Science.gov

Sample records for resonance parameter evaluations

  1. Evaluation of Silicon Neutron Resonance Parameters in the Energy Range Thermal to 1800 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.

    2002-09-30

    The evaluation of the neutron cross sections of the three stable isotopes of silicon in the energy range thermal to 20 MeV was performed by Hetrick et al. for ENDF/B-VI (Evaluated Nuclear Data File). Resonance parameters were obtained in the energy range thermal to 1500 keV from a SAMMY analysis of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory experimental neutron transmission data. A new measurement of the capture cross section of natural silicon in the energy range 1 to 700 keV has recently been performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. Results of this measurement were used in a SAMMY reevaluation of the resonance parameters, allowing determination of the capture width of a large number of resonances. The experimental data base is described; properties of the resonance parameters are given. For the first time the direct neutron capture component has been taken into account from the calculation by Rauscher et al. in the energy range from thermal to 1 MeV. Results of benchmark calculations are also given. The new evaluation is available in the ENDF/B-VI format.

  2. Evaluation of silicon neutron resonance parameters in the thermal to 1800 keV energy range.

    PubMed

    Derrien, H; Leal, L C; Guber, K H; Larson, N M

    2005-01-01

    Because silicon is a major constituent of concrete and soil, neutron and gamma ray information on silicon is important for reactor shielding and criticality safety calculations. Therefore, much effort was put into the ENDF/B-VI evaluation for the three stable isotopes of silicon. The neutron capture cross section of natural silicon was recently measured at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in the energy range 1-700 keV. Using the ENDF/B-VI evaluation for initial values, a new evaluation of the resonance parameters was performed by adding the results of the ORELA capture measurements to the experimental database. The computer code SAMMY was used for the analysis of the experimental data; the new version of SAMMY allows accurate calculations of the self-shielding and multiple scattering effects in the capture measurements. The accuracy of the radiative capture widths of the resonances was improved by this analysis. Accurate values of the s-, p- and d-wave neutron strength functions were also obtained. Although the resonance capture component of the present evaluation is 2-3 times smaller than that in ENDF/B-VI, the total capture cross section is much larger, at least for energies >250 keV, because the direct capture component contributes values of the same order of magnitude as the resonance component. The direct component was not taken into account in the ENDF/B-VI evaluation and was calculated for the first time in the present evaluation. PMID:16381717

  3. Evaluation of 238U Resonance Parameters from 0 to 20 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrien, H.; Courcelle, A.; Leal, L. C.; Larson, N.; Santamarina, A.

    2005-05-01

    The neutron resonance parameters of 238U were obtained in the energy range 0 to 20 keV from a sequential SAMMY analysis of the most recent high-resolution neutron transmission and neutron capture cross-section measurements. Special care was taken in the analysis of the lowest s-wave resonances leading to resonance parameters slightly different from those of ENDF/B-VI (Moxon-Sowerby resonance parameters). The resolved-resonance range was extended to 20 keV, taking advantage of the high-resolution neutron transmission data of Harvey and neutron capture data of Macklin et al. Preliminary integral tests were performed with the new resonance parameters; thermal low-enriched benchmark calculations show an improvement of the keff prediction, mainly due to a 1.5% decrease of the capture cross section at 0.0253 eV and about a 0.4% decrease of the effective shielded resonance capture integral.

  4. Evaluation of 238U Resonance Parameters from 0 to 20 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, N.; Courcelle, A.; Santamarina, A.

    2005-05-24

    The neutron resonance parameters of 238U were obtained in the energy range 0 to 20 keV from a sequential SAMMY analysis of the most recent high-resolution neutron transmission and neutron capture cross-section measurements. Special care was taken in the analysis of the lowest s-wave resonances leading to resonance parameters slightly different from those of ENDF/B-VI (Moxon-Sowerby resonance parameters). The resolved-resonance range was extended to 20 keV, taking advantage of the high-resolution neutron transmission data of Harvey and neutron capture data of Macklin et al. Preliminary integral tests were performed with the new resonance parameters; thermal low-enriched benchmark calculations show an improvement of the keff prediction, mainly due to a 1.5% decrease of the capture cross section at 0.0253 eV and about a 0.4% decrease of the effective shielded resonance capture integral.

  5. [Effect of the evaluation parameter on sensitivity of resonance thrombography of thrombocytopenia in dogs].

    PubMed

    Adamik, A; Mischke, R

    1998-11-01

    Based on 109 blood samples taken from 36 dogs suffering from thrombocytopenia resonance thrombography with the resonance thrombograph RTG 801 (von Hoerner und Sulger Electronic GmbH, Schwetzingen; manufacturer: Fresenius AG, Bad Homburg) was distinctly more sensitive and more closely correlated to the platelet count using an optimized parameter of the resonance thrombogramm (RTG) in comparison to usual parameters. Nevertheless, clinical requirements regarding samples with platelet counts > 25,000/microliter were not fulfilled. Out of 13 samples with reduced platelet count and simultanous extended capillary bleeding time, depending on the used parameter a maximum of 9 samples could be detected as pathological by the RTG. The normal RTG in part of the cases with clearly altered primary haemostasis contrasts to the exclusive use of RTG in the screening of thrombocytopenia in dogs. PMID:9857562

  6. Fascicular Ratio: A New Parameter to Evaluate Peripheral Nerve Pathology on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tagliafico, Alberto S.; Tagliafico, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The objective of the study was to define and quantitatively evaluate the fascicular ratio (FR) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with peripheral neuropathies compared with healthy controls. Forty control subjects (20 women, 20 men; age, 44.6 ± 13.4 years) and 40 patients with peripheral neuropathy (22 women, 18 men; age, 50.3 ± 10.2 years) were examined with a standard 3T MRI protocol. With customized software (with semiautomatic and automatic interface), the hypointense and hyperintense areas of the peripheral nerves corresponding to fascicular and nonfascicular tissue were examined on T1-weighted sequences. The ratio of fascicular pixels to total pixels was called FR. Correlation with FR calculated on high-resolution ultrasound was performed. The statistical analysis included the Mann–Whitney U test of controls versus patients, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, and the subgroup analysis of patients according to etiologies of neuropathy. Intraobserver and interobserver agreement was calculated based on the evaluation made by 3 readers. Finally, a complete automatic evaluation was performed. On MRI, FRs were significantly increased in patients compared with controls (FR, 76.7 ± 15.1 vs 56 ± 12.3; P < 0.0001 for the semiautomatic interface; and FR 66.3 ± 17.5 vs 47.8 ± 18.4; P < 0.0001 for the automatic interface). The increase in FR was caused mainly by an increase in the hypointense part of the nerve. This observation was valid for all causes of neuropathies. ROC analysis found an area under the curve of 0.75 (95% confidence interval, 0.44–0.81) for FR to discriminate neuropathy from control. The correlation coefficient between MRI and ultrasound was significant (r = 0.49; 95% confidence interval for r, 0.21–0.70; P = 0.012). With the semiautomated evaluation, the mean intraobserver agreement was good (K = 0.86). The interobserver agreements were also good (reader 1

  7. Resonance Parameter Adjustment Based on Integral Experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sobes, Vladimir; Leal, Luiz; Arbanas, Goran; Forget, Benoit

    2016-06-02

    Our project seeks to allow coupling of differential and integral data evaluation in a continuous-energy framework and to use the generalized linear least-squares (GLLS) methodology in the TSURFER module of the SCALE code package to update the parameters of a resolved resonance region evaluation. We recognize that the GLLS methodology in TSURFER is identical to the mathematical description of a Bayesian update in SAMMY, the SAMINT code was created to use the mathematical machinery of SAMMY to update resolved resonance parameters based on integral data. Traditionally, SAMMY used differential experimental data to adjust nuclear data parameters. Integral experimental data, suchmore » as in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments Project, remain a tool for validation of completed nuclear data evaluations. SAMINT extracts information from integral benchmarks to aid the nuclear data evaluation process. Later, integral data can be used to resolve any remaining ambiguity between differential data sets, highlight troublesome energy regions, determine key nuclear data parameters for integral benchmark calculations, and improve the nuclear data covariance matrix evaluation. Moreover, SAMINT is not intended to bias nuclear data toward specific integral experiments but should be used to supplement the evaluation of differential experimental data. Using GLLS ensures proper weight is given to the differential data.« less

  8. Integral data analysis for resonance parameters determination

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Derrien, H.

    1997-09-01

    Neutron time-of-flight experiments have long been used to determine resonance parameters. Those resonance parameters have then been used in calculations of integral quantities such as Maxwellian averages or resonance integrals, and results of those calculations in turn have been used as a criterion for acceptability of the resonance analysis. However, the calculations were inadequate because covariances on the parameter values were not included in the calculations. In this report an effort to correct for that deficiency is documented: (1) the R-matrix analysis code SAMMY has been modified to include integral quantities of importance, (2) directly within the resonance parameter analysis, and (3) to determine the best fit to both differential (microscopic) and integral (macroscopic) data simultaneously. This modification was implemented because it is expected to have an impact on the intermediate-energy range that is important for criticality safety applications.

  9. Influence of resonance parameters' correlations on the resonance integral uncertainty; 55Mn case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žerovnik, Gašper; Trkov, Andrej; Capote, Roberto; Rochman, Dimitri

    2011-03-01

    For nuclides with a large number of resonances the covariance matrix of resonance parameters can become very large and expensive to process in terms of the computation time. By converting covariance matrix of resonance parameters into covariance matrices of background cross-section in a more or less coarse group structure a considerable amount of computer time and memory can be saved. The question is how important is the information that is discarded in the process. First, the uncertainty of the 55Mn resonance integral was estimated in narrow resonance approximation for different levels of self-shielding using Bondarenko method by random sampling of resonance parameters according to their covariance matrices from two different 55Mn evaluations: one from Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group NRG (with large uncertainties but no correlations between resonances), the other from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (with smaller uncertainties but full covariance matrix). We have found out that if all (or at least significant part of the) resonance parameters are correlated, the resonance integral uncertainty greatly depends on the level of self-shielding. Second, it was shown that the commonly used 640-group SAND-II representation cannot describe the increase of the resonance integral uncertainty. A much finer energy mesh for the background covariance matrix would have to be used to take the resonance structure into account explicitly, but then the objective of a more compact data representation is lost.

  10. Rho resonance parameters from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dehua; Alexandru, Andrei; Molina, Raquel; Döring, Michael

    2016-08-01

    We perform a high-precision calculation of the phase shifts for π -π scattering in the I =1 , J =1 channel in the elastic region using elongated lattices with two mass-degenerate quark flavors (Nf=2 ). We extract the ρ resonance parameters using a Breit-Wigner fit at two different quark masses, corresponding to mπ=226 MeV and mπ=315 MeV , and perform an extrapolation to the physical point. The extrapolation is based on a unitarized chiral perturbation theory model that describes well the phase shifts around the resonance for both quark masses. We find that the extrapolated value, mρ=720 (1 )(15 ) MeV , is significantly lower that the physical rho mass and we argue that this shift could be due to the absence of the strange quark in our calculation.

  11. Resonance parameter measurements and analysis of gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Leinweber, G.; Barry, D. P.; Trbovich, M. J.; Burke, J. A.; Drindak, N. J.; Knox, H. D.; Ballad, R. V.; Block, R. C.; Danon, Y.; Severnyak, L. I.

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of the present work is to measure the neutron cross sections of gadolinium accurately. Gd has the highest thermal absorption cross section of any natural element. Therefore it is an important element for thermal reactor applications Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. (RPI) LINAC facility using metallic and liquid Gd samples. The liquid samples were isotopically-enriched in either {sup 155}Gd or {sup 157}Gd. The capture measurements were made at the 25-m flight station with a sodium iodide detector, and the transmission measurements were performed at 15- and 25-m flight stations with {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors. The multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY was used to extract resonance parameters. The results of the thermal region analysis are significant. Resonance parameters for the low energy doublet, at 0.025 and 0.032 eV, are presented. The thermal (2200 m/s) capture cross section of {sup 157}Gd has been measured to be 11% smaller than that calculated from ENDF/B-VI updated through release 8. Thermal capture cross sections and capture resonance integrals for each isotope as well as elemental gadolinium are presented. In the epithermal region, natural metal samples were measured in capture and transmission. Neutron interaction data up to 300 eV have been analyzed. Substantial improvement to the understanding of gadolinium cross sections is presented, particularly above 180 eV where the ENDF resolved region for {sup 155}Gd ends. (authors)

  12. Evaluating the uncertainty in exchange parameters determined from off-resonance R1ρ relaxation dispersion for systems in fast exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothe, Jameson R.; Stein, Zachary W.; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-07-01

    Spin relaxation in the rotating frame (R1ρ) is a powerful NMR technique for characterizing fast microsecond timescale exchange processes directed toward short-lived excited states in biomolecules. At the limit of fast exchange, only kex = k1 + k-1 and Φex = pGpE(Δω)2 can be determined from R1ρ data limiting the ability to characterize the structure and energetics of the excited state conformation. Here, we use simulations to examine the uncertainty with which exchange parameters can be determined for two state systems in intermediate-to-fast exchange using off-resonance R1ρ relaxation dispersion. R1ρ data computed by solving the Bloch-McConnell equations reveals small but significant asymmetry with respect to offset (R1ρ (ΔΩ) ≠ R1ρ (-ΔΩ), which is a hallmark of slow-to-intermediate exchange, even under conditions of fast exchange for free precession chemical exchange line broadening (kex/Δω > 10). A grid search analysis combined with bootstrap and Monte-Carlo based statistical approaches for estimating uncertainty in exchange parameters reveals that both the sign and magnitude of Δω can be determined at a useful level of uncertainty for systems in fast exchange (kex/Δω < 10) but that this depends on the uncertainty in the R1ρ data and requires a thorough examination of the multidimensional variation of χ2 as a function of exchange parameters. Results from simulations are complemented by analysis of experimental R1ρ data measured in three nucleic acid systems with exchange processes occurring on the slow (kex/Δω = 0.2; pE = ∼0.7%), fast (kex/Δω = ∼10-16; pE = ∼13%) and very fast (kex = 39,000 s-1) chemical shift timescales.

  13. Single-level resonance parameters fit nuclear cross-sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drawbaugh, D. W.; Gibson, G.; Miller, M.; Page, S. L.

    1970-01-01

    Least squares analyses of experimental differential cross-section data for the U-235 nucleus have yielded single level Breit-Wigner resonance parameters that fit, simultaneously, three nuclear cross sections of capture, fission, and total.

  14. 239Pu Resonance Evaluation for Thermal Benchmark System Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, L. C.; Noguere, G.; de Saint Jean, C.; Kahler, A. C.

    2014-04-01

    Analyses of thermal plutonium solution critical benchmark systems have indicated a deficiency in the 239Pu resonance evaluation. To investigate possible solutions to this issue, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Working Party for Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) established Subgroup 34 to focus on the reevaluation of the 239Pu resolved resonance parameters. In addition, the impacts of the prompt neutron multiplicity (νbar) and the prompt neutron fission spectrum (PFNS) have been investigated. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the 239Pu resolved resonance evaluation effort.

  15. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis Using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Trbovich, M J; Barry, D P; Slovacek, R E; Danon, Y; Block, R C; Francis, N C; Lubert, M; Burke, J A; Drindak, N J; Lienweber, G; Ballad, R

    2007-02-06

    The focus of this work is to determine the resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005 - 200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf resonances near 8 eV. Accurate hafnium cross sections and resonance parameters are needed in order to quantify the effects of hafnium found in zirconium, a metal commonly used in reactors. The accuracy of the cross sections and the corresponding resonance parameters used in current nuclear analysis tools are rapidly becoming the limiting factor in reducing the overall uncertainty on reactor physics calculations. Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission are routinely performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) LINAC using the time-of flight technique. {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m, respectively. Capture experiments were performed using a sixteen section NaI multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized several thicknesses of metallic and isotope-enriched liquid Hf samples. The liquid Hf samples were designed to provide information on the {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf contributions to the 8 eV doublet without saturation. Data analyses were performed using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. A combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005 - 200 eV. Additionally, resonance integrals were calculated, along with errors for each hafnium isotope, using the NJOY and INTER codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previous values. The {sup 176}Hf resonance integral, based on this work, is approximately 73% higher than the ENDF/B-VI value. This is due primarily to the changes to resonance parameters in the 8 eV resonance, the neutron width presented in this work is more than twice that of the previous value. The calculated elemental

  16. Neutron Resonance Parameters and Covariance Matrix of 239Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Larson, Nancy M

    2008-08-01

    In order to obtain the resonance parameters in a single energy range and the corresponding covariance matrix, a reevaluation of 239Pu was performed with the code SAMMY. The most recent experimental data were analyzed or reanalyzed in the energy range thermal to 2.5 keV. The normalization of the fission cross section data was reconsidered by taking into account the most recent measurements of Weston et al. and Wagemans et al. A full resonance parameter covariance matrix was generated. The method used to obtain realistic uncertainties on the average cross section calculated by SAMMY or other processing codes was examined.

  17. Parameter measurement of synchronous reluctance motor using LC resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Joonseon; Kim, Ki-Chan; Lee, Ju

    2006-04-01

    The motor characterizing parameters are most important factors to drive precisely, effectively, and robustly. Especially, the exact knowledge of synchronous inductance is necessary to control the torque precisely in synchronous reluctance motor (SynRM). Therefore many works have been done for the exact measurement of motor parameters. In this paper, we propose the simple method of measuring the motor parameters, especially measuring the synchronous inductance of SynRM, which can overcome the demerits of conventional methods and measure the exact values. The proposed method uses the resonance phenomenon between the phase inductance and capacitors externally connected.

  18. Evaluation of Neutron Resonance Cross Section Data at GELINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillebeeckx, P.; Becker, B.; Capote, R.; Emiliani, F.; Guber, K.; Heyse, J.; Kauwenberghs, K.; Kopecky, S.; Lampoudis, C.; Massimi, C.; Mondelaers, W.; Moxon, M.; Noguere, G.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Pronyaev, V.; Siegler, P.; Sirakov, I.; Trkov, A.; Volev, K.; Zerovnik, G.

    2014-05-01

    Over the last decade, the EC-JRC-IRMM, in collaboration with other institutes such as INRNE Sofia (BG), INFN Bologna (IT), ORNL (USA), CEA Cadarache (FR) and CEA Saclay (FR), has made an intense effort to improve the quality of neutron-induced cross section data in the resonance region. These improvements relate to both the infrastructure of the facility and the measurement setup, and the data reduction and analysis procedures. As a result total and reaction cross section data in the resonance region with uncertainties better than 0.5 % and 2 %, respectively, can be produced together with evaluated data files for both the resolved and unresolved resonance region. The methodology to produce full ENDF compatible files, including covariances, is illustrated by the production of resolved resonance parameter files for 241Am, Cd and W and an evaluation for 197Au in the unresolved resonance region.

  19. Determination of Resonance Parameters and their Covariances from Neutron Induced Reaction Cross Section Data

    SciTech Connect

    Schillebeeckx, P.; Becker, B.; Danon, Y.; Guber, K.; Harada, H.; Heyse, J.; Junghans, A.R.; Kopecky, S.; Massimi, C.; Moxon, M.C.; Otuka, N.; Sirakov, I.; Volev, K.

    2012-12-15

    Cross section data in the resolved and unresolved resonance region are represented by nuclear reaction formalisms using parameters which are determined by fitting them to experimental data. Therefore, the quality of evaluated cross sections in the resonance region strongly depends on the experimental data used in the adjustment process and an assessment of the experimental covariance data is of primary importance in determining the accuracy of evaluated cross section data. In this contribution, uncertainty components of experimental observables resulting from total and reaction cross section experiments are quantified by identifying the metrological parameters involved in the measurement, data reduction and analysis process. In addition, different methods that can be applied to propagate the covariance of the experimental observables (i.e. transmission and reaction yields) to the covariance of the resonance parameters are discussed and compared. The methods being discussed are: conventional uncertainty propagation, Monte Carlo sampling and marginalization. It is demonstrated that the final covariance matrix of the resonance parameters not only strongly depends on the type of experimental observables used in the adjustment process, the experimental conditions and the characteristics of the resonance structure, but also on the method that is used to propagate the covariances. Finally, a special data reduction concept and format is presented, which offers the possibility to store the full covariance information of experimental data in the EXFOR library and provides the information required to perform a full covariance evaluation.

  20. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis Using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    MJ Trbovich; DP Barry; RE Slovacck; Y Danon; RC Block; JA Burke; NJ Drindak; G Leinweber; RV Ballad

    2004-10-13

    The focus of this work is to determine resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005-200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf resonances near 8 eV. The large neutron cross section of hafnium, combined with its corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties, make it a useful material for controlling nuclear reactions. Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission were performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) electron linear accelerator (LINAC) using the time of flight method. {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m. Capture experiments were done using a sixteen section NaI(Tl) multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized various thicknesses of metallic and isotopically-enriched liquid samples. The liquid samples were designed to provide information on the {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf contributions to the 8 eV doublet without saturation. Data analysis was done using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M6 beta. SAMMY is able to account for experimental resolution effects for each of the experimental setups at the RPI LINAC, and also can correct for multiple scattering effects in neutron capture yield data. The combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005-200 eV. Resonance integrals were calculated along with errors for each hafnium isotope using the NJOY [1] and INTER [2] codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previously published values; however the calculated elemental hafnium resonance integral changed very little.

  1. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Trbovich, Michael J.; Barry, Devin P.; Burke, John A.; Drindak, Noel J.; Leinweber, Greg; Ballad, Robert V.; Slovacek, Rudy E.; Danon, Yaron; Block, Robert C.

    2005-05-24

    The focus of this work is to determine resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005-200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping 176Hf and 178Hf resonances near 8 eV. The large neutron cross section of hafnium, combined with its corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties, make it a useful material for controlling nuclear reactions.Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission were performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) electron linear accelerator (LINAC) using the time of flight method. 6Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m. Capture experiments were done using a sixteen-section NaI(Tl) multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized various thicknesses of metallic and isotopically enriched liquid samples. The liquid samples were designed to provide information on the 176Hf and 178Hf contributions to the 8-eV doublet without saturation.Data analysis was done using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M6 beta. SAMMY is able to account for experimental resolution effects for each of the experimental setups at the RPI LINAC, and also can correct for multiple scattering effects in neutron capture yield data. The combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005-200 eV. Resonance integrals were calculated along with errors for each hafnium isotope using the NJOY and INTER codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previously published values; however the calculated elemental hafnium resonance integral changed very little.

  2. Statistical parameters for gloss evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Peiponen, Kai-Erik; Juuti, Mikko

    2006-02-13

    The measurement of minute changes in local gloss has not been presented in international standards due to a lack of suitable glossmeters. The development of a diffractive-element-based glossmeter (DOG) made it possible to detect local variation of gloss from planar and complex-shaped surfaces. Hence, a demand for proper statistical gloss parameters for classifying surface quality by gloss, similar to the standardized surface roughness classification, has become necessary. In this letter, we define statistical gloss parameters and utilize them as an example in the characterization of gloss from metal surface roughness standards by the DOG.

  3. Evaluation and Treatment of Resonance Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kummer, Ann W.; Lee, Linda

    1996-01-01

    Resonance disorders can have a variety of causes but the appropriate evaluation includes a speech pathology evaluation and may require a videofluoroscopic speech study or nasopharyngoscopy assessment. Treatment may include surgery or the use of prosthetic devices, and usually speech therapy. An interdisciplinary approach is best. (Author/DB)

  4. Resonance Evaluation of 48Ti Including Covariance for Criticality Safety Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, Luiz C; Guber, Klaus H; Arbanas, Goran; Wiarda, Dorothea; Koehler, Paul Edward; Kahler, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we report the methodology and the results of an evaluation carried out for 48Ti in the resolved resonance region for applications in criticality safety calculations. The evaluation was performed using the computer code SAMMY with the reduced R-matrix Reich-Moore formalism. The Bayes scheme was utilized for fitting the experimental data. New transmission and capture data were essential in the evaluation process. A complete set of resonance parameters was obtained in the energy region from thermal to 400 keV. In addition to the resonance parameters, a resonance parameter covariance matrix was also obtained. The impact of the new resonance parameter evaluation in benchmark calculations, as well as the uncertainty, was verified.

  5. Theory and computation of nuclear magnetic resonance parameters.

    PubMed

    Vaara, Juha

    2007-10-28

    The art of quantum chemical electronic structure calculation has over the last 15 years reached a point where systematic computational studies of magnetic response properties have become a routine procedure for molecular systems. One of their most prominent areas of application are the spectral parameters of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, due to the immense importance of this experimental method in many scientific disciplines. This article attempts to give an overview on the theory and state-of-the-art of the practical computations in the field, in terms of the size of systems that can be treated, the accuracy that can be expected, and the various factors that would influence the agreement of even the most accurate imaginable electronic structure calculation with experiment. These factors include relativistic effects, thermal effects, as well as solvation/environmental influences, where my group has been active. The dependence of the NMR spectra on external magnetic and optical fields is also briefly touched on. PMID:17925967

  6. On the Methodology to Calculate the Covariance of Estimated Resonance Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, B.; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.

    2015-01-15

    Principles to determine resonance parameters and their covariance from experimental data are discussed. Different methods to propagate the covariance of experimental parameters are compared. A full Bayesian statistical analysis reveals that the level to which the initial uncertainty of the experimental parameters propagates, strongly depends on the experimental conditions. For high precision data the initial uncertainties of experimental parameters, like a normalization factor, has almost no impact on the covariance of the parameters in case of thick sample measurements and conventional uncertainty propagation or full Bayesian analysis. The covariances derived from a full Bayesian analysis and least-squares fit are derived under the condition that the model describing the experimental observables is perfect. When the quality of the model can not be verified a more conservative method based on a renormalization of the covariance matrix is recommended to propagate fully the uncertainty of experimental systematic effects. Finally, neutron resonance transmission analysis is proposed as an accurate method to validate evaluated data libraries in the resolved resonance region.

  7. Comments on extracting the resonance strength parameter from yield data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Stephen; Favalli, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The F(α,n) reaction is the focus of on-going research in part because it is an important source of neutrons in the nuclear fuel cycle which can be exploited to assay nuclear materials, especially uranium in the form of UF6 [1,2]. At the present time there remains some considerable uncertainty (of the order of ±20%) in the thick target integrated over angle (α,n) yield from 19F (100% natural abundance) and its compounds as discussed in [3,4]. An important thin target cross-section measurement is that of Wrean and Kavanagh [5] who explore the region from below threshold (2.36 MeV) to approximately 3.1 MeV with fine energy resolution. Integration of their cross-section data over the slowing down history of a stopping α-particle allows the thick target yield to be calculated for incident energies up to 3.1 MeV. This trend can then be combined with data from other sources to obtain a thick target yield curve over the wider range of interest to the fuel cycle (roughly threshold to 10 MeV to include all relevant α-emitters). To estimate the thickness of the CaF2 target they used, Wrean and Kavanagh separately measured the integrated yield of the 6.129 MeV γ-rays from the resonance at 340.5 keV (laboratory α-particle kinetic energy) in the 19F(p,αγ) reaction. To interpret the data they adopted a resonance strength parameter of (22.3±0.8) eV based on a determination by Becker et al [6]. The value and its uncertainty directly affects the thickness estimate and the extracted (α,n) cross-section values. In their citation to Becker et al's work, Wrean and Kavanagh comment that they did not make use of an alternative value of (23.7±1.0) eV reported by Croft [7] because they were unable to reproduce the value from the data given in that paper. The value they calculated for the resonance strength from the thick target yield given by Croft was 21.4 eV. The purpose of this communication is to revisit the paper by Croft published in this journal and specifically to

  8. Resonance Parameters of the Rho-Meson from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Feng, Karl Jansen, Dru Renner

    2011-05-01

    We perform a non-perturbative lattice calculation of the P-wave pion-pion scattering phase in the rho-meson decay channel using two flavors of maximally twisted mass fermions at pion masses ranging from 480 MeV to 290 MeV. Making use of finite-size methods, we evaluate the pion-pion scattering phase in the center-of-mass frame and two moving frames. Applying an effective range formula, we find a good description of our results for the scattering phase as a function of the energy covering the resonance region. This allows us to extract the rho-meson mass and decay width and to study their quark mass dependence.

  9. Resonance parameters of the {rho} meson from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xu; Jansen, Karl; Renner, Dru B.

    2011-05-01

    We perform a nonperturbative lattice calculation of the P-wave pion-pion scattering phase in the {rho}-meson decay channel using two flavors of maximally twisted mass fermions at pion masses ranging from 480 to 290 MeV. Making use of finite-size methods, we evaluate the pion-pion scattering phase in the center-of-mass frame and two moving frames. Applying an effective range formula, we find a good description of our results for the scattering phase as a function of the energy covering the resonance region. This allows us to extract the {rho}-meson mass and decay width and to study their quark mass dependence.

  10. Parameter-Induced Stochastic Resonance of Weak Periodic Signal Excitation with α Stable Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing; Kou, Jie; Jiao, Shang-Bin

    In view of the nonlinear bistable system, this paper studied the parameter-induced stochastic resonance phenomenon of low-frequency weak signal excitation under α stable noise environment, and explored the action laws of the α stable noise distribution parameters α, β, μ, σ and the bistable system parameters a, b on stochastic resonance effect. The results show that in different α stable noise, adjusting the bistable system parameters can induce stochastic resonance; Moreover, when a(or b) is fixed, the intervals of b(or a) which can induce stochastic resonance are multiple and don't change with any α stable distribution parameter. Further, by combining with the parameter compensation method for researching on high-frequency weak signal, the same action laws as the low-frequency signal are got. The conclusions are significant for using parameter-induced stochastic resonance principle in weak signal detection in the abnormal diffusion dynamical system.

  11. Modification of piezoelectric vibratory gyroscope resonator parameters by feedback control.

    PubMed

    Loveday, P W; Rogers, C A

    1998-01-01

    A method for analyzing the effect of feedback control on the dynamics of piezoelectric resonators used in vibratory gyroscopes has been developed. This method can be used to determine the feasibility of replacing the traditional mechanical balancing operations, used to adjust the resonant frequency, by displacement feedback and for determining the velocity feedback required to produce a particular bandwidth. Experiments were performed on a cylindrical resonator with discrete piezoelectric actuation and sensing elements to demonstrate the principles. Good agreement between analysis and experiment was obtained, and it was shown that this type of resonator could be balanced by displacement feedback. The analysis method presented also is applicable to micromachined piezoelectric gyroscopes. PMID:18244281

  12. R-MATRIX RESONANCE ANALYSIS AND STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF THE RESONANCE PARAMETERS OF 233U IN THE NEUTRON ENERGY RANGE FROM THERMAL TO 600 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.

    2001-02-27

    The R-matrix resonance analysis of experimental neutron transmission and cross sections of {sup 233}U, with the Reich-Moore Bayesian code SAMMY, was extended up to the neutron energy of 600 eV by taking advantage of new high resolution neutron transmission and fission cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). The experimental data base is described. In addition to the microscopic data (time-of-flight measurements of transmission and cross sections), some experimental and evaluated integral quantities were included in the data base. Tabulated and graphical comparisons between the experimental data and the SAMMY calculated cross sections are given. The ability of the calculated cross sections to reproduce the effective multiplication factors k{sub eff} for various thermal, intermediate, and fast systems was tested. The statistical properties of the resonance parameters were examined and recommended values of the average s-wave resonance parameters are given.

  13. Test of the Universality of the Three-Body Efimov Parameter at Narrow Feshbach Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sanjukta; Landini, Manuele; Trenkwalder, Andreas; Semeghini, Giulia; Spagnolli, Giacomo; Simoni, Andrea; Fattori, Marco; Inguscio, Massimo; Modugno, Giovanni

    2013-08-01

    We measure the critical scattering length for the appearance of the first three-body bound state, or Efimov three-body parameter, at seven different Feshbach resonances in ultracold K39 atoms. We study both intermediate and narrow resonances, where the three-body spectrum is expected to be determined by the nonuniversal coupling of two scattering channels. Instead, our observed ratio of the three-body parameter with the van der Waals radius is approximately the same universal ratio as for broader resonances. This unexpected observation suggests the presence of a new regime for three-body scattering at narrow resonances.

