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Sample records for resonance nqr techniques

  1. Explosives detection by nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garroway, Allen N.; Buess, Michael L.; Yesinowski, James P.; Miller, Joel B.; Krauss, Ronald A.

    1994-10-01

    Pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) of 14N nuclei is quite promising as a method for detecting explosives such as RDX and contraband narcotics such as cocaine and heroin in quantities of interest. Pure NQR is conducted without an external applied magnetic field, so potential concerns about damage to magnetically encoded data or exposure of personnel to large magnetic fields are not relevant. Because NQR frequencies of different compounds are quite distinct, we do not encounter false alarms from the NQR signals of other benign materials. We have constructed a laboratory prototype NQR explosives detector which interrogates a volume of 300 liters (10 ft3). This paper presents abbreviated results from a demonstration of the laboratory prototype NQR explosives detector conducted at the Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center in May 1994 on RDX-based explosives.

  2. Frequency selective detection of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spin echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somasundaram, Samuel D.; Jakobsson, Andreas; Smith, John A. S.; Althoefer, Kaspar A.

    2006-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a radio frequency (RF) technique that can be used to detect the presence of quadrupolar nuclei, such as the 14N nucleus prevalent in many explosives and narcotics. The technique has been hampered by low signal-to-noise ratios and is further aggravated by the presence of RF interference (RFI). To ensure accurate detection, proposed detectors should exploit the rich form of the NQR signal. Furthermore, the detectors should also be robust to any remaining residual interference, left after suitable RFI mitigation has been employed. In this paper, we propose a new NQR data model, particularly for the realistic case where multiple pulse sequences are used to generate trains of spin echoes. Furthermore, we refine two recently proposed approximative maximum likelihood (AML) detectors, enabling the algorithm to optimally exploit the data model of the entire echo train and also incorporate knowledge of the temperature dependent spin-echo decay time. The AML-based detectors ensure accurate detection and robustness against residual RFI, even when the temperature of the sample is not precisely known, by exploiting the dependencies of the NQR resonant lines on temperature. Further robustness against residual interference is gained as the proposed detector is frequency selective; exploiting only those regions of the spectrum where the NQR signal is expected. Extensive numerical evaluations based on both simulated and measured NQR data indicate that the proposed Frequency selective Echo Train AML (FETAML) detector offers a significant improvement as compared to other existing detectors.

  3. Methyl quantum tunneling and nitrogen-14 NQR NMR studies using a SQUID magnetic resonance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Black, B.E. |

    1993-07-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques have been very successful in obtaining molecular conformation and dynamics information. Unfortunately, standard NMR and NQR spectrometers are unable to adequately detect resonances below a few megahertz due to the frequency dependent sensitivity of their Faraday coil detectors. For this reason a new spectrometer with a dc SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) detector, which has no such frequency dependence, has been developed. Previously, this spectrometer was used to observe {sup 11}B and {sup 27}Al NQR resonances. The scope of this study was increased to include {sup 23}Na, {sup 51}V, and {sup 55}Mn NQR transitions. Also, a technique was presented to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances through cross relaxation of the nitrogen polarization to adjacent proton spins. When the proton Zeeman splitting matches one nitrogen quadrupoler transition the remaining two {sup 14}N transitions can be detected by sweeping a saturating rf field through resonance. Additionally, simultaneous excitation of two nitrogen resonances provides signal enhancement which helps to connect transitions from the same site. In this way, nitrogen-14 resonances were observed in several amino acids and polypeptides. This spectrometer has also been useful in the direct detection of methyl quantum tunneling splittings at 4.2 K. Tunneling, frequencies of a homologous series of carboxylic acids were measured and for solids with equivalent crystal structures, an exponential correlation between the tunneling frequency and the enthalpy of fusion is observed. This correlation provides information about the contribution of intermolecular interactions to the energy barrier for methyl rotation.

  4. Measurement of in-situ stress in salt and rock using NQR techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Schempp, E.; Hirschfeld, T.; Klainer, S.

    1980-12-01

    A discussion of how stress and strain affect the quantities which can be measured in an NQR experiment shows that, for stresses of the magnitude to be expected at depths up to about 10,000 feet, quadrupole coupling constants will fall in the range of 1 to 10 kHz for both the sodium and chloride ions in NaCl. The most promising system involves pulsed nuclear double resonance detection; and alterative is to observe the quadrupolar splitting of the NMR signal. Choices to be made in the measurement and mapping techniques are discussed. The well-known perturbation of the homogenous stress field in the neighborhood of a borehole is shown to be advantageous from the point of view of obtaining directional information on the stress. Construction and operation of a borehole stress sensor are considered. The NQR technique seems feasible for measuring the magnitude and direction of underground stress with a resolution of about 25 psi, or 2.5% at 1000 psi. Downhole instrumentation suitable for in-situ determinations of stress appears within the state of the art. Additional tasks required on the project are identified.

  5. A Computer-controlled, Fully Automatic NMR/NQR Double Resonance Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenye, Feng; Lcken, Edwin A. C.; Diolot, Jacques

    1992-02-01

    A completely automatic computer-controlled NMR/NQR double resonance spectrometer is described. It features automatic tuning of the low, variable frequency power amplifier, thus permitting untended use over long periods, with high sensitivity and signal reproducibility. The sample is transferred between the low-frequency, zero-field region and the high-field region using compressed air and the possibility of switching on a field of several tens of gauss during the transfer of the sample is also included

  6. Nuclear quadrupole resonance detection of explosives: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Joel B.

    2011-06-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a spectroscopic technique closely related to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). These techniques, and NQR in particular, induce signals from the material being interrogated that are very specific to the chemical and physical structure of the material, but are relatively insensitive to the physical form of the material. NQR explosives detection exploits this specificity to detect explosive materials, in contrast to other well known techniques that are designed to detect explosive devices. The past two decades have seen a large research and development effort in NQR explosives detection in the United States aimed at transportation security and military applications. Here, I will briefly describe the physical basis for NQR before discussing NQR developments over the past decade, with particular emphasis on landmine detection and the use of NQR in combating IED's. Potential future directions for NQR research and development are discussed.

  7. Jun2006 Years of Nmr/nqr Experiments in Solid Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Detlef

    2006-06-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) experiments in solid electrolytes started around 1975 when a new interest arose in solids with high ionic conductivity. The emphasis of this revue is on experiments rather than theoretical issues. We will present typical NMR/NQR studies which demonstrate the power of these techniques to elucidate dynamic and static behavior of these solids at a microscopic level. Because of the overwhelming wealth of results accumulated in the last 30 years, we will be limited to some characteristic examples.

  8. PEANUT experiment in NQR spectroscopy for I=3/2.

    PubMed

    Sinyavsky, Nikolay; Dolinenkov, Philip; Ma?kowiak, Mariusz

    2012-01-01

    The experiment with phase inversion and phase-inverted echo-amplitude detected nutation (PEANUT) was introduced in the nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). Formulas were obtained describing the NQR (I=3/2) experiment. Exemplary experiments are provided confirming the predicted particularities of the PEANUT spectra in NQR Cl-35. It is proposed to apply the method for the purpose of determination the asymmetry parameter of the electric field gradient (EFG) tensor in powders with the help of the analysis of PEANUT interferograms. Application of two-dimensional PEANUT experiments, in which the nutation frequencies correlate with the resonance NQR frequencies, can substantially simplify the interpretation of complex spectra. PMID:22365993

  9. 14N NQR and relaxation in ammonium nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, David

    2015-04-01

    The complete 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectrum of ammonium nitrate is presented recorded using two double resonance techniques - double contact cross relaxation and zero field NQR. The spectra gave the quadrupole coupling constant (Qcc) and asymmetry parameter ( ?) values for the nitro of 611 kHz, 0.229 and that for the ammonium nitrogen of 242 kHz, 0.835. The three relaxation transition probabilities have been determined for both the nitro and ammonium nitrogen atoms. The bi-exponential relaxation times (T 1) were measured at 295 K. The values for nitro are 16.9 s and 10.5 s and that of the ammonium are 23.0 s and 16.4 s.

  10. Detection of {sup 14}N and {sup 35}Cl in cocaine base and hydrochloride using NQR, NMR, and SQUID techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Yesinowski, J.P.; Buess, M.L.; Garroway, A.N.; Ziegeweid, M.; Pines, A. |

    1995-07-01

    Results from {sup 14}N pure NQR of cocaine in the free base form (cocaine base) yield a nuclear quadrupole coupling constant (NQCC) e{sup 2}Qq/h of 5.0229 ({+-}0.0001) MHz and an asymmetry parameter {eta} of 0.0395 ({+-}0.0001) at 295 K, with corresponding values of 5.0460 ({+-}0.0013) MHz and 0.0353 ({+-}0.0008) at 77 K. Both pure NQR (at 295-77 K) and a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detector (at 4.2 K) were used to measure the very low (<1 MHz) {sup 14}N transition frequencies in cocaine hydrochloride; at 295 K the NQCC is 1.1780 ({+-}0.0014) MHz and the asymmetry parameter is 0.2632 ({+-}0.0034). Stepping the carrier frequency enables one to obtain a powder pattern without the severe intensity distortions that otherwise arise from finite pulse power. A powder pattern simulation using an NQCC value of 5.027 MHz and an asymmetry parameter {eta} of 0.2 agrees reasonably well with the experimental stepped-frequency spectrum. The use of pure NQR for providing nondestructive, quantitative, and highly specific detection of crystalline compounds is discussed, as are experimental strategies. 31 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Application of a dc SQUID to rf amplification: NQR

    SciTech Connect

    Hilbert, C.; Clarke, J.; Sleator, T.; Hahn, E.L.

    1985-05-01

    Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) have been used for more than a decade for the detection of magnetic resonance. Until recently, these devices had mostly been confined to operation in the audiofrequency range, so that experiments have been restricted to measurements of resonance at low frequencies, or of changes in the static susceptibility of a sample induced by rf irradiation at the resonant frequency. However, the recent extension of the operating range of low noise dc SQUIDs to radiofrequencies (rf) allows one to detect magnetic resonance directly at frequencies up to several hundred megahertz. In this paper, we begin by summarizing the properties of dc SQUIDs as tuned rf amplifers. We then describe first, the development of a SQUID system for the detection of pulsed nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) at about 30 MHz and second, a novel technique for observing magnetic resonances in the absence of any externally applied rf fields.

  12. A Pulsed Spectrometer Designed for Feedback NQR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiano, J. L.; Ginsberg, M. D.

    2000-02-01

    A pulsed NQR spectrometer specifically designed to facilitate real-time tuning of pulse sequence parameters is described. A modular approach based on the interconnection of several rack-mounted blocks provides easy access to all spectrometer signals and simplifies the task of modifying the spectrometer design. We also present experimental data that demonstrates the ability of the spectrometer to increase the signal to noise ratio of NQR measurements by automatically adjusting the pulse width in the strong off-resonant comb pulse sequence.

  13. SQUID detected NMR and NQR. Superconducting Quantum Interference Device.

    PubMed

    Augustine, M P; TonThat, D M; Clarke, J

    1998-03-01

    The dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) is a sensitive detector of magnetic flux, with a typical flux noise of the order 1 muphi0 Hz(-1/2) at liquid helium temperatures. Here phi0 = h/2e is the flux quantum. In our NMR or NQR spectrometer, a niobium wire coil wrapped around the sample is coupled to a thin film superconducting coil deposited on the SQUID to form a flux transformer. With this untuned input circuit the SQUID measures the flux, rather than the rate of change of flux, and thus retains its high sensitivity down to arbitrarily low frequencies. This feature is exploited in a cw spectrometer that monitors the change in the static magnetization of a sample induced by radio frequency irradiation. Examples of this technique are the detection of NQR in 27Al in sapphire and 11B in boron nitride, and a level crossing technique to enhance the signal of 14N in peptides. Research is now focused on a SQUID-based spectrometer for pulsed NQR and NMR, which has a bandwidth of 0-5 MHz. This spectrometer is used with spin-echo techniques to measure the NQR longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of 14N in NH4ClO4, 63+/-6 ms and 22+/-2 ms, respectively. With the aid of two-frequency pulses to excite the 359 kHz and 714 kHz resonances in ruby simultaneously, it is possible to obtain a two-dimensional NQR spectrum. As a third example, the pulsed spectrometer is used to study NMR spectrum of 129Xe after polariza-tion with optically pumped Rb. The NMR line can be detected at frequencies as low as 200 Hz. At fields below about 2 mT the longitudinal relaxation time saturates at about 2000 s. Two recent experiments in other laboratories have extended these pulsed NMR techniques to higher temperatures and smaller samples. In the first, images were obtained of mineral oil floating on water at room temperature. In the second, a SQUID configured as a thin film gradiometer was used to detect NMR in a 50 microm particle of 195Pt at 6 mT and 4.2 K. PMID:9650797

  14. 14 N NQR spectrum of sildenafil citrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, David; Singh, Nadia

    2015-04-01

    The 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectrum of sildenafil citrate tablets has been recorded allowing the quadrupole coupling constants and asymmetry parameters of all six unique nitrogen atoms in its structure to be determined. A density function calculation gives results that are largely in agreement with the experimental values.

  15. Land mine detection by nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbs, Andrew D.; Barrall, Geoffrey A.; Czipott, Peter V.; Lathrop, Daniel K.; Lee, Y. K.; Magnuson, Erik E.; Matthews, Robert; Vierkotter, Stephie A.

    1998-09-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) combines the compound specific detection capability offered by chemical detection techniques with the spatial localization capability and convenience of an induction coil metal detector. In the 16 years since NQR was last applied to mine detection in the U.S., there has been considerable improvement in the basic techniques. This paper reviews the progress achieved under a recent initiative to detect landmines by NQR. Two basic technical developments are summarized: the design of a detection coil suitable for probing the ground for landmines buried at typical depths, and an increase in the NQR signal obtained from the explosive TNT. In addition, we report the sensitivity of an NQR detection system to detect the electromagnetic response of metal-cased landmines.

  16. Intensity of NQR lines for integer spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anferov, V. P.; Beloglazov, G. S.; Grechishkin, V. S.

    1986-12-01

    Because of the publication of contradictory information demonstrating an incorrect approach to the modeling of NQR-NMR frequency-intensity spectra of integral-spin isotopes (for example, boron-10), we study the NQR-NMR double resonance with level crossing (DRLC) in10B-1H,11B-1H,59K-1H and23Na-1H in crystal hydrates of sodium tetraborate (Na2B4O710H2O) and potassium tetraborate (K2B4O74H2O) and the results of the measurements are compared with theoretical calculations. The fact that for a system including three elements-quadrupole (NQR), Zeeman (NMR), and dipole-dipole, which establishes the interaction of the first two- the intensities of the lines in double resonance spectra are determined both by the equations of balance of the populations of the levels of the quadrupole and Zeeman reservoirs and by the probabilities of transitions within each reservoir is taken into account in the calculations. The distortion of the energy levels of the NQR subsystem by the magnetic field in the process of level crossing with the NMR subsystem is taken into account.

  17. Pulsed Spin Locking in Spin-1 NQR: Broadening Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Michael W.

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a branch of magnetic resonance physics that allows for the detection of spin I > 1/2 nuclei in crystalline and semi-crystalline materials. Through the application of a resonant radio frequency (rf) pulse, the nuclei's response is to create an oscillating magnetic moment at a frequency unique to the target substance. This creates the NQR signal, which is typically weak and rapidly decaying. The decay is due to the various line broadening mechanisms, the relative strengths of which are functions of the specific material, in addition to thermal relaxation processes. Through the application of a series of rf pulses the broadening mechanisms can be refocused, narrowing the linewidth and extending the signal in time. Three line broadening mechanisms are investigated to explain the NQR signal's linewidth and behavior. The first, electric field gradient (EFG) inhomogeneity, is due to variations in the local electric environment among the target nuclei, for instance from crystal imperfections. While EFG inhomogeneity can vary between samples of the same chemical composition and structure, the other broadening mechanisms of homonuclear and heteronuclear dipolar coupling are specific to this composition and structure. Simple analytical models are developed that explain the NQR signal response to pulse sequences by accounting for the behavior of each broadening mechanism. After a general theoretical introduction, a model of pairs of spin-1 nuclei is investigated, and the refocusing behaviors of EFG and homonuclear dipolar coupling are analyzed. This reveals the conditions where EFG is refocused but homonuclear dipolar coupling is not. In this case the resulting signal shows a rapid decay, the rate of which becomes a measure of interatomic distances. This occurs even in the more complex case of a powder sample with its many randomly oriented crystallites, under particular pulsing conditions. Many target NQR compounds are rich in hydrogen, and therefore might have a significant heteronuclear dipolar coupling component. To incorporate this, a second model is developed composed of two different nuclear species, one spin 1 the other spin 1/2, although the work can be extended to additional spin species. This model reveals that heteronuclear dipolar coupling for this system behaves just like EFG broadening under spin locking, and that the strong homonuclear response is still observable. The experimental results closely match theoretical predictions, and the conclusions greatly expand the number of target substances that are suitable for this measurement technique of homonuclear dipolar coupling. The combined results explain why certain pulse sequences perform better than others for substance detection: it is because of the relative strengths of the line broadening mechanisms. Therefore the ability to measure homonuclear dipolar coupling's contribution to the linewidth is useful not only for material characterization, but also for substance detection. By explaining the conditions that reveal homonuclear coupling, we make it possible to measure the relative broadening strengths, increasing the efficiency of NQR in these roles.

  18. NQR studies on 2,5-dichlorophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasturi, Alapati; Venkatacharyulu, P.; Premaswarup, D.

    1990-11-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) Zeeman effect studies were carried out on cylindrical single crystals of 2,5-dichlorophenol, using the two 35Cl-NQR frequencies. A self-quenched superregenerative NQR spectrometer was used, and the spectra were analysed ot obtain information on the nature of the crystalline unit cell. An analysis of the experimental data reveals that: (1) the results are in good agreement with the structural reports of Bavoux and Perrin; (2) the crystal unequivocally belongs to the monoclinic system; (3) there are two crystallographically equivalent but physically inequivalent directions for the principal field gradient axes for both the low- and high-frequency resonance lines; (4) as the number of physically inequivalent directions for each of the two resonance lines is two, the minimum number of molecules per unit cell is two; (5) the b axis (90°,90°) is identified as the symmetry axis; (6) the growth axis is slightly inclined to the c axis; (7) the asymmetry parameters obtained for the loci corresponding to the low-frequency line, which is hydrogen bonded, are greater than those for the high-frequency line, which is nonhydrogen bonded; (8) the double-bond character is greater for the hydrogen-bonded chlorine than for the non-hydrogen-bonded chlorine; (9) the ratios of the various bond characters estimated for both the low- and high-frequency resonance lines are 69:24:7 and 74:24:2.

  19. Low-Frequency NMR and Nqr with a DC SQUID Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Nong-Qiang

    A sensitive Fourier-transform spectrometer based on a dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) has been developed for the direct detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in zero applied magnetic field and pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) at low frequencies. The motivation to detect zero field NMR and NQR is to provide a new high resolution spectroscopy technique at frequencies below 200 kHz to study ultra-weak interactions in chemicals and materials. By comparing the sensitivity of a SQUID amplifier with that of a conventional semiconductor amplifier, it is shown that a SQUID amplifier is essential for the direct detection of low frequency resonant signals. The spectrometer has a frequency response extending from about 10 to 200 kHz, and a recovery time (after the magnetic pulse is removed) of about 50 mus. The spectrometer is used to detect NMR spectra from Pt and Cu metal powders in a magnetic field of 6 mtesla, and NQR spectra from ^2D in a tunneling methyl group and ^{14}N in rm NH_4ClO_4. Finally, the zero field NMR spectrum from a quantum tunneling methyl group is calculated.

  20. Numerical simulation of NQR/NMR: Applications in quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Possa, Denimar; Gaudio, Anderson C; Freitas, Jair C C

    2011-04-01

    A numerical simulation program able to simulate nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments is presented, written using the Mathematica package, aiming especially applications in quantum computing. The program makes use of the interaction picture to compute the effect of the relevant nuclear spin interactions, without any assumption about the relative size of each interaction. This makes the program flexible and versatile, being useful in a wide range of experimental situations, going from NQR (at zero or under small applied magnetic field) to high-field NMR experiments. Some conditions specifically required for quantum computing applications are implemented in the program, such as the possibility of use of elliptically polarized radiofrequency and the inclusion of first- and second-order terms in the average Hamiltonian expansion. A number of examples dealing with simple NQR and quadrupole-perturbed NMR experiments are presented, along with the proposal of experiments to create quantum pseudopure states and logic gates using NQR. The program and the various application examples are freely available through the link http://www.profanderson.net/files/nmr_nqr.php. PMID:21324720

  1. Modified steady-state free precession pulse sequences for the detection of pure nuclear quadrupole resonance.

    PubMed

    Rudakov, T N; Mikhaltsevitch, V T; Flexman, J H

    2004-01-01

    Modifications of the steady-state free precession multi-pulse technique for the effective detection of the nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) signals are proposed. These modifications are based on the use of composite pulses and enable the suppression of the coherent noise signals such as the magneto-acoustic and piezo-electric signals or the ringing signal from the NQR probe. Experimental results of applying the proposed technique to nitrogen-14 NQR in the sample of C6H12N4 are also presented and convincingly demonstrate its effectiveness. PMID:14698393

  2. Zeeman shift--a tool for assignment of 14N NQR lines of nonequivalent 14N atoms in powder samples.

    PubMed

    Luznik, J; Jazbinsek, V; Pirnat, J; Seliger, J; Trontelj, Z

    2011-09-01

    The use of Zeeman perturbed 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) to determine the ?+ and ?-14N lines in polycrystalline samples with several nonequivalent nitrogen atoms was investigated. The 14N NQR line shift due to a weak external Zeeman magnetic field was calculated, assuming isotropic distribution of EFG tensor directions. We calculated the broad line distribution of the ?+ and ?- line shifts and experimentally confirmed the calculated Zeeman field dependence of singularities (NQR peaks) in cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) and aminotetrazole monohydrate (ATMH). The calculated and measured frequency shifts agreed well. The proposed measurement method enabled determination of which 14N NQR lines in ATMH belong to ?+ and which to ?- transitions. PMID:21783395

  3. Two-dimensional NQR using ultra-broadband electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, S.; Song, Y.-Q.

    2014-03-01

    We have recently developed an ultra-broadband instrument that can effectively excite and detect NMR and NQR signals over a wide frequency range. Our current system operates between 100 kHz and 3.2 MHz using an un-tuned sample coil. The major benefits of this instrument compared to conventional NQR/NMR systems include increased robustness, ease of use (in particular for multi-frequency experiments), and elimination of the need for tuning adjustments in the hardware. Here we describe its use for performing two-dimensional (2D) scans, which allow improved interpretation of complex NQR spectra by detecting the connected resonances. Our method relies on population transfers between the three energy levels of spin-1 nuclei (such as 14N) by using multi-frequency excitation and a single RF coil. Experimental results on pure samples and mixtures are also presented.

  4. Optimal filtering in multipulse sequences for nuclear quadrupole resonance detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osokin, D. Ya.; Khusnutdinov, R. R.; Mozzhukhin, G. V.; Rameev, B. Z.

    2014-05-01

    The application of the multipulse sequences in nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) detection of explosive and narcotic substances has been studied. Various approaches to increase the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of signal detection are considered. We discussed two modifications of the phase-alternated multiple-pulse sequence (PAMS): the 180 pulse sequence with a preparatory pulse and the 90 pulse sequence. The advantages of optimal filtering to detect NQR in the case of the coherent steady-state precession have been analyzed. It has been shown that this technique is effective in filtering high-frequency and low-frequency noise and increasing the reliability of NQR detection. Our analysis also shows the PAMS with 180 pulses is more effective than PSL sequence from point of view of the application of optimal filtering procedure to the steady-state NQR signal.

  5. Applications of nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy in drug development.

    PubMed

    Latosin?ska, Jolanta N

    2007-02-01

    In this review, fundamentals of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy are briefly outlined. Examples of its applications in drug development are discussed to demonstrate that the NQR method is a sophisticated, non-destructive and valuable analytical technique for studying pharmaceuticals, providing effective assistance at the two main steps of drug development: the physical and chemical characterization of the active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) at the analytical step and API development. This review covers different aspects of the use of NQR spectroscopy for drug development and analysis and illustrates the power and versatility of this method in the determination of impurities, polymorphic forms, the drug's structure and conformation, characterization of the interactions between the drug and ligands, search for analogs (second- or third-generation drugs) and the drug's thermal stability. Lastly, NQR advantages and restrictions in the aspect of application in drug development studies are summarized. PMID:23496079

  6. An analytical method for estimating the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance parameters of organic compounds with complex free induction decays for radiation effects studies

    SciTech Connect

    Iselin, L.H.

    1992-12-31

    The use of {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as a radiation dosimetry tool has only recently been explored. An analytical method for analyzing {sup 14}N NQR complex free induction decays is presented with the background necessary to conduct pulsed NQR experiments. The {sup 14}N NQR energy levels and possible transitions are derived in step-by-step detail. The components of a pulsed NQR spectrometer are discussed along with the experimental techniques for conducting radiation effects experiments using the spectrometer. Three data analysis techniques -- the power spectral density Fourier transform, state space singular value decomposition (HSVD), and nonlinear curve fitting (using the downhill simplex method of global optimization and the Levenberg-Marquart method) -- are explained. These three techniques are integrated into an analytical method which uses these numerical techniques in this order to determine the physical NQR parameters. Sample data sets of urea and guanidine sulfate data are used to demonstrate how these methods can be employed to analyze both simple and complex free induction decays. By determining baseline values for biologically significant organics, radiation effects on the NQR parameters can be studied to provide a link between current radiation dosimetry techniques and the biological effects of radiation.

  7. Local electric state of noncentrosymmetric superconductor Mo3Al2C revealed by Mo NQR and NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Y.; Kimura, Y.; Kumagai, K.; Bauer, E.; Rogl, G.; Rogl, P.

    2012-12-01

    Mo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements were performed on a noncentrosymmetric superconductor Mo3Al2C to investigate the local electronic state at Mo nuclei, which carries the electrons responsible for superconductivity. The NQR frequency, which is linked to the electric field gradient at Mo site, was determined from 95Mo NMR spectrum and the result was verified by the independent 97Mo NQR measurement. The experimentally obtained value is compared to the result of a point charge calculation to extract the EFG induced by conduction electrons and reveal the local electronic state.

  8. FPGA based pulsed NQR spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemnani, Preeti; Rajarajan, A. K.; Joshi, Gopal; Motiwala, Paresh D.; Ravindranath, S. V. G.

    2014-04-01

    An NQR spectrometer for the frequency range of 1 MHz to 5 MHZ has been designed constructed and tested using an FPGA module. Consisting of four modules viz. Transmitter, Probe, Receiver and computer controlled (FPGA & Software) module containing frequency synthesizer, pulse programmer, mixer, detection and display, the instrument is capable of exciting nuclei with a power of 200W and can detect signal of a few microvolts in strength. 14N signal from NaNO2 has been observed with the expected signal strength.

  9. Low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonance with a dc SQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.W.

    1991-07-01

    Conventional pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a technique well suited for the study of very large quadrupolar interactions. Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have been developed for the study of smaller quadrupolar interactions. However, there are many nuclei which have quadrupolar interactions of intermediate strength. Quadrupolar interactions in this region have traditionally been difficult or unfeasible to detect. This work describes the development and application of a SQUID NQR technique which is capable of measuring intermediate strength quadrupolar interactions, in the range of a few hundred kilohertz to several megahertz. In this technique, a dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) is used to monitor the longitudinal sample magnetization, as opposed to the transverse magnetization, as a rf field is swept in frequency. This allows the detection of low-frequency nuclear quadrupole resonances over a very wide frequency range with high sensitivity. The theory of this NQR technique is discussed and a description of the dc SQUID system is given. In the following chapters, the spectrometer is discussed along with its application to the study of samples containing half-odd-integer spin quadrupolar nuclei, in particular boron-11 and aluminum-27. The feasibility of applying this NQR technique in the study of samples containing integer spin nuclei is discussed in the last chapter. 140 refs., 46 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. A computational NQR study on the hydrogen-bonded lattice of cytosine-5-acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Mahmoud; Hadipour, Nasser L

    2008-04-15

    A computational study at the level of density functional theory (DFT) employing 6-311++G** standard basis set was carried out to evaluate nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy parameters in cytosine-5-acetic acid (C5AA). Since the electric field gradient (EFG) tensors are very sensitive to the electrostatic environment at the sites of quadruple nuclei, the most possible interacting molecules with the target one were considered in a five-molecule model system of C5AA using X-ray coordinates transforming. The hydrogen atoms positions were optimized and two model systems of original and H-optimized C5AA were considered in NQR calculations. The calculated EFG tensors at the sites of (17)O, (14)N, and (2)H nuclei were converted to their experimentally measurable parameters, quadrupole coupling constants and asymmetry parameters. The evaluated NQR parameters reveal that the nuclei in original and H-optimized systems contribute to different hydrogen bonding (HB) interaction. The comparison of calculated parameters between optimized isolated gas-phase and crystalline monomer also shows the relationship between the structural deformation and NQR parameters in C5AA. The basis set superposition error (BSSE) calculations yielded no significant errors for employed basis set in the evaluation of NQR parameters. All the calculations were performed by Gaussian 98 package of program. PMID:17926341

  11. Temperature dependence of 35Cl NQR in 3,4-Dichlorophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandramani, R.; Devaraj, N.; Indumathy, A.; Ramakrishna, J.

    NQR frequencies in 3,4-dichlorophenol are investigated in the temperature range 77 K to room temperature. Two resonances have been observed throughout the temperature range, corresponding to the two chemically inequivalent chlorine sites. Using Bayer's theory and Brown's method torsional frequencies and their temperature dependence in this range are estimated.

  12. Optimization of NQR Pulse Parameters using Feedback Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiano, J. L.; Blauch, A. J.; Ginsberg, M. D.

    2000-02-01

    A new method for increasing the probability of detecting nuclear resonance signals is demon-strated experimentally. It is well known that the detection of signals with a low signal to noise ratio (SNR) results in missed detections of false alarms. In situations where the noise is correlated or where limited data is averaging, it may not be possible to achieve a desired SNR through averaging alone. We present an alternative approach in which a feedback algorithm automatically adjusts pulse parameters so that the SNR and probability of correct detection are increased. Experimental results are presented for the detection of 14N NQR signals.

  13. 35Cl NQR frequency and spin lattice relaxation time in 3,4-dichlorophenol as a function of pressure and temperature.

    PubMed

    Ramu, L; Ramesh, K P; Chandramani, R

    2013-01-01

    The pressure dependences of (35)Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) frequency, temperature and pressure variation of spin lattice relaxation time (T(1)) were investigated in 3,4-dichlorophenol. T(1) was measured in the temperature range 77-300?K. Furthermore, the NQR frequency and T(1) for these compounds were measured as a function of pressure up to 5?kbar at 300?K. The temperature dependence of the average torsional lifetimes of the molecules and the transition probabilities W(1) and W(2) for the ?m?=?1 and ?m?=?2 transitions were also obtained. A nonlinear variation of NQR frequency with pressure has been observed and the pressure coefficients were observed to be positive. A thermodynamic analysis of the data was carried out to determine the constant volume temperature coefficients of the NQR frequency. An attempt is made to compare the torsional frequencies evaluated from NQR data with those obtained by IR spectra. On selecting the appropriate mode from IR spectra, a good agreement with torsional frequency obtained from NQR data is observed. The previously mentioned approach is a good illustration of the supplementary nature of the data from IR studies, in relation to NQR studies of compounds in solid state. PMID:23161529

  14. Application of two-dimensional exchange nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for the study of incommensurate solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muntean, Ligia Aurora

    This dissertation includes a study of atomic dynamics in incommensurate systems by specialized nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques, such as two-dimensional (2D) exchange NMR, and Hahn spin-echo decay. The atomic dynamics described by the diffusion-like motion of the modulation wave in incommensurate phases is one of the subjects of condensed matter physics that is not fully understood and has attracted a great deal of attention in recent years. Our Hahn spin-echo decay and 2D exchange and exchange-difference NMR experiments have contributed to understanding some of the aspects of this debated subject and have brought conclusive experimental evidence for the existence of the modulation wave diffusion in Rb2ZnCl 4 and BaNaNb5O15. We performed 87Rb NMR and 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) Hahn spin echo magnetization decay measurements in the incommensurate (I) phase of Rb2ZnCl4. From these measurements we obtained values for the diffusion coefficients for 87Rb NMR and 35Cl NQR and found them to be similar. This fact strongly supports the existence of modulation wave diffusion in the I phase, that should affect both Rb and Cl ions comparably. We also used 87Rb 2D exchange-difference NMR to study atomic motions in the incommensurate (I) and paraelectric (P) phases, to elucidate the nature of the I-P transition. The P phase results are identified as normal modes arising from simultaneous reorientations of ZnCl4 tetrahedra and corresponding Rb ions displacements between two sites. These normal modes freeze out in the I phase and change to the diffusion-like motion of the modulation wave. This dissertation also includes a study of modulation wave dynamics in the I phase of barium sodium niobate (BSN) by 2D exchange NMR. The modulation wave diffusion has been previously inferred in BSN from a complementary experiment, the Hahn spin-echo decay. However, since this experiment cannot unambiguously distinguish between different types of motional mechanisms, the modulation wave diffusion interpretation of the Hahn echo experimental results could still be under question. Our 93Nb 2D exchange NMR data provide additional strong evidence for the existence of progressive diffusion-like motion of the modulation wave and rules out a two-site jump model in BSN.

  15. A miniaturized NQR spectrometer for a multi-channel NQR-based detection device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beguš, Samo; Jazbinšek, Vojko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko

    2014-10-01

    A low frequency (0.5-5 MHz) battery operated sensitive pulsed NQR spectrometer with a transmitter power up to 5 W and a total mass of about 3 kg aimed at detecting 14N NQR signals, predominantly of illicit materials, was designed and assembled. This spectrometer uses a standard software defined radio (SDR) platform for the data acquisition unit. Signal processing is done with the LabView Virtual instrument on a personal computer. We successfully tested the spectrometer by measuring 14N NQR signals from aminotetrazole monohydrate (ATMH), potassium nitrate (PN), paracetamol (PCM) and trinitrotoluene (TNT). Such a spectrometer is a feasible component of a portable single or multichannel 14N NQR based detection device.

  16. A miniaturized NQR spectrometer for a multi-channel NQR-based detection device.

    PubMed

    Begu, Samo; Jazbinek, Vojko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko

    2014-10-01

    A low frequency (0.5-5 MHz) battery operated sensitive pulsed NQR spectrometer with a transmitter power up to 5 W and a total mass of about 3 kg aimed at detecting (14)N NQR signals, predominantly of illicit materials, was designed and assembled. This spectrometer uses a standard software defined radio (SDR) platform for the data acquisition unit. Signal processing is done with the LabView Virtual instrument on a personal computer. We successfully tested the spectrometer by measuring (14)N NQR signals from aminotetrazole monohydrate (ATMH), potassium nitrate (PN), paracetamol (PCM) and trinitrotoluene (TNT). Such a spectrometer is a feasible component of a portable single or multichannel (14)N NQR based detection device. PMID:25233110

  17. Ru-NQR studies on filled skutterudite compounds RRu4P12 (R=La,Nd,Sm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaki, S.; Mito, T.; Takemura, M.; Wada, S.; Harima, H.; Kikuchi, D.; Sato, H.; Sugawara, H.; Takeda, N.; Zheng, G.-q.

    2008-04-01

    We report nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies on Ru-sites of filled skutterudite compounds RRu4P12 (R=La,Nd,Sm) in zero magnetic field. For NdRu4P12, the Ru101-NQR signal disappears below TC=1.6 K, which is indicative of the transformation into the ferromagnetically ordered ground state. For SmRu4P12, a single Ru101-NQR line splits into two lines below the metal-insulator transition temperature TMI=16.5 K with the intensity ratio of 3:1. This result gives evidence that there are two inequivalent Ru-sites with different electric field gradient. The intensity ratio leads to a conclusion that the symmetry is lowered below TMI from a cubic Im3bar space group to a trigonal R3bar one.

  18. 75As-NQR study of the hybridization gap semiconductor CeOs4As12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogi, M.; Higa, N.; Niki, H.; Kawata, T.; Sekine, C.

    2016-02-01

    We performed an 75As nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurement on CeOs4As12. The 75As-NQR spectrum shape demonstrates that the Ce-site filling fraction of our high-pressure synthesized sample is close to unity. A presence of the c — f hybridization gap is confirmed from the temperature dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1. An increase of 1/T1 below ∼3 K indicates a development of the spin fluctuations. The 1/T1 for CeOs4As12 shows similar behavior as that for CeOs4Sb12 with different magnitude of the c — f hybridization gap. An absence of phase transition in CeOs4As12 may be caused by the increase of the c — f hybridization, which increases the gap magnitude and reduces the residual density of state inside the gap.

  19. Measurement of temperature and temperature gradient in millimeter samples by chlorine NQR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunik, Janko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko

    2009-09-01

    A mini-thermometer based on the 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) frequency temperature dependence in the chlorates KClO3 and NaClO3 was built and successfully tested by measuring temperature and temperature gradient at 77 K and higher in about 100 mm3 active volume of a mini Joule-Thomson refrigerator. In the design of the tank-circuit coil, an array of small coils connected in series enabled us (a) to achieve a suitable ratio of inductance to capacity in the NQR spectrometer input tank circuit, (b) to use a single crystal of KClO3 or NaClO3 (of 1-2 mm3 size) in one coil as a mini-thermometer with a resolution of 0.03 K and (c) to construct a system for measuring temperature gradients when the spatial coordinates of each chlorate single crystal within an individual coil are known.

  20. 93Nb- and 27Al-NMR/NQR studies of the praseodymium based PrNb2Al20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Tetsuro; Kotegawa, Hisashi; Tou, Hideki; Higashinaka, Ryuji; Nakama, Akihiro; Aoki, Yuji; Sato, Hideyuki

    2015-03-01

    We report a study of 93Nb- and 27Al-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) in a praseodymium based compound PrNb2Al20. The observed NMR line at around 3 T and 30 K shows a superposition of typical powder patterns of one Nb signal and at least two Al signals. 93Nb-NMR line could be reproduced by using the previously reported NQR frequency ?Q ? 1.8MHz and asymmetry parameter ? ? 0 [Kubo T et al 2014 JPS Conf. Proc. 3 012031]. From 27Al-NMR/NQR, NQR parameters are obtained to be ?Q,A ? 1.53 MHz, and ?A ? 0.20 for the site A, and ?Q,B ? 2.28 MHz, and ?B ? 0.17 for the site B. By comparing this result with the previous 27Al-NMR study of PrT2Al20 (T = Ti, V) [Tokunaga Y et al 2013 Phys. Rev. B 88 085124], these two Al site are assigned to the two of three crystallographycally inequivalent Al sites.

  1. (121,123)Sb and (75)As NMR and NQR investigation of the tetrahedrite (Cu12Sb4S13) - Tennantite (Cu12As4S13) system and other metal arsenides.

    PubMed

    Bastow, T J; Lehmann-Horn, J A; Miljak, D G

    2015-10-01

    This work is motivated by the recent developments in online minerals analysis in the mining and minerals processing industry via nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). Here we describe a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and NQR study of the minerals tennantite (Cu12As4S13) and tetrahedrite (Cu12 Sb4S13). In the first part NQR lines associated with (75)As in tennantite and (121,123)Sb isotopes in tetrahedrite are reported. The spectroscopy has been restricted to an ambient temperature studies in accord with typical industrial conditions. The second part of this contribution reports nuclear quadrupole-perturbed NMR findings on further, only partially characterised, metal arsenides. The findings enhance the detection capabilities of NQR based analysers for online measurement applications and may aid to control arsenic and antimony concentrations in metal processing stages. PMID:26453410

  2. Review: Magnetic resonance imaging techniques in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging the eye with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved difficult due to the eyes propensity to move involuntarily over typical imaging timescales, obscuring the fine structure in the eye due to the resulting motion artifacts. However, advances in MRI technology help to mitigate such drawbacks, enabling the acquisition of high spatiotemporal resolution images with a variety of contrast mechanisms. This review aims to classify the MRI techniques used to date in clinical and preclinical ophthalmologic studies, describing the qualitative and quantitative information that may be extracted and how this may inform on ocular pathophysiology. PMID:23112569

  3. Electron density distribution in cladribine (2-chloro-2?-deoxyadenosine) - A drug against leukemia and multiple sclerosis - Studied by multinuclear NQR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latosi?ska, J. N.; Latosi?ska, M.; Seliger, J.; agar, V.; Kazimierczuk, Z.

    2009-07-01

    2-Chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine (Cladribine) chemotherapeutic drug has been studied experimentally in solid state by 35Cl NQR and NMR-NQR double resonance and theoretically by the Density Functional Theory. Fifteen resonance frequencies on 14N have been detected and assigned to particular nitrogen sites in the 2-CdA molecule. The effects of tautomerism, regioisomerism, conformations and molecular aggregations, related to intermolecular hydrogen bond formation, on the NQR parameters have been analysed within the DFT and AIM ( Atoms in Molecules) formalism. The properties of the whole molecule, the so-called global reactivity descriptors, have been calculated for a comparison of both syn and anti conformations of 2-CdA molecule to check the effect of crystal packing on molecular conformation.

  4. Statistical normalization techniques for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Russell T; Sweeney, Elizabeth M; Goldsmith, Jeff; Shiee, Navid; Mateen, Farrah J; Calabresi, Peter A; Jarso, Samson; Pham, Dzung L; Reich, Daniel S; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M

    2014-01-01

    While computed tomography and other imaging techniques are measured in absolute units with physical meaning, magnetic resonance images are expressed in arbitrary units that are difficult to interpret and differ between study visits and subjects. Much work in the image processing literature on intensity normalization has focused on histogram matching and other histogram mapping techniques, with little emphasis on normalizing images to have biologically interpretable units. Furthermore, there are no formalized principles or goals for the crucial comparability of image intensities within and across subjects. To address this, we propose a set of criteria necessary for the normalization of images. We further propose simple and robust biologically motivated normalization techniques for multisequence brain imaging that have the same interpretation across acquisitions and satisfy the proposed criteria. We compare the performance of different normalization methods in thousands of images of patients with Alzheimer's disease, hundreds of patients with multiple sclerosis, and hundreds of healthy subjects obtained in several different studies at dozens of imaging centers. PMID:25379412

  5. A Technique for Adjusting Eigenfrequencies of WGM Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Maleki, Lute; Matsko, Andrey; Iltchenko, Vladimir; Martin, Jan

    2009-01-01

    A simple technique has been devised for making small, permanent changes in the eigenfrequencies (resonance frequencies) of whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) dielectric optical resonators that have high values of the resonance quality factor (Q). The essence of the technique is to coat the resonator with a thin layer of a transparent polymer having an index of refraction close to that of the resonator material. Successive small frequency adjustments can be made by applying successive coats. The technique was demonstrated on a calcium fluoride resonator to which successive coats of a polymer were applied by use of a hand-made wooden brush. To prevent temperature- related frequency shifts that could interfere with the verification of the effectiveness of this technique, the temperature of the resonator was stabilized by means of a three-stage thermoelectric cooler. Measurements of the resonator spectrum showed the frequency shifts caused by the successive coating layers.

  6. Pressure Dependence of the Chlorine NQR in Chloro Pyridines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, K. P.; Ramakrishna, J.; Suresh, K. S.; Rao, C. Raghavendra

    2000-02-01

    The 35CI NQR frequency (?Q) and spin lattice relaxation time (T1 ) in 2,6-dichloropyridine, 2 amino 3,5-dichloropyridine and 6 chloro 2-pyridinol have been measured as a function of pressure up to 5.1 kbar at 300 K, and the data have been analysed to estimate the temperature coefficients of the NQR frequency at constant volume. All the three compounds show a non linear variation of the NQR frequency with pressure which can be described by a 2nd order polynomial in pressure. The rate of change of the NQR frequency with pressure is positive and decreases with increasing pressure. The spin lattice relaxation time T1, in all the three compounds shows a small increase with pressure, indicating that the relaxation is mainly due to the torsional motions.

  7. Beta-detected NQR in zero field with a low energy beam of 8Li+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Z.; Kiefl, R. F.; Chow, K. H.; MacFarlane, W. A.; Kreitzman, S. R.; Arseneau, D. J.; Daviel, S.; Levy, C. D. P.; Maeno, Y.; Poutissou, R.

    2006-03-01

    Beta-detected nuclear quadrupole resonances ( ?-NQR) in zero field are observed using a beam of low energy highly polarized radioactive Li+8. The resonances were detected in SrTiO 3, Al 2O 3 and Sr 2RuO 4 single crystals by monitoring the beta-decay anisotropy as a function of a small audio frequency magnetic field. The resonances show clearly that Li+8 occupies one site with non-cubic symmetry in SrTiO 3, two in Al 2O 3 and three sites in Sr 2RuO 4. The resonance amplitude and width are surprisingly large compared to the values expected from transitions between the |2>?|1> spin states, indicating a significant mixing between the |m> quadrupolar split levels.

  8. New perspectives in the PAW/GIPAW approach: J(P-O-Si) coupling constants, antisymmetric parts of shift tensors and NQR predictions.

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, Christian; Gervais, Christel; Coelho, Cristina; Pourpoint, Frédérique; Azaïs, Thierry; Bonhomme-Coury, Laure; Babonneau, Florence; Jacob, Guy; Ferrari, Maude; Canet, Daniel; Yates, Jonathan R; Pickard, Chris J; Joyce, Siân A; Mauri, Francesco; Massiot, Dominique

    2010-12-01

    In 2001, Pickard and Mauri implemented the gauge including projected augmented wave (GIPAW) protocol for first-principles calculations of NMR parameters using periodic boundary conditions (chemical shift anisotropy and electric field gradient tensors). In this paper, three potentially interesting perspectives in connection with PAW/GIPAW in solid-state NMR and pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) are presented: (i) the calculation of J coupling tensors in inorganic solids; (ii) the calculation of the antisymmetric part of chemical shift tensors and (iii) the prediction of (14)N and (35)Cl pure NQR resonances including dynamics. We believe that these topics should open new insights in the combination of GIPAW, NMR/NQR crystallography, temperature effects and dynamics. Points (i), (ii) and (iii) will be illustrated by selected examples: (i) chemical shift tensors and heteronuclear (2)J(P-O-Si) coupling constants in the case of silicophosphates and calcium phosphates [Si(5)O(PO(4))(6), SiP(2)O(7) polymorphs and α-Ca(PO(3))(2)]; (ii) antisymmetric chemical shift tensors in cyclopropene derivatives, C(3)X(4) (X = H, Cl, F) and (iii) (14)N and (35)Cl NQR predictions in the case of RDX (C(3)H(6)N(6)O(6)), β-HMX (C(4)H(8)N(8)O(8)), α-NTO (C(2)H(2)N(4)O(3)) and AlOPCl(6). RDX, β-HMX and α-NTO are explosive compounds. PMID:20589728

  9. Analysis and Calibration Techniques for Superconducting Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Wollack, Edward J.; Barrentine, Emily M.; Brown, Ari D.; Moseley, S. Harvey; U-Yen, Kongpop

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed and experimentally explored for in-situ calibration of complex transmission data for superconducting microwave resonators. This cryogenic calibration method accounts for the instrumental transmission response between the vector network analyzer reference plane and the device calibration plane. Once calibrated, the observed resonator response is analyzed in detail by two approaches. The first, a phenomenological model based on physically realizable rational functions, enables the extraction of multiple resonance frequencies and widths for coupled resonators without explicit specification of the circuit network. In the second, an ABCD-matrix representation for the distributed transmission line circuit is used to model the observed response from the characteristic impedance and propagation constant. When used in conjunction with electromagnetic simulations, the kinetic inductance fraction can be determined with this method with an accuracy of 2%. Datasets for superconducting microstrip and coplanar-waveguide resonator devices were investigated and a recovery within 1% of the observed complex transmission amplitude was achieved with both analysis approaches. The experimental configuration used in microwave characterization of the devices and self-consistent constraints for the electromagnetic constitutive relations for parameter extraction are also presented.

  10. Analysis and calibration techniques for superconducting resonators.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Wollack, Edward J; Barrentine, Emily M; Brown, Ari D; Moseley, S Harvey; U-Yen, Kongpop

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed and experimentally explored for in-situ calibration of complex transmission data for superconducting microwave resonators. This cryogenic calibration method accounts for the instrumental transmission response between the vector network analyzer reference plane and the device calibration plane. Once calibrated, the observed resonator response is analyzed in detail by two approaches. The first, a phenomenological model based on physically realizable rational functions, enables the extraction of multiple resonance frequencies and widths for coupled resonators without explicit specification of the circuit network. In the second, an ABCD-matrix representation for the distributed transmission line circuit is used to model the observed response from the characteristic impedance and propagation constant. When used in conjunction with electromagnetic simulations, the kinetic inductance fraction can be determined with this method with an accuracy of 2%. Datasets for superconducting microstrip and coplanar-waveguide resonator devices were investigated and a recovery within 1% of the observed complex transmission amplitude was achieved with both analysis approaches. The experimental configuration used in microwave characterization of the devices and self-consistent constraints for the electromagnetic constitutive relations for parameter extraction are also presented. PMID:25638068

  11. Two-dimensional exchange 35Cl NQR spectroscopy of hexachloroethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maćkowiak, Mariusz; Sinyavsky, Nicolay; Bluemich, Bernhard

    2005-05-01

    Two-dimensional exchange 35Cl NQR spectroscopy for studies of the CCl 3-group reorientation processes in hexachloroethane has been applied. It has been demonstrated that 2D NQR exchange spectroscopy is appropriate for quantitative studies of exchange processes in molecular crystals containing quadrupole nuclei. The method is of particular value for the detection of exchange networks in systems with many sites. Thus, detailed information on the exchange pathways within a network of structural isomers in hexachloroethane can be deduced and a proper assignment of the NQR lines can be made. Temperature dependence of the exchange rate was studied. The mixing dynamics by exchange and the expected cross-peak intensities have been derived. The very good agreement of the experimental results with theoretical predictions confirms the validity of the motion model.

  12. NQR experiments on Sc-Y alloys at very low temperatures. [Absolute thermometry below 500[mu]K

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, L.; Smith, E.N.; Richardson, R.C. )

    1992-10-01

    The authors performed Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) experiments on an alloy of scandium and yttrium. They find that the characteristic resonance frequencies in zero external field are 50% larger than in pure scandium. This increase in frequency makes the Sc-Y alloy a better candidate for absolute thermometry below 500 [mu]K. However, the spin-lattice relaxation time of this alloy is more than an order of magnitude longer than in the pure scandium. In addition, an abrupt increase in the Korringa constant was observed for temperatures below 5mK.

  13. Ab initio DFT study of bisphosphonate derivatives as a drug for inhibition of cancer: NMR and NQR parameters.

    PubMed

    Aghabozorg, Hussein; Sohrabi, Beheshteh; Mashkouri, Sara; Aghabozorg, Hamid Reza

    2012-03-01

    DFT computations were carried out to characterize the (17)Oand (2)H electric field gradient, EFG, in various bisphosphonate derivatives. The computations were performed at the B3LYP level with 6-311++G (d,P) standard basis set. Calculated EFG tensors were used to determine the (17)O and (2)H nuclear quadrupole coupling constant, ? and asymmetry parameter, ?. For better understanding of the bonding and electronic structure of bisphosphonates, isotropic and anisotropic NMR chemical shieldings were calculated for the (13)C, (17)O and (31)P nuclei using GIAO method for the optimized structure of intermediate bisphosphonates at B3LYP level of theory using 6-311++G (d, p) basis set. The results showed that various substituents have a strong effect on the nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) parameters (?, ?) of (17)O in contrast with (2)H NQR parameters. The NMR and NQR parameters were studied in order to find the correlation between electronic structure and the activity of the desired bisphosphonates. In addition, the effect of substitutions on the bisphosphonates polarity was investigated. Molecular polarity was determined via the DFT calculated dipole moment vectors and the results showed that substitution of bromine atom on the ring would increase the activity of bisphosphonates. PMID:21633790

  14. Single crystal zeeman effect studies on 35Cl NQR lines of 2,6-dichlorophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, N. V. L. N.; Venkatacharyulu, P.; Premaswarup, D.

    1987-10-01

    Zeeman effect studies on the two 35Cl NQR lines in cylindrical single crystals of 2,6-dichlorophenol were carried out using a self-quenched super-regenerative NQR spectrometer to obtain information on the nature of the crystalline unit cell and the effect of hydrogen bonding on the electric field gradient tensor. Analysis of the experimental data reveals: (1) the results are in good agreement with those reported from X-ray studies; (2) the crystal is unequivocally identified as belonging to the orthorhombic system; (3) there are two crystallographically equivalent and four physically nonequivalent directions for the principal field gradients for both the low and high frequency resonance lines; (4) the directions of the crystalline a, b, c axes are uniquely identified as (90°, 0°), (0°, -), and (90°, 90°); (5) the b-axis is identified as the growth axis; (6) there are a minimum of four molecules per unit cell, the four molecules lie in different planes, which are, however, connected by symmetry operations; (7)_there exists a weak intramolecular hydrogen bonding in the crystal; (8) the asymmetry parameters for the loci corresponding to the low frequency resonance line, which is affected by hydrogen bonding, are less than the asymmetry parameters of the loci corresponding to the high frequency resonance line, which is not affected by hydrogen bonding; (9) the single bond and ionic bond characters for the hish frequency line are less than that of the low frequency line, while the double bond character for the low frequency line is less than that of the high frequency line and (10) the small deviation between the single bond and double bond characters of the two resonance lines is attributed to the existence of weak hydrogen bonding in the crystal.

  15. Specific Heat and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Study of Thiourea-Hexachloroethane Inclusion Compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekhova, G. N.; Goren, S. D.; Krieger, Ju. H.; Linsky, D.; Lusternik, V.; Panich, A. M.; Semenov, A. R.; Voronel, A.

    2000-02-01

    Specific heat and 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements of the channel thio-urea-hexachloroethane inclusion compound are presented. Experimental NQR data confirm the results of atom-atom potential calculations that the guest sublattice comprises two types of nearly commensurate finite molecular chains, having different structure and separated by domain walls. Specific heat measurements show phase transition near 96 K.

  16. Solid-state NMR/NQR and first-principles study of two niobium halide cluster compounds.

    PubMed

    Perić, Berislav; Gautier, Régis; Pickard, Chris J; Bosiočić, Marko; Grbić, Mihael S; Požek, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Two hexanuclear niobium halide cluster compounds with a [Nb6X12](2+) (X=Cl, Br) diamagnetic cluster core, have been studied by a combination of experimental solid-state NMR/NQR techniques and PAW/GIPAW calculations. For niobium sites the NMR parameters were determined by using variable Bo field static broadband NMR measurements and additional NQR measurements. It was found that they possess large positive chemical shifts, contrary to majority of niobium compounds studied so far by solid-state NMR, but in accordance with chemical shifts of (95)Mo nuclei in structurally related compounds containing [Mo6Br8](4+) cluster cores. Experimentally determined δiso((93)Nb) values are in the range from 2,400 to 3,000 ppm. A detailed analysis of geometrical relations between computed electric field gradient (EFG) and chemical shift (CS) tensors with respect to structural features of cluster units was carried out. These tensors on niobium sites are almost axially symmetric with parallel orientation of the largest EFG and the smallest CS principal axes (Vzz and δ33) coinciding with the molecular four-fold axis of the [Nb6X12](2+) unit. Bridging halogen sites are characterized by large asymmetry of EFG and CS tensors, the largest EFG principal axis (Vzz) is perpendicular to the X-Nb bonds, while intermediate EFG principal axis (Vyy) and the largest CS principal axis (δ11) are oriented in the radial direction with respect to the center of the cluster unit. For more symmetrical bromide compound the PAW predictions for EFG parameters are in better correspondence with the NMR/NQR measurements than in the less symmetrical chlorine compound. Theoretically predicted NMR parameters of bridging halogen sites were checked by (79/81)Br NQR and (35)Cl solid-state NMR measurements. PMID:24581866

  17. Studies of the electronic structure and biological activity of chosen 1,4-benzodiazepines by 35Cl NQR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronisz, K.; Ostafin, M.; Poleshchuk, O. Kh.; Mielcarek, J.; Nogaj, B.

    2006-11-01

    Selected derivatives of 1,4-benzodiazepine: lorazepam, lormetazepam, oxazepam and temazepam, used as active substances in anxiolytic drugs, have been studied by 35Cl NQR method in order to find the correlation between electronic structure and biological activity. The 35Cl NQR resonance frequencies ( νQ) measured at 77 K have been correlated with the following parameters characterising their biological activity: biological half-life period ( t0.5), affinity to benzodiazepine receptor (IC 50) and mean dose equivalent. The results of experimental study of some benzodiazepine derivatives by nuclear quadrupole resonance of 35Cl nuclei are compared with theoretical results based on DFT calculations which were carried out by means of Gaussian'98 W software.

  18. Narcotics and explosives detection by 14N pure nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garroway, Allen N.; Buess, Michael L.; Yesinowski, James P.; Miller, Joel B.

    1994-03-01

    Pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) of 14N nuclei is quite promising as a method for detecting explosives such as RDX and contraband narcotics such as cocaine and heroin in quantities of interest. Pure NQR is conducted without an external applied magnetic field, so potential concerns about damage to magnetically encoded data or exposure of personnel to large magnetic fields are not relevant. Because NQR frequencies of different compounds are quite distinct, we do not encounter false alarms from the NQR signals of other benign materials. We have constructed a proof-of-concept NQR explosives detector which interrogates a volume of 300 liters (10 ft3). With minimal modification to the existing explosives detector, we can detect operationally relevant quantities of (free base) cocaine within the 300-liter inspection volume in 6 seconds. We are presently extending this approach to the detection of heroin base and also examining 14N and 35,37Cl pure NQR for detection of the hydrochloride forms of both materials. An adaptation of this NQR approach may be suitable for scanning personnel for externally carried contraband and explosives. We first outline the basics of the NQR approach, highlighting strengths and weaknesses, and then present representative results for RDX and cocaine detection. We also present a partial compendium of relevant NQR parameters measured for some materials of interest.

  19. Polymorphism and disorder in natural active ingredients. Low and high-temperature phases of anhydrous caffeine: Spectroscopic ((1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR/(14)N NQR) and solid-state computational modelling (DFT/QTAIM/RDS) study.

    PubMed

    Seliger, Janez; Žagar, Veselko; Apih, Tomaž; Gregorovič, Alan; Latosińska, Magdalena; Olejniczak, Grzegorz Andrzej; Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia

    2016-03-31

    The polymorphism of anhydrous caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine; 1,3,7-trimethyl-1H-purine-2,6-(3H,7H)-dione) has been studied by (1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance) double resonance and pure (14)N NQR (Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance) followed by computational modelling (Density Functional Theory, supplemented Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules with Reduced Density Gradient) in solid state. For two stable (phase II, form β) and metastable (phase I, form α) polymorphs the complete NQR spectra consisting of 12 lines were recorded. The assignment of signals detected in experiment to particular nitrogen sites was verified with the help of DFT. The shifts of the NQR frequencies, quadrupole coupling constants and asymmetry parameters at each nitrogen site due to polymorphic transition were evaluated. The strongest shifts were observed at N(3) site, while the smallest at N(9) site. The commercial pharmaceutical sample was found to contain approximately 20-25% of phase I and 75-80% of phase II. The orientational disorder in phase II with a local molecular arrangement mimics that in phase I. Substantial differences in the intermolecular interaction phases I and II of caffeine were analysed using computational (DFT/QTAIM/RDS) approach. The analysis of local environment of each nitrogen nucleus permitted drawing some conclusions on the topology of interactions in both polymorphs. For the most stable orientations in phase I and phase II the maps of the principal component qz of EFG tensor and its asymmetry parameter at each point of the molecular system were calculated and visualized. The relevant maps calculated for both phases I and II indicates small variation in electrostatic potential upon phase change. Small differences between packings in phases slightly disturb the neighbourhood of the N(1) and N(7) nitrogens, thus are meaningless from the biological point of view. The composition of two phases in pharmaceutical material should not be any obstacle, which is relevant from the pharmaceutical industry point of view. PMID:26826282

  20. In vivo studies of brain development by magnetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Inder, T E; Huppi, P S

    2000-01-01

    Understanding of the morphological development of the human brain has largely come from neuropathological studies obtained postmortem. Magnetic resonance (MR) techniques have recently allowed the provision of detailed structural, metabolic, and functional information in vivo on the human brain. These techniques have been utilized in studies from premature infants to adults and have provided invaluable data on the sequence of normal human brain development. This article will focus on MR techniques including conventional structural MR imaging techniques, quantitative morphometric MR techniques, diffusion weighted MR techniques, and MR spectroscopy. In order to understand the potential applications and limitations of MR techniques, relevant physical and biological principles for each of the MR techniques are first reviewed. This is followed by a review of the understanding of the sequence of normal brain development utilizing these techniques. MRDD Research Reviews 6:59-67, 2000. PMID:10899798

  1. A new dedicated ?-NMR/?-NQR setup for LISE-GANIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rydt, M.; Lozeva, R.; Vermeulen, N.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Grvy, S.; Himpe, P.; Stdel, C.; Thomas, J. C.; Vingerhoets, P.; Neyens, G.

    2009-12-01

    A new ?-NMR/?-NQR setup is developed to study nuclear magnetic dipole moments and electric quadrupole moments at the LISE fragment separator at GANIL. Two key elements make the new design very powerful: the homogeneous magnet and the strong radio-frequency amplifier. The combination of both makes it possible to examine a broad spectrum of magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments. Several factors have an influence on the detection efficiency and on the sensitivity of the setup to observe a resonant change in the ?-asymmetry: the thickness and the tilting angle of the implantation crystal, the material in the vacuum chamber, the applied magnetic field and the Q?-value of the decaying nuclei. A detailed study of these effects is made using a dedicated GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code.

  2. NMR and NQR study of the thermodynamically stable quasicrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shastri, A.

    1995-02-10

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 61,65}Cu NMR measurements are reported for powder samples of stable AlCuFe and AlCuRu icosahedral quasicrystals and their crystalline approximants, and for a AlPdMn single grain quasicrystal. Furthermore, {sup 27}Al NQR spectra at 4.2 K have been observed in the AlCuFe and AlCuRu samples. From the quadrupole perturbed NMR spectra at different magnetic fields, and from the zero field NQR spectra, a wide distribution of local electric field gradient (EFG) tensor components and principal axis system orientations was found at the Al site. A model EFG calculation based on a 1/1 AlCuFe approximant was successful in explaining the observed NQR spectra. It is concluded that the average local gradient is largely determined by the p-electron wave function at the Al site, while the width of the distribution is due to the lattice contribution to the EFG. Comparison of {sup 63}Cu NMR with {sup 27}Al NMR shows that the EFG distribution at the two sites is similar, but that the electronic contribution to the EFG is considerably smaller at the Cu site, in agreement with a more s-type wave function of the conduction electrons.

  3. Surface Plasmon Resonance: A Versatile Technique for Biosensor Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hoang Hiep; Park, Jeho; Kang, Sebyung; Kim, Moonil

    2015-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a label-free detection method which has emerged during the last two decades as a suitable and reliable platform in clinical analysis for biomolecular interactions. The technique makes it possible to measure interactions in real-time with high sensitivity and without the need of labels. This review article discusses a wide range of applications in optical-based sensors using either surface plasmon resonance (SPR) or surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI). Here we summarize the principles, provide examples, and illustrate the utility of SPR and SPRI through example applications from the biomedical, proteomics, genomics and bioengineering fields. In addition, SPR signal amplification strategies and surface functionalization are covered in the review. PMID:25951336

  4. Low-power stimulated emission nuclear quadrupole resonance detection system utilizing Rabi transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolos, John; Mouyos, William; Feng, Judy; Chase, Walter

    2013-06-01

    The application of CW radar techniques to Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) detection of nitrogen based explosives and chlorine based narcotics enables the use of low power levels, in the range of 10's of watts, to yield high signal strengths. By utilizing Rabi transitions the nucleus oscillates between states one and two under the time dependent incident electromagnetic field and alternately absorbs energy from the incident field while emitting coherent energy via stimulated emission. Through the application of a cancellation algorithm the incident field is eliminated from the NQR response, allowing the receive signal to be measured while transmitting. The response signal is processed using matched filters of the NQR response which enables the direct detection of explosives. This technology has applicability to the direct detection of explosives and narcotics for security screening, all at safe low power levels, opposed to the current XRay and Millimeter wave screening systems that detect objects that may contain explosives and utilize high power. The quantum mechanics theoretical basis for the approach and an application for a system for security screening are described with empirical results presented to show the effects observed.

  5. Munitions classification using an Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.S.; Chen, J.T.; Vela, O.A.; Lewis, P.S.

    1993-12-01

    In support of the Bilateral Chemical Weapons Agreement between the United States and Russia, Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique that discriminates between different types of artillery munitions. This NDE classification technique allows on-site inspectors to rapidly classify the munitions as chemical or high explosive, and furthermore discriminates between various subclasses of these types of munitions. This technique, based on acoustic resonance measurements, has been successfully demonstrated on a wide variety of high explosive and chemical munitions. The technique consists of building templates of spectral features from sets of known munitions. Spectral features of unknown munitions are compared with a library of templates, and the degree of match between the features and the templates is used to classify the munition. This paper describes the technique, including the feature extraction, clustering and classification algorithms.

  6. Chlorine-35 NQR and 1H NMR study of guest structure and dynamics in the thiourea-hexachloroethane inclusion compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panich, A. M.; Krieger, Ju H.; Semenov, A. R.; Goren, S. D.; Chekhova, G. N.

