrary slice positioning while avoiding ionizing radiation and nephrotoxic iodine contrast agents. The major constraints are: limited patient access, the insufficient assortment of compatible instruments and the difficult device visualization compared to X-ray based techniques. For the latter, resonant MRI markers, fabricated by using the wire-winding technique, have been developed. This fabrication technique serves as a functional model but has no clinical use. Thus, the aim of this study is to illustrate a four-phase design process of resonant markers involving microsystems technologies. The planning phase comprises the definition of requirements and the simulation of electromagnetic performance of the MRI markers. The following technologies were considered for the realization phase: aerosol-deposition process, hot embossing technology and thin film technology. The subsequent evaluation phase involves several test methods regarding electrical and mechanical characterization as well as MRI visibility aspects. The degree of fulfillment of the predefined requirements is determined within the analysis phase. Furthermore, an exemplary evaluation of four realized MRI markers was conducted, focusing on the performance within the MRI environment. PMID:25460277

  11. Reliable and integrated technique for determining resonant frequency in radio frequency resonators. Application to a high-precision resonant cavity-based displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauregui, Rigoberto; Asua, Estibaliz; Portilla, Joaquin; Etxebarria, Victor

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a reliable and integrated technique for determining the resonant frequency of radio frequency resonators, which can be of interest for different purposes. The approach uses a heterodyne scheme as phase detector coupled to a voltage-controlled oscillator. The system seeks the oscillator frequency that produces a phase null in the resonator, which corresponds to the resonant frequency. A complete explanation of the technique to determine the resonant frequency is presented and experimentally tested. The method has been applied to a high-precision displacement sensor based on resonant cavity, obtaining a theoretical nanometric precision.

  12. Nuclear magnetic and quadrupole resonance studies of the stripes materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafe, H.-J.

    2012-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic and Quadrupole Resonance (NMR/NQR) is a powerful tool to probe electronic inhomogeneities in correlated electron systems. Its local character allows for probing different environments due to spin density modulations or inhomogeneous doping distributions emerging from the correlations in these systems. In fact, NMR/NQR is not only sensitive to magnetic properties through interaction of the nuclear spin, but also allows to probe the symmetry of the charge distribution and its homogeneity, as well as structural modulations, through sensitivity to the electric field gradient (EFG). We review the results of NMR and NQR in the cuprates from intrinsic spatial variations of the hole concentration in the normal state to stripe order at low temperatures, thereby keeping in mind the influence of doping induced disorder and inhomogeneities. Finally, we briefly discuss NQR evidence for local electronic inhomogeneities in the recently discovered iron pnictides, suggesting that electronic inhomogeneities are a common feature of correlated electron systems.

  13. Novel technique in the segmentation of magnetic resonance image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwok-Leung

    1996-04-01

    In this investigation, automatic image segmentation is carried out on magnetic resonance image (MRI). A novel technique based on the maximum minimum measure is devised. The measure is improved by combining the smoothing and counting processes, and then normalizing the number of maximum and minimum positions over the region of interest (ROI). Two parameters (MM_H and MM_V) are generated and used for the segmentation. The technique is tested on some brain MRIs of a human male from the Visible Human Project of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, USA. Preliminary results indicate that the maximum minimum measure can provide effective parameters for human tissue characterization and image segmentation with an added advantage of faster computation.

  14. (14)N NQR, relaxation and molecular dynamics of the explosive TNT.

    PubMed

    Smith, John A S; Rowe, Michael D; Althoefer, Kaspar; Peirson, Neil F; Barras, Jamie

    2015-10-01

    Multiple pulse sequences are widely used for signal enhancement in NQR detection applications. Since the various (14)N NQR relaxation times, signal decay times and frequency of each NQR line have a major influence on detection sequence performance, it is important to characterise these parameters and their temperature variation, as fully as possible. In this paper we discuss such measurements for a number of the ν+ and ν- NQR lines of monoclinic and orthorhombic TNT and relate the temperature variation results to molecular dynamics. The temperature variation of the (14)N spin-lattice relaxation times T1 is interpreted as due to hindered rotation of the NO2 group about the C-NO2 bond with an activation energy of 89 kJ mol(-1) for the ortho and para groups of monoclinic TNT and 70 kJ mol(-1) for the para group of orthorhombic TNT. PMID:26440130

  15. /sup 127/I NQR spectra of carborane-containing compounds of polycoordinated iodine

    SciTech Connect

    Semin, G.K.; Grushin, V.V.; Gushchin, S.I.; Lisichkina, I.N.; Petokhov, S.A.; Tolstaya, T.P.

    1985-05-20

    The NQR spectra of polycoordinated iodine compounds is studied. A table presents the I 127 NQR spectra of electroneutral PhIC1/sub 2/ derivatives with intermolecular coordination in the solid state and ionic compounds including compounds with interionic coordination. A considerable increase in the quadrupole coupling constants and significant decrease in the asymmetry parameter is found in carborane-containing CBIC1/sub 2/ and PhCBIX compounds in comparison with the corresponding phenyl and diphenyl derivatives.

  16. The application of frequency swept pulses for the acquisition of nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossini, Aaron J.; Hamaed, Hiyam; Schurko, Robert W.

    2010-09-01

    The acquisition of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra with wideband uniform rate and smooth truncation (WURST) pulses is investigated. 75As and 35Cl NQR spectra acquired with the WURST echo sequence are compared to those acquired with standard Hahn-echo sequences and echo sequences which employ composite refocusing pulses. The utility of WURST pulses for locating NQR resonances of unknown frequency is investigated by monitoring the integrated intensity and signal to noise of 35Cl and 75As NQR spectra acquired with transmitter offsets of several hundreds kilohertz from the resonance frequencies. The WURST echo sequence is demonstrated to possess superior excitation bandwidths in comparison to the pulse sequences which employ conventional monochromatic rectangular pulses. The superior excitation bandwidths of the WURST pulses allows for differences in the characteristic impedance of the receiving and excitation circuits of the spectrometer to be detected. Impedance mismatches have previously been reported by Marion and Desvaux [D.J.Y. Marion, H. Desvaux, J. Magn. Reson. (2008) 193(1) 153-157] and Muller et al. [M. Nausner, J. Schlagnitweit, V. Smrecki, X. Yang, A. Jerschow, N. Muller, J. Magn. Reson. (2009) 198(1) 73-79]. In this regard, WURST pulse sequences may afford an efficient new method for experimentally detecting impedance mismatches between receiving and excitation circuits, allowing for the optimization of solids and solution NMR and NQR spectrometer systems. The use of the Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence for signal enhancement of NQR spectra acquired with WURST pulses and conventional pulses is also investigated. Finally, the utility of WURST pulses for the acquisition of wideline NQR spectra is demonstrated by acquiring part of the 63/65Cu NQR spectrum of CuCN.

  17. Magnetic correlations in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 from NQR relaxation and specific heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsa, F.; Rigamonti, A.

    1991-01-01

    La-139 and Cu-63 Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) relaxation measurements in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 for x ranging from 0 up to 0.3, with particular emphasis on the effect of doping on the Cu(2+) magnetic correlations and dynamics, are reviewed. In the low doping limit, x less than or equal to 0.05, the results can be interpreted consistently in terms of a simple phenomenological 'two-fluids' model whereby the effect of thermally-activated mobile O(2p) holes is the one of disrupting locally the Cu(2+) spin correlations. For x greater than or equal to 0.1, the results indicate the onset, as T approaches T(sub c)(+), of a strong coupling between Cu(2+) spins and the Fermi liquid of O(2p) holes leading to the apparent disappearance of localized Cu(2+) moment in connection with the opening of a superconducting gap.

  18. 35C NQR studies in 2,4,6-,2,3,6-, and 2,3,4-trichloro anisoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rukmani, K.; Ramakrishna, J.

    1985-02-01

    The chlorine-35 NQR frequencies and their temperature variation in 2,4,6-, 2,3,6- and 2,3,4-trichloro anisoles have been studied and compared with the corresponding chlorophenols with a view to studying the effect of hydrogen bonding. The observed frequencies have been assigned to the various chlorines with the help of the additive model of the substituent effect. The temperature dependence has been analysed in terms of the Bayer—Kushida—Brown models. The torsional frequencies and their temperature dependence have been calculated numerically under a two mode approximation. A comparison of the trichloro anisoles with the corresponding trichloro phenols has shown that the resonance frequency decreases due to hydrogen bonding while the torsional frequencies are not affected.

  19. Studies of Ga NMR and NQR in SrGa4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niki, H.; Higa, N.; Nakamura, S.; Kuroshima, H.; Toji, T.; Yogi, M.; Nakamura, A.; Hedo, M.; Nakama, T.; Ōnuki, Y.; Harima, H.

    2015-04-01

    In order to microscopically investigate the properties in SrGa4, the Ga NMR measurements of a powder sample were carried out. The Ga NMR spectra corresponding to Ga(I) and Ga(II) sites are obtained. The NMR spectra of 69&71Ga (a nuclear spin I = 3/2) in the powder sample of SrGa4 do not take a typical powder pattern caused by the NQR interaction, but take the spectra consisting of three well resolved resonance-lines, which indicates that the nonuniform distribution of crystal orientation in the powder sample occurs because of the magnetic anisotropy. From the analysis of the Ga NMR spectrum, it is found that the ab-plane of the crystal is parallel to the external magnetic field, which would be attributed to the anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility with the easy axis parallel to the ab-plane. This result is also confirmed by the 69Ga NQR in SrGa4. The Knight shifts of the 69Ga(I) and 69Ga(II) shift slightly to the negative side with decreasing temperature due to the core polarization of the d-electrons. The values of the Knight shift of the 69Ga(I) and 69Ga(II) are 0.01 and -0.11 % at 4.2 K, and 0.09 and -0.08 % at 300 K, respectively. The values of the 1/ T 1 T of the NMR of both 69Ga(I) and 69Ga(II) are almost constant between 4.2 and 100 K, whose values are 1.5 s -1 K -1 at 69Ga(I) and 0.12 s -1 K -1 at 69Ga(II), while the 1/ T 1 T slightly increase above 100K with increasing temperature. The value of T 1 of 69Ga(I) is one order of magnitude less than that of 69Ga(II).

  20. A resonant series counterpulse technique for high current opening switches

    SciTech Connect

    Dijk, E. van; Gelder, P. van

    1995-01-01

    A counterpulse technique for the controlled interruption of very high currents in inductive storage pulsed power systems is described and analyzed, and some simulation results of its performance are presented. The accompanying circuit comprises a pre-charged capacitor bank, connected in series with the inductive load, which has to be provided with a current pulse. Upon actuation, a resonant counterpulse current is created in the opening switch, connected in parallel with the current source and the load. In this way, the opening switch is opened at low current. A separate closing switch prevents closing of the opening switch at high voltage. Operation of the opening switch, often a mechanical switch, at low current and low voltage prevents arc erosion of the contacts. The advantage of this circuit compared to other counterpulse circuits is that the capacitor bank does not experience a voltage reversal. Electrolytic capacitors, which have a high energy density, are applied. The remaining energy of the capacitor bank after opening the opening switch, is transferred to the load. The required initial voltage of the capacitor bank is only a few hundred volts, whereas it may be above a kilovolt in other circuits. Another advantage of the method described here is that the load does not experience a pre-current, causing unwanted preheating of the load, before the resonant current is activated. At the moment, work is being performed at the Pulse Physics Laboratory to develop the resonant series counterpulse circuit for use with rail accelerators, which must be supplied with current pulses in the millisecond range up to the mega-ampere level.

  1. Nuclear quadrupole resonance lineshape analysis for different motional models: Stochastic Liouville approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Earle, K. A.; Mielczarek, A.; Kubica, A.; Milewska, A.; Moscicki, J.

    2011-12-01

    A general theory of lineshapes in nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), based on the stochastic Liouville equation, is presented. The description is valid for arbitrary motional conditions (particularly beyond the valid range of perturbation approaches) and interaction strengths. It can be applied to the computation of NQR spectra for any spin quantum number and for any applied magnetic field. The treatment presented here is an adaptation of the "Swedish slow motion theory," [T. Nilsson and J. Kowalewski, J. Magn. Reson. 146, 345 (2000), 10.1006/jmre.2000.2125] originally formulated for paramagnetic systems, to NQR spectral analysis. The description is formulated for simple (Brownian) diffusion, free diffusion, and jump diffusion models. The two latter models account for molecular cooperativity effects in dense systems (such as liquids of high viscosity or molecular glasses). The sensitivity of NQR slow motion spectra to the mechanism of the motional processes modulating the nuclear quadrupole interaction is discussed.

  2. Quantitative Proton Magnetic Resonance Techniques for Measuring Fat

    PubMed Central

    Harry, Houchun; Kan, Hermien E.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate, precise, and reliable techniques for quantifying body and organ fat distributions are important tools in physiology research. They are critically needed in studies of obesity and diseases involving excess fat accumulation. Proton magnetic resonance methods address this need by providing an array of relaxometry-based (T1, T2) and chemical-shift-based approaches. These techniques can generate informative visualizations of regional and whole-body fat distributions, yield measurements of fat volumes within specific body depots, and quantify fat accumulation in abdominal organs and muscles. MR methods are commonly used to investigate the role of fat in nutrition and metabolism, to measure the efficacy of short and long-term dietary and exercise interventions, to study the implications of fat in organ steatosis and muscular dystrophies, and to elucidate pathophysiological mechanisms in the context of obesity and its comorbidities. The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of mainstream MR strategies for fat quantification. The article will succinctly describe the principles that differentiate water and fat proton signals, summarize advantages and limitations of various techniques, and offer a few illustrative examples. The article will also highlight recent efforts in MR of brown adipose tissue and conclude by briefly discussing some future research directions. PMID:24123229

  3. Unconventional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques using nanostructured diamond surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, Victor; Jarmola, Andrey; Budker, Dmitry; Santori, Charles; Huang, Zhihong; Beausoleil, Raymond

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technologies rely on obtaining high nuclear magnetization, motivating low operating temperatures and high magnetic fields. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) techniques traditionally require another superconducting magnet and THz optics. We seek to use chip-scale devices to polarize nuclei in liquids at room temperature. The technique relies on optical pumping of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers and subsequent transfer of polarization to nuclei via hyperfine interaction, spin diffusion, and heteronuclear polarization transfer. We expect efficient polarization transfer will be realized by maximizing the diamond surface area. We have fabricated densely-packed (50 % packing fraction), high-aspect-ratio (10+) nanopillars over mm2 regions of the diamond surface. Pillars designed to have a few-hundred-nanometer diameter act as optical antennas, reducing saturation intensity. We also report progress in using nanopillar arrays as sensitive optical detectors of nano-scale NMR by measuring NV center Zeeman shifts produced by nearby external nuclei. The enhanced surface area increases the effective density of NV centers which couple to external nuclei. Combining these techniques may enable, e.g., identification of trace analytes and molecular imaging.

  4. Magnetic resonance techniques for investigation of multiple sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKay, Alex; Laule, Cornelia; Li, David K. B.; Meyers, Sandra M.; Russell-Schulz, Bretta; Vavasour, Irene M.

    2014-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common neurological disease which can cause loss of vision and balance, muscle weakness, impaired speech, fatigue, cognitive dysfunction and even paralysis. The key pathological processes in MS are inflammation, edema, myelin loss, axonal loss and gliosis. Unfortunately, the cause of MS is still not understood and there is currently no cure. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important clinical and research tool for MS. 'Conventional' MRI images of MS brain reveal bright lesions, or plaques, which demark regions of severe tissue damage. Conventional MRI has been extremely valuable for the diagnosis and management of people who have MS and also for the assessment of therapies designed to reduce inflammation and promote repair. While conventional MRI is clearly valuable, it lack pathological specificity and, in some cases, sensitivity to non-lesional pathology. Advanced MR techniques have been developed to provide information that is more sensitive and specific than what is available with clinical scanning. Diffusion tensor imaging and magnetization transfer provide a general but non-specific measure of the pathological state of brain tissue. MR spectroscopy provides concentrations of brain metabolites which can be related to specific pathologies. Myelin water imaging was designed to assess brain myelination and has proved useful for measuring myelin loss in MS. To combat MS, it is crucial that the pharmaceutical industry finds therapies which can reverse the neurodegenerative processes which occur in the disease. The challenge for magnetic resonance researchers is to design imaging techniques which can provide detailed pathological information relating to the mechanisms of MS therapies. This paper briefly describes the pathologies of MS and demonstrates how MS-associated pathologies can be followed using both conventional and advanced MR imaging protocols.

  5. The Hairpin Resonator: A New Look at an Old Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piejak, Robert; Godyak, Valery; Garner, Richard; Alexandrovich, Benjamin

    2003-10-01

    R. L Stenzel(1) first introduced a microwave resonator probe (referred to here as a hairpin probe) to measure local electron density in a low-pressure plasma discharge. Judging from literature citations, this technique appears to be rarely used. In order to compare electron density measurements of a Langmuir probe and microwave interferometer measurements, a hairpin probe was designed and built. Stenzel's original design was modified to increase coupling to the hairpin structure, to reduce cross coupling to the pick-up probe and to minimize plasma perturbation. In addition, a sheath correction was determined based on the fluid equations for collisionless ions in a cylindrical electron-free sheath, coupled with a determination of the capacitance between hairpin wires. Instead of using the microwave setup described by Stenzel(1) (sweep oscillator, TWT amplified, detector, Boxcar integrator X-Y recorder) an "off the shelf" spectrum analyzer with a tracking generator was used to monitor resonant frequency of the hairpin. The result of these changes is a relatively simple diagnostic tool that can be used to determine the electron density in a low-pressure plasma discharge. This system is believed to be accurate and has been found to be highly reproducible from day to day. Measurements are relatively easy to interpret. The hairpin probe can be used in rf and dc low-pressure discharges and in chemically active discharges where probe surface contamination is significant. It is also useable in weakly magnetized plasmas. In this work we discuss probe construction, design and usage. In addition, a series of measurements comparing the results of the hairpin probe, Langmuir probe and microwave interferometer results are also presented. The hairpin probe is a valuable plasma diagnostic technique that has been overlooked for too long. (1) R. L. Stenzel, Rev. Sci. Instrum., Vol. 47, No. 5, p. 503, (1976)

  6. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Laws, David D.

    2000-06-01

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone ({phi}/{psi}) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined {sup 13}C{sub a}, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of {alpha}-helical and {beta}-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly {beta}-sheet.

  7. Localization and Function of the Membrane-bound Riboflavin in the Na+-translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) from Vibrio cholerae*

    PubMed Central

    Casutt, Marco S.; Huber, Tamara; Brunisholz, René; Tao, Minli; Fritz, Günter; Steuber, Julia

    2010-01-01

    The sodium ion-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) from the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae is a respiratory membrane protein complex that couples the oxidation of NADH to the transport of Na+ across the bacterial membrane. The Na+-NQR comprises the six subunits NqrABCDEF, but the stoichiometry and arrangement of these subunits are unknown. Redox-active cofactors are FAD and a 2Fe-2S cluster on NqrF, covalently attached FMNs on NqrB and NqrC, and riboflavin and ubiquinone-8 with unknown localization in the complex. By analyzing the cofactor content and NADH oxidation activity of subcomplexes of the Na+-NQR lacking individual subunits, the riboflavin cofactor was unequivocally assigned to the membrane-bound NqrB subunit. Quantitative analysis of the N-terminal amino acids of the holo-complex revealed that NqrB is present in a single copy in the holo-complex. It is concluded that the hydrophobic NqrB harbors one riboflavin in addition to its covalently attached FMN. The catalytic role of two flavins in subunit NqrB during the reduction of ubiquinone to ubiquinol by the Na+-NQR is discussed. PMID:20558724

  8. Coexistence of multiple charge-density waves and superconductivity in SrPt2As2 revealed by 75As-NMR /NQR and 195Pt-NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Shinji; Tani, Yoshihiko; Mabuchi, Tomosuke; Kudo, Kazutaka; Nishikubo, Yoshihiro; Mitsuoka, Daisuke; Nohara, Minoru; Zheng, Guo-qing

    2015-02-01

    The relationship between charge-density wave (CDW) orders and superconductivity in arsenide superconductor SrPt2As2 with Tc=5.2 K which crystallizes in the CaBe2Ge2 -type structure was studied by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements up to 520 K, and 75As nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) and 195Pt-NMR measurements down to 1.5 K. At high temperature, 75As-NMR spectrum and nuclear-spin-relaxation rate (1 /T1) have revealed two distinct CDW orders, one realized in the As-Pt-As layer below TCDWAs (1 )=410 K and the other in the Pt-As-Pt layer below TCDWAs (2 )=255 K . The 1 /T1 measured by 75As-NQR shows a clear Hebel-Slichter peak just below Tc and decreases exponentially well below Tc. Concomitantly, 195Pt Knight shift decreases below Tc. Our results indicate that superconductivity in SrPt2As2 is in the spin-singlet state with an s -wave gap and is robust under the two distinct CDW orders in different layers.

  9. Ferromagnetic Quantum Critical Fluctuations and Anomalous Coexistence of Ferromagnetism and Superconductivity in UCoGe Revealed by Co-NMR and NQR Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Tetsuya; Nakai, Yusuke; Ihara, Yoshihiko; Ishida, Kenji; Deguchi, Kazuhiko; Sato, Noriaki K.; Satoh, Isamu

    2008-02-01

    Co nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies were carried out for the recently discovered UCoGe, in which the ferromagnetic and superconducting (SC) transitions are reported to occur at TCurie˜ 3 K and TS˜ 0.8 K [Huy et al.: Phys. Rev. Lett. 99 (2007) 067006], in order to investigate the coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity as well as the normal-state and SC properties from a microscopic point of view. From the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 and Knight-shift measurements, we confirm that ferromagnetic fluctuations that possess a quantum critical character are present above TCurie and also the occurrence of a ferromagnetic transition at 2.5 K in our polycrystalline sample. The magnetic fluctuations in the normal state show that UCoGe is an itinerant ferromagnet similar to ZrZn2 and YCo2. The onset SC transition is identified at TS˜ 0.7 K, below which 1/T1 arising from 30% of the volume fraction starts to decrease due to the opening of the SC gap. This component of 1/T1, which follows a T3 dependence in the temperature range 0.3-0.1 K, coexists with the magnetic components of 1/T1 showing a \\sqrt{T} dependence below TS. From the NQR measurements in the SC state, we suggest that the self-induced vortex state is realized in UCoGe.

  10. Mixed-radiation-field dosimetry utilizing Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Hintenlang, D.E.; Jamil, K.; Iselin, L.H.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation effects on urea, thiourea, guanidine carbonate and guanine sulfate were evaluated for both photon and neutron irradiations. Hydration of these materials typically provides a greatly increased sensitivity to both forms of radiation exposure, although not all materials lend themselves to this treatment without changing the chemical structure of the compound. Urea was found to be the most stable hydrated compound and provides the best sensitivity for quantifying radiation effects using NQR techniques. Urea permits a straight-forward quantification of each of the important parameters of the observed NQR signal, the FID. Several advanced data analysis methods were developed to assist in quantifying NQR spectra, both from urea and materials having more complex molecular structures, such as thiourea and guanidine sulfate. Unfortunately, these analysis techniques are frequently quite time consuming for the complex NQR spectra that result from some of these materials. The simpler analysis afforded by urea has therefore made it the prime candidate for an NQR dosimetry material. The moderate sensitivity of hydrated urea to photon irradiation does not permit this material to achieve the levels of performance required for a personnel dosimeter. It does, however, demonstrate acceptable sensitivity over dose ranges where it could provide a good biological dosimeter for several areas of radiation processing. The demonstrated photon sensitivity could permit hydrated urea to be used in applications such as food irradiation dosimetry. This material also exhibits a good sensitivity to neutron irradiation. The precise correlation between neutron exposure and the parameters of the resulting NQR spectra are currently being developed.

  11. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Herman

    2016-09-01

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3 / 2 , 5 / 2 , 7 / 2, and 9 / 2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  12. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cho, Herman

    2016-02-28

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3/2,5/2,7/2, and 9/2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Furthermore, applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  13. Threshold-crossing counting technique for damping factor determination of resonator sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Kefeng; Grimes, Craig A.

    2004-12-01

    The behavior of resonator-type sensors at resonance is characterized by two fundamental parameters: resonance frequency and damping factor (or Q-factor). Practical applications require accurate and efficient measurements of these two parameters. Using magnetoelastic resonant sensors as a test case earlier work [K. Zeng, K. G. Ong, C. Mungle, and C. A. Grimes, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 4375 (2002)] demonstrated the ability to determine resonance frequency by counting the number of cycles in the transient response of a pulsewise excited sensor. Presented in this paper is a novel technique for measuring the damping factor of a resonant magnetoelastic sensor, or any resonator type sensor, using threshold-crossing counting of the transient response. The damping factor determination technique eliminates the need for a lock-in amplifier or FFT analysis as in the conventional method of quality factor estimation from spectrum analysis, significantly simplifying the electronic implementation as well as improving measurement speed and accuracy.

  14. Experimental study of liquid level gauge for liquid hydrogen using Helmholtz resonance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Akihiro; Nishizu, Takahisa

    2016-07-01

    The Helmholtz resonance technique was applied to a liquid level gauge for liquid hydrogen to confirm the applicability of the technique in the cryogenic industrial field. A specially designed liquid level gauge that has a Helmholtz resonator with a small loudspeaker was installed in a glass cryostat. A swept frequency signal was supplied to the loudspeaker, and the acoustic response was detected by measuring the electrical impedance of the loudspeaker's voice coil. The penetration depth obtained from the Helmholtz resonance frequency was compared with the true value, which was read from a scale. In principle, the Helmholtz resonance technique is available for use with liquid hydrogen, however there are certain problems as regards practical applications. The applicability of the Helmholtz resonance technique to liquid hydrogen is discussed in this study.

  15. Suppression of electron correlations in the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 under ambient pressure demonstrated by As75 NMR/NQR measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Yuji; Roy, Beas; Ran, Sheng; Budko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2014-03-20

    The static and the dynamic spin correlations in the low-temperature collapsed tetragonal and the high-temperature tetragonal phase in CaFe2As2 have been investigated by As75 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. Through the temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts, although stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin correlations are realized in the high-temperature tetragonal phase, no trace of the AFM spin correlations can be found in the nonsuperconducting, low-temperature, collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase. Given that there is no magnetic broadening in As75 NMR spectra, together with the T-independent behavior of magnetic susceptibility χ and the T dependence of 1/T1Tχ, we conclude that Fe spin correlations are completely quenched statically and dynamically in the nonsuperconducting cT phase in CaFe2As2.

  16. Suppression of electron correlations in the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 under ambient pressure demonstrated by As75 NMR/NQR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Y.; Roy, B.; Ran, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2014-03-01

    The static and the dynamic spin correlations in the low-temperature collapsed tetragonal and the high-temperature tetragonal phase in CaFe2As2 have been investigated by As75 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. Through the temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts, although stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin correlations are realized in the high-temperature tetragonal phase, no trace of the AFM spin correlations can be found in the nonsuperconducting, low-temperature, collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase. Given that there is no magnetic broadening in As75 NMR spectra, together with the T-independent behavior of magnetic susceptibility χ and the T dependence of 1/T1Tχ, we conclude that Fe spin correlations are completely quenched statically and dynamically in the nonsuperconducting cT phase in CaFe2As2.

  17. Surface Plasmon Resonance: An Introduction to a Surface Spectroscopy Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Yijun; Zeng, Xiangqun; Liang, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has become an important optical biosensing technology in the areas of biochemistry, biology, and medical sciences because of its real-time, label-free, and noninvasive nature. The high cost of commercial devices and consumables has prevented SPR from being introduced in the undergraduate laboratory. Here, we present…

  18. Electronic properties of Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductors as seen by Cu and O NMR/NQR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinkmann, D.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) allow the investigation of electronic properties at the atomic level. We will report on such studies of typical members of the the Y-Ba-Cu-O family such as YBa2Cu30(6 + x) (1-2-3-(6 + x)), YBa2Cu4O8 (1-2-4) and Y2Ba4Cu7015 (2-4-7) with many examples of recent work performed in our laboratory. In particular, we will deal with Knight shift and relaxation studies of copper and oxygen. We will discuss important issues of current studies such as: (1) Existence of a common electronic spin-susceptibility in the planes (and perhaps in the chains) of 1-2-4; (2) Strong evidence for the existence of a pseudo spin-gap of the antiferromagnetic fluctuations in 1-2-4 and 2-4-7; (3) Evidence for d-wave pairing in 1-2-4; (4) Strong coupling of inequivalent Cu-O planes in 2-4-7 and possible origin for the high Tc value of this compound; and (5) The possibility to describe NMR data in the framework of a charge-excitation picture.

  19. Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Studies of the Sorc Sequence and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Polymers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakody, Jayakody R. Pemadasa

    1993-01-01

    The behavior of induction signals during steady -state pulse irradiation in ^{14} N NQR was investigated experimentally. Because Strong Off-resonance Comb (SORC) signals recur as long as the pulsing continues, very efficient signal-averaging can result. The dependence of these steady-state SORC signals on pulse parameters and on frequency offset are presented, together with a discussion of the applicability of the method. Also as part of the NQR work, Cocaine base has been detected using conventional NQR techniques. The experimental results show that SORC detection can be of sufficient sensitivity to form the basis of narcotics screening devices for both mail and airline baggage. A new NMR technique, to obtain the correlation time of the random thermal motion of a polymer at temperatures near the glass transition has been introduced. The temperature dependence is a result of thermal motion. For slow-motion of a polymer chain near the glass transition, the CSA parameter begins to decrease. This motional narrowing can be interpreted to yield the correlation time of the thermal motion. In this work Nitrocellulose isotopically highly enriched with ^{15}N was studied at four different temperatures between 27^ circ and 120^circ Celsius and the correlation times for polymer backbone motions were obtained. Nafion films containing, water (D_2 O and H_2^{17}O) and methanol (CH_3OD, CH _3^{17}OH), have been studied using Deuteron and Oxygen-17 NMR spectroscopy. Glassy behavior of the water domains at low temperature is evidenced by the specific nature of the ^2H NMR lineshapes. Activation energies extracted from ^2H spin-lattice relaxation data on the high temperature side of the T_1 minimum exhibit a steady increase with increasing water content. In spite of a high degree of molecular mobility, angular-dependent spectra of both unstretched and stretched samples reflect considerable anisotropy of the host polymer. Activation volumes corresponding to a specific dynamical

  20. The Conformational Changes Induced by Ubiquinone Binding in the Na+-pumping NADH:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) Are Kinetically Controlled by Conserved Glycines 140 and 141 of the NqrB Subunit*

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Madeleine; Juárez, Oscar; Neehaul, Yashvin; Cook, Darcie A.; Barquera, Blanca; Hellwig, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Na+-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) is responsible for maintaining a sodium gradient across the inner bacterial membrane. This respiratory enzyme, which couples sodium pumping to the electron transfer between NADH and ubiquinone, is not present in eukaryotes and as such could be a target for antibiotics. In this paper it is shown that the site of ubiquinone reduction is conformationally coupled to the NqrB subunit, which also hosts the final cofactor in the electron transport chain, riboflavin. Previous work showed that mutations in conserved NqrB glycine residues 140 and 141 affect ubiquinone reduction and the proper functioning of the sodium pump. Surprisingly, these mutants did not affect the dissociation constant of ubiquinone or its analog HQNO (2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide) from Na+-NQR, which indicates that these residues do not participate directly in the ubiquinone binding site but probably control its accessibility. Indeed, redox-induced difference spectroscopy showed that these mutations prevented the conformational change involved in ubiquinone binding but did not modify the signals corresponding to bound ubiquinone. Moreover, data are presented that demonstrate the NqrA subunit is able to bind ubiquinone but with a low non-catalytically relevant affinity. It is also suggested that Na+-NQR contains a single catalytic ubiquinone binding site and a second site that can bind ubiquinone but is not active. PMID:25006248

  1. Coal thickness gauge using RRAS techniques, part 1. [radiofrequency resonance absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rollwitz, W. L.; King, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    A noncontacting sensor having a measurement range of 0 to 6 in or more, and with an accuracy of 0.5 in or better is needed to control the machinery used in modern coal mining so that the thickness of the coal layer remaining over the rock is maintained within selected bounds. The feasibility of using the radiofrequency resonance absorption (RRAS) techniques of electron magnetic resonance (EMR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as the basis of a coal thickness gauge is discussed. The EMR technique was found, by analysis and experiments, to be well suited for this application.

  2. Temperature variation of ultralow frequency modes and mean square displacements in solid lasamide (diuretic drug) studied by 35Cl-NQR, X-ray and DFT/QTAIM.

    PubMed

    Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia; Latosińska, Magdalena; Kasprzak, Jerzy; Tomczak, Magdalena; Maurin, Jan Krzysztof

    2012-10-25

    The application of combined (35)Cl-NQR/X-ray/DFT/QTAIM methods to study the temperature variation of anisotropic displacement parameters and ultralow frequency modes of anharmonic torsional vibrations in the solid state is illustrated on the example of 2,4-dichloro-5-sulfamolybenzoic acid (lasamide, DSBA) which is a diuretic and an intermediate in the synthesis of furosemide and thus its common impurity. The crystallographic structure of lasamide is solved by X-ray diffraction and refined to a final R-factor of 3.06% at room temperature. Lasamide is found to crystallize in the triclinic space group P-1, with two equivalent molecules in the unit cell a = 7.5984(3) Å, b = 8.3158(3) Å, c = 8.6892(3) Å; α = 81.212(3)°, β = 73.799(3)°, γ = 67.599(3)°. Its molecules form symmetric dimers linked by two short and linear intermolecular hydrogen bonds O-H···O (O-H···O = 2.648 Å and ∠OHO = 171.5°), which are further linked by weaker and longer intermolecular hydrogen bonds N-H···O (N-H···O = 2.965 Å and ∠NHO = 166.4°). Two (35)Cl-NQR resonance frequencies, 36.899 and 37.129 MHz, revealed at room temperature are assigned to chlorine sites at the ortho and para positions, relative to the carboxyl functional group, respectively. The difference in C-Cl(1) and C-Cl(2) bond lengths only slightly affects the value of (35)Cl-NQR frequencies, which results mainly from chemical inequivalence of chlorine atoms but also involvement in different intermolecular interactions pattern. The smooth decrease in both (35)Cl-NQR frequencies with increasing temperature in the range of 77-300 K testifies to the averaging of EFG tensor at each chlorine site due to anharmonic torsional vibrations. Lasamide is thermally stable; no temperature-induced release of chlorine or decomposition of this compound is detected. The temperature dependence of ultralow frequency modes of anharmonic small-angle internal torsional vibrations averaging EFG tensor and mean square angle

  3. Methods for magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Wind, Robert A.; Minard, Kevin R.; Majors, Paul D.

    2011-11-22

    Methods of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object are disclosed that include placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. In particular embodiments the method includes pulsing the radio frequency to provide at least two of a spatially selective read pulse, a spatially selective phase pulse, and a spatially selective storage pulse. Further disclosed methods provide pulse sequences that provide extended imaging capabilities, such as chemical shift imaging or multiple-voxel data acquisition.

  4. Magnetic correlations in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 from NQR relaxation and specific heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsa, F.; Rigamonti, A.

    1990-01-01

    La-139 and Cu-63 Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) relaxation measurements in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 for O = to or less than 0.3 and in the temperature range 1.6 + 450 K are analyzed in terms of Cu(++) magnetic correlations and dynamics. It is described how the magnetic correlations that would result from Cu-Cu exchange are reduced by mobile charge defects related to x-doping. A comprehensive picture is given which explains satisfactorily the x and T dependence of the correlation time, of the correlation length and of the Neel temperature T(sub n)(x) as well as being consistent with known electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. It is discussed how, in the superconducting samples, the mobile defects also cause the decrease, for T yields T(sub c)(+) of the hyperfine Cu electron-nucleus effective interaction, leading to the coexistence of quasi-localized, reduced magnetic moments from 3d Cu electrons and mobile oxygen p-hole carriers. The temperature dependence of the effective hyperfine field around the superconducting transition yields an activation energy which could be related to the pairing energy. New specific heat measurements are also presented and discussed in terms of the above picture.

  5. Sb-NQR study on novel superconductivity in (Pr 1-xLa x)Os 4Sb 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Takayuki; Yogi, Mamoru; Imamura, Yoju; Mukuda, Hidekazu; Kitaoka, Yoshio; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Sugawara, Hitoshi; Sato, Hideyuki

    2007-03-01

    We report on superconducting (SC) properties in a series of filled-skutterudite compounds (Pr 1-xLa x)Os 4Sb 12 through the Sb nuclear-quadrupole-resonance (NQR). In the SC state, the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/ T1Pr at Pr-cage decreases exponentially with no coherence peak below TC, consistent with the results for the pure PrOs 4Sb 12. In the Pr-rich compounds of x=0.05 and 0.2, the residual density of states (RDOS) at the Fermi level are induced below TC due to the La substitution. It is concluded that the RDOS is not due to the impurity effect that used to be observed in unconventional superconductors with line-node gap. Rather, a part of the Fermi surface that contributes to 5.5% of the total is suggested to become gapless for x=0.05 and 0.2, yielding the RDOS. For the La-rich compounds of x=0.4, 0.8 and 1, as the Pr-substitution for La increases, TC increases and a size of energy gap increases. The Pr-substitution for La makes the pairing interaction for forming the Cooper pairs strong and causes an anisotropy in its energy-gap structure.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Elastography and Other Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Chronic Liver Disease: Current Status and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cher Heng; Venkatesh, Sudhakar Kundapur

    2016-09-15

    Recent advances in the noninvasive imaging of chronic liver disease have led to improvements in diagnosis, particularly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A comprehensive evaluation of the liver may be performed with the quantification of the degree of hepatic steatosis, liver iron concentration, and liver fibrosis. In addition, MRI of the liver may be used to identify complications of cirrhosis, including portal hypertension, ascites, and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review article, we discuss the state of the art techniques in liver MRI, namely, magnetic resonance elastography, hepatobiliary phase MRI, and liver fat and iron quantification MRI. The use of these advanced techniques in the management of chronic liver diseases, including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, will be elaborated. PMID:27563019

  7. Magnetic Resonance Elastography and Other Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Chronic Liver Disease: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Cher Heng; Venkatesh, Sudhakar Kundapur

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in the noninvasive imaging of chronic liver disease have led to improvements in diagnosis, particularly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A comprehensive evaluation of the liver may be performed with the quantification of the degree of hepatic steatosis, liver iron concentration, and liver fibrosis. In addition, MRI of the liver may be used to identify complications of cirrhosis, including portal hypertension, ascites, and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review article, we discuss the state of the art techniques in liver MRI, namely, magnetic resonance elastography, hepatobiliary phase MRI, and liver fat and iron quantification MRI. The use of these advanced techniques in the management of chronic liver diseases, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, will be elaborated. PMID:27563019

  8. Investigation of Wavelet-Based Enhancements to Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Explosives Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, Stephen W.; Dress, William B.; Hibbs, Andrew D.; Barrall, Geoffrey A.

    1998-06-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is effective for the detection and identification of certain types of explosives such as RDX, PETN and TNT. In explosive detection, the NQR response of certain 14N nuclei present in the crystalline material is probed. The 14N nuclei possess a nuclear quadrupole moment which in the presence of an electric field gradient produces an energy level splitting which may be excited by radio-frequency magnetic fields. Pulsing on the sample with a radio signal of the appropriate frequency produces a transient NQR response which may then be detected. Since the resonant frequency is dependent upon both the quadrupole moment of the 14N nucleus and the nature of the local electric field gradients, it is very compound specific. Under DARPA sponsorship, the authors are using multiresolution methods to investigate the enhancement of operation of NQR explosives detectors used for land mine detection. For this application, NQR processing time must be reduced to less than one second. False alarm responses due to acoustic and piezoelectric ringing must be suppressed. Also, as TNT is the most prevalent explosive found in land mines, NQR detection of TNT must be made practical despite unfavorable relaxation tunes. All three issues require improvement in signal-to-noise ratio, and all would benefit from improved feature extraction. This paper reports some of the insights provided by multiresolution methods that can be used to obtain these improvements. It includes results of multiresolution analysis of experimentally observed NQR signatures for RDX responses and various false alarm signatures in the absence of explosive compounds.

  9. NQR application to the study of hydrogen dynamics in hydrogen-bonded molecular dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaji, Tetsuo

    2016-12-01

    The temperature dependences of 1H NMR as well as 35Cl NQR spin-lattice relaxation times T 1 were investigated in order to study the hydrogen transfer dynamics in carboxylic acid dimers in 3,5-dichloro- and 2,6-dichlorobenzoic acids. The asymmetry energy A/ k B and the activation energy V/ k B for the hydrogen transfer were estimated to be 240 K and 900 K, and 840 K and 2500 K, respectively, for these compounds. In spite of a large asymmetric potential the quantum nature of hydrogen transfer is recognized in the slope of the temperature dependence of T 1 on the low-temperature side of the T 1 minimum. The NQR T 1 measurements was revealed to be a good probe for the hydrogen transfer dynamics.

  10. Apparatus for measuring elastic constants of single crystals by a resonance technique up to 1825 K

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, T.; Anderson, O.L.

    1988-08-01

    By holding the rectangular parallelepiped specimen between long, thinalumina buffer rods, we can detect the resonance vibration of a specimen even attemperatures above 1800 K. This new technique, in combination with the theoryfor the calculation of the resonance frequency spectrum of a rectangularparallelepiped specimen, enables us to determine the high-temperature elastic properties of single-crystal materials. The first application of this new device was to determine the elastic stiffness constants of single-crystal corundum up to 1825 K.

  11. Waveguide-type optical passive ring resonator gyro using frequency modulation spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ning; Lijun, Guo; Mei, Kong; Tuoyuan, Chen

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports the experimental results of silica on a silicon ring resonator in a resonator micro optic gyroscope based on the frequency modulation spectroscopy technique by our research group. The ring resonator is composed of a 4 cm diameter silica waveguide. By testing at λ = 1550 nm, the FSR, FWHM and the depth of resonance are 3122 MHz, 103.07 MHz and 0.8 respectively. By using a polarization controller, the resonance curve under the TM mode can be inhibited. The depth of resonance increased from 0.8 to 0.8913, namely the finesse increase from 30.33 to 33.05. In the experiments, there is an acoustic-optical frequency shifter (AOFS) in each light loop. We lock the lasing frequency at the resonance frequency of the silica waveguide ring resonator for the counterclockwise lightwave; the frequency difference between the driving frequencies of the two AOFS is equivalent to the Sagnac frequency difference caused by gyro rotation. Thus, the gyro output is observed. The slope of the linear fit is about 0.330 mV/(°/s) based on the -900 to 900 kHz equivalent frequency and the gyro dynamic range is ±2.0 × 103 rad/s.

  12. Stand-off explosive detection utilizing low power stimulated emission nuclear quadrupole resonance detection and subwavelength focusing wideband super lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolos, John; Mouyos, William; Feng, Judy; Chase, Walter

    2015-05-01

    The need for advanced techniques to detect improvised explosive devices (IED) at stand-off distances greater than ten (10) meters has driven AMI Research and Development (AMI) to develop a solution to detect and identify the threat utilizing a forward looking Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) combined with our CW radar technology Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) detection system. The novel features include a near-field sub-wavelength focusing antenna, a wide band 300 KHz to 300 MHz rapidly scanning CW radar facilitated by a high Q antenna/tuner, and an advanced processor utilizing Rabi transitions where the nucleus oscillates between states under the time dependent incident electromagnetic field and alternately absorbs energy from the incident field while emitting coherent energy via stimulated emission. AMI's Sub-wavelength Focusing Wide Band Super Lens uses a Near-Field SAR, making detection possible at distances greater than ten (10) meters. This super lens is capable of operating on the near-field and focusing electromagnetic waves to resolutions beyond the diffraction limit. When applied to the case of a vehicle approaching an explosive hazard the methodologies of synthetic aperture radar is fused with the array based super resolution and the NQR data processing detecting the explosive hazard.

  13. Foil cycling technique for the VESUVIO spectrometer operating in the resonance detector configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Schooneveld, E. M.; Mayers, J.; Rhodes, N. J.; Pietropaolo, A.; Andreani, C.; Senesi, R.; Gorini, G.; Perelli-Cippo, E.; Tardocchi, M.

    2006-09-15

    This article reports a novel experimental technique, namely, the foil cycling technique, developed on the VESUVIO spectrometer (ISIS spallation source) operating in the resonance detector configuration. It is shown that with a proper use of two foils of the same neutron absorbing material it is possible, in a double energy analysis process, to narrow the width of the instrumental resolution of a spectrometer operating in the resonance detector configuration and to achieve an effective subtraction of the neutron and gamma backgrounds. Preliminary experimental results, obtained from deep inelastic neutron scattering measurements on lead, zirconium hydride, and deuterium chloride samples, are presented.

  14. Isotope effect on the temperature dependence of the 35Cl NQR frequency in (NH4)2RuCl6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kume, Yoshio; Amino, Daiki; Asaji, Tetsuo

    2013-07-01

    The 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance frequencies and spin-lattice relaxation times for (NH4)2RuCl6, (ND4)2RuCl6, (NH4)2SnCl6, and (ND4)2SnCl6 were measured in the temperature range 4.2-300 K. In these four compounds, it was confirmed that no phase transition occurs in the observed temperature range. At 4.2 K, discrepancies of the NQR frequency between non-deuterated and deuterated compounds, which are attributed to the difference in the spatial distributions of hydrogen (deuterium) atoms in the ground states of the rotational motion of ammonium ion, reached to 24 kHz and 23 kHz for the ruthenate compounds and the stannate compounds, respectively. The separation between the ground and the first excited states of the rotational motion of the ammonium ion was estimated to be 466 J mol-1 and 840 J mol-1 for (ND4)2RuCl6 and (NH4)2RuCl6, respectively, by least-square fitting calculations of temperature dependence of the NQR frequency. For (ND4)2SnCl6 and (NH4)2SnCl6, these quantities were estimated to be 501 J mol-1 and 1544 J mol-1, respectively. It was clarified that the T1 minimum, which has been observed for the stannate compounds at around 60 K as a feature of the temperature dependence, was dependent on a method of sample preparation. It is concluded that the minimum is not an essential character of the ammonium hexachlorostannate(IV) since the crystals prepared in strong acid condition to prevent a partial substitution of chlorine atoms by hydroxyl groups, did not show such T1 minimum.

  15. Investigating real-time activation of adenosine receptors by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yimei; Yang, Hongqin; Zheng, Liqin; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen

    2013-02-01

    Adenosine receptors play important roles in many physiological and pathological processes, for example regulating myocardial oxygen consumption and the release of neurotransmitters. The activations of adenosine receptors have been studied by some kinds of techniques, such as western blot, immunohistochemistry, etc. However, these techniques cannot reveal the dynamical response of adenosine receptors under stimulation. In this paper, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique was introduced to study the real-time activation of adenosine receptors by monitoring the dynamics of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level. The results showed that there were significant differences between adenosine receptors on real-time responses under stimulation. Moreover, the dynamics of cAMP level demonstrated that competition between adenosine receptors existed. Taken together, our study indicates that monitoring the dynamics of cAMP level using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique could be one potential approach to investigate the mechanism of competitions between adenosine receptors.

  16. CORDIC algorithm based digital detection technique applied in resonator fiber optic gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhihuai; Jin, Xiaojun; Ma, Huilian; Jin, Zhonghe

    2009-06-01

    A digital detection technique based on the coordinate rotation digital computer (CORDIC) algorithm is proposed for a resonator fiber optic gyroscope (R-FOG). It makes the generation of modulation signal, synchronous demodulation and signal processing in R-FOG to be realized in a single field programmable gate array (FPGA). The frequency synthesis and synchronous detection techniques based on the CORDIC algorithm have been analyzed and designed firstly. The experimental results indicate that the precision of the detection circuit satisfies the requirements for the closed-loop feedback in R-FOG system. The frequency of the laser is locked to the resonance frequency of the fiber ring resonator stably and the open-loop gyro output signal is observed successfully. The dynamic range and the bias drift of the R-FOG are ±1.91 rad/s and 0.005 rad/s over 10 s, respectively.

  17. Microwave resonance lamp absorption technique for measuring temperature and OH number density in combustion environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lempert, Walter R.

    1988-01-01

    A simple technique for simultaneous determination of temperature and OH number density is described, along with characteristic results obtained from measurements using a premixed, hydrogen air flat flame burner. The instrumentation is based upon absorption of resonant radiation from a flowing microwave discharge lamp, and is rugged, relatively inexpensive, and very simple to operate.

  18. (14) N nuclear quadrupole resonance study of piroxicam: confirmation of new polymorphic form V.

    PubMed

    Lavrič, Zoran; Pirnat, Janez; Lužnik, Janko; Puc, Uroš; Trontelj, Zvonko; Srčič, Stane

    2015-06-01

    A new polymorphic crystal form of piroxicam was discovered while preparing crystalline samples of piroxicam for (14) N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) analysis. The new crystal form, designated as V, was prepared by evaporative recrystallization from dichloromethane. Three known polymorphic forms (I, II, and III) were also prepared. Our aim was to apply (14) N NQR to characterize the new polymorphic form of piroxicam and compare the results with those of the other known polymorphic forms. Additional analytical methods used for characterization were X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), thermal analysis, and vibrational spectroscopy. For the first time, a complete set of nine characteristic (14) N NQR frequencies was found for each prepared polymorph of piroxicam. The consistent set of measured frequencies and calculated characteristic quadrupole parameters found for the new polymorphic form V is a convincing evidence that we are dealing with a new form. The already known piroxicam polymorphic forms were characterized similarly. The XRPD results were in accordance with the conclusions of (14) N NQR analysis. The performed study clearly demonstrates a strong potential of (14) N NQR method to be applied as a highly discriminative spectroscopic analytical tool to characterize polymorphic forms. PMID:25776345

  19. An efficient technique for the reduction of wavelength noise in resonance-based integrated photonic sensors.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Farshid; Chamanzar, Maysamreza; Eftekhar, Ali A; Adibi, Ali

    2014-11-21

    A systematic study of the limit of detection (LOD) in resonance-based silicon photonic lab-on-chip sensors is presented. The effects of the noise, temperature fluctuations, and the fundamental thermodynamic limit of the resonator are studied. Wavelength noise is identified as the dominant source of noise, and an efficient technique for suppressing this noise is presented. A large ensemble of statistical data from the transmission measurements in a laser-scanning configuration on five silicon nitride (SiN) microrings is collected to discuss and identify the sources of noise. The experimental results show that the LOD is limited by a 3σ wavelength noise of ∼1.8 pm. We present a sub-periodic interferometric technique, relying on an inverse algorithm, to suppress this noise. Our technique reduces the wavelength noise by more than one order of magnitude to an ensemble average of 3σ = 120 fm, for a resonator quality factor (Q) of about 5 × 10(4) without any temperature stabilization or cooling. This technique is readily amenable to on-chip integration to realize highly accurate and low-cost lab-on-chip sensors. PMID:25243248

  20. Resonance frequencies and Young's modulus determination of magnetorheological elastomers using the photoacoustic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel Macias, J.; Ordonez-Miranda, J.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    A simple and reliable methodology for determining the Young's modulus of magnetorheological elastomers is proposed based on the resonance frequencies of the amplitude of the photoacoustic signal. An explicit expression for the pressure changes within a photoacoustic cell, due to the thermal expansion of the air and the elastic bending of a clamped circular elastic membrane, is derived and analyzed. It is found that the resonance behavior of the amplitude of the photoacoustic signal is due to the contribution of the axial bending of its thickness. It is also shown that the Young's modulus of the membrane is proportional to its density, the square of its resonance frequencies and the fourth power of its radius, and inversely proportional to the square of its thickness. The application of the proposed approach to membranes made up of spherical microparticles of carbonyl iron powder embedded in a matrix of silicone rubber with weight concentrations of 0%, 5.2%, and 13.7% yields accurate and reproducible results, which are in good agreement with reported data in the literature. The highest accuracy on the measurement of the resonance frequencies and therefore on the Young's modulus is found for the first resonance peak. When a magnetic field is applied to the samples to modify their stiffness, it is observed that the Young's modulus increases with the magnetic field. This novel application of the photoacoustic technique opens the possibility of performing mechanical characterization of a broad diversity of magnetorheological membranes.

  1. Persistence of singlet fluctuations in the coupled spin tetrahedra system Cu2Te2O5Br2 revealed by high-field magnetization, 79Br NQR, and 125Te NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, S.-H.; Choi, K.-Y.; Berger, H.; Büchner, B.; Grafe, H.-J.

    2012-11-01

    We present high-field magnetization and 79Br nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) and 125Te nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies in the weakly coupled Cu2+ (S=1/2) tetrahedral system Cu2Te2O5Br2. The field-induced level crossing effects were observed by the magnetization measurements in a long-ranged magnetically ordered state which was confirmed by a strong divergence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate T1-1 at T0=13.5 K. In the paramagnetic state, T1-1 reveals an effective singlet-triplet spin gap much larger than that observed by static bulk measurements. Our results imply that the inter- and the intratetrahedral interactions compete, but at the same time they cooperate strengthening effectively the local intratetrahedral exchange couplings. We discuss that the unusual feature originates from the frustrated intertetrahedral interactions.