  14. Effects of relevant parameters on the bandgaps of acoustic metamaterials with multi-resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Rongqi; Lin, Jieqiong

    2016-04-01

    Locally resonant acoustic metamaterials with multi-resonators are generally regarded as a fine trend for managing the bandgaps, the different effects of relevant structural parameters on the bandgaps, which will be numerically investigated in this paper. A two-step homogenization method is extended to achieve the effective mass of multi-resonators metamaterial in the lattice system. As comparison, the dispersive wave propagation in lattice system and continuum model is studied. Then, the different effects of relevant parameters on the center frequencies and bandwidth of bandgaps are perfectly revealed, and the steady-state responses in the continuum models with purposed relevant parameters are additionally clarified. The related results can well confirm that the bandgaps exist around the undamped natural frequencies of internal resonators, and also their bandwidth can be efficiently controlled with the ensured center frequencies. Moreover, the design of purposed multi-resonators acoustic metamaterial in vibration control is presented and discussed by an example.

  15. Aperiodic signals processing via parameter-tuning stochastic resonance in a photorefractive ring cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xuefeng; Cao, Guangzhan; Liu, Hongjun

    2014-04-15

    Based on solving numerically the generalized nonlinear Langevin equation describing the nonlinear dynamics of stochastic resonance by Fourth-order Runge-Kutta method, an aperiodic stochastic resonance based on an optical bistable system is numerically investigated. The numerical results show that a parameter-tuning stochastic resonance system can be realized by choosing the appropriate optical bistable parameters, which performs well in reconstructing aperiodic signals from a very high level of noise background. The influences of optical bistable parameters on the stochastic resonance effect are numerically analyzed via cross-correlation, and a maximum cross-correlation gain of 8 is obtained by optimizing optical bistable parameters. This provides a prospective method for reconstructing noise-hidden weak signals in all-optical signal processing systems.

  16. SAMDIST: A Computer Code for Calculating Statistical Distributions for R-Matrix Resonance Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.

    1995-01-01

    The: SAMDIST computer code has been developed to calculate distribution of resonance parameters of the Reich-Moore R-matrix type. The program assumes the parameters are in the format compatible with that of the multilevel R-matrix code SAMMY. SAMDIST calculates the energy-level spacing distribution, the resonance width distribution, and the long-range correlation of the energy levels. Results of these calculations are presented in both graphic and tabular forms.

  17. SAMDIST: A computer code for calculating statistical distributions for R-matrix resonance parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.; Larson, N.M.

    1995-09-01

    The SAMDIST computer code has been developed to calculate distribution of resonance parameters of the Reich-Moore R-matrix type. The program assumes the parameters are in the format compatible with that of the multilevel R-matrix code SAMMY. SAMDIST calculates the energy-level spacing distribution, the resonance width distribution, and the long-range correlation of the energy levels. Results of these calculations are presented in both graphic and tabular forms.

  18. Fast determination of beef quality parameters with time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Fabíola Manhas Verbi; Bertelli Pflanzer, Sérgio; Gomig, Thaísa; Lugnani Gomes, Carolina; de Felício, Pedro Eduardo; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2013-04-15

    The noteworthy of this study is to predict seven quality parameters for beef samples using time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR) relaxometry data and multivariate models. Samples from 61 Bonsmara heifers were separated into five groups based on genetic (breeding composition) and feed system (grain and grass feed). Seven sample parameters were analyzed by reference methods; among them, three sensorial parameters, flavor, juiciness and tenderness and four physicochemical parameters, cooking loss, fat and moisture content and instrumental tenderness using Warner Bratzler shear force (WBSF). The raw beef samples of the same animals were analyzed by TD-NMR relaxometry using Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) and Continuous Wave-Free Precession (CWFP) sequences. Regression models computed by partial least squares (PLS) chemometric technique using CPMG and CWFP data and the results of the classical analysis were constructed. The results allowed for the prediction of aforementioned seven properties. The predictive ability of the method was evaluated using the root mean square error (RMSE) for the calibration (RMSEC) and validation (RMSEP) data sets. The reference and predicted values showed no significant differences at a 95% confidence level. PMID:23601874

  19. Vibroacoustic test plan evaluation: Parameter variation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahle, C. V.; Gongloef, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    Statistical decision models are shown to provide a viable method of evaluating the cost effectiveness of alternate vibroacoustic test plans and the associated test levels. The methodology developed provides a major step toward the development of a realistic tool to quantitatively tailor test programs to specific payloads. Testing is considered at the no test, component, subassembly, or system level of assembly. Component redundancy and partial loss of flight data are considered. Most and probabilistic costs are considered, and incipient failures resulting from ground tests are treated. Optimums defining both component and assembly test levels are indicated for the modified test plans considered. modeling simplifications must be considered in interpreting the results relative to a particular payload. New parameters introduced were a no test option, flight by flight failure probabilities, and a cost to design components for higher vibration requirements. Parameters varied were the shuttle payload bay internal acoustic environment, the STS launch cost, the component retest/repair cost, and the amount of redundancy in the housekeeping section of the payload reliability model.

  20. Evaluating intensity parameters for debris flow vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiler, Margreth

    2014-05-01

    In mountain regions natural hazard processes such as debris flows or hyper-concentrated flows repeatedly lead to high damages. After an event, detailed documentation of the meteorological, hydrological and geomorphological indicators are standardized, and additional data on debris covering run out areas, indicators for processes velocity and transported volumes are gathered. Information on deposition height of debris is an important parameter to estimate the intensity of the process impacting the buildings and infrastructure and hence to establish vulnerability curves. However, the deposition height of mobilized material in settlements and on infrastructure is mostly not directly evaluated because recovery work starts immediately or even during the event leading to a removal of accumulated material. Different approaches exist to reconstruct deposition heights after torrent events, such as mind mapping, comparison of LIDAR-based DEM before and after the event as well as the reconstruction by using photo documentation and the estimation of deposition heights according to standardised elements at buildings and infrastructure. In our study, these different approaches to estimate deposition height and the spatial distribution of the accumulated material are applied and compared against each other by using the case study of the debris flow event in Brienz (Switzerland) which occurred during the serve flood events of August 2005 in the Alps. Within the analysis, different factors including overall costs and time consumption (manpower, equipment), accuracy and preciseness are compared and evaluated to establish optimal maps of the extent and deposition depth after torrent events and to integrate this information in the vulnerability analysis.

  1. Neutron total cross-sections and resonance parameters of Mo and Ta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moinul Haque Meaze, A. K. M.; Devan, K.; Lee, Y. S.; Oh, Y. D.; Kim, G. N.; Son, D.

    2007-02-01

    Experimental results of transmissions for the samples of natural molybdenum with thickness 0.0192 atoms/barn and for the four samples of natural tantalum with thickness 0.0222, 0.0111, 0.0055 and 0.0025 atoms/barn are presented in this work. Measurements were carried out at the Pohang Neutron Facility which consists of a 100 MeV Linac, water-cooled tantalum target, and 12 m flight path length. Effective total cross-sections were extracted from the transmission data, and resonance parameters were obtained by using the code SAMMY. The present measurements were compared with other measurements and with the evaluated nuclear data file ENDF/B-VI.8.

  2. Measurement of neutron total cross-section and resonance parameters of xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoy, V. R.; Wang, T. F.; Kim, G. N.; Oh, Y. D.; Cho, M. H.; Ko, I. S.; Namkung, W.

    2009-07-01

    We measured the neutron total cross-sections of natural xenon in the neutron energy region from 0.1 to 40 eV by using the time-of-flight method at the Pohang neutron facility, which consists of an electron linear accelerator, a water-cooled tantalum target with a water moderator, and a 12-m long time-of-flight path. A 6Li-ZnS(Ag) scintillator with a diameter of 12.5 cm and a thickness of 1.6 cm was used as a neutron detector. Notch filters composed of Co, In, Cd were used to estimate the background level and to calculate the neutron flight path length. The present measurement was compared with the existing experimental and the evaluated data. The resonance parameters of Xe isotopes were obtained from the transmission ratio by using the SAMMY code and were compared with other previous results.

  3. Chronic liver disease: evaluation by magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Goldberg, H.I.; Moss, A.A.; Bass, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging distinguished hepatitis from fatty liver and cirrhosis in a woman with a history of alcohol abuse. Anatomic and physiologic manifestations of portal hypertension were also demonstrated by MR.

  4. Deep-tissue imaging of intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy-transfer parameters.

    PubMed

    Gaind, Vaibhav; Kularatne, Sumith; Low, Philip S; Webb, Kevin J

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate the in vivo reconstruction of all fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) parameters, including the nanometer donor-acceptor distance, in a mouse. The FRET chemical targets cancer cells, and on internalization, the acceptor is released, in lieu of a targeted anticancer drug in chemotherapy. Our method provides a new vehicle for studying disease by imaging FRET parameters in deep tissue. PMID:20436553

  5. Resonance parameters based analysis for metallic thickness optimization of a bimetallic plasmonic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Mahua; Banerjee, Jayeta; Ray, Mina

    2014-02-01

    Metallic film thickness optimization in mono- and bimetallic plasmonic structures has been carried out in order to determine the correct device parameters. Different resonance parameters, such as reflectivity, phase, field enhancement, and the complex amplitude reflectance Argand diagram (CARAD), have been investigated for the proposed optimization procedure. Comparison of mono- and bimetallic plasmonic structures has been carried out in the context of these resonance parameters with simultaneous angular and spectral interrogation. Differential phase analysis has also been performed and its application to sensing has been discussed along with a proposed interferometric set-up.

  6. Resonance Analysis and Evaluation of the Uranium -235 Neutron-Induced Cross-Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, Luiz Carlos

    Neutron cross sections of fissile nuclei are of considerable interest for the understanding of parameters such as resonance absorption, resonance escape probability, resonance self-shielding, and the dependence of the reactivity on temperature. In the present study, new techniques for the evaluation of the ^{235}U neutron cross sections are described. The Reich-Moore formalism of the Bayesian computer code SAMMY was used to perform consistent R-matrix multilevel analyses of the selected neutron cross-section data. The Delta_3 -statistics of Dyson and Mehta, along with high -resolution data and the spin-separated fission cross-section data, have provided the possibility of developing a new methodology for the analysis and evaluation of neutron -nucleus cross-sections. The result of the analysis consists of a set of resonance parameters which describe the ^{235}U neutron cross sections up to 500 eV. The set of resonance parameters obtained through a R-matrix analysis are expected to satisfy statistical properties which lead to information on the nuclear structure. The resonance parameters were tested and showed good agreement with the theory. It is expected that the parametrization of the ^{235}U neutron cross sections obtained in this dissertation represents the current state of art in data as well as in theory and, therefore, can be of direct use in reactor calculations.

  7. Neutron Capture and Transmission Measurements and Resonance Parameter Analysis of Samarium

    SciTech Connect

    G. Leinweber; J.A. Burke; H.D. Knox; N.J. Drindak; D.W. Mesh; W.T. Haines; R.V. Ballad; R.C. Block; R.E. Slovacek; C.J. Werner; M.J. Trbovich; D.P. Barry; T. Sato

    2001-07-16

    The purpose of the present work is to accurately measure the neutron cross sections of samarium. The most significant isotope is {sup 149}Sm, which has a large neutron absorption cross section at thermal energies and is a {sup 235}U fission product with a 1% yield. Its cross sections are thus of concern to reactor neutronics. Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic institute (RPI) LINAC facility using metallic and liquid Sm samples. The capture measurements were made at the 25 meter flight station with a multiplicity-type capture detector, and the transmission total cross-section measurements were performed at 15- and 25-meter flight stations with {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors. Resonance parameters were determined by a combined analysis of six experiments (three capture and three transmission) using the multi-level R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M2. The significant features of this work are as follows. Dilute samples of samarium nitrate in deuterated water (D{sub 2}O) were prepared to measure the strong resonances at 0.1 and 8 eV without saturation. Disk-shaped spectroscopic quartz cells were obtained with parallel inner surfaces to provide a uniform thickness of solution. The diluent feature of the SAMMY program was used to analyze these data. The SAMMY program also includes multiple scattering corrections to capture yield data and resolution functions specific to the RPI facility. Resonance parameters for all stable isotopes of samarium were deduced for all resonances up to 30 eV. Thermal capture cross-section and capture resonance integral calculations were made using the resultant resonance parameters and were compared to results obtained using resonance parameters from ENDF/B-VI updated through release 3. Extending the definition of the capture resonance integral to include the strong 0.1 eV resonance in {sup 149}Sm, present measurements agree within estimated

  8. Efimov Resonance and Three-Body Parameter in a Lithium-Rubidium Mixture.

    PubMed

    Maier, R A W; Eisele, M; Tiemann, E; Zimmermann, C

    2015-07-24

    We study collisional heating in a cold ^{7}Li-^{87}Rb mixture near a broad Feshbach resonance at 661 G. At the high field slope of the resonance, we find an enhanced three-body recombination rate that we interpret as a heteronuclear Efimov resonance. With improved Feshbach spectroscopy of two further resonances, a model for the molecular potentials has been developed that now consistently explains all known Feshbach resonances of the various Li-Rb isotope mixtures. The model is used to determine the scattering length of the observed Efimov state. Its value of -1870a_{0} Bohr radii supports the currently discussed assumption of universality of the three-body parameter also in heteronuclear mixtures. PMID:26252682

  9. Radio frequency spectral characterization and model parameters extraction of high Q optical resonators.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Zeina; Boucher, Yann G; Fernandez, Arnaud; Balac, Stéphane; Llopis, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    A microwave domain characterization approach is proposed to determine the properties of high quality factor optical resonators. This approach features a very high precision in frequency and aims to acquire a full knowledge of the complex transfer function (amplitude and phase) characterizing an optical resonator using a microwave vector network analyzer. It is able to discriminate between the different coupling regimes, from the under-coupling to the selective amplification, and it is used together with a model from which the main resonator parameters are extracted, i.e. coupling factor, intrinsic losses, phase slope, intrinsic and external quality factor. PMID:27251460

  10. Radio frequency spectral characterization and model parameters extraction of high Q optical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Zeina; Boucher, Yann G.; Fernandez, Arnaud; Balac, Stéphane; Llopis, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    A microwave domain characterization approach is proposed to determine the properties of high quality factor optical resonators. This approach features a very high precision in frequency and aims to acquire a full knowledge of the complex transfer function (amplitude and phase) characterizing an optical resonator using a microwave vector network analyzer. It is able to discriminate between the different coupling regimes, from the under-coupling to the selective amplification, and it is used together with a model from which the main resonator parameters are extracted, i.e. coupling factor, intrinsic losses, phase slope, intrinsic and external quality factor.

  11. Radio frequency spectral characterization and model parameters extraction of high Q optical resonators

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Zeina; Boucher, Yann G.; Fernandez, Arnaud; Balac, Stéphane; Llopis, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    A microwave domain characterization approach is proposed to determine the properties of high quality factor optical resonators. This approach features a very high precision in frequency and aims to acquire a full knowledge of the complex transfer function (amplitude and phase) characterizing an optical resonator using a microwave vector network analyzer. It is able to discriminate between the different coupling regimes, from the under-coupling to the selective amplification, and it is used together with a model from which the main resonator parameters are extracted, i.e. coupling factor, intrinsic losses, phase slope, intrinsic and external quality factor. PMID:27251460

  12. Neutron Capture and Transmission Measurements and Resonance Parameter Analysis of Samarium

    SciTech Connect

    Leinweber, G.; Burke, J.A.; Knox, H.D.; Drindak, N.J.; Mesh, D.W.; Haines, W.T.; Ballad, R.V.; Block, R.C.; Slovacek, R.E.; Werner, C.J.; Trbovich, M.J.; Barry, D.P.; Sato, T.

    2002-09-15

    The purpose of the present work is to measure the neutron cross sections of samarium accurately. The most significant isotope is {sup 149}Sm, which has a large neutron absorption cross section at thermal energies and is a {sup 235}U fission product with a 1% yield. Its cross sections are thus of concern to reactor neutronics.Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) LINAC facility using metallic and liquid Sm samples. The capture measurements were made at the 25-m flight station with a multiplicity-type capture detector, and the transmission total cross-section measurements were performed at 15- and 25-m flight stations with {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors. Resonance parameters were determined by a combined analysis of six experiments (three capture and three transmission) using the multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M2.The significant features of this work are as follows. Dilute samples of samarium nitrate in deuterated water (D{sub 2}O) were prepared to measure the strong resonances at 0.1 and 8 eV without saturation. Disk-shaped spectroscopic quartz cells were obtained with parallel inner surfaces to provide a uniform thickness of solution. The diluent feature of the SAMMY program was used to analyze these data. The SAMMY program also includes multiple-scattering corrections to capture yield data and resolution functions specific to the RPI facility.Resonance parameters for all stable isotopes of samarium were deduced for all resonances up to 30 eV. Thermal capture cross-section and capture resonance integral (RI) calculations were made using the resultant resonance parameters and were compared to results obtained using resonance parameters from ENDF/B-VI updated through release 3. Extending the definition of the capture RI to include the strong 0.1-eV resonance in {sup 149}Sm, present measurements agree within estimated uncertainties with ENDF

  13. Pumping test evaluation of stream depletion parameters.

    PubMed

    Lough, Hilary K; Hunt, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Descriptions are given of a pumping test and a corresponding analysis that permit calculation of all five hydrogeological parameters appearing in the Hunt (2003) solution for stream depletion caused by ground water abstraction from a well beside a stream. This solution assumes that flow in the pumped aquifer is horizontal, flow in the overlying aquitard or system of aquitards is vertical, and the free surface in the top aquitard is allowed to draw down. The definition of an aquitard in this paper is any layer with a vertical hydraulic conductivity much lower than the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the pumped aquifer. These "aquitards" may be reasonably permeable layers but are distinguished from the pumped aquifer by their hydraulic conductivity contrast. The pumping test requires a complete set of drawdown measurements from at least one observation well. This well must be deep enough to penetrate the pumped aquifer, and pumping must continue for a sufficient time to ensure that depleted streamflow becomes a significant portion of the well abstraction rate. Furthermore, two of the five parameters characterize an aquitard that overlies the pumped aquifer, and values for these parameters are seen to be dependent upon the initial water table elevation in the aquitard. The field test analyzed herein used a total of eight observation wells screened in the pumped aquifer, and measurements from these wells gave eight sets of parameters that are used in a sensitivity analysis to determine the relative importance of each parameter in the stream depletion calculations. PMID:16857031

  14. 'Coulomb' description of basic relaxation parameters of isobar analog and charge-exchange giant monopole resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, M. L.; Rykovanov, V. S.; Urin, M. G.

    2010-12-15

    Within a semimicroscopic approach, basic relaxation parameters of the isobaric analog resonance and of the charge-exchange giant monopole resonance, which is an overtone of the isobaric analog resonance, are interpreted in terms of the mean Coulomb field of a nucleus. The continuum version of the random-phase approximation, allowance for an approximate isospin conservation in nuclei in an explicit form, and a phenomenological description of the fragmentation effect are basic ingredients of the approach used. The aforementioned parameters were calculated for a number of magic and near-magic nuclei by using a partly self-consistent phenomenological nuclear mean field and the isovector part of the Landau-Migdal interaction in the particle-hole channel. The results of the calculations are compared with corresponding experimental data.

  15. Controlling the Radiation Parameters of a Resonant Medium Excited by a Sequence of Ultrashort Superluminal Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, R. M.; Arkhipov, M. V.; Belov, P. A.; Babushkin, I.; Tolmachev, Yu. A.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of controlling the radiation parameters of a spatially periodic one-dimensional medium consisting of classical harmonic oscillators by means of a sequence of ultrashort pulses that propagate through the medium with a superluminal velocity. We show that, in the spectrum of the transient process, in addition to the radiation at a resonant frequency of oscillators, new frequencies arise that depend on the period of the spatial distribution of the oscillator density, the excitation velocity, and the angle of observation. We have examined in detail the case of excitation of the medium by a periodic sequence of ultrashort pulses that travel with a superluminal velocity. We show that it is possible to excite oscillations of complex shapes and to control the radiation parameters of the resonant medium by changing the relationship between the pulse repetition rate, the medium resonant frequency, and the new frequency.

  16. Evaluation of ventricular function with gated cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Osbakken, M; Yuschok, T

    1986-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of using planar images obtained with gated cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to evaluate ventricular contractile function, cardiac chamber volume (V), and ejection fraction (EF) were calculated using MR images obtained in five previously catheterized patients. Patients were imaged with a .15-Tesla 55-cm bore magnet using the ECG to gate the images. Spin echo pulse sequences (30/500, TE/TR) were used to produce images in the transverse (T), coronal (C), and sagittal (S) planes at end diastole (ED) and end systole (ES). Slice thickness was 1.5 cm, with 2-mm resolution. A calibration grid was imaged in each plane to determine correction factors. Cardiac chamber areas were determined via planimetry. An area-length-volume algorithm was used to obtain EDV and ESV. Three combinations of biplane images in ES and ED were used (T/C, T/S, C/S). Volume data were used to calculate EF. Contrast ventriculogram volumes tended to be greater than MRI volumes, but EFs were similar with both techniques. In conclusion, gated cardiac MR images can be used to evaluate the ventricular function parameters of volume and ejection fraction. PMID:3731263

  17. New Resolved Resonance Region Evaluation for 63Cu and 65Cu for Nuclear Criticality Safety Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sobes, Vladimir; Leal, Luiz C; Guber, Klaus H; Forget, Benoit; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Siegler, P.

    2014-01-01

    A new resolved resonance region evaluation of 63Cu and 65Cu was done in the energy region from 10-5 eV to 99.5 keV. The R-Matrix SAMMY method using the Reich-Moore approximation was used to create a new set of consistent resonance parameters. The new evaluation was based on three experimental transmission data sets; two measured at ORELA and one from MITR, and two radiative capture experimental data sets from GELINA. A total of 141 new resonances were identied for 63Cu and 117 for 65Cu. The corresponding set of external resonances for each isotope was based on the identied resonances above 99.5 keV from the ORELA transmission data. The negative external levels (bound levels) were determined to match the dierential thermal cross section measured at the MITR. Double dierential elastic scattering cross sections were calculated from the new set of resonance parameters. Benchmarking calculations were carried out on a set of ICSBEP benchmarks. This work is in support of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program.

  18. New Resolved Resonance Region Evaluation for 63,65Cu for Nuclear Criticality Safety Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobes, V.; Leal, L. C.; Guber, K.; Forget, B.; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Siegler, P.

    2014-04-01

    A new resolved resonance region evaluation of 63,65Cu was done in the energy region from 10-5 eV to 99.5 keV. The R-Matrix SAMMY method using the Reich-Moore approximation was used to create a new set of consistent resonance parameters. The new evaluation is based on three experimental transmission data sets: two measured at ORELA and one at MITR, plus two radiative capture experimental data sets from GELINA. A total of 141 new resonances were identified for 63Cu and 117 for 65Cu. The corresponding set of external resonances for each isotope is based on the identified resonances above 99.5 keV from the ORELA transmission data. The negative external levels (bound levels) have been determined to match the thermal cross section measured at the MITR. Differential elastic scattering cross sections have been calculated from the new set of resonance parameters. Benchmarking calculations were carried out on a set of ICSBEP benchmarks.

  19. Use of Magnetic Resonance in the Evaluation of Cranial Trauma.

    PubMed

    Altmeyer, Wilson; Steven, Andrew; Gutierrez, Juan

    2016-05-01

    MR imaging is an extremely useful tool in the evaluation of traumatic brain injury in the emergency department. Although CT still plays the dominant role in urgent patient triage, MR imaging's impact on traumatic brain injury imaging continues to expand. MR imaging has shown superiority to CT for certain traumatic processes, such as diffuse axonal injury, cerebral contusion, and infarction. Magnetic resonance angiography and magnetic resonance venography allow emergent vascular imaging for patients that should avoid ionizing radiation or intravenous contrast. PMID:27150321

  20. Methodological aspects in the calculation of parity-violating effects in nuclear magnetic resonance parameters.

    PubMed

    Weijo, Ville; Bast, Radovan; Manninen, Pekka; Saue, Trond; Vaara, Juha

    2007-02-21

    We examine the quantum chemical calculation of parity-violating (PV) electroweak contributions to the spectral parameters of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from a methodological point of view. Nuclear magnetic shielding and indirect spin-spin coupling constants are considered and evaluated for three chiral molecules, H2O2, H2S2, and H2Se2. The effects of the choice of a one-particle basis set and the treatment of electron correlation, as well as the effects of special relativity, are studied. All of them are found to be relevant. The basis-set dependence is very pronounced, especially at the electron correlated ab initio levels of theory. Coupled-cluster and density-functional theory (DFT) results for PV contributions differ significantly from the Hartree-Fock data. DFT overestimates the PV effects, particularly with nonhybrid exchange-correlation functionals. Beginning from third-row elements, special relativity is of importance for the PV NMR properties, shown here by comparing perturbational one-component and various four-component calculations. In contrast to what is found for nuclear magnetic shielding, the choice of the model for nuclear charge distribution--point charge or extended (Gaussian)--has a significant impact on the PV contribution to the spin-spin coupling constants. PMID:17328593

  1. Stochastic Parameter Resonance of Road-Vehicle Systems and Related Bifurcation Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedig, Walter V.

    The paper investigates stochastic dynamics of road-vehicle systems and related bifurcation problems. The ride on rough roads generates vertical car vibrations whose root-mean-squares are resonant for critical car speeds and vanish when the car velocity is increasing, infinitely. These investigations are extended to wheel suspensions with progressive spring characteristics. For weak but still positive damping, the car vibrations become unstable when the velocity reaches the parameter resonance near twice the critical speed bifurcating into stochastic chaos of larger non-stationary car vibrations.

  2. Practice Parameter for Child and Adolescent Forensic Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This Parameter addresses the key concepts that differentiate the forensic evaluation of children and adolescents from a clinical assessment. There are ethical issues unique to the forensic evaluation, because the forensic evaluator's duty is to the person, court, or agency requesting the evaluation, rather than to the patient. The forensic…

  3. Trojan resonant dynamics, stability, and chaotic diffusion, for parameters relevant to exoplanetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páez, Rocío Isabel; Efthymiopoulos, Christos

    2015-02-01

    The possibility that giant extrasolar planets could have small Trojan co-orbital companions has been examined in the literature from both viewpoints of the origin and dynamical stability of such a configuration. Here we aim to investigate the dynamics of hypothetical small Trojan exoplanets in domains of secondary resonances embedded within the tadpole domain of motion. To this end, we consider the limit of a massless Trojan companion of a giant planet. Without other planets, this is a case of the elliptic restricted three body problem (ERTBP). The presence of additional planets (hereafter referred to as the restricted multi-planet problem, RMPP) induces new direct and indirect secular effects on the dynamics of the Trojan body. The paper contains a theoretical and a numerical part. In the theoretical part, we develop a Hamiltonian formalism in action-angle variables, which allows us to treat in a unified way resonant dynamics and secular effects on the Trojan body in both the ERTBP or the RMPP. In both cases, our formalism leads to a decomposition of the Hamiltonian in two parts, . , called the basic model, describes resonant dynamics in the short-period (epicyclic) and synodic (libration) degrees of freedom, while contains only terms depending trigonometrically on slow (secular) angles. is formally identical in the ERTBP and the RMPP, apart from a re-definition of some angular variables. An important physical consequence of this analysis is that the slow chaotic diffusion along resonances proceeds in both the ERTBP and the RMPP by a qualitatively similar dynamical mechanism. We found that this is best approximated by the paradigm of `modulational diffusion'. In the paper's numerical part, we then focus on the ERTBP in order to make a detailed numerical demonstration of the chaotic diffusion process along resonances. Using color stability maps, we first provide a survey of the resonant web for characteristic mass parameter values of the primary, in which the

  4. Virtual Acoustics: Evaluation of Psychoacoustic Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Current virtual acoustic displays for teleconferencing and virtual reality are usually limited to very simple or non-existent renderings of reverberation, a fundamental part of the acoustic environmental context that is encountered in day-to-day hearing. Several research efforts have produced results that suggest that environmental cues dramatically improve perceptual performance within virtual acoustic displays, and that is possible to manipulate signal processing parameters to effectively reproduce important aspects of virtual acoustic perception in real-time. However, the computational resources for rendering reverberation remain formidable. Our efforts at NASA Ames have been focused using a several perceptual threshold metrics, to determine how various "trade-offs" might be made in real-time acoustic rendering. This includes both original work and confirmation of existing data that was obtained in real rather than virtual environments. The talk will consider the importance of using individualized versus generalized pinnae cues (the "Head-Related Transfer Function"); the use of head movement cues; threshold data for early reflections and late reverberation; and consideration of the necessary accuracy for measuring and rendering octave-band absorption characteristics of various wall surfaces. In addition, a consideration of the analysis-synthesis of the reverberation within "everyday spaces" (offices, conference rooms) will be contrasted to the commonly used paradigm of concert hall spaces.

  5. Changes of Schumann resonance parameters during the solar proton event of 14 July 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldugin, V. C.; Maltsev, Y. P.; Vasiljev, A. N.; Shvets, A. V.; Nikolaenko, A. P.

    2003-03-01

    The ELF measurements in Russian observatories Lovozero (the Kola Peninsula) and Lekhta (Karelija) during the solar proton event of 14 July 2000 show the decrease of frequencies of the first and second Schumann resonance modes of ˜0.4 Hz and the increase of the first-mode bandwidth from 0.8 to 1.5 Hz. The solar X-ray burst, preceding the proton precipitation, is accompanied by the increase of the first-mode frequency. Approximate formulas for frequencies and qualities of the two first modes are found for a two-layer model of the Schumann resonator (SR). The changes of the SR parameters are a response of the Earth-ionosphere resonator to large-scale disturbances of the polar ionosphere.

  6. Parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy and its application to weak signal detection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinjing; Zhang, Tao

    2015-02-15

    The parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy (PSRSE) method is introduced for the detection of a very weak signal in the presence of strong noise. The effect of stochastic resonance on the detection is optimized using parameters obtained in spectral entropy analysis. Upon processing employing the PSRSE method, the amplitude of the weak signal is enhanced and the noise power is reduced, so that the frequency of the signal can be estimated with greater precision through spectral analysis. While the improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio is similar to that obtained using the Duffing oscillator algorithm, the computational cost reduces from O(N{sup 2}) to O(N). The PSRSE approach is applied to the frequency measurement of a weak signal made by a vortex flow meter. The results are compared with those obtained applying the Duffing oscillator algorithm.

  7. Classification of hydrological parameter sensitivity and evaluation of parameter transferability across 431 US MOPEX basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Huiying; Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Bao, Jie; Sun, Yu; Tesfa, Teklu; Ruby Leung, L.

    2016-05-01

    The Community Land Model (CLM) represents physical, chemical, and biological processes of the terrestrial ecosystems that interact with climate across a range of spatial and temporal scales. As CLM includes numerous sub-models and associated parameters, the high-dimensional parameter space presents a formidable challenge for quantifying uncertainty and improving Earth system predictions needed to assess environmental changes and risks. This study aims to evaluate the potential of transferring hydrologic model parameters in CLM through sensitivity analyses and classification across watersheds from the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) in the United States. The sensitivity of CLM-simulated water and energy fluxes to hydrological parameters across 431 MOPEX basins are first examined using an efficient stochastic sampling-based sensitivity analysis approach. Linear, interaction, and high-order nonlinear impacts are all identified via statistical tests and stepwise backward removal parameter screening. The basins are then classified according to their parameter sensitivity patterns (internal attributes), as well as their hydrologic indices/attributes (external hydrologic factors) separately, using Principal component analysis (PCA) and expectation-maximization (EM) - based clustering approach. Similarities and differences among the parameter sensitivity-based classification system (S-Class), the hydrologic indices-based classification (H-Class), and the Koppen climate classification systems (K-Class) are discussed. Within each parameter sensitivity-based classification system (S-Class) with similar parameter sensitivity characteristics, similar inversion modeling setups can be used for parameter calibration, and the parameters and their contribution or significance to water and energy cycling may also be more transferrable. This classification study provides guidance on identifiable parameters, and on parameterization and inverse model design for CLM but the

  8. RIPL - Reference Input Parameter Library for Calculation of Nuclear Reactions and Nuclear Data Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Capote, R. , E-Mail: r.capotenoy@iaea.org; Herman, M.; Oblozinsky, P.; Young, P.G.; Goriely, S.; Belgya, T.; Ignatyuk, A.V.; Koning, A.J.; Hilaire, S.; Plujko, V.A.; Avrigeanu, M.; Bersillon, O.; Chadwick, M.B.; Fukahori, T.; Ge, Zhigang; Han, Yinlu; Kailas, S.; Kopecky, J.; Maslov, V.M.; Reffo, G.