    2000-07-01

    Atom-atomic potential calculation of the channel non-stoichiometric thiourea-hexachloroethane inclusion compound shows that the structure of the guest sublattice comprises two types of finite molecular chain, having different structure and separated by domain walls. In the present paper we present results of 35Cl NQR and 1H NMR measurements of thiourea-hexachloroethane, [2.95(NH2)2CS]C2Cl6, in the temperature range from 7.5 to 90 K, which confirm this model and show the existence of such a state at least below 60 K. Two resonances in the NQR spectra were assigned to the two nearly commensurate regions, while the third resonance, showing an anomalous behaviour, was attributed to the guest molecules in the domain wall. The observed structure results from the different periodicity of the guest and host substructures and shows a difference from conventional continuum models of the incommensurate state. Propagation motion of the domain wall over the channel is discussed.

  7. Chemical structure and intra-molecular effects on NMR-NQR tensors of harmine and harmaline alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadinejad, Neda; Tahan, Arezoo; Talebi Tari, Mostafa

    2016-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) methods were used to analyze the effects of molecular structure and ring currents on the NMR chemical shielding tensors and NQR frequencies of harmine and harmaline alkaloids in the gas phase. The results demonstrated that NMR tensors and NQR frequencies of 15N nuclei in these compounds depend on chemical environment and resonance interactions. Hence, their values are obviously different in the mentioned structures. The interpretation of natural bond orbital (NBO) data suggests that in harmine structure, the lone pair participation of N9 in π-system electron clouds causes to development of aromaticity nature in pyrrole ring. However, the chemical shielding around N9 atom in harmine structure is higher than in harmaline, while in harmaline structure, lone pair participation of N2 in π-system electron clouds causes to development of aromaticity nature in pyridine ring. Hence, chemical shielding around N2 atom in harmaline structure is higher than in harmine. It can be deduced that by increasing lone pair electrons contribution of nitrogen atoms in ring resonance interactions and aromaticity development, the values of NMR chemical shielding around them increase, while χ and q zz values of these nuclei decrease.

  8. Experimental study of the structure of chalcogenide glassy semiconductors in three-component systems of Ge-As-Se and As-Sb-Se by means of NQR and EPR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolebrukh, Olga; Sinyavsky, Nikolay; Korneva, Irina; Dobosz, Bernadeta; Ostafin, Michal; Nogaj, Boleslaw; Krzyminiewski, Ryszard

    2013-12-01

    The structure of chalcogenide glassy semiconductors in three-component systems of Ge-As-Se and As-Sb-Se has been studied by means of both NQR (nuclear quadrupole resonance) and EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) spectroscopy. It is investigated that in the glasses of both systems the value of the electric field gradient at the resonating nuclei grows with increasing concentration of the clusters As2Se3 and Sb2Se3, thereby increasing the NQR resonance frequencies. It appears that for the Ge-As-Se system the structural transition from a two-dimensional to three-dimensional structure occurs at average coordination number bar r = 2.45. The EPR spectral parameters of glasses depend on the composition, the average coordination number and the temperature, and these are discussed. The effect of "ageing" for CGS (chalcogenide glassy semiconductors) of As-Sb-Se system due to partial crystallization of the sample is observed from the EPR spectra.

  9. Double-incident angle technique for surface plasmon resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Wang, Keyi

    2015-09-01

    A new double-incident angle technique for surface plasmon resonance measurement is described. It is based on differential measurements at two chosen incident angles where the slopes are steepest and the reflectance changes are the biggest. The technique is as simple and robust as the conventional SPR detection measuring the reflected intensities using convergent light beam, but it has the advantage of being nonsensitive to variations of the resonance width and providing a higher sensitivity. Different concentrations of NaCl solutions are used to test the method. Compared with traditional single-incident angle method, sensitivity of this new method is improved by approximately 59%. It can be applied in genomics, proteomics, medical diagnostics, and many other fields of science and industry where a real time ultra-sensitive analysis of adsorption or of analyte-receptor binding is of interest.

  10. Total body water measurements using resonant cavity perturbation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Darren A.; Robinson, Martin P.

    2004-05-01

    A recent paper proposed a novel technique for determining the total body water (TBW) of patients suffering with abnormal hydration levels, using a resonant cavity perturbation method. Current techniques to measure TBW are limited by resolution and technical constraints. However, this new method involves measuring the dielectric properties of the body, by placing a subject in a large cavity resonator and measuring the subsequent change in its resonant frequency, fres and its Q-factor. Utilizing the relationship that water content correlates to these dielectric properties, it has been shown that the measured response of these parameters enables determination of TBW. Results are presented for a preliminary study using data estimated from anthropometric measurements, where volunteers were asked to lie and stand in an electromagnetic screened room, before and after drinking between 1 and 2 l of water, and in some cases, after voiding the bladder. Notable changes in the parameters were observed; fres showed a negative shift and Q was reduced. Preliminary calibration curves using estimated values of water content have been developed from these results, showing that for each subject the measured resonant frequency is a linear function of TBW. Because the gradients of these calibration curves correlate to the mass-to-height-ratio of the volunteers, it has proved that a system in which TBW can be unequivocally obtained is possible. Measured values of TBW have been determined using this new pilot-technique, and the values obtained correlate well with theoretical values of body water (r = 0.87) and resolution is very good (750 ml). The results obtained are measurable, repeatable and statistically significant. This leads to confidence in the integrity of the proposed technique.

  11. WURST-QCPMG sequence and "spin-lock" in 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorovi?, Alan; Apih, Toma

    2013-08-01

    14N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is a promising method for the analysis of pharmaceuticals or for the detection of nitrogen based illicit compounds, but so far, the technique is still not widely used, mostly due to the very low sensitivity. This problem is already acute in the preliminary NQR stage, when a compound is being examined for the first time and the NQR frequencies are being searched for, by scanning a wide frequency range step-by-step. In the present work, we experimentally show how to increase the efficiency of this initial stage by using a combination of a wideband excitation achieved with frequency swept pulses (WURST) and a "spin-lock" state obtained with a quadrupolar-CPMG (QCPMG) sequence. In the first part we show that WURST pulses provide a much larger excitation bandwidth compared to common rectangular pulses. This increased bandwidth allows to increase the frequency step and reduces the total number of steps in a scanning stage. In the second part we show that the "spin-lock" decay time T2eff obtained with the WURST-QCPMG combination is practically identical with the T2eff obtained with the most common "spin-lock" sequence, the SLSE, despite a very different nature and length of excitation pulses. This allows for a substantial S/N increase through echo averaging in every individual step and really allows to exploit all the advantages of the wider excitation in the NQR frequency scanning stage. Our experimental results were obtained on a sample of trinitrotoluene, but identical behavior is expected for all compounds where a "spin-lock" state can be created.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques: fMRI, DWI, and PWI

    PubMed Central

    Holdsworth, Samantha J.; Bammer, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive technique which can acquire important quantitative and anatomical information from an individual in any plane or volume at comparatively high resolution. Over the past several years, developments in scanner hardware and software have enabled the acquisition of fast MRI imaging, proving extremely useful in various clinical and research applications such as in brain mapping or functional MRI (fMRI), perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). These techniques have revolutionized the use of MRI in the clinics, providing great insight into physiologic mechanisms and pathologic conditions. Since these relatively new areas of MRI have relied on fast scanning techniques, they have only recently been widely introduced to clinical sites. As such, this review article is devoted to the technological aspects of these techniques, as well as their roles and limitations in neuroimaging applications. PMID:18843569

  13. Nuclear quadrupole resonance studies of the SORC sequence and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakody, J.R.P.

    1993-12-31

    The behavior of induction signals during steady-state pulse irradiation in {sup 14}N NQR was investigated experimentally. Because Strong Off-resonance Comb (SORC) signals recur as long as the pulsing continues, very efficient signal-averaging can result. The dependence of these steady-state SORC signals on pulse parameters and on frequency offset are presented, together with a discussion of the applicability of the method. Also as part of the NQR work, cocaine base has been detected using conventional NQR techniques. The experimental results show that SORC detection can be of sufficient sensitivity to form the basis of narcotics screening devices for both mail and airline baggage. A new NMR technique, to obtain the correlation time of the random thermal motion of a polymer at temperatures near the glass transition has been introduced. The temperature dependence is a result of thermal motion. For slow-motion of a polymer chain near the glass transition, the CSA parameter begins to decrease. This motional narrowing can be interpreted to yield the correlation time of the thermal motion. In this work nitrocellulose isotopically highly enriched with {sup 15}N was studied at four different temperatures between 27{degrees} and 120{degrees} Celsius and the correlation times for polymer backbone motions were obtained. Naflon films containing water (D{sub 2}O and H{sub 2} {sup 17}O) and methanol (CH{sub 3}OD, CH{sub 3} {sup 17}OH), have been studied using deuteron and oxygen-17 NMR spectroscopy. Glassy behavior of the water domains at low temperature is evidenced by the specific nature of the {sup 2}H NMR lineshapes. Activation energies extracted from {sup 2}H spin-lattice relaxation data on the high temperature side of the T{sub 1} minimum exhibit a steady increase with increasing water content. In spite of a high degree of molecular mobility, angular-dependent spectra of both unstretched and stretched samples reflect considerable anisotrophy of the host polymer.

  14. Various diffusion magnetic resonance imaging techniques for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Meng-Yue; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Tian-Wu; Huang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors and remains a treatment-refractory cancer with a poor prognosis. Currently, the diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasm depends mainly on imaging and which methods are conducive to detecting small lesions. Compared to the other techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has irreplaceable advantages and can provide valuable information unattainable with other noninvasive or minimally invasive imaging techniques. Advances in MR hardware and pulse sequence design have particularly improved the quality and robustness of MRI of the pancreas. Diffusion MR imaging serves as one of the common functional MRI techniques and is the only technique that can be used to reflect the diffusion movement of water molecules in vivo. It is generally known that diffusion properties depend on the characterization of intrinsic features of tissue microdynamics and microstructure. With the improvement of the diffusion models, diffusion MR imaging techniques are increasingly varied, from the simplest and most commonly used technique to the more complex. In this review, the various diffusion MRI techniques for pancreatic cancer are discussed, including conventional diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), multi-b DWI based on intra-voxel incoherent motion theory, diffusion tensor imaging and diffusion kurtosis imaging. The principles, main parameters, advantages and limitations of these techniques, as well as future directions for pancreatic diffusion imaging are also discussed. PMID:26753059

  15. I: Low Frequency NMR and NQR Using a dc SQUID. II: Variable-temperature 13C CP/MAS of Organometallics

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegeweid, M.A.

    1995-11-29

    NMR and NQR at low frequencies are difficult prospects due to small nuclear spin polarization. Furthermore, the sensitivity'of the inductive pickup circuitry of standard spectrometers is reduced as the frequency is lowered. I have used a cw-SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) spectrometer, which has no such frequency dependence, to study the local atomic environment of {sup 14}N via the quadrupolar interaction. Because {sup 14}N has spin I = 1 and a 0-6 MHz frequency range, it is not possible to obtain well-resolved spectra in high magnetic fields. I have used a technique to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances via their effect on neighboring protons mediated by the heteronuclear dipolar interaction to study peptides and narcotics. The sensitivity of the SQUID is not enough to measure low-frequency surface (or other low spin density) systems. The application of spin-polarized xenon has been previously used to enhance polarization in conventional NMR experiments. Because xenon only polarizes spins with which it is in contact, it is surface selective. While differences in chemical shifts between surface and bulk spins are not large, it is expected that the differences in quadrupole coupling constant should be very large due to the drastic change of the electric field gradient surrounding spins at the surface. With this in mind, I have taken preliminary steps to measure SQUID detected polarization transfer from Xe to another spin species at 4.2 K and in small magnetic fields (<50 G). In this regime, the spin-lattice relaxation of xenon is dependent on the applied magnetic field. The results of our efforts to characterize the relaxation of xenon are presented. The final section describes the solid-state variable-temperature (VT) one- and two-dimensional {sup 13}C cross polarization (CP)/magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR of Hf({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}({eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}, Zr({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 3}({eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}) and Sn({eta}{sup 1}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 4}. This work was undertaken in the hope of gaining insight into the intramolecuhrr dynamics, specifically which fluxional processes exist in the solid state, by what mechanism rearrangements are occurring, and the activation energies by which these processes are governed.

  16. A new characterization technique for lossy piezoceramic resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Robert Allan, Jr.

    2000-11-01

    Piezoelectricity was discovered by the brothers Curie in 1880. They found that, in certain materials such as zincblende, tourmaline, can sugar, topaz and quartz, mechanical stresses were accompanied by the production of electric surface charges. The piezoelectric effect remained a curiosity until the early 1920s when it was utilized to realize crystal resonators for the stabilization of oscillators, thereby launching the field of frequency control. Piezoelectricity has found many applications as oscillators, filters, and sensors in televisions, cellular phones, radios, ultrasonic imaging, radar and signal processing to name just a few. Most of these applications use high Q single crystal materials such as quartz. These materials can become expensive as the application becomes more specialized. Piezoceramic materials can be used in these applications because it is less expensive, but the Q of the material is low and has very blunt characteristics as compared to quartz. This low Q and blunt resonance is connected to the loss in the material and makes it difficult to characterize the material and to get the maximum performance out of devices made from this material. We have developed a new characterization technique for lossy piezoceramic material based on the use of complex frequencies to stimulate the devices complex resonant point. This technique enables us to find the frequency dependent attenuation constant, and the impedance at the complex resonant point. The material properties of piezoceramics can be described through the use of complex material constants. The solution of the acoustic wave equation leads to complex frequencies as the resonant points for a thickness excited resonator. This leads to the use of complex frequency excitation, which is an exponentially decaying sine wave. The Laplace transform of this type of signal has an imaginary part which is the frequency and the real part which is related to the attenuation of the device. So this type of signal is ideal to characterize lossy materials which can be described with complex material constants. Experimental results will be presented showcasing the complex frequency excitation technique. The attenuation constant calculations will be presented along with the variation of the impedance as a function of the attenuation constant. Modeling and simulation results using an equivalent circuit model will also be presented.

  17. Ferromagnetic Spin Fluctuation and Unconventional Superconductivity in Rb2Cr3As3 Revealed by 75As NMR and NQR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Tang, Z. T.; Cao, G. H.; Zheng, Guo-qing

    2015-10-01

    We report 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies on the superconductor Rb2Cr3As3 with a quasi-one-dimensional crystal structure. Below T 100 K , the spin-lattice relaxation rate (1 /T1 ) divided by temperature, 1 /T1T , increases upon cooling down to Tc=4.8 K , showing a Curie-Weiss-like temperature dependence. The Knight shift also increases with decreasing temperature. These results suggest ferromagnetic spin fluctuation. In the superconducting state, 1 /T1 decreases rapidly below Tc without a Hebel-Slichter peak, and follows a T5 variation below T 3 K , which points to unconventional superconductivity with point nodes in the gap function.

  18. Ferromagnetic Spin Fluctuation and Unconventional Superconductivity in Rb2Cr3As3 Revealed by 75As NMR and NQR.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Tang, Z T; Cao, G H; Zheng, Guo-Qing

    2015-10-01

    We report (75)As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies on the superconductor Rb(2)Cr(3)As(3) with a quasi-one-dimensional crystal structure. Below T∼100  K, the spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T(1)) divided by temperature, 1/T(1)T, increases upon cooling down to T(c)=4.8  K, showing a Curie-Weiss-like temperature dependence. The Knight shift also increases with decreasing temperature. These results suggest ferromagnetic spin fluctuation. In the superconducting state, 1/T(1) decreases rapidly below T(c) without a Hebel-Slichter peak, and follows a T(5) variation below T∼3  K, which points to unconventional superconductivity with point nodes in the gap function. PMID:26551818

  19. Resonant marker design and fabrication techniques for device visualization during interventional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Mandy; Detert, Markus; Rube, Martin A; El-Tahir, Abubakr; Elle, Ole Jakob; Melzer, Andreas; Schmidt, Bertram; Rose, Georg H

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has great potential as an imaging modality for guiding minimally invasive interventions because of its superior soft tissue contrast and the possibility of arbitrary slice positioning while avoiding ionizing radiation and nephrotoxic iodine contrast agents. The major constraints are: limited patient access, the insufficient assortment of compatible instruments and the difficult device visualization compared to X-ray based techniques. For the latter, resonant MRI markers, fabricated by using the wire-winding technique, have been developed. This fabrication technique serves as a functional model but has no clinical use. Thus, the aim of this study is to illustrate a four-phase design process of resonant markers involving microsystems technologies. The planning phase comprises the definition of requirements and the simulation of electromagnetic performance of the MRI markers. The following technologies were considered for the realization phase: aerosol-deposition process, hot embossing technology and thin film technology. The subsequent evaluation phase involves several test methods regarding electrical and mechanical characterization as well as MRI visibility aspects. The degree of fulfillment of the predefined requirements is determined within the analysis phase. Furthermore, an exemplary evaluation of four realized MRI markers was conducted, focusing on the performance within the MRI environment. PMID:25460277

  20. Detecting body cavity bombs with nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Michael London

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a technology with great potential for detecting hidden explosives. Past NQR research has studied the detection of land mines and bombs concealed within luggage and packages. This thesis focuses on an NQR application that has received less attention and little or no publicly available research: detecting body cavity bombs (BCBs). BCBs include explosives that have been ingested, inserted into orifices, or surgically implanted. BCBs present a threat to aviation and secure facilities. They are extremely difficult to detect with the technology currently employed at security checkpoints. To evaluate whether or not NQR can be used to detect BCBs, a computational model is developed to assess how the dielectric properties of biological tissue affect the radio frequency magnetic field employed in NQR (0.5-5MHz). The relative permittivity of some biological tissue is very high (over 1,000 at 1MHz), making it conceivable that there is a significant effect on the electromagnetic field. To study this effect, the low-frequency approximation known as the Darwin model is employed. First, the electromagnetic field of a coil is calculated in free space. Second, a dielectric object or set of objects is introduced, and the free-space electric field is modified to accommodate the dielectric object ensuring that the relevant boundary conditions are obeyed. Finally, the magnetic field associated with the corrected electric field is calculated. This corrected magnetic field is evaluated with an NQR simulation to estimate the impact of dielectric tissue on NQR measurements. The effect of dielectric tissue is shown to be small, thus obviating a potential barrier to BCB detection. The NQR model presented may assist those designing excitation and detection coils for NQR. Some general coil design considerations and strategies are discussed.

  1. Simple measurement technique for resonance frequency of micromachined cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Somashekara; Bhattacharya, Enakshi

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses a simple electrical measurement technique to determine resonance frequency of surface micromachined cantilever beams that is also suitable for packaged devices. Measurements are done on oxide anchored doped polysilicon beams. If the beam is driven by an AC signal riding on the DC bias, the beam starts vibrating. When the drive frequency matches the natural frequency of the beam, the oscillation amplitude is maximum. In this measurement, the DC bias is fixed at a value lower than the pull-in voltage. A small AC bias is then applied such that the sum of the DC and the maximum amplitude of the AC is less than the pull-in voltage. The frequency of the AC is then swept and at resonance, because of large displacement, the beam is pulled in and this is detected by a current flowing between the beam and the substrate. By iteratively adjusting the DC bias it is possible to make sure that pull-in occurs only due to resonance and the frequency setting at this point gives the natural frequency of the beam. Measured values for different beam lengths were compared with Doppler Vibrometry results and gave an excellent match.

  2. Nuclear magnetic and quadrupole resonance studies of the stripes materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafe, H.-J.

    2012-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic and Quadrupole Resonance (NMR/NQR) is a powerful tool to probe electronic inhomogeneities in correlated electron systems. Its local character allows for probing different environments due to spin density modulations or inhomogeneous doping distributions emerging from the correlations in these systems. In fact, NMR/NQR is not only sensitive to magnetic properties through interaction of the nuclear spin, but also allows to probe the symmetry of the charge distribution and its homogeneity, as well as structural modulations, through sensitivity to the electric field gradient (EFG). We review the results of NMR and NQR in the cuprates from intrinsic spatial variations of the hole concentration in the normal state to stripe order at low temperatures, thereby keeping in mind the influence of doping induced disorder and inhomogeneities. Finally, we briefly discuss NQR evidence for local electronic inhomogeneities in the recently discovered iron pnictides, suggesting that electronic inhomogeneities are a common feature of correlated electron systems.

  3. Utilization of pure nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy for the study of pharmaceutical crystal forms.

    PubMed

    Prez, S C; Cerioni, L; Wolfenson, A E; Faudone, S; Cuffini, S L

    2005-07-14

    Solid-state physical characterization of a pharmaceutical substance is necessary for successful development and approval of the final product. Different physical analytical techniques are available to do so: X-ray diffraction (XRD), IR, Raman, DSC, TG and NMR. Moreover, all of them detect the presence of excipients perturbing the analysis of the pure substance in low doses. In order to study polymorphism and pseudo polymorphism of drug, this paper introduces possible applications of pure nuclear quadrupole resonance, as a non-destructive technique in qualitative and quantitative approaches. Chlorpropamide and diclofenac sodium were used as examples. Unlike the mentioned techniques, the nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) signal of pharmaceutical compounds is not perturbed by the presence of solid excipient or other substances unless they possess resonance frequencies in the same frequency range of the compound studied. PMID:15913931

  4. Absence of Magnetic Dipolar Phase Transition and Evolution of Low-Energy Excitations in PrNb2Al20 with Crystal Electric Field ?3 Ground State: Evidence from 93Nb-NQR Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Tetsuro; Kotegawa, Hisashi; Tou, Hideki; Higashinaka, Ryuji; Nakama, Akihiro; Aoki, Yuji; Sato, Hideyuki

    2015-07-01

    We report measurements of bulk magnetic susceptibility and 93Nb nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) in the Pr-based caged compound PrNb2Al20. By analyzing the magnetic susceptibility and magnetization, the crystal electric field (CEF) level scheme of PrNb2Al20 is determined to be ?3(0 K)-?4(21.32 K)-?5(43.98 K)-?1(51.16 K) within the framework of the localized 4f electron picture. The 93Nb-NQR spectra exhibit neither spectral broadening nor spectral shift upon cooling down to 75 mK. The 93Nb-NQR spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 at 5 K depends on the frequency and remains almost constant below 5 K. The frequency dependence of 1/T1 is attributed to the magnetic fluctuation due to the hyperfine-enhanced 141Pr nuclear moment inherent in the nonmagnetic ?3 CEF ground state. The present NQR results provide evidence that no symmetry-breaking magnetic dipole order occurs down to 75 mK. Also, considering an invariant form of the quadrupole and octupole couplings between a 93Nb nucleus and Pr 4f electrons, Pr 4f quadrupoles and an octupole can couple with a 93Nb nuclear quadrupole moment and nuclear spin, respectively. Together with the results of bulk measurements, the present NQR results suggest that the possibility of a static quadrupole or octupole ordering can be excluded down to 100 mK. At low temperatures below 500 mK, however, the nuclear spin-echo decay rate gradually increases and the decay curve changes from Gaussian decay to Lorentzian decay, suggesting the evolution of a low-energy excitation.

  5. Resonant frequency calculations using a hybrid perturbation-Galerkin technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geer, James F.; Andersen, Carl M.

    1991-01-01

    A two-step hybrid perturbation Galerkin technique is applied to the problem of determining the resonant frequencies of one or several degrees of freedom nonlinear systems involving a parameter. In one step, the Lindstedt-Poincare method is used to determine perturbation solutions which are formally valid about one or more special values of the parameter (e.g., for large or small values of the parameter). In step two, a subset of the perturbation coordinate functions determined in step one is used in Galerkin type approximation. The technique is illustrated for several one degree of freedom systems, including the Duffing and van der Pol oscillators, as well as for the compound pendulum. For all of the examples considered, it is shown that the frequencies obtained by the hybrid technique using only a few terms from the perturbation solutions are significantly more accurate than the perturbation results on which they are based, and they compare very well with frequencies obtained by purely numerical methods.

  6. Resonant frequency calculations using a hybrid perturbation-Galerkin technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geer, James F.; Andersen, Carl M.

    1991-01-01

    A two-step hybrid perturbation Galerkin technique is applied to the problem of determining the resonant frequencies of one or several degree of freedom nonlinear systems involving a parameter. In one step, the Lindstedt-Poincare method is used to determine perturbation solutions which are formally valid about one or more special values of the parameter (e.g., for large or small values of the parameter). In step two, a subset of the perturbation coordinate functions determined in step one is used in Galerkin type approximation. The technique is illustrated for several one degree of freedom systems, including the Duffing and van der Pol oscillators, as well as for the compound pendulum. For all of the examples considered, it is shown that the frequencies obtained by the hybrid technique using only a few terms from the perturbation solutions are significantly more accurate than the perturbation results on which they are based, and they compare very well with frequencies obtained by purely numerical methods.

  7. Quantitative Proton Magnetic Resonance Techniques for Measuring Fat

    PubMed Central

    Harry, Houchun; Kan, Hermien E.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate, precise, and reliable techniques for quantifying body and organ fat distributions are important tools in physiology research. They are critically needed in studies of obesity and diseases involving excess fat accumulation. Proton magnetic resonance methods address this need by providing an array of relaxometry-based (T1, T2) and chemical-shift-based approaches. These techniques can generate informative visualizations of regional and whole-body fat distributions, yield measurements of fat volumes within specific body depots, and quantify fat accumulation in abdominal organs and muscles. MR methods are commonly used to investigate the role of fat in nutrition and metabolism, to measure the efficacy of short and long-term dietary and exercise interventions, to study the implications of fat in organ steatosis and muscular dystrophies, and to elucidate pathophysiological mechanisms in the context of obesity and its comorbidities. The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of mainstream MR strategies for fat quantification. The article will succinctly describe the principles that differentiate water and fat proton signals, summarize advantages and limitations of various techniques, and offer a few illustrative examples. The article will also highlight recent efforts in MR of brown adipose tissue and conclude by briefly discussing some future research directions. PMID:24123229

  8. Magnetic resonance techniques for investigation of multiple sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKay, Alex; Laule, Cornelia; Li, David K. B.; Meyers, Sandra M.; Russell-Schulz, Bretta; Vavasour, Irene M.

    2014-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common neurological disease which can cause loss of vision and balance, muscle weakness, impaired speech, fatigue, cognitive dysfunction and even paralysis. The key pathological processes in MS are inflammation, edema, myelin loss, axonal loss and gliosis. Unfortunately, the cause of MS is still not understood and there is currently no cure. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important clinical and research tool for MS. 'Conventional' MRI images of MS brain reveal bright lesions, or plaques, which demark regions of severe tissue damage. Conventional MRI has been extremely valuable for the diagnosis and management of people who have MS and also for the assessment of therapies designed to reduce inflammation and promote repair. While conventional MRI is clearly valuable, it lack pathological specificity and, in some cases, sensitivity to non-lesional pathology. Advanced MR techniques have been developed to provide information that is more sensitive and specific than what is available with clinical scanning. Diffusion tensor imaging and magnetization transfer provide a general but non-specific measure of the pathological state of brain tissue. MR spectroscopy provides concentrations of brain metabolites which can be related to specific pathologies. Myelin water imaging was designed to assess brain myelination and has proved useful for measuring myelin loss in MS. To combat MS, it is crucial that the pharmaceutical industry finds therapies which can reverse the neurodegenerative processes which occur in the disease. The challenge for magnetic resonance researchers is to design imaging techniques which can provide detailed pathological information relating to the mechanisms of MS therapies. This paper briefly describes the pathologies of MS and demonstrates how MS-associated pathologies can be followed using both conventional and advanced MR imaging protocols.

  9. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Laws, David D.

    2000-06-01

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone ({phi}/{psi}) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined {sup 13}C{sub a}, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of {alpha}-helical and {beta}-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly {beta}-sheet.

  10. Magnetic correlations in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 from NQR relaxation and specific heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsa, F.; Rigamonti, A.

    1991-01-01

    La-139 and Cu-63 Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) relaxation measurements in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 for x ranging from 0 up to 0.3, with particular emphasis on the effect of doping on the Cu(2+) magnetic correlations and dynamics, are reviewed. In the low doping limit, x less than or equal to 0.05, the results can be interpreted consistently in terms of a simple phenomenological 'two-fluids' model whereby the effect of thermally-activated mobile O(2p) holes is the one of disrupting locally the Cu(2+) spin correlations. For x greater than or equal to 0.1, the results indicate the onset, as T approaches T(sub c)(+), of a strong coupling between Cu(2+) spins and the Fermi liquid of O(2p) holes leading to the apparent disappearance of localized Cu(2+) moment in connection with the opening of a superconducting gap.

  11. 35C NQR studies in 2,4,6-,2,3,6-, and 2,3,4-trichloro anisoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rukmani, K.; Ramakrishna, J.

    1985-02-01

    The chlorine-35 NQR frequencies and their temperature variation in 2,4,6-, 2,3,6- and 2,3,4-trichloro anisoles have been studied and compared with the corresponding chlorophenols with a view to studying the effect of hydrogen bonding. The observed frequencies have been assigned to the various chlorines with the help of the additive model of the substituent effect. The temperature dependence has been analysed in terms of the BayerKushidaBrown models. The torsional frequencies and their temperature dependence have been calculated numerically under a two mode approximation. A comparison of the trichloro anisoles with the corresponding trichloro phenols has shown that the resonance frequency decreases due to hydrogen bonding while the torsional frequencies are not affected.

  12. Studies of Ga NMR and NQR in SrGa4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niki, H.; Higa, N.; Nakamura, S.; Kuroshima, H.; Toji, T.; Yogi, M.; Nakamura, A.; Hedo, M.; Nakama, T.; ?nuki, Y.; Harima, H.

    2015-04-01

    In order to microscopically investigate the properties in SrGa4, the Ga NMR measurements of a powder sample were carried out. The Ga NMR spectra corresponding to Ga(I) and Ga(II) sites are obtained. The NMR spectra of 69&71Ga (a nuclear spin I = 3/2) in the powder sample of SrGa4 do not take a typical powder pattern caused by the NQR interaction, but take the spectra consisting of three well resolved resonance-lines, which indicates that the nonuniform distribution of crystal orientation in the powder sample occurs because of the magnetic anisotropy. From the analysis of the Ga NMR spectrum, it is found that the ab-plane of the crystal is parallel to the external magnetic field, which would be attributed to the anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility with the easy axis parallel to the ab-plane. This result is also confirmed by the 69Ga NQR in SrGa4. The Knight shifts of the 69Ga(I) and 69Ga(II) shift slightly to the negative side with decreasing temperature due to the core polarization of the d-electrons. The values of the Knight shift of the 69Ga(I) and 69Ga(II) are 0.01 and -0.11 % at 4.2 K, and 0.09 and -0.08 % at 300 K, respectively. The values of the 1/ T 1 T of the NMR of both 69Ga(I) and 69Ga(II) are almost constant between 4.2 and 100 K, whose values are 1.5 s -1 K -1 at 69Ga(I) and 0.12 s -1 K -1 at 69Ga(II), while the 1/ T 1 T slightly increase above 100K with increasing temperature. The value of T 1 of 69Ga(I) is one order of magnitude less than that of 69Ga(II).

  13. Magnetic resonance velocity mapping: clinical application of a new technique.

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, S R; Firmin, D N; Klipstein, R H; Rees, R S; Longmore, D B

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance velocity mapping is a new technique which provides a display of velocity within the cardiovascular system at any point of the cardiac cycle. A short field echo sequence with even echo rephasing is used to obtain a signal from rapidly moving blood and a cine display is provided by rapid repetition of the sequence. The amplitude image shows the anatomy, with blood giving a high signal and areas of turbulent flow no signal. The phase image is a map of velocities at each point in the image plane. Thirteen cases are described in which the technique either provided a diagnosis or helped in functional assessment. Flow through atrial and ventricular septal defects was seen, although turbulent flow distal to the ventricular shunts led to some loss of quantitative information. In three patients with valve disease jets of abnormal flow were seen because of signal loss and it is suggested that the size of the area of turbulence may be used to quantify the severity of regurgitation. Velocities were measured in four coronary artery bypass grafts in two patients, and low velocity was seen in a graft with distal disease that supplied the infarcted territory. Velocity was reduced distal to an aortic coarctation and it was increased at the site of narrowing caused by thrombosis in a deep vein. The speed and direction of flow in the central vessels in a patient with complex congenital heart disease helped to establish the anatomy. The technique provides useful information in a wide range of disorders of the cardiovascular system, and in some cases may avoid the need for invasive investigation. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Fig 6 Fig 7 Fig 8 PMID:3496109

  14. Coexistence of multiple charge-density waves and superconductivity in SrPt2As2 revealed by 75As-NMR /NQR and 195Pt-NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Shinji; Tani, Yoshihiko; Mabuchi, Tomosuke; Kudo, Kazutaka; Nishikubo, Yoshihiro; Mitsuoka, Daisuke; Nohara, Minoru; Zheng, Guo-qing

    2015-02-01

    The relationship between charge-density wave (CDW) orders and superconductivity in arsenide superconductor SrPt2As2 with Tc=5.2 K which crystallizes in the CaBe2Ge2 -type structure was studied by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements up to 520 K, and 75As nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) and 195Pt-NMR measurements down to 1.5 K. At high temperature, 75As-NMR spectrum and nuclear-spin-relaxation rate (1 /T1) have revealed two distinct CDW orders, one realized in the As-Pt-As layer below TCDWAs (1 )=410 K and the other in the Pt-As-Pt layer below TCDWAs (2 )=255 K . The 1 /T1 measured by 75As-NQR shows a clear Hebel-Slichter peak just below Tc and decreases exponentially well below Tc. Concomitantly, 195Pt Knight shift decreases below Tc. Our results indicate that superconductivity in SrPt2As2 is in the spin-singlet state with an s -wave gap and is robust under the two distinct CDW orders in different layers.

  15. Ferromagnetic Quantum Critical Fluctuations and Anomalous Coexistence of Ferromagnetism and Superconductivity in UCoGe Revealed by Co-NMR and NQR Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Tetsuya; Nakai, Yusuke; Ihara, Yoshihiko; Ishida, Kenji; Deguchi, Kazuhiko; Sato, Noriaki K.; Satoh, Isamu

    2008-02-01

    Co nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies were carried out for the recently discovered UCoGe, in which the ferromagnetic and superconducting (SC) transitions are reported to occur at TCurie 3 K and TS 0.8 K [Huy et al.: Phys. Rev. Lett. 99 (2007) 067006], in order to investigate the coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity as well as the normal-state and SC properties from a microscopic point of view. From the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 and Knight-shift measurements, we confirm that ferromagnetic fluctuations that possess a quantum critical character are present above TCurie and also the occurrence of a ferromagnetic transition at 2.5 K in our polycrystalline sample. The magnetic fluctuations in the normal state show that UCoGe is an itinerant ferromagnet similar to ZrZn2 and YCo2. The onset SC transition is identified at TS 0.7 K, below which 1/T1 arising from 30% of the volume fraction starts to decrease due to the opening of the SC gap. This component of 1/T1, which follows a T3 dependence in the temperature range 0.3-0.1 K, coexists with the magnetic components of 1/T1 showing a \\sqrt{T} dependence below TS. From the NQR measurements in the SC state, we suggest that the self-induced vortex state is realized in UCoGe.

  16. Mixed-radiation-field dosimetry utilizing Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Hintenlang, D.E.; Jamil, K.; Iselin, L.H.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation effects on urea, thiourea, guanidine carbonate and guanine sulfate were evaluated for both photon and neutron irradiations. Hydration of these materials typically provides a greatly increased sensitivity to both forms of radiation exposure, although not all materials lend themselves to this treatment without changing the chemical structure of the compound. Urea was found to be the most stable hydrated compound and provides the best sensitivity for quantifying radiation effects using NQR techniques. Urea permits a straight-forward quantification of each of the important parameters of the observed NQR signal, the FID. Several advanced data analysis methods were developed to assist in quantifying NQR spectra, both from urea and materials having more complex molecular structures, such as thiourea and guanidine sulfate. Unfortunately, these analysis techniques are frequently quite time consuming for the complex NQR spectra that result from some of these materials. The simpler analysis afforded by urea has therefore made it the prime candidate for an NQR dosimetry material. The moderate sensitivity of hydrated urea to photon irradiation does not permit this material to achieve the levels of performance required for a personnel dosimeter. It does, however, demonstrate acceptable sensitivity over dose ranges where it could provide a good biological dosimeter for several areas of radiation processing. The demonstrated photon sensitivity could permit hydrated urea to be used in applications such as food irradiation dosimetry. This material also exhibits a good sensitivity to neutron irradiation. The precise correlation between neutron exposure and the parameters of the resulting NQR spectra are currently being developed.

  17. A study of transition-metal organometallic complexes combining 35Cl solid-state NMR spectroscopy and 35Cl?NQR spectroscopy and first-principles DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Karen E; O'Keefe, Christopher A; Gauvin, Rgis M; Trbosc, Julien; Delevoye, Laurent; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Popoff, Nicolas; Taoufik, Mostafa; Oudatchin, Konstantin; Schurko, Robert W

    2013-09-01

    A series of transition-metal organometallic complexes with commonly occurring metal-chlorine bonding motifs were characterized using (35)Cl solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy, (35)Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy, and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations of NMR interaction tensors. Static (35)Cl ultra-wideline NMR spectra were acquired in a piecewise manner at standard (9.4?T) and high (21.1?T) magnetic field strengths using the WURST-QCPMG pulse sequence. The (35)Cl electric field gradient (EFG) and chemical shielding (CS) tensor parameters were readily extracted from analytical simulations of the spectra; in particular, the quadrupolar parameters are shown to be very sensitive to structural differences, and can easily differentiate between chlorine atoms in bridging and terminal bonding environments. (35)Cl?NQR spectra were acquired for many of the complexes, which aided in resolving structurally similar, yet crystallographically distinct and magnetically inequivalent chlorine sites, and with the interpretation and assignment of (35)Cl?SSNMR spectra. (35)Cl?EFG tensors obtained from first-principles DFT calculations are consistently in good agreement with experiment, highlighting the importance of using a combined approach of theoretical and experimental methods for structural characterization. Finally, a preliminary example of a (35)Cl?SSNMR spectrum of a transition-metal species (TiCl4) diluted and supported on non-porous silica is presented. The combination of (35)Cl?SSNMR and (35)Cl?NQR spectroscopy and DFT calculations is shown to be a promising and simple methodology for the characterization of all manner of chlorine-containing transition-metal complexes, in pure, impure bulk and supported forms. PMID:23907813

  18. Detection of RDX and TNT mine-like targets by nuclear quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deas, Robert M.; Burch, Ian A.; Port, Daniel M.

    2002-08-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) is being researched in order to confirm the presence of explosives as part of landmine sensor suites for the UK MOD hand held and vehicle mounted detection applied research programs. A low power NQR system has been developed as a non-contacting, but short range, detection method for explosives typically found in landmines. The results of stand-off detection of buried anti-personnel and anti-tank quantities of RDX and TNT by this system are presented and the differences in the detection of these explosives by NQR are discussed. Signal processing and radio frequency interference rejection methods to improve the performance of NQR explosive detection have been investigated.

  19. 35Cl NQR study of incommensurate state in thiourea-hexachloroethane inclusion compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panich, A. M.; Semenov, A. R.; Chekhova, G. N.; Krieger, Ju. H.; Goren, S. D.

    1999-04-01

    A study of the incommensurate phase of the channel thiourea-hexachloroethane inclusion compound by means of 35Cl NQR, in the temperature range from 68 to 88 K, is presented. Hahn echo measurements indicate the slow diffusion-like motion of the modulation wave. This motion is obtained close to the transition temperature Ti˜90 K. At higher temperatures, the NQR spectrum is not observed. We attribute this fact to the reorientational mobility of C 2Cl 6 molecules in the host sublattice, probably accompanied by an order-disorder phase transition.

  20. Surface Plasmon Resonance: An Introduction to a Surface Spectroscopy Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Yijun; Zeng, Xiangqun; Liang, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has become an important optical biosensing technology in the areas of biochemistry, biology, and medical sciences because of its real-time, label-free, and noninvasive nature. The high cost of commercial devices and consumables has prevented SPR from being introduced in the undergraduate laboratory. Here, we present

  1. Surface Plasmon Resonance: An Introduction to a Surface Spectroscopy Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Yijun; Zeng, Xiangqun; Liang, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has become an important optical biosensing technology in the areas of biochemistry, biology, and medical sciences because of its real-time, label-free, and noninvasive nature. The high cost of commercial devices and consumables has prevented SPR from being introduced in the undergraduate laboratory. Here, we present…

  2. 127I NQR, 1H NMR and crystal structure of a novel compound, guanidinium heptaiodomercurate(II) [C(NH 2) 3] 3Hg 2I 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terao, Hiromitsu; Kai, Yoshihiko; Gesing, Thorsten M.; Ishihara, Hideta; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Gowda, B. Thimme

    2009-08-01

    The crystal structure of [C(NH 2) 3] 3Hg 2I 7 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/ c with a = 10.301(2), b = 11.919(2), c = 22.143(4) , ? = 100.50(3), and Z = 4. The asymmetric unit of the structure consists of an Hg 2I 73- anion and three guanidinium cations [C(NH 2) 3] +. The Hg 2I 73- anion is composed of two distorted HgI 4 tetrahedra which share an apex of I(4) atom and are related to each other by the C 2 axis. The lengths of the four Hg-I bonds of the tetrahedron are different, the longest being the bridging Hg-I(4) bond. In accordance with the crystal structure, four 127I NQR resonance lines have been observed and are assigned to m = 1/2 ? 3/2 transitions. With decreasing temperature one line assigned to the bridging I(4) atom faded out around 250 K. The temperature dependence of 1H NMR T1 has been analyzed by postulating the C 3 reorientations of two crystallographically independent cations with the BPP and the Arrhenius type relations. The hydrogen bond interactions N-H⋯I are important in the architecture of the crystal structure, which manifest themselves on the differences in the Hg-I bond lengths, in the NQR frequencies, and in the activation energies of the cation reorientations.

  3. Suppression of electron correlations in the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 under ambient pressure demonstrated by As75 NMR/NQR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Y.; Roy, B.; Ran, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.

    2014-03-01

    The static and the dynamic spin correlations in the low-temperature collapsed tetragonal and the high-temperature tetragonal phase in CaFe2As2 have been investigated by As75 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. Through the temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts, although stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin correlations are realized in the high-temperature tetragonal phase, no trace of the AFM spin correlations can be found in the nonsuperconducting, low-temperature, collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase. Given that there is no magnetic broadening in As75 NMR spectra, together with the T-independent behavior of magnetic susceptibility ? and the T dependence of 1/T1T?, we conclude that Fe spin correlations are completely quenched statically and dynamically in the nonsuperconducting cT phase in CaFe2As2.

  4. Suppression of electron correlations in the collapsed tetragonal phase of CaFe2As2 under ambient pressure demonstrated by As75 NMR/NQR measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Yuji; Roy, Beas; Ran, Sheng; Budko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2014-03-20

    The static and the dynamic spin correlations in the low-temperature collapsed tetragonal and the high-temperature tetragonal phase in CaFe2As2 have been investigated by As75 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. Through the temperature (T) dependence of the nuclear spin lattice relaxation rates (1/T1) and the Knight shifts, although stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin correlations are realized in the high-temperature tetragonal phase, no trace of the AFM spin correlations can be found in the nonsuperconducting, low-temperature, collapsed tetragonal (cT) phase. Given that there is no magnetic broadening in As75 NMR spectra, together with the T-independent behavior of magnetic susceptibility ? and the T dependence of 1/T1T?, we conclude that Fe spin correlations are completely quenched statically and dynamically in the nonsuperconducting cT phase in CaFe2As2.

  5. Electronic properties of Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductors as seen by Cu and O NMR/NQR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinkmann, D.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) allow the investigation of electronic properties at the atomic level. We will report on such studies of typical members of the the Y-Ba-Cu-O family such as YBa2Cu30(6 + x) (1-2-3-(6 + x)), YBa2Cu4O8 (1-2-4) and Y2Ba4Cu7015 (2-4-7) with many examples of recent work performed in our laboratory. In particular, we will deal with Knight shift and relaxation studies of copper and oxygen. We will discuss important issues of current studies such as: (1) Existence of a common electronic spin-susceptibility in the planes (and perhaps in the chains) of 1-2-4; (2) Strong evidence for the existence of a pseudo spin-gap of the antiferromagnetic fluctuations in 1-2-4 and 2-4-7; (3) Evidence for d-wave pairing in 1-2-4; (4) Strong coupling of inequivalent Cu-O planes in 2-4-7 and possible origin for the high Tc value of this compound; and (5) The possibility to describe NMR data in the framework of a charge-excitation picture.

  6. Pulsed Bromine-81 Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy of Brominated Flame Retardants and Associated Polymer Blends.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrse, Anthony A.; Lee, Youngil; Bryant, Pamela L.; Fronczek, Frank R.; Butler, Leslie G.; Simeral, Larry S.

    1998-03-01

    The dispersion of brominated flame retardants in polymers is monitored with bromine-81 NQR using a pulse NQR spectrometer. The NQR spectrometer consists of a homemade 10-300 MHz single-channel NMR console coupled to a broadly tunable probe. The probe is a loop-gap resonator usable from 220 to 300 MHz, and automatically tuned over any 5 MHz region with a stepping motor and an RF bidirectional coupler. Bromine-81 NQR spectra of several brominated aromatic flame retardants, as pure materials and in polymers, were recorded in the range of 227 to 256 MHz in zero applied magnetic field. Two factors affect the bromine-79/81 NQR transition frequencies in brominated aromatics: electron withdrawing substituents on the ring and intermolecular contacts with other bromine atoms in the crystal structure. An existing model for substituents is updated and a point charge model for the intermolecular contacts is developed. In this study, we exploit the bromine-81 NQR transition frequency dependence on intermolecular contacts to learn how a flame retardant is dispersed in a polymer matrix.

  7. Coal thickness gauge using RRAS techniques, part 1. [radiofrequency resonance absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rollwitz, W. L.; King, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    A noncontacting sensor having a measurement range of 0 to 6 in or more, and with an accuracy of 0.5 in or better is needed to control the machinery used in modern coal mining so that the thickness of the coal layer remaining over the rock is maintained within selected bounds. The feasibility of using the radiofrequency resonance absorption (RRAS) techniques of electron magnetic resonance (EMR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as the basis of a coal thickness gauge is discussed. The EMR technique was found, by analysis and experiments, to be well suited for this application.

  8. Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Studies of the Sorc Sequence and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Polymers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakody, Jayakody R. Pemadasa

    1993-01-01

    The behavior of induction signals during steady -state pulse irradiation in ^{14} N NQR was investigated experimentally. Because Strong Off-resonance Comb (SORC) signals recur as long as the pulsing continues, very efficient signal-averaging can result. The dependence of these steady-state SORC signals on pulse parameters and on frequency offset are presented, together with a discussion of the applicability of the method. Also as part of the NQR work, Cocaine base has been detected using conventional NQR techniques. The experimental results show that SORC detection can be of sufficient sensitivity to form the basis of narcotics screening devices for both mail and airline baggage. A new NMR technique, to obtain the correlation time of the random thermal motion of a polymer at temperatures near the glass transition has been introduced. The temperature dependence is a result of thermal motion. For slow-motion of a polymer chain near the glass transition, the CSA parameter begins to decrease. This motional narrowing can be interpreted to yield the correlation time of the thermal motion. In this work Nitrocellulose isotopically highly enriched with ^{15}N was studied at four different temperatures between 27^ circ and 120^circ Celsius and the correlation times for polymer backbone motions were obtained. Nafion films containing, water (D_2 O and H_2^{17}O) and methanol (CH_3OD, CH _3^{17}OH), have been studied using Deuteron and Oxygen-17 NMR spectroscopy. Glassy behavior of the water domains at low temperature is evidenced by the specific nature of the ^2H NMR lineshapes. Activation energies extracted from ^2H spin-lattice relaxation data on the high temperature side of the T_1 minimum exhibit a steady increase with increasing water content. In spite of a high degree of molecular mobility, angular-dependent spectra of both unstretched and stretched samples reflect considerable anisotropy of the host polymer. Activation volumes corresponding to a specific dynamical process were obtained from measurements of spin-lattice relaxation vs. pressure. From the NMR measurements of Nafion films containing methanol, it was found that the molecular motion is much more rapid than the molecular motion of water in Nafion membranes.

  9. Methods for magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Wind, Robert A.; Minard, Kevin R.; Majors, Paul D.

    2011-11-22

    Methods of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object are disclosed that include placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. In particular embodiments the method includes pulsing the radio frequency to provide at least two of a spatially selective read pulse, a spatially selective phase pulse, and a spatially selective storage pulse. Further disclosed methods provide pulse sequences that provide extended imaging capabilities, such as chemical shift imaging or multiple-voxel data acquisition.

  10. The Conformational Changes Induced by Ubiquinone Binding in the Na+-pumping NADH:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) Are Kinetically Controlled by Conserved Glycines 140 and 141 of the NqrB Subunit*

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Madeleine; Juárez, Oscar; Neehaul, Yashvin; Cook, Darcie A.; Barquera, Blanca; Hellwig, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Na+-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) is responsible for maintaining a sodium gradient across the inner bacterial membrane. This respiratory enzyme, which couples sodium pumping to the electron transfer between NADH and ubiquinone, is not present in eukaryotes and as such could be a target for antibiotics. In this paper it is shown that the site of ubiquinone reduction is conformationally coupled to the NqrB subunit, which also hosts the final cofactor in the electron transport chain, riboflavin. Previous work showed that mutations in conserved NqrB glycine residues 140 and 141 affect ubiquinone reduction and the proper functioning of the sodium pump. Surprisingly, these mutants did not affect the dissociation constant of ubiquinone or its analog HQNO (2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide) from Na+-NQR, which indicates that these residues do not participate directly in the ubiquinone binding site but probably control its accessibility. Indeed, redox-induced difference spectroscopy showed that these mutations prevented the conformational change involved in ubiquinone binding but did not modify the signals corresponding to bound ubiquinone. Moreover, data are presented that demonstrate the NqrA subunit is able to bind ubiquinone but with a low non-catalytically relevant affinity. It is also suggested that Na+-NQR contains a single catalytic ubiquinone binding site and a second site that can bind ubiquinone but is not active. PMID:25006248

  11. Mixed-radiation-field dosimetry utilizing Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hintenlang, D.E.; Jamil, K.; Iselin, L.H.

    1992-12-31

    Radiation effects on urea, thiourea, guanidine carbonate and guanine sulfate were evaluated for both photon and neutron irradiations. Hydration of these materials typically provides a greatly increased sensitivity to both forms of radiation exposure, although not all materials lend themselves to this treatment without changing the chemical structure of the compound. Urea was found to be the most stable hydrated compound and provides the best sensitivity for quantifying radiation effects using NQR techniques. Urea permits a straight-forward quantification of each of the important parameters of the observed NQR signal, the FID. Several advanced data analysis methods were developed to assist in quantifying NQR spectra, both from urea and materials having more complex molecular structures, such as thiourea and guanidine sulfate. Unfortunately, these analysis techniques are frequently quite time consuming for the complex NQR spectra that result from some of these materials. The simpler analysis afforded by urea has therefore made it the prime candidate for an NQR dosimetry material. The moderate sensitivity of hydrated urea to photon irradiation does not permit this material to achieve the levels of performance required for a personnel dosimeter. It does, however, demonstrate acceptable sensitivity over dose ranges where it could provide a good biological dosimeter for several areas of radiation processing. The demonstrated photon sensitivity could permit hydrated urea to be used in applications such as food irradiation dosimetry. This material also exhibits a good sensitivity to neutron irradiation. The precise correlation between neutron exposure and the parameters of the resulting NQR spectra are currently being developed.

  12. Temperature variation of ultralow frequency modes and mean square displacements in solid lasamide (diuretic drug) studied by 35Cl-NQR, X-ray and DFT/QTAIM.

    PubMed

    Latosi?ska, Jolanta Natalia; Latosi?ska, Magdalena; Kasprzak, Jerzy; Tomczak, Magdalena; Maurin, Jan Krzysztof

    2012-10-25

    The application of combined (35)Cl-NQR/X-ray/DFT/QTAIM methods to study the temperature variation of anisotropic displacement parameters and ultralow frequency modes of anharmonic torsional vibrations in the solid state is illustrated on the example of 2,4-dichloro-5-sulfamolybenzoic acid (lasamide, DSBA) which is a diuretic and an intermediate in the synthesis of furosemide and thus its common impurity. The crystallographic structure of lasamide is solved by X-ray diffraction and refined to a final R-factor of 3.06% at room temperature. Lasamide is found to crystallize in the triclinic space group P-1, with two equivalent molecules in the unit cell a = 7.5984(3) , b = 8.3158(3) , c = 8.6892(3) ; ? = 81.212(3), ? = 73.799(3), ? = 67.599(3). Its molecules form symmetric dimers linked by two short and linear intermolecular hydrogen bonds O-HO (O-HO = 2.648 and ?OHO = 171.5), which are further linked by weaker and longer intermolecular hydrogen bonds N-HO (N-HO = 2.965 and ?NHO = 166.4). Two (35)Cl-NQR resonance frequencies, 36.899 and 37.129 MHz, revealed at room temperature are assigned to chlorine sites at the ortho and para positions, relative to the carboxyl functional group, respectively. The difference in C-Cl(1) and C-Cl(2) bond lengths only slightly affects the value of (35)Cl-NQR frequencies, which results mainly from chemical inequivalence of chlorine atoms but also involvement in different intermolecular interactions pattern. The smooth decrease in both (35)Cl-NQR frequencies with increasing temperature in the range of 77-300 K testifies to the averaging of EFG tensor at each chlorine site due to anharmonic torsional vibrations. Lasamide is thermally stable; no temperature-induced release of chlorine or decomposition of this compound is detected. The temperature dependence of ultralow frequency modes of anharmonic small-angle internal torsional vibrations averaging EFG tensor and mean square angle displacements at both chlorine sites is derived from the (35)Cl-NQR temperature dependence. The frequencies of torsional vibrations higher for the para site than the ortho site are in good agreement with those obtained from thermal parameters obtained from X-ray studies. The mean square angle displacements are in good agreement with those estimated from X-ray data with the use of the TLS model. The detailed DFT/QTAIM analysis suggests that the interplay between different hydrogen bonds in adjacent molecules forming dimers is responsible for the differences in flexibility of the carboxyl and sulphonamide substituents as well as both C-Cl(1) and C-Cl(2) bonds. Three ultralow wavenumber modes of internal vibrations in Raman and IR spectra obtained at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level close to those obtained within the TLS model suggest that internal and external modes of vibrations are not well separated. PMID:23020838

  13. Surface Plasmon Resonance: An Introduction to a Surface Spectroscopy Technique

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yijun; Zeng, Xiangqun; Liang, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has become an important optical biosensing technology in the areas of biochemistry, biology, and medical sciences because of its real-time, label-free, and noninvasive nature. The high cost of commercial devices and consumables has prevented SPR from being introduced in the undergraduate laboratory. Here we present an affordable homemade SPR device with all of its components accessible to visualization. This design allows ease of integration with electrochemistry and makes the device suitable for education. We describe a laboratory experiment in which students examine the relationship between the SPR angle and the solution refractive index at the interface and perform a coupled SPRelectrochemistry experiment. Students also study the antibodyantigen binding activity. Most of the experimental work was done as a project by a grade 12 high-school student under proper supervision. We believe that the SPR device and the SPR laboratory will enhance undergraduate chemical education by introducing students to this important modern instrumentation and will help students to learn and understand the molecular interactions occurring at interfaces. PMID:21359107

  14. A novel power amplification scheme for nuclear magnetic resonance/nuclear quadrupole resonance systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinwang; Schemm, Nathan; Balk?r, Sina

    2011-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR)-based chemical analysis systems have been widely utilized in various areas such as medicine, security, and academic research. In these applications, the power amplifier stage plays a key role in generating the required oscillating magnetic fields within a radio frequency coil that serves as the probe. However, the bulky size and relatively low efficiency of the traditional power amplification schemes employed present a bottleneck for the realization of compact sized and portable NMR and NQR systems. To address this problem, this work presents a class D voltage-switching power amplification scheme with novel fast-start and fast-stop functions that are suitable for generating ideal NMR and NQR excitation signals. Compared to the traditional analog power amplifiers (PAs), the proposed switched-mode PA can achieve significant improvement on the power efficiency as well as the physical volume. A PA circuit for portable NQR-based explosive detection systems has been designed and built using the proposed scheme with 1 kW possible maximum output power and 10 MHz maximum operating frequency. Test results show that the presented PA achieves more than 60% measured efficiency within a highly compact volume while sustaining fast start and stop of excitation signals in the order of microseconds. PMID:21456776

  15. A novel power amplification scheme for nuclear magnetic resonance/nuclear quadrupole resonance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinwang; Schemm, Nathan; Balk?r, Sina

    2011-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR)-based chemical analysis systems have been widely utilized in various areas such as medicine, security, and academic research. In these applications, the power amplifier stage plays a key role in generating the required oscillating magnetic fields within a radio frequency coil that serves as the probe. However, the bulky size and relatively low efficiency of the traditional power amplification schemes employed present a bottleneck for the realization of compact sized and portable NMR and NQR systems. To address this problem, this work presents a class D voltage-switching power amplification scheme with novel fast-start and fast-stop functions that are suitable for generating ideal NMR and NQR excitation signals. Compared to the traditional analog power amplifiers (PAs), the proposed switched-mode PA can achieve significant improvement on the power efficiency as well as the physical volume. A PA circuit for portable NQR-based explosive detection systems has been designed and built using the proposed scheme with 1 kW possible maximum output power and 10 MHz maximum operating frequency. Test results show that the presented PA achieves more than 60% measured efficiency within a highly compact volume while sustaining fast start and stop of excitation signals in the order of microseconds.

  16. Stereoelectronic structure and 35Cl NQR parameters of 4-(trichlorgermyl)butan-2-one using ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feshin, V. P.; Feshina, E. V.

    2012-03-01

    The results of ab initio calculations at the RHF/6-31G(d) and MP2/6-31G(d) levels of two stable structures of the 4-(trichlorgermyl)butan-2-one molecule with total optimization of their geometry have been represented. The structure with pentacoordinated Ge atom is energetically more advantageous as compared with that with tetracoordinated one. Using these results, the 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) frequencies and asymmetry parameters of the electric field gradient (EFG) at the 35Cl nuclei in molecule with pentacoordinated Ge atom have been assessed, the frequencies satisfactorily agreeing with experimental data. Calculations at the RHF/6-31G(d) level have been performed also at various Ge⋯O distances. It has been demonstrated that convergence of the Ge and O coordination centers leads to the increase of positive charge at the Ge coordination center and of negative charge at the O coordination center, at that, electron density from the Ge atom shifts mainly to the axial Cl atom and from the C atom of carbonyl group - to its O atom. The electron density transfer from the O to Ge atom does not occur.

  17. Magnetic correlations in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 from NQR relaxation and specific heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsa, F.; Rigamonti, A.

    1990-01-01

    La-139 and Cu-63 Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) relaxation measurements in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 for O = to or less than 0.3 and in the temperature range 1.6 + 450 K are analyzed in terms of Cu(++) magnetic correlations and dynamics. It is described how the magnetic correlations that would result from Cu-Cu exchange are reduced by mobile charge defects related to x-doping. A comprehensive picture is given which explains satisfactorily the x and T dependence of the correlation time, of the correlation length and of the Neel temperature T(sub n)(x) as well as being consistent with known electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. It is discussed how, in the superconducting samples, the mobile defects also cause the decrease, for T yields T(sub c)(+) of the hyperfine Cu electron-nucleus effective interaction, leading to the coexistence of quasi-localized, reduced magnetic moments from 3d Cu electrons and mobile oxygen p-hole carriers. The temperature dependence of the effective hyperfine field around the superconducting transition yields an activation energy which could be related to the pairing energy. New specific heat measurements are also presented and discussed in terms of the above picture.

  18. Investigation of Wavelet-Based Enhancements to Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Explosives Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, Stephen W.; Dress, William B.; Hibbs, Andrew D.; Barrall, Geoffrey A.

    1998-06-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is effective for the detection and identification of certain types of explosives such as RDX, PETN and TNT. In explosive detection, the NQR response of certain 14N nuclei present in the crystalline material is probed. The 14N nuclei possess a nuclear quadrupole moment which in the presence of an electric field gradient produces an energy level splitting which may be excited by radio-frequency magnetic fields. Pulsing on the sample with a radio signal of the appropriate frequency produces a transient NQR response which may then be detected. Since the resonant frequency is dependent upon both the quadrupole moment of the 14N nucleus and the nature of the local electric field gradients, it is very compound specific. Under DARPA sponsorship, the authors are using multiresolution methods to investigate the enhancement of operation of NQR explosives detectors used for land mine detection. For this application, NQR processing time must be reduced to less than one second. False alarm responses due to acoustic and piezoelectric ringing must be suppressed. Also, as TNT is the most prevalent explosive found in land mines, NQR detection of TNT must be made practical despite unfavorable relaxation tunes. All three issues require improvement in signal-to-noise ratio, and all would benefit from improved feature extraction. This paper reports some of the insights provided by multiresolution methods that can be used to obtain these improvements. It includes results of multiresolution analysis of experimentally observed NQR signatures for RDX responses and various false alarm signatures in the absence of explosive compounds.

  19. Resonant cavity based time-domain multiplexing techniques for coherently combined fiber laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, T.; Ruppe, J.; Stanfield, P.; Nees, J.; Wilcox, R.; Galvanauskas, A.

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes novel time-domain multiplexing techniques that use various resonant cavity configurations for increasing pulse energy extraction per each parallel amplification channel of a coherently combined array. Two different techniques are presented: a so-called N2 coherent array combining technique, applicable to a periodic pulse train, and a coherent pulse stacking amplification (CPSA) technique, applicable to a pulse burst. The first technique is a coherent combining technique, which achieves simultaneous beam combining and time-domain pulse multiplexing/down-counting using traveling-wave Fabry-Perot type resonators. The second technique is purely a time-domain pulse multiplexing technique, used with either a single amplifier or an amplifier array, which uses traveling-wave Gires-Tourmois type resonators. The importance of these techniques is that they can enable stacking of very large number of pulses, thus increasing effective amplified-pulse duration potentially by 102 to 103 times, and reducing fiber array size by the corresponding factor. This could lead to very compact coherently combined arrays even for generating very high pulse energies in the range of 1 to 100 J.

  20. Waveguide-type optical passive ring resonator gyro using frequency modulation spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ning; Lijun, Guo; Mei, Kong; Tuoyuan, Chen

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports the experimental results of silica on a silicon ring resonator in a resonator micro optic gyroscope based on the frequency modulation spectroscopy technique by our research group. The ring resonator is composed of a 4 cm diameter silica waveguide. By testing at ? = 1550 nm, the FSR, FWHM and the depth of resonance are 3122 MHz, 103.07 MHz and 0.8 respectively. By using a polarization controller, the resonance curve under the TM mode can be inhibited. The depth of resonance increased from 0.8 to 0.8913, namely the finesse increase from 30.33 to 33.05. In the experiments, there is an acoustic-optical frequency shifter (AOFS) in each light loop. We lock the lasing frequency at the resonance frequency of the silica waveguide ring resonator for the counterclockwise lightwave; the frequency difference between the driving frequencies of the two AOFS is equivalent to the Sagnac frequency difference caused by gyro rotation. Thus, the gyro output is observed. The slope of the linear fit is about 0.330 mV/(/s) based on the -900 to 900 kHz equivalent frequency and the gyro dynamic range is 2.0 103 rad/s.

  1. Fast Spiral two-point Dixon technique using block regional off-resonance correction.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Hisamoto; Lewin, Jonathan S; Duerk, Jeffrey L

    2004-12-01

    The Spiral two-point Dixon (Spiral 2PD) technique has recently been proposed as a method for unambiguous water-fat decomposition in spiral imaging. It also corrects for off-resonance blurring artifacts using only two data sets. In the Spiral 2PD technique, several predetermined off-resonance frequencies are tested to both separate water and fat signals and deblur the decomposed images. Unfortunately, the algorithm is computationally quite intensive since the range of tested frequencies must be set sufficiently large to span the full range of anticipated B(0) variation over the scanned objects. The block regional off-resonance correction (BRORC) algorithm corrects for off-resonance blurring artifacts block by block through the reconstructed image and usually provides several times higher computational efficiency than the conventional frequency-segmented off-resonance correction algorithm. This work shows that both water-fat decomposition and blurring artifact correction can be performed block by block using two spiral images with different TEs and that this new technique (BRORC-Spiral2PD technique) significantly improves the computational efficiency of other Spiral 2PD algorithms, opening new opportunities for spiral imaging. PMID:15562484

  2. Measuring acoustic mode resonance alone as a sensitive technique to extract antiferromagnetic coupling strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yajun; Svedlindh, Peter; Kostylev, Mikhail; Ranjbar, Mojtaba; Dumas, Randy K.; kerman, Johan

    2015-08-01

    We have studied static and dynamic magnetic properties of a general asymmetric trilayer system using numerical simulations. For ferromagnetic, 90?, and antiferromagnetic coupling, the magnetizations of the two magnetic layers exhibit one, two, and three phases with increasing external field, respectively. The total magnetization and ferromagnetic resonance accordingly follow these phases of the magnetization vectors. The resonance condition is related to the interlayer coupling strength in such a way that a larger coupling constant yields a higher value of fres/H , where fres is the resonance frequency at the external magnetic field H . Based on the simulation results, it is proposed that measurements of the acoustic mode resonance alone at unsaturated conditions provide a sensitive and accurate technique to extract the antiferromagnetic coupling strength. The technique is demonstrated experimentally with the broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements of two trilayer films with weak and strong coupling strengths. The technique offers an efficient and sensitive method for antiferromagnetic coupling strength extraction, yielding coupling constant values with a precision of better than 0.03 erg/cm2. Also, separation of the bilinear and biquadratic coupling contributions is possible with the technique.