  2. Microwave band on-chip coil technique for single electron spin resonance in a quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Obata, Toshiaki; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel; Kubo, Toshihiro; Yoshida, Katsuharu; Tokura, Yasuhiro; Tarucha, Seigo

    2007-10-01

    Microwave band on-chip microcoils are developed for the application to single electron spin resonance measurement with a single quantum dot. Basic properties such as characteristic impedance and electromagnetic field distribution are examined for various coil designs by means of experiment and simulation. The combined setup operates relevantly in the experiment at dilution temperature. The frequency responses of the return loss and Coulomb blockade current are examined. Capacitive coupling between a coil and a quantum dot causes photon assisted tunneling, whose signal can greatly overlap the electron spin resonance signal. To suppress the photon assisted tunneling effect, a technique for compensating for the microwave electric field is developed. Good performance of this technique is confirmed from measurement of Coulomb blockade oscillations. PMID:17979446

  3. Roles of the Sodium-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) on Vibrio cholerae Metabolism, Motility and Osmotic Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Minato, Yusuke; Halang, Petra; Quinn, Matthew J.; Faulkner, Wyatt J.; Aagesen, Alisha M.; Steuber, Julia; Stevens, Jan F.; Häse, Claudia C.

    2014-01-01

    The Na+ translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) is a unique respiratory enzyme catalyzing the electron transfer from NADH to quinone coupled with the translocation of sodium ions across the membrane. Typically, Vibrio spp., including Vibrio cholerae, have this enzyme but lack the proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I). Thus, Na+-NQR should significantly contribute to multiple aspects of V. cholerae physiology; however, no detailed characterization of this aspect has been reported so far. In this study, we broadly investigated the effects of loss of Na+-NQR on V. cholerae physiology by using Phenotype Microarray (Biolog), transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. We found that the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant showed multiple defects in metabolism detected by Phenotype Microarray. Transcriptome analysis revealed that the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant up-regulates 31 genes and down-regulates 55 genes in both early and mid-growth phases. The most up-regulated genes included the cadA and cadB genes, encoding a lysine decarboxylase and a lysine/cadaverine antiporter, respectively. Increased CadAB activity was further suggested by the metabolomics analysis. The down-regulated genes include sialic acid catabolism genes. Metabolomic analysis also suggested increased reductive pathway of TCA cycle and decreased purine metabolism in the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant. Lack of Na+-NQR did not affect any of the Na+ pumping-related phenotypes of V. cholerae suggesting that other secondary Na+ pump(s) can compensate for Na+ pumping activity of Na+-NQR. Overall, our study provides important insights into the contribution of Na+-NQR to V. cholerae physiology. PMID:24811312

  4. Dynamic neutron scattering on incoherent systems using efficient resonance spin flip techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Häussler, Wolfgang; Kredler, Lukas

    2014-05-15

    We have performed numerical ray-tracing Monte-Carlo-simulations of incoherent dynamic neutron scattering experiments. We intend to optimize the efficiency of incoherent measurements depending on the fraction of neutrons scattered without and with spin flip at the sample. In addition to conventional spin echo, we have numerically and experimentally studied oscillating intensity techniques. The results point out the advantages of these different spin echo variants and are an important prerequisite for neutron resonance spin echo instruments like RESEDA (FRM II, Munich), to choose the most efficient technique depending on the scattering vector range and the properties of the sample system under study.

  5. Determination of internal friction using ultrasonic diffuse field and resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetta, P. D.; Johnson, Ward

    2000-05-01

    Attempts to nondestructively determine mechanical properties of metals and alloys have traditionally focused on empirical correlations or relied on models using static microstructural parameters, such as grain size. Since mechanical properties are dynamic, a more direct approach is to use measurements of defect dynamics coupled with quantitative models to predict mechanical properties. One such measurement is the ultrasonic internal friction as determined by resonance techniques. However, such techniques have limited applicability for testing structural materials, because the techniques require specimens to have free boundaries and, generally, regular geometry. In recent years, diffuse field ultrasound has been used to measure internal friction and shows promise for practical nondestructive materials characterization of irregularly shaped specimens. In this paper, the connection between the resonance and diffuse field techniques will be explored. In addition, measurements performed using these techniques will be compared to traditional pulse echo measurements of attenuation and back scattered grain noise to study the relative contributions of internal friction and scattering in copper and aluminum alloys.—This research was conducted while P. D. Panetta held a National Research Council Research Associateship.

  6. Numerical and experimental investigation of a low-frequency measurement technique: differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hanjun; Zhao, Jianguo; Tang, Genyang; Ma, Xiaoyi; Wang, Shangxu

    2016-06-01

    Differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy (DARS) has been developed to determine the elastic properties of saturated rocks within the kHz frequency range. This laboratory technique is based on considerations from perturbation theory, wherein the resonance frequencies of the resonant cavity with and without a perturbation sample are used to estimate the acoustic properties of the test sample. In order to better understand the operating mechanism of DARS and therefore optimize the procedure, it is important to develop an accurate and efficient numerical model. Accordingly, this study presents a new multiphysics model by coupling together considerations from acoustics, solid mechanics, and electrostatics. The numerical results reveal that the newly developed model can successfully simulate the acoustic pressure field at different resonance modes, and that it can accurately reflect the measurement process. Based on the understanding of the DARS system afforded by the numerical simulation, we refine the system configuration by utilizing cavities of different lengths and appropriate radii to broaden the frequency bandwidth and ensure testing accuracy. Four synthetic samples are measured to test the performance of the optimized DARS system, in conjunction with ultrasonic and static measurements. For nonporous samples, the estimated bulk moduli are shown to be independent of the different measurement methods (i.e. DARS or ultrasonic techniques). In contrast, for sealed porous samples, the differences in bulk moduli between the low- and high-frequency techniques can be clearly observed; this discrepancy is attributed to frequency dispersion. In summary, the optimized DARS system with an extended frequency range of 500–2000 Hz demonstrates considerable utility in investigating the frequency dependence of the acoustic properties of reservoir rocks.

  7. Frequency-Temperature Compensation Techniques for High-Q Microwave Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnett, John G.; Tobar, Michael E.

    Low-noise high-stability resonator oscillators based on high-Q monolithic sapphire ``Whispering Gallery'' (WG)-mode resonators have become important devices for telecommunication, radar and metrological applications. The extremely high quality factor of sapphire, of 2 x10^5 at room temperature, 5 x10^7 at liquid nitrogen temperature and 5 x10^9 at liquid helium temperature has enabled the lowest phase noise and highly frequency-stable oscillators in the microwave regime to be constructed. To create an oscillator with exceptional frequency stability, the resonator must have its frequency-temperature dependence annulled at some temperature, as well as a high quality factor. The Temperature Coefficient of Permittivity (TCP) for sapphire is quite large, at 10-100parts per million/K above 77K. This mechanism allows temperature fluctuations to transform to resonator frequency fluctuations.A number of research groups worldwide have investigated various methods of compensating the TCP of a sapphire dielectric resonator at different temperatures. The usual electromagnetic technique of annulment involves the use of paramagnetic impurities contributing an opposite temperature coefficient of the magnetic susceptibility to the TCP. This technique has only been realized successfully in liquid helium environments. Near 4K the thermal expansion and permittivity effects are small and only small quantities of the paramagnetic ions are necessary to compensate the mode frequency. Compensation is due to impurity ions that were incidentally left over from the manufacturing process.Recently, there has been an effort to dispense with the need for liquid helium and make a compact flywheel oscillator for the new generation of primary frequency standards such as the cesium fountain at the Laboratoire Primaire du Temps et des Fréquences (LPTF), France. To achieve the stability limit imposed

  8. A biofilm microreactor system for simultaneous electrochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Ewing, R. James; Ewing, Thomas; Mueller, Karl T.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-03-01

    In order to fully understand electrochemically active biofilms and the limitations to their scale-up in industrial biofilm reactors, a complete picture of the microenvironments inside the biofilm is needed. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are ideally suited for the study of biofilms and for probing their microenvironments because these techniques allow for non-invasive interrogation and in situ monitoring with high resolution. By combining NMR with simultaneous electrochemical techniques, it is possible to sustain and study live electrochemically active biofilms. Here, we introduce a novel biofilm microreactor system that allows for simultaneous electrochemical and NMR techniques (EC-NMR) at the microscale. Microreactors were designed with custom radiofrequency resonator coils, which allowed for NMR measurements of biofilms growing on polarized gold electrodes. For an example application of this system, we grew Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms. NMR was used to investigate growth media flow velocities, which were compared to simulated laminar flow, and electron donor concentrations inside the biofilms. We use Monte Carlo error analysis to estimate standard deviations of the electron donor concentration measurements within the biofilm. The EC-NMR biofilm microreactor system can ultimately be used to correlate extracellular electron transfer rates with metabolic reactions and explore extracellular electron transfer mechanisms.

  9. A biofilm microreactor system for simultaneous electrochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Renslow, R S; Babauta, J T; Majors, P D; Mehta, H S; Ewing, R J; Ewing, T W; Mueller, K T; Beyenal, H

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are ideally suited for the study of biofilms and for probing their microenvironments because these techniques allow for noninvasive interrogation and in situ monitoring with high resolution. By combining NMR with simultaneous electrochemical techniques, it is possible to sustain and study live biofilms respiring on electrodes. Here, we describe a biofilm microreactor system, including a reusable and a disposable reactor, that allows for simultaneous electrochemical and NMR techniques (EC-NMR) at the microscale. Microreactors were designed with custom radio frequency resonator coils, which allowed for NMR measurements of biofilms growing on polarized gold electrodes. For an example application of this system we grew Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms on electrodes. EC-NMR was used to investigate growth medium flow velocities and depth-resolved acetate concentration inside the biofilm. As a novel contribution we used Monte Carlo error analysis to estimate the standard deviations of the acetate concentration measurements. Overall, we found that the disposable EC-NMR microreactor provided a 9.7 times better signal-to-noise ratio over the reusable reactor. The EC-NMR biofilm microreactor system can ultimately be used to correlate extracellular electron transfer rates with metabolic reactions and explore extracellular electron transfer mechanisms. PMID:24622544

  10. Resonant-type MEMS transducers excited by two acoustic emission simulation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozevin, Didem; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.; Pessiki, Stephen

    2004-07-01

    Acoustic emission testing is a passive nondestructive testing technique used to identify the onset and characteristics of damage through the detection and analysis of transient stress waves. Successful detection and implementation of acoustic emission requires good coupling, high transducer sensitivity and ability to discriminate noise from real signals. We report here detection of simulated acoustic emission signals using a MEMS chip fabricated in the multi-user polysilicon surface micromachining (MUMPs) process. The chip includes 18 different transducers with 10 different resonant frequencies in the range of 100 kHz to 1 MHz. It was excited by two different source simulation techniques; pencil lead break and impact loading. The former simulation was accomplished by breaking 0.5 mm lead on the ceramic package. Four transducer outputs were collected simultaneously using a multi-channel oscilloscope. The impact loading was repeated for five different diameter ball bearings. Traditional acoustic emission waveform analysis methods were applied to both data sets to illustrate the identification of different source mechanisms. In addition, a sliding window Fourier transform was performed to differentiate frequencies in time-frequency-amplitude domain. The arrival and energy contents of each resonant frequency were investigated in time-magnitude plots. The advantages of the simultaneous excitation of resonant transducers on one chip are discussed and compared with broadband acoustic emission transducers.

  11. Automatic detection of ionospheric Alfvén resonances using signal and image processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beggan, C. D.

    2014-08-01

    Induction coils permit the measurement of small and very rapid changes of the magnetic field. A new set of induction coils in the UK (at L = 3.2) record magnetic field changes over an effective frequency range of 0.1-40 Hz, encompassing phenomena such as the Schumann resonances, magnetospheric pulsations and ionospheric Alfvén resonances (IARs). The IARs typically manifest themselves as a series of spectral resonance structures (SRSs) within the 1-10 Hz frequency range, usually appearing as fine bands or fringes in spectrogram plots and occurring almost daily during local night-time, disappearing during the daylight hours. The behaviour of the occurrence in frequency (f) and the difference in frequency between fringes (Δf) varies throughout the year. In order to quantify the daily, seasonal and annual changes of the SRSs, we developed a new method based on signal and image processing techniques to identify the fringes and to quantify the values of f, Δf and other relevant parameters in the data set. The technique is relatively robust to noise though requires tuning of threshold parameters. We analyse 18 months of induction coil data to demonstrate the utility of the method.

  12. Fabrication of capacitive acoustic resonators combining 3D printing and 2D inkjet printing techniques.

    PubMed

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Ogam, Erick; Loussert, Christophe; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing and two-dimensional (2D) printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency. PMID:26473878

  13. Fabrication of Capacitive Acoustic Resonators Combining 3D Printing and 2D Inkjet Printing Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Ogam, Erick; Loussert, Christophe; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing and two-dimensional (2D) printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency. PMID:26473878

  14. Vibrational techniques applied to photosynthesis: Resonance Raman and fluorescence line-narrowing.

    PubMed

    Gall, Andrew; Pascal, Andrew A; Robert, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy may yield precise information on the conformation of, and the interactions assumed by, the chromophores involved in the first steps of the photosynthetic process. Selectivity is achieved via resonance with the absorption transition of the chromophore of interest. Fluorescence line-narrowing spectroscopy is a complementary technique, in that it provides the same level of information (structure, conformation, interactions), but in this case for the emitting pigment(s) only (whether isolated or in an ensemble of interacting chromophores). The selectivity provided by these vibrational techniques allows for the analysis of pigment molecules not only when they are isolated in solvents, but also when embedded in soluble or membrane proteins and even, as shown recently, in vivo. They can be used, for instance, to relate the electronic properties of these pigment molecules to their structure and/or the physical properties of their environment. These techniques are even able to follow subtle changes in chromophore conformation associated with regulatory processes. After a short introduction to the physical principles that govern resonance Raman and fluorescence line-narrowing spectroscopies, the information content of the vibrational spectra of chlorophyll and carotenoid molecules is described in this article, together with the experiments which helped in determining which structural parameter(s) each vibrational band is sensitive to. A selection of applications is then presented, in order to illustrate how these techniques have been used in the field of photosynthesis, and what type of information has been obtained. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems. PMID:25268562

  15. Direct imaging of neural currents using ultra-low field magnetic resonance techniques

    DOEpatents

    Volegov, Petr L.; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Mosher, John C.; Espy, Michelle A.; Kraus, Jr., Robert H.

    2009-08-11

    Using resonant interactions to directly and tomographically image neural activity in the human brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques at ultra-low field (ULF), the present inventors have established an approach that is sensitive to magnetic field distributions local to the spin population in cortex at the Larmor frequency of the measurement field. Because the Larmor frequency can be readily manipulated (through varying B.sub.m), one can also envision using ULF-DNI to image the frequency distribution of the local fields in cortex. Such information, taken together with simultaneous acquisition of MEG and ULF-NMR signals, enables non-invasive exploration of the correlation between local fields induced by neural activity in cortex and more `distant` measures of brain activity such as MEG and EEG.

  16. Parametric techniques for characterizing myocardial tissue by magnetic resonance imaging (part 1): T1 mapping.

    PubMed

    Perea Palazón, R J; Ortiz Pérez, J T; Prat González, S; de Caralt Robira, T M; Cibeira López, M T; Solé Arqués, M

    2016-01-01

    The development of myocardial fibrosis is a common process in the appearance of ventricular dysfunction in many heart diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to accurately evaluate the structure and function of the heart, and its role in the macroscopic characterization of myocardial fibrosis by late enhancement techniques has been widely validated clinically. Recent studies have demonstrated that T1-mapping techniques can quantify diffuse myocardial fibrosis and the expansion of the myocardial extracellular space in absolute terms. However, further studies are necessary to validate the usefulness of this technique in the early detection of tissue remodeling at a time when implementing early treatment would improve a patient's prognosis. This article reviews the state of the art for T1 mapping of the myocardium, its clinical applications, and its limitations. PMID:26944850

  17. Review of pyroelectric thermal energy harvesting and new MEMs-based resonant energy conversion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Scott R.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Mostafa, Salwa; Rajic, Slo; Datskos, Panos G.

    2012-06-01

    Harvesting electrical energy from thermal energy sources using pyroelectric conversion techniques has been under investigation for over 50 years, but it has not received the attention that thermoelectric energy harvesting techniques have during this time period. This lack of interest stems from early studies which found that the energy conversion efficiencies achievable using pyroelectric materials were several times less than those potentially achievable with thermoelectrics. More recent modeling and experimental studies have shown that pyroelectric techniques can be cost competitive with thermoelectrics and, using new temperature cycling techniques, has the potential to be several times as efficient as thermoelectrics under comparable operating conditions. This paper will review the recent history in this field and describe the techniques that are being developed to increase the opportunities for pyroelectric energy harvesting. The development of a new thermal energy harvester concept, based on temperature cycled pyroelectric thermal-to-electrical energy conversion, are also outlined. The approach uses a resonantly driven, pyroelectric capacitive bimorph cantilever structure that can be used to rapidly cycle the temperature in the energy harvester. The device has been modeled using a finite element multi-physics based method, where the effect of the structure material properties and system parameters on the frequency and magnitude of temperature cycling, and the efficiency of energy recycling using the proposed structure, have been modeled. Results show that thermal contact conductance and heat source temperature differences play key roles in dominating the cantilever resonant frequency and efficiency of the energy conversion technique. This paper outlines the modeling, fabrication and testing of cantilever and pyroelectric structures and single element devices that demonstrate the potential of this technology for the development of high efficiency thermal

  18. Review of pyroelectric thermal energy harvesting and new MEMs based resonant energy conversion techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Scott Robert; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Mostafa, Salwa; Rajic, Slobodan; Datskos, Panos G

    2012-01-01

    Harvesting electrical energy from thermal energy sources using pyroelectric conversion techniques has been under investigation for over 50 years, but it has not received the attention that thermoelectric energy harvesting techniques have during this time period. This lack of interest stems from early studies which found that the energy conversion efficiencies achievable using pyroelectric materials were several times less than those potentially achievable with thermoelectrics. More recent modeling and experimental studies have shown that pyroelectric techniques can be cost competitive with thermoelectrics and, using new temperature cycling techniques, has the potential to be several times as efficient as thermoelectrics under comparable operating conditions. This paper will review the recent history in this field and describe the techniques that are being developed to increase the opportunities for pyroelectric energy harvesting. The development of a new thermal energy harvester concept, based on temperature cycled pyroelectric thermal-to-electrical energy conversion, are also outlined. The approach uses a resonantly driven, pyroelectric capacitive bimorph cantilever structure that can be used to rapidly cycle the temperature in the energy harvester. The device has been modeled using a finite element multi-physics based method, where the effect of the structure material properties and system parameters on the frequency and magnitude of temperature cycling, and the efficiency of energy recycling using the proposed structure, have been modeled. Results show that thermal contact conductance and heat source temperature differences play key roles in dominating the cantilever resonant frequency and efficiency of the energy conversion technique. This paper outlines the modeling, fabrication and testing of cantilever and pyroelectric structures and single element devices that demonstrate the potential of this technology for the development of high efficiency thermal

  19. A Second Look at Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis as a Spent Fuel NDA Technique

    SciTech Connect

    James W .Sterbentz; David L. Chichester

    2011-07-01

    Many different nondestructive analysis techniques are currently being investigated as a part of the United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) seeking methods to quantify plutonium in spent fuel. Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) is one of these techniques. Having first been explored in the mid-1970s for the analysis of individual spent-fuel pins a second look, using advanced simulation and modeling methods, is now underway to investigate the suitability of the NRTA technique for assaying complete spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The technique is similar to neutron time-of-flight methods used for cross-section determinations but operates over only the narrow 0.1-20 eV range where strong, distinguishable resonances exist for both the plutonium (239, 240, 241,242Pu) and uranium (235,236,238U) isotopes of interest in spent fuel. Additionally, in this energy range resonances exists for six important fission products (99Tc, 103Rh, 131Xe, 133Cs, 145Nd, and 152Sm) which provide additional information to support spent fuel plutonium assay determinations. Initial modeling shows excellent agreement with previously published experimental data for measurements of individual spent-fuel pins where plutonium assays were demonstrated to have a precision of 2-4%. Within the simulation and modeling analyses of this project scoping studies have explored fourteen different aspects of the technique including the neutron source, drift tube configurations, and gross neutron transmission as well as the impacts of fuel burn up, cooling time, and fission-product interferences. These results show that NRTA may be a very capable experimental technique for spent-fuel assay measurements. The results suggest sufficient transmission strength and signal differentiability is possible for assays through up to 8 pins. For an 8-pin assay (looking at an assembly diagonally), 64% of the pins in a typical 17 ? 17 array of a pressurized water reactor fuel

  20. Development of techniques in magnetic resonance and structural studies of the prion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, Hans-Marcus L.

    2000-07-01

    Magnetic resonance is the most powerful analytical tool used by chemists today. Its applications range from determining structures of large biomolecules to imaging of human brains. Nevertheless, magnetic resonance remains a relatively young field, in which many techniques are currently being developed that have broad applications. In this dissertation, two new techniques are presented, one that enables the determination of torsion angles in solid-state peptides and proteins, and another that involves imaging of heterogenous materials at ultra-low magnetic fields. In addition, structural studies of the prion protein via solid-state NMR are described. More specifically, work is presented in which the dependence of chemical shifts on local molecular structure is used to predict chemical shift tensors in solid-state peptides with theoretical ab initio surfaces. These predictions are then used to determine the backbone dihedral angles in peptides. This method utilizes the theoretical chemicalshift tensors and experimentally determined chemical-shift anisotropies (CSAs) to predict the backbone and side chain torsion angles in alanine, leucine, and valine residues. Additionally, structural studies of prion protein fragments are described in which conformationally-dependent chemical-shift measurements were made to gain insight into the structural differences between the various conformational states of the prion protein. These studies are of biological and pathological interest since conformational changes in the prion protein are believed to cause prion diseases. Finally, an ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging technique is described that enables imaging and characterization of heterogeneous and porous media. The notion of imaging gases at ultra-low fields would appear to be very difficult due to the prohibitively low polarization and spin densities as well as the low sensitivities of conventional Faraday coil detectors. However, Chapter 5 describes how gas imaging

  1. Phase Noise Improvement Techniques for Oscillator Circuit Using External Crystal Resonant Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaike, Takeshi; Sakuta, Yukinori; Sekine, Yoshifumi

    This paper describes a new techniques of reducing phase noise in oscillator circuits. Our method uses an external crystal resonant circuit that acts as a frequency reference and is based on correlation with negative feedback control. We present the circuit configuration and the transfer function used in this method, as well as measured single sideband (SSB) phase noise characteristics. Our experiments show that phase noise can be decreased as it is a theoretical value when using LC oscillator. Furthermore, we examine application for voltage controlled crystal oscillator (VCXO). As a results, we can improve that the phase noise characteristics more than that of original VCXO without spoiling frequency tuning range of VCXO.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of multiple sclerosis: a study of pulse-technique efficacy

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Price, A.C.; Kirshner, H.S.; Allen, J.H.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1984-11-01

    Forty-two patients with the clinical diagnosis of multiple sclerosis were examined by proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 0.5 T. An extensive protocol was used to facilitate a comparison of the efficacy of different pulse techniques. Results were also compared in 39 cases with high-resolution x-ray computed tomography (CT). MRI revealed characteristic abnormalities in each case, whereas CT was positive in only 15 of 33 patients. Cerebral abnormalities were best shown with the T2-weighted spin-echo sequence: brainstem lesions were best defined on the inversion-recovery sequence.

  3. Myocardial tagging by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance: evolution of techniques--pulse sequences, analysis algorithms, and applications

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) tagging has been established as an essential technique for measuring regional myocardial function. It allows quantification of local intramyocardial motion measures, e.g. strain and strain rate. The invention of CMR tagging came in the late eighties, where the technique allowed for the first time for visualizing transmural myocardial movement without having to implant physical markers. This new idea opened the door for a series of developments and improvements that continue up to the present time. Different tagging techniques are currently available that are more extensive, improved, and sophisticated than they were twenty years ago. Each of these techniques has different versions for improved resolution, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), scan time, anatomical coverage, three-dimensional capability, and image quality. The tagging techniques covered in this article can be broadly divided into two main categories: 1) Basic techniques, which include magnetization saturation, spatial modulation of magnetization (SPAMM), delay alternating with nutations for tailored excitation (DANTE), and complementary SPAMM (CSPAMM); and 2) Advanced techniques, which include harmonic phase (HARP), displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE), and strain encoding (SENC). Although most of these techniques were developed by separate groups and evolved from different backgrounds, they are in fact closely related to each other, and they can be interpreted from more than one perspective. Some of these techniques even followed parallel paths of developments, as illustrated in the article. As each technique has its own advantages, some efforts have been made to combine different techniques together for improved image quality or composite information acquisition. In this review, different developments in pulse sequences and related image processing techniques are described along with the necessities that led to their invention, which makes this

  4. Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Studies of Charge Distributions in Molecular Solids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenbaum, Steven Garry

    A detailed description of an NMR-NQR double resonance spectrometer designed and constructed in this laboratory is given, including some instruction on its use. ('14)N NQR data obtained by pulse methods for six classes of nitrogen-containing compounds are presented and analyzed in the framework of the Townes and Dailey theory. A study of the anti-cancer drugs cyclophosphamide, isophosphamide and triphosphamide suggests the existence of a correlation between the substance's chemotherapeutic efficacy and the (pi) - (sigma)(,NP) charge density at the trigonal nitrogen. Satisfactory correlations of the NQR spectra of 22 monosubstituted anilines with both the Hammett (sigma) parameters and the in vitro biological activities of the corresponding sulfanilamides have been found, indicating that the nitrogen lone-pair orbital is more sensitive than the nitrogen-carbon sigma orbital is to substituent effects. NQR spectra of several N-acetyl amino acids and related compounds are reported. The inductive effect of the chloroacetyl group on the nitrogen is discussed. A positive correlation between the (pi) - (sigma)(,NC) electron density at the nitrogen and the Taft inductive parameter (sigma)* is observed, suggesting that the nitrogen (pi) -charge density in the N-acetyl amino acids does not vary appreciably. Both ('14)N and ('35)Cl NQR data have been obtained for a series of compounds containing nitrogen directly bonded to chlorine. The existence of a linear correlation between the ('14)N and ('35)Cl quadrupole coupling constants is interpreted in terms of a simple model dealing with charge excesses and deficiencies at the respective nuclei. A study of two complexes of 4-aminopyridine (4AP) addresses the loss of pyridine nitrogen lone-pair charge upon formation of the strong and asymmetric N-H-N bond characteristic of these complexes. Evidence of hydrogen bonding interactions involving the amino nitrogens is found to be in agreement with a published neutron diffraction study

  5. Refractive index dispersion of swift heavy ion irradiated BFO thin films using Surface Plasmon Resonance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, Ayushi; Sharma, Savita; Tomar, Monika; Singh, Fouran; Gupta, Vinay

    2016-07-01

    Swift heavy ion irradiation (SHI) is an effective technique to induce defects for possible modifications in the material properties. There is growing interest in studying the optical properties of multiferroic BiFeO3 (BFO) thin films for optoelectronic applications. In the present work, BFO thin films were prepared by sol-gel spin coating technique and were irradiated using the 15 UD Pelletron accelerator with 100 MeV Au9+ ions at a fluence of 1 × 1012 ions cm-2. The as-grown films became rough and porous on ion irradiation. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technique has been identified as a highly sensitive and powerful technique for studying the optical properties of a dielectric material. Optical properties of BFO thin films, before and after irradiation were studied using SPR technique in Otto configuration. Refractive index is found to be decreasing from 2.27 to 2.14 on ion irradiation at a wavelength of 633 nm. Refractive index dispersion of BFO thin film (from 405 nm to 633 nm) before and after ion radiation was examined.

  6. High-frequency mode conversion technique for stiff lesion detection with magnetic resonance elastography (MRE).

    PubMed

    Mariappan, Yogesh K; Glaser, Kevin J; Manduca, Armando; Romano, Anthony J; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K; Yin, Meng; Ehman, Richard L

    2009-12-01

    A novel imaging technique is described in which the mode conversion of longitudinal waves is used for the qualitative detection of stiff lesions within soft tissue using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) methods. Due to the viscoelastic nature of tissue, high-frequency shear waves attenuate rapidly in soft tissues but much less in stiff tissues. By introducing minimally-attenuating longitudinal waves at a significantly high frequency into tissue, shear waves produced at interfaces by mode conversion will be detectable in stiff regions, but will be significantly attenuated and thus not detectable in the surrounding soft tissue. This contrast can be used to detect the presence of stiff tissue. The proposed technique is shown to readily depict hard regions (mimicking tumors) present in tissue-simulating phantoms and ex vivo breast tissue. In vivo feasibility is demonstrated on a patient with liver metastases in whom the tumors are readily distinguished. Preliminary evidence also suggests that quantitative stiffness measurements of stiff regions obtained with this technique are more accurate than those from conventional MRE because of the short shear wavelengths. This rapid, qualitative technique may lend itself to applications in which the localization of stiff, suspicious neoplasms is coupled with more sensitive techniques for thorough characterization. PMID:19859936

  7. Magnetic Resonance Techniques Applied to the Diagnosis and Treatment of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    de Celis Alonso, Benito; Hidalgo-Tobón, Silvia S; Menéndez-González, Manuel; Salas-Pacheco, José; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) affects at least 10 million people worldwide. It is a neurodegenerative disease, which is currently diagnosed by neurological examination. No neuroimaging investigation or blood biomarker is available to aid diagnosis and prognosis. Most effort toward diagnosis using magnetic resonance (MR) has been focused on the use of structural/anatomical neuroimaging and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). However, deep brain stimulation, a current strategy for treating PD, is guided by MR imaging (MRI). For clinical prognosis, diagnosis, and follow-up investigations, blood oxygen level-dependent MRI, DTI, spectroscopy, and transcranial magnetic stimulation have been used. These techniques represent the state of the art in the last 5 years. Here, we focus on MR techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:26191037

  8. Characterizing Si:P quantum dot qubits with spin resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Chen, Chin-Yi; Klimeck, Gerhard; Simmons, Michelle Y; Rahman, Rajib

    2016-01-01

    Quantum dots patterned by atomically precise placement of phosphorus donors in single crystal silicon have long spin lifetimes, advantages in addressability, large exchange tunability, and are readily available few-electron systems. To be utilized as quantum bits, it is important to non-invasively characterise these donor quantum dots post fabrication and extract the number of bound electron and nuclear spins as well as their locations. Here, we propose a metrology technique based on electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements with the on-chip circuitry already needed for qubit manipulation to obtain atomic scale information about donor quantum dots and their spin configurations. Using atomistic tight-binding technique and Hartree self-consistent field approximation, we show that the ESR transition frequencies are directly related to the number of donors, electrons, and their locations through the electron-nuclear hyperfine interaction. PMID:27550779

  9. Characterizing Si:P quantum dot qubits with spin resonance techniques

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Chen, Chin-Yi; Klimeck, Gerhard; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Rahman, Rajib

    2016-01-01

    Quantum dots patterned by atomically precise placement of phosphorus donors in single crystal silicon have long spin lifetimes, advantages in addressability, large exchange tunability, and are readily available few-electron systems. To be utilized as quantum bits, it is important to non-invasively characterise these donor quantum dots post fabrication and extract the number of bound electron and nuclear spins as well as their locations. Here, we propose a metrology technique based on electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements with the on-chip circuitry already needed for qubit manipulation to obtain atomic scale information about donor quantum dots and their spin configurations. Using atomistic tight-binding technique and Hartree self-consistent field approximation, we show that the ESR transition frequencies are directly related to the number of donors, electrons, and their locations through the electron-nuclear hyperfine interaction. PMID:27550779

  10. Magnetic Resonance Techniques Applied to the Diagnosis and Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Celis Alonso, Benito; Hidalgo-Tobón, Silvia S.; Menéndez-González, Manuel; Salas-Pacheco, José; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) affects at least 10 million people worldwide. It is a neurodegenerative disease, which is currently diagnosed by neurological examination. No neuroimaging investigation or blood biomarker is available to aid diagnosis and prognosis. Most effort toward diagnosis using magnetic resonance (MR) has been focused on the use of structural/anatomical neuroimaging and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). However, deep brain stimulation, a current strategy for treating PD, is guided by MR imaging (MRI). For clinical prognosis, diagnosis, and follow-up investigations, blood oxygen level-dependent MRI, DTI, spectroscopy, and transcranial magnetic stimulation have been used. These techniques represent the state of the art in the last 5 years. Here, we focus on MR techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26191037

  11. Temperature and baric dependence of nuclear quadruple resonance spectra in indium and gallium monoselenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandozhko, Victor; Raranskii, Nikolai; Balazjuk, Vitaly; Samila, Andriy; Kovalyuk, Zahar

    2013-12-01

    Pulsed radiospectroscopy method has been used to study nuclear quadruple resonance (NQR) spectra of 69Ga and 115In isotopes in the layered semiconductors GaSe and InSe. It has been found that in GaSe and InSe there is a considerable temperature dependence of NQR frequency which in the temperature range of 250 to 390 K is practically linear with conversion slope 1.54 kHz/degree for 69Ga and 2.35 kHz/degree for 115In. In the same crystals the effect of uniaxial pressure on NQR spectra applied along the optical axis с up to the values of 500 kg/сm2 has been studied. A strong attenuation of NQR spectra intensity with increase in pressure on layered crystal package has been established. The unvaried multiplicity of resonance spectra indicates the absence of structural transformations in these layered crystals over the investigated range of temperatures and pressures.

  12. Biochemical component identification by light scattering techniques in whispering gallery mode optical resonance based sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saetchnikov, Vladimir A.; Tcherniavskaia, Elina A.; Saetchnikov, Anton V.; Schweiger, Gustav; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Experimental data on detection and identification of variety of biochemical agents, such as proteins (albumin, interferon, C reactive protein), microelements (Na+, Ca+), antibiotic of different generations, in both single and multi component solutions under varied in wide range concentration are represented. Analysis has been performed on the light scattering parameters of whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonance based sensor with dielectric microspheres from glass and PMMA as sensitive elements fixed by spin - coating techniques in adhesive layer on the surface of substrate or directly on the coupling element. Sensitive layer was integrated into developed fluidic cell with a digital syringe. Light from tuneable laser strict focusing on and scattered by the single microsphere was detected by a CMOS camera. The image was filtered for noise reduction and integrated on two coordinates for evaluation of integrated energy of a measured signal. As the entrance data following signal parameters were used: relative (to a free spectral range) spectral shift of frequency of WGM optical resonance in microsphere and relative efficiency of WGM excitation obtained within a free spectral range which depended on both type and concentration of investigated agents. Multiplexing on parameters and components has been realized using spatial and spectral parameters of scattered by microsphere light with developed data processing. Biochemical component classification and identification of agents under investigation has been performed by network analysis techniques based on probabilistic network and multilayer perceptron. Developed approach is demonstrated to be applicable both for single agent and for multi component biochemical analysis.

  13. Fiber optic profenofos sensor based on surface plasmon resonance technique and molecular imprinting.

    PubMed

    Shrivastav, Anand M; Usha, Sruthi P; Gupta, Banshi D

    2016-05-15

    A successful approach for the fabrication and characterization of an optical fiber sensor for the detection of profenofos based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and molecular imprinting is introduced. Molecular imprinting technology is used for the creation of three dimensional binding sites having complementary shape and size of the specific template molecule over a polymer for the recognition of the same. Binding of template molecule with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) layer results in the change in the dielectric nature of the sensing surface (polymer) and is identified by SPR technique. Spectral interrogation method is used for the characterization of the sensing probe. The operating profenofos concentration range of the sensor is from 10(-4) to 10(-1)µg/L. A red shift of 18.7 nm in resonance wavelength is recorded for this profenofos concentration range. The maximum sensitivity of the sensor is 12.7 nm/log (µg/L) at 10(-4)µg/L profenofos concentration. Limit of detection (LOD) of the sensor is found to be 2.5×10(-6)µg/L. Selectivity measurements predict the probe highly selective for the profenofos molecule. Besides high sensitivity due to SPR technique and selectivity due to molecular imprinting, proposed sensor has numerous other advantages like immunity to electromagnetic interference, fast response, low cost and capability of online monitoring and remote sensing of analyte due to the fabrication of the probe on optical fiber. PMID:26706813

  14. Some Nuclear Techniques in Experimental Magnetism: Mössbauer Effect, Neutron Scattering and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piecuch, Michel

    The goal of this chapter is to present three traditional methods for the study of magnetic properties : Mössbauer effect, neutron diffraction and nuclear magnetic resonance. It begins by recalling the basic properties of atomic nuclei and describing the hyperfine interactions between the nucleus and its surrounding. Then, the recoilless absorption of γ-rays by crystal, the Mössbauer effect is presented, we discuss the main parameters measured and show one example of application. Next we present neutron interactions with matter, the interaction of neutrons with the atomic nucleus and the interaction of the neutron magnetic moment with the magnetic moment of electrons. The use of polarized neutron and the inelastic scattering of neutrons are also discussed. The comparison between neutron experiments and synchrotron radiation techniques is briefly reviewed. One example of the use of neutron scattering in the domain of thin film magnetism is shown. Finally, we present the basic theory of nuclear magnetic resonance and one application of this technique to the study of Co/Cu multilayers.

  15. 14N NQR and the Molecular Charge Topology in Coordinated Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgich, Juan; Aray, Yosslen; Ospina, Edgar

    1992-02-01

    14N NQR spectra of [Co(NH3 ) 6 ] • 3Cl, [Co(NH3 ) 5CO3 ] • NO 3 , [Zn(NH3 ) 4 ] • 2Cl, [Zn(NH3 ) 4 ] •(BF4)2, and [Ag(NH3) 4 ] • NO 3 were obtained at 77 K. The results, analyzed by means of the topology of the charge distribution obtained from ab-initio MO calculations of free and of a model of coordinated NH3 , showed that bonding to the metal-ion produces a strong decrease (Co ≫ Zn ≈Ag) in the N nonbonded density ("lone pair") and an increase in the bonded maxima found in the N - H bond direction of the N valence shell.

  16. Resonant fiber optic gyro based on a sinusoidal wave modulation and square wave demodulation technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linglan; Yan, Yuchao; Ma, Huilian; Jin, Zhonghe

    2016-04-20

    New developments are made in the resonant fiber optic gyro (RFOG), which is an optical sensor for the measurement of rotation rate. The digital signal processing system based on the phase modulation technique is capable of detecting the weak frequency difference induced by the Sagnac effect and suppressing the reciprocal noise in the circuit, which determines the detection sensitivity of the RFOG. A new technique based on the sinusoidal wave modulation and square wave demodulation is implemented, and the demodulation curve of the system is simulated and measured. Compared with the past technique using sinusoidal modulation and demodulation, it increases the slope of the demodulation curve by a factor of 1.56, improves the spectrum efficiency of the modulated signal, and reduces the occupancy of the field-programmable gate array resource. On the basis of this new phase modulation technique, the loop is successfully locked and achieves a short-term bias stability of 1.08°/h, which is improved by a factor of 1.47. PMID:27140098

  17. Sparse Reconstruction Techniques in Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Methods, Applications, and Challenges to Clinical Adoption.

    PubMed

    Yang, Alice C; Kretzler, Madison; Sudarski, Sonja; Gulani, Vikas; Seiberlich, Nicole

    2016-06-01

    The family of sparse reconstruction techniques, including the recently introduced compressed sensing framework, has been extensively explored to reduce scan times in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). While there are many different methods that fall under the general umbrella of sparse reconstructions, they all rely on the idea that a priori information about the sparsity of MR images can be used to reconstruct full images from undersampled data. This review describes the basic ideas behind sparse reconstruction techniques, how they could be applied to improve MRI, and the open challenges to their general adoption in a clinical setting. The fundamental principles underlying different classes of sparse reconstructions techniques are examined, and the requirements that each make on the undersampled data outlined. Applications that could potentially benefit from the accelerations that sparse reconstructions could provide are described, and clinical studies using sparse reconstructions reviewed. Lastly, technical and clinical challenges to widespread implementation of sparse reconstruction techniques, including optimization, reconstruction times, artifact appearance, and comparison with current gold standards, are discussed. PMID:27003227

  18. Detection of Bacterial Magnetofossils with Ferromagnetic Resonance and Rock Magnetic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, J. L.; Kim, S.; Weiss, B.

    2001-12-01

    Intracellular biomineralization of magnetite is a biochemical process used by members of the Bacteria, Protist, and Animal kingdoms, and the fossil remains of this process on Earth (termed magnetofossils) have been documented in sediments as old as the ~2 Byr Gunflint Chert. Magnetofossils 4 Byr old have also been reported from carbonates in the Martian meteorite ALH84001; if this interpretation is correct, they represent the oldest evidence for life yet found. Past techniques for identification of bacterial magnetofossils have relied on the use of particle extraction and high-resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM). Because these techniques are time-consuming and fairly complex, they are not appropriate for screening large volumes of sediments on Earth and could not be used remotely on a Martian lander. For this reason, we have been testing a variety of ferromagnetic resonance and low-temperature rock magnetic techniques to determine if they are capable of identifying correctly rock samples known to contain abundant magnetofossils. An instrument capable of making such a determination, if deployed on the Martian surface, could be extraordinarily valuable for selecting samples for return to Earth. Several features of the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra have signatures only displayed by pure samples of magnetite from the magnetotactic bacteria, and from samples known to contain abundant magnetofossils. These unique features apparently arise from the elongated shape and narrow size distribution of the single-domain magnetite produced by these bacteria. Preliminary results from ALH84001 carbonates also have these features. We are also currently obtaining FMR spectra and low-temperature rock magnetic data on samples of Archean and Early Proterozoic sediments from Australia to search for older evidence of intracellular magnetite biomineralization on Earth.

  19. Three-dimensional electron paramagnetic resonance imaging technique for mapping porosity in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Kordas, G.; Kang, Y.H. )

    1991-04-01

    This paper reports on a three-dimensional (3D) electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) method which was developed to probe the structure and size of pores in ceramic materials. The imaging device that was added to the EPR instrument consisted of a computer-controlled current source and magnetic field gradient. This add-on facility was tested using a well-defined diphenlpicrylhydrazzyl phantom sample. Pumice was then used to demonstrate the potential of the technique. This stone was immersed in a 0.5 mm {sup 15}N-substituted per-deutereted tempone water solution to fill the pores with spin labels. Images were reconstructed using a filtered back-projection technique. A two-dimensional (2D) imaging plane was constructed by collecting 33 projection planes over 180 {degrees}. A 3D image was derived from 22 planes each constructed by 22 projections. At present, the facility allows a resolution of 69 and 46 {mu}m for 2D and 3D imaging, respectively. Advancements of the imaging apparatus, software, and line width of the spin labels will be needed to enhance the resolution of this technique.

  20. Multishot Targeted PROPELLER Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Description of the Technique and Initial Applications

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jie; Larson, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To test the feasibility of combining inner-volume imaging (IVI) techniques with conventional multishot periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER) techniques for targeted-PROPELLER magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and Methods Perpendicular section-selective gradients for spatially selective excitation and refocusing RF pulses were applied to limit the refocused field-of-view (FOV) along the phase-encoding direction for each rectangular blade image. We performed comparison studies in phantoms and normal volunteers by using targeted-PROPELLER methods for a wide range of imaging applications that commonly use turbo-spin-echo (TSE) approaches (brain, abdominal, vessel wall, cardiac). Results In these initial studies, we demonstrated the feasibility of using targeted-PROPELLER approaches to limit the imaging FOV thereby reducing the number of blades or permitting increased spatial resolution without commensurate increases in scan time. Both phantom and in vivo motion studies demonstrated the potential for more robust regional self-navigated motion correction compared with conventional full FOV PROPELLER methods. Conclusion We demonstrated that the reduced FOV targeted-PROPELLER technique offers the potential for reducing imaging time, increasing spatial resolution, and targeting specific areas for robust regional motion correction. PMID:19465860

  1. Rapid determination of internal volumes of membrane vesicles with electron spin resonance-stopped flow technique.

    PubMed

    Anzai, K; Higashi, K; Kirino, Y

    1988-01-13

    We have developed an electron spin resonance (ESR)-stopped flow technique and employed it for the simple and rapid determination of internal volumes of biomembrane vesicles and liposomes. A vesicle suspension containing a neutral and membrane-permeable spin label, 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-oxopiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPONE), was mixed in the stopped-flow apparatus with an isotonic solution of relatively impermeable line broadening agents, potassium tris(oxalato)chromate(III) or potassium ferricyanide, and an ESR spectrum was recorded. From the relative intensity of the sharp triplet signal due to TEMPONE in the aqueous space within vesicles, the determination of the internal aqueous volume was straightforward. Using this technique, it is possible to measure intravesicular volumes in 0.1 s. The internal volume of sonicated phospholipid vesicles was approximately 0.3 microliter/mg lipid. The light fraction of sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane vesicles isolated from rabbit skeletal muscle was estimated to have an internal volume of 2.2-2.6 microliter/mg protein in its resting state. Activation of Ca2+ pumps in the membrane upon addition of ATP and Ca2+ ions decreased the internal volume by about 10%. This finding supports the hypothesis that the Ca2+ pump is electrogenic and that the efflux of potassium ions compensates for the influx of positive charges. The present technique is widely applicable to the simple and rapid determination of the internal volumes of membrane vesicles. PMID:2825810

  2. Implant stability evaluation by resonance frequency analysis in the fit lock technique. A clinical study.

    PubMed

    Falisi, Giovanni; Galli, Massimo; Velasquez, Pedro Vittorini; Rivera, Juan Carlos Gallegos; Di Paolo, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Surgical procedures for the application of implants in the lateral-superior sectors are affected by the availability of the residual bone. When this condition is lower than 5 mm it is recommended that techniques involving two therapeutic phases, a reconstructive and an applicative one, as reported in the international literature, are adopted. The authors propose here a new method with the potential to apply implants simultaneously with the reconstructive phase. The aim of this longitudinal retrospective study was to evaluate the stability of implants applied with the fit lock technique in the upper maxillarys in us with bone availability lower than 4 mm by measuring resonance frequency at different follow-up periods The seme as urements, carried out on 30 implants, were analysed with specific statistical procedures. The results indicate that the stability of the implants inserted with the fit lock method increases progressively over time in a statistically significant manner. The stability recorded after one year from the insertion (ISQ T2) is significantly higher than that recorded after six months (ISQ T1), and this is significantly higher than that recorded at the time of implant placement (ISQ T0). The implants inserted in the maxillary zones with scarce bone availability and applied with this technique showed a similar stability as reported with other techniques. In light of the results, the authors confirm that the primary stability represents the basic requirement to guarantee a correct healing of the implant and demonstrate that the fit lock technique also all ows reaching this condition when bone availability is minimal. PMID:23991271

  3. Structural and Functional Investigation of Flavin Binding Center of the NqrC Subunit of Sodium-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase from Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Bertsova, Yulia; Polovinkin, Vitaly; Gushchin, Ivan; Ishchenko, Andrii; Kovalev, Kirill; Mishin, Alexey; Kachalova, Galina; Popov, Alexander; Bogachev, Alexander; Gordeliy, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQR) is a redox-driven sodium pump operating in the respiratory chain of various bacteria, including pathogenic species. The enzyme has a unique set of redox active prosthetic groups, which includes two covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) residues attached to threonine residues in subunits NqrB and NqrC. The reason of FMN covalent bonding in the subunits has not been established yet. In the current work, binding of free FMN to the apo-form of NqrC from Vibrio harveyi was studied showing very low affinity of NqrC to FMN in the absence of its covalent bonding. To study structural aspects of flavin binding in NqrC, its holo-form was crystallized and its 3D structure was solved at 1.56 Å resolution. It was found that the isoalloxazine moiety of the FMN residue is buried in a hydrophobic cavity and that its pyrimidine ring is squeezed between hydrophobic amino acid residues while its benzene ring is extended from the protein surroundings. This structure of the flavin-binding pocket appears to provide flexibility of the benzene ring, which can help the FMN residue to take the bended conformation and thus to stabilize the one-electron reduced form of the prosthetic group. These properties may also lead to relatively weak noncovalent binding of the flavin. This fact along with periplasmic location of the FMN-binding domains in the vast majority of NqrC-like proteins may explain the necessity of the covalent bonding of this prosthetic group to prevent its loss to the external medium. PMID:25734798

  4. Structural and functional investigation of flavin binding center of the NqrC subunit of sodium-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Borshchevskiy, Valentin; Round, Ekaterina; Bertsova, Yulia; Polovinkin, Vitaly; Gushchin, Ivan; Ishchenko, Andrii; Kovalev, Kirill; Mishin, Alexey; Kachalova, Galina; Popov, Alexander; Bogachev, Alexander; Gordeliy, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQR) is a redox-driven sodium pump operating in the respiratory chain of various bacteria, including pathogenic species. The enzyme has a unique set of redox active prosthetic groups, which includes two covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) residues attached to threonine residues in subunits NqrB and NqrC. The reason of FMN covalent bonding in the subunits has not been established yet. In the current work, binding of free FMN to the apo-form of NqrC from Vibrio harveyi was studied showing very low affinity of NqrC to FMN in the absence of its covalent bonding. To study structural aspects of flavin binding in NqrC, its holo-form was crystallized and its 3D structure was solved at 1.56 Å resolution. It was found that the isoalloxazine moiety of the FMN residue is buried in a hydrophobic cavity and that its pyrimidine ring is squeezed between hydrophobic amino acid residues while its benzene ring is extended from the protein surroundings. This structure of the flavin-binding pocket appears to provide flexibility of the benzene ring, which can help the FMN residue to take the bended conformation and thus to stabilize the one-electron reduced form of the prosthetic group. These properties may also lead to relatively weak noncovalent binding of the flavin. This fact along with periplasmic location of the FMN-binding domains in the vast majority of NqrC-like proteins may explain the necessity of the covalent bonding of this prosthetic group to prevent its loss to the external medium. PMID:25734798

  5. [Research on glucose measuring technique by surface plasmon resonance based on thiol coupling].

    PubMed

    Li, Da-Chao; Yang, Di; Yang, Jia; Zhang, Jing-Xin; Wu, Peng; Yu, Hai-Xia; Xu, Ke-Xin

    2014-03-01

    In the glucose measuring technique by surface plasmon resonance, D-galactose/D-glucose binding protein (GGBP) that can specifically adsorb glucose was introduced, and high-precision specific detection of glucose concentration was realized. In the present paper, the GGBP protein was bound on the surface of SPR sensor through thiol coupling method. GGBP binding experiment was carried out on SPR sensor and then glucose concentration experiment was conducted with this sensor. The results indicated that the SPR sensor had good linearity, stability and repeatability in the range of 0.1-10 mg x dL(-1). SPR sensor bound with GGBP would have great potential and vast development prospects. PMID:25208374

  6. Demonstration of the stabilization technique for nonplanar optical resonant cavities utilizing polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Akagi, T.; Araki, S.; Funahashi, Y.; Honda, Y.; Okugi, T.; Omori, T.; Shimizu, H.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Miyoshi, S.; Takahashi, T. Tanaka, R.; Uesugi, Y.; Yoshitama, H.; Sakaue, K.; Washio, M.

    2015-04-15

    Based on our previously developed scheme to stabilize nonplanar optical resonant cavities utilizing polarization caused by a geometric phase in electromagnetic waves traveling along a twisted path, we report an application of the technique for a cavity installed in the Accelerator Test Facility, a 1.3-GeV electron beam accelerator at KEK, in which photons are generated by laser-Compton scattering. We successfully achieved a power enhancement of 1200 with 1.4% fluctuation, which means that the optical path length of the cavity has been controlled with a precision of 14 pm under an accelerator environment. In addition, polarization switching utilizing a geometric phase of the nonplanar cavity was demonstrated.

  7. Use of Resonance Energy Transfer Techniques for In Vivo Detection of Chemokine Receptor Oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Rodríguez-Frade, José Miguel; Mellado, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Since the first reports on chemokine function, much information has been generated on the implications of these molecules in numerous physiological and pathological processes, as well as on the signaling events activated through their binding to receptors. As is the case for other G protein-coupled receptors, chemokine receptors are not isolated entities that are activated following ligand binding; rather, they are found as dimers and/or higher order oligomers at the cell surface, even in the absence of ligands. These complexes form platforms that can be modified by receptor expression and ligand levels, indicating that they are dynamic structures. The analysis of the conformations adopted by these receptors at the membrane and their dynamics is thus crucial for a complete understanding of the function of the chemokines. We focus here on the methodology insights of new techniques, such as those based on resonance energy transfer for the analysis of chemokine receptor conformations in living cells. PMID:27271913

  8. Evaluation of Possible Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Diagnostic Techniques for Tokamak Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Zweben; T.W. Kornack; D. Majeski; G. Schilling; C.H. Skinner; R. Wilson

    2002-08-05

    Potential applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diagnostic techniques to tokamak experiments are evaluated. NMR frequencies for hydrogen isotopes and low-Z nuclei in such experiments are in the frequency range approximately equal to 20-200 MHz, so existing RF [radio-frequency] antennas could be used to rotate the spin polarization and to make the NMR measurements. Our tentative conclusion is that such measurements are possible if highly spin polarized H or (superscript)3He gas sources (which exist) are used to fuel these plasmas. In addition, NMR measurements of the surface layers of the first wall (without plasma) may also be possible, e.g., to evaluate the inventory of tritium inside the vessel.