    2009-12-15

    We describe the physics and data included in the Reference Input Parameter Library, which is devoted to input parameters needed in calculations of nuclear reactions and nuclear data evaluations. Advanced modelling codes require substantial numerical input, therefore the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has worked extensively since 1993 on a library of validated nuclear-model input parameters, referred to as the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL). A final RIPL coordinated research project (RIPL-3) was brought to a successful conclusion in December 2008, after 15 years of challenging work carried out through three consecutive IAEA projects. The RIPL-3 library was released in January 2009, and is available on the Web through (http://www-nds.iaea.org/RIPL-3/). This work and the resulting database are extremely important to theoreticians involved in the development and use of nuclear reaction modelling (ALICE, EMPIRE, GNASH, UNF, TALYS) both for theoretical research and nuclear data evaluations. The numerical data and computer codes included in RIPL-3 are arranged in seven segments: MASSES contains ground-state properties of nuclei for about 9000 nuclei, including three theoretical predictions of masses and the evaluated experimental masses of Audi et al. (2003). DISCRETE LEVELS contains 117 datasets (one for each element) with all known level schemes, electromagnetic and {gamma}-ray decay probabilities available from ENSDF in October 2007. NEUTRON RESONANCES contains average resonance parameters prepared on the basis of the evaluations performed by Ignatyuk and Mughabghab. OPTICAL MODEL contains 495 sets of phenomenological optical model parameters defined in a wide energy range. When there are insufficient experimental data, the evaluator has to resort to either global parameterizations or microscopic approaches. Radial density distributions to be used as input for microscopic calculations are stored in the MASSES segment. LEVEL DENSITIES contains

  9. RIPL - Reference Input Parameter Library for Calculation of Nuclear Reactions and Nuclear Data Evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capote, R.; Herman, M.; Obložinský, P.; Young, P. G.; Goriely, S.; Belgya, T.; Ignatyuk, A. V.; Koning, A. J.; Hilaire, S.; Plujko, V. A.; Avrigeanu, M.; Bersillon, O.; Chadwick, M. B.; Fukahori, T.; Ge, Zhigang; Han, Yinlu; Kailas, S.; Kopecky, J.; Maslov, V. M.; Reffo, G.; Sin, M.; Soukhovitskii, E. Sh.; Talou, P.

    2009-12-01

    We describe the physics and data included in the Reference Input Parameter Library, which is devoted to input parameters needed in calculations of nuclear reactions and nuclear data evaluations. Advanced modelling codes require substantial numerical input, therefore the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has worked extensively since 1993 on a library of validated nuclear-model input parameters, referred to as the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL). A final RIPL coordinated research project (RIPL-3) was brought to a successful conclusion in December 2008, after 15 years of challenging work carried out through three consecutive IAEA projects. The RIPL-3 library was released in January 2009, and is available on the Web through http://www-nds.iaea.org/RIPL-3/. This work and the resulting database are extremely important to theoreticians involved in the development and use of nuclear reaction modelling (ALICE, EMPIRE, GNASH, UNF, TALYS) both for theoretical research and nuclear data evaluations. The numerical data and computer codes included in RIPL-3 are arranged in seven segments: MASSES contains ground-state properties of nuclei for about 9000 nuclei, including three theoretical predictions of masses and the evaluated experimental masses of Audi et al. (2003). DISCRETE LEVELS contains 117 datasets (one for each element) with all known level schemes, electromagnetic and γ-ray decay probabilities available from ENSDF in October 2007. NEUTRON RESONANCES contains average resonance parameters prepared on the basis of the evaluations performed by Ignatyuk and Mughabghab. OPTICAL MODEL contains 495 sets of phenomenological optical model parameters defined in a wide energy range. When there are insufficient experimental data, the evaluator has to resort to either global parameterizations or microscopic approaches. Radial density distributions to be used as input for microscopic calculations are stored in the MASSES segment. LEVEL DENSITIES contains

  10. RIPL-Reference Input Parameter Library for Calculation of Nuclear Reactions and Nuclear Data Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Capote, R.; Herman, M.; Capote,R.; Herman,M.; Oblozinsky,P.; Young,P.G.; Goriely,S.; Belgy,T.; Ignatyuk,A.V.; Koning,A.J.; Hilaire,S.; Pljko,V.A.; Avrigeanu,M.; Bersillon,O.; Chadwick,M.B.; Fukahori,T.; Ge, Zhigang; Han,Yinl,; Kailas,S.; Kopecky,J.; Maslov,V.M.; Reffo,G.; Sin,M.; Soukhovitskii,E.Sh.; Talou,P

    2009-12-01

    We describe the physics and data included in the Reference Input Parameter Library, which is devoted to input parameters needed in calculations of nuclear reactions and nuclear data evaluations. Advanced modelling codes require substantial numerical input, therefore the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has worked extensively since 1993 on a library of validated nuclear-model input parameters, referred to as the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL). A final RIPL coordinated research project (RIPL-3) was brought to a successful conclusion in December 2008, after 15 years of challenging work carried out through three consecutive IAEA projects. The RIPL-3 library was released in January 2009, and is available on the Web through http://www-nds.iaea.org/RIPL-3/. This work and the resulting database are extremely important to theoreticians involved in the development and use of nuclear reaction modelling (ALICE, EMPIRE, GNASH, UNF, TALYS) both for theoretical research and nuclear data evaluations. The numerical data and computer codes included in RIPL-3 are arranged in seven segments: MASSES contains ground-state properties of nuclei for about 9000 nuclei, including three theoretical predictions of masses and the evaluated experimental masses of Audi et al. (2003). DISCRETE LEVELS contains 117 datasets (one for each element) with all known level schemes, electromagnetic and {gamma}-ray decay probabilities available from ENSDF in October 2007. NEUTRON RESONANCES contains average resonance parameters prepared on the basis of the evaluations performed by Ignatyuk and Mughabghab. OPTICAL MODEL contains 495 sets of phenomenological optical model parameters defined in a wide energy range. When there are insufficient experimental data, the evaluator has to resort to either global parameterizations or microscopic approaches. Radial density distributions to be used as input for microscopic calculations are stored in the MASSES segment. LEVEL DENSITIES contains

  11. sup 56 Fe resonance parameters for neutron energies up to 850 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Perey, C.M.; Perey, F.G.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Larson, N.M.

    1990-12-01

    High-resolution neutron measurements for {sup 56}Fe-enriched iron targets were made at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in transmission below 20 MeV and in differential elastic scattering below 5 MeV. Transmission measurements were also performed with a natural iron target below 160 keV. The transmission data were analyzed from 5 to 850 keV with the multilevel R-matrix code SAMMY which uses Bayes' theorem for the fitting process. This code provides energies and neutron widths of the resonances inside the 5- to 850-keV energy region, as well as possible parameterization for resonances external to the analyzed region to describe the smooth cross section from a few eV to 850 keV. The resulting set of resonance parameters yields the accepted values for the thermal total and capture cross sections. The differential elastic-scattering data at several scattering angles were compared to theoretical calculations from 40 to 850 keV using the R-matrix code RFUNC based on the Blatt-Biedenharn formalism. Various combinations of spin and parity were tried to predict cross sections for the well defined {ell} > 0 resonances; comparison of these predictions with the data allowed us to determine the most likely spin and parity assignments for these resonances. The results of a capture data analysis by Corvi et al. (COR84), from 2 to 350 keV, were combined with our results to obtain the radiation widths of the resonances below 350 keV observed in transmission, capture, and differential elastic-scattering experiments.

  12. High resonant mass sensor evaluation: An effective method

    SciTech Connect

    Tseytlin, Yakov M.

    2005-11-15

    Micro- and nanocantilever mass sensors in higher resonant oscillation modes are very sensitive to an additional mass, which is positioned along their length except for the nodal points. However, the known evaluation methods of this sensitivity are usually complicated, which is not effective in applications for atomic force microscopy. Our solution is simple, unified, and based on the superposition force method, which allows us to estimate effective spring constants, effective mass factors, and correct prediction of sensitivity for nano- and microcantilevers along their length in higher resonant modes. Simple analytical and computer aided calculation algorithms are developed. Calculation results are close to the experimental and computer simulation data within a few percent.

  13. JUPITER PROJECT - JOINT UNIVERSAL PARAMETER IDENTIFICATION AND EVALUATION OF RELIABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The JUPITER (Joint Universal Parameter IdenTification and Evaluation of Reliability) project builds on the technology of two widely used codes for sensitivity analysis, data assessment, calibration, and uncertainty analysis of environmental models: PEST and UCODE.

  14. A novel parameter-induced stochastic resonance phenomena in fractional Fourier domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lifeng; Wang, Huiqi; Lv, Wangyong; Zhong, Suchuan

    2016-08-01

    The parameter-induced stochastic resonance (SR) phenomenon in a novel self-adaptive dynamical system driven by linear frequency modulated (LFM) signal and additive noise is considered from the view of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). It is found that the dynamical system can be perfectly analyzed by equivalently transforming it into a traditional first-order linear dynamical system driven by periodic signal and additive noise in fractional Fourier transform (FrFT) domain with an optimal rotated angle, and the theoretical analysis and simulation results show that output SNR exhibits the SR behavior when it is plotted as a function of the system parameter. Furthermore, the optimal value of adjusted parameter is obtained, and the possible area of SNR gain is theoretically determined only by center-frequency and modulated frequency of the driving LFM signal.

  15. Parameter optimization analysis to minimize the polarization error in a localized thermal tunable fiber ring resonator gyro.

    PubMed

    Bobbili, Prasada Rao; Nayak, Jagannath; Pinnoji, Prerana Dabral; Rama Koti Reddy, D V

    2016-03-10

    The accuracy of the resonant frequency servo loop is a major concern for the high-performance operation of a resonant fiber optic gyro. For instance, a bias error as large as tens or even hundreds of degrees/hour has been observed at the demodulated output of the resonant frequency servo loop. The traditional frequency servo mechanism is not an efficient tool to address this problem. In our previous work, we proposed a novel method to minimize the laser frequency noise to the level of the shot noise by refractive index modulation by a thermally tunable resonator. In this paper, we performed the parameter optimization for the resonator coil, multifunction integrated-optics chip, and couplers by the transition matrix using the Jones matrix methodology to minimize the polarization error. With the optimized parameter values, we achieved the bias value of the resonator fiber optic gyro to 1.924°/h. PMID:26974794

  16. Longitudinal NMR parameter measurements of Japanese pear fruit during the growing process using a mobile magnetic resonance imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geya, Yuto; Kimura, Takeshi; Fujisaki, Hirotaka; Terada, Yasuhiko; Kose, Katsumi; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Gemma, Hiroshi; Sekozawa, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Longitudinal nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameter measurements of Japanese pear fruit (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai, Kosui) were performed using an electrically mobile magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system with a 0.2 T and 16 cm gap permanent magnet. To measure the relaxation times and apparent diffusion coefficients of the pear fruit in relation to their weight, seven pear fruits were harvested almost every week during the cell enlargement period and measured in a research orchard. To evaluate the in situ relaxation times, six pear fruits were longitudinally measured for about two months during the same period. The measurements for the harvested samples showed good agreement with the in situ measurements. From the measurements of the harvested samples, it is clear that the relaxation rates of the pear fruits linearly change with the inverse of the linear dimension of the fruits, demonstrating that the relaxation mechanism is a surface relaxation. We therefore conclude that the mobile MRI system is a useful device for measuring the NMR parameters of outdoor living plants.

  17. Symmetric Resonance Charge Exchange Cross Section Based on Impact Parameter Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, Kazem; Murphy, Kendrah; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Using a two-state impact parameter approximation, a calculation has been carried out to obtain symmetric resonance charge transfer cross sections between nine ions and their parent atoms or molecules. Calculation is based on a two-dimensional numerical integration. The method is mostly suited for hydrogenic and some closed shell atoms. Good agreement has been obtained with the results of laboratory measurements for the ion-atom pairs H+-H, He+-He, and Ar+-Ar. Several approximations in a similar published calculation have been eliminated.

  18. Neutron total cross section and resonance parameters of /sup 231/Pa

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, A.R.Z.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Patterson, J.R.

    1981-08-01

    Time-of-flight measurements of the neutron total cross section of /sup 231/Pa were carried out, in the energy range 0.01 to 10,000 eV, on two sample thicknesses using the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator as the pulsed neutron source. The multilevel R matrix code MULTI, which includes instrumental resolution and the Doppler broadening, has been used to fit the data. The resonance parameters obtained from the present multilevel R matrix analysis of /sup 231/Pa transmission data from 0.03 to 120 eV are given. 14 refs.

  19. Statistical method of evaluation of flip-flop dynamical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieczorek, P. Z.; Opalski, L. J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents statistical algorithm and measurement system for precise evaluation of flip-flop dynamical parameters in asynchronous operation. The analyzed flip-flop parameters are failure probability, MTBF and propagation delay. It is shown how these parameters depend on metastable operation of flip-flops. The numerical and hardware solutions shown in article allow for precise and reliable comparison of flip-flops. Also the analysis of influence of flip-flop electrical parameters of flip-flop electrical parameters on their metastable operation is possible with use of presented statistical method. Statistical estimation of parameters of flip-flops in which metastability occurs, seems to be more reliable than standard empirical methods of flip-flop analysis. Presented method allows for showing inaccuracies in theoretical model of metastability.

  20. [Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation of coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Bayraktaroğlu, Selen; Alper, Hüdaver

    2008-07-01

    Considerable advances have been achieved in cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology, and MRI has become an important noninvasive imaging tool in the management of coronary artery disease. Cardiac MRI can provide information about myocardial perfusion, viability and contractile reserve. The information obtained not only provides diagnostic information but also has an important prognostic value. This article reviews the recent advances in cardiac MRI for evaluation of coronary artery disease. PMID:18611838

  1. A magnetic resonance imaging study on the articulatory and acoustic speech parameters of Malay vowels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The phonetic properties of six Malay vowels are investigated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize the vocal tract in order to obtain dynamic articulatory parameters during speech production. To resolve image blurring due to the tongue movement during the scanning process, a method based on active contour extraction is used to track tongue contours. The proposed method efficiently tracks tongue contours despite the partial blurring of MRI images. Consequently, the articulatory parameters that are effectively measured as tongue movement is observed, and the specific shape of the tongue and its position for all six uttered Malay vowels are determined. Speech rehabilitation procedure demands some kind of visual perceivable prototype of speech articulation. To investigate the validity of the measured articulatory parameters based on acoustic theory of speech production, an acoustic analysis based on the uttered vowels by subjects has been performed. As the acoustic speech and articulatory parameters of uttered speech were examined, a correlation between formant frequencies and articulatory parameters was observed. The experiments reported a positive correlation between the constriction location of the tongue body and the first formant frequency, as well as a negative correlation between the constriction location of the tongue tip and the second formant frequency. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is an effective tool for the dynamic study of speech production. PMID:25060583

  2. Best parameters selection for wavelet packet-based compression of magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Abu-Rezq, A N; Tolba, A S; Khuwaja, G A; Foda, S G

    1999-10-01

    Transmission of compressed medical images is becoming a vital tool in telemedicine. Thus new methods are needed for efficient image compression. This study discovers the best design parameters for a data compression scheme applied to digital magnetic resonance (MR) images. The proposed technique aims at reducing the transmission cost while preserving the diagnostic information. By selecting the wavelet packet's filters, decomposition level, and subbands that are better adapted to the frequency characteristics of the image, one may achieve better image representation in the sense of lower entropy or minimal distortion. Experimental results show that the selection of the best parameters has a dramatic effect on the data compression rate of MR images. In all cases, decomposition at three or four levels with the Coiflet 5 wavelet (Coif 5) results in better compression performance than the other wavelets. Image resolution is found to have a remarkable effect on the compression rate. PMID:10529302

  3. FRETView: a computer program to simplify the process of obtaining fluorescence resonance energy transfer parameters.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Nathan; Dyer, Joanne; Martí, Angel A; Solomon, Marissa; Turro, Nicholas J

    2007-08-01

    The process of modeling the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process for a donor-acceptor pair can be rather challenging, yet few computer programs exist that allow such modeling to be done with relative ease. In order to address this, we have developed a Java-based program, FRETView, which allows numerous FRET parameters to be obtained with just a few mouse clicks. Being a Java-based program, it runs equally well on all the major operating systems such as Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, Solaris. The program allows the user to effortlessly input pertinent information about the donor-acceptor pair, including the absorption and/or emission spectra, and outputs the calculated FRET parameters in table format, as well as graphical plots. PMID:17668122

  4. Rough parameter dependence in climate models and the role of Ruelle-Pollicott resonances

    PubMed Central

    Chekroun, Mickaël David; Neelin, J. David; Kondrashov, Dmitri; McWilliams, James C.; Ghil, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Despite the importance of uncertainties encountered in climate model simulations, the fundamental mechanisms at the origin of sensitive behavior of long-term model statistics remain unclear. Variability of turbulent flows in the atmosphere and oceans exhibits recurrent large-scale patterns. These patterns, while evolving irregularly in time, manifest characteristic frequencies across a large range of time scales, from intraseasonal through interdecadal. Based on modern spectral theory of chaotic and dissipative dynamical systems, the associated low-frequency variability may be formulated in terms of Ruelle-Pollicott (RP) resonances. RP resonances encode information on the nonlinear dynamics of the system, and an approach for estimating them—as filtered through an observable of the system—is proposed. This approach relies on an appropriate Markov representation of the dynamics associated with a given observable. It is shown that, within this representation, the spectral gap—defined as the distance between the subdominant RP resonance and the unit circle—plays a major role in the roughness of parameter dependences. The model statistics are the most sensitive for the smallest spectral gaps; such small gaps turn out to correspond to regimes where the low-frequency variability is more pronounced, whereas autocorrelations decay more slowly. The present approach is applied to analyze the rough parameter dependence encountered in key statistics of an El-Niño–Southern Oscillation model of intermediate complexity. Theoretical arguments, however, strongly suggest that such links between model sensitivity and the decay of correlation properties are not limited to this particular model and could hold much more generally. PMID:24443553

  5. Evaluation of Regional Storage-Discharge Parameters from Recession Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, B. F.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Subsurface storage and discharge are important components of watershed behaviors to rainfall-runoff responses. The current representations of subsurface-surface relationships are poor in land surface models; such poor representation limits the application of land surface models to evaluate current and future conjunctive water management scenarios. The aim of this research is to derive storage-discharge relationships using streamflow recession hydrograph analysis for watersheds located throughout California. Regression analyses are performed to evaluate empirical storage-discharge parameters as a function of physical watershed parameters and catchment hydrologic characteristics. We illustrate how such regional empirical evaluations provide functional relationships consistent with historic literature to develop parameters for surface-subsurface interaction in fine-resolution land surface models for California.

  6. Multi-parameter sensing with a single magnetoelastic sensor by applying loads on the null locations of multiple resonant modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeRouin, Andrew; Ghee Ong, Keat

    2016-03-01

    Magnetoelastic sensors are mass sensitive sensors commonly used for stress and pressure measurement, as well as chemical and biological monitoring when combined with a functionalized coating. Magnetoelastic sensors are typically made of free-standing, rectangular strips of magnetoelastic materials that exhibit longitudinal, extensional vibrations due to the excitation of magnetic fields. A single magnetoelastic sensor is generally used to monitor one parameter since only the fundamental resonant frequency is measured. Multiple-parameter sensing in close proximity has previously been achieved by using multiple magnetoelastic sensors of different dimensions and tracking their resonant frequencies independently. However, this requires a large surface area and inconvenient layout of dissimilarly shaped sensors. This paper presents a technique for monitoring multiple parameters with a single magnetoelastic sensor by applying separate mass loads at the null points (points of zero vibration) of multiple resonant modes. Applying a load at a null location does not affect the corresponding resonant mode but alters the resonant frequencies of other modes. Therefore, by isolating the variables of interest to multiple null points and simultaneously measuring the resonant frequency shifts of related resonant modes, the masses at each null location can be calculated. Results showed that changing the coverage at a null location along the width of the sensor can be used to minimize the loading effect on the corresponding resonant mode. In contrast, changing the lengthwise coverage can maximize the loading effect on other resonant modes, thus increasing the mass sensitivity of the sensor. Furthermore, simultaneously applying loads to null points of multiple resonant modes had a nearly additive effect, allowing detection of multiple parameters with a single magnetoelastic sensor.

  7. Study and Optimization of CPT Resonance Parameters in 87 Rb/Ar/Ne Microcells Aimed for Application in Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masian, Y.; Sivak, A.; Sevostianov, D.; Vassiliev, V.; Velichansky, V.

    The paper shows the presents results of studies of small-size rubidium cells with argon and neon buffer gases, produced by a patent pended technique of laser welding [Fishman et al. (2014)]. Cells were designed for miniature frequency standard. Temperature dependence of the frequency of the coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance was measured and used to optimize the ratio of partial pressures of buffer gases. The influence of duration and regime of annealing on the CPT-resonance frequency drift was investigated. The parameters of the FM modulation of laser current for two cases which correspond to the highest amplitude of CPT resonance and to the smallest light shifts of the resonance frequency were determined. The temperature dependences of the CPT resonance frequency were found to be surprisingly different in the two cases. A non-linear dependence of CPT resonance frequency on the temperature of the cell with the two extremes was revealed for one of these cases.

  8. Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions.

    PubMed

    Costabel, Stephan; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2013-04-01

    [1] For characterizing water flow in the vadose zone, the water retention curve (WRC) of the soil must be known. Because conventional WRC measurements demand much time and effort in the laboratory, alternative methods with shortened measurement duration are desired. The WRC can be estimated, for instance, from the cumulative pore size distribution (PSD) of the investigated material. Geophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry have successfully been applied to recover PSDs of sandstones and limestones. It is therefore expected that the multiexponential analysis of the NMR signal from water-saturated loose sediments leads to a reliable estimation of the WRC. We propose an approach to estimate the WRC using the cumulative NMR relaxation time distribution and approximate it with the well-known van-Genuchten (VG) model. Thereby, the VG parameter n, which controls the curvature of the WRC, is of particular interest, because it is the essential parameter to predict the relative hydraulic conductivity. The NMR curves are calibrated with only two conventional WRC measurements, first, to determine the residual water content and, second, to define a fixed point that relates the relaxation time to a corresponding capillary pressure. We test our approach with natural and artificial soil samples and compare the NMR-based results to WRC measurements using a pressure plate apparatus and to WRC predictions from the software ROSETTA. We found that for sandy soils n can reliably be estimated with NMR, whereas for samples with clay and silt contents higher than 10% the estimation fails. This is the case when the hydraulic properties of the soil are mainly controlled by the pore constrictions. For such samples, the sensitivity of the NMR method for the pore bodies hampers a plausible WRC estimation. Citation: Costabel, S., and U. Yaramanci (2013), Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions, Water

  9. The Application of Multiobjective Genetic Algorithm to the Parameter Optimization of Single-Well Potential Stochastic Resonance Algorithm Aimed at Simultaneous Determination of Multiple Weak Chromatographic Peaks

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Bingren; Wu, Xiaohong; Liu, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous determination of multiple weak chromatographic peaks via stochastic resonance algorithm attracts much attention in recent years. However, the optimization of the parameters is complicated and time consuming, although the single-well potential stochastic resonance algorithm (SSRA) has already reduced the number of parameters to only one and simplified the process significantly. Even worse, it is often difficult to keep amplified peaks with beautiful peak shape. Therefore, multiobjective genetic algorithm was employed to optimize the parameter of SSRA for multiple optimization objectives (i.e., S/N and peak shape) and multiple chromatographic peaks. The applicability of the proposed method was evaluated with an experimental data set of Sudan dyes, and the results showed an excellent quantitative relationship between different concentrations and responses. PMID:24526920

  10. Evaluation of trapping parameters of annealed natural quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Rui; Wei, Ming-Jian; Song, Bo; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Qiu-Yue; Pan, Bao-Lin; Li, Teng-Fei

    2016-05-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) trapping parameters of annealed quartz have been investigated. The apparent TL peaks observed at temperatures of 133 °C, 211 °C, 266 °C and 405 °C, respectively, were named Peak I, Peak II, Peak III and Peak IV. The Tm - Tstop method is applied to investigate the number of peaks and their positions, and to obtain the trap distributions in the quartz. Peak shape (PS), Hoogenstraaten method (Various Heating Rates Method, VHR), and Computerized Glow Curve Deconvolution (CGCD) are used to evaluate the trapping parameters of the annealed quartz. The glow curve can be considered as a superposition of at least nine overlapping peaks. These peaks show up at 133 °C, 211 °C, 266 °C, 308 °C, 333 °C, 384 °C, 441 °C, 466 °C and 484 °C. The PS method can be only used in evaluating the parameters for Peaks I. The VHR method can be used in evaluating the trapping parameters for the first three peaks. CGCD method is complementary to obtaining parameters for the sub-peaks, and the thermal quenching correction with the Urbach's method is necessary. The Urbach's coefficient for the quartz is 30.03 kTm.

  11. The calculation of electrical parameters of AT-cut quartz crystal resonators with the consideration of material viscosity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji; Zhao, Wenhua; Du, Jianke; Hu, Yuantai

    2011-01-01

    Electrical parameters like resistance and quality factor of a quartz crystal resonator cannot be determined through vibration analysis without considering the presence of material dissipation. In this study, we use the first-order Mindlin plate equations of piezoelectric plates for thickness-shear vibrations of a simple resonator model with partial electrodes. We derive the expressions of electrical parameters with emphasis on the resistance that is related to the imaginary part of complex elastic constants, or the viscosity, of quartz crystal. Since all electrical parameters are frequency dependent, this procedure provides the chance to study the frequency behavior of crystal resonators with a direct formulation. We understand that the electrical parameters are strongly affected by the manufacturing process, with the plating techniques in particular, but the theoretical approach we presented here will be the first step for the precise estimation of such parameters and their further applications in the analysis of nonlinear behavior of resonators. We calculated the parameters from our simple resonator model of AT-cut quartz crystal with the first-order Mindlin plate theory to demonstrate the procedure and show that the numerical results are consistent with earlier measurements. PMID:20594568

  12. A Novel Parameter for Ramp Metering and Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Jia, Yuanhua; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Feng; Ao, Guchang

    Real and scientific traffic flow parameter are the basis to make efficient traffic control strategy and establish control function and this will leads to an appropriate and impartial reflection to efficiency and equity of control property. Intelligent control is a new development where the control problem is to find the combination of control measures that result in the best road performance and control effectiveness. The problems of intelligent metering evaluation for local ramp are considered. In this paper, a novel ramp queuing parameter-the reduplicated waiting time was posed using the queuing theory. With in-situ traffic flow data, comparison between the novel and previous parameters are made to clarify the advantages of the novel parameter.

  13. The Dependence Of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Image Contrast On Intrinsic And Operator-Selectable Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrli, F. W.; MacFall, J. R.; Glover, G. H.

    1983-12-01

    In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) the image pixel value is governed by four intrinsic parameters: the spin density ρ, the spin-lattice relaxation time T1, the spin-spin relaxation time T2 and, for non-stationary spins, the flow velocity v. The extent to which the signal is weighted toward one or several parameters is related to the history of the spin system preceding the detection pulse. In the present work T1 and T2 were determined in vivo for several regions in the CNS from inversion-recovery (T1) And multiple-echo (T2) images, using least-squares fitting procedures. From averaged values of T1 and T2 in grey matter, white matter and CSF, the signal intensity was calculated on the basis of the Bloch equations and plotted as a function of the intrinsic parameters for the three most common imaging pulse sequences. These data are in excellent agreement with images, recorded from normal volunteers on an experimental whole-body imaging system operating at 12.8 MHz (0.3T). The graphical presentation of contrast further will provide the radiologist with a straightforward tool for image interpretation.

  14. Resonance parameters of the first 1/2+ state in Be9 and astrophysical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burda, O.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Richter, A.; Forssén, C.; Brown, B. A.

    2010-07-01

    Spectra of the Be9(e,e') reaction have been measured at the Superconducting Darmstadt Electron Linear Accelerator at an electron energy of E0=73 MeV and scattering angles of 93° and 141° with high-energy resolution up to excitation energies of Ex=8 MeV. The astrophysically relevant resonance parameters of the first excited 1/2+ state of Be9 have been extracted in a one-level approximation of R-matrix theory, resulting in resonance energy ER=1.748(6) MeV and width ΓR=274(8) keV, which are in good agreement with the latest Be9(γ,n) experiment but with considerably improved uncertainties. However, the reduced B(E1) transition strength deduced from an extrapolation of the (e,e') data to the photon point is smaller by a factor of two. Implications of the new results for possible production of C12 in neutron-rich astrophysical scenarios are discussed.

  15. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of pericardial disease

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Muhammad; Watkin, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Pericardial diseases are commonly encountered in clinical practice and may present as an isolated process or in association with various systemic conditions. Traditionally transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) has been the method of choice for the evaluation of suspected pericardial disease but increasingly computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are also being used as part of a rational multi-modality imaging approach tailored to the specific clinical scenario. This paper reviews the role of CT and MRI across the spectrum of pericardial diseases. PMID:27429911

  16. Evaluation of hail suppression programme effectiveness using radar derived parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Satyanarayana; Paulitsch, Helmut; Teschl, Reinhard; Süsser-Rechberger, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is evaluating "the operational hail suppression programme" in the province of Styria, Austria "for the year 2015". For the evaluation purpose the HAILSYS software tool was developed by integrating single polarization C-band weather radar data, aircraft trajectory, radiosonde freezing level data, hail events and crop damages information from the ground. The hail related radar derived parameters are: hail mass aloft, hail mass flux, probability of hail, vertical integrated hail mass, hail kinetic energy flux, and storm severity index. The spatial maps of hail kinetic energy and hail mass were developed to evaluate the seeding effect. The time history plots of vertical integrated hail mass, hail mass aloft and the probability of hail are drawn over an entire cell lifetime. The sensitivity and variation of radar hail parameters over time and associated changes due to cloud seeding will be presented.

  17. Determination of molecular spectroscopic parameters and energy-transfer rates by double-resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinfeld, J. I.; Foy, B.; Hetzler, J.; Flannery, C.; Klaassen, J.; Mizugai, Y.; Coy, S.

    1990-01-01

    The spectroscopy of small to medium-size polyatomic molecules can be extremely complex, especially in higher-lying overtone and combination vibrational levels. The high density of levels also complicates the understanding of inelastic collision processes, which is required to model energy transfer and collision broadening of spectral lines. Both of these problems can be addressed by double-resonance spectroscopy, i.e., time-resolved pump-probe measurements using microwave, infrared, near-infrared, and visible-wavelength sources. Information on excited-state spectroscopy, transition moments, inelastic energy transfer rates and propensity rules, and pressure-broadening parameters may be obtained from such experiments. Examples are given for several species of importance in planetary atmospheres, including ozone, silane, ethane, and ammonia.

  18. Parameter Sensitivity Evaluation of the CLM-Crop model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewniak, B. A.; Zeng, X.; Mametjanov, A.; Anitescu, M.; Norris, B.; Kotamarthi, V. R.

    2011-12-01

    In order to improve carbon cycling within Earth System Models, crop representation for corn, spring wheat, and soybean species has been incorporated into the latest version of the Community Land Model (CLM), the land surface model in the Community Earth System Model. As a means to evaluate and improve the CLM-Crop model, we will determine the sensitivity of various crop parameters on carbon fluxes (such as GPP and NEE), yields, and soil organic matter. The sensitivity analysis will perform small perturbations over a range of values for each parameter on individual grid sites, for comparison with AmeriFlux data, as well as globally so crop model parameters can be improved. Over 20 parameters have been identified for evaluation in this study including carbon-nitrogen ratios for leaves, stems, roots, and organs; fertilizer applications; growing degree days for each growth stage; and more. Results from this study will be presented to give a better understanding of the sensitivity of the various parameters used to represent crops, which will help improve the overall model performance and aid with determining future influences climate change will have on cropland ecosystems.

