Science.gov

Sample records for resonance parameter evaluations

  1. Evaluation of Silicon Neutron Resonance Parameters in the Energy Range Thermal to 1800 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.

    2002-09-30

    The evaluation of the neutron cross sections of the three stable isotopes of silicon in the energy range thermal to 20 MeV was performed by Hetrick et al. for ENDF/B-VI (Evaluated Nuclear Data File). Resonance parameters were obtained in the energy range thermal to 1500 keV from a SAMMY analysis of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory experimental neutron transmission data. A new measurement of the capture cross section of natural silicon in the energy range 1 to 700 keV has recently been performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. Results of this measurement were used in a SAMMY reevaluation of the resonance parameters, allowing determination of the capture width of a large number of resonances. The experimental data base is described; properties of the resonance parameters are given. For the first time the direct neutron capture component has been taken into account from the calculation by Rauscher et al. in the energy range from thermal to 1 MeV. Results of benchmark calculations are also given. The new evaluation is available in the ENDF/B-VI format.

  2. Evaluation of silicon neutron resonance parameters in the thermal to 1800 keV energy range.

    PubMed

    Derrien, H; Leal, L C; Guber, K H; Larson, N M

    2005-01-01

    Because silicon is a major constituent of concrete and soil, neutron and gamma ray information on silicon is important for reactor shielding and criticality safety calculations. Therefore, much effort was put into the ENDF/B-VI evaluation for the three stable isotopes of silicon. The neutron capture cross section of natural silicon was recently measured at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in the energy range 1-700 keV. Using the ENDF/B-VI evaluation for initial values, a new evaluation of the resonance parameters was performed by adding the results of the ORELA capture measurements to the experimental database. The computer code SAMMY was used for the analysis of the experimental data; the new version of SAMMY allows accurate calculations of the self-shielding and multiple scattering effects in the capture measurements. The accuracy of the radiative capture widths of the resonances was improved by this analysis. Accurate values of the s-, p- and d-wave neutron strength functions were also obtained. Although the resonance capture component of the present evaluation is 2-3 times smaller than that in ENDF/B-VI, the total capture cross section is much larger, at least for energies >250 keV, because the direct capture component contributes values of the same order of magnitude as the resonance component. The direct component was not taken into account in the ENDF/B-VI evaluation and was calculated for the first time in the present evaluation. PMID:16381717

  3. Evaluation of 238U Resonance Parameters from 0 to 20 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrien, H.; Courcelle, A.; Leal, L. C.; Larson, N.; Santamarina, A.

    2005-05-01

    The neutron resonance parameters of 238U were obtained in the energy range 0 to 20 keV from a sequential SAMMY analysis of the most recent high-resolution neutron transmission and neutron capture cross-section measurements. Special care was taken in the analysis of the lowest s-wave resonances leading to resonance parameters slightly different from those of ENDF/B-VI (Moxon-Sowerby resonance parameters). The resolved-resonance range was extended to 20 keV, taking advantage of the high-resolution neutron transmission data of Harvey and neutron capture data of Macklin et al. Preliminary integral tests were performed with the new resonance parameters; thermal low-enriched benchmark calculations show an improvement of the keff prediction, mainly due to a 1.5% decrease of the capture cross section at 0.0253 eV and about a 0.4% decrease of the effective shielded resonance capture integral.

  4. Evaluation of 238U Resonance Parameters from 0 to 20 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, N.; Courcelle, A.; Santamarina, A.

    2005-05-24

    The neutron resonance parameters of 238U were obtained in the energy range 0 to 20 keV from a sequential SAMMY analysis of the most recent high-resolution neutron transmission and neutron capture cross-section measurements. Special care was taken in the analysis of the lowest s-wave resonances leading to resonance parameters slightly different from those of ENDF/B-VI (Moxon-Sowerby resonance parameters). The resolved-resonance range was extended to 20 keV, taking advantage of the high-resolution neutron transmission data of Harvey and neutron capture data of Macklin et al. Preliminary integral tests were performed with the new resonance parameters; thermal low-enriched benchmark calculations show an improvement of the keff prediction, mainly due to a 1.5% decrease of the capture cross section at 0.0253 eV and about a 0.4% decrease of the effective shielded resonance capture integral.

  5. [Effect of the evaluation parameter on sensitivity of resonance thrombography of thrombocytopenia in dogs].

    PubMed

    Adamik, A; Mischke, R

    1998-11-01

    Based on 109 blood samples taken from 36 dogs suffering from thrombocytopenia resonance thrombography with the resonance thrombograph RTG 801 (von Hoerner und Sulger Electronic GmbH, Schwetzingen; manufacturer: Fresenius AG, Bad Homburg) was distinctly more sensitive and more closely correlated to the platelet count using an optimized parameter of the resonance thrombogramm (RTG) in comparison to usual parameters. Nevertheless, clinical requirements regarding samples with platelet counts > 25,000/microliter were not fulfilled. Out of 13 samples with reduced platelet count and simultanous extended capillary bleeding time, depending on the used parameter a maximum of 9 samples could be detected as pathological by the RTG. The normal RTG in part of the cases with clearly altered primary haemostasis contrasts to the exclusive use of RTG in the screening of thrombocytopenia in dogs. PMID:9857562

  6. Fascicular Ratio: A New Parameter to Evaluate Peripheral Nerve Pathology on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tagliafico, Alberto S.; Tagliafico, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The objective of the study was to define and quantitatively evaluate the fascicular ratio (FR) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with peripheral neuropathies compared with healthy controls. Forty control subjects (20 women, 20 men; age, 44.6 ± 13.4 years) and 40 patients with peripheral neuropathy (22 women, 18 men; age, 50.3 ± 10.2 years) were examined with a standard 3T MRI protocol. With customized software (with semiautomatic and automatic interface), the hypointense and hyperintense areas of the peripheral nerves corresponding to fascicular and nonfascicular tissue were examined on T1-weighted sequences. The ratio of fascicular pixels to total pixels was called FR. Correlation with FR calculated on high-resolution ultrasound was performed. The statistical analysis included the Mann–Whitney U test of controls versus patients, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, and the subgroup analysis of patients according to etiologies of neuropathy. Intraobserver and interobserver agreement was calculated based on the evaluation made by 3 readers. Finally, a complete automatic evaluation was performed. On MRI, FRs were significantly increased in patients compared with controls (FR, 76.7 ± 15.1 vs 56 ± 12.3; P < 0.0001 for the semiautomatic interface; and FR 66.3 ± 17.5 vs 47.8 ± 18.4; P < 0.0001 for the automatic interface). The increase in FR was caused mainly by an increase in the hypointense part of the nerve. This observation was valid for all causes of neuropathies. ROC analysis found an area under the curve of 0.75 (95% confidence interval, 0.44–0.81) for FR to discriminate neuropathy from control. The correlation coefficient between MRI and ultrasound was significant (r = 0.49; 95% confidence interval for r, 0.21–0.70; P = 0.012). With the semiautomated evaluation, the mean intraobserver agreement was good (K = 0.86). The interobserver agreements were also good (reader 1

  7. Resonance Parameter Adjustment Based on Integral Experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sobes, Vladimir; Leal, Luiz; Arbanas, Goran; Forget, Benoit

    2016-06-02

    Our project seeks to allow coupling of differential and integral data evaluation in a continuous-energy framework and to use the generalized linear least-squares (GLLS) methodology in the TSURFER module of the SCALE code package to update the parameters of a resolved resonance region evaluation. We recognize that the GLLS methodology in TSURFER is identical to the mathematical description of a Bayesian update in SAMMY, the SAMINT code was created to use the mathematical machinery of SAMMY to update resolved resonance parameters based on integral data. Traditionally, SAMMY used differential experimental data to adjust nuclear data parameters. Integral experimental data, suchmore » as in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments Project, remain a tool for validation of completed nuclear data evaluations. SAMINT extracts information from integral benchmarks to aid the nuclear data evaluation process. Later, integral data can be used to resolve any remaining ambiguity between differential data sets, highlight troublesome energy regions, determine key nuclear data parameters for integral benchmark calculations, and improve the nuclear data covariance matrix evaluation. Moreover, SAMINT is not intended to bias nuclear data toward specific integral experiments but should be used to supplement the evaluation of differential experimental data. Using GLLS ensures proper weight is given to the differential data.« less

  8. Integral data analysis for resonance parameters determination

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Derrien, H.