  9. Further Evaluation of the Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) Technique for Assaying Plutonium in Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    J. W. Sterbentz; D. L. Chichester

    2011-09-01

    This is an end-of-year report (Fiscal Year (FY) 2011) for the second year of effort on a project funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241). The goal of this project is to investigate the feasibility of using Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) to assay plutonium in commercial light-water-reactor spent fuel. This project is part of a larger research effort within the Next-Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) to evaluate methods for assaying plutonium in spent fuel, the Plutonium Assay Challenge. The second-year goals for this project included: (1) assessing the neutron source strength needed for the NRTA technique, (2) estimating count times, (3) assessing the effect of temperature on the transmitted signal, (4) estimating plutonium content in a spent fuel assembly, (5) providing a preliminary assessment of the neutron detectors, and (6) documenting this work in an end of the year report (this report). Research teams at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and at several universities are also working to investigate plutonium assay methods for spent-fuel safeguards. While the NRTA technique is well proven in the scientific literature for assaying individual spent fuel pins, it is a newcomer to the current NGSI efforts studying Pu assay method techniques having just started in March 2010; several analytical techniques have been under investigation within this program for two to three years or more. This report summarizes work performed over a nine month period from January-September 2011 and is to be considered a follow-on or add-on report to our previous published summary report from December 2010 (INL/EXT-10-20620).

  10. Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perozzi, E.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A resonance in CELESTIAL MECHANICS occurs when some of the quantities characterizing the motion of two or more celestial bodies can be considered as commensurable, i.e. their ratio is close to an integer fraction. In a simplified form, this can be expressed as ...

  11. Optical properties of WO{sub 3} thin films using surface plasmon resonance technique

    SciTech Connect

    Paliwal, Ayushi; Sharma, Anjali; Gupta, Vinay E-mail: vgupta@physics.du.ac.in; Tomar, Monika

    2014-01-28

    Indigenously assembled surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique has been exploited to study the thickness dependent dielectric properties of WO{sub 3} thin films. WO{sub 3} thin films (80 nm to 200 nm) have been deposited onto gold (Au) coated glass prism by sputtering technique. The structural, optical properties and surface morphology of the deposited WO{sub 3} thin films were studied using X-ray diffraction, UV-visible spectrophotometer, Raman spectroscopy, and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XRD analysis shows that all the deposited WO{sub 3} thin films are exhibiting preferred (020) orientation and Raman data indicates that the films possess single phase monoclinic structure. SEM images reveal the variation in grain size with increase in thickness. The SPR reflectance curves of the WO{sub 3}/Au/prism structure were utilized to estimate the dielectric properties of WO{sub 3} thin films at optical frequency (λ = 633 nm). As the thickness of WO{sub 3} thin film increases from 80 nm to 200 nm, the dielectric constant is seen to be decreasing from 5.76 to 3.42, while the dielectric loss reduces from 0.098 to 0.01. The estimated value of refractive index of WO{sub 3} film is in agreement to that obtained from UV-visible spectroscopy studies. The strong dispersion in refractive index is observed with wavelength of incident laser light.

  12. Updates in advanced diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging techniques in the evaluation of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Lawrence, Edward Malnor; Mazaheri, Yousef; Sala, Evis

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) is considered part of the standard imaging protocol for the evaluation of patients with prostate cancer. It has been proven valuable as a functional tool for qualitative and quantitative analysis of prostate cancer beyond anatomical MRI sequences such as T2-weighted imaging. This review discusses ongoing controversies in DW-MRI acquisition, including the optimal number of b-values to be used for prostate DWI, and summarizes the current literature on the use of advanced DW-MRI techniques. These include intravoxel incoherent motion imaging, which better accounts for the non-mono-exponential behavior of the apparent diffusion coefficient as a function of b-value and the influence of perfusion at low b-values. Another technique is diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI). Metrics from DKI reflect excess kurtosis of tissues, representing its deviation from Gaussian diffusion behavior. Preliminary results suggest that DKI findings may have more value than findings from conventional DW-MRI for the assessment of prostate cancer. PMID:26339460

  13. Sedimentary rock porosity studied by electromagnetic techniques: nuclear magnetic resonance and dielectric permittivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramia, M. E.; Martín, C. A.

    2015-02-01

    The present work involves a comprehensive experimental study of porosity and pore size distribution of sedimentary rocks, from oil fields formations, by means of two electromagnetic techniques, namely proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and dielectric complex constant (DCC) as function of the frequency, both providing complementary results. The NMR yields an accurate determination of the relative pore size distribution and both movable and irreducible fluids. The DCC measurement provides the direct current electrical resistivity of the samples with different degrees of hydration. Thus, combining the results of both techniques allows the determination of the tortuosity index, by means of Archie's relation, and from it the average pore channel length. These measurements are performed on fully hydrated (saturated), centrifuged, dried, and cleaned rocks and also on samples with the irreducible fluids. Finally, the results are complemented with capillary pressure measurements to obtain the total volume associated with the pore channels related to the rock permeability. Additionally, the work presents a particular method to use a network analyzer to measure the DCC.

  14. Use of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Stephane; Renard, Felix; Achard, Sophie; Lana-Peixoto, Marco A.; Palace, Jacqueline; Asgari, Nasrin; Klawiter, Eric C.; Tenembaum, Silvia N.; Banwell, Brenda; Greenberg, Benjamin M.; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Levy, Michael; Villoslada, Pablo; Saiz, Albert; Fujihara, Kazuo; Chan, Koon Ho; Schippling, Sven; Paul, Friedemann; Kim, Ho Jin; de Seze, Jerome; Wuerfel, Jens T.

    2016-01-01

    Brain parenchymal lesions are frequently observed on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorder, but the specific morphological and temporal patterns distinguishing them unequivocally from lesions caused by other disorders have not been identified. This literature review summarizes the literature on advanced quantitative imaging measures reported for patients with NMO spectrum disorder, including proton MR spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetization transfer imaging, quantitative MR volumetry, and ultrahigh-field strength MRI. It was undertaken to consider the advanced MRI techniques used for patients with NMO by different specialists in the field. Although quantitative measures such as proton MR spectroscopy or magnetization transfer imaging have not reproducibly revealed diffuse brain injury, preliminary data from diffusion-weighted imaging and brain tissue volumetry indicate greater white matter than gray matter degradation. These findings could be confirmed by ultrahigh-field MRI. The use of nonconventional MRI techniques may further our understanding of the pathogenic processes in NMO spectrum disorders and may help us identify the distinct radiographic features corresponding to specific phenotypic manifestations of this disease. PMID:26010909

  15. Use of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Stephane; Renard, Felix; Achard, Sophie; Lana-Peixoto, Marco A; Palace, Jacqueline; Asgari, Nasrin; Klawiter, Eric C; Tenembaum, Silvia N; Banwell, Brenda; Greenberg, Benjamin M; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Levy, Michael; Villoslada, Pablo; Saiz, Albert; Fujihara, Kazuo; Chan, Koon Ho; Schippling, Sven; Paul, Friedemann; Kim, Ho Jin; de Seze, Jerome; Wuerfel, Jens T; Cabre, Philippe; Marignier, Romain; Tedder, Thomas; van Pelt, Danielle; Broadley, Simon; Chitnis, Tanuja; Wingerchuk, Dean; Pandit, Lekha; Leite, Maria Isabel; Apiwattanakul, Metha; Kleiter, Ingo; Prayoonwiwat, Naraporn; Han, May; Hellwig, Kerstin; van Herle, Katja; John, Gareth; Hooper, D Craig; Nakashima, Ichiro; Sato, Douglas; Yeaman, Michael R; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Zamvil, Scott; Stüve, Olaf; Aktas, Orhan; Smith, Terry J; Jacob, Anu; O'Connor, Kevin

    2015-07-01

    Brain parenchymal lesions are frequently observed on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorder, but the specific morphological and temporal patterns distinguishing them unequivocally from lesions caused by other disorders have not been identified. This literature review summarizes the literature on advanced quantitative imaging measures reported for patients with NMO spectrum disorder, including proton MR spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetization transfer imaging, quantitative MR volumetry, and ultrahigh-field strength MRI. It was undertaken to consider the advanced MRI techniques used for patients with NMO by different specialists in the field. Although quantitative measures such as proton MR spectroscopy or magnetization transfer imaging have not reproducibly revealed diffuse brain injury, preliminary data from diffusion-weighted imaging and brain tissue volumetry indicate greater white matter than gray matter degradation. These findings could be confirmed by ultrahigh-field MRI. The use of nonconventional MRI techniques may further our understanding of the pathogenic processes in NMO spectrum disorders and may help us identify the distinct radiographic features corresponding to specific phenotypic manifestations of this disease. PMID:26010909

  16. Understanding and controlling spin-systems using electron spin resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Mathew

    the frequency of this nutation. Experimental findings fit well the analytical model developed. This process could lead to the use of multi-level spin systems as tunable solid state qubits. Finally, if quantum computing technologies are to be commercially realized, an on-chip method to address qubits must be developed. One way to incorporate SMMs to an on-chip device is by way of a coplanar waveguide (CPW) resonator. Efforts to create a resonator of this type to be used to perform low-temperature ESR on-chip will be described. Our work is focused on implementing such on-chip techniques in high magnetic fields, which is desirable for ESR-type of experiments in (quasi-)isotropic spin systems. Considerable attention is given to the coupling of these devices and a geometry is presented for a superconducting CPW resonator that is critically coupled. The effect of the magnetic field on the resonance position and its quality factor is addressed as well. Our devices show robust performance in field upwards of 1 Tesla and their use in performing on-chip ESR measurements seem promising.

  17. A Physics-based Automated Technique for the Detection of Field Line Resonance Frequency in Ground Magnetometer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudouridis, A.; Zesta, E.; Moldwin, M.

    2015-12-01

    The accurate determination of the Field Line Resonance (FLR) frequency of a resonating geomagnetic field line is necessary for the remote monitoring of the plasmaspheric mass density during geomagnetic storms and quiet times alike. Under certain assumptions the plasmaspheric mass density at the equator is inversely proportional to the square of the FLR frequency. The most common techniques to determine the FLR frequency from ground magnetometer measurements are the amplitude ratio and phase difference techniques, both based on geomagnetic field measurements at two latitudinally separated ground stations. Previously developed automated techniques have used statistical methods to pinpoint the FLR frequency using the amplitude ratio and phase difference calculations. We now introduce a physics-based automated technique that can reproduce the resonant wave characteristics from the two ground station data, and from those determine the FLR frequency. The advantage of the new technique, besides moving away from ambiguous statistical manipulations of the ground data, is the estimation of physically determined errors of the FLR frequency, which can yield physically determined errors of the equatorial plasmaspheric mass density. We present preliminary results of the new technique calculations, and test it using data from the new Inner-Magnetospheric Array for Geospace Science (iMAGS) ground magnetometer chain along the coast of Chile and the east coast of the United States. We compare the results with the results of previously published statistical automated techniques.

  18. Determination of nucleic acids with a near infrared cyanine dye using resonance light scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang; Zheng, Hong; Li, Ling; Wu, Yuqin; Chen, Jinlong; Zhuo, Shujuan; Zhu, Changqing

    2006-06-01

    A new method for the determination of nucleic acids has been developed based on the enhancement effect of resonance light scattering (RLS) with a cationic near infrared (NIR) cyanine dye. Under the optimal conditions, the enhanced RLS intensity at 823 nm is proportional to the concentration of nucleic acids in the range of 0-400 ng mL -1 for both calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) and fish sperm DNA (FS DNA), 0-600 ng mL -1 for snake ovum RNA (SO RNA). The detection limits are 3.5 ng mL -1, 3.4 ng mL -1 and 2.9 ng mL -1 for CT DNA, FS DNA and SO RNA, respectively. Owing to performing in near infrared region, this method not only has high sensitivity endowed by RLS technique but also avoids possible spectral interference from background. It has been applied to the determination of nucleic acids in synthetic and real samples and satisfactory results were obtained.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Arthrography of the Glenohumeral Joint: Ultrasonography-Guided Technique Using a Posterior Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Yildirim, Omer Selim; Suma, Selami; Ozgokce, Mesut; Okur, Adnan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and feasibility of ultrasound (US)-guided magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography of the glenohumeral joint via a posterior approach. Materials and Methods: Thirty-four patients (18 males and 16 females) who were suspected to have glenohumeral joint pathology were examined using MR arthrography. The patients ranged in age from 21 to 85 years, and the average age was 45±15.9 years. A Toshiba Xario US unit was utilized. Ultrasonography examinations were conducted using a broad-band 5–12 MHz linear array transducer. Gadolinium was injected into the shoulder joint using an 18–20 gauge needle. MR imaging was performed within the first 30 min after the injection. Results: The injection of gadolinium into the shoulder joint was successfully accomplished in all 34 patients. Major contrast media extravasation outside the joint was depicted in only two patients (5.9%). No major complications were encountered. Conclusion: Ultrasonography is an effective alternate guidance technique for the injection of gadolinium into the glenohumeral joint for MR arthrography. US-guided arthrography via a posterior approach to the glenohumeral joint is safe, accurate, well tolerated by patients and easy to perform with minimal training. PMID:25610213

  20. In vivo biodistribution and biological impact of injected carbon nanotubes using magnetic resonance techniques

    PubMed Central

    Al Faraj, Achraf; Fauvelle, Florence; Luciani, Nathalie; Lacroix, Ghislaine; Levy, Michael; Crémillieux, Yannick; Canet-Soulas, Emmanuelle

    2011-01-01

    Background: Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) hold promise for applications as contrast agents and target delivery carriers in the field of nanomedicine. When administered in vivo, their biodistribution and pharmacological profile needs to be fully characterized. The tissue distribution of carbon nanotubes and their potential impact on metabolism depend on their shape, coating, and metallic impurities. Because standard radiolabeled or fluorescently-labeled pharmaceuticals are not well suited for long-term in vivo follow-up of carbon nanotubes, alternative methods are required. Methods: In this study, noninvasive in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) investigations combined with high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS), Raman spectroscopy, iron assays, and histological analysis ex vivo were proposed and applied to assess the biodistribution and biological impact of intravenously injected pristine (raw and purified) and functionalized SWCNT in a 2-week longitudinal study. Iron impurities allowed raw detection of SWCNT in vivo by susceptibility-weighted MRI. Results: A transitional accumulation in the spleen and liver was observed by MRI. Raman spectroscopy, iron assays, and histological findings confirmed the MRI readouts. Moreover, no acute toxicological effect on the liver metabolic profile was observed using the HR-MAS technique, as confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. Conclusion: This study illustrates the potential of noninvasive MRI protocols for longitudinal assessment of the biodistribution of SWCNT with associated intrinsic metal impurities. The same approach can be used for any other magnetically-labeled nanoparticles. PMID:21499425

  1. Studies of Structure and Phase Transition in [C(NH2)3]HgBr3 and [C(NH2)3]HgI3 by Means of Halogen NQR, 1H NMR, and Single Crystal X-Ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terao, Hiromitsu; Hashimoto, Masao; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Furukawa, Yoshihiro

    2000-02-01

    The crystal structure of [C(NH2)3]HgBr3 was determined at room temperature: monoclinic, space group C2/c, Z = 4, a = 775.0(2), b = 1564.6(2), c = 772.7(2) pm, β = 109.12(2)°. In the crystal, almost planar HgBr3- ions are connected via Hg ··· Br bonds, resulting in single chains of trigonal bipyramidal HgBr5 units which run along the c direction. [C(NH2)3]HgI3 was found to be isomorphous with the bromide at room temperature. The temperature dependence of the halogen NQR frequencies (77 < 77K < ca. 380) and the DTA measurements evidenced no phase transition for the bromide, but a second-order phase transition at (251 ± 1) K (Tc1) and a first-order one at (210 ± 1) K for the iodide. The transitions at Tc2are accompanied with strong supercooling and significant superheating. The room temperature phase (RTP) and the intermediate temperature phase (ITP) of the iodide are characterized by two 127I(m=1/2↔3/2) NQR lines which are assigned to the terminal and the bridging I atoms, respectively. There exist three lines in the lowest temperature phase (LTP), indicating that the resonance line of the bridging atom splits into two. The signal intensities of the 127I(m =1/2↔3/2) NQR lines in the LTP decrease with decreasing temperature resulting in no detection below ca. 100 K. The 127I(m=1/2↔3/2) NQR frequency vs. temperature curves are continuous at Tcl, but they are unusual in the LTP. The T1vs. Tcurves of 1H NMR for the bromide and iodide are explainable by the reorientational motions of the cations about their pseudo three-fold axes. The estimated activation energies of the motions are 35.0 kJ/mol for the bromide, and 24.1, 30.1, and 23.0 kJ/mol for the RTP, FTP, and LTP of the iodide, respectively

  2. Technique for liposuction fat reimplantation and long-term volume evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hörl, H W; Feller, A M; Biemer, E

    1991-03-01

    Injection with one's own fat tissue remains controversial due to a lack of objective data pertaining to postoperative volume control. Facial defects in a total of 53 patients were repaired using autogenous fat tissue. The fatty tissue was obtained from the lower abdomen, buttocks, or inner portion of the upper thigh and then suspended before injection in a solution of 250 ml Ringer's solution, 50 ml distilled water, and 0.7 ml hyaluronidase. The fatty tissue was collected by a filter integrated within the suction system and subsequently prepared, as follows: (1) Cell detritus, blood constituents, and local anesthetic were flushed away by using a physiological Ringer's solution. (2) The defects were filled by using a finely calibrated, locked injection, whereby the desired amount of fatty tissue could be accurately instilled. (3) Injection was carefully performed directly under the cutis through a large lumen cannula and under close observation to avoid the injection of any fatty tissue intracutaneously. Before the procedure, the augmented areas had been evaluated by using magnetic resonance imaging (in T1-weighted images). Postoperatively, the sites were once again documented for volume at control intervals of 6 days, and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. The volumes were computer-calculated integrally from the sum of the area of all the layers according to the following formula:v = (d + g).E(ai). Despite the use of hyaluronidase as well as an atraumatic liposuction technique, microscopic examination revealed 40% of the aspirated cells to have defective cell membranes. Without hyaluronidase, this figure rose to 50%. One-year follow-up in 10 patients showed that through the break-down of these damaged cells, a particularly high volume loss of 49% was documentable at 3 months after the procedure. Further follow-up at 6 months showed that average volume decline had risen to a total of 55%, whereas, at 9 months as well as 12 months, no further loss could be detected. Autogenous

  3. Application of Resonant Frequency Eddy Current Technique on a Shot-Peened Nickel-Based Engine-Grade Material

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Ray T.; Sathish, Shamachary; Boehnlein, Thomas R.; Blodgett, Mark P.

    2007-03-21

    The shot peening conditions of a nickel-based engine-grade material were evaluated using a novel eddy current measurement technique. With this technique, the shift of a resonant frequency was found to be dependent on variables which also affect conventional eddy current testing. The cable effect is another important variable, which is often neglected in a routine eddy current testing, is also discussed. Experimental results showed that at high frequencies, the shot peening conditions were easily distinguishable using this frequency shift technique.

  4. Magnetic resonance techniques to quantify tissue damage, tissue repair, and functional cortical reorganization in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Filippi, M; Agosta, F

    2009-01-01

    A dramatic paradigm shift is taking place in our understanding of the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). An important contribution to such a shift has been made possible by the advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology, which allows structural damage to be quantified in the brains of patients with MS and to be followed over the course of the disease. Modern quantitative MR techniques have reshaped the picture of MS, leading to the definition of the so- called "axonal hypothesis" (i.e., changes in axonal metabolism, morphology, or density are important determinants of functional impairment in MS). Metrics derived from magnetization transfer and diffusion-weighted MRI enable us to quantify the extent of structural changes occurring within T2-visible lesions and normal-appearing tissues (including gray matter), with increased pathological specificity over conventional MRI to irreversible tissue damage; proton MR spectroscopy adds valuable pieces of information on the biochemical nature of such changes. Finally, functional MRI can provide new insights into the role of cortical adaptive changes in limiting the clinical consequences of MS-related irreversible structural damage. Our current understanding of the pathophysiology of MS is that this is not only a disease of the white matter, characterized by focal inflammatory lesions, but also a disease involving more subtle and diffuse damage throughout the white and gray matter. The inflammatory and neurodegenerative components of the disease process are present from the earliest observable phases of the disease, but appear to be, at least partially, dissociated. In addition, recovery and repair play an important role in the genesis of the clinical manifestations of the disease, involving both structural changes and plastic reorganization of the cortex. This new picture of MS has important implications in the context of treatment options, since it suggests that agents that protect against

  5. Characterization of nitrogen-rich silicon nitride films grown by the electron cyclotron resonance plasma technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Reehal, H. S.; Martínez, F. L.; San Andrés, E.; del Prado, A.

    2003-07-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride films have been deposited by the electron cyclotron resonance plasma technique, using N2 and SiH4 as precursor gases. The gas flow ratio, deposition temperature and microwave power have been varied in order to study their effect on the properties of the films, which were characterized by Rutherford back-scattering spectrometry, elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and ellipsometry. All samples show N/Si ratios near or above the stoichiometric value (N/Si = 1.33). The hydrogen content determined from ERDA measurements is significantly higher than the amount detected by infrared spectroscopy, evidencing the presence of non-bonded H. As the N2/SiH4 gas flow ratio is increased (by decreasing the SiH4 partial pressure), the Si content decreases and the N-H concentration increases, while the N content remains constant, resulting in an increase of the N/Si ratio. The decrease of the Si content causes a decrease of the refractive index and the density of the film, while the growth ratio also decreases due to the limiting factor of the SiH4 partial pressure. The infrared Si-N stretching band shifts to higher wavenumbers as the N-H concentration increases. The increase of deposition temperature promotes the release of H, resulting in a higher incorporation of N and Si into the film and a decrease of the N/Si ratio. The effect of increasing the microwave power is analogous to increasing the N2/SiH4 ratio, due to the increase in the proportion of nitrogen activated species.

  6. Structure, spectra and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid studied by density functional theory, Raman spectroscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Mohanty, B. P.; Saini, G. S. S.

    2016-02-01

    Structure, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid towards hydroxyl radicals have been studied computationally and in vitro by ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Time dependant density functional theory calculations have been employed to specify various electronic transitions in ultraviolet-visible spectra. Observed chemical shifts and vibrational bands in nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectra, respectively have been assigned with the help of calculations. Changes in the structure of ascorbic acid in aqueous phase have been examined computationally and experimentally by recording Raman spectra in aqueous medium. Theoretical calculations of the interaction between ascorbic acid molecule and hydroxyl radical predicted the formation of dehydroascorbic acid as first product, which has been confirmed by comparing its simulated spectra with the corresponding spectra of ascorbic acid in presence of hydrogen peroxide.

  7. Characterization technique of optical whispering gallery mode resonators in the microwave frequency domain for optoelectronic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Merrer, Pierre-Henri; Saleh, Khaldoun; Llopis, Olivier; Berneschi, Simone; Cosi, Franco; Conti, Gualtiero Nunzi

    2012-07-10

    Optical Q factor measurements are performed on a whispering gallery mode (WGM) disk resonator using a microwave frequency domain approach instead of using an optical domain approach. An absence of hysteretic behavior and a better linearity are obtained when performing linewidth measurements by using a microwave modulation for scanning the resonances instead of the piezoelectric-based frequency tuning capability of the laser. The WGM resonator is then used to stabilize a microwave optoelectronic oscillator. The microwave output of this system generates a 12.48 GHz signal with -94 dBc/Hz phase noise at 10 kHz offset. PMID:22781250

  8. Investigation of the effects of metal-wire resonators in sub-wavelength array based on time-reversal technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Hui-Lin; Xiao, Shao-Qiu

    2016-05-01

    The resonant metalens consisting of metal-wire resonators with equally finite length can break the diffraction barrier well suited for super-resolution imaging. In this study, a basic combination constructed by two metal-wire resonators with different lengths is proposed, and its resonant characteristics is analyzed using the method of moments (MoM). Based on the time reversal (TR) technique, this kind of combination can be applied to a sub-wavelength two-element antenna array with a 1/40-wavelength interval to make the elements work simultaneously with little interference in the frequency band of 1.0-1.5 GHz and 1.5-2.0 GHz, respectively. The simulations and experiments show that analysis of MoM and the application of the resonators can be used to design multi-frequency sub-wavelength antenna arrays efficiently. This general design method is convenient and can be used for many applications, such as weakening jamming effectiveness in communication systems, and sub-wavelength imaging in a broad frequency band.

  9. Mass perturbation techniques for tuning and decoupling of a Disk Resonator Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, David

    Axisymmetric microelectromechanical (MEM) vibratory rate gyroscopes are designed so that the two Coriolis-coupled modes exploited for rate sensing possess equal modal frequencies and so that the central post which attaches the resonator to the sensor case is a nodal point of the these two modes. The former quality maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the sensor, while the latter quality eliminates any coupling of linear acceleration to the modes of interest, which, if present, creates spurious rate signals in response to linear vibration of the sensor case. When the gyro resonators are fabricated, however, small mass and stiffness asymmetries cause the frequencies of the two modes to deviate from each other and couple these modes to linear acceleration. In a resonator post-fabrication step, these effects can be reduced by altering the mass distribution of the resonator. In this dissertation, a scale model of the axisymmetric resonator of the Disk Resonator Gyroscope (DRG) is used to develop and test methods that successfully reduce frequency detuning (Part I) and linear acceleration coupling (Part II) through guided mass perturbations.

  10. Optimized Shielding and Fabrication Techniques for TiN and Al Microwave Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreikebaum, John Mark; Kim, Eunseong; Livingston, William; Dove, Allison; Calusine, Gregory; Hover, David; Rosenberg, Danna; Oliver, William; Siddiqi, Irfan

    We present a systematic study of the effects of shielding and packaging on the internal quality factor (Qi) of Al and TiN microwave resonators designed for use in qubit readout. Surprisingly, Qi =1.3x106 TiN samples investigated at 100 mK exhibited no significant changes in linewidth when operated without magnetic shielding and in an open cryo-package. In contrast, Al resonators showed systematic improvement in Qi with each successive shield. Measurements were performed in an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator, where typical ambient fields of 0.2 mT are present at the sample stage. We discuss the effect of 100 mK and 500 mK Cu radiation shields and cryoperm magnetic shielding on resonator Q as a function of temperature and input power in samples prepared with a variety of surface treatments, fabrication recipes, and embedding circuits. This research was supported by the ARO and IARPA.

  11. In situ diagnostics of ionospheric plasma with the resonance cone technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, V.; Piel, A.; Thiemann, H.; Oyama, K. I.

    1993-11-01

    Electron density and temperature profiles in the mid latitude ionosphere are derived from the 'resonance cone' in the radiation pattern of high-frequency point antennas aboard a sounding rocket. By comparing the shapes for reversed wave propagation direction it is possible to study electron drift motion and field-aligned beams. The data from the COREX-I (Cooperative Resonance Cone Experiment) experiment show close agreement of electron density and temperature profiles from resonance cones with results from independent instruments. There was no indication of a substantial temperature anomaly at E region altitude during this flight. An unexpected electron drift can be interpreted as electron Hall current in the presheath of the negative charged payload. Field-aligned beams, which has been suggested in connection with the temperature anomaly, were not detected.

  12. Dual-mode temperature compensation technique for laser stabilization to a crystalline whispering gallery mode resonator.

    PubMed

    Fescenko, I; Alnis, J; Schliesser, A; Wang, C Y; Kippenberg, T J; Hänsch, T W

    2012-08-13

    Frequency stabilization of a diode laser locked to a whispering gallery mode (WGM) reference resonator made of a MgF2 single crystal is demonstrated. The strong thermal dependence of the difference frequency between two orthogonally polarized TE an TM modes (dual-mode frequency) of the optically anisotropic crystal material allows sensitive measurement of the resonator's temperature within the optical mode volume. This dual-mode signal was used as feedback for self-referenced temperature stabilization to nanokelvin precision, resulting in frequency stability of 0.3 MHz/h at 972 nm, which was measured by comparing with an independent ultrastable laser. PMID:23038559

  13. Advanced numerical technique for analysis of surface and bulk acoustic waves in resonators using periodic metal gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumenko, Natalya F.

    2014-09-01

    A numerical technique characterized by a unified approach for the analysis of different types of acoustic waves utilized in resonators in which a periodic metal grating is used for excitation and reflection of such waves is described. The combination of the Finite Element Method analysis of the electrode domain with the Spectral Domain Analysis (SDA) applied to the adjacent upper and lower semi-infinite regions, which may be multilayered and include air as a special case of a dielectric material, enables rigorous simulation of the admittance in resonators using surface acoustic waves, Love waves, plate modes including Lamb waves, Stonely waves, and other waves propagating along the interface between two media, and waves with transient structure between the mentioned types. The matrix formalism with improved convergence incorporated into SDA provides fast and robust simulation for multilayered structures with arbitrary thickness of each layer. The described technique is illustrated by a few examples of its application to various combinations of LiNbO3, isotropic silicon dioxide and silicon with a periodic array of Cu electrodes. The wave characteristics extracted from the admittance functions change continuously with the variation of the film and plate thicknesses over wide ranges, even when the wave nature changes. The transformation of the wave nature with the variation of the layer thicknesses is illustrated by diagrams and contour plots of the displacements calculated at resonant frequencies.

  14. Measurement of the 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance frequencies by the solid effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliger, J.; Žagar, V.

    2008-07-01

    1H- 14N nuclear quadrupole double resonance using magnetic field cycling between high and low magnetic field and solid effect in the low magnetic field is analyzed in details. The transition probabilities per unit time for the solid-effect transitions are calculated. The double resonance spectra are calculated in the limiting cases of fast and slow nitrogen spin-lattice relaxation. The double resonance spectra are measured in histamine and quinolinic acid. The experimental spectra are analyzed and the 14N NQR frequencies are determined.

  15. Modern techniques of magnetic resonance in the evaluation of primary central nervous system lymphoma: contributions to the diagnosis and differential diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Antonio José; Sobreira Guedes, Bruno Vasconcelos; da Silveira da Rocha, Talita Maira Bueno; Maia Junior, Antonio Carlos Martins; Chiattone, Carlos Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    In addition to findings from conventional magnetic resonance imaging, modern magnetic resonance imaging techniques have provided important information about tumor metabolism, in vivo metabolite formation, water molecule diffusion, microvascular density, and blood-brain barrier permeability, all of which have improved the in vivo diagnostic accuracy of this method in the evaluation of primary central nervous system lymphoma. These nonconventional magnetic resonance techniques are useful in the clinical practice because they enhance conventional magnetic resonance imaging by reinforcing the possibility of a diagnosis and by allowing the early detection of disease recurrence. This report is a review of the most relevant contributions of nonconventional magnetic resonance techniques to the imaging diagnosis of primary central nervous system lymphoma, the differential diagnosis of this disease, and the prognosis of patients. This paper aims to describe a wide range of presentations of primary central nervous system lymphoma, their appearance in imaging, and the differential diagnoses of this disease. PMID:26969774

  16. CVD graphene growth and transfer techniques for the fabrication of micromechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losowyj, Daniel; Storch, Isaac; McCune, Thomas; McEuen, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Graphene's superlative mechanical strength, electrical mobility, low mass, and large surface area make it a prime candidate for use in micromechanical resonators, which have potential applications in mass and force sensing, radio frequency signal processing, and optomechanics. Our resonators use graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and have excellent mechanical performance, but their electrical performance is comparatively worse than that of exfoliated graphene devices. We attribute these limitations to contamination from copper oxidation during the growth and solvents used in the transfer process. To remedy this, we have performed CVD growths on copper foils with long anneal times, confirming with Raman spectroscopy and SEM that the graphene is single layer and high quality. We have also found that graphene suspended on a substrate can survive high temperature air annealing, provided that the temperature ramp is gradual. Improving the electrical performance of these novel devices will facilitate their use in a variety of new experiments and applications.

  17. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOEpatents

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2004-12-28

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  18. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOEpatents

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-12-30

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  19. Advances in fiber optic-based UV resonance Raman spectroscopy techniques for anatomical and physiological investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, H. Georg; Barbosa, Christopher J.; Greek, L. Shane; Turner, Robin F. B.; Haynes, C. A.; Klein, Karl-Friedrich; Blades, Michael W.

    1999-04-01

    UV resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRRS) is becoming a very popular spectroscopic method for bioanalytical investigations due to its high sensitivity, lack of fluorescence, and suitability for use in aqueous solutions. We have made a number of technological advances, especially the development of fiber-optic-based technologies, which permit the performance of remote/in-situ UVRRS measurements. We will be reporting on improved optical fiber probes and demonstrate their benefits in performing UVRRS on neurotransmitters, saliva, and urine.

  20. Direct and Inverse Techniques of Guided-Mode Resonance Filters Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibuleac, Sorin; Magnusson, Robert; Maldonado, Theresa A.; Zuffada, Cinzia

    1997-01-01

    Guided-mode resonances arise in single or multilayer waveguides where one or more homogeneous layers are replaced by diffraction gratings (Fig. 1.) The diffractive element enables an electromagnetic wave incident on a waveguide grating to be coupled to the waveguide modes supportable by the structure in the absence of the modulation (i.e. the difference between the high and low dielectric constants of the grating) at specific values of the wavelength and incident angle. The periodic modulation of the guide makes the structure leaky, preventing sustained propagation of modes in the waveguide and coupling the waves out into the substrate and cover. As the wavelength is varied around resonance a rapid variation in the intensities of the external propagating waves occurs. By selecting a grating period small enough to eliminate the higher-order propagating waves, an increase in the zero-order intensities up to 100% can result. The pronounced frequency selectivity of guided-mode resonances in dielectric waveguide gratings can be applied to design high-efficiency reflection and transmission filters [1-3].

  1. Technique for magnetic susceptibility determination in the highly doped semiconductors by electron spin resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Veinger, A. I.; Zabrodskii, A. G.; Tisnek, T. V.; Goloshchapov, S. I.; Semenikhin, P. V.

    2014-08-20

    A method for determining the magnetic susceptibility in the highly doped semiconductors is considered. It is suitable for the semiconductors near the metal - insulator transition when the conductivity changes very quickly with the temperature and the resonance line form distorts. A procedure that is based on double integration of the positive part of the derivative of the absorption line having a Dyson shape and takes into account the depth of the skin layer is described. Analysis is made for the example of arsenic-doped germanium samples at a rather high concentration corresponding to the insulator-metal phase transition.

  2. Magnetic resonance as a technique to magnetic biosensors characterization in Neocapritermes opacus termites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, J. F.; Wajnberg, E.; Esquivel, D. M. S.; Alves, O. C.

    2005-07-01

    This experimental study quantitatively correlates the saturation magnetization obtained from hysteresis curves (SQUID measurements) to the second integral of the magnetic resonance (MR) spectra of Neocapritermes opacus termites. Termites were submitted to an iron private diet, feeding them with pure cellulose for up to four days. This diet cleans their guts of ingested detrital material, eliminating non-biogenic soil-derived magnetite from the ensuing analyses. A clear relation between total magnetic moment (emu) from SQUID measurements and the signal intensity (absorption area) from MR is given.

  3. Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA): A Nondestructive Assay Technique for the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative’s Plutonium Assay Challenge

    SciTech Connect

    J. W. Sterbentz; D. L. Chichester

    2010-12-01

    This is an end-of-year report for a project funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241). The goal of this project is to investigate the feasibility of using Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) to assay plutonium in commercial light-water-reactor spent fuel. This project is part of a larger research effort within the Next-Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) to evaluate methods for assaying plutonium in spent fuel, the Plutonium Assay Challenge. The first-year goals for this project were modest and included: 1) developing a zero-order MCNP model for the NRTA technique, simulating data results presented in the literature, 2) completing a preliminary set of studies investigating important design and performance characteristics for the NRTA measurement technique, and 3) documentation of this work in an end of the year report (this report). Research teams at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and at several universities are also working to investigate plutonium assay methods for spent-fuel safeguards. While the NRTA technique is well proven in the scientific literature for assaying individual spent fuel pins, it is a newcomer to the current NGSI efforts studying Pu assay method techniques having just started in March 2010; several analytical techniques have been under investigation within this program for two to three years or more. This report summarizes a nine month period of work.

  4. Intracellular hypoxia of tumor tissue estimated by noninvasive electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry technique using paramagnetic probes.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Atsuko; Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro; Matsumoto, Shingo; Hyodo, Fuminori; Sowers, Anastasia L; Koscielniak, Janusz W; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Subramanian, Sankaran; Mitchell, James B; Krishna, Murali C

    2011-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry at 700 MHz operating frequency employing a surface coil resonator is used to assess tissue partial pressure of oxygen (pO(2)) using paramagnetic media whose linewidth and decay constant are related to oxygen concentration. Differences in extracellular and intracellular pO(2) in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tumor tissue were tested using several types of water-soluble paramagnetic media, which localize extracellularly or permeate through the cell membrane. The nitroxide carboxy-PROXYL (CxP) can only be distributed in blood plasma and extracellular fluids whereas the nitroxides carbamoyl-PROXYL (CmP) and TEMPOL (TPL) can permeate cell membranes and localize intracellularly. EPR signal decay constant and the linewidth of the intravenously administered nitroxides in SCC tumor tissues implanted in mouse thigh and the contralateral normal muscle of healthy mice breathing gases with different pO(2) were compared. The pO(2) in the blood can depend on the oxygen content in the breathing gas while tissue pO(2) was not directly influenced by pO(2) in the breathing gas. The decay constants of CmP and TPL in tumor tissue were significantly larger than in the normal muscles, and lower linewidths of CmP and TPL in tumor tissue was observed. The SCC tumor showed intracellular hypoxia even though the extracellular pO(2) is similar to normal tissue in the peripheral region. PMID:21212532

  5. Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance: A Novel Technique for the In Vivo Assessment of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Marie A.; Clarke, Kieran; Neubauer, Stefan; Tyler, Damian J.

    2011-01-01

    Non-invasive imaging plays a central role in cardiovascular disease for determining diagnosis, prognosis, and optimizing patient management. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated that monitoring hyperpolarized 13C-labelled tracers with magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy (MRI and MRS) offers a new way to investigate the normal and diseased heart, and that the technology may be useful in patients with heart disease. In this review, we show how hyperpolarized 13C-labelled tracers are generated and have been applied experimentally, and outline the methodological advances currently underway to enable translation of hyperpolarized 13C MRI and MRS into the clinic. Using hyperpolarized 13C-labelled metabolites and metabolic MRI and MRS could help assessment of many human cardiovascular diseases, including coronary artery disease, heart failure and metabolic cardiomyopathies. We discuss the clinical areas in which the technology may, in the future, aid in the diagnosis and management of patients with cardiovascular diseases, including dynamic investigations of in vivo metabolism, coronary angiography and quantitative perfusion imaging. It is possible that, in the future, hyperpolarized magnetic resonance will play a major role in clinical cardiology. PMID:21969318

  6. Sensitive Determination of Proteins with Naphthol Green B by Resonance Light Scattering Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, B.; Zhong, H.; Li, X.-M.; Wang, Y.-Z.; Ding, B.-C.; Cheng, Z.-P.; Zhang, L.-L.; Li, S.-P.; Yao, C.

    2013-09-01

    A new quantitative determination method for trace proteins using naphthol green B (NGB) by resonance light scattering (RLS) spectroscopy has been developed. The method is based on the interaction of protein and NGB at pH 3.00, which causes a substantial enhancement of the resonance scattering signal of NGB in the wavelength range 300-550 nm with the maximum RLS at 392.0 nm. Under optimum conditions, the linear range is 0.010-28.2 μg/ml for bovine serum albumin (BSA) and 0.010-31.3 μg/ml for human serum albumin (HSA). The detection limits (S/N=3) are 8.2 ng/ml for BSA and 7.9 ng/ml for HSA, respectively. There is little or no interference from amino acids, most of the metal ions, or other coexisting substances. The easy-to-use method, with high sensitivity and good reproducibility, was satisfactorily applied to the determination of total protein in human serum samples. The determination results for human serum samples are identical to those provided by clinical physicians.

  7. Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence in the Detection and Analysis of Proteins: A Focus on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ghisaidoobe, Amar B. T.; Chung, Sang J.

    2014-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurs when the distance between a donor fluorophore and an acceptor is within 10 nm, and its application often necessitates fluorescent labeling of biological targets. However, covalent modification of biomolecules can inadvertently give rise to conformational and/or functional changes. This review describes the application of intrinsic protein fluorescence, predominantly derived from tryptophan (λEX ∼ 280 nm, λEM ∼ 350 nm), in protein-related research and mainly focuses on label-free FRET techniques. In terms of wavelength and intensity, tryptophan fluorescence is strongly influenced by its (or the protein’s) local environment, which, in addition to fluorescence quenching, has been applied to study protein conformational changes. Intrinsic Förster resonance energy transfer (iFRET), a recently developed technique, utilizes the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan in conjunction with target-specific fluorescent probes as FRET donors and acceptors, respectively, for real time detection of native proteins. PMID:25490136

  8. Biomechanical evaluation of oversized drilling technique on primary implant stability measured by insertion torque and resonance frequency analysis

    PubMed Central

    Santamaría-Arrieta, Gorka; Brizuela-Velasco, Aritza; Fernández-González, Felipe J.; Chávarri-Prado, David; Chento-Valiente, Yelko; Solaberrieta, Eneko; Diéguez-Pereira, Markel; Yurrebaso-Asúa, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the influence of implant site preparation depth on primary stability measured by insertion torque and resonance frequency analysis (RFA). Material and Methods Thirty-two implant sites were prepared in eight veal rib blocks. Sixteen sites were prepared using the conventional drilling sequence recommended by the manufacturer to a working depth of 10mm. The remaining 16 sites were prepared using an oversize drilling technique (overpreparation) to a working depth of 12mm. Bone density was determined using cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). The implants were placed and primary stability was measured by two methods: insertion torque (Ncm), and RFA (implant stability quotient [ISQ]). Results The highest torque values were achieved by the conventional drilling technique (10mm). The ANOVA test confirmed that there was a significant correlation between torque and drilling depth (p<0.05). However, no statistically significant differences were obtained between ISQ values at 10 or 12 mm drilling depths (p>0.05) at either measurement direction (cortical and medullar). No statistical relation between torque and ISQ values was identified, or between bone density and primary stability (p >0.05). Conclusions Vertical overpreparation of the implant bed will obtain lower insertion torque values, but does not produce statistically significant differences in ISQ values. Key words:Implant stability quotient, overdrilling, primary stability, resonance frequency analysis, torque. PMID:27398182

  9. A simple and highly sensitive assay of perfluorooctanoic acid based on resonance light scattering technique.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Zheng, Yonghong; Liang, Jiaman; Long, Sha; Chen, Xianping; Tan, Kejun

    2016-04-15

    A simple, highly sensitive resonance light scattering (RLS) method for the detection of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has been developed based on the interaction with crystal violet (CV). It was found that PFOA can form complexes with CV in acid medium resulting in remarkable enhancement of the RLS intensity of the system. And the enhanced RLS intensities are in proportion to the concentration of PFOA in the range of 0.1-25.0μmol/L (R(2)=0.9998), with a detection limit of 11.0nmol/L (S/N=3). In this work, the optimum reaction conditions and the interferences of foreign substances were investigated. The reaction mechanism between CV and PFOA was also studied by the absorption spectrum and scanning electron microscope (SEM). This method is successfully applied to the determination of PFOA in tap water and Jialing river water samples with RSD≤4.04%. PMID:26824483

  10. Determination of protein by resonance light scattering technique using dithiothreitol-sodium dodecylbenzene sulphonate as probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lihang; Mu, Dan; Gao, Dejiang; Deng, Xinyu; Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Hanqi; Yu, Aimin

    2009-02-01

    The resonance light scattering (RLS) spectra of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-dithiothreitol (DTT)-sodium dodecylbenzene sulphonate (SDBS) and its analytical application were investigated. The RLS intensity of this system can be effectively enhanced in the presence of BSA. Based on the enhanced RLS intensity, a simple assay for BSA was developed. The experimental results indicate that the enhanced RLS intensity is proportional to the concentration of BSA in the range from 1.0 × 10 -8 to 7.5 × 10 -7 mol L -1 with the determination limit of 5.0 × 10 -9 mol L -1. The effects of pH, concentration of SDBS and DTT on the RLS enhancement were discussed. Most metal ions have little interference on the determination of BSA. Some synthetic and real samples were analyzed, and the results obtained were in good agreement with those obtained by Bradford method.

  11. Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensor Technique: Fabrication, Advancement, and Application.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gaoling; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Dai, Jianxiong; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-01

    Fiber optic-based biosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology are advanced label-free optical biosensing methods. They have brought tremendous progress in the sensing of various chemical and biological species. This review summarizes four sensing configurations (prism, grating, waveguide, and fiber optic) with two ways, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and diffraction, to excite the surface plasmons. Meanwhile, the designs of different probes (U-bent, tapered, and other probes) are also described. Finally, four major types of biosensors, immunosensor, DNA biosensor, enzyme biosensor, and living cell biosensor, are discussed in detail for their sensing principles and applications. Future prospects of fiber optic-based SPR sensor technology are discussed. PMID:27119268

  12. "More is different" in functional magnetic resonance imaging: a review of recent data analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Gabriele; Stelzer, Johannes; Neumann, Jane; Ay, Nihat; Turner, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Two aspects play a key role in recently developed strategies for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data analysis: first, it is now recognized that the human brain is a complex adaptive system and exhibits the hallmarks of complexity such as emergence of patterns arising out of a multitude of interactions between its many constituents. Second, the field of fMRI has evolved into a data-intensive, big data endeavor with large databases and masses of data being shared around the world. At the same time, ultra-high field MRI scanners are now available producing data at previously unobtainable quality and quantity. Both aspects have led to shifts in the way in which we view fMRI data. Here, we review recent developments in fMRI data analysis methodology that resulted from these shifts in paradigm. PMID:23402339

  13. A simple and highly sensitive assay of perfluorooctanoic acid based on resonance light scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang; Zheng, Yonghong; Liang, Jiaman; Long, Sha; Chen, Xianping; Tan, Kejun

    2016-04-01

    A simple, highly sensitive resonance light scattering (RLS) method for the detection of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has been developed based on the interaction with crystal violet (CV). It was found that PFOA can form complexes with CV in acid medium resulting in remarkable enhancement of the RLS intensity of the system. And the enhanced RLS intensities are in proportion to the concentration of PFOA in the range of 0.1-25.0 μmol/L (R2 = 0.9998), with a detection limit of 11.0 nmol/L (S/N = 3). In this work, the optimum reaction conditions and the interferences of foreign substances were investigated. The reaction mechanism between CV and PFOA was also studied by the absorption spectrum and scanning electron microscope (SEM). This method is successfully applied to the determination of PFOA in tap water and Jialing river water samples with RSD ≤ 4.04%.

  14. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques in the preterm brain: methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Tao, Joshua D; Neil, Jeffrey J

    2014-01-01

    Brain development and brain injury in preterm infants are areas of active research. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a non-invasive tool applicable to both animal models and human infants, provides a wealth of information on this process by bridging the gap between histology (available from animal studies) and developmental outcome (available from clinical studies). Moreover, MRI also offers information regarding diagnosis and prognosis in the clinical setting. Recent advances in MR methods - diffusion tensor imaging, volumetric segmentation, surface based analysis, functional MRI, and quantitative metrics - further increase the sophistication of information available regarding both brain structure and function. In this review, we discuss the basics of these newer methods as well as their application to the study of premature infants. PMID:25055864

  15. Three-Dimensional Imaging Techniques in Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Shih-Hui; MacBeth, Melissa; Dougherty, William; Garbini, Joseph; Sidles, John

    2001-05-01

    We describe recent experimental progress toward nanometer-scale 3D MRFM imaging at the University of Washington. In MRFM imaging, only spins within a thin, strongly curved sensitive slice have the correct local field for magnetic resonance. Typical thickness and radius of the slice are of the order of nanometers and microns respectively, and the overall dimensions the scanning region are several hundreds of nanometers. The raw MRFM force data are the convolution of the density of the sample and the Green’s function of the sensitive slice. Because the Green's function is strongly curvilinear, reconstructing the sample density images is difficult for Fourier transfer based deconvolution methods. Therefore, a projected Landweber iterative method is applied to reconstruct MRFM images. Simulated deconvoluted images show good results, and experimental tests are in progress. Attendees are invited to visit our laboratory at the University of Washington; contact the author for directions.

  16. Role of Imaging Techniques for Diagnosis, Prognosis and Management of Heart Failure Patients: Cardiac Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jorge A.; Kramer, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (CMR) has evolved into a major tool for the diagnosis and assessment of prognosis of patients suffering from heart failure. Anatomical and structural imaging, functional assessment, T1 and T2 mapping tissue characterization and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) have provided clinicians with tools to distinguish between non-ischemic and ischemic cardiomyopathies and to identify the etiology of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. LGE is a useful tool to predict the likelihood of functional recovery after revascularization in patients with CAD and to guide the LV lead placement in those who qualify for cardiac resynchronization (CRT) therapy. In addition, the presence of LGE and its extent in myocardial tissue relates to overall cardiovascular outcomes. Emerging roles for cardiac imaging in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction (HFpEF) are being studied and CMR continues to be among the most promising noninvasive imaging alternatives in the diagnosis of this disease. PMID:26041670

  17. Determination of dysprosium by resonance light scattering technique in the presence of BPMPHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shuna; Wu, Xia; Yang, Jinghe; Li, Lei; Wang, Yuebo

    2004-01-01

    Dysprosium has been determined by resonance light scattering (RLS) method in the presence of 1,6-bi(1'-phenyl-3'-methyl-5'-pyrazolone-4'-)hexanedione (BPMPHD) at pH 5.5. The Dy-BPMPHD system has three characteristic peaks at 358, 399 and 450 nm, especially the peak at 358 nm, which is proportional to the concentration of Dy 3+ in the range of 1.0×10 -10-1.0×10 -5 mol l -1. The detection limit (S/N=2) is 5.6×10 -12 mol l -1. Synthetic samples are determined satisfactorily. A new sensitive method for detection of dysprosium has been proposed.

  18. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOEpatents

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-11-25

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the biological object in a main magnetic field and in a radio frequency field, the main magnetic field having a static field direction; rotating the biological object at a rotational frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. According to another embodiment, the radio frequency is pulsed to provide a sequence capable of producing a spectrum that is substantially free of spinning sideband peaks.

  19. Determination of deoxyribonucleic acids by a resonance light scattering technique and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Nianqin; Jia, Guifang; Hou, Shicong; Xiong, Yanmei; Dong, Yanhong

    2003-12-01

    For the first time, acetamiprid has been used to determine nucleic acid (DNA) using the resonance light scattering (RLS). The RLS of acetamiprid was greatly enhanced by DNA in the range of pH 1.6-1.8. A RLS peak at 313 nm was found, and the enhanced intensity of RLS at this wavelength was proportional to the concentration of DNA. The linear range of the calibration curve was 0-11.0 μg ml -1 with the detection limit of 20 ng ml -1. The nucleic acids in synthetic sample and in rice seedling extraction were determined satisfactorily. The interaction mechanism of acetamiprid and DNA is discussed. Mechanism studies show that the enhanced RLS is due to the aggregation of acetamiprid in the presence of DNA.

  20. Resonance light scattering determination of 6-mercaptopurine coupled with HPLC technique.

    PubMed

    Li, Ai Ping; Peng, Jing Dong; Zhou, MingQiong; Zhang, Jin

    2016-02-01

    A simple, fast, costless, sensitive and selective method of resonance light scattering coupled with HPLC was established for the determination of 6-mercaptopurine in human urine sample. In a Britton-Robinson buffer solution of pH5.5, the formation of coordination complex between 6-mercaptopurine and metal palladium (II) led to enhance the RLS intensity of the system. The RLS signal was detected by fluorescence detector at λ(ex)=λ(em)=315 nm. The analytical parameters were provided by the coupled system, the linear of 6-mercaptopurine response from 0.0615 to 2.40 μg L(-1) and the limit of detection (S/N=3) was 0.05 μg L(-1). The presented method has been applied to determine 6-mercaptopurine in human urine samples which obtained satisfactory results. Moreover, the reaction mechanism and possible reasons for enhancement of RLS were fully discussed. PMID:26479445

  1. Resonance light scattering determination of 6-mercaptopurine coupled with HPLC technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ai Ping; Peng, Jing Dong; Zhou, MingQiong; Zhang, Jin

    2016-02-01

    A simple, fast, costless, sensitive and selective method of resonance light scattering coupled with HPLC was established for the determination of 6-mercaptopurine in human urine sample. In a Britton-Robinson buffer solution of pH 5.5, the formation of coordination complex between 6-mercaptopurine and metal palladium (II) led to enhance the RLS intensity of the system. The RLS signal was detected by fluorescence detector at λex = λem = 315 nm. The analytical parameters were provided by the coupled system, the linear of 6-mercaptopurine response from 0.0615 to 2.40 μg L- 1 and the limit of detection (S/N = 3) was 0.05 μg L- 1. The presented method has been applied to determine 6-mercaptopurine in human urine samples which obtained satisfactory results. Moreover, the reaction mechanism and possible reasons for enhancement of RLS were fully discussed.