  19. Blind Source Parameters for Performance Evaluation of Despeckling Filters.

    PubMed

    Biradar, Nagashettappa; Dewal, M L; Rohit, ManojKumar; Gowre, Sanjaykumar; Gundge, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    The speckle noise is inherent to transthoracic echocardiographic images. A standard noise-free reference echocardiographic image does not exist. The evaluation of filters based on the traditional parameters such as peak signal-to-noise ratio, mean square error, and structural similarity index may not reflect the true filter performance on echocardiographic images. Therefore, the performance of despeckling can be evaluated using blind assessment metrics like the speckle suppression index, speckle suppression and mean preservation index (SMPI), and beta metric. The need for noise-free reference image is overcome using these three parameters. This paper presents a comprehensive analysis and evaluation of eleven types of despeckling filters for echocardiographic images in terms of blind and traditional performance parameters along with clinical validation. The noise is effectively suppressed using the logarithmic neighborhood shrinkage (NeighShrink) embedded with Stein's unbiased risk estimation (SURE). The SMPI is three times more effective compared to the wavelet based generalized likelihood estimation approach. The quantitative evaluation and clinical validation reveal that the filters such as the nonlocal mean, posterior sampling based Bayesian estimation, hybrid median, and probabilistic patch based filters are acceptable whereas median, anisotropic diffusion, fuzzy, and Ripplet nonlinear approximation filters have limited applications for echocardiographic images. PMID:27298618

  20. Blind Source Parameters for Performance Evaluation of Despeckling Filters

    PubMed Central

    Biradar, Nagashettappa; Dewal, M. L.; Rohit, ManojKumar; Gowre, Sanjaykumar; Gundge, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    The speckle noise is inherent to transthoracic echocardiographic images. A standard noise-free reference echocardiographic image does not exist. The evaluation of filters based on the traditional parameters such as peak signal-to-noise ratio, mean square error, and structural similarity index may not reflect the true filter performance on echocardiographic images. Therefore, the performance of despeckling can be evaluated using blind assessment metrics like the speckle suppression index, speckle suppression and mean preservation index (SMPI), and beta metric. The need for noise-free reference image is overcome using these three parameters. This paper presents a comprehensive analysis and evaluation of eleven types of despeckling filters for echocardiographic images in terms of blind and traditional performance parameters along with clinical validation. The noise is effectively suppressed using the logarithmic neighborhood shrinkage (NeighShrink) embedded with Stein's unbiased risk estimation (SURE). The SMPI is three times more effective compared to the wavelet based generalized likelihood estimation approach. The quantitative evaluation and clinical validation reveal that the filters such as the nonlocal mean, posterior sampling based Bayesian estimation, hybrid median, and probabilistic patch based filters are acceptable whereas median, anisotropic diffusion, fuzzy, and Ripplet nonlinear approximation filters have limited applications for echocardiographic images. PMID:27298618

  1. Elbow magnetic resonance imaging: imaging anatomy and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hauptfleisch, Jennifer; English, Collette; Murphy, Darra

    2015-04-01

    The elbow is a complex joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often the imaging modality of choice in the workup of elbow pain, especially in sports injuries and younger patients who often have either a history of a chronic repetitive strain such as the throwing athlete or a distinct traumatic injury. Traumatic injuries and alternative musculoskeletal pathologies can affect the ligaments, musculotendinous, cartilaginous, and osseous structures of the elbow as well as the 3 main nerves to the upper limb, and these structures are best assessed with MRI.Knowledge of the complex anatomy of the elbow joint as well as patterns of injury and disease is important for the radiologist to make an accurate diagnosis in the setting of elbow pain. This chapter will outline elbow anatomy, basic imaging parameters, compartmental pathology, and finally applications of some novel MRI techniques. PMID:25835585

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance evaluation of stroke: a preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, R.N.; Willcott, M.R.; Schneiders, N.J.; Ford, J.J.; Derman, H.S.

    1983-10-01

    Nine patients who had acute and subacute stroke were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using a 6-MHz Bruker Instruments proton scanner. A modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence was used for signal detection. The resultant string of spin-echoes was Fourier transformed into projections that were subsequently back-projected to a series of spin-echo images. From these images, spin density and T/sub 2/ were calculated for each pixel. The NMR scans revealed stroke in each of the patients, while CT demonstrated only eight of the lesions. T/sub 2/ was prolonged in all of the ischemic regions and is the most sensitive NMR parameter in detecting stroke. These preliminary results suggest that NMR scanning of patients who have acute stroke may be cliniclly useful, and that the T/sub 2/ component of the NRM signal is most important.

  3. Towards in vivo imaging of intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer parameters.

    PubMed

    Gaind, Vaibhav; Webb, Kevin J; Kularatne, Sumith; Bouman, Charles A

    2009-08-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a nonradiative energy transfer process based on dipole-dipole interaction between donor and acceptor fluorophores that are spatially separated by a distance of a few nanometers. FRET has proved to be of immense value in the study of cellular function and the underlying cause of disease due to, for example, protein misfolding (of consequence in Alzheimer's disease). The standard parameterization in intramolecular FRET is the lifetime and yield, which can be related to the donor-acceptor (DA) distance. FRET imaging has thus far been limited to in vitro or near-surface microscopy because of the deleterious effects of substantial scatter. We show that it is possible to extract the microscopic FRET parameters in a highly scattering environment by incorporating the FRET kinetics of an ensemble of DA molecules connected by a flexible or rigid linker into an optical diffusion tomography (ODT) framework. We demonstrate the efficacy of our approach for extracting the microscopic DA distance through simulations and an experiment using a phantom with scattering properties similar to tissue. Our method will allow the in vivo imaging of FRET parameters in deep tissue, and hence provide a new vehicle for the fundamental study of disease. PMID:19649115

  4. Achieving high bit rate logical stochastic resonance in a bistable system by adjusting parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ding-Xin; Gu, Feng-Shou; Feng, Guo-Jin; Yang, Yong-Min; Ball, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    The phenomenon of logical stochastic resonance (LSR) in a nonlinear bistable system is demonstrated by numerical simulations and experiments. However, the bit rates of the logical signals are relatively low and not suitable for practical applications. First, we examine the responses of the bistable system with fixed parameters to different bit rate logic input signals, showing that an arbitrary high bit rate LSR in a bistable system cannot be achieved. Then, a normalized transform of the LSR bistable system is introduced through a kind of variable substitution. Based on the transform, it is found that LSR for arbitrary high bit rate logic signals in a bistable system can be achieved by adjusting the parameters of the system, setting bias value and amplifying the amplitudes of logic input signals and noise properly. Finally, the desired OR and AND logic outputs to high bit rate logic inputs in a bistable system are obtained by numerical simulations. The study might provide higher feasibility of LSR in practical engineering applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51379526).

  5. Extracting the resonance parameters from experimental data on scattering of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaandrager, P.; Rakityansky, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    A new parametrization of the multi-channel S-matrix is used to fit scattering data and then to locate the resonances as its poles. The S-matrix is written in terms of the corresponding “in” and “out” Jost matrices which are expanded in the Taylor series of the collision energy E around an appropriately chosen energy E0. In order to do this, the Jost matrices are written in a semi-analytic form where all the factors (involving the channel momenta and Sommerfeld parameters) responsible for their “bad behavior” (i.e., responsible for the multi-valuedness of the Jost matrices and for branching of the Riemann surface of the energy) are given explicitly. The remaining unknown factors in the Jost matrices are analytic and single-valued functions of the variable E and are defined on a simple energy plane. The expansion is done for these analytic functions and the expansion coefficients are used as the fitting parameters. The method is tested on a two-channel model, using a set of artificially generated data points with typical error bars and a typical random noise in the positions of the points.

  6. Diurnal and seasonal variations in the Schumann resonance parameters observed at Chinese observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongjuan; Yu, Haiyan; Cao, Bingxia; Qiao, Xiaolin

    2013-06-01

    The Schumann resonances (SRs) are of great significance for probing the global circuit. The diurnal and seasonal variations in mode amplitudes and frequencies of the first four modes of SR magnetic components based on 2 years measurements at the stations located in China are firstly presented here. The frequencies of all the four modes have their maxima during boreal winter and minima during summer, while the mode amplitudes change oppositely. The variations of both frequencies and amplitudes show their strong relationships with the lighting activity in south-east Asia (0800 UT) which is the nearest source to the observatories in China, while the other sources in Africa (1400 UT) and South America (2000 UT) have less effects on the mode amplitudes of both magnetic components. The effect of day-night asymmetry on SR parameters is estimated by a 3D-FDTD model of the Earth-ionosphere cavity with a single pulse traveling around the equator in a day. Two models of the Earth-ionosphere cavity, namely, a symmetric cavity and a cavity with day-night asymmetric conductivity profile are exploited. It is clear that the minima in the diurnal patterns of the mode frequencies near local sunrise/sunset times are mainly related to the migrations of the global lighting activity, not the day-night ionosphere asymmetry. Moreover, it is concluded that the ionosphere-induced variations of SR parameters including mode frequencies and amplitudes are much smaller than the variations resulting from lighting activity.

  7. [Value of electrogastrographic parameters in evaluation of gastric myoelectrical activity].

    PubMed

    Tabor, S; Thor, P J; Pitala, A; Laskiewicz, J

    1999-01-01

    Electrogastrography (EGG) is presently the only non-invasive method for the evaluation of gastric myoelectrical activity. In relation to the more and more described disturbances of the basic electrical rhythm in different pathological units EGG has been applied on a still larger scale. However, the data obtained from the EGG record do not reflect directly the gastric motility. This method allows only to make an indirect evaluation of the gastric motor disturbances. It still entails a great number of investigations so as to attain a better precisions of the evaluations of its clinical usefulness in gastroenterological diagnostics. This thesis presents the basic information on the methodology, the parameters under evaluation and the clinical application of the EGG method. PMID:10909472

  8. Performance Evaluation and Parameter Identification on DROID III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumb, Julianna J.

    2011-01-01

    The DROID III project consisted of two main parts. The former, performance evaluation, focused on the performance characteristics of the aircraft such as lift to drag ratio, thrust required for level flight, and rate of climb. The latter, parameter identification, focused on finding the aerodynamic coefficients for the aircraft using a system that creates a mathematical model to match the flight data of doublet maneuvers and the aircraft s response. Both portions of the project called for flight testing and that data is now available on account of this project. The conclusion of the project is that the performance evaluation data is well-within desired standards but could be improved with a thrust model, and that parameter identification is still in need of more data processing but seems to produce reasonable results thus far.

  9. Evaluation of acoustical parameters of a Brazilian popular housing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Jos A. C.; Diniz, Fabiano B.; Ferreira, Andressa M. C.; Zannin, Paulo T.

    2003-10-01

    This article presents the results obtained from the evaluation of the acoustical insulation parameters determined in situ in a popular residence projected to offer an option to combat the housing deficit of the low income Brazilian population. This evaluation has been carried out according to the statements of the standards ISO 140-4 and 140-5, which state about this type of measurement. The results have shown that the surveyed house presents a satisfactory performance if compared to the standard of the Brazilian civil construction, but it is not adequate if compared to the demands of the international standards.

  10. First-principles calculation of parameters of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in solids.

    PubMed

    Kadantsev, Eugene S; Ziegler, Tom

    2010-12-01

    The hyperfine A-tensor and Zeeman g-tensor parameterize the interaction of an 'effective' electron spin with the magnetic field due to the nuclear spin and the homogeneous external magnetic field, respectively. The A- and g-tensors are the quantities of primary interest in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. In this paper, we review our work [E.S. Kadantsev, T. Ziegler, J. Phys. Chem. A 2008, 112, 4521; E. S. Kadantsev, T. Ziegler, J. Phys. Chem. A 2009, 113, 1327] on the calculation of these EPR parameters under periodic boundary conditions (PBC) from first-principles. Our methodology is based on the Kohn-Sham DFT (KS DFT), explicit usage of Bloch basis set made up of numerical and Slater-type atomic orbitals (NAOs/STOs), and is implemented in the 'full potential' program BAND. Our implementation does not rely on the frozen core approximation. The NAOs/STOs basis is well suited for the accurate representation of the electron density near the nuclei, a prerequisite for the calculation of highly accurate hyperfine parameters. In the case of g-tensor, our implementation is based on the method of Van Lenthe et al. [E. van Lenthe, P. E. S. Wormer, A. van der Avoird, J. Chem. Phys. 1997, 107, 2488] in which the spin-orbital coupling is taken into account variationally. We demonstrate the viability of our scheme by calculating EPR parameters of paramagnetic defects in solids. We consider the A-tensor of 'normal' and 'anomalous' muonium defect in IIIA-VA semiconductors as well as the S2 anion radical in KCl host crystal lattice. PMID:20821407

  11. EVALUATION AND TESTING OF A LOW-B SPOKE RESONATOR

    SciTech Connect

    T. TAJIMA; D. I MONTOYA; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    Within the framework of the Advanced Accelerator Applications (AAA) project we are interested in building and testing low-{beta} spoke resonators (cavities). To familiarize us with the specifics of these structures Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) kindly loaned us one of their spoke cavities for evaluation. This is a {beta}=0.291 2-gap resonator at 340 MHz. We benchmarked our computer codes by comparing room temperature measurements of frequency, tuning sensitivity, tuning forces, etc. with our 3D simulation results. The cavity was tested at both 4 K and 2 K. The results showed maximum accelerating gradients of 12.5 MV/m (4 K) and 12.3 MV/m (2 K), which correspond to a peak electric field of 40 MV/m and a peak magnetic field of 1063 Oe. Q{sub 0} values at 5 MV/m also exceeded by more than a factor 2 of present AAA specification. These results encouraged us toward development of spoke cavities for the low energy section (6.7 MeV to 109 MeV) of ADTF (Accelerator-Driven Test Facility) of AAA project.

  12. Evaluation of muscle injury using magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBlanc, A. D.; Jaweed, M.; Evans, H.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate spin echo T2 relaxation time changes in thigh muscles after intense eccentric exercise in healthy men. Spin echo and calculated T2 relaxation time images of the thighs were obtained on several occasions after exercise of one limb; the contralateral limb served as control. Muscle damage was verified by elevated levels of serum creatine kinase (CK). Thirty percent of the time no exercise effect was discernible on the magnetic resonance (MR) images. In all positive MR images (70%) the semitendinosus muscle was positive, while the biceps femoris, short head, and gracilis muscles were also positive in 50% and 25% of the total cases, respectively. The peak T2 relaxation time and serum CK were correlated (r = 0.94, p<0.01); temporal changes in muscle T2 relaxation time and serum CK were similar, although T2 relaxation time remained positive after serum CK returned to background levels. We conclude that magnetic resonance imaging can serve as a useful tool in the evaluation of eccentric exercise muscle damage by providing a quantitative indicator of damage and its resolution as well as the specific areas and muscles.

  13. Theory and experimental verifications of the resonator Q and equivalent electrical parameters due to viscoelastic and mounting supports losses.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yook-Kong; Patel, Mihir S; Tanaka, Masako

    2010-08-01

    A novel analytical/numerical method for calculating the resonator Q and its equivalent electrical parameters due to viscoelastic, conductivity, and mounting supports losses is presented. The method presented will be quite useful for designing new resonators and reducing the time and costs of prototyping. There was also a necessity for better and more realistic modeling of the resonators because of miniaturization and the rapid advances in the frequency ranges of telecommunication. We present new 3-D finite elements models of quartz resonators with viscoelasticity, conductivity, and mounting support losses. The losses at the mounting supports were modeled by perfectly matched layers (PMLs). A previously published theory for dissipative anisotropic piezoelectric solids was formulated in a weak form for finite element (FE) applications. PMLs were placed at the base of the mounting supports to simulate the energy losses to a semi-infinite base substrate. FE simulations were carried out for free vibrations and forced vibrations of quartz tuning fork and AT-cut resonators. Results for quartz tuning fork and thickness shear AT-cut resonators were presented and compared with experimental data. Results for the resonator Q and the equivalent electrical parameters were compared with their measured values. Good equivalences were found. Results for both low- and high-Q AT-cut quartz resonators compared well with their experimental values. A method for estimating the Q directly from the frequency spectrum obtained for free vibrations was also presented. An important determinant of the quality factor Q of a quartz resonator is the loss of energy from the electrode area to the base via the mountings. The acoustical characteristics of the plate resonator are changed when the plate is mounted onto a base substrate. The base affects the frequency spectra of the plate resonator. A resonator with a high Q may not have a similarly high Q when mounted on a base. Hence, the base is an

  14. Density functional theory computation of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance parameters in light and heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, Kiplangat

    This thesis illustrates the utilization of Density functional theory (DFT) in calculations of gas and solution phase Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) properties of light and heavy nuclei. Computing NMR properties is still a challenge and there are many unknown factors that are still being explored. For instance, influence of hydrogen-bonding; thermal motion; vibration; rotation and solvent effects. In one of the theoretical studies of 195Pt NMR chemical shift in cisplatin and its derivatives illustrated in Chapter 2 and 3 of this thesis. The importance of representing explicit solvent molecules explicitly around the Pt center in cisplatin complexes was outlined. In the same complexes, solvent effect contributed about half of the J(Pt-N) coupling constant. Indicating the significance of considering the surrounding solvent molecules in elucidating the NMR measurements of cisplatin binding to DNA. In chapter 4, we explore the Spin-Orbit (SO) effects on the 29Si and 13C chemical shifts induced by surrounding metal and ligands. The unusual Ni, Pd, Pt trends in SO effects to the 29Si in metallasilatrane complexes X-Si-(mu-mt)4-M-Y was interpreted based on electronic and relativistic effects rather than by structural differences between the complexes. In addition, we develop a non-linear model for predicting NMR SO effects in a series of organics bonded to heavy nuclei halides. In chapter 5, we extend the idea of "Chemist's orbitals" LMO analysis to the quantum chemical proton NMR computation of systems with internal resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds. Consequently, we explicitly link the relationship between the NMR parameters related to H-bonded systems and intuitive picture of a chemical bond from quantum calculations. The analysis shows how NMR signatures characteristic of H-bond can be explained by local bonding and electron delocalization concepts. One shortcoming of some of the anti-cancer agents like cisplatin is that they are toxic and researchers are looking for

  15. Parameter uncertainty and variability in evaluative fate and exposure models.

    PubMed

    Hertwich, E G; McKone, T E; Pease, W S

    1999-12-01

    The human toxicity potential, a weighting scheme used to evaluate toxic emissions for life cycle assessment and toxics release inventories, is based on potential dose calculations and toxicity factors. This paper evaluates the variance in potential dose calculations that can be attributed to the uncertainty in chemical-specific input parameters as well as the variability in exposure factors and landscape parameters. A knowledge of the uncertainty allows us to assess the robustness of a decision based on the toxicity potential; a knowledge of the sources of uncertainty allows us to focus our resources if we want to reduce the uncertainty. The potential dose of 236 chemicals was assessed. The chemicals were grouped by dominant exposure route, and a Monte Carlo analysis was conducted for one representative chemical in each group. The variance is typically one to two orders of magnitude. For comparison, the point estimates in potential dose for 236 chemicals span ten orders of magnitude. Most of the variance in the potential dose is due to chemical-specific input parameters, especially half-lives, although exposure factors such as fish intake and the source of drinking water can be important for chemicals whose dominant exposure is through indirect routes. Landscape characteristics are generally of minor importance. PMID:10765456

  16. Treatment time reduction through parameter optimization in magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coon, Joshua

    Magnetic Resonance guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MRgHIFU) treatments are a promising modality for cancer treatments in which a focused beam of ultrasound energy is used to kill tumor tissue. However, obstacles still exist to its widespread clinical implementation, including long treatment times. This research demonstrates reductions in treatment times through intelligent selection of the user-controllable parameters, including: the focal zone treatment path, focal zone size, focal zone spacing, and whether to treat one or several focal zone locations at any given time. Several treatments using various combinations of these parameters were simulated using a finite difference method to solve the Pennes bio-heat transfer equation for an ultrasonically heated tissue region with a wide range of acoustic, thermal, geometric, and tumor properties. The total treatment time was iteratively optimized using either a heuristic method or routines included in the Matlab software package, with constraints imposed for patient safety and treatment efficacy. The results demonstrate that large reductions in treatment time are possible through the intelligent selection of user-controllable treatment parameters. For the treatment path, treatment times are reduced by as much as an order of magnitude if the focal zones are arranged into stacks along the axial direction and a middle-front-back ordering is followed. For situations where normal tissue heating constraints are less stringent, these focal zones should have high levels of adjacency to further decrease treatment times; however, adjacency should be reduced in some cases where normal tissue constraints are more stringent. Also, the use of smaller, more concentrated focal zones produces shorter treatment times than larger, more diluted focal zones, a result verified in an agar phantom model. Further, focal zones should be packed using only a small amount of overlap in the axial direction and with a small gap in the

  17. Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costabel, Stephan; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2013-04-01

    For characterizing water flow in the vadose zone, the water retention curve (WRC) of the soil must be known. Because conventional WRC measurements demand much time and effort in the laboratory, alternative methods with shortened measurement duration are desired. The WRC can be estimated, for instance, from the cumulative pore size distribution (PSD) of the investigated material. Geophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry have successfully been applied to recover PSDs of sandstones and limestones. It is therefore expected that the multiexponential analysis of the NMR signal from water-saturated loose sediments leads to a reliable estimation of the WRC. We propose an approach to estimate the WRC using the cumulative NMR relaxation time distribution and approximate it with the well-known van-Genuchten (VG) model. Thereby, the VG parameter n, which controls the curvature of the WRC, is of particular interest, because it is the essential parameter to predict the relative hydraulic conductivity. The NMR curves are calibrated with only two conventional WRC measurements, first, to determine the residual water content and, second, to define a fixed point that relates the relaxation time to a corresponding capillary pressure. We test our approach with natural and artificial soil samples and compare the NMR-based results to WRC measurements using a pressure plate apparatus and to WRC predictions from the software ROSETTA. We found that for sandy soils n can reliably be estimated with NMR, whereas for samples with clay and silt contents higher than 10% the estimation fails. This is the case when the hydraulic properties of the soil are mainly controlled by the pore constrictions. For such samples, the sensitivity of the NMR method for the pore bodies hampers a plausible WRC estimation.

  18. Variability of Schumann resonance parameters observed at low latitude stations in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, X.-Y.; Xiao, Z.; Hao, Y.-Q.; Zhang, D.-H.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the Schumann resonance (SR) parameters observed at low latitude stations in China for the first time. Variations of SR peak frequency and intensity on different timescales (from minutes to years) are analyzed in detail. Diurnal and seasonal variations are shown and the source-observer distance is calculated to confirm the contributions of lightning activity. Differences in the profiles of SR intensity between the NS and EW components are due to the effects of the source-observer distance and the relative position of the observer to the sources. Diurnal frequency variations are more complicated and cannot be directly linked with the three thunderstorm centers. Seasonal variations are clear for intensity but not for frequency. The differences in the diurnal and seasonal variations between the SR intensity and frequency show that the greatest contributor to SR intensity is global lightning activity, while the SR frequency is not affected solely by lightning, as certain other factors involving ionosphere properties may play non-negligible roles. We also emphasize that our observations do not show a distinct day-night change in the SR parameters, and that the SR intensity does not show abrupt changes across terminators. This observation is consistent with previous simulations. Finally, the response of the SR to a solar flare is discussed. The flare leads to a sudden increase of about 0.2 Hz relative to the 2σ level of the SR frequencies in the first three modes, which is in agreement with other works in the literature. This frequency enhancement is explained using theoretical calculations.

  19. A laboratory study to estimate pore geometric parameters of sandstones using complex conductivity and nuclear magnetic resonance for permeability prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, Gordon; Keating, Kristina; Binley, Andrew; Slater, Lee

    2016-06-01

    We estimate parameters from the Katz and Thompson permeability model using laboratory complex electrical conductivity (CC) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data to build permeability models parameterized with geophysical measurements. We use the Katz and Thompson model based on the characteristic hydraulic length scale, determined from mercury injection capillary pressure estimates of pore throat size, and the intrinsic formation factor, determined from multisalinity conductivity measurements, for this purpose. Two new permeability models are tested, one based on CC data and another that incorporates CC and NMR data. From measurements made on forty-five sandstone cores collected from fifteen different formations, we evaluate how well the CC relaxation time and the NMR transverse relaxation times compare to the characteristic hydraulic length scale and how well the formation factor estimated from CC parameters compares to the intrinsic formation factor. We find: (1) the NMR transverse relaxation time models the characteristic hydraulic length scale more accurately than the CC relaxation time (R2 of 0.69 and 0.33 and normalized root mean square errors (NRMSE) of 0.16 and 0.21, respectively); (2) the CC estimated formation factor is well correlated with the intrinsic formation factor (NRMSE=0.23). We demonstrate that that permeability estimates from the joint-NMR-CC model (NRMSE=0.13) compare favorably to estimates from the Katz and Thompson model (NRMSE=0.074). This model advances the capability of the Katz and Thompson model by employing parameters measureable in the field giving it the potential to more accurately estimate permeability using geophysical measurements than are currently possible.

  20. TRITOX: a multiple parameter evaluation of tritium toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Carsten, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The increased use of nuclear reactors for power generation will lead to the introduction of tritium into the environment. The need for assessing possible immediate and long-term effects of exposure to this tritium led to the development of a broad program directed towards evaluating the possible somatic and genetic effects of continuous exposure to tritiated water (HTO). Among the parameters measured are the genetic, cytogenetic, reproductive efficiency, growth, nonspecific lifetime shortening, bone marrow cellularity and stem cell content, relative biological effectiveness as compared to /sup 137/Cesium gamma exposure, and related biochemical and microdosimetric evaluations. These parameters have been evaluated on animals maintained on HTO at 10 to 100 times the maximum permissible concentration (0.03 - 3.0 ..mu..Ci/ml) for HTO. Dominant lethal mutations, chromosome aberrations in regenerating liver, increased sister chromatid exchanges in bone marrow and reduction in bone marrow stem cell content have been observed at the higher concentrations. The relative biological effectiveness for HTO ingestion as compared to external /sup 137/Cesium gamma exposures has been found to be between 1 and 2.

  1. Measurement of resonance parameters of orbitally excited narrow B0 mesons.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; González, B Alvarez; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Griso, S Pagan; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-03-13

    We report a measurement of resonance parameters of the orbitally excited (L=1) narrow B0 mesons in decays to B;{(*)+}pi;{-} using 1.7 fb;{-1} of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The mass and width of the B_{2};{*0} state are measured to be m(B_{2};{*0})=5740.2_{-1.8};{+1.7}(stat)-0.8+0.9(syst) MeV/c;{2} and Gamma(B_{2};{*0})=22.7_{-3.2};{+3.8}(stat)-10.2+3.2(syst) MeV/c;{2}. The mass difference between the B_{2};{*0} and B10 states is measured to be 14.9_{-2.5};{+2.2}(stat)-1.4+1.2(syst) MeV/c;{2}, resulting in a B10 mass of 5725.3_{-2.2};{+1.6}(stat)-1.5+1.4(syst) MeV/c;{2}. This is currently the most precise measurement of the masses of these states and the first measurement of the B_{2};{*0} width. PMID:19392106

  2. Measurement of Resonance Parameters of Orbitally Excited Narrow B^0 Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, : T.

    2008-09-01

    The authors report a measurement of resonance parameters of the orbitally excited (L = 1) narrow B{sup 0} mesons in decays to B{sup (*)+}{pi}{sup -} using 1.7 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The mass and width of the B*{sub 2}{sup 0} state are measured to be m(B*{sub 2}{sup 0}) = 5740.2{sub -1.8}{sup +1.7}(stat.){sub -0.8}{sup +0.9}(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2} and {Lambda}(B*{sub 2}{sup 0}) = 22.7{sub -3.2}{sup +3.8}(stat.){sub -10.2}{sup +3.2}(syst.) MeV/c{sub 2}. The mass difference between the B*{sub 2}{sup 0} and B{sub 1}{sup 0} states is measured to be 14.9{sub -2.5}{sup +2.2}(stat.){sub -1.4}{sup +1.2}(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}, resulting in a B{sub 1}{sup 0} mass of 5725.3{sub -2.2}{sup +1.6}(stat.){sub -1.5}{sup +1.4}(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}. This is currently the most precise measurement of the masses of these states and the first measurement of the B*{sub 2}{sup 0} width.

  3. Parameter dependence of stochastic resonance in the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model driven by trichotomous noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huiqing; Yang, Tingting; Xu, Yong; Xu, Wei

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the stochastic resonance in a FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model driven by trichotomous noise and periodic signal, focusing on the dependence of properties of stochastic resonance (SR) on system parameters. The stochastic resonance is shown through several different measures: system response, power spectrum and signal-to-noise ratio. Firstly, it is found that whether the neuron can fire regularly depends on the cooperative effect of the signal frequency and the signal amplitude for the deterministic FHN neuron. When the forcing amplitude alone is insufficient to cause the neuron firing, the neuron can fire with the addition of trichotomous noise. Secondly, we show that power spectrum is maximized for an optimal value of the noise correlation time, which is the signature of SR. Finally, from studying SNR, the specific system parameters are found to optimize the SR phenomenon.

  4. Blade resonance parameter identification based on tip-timing method without the once-per revolution sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Haotian; Duan, Fajie; Zhang, Jilong

    2016-01-01

    Blade tip-timing is the most effective method for blade vibration online measurement of turbomachinery. In this article a synchronous resonance vibration measurement method of blade based on tip-timing is presented. This method requires no once-per revolution sensor which makes it more generally applicable in the condition where this sensor is difficult to install, especially for the high-pressure rotors of dual-rotor engines. Only three casing mounted probes are required to identify the engine order, amplitude, natural frequency and the damping coefficient of the blade. A method is developed to identify the blade which a tip-timing data belongs to without once-per revolution sensor. Theoretical analyses of resonance parameter measurement are presented. Theoretic error of the method is investigated and corrected. Experiments are conducted and the results indicate that blade resonance parameter identification is achieved without once-per revolution sensor.

  5. Assessment of uncertainty in parameter evaluation and prediction.

    PubMed

    Meinrath, G; Ekberg, C; Landgren, A; Liljenzin, J O

    2000-02-01

    Like in all experimental science, chemical data is affected by the limited precision of the measurement process. Quality control and traceability of experimental data require suitable approaches to express properly the degree of uncertainty. Noise and bias are nuisance effects reducing the information extractable from experimental data. However, because of the complexity of the numerical data evaluation in many chemical fields, often mean values from data analysis, e.g. multi-parametric curve fitting, are reported only. Relevant information on the interpretation limits, e.g. standard deviations or confidence limits, are either omitted or estimated. Modern techniques for handling of uncertainty in both parameter evaluation and prediction are strongly based on the calculation power of computers. Advantageously, computer-intensive methods like Monte Carlo resampling and Latin Hypercube sampling do not require sophisticated and often unavailable mathematical treatment. The statistical concepts are introduced. Applications of some computer-intensive statistical techniques to chemical problems are demonstrated. PMID:18967855

  6. Parameters of Instrumental Swallowing Evaluations: Describing a Diagnostic Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Pisegna, Jessica M; Langmore, Susan E

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare selected parameters of two swallow evaluations: fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) and the modified barium swallow (MBS) study. This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study. Fifty-five clinicians were asked to watch video recordings of swallow evaluations of 2 patients that were done using fluoroscopy and endoscopy simultaneously. In a randomized order, clinicians viewed 4 edited videos from simultaneous evaluations: the FEES and MBS videos of patient 1 and 2 each taking one swallow of 5 mL applesauce. Clinicians filled out a questionnaire that asked (1) which anatomical sites they could visualize on each video, (2) where they saw pharyngeal residue after a swallow, (3) their overall clinical impression of the pharyngeal residue, and (4) their opinions of the evaluation styles. Clinicians reported a significant difference in the visualization of anatomical sites, 11 of the 15 sites were reported as better-visualized on the FEES than on the MBS video (p < 0.05). Clinicians also rated residue to be present in more locations on the FEES than on the MBS. Clinicians' overall impressions of the severity of residue on the same exact swallow were significantly different depending on the evaluation type (FEES vs. MBS for patient 1 χ(2) = 20.05, p < 0.0001; patient 2 χ(2) = 7.52, p = 0.006), with FEES videos rated more severely. FEES advantages were: more visualization of pharyngeal and laryngeal swallowing anatomy and residue. However, as a result, clinicians provided more severe impressions of residue amount on FEES. On one hand, this suggests that FEES is a more sensitive tool than MBS studies, but on the other hand, clinicians might provide more severe interpretations on FEES. PMID:26987971

  7. A high-fidelity Monte Carlo evaluation of CANDU-6 safety parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Hartanto, D.