    1997-09-01

    Neutron time-of-flight experiments have long been used to determine resonance parameters. Those resonance parameters have then been used in calculations of integral quantities such as Maxwellian averages or resonance integrals, and results of those calculations in turn have been used as a criterion for acceptability of the resonance analysis. However, the calculations were inadequate because covariances on the parameter values were not included in the calculations. In this report an effort to correct for that deficiency is documented: (1) the R-matrix analysis code SAMMY has been modified to include integral quantities of importance, (2) directly within the resonance parameter analysis, and (3) to determine the best fit to both differential (microscopic) and integral (macroscopic) data simultaneously. This modification was implemented because it is expected to have an impact on the intermediate-energy range that is important for criticality safety applications.

  9. Influence of resonance parameters' correlations on the resonance integral uncertainty; 55Mn case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žerovnik, Gašper; Trkov, Andrej; Capote, Roberto; Rochman, Dimitri

    2011-03-01

    For nuclides with a large number of resonances the covariance matrix of resonance parameters can become very large and expensive to process in terms of the computation time. By converting covariance matrix of resonance parameters into covariance matrices of background cross-section in a more or less coarse group structure a considerable amount of computer time and memory can be saved. The question is how important is the information that is discarded in the process. First, the uncertainty of the 55Mn resonance integral was estimated in narrow resonance approximation for different levels of self-shielding using Bondarenko method by random sampling of resonance parameters according to their covariance matrices from two different 55Mn evaluations: one from Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group NRG (with large uncertainties but no correlations between resonances), the other from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (with smaller uncertainties but full covariance matrix). We have found out that if all (or at least significant part of the) resonance parameters are correlated, the resonance integral uncertainty greatly depends on the level of self-shielding. Second, it was shown that the commonly used 640-group SAND-II representation cannot describe the increase of the resonance integral uncertainty. A much finer energy mesh for the background covariance matrix would have to be used to take the resonance structure into account explicitly, but then the objective of a more compact data representation is lost.

  10. Rho resonance parameters from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dehua; Alexandru, Andrei; Molina, Raquel; Döring, Michael

    2016-08-01

    We perform a high-precision calculation of the phase shifts for π -π scattering in the I =1 , J =1 channel in the elastic region using elongated lattices with two mass-degenerate quark flavors (Nf=2 ). We extract the ρ resonance parameters using a Breit-Wigner fit at two different quark masses, corresponding to mπ=226 MeV and mπ=315 MeV , and perform an extrapolation to the physical point. The extrapolation is based on a unitarized chiral perturbation theory model that describes well the phase shifts around the resonance for both quark masses. We find that the extrapolated value, mρ=720 (1 )(15 ) MeV , is significantly lower that the physical rho mass and we argue that this shift could be due to the absence of the strange quark in our calculation.

  11. Resonance parameter measurements and analysis of gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Leinweber, G.; Barry, D. P.; Trbovich, M. J.; Burke, J. A.; Drindak, N. J.; Knox, H. D.; Ballad, R. V.; Block, R. C.; Danon, Y.; Severnyak, L. I.

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of the present work is to measure the neutron cross sections of gadolinium accurately. Gd has the highest thermal absorption cross section of any natural element. Therefore it is an important element for thermal reactor applications Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. (RPI) LINAC facility using metallic and liquid Gd samples. The liquid samples were isotopically-enriched in either {sup 155}Gd or {sup 157}Gd. The capture measurements were made at the 25-m flight station with a sodium iodide detector, and the transmission measurements were performed at 15- and 25-m flight stations with {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors. The multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY was used to extract resonance parameters. The results of the thermal region analysis are significant. Resonance parameters for the low energy doublet, at 0.025 and 0.032 eV, are presented. The thermal (2200 m/s) capture cross section of {sup 157}Gd has been measured to be 11% smaller than that calculated from ENDF/B-VI updated through release 8. Thermal capture cross sections and capture resonance integrals for each isotope as well as elemental gadolinium are presented. In the epithermal region, natural metal samples were measured in capture and transmission. Neutron interaction data up to 300 eV have been analyzed. Substantial improvement to the understanding of gadolinium cross sections is presented, particularly above 180 eV where the ENDF resolved region for {sup 155}Gd ends. (authors)

  12. Evaluating the uncertainty in exchange parameters determined from off-resonance R1ρ relaxation dispersion for systems in fast exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothe, Jameson R.; Stein, Zachary W.; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-07-01

    Spin relaxation in the rotating frame (R1ρ) is a powerful NMR technique for characterizing fast microsecond timescale exchange processes directed toward short-lived excited states in biomolecules. At the limit of fast exchange, only kex = k1 + k-1 and Φex = pGpE(Δω)2 can be determined from R1ρ data limiting the ability to characterize the structure and energetics of the excited state conformation. Here, we use simulations to examine the uncertainty with which exchange parameters can be determined for two state systems in intermediate-to-fast exchange using off-resonance R1ρ relaxation dispersion. R1ρ data computed by solving the Bloch-McConnell equations reveals small but significant asymmetry with respect to offset (R1ρ (ΔΩ) ≠ R1ρ (-ΔΩ), which is a hallmark of slow-to-intermediate exchange, even under conditions of fast exchange for free precession chemical exchange line broadening (kex/Δω > 10). A grid search analysis combined with bootstrap and Monte-Carlo based statistical approaches for estimating uncertainty in exchange parameters reveals that both the sign and magnitude of Δω can be determined at a useful level of uncertainty for systems in fast exchange (kex/Δω < 10) but that this depends on the uncertainty in the R1ρ data and requires a thorough examination of the multidimensional variation of χ2 as a function of exchange parameters. Results from simulations are complemented by analysis of experimental R1ρ data measured in three nucleic acid systems with exchange processes occurring on the slow (kex/Δω = 0.2; pE = ∼0.7%), fast (kex/Δω = ∼10-16; pE = ∼13%) and very fast (kex = 39,000 s-1) chemical shift timescales.

  13. Single-level resonance parameters fit nuclear cross-sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drawbaugh, D. W.; Gibson, G.; Miller, M.; Page, S. L.

    1970-01-01

    Least squares analyses of experimental differential cross-section data for the U-235 nucleus have yielded single level Breit-Wigner resonance parameters that fit, simultaneously, three nuclear cross sections of capture, fission, and total.

  14. 239Pu Resonance Evaluation for Thermal Benchmark System Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, L. C.; Noguere, G.; de Saint Jean, C.; Kahler, A. C.