  3. Foil cycling technique for the VESUVIO spectrometer operating in the resonance detector configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Schooneveld, E. M.; Mayers, J.; Rhodes, N. J.; Pietropaolo, A.; Andreani, C.; Senesi, R.; Gorini, G.; Perelli-Cippo, E.; Tardocchi, M.

    2006-09-15

    This article reports a novel experimental technique, namely, the foil cycling technique, developed on the VESUVIO spectrometer (ISIS spallation source) operating in the resonance detector configuration. It is shown that with a proper use of two foils of the same neutron absorbing material it is possible, in a double energy analysis process, to narrow the width of the instrumental resolution of a spectrometer operating in the resonance detector configuration and to achieve an effective subtraction of the neutron and gamma backgrounds. Preliminary experimental results, obtained from deep inelastic neutron scattering measurements on lead, zirconium hydride, and deuterium chloride samples, are presented.

  4. 35Cl NQR Spectra of several 2,2-bis- p-chlorophenyl chloroethane derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogaj, B.; Pietrzak, J.; Wielopolska, E.; Schroeder, G.; Jarczewski, A.

    Measurement of NQR line frequency at 77 K have been performed for the following compounds: 1-chloro-2,2-bis-(p-chlorophenyl) ethylene (DDMU), 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis-(p-chlorophenyl) ethylene (DDE), 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis-(p-chlorophenyl) ethane (ODD), 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane (DDT). An attempt to assign spectrum lines to particular Cl nuclei in a molecule has been made. Molecular and crystallographic inequivalences occurring in these compounds have been considered. Comparison of the NQR and crystallographic data revealed the influence of phenyl rings conformation on electric charge distribution in the studied molecules.

  5. Part I. Analyzing the distribution of gas law questions in chemistry textbooks. Part II. Chlorine-35 NQR spectra of group 1 and silver dichloromethanesulfonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillette, Gabriel

    Part I. Two studies involving the gas law questions in eight high school and Advanced Placement/college chemistry textbooks were performed using loglinear analysis to look for associations among six variables. These variables included Bloom's Taxonomy (higher-order, lower-order), Book Type (high school, college), Question Format (multiple-choice, problem, short answer), Question Placement (in-chapter, end-of-chapter, test bank), Representation (macroscopic, microscopic, symbolic), and Arkansas Science Standard (conceptual, mathematical; gas laws, pressure conversion, stoichiometry). The first study, involving the conceptual gas law questions, found the Book Type and Question Placement variables had the biggest impact, each appearing in 5 of the 11 significant associations. The second study, involving the mathematical gas law questions, found the Question Placement had the biggest impact, appearing in 7 of the 11 significant associations, followed by Book Type and the Arkansas Science Standard variables, which appeared in 5 of the 11 significant associations. These studies showed that compared to the high school books, college books have fewer multiple-choice questions (compared to short-answer and problem questions), fewer in-chapter questions (compared to end-of-chapter and test bank questions), fewer questions in the chapters and more questions at the end of the chapters and fewer multiple-choice questions in and at the end of the books and more multiple-choice questions in the test banks. Part II. The dichloromethanesulfonate salts of several +1 charged cations, M+Cl2CHSO3 - (M = Li, Na, K, Rb Ag, Cs Tl) were synthesized and studied by 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). Dichloromethanesulfonic acid was prepared by the methanolysis of dichloromethanesulfonyl chloride, which was neutralized with the metal carbonates to produce the corresponding metal dichloromethanesulfonate salts. This study completed the NQR investigation of the family of chloroacetates and chloromethanesulfonates of silver. The study suggests that the ability of organochlorine atoms to coordinate to silver ions decreases as the number of electron-withdrawing groups attached to carbon atom bound to the coordinating chlorine atom increases. The unusually large NQR spectral width found among M+Cl2CHCO2 - salts are not present among M+Cl2CHSO 3- salts and does not appear to be generally characteristic of the dichloromethyl family of salts.

  6. Mutual effect of ligands in nitrido and nitroso complexes of osmium and ruthenium from NQR data

    SciTech Connect

    Kravchenko. E.A.; Burtsev, M.Yu.; Sinitsyn, M.N.; Svetlov, A.A.; Kokunov, Ya.V.; Buslaev, A.

    1987-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study by NQR the spectral results of the mutual ligand effect in complex compounds having various types of short bonds. The authors obtained the /sup 35/Cl, /sup 81/Br, and /sup 127/I NQR spectra of a large number of halogen complexes of osmium and ruthenium having short Os=N and M in equilibrium NO bonds of the following types: R(OsNHal/sub 4/) (R = (Ph/sub 4/P)/sup +/, (Bu/sub 4/N)/sup +/; Hal = Cl/sup -/, Br/sup -/, I/sup -/), K/sub 2/(OsNCl/sub 5/), Rb/sub 2/(OsNBr/sub 5/), (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/(OsNBr/sub 5/), K(OsNHal/sub 4/L) (Hal = Cl/sup -/, Br/sup -/; L = H/sub 2/O, CH/sub 3/CN), K/sub 2/(MNOHal/sub 5/) (M = Os, Ru; Hal = Cl/sup -/, Br/sup -/, I/sup -/). The experimental NQR values measured are connected by the Townes and Dailey theory with the chemical bond characteristics i, sigma, ..pi.., the degree of the ionic, the sigma-covalent, and the ..pi..-covalent natures respectively ( i + sigma + ..pi.. = 1).

  7. Stand-off explosive detection utilizing low power stimulated emission nuclear quadrupole resonance detection and subwavelength focusing wideband super lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolos, John; Mouyos, William; Feng, Judy; Chase, Walter

    2015-05-01

    The need for advanced techniques to detect improvised explosive devices (IED) at stand-off distances greater than ten (10) meters has driven AMI Research and Development (AMI) to develop a solution to detect and identify the threat utilizing a forward looking Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) combined with our CW radar technology Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) detection system. The novel features include a near-field sub-wavelength focusing antenna, a wide band 300 KHz to 300 MHz rapidly scanning CW radar facilitated by a high Q antenna/tuner, and an advanced processor utilizing Rabi transitions where the nucleus oscillates between states under the time dependent incident electromagnetic field and alternately absorbs energy from the incident field while emitting coherent energy via stimulated emission. AMI's Sub-wavelength Focusing Wide Band Super Lens uses a Near-Field SAR, making detection possible at distances greater than ten (10) meters. This super lens is capable of operating on the near-field and focusing electromagnetic waves to resolutions beyond the diffraction limit. When applied to the case of a vehicle approaching an explosive hazard the methodologies of synthetic aperture radar is fused with the array based super resolution and the NQR data processing detecting the explosive hazard.

  8. Investigating real-time activation of adenosine receptors by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yimei; Yang, Hongqin; Zheng, Liqin; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen

    2013-02-01

    Adenosine receptors play important roles in many physiological and pathological processes, for example regulating myocardial oxygen consumption and the release of neurotransmitters. The activations of adenosine receptors have been studied by some kinds of techniques, such as western blot, immunohistochemistry, etc. However, these techniques cannot reveal the dynamical response of adenosine receptors under stimulation. In this paper, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique was introduced to study the real-time activation of adenosine receptors by monitoring the dynamics of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level. The results showed that there were significant differences between adenosine receptors on real-time responses under stimulation. Moreover, the dynamics of cAMP level demonstrated that competition between adenosine receptors existed. Taken together, our study indicates that monitoring the dynamics of cAMP level using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique could be one potential approach to investigate the mechanism of competitions between adenosine receptors.

  9. Application of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Evaluation of the Lower Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Hillary J.; Dragoo, Jason L.; Hargreaves, Brian A.; Levenston, Marc E.; Gold, Garry E.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis This article reviews current magnetic resonance imaging techniques for imaging the lower extremity, focusing on imaging of the knee, ankle, and hip joints. Recent advancements in MRI include imaging at 7 Tesla, using multiple receiver channels, T2* imaging, and metal suppression techniques, allowing more detailed visualization of complex anatomy, evaluation of morphological changes within articular cartilage, and imaging around orthopedic hardware. PMID:23622097

  10. Microwave resonance lamp absorption technique for measuring temperature and OH number density in combustion environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lempert, Walter R.

    1988-01-01

    A simple technique for simultaneous determination of temperature and OH number density is described, along with characteristic results obtained from measurements using a premixed, hydrogen air flat flame burner. The instrumentation is based upon absorption of resonant radiation from a flowing microwave discharge lamp, and is rugged, relatively inexpensive, and very simple to operate.

  11. Isotope effect on the temperature dependence of the 35Cl NQR frequency in (NH4)2RuCl6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kume, Yoshio; Amino, Daiki; Asaji, Tetsuo

    2013-07-01

    The 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance frequencies and spin-lattice relaxation times for (NH4)2RuCl6, (ND4)2RuCl6, (NH4)2SnCl6, and (ND4)2SnCl6 were measured in the temperature range 4.2-300 K. In these four compounds, it was confirmed that no phase transition occurs in the observed temperature range. At 4.2 K, discrepancies of the NQR frequency between non-deuterated and deuterated compounds, which are attributed to the difference in the spatial distributions of hydrogen (deuterium) atoms in the ground states of the rotational motion of ammonium ion, reached to 24 kHz and 23 kHz for the ruthenate compounds and the stannate compounds, respectively. The separation between the ground and the first excited states of the rotational motion of the ammonium ion was estimated to be 466 J mol-1 and 840 J mol-1 for (ND4)2RuCl6 and (NH4)2RuCl6, respectively, by least-square fitting calculations of temperature dependence of the NQR frequency. For (ND4)2SnCl6 and (NH4)2SnCl6, these quantities were estimated to be 501 J mol-1 and 1544 J mol-1, respectively. It was clarified that the T1 minimum, which has been observed for the stannate compounds at around 60 K as a feature of the temperature dependence, was dependent on a method of sample preparation. It is concluded that the minimum is not an essential character of the ammonium hexachlorostannate(IV) since the crystals prepared in strong acid condition to prevent a partial substitution of chlorine atoms by hydroxyl groups, did not show such T1 minimum.

  12. NQR study of neutral-ionic phase transition and quantum paraelectric state in organic charge-transfer complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, Fumitatsu; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Kanoda, Kazushi; Horiuchi, Sachio; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2008-12-01

    NQR measurements were performed for the charge-transfer complexes DMTTF-QBr nCl n-4 under ambient and hydrostatic pressures in order to understand the neutral-ionic phase transition and the quantum critical behavior. The 35Cl NQR spectrum of DMTTF-QCl 4 showed a splitting and a shift below Tc, indicating the occurrence of dimerization and charge transfer. The spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/ T1 showed a peak anomaly around Tc, reflecting the critical slowing down. The quantum paraelectric states in DMTTF-2,6-QBr 2Cl 2 and pressured DMTTF-QBr 4 were studied by the 79Br NQR. We found the microscopic evidence for the evolution of the critical fluctuations at low temperatures in the temperature dependence of spin-lattice relaxation rate.

  13. Dynamic characteristics of fiber optic ring resonator with different phase modulation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Bo; Fan, Yue

    2013-09-01

    Dynamic responses of fiber optic ring resonator (FORR) under triangle wave, sawtooth wave and sine wave phase modulation techniques are analyzed. Theoretical analysis shows that the performance of the resonator is affected by the fiber length L, and when L=0.075 m, the normalized output curves can reveal the steady-state performance of the resonator, which will be used in integrated optical resonance gyro (IORG). When L=0.75 m, the normalized output curves exhibit oscillatory behavior, which becomes more serious with the further increasing of L. In addition, the normalized output curves with different modulation frequency and power transmission coefficient of fiber are also analyzed. Results show that the oscillatory behavior becomes more seriously when modulation frequency changes from 33.4 kHz to 3340 kHz, the peak value of which becomes bigger. In addition, with the increasing of the power transmission coefficient α, the resonance curves become acute which exhibit the favorable performance of the FORR exactly.

  14. Clinical decision support systems for brain tumor characterization using advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Tsolaki, Evangelia; Kousi, Evanthia; Svolos, Patricia; Kapsalaki, Efthychia; Theodorou, Kyriaki; Kappas, Constastine; Tsougos, Ioannis

    2014-04-28

    In recent years, advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging and perfusion weighted imaging have been used in order to resolve demanding diagnostic problems such as brain tumor characterization and grading, as these techniques offer a more detailed and non-invasive evaluation of the area under study. In the last decade a great effort has been made to import and utilize intelligent systems in the so-called clinical decision support systems (CDSS) for automatic processing, classification, evaluation and representation of MRI data in order for advanced MRI techniques to become a part of the clinical routine, since the amount of data from the aforementioned techniques has gradually increased. Hence, the purpose of the current review article is two-fold. The first is to review and evaluate the progress that has been made towards the utilization of CDSS based on data from advanced MRI techniques. The second is to analyze and propose the future work that has to be done, based on the existing problems and challenges, especially taking into account the new imaging techniques and parameters that can be introduced into intelligent systems to significantly improve their diagnostic specificity and clinical application. PMID:24778769

  15. Clinical decision support systems for brain tumor characterization using advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    Tsolaki, Evangelia; Kousi, Evanthia; Svolos, Patricia; Kapsalaki, Efthychia; Theodorou, Kyriaki; Kappas, Constastine; Tsougos, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging and perfusion weighted imaging have been used in order to resolve demanding diagnostic problems such as brain tumor characterization and grading, as these techniques offer a more detailed and non-invasive evaluation of the area under study. In the last decade a great effort has been made to import and utilize intelligent systems in the so-called clinical decision support systems (CDSS) for automatic processing, classification, evaluation and representation of MRI data in order for advanced MRI techniques to become a part of the clinical routine, since the amount of data from the aforementioned techniques has gradually increased. Hence, the purpose of the current review article is two-fold. The first is to review and evaluate the progress that has been made towards the utilization of CDSS based on data from advanced MRI techniques. The second is to analyze and propose the future work that has to be done, based on the existing problems and challenges, especially taking into account the new imaging techniques and parameters that can be introduced into intelligent systems to significantly improve their diagnostic specificity and clinical application. PMID:24778769

  16. Effect of Geomagnetism on 101Ru Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Measurements of CeRu2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manago, Masahiro; Ishida, Kenji; Matsuda, Tatsuma D.; ?nuki, Yoshichika

    2015-11-01

    We performed 101Ru nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements on the s-wave superconductor CeRu2 and found oscillatory behavior in the spin-echo amplitude at the | 1/2> \\leftrightarrow | 3/2> transitions but not at the | 3/2> \\leftrightarrow | 5/2> transitions. The modulation disappears in the superconducting state or in a magnetic shield, which implies a geomagnetic field effect. Our results indicate that the NQR spin-echo decay curve at the | 1/2> \\leftrightarrow | 3/2> transitions is sensitive to a weak magnetic field.

  17. Extracting Information about the Rotator Cuff from Magnetic Resonance Images Using Deterministic and Random Techniques

    PubMed Central

    De Los Ros, F. A.; Paluszny, M.

    2015-01-01

    We consider some methods to extract information about the rotator cuff based on magnetic resonance images; the study aims to define an alternative method of display that might facilitate the detection of partial tears in the supraspinatus tendon. Specifically, we are going to use families of ellipsoidal triangular patches to cover the humerus head near the affected area. These patches are going to be textured and displayed with the information of the magnetic resonance images using the trilinear interpolation technique. For the generation of points to texture each patch, we propose a new method that guarantees the uniform distribution of its points using a random statistical method. Its computational cost, defined as the average computing time to generate a fixed number of points, is significantly lower as compared with deterministic and other standard statistical techniques. PMID:25650281

  18. Dynamic neutron scattering on incoherent systems using efficient resonance spin flip techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Häussler, Wolfgang; Kredler, Lukas

    2014-05-15

    We have performed numerical ray-tracing Monte-Carlo-simulations of incoherent dynamic neutron scattering experiments. We intend to optimize the efficiency of incoherent measurements depending on the fraction of neutrons scattered without and with spin flip at the sample. In addition to conventional spin echo, we have numerically and experimentally studied oscillating intensity techniques. The results point out the advantages of these different spin echo variants and are an important prerequisite for neutron resonance spin echo instruments like RESEDA (FRM II, Munich), to choose the most efficient technique depending on the scattering vector range and the properties of the sample system under study.

  19. Frequency-Temperature Compensation Techniques for High-Q Microwave Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnett, John G.; Tobar, Michael E.

    Low-noise high-stability resonator oscillators based on high-Q monolithic sapphire ``Whispering Gallery'' (WG)-mode resonators have become important devices for telecommunication, radar and metrological applications. The extremely high quality factor of sapphire, of 2 x10^5 at room temperature, 5 x10^7 at liquid nitrogen temperature and 5 x10^9 at liquid helium temperature has enabled the lowest phase noise and highly frequency-stable oscillators in the microwave regime to be constructed. To create an oscillator with exceptional frequency stability, the resonator must have its frequency-temperature dependence annulled at some temperature, as well as a high quality factor. The Temperature Coefficient of Permittivity (TCP) for sapphire is quite large, at 10-100parts per million/K above 77K. This mechanism allows temperature fluctuations to transform to resonator frequency fluctuations.A number of research groups worldwide have investigated various methods of compensating the TCP of a sapphire dielectric resonator at different temperatures. The usual electromagnetic technique of annulment involves the use of paramagnetic impurities contributing an opposite temperature coefficient of the magnetic susceptibility to the TCP. This technique has only been realized successfully in liquid helium environments. Near 4K the thermal expansion and permittivity effects are small and only small quantities of the paramagnetic ions are necessary to compensate the mode frequency. Compensation is due to impurity ions that were incidentally left over from the manufacturing process.Recently, there has been an effort to dispense with the need for liquid helium and make a compact flywheel oscillator for the new generation of primary frequency standards such as the cesium fountain at the Laboratoire Primaire du Temps et des Frquences (LPTF), France. To achieve the stability limit imposed by quantum projection noise requires that the local oscillator stability is of the order of 10^-14. Currently work is under way to achieve this goal in space-borne and mobile liquid-nitrogen-cooled systems. The work appears promising and, as at early 2000, the realization of this goal should not be far off.In this contribution we review techniques that cancel the TCP of sapphire and other dielectric resonators. Details of the temperature control system required to achieve current and target frequency stabilities are discussed.

  20. A biofilm microreactor system for simultaneous electrochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Ewing, R. James; Ewing, Thomas; Mueller, Karl T.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-03-01

    In order to fully understand electrochemically active biofilms and the limitations to their scale-up in industrial biofilm reactors, a complete picture of the microenvironments inside the biofilm is needed. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are ideally suited for the study of biofilms and for probing their microenvironments because these techniques allow for non-invasive interrogation and in situ monitoring with high resolution. By combining NMR with simultaneous electrochemical techniques, it is possible to sustain and study live electrochemically active biofilms. Here, we introduce a novel biofilm microreactor system that allows for simultaneous electrochemical and NMR techniques (EC-NMR) at the microscale. Microreactors were designed with custom radiofrequency resonator coils, which allowed for NMR measurements of biofilms growing on polarized gold electrodes. For an example application of this system, we grew Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms. NMR was used to investigate growth media flow velocities, which were compared to simulated laminar flow, and electron donor concentrations inside the biofilms. We use Monte Carlo error analysis to estimate standard deviations of the electron donor concentration measurements within the biofilm. The EC-NMR biofilm microreactor system can ultimately be used to correlate extracellular electron transfer rates with metabolic reactions and explore extracellular electron transfer mechanisms.

  1. Fabrication of capacitive acoustic resonators combining 3D printing and 2D inkjet printing techniques.

    PubMed

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Ogam, Erick; Loussert, Christophe; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing and two-dimensional (2D) printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency. PMID:26473878

  2. Fabrication of Capacitive Acoustic Resonators Combining 3D Printing and 2D Inkjet Printing Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Ogam, Erick; Loussert, Christophe; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing and two-dimensional (2D) printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency. PMID:26473878

  3. Vibrational techniques applied to photosynthesis: Resonance Raman and fluorescence line-narrowing.

    PubMed

    Gall, Andrew; Pascal, Andrew A; Robert, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy may yield precise information on the conformation of, and the interactions assumed by, the chromophores involved in the first steps of the photosynthetic process. Selectivity is achieved via resonance with the absorption transition of the chromophore of interest. Fluorescence line-narrowing spectroscopy is a complementary technique, in that it provides the same level of information (structure, conformation, interactions), but in this case for the emitting pigment(s) only (whether isolated or in an ensemble of interacting chromophores). The selectivity provided by these vibrational techniques allows for the analysis of pigment molecules not only when they are isolated in solvents, but also when embedded in soluble or membrane proteins and even, as shown recently, in vivo. They can be used, for instance, to relate the electronic properties of these pigment molecules to their structure and/or the physical properties of their environment. These techniques are even able to follow subtle changes in chromophore conformation associated with regulatory processes. After a short introduction to the physical principles that govern resonance Raman and fluorescence line-narrowing spectroscopies, the information content of the vibrational spectra of chlorophyll and carotenoid molecules is described in this article, together with the experiments which helped in determining which structural parameter(s) each vibrational band is sensitive to. A selection of applications is then presented, in order to illustrate how these techniques have been used in the field of photosynthesis, and what type of information has been obtained. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems. PMID:25268562

  4. Feasibility of nuclear quadrupole resonance as a novel dosimetry tool

    SciTech Connect

    Iselin, L.H.; Hintenlang, D.E.; Epperson, S.J.; Higgins, G.A.; Jamil, K.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (N.Q.R) frequencies are influenced by the symmetry of the charge distribution of a compound around the site of interest. Damage by ionizing radiation causes changes in this charge symmetry which can be detected by standard pulsed N.Q.R. methods. Previous work done on various chlorates of [sup 35]Cl at room temperature (Vargas et al., 1978) shows a linear effect between absorbed gammadose and the N.Q.R. frequency shift and line broadening. This paper reviews the theory of N.Q.R. and details our experimental apparatus. The accumulated data on [sup 14]N-containing compounds, both irradiated and nonirradiated, is discussed. The long term goal of this research is to choose an appropriate organic compound to duplicate the effects of radiation on human tissue. Under such conditions, we may be able to extend this work to provide a mixed radiation field (gamma and neutron) dosimeter which does not require knowing quality factors or energy fluences.

  5. Feasibility of nuclear quadrupole resonance as a novel dosimetry tool

    SciTech Connect

    Iselin, L.H.; Hintenlang, D.E.; Epperson, S.J.; Higgins, G.A.; Jamil, K.

    1990-12-31

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (N.Q.R) frequencies are influenced by the symmetry of the charge distribution of a compound around the site of interest. Damage by ionizing radiation causes changes in this charge symmetry which can be detected by standard pulsed N.Q.R. methods. Previous work done on various chlorates of {sup 35}Cl at room temperature (Vargas et al., 1978) shows a linear effect between absorbed gammadose and the N.Q.R. frequency shift and line broadening. This paper reviews the theory of N.Q.R. and details our experimental apparatus. The accumulated data on {sup 14}N-containing compounds, both irradiated and nonirradiated, is discussed. The long term goal of this research is to choose an appropriate organic compound to duplicate the effects of radiation on human tissue. Under such conditions, we may be able to extend this work to provide a mixed radiation field (gamma and neutron) dosimeter which does not require knowing quality factors or energy fluences.

  6. A no-tune no-match wideband probe for nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy in the VHF range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharfetter, Hermann; Petrovic, Andreas; Eggenhofer, Heidi; Stollberger, Rudolf

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy is a method for the characterization of chemical compounds containing so-called quadrupolar nuclei. Similar to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the sample under investigation is irradiated with strong radiofrequency (RF) pulses, which stimulate the emission of weak RF signals from the quadrupolar nuclei. The signals are then amplified and Fourier transformed so as to obtain a spectrum. In principle, narrowband NQR spectra can be measured with NMR spectrometers. However, pure NQR signals require the absence of a static magnetic field and several special applications require the characterization of a substance over a large bandwidth, e.g. 50-100% of the central frequency, which is hardly possible with standard NMR equipment. Dedicated zero-field NQR equipment is not widespread and current concepts employ resonating probes which are tuned and matched over a wide range by using mechanical capacitors driven by stepper motors. While providing the highest signal to noise ratio (SNR) such probes are slow in operation and can only be operated from dedicated NMR consoles. We developed a low-cost NQR wideband probe without tuning and matching for applications in the very high frequency (VHF) range below 300?MHz. The probe coil was realized as part of a reactive network which approximates an exponential transmission line. The input reflection coefficient of the two developed prototype probe coils is ? 20?dB between 90-145?MHz and 74.5-99.5?MHz, respectively. Two wideband NQR spectra of published test substances were acquired with an SNR of better than 20?dB after sufficient averaging. The measured signals and the SNR correspond very well to the theoretically expected values and demonstrate the feasibility of the method. Because there is no need for tuning and matching, our probes can be operated easily from any available NMR console.

  7. Direct imaging of neural currents using ultra-low field magnetic resonance techniques

    DOEpatents

    Volegov, Petr L.; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Mosher, John C.; Espy, Michelle A.; Kraus, Jr., Robert H.

    2009-08-11

    Using resonant interactions to directly and tomographically image neural activity in the human brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques at ultra-low field (ULF), the present inventors have established an approach that is sensitive to magnetic field distributions local to the spin population in cortex at the Larmor frequency of the measurement field. Because the Larmor frequency can be readily manipulated (through varying B.sub.m), one can also envision using ULF-DNI to image the frequency distribution of the local fields in cortex. Such information, taken together with simultaneous acquisition of MEG and ULF-NMR signals, enables non-invasive exploration of the correlation between local fields induced by neural activity in cortex and more `distant` measures of brain activity such as MEG and EEG.

  8. Cu NQR study of charge localization in HgBa2CuO4+? with different oxygen content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gippius, A. A.; Antipov, E. V.; Hoffmann, W.; Lders, K.

    1996-02-01

    Variation of the oxygen content ? in HgBa2CuO4+?(1201) provides a good opportunity to study the influence of oxygen doping on nuclear quadrupole interactions (NQI) and charge localization in different regions of (Tc-?) phase diagram. We performed63,65Cu NQR of series HgBa2CuO4+? samples with different oxygen content ?.

  9. Review of pyroelectric thermal energy harvesting and new MEMs based resonant energy conversion techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Scott Robert; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Mostafa, Salwa; Rajic, Slobodan; Datskos, Panos G

    2012-01-01

    Harvesting electrical energy from thermal energy sources using pyroelectric conversion techniques has been under investigation for over 50 years, but it has not received the attention that thermoelectric energy harvesting techniques have during this time period. This lack of interest stems from early studies which found that the energy conversion efficiencies achievable using pyroelectric materials were several times less than those potentially achievable with thermoelectrics. More recent modeling and experimental studies have shown that pyroelectric techniques can be cost competitive with thermoelectrics and, using new temperature cycling techniques, has the potential to be several times as efficient as thermoelectrics under comparable operating conditions. This paper will review the recent history in this field and describe the techniques that are being developed to increase the opportunities for pyroelectric energy harvesting. The development of a new thermal energy harvester concept, based on temperature cycled pyroelectric thermal-to-electrical energy conversion, are also outlined. The approach uses a resonantly driven, pyroelectric capacitive bimorph cantilever structure that can be used to rapidly cycle the temperature in the energy harvester. The device has been modeled using a finite element multi-physics based method, where the effect of the structure material properties and system parameters on the frequency and magnitude of temperature cycling, and the efficiency of energy recycling using the proposed structure, have been modeled. Results show that thermal contact conductance and heat source temperature differences play key roles in dominating the cantilever resonant frequency and efficiency of the energy conversion technique. This paper outlines the modeling, fabrication and testing of cantilever and pyroelectric structures and single element devices that demonstrate the potential of this technology for the development of high efficiency thermal-to-electrical energy conversion devices.

  10. Review of pyroelectric thermal energy harvesting and new MEMs-based resonant energy conversion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Scott R.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Mostafa, Salwa; Rajic, Slo; Datskos, Panos G.

    2012-06-01

    Harvesting electrical energy from thermal energy sources using pyroelectric conversion techniques has been under investigation for over 50 years, but it has not received the attention that thermoelectric energy harvesting techniques have during this time period. This lack of interest stems from early studies which found that the energy conversion efficiencies achievable using pyroelectric materials were several times less than those potentially achievable with thermoelectrics. More recent modeling and experimental studies have shown that pyroelectric techniques can be cost competitive with thermoelectrics and, using new temperature cycling techniques, has the potential to be several times as efficient as thermoelectrics under comparable operating conditions. This paper will review the recent history in this field and describe the techniques that are being developed to increase the opportunities for pyroelectric energy harvesting. The development of a new thermal energy harvester concept, based on temperature cycled pyroelectric thermal-to-electrical energy conversion, are also outlined. The approach uses a resonantly driven, pyroelectric capacitive bimorph cantilever structure that can be used to rapidly cycle the temperature in the energy harvester. The device has been modeled using a finite element multi-physics based method, where the effect of the structure material properties and system parameters on the frequency and magnitude of temperature cycling, and the efficiency of energy recycling using the proposed structure, have been modeled. Results show that thermal contact conductance and heat source temperature differences play key roles in dominating the cantilever resonant frequency and efficiency of the energy conversion technique. This paper outlines the modeling, fabrication and testing of cantilever and pyroelectric structures and single element devices that demonstrate the potential of this technology for the development of high efficiency thermal-toelectrical energy conversion devices.

  11. A Second Look at Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis as a Spent Fuel NDA Technique

    SciTech Connect

    James W .Sterbentz; David L. Chichester

    2011-07-01

    Many different nondestructive analysis techniques are currently being investigated as a part of the United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) seeking methods to quantify plutonium in spent fuel. Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) is one of these techniques. Having first been explored in the mid-1970s for the analysis of individual spent-fuel pins a second look, using advanced simulation and modeling methods, is now underway to investigate the suitability of the NRTA technique for assaying complete spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The technique is similar to neutron time-of-flight methods used for cross-section determinations but operates over only the narrow 0.1-20 eV range where strong, distinguishable resonances exist for both the plutonium (239, 240, 241,242Pu) and uranium (235,236,238U) isotopes of interest in spent fuel. Additionally, in this energy range resonances exists for six important fission products (99Tc, 103Rh, 131Xe, 133Cs, 145Nd, and 152Sm) which provide additional information to support spent fuel plutonium assay determinations. Initial modeling shows excellent agreement with previously published experimental data for measurements of individual spent-fuel pins where plutonium assays were demonstrated to have a precision of 2-4%. Within the simulation and modeling analyses of this project scoping studies have explored fourteen different aspects of the technique including the neutron source, drift tube configurations, and gross neutron transmission as well as the impacts of fuel burn up, cooling time, and fission-product interferences. These results show that NRTA may be a very capable experimental technique for spent-fuel assay measurements. The results suggest sufficient transmission strength and signal differentiability is possible for assays through up to 8 pins. For an 8-pin assay (looking at an assembly diagonally), 64% of the pins in a typical 17 ? 17 array of a pressurized water reactor fuel assembly can be part of a complete transmission assay measurement with high precision. Analysis of rows with up to 12 pins may also be feasible but with diminished precision. Preliminary data analysis of an NRTA simulation has demonstrated the simplicity of the technique.

  12. Reduction of reset pulse in resonant frequency servo loop for resonant fiber-optic gyro by an auto-controlled reset technique.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huilian; Lu, Xiao; Jin, Zhonghe

    2013-12-20

    Resonant fiber-optic gyro (RFOG) based on the Sagnac effect has the potential to achieve the inertial navigation system requirement with a short sensing coil. A high-accuracy resonant frequency servo loop is indispensable for a high-performance RFOG. A digital proportional-integral (PI) controller is always adopted in the resonant frequency servo loop. The resonant frequency of the optical fiber ring resonator drifts with environmental temperature changes. When the resonant frequency drift is beyond the tracking range of the resonant frequency servo loop, the digital PI controller overflows and outputs a reset signal. A large reset pulse, which is equivalent to a rotation rate error of 26/h, has been observed at the output of the RFOG, while a long time is required for returning to the lock-in state simultaneously. To reduce the effect of the overflow resetting in the digital PI controller, an auto-controlled reset technique is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. As a result, the time for returning to the lock-in state is reduced to 5ms from 8s. With the integration time of 1s, the equivalent accuracy of the resonant frequency servo loop is improved to 0.18/h. PMID:24513942

  13. Development of techniques in magnetic resonance and structural studies of the prion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, Hans-Marcus L.

    2000-07-01

    Magnetic resonance is the most powerful analytical tool used by chemists today. Its applications range from determining structures of large biomolecules to imaging of human brains. Nevertheless, magnetic resonance remains a relatively young field, in which many techniques are currently being developed that have broad applications. In this dissertation, two new techniques are presented, one that enables the determination of torsion angles in solid-state peptides and proteins, and another that involves imaging of heterogenous materials at ultra-low magnetic fields. In addition, structural studies of the prion protein via solid-state NMR are described. More specifically, work is presented in which the dependence of chemical shifts on local molecular structure is used to predict chemical shift tensors in solid-state peptides with theoretical ab initio surfaces. These predictions are then used to determine the backbone dihedral angles in peptides. This method utilizes the theoretical chemicalshift tensors and experimentally determined chemical-shift anisotropies (CSAs) to predict the backbone and side chain torsion angles in alanine, leucine, and valine residues. Additionally, structural studies of prion protein fragments are described in which conformationally-dependent chemical-shift measurements were made to gain insight into the structural differences between the various conformational states of the prion protein. These studies are of biological and pathological interest since conformational changes in the prion protein are believed to cause prion diseases. Finally, an ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging technique is described that enables imaging and characterization of heterogeneous and porous media. The notion of imaging gases at ultra-low fields would appear to be very difficult due to the prohibitively low polarization and spin densities as well as the low sensitivities of conventional Faraday coil detectors. However, Chapter 5 describes how gas imaging at ultra-low fields is realized by incorporating the high sensitivities of a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with the high polarizations attainable through optica11y pumping {sup 129}Xe gas.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of multiple sclerosis: a study of pulse-technique efficacy

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Price, A.C.; Kirshner, H.S.; Allen, J.H.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1984-11-01

    Forty-two patients with the clinical diagnosis of multiple sclerosis were examined by proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 0.5 T. An extensive protocol was used to facilitate a comparison of the efficacy of different pulse techniques. Results were also compared in 39 cases with high-resolution x-ray computed tomography (CT). MRI revealed characteristic abnormalities in each case, whereas CT was positive in only 15 of 33 patients. Cerebral abnormalities were best shown with the T2-weighted spin-echo sequence: brainstem lesions were best defined on the inversion-recovery sequence.

  15. Myocardial tagging by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance: evolution of techniques--pulse sequences, analysis algorithms, and applications

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) tagging has been established as an essential technique for measuring regional myocardial function. It allows quantification of local intramyocardial motion measures, e.g. strain and strain rate. The invention of CMR tagging came in the late eighties, where the technique allowed for the first time for visualizing transmural myocardial movement without having to implant physical markers. This new idea opened the door for a series of developments and improvements that continue up to the present time. Different tagging techniques are currently available that are more extensive, improved, and sophisticated than they were twenty years ago. Each of these techniques has different versions for improved resolution, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), scan time, anatomical coverage, three-dimensional capability, and image quality. The tagging techniques covered in this article can be broadly divided into two main categories: 1) Basic techniques, which include magnetization saturation, spatial modulation of magnetization (SPAMM), delay alternating with nutations for tailored excitation (DANTE), and complementary SPAMM (CSPAMM); and 2) Advanced techniques, which include harmonic phase (HARP), displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE), and strain encoding (SENC). Although most of these techniques were developed by separate groups and evolved from different backgrounds, they are in fact closely related to each other, and they can be interpreted from more than one perspective. Some of these techniques even followed parallel paths of developments, as illustrated in the article. As each technique has its own advantages, some efforts have been made to combine different techniques together for improved image quality or composite information acquisition. In this review, different developments in pulse sequences and related image processing techniques are described along with the necessities that led to their invention, which makes this article easy to read and the covered techniques easy to follow. Major studies that applied CMR tagging for studying myocardial mechanics are also summarized. Finally, the current article includes a plethora of ideas and techniques with over 300 references that motivate the reader to think about the future of CMR tagging. PMID:21798021

  16. Rapid and Sensitive Determination of Trace Chloride Ion in Drinks Using Resonance Light Scattering Technique

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hui; Wu, Dong Hui

    2008-01-01

    A resonance light scattering (RLS) technique to determine chloride ions in drinks was developed. Chloride ions were found to bind Ag+ forming AgCl aggregates that produced intense resonance scattering light. Effects of factors such as acidity, ionic strength, and coexistent interferents on the RLS of AgCl aggregates were investigated. The pH of solution almost did not affect the production of RLS and few foreign species interfered with the detection of chloride ions. The resonance scattering light intensity at the maximum peak of 571 nm was linear to the concentration of chloride ions in the range of 1.428.52 ng mL?1 with a detection limit of 0.71 ng mL?1. To determine the feasibility of the proposed method, some samples of water and drinks were analyzed. The attained results were in agreement with that of ion-selective electrode method. Good recovery results were also obtained with the range of 94.08105.63%. The sensitivity and selectivity of the RLS method are high enough to determine trace amounts of chloride ions without any significant interference from high concentration of other components such as common anions and cations. PMID:18509483

  17. Application of surface plasmon resonance imaging technique for the detection of single spherical biological submicrometer particles.

    PubMed

    Shpacovitch, Victoria; Temchura, Vladimir; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Hamacher, Joachim; Skolnik, Julia; Libuschewski, Pascal; Siedhoff, Dominic; Weichert, Frank; Marwedel, Peter; Müller, Heinrich; Überla, Klaus; Hergenröder, Roland; Zybin, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    Recent proof-of-principle studies demonstrated the suitability of the surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) technique for the detection of individual submicrometer and nanoparticles in solutions. In the current study, we used the SPRi technique for visualization of the binding of round-shaped viruses (inactivated influenza A virus) and virus-like particles (human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-based virus-like particles) to the functionalized sensor surface. We show the applicability of the SPRi technique for the detection of individual virus-like particles in buffers without serum as well as in buffers containing different concentrations of serum. Furthermore, we prove the specificity of visualized binding events using two different pseudotypes of HIV virus-like particles. We also demonstrate the applicability of the SPRi technique for the determination of relative particle concentrations in solutions. Moreover, we suggest a technical approach, which allows enhancing the magnitude of binding signals. Our studies indicate that the SPRi technique represents an efficient research tool for quantification and characterization of biological submicrometer objects such as viruses or virus-like particles, for example. PMID:26095398

  18. Dimensional characterization of a quasispherical resonator by microwave and coordinate measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, R.; Flack, D.; Morantz, P.; Sutton, G.; Shore, P.; de Podesta, M.

    2011-02-01

    We describe the dimensional characterization of copper quasisphere NPL-Cranfield 2. The quasisphere is assembled from two hemispheres such that the internal shape is a triaxial ellipsoid, the major axes of which have nominal radii 62.000 mm, 62.031 mm and 62.062 mm. The artefact has been manufactured using diamond-turning technology and shows a deviation from design form of less than 1 m over most of its surface. Our characterization involves both coordinate measuring machine (CMM) experiments and microwave resonance spectroscopy. We have sought to reduce the dimensional uncertainty below the maximum permissible error of the CMM by comparative measurements with silicon and Zerodur spheres of known volume. Using this technique we determined the equivalent radius with an uncertainty of u(k = 1) = 114 nm, a fractional uncertainty of 1.8 parts in 106. Due to anisotropy of the probe response, we could only determine the eccentricities of the quasihemispheres with a fractional uncertainty of approximately 2%. Our microwave characterization uses the TM11 to TM18 resonances. We find the equivalent radius inferred from analysis of these modes to be consistent within 4 nm with an overall uncertainty u(k = 1) = 11 nm. We discuss corrections for surface conductivity, waveguide perturbations and dielectric surface layers. We find that the CMM radius estimates derived from each hemisphere cannot be used to accurately predict the equivalent radius of the assembled resonator for two reasons. Firstly, the equatorial flanges are flat only to within 1 m, leading to an equatorial 'gap' whose dimension cannot be reliably estimated. Secondly, the resonator undergoes significant elastic distortion when the bolts connecting the hemispheres are tightened. We provide CMM and microwave measurements to support these conclusions in addition to finite-element modelling. Finally, we consider the implications of this work on a forthcoming experiment to determine the Boltzmann constant with a relative uncertainty below 1 part in 106.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Techniques Applied to the Diagnosis and Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Celis Alonso, Benito; Hidalgo-Tobón, Silvia S.; Menéndez-González, Manuel; Salas-Pacheco, José; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) affects at least 10 million people worldwide. It is a neurodegenerative disease, which is currently diagnosed by neurological examination. No neuroimaging investigation or blood biomarker is available to aid diagnosis and prognosis. Most effort toward diagnosis using magnetic resonance (MR) has been focused on the use of structural/anatomical neuroimaging and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). However, deep brain stimulation, a current strategy for treating PD, is guided by MR imaging (MRI). For clinical prognosis, diagnosis, and follow-up investigations, blood oxygen level-dependent MRI, DTI, spectroscopy, and transcranial magnetic stimulation have been used. These techniques represent the state of the art in the last 5 years. Here, we focus on MR techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26191037

  20. Biochemical component identification by light scattering techniques in whispering gallery mode optical resonance based sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saetchnikov, Vladimir A.; Tcherniavskaia, Elina A.; Saetchnikov, Anton V.; Schweiger, Gustav; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Experimental data on detection and identification of variety of biochemical agents, such as proteins (albumin, interferon, C reactive protein), microelements (Na+, Ca+), antibiotic of different generations, in both single and multi component solutions under varied in wide range concentration are represented. Analysis has been performed on the light scattering parameters of whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonance based sensor with dielectric microspheres from glass and PMMA as sensitive elements fixed by spin - coating techniques in adhesive layer on the surface of substrate or directly on the coupling element. Sensitive layer was integrated into developed fluidic cell with a digital syringe. Light from tuneable laser strict focusing on and scattered by the single microsphere was detected by a CMOS camera. The image was filtered for noise reduction and integrated on two coordinates for evaluation of integrated energy of a measured signal. As the entrance data following signal parameters were used: relative (to a free spectral range) spectral shift of frequency of WGM optical resonance in microsphere and relative efficiency of WGM excitation obtained within a free spectral range which depended on both type and concentration of investigated agents. Multiplexing on parameters and components has been realized using spatial and spectral parameters of scattered by microsphere light with developed data processing. Biochemical component classification and identification of agents under investigation has been performed by network analysis techniques based on probabilistic network and multilayer perceptron. Developed approach is demonstrated to be applicable both for single agent and for multi component biochemical analysis.

  1. Fiber optic profenofos sensor based on surface plasmon resonance technique and molecular imprinting.

    PubMed

    Shrivastav, Anand M; Usha, Sruthi P; Gupta, Banshi D

    2016-05-15

    A successful approach for the fabrication and characterization of an optical fiber sensor for the detection of profenofos based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and molecular imprinting is introduced. Molecular imprinting technology is used for the creation of three dimensional binding sites having complementary shape and size of the specific template molecule over a polymer for the recognition of the same. Binding of template molecule with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) layer results in the change in the dielectric nature of the sensing surface (polymer) and is identified by SPR technique. Spectral interrogation method is used for the characterization of the sensing probe. The operating profenofos concentration range of the sensor is from 10(-4) to 10(-1)µg/L. A red shift of 18.7nm in resonance wavelength is recorded for this profenofos concentration range. The maximum sensitivity of the sensor is 12.7nm/log (µg/L) at 10(-4)µg/L profenofos concentration. Limit of detection (LOD) of the sensor is found to be 2.5×10(-6)µg/L. Selectivity measurements predict the probe highly selective for the profenofos molecule. Besides high sensitivity due to SPR technique and selectivity due to molecular imprinting, proposed sensor has numerous other advantages like immunity to electromagnetic interference, fast response, low cost and capability of online monitoring and remote sensing of analyte due to the fabrication of the probe on optical fiber. PMID:26706813

  2. Temperature and baric dependence of nuclear quadruple resonance spectra in indium and gallium monoselenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandozhko, Victor; Raranskii, Nikolai; Balazjuk, Vitaly; Samila, Andriy; Kovalyuk, Zahar

    2013-12-01

    Pulsed radiospectroscopy method has been used to study nuclear quadruple resonance (NQR) spectra of 69Ga and 115In isotopes in the layered semiconductors GaSe and InSe. It has been found that in GaSe and InSe there is a considerable temperature dependence of NQR frequency which in the temperature range of 250 to 390 K is practically linear with conversion slope 1.54 kHz/degree for 69Ga and 2.35 kHz/degree for 115In. In the same crystals the effect of uniaxial pressure on NQR spectra applied along the optical axis с up to the values of 500 kg/сm2 has been studied. A strong attenuation of NQR spectra intensity with increase in pressure on layered crystal package has been established. The unvaried multiplicity of resonance spectra indicates the absence of structural transformations in these layered crystals over the investigated range of temperatures and pressures.

  3. Detection of Bacterial Magnetofossils with Ferromagnetic Resonance and Rock Magnetic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, J. L.; Kim, S.; Weiss, B.

    2001-12-01

    Intracellular biomineralization of magnetite is a biochemical process used by members of the Bacteria, Protist, and Animal kingdoms, and the fossil remains of this process on Earth (termed magnetofossils) have been documented in sediments as old as the ~2 Byr Gunflint Chert. Magnetofossils 4 Byr old have also been reported from carbonates in the Martian meteorite ALH84001; if this interpretation is correct, they represent the oldest evidence for life yet found. Past techniques for identification of bacterial magnetofossils have relied on the use of particle extraction and high-resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM). Because these techniques are time-consuming and fairly complex, they are not appropriate for screening large volumes of sediments on Earth and could not be used remotely on a Martian lander. For this reason, we have been testing a variety of ferromagnetic resonance and low-temperature rock magnetic techniques to determine if they are capable of identifying correctly rock samples known to contain abundant magnetofossils. An instrument capable of making such a determination, if deployed on the Martian surface, could be extraordinarily valuable for selecting samples for return to Earth. Several features of the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra have signatures only displayed by pure samples of magnetite from the magnetotactic bacteria, and from samples known to contain abundant magnetofossils. These unique features apparently arise from the elongated shape and narrow size distribution of the single-domain magnetite produced by these bacteria. Preliminary results from ALH84001 carbonates also have these features. We are also currently obtaining FMR spectra and low-temperature rock magnetic data on samples of Archean and Early Proterozoic sediments from Australia to search for older evidence of intracellular magnetite biomineralization on Earth.

  4. 105Pd NMR/NQR studies in UPd 2Al 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, K.; Kohori, Y.; Kohara, T.

    1999-01-01

    105Pd NMR and NQR measurements have been performed both in the normal and in the superconducting states for UPd 2Al 3. In the antiferromagnetically (AF) ordered state, the small internal field of about 3 kOe (at 4.2 K), which is perpendicular to the c-axis, appears below 14.5 K and does not decrease in the superconducting state. The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/ T1, in UPd 2Al 3 is nearly temperature, T, independent in the paramagnetic state up to 60 K, successively diverges at Nel temperature associated with the critical slowing down of U magnetic moments, and then decreases markedly in the AF ordered state. In the superconducting state, 1/ T1 decreases in proportion to T3 down to 0.4 K with no coherence peak just below TC, which indicates the occurrence of anisotropic superconductivity having line nodes in the superconducting energy gap.

  5. 35Cl NQR Study of Thermoactivated Motions of Nitro Groups in Picryl Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyuntsel, Igor A.

    1996-06-01

    The temperature dependences of the 35Cl NQR frequency (ν), spin-lattice relaxation time (T1), and spin-spin relaxation time (T2) have been studied in 2,4,6-trinitrochlorobenzene (picryl chloride) from 77 K up to the melting point (354 K). The T1(T) curve exhibits a pronounced composite mimimum near 300 K which gives evidence for the reorientations of the two ortho-NO2 groups around their two-fold symmetry axes with the activation energies of 27.4 kJ mol - 1 and 31.2 kJ mol - 1. These values can be related to the ortho-NO2 groups having the twist angles of 33° and 81°, respectively (the crystal structure of picryl chloride is known). The T2(T) dependence exhibits interesting features, too: a deep minimum about 140 K and a new rapid decrease above 270 K.

  6. Disbond Detection Technique for Liner/propellant Interface Using Ultrasonic Resonance and Lamb Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Ryun; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    Adhesive interface tests using ultrasonic waves are far superior to other nondestructive tests for detecting the disbond interface. However, a multilayered structure consisting of a steel case, rubber insulation, liner, and propellant poses many difficulties for analyzing ultrasonic waves because of the superposition of the reflected waves and the large differences in the acoustic impedances of the various materials. Therefore, ultrasonic tests for detecting the disbond interface of multilayered structures have been applied in very limited areas between the steel case and rubber insulation using an automatic system. The existing ultrasonic test cannot detect the disbond interface between the rubber and propellant of a multilayered structure because most of the ultrasonic waves are absorbed in the rubber material, which has low acoustic impedance. This problem could be overcome by amplifying the ultrasonic waves using the ultrasonic resonance method. The Lamb waves were used to evaluate the instability of the ultrasonic waves caused by the contact condition on the surface of the multilayered structure. In this paper, a new technique to detect the disbond interface between the liner and propellant using the property of ultrasonic resonance and Lamb waves is discussed in detail.

  7. Development of a dispersive read-out technique for quantum measurements of nanomechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouxinol, Francisco; Lahaye, Matthew; Hao, Hugo; Shim, Seung-Bo

    2013-03-01

    Over the last decade, there has been an active effort to prepare and measure mechanical structures in the quantum regime for the purpose of sensing weak forces and for studying fundamental topics in quantum mechanics such as quantum measurement, entanglement and decoherence in new macroscopic limits. One promsing tool for such studies is the qubit-coupled mechanical resonator. In this work we discuss some of our first results towards the development of a nanoelectromechanical system that integrates a charge-type superconducting qubit as a detector to probe the number-states of a nanomechanical mode. In our system the qubit-coupled nanoresonator is embedded in a superconducting microwave resonator (SMR); the SMR then serves to perform spectroscopic measurements of the qubit to infer the number-state statistics of the nanoresonator in a manner analogous to dispersive measurement techniques used in circuit and cavity QED to probe the number-states of electromagnetic cavities. We will discuss the design and measurement of our latest generation devices and the prospects for achieving single-phonon measurement resolution with this system. This work is supported by NSF-DMR Career Award 1056423 and funding from the College of Arts and Sciences at Syracuse University.

  8. Three-dimensional electron paramagnetic resonance imaging technique for mapping porosity in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Kordas, G.; Kang, Y.H. )

    1991-04-01

    This paper reports on a three-dimensional (3D) electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) method which was developed to probe the structure and size of pores in ceramic materials. The imaging device that was added to the EPR instrument consisted of a computer-controlled current source and magnetic field gradient. This add-on facility was tested using a well-defined diphenlpicrylhydrazzyl phantom sample. Pumice was then used to demonstrate the potential of the technique. This stone was immersed in a 0.5 mm {sup 15}N-substituted per-deutereted tempone water solution to fill the pores with spin labels. Images were reconstructed using a filtered back-projection technique. A two-dimensional (2D) imaging plane was constructed by collecting 33 projection planes over 180 {degrees}. A 3D image was derived from 22 planes each constructed by 22 projections. At present, the facility allows a resolution of 69 and 46 {mu}m for 2D and 3D imaging, respectively. Advancements of the imaging apparatus, software, and line width of the spin labels will be needed to enhance the resolution of this technique.

  9. Implant stability evaluation by resonance frequency analysis in the fit lock technique. A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Falisi, Giovanni; Galli, Massimo; Velasquez, Pedro Vittorini; Rivera, Juan Carlos Gallegos; Di Paolo, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Surgical procedures for the application of implants in the lateral-superior sectors are affected by the availability of the residual bone. When this condition is lower than 5 mm it is recommended that techniques involving two therapeutic phases, a reconstructive and an applicative one, as reported in the international literature, are adopted. The authors propose here a new method with the potential to apply implants simultaneously with the reconstructive phase. The aim of this longitudinal retrospective study was to evaluate the stability of implants applied with the fit lock technique in the upper maxillarys in us with bone availability lower than 4 mm by measuring resonance frequency at different follow-up periods The seme as urements, carried out on 30 implants, were analysed with specific statistical procedures. The results indicate that the stability of the implants inserted with the fit lock method increases progressively over time in a statistically significant manner. The stability recorded after one year from the insertion (ISQ T2) is significantly higher than that recorded after six months (ISQ T1), and this is significantly higher than that recorded at the time of implant placement (ISQ T0). The implants inserted in the maxillary zones with scarce bone availability and applied with this technique showed a similar stability as reported with other techniques. In light of the results, the authors confirm that the primary stability represents the basic requirement to guarantee a correct healing of the implant and demonstrate that the fit lock technique also all ows reaching this condition when bone availability is minimal. PMID:23991271

  10. Resonant charge transfer in He/+/-He collisions studied with the merging-beams technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rundel, R. D.; Nitz, D. E.; Smith, K. A.; Geis, M. W.; Stebbings, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Absolute cross sections are reported for the resonant charge-transfer reaction He(+) + He yields He + He(+) at collision energies between 0.1 and 187 eV. The results, obtained using a new merging-beam apparatus are in agreement both with theory and with measurements made using other experimental techniques. The experimentally determined cross sections between 0.5 and 187 eV fall about a line given by sigma exp 1/2(sq-A) = 5.09-2.99 lnW, where W is the collision energy in eV. Considerable attention is paid to the configuration and operation of the apparatus. Tests and calculations which confirm the interpretation of the experimental data in a merging-beam experiment are discussed.

  11. Demonstration of the stabilization technique for nonplanar optical resonant cavities utilizing polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Akagi, T.; Araki, S.; Funahashi, Y.; Honda, Y.; Okugi, T.; Omori, T.; Shimizu, H.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Miyoshi, S.; Takahashi, T. Tanaka, R.; Uesugi, Y.; Yoshitama, H.; Sakaue, K.; Washio, M.

    2015-04-15

    Based on our previously developed scheme to stabilize nonplanar optical resonant cavities utilizing polarization caused by a geometric phase in electromagnetic waves traveling along a twisted path, we report an application of the technique for a cavity installed in the Accelerator Test Facility, a 1.3-GeV electron beam accelerator at KEK, in which photons are generated by laser-Compton scattering. We successfully achieved a power enhancement of 1200 with 1.4% fluctuation, which means that the optical path length of the cavity has been controlled with a precision of 14 pm under an accelerator environment. In addition, polarization switching utilizing a geometric phase of the nonplanar cavity was demonstrated.

  12. Demonstration of the stabilization technique for nonplanar optical resonant cavities utilizing polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, T.; Araki, S.; Funahashi, Y.; Honda, Y.; Miyoshi, S.; Okugi, T.; Omori, T.; Shimizu, H.; Sakaue, K.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, R.; Terunuma, N.; Uesugi, Y.; Urakawa, J.; Washio, M.; Yoshitama, H.

    2015-04-01

    Based on our previously developed scheme to stabilize nonplanar optical resonant cavities utilizing polarization caused by a geometric phase in electromagnetic waves traveling along a twisted path, we report an application of the technique for a cavity installed in the Accelerator Test Facility, a 1.3-GeV electron beam accelerator at KEK, in which photons are generated by laser-Compton scattering. We successfully achieved a power enhancement of 1200 with 1.4% fluctuation, which means that the optical path length of the cavity has been controlled with a precision of 14 pm under an accelerator environment. In addition, polarization switching utilizing a geometric phase of the nonplanar cavity was demonstrated.

  13. Evaluation of Possible Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Diagnostic Techniques for Tokamak Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Zweben; T.W. Kornack; D. Majeski; G. Schilling; C.H. Skinner; R. Wilson

    2002-08-05

    Potential applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diagnostic techniques to tokamak experiments are evaluated. NMR frequencies for hydrogen isotopes and low-Z nuclei in such experiments are in the frequency range approximately equal to 20-200 MHz, so existing RF [radio-frequency] antennas could be used to rotate the spin polarization and to make the NMR measurements. Our tentative conclusion is that such measurements are possible if highly spin polarized H or (superscript)3He gas sources (which exist) are used to fuel these plasmas. In addition, NMR measurements of the surface layers of the first wall (without plasma) may also be possible, e.g., to evaluate the inventory of tritium inside the vessel.

  14. Complimentary effect of yogic sound resonance relaxation technique in patients with common neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Yogitha, Bali; Nagarathna, R; John, Ebnezar; Nagendra, HR

    2010-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown that conventional treatment methods with drugs, physiotherapy and exercises for common neck pain (CNP) may be inadequate. Yoga techniques have been found to be effective complimentary therapies in chronic low back pain and also for stress reduction in other diseases. Objective: The aim of the study was to examine the complimentary role of a yogic relaxation called mind sound resonance technique (MSRT) in non-surgical management of CNP. Materials and Methods: In this randomized controlled study, 60 patients with CNP were assigned to two groups (yoga, n=30) and (control, n=30). The yoga group received yogic MSRT for 20 minutes in supine position after the conventional physiotherapy program for 30 minutes using pre-recorded audio CD and the control group had non-guided supine rest for 20 minutes (after physiotherapy), for 10 days. MSRT provides deep relaxation for both mind and body by introspective experience of the sound resonance in the whole body while repeating the syllables A, U, M and Om and a long chant (Mahamrityunjaya mantra) several times in a meaningful sequence. Both the groups had pre and post assessments using visual pain analog scale, tenderness scoring key, neck disability score (NDS) questionnaire, goniometric measurement of cervical spinal flexibility, and state and trait anxiety inventory-Y1 (STAI-Y1). Results: Mann-Whitney U test showed significant difference between groups in pain (P<0.01), tenderness (P<0.01), neck movements (P<0.01). NDS (P<0.01) and state anxiety (STAI-Y1) showed higher reduction in yoga (P<0.01) than that in the control group. Wilcoxons test showed a significant improvement in both groups on all variables (P<0.01). Conclusions: Yoga relaxation through MSRT adds significant complimentary benefits to conventional physiotherapy for CNP by reducing pain, tenderness, disability and state anxiety and providing improved flexibility. PMID:20948897

  15. Application of Pulse Techniques to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Oriented Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Herbert Reginald

    This thesis is based on an experimental study in nuclear orientation NMR in which the radio frequency field was applied in the form of pulses or pulse sequences. The experiments described represent the development and subsequent applications of the techniques of pulsed single passage NMR/ON, pulsed NMR/ON, spin echo NMR/ON and pulsed FM (frequency modulated) NMR/ON. In order to develop these new techniques an adiabatic demagnetization cryostat with base temperature down to 4 mK and useful cryogenic run time of up to 14 hours was built and a variety of RF pulse circuits centred around a 1 kW broadband amplifier also developed. The techniques were applied to samples of ('60)Co in polycrystalline iron. The resonant processes were observed via the effects of the RF field upon the ('60)Co gamma anisotropy. The experiments have shown that large resonant effects can be produced by intense RF pulses without excessive eddy current heating. In the case of pulsed single passage NMR/ON it is shown that high intensity pulsed sweeps can provide an estimate of the quadrupole interaction strength for a random distribution of EFG's and can also provide useful qualitative information on the strength of the nuclear spin spin interaction. It is also shown that the pulsed FM and pulsed single passage techniques adequately compensate for reduction in the ferromagnetic enhancement factor with increasing applied magnetic field thereby allowing the first unambiguous measurement of an impurity Knight shift (('60)CoFe, K = 1.5 (+OR-) 0.4%). It is also shown that the classic pulse sequences of conventional pulsed NMR, providing quantitative measurements of the nuclear spin spin relaxation time T(,2) and spin lattice relaxation time T(,1), can be applied to nuclear orientation samples through the application of one additional pulse, thus affording a sensitivity enhancement of six to seven orders of magnitude over conventional pulsed NMR on stable isotopes. The spin echo NMR/ON experiments provide a direct measurement of the irreversible dephasing of the ('60)Co spins and it is found that this is 5 (+OR-) 3 ms.

  16. Further Evaluation of the Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) Technique for Assaying Plutonium in Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    J. W. Sterbentz; D. L. Chichester

    2011-09-01

    This is an end-of-year report (Fiscal Year (FY) 2011) for the second year of effort on a project funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241). The goal of this project is to investigate the feasibility of using Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) to assay plutonium in commercial light-water-reactor spent fuel. This project is part of a larger research effort within the Next-Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) to evaluate methods for assaying plutonium in spent fuel, the Plutonium Assay Challenge. The second-year goals for this project included: (1) assessing the neutron source strength needed for the NRTA technique, (2) estimating count times, (3) assessing the effect of temperature on the transmitted signal, (4) estimating plutonium content in a spent fuel assembly, (5) providing a preliminary assessment of the neutron detectors, and (6) documenting this work in an end of the year report (this report). Research teams at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and at several universities are also working to investigate plutonium assay methods for spent-fuel safeguards. While the NRTA technique is well proven in the scientific literature for assaying individual spent fuel pins, it is a newcomer to the current NGSI efforts studying Pu assay method techniques having just started in March 2010; several analytical techniques have been under investigation within this program for two to three years or more. This report summarizes work performed over a nine month period from January-September 2011 and is to be considered a follow-on or add-on report to our previous published summary report from December 2010 (INL/EXT-10-20620).

  17. NQR study of local structures and cooling rate dependent superconductivity in La sub 2 CuO sub 4+. delta

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, A.P.; Ahrens, E.T.; Hammel, P.C.; Heffner, R.H.; Thompson, J.D.; Canfield, P.C.; Fisk, Z. ); Schirber, J.E. )

    1992-01-01

    Structural properties of oxygen-annealed polycrystals of La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4 + {delta}} ({delta}{approximately}0.03) have been studied using {sup 139}La NQR spectroscopy. Superconducting critical temperatures were found to depend on the rate of cooling through a narrow temperature range at about 195K. Preliminary analysis of the {sup 139}La NQR spectra suggest that the oxygen-rich phase-separated region is composed of two structurally distinct phases, both of which are metallic and super-conducting. One phase has a structure closely related to the stoichiometric oxygen-poor compound. The second shows a considerable amount of apical oxygen disorder, a large shift in NQR frequency {nu}{sub Q}, and a volume fraction which increases with cooling rate. The formation of the second phase below {minus}200K is indicative of the freezing Of CuO{sub 6} octahedral tilting. Abrupt shifts in {nu}{sub Q} above {Tc} were also observed for both phases, suggestive of a local structural anomaly or charge transfer to the Cu-O plane.

  18. Sedimentary rock porosity studied by electromagnetic techniques: nuclear magnetic resonance and dielectric permittivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramia, M. E.; Martn, C. A.

    2015-02-01

    The present work involves a comprehensive experimental study of porosity and pore size distribution of sedimentary rocks, from oil fields formations, by means of two electromagnetic techniques, namely proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and dielectric complex constant (DCC) as function of the frequency, both providing complementary results. The NMR yields an accurate determination of the relative pore size distribution and both movable and irreducible fluids. The DCC measurement provides the direct current electrical resistivity of the samples with different degrees of hydration. Thus, combining the results of both techniques allows the determination of the tortuosity index, by means of Archie's relation, and from it the average pore channel length. These measurements are performed on fully hydrated (saturated), centrifuged, dried, and cleaned rocks and also on samples with the irreducible fluids. Finally, the results are complemented with capillary pressure measurements to obtain the total volume associated with the pore channels related to the rock permeability. Additionally, the work presents a particular method to use a network analyzer to measure the DCC.

  19. Optical properties of WO{sub 3} thin films using surface plasmon resonance technique

    SciTech Connect

    Paliwal, Ayushi; Sharma, Anjali; Gupta, Vinay E-mail: vgupta@physics.du.ac.in; Tomar, Monika

    2014-01-28

    Indigenously assembled surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique has been exploited to study the thickness dependent dielectric properties of WO{sub 3} thin films. WO{sub 3} thin films (80 nm to 200 nm) have been deposited onto gold (Au) coated glass prism by sputtering technique. The structural, optical properties and surface morphology of the deposited WO{sub 3} thin films were studied using X-ray diffraction, UV-visible spectrophotometer, Raman spectroscopy, and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XRD analysis shows that all the deposited WO{sub 3} thin films are exhibiting preferred (020) orientation and Raman data indicates that the films possess single phase monoclinic structure. SEM images reveal the variation in grain size with increase in thickness. The SPR reflectance curves of the WO{sub 3}/Au/prism structure were utilized to estimate the dielectric properties of WO{sub 3} thin films at optical frequency (λ = 633 nm). As the thickness of WO{sub 3} thin film increases from 80 nm to 200 nm, the dielectric constant is seen to be decreasing from 5.76 to 3.42, while the dielectric loss reduces from 0.098 to 0.01. The estimated value of refractive index of WO{sub 3} film is in agreement to that obtained from UV-visible spectroscopy studies. The strong dispersion in refractive index is observed with wavelength of incident laser light.