  2. Triplet State Delocalization in a Conjugated Porphyrin Dimer Probed by Transient Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Techniques

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The delocalization of the photoexcited triplet state in a linear butadiyne-linked porphyrin dimer is investigated by time-resolved and pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) with laser excitation. The transient EPR spectra of the photoexcited triplet states of the porphyrin monomer and dimer are characterized by significantly different spin polarizations and an increase of the zero-field splitting parameter D from monomer to dimer. The proton and nitrogen hyperfine couplings, determined using electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and X- and Q-band HYSCORE, are reduced to about half in the porphyrin dimer. These data unequivocally prove the delocalization of the triplet state over both porphyrin units, in contrast to the conclusions from previous studies on the triplet states of closely related porphyrin dimers. The results presented here demonstrate that the most accurate estimate of the extent of triplet state delocalization can be obtained from the hyperfine couplings, while interpretation of the zero-field splitting parameter D can lead to underestimation of the delocalization length, unless combined with quantum chemical calculations. Furthermore, orientation-selective ENDOR and HYSCORE results, in combination with the results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, allowed determination of the orientations of the zero-field splitting tensors with respect to the molecular frame in both porphyrin monomer and dimer. The results provide evidence for a reorientation of the zero-field splitting tensor and a change in the sign of the zero-field splitting D value. The direction of maximum dipolar coupling shifts from the out-of-plane direction in the porphyrin monomer to the vector connecting the two porphyrin units in the dimer. This reorientation, leading to an alignment of the principal optical transition moment and the axis of maximum dipolar coupling, is also confirmed by magnetophotoselection experiments. PMID:25914154

  3. Feasibility Study of Velocity and Temperature Measurements of an Arcjet Flow using Laser Resonance Doppler Velocimetric (LRDV) Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rob, Mohammad A.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials are used in space vehicles to shield from high heating environment encountered during their atmospheric reentry. Arcjet wind tunnels are used to simulate the flowfield encountered by the spacecrafts, and are used for testing TPS materials. How well these tests simulate the actual heating environment encountered by space vehicles depends on the characteristics of the simulated flow. The flow characterization requires the determination of temperature, concentration, and velocity of the various atomic and molecular species present in the flow. However, determining these parameters requires a complex set of both analytical and experimental procedures. The ability to properly simulate the flight environment is directly related to the accuracy with which these techniques can be used to define the arcjet Laser Resonance Doppler Velocimetric (LRDV) technique can be used to accurately determine the velocity and temperature of a gaseous species. In this technique, the medium is probed with a laser beam that is in resonance with an absorbing transition of the species. The absorption lineshape is Doppler-shifted due to the flow velocity of the species, and the frequency shift is detected as the variation in intensity of the fluorescence emitted by the species. Thus a measurement of the Doppler shift and the width of a spectral line can give both the temperature and the velocity of the flowfield. This summer, our project was to make a feasibility study to set up an experimental arrangement for the laser resonance Doppler velocimetric technique using a ring dye laser. Experiments required troubleshooting, cleaning, testing, and alignment of two lasers and several diagnostics instruments. All instruments and lasers necessary for the project worked well, but the output power of the broadband fundamental dye laser was limited to about 20 mW. This was quite low as compared to that necessary to obtain second harmonic oscillation at 327.49 nm

  4. Fluorescence/bioluminescence resonance energy transfer techniques to study G-protein-coupled receptor activation and signaling.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Martin J; Nuber, Susanne; Hoffmann, Carsten

    2012-04-01

    Fluorescence and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (FRET and BRET) techniques allow the sensitive monitoring of distances between two labels at the nanometer scale. Depending on the placement of the labels, this permits the analysis of conformational changes within a single protein (for example of a receptor) or the monitoring of protein-protein interactions (for example, between receptors and G-protein subunits). Over the past decade, numerous such techniques have been developed to monitor the activation and signaling of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in both the purified, reconstituted state and in intact cells. These techniques span the entire spectrum from ligand binding to the receptors down to intracellular second messengers. They allow the determination and the visualization of signaling processes with high temporal and spatial resolution. With these techniques, it has been demonstrated that GPCR signals may show spatial and temporal patterning. In particular, evidence has been provided for spatial compartmentalization of GPCRs and their signals in intact cells and for distinct physiological consequences of such spatial patterning. We review here the FRET and BRET technologies that have been developed for G-protein-coupled receptors and their signaling proteins (G-proteins, effectors) and the concepts that result from such experiments. PMID:22407612

  5. NQR-NMR studies of higher alcohol synthesis Cu-Co catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-17

    The primary objective of the project is to examine the relations between the catalytic and magnetic properties of the copper-cobalt higher alcohol synthesis catalysts. We have undertaken to investigate the magnetic character by studying the Nuclear Quadrupole resonance of copper and (Zerofield) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of cobalt in copper cobalt catalysts.

  6. Advanced Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques of the Human Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Andre, Jalal B.; Bammer, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Unlike those of the brain, advances in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the human spinal cord have been challenged by the more complicated and inhomogeneous anatomy of the spine, the differences in magnetic susceptibility between adjacent air and fluid-filled structures and the surrounding soft tissues, and the inherent limitations of the initially used echo-planar imaging techniques used to image the spine. Interval advances in DWI techniques for imaging the human spinal cord, with the specific aims of improving the diagnostic quality of the images, and the simultaneous reduction in unwanted artifacts have resulted in higher-quality images that are now able to more accurately portray the complicated underlying anatomy and depict pathologic abnormality with improved sensitivity and specificity. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has benefited from the advances in DWI techniques, as DWI images form the foundation for all tractography and DTI. This review provides a synopsis of the many recent advances in DWI of the human spinal cord, as well as some of the more common clinical uses for these techniques, including DTI and tractography. PMID:22158130

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of degenerative cervical myelopathy: a review of structural changes and measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Aria; Martin, Allan R; Mikulis, David; Fehlings, Michael G

    2016-06-01

    Degenerative cervical myelopathy encompasses a spectrum of age-related structural changes of the cervical spine that result in static and dynamic injury to the spinal cord and collectively represent the most common cause of myelopathy in adults. Although cervical myelopathy is determined clinically, the diagnosis requires confirmation via imaging, and MRI is the preferred modality. Because of the heterogeneity of the condition and evolution of MRI technology, multiple techniques have been developed over the years in an attempt to quantify the degree of baseline severity and potential for neurological recovery. In this review, these techniques are categorized anatomically into those that focus on bone, ligaments, discs, and the spinal cord. In addition, measurements for the cervical spine canal size and sagittal alignment are also described briefly. These tools have resulted collectively in the identification of numerous useful parameters. However, the development of multiple techniques for assessing the same feature, such as cord compression, has also resulted in a number of challenges, including introducing ambiguity in terms of which methods to use and hindering effective comparisons of analysis in the literature. In addition, newer techniques that use advanced MRI are emerging and providing exciting new tools for assessing the spinal cord in patients with degenerative cervical myelopathy. PMID:27246488

  8. Nuclear magnetic and quadrupole resonance in metallic powders in the presence of strong quadrupole interaction: Rhenium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitropoulos, C.; Maglione, M.; Borsa, F.

    1988-03-01

    The nuclear-magnetic-resonance and nuclear-quadrupole-resonance (NQR-NMR) spectra of /sup 187/Re and /sup 185/Re in a powder of rhenium metal were measured in the temperature range 5--10 K both in zero field and with an external magnetic field. The zero-field NQR spectrum is severely broadened by a nonuniform distribution of quadrupole interactions. The average quadrupole coupling frequencies measured at 5 K are, for the two isotopes, ..nu../sub Q/ = 39 +- 0.2 MHz (/sup 187/Re) and ..nu../sub Q/ = 40.8 +- 0.3 MHz (/sup 185/Re). The spectra obtained in the presence of an external magnetic field can be interpreted satisfactorily in terms of transitions among the eigenstates of the full Hamiltonian (Zeeman plus quadrupolar). Measurements of relaxation rates yield T/sub 1/T = 0.03 sK, indicating a relaxation mechanism driven by the hyperfine interaction with the conduction electrons. The feasibility of NQR-NMR studies in small metal particles in the presence of strong inhomogeneous quadrupole interactions is assessed

  9. Neutron intensity modulation and time-focusing with integrated Larmor and resonant frequency techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jinkui Hamilton, William A.; Robertson, J. L.; Crow, Lowell; Lee, Sung-Woo; Kang, Yoon W.

    2015-09-14

    The analysis of neutron diffraction experiments often assumes that neutrons are elastically scattered from the sample. However, there is growing evidence that a significant fraction of the detected neutrons is in fact inelastically scattered, especially from soft materials and aqueous samples. Ignoring these inelastic contributions gives rise to inaccurate experimental results. To date, there has been no simple method with broad applicability for inelastic signal separation in neutron diffraction experiments. Here, we present a simple and robust method that we believe could be suited for this purpose. We use two radio frequency resonant spin flippers integrated with a Larmor precession field to modulate the neutron intensity and to encode the inelastic scattering information into the neutron data. All three components contribute to the spin encoding. The Larmor field serves several additional purposes. Its usage facilitates neutron time-focusing, eliminates the need for stringent magnetic shielding, and allows for compact setups. The scheme is robust, simple, and flexible. We believe that, with further improvements, it has the potential of adding inelastic signal discrimination capabilities to many existing diffraction instruments in the future.

  10. Novel electro-optical coupling technique for magnetic resonance-compatible positron emission tomography detectors.

    PubMed

    Olcott, Peter D; Peng, Hao; Levin, Craig S

    2009-01-01

    A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible positron emission tomography (PET) detector design is being developed that uses electro-optical coupling to bring the amplitude and arrival time information of high-speed PET detector scintillation pulses out of an MRI system. The electro-optical coupling technology consists of a magnetically insensitive photodetector output signal connected to a nonmagnetic vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) diode that is coupled to a multimode optical fiber. This scheme essentially acts as an optical wire with no influence on the MRI system. To test the feasibility of this approach, a lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a single pixel of a solid-state photomultiplier array was placed in coincidence with a lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a fast photomultiplier tube with both the new nonmagnetic VCSEL coupling and the standard coaxial cable signal transmission scheme. No significant change was observed in 511 keV photopeak energy resolution and coincidence time resolution. This electro-optical coupling technology enables an MRI-compatible PET block detector to have a reduced electromagnetic footprint compared with the signal transmission schemes deployed in the current MRI/PET designs. PMID:19397853

  11. Neutron intensity modulation and time-focusing with integrated Larmor and resonant frequency techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinkui; Hamilton, William A.; Lee, Sung-Woo; Robertson, J. L.; Crow, Lowell; Kang, Yoon W.

    2015-09-01

    The analysis of neutron diffraction experiments often assumes that neutrons are elastically scattered from the sample. However, there is growing evidence that a significant fraction of the detected neutrons is in fact inelastically scattered, especially from soft materials and aqueous samples. Ignoring these inelastic contributions gives rise to inaccurate experimental results. To date, there has been no simple method with broad applicability for inelastic signal separation in neutron diffraction experiments. Here, we present a simple and robust method that we believe could be suited for this purpose. We use two radio frequency resonant spin flippers integrated with a Larmor precession field to modulate the neutron intensity and to encode the inelastic scattering information into the neutron data. All three components contribute to the spin encoding. The Larmor field serves several additional purposes. Its usage facilitates neutron time-focusing, eliminates the need for stringent magnetic shielding, and allows for compact setups. The scheme is robust, simple, and flexible. We believe that, with further improvements, it has the potential of adding inelastic signal discrimination capabilities to many existing diffraction instruments in the future.

  12. Determination of nucleic acids at nanogram level using resonance light scattering technique with Congo Red

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xia; Wang, Yuebo; Wang, Minqin; Sun, Shuna; Yang, Jinghe; Luan, Yuxia

    2005-01-01

    Based on the enhancement of the resonance light scattering (RLS) of Congo Red (CR) by nucleic acid, a new quantitative method for nucleic acid is developed. In the Tris-HCl buffer (pH 10.5), the weak light scattering of CR is greatly enhanced by addition of nucleic acid and CTMAB, the maximum peak is at 560 nm and the enhanced intensity of RLS is in proportion to the concentration of nucleic acid. The linear range is 1.0×10 -9 to 1.0×10 -6 g ml -1, 7.5×10 -8 to 1.0×10 -6 g ml -1 and 7.5×10 -8 to 2.5×10 -6 g ml -1 for herring sperm DNA, calf thymus DNA and yeast RNA, and the detection limits are 0.019, 0.89 and 1.2 ng ml -1 ( S/ N = 3), respectively. Actual biological samples were satisfactorily determined.

  13. Nanoscale Characterization of Organometal Trihalide Perovskite using Photothermal Induced Resonance (PTIR) Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Jungseok; Centrone, Andrea; Yuan, Yongbo; Shao, Yuchuan; Wang, Qi; Xiao, Zhengguo; Dong, Qingfeng; Huang, Jinsong

    Further improvement of the performance of organometal trihalide perovskites (OTP) solar cells can be aided by nanoscale characterization. Photothermal induced resonance (PTIR), is a novel scanning probe method that enable measuring vibrational and electronic absorption maps and spectra with a resolution as high as 20 nm. In this presentation, the chemical composition and bandgap of OTP thin films was characterized with PTIR: 1) to identify the origin of the switchable photovoltaic effect and 2) to quantify the local chloride content in mixed-halide perovskites. PTIR vibrational maps recorded in correspondence of methyl ammonium ions (MA +) for a as prepared lateral structure solar cell were uniform but displayed stronger intensity in proximity of the cathode after electric poling. Those measurements provide the first direct proof of ion electron migration in OTP devices. Because chloride incorporation modifies the bandgap in MAPbI3-xClx perovskites, PTIR electronic maps and spectra were used to extract the local chloride content as a function of annealing. Results show that the as-prepared sample consist of a mixture of Cl-rich and Cl-poor phases that evolves into a homogenous Cl-poorer phase upon annealing. This measurement suggests that Cl- is progressively expelled from the film.

  14. A sensitive resveratrol assay with a simple probe methylene blue by resonance light scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Haiyan; Dai, Kaijin; Luo, Qizhi; Duan, Wenjun; Xie, Yang

    2011-01-01

    A novel resonance light scattering (RLS) method was developed for the determination of resveratrol based on the interaction between resveratrol and methylene blue (MB). It was found that at pH 8.69, the weak RLS intensity of MB was remarkably enhanced by the addition of trace amount of resveratrol with the maximum peak located at 385.0 nm. Under the optimum conditions, a good linear relationship between the enhanced RLS intensities and the concentrations of resveratrol was obtained over the range of 2.0-14.0 μg ml -1 with the detection limit (3 σ) of 0.63 μg ml -1. The results of the analysis of resveratrol in synthetic samples and human urine are satisfactory, which showed it may provide a more sensitive, convenient, rapid and reproducible method for the detection of resveratrol, especially in biological and pharmaceutical field. In this work, the characteristics of RLS, absorption and fluorescence spectra of the resveratrol-MB system, the influencing factors and the optimum conditions of the reaction were investigated.

  15. Quantitative 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance in tablets of the antidiabetic medicine Diabinese.

    PubMed

    Tate, Elizabeth; Althoefer, Kaspar; Barras, Jamie; Rowe, Michael D; Smith, John A S; Pearce, Gareth E S; Wren, Stephen A C

    2009-07-01

    Pulsed (35)Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) experiments have been performed on 250-mg tablets of the antidiabetic medicine Diabinese to establish the conditions needed for noninvasive quantitative analysis of the medicine in standard bottles. One important condition is the generation of a uniform radio-frequency (RF) field over the sample, which has been achieved by two designs of sample coil: one of variable pitch, and the other a resonator that has been fabricated from a single turn of copper sheet with a longitudinal gap bridged by tuning capacitors. The results from blind tests show that the number of tablets in a bottle could be predicted to within +/-3%. PMID:19492808

  16. In-Situ Characterization of Tissue Blood Flow, Blood Content, and Water State Using New Techniques in Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conturo, Thomas Edward

    Tissue blood flow, blood content, and water state have been characterized in-situ with new nuclear magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The sensitivities of standard techniques to the physiologic tissue parameters spin density (N_{rm r}) and relaxation times (T_1 and T_2 ) are mathematically defined. A new driven inversion method is developed so that tissue T_1 and T_2 changes produce cooperative intensity changes, yielding high contrast, high signal to noise, and sensitivity to a wider range of tissue parameters. The actual tissue parameters were imaged by automated collection of multiple-echo data having multiple T _1 dependence. Data are simultaneously fit by three-parameters to a closed-form expression, producing lower inter-parameter correlation and parameter noise than in separate T_1 or T_2 methods or pre-averaged methods. Accurate parameters are obtained at different field strengths. Parametric images of pathology demonstrate high sensitivity to tissue heterogeneity, and water content is determined in many tissues. Erythrocytes were paramagnetically labeled to study blood content and relaxation mechanisms. Liver and spleen relaxation were enhanced following 10% exchange of animal blood volumes. Rapid water exchange between intracellular and extracellular compartments was validated. Erythrocytes occupied 12.5% of renal cortex volume, and blood content was uniform in the liver, spleen and kidney. The magnitude and direction of flow velocity was then imaged. To eliminate directional artifacts, a bipolar gradient technique sensitized to flow in different directions was developed. Phase angle was reconstructed instead of intensity since the former has a 2pi -fold higher dynamic range. Images of flow through curves demonstrated secondary flow with a centrifugally-biased laminar profile and stationary velocity peaks along the curvature. Portal vein flow velocities were diminished or reversed in cirrhosis. Image artifacts have been characterized and removed. The

  17. Measurements of ocean surface spectrum from an aircraft using the two-frequency microwave resonance technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. W.; Weissman, D. E.; Jones, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the results of a two-frequency (Delta k) microwave radar experiment conducted from an aircraft and aimed primarily at the development of remote sensing techniques to measure ocean surface wave spectral characteristics. The experiment was conducted as part of the Maritime Remote Sensing (MARSEN) project in the North Sea during the autumn of 1979. The objective was to demonstrate the feasibility of and study the performance of the Delta k technique from a higher altitude platform, at shallower incidence angles, and at higher Doppler velocities than earlier stationary platform experiments allowed. A quantitative engineering evaluation of the results of two comprehensive flights is provided, and the qualitative significance of the results is discussed from a geophysical point of view in terms of the existing theory.

  18. Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Comprehensive Update on Principles and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ka-Loh; Ostergaard, Leif; Calamante, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Perfusion is a fundamental biological function that refers to the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to tissue by means of blood flow. Perfusion MRI is sensitive to microvasculature and has been applied in a wide variety of clinical applications, including the classification of tumors, identification of stroke regions, and characterization of other diseases. Perfusion MRI techniques are classified with or without using an exogenous contrast agent. Bolus methods, with injections of a contrast agent, provide better sensitivity with higher spatial resolution, and are therefore more widely used in clinical applications. However, arterial spin-labeling methods provide a unique opportunity to measure cerebral blood flow without requiring an exogenous contrast agent and have better accuracy for quantification. Importantly, MRI-based perfusion measurements are minimally invasive overall, and do not use any radiation and radioisotopes. In this review, we describe the principles and techniques of perfusion MRI. This review summarizes comprehensive updated knowledge on the physical principles and techniques of perfusion MRI. PMID:25246817

  19. Penaeus orientolis prawn freshness rapid determination method based on electronic nose and non-linear stochastic resonance technique

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Liu; Yuanyuan, Han; Yanping, Cai; Jiaojiao, Jin; Guohua, Hui

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, Penaeus orientolis prawn freshness rapid determination method using electronic nose (e-nose) and non-linear data processing technique is studied. E-nose responses to prawns stored at 4°C are measured. Meanwhile, physical/chemical indexes (firmness, pH, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), total viable count (TVC), and human sensory evaluation) are examined to provide freshness references for e-nose analysis. E-nose measurement data is analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA), stochastic resonance (SR), and double-layered cascaded serial stochastic resonance (DCSSR). PCA partially discriminates prawns under different storage time. SR and DCSSR signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectrum eigen values discriminate prawns successfully. Multi-variables regressions (MVR) are conducted between physical/chemical indexes and SR/DCSSR output SNR minimal (SNR-Min) values. Results indicate that SNR-Min values present more significant linearity relation with physical/chemical indexes. Prawn freshness forecasting model is developed via Harris fitting regression on DCSSR SNR-Min values. Validating experiments demonstrate that forecasting accuracy of this model is 94.29%. PMID:25551520

  20. Evaluation of aortic stenosis by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging: comparison with established routine clinical techniques

    PubMed Central

    Kupfahl, C; Honold, M; Meinhardt, G; Vogelsberg, H; Wagner, A; Mahrholdt, H; Sechtem, U

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether direct planimetry of aortic valve area (AVA) by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is a reliable tool for determining the severity of aortic stenosis compared with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE), and cardiac catheterisation. Methods: 44 symptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis were studied. By cardiac catheterisation AVA was calculated by the Gorlin equation. AVA was measured with CMR from steady state free precession (true fast imaging with steady state precession) by planimetry. AVA was also determined from TOE images by planimetry and from TTE images by the continuity equation. Results: Bland-Altman analysis evaluating intraobserver and interobserver variability showed a very small bias for both (−0.016 and 0.019, respectively; n  =  20). Bias and limits of agreement between CMR and TTE were 0.05 (−0.35, 0.44) cm2 (n  =  37), between CMR and TOE 0.02 (−0.39, 0.42) cm2 (n  =  32), and between CMR and cardiac catheterisation 0.09 (−0.30, 0.47) cm2 (n  =  36). The sensitivity and specificity of CMR to detect AVA ⩽ 0.80 cm2 measured by cardiac catheterisation was 78% and 89%, of TOE 70% and 70%, and of TTE 74% and 67%, respectively. Conclusion: CMR planimetry is highly reliable and reproducible. Further, CMR planimetry had the best sensitivity and specificity of all non-invasive methods for detecting severe aortic stenosis in comparison with cardiac catheterisation. Therefore, CMR planimetry of AVA with steady state free precession is a new powerful diagnostic tool, particularly for patients with uncertain or discrepant findings by other modalities. PMID:15253962

  1. Single Breath-Hold Physiotherapy Technique: Effective tool for T2* magnetic resonance imaging in young patients with thalassaemia major.

    PubMed

    Mevada, Surekha T; Al-Mahruqi, Najma; El-Beshlawi, Ismail; El-Shinawy, Mohamed; Zachariah, Mathew; Al-Rawas, Abdul H; Daar, Shahina; Wali, Yasser

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging using T2* (MRI T2*) is a highly sensitive and non-invasive technique for the detection of tissue iron load. Although the single breath-hold multi-echo T2* technique has been available at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Muscat, Oman, since 2006, it could not be performed on younger patients due to their inability to hold their breath after expiration. This study was carried out between May 2007 and May 2015 and assessed 50 SQUH thalassaemic patients aged 7-17 years old. Seven of these patients underwent baseline and one-year follow-up MRI T2* scans before receiving physiotherapy training. Subsequently, all patients were trained by a physiotherapist to hold their breath for approximately 15-20 seconds at the end of expiration before undergoing baseline and one-year follow-up MRI T2* scans. Failure rates for the pre- and post-training groups were 6.0% and 42.8%, respectively. These results indicate that the training of thalassaemic patients in breath-hold techniques is beneficial and increases rates of compliance for MRI T2* scans. PMID:26909218

  2. Using nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance and electric field gradient information for the study of radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Iselin, L.H.

    1995-12-01

    Nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) was used in an attempt to detect the effects of ionizing radiation on organic material. Previously reported resonances for urea were detected at 2,913.32 {+-} 0.01 kHz and 2,347.88 {+-} 0.08 kHz with associated T{sub 2}* values 780 {+-} 20 {micro}s and 523 {+-} 24 {micro}s, respectively. The previously unreported {nu}{sub {minus}} line for urea-d{sup 4} was detected at 2,381 {+-} 0.04 Khz and used to determine accurately for the first time the values for the nuclear quadrupole coupling constant {chi} (3,548.74 {+-} 0.03 kHz) and the asymmetry parameter {eta} (0.31571 {+-} 0.00007) for urea-d{sup 4}. The inverse linewidth parameter T{sub 2}* for {nu}{sub +} was measured at 928 {+-} 23 {micro}s and for {nu}{sub {minus}} at 721 {+-} 12 {micro}s. Townes and Dailey analysis was performed and urea-d{sup 4} exhibits a 0.004 increase in lone pair electronic density and a slight decrease in N-H bond electronic density, as compared to urea, probably due to the mass difference. A relationship is proposed, referred to as NQR linewidth analysis, between the dynamic spin relaxation times T{sub 2} and T{sub 2}* and the widths of the distributions of the NQR parameters. Linewidth analysis is presented as a tool for possible use in future NQR work in all area, not just radiation effects. This relationship is tested using sodium nitrite T{sub 2} and T{sub 2}* values for {nu}{sub {minus}} and {nu}{sub {minus}} as a function of temperature.

  3. A comparison of neural network and fuzzy clustering techniques in segmenting magnetic resonance images of the brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Lawrence O.; Bensaid, Amine M.; Clarke, Laurence P.; Velthuizen, Robert P.; Silbiger, Martin S.; Bezdek, James C.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) brain section images are segmented and then synthetically colored to give visual representations of the original data with three approaches: the literal and approximate fuzzy c-means unsupervised clustering algorithms and a supervised computational neural network, a dynamic multilayered perception trained with the cascade correlation learning algorithm. Initial clinical results are presented on both normal volunteers and selected patients with brain tumors surrounded by edema. Supervised and unsupervised segmentation techniques provide broadly similar results. Unsupervised fuzzy algorithms were visually observed to show better segmentation when compared with raw image data for volunteer studies. However, for a more complex segmentation problem with tumor/edema or cerebrospinal fluid boundary, where the tissues have similar MR relaxation behavior, inconsistency in rating among experts was observed.

  4. Field enhancement and resonance phenomena in complex three-dimensional nanoparticles: efficient computation using the source-model technique.

    PubMed

    Ishay, Yakir; Leviatan, Yehuda; Bartal, Guy

    2014-05-15

    We present a semi-analytical method for computing the electromagnetic field in and around 3D nanoparticles (NP) of complex shape and demonstrate its power via concrete examples of plasmonic NPs that have nonsymmetrical shapes and surface areas with very small radii of curvature. In particular, we show the three axial resonances of a 3D cashew-nut and the broadband response of peanut-shell NPs. The method employs the source-model technique along with a newly developed intricate source distributing algorithm based on the surface curvature. The method is simple and can outperform finite-difference time domain and finite-element-based software tools in both its efficiency and accuracy. PMID:24978226

  5. DNAzyme-based biosensor for Cu(2+) ion by combining hybridization chain reaction with fluorescence resonance energy transfer technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Chen, Ling; Ou, Yidian; Wang, Zhenhua; Fu, Fengfu; Guo, Liangqia

    2016-08-01

    A novel signal amplification strategy based on Cu(2+)-dependent DNAzyme was developed for sensing Cu(2+) ion by combining hybridization chain reaction (HCR) with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. In the presence of Cu(2+) ion, the substrate strands of Cu(2+)-dependent DNAzyme immobilized on magnetic beads were specifically cleaved and released. The released strands initiated the HCR process of hairpin H1 and H2 labeled with FAM as the donor and TAMRA as the acceptor, respectively. Long nicked dsDNA structures were self-assembled to bring the donor and the acceptor in close proximity, resulting in a FRET process. The relative ratio of fluorescent intensities of the acceptor and donor was used to quantitatively detect Cu(2+) ion with a limit of detection of 0.5nmolL(-1). This proposed biosensor was applied to detect Cu(2+) ion in tap water with satisfactory results. PMID:27216680

  6. A Wafer-Level Sn-Rich Au—Sn Bonding Technique and Its Application in Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xu; Lv, Xing-Dong; Wei, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Zhe; Yang, Jin-Ling; Qi, Zhi-Mei; Yang, Fu-Hua

    2014-05-01

    Sn-rich Au—Sn solder bonding is systematically investigated. High shear strength (64MPa) and good hermeticity (a leak rate lower than 1 × 10-7 torr·l/s) are obtained for Au—Sn solder with 54 wt% Sn bonded at 310°C. The AuSn2 phase with the highest Vickers-hardness among the four stable intermetallic compounds of the Au—Sn system makes a major contribution to the high bonding strength. This bonding technique has been successfully used to package the Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) sensors. The Sn-rich Au—Sn solder bonding provides a reliable, low-cost, low-temperature and wafer-level hermetic packaging solution for the micro-electromechanical system devices and has potential applications in high-end biomedical sensors.

  7. Pediatric Emergency Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Current Indications, Techniques, and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Chang, Patricia T; Yang, Edward; Swenson, David W; Lee, Edward Y

    2016-05-01

    MR imaging plays an important role in the detection and characterization of several pediatric disease entities that can occur in the emergent setting because of its cross-sectional imaging capability, lack of ionizing radiation exposure, and superior soft tissue contrast. In the age of as low as reasonably achievable, these advantages have made MR imaging an increasingly preferred modality for diagnostic evaluations even in time-sensitive settings. In this article, the authors discuss the current indications, techniques, and clinical applications of MR imaging in the evaluation of pediatric emergencies. PMID:27150329

  8. Investigating the Impact of Biological Impurities on the Liquid Vein Network in Polycrystalline Ice Using Magnetic Resonance Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brox, T. I.; Vogt, S. J.; Brown, J. R.; Skidmore, M. L.; Codd, S. L.; Seymour, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that microorganisms can occupy the liquid filled inter-crystalline vein network in ice and maintain their metabolic activity under these conditions. Additionally, certain cold tolerant microorganisms produce extra-cellular proteins (i.e., ice-binding proteins) that have the ability to bind to the prism face of an ice crystal and inhibit ice recrystallization. One such microorganism is Chryseobacterium sp. V3519-10, a bacterium isolated from a depth of 3519 m in the Vostok Ice Core, Antarctica. While such an adaptation can impact ice crystal structure, it is not known what effect these proteins may have on the liquid vein network and to what extent these organisms may control their habitat. This study uses magnetic resonance techniques to investigate the effects of chemical and biological impurities on the liquid vein structure in ice. Magnetic resonance techniques are powerful tools for probing pore structure and transport dynamics in porous media systems, however, their ability to characterize ice as a porous media has not yet been fully explored. Three experimental conditions were evaluated in this study. Ices were prepared from 7 g/L NaCl solutions with; 1) addition of a quantified amount of extra-cellular proteins (>30kDa) extracted from Chryseobacterium sp. V3519-10 2) addition of equivalent concentrations of the protein, Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and 3) no protein addition. Samples were frozen and analyzed at -15°C. The liquid vein structure, as a function of salt and protein concentrations, was characterized to obtain information on liquid water content, vein surface to volume ratios and tortuosity as a measure of vein network interconnectivity. These measurements were non-destructive and made at various time intervals after freezing to monitor the evolution of microstructure due to recrystallization and assess the effects of the added proteins.

  9. Structural and biophysical characterisation of G protein-coupled receptor ligand binding using resonance energy transfer and fluorescent labelling techniques.

    PubMed

    Ward, Richard J; Milligan, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between ligands and the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to which they bind has long been the focus of intensive investigation. The signalling cascades triggered by receptor activation, due in most cases to ligand binding, are of great physiological and medical importance; indeed, GPCRs are targeted by in excess of 30% of small molecule therapeutic medicines. Attempts to identify further pharmacologically useful GPCR ligands, for receptors with known and unknown endogenous ligands, continue apace. In earlier days direct assessment of such interactions was restricted largely to the use of ligands incorporating radioactive isotope labels as this allowed detection of the ligand and monitoring its interaction with the GPCR. This use of such markers has continued with the development of ligands labelled with fluorophores and their application to the study of receptor-ligand interactions using both light microscopy and resonance energy transfer techniques, including homogenous time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Details of ligand-receptor interactions via X-ray crystallography are advancing rapidly as methods suitable for routine production of substantial amounts and stabilised forms of GPCRs have been developed and there is hope that this may become as routine as the co-crystallisation of serine/threonine kinases with ligands, an approach that has facilitated widespread use of rapid structure-based ligand design. Conformational changes involved in the activation of GPCRs, widely predicted by biochemical and biophysical means, have inspired the development of intramolecular FRET-based sensor forms of GPCRs designed to investigate the events following ligand binding and resulting in a signal propagation across the cell membrane. Finally, a number of techniques are emerging in which ligand-GPCR binding can be studied in ways that, whilst indirect, are able to monitor its results in an unbiased and integrated manner. This article is part

  10. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Skeletal Muscle: A Comparison of Two Quantitation Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Salibi, Nouha; Fayad, Laura M.; Barker, Peter B.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives The aim of this study was to develop and compare two methods for quantification of metabolite concentrations in human skeletal muscle using phased-array receiver coils at 3 Tesla. Materials and Methods Water suppressed and un-suppressed spectra were recorded from the quadriceps muscle (vastus medialis) in 8 healthy adult volunteers, and from a calibration phantom containing 69 mM/L N-acetyl aspartate. Using the phantom replacement technique, trimethylamine specifically [TMA] and creatine [Cr] concentrations were estimated, and compared to those values obtained by using the water reference method. Results Quadriceps [TMA] concentrations were 9.5 ± 2.4 and 9.6 ± 4.1 mmol/kg wet weight using the phantom replacement and water referencing methods respectively, while [Cr] concentrations were 26.8 ± 12.2 and 24.1 ± 5.3 mmol/kg wet weight respectively. Conclusions Reasonable agreement between water referencing and phantom replacement methods was found, although for [Cr] variation was significantly higher for the phantom replacement technique. The relative advantages and disadvantages of each approach are discussed. PMID:24792959

  11. Search for Narrow Resonances in Dijet Final States at √{s }=8 TeV with the Novel CMS Technique of Data Scouting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Luetic, J.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Cimmino, A.; Cornelis, T.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Poyraz, D.; Salva, S.; Schöfbeck, R.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; De Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Forthomme, L.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; Da Silveira, G. G.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Fang, W.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Liu, Z.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhao, J.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; González Hernández, C. F.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Ferencek, D.; Kadija, K.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Elgammal, S.; Mohamed, A.; Mohammed, Y.; Salama, E.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Perrini, L.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Ghosh, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Kucher, I.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Abdulsalam, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.

    2016-07-01

    A search for narrow resonances decaying into dijet final states is performed on data from proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 18.8 fb-1 . The data were collected with the CMS detector using a novel technique called data scouting, in which the information associated with these selected events is much reduced, permitting collection of larger data samples. This technique enables CMS to record events containing jets at a rate of 1 kHz, by collecting the data from the high-level-trigger system. In this way, the sensitivity to low-mass resonances is increased significantly, allowing previously inaccessible couplings of new resonances to quarks and gluons to be probed. The resulting dijet mass distribution yields no evidence of narrow resonances. Upper limits are presented on the resonance cross sections as a function of mass, and compared with a variety of models predicting narrow resonances. The limits are translated into upper limits on the coupling of a leptophobic resonance ZB' to quarks, improving on the results obtained by previous experiments for the mass range from 500 to 800 GeV.

  12. Search for Narrow Resonances in Dijet Final States at sqrt[s]=8  TeV with the Novel CMS Technique of Data Scouting.

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Asilar, E; Bergauer, T; Brandstetter, J; Brondolin, E; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Flechl, M; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; König, A; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Matsushita, T; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rad, N; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schieck, J; Strauss, J; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Lauwers, J; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Abu Zeid, S; Blekman, F; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; De Bruyn, I; Deroover, K; Heracleous, N; Lowette, S; Moortgat, S; Moreels, L; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Parijs, I; Brun, H; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Delannoy, H; Fasanella, G; Favart, L; Goldouzian, R; Grebenyuk, A; Karapostoli, G; Lenzi, T; Léonard, A; Luetic, J; Maerschalk, T; Marinov, A; Randle-Conde, A; Seva, T; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Yonamine, R; Zenoni, F; Zhang, F; Cimmino, A; Cornelis, T; Dobur, D; Fagot, A; Garcia, G; Gul, M; Mccartin, J; Poyraz, D; Salva, S; Schöfbeck, R; Tytgat, M; Van Driessche, W; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Beluffi, C; Bondu, O; Brochet, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; De Visscher, S; Delaere, C; Delcourt, M; Forthomme, L; Francois, B; Giammanco, A; Jafari, A; Jez, P; Komm, M; Lemaitre, V; Magitteri, A; Mertens, A; Musich, M; Nuttens, C; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Wertz, S; Beliy, N; Aldá Júnior, W L; Alves, F L; Alves, G A; Brito, L; Correa Martins Junior, M; Hensel, C; Moraes, A; Pol, M E; Rebello Teles, P; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; Da Silveira, G G; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Huertas Guativa, L M; Malbouisson, H; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mora Herrera, C; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Ahuja, S; Bernardes, C A; Dogra, S; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Mercadante, P G; Moon, C S; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Romero Abad, D; Ruiz Vargas, J C; Aleksandrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Iaydjiev, P; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Glushkov, I; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Fang, W; Ahmad, M; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Chen, Y; Cheng, T; Du, R; Jiang, C H; Leggat, D; Liu, Z; Romeo, F; Shaheen, S M; Spiezia, A; Tao, J; Wang, C; Wang, Z; Zhang, H; Zhao, J; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Li, Q; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Xu, Z; Avila, C; Cabrera, A; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Florez, C; Gomez, J P; González Hernández, C F; Ruiz Alvarez, J D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Puljak, I; Ribeiro Cipriano, P M; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Ferencek, D; Kadija, K; Micanovic, S; Sudic, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Rykaczewski, H; Finger, M; Finger, M; Carrera Jarrin, E; Elgammal, S; Mohamed, A; Mohammed, Y; Salama, E; Calpas, B; Kadastik, M; Murumaa, M; Perrini, L; Raidal, M; Tiko, A; Veelken, C; Eerola, P; Pekkanen, J; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Peltola, T; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Wendland, L; Talvitie, J; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Favaro, C; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Ghosh, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Kucher, I; Locci, E; Machet, M; Malcles, J; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Zghiche, A; Abdulsalam, A; Antropov, I; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Busson, P; Cadamuro, L; Chapon, E; Charlot, C; Davignon, O; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Jo, M; Lisniak, S; Miné, P; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Ortona, G; Paganini, P; Pigard, P; Regnard, S; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Strebler, T; Yilmaz, Y; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Aubin, A; Bloch, D; Brom, J-M; Buttignol, M; Chabert, E C; Chanon, N; Collard, C; Conte, E; Coubez, X; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Le Bihan, A-C; Merlin, J A; Skovpen, K; Van Hove, P; Gadrat, S; Beauceron, S; Bernet, C; Boudoul, G; Bouvier, E; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Courbon, B; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fan, J; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Grenier, G; Ille, B; Lagarde, F; Laktineh, I B; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Pequegnot, A L; Perries, S; Popov, A; Sabes, D; Sordini, V; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Toriashvili, T; Lomidze, D; Autermann, C; Beranek, S; Feld, L; Heister, A; Kiesel, M K; Klein, K; Lipinski, M; Ostapchuk, A; Preuten, M; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schomakers, C; Schulte, J F; Schulz, J; Verlage, T; Weber, H; Zhukov, V

    2016-07-15

    A search for narrow resonances decaying into dijet final states is performed on data from proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 18.8  fb^{-1}. The data were collected with the CMS detector using a novel technique called data scouting, in which the information associated with these selected events is much reduced, permitting collection of larger data samples. This technique enables CMS to record events containing jets at a rate of 1 kHz, by collecting the data from the high-level-trigger system. In this way, the sensitivity to low-mass resonances is increased significantly, allowing previously inaccessible couplings of new resonances to quarks and gluons to be probed. The resulting dijet mass distribution yields no evidence of narrow resonances. Upper limits are presented on the resonance cross sections as a function of mass, and compared with a variety of models predicting narrow resonances. The limits are translated into upper limits on the coupling of a leptophobic resonance Z_{B}^{'} to quarks, improving on the results obtained by previous experiments for the mass range from 500 to 800 GeV. PMID:27472109

  13. Development of High Resolution Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Neutron Dosimetry Technique with93Nb(n,n')93mNb Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Hideki; Takatsuka, Takaaki; Takamatsu, Takahide; Adachi, Yoshitaka; Furuta, Yujin; Noto, Takuma; Iguchi, Tetsuo; Sonnenschein, Volker; Wendt, Klaus; Ito, Chikara; Maeda, Shigetaka

    2016-02-01

    We have proposed an advanced technique to measure the 93mNb yield precisely by Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry, instead of conventional characteristic X-ray spectroscopy. 93mNb-selective resonance ionization is achievable by distinguishing the hyperfine splitting of the atomic energy levels between 93Nb and 93mNb at high resolution. In advance of 93mNb detection, we could successfully demonstrate high resolution resonant ionization spectroscopy of stable 93Nb using an all solid-state, narrow-band and tunable Ti:Sapphire laser system operated at 1 kHz repetition rate.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Three-dimensional Cube Technique in the Measurement of Piglet Femoral Anteversion

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dong-Mei; Pan, Shi-Nong; Wang, En-Bo; Zheng, Li-Qiang; Guo, Wen-Li; Fu, Xi-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Background: The accurate measurement of the femoral anteversion (FA) angle is always a topic of much debate in the orthopedic surgery and radiology research. We aimed to explore a new FA measurement method to acquire accurate results without radiation damage using piglet model. Methods: A total of thirty piglets were assigned to two groups based on the age. Bilateral femora were imaged with 3.0-T magnetic resonance (MR) and 64-slice computed tomography (CT) examinations on all piglets. FA was measured on MR-three-dimensional (3D) postprocessing software with a four-step method: initial validation of the femoral condylar axis, validation of the condylar plane, validation of the femoral neck axis, and line-plane angle measurement of FA. After MR and CT examinations, all piglets were sacrificed and their degree of FA was measured using their excised, dried femora. MR, CT, and dried-femur measurement results were analyzed statistically; MR and CT measurements were compared for accuracy against each other and against the gold standard dried femur measurement. Results: In both groups, the mean FA value measured by MR was lower than that measured by CT. A statistically significant difference was observed between CT- and dried-femur measurements but not between MR- and dried-femur measurements. A higher correlation (0.783 vs. 0.408) and a higher consistency (0.863 vs. 0.578) with dried-femur measurement results were seen for MR measurements than CT measurements in the 1-week age group. However, in the 8-week age group, similar correlations (0.707 vs. 0.669) and consistencies (0.864 vs. 0.821) were observed. Conclusions: Noninvasive MR-3D-Cube reconstruction was able to accurately measure FA in piglets. Particularly in the 1-week age group with a larger proportion of cartilaginous structures, the correlation and consistency between MR- and dried-femur measurement results were higher than those between CT- and dried-femur measurements, suggesting that MR may be a new useful

  15. Microwave resonant technique in studies of photodielectric properties of bulk, thin film and nanoparticle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, V. V.; Rakhmatullin, R. M.; Cefalas, A. C.; Semashko, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    An enhanced contactless microwave technique allows us to study the photoconductivity of materials. The transient response of the complex permittivity of matter (ε ={ε1}-j{ε2} ) under optical irradiation is measured with nanosecond time resolution. The main advantage of the novel methodology is the elimination of the polarization effect in evaluating photoconductivity. The potential of the methodology was demonstrated by photoconductivity measurements in Si [1 0 0] crystal, CeO2 nanocrystalline powder and Ce-doped LiYF4 single crystal. The variations of complex permittivity (δ {ε1} and δ {ε2} ) of Si [1 0 0] crystal, CeO2 nanocrystalline powder and Ce-doped LiYF4 single crystal under optical irradiation was measured and accurate values for crystalline band gaps were extracted. Finally, quantum confinement effects were observed in nano-size crystalline powders.

  16. Technique for enhancing the power output of an electrostatic generator employing parametric resonance

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2016-02-23

    A circuit-based technique enhances the power output of electrostatic generators employing an array of axially oriented rods or tubes or azimuthal corrugated metal surfaces for their electrodes. During generator operation, the peak voltage across the electrodes occurs at an azimuthal position that is intermediate between the position of minimum gap and maximum gap. If this position is also close to the azimuthal angle where the rate of change of capacity is a maximum, then the highest rf power output possible for a given maximum allowable voltage at the minimum gap can be attained. This rf power output is then coupled to the generator load through a coupling condenser that prevents suppression of the dc charging potential by conduction through the load. Optimized circuit values produce phase shifts in the rf output voltage that allow higher power output to occur at the same voltage limit at the minimum gap position.

  17. Techniques for High-speed Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Rats and Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Rehwald, Wolfgang G.; Reeder, Scott B.; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Judd, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    Progress in research on hypertension, heart failure, aging, post-infarct remodeling, and the molecular basis of cardiovascular diseases in general has been greatly facilitated in recent years by the development of specialized small-mammal models by selective breeding and/or genetic alteration. Routine noninvasive evaluation of cardiac function and perfusion in these animals models, however, is difficult using existing methods. In principle, MRI can be used for this purpose, but in practice this is difficult because of problems related to RF coils, cardiac gating, and imaging pulse sequences. In this article, solutions to these problems are described that have allowed us to use MRI to routinely image the hearts of rats and rabbits. Specifically described are four RF coils, cardiac gating schemes, and an imaging pulse sequence specially designed for cardiac imaging in these animals on a 4.7 T Omega chemical-shift imaging (CSI) spectrometer. These techniques can be used to obtain, within 2 min, eight double-oblique short-axis images of the rat at different cardiac phases with 200 × 400 μm in-plane resolution and a slice thickness of 2 mm. Moreover, myocardial tissue tagging can be performed with tag thicknesses and separations comparable to those used routinely in humans. The technical information is presented in sufficient detail to allow researchers at other sites to reproduce the results. This information should facilitate the use of MRI for the noninvasive examination of cardiac function and perfusion, which can be combined with other established techniques for the study of cardiovascular disease in specialized animal models. PMID:8978641

  18. Broadband echo sequence using a pi composite pulse for the pure NQR of a spin I = 32 powder sample

    PubMed

    Odin

    2000-04-01

    This work presents a numerical approach to optimizing sequences with composite pulses for the pure NQR of a spin I = 32 powder sample. The calculations are based on a formalism developed in a previous paper, which allows a fast powder-averaging procedure to be implemented. The framework of the Cayley-Klein matrices to describe space rotations by 2 x 2 unitary and unimodular complex matrices is used to calculate the pulse propagators. The object of such a study is to design a high-performance echo sequence composed of a single preparation pulse and a three-pulse composite transfer pulse. We mean a sequence leading to a large excitation bandwidth with a good signal-to-noise ratio, a flat excitation profile near the irradiation frequency, and a good linearity of the phase as a function of frequency offset. Such a composite echo sequence is intended to give a better excitation profile than the classical Hahn (θ)-tau-(2θ) echo sequence. It is argued that in pure NQR of a powder sample, the sequence must be optimized as a whole since both the excitation and the reception of the signal depend on the relative orientation of the crystallites with respect to the coil axis. To our knowledge, this is the first time such a global approach is presented. An extensive numerical study of the composite echo sequence described above is performed in this article. The key of the discrimination between the sequences lies in using the first five reduced moments of the excitation profile as well as an estimator of the phase linearity. Based on such information, we suggest that the echo sequence that best fulfills our criterion is (1)(0)-tau-(0.35)(0)(2.1)(pi)(0.35)(0), the pulse angles omega(RF)t(p) being in radians. The subscripts are the relative pulse phases. We outlined the way to implement the spin echo mapping method to reconstruct large spectra with this sequence, and it is shown that it reduces the acquisition time by a factor of 1.7 if compared to the classical Hahn echo. Some

  19. Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging techniques to probe muscle structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malis, Vadim

    Structural and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) studies of skeletal muscle allow the elucidation of muscle physiology under normal and pathological conditions. Continuing on the efforts of the Muscle Imaging and Modeling laboratory, the focus of the thesis is to (i) extend and refine two challenging imaging modalities: structural imaging using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and functional imaging based on Velocity Encoded Phase Contrast Imaging (VE-PC) and (ii) apply these methods to explore age related structure and functional differences of the gastrocnemius muscle. Diffusion Tensor Imaging allows the study of tissue microstructure as well as muscle fiber architecture. The images, based on an ultrafast single shot Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) sequence, suffer from geometric distortions and low signal to noise ratio. A processing pipeline was developed to correct for distortions and to improve image Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). DTI acquired on a senior and young cohort of subjects were processed through the pipeline and differences in DTI derived indices and fiber architecture between the two cohorts were explored. The DTI indices indicated that at the microstructural level, fiber atrophy was accompanied with a reduction in fiber volume fraction. At the fiber architecture level, fiber length and pennation angles decreased with age that potentially contribute to the loss of muscle force with age. Velocity Encoded Phase Contrast imaging provides tissue (e.g. muscle) velocity at each voxel which allows the study of strain and Strain Rate (SR) under dynamic conditions. The focus of the thesis was to extract 2D strain rate tensor maps from the velocity images and apply the method to study age related differences. The tensor mapping can potentially provide unique information on the extracellular matrix and lateral transmission the role of these two elements has recently emerged as important determinants of force loss with age. In the cross sectional study on

  20. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in children: technique and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Eutsler, Eric P; Khanna, Geetika

    2016-05-01

    Whole-body MR imaging is being increasingly used in children to evaluate the extent of various oncologic and non-oncologic entities. The lack of exposure to ionizing radiation, excellent soft-tissue contrast (even without the use of contrast agents), and functional imaging capabilities make it especially suitable for screening and surveillance in the pediatric population. Technical developments such as moving table platforms, multi-channel/multi-element surface coils, and parallel imaging allow imaging of the entire body with multiple sequences in a reasonable 30- to 40-min time frame, which has facilitated its acceptance in routine clinical practice. The initial investigations in whole-body MR imaging were primarily focused on oncologic applications such as tumor screening and staging. The exquisite sensitivity of fluid-sensitive MR sequences to many different types of pathology has led to new applications of whole-body MR imaging in evaluation of multifocal rheumatologic conditions. Availability of blood pool contrast agents has allowed whole-body MR angiographic imaging of vascular malformations, vasculitides and vasculopathies. Whole-body MRI is being applied for delineating the extent and distribution of systemic and multifocal diseases, establishing diagnoses, assessing treatment response, and surveillance imaging. This article reviews the technique and clinical applications of whole-body MR imaging in children. PMID:27229503

  1. Theoretical and experimental evaluation of broadband decoupling techniques for in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Robin A

    2005-06-01

    A theoretical and experimental evaluation of existing broadband decoupling methods with respect to their utility for in vivo (1)H-(13)C NMR spectroscopy is presented. Simulations are based on a modified product operator formalism, while an experimental evaluation is performed on in vitro samples and human leg and rat brain in vivo. The performance of broadband decoupling methods was evaluated with respect to the required peak and average RF powers, decoupling bandwidth, decoupling side bands, heteronuclear scalar coupling constant, and sensitivity toward B(2) inhomogeneity. In human applications only the WALTZ and MLEV decoupling methods provide adequate decoupling performance at RF power levels that satisfy the FDA guidelines on local tissue heating. For very low RF power levels (B(2max) < 300 Hz) one should verify empirically whether the experiment will benefit from broadband decoupling. At higher RF power levels acceptable for animal studies additional decoupling techniques become available and provide superior performance. Since the average RF power of adiabatic RF pulses is almost always significantly lower than the peak RF power, it can be stated that for average RF powers suitable for animal studies it is always possible to design an adiabatic decoupling scheme that outperforms all other schemes. B(2) inhomogeneity degrades the decoupling performance of all methods, but the decoupling bandwidths for WALTZ-16 and especially adiabatic methods are still satisfactory for useful in vivo decoupling with a surface coil. PMID:15906279

  2. Flexible reduced field of view magnetic resonance imaging based on single-shot spatiotemporally encoded technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Cai, Cong-Bo; Chen, Lin; Chen, Ying; Qu, Xiao-Bo; Cai, Shu-Hui

    2015-10-01

    In many ultrafast imaging applications, the reduced field-of-view (rFOV) technique is often used to enhance the spatial resolution and field inhomogeneity immunity of the images. The stationary-phase characteristic of the spatiotemporally-encoded (SPEN) method offers an inherent applicability to rFOV imaging. In this study, a flexible rFOV imaging method is presented and the superiority of the SPEN approach in rFOV imaging is demonstrated. The proposed method is validated with phantom and in vivo rat experiments, including cardiac imaging and contrast-enhanced perfusion imaging. For comparison, the echo planar imaging (EPI) experiments with orthogonal RF excitation are also performed. The results show that the signal-to-noise ratios of the images acquired by the proposed method can be higher than those obtained with the rFOV EPI. Moreover, the proposed method shows better performance in the cardiac imaging and perfusion imaging of rat kidney, and it can scan one or more regions of interest (ROIs) with high spatial resolution in a single shot. It might be a favorable solution to ultrafast imaging applications in cases with severe susceptibility heterogeneities, such as cardiac imaging and perfusion imaging. Furthermore, it might be promising in applications with separate ROIs, such as mammary and limb imaging. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474236, 81171331, and U1232212).

  3. Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance: a non-invasive technique for the study of muscle bioenergetics during exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Sapega, A.A.; Sokolow, D.P.; Graham, T.J.; Chance, B.