    2014-04-01

    Analyses of thermal plutonium solution critical benchmark systems have indicated a deficiency in the 239Pu resonance evaluation. To investigate possible solutions to this issue, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Working Party for Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) established Subgroup 34 to focus on the reevaluation of the 239Pu resolved resonance parameters. In addition, the impacts of the prompt neutron multiplicity (νbar) and the prompt neutron fission spectrum (PFNS) have been investigated. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the 239Pu resolved resonance evaluation effort.

  15. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis Using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Trbovich, M J; Barry, D P; Slovacek, R E; Danon, Y; Block, R C; Francis, N C; Lubert, M; Burke, J A; Drindak, N J; Lienweber, G; Ballad, R

    2007-02-06

    The focus of this work is to determine the resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005 - 200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf resonances near 8 eV. Accurate hafnium cross sections and resonance parameters are needed in order to quantify the effects of hafnium found in zirconium, a metal commonly used in reactors. The accuracy of the cross sections and the corresponding resonance parameters used in current nuclear analysis tools are rapidly becoming the limiting factor in reducing the overall uncertainty on reactor physics calculations. Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission are routinely performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) LINAC using the time-of flight technique. {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m, respectively. Capture experiments were performed using a sixteen section NaI multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized several thicknesses of metallic and isotope-enriched liquid Hf samples. The liquid Hf samples were designed to provide information on the {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf contributions to the 8 eV doublet without saturation. Data analyses were performed using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. A combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005 - 200 eV. Additionally, resonance integrals were calculated, along with errors for each hafnium isotope, using the NJOY and INTER codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previous values. The {sup 176}Hf resonance integral, based on this work, is approximately 73% higher than the ENDF/B-VI value. This is due primarily to the changes to resonance parameters in the 8 eV resonance, the neutron width presented in this work is more than twice that of the previous value. The calculated elemental

  16. Neutron Resonance Parameters and Covariance Matrix of 239Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Larson, Nancy M

    2008-08-01

    In order to obtain the resonance parameters in a single energy range and the corresponding covariance matrix, a reevaluation of 239Pu was performed with the code SAMMY. The most recent experimental data were analyzed or reanalyzed in the energy range thermal to 2.5 keV. The normalization of the fission cross section data was reconsidered by taking into account the most recent measurements of Weston et al. and Wagemans et al. A full resonance parameter covariance matrix was generated. The method used to obtain realistic uncertainties on the average cross section calculated by SAMMY or other processing codes was examined.

  17. Parameter measurement of synchronous reluctance motor using LC resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Joonseon; Kim, Ki-Chan; Lee, Ju

    2006-04-01

    The motor characterizing parameters are most important factors to drive precisely, effectively, and robustly. Especially, the exact knowledge of synchronous inductance is necessary to control the torque precisely in synchronous reluctance motor (SynRM). Therefore many works have been done for the exact measurement of motor parameters. In this paper, we propose the simple method of measuring the motor parameters, especially measuring the synchronous inductance of SynRM, which can overcome the demerits of conventional methods and measure the exact values. The proposed method uses the resonance phenomenon between the phase inductance and capacitors externally connected.

  18. Evaluation of Neutron Resonance Cross Section Data at GELINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillebeeckx, P.; Becker, B.; Capote, R.; Emiliani, F.; Guber, K.; Heyse, J.; Kauwenberghs, K.; Kopecky, S.; Lampoudis, C.; Massimi, C.; Mondelaers, W.; Moxon, M.; Noguere, G.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Pronyaev, V.; Siegler, P.; Sirakov, I.; Trkov, A.; Volev, K.; Zerovnik, G.

    2014-05-01

    Over the last decade, the EC-JRC-IRMM, in collaboration with other institutes such as INRNE Sofia (BG), INFN Bologna (IT), ORNL (USA), CEA Cadarache (FR) and CEA Saclay (FR), has made an intense effort to improve the quality of neutron-induced cross section data in the resonance region. These improvements relate to both the infrastructure of the facility and the measurement setup, and the data reduction and analysis procedures. As a result total and reaction cross section data in the resonance region with uncertainties better than 0.5 % and 2 %, respectively, can be produced together with evaluated data files for both the resolved and unresolved resonance region. The methodology to produce full ENDF compatible files, including covariances, is illustrated by the production of resolved resonance parameter files for 241Am, Cd and W and an evaluation for 197Au in the unresolved resonance region.

  19. Determination of Resonance Parameters and their Covariances from Neutron Induced Reaction Cross Section Data

    SciTech Connect

    Schillebeeckx, P.; Becker, B.; Danon, Y.; Guber, K.; Harada, H.; Heyse, J.; Junghans, A.R.; Kopecky, S.; Massimi, C.; Moxon, M.C.; Otuka, N.; Sirakov, I.; Volev, K.

    2012-12-15

    Cross section data in the resolved and unresolved resonance region are represented by nuclear reaction formalisms using parameters which are determined by fitting them to experimental data. Therefore, the quality of evaluated cross sections in the resonance region strongly depends on the experimental data used in the adjustment process and an assessment of the experimental covariance data is of primary importance in determining the accuracy of evaluated cross section data. In this contribution, uncertainty components of experimental observables resulting from total and reaction cross section experiments are quantified by identifying the metrological parameters involved in the measurement, data reduction and analysis process. In addition, different methods that can be applied to propagate the covariance of the experimental observables (i.e. transmission and reaction yields) to the covariance of the resonance parameters are discussed and compared. The methods being discussed are: conventional uncertainty propagation, Monte Carlo sampling and marginalization. It is demonstrated that the final covariance matrix of the resonance parameters not only strongly depends on the type of experimental observables used in the adjustment process, the experimental conditions and the characteristics of the resonance structure, but also on the method that is used to propagate the covariances. Finally, a special data reduction concept and format is presented, which offers the possibility to store the full covariance information of experimental data in the EXFOR library and provides the information required to perform a full covariance evaluation.

  20. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis Using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    MJ Trbovich; DP Barry; RE Slovacck; Y Danon; RC Block; JA Burke; NJ Drindak; G Leinweber; RV Ballad

    2004-10-13

    The focus of this work is to determine resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005-200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf resonances near 8 eV. The large neutron cross section of hafnium, combined with its corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties, make it a useful material for controlling nuclear reactions. Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission were performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) electron linear accelerator (LINAC) using the time of flight method. {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m. Capture experiments were done using a sixteen section NaI(Tl) multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized various thicknesses of metallic and isotopically-enriched liquid samples. The liquid samples were designed to provide information on the {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf contributions to the 8 eV doublet without saturation. Data analysis was done using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M6 beta. SAMMY is able to account for experimental resolution effects for each of the experimental setups at the RPI LINAC, and also can correct for multiple scattering effects in neutron capture yield data. The combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005-200 eV. Resonance integrals were calculated along with errors for each hafnium isotope using the NJOY [1] and INTER [2] codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previously published values; however the calculated elemental hafnium resonance integral changed very little.

  1. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Trbovich, Michael J.; Barry, Devin P.; Burke, John A.; Drindak, Noel J.; Leinweber, Greg; Ballad, Robert V.; Slovacek, Rudy E.; Danon, Yaron; Block, Robert C.