  20. Updates in advanced diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging techniques in the evaluation of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Lawrence, Edward Malnor; Mazaheri, Yousef; Sala, Evis

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) is considered part of the standard imaging protocol for the evaluation of patients with prostate cancer. It has been proven valuable as a functional tool for qualitative and quantitative analysis of prostate cancer beyond anatomical MRI sequences such as T2-weighted imaging. This review discusses ongoing controversies in DW-MRI acquisition, including the optimal number of b-values to be used for prostate DWI, and summarizes the current literature on the use of advanced DW-MRI techniques. These include intravoxel incoherent motion imaging, which better accounts for the non-mono-exponential behavior of the apparent diffusion coefficient as a function of b-value and the influence of perfusion at low b-values. Another technique is diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI). Metrics from DKI reflect excess kurtosis of tissues, representing its deviation from Gaussian diffusion behavior. Preliminary results suggest that DKI findings may have more value than findings from conventional DW-MRI for the assessment of prostate cancer. PMID:26339460

  1. Use of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Stephane; Renard, Felix; Achard, Sophie; Lana-Peixoto, Marco A; Palace, Jacqueline; Asgari, Nasrin; Klawiter, Eric C; Tenembaum, Silvia N; Banwell, Brenda; Greenberg, Benjamin M; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Levy, Michael; Villoslada, Pablo; Saiz, Albert; Fujihara, Kazuo; Chan, Koon Ho; Schippling, Sven; Paul, Friedemann; Kim, Ho Jin; de Seze, Jerome; Wuerfel, Jens T; Cabre, Philippe; Marignier, Romain; Tedder, Thomas; van Pelt, Danielle; Broadley, Simon; Chitnis, Tanuja; Wingerchuk, Dean; Pandit, Lekha; Leite, Maria Isabel; Apiwattanakul, Metha; Kleiter, Ingo; Prayoonwiwat, Naraporn; Han, May; Hellwig, Kerstin; van Herle, Katja; John, Gareth; Hooper, D Craig; Nakashima, Ichiro; Sato, Douglas; Yeaman, Michael R; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Zamvil, Scott; Stve, Olaf; Aktas, Orhan; Smith, Terry J; Jacob, Anu; O'Connor, Kevin

    2015-07-01

    Brain parenchymal lesions are frequently observed on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorder, but the specific morphological and temporal patterns distinguishing them unequivocally from lesions caused by other disorders have not been identified. This literature review summarizes the literature on advanced quantitative imaging measures reported for patients with NMO spectrum disorder, including proton MR spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetization transfer imaging, quantitative MR volumetry, and ultrahigh-field strength MRI. It was undertaken to consider the advanced MRI techniques used for patients with NMO by different specialists in the field. Although quantitative measures such as proton MR spectroscopy or magnetization transfer imaging have not reproducibly revealed diffuse brain injury, preliminary data from diffusion-weighted imaging and brain tissue volumetry indicate greater white matter than gray matter degradation. These findings could be confirmed by ultrahigh-field MRI. The use of nonconventional MRI techniques may further our understanding of the pathogenic processes in NMO spectrum disorders and may help us identify the distinct radiographic features corresponding to specific phenotypic manifestations of this disease. PMID:26010909

  2. [The abilities of the electron paramagnetic resonance technique to diagnose urological cancers].

    PubMed

    Ibragimova, M I; Chushnikov, A I; Moiseev, V N; Petukhov, V Iu; Zheglov, E P

    2011-03-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique was used to study the venous blood levels of Fe(3+)-transferrin (Fe(3+)-TF) and Cu(2+)-ceruloplasmin (Cu(2+)-CP) in three different groups: donors, outpatients, and patients with Stages I-IV bladder and kidney cancer. The anemia-related range of concentrations of paramagnetic centers Fe(3+)-TF was determined, which corresponded to the hemoglobin levels below the normal physiological value (< or = 120 g/l). It was found that the blood concentration of Cu(2+)-TCP exceeded the normal value in the donors and outpatients who had anemia whereas it increased up to abnormally high values in anemic cancer virtually always due to the enhanced synthesis of CP. Simultaneous monitoring of Fe(3+)-TF and Cu(2+)-CP levels may serve as a basis for the rapid diagnosis of cancers by the technique EPR even in the early stage of the tumor process. The method may be also used to predict the course of the disease and to screen anemic patients. PMID:21574457

  3. Structural and Functional Investigation of Flavin Binding Center of the NqrC Subunit of Sodium-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase from Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Bertsova, Yulia; Polovinkin, Vitaly; Gushchin, Ivan; Ishchenko, Andrii; Kovalev, Kirill; Mishin, Alexey; Kachalova, Galina; Popov, Alexander; Bogachev, Alexander; Gordeliy, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQR) is a redox-driven sodium pump operating in the respiratory chain of various bacteria, including pathogenic species. The enzyme has a unique set of redox active prosthetic groups, which includes two covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) residues attached to threonine residues in subunits NqrB and NqrC. The reason of FMN covalent bonding in the subunits has not been established yet. In the current work, binding of free FMN to the apo-form of NqrC from Vibrio harveyi was studied showing very low affinity of NqrC to FMN in the absence of its covalent bonding. To study structural aspects of flavin binding in NqrC, its holo-form was crystallized and its 3D structure was solved at 1.56 resolution. It was found that the isoalloxazine moiety of the FMN residue is buried in a hydrophobic cavity and that its pyrimidine ring is squeezed between hydrophobic amino acid residues while its benzene ring is extended from the protein surroundings. This structure of the flavin-binding pocket appears to provide flexibility of the benzene ring, which can help the FMN residue to take the bended conformation and thus to stabilize the one-electron reduced form of the prosthetic group. These properties may also lead to relatively weak noncovalent binding of the flavin. This fact along with periplasmic location of the FMN-binding domains in the vast majority of NqrC-like proteins may explain the necessity of the covalent bonding of this prosthetic group to prevent its loss to the external medium. PMID:25734798

  4. Understanding and controlling spin-systems using electron spin resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Mathew

    Single molecule magnets (SMMs) posses multi-level energy structures with properties that make them attractive candidates for implementation into quantum information technologies. However there are some major hurdles that need to be overcome if these systems are to be used as the fundamental components of an eventual quantum computer. One such hurdle is the relatively short coherence times these systems display which severely limits the amount of time quantum information can remain encoded within them. In this dissertation, recent experiments conducted with the intent of bringing this technology closer to realization are presented. The detailed knowledge of the spin Hamiltonian and mechanisms of decoherence in SMMs are absolutely essential if these systems are to be used in technologies. To that effect, experiments were done on a particularly promising SMM, the complex K6[VIV15AsIII 6O42(H2O)] · 8H2O, known as V15. High-field electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements were performed on this system at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. The resulting spectra allowed for detailed analysis of the V15 spin Hamiltonian which will be presented as well as the most precise values yet reported for the g-factors of this system. Additionally, the line widths of the ESR spectra are studied in depth and found to reveal that fluctuations within the spin-orbit interaction are a mechanism for decoherence in V15. A new model for decoherence is presented that describes very well both the temperature and field orientation dependences of the measured ESR line widths. Also essential is the ability to control spin-states of SMMs. Presented in this dissertation as well is the demonstration of the coherent manipulation of the multi-state spin system Mn2+ diluted in MgO by means of a two-tone pulse drive. Through the detuning between the excitation and readout radio frequency pulses it is possible to select the number of photons involved in a Rabi oscillation as well as increase the frequency of this nutation. Experimental findings fit well the analytical model developed. This process could lead to the use of multi-level spin systems as tunable solid state qubits. Finally, if quantum computing technologies are to be commercially realized, an on-chip method to address qubits must be developed. One way to incorporate SMMs to an on-chip device is by way of a coplanar waveguide (CPW) resonator. Efforts to create a resonator of this type to be used to perform low-temperature ESR on-chip will be described. Our work is focused on implementing such on-chip techniques in high magnetic fields, which is desirable for ESR-type of experiments in (quasi-)isotropic spin systems. Considerable attention is given to the coupling of these devices and a geometry is presented for a superconducting CPW resonator that is critically coupled. The effect of the magnetic field on the resonance position and its quality factor is addressed as well. Our devices show robust performance in field upwards of 1 Tesla and their use in performing on-chip ESR measurements seem promising.

  5. Breast Biopsies Under Magnetic Resonance Imaging Guidance: Challenges of an Essential but Imperfect Technique.

    PubMed

    Chevrier, Marie-Claude; David, Julie; Khoury, Mona El; Lalonde, Lucie; Labelle, Maude; Trop, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided breast biopsy is an essential tool of a breast imager; yet, a decade after its introduction, this technique remains challenging and imperfect. This article presents the technique of MRI-guided biopsy, with an emphasis on challenges particular to the technique: technical considerations related to adequate lesion sampling and difficulties in confirming radiologic-pathologic correlation for enhancing lesions. Through clinical vignettes, challenges unique to MRI-guided biopsy are discussed and practical tips are offered. Prebiopsy planning including second-look targeted studies, patient preparation, and equipment is covered. Challenging situations pertaining to breast size, lesion location, or type of enhancement are illustrated, as well as the topic of performing multiple MRI-guided breast biopsies in a single session and biopsies of women with implants. Postbiopsy management is discussed. Success of MRI-guided biopsies requires careful prebiopsy planning, as well as appropriate choice of biopsy device, optimized for the specifics of breast shape and lesion size and location. Special features of biopsy systems (smaller apertures and blunt tips) facilitate the sampling of lesions in challenging locations. Vanishing lesions should undergo short-term follow-up, because malignancy cannot be excluded, as should lesions diagnosed as benign after pathologic analysis when the result is felt to be concordant with imaging features. To this end, radiologic-pathologic correlation is essential. Underestimation rates after MRI-guided breast biopsy are superior to those for vacuum-assisted stereotactic biopsy and ultrasound-guided biopsy. Close follow-up and rebiopsy should be considered when there is imaging-discordant histology. For benign and concordant histology, a first follow-up can be offered at 6 months. PMID:26272705

  6. Study of a defect detection accuracy of a granite nondestructive resonance technique based on a laser interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pod?orny, Tomasz; Budzy?, Grzegorz; Rzepka, Janusz; Tkaczyk, Jakub

    2014-05-01

    A nondestructive testing technique based on a resonance approach and a laser interferometer device is introduced in the presented paper. It utilizes a not synchronized with an acquisition device and low power excitation source. Induced vibrations are acquired using high resolution laser interferometer in a configuration of a vibrometer. As a result, the test equipment is significantly simplified and tailored to the industry requirements. Sample evaluation process is based on a processing that fits lowest order resonance frequencies to p-wave and s-wave frequencies. Obtained velocities are used to fit higher order resonance frequencies present in the response with positions and lengths of resonators formed by cracks or flaws. Presented research focuses on an assessment of accuracy and sensitivity of the introduced method. Performed measurements revealed that it is possible to obtain decent parameters for industry applications.

  7. Electrochemical surface plasmon resonance measurement based on gold nanohole array fabricated by nanoimprinting technique.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Kohei; Kurita, Ryoji; Niwa, Osamu

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we describe our development of an electrochemical surface plasmon resonance (EC-SPR) measurement device based on a bottom-filled gold nanohole array. The polymer based gold nanohole array was fabricated with a UV nanoimprint technique and electron beam gold deposition. Direct reflection mode measurement was used to monitor the SPR dip in the reflection spectra. A cyclic voltammogram was also operated by using the standard three electrodes containing working electrode having a gold nanohole array and counter and reference electrodes. The gold nanohole array was modified with an osmium-poly(vinylpyridine)-wired horseradish peroxidase (Os-gel-HRP) film, and its redox state induced by the change in potential was monitored simultaneously. The redox state of the local film was obtained simply by scanning the sample substrate stage. The substrate modified with Os-gel-HRP film was incorporated in a microfluidic chip, and then the hydrogen peroxide was determined in terms of the redox change in the Os complex mediator from the slope of the SPR dip shift. The linear relation of hydrogen peroxide from 10 to 250 ?M was successfully monitored, and a high conversion efficiency was realized. PMID:22283116

  8. Magnetic resonanceguided percutaneous cryosurgery of breast carcinoma: technique and early clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Jacques; Traor, Amidou; Dionne, Guy; Dumont, Marcel; Fouquette, Bertrand; Dufour, Marie; Cloutier, Sonia; Moisan, Christian

    2004-01-01

    Purpose This phase I study was designed to demonstrate the feasibility, safety, efficacy and predictability of percutaneous cryosurgery, guided under magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, in the treatment of invasive breast carcinoma. Patients and methods Under the guidance of nearreal-time T1-weighted FSE images of a 0.5-T open-configuration MR system, percutaneous cryosurgery was performed in 25 patients with operable invasive breast carcinoma, 4 weeks prior to their scheduled mastectomy. Predictive assessments by interventional radiologists using 4 breast-imaging techniques (mammography, sonography, scintigraphy and MR) were correlated with postmastectomy results of histopathology and assessed for predictability. Local and systemic morbidity were also evaluated during the month of follow-up preceding mastectomy. Results Percutaneous cryosurgery resulted in no serious complications, either local or systemic. All tumoural tissues included in the cryogenic iceball were destroyed, with no viable histologic residues. Ablation was total in 13 of the 25 tumours treated. Combining periprocedural MR images with postprocedure scintimammographic findings enabled a 96% rate for predicting the cryosurgical results. Conclusions MR-guided cryosurgery of breast carcinoma is feasible, safe and efficient, with predictable results. Major drawbacks are that the cryolesion (a palpable iceball) persists for a month or more after the procedure, undermining the reliability of the physical examination; and that breast imaging (mammography, ultrasound and MR) presents the same difficulty of interpretation as the physical exam even 1 month after the procedure. More studies are required to refine this treatment method. PMID:15540687

  9. Assessment of magnetic resonance techniques to measure muscle damage 24 h after eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Fulford, J; Eston, R G; Rowlands, A V; Davies, R C

    2015-02-01

    The study examined which of a number of different magnetic resonance (MR) methods were sensitive to detecting muscle damage induced by eccentric exercise. Seventeen healthy, physically active participants, with muscle damage confirmed by non-MR methods were tested 24 h after performing eccentric exercise. Techniques investigated whether damage could be detected within the quadriceps muscle as a whole, and individually within the rectus femoris, vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), and vastus intermedius (VI). Relative to baseline values, significant changes were seen in leg and muscle cross-sectional areas and volumes and the resting inorganic phosphate concentration. Significant time effects over all muscles were also seen in the transverse relaxation time (T2) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values, with individually significant changes seen in the VL, VM, and VI for T2 and in the VI for ADC. A significant correlation was found between muscle volume and the average T2 change (r = 0.59) but not between T2 and ADC or Pi alterations. There were no significant time effects over all muscles for magnetization transfer contrast images, for baseline pH, phosphocreatine (PCr), phosphodiester, or ATP metabolite concentrations or the time constant describing the rate of PCr recovery following exercise. PMID:24738493

  10. Quenching resonance energy transfer (QRET): a single-label technique for inhibitor screening and interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Kopra, Kari; Hrm, Harri

    2015-12-25

    The increased number of therapeutic targets has led to a growing need for screening methods enabling possible inhibitor compound selection. Information for new therapeutic targets has been found mostly from sequencing of the human genome but this knowledge cannot be directly converted into clinically relevant drug molecules. After target identification, the multistep drug development process takes many years and hundreds of millions of dollars are spent without certainty of the outcome. The first and the most critical step in the drug development process is hit selection. The optimal high throughput screening method should provide the highest possible number of true positive hits for further studies and lead discovery. The result should be achieved with low material consumption in a rapid and automated process. Radioactive label based methods are sensitive, but due to the problems arising from the radioactivity, luminescence-based methods have become increasingly popular in screening. In this review, the time-resolved luminescence based quenching resonance energy transfer (QRET) technique is discussed for primary screening. PMID:25721971

  11. Patient's specific modeling of the spinal canal hydrodynamics using bond graph technique and magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yallapragada, Naresh; Alperin, Noam

    2003-05-01

    The spinal canal contributes to the overall compliance of the craniospinal compartment. Thus it plays an important role in the regulation of craniospinal hydrodynamics and intracranial pressure. Limited information is available concerning the spinal canal compliance and its distribution along the spinal canal. Current methods of compliance measurement require injection of fluid into the spinal canal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces and thus are associated with morbidity. A noninvasive method of deriving the spinal canal compliance and its distribution is being developed. A motion-sensitive Magnetic Resonance Imaging technique is employed to quantify the oscillating CSF flow at several locations along the spinal canal. The differential equations governing CSF flow are derived using Bond Graph methodology. Flow dynamics satisfying the differential equations is then compared iteratively with actual flow measurements to yield spinal canal compliance, and CSF resistance and inertia. The model was validated using CSF flow measurements obtained from 4 healthy volunteers. The model predicted CSF flow was compared with measured CSF flow waveforms at intermediate locations. Compliance values ranged from 1.7 mL/mmHg to 45.2 mL/mmHg. The model further provides new information about the relative contribution sub segments of the canal to the overall spinal canal compliance.

  12. Determination of nucleic acids with a near infrared cyanine dye using resonance light scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang; Zheng, Hong; Li, Ling; Wu, Yuqin; Chen, Jinlong; Zhuo, Shujuan; Zhu, Changqing

    2006-06-01

    A new method for the determination of nucleic acids has been developed based on the enhancement effect of resonance light scattering (RLS) with a cationic near infrared (NIR) cyanine dye. Under the optimal conditions, the enhanced RLS intensity at 823 nm is proportional to the concentration of nucleic acids in the range of 0-400 ng mL -1 for both calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) and fish sperm DNA (FS DNA), 0-600 ng mL -1 for snake ovum RNA (SO RNA). The detection limits are 3.5 ng mL -1, 3.4 ng mL -1 and 2.9 ng mL -1 for CT DNA, FS DNA and SO RNA, respectively. Owing to performing in near infrared region, this method not only has high sensitivity endowed by RLS technique but also avoids possible spectral interference from background. It has been applied to the determination of nucleic acids in synthetic and real samples and satisfactory results were obtained.

  13. An adaptive fuzzy-neural-network controller for ultrasonic motor drive using the LLCC resonant technique.

    PubMed

    Lin, F J; Wai, R J; Lin, H H

    1999-01-01

    In this study an adaptive fuzzy-neural-network controller (AFNNC) is proposed to control a rotary traveling wave-type ultrasonic motor (USM) drive system. The USM is derived by a newly designed, high frequency, two-phase voltage source inverter using two inductances and two capacitances (LLCC) resonant technique. Then, because the dynamic characteristics of the USM are complicated and the motor parameters are time varying, an AFNNC is proposed to control the rotor position of the USM. In the proposed controller, the USM drive system is identified by a fuzzy-neural-network identifier (FNNI) to provide the sensitivity information of the drive system to an adaptive controller. The backpropagation algorithm is used to train the FNNI on line. Moreover, to guarantee the convergence of identification and tracking errors, analytical methods based on a discrete-type Lyapunov function are proposed to determine the varied learning rates of the FNNI and the optimal learning rate of the adaptive controller. In addition, the effectiveness of the adaptive fuzzy-neural-network (AFNN) controlled USM drive system is demonstrated by some experimental results. PMID:18238472

  14. Robust control of linear ceramic motor drive with LLCC resonant technique.

    PubMed

    Wai, Rong-Jong

    2003-07-01

    This study presents a robust control system for a linear ceramic motor (LCM) that is driven by a high-frequency voltage source inverter using two-inductance two-capacitance (LLCC) resonant technique. The structure and driving principle of the LCM are introduced. Because the dynamic characteristics and motor parameters of the LCM are nonlinear and time varying, a robust control system is designed based on the hypothetical dynamic model to achieve high-precision position control. The presentation of robust control for the LCM drive system is divided into three parts, which comprise state feedback controller, feed-forward controller, and uncertainty controller. The adaptation laws of control gains in the robust control system are derived in the sense of Lyapunov stability theorem such that the stability of the control system can be guaranteed. It not only has the learning ability similar to intelligent control, but also its control framework is more simple than intelligent control. With the proposed robust control system, the controlled LCM drive possesses the advantages of good tracking control performance and robustness to uncertainties. The effectiveness of the proposed robust control system is verified by experimental results in the presence of uncertainties. In addition, the advantages of the proposed control system are indicated in comparison with the traditional integral-proportional (IP) position control system. PMID:12894924

  15. The role of advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques in primary progressive MS.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Maria A; Absinta, Martina; Filippi, Massimo

    2012-04-01

    Primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) is characterized by a steady progression of irreversible disability from the onset of the disease. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a valuable tool to quantify the disease burden in the brain and spinal cord of patients with MS, measures derived from conventional MRI, including T2-visible lesions, gadolinium-enhancing lesions and atrophy, are correlated only weakly with the clinical manifestations of PPMS. On the contrary, advanced MRI techniques are contributing significantly to the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the irreversible accumulation of disability in PPMS patients. Data from quantitative MRI studies suggest that the extent and topography of "diffuse" damage in different central nervous system (CNS) compartments (i.e. normal-appearing brain white matter and grey matter and the spinal cord) is associated with the severity of disability in PPMS and can predict subsequent medium-term disease evolution. Functional MRI studies have shown that the impairment of the adaptive capacity of the cortex to limit the clinical consequences of structural CNS damage is yet another factor contributing to the manifestations of this condition. PMID:21814822

  16. Microdetermination of proteins by resonance light scattering technique based on aggregation of ferric nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu-hong, Zhang; Yong-shan, Fan; Shuo, Feng; Yun-feng, Zhang

    2009-05-01

    A new method for protein determination is presented that allows measurement of proteins at nanogram levels with simple procedure. The method applies a resonance light scattering (RLS) technique, but based on aggregation of ferric nanoparticles on protein template instead of the usual interaction of organic days with proteins. By mixing ferric colloid with sodium cacodylate buffer solution, ferric nanoparticles can be obtained in the size of about 5 nm and kept their positive charges in a wide range of pH 1.8-7.6. The ferric nanoparticles can interact with proteins to form particular aggregates and thus result in strong and stable RLS. Under optimal conditions (wavelength of 451 nm and pH 7.4), few substances interfere with this assay. The detection limitation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) is 6.6 ng/mL and the linear range is 20-700 ng/mL. This method gives almost identical responses for BSA, human serum albumin (HSA) and γ-globulin (γ-G), and can be used for the determination of total proteins in human serum with satisfactory results.

  17. Molecular Imaging of Tumors Using a Quantitative T1 Mapping Technique via Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Kelsey; Johansen, Mette L.; Craig, Sonya E.; Vincent, Jason; Howell, Michael; Gao, Ying; Lu, Lan; Erokwu, Bernadette; Agnes, Richard S.; Lu, Zheng-Rong; Pokorski, Jonathan K.; Basilion, James; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark; Flask, Chris; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with molecular imaging agents would allow for the specific localization of brain tumors. Prior studies using T1-weighted MR imaging demonstrated that the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA)3 molecular imaging agent labeled heterotopic xenograft models of brain tumors more intensely than non-specific contrast agents using conventional T1-weighted imaging techniques. In this study, we used a dynamic quantitative T1 mapping strategy to more objectively compare intra-tumoral retention of the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA)3 agent over time in comparison to non-targeted control agents. Our results demonstrate that the targeted SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA)3 agent, a scrambled-Tris-(Gd-DOTA)3 control agent, and the non-specific clinical contrast agent Optimark all enhanced flank tumors of human glioma cells with similar maximal changes on T1 mapping. However, the retention of the agents differs. The non-specific agents show significant recovery within 20 min by an increase in T1 while the specific agent SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA)3 is retained in the tumors and shows little recovery over 60 min. The retention effect is demonstrated by percent change in T1 values and slope calculations as well as by calculations of gadolinium concentration in tumor compared to muscle. Quantitative T1 mapping demonstrates the superior binding and retention in tumors of the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA)3 agent over time compared to the non-specific contrast agent currently in clinical use. PMID:26435847

  18. Structure, spectra and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid studied by density functional theory, Raman spectroscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurpreet; Mohanty, B P; Saini, G S S

    2016-02-15

    Structure, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid towards hydroxyl radicals have been studied computationally and in vitro by ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Time dependant density functional theory calculations have been employed to specify various electronic transitions in ultraviolet-visible spectra. Observed chemical shifts and vibrational bands in nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectra, respectively have been assigned with the help of calculations. Changes in the structure of ascorbic acid in aqueous phase have been examined computationally and experimentally by recording Raman spectra in aqueous medium. Theoretical calculations of the interaction between ascorbic acid molecule and hydroxyl radical predicted the formation of dehydroascorbic acid as first product, which has been confirmed by comparing its simulated spectra with the corresponding spectra of ascorbic acid in presence of hydrogen peroxide. PMID:26580511

  19. Structure, spectra and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid studied by density functional theory, Raman spectroscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Mohanty, B. P.; Saini, G. S. S.

    2016-02-01

    Structure, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid towards hydroxyl radicals have been studied computationally and in vitro by ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Time dependant density functional theory calculations have been employed to specify various electronic transitions in ultraviolet-visible spectra. Observed chemical shifts and vibrational bands in nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectra, respectively have been assigned with the help of calculations. Changes in the structure of ascorbic acid in aqueous phase have been examined computationally and experimentally by recording Raman spectra in aqueous medium. Theoretical calculations of the interaction between ascorbic acid molecule and hydroxyl radical predicted the formation of dehydroascorbic acid as first product, which has been confirmed by comparing its simulated spectra with the corresponding spectra of ascorbic acid in presence of hydrogen peroxide.

  20. Sodium and potassium salts of dichloroisocyanuric acid and their hydrates as antimicrobials agents studied by 35Cl-NQR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, A.; Brycki, B.; Kaczmarek, M.; Poleshchuk, O. Kh.; Ostafin, M.; Nogaj, B.

    2006-06-01

    The electronic structure of dichloroisocyanuric acid derivatives was analysed by 35Cl-NQR spectroscopy and DFT calculations. Here we concentrate our attention on three different factors: type of metallic substituent (sodium and potassium), temperature of the sample (liquid nitrogen and room) and degree of hydration (an amount of water molecules attached to analysed compounds). In particular, all the variations in 35Cl-NQR frequencies upon hydration of salts containing sodium and potassium ions are explained as a consequence of H-bonds formation and accompanied effects of charge redistribution. Our studies can be useful in searching for the derivatives of dichloroisocyanuric acid revealing higher antimicrobial activity.

  1. Accuracy of single-cut adjustment technique for double resonant Brillouin fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lpez-Mercado, Cesar A.; Spirin, Vasily V.; Kablukov, Sergey I.; Zlobina, Ekaterina A.; Zolotovskiy, Igor O.; Mgret, Patrice; Fotiadi, Andrei A.

    2014-06-01

    We present a detailed error analysis of the algorithm for adjustment of double resonance in short-length Brillouin ring fiber laser. Adjusted laser cavity is simultaneously resonant for the pump and Stokes radiations. We demonstrate that this algorithm provides an accuracy of 1-7 MHz for the resonance peak location under conditions of regular uncertainties in measurement and cutting. Demonstrated approach is equally useful for the design of singlemode fiber lasers with ultra-narrow optical spectra, Q-switched Brillouin fiber lasers as well as for applications employing high power fiber cavities free from stimulated Brillouin scattering.

  2. The role of magnetic resonance techniques in understanding and managing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, D H; Grossman, R I; Reingold, S C; McFarland, H F

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) techniques have had a major impact in the last 10-15 years in understanding and managing multiple sclerosis. This review summarizes the current uses of MR in multiple sclerosis, based on the proceedings of a recent international workshop, under four headings: (i) technical issues; (ii) role in diagnosis; (iii) natural history studies in understanding the disease; (iv) application in clinical trials. The theory and methodology of relevant technical issues is outlined, in order to provide a framework with which to understand the potential and limitations of MR in addressing biological and clinical questions in multiple sclerosis. The principles underlying signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratio are discussed, along with the techniques and clinical results for conventional and fast spin echo T2-weighted imaging, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, detection of blood-brain barrier break down and hypointense lesions on T1-weighted images, magnetization transfer, T2 decay-curve analysis, MR spectroscopy, spinal cord imaging, diffusion imaging, and quantification of lesion load and atrophy. MRI has an extremely valuable role in confirming the clinical diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. T2-weighted brain imaging remains the standard diagnostic tool, but in some instances it is usefully complemented with gadolinium enhancement and spinal imaging. The caveat that the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis remains primarily a clinical one cannot be over-emphasized. Serial MRI studies have added much to our understanding of the natural history and pathophysiology of the disease. Blood-brain barrier breakdown is a consistent early feature of new lesion development in relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive multiple, sclerosis, and this usually correlates with active inflammation and myelin breakdown. A number of the acute MR changes are reversible, but chronic persistent abnormalities in a number of MR parameters, such as reduced N-acetyl aspartate, low magnetization transfer ratios, atrophy and T1-hypointensity, suggest the presence of demyelination and/or axonal degeneration in many chronic lesions. The presence and extent of T2-weighted MRI abnormalities at first presentation with a clinically isolated syndrome suggestive of demyelination strongly predicts the risk of developing clinically definite multiple sclerosis in the next few years. In established multiple sclerosis, however, the correlations between T2 abnormalities and disability are modest. This poor relationship partly relates to the discrepancy between lesion site and function in attempting to correlate locomotor disability with brain MRI findings. However, the correlations between brain lesion load and cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis, whilst more evident, are still modest. A more important limitation is the low pathological specificity of abnormalities seen on T2-weighted images. Stronger correlations have been found between disability and new putative MR markers for demyelination and/or axonal degeneration. Serial studies using multiple MR techniques are now needed to further clarify pathophysiological mechanisms in multiple sclerosis. Serial MR has become an important tool in monitoring treatment efficacy. It provides data which can be readily analysed in a blinded fashion and which directly inspects the pathological evolution; it also enables a rapid and sensitive measure of treatment outcome in early relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive disease. Because of the modest clinical correlations it is, however, still appropriate that the definitive determinant of treatment efficacy remains a clinical one. Further work is needed to address issues of quality control in serial studies, statistical calculation of appropriate sample sizes, and optimization of the nature and frequency of MR outcomes measured. PMID:9549485

  3. Advanced magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging techniques applied to brain development and animal models of perinatal injury.

    PubMed

    van de Looij, Yohan; Dean, Justin M; Gunn, Alistair J; Hppi, Petra S; Sizonenko, Stphane V

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used in the field of brain development and perinatal brain injury. Due to technical progress the magnetic field strength (B0) of MR systems has continuously increased, favoring (1)H-MRS with quantification of up to 18 metabolites in the brain and short echo time (TE) MRI sequences including phase and susceptibility imaging. For longer TE techniques including diffusion imaging modalities, the benefits of higher B0 have not been clearly established. Nevertheless, progress has also been made in new advanced diffusion models that have been developed to enhance the accuracy and specificity of the derived diffusion parameters. In this review, we will describe the latest developments in MRS and MRI techniques, including high-field (1)H-MRS, phase and susceptibility imaging, and diffusion imaging, and discuss their application in the study of cerebral development and perinatal brain injury. PMID:25818582

  4. Dual-mode temperature compensation technique for laser stabilization to a crystalline whispering gallery mode resonator.

    PubMed

    Fescenko, I; Alnis, J; Schliesser, A; Wang, C Y; Kippenberg, T J; Hnsch, T W

    2012-08-13

    Frequency stabilization of a diode laser locked to a whispering gallery mode (WGM) reference resonator made of a MgF2 single crystal is demonstrated. The strong thermal dependence of the difference frequency between two orthogonally polarized TE an TM modes (dual-mode frequency) of the optically anisotropic crystal material allows sensitive measurement of the resonator's temperature within the optical mode volume. This dual-mode signal was used as feedback for self-referenced temperature stabilization to nanokelvin precision, resulting in frequency stability of 0.3 MHz/h at 972 nm, which was measured by comparing with an independent ultrastable laser. PMID:23038559

  5. 139La NQR and NMR studies of the structural phase transitions in La 1.8- xEu 0.2Sr xCuO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, B. J.; Hammel, P. C.

    139La NQR and NMR relaxation measurements in the title compound have been used to investigate the dynamical properties of the structural phase transitions (SPT): HTT ? LTO and LTO ? LTT of lathanum cuprate. We present the data for thermodynamic fluctuations of critical modes in the vicinity of the SPT's which clearly reveal the character of each SPT and its dependence on doped hole concentration.

  6. The influence of the analysis technique on estimating liver iron overload using magnetic resonance imaging T2* quantification.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, El-Sayed H; Khalifa, Ayman M; Eldaly, Ahmed K

    2014-01-01

    Iron toxicity is the major cause of tissue damage in patients with iron overload. Iron deposits mainly in the liver, where its concentration closely correlates with whole body iron overload. Different techniques have been proposed for estimating iron content, with liver biopsy being the gold standard despite its invasiveness and influence by sampling error. Recently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been established as an effective technique for evaluating iron overload by measuring T2(*) in the liver. However, various factors associated with the adopted analysis technique, mainly the exponential fitting model and signal averaging method, affect the resulting measurements. In this study, we evaluate the influences of these factors on T2(*) measurement in numerical phantom, calibrated phantoms, and nine patients with different degrees of iron overload. The results show different performances among the fitting models and signal averaging methods, which are affected by SNR, image quality and signal homogeneity inside the selected ROI for analysis. PMID:25571026

  7. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOEpatents

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2004-12-28

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  8. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOEpatents

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-12-30

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  9. Measurement of the 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance frequencies by the solid effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliger, J.; Žagar, V.

    2008-07-01

    1H- 14N nuclear quadrupole double resonance using magnetic field cycling between high and low magnetic field and solid effect in the low magnetic field is analyzed in details. The transition probabilities per unit time for the solid-effect transitions are calculated. The double resonance spectra are calculated in the limiting cases of fast and slow nitrogen spin-lattice relaxation. The double resonance spectra are measured in histamine and quinolinic acid. The experimental spectra are analyzed and the 14N NQR frequencies are determined.

  10. Magnetic resonance as a technique to magnetic biosensors characterization in Neocapritermes opacus termites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, J. F.; Wajnberg, E.; Esquivel, D. M. S.; Alves, O. C.

    2005-07-01

    This experimental study quantitatively correlates the saturation magnetization obtained from hysteresis curves (SQUID measurements) to the second integral of the magnetic resonance (MR) spectra of Neocapritermes opacus termites. Termites were submitted to an iron private diet, feeding them with pure cellulose for up to four days. This diet cleans their guts of ingested detrital material, eliminating non-biogenic soil-derived magnetite from the ensuing analyses. A clear relation between total magnetic moment (emu) from SQUID measurements and the signal intensity (absorption area) from MR is given.

  11. Technique for magnetic susceptibility determination in the highly doped semiconductors by electron spin resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Veinger, A. I.; Zabrodskii, A. G.; Tisnek, T. V.; Goloshchapov, S. I.; Semenikhin, P. V.

    2014-08-20

    A method for determining the magnetic susceptibility in the highly doped semiconductors is considered. It is suitable for the semiconductors near the metal - insulator transition when the conductivity changes very quickly with the temperature and the resonance line form distorts. A procedure that is based on double integration of the positive part of the derivative of the absorption line having a Dyson shape and takes into account the depth of the skin layer is described. Analysis is made for the example of arsenic-doped germanium samples at a rather high concentration corresponding to the insulator-metal phase transition.

  12. Determination of proteins with fullerol by a resonance light scattering technique.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guang-Chao; Zhang, Ping; Wei, Xian-Wen; Yang, Zhou-Sheng

    2004-11-15

    Fullerol has been synthesized through the reaction of fullerene C60 with NaOH in aqueous solution by means of ultrasonic agitation and characterized by infrared and 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The fullerol obtained shows good solubility and excellent stability in water. A weak resonance light scattering (RLS) spectrum of fullerol was observed in aqueous solution. However, the intensity of the RLS signal could be enhanced in the presence of proteins, including bovine serum albumin (BSA), human serum albumin (HSA), pepsin (Pep), and lysozyme (Lys). Based on the enhancement of the RLS, a sensitive method for the determination of proteins has been established. The quantitative conditions were considered with regard to the effects of the pH, the ion strength, and the concentration of the fullerol. Under the optimum conditions, the intensity of the RLS was proportional to the concentration of proteins with the limits of detection of 9.7, 10.9, 57.4, and 8.5 ng mL(-1) for BSA, HSA, Pep, and Lys, respectively. Almost no interference can be observed from some amino acids, nucleic acids, and most of the metal ions. The model samples and human serum samples were determined satisfactorily with the proposed method. PMID:15494137

  13. Sensitive Determination of Proteins with Naphthol Green B by Resonance Light Scattering Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, B.; Zhong, H.; Li, X.-M.; Wang, Y.-Z.; Ding, B.-C.; Cheng, Z.-P.; Zhang, L.-L.; Li, S.-P.; Yao, C.

    2013-09-01

    A new quantitative determination method for trace proteins using naphthol green B (NGB) by resonance light scattering (RLS) spectroscopy has been developed. The method is based on the interaction of protein and NGB at pH 3.00, which causes a substantial enhancement of the resonance scattering signal of NGB in the wavelength range 300-550 nm with the maximum RLS at 392.0 nm. Under optimum conditions, the linear range is 0.010-28.2 ?g/ml for bovine serum albumin (BSA) and 0.010-31.3 ?g/ml for human serum albumin (HSA). The detection limits (S/N=3) are 8.2 ng/ml for BSA and 7.9 ng/ml for HSA, respectively. There is little or no interference from amino acids, most of the metal ions, or other coexisting substances. The easy-to-use method, with high sensitivity and good reproducibility, was satisfactorily applied to the determination of total protein in human serum samples. The determination results for human serum samples are identical to those provided by clinical physicians.

  14. High resolution image acquisition from magnetic resonance and computed tomography scans using the curvelet fusion algorithm with inverse interpolation techniques.

    PubMed

    Ali, Fatma E; El-Dokany, Ibrahim M; Saad, Abdelfattah A; Al-Nuaimy, Waleed; Abd El-Samie, Fathi E

    2010-01-01

    We present a new approach, based on the curvelet transform, for the fusion of magnetic resonance and computed tomography images. The objective of this fusion process is to obtain images, with as much detail as possible, for medical diagnosis. This approach is based on the application of the additive wavelet transform on both images and the segmentation of their detail planes into small overlapping tiles. The ridgelet transform is then applied on each of these tiles, and the fusion process is performed on the ridgelet transforms of the tiles. To maximize the benefit of the fused images, inverse interpolation techniques are used to obtain high resolution images from the low resolution fused images. Three inverse interpolation techniques are presented and compared. Simulation results show the superiority of the proposed curvelet fusion approach to the traditional discrete wavelet transform fusion technique. Results also reveal that inverse interpolation techniques have succeeded in obtaining high resolution images from the fused images with better quality than that of the traditional cubic spline interpolation technique. PMID:20062497

  15. Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA): A Nondestructive Assay Technique for the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative’s Plutonium Assay Challenge

    SciTech Connect

    J. W. Sterbentz; D. L. Chichester

    2010-12-01

    This is an end-of-year report for a project funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241). The goal of this project is to investigate the feasibility of using Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) to assay plutonium in commercial light-water-reactor spent fuel. This project is part of a larger research effort within the Next-Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) to evaluate methods for assaying plutonium in spent fuel, the Plutonium Assay Challenge. The first-year goals for this project were modest and included: 1) developing a zero-order MCNP model for the NRTA technique, simulating data results presented in the literature, 2) completing a preliminary set of studies investigating important design and performance characteristics for the NRTA measurement technique, and 3) documentation of this work in an end of the year report (this report). Research teams at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and at several universities are also working to investigate plutonium assay methods for spent-fuel safeguards. While the NRTA technique is well proven in the scientific literature for assaying individual spent fuel pins, it is a newcomer to the current NGSI efforts studying Pu assay method techniques having just started in March 2010; several analytical techniques have been under investigation within this program for two to three years or more. This report summarizes a nine month period of work.

  16. Polarization spectroscopy of the sodium dimer utilizing a triple-resonance technique in the presence of argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Phillip; Horton, Timothy; McFarland, Jacob; Bayram, Burcin; Miami University Spectroscopy Team

    2015-05-01

    The collisional dynamics of molecular sodium in the 61Σg electronic state is under investigation using a triple resonance technique in the presence of argon. A continuous wave ring dye laser is used to populate specific rovibrational levels of the A1Σu electronic state. A pump-probe technique is then employed where the pump laser populates the 61Σg state, and the probe laser dumps the population to the B1Σu state. From this level, fluorescence is detected as the system decays to the X1Σg state. We measure the polarization of this signal in the presence of various argon pressures. We will present our current work as well as the processes involved in the experiment. Financial support from the National Science Foundation (Grant No. NSF-PHY-1309571) is gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence in the Detection and Analysis of Proteins: A Focus on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ghisaidoobe, Amar B. T.; Chung, Sang J.

    2014-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurs when the distance between a donor fluorophore and an acceptor is within 10 nm, and its application often necessitates fluorescent labeling of biological targets. However, covalent modification of biomolecules can inadvertently give rise to conformational and/or functional changes. This review describes the application of intrinsic protein fluorescence, predominantly derived from tryptophan (λEX ∼ 280 nm, λEM ∼ 350 nm), in protein-related research and mainly focuses on label-free FRET techniques. In terms of wavelength and intensity, tryptophan fluorescence is strongly influenced by its (or the protein’s) local environment, which, in addition to fluorescence quenching, has been applied to study protein conformational changes. Intrinsic Förster resonance energy transfer (iFRET), a recently developed technique, utilizes the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan in conjunction with target-specific fluorescent probes as FRET donors and acceptors, respectively, for real time detection of native proteins. PMID:25490136

  18. Resonance light scattering determination of 6-mercaptopurine coupled with HPLC technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ai Ping; Peng, Jing Dong; Zhou, MingQiong; Zhang, Jin

    2016-02-01

    A simple, fast, costless, sensitive and selective method of resonance light scattering coupled with HPLC was established for the determination of 6-mercaptopurine in human urine sample. In a Britton-Robinson buffer solution of pH 5.5, the formation of coordination complex between 6-mercaptopurine and metal palladium (II) led to enhance the RLS intensity of the system. The RLS signal was detected by fluorescence detector at λex = λem = 315 nm. The analytical parameters were provided by the coupled system, the linear of 6-mercaptopurine response from 0.0615 to 2.40 μg L- 1 and the limit of detection (S/N = 3) was 0.05 μg L- 1. The presented method has been applied to determine 6-mercaptopurine in human urine samples which obtained satisfactory results. Moreover, the reaction mechanism and possible reasons for enhancement of RLS were fully discussed.

  19. Determination of deoxyribonucleic acids by a resonance light scattering technique and its application.

    PubMed

    Jie, Nianqin; Jia, Guifang; Hou, Shicong; Xiong, Yanmei; Dong, Yanhong

    2003-12-01

    For the first time, acetamiprid has been used to determine nucleic acid (DNA) using the resonance light scattering (RLS). The RLS of acetamiprid was greatly enhanced by DNA in the range of pH 1.6-1.8. A RLS peak at 313 nm was found, and the enhanced intensity of RLS at this wavelength was proportional to the concentration of DNA. The linear range of the calibration curve was 0-11.0 microg ml(-1) with the detection limit of 20 ng ml(-1). The nucleic acids in synthetic sample and in rice seedling extraction were determined satisfactorily. The interaction mechanism of acetamiprid and DNA is discussed. Mechanism studies show that the enhanced RLS is due to the aggregation of acetamiprid in the presence of DNA. PMID:14607226

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Ultrasound Fusion-Guided Prostate Biopsy: Review of Technology, Techniques, and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kongnyuy, Michael; George, Arvin K; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R; Pinto, Peter A

    2016-04-01

    Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided (12-14 core) systematic biopsy of the prostate is the recommended standard for patients with suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa). Advances in imaging have led to the application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection of PCa with subsequent development of software-based co-registration allowing for the integration of MRI with real-time TRUS during prostate biopsy. A number of fusion-guided methods and platforms are now commercially available with common elements in image and analysis and planning. Implementation of fusion-guided prostate biopsy has now been proven to improve the detection of clinically significant PCa in appropriately selected patients. PMID:26902626

  1. Study on naringenin-CTMAB-DNA system by resonance light scattering technique and its analytical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Shuyun; Wang, Yu; Pang, Bo; Yan, Lili

    2011-09-01

    A new high-sensitivity determination method of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) with detection limit at nanogram levels was proposed. Based on the measurement of resonance light scattering (RLS), it was found DNA could combine with naringenin and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB) in basic Tris-HCl buffer and produce enhanced RLS signal. The optimum conditions for this system were studied in detail. The enhanced intensity of RLS of naringenin-CTMAB at 353 nm was directly proportional to the concentration of DNA in the range of 0.017-1.7 ?g mL -1. The detection limit was 5.06 ng mL -1. Using the proposed method, the synthetic samples were analyzed with satisfactory results, the recovery was 99.3-105.0% and RSD was 0.7-3.7%.

  2. A simple and highly sensitive assay of perfluorooctanoic acid based on resonance light scattering technique.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Zheng, Yonghong; Liang, Jiaman; Long, Sha; Chen, Xianping; Tan, Kejun

    2016-04-15

    A simple, highly sensitive resonance light scattering (RLS) method for the detection of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has been developed based on the interaction with crystal violet (CV). It was found that PFOA can form complexes with CV in acid medium resulting in remarkable enhancement of the RLS intensity of the system. And the enhanced RLS intensities are in proportion to the concentration of PFOA in the range of 0.1-25.0μmol/L (R(2)=0.9998), with a detection limit of 11.0nmol/L (S/N=3). In this work, the optimum reaction conditions and the interferences of foreign substances were investigated. The reaction mechanism between CV and PFOA was also studied by the absorption spectrum and scanning electron microscope (SEM). This method is successfully applied to the determination of PFOA in tap water and Jialing river water samples with RSD≤4.04%. PMID:26824483

  3. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOEpatents

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-11-25

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the biological object in a main magnetic field and in a radio frequency field, the main magnetic field having a static field direction; rotating the biological object at a rotational frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. According to another embodiment, the radio frequency is pulsed to provide a sequence capable of producing a spectrum that is substantially free of spinning sideband peaks.

  4. Resonance light scattering determination of 6-mercaptopurine coupled with HPLC technique.

    PubMed

    Li, Ai Ping; Peng, Jing Dong; Zhou, MingQiong; Zhang, Jin

    2016-02-01

    A simple, fast, costless, sensitive and selective method of resonance light scattering coupled with HPLC was established for the determination of 6-mercaptopurine in human urine sample. In a Britton-Robinson buffer solution of pH5.5, the formation of coordination complex between 6-mercaptopurine and metal palladium (II) led to enhance the RLS intensity of the system. The RLS signal was detected by fluorescence detector at ?(ex)=?(em)=315 nm. The analytical parameters were provided by the coupled system, the linear of 6-mercaptopurine response from 0.0615 to 2.40 ?g L(-1) and the limit of detection (S/N=3) was 0.05 ?g L(-1). The presented method has been applied to determine 6-mercaptopurine in human urine samples which obtained satisfactory results. Moreover, the reaction mechanism and possible reasons for enhancement of RLS were fully discussed. PMID:26479445

  5. Determination of protein by resonance light scattering technique using dithiothreitol-sodium dodecylbenzene sulphonate as probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lihang; Mu, Dan; Gao, Dejiang; Deng, Xinyu; Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Hanqi; Yu, Aimin

    2009-02-01

    The resonance light scattering (RLS) spectra of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-dithiothreitol (DTT)-sodium dodecylbenzene sulphonate (SDBS) and its analytical application were investigated. The RLS intensity of this system can be effectively enhanced in the presence of BSA. Based on the enhanced RLS intensity, a simple assay for BSA was developed. The experimental results indicate that the enhanced RLS intensity is proportional to the concentration of BSA in the range from 1.0 10 -8 to 7.5 10 -7 mol L -1 with the determination limit of 5.0 10 -9 mol L -1. The effects of pH, concentration of SDBS and DTT on the RLS enhancement were discussed. Most metal ions have little interference on the determination of BSA. Some synthetic and real samples were analyzed, and the results obtained were in good agreement with those obtained by Bradford method.

  6. Resonance light scattering technique for the determination of protein with rutin and cetylpyridine bromide system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Yang, Jinghe; Liu, Shufang; Wu, Xia; Su, Benyu; Wu, Tao

    2005-02-01

    A new resonance light scattering (RLS) assay of protein is presented. In Tris-NaOH (pH = 10.93) buffer, the RLS of rutin-cetylpyridine bromide (CPB) system can be greatly enhanced by protein, including bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA). The enhanced RLS intensities are in proportion to the concentration of proteins in the range of 5 × 10 -9 to 2.5 × 10 -6 g ml -1 for BSA and 2.5 × 10 -8 to 3.5 × 10 -6 g ml -1 for HSA. The detection limits (S/N = 3) are 3.0 ng ml -1 for BSA and 10.0 ng ml -1 for HSA. Samples are determined satisfactorily.

  7. Studies in Low Dimensional Spin Dynamics via the Electron Spin Resonance Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khattak, Nazir Shah

    We have performed studies at room temperature as well as at low temperatures on the electron paramagnetic resonance profile of nearly one dimensional magnetic systems, TMMC:Cu and TMMC:Cd. This studies have focussed on the variation of the line width, the line shift and the line shape as a function of impurities and temperature. We have specifically directed our attention towards dimensionality effects i.e. studies of these crucial magnetic parameters as a function of the polar angles (THETA) and (phi) which the one dimensional axis of these systems makes with the external magnetic field H(,o). We have found the EPR line shape of TMMC is asymmetric (distorted) at X-Band frequencies. These results are presented and discussed in relationship to previously published work on these and related systems and to appropriate theoretical models.

  8. Triplet state delocalization in a conjugated porphyrin dimer probed by transient electron paramagnetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Tait, Claudia E; Neuhaus, Patrik; Anderson, Harry L; Timmel, Christiane R

    2015-05-27

    The delocalization of the photoexcited triplet state in a linear butadiyne-linked porphyrin dimer is investigated by time-resolved and pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) with laser excitation. The transient EPR spectra of the photoexcited triplet states of the porphyrin monomer and dimer are characterized by significantly different spin polarizations and an increase of the zero-field splitting parameter D from monomer to dimer. The proton and nitrogen hyperfine couplings, determined using electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and X- and Q-band HYSCORE, are reduced to about half in the porphyrin dimer. These data unequivocally prove the delocalization of the triplet state over both porphyrin units, in contrast to the conclusions from previous studies on the triplet states of closely related porphyrin dimers. The results presented here demonstrate that the most accurate estimate of the extent of triplet state delocalization can be obtained from the hyperfine couplings, while interpretation of the zero-field splitting parameter D can lead to underestimation of the delocalization length, unless combined with quantum chemical calculations. Furthermore, orientation-selective ENDOR and HYSCORE results, in combination with the results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, allowed determination of the orientations of the zero-field splitting tensors with respect to the molecular frame in both porphyrin monomer and dimer. The results provide evidence for a reorientation of the zero-field splitting tensor and a change in the sign of the zero-field splitting D value. The direction of maximum dipolar coupling shifts from the out-of-plane direction in the porphyrin monomer to the vector connecting the two porphyrin units in the dimer. This reorientation, leading to an alignment of the principal optical transition moment and the axis of maximum dipolar coupling, is also confirmed by magnetophotoselection experiments. PMID:25914154

  9. [Determination of palmatine hydrochloride based on the interaction with morin by resonance light scattering technique].

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-yu; Li, Hua-chun; Wu, Fei

    2014-06-01

    A novel resonance light scattering method for the determination of PaH was developed based on the interaction of Palmatine hydrochloride (PaH) with Morin in pH 4. 6 HAc-NaAc buffer medium, and this interaction can result in largely enhanced resonance light scattering (RLS) signal characterized by a peak at 308.0 nm. It was found that the enhanced RLS signals intensity (I(RLS)) at 308.0 nm is proportional to the concentration of PaH. The limit of detection is 8.0 nmol x L(-1) and the linear range is from 0.08 to 1.0 mol x L(-1). In this study, the mechanism of this reaction was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV absorption spectrum. The SEM images and DLS graph show that ion-association complex aggregated after the addition of PaH. The experimental condition optimization results indicate that when the buffer medium is pH 4.6 HAc-NaAc without adding NaCl, the system has a good response for PaH. The authors investigated the stability of this system. The results indicate that this reaction system has a rapid response and the IRLS can reach the maximum within 5 min and remain stable at least for 120 min. The tolerance of coexisting foreign substances in the system was also studied. The research results show that the common metal ions, inorganic anions, a part of carbohydrate and amino acids have negligible effects on the analysis of PaH. This proposed method has some advantages including simplicity, rapidity and sensitivity. It also has been applied to the detection of PaH in tablet and capsule samples with RSD ? 3.3%. PMID:25358169

  10. Triplet State Delocalization in a Conjugated Porphyrin Dimer Probed by Transient Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Techniques

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The delocalization of the photoexcited triplet state in a linear butadiyne-linked porphyrin dimer is investigated by time-resolved and pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) with laser excitation. The transient EPR spectra of the photoexcited triplet states of the porphyrin monomer and dimer are characterized by significantly different spin polarizations and an increase of the zero-field splitting parameter D from monomer to dimer. The proton and nitrogen hyperfine couplings, determined using electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and X- and Q-band HYSCORE, are reduced to about half in the porphyrin dimer. These data unequivocally prove the delocalization of the triplet state over both porphyrin units, in contrast to the conclusions from previous studies on the triplet states of closely related porphyrin dimers. The results presented here demonstrate that the most accurate estimate of the extent of triplet state delocalization can be obtained from the hyperfine couplings, while interpretation of the zero-field splitting parameter D can lead to underestimation of the delocalization length, unless combined with quantum chemical calculations. Furthermore, orientation-selective ENDOR and HYSCORE results, in combination with the results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, allowed determination of the orientations of the zero-field splitting tensors with respect to the molecular frame in both porphyrin monomer and dimer. The results provide evidence for a reorientation of the zero-field splitting tensor and a change in the sign of the zero-field splitting D value. The direction of maximum dipolar coupling shifts from the out-of-plane direction in the porphyrin monomer to the vector connecting the two porphyrin units in the dimer. This reorientation, leading to an alignment of the principal optical transition moment and the axis of maximum dipolar coupling, is also confirmed by magnetophotoselection experiments. PMID:25914154

  11. An innovative method for the non-destructive identification of photodegradation products in solid state: 1H-14N NMR-NQR and DFT/QTAIM study of photodegradation of nifedipine (anti-hypertensive) to nitrosonifedipine (potential anti-oxidative).

    PubMed

    Latosi?ska, J N; Latosi?ska, M; Seliger, J; Zagar, V

    2012-08-30

    Stability of the antihypertensive drug nifedipine (NIF) has been studied experimentally in solid state by (1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR double resonance (NQDR) and theoretically by the Density Functional Theory (DFT). Photodegradation of NIF to its metabolite in vivo nitrosonifedipine, NO-NIF (antioxidative agent) upon long term daylight exposure was detected and the changes in the molecular structure of NIF were analysed. The photoconversion of NIF to NO-NIF in solid was found to be accompanied with the electron density redistribution at nitrogen sites (NH to N and NO(2) to NO) and proved to be successfully detected with identification of photoproducts by (1)H-(14)N NQDR and DFT methods. The increase in the e(2)qQ/h and ? describing EFG tendency towards non-spherical symmetry was significantly greater upon the reduction of NO(2) site than upon hydrogen abstraction from NH site. The level of sensitivity of detection of the photodegradation product was about 1% of the original sample. The Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) analysis has been found useful in predicting photoreactive sites in the molecules and finding the explanation of differences in reactivity between parent NIF and its photoproduct NO-NIF. Using NIF as a model, this study demonstrates the suitability of NQDR supported by DFT for non-destructive determination of the photodegradation products in solid state. PMID:22609436

  12. Feasibility Study of Velocity and Temperature Measurements of an Arcjet Flow using Laser Resonance Doppler Velocimetric (LRDV) Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rob, Mohammad A.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials are used in space vehicles to shield from high heating environment encountered during their atmospheric reentry. Arcjet wind tunnels are used to simulate the flowfield encountered by the spacecrafts, and are used for testing TPS materials. How well these tests simulate the actual heating environment encountered by space vehicles depends on the characteristics of the simulated flow. The flow characterization requires the determination of temperature, concentration, and velocity of the various atomic and molecular species present in the flow. However, determining these parameters requires a complex set of both analytical and experimental procedures. The ability to properly simulate the flight environment is directly related to the accuracy with which these techniques can be used to define the arcjet Laser Resonance Doppler Velocimetric (LRDV) technique can be used to accurately determine the velocity and temperature of a gaseous species. In this technique, the medium is probed with a laser beam that is in resonance with an absorbing transition of the species. The absorption lineshape is Doppler-shifted due to the flow velocity of the species, and the frequency shift is detected as the variation in intensity of the fluorescence emitted by the species. Thus a measurement of the Doppler shift and the width of a spectral line can give both the temperature and the velocity of the flowfield. This summer, our project was to make a feasibility study to set up an experimental arrangement for the laser resonance Doppler velocimetric technique using a ring dye laser. Experiments required troubleshooting, cleaning, testing, and alignment of two lasers and several diagnostics instruments. All instruments and lasers necessary for the project worked well, but the output power of the broadband fundamental dye laser was limited to about 20 mW. This was quite low as compared to that necessary to obtain second harmonic oscillation at 327.49 nm for the LRDV studies. Further optimization of the dye laser optical elements is necessary before it can be used for the experiment, which requires narrowband (about 20 Mhz) laser operation.

  13. Cu nuclear magnetic resonance of aligned single crystals of YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7/. sqrt. /sub delta/

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, C.H.; Durand, D.J.; Zax, D.B.; Slichter, C.P.; Rice, J.P.; Ginsberg, D.M.

    1988-05-01

    There are two types of Cu sites in YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7/..sqrt../sub delta/, plane and chain. One gives a nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) at 22.0 MHz, the other at 31.5 MHz. Measurements of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time in the superconducting state show that the 31.5-MHz site has a much larger energy gap (as though its T/sub c/ were 200 K), but different experimental workers have differed as to whether this is the chain or plane site. We report nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies at 81.1 kG and 100 K on oriented single crystals, and conclude from symmetry arguments that the 31.5-MHz NQR arises from the plane site.

  14. Investigation of Mn Implanted LiNbO{sub 3} applying electron paramagnetic resonance technique

    SciTech Connect

    Darwish, A.; Ila, D.; Poker, D.B.; Hensley, D.K.

    1997-10-01

    The effect of ion implantation on the LiNbO{sub 3} crystal is studied using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR). EPR measurements on these crystals were performed as a function of ion species Mn and Fe and fluence at room temperature. Also the effect of the laser illumination on the EPR signal was determined by illuminating the crystal in situ and measuring the decay and growth of the EPR signal. LiNbO{sub 3}:Mn{sup 2+} at a depth of approximately 200 nm was formed by implantation of 2.5 {times} 10{sup 14} Mncm{sup 2} and 1 {times} 10{sup 17} Mn/cm{sup 2} at 2 MeV. The implanted samples were compared with bulk doped crystals. It was found that the decay and growth of Mn EPR for the implanted crystal is very small compared with the bulk doped LiNbO{sub 3}:Mn crystal. This was found to be primarily due to the spin concentration on the crystals. On the other, hand the decay time of the high fluence is about 40% slower than the decay of the low fluence implanted crystal.

  15. Novel electro-optical coupling technique for magnetic resonance-compatible positron emission tomography detectors.

    PubMed

    Olcott, Peter D; Peng, Hao; Levin, Craig S

    2009-01-01

    A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible positron emission tomography (PET) detector design is being developed that uses electro-optical coupling to bring the amplitude and arrival time information of high-speed PET detector scintillation pulses out of an MRI system. The electro-optical coupling technology consists of a magnetically insensitive photodetector output signal connected to a nonmagnetic vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) diode that is coupled to a multimode optical fiber. This scheme essentially acts as an optical wire with no influence on the MRI system. To test the feasibility of this approach, a lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a single pixel of a solid-state photomultiplier array was placed in coincidence with a lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a fast photomultiplier tube with both the new nonmagnetic VCSEL coupling and the standard coaxial cable signal transmission scheme. No significant change was observed in 511 keV photopeak energy resolution and coincidence time resolution. This electro-optical coupling technology enables an MRI-compatible PET block detector to have a reduced electromagnetic footprint compared with the signal transmission schemes deployed in the current MRI/PET designs. PMID:19397853

  16. Neutron intensity modulation and time-focusing with integrated Larmor and resonant frequency techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinkui; Hamilton, William A.; Lee, Sung-Woo; Robertson, J. L.; Crow, Lowell; Kang, Yoon W.

    2015-09-01

    The analysis of neutron diffraction experiments often assumes that neutrons are elastically scattered from the sample. However, there is growing evidence that a significant fraction of the detected neutrons is in fact inelastically scattered, especially from soft materials and aqueous samples. Ignoring these inelastic contributions gives rise to inaccurate experimental results. To date, there has been no simple method with broad applicability for inelastic signal separation in neutron diffraction experiments. Here, we present a simple and robust method that we believe could be suited for this purpose. We use two radio frequency resonant spin flippers integrated with a Larmor precession field to modulate the neutron intensity and to encode the inelastic scattering information into the neutron data. All three components contribute to the spin encoding. The Larmor field serves several additional purposes. Its usage facilitates neutron time-focusing, eliminates the need for stringent magnetic shielding, and allows for compact setups. The scheme is robust, simple, and flexible. We believe that, with further improvements, it has the potential of adding inelastic signal discrimination capabilities to many existing diffraction instruments in the future.

  17. A sensitive resveratrol assay with a simple probe methylene blue by resonance light scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Haiyan; Dai, Kaijin; Luo, Qizhi; Duan, Wenjun; Xie, Yang

    2011-01-01

    A novel resonance light scattering (RLS) method was developed for the determination of resveratrol based on the interaction between resveratrol and methylene blue (MB). It was found that at pH 8.69, the weak RLS intensity of MB was remarkably enhanced by the addition of trace amount of resveratrol with the maximum peak located at 385.0 nm. Under the optimum conditions, a good linear relationship between the enhanced RLS intensities and the concentrations of resveratrol was obtained over the range of 2.0-14.0 μg ml -1 with the detection limit (3 σ) of 0.63 μg ml -1. The results of the analysis of resveratrol in synthetic samples and human urine are satisfactory, which showed it may provide a more sensitive, convenient, rapid and reproducible method for the detection of resveratrol, especially in biological and pharmaceutical field. In this work, the characteristics of RLS, absorption and fluorescence spectra of the resveratrol-MB system, the influencing factors and the optimum conditions of the reaction were investigated.

  18. Determination of nucleic acids at nanogram level using resonance light scattering technique with Congo Red

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xia; Wang, Yuebo; Wang, Minqin; Sun, Shuna; Yang, Jinghe; Luan, Yuxia

    2005-01-01

    Based on the enhancement of the resonance light scattering (RLS) of Congo Red (CR) by nucleic acid, a new quantitative method for nucleic acid is developed. In the Tris-HCl buffer (pH 10.5), the weak light scattering of CR is greatly enhanced by addition of nucleic acid and CTMAB, the maximum peak is at 560 nm and the enhanced intensity of RLS is in proportion to the concentration of nucleic acid. The linear range is 1.0×10 -9 to 1.0×10 -6 g ml -1, 7.5×10 -8 to 1.0×10 -6 g ml -1 and 7.5×10 -8 to 2.5×10 -6 g ml -1 for herring sperm DNA, calf thymus DNA and yeast RNA, and the detection limits are 0.019, 0.89 and 1.2 ng ml -1 ( S/ N = 3), respectively. Actual biological samples were satisfactorily determined.

  19. Rock magnetic techniques complemented by ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy to analyse a sediment record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kind, Jessica; Raden, Ulrike J. van; García-Rubio, Inés.; Gehring, Andreas U.

    2012-10-01

    Environmental magnetism uses the spatial and temporal occurrence of magnetic carriers as diagnostic tools to detect environmental changes. Concentration, composition, grain size and configuration of the carriers inferred from magnetic properties are key parameters, because they are indicative of the formation conditions of magnetic phases, and/or of processes such as diagenesis and weathering. We present a detailed ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectroscopy analysis in concert with routinely used rock magnetic measurements to determine these parameters in a sediment record that documents the development of Lake Soppensee (Central Switzerland) since latest Pleistocene. FMR spectroscopy monitors varying concentration of the predominant magnetite/maghemite by the spectral signal intensity, whereas the stable single domain and superparamagnetic states are determined by the signal shape at room and low temperature. Fitting and simulation of FMR spectra are successfully applied to samples with well-defined magnetite components in the sediment matrix. Clear evidence for the colonization of magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) in Lake Soppensee was possible by applying empirical spectral separation to measured FMR signals that yield two magnetite populations differing in their configuration, that is, dispersed and aligned in chains. Low temperature measurements showed that these MTB can be preserved as pure or oxidized magnetite. The FMR data set confirms and completes rock magnetic information obtained from the lacustrine sedimentary record. The advanced application of FMR spectroscopy in the presented study critically highlights the benefit of this rapid and non-destructive method for future analysis of magnetic properties in environmental studies.

  20. Novel techniques for strong coupling between spin ensembles and cavity resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creedon, Daniel; Goryachev, Maxim; Farr, Warrick; Le Floch, Jean-Michel; Fan, Yaohui; Carvalho, Natlia; Tobar, Michael; Kostylev, Mikhail; Castelletto, Stefania; Bushev, Pavel

    2015-03-01

    Spins in solids are a promising physical subsystem for the realization of hybrid quantum systems. We focus on experiments coupling spins to three dimensional cavities, a system where it is critical to achieve operation in the strong coupling regime. This has been achieved using two approaches: coupling to impurity ions in single-crystal Whispering Gallery photonic resonators, and by using a novel field focusing re-entrant cavity. The first approach has allowed us to investigate various impurities in sapphire, quartz, and YAG, as well as iron group ions in YSO. This method is characterised by relatively narrow photon linewidths, higher filling factors and lower impurity concentration. The second approach allowed strong coupling to P1 impurities in diamond and operation in the ultra-strong coupling regime with magnons in YIG. This method is designed to achieve spatial separation of the cavity magnetic and electric fields, relatively high filling factors with sub-mm crystals of any shape and a high concentration of magnetic ions, as well as arbitrary engineering of the cavity spectrum and field distribution.