    1987-08-01

    Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance (/sup 31/P NMR) spectroscopy is a non-destructive analytical laboratory technique that, due to recent technical advances, has become applicable to the study of high-energy phosphate metabolism in both animal and human extremity muscles (in vivo). /sup 31/P NMR can assay cellular phosphocreatine, ATP, inorganic phosphate, the phosphorylated glycolytic intermediates, and intra-cellular pH in either resting or exercising muscle, in a non-invasive manner. NMR uses non-perturbing levels of radio-frequency energy as its biophysical probe and can therefore safely study intact muscle in a repeated fashion while exerting no artifactual influence on ongoing metabolic processes. Compared with standard tissue biopsy and biochemical assay techniques, NMR possesses the advantages of being non-invasive, allowing serial in situ studies of the same tissue sample, and providing measurements of only active (unbound) metabolites. NMR studies of exercising muscle have yielded information regarding fatigue mechanisms at the cellular level and are helping resolve long-standing questions regarding the metabolic control of glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, and post-exercise phosphocreatine re-synthesis. NMR is also being utilized to measure enzymatic reaction rates in vivo. In the near future, other forms of NMR spectroscopy may also permit the non-invasive measurement of tissue glycogen and lactate content. 75 references.

  4. Experimental Models of Brain Ischemia: A Review of Techniques, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Investigational Cell-Based Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Canazza, Alessandra; Minati, Ludovico; Boffano, Carlo; Parati, Eugenio; Binks, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Stroke continues to be a significant cause of death and disability worldwide. Although major advances have been made in the past decades in prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation, enormous challenges remain in the way of translating new therapeutic approaches from bench to bedside. Thrombolysis, while routinely used for ischemic stroke, is only a viable option within a narrow time window. Recently, progress in stem cell biology has opened up avenues to therapeutic strategies aimed at supporting and replacing neural cells in infarcted areas. Realistic experimental animal models are crucial to understand the mechanisms of neuronal survival following ischemic brain injury and to develop therapeutic interventions. Current studies on experimental stroke therapies evaluate the efficiency of neuroprotective agents and cell-based approaches using primarily rodent models of permanent or transient focal cerebral ischemia. In parallel, advancements in imaging techniques permit better mapping of the spatial-temporal evolution of the lesioned cortex and its functional responses. This review provides a condensed conceptual review of the state of the art of this field, from models and magnetic resonance imaging techniques through to stem cell therapies. PMID:24600434

  5. Sequencing of Plant Wall Heteroxylans Using Enzymic, Chemical (Methylation) and Physical (Mass Spectrometry, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) Techniques.

    PubMed

    Ratnayake, Sunil; Ford, Kristina; Bacic, Antony

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the specific techniques used for the characterization of reducing end (RE) and internal region glycosyl sequence(s) of heteroxylans. De-starched wheat endosperm cell walls were isolated as an alcohol-insoluble residue (AIR)(1) and sequentially extracted with water (W-sol Fr) and 1 M KOH containing 1% NaBH4 (KOH-sol Fr) as described by Ratnayake et al. (2014)(2). Two different approaches (see summary in Figure 1) are adopted. In the first, intact W-sol AXs are treated with 2AB to tag the original RE backbone chain sugar residue and then treated with an endoxylanase to generate a mixture of 2AB-labelled RE and internal region reducing oligosaccharides, respectively. In a second approach, the KOH-sol Fr is hydrolyzed with endoxylanase to first generate a mixture of oligosaccharides which are subsequently labelled with 2AB. The enzymically released ((un)tagged) oligosaccharides from both W- and KOH-sol Frs are then methylated and the detailed structural analysis of both the native and methylated oligosaccharides is performed using a combination of MALDI-TOF-MS, RP-HPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS and ESI-MS(n). Endoxylanase digested KOH-sol AXs are also characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) that also provides information on the anomeric configuration. These techniques can be applied to other classes of polysaccharides using the appropriate endo-hydrolases. PMID:27077895

  6. Quantitative determination of copper in a glass matrix using double pulse laser induced breakdown and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Ahmed A I; Morsy, Mohamed A

    2016-07-01

    A series of lithium-lead-borate glasses of a variable copper oxide loading were quantitatively analyzed in this work using two distinct spectroscopic techniques, namely double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). DP-LIBS results measured upon a combined nanosecond lasers irradiation running at 266nm and 1064nm pulses of a collinear configuration directed to the surface of borate glass samples with a known composition. This arrangement was employed to predict the electron's temperature (Te) and density (Ne) of the excited plasma from the recorded spectra. The intensity of elements' responses using this scheme is higher than that of single-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (SP-LIBS) setup under the same experimental conditions. On the other hand, the EPR data shows typical Cu (II) EPR-signals in the borate glass system that is networked at a distorted tetragonal Borate-arrangement. The signal intensity of the Cu (II) peak at g⊥=2.0596 has been used to quantify the Cu-content accurately in the glass matrix. Both techniques produced linear calibration curves of Cu-metals in glasses with excellent linear regression coefficient (R(2)) values. This study establishes a good correlation between DP-LIBS analysis of glass and the results obtained using EPR spectroscopy. The proposed protocols prove the great advantage of DP-LIBS system for the detection of a trace copper on the surface of glasses. PMID:27154655

  7. Improving the image and quantitative data of magnetic resonance imaging through hardware and physics techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaggie, Joshua D.

    In Chapter 1, an introduction to basic principles or MRI is given, including the physical principles, basic pulse sequences, and basic hardware. Following the introduction, five different published and yet unpublished papers for improving the utility of MRI are shown. Chapter 2 discusses a small rodent imaging system that was developed for a clinical 3 T MRI scanner. The system integrated specialized radiofrequency (RF) coils with an insertable gradient, enabling 100 microm isotropic resolution imaging of the guinea pig cochlea in vivo, doubling the body gradient strength, slew rate, and contrast-to-noise ratio, and resulting in twice the signal-to-noise (SNR) when compared to the smallest conforming birdcage. Chapter 3 discusses a system using BOLD MRI to measure T2* and invasive fiberoptic probes to measure renal oxygenation (pO2). The significance of this experiment is that it demonstrated previously unknown physiological effects on pO2, such as breath-holds that had an immediate (<1 sec) pO2 decrease (˜6 mmHg), and bladder pressure that had pO2 increases (˜6 mmHg). Chapter 4 determined the correlation between indicators of renal health and renal fat content. The R2 correlation between renal fat content and eGFR, serum cystatin C, urine protein, and BMI was less than 0.03, with a sample size of ˜100 subjects, suggesting that renal fat content will not be a useful indicator of renal health. Chapter 5 is a hardware and pulse sequence technique for acquiring multinuclear 1H and 23Na data within the same pulse sequence. Our system demonstrated a very simple, inexpensive solution to SMI and acquired both nuclei on two 23Na channels using external modifications, and is the first demonstration of radially acquired SMI. Chapter 6 discusses a composite sodium and proton breast array that demonstrated a 2-5x improvement in sodium SNR and similar proton SNR when compared to a large coil with a linear sodium and linear proton channel. This coil is unique in that sodium

  8. An automatic method for detection and classification of Ionospheric Alfvén Resonances using signal and image processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beggan, Ciaran

    2014-05-01

    Induction coils permit us to measure the very rapid changes of the magnetic field. In June 2012, the British Geological Survey Geomagnetism team installed two high frequency (100 Hz) induction coil magnetometers at the Eskdalemuir Observatory (55.3° N, 3.2° W, L~3), in the Scottish Borders of the United Kingdom. The Eskdalemuir Observatory is one of the longest running geophysical sites in the UK (beginning operation in 1908) and is located in a rural valley with a quiet magnetic environment. The coils record magnetic field changes over an effective frequency range of about 0.1-40Hz, and encompass phenomena such as the Schumann resonances, magnetospheric pulsations and Ionospheric Alfvén Resonances (IAR). In this study we focus on the IAR, which are related to the vibration of magnetic field lines passing through the ionosphere, believed to be mainly excited by lower atmospheric electrical discharges. The IAR typically manifest as a series of spectral resonances structures (SRS) within the 1-6Hz frequency range, usually appearing a fine bands or fringes in spectrogram plots. The SRS tend to occur daily between 18.00-06.00UT at the Eskdalemuir site, disappearing during the daylight hours. They usually start as a single low frequency before bifurcating into 5-10 separate fringes, increasing in frequency until around midnight. The fringes also widen in frequency before fading around 06.00UT. Occasionally, the fringes decrease in frequency slightly around 03.00UT before fading. In order to quantify the daily, seasonal and annual changes of the SRS, we developed a new method to identify the fringes and to quantify their occurrence in frequency (f) and the change in frequency (Δf). The method uses short time-series of 100 seconds to produce an FFT spectral plot from which the non-stationary peaks are identified using the residuals from a best-fit six order spline. This is repeated for an entire day of data. The peaks from each time-slice are placed into a matrix

  9. Compositional study of silicon oxynitride thin films deposited using electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, H.; Sah, R.E.

    2005-05-01

    We have used backscattering spectrometry and {sup 15}N({sup 1}H,{alpha},{gamma}){sup 12}C nuclear reaction analysis techniques to study in detail the variation in the composition of silicon oxynitride films with deposition parameters. The films were deposited using 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique from mixtures of precursors argon, nitrous oxide, and silane at deposition temperature 90 deg. C. The deposition pressure and nitrous oxide-to-silane gas flow rates ratio have been found to have a pronounced influence on the composition of the films. When the deposition pressure was varied for a given nitrous oxide-to-silane gas flow ratio, the amount of silicon and nitrogen increased with the deposition pressure, while the amount of oxygen decreased. For a given deposition pressure, the amount of incorporated nitrogen and hydrogen decreased while that of oxygen increased with increasing nitrous oxide-to-silane gas flow rates ratio. For nitrous oxide-to-silane gas flow ratio of 5, we obtained films which contained neither chemically bonded nor nonbonded nitrogen atoms as revealed by the results of infrared spectroscopy, backscattering spectrometry, and nuclear reaction analysis. Our results demonstrate the nitrogen-free nearly stoichiometric silicon dioxide films can be prepared from a mixture of precursors argon, nitrous oxide, and silane at low substrate temperature using high-density PECVD technique. This avoids the use of a hazardous and an often forbidden pair of silane and oxygen gases in a plasma reactor.

  10. High precision micro-impulse measurements for micro-thrusters based on torsional pendulum and sympathetic resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daixian; Wu, Jianjun; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Hua; He, Zhen

    2013-12-01

    A sympathetic resonance theory is analyzed and applied in a newly developed torsional pendulum to measure the micro-impulse produced by a μN s-class ablative pulsed plasma thruster. According to theoretical analysis on the dynamical behaviors of a torsional pendulum, the resonance amplification effect of micro-signals is presented. In addition, a new micro-impulse measurement method based on sympathetic resonance theory is proposed as an improvement of the original single pulse measurement method. In contrast with the single pulse measurement method, the advantages of sympathetic resonance method are significant. First, because of the magnification of vibration signals due to resonance processes, measurement precision for the sympathetic resonance method becomes higher especially in reducing reading error. With an increase in peak number, the relative errors induced by readout of voltage signals decrease to approximately ±1.9% for the sympathetic resonance mode, whereas the relative error in single pulse mode is estimated as ±13.4%. Besides, by using the resonance amplification effect the sympathetic resonance method makes it possible to measure an extremely low-impulse beyond the resolution of a thrust stand without redesigning or purchasing a new one. Moreover, because of the simple operational principle and structure the sympathetic resonance method is much more convenient and inexpensive to be implemented than other high-precision methods. Finally, the sympathetic resonance measurement method can also be applied in other thrust stands to improve further the ability to measure the low-impulse bits.

  11. High precision micro-impulse measurements for micro-thrusters based on torsional pendulum and sympathetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daixian; Wu, Jianjun; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Hua; He, Zhen

    2013-12-01

    A sympathetic resonance theory is analyzed and applied in a newly developed torsional pendulum to measure the micro-impulse produced by a μN s-class ablative pulsed plasma thruster. According to theoretical analysis on the dynamical behaviors of a torsional pendulum, the resonance amplification effect of micro-signals is presented. In addition, a new micro-impulse measurement method based on sympathetic resonance theory is proposed as an improvement of the original single pulse measurement method. In contrast with the single pulse measurement method, the advantages of sympathetic resonance method are significant. First, because of the magnification of vibration signals due to resonance processes, measurement precision for the sympathetic resonance method becomes higher especially in reducing reading error. With an increase in peak number, the relative errors induced by readout of voltage signals decrease to approximately ±1.9% for the sympathetic resonance mode, whereas the relative error in single pulse mode is estimated as ±13.4%. Besides, by using the resonance amplification effect the sympathetic resonance method makes it possible to measure an extremely low-impulse beyond the resolution of a thrust stand without redesigning or purchasing a new one. Moreover, because of the simple operational principle and structure the sympathetic resonance method is much more convenient and inexpensive to be implemented than other high-precision methods. Finally, the sympathetic resonance measurement method can also be applied in other thrust stands to improve further the ability to measure the low-impulse bits. PMID:24387474

  12. Ferromagnetic critical behavior in U(Co1-xFex)Al (0 ≤x ≤0.02 ) studied by 59Co nuclear quadrupole resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karube, K.; Hattori, T.; Ishida, K.; Kimura, N.

    2015-02-01

    In order to investigate physical properties around a ferromagnetic (FM) quantum transition point and a tricritical point (TCP) in the itinerant-electron metamagnetic compound UCoAl, we have performed the 59Co nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurement for the Fe-substituted U(Co1-xFex)Al(x =0 ,0.5 ,1 ,and2 %) in zero external magnetic field. The Fe concentration dependence of 59Co -NQR spectra at low temperatures indicates that the first-order FM transition occurs at least above x =1 % . The magnetic fluctuations along the c axis detected by the nuclear spin-spin relaxation rate 1 /T2 exhibit an anomaly at Tmax˜20 K and enhance with increasing x . These results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions and indicate the presence of prominent critical fluctuations at the TCP in this system.

  13. Resonance line transfer calculations by doubling thin layers. I - Comparison with other techniques. II - The use of the R-parallel redistribution function. [planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yelle, Roger V.; Wallace, Lloyd

    1989-01-01

    A versatile and efficient technique for the solution of the resonance line scattering problem with frequency redistribution in planetary atmospheres is introduced. Similar to the doubling approach commonly used in monochromatic scattering problems, the technique has been extended to include the frequency dependence of the radiation field. Methods for solving problems with external or internal sources and coupled spectral lines are presented, along with comparison of some sample calculations with results from Monte Carlo and Feautrier techniques. The doubling technique has also been applied to the solution of resonance line scattering problems where the R-parallel redistribution function is appropriate, both neglecting and including polarization as developed by Yelle and Wallace (1989). With the constraint that the atmosphere is illuminated from the zenith, the only difficulty of consequence is that of performing precise frequency integrations over the line profiles. With that problem solved, it is no longer necessary to use the Monte Carlo method to solve this class of problem.

  14. An ICR study of ion-molecule reactions of PH(n)+ ions. [of importance to interstellar chemistry, using ion cyclotron resonance techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, L. R.; Anicich, V. G.; Huntress, W. T.

    1983-01-01

    The reactions of PH(n)+ ions (n = 0-3) were examined with a number of neutrals using ion-cyclotron-resonance techniques. The reactions examined have significance for the distribution of phosphorus in interstellar molecules. The results indicate that interstellar molecules containing the P-O bond are likely to be more abundant than those containing the P-H bond.

  15. A comparative study of magnetic resonance venography techniques for the evaluation of the internal jugular veins in multiple sclerosis patients☆

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M. Tamizur; Sethi, Sean K.; Utriainen, David T.; Hewett, J. Joseph; Haacke, E. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess the vascular nature of diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) is a growing field of research. This work reports on the application of MR angiographic (MRA) and venographic (MRV) techniques in assessing the extracranial vasculature in MS patients. Materials and Methods A standardized MRI protocol containing 2D TOF-MRV and dynamic 3D contrast-enhanced (CE) MRAV was run for 170 MS patients and 40 healthy controls (HC). The cross-sectional area (CSA) of the internal jugular veins (IJVs) was measured at three neck levels in all subjects for both MRV techniques to determine the presence of venous stenoses. All data were analyzed retrospectively. Results For the values where both methods showed signal, the 3D method showed larger CSA measurement values compared to 2D methods in both IJVs, in both MS and HC subjects which was confirmed with student paired t-tests. Of the 170 MS patients, 93 (55%) in CE-MRAV and 103 (61%) in TOF-MRV showed stenosis in at least one IJV. The corresponding numbers for the 40 HC subjects were 2 (5%) and 4 (10%), respectively. Carotid ectasias with IJV stenosis were seen in 26 cases (15%) with 3D CE-MRAV and were not observable with 2D TOF-MRV. Carotid ectasias were not seen in the HC group. In the 2D TOF-MRV data, banding of the IJVs related to slow flow was seen in 58 (34%) MS cases and in no HC cases. MS patients showed lower average CSAs than the HC subjects. Conclusion The 3D CE MRAV depicted the vascular anatomy more completely than the 2D TOF-MRV. However, the 3D CE MRAV does not provide any information about the flow characteristics which are indirectly available in the 2D TOF-MRV in those cases where there is slow flow. PMID:23850076

  16. Pulsed Fourier-transform NQR of 14N with a dc SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hürlimann, M. D.; Pennington, C. H.; Fan, N. Q.; Clarke, John; Pines, A.; Hahn, E. L.

    1992-07-01

    The zero-field free induction decay of solid ammonium perchlorate at 1.5 K has been directly detected with a dc superconducting quantum interference device. The Fourier-transform spectrum consists of three sharp lines at 17.4, 38.8, and 56.2 kHz arising from pure 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions. The absence of splittings and resonance transitions from dipolar-coupled proton spins is attributed to reorientation of the ammonium groups by quantum tunneling in combination with motional averaging in the three proton levels characterized by the irreducible representation T. The measured 14N spin-spin relaxation time is 22+/-2 ms and the spin-lattice relaxation time is 63+/-6 ms.

  17. In vivo evaluation of different alterations of redox status by studying pharmacokinetics of nitroxides using magnetic resonance techniques

    PubMed Central

    Bačić, Goran; Pavićević, Aleksandra; Peyrot, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Free radicals, particularly reactive oxygen species (ROS), are involved in various pathologies, injuries related to radiation, ischemia-reperfusion or ageing. Unfortunately, it is virtually impossible to directly detect free radicals in vivo, but the redox status of the whole organism or particular organ can be studied in vivo by using magnetic resonance techniques (EPR and MRI) and paramagnetic stable free radicals – nitroxides. Here we review results obtained in vivo following the pharmacokinetics of nitroxides on experimental animals (and a few in humans) under various conditions. The focus was on conditions where the redox status has been altered by induced diseases or harmful agents, clearly demonstrating that various EPR/MRI/nitroxide combinations can reliably detect metabolically induced changes in the redox status of organs. These findings can improve our understanding of oxidative stress and provide a basis for studying the effectiveness of interventions aimed to modulate oxidative stress. Also, we anticipate that the in vivo EPR/MRI approach in studying the redox status can play a vital role in the clinical management of various pathologies in the years to come providing the development of adequate equipment and probes. PMID:26827126

  18. Methodological considerations of electron spin resonance spin trapping techniques for measuring reactive oxygen species generated from metal oxide nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Min Sook; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Park, Soo Jin; Lee, Ah Young; Song, Mi Ryoung; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Jun Sung

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated on the surfaces of nanomaterials are important for understanding their toxicity and toxic mechanisms, which are in turn beneficial for manufacturing more biocompatible nanomaterials in many industrial fields. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a useful tool for detecting ROS formation. However, using this technique without first considering the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and proper conditions of the spin trapping agent (such as incubation time) may lead to misinterpretation of the resulting data. In this report, we suggest methodological considerations for ESR as pertains to magnetism, sample preparation and proper incubation time with spin trapping agents. Based on our results, each spin trapping agent should be given the proper incubation time. For nanomaterials having magnetic properties, it is useful to remove these nanomaterials via centrifugation after reacting with spin trapping agents. Sonication for the purpose of sample dispersion and sample light exposure should be controlled during ESR in order to enhance the obtained ROS signal. This report will allow researchers to better design ESR spin trapping applications involving nanomaterials. PMID:27194379

  19. Methodological considerations of electron spin resonance spin trapping techniques for measuring reactive oxygen species generated from metal oxide nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Min Sook; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Park, Soo Jin; Lee, Ah Young; Song, Mi Ryoung; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Jun Sung

    2016-05-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated on the surfaces of nanomaterials are important for understanding their toxicity and toxic mechanisms, which are in turn beneficial for manufacturing more biocompatible nanomaterials in many industrial fields. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a useful tool for detecting ROS formation. However, using this technique without first considering the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and proper conditions of the spin trapping agent (such as incubation time) may lead to misinterpretation of the resulting data. In this report, we suggest methodological considerations for ESR as pertains to magnetism, sample preparation and proper incubation time with spin trapping agents. Based on our results, each spin trapping agent should be given the proper incubation time. For nanomaterials having magnetic properties, it is useful to remove these nanomaterials via centrifugation after reacting with spin trapping agents. Sonication for the purpose of sample dispersion and sample light exposure should be controlled during ESR in order to enhance the obtained ROS signal. This report will allow researchers to better design ESR spin trapping applications involving nanomaterials.

  20. Methodological considerations of electron spin resonance spin trapping techniques for measuring reactive oxygen species generated from metal oxide nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Min Sook; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Park, Soo Jin; Lee, Ah Young; Song, Mi Ryoung; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Jun Sung

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated on the surfaces of nanomaterials are important for understanding their toxicity and toxic mechanisms, which are in turn beneficial for manufacturing more biocompatible nanomaterials in many industrial fields. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a useful tool for detecting ROS formation. However, using this technique without first considering the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and proper conditions of the spin trapping agent (such as incubation time) may lead to misinterpretation of the resulting data. In this report, we suggest methodological considerations for ESR as pertains to magnetism, sample preparation and proper incubation time with spin trapping agents. Based on our results, each spin trapping agent should be given the proper incubation time. For nanomaterials having magnetic properties, it is useful to remove these nanomaterials via centrifugation after reacting with spin trapping agents. Sonication for the purpose of sample dispersion and sample light exposure should be controlled during ESR in order to enhance the obtained ROS signal. This report will allow researchers to better design ESR spin trapping applications involving nanomaterials. PMID:27194379

  1. Established and emerging cardiovascular magnetic resonance techniques for the assessment of stable coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ripley, David P.; Motwani, Manish; Plein, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. International guidelines recommend cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) as an investigative option in those presenting with chest pain to inform diagnosis, risk stratify and determine the need for revascularization. CMR offers a unique method to assess global and regional cardiac function, myocardial perfusion, myocardial viability, tissue characterisation and proximal coronary anatomy all within a single study. This results in high diagnostic accuracy for the detection of significant coronary stenoses and an established role in the management of both stable CHD and acute coronary syndromes (ACS). The growing evidence base for the prognostic value of CMR, emerging advances in acquisition techniques, improvements in hardware and the completion of current major multi-centre clinical CMR trials will further raise its prominence in international guidelines and routine cardiological practice. This article will focus on the rapidly evolving role of the multi-parametric CMR examination in the assessment of patients with stable and unstable CHD. PMID:25392820

  2. In vivo evaluation of different alterations of redox status by studying pharmacokinetics of nitroxides using magnetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Bačić, Goran; Pavićević, Aleksandra; Peyrot, Fabienne

    2016-08-01

    Free radicals, particularly reactive oxygen species (ROS), are involved in various pathologies, injuries related to radiation, ischemia-reperfusion or ageing. Unfortunately, it is virtually impossible to directly detect free radicals in vivo, but the redox status of the whole organism or particular organ can be studied in vivo by using magnetic resonance techniques (EPR and MRI) and paramagnetic stable free radicals - nitroxides. Here we review results obtained in vivo following the pharmacokinetics of nitroxides on experimental animals (and a few in humans) under various conditions. The focus was on conditions where the redox status has been altered by induced diseases or harmful agents, clearly demonstrating that various EPR/MRI/nitroxide combinations can reliably detect metabolically induced changes in the redox status of organs. These findings can improve our understanding of oxidative stress and provide a basis for studying the effectiveness of interventions aimed to modulate oxidative stress. Also, we anticipate that the in vivo EPR/MRI approach in studying the redox status can play a vital role in the clinical management of various pathologies in the years to come providing the development of adequate equipment and probes. PMID:26827126

  3. Application of AI techniques to a voice-actuated computer system for reconstructing and displaying magnetic resonance imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherley, Patrick L.; Pujol, Alfonso, Jr.; Meadow, John S.

    1990-07-01

    To provide a means of rendering complex computer architectures languages and input/output modalities transparent to experienced and inexperienced users research is being conducted to develop a voice driven/voice response computer graphics imaging system. The system will be used for reconstructing and displaying computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scan data. In conjunction with this study an artificial intelligence (Al) control strategy was developed to interface the voice components and support software to the computer graphics functions implemented on the Sun Microsystems 4/280 color graphics workstation. Based on generated text and converted renditions of verbal utterances by the user the Al control strategy determines the user''s intent and develops and validates a plan. The program type and parameters within the plan are used as input to the graphics system for reconstructing and displaying medical image data corresponding to that perceived intent. If the plan is not valid the control strategy queries the user for additional information. The control strategy operates in a conversation mode and vocally provides system status reports. A detailed examination of the various AT techniques is presented with major emphasis being placed on their specific roles within the total control strategy structure. 1.

  4. An Improved Formula of Fundamental Resonance Frequency of a Layered Half-Space Model Used in H/V Ratio Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuan, Tran Thanh; Vinh, Pham Chi; Ohrnberger, Matthias; Malischewsky, Peter; Aoudia, Abdelkrim

    2016-08-01

    The resonance frequency of the transmission response in layered half-space model is important in the study of site effect because it is the frequency where the shake-ability of the ground is enhanced significantly. In practice, it is often determined by the H/V ratio technique in which the peak frequency of recorded H/V spectral ratio is interpreted as the resonance frequency. Despite of its importance, there has not been any formula of the resonance frequency of the layered half-space structure. In this paper, a simple approximate formula of the fundamental resonance frequency is presented after an exact formula in explicit form of the response function of vertically SH incident wave is obtained. The formula is in similar form with the one used in H/V ratio technique but it reflects several major effects of the model to the resonance frequency such as the arrangement of layers, the impedance contrast between layers and the half-space. Therefore, it could be considered as an improved formula used in H/V ratio technique. The formula also reflects the consistency between two approaches of the H/V ratio technique based on SH body waves or Rayleigh surface waves on the peak frequency under high impedance contrast condition. This formula is in explicit form and, therefore, may be used in the direct and inverse problem efficiently. A numerical illustration of the improved formula for an actual layered half-space model already investigated by H/V ratio technique is presented to demonstrate its new features and its improvement to the currently used formula.

  5. An Improved Formula of Fundamental Resonance Frequency of a Layered Half-Space Model Used in H/V Ratio Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuan, Tran Thanh; Vinh, Pham Chi; Ohrnberger, Matthias; Malischewsky, Peter; Aoudia, Abdelkrim

    2016-05-01

    The resonance frequency of the transmission response in layered half-space model is important in the study of site effect because it is the frequency where the shake-ability of the ground is enhanced significantly. In practice, it is often determined by the H/V ratio technique in which the peak frequency of recorded H/V spectral ratio is interpreted as the resonance frequency. Despite of its importance, there has not been any formula of the resonance frequency of the layered half-space structure. In this paper, a simple approximate formula of the fundamental resonance frequency is presented after an exact formula in explicit form of the response function of vertically SH incident wave is obtained. The formula is in similar form with the one used in H/V ratio technique but it reflects several major effects of the model to the resonance frequency such as the arrangement of layers, the impedance contrast between layers and the half-space. Therefore, it could be considered as an improved formula used in H/V ratio technique. The formula also reflects the consistency between two approaches of the H/V ratio technique based on SH body waves or Rayleigh surface waves on the peak frequency under high impedance contrast condition. This formula is in explicit form and, therefore, may be used in the direct and inverse problem efficiently. A numerical illustration of the improved formula for an actual layered half-space model already investigated by H/V ratio technique is presented to demonstrate its new features and its improvement to the currently used formula.

  6. Investigation of Very Slowly Tumbling Spin Labels by Nonlinear Spin Response Techniques: Theory and Experiment for Stationary Electron Electron Double Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Smigel, Murray D.; Dalton, Larry R.; Hyde, James S.; Dalton, Lauraine A.

    1974-01-01

    The investigation of very slowly tumbling spin labels by nonlinear electron spin response techniques is discussed. Such techniques permit characterization of rotational processes with correlation times from 10-3 to 10-7 sec even though the linear spin response (ESR) technique is insensitive to motion in this region. Nonlinear techniques fall into two categories: (a) Techniques (referred to as passage techniques) in which the distribution of saturation throughout the spin system is determined both by the applied magnetic field modulation of the resonance condition and by the modulation of the resonance frequency induced by the molecular motion. The time dependence of this distribution produces phase and amplitude changes in the observed signals. (b) Techniques that measure the integral of the distribution function of the time required for saturated spin packets to move between pumped and observed portions of the spectrum [stationary and pulsed electron electron double resonance (ELDOR) techniques]. Quantitative analysis of passage ESR and stationary ELDOR techniques can be accomplished employing a density matrix treatment that explicitly includes the interaction of the spins with applied radiation and modulation fields. The effect of molecular motion inducing a random modulation of the anisotropic spin interactions can be calculated by describing the motion by the diffusion equation appropriate to the motional model assumed. For infinitesimal steps the eigen-functions of the diffusion operator are known analytically, while for random motion of arbitrary step size they are determined by diagonalizing the transition matrix appropriate for the step model used. The present communication reports investigation of the rotational diffusion of the spin label probes 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidinol-1-oxyl and 17β-hydroxy-4′,4′-dimethylspiro-[5α-androstane-3,2′-oxazolidin]-3′-oxyl in sec-butylbenzene. Experimental spectra are compared with computer simulations of

  7. 93Nb Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance in Orthorhombic Phase of Niobium Pentabromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Noriaki; Abe, Yoshihito

    1982-05-01

    The 93Nb NQR has been investigated in one phase of NbBr5 which was identified to be orthorhombic by the X-ray analysis. The resonance frequencies have been measured between 4.2 K and 423 K, its melting point. The coupling constant showed a positive temperature dependence up to melting point. The temperature dependence of the coupling constant is compared between NbBr5 and NbCl5 from the view point of π-bond character.

  8. Resonant behavior of dielectric objects (electrostatic resonances).

    PubMed

    Fredkin, D R; Mayergoyz, I D

    2003-12-19

    Resonant behavior of dielectric objects occurs at certain frequencies for which the object permittivity is negative and the free-space wavelength is large in comparison with the object dimensions. Unique physical features of these resonances are studied and a novel technique for the calculation of resonance values of permittivity, and hence resonance frequencies, is proposed. Scale invariance of resonance frequencies, unusually strong orthogonality properties of resonance modes, and a two-dimensional phenomenon of "twin" spectra are reported. The paper concludes with brief discussions of optical controllability of these resonances in semiconductor nanoparticles and a plausible, electrostatic resonance based, mechanism for nucleation and formation of ball lightning. PMID:14754117

  9. NMR and NQR study of Si-doped (6,0) zigzag single-walled aluminum nitride nanotube as n or P-semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Baei, Mohammad T; Peyghan, Ali Ahmadi; Tavakoli, Khadijeh; Babaheydari, Ali Kazemi; Moghimi, Masoumeh

    2012-09-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to investigate the electronic structure properties of pristine and Si-doped aluminum nitride nanotubes as n or P-semiconductors at the B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory in order to evaluate the influence of Si-doped in the (6,0) zigzag AlNNTs. We extended the DFT calculation to predict the electronic structure properties of Si-doped aluminum nitride nanotubes, which are very important for production of solid-state devices and other applications. To this aim, pristine and Si-doped AlNNT structures in two models (Si(N) and Si(Al)) were optimized, and then the electronic properties, the isotropic (CS(I)) and anisotropic (CS(A)) chemical shielding parameters for the sites of various (27)Al and (14)N atoms, NQR parameters for the sites of various of (27)Al and (14)N atoms, and quantum molecular descriptors were calculated in the optimized structures. The optimized structures, the electronic properties, NMR and NQR parameters, and quantum molecular descriptors for the Si(N) and Si(Al) models show that the Si(N) model is a more reactive material than the pristine or Si(Al) model. PMID:22588584

  10. Quantitative linear and nonlinear resonance inspection techniques and analysis for material characterization: application to concrete thermal damage.

    PubMed

    Payan, C; Ulrich, T J; Le Bas, P Y; Saleh, T; Guimaraes, M

    2014-08-01

    Developed in the late 1980s, Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (NRUS) has been widely employed in the field of material characterization. Most of the studies assume the measured amplitude to be proportional to the strain amplitude which drives nonlinear phenomena. In 1D resonant bar experiments, the configuration for which NRUS was initially developed, this assumption holds. However, it is not true for samples of general shape which exhibit several resonance mode shapes. This paper proposes a methodology based on linear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy, numerical simulations and nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy to provide quantitative values of nonlinear elastic moduli taking into account the 3D nature of the samples. In the context of license renewal in the field of nuclear energy, this study aims at providing some quantitative information related to the degree of micro-cracking of concrete and cement based materials in the presence of thermal damage. The resonance based method is validated as regard with concrete microstructure evolution during thermal exposure. PMID:25096088

  11. Invited Article: Dielectric material characterization techniques and designs of high-Q resonators for applications from micro to millimeter-waves frequencies applicable at room and cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Floch, Jean-Michel; Fan, Y.; Humbert, Georges; Shan, Qingxiao; Férachou, Denis; Bara-Maillet, Romain; Aubourg, Michel; Hartnett, John G.; Madrangeas, Valerie; Cros, Dominique; Blondy, Jean-Marc; Krupka, Jerzy; Tobar, Michael E.

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric resonators are key elements in many applications in micro to millimeter wave circuits, including ultra-narrow band filters and frequency-determining components for precision frequency synthesis. Distributed-layered and bulk low-loss crystalline and polycrystalline dielectric structures have become very important for building these devices. Proper design requires careful electromagnetic characterization of low-loss material properties. This includes exact simulation with precision numerical software and precise measurements of resonant modes. For example, we have developed the Whispering Gallery mode technique for microwave applications, which has now become the standard for characterizing low-loss structures. This paper will give some of the most common characterization techniques used in the micro to millimeter wave regime at room and cryogenic temperatures for designing high-Q dielectric loaded cavities.

  12. Correction of breathing-induced errors in magnetic resonance thermometry of hyperthermia using multiecho field fitting techniques

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Cory R.; Soher, Brian J.; MacFall, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Breathing motion can create large errors when performing magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry of the breast. Breath holds can be used to minimize these errors, but not eliminate them. Between breath holds, the referenceless method can be used to further reduce errors by relying on regions of nonheated fatty tissue surrounding the heated region. When the surrounding tissue is heated (i.e., for a hyperthermia treatment), errors can result due to phase changes of the small amounts of water in the tissue. Therefore, an extension of the referenceless method is proposed which fits for the field in fatty tissue independent of temperature change and extrapolates it to the water-rich regions. Methods: Nonheating experiments were performed with male volunteers performing breath holds on top of a phantom mimicking a breast with a tumor. Heating experiments were also conducted with the same phantom while mechanically simulated breath holds were performed. A nonheating experiment was also performed with a healthy female breast. For each experiment, a nonlinear fitting algorithm was used to fit for temperature change and B0 field inside of the fatty tissue. The field changes were then extrapolated into water-rich (tumor) portions of the image using a least-squares fit to a fifth-order equation, to correct for field changes due to breath hold changes. Similar results were calculated using the image phase, to mimic the use of the referenceless method. Results: Phantom results showed large reduction of mean error and standard deviation. In the non-heating experiments, the traditional referenceless method and our extended method both corrected by similar amounts. However, in the heating experiments, the average deviation of the temperature calculated with the extended method from a fiber optic probe temperature was approximately 50% less than the deviation with the referenceless method. The in vivo breast results demonstrated reduced standard deviation and mean. Conclusions

  13. Preclinical assessment of a new magnetic resonance-based technique for determining bone quality by characterization of trabecular microarchitecture.

    PubMed

    Evans, B A J; James, T W; James, K; Cox, A; Farr, L; Paisey, S J; Dempster, D W; Stone, M D; Griffiths, P A; Hugtenburg, R P; Brady, Sir M; Wells, T

    2014-12-01

    The utility of HR-CT to study longitudinal changes in bone microarchitecture is limited by subject radiation exposure. Although MR is not subject to this limitation, it is limited both by patient movement that occurs during prolonged scanning at distal sites, and by the signal-to-noise ratio that is achievable for high-resolution images in a reasonable scan time at proximal sites. Recently, a novel MR-based technique, fine structure analysis (FSA) (Chase et al. Localised one-dimensional magnetic resonance spatial frequency spectroscopy. PCT/US2012/068284 2012, James and Chase Magnetic field gradient structure characteristic assessment using one-dimensional (1D) spatial frequency distribution analysis. 7932720 B2, 2011) has been developed which provides both high-resolution and fast scan times, but which generates at a designated set of spatial positions (voxels) a one-dimensional signal of spatial frequencies. Appendix 1 provides a brief introduction to FSA. This article describes an initial exploration of FSA for the rapid, non-invasive characterization of trabecular microarchitecture in a preclinical setting. For L4 vertebrae of sham and ovariectomized (OVX) rats, we compared FSA-generated metrics with those from CT datasets and from CT-derived histomorphometry parameters, trabecular number (Tb.N), bone volume density (BV/TV), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) and trabecular separation (Tb.Sp). OVX caused a reduction of the higher frequency structures that correspond to a denser trabecular lattice, while increasing the preponderance of lower frequency structures, which correspond to a more open lattice. As one example measure, the centroid of the FSA spectrum (which we refer to as fSAcB) showed strong correlation in the same region with CT-derived histomorphometry values: Tb.Sp: r -0.63, p < 0.001; Tb.N: r 0.71, p < 0.001; BV/TV: r 0.64, p < 0.001, Tb.Th: r 0.44, p < 0.05. Furthermore, we found a 17.5% reduction in fSAcB in OVX rats (p < 0.0001). In a longitudinal

  14. Interstitial laser phototherapy assisted by magnetic resonance imaging: A new technique for monitoring laser-tissue interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, D.J.; Saxton, R.E.; Layfield, L.J.; Fetterman, H.R.; Castro, D.J.; Tartell, P.B.; Robinson, J.D.; To, S.Y.; Nishimura, E.; Lufkin, R.B. )

    1990-05-01

    The rapid technological advances of magnetic resonance imaging, laser fiberoptics, and compatible probes may allow treatment of deep and sometimes surgically unreachable tumors of the head and neck with minimal morbidity through interstitial laser phototherapy. In this study, a new application of magnetic resonance imaging was developed to monitor and quantify laser-induced tissue damages. Pig skin was exposed to increased levels of argon laser (514.5 nm) at energy densities between 62.5 and 375 J/cm2 as determined by an accurate and reproducible method of dosimetry. Thermal profiles were recorded using an infrared sensor and T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance images were taken; afterward, biopsies were performed to quantitate the level of tissue damage. Our results demonstrate that above a certain threshold of laser energy, the magnetic resonance imaging findings are temperature dependent. Appropriate development of a scale matching laser energies, temperature profiles, T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance images, and histological quantitation of tissue destruction will allow us to optimize the three-dimensional control and monitoring of laser-tissue interactions.

  15. NQR-NMR studies of higher alcohol synthesis Cu-Co catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-17

    Our previous studies (1,2) on the zerofield NMR spectra of Cu/Co catalysts revealed that the method of preparation sensitively influences the magnetic character of the Catalyst. Catalytic studies of the earlier investigators also (3) show similar influence on the product selectivity and indicate reproducible performance is critically dependent on the control and rigor of the preparation technique. To compliment the NMR results, we have made a thorough investigation of the Hysteresis character of the Cu/Co catalysts with the metal ratio varying from 0.2 to 4.0.

  16. Measurement of the 183 keV Resonance in 17O(p,alpha)14N using a Novel Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Moazen, Brian H; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeff C; Chae, Kyung Yuk; Chipps, Kelly A; Domizioli, Carlo P; Fitzgerald, Ryan; Greife, Uwe; Hix, William Raphael; Grzywacz-Jones, Kate L; KOZUB, RAYMOND L; Lingerfelt, Eric J; Livesay, Jake; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Pain, Steven D; Roberts, Luke F; Shriner, Jr., John F; Smith, Michael Scott; Thomas, Jeffrey S

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a novel technique for measurements of low energy (p,alpha) reactions using heavy ion beams and a differentially-pumped windowless gas target. We applied this new approach to study the 183 keV resonance in the 17O(p,alpha)14}N reaction. We report a resonance energy (center-of-mass) of 183.5{+0.1}{-0.4} keV, a resonance strength of 1.70 +/- 0.15 meV, and set an upper limit (95\\% confidence) on the total width of the state of < 0.1 keV. This resonance is important for the 17O(p,alpha)14}N reaction rate, and we find that 18F production is significantly decreased in low mass ONeMg novae but less affected in more energetic novae. We also report the first determination of the stopping power for oxygen ions in hydrogen gas near the peak of the Bragg curve (E=193 keV/u) to be (63+/-1)e-15 eV-cm2.

  17. Improved L-C resonant decay technique for Q measurement of quasilinear power inductors: New results for MPP and ferrite powdered cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.; Gerber, Scott S.

    1995-01-01

    The L-C resonant decay technique for measuring circuit Q or losses is improved by eliminating the switch from the inductor-capacitor loop. A MOSFET switch is used instead to momentarily connect the resonant circuit to an existing voltage source, which itself is gated off during the decay transient. Very reproducible, low duty cycle data could be taken this way over a dynamic voltage range of at least 10:1. Circuit Q is computed from a polynomial fit to the sequence of the decaying voltage maxima. This method was applied to measure the losses at 60 kHz in inductors having loose powder cores of moly permalloy and an Mn-Zn power ferrite. After the copper and capacitor losses are separated out, the resulting specific core loss is shown to be roughly as expected for the MPP powder, but anomalously high for the ferrite powder. Possible causes are mentioned.

  18. High-resolution wave number spectrum using multi-point measurements in space - the Multi-point Signal Resonator (MSR) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Y.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Motschmann, U.

    2011-02-01

    A new analysis method is presented that provides a high-resolution power spectrum in a broad wave number domain based on multi-point measurements. The analysis technique is referred to as the Multi-point Signal Resonator (MSR) and it benefits from Capon's minimum variance method for obtaining the proper power spectral density of the signal as well as the MUSIC algorithm (Multiple Signal Classification) for considerably reducing the noise part in the spectrum. The mathematical foundation of the analysis method is presented and it is applied to synthetic data as well as Cluster observations of the interplanetary magnetic field. Using the MSR technique for Cluster data we find a wave in the solar wind propagating parallel to the mean magnetic field with relatively small amplitude, which is not identified by the Capon spectrum. The Cluster data analysis shows the potential of the MSR technique for studying waves and turbulence using multi-point measurements.

  19. Study of hydrogen in coals, polymers, oxides, and muscle water by nuclear magnetic resonance; extension of solid-state high-resolution techniques. [Hydrogen molybdenum bronze

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, L.M.

    1981-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been an important analytical and physical research tool for several decades. One area of NMR which has undergone considerable development in recent years is high resolution NMR of solids. In particular, high resolution solid state /sup 13/C NMR spectra exhibiting features similar to those observed in liquids are currently achievable using sophisticated pulse techniques. The work described in this thesis develops analogous methods for high resolution /sup 1/H NMR of rigid solids. Applications include characterization of hydrogen aromaticities in fossil fuels, and studies of hydrogen in oxides and bound water in muscle.

  20. Evaluation of [sup 31]P magnetic resonance spectroscopy localization techniques in human myocardium and soft-tissue sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chun-Wei.

    1993-01-01

    The overall goals of this thesis are to establish and evaluate [sup 31]P MR spectroscopy localization techniques for their application to the study of human myocardium and sarcomas. Several localization techniques which include 1D-CSI, ISIS, ISIS/CSI, and 2D-CSI were evaluated in the myocardial muscle of normal subjects and patients receiving 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy. Among these localization techniques, 2D-CSI is recommended since it shows good selectivity, good flexibility and a good compromise between sensitivity patient toleration limits. These localization techniques were also evaluated in patients with osteosarcoma and soft-tissue sarcomas. Among these localization techniques, 1D-CSI is recommended for big and superficial tumors. Further definition of the voxel is provided by using 2D-CSI or 3D-CSI in the case of small or deep seated tumors. Several techniques that should improve the [sup 31]P MR spectroscopic study of patients in the future are evaluated on the phantom. These include the presaturation of the chest wall muscle for improved myocardial spectral using the CSI sequence, implementation of the BIR-4 pulse for variable angle adjustable pulse, and the proton decoupling technique for improved resolution and sensitivity. The good performance of the phantoms studies show that these techniques can be further extended to the normal subject and patient studies.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with dc SQUID amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Heaney, M.B. . Dept. of Physics Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 {times} 10{sup 17} in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO{sub 3} crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of quadrupolar nuclei and dipolar field effects

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Jeffry Todd

    2004-12-21

    Experimental and theoretical research conducted in two areas in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented: (1) studies of the coherent quantum-mechanical control of the angular momentum dynamics of quadrupolar (spin I > 1/2) nuclei and its application to the determination of molecular structure; and (2) applications of the long-range nuclear dipolar field to novel NMR detection methodologies.The dissertation is organized into six chapters. The first two chapters and associated appendices are intended to be pedagogical and include an introduction to the quantum mechanical theory of pulsed NMR spectroscopy and the time dependent theory of quantum mechanics. The third chapter describes investigations of the solid-state multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) NMR experiment applied to I = 5/2 quadrupolar nuclei. This work reports the use of rotary resonance-matched radiofrequency irradiation for sensitivity enhancement of the I = 5/2 MQMAS experiment. These experiments exhibited certain selective line narrowing effects which were investigated theoretically.The fourth chapter extends the discussion of multiple quantum spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to a mostly theoretical study of the feasibility of enhancing the resolution of nitrogen-14 NMR of large biomolecules in solution via double-quantum spectroscopy. The fifth chapter continues to extend the principles of multiple quantum NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to make analogies between experiments in NMR/nuclear quadrupolar resonance (NQR) and experiments in atomic/molecular optics (AMO). These analogies are made through the Hamiltonian and density operator formalism of angular momentum dynamics in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.The sixth chapter investigates the use of the macroscopic nuclear dipolar field to encode the NMR spectrum of an analyte nucleus indirectly in the magnetization of a sensor nucleus. This technique could potentially serve as an

  3. Identification of Field Line Resonances in the Magnetosphere Using the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (superdarn): New ``CROSS-POWER and Cross-Phase Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzino, L.; Fenrich, F. R.

    2010-12-01

    Field Line Resonances (FLRs) are Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) standing waves that appear in discrete frequencies and occur in Earth’s Magnetic Field as a result of wave coupling of MHD compressional and Shear Alfvén waves. The main purpose of the new ‘cross-power and cross-phase’ technique, presented in this analysis, is to systematically identify FLR occurrence using data from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN), a radar network that detects coherent echoes from plasma irregularities that are aligned with the field lines. SuperDARN data has been successfully used for more than 17 years to identify FLRs, due to its large coverage over the polar cap and auroral region. Specifications of the instrument as well as the algorithm used by this new technique will be explained in detail. As an example we will apply the technique to a known 1.9 mHz FLR that occurred on November 20th 2003 at 22:30-23:00 UT detected by the Prince George station. Discussion of the application of this technique to automatically detect other events, and the future statistical analysis of all events identified will be presented.

  4. Video-rate resonant scanning multiphoton microscopy: An emerging technique for intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D; Chung, Euiheon; Cook, Daniel C; Han, Xiaoxing; Gruionu, Gabriel; Liao, Shan; Munn, Lance L; Padera, Timothy P; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K

    2012-01-01

    The abnormal tumor microenvironment fuels tumor progression, metastasis, immune suppression, and treatment resistance. Over last several decades, developments in and applications of intravital microscopy have provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, intravital multiphoton microscopy has revealed the abnormal structure and function of tumor-associated blood and lymphatic vessels, the role of aberrant tumor matrix in drug delivery, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells, the dynamics of immune cell trafficking to and within tumors, and gene expression in tumors. However, traditional multiphoton microscopy suffers from inherently slow imaging rates-only a few frames per second, thus unable to capture more rapid events such as blood flow, lymphatic flow, and cell movement within vessels. Here, we report the development and implementation of a video-rate multiphoton microscope (VR-MPLSM) based on resonant galvanometer mirror scanning that is capable of recording at 30 frames per second and acquiring intravital multispectral images. We show that the design of the system can be readily implemented and is adaptable to various experimental models. As examples, we demonstrate the utility of the system to directly measure flow within tumors, capture metastatic cancer cells moving within the brain vasculature and cells in lymphatic vessels, and image acute responses to changes in a vascular network. VR-MPLSM thus has the potential to further advance intravital imaging and provide new insight into the biology of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24353926

  5. Usefulness of two-point Dixon fat-water separation technique in gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ying; Rao, Sheng-Xiang; Chen, Cai-Zhong; Li, Ren-Chen; Zeng, Meng-Su

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare differences between volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) using two-point Dixon fat-water separation (Dixon-VIBE) and chemically selective fat saturation (FS-VIBE) with magnetic resonance imaging examination. METHODS: Forty-nine patients were included, who were scanned with two VIBE sequences (Dixon-VIBE and FS-VIBE) in hepatobiliary phase after gadoxetic acid administration. Subjective evaluations including sharpness of tumor, sharpness of vessels, strength and homogeneity of fat suppression, and artifacts that were scored using a 4-point scale. The liver-to-lesion contrast was also calculated and compared. RESULTS: Dixon-VIBE with water reconstruction had significantly higher subjective scores than FS-VIBE in strength and homogeneity of fat suppression (< 0.0001) but lower scores in sharpness of tumor (P < 0.0001), sharpness of vessels (P = 0.0001), and artifacts (P = 0.034). The liver-to-lesion contrast on Dixon-VIBE images was significantly lower than that on FS-VIBE (16.6% ± 9.4% vs 23.9% ± 12.1%, P = 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Dixon-VIBE provides stronger and more homogenous fat suppression than FS-VIBE, while has lower clarity of focal liver lesions in hepatobiliary phase after gadoxetic acid administration. PMID:25945017

  6. Determination of bovine serum albumin using resonance light scattering technique with sodium dodecylbenzene sulphonate-cetyltrimethylammonium bromide probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Dejiang; He, Na; Tian, Yuan; Chen, Yanhua; Zhang, Hanqi; Yu, Aimin

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulphonate (SDBS) and cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB) were used as resonance light scattering (RLS) probe to determine bovine serum albumin (BSA). Based on the weak RLS intensity of SDBS-CTMAB probe and the enhancement of RLS intensity of BSA in the presence of the probe, a simple assay for BSA was developed. The experimental results showed that the formation of three component complex BSA-SDBS-CTMAB is the main reason for the enhancement of RLS intensity of BSA, in which SDBS as a bridge can interact with both BSA and CTMAB. The effects of pH value, incubation time, concentrations of SDBS and CTMAB on the enhanced RLS intensity of BSA were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the enhanced RLS intensity is proportional to the concentration of BSA in the range from 2.5 × 10 -8 to 2.0 × 10 -6 mol L -1. The detection limit is 9.7 × 10 -9 mol L -1 for BSA. The study of foreign substance effect on the determination of BSA indicated that most of metal ions have little effect on the determination of BSA. The results of assay for BSA in synthetic samples were satisfactory.

  7. Characterization of plastic scintillators using magnetic resonance techniques for the upgrade of the Tile Calorimeter in the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelwan, C.; Jivan, H.; Joubert, D.; Keartland, J.; Liao, S.; Peters, G.; Sideras-Haddad, E.

    2015-10-01

    In this study we look at radiation damage and its adverse effects on plastic scintillators housed within the Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS detector. The study focuses on determining how the interaction of ionizing radiation with plastic scintillators effects their efficacy and desired properties such as high light output and fast decay time. Plastic scintillators form an integral part of the ATLAS trigger system and their optimal functionality is paramount to the success of ATLAS. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) provides insight into the electronic structure of the plastics and can characterize the damage caused by ionizing radiation. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations will be performed in order to simulate the EPR signal. Preliminary EPR results investigate four different types of plastic scintillators. These include three polyvinyl-toluene based Eljen technologies: EJ200, EJ208 and EJ260, and one polystyrene based Dubna sample. It has been observed that the Dubna sample, identical on the current scintillator used in the ATLAS detector, undergoes more structural damage when compared to the Eljen samples.