    2005-05-24

    The focus of this work is to determine resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005-200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping 176Hf and 178Hf resonances near 8 eV. The large neutron cross section of hafnium, combined with its corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties, make it a useful material for controlling nuclear reactions.Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission were performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) electron linear accelerator (LINAC) using the time of flight method. 6Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m. Capture experiments were done using a sixteen-section NaI(Tl) multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized various thicknesses of metallic and isotopically enriched liquid samples. The liquid samples were designed to provide information on the 176Hf and 178Hf contributions to the 8-eV doublet without saturation.Data analysis was done using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M6 beta. SAMMY is able to account for experimental resolution effects for each of the experimental setups at the RPI LINAC, and also can correct for multiple scattering effects in neutron capture yield data. The combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005-200 eV. Resonance integrals were calculated along with errors for each hafnium isotope using the NJOY and INTER codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previously published values; however the calculated elemental hafnium resonance integral changed very little.

  2. Statistical parameters for gloss evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Peiponen, Kai-Erik; Juuti, Mikko

    2006-02-13

    The measurement of minute changes in local gloss has not been presented in international standards due to a lack of suitable glossmeters. The development of a diffractive-element-based glossmeter (DOG) made it possible to detect local variation of gloss from planar and complex-shaped surfaces. Hence, a demand for proper statistical gloss parameters for classifying surface quality by gloss, similar to the standardized surface roughness classification, has become necessary. In this letter, we define statistical gloss parameters and utilize them as an example in the characterization of gloss from metal surface roughness standards by the DOG.

  3. Evaluation and Treatment of Resonance Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kummer, Ann W.; Lee, Linda

    1996-01-01

    Resonance disorders can have a variety of causes but the appropriate evaluation includes a speech pathology evaluation and may require a videofluoroscopic speech study or nasopharyngoscopy assessment. Treatment may include surgery or the use of prosthetic devices, and usually speech therapy. An interdisciplinary approach is best. (Author/DB)

  4. Resonance Evaluation of 48Ti Including Covariance for Criticality Safety Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, Luiz C; Guber, Klaus H; Arbanas, Goran; Wiarda, Dorothea; Koehler, Paul Edward; Kahler, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we report the methodology and the results of an evaluation carried out for 48Ti in the resolved resonance region for applications in criticality safety calculations. The evaluation was performed using the computer code SAMMY with the reduced R-matrix Reich-Moore formalism. The Bayes scheme was utilized for fitting the experimental data. New transmission and capture data were essential in the evaluation process. A complete set of resonance parameters was obtained in the energy region from thermal to 400 keV. In addition to the resonance parameters, a resonance parameter covariance matrix was also obtained. The impact of the new resonance parameter evaluation in benchmark calculations, as well as the uncertainty, was verified.

  5. Theory and computation of nuclear magnetic resonance parameters.

    PubMed

    Vaara, Juha

    2007-10-28

    The art of quantum chemical electronic structure calculation has over the last 15 years reached a point where systematic computational studies of magnetic response properties have become a routine procedure for molecular systems. One of their most prominent areas of application are the spectral parameters of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, due to the immense importance of this experimental method in many scientific disciplines. This article attempts to give an overview on the theory and state-of-the-art of the practical computations in the field, in terms of the size of systems that can be treated, the accuracy that can be expected, and the various factors that would influence the agreement of even the most accurate imaginable electronic structure calculation with experiment. These factors include relativistic effects, thermal effects, as well as solvation/environmental influences, where my group has been active. The dependence of the NMR spectra on external magnetic and optical fields is also briefly touched on. PMID:17925967

  6. On the Methodology to Calculate the Covariance of Estimated Resonance Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, B.; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.

    2015-01-15

    Principles to determine resonance parameters and their covariance from experimental data are discussed. Different methods to propagate the covariance of experimental parameters are compared. A full Bayesian statistical analysis reveals that the level to which the initial uncertainty of the experimental parameters propagates, strongly depends on the experimental conditions. For high precision data the initial uncertainties of experimental parameters, like a normalization factor, has almost no impact on the covariance of the parameters in case of thick sample measurements and conventional uncertainty propagation or full Bayesian analysis. The covariances derived from a full Bayesian analysis and least-squares fit are derived under the condition that the model describing the experimental observables is perfect. When the quality of the model can not be verified a more conservative method based on a renormalization of the covariance matrix is recommended to propagate fully the uncertainty of experimental systematic effects. Finally, neutron resonance transmission analysis is proposed as an accurate method to validate evaluated data libraries in the resolved resonance region.

  7. Comments on extracting the resonance strength parameter from yield data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Stephen; Favalli, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The F(α,n) reaction is the focus of on-going research in part because it is an important source of neutrons in the nuclear fuel cycle which can be exploited to assay nuclear materials, especially uranium in the form of UF6 [1,2]. At the present time there remains some considerable uncertainty (of the order of ±20%) in the thick target integrated over angle (α,n) yield from 19F (100% natural abundance) and its compounds as discussed in [3,4]. An important thin target cross-section measurement is that of Wrean and Kavanagh [5] who explore the region from below threshold (2.36 MeV) to approximately 3.1 MeV with fine energy resolution. Integration of their cross-section data over the slowing down history of a stopping α-particle allows the thick target yield to be calculated for incident energies up to 3.1 MeV. This trend can then be combined with data from other sources to obtain a thick target yield curve over the wider range of interest to the fuel cycle (roughly threshold to 10 MeV to include all relevant α-emitters). To estimate the thickness of the CaF2 target they used, Wrean and Kavanagh separately measured the integrated yield of the 6.129 MeV γ-rays from the resonance at 340.5 keV (laboratory α-particle kinetic energy) in the 19F(p,αγ) reaction. To interpret the data they adopted a resonance strength parameter of (22.3±0.8) eV based on a determination by Becker et al [6]. The value and its uncertainty directly affects the thickness estimate and the extracted (α,n) cross-section values. In their citation to Becker et al's work, Wrean and Kavanagh comment that they did not make use of an alternative value of (23.7±1.0) eV reported by Croft [7] because they were unable to reproduce the value from the data given in that paper. The value they calculated for the resonance strength from the thick target yield given by Croft was 21.4 eV. The purpose of this communication is to revisit the paper by Croft published in this journal and specifically to

  8. Resonance Parameters of the Rho-Meson from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Feng, Karl Jansen, Dru Renner

    2011-05-01

    We perform a non-perturbative lattice calculation of the P-wave pion-pion scattering phase in the rho-meson decay channel using two flavors of maximally twisted mass fermions at pion masses ranging from 480 MeV to 290 MeV. Making use of finite-size methods, we evaluate the pion-pion scattering phase in the center-of-mass frame and two moving frames. Applying an effective range formula, we find a good description of our results for the scattering phase as a function of the energy covering the resonance region. This allows us to extract the rho-meson mass and decay width and to study their quark mass dependence.

  9. Resonance parameters of the {rho} meson from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xu; Jansen, Karl; Renner, Dru B.

    2011-05-01

    We perform a nonperturbative lattice calculation of the P-wave pion-pion scattering phase in the {rho}-meson decay channel using two flavors of maximally twisted mass fermions at pion masses ranging from 480 to 290 MeV. Making use of finite-size methods, we evaluate the pion-pion scattering phase in the center-of-mass frame and two moving frames. Applying an effective range formula, we find a good description of our results for the scattering phase as a function of the energy covering the resonance region. This allows us to extract the {rho}-meson mass and decay width and to study their quark mass dependence.