  1. In-Situ Characterization of Tissue Blood Flow, Blood Content, and Water State Using New Techniques in Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conturo, Thomas Edward

    Tissue blood flow, blood content, and water state have been characterized in-situ with new nuclear magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The sensitivities of standard techniques to the physiologic tissue parameters spin density (N_{rm r}) and relaxation times (T_1 and T_2 ) are mathematically defined. A new driven inversion method is developed so that tissue T_1 and T_2 changes produce cooperative intensity changes, yielding high contrast, high signal to noise, and sensitivity to a wider range of tissue parameters. The actual tissue parameters were imaged by automated collection of multiple-echo data having multiple T _1 dependence. Data are simultaneously fit by three-parameters to a closed-form expression, producing lower inter-parameter correlation and parameter noise than in separate T_1 or T_2 methods or pre-averaged methods. Accurate parameters are obtained at different field strengths. Parametric images of pathology demonstrate high sensitivity to tissue heterogeneity, and water content is determined in many tissues. Erythrocytes were paramagnetically labeled to study blood content and relaxation mechanisms. Liver and spleen relaxation were enhanced following 10% exchange of animal blood volumes. Rapid water exchange between intracellular and extracellular compartments was validated. Erythrocytes occupied 12.5% of renal cortex volume, and blood content was uniform in the liver, spleen and kidney. The magnitude and direction of flow velocity was then imaged. To eliminate directional artifacts, a bipolar gradient technique sensitized to flow in different directions was developed. Phase angle was reconstructed instead of intensity since the former has a 2pi -fold higher dynamic range. Images of flow through curves demonstrated secondary flow with a centrifugally-biased laminar profile and stationary velocity peaks along the curvature. Portal vein flow velocities were diminished or reversed in cirrhosis. Image artifacts have been characterized and removed. The foldover in magnified images was eliminated by exciting limited regions with orthogonal pi/2 and pi pulses. Off-midline regions were imaged by tandemly offsetting the phase-encoding and excitation. Artifacts due to non-steady-state conditions were demonstrated. The approach to steady state was defined by operators and vectors, and any repeated series of RF pulses was proven to produce a steady-state. The vector difference between the magnetization and its steady state value is relatively constant during the approach. The repetition time relative to T_1 is the main determinant of approach rate, and off-resonant RF pulses incoherent with the magnetization produce a more rapid approach than on-resonant pulses.

  2. Measurements of ocean surface spectrum from an aircraft using the two-frequency microwave resonance technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. W.; Weissman, D. E.; Jones, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the results of a two-frequency (Delta k) microwave radar experiment conducted from an aircraft and aimed primarily at the development of remote sensing techniques to measure ocean surface wave spectral characteristics. The experiment was conducted as part of the Maritime Remote Sensing (MARSEN) project in the North Sea during the autumn of 1979. The objective was to demonstrate the feasibility of and study the performance of the Delta k technique from a higher altitude platform, at shallower incidence angles, and at higher Doppler velocities than earlier stationary platform experiments allowed. A quantitative engineering evaluation of the results of two comprehensive flights is provided, and the qualitative significance of the results is discussed from a geophysical point of view in terms of the existing theory.

  3. Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Comprehensive Update on Principles and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ka-Loh; Ostergaard, Leif; Calamante, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Perfusion is a fundamental biological function that refers to the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to tissue by means of blood flow. Perfusion MRI is sensitive to microvasculature and has been applied in a wide variety of clinical applications, including the classification of tumors, identification of stroke regions, and characterization of other diseases. Perfusion MRI techniques are classified with or without using an exogenous contrast agent. Bolus methods, with injections of a contrast agent, provide better sensitivity with higher spatial resolution, and are therefore more widely used in clinical applications. However, arterial spin-labeling methods provide a unique opportunity to measure cerebral blood flow without requiring an exogenous contrast agent and have better accuracy for quantification. Importantly, MRI-based perfusion measurements are minimally invasive overall, and do not use any radiation and radioisotopes. In this review, we describe the principles and techniques of perfusion MRI. This review summarizes comprehensive updated knowledge on the physical principles and techniques of perfusion MRI. PMID:25246817

  4. Penaeus orientolis prawn freshness rapid determination method based on electronic nose and non-linear stochastic resonance technique

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Liu; Yuanyuan, Han; Yanping, Cai; Jiaojiao, Jin; Guohua, Hui

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, Penaeus orientolis prawn freshness rapid determination method using electronic nose (e-nose) and non-linear data processing technique is studied. E-nose responses to prawns stored at 4°C are measured. Meanwhile, physical/chemical indexes (firmness, pH, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), total viable count (TVC), and human sensory evaluation) are examined to provide freshness references for e-nose analysis. E-nose measurement data is analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA), stochastic resonance (SR), and double-layered cascaded serial stochastic resonance (DCSSR). PCA partially discriminates prawns under different storage time. SR and DCSSR signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectrum eigen values discriminate prawns successfully. Multi-variables regressions (MVR) are conducted between physical/chemical indexes and SR/DCSSR output SNR minimal (SNR-Min) values. Results indicate that SNR-Min values present more significant linearity relation with physical/chemical indexes. Prawn freshness forecasting model is developed via Harris fitting regression on DCSSR SNR-Min values. Validating experiments demonstrate that forecasting accuracy of this model is 94.29%. PMID:25551520

  5. High-resolution ion partitioning technique by phase-specific ion excitation for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, C.D.; Kerley, E.L.; Russell, D.H.

    1989-01-01

    The intrinsic versatility of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) for analytical studies has been widely demonstrated. The utility of ion traps arises from the ability to manipulate ions that are stored in the trap. Ion manipulation is accomplished in FT-ICR by ion ejection e.g., ion selection for chemical studies and ejection of high abundance ions for enhancement of dynamic range. Ion ejection is achieved by accelerating unwanted ions (by resonant radio frequency (rf) excitation) until their radii exceed the confines of the ICR cell. Although the excitation magnitude is substantially by accelerating unwanted ions to radii which need only exceed the dimensions of the conductance limit, tailing of an excitation sweep can still result in inadvertent excitation of the ion of interest. A technique is described for ion selection that combines phase-specific excitation and ion discrimination on partitioning in a two-section FT-ICR cell. This method greatly enhances ion isolation by applying the relationship of the excitation phase angle to ion acceleration. The radial velocity of ions is modulated by phase-specific excitation. By control of the radial velocity (i.e., cyclotron radius), selected ions can be manipulated to produce high ion selectivity upon partitioning.

  6. Inspiratory resonant frequency of forced oscillation technique as a predictor of the composite physiologic index in interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Masato; Shirai, Toshihiro; Mori, Kazutaka; Mikamo, Masashi; Shishido, Yuichiro; Akita, Takefumi; Morita, Satoru; Asada, Kazuhiro; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-02-01

    The composite physiologic index (CPI), which is derived from FEV1, FVC, and diffusing capacity, has been developed to predict the extent of fibrosis on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). However, the relevance to the forced oscillation technique (FOT) is not fully understood. We hypothesized that FOT would independently predict the CPI in interstitial lung disease (ILD). In this cross-sectional study we assessed the relationship between pulmonary function tests, forced oscillatory parameters, and the degree of fibrosis in ILD. Spirometry, evaluation of diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide, and the broadband frequency FOT were performed in 93 patients with a clinical/HRCT diagnosis of ILD. The CPI was calculated and fibrosis extent was measured by HRCT and scored. Univariate analyses revealed that, of the forced oscillatory parameters, inspiratory resonant frequency best correlated with FVC, FEV1, diffusing capacity, CPI, and fibrosis score. In multiple regression analyses, CPI was independently predicted by inspiratory resonant frequency and fibrosis score (model R(2)=0.405, p<0.0001). PMID:25514184

  7. A systematic review of brain frontal lobe parcellation techniques in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cox, Simon R; Ferguson, Karen J; Royle, Natalie A; Shenkin, Susan D; MacPherson, Sarah E; MacLullich, Alasdair M J; Deary, Ian J; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2014-01-01

    Manual volumetric measurement of the brain's frontal lobe and its subregions from magnetic resonance images (MRIs) is an established method for researching neural correlates of clinical disorders or cognitive functions. However, there is no consensus between methods used to identify relevant boundaries of a given region of interest (ROI) on MRIs, and those used may bear little relation to each other or the underlying structural, functional and connective architecture. This presents challenges for the analysis and synthesis of such results. We therefore performed a systematic literature review to highlight variations in the anatomical boundaries used to measure frontal regions, contextualised by up-to-date evidence from histology, hodology and neuropsychology. We searched EMBASE and MEDLINE for studies in English reporting three-dimensional boundaries for manually delineating the brain's frontal lobe or sub-regional ROIs from MRIs. Exclusion criteria were: exclusive use of co-ordinate grid systems; insufficient detail to allow method replication; publication in grey literature only. Papers were assessed on quality criteria relating to bias, reproducibility and protocol rationale. There was a large degree of variability in the three-dimensional boundaries of all regions used by the 208 eligible papers. Half of the reports did not justify their rationale for boundary selection, and each paper met on average only three quarters of quality criteria. For the frontal lobe and each subregion (frontal pole, anterior cingulate, dorsolateral, inferior-lateral, and orbitofrontal) we identified reproducible methods for a biologically plausible target ROI. It is hoped that this synthesis will guide the design of future volumetric studies of cerebral structure. PMID:23474540

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance with dc SQUID preamplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, N.Q.; Heaney, M.B.; Clarke, J.; Newitt, D.; Wald, L.L.; Hahn, E.L.; Bielecki, A.; Pines, A.

    1989-03-01

    Sensitive radio-frequency (rf) amplifiers based on dc Superconducting QUantum Intererference Devices (SQUIDSs) are available for frequencies up to 200 MHz. At 4.2 K, the gain and noise temperature of a typical tuned amplifier are 18.6+-0.5 dB and 1.7+0.5 K at 93 MHz. These amplifiers are being applied to a series of novel experiments on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). The high sensitivity of these amplifiers was demonstrated in the observation of nuclear spin noise, the emission of photons by /sup 35/Cl nuclei in a state of zero polarization. In the more conventional experiments in which one applies a large rf pulse to the spins, a Q-spoiler, consisting of a series array of Josephson junctions, is used to reduce the Q of the input circuit to a very low value during the pulse. The Q-spoiler enables the circuit to recover quickly after the pulse, and has been used in an NQR experiment to achieve a sensitivity of about 2 x 10/sup 16/ nuclear Bohr magnetons in a single free precession signal with a bandwidth of 10 kHz. In a third experiment, a sample containing /sup 35/Cl nuclei was placed in a capacitor and the signal detected electrically using a tuned SQUID amplifier and Q-spoiler. In this way, the electrical polarization induced by the precessing Cl nuclear quadrupole moments was detected: this is the inverse of the Stark effect in NQR. Two experiments involving NMR have been carried out. In the first, the 30 MHz resonance in /sup 119/Sn nuclei is detected with a tuned amplifier and Q-spoiler, and a single pulse resolution of 10/sup 18/ nuclear Bohr magnetons in a bandwidth of 25 kHz has been achieved. For the second, a low frequency NMR system has been developed that uses an untuned input circuit coupled to the SQUID. The resonance in /sup 195/Pt nuclei has been observed at 55 kHz in a field of 60 gauss.

  9. A comparison of neural network and fuzzy clustering techniques in segmenting magnetic resonance images of the brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Lawrence O.; Bensaid, Amine M.; Clarke, Laurence P.; Velthuizen, Robert P.; Silbiger, Martin S.; Bezdek, James C.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) brain section images are segmented and then synthetically colored to give visual representations of the original data with three approaches: the literal and approximate fuzzy c-means unsupervised clustering algorithms and a supervised computational neural network, a dynamic multilayered perception trained with the cascade correlation learning algorithm. Initial clinical results are presented on both normal volunteers and selected patients with brain tumors surrounded by edema. Supervised and unsupervised segmentation techniques provide broadly similar results. Unsupervised fuzzy algorithms were visually observed to show better segmentation when compared with raw image data for volunteer studies. However, for a more complex segmentation problem with tumor/edema or cerebrospinal fluid boundary, where the tissues have similar MR relaxation behavior, inconsistency in rating among experts was observed.

  10. Field enhancement and resonance phenomena in complex three-dimensional nanoparticles: efficient computation using the source-model technique.

    PubMed

    Ishay, Yakir; Leviatan, Yehuda; Bartal, Guy

    2014-05-15

    We present a semi-analytical method for computing the electromagnetic field in and around 3D nanoparticles (NP) of complex shape and demonstrate its power via concrete examples of plasmonic NPs that have nonsymmetrical shapes and surface areas with very small radii of curvature. In particular, we show the three axial resonances of a 3D cashew-nut and the broadband response of peanut-shell NPs. The method employs the source-model technique along with a newly developed intricate source distributing algorithm based on the surface curvature. The method is simple and can outperform finite-difference time domain and finite-element-based software tools in both its efficiency and accuracy. PMID:24978226

  11. Quantitative Evaluation of Left Ventricular Wall Motion in Patient with Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Using Magnetic Resonance Tagging Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Tadashi; Nakano, Takahiro; Tsutsumi, Masakazu; Kawasaki, Shingo; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Tokuda, Masataka

    Left ventricular wall motions during systole were investigated from a mechanical perspective by using a magnetic resonance tagging technique. Subjects were 7 patients with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). First, by analyzing strain in the left ventricular wall, cardiac contractility was evaluated in the patients with CABG. Next, by calculating displacement in the myocardial wall, paradoxical movements following CABG were quantitatively evaluated. Strain analysis showed local decreases in circumferential strain in 4 of 7 subjects. The results of displacement analysis clarified that following CABG, the degree of radial displacement was small in the septal wall and large in the lateral wall, and circumferential displacement towards the septal wall occurred in the anterior and posterior walls. Since this behavior was seen in both reduced and normal cardiac contractility groups, paradoxical movements in the present patients were not caused by reduced cardiac contractility, but rather by rigid-body motion of the entire heart.

  12. Anatomy of the cranioencephalic structures of the camel (Camelus dromedarius L.) by imaging techniques: a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Arencibia, A; Rivero, M A; Gil, F; Ramrez, J A; Corbera, J A; Ramrez, G; Vzquez, J M

    2005-02-01

    The objective of this study was to define the anatomy of the cranioencephalic structures and associated formations in camel using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MR images were acquired in sagittal, transverse and oblique dorsal planes, using spin-echo techniques, a magnet of 1.5 T and a standard human body coil. MR images were compared with corresponding frozen cross-sections of the head. Different anatomic structures were identified and labelled at each level. The resulting images provided excellent soft tissue contrast and anatomic detail of the brain and associated structures of the camel head. Annotated MR images from this study are intended to be a reference for clinical imaging studies of the head of the dromedary camel. PMID:15649228

  13. Investigating the Impact of Biological Impurities on the Liquid Vein Network in Polycrystalline Ice Using Magnetic Resonance Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brox, T. I.; Vogt, S. J.; Brown, J. R.; Skidmore, M. L.; Codd, S. L.; Seymour, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that microorganisms can occupy the liquid filled inter-crystalline vein network in ice and maintain their metabolic activity under these conditions. Additionally, certain cold tolerant microorganisms produce extra-cellular proteins (i.e., ice-binding proteins) that have the ability to bind to the prism face of an ice crystal and inhibit ice recrystallization. One such microorganism is Chryseobacterium sp. V3519-10, a bacterium isolated from a depth of 3519 m in the Vostok Ice Core, Antarctica. While such an adaptation can impact ice crystal structure, it is not known what effect these proteins may have on the liquid vein network and to what extent these organisms may control their habitat. This study uses magnetic resonance techniques to investigate the effects of chemical and biological impurities on the liquid vein structure in ice. Magnetic resonance techniques are powerful tools for probing pore structure and transport dynamics in porous media systems, however, their ability to characterize ice as a porous media has not yet been fully explored. Three experimental conditions were evaluated in this study. Ices were prepared from 7 g/L NaCl solutions with; 1) addition of a quantified amount of extra-cellular proteins (>30kDa) extracted from Chryseobacterium sp. V3519-10 2) addition of equivalent concentrations of the protein, Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and 3) no protein addition. Samples were frozen and analyzed at -15C. The liquid vein structure, as a function of salt and protein concentrations, was characterized to obtain information on liquid water content, vein surface to volume ratios and tortuosity as a measure of vein network interconnectivity. These measurements were non-destructive and made at various time intervals after freezing to monitor the evolution of microstructure due to recrystallization and assess the effects of the added proteins.

  14. Structural and biophysical characterisation of G protein-coupled receptor ligand binding using resonance energy transfer and fluorescent labelling techniques.

    PubMed

    Ward, Richard J; Milligan, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between ligands and the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to which they bind has long been the focus of intensive investigation. The signalling cascades triggered by receptor activation, due in most cases to ligand binding, are of great physiological and medical importance; indeed, GPCRs are targeted by in excess of 30% of small molecule therapeutic medicines. Attempts to identify further pharmacologically useful GPCR ligands, for receptors with known and unknown endogenous ligands, continue apace. In earlier days direct assessment of such interactions was restricted largely to the use of ligands incorporating radioactive isotope labels as this allowed detection of the ligand and monitoring its interaction with the GPCR. This use of such markers has continued with the development of ligands labelled with fluorophores and their application to the study of receptor-ligand interactions using both light microscopy and resonance energy transfer techniques, including homogenous time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Details of ligand-receptor interactions via X-ray crystallography are advancing rapidly as methods suitable for routine production of substantial amounts and stabilised forms of GPCRs have been developed and there is hope that this may become as routine as the co-crystallisation of serine/threonine kinases with ligands, an approach that has facilitated widespread use of rapid structure-based ligand design. Conformational changes involved in the activation of GPCRs, widely predicted by biochemical and biophysical means, have inspired the development of intramolecular FRET-based sensor forms of GPCRs designed to investigate the events following ligand binding and resulting in a signal propagation across the cell membrane. Finally, a number of techniques are emerging in which ligand-GPCR binding can be studied in ways that, whilst indirect, are able to monitor its results in an unbiased and integrated manner. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Structural and biophysical characterisation of membrane protein-ligand binding. PMID:23590995

  15. Nuclear magnetic and quadrupole resonance in metallic powders in the presence of strong quadrupole interaction: Rhenium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitropoulos, C.; Maglione, M.; Borsa, F.

    1988-03-01

    The nuclear-magnetic-resonance and nuclear-quadrupole-resonance (NQR-NMR) spectra of /sup 187/Re and /sup 185/Re in a powder of rhenium metal were measured in the temperature range 5--10 K both in zero field and with an external magnetic field. The zero-field NQR spectrum is severely broadened by a nonuniform distribution of quadrupole interactions. The average quadrupole coupling frequencies measured at 5 K are, for the two isotopes, ..nu../sub Q/ = 39 +- 0.2 MHz (/sup 187/Re) and ..nu../sub Q/ = 40.8 +- 0.3 MHz (/sup 185/Re). The spectra obtained in the presence of an external magnetic field can be interpreted satisfactorily in terms of transitions among the eigenstates of the full Hamiltonian (Zeeman plus quadrupolar). Measurements of relaxation rates yield T/sub 1/T = 0.03 sK, indicating a relaxation mechanism driven by the hyperfine interaction with the conduction electrons. The feasibility of NQR-NMR studies in small metal particles in the presence of strong inhomogeneous quadrupole interactions is assessed

  16. Development of High Resolution Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Neutron Dosimetry Technique with93Nb(n,n')93mNb Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Hideki; Takatsuka, Takaaki; Takamatsu, Takahide; Adachi, Yoshitaka; Furuta, Yujin; Noto, Takuma; Iguchi, Tetsuo; Sonnenschein, Volker; Wendt, Klaus; Ito, Chikara; Maeda, Shigetaka

    2016-02-01

    We have proposed an advanced technique to measure the 93mNb yield precisely by Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry, instead of conventional characteristic X-ray spectroscopy. 93mNb-selective resonance ionization is achievable by distinguishing the hyperfine splitting of the atomic energy levels between 93Nb and 93mNb at high resolution. In advance of 93mNb detection, we could successfully demonstrate high resolution resonant ionization spectroscopy of stable 93Nb using an all solid-state, narrow-band and tunable Ti:Sapphire laser system operated at 1 kHz repetition rate.

  17. Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging techniques to probe muscle structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malis, Vadim

    Structural and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) studies of skeletal muscle allow the elucidation of muscle physiology under normal and pathological conditions. Continuing on the efforts of the Muscle Imaging and Modeling laboratory, the focus of the thesis is to (i) extend and refine two challenging imaging modalities: structural imaging using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and functional imaging based on Velocity Encoded Phase Contrast Imaging (VE-PC) and (ii) apply these methods to explore age related structure and functional differences of the gastrocnemius muscle. Diffusion Tensor Imaging allows the study of tissue microstructure as well as muscle fiber architecture. The images, based on an ultrafast single shot Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) sequence, suffer from geometric distortions and low signal to noise ratio. A processing pipeline was developed to correct for distortions and to improve image Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). DTI acquired on a senior and young cohort of subjects were processed through the pipeline and differences in DTI derived indices and fiber architecture between the two cohorts were explored. The DTI indices indicated that at the microstructural level, fiber atrophy was accompanied with a reduction in fiber volume fraction. At the fiber architecture level, fiber length and pennation angles decreased with age that potentially contribute to the loss of muscle force with age. Velocity Encoded Phase Contrast imaging provides tissue (e.g. muscle) velocity at each voxel which allows the study of strain and Strain Rate (SR) under dynamic conditions. The focus of the thesis was to extract 2D strain rate tensor maps from the velocity images and apply the method to study age related differences. The tensor mapping can potentially provide unique information on the extracellular matrix and lateral transmission the role of these two elements has recently emerged as important determinants of force loss with age. In the cross sectional study on aging, strain rate during isometric contraction was significantly reduced in the seniors; presumably from decrease in muscle slack and increase in stiffness with age. Other parameters of interest from this study that allow inferences on the ECM and lateral transmission are the asymmetry of deformation in the fiber cross section as well as the angle between the SR and muscle fiber. The last part of thesis, which is a 'work-in-progress', is the extension to 3D SR tensor mapping using a 3D spatial, 3D velocity encoded imaging sequence. This is combined with Diffusion Tensor Imaging to obtain the lead eigenvector (muscle fiber direction) at each voxel. The 3D SR is then rotated to the basis of the DTI to obtain a 'Fiber Aligned Strain rate: FASR'. The off diagonal elements of FASR are shear strain terms. Detailed analysis of the shear strain will provide a unique non-invasive method to probe lateral transmission.

  18. Using nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance and electric field gradient information for the study of radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Iselin, L.H.

    1995-12-01

    Nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) was used in an attempt to detect the effects of ionizing radiation on organic material. Previously reported resonances for urea were detected at 2,913.32 {+-} 0.01 kHz and 2,347.88 {+-} 0.08 kHz with associated T{sub 2}* values 780 {+-} 20 {micro}s and 523 {+-} 24 {micro}s, respectively. The previously unreported {nu}{sub {minus}} line for urea-d{sup 4} was detected at 2,381 {+-} 0.04 Khz and used to determine accurately for the first time the values for the nuclear quadrupole coupling constant {chi} (3,548.74 {+-} 0.03 kHz) and the asymmetry parameter {eta} (0.31571 {+-} 0.00007) for urea-d{sup 4}. The inverse linewidth parameter T{sub 2}* for {nu}{sub +} was measured at 928 {+-} 23 {micro}s and for {nu}{sub {minus}} at 721 {+-} 12 {micro}s. Townes and Dailey analysis was performed and urea-d{sup 4} exhibits a 0.004 increase in lone pair electronic density and a slight decrease in N-H bond electronic density, as compared to urea, probably due to the mass difference. A relationship is proposed, referred to as NQR linewidth analysis, between the dynamic spin relaxation times T{sub 2} and T{sub 2}* and the widths of the distributions of the NQR parameters. Linewidth analysis is presented as a tool for possible use in future NQR work in all area, not just radiation effects. This relationship is tested using sodium nitrite T{sub 2} and T{sub 2}* values for {nu}{sub {minus}} and {nu}{sub {minus}} as a function of temperature.

  19. Flexible reduced field of view magnetic resonance imaging based on single-shot spatiotemporally encoded technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Cai, Cong-Bo; Chen, Lin; Chen, Ying; Qu, Xiao-Bo; Cai, Shu-Hui

    2015-10-01

    In many ultrafast imaging applications, the reduced field-of-view (rFOV) technique is often used to enhance the spatial resolution and field inhomogeneity immunity of the images. The stationary-phase characteristic of the spatiotemporally-encoded (SPEN) method offers an inherent applicability to rFOV imaging. In this study, a flexible rFOV imaging method is presented and the superiority of the SPEN approach in rFOV imaging is demonstrated. The proposed method is validated with phantom and in vivo rat experiments, including cardiac imaging and contrast-enhanced perfusion imaging. For comparison, the echo planar imaging (EPI) experiments with orthogonal RF excitation are also performed. The results show that the signal-to-noise ratios of the images acquired by the proposed method can be higher than those obtained with the rFOV EPI. Moreover, the proposed method shows better performance in the cardiac imaging and perfusion imaging of rat kidney, and it can scan one or more regions of interest (ROIs) with high spatial resolution in a single shot. It might be a favorable solution to ultrafast imaging applications in cases with severe susceptibility heterogeneities, such as cardiac imaging and perfusion imaging. Furthermore, it might be promising in applications with separate ROIs, such as mammary and limb imaging. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474236, 81171331, and U1232212).

  20. A noncontact resonance frequency detection technique for the assessment of the interfacial bone defect around a dental implant.

    PubMed

    Pan, Min-Chun; Zhuang, Han-Bo; Chen, Chin-Sung; Wu, Jer-Whey; Lee, Shyh-Yuan

    2013-12-01

    This study employed a noncontact resonance frequency (RF) detection technique that was developed by our group to evaluate the interfacial bone in in vitro implant-bone models. Based on our method, the implant-bone structure was excited by the acoustic energy of a loudspeaker, and its vibration response was acquired with a capacitance sensor. The spectral analysis was used to characterize the first RF value. Two types of in vitro defect models, Buccal-Lingual (BL) and Mesial-Distal (MD), were constructed for the verification. The measurements of the RF for a defect model clamped at four different heights (9, 10, 11, and 12 mm) were performed in two sensing directions (BL and MD). Moreover, each model was also analyzed using an Osstell Mentor. The obtained two parameters, RF and ISQ (Implant Stability Quotient), were statistically analyzed through one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and linear regression analysis for comparisons. The RF and the ISQ values obtained for all of the defect models at the four clamp heights decreased significantly (p < 0.05) with an increase in the severity of the defect. The two parameters for each imperfection increase significantly (p < 0.05) with an increase in the clamp height. Additionally, the RFs of all of the defect models are linearly correlated with their corresponding ISQs for the four clamp heights and the two measuring orientations. Therefore, our developed technique is feasible for the assessment of the postoperative healing around a dental implant. PMID:23764430

  1. Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance: a non-invasive technique for the study of muscle bioenergetics during exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Sapega, A.A.; Sokolow, D.P.; Graham, T.J.; Chance, B.

    1987-08-01

    Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance (/sup 31/P NMR) spectroscopy is a non-destructive analytical laboratory technique that, due to recent technical advances, has become applicable to the study of high-energy phosphate metabolism in both animal and human extremity muscles (in vivo). /sup 31/P NMR can assay cellular phosphocreatine, ATP, inorganic phosphate, the phosphorylated glycolytic intermediates, and intra-cellular pH in either resting or exercising muscle, in a non-invasive manner. NMR uses non-perturbing levels of radio-frequency energy as its biophysical probe and can therefore safely study intact muscle in a repeated fashion while exerting no artifactual influence on ongoing metabolic processes. Compared with standard tissue biopsy and biochemical assay techniques, NMR possesses the advantages of being non-invasive, allowing serial in situ studies of the same tissue sample, and providing measurements of only active (unbound) metabolites. NMR studies of exercising muscle have yielded information regarding fatigue mechanisms at the cellular level and are helping resolve long-standing questions regarding the metabolic control of glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, and post-exercise phosphocreatine re-synthesis. NMR is also being utilized to measure enzymatic reaction rates in vivo. In the near future, other forms of NMR spectroscopy may also permit the non-invasive measurement of tissue glycogen and lactate content. 75 references.

  2. Time-domain simulations of nonlinear interaction in microring resonators using finite-difference and coupled mode techniques.

    PubMed

    Shugayev, Roman; Bermel, Peter

    2014-08-11

    Nonlinear interactions within compact, on-chip microring resonant cavities is a topic of increasing interest in current silicon photonics research. Frequency combs, one of the emerging nonlinear applications in microring optics, offers great potential from both scientific and practical perspectives. However, the mechanisms of comb formation appear to differ from traditional frequency combs formed by pulsed femtosecond lasers, and thus require detailed elucidation through theory and simulation. Here we propose a technique to mimic the accuracy of finite-difference time domain (FDTD) full wave nonlinear optical simulations with only a small fraction of the computational resources. Our new hybrid approach combines a single linear FDTD simulation of the key interaction parameters, then directly inserts them into a coupled-mode theory simulation. Comparison of the hybrid approach and full FDTD shows a good match both in frequency domain and in time domain. Thus, it retains the advantage of FDTD in terms of direct connection with experimental designs, while finishing much faster and sidestepping stability issues associated with direct simulation of nonlinear phenomena. The hybrid technique produces several key results explored in this paper, including: demonstrating that comb formation can occur with both anomalous and normal dispersion; suggesting a new mechanism for incoherent (Type II) frequency comb formation; and illustrating a method for creating soliton-like pulses in on-chip microresonators. PMID:25321006

  3. Dataset of magnetic resonance images of nonepileptic subjects and temporal lobe epilepsy patients for validation of hippocampal segmentation techniques.

    PubMed

    Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Elisevich, Kost V; Patel, Suresh; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2011-12-01

    The hippocampus has become the focus of research in several neurodegenerative disorders. Automatic segmentation of this structure from magnetic resonance (MR) imaging scans of the brain facilitates this work. Segmentation techniques must be evaluated using a dataset of MR images with accurate hippocampal outlines generated manually. Manual segmentation is not a trivial task. Lack of a unique segmentation protocol and poor image quality are only two factors that have confounded the consistency required for comparative study. We have developed a publicly available dataset of T1-weighted (T1W) MR images of epileptic and nonepileptic subjects along with their hippocampal outlines to provide a means of evaluation of segmentation techniques. This dataset contains 50 T1W MR images, 40 epileptic and ten nonepileptic. All images were manually segmented by a widely used protocol. Twenty five images were selected for training and were provided with hippocampal labels. Twenty five other images were provided without labels for testing algorithms. The users are allowed to evaluate their generated labels for the test images using 11 segmentation similarity metrics. Using this dataset, we evaluated two segmentation algorithms, Brain Parser and Classifier Fusion and Labeling (CFL), trained by the training set. For Brain Parser, an average Dice coefficient of 0.64 was obtained with the testing set. For CFL, this value was 0.75. Such findings indicate a need for further improvement of segmentation algorithms in order to enhance reliability. PMID:21286946

  4. Comparison of the results of computerized tomographic and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging techniques in inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Erturk, Sukru Mehmet; Cakmakci, Selma; Bayram, Aysel; Tokgoz, Safiye; Caliskan, Kosti Can; Celebi, Irfan

    2013-01-01

    Aim To compare the findings obtained by computerised tomography (CT) enterography, which uses oral neutral contrast material and non-contrasted diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) technique and reveal the diagnostic value of DW-MRI in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. Methods Patients with established or clinically suspect diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease were included in the study. CT enterography and DW-MRI obtained from the patients were evaluated by a radiologist blinded to the endoscopic and/or histopathological results. Duodenum, jejunum, ileal loops, ascending, transverse, descending colon, sigmoid colon and rectum were evaluated in that order as for general imaging quality, luminal distension and adequate visualization of the intestinal wall. Image qualities of neutral contrast CT-enterography and DW-MRI were compared. Results The study included 31 patients. Based on statistical analyses, the best correlation between the results of CT-enterography and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) were observed in the evaluation of transverse colon, ileum and duodenum in order of decreasing frequency and with an almost perfect compatibility. Radiological findings of sigmoid colon, jejunum and descending colon were completely compatible. However, a moderate degree of compatibility was estimated between radiological findings of rectum and cecum. Conclusions Though conventional enteroclysis is the gold standard method among radiological imaging techniques used for the evaluation of inflammatory small intestinal abnormalities, CT enterography and DW-MRI are alternative methods that can be used effectively to obtain useful information. PMID:24404447

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Coronary Arteries and Heart Valves in a Living Mouse: Techniques and Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, Jan; Wiesmann, Frank; Lanz, Titus; Haase, Axel

    2000-10-01

    New investigations in MRI of a mouse heart showed high-contrast cardiac images and thereby the possibility of doing functional cardiac studies of in vivo mice. But is MRI, in addition, capable of visualizing microstructures such as the coronary arteries and the heart valves of a living mouse? To answer this question, 2D and 3D gradient echo sequences with and without flow compensation were used to image the coronary arteries. To increase signal-to-noise ratio, a birdcage resonator was optimized for mouse heart imaging. Contrast between blood and myocardium was achieved through the inflow effect. A segmented three-dimensional FLASH sequence acquired with a multiple overlap thin slab technique showed the best results. With this technique an isotropic resolution of 100 ?m was achieved. The left coronary artery could be visualized up to the apex of the heart. This is demonstrated with short axis views and 3D surface reconstructions of the mouse heart. The four cardiac valves were also visible with the 3D method.

  6. Clinical significance of a highly sensitive enzyme immunoassay of hepatitis B surface antigen using a novel electron spin resonance technique.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Masanori; Saito, Takafumi; Watanabe, Hisayoshi; Matsuo, Taku; Saito, Koji; Togashi, Hitoshi; Kawata, Sumio; Ishikawa, Kazuyoshi; Aoyama, Masaaki; Kamada, Hitoshi; Shinzawa, Haruhide

    2002-02-01

    We developed a highly sensitive enzyme immunoassay (EIA), the p-AP/HHTIO method, that detects serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) by measuring stabilized nitroxide radicals using a novel electron spin resonance technique [Matsuo et al. (1998) Free Radic Biol Med 25:929-935]. To demonstrate the clinical significance of this method and to reveal occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in patients, we used the method to analyze serum samples of 30 patients with acute or fulminant hepatitis who were negative for HBsAg by standard EIA, and those of seven chronic HBV carriers who became negative for HBsAg during a follow-up period by standard EIA. We also examined serum HBV DNA by amplification of the HBV S gene, using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The p-AP/HHTIO method showed that 9 of 20 (45%) patients with acute hepatitis and 2 of 10 (20%) with fulminant hepatitis were positive for HBsAg; PCR detected HBV DNA in these HBsAg-positive patients. Antibody against hepatitis B core antigen was detected in one patient with fulminant hepatitis. The p-AP/HHTIO method demonstrated prolonged seropositivity of HBsAg even after standard EIA showed a loss of HBsAg in all seven HBV carriers. Our p-AP/HHTIO method is useful for screening and diagnosing HBV infection in patients with liver diseases who are negative for conventional HBV-related serological markers. PMID:11782924

  7. An automatic method for detection and classification of Ionospheric Alfvn Resonances using signal and image processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beggan, Ciaran

    2014-05-01

    Induction coils permit us to measure the very rapid changes of the magnetic field. In June 2012, the British Geological Survey Geomagnetism team installed two high frequency (100 Hz) induction coil magnetometers at the Eskdalemuir Observatory (55.3 N, 3.2 W, L~3), in the Scottish Borders of the United Kingdom. The Eskdalemuir Observatory is one of the longest running geophysical sites in the UK (beginning operation in 1908) and is located in a rural valley with a quiet magnetic environment. The coils record magnetic field changes over an effective frequency range of about 0.1-40Hz, and encompass phenomena such as the Schumann resonances, magnetospheric pulsations and Ionospheric Alfvn Resonances (IAR). In this study we focus on the IAR, which are related to the vibration of magnetic field lines passing through the ionosphere, believed to be mainly excited by lower atmospheric electrical discharges. The IAR typically manifest as a series of spectral resonances structures (SRS) within the 1-6Hz frequency range, usually appearing a fine bands or fringes in spectrogram plots. The SRS tend to occur daily between 18.00-06.00UT at the Eskdalemuir site, disappearing during the daylight hours. They usually start as a single low frequency before bifurcating into 5-10 separate fringes, increasing in frequency until around midnight. The fringes also widen in frequency before fading around 06.00UT. Occasionally, the fringes decrease in frequency slightly around 03.00UT before fading. In order to quantify the daily, seasonal and annual changes of the SRS, we developed a new method to identify the fringes and to quantify their occurrence in frequency (f) and the change in frequency (?f). The method uses short time-series of 100 seconds to produce an FFT spectral plot from which the non-stationary peaks are identified using the residuals from a best-fit six order spline. This is repeated for an entire day of data. The peaks from each time-slice are placed into a matrix which is then treated as an image. In combination with the spectrogram image of that day, the SRS are identified using image processing techniques. The peaks can now be mapped as continuous lines throughout the spectrogram. Finally, we can investigate the f and ?f statistics over the entire length of the dataset. We intend to run the coils as a long term experiment. The data and code are available on request.

  8. Compositional study of silicon oxynitride thin films deposited using electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, H.; Sah, R.E.

    2005-05-01

    We have used backscattering spectrometry and {sup 15}N({sup 1}H,{alpha},{gamma}){sup 12}C nuclear reaction analysis techniques to study in detail the variation in the composition of silicon oxynitride films with deposition parameters. The films were deposited using 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique from mixtures of precursors argon, nitrous oxide, and silane at deposition temperature 90 deg. C. The deposition pressure and nitrous oxide-to-silane gas flow rates ratio have been found to have a pronounced influence on the composition of the films. When the deposition pressure was varied for a given nitrous oxide-to-silane gas flow ratio, the amount of silicon and nitrogen increased with the deposition pressure, while the amount of oxygen decreased. For a given deposition pressure, the amount of incorporated nitrogen and hydrogen decreased while that of oxygen increased with increasing nitrous oxide-to-silane gas flow rates ratio. For nitrous oxide-to-silane gas flow ratio of 5, we obtained films which contained neither chemically bonded nor nonbonded nitrogen atoms as revealed by the results of infrared spectroscopy, backscattering spectrometry, and nuclear reaction analysis. Our results demonstrate the nitrogen-free nearly stoichiometric silicon dioxide films can be prepared from a mixture of precursors argon, nitrous oxide, and silane at low substrate temperature using high-density PECVD technique. This avoids the use of a hazardous and an often forbidden pair of silane and oxygen gases in a plasma reactor.

  9. High precision micro-impulse measurements for micro-thrusters based on torsional pendulum and sympathetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daixian; Wu, Jianjun; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Hua; He, Zhen

    2013-12-01

    A sympathetic resonance theory is analyzed and applied in a newly developed torsional pendulum to measure the micro-impulse produced by a ?N s-class ablative pulsed plasma thruster. According to theoretical analysis on the dynamical behaviors of a torsional pendulum, the resonance amplification effect of micro-signals is presented. In addition, a new micro-impulse measurement method based on sympathetic resonance theory is proposed as an improvement of the original single pulse measurement method. In contrast with the single pulse measurement method, the advantages of sympathetic resonance method are significant. First, because of the magnification of vibration signals due to resonance processes, measurement precision for the sympathetic resonance method becomes higher especially in reducing reading error. With an increase in peak number, the relative errors induced by readout of voltage signals decrease to approximately 1.9% for the sympathetic resonance mode, whereas the relative error in single pulse mode is estimated as 13.4%. Besides, by using the resonance amplification effect the sympathetic resonance method makes it possible to measure an extremely low-impulse beyond the resolution of a thrust stand without redesigning or purchasing a new one. Moreover, because of the simple operational principle and structure the sympathetic resonance method is much more convenient and inexpensive to be implemented than other high-precision methods. Finally, the sympathetic resonance measurement method can also be applied in other thrust stands to improve further the ability to measure the low-impulse bits. PMID:24387474

  10. Resonance line transfer calculations by doubling thin layers. I - Comparison with other techniques. II - The use of the R-parallel redistribution function. [planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yelle, Roger V.; Wallace, Lloyd

    1989-01-01

    A versatile and efficient technique for the solution of the resonance line scattering problem with frequency redistribution in planetary atmospheres is introduced. Similar to the doubling approach commonly used in monochromatic scattering problems, the technique has been extended to include the frequency dependence of the radiation field. Methods for solving problems with external or internal sources and coupled spectral lines are presented, along with comparison of some sample calculations with results from Monte Carlo and Feautrier techniques. The doubling technique has also been applied to the solution of resonance line scattering problems where the R-parallel redistribution function is appropriate, both neglecting and including polarization as developed by Yelle and Wallace (1989). With the constraint that the atmosphere is illuminated from the zenith, the only difficulty of consequence is that of performing precise frequency integrations over the line profiles. With that problem solved, it is no longer necessary to use the Monte Carlo method to solve this class of problem.

  11. Impact of the state of water on the dispersion stability of a skin cream formulation elucidated by magnetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Masato; Onuki, Yoshinori; Okuno, Yoshihide; Takayama, Kozo

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the state of water and the dispersion stability of a skin cream formulation. Hydrophilic ointments treated with a high-pressure wet-type jet mill were used as model formulations. Spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1)) were measured by magnetic resonance techniques to estimate the state of water in samples. A shorter T(1) relaxation time was obtained from samples with higher surfactant content, whereas the processing pressure of the jet mill and 1-week storage at 40 C did not influence the T(1) relaxation time. Observations using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that coalescence occurred in samples with lower surfactant contents (1.0% by weight) following 1-week storage at 40 C. We also investigated samples prepared using a hydrophilic surfactant with a short polyethylene glycol (PEG) chain and with PEG-4000. From the change in T(1) relaxation times after removing the oil phase from samples by centrifugation, it was clarified that most of the surfactant was located on the surface of oil droplets. Furthermore, SEM observations showed that phase separation was facilitated as the PEG chain length of the surfactant shortened. Thus, a thin water layer over oil droplets is the most important factor for stabilizing their dispersion. This study provides proof-of-principle results on the contribution of the state of water to the dispersion stability of a skin cream formulation. PMID:21372414

  12. Established and emerging cardiovascular magnetic resonance techniques for the assessment of stable coronary heart disease and acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ripley, David P.; Motwani, Manish; Plein, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. International guidelines recommend cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) as an investigative option in those presenting with chest pain to inform diagnosis, risk stratify and determine the need for revascularization. CMR offers a unique method to assess global and regional cardiac function, myocardial perfusion, myocardial viability, tissue characterisation and proximal coronary anatomy all within a single study. This results in high diagnostic accuracy for the detection of significant coronary stenoses and an established role in the management of both stable CHD and acute coronary syndromes (ACS). The growing evidence base for the prognostic value of CMR, emerging advances in acquisition techniques, improvements in hardware and the completion of current major multi-centre clinical CMR trials will further raise its prominence in international guidelines and routine cardiological practice. This article will focus on the rapidly evolving role of the multi-parametric CMR examination in the assessment of patients with stable and unstable CHD. PMID:25392820

  13. Using (1)H magnetic resonance imaging and complementary analytical techniques to characterize developmental changes in the Zantedeschia Spreng. tuber.

    PubMed

    Robinson, A; Clark, C J; Clemens, J

    2000-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and complementary analytical techniques were used to examine tissue structure and developmental changes occurring during active growth in the root tuber of ZANTEDESCHIA: Spreng. cv. Chianti, a commercially significant cut flower. Plants were observed during the period of leaf senescence and tuberization at the end of the first growth cycle of micropropagated plantlets and, following cool storage to break endodormancy, during development occurring after the replanting of ecodormant tubers. MRI distinguished two distinct regions within the tuber, and the differences in the binding state of water in the two regions were reflected in differences in tissue morphology and function. An abundance of free water was observed in tissue comprised of large parenchyma cells, at the base of the tuber. This tissue appeared to be involved in maintaining the viability of the plant during the period of dormancy, a function indicated primarily by increased metabolic activity in this tissue during dormancy, and reduced metabolic activity during periods of active growth. In contrast, water was more tightly bound in tissue comprised of small parenchyma cells. This tissue appeared to operate as a region for dynamic carbohydrate storage. The initial increase in the free water content of this tissue during the growth phase was linked to the mobilization of starch during canopy development. The subsequent decrease in free water in the remainder of the growth period was linked to the reaccumulation of starch while the tuber functioned as a sink for photosynthate prior to canopy senescence. PMID:11141175

  14. In vivo evaluation of different alterations of redox status by studying pharmacokinetics of nitroxides using magnetic resonance techniques

    PubMed Central

    Bačić, Goran; Pavićević, Aleksandra; Peyrot, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Free radicals, particularly reactive oxygen species (ROS), are involved in various pathologies, injuries related to radiation, ischemia-reperfusion or ageing. Unfortunately, it is virtually impossible to directly detect free radicals in vivo, but the redox status of the whole organism or particular organ can be studied in vivo by using magnetic resonance techniques (EPR and MRI) and paramagnetic stable free radicals – nitroxides. Here we review results obtained in vivo following the pharmacokinetics of nitroxides on experimental animals (and a few in humans) under various conditions. The focus was on conditions where the redox status has been altered by induced diseases or harmful agents, clearly demonstrating that various EPR/MRI/nitroxide combinations can reliably detect metabolically induced changes in the redox status of organs. These findings can improve our understanding of oxidative stress and provide a basis for studying the effectiveness of interventions aimed to modulate oxidative stress. Also, we anticipate that the in vivo EPR/MRI approach in studying the redox status can play a vital role in the clinical management of various pathologies in the years to come providing the development of adequate equipment and probes. PMID:26827126

  15. Multiphoton and magnetic resonance imaging of Barley embryos: comparing micro-imaging techniques across scale and parameter barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Martin; Manz, Bertram; Riemann, Iris; Volke, Frank; Weschke, Winfriede; König, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    Multiphoton stimulated autofluorescence microscopy and Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) address different molecular properties of the sample and reach to a different length scale. MRI maps density or mobility of nuclei (here: hydrogen), and targets at whole objects from the scale of sub-millimetres to meters. Multiphoton imaging profits from the nonlinear absorption of light in the focus of a femtosecond laser source stimulating the autofluorescence of biomolecules. As this effect relies on a high light intensity the accessible field of view is limited, but the resolution is very high. Studying a plant embryo (barley) we compare the two techniques. At 770 nm excitation the cell walls of the embryo exhibited significant autofluorescence, allowing for a subcellular resolution. While details where imaged with an objective of N.A. 1.3, an overview was generated with a N.A. as low as 0.25. The overview image as well as merged images and tomographical data were used to link the high-resolution optical data with the three-dimensional highresolution MR images. There, images of the proton density were acquired using a standard 3D spin-echo imaging pulse sequence. While the optical high-resolution data provides a field of view restricted to only a small part of the embryo, the MR image contains the whole grain. Bridging the scales it might be possible to trace transport of e.g. nutrients from large structure of the plant to the cellular level.

  16. Ferromagnetic critical behavior in U(Co1-xFex)Al (0 ?x ?0.02 ) studied by 59Co nuclear quadrupole resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karube, K.; Hattori, T.; Ishida, K.; Kimura, N.

    2015-02-01

    In order to investigate physical properties around a ferromagnetic (FM) quantum transition point and a tricritical point (TCP) in the itinerant-electron metamagnetic compound UCoAl, we have performed the 59Co nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurement for the Fe-substituted U(Co1-xFex)Al(x =0 ,0.5 ,1 ,and2 %) in zero external magnetic field. The Fe concentration dependence of 59Co -NQR spectra at low temperatures indicates that the first-order FM transition occurs at least above x =1 % . The magnetic fluctuations along the c axis detected by the nuclear spin-spin relaxation rate 1 /T2 exhibit an anomaly at Tmax20 K and enhance with increasing x . These results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions and indicate the presence of prominent critical fluctuations at the TCP in this system.

  17. NMR and NQR study of the electronic and structural properties of Al-Cu-Fe and Al-Cu-Ru quasicrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shastri, A.; Borsa, F.; Torgeson, D.R.; Shield, J.E.; Goldman, A.I. )

    1994-12-01

    [sup 27]Al and [sup 63,65]Cu NMR is reported for powdered stable Al-Cu-Fe and Al-Cu-Ru icosahedral quasicrystals and crystalline approximants, and for an Al-Pd-Mn single-grain quasicrystal. [sup 27]Al NQR spectra at 4.2 K were observed in Al-Cu-Fe and Al-Cu-Ru samples. From quadrupole-perturbed NMR spectra at different magnetic fields, and from zero-field NQR spectra, a wide distribution of local electric-field gradient (EFG) tensor components and principal-axis-system orientations was found at the Al site. A model EFG calculation based on a 1/1 Al-Cu-Fe approximant successfully explained the observed NQR spectra. The average local gradient is largely determined by the [ital p]-electron wave function at the Al site, while the width of the distribution is due to EFG lattice contribution. Comparison of [sup 63]Cu and [sup 27]Al NMR shows the EFG distribution at the two sites is similar, but the electronic contribution to the EFG is considerably smaller at the Cu site, in agreement with a more [ital s]-type wave function of the conduction electrons. Overall spread of EFG values is well reproduced by calculation based on the approximant. However, the experimental spectra indicate a much larger number of nonequivalent sites when compared with the simulated NQR spectra based on the 1/1 approximant. The short-range, local chemical order is well represented by the approximant, but differences in coordination must be included at intermediate range in the quasicrystal. Measured [sup 27]Al Knight shift, magnetic susceptibility, and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time as a function of temperature indicate reduced density of states at the Fermi level by a factor of 7 or 8 from the value in Al metal, consistent with the notion of a pseudogap for these quasicrystals. No differences in measured parameters were detected as a function of composition of the quasicrystalline alloys.

  18. Resonant behavior of dielectric objects (electrostatic resonances).

    PubMed

    Fredkin, D R; Mayergoyz, I D

    2003-12-19

    Resonant behavior of dielectric objects occurs at certain frequencies for which the object permittivity is negative and the free-space wavelength is large in comparison with the object dimensions. Unique physical features of these resonances are studied and a novel technique for the calculation of resonance values of permittivity, and hence resonance frequencies, is proposed. Scale invariance of resonance frequencies, unusually strong orthogonality properties of resonance modes, and a two-dimensional phenomenon of "twin" spectra are reported. The paper concludes with brief discussions of optical controllability of these resonances in semiconductor nanoparticles and a plausible, electrostatic resonance based, mechanism for nucleation and formation of ball lightning. PMID:14754117

  19. Quantitative linear and nonlinear resonance inspection techniques and analysis for material characterization: application to concrete thermal damage.

    PubMed

    Payan, C; Ulrich, T J; Le Bas, P Y; Saleh, T; Guimaraes, M

    2014-08-01

    Developed in the late 1980s, Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (NRUS) has been widely employed in the field of material characterization. Most of the studies assume the measured amplitude to be proportional to the strain amplitude which drives nonlinear phenomena. In 1D resonant bar experiments, the configuration for which NRUS was initially developed, this assumption holds. However, it is not true for samples of general shape which exhibit several resonance mode shapes. This paper proposes a methodology based on linear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy, numerical simulations and nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy to provide quantitative values of nonlinear elastic moduli taking into account the 3D nature of the samples. In the context of license renewal in the field of nuclear energy, this study aims at providing some quantitative information related to the degree of micro-cracking of concrete and cement based materials in the presence of thermal damage. The resonance based method is validated as regard with concrete microstructure evolution during thermal exposure. PMID:25096088

  20. Invited article: Dielectric material characterization techniques and designs of high-Q resonators for applications from micro to millimeter-waves frequencies applicable at room and cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Le Floch, Jean-Michel; Fan, Y; Humbert, Georges; Shan, Qingxiao; Frachou, Denis; Bara-Maillet, Romain; Aubourg, Michel; Hartnett, John G; Madrangeas, Valerie; Cros, Dominique; Blondy, Jean-Marc; Krupka, Jerzy; Tobar, Michael E

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric resonators are key elements in many applications in micro to millimeter wave circuits, including ultra-narrow band filters and frequency-determining components for precision frequency synthesis. Distributed-layered and bulk low-loss crystalline and polycrystalline dielectric structures have become very important for building these devices. Proper design requires careful electromagnetic characterization of low-loss material properties. This includes exact simulation with precision numerical software and precise measurements of resonant modes. For example, we have developed the Whispering Gallery mode technique for microwave applications, which has now become the standard for characterizing low-loss structures. This paper will give some of the most common characterization techniques used in the micro to millimeter wave regime at room and cryogenic temperatures for designing high-Q dielectric loaded cavities. PMID:24689557

  1. Development of /sup 19/F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques for investigation in situ: application to cerebral evolution of 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques have been developed to noninvasively investigate evolving cerebral 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2FDG) transport and metabolism in the conscious, intact rat. Significant improvements in spectral sensitivity and resolution are achieved upon implementation of proton decoupling the fluorine nuclide in situ and result from the collapse of /sup 18/F-/sup 1/H scalar coupling multiplet structure and a substantial positive nuclear Overhauser effect.

  2. A versatile computer-controlled pulsed nuclear quadrupole resonance spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Gregory; MacNamara, Ernesto; Santini, Robert E.; Raftery, Daniel

    1999-12-01

    A new, pulsed nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectrometer capable of performing a variety of pulsed and swept experiments is described. The spectrometer features phase locked, superheterodyne detection using a commercial spectrum analyzer and a fully automatic, computer-controlled tuning and matching network. The tuning and matching network employs stepper motors which turn high power air gap capacitors in a "moving grid" optimization strategy to minimize the reflected power from a directional coupler. In the duplexer circuit, digitally controlled relays are used to switch different lengths of coax cable appropriate for the different radio frequencies. A home-built pulse programmer card controls the timing of radio frequency pulses sent to the probe, while data acquisition and control software is written in Microsoft Quick Basic. Spin-echo acquisition experiments are typically used to acquire the data, although a variety of pulse sequences can be employed. Scan times range from one to several hours depending upon the step resolution and the spectral range required for each experiment. Pure NQR spectra of NaNO2 and 3-aminopyridine are discussed.

  3. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Measurements of Free Radicals in the Intact Beating Heart: A Technique for Detection and Characterization of Free Radicals in Whole Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweier, Jay L.; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    1988-08-01

    Free radicals have been hypothesized to be important mediators of disease in a variety of organs and tissues. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy can be applied to directly measure free radicals; however, it has not been possible to measure important biological radicals in situ because conventional spectrometer designs are not suitable for the performance of measurements on whole organs or tissues. We report the development of an EPR spectrometer designed for optimum performance in measuring free radicals in intact biological organs or tissues. This spectrometer consists of a 1- to 2-GHz microwave bridge with the source locked to the resonant frequency of a recessed gap loop-gap resonator. With this spectrometer, radical concentrations as low as 0.4 ? M can be measured. Isolated beating hearts were studied in which simultaneous real time measurements of free radicals and cardiac contractile function were performed. This in vivo EPR technique was applied to study the kinetics of free radical uptake and metabolism in normally perfused and globally ischemic hearts. In addition, we show that this technique can be used to noninvasively measure tissue oxygen consumption. Thus, it is demonstrated that EPR spectroscopy can be applied to directly measure in vivo free radical metabolism and tissue oxygen consumption. This technique offers great promise in the study of in vivo free radical generation and the effects of this radical generation on whole biological tissues.

  4. Breast magnetic resonance imaging technique at 1.5 T and 3 T: requirements for quality imaging and American College of Radiology accreditation.

    PubMed

    DeMartini, Wendy B; Rahbar, Habib

    2013-08-01

    Although there are multiple variations in acquisition protocols for breast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, there is agreement that components of high-quality technique include a bilateral acquisition obtained with a dedicated breast coil. Further, key pulse sequences should be included and spatial and temporal resolution should be sufficiently high to assess lesion morphology and kinetics. Artifacts must be recognized and avoided. The American College of Radiology Breast MRI Accreditation Program requirements provide minimum standards to guide facilities in technique. MR imaging at 3 T is increasingly available and offers signal-to-noise ratio advantages over 1.5 T but also some technical challenges. PMID:23928238

  5. s-wave superconductivity in superconducting BaTi2Sb2O revealed by 121/123Sb-NMR/nuclear quadrupole resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, S.; Ishida, K.; Nakano, K.; Yajima, T.; Kageyama, H.

    2013-02-01

    We report the 121/123Sb-NMR/nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements on the superconductor BaTi2Sb2O with a two-dimensional Ti2O square-net layer formed with Ti3+ (3d1). NQR measurements revealed that the in-plane four-fold symmetry is broken at the Sb site below TA40 K, without an internal field appearing at the Sb site. These exclude a spin-density wave (SDW)/ charge density wave (CDW) ordering with incommensurate correlations, but can be understood with the commensurate CDW ordering at TA. The spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1, measured at the four-fold symmetry breaking site, decreases below superconducting (SC) transition temperature Tc, indicative of the microscopic coexistence of superconductivity and the CDW/SDW phase below TA. Furthermore, 1/T1 of 121Sb-NQR shows a coherence peak just below Tc and decreases exponentially at low temperatures. These results are in sharp contrast with those in cuprate and iron-based superconductors, and strongly suggest that its SC symmetry is classified to an ordinary s-wave state.

  6. Simulations of imaging of the local density of states by a charged probe technique for resonant cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolasi?ski, K.; Szafran, B.

    2013-10-01

    We simulate scanning probe imaging of the local density of states related to scattering Fermi level wave functions inside a resonant cavity. We calculate the potential landscape within the cavity, taking into account the Coulomb charge of the probe and its screening by deformation of the two-dimensional electron gas using the local density approximation. Approximation of the tip potential by a Lorentz function is discussed. The electron transfer problem is solved with a finite difference approach. We look for stable work points for the extraction of the local density of states from conductance maps. We find that conductance maps are highly correlated with the local density of states when the Fermi energy level enters into Fano resonance with states localized within the cavity. Generally outside resonances the correlation between the local density of states and conductance maps is low.

  7. Note: Matching index technique for avoiding higher order mode resonance in accelerators: INDUS-2 accelerator as a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, V.; Joshi, S. C.; Bhandarkar, U. V.; Krishnagopal, S.; Centre for Excellence in Basic Sciences, Mumbai 400098

    2013-08-15

    Resonance between circulating beam frequencies and RF cavity Higher Order Modes (HOMs) of accelerators can lead to coupled-bunch instabilities. Shifting these HOMs to avoid the resonance is a topic of active interest. A study has been carried out for the accelerating cavities of the INDUS-2. For quantitative measure of deciding which modes have to be moved and by how much, we introduce a new index called the matching index (I{sub M}), as a measure of how close a HOM is to the nearest beam mode. Depending on the value of I{sub M}, the operating scenarios are classified as safe and unsafe.

  8. Improved L-C resonant decay technique for Q measurement of quasilinear power inductors: New results for MPP and ferrite powdered cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.; Gerber, Scott S.

    1995-01-01

    The L-C resonant decay technique for measuring circuit Q or losses is improved by eliminating the switch from the inductor-capacitor loop. A MOSFET switch is used instead to momentarily connect the resonant circuit to an existing voltage source, which itself is gated off during the decay transient. Very reproducible, low duty cycle data could be taken this way over a dynamic voltage range of at least 10:1. Circuit Q is computed from a polynomial fit to the sequence of the decaying voltage maxima. This method was applied to measure the losses at 60 kHz in inductors having loose powder cores of moly permalloy and an Mn-Zn power ferrite. After the copper and capacitor losses are separated out, the resulting specific core loss is shown to be roughly as expected for the MPP powder, but anomalously high for the ferrite powder. Possible causes are mentioned.

  9. Improved L-C resonant decay technique for Q measurement of quasilinear power inductors: New results for MPP and ferrite powdered cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedra, Janis M.; Gerber, Scott S.

    1995-08-01

    The L-C resonant decay technique for measuring circuit Q or losses is improved by eliminating the switch from the inductor-capacitor loop. A MOSFET switch is used instead to momentarily connect the resonant circuit to an existing voltage source, which itself is gated off during the decay transient. Very reproducible, low duty cycle data could be taken this way over a dynamic voltage range of at least 10:1. Circuit Q is computed from a polynomial fit to the sequence of the decaying voltage maxima. This method was applied to measure the losses at 60 kHz in inductors having loose powder cores of moly permalloy and an Mn-Zn power ferrite. After the copper and capacitor losses are separated out, the resulting specific core loss is shown to be roughly as expected for the MPP powder, but anomalously high for the ferrite powder. Possible causes are mentioned.

  10. High-resolution wave number spectrum using multi-point measurements in space - the Multi-point Signal Resonator (MSR) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Y.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Motschmann, U.

    2011-02-01

    A new analysis method is presented that provides a high-resolution power spectrum in a broad wave number domain based on multi-point measurements. The analysis technique is referred to as the Multi-point Signal Resonator (MSR) and it benefits from Capon's minimum variance method for obtaining the proper power spectral density of the signal as well as the MUSIC algorithm (Multiple Signal Classification) for considerably reducing the noise part in the spectrum. The mathematical foundation of the analysis method is presented and it is applied to synthetic data as well as Cluster observations of the interplanetary magnetic field. Using the MSR technique for Cluster data we find a wave in the solar wind propagating parallel to the mean magnetic field with relatively small amplitude, which is not identified by the Capon spectrum. The Cluster data analysis shows the potential of the MSR technique for studying waves and turbulence using multi-point measurements.

  11. Conceptual Study on New Isotope Analysis Technique with Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using Inductively Coupled Plasma as an Atomic Source (ICP-RIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, K.; Higuchi, Y.; Tomita, H.; Kawarabayashi, J.; Uritani, A.; Iguchi, T.

    2009-03-01

    We have proposed the novel isotope analysis technique with Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry using Inductively Coupled Plasma as an atomic source (ICP-RIMS). Each component of ICP-RIMS is conceptually designed. We conclude that the orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometer (oa-TOF-MS) driven by a high-repetition-rate pulsed laser would be suitable system for ICP-RIMS. We, additionally, suggest that the first vacuum stage of the vacuum interface, which is between the sampling and skimmer cones, is desired to maintain as low pressure as possible in order to suppress the Doppler broadening and to skim the supersonic jet effectively.

  12. Study of hydrogen in coals, polymers, oxides, and muscle water by nuclear magnetic resonance; extension of solid-state high-resolution techniques. [Hydrogen molybdenum bronze

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, L.M.

    1981-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been an important analytical and physical research tool for several decades. One area of NMR which has undergone considerable development in recent years is high resolution NMR of solids. In particular, high resolution solid state /sup 13/C NMR spectra exhibiting features similar to those observed in liquids are currently achievable using sophisticated pulse techniques. The work described in this thesis develops analogous methods for high resolution /sup 1/H NMR of rigid solids. Applications include characterization of hydrogen aromaticities in fossil fuels, and studies of hydrogen in oxides and bound water in muscle.

  13. Evaluation of [sup 31]P magnetic resonance spectroscopy localization techniques in human myocardium and soft-tissue sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chun-Wei.

    1993-01-01

    The overall goals of this thesis are to establish and evaluate [sup 31]P MR spectroscopy localization techniques for their application to the study of human myocardium and sarcomas. Several localization techniques which include 1D-CSI, ISIS, ISIS/CSI, and 2D-CSI were evaluated in the myocardial muscle of normal subjects and patients receiving 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy. Among these localization techniques, 2D-CSI is recommended since it shows good selectivity, good flexibility and a good compromise between sensitivity patient toleration limits. These localization techniques were also evaluated in patients with osteosarcoma and soft-tissue sarcomas. Among these localization techniques, 1D-CSI is recommended for big and superficial tumors. Further definition of the voxel is provided by using 2D-CSI or 3D-CSI in the case of small or deep seated tumors. Several techniques that should improve the [sup 31]P MR spectroscopic study of patients in the future are evaluated on the phantom. These include the presaturation of the chest wall muscle for improved myocardial spectral using the CSI sequence, implementation of the BIR-4 pulse for variable angle adjustable pulse, and the proton decoupling technique for improved resolution and sensitivity. The good performance of the phantoms studies show that these techniques can be further extended to the normal subject and patient studies.

  14. Isotope ratio of Cl NQR spin-lattice relaxation times in 1D hydrogen-bonding system of tetramethylpyrazine-chloranilic acid at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaji, Tetsuo

    2013-05-01

    The temperature dependences of spin-lattice relaxation time T 1 of 35Cl and 37Cl NQR were studied for the co-crystal of tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) with chloranilic acid (H2ca), TMP-H2ca, in which one-dimensional hydrogen bonding is formed by alternate arrangement of TMP and H2ca. The isotope ratio 37Cl T 1 / 35Cl T 1 was determined to be 1.0 0.1 above ca. 290 K where a steep decrease of spin-lattice relaxation time T 1 with increasing temperature was observed. In this temperature range it is suggested that the relaxation is originated from the slow fluctuation of electric field gradient (EFG). Beside EFG fluctuation due to the external-charge-density fluctuation, the small angle reorientation of the quantization axis triggered by a proton transfer motion between N...H-O and N-H...O hydrogen bonding states is proposed.

  15. Topology of the interactions pattern in pharmaceutically relevant polymorphs of methylxanthines (caffeine, theobromine, and theophiline): combined experimental (H-?N nuclear quadrupole double resonance) and computational (DFT and Hirshfeld-based) study.