    2012-07-01

    Important safety parameters such as the fuel temperature coefficient (FTC) and the power coefficient of reactivity (PCR) of the CANDU-6 (CANada Deuterium Uranium) reactor have been evaluated by using a modified MCNPX code. For accurate analysis of the parameters, the DBRC (Doppler Broadening Rejection Correction) scheme was implemented in MCNPX in order to account for the thermal motion of the heavy uranium nucleus in the neutron-U scattering reactions. In this work, a standard fuel lattice has been modeled and the fuel is depleted by using the MCNPX and the FTC value is evaluated for several burnup points including the mid-burnup representing a near-equilibrium core. The Doppler effect has been evaluated by using several cross section libraries such as ENDF/B-VI, ENDF/B-VII, JEFF, JENDLE. The PCR value is also evaluated at mid-burnup conditions to characterize safety features of equilibrium CANDU-6 reactor. To improve the reliability of the Monte Carlo calculations, huge number of neutron histories are considered in this work and the standard deviation of the k-inf values is only 0.5{approx}1 pcm. It has been found that the FTC is significantly enhanced by accounting for the Doppler broadening of scattering resonance and the PCR are clearly improved. (authors)

  8. Comprehensive evaluation of fracture parameters by dual laterolog data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboorian-Jooybari, Hadi; Dejam, Morteza; Chen, Zhangxin; Pourafshary, Peyman

    2016-08-01

    Reservoir quality and productivity of tight formations depend heavily on the degree of fracture development. In fact, hard and dense carbonate formations may not be considered as net pay without the presence of fractures that convey fluids towards the wellbore. The evaluation of fractures is key to effective reservoir characterization for purposes like well drilling and completion as well as development and simulation of fractured reservoirs. Although imaging technologies such as Formation Micro-Scanners and Imagers (FMS and FMI) provide useful information about fracture properties (i.e., dip angle, porosity, aperture, and permeability), they are very expensive and may not be available in all wells. In this work, fracture parameters are estimated using conventional dual laterolog (DLL) resistivity which includes shallow (LLS) and deep (LLD) responses. This technique is based on electrical resistivity anomalies resulting from the separation of shallow and deep laterolog curves. Fracture parameters that can be calculated by DLL include dip angle, aperture, porosity, permeability, and cementation factor. The accuracy of the parameters calculated using DLL data is validated by the results of FMI in a well in one of the Iranian fractured reservoirs. Contrary to the image logs, the conventional DLL is run routinely in all drilled wells. Therefore, if a reservoir has limited and insufficient data of image logs, as it is often the case, the DLLs can be used as a reliable replacement in the construction of fracture models. Furthermore, DLL has an advantage of deeper evaluation of fractures in comparison with the immediate borehole investigation of image logs.

  9. Triangular Ring Resonator: Direct Measurement of the Parity-Odd Parameters of the Photon Sector of SME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exirifard, Qasem

    2014-03-01

    We introduce the Triangular Ring (TR) resonator. We show that the difference between the clockwise and anti-clockwise resonant frequencies of a vacuum TR resonator is sensitive to the birefringence parity-odd parameters of the photon's sector of the minimal Standard Model Extension (mSME): the Standard Model plus all the perturbative parameters encoding the break of the Lorentz symmetry. We report that utilizing the current technology allows for direct measurement of these parameters with a sensitivity of the parity-even ones and improves the best current resonator bounds by couple of orders of magnitudes. We note that, designing an optical table that rotates perpendicular to the gravitational equipotential surface (geoid) allows for direct measurement of the constancy of the light speed at the vicinity of the earth in all directions, in particular, perpendicular to the geoid. If this table could achieve the precision of the ordinary tables, then it would improve the GPS bounds on the constancy of the light speed perpendicular to geoid by about eight orders of magnitude.

  10. Analytical modeling of Schumann resonance and ELF propagation parameters on Mars with a multi-layered ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozakiewicz, Joanna; Kulak, Andrzej; Mlynarczyk, Janusz

    2015-11-01

    Two electrically conductive planetary spheres, the ionosphere and the ground, form a spherical waveguide. Within such a planetary cavity a phenomenon called Schumann resonance (SR) can occur. It is a resonance of extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic waves. The resonance parameters are strongly related to the electromagnetic properties of the cavity. On Mars, as there is no liquid water at the planetary surface, the ground has a low conductivity. In such a situation, ELF waves penetrate into the planetary subsurface up to many kilometers depth. To examine the influence of low-conductivity grounds on ELF propagation, we have introduced a recently developed analytical method, which enables to estimate the propagation parameters and explicate their dependence of the ground properties. Since the presented model is fully analytical, it is computationally efficient and can be very useful in finding inverse solutions. To demonstrate the potential of the method, we present the relationship between individual ground properties and the parameters of Schumann resonance. The obtained results indicate that Martian exploration performed by one ELF station located at the planetary surface can reveal, along with the properties of the ionosphere, the existence of liquid water under the Martian surface.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of atomic xenon dissolved in Gay-Berne model liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Lintuvuori, Juho; Straka, Michal; Vaara, Juha

    2007-03-01

    We present constant-pressure Monte Carlo simulations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral parameters, nuclear magnetic shielding relative to the free atom as well as nuclear quadrupole coupling, for atomic xenon dissolved in a model thermotropic liquid crystal. The solvent is described by Gay-Berne (GB) molecules with parametrization kappa=4.4, kappa{'}=20.0 , and mu=nu=1 . The reduced pressure of P{*}=2.0 is used. Previous simulations of a pure GB system with this parametrization have shown that upon lowering the temperature, the model exhibits isotropic, nematic, smectic- A , and smectic- B /molecular crystal phases. We introduce spherical xenon solutes and adjust the energy and length scales of the GB-Xe interaction to those of the GB-GB interaction. This is done through first principles quantum chemical calculations carried out for a dimer of model mesogens as well as the mesogen-xenon complex. We preparametrize quantum chemically the Xe nuclear shielding and quadrupole coupling tensors when interacting with the model mesogen, and use the parametrization in a pairwise additive fashion in the analysis of the simulation. We present the temperature evolution of {129/131}Xe shielding and 131Xe quadrupole coupling in the different phases of the GB model. From the simulations, separate isotropic and anisotropic contributions to the experimentally available total shielding can be obtained. At the experimentally relevant concentration, the presence of the xenon atoms does not significantly affect the phase behavior as compared to the pure GB model. The simulations reproduce many of the characteristic experimental features of Xe NMR in real thermotropic LCs: Discontinuity in the value or trends of the shielding and quadrupole coupling at the nematic-isotropic and smectic-A-nematic phase transitions, nonlinear shift evolution in the nematic phase reflecting the behavior of the orientational order parameter, and decreasing shift in the smectic-A phase. The last

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of atomic xenon dissolved in Gay-Berne model liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lintuvuori, Juho; Straka, Michal; Vaara, Juha

    2007-03-01

    We present constant-pressure Monte Carlo simulations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral parameters, nuclear magnetic shielding relative to the free atom as well as nuclear quadrupole coupling, for atomic xenon dissolved in a model thermotropic liquid crystal. The solvent is described by Gay-Berne (GB) molecules with parametrization κ=4.4 , κ'=20.0 , and μ=ν=1 . The reduced pressure of P⋆=2.0 is used. Previous simulations of a pure GB system with this parametrization have shown that upon lowering the temperature, the model exhibits isotropic, nematic, smectic- A , and smectic- B /molecular crystal phases. We introduce spherical xenon solutes and adjust the energy and length scales of the GB-Xe interaction to those of the GB-GB interaction. This is done through first principles quantum chemical calculations carried out for a dimer of model mesogens as well as the mesogen-xenon complex. We preparametrize quantum chemically the Xe nuclear shielding and quadrupole coupling tensors when interacting with the model mesogen, and use the parametrization in a pairwise additive fashion in the analysis of the simulation. We present the temperature evolution of Xe129/131 shielding and Xe131 quadrupole coupling in the different phases of the GB model. From the simulations, separate isotropic and anisotropic contributions to the experimentally available total shielding can be obtained. At the experimentally relevant concentration, the presence of the xenon atoms does not significantly affect the phase behavior as compared to the pure GB model. The simulations reproduce many of the characteristic experimental features of Xe NMR in real thermotropic LCs: Discontinuity in the value or trends of the shielding and quadrupole coupling at the nematic-isotropic and smectic- A -nematic phase transitions, nonlinear shift evolution in the nematic phase reflecting the behavior of the orientational order parameter, and decreasing shift in the smectic- A phase. The last

  13. Evaluation of the IRT Parameter Invariance Property for the MCAT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelkar, Vinaya; Wightman, Linda F.; Luecht, Richard M.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the viability of the property of parameter invariance for the one-parameter (1P), two-parameter (2P), and three-parameter (3P) item response theory (IRT) models for the Medical College Admissions Tests (MCAT). Invariance of item parameters across different gender, ethnic, and language groups and the…

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of anterior cruciate ligament tears: reevaluation of quantitative parameters and imaging findings including a simplified method for measuring the anterior cruciate ligament angle.

    PubMed

    Mellado, J M; Calmet, J; Olona, M; Giné, J; Saurí, A

    2004-05-01

    We evaluated the diagnostic utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for predicting anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears using both quantitative parameters and nonquantitative imaging findings. MRI examinations were retrospectively evaluated in a group of patients with arthroscopically confirmed complete ACL tear and in a control group with arthroscopically confirmed intact ACL. We evaluated multiple MRI features to compare their sensitivity and specificity for detecting ACL tears. Particular emphasis is put on the evaluation of three different quantitative parameters, including a simplified method for measuring the ACL angle. With a threshold value of 45 degrees the ACL angle reached a sensitivity and specificity of 100% for detecting ACL tears. With a threshold value of 0 degrees the Blumensaat angle had a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 98%. Finally, a threshold value of 115 degrees gave the posterior cruciate ligament angle a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity of 82%. Discontinuity was found to be the most useful of the ACL abnormalities. Of the secondary findings anterior tibial displacement was the best predictor of ligamentous injury. However, ACL abnormalities and secondary findings, alone or combined, failed to surpass the diagnostic value of the ACL angle for predicting ACL tears. Quantitative parameters are thus good predictors of ACL tears and may increase the overall sensitivity and specificity of MRI. The ACL angle may be confidently measured in a single MRI section and can be considered to be the most reliable quantitative parameter for detecting ACL tears. PMID:14530852

  15. Evaluation of Neonatal Hemolytic Jaundice: Clinical and Laboratory Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Cherepnalkovski, Anet Papazovska; Krzelj, Vjekoslav; Zafirovska-Ivanovska, Beti; Gruev, Todor; Markic, Josko; Aluloska, Natasa; Zdraveska, Nikolina; Piperkovska, Katica

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neonatal jaundice that occurs in ABO or Rhesus issoimunisation has been recognized as one of the major risk factors for development of severe hyperbilirubinemia and bilirubin neurotoxicity. AIM: Aim of our study was to investigate clinical and laboratory parameters associated with hemolytic jaundice due to Rh and ABO incompatibility and compare results with the group of unspecific jaundice. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred sixty seven (167) neonatal hyperbilirubinemia cases were included in the study, 24.6% of which presented with ABO/Rhesus type hemolytic jaundice, and the rest with unspecific jaundice. Evaluation included: blood count, reticulocites, serum bilirubin, aminotransferases, blood grouping, and Coombs test, also the day of bilirubin peak, duration of the hyperbilirubinemia, and additional bilirubin measurements. RESULTS: We showed significantly lower mean values of hemoglobin, erythrocytes and hematocrit and significantly higher values of reticulocytes in the group of ABO/Rh incompatibility compared to the group of jaundice of unspecific etiology; also an earlier presentation and a higher-grade jaundice in this group. CONCLUSIONS: The laboratory profile in ABO/Rh isoimmunisation cases depicts hemolytic mechanism of jaundice. These cases carry a significant risk for early and severe hyperbilirubinemia and are eligible for neurodevelopmental follow-up. Hematological parameters and blood grouping are simple diagnostic methods that assist the etiological diagnosis of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. PMID:27275310

  16. Neutron Cross Section Processing Methods for Improved Integral Benchmarking of Unresolved Resonance Region Evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Jonathan A.; Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord S.; Brown, Forrest B.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we describe the development and application of computational methods for processing neutron cross section data in the unresolved resonance region (URR). These methods are integrated with a continuous-energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code, thereby enabling their use in high-fidelity analyses. Enhanced understanding of the effects of URR evaluation representations on calculated results is then obtained through utilization of the methods in Monte Carlo integral benchmark simulations of fast spectrum critical assemblies. First, we present a so-called on-the-fly (OTF) method for calculating and Doppler broadening URR cross sections. This method proceeds directly from ENDF-6 average unresolved resonance parameters and, thus, eliminates any need for a probability table generation pre-processing step in which tables are constructed at several energies for all desired temperatures. Significant memory reduction may be realized with the OTF method relative to a probability table treatment if many temperatures are needed. Next, we examine the effects of using a multi-level resonance formalism for resonance reconstruction in the URR. A comparison of results obtained by using the same stochastically-generated realization of resonance parameters in both the single-level Breit-Wigner (SLBW) and multi-level Breit-Wigner (MLBW) formalisms allows for the quantification of level-level interference effects on integrated tallies such as keff and energy group reaction rates. Though, as is well-known, cross section values at any given incident energy may differ significantly between single-level and multi-level formulations, the observed effects on integral results are minimal in this investigation. Finally, we demonstrate the calculation of true expected values, and the statistical spread of those values, through independent Monte Carlo simulations, each using an independent realization of URR cross section structure throughout. It is observed that both probability table

  17. Evaluation of Hemodynamic Parameters as Predictors of Glaucoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Janulevičiene, Ingrida; Ehrlich, Rita; Siesky, Brent; Nedzelskienė, Irena; Harris, Alon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate hemodynamic parameters as possible predictors for glaucoma progression. Methods. An 18-month randomized double-masked cohort study including 30 open-angle glaucoma patients receiving fixed-combination treatment with Dorzolamide/Timolol (DTFC) or Latanoprost/Timolol (LTFC) (n = 15 per group) was performed. Intraocular pressure (IOP), arterial blood pressure (BP), ocular and diastolic perfusion pressures (OPP, DPP), color Doppler imaging, pulsatile ocular blood flow analysis, scanning laser polarimetry, and Humphrey visual field evaluations were included. Results. Both treatments showed statistically similar IOP reduction. Six patients in DTFC and 7 in LTFC group met glaucoma progression criteria. DTFC group had higher OPP, DPP, and lower vascular resistivity indices as compared to the LTFC. Progressing patients had higher nerve fiber index, lower systolic BP, OPP, DPP, higher ophthalmic and central retinal artery vascular resistance, and lower pulse volume (P < .05; t-test). Conclusions. Structural changes consistent with glaucoma progression correlate with non-IOP-dependent risk factors. PMID:21577269

  18. Distinguishing black-hole spin-orbit resonances by their gravitational wave signatures. II. Full parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifirò, Daniele; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Gerosa, Davide; Berti, Emanuele; Kesden, Michael; Littenberg, Tyson; Sperhake, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    Gravitational waves from coalescing binary black holes encode the evolution of their spins prior to merger. In the post-Newtonian regime and on the precession time scale, this evolution has one of three morphologies, with the spins either librating around one of two fixed points ("resonances") or circulating freely. In this paper we perform full parameter estimation on resonant binaries with fixed masses and spin magnitudes, changing three parameters: a conserved "projected effective spin" ξ and resonant family Δ Φ =0 ,π (which uniquely label the source); the inclination θJ N of the binary's total angular momentum with respect to the line of sight (which determines the strength of precessional effects in the waveform); and the signal amplitude. We demonstrate that resonances can be distinguished for a wide range of binaries, except for highly symmetric configurations where precessional effects are suppressed. Motivated by new insight into double-spin evolution, we introduce new variables to characterize precessing black hole binaries which naturally reflects the time scale separation of the system and therefore better encode the dynamical information carried by gravitational waves.

  19. Nonlinear Parameters for a Diagnosis of Micro-Scale Cracks Using a Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (nrus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Yong-Moo; Alam, M. K.; Kim, CheolGi

    2010-02-01

    Micro-scale cracks in a material are one of the major factors for the determination of life of a structure as well as for the structural integrity. Micro-scale cracks caused by materials degradation and damage will affect the resonance spectrum of a sample only very slightly and be masked by the resolution of the frequency spectrum when we use a standard linear Resonance Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) analysis. Micro-scale damages, however, can produce a nonlinear elastic behavior. The nonlinearity can be measured by increasing the dynamic strain i.e. excitation amplitude in a Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (NRUS) device. In this paper a feasibility of NRUS for a diagnosis of micro-cracks are investigated for low carbon steel CT specimens. A shift of resonance frequency and normalized amplitude of resonance pattern are chosen to correlate the micro-scale cracks or damage. These two nonlinear parameters can be a potential tool for the detection of micro-cracks or damage of a material.

  20. Evaluation of sub-microsecond recovery resonators for in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyodo, F.; Subramanian, S.; Devasahayam, N.; Murugesan, R.; Matsumoto, K.; Mitchell, J. B.; Krishna, M. C.

    2008-02-01

    Time-domain (TD) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging at 300 MHz for in vivo applications requires resonators with recovery times less than 1 μs after pulsed excitation to reliably capture the rapidly decaying free induction decay (FID). In this study, we tested the suitability of the Litz foil coil resonator (LCR), commonly used in MRI, for in vivo EPR/EPRI applications in the TD mode and compared with parallel coil resonator (PCR). In TD mode, the sensitivity of LCR was lower than that of the PCR. However, in continuous wave (CW) mode, the LCR showed better sensitivity. The RF homogeneity was similar in both the resonators. The axis of the RF magnetic field is transverse to the cylindrical axis of the LCR, making the resonator and the magnet co-axial. Therefore, the loading of animals, and placing of the anesthesia nose cone and temperature monitors was more convenient in the LCR compared to the PCR whose axis is perpendicular to the magnet axis.

  1. Experimental evaluation of the twofold electromagnetic enhancement theory of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Itoh, Tamitake; Biju, Vasudevanpillai; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2009-02-15

    We examined an electromagnetic (EM) theory of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) using single Ag nanoaggregates. The SERRS-EM theory is characterized by twofold EM enhancement induced by the coupling of plasmon resonance with both excitation and emission of Raman scattering plus fluorescence. The total emission cross-section spectra of enhanced Raman scattering and enhanced fluorescence were calculated using the following parameters: the spectrum of enhancement factor induced by plasmon resonance, resonance Raman scattering overlapped with fluorescence, and excitation wavelengths. The calculations well agreed with experimental total emission cross-section spectra, thus providing strong indications that the SERRS-EM theory is quantitatively correct.

  2. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Herman

    2016-09-01

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3 / 2 , 5 / 2 , 7 / 2, and 9 / 2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  3. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cho, Herman

    2016-02-28

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3/2,5/2,7/2, and 9/2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Furthermore, applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  4. Neutron Resonance Parameters of 238U and the Calculated Cross Sections from the Reich-Moore Analysis of Experimental Data in the Neutron Energy Range from 0 keV to 20 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H

    2005-12-05

    The neutron resonance parameters of {sup 238}U were obtained from a SAMMY analysis of high-resolution neutron transmission measurements and high-resolution capture cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in the years 1970-1990, and from more recent transmission and capture cross section measurements performed at the Geel Linear Accelerator (GELINA). Compared with previous evaluations, the energy range for this resonance analysis was extended from 10 to 20 keV, taking advantage of the high resolution of the most recent ORELA transmission measurements. The experimental database and the method of analysis are described in this report. The neutron transmissions and the capture cross sections calculated with the resonance parameters are compared with the experimental data. A description is given of the statistical properties of the resonance parameters and of the recommended values of the average parameters. The new evaluation results in a slight decrease of the effective capture resonance integral and improves the prediction of integral thermal benchmarks by 70 pcm to 200 pcm.

  5. Evaluated 182,183,184,186W Neutron Cross Sections and Covariances in the Resolved Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect

    Pigni, Marco T; Leal, Luiz C

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently completed the resonance parameter evaluation of four tungsten isotopes, i.e., 182,183,184,186W, in the neutron energy range of thermal up to several keV. This nuclear data work was performed with support from the US Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) in an effort to provide improved tungsten cross section and covariance data for criticality safety analyses. The evaluation methodology uses the Reich-Moore approximation of the R-matrix formalism of the code SAMMY to fit high-resolution measurements performed in 2010 and 2012 at the Geel linear accelerator facility (GELINA), as well as other experimental data sets on natural tungsten available in the EXFOR library. In the analyzed energy range, this work nearly doubles the resolved resonance region (RRR) present in the latest US nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.1. In view of the interest in tungsten for distinct types of nuclear applications and the relatively homogeneous distribution of the isotopic tungsten—namely, 182W(26.5%), 183W(14.31%), 184W(30.64%), and 186W(28.43%) - the completion of these four evaluations represents a significant contribution to the improvement of the ENDF library. This paper presents an overview of the evaluated resonance parameters and related covariances for total and capture cross sections on the four tungsten isotopes.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations: Parameter evaluation, application and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jin

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a theoretical technique for investigating the physical properties of a wide variety of molecules. This dissertation contains my studies on three important parts of the MD simulation: evaluation of parameters in empirical energy functions widely used in MD simulations, application of MD simulation on experimentally interested biological molecules and development of new methods for constraint dynamics simulations. All the work in this thesis made use of CHARMM as an MD simulation tool. The MD simulation uses empirical energy functions parameterized by a set of parameters. These parameters play an important role in the quality of the simulations. I evaluated nine parameter sets from Harvard University and Molecular Simulations, Inc. for protein simulations by the MD simulations of hydrated form of carboxy- myoglobin and interleukin-1/beta, which are rich in two typical protein structure motifs, helix and β sheet structures respectively. It is found that some sets are good at representing helical structure proteins while others are good at β sheet proteins. But all of them need improvement on representing motions at low temperature. Experimental evidence indicates that the 1A coiled-coil domains of the Intermediate Filament (IF) proteins consisting of coiled human keratins 1 and 10 (K1 and K10) are 'hot spots' for substitutional mutations. Some of these mutations are correlated to the human skin diseases-epidermolytic hyperkeratiosis (EH) and epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS). The MD simulation technique is used here for the first time to model and simulate these proteins to elucidate the molecular-level effects of these mutations. Lacking the experimental crystal structures, the initial structure of 1A domain of the wild type Intermediate Filament protein and its mutants were modeled from scratch to reproduce the well- known properties of the proteins of this kind followed by identical MD simulations. The important result is

  7. Far-field beam quality evaluation of high-power unstable resonators TEA CO2 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ruhai; Chen, Ning; Shi, Kui; Wang, Bing

    2013-05-01

    High average power pulsed TEA CO2 lasers have many important applications, such as laser manufacturing, military applications, but there rarely have reports about the theoretical and experimental studies on the virtual confocus resonator of pulsed TEA CO2 laser, especially its far field optical quality. Based on the real date of the unstable resonator modified by the stable resonator of high power TEA CO2, three common theoretical evaluations and analyzes were conducted and compared with the measured results of far field light intensity distribution with 2 kW designed unstable resonator laser with the block ratio is ɛ=0.404. The results show that the unstable resonator can obtain near diffraction limitation and high optical quality beam. The β factor is smaller than 4 times than the stable resonator. Furthermore, the smaller block factor can make higher power in bucket for the unstable resonator. The comprehensive prediction and evaluation of designed unstable resonator need to synthetically use these three theoretical methods of the evaluations. The simulation results, with considering the optical aberration, heat distortion and atmospheric effect, agree well with the real recording image by the infrared imaging system in the distance of 300m. The research of this paper has very important reference value for evaluating the tactical effectiveness and optimization design of high power TEA CO2 laser system with different unstable resonators.

  8. Brain magnetic resonance imaging, aerobic power, and metabolic parameters among 30 asymptomatic scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Tripodi, D; Dupas, B; Potiron, M; Louvet, S; Geraut, C

    2004-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the presence of cerebral lesions in asymptomatic scuba divers and explain the causes of them: potential risk factors associating cardiovascular risk factors, low aerobic capacity, or characteristics of diving (maximum depth, ascent rate). Experienced scuba divers, over 40 years of age, without any decompression sickness (DCS) history were included. We studied 30 scuba divers (instructors) without any clinical symptoms. For all of them, we carried out a clinical examination with fatty body mass determination and we questioned them about their diving habits. A brain Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI), an assessment of maximal oxygen uptake, glycemia, triglyceridemia, and cholesterolemia were systematically carried out. Cerebral spots of high intensity were found at 33 % in the scuba diving group and 30 % in the control group. In the diving group, abnormalities were related to unsafe scuba-diving or metabolic abnormalities. In our study, we did not find a significant relationship between the lesions of the central nervous system, and the age, depth of the dives, number of dives, and ergometric performances (maximal oxygen uptake, V.O (2max), serum level of blood lactate). Nevertheless, we found a significant relationship between the lesions of the central nervous system and ascent rate faster than 10 meters per minute (r = 0.57; p = 0.003) or presence of high level of cholesterolemia (r = 0.6; p = 0.001). We found concordant results using the Cochran's Test: meaningful link between the number of brain lesions and the speed of decompression (Uexp = 14 < Utable = 43; alpha = 0.05, p < 0.01). We concluded that hyperintensities can be explained by preformed nitrogen gas microbubbles and particularly in presence of cholesterol, when the ascent rate is up to 10 meters per minute. So, it was remarkable to note that asymptomatic patients practicing scuba diving either professionally or recreationally, presented lesions of the central nervous

  9. Approaches to real-time tsunami wave parameters evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentyev, Mikhail; Titov, Vasily; Romanenko, Alexey

    2014-05-01

    Timely prediction of tsunami wave parameters is still among actual problems for tsunami risk mitigation. After the Great East Japan Earthquake (Mach 11, 2011) it takes only 20 minutes for tsunami wave to approach the cost of Japan after the quake. Existing models and software applications allow experts to simulate tsunami wave propagation rather fast. However, all the models require knowledge about initial see-face disturbance at tsunami source. Seismic data, available right after the event, provide the information about earthquake magnitude and epicenter location. There are a number of approaches to evaluate the initial see-face disturbance (using knowledge about the trench geo structure, satellite imaging, etc.). One of perspective approaches is to recalculate tsunami wave profiles, recorded by deep-ocean stations like DART buoys or GPS equipment, in terms of initial sea surface displacement. The so-called preliminary calculation strategy suggests that the targeted subduction zone is covered by a number rectangular "unit sources" 50x100 km. Wave propagation from each unit source, caused by the unified shape (typical for the given subduction zone), is calculated in advance other the entire aquatoria. After real event the wave profile, measure at certain sensor, is approximated as linear combination of model signals from the above unit sources, calculated at the same point. Method was proved to be rather accurate. However, it takes valuable time to recover initial displacement at tsunami source in case of larger zone of disturbance (e.g. about 20 minutes for processing tsunami epicenter covered with six unit-sources). We suggest new algorithm for above mentioned model. This is based on Fourier theory and involves orthogonal decomposition of simulated profiles, calculated from the unit sources. It takes only about 1 second to recover tsunami source of twenty unit-sources. This allows one to speak about possibility to develop real-time system for evaluating tsunami.

  10. NERO: a code for the nonlinear evaluation of resonances in one-turn mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todesco, E.; Gemmi, M.; Giovannozzi, M.

    1997-10-01

    We describe a code that evaluates the stability, the position and the width of resonances in four-dimensional symplectic mappings. The code is based on the computation of the resonant perturbative series through the program ARES, and on the analysis of the resonant orbits of the interpolating Hamiltonian. The code is dedicated to the study and to the comparison of the nonlinear behaviour in one-turn betatronic maps.

  11. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PARAMETERS OF SEDIMENT EXTRACTION AND FRACTIONATION THAT INFLUENCE TOXICITY AS EVALUATED BY MICROTOX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several physical and chemical parameters of sediment extraction and fractionation of organic compounds that influence bioassay results were evaluated. ach parameter was evaluated with a photoluminescent bacterial bioassay (Microtox) as an end point. hree solvents (acetonitrile, a...

  12. Evaluation of Elution Parameters for Cesium Ion Exchange Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Burgeson, Ingrid E.; Deschane, Jaquetta R.; Cook, Bryan J.; Blanchard, David L.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2006-08-28

    Cesium ion exchange is one of the planned processes for treating and disposing of waste at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. Radioactive supernatant liquids from the waste tanks will undergo ultrafiltration, followed by cesium ion exchange using a regenerable organic ion exchange resin. Two resins, SuperLig?644 and a Resorcinol-formaldehyde resin are being evaluated for cesium removal and cesium elution characteristics. The main purpose of this study is to optimize the cesium elution to provide a resin which after undergoing elution would meet the U.S. Department of Energy/Office of River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant processing and resin disposal criteria. Columns of each resin type were loaded to greater or equal to 90% breakthrough with a Hanford waste stimulant and eluted with nitric acid. The temperature, flow rate and nitric acid concentration were varied to determine the optimal elution conditions. Temperature and eluant flow rate were the most important elution parameters. As would be predicted based upon kinetic consideration alone, decreasing the eluant flow rate and increasing the temperature provided the optimal elution conditions. Varying the nitric acid concentration did not have a significant effect on the elution; however, elutions performed using both high acid concentration (1M) and elevated temperature (45 C) resulted in resin degradation, causing gas generation and resin bed disruption.

  13. Dual-Channel Single-Molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer to Establish Distance Parameters for RNA Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The increasing interest in RNA nanotechnology and the demonstrated feasibility of using RNA nanoparticles as therapeutics have prompted the need for imaging systems with nanometer-scale resolution for RNA studies. Phi29 dimeric pRNAs can serve as building blocks in assembly into the hexameric ring of the nanomotors, as modules of RNA nanoparciles, and as vehicles for specific delivery of therapeutics to cancers or viral infected cells. The understanding of the 3D structure of this novel RNA dimeric particle is fundamentally and practically important. Although a 3D model of pRNA dimer has been proposed based on biochemical analysis, no distance measurements or X-ray diffraction data have been reported. Here we evaluated the application of our customized single-molecule dual-viewing system for distance measurement within pRNA dimers using single-molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET). Ten pRNA monomers labeled with single donor or acceptor fluorophores at various locations were constructed and eight dimers were assembled. smFRET signals were detected for six dimers. The tethered arm sizes of the fluorophores were estimated empirically from dual-labeled RNA/DNA standards. The distances between donor and acceptor were calculated and used as distance parameters to assess and refine the previously reported 3D model of the pRNA dimer. Distances between nucleotides in pRNA dimers were found to be different from those of the dimers bound to procapsid, suggesting a conformational change of the pRNA dimer upon binding to the procapsid. PMID:20954698

  14. Harvesting rockfall hazard evaluation parameters from Google Earth Street View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partsinevelos, Panagiotis; Agioutantis, Zacharias; Tripolitsiotis, Achilles; Steiakakis, Chrysanthos; Mertikas, Stelios

    2015-04-01

    Rockfall incidents along highways and railways prove extremely dangerous for properties, infrastructures and human lives. Several qualitative metrics such as the Rockfall Hazard Rating System (RHRS) and the Colorado Rockfall Hazard Rating System (CRHRS) have been established to estimate rockfall potential and provide risk maps in order to control and monitor rockfall incidents. The implementation of such metrics for efficient and reliable risk modeling require accurate knowledge of multi-parametric attributes such as the geological, geotechnical, topographic parameters of the study area. The Missouri Rockfall Hazard Rating System (MORH RS) identifies the most potentially problematic areas using digital video logging for the determination of parameters like slope height and angle, face irregularities, etc. This study aims to harvest in a semi-automated approach geometric and qualitative measures through open source platforms that may provide 3-dimensional views of the areas of interest. More specifically, the Street View platform from Google Maps, is hereby used to provide essential information that can be used towards 3-dimensional reconstruction of slopes along highways. The potential of image capturing along a programmable virtual route to provide the input data for photogrammetric processing is also evaluated. Moreover, qualitative characterization of the geological and geotechnical status, based on the Street View images, is performed. These attributes are then integrated to deliver a GIS-based rockfall hazard map. The 3-dimensional models are compared to actual photogrammetric measures in a rockfall prone area in Crete, Greece while in-situ geotechnical characterization is also used to compare and validate the hazard risk. This work is considered as the first step towards the exploitation of open source platforms to improve road safety and the development of an operational system where authorized agencies (i.e., civil protection) will be able to acquire near

  15. A new method of evaluating tight gas sands pore structure from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Liang; Mao, Zhi-qiang; Xie, Xiu-hong

    2016-04-01

    Tight gas sands always display such characteristics of ultra-low porosity, permeability, high irreducible water, low resistivity contrast, complicated pore structure and strong heterogeneity, these make that the conventional methods are invalid. Many effective gas bearing formations are considered as dry zones or water saturated layers, and cannot be identified and exploited. To improve tight gas sands evaluation, the best method is quantitative characterizing rock pore structure. The mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves are advantageous in predicting formation pore structure. However, the MICP experimental measurements are limited due to the environment and economy factors, this leads formation pore structure cannot be consecutively evaluated. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs are considered to be promising in evaluating rock pore structure. Generally, to consecutively quantitatively evaluate tight gas sands pore structure, the best method is constructing pseudo Pc curves from NMR logs. In this paper, based on the analysis of lab experimental results for 20 core samples, which were drilled from tight gas sandstone reservoirs of Sichuan basin, and simultaneously applied for lab MICP and NMR measurements, the relationships of piecewise power function between nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) transverse relaxation T2 time and pore-throat radius Rc are established. A novel method, which is used to transform NMR reverse cumulative curve as pseudo capillary pressure (Pc) curve is proposed, and the corresponding model is established based on formation classification. By using this model, formation pseudo Pc curves can be consecutively synthesized. The pore throat radius distribution, and pore structure evaluation parameters, such as the average pore throat radius (Rm), the threshold pressure (Pd), the maximum pore throat radius (Rmax) and so on, can also be precisely extracted. After this method is extended into field applications, several tight gas

  16. Generalized Parameter-Adjusted Stochastic Resonance of Duffing Oscillator and Its Application to Weak-Signal Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Zhi-Hui; Leng, Yong-Gang

    2015-01-01

    A two-dimensional Duffing oscillator which can produce stochastic resonance (SR) is studied in this paper. We introduce its SR mechanism and present a generalized parameter-adjusted SR (GPASR) model of this oscillator for the necessity of parameter adjustments. The Kramers rate is chosen as the theoretical basis to establish a judgmental function for judging the occurrence of SR in this model; and to analyze and summarize the parameter-adjusted rules under unmatched signal amplitude, frequency, and/or noise-intensity. Furthermore, we propose the weak-signal detection approach based on this GPASR model. Finally, we employ two practical examples to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach in practical engineering application. PMID:26343671

  17. US-based Drug Cost Parameter Estimation for Economic Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Joseph F; Meek, Patrick D; Rosenberg, Marjorie A

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In the US, more than 10% of national health expenditures are for prescription drugs. Assessing drug costs in US economic evaluation studies is not consistent, as the true acquisition cost of a drug is not known by decision modelers. Current US practice focuses on identifying one reasonable drug cost and imposing some distributional assumption to assess uncertainty. Methods We propose a set of Rules based on current pharmacy practice that account for the heterogeneity of drug product costs. The set of products derived from our Rules, and their associated costs, form an empirical distribution that can be used for more realistic sensitivity analyses, and create transparency in drug cost parameter computation. The Rules specify an algorithmic process to select clinically equivalent drug products that reduce pill burden, use an appropriate package size, and assume uniform weighting of substitutable products. Three diverse examples show derived empirical distributions and are compared with previously reported cost estimates. Results The shapes of the empirical distributions among the three drugs differ dramatically, including multiple modes and different variation. Previously published estimates differed from the means of the empirical distributions. Published ranges for sensitivity analyses did not cover the ranges of the empirical distributions. In one example using lisinopril, the empirical mean cost of substitutable products was $444 (range $23–$953) as compared to a published estimate of $305 (range $51–$523). Conclusions Our Rules create a simple and transparent approach to create cost estimates of drug products and assess their variability. The approach is easily modified to include a subset of, or different weighting for, substitutable products. The derived empirical distribution is easily incorporated into one-way or probabilistic sensitivity analyses. PMID:25532826

  18. Evaluation of Linking Methods for Placing Three-Parameter Logistic Item Parameter Estimates onto a One-Parameter Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karkee, Thakur B.; Wright, Karen R.