  10. Modification of piezoelectric vibratory gyroscope resonator parameters by feedback control.

    PubMed

    Loveday, P W; Rogers, C A

    1998-01-01

    A method for analyzing the effect of feedback control on the dynamics of piezoelectric resonators used in vibratory gyroscopes has been developed. This method can be used to determine the feasibility of replacing the traditional mechanical balancing operations, used to adjust the resonant frequency, by displacement feedback and for determining the velocity feedback required to produce a particular bandwidth. Experiments were performed on a cylindrical resonator with discrete piezoelectric actuation and sensing elements to demonstrate the principles. Good agreement between analysis and experiment was obtained, and it was shown that this type of resonator could be balanced by displacement feedback. The analysis method presented also is applicable to micromachined piezoelectric gyroscopes. PMID:18244281

  11. Parameter-Induced Stochastic Resonance of Weak Periodic Signal Excitation with α Stable Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing; Kou, Jie; Jiao, Shang-Bin

    In view of the nonlinear bistable system, this paper studied the parameter-induced stochastic resonance phenomenon of low-frequency weak signal excitation under α stable noise environment, and explored the action laws of the α stable noise distribution parameters α, β, μ, σ and the bistable system parameters a, b on stochastic resonance effect. The results show that in different α stable noise, adjusting the bistable system parameters can induce stochastic resonance; Moreover, when a(or b) is fixed, the intervals of b(or a) which can induce stochastic resonance are multiple and don't change with any α stable distribution parameter. Further, by combining with the parameter compensation method for researching on high-frequency weak signal, the same action laws as the low-frequency signal are got. The conclusions are significant for using parameter-induced stochastic resonance principle in weak signal detection in the abnormal diffusion dynamical system.

  12. R-MATRIX RESONANCE ANALYSIS AND STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF THE RESONANCE PARAMETERS OF 233U IN THE NEUTRON ENERGY RANGE FROM THERMAL TO 600 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.

    2001-02-27

    The R-matrix resonance analysis of experimental neutron transmission and cross sections of {sup 233}U, with the Reich-Moore Bayesian code SAMMY, was extended up to the neutron energy of 600 eV by taking advantage of new high resolution neutron transmission and fission cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). The experimental data base is described. In addition to the microscopic data (time-of-flight measurements of transmission and cross sections), some experimental and evaluated integral quantities were included in the data base. Tabulated and graphical comparisons between the experimental data and the SAMMY calculated cross sections are given. The ability of the calculated cross sections to reproduce the effective multiplication factors k{sub eff} for various thermal, intermediate, and fast systems was tested. The statistical properties of the resonance parameters were examined and recommended values of the average s-wave resonance parameters are given.

  13. Test of the Universality of the Three-Body Efimov Parameter at Narrow Feshbach Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sanjukta; Landini, Manuele; Trenkwalder, Andreas; Semeghini, Giulia; Spagnolli, Giacomo; Simoni, Andrea; Fattori, Marco; Inguscio, Massimo; Modugno, Giovanni

    2013-08-01

    We measure the critical scattering length for the appearance of the first three-body bound state, or Efimov three-body parameter, at seven different Feshbach resonances in ultracold K39 atoms. We study both intermediate and narrow resonances, where the three-body spectrum is expected to be determined by the nonuniversal coupling of two scattering channels. Instead, our observed ratio of the three-body parameter with the van der Waals radius is approximately the same universal ratio as for broader resonances. This unexpected observation suggests the presence of a new regime for three-body scattering at narrow resonances.

  14. Effects of relevant parameters on the bandgaps of acoustic metamaterials with multi-resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Rongqi; Lin, Jieqiong

    2016-04-01

    Locally resonant acoustic metamaterials with multi-resonators are generally regarded as a fine trend for managing the bandgaps, the different effects of relevant structural parameters on the bandgaps, which will be numerically investigated in this paper. A two-step homogenization method is extended to achieve the effective mass of multi-resonators metamaterial in the lattice system. As comparison, the dispersive wave propagation in lattice system and continuum model is studied. Then, the different effects of relevant parameters on the center frequencies and bandwidth of bandgaps are perfectly revealed, and the steady-state responses in the continuum models with purposed relevant parameters are additionally clarified. The related results can well confirm that the bandgaps exist around the undamped natural frequencies of internal resonators, and also their bandwidth can be efficiently controlled with the ensured center frequencies. Moreover, the design of purposed multi-resonators acoustic metamaterial in vibration control is presented and discussed by an example.

  15. Aperiodic signals processing via parameter-tuning stochastic resonance in a photorefractive ring cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xuefeng; Cao, Guangzhan; Liu, Hongjun

    2014-04-15

    Based on solving numerically the generalized nonlinear Langevin equation describing the nonlinear dynamics of stochastic resonance by Fourth-order Runge-Kutta method, an aperiodic stochastic resonance based on an optical bistable system is numerically investigated. The numerical results show that a parameter-tuning stochastic resonance system can be realized by choosing the appropriate optical bistable parameters, which performs well in reconstructing aperiodic signals from a very high level of noise background. The influences of optical bistable parameters on the stochastic resonance effect are numerically analyzed via cross-correlation, and a maximum cross-correlation gain of 8 is obtained by optimizing optical bistable parameters. This provides a prospective method for reconstructing noise-hidden weak signals in all-optical signal processing systems.

  16. SAMDIST: A Computer Code for Calculating Statistical Distributions for R-Matrix Resonance Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.

    1995-01-01

    The: SAMDIST computer code has been developed to calculate distribution of resonance parameters of the Reich-Moore R-matrix type. The program assumes the parameters are in the format compatible with that of the multilevel R-matrix code SAMMY. SAMDIST calculates the energy-level spacing distribution, the resonance width distribution, and the long-range correlation of the energy levels. Results of these calculations are presented in both graphic and tabular forms.

  17. SAMDIST: A computer code for calculating statistical distributions for R-matrix resonance parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.; Larson, N.M.

    1995-09-01

    The SAMDIST computer code has been developed to calculate distribution of resonance parameters of the Reich-Moore R-matrix type. The program assumes the parameters are in the format compatible with that of the multilevel R-matrix code SAMMY. SAMDIST calculates the energy-level spacing distribution, the resonance width distribution, and the long-range correlation of the energy levels. Results of these calculations are presented in both graphic and tabular forms.

  18. Fast determination of beef quality parameters with time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Fabíola Manhas Verbi; Bertelli Pflanzer, Sérgio; Gomig, Thaísa; Lugnani Gomes, Carolina; de Felício, Pedro Eduardo; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2013-04-15

    The noteworthy of this study is to predict seven quality parameters for beef samples using time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR) relaxometry data and multivariate models. Samples from 61 Bonsmara heifers were separated into five groups based on genetic (breeding composition) and feed system (grain and grass feed). Seven sample parameters were analyzed by reference methods; among them, three sensorial parameters, flavor, juiciness and tenderness and four physicochemical parameters, cooking loss, fat and moisture content and instrumental tenderness using Warner Bratzler shear force (WBSF). The raw beef samples of the same animals were analyzed by TD-NMR relaxometry using Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) and Continuous Wave-Free Precession (CWFP) sequences. Regression models computed by partial least squares (PLS) chemometric technique using CPMG and CWFP data and the results of the classical analysis were constructed. The results allowed for the prediction of aforementioned seven properties. The predictive ability of the method was evaluated using the root mean square error (RMSE) for the calibration (RMSEC) and validation (RMSEP) data sets. The reference and predicted values showed no significant differences at a 95% confidence level. PMID:23601874

  19. Vibroacoustic test plan evaluation: Parameter variation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahle, C. V.; Gongloef, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    Statistical decision models are shown to provide a viable method of evaluating the cost effectiveness of alternate vibroacoustic test plans and the associated test levels. The methodology developed provides a major step toward the development of a realistic tool to quantitatively tailor test programs to specific payloads. Testing is considered at the no test, component, subassembly, or system level of assembly. Component redundancy and partial loss of flight data are considered. Most and probabilistic costs are considered, and incipient failures resulting from ground tests are treated. Optimums defining both component and assembly test levels are indicated for the modified test plans considered. modeling simplifications must be considered in interpreting the results relative to a particular payload. New parameters introduced were a no test option, flight by flight failure probabilities, and a cost to design components for higher vibration requirements. Parameters varied were the shuttle payload bay internal acoustic environment, the STS launch cost, the component retest/repair cost, and the amount of redundancy in the housekeeping section of the payload reliability model.