    PubMed

    Latosi?ska, Jolanta Natalia; Latosi?ska, Magdalena; Olejniczak, Grzegorz A; Seliger, Janez; agar, Veselko

    2014-09-22

    Three anhydrous methylxanthines: caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine; 1,3,7-trimethyl-1H-purine-2,6-(3H,7H)-dione) and its two metabolites theophylline (1,3-dimethylxanthine; 1,3-dimethyl-7H-purine-2,6-dione) and theobromine (3,7-dimethyl-xanthine; 3,7-dimethyl-7H-purine-2,6-dione), which reveal multifaceted therapeutic potential, have been studied experimentally in solid state by (1)H-(14)N NMR-NQR (nuclear magnetic resonance-nuclear quadrupole resonance) double resonance (NQDR). For each compound the complete NQR spectrum consisting of 12 lines was recorded. The multiplicity of NQR lines indicates the presence of a stable ? form of anhydrous caffeine at 233 K and stable form II of anhydrous theobromine at 213 K. The assignment of signals detected in NQR experiment to particular nitrogen atoms was made on the basis of quantum chemistry calculations performed for monomer, cluster, and solid at the DFT/GGA/BLYP/DPD level. The shifts due to crystal packing interactions were evaluated, and the multiplets detected by NQR were assigned to N(9) in theobromine and N(1) and N(9) in caffeine. The ordering theobromine > theophylline > caffeine site and theophylline < theobromine < caffeine according to increasing electric field gradient (EFG) at the N(1) and N(7) sites, respectively, reflects the changes in biological activity profile of compounds from the methylxanthines series (different pharmacological effects). This difference is elucidated on the basis of the ability to form intra- and intermolecular interactions (hydrogen bonds and ?? stacking interactions). The introduction of methyl groups to xanthine restricts the ability of nitrogen atoms to participate in strong hydrogen bonds; as a result, the dominating effect shifts from hydrogen bond (theobromine) to ?? stacking (caffeine). Substantial differences in the intermolecular interactions in stable forms of methylxanthines differing in methylation (site or number) were analyzed within the Hirshfeld surface-based approach. The analysis of local environment of the nitrogen nucleus permitted drawing some conclusions on the nature of the interactions required for effective processes of recognition and binding of a given methylxanthine to A1-A(2A) receptor (target for caffeine in the brain). Although the interactions responsible for linking neighboring methylxanthines molecules in crystals and methylxanthines with targets in the human organism can differ significantly, the knowledge of the topology of interactions provides reliable preliminary information about the nature of this binding. PMID:25184363

  16. Ultrafast multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance technique: A proof of concept based on inverse-k-space for convenient and efficient performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhiliang; Yang, Jian; Chen, Youhe; Chen, Lin; Cao, Shuohui; Cai, Shuhui; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-02-01

    Ultrafast multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique serves as an important and powerful tool for analyzing chemical and biological systems. Here, we propose an inverse-k-space along with a systematic processing strategy to improve quality of the ultrafast spectrum in terms of lineshape, signal-to-noise ratio, and adaptability to magnetic-field inhomogeneity. Experiments on phantom solutions and a chemical reaction system were performed to validate the effectiveness of inverse-k-space in enhancing the spectral quality of ultrafast technique. On the basis of its versatility, the inverse-k-space will facilitate applications of multidimensional NMR spectra in the rapid characterization of homogeneous chemical systems as well as in the real-time detection of inhomogeneous reaction systems.

  17. Surface plasmon resonance technique for directly probing the interaction of DNA and graphene oxide and ultra-sensitive biosensing.

    PubMed

    Xue, Tianyu; Cui, Xiaoqiang; Guan, Weiming; Wang, Qiyu; Liu, Chang; Wang, Haitao; Qi, Kun; Singh, D J; Zheng, Weitao

    2014-08-15

    The binding of DNA with graphene oxide (GO) is important for applications in disease diagnosis, genetic screening, and drug discovery. The standard assay methods are mainly limited to indirect observation via fluorescence labeling. Here we report the use of surface plasmon resonance for direct sensing of DNA/GO binding. We show that this can be used for ultra-sensitive detection of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Furthermore, the results provide a more direct probe of DNA/GO binding abilities and confirm that hydrogen bonding plays a key role in the interaction between GO and ssDNA. This enables to a novel biosensor for highly sensitive and selective detection of ssDNA based on indirect competitive inhibition assay (ICIA). We report development of such a sensor with a linear dynamic range of 10(-14)-10(-6)M, a detection limit of 10fM and a high level of stability during repeated regeneration. PMID:24686149

  18. Time-differential radio-frequency muon spin resonance (TD-RF?SR) technique at a pulsed muon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuermann, R.; Schmidl, J.; Seeger, A.; Stammler, Th.; Herlach, D.; Major, J.

    1997-04-01

    Longitudinal-field ?SR methods, e.g., radio-frequency ?+ spin resonance (RF?SR), are well suited to investigate dynamic processes that destroy the phase coherence of the muon spin ensemble. Additional information on relaxation processes of the muon species under investigation is obtained from time-differential (TD) data acquisition. In this paper we describe the set-up of a TD-RF?SR spectrometer installed at the ISIS pulsed muon facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL, Chilton, UK). As an example, results of TD-RF?SR measurements on muons in diamagnetic environment ?d in a boron-doped silicon sample under illumination at 55 K are presented.

  19. Comparison of the effect of the rotation palatoplasty and V-Y pushback palatoplasty techniques on palate elongation with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Isik, D; Bora, A; Yuce, S; Davran, R; Kocak, O F; Canbaz, Y; Avcu, S; Atik, B

    2015-06-01

    Most surgical techniques used in cleft palate repair require the extension of the palate to the pharynx. However, no adequate information exists regarding the extent to which this elongation obtained during operation continues in late postoperative period. In this study, we compared and measured palate elongation in patients with a cleft palate who underwent a V-Y pushback or rotation palatoplasty, by means of magnetic resonance images obtained before and 1 year after surgery. The hard palate, soft palate, and total palate lengths were measured for all of the patients, and the velopharyngeal opening area width was calculated. In patients who underwent the V-Y pushback technique (n=13), the total palate and soft palate lengths were shortened by an average of 0.10 and 0.14cm after surgery, respectively. However, the hard palate length was elongated by an average of 0.13cm. In the rotation palatoplasty group (n=13), the total palate, hard palate, and soft palate lengths were elongated by 0.57, 0.10, and 0.49cm, respectively. The velopharyngeal opening was narrowed by 0.06cm(2) using the V-Y pushback technique and by 0.29cm(2) using the rotational palatoplasty. This study demonstrated that the palate does not elongate during the V-Y pushback technique, as expected. However, rotational palatoplasty elongates the soft palate. PMID:25739665

  20. Identification of Field Line Resonances in the Magnetosphere Using the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (superdarn): New ``CROSS-POWER and Cross-Phase Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzino, L.; Fenrich, F. R.

    2010-12-01

    Field Line Resonances (FLRs) are Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) standing waves that appear in discrete frequencies and occur in Earths Magnetic Field as a result of wave coupling of MHD compressional and Shear Alfvn waves. The main purpose of the new cross-power and cross-phase technique, presented in this analysis, is to systematically identify FLR occurrence using data from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN), a radar network that detects coherent echoes from plasma irregularities that are aligned with the field lines. SuperDARN data has been successfully used for more than 17 years to identify FLRs, due to its large coverage over the polar cap and auroral region. Specifications of the instrument as well as the algorithm used by this new technique will be explained in detail. As an example we will apply the technique to a known 1.9 mHz FLR that occurred on November 20th 2003 at 22:30-23:00 UT detected by the Prince George station. Discussion of the application of this technique to automatically detect other events, and the future statistical analysis of all events identified will be presented.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with dc SQUID amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Heaney, M.B. . Dept. of Physics Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 {times} 10{sup 17} in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO{sub 3} crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with DC SQUID amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaney, M. B.

    1990-11-01

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al2O3/Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 x 10(exp 17) in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO3 crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of quadrupolar nuclei and dipolar field effects

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Jeffry Todd

    2004-12-21

    Experimental and theoretical research conducted in two areas in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented: (1) studies of the coherent quantum-mechanical control of the angular momentum dynamics of quadrupolar (spin I > 1/2) nuclei and its application to the determination of molecular structure; and (2) applications of the long-range nuclear dipolar field to novel NMR detection methodologies.The dissertation is organized into six chapters. The first two chapters and associated appendices are intended to be pedagogical and include an introduction to the quantum mechanical theory of pulsed NMR spectroscopy and the time dependent theory of quantum mechanics. The third chapter describes investigations of the solid-state multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) NMR experiment applied to I = 5/2 quadrupolar nuclei. This work reports the use of rotary resonance-matched radiofrequency irradiation for sensitivity enhancement of the I = 5/2 MQMAS experiment. These experiments exhibited certain selective line narrowing effects which were investigated theoretically.The fourth chapter extends the discussion of multiple quantum spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to a mostly theoretical study of the feasibility of enhancing the resolution of nitrogen-14 NMR of large biomolecules in solution via double-quantum spectroscopy. The fifth chapter continues to extend the principles of multiple quantum NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to make analogies between experiments in NMR/nuclear quadrupolar resonance (NQR) and experiments in atomic/molecular optics (AMO). These analogies are made through the Hamiltonian and density operator formalism of angular momentum dynamics in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.The sixth chapter investigates the use of the macroscopic nuclear dipolar field to encode the NMR spectrum of an analyte nucleus indirectly in the magnetization of a sensor nucleus. This technique could potentially serve as an encoding module for the recently developed NMR remote detection experiment. The feasibility of using hyperpolarized xenon-129 gas as a sensor is discussed. This work also reports the use of an optical atomic magnetometer to detect the nuclear magnetization of Xe-129 gas, which has potential applicability as a detection module for NMR remote detection experiments.

  4. Determination of dopamine at the nanogram level based on the formation of Prussian blue nanoparticles by resonance Rayleigh scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jiang Xue; Wen, Wei; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2012-02-01

    In pH 2.6 HCl solution, dopamine (DA) could reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II), which further reacted with [Fe(CN) 6] 3- to form a Fe 3[Fe(CN) 6] 2 complex. By virtue of hydrophobic force and Van der Waals force, the complex aggregated to form Fe 3[Fe(CN) 6] 2 nanoparticles with the average diameter of about 20 nm. This resulted in a significant enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS). The maximum wavelength of the ion-association complex was located at about 350 nm. The increment of scattering intensity (? IRRS) was directly proportional to the concentration of DA in the range of 0.06-1.0 ?g/mL. This method has high sensitivity and the detection limit (3 ?) for DA was 3.43 ng/mL. In this work, the characteristics of absorption and RRS spectra of this reaction have been studied. The optimum reaction condition and influencing factors have been investigated. The method was applied to the determination of DA in pharmaceutical samples with satisfactory results. Furthermore, the reaction mechanism and the reasons of RRS enhancement have been explored.

  5. Investigation of high-contrast velocity selective optical pumping resonance at the cycling transition of Cs using fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Saswati; Ray, Biswajit; Ghosh, Pradip Narayan; Cartaleva, Stefka; Slavov, Dimitar

    2015-12-01

    A high contrast (∼48%) Velocity Selective Optical Pumping (VSOP) resonance at the closed transition Fg=4→Fe=5 of Cs-D2 line is obtained in the fluorescence signal under co-propagating pump-probe configuration. We use a 5.2 μm cell operating at reduced temperature (∼55 °C) and the intensity of the pump-laser is kept lower than that of the probe-laser. The observed sharp narrow structure is suitable for side-arms frequency-locking of the cooling- (i.e. probe-) laser in a cold atom experiment, with possibility for "-Γ" to "-4Γ" red-detuning and "+Γ" to "+10Γ" blue-detuning using the standard properties of the commercially available electronics. We have developed a theoretical model corresponding to the thin cell, incorporating the atomic time-of-flight dependent optical pumping decay rate to describe the dimensional anisotropy of the thin cell. The model shows good qualitative agreement with the observation and simulates as well the cases of cells with smaller thickness. It also describes correctly the temperature dependence of the line broadening and shows the potential for further optimization and red-shift detuning above "-4Γ". It may be of interest for further development of miniaturized modules, like the recently developed portable small magneto-optical traps.

  6. Graphene quantum dots and the resonance light scattering technique for trace analysis of phenol in different water samples.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ruiling; Wang, Yong; Ni, Yongnian; Kokot, Serge

    2014-07-01

    A novel, highly selective resonance light scattering (RLS) method was researched and developed for the analysis of phenol in different types of industrial water. An important aspect of the method involved the use of graphene quantum dots (GQDs), which were initially obtained from the pyrolysis of citric acid dissolved in aqueous solutions. The GQDs in the presence of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and H2O2 were found to react quantitatively with phenol such that the RLS spectral band (310 nm) was quantitatively enhanced as a consequence of the interaction between the GQDs and the quinone formed in the above reaction. It was demonstrated that the novel analytical method had better selectivity and sensitivity for the determination of phenol in water as compared to other analytical methods found in the literature. Thus, trace amounts of phenol were detected over the linear ranges of 6.0010(-8)-2.1610(-6)M and 2.4010(-6)-2.8810(-5)M with a detection limit of 2.2010(-8)M. In addition, three different spiked waste water samples and two untreated lake water samples were analysed for phenol. Satisfactory results were obtained with the use of the novel, sensitive and rapid RLS method. PMID:24840454

  7. Video-rate resonant scanning multiphoton microscopy: An emerging technique for intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D; Chung, Euiheon; Cook, Daniel C; Han, Xiaoxing; Gruionu, Gabriel; Liao, Shan; Munn, Lance L; Padera, Timothy P; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K

    2012-01-01

    The abnormal tumor microenvironment fuels tumor progression, metastasis, immune suppression, and treatment resistance. Over last several decades, developments in and applications of intravital microscopy have provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, intravital multiphoton microscopy has revealed the abnormal structure and function of tumor-associated blood and lymphatic vessels, the role of aberrant tumor matrix in drug delivery, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells, the dynamics of immune cell trafficking to and within tumors, and gene expression in tumors. However, traditional multiphoton microscopy suffers from inherently slow imaging rates-only a few frames per second, thus unable to capture more rapid events such as blood flow, lymphatic flow, and cell movement within vessels. Here, we report the development and implementation of a video-rate multiphoton microscope (VR-MPLSM) based on resonant galvanometer mirror scanning that is capable of recording at 30 frames per second and acquiring intravital multispectral images. We show that the design of the system can be readily implemented and is adaptable to various experimental models. As examples, we demonstrate the utility of the system to directly measure flow within tumors, capture metastatic cancer cells moving within the brain vasculature and cells in lymphatic vessels, and image acute responses to changes in a vascular network. VR-MPLSM thus has the potential to further advance intravital imaging and provide new insight into the biology of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24353926

  8. Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy as a Technique for Gentamicin Drug Susceptibility Studies with Escherichia coli ATCC 25922

    PubMed Central

    García-Álvarez, Lara; Busto, Jesús H.; Avenoza, Alberto; Sáenz, Yolanda; Peregrina, Jesús Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial drug susceptibility tests involving multiple time-consuming steps are still used as reference methods. Today, there is a need for the development of new automated instruments that can provide faster results and reduce operating time, reagent costs, and labor requirements. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy meets those requirements. The metabolism and antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 in the presence of gentamicin have been analyzed using NMR and compared with a reference method. Direct incubation of the bacteria (with and without gentamicin) into the NMR tube has also been performed, and differences in the NMR spectra were obtained. The MIC, determined by the reference method found in this study, would correspond with the termination of the bacterial metabolism observed with NMR. Experiments carried out directly into the NMR tube enabled the development of antimicrobial drug susceptibility tests to assess the effectiveness of the antibiotic. NMR is an objective and reproducible method for showing the effects of a drug on the subject bacterium and can emerge as an excellent tool for studying bacterial activity in the presence of different antibiotic concentrations. PMID:25972417

  9. Characterization of plastic scintillators using magnetic resonance techniques for the upgrade of the Tile Calorimeter in the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelwan, C.; Jivan, H.; Joubert, D.; Keartland, J.; Liao, S.; Peters, G.; Sideras-Haddad, E.

    2015-10-01

    In this study we look at radiation damage and its adverse effects on plastic scintillators housed within the Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS detector. The study focuses on determining how the interaction of ionizing radiation with plastic scintillators effects their efficacy and desired properties such as high light output and fast decay time. Plastic scintillators form an integral part of the ATLAS trigger system and their optimal functionality is paramount to the success of ATLAS. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) provides insight into the electronic structure of the plastics and can characterize the damage caused by ionizing radiation. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations will be performed in order to simulate the EPR signal. Preliminary EPR results investigate four different types of plastic scintillators. These include three polyvinyl-toluene based Eljen technologies: EJ200, EJ208 and EJ260, and one polystyrene based Dubna sample. It has been observed that the Dubna sample, identical on the current scintillator used in the ATLAS detector, undergoes more structural damage when compared to the Eljen samples.

  10. Double-wavelength overlapping resonance Rayleigh scattering technique for the simultaneous quantitative analysis of three β-adrenergic blockade.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xuanping; Yang, Jidong; Li, Qin; Yang, Qiong; Shen, Yizhong

    2016-05-15

    Four simple and accurate spectrophotometric methods were proposed for the simultaneous determination of three β-adrenergic blockade, e.g. atenolol, metoprolol and propranolol. The methods were based on the reaction of the three drugs with erythrosine B (EB) in a Britton-Robinson buffer solution at pH4.6. EB could combine with the drugs to form three ion-association complexes, which resulted in the resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) intensity that is enhanced significantly with new RRS peaks that appeared at 337nm and 370nm, respectively. In addition, the fluorescence intensity of EB was also quenched. The enhanced scattering intensities of the two peaks and the fluorescence quenched intensity of EB were proportional to the concentrations of the drugs, respectively. What is more, the RRS intensity overlapped with the double-wavelength of 337nm and 370nm (so short for DW-RRS) was also proportional to the drugs concentrations. So, a new method with highly sensitive for simultaneous determination of three bisoprolol drugs was established. Finally, the optimum reaction conditions, influencing factors and spectral enhanced mechanism were investigated. The new DW-RRS method has been applied to simultaneously detect the three β-blockers in fresh serum with satisfactory results. PMID:26926395

  11. Investigation of high-contrast velocity selective optical pumping resonance at the cycling transition of Cs using fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Saswati; Ray, Biswajit; Ghosh, Pradip Narayan; Cartaleva, Stefka; Slavov, Dimitar

    2015-12-01

    A high contrast (?48%) Velocity Selective Optical Pumping (VSOP) resonance at the closed transition Fg=4?Fe=5 of Cs-D2 line is obtained in the fluorescence signal under co-propagating pump-probe configuration. We use a 5.2 ?m cell operating at reduced temperature (?55 C) and the intensity of the pump-laser is kept lower than that of the probe-laser. The observed sharp narrow structure is suitable for side-arms frequency-locking of the cooling- (i.e. probe-) laser in a cold atom experiment, with possibility for "-?" to "-4?" red-detuning and "+?" to "+10?" blue-detuning using the standard properties of the commercially available electronics. We have developed a theoretical model corresponding to the thin cell, incorporating the atomic time-of-flight dependent optical pumping decay rate to describe the dimensional anisotropy of the thin cell. The model shows good qualitative agreement with the observation and simulates as well the cases of cells with smaller thickness. It also describes correctly the temperature dependence of the line broadening and shows the potential for further optimization and red-shift detuning above "-4?". It may be of interest for further development of miniaturized modules, like the recently developed portable small magneto-optical traps.

  12. Usefulness of two-point Dixon fat-water separation technique in gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ying; Rao, Sheng-Xiang; Chen, Cai-Zhong; Li, Ren-Chen; Zeng, Meng-Su

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare differences between volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) using two-point Dixon fat-water separation (Dixon-VIBE) and chemically selective fat saturation (FS-VIBE) with magnetic resonance imaging examination. METHODS: Forty-nine patients were included, who were scanned with two VIBE sequences (Dixon-VIBE and FS-VIBE) in hepatobiliary phase after gadoxetic acid administration. Subjective evaluations including sharpness of tumor, sharpness of vessels, strength and homogeneity of fat suppression, and artifacts that were scored using a 4-point scale. The liver-to-lesion contrast was also calculated and compared. RESULTS: Dixon-VIBE with water reconstruction had significantly higher subjective scores than FS-VIBE in strength and homogeneity of fat suppression (< 0.0001) but lower scores in sharpness of tumor (P < 0.0001), sharpness of vessels (P = 0.0001), and artifacts (P = 0.034). The liver-to-lesion contrast on Dixon-VIBE images was significantly lower than that on FS-VIBE (16.6% 9.4% vs 23.9% 12.1%, P = 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Dixon-VIBE provides stronger and more homogenous fat suppression than FS-VIBE, while has lower clarity of focal liver lesions in hepatobiliary phase after gadoxetic acid administration. PMID:25945017

  13. Assembly of AuNRs and eugenol for trace analysis of eugenol using resonance light scattering technique.

    PubMed

    Bi, Shuyun; Wang, Yu; Zhou, Huifeng; Zhao, Tingting

    2016-01-01

    A new resonance light scattering (RLS) method for determining eugenol was developed using gold nanorods (AuNRs) as probes which were synthesized in our lab. The weak RLS intensity of eugenol was obviously enhanced by the use of AuNRs. All of the results from the SEM, RLS and UV spectra indicated that eugenol induced the assembly of AuNRs; thus, a new complex of AuNRs-eugenol was formed. The assembly of this new complex was achieved through a coordination bond between eugenol and AuNRs. Under optimum experimental conditions, a direct linear relationship was established between the enhancement of RLS intensity and the concentration of eugenol in the range of 0.043-10.60 ?g ml(-1) (r=0.9927). Moreover, the limit of detection (LOD) was found at a nanogram level (7.28 ng ml(-1) by 3S0/S). The recovery and RSD (n=5) of three synthetic samples were 99.7-104.2% and 0.81-1.19%, respectively. The method was successfully employed for the analysis of eugenol in curry powder samples. PMID:26478397

  14. Following the transient reactions in lithium-sulfur batteries using an in situ nuclear magnetic resonance technique.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jie; Hu, Jian Zhi; Chen, Honghao; Vijayakumar, M; Zheng, Jianming; Pan, Huilin; Walter, Eric D; Hu, Mary; Deng, Xuchu; Feng, Ju; Liaw, Bor Yann; Gu, Meng; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Lu, Dongping; Xu, Suochang; Wang, Chongmin; Liu, Jun

    2015-05-13

    A fundamental understanding of electrochemical reaction pathways is critical to improving the performance of Li-S batteries, but few techniques can be used to directly identify and quantify the reaction species during disharge/charge cycling processes in real time. Here, an in situ (7)Li NMR technique employing a specially designed cylindrical microbattery was used to probe the transient electrochemical and chemical reactions occurring during the cycling of a Li-S system. In situ NMR provides real time, semiquantitative information related to the temporal evolution of lithium polysulfide allotropes during both discharge/charge processes. This technique uniquely reveals that the polysulfide redox reactions involve charged free radicals as intermediate species that are difficult to detect in ex situ NMR studies. Additionally, it also uncovers vital information about the (7)Li chemical environments during the electrochemical and parasitic reactions on the Li metal anode. These new molecular-level insights about transient species and the associated anode failure mechanism are crucial to delineating effective strategies to accelerate the development of Li-S battery technologies. PMID:25785550

  15. Human immunoglobulin adsorption investigated by means of quartz crystal microbalance dissipation, atomic force microscopy, surface acoustic wave, and surface plasmon resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cheng; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Angelova, Angelina; Choi, Kang-Hoon; Laureyn, Wim; Frederix, Filip; Francis, Laurent A; Campitelli, Andrew; Engelborghs, Yves; Borghs, Gustaaf

    2004-07-01

    Time-resolved adsorption behavior of a human immunoglobin G (hIgG) protein on a hydrophobized gold surface is investigated using multitechniques: quartz crystal microbalance/dissipation (QCM-D) technique; combined surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and Love mode surface acoustic wave (SAW) technique; combined QCM-D and atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique. The adsorbed hIgG forms interfacial structures varying in organization from a submonolayer to a multilayer. An "end-on" IgG orientation in the monolayer film, associated with the surface coverage results, does not corroborate with the effective protein thickness determined from SPR/SAW measurements. This inconsistence is interpreted by a deformation effect induced by conformation change. This conformation change is confirmed by QCM-D measurement. Combined SPR/SAW measurements suggest that the adsorbed protein barely contains water after extended contact with the hydrophobic surface. This limited interfacial hydration also contributed to a continuous conformation change in the adsorbed protein layer. The viscoelastic variation associated with interfacial conformation changes induces about 1.5 times overestimation of the mass uptake in the QCM-D measurements. The merit of combined multitechnique measurements is demonstrated. PMID:16459603

  16. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Ozone-Induced Injury in the Nasal Airways of Monkeys Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Morphometric Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, Stephen A.; Minard, Kevin R.; Trease, Lynn L.; Wagner, James G.; Garcia, Guilherme M.; Ballinger, Carol A.; Kimbell, Julia; Plopper, Charles G.; Corley, Rick A.; Postlewait, Ed; Harkema, Jack R.

    2007-03-01

    ABSTRACT Age-related changes in gross and microscopic structure of the nasal cavity can alter local tissue susceptibility as well as the dose of inhaled toxicant delivered to susceptible sites. This article describes a novel method for the use of magnetic resonance imaging, 3-dimensional airway modeling, and morphometric techniques to characterize the distribution and magnitude of ozone-induced nasal injury in infant monkeys. Using this method, we are able to generate age-specific, 3-dimensional, epithelial maps of the nasal airways of infant Rhesus macaques. The principal nasal lesions observed in this primate model of ozone-induced nasal toxicology were neutrophilic rhinitis, along with necrosis and exfoliation of the epithelium lining the anterior maxilloturbinate. These lesions, induced by acute or cyclic (episodic) exposures, were examined by light microscopy, quantified by morphometric techniques, and mapped on 3-dimensional models of the nasal airways. Here, we describe the histopathologic, imaging, and computational biology methods developed to efficiently characterize, localize, quantify, and map these nasal lesions. By combining these techniques, the location and severity of the nasal epithelial injury were correlated with epithelial type, nasal airway geometry, and local biochemical and molecular changes on an individual animal basis. These correlations are critical for accurate predictive modeling of exposure-dose-response relationships in the nasal airways, and subsequent extrapolation of nasal findings in animals to humans for developing risk assessment.

  17. Application of Polypyrrole Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Composite Layer for Detection of Mercury, Lead and Iron Ions Using Surface Plasmon Resonance Technique

    PubMed Central

    Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Noor, A. S. M.; Bahrami, Afarin; Lim, H. N.; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Mahdi, Mohd. Adzir

    2014-01-01

    Polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layers were used to modify the gold layer to measure heavy metal ions using the surface plasmon resonance technique. The new sensor was fabricated to detect trace amounts of mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and iron (Fe) ions. In the present research, the sensitivity of a polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotube composite layer and a polypyrrole layer were compared. The application of polypyrrole multi-walled carbon nanotubes enhanced the sensitivity and accuracy of the sensor for detecting ions in an aqueous solution due to the binding of mercury, lead, and iron ions to the sensing layer. The Hg ion bonded to the sensing layer more strongly than did the Pb and Fe ions. The limitation of the sensor was calculated to be about 0.1 ppm, which produced an angle shift in the region of 0.3 to 0.6. PMID:24733263

  18. The analytical application and spectral investigation of DNA-CPB-emodin and sensitive determination of DNA by resonance Rayleigh light scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Shuyun; Wang, Yu; Wang, Tianjiao; Pang, Bo; Zhao, Tingting

    2013-01-01

    A new sensitive DNA probe containing cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) and emodin (an effective component of Chinese herbal medicine) was developed using the resonance Rayleigh light scattering (RLS) technique. A novel assay was first developed to detect DNA at nanogram level based on the ternary system of DNA-CPB-emodin. The RLS signal of DNA was enhanced remarkably in the presence of emodin-CPB, and the enhanced RLS intensity at 340.0 nm was in direct proportion to DNA concentration in the range of 0.01-2.72 ?g mL-1 with a good linear relationship. The detection limit was 1.5 ng mL-1. Three synthetic DNA samples were measured obtaining satisfactory results, the recovery was 97.6-107.3%.

  19. Characterization of oxygen vacancy defects in Ba1?xCaxTiO3 insulating ceramics using electron paramagnetic resonance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Da-Yong; Yuan, Long-Fei; Liang, Wei-Na; Zhu, Zhao-Bin

    2016-01-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique was employed to detect oxygen vacancy defects in the tetragonal Ba1?xCaxTiO3 (x = 0.03) ceramics (BCa3T) prepared via the mixed oxide route at 13001500 C. In the rhombohedral phase below ?100 C, an EPR signal at g = 1.955 appeared in the insulating BCa3T with an electrical resistivity of 108 ? cm and was assigned to ionized oxygen vacancy defects. BCa3T prepared at 1300 C showed a temperature-stable X6S dielectric specification (?? = 1750). Three types of vacancy defect, namely, Ba, Ti, and O vacances, could coexist in BCa3T owing to the partial Ti-site occupation by Ca2+.

  20. Following the Transient Reactions in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries Using In an In Situ Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jie; Hu, Jian Z.; Chen, Honghao; Vijayakumar, M.; Zheng, Jianming; Pan, Huilin; Walter, Eric D.; Hu, Mary Y.; Deng, Xuchu; Feng, Ju; Liaw, Bor Yann; Gu, Meng; Deng, Zhiqun; Lu, Dongping; Xu, Suochang; Wang, Chong M.; Liu, Jun

    2015-05-13

    Li-S batteries hold great potential for next-generation, large-format power source applications; yet, the fundamental understanding of the electrochemical reaction pathways remains lacking to enable their functionality as promised. Here, in situ NMR technique employing a specially designed cylindrical micro battery was used to monitor the chemical environments around Li+ ions during repetitive charge-discharge process and track the transient electrochemical and chemical reactions occurring in the whole Li-S system. The in situ NMR provides real time, quantitative information related to the temporal concentration variations of the polysulfides with various chain lengths, providing important clues for the reaction pathways during both discharge and charge processes. The in-situ technique also reveals that redox reactions may involve transient species that are difficult to detect in ex-situ NMR study. Intermediate species such as charged free radicals may play an important role in the formation of the polysulfide products. Additionally, in situ NMR measurement simultaneously reveals vital information on the 7Li chemical environments in the electrochemical and parasitic reactions on the lithium anode that promotes the understanding of the failure mechanism in the Li-S system. These new insights could help design effective strategies to accelerate the development of Li-S battery technology.

  1. Spinal Cord Segmentation by One Dimensional Normalized Template Matching: A Novel, Quantitative Technique to Analyze Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data

    PubMed Central

    Cadotte, Adam; Cadotte, David W.; Livne, Micha; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Fleet, David; Mikulis, David; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord segmentation is a developing area of research intended to aid the processing and interpretation of advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For example, high resolution three-dimensional volumes can be segmented to provide a measurement of spinal cord atrophy. Spinal cord segmentation is difficult due to the variety of MRI contrasts and the variation in human anatomy. In this study we propose a new method of spinal cord segmentation based on one-dimensional template matching and provide several metrics that can be used to compare with other segmentation methods. A set of ground-truth data from 10 subjects was manually-segmented by two different raters. These ground truth data formed the basis of the segmentation algorithm. A user was required to manually initialize the spinal cord center-line on new images, taking less than one minute. Template matching was used to segment the new cord and a refined center line was calculated based on multiple centroids within the segmentation. Arc distances down the spinal cord and cross-sectional areas were calculated. Inter-rater validation was performed by comparing two manual raters (n = 10). Semi-automatic validation was performed by comparing the two manual raters to the semi-automatic method (n = 10). Comparing the semi-automatic method to one of the raters yielded a Dice coefficient of 0.91 +/- 0.02 for ten subjects, a mean distance between spinal cord center lines of 0.32 +/- 0.08 mm, and a Hausdorff distance of 1.82 +/- 0.33 mm. The absolute variation in cross-sectional area was comparable for the semi-automatic method versus manual segmentation when compared to inter-rater manual segmentation. The results demonstrate that this novel segmentation method performs as well as a manual rater for most segmentation metrics. It offers a new approach to study spinal cord disease and to quantitatively track changes within the spinal cord in an individual case and across cohorts of subjects. PMID:26445367

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance with dc SQUID (Super-conducting QUantum Interference Device) preamplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, N. Q.; Heaney, Michael B.; Clark, John; Newitt, D.; Wald, Lawrence L.; Hahn, Erwin L.; Bierlecki, A.; Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    Sensitive radio-frequency (RF) amplifiers based on dc Superconducting QUantum Interface Devices (SQUIDS) are available for frequencies up to 200 MHz. At 4.2 K, the gain and noise temperature of a typical tuned amplifier are 18.6 + or - 0.5 dB and 1.7 + or - 0.5 K at 93 MHz. These amplifiers are being applied to a series of novel experiments on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). The high sensitivity of these amplifiers was demonstrated in the observation of nuclear spin noise, the emission of photons by Cl-35 nuclei in a state of zero polarization. In the more conventional experiments in which one applies a large RF pulse to the spins, a Q-spoiler, consisting of a series array of Josephson junctions, is used to reduce the Q of the input circuit to a very low value during the pulse. The Q-spoiler enables the circuit to recover quickly after the pulse, and has been used in an NQR experiment to achieve a sensitivity of about 2 x 10(16) nuclear Bohr magnetons in a single free precession signal with a bandwidth of 10 kHz. In a third experiment, a sample containing Cl-35 nuclei was placed in a capacitor and the signal detected electrically using a tuned SQUID amplifier and Q-spoiler. In this way, the electrical polarization induced by the precessing Cl nuclear quadrupole moments was detected: this is the inverse of the Stark effect in NQR. Two experiments involving NMR have been carried out. In the first, the 30 MHz resonance in Sn-119 nuclei is detected with a tuned amplifier and Q-spoiler, and a single pulse resolution of 10(18) nuclear Bohr magnetons in a bandwidth of 25 kHz has been achieved. For the second, a low frequency NMR system has been developed that uses an untuned input circuit coupled to the SQUID. The resonance in Pt-195 nuclei has been observed at 55 kHz in a field of 60 gauss.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance with dc SQUID (Super-conducting QUantum Interference Device) preamplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, N.Q.; Heaney, M.B.; Clark, J.; Newitt, D.; Wald, L.; Hahn, E.L.; Bierlecki, A.; Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    Sensitive radio-frequency (rf) amplifiers based on dc Superconducting QUantum Interface Devices (SQUIDS) are available for frequencies up to 200 MHz. At 4.2 K, the gain and noise temperature of a typical tuned amplifier are 18.6 +- 0.5 dB and 1.7 +- 0.5 K at 93 MHz. These amplifiers are being applied to a series of novel experiments on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). The high sensitivity of these amplifiers was demonstrated in the observation of ''nuclear spin noise'', the emission of photons by /sup 35/Cl nuclei in a state of zero polarization. In the more conventional experiments in which one applies a large rf pulse to the spins, a Q-spoiler, consisting of a series array of Josephson junctions, is used to reduce the Q of the input circuit to a very low value during the pulse. The Q-spoiler enables the circuit to recover quickly after the pulse, and has been used in an NQR experiment to achieve a sensitivity of about 2 /times/ 10/sup 16/ nuclear Bohr magnetons in a single free precession signal with a bandwidth of 10 kHz. In a third experiment, a sample containing /sup 35/Cl nuclei was placed in a capacitor and the signal detected electrically using a tuned SQUID amplifier and Q-spoiler. In this way, the electrical polarization induced by the precessing Cl nuclear quadrupole moments was detected: this is the inverse of the Stark effect in NQR. Two experiments involving NMR have been carried out. In the first, the 30 MHz resonance in /sup 119/Sn nuclei is detected with a tuned amplifier and Q-spoiler, and a single pulse resolution of 10/sup 18/ nuclear Bohr magnetons in a bandwidth of 25 kHz has been achieved. For the second, a low frequency NMR system has been developed that uses an untuned input circuit coupled to the SQUID. The resonance in /sup 195/Pt nuclei has been observed at 55 kHz in a field of 60 gauss. 23 refs., 11 figs.

  4. Biomonitoring of chromium(VI) deposited in pulmonary tissues: pilot studies of a magnetic resonance imaging technique in a post-mortem rodent model.

    PubMed

    Shayer, Rob; Kinchesh, Paul; Raffray, Mark; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    The biomonitoring of individuals exposed to chromium(VI) by inhalation is often based on determinations of chromium in body fluids such as blood, plasma or urine, or on assessments of DNA damage in non-lung surrogate tissues such as peripheral blood lymphocytes. These techniques are of some use as biomarkers of internal exposure or biological effect, mainly in the case of soluble chromium(VI) compounds, but they provide at best only indirect information about chromium(VI) concentrations in the main target organ of interest - the lung. An urgent need exists for a non-invasive technique to permit the visualization and quantification of chromium(VI) in the lung of exposed humans. This study details the development of a lung imaging technique based on the detection of paramagnetic chromium using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The intracellular reductive conversion of chromium(VI) is a crucial bioactivation step in its carcinogenicity, and the MRI method described here relies on the conversion of non-paramagnetic (MRI 'silent') chromium(VI) to detectable paramagnetic species such as chromium(III). Initial studies with chromium(III) revealed that a range of 2.5-5 microg chromium(III) instilled in rat lung is considered to be the lower limit of detection of this method. It was possible to demonstrate the presence of 30 microg chromium(VI) in our post-mortem rat model. The ultimate objective of this work is to determine whether this technique has applicability to the biomonitoring of chromium(VI) inhalation exposures that result in internalized lung doses in human subjects. PMID:15204309

  5. Technique for designing and evaluating probe caps used in optical topography of infants using a real head model based on three dimensional magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Yukiko; Sato, Hiroki; Uchida-Ota, Mariko; Nakai, Akio; Maki, Atsushi

    2008-06-01

    We have developed an effective technique for aiding the design and evaluating the performance of the probe caps used to perform optical topography (OT) on infants. To design and evaluate a probe cap, it is necessary to determine the measurement positions for conducting OT on the brain surface of subjects. One technique for determining these positions on the brain surface is to find their three-dimensional (3D) coordinates using a 3D magnetic space digitizer, which consists of a 3D magnetic source and a 3D magnetic sensor. The problem with this technique is that it takes a long time to determine all the measurement points on the subject's head and it is difficult to use with infants. It is a particular problem with infants who cannot support their own heads. Therefore, we have developed a real model of an infant subject's head based on 3D magnetic resonance (MR) images. The model is made from an optical-curable resin using 3D computer-aided-format coordinate data taken from 3D MR image-format coordinate data. We have determined the measurement positions on the surface of the model corresponding to a scalp using a 3D magnetic space digitizer and displayed the positions on a 3D MR image of the infant's brain. Using this technique, we then determined the actual 72 measurement positions located over the entire brain surface area for use with our new whole-head probe cap for neonates and infants. This method is useful for evaluating the performance of and designing probe caps.

  6. Electron impact transfer rates between metastable and resonant states of argon investigated by laser pump-probe technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Emile; van Veldhuizen, Eddie; Kroesen, Gerrit; Sadeghi, Nader

    2015-10-01

    The laser pump-probe technique is used to study the electron impact transfer between the 1s5 and 1s4 states of argon (in Paschen’s notation) belonging to the 2P3/2 ion core for electron temperatures in the range of 1-2 eV. A rate coefficient of 1.9+/- 0.3\\cdot {{10}-13} m3s-1 is determined for the transfer from 1s5 to 1s4 state. Different pumping schemes between the 1s and 2p states but also 3p states are used to verify the obtained value but also to probe the transfers with ion-core change toward the 2P1/2 ion-core. Our results show the presence of an important transfer channel between 1s2 and 1s4 states, and a rate coefficient of 2.1+/- 0.3\\cdot {{10}-13} m3 s-1 is estimated for this transfer. The present results confirm that recent quantum mechanical calculations by Zatsarinny et al [1] underestimate significantly the cross sections for electron impact transfers between 1s states of argon.

  7. Free-breathing 3D steady-state free precession coronary magnetic resonance angiography: Comparison of four navigator gating techniques

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thanh D.; Spincemaille, Pascal; Cham, Matthew D.; Weinsaft, Jonathan W.; Prince, Martin R.; Wang, Yi

    2009-01-01

    This work compares the performance of four navigator gating algorithms (accept/reject (A/R), diminishing variance algorithm (DVA), phase ordering with automatic window selection (PAWS), and retrospective gating (RETRO)) in suppressing respiratory motion artifacts in free-breathing 3D balanced steady-state free precession coronary MRA. In ten volunteers, the right coronary artery (RCA) or the left anterior descending artery (LAD) was imaged (both if time permitted) at 1.5 T with the four gating techniques in random order. Vessel signal, vessel contrast and motion suppression was scored by the consensus of two blinded readers. In 15 imaged vessels (9 RCA and 6 LAD), PAWS provided significantly better image quality than A/R (P < 0.05), DVA (P = 0.02) and RETRO (P = 0.002). While the quality difference between A/R and DVA was not statistically significant, both algorithms yielded significantly better image quality than RETRO. PAWS and DVA were the most efficient algorithms, providing an approximately 20% and 40% relative increase in average navigator efficiency compared to A/R and RETRO, respectively. PMID:19152775

  8. Rate constant for the reaction H + NO2 from 195 to 400 K with FP-RF and DF-RF techniques. [Flash Photolysis and Discharge Flow-Resonance Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Nava, D. F.; Payne, W. A.; Lee, J. H.; Stief, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements are made of the rate constant for the reaction H + NO2 yielding OH + NO over significant temperature ranges with the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence (FP-RF) technique and also with the discharge flow-resonance fluorescence (DF-RF) technique. Since it is important to study chemical reactions with more than one technique, the above reaction is investigated with the FP-RF technique over the temperature range 230-400 K. The results reported do not agree with earlier determinations. Accordingly, a separate set of measurements is made with the DF-RF technique over the temperature range 195-368 K; the results are also reported. The reaction is also considered theoretically, especially with regard to the question of temperature dependence and absolute magnitude of the rate constant.

  9. Adaptive optics sensing and control technique to optimize the resonance of the Laguerre-Gauss 33 mode in Fabry-Perot cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajente, G.; Day, R. A.

    2013-06-01

    Second and third generation gravitational wave interferometric detectors will be limited in their sensitivity by thermal noise of the core optics. One way to reduce this contribution is to use an input laser beam with a more uniform distribution of the power: for this reason the use of the Laguerre-Gauss LG3,3 mode as interferometer input has been suggested. The main issue with this approach is the fact that in resonant cavities with spherical mirrors the input mode will be degenerate with nine other modes. This implies very stringent requirements on the mirror surface quality, beyond the present polishing technology capabilities: it is not possible to obtain mirrors with low enough surface roughness to meet the requirements for the operation of a gravitational wave detector. In a previous paper an approach to apply in situ thermal corrections to the main surface of the mirrors was proposed. In this paper we develop further the technique, showing that it is possible to compute the optimal correction using only the information that can be extracted from the intensity images in reflection of the resonant cavity, without any a priori knowledge of the mirror surface maps. We test our proposal using optical simulations and we are able to considerably improve the quality of the beam reflected from a cavity with realistic mirror surface maps: without any correction the purity of the reflected beam was degraded to below 90%; with the proposed adaptive optics system we could recover a purity of 99.96%. The implementation of the proposed system would allow the use of a LG3,3 input mode with the mirror qualities available today. In addition we show that it is possible to correct the aberrations introduced by both mirrors acting only on one of the two. In this way it is possible to avoid introducing unwanted thermal lensing in the input mirrors.

  10. Nondestructive testing of adhesive bonds by nuclear quadrupole resonance method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, R. R.

    1971-01-01

    Inert, strain sensitive tracer, cuprous oxide, added to polymeric adhesive ensures sufficiently large signal to noise ratio in NQR system output. Method is successful, provided that RF-transparent structural materials are used between modified adhesive and probe of NQR spectrometer.

  11. Modeling techniques for analysis and interpretation of electron magnetic resonance (EMR) data for transition ions at low symmetry sites in crystalsA primer for experimentalists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudowicz, Czes?aw; Gnutek, Pawe?

    2009-11-01

    Electron magnetic resonance (EMR) studies of paramagnetic centers exhibiting monoclinic and triclinic local site symmetry have gained renewed importance, since such centers occur often in various technologically important materials and biological systems. The intricate low symmetry aspects, which arise for such centers, bear on meaningful interpretation of EMR data and their correlation with structural data. This review provides a primer for experimentalists who wish to utilize efficiently the modeling techniques for analysis and interpretation of EMR data for transition ions, especially ions located at low symmetry sites in crystals. This requires proper understanding of the low symmetry effects observable in EMR spectra as well as related theoretical questions concerning, e.g., (i) existence of physically equivalent zero-field splitting (ZFS) parameter sets, (ii) clear definitions of the axis systems, (iii) proper forms of spin Hamiltonians, and (iv) distinction between apparent and actual low symmetry cases. The question (i) involves consideration of the orthorhombic standardization, which provides basis for standardization of monoclinic and triclinic ZFS parameters. Thus, the aspects pertaining to orthorhombic site symmetry are also outlined. To solve other questions several modeling techniques have been utilized and related computer packages have recently been developed in our group: (1) the superposition model calculations of the zero-field splitting parameters (ZFSPs) in arbitrary symmetry, (2) the procedure for diagonalization of the 2nd-rank ZFSPs and transformation of respective 4th- and 6th-rank ZFSPs, (3) the pseudosymmetry axes method for approximation of the 4th- and 6th-rank ZFSPs to higher symmetry, and (4) the closeness factors and norm ratios for quantitative comparisons of various ZFSP sets. These modeling techniques enable deeper analysis and interpretation of the low symmetry aspects involved in the fitted and theoretical ZFSPs. The computer packages facilitate extracting useful structural information inherent in monoclinic and triclinic ZFSP sets. Illustrative examples taken from recent studies of low symmetry ion-host systems are discussed.

  12. Towards ferromagnetic quantum criticality in FeGa3 -xGex :71Ga NQR as a zero-field microscopic probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, M.; Wagner-Reetz, M.; Cardoso-Gil, R.; Gille, P.; Steglich, F.; Grin, Y.; Baenitz, M.

    2016-02-01

    71Ga NQR, magnetization, and specific-heat measurements have been performed on polycrystalline Ge-doped FeGa3 samples. A crossover from an insulator to a correlated local moment metal in the low-doping regime and the evolution of itinerant ferromagnet upon further doping is found. For the nearly critical concentration at the threshold of ferromagnetic order, xC=0.15, 71(1 /T1T ) exhibits a pronounced T-4 /3 power law over two orders of magnitude in temperature, which indicates three-dimensional quantum critical ferromagnetic fluctuations. Furthermore, for the ordered x =0.2 sample (TC≈6 K), 71(1 /T1T ) could be fitted well in the frame of Moriya's self-consistent renormalization theory for weakly ferromagnetic systems with 1 /T1T ˜χ . In contrast to this, the low-doping regime nicely displays local moment behavior where 1 /T1T ˜χ2 is valid. For T →0 , the Sommerfeld ratio γ =(C /T ) is enhanced (70 mJ /mole K2 for x =0.1 ) , which indicates the formation of heavy 3 d electrons.

  13. Resonances and resonance widths

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1986-05-01

    Two-dimensional betatron resonances are much more important than their simple one-dimensional counterparts and exhibit a strong dependence on the betatron phase advance per cell. A practical definition of ''width'' is expanded upon in order to display these relations in tables. A primarily pedagogical introduction is given to explain the tables, and also to encourage a wider capability for deriving resonance behavior and wider use of ''designer'' resonances.

  14. Implementation of Various Modalities of the Optical-Optical Double Resonance Techniques To Simplify the Interpretation of the Spectra of Highly Excited States of Nitric Oxide.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yong-Ge; Coln-Garca, Jorge E; Cabrera, Carlos R; Quiones, Edwin

    2015-08-01

    We combined various modalities of the optical-optical double resonance (OODR) photoionization technique to simplify the interpretation of crowded molecular spectra. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our method, we applied it to the 64000 to 65200 cm(-1) spectral region of the molecule NO, where exist the following electronic states: B (2)? (v = 21), D (2)?(+) (v = 5), F (2)? (v = 1), L (2)? (v = 3), and K (2)? (v = 0). This spectral region is complicated because (1) several electronic states are close in energy, (2) some of the rotational energy patterns are irregular, and (3) the relative intensity of the different bands varies markedly. We implemented four modalities of the OODR experimental technique that involved the combined use of two or three lasers. The individual rotational levels up to N' = 20 of the A(2)?(+) (v = 0) state were pumped as intermediate states by one-photon excitation from appropriate rotational levels in the X(2)? (v = 0) ground state. Some of the schemes implemented provided information about line positions and relative band intensities, whereas the ion-dip detection scheme provided insight into the fate of the population in the different states. The term values that we derived are in good agreement with the literature ones. We rotationally resolved the spectra for the K (2)? (v = 0) and B (2)? (v = 21) states up to N = 20, and for the D (2)?(+) (v = 5) and L (2)? (v = 3) states up to N = 8 and 7, respectively. Strangely, only in the rotational levels between N = 6 and N = 20 were we able to observe the F (2)? state, which is mostly mixed with the B' (2)? (v = 4) state and usually notated as F (2)? (v = 1) ? B' (2)? (v = 4). We obtained the rotational constants for the B (2)?1/2 (v = 21), L (2)?3/2 (v = 3), and K (2)?1/2 (v = 0) states, which had not been previously reported. PMID:26166549

  15. Hybridization-driven gap in U3Bi4Ni3: a 209Bi NMR/NQR study

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Seung H

    2009-01-01

    We report {sup 209}Bi nuclear-magnetic-resonance and nuclear-quadrupole-resonance measurements on a single crystal of the Kondo insulator U{sub 3}Bi{sub 4}Ni{sub 3}. The {sup 209}Bi nuclear-spin-lattice relaxation rate (T{sub 1}{sup -1}) shows activated behavior and is well fit by a spin gap of 220 K. The {sup 209}Bi Knight shift (K) exhibits a strong temperature dependence arising from 5f electrons, in which K is negative at high temperatures and increases as the temperature is lowered. Below 50 K, K shows a broad maximum and decreases slightly upon further cooling. Our data provide insight into the evolution of the hyperfine fields in a fully gapped Kondo insulator based on 5f electron hybridization.

  16. Artificial neural network assisted kinetic spectrophotometric technique for simultaneous determination of paracetamol and p-aminophenol in pharmaceutical samples using localized surface plasmon resonance band of silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodaveisi, Javad; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Haji Shabani, Ali Mohammad; Rohani Moghadam, Masoud; Hormozi-Nezhad, Mohammad Reza

    2015-03-01

    Spectrophotometric analysis method based on the combination of the principal component analysis (PCA) with the feed-forward neural network (FFNN) and the radial basis function network (RBFN) was proposed for the simultaneous determination of paracetamol (PAC) and p-aminophenol (PAP). This technique relies on the difference between the kinetic rates of the reactions between analytes and silver nitrate as the oxidizing agent in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) which is the stabilizer. The reactions are monitored at the analytical wavelength of 420 nm of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) band of the formed silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs). Under the optimized conditions, the linear calibration graphs were obtained in the concentration range of 0.122-2.425 μg mL-1 for PAC and 0.021-5.245 μg mL-1 for PAP. The limit of detection in terms of standard approach (LODSA) and upper limit approach (LODULA) were calculated to be 0.027 and 0.032 μg mL-1 for PAC and 0.006 and 0.009 μg mL-1 for PAP. The important parameters were optimized for the artificial neural network (ANN) models. Statistical parameters indicated that the ability of the both methods is comparable. The proposed method was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of PAC and PAP in pharmaceutical preparations.

  17. An investigation on the interaction of DNA with hesperetin/apigenin in the presence of CTAB by resonance Rayleigh light scattering technique and its analytical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Shuyun; Wang, Yu; Pang, Bo; Yan, Lili; Wang, Tianjiao

    2012-05-01

    Two new systems for measuring DNA at nanogram levels by a resonance Rayleigh light scattering (RLS) technique with a common spectrofluorometer were proposed. In the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), the interaction of DNA with hesperetin and apigenin (two effective components of Chinese herbal medicine) could enhance RLS signals with the maximum peak at 363 and 433 nm respectively. The enhanced intensity of RLS was directly proportional to the concentration of DNA in the range of 0.022-4.4 ?g mL-1 for DNA-CTAB-hesperetin system and 0.013-4.4 ?g mL-1 for DNA-CTAB-apigenin system. The detection limit was 2.34 ng mL-1 and 2.97 ng mL-1 respectively. Synthetic samples were measured satisfactorily. The recovery of DNA-CTAB-hesperetin system was 97.3-101.9% and that of DNA-CTAB-apigenin system was 101.2-109.5%.

  18. A novel and selective assay for the quantitative analysis of molybdenum(VI) at nanogram level by resonance light scattering quenching technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhan Guang; Zhu, Li; Zhang, Tai Yu; Liu, Jin Bin; Han, Ya Li

    2008-07-01

    A novel method is designed for the direct determination of trace amounts of molybdenum(VI) in tap water, human hair, and Chinese herbal medicine by means of decreasing resonance light scattering (RLS) technique. The characteristics of RLS spectra, the effective factors, and optimum conditions of the reaction were studied. In the medium of hydrochloric acid (pH 2.38), Mo(VI), dibromohydroxyphenylfluorone (DBHPF), and Triton X-100 react to form a complex, resulting in significant decreasing RLS signals of DBHPF-Triton X-100. The decreasing RLS intensity at 583.0 nm is proportional to the concentration of Mo(VI) up to 8.0 ng mL -1. The detection limit is 0.013 ng mL -1. The method is simple, reproducible, with reaction rapidity and stability of complexes formed. Moreover, the high selectivity and sensitivity of this method permits its direct determination of molybdenum(VI) in tap water, human hair, and Chinese herbal medicine and the results are in agreement with those obtained by the inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) method.

  19. Protein-Flavonoid Interaction Studies by a Taylor Dispersion Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) Technique: A Novel Method to Assess Biomolecular Interactions.

    PubMed

    Vachali, Preejith P; Li, Binxing; Besch, Brian M; Bernstein, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids are common polyphenolic compounds widely distributed in fruits and vegetables. These pigments have important pharmacological relevance because emerging research suggests possible anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties as well other beneficial health effects. These compounds are relatively hydrophobic molecules, suggesting the role of blood transport proteins in their delivery to tissues. In this study, we assess the binding interactions of four flavonoids (kaempferol, luteolin, quercetin, and resveratrol) with human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant protein in the blood, and with glutathione S-transferase pi isoform-1 (GSTP1), an enzyme with well-characterized hydrophobic binding sites that plays an important role in detoxification of xenobiotics with reduced glutathione, using a novel Taylor dispersion surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique. For the first time, HSA sites revealed a high-affinity binding site for flavonoid interactions. Out of the four flavonoids that we examined, quercetin and kaempferol showed the strongest equilibrium binding affinities (KD) of 63 ± 0.03 nM and 37 ± 0.07 nM, respectively. GSTP1 displayed lower affinities in the micromolar range towards all of the flavonoids tested. The interactions of flavonoids with HSA and GSTP1 were studied successfully using this novel SPR assay method. The new method is compatible with both kinetic and equilibrium analyses. PMID:26927197

  20. A novel method for study of the aggregation of protein induced by metal ion aluminum(III) using resonance Rayleigh scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Xiufen; Zhang, Caihua; Cheng, Jiongjia; Bi, Shuping

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel method for the study of the aggregation of protein induced by metal ion aluminum(III) using resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) technique. In neutral Tris-HCl medium, the effect of this aggregation of protein results in the enhancement of RRS intensity and the relationship between the enhancement of the RRS signal and the Al concentration is nonlinear. On this basis, we established a new method for the determination of the critical induced-aggregation concentrations ( CCIAC) of metal ion Al(III) inducing the protein aggregation. Our results show that many factors, such as, pH value, anions, salts, temperature and solvents have obvious effects. We also studied the extent of aggregation and structural changes using ultra-violet spectrometry, protein intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism to further understand the exact mechanisms of the aggregation characteristics of proteins induced by metal ion Al(III) at the molecular level, to help us to develop effective methods to investigate the toxicity of metal ion Al, and to provide theoretical and quantitative evidences for the development of appropriate treatments for neurodementia such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and dementia related to dialysis.

  1. 63,65Cu Nuclear Resonance Study of the Coupled Spin Dimers and Chains Compound Cu2Fe2Ge4O13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Jun; Nagura, Shiro; Murakami, Kazumasa; Masuda, Takatsugu; Redhammer, Gnther J.

    2013-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) of Cu have been measured in a coupled spin dimers and chains compound Cu2Fe2Ge4O13. Cu NQR has also been measured in an isostructural material Cu2Sc2Ge4O13 including only spin dimers. Comparison of the temperature dependence of the 63Cu nuclear spin--lattice relaxation rate between the two compounds reveals that the Fe chains in Cu2Fe2Ge4O13 do not change a spin gap energy of the Cu dimers from that in Cu2Sc2Ge4O13, contributing additionally to the relaxation rate at the Cu site. A modestly large internal field of 3.39 T was observed at the Cu site in the antiferromagnetic state of Cu2Fe2 Ge4O13 at 4.2 K, which is partly because of quantum reduction of the ordered moment of a Cu atom. The internal field and the ordered moment of Cu are noncollinear due to large anisotropy of the hyperfine interaction at the Cu site. A model analysis of the internal field based on the fourfold planar coordination of Cu suggests that a 3d hole of the Cu2+ ion is mainly in the d(x2-y2) orbital state.

  2. Molecular resonance phenomena. [Calculation of resonance widths

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A.U.

    1980-01-01

    It is attempted to show that the Stieltjes-moment-theory provides a practical and a reasonably accurate method for calculating the widths of molecular resonances. The method seems to possess a number of advantages for molecular applications, since it avoids the explicit construction of continuum wavefunctions. It is very simple to implement the technique numerically, because it requires only existing bound-state electronic structure codes. Through the use of configuration interaction techniques, many-electron correlation and polarization effects can be included in the description of both the resonance and the non-resonant background continuum. To illustrate the utility and the accuracy of the Stieltjes-moment-theory technique, used in conjunction with configuration interaction (CI) wave functions, recent applications to the /sup 1/..sigma../sub u/(1sigma/sub u/ 2sigma/sub g/) autoionizing resonance state of H/sub 2/ and the well known /sup 2/PI/sub g/ state of N/sub 2//sup -/ are discussed. The choices of the one-electron basis sets and the types of many-electron configurations appropriate for these two cases are described. Also, guidelines for the selection of the projection operators defining the resonant and non-resonant subspaces in the case of both Feshbach and shape-resonances are given. The numerical results indicate that the Stieltjes-moment-theory technique, which employs L/sup 2/ basis functions exclusively, produces as accurate resonance parameters as can be extracted from direct electron-molecule scattering calculations, provided approximately the same approximations are used to describe important physical effects such as target polarization. Furthermore the method provides sufficiently accurate fixed-nuclei electronic resonance parameters to be used in ab initio calculation of resonant vibrational excitation cross sections. (WHK)

  3. Kinetics of electrochemically controlled surface reactions on bulk and thin film metals studied with Fourier transform impedance spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assiongbon, Kankoe A.

    2005-07-01

    In the work presented in this thesis, the surface sensitive electrochemical techniques of cyclic voltametry (CV), potential step (PS) and Fourier transform impedance spectroscopy (FT-EIS), as well as the optical technique of surface plasmon resonance (SPR), were used to probe a wide variety of surface processes at various metal/liquid interface. Three polycrystalline metals (Au, Ta and Cu) and a Cr-coated gold film were used for these studies in different aqueous environments. A combination of CV with FT-EIS and PS was used to investigate electronic and structural proprieties of a modified bulk electrode of Au. This experimental system involved under potential deposition (UPD) of Bi3+ on Au in a supporting aqueous electrolyte containing ClO-4 . UPD range of Bi3+ was determined, and adsorption kinetics of Bi3+ in the presence of coadsorbing anion, ClO-4 were quantified. Potentiodynamic growth of oxide films of Ta in the following electrolytes NaNO3, NaNO3 + 5wt% H2O2, NaOH and NaOH + 5wt% H2O2 had been investigated. The oxide films were grown in the range -0.1 → +0.4V (high electric field) at a scan rate of 10 mV/s. Time resolved A.C. impedance spectroscopy measurements in the frequency range (0.1--20 KHz) were performed to characterize the surface reactions of oxide formation. The results are interpreted in terms of charge conductivity O2- through the oxide film, and disintegration of H2O2 into OH-. In a high pH medium (pH 12), dissociation of H2O2 was catalytically enhanced. This led to destabilization of the electrogenerated tantalum oxide surface film in the form of a soluble hexatantalate species. In contrast with the electrolytes, NaNO3, NaNO3 + 5wt% H2O2, NaOH, where only the oxide growth was observed, the A.C. impedance spectroscopy measurements in NaOH + 5wt% H 2O2 showed competition between oxide formation and its removal. These results are relevant for chemical slurry design in chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of Ta. Further investigations were performed by studying potential galvanic corrosion effects that are susceptible to occur during planarization process in CMP technology. A combination of FT-EIS with potentiodynamic polarization and galvanic current measurements showed evidence of these effects when Cu (interconnected material in integrated circuits) and Ta (barrier material) were brought into electrical contact via abrasive-free polishing solutions. Quantitative analyses of kinetics of these effects were performed. Catalytic activity of a thin film Au (˜40 nm) toward methanol oxidation in alkaline medium for direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) was carried out in this part of the work. A relatively unique combined technique of FT-EIS and SPR was used to perform this study. The FT-EIS data provided detailed kinetic parameters that characterize electro-oxidation of methanol. This led to a quantitative understanding of the mechanism of the probed surface reactions. At the same time, the SPR data provided with high accuracy the optical parameters and electronic characteristics of the thin film Au. The combined technique provided a complete understanding of the observed surface reactions, and showed consistency in data.

  4. Zero-field splittings of NQR spectra for bismuth(III) oxy compounds revealed by quadrupole spin echo envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchenko, E. A.; Orlov, V. G.; Morgunov, V. G.; Shlykov, M. P.

    2007-11-01

    Local magnetic fields up to 250 G were earlier found by measuring the NQI parameters in bismuth(III) oxy compounds conventionally considered as diamagnets, a strong increase in the 209Bi line intensities being observed in external magnetic fields. An approach based on registration of the quadrupole spin-echo envelopes enabled to reveal small (within an inhomogeneous line broadening) splittings in some other compounds of this type. The modeling of time dependence of the quadrupole spin echo amplitude indicated that modulations of the spin echo envelope in BaBiO2Cl and Bi3B5O12 resulted from weak (?5 G) local magnetic fields. By using this approach, it was found that an increase in the 209Bi resonance intensity in external magnetic fields is related to an influence of the fields on the nuclear spin-spin relaxation rate for the appropriate compounds.

  5. Zero-field splittings of NQR spectra for bismuth(III) oxy compounds revealed by quadrupole spin echo envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchenko, E. A.; Orlov, V. G.; Morgunov, V. G.; Shlykov, M. P.

    Local magnetic fields up to 250 G were earlier found by measuring the NQI parameters in bismuth(III) oxy compounds conventionally considered as diamagnets, a strong increase in the 209Bi line intensities being observed in external magnetic fields. An approach based on registration of the quadrupole spin-echo envelopes enabled to reveal small (within an inhomogeneous line broadening) splittings in some other compounds of this type. The modeling of time dependence of the quadrupole spin echo amplitude indicated that modulations of the spin echo envelope in BaBi02Cl and Bi3B5012 resulted from weak (?5 G) local magnetic fields. By using this approach, it was found that an increase in the 209Bi resonance intensity in external magnetic fields is related to an influence of the fields on the nuclear spin-spin relaxation rate for the appropriate compounds.

  6. Six DOF in vivo kinematics of the ankle joint complex: Application of a combined dual-orthogonal fluoroscopic and magnetic resonance imaging technique.

    PubMed

    de Asla, Richard J; Wan, Lu; Rubash, Harry E; Li, Guoan

    2006-05-01

    Accurate knowledge of in vivo ankle joint complex (AJC) biomechanics is critical for understanding AJC disease states and for improvement of surgical treatments. This study investigated 6 degrees-of-freedom (DOF) in vivo kinematics of the human AJC using a combined dual-orthogonal fluoroscopic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique. Five healthy ankles of living subjects were studied during three in vivo activities of the foot, including maximum plantarflexion and dorsiflexion, maximum supination and pronation, and three weight-bearing positions in simulated stance phases of walking. A three-dimensional (3D) computer model of the AJC (including tibia, fibula, talus, and calcaneus) was constructed using 3D MR images of the foot. The in vivo AJC position at each selected position of the foot was captured using two orthogonally positioned fluoroscopes. In vivo AJC motion could then be reproduced by coupling the orthogonal images with the 3D AJC model in a virtual dual-orthogonal fluoroscopic system. From maximum dorsiflexion to plantarflexion, the arc of motion of the talocrural joint (47.5 +/- 2.2 degrees) was significantly larger than that of the subtalar joint (3.1 +/- 6.8 degrees). Both joints showed similar degrees of internal-external and inversion-eversion rotation. From maximum supination to pronation, all rotations and translations of the subtalar joint were significantly larger than those of the talocrural joint. From heel strike to midstance, the plantarflexion contribution from the talocrural joint (9.1 +/- 5.3 degrees) was significantly larger than that of the subtalar joint (-0.9 +/- 1.2 degrees). From midstance to toe off, internal rotation and inversion of the subtalar joint (12.3 +/- 8.3 degrees and -10.7 +/- 3.8 degrees, respectively) were significantly larger than those of the talocrural joint (-1.6 +/- 5.9 degrees and -1.7 +/- 2.7 degrees). Strong kinematic coupling between the talocrural and subtalar joints was observed during in vivo AJC activities. The contribution of the talocrural joint to active dorsi-plantarflexion was higher than that of the subtalar joint, whereas the contribution of the subtalar joint to active supination-pronation was higher than that of the talocrural joint. In addition, the talocrural joint demonstrated larger motion during the early part of stance phase while the subtalar joint contributes more motion during the later part of stance phase. The results add quantitative data to an in vivo database of normals that can be used in clinical diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation of the AJC after injuries. PMID:16609963

  7. Effect of a weak static magnetic field on nitrogen-14 quadrupole resonance in the case of an axially symmetric electric field gradient tensor.