  8. Use of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as a simple probe for rapid determination of emodin by resonance light scattering technique.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Haiyan; Luo, Qizhi; Dai, Kaijin; Duan, Wenjun; Fan, Yinzhou; Xie, Yang

    2012-10-01

    A new resonance light scattering (RLS) method for emodin determination with cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as probe has been developed. In Britton-Robinson buffer (pH 6.5) medium, emodin reacted with cationic surfactant CTAB and formed the emodin-CTAB complex. The complex aggregated together through hydrophobic forces and causing great enhancement of RLS signals with the maximum peak located at about 350 nm. The enhanced RLS intensities were found to be proportional to the concentration of emodin in the range of 0.54-9.72 μg ml(-1) with the detection limit (3σ) of 10.3 ng ml(-1). In this work, the characteristics of RLS, absorption, fluorescence spectra of the system were studied. The optimum reaction condition and the influencing factors on the RLS signal were investigated in detail. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of emodin in synthetic samples and human urine with satisfactory results. Furthermore, the forms of the substances under the experimental condition and the mechanism of the reaction were discussed in detail. PMID:22929864

  9. Investigation of high-contrast velocity selective optical pumping resonance at the cycling transition of Cs using fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Saswati; Ray, Biswajit; Ghosh, Pradip Narayan; Cartaleva, Stefka; Slavov, Dimitar

    2015-12-01

    A high contrast (∼48%) Velocity Selective Optical Pumping (VSOP) resonance at the closed transition Fg=4→Fe=5 of Cs-D2 line is obtained in the fluorescence signal under co-propagating pump-probe configuration. We use a 5.2 μm cell operating at reduced temperature (∼55 °C) and the intensity of the pump-laser is kept lower than that of the probe-laser. The observed sharp narrow structure is suitable for side-arms frequency-locking of the cooling- (i.e. probe-) laser in a cold atom experiment, with possibility for "-Γ" to "-4Γ" red-detuning and "+Γ" to "+10Γ" blue-detuning using the standard properties of the commercially available electronics. We have developed a theoretical model corresponding to the thin cell, incorporating the atomic time-of-flight dependent optical pumping decay rate to describe the dimensional anisotropy of the thin cell. The model shows good qualitative agreement with the observation and simulates as well the cases of cells with smaller thickness. It also describes correctly the temperature dependence of the line broadening and shows the potential for further optimization and red-shift detuning above "-4Γ". It may be of interest for further development of miniaturized modules, like the recently developed portable small magneto-optical traps.

  10. Graphene quantum dots and the resonance light scattering technique for trace analysis of phenol in different water samples.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ruiling; Wang, Yong; Ni, Yongnian; Kokot, Serge

    2014-07-01

    A novel, highly selective resonance light scattering (RLS) method was researched and developed for the analysis of phenol in different types of industrial water. An important aspect of the method involved the use of graphene quantum dots (GQDs), which were initially obtained from the pyrolysis of citric acid dissolved in aqueous solutions. The GQDs in the presence of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and H2O2 were found to react quantitatively with phenol such that the RLS spectral band (310 nm) was quantitatively enhanced as a consequence of the interaction between the GQDs and the quinone formed in the above reaction. It was demonstrated that the novel analytical method had better selectivity and sensitivity for the determination of phenol in water as compared to other analytical methods found in the literature. Thus, trace amounts of phenol were detected over the linear ranges of 6.00×10(-8)-2.16×10(-6)M and 2.40×10(-6)-2.88×10(-5)M with a detection limit of 2.20×10(-8)M. In addition, three different spiked waste water samples and two untreated lake water samples were analysed for phenol. Satisfactory results were obtained with the use of the novel, sensitive and rapid RLS method. PMID:24840454

  11. Pharmacokinetic detection of penicillin excreted in urine using a totally internally reflected resonance light scattering technique with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng Zhi; Feng, Ping; Li, Yuan Fang; Tan, Ke Jun

    2005-05-01

    A quantitative analysis method for penicillins including ampicillin (AmP), benzyl penicillin (BP), oxacillin (OA) and amoxycillin (AmO) is proposed that makes use of the totally internally reflected resonance light scattering (TIR-RLS) signal from the penicillin at the H2O/CCl4 interface in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB), and enables the pharmacokinetics of penicillin taken orally and excreted through urine to be monitored. Penicillin is coadsorbed with CTMAB at the H2O/CCl4 interface in neutral solution, resulting in the formation of ion associates that display greatly enhanced TIR-RLS signals (maximum at 368-372 nm). This enhanced TIR-RLS intensity was found to be proportional to the penicillin concentration over the range 0.2 x 10(-6) to 2.2 x 10(-6) mol L(-1), with limits of determination (3sigma) of 5.0 x 10(-8) to 7.0 x 10(-8) mol L(-1). Pharmacokinetics studies performed using the present method show that the excretion of orally-taken ampicillin through urine has a half-time of 1.05 h and an excremental quantum over 8 h of 49.3%, respectively. PMID:15900456

  12. Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy as a Technique for Gentamicin Drug Susceptibility Studies with Escherichia coli ATCC 25922

    PubMed Central

    García-Álvarez, Lara; Busto, Jesús H.; Avenoza, Alberto; Sáenz, Yolanda; Peregrina, Jesús Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial drug susceptibility tests involving multiple time-consuming steps are still used as reference methods. Today, there is a need for the development of new automated instruments that can provide faster results and reduce operating time, reagent costs, and labor requirements. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy meets those requirements. The metabolism and antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 in the presence of gentamicin have been analyzed using NMR and compared with a reference method. Direct incubation of the bacteria (with and without gentamicin) into the NMR tube has also been performed, and differences in the NMR spectra were obtained. The MIC, determined by the reference method found in this study, would correspond with the termination of the bacterial metabolism observed with NMR. Experiments carried out directly into the NMR tube enabled the development of antimicrobial drug susceptibility tests to assess the effectiveness of the antibiotic. NMR is an objective and reproducible method for showing the effects of a drug on the subject bacterium and can emerge as an excellent tool for studying bacterial activity in the presence of different antibiotic concentrations. PMID:25972417

  13. Double-wavelength overlapping resonance Rayleigh scattering technique for the simultaneous quantitative analysis of three β-adrenergic blockade.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xuanping; Yang, Jidong; Li, Qin; Yang, Qiong; Shen, Yizhong

    2016-05-15

    Four simple and accurate spectrophotometric methods were proposed for the simultaneous determination of three β-adrenergic blockade, e.g. atenolol, metoprolol and propranolol. The methods were based on the reaction of the three drugs with erythrosine B (EB) in a Britton-Robinson buffer solution at pH4.6. EB could combine with the drugs to form three ion-association complexes, which resulted in the resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) intensity that is enhanced significantly with new RRS peaks that appeared at 337nm and 370nm, respectively. In addition, the fluorescence intensity of EB was also quenched. The enhanced scattering intensities of the two peaks and the fluorescence quenched intensity of EB were proportional to the concentrations of the drugs, respectively. What is more, the RRS intensity overlapped with the double-wavelength of 337nm and 370nm (so short for DW-RRS) was also proportional to the drugs concentrations. So, a new method with highly sensitive for simultaneous determination of three bisoprolol drugs was established. Finally, the optimum reaction conditions, influencing factors and spectral enhanced mechanism were investigated. The new DW-RRS method has been applied to simultaneously detect the three β-blockers in fresh serum with satisfactory results. PMID:26926395

  14. Double-wavelength overlapping resonance Rayleigh scattering technique for the simultaneous quantitative analysis of three β-adrenergic blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xuanping; Yang, Jidong; Li, Qin; Yang, Qiong; Shen, Yizhong

    2016-05-01

    Four simple and accurate spectrophotometric methods were proposed for the simultaneous determination of three β-adrenergic blockade, e.g. atenolol, metoprolol and propranolol. The methods were based on the reaction of the three drugs with erythrosine B (EB) in a Britton-Robinson buffer solution at pH 4.6. EB could combine with the drugs to form three ion-association complexes, which resulted in the resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) intensity that is enhanced significantly with new RRS peaks that appeared at 337 nm and 370 nm, respectively. In addition, the fluorescence intensity of EB was also quenched. The enhanced scattering intensities of the two peaks and the fluorescence quenched intensity of EB were proportional to the concentrations of the drugs, respectively. What is more, the RRS intensity overlapped with the double-wavelength of 337 nm and 370 nm (so short for DW-RRS) was also proportional to the drugs concentrations. So, a new method with highly sensitive for simultaneous determination of three bisoprolol drugs was established. Finally, the optimum reaction conditions, influencing factors and spectral enhanced mechanism were investigated. The new DW-RRS method has been applied to simultaneously detect the three β-blockers in fresh serum with satisfactory results.

  15. Sensitivity of the curve-to-growth technique utilized in rocket experiments to determine the line shape of solar He I resonance lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. Y. R.; Ogawa, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    The sensitivity of the curve-of-growth (COG) technique utilized in rocket measurements to determine the line profiles of the solar He I resonance emissions is theoretically examined with attention to the possibility of determining the line core shape using this technique. The line at 584.334 A is chosen as an illustration. Various possible source functions of the solar line have been assumed in the computation of the integrated transmitted intensity. A recent observational data set obtained by the present researchers is used as the constraint of the computation. It is confirmed that the COG technique can indeed provide a good measurement of the solar line width. However, to obtain detailed knowledge of the solar profile at line center and in the core region, (1) it is necessary to be able to carry out relative solar flux measurements with a 1-percent or better precision, and (2) it must be possible to measure the He gas pressure in the absorption cell to lower than 0.1 mtorr. While these numbers apply specifically to the present geometry, the results are readily scaled to other COG measurements using other experimental parameters.

  16. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Ozone-Induced Injury in the Nasal Airways of Monkeys Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Morphometric Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, Stephen A.; Minard, Kevin R.; Trease, Lynn L.; Wagner, James G.; Garcia, Guilherme M.; Ballinger, Carol A.; Kimbell, Julia; Plopper, Charles G.; Corley, Rick A.; Postlewait, Ed; Harkema, Jack R.

    2007-03-01

    ABSTRACT Age-related changes in gross and microscopic structure of the nasal cavity can alter local tissue susceptibility as well as the dose of inhaled toxicant delivered to susceptible sites. This article describes a novel method for the use of magnetic resonance imaging, 3-dimensional airway modeling, and morphometric techniques to characterize the distribution and magnitude of ozone-induced nasal injury in infant monkeys. Using this method, we are able to generate age-specific, 3-dimensional, epithelial maps of the nasal airways of infant Rhesus macaques. The principal nasal lesions observed in this primate model of ozone-induced nasal toxicology were neutrophilic rhinitis, along with necrosis and exfoliation of the epithelium lining the anterior maxilloturbinate. These lesions, induced by acute or cyclic (episodic) exposures, were examined by light microscopy, quantified by morphometric techniques, and mapped on 3-dimensional models of the nasal airways. Here, we describe the histopathologic, imaging, and computational biology methods developed to efficiently characterize, localize, quantify, and map these nasal lesions. By combining these techniques, the location and severity of the nasal epithelial injury were correlated with epithelial type, nasal airway geometry, and local biochemical and molecular changes on an individual animal basis. These correlations are critical for accurate predictive modeling of exposure-dose-response relationships in the nasal airways, and subsequent extrapolation of nasal findings in animals to humans for developing risk assessment.

  17. Correlative Förster Resonance Electron Transfer-Proximity Ligation Assay (FRET-PLA) Technique for Studying Interactions Involving Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ivanusic, Daniel; Denner, Joachim; Bannert, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    This unit provides a guide and detailed protocol for studying membrane protein-protein interactions (PPI) using the acceptor-sensitized Förster resonance electron transfer (FRET) method in combination with the proximity ligation assay (PLA). The protocol in this unit is focused on the preparation of FRET-PLA samples and the detection of correlative FRET/PLA signals as well as on the analysis of FRET-PLA data and interpretation of correlative results when using cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) as a FRET donor and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) as a FRET acceptor. The correlative application of FRET and PLA combines two powerful tools for monitoring PPI, yielding results that are more reliable than with either technique alone. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27479505

  18. A general algorithm for magnetic resonance imaging simulation: a versatile tool to collect information about imaging artefacts and new acquisition techniques.

    PubMed

    Placidi, Giuseppe; Alecci, Marcello; Sotgiu, Antonello

    2002-01-01

    An innovative algorithm for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) capable of demonstrating the source of various artefacts and driving the hardware and software acquisition process is presented. The algorithm is based on the application of the Bloch equations to the magnetization vector of each point of the simulated object, as requested by the instructions of the MRI pulse sequence. The collected raw data are then used to reconstruct the image of the object. The general structure of the algorithm makes it possible to simulate a great range of imaging situations in order to explain the nature of unwanted artefacts and to study new acquisition techniques. The way the algorithm structures the sequence has also allowed the easy implementation of MRI data acquisition on a commercial general-purpose DSP-based data acquisition board, thus facilitating the comparison between simulated and experimental results. PMID:15460653

  19. Third-order optical nonlinearities of sol-gel silica coating films containing metal porphyrin derivatives measured by resonant femtosecond degenerate four-wave mixing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasatani, Kazuo; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Takenaka, Shunsuke

    2003-11-01

    Third-order optical nonlinearities of sol-gel silica coating films containing metal porphyrin derivatives were measured under resonant conditions by the femtosecond degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) technique. Temporal profiles of the DFWM signal were measured with a time resolution of 0.3 ps, and were found to consist of two components, the coherent instantaneous nonlinear response and the delayed response with a decay time constant of several to several hundred ps. The latter can be attributed to population grating of an excited state, and contribution of slow component was very little for a zinc porphyrin derivative. The values of electronic component of the optical nonlinear susceptibility, χ(3) xxxx, for these films were ca. 2 x 10-10 esu.

  20. Excitonic emission and absorption resonances in V0.25W0.75Se2 single crystals grown by direct vapour transport technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solanki, G. K.; Pataniya, Pratik; Sumesh, C. K.; Patel, K. D.; Pathak, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    A systematic study on emission and absorption spectra of vanadium mixed tungsten diselenide single crystals grown by direct vapour transport (DVT) technique is reported. The grown crystals were characterized by energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDAX), which gives the confirmation about the stoichiometry. The structural characterizations were accomplished by X-ray diffraction (XRD), surface morphology and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These characterizations were indicating the growth of V0.25W0.75Se2 single crystal from vapour phase. The optical response of this material has been observed by combination of UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy and photo luminescence (PL) spectroscopy. A detailed study of excitonic emission and absorption resonances was carried out on grown crystals. The energy band gap was calculated for indirect allowed transition with absorbed and emitted phonon. Additionally, absorption tail for grown crystal is found to obey the Urbach's rule.

  1. Characterization of oxygen vacancy defects in Ba1-xCaxTiO3 insulating ceramics using electron paramagnetic resonance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Da-Yong; Yuan, Long-Fei; Liang, Wei-Na; Zhu, Zhao-Bin

    2016-01-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique was employed to detect oxygen vacancy defects in the tetragonal Ba1-xCaxTiO3 (x = 0.03) ceramics (BCa3T) prepared via the mixed oxide route at 1300-1500 °C. In the rhombohedral phase below -100 °C, an EPR signal at g = 1.955 appeared in the insulating BCa3T with an electrical resistivity of 108 Ω cm and was assigned to ionized oxygen vacancy defects. BCa3T prepared at 1300 °C showed a temperature-stable X6S dielectric specification (ɛ‧ = 1750). Three types of vacancy defect, namely, Ba, Ti, and O vacances, could coexist in BCa3T owing to the partial Ti-site occupation by Ca2+.

  2. Application of Polypyrrole Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Composite Layer for Detection of Mercury, Lead and Iron Ions Using Surface Plasmon Resonance Technique

    PubMed Central

    Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Noor, A. S. M.; Bahrami, Afarin; Lim, H. N.; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Mahdi, Mohd. Adzir

    2014-01-01

    Polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layers were used to modify the gold layer to measure heavy metal ions using the surface plasmon resonance technique. The new sensor was fabricated to detect trace amounts of mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and iron (Fe) ions. In the present research, the sensitivity of a polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layer and a polypyrrole layer were compared. The application of polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotubes enhanced the sensitivity and accuracy of the sensor for detecting ions in an aqueous solution due to the binding of mercury, lead, and iron ions to the sensing layer. The Hg ion bonded to the sensing layer more strongly than did the Pb and Fe ions. The limitation of the sensor was calculated to be about 0.1 ppm, which produced an angle shift in the region of 0.3° to 0.6°. PMID:24733263

  3. Application of polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layer for detection of mercury, lead and iron ions using surface plasmon resonance technique.

    PubMed

    Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Noor, A S M; Bahrami, Afarin; Lim, H N; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Mahdi, Mohd Adzir

    2014-01-01

    Polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layers were used to modify the gold layer to measure heavy metal ions using the surface plasmon resonance technique. The new sensor was fabricated to detect trace amounts of mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and iron (Fe) ions. In the present research, the sensitivity of a polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layer and a polypyrrole layer were compared. The application of polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotubes enhanced the sensitivity and accuracy of the sensor for detecting ions in an aqueous solution due to the binding of mercury, lead, and iron ions to the sensing layer. The Hg ion bonded to the sensing layer more strongly than did the Pb and Fe ions. The limitation of the sensor was calculated to be about 0.1 ppm, which produced an angle shift in the region of 0.3° to 0.6°. PMID:24733263

  4. Following the Transient Reactions in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries Using In an In Situ Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jie; Hu, Jian Z.; Chen, Honghao; Vijayakumar, M.; Zheng, Jianming; Pan, Huilin; Walter, Eric D.; Hu, Mary Y.; Deng, Xuchu; Feng, Ju; Liaw, Bor Yann; Gu, Meng; Deng, Zhiqun; Lu, Dongping; Xu, Suochang; Wang, Chong M.; Liu, Jun

    2015-05-13

    Li-S batteries hold great potential for next-generation, large-format power source applications; yet, the fundamental understanding of the electrochemical reaction pathways remains lacking to enable their functionality as promised. Here, in situ NMR technique employing a specially designed cylindrical micro battery was used to monitor the chemical environments around Li+ ions during repetitive charge-discharge process and track the transient electrochemical and chemical reactions occurring in the whole Li-S system. The in situ NMR provides real time, quantitative information related to the temporal concentration variations of the polysulfides with various chain lengths, providing important clues for the reaction pathways during both discharge and charge processes. The in-situ technique also reveals that redox reactions may involve transient species that are difficult to detect in ex-situ NMR study. Intermediate species such as charged free radicals may play an important role in the formation of the polysulfide products. Additionally, in situ NMR measurement simultaneously reveals vital information on the 7Li chemical environments in the electrochemical and parasitic reactions on the lithium anode that promotes the understanding of the failure mechanism in the Li-S system. These new insights could help design effective strategies to accelerate the development of Li-S battery technology.

  5. Spinal Cord Segmentation by One Dimensional Normalized Template Matching: A Novel, Quantitative Technique to Analyze Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data.

    PubMed

    Cadotte, Adam; Cadotte, David W; Livne, Micha; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Fleet, David; Mikulis, David; Fehlings, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord segmentation is a developing area of research intended to aid the processing and interpretation of advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For example, high resolution three-dimensional volumes can be segmented to provide a measurement of spinal cord atrophy. Spinal cord segmentation is difficult due to the variety of MRI contrasts and the variation in human anatomy. In this study we propose a new method of spinal cord segmentation based on one-dimensional template matching and provide several metrics that can be used to compare with other segmentation methods. A set of ground-truth data from 10 subjects was manually-segmented by two different raters. These ground truth data formed the basis of the segmentation algorithm. A user was required to manually initialize the spinal cord center-line on new images, taking less than one minute. Template matching was used to segment the new cord and a refined center line was calculated based on multiple centroids within the segmentation. Arc distances down the spinal cord and cross-sectional areas were calculated. Inter-rater validation was performed by comparing two manual raters (n = 10). Semi-automatic validation was performed by comparing the two manual raters to the semi-automatic method (n = 10). Comparing the semi-automatic method to one of the raters yielded a Dice coefficient of 0.91 +/- 0.02 for ten subjects, a mean distance between spinal cord center lines of 0.32 +/- 0.08 mm, and a Hausdorff distance of 1.82 +/- 0.33 mm. The absolute variation in cross-sectional area was comparable for the semi-automatic method versus manual segmentation when compared to inter-rater manual segmentation. The results demonstrate that this novel segmentation method performs as well as a manual rater for most segmentation metrics. It offers a new approach to study spinal cord disease and to quantitatively track changes within the spinal cord in an individual case and across cohorts of subjects. PMID:26445367

  6. Technique for designing and evaluating probe caps used in optical topography of infants using a real head model based on three dimensional magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Yukiko; Sato, Hiroki; Uchida-Ota, Mariko; Nakai, Akio; Maki, Atsushi

    2008-06-01

    We have developed an effective technique for aiding the design and evaluating the performance of the probe caps used to perform optical topography (OT) on infants. To design and evaluate a probe cap, it is necessary to determine the measurement positions for conducting OT on the brain surface of subjects. One technique for determining these positions on the brain surface is to find their three-dimensional (3D) coordinates using a 3D magnetic space digitizer, which consists of a 3D magnetic source and a 3D magnetic sensor. The problem with this technique is that it takes a long time to determine all the measurement points on the subject's head and it is difficult to use with infants. It is a particular problem with infants who cannot support their own heads. Therefore, we have developed a real model of an infant subject's head based on 3D magnetic resonance (MR) images. The model is made from an optical-curable resin using 3D computer-aided-format coordinate data taken from 3D MR image-format coordinate data. We have determined the measurement positions on the surface of the model corresponding to a scalp using a 3D magnetic space digitizer and displayed the positions on a 3D MR image of the infant's brain. Using this technique, we then determined the actual 72 measurement positions located over the entire brain surface area for use with our new whole-head probe cap for neonates and infants. This method is useful for evaluating the performance of and designing probe caps.

  7. Nondestructive testing of adhesive bonds by nuclear quadrupole resonance method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, R. R.

    1971-01-01

    Inert, strain sensitive tracer, cuprous oxide, added to polymeric adhesive ensures sufficiently large signal to noise ratio in NQR system output. Method is successful, provided that RF-transparent structural materials are used between modified adhesive and probe of NQR spectrometer.

  8. A bead-based fluorescence immunosensing technique enabled by the integration of Förster resonance energy transfer and optoelectrokinetic concentration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jhih-Cheng; Ku, Hu-Yao; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Chuang, Han-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Bead-based immunosensing has been growing as a promising technology in the point-of-care diagnostics due to great flexibility. For dilute samples, functionalized particles can be used to collect dispersed analytes and act as carriers for particle manipulation. To realize rapid and visual immunosensing, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used herein to ensure only the diabetic biomarker, lipocalin 1, to be detected. The measurement was made in an aqueous droplet sandwiched between two parallel plate electrodes. With an electric field and a focused laser beam applying on the microchip simultaneously, the immunocomplexes in the droplet were further concentrated to enhance the FRET fluorescent signal. The optoelectrokinetic technique, termed rapid electrokinetic patterning (REP), has been proven to be excellent in dynamic and programmable particle manipulation. Therefore, the detection can be complete within several tens of seconds. The lower detection limit of the REP-enabled bead-based diagnosis reached nearly 5 nM. The combinative use of FRET and the optoelectrokinetic technique for the bead-based immunosensing enables a rapid measure to diagnose early stage diseases and dilute analytes. PMID:26865906

  9. HCN, a triple-resonance NMR technique for selective observation of histidine and tryptophan side chains in 13C/15N-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Sudmeier, J L; Ash, E L; Günther, U L; Luo, X; Bullock, P A; Bachovchin, W W

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from 1H to 13C to 15N and reverse through direct spin couplings 1JCH and 1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonances in uniformly 13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay tau 3 were employed for determination of optimal tau 3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the 1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the 13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 12 1H and 13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 12 15N chemical shifts were determined. The 13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping 1H and 15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mM sample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited alpha-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited alpha-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55 degrees C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole 1H and/or 15N nuclei. PMID:8995843

  10. HCN, A Triple-Resonance NMR Technique for Selective Observation of Histidine and Tryptophan Side Chains in 13C/ 15N-Labeled Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudmeier, James L.; Ash, Elissa L.; Günther, Ulrich L.; Luo, Xuelian; Bullock, Peter A.; Bachovchin, William W.

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from1H to13C to15N and reverse through direct spin couplings1JCHand1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain1H,13C, and15N resonances in uniformly13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay τ3were employed for determination of optimal τ3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 121H and13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 1215N chemical shifts were determined. The13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping1H and15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mMsample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited α-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited α-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55°C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole1H and/or15N nuclei.

  11. Hybridization-driven gap in U3Bi4Ni3: a 209Bi NMR/NQR study

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Seung H

    2009-01-01

    We report {sup 209}Bi nuclear-magnetic-resonance and nuclear-quadrupole-resonance measurements on a single crystal of the Kondo insulator U{sub 3}Bi{sub 4}Ni{sub 3}. The {sup 209}Bi nuclear-spin-lattice relaxation rate (T{sub 1}{sup -1}) shows activated behavior and is well fit by a spin gap of 220 K. The {sup 209}Bi Knight shift (K) exhibits a strong temperature dependence arising from 5f electrons, in which K is negative at high temperatures and increases as the temperature is lowered. Below 50 K, K shows a broad maximum and decreases slightly upon further cooling. Our data provide insight into the evolution of the hyperfine fields in a fully gapped Kondo insulator based on 5f electron hybridization.

  12. Bonding and molecular motions in the 1:1 molecular complexes of 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane with tetrahalomethane as studied by means of NQR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, T.; Suzuki, T.; Negita, H.

    1983-12-01

    NQR spectra were observed in the complexes of 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) with tetrachloromethane and tetrabromomethane at various temperatures. A phase transition was found at 319 K for DABCO·CBr 4. From spin-lattice relaxation times of nitrogen-14 in DABCO·CBr 4, the activation energy of the reorientation of DABCO about the NN axis was calculated to be 18.3 kJ/mol which agrees with the value obtained from the second moment of proton NMR spectra. The bond nature is discussed using the Townes-Dailey treatment.

  13. Resonances and resonance widths

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1986-05-01

    Two-dimensional betatron resonances are much more important than their simple one-dimensional counterparts and exhibit a strong dependence on the betatron phase advance per cell. A practical definition of ''width'' is expanded upon in order to display these relations in tables. A primarily pedagogical introduction is given to explain the tables, and also to encourage a wider capability for deriving resonance behavior and wider use of ''designer'' resonances.

  14. Application of fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques to the study of lectin-binding site distribution on Paramecium primaurelia (Protista, Ciliophora) cell surface.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, D; Delmonte Corrado, M U; Politi, H; Bottiroli, G

    1998-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a photophysical phenomenon occurring between the molecules of two fluorochromes with suitable spectral characteristics (donor-acceptor dye pair), and consisting in an excitation energy migration through a non-radiative process. Since the efficiency of the process is strictly dependent on the distance and reciprocal orientation of the donor and acceptor molecules, FRET-based techniques can be successfully applied to the study of biomolecules and cell component organisation and distribution. These techniques have been employed in studying Paramecium primaurelia surface membrane for the reciprocal distribution of N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc) and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) glycosidic residues, which were found to be involved in mating cell pairing. NeuAc and GlcNAc were detected by their specific binding lectins, Limulus polyphemus agglutinin (LPA) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), respectively. Microspectrofluorometric analysis afforded the choice of fluorescein isothiocyanate and Texas red conjugated with LPA and WGA, respectively, as a suitable donor-acceptor couple efficiently activating FRET processes. Studies performed both in solution and in cells allowed to define the experimental conditions favourable for a FRET analysis. The comparative study carried out both on the conjugating-region and the non conjugating region of the surface membrane, indicates that FRET distribution appears quite homogeneous in mating-competent mating type (mt) I, whereas, in mating-competent mt II cells, FRET distribution seems to be preferentially localised on the conjugating-region functionally involved in mating cell pairing. This difference in the distribution of lectin-binding sites is suggested to be related to mating-competence acquisition. PMID:9857246

  15. Why currently used diagnostic techniques for heart failure in rheumatoid arthritis are not enough: the challenge of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Mavrogeni, Sophie; Dimitroulas, Theodoros; Gabriel, Sherine; Sfikakis, Petros P; Pohost, Gerald M; Kitas, George D

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a multiorgan inflammatory disorder affecting approximately 1% of the population that leads to progressive joint destruction and disability. Patients with RA exhibit a high risk of cardiovascular disease, which results in premature morbidity and mortality and reduced life expectancy, when compared with the general population. Among various guises of myocardial involvement, heart failure (HF) has been recently recognized as an important contributory factor to the excess cardiovascular mortality associated with RA. HF in RA typically presents with occult clinical symptomatology and is mainly associated with structural and functional left ventricular abnormalities leading to diastolic dysfunction, while systolic myocardial performance remains well preserved. As isolated diastolic dysfunction is a predictor of high mortality, the evaluation of patients in early asymptomatic stages, when treatment targeting the heart is more likely to be effective, is of great importance. Although patient history and physical examination remain the cornerstones of HF evaluation, noninvasive imaging of cardiac chambers, coronary arteries, and great vessels may be necessary. Echocardiography, nuclear techniques, and invasive coronary angiography are already established in the routine assessment of HF; however, many aspects of HF pathophysiology in RA remain obscure, due to the limitations of currently used techniques. The capability of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) to capture early tissue changes allows timely detection of pathophysiologic phenomena of HF in RA, such as myocardial inflammation and myocardial perfusion defects, due to either macrovascular (coronary artery disease) or microvascular (vasculitis) disease. Therefore, CMR may be a useful tool for early, accurate diagnosis and research in patients with RA. PMID:25662926

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Uterine Fibroids: Effect of Bowel Interposition on Procedure Feasibility and a Unique Bowel Displacement Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-sun; Lim, Hyo Keun; Rhim, Hyunchul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of bowel interposition on assessing procedure feasibility, and the usefulness and limiting conditions of bowel displacement techniques in magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation of uterine fibroids. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approved this study. A total of 375 screening MR exams and 206 MR-HIFU ablations for symptomatic uterine fibroids performed between August 2010 and March 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The effect of bowel interposition on procedure feasibility was assessed by comparing pass rates in periods before and after adopting a unique bowel displacement technique (bladder filling, rectal filling and subsequent bladder emptying; BRB maneuver). Risk factors for BRB failure were evaluated using logistic regression analysis. Results Overall pass rates of pre- and post-BRB periods were 59.0% (98/166) and 71.7% (150/209), and in bowel-interposed cases they were 14.6% (7/48) and 76.4% (55/72), respectively. BRB maneuver was technically successful in 81.7% (49/60). Through-the-bladder sonication was effective in eight of eleven BRB failure cases, thus MR-HIFU could be initiated in 95.0% (57/60). A small uterus on treatment day was the only significant risk factor for BRB failure (B = 0.111, P = 0.017). Conclusion The BRB maneuver greatly reduces the fraction of patients deemed ineligible for MR-HIFU ablation of uterine fibroids due to interposed bowels, although care is needed when the uterus is small. PMID:27186881

  17. Protein-Flavonoid Interaction Studies by a Taylor Dispersion Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) Technique: A Novel Method to Assess Biomolecular Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vachali, Preejith P.; Li, Binxing; Besch, Brian M.; Bernstein, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids are common polyphenolic compounds widely distributed in fruits and vegetables. These pigments have important pharmacological relevance because emerging research suggests possible anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties as well other beneficial health effects. These compounds are relatively hydrophobic molecules, suggesting the role of blood transport proteins in their delivery to tissues. In this study, we assess the binding interactions of four flavonoids (kaempferol, luteolin, quercetin, and resveratrol) with human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant protein in the blood, and with glutathione S-transferase pi isoform-1 (GSTP1), an enzyme with well-characterized hydrophobic binding sites that plays an important role in detoxification of xenobiotics with reduced glutathione, using a novel Taylor dispersion surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique. For the first time, HSA sites revealed a high-affinity binding site for flavonoid interactions. Out of the four flavonoids that we examined, quercetin and kaempferol showed the strongest equilibrium binding affinities (KD) of 63 ± 0.03 nM and 37 ± 0.07 nM, respectively. GSTP1 displayed lower affinities in the micromolar range towards all of the flavonoids tested. The interactions of flavonoids with HSA and GSTP1 were studied successfully using this novel SPR assay method. The new method is compatible with both kinetic and equilibrium analyses. PMID:26927197

  18. Continuous Monitoring of Specific mRNA Expression Responses with a Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer-Based DNA Nano-tweezer Technique That Does Not Require Gene Recombination.

    PubMed

    Shigeto, Hajime; Nakatsuka, Keisuke; Ikeda, Takeshi; Hirota, Ryuichi; Kuroda, Akio; Funabashi, Hisakage

    2016-08-16

    This letter discusses the feasibility of continuously monitoring specific mRNA expression responses in a living cell with a probe structured as a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based DNA nano-tweezer (DNA-NT). The FRET-based DNA-NT, self-assembled from three single-stranded DNAs, alters its structure from an open state to a closed state in recognition of a target mRNA, resulting in the closing of the distal relation of previously modified FRET-paired fluorescent dyes and generating a FRET signal. The expressions of glucose transporters (GLUT) 1 and 4 in a mouse hepato-carcinoma (Hepa 1-6 cells) were selected as the target model. Live-cell imaging analysis of Hepa 1-6 cells with both FRET-based DNA-NTs indicated that the behaviors of the FRET signals integrated in each individual cell were similar to those measured with the conventional mass analysis technique of semiquantitative real-time (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR). From these results, it is concluded that continuous monitoring of gene expression response without gene recombination is feasible with a FRET-based DNA-NT, even in a single cell manner. PMID:27458920

  19. Comparison of the different responses of surface plasmon resonance and quartz crystal microbalance techniques at solid-liquid interfaces under various experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiajie; Ren, Chunlai; Zhu, Tao; Wang, Kaiyu; Jiang, Zhongying; Ma, Yuqiang

    2015-02-21

    A molecular level understanding of the phenomena taking place at solid-liquid interfaces, ranging from changes in mass to conformation changes, is the key to developing and improving many chemical and biological systems and their scientific and medical applications. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) techniques are often coupled to achieve this understanding. We divided various experimentally relevant scenarios into the following six categories: boundary solutions; surface modifications; conformation; viscoelastic properties; molecular ruler; and mass sensitivity. For each case, based on theoretical analyses, we discuss the following four points with respect to discrete adsorbates at solid-liquid interfaces: (1) the different types of information that can be obtained, why it can be obtained and how to obtain it; (2) the origins of many current approaches and why they are imperfect; (3) guidelines for experimental design; and (4) possible studies, such as the effect of dimensional confinement and adsorption forces on the ability of conformational changes to occur on the receipt of external stimuli and the hysteresis in these changes. PMID:25575354

  20. A novel method for study of the aggregation of protein induced by metal ion aluminum(III) using resonance Rayleigh scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Xiufen; Zhang, Caihua; Cheng, Jiongjia; Bi, Shuping

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel method for the study of the aggregation of protein induced by metal ion aluminum(III) using resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) technique. In neutral Tris-HCl medium, the effect of this aggregation of protein results in the enhancement of RRS intensity and the relationship between the enhancement of the RRS signal and the Al concentration is nonlinear. On this basis, we established a new method for the determination of the critical induced-aggregation concentrations ( CCIAC) of metal ion Al(III) inducing the protein aggregation. Our results show that many factors, such as, pH value, anions, salts, temperature and solvents have obvious effects. We also studied the extent of aggregation and structural changes using ultra-violet spectrometry, protein intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism to further understand the exact mechanisms of the aggregation characteristics of proteins induced by metal ion Al(III) at the molecular level, to help us to develop effective methods to investigate the toxicity of metal ion Al, and to provide theoretical and quantitative evidences for the development of appropriate treatments for neurodementia such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and dementia related to dialysis.

  1. Artificial neural network assisted kinetic spectrophotometric technique for simultaneous determination of paracetamol and p-aminophenol in pharmaceutical samples using localized surface plasmon resonance band of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Khodaveisi, Javad; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Haji Shabani, Ali Mohammad; Rohani Moghadam, Masoud; Hormozi-Nezhad, Mohammad Reza

    2015-03-01

    Spectrophotometric analysis method based on the combination of the principal component analysis (PCA) with the feed-forward neural network (FFNN) and the radial basis function network (RBFN) was proposed for the simultaneous determination of paracetamol (PAC) and p-aminophenol (PAP). This technique relies on the difference between the kinetic rates of the reactions between analytes and silver nitrate as the oxidizing agent in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) which is the stabilizer. The reactions are monitored at the analytical wavelength of 420nm of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) band of the formed silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs). Under the optimized conditions, the linear calibration graphs were obtained in the concentration range of 0.122-2.425μgmL(-1) for PAC and 0.021-5.245μgmL(-1) for PAP. The limit of detection in terms of standard approach (LODSA) and upper limit approach (LODULA) were calculated to be 0.027 and 0.032μgmL(-1) for PAC and 0.006 and 0.009μgmL(-1) for PAP. The important parameters were optimized for the artificial neural network (ANN) models. Statistical parameters indicated that the ability of the both methods is comparable. The proposed method was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of PAC and PAP in pharmaceutical preparations. PMID:25528506

  2. Artificial neural network assisted kinetic spectrophotometric technique for simultaneous determination of paracetamol and p-aminophenol in pharmaceutical samples using localized surface plasmon resonance band of silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodaveisi, Javad; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Haji Shabani, Ali Mohammad; Rohani Moghadam, Masoud; Hormozi-Nezhad, Mohammad Reza

    2015-03-01

    Spectrophotometric analysis method based on the combination of the principal component analysis (PCA) with the feed-forward neural network (FFNN) and the radial basis function network (RBFN) was proposed for the simultaneous determination of paracetamol (PAC) and p-aminophenol (PAP). This technique relies on the difference between the kinetic rates of the reactions between analytes and silver nitrate as the oxidizing agent in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) which is the stabilizer. The reactions are monitored at the analytical wavelength of 420 nm of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) band of the formed silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs). Under the optimized conditions, the linear calibration graphs were obtained in the concentration range of 0.122-2.425 μg mL-1 for PAC and 0.021-5.245 μg mL-1 for PAP. The limit of detection in terms of standard approach (LODSA) and upper limit approach (LODULA) were calculated to be 0.027 and 0.032 μg mL-1 for PAC and 0.006 and 0.009 μg mL-1 for PAP. The important parameters were optimized for the artificial neural network (ANN) models. Statistical parameters indicated that the ability of the both methods is comparable. The proposed method was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of PAC and PAP in pharmaceutical preparations.

  3. Protein-Flavonoid Interaction Studies by a Taylor Dispersion Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) Technique: A Novel Method to Assess Biomolecular Interactions.

    PubMed

    Vachali, Preejith P; Li, Binxing; Besch, Brian M; Bernstein, Paul S

    2016-03-01

    Flavonoids are common polyphenolic compounds widely distributed in fruits and vegetables. These pigments have important pharmacological relevance because emerging research suggests possible anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties as well other beneficial health effects. These compounds are relatively hydrophobic molecules, suggesting the role of blood transport proteins in their delivery to tissues. In this study, we assess the binding interactions of four flavonoids (kaempferol, luteolin, quercetin, and resveratrol) with human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant protein in the blood, and with glutathione S-transferase pi isoform-1 (GSTP1), an enzyme with well-characterized hydrophobic binding sites that plays an important role in detoxification of xenobiotics with reduced glutathione, using a novel Taylor dispersion surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique. For the first time, HSA sites revealed a high-affinity binding site for flavonoid interactions. Out of the four flavonoids that we examined, quercetin and kaempferol showed the strongest equilibrium binding affinities (K(D)) of 63 ± 0.03 nM and 37 ± 0.07 nM, respectively. GSTP1 displayed lower affinities in the micromolar range towards all of the flavonoids tested. The interactions of flavonoids with HSA and GSTP1 were studied successfully using this novel SPR assay method. The new method is compatible with both kinetic and equilibrium analyses. PMID:26927197

  4. Anisotropic pairing in superconducting Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}: Ru NMR and NQR studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, K.; Kitaoka, Y.; Asayama, K.; Ikeda, S.; Nishizaki, S.; Maeno, Y.; Yoshida, K.; Fujita, T.

    1997-07-01

    Ru NMR and nuclear quadrupole resonance studies are reported on single-crystal Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} (T{sub c}=0.7 K) with the same layered perovskite structure as La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}. The Pauli spin susceptibility deduced from the Ru Knight shift is found to be largely enhanced by a factor of {approximately}5.4 as compared with the value from the band calculation. In the superconducting state, the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T{sub 1} exhibits a sharp decrease with no coherence peak just below T{sub c} and the T{sub 1}T=constant behavior well below T{sub c}, suggesting that the anisotropic pairing state is realized as in heavy-fermion and high-T{sub c} superconductors. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of myocardial edema using a short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) black-blood technique: Diagnostic accuracy of visual and semi-quantitative assessment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) black-blood technique has been used to visualize myocardial edema, and thus to differentiate acute from chronic myocardial lesions. However, some cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) groups have reported variable image quality, and hence the diagnostic value of STIR in routine clinical practice has been put into question. The aim of our study was to analyze image quality and diagnostic performance of STIR using a set of pulse sequence parameters dedicated to edema detection, and to discuss possible factors that influence image quality. We hypothesized that STIR imaging is an accurate and robust way of detecting myocardial edema in non-selected patients with acute myocardial infarction. Methods Forty-six consecutive patients with acute myocardial infarction underwent CMR (day 4.5, +/- 1.6) including STIR for the assessment of myocardial edema and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) for quantification of myocardial necrosis. Thirty of these patients underwent a follow-up CMR at approximately six months (195 +/- 39 days). Both STIR and LGE images were evaluated separately on a segmental basis for image quality as well as for presence and extent of myocardial hyper-intensity, with both visual and semi-quantitative (threshold-based) analysis. LGE was used as a reference standard for localization and extent of myocardial necrosis (acute) or scar (chronic). Results Image quality of STIR images was rated as diagnostic in 99.5% of cases. At the acute stage, the sensitivity and specificity of STIR to detect infarcted segments on visual assessment was 95% and 78% respectively, and on semi-quantitative assessment was 99% and 83%, respectively. STIR differentiated acutely from chronically infarcted segments with a sensitivity of 95% by both methods and with a specificity of 99% by visual assessment and 97% by semi-quantitative assessment. The extent of hyper-intense areas on acute STIR images was 85% larger than

  6. Effect of a weak static magnetic field on nitrogen-14 quadrupole resonance in the case of an axially symmetric electric field gradient tensor.

    PubMed

    Guendouz, Laouès; Aissani, Sarra; Marêché, Jean-François; Retournard, Alain; Marande, Pierre-Louis; Canet, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The application of a weak static B0 magnetic field (less than 1 mT) may produce a well-defined splitting of the (14)N Quadrupole Resonance line when the electric field gradient tensor at the nitrogen nucleus level is of axial symmetry. It is theoretically shown and experimentally confirmed that the actual splitting (when it exists) as well as the line-shape and the signal intensity depends on three factors: (i) the amplitude of B0, (ii) the amplitude and pulse duration of the radio-frequency field, B1, used for detecting the NQR signal, and (iii) the relative orientation of B0 and B1. For instance, when B0 is parallel to B1 and regardless of the B0 value, the signal intensity is three times larger than when B0 is perpendicular to B1. This point is of some importance in practice since NQR measurements are almost always performed in the earth field. Moreover, in the course of this study, it has been recognized that important pieces of information regarding line-shape are contained in data points at the beginning of the free induction decay (fid) which, in practice, are eliminated for avoiding spurious signals due to probe ringing. It has been found that these data points can generally be retrieved by linear prediction (LP) procedures. As a further LP benefit, the signal intensity loss (by about a factor of three) is regained. PMID:24183810

  7. Ray Tracing Technique for Modeling of Power Deposition into Electron Cyclotron Resonance Discharge of a Simple Mirror Trap with Longitudinal Launch of Microwave Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gospodchikov, E.D.; Smolyakova, O.B.; Suvorov, E.V.

    2005-01-15

    The ray-tracing procedure for modeling the power deposition into electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge in an axisymmetric mirror trap with longitudinal launch of microwave power is presented. To deal with cyclotron absorption for normal waves of magnetized plasma propagating nearly along the magnetic field in the vicinity of electron cyclotron frequency approximate dispersion relation has been derived using Stix components for microwave electric field. Calculations have been performed for parameters corresponding to ECR multicharge ion (MCI) source (IAP RAS) as example. It is shown that the efficient power deposition into ECR discharge within single pass of radiation through the plasma column may be provided under conditions that parasitic cyclotron resonance (before the plug) is outside the plasma volume and the electron density in the vicinity of the main resonance is undercritical. This is in a qualitative agreement with experimental results.

  8. New analytical technique for establishing the quality of Soil Organic Matter affected by a wildfire. A first approach using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio T.; González-Pérez, José A.; Waggoner, Derek C.; Almendros, Gonzalo; González-Vila, Francisco J.; Hatcher, Patrick G.

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: Fire is one of the most important modulator factors of the environment and the forest. It is able to induce chemical and biological shifts and these, in turn, can alter the physical properties of soil. Generally, fire affects the most reactive fraction, soil organic matter (SOM) (González-Pérez et al., 2004) resulting in changes to several soil properties and functions. To study changes in SOM following a wildfire, researchers can count on several traditional as well as new analytical techniques. One of the most recently employed techniques is Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). This new powerful ultra-high resolution mass spectral technique, together with graphic interpretation tools such as van Krevelen diagrams (Kim et al, 2003), may be used to shed light on alterations caused by the burning of SOM. The objective of this research is to study fire impacts on SOM, using a sandy soil collected under a Cork oak (Quercus suber) in Doñana National Park, Southwest Spain. that was affected by a wildfire in August 2012. Methods: The impact of fire on SOM was studied in various different sieve fractions (coarse, 1-2 mm, and fine, <0.05 mm) collected in a burned area and an adjacent unburned control site with the same physiographic conditions. Alkaline extracts of SOM from each soil sample were examined using a Bruker Daltonics 12 Tesla Apex Qe FT-ICR-MS equipped with an Apollo II ESI ion source (operating in negative ion mode). The ESI voltages were optimized for each sample, and all spectra were internally calibrated following the procedure of (Sleighter and Hatcher, 2007), after which, peaks were assigned unique molecular formulas using a MatLab script written in house by Dr. Wassim Obeid of Old Dominion University. Results: The van Krevelen diagrams together with the relative intensity of each chemical compound, both obtained by FT-ICR-MS, allowed us to assess SOM quality for each sample and size fractions. The

  9. New analytical technique for establishing the quality of Soil Organic Matter affected by a wildfire. A first approach using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio T.; González-Pérez, José A.; Waggoner, Derek C.; Almendros, Gonzalo; González-Vila, Francisco J.; Hatcher, Patrick G.

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: Fire is one of the most important modulator factors of the environment and the forest. It is able to induce chemical and biological shifts and these, in turn, can alter the physical properties of soil. Generally, fire affects the most reactive fraction, soil organic matter (SOM) (González-Pérez et al., 2004) resulting in changes to several soil properties and functions. To study changes in SOM following a wildfire, researchers can count on several traditional as well as new analytical techniques. One of the most recently employed techniques is Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). This new powerful ultra-high resolution mass spectral technique, together with graphic interpretation tools such as van Krevelen diagrams (Kim et al, 2003), may be used to shed light on alterations caused by the burning of SOM. The objective of this research is to study fire impacts on SOM, using a sandy soil collected under a Cork oak (Quercus suber) in Doñana National Park, Southwest Spain. that was affected by a wildfire in August 2012. Methods: The impact of fire on SOM was studied in various different sieve fractions (coarse, 1-2 mm, and fine, <0.05 mm) collected in a burned area and an adjacent unburned control site with the same physiographic conditions. Alkaline extracts of SOM from each soil sample were examined using a Bruker Daltonics 12 Tesla Apex Qe FT-ICR-MS equipped with an Apollo II ESI ion source (operating in negative ion mode). The ESI voltages were optimized for each sample, and all spectra were internally calibrated following the procedure of (Sleighter and Hatcher, 2007), after which, peaks were assigned unique molecular formulas using a MatLab script written in house by Dr. Wassim Obeid of Old Dominion University. Results: The van Krevelen diagrams together with the relative intensity of each chemical compound, both obtained by FT-ICR-MS, allowed us to assess SOM quality for each sample and size fractions. The

  10. Resonance Ionization, Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, J. P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is an analytical technique that uses photons from lasers to resonantly excite an electron from some initial state of a gaseous atom through various excited states of the atom or molecule. Described are the apparatus, some analytical applications, and the precision and accuracy of the technique. Lists 26 references. (CW)

  11. Terahertz cyclotron resonance spectroscopy of an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure using a high-field pulsed magnet and an asynchronous optical sampling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, B. F.; Smith, W. F.; Hibberd, M. T.; Dawson, P.; Beck, M.; Bartels, A.; Guiney, I.; Humphreys, C. J.; Graham, D. M.

    2016-05-01

    The effective mass, sheet carrier concentration, and mobility of electrons within a two-dimensional electron gas in an AlGaN/GaN heterostructure were determined using a laboratory-based terahertz cyclotron resonance spectrometer. The ability to perform terahertz cyclotron resonance spectroscopy with magnetic fields of up to 31 T was enabled by combining a high-field pulsed magnet with a modified asynchronous optical sampling terahertz detection scheme. This scheme allowed around 100 transmitted terahertz waveforms to be recorded over the 14 ms magnetic field pulse duration. The sheet density and mobility were measured to be 8.0 × 1012 cm-2 and 9000 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 77 K. The in-plane electron effective mass at the band edge was determined to be 0.228 ± 0.002m0.

  12. NQR-NMR studies of higher alcohol synthesis Cu-Co catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, June 15--September 15, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-17

    The primary objective of the project is to examine the relations between the catalytic and magnetic properties of the copper-cobalt higher alcohol synthesis catalysts. We have undertaken to investigate the magnetic character by studying the Nuclear Quadrupole resonance of copper and (Zerofield) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of cobalt in copper cobalt catalysts.

  13. Unstable optical resonators.

    PubMed

    Kahn, W K

    1966-03-01

    A technique, firmly based on a development from ray optics, is presented for calculating the loss due to the finite sizes of curved mirrors when these form an unstable optical resonator. If paraxial rays launched within such a resonator are confined near the resonator axis, the resonator is termed stable; otherwise it is termed unstable, and is known to have high losses. Siegman has recently presented a geometrical method, brilliantly constructed ad hoc, for calculating these losses in unstable resonators, and indicated where these might be advantageous in laser application. The ray optical theory presented here, which employs the concept of ray modes in an equivalent beam waveguide, is shown to yield results equivalent to those of Siegman for all cases considered by him. However, being derived from conventional ray optics, the validity of the formulas is independently established, and these formulas are immediately applicable to re-entrant resonators and resonators containing inhomogeneous media. The fractional loss per resonator pass is equal to 1-|lambda(2)|, where |lambda(2)| < this 1 is an eigenvalue of the transfer matrix T, representing the corresponding ray transformation. PMID:20048863

  14. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    DOEpatents

    Chang, J.J.

    1995-07-18

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality. 5 figs.

  15. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jim J.

    1995-07-18

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality.

  16. Transverse-Mode Spurious Suppression Technique for Surface Acoustic Wave Resonator with Zero Temperature Coefficient of Frequency on a SiO2/Al/LiNbO3 Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Hidekazu; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Tsurunari, Tetsuya; Fujiwara, Joji; Hamaoka, Yosuke; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we describe a suppression technique of transverse-mode spurious responses for a surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator with a near zero temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) on a SiO2/Al/LiNbO3 structure. We investigated the thinning of SiO2 on the dummy electrode region and studied how the transverse-mode responses change with remaining SiO2 thickness h on the dummy electrode region. As the results, we clarified that the remaining SiO2 thickness h on the dummy electrode region has an optimum value and could suppress the transverse-mode spurious responses completely when H and h are set at 0.35 λ and 0.20 λ, respectively. It was demonstrated that the selective SiO2 removal technique is effective to suppress transverse-mode spurious responses for SAW resonators employing the SiO2/Al/LiNbO3 structure for a wide range of SiO2 thicknesses, provided that the SiO2 thickness at the dummy electrode region is adjusted properly.

  17. Optical resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention discloses a semi-ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) optical resonator structure comprising a medium including an edge forming a reflective facet and a waveguide within the medium, the waveguide having opposing ends formed by the reflective facet. The performance of the SRFP resonator can be further enhanced by including a Mach-Zehnder interferometer in the waveguide on one side of the gain medium. The optical resonator can be employed in a variety of optical devices. Laser structures using at least one SRFP resonator are disclosed where the resonators are disposed on opposite sides of a gain medium. Other laser structures employing one or more resonators on one side of a gain region are also disclosed.

  18. Resonance scraping

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1986-06-01

    Protons lost in a ring leave at a few preferred locations, determined by some non-linear property of the dipoles. This paper suggests taking control of lost protons by beating the magnets at their own game - by means of a designed resonance used as a beam scraper. It is a study of suitable resonances, including estimates of the required multipole element strengths. The appropriate resonances are two-dimensional. A large number of figures is included.

  19. Study on the interaction between hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether and DNA and the determination of hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether using the resonance light scattering technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhanguang; Song, Tianhe; Chen, Xi; Wang, Shaobin; Chen, Junhui

    2010-10-15

    The interaction between photosensitizer anticancer drug hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME) and ctDNA has been studied based on the decreased resonance light scattering (RLS) phenomenon. The RLS, UV-vis and fluorescence spectra characteristics of the HMME-ctDNA system were investigated. Besides, the phosphodiesters quaternary ammonium salt (PQAS), a kind of new gemini surfactant synthesized recently, was used to determine anticancer drug HMME based on the increasing RLS intensity. Under the optimum assay conditions, the enhanced RLS intensity was proportional to the concentration of HMME. The linear range was 0.8-8.4microgmL(-1), with correlation coefficient R(2)=0.9913. The detection limit was 0.014microgmL(-1). The human serum samples and urine samples were determined satisfactorily, which proved that this method was reliable and applicable in the determination of HMME in body fluid. The presented method was simple, sensitive and straightforward and could be a significant method in clinical analysis. PMID:20643575

  20. Study on the interaction between hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether and DNA and the determination of hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether using the resonance light scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhanguang; Song, Tianhe; Chen, Xi; Wang, Shaobin; Chen, Junhui

    2010-10-01

    The interaction between photosensitizer anticancer drug hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME) and ctDNA has been studied based on the decreased resonance light scattering (RLS) phenomenon. The RLS, UV-vis and fluorescence spectra characteristics of the HMME-ctDNA system were investigated. Besides, the phosphodiesters quaternary ammonium salt (PQAS), a kind of new gemini surfactant synthesized recently, was used to determine anticancer drug HMME based on the increasing RLS intensity. Under the optimum assay conditions, the enhanced RLS intensity was proportional to the concentration of HMME. The linear range was 0.8-8.4 μg mL -1, with correlation coefficient R2 = 0.9913. The detection limit was 0.014 μg mL -1. The human serum samples and urine samples were determined satisfactorily, which proved that this method was reliable and applicable in the determination of HMME in body fluid. The presented method was simple, sensitive and straightforward and could be a significant method in clinical analysis.