  20. Evaluating intensity parameters for debris flow vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiler, Margreth

    2014-05-01

    In mountain regions natural hazard processes such as debris flows or hyper-concentrated flows repeatedly lead to high damages. After an event, detailed documentation of the meteorological, hydrological and geomorphological indicators are standardized, and additional data on debris covering run out areas, indicators for processes velocity and transported volumes are gathered. Information on deposition height of debris is an important parameter to estimate the intensity of the process impacting the buildings and infrastructure and hence to establish vulnerability curves. However, the deposition height of mobilized material in settlements and on infrastructure is mostly not directly evaluated because recovery work starts immediately or even during the event leading to a removal of accumulated material. Different approaches exist to reconstruct deposition heights after torrent events, such as mind mapping, comparison of LIDAR-based DEM before and after the event as well as the reconstruction by using photo documentation and the estimation of deposition heights according to standardised elements at buildings and infrastructure. In our study, these different approaches to estimate deposition height and the spatial distribution of the accumulated material are applied and compared against each other by using the case study of the debris flow event in Brienz (Switzerland) which occurred during the serve flood events of August 2005 in the Alps. Within the analysis, different factors including overall costs and time consumption (manpower, equipment), accuracy and preciseness are compared and evaluated to establish optimal maps of the extent and deposition depth after torrent events and to integrate this information in the vulnerability analysis.

  1. Measurement of neutron total cross-section and resonance parameters of xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoy, V. R.; Wang, T. F.; Kim, G. N.; Oh, Y. D.; Cho, M. H.; Ko, I. S.; Namkung, W.

    2009-07-01

    We measured the neutron total cross-sections of natural xenon in the neutron energy region from 0.1 to 40 eV by using the time-of-flight method at the Pohang neutron facility, which consists of an electron linear accelerator, a water-cooled tantalum target with a water moderator, and a 12-m long time-of-flight path. A 6Li-ZnS(Ag) scintillator with a diameter of 12.5 cm and a thickness of 1.6 cm was used as a neutron detector. Notch filters composed of Co, In, Cd were used to estimate the background level and to calculate the neutron flight path length. The present measurement was compared with the existing experimental and the evaluated data. The resonance parameters of Xe isotopes were obtained from the transmission ratio by using the SAMMY code and were compared with other previous results.

  2. Neutron total cross-sections and resonance parameters of Mo and Ta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moinul Haque Meaze, A. K. M.; Devan, K.; Lee, Y. S.; Oh, Y. D.; Kim, G. N.; Son, D.

    2007-02-01

    Experimental results of transmissions for the samples of natural molybdenum with thickness 0.0192 atoms/barn and for the four samples of natural tantalum with thickness 0.0222, 0.0111, 0.0055 and 0.0025 atoms/barn are presented in this work. Measurements were carried out at the Pohang Neutron Facility which consists of a 100 MeV Linac, water-cooled tantalum target, and 12 m flight path length. Effective total cross-sections were extracted from the transmission data, and resonance parameters were obtained by using the code SAMMY. The present measurements were compared with other measurements and with the evaluated nuclear data file ENDF/B-VI.8.

  3. Chronic liver disease: evaluation by magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Goldberg, H.I.; Moss, A.A.; Bass, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging distinguished hepatitis from fatty liver and cirrhosis in a woman with a history of alcohol abuse. Anatomic and physiologic manifestations of portal hypertension were also demonstrated by MR.

  4. Deep-tissue imaging of intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy-transfer parameters.

    PubMed

    Gaind, Vaibhav; Kularatne, Sumith; Low, Philip S; Webb, Kevin J

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate the in vivo reconstruction of all fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) parameters, including the nanometer donor-acceptor distance, in a mouse. The FRET chemical targets cancer cells, and on internalization, the acceptor is released, in lieu of a targeted anticancer drug in chemotherapy. Our method provides a new vehicle for studying disease by imaging FRET parameters in deep tissue. PMID:20436553

  5. Resonance parameters based analysis for metallic thickness optimization of a bimetallic plasmonic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Mahua; Banerjee, Jayeta; Ray, Mina

    2014-02-01

    Metallic film thickness optimization in mono- and bimetallic plasmonic structures has been carried out in order to determine the correct device parameters. Different resonance parameters, such as reflectivity, phase, field enhancement, and the complex amplitude reflectance Argand diagram (CARAD), have been investigated for the proposed optimization procedure. Comparison of mono- and bimetallic plasmonic structures has been carried out in the context of these resonance parameters with simultaneous angular and spectral interrogation. Differential phase analysis has also been performed and its application to sensing has been discussed along with a proposed interferometric set-up.

  6. Resonance Analysis and Evaluation of the Uranium -235 Neutron-Induced Cross-Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, Luiz Carlos

    Neutron cross sections of fissile nuclei are of considerable interest for the understanding of parameters such as resonance absorption, resonance escape probability, resonance self-shielding, and the dependence of the reactivity on temperature. In the present study, new techniques for the evaluation of the ^{235}U neutron cross sections are described. The Reich-Moore formalism of the Bayesian computer code SAMMY was used to perform consistent R-matrix multilevel analyses of the selected neutron cross-section data. The Delta_3 -statistics of Dyson and Mehta, along with high -resolution data and the spin-separated fission cross-section data, have provided the possibility of developing a new methodology for the analysis and evaluation of neutron -nucleus cross-sections. The result of the analysis consists of a set of resonance parameters which describe the ^{235}U neutron cross sections up to 500 eV. The set of resonance parameters obtained through a R-matrix analysis are expected to satisfy statistical properties which lead to information on the nuclear structure. The resonance parameters were tested and showed good agreement with the theory. It is expected that the parametrization of the ^{235}U neutron cross sections obtained in this dissertation represents the current state of art in data as well as in theory and, therefore, can be of direct use in reactor calculations.