    PubMed

    Guendouz, Laous; Aissani, Sarra; March, Jean-Franois; Retournard, Alain; Marande, Pierre-Louis; Canet, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The application of a weak static B0 magnetic field (less than 1 mT) may produce a well-defined splitting of the (14)N Quadrupole Resonance line when the electric field gradient tensor at the nitrogen nucleus level is of axial symmetry. It is theoretically shown and experimentally confirmed that the actual splitting (when it exists) as well as the line-shape and the signal intensity depends on three factors: (i) the amplitude of B0, (ii) the amplitude and pulse duration of the radio-frequency field, B1, used for detecting the NQR signal, and (iii) the relative orientation of B0 and B1. For instance, when B0 is parallel to B1 and regardless of the B0 value, the signal intensity is three times larger than when B0 is perpendicular to B1. This point is of some importance in practice since NQR measurements are almost always performed in the earth field. Moreover, in the course of this study, it has been recognized that important pieces of information regarding line-shape are contained in data points at the beginning of the free induction decay (fid) which, in practice, are eliminated for avoiding spurious signals due to probe ringing. It has been found that these data points can generally be retrieved by linear prediction (LP) procedures. As a further LP benefit, the signal intensity loss (by about a factor of three) is regained. PMID:24183810

  8. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques

  9. Resonance Ionization, Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, J. P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is an analytical technique that uses photons from lasers to resonantly excite an electron from some initial state of a gaseous atom through various excited states of the atom or molecule. Described are the apparatus, some analytical applications, and the precision and accuracy of the technique. Lists 26 references. (CW)

  10. Microstrip resonators for electron paramagnetic resonance experiments.

    PubMed

    Torrezan, A C; Mayer Alegre, T P; Medeiros-Ribeiro, G

    2009-07-01

    In this article we evaluate the performance of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) setup using a microstrip resonator (MR). The design and characterization of the resonator are described and parameters of importance to EPR and spin manipulation are examined, including cavity quality factor, filling factor, and microwave magnetic field in the sample region. Simulated microwave electric and magnetic field distributions in the resonator are also presented and compared with qualitative measurements of the field distribution obtained by a perturbation technique. Based on EPR experiments carried out with a standard marker at room temperature and a MR resonating at 8.17 GHz, the minimum detectable number of spins was found to be 5 x 10(10) spins/GHz(1/2) despite the low MR unloaded quality factor Q0=60. The functionality of the EPR setup was further evaluated at low temperature, where the spin resonance of Cr dopants present in a GaAs wafer was detected at 2.3 K. The design and characterization of a more versatile MR targeting an improved EPR sensitivity and featuring an integrated biasing circuit for the study of samples that require an electrical contact are also discussed. PMID:19655985

  11. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jim J. (Dublin, CA)

    1995-07-18

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality.

  12. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    DOEpatents

    Chang, J.J.

    1995-07-18

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality. 5 figs.

  13. Quantitative determination of proteins at nanogram levels by the resonance light-scattering technique with composite nanoparticles of CdS/PAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongqi; Xu, Fagong; Hong, Shi; Wang, Lun

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes the development of composite nanoparticles. A novel composite nanoparticle has been prepared by an in situ polymerization method. The nano-CdS has been prepared, then the polymerization of acrylic acid (AA) was carried out by initiator potassium persulfate (KPS) under ultrasonic irradiation. The surface of the composite nanoparticles was covered with abundant carboxylic groups (-COOH). The nanoparticles are water-soluble, stable and biocompatible. Reaction of the composite nanoparticles with proteins results in an enhanced resonance light scattering (RLS) at 380 nm. Based on this, a new resonance light-scattering (RLS) method was developed for the determination of proteins including BSA, HSA and human γ-IgG. Under the optimum conditions, the enhanced RLS intensity is linearly proportional to the concentration of proteins. The liner range is 0.1-15 μg mL -1 for HSA, 0.2-20 μg mL -1 for BSA and 0.1-50.0 μg mL -1 for human γ-IgG, respectively. The method has been applied to the determination of the total protein in human serum samples collected from the hospital and the results are in good agreement with those reported by the hospital. This method proved to be very sensitive, rapid, simple and tolerant of most interfering substances.

  14. Study on interactions of aminoglycoside antibiotics with calf thymus DNA and determination of calf thymus DNA via the resonance Rayleigh scattering technique.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Man; Li, Chunyan; Shi, Ying; Liu, Shaopu; Liu, Zhongfang; Hu, Xiaoli

    2015-11-01

    A simple and sensitive resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) spectra method was developed for the determination of calf thymus DNA (ctDNA). The enhanced RRS signals were based on the interactions between ctDNA and aminoglycoside antibiotics (AGs) including kanamycin (KANA), tobramycin (TOB), gentamicin (GEN) and neomycin (NEO) in a weakly acidic medium (pH 3.3-5.7). Parameters influencing the method were investigated. Under optimum conditions, increments in the scattering intensity (∆I) were directly proportional to the concentration of ctDNA over certain ranges. The detection limit ranged from 12.2 to 16.9 ng/mL. Spectroscopic methods, including RRS spectra, absorption spectra and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, coupled with thermo-denaturation experiments were used to study the interactions, indicating that the interaction between AGs with ctDNA was electrostatic binding mode. PMID:25736683

  15. Optical resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention discloses a semi-ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) optical resonator structure comprising a medium including an edge forming a reflective facet and a waveguide within the medium, the waveguide having opposing ends formed by the reflective facet. The performance of the SRFP resonator can be further enhanced by including a Mach-Zehnder interferometer in the waveguide on one side of the gain medium. The optical resonator can be employed in a variety of optical devices. Laser structures using at least one SRFP resonator are disclosed where the resonators are disposed on opposite sides of a gain medium. Other laser structures employing one or more resonators on one side of a gain region are also disclosed.

  16. Resonance scraping

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1986-06-01

    Protons lost in a ring leave at a few preferred locations, determined by some non-linear property of the dipoles. This paper suggests taking control of lost protons by beating the magnets at their own game - by means of a designed resonance used as a beam scraper. It is a study of suitable resonances, including estimates of the required multipole element strengths. The appropriate resonances are two-dimensional. A large number of figures is included.

  17. Study on the interaction between hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether and DNA and the determination of hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether using the resonance light scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhanguang; Song, Tianhe; Chen, Xi; Wang, Shaobin; Chen, Junhui

    2010-10-01

    The interaction between photosensitizer anticancer drug hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME) and ctDNA has been studied based on the decreased resonance light scattering (RLS) phenomenon. The RLS, UV-vis and fluorescence spectra characteristics of the HMME-ctDNA system were investigated. Besides, the phosphodiesters quaternary ammonium salt (PQAS), a kind of new gemini surfactant synthesized recently, was used to determine anticancer drug HMME based on the increasing RLS intensity. Under the optimum assay conditions, the enhanced RLS intensity was proportional to the concentration of HMME. The linear range was 0.8-8.4 μg mL -1, with correlation coefficient R2 = 0.9913. The detection limit was 0.014 μg mL -1. The human serum samples and urine samples were determined satisfactorily, which proved that this method was reliable and applicable in the determination of HMME in body fluid. The presented method was simple, sensitive and straightforward and could be a significant method in clinical analysis.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Enterography Findings in Crohn?s disease in the Pediatric Population and Correlation with Fluoroscopic and Multidetector Computed Tomographic Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Parul; Ormanoski, Margaret; Hoadley, Kim M.

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, fluoroscopic examinations such as enteroclysis, upper GI studies, and small bowel follow through exams have been the procedures of choice in evaluating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in pediatric populations. With the advent of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), it has subsequently become a complementary examination in imaging inflammatory bowel disease. A major advantage of MDCT over fluoroscopic examination is its ability to directly visualize bowel mucosa, as well as demonstrate extra-enteric complications of IBD such as abscesses, fistulae, and sinus tracts. The major disadvantage of CT however is exposure to ionizing radiation, especially in IBD patients of the pediatric age group who maybe repeatedly imaged due to exacerbations. As a result, magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) is becoming increasingly important in the evaluation and follow-up of pediatric patients with IBD. This pictorial essay will summarize the multi-modality imaging findings of IBD with emphasis on MRE including the imaging protocol and procedure. For the purposes of this article, patients less than 17 years of age have been considered to represent the pediatric population. PMID:22315708

  19. Optimizing C{sup 4+} and C{sup 5+} beams of the Kei2 electron cyclotron resonance ion source using a special gas-mixing technique

    SciTech Connect

    Drentje, A.G.; Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.

    2006-03-15

    With the prototype electron cyclotron resonance ion source for the next carbon therapy facility in Japan a series of measurements has been performed in order (a) to find the best condition for producing high beam currents of C{sup 4+} ions, and (b) to study the effect of 'special' gas mixing by using a chemical compound as a feed gas. The effect would then appear as an increase in high charge state production in this case of C{sup 5+} ions. In 'regular' gas-mixing experiments it is well known that an isotopic phenomenon occurs: a heavier isotope of the mixing gas is increasing the production of high charge states of the beam gas ions. A similar isotopic effect has been found in the present experiment: with deuterated methane (CD{sub 4} gas) the C{sup 5+} beam currents are about 10% higher than with regular methane (CH{sub 4} gas). The 'mixing-gas' ratio D (or H) to C can be decreased by choosing, e.g., butane gas; in this case the isotopic effect for C{sup 5+} production is even stronger (>15%). For production of C{sup 4+} ions the isotopic effect appears to be absent. Clearly this is related to the much easier production. It turns out that the relative amount of carbon is much more important: butane gives about 10% higher C{sup 4+}-ion currents than methane.

  20. A gas-jet transport and catcher technique for on-line production of radioactive ion beams using an electron cyclotron resonance ion-source

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, V.; Chakrabarti, A.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Karmakar, P.; Bandyopadhyay, A.; Dechoudhury, S.; Mondal, M.; Pandey, H. K.; Lavanyakumar, D.; Mandi, T. K.; Dutta, D. P.; Kundu Roy, T.; Bhowmick, D.; Sanyal, D.; Srivastava, S. C. L.; Ray, A.; Ali, Md. S.; Bhattacharjee, S.

    2013-03-15

    Radioactive ion beams (RIB) have been produced on-line, using a gas-jet recoil transport coupled Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion-source at the VECC-RIB facility. Radioactive atoms/molecules carried through the gas-jet were stopped in a catcher placed inside the ECR plasma chamber. A skimmer has been used to remove bulk of the carrier gas at the ECR entrance. The diffusion of atoms/molecules through the catcher has been verified off-line using stable isotopes and on-line through transmission of radioactive reaction products. Beams of {sup 14}O (71 s), {sup 42}K (12.4 h), {sup 43}K (22.2 h), and {sup 41}Ar (1.8 h) have been produced by bombarding nitrogen and argon gas targets with proton and alpha particle beams from the K130 cyclotron at VECC. Typical measured intensity of RIB at the separator focal plane is found to be a few times 10{sup 3} particles per second (pps). About 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} pps of 1.4 MeV {sup 14}O RIB has been measured after acceleration through a radiofrequency quadrupole linac. The details of the gas-jet coupled ECR ion-source and RIB production experiments are presented along with the plans for the future.

  1. Study on the interaction between nucleic acid and Eu 3+-oxolinic acid and the determination of nucleic acid using the resonance light scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xia; Sun, Shuna; Yang, Jinghe; Wang, Minqin; Liu, Liyan; Guo, Changying

    2005-12-01

    At pH 9.75, the resonance light scattering (RLS) intensity of OA-Eu 3+ system is greatly enhanced by nucleic acid. Based on this phenomenon, a new quantitative method for nucleic acid in aqueous solution has been developed. Under the optimum condition, the enhanced RLS is proportional to the concentration of nucleic acid in the range of 1.0 × 10 -9 to 1.0 × 10 -6 g/ml for herring sperm DNA, 8.0 × 10 -10 to 1.0 × 10 -6 g/ml for calf thymus DNA and 1.0 × 10 -9 to 1.0 × 10 -6 g/ml for yeast RNA, and their detection limits are 0.020, 0.011 and 0.010 ng/ml, respectively. Synthetic samples and actual samples were satisfactorily determined. In addition, the interaction mechanism between nucleic acid and OA-Eu 3+ is also investigated.

  2. Linear low-density polyethylene and zirconium phosphate nanocomposites: evidence from thermal, thermo-mechanical, morphological and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance techniques.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Luis C; Silva, Daniela F; Lino, Adan S

    2012-12-01

    Lamellar alpha-zirconium phosphate was synthesized by direct precipitation and also directly expanded with octadecylamine, through alcoholic solution. To produce a nanocomposite, it was incorporated in linear low-density polyethylene in the molten state, using a counterrotating twin-screw extruder set at 170-190 degrees C and 100 rpm. The differential scanning calorimetry analysis revealed a decrease in the polyolefin melting temperature and crystallinity degree. The higher onset temperature of the zirconium phosphate modified with octadecylamine and linear low density polyethylene composite indicated an increasing of thermal stability and it suggests that some polyethylene chains entered into the filler's spacing. Dynamic-mechanical analysis evidenced an increase in both moduli (storage and loss). Wide-angle X-ray diffraction showed additional peaks--diffraction angles appeared in the region beneath 12 degrees--which were attributed to partial intercalation of polyethylene chains between filler interlamellar spacing. By hydrogen low-field nuclear magnetic resonance, the two low intensity relaxation time peaks shifted to higher values, strongly suggesting interaction between the octadecylamine and polymer matrix into the filler galleries. From these results, it may be postulated that a partially intercalated and/or exfoliated nanostructure in the zirconium phosphate modified with octadecylamine and linear low density polyethylene composite was achieved. PMID:23447930

  3. Maximum toe flexor muscle strength and quantitative analysis of human plantar intrinsic and extrinsic muscles by a magnetic resonance imaging technique

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to investigate the relationships between the maximum isometric toe flexor muscle strength (TFS) and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the plantar intrinsic and extrinsic muscles and to identify the major determinant of maximum TFS among CSA of the plantar intrinsic and extrinsic muscles. Methods Twenty six young healthy participants (14 men, 12 women; age, 20.4??1.6years) volunteered for the study. TFS was measured by a specific designed dynamometer, and CSA of plantar intrinsic and extrinsic muscles were measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To measure TFS, seated participants optimally gripped the bar with their toes and exerted maximum force on the dynamometer. For each participant, the highest force produced among three trials was used for further analysis. To measure CSA, serial T1-weighted images were acquired. Results TFS was significantly correlated with CSA of the plantar intrinsic and extrinsic muscles. Stepwise multiple linear regression analyses identified that the major determinant of TFS was CSA of medial parts of plantar intrinsic muscles (flexor hallucis brevis, flexor digitorum brevis, quadratus plantae, lumbricals and abductor hallucis). There was no significant difference between men and women in TFS/CSA. Conclusions CSA of the plantar intrinsic and extrinsic muscles is one of important factors for determining the maximum TFS in humans. PMID:24955128

  4. Quantitative trace analysis of benzene using an array of plasma-treated metal-decorated carbon nanotubes and fuzzy adaptive resonant theory techniques.

    PubMed

    Leghrib, Radouane; Llobet, Eduard

    2011-12-01

    The functionalization of carbon nanotube sidewalls with metal nanoparticles is exploited here to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of gas sensors operated at room temperature. An array of sensors using oxygen plasma treated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (bare and decorated with Pt, Pd or Rh nanoparticles) is shown to selectively detect traces of benzene (i.e., 100 ppb) in the presence of carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide or nitrogen dioxide at different humidity levels. Employing a quantitative fuzzy adaptive resonant theory (ART) network whose inputs are the responses of the sensor array, it is possible to accurately estimate benzene concentration in a changing background. The quantitative fuzzy ART is especially suited for compensating the nonlinear effects in sensor response caused by changes in ambient humidity, which explains why this method clearly outperforms partial least squares calibration models at estimating benzene concentration. These results open the way to design new affordable, wearable, sensitive and selective detectors aimed at the personal protection of workers subject to occupational exposure to benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylenes. PMID:22093340

  5. New Techniques for Cartilage Magnetic Resonance Imaging Relaxation Time Analysis: Texture Analysis of Flattened Cartilage and Localized Intra- and Inter-subject Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Link, Thomas M.; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2010-01-01

    MR relaxation time measurements of knee cartilage have shown potential to characterize knee osteoarthritis (OA). In this work, techniques that allow localized intra- and inter-subject comparisons of cartilage relaxation times, as well as cartilage flattening for texture analysis parallel and perpendicular to the natural cartilage layers, are presented. The localized comparisons are based on the registration of bone structures and the assignment of relaxation time feature vectors to each point in the bone cartilage interface. Cartilage flattening was accomplished with Bezier splines and warping, and texture analysis was performed with second-order texture measures using gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM). In a cohort of five normal subjects the performance and reproducibility of the techniques were evaluated using T1? maps of femoral knee cartilage. The feasibility of creating a mean cartilage relaxation time map is also presented. Successful localized intra- and inter-subject T1? comparisons were obtained with reproducibility similar to that reported in the literature for regional T2. Improvement of the reproducibility of GLCM features was obtained by flattening the T1? maps. The results indicate that the presented techniques have potential in longitudinal and population studies of knee OA at different stages of the disease. PMID:18506807

  6. New techniques for cartilage magnetic resonance imaging relaxation time analysis: texture analysis of flattened cartilage and localized intra- and inter-subject comparisons.

    PubMed

    Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Link, Thomas M; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2008-06-01

    MR relaxation time measurements of knee cartilage have shown potential to characterize knee osteoarthritis (OA). In this work, techniques that allow localized intra- and inter-subject comparisons of cartilage relaxation times, as well as cartilage flattening for texture analysis parallel and perpendicular to the natural cartilage layers, are presented. The localized comparisons are based on the registration of bone structures and the assignment of relaxation time feature vectors to each point in the bone-cartilage interface. Cartilage flattening was accomplished with Bezier splines and warping, and texture analysis was performed with second-order texture measures using gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM). In a cohort of five normal subjects the performance and reproducibility of the techniques were evaluated using T1rho maps of femoral knee cartilage. The feasibility of creating a mean cartilage relaxation time map is also presented. Successful localized intra- and inter-subject T1rho comparisons were obtained with reproducibility similar to that reported in the literature for regional T2. Improvement of the reproducibility of GLCM features was obtained by flattening the T1rho maps. The results indicate that the presented techniques have potential in longitudinal and population studies of knee OA at different stages of the disease. PMID:18506807

  7. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  8. The comparison of efficacy of different imaging techniques (conventional radiography, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance) in assessment of wrist joints and metacarpophalangeal joints in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sankowski, Artur Jacek; ?ebkowska, Urszula Maria; ?wik?a, Jaros?aw; Walecka, Irena; Walecki, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease which develops in patients with psoriasis. The rheumatoid factor is characteristically absent in the serum of PsA patients. Etiology of the disease is still unclear but a number of genetic associations have been identified. Inheritance of the disease is multilevel and the role of environmental factors is emphasized. Immunology of PsA is also quite complex. Inflammation is caused by immunological reactions leading to a release of kinins. Destructive changes in bones usually appear after a few months from the onset of clinical symptoms. Material/Methods: PsA typically involves joints of the axial skeleton with an asymmetrical patern. The spectrum of symptoms includes inflammatory changes in attachments of articular capsules, tendons, and ligaments to bone surface. The disease can have a diverse clinical course but usually manifests as oligoarthritis. Results: Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of PsA. Classical radiography has been used for this purpose for over a hundred years. It allows to identify late stages of the disease, when bone tissue is affected. In the last 20 years however many new imaging modalities, such as ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR), have been developed and became important diagnostic tools for evaluating rheumatoid diseases. They enable the assessment and monitoring of early inflammatory changes. Conclusions: As a result, patients have earlier access to modern treatment and thus formation of destructive changes in joints can be markedly delayed or even avoided. PMID:23494635

  9. Correlation of iron deposition and change of gliocyte metabolism in the basal ganglia region evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging techniques: an in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haodi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We assessed the correlation between iron deposition and the change of gliocyte metabolism in healthy subjects’ basal ganglia region, by using 3D-enhanced susceptibility weighted angiography (ESWAN) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). Material and methods Seventy-seven healthy volunteers (39 female and 38 male subjects; age range: 24–82 years old) were enrolled in the experiment including ESWAN and proton MRS sequences, consent for which was provided by themselves or their guardians. For each subject, the mean phase value gained by ESWAN was used to evaluate the iron deposition; choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) and mI/Cr ratios gained by 1H-MRS were used to evaluate gliocyte metabolism in the basal ganglia region of both sides. The paired t test was used to test the difference between the two sides of the basal ganglia region. Linear regression was performed to evaluate the relation between mean phase value and age. Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated to analyze the relationship between the result of ESWAN and 1H-MRS. Results There was no difference between the two sides of the basal ganglia region in the mean phase value and Cho/Cr. But in mI/Cr the mean phase value of each nucleus in bilateral basal ganglia decreased with increasing age. There are 16 r-values between the mean phase value and Cho/Cr and mI/Cr in bilateral basal ganglia region. And each of all p-values is less than 0.001 (p < 0.001). Conclusions Iron deposition in the bilateral basal ganglia is associated with the change of gliocyte metabolism with increasing age. Iron deposition in each nucleus of the basal ganglia region changes with age. PMID:26925133

  10. Mechanical characterization of articular cartilage by combining magnetic resonance imaging and finite-element analysisa potential functional imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julkunen, P.; Korhonen, R. K.; Nissi, M. J.; Jurvelin, J. S.

    2008-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a method for non-invasive characterization of cartilage composition and structure. We aimed to see whether T1 and T2 relaxation times are related to proteoglycan (PG) and collagen-specific mechanical properties of articular cartilage. Specifically, we analyzed whether variations in the depthwise collagen orientation, as assessed by the laminae obtained from T2 profiles, affect the mechanical characteristics of cartilage. After MRI and unconfined compression tests of human and bovine patellar cartilage samples, fibril-reinforced poroviscoelastic finite-element models (FEM), with depthwise collagen orientations implemented from quantitative T2 maps (3 laminae for human, 3-7 laminae for bovine), were constructed to analyze the non-fibrillar matrix modulus (PG specific), fibril modulus (collagen specific) and permeability of the samples. In bovine cartilage, the non-fibrillar matrix modulus (R = -0.64, p < 0.05) as well as the initial permeability (R = 0.70, p < 0.05) correlated with T1. In bovine cartilage, T2 correlated positively with the initial fibril modulus (R = 0.62, p = 0.05). In human cartilage, the initial fibril modulus correlated negatively (R = -0.61, p < 0.05) with T2. Based on the simulations, cartilage with a complex collagen architecture (5 or 7 laminae), leading to high bulk T2 due to magic angle effects, provided higher compressive stiffness than tissue with a simple collagen architecture (3 laminae). Our results suggest that T1 reflects PG-specific mechanical properties of cartilage. High T2 is characteristic to soft cartilage with a classical collagen architecture. Contradictorily, high bulk T2 can also be found in stiff cartilage with a multilaminar collagen fibril network. By emerging MRI and FEM, the present study establishes a step toward functional imaging of articular cartilage.

  11. Phosphonated trityl probes for concurrent in vivo tissue oxygen and pH monitoring using electron paramagnetic resonance-based techniques.

    PubMed

    Dhimitruka, Ilirian; Bobko, Andrey A; Eubank, Timothy D; Komarov, Denis A; Khramtsov, Valery V

    2013-04-17

    Previously we proposed the concept of dual function pH and oxygen paramagnetic probes based on the incorporation of ionizable groups into the structure of persistent triarylmethyl radicals, TAMs (J. Am. Chem. Soc.2007, 129, 7240-7241). In this paper, we synthesized an asymmetric monophosphonated TAM probe with the simplest doublet hfs pattern ideally suited for dual function electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-based applications. An extraordinary low line width of the synthesized deuterated derivative, p1TAM-D (?Hpp ? 50 mG, Lorentz line width, ?20 mG) results in high sensitivity to pO2 due to oxygen-induced line broadening (?LW/?pO2 ? 0.5 mG/mmHg or ?400 mG/mM); accuracy of pO2 measurement, ?1 mmHg). The presence of a phosphono group in the p1TAM-D structure provides pH sensitivity to its EPR spectra in the physiological range of pH from 5.9 to 8.2 with the ratio of signal intensities of protonated and deprotonated states being a reliable pH marker (accuracy of pH measurements, 0.05). The independent character of pH and [O2] effects on the EPR spectra of p1TAM-D provides dual functionality to this probe. The L-band EPR studies performed in breast tumor-bearing mice show a significant difference in extracellular pH and pO2 between tumor and normal mammary gland tissues, as well as the effect of animal breathing with 100% O2 on tissue oxygenation. The developed dual function phosphonated p1TAM-D probe provides a unique tool for in vivo concurrent tissue oxygen and pH monitoring. PMID:23517077

  12. Phosphonated Trityl Probes for Concurrent in Vivo Tissue Oxygen and pH Monitoring Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance-Based Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Dhimitruka, Ilirian; Bobko, Andrey A.; Eubank, Timothy D.; Komarov, Denis A.; Khramtsov, Valery V.

    2014-01-01

    Previously we proposed the concept of dual function pH and oxygen paramagnetic probes based on the incorporation of ionizable groups into the structure of persistent triarylmethyl radicals, TAMs (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2007, 129, 72407241). In this paper, we synthesized an asymmetric monophosphonated TAM probe with the simplest doublet hfs pattern ideally suited for dual function electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-based applications. An extraordinary low line width of the synthesized deuterated derivative, p1TAM-D (?Hpp ? 50 mG, Lorentz line width, ?20 mG) results in high sensitivity to pO2 due to oxygen-induced line broadening (?LW/?pO2 ? 0.5 mG/mmHg or ?400 mG/mM); accuracy of pO2 measurement, ?1 mmHg). The presence of a phosphono group in the p1TAM-D structure provides pH sensitivity to its EPR spectra in the physiological range of pH from 5.9 to 8.2 with the ratio of signal intensities of protonated and deprotonated states being a reliable pH marker (accuracy of pH measurements, 0.05). The independent character of pH and [O2] effects on the EPR spectra of p1TAM-D provides dual functionality to this probe. The L-band EPR studies performed in breast tumor-bearing mice show a significant difference in extracellular pH and pO2 between tumor and normal mammary gland tissues, as well as the effect of animal breathing with 100% O2 on tissue oxygenation. The developed dual function phosphonated p1TAM-D probe provides a unique tool for in vivo concurrent tissue oxygen and pH monitoring. PMID:23517077

  13. Quantitative determination of proteins at nanogram levels by the resonance light-scattering technique with macromolecules nanoparticles of PS?AA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Leyu; Chen, Hongqi; Li, Ling; Xia, Tingting; Dong, Ling; Wang, Lun

    2004-03-01

    The polystyrene-acrylic acid (PS-AA) nanoparticles have been prepared by ultrasonic polymerization, characterized by FT-IR and TEM. It is the first report on the determination of proteins with macromolecules nanoparticles of PS-AA by resonance light-scattering (RLS). At pH 6.9, the RLS of macromolecules nanoparticles of PS-AA can be enhanced by proteins. Based on this, a novel quantitative assay of proteins at the nanogram levels has been proposed. At pH 6.9, the RLS signals of PS-AA were greatly enhanced by proteins in the region of 250-700 nm characterized by the peak at 342 nm. Under optimal conditions, the linear ranges of the calibration curves were 0.02-11.0 μg ml -1, 0.04-10.0 μg ml -1 and 0.03-10.0 μg ml -1 for γ-globulin (γ-IgG), bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA), respectively. The detection limits were 16.0 ng ml -1, 19.0 ng ml -1, and 15.0 ng ml -1 for γ-IgG, BSA and HSA, respectively. The method has been applied to the analysis of total proteins in human serum samples collected from the hospital and the results were in good agreement with those reported by the hospital, which indicates that the method presented here is not only sensitive, simple, but also reliable and suitable for practical application.

  14. Stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammaitoni, Luca; Hänggi, Peter; Jung, Peter; Marchesoni, Fabio

    1998-01-01

    Over the last two decades, stochastic resonance has continuously attracted considerable attention. The term is given to a phenomenon that is manifest in nonlinear systems whereby generally feeble input information (such as a weak signal) can be be amplified and optimized by the assistance of noise. The effect requires three basic ingredients: (i) an energetic activation barrier or, more generally, a form of threshold; (ii) a weak coherent input (such as a periodic signal); (iii) a source of noise that is inherent in the system, or that adds to the coherent input. Given these features, the response of the system undergoes resonance-like behavior as a function of the noise level; hence the name stochastic resonance. The underlying mechanism is fairly simple and robust. As a consequence, stochastic resonance has been observed in a large variety of systems, including bistable ring lasers, semiconductor devices, chemical reactions, and mechanoreceptor cells in the tail fan of a crayfish. In this paper, the authors report, interpret, and extend much of the current understanding of the theory and physics of stochastic resonance. They introduce the readers to the basic features of stochastic resonance and its recent history. Definitions of the characteristic quantities that are important to quantify stochastic resonance, together with the most important tools necessary to actually compute those quantities, are presented. The essence of classical stochastic resonance theory is presented, and important applications of stochastic resonance in nonlinear optics, solid state devices, and neurophysiology are described and put into context with stochastic resonance theory. More elaborate and recent developments of stochastic resonance theory are discussed, ranging from fundamental quantum properties-being important at low temperatures-over spatiotemporal aspects in spatially distributed systems, to realizations in chaotic maps. In conclusion the authors summarize the achievements and attempt to indicate the most promising areas for future research in theory and experiment.

  15. Morphological resonances for multicomponent immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitten, W. B.; Shapiro, M. J.; Ramsey, J. M.; Bronk, B. V.

    1995-06-01

    An immunoassay technique capable of detecting and identifying a number of species of microorganisms in a single analysis is described. The method uses optical-resonance size discrimination of microspheres to identify antibodies to which stained microorganisms are bound.

  16. Two-frequency heating technique at the 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Biri, S.; Rácz, R.; Sasaki, N.; Takasugi, W.

    2014-02-15

    The two-frequency heating technique was studied to increase the beam intensities of highly charged ions provided by the high-voltage extraction configuration (HEC) ion source at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The observed dependences on microwave power and frequency suggested that this technique improved plasma stability but it required precise frequency tuning and more microwave power than was available before 2013. Recently, a new, high-power (1200 W) wide band-width (17.1–18.5 GHz) travelling-wave-tube amplifier (TWTA) was installed. After some single tests with klystron and TWT amplifiers the simultaneous injection of the two microwaves has been successfully realized. The dependence of highly charged ions (HCI) currents on the superposed microwave power was studied by changing only the output power of one of the two amplifiers, alternatively. While operating the klystron on its fixed 18.0 GHz, the frequency of the TWTA was swept within its full limits (17.1–18.5 GHz), and the effect of this frequency on the HCI-production rate was examined under several operation conditions. As an overall result, new beam records of highly charged argon, krypton, and xenon beams were obtained at the NIRS-HEC ion source by this high-power two-frequency operation mode.

  17. Two-frequency heating technique at the 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences.

    PubMed

    Biri, S; Kitagawa, A; Muramatsu, M; Drentje, A G; Rácz, R; Yano, K; Kato, Y; Sasaki, N; Takasugi, W

    2014-02-01

    The two-frequency heating technique was studied to increase the beam intensities of highly charged ions provided by the high-voltage extraction configuration (HEC) ion source at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The observed dependences on microwave power and frequency suggested that this technique improved plasma stability but it required precise frequency tuning and more microwave power than was available before 2013. Recently, a new, high-power (1200 W) wide band-width (17.1-18.5 GHz) travelling-wave-tube amplifier (TWTA) was installed. After some single tests with klystron and TWT amplifiers the simultaneous injection of the two microwaves has been successfully realized. The dependence of highly charged ions (HCI) currents on the superposed microwave power was studied by changing only the output power of one of the two amplifiers, alternatively. While operating the klystron on its fixed 18.0 GHz, the frequency of the TWTA was swept within its full limits (17.1-18.5 GHz), and the effect of this frequency on the HCI-production rate was examined under several operation conditions. As an overall result, new beam records of highly charged argon, krypton, and xenon beams were obtained at the NIRS-HEC ion source by this high-power two-frequency operation mode. PMID:24593510

  18. Magnetic resonance image segmentation using semi-automated software for quantification of knee articular cartilageinitial evaluation of a technique for paired scans

    PubMed Central

    Brem, M. H.; Lang, P. K.; Neumann, G.; Schlechtweg, P. M.; Schneider, E.; Jackson, R.; Yu, J.; Eaton, C. B.; Hennig, F. F.; Yoshioka, H.; Pappas, G.; Duryea, J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Software-based image analysis is important for studies of cartilage changes in knee osteoarthritis (OA). This study describes an evaluation of a semi-automated cartilage segmentation software tool capable of quantifying paired images for potential use in longitudinal studies of knee OA. We describe the methodology behind the analysis and demonstrate its use by determination of testretest analysis precision of duplicate knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets. Methods Testretest knee MR images of 12 subjects with a range of knee health were evaluated from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) pilot MR study. Each subject was removed from the magnet between the two scans. The 3D DESS (sagittal, 0.456 mm0.365 mm, 0.7 mm slice thickness, TR 16.5 ms, TE 4.7 ms) images were obtained on a 3-T Siemens Trio MR system with a USA Instruments quadrature transmitreceive extremity coil. Segmentation of one 3D-image series was first performed and then the corresponding retest series was segmented by viewing both image series concurrently in two adjacent windows. After manual registration of the series, the first segmentation cartilage outline served as an initial estimate for the second segmentation. We evaluated morphometric measures of the bone and cartilage surface area (tAB and AC), cartilage volume (VC), and mean thickness (ThC.me) for medial/lateral tibia (MT/LT), total femur (F) and patella (P). Testretest reproducibility was assessed using the root-mean square coefficient of variation (RMS CV%). Results For the paired analyses, RMS CV % ranged from 0.9% to 1.2% for VC, from 0.3% to 0.7% for AC, from 0.6% to 2.7% for tAB and 0.8% to 1.5% for ThC.me. Conclusion Paired image analysis improved the measurement precision of cartilage segmentation. Our results are in agreement with other publications supporting the use of paired analysis for longitudinal studies of knee OA. PMID:19252907

  19. DC SQUID detection of new magnetic resonance phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Sleator, T.

    1986-01-01

    A dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) was used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier at liquid helium temperatures to detect very-low-signal magnetic resonance phenomena. Three experiments were performed. In the first experiment, a dc SQUID was used to detect pulsed nuclear quadrupole resonance at about 30 MHz. At a bath temperature of 4.2K, a total system noise temperature of 6 +/- 1K was achieved, with a quality factor Q of 2500. A novel Q-spoiler, consisting of a series array of Josephson tunnel junction, reduced the ring-down time of the tuned circuit after each pulse. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free-precession signal after a single pulse was about 2 x 10/sup 16/ in a bandwidth of 10 kHz. In the second experiment, a sample of nuclear spins was placed in the inductor of a tuned LCR circuit and the spectral density of current fluctuations in the circuit was measured using a dc SQUID as an rf amplifier. The measurements were made in liquid helium at 1.5K on samples of NaClO/sub 3/ and KClO/sub 3/, each of which exhibit a /sup 35/Cl NQR transition at about 30 MHz. In the third experiment, precessing nuclear quadrupole moments were observed to induce oscillating electric dipole moments in neighboring atoms. The /sup 35/Cl nuclei of a single crystal of NaClO/sub 3/ placed between the plates of a capacitor were excited into precession by a rf pulse.

  20. Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) With Improved Selectivity Achieved By Ion Pulse Compression Using In-Source Time-of-flight Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mishin, V. I.; Malinovsky, A. L.; Mishin, D. V.

    2009-03-17

    This paper describes for the first time the improved selectivity of the RILIS made possible by the time-of-flight (TOF) ion bunch compression. Brief description of the compression principles and some preliminary experimental results are presented. In the off-line experiments short ion peaks of natural Li, Na, K, Tm and Yb are observed as ions leave the RILIS-TOF structure. For Tm the ion peaks of 5 {mu}s half-height duration are detected and 1 {mu}s peaks for Sn are predicted. In view of the repetition rate of the ISOLDE-RILIS lasers it is hoped that the selectivity of Sn isotopes production may be improved as much as 100 employing the RILIS with the TOF ion bunch compression and a gating technique.

  1. Magnetic resonance annual, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1987-01-01

    This book features reviews of high-resolution MRI of the knee, MRI of the normal and ischmeic hip, MRI of the heart, and temporomandibular joint imaging, as well as thorough discussion on artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging. Contributors consider the clinical applications of gadolinium-DTPA in magnetic resonance imaging and the clinical use of partial saturation and saturation recovery sequences. Timely reports assess the current status of rapid MRI and describe a new rapid gated cine MRI technique. Also included is an analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow effects during MRI of the central nervous system.

  2. Magnetic Resonance

    Cancer.gov

    Focus Group on Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) in Clinical Oncology(April 1999) To explore the technical requirements for MRS and the application of hydrogen and multinuclear spectroscopy for tumor response to therapy.

  3. Effects of molecular resonances on Rydberg blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derevianko, Andrei; Kmr, Pter; Topcu, Turker; Kroeze, Ronen M.; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2015-12-01

    We study the effect of resonances associated with complex molecular interaction of Rydberg atoms on Rydberg blockade. We show that densely spaced molecular potentials between doubly excited atomic pairs become unavoidably resonant with the optical excitation at short interatomic separations. Such molecular resonances limit the coherent control of individual excitations in Rydberg blockade. As an illustration, we compute the molecular interaction potentials of Rb atoms near the 100 s states asymptote to characterize such detrimental molecular resonances and determine the resonant loss rate to molecules and inhomogeneous light shifts. Techniques to avoid the undesired effect of molecular resonances are discussed.

  4. SPECTRAL IMAGING TECHNIQUES FOR GRAIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three spectral imaging techniques were employed for the purpose of assessing the quality of cereal grains. Each of these techniques provided unique, yet complementary, information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), also called magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was used to detect mobile components ...

  5. Nanoscale Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugar, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), based on the sensitive detection of nuclear spins, enables three dimensional imaging without radiation damage. Conventional MRI techniques achieve spatial resolution that is at best a few micrometers due to sensitivity limitations of conventional inductive detection. The advent of ultrasensitive nanoscale magnetic sensing opens the possibility of extending MRI to the nanometer scale. If this can be pushed far enough, one can envision taking 3D images of individual biomolecules and, perhaps, even solving molecular structures of proteins. In this talk we will discuss issues related to nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging, especially its implementation using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). We will also consider the future possibility of using NV centers in diamond for detection of nanoMRI. This work was performed in collaboration with John Mamin, Mark Sherwood, Christian Degen, Martino Poggio and Ginel Hill.

  6. Gaussian-Beam Laser-Resonator Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Patricia L.; Bair, Clayton H.; Barnes, Norman

    1989-01-01

    Gaussian Beam Laser Resonator Program models laser resonators by use of Gaussian-beam-propagation techniques. Used to determine radii of beams as functions of position in laser resonators. Algorithm used in program has three major components. First, ray-transfer matrix for laser resonator must be calculated. Next, initial parameters of beam calculated. Finally, propagation of beam through optical elements computed. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN (Version 4.01).

  7. MACHINERY RESONANCE AND DRILLING

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R.; Fowley, M.

    2010-01-23

    New developments in vibration analysis better explain machinery resonance, through an example of drill bit chattering during machining of rusted steel. The vibration of an operating drill motor was measured, the natural frequency of an attached spring was measured, and the two frequencies were compared to show that the system was resonant. For resonance to occur, one of the natural frequencies of a structural component must be excited by a cyclic force of the same frequency. In this case, the frequency of drill bit chattering due to motor rotation equaled the spring frequency (cycles per second), and the system was unstable. A soft rust coating on the steel to be drilled permitted chattering to start at the drill bit tip, and the bit oscillated on and off of the surface, which increased the wear rate of the drill bit. This resonant condition is typically referred to as a motor critical speed. The analysis presented here quantifies the vibration associated with this particular critical speed problem, using novel techniques to describe resonance.

  8. Ferromagnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigen, Philip E.; Roukes, Michael L.; Hammel, Peter C.

    The magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) is a novel scanning probe instrument that combines the three-dimensional imaging capabilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the high sensitivity and resolution of atomic force microscopy (AFM). In the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) mode or the electron spin resonance (ESR) mode it will enable nondestructive, chemical-specific, high-resolution microscopic studies and imaging of subsurface properties of a broad range of materials. In its most successful application to date, MRFM has been used to study microscopic ferromagnets. In ferromagnets the long-range spin-spin couplings preclude localized excitation of individual spins. Rather, the excitations employed in ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) are the normal magnetostatic wave (or spin-wave) modes determined by the geometry of the sample. In this case the response of the cantilever will be a measure of the amplitude of the FMR signal integrated over the volume where the magnetic field gradient of the tip magnet is significant. Thus, as the magnetic tip is scanned across the material under study, the signal intensity will be proportional to the local amplitude of the normal modes. In addition, the MRFM technique has proven useful for the observation of relaxation processes in microscopic samples. The MRFM will also enable the microscopic investigations of the nonequilibrium spin polarization resulting from spin injection. Microscopic MRFM studies will provide unprecedented insight into the physics of magnetic and spin-based materials at micrometer and submicrometer dimensions.

  9. Resonances in Positronium Hydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, Richard J.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recently, Ho and his colleagues have calculated the positions and widths of a series of resonances in the Ps+H scattering system, using the complex -rotation method and have compared them with estimates that I made many years ago using a quite different technique. I assumed that the resonance mechanism was the existence in the rearrangement channel [e+ + H-] of an infinite series of perturbed Coulomb bound states. Although these must be broadened and shifted by coupling with the open scattering channel, I expected them to lie very close to the actual resonance positions. To verify this, I did a model calculation for S-waves, including the coupling, and found that the first two resonances were not shifted very far from their unperturbed position. The new, detailed calculation agrees with this result, but when the P-wave was examined it was found, surprisingly, that the lowest resonance indeed moved up in energy by a large amount. With the help of Joseph DiRienzi of the College of Notre Dame of Maryland I am now extending the old calculation to P- and D-waves, in an attempt to understand this unexpected energy shift. Results will be presented at the Workshop.

  10. Magnetic resonance fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dan; Gulani, Vikas; Seiberlich, Nicole; Liu, Kecheng; Sunshine, Jeffrey L; Duerk, Jeffrey L; Griswold, Mark A

    2013-03-14

    Magnetic resonance is an exceptionally powerful and versatile measurement technique. The basic structure of a magnetic resonance experiment has remained largely unchanged for almost 50 years, being mainly restricted to the qualitative probing of only a limited set of the properties that can in principle be accessed by this technique. Here we introduce an approach to data acquisition, post-processing and visualization--which we term 'magnetic resonance fingerprinting' (MRF)--that permits the simultaneous non-invasive quantification of multiple important properties of a material or tissue. MRF thus provides an alternative way to quantitatively detect and analyse complex changes that can represent physical alterations of a substance or early indicators of disease. MRF can also be used to identify the presence of a specific target material or tissue, which will increase the sensitivity, specificity and speed of a magnetic resonance study, and potentially lead to new diagnostic testing methodologies. When paired with an appropriate pattern-recognition algorithm, MRF inherently suppresses measurement errors and can thus improve measurement accuracy. PMID:23486058

  11. Design and testing of a low impedance transceiver circuit for nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance.

    PubMed

    Sato-Akaba, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    A low impedance transceiver circuit consisting of a transmit-receive switch circuit, a class-D amplifier and a transimpedance amplifier (TIA) was newly designed and tested for a nitrogen-14 NQR. An NQR signal at 1.37MHz from imidazole was successfully observed with the dead time of ~85µs under the high Q transmission (Q~120) and reception (Q~140). The noise performance of the low impedance TIA with an NQR probe was comparable with a commercial low noise 50Ω amplifier (voltage input noise: 0.25 nV/Hz) which was also connected to the probe. The protection voltage for the pre-amplifier using the low impedance transceiver was ~10 times smaller than that for the pre-amplifier using a 50Ω conventional transceiver, which is suitable for NQR remote sensing applications. PMID:25293696

  12. GAUSSIAN BEAM LASER RESONATOR PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    In designing a laser cavity, the laser engineer is frequently concerned with more than the stability of the resonator. Other considerations include the size of the beam at various optical surfaces within the resonator or the performance of intracavity line-narrowing or other optical elements. Laser resonators obey the laws of Gaussian beam propagation, not geometric optics. The Gaussian Beam Laser Resonator Program models laser resonators using Gaussian ray trace techniques. It can be used to determine the propagation of radiation through laser resonators. The algorithm used in the Gaussian Beam Resonator program has three major components. First, the ray transfer matrix for the laser resonator must be calculated. Next calculations of the initial beam parameters, specifically, the beam stability, the beam waist size and location for the resonator input element, and the wavefront curvature and beam radius at the input surface to the first resonator element are performed. Finally the propagation of the beam through the optical elements is computed. The optical elements can be modeled as parallel plates, lenses, mirrors, dummy surfaces, or Gradient Index (GRIN) lenses. A Gradient Index lens is a good approximation of a laser rod operating under a thermal load. The optical system may contain up to 50 elements. In addition to the internal beam elements the optical system may contain elements external to the resonator. The Gaussian Beam Resonator program was written in Microsoft FORTRAN (Version 4.01). It was developed for the IBM PS/2 80-071 microcomputer and has been implemented on an IBM PC compatible under MS DOS 3.21. The program was developed in 1988 and requires approximately 95K bytes to operate.

  13. Laser Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, L. L. (inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An optical resonator cavity configuration has a unitary mirror with oppositely directed convex and concave reflective surfaces disposed into one fold and concertedly reversing both ends of a beam propagating from a laser rod disposed between two total internal reflection prisms. The optical components are rigidly positioned with perpendicularly crossed virtual rooflines by a compact optical bed. The rooflines of the internal reflection prisms, are arranged perpendicularly to the axis of the laser beam and to the optical axes of the optical resonator components.

  14. Discrete resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivaldi, Franco

    2015-12-01

    The concept of resonance has been instrumental to the study of Hamiltonian systems with divided phase space. One can also define such systems over discrete spaces, which have a finite or countable number of points, but in this new setting the notion of resonance must be re-considered from scratch. I review some recent developments in the area of arithmetic dynamics which outline some salient features of linear and nonlinear stable (elliptic) orbits over a discrete space, and also underline the difficulties that emerge in their analysis.

  15. Magnetic resonance colonography.

    PubMed

    Graser, Anno

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance colonography (MRC) is performed on a whole body scanner after laxative-based purgation and distension of the large bowel with water. To achieve good image quality, acquisition of sequences within a comfortable breath-hold time is essential. Frequently, fast 3D fat-saturated T1-weighted techniques with parallel imaging are used to meet this demand, providing "dark lumen" contrast of the bowel with high signal intensity of the bowel wall after intravenous injection of contrast agent. This article sheds light on MRC technique, image acquisition, post processing, and normal findings, relevant pathologies, and differential diagnoses of the most frequent pathologies encountered at MRC. PMID:23182511

  16. Use of surface plasmon resonance to study the elongation kinetics and the binding properties of the highly amyloidogenic A?(1-42) peptide, synthesized by depsi-peptide technique.

    PubMed

    Stravalaci, Matteo; Beeg, Marten; Salmona, Mario; Gobbi, Marco

    2011-01-15

    A wide variety of human diseases are associated with the formation of highly organized protein aggregates termed amyloid fibrils, whose growth (elongation) is due to the assembly of the basic molecular units (monomers) in a sequential polymerization process. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology has been proposed as a powerful approach to study in detail the fibril elongation of some amyloidogenic peptides. In particular, the injection of monomers over immobilized fibrils allows to follow in real time, and on a very short time-scale, the kinetics of fibril growth. In the present study we confirmed and extended this application of SPR to A?(1-42), hampered till now by the very pronounced aggregation propensity of this peptide, involved in Alzheimer disease. We took advantage of a new synthetic strategy ("depsi-peptide" technique) which allows to obtain reliable seed-free solutions (monomers) as well as fibrils of A?(1-42). SPR data were consistent with a "dock-and-lock" mechanism underlying A?(1-42) elongation process. The setup of an assay monitoring the elongation kinetics is very useful for investigating potential anti-amyloidogenic compounds. Moreover, the possibility to reliably immobilize both A?(1-42) monomers and fibrils allows to measure the binding affinities of putative ligands for these different species. The approach applied here to A?(1-42) might well be also applied to the study of other fibrillogenic peptides/proteins or to the study of polymerization reactions in general. PMID:21112205

  17. Mode Orientation Control For Sapphire Dielectric Ring Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago, David G.; Dick, G. John; Prata, Aluizio

    1996-01-01

    Small sapphire tuning wedge used in technique for solving mode-purity problem associated with sapphire dielectric-ring resonator part of cryogenic microwave frequency discriminator. Breaks quasi-degeneracy of two modes and allows selective coupling to just one mode. Wedge mounted on axle entering resonator cavity and rotated while resonator cryogenically operating in vacuum. Furthermore, axle moved vertically to tune resonant frequency.

  18. Techniques for classifying acoustic resonant spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.S.; Lewis, P.S.; Chen, J.T.; Vela, O.A.

    1995-12-31

    A second-generation nondestructive evaluation (NDE) system that discriminates between different types of chemical munitions is under development. The NDE system extracts features from the acoustic spectra of known munitions, builds templates from these features, and performs classification by comparing features extracted from an unknown munition to a template library. Improvements over first-generation feature extraction template construction and classification algorithms are reported. Results are presented on the performance of the system and a large data set collected from surrogate-filled munitions.

  19. Tunable micro- and nanomechanical resonators.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Ming; Hu, Kai-Ming; Peng, Zhi-Ke; Meng, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Advances in micro- and nanofabrication technologies have enabled the development of novel micro- and nanomechanical resonators which have attracted significant attention due to their fascinating physical properties and growing potential applications. In this review, we have presented a brief overview of the resonance behavior and frequency tuning principles by varying either the mass or the stiffness of resonators. The progress in micro- and nanomechanical resonators using the tuning electrode, tuning fork, and suspended channel structures and made of graphene have been reviewed. We have also highlighted some major influencing factors such as large-amplitude effect, surface effect and fluid effect on the performances of resonators. More specifically, we have addressed the effects of axial stress/strain, residual surface stress and adsorption-induced surface stress on the sensing and detection applications and discussed the current challenges. We have significantly focused on the active and passive frequency tuning methods and techniques for micro- and nanomechanical resonator applications. On one hand, we have comprehensively evaluated the advantages and disadvantages of each strategy, including active methods such as electrothermal, electrostatic, piezoelectrical, dielectric, magnetomotive, photothermal, mode-coupling as well as tension-based tuning mechanisms, and passive techniques such as post-fabrication and post-packaging tuning processes. On the other hand, the tuning capability and challenges to integrate reliable and customizable frequency tuning methods have been addressed. We have additionally concluded with a discussion of important future directions for further tunable micro- and nanomechanical resonators. PMID:26501294

  20. Tunable Micro- and Nanomechanical Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-Ming; Hu, Kai-Ming; Peng, Zhi-Ke; Meng, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Advances in micro- and nanofabrication technologies have enabled the development of novel micro- and nanomechanical resonators which have attracted significant attention due to their fascinating physical properties and growing potential applications. In this review, we have presented a brief overview of the resonance behavior and frequency tuning principles by varying either the mass or the stiffness of resonators. The progress in micro- and nanomechanical resonators using the tuning electrode, tuning fork, and suspended channel structures and made of graphene have been reviewed. We have also highlighted some major influencing factors such as large-amplitude effect, surface effect and fluid effect on the performances of resonators. More specifically, we have addressed the effects of axial stress/strain, residual surface stress and adsorption-induced surface stress on the sensing and detection applications and discussed the current challenges. We have significantly focused on the active and passive frequency tuning methods and techniques for micro- and nanomechanical resonator applications. On one hand, we have comprehensively evaluated the advantages and disadvantages of each strategy, including active methods such as electrothermal, electrostatic, piezoelectrical, dielectric, magnetomotive, photothermal, mode-coupling as well as tension-based tuning mechanisms, and passive techniques such as post-fabrication and post-packaging tuning processes. On the other hand, the tuning capability and challenges to integrate reliable and customizable frequency tuning methods have been addressed. We have additionally concluded with a discussion of important future directions for further tunable micro- and nanomechanical resonators. PMID:26501294

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Paul H. (Los Alamos, NM); Brainard, James R. (Los Alamos, NM); Jarvinen, Gordon D. (Los Alamos, NM); Ryan, Robert R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC.sub.16 H.sub.14 N.sub.6. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1997-12-30

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 10 figs.

  3. Study of lignification by noninvasive techniques in growing maize internodes. An investigation by Fourier transform infrared cross-polarization-magic angle spinning 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and immunocytochemical transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Joseleau, J P; Ruel, K

    1997-01-01

    Noninvasive techniques were used for the study in situ of lignification in the maturing cell walls of the maize (Zea mays L.) stem. Within the longitudinal axis of a developing internode all of the stages of lignification can be found. The synthesis of the three types of lignins, p-hydroxyphenylpropane (H), guaiacyl (G), and syringyl (S), was investigated in situ by cross-polarization-magic angle spinning 13C-solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and immunocytochemical electron microscopy. The first lignin appearing in the parenchyma is of the G-type preceeding the incorporation of S nuclei in the later stages. However, in vascular bundles, typical absorption bands of S nuclei are visible in the Fourier transform infrared spectra at the earliest stage of lignification. Immunocytochemical determination of the three types of lignin in transmission electron microscopy was possible thanks to the use of antisera prepared against synthetic H, G, and the mixed GS dehydrogenative polymers (K. Ruel, O. Faix, J.P. Joseleau [1994] J Trace Microprobe Tech 12: 247-265). The specificity of the immunological probes demonstrated that there are differences in the relative temporal synthesis of the H, G, and GS lignins in the different tissues undergoing lignification. Considering the intermonomeric linkages predominating in the antigens used for the preparation of the immunological probes, the relative intensities of the labeling obtained provided, for the first time to our knowledge, information about the macromolecular nature of lignins (condensed versus noncondensed) in relation to their ultrastructural localization and development stage. PMID:9232887

  4. Forensic age estimation via 3-T magnetic resonance imaging of ossification of the proximal tibial and distal femoral epiphyses: Use of a T2-weighted fast spin-echo technique.

    PubMed

    Ekizoglu, Oguzhan; Hocaoglu, Elif; Inci, Ercan; Can, Ismail Ozgur; Aksoy, Sema; Kazimoglu, Cemal

    2016-03-01

    Radiation exposure during forensic age estimation is associated with ethical implications. It is important to prevent repetitive radiation exposure when conducting advanced ultrasonography (USG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility of 3.0-T MRI in determining the degree of ossification of the distal femoral and proximal tibial epiphyses in a group of Turkish population. We retrospectively evaluated coronal T2-weighted and turbo spin-echo sequences taken upon MRI of 503 patients (305 males, 198 females; age 10-30 years) using a five-stage method. Intra- and interobserver variations were very low. (Intraobserver reliability was κ=0.919 for the distal femoral epiphysis and κ=0.961 for the proximal tibial epiphysis, and interobserver reliability was κ=0.836 for the distal femoral epiphysis and κ=0.885 for the proximal tibial epiphysis.) Spearman's rank correlation analysis indicated a significant positive relationship between age and the extent of ossification of the distal femoral and proximal tibial epiphyses (p<0.001). Comparison of male and female data revealed significant between-gender differences in the ages at first attainment of stages 2, 3, and 4 ossifications of the distal femoral epiphysis and stage 1 and 4 ossifications of the proximal tibial epiphysis (p<0.05). The earliest ages at which ossification of stages 3, 4, and 5 was evident in the distal femoral epiphysis were 14, 17, and 22 years in males and 13, 16, and 21 years in females, respectively. Proximal tibial epiphysis of stages 3, 4, and 5 ossification was first noted at ages 14, 17, and 18 years in males and 13, 15, and 16 years in females, respectively. MRI of the distal femoral and proximal tibial epiphyses is an alternative, noninvasive, and reliable technique to estimate age. PMID:26797254

  5. Ventricular mechanics: techniques and applications.

    PubMed

    Lorca, Maria Clara N; Haraldsson, Henrik; Ordovas, Karen G

    2015-02-01

    Magnetic resonance assessment of regional myocardial function is a novel potentially important tool for early identification of cardiac pathology. Many cardiac magnetic resonance techniques have been developed for detection and quantification of regional strain abnormalities including steady-state free-precession CINE, tagging, displacement encoding with stimulated echoes, strain encoding imaging, and feature tracking. Potential clinical applications of magnetic resonance strain imaging include early detection of systolic dysfunction in heart failure patients with both ischemic and nonischemic etiologies. PMID:25476669

  6. A mirrorless spinwave resonator.

    PubMed

    Pinel, Olivier; Everett, Jesse L; Hosseini, Mahdi; Campbell, Geoff T; Buchler, Ben C; Lam, Ping Koy

    2015-01-01

    Optical resonance is central to a wide range of optical devices and techniques. In an optical cavity, the round-trip length and mirror reflectivity can be chosen to optimize the circulating optical power, linewidth, and free-spectral range (FSR) for a given application. In this paper we show how an atomic spinwave system, with no physical mirrors, can behave in a manner that is analogous to an optical cavity. We demonstrate this similarity by characterising the build-up and decay of the resonance in the time domain, and measuring the effective optical linewidth and FSR in the frequency domain. Our spinwave is generated in a 20?cm long Rb gas cell, yet it facilitates an effective FSR of 83?kHz, which would require a round-trip path of 3.6?km in a free-space optical cavity. Furthermore, the spinwave coupling is controllable enabling dynamic tuning of the effective cavity parameters. PMID:26655839

  7. Evaluation of the Chromium Resonance Parameters Including Resonance Parameter Covariance

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, Luiz C; Derrien, Herve; Guber, Klaus H; Arbanas, Goran; Wiarda, Dorothea

    2011-01-01

    The intent of this work is to report the results and describe the procedures utilized to evaluate the chromium isotopes' cross sections, i.e., (50)Cr, (52)Cr, (53)Cr, and (54)Cr, for criticality safety applications. The evaluations were done in the resolved resonance region using the reduced Reich-Moore R-matrix formalism. The novel aspect of this evaluation is the inclusion of new transmission and capture cross-section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) for energies below 100 keV and the extension of the (53)Cr energy region. The resonance analysis was performed with the multilevel R-matrix code, SAMMY, which utilizes the generalized least-squares technique based on the Bayes' theory. Complete sets of resonance parameters and resonance parameter covariance matrices (RPCMs) were obtained for each of the chromium isotopes from the SAMMY analysis of the experimental database.

  8. Mechanism of metallization and superconductivity suppression in YBa2(Cu0.97 Zn0.03)3 O6.92 revealed by 67Zn NQR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelc, D.; Poek, M.; Despoja, V.; Sunko, D. K.

    2015-08-01

    We measure the nuclear quadrupole resonance signal on the Zn site in nearly optimally doped YBa2Cu3O6.92, when Cu is substituted by 3% of isotopically pure 67Zn. We observe that Zn creates large insulating islands, confirming two earlier conjectures: that doping provokes an orbital transition in the CuO2 plane, which is locally reversed by Zn substitution, and that the islands are antiferromagnetic. Also, we find that the Zn impurity locally induces a breaking of the D4 symmetry. Cluster and DFT calculations show that the D4 symmetry breaking is due to the same partial lifting of degeneracy of the nearest-neighbor oxygen sites as in the LTT transition in {La}{}2-xBaxCuO4, similarly well-known to strongly suppress superconductivity (SC). These results show that in-plane oxygen 2p5 orbital configurations are principally involved in the metallicity and SC of all high-Tc cuprates, and provide a qualitative symmetry-based constraint on the SC mechanism.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of acquired cardiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Carrol, C L; Higgins, C B; Caputo, G R

    1996-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, advances in magnetic resonance imaging techniques have increased the accuracy and applicability of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. These advances have improved the utility of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating cardiac morphology, blood flow, and myocardial contractility, all significant diagnostic features in the evaluation of the patient with acquired heart disease. Utilization of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging has been limited, primarily due to clinical reliance upon nuclear scintigraphy and echocardiography. Recent developments in fast and ultrafast imaging should continue to enhance the significance of magnetic resonance imaging in this field. Widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the cardiovascular system will ultimately depend upon its maturation into a comprehensive, noninvasive imaging technique for the varying manifestations of acquired heart disease, including cardiomyopathy, ischemic heart disease, and acquired valvular disease. Images PMID:8792545

  10. Hybrid plasmon photonic crystal resonance grating for integrated spectrometer biosensor.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Guo, Junpeng

    2015-01-15

    Using nanofabricated hybrid metal-dielectric nanohole array photonic crystal gratings, a hybrid plasmonic optical resonance spectrometer biosensor is demonstrated. The new spectrometer sensor technique measures plasmonic optical resonance from the first-order diffraction rather than via the traditional method of measuring optical resonance from transmission. The resonance spectra measured with the new spectrometer technique are compared with the spectra measured using a commercial optical spectrometer. It is shown that the new optical resonance spectrometer can be used to measure plasmonic optical resonance that otherwise cannot be measured with a regular optical spectrometer. PMID:25679856

  11. If It's Resonance, What is Resonating?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon under the name "resonance," which, is based on the mathematical analogy between mechanical resonance and the behavior of wave functions in quantum mechanical exchange phenomena was described. The resonating system does not have a structure intermediate between those involved in the resonance, but instead a structure which is further

  12. Optical microspherical resonators for biomedical sensing.

    PubMed

    Soria, Silvia; Berneschi, Simone; Brenci, Massimo; Cosi, Franco; Conti, Gualtiero Nunzi; Pelli, Stefano; Righini, Giancarlo C

    2011-01-01

    Optical resonators play an ubiquitous role in modern optics. A particular class of optical resonators is constituted by spherical dielectric structures, where optical rays are total internal reflected. Due to minimal reflection losses and to potentially very low material absorption, these guided modes, known as whispering gallery modes, can confer the resonator an exceptionally high quality factor Q, leading to high energy density, narrow resonant-wavelength lines and a lengthy cavity ringdown. These attractive characteristics make these miniaturized optical resonators especially suited as laser cavities and resonant filters, but also as very sensitive sensors. First, a brief analysis is presented of the characteristics of microspherical resonators, of their fabrication methods, and of the light coupling techniques. Then, we attempt to overview some of the recent advances in the development of microspherical biosensors, underlining a number of important applications in the biomedical field. PMID:22346603

  13. Thermal nonlinearity in silicon microcylindrical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukovic, Natasha; Healy, Noel; Mehta, Priyanth; Day, Todd D.; Sazio, Pier J. A.; Badding, John V.; Peacock, Anna C.

    2012-04-01

    We explore the thermally induced nonlinearity in hydrogenated amorphous silicon microcylindrical resonators that are fabricated from the silicon optical fiber platform. In particular, we use a pump-probe technique to experimentally demonstrate thermally induced optical modulation and determine the response time. Through characterization of the thermal properties and the associated resonance wavelength shifts, we will show that it is possible to infer the material absorption coefficient for a range of whispering gallery mode resonators.

  14. Nanotube resonator devices

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Zettl, Alexander K; Weldon, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-06

    A fully-functional radio receiver fabricated from a single nanotube is being disclosed. Simultaneously, a single nanotube can perform the functions of all major components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A DC voltage source, as supplied by a battery, can power the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, successful music and voice reception has been demonstrated. Also disclosed are a radio transmitter and a mass sensor using a nanotube resonator device.

  15. Optically detected magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, Aharon; Shapiro, Guy; Fischer, Ran; London, Paz; Gershoni, David

    2015-01-19

    Optically detected magnetic resonance provides ultrasensitive means to detect and image a small number of electron and nuclear spins, down to the single spin level with nanoscale resolution. Despite the significant recent progress in this field, it has never been combined with the power of pulsed magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Here, we demonstrate how these two methodologies can be integrated using short pulsed magnetic field gradients to spatially encode the sample. This result in what we denote as an 'optically detected magnetic resonance imaging' technique. It offers the advantage that the image is acquired in parallel from all parts of the sample, with well-defined three-dimensional point-spread function, and without any loss of spectroscopic information. In addition, this approach may be used in the future for parallel but yet spatially selective efficient addressing and manipulation of the spins in the sample. Such capabilities are of fundamental importance in the field of quantum spin-based devices and sensors.

  16. Optically detected magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, Aharon; Shapiro, Guy; Fischer, Ran; London, Paz; Gershoni, David

    2015-01-01

    Optically detected magnetic resonance provides ultrasensitive means to detect and image a small number of electron and nuclear spins, down to the single spin level with nanoscale resolution. Despite the significant recent progress in this field, it has never been combined with the power of pulsed magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Here, we demonstrate how these two methodologies can be integrated using short pulsed magnetic field gradients to spatially encode the sample. This result in what we denote as an "optically detected magnetic resonance imaging" technique. It offers the advantage that the image is acquired in parallel from all parts of the sample, with well-defined three-dimensional point-spread function, and without any loss of spectroscopic information. In addition, this approach may be used in the future for parallel but yet spatially selective efficient addressing and manipulation of the spins in the sample. Such capabilities are of fundamental importance in the field of quantum spin-based devices and sensors.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of radiation optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, C.F.; Schatz, N.J.; Glaser, J.S. )

    1990-10-15

    Three patients with delayed radiation optic neuropathy after radiation therapy for parasellar neoplasms underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The affected optic nerves and chiasms showed enlargement and focal gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement. The magnetic resonance imaging technique effectively detected and defined anterior visual pathway changes of radionecrosis and excluded the clinical possibility of visual loss because of tumor recurrence.

  18. Dual-frequency ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Y.; Bailey, W. E.

    2006-05-01

    We describe a new experimental technique to investigate coupling effects between different layers or modes in ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). Dual FMR frequencies are excited (2-8GHz) simultaneously and detected selectively in a broadband rf circuit using lock-in amplifier detection at separate modulation frequencies.