    2004-01-01

    Different item response theory (IRT) models may be employed for item calibration. Change of testing vendors, for example, may result in the adoption of a different model than that previously used with a testing program. To provide scale continuity and preserve cut score integrity, item parameter estimates from the new model must be linked to the…

  19. Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perozzi, E.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A resonance in CELESTIAL MECHANICS occurs when some of the quantities characterizing the motion of two or more celestial bodies can be considered as commensurable, i.e. their ratio is close to an integer fraction. In a simplified form, this can be expressed as ...

  20. Design parameters of a resonant infrared photoconductor with unity quantum efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam; Mcmurray, Robert E., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This paper proposes a concept of a resonant infrared photoconductor that has characteristics of 100 percent quantum efficiency, high photoconductive gain, and very low noise equivalent power. Central to this concept is an establishment of a high-finesse absorption cavity internal to the detector element. A theoretical analysis is carried out, demonstrating this concept and providing some design guidelines. A Ge:Ga FIR detector is presently being fabricated using this approach.

  1. Approximate Schumann resonance parameters for a two-scale-height ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sentman, D. D.

    1990-01-01

    An isotropic, spherically symmetric two-scale-height ionosphere's transverse magnetic mode eigenfrequencies, as well as the height and angular profiles of its electric and magnetic fields, are presently addressed by an approximate solution. The electromagnetic energy in the eigenmodes is equally partitioned between the electric and magnetic fields, allowing a simple expression of the relative degrees of dissipation within the radial and tangential dissipation layers. The results obtained may be relevant to interpretations of the temporal variations in the Schumann resonances.

  2. Electrostatic Generation of Bulk Acoustic Waves and Electrical Parameters of Si-MEMS Resonators.

    PubMed

    Dulmet, Bernard; Ivan, Mihaela Eugenia; Ballandras, Sylvain

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes an analytical approach to model the generation of bulk acoustic waves in an electrostatically excited silicon MEMS structure, as well as its electromechanical response in terms of static and dynamic displacements, electromechanical coupling, and motional current. The analysis pertains to the single-port electrostatic drive of trapped-energy thickness-extensional (TE) modes in thin plates. Both asymmetric single-side and symmetric double-side electrostatic gap configurations are modeled. Green's function is used to describe the characteristic of the static displacement of the driven surface of the structure versus the dc bias voltage, which allows us to determine the electrical response of the resonator. Optical and electrical characterizations have been performed on resonator samples operating at 10.3 MHz on the fundamental of TE mode under single-side electrostatic excitation. The various figures of merit depend on the dc bias voltage. Typical values of 9000 for the Q-factor, and of 10(-5) for the electromechanical coupling factor k(2) have been obtained with [Formula: see text] for [Formula: see text]-thick gaps. Here-considered modes have a typical temperature coefficients of frequency (TCF) close to -30 ppm/(°)C. We conclude that the practical usability of such electrostatically excited bulk acoustic waves (BAW) resonators essentially depends on the efficiency of the compensation of feed-through capacitance. PMID:26642450

  3. Mechanical design parameters for detection of nuclear signals by magnetic resonance force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, G.J.; Hanlon, J.A.; Lamartine, B.; Hawley, M.; Solem, J.C.; Signer, S.; Jarmer, J.J.; Penttila, S.; Sillerud, L.O.; Pryputniewicz, R.J.

    1993-10-01

    Recent theoretical work has shown that mechanical detection of magnetic resonance from a single nuclear spin is in principle possible. This theory has recently been experimentally validated by the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance signals using microscale cantilevers. Currently we are extending this technology in an attempt to detect nuclear signals which are extending this technology in an attempt to detect nuclear signals which are three orders of magnitude lower in intensity than electron signals. In order to achieve the needed thousand-fold improvement in sensitivity we have undertaken the development of optimized mechanical cantilevers and highly polarized samples. Finite element modeling is used as a tool to simulate cantilever beam dynamics and to optimize the mechanical properties including Q, resonant frequency, amplitude of vibration and spring constant. Simulations are compared to experiments using heterodyne hologram interferometry. Nanofabrication of optimized cantilevers via ion milling will be directed by the outcome of these simulations and experiments. Highly polarized samples are developed using a three-fold approach: (1) high magnetic field strength (2.5T), (2) low temperature (1K), and (3) use of samples polarized by dynamic nuclear polarization. Our recent experiments have demonstrated nuclear polarizations in excess of 50% in molecules of toulene.

  4. Surface Plasmon Resonance Evaluation of Colloidal Metal Aerogel Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Sibille, Laurent; Cronise, Raymond J.; Noever, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging has in the past been applied to the characterization of thin films. In this study we apply the surface plasmon technique not to determine macroscopic spatial variations but rather to determine average microscopic information. Specifically, we deduce the dielectric properties of the surrounding gel matrix and information concerning the dynamics of the gelation process from the visible absorption characteristics of colloidal metal nanoparticles contained in aerogel pores. We have fabricated aerogels containing gold and silver nanoparticles. Because the dielectric constant of the metal particles is linked to that of the host matrix at the surface plasmon resonance, any change 'in the dielectric constant of the material surrounding the metal nanoparticles results in a shift in the surface plasmon wavelength. During gelation the surface plasmon resonance shifts to the red as the average or effective dielectric constant of the matrix increases. Conversely, formation of an aerogel or xerogel through supercritical extraction or evaporation of the solvent produces a blue shift in the resonance indicating a decrease in the dielectric constant of the matrix. From the magnitude of this shift we deduce the average fraction of air and of silica in contact with the metal particles. The surface area of metal available for catalytic gas reaction may thus be determined.

  5. Referencing strategy for the direct comparison of nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics motional parameters in RNA.

    PubMed

    Musselman, Catherine; Zhang, Qi; Al-Hashimi, Hashim; Andricioaei, Ioan

    2010-01-21

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are both techniques that can be used to characterize the structural dynamics of biomolecules and their underlying time scales. Comparison of relaxation parameters obtained through each methodology allows for cross validation of techniques and for complementarity in the analysis of dynamics. Here we present a combined NMR/MD study of the dynamics of HIV-1 transactivation response (TAR) RNA. We compute relaxation constants (R(1), R(2), and NOE) and model-free parameters (S(2) and tau) from a 65 ns molecular dynamics (MD) trajectory and compare them with the respective parameters measured in a domain-elongation NMR experiment. Using the elongated domain as the frame of reference for all computed parameters allows for a direct comparison between experiment and simulation. We see good agreement for many parameters and gain further insight into the nature of the local and global dynamics of TAR, which are found to be quite complex, spanning multiple time scales. For the few cases where agreement is poor, comparison of the dynamical parameters provides insight into the limits of each technique. We suggest a frequency-matching procedure that yields an upper bound for the time scale of dynamics to which the NMR relaxation experiment is sensitive. PMID:20039757

  6. An Analysis Method for Superconducting Resonator Parameter Extraction with Complex Baseline Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    A new semi-empirical model is proposed for extracting the quality (Q) factors of arrays of superconducting microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). The determination of the total internal and coupling Q factors enables the computation of the loss in the superconducting transmission lines. The method used allows the simultaneous analysis of multiple interacting discrete resonators with the presence of a complex spectral baseline arising from reflections in the system. The baseline removal allows an unbiased estimate of the device response as measured in a cryogenic instrumentation setting.

  7. Assessment of Gate Width Size on Lifetime-Based Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Parameter Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sez-Jade; Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Intes, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) enables the observation of interactions at the nanoscale level through the use of fluorescence optical imaging techniques. In FRET, fluorescence lifetime imaging can be used to quantify the fluorescence lifetime changes of the donor molecule, which are associated with proximity between acceptor and donor molecules. Among the FRET parameters derived from fluorescence lifetime imaging, the percentage of donor that interacts with the acceptor (in proximity) can be estimated via model-based fitting. However, estimation of the lifetime parameters can be affected by the acquisition parameters such as the temporal characteristics of the imaging system. Herein, we investigate the effect of various gate widths on the accuracy of estimation of FRET parameters with focus on the near-infrared spectral window. Experiments were performed in silico, in vitro, and in vivo with gate width sizes ranging from 300 ps to 1000 ps in intervals of 100 ps. For all cases, the FRET parameters were retrieved accurately and the imaging acquisition time was decreased three-fold. These results indicate that increasing the gate width up to 1000 ps still allows for accurate quantification of FRET interactions even in the case of short lifetimes such as those encountered with near-infrared FRET pairs. PMID:26557647

  8. Two statistics for evaluating parameter identifiability and error reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doherty, John; Hunt, Randall J.

    2009-01-01

    Two statistics are presented that can be used to rank input parameters utilized by a model in terms of their relative identifiability based on a given or possible future calibration dataset. Identifiability is defined here as the capability of model calibration to constrain parameters used by a model. Both statistics require that the sensitivity of each model parameter be calculated for each model output for which there are actual or presumed field measurements. Singular value decomposition (SVD) of the weighted sensitivity matrix is then undertaken to quantify the relation between the parameters and observations that, in turn, allows selection of calibration solution and null spaces spanned by unit orthogonal vectors. The first statistic presented, "parameter identifiability", is quantitatively defined as the direction cosine between a parameter and its projection onto the calibration solution space. This varies between zero and one, with zero indicating complete non-identifiability and one indicating complete identifiability. The second statistic, "relative error reduction", indicates the extent to which the calibration process reduces error in estimation of a parameter from its pre-calibration level where its value must be assigned purely on the basis of prior expert knowledge. This is more sophisticated than identifiability, in that it takes greater account of the noise associated with the calibration dataset. Like identifiability, it has a maximum value of one (which can only be achieved if there is no measurement noise). Conceptually it can fall to zero; and even below zero if a calibration problem is poorly posed. An example, based on a coupled groundwater/surface-water model, is included that demonstrates the utility of the statistics. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Neutron resonance parameters of /sup 79/Br and /sup 81/Br up to 15 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, M.; Kawarasaki, Y.; Mizumoto, M.

    1980-09-01

    Resonance parameters of separated isotopes of bromine were measured using TOF spectrometer of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute linear accelerator. Transmission and capture measurements were made with /sup 6/Li-glass and Moxon-Rae detectors, on separated isotopes (approx. 98%) of /sup 79/Br and /sup 81/Br. Resonance analyses were made on transmission data with an area analysis code, and on capture data with a Monte-Carlo program CAFIT. For /sup 79/Br gGAMMA/sup 0//sub n/ values for 156 levels below 10 keV are obtained, and for /sup 81/Br 100 levels below 15 keV. Strength functions are obtained: for /sup 79/Br S/sub O/ = (1.27 +- 0.14) x10/sup -4/ below 10 keV, and for /sup 81/Br S/sub O/ = (0.86 +- 0.14)10/sup -4/ below 15 keV. Intermediate structures are observed in the resonances of /sup 81/Br showing clusters of levels at 1.2, 10, 11.5, and 14 keV, where the sum of gGAMMA/sup 0//sub n/ vs. neutron energy shows steep rises.

  10. Neutron total and capture cross section measurements and resonance parameter analysis of tungsten from 0.01 eV to 200 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, C.J.; Block, R.C.; Slovacek, R.E.; Overberg, M.E.; Moretti, B.E.; Burke, J.A.; Leinweber, G.; Drindak, N.J.

    1998-06-15

    Natural tungsten metal was measured using neutron time-of-flight spectroscopy at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) Gaerttner Laboratory linear accelerator to determine the tungsten resonance parameters. Three separate measurements were performed: transmission, capture, and self-indication. Previous measurements did not employ all three experiment types and used less sophisticated methods. The current work improves on the published tungsten data base and reduces resonance parameter uncertainties.

  11. Experimental epiphysiodesis: magnetic resonance imaging evaluation with histopathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Synder, M; Harcke, H T; Conard, K; Bowen, J R

    2001-01-01

    We performed an experimental epiphysiodesis on the tibia in 16 immature New Zealand white rabbits. The purpose was to study the process of trauma-induced growth plate closure. The animals were killed at weekly intervals over 8 weeks. We correlated the histological findings with serial magnetic resonance images. The undamaged, central part of the growth plate became histologically abnormal within 1 week. Mature bone bridge formation in the area of the epiphysiodesis was seen after 3 to 4 weeks. The study suggests that growth arrest starts before the bone bridge formation. Factors regulating cartilage growth may also play a role. PMID:11820437

  12. The Evaluation of the Parameters in the van Deemter Equation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Harvey W.

    1982-01-01

    Describes experiment expanding on principles behind measuring efficiency of chromatographic columns and allowing calculation of parameters in the van Deemter equation. Easily accomplished in a three-hour period using a gas chromatograph in which gas flow can be changed and measured. Mathematical solutions can be attained with programmable…

  13. Sexual dimorphism in tooth morphometrics: An evaluation of the parameters

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Abhishek; Kamath, Venkatesh V.; Satelur, Krishnanand; Rajkumar, Komali; Sundaram, Lavanya

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Sexual dimorphism refers to the variations in tooth size and shape between the sexes. The consistency of these variations is valuable in the identification of the sex of an individual in times of mass disaster when whole body parts get destroyed or are unavailable. There exist differences in the expression of these variables across races and regions. This study aims to tabulate and identify the variations in tooth measurements using standarized reference points in an attempt to establish parameters of sexual dimorphism. Materials and Methods: 100 individuals (50 of each sex) in the age group 19-23 years were assessed for standard morphometric parameters of the maxillary central incisor, canine, premolar and molar. Odontometric measurements of established parameters were recorded from impression casts of the maxillary jaws. The mesiodistal width (MDW), the bucco-ligual width (BLW), the crown length (CL) and the cervical angle (CA) were charted among the teeth. The consistency of the variations was statistically analyzed and a logistic regression table was prepared to identify the sex of the individual from the tooth measurements. Results and Conclusions: The BLW, MDW and CL reflected significant variations among all the teeth to be effective in establishing sexual dimorphism. CA as a parameter was inadequate across all the teeth. The permanent maxillary canine was the most important tooth to be reflective of the gender and statistically significant to be utilized for gender determination. PMID:27051219

  14. Response of early active rheumatoid arthritis to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors: evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Wataru; Nishikawa, Kenichiro; Hirose, Masuko; Nanki, Toshihiro; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory changes (synovitis and bone marrow edema) and destructive changes (bone erosion) were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and their relations with disease activity were assessed during treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. Ten patients with early active RA underwent MRI at 0 and 16 weeks of TNF-inhibitor treatment. The carpal bones of the dominant hand were evaluated by the outcome measures in rheumatology clinical trials MRI score for RA. After 16 weeks, the mean disease activity score (DAS 28) decreased significantly from 5.54 to 2.70, while the number of tender joints, number of swollen joints, and inflammatory parameters were also significantly improved. The mean synovitis and marrow edema scores determined by MRI showed a significant decrease from 6.1 to 2.2 and 12.8 to 6.2, respectively, while the annual bone-erosion progression score decreased from 12.6 to 2.0. Although synovitis persisted in some patients, imaging remission was achieved in two patients. In conclusion, TNF-inhibitor therapy achieved an early decrease of disease activity and MRI revealed amelioration of joint destruction. The MRI score for RA is useful for assessing the early response to TNF inhibitors. PMID:18762862

  15. Qualitative Parameters for Evaluation Procedures of Non-Formal and Informal Learning Achievements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stasiunaitiene, Egle; Kaminskiene, Lina

    2009-01-01

    The article introduces evaluation principles of non-formal and informal learning that determine the quality of evaluation, describes stages of the evaluation procedure, differentiates their qualitative parameters and defines their criteria and indicators. It also brings in the discussion that consideration of qualitative parameters for the…

  16. Anomalous Solute Transport in Saturated Porous Media: Linking Transport Model Parameters to Electrical and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, R. D.; Binley, A. M.; Keating, K.; France, S.; Osterman, G. K.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.

    2013-12-01

    The advection-dispersion equation fails to describe non-Fickian solute transport in saturated porous media, necessitating the use of other models. The dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) model partitions the total porosity into mobile and less-mobile domains with solute exchange between the domains; consequently, the DDMT model can produce a better fit to breakthrough curves (BTCs) in systems defined by more- and less-mobile components. However, direct experimental estimation of DDMT model parameters such as rate of exchange and the mobile and less-mobile porosities remains elusive. Consequently, model parameters are often calculated purely as a model fitting exercise. There is a clear need for material characterization techniques that can offer some insight into the pore space geometrical arrangement, particularly if such techniques can be extended to the field scale. Here, we interpret static direct-current (DC) resistivity, complex resistivity (CR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) geophysical measurements in the characterization of mass transfer parameters. We use two different samples of the zeolite clinoptilolite, a material shown to demonstrate solute mass transfer due to a significant intragranular porosity, along with glass beads as a control. We explore the relation between geophysical and DDMT parameters in conjunction with supporting material characterization methods. Our results reveal how these geophysical measurements can offer some insight into the pore structures controlling the observed anomalous transport behavior.

  17. Experimental evaluation of a modal parameter based system identification procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Minli; Feng, Ningsheng; Hahn, Eric J.

    2016-02-01

    Correct modelling of the foundation of a rotor bearing foundation system (RBFS) is an invaluable asset for the balancing and efficient running of turbomachinery. Numerical experiments have shown that a modal parameter based identification approach could be feasible for this purpose but there is a lack of experimental verification of the suitability of such a modal approach for even the simplest systems. In this paper the approach is tested on a simple experimental rig comprising a clamped horizontal bar with lumped masses. It is shown that apart from damping, the proposed approach can identify reasonably accurately the relevant modal parameters of the rig; and that the resulting equivalent system can predict reasonably well the frequency response of the rig. Hence, the proposed approach shows promise but further testing is required, since application to identifying the foundation of an RBFS involves the additional problem of accurately obtaining the force excitation from motion measurements.

  18. Evaluation of polarimetric SAR parameters for soil moisture retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Jian-Cheng; Vanzyl, Jakob J.; Engman, Edwin T.

    1992-01-01

    Results of ongoing efforts to develop an algorithm for soil moisture retrieval from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery are reported. Estimates of soil moisture are of great importance in numerous environmental studies, including hydrology, meteorology, and agriculture. Previous studies using extensive scatterometer measurements have established the optimum parameters for moisture retrieval as C-band HH radar operating at incidence angles between 10 to 15 deg. However, these parameters were not tested or verified with imaging radar systems. The results from different investigators showed considerable variability in the relationship between soil moisture and radar backscattering. This variability suggests that those algorithms are site-specific. Furthermore, the small incidence angle requirement limits the spatial application, especially for airborne radar systems.

  19. The evaluation of radiation damage parameter for CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilj, V.; Skukan, N.; Jakšić, M.; Pomorski, M.; Kada, W.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T.

    2016-04-01

    There are a few different phenomenological approaches that aim to track the dependence of signal height in irradiated solid state detectors on the fluence of damaging particles. However, none of them are capable to provide a unique radiation hardness parameter that would reflect solely the material capability to withstand high radiation environment. To extract such a parameter for chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, two different diamond detectors were irradiated with proton beams in MeV energy range and subjected afterwards to ion beam induced charge (IBIC) analysis. The change in charge collection efficiency (CCE) due to defects produced was investigated in context of a theoretical model that was developed on the basis of the adjoint method for linearization of the continuity equations of electrons and holes. Detailed modeling of measured data resulted with the first known value of the kσ product for diamond, where k represents the number of charge carriers' traps created per one simulated primary lattice vacancy and σ represents the charge carriers' capture cross section. As discussed in the text, this product could be considered as a true radiation damage parameter.

  20. Determination of GLUT1 Oligomerization Parameters using Bioluminescent Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Looyenga, Brendan; VanOpstall, Calvin; Lee, Zion; Bell, Jed; Lodge, Evans; Wrobel, Katherine; Arnoys, Eric; Louters, Larry

    2016-01-01

    The facilitated glucose transporter GLUT1 (SLC2A1) is an important mediator of glucose homeostasis in humans. Though it is found in most cell types to some extent, the level of GLUT1 expression across different cell types can vary dramatically. Prior studies in erythrocytes—which express particularly high levels of GLUT1—have suggested that GLUT1 is able to form tetrameric complexes with enhanced transport activity. Whether dynamic aggregation of GLUT1 also occurs in cell types with more modest expression of GLUT1, however, is unclear. To address this question, we developed a genetically encoded bioluminescent Förster resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay using the luminescent donor Nanoluciferase and fluorescent acceptor mCherry. By tethering these proteins to the N-terminus of GLUT1 and performing saturation BRET analysis, we were able to demonstrate the formation of multimeric complexes in live cells. Parallel use of flow cytometry and immunoblotting further enabled us to estimate the density of GLUT1 proteins required for spontaneous oligomerization. These data provide new insights into the physiological relevance of GLUT1 multimerization as well as a new variant of BRET assay that is useful for measuring the interactions among other cell membrane proteins in live cells. PMID:27357903

  1. Determination of GLUT1 Oligomerization Parameters using Bioluminescent Förster Resonance Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Looyenga, Brendan; VanOpstall, Calvin; Lee, Zion; Bell, Jed; Lodge, Evans; Wrobel, Katherine; Arnoys, Eric; Louters, Larry

    2016-01-01

    The facilitated glucose transporter GLUT1 (SLC2A1) is an important mediator of glucose homeostasis in humans. Though it is found in most cell types to some extent, the level of GLUT1 expression across different cell types can vary dramatically. Prior studies in erythrocytes-which express particularly high levels of GLUT1-have suggested that GLUT1 is able to form tetrameric complexes with enhanced transport activity. Whether dynamic aggregation of GLUT1 also occurs in cell types with more modest expression of GLUT1, however, is unclear. To address this question, we developed a genetically encoded bioluminescent Förster resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay using the luminescent donor Nanoluciferase and fluorescent acceptor mCherry. By tethering these proteins to the N-terminus of GLUT1 and performing saturation BRET analysis, we were able to demonstrate the formation of multimeric complexes in live cells. Parallel use of flow cytometry and immunoblotting further enabled us to estimate the density of GLUT1 proteins required for spontaneous oligomerization. These data provide new insights into the physiological relevance of GLUT1 multimerization as well as a new variant of BRET assay that is useful for measuring the interactions among other cell membrane proteins in live cells. PMID:27357903

  2. Evaluation of a microwave resonator for predicting grain moisture independent of bulk density

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This work evaluated the ability of a planar whispering mode resonator to predict moisture considering moisture and densities expected in an on-harvester application. A calibration model was developed to accurately predict moisture over the moisture, density and temperature ranges evaluated. This mod...

  3. Clinical evaluation of osseointegration using resonance frequency analysis

    PubMed Central

    Satwalekar, Parth; Nalla, Sandeep; Reddy, Ramaswamy; Chowdary, Sheeba Glory

    2015-01-01

    The stability of the implant at the time of placement and during the development of the osseointegration process are the two major issues governing the implant survival. Implant stability is a mechanical phenomenon related to local factors such as bone quality, quantity, type of placement technique and type of implant used. The application of a user-friendly, clinically reliable, non-invasive method to assess implant stability and the osseointegration process is considered highly desirable. Resonance frequency analysis (RFA) is one such method which shows almost perfect reproducibility and repeatability after statistical analysis. The aim of this paper is to review the various methods used to assess implant stability and on the currently used RFA method which is being highly accepted in the recent times. PMID:26929512

  4. Evaluation of plasma-based transmit coils for magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Webb, A G; Aussenhofer, S A

    2015-12-01

    In this work a new concept for designing transmit coils for magnetic resonance using a plasma is introduced. Unlike conventional coils, a plasma can be turned on and off, eliminating electrical interactions between coils, and enabling radiofrequency-invisibility when desired. A surfatron has been designed to produce a surface-mode wave which propagates along the inner surface of a commercial fluorescent lighting tube. NMR spectra and images have been produced using the plasma as the transmit coil and a copper-based monopole to receive the signal. The transmit efficiency of the plasma tube was estimated, and is currently much lower than that of an equivalently-sized metal-based structure: however, there are many potential methods for increasing the efficiency using a custom-built plasma tube. PMID:26529202

  5. Magnetic resonance evaluation of hydronephrosis in the dog

    SciTech Connect

    Thickman, D.; Kundel, H.; Biery, D.

    1984-07-01

    The ability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to detect and distinguish various stages of obstruction in the canine kidney was investigated. MR images were obtained at acute, subacute, and chronic stages of experimentally produced hydronephrosis. The renal cortex was distinguished from the renal medulla in the normal dog and in the acute and subacute stages of hydronephrosis. T1 relaxation times of the renal cortex and medulla were measured in vitro in 14 normal and nine experimental animals. These values were used to compute the amount of tissue contrast between the cortex and medulla and were compared with the degree of corticomedullary differentiation seen in the image. A relationship was noted between increasing T1 values and increasing water content. Corticomedullary contrast decreased with obstruction. The variation in corticomedullary image contracts may be useful for assessing the duration of hydronephrosis.

  6. Clinical evaluation of osseointegration using resonance frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Satwalekar, Parth; Nalla, Sandeep; Reddy, Ramaswamy; Chowdary, Sheeba Glory

    2015-01-01

    The stability of the implant at the time of placement and during the development of the osseointegration process are the two major issues governing the implant survival. Implant stability is a mechanical phenomenon related to local factors such as bone quality, quantity, type of placement technique and type of implant used. The application of a user-friendly, clinically reliable, non-invasive method to assess implant stability and the osseointegration process is considered highly desirable. Resonance frequency analysis (RFA) is one such method which shows almost perfect reproducibility and repeatability after statistical analysis. The aim of this paper is to review the various methods used to assess implant stability and on the currently used RFA method which is being highly accepted in the recent times. PMID:26929512

  7. Evaluation of Parameters for High Efficiency Transformation of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Suleyman; Thompson, Mitchell G.; Jacobs, Anna C.; Zurawski, Daniel V.; Kirkup, Benjamin C.

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging, nosocomial pathogen that is poorly characterized due to a paucity of genetic tools and methods. While whole genome sequence data from several epidemic and environmental strains have recently become available, the functional characterization of genes is significantly lagging. Efficient transformation is one of the first steps to develop molecular tools that can be used to address these shortcomings. Here we report parameters allowing high efficiency transformation of A. baumannii. Using a multi-factorial experimental design we found that growth phase, voltage, and resistance all significantly contribute to transformation efficiency. The highest efficiency (4.3 × 108 Transformants/μg DNA) was obtained at the stationary growth phase of the bacterium (OD 6.0) using 25 ng of plasmid DNA under 100 Ohms resistance and 1.7 kV/cm voltage. The optimized electroporation parameters reported here provide a useful tool for genetic manipulation of A. baumannii. PMID:26911658

  8. Anomalous solute transport in saturated porous media: Relating transport model parameters to electrical and nuclear magnetic resonance properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Ryan D.; Binley, Andrew; Keating, Kristina; France, Samantha; Osterman, Gordon; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Singha, Kamini

    2015-02-01

    The advection-dispersion equation (ADE) fails to describe commonly observed non-Fickian solute transport in saturated porous media, necessitating the use of other models such as the dual-domain mass-transfer (DDMT) model. DDMT model parameters are commonly calibrated via curve fitting, providing little insight into the relation between effective parameters and physical properties of the medium. There is a clear need for material characterization techniques that can provide insight into the geometry and connectedness of pore spaces related to transport model parameters. Here, we consider proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), direct-current (DC) resistivity, and complex conductivity (CC) measurements for this purpose, and assess these methods using glass beads as a control and two different samples of the zeolite clinoptilolite, a material that demonstrates non-Fickian transport due to intragranular porosity. We estimate DDMT parameters via calibration of a transport model to column-scale solute tracer tests, and compare NMR, DC resistivity, CC results, which reveal that grain size alone does not control transport properties and measured geophysical parameters; rather, volume and arrangement of the pore space play important roles. NMR cannot provide estimates of more-mobile and less-mobile pore volumes in the absence of tracer tests because these estimates depend critically on the selection of a material-dependent and flow-dependent cutoff time. Increased electrical connectedness from DC resistivity measurements are associated with greater mobile pore space determined from transport model calibration. CC was hypothesized to be related to length scales of mass transfer, but the CC response is unrelated to DDMT.

  9. Evaluation parameters for the alkaline fuel cell oxygen electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, J.; Srinivasan, V.

    1985-01-01

    Studies were made of Pt- and Au-catalyzed porous electrodes, designed for the cathode of the alkaline H2/O2 fuel cell, employing cyclic voltammetry and the floating half-cell method. The purpose was to obtain parameters from the cyclic voltammograms which could predict performance in the fuel cell. It was found that a satisfactory relationship between these two types of measurement could not be established; however, useful observations were made of relative performance of several types of carbon used as supports for noble metal catalysts and of some Au catalysts. The best half-cell performance with H2/O2 in a 35 percent KOH electrolyte at 80 C was given by unsupported fine particle Au on Teflon; this electrode is used in the Orbiter fuel cell.

  10. Evaluating System Parameters on a Dragonfly using Simulation and Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatele, Abhinav; Jain, Nikhil; Livnat, Yarden; Pascucci, Valerio; Bremer, Peer-Timo

    2015-04-24

    The dragon y topology is becoming a popular choice for build- ing high-radix, low-diameter networks with high-bandwidth links. Even with a powerful network, preliminary experi- ments on Edison at NERSC have shown that for communica- tion heavy applications, job interference and thus presumably job placement remains an important factor. In this paper, we explore the e ects of job placement, job sizes, parallel workloads and network con gurations on network through- put to better understand inter-job interference. We use a simulation tool called Damsel y to model the network be- havior of Edison and study the impact of various system parameters on network throughput. Parallel workloads based on ve representative communication patters are used and the simulation studies on up to 131,072 cores are aided by a new visualization of the dragon y network.

  11. /sup 187/Os + n resonance parameters in the interval 27-500 eV neutron energies

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, R.R.; Carlton, R.F.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.