  7. Neutron Capture and Transmission Measurements and Resonance Parameter Analysis of Samarium

    SciTech Connect

    G. Leinweber; J.A. Burke; H.D. Knox; N.J. Drindak; D.W. Mesh; W.T. Haines; R.V. Ballad; R.C. Block; R.E. Slovacek; C.J. Werner; M.J. Trbovich; D.P. Barry; T. Sato

    2001-07-16

    The purpose of the present work is to accurately measure the neutron cross sections of samarium. The most significant isotope is {sup 149}Sm, which has a large neutron absorption cross section at thermal energies and is a {sup 235}U fission product with a 1% yield. Its cross sections are thus of concern to reactor neutronics. Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic institute (RPI) LINAC facility using metallic and liquid Sm samples. The capture measurements were made at the 25 meter flight station with a multiplicity-type capture detector, and the transmission total cross-section measurements were performed at 15- and 25-meter flight stations with {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors. Resonance parameters were determined by a combined analysis of six experiments (three capture and three transmission) using the multi-level R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M2. The significant features of this work are as follows. Dilute samples of samarium nitrate in deuterated water (D{sub 2}O) were prepared to measure the strong resonances at 0.1 and 8 eV without saturation. Disk-shaped spectroscopic quartz cells were obtained with parallel inner surfaces to provide a uniform thickness of solution. The diluent feature of the SAMMY program was used to analyze these data. The SAMMY program also includes multiple scattering corrections to capture yield data and resolution functions specific to the RPI facility. Resonance parameters for all stable isotopes of samarium were deduced for all resonances up to 30 eV. Thermal capture cross-section and capture resonance integral calculations were made using the resultant resonance parameters and were compared to results obtained using resonance parameters from ENDF/B-VI updated through release 3. Extending the definition of the capture resonance integral to include the strong 0.1 eV resonance in {sup 149}Sm, present measurements agree within estimated

  8. Efimov Resonance and Three-Body Parameter in a Lithium-Rubidium Mixture.

    PubMed

    Maier, R A W; Eisele, M; Tiemann, E; Zimmermann, C

    2015-07-24

    We study collisional heating in a cold ^{7}Li-^{87}Rb mixture near a broad Feshbach resonance at 661 G. At the high field slope of the resonance, we find an enhanced three-body recombination rate that we interpret as a heteronuclear Efimov resonance. With improved Feshbach spectroscopy of two further resonances, a model for the molecular potentials has been developed that now consistently explains all known Feshbach resonances of the various Li-Rb isotope mixtures. The model is used to determine the scattering length of the observed Efimov state. Its value of -1870a_{0} Bohr radii supports the currently discussed assumption of universality of the three-body parameter also in heteronuclear mixtures. PMID:26252682

  9. Radio frequency spectral characterization and model parameters extraction of high Q optical resonators.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Zeina; Boucher, Yann G; Fernandez, Arnaud; Balac, Stéphane; Llopis, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    A microwave domain characterization approach is proposed to determine the properties of high quality factor optical resonators. This approach features a very high precision in frequency and aims to acquire a full knowledge of the complex transfer function (amplitude and phase) characterizing an optical resonator using a microwave vector network analyzer. It is able to discriminate between the different coupling regimes, from the under-coupling to the selective amplification, and it is used together with a model from which the main resonator parameters are extracted, i.e. coupling factor, intrinsic losses, phase slope, intrinsic and external quality factor. PMID:27251460

  10. Radio frequency spectral characterization and model parameters extraction of high Q optical resonators

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Zeina; Boucher, Yann G.; Fernandez, Arnaud; Balac, Stéphane; Llopis, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    A microwave domain characterization approach is proposed to determine the properties of high quality factor optical resonators. This approach features a very high precision in frequency and aims to acquire a full knowledge of the complex transfer function (amplitude and phase) characterizing an optical resonator using a microwave vector network analyzer. It is able to discriminate between the different coupling regimes, from the under-coupling to the selective amplification, and it is used together with a model from which the main resonator parameters are extracted, i.e. coupling factor, intrinsic losses, phase slope, intrinsic and external quality factor. PMID:27251460

  11. Radio frequency spectral characterization and model parameters extraction of high Q optical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Zeina; Boucher, Yann G.; Fernandez, Arnaud; Balac, Stéphane; Llopis, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    A microwave domain characterization approach is proposed to determine the properties of high quality factor optical resonators. This approach features a very high precision in frequency and aims to acquire a full knowledge of the complex transfer function (amplitude and phase) characterizing an optical resonator using a microwave vector network analyzer. It is able to discriminate between the different coupling regimes, from the under-coupling to the selective amplification, and it is used together with a model from which the main resonator parameters are extracted, i.e. coupling factor, intrinsic losses, phase slope, intrinsic and external quality factor.

  12. Neutron Capture and Transmission Measurements and Resonance Parameter Analysis of Samarium

    SciTech Connect

    Leinweber, G.; Burke, J.A.; Knox, H.D.; Drindak, N.J.; Mesh, D.W.; Haines, W.T.; Ballad, R.V.; Block, R.C.; Slovacek, R.E.; Werner, C.J.; Trbovich, M.J.; Barry, D.P.; Sato, T.

    2002-09-15

    The purpose of the present work is to measure the neutron cross sections of samarium accurately. The most significant isotope is {sup 149}Sm, which has a large neutron absorption cross section at thermal energies and is a {sup 235}U fission product with a 1% yield. Its cross sections are thus of concern to reactor neutronics.Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) LINAC facility using metallic and liquid Sm samples. The capture measurements were made at the 25-m flight station with a multiplicity-type capture detector, and the transmission total cross-section measurements were performed at 15- and 25-m flight stations with {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors. Resonance parameters were determined by a combined analysis of six experiments (three capture and three transmission) using the multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M2.The significant features of this work are as follows. Dilute samples of samarium nitrate in deuterated water (D{sub 2}O) were prepared to measure the strong resonances at 0.1 and 8 eV without saturation. Disk-shaped spectroscopic quartz cells were obtained with parallel inner surfaces to provide a uniform thickness of solution. The diluent feature of the SAMMY program was used to analyze these data. The SAMMY program also includes multiple-scattering corrections to capture yield data and resolution functions specific to the RPI facility.Resonance parameters for all stable isotopes of samarium were deduced for all resonances up to 30 eV. Thermal capture cross-section and capture resonance integral (RI) calculations were made using the resultant resonance parameters and were compared to results obtained using resonance parameters from ENDF/B-VI updated through release 3. Extending the definition of the capture RI to include the strong 0.1-eV resonance in {sup 149}Sm, present measurements agree within estimated uncertainties with ENDF

  13. Pumping test evaluation of stream depletion parameters.

    PubMed

    Lough, Hilary K; Hunt, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Descriptions are given of a pumping test and a corresponding analysis that permit calculation of all five hydrogeological parameters appearing in the Hunt (2003) solution for stream depletion caused by ground water abstraction from a well beside a stream. This solution assumes that flow in the pumped aquifer is horizontal, flow in the overlying aquitard or system of aquitards is vertical, and the free surface in the top aquitard is allowed to draw down. The definition of an aquitard in this paper is any layer with a vertical hydraulic conductivity much lower than the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the pumped aquifer. These "aquitards" may be reasonably permeable layers but are distinguished from the pumped aquifer by their hydraulic conductivity contrast. The pumping test requires a complete set of drawdown measurements from at least one observation well. This well must be deep enough to penetrate the pumped aquifer, and pumping must continue for a sufficient time to ensure that depleted streamflow becomes a significant portion of the well abstraction rate. Furthermore, two of the five parameters characterize an aquitard that overlies the pumped aquifer, and values for these parameters are seen to be dependent upon the initial water table elevation in the aquitard. The field test analyzed herein used a total of eight observation wells screened in the pumped aquifer, and measurements from these wells gave eight sets of parameters that are used in a sensitivity analysis to determine the relative importance of each parameter in the stream depletion calculations. PMID:16857031

  14. Controlling the Radiation Parameters of a Resonant Medium Excited by a Sequence of Ultrashort Superluminal Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, R. M.; Arkhipov, M. V.; Belov, P. A.; Babushkin, I.; Tolmachev, Yu. A.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of controlling the radiation parameters of a spatially periodic one-dimensional medium consisting of classical harmonic oscillators by means of a sequence of ultrashort pulses that propagate through the medium with a superluminal velocity. We show that, in the spectrum of the transient process, in addition to the radiation at a resonant frequency of oscillators, new frequencies arise that depend on the period of the spatial distribution of the oscillator density, the excitation velocity, and the angle of observation. We have examined in detail the case of excitation of the medium by a periodic sequence of ultrashort pulses that travel with a superluminal velocity. We show that it is possible to excite oscillations of complex shapes and to control the radiation parameters of the resonant medium by changing the relationship between the pulse repetition rate, the medium resonant frequency, and the new frequency.