  19. Pocket atlas of cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Haughton, V.M.; Daniels, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    This atlas illustrates normal cerebral anatomy in magnetic resonance images. From their studies in cerebral anatomy utilizing cryomicrotome and other techniques, the authors selected more than 100 high-resolution images that represent the most clinically useful scans.

  20. Photon Dynamics in Coherently Coupled Optical Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hong-Rok; Fuller, K. A.

    2004-01-01

    The temporal response of coupled resonators is investigated using a linear systems analysis and coupled mode theory. Damped Rabi oscillations, slow and fast light, and coherent photon transfer techniques are demonstrated in these systems.

  1. Resonance IR: a coherent multidimensional analogue of resonance Raman.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Erin S; Neff-Mallon, Nathan A; Handali, Jonathan D; Wright, John C

    2014-05-01

    This work demonstrates the use of triply resonant sum frequency (TRSF) spectroscopy as a "resonance IR" analogue to resonance Raman spectroscopy. TRSF is a four-wave-mixing process where three lasers with independent frequencies interact coherently with a sample to generate an output at their triple summation frequency. The first two lasers are in the infrared and result in two vibrational excitations, while the third laser is visible and induces a two-quantum anti-Stokes resonance Raman transition. The signal intensity grows when the laser frequencies are all in resonance with coupled vibrational and electronic states. The method therefore provides electronic enhancement of IR-active vibrational modes. These modes may be buried beneath solvent in the IR spectrum and also be Raman-inactive and therefore inaccessible by other techniques. The method is presented on the centrosymmetric complex copper phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate. In this study, the two vibrational frequencies were scanned across ring-breathing modes, while the visible frequency was left in resonance with the copper phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate Q band, resulting in a two-dimensional infrared plot that also reveals coupling between vibrational states. TRSF has the potential to be a very useful probe of structurally similar biological motifs such as hemes, as well as synthetic transition-metal complexes. PMID:24707979

  2. A Comparison of FTNMR and FTIR Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahn, Myong-Ku

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared are two spectroscopic methods that commonly use the Fourier transform technique. Discussed are the similarities and differences in the use of the Fourier transform in these two spectroscopic techniques. (CW)

  3. Phase transition study of confined water molecules inside carbon nanotubes: hierarchical multiscale method from molecular dynamics simulation to ab initio calculation.

    PubMed

    Javadian, Soheila; Taghavi, Fariba; Yari, Faramarz; Hashemianzadeh, Seyed Majid

    2012-09-01

    In this study, the mechanism of the temperature-dependent phase transition of confined water inside a (9,9) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) was studied using the hierarchical multi-scale modeling techniques of molecular dynamics (MD) and density functional theory (DFT). The MD calculations verify the formation of hexagonal ice nanotubes at the phase transition temperature T(c)=275K by a sharp change in the location of the oxygen atoms inside the SWCNT. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis provides evidence of considerable intermolecular charge transfer during the phase transition and verifies that the ice nanotube contains two different forms of hydrogen bonding due to confinement. Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses were used to demonstrate the fundamental influence of intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions on the formation and electronic structure of ice nanotubes. In addition, the NQR analysis revealed that the rearrangement of nano-confined water molecules during the phase transition could be detected directly by the orientation of ¹⁷O atom EFG tensor components related to the molecular frame axes. The effects of nanoscale confinements in ice nanotubes and water clusters were analyzed by experimentally observable NMR and NQR parameters. These findings showed a close relationship between the phase behavior and orientation of the electronic structure in nanoscale structures and demonstrate the usefulness of NBO and NQR parameters for detecting phase transition phenomena in nanoscale confining environments. PMID:23085156

  4. Resonator modeling by field tracing: a flexible approach for fully vectorial laser resonator modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asoubar, Daniel; Wyrowski, Frank; Schweitzer, Hagen; Hellmann, Christian; Kuhn, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays lasers cover a broad spectrum of applications, like laser material processing, metrology and communications. Therefore a broad variety of different lasers, containing various active media and resonator setups, are used to provide high design flexibility. The optimization of such multi-parameter laser setups requires powerful simulation techniques. In literature mainly three practical resonator modeling techniques can be found: Rigorous techniques, e.g. the finite element method (FEM), approximated solutions based on paraxial Gaussian beam tracing by ABCD matrices and the Fox and Li algorithm are used to analyze transversal resonator modes. All of these existing approaches have in common, that only a single simulation technique is used for the whole resonator. In contrast we reformulate the scalar Fox and Li integral equation for resonator eigenmode calculation into a fully vectorial field tracing operator equation. This allows the flexible combination of different modeling techniques in different subdomains of the resonator. The work introduces the basic concepts of field tracing in resonators to calculate vectorial, transversal eigenmodes of stable and unstable resonators.

  5. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    DOEpatents

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  6. Excitation of giant resonances via direct reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, F.E.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental measurements of electric giant multipole resonances are discussed. The parameters of the giant quadrupole resonance are now firmly established by an extensive set of measurements. The GQR is providing a significant influence in other areas of nuclear physics. The monopole resonance has now been established and its observation has provided the first direct measure of the nuclear compressibility. A strong case for the existence of a giant octupole resonance is now being made through a variety of hadron reactions. However, the supply of giant multipole resonances has not been exhausted. The newer techniques such as higher energy proton scattering, charge exchange reactions, heavy-ion scattering and pion reactions offer considerable hope for identifying new resonances during the next few years.

  7. Resonant acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Wenjuan; Li, Rui; Ma, Teng; Li, Jiawen; Kirk Shung, K.; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2013-09-01

    We report on a resonant acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography (ARF-OCE) technique that uses mechanical resonant frequency to characterize and identify tissues of different types. The linear dependency of the resonant frequency on the square root of Young's modulus was validated on silicone phantoms. Both the frequency response spectrum and the 3D imaging results from the agar phantoms with hard inclusions confirmed the feasibility of deploying the resonant frequency as a mechanical contrast for tissue imaging. Furthermore, the results of resonant ARF-OCE imaging of a post-mortem human coronary artery with atherosclerosis demonstrate the potential of the resonant ARF-OCE as a non-invasive method for imaging and characterizing vulnerable plaques.

  8. System and method for regulating resonant inverters

    DOEpatents

    Stevanovic, Ljubisa Dragoljub (Clifton Park, NY); Zane, Regan Andrew (Superior, CO)

    2007-08-28

    A technique is provided for direct digital phase control of resonant inverters based on sensing of one or more parameters of the resonant inverter. The resonant inverter control system includes a switching circuit for applying power signals to the resonant inverter and a sensor for sensing one or more parameters of the resonant inverter. The one or more parameters are representative of a phase angle. The resonant inverter control system also includes a comparator for comparing the one or more parameters to a reference value and a digital controller for determining timing of the one or more parameters and for regulating operation of the switching circuit based upon the timing of the one or more parameters.

  9. Transmission surface plasmon resonance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loison, Olivier; Fort, Emmanuel

    2013-09-01

    We present a microscopy technique to image minute variations of optical properties at the interface of a metallic thin-film. This technique is based on an original transmission configuration of surface plasmon resonance sensors. It combines high diffraction-limited lateral resolution with unaltered refractive index sensitivity. Transmitted light is obtained by using near-field transducers positioned at the metal/dielectric interface to probe the propagative surface plasmon dispersion curve. This label-free technique can find applications in highly multiplexed molecular sensing or full-field surface microscopy. As an example, we show tomography images of silica nanometric patterns.

  10. 35CI NQR and Structural Studies of N-(2,6-Dichlorophenyl)-Amides, 2,6-Cl2C6H3-NHCO-R (R = H or CH3-y Xy and X = CH3 or CI; y = 0,1, 2 or 3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowda, B. Thimme; Paulus, Helmut; Fuess, Hartmut

    2000-10-01

    The effect of side chain substitution on the 35CI NQR and crystal structure of amides of the type N-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-amides, 2,6-Cl2C6H3-NHCO-R (R = H or CH3_yXy where X = CH3 or CI and y = 0, 1, 2 or 3), has been studied by measuring the 35C1 NQR spectra and determining the crystal structures of the compounds N-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-formamide, 2,6-Cl2C6H3- NHCO-H (DCPFA); N-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-2-methylacetamide(propionamide), 2,6-Cl2C6H3- NHCO-CH2CH3 (DCPMA); N-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-2,2-dimethylacetamide(isobutyramide), 2,6- Cl2C6H3-NHCO-CH(CH3 ) 2 (DCPDMA) and N-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trimethylacetamide (neopentylamide), 2,6-Cl2C6H3-NHCO-C(CH3)3 (DCPTMA), and by analysing the present data along with the 35CI NQR spectra and / or crystal structures of the compounds, 2,6-dichloroaniline, 2,6-Cl2C6H3-NH2 (DCA), N-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-acetamide, 2,6-Cl2C6H3--NHCO-CH3 (DCPA), N-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-2-chloroacetamide, 2,6-Cl2C6H3-NHCO-CH2Cl (DCPCA), N- (2,6-dichlorophenyl)-2,2-dichloroacetamide, 2,6-Cl2C6H3-NHCO-CHCl2 (DCPDCA) and N- (2,6-dichlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroacetamide, 2,6-Cl2C6H3-NHCO-CCl3 (DCPTCA). The crystal type, space group, formula units and lattice constants in A of the new structures are;DCPFA: orthorhombic, Pbca, Z = 8, a = 8.593(3), b = 12.728(4), c = 14.376(4); DCPMA: orthorhombic, P212121, Z = 4, a = 4.774(2), b = 10.961(5), c = 19.562(8); DCPDMA: monoclinic, P21/c, Z = 4, a = 9.901(4), b = 13.785(5), c = 9.060(3), = 103.58(2) and DCPTMA: monoclinic, P21/n, Z = 8, a = 16.047(5), b = 9.882(3), c = 16.270(5) = 102.12(1). The compound, DCPTMA shows two molecules in its asymmetric unit. This is in agreement with the multiple lines observed in the 35CI NQR spectra of the compound. The conversion of DCA (monoclinic) into it's various acid amides DCPFA, DCPA, DCPMA, DCPDMA, DCPTMA, DCPCA and DCPTCA affects it's crystal symmetry. The replacement of the side chain CH3 in DCPA by the H atom or substitution of either a CH3 group or a CI atom for one of the H atoms in the side chain CH3 or replacement of the two ring CI atoms by the H atoms changes it's crystal symmetry from monoclinic to orthorhombic, while the substitution of 2 or all the 3 H atoms in the CH3 group of DCPA by 2 or 3 CH3 groups or CI atoms restores it's crystal symmetry back to the monoclinic type. The bond lengths and bond angles are normal except for some deviations.

  11. Persistence, resistance, resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsadka, Maayan

    Sound cannot travel in a vacuum, physically or socially. The ways in which sound operates are a result of acoustic properties, and the ways by which it is considered to be music are a result of social constructions. Therefore, music is always political, regardless of its content: the way it is performed and composed; the choice of instrumentation, notation, tuning; the medium of its distribution; its inherent hierarchy and power dynamics, and more. My compositional praxis makes me less interested in defining a relationship between music and politics than I am in erasing---or at least blurring---the borders between them. In this paper I discuss the aesthetics of resonance and echo in their metaphorical, physical, social, and musical manifestations. Also discussed is a political aesthetic of resonance, manifested through protest chants. I transcribe and analyze common protest chants from around the world, categorizing and unifying them as universal crowd-mobilizing rhythms. These ideas are explored musically in three pieces. Sumud: Rhetoric of Resistance in Three Movements, for two pianos and two percussion players, is a musical interpretation of the political/social concept of sumud, an Arabic word that literally means "steadfastness" and represents Palestinian non-violent resistance. The piece is based on common protest rhythms and uses the acoustic properties inherent to the instruments. The second piece, Three Piano Studies, extends some of the musical ideas and techniques used in Sumud, and explores the acoustic properties and resonance of the piano. The final set of pieces is part of my Critical Mess Music Project. These are site-specific musical works that attempt to blur the boundaries between audience, performers and composer, in part by including people without traditional musical training in the process of music making. These pieces use the natural structure and resonance of an environment, in this case, locations on the UCSC campus, and offer an active form of musical consumption and experience. The three pieces draw lines connecting different aspects of persistence, resistance, and resonance.

  12. Resonant frequency of gold/polycarbonate hybrid nano resonators fabricated on plastics via nano-transfer printing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We report the fabrication of gold/polycarbonate (Au/PC) hybrid nano resonators on plastic substrates through a nano-transfer printing (nTP) technique, and the parametric studies of the resonant frequency of the resulting hybrid nano resonators. nTP is a nanofabrication technique that involves an assembly process by which a printable layer can be transferred from a transfer substrate to a device substrate. In this article, we applied nTP to fabricate Au/PC hybrid nano resonators on a PC substrate. When an AC voltage is applied, the nano resonator can be mechanically excited when the AC frequency reaches the resonant frequency of the nano resonator. We then performed systematic parametric studies to identify the parameters that govern the resonant frequency of the nano resonators, using finite element method. The quantitative results for a wide range of materials and geometries offer vital guidance to design hybrid nano resonators with a tunable resonant frequency in a range of more than three orders of magnitude (e.g., 10 KHz-100 MHz). Such nano resonators could find their potential applications in nano electromechanical devices. Fabricating hybrid nano resonators via nTP further demonstrates nTP as a potential fabrication technique to enable a low-cost and scalable roll-to-roll printing process of nanodevices. PMID:21711590

  13. Absorbing polarization selective resonant gratings.

    PubMed

    Lehmuskero, Anni; Vartiainen, Ismo; Saastamoinen, Toni; Alasaarela, Tapani; Kuittinen, Markku

    2010-12-20

    We introduce resonant absorbers that consist of linear metal wires embedded inside of a titanium dioxide grating. We show that in these structures the guided-mode resonance may lead to the almost total absorption of one polarization component and greatly enhance the absorption in localized surface plasma resonance. In addition, we show that the structures have potential to function as filters or polarizing beamsplitters. Absorption of 99.67 % has been obtained together with the contrast of 6600 at the wavelength of 532 nm. This corresponds the extinction of 8.8597. The results have been verified experimentally by fabricating an absorbing filter with electron beam lithography and atomic layer deposition technique. The absorption is remarkably high considering the thickness of the structures which is only 219-333 nm. PMID:21197005

  14. Microscopic description of ?-like resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delion, D. S.; Suhonen, J.

    2000-02-01

    A description of ?-like resonances is given in terms of single-particle states including narrow Gamow resonances in continuum. The equations of motion are derived within the multistep shell-model approach; the lowest collective two-particle eigenmodes are used as building blocks for the four-particle states. A good agreement with the low-lying states in 212Po is obtained. A new technique to estimate the ?-particle formation amplitude for any multipolarity is proposed. The spectroscopic factor of the ?-decay between ground states is reproduced, but the total width is by two orders of magnitude less than the experimental total width, due to the absence of the background components. The ?-like structure of the lowest states in 212Po is analyzed and strong high-lying resonances are predicted. The derived equivalent local potential for the ?-particle scattering has a molecular shape.

  15. Cancellation of environmental effects in resonant mass sensors based on resonance mode and effective mass

    SciTech Connect

    Naeli, Kianoush; Brand, Oliver

    2009-06-15

    A novel technique is developed to cancel the effect of environmental parameters, e.g., temperature and humidity, in resonant mass sensing. Utilizing a single resonator, the environmental cancellation is achieved by monitoring a pair of resonant overtones and the effective sensed mass in those overtones. As an eminent advantage, especially compared to dual-mode temperature compensation techniques, the presented technique eliminates any need for previously measured look-up tables or fitting the measurement data. We show that a resonant cantilever beam is an appropriate platform for applying this technique, and derive an analytical expression to relate the actual and effective sensed masses on a cantilever beam. Thereby, it is shown that in applying the presented technique successfully, the effective sensed masses must not be the same in the investigated pair of resonance overtones. To prove the feasibility of the proposed technique, flexural resonance frequencies of a silicon cantilever are measured before and after loading with a strip of photoresist. Applying the presented technique shows significant reductions in influence of environmental parameters, with the temperature and humidity coefficients of frequency being improved from -19.5 to 0.2 ppm deg. C{sup -1} and from 0.7 to -0.03 ppm %RH{sup -1}, respectively.

  16. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, Robert R. (Aiken, SC)

    1995-01-01

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions.

  17. A mirrorless spinwave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinel, Olivier; Everett, Jesse L.; Hosseini, Mahdi; Campbell, Geoff T.; Buchler, Ben C.; Lam, Ping Koy

    2015-12-01

    Optical resonance is central to a wide range of optical devices and techniques. In an optical cavity, the round-trip length and mirror reflectivity can be chosen to optimize the circulating optical power, linewidth, and free-spectral range (FSR) for a given application. In this paper we show how an atomic spinwave system, with no physical mirrors, can behave in a manner that is analogous to an optical cavity. We demonstrate this similarity by characterising the build-up and decay of the resonance in the time domain, and measuring the effective optical linewidth and FSR in the frequency domain. Our spinwave is generated in a 20 cm long Rb gas cell, yet it facilitates an effective FSR of 83 kHz, which would require a round-trip path of 3.6 km in a free-space optical cavity. Furthermore, the spinwave coupling is controllable enabling dynamic tuning of the effective cavity parameters.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Litwiller, Daniel V.; Mariappan, Yogesh K.; Ehman, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Often compared to the practice of manual palpation, magnetic resonance elastography is an emerging technology for quantitatively assessing the mechanical properties of tissue as a basis for characterizing disease. The potential of MRE as a diagnostic tool is rooted in the fact that normal and diseased tissues often differ significantly in terms of their intrinsic mechanical properties. MRE uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in conjunction with the application of mechanical shear waves to probe tissue mechanics. This process can be broken down into three essential steps: inducing shear waves in the tissue,imaging the propagating shear waves with MRI, andanalyzing the wave data to generate quantitative images of tissue stiffness MRE has emerged as a safe, reliable and noninvasive method for staging hepatic liver fibrosis, and is now used in some locations as an alternative to biopsy. MRE is also being used in the ongoing investigations of numerous other organs and tissues, including, for example, the spleen, kidney, pancreas, brain, heart, breast, skeletal muscle, prostate, vasculature, lung, spinal cord, eye, bone, and cartilage. In the article that follows, some fundamental techniques and applications of MRE are summarized. PMID:26361467

  19. A mirrorless spinwave resonator

    PubMed Central

    Pinel, Olivier; Everett, Jesse L.; Hosseini, Mahdi; Campbell, Geoff T.; Buchler, Ben C.; Lam, Ping Koy

    2015-01-01

    Optical resonance is central to a wide range of optical devices and techniques. In an optical cavity, the round-trip length and mirror reflectivity can be chosen to optimize the circulating optical power, linewidth, and free-spectral range (FSR) for a given application. In this paper we show how an atomic spinwave system, with no physical mirrors, can behave in a manner that is analogous to an optical cavity. We demonstrate this similarity by characterising the build-up and decay of the resonance in the time domain, and measuring the effective optical linewidth and FSR in the frequency domain. Our spinwave is generated in a 20 cm long Rb gas cell, yet it facilitates an effective FSR of 83 kHz, which would require a round-trip path of 3.6 km in a free-space optical cavity. Furthermore, the spinwave coupling is controllable enabling dynamic tuning of the effective cavity parameters. PMID:26655839

  20. Cavity- and waveguide-resonators in electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Webb, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Cavity resonators are widely used in electron paramagnetic resonance, very high field magnetic resonance microimaging and also in high field human imaging. The basic principles and designs of different forms of cavity resonators including rectangular, cylindrical, re-entrant, cavity magnetrons, toroidal cavities and dielectric resonators are reviewed. Applications in EPR and MRI are summarized, and finally the topic of traveling wave MRI using the magnet bore as a waveguide is discussed. PMID:25456314

  1. "Resonances" in the dielectric absorption of DNA?

    PubMed Central

    Foster, K R; Epstein, B R; Gealt, M A

    1987-01-01

    An attempt was made to confirm previous reports of resonant-like dielectric absorption of plasmid DNA in aqueous solutions at 1-10 GHz. The dielectric properties of the sample were measured using an automatic network analyzer with two different techniques. One technique used an open-ended coaxial probe immersed in the sample; the other employed a coaxial transmission line. No resonances were observed that could be attributed to the sample; however, resonance-type artifacts were prominent in the probe measurements. The coaxial line technique appears to be less susceptible to such artifacts. We note two important sources of error in the calibration of the automatic network analyzer using the probe technique. PMID:3307930

  2. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    John Bulava; Robert Edwards; George Fleming; K. Jimmy Juge; Adam C. Lichtl; Nilmani Mathur; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Stephen J. Wallace

    2007-06-16

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  3. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtl, Adam C.; Bulava, John; Morningstar, Colin; Edwards, Robert; Mathur, Nilmani; Richards, David; Fleming, George; Juge, K. Jimmy; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2007-10-26

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  4. Gallium nitride nanowire electromechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Jason Michael

    Nanoscale mechanical resonators are of great interest for high-resolution sensing applications, where the small resonator mass and high quality factor (Q, defined as resonance frequency f0 over full width at half maximum power) lead to unprecedented sensitivity. Here, we investigate gallium nitride (GaN) nanowire (NW) resonators. The single-crystal, c-axis NWs are 5 mum -- 20 mum long, with diameters from 50 nm -- 500 nm, and grow essentially free of defects. Our initial experiments involve measuring the resonances of as-grown NWs in a scanning electron microscope, where we observe exceptionally high Q values of 10 4 -- 105, one to two orders of magnitude higher than most NWs of comparable size. Using a single NW as a mass sensor, we then demonstrate a sub-attogram mass sensitivity. To provide a more flexible measurement technique that avoids electron-microscope detection, we fabricate doubly clamped NWs with an entirely electronic drive and readout scheme using a combination of lithographic patterning and dielectrophoresis. An electrostatic gate induces vibration, while readout utilizes the piezoresistivity of GaN. Observed resonances range from 9--36 MHz with Q values typically around 103 at room temperature and 10 -4 Pa. We use the behavior of f0 and Q to sense the NW's local environment, such as the additional sources of energy dissipation not present in the as-grown NWs. By cooling the device to 8 K, Q increases by an order of magnitude to above 104, with a highest value to date of 26,000 under vacuum. We explore additional NW properties through the thermal noise in the NW's mechanical motion and the exponential decay of mechanical motion in the presence of burst drive. Finally, we investigate the low-frequency 1/f parameter noise displayed by f0. We show that the noise in f0 is consistent with noise in the NW's resistance leading to temperature noise from local Joule heating, which in turn generates resonance frequency noise. For sensor applications, there will be optimal drive conditions that balance the f 0 noise with the signal-to-noise ratio of the system. With these insights, along with the simple drive and readout technique, these GaN-NW doubly clamped resonators have significant potential for high-resolution sensing applications.

  5. Tunable resonator-based devices for producing variable delays and narrow spectral linewidths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor); Matsko, Andrey B. (Inventor); Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Devices with two or more coupled resonators to produce narrow spectral responses due to interference of signals that transmit through the resonators and techniques for operating such devices to achieve certain operating characteristics are described. The devices may be optical devices where optical resonators such as whispering gallery mode resonators may be used. In one implementation, at least one of the coupled optical resonators is a tunable resonator and is tuned to change its resonance frequency to tune the spectral response of the device. The described devices and techniques may be applied in optical filters, optical delays, optical waveform generators, and other applications.

  6. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence of U-235

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Caggiano, Joseph A.; Hensley, Walter K.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Pratt, Sharon L.; Bertozzi, William; Korbly, Steve; Ledoux, Robert; Park, William H.

    2009-07-13

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence is a physical process that provides an isotopic-specific signature that could be used for the identification and characterization of materials. The technique involves the detection of prompt discrete-energy photons emitted from a sample which is exposed to photons in the MeV energy range. Potential applications of the technique range from detection of high explosives to characterization of special nuclear materials. One isotope of significant interest is 235U. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Passport Systems have collaborated to conduct measurements to search for a nuclear resonance fluorescence response of 235U below 3 MeV using a 200 g sample of highly enriched uranium. Nine 235U resonances between 1650 and 2010 keV were identified in the preliminary analysis. Analysis of the measurement data to determine the integrated cross sections of the resonances is in progress.

  7. Resolution enhancement of surface plasmon resonance sensors with spectral interrogation: resonant wavelength considerations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenling; Liu, Le; He, Yonghong; Ma, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has been used extensively in biosensing implementation as a high-sensitivity and label-free sensing technique. For SPR sensors based on spectral interrogation, their performance in terms of refractive index (RI) resolution differs substantially when operating at different resonant wavelengths. This paper presents a feasible scheme of enhancing the sensor resolution by simulating measured SPR curves using an experiment-assisted simulation model to effectively explore the optimal resonant wavelength for the sensing system. It shows that the variation of experimentally obtained RI resolution with the resonant wavelength is in good accordance with the simulation results. In addition, the RI resolution at the derived optimal resonant wavelength is at least 2 times better than that at the commonly used resonant wavelength region both experimentally and theoretically. The methods of the proposed scheme potentially facilitate optimization of various sensor instrumentation for high-resolution SPR sensing. PMID:26836096

  8. Integral resonator gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor); Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Hayworth, Ken J. (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean V. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention discloses an inertial sensor having an integral resonator. A typical sensor comprises a planar mechanical resonator for sensing motion of the inertial sensor and a case for housing the resonator. The resonator and a wall of the case are defined through an etching process. A typical method of producing the resonator includes etching a baseplate, bonding a wafer to the etched baseplate, through etching the wafer to form a planar mechanical resonator and the wall of the case and bonding an end cap wafer to the wall to complete the case.

  9. Low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of systems frustrated by competing exchange interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Beas

    This doctoral thesis emphasizes on the study of frustrated systems which form a very interesting class of compounds in physics. The technique used for the investigation of the magnetic properties of the frustrated materials is Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). NMR is a very novel tool for the microscopic study of the spin systems. NMR enables us to investigate the local magnetic properties of any system exclusively. The NMR experiments on the different systems yield us knowledge of the static as well as the dynamic behavior of the electronic spins. Frustrated systems bear great possibilities of revelation of new physics through the new ground states they exhibit. The vandates AA'VO(PO4)2 [AA' ? Zn2 and BaCd] are great prototypes of the J1-J2 model which consists of magnetic ions sitting on the corners of a square lattice. Frustration is caused by the competing nearest-neighbor (NN) and next-nearest neighbor (NNN) exchange interactions. The NMR investigation concludes a columnar antiferromagnetic (AFM) state for both the compounds from the sharp peak of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) and a sudden broadening of the 31P-NMR spectrum. The important conclusion from our study is the establishment of the first H-P-T phase diagram of BaCdVO(PO4)2. Application of high pressure reduces the saturation field (HS) in BaCdVO(PO4)2 and decreases the ratio J2/J1, pushing the system more towards a questionable boundary (a disordered ground state) between the columnar AFM and a ferromagnetic ground state. A pressure up to 2.4 GPa will completely suppress HS. The Fe ions in the `122' iron-arsenide superconductors also sit on a square lattice thus closely resembling the J1-J2 model. The 75As-NMR and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) experiments are conducted in the compound CaFe2As2 prepared by two different heat treatment methods (`as-grown' and `annealed'). Interestingly the two samples show two different ground states. While the ground state of the `as-grown' sample shows a non-magnetic collapsed tetragonal phase (with no magnetic fluctuations), the ground state of the `annealed' sample shows a magnetically long-range ordered orthorhombic phase. The temperature dependence of 1/T1 and that of Knight shift showed that the electron correlations completely disappear in the nonsuperconducting collapsed tetragonal phase in `as-grown' sample of CaFe2As2 indicating quenching of Fe moments. The insulating A-site spinel compound CoAl2O4 exhibits frustration due to competing NN and NNN exchange interactions. This compound has been studied for a long time yet there has been a contradiction as to what the ground state of this compound is. The origin of this ambiguity was pointed out to be microstructure effects such as site-inversion between Co and Al. Thus depending on the value of degree of site inversion x [(Co{1-x}Alx)[Al{2-x}Cox]O4], the ground states differ. A very high quality sample was prepared (x ? 0.06) and 27Al and 59Co NMR were performed to study the ground state of this compound. Together with the results from heat capacity, magnetic measurements and neutron diffraction measurements we conclude that the ground state is collinear AFM. We settled a long debated problem for the ground state of CoAl2O4. The compound BiMn2PO6 is a magnetically frustrated system with three-dimensional magnetic ordering. Frustration in this compound is caused by the comparable values of the exchange interactions along the chain, along the rung and in between the ladders. Thus the magnetic structure of this compound is quite complex with the temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility exhibiting peak at 30 K, a jump at 43 K and a change of slope at 10 K. 31P-NMR study was done on this system to investigate the nature of transitions (if any) at these temperatures. NMR study suggested a long-range AFM transition at 30 K with a sharp peak in 1/T1. No signature of transition at 43 K suggested its origin is extrinsic. Between 10 K and 30 K the NMR spectra proved the existence of a commensurate magnetic order while below 10 K, the shape of

  10. Resonances in barred galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceverino, D.; Klypin, A.

    2007-08-01

    The inner parts of many spiral galaxies are dominated by bars. These are strong non-axisymmetric features which significantly affect orbits of stars and dark matter particles. One of the main effects is the dynamical resonances between galactic material and the bar. We detect and characterize these resonances in N-body models of barred galaxies by measuring angular and radial frequencies of individual orbits. We found narrow peaks in the distribution of orbital frequencies with each peak corresponding to a specific resonance. We found five different resonances in the stellar disc and two in the dark matter. The corotation resonance (CR) and the inner and outer Lindblad resonances are the most populated. The spatial distributions of particles near resonances are wide. For example, the inner Lindblad resonance is not localized at a given radius. Particles near this resonance are mainly distributed along the bar and span a wide range of radii. On the other hand, particles near the CR are distributed in two broad areas around the two stable Lagrange points. The distribution resembles a wide ring at the corotation radius. Resonances capture disc and halo material in near-resonant orbits. Our analysis of orbits in both N-body simulations and simple analytical models indicates that resonances tend to prevent the dynamical evolution of this trapped material. Only if the bar evolves as a whole, resonances drift through the phase space. In this case particles anchored near resonant orbits track the resonance shift and evolve. The criteria to ensure a correct resonant behaviour discussed by Weinberg and Katz can be achieved with few millions particles because the regions of trapped orbits near resonances are large and evolving.

  11. A time domain based method for the accurate measurement of Q-factor and resonance frequency of microwave resonators.

    PubMed

    Gyre, B; Mrkus, B G; Bernth, B; Murnyi, F; Simon, F

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel method to determine the resonant frequency and quality factor of microwave resonators which is faster, more stable, and conceptually simpler than the yet existing techniques. The microwave resonator is pumped with the microwave radiation at a frequency away from its resonance. It then emits an exponentially decaying radiation at its eigen-frequency when the excitation is rapidly switched off. The emitted microwave signal is down-converted with a microwave mixer, digitized, and its Fourier transformation (FT) directly yields the resonance curve in a single shot. Being a FT based method, this technique possesses the Fellgett (multiplex) and Connes (accuracy) advantages and it conceptually mimics that of pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance. We also establish a novel benchmark to compare accuracy of the different approaches of microwave resonator measurements. This shows that the present method has similar accuracy to the existing ones, which are based on sweeping or modulating the frequency of the microwave radiation. PMID:26429462

  12. Sterile technique

    MedlinePLUS

    ... if you are having trouble using the sterile technique. ... Perry AG, Potter PA. Sterile technique. In: Perry AG, Potter PA. Clinical Nursing Skills and Techniques . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2010:chap 8.

  13. Approaching Moons from Resonance via Invariant Manifolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Rodney L.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the approach phase from the final resonance of the endgame scenario in a tour design is examined within the context of invariant manifolds. Previous analyses have typically solved this problem either by using numerical techniques or by computing a catalog of suitable trajectories. The invariant manifolds of a selected set of libration orbits and unstable resonant orbits are computed here to serve as guides for desirable approach trajectories. The analysis focuses on designing an approach phase that may be tied into the final resonance in the endgame sequence while also targeting desired conditions at the moon.

  14. Opto-electronic oscillators having optical resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Xiaotian Steve (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor); Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Systems and techniques of incorporating an optical resonator in an optical part of a feedback loop in opto-electronic oscillators. This optical resonator provides a sufficiently long energy storage time and hence to produce an oscillation of a narrow linewidth and low phase noise. Certain mode matching conditions are required. For example, the mode spacing of the optical resonator is equal to one mode spacing, or a multiplicity of the mode spacing, of an opto-electronic feedback loop that receives a modulated optical signal and to produce an electrical oscillating signal.

  15. Characteristic analysis of coupled microstrip patch resonators on ferrimagnetic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, K.; Chen, Y.; Barry, W.; Corlett, J.

    1996-04-01

    This paper is to use the spectral-domain technique to perform characteristic analysis of coupled microstrip patch resonators on ferrimagnetic substrates. Our formulation has been validated by comparing our result with the published data and showing an excellent agreement between them. Numerical computations have been performed to obtain dependence of resonant frequency on patch dimensions, offset and separation between the two patches, thicknesses of ferrimagnetic film and substrate. It has been seen that as the length of the patch increases the resonant frequency decreases. The larger the offset between the two patches the lower the resonant frequency. The separation between the two patches strongly affects the resonant frequency. It is also found that the resonant frequency increases as the width of the patch decreases. For the fixed dimensions, separation and offset, a thinner substrate results in a higher resonant frequency, and in contrast, a thinner ferrimagnetic film results in a lower resonant frequency. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Implementation and characterization of meta-resonator antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In Kwang; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    2015-04-01

    Metamaterials are artificially engineered microstructures that have strong resonance behavior although their electrical size is very small. Meta-resonator (metamaterial resonator) antennas use the resonance of the metamaterials to reduce the size of radiators and design multiband antennas. A split-ring resonator (SRR) is a well-studied metamaterial structure which obtains negative permittivity and/or permeability in a narrow frequency region. In this paper, metamaterial structures and meta-resonator antennas are designed and simulated using a full wave simulator. 2D metaresonator antennas are fabricated by photolithography and 3D meta-resonator antennas are fabricated by LTCC (Low- Temperature Co-fired Ceramic) technique. A free space measurement system is used to characterize metamaterial samples. Several 2D/3D meta-resonator antennas with SRRs are described.

  17. Numerical Investigations of High Pressure Acoustic Waves in Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athavale, Mahesh; Pindera, Maciej; Daniels, Christopher C.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation presents work on numerical investigations of nonlinear acoustic phenomena in resonators that can generate high-pressure waves using acoustic forcing of the flow. Time-accurate simulations of the flow in a closed cone resonator were performed at different oscillation frequencies and amplitudes, and the numerical results for the resonance frequency and fluid pressure increase match the GRC experimental data well. Work on cone resonator assembly simulations has started and will involve calculations of the flow through the resonator assembly with and without acoustic excitation. A new technique for direct calculation of resonance frequency of complex shaped resonators is also being investigated. Script-driven command procedures will also be developed for optimization of the resonator shape for maximum pressure increase.

  18. Crossing simple resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1985-08-01

    A simple criterion governs the beam distortion and/or loss of protons on a fast resonance crossing. Results from numerical integrations are illustrated for simple sextupole, octupole, and 10-pole resonances.

  19. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Electromagnetic Modeling Related ... Resonance Imaging Equipment in Clinical Use (March 2015) FDA/CDER: Information on Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents More ...

  20. Nanomechanical resonance detector

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Jeffrey C; Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-10-29

    An embodiment of a nanomechanical frequency detector includes a support structure and a plurality of elongated nanostructures coupled to the support structure. Each of the elongated nanostructures has a particular resonant frequency. The plurality of elongated nanostructures has a range of resonant frequencies. An embodiment of a method of identifying an object includes introducing the object to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the object. An embodiment of a method of identifying a molecular species of the present invention includes introducing the molecular species to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the molecular species.

  1. Multipass modes in an open resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niziev, V. G.; Grishaev, R. V.; Panchenko, V. Ya

    2015-02-01

    The papers dealing with multipass modes in open stable resonators are reviewed. A numerical model of an axially symmetric resonator is described that permits the properties of multipass modes to be studied in wave approximation. It is shown that for Fresnel numbers larger than unity, multiple reflections of radiation from the stable resonator mirrors lead to sustained quasi-stationary field oscillations in the resonator which are indicative of the essential contribution of multipass modes. The calculations in filling the resonator with the active medium have been performed for two types of lasers: with the on-axis and off-axis gain maxima. Resonator designs are suggested, trajectory selection techniques are considered to provide high-quality radiation at large Fresnel numbers. The confocal resonator properties are analyzed in the context of competition between single-pass and multipass modes. Relying on the results of calculations for multipass mode generation, a critical analysis of the experimental works is presented suggesting a logical explanation for the peculiarities which had not been physically interpreted in the original publications. An advanced understanding of the physics of multipass mode formations allowed us to put forward a special design of stable resonators for the generation of high quality radiation in high-power lasers.

  2. Fabrication of Ta2O5/GeNx gate insulator stack for Ge metal-insulator-semiconductor structures by electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma nitridation and sputtering deposition techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otani, Yohei; Itayama, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Takuo; Fukuda, Yukio; Toyota, Hiroshi; Ono, Toshiro; Mitsui, Minoru; Nakagawa, Kiyokazu

    2007-04-01

    The authors have fabricated germanium (Ge) metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures with a 7-nm-thick tantalum pentaoxide (Ta2O5)/2-nm-thick germanium nitride (GeNx) gate insulator stack by electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma nitridation and sputtering deposition. They found that pure GeNx ultrathin layers can be formed by the direct plasma nitridation of the Ge surface without substrate heating. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed no oxidation of the GeNx layer after the Ta2O5 sputtering deposition. The fabricated MIS capacitor with a capacitance equivalent thickness of 4.3nm showed excellent leakage current characteristics. The interface trap density obtained by the modified conductance method was 41011cm-2eV-1 at the midgap.

  3. Electron Spin Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy of Nitroxide Spin Labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Eric W.; Lee, Sanggap; Hickman, Steven A.; Wright, Sarah J.; Marohn, John A.

    2009-03-01

    Nitroxide spin labels are widely used in electron spin resonance studies of biological and polymeric systems. Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a magnetic resonance technique that couples the high spatial resolution of a scanning probe microscope with the species selectivity of magnetic resonance. We report on our investigations of 4-amino TEMPO, a nitroxide spin label, by force-gradient MRFM. Our microscope operates at high vacuum in liquid helium, using a custom fabricated ultra-soft silicon cantilever in the magnet-on-cantilever geometry. An 18 GHz gap coupled microstripline resonator supplies the transverse field.

  4. Microfabricated teeter-totter resonator

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, Douglas Ray; Heller, Edwin J.; Shul, Randy J.

    2004-11-23

    A microfabricated teeter-totter resonator comprises a frame, a paddle pivotably anchored to the frame by pivot arms that define an axis of rotation, a current conductor line on a surface of the paddle, means for applying a static magnetic field substantially perpendicular to the rotational axis and in the plane of the paddle, and means for energizing the current conductor line with an alternating current. A Lorentz force is generated by the interaction of the magnetic field with the current flowing in the conductor line, causing the paddle to oscillate about the axis of rotation. The teeter-totter resonator can be fabricated with micromachining techniques with materials used in the integrated circuits manufacturing industry. The microfabricated teeter-totter resonator has many varied applications, both as an actuation device and as a sensor. When used as a chemical sensor, a chemically sensitive coating can be disposed on one or both surfaces of the paddle to enhance the absorption of chemical analytes from a fluid stream. The resulting mass change can be detected as a change in the resonant frequency or phase of the oscillatory motion of the paddle.

  5. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew, E. R.

    2009-06-01

    Author's preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Basic theory; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Measurement of nuclear properties and general physical applications; 5. Nuclear magnetic resonance in liquids and gases; 6. Nuclear magnetic resonance in non-metallic solids; 7. Nuclear magnetic resonance in metals; 8. Quadrupole effects; Appendices 1-6; Glossary of symbols; Bibliography and author index; Subject index.

  6. An Inexpensive Resonance Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dukes, Phillip

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenon of resonance is applicable to almost every branch of physics. Without resonance, there wouldn't be televisions or stereos, or even swings on the playground. However, resonance also has undesirable side effects such as irritating noises in the car and the catastrophic events such as helicopters flying apart. In this article, the

  7. An Inexpensive Resonance Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dukes, Phillip

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenon of resonance is applicable to almost every branch of physics. Without resonance, there wouldn't be televisions or stereos, or even swings on the playground. However, resonance also has undesirable side effects such as irritating noises in the car and the catastrophic events such as helicopters flying apart. In this article, the…

  8. Advances in electron nuclear double resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Thomann, H.; Bernardo, M.

    1993-12-31

    The introduction of pulsed techniques has significantly enhanced the versatility of electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy. In pulsed ENDOR experiments, short, intense microwave and radio frequency (rf) pulses are used to induce electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and NMR transitions on time scales short with respect to the electron and nuclear spin relaxation times. EPR detection of both spin-population transfer and coherence transfer among the nuclear hyperfine sublevels is then possible. In contrast to the conventional experiments using continuous-wave (CW) irradiation, ENDOR spectra recorded by pulsed population-transfer techniques are not sensitive to the ratio of the electron and nuclear spin relaxation rates. Consequently, pulsed ENDOR experiments are expected to be more widely applicable than CW experiments. Pulsed techniques further offer the possibility for greater sensitivity, enhanced spectral resolution, and for completely new types of double resonance experiments. 31 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Baryon Spectroscopy and Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Edwards

    2011-12-01

    A short review of current efforts to determine the highly excited state spectrum of QCD, and in particular baryons, using lattice QCD techniques is presented. The determination of the highly excited spectrum of QCD is a major theoretical and experimental challenge. The experimental investigation of the excited baryon spectrum has been a long-standing element of the hadronic-physics program, an important component of which is the search for so-called 'missing resonances', baryonic states predicted by the quark model based on three constituent quarks but which have not yet been observed experimentally. Should such states not be found, it may indicate that the baryon spectrum can be modeled with fewer effective degrees of freedom, such as in quark-diquark models. In the past decade, there has been an extensive program to collect data on electromagnetic production of one and two mesons at Jefferson Lab, MIT-Bates, LEGS, MAMI, ELSA, and GRAAL. To analyze these data, and thereby refine our knowledge of the baryon spectrum, a variety of physics analysis models have been developed at Bonn, George Washington University, Jefferson Laboratory and Mainz. To provide a theoretical determination and interpretation of the spectrum, ab initio computations within lattice QCD have been used. Historically, the calculation of the masses of the lowest-lying states, for both baryons and mesons, has been a benchmark calculation of this discretized, finite-volume computational approach, where the aim is well-understood control over the various systematic errors that enter into a calculation; for a recent review. However, there is now increasing effort aimed at calculating the excited states of the theory, with several groups presenting investigations of the low-lying excited baryon spectrum, using a variety of discretizations, numbers of quark flavors, interpolating operators, and fitting methodologies. Some aspects of these calculations remain unresolved and are the subject of intense effort, notably the ordering of the Roper resonance in the low-lying Nucleon spectrum.

  10. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy intrinsic seals

    SciTech Connect

    Olinger, C.T.; Burr, T.; Vnuk, D.R.

    1994-08-01

    We have begun to quantify the ability of acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS) to detect the removal and replacement of the lid of a simulated special nuclear materials drum. Conceptually, the acoustic spectrum of a container establishcs a baseline fingerprint, which we refer to as an intrinsic seal, for the container. Simply removing and replacing the lid changes some of the resonant frequencies because it is impossible to exactly duplicate all of the stress patterns between the lid and container. Preliminary qualitative results suggested that the ARS intrinsic seal could discriminate between cases where a lid has or has not been removed. The present work is directed at quantifying the utility of the ARS intrinsic seal technique, including the technique`s sensitivity to ``nuisance`` effects, such as temperature swings, movement of the container, and placement of the transducers. These early quantitative tests support the potential of the ARS intrinsic seal application, but also reveal a possible sensitivity to nuisance effects that could limit environments or conditions under which the technique is effective.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Study of Nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shames, A. I.; Panich, A. M.; Kempiski, W.; Baidakova, M. V.; Osipov, V. Yu.; Enoki, T.; Vul', A. Ya.

    Magnetic resonance techniques, namely Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and solid state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), are powerful non-destructive tools for studying electron-nuclear and crystalline structure, inherent electronic and magnetic properties and transformations in carbon-based nanomaterials. EPR allows to control purity of ultradispersed diamond (UDD) samples, to study the origin, location and spin-lattice relaxation of radical-type carbon-inherited paramagnetic centers (RPC) as well as their transformation during the process of temperature driven diamond-to-graphite conversion. Solid state NMR on 1H and 13C nuclei provide one with information on the crystalline quality, allows quantitative estimation of the number of different allotropic forms, and reveals electron-nuclear interactions within the UDD samples under study. Results of recent EPR and 13C NMR study of pure and transition metal doped UDD samples, obtained by detonation technique, are reported and discussed. In addition to characteristic EPR signals, originated form para- and ferromagnetic impurities and doping ions, the UDD samples show a high concentration of RPC (up to 1020 spin/gram), which are due to structural defects (dangling C-C bonds) on the diamond cluster surface. In-situ EPR sample's vacuumization experiment in conjunction with precise SQUID magnetization measurements allowed concluding that each UDD particle carries a single spin (dangling bond) per each from 8 crystal (111) facets bounded the particle.

  12. Resonant and non-resonant magnetic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    McWhan, D.B.; Hastings, J.B.; Kao, C.C.; Siddons, D.P.

    1991-01-01

    The tunability and the polarization of synchrotron radiation open upon new possibilities for the study of magnetism. Studies on magnetic materials performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source are reviewed, and thy fall into four areas: structure, evolution of magnetic order, separation of L and S, and resonance effects. In the vicinity of atomic absorption edges, the Faraday effect, magnetic circular dichroism, and resonant magnetic scattering are all related resonance effects which measure the spin polarized density of states. The production and analysis of polarized beams are discussed in the context of the study of magnetism with synchrotron radiation.

  13. Resonant and non-resonant magnetic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    McWhan, D.B.; Hastings, J.B.; Kao, C.C.; Siddons, D.P.

    1991-12-31

    The tunability and the polarization of synchrotron radiation open upon new possibilities for the study of magnetism. Studies on magnetic materials performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source are reviewed, and thy fall into four areas: structure, evolution of magnetic order, separation of L and S, and resonance effects. In the vicinity of atomic absorption edges, the Faraday effect, magnetic circular dichroism, and resonant magnetic scattering are all related resonance effects which measure the spin polarized density of states. The production and analysis of polarized beams are discussed in the context of the study of magnetism with synchrotron radiation.

  14. Ovenized microelectromechanical system (MEMS) resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, Roy H; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kim, Bongsang

    2014-03-11

    An ovenized micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) resonator including: a substantially thermally isolated mechanical resonator cavity; a mechanical oscillator coupled to the mechanical resonator cavity; and a heating element formed on the mechanical resonator cavity.

  15. Potential Antiferromagnetic Fluctuations in Hole-Doped Iron-Pnictide Superconductor Ba1-xKxFe2As2 Studied by 75As Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Masanori; Yamada, Yuji; Saito, Taku; Nagashima, Ryo; Konishi, Takehisa; Toriyama, Tatsuya; Ohta, Yukinori; Fukazawa, Hideto; Kohori, Yoh; Furukawa, Yuji; Kihou, Kunihiro; Lee, Chul-Ho; Iyo, Akira; Eisaki, Hiroshi

    2012-05-01

    We have performed 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) meas urements on single-crystalline Ba1-xKxFe2As2 for x = 0.27{--}1. 75As nuclear quadruple resonance frequency (?Q) increases linearly with increasing x. The Knight shift K in the normal state shows Pauli paramagnetic behavior with a weak temperature T dependence. K increases gradually with increasing x. By contrast, the nuclear spin--lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 in the normal state has a strong T dependence, which indicates the existence of large antiferomagnetic (AF) spin fluctuations for all x's. The T dependence of 1/T1 shows a gaplike behavior below approximately 100 K for 0.6 < x < 0.9. This behaviors is well explained by the change in the band structure with the expansion of hole Fermi surfaces and the shrinkage and disappearance of electron Fermi surfaces at the Brillouin zone (BZ) with increasing x. The anisotropy of 1/T1, represented by the ratio of 1/T1ab to 1/T1c, is always larger than 1 for all x's, which indicates that stripe-type AF fluctuations are dominant in this system. The K in the superconducting (SC) state decreases, which corresponds to the appearance of spin-singlet superconductivity. The T dependence of 1/T1 in the SC state indicates a multiple-SC-gap feature. A simple two-gap model analysis shows that the larger superconducting gap gradually decreases with increasing x from 0.27 to 1 and a smaller gap decreases rapidly and nearly vanishes for x > 0.6 where electron pockets in BZ disappear.

  16. Theoretical characterization of the collective resonance states underlying the xenon giant dipole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Jen; Pabst, Stefan; Karamatskou, Antonia; Santra, Robin

    2015-03-01

    We present a detailed theoretical characterization of the two fundamental collective resonances underlying the xenon giant dipole resonance (GDR). This is achieved consistently by two complementary methods implemented within the framework of the configuration-interaction singles (CIS) theory. The first method accesses the resonance states by diagonalizing the many-electron Hamiltonian using the smooth exterior complex scaling technique. The second method involves a different application of the Gabor analysis to wave-packet dynamics. We identify one resonance at an excitation energy of 74 eV with a lifetime of 27 as and the second at 107 eV with a lifetime of 11 as . Our work provides a deeper understanding of the nature of the resonances associated with the GDR: a group of close-lying intrachannel resonances splits into two far-separated resonances through interchannel couplings involving the 4 d electrons. The CIS approach allows a transparent interpretation of the two resonances as new collective modes. Due to the strong entanglement between the excited electron and the ionic core, the resonance wave functions are not dominated by any single particle-hole state. This gives rise to plasma-like collective oscillations of the 4 d shell as a whole.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Reporter Gene Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sheen-Woo; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Biswal, Sandip

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging has undergone an explosive advancement in recent years, due to the tremendous research efforts made to understand and visualize biological processes. Molecular imaging by definition assesses cellular and molecular processes in living subjects, with the targets of following metabolic, genomic, and proteomic events. Furthermore, reporter gene imaging plays a central role in this field. Many different approaches have been used to visualize genetic events in living subjects, such as, optical, radionuclide, and magnetic resonance imaging. Compared with the other techniques, magnetic resonance (MR)-based reporter gene imaging has not occupied center stage, despite its superior three-dimensional depictions of anatomical details. In this article, the authors review the principles and applications of various types of MR reporter gene imaging technologies and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. PMID:22539936

  18. Stochastic resonance in paramagnetic resonance systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gammaitoni, L.; Santucci, S. ); Martinelli, M.; Pardi, L. )

    1993-01-01

    Experimental evidence of the stochastic resonance phenomenon in an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) system is reported. The amplitude and phase response of the EPR system operating in bistable conditions are measured for increasing values of the noise intensity. Theoretical predictions based on a simple dynamical model for the relevant system observables are shown to be in good agreement with experimental results. 16 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Resonantly detecting axion-mediated forces with nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Geraci, Andrew A

    2014-10-17

    We describe a method based on precision magnetometry that can extend the search for axion-mediated spin-dependent forces by several orders of magnitude. By combining techniques used in nuclear magnetic resonance and short-distance tests of gravity, our approach can substantially improve upon current experimental limits set by astrophysics, and probe deep into the theoretically interesting regime for the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) axion. Our method is sensitive to PQ axion decay constants between 10(9) and 10(12) GeV or axion masses between 10(-6) and 10(-3) eV, independent of the cosmic axion abundance. PMID:25361250

  20. Pyknometric volume measurement of a quasispherical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, R.; Davidson, S.; Perkin, M.; Morantz, P.; Sutton, G.; de Podesta, M.

    2012-06-01

    We have measured the internal volume of a 1 litre, diamond-turned copper quasispherical resonator with a fractional uncertainty of approximately 1 part in 106 using two independent techniques. This is in response to the need for a uniquely accurate measurement of resonator volume, for the purpose of measuring the Boltzmann constant in pursuit of the redefinition of the kelvin. The first technique is a pyknometric measurement using water as a liquid of known density. We describe the development of a procedure that results in stable, reproducible volume measurements. We provide a detailed discussion of the factors that affect the water density, such as dissolved gases. The second technique is microwave resonance spectroscopy. Here, we measure the resonant frequencies of the TM1n modes and relate them to the dimensions of the resonator. We evaluate the frequency perturbations that arise from the coupling waveguides and the electrical resistivity of the copper surface. The results of the microwave measurements show evidence of a dielectric coating on the surface. We propose that this is an oxide layer and estimate its thickness from the microwave data. Finally, we compare the volume estimates from the two methods, and find that the difference is within the combined uncertainty.

  1. Resonant Tunneling in Double Bilayer Graphene Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallahazad, Babak; Lee, Kayoung; Kang, Sangwoo; Xue, Jiamin; Larentis, Stefano; Corbet, Christopher; Kim, Kyounghwan; Movva, Hema; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Register, Leonard; Banerjee, Sanjay; Tutuc, Emanuel

    2015-03-01

    We present the realization and characterization of independently contacted and rotationally aligned double bilayer graphene heterostructures, that show gate-tunable tunneling resonances and negative differential resistance in their interlayer current-voltage characteristics. Our devices are fabricated by successively stacking mechanically exfoliated bilayer graphene and hexagonal boron nitride dielectric using a layer-by-layer transfer technique. The bilayers are rotationally aligned during the device fabrication by selecting flakes with straight edges, and using them as a reference for alignment. We determine the heterostructure energy band alignment at the tunneling resonance using the individual layer carrier densities, and including the chemical potential dependence on the carrier density. Our analysis show that the tunneling resonances occur when the charge neutrality points of the two bilayer graphene are energetically aligned, which suggests the resonances stem from the momentum conserving tunneling. This work has been supported by NRI-SWAN, ONR, and Intel.

  2. Hip Prosthesis Detection based on Complex Natural Resonances.

    PubMed

    Lui, Hoi-Shun; Shuley, Nicholas; Crozier, Stuart

    2005-01-01

    Resonance based radar target detection has been applied to Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) applications for the detection and recognition of landmines. Target detection is achieved by searching for certain target dependent Complex Natural Resonances (CNRs), which could be considered as a feature set for identification. In this paper, detection of a hip prosthesis under human tissues using resonance based target detection technique is investigated. PMID:17282504

  3. Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Karl T.; Pruski, Marek; Washton, Nancy M.; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2013-03-07

    This report recaps the "Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance" workshop, held in late 2011. This exploratory workshop's goal was to discuss and address challenges for the next generation of magnetic resonance experimentation. During the workshop, participants from throughout the world outlined the science drivers and instrumentation demands for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and associated magnetic resonance techniques, discussed barriers to their advancement, and deliberated the path forward for significant and impactful advances in the field.

  4. Noncontrast Magnetic Resonance Lymphography.

    PubMed

    Arriv, Lionel; Derhy, Sarah; El Mouhadi, Sana; Monnier-Cholley, Laurence; Menu, Yves; Becker, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Background?Different imaging techniques have been used for the investigation of the lymphatic channels and lymph glands. Noncontrast magnetic resonance (MR) lymphography has significant advantages in comparison with other imaging modalities. Methods?Noncontrast MR lymphography uses very heavily T2-weighted fast spin echo sequences which obtain a nearly complete signal loss in tissue background and specific display of lymphatic vessels with a long T2 relaxation time. The raw data can be processed with different algorithms such as maximum intensity projection algorithm to obtain an anatomic representation. Results?Standard T2-weighted MR images easily demonstrate the location of edema. It appears as subcutaneous infiltration of soft tissue with a classical honeycomb pattern. True collection around the muscular area may be demonstrated in case of severe lymphedema. Lymph nodes may be normal in size, number, and signal intensity; in other cases, lymph nodes may be smaller in size or number of lymph nodes may be restricted. MR lymphography allows a classification of lymphedema in aplasia (no collecting vessels demonstrated); hypoplasia (a small number of lymphatic vessels), and numerical hyperplasia or hyperplasia (with an increased number of lymphatic vessels of greater and abnormal diameter). Conclusion?Noncontrast MR lymphography is a unique noninvasive imaging modality for the diagnosis of lymphedema. It can be used for positive diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and specific evaluation of lymphedema severity. It may also be used for follow-up evaluation after treatment. PMID:25826439

  5. Resonances in Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, J. J.; Cuzzi, J. N.

    1982-01-01

    The locations and strengths of the major resonances of Saturn's known moons with particles orbiting within Saturn's rings are calculated. The resonant effects of an outer satellite on Saturn's rings is analyzed by Fourier expanding the satellite's potential, and it is found that the forcing at an l:(m-1) resonance depends on the moon's eccentricity to the (l-m) power. As most of Saturn's inner moons are in very nearly circular orbits, only their strongest resonances, with l = m and l = m+1, are calculated. For Mimas, which has a somewhat larger eccentricity, resonances with l = m+2 are also computed. All of the resonances of these forms which are located between Saturn's cloud tops and 2.267 Saturn radii are tabulated, except some of those due to tiny 1980 S28.

  6. Dismantling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Wiese, E.

    1998-03-13

    Most of the dismantling techniques used in a Decontamination and Dismantlement (D and D) project are taken from conventional demolition practices. Some modifications to the techniques are made to limit exposure to the workers or to lessen the spread of contamination to the work area. When working on a D and D project, it is best to keep the dismantling techniques and tools as simple as possible. The workers will be more efficient and safer using techniques that are familiar to them. Prior experience with the technique or use of mock-ups is the best way to keep workers safe and to keep the project on schedule.

  7. Micromagnetic Modeling of Localized Ferromagnetic Resonance Detected with Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelekhov, Denis V.; Martin, Ivar; Obukhov, Yuri; Kim, Jongjoo; Lee, Inhee; Nazaretski, Evgueni; Movshovich, Roman; Hammel, P. Chris

    2008-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) is a novel scanned probe technique based on mechanical detection of magnetic resonance. Its extreme sensitivity originates partially from the high magnetic field gradient of MRFM probe micromagnet which couples the MRFM probe to the magnetic moments in the sample. We report micromagnetic modeling of Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) performed in the local field of the micromagnetic MRFM probe: its strongly inhomogeneous field enables the excitation of localized FMR modes in the sample. This unusual effect provides a mechanism for spatially resolved FMR investigations of ferromagnetic systems. We discuss spatial resolution and results for both quasi 2D and 1D systems.

  8. Large mode radius resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    Resonator configurations permitting operation with large mode radius while maintaining good transverse mode discrimination are considered. Stable resonators incorporating an intracavity telescope and unstable resonator geometries utilizing an output coupler with a Gaussian reflectivity profile are shown to enable large radius single mode laser operation. Results of heterodyne studies of pulsed CO2 lasers with large (11mm e sup-2 radius) fundamental mode sizes are presented demonstrating minimal frequency sweeping in accordance with the theory of laser-induced medium perturbations.

  9. OCT techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fercher, Adolf F.; Drexler, Wolfgang; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    1996-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become one of the most promising imaging techniques in biology and medicine. Microscopic techniques using rapid image acquisition by scanning beam techniques and large-sample macroscopic techniques using scanning-stages have been developed. Basic to all OCT imaging schemes described so far is the use of low coherence techniques to detect the depth position of light remitting sites in the object. Either time-domain OCT imaging or Fourier-domain OCT imaging can be used. Furthermore, OCT techniques have been developed for metrologic application s like the measurement of the refractive index of tissue and the velocity profile of fluids in tubes. This paper reviews OCT imaging techniques used in experimental and clinical applications and discusses arrangement s to improve longitudinal and transversal resolution.

  10. Continuous-wave 355-nm laser source based on doubly resonant sum-frequency mixing in an external resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneda, Y.; Kubota, S.

    1995-11-01

    Using doubly resonant sum-frequency mixing between 1064 and 532 nm in an external resonator, we obtained 186 mW of continuous-wave ultraviolet output at {lambda}=355 nm with more than 20% conversion efficiency from the total incident power onto the mixing cavity. The resonator mirrors are shared by both the 1064a nd the 532-nm beams, yielding an optimum mode overlap between the two resonating modes. To maintain the simultaneous resonance, we locked the external resonator to the single-frequency green laser and locked the 1064-nm laser to the resonator. This technique can be applied to cw sum- or difference-frequency mixing of any two wavelengths. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital Optical} {ital Society} {ital of} {ital America}.

  11. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad; Kenouche, Samir; Coillot, Christophe; Alibert, Eric; Jabakhanji, Bilal; Schimpf, Remy; Zanca, Michel; Stein, Paul; Goze-Bac, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to characterize and model evanescent electromagnetic fields originating from NMR phenomenon. We report that in this experimental configuration the available NMR signal is one order of magnitude larger and follows an exponential decay inversely proportional to the size of the emitters. Those investigations open a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging. PMID:26751800

  12. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad; Kenouche, Samir; Coillot, Christophe; Alibert, Eric; Jabakhanji, Bilal; Schimpf, Remy; Zanca, Michel; Stein, Paul; Goze-Bac, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to characterize and model evanescent electromagnetic fields originating from NMR phenomenon. We report that in this experimental configuration the available NMR signal is one order of magnitude larger and follows an exponential decay inversely proportional to the size of the emitters. Those investigations open a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging. PMID:26751800

  13. Localized ferromagnetic resonance using Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongjoo

    Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) is a novel approach to scanned probe imaging, combining the advantages of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) [1]. It has extremely high sensitivity that has demonstrated detection of individual electron spins [2] and small numbers of nuclear spins [3]. Here we describe our MRFM experiments on Ferromagnetic thin film structures. Unlike ESR and NMR, Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) is defined not only by local probe field and the sample structures, but also by strong spin-spin dipole and exchange interactions in the sample. Thus, imaging and spatially localized study using FMR requires an entirely new approach. In MRFM, a probe magnet is used to detect the force response from the sample magnetization and it provides local magnetic field gradient that enables mapping of spatial location into resonance field. The probe field influences on the FMR modes in a sample, thus enabling local measurements of properties of ferromagnets. When sufficiently intense, the inhomogeneous probe field defines the region in which FMR modes are stable, thus producing localized modes. This feature enables FMRFM to be important tool for the local study of continuous ferromagnetic samples and structures. In our experiments, we explore the properties of the FMR signal as the strength of the local probe field evolves from the weak to strong perturbation limit. This underlies the important new capability of Ferromagnetic resonance imaging, a powerful new approach to imaging ferromagnet. The new developed FMR imaging technique enables FMR imaging and localized FMR spectroscopy to combine spectroscopy and lateral information of ferromagnetic resonance images [4][5]. Our theoretical approach agrees well with spatially localized spectroscopy and imaging results. This approach also allows analysis and reconstruction of FMR modes in a sample. Finally we consider the effect of strong probe fields on FMR modes. In this regime the probe field significantly modifies the FMR modes. In particular we observe the complete local suppression of the FMR mode under the probe. This provides as a new tool for local study of continuous ferromagnetic thin films and microstructures.

  14. Split-resonator integrated-post MEMS gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, Youngsam (Inventor); Hayworth, Ken J. (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A split-resonator integrated-post vibratory microgyroscope may be fabricated using micro electrical mechanical systems (MEMS) fabrication techniques. The microgyroscope may include two gyroscope sections bonded together, each gyroscope section including resonator petals, electrodes, and an integrated half post. The half posts are aligned and bonded to act as a single post.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance: General concepts and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Paudler, W.W.

    1987-01-01

    This book describes the use of NMR for structural and mechanistic studies in organic and inorganic chemistry and biochemistry. Theory is presented in semi-empirical fashion, and only a minimal mathematical approach applied. It describes the original NMR experiment done using the low resolution technique and advances to the modern Fourier transform technique. In addition to chemical shifts, coupling constants, and double resonance, this book covers magic angle and treats inorganic and biological systems. Presentations include appropriate examples and problems.

  16. On open electromagnetic resonators: relation between interferometers and resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Manenkov, Aleksandr A; Bykov, Vladimir P; Kuleshov, N V

    2010-05-26

    The physical difference between the concepts 'Fabry-Perot interferometer' and 'open resonator' is discussed. It is shown that the use of the term 'Fabry-Perot resonator' for open laser resonators is incorrect both from the historical viewpoint and from the viewpoint of the physical meaning of the processes occurring in these resonators. (laser beams and resonators)

  17. Line shapes of coherent population trapping resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, A.; Knappe, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Wynands, R.

    2001-04-01

    The line shapes of coherent population trapping resonances have been measured with high resolution and signal-to-noise ratio using a frequency-modulation technique with subsequent deconvolution of the line shapes. Simple models allow a perfect modeling of the experimental line shapes.

  18. The renaissance of fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Selvin, P R

    2000-09-01

    Recent advances in fluorescence resonance energy transfer have led to qualitative and quantitative improvements in the technique, including increased spatial resolution, distance range, and sensitivity. These advances, due largely to new fluorescent dyes, but also to new optical methods and instrumentation, have opened up new biological applications. PMID:10966639

  19. Imaging Intelligence with Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Rex E.; Gasparovic, Charles; Chavez, Robert S.; Caprihan, Arvind; Barrow, Ranee; Yeo, Ronald A.

    2009-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([to the first power]H-MRS) is a technique for the assay of brain neurochemistry "in vivo." N-acetylaspartate (NAA), the most prominent metabolite visible within the [to the first power]H-MRS spectrum, is found primarily within neurons. The current study was designed to further elucidate NAA-cognition

  20. [Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the kidneys].

    PubMed

    Lanzman, R S; Notohamiprodjo, M; Wittsack, H J

    2015-12-01

    Interest in functional renal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has significantly increased in recent years. This review article provides an overview of the most important functional imaging techniques and their potential clinical applications for assessment of native and transplanted kidneys, with special emphasis on the clarification of renal tumors. PMID:26628260