    1982-01-01

    The neutron total cross section for /sup 187/Os, in the energy range, 27 eV to 500 eV, has been measured at the ORELA facility by the neutron time-of-flight technique, utilizing a 2.0 gm osmium sample (n = 0.008401 Os-nuclei/barn) enriched to 70.38% /sup 187/Os. Measurements were performed at a 80 m flight station with an energy resolution, ..delta..E/E, of 0.1% using a /sup 6/Li glass scintillator. Resolved resonances have been analyzed by a Reich-Moore multilevel code (SAMMY) to obtain parameters for 85 resonances up to 500 eV. Preliminary determinations of the level spacing (5 eV) and s-wave strength function (3.9 x 10/sup -4/) for /sup 187/Os are in agreement with recent analyses of the osmium isotopes, made in connection with the use of the Re/Os chronometer for estimating the duration of stellar nucleosynthesis.

  12. Relativistic effects in the intermolecular interaction-induced nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of xenon dimer.

    PubMed

    Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Ilias, Miroslav; Jensen, Hans Jorgen Aagaard; Vaara, Juha

    2007-10-28

    Relativistic effects on the (129)Xe nuclear magnetic resonance shielding and (131)Xe nuclear quadrupole coupling (NQC) tensors are examined in the weakly bound Xe(2) system at different levels of theory including the relativistic four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) method. The intermolecular interaction-induced binary chemical shift delta, the anisotropy of the shielding tensor Deltasigma, and the NQC constant along the internuclear axis chi( parallel) are calculated as a function of the internuclear distance. DHF shielding calculations are carried out using gauge-including atomic orbitals. For comparison, the full leading-order one-electron Breit-Pauli perturbation theory (BPPT) is applied using a common gauge origin. Electron correlation effects are studied at the nonrelativistic (NR) coupled-cluster singles and doubles with perturbational triples [CCSD(T)] level of theory. The fully relativistic second-order Moller-Plesset many-body perturbation (DMP2) theory is used to examine the cross coupling between correlation and relativity on NQC. The same is investigated for delta and Deltasigma by BPPT with a density functional theory model. A semiquantitative agreement between the BPPT and DHF binary property curves is obtained for delta and Deltasigma in Xe(2). For these properties, the currently most complete theoretical description is obtained by a piecewise approximation where the uncorrelated relativistic DHF results obtained close to the basis-set limit are corrected, on the one hand, for NR correlation effects and, on the other hand, for the BPPT-based cross coupling of relativity and correlation. For chi( parallel), the fully relativistic DMP2 results obtain a correction for NR correlation effects beyond MP2. The computed temperature dependence of the second virial coefficient of the (129)Xe nuclear shielding is compared to experiment in Xe gas. Our best results, obtained with the piecewise approximation for the binary chemical shift combined with the

  13. Preliminary resolved resonance region evaluation of copper-63 from 0 to 300 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Sobes, V.; Forget, B.; Leal, L.; Guber, K.

    2012-07-01

    A new preliminary evaluation of Cu-63 was done in the energy region from 0 to 300 keV extending the resolved resonance region of the previous, ENDF/B-VII.0, evaluation three-fold. The new evaluation was based on three experimental transmission data sets; two measured at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) and one from the Massachusetts Inst. of Technology Nuclear Reactor (MITR). A total of 275 new resonances were identified and a corresponding set of external resonances was approximated to mock up the external levels. The negative external levels (bound level) were modified to match the thermal cross section values. A preliminary benchmarking calculation was made using 11 ICSBEP benchmarks. This work is in support of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program. (authors)

  14. The far-infrared laser magnetic resonance spectrum of the SiH radical and determination of ground state parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. M.; Curl, R. F.; Evenson, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    The far-infrared laser magnetic resonance spectrum of the SiH radical in the v = O level of its X2Pi state has been recorded. The signals are rather weak. The molecules were generated in the reaction between fluorine atoms and SiH4. Rotational transitions have been detected in both 2Pi1/2 and 2Pi3/2 spin components but no fine structure transitions between the spin components were observed. Proton hyperfine splittings were resolved on some lines. The measurements have been analyzed, subjected to a least-squares fit using an effective Hamiltonian, and the appropriate molecular parameters determined. The weakness of the spectrum and the failure of attempts to power saturate favorable lines are both consistent with a small value for the electric dipole moment for SiH.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of rectal cancer: staging and restaging evaluation.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Courtney C; Sullivan, Patrick S; Kalb, Bobby T; Tipton, Russell G; Hanley, Krisztina Z; Kitajima, Hiroumi D; Dixon, W Thomas; Votaw, John R; Oshinski, John N; Mittal, Pardeep K

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is used to non-invasively stage and restage rectal adenocarcinomas. Accurate staging is important as the depth of tumor extension and the presence or absence of lymph node metastases determines if an individual will undergo preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Accurate description of tumor location is important for presurgical planning. The relationship of the tumor to the anal sphincter in addition to the depth of local invasion determines the surgical approach used for resection. High-resolution T2-weighted imaging is the primary sequence used for initial staging. The addition of diffusion-weighted imaging improves accuracy in the assessment of treatment response on restaging scans. Approximately 10%-30% of individuals will experience a complete pathologic response following chemoradiation with no residual viable tumor found in the resected specimen at histopathologic assessment. In some centers, individuals with no residual tumor visible on restaging MR who are thought to be at high operative risk are monitored with serial imaging and a "watch and wait" approach in lieu of resection. Normal rectal anatomy, MR technique utilized for staging and restaging scans, and TMN staging are reviewed. An overview of surgical techniques used for resection including newer, minimally invasive endoluminal techniques is included. PMID:25759246

  16. Noncontact nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy to evaluate creep damage in an austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, T.; Kusanagi, Y.; Ishii, Y.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we described an evaluating technique of creep damage in an austenitic stainless steel by the combination with an electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) and the nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (NRUS), which was a resonance-based technique exploiting the significant nonlinear behavior of damaged materials. In NRUS, the resonant frequency of an object is studied as a function of the excitation level. As the excitation level increases, the elastic nonlinearity was manifest by a shift in the resonance frequency. The nonlinearity with NRUS showed a peak at 50 % and a minimum at 70 % of the total creep life. This nonlinearity measurement has a potential to assess creep damage advance and predict the creep remaining life of metals.

  17. Resolution of the multichannel anomaly in the extraction of S-matrix resonance-pole parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Ceci, Sasa; Stahov, Jugoslav; Svarc, Alfred; Zauner, Branimir; Watson, Shon

    2008-06-01

    Within the framework of a mathematically well-defined coupled-channel T-matrix model we have improved the existing multichannel pole-extraction procedure based on the numerical analytic continuation of the channel propagator, and for the first time we present the full set of pole parameters for already published amplitudes. Standard single-channel pole-extraction method (speed plot) was then applied to those amplitudes and resulting sets of T-matrix poles were inspected. The anomaly has been established that in some partial waves the pole values extracted using the standard single-channel methods differ not only from the values obtained using the analytic continuation method, but also change from one reaction to another. Inspired by this peculiarity, we have developed a new single-channel pole-extraction method based solely on the assumption of the partial wave analyticity. Since the speed plot turns out to be the lowest order term of the proposed method, the anomaly is understood and resolved.

  18. Tabletop magnetic resonance elastography for the measurement of viscoelastic parameters of small tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipek-Ugay, Selcan; Drießle, Toni; Ledwig, Michael; Guo, Jing; Hirsch, Sebastian; Sack, Ingolf; Braun, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of low-cost tabletop MR elastography (MRE) for quantifying the complex shear modulus G∗ of small soft biological tissue samples as provided by pathologists. The MRE system was developed based on a tabletop MRI scanner equipped with a 0.5 T permanent magnet and a tissue sample holder mounted to a loudspeaker. A spin echo sequence was enhanced with motion-encoding gradients of 250 mT/m amplitude synchronized to acoustic vibration frequencies. Shear wave images suitable for elastography were acquired between vibration frequencies of 0.5 and 1 kHz in agarose, ultrasound gel, porcine liver, porcine skeletal muscle, and bovine heart with a spatial resolution of 234 μm pixel edge length. The measured frequency dependence of G∗ agreed well with previous work based on high-field MR systems. The ratio between loss and storage moduli was highest in liver and ultrasound gel, followed by muscle tissue and agarose gel while ultrasound gel and liver showed similarly low storage moduli compared to the other samples. The shear wave to noise ratio is an important imaging criteria for MRE and was about 4.2 times lower for the preliminary setup of the 0.5 T tabletop system compared to a 7 T animal scanner. In the future, the new tabletop MRE system may serve as a low cost device for preclinical research on the correlation of viscoelastic parameters with histopathology of biological samples.

  19. Tabletop magnetic resonance elastography for the measurement of viscoelastic parameters of small tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Ipek-Ugay, Selcan; Drießle, Toni; Ledwig, Michael; Guo, Jing; Hirsch, Sebastian; Sack, Ingolf; Braun, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of low-cost tabletop MR elastography (MRE) for quantifying the complex shear modulus G(∗) of small soft biological tissue samples as provided by pathologists. The MRE system was developed based on a tabletop MRI scanner equipped with a 0.5 T permanent magnet and a tissue sample holder mounted to a loudspeaker. A spin echo sequence was enhanced with motion-encoding gradients of 250 mT/m amplitude synchronized to acoustic vibration frequencies. Shear wave images suitable for elastography were acquired between vibration frequencies of 0.5 and 1 kHz in agarose, ultrasound gel, porcine liver, porcine skeletal muscle, and bovine heart with a spatial resolution of 234 μm pixel edge length. The measured frequency dependence of G(∗) agreed well with previous work based on high-field MR systems. The ratio between loss and storage moduli was highest in liver and ultrasound gel, followed by muscle tissue and agarose gel while ultrasound gel and liver showed similarly low storage moduli compared to the other samples. The shear wave to noise ratio is an important imaging criteria for MRE and was about 4.2 times lower for the preliminary setup of the 0.5 T tabletop system compared to a 7 T animal scanner. In the future, the new tabletop MRE system may serve as a low cost device for preclinical research on the correlation of viscoelastic parameters with histopathology of biological samples. PMID:25554945

  20. Evaluation of Experimental Concepts Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snehota, M.; Cislerova, M.; Gao Amin, M. H.; Hall, L. D.

    2003-04-01

    Laboratory experiments on undisturbed soil cores are an invaluable source of information in the field of soil hydraulics. Good definition of the flow domain and freedom in selection of boundary conditions are the major advantages. In the current study the infiltration-outflow experiments were continuously scanned by the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The experimental concept was based on the vertical downward flow through an undisturbed soil core [Snehota et al., 2002]. The constant pressure was applied at the top surface of the sample by a customized infiltration disc. The tension infiltrations are arranged using the NYBOLT membrane attached. For small positive pressure head (ponded infiltration) the same disc was used with few modifications. At the bottom, the support perforated plate is considered as a seepage face boundary condition. Inflow, outflow and important pressures were recorded by the data acquisition system. Three soil cores of coarse sandy loam soil (Korkusova Hut, Czech Republic) were studied. The set of experiments was performed in the whole-body MR unit. The imaging involved the low-resolution vertical 2D projection of rapid changes during transient parts of an experiment. Horizontal 2D imaging was performed across the whole sample volume during the steady state and the equilibrium stages. MR properties of studied soil allow visualizing water in large pores. Due to high heterogeneity of the soil under study the preferential flow prevails close to saturation. Similar patterns came out from dye tracer experiment. As the result, the MR images were obtained together with the hydraulic and mass balance measurements. In analyzed experiments, the MR signal distribution changes appeared to be higher in the upper part of the sample, as the result of the change in the upper boundary condition. Flow through the bottom of the sample seemed to be restricted by the hydraulics of the support plate. Based on MR imaging analyses modifications at the bottom

  1. Evaluation of oxidative and antioxidative parameters in generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Emhan, Ali; Selek, Salih; Bayazıt, Hüseyin; Fatih Karababa, İbrahim; Katı, Mahmut; Aksoy, Nurten

    2015-12-30

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a prevalent psychiatric disorder. The exact causes of GAD still unknown, in addition to neurochemical and neuroanatomic disorders, genetic and environmental factors are discussed in etiology. In our study we aimed to evaluate the oxidative metabolism's status and investigate the role of oxidative metabolites in GAD. Blood samples were taken from enrolled subjects in appropriate way and total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), and oxidative stress index (OSI) were studied in Harran University Biochemistry Labs. Results were compared between groups. The patients' TOS and OSI levels were significantly higher than control group. The patients' TAS levels were significantly lower than controls'. According to our findings, oxidative stress mechanism might have a role in GAD pathophysiology. In the future, total antioxidants may be used as a biologic marker in GAD etiology but more research is needed. PMID:26564548

  2. Optimization of Regularization Parameters in Compressed Sensing of Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Can Statistical Image Metrics Mimic Radiologists' Perception?

    PubMed Central

    Akasaka, Thai; Fujimoto, Koji; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Okada, Tomohisa; Fushumi, Yasutaka; Yamamoto, Akira; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Togashi, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    In Compressed Sensing (CS) of MRI, optimization of the regularization parameters is not a trivial task. We aimed to establish a method that could determine the optimal weights for regularization parameters in CS of time-of-flight MR angiography (TOF-MRA) by comparing various image metrics with radiologists’ visual evaluation. TOF-MRA of a healthy volunteer was scanned using a 3T-MR system. Images were reconstructed by CS from retrospectively under-sampled data by varying the weights for the L1 norm of wavelet coefficients and that of total variation. The reconstructed images were evaluated both quantitatively by statistical image metrics including structural similarity (SSIM), scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and qualitatively by radiologists’ scoring. The results of quantitative metrics and qualitative scorings were compared. SSIM and SIFT in conjunction with brain masks and CNR of artery-to-parenchyma correlated very well with radiologists’ visual evaluation. By carefully selecting a region to measure, we have shown that statistical image metrics can reflect radiologists’ visual evaluation, thus enabling an appropriate optimization of regularization parameters for CS. PMID:26744843

  3. Key Parameters Evaluation for Hip Prosthesis with Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongqiang; Li, Dichen; Lian, Qin; Li, Xiang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2007-09-01

    Stem length and cross section are two key parameters that influence the stability and longevity of metallic hip prosthesis in the total hip arthroplasty (THA). In order to assess their influence to the stress and fatigue behavior of hip prosthesis, a series model of hip prosthesis with round-shaped or drum-shaped cross section, and with different stem lengths were created. These models were analyzed under both static and dynamic loading conditions with finite element analysis, and dynamic loading represents normal walking was used in the dynamic analysis. The stress on the metallic stem, cement, and adjacent bone were got, micromotion on the cement-metal interface were got too. Safety factors for fatigue life of the hip prothesis were calculated based on data obtained from dynamic analysis. Static analysis shows that drum-shaped cross section can decrease the displacement of the stem, that stress on drum-shaped stem focus on the corner of the femoral neck and the distal part of hip prosthesis, whereas the stress on the round-shaped stem distributes evenly over most part of the stem, and maximum stress on stem prosthesis fluctuates with stem length bottoming out at stem length range from 80 mm to 110 mm, that drum-shaped stems with drum height 8 mm generate more stress at the distal part of stem than drum-shaped stems with drum height 10 mm and round stems do. Dynamic and fatigue analysis shows that drum-shaped stem with drum height 10 mm and stem length 90 mm has the greatest safety factor therefore long fatigue life.

  4. Evaluation of Anthropometric and Metabolic Parameters in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Yaşar; Yilmaz, Süreyya; Güven, Mehmet; Kılınç, Faruk; Kara, Ali Veysel; Yilmaz, Zülfükar; Kırbaş, Gökhan; Tuzcu, Alpaslan Kemal; Yılmaz Aydın, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Sleep disorders have recently become a significant public health problem worldwide and have deleterious health consequences. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common type of sleep-related breathing disorders. We aimed to evaluate anthropometric measurements, glucose metabolism, and cortisol levels in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Materials and Methods. A total of 50 patients with a body mass index ≥30 and major OSA symptoms were included in this study. Anthropometric measurements of the patients were recorded and blood samples were drawn for laboratory analysis. A 24-hour urine sample was also collected from each subject for measurement of 24-hour cortisol excretion. Patients were divided equally into 2 groups according to polysomnography results: control group with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) <5 (n = 25) and OSA group with an AHI ≥5 (n = 25). Results. Neck and waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, late-night serum cortisol, morning serum cortisol after 1 mg dexamethasone suppression test, and 24-hour urinary cortisol levels were significantly higher in OSA patients compared to control subjects. Newly diagnosed DM was more frequent in patients with OSA than control subjects (32% versus 8%, p = 0.034). There was a significant positive correlation between AHI and neck circumference, glucose, and late-night serum cortisol. Conclusions. Our study indicates that increased waist and neck circumferences constitute a risk for OSA regardless of obesity status. In addition, OSA has adverse effects on endocrine function and glucose metabolism. PMID:26257957

  5. Quantifying Uranium Isotope Ratios Using Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry: The Influence of Laser Parameters on Relative Ionization Probability

    SciTech Connect

    Isselhardt, Brett H.

    2011-09-01

    Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) has been developed as a method to measure relative uranium isotope abundances. In this approach, RIMS is used as an element-selective ionization process to provide a distinction between uranium atoms and potential isobars without the aid of chemical purification and separation. We explore the laser parameters critical to the ionization process and their effects on the measured isotope ratio. Specifically, the use of broad bandwidth lasers with automated feedback control of wavelength was applied to the measurement of 235U/238U ratios to decrease laser-induced isotopic fractionation. By broadening the bandwidth of the first laser in a 3-color, 3-photon ionization process from a bandwidth of 1.8 GHz to about 10 GHz, the variation in sequential relative isotope abundance measurements decreased from >10% to less than 0.5%. This procedure was demonstrated for the direct interrogation of uranium oxide targets with essentially no sample preparation. A rate equation model for predicting the relative ionization probability has been developed to study the effect of variation in laser parameters on the measured isotope ratio. This work demonstrates that RIMS can be used for the robust measurement of uranium isotope ratios.

  6. Evaluation of acetabular cup initial fixation by using resonance frequency principle.

    PubMed

    Henys, Petr; Capek, Lukas; Fencl, Jaroslav; Prochazka, Egon

    2015-01-01

    The clinical practice shows that the loosening of acetabular cups is more frequent than stem loosening. With standard cups, the incidence of dislocation failure is highest in the first year after arthroplasty implantation. The aim of the study was to quantitatively evaluate the implant-bone stability of a cementless acetabular cup prosthesis by using a device based on resonance frequency analysis. The evaluation of this device was done by finite element analysis and in vitro experiments. It was shown that not all the resonance frequencies can be measured by our device. The resonance frequencies vary within the range of 500-3000 Hz. The proposed power spectrum measurement gives the information about the absolute stiffness of the press-fit implant. PMID:25655952

  7. Evaluation of brain edema using magnetic resonance proton relaxation times

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Nishimura, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Experimental and clinical studies on the evaluation of water content in cases of brain edema were performed in vivo, using MR proton relaxation times (longitudinal relaxation time, T1; transverse relaxation time, T2). Brain edema was produced in the white matter of cats by the direct infusion method. The correlations between proton relaxation times obtained from MR images and the water content of white matter were studied both in autoserum-infused cats and in saline-infused cats. The correlations between T1 as well as T2 and the water content in human vasogenic brain edema were also examined and compared with the data obtained from the serum group. T1 and T2 showed good correlations with the water content of white matter not only in the experimental animals but also in the clinical cases. The quality of the edema fluid did not influence relaxation time and T1 seemed to represent almost solely the water content of the tissue. T2, however, was affected by the nature of existence of water and was more sensitive than T1 in detecting extravasated edema fluid. It seems feasible therefore to evaluate the water content of brain edema on the basis of T1 values.

  8. The Evaluation of Empirical Resonance Energies as Reaction Enthalpies with Particular Reference to Benzene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Philip; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of experimental resonance energy, explaining how its magnitude depends upon choice of reference molecules from which bond energies are derived. Also explains how it can be evaluated more simply, without recourse to bond energies, as enthalpy change for a reaction predetermined by choice of reference molecules. (JN)

  9. [Optimal imaging parameters and the advantage of cerebrospinal fluid flow image using time-spatial labeling inversion pulse at 3 tesla magnetic resonance imaging: comparison of image quality for 1.5 tesla magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Ozasa, Masaya; Yahata, Seiji; Yoshida, Ayako; Takeyama, Mamoru; Eshima, Mitsuhiro; Shinohara, Maiko; Yamamoto, Takao; Abe, Kayoko

    2014-12-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) imaging by time-spatial labeling inversion pulse (Time-SLIP) technique is labeled by CSF with a selective inversion recovery (IR) pulse as internal tracer, thus making it possible to visualize CSF dynamics non-invasively. The purpose of this study was to clarify labeled CSF signals during various black blood time to inversion (BBTI) values at 3 tesla (T) and 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to determine appropriate CSF imaging parameters at 3 T MRI in 10 healthy volunteers. To calculate optimal BBTI values, ROIs were set in untagged cerebral parenchyma and CSF on the image of the CSF flow from the aqueduct to the fourth ventricle in 1.5 T and 3 T MRI. Visual evaluation of CSF flow also was assessed with changes of matrix and echo time (TE) at 3 T MRI. The mean BBTI value at null point of untagged CSF in 3 T MRI was longer than that of 1.5 T. The MR conditions of the highest visual evaluation were FOV, 14 cm×14 cm; Matrix, 192×192; and TE, 117 ms. CSF imaging using Time-SLIP at 3 T MRI is expected visualization of CSF flow and clarification of CSF dynamics in more detail by setting the optimal conditions because 3 T MRI has the advantage of high contrast and high signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:25672449

  10. Nondestructive evaluation of explosively welded clad rods by resonance acoustic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Y; Tysoe, B; Sim, J; Mirkhani, K; Sinclair, A N; Honarvar, F; Sildva, Harry; Szecket, Alexander; Hardwick, Roy

    2003-07-01

    A resonance acoustic spectroscopy technique is assessed for nondestructive evaluation of explosively welded clad rods. Each rod is modeled as a two-layered cylinder with a spring-mass system to represent a thin interfacial layer containing the weld. A range of interfacial profiles is generated in a set of experimental samples by varying the speed of the explosion that drives the copper cladding into the aluminum core. Excellent agreement is achieved between measured and calculated values of the resonant frequencies of the system, through appropriate adjustment of the interfacial mass and spring constants used in the wave scattering calculations. Destructive analysis of the interface in the experimental specimens confirms that key features of the interfacial profile may be inferred from resonance acoustic spectroscopy analysis applied to ultrasonic measurements. PMID:12788219

  11. A COMPUTATIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR EVALUATION OF NPS MANAGEMENT SCENARIOS: ROLE OF PARAMETER UNCERTAINTY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Utility of complex distributed-parameter watershed models for evaluation of the effectiveness of non-point source sediment and nutrient abatement scenarios such as Best Management Practices (BMPs) often follows the traditional {calibrate ---> validate ---> predict} procedure. Des...

  12. BUILDING MODEL ANALYSIS APPLICATIONS WITH THE JOINT UNIVERSAL PARAMETER IDENTIFICATION AND EVALUATION OF RELIABILITY (JUPITER) API

    EPA Science Inventory

    The open-source, public domain JUPITER (Joint Universal Parameter IdenTification and Evaluation of Reliability) API (Application Programming Interface) provides conventions and Fortran-90 modules to develop applications (computer programs) for analyzing process models. The input ...

  13. Infrared and far-infrared laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the GeH radical - Determination of ground state parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. M.; Evenson, K. M.; Sears, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    The GeH radical has been detected in its ground 2 Pi state in the gas phase reaction of fluorine atoms with GeH4 by laser magnetic resonance techniques. Rotational transitions within both 2 Pi 1/2 and 2 Pi 3/2 manifolds have been observed at far-infrared wavelengths and rotational transitions between the two fine structure components have been detected at infrared wavelengths (10 microns). Signals have been observed for all five naturally occurring isotopes of germanium. Nuclear hyperfine structure for H-1 and Ge-73 has also been observed. The data for the dominant isotope (/Ge-74/H) have been fitted to within experimental error by an effective Hamiltonian to give a set of molecular parameters for the X 2 Pi state which is very nearly complete. In addition, the dipole moment of GeH in its ground state has been estimated from the relative intensities of electric and magnetic dipole transitions in the 10 micron spectrum to be 1.24(+ or - 0.10) D.

  14. TI-205 nuclear magnetic resonance determination of the thermodynamic parameters for the binding of monovalent cations to gramicidins A and C.

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, J F; Fernandez, J Q; Shungu, D C; Whaley, W L; Koeppe, R E; Millett, F S

    1988-01-01

    Thermodynamic parameters for the binding of the monovalent cations, Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+, NH4+, TI+, and Ag+, to gramicidin A and for the binding of TI+ to gramicidin C, incorporated into lysophosphatidylcholine, have been determined using a combination of TI-205 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and competition binding. The thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy and entropy, are discussed in terms of a process involving the transfer of cations from an aqueous to amide environment. PMID:2462930

  15. Modeling of Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy Based Nondestructive Evaluation Using the "XYZ-Algorithm"

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Salahuddin; Bond, Leonard J.

    2007-05-03

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) is employed as a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tool in a number of metal/ceramic forming industries [1]. The presence of volumetric defects in an otherwise flaw-free object affects the resonance characteristics of the object. The changes in resonance behavior depend on the number, locations, volume, and material properties of the defects. Since the normal modes of an object depend on its geometry and the position-dependent material properties, namely the density and the complex elastic stiffness tensor, by accurate measurement of a specimen’s resonance frequencies and amplitudes, one can detect and characterize flaws embedded within it. A correct forward mathematical model to predict resonance characteristics is vital to the required analyses. In this paper, we present several computational results depicting the influence of the presence of embedded flaws/defects in a test specimen having simple geometrical shape. The mathematical model is based on the computationally efficient “XYZ Algorithm” of Visscher et al.

  16. Resonance wood [Picea abies (L.) Karst.]--evaluation and prediction of violin makers' quality-grading.

    PubMed

    Buksnowitz, Christoph; Teischinger, Alfred; Müller, Ulrich; Pahler, Andreas; Evans, Robert

    2007-04-01

    The definition of quality in the field of resonance wood for musical instrument making has attracted considerable interest over decades but has remained incomplete. The current work compares the traditional knowledge and practical experience of violin makers with a material-science approach to objectively characterize the properties of resonance wood. Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] has earned a very high reputation for the construction of resonance tops of stringed instruments and resonance boards of keyboard instruments, and was therefore chosen as the focus of the investigation. The samples were obtained from numerous renowned resonance wood regions in the European Alps and cover the whole range of available qualities. A set of acoustical, anatomical, mechanical and optical material properties was measured on each sample. These measurements were compared with subjective quality grading by violin makers, who estimated the acoustical, optical and overall suitability for violin making. Multiple linear regression models were applied to evaluate the predictability of the subjective grading using the measured material characteristics as predictors. The results show that luthiers are able to estimate wood quality related to visible features, but predictions of mechanical and acoustical properties proved to be very poor. PMID:17471750

  17. Evaluation of silicon tuning fork resonators under mechanical loads and space-relevant radiation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandi, Tobias; Baborowski, Jacek; Dommann, Alex; Shea, Herbert R.; Cardot, Francis; Neels, Antonia

    2014-10-01

    This work reports on mechanical tests and irradiations made on silicon bulk-acoustic wave resonators. The resonators were based on a tuning fork geometry and actuated by a piezoelectric aluminum nitride layer. They had a resonance frequency of 150 kHz and a quality factor of about 20,000 under vacuum. The susceptibility of the devices to radiation-induced degradation was investigated using Co60 γ-rays and 50 MeV protons with space-relevant doses of up to 170 krad. The performance of the devices after irradiation indicated a high tolerance to both ionizing damage and displacement damage effects. In addition, the device characteristics were evaluated after mechanical shock and vibration tests and only small effects on the devices were observed. In all experiments, no significant changes of the resonance characteristics were observed within the experimental uncertainty, which was below 100 ppm for the resonance frequency. The results support the efforts toward design and fabrication of highly reliable MEMS devices for space applications.

  18. Criteria for first- and second-order vibrational resonances and correct evaluation of the Darling-Dennison resonance coefficients using the canonical Van Vleck perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnoshchekov, Sergey V.; Isayeva, Elena V.; Stepanov, Nikolay F.

    2014-12-21

    The second-order vibrational Hamiltonian of a semi-rigid polyatomic molecule when resonances are present can be reduced to a quasi-diagonal form using second-order vibrational perturbation theory. Obtaining exact vibrational energy levels requires subsequent numerical diagonalization of the Hamiltonian matrix including the first- and second-order resonance coupling coefficients. While the first-order Fermi resonance constants can be easily calculated, the evaluation of the second-order Darling-Dennison constants requires more complicated algebra for seven individual cases with different numbers of creation-annihilation vibrational quanta. The difficulty in precise evaluation of the Darling-Dennison coefficients is associated with the previously unrecognized interference with simultaneously present Fermi resonances that affect the form of the canonically transformed Hamiltonian. For the first time, we have presented the correct form of the general expression for the evaluation of the Darling-Dennison constants that accounts for the underlying effect of Fermi resonances. The physically meaningful criteria for selecting both Fermi and Darling-Dennison resonances are discussed and illustrated using numerical examples.

  19. Improved Estimation of Cardiac Function Parameters Using a Combination of Independent Automated Segmentation Results in Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lebenberg, Jessica; Lalande, Alain; Clarysse, Patrick; Buvat, Irene; Casta, Christopher; Cochet, Alexandre; Constantinidès, Constantin; Cousty, Jean; de Cesare, Alain; Jehan-Besson, Stephanie; Lefort, Muriel; Najman, Laurent; Roullot, Elodie; Sarry, Laurent; Tilmant, Christophe; Frouin, Frederique; Garreau, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed at combining different segmentation approaches to produce a robust and accurate segmentation result. Three to five segmentation results of the left ventricle were combined using the STAPLE algorithm and the reliability of the resulting segmentation was evaluated in comparison with the result of each individual segmentation method. This comparison was performed using a supervised approach based on a reference method. Then, we used an unsupervised statistical evaluation, the extended Regression Without Truth (eRWT) that ranks different methods according to their accuracy in estimating a specific biomarker in a population. The segmentation accuracy was evaluated by estimating six cardiac function parameters resulting from the left ventricle contour delineation using a public cardiac cine MRI database. Eight different segmentation methods, including three expert delineations and five automated methods, were considered, and sixteen combinations of the automated methods using STAPLE were investigated. The supervised and unsupervised evaluations demonstrated that in most cases, STAPLE results provided better estimates than individual automated segmentation methods. Overall, combining different automated segmentation methods improved the reliability of the segmentation result compared to that obtained using an individual method and could achieve the accuracy of an expert. PMID:26287691

  20. Update on Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Ultrasound Evaluation of Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Deepak, Parakkal; Kolbe, Amy B; Fidler, Jeff L; Fletcher, Joel G; Knudsen, John M; Bruining, David H

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) and abdominal ultrasound are integral parts of multimodality assessments for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Applications include assessing Crohn's disease (CD) extent and severity, differentiating CD from ulcerative colitis, detecting CD complications, evaluating response to therapy, and demonstrating postoperative recurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging protocols are being developed that may reduce or eliminate the need for intravenous contrast agents and better differentiate inflammatory from fibrotic strictures. MRE scoring systems have been created to objectively quantify disease activity and response to therapy. By utilizing advanced sonographic imaging techniques, including ultrasound contrast and Doppler assessments, the role of abdominal ultrasonography in the evaluation and management of CD continues to expand. Abdominal ultrasound may function as a low-cost, point-of care assessment tool, especially in CD restricted to the terminal ileum and ileocolic anastomosis. PMID:27231453

  1. Efficiency modeling and evaluation of a resonant snubber based soft- switching inverter for motor drive applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, J.S.; Young, R.W.; Ott, G.W.

    1995-12-31

    This paper establishes an analytical model for a resonant snubber based soft-switching inverter. The model adopts loss separation method to evaluate losses in individual components. Because of symmetry of the inverter circuit, the developed model is suitable for both single-phase and three-phase inverters. A single-phase inverter was built and tested with a single-phase induction motor driving a fan load to verify the developed model. The equivalent single-phase induction motor model was curve-fitted from experiment. Analytical results showed reasonable agreement with experiment. The same efficiency evaluation method was then applied to the conventional hard-switching inverter, and the results were compared with that of the soft-switching inverter. The resonant snubber base soft-switching inverter shows substantial efficiency improvement over the hard switching PWM (pulse-width-modulation) inverter, especially in low speed operation.