  1. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  2. Morphological resonances for multicomponent immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitten, W. B.; Shapiro, M. J.; Ramsey, J. M.; Bronk, B. V.

    1995-06-01

    An immunoassay technique capable of detecting and identifying a number of species of microorganisms in a single analysis is described. The method uses optical-resonance size discrimination of microspheres to identify antibodies to which stained microorganisms are bound.

  3. Mechanical characterization of articular cartilage by combining magnetic resonance imaging and finite-element analysis—a potential functional imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julkunen, P.; Korhonen, R. K.; Nissi, M. J.; Jurvelin, J. S.

    2008-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a method for non-invasive characterization of cartilage composition and structure. We aimed to see whether T1 and T2 relaxation times are related to proteoglycan (PG) and collagen-specific mechanical properties of articular cartilage. Specifically, we analyzed whether variations in the depthwise collagen orientation, as assessed by the laminae obtained from T2 profiles, affect the mechanical characteristics of cartilage. After MRI and unconfined compression tests of human and bovine patellar cartilage samples, fibril-reinforced poroviscoelastic finite-element models (FEM), with depthwise collagen orientations implemented from quantitative T2 maps (3 laminae for human, 3-7 laminae for bovine), were constructed to analyze the non-fibrillar matrix modulus (PG specific), fibril modulus (collagen specific) and permeability of the samples. In bovine cartilage, the non-fibrillar matrix modulus (R = -0.64, p < 0.05) as well as the initial permeability (R = 0.70, p < 0.05) correlated with T1. In bovine cartilage, T2 correlated positively with the initial fibril modulus (R = 0.62, p = 0.05). In human cartilage, the initial fibril modulus correlated negatively (R = -0.61, p < 0.05) with T2. Based on the simulations, cartilage with a complex collagen architecture (5 or 7 laminae), leading to high bulk T2 due to magic angle effects, provided higher compressive stiffness than tissue with a simple collagen architecture (3 laminae). Our results suggest that T1 reflects PG-specific mechanical properties of cartilage. High T2 is characteristic to soft cartilage with a classical collagen architecture. Contradictorily, high bulk T2 can also be found in stiff cartilage with a multilaminar collagen fibril network. By emerging MRI and FEM, the present study establishes a step toward functional imaging of articular cartilage.

  4. Correlation of iron deposition and change of gliocyte metabolism in the basal ganglia region evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging techniques: an in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haodi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We assessed the correlation between iron deposition and the change of gliocyte metabolism in healthy subjects’ basal ganglia region, by using 3D-enhanced susceptibility weighted angiography (ESWAN) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). Material and methods Seventy-seven healthy volunteers (39 female and 38 male subjects; age range: 24–82 years old) were enrolled in the experiment including ESWAN and proton MRS sequences, consent for which was provided by themselves or their guardians. For each subject, the mean phase value gained by ESWAN was used to evaluate the iron deposition; choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) and mI/Cr ratios gained by 1H-MRS were used to evaluate gliocyte metabolism in the basal ganglia region of both sides. The paired t test was used to test the difference between the two sides of the basal ganglia region. Linear regression was performed to evaluate the relation between mean phase value and age. Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated to analyze the relationship between the result of ESWAN and 1H-MRS. Results There was no difference between the two sides of the basal ganglia region in the mean phase value and Cho/Cr. But in mI/Cr the mean phase value of each nucleus in bilateral basal ganglia decreased with increasing age. There are 16 r-values between the mean phase value and Cho/Cr and mI/Cr in bilateral basal ganglia region. And each of all p-values is less than 0.001 (p < 0.001). Conclusions Iron deposition in the bilateral basal ganglia is associated with the change of gliocyte metabolism with increasing age. Iron deposition in each nucleus of the basal ganglia region changes with age. PMID:26925133

  5. Epitope extraction technique using a proteolytic magnetic reactor combined with Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry as a tool for the screening of potential vaccine lead peptides.

    PubMed

    Bílková, Z; Stefanescu, R; Cecal, R; Korecká, L; Ouzká, S; Jezová, J; Viovy, J-L; Przybylski, M

    2005-01-01

    Epitope extraction technique is based on the specific digestion of a target protein followed by immunoaffinity isolation of a specific recognition peptide. This technique, in combination with mass spectrometry, has been efficiently used for epitope identification. The major goal of this work was to utilize newly developed enzyme and immunoaffinity magnetic reactors for the epitope extraction procedure and confirm the efficiency of this improved system for epitope screening of proteins. Alginic acid-coated magnetite microparticles with immobilized TPCK-trypsin provided high working efficiency with low non-specific adsorption, digestion time in minutes and low frequency of missed cleavages. The sensitivity and specificity of tryptic fragmentation of the beta-amyloid-peptide Abeta (1-40) as a model polypeptide was confirmed by Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry analysis. The Sepharose reactor or immunoaffinity magnetic reactors, both with anti-amyloid-beta monoclonal antibodies, were used for specific isolation and identification of target peptides. In this way, the epitope extraction technique combined with mass spectrometric analysis is shown to be an excellent base for molecular screening of potential vaccine lead proteins. PMID:16322655

  6. Two-frequency heating technique at the 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biri, S.; Kitagawa, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Drentje, A. G.; Rácz, R.; Yano, K.; Kato, Y.; Sasaki, N.; Takasugi, W.

    2014-02-01

    The two-frequency heating technique was studied to increase the beam intensities of highly charged ions provided by the high-voltage extraction configuration (HEC) ion source at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The observed dependences on microwave power and frequency suggested that this technique improved plasma stability but it required precise frequency tuning and more microwave power than was available before 2013. Recently, a new, high-power (1200 W) wide band-width (17.1-18.5 GHz) travelling-wave-tube amplifier (TWTA) was installed. After some single tests with klystron and TWT amplifiers the simultaneous injection of the two microwaves has been successfully realized. The dependence of highly charged ions (HCI) currents on the superposed microwave power was studied by changing only the output power of one of the two amplifiers, alternatively. While operating the klystron on its fixed 18.0 GHz, the frequency of the TWTA was swept within its full limits (17.1-18.5 GHz), and the effect of this frequency on the HCI-production rate was examined under several operation conditions. As an overall result, new beam records of highly charged argon, krypton, and xenon beams were obtained at the NIRS-HEC ion source by this high-power two-frequency operation mode.

  7. Two-frequency heating technique at the 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Biri, S.; Rácz, R.; Sasaki, N.; Takasugi, W.

    2014-02-15

    The two-frequency heating technique was studied to increase the beam intensities of highly charged ions provided by the high-voltage extraction configuration (HEC) ion source at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The observed dependences on microwave power and frequency suggested that this technique improved plasma stability but it required precise frequency tuning and more microwave power than was available before 2013. Recently, a new, high-power (1200 W) wide band-width (17.1–18.5 GHz) travelling-wave-tube amplifier (TWTA) was installed. After some single tests with klystron and TWT amplifiers the simultaneous injection of the two microwaves has been successfully realized. The dependence of highly charged ions (HCI) currents on the superposed microwave power was studied by changing only the output power of one of the two amplifiers, alternatively. While operating the klystron on its fixed 18.0 GHz, the frequency of the TWTA was swept within its full limits (17.1–18.5 GHz), and the effect of this frequency on the HCI-production rate was examined under several operation conditions. As an overall result, new beam records of highly charged argon, krypton, and xenon beams were obtained at the NIRS-HEC ion source by this high-power two-frequency operation mode.

  8. Two-frequency heating technique at the 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences.

    PubMed

    Biri, S; Kitagawa, A; Muramatsu, M; Drentje, A G; Rácz, R; Yano, K; Kato, Y; Sasaki, N; Takasugi, W

    2014-02-01

    The two-frequency heating technique was studied to increase the beam intensities of highly charged ions provided by the high-voltage extraction configuration (HEC) ion source at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The observed dependences on microwave power and frequency suggested that this technique improved plasma stability but it required precise frequency tuning and more microwave power than was available before 2013. Recently, a new, high-power (1200 W) wide band-width (17.1-18.5 GHz) travelling-wave-tube amplifier (TWTA) was installed. After some single tests with klystron and TWT amplifiers the simultaneous injection of the two microwaves has been successfully realized. The dependence of highly charged ions (HCI) currents on the superposed microwave power was studied by changing only the output power of one of the two amplifiers, alternatively. While operating the klystron on its fixed 18.0 GHz, the frequency of the TWTA was swept within its full limits (17.1-18.5 GHz), and the effect of this frequency on the HCI-production rate was examined under several operation conditions. As an overall result, new beam records of highly charged argon, krypton, and xenon beams were obtained at the NIRS-HEC ion source by this high-power two-frequency operation mode. PMID:24593510

  9. Technique for measuring the Cooper-pair velocity, density, and mass using Doppler splitting of the plasmon resonance in low-dimensional superconductor microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Mishonov, T.M. )

    1994-08-01

    The creation of a Cooper-pair mass spectroscopy is suggested. The plasmons in low-dimensional superconductor structures (layers or wires in the dielectric background) are theoretically considered for this purpose. The Cooper-pair mass [ital m][sup *] (the parameter [ital m][sup *] in London electrodynamics) can be determined by measurements of the Doppler shift of the plasmon frequency when a direct current is applied through the superconductor. The plasmons with frequency [omega] lower than the superconducting gap 2[Delta] can be detected by the same far-infrared absorption technique and grating coupling used previously for investigation of two-dimensional plasmons in semiconductor microstructures and polaritons in condensed-matter physics.

  10. Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) With Improved Selectivity Achieved By Ion Pulse Compression Using In-Source Time-of-flight Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mishin, V. I.; Malinovsky, A. L.; Mishin, D. V.

    2009-03-17

    This paper describes for the first time the improved selectivity of the RILIS made possible by the time-of-flight (TOF) ion bunch compression. Brief description of the compression principles and some preliminary experimental results are presented. In the off-line experiments short ion peaks of natural Li, Na, K, Tm and Yb are observed as ions leave the RILIS-TOF structure. For Tm the ion peaks of 5 {mu}s half-height duration are detected and 1 {mu}s peaks for Sn are predicted. In view of the repetition rate of the ISOLDE-RILIS lasers it is hoped that the selectivity of Sn isotopes production may be improved as much as 100 employing the RILIS with the TOF ion bunch compression and a gating technique.

  11. Magnetic resonance annual, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1987-01-01

    This book features reviews of high-resolution MRI of the knee, MRI of the normal and ischmeic hip, MRI of the heart, and temporomandibular joint imaging, as well as thorough discussion on artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging. Contributors consider the clinical applications of gadolinium-DTPA in magnetic resonance imaging and the clinical use of partial saturation and saturation recovery sequences. Timely reports assess the current status of rapid MRI and describe a new rapid gated cine MRI technique. Also included is an analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow effects during MRI of the central nervous system.

  12. SPECTRAL IMAGING TECHNIQUES FOR GRAIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three spectral imaging techniques were employed for the purpose of assessing the quality of cereal grains. Each of these techniques provided unique, yet complementary, information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), also called magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was used to detect mobile components ...

  13. Gaussian-Beam Laser-Resonator Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Patricia L.; Bair, Clayton H.; Barnes, Norman

    1989-01-01

    Gaussian Beam Laser Resonator Program models laser resonators by use of Gaussian-beam-propagation techniques. Used to determine radii of beams as functions of position in laser resonators. Algorithm used in program has three major components. First, ray-transfer matrix for laser resonator must be calculated. Next, initial parameters of beam calculated. Finally, propagation of beam through optical elements computed. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN (Version 4.01).

  14. Tunable Resonant Scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagu, Jean I.

    1987-01-01

    The most attractive features of resonant scanners are high reliability and eternal life as well as extremely low wobble and jitter. Power consumption is also low, electronic drive is simple, and the device is capable of handling large beams. All of these features are delivered at a low cost in a small package. The resonant scanner's use in numerous high precision applications, however, has been limited because of the difficulty in controlling its phase and resonant frequency. This paper introduces the concept of tunable/controllable resonant scanners, discusses their features, and offers a number of tuning techniques. It describes two angular scanner designs and presents data on tunable range and life tests. It also reviews applications for these new tunable resonant scanners that preserve the desirable features of earlier models while removing the old problems with synchronization or time base flexibility. The three major types of raster scanning applications where the tunable resonant scanner may be of benefit are: 1. In systems with multiple time bases such as multiple scanner networks or with scanners keyed to a common clock (the line frequency or data source) or a machine with multiple resonant scanners. A typical application is image and text transmission, also a printer with a large data base where a buffer is uneconomical. 2. In systems sharing data processing or laser equipment for reasons of cost or capacity, typically multiple work station manufacturing processes or graphic processes. 3. In systems with extremely precise time bases where the frequency stability of conventional scanners cannot be relied upon.

  15. MACHINERY RESONANCE AND DRILLING

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R.; Fowley, M.

    2010-01-23

    New developments in vibration analysis better explain machinery resonance, through an example of drill bit chattering during machining of rusted steel. The vibration of an operating drill motor was measured, the natural frequency of an attached spring was measured, and the two frequencies were compared to show that the system was resonant. For resonance to occur, one of the natural frequencies of a structural component must be excited by a cyclic force of the same frequency. In this case, the frequency of drill bit chattering due to motor rotation equaled the spring frequency (cycles per second), and the system was unstable. A soft rust coating on the steel to be drilled permitted chattering to start at the drill bit tip, and the bit oscillated on and off of the surface, which increased the wear rate of the drill bit. This resonant condition is typically referred to as a motor critical speed. The analysis presented here quantifies the vibration associated with this particular critical speed problem, using novel techniques to describe resonance.

  16. Resonances in Positronium Hydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, Richard J.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recently, Ho and his colleagues have calculated the positions and widths of a series of resonances in the Ps+H scattering system, using the complex -rotation method and have compared them with estimates that I made many years ago using a quite different technique. I assumed that the resonance mechanism was the existence in the rearrangement channel [e+ + H-] of an infinite series of perturbed Coulomb bound states. Although these must be broadened and shifted by coupling with the open scattering channel, I expected them to lie very close to the actual resonance positions. To verify this, I did a model calculation for S-waves, including the coupling, and found that the first two resonances were not shifted very far from their unperturbed position. The new, detailed calculation agrees with this result, but when the P-wave was examined it was found, surprisingly, that the lowest resonance indeed moved up in energy by a large amount. With the help of Joseph DiRienzi of the College of Notre Dame of Maryland I am now extending the old calculation to P- and D-waves, in an attempt to understand this unexpected energy shift. Results will be presented at the Workshop.

  17. Auger resonant Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Azuma, Y.; LeBrun, T.; MacDonald, M.; Southworth, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    As noted above, traditional spectroscopy of the electronic structure of the inner shells of atoms, molecules, and solids is limited by the lifetime broadening of the core-excited states. This limitation can also be avoided with the non-radiative analog of X-ray Raman scattering - resonant Auger Raman spectroscopy. We have used this technique to study the K-shell excitation spectrum of argon as the photon energy is continuously scanned across threshold.

  18. GAUSSIAN BEAM LASER RESONATOR PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    In designing a laser cavity, the laser engineer is frequently concerned with more than the stability of the resonator. Other considerations include the size of the beam at various optical surfaces within the resonator or the performance of intracavity line-narrowing or other optical elements. Laser resonators obey the laws of Gaussian beam propagation, not geometric optics. The Gaussian Beam Laser Resonator Program models laser resonators using Gaussian ray trace techniques. It can be used to determine the propagation of radiation through laser resonators. The algorithm used in the Gaussian Beam Resonator program has three major components. First, the ray transfer matrix for the laser resonator must be calculated. Next calculations of the initial beam parameters, specifically, the beam stability, the beam waist size and location for the resonator input element, and the wavefront curvature and beam radius at the input surface to the first resonator element are performed. Finally the propagation of the beam through the optical elements is computed. The optical elements can be modeled as parallel plates, lenses, mirrors, dummy surfaces, or Gradient Index (GRIN) lenses. A Gradient Index lens is a good approximation of a laser rod operating under a thermal load. The optical system may contain up to 50 elements. In addition to the internal beam elements the optical system may contain elements external to the resonator. The Gaussian Beam Resonator program was written in Microsoft FORTRAN (Version 4.01). It was developed for the IBM PS/2 80-071 microcomputer and has been implemented on an IBM PC compatible under MS DOS 3.21. The program was developed in 1988 and requires approximately 95K bytes to operate.

  19. Discrete resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivaldi, Franco

    2015-12-01

    The concept of resonance has been instrumental to the study of Hamiltonian systems with divided phase space. One can also define such systems over discrete spaces, which have a finite or countable number of points, but in this new setting the notion of resonance must be re-considered from scratch. I review some recent developments in the area of arithmetic dynamics which outline some salient features of linear and nonlinear stable (elliptic) orbits over a discrete space, and also underline the difficulties that emerge in their analysis.

  20. Discrete resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivaldi, Franco

    The concept of resonance has been instrumental to the study of Hamiltonian systems with divided phase space. One can also define such systems over discrete spaces, which have a finite or countable number of points, but in this new setting the notion of resonance must be re-considered from scratch. I review some recent developments in the area of arithmetic dynamics which outline some salient features of linear and nonlinear stable (elliptic) orbits over a discrete space, and also underline the difficulties that emerge in their analysis.

  1. Laser Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, L. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An optical resonator cavity configuration has a unitary mirror with oppositely directed convex and concave reflective surfaces disposed into one fold and concertedly reversing both ends of a beam propagating from a laser rod disposed between two total internal reflection prisms. The optical components are rigidly positioned with perpendicularly crossed virtual rooflines by a compact optical bed. The rooflines of the internal reflection prisms, are arranged perpendicularly to the axis of the laser beam and to the optical axes of the optical resonator components.

  2. Mode Orientation Control For Sapphire Dielectric Ring Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago, David G.; Dick, G. John; Prata, Aluizio

    1996-01-01

    Small sapphire tuning wedge used in technique for solving mode-purity problem associated with sapphire dielectric-ring resonator part of cryogenic microwave frequency discriminator. Breaks quasi-degeneracy of two modes and allows selective coupling to just one mode. Wedge mounted on axle entering resonator cavity and rotated while resonator cryogenically operating in vacuum. Furthermore, axle moved vertically to tune resonant frequency.

  3. Use of surface plasmon resonance to study the elongation kinetics and the binding properties of the highly amyloidogenic Aβ(1-42) peptide, synthesized by depsi-peptide technique.

    PubMed

    Stravalaci, Matteo; Beeg, Marten; Salmona, Mario; Gobbi, Marco

    2011-01-15

    A wide variety of human diseases are associated with the formation of highly organized protein aggregates termed amyloid fibrils, whose growth (elongation) is due to the assembly of the basic molecular units (monomers) in a sequential polymerization process. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology has been proposed as a powerful approach to study in detail the fibril elongation of some amyloidogenic peptides. In particular, the injection of monomers over immobilized fibrils allows to follow in real time, and on a very short time-scale, the kinetics of fibril growth. In the present study we confirmed and extended this application of SPR to Aβ(1-42), hampered till now by the very pronounced aggregation propensity of this peptide, involved in Alzheimer disease. We took advantage of a new synthetic strategy ("depsi-peptide" technique) which allows to obtain reliable seed-free solutions (monomers) as well as fibrils of Aβ(1-42). SPR data were consistent with a "dock-and-lock" mechanism underlying Aβ(1-42) elongation process. The setup of an assay monitoring the elongation kinetics is very useful for investigating potential anti-amyloidogenic compounds. Moreover, the possibility to reliably immobilize both Aβ(1-42) monomers and fibrils allows to measure the binding affinities of putative ligands for these different species. The approach applied here to Aβ(1-42) might well be also applied to the study of other fibrillogenic peptides/proteins or to the study of polymerization reactions in general. PMID:21112205

  4. Characterization of sodium transport in Acholeplasma laidlawii B cells and in lipid vesicles containing purified A. laidlawii (Na+-Mg2+)-ATPase by using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and 22Na tracer techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, S; Lewis, R N; George, R; Sykes, B D; McElhaney, R N

    1988-01-01

    The active transport of sodium ions in live Acholeplasma laidlawii B cells and in lipid vesicles containing the (Na+-Mg2+)-ATPase from the plasma membrane of this microorganism was studied by 23Na nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic and 22Na tracer techniques, respectively. In live A. laidlawii B cells, the transport of sodium was an active process in which metabolic energy was harnessed for the extrusion of sodium ions against a concentration gradient. The process was inhibited by low temperatures and by the formation of gel state lipid in the plasma membrane of this organism. In reconstituted proteoliposomes containing the purified (Na+-Mg2+)-ATPase, the hydrolysis of ATP was accompanied by the transport of sodium ions into the lipid vesicles, and the transport process was impaired by reagents known to inhibit ATPase activity. At the normal growth temperature (37 degrees C), this transport process required a maximum of 1 mol of ATP per mol of sodium ion transported. Together, these results provide direct experimental evidence that the (Na+-Mg2+)-ATPase of the Acholeplasma laidlawii B membrane is the cation pump which maintains the low levels of intracellular sodium characteristic of this microorganism. PMID:2973459

  5. Whole-body imaging of adoptively transferred T cells using magnetic resonance imaging, single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography techniques, with a focus on regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Leech, J M; Sharif-Paghaleh, E; Maher, J; Livieratos, L; Lechler, R I; Mullen, G E; Lombardi, G; Smyth, L A

    2013-01-01

    Cell-based therapies using natural or genetically modified regulatory T cells (Tregs) have shown significant promise as immune-based therapies. One of the main difficulties facing the further advancement of these therapies is that the fate and localization of adoptively transferred Tregs is largely unknown. The ability to dissect the migratory pathway of these cells in a non-invasive manner is of vital importance for the further development of in-vivo cell-based immunotherapies, as this technology allows the fate of the therapeutically administered cell to be imaged in real time. In this review we will provide an overview of the current clinical imaging techniques used to track T cells and Tregs in vivo, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In addition, we will discuss how the finding of these studies can be used, in the context of transplantation, to define the most appropriate Treg subset required for cellular therapy. PMID:23574314

  6. Development of a Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Immunosensor for Detection of 10 Major O-Antigens on Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli, with a Gel Displacement Technique To Remove Bound Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Tomomi; Miyake, Shiro; Nakano, Satoshi; Morimura, Hiroyuki; Hirakawa, Yuki; Nagao, Miki; Iijima, Yoshio; Narita, Hiroshi; Ichiyama, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    A surface plasmon resonance-based immunosensor (SPR-immunosensor) was developed for the detection of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) belonging to the O-antigen groups O26, O91, O103, O111, O115, O121, O128, O145, O157, and O159. The polyclonal antibodies (PoAbs) generated against each of the STEC O-antigen types in rabbits were purified and were immobilized on the sensor chip at 0.5 mg/mL. The limit of detection for STEC O157 by the SPR-immunosensor was found to be 6.3 × 10(4) cells for 75 s. Each of the examined 10 O-antigens on the STECs was detected by the corresponding PoAb with almost no reaction to the other PoAbs. The detected STECs were sufficiently removed from the PoAbs using gelatin or agarose gel without deactivation of the PoAbs, enabling repeatable use of the sensor chip. The developed SPR-immunosensor can be applied for the detection of multiple STEC O-antigens. Furthermore, the new antigen removal technique using the gel displacement approach can be utilized with various immunosensors to improve the detection of pathogens in clinical and public health settings. PMID:27243947

  7. Tunable Micro- and Nanomechanical Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-Ming; Hu, Kai-Ming; Peng, Zhi-Ke; Meng, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Advances in micro- and nanofabrication technologies have enabled the development of novel micro- and nanomechanical resonators which have attracted significant attention due to their fascinating physical properties and growing potential applications. In this review, we have presented a brief overview of the resonance behavior and frequency tuning principles by varying either the mass or the stiffness of resonators. The progress in micro- and nanomechanical resonators using the tuning electrode, tuning fork, and suspended channel structures and made of graphene have been reviewed. We have also highlighted some major influencing factors such as large-amplitude effect, surface effect and fluid effect on the performances of resonators. More specifically, we have addressed the effects of axial stress/strain, residual surface stress and adsorption-induced surface stress on the sensing and detection applications and discussed the current challenges. We have significantly focused on the active and passive frequency tuning methods and techniques for micro- and nanomechanical resonator applications. On one hand, we have comprehensively evaluated the advantages and disadvantages of each strategy, including active methods such as electrothermal, electrostatic, piezoelectrical, dielectric, magnetomotive, photothermal, mode-coupling as well as tension-based tuning mechanisms, and passive techniques such as post-fabrication and post-packaging tuning processes. On the other hand, the tuning capability and challenges to integrate reliable and customizable frequency tuning methods have been addressed. We have additionally concluded with a discussion of important future directions for further tunable micro- and nanomechanical resonators. PMID:26501294

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Paul H.; Brainard, James R.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ryan, Robert R.

    1997-01-01

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC.sub.16 H.sub.14 N.sub.6. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1997-12-30

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 10 figs.

  10. Analysis of the performance of a phase alternated multiple pulse sequence in spin I = 7/2 zero-field NQR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, A.

    Zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of solids containing quadrupole nuclei usually results in broad spectral lines. This line-broadening is due mainly to the inhomogeneity of the electric field gradient (EFG) at the quadrupolar nuclear site. High resolution spectra of such solids can be obtained with the application of suitably designed multiple radiofrequency (RF) pulse sequences. The performance is reported for a periodic and cyclic phase alternated multiple RF pulse sequence (PAPS) in a spin I = 7/2 system in zero external magnetic field. Average Hamiltonian theory based on the Magnus expansion is used to solve the time-dependent Liouville-von Neumann equation of motion of the spin system under the effect of the PAPS sequence. Single transition operators are employed in the spin dynamics calculations. It is shown that the multiple pulse seqeuncearation pulse, suppresses the EFG inhomogeneity to a maximum extent when = 2 . [-- ] 2 , where is the prep1 2 2 N 1 2 1

  11. Single spin magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  12. Single spin magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution. PMID:27378060

  13. Near-resonance-Rayleigh scattering measurement on a resonant laser-driven barium plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nee, T.A.

    1985-06-01

    Near-resonance-Rayleigh scattering is used as a space-time-resolved density probe on a resonant laser-driven barium plasma. Feasibility of this technique was investigated. Comparison to other methods such as absorption technique is made and found to be consistent.

  14. Resonance frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajiv K; Padmanabhan, Thallam V

    2011-01-01

    Initial stability at the placement and development of osseointegration are two major issues for implant survival. Implant stability is a mechanical phenomenon which is related to the local bone quality and quantity, type of implant, and placement technique used. The application of a simple, clinically applicable, non-invasive test to assess implant stability and osseointegration is considered highly desirable. Resonance frequency analysis (RFA) is one of such techniques which is most frequently used now days. The aim of this paper was to review and analyze critically the current available literature in the field of RFA, and to also discuss based on scientific evidence, the prognostic value of RFA to detect implants at risk of failure. A search was made using the PubMed database to find all the literature published on "Resonance frequency analysis for implant stability" till date. Articles discussed in vivo or in vitro studies comparing RFA with other methods of implant stability measurement and articles discussing its reliability were thoroughly reviewed and discussed. A limited number of clinical reports were found. Various studies have demonstrated the feasibility and predictability of the technique. However, most of these articles are based on retrospective data or uncontrolled cases. Randomized, prospective, parallel-armed longitudinal human trials are based on short-term results and long-term follow up are still scarce in this field. Nonetheless, from available literature, it may be concluded that RFA technique evaluates implant stability as a function of stiffness of the implant bone interface and is influenced by factors such as bone type, exposed implant height above the alveolar crest. Resonance frequency analysis could serve as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for detecting the implant stability of dental implants during the healing stages and in subsequent routine follow up care after treatment. Future studies, preferably randomized, prospective

  15. Whole-body three-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) angiography with parallel imaging techniques on a multichannel MR system for the detection of various systemic arterial diseases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiang; Chen, Bin; Wang, Jian-Hua; Zeng, Meng-Su; Wang, Yi-Xiang

    2006-11-01

    Using a 1.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) imager equipped with 32 receiving channels and integrated parallel acquisition techniques, 37 patients underwent whole-body three-dimensional (3D) contrast-enhanced MR angiography (WB 3D CE MRA). The patients included had clinically documented or suspected peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD, n = 19), Takayasu arteritis (n = 8), polyarteritis nodosa (n = 1), type-B dissection (n = 4), thoracic and/or abdominal aneurysm (n = 5). Sixty-eight surface coils were employed to encompass the whole body. Four 3D CE MRA stations were acquired successively through automatic table moving. The spatial resolution was 1.6 x 1.0 mm and slice thickness was 1.5 mm for all stations. A total scan range of 188 cm was acquired. Overall image quality of each arterial segment and venous overlay were assessed. The depiction of various systemic arterial diseases was evaluated and compared, in 20 patients, with other imaging modalities. This WB 3D CE MRA yielded a detailed display of the arterial system with an average MR room time of 17.4 min. The image quality was considered diagnostic in 99.3% of the arterial segments. In 7 of 19 patients with PAOD, WB MRA showed additional vascular narrowing apart from peripheral arterial disease. In nine patients with vasculitis, WB MRA depicted luminal irregularity, narrowing or occlusion, aneurysm, and collateral circulation involving multiple vascular segments. WB MRA also clearly revealed the severity and extent of dissection and aortic aneurysm. In 20 cases where additional imaging investigations have been carried out, the vascular pathologies demonstrated by WB MRA agree with these additional imaging investigations. PMID:17143719

  16. Forensic age estimation via 3-T magnetic resonance imaging of ossification of the proximal tibial and distal femoral epiphyses: Use of a T2-weighted fast spin-echo technique.

    PubMed

    Ekizoglu, Oguzhan; Hocaoglu, Elif; Inci, Ercan; Can, Ismail Ozgur; Aksoy, Sema; Kazimoglu, Cemal

    2016-03-01

    Radiation exposure during forensic age estimation is associated with ethical implications. It is important to prevent repetitive radiation exposure when conducting advanced ultrasonography (USG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility of 3.0-T MRI in determining the degree of ossification of the distal femoral and proximal tibial epiphyses in a group of Turkish population. We retrospectively evaluated coronal T2-weighted and turbo spin-echo sequences taken upon MRI of 503 patients (305 males, 198 females; age 10-30 years) using a five-stage method. Intra- and interobserver variations were very low. (Intraobserver reliability was κ=0.919 for the distal femoral epiphysis and κ=0.961 for the proximal tibial epiphysis, and interobserver reliability was κ=0.836 for the distal femoral epiphysis and κ=0.885 for the proximal tibial epiphysis.) Spearman's rank correlation analysis indicated a significant positive relationship between age and the extent of ossification of the distal femoral and proximal tibial epiphyses (p<0.001). Comparison of male and female data revealed significant between-gender differences in the ages at first attainment of stages 2, 3, and 4 ossifications of the distal femoral epiphysis and stage 1 and 4 ossifications of the proximal tibial epiphysis (p<0.05). The earliest ages at which ossification of stages 3, 4, and 5 was evident in the distal femoral epiphysis were 14, 17, and 22 years in males and 13, 16, and 21 years in females, respectively. Proximal tibial epiphysis of stages 3, 4, and 5 ossification was first noted at ages 14, 17, and 18 years in males and 13, 15, and 16 years in females, respectively. MRI of the distal femoral and proximal tibial epiphyses is an alternative, noninvasive, and reliable technique to estimate age. PMID:26797254

  17. Study of lignification by noninvasive techniques in growing maize internodes. An investigation by Fourier transform infrared cross-polarization-magic angle spinning 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and immunocytochemical transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Joseleau, J P; Ruel, K

    1997-07-01

    Noninvasive techniques were used for the study in situ of lignification in the maturing cell walls of the maize (Zea mays L.) stem. Within the longitudinal axis of a developing internode all of the stages of lignification can be found. The synthesis of the three types of lignins, p-hydroxyphenylpropane (H), guaiacyl (G), and syringyl (S), was investigated in situ by cross-polarization-magic angle spinning 13C-solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and immunocytochemical electron microscopy. The first lignin appearing in the parenchyma is of the G-type preceeding the incorporation of S nuclei in the later stages. However, in vascular bundles, typical absorption bands of S nuclei are visible in the Fourier transform infrared spectra at the earliest stage of lignification. Immunocytochemical determination of the three types of lignin in transmission electron microscopy was possible thanks to the use of antisera prepared against synthetic H, G, and the mixed GS dehydrogenative polymers (K. Ruel, O. Faix, J.P. Joseleau [1994] J Trace Microprobe Tech 12: 247-265). The specificity of the immunological probes demonstrated that there are differences in the relative temporal synthesis of the H, G, and GS lignins in the different tissues undergoing lignification. Considering the intermonomeric linkages predominating in the antigens used for the preparation of the immunological probes, the relative intensities of the labeling obtained provided, for the first time to our knowledge, information about the macromolecular nature of lignins (condensed versus noncondensed) in relation to their ultrastructural localization and development stage. PMID:9232887

  18. [Magnetic resonance, an introduction].

    PubMed

    Cabrera Rueda, D J; Fernández Herrerías, G

    2000-09-01

    What would you explain to a patient if he/she had to undergo a magnetic resonance imagery session? Do you know if a person wearing a pacemaker can undergo an MRI? These and many other questions are answered in the following article since magnetic resonance imagery is a very useful diagnostic medium; however, it is one which not everyone has been able to get to know and use. The authors shed light on this diagnostic technique for nurses starting with its physical foundations; since knowing these aids professionals to correctly plan our treatments and improves the attention provided to patients who undergo this test. The authors also list the specific components in this device, the possible biological effects, the detractions and some basic recommendations. PMID:11111673

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of acquired cardiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Carrol, C L; Higgins, C B; Caputo, G R

    1996-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, advances in magnetic resonance imaging techniques have increased the accuracy and applicability of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. These advances have improved the utility of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating cardiac morphology, blood flow, and myocardial contractility, all significant diagnostic features in the evaluation of the patient with acquired heart disease. Utilization of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging has been limited, primarily due to clinical reliance upon nuclear scintigraphy and echocardiography. Recent developments in fast and ultrafast imaging should continue to enhance the significance of magnetic resonance imaging in this field. Widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the cardiovascular system will ultimately depend upon its maturation into a comprehensive, noninvasive imaging technique for the varying manifestations of acquired heart disease, including cardiomyopathy, ischemic heart disease, and acquired valvular disease. Images PMID:8792545

  20. NQR-NMR studies of higher alcohol synthesis Cu-Co catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, June 15--September 15, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-17

    Our previous studies (1,2) on the zerofield NMR spectra of Cu/Co catalysts revealed that the method of preparation sensitively influences the magnetic character of the Catalyst. Catalytic studies of the earlier investigators also (3) show similar influence on the product selectivity and indicate reproducible performance is critically dependent on the control and rigor of the preparation technique. To compliment the NMR results, we have made a thorough investigation of the Hysteresis character of the Cu/Co catalysts with the metal ratio varying from 0.2 to 4.0.

  1. If It's Resonance, What is Resonating?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon under the name "resonance," which, is based on the mathematical analogy between mechanical resonance and the behavior of wave functions in quantum mechanical exchange phenomena was described. The resonating system does not have a structure intermediate between those involved in the resonance, but instead a structure which is further…

  2. Thermal nonlinearity in silicon microcylindrical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukovic, Natasha; Healy, Noel; Mehta, Priyanth; Day, Todd D.; Sazio, Pier J. A.; Badding, John V.; Peacock, Anna C.

    2012-04-01

    We explore the thermally induced nonlinearity in hydrogenated amorphous silicon microcylindrical resonators that are fabricated from the silicon optical fiber platform. In particular, we use a pump-probe technique to experimentally demonstrate thermally induced optical modulation and determine the response time. Through characterization of the thermal properties and the associated resonance wavelength shifts, we will show that it is possible to infer the material absorption coefficient for a range of whispering gallery mode resonators.

  3. Optical Microspherical Resonators for Biomedical Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Soria, Silvia; Berneschi, Simone; Brenci, Massimo; Cosi, Franco; Conti, Gualtiero Nunzi; Pelli, Stefano; Righini, Giancarlo C.

    2011-01-01

    Optical resonators play an ubiquitous role in modern optics. A particular class of optical resonators is constituted by spherical dielectric structures, where optical rays are total internal reflected. Due to minimal reflection losses and to potentially very low material absorption, these guided modes, known as whispering gallery modes, can confer the resonator an exceptionally high quality factor Q, leading to high energy density, narrow resonant-wavelength lines and a lengthy cavity ringdown. These attractive characteristics make these miniaturized optical resonators especially suited as laser cavities and resonant filters, but also as very sensitive sensors. First, a brief analysis is presented of the characteristics of microspherical resonators, of their fabrication methods, and of the light coupling techniques. Then, we attempt to overview some of the recent advances in the development of microspherical biosensors, underlining a number of important applications in the biomedical field. PMID:22346603

  4. Optically detected magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, Aharon; Shapiro, Guy; Fischer, Ran; London, Paz; Gershoni, David

    2015-01-19

    Optically detected magnetic resonance provides ultrasensitive means to detect and image a small number of electron and nuclear spins, down to the single spin level with nanoscale resolution. Despite the significant recent progress in this field, it has never been combined with the power of pulsed magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Here, we demonstrate how these two methodologies can be integrated using short pulsed magnetic field gradients to spatially encode the sample. This result in what we denote as an 'optically detected magnetic resonance imaging' technique. It offers the advantage that the image is acquired in parallel from all parts of the sample, with well-defined three-dimensional point-spread function, and without any loss of spectroscopic information. In addition, this approach may be used in the future for parallel but yet spatially selective efficient addressing and manipulation of the spins in the sample. Such capabilities are of fundamental importance in the field of quantum spin-based devices and sensors.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    NMR is remarkable in the number of innovations that have appeared and become established within the past five years. This thoroughly up-to-date account of the field explains fundamentals and applications of the NMR phenomenon from the viewpoint of a physical chemist. Beginning with descriptions of basic concepts involved in continuous wave operation, the book goes on to cover spectral analysis, relaxation phenomena, the effects of pulses, the Fourier transform model, double resonance and the effects of chemical exchange and quadrupolar interactions. The book also includes the new techniques for work on solids and for complicated pulse sequences, plus abundant figures and illustrative spectra.

  6. Nanotube resonator devices

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Zettl, Alexander K; Weldon, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-06

    A fully-functional radio receiver fabricated from a single nanotube is being disclosed. Simultaneously, a single nanotube can perform the functions of all major components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A DC voltage source, as supplied by a battery, can power the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, successful music and voice reception has been demonstrated. Also disclosed are a radio transmitter and a mass sensor using a nanotube resonator device.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of radiation optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, C.F.; Schatz, N.J.; Glaser, J.S. )

    1990-10-15

    Three patients with delayed radiation optic neuropathy after radiation therapy for parasellar neoplasms underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The affected optic nerves and chiasms showed enlargement and focal gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement. The magnetic resonance imaging technique effectively detected and defined anterior visual pathway changes of radionecrosis and excluded the clinical possibility of visual loss because of tumor recurrence.

  8. Techniques for Vocal Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiest, Lori

    1997-01-01

    Outlines a series of simple yet effective practices, techniques, and tips for improving the singing voice and minimizing stress on the vocal chords. Describes the four components for producing vocal sound: respiration, phonation, resonation, and articulation. Provides exercises for each and lists symptoms of sickness and vocal strain. (MJP)

  9. Pocket atlas of cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Haughton, V.M.; Daniels, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    This atlas illustrates normal cerebral anatomy in magnetic resonance images. From their studies in cerebral anatomy utilizing cryomicrotome and other techniques, the authors selected more than 100 high-resolution images that represent the most clinically useful scans.

  10. Resonance IR: a coherent multidimensional analogue of resonance Raman.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Erin S; Neff-Mallon, Nathan A; Handali, Jonathan D; Wright, John C

    2014-05-01

    This work demonstrates the use of triply resonant sum frequency (TRSF) spectroscopy as a "resonance IR" analogue to resonance Raman spectroscopy. TRSF is a four-wave-mixing process where three lasers with independent frequencies interact coherently with a sample to generate an output at their triple summation frequency. The first two lasers are in the infrared and result in two vibrational excitations, while the third laser is visible and induces a two-quantum anti-Stokes resonance Raman transition. The signal intensity grows when the laser frequencies are all in resonance with coupled vibrational and electronic states. The method therefore provides electronic enhancement of IR-active vibrational modes. These modes may be buried beneath solvent in the IR spectrum and also be Raman-inactive and therefore inaccessible by other techniques. The method is presented on the centrosymmetric complex copper phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate. In this study, the two vibrational frequencies were scanned across ring-breathing modes, while the visible frequency was left in resonance with the copper phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate Q band, resulting in a two-dimensional infrared plot that also reveals coupling between vibrational states. TRSF has the potential to be a very useful probe of structurally similar biological motifs such as hemes, as well as synthetic transition-metal complexes. PMID:24707979

  11. Virtual magnetic resonance colonography

    PubMed Central

    Debatin, J; Lauenstein, T

    2003-01-01

    Colorectal cancer screening has vast potential. Beyond considerations for cost and diagnostic accuracy, the effectiveness of any colorectal screening strategy will be dependent on the degree of patient acceptance. Magnetic resonance (MR) colonography has been shown to be accurate regarding the detection of clinically relevant colonic polyps exceeding 10 mm in size, with reported sensitivity and specificity values exceeding 95%. To further increase patient acceptance, strategies for fecal tagging have recently been developed. By modulating the signal of fecal material to be identical to the signal characteristics of the enema applied to distend the colon, fecal tagging in conjunction with MR colonography obviates the need for bowel cleansing. The review will describe the techniques underlying MR colonography and describe early clinical experience with fecal tagging techniques. PMID:12746264

  12. Microwave and millimeter-wave resonant tunneling diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sollner, T. C. L. Gerhard; Brown, Elliott R.; Goodhue, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    Several demonstrated resonant tunneling devices including oscillators, mixers, multiplexers, and a variable negative resistance are discussed. Techniques of the millimeter/submillimeter regime are also discussed.

  13. A Comparison of FTNMR and FTIR Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahn, Myong-Ku

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared are two spectroscopic methods that commonly use the Fourier transform technique. Discussed are the similarities and differences in the use of the Fourier transform in these two spectroscopic techniques. (CW)

  14. Resonator modeling by field tracing: a flexible approach for fully vectorial laser resonator modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asoubar, Daniel; Wyrowski, Frank; Schweitzer, Hagen; Hellmann, Christian; Kuhn, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays lasers cover a broad spectrum of applications, like laser material processing, metrology and communications. Therefore a broad variety of different lasers, containing various active media and resonator setups, are used to provide high design flexibility. The optimization of such multi-parameter laser setups requires powerful simulation techniques. In literature mainly three practical resonator modeling techniques can be found: Rigorous techniques, e.g. the finite element method (FEM), approximated solutions based on paraxial Gaussian beam tracing by ABCD matrices and the Fox and Li algorithm are used to analyze transversal resonator modes. All of these existing approaches have in common, that only a single simulation technique is used for the whole resonator. In contrast we reformulate the scalar Fox and Li integral equation for resonator eigenmode calculation into a fully vectorial field tracing operator equation. This allows the flexible combination of different modeling techniques in different subdomains of the resonator. The work introduces the basic concepts of field tracing in resonators to calculate vectorial, transversal eigenmodes of stable and unstable resonators.

  15. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    DOEpatents

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  16. Indirect (J) coupling of inequivalent ^75As nuclei in crystalline and glassy As_2Se3 and As_2S_3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, J.; Ahn, E.; Hart, P.; Williams, G. A.; Taylor, P. C.; Facelli, J. C.

    2004-03-01

    Indirect nuclear spin-spin couplings, or J couplings, were first observed in liquids using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques [1]. Because of the nature of the quadrupole Hamiltonian in pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) experiments J couplings should be observable between inequivalent nuclei [2]. We present results of ^75As NQR measurements in crystalline and glassy As_2S3 and As_2Se_3. These ^75As NQR measurements were performed at various frequencies between about 55 and 75 MHz. The NQR frequency is determined by the electric field gradient (EFG) at the nucleus, and in these materials there are two non-equivalent sites in each of the two crystals. The J coupling can occur through several chemical bonds, and in our case this coupling must go through two As-S covalent bonds since the nearest neighbor As sites are separated by chalcogen atoms. Instead of the monotonic decay expected from relaxation spin-spin theory, the decays of the NQR Hahn echoes following a 90^0-180^0pulse sequence exhibit damped oscillations superimposed on an exponential decay. These damped oscillations can be explained by an indirect coupling (J coupling). Experimental values of the J couplings were obtained from the periods of the oscillations and calculations of the most probable transitions using 2^nd order perturbation theory. The value estimated by this method for the ^2J(^75As-S-^75As) in crystalline As_2S3 compares well with empirical estimates, which are obtained using an existing value of ^2J(^31P-S-^31P) and known scalings with atomic number from the literature. 1. E. L. Hahn and D. E Maxwell, Phys. Rev. 84, 1246 (1951). 2. T. P. Das and E. L. Hahn, Solid State Physics, supp 1, Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy, p. 28, Academic Press 1958.

  17. System and method for regulating resonant inverters

    DOEpatents

    Stevanovic, Ljubisa Dragoljub; Zane, Regan Andrew

    2007-08-28

    A technique is provided for direct digital phase control of resonant inverters based on sensing of one or more parameters of the resonant inverter. The resonant inverter control system includes a switching circuit for applying power signals to the resonant inverter and a sensor for sensing one or more parameters of the resonant inverter. The one or more parameters are representative of a phase angle. The resonant inverter control system also includes a comparator for comparing the one or more parameters to a reference value and a digital controller for determining timing of the one or more parameters and for regulating operation of the switching circuit based upon the timing of the one or more parameters.

  18. Persistence, resistance, resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsadka, Maayan

    Sound cannot travel in a vacuum, physically or socially. The ways in which sound operates are a result of acoustic properties, and the ways by which it is considered to be music are a result of social constructions. Therefore, music is always political, regardless of its content: the way it is performed and composed; the choice of instrumentation, notation, tuning; the medium of its distribution; its inherent hierarchy and power dynamics, and more. My compositional praxis makes me less interested in defining a relationship between music and politics than I am in erasing---or at least blurring---the borders between them. In this paper I discuss the aesthetics of resonance and echo in their metaphorical, physical, social, and musical manifestations. Also discussed is a political aesthetic of resonance, manifested through protest chants. I transcribe and analyze common protest chants from around the world, categorizing and unifying them as universal crowd-mobilizing rhythms. These ideas are explored musically in three pieces. Sumud: Rhetoric of Resistance in Three Movements, for two pianos and two percussion players, is a musical interpretation of the political/social concept of sumud, an Arabic word that literally means "steadfastness" and represents Palestinian non-violent resistance. The piece is based on common protest rhythms and uses the acoustic properties inherent to the instruments. The second piece, Three Piano Studies, extends some of the musical ideas and techniques used in Sumud, and explores the acoustic properties and resonance of the piano. The final set of pieces is part of my Critical Mess Music Project. These are site-specific musical works that attempt to blur the boundaries between audience, performers and composer, in part by including people without traditional musical training in the process of music making. These pieces use the natural structure and resonance of an environment, in this case, locations on the UCSC campus, and offer an active

  19. Doubly rotated contoured quartz resonators.

    PubMed

    Sinha, B K

    2001-09-01

    Doubly rotated contoured quartz resonators are used in the design of temperature-compensated stable clocks and dual-mode sensors for simultaneous measurements of pressure and temperature. The design of these devices is facilitated by models that can predict frequency spectra associated with the three thickness modes and temperature and stress-induced frequency changes as a function of crystalline orientation. The Stevens-Tiersten technique for the analysis of the C-mode of a doubly rotated contoured quartz resonator is extended to include the other two thickness modes. Computational results for harmonic and anharmonic overtones of all three thickness modes of such resonators help in optimizing the radius of curvature of the contour and electrode shape for suppression of unwanted modes and prevention of activity dips. The temperature and stress-induced changes in thickness-mode resonator frequencies are calculated from a perturbation technique for small dynamic fields superposed on a static bias. The static bias refers to either a temperature or stress-induced static deformation of the resonator plate. Phenomenological models are also used for calculating the temperature and stress-induced changes in resonant frequencies as a function of crystalline orientation. Results for the SBTC-cut quartz plate with a spherical convex contour of 260 mm indicate that normal trapping occurs for the third (n = 3) and fifth (n = 5) harmonic of the A-mode, the fundamental (n = 1) and third (n = 3) harmonic of the B-mode, and the fundamental (n = 1) and fifth (n = 5) harmonic of the C-mode. PMID:11570746

  20. Cancellation of environmental effects in resonant mass sensors based on resonance mode and effective mass

    SciTech Connect

    Naeli, Kianoush; Brand, Oliver

    2009-06-15

    A novel technique is developed to cancel the effect of environmental parameters, e.g., temperature and humidity, in resonant mass sensing. Utilizing a single resonator, the environmental cancellation is achieved by monitoring a pair of resonant overtones and the effective sensed mass in those overtones. As an eminent advantage, especially compared to dual-mode temperature compensation techniques, the presented technique eliminates any need for previously measured look-up tables or fitting the measurement data. We show that a resonant cantilever beam is an appropriate platform for applying this technique, and derive an analytical expression to relate the actual and effective sensed masses on a cantilever beam. Thereby, it is shown that in applying the presented technique successfully, the effective sensed masses must not be the same in the investigated pair of resonance overtones. To prove the feasibility of the proposed technique, flexural resonance frequencies of a silicon cantilever are measured before and after loading with a strip of photoresist. Applying the presented technique shows significant reductions in influence of environmental parameters, with the temperature and humidity coefficients of frequency being improved from -19.5 to 0.2 ppm deg. C{sup -1} and from 0.7 to -0.03 ppm %RH{sup -1}, respectively.

  1. Direct measurement of the intrinsic linewidth of a resonant state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobos, Zachary; Reed, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We have applied inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) techniques to a resonantly-coupled system to determine quantitative differences in resonant versus non-resonant IETS. We use as a model system a set of GaAs-AlGaAs resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs)(footnote: with different barrier widths to tune resonant state linewidths and transmission coefficients. Modulation-broadening studies confirm theoretical predictions; however, the thermal dependence is markedly different than expected from classical IETS theory. An analysis of resonance shut-off reveals that the thermal dependence reflects the thermal broadening of the injector and resonant state density of states. Using this analysis, we show that one can extract both the transmission coefficient and the intrinsic linewidth of the resonant state. This is compared for RTDs of different tunneling barrier widths, and we observe the expected increase in resonance width for thinner barriers. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation.

  2. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, R.R.

    1995-02-14

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell is disclosed having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions. 5 figs.

  3. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions.

  4. A mirrorless spinwave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinel, Olivier; Everett, Jesse L.; Hosseini, Mahdi; Campbell, Geoff T.; Buchler, Ben C.; Lam, Ping Koy

    2015-12-01

    Optical resonance is central to a wide range of optical devices and techniques. In an optical cavity, the round-trip length and mirror reflectivity can be chosen to optimize the circulating optical power, linewidth, and free-spectral range (FSR) for a given application. In this paper we show how an atomic spinwave system, with no physical mirrors, can behave in a manner that is analogous to an optical cavity. We demonstrate this similarity by characterising the build-up and decay of the resonance in the time domain, and measuring the effective optical linewidth and FSR in the frequency domain. Our spinwave is generated in a 20 cm long Rb gas cell, yet it facilitates an effective FSR of 83 kHz, which would require a round-trip path of 3.6 km in a free-space optical cavity. Furthermore, the spinwave coupling is controllable enabling dynamic tuning of the effective cavity parameters.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Litwiller, Daniel V.; Mariappan, Yogesh K.; Ehman, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Often compared to the practice of manual palpation, magnetic resonance elastography is an emerging technology for quantitatively assessing the mechanical properties of tissue as a basis for characterizing disease. The potential of MRE as a diagnostic tool is rooted in the fact that normal and diseased tissues often differ significantly in terms of their intrinsic mechanical properties. MRE uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in conjunction with the application of mechanical shear waves to probe tissue mechanics. This process can be broken down into three essential steps: inducing shear waves in the tissue,imaging the propagating shear waves with MRI, andanalyzing the wave data to generate quantitative images of tissue stiffness MRE has emerged as a safe, reliable and noninvasive method for staging hepatic liver fibrosis, and is now used in some locations as an alternative to biopsy. MRE is also being used in the ongoing investigations of numerous other organs and tissues, including, for example, the spleen, kidney, pancreas, brain, heart, breast, skeletal muscle, prostate, vasculature, lung, spinal cord, eye, bone, and cartilage. In the article that follows, some fundamental techniques and applications of MRE are summarized. PMID:26361467

  6. A mirrorless spinwave resonator

    PubMed Central

    Pinel, Olivier; Everett, Jesse L.; Hosseini, Mahdi; Campbell, Geoff T.; Buchler, Ben C.; Lam, Ping Koy

    2015-01-01

    Optical resonance is central to a wide range of optical devices and techniques. In an optical cavity, the round-trip length and mirror reflectivity can be chosen to optimize the circulating optical power, linewidth, and free-spectral range (FSR) for a given application. In this paper we show how an atomic spinwave system, with no physical mirrors, can behave in a manner that is analogous to an optical cavity. We demonstrate this similarity by characterising the build-up and decay of the resonance in the time domain, and measuring the effective optical linewidth and FSR in the frequency domain. Our spinwave is generated in a 20 cm long Rb gas cell, yet it facilitates an effective FSR of 83 kHz, which would require a round-trip path of 3.6 km in a free-space optical cavity. Furthermore, the spinwave coupling is controllable enabling dynamic tuning of the effective cavity parameters. PMID:26655839

  7. Cavity- and waveguide-resonators in electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Webb, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Cavity resonators are widely used in electron paramagnetic resonance, very high field magnetic resonance microimaging and also in high field human imaging. The basic principles and designs of different forms of cavity resonators including rectangular, cylindrical, re-entrant, cavity magnetrons, toroidal cavities and dielectric resonators are reviewed. Applications in EPR and MRI are summarized, and finally the topic of traveling wave MRI using the magnet bore as a waveguide is discussed. PMID:25456314

  8. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence of 237 Np

    SciTech Connect

    Angell, Chris T.; Yee, R.; Joshi, T.; Swanberg, E.; Norman, E. B.; Hicks, C. L.; Klimenko, A.; Korbly, Steve; Wilson, C.; Kulp, W. D.; Warren, Glen A.; Bray, T. H.; Copping, R.; Glans, P.A.; Tyliszczak, T.; Shuh, David K.

    2010-11-15

    Identification and characterization of fissile material is of international concern because of the possibility of proliferation. For safeguards applications, techniques providing isotopic information are necessary [1]. However, few techniques can distinguish between fissile isotopes. Nuclear resonance fluorescence is one technique that can be used in applications to identify and quantify isotopic content. NRF has also been proposed in several detector systems as a viable way to identify fissile material in cargo containers [2, 3]. It is necessary to measure the characteristic resonances of each isotope that is to be distinguished in identification and assay applications.

  9. Magnetic resonance of slotted circular cylinder resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Junjie; Liu, Shiyang; Lin, Zhifang; Chui, S. T.

    2008-07-01

    By a rigorous full-wave approach, a systemic study is made on the magnetic resonance of slotted circular cylinder resonators (SCCRs) made of a perfect conductor for the lossless case. This is a two-dimensional analog of the split-ring resonator and may serve as an alternative type of essential constituent of electromagnetic metamaterials. It is found that the resonance frequency can be modulated by changing the geometrical parameters and the dielectrics filling in the cavity and the slot. An approximate empirical expression is presented for magnetic resonance frequency of SCCRs from the viewpoint of an L-C circuit system. Finally, it is demonstrated that the SCCR structure can be miniaturized to less than 1/150 resonant wavelength in size with the dielectrics available currently.

  10. Phase-Shift Control of Resonant Frequencies of Magnetostatic Wave Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Takuro; Nakazawa, Hiroaki

    1994-05-01

    We discuss a possible technique to control the resonant frequencies of a straight-edge magnetostatic wave (MSW) resonator without changing the external applied magnetic field and the circuit parameters of a feedback load circuit. The method is to use two additional microstrip electrodes at the edges of the resonator and two varactor diodes connected in series. Upon varying the bias voltages to the varactor diodes, the input admittance at the center electrode can be changed. Theoretical investigation reveals that very large resonant frequency shifts can be obtained by changing only the bias voltage change to the varactor diodes, which may be useful in mobile telephone applications in the gigaherz frequency range.

  11. Tuning Concept for Resonant Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Deviations from resonance detected by sampling phases. Automatic tuner feedback control system derives error signal from E and H plane probe signals. Control objective to maintain phase difference between E and H at 90 degrees. Technique estimated to sensitive to fractional frequency deviation of about 5 X 10-16 and applicable not only to masers but also other microwave elements, including klystrons, general purpose oscillators, and frequency standards.

  12. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtl, Adam C.; Bulava, John; Morningstar, Colin; Edwards, Robert; Mathur, Nilmani; Richards, David; Fleming, George; Juge, K. Jimmy; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2007-10-26

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  13. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    John Bulava; Robert Edwards; George Fleming; K. Jimmy Juge; Adam C. Lichtl; Nilmani Mathur; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Stephen J. Wallace

    2007-06-16

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  14. Tunable resonator-based devices for producing variable delays and narrow spectral linewidths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor); Matsko, Andrey B. (Inventor); Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Devices with two or more coupled resonators to produce narrow spectral responses due to interference of signals that transmit through the resonators and techniques for operating such devices to achieve certain operating characteristics are described. The devices may be optical devices where optical resonators such as whispering gallery mode resonators may be used. In one implementation, at least one of the coupled optical resonators is a tunable resonator and is tuned to change its resonance frequency to tune the spectral response of the device. The described devices and techniques may be applied in optical filters, optical delays, optical waveform generators, and other applications.

  15. Low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of systems frustrated by competing exchange interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Beas

    This doctoral thesis emphasizes on the study of frustrated systems which form a very interesting class of compounds in physics. The technique used for the investigation of the magnetic properties of the frustrated materials is Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). NMR is a very novel tool for the microscopic study of the spin systems. NMR enables us to investigate the local magnetic properties of any system exclusively. The NMR experiments on the different systems yield us knowledge of the static as well as the dynamic behavior of the electronic spins. Frustrated systems bear great possibilities of revelation of new physics through the new ground states they exhibit. The vandates AA'VO(PO4)2 [AA' ≡ Zn2 and BaCd] are great prototypes of the J1-J2 model which consists of magnetic ions sitting on the corners of a square lattice. Frustration is caused by the competing nearest-neighbor (NN) and next-nearest neighbor (NNN) exchange interactions. The NMR investigation concludes a columnar antiferromagnetic (AFM) state for both the compounds from the sharp peak of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) and a sudden broadening of the 31P-NMR spectrum. The important conclusion from our study is the establishment of the first H-P-T phase diagram of BaCdVO(PO4)2. Application of high pressure reduces the saturation field (HS) in BaCdVO(PO4)2 and decreases the ratio J2/J1, pushing the system more towards a questionable boundary (a disordered ground state) between the columnar AFM and a ferromagnetic ground state. A pressure up to 2.4 GPa will completely suppress HS. The Fe ions in the `122' iron-arsenide superconductors also sit on a square lattice thus closely resembling the J1-J2 model. The 75As-NMR and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) experiments are conducted in the compound CaFe2As2 prepared by two different heat treatment methods (`as-grown' and `annealed'). Interestingly the two samples show two different ground states. While the ground state of the `as

  16. Quantum interference between resonant and nonresonant photorecombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, B.; Xiao, J.; Yao, K.; Shen, Y.; Yang, Y.; Lu, D.; Li, W. X.; Qiu, M. L.; Wang, X.; Chen, C. Y.; Fu, Y.; Wei, B.; Zheng, C.; Huang, L. Y.; Zhang, B. H.; Tang, Y. J.; Hutton, R.; Zou, Y.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present experimental and theoretical studies on the interference between resonant and nonresonant photorecombinations for the main resonances of ground-state He-, Be-, B-, C-, N-, and O-like W ions. Experiments were done using a fast electron energy scanning technique at the upgraded Shanghai electron-beam ion trap. Asymmetric resonances were observed, and their Fano factors, which measure the interference degree, were determined. The calculations were done under the framework of Fano's theory by using the flexible atomic code, in which the relativistic configuration interaction method was employed. Among the nine resonances studied in this work, eight experimental results agree with the calculation within experimental uncertainties. But the experimental result for the resonance of Be-like W ions, through the intermediate state of [(1s2s22p 1 /2) 12 p3 /2] 5 /2, deviates from its corresponding theoretical result by 1.3 times experimental uncertainty.

  17. Simple method for locking birefringent resonators.

    PubMed

    Libson, Adam; Brown, Nicolas; Buikema, Aaron; López, Camilo Cela; Dordevic, Tamara; Heising, Matthew; Evans, Matthew

    2015-02-01

    We report on a simple method of locking a laser to a birefringent cavity using polarization spectroscopy. The birefringence of the resonator permits the simple extraction of an error signal by using one polarization state as a phase reference for another state. No modulation of the light or the resonator is required, reducing the complexity of the laser locking setup. This method of producing an error signal can be used on most birefringent optical resonators, even if the details of birefringence and eigenpolarizations are not known. This technique is particularly well suited for fiber ring resonators due to the inherent birefringence of the fiber and the unknown nature of that birefringence. We present an experimental demonstration of this technique using a fiber ring. PMID:25836232

  18. Integral resonator gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor); Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Hayworth, Ken J. (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean V. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention discloses an inertial sensor having an integral resonator. A typical sensor comprises a planar mechanical resonator for sensing motion of the inertial sensor and a case for housing the resonator. The resonator and a wall of the case are defined through an etching process. A typical method of producing the resonator includes etching a baseplate, bonding a wafer to the etched baseplate, through etching the wafer to form a planar mechanical resonator and the wall of the case and bonding an end cap wafer to the wall to complete the case.

  19. Resonance poles in three-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, B. C.; Afnan, I. R.

    1984-12-01

    We develop a method for finding resonance poles in Faddeev equations. The method is computationally simpler than previous methods and is based on the rotation of contour technique. It is applied to πd elastic scattering with coupling to the NΔ channel. The position of the pole is compared with predictions based on Argand diagram and speed analysis. We find that the conventional methods are unreliable if the pole is further from the real axis than the Δ resonance pole.

  20. Low-loss coupling to dielectric resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearn, C. P.; Bradshaw, E. S.; Trew, R. J.; Hefner, B. B., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A compilation is presented of experimental observations and arguments concerning the use of dielectric resonators in applications requiring both tight coupling (beta greater than 10) and high unloaded Q, such as low loss bandpass filters. The microstrip coupled dielectric resonator is the primary focus, but an alternative coupling technique is discussed and comparatively evaluated. It is concluded that coupling factors as large as 65 are achievable.

  1. Optically Detected Ferromagnetic Resonance in Metallic Ferromagnets Via Off-Resonant Detection of Nitrogen Vacancy Centers in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Michael R.; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Schulze, Joe; Purser, Carola M.; Manuilov, Sergei; Wolfe, Christopher; Brangham, Jack T.; Yang, Fengyuan; Hammel, P. Chris

    We report optical detection of ferromagnetic resonance in thin film metallic ferromagnets using a recently discovered approach employing nitrogen vacancy centers in nanodiamonds. While conventional optically detected magnetic resonance measures magnetic fields through their impact on the magnetic resonance frequency of the nitrogen vacancy center, we measure a change in the nitrogen vacancy center photoluminescence at the ferromagnet's resonance condition without need to work at the NV resonance frequency. This measurement technique allows sensitive, local detection of ferromagnetic resonance and can enable the study of magnetic dynamics at the nanoscale in a wide range of materials. While this measurement protocol was first reported in the study of ferromagnetic resonance in YIG, here we demonstrate the measurement in commonly used metallic ferromagnets to establish the generality of the technique and open the possibility of measuring nanoscale patterned devices and magnetic textures based on metallic ferromagnets of both commercial and scientific interest.

  2. A time domain based method for the accurate measurement of Q-factor and resonance frequency of microwave resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Gyüre, B.; Márkus, B. G.; Bernáth, B.; Simon, F.; Murányi, F.

    2015-09-15

    We present a novel method to determine the resonant frequency and quality factor of microwave resonators which is faster, more stable, and conceptually simpler than the yet existing techniques. The microwave resonator is pumped with the microwave radiation at a frequency away from its resonance. It then emits an exponentially decaying radiation at its eigen-frequency when the excitation is rapidly switched off. The emitted microwave signal is down-converted with a microwave mixer, digitized, and its Fourier transformation (FT) directly yields the resonance curve in a single shot. Being a FT based method, this technique possesses the Fellgett (multiplex) and Connes (accuracy) advantages and it conceptually mimics that of pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance. We also establish a novel benchmark to compare accuracy of the different approaches of microwave resonator measurements. This shows that the present method has similar accuracy to the existing ones, which are based on sweeping or modulating the frequency of the microwave radiation.

  3. Composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Hou, H.Q.; Chow, W.W.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-05-01

    The use of two coupled laser cavities has been employed in edge emitting semiconductor lasers for mode suppression and frequency stabilization. The incorporation of coupled resonators within a vertical cavity laser opens up new possibilities due to the unique ability to tailor the interaction between the cavities. Composite resonators can be utilized to control spectral and temporal properties within the laser; previous studies of coupled cavity vertical cavity lasers have employed photopumped structures. The authors report the first composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode consisting of two optical cavities and three monolithic distributed Bragg reflectors. Cavity coupling effects and two techniques for external modulation of the laser are described.

  4. Opto-electronic oscillators having optical resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Xiaotian Steve (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor); Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Systems and techniques of incorporating an optical resonator in an optical part of a feedback loop in opto-electronic oscillators. This optical resonator provides a sufficiently long energy storage time and hence to produce an oscillation of a narrow linewidth and low phase noise. Certain mode matching conditions are required. For example, the mode spacing of the optical resonator is equal to one mode spacing, or a multiplicity of the mode spacing, of an opto-electronic feedback loop that receives a modulated optical signal and to produce an electrical oscillating signal.

  5. Approaching Moons from Resonance via Invariant Manifolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Rodney L.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the approach phase from the final resonance of the endgame scenario in a tour design is examined within the context of invariant manifolds. Previous analyses have typically solved this problem either by using numerical techniques or by computing a catalog of suitable trajectories. The invariant manifolds of a selected set of libration orbits and unstable resonant orbits are computed here to serve as guides for desirable approach trajectories. The analysis focuses on designing an approach phase that may be tied into the final resonance in the endgame sequence while also targeting desired conditions at the moon.

  6. Numerical Investigations of High Pressure Acoustic Waves in Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athavale, Mahesh; Pindera, Maciej; Daniels, Christopher C.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation presents work on numerical investigations of nonlinear acoustic phenomena in resonators that can generate high-pressure waves using acoustic forcing of the flow. Time-accurate simulations of the flow in a closed cone resonator were performed at different oscillation frequencies and amplitudes, and the numerical results for the resonance frequency and fluid pressure increase match the GRC experimental data well. Work on cone resonator assembly simulations has started and will involve calculations of the flow through the resonator assembly with and without acoustic excitation. A new technique for direct calculation of resonance frequency of complex shaped resonators is also being investigated. Script-driven command procedures will also be developed for optimization of the resonator shape for maximum pressure increase.

  7. Neutron resonance averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    The principles of resonance averaging as applied to neutron capture reactions are described. Several illustrations of resonance averaging to problems of nuclear structure and the distribution of radiative strength in nuclei are provided. 30 refs., 12 figs.

  8. Nanomechanical resonance detector

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Jeffrey C; Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-10-29

    An embodiment of a nanomechanical frequency detector includes a support structure and a plurality of elongated nanostructures coupled to the support structure. Each of the elongated nanostructures has a particular resonant frequency. The plurality of elongated nanostructures has a range of resonant frequencies. An embodiment of a method of identifying an object includes introducing the object to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the object. An embodiment of a method of identifying a molecular species of the present invention includes introducing the molecular species to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the molecular species.

  9. Tunable Magnetic Resonance via Interlayer Exchange Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Wilson, Jeffrey; Simons, Rainee; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John

    Magnetic resonance is a critical property of magnetic materials for the applications in microwave devices and novel spintronics devices. The resonance frequency is commonly controlled with an external magnetic field generated by an energy-inefficient and bulky electromagnet. The search for tuning the resonance frequency without electromagnets has attracted tremendous attention. The voltage control of resonance frequency has been demonstrated in multiferroic heterostructures through magnetoelastic effect. However, the frequency tunable range is limited. We propose a paradigm to tune the magnetic resonance frequency by recognizing the huge interlayer exchange field and the existence of the high-frequency modes in coupled oscillators. We demonstrate the optical mode in exchange coupled magnetic layers which occurred at much higher frequencies than coherent ferromagnetic resonance. We further demonstrated a large resonance frequency tunable range from 11GHz to 21 GHz in a spin valve device by in-situ manipulating of the exchange interaction. The technique developed here is far more efficient than the conventional methods of using electromagnets and multiferroics. This new scheme will have an immediate impact on applications based on magnetic resonance.

  10. Microfabricated teeter-totter resonator

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, Douglas Ray; Heller, Edwin J.; Shul, Randy J.

    2004-11-23

    A microfabricated teeter-totter resonator comprises a frame, a paddle pivotably anchored to the frame by pivot arms that define an axis of rotation, a current conductor line on a surface of the paddle, means for applying a static magnetic field substantially perpendicular to the rotational axis and in the plane of the paddle, and means for energizing the current conductor line with an alternating current. A Lorentz force is generated by the interaction of the magnetic field with the current flowing in the conductor line, causing the paddle to oscillate about the axis of rotation. The teeter-totter resonator can be fabricated with micromachining techniques with materials used in the integrated circuits manufacturing industry. The microfabricated teeter-totter resonator has many varied applications, both as an actuation device and as a sensor. When used as a chemical sensor, a chemically sensitive coating can be disposed on one or both surfaces of the paddle to enhance the absorption of chemical analytes from a fluid stream. The resulting mass change can be detected as a change in the resonant frequency or phase of the oscillatory motion of the paddle.

  11. Temperature Sensors Based on WGM Optical Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute; Itchenko, Vladimir; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2008-01-01

    A proposed technique for measuring temperature would exploit differences between the temperature dependences of the frequencies of two different electromagnetic modes of a whispering gallery-mode (WGM) optical resonator. An apparatus based on this technique was originally intended to be part of a control system for stabilizing a laser frequency in the face of temperature fluctuations. When suitably calibrated, apparatuses based on this technique could also serve as precise temperature sensors for purposes other than stabilization of lasers. A sensor according to the proposal would include (1) a transparent WGM dielectric resonator having at least two different sets of modes characterized by different thermo-optical constants and (2) optoelectronic instrumentation for measuring the difference between the temperature-dependent shifts of the resonance frequencies of the two sets of modes.

  12. An Inexpensive Resonance Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dukes, Phillip

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenon of resonance is applicable to almost every branch of physics. Without resonance, there wouldn't be televisions or stereos, or even swings on the playground. However, resonance also has undesirable side effects such as irritating noises in the car and the catastrophic events such as helicopters flying apart. In this article, the…

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Teens > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A Text Size What's ... Exam Safety Getting Your Results What Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of safe, painless testing ...

  14. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew, E. R.

    2009-06-01

    Author's preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Basic theory; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Measurement of nuclear properties and general physical applications; 5. Nuclear magnetic resonance in liquids and gases; 6. Nuclear magnetic resonance in non-metallic solids; 7. Nuclear magnetic resonance in metals; 8. Quadrupole effects; Appendices 1-6; Glossary of symbols; Bibliography and author index; Subject index.

  15. Baryon Spectroscopy and Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Edwards

    2011-12-01

    A short review of current efforts to determine the highly excited state spectrum of QCD, and in particular baryons, using lattice QCD techniques is presented. The determination of the highly excited spectrum of QCD is a major theoretical and experimental challenge. The experimental investigation of the excited baryon spectrum has been a long-standing element of the hadronic-physics program, an important component of which is the search for so-called 'missing resonances', baryonic states predicted by the quark model based on three constituent quarks but which have not yet been observed experimentally. Should such states not be found, it may indicate that the baryon spectrum can be modeled with fewer effective degrees of freedom, such as in quark-diquark models. In the past decade, there has been an extensive program to collect data on electromagnetic production of one and two mesons at Jefferson Lab, MIT-Bates, LEGS, MAMI, ELSA, and GRAAL. To analyze these data, and thereby refine our knowledge of the baryon spectrum, a variety of physics analysis models have been developed at Bonn, George Washington University, Jefferson Laboratory and Mainz. To provide a theoretical determination and interpretation of the spectrum, ab initio computations within lattice QCD have been used. Historically, the calculation of the masses of the lowest-lying states, for both baryons and mesons, has been a benchmark calculation of this discretized, finite-volume computational approach, where the aim is well-understood control over the various systematic errors that enter into a calculation; for a recent review. However, there is now increasing effort aimed at calculating the excited states of the theory, with several groups presenting investigations of the low-lying excited baryon spectrum, using a variety of discretizations, numbers of quark flavors, interpolating operators, and fitting methodologies. Some aspects of these calculations remain unresolved and are the subject of intense

  16. Magnetic resonance angiography: physical principles and applications.

    PubMed

    Kiruluta, Andrew J M; González, R Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is the visualization of hemodynamic flow using imaging techniques that discriminate flowing spins in blood from those in stationary tissue. There are two classes of MRA methods based on whether the magnetic resonance imaging signal in flowing blood is derived from the amplitude of the moving spins, the time-of-flight methods, or is based on the phase accumulated by these flowing spins, as in phase contrast methods. Each method has particular advantages and limitations as an angiographic imaging technique, as evidenced in their application space. Here we discuss the physics of MRA for both classes of imaging techniques, including contrast-enhanced approaches and the recent rapid expansion of the techniques to fast acquisition and processing techniques using parallel imaging coils as well as their application in high-field MR systems such as 3T and 7T. PMID:27432663

  17. Ovenized microelectromechanical system (MEMS) resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, Roy H; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kim, Bongsang

    2014-03-11

    An ovenized micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) resonator including: a substantially thermally isolated mechanical resonator cavity; a mechanical oscillator coupled to the mechanical resonator cavity; and a heating element formed on the mechanical resonator cavity.

  18. Optical Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Paul; Bouchon, Patrick; Haïdar, Riad; Pardo, Fabrice

    2014-08-01

    Helmholtz resonators are widely used acoustic components able to select a single frequency. Here, based on an analogy between acoustics and electromagnetism wave equations, we present an electromagnetic 2D Helmholtz resonator made of a metallic slit-box structure. At the resonance, the light is funneled in the λ/800 apertures, and is subsequently absorbed in the cavity. As in acoustics, there is no higher order of resonance, which is an appealing feature for applications such as photodetection or thermal emission. Eventually, we demonstrate that the slit is of capacitive nature while the box behaves inductively. We derive an analytical formula for the resonance wavelength, which does not rely on wave propagation and therefore does not depend on the permittivity of the material filling the box. Besides, in contrast with half-wavelength resonators, the resonance wavelength can be engineered by both the slit aspect ratio and the box area.

  19. Magnetic resonance energy and topological resonance energy.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Jun-Ichi

    2016-04-28

    Ring-current diamagnetism of a polycyclic π-system is closely associated with thermodynamic stability due to the individual circuits. Magnetic resonance energy (MRE), derived from the ring-current diamagnetic susceptibility, was explored in conjunction with graph-theoretically defined topological resonance energy (TRE). For many aromatic molecules, MRE is highly correlative with TRE with a correlation coefficient of 0.996. For all π-systems studied, MRE has the same sign as TRE. The only trouble with MRE may be that some antiaromatic and non-alternant species exhibit unusually large MRE-to-TRE ratios. This kind of difficulty can in principle be overcome by prior geometry-optimisation or by changing spin multiplicity. Apart from the semi-empirical resonance-theory resonance energy, MRE is considered as the first aromatic stabilisation energy (ASE) defined without referring to any hypothetical polyene reference. PMID:26878709

  20. Resonance splitting in gyrotropic ring resonators.

    PubMed

    Jalas, Dirk; Petrov, Alexander; Krause, Michael; Hampe, Jan; Eich, Manfred

    2010-10-15

    We present the theoretical concept of an optical isolator based on resonance splitting in a silicon ring resonator covered with a magneto-optical polymer cladding. For this task, a perturbation method is derived for the modes in the cylindrical coordinate system. A polymer magneto-optical cladding causing a 0.01 amplitude of the off-diagonal element of the dielectric tensor is assumed. It is shown that the derived resonance splitting of the clockwise and counterclockwise modes increases for smaller ring radii. For the ring with a radius of approximately 1.5μm, a 29GHz splitting is demonstrated. An integrated optical isolator with a 10μm geometrical footprint is proposed based on a critically coupled ring resonator. PMID:20967092

  1. A New Microcell Technique for NMR Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Sophia J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a new laboratory technique for working with small samples of compounds used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Demonstrates how microcells can be constructed for each experiment and samples can be recycled. (TW)

  2. Cantilever detected ferromagnetic resonance in thin Fe50Ni50, Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5 and Sr2FeMoO6 films using a double modulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonsov, Alexey; Ohmichi, Eiji; Leksin, Pavel; Omar, Ahmad; Wang, Hailong; Wurmehl, Sabine; Yang, Fengyuan; Ohta, Hitoshi

    2016-09-01

    In this work we introduce a new method, which employs commercial piezo-cantilevers, for a ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) detection from thin, nm-size, films. Our setup has an option to rotate the sample in the magnetic field and it operates up to the high microwave frequencies of 160 GHz. Using our cantilever based FMR spectrometer we have investigated a set of samples, namely quasi-bulk and 84 nm film Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5 samples, 16 nm Fe50Ni50 film and 150 nm Sr2FeMoO6 film. Low frequency and room temperature test of our setup using 84 nm Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5 film yielded a result identical to a standard X-Band spectrometer, namely a single line with quite small linewidth. Our measurements at low temperatures and high frequencies revealed a quite strong FMR response detected in all samples. The FMR spectra share common features, such as the emergence of the second line with an opposite angular dependence, and a drastic increase of the linewidths with increasing microwave frequency. We believe that these findings are results of the complicated dynamics of the magnetization at low temperatures and high frequencies, which we were able to probe using our cantilever based FMR setup.

  3. Cantilever detected ferromagnetic resonance in thin Fe50Ni50, Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5 and Sr2FeMoO6 films using a double modulation technique.

    PubMed

    Alfonsov, Alexey; Ohmichi, Eiji; Leksin, Pavel; Omar, Ahmad; Wang, Hailong; Wurmehl, Sabine; Yang, Fengyuan; Ohta, Hitoshi

    2016-09-01

    In this work we introduce a new method, which employs commercial piezo-cantilevers, for a ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) detection from thin, nm-size, films. Our setup has an option to rotate the sample in the magnetic field and it operates up to the high microwave frequencies of 160GHz. Using our cantilever based FMR spectrometer we have investigated a set of samples, namely quasi-bulk and 84nm film Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5 samples, 16nm Fe50Ni50 film and 150nm Sr2FeMoO6 film. Low frequency and room temperature test of our setup using 84nm Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5 film yielded a result identical to a standard X-Band spectrometer, namely a single line with quite small linewidth. Our measurements at low temperatures and high frequencies revealed a quite strong FMR response detected in all samples. The FMR spectra share common features, such as the emergence of the second line with an opposite angular dependence, and a drastic increase of the linewidths with increasing microwave frequency. We believe that these findings are results of the complicated dynamics of the magnetization at low temperatures and high frequencies, which we were able to probe using our cantilever based FMR setup. PMID:27498338

  4. 13C and 31P chemical shielding tensors of a single crystal of dipotassium α- D-glucose-1-phosphate dihydrate. An application of a 13C-{ 1H, 31P} triple-resonance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, C. A.; Naito, A.; Sastry, D. L.; Takegoshi, K.

    The 13C NMR spectra of a single crystal of dipotassium α- D-glucose-l-phosphate dehydrate for different orientations in the external magnetic field, were recorded by using 1H and 31P double nuclear decoupling. To overcome difficulties encountered because of the high 13C RF power required to achieve the Hartmann-Hahn condition, a new cross-polarization method (K. Takegoshi and C. A. McDowell, J. Magn. Reson.67, 356 (1986)) was used. The directions of the most shielded principal value of the 13C chemical shielding tensors for the C2-C6 carbon nuclei in the glucose group were along the CO bond, and that for the CI carbon nucleus made an angle of 42† with the C1-O5 bond direction in the O1-C1-O5 plane. The 31P chemical shielding tensors are axially symmetric and the direction of the least shielded principal value is almost parallel to the P-O1(R) bond, which is the longest among the four PO bonds in the phosphate moiety.

  5. Non-Neutral Drift Resonance in Magnetrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaup, D. J.

    2005-04-01

    We study the features of the RF fields in a magnetron, when the RF amplitude has saturated, in the nonrelativistic, electrostatic limit. In this saturated stage, the linear RF equations can be reduced to a fifth-order set of ordinary differential equations. Two modes of which are fast cyclotron modes, one mode is a fast drift wave, and the other two modes are the usual, well-known, slow magnetron modes. Here, we will study the interaction between the fast drift mode (diocotron mode) and the slow magnetron modes, at the diocotron resonance. We will also show that the fast cyclotron modes can be ignored at this resonance, and thereby can reduce the system to a third- order set of ordinary differential equations. Using multiscale techniques, we will then obtain solutions for the inner and the outer regions at the diocotron resonance, and thereby obtain the conversion and transmission rates between these three modes at the diocotron resonance.

  6. Tunable resonant structures for photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptasinski, Joanna Nina

    Photonics is an evolving field allowing for optical devices to be made cost effectively using standard semiconductor fabrication techniques, which in turn enables integration with microelectronic chips. Chip scale photonics will play an increasing role in the future of communications as the demand for bandwidth and reduced power consumption per bit continues to grow. Tunable optical circuit components are one of the essential technologies in the development of photonic analogues for classical electronic devices, where tunable photonic resonant structures allow for altering of their electromagnetic spectrum and find applications in optical switching, filtering, buffering, lasers and biosensors. The scope of this work is focused on tunable resonant structures for photonic integrated circuits. Specifically, this work demonstrates active tuning of silicon photonic resonant structures using the properties of dye doped nematic liquid crystals, temperature stabilization of silicon photonics using the passive properties of liquid crystals, and the effects of low density plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) claddings on ring resonator device performance.

  7. Temperature compensated silicon resonators for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rais-Zadeh, Mina; Thakar, Vikram A.; Wu, Zhengzheng; Peczalski, Adam

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents piezoelectric transduction and frequency trimming of silicon-based resonators with a center frequency in the low megahertz regime. The temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) of the resonators is reduced using both passive and active compensation schemes. Specifically, a novel technique utilizing oxide-refilled trenches is implemented to achieve efficient temperature compensation while maintaining compatibility with wet release processes. Using this method, we demonstrate high-Q resonators having a first-order TCF as low as 3 ppm/°C and a turnover temperature of around 90 °C, ideally suited for use in ovenized platforms. Using active tuning, the temperature sensitivity of the resonator is further compensated around the turnover temperature, demonstrating frequency instability of less than 400 ppb. Such devices are ideally suited as timing units in space applications where size, power consumption, and temperature stability are of critical importance.

  8. Resonance phenomena: From compound nucleus decay to proton radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charity, R. J.

    2016-03-01

    The role of resonances in exotic nuclei is investigated. This encompasses one and two nucleon emitters for ground-state nuclei beyond the drip lines to compound nuclei formed at higher excitation energies which, in some cases, can decay to produce these ground-state emitters. The role of barrier penetration and configuration mixing are both considered in explaining the long lifetimes observed in narrow resonances. Finally, two experimental techniques for studying exotic resonances are presented.

  9. Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Karl T.; Pruski, Marek; Washton, Nancy M.; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2013-03-07

    This report recaps the "Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance" workshop, held in late 2011. This exploratory workshop's goal was to discuss and address challenges for the next generation of magnetic resonance experimentation. During the workshop, participants from throughout the world outlined the science drivers and instrumentation demands for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and associated magnetic resonance techniques, discussed barriers to their advancement, and deliberated the path forward for significant and impactful advances in the field.

  10. Entangling distant resonant exchange qubits via circuit quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasa, Vanita; Taylor, Jacob M.; Tahan, Charles

    Enabling modularity within a quantum information processing device relies on robust entanglement of coherent qubits at macroscopic distances. To address this challenge, we investigate theoretically a hybrid quantum system consisting of spatially separated resonant exchange qubits, defined in three-electron semiconductor triple quantum dots, that are coupled via a superconducting transmission line resonator. By analyzing three specific approaches drawn from circuit quantum electrodynamics and Hartmann-Hahn double resonance techniques for implementing resonator-mediated two-qubit entangling gates in both dispersive and resonant regimes, we show that methods for entangling superconducting qubits map directly to resonant exchange qubits. We also calculate the rate of relaxation via phonons for resonant exchange qubits in silicon triple dots and show that such an implementation is particularly well-suited to achieving the strong coupling regime. Our approach combines the robustness of encoded spin qubits in silicon with the rapid and robust long-range entanglement provided by circuit QED systems.

  11. Diagnostic cardiology: Noninvasive imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Come, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 23 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The chest x-ray and cardiac series; Computed tomographic scanning of the heart, coronary arteries, and great vessels; Digital subtraction angiography in the assessment of cardiovascular disease; Magnetic resonance: technique and cardiac applications; Basics of radiation physics and instrumentation; and Nuclear imaging: the assessment of cardiac performance.

  12. Excitonic surface lattice resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphrey, A. D.; Gentile, M. J.; Barnes, W. L.

    2016-08-01

    Electromagnetic resonances are important in controlling light at the nanoscale. The most studied such resonance is the surface plasmon resonance that is associated with metallic nanostructures. Here we explore an alternative resonance, the surface exciton-polariton resonance, one based on excitonic molecular materials. Our study is based on analytical and numerical modelling. We show that periodic arrays of suitable molecular nanoparticles may support surface lattice resonances that arise as a result of coherent interactions between the particles. Our results demonstrate that excitonic molecular materials are an interesting alternative to metals for nanophotonics; they offer the prospect of both fabrication based on supramolecular chemistry and optical functionality arising from the way the properties of such materials may be controlled with light.

  13. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad; Kenouche, Samir; Coillot, Christophe; Alibert, Eric; Jabakhanji, Bilal; Schimpf, Remy; Zanca, Michel; Stein, Paul; Goze-Bac, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to characterize and model evanescent electromagnetic fields originating from NMR phenomenon. We report that in this experimental configuration the available NMR signal is one order of magnitude larger and follows an exponential decay inversely proportional to the size of the emitters. Those investigations open a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging. PMID:26751800

  14. Large mode radius resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    Resonator configurations permitting operation with large mode radius while maintaining good transverse mode discrimination are considered. Stable resonators incorporating an intracavity telescope and unstable resonator geometries utilizing an output coupler with a Gaussian reflectivity profile are shown to enable large radius single mode laser operation. Results of heterodyne studies of pulsed CO2 lasers with large (11mm e sup-2 radius) fundamental mode sizes are presented demonstrating minimal frequency sweeping in accordance with the theory of laser-induced medium perturbations.

  15. Local resonance bandgaps in periodic media: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, L; Phani, A Srikantha

    2013-09-01

    Periodic composites such as acoustic metamaterials use local resonance phenomenon in designing low frequency sub-Bragg bandgaps. These bandgaps emerge from a resonant scattering interaction between a propagating wave and periodically arranged resonators. This paper develops a receptance coupling technique to combine the dynamics of the resonator with the unit cell dynamics of the background medium to analyze flexural wave transmission in a periodic structure, involving a single degree of freedom coupling between the medium and the resonator. Receptance techniques allow for a straightforward extension to higher dimensional systems with multiple degrees of freedom coupling and for easier experimental measurements. Closed-form expressions for the location and width of sub-Bragg bandgaps are obtained. Rigid body modes of the unit cell of the background medium are shown to set the bounding frequencies for local resonance bandgaps. Results from the receptance analysis compare well with Bloch wave analysis and experiments performed on a finite structural beam with periodic masses and resonators. Stronger coupling and inertia of the resonator increase the local resonance bandgap width. Two-fold periodicity widens the Bragg bandgap, narrowed by local resonators, thus expanding the design space and highlighting the advantages of hierarchical periodicity. PMID:23967928

  16. Dismantling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Wiese, E.

    1998-03-13

    Most of the dismantling techniques used in a Decontamination and Dismantlement (D and D) project are taken from conventional demolition practices. Some modifications to the techniques are made to limit exposure to the workers or to lessen the spread of contamination to the work area. When working on a D and D project, it is best to keep the dismantling techniques and tools as simple as possible. The workers will be more efficient and safer using techniques that are familiar to them. Prior experience with the technique or use of mock-ups is the best way to keep workers safe and to keep the project on schedule.

  17. Split-resonator integrated-post MEMS gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, Youngsam (Inventor); Hayworth, Ken J. (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A split-resonator integrated-post vibratory microgyroscope may be fabricated using micro electrical mechanical systems (MEMS) fabrication techniques. The microgyroscope may include two gyroscope sections bonded together, each gyroscope section including resonator petals, electrodes, and an integrated half post. The half posts are aligned and bonded to act as a single post.

  18. Imaging Intelligence with Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Rex E.; Gasparovic, Charles; Chavez, Robert S.; Caprihan, Arvind; Barrow, Ranee; Yeo, Ronald A.

    2009-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([to the first power]H-MRS) is a technique for the assay of brain neurochemistry "in vivo." N-acetylaspartate (NAA), the most prominent metabolite visible within the [to the first power]H-MRS spectrum, is found primarily within neurons. The current study was designed to further elucidate NAA-cognition…

  19. Low-temperature magnetic resonance force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wago, Koichi

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a technique whose goal is to combine the three-dimensional, chemically specific imaging capability of magnetic resonance imaging with the atomic-scale spatial resolution of scanning force microscopy. MRFM relies on the detection of small oscillatory magnetic forces between spins in the sample and a magnetic tip, using a micromechanical cantilever. The force resolution is a key issue for successfully operating MRFM experiments. Operating at low temperature improves the force resolution because of the reduced thermal energy and increased mechanical Q of the cantilever. The spin polarization is also enhanced at low temperature, leading to the improved magnetic resonance sensitivity for ensemble spin samples. A low-temperature magnetic resonance force detection apparatus was built and used to demonstrate a force resolution of 8×10sp{-17}\\ N/sqrt{Hz} at 6 K with a commercial single-crystal silicon cantilever. Both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were detected in micron-size samples. Force-detection technique was also applied to a wide range of magnetic resonance measurements, including inversion recovery, nutation, and spin echoes. Force-detected EPR spectra of phosphorus-doped silicon revealed hyperfine splitting, illustrating the possibility of using the MRFM technique for spectroscopic purposes. An improved low-temperature magnetic resonance force microscope was also built, incorporating a magnetic tip mounted directly on the cantilever. This allows a much wider variety of samples to be investigated and greatly improves the convenience of the technique. Using the improved microscope, three-dimensional EPR imaging of diphenylpicrylhydrazil (DPPH) particles was accomplished by scanning the sample in two dimensions while stepping an external field. The EPR force map showed a broad response reflecting the size and shape of the sample, allowing a three-dimensional real

  20. Ureteric access sheath aided insertion of resonance metal ureteric stent

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Matthew; Strahan, Stephen; Wines, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ureteral obstruction caused by malignancy is a challenging and often complicated problem for urologists. We present a novel technique of ureteric access sheath aided insertion of a Resonance metal ureteric stent in the setting of a difficult obstruction. PMID:24879725

  1. A vibration energy harvesting device with bidirectional resonance frequency tunability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challa, Vinod R.; Prasad, M. G.; Shi, Yong; Fisher, Frank T.

    2008-02-01

    Vibration energy harvesting is an attractive technique for potential powering of wireless sensors and low power devices. While the technique can be employed to harvest energy from vibrations and vibrating structures, a general requirement independent of the energy transfer mechanism is that the vibration energy harvesting device operate in resonance at the excitation frequency. Most energy harvesting devices developed to date are single resonance frequency based, and while recent efforts have been made to broaden the frequency range of energy harvesting devices, what is lacking is a robust tunable energy harvesting technique. In this paper, the design and testing of a resonance frequency tunable energy harvesting device using a magnetic force technique is presented. This technique enabled resonance tuning to ± 20% of the untuned resonant frequency. In particular, this magnetic-based approach enables either an increase or decrease in the tuned resonant frequency. A piezoelectric cantilever beam with a natural frequency of 26 Hz is used as the energy harvesting cantilever, which is successfully tuned over a frequency range of 22-32 Hz to enable a continuous power output 240-280 µW over the entire frequency range tested. A theoretical model using variable damping is presented, whose results agree closely with the experimental results. The magnetic force applied for resonance frequency tuning and its effect on damping and load resistance have been experimentally determined.

  2. Improved acoustic viscosimeter technique. [for determining fluid shear viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisch, M. R.; Moeller, R. P.; Carome, E. F.

    1976-01-01

    An improved technique has been developed for studies of the shear viscosity of fluids. It utilizes an acoustic resonator as a four-terminal electrical device; the resonator's amplitude response may be determined directly and simply related to the fluid's viscosity. The use of this technique is discussed briefly and data obtained in several fluids is presented.

  3. Magnetic resonance elastography of abdomen.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Sudhakar Kundapur; Ehman, Richard L

    2015-04-01

    Many diseases cause substantial changes in the mechanical properties of tissue, and this provides motivation for developing methods to noninvasively assess the stiffness of tissue using imaging technology. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has emerged as a versatile MRI-based technique, based on direct visualization of propagating shear waves in the tissues. The most established clinical application of MRE in the abdomen is in chronic liver disease. MRE is currently regarded as the most accurate noninvasive technique for detection and staging of liver fibrosis. Increasing experience and ongoing research is leading to exploration of applications in other abdominal organs. In this review article, the current use of MRE in liver disease and the potential future applications of this technology in other parts of the abdomen are surveyed. PMID:25488346

  4. Magnetic Resonance Elastography of Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Sudhakar K.; Ehman, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases cause substantial changes in the mechanical properties of tissue and this provides motivation for developing methods to non-invasively assess the stiffness of tissue using imaging technology. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has emerged as a versatile MRI-based technique, based on direct visualization of propagating shear waves in the tissues. The most established clinical application of MRE in the abdomen is in chronic liver disease. MRE is currently regarded as the most accurate non-invasive technique for detection and staging of liver fibrosis. Increasing experience and ongoing research is leading to exploration of applications in other abdominal organs. In this review article, the current use of MRE in liver disease and the potential future applications of this technology in other parts of the abdomen are surveyed. PMID:25488346

  5. The resonator handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jerry D.; Zhou, Shiliang

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to extend resonator theory into the region in which the planar mirror is quite small. Results of the theoretical description are then extended to resonator design and experimental arrangements as discussed in further sections of this work. Finally, a discussion of dielectric measurements for small samples is included as a specific application of this work.

  6. Resonances in heavy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Betts, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    The experimental situation for the study of resonances in heavy-ion collisions is reviewed, with emphasis on the heaviest systems. New data are presented which show some of the systematics of this phenomenon. The narrow resonance structures are established as a feature of the nuclear structure of the composite system rather than a purely entrance channel effect.

  7. The Concept of Resonance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truhlar, Donald G.

    2007-01-01

    A general example of a delocalization system associated with a higher energy than the localized one, which suggests that it is wrong to consider delocalization as equivalent to resonance stabilization, is presented. The meaning of resonance energy as it appears in valence bond theory is described as the lowering of the calculated ground-state…

  8. Renal imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Hierholzer, K; Hierholzer, J

    1997-01-01

    The ancient approach to obtain an image of the kidneys (and other internal organs) was 'section-inspection-imaging' by drawing, painting, sculpturing, and modelling. The present study follows chronologically the development and use of sectioning techniques from ancient (often forbidden) methods to modern microdissection and maceration of silicone-rubber-injected tubules. Inspection evolved from the use of the naked eye to magnifying lenses, microscopes and finally electron microscopy. Pertinent examples such as the description of the kidneys as the site of urine formation, the visualization of loop structures in the renal medulla and the imaging of tight junction strands are discussed. Inspection or visualization of renal structure and function has been revolutionized by modern noninvasive techniques, such as X-ray imaging, imaging by radioisotopes, ultrasound, computer tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance. Pertinent examples are given demonstrating the potency of the various techniques. The contribution of computerized data evaluation is discussed. The development of micropuncture and microperfusion techniques has opened the field for direct imaging not only of renal (sub)structural details but also of functional parameters such as transtubular reabsorption rates, single glomerular capillary filtration and conductance of the paracellular pathway. We focus particularly on techniques specifically designed to visualize renal hemodynamic and transport parameters. PMID:9189257

  9. MEMS metrology techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Erik

    2004-12-01

    The MEMS industry currently produces over $13 billion in annual revenue, with devices in such diverse applications as blood pressure sensors, projection displays, optical switches, printers, hard drives, and gyroscopes. As production techniques improve, ever more functions may be served by MEMS, and the industry is growing at an annual rate of more than 15%. The large diversity of MEMS leads to many challenges in metrology, as each design has different critical factors which will affect its performance. Unlike traditional semiconductor devices, MEMS require characterization both in their static state and under actuation. Parameters of interest include shape, dimensions, surface roughness, sidewall angles, film thickness, residual stress, feature volumes, response times, thermal properties, resonance frequencies, stiction, environmental immunity and more. This talk will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of a variety of techniques for MEMS surface metrology. Bright- and dark-field microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, contact and non-contact surface profilometry, atomic force microscopy, laser Doppler vibrometry and digital holography are some of the primary techniques used to evaluate MEMS surfaces and motion. While no single technique can fully characterize all MEMS devices, or even one device under all conditions, the utility of each of the different types of instruments is increasing as they are pushed by MEMS and other industries to provide more characterization capability. With a broad understanding of the various metrology techniques available, the one or few critical instruments to measure a given class of devices will hopefully be more easily understood.

  10. MEMS metrology techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Erik

    2005-01-01

    The MEMS industry currently produces over $13 billion in annual revenue, with devices in such diverse applications as blood pressure sensors, projection displays, optical switches, printers, hard drives, and gyroscopes. As production techniques improve, ever more functions may be served by MEMS, and the industry is growing at an annual rate of more than 15%. The large diversity of MEMS leads to many challenges in metrology, as each design has different critical factors which will affect its performance. Unlike traditional semiconductor devices, MEMS require characterization both in their static state and under actuation. Parameters of interest include shape, dimensions, surface roughness, sidewall angles, film thickness, residual stress, feature volumes, response times, thermal properties, resonance frequencies, stiction, environmental immunity and more. This talk will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of a variety of techniques for MEMS surface metrology. Bright- and dark-field microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, contact and non-contact surface profilometry, atomic force microscopy, laser Doppler vibrometry and digital holography are some of the primary techniques used to evaluate MEMS surfaces and motion. While no single technique can fully characterize all MEMS devices, or even one device under all conditions, the utility of each of the different types of instruments is increasing as they are pushed by MEMS and other industries to provide more characterization capability. With a broad understanding of the various metrology techniques available, the one or few critical instruments to measure a given class of devices will hopefully be more easily understood.

  11. Resonant snubber inverter

    DOEpatents

    Lai, J.S.; Young, R.W. Sr.; Chen, D.; Scudiere, M.B.; Ott, G.W. Jr.; White, C.P.; McKeever, J.W.

    1997-06-24

    A resonant, snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the main inverter switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter. 14 figs.

  12. Narrowband resonant transmitter

    DOEpatents

    Hutchinson, Donald P.; Simpson, Marcus L.; Simpson, John T.

    2004-06-29

    A transverse-longitudinal integrated optical resonator (TLIR) is disclosed which includes a waveguide, a first and a second subwavelength resonant grating in the waveguide, and at least one photonic band gap resonant structure (PBG) in the waveguide. The PBG is positioned between the first and second subwavelength resonant gratings. An electro-optic waveguide material may be used to permit tuning the TLIR and to permit the TLIR to perform signal modulation and switching. The TLIR may be positioned on a bulk substrate die with one or more electronic and optical devices and may be communicably connected to the same. A method for fabricating a TLIR including fabricating a broadband reflective grating is disclosed. A method for tuning the TLIR's transmission resonance wavelength is also disclosed.

  13. Resonant snubber inverter

    DOEpatents

    Lai, Jih-Sheng; Young, Sr., Robert W.; Chen, Daoshen; Scudiere, Matthew B.; Ott, Jr., George W.; White, Clifford P.; McKeever, John W.

    1997-01-01

    A resonant, snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the main inverter switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter.

  14. Opto-acoustic phenomena in whispering gallery mode resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoping; Chembo, Yanne K.

    2016-01-01

    Optical whispering gallery mode resonators are important platforms to enhance and study various nonlinear frequency conversion processes. Stimulated Brillouin scattering is one of the strongest nonlinear effects, and can be successfully investigated using these platforms. In this article, we study the phenomenon of stimulated Brillouin scattering using a crystalline disk resonator. A fast scanning ringdown spectroscopy technique is used to characterize the optical modes featuring quality factors of the order of one billion at telecom wavelengths. The mW scale threshold power in a centimeter disk resonator is observed and found to be strongly dependent on the gap between the resonator and the prism coupler.

  15. MAGNETIC RESONANCE ELASTOGRAPHY: A REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Mariappan, Yogesh K; Glaser, Kevin J; Ehman, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) is a rapidly developing technology for quantitatively assessing the mechanical properties of tissue. The technology can be considered to be an imaging-based counterpart to palpation, commonly used by physicians to diagnose and characterize diseases. The success of palpation as a diagnostic method is based on the fact that the mechanical properties of tissues are often dramatically affected by the presence of disease processes such as cancer, inflammation, and fibrosis. MRE obtains information about the stiffness of tissue by assessing the propagation of mechanical waves through the tissue with a special magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique. The technique essentially involves three steps: generating shear waves in the tissue,acquiring MR images depicting the propagation of the induced shear waves andprocessing the images of the shear waves to generate quantitative maps of tissue stiffness, called elastograms. MRE is already being used clinically for the assessment of patients with chronic liver diseases and is emerging as a safe, reliable and noninvasive alternative to liver biopsy for staging hepatic fibrosis. MRE is also being investigated for application to pathologies of other organs including the brain, breast, blood vessels, heart, kidneys, lungs and skeletal muscle. The purpose of this review article is to introduce this technology to clinical anatomists and to summarize some of the current clinical applications that are being pursued. PMID:20544947

  16. Acoustic resonance for nonmetallic mine detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-04-01

    The feasibility of acoustic resonance for detection of plastic mines was investigated by researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Instrumentation and Controls Division under an internally funded program. The data reported in this paper suggest that acoustic resonance is not a practical method for mine detection. Representative small plastic anti-personnel mines were tested, and were found to not exhibit detectable acoustic resonances. Also, non-metal objects known to have strong acoustic resonances were tested with a variety of excitation techniques, and no practical non-contact method of exciting a consistently detectable resonance in a buried object was discovered. Some of the experimental data developed in this work may be useful to other researchers seeking a method to detect buried plastic mines. A number of excitation methods and their pitfalls are discussed. Excitation methods that were investigated include swept acoustic, chopped acoustic, wavelet acoustic, and mechanical shaking. Under very contrived conditions, a weak response that could be attributed to acoustic resonance was observed, but it does not appear to be practical as a mine detection feature. Transfer properties of soil were investigated. Impulse responses of several representative plastic mines were investigated. Acoustic leakage coupling, and its implications as a disruptive mechanism were investigated.

  17. Spin dynamics in CuO and Cu[sub 1[minus][ital x

    SciTech Connect

    Carretta, P.; Corti, M.; Rigamonti, A. )

    1993-08-01

    [sup 63]Cu nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), nuclear antiferromagnetic resonance (AFNMR), and spin-lattice relaxation, as well as [sup 7]Li NMR and relaxation measurements in CuO and in Cu[sub 1[minus][ital x

  18. Magnetic Resonance Characterization of Ischemic Tissue Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Jerry S; Wang, Xiaoying; Zhe Sun, Phillip

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) are versatile diagnostic techniques capable of characterizing the complex stroke pathophysiology, and hold great promise for guiding stroke treatment. Particularly, tissue viability and salvageability are closely associated with its metabolic status. Upon ischemia, ischemic tissue metabolism is disrupted including altered metabolism of glucose and oxygen, elevated lactate production/accumulation, tissue acidification and eventually, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion and energy failure. Whereas metabolism impairment during ischemic stroke is complex, it may be monitored non-invasively with magnetic resonance (MR)-based techniques. Our current article provides a concise overview of stroke pathology, conventional and emerging imaging and spectroscopy techniques, and data analysis tools for characterizing ischemic tissue damage. PMID:22216079

  19. Fully vectorial laser resonator modeling by vector extrapolation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asoubar, Daniel; Kuhn, Michael; Wyrowski, Frank

    2015-02-01

    The optimization of multi-parameter resonators requires flexible simulation techniques beyond the scalar approximation. Therefore we generalize the scalar Fox and Li algorithm for the transversal eigenmode calculation to a fully vectorial model. This modified eigenvalue problem is solved by two polynomial-type vector extrapolation methods, namely the minimal polynomial extrapolation and the reduced rank extrapolation. Compared to other eigenvalue solvers these techniques can also be applied to resonators including nonlinear components. As an example we show the calculation of an azimuthally polarized eigenmode emitted by a resonator containing a discontinuous phase element and a nonlinear active medium. The simulation is verified by experiments.

  20. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Driessen, Mieke M P; Breur, Johannes M P J; Budde, Ricardo P J; van Oorschot, Joep W M; van Kimmenade, Roland R J; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj; Meijboom, Folkert J; Leiner, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. PMID:25552386