  2. Update on Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Ultrasound Evaluation of Crohn’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Deepak, Parakkal; Kolbe, Amy B.; Fidler, Jeff L.; Fletcher, Joel G.; Knudsen, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) and abdominal ultrasound are integral parts of multimodality assessments for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Applications include assessing Crohn’s disease (CD) extent and severity, differentiating CD from ulcerative colitis, detecting CD complications, evaluating response to therapy, and demonstrating postoperative recurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging protocols are being developed that may reduce or eliminate the need for intravenous contrast agents and better differentiate inflammatory from fibrotic strictures. MRE scoring systems have been created to objectively quantify disease activity and response to therapy. By utilizing advanced sonographic imaging techniques, including ultrasound contrast and Doppler assessments, the role of abdominal ultrasonography in the evaluation and management of CD continues to expand. Abdominal ultrasound may function as a low-cost, point-of care assessment tool, especially in CD restricted to the terminal ileum and ileocolic anastomosis. PMID:27231453

  3. Plasma drifts deduced from resonance cone asymmetries: II. Evaluation of COREX data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piel, A.; Rohde, V.; Thiemann, H.; Oyama, K. I.

    The data from the COREX instrument are discussed with respect to non-reciprocities in resonance cones for opposing wave propagation directions. The shift of the maxima has a different symmetry from the case of field aligned drifts. Using a generalized drift model the magnitude and direction of the drift is evaluated. Velocities of the order of up to 38 km/s are found. The drift direction is nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field.

  4. Magnetic resonance cholangiographic evaluation of intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile duct variations

    PubMed Central

    Sureka, Binit; Bansal, Kalpana; Patidar, Yashwant; Arora, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    Biliary anatomy and its common and uncommon variations are of considerable clinical significance when performing living donor transplantation, radiological interventions in hepatobiliary system, laparoscopic cholecystectomy, and liver resection (hepatectomy, segmentectomy). Because of increasing trend found in the number of liver transplant surgeries being performed, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) has become the modality of choice for noninvasive evaluation of abnormalities of the biliary tract. The purpose of this study is to describe the anatomic variations of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic biliary tree. PMID:27081220

  5. Acute Cardiac Impairment Associated With Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer: Magnetic Resonance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hatakenaka, Masamitsu; Yonezawa, Masato; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nagao, Michinobu; Matsuo, Yoshio; Kamitani, Takeshi; Higo, Taiki; Nishikawa, Kei; Setoguchi, Taro; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate acute cardiac effects of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained from all participants. The left ventricular function (LVF) of 31 patients with esophageal cancer who received cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil-based CCRT was evaluated using cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging. The patients were classified into two groups according to mean LV dose. The parameters related to LVF were compared between before and during (40 Gy) or between before and after CCRT using a Wilcoxon matched-pairs single rank test, and parameter ratios (during/before CCRT, after/before CCRT) were also compared between the groups with a t test. Data were expressed as mean {+-} SE. Results: In the low LV-dose group (n = 10; mean LV dose <0.6 Gy), LV ejection fraction decreased significantly (before vs. during vs. after CCRT; 62.7% {+-} 2.98% vs. 59.8% {+-} 2.56% vs. 60.6% {+-} 3.89%; p < 0.05). In the high LV-dose group (n = 21; mean LV dose of 3.6-41.2 Gy), LV end-diastolic volume index (before vs. after CCRT; 69.1 {+-} 2.93 vs. 57.0 {+-} 3.23 mL/m{sup 2}), LV stroke volume index (38.6 {+-} 1.56 vs. 29.9 {+-} 1.60 mL/m{sup 2}), and LV ejection fraction (56.9% {+-} 1.79% vs. 52.8% {+-} 1.15%) decreased significantly (p < 0.05) after CCRT. Heart rate increased significantly (before vs. during vs. after CCRT; 66.8 {+-} 3.05 vs. 72.4 {+-} 4.04 vs. 85.4 {+-} 3.75 beats per minute, p < 0.01). Left ventricle wall motion decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in segments 8 (before vs. during vs. after CCRT; 6.64 {+-} 0.54 vs. 4.78 {+-} 0.43 vs. 4.79 {+-} 0.50 mm), 9 (6.88 {+-} 0.45 vs. 5.04 {+-} 0.38 vs. 5.27 {+-} 0.47 mm), and 10 (9.22 {+-} 0.48 vs. 8.08 {+-} 0.34 vs. 8.19 {+-} 0.56 mm). The parameter ratios of LV end-diastolic volume index, stroke volume index, wall motion in segment 9, and heart rate showed significant difference

  6. Profiles of ion beams and plasma parameters on a multi-frequencies microwaves large bore electron cyclotron resonance ion source with permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yushi; Sakamoto, Naoki; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2012-02-15

    In order to contribute to various applications of plasma and beams based on an electron cyclotron resonance, a new concept on magnetic field with all magnets on plasma production and confinement has been proposed with enhanced efficiency for broad and dense ion beam. The magnetic field configuration consists of a pair of comb-shaped magnet surrounding plasma chamber cylindrically. Resonance zones corresponding for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz frequencies are positioned at spatially different positions. We launch simultaneously multiplex frequencies microwaves operated individually, try to control profiles of the plasma parameters and the extracted ion beams, and to measure them in detail.

  7. Design and evaluation of a 1.1-GHz surface coil resonator for electron paramagnetic resonance-based tooth dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Hirotaka; Hirata, Hiroshi; Petryakov, Sergey; Lesniewski, Piotr; Williams, Benjamin B; Flood, Ann Barry; Swartz, Harold M

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes an optimized design of a surface coil resonator for in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-based tooth dosimetry. Using the optimized resonator, dose estimates with the standard error of the mean of approximately 0.5 Gy were achieved with irradiated human teeth. The product of the quality factor and the filling factor of the resonator was computed as an index of relative signal intensity in EPR tooth dosimetry by the use of 3-D electromagnetic wave simulator and radio frequency circuit design environment (ANSYS HFSS and Designer). To verify the simulated results of the signal intensity in our numerical model of the resonator and a tooth sample, we experimentally measured the radiation-induced signals from an irradiated tooth with an optimally designed resonator. In addition to the optimization of the resonator design, we demonstrated the improvement of the stability of EPR spectra by decontamination of the surface coil resonator using an HCl solution, confirming that contamination of small magnetic particles on the silver wire of the surface coil had degraded the stability of the EPR spectral baseline. PMID:24845300

  8. Evaluation of kinetic constants of biomolecular interaction on optical surface plasmon resonance sensor with Newton Iteration Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Guoliang; Hu, Jiandong; Hu, Fengjiang; Wei, Jianguang; Shi, Liang

    2010-10-01

    In the immunology, there are two important types of biomolecular interaction: antigens-antibodies and receptors-ligands. Monitoring the response rate and affinity of biomolecular interaction can help analyze the protein function, drug discover, genomics and proteomics research. Moreover the association rate constant and dissociation rate constant of receptors-ligands are the important parameters for the study of signal transmission between cells. Recent advances in bioanalyzer instruments have greatly simplified the measurement of the kinetics of molecular interactions. Non-destructive and real-time monitoring the response to evaluate the parameters between antigens and antibodies can be performed by using optical surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor technology. This technology provides a quantitative analysis that is carried out rapidly with label-free high-throughput detection using the binding curves of antigens-antibodies. Consequently, the kinetic parameters of interaction between antigens and antibodies can be obtained. This article presents a low cost integrated SPR-based bioanalyzer (HPSPR-6000) designed by ourselves. This bioanalyzer is mainly composed of a biosensor TSPR1K23, a touch-screen monitor, a microprocessor PIC24F128, a microflow cell with three channels, a clamp and a photoelectric conversion device. To obtain the kinetic parameters, sensorgrams may be modeled using one of several binding models provided with BIAevaluation software 3.0, SensiQ or Autolab. This allows calculation of the association rate constant (ka) and the dissociation rate constant (kd). The ratio of ka to kd can be used to estimate the equilibrium constant. Another kind is the analysis software OriginPro, which can process the obtained data by nonlinear fitting and then get some correlative parameters, but it can't be embedded into the bioanalyzer, so the bioanalyzer don't support the use of OriginPro. This paper proposes a novel method to evaluate the kinetic parameters

  9. Improved Quantification of Cerebral Hemodynamics Using Individualized Time Thresholds for Assessment of Peak Enhancement Parameters Derived from Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nasel, Christian; Kalcher, Klaudius; Boubela, Roland; Moser, Ewald

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Assessment of cerebral ischemia often employs dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with evaluation of various peak enhancement time parameters. All of these parameters use a single time threshold to judge the maximum tolerable peak enhancement delay that is supposed to reliably differentiate sufficient from critical perfusion. As the validity of this single threshold approach still remains unclear, in this study, (1) the definition of a threshold on an individual patient-basis, nevertheless (2) preserving the comparability of the data, was investigated. Methods The histogram of time-to-peak (TTP) values derived from DSC-MRI, the so-called TTP-distribution curve (TDC), was modeled using a double-Gaussian model in 61 patients without severe cerebrovascular disease. Particular model-based zf-scores were used to describe the arterial, parenchymal and venous bolus-transit phase as time intervals Ia,p,v. Their durations (delta Ia,p,v), were then considered as maximum TTP-delays of each phase. Results Mean-R2 for the model-fit was 0.967. Based on the generic zf-scores the proposed bolus transit phases could be differentiated. The Ip-interval reliably depicted the parenchymal bolus-transit phase with durations of 3.4 s–10.1 s (median = 4.3s), where an increase with age was noted (∼30 ms/year). Conclusion Individual threshold-adjustment seems rational since regular bolus-transit durations in brain parenchyma obtained from the TDC overlap considerably with recommended critical TTP-thresholds of 4 s–8 s. The parenchymal transit time derived from the proposed model may be utilized to individually correct TTP-thresholds, thereby potentially improving the detection of critical perfusion. PMID:25521121

  10. Sperm motility parameters to evaluate the seminal quality of Boa constrictor occidentalis, a threatened snake species.

    PubMed

    Tourmente, M; Cardozo, G A; Guidobaldi, H A; Giojalas, L C; Bertona, M; Chiaraviglio, M

    2007-02-01

    Semen quality analysis constitutes a powerful tool to evaluate the fertility potential of males in threatened species. The Argentine boa constrictor or lampalagua (Boa constrictor occidentalis) is a threatened snake species and has been included in Appendix I of CITES. The objective of this work is to characterize the sperm of B. c. occidentalis on the bases of dynamic parameters to improve this species conservation. Dynamic parameters were measured in sperm samples using videomicroscopy and image analysis software. The sperm population showed a high degree of heterogeneity in velocity parameter values and 95% of the cells showed a linear pattern of movement. Studies in other species indicate that the number of motile spermatozoa and their movement speed is directly correlated with fertilization success. This work will help to establish basic parameter values for the evaluation of the reproductive potential of populations of B. c. occidentalis and to resolve questions referred to its reproductive strategies. PMID:16857223

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the chest in the evaluation of cancer patients: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Hochhegger, Bruno; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Santana, Pablo Rydz Pinheiro; Sousa, Arthur Soares; Souza, Luciana Soares; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has several advantages in the evaluation of cancer patients with thoracic lesions, including involvement of the chest wall, pleura, lungs, mediastinum, esophagus and heart. It is a quite useful tool in the diagnosis, staging, surgical planning, treatment response evaluation and follow-up of these patients. In the present review, the authors contextualize the relevance of MRI in the evaluation of thoracic lesions in cancer patients. Considering that MRI is a widely available method with high contrast and spatial resolution and without the risks associated with the use of ionizing radiation, its use combined with new techniques such as cine-MRI and functional methods such as perfusion- and diffusion-weighted imaging may be useful as an alternative tool with performance comparable or complementary to conventional radiological methods such as radiography, computed tomography and PET/CT imaging in the evaluation of patients with thoracic neoplasias. PMID:25798006

  12. Evaluation of microstructural parameters of oxide dispersion strengthened steels from X-ray diffraction profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasenko, Svetlana; Benediktovitch, Andrei; Ulyanenkova, Tatjana; Uglov, Vladimir; Skuratov, Vladimir; O'Connell, Jacques; Neethling, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    The microstructural parameters of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels from measured diffraction profiles were evaluated using an approach where the complex oxide nanoparticles (Y2Ti2O7 and Y4Al2O9) are modeled as spherical inclusions in the steel matrix with coherent or incoherent boundaries. The proposed method enables processing of diffraction data from materials containing spherical inclusions in addition to straight dislocations, and taking into account broadening due to crystallite size and instrumental effects. The parameters of crystallite size distribution modeled by a lognormal distribution function (the parameters m and σ), the strain anisotropy parameter q, the dislocation density ρ, the dislocation arrangement parameter M, the density of oxide nanoparticles ρnp and the nanoparticle radius r0 were determined for the ODS steel samples. The results obtained are in good agreement with the results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  13. An automated procedure for material parameter evaluation for viscoplastic constitutive models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbrie, P. K.; James, G. H.; Hill, P. S.; Allen, D. H.; Haisler, W. E.

    1988-01-01

    An automated procedure is presented for evaluating the material parameters in Walker's exponential viscoplastic constitutive model for metals at elevated temperature. Both physical and numerical approximations are utilized to compute the constants for Inconel 718 at 1100 F. When intermediate results are carefully scrutinized and engineering judgement applied, parameters may be computed which yield stress output histories that are in agreement with experimental results. A qualitative assessment of the theta-plot method for predicting the limiting value of stress is also presented. The procedure may also be used as a basis to develop evaluation schemes for other viscoplastic constitutive theories of this type.

  14. Reliability evaluation for failed fuel identification using resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Yoshihiro; Ito, Chikara; Harano, Hideki

    2013-04-01

    In the fast reactors, rapid and accurate identification of a fuel failure event is essential for ensuring safety operation. Isotopic analysis of krypton (Kr) and xenon (Xe) using resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is an effective identification tool, in which Kr and Xe atoms are resonantly ionized by a pulsed laser at 216.7 nm and 249.6 nm, respectively, and then three isotopic ratios: 78Kr/80Kr, 82Kr/80Kr and 126Xe/129Xe are measured to detect the location of the failed fuel assembly. In this paper, we report on the required analytical precision of RIMS estimated from simulation studies as well as the analytical performance of our spectrometer to evaluate the availability of RIMS to the failed fuel identification technique in the fast reactors.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the liver: New imaging strategies for evaluating focal liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Coenegrachts, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    The early detection of focal liver lesions, particularly those which are malignant, is of utmost importance. The resection of liver metastases of some malignancies (including colorectal cancer) has been shown to improve the survival of patients. Exact knowledge of the number, size, and regional distribution of liver metastases is essential to determine their resectability. Almost all focal liver lesions larger than 10 mm are demonstrated with current imaging techniques but the detection of smaller focal liver lesions is still relatively poor. One of the advantages of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver is better soft tissue contrast (compared to other radiologic modalities), which allows better detection and characterization of the focal liver lesions in question. Developments in MRI hardware and software and the availability of novel MRI contrast agents have further improved the diagnostic yield of MRI in lesion detection and characterization. Although the primary modalities for liver imaging are ultrasound and computed tomography, recent studies have suggested that MRI is the most sensitive method for detecting small liver metastatic lesions, and MRI is now considered the pre-operative standard method for diagnosis. Two recent developments in MRI sequences for the upper abdomen comprise unenhanced diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and keyhole-based dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI (4D THRIVE). DWI allows improved detection (b = 10 s/mm2) of small (< 10 mm) focal liver lesions in particular, and is useful as a road map sequence. Also, using higher b-values, the calculation of the apparent diffusion coefficient value, true diffusion coefficient, D, and the perfusion fraction, f, has been used for the characterization of focal liver lesions. DCE 4D THRIVE enables MRI of the liver with high temporal and spatial resolution and full liver coverage. 4D THRIVE improves evaluation of focal liver lesions, providing multiple arterial and venous phases, and

  16. Recent results of the parameters A and R measurements in the resonance region of the {pi}N-elastic scattering and subsequent investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Sumachev, V. V.; Beloglazov, Yu. A.; Filimonov, E. A.; Kovalev, A. I.; Kozlenko, N. G.; Kruglov, S. P.; Kulbardis, A. A.; Lopatin, I. V.; Novinsky, D. V.; Shchedrov, V. A.; Trautman, V. Yu.; Alekseev, I. G.; Budkovsky, P. E.; Kanavets, V. P.; Koroleva, L. I.; Morozov, B. V.; Nesterov, V. M.; Ryltsov, V. V.; Sulimov, A. D.; Svirida, D. N.

    2008-10-13

    The existing models of baryons usually predict considerably more resonance (three or more in number) than it was found by investigation of elastic pion-nucleon scattering. This disagreement invites further investigation of the pion-nucleon interaction and among other things the measurement of spin rotation parameters A and R in the elastic pion-nucleon scattering.Recent experiments of the PNPI and PNPI-ITEP collaborations resolved a part of twofold ambiguities of the existing partial wave analyses (PWA). These results were used in the last PWA of the George Washington University group SP06. The proposal for the additional spin rotation parameters A and R measurement in the resonance region is motivated. Such additional measurements are necessary to resolve remaining twofold ambiguities of the existing PWAs.

  17. Recent results of the parameters A and R measurements in the resonance region of the πN-elastic scattering and subsequent investigations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumachev, V. V.; Beloglazov, Yu. A.; Filimonov, E. A.; Kovalev, A. I.; Kozlenko, N. G.; Kruglov, S. P.; Kulbardis, A. A.; Lopatin, I. V.; Novinsky, D. V.; Shchedrov, V. A.; Trautman, V. Yu.; Alekseev, I. G.; Budkovsky, P. E.; Kanavets, V. P.; Koroleva, L. I.; Morozov, B. V.; Nesterov, V. M.; Ryltsov, V. V.; Sulimov, A. D.; Svirida, D. N.; Bazhanov, N. A.; Bunyatova, E. I.

    2008-10-01

    The existing models of baryons usually predict considerably more resonance (three or more in number) than it was found by investigation of elastic pion-nucleon scattering. This disagreement invites further investigation of the pion-nucleon interaction and among other things the measurement of spin rotation parameters A and R in the elastic pion-nucleon scattering. Recent experiments of the PNPI and PNPI-ITEP collaborations resolved a part of twofold ambiguities of the existing partial wave analyses (PWA). These results were used in the last PWA of the George Washington University group SP06. The proposal for the additional spin rotation parameters A and R measurement in the resonance region is motivated. Such additional measurements are necessary to resolve remaining twofold ambiguities of the existing PWAs.

  18. Evaluation of Three Methods for Determining EMG-Muscle Force Parameter Estimates for the Shoulder Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Gatti, Christopher J.; Doro, Lisa Case; Langenderfer, Joseph E.; Mell, Amy G.; Maratt, Joseph D.; Carpenter, James E.; Hughes, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    Background Accurate prediction of in vivo muscle forces is essential for relevant analyses of musculoskeletal biomechanics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate three methods for predicting muscle forces of the shoulder by comparing calculated muscle parameters, which relate electromyographic activity to muscle forces. Methods Thirteen subjects performed sub-maximal, isometric contractions consisting of six actions about the shoulder and two actions about the elbow. Electromyography from 12 shoulder muscles and internal shoulder moments were used to determine muscle parameters using traditional multiple linear regression, principal-components regression, and a sequential muscle parameter determination process using principal-components regression. Muscle parameters were evaluated based on their sign (positive or negative), standard deviations, and error between the measured and predicted internal shoulder moments. Findings It was found that no method was superior with respect to all evaluation criteria. The sequential principal-components regression method most frequently produced muscle parameters that could be used to estimate muscle forces, multiple regression best predicted the measured internal shoulder moments, and the results of principal-components regression fell between those of sequential principal-components regression and multiple regression. Interpretation The selection of a muscle parameter estimation method should be based on the importance of the evaluation criteria. Sequential principal-components regression should be used if a greater number of physiologically accurate muscle forces are desired, while multiple regression should be used for a more accurate prediction of measured internal shoulder moments. However, all methods produced muscle parameters which can be used to predict in vivo muscle forces of the shoulder. PMID:17945401

  19. Evaluation of patello-femoral alignment by CT scans: interobserver reliability of several parameters.

    PubMed

    Dei Giudici, Luca; Enea, Davide; Pierdicca, Laura; Cecconi, Stefano; Ulisse, Serena; Arima, Serena; Giovagnoni, Andrea; Gigante, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Patello-femoral malalignment (PFM) is a common cause of disability often related to patello-femoral syndrome (PFS). Several causes have been taken into account; a proper diagnosis requires instrumental imaging and a methodical evaluation of different parameters. The aim of the present study was to identify the most reliable parameters for measuring patello-femoral and inferior limb alignment by CT. Twenty randomly selected patients suffering from PFS for a total of 40 knees were studied by static CT scans in order to assess patellar tilt, patellar displacement, patellar and trochlear morphology and inferior limb alignment. All known parameters were measured; the variability of the measurements between observers was evaluated by boxplots, Pearson's correlation coefficients, and infraclass correlation coefficient [ICC(2,1)] based on a two-way random effect model. Bland-Altman mean differences and 95 % limits of agreement were computed for each pair of measurements. Patellar tilt parameters appeared equally reliable; patellar displacement is best measured with BoTot that showed an ICC of 0.889; morphology is best measured with WibergTot, with an ICC of 0.862; lastly, for the inferior limb alignment parameters' analysis, FTV outperformed the others in terms of reliability. The present study allowed us to select a limited number of reliable parameters in the evaluation of patello-femoral and inferior limb alignment. The use of these parameters may also result in a more reliable comparison of studies on PFM and in a better evaluation of the treatment outcomes. PMID:25851081

  20. Cardiac and somatic parameters in zebrafish: tools for the evaluation of cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Rafael; Vásquez, Isabel Cristina

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a worldwide public health problem. To date, extensive research has been conducted to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms that trigger cardiovascular diseases and to evaluate therapeutic options. Animal models are widely used to achieve these goals, and zebrafish have emerged as a low-cost model that produces rapid results. Currently, a large body of research is devoted to the cardiovascular development and diverse cardiovascular disorders of zebrafish embryos and larvae. However, less research has been conducted on adult zebrafish specimens. In this study, we evaluated a method to obtain and to evaluate morphometric parameters (of both the entire animal and the heart) of adult zebrafish. We used these data to calculate additional parameters, such as body mass index, condition factor and cardiac somatic index. This method and its results can be used as reference for future studies that aim to evaluate the pathophysiological aspects of the zebrafish cardiovascular system. PMID:26553553

  1. Study of the selection of indicator parameters in marine water quality evaluation and the evaluation methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Pan, Delu; Wang, Difeng; Fu, Dongyang

    2014-10-01

    In order to obtain the indicator types which must be introduced in marine water quality evaluation as well as the suitable evaluation methodology, GB3097-1997 National Marine Water Quality Standards is, in the first place, analyzed to establish a hypothetical sample which is consisting of 2000 stances, each stance containing the information of 21 indicators. And then a stepwise discriminant method is utilized to filter the 21 indicators in accordance with their water quality classification discriminant abilities. And finally, 6 indicators with significant discriminant ability, biochemical oxygen demand(BOD5), oil type(Oil), total phosphorus(P), cadmium(Cd), cyanide(HH) and chemical oxygen demand(COD), are selected and the water quality evaluation chart of the corresponding six indicators is also established. Theoretically, the water quality indicator types and the suitable evaluation methodology, which must be introduced when the water quality evaluation is done in all the waters under the jurisdiction of China, are discussed in this paper, providing theoretical basis for the subsequent marine water quality evaluation based on field observation.

  2. SENSITIVE PARAMETER EVALUATION FOR A VADOSE ZONE FATE AND TRANSPORT MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents information pertaining to quantitative evaluation of the potential impact of selected parameters on output of vadose zone transport and fate models used to describe the behavior of hazardous chemicals in soil. The Vadose 2one Interactive Processes (VIP) model...

  3. Important Physiological Parameters and Physical Activity Data for Evaluating Exposure Modeling Performance: a Synthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this report is to develop a database of physiological parameters needed for understanding and evaluating performance of the APEX and SHEDS exposure/intake dose rate model used by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as part of its regulatory activities. The A...

  4. Subsonic flight test evaluation of a propulsion system parameter estimation process for the F100 engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Gilyard, Glenn B.

    1992-01-01

    An adaptive-performance-seeking control system which optimizes the quasi-steady-state performance of the F-15 propulsion system is discussed. This paper presents flight- and ground-test evaluations of the propulsion system parameter-estimation process used by the performance seeking control system. The estimator consists of a compact propulsion system model and an extended Kalman filter. The extended Kalman filter estimates five engine component deviation parameters from measured inputs. The compact model uses measurements and Kalman-filter estimates as inputs to predict unmeasured propulsion parameters such as net propulsive force and fan stall margin. The ability to track trends and estimate absolute values of propulsion system parameters was demonstrated. For example, thrust stand results show a good correlation especially in trends between the performance seeking control estimated and measured thrust.

  5. Evaluation of robust wave image processing methods for magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing Nan; Shan, Xiang; Xiang, Kui; An, Ning; Xu, Jinzhang; Huang, Weimin; Kobayashi, Etsuko

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a promising modality for in vivo quantification and visualization of soft tissue elasticity. It involves three stages of processes for (1) external excitation, (2) wave imaging and (3) elasticity reconstruction. One of the important issues to be addressed in MRE is wave image processing and enhancement. In this study we approach it from three different ways including phase unwrapping, directional filtering and noise suppression. The relevant solutions were addressed briefly. Some of them were implemented and evaluated on both simulated and experimental MRE datasets. The results confirm that wave image enhancement is indispensable before carrying out MRE elasticity reconstruction. PMID:25222934

  6. Inverse modeling approach for evaluation of kinetic parameters of a biofilm reactor using tabu search.

    PubMed

    Kumar, B Shiva; Venkateswarlu, Ch

    2014-08-01

    The complex nature of biological reactions in biofilm reactors often poses difficulties in analyzing such reactors experimentally. Mathematical models could be very useful for their design and analysis. However, application of biofilm reactor models to practical problems proves somewhat ineffective due to the lack of knowledge of accurate kinetic models and uncertainty in model parameters. In this work, we propose an inverse modeling approach based on tabu search (TS) to estimate the parameters of kinetic and film thickness models. TS is used to estimate these parameters as a consequence of the validation of the mathematical models of the process with the aid of measured data obtained from an experimental fixed-bed anaerobic biofilm reactor involving the treatment of pharmaceutical industry wastewater. The results evaluated for different modeling configurations of varying degrees of complexity illustrate the effectiveness of TS for accurate estimation of kinetic and film thickness model parameters of the biofilm process. The results show that the two-dimensional mathematical model with Edward kinetics (with its optimum parameters as mu(max)rho(s)/Y = 24.57, Ks = 1.352 and Ki = 102.36) and three-parameter film thickness expression (with its estimated parameters as a = 0.289 x 10(-5), b = 1.55 x 10(-4) and c = 15.2 x 10(-6)) better describes the biofilm reactor treating the industry wastewater. PMID:25306783

  7. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Kissing Bonds using Local Defect Resonance (LDR) Spectroscopy: A Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delrue, S.; Tabatabaeipour, M.; Hettler, J.; Van Den Abeele, K.

    With the growing demand from industry to optimize and further develop existing Non-Destructive Testing & Evaluation (NDT&E) techniques or new methods to detect and characterize incipient damage with high sensitivity and increased quality, ample efforts have been devoted to better understand the typical behavior of kissing bonds, such as delaminations and cracks. Recently, it has been shown experimentally that the nonlinear ultrasonic response of kissing bonds could be enhanced by using Local Defect Resonance (LDR) spectroscopy. LDR spectroscopy is an efficient NDT technique that takes advantage of the characteristic fre- quencies of the defect (defect resonances) in order to provide maximum acoustic wave-defect interaction. In fact, for nonlinear methodologies, the ultrasonic excitation of the sample should occur at either multiples or integer ratios of the characteristic defect resonance frequencies, in order to obtain the highest signal-to-noise response in the nonlinear LDR spectroscopy. In this paper, the potential of using LDR spectroscopy for the detection, localization and characterization of kissing bonds is illustrated using a 3D simulation code for elastic wave propagation in materials containing closed but dynamically active cracks or delaminations. Using the model, we are able to define an appropriate method, based on the Scaling Subtraction Method (SSM), to determine the local defect resonance frequencies of a delamination in a composite plate and to illustrate an increase in defect nonlinearity due to LDR. The simulation results will help us to obtain a better understanding of the concept of LDR and to assist in the further design and testing of LDR spectroscopy for the detection, localization and characterization of kissing bonds.

  8. Evaluation of nonlocal parameter in the vibrations of single-walled carbon nanotubes with initial strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash, B.; Ansari, R.

    2010-06-01

    Based upon a nonlocal shell model accounting for the small-scale effects, the vibration characteristics of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different boundary conditions subjected to initial strain are studied in this paper. The set of governing equations of motion is numerically solved by a method that emerged from incorporating the radial point interpolation approximation within the framework of the generalized differential quadrature method. The effectiveness of the present nonlocal shell model is assessed by the molecular dynamics simulations as a benchmark of good accuracy. Accordingly, nonlocal parameters for clamped and cantilever SWCNTs with thicknesses of 0.066 and 0.34 nm are proposed due to the uncertainty that exists in defining nanotube wall thickness. The simulation results show that the resonant frequencies of SWCNTs are very sensitive to the initial strain, although small.

  9. Electrical and ionic conductivity effects on magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of CuI.

    PubMed

    Yesinowski, James P; Ladouceur, Harold D; Purdy, Andrew P; Miller, Joel B

    2010-12-21

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of two different types of conductivity, electrical and ionic, upon magic-angle spinning NMR spectra. The experimental demonstration of these effects involves (63)Cu, (65)Cu, and (127)I variable temperature MAS-NMR experiments on samples of γ-CuI, a Cu(+)-ion conductor at elevated temperatures as well as a wide bandgap semiconductor. We extend previous observations that the chemical shifts depend very strongly upon the square of the spinning-speed as well as the particular sample studied and the magnetic field strength. By using the (207)Pb resonance of lead nitrate mixed with the γ-CuI as an internal chemical shift thermometer we show that frictional heating effects of the rotor do not account for the observations. Instead, we find that spinning bulk CuI, a p-type semiconductor due to Cu(+) vacancies in nonstoichiometric samples, in a magnetic field generates induced AC electric currents from the Lorentz force that can resistively heat the sample by over 200 °C. These induced currents oscillate along the rotor spinning axis at the spinning speed. Their associated heating effects are disrupted in samples containing inert filler material, indicating the existence of macroscopic current pathways between micron-sized crystallites. Accurate measurements of the temperature-dependence of the (63)Cu and (127)I chemical shifts in such diluted samples reveal that they are of similar magnitude (ca. 0.27 ppm/K) but opposite sign (being negative for (63)Cu), and appear to depend slightly upon the particular sample. This relationship is identical to the corresponding slopes of the chemical shifts versus square of the spinning speed, again consistent with sample heating as the source of the observed large shift changes. Higher drive-gas pressures are required to spin samples that have higher effective electrical conductivities, indicating the presence of a braking effect arising from the induced currents produced by

  10. Electrical and ionic conductivity effects on magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of CuI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesinowski, James P.; Ladouceur, Harold D.; Purdy, Andrew P.; Miller, Joel B.

    2010-12-01

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of two different types of conductivity, electrical and ionic, upon magic-angle spinning NMR spectra. The experimental demonstration of these effects involves 63Cu, 65Cu, and 127I variable temperature MAS-NMR experiments on samples of γ-CuI, a Cu+-ion conductor at elevated temperatures as well as a wide bandgap semiconductor. We extend previous observations that the chemical shifts depend very strongly upon the square of the spinning-speed as well as the particular sample studied and the magnetic field strength. By using the 207Pb resonance of lead nitrate mixed with the γ-CuI as an internal chemical shift thermometer we show that frictional heating effects of the rotor do not account for the observations. Instead, we find that spinning bulk CuI, a p-type semiconductor due to Cu+ vacancies in nonstoichiometric samples, in a magnetic field generates induced AC electric currents from the Lorentz force that can resistively heat the sample by over 200 °C. These induced currents oscillate along the rotor spinning axis at the spinning speed. Their associated heating effects are disrupted in samples containing inert filler material, indicating the existence of macroscopic current pathways between micron-sized crystallites. Accurate measurements of the temperature-dependence of the 63Cu and 127I chemical shifts in such diluted samples reveal that they are of similar magnitude (ca. 0.27 ppm/K) but opposite sign (being negative for 63Cu), and appear to depend slightly upon the particular sample. This relationship is identical to the corresponding slopes of the chemical shifts versus square of the spinning speed, again consistent with sample heating as the source of the observed large shift changes. Higher drive-gas pressures are required to spin samples that have higher effective electrical conductivities, indicating the presence of a braking effect arising from the induced currents produced by rotating a