  15. 'Coulomb' description of basic relaxation parameters of isobar analog and charge-exchange giant monopole resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, M. L.; Rykovanov, V. S.; Urin, M. G.

    2010-12-15

    Within a semimicroscopic approach, basic relaxation parameters of the isobaric analog resonance and of the charge-exchange giant monopole resonance, which is an overtone of the isobaric analog resonance, are interpreted in terms of the mean Coulomb field of a nucleus. The continuum version of the random-phase approximation, allowance for an approximate isospin conservation in nuclei in an explicit form, and a phenomenological description of the fragmentation effect are basic ingredients of the approach used. The aforementioned parameters were calculated for a number of magic and near-magic nuclei by using a partly self-consistent phenomenological nuclear mean field and the isovector part of the Landau-Migdal interaction in the particle-hole channel. The results of the calculations are compared with corresponding experimental data.

  16. Evaluation of ventricular function with gated cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Osbakken, M; Yuschok, T

    1986-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of using planar images obtained with gated cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to evaluate ventricular contractile function, cardiac chamber volume (V), and ejection fraction (EF) were calculated using MR images obtained in five previously catheterized patients. Patients were imaged with a .15-Tesla 55-cm bore magnet using the ECG to gate the images. Spin echo pulse sequences (30/500, TE/TR) were used to produce images in the transverse (T), coronal (C), and sagittal (S) planes at end diastole (ED) and end systole (ES). Slice thickness was 1.5 cm, with 2-mm resolution. A calibration grid was imaged in each plane to determine correction factors. Cardiac chamber areas were determined via planimetry. An area-length-volume algorithm was used to obtain EDV and ESV. Three combinations of biplane images in ES and ED were used (T/C, T/S, C/S). Volume data were used to calculate EF. Contrast ventriculogram volumes tended to be greater than MRI volumes, but EFs were similar with both techniques. In conclusion, gated cardiac MR images can be used to evaluate the ventricular function parameters of volume and ejection fraction. PMID:3731263

  17. New Resolved Resonance Region Evaluation for 63Cu and 65Cu for Nuclear Criticality Safety Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sobes, Vladimir; Leal, Luiz C; Guber, Klaus H; Forget, Benoit; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Siegler, P.

    2014-01-01

    A new resolved resonance region evaluation of 63Cu and 65Cu was done in the energy region from 10-5 eV to 99.5 keV. The R-Matrix SAMMY method using the Reich-Moore approximation was used to create a new set of consistent resonance parameters. The new evaluation was based on three experimental transmission data sets; two measured at ORELA and one from MITR, and two radiative capture experimental data sets from GELINA. A total of 141 new resonances were identied for 63Cu and 117 for 65Cu. The corresponding set of external resonances for each isotope was based on the identied resonances above 99.5 keV from the ORELA transmission data. The negative external levels (bound levels) were determined to match the dierential thermal cross section measured at the MITR. Double dierential elastic scattering cross sections were calculated from the new set of resonance parameters. Benchmarking calculations were carried out on a set of ICSBEP benchmarks. This work is in support of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program.

  18. New Resolved Resonance Region Evaluation for 63,65Cu for Nuclear Criticality Safety Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobes, V.; Leal, L. C.; Guber, K.; Forget, B.; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Siegler, P.

    2014-04-01

    A new resolved resonance region evaluation of 63,65Cu was done in the energy region from 10-5 eV to 99.5 keV. The R-Matrix SAMMY method using the Reich-Moore approximation was used to create a new set of consistent resonance parameters. The new evaluation is based on three experimental transmission data sets: two measured at ORELA and one at MITR, plus two radiative capture experimental data sets from GELINA. A total of 141 new resonances were identified for 63Cu and 117 for 65Cu. The corresponding set of external resonances for each isotope is based on the identified resonances above 99.5 keV from the ORELA transmission data. The negative external levels (bound levels) have been determined to match the thermal cross section measured at the MITR. Differential elastic scattering cross sections have been calculated from the new set of resonance parameters. Benchmarking calculations were carried out on a set of ICSBEP benchmarks.

  19. Use of Magnetic Resonance in the Evaluation of Cranial Trauma.

    PubMed

    Altmeyer, Wilson; Steven, Andrew; Gutierrez, Juan

    2016-05-01

    MR imaging is an extremely useful tool in the evaluation of traumatic brain injury in the emergency department. Although CT still plays the dominant role in urgent patient triage, MR imaging's impact on traumatic brain injury imaging continues to expand. MR imaging has shown superiority to CT for certain traumatic processes, such as diffuse axonal injury, cerebral contusion, and infarction. Magnetic resonance angiography and magnetic resonance venography allow emergent vascular imaging for patients that should avoid ionizing radiation or intravenous contrast. PMID:27150321

  20. Methodological aspects in the calculation of parity-violating effects in nuclear magnetic resonance parameters.

    PubMed

    Weijo, Ville; Bast, Radovan; Manninen, Pekka; Saue, Trond; Vaara, Juha

    2007-02-21

    We examine the quantum chemical calculation of parity-violating (PV) electroweak contributions to the spectral parameters of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from a methodological point of view. Nuclear magnetic shielding and indirect spin-spin coupling constants are considered and evaluated for three chiral molecules, H2O2, H2S2, and H2Se2. The effects of the choice of a one-particle basis set and the treatment of electron correlation, as well as the effects of special relativity, are studied. All of them are found to be relevant. The basis-set dependence is very pronounced, especially at the electron correlated ab initio levels of theory. Coupled-cluster and density-functional theory (DFT) results for PV contributions differ significantly from the Hartree-Fock data. DFT overestimates the PV effects, particularly with nonhybrid exchange-correlation functionals. Beginning from third-row elements, special relativity is of importance for the PV NMR properties, shown here by comparing perturbational one-component and various four-component calculations. In contrast to what is found for nuclear magnetic shielding, the choice of the model for nuclear charge distribution--point charge or extended (Gaussian)--has a significant impact on the PV contribution to the spin-spin coupling constants. PMID:17328593

  1. Stochastic Parameter Resonance of Road-Vehicle Systems and Related Bifurcation Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedig, Walter V.

    The paper investigates stochastic dynamics of road-vehicle systems and related bifurcation problems. The ride on rough roads generates vertical car vibrations whose root-mean-squares are resonant for critical car speeds and vanish when the car velocity is increasing, infinitely. These investigations are extended to wheel suspensions with progressive spring characteristics. For weak but still positive damping, the car vibrations become unstable when the velocity reaches the parameter resonance near twice the critical speed bifurcating into stochastic chaos of larger non-stationary car vibrations.

  2. Practice Parameter for Child and Adolescent Forensic Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This Parameter addresses the key concepts that differentiate the forensic evaluation of children and adolescents from a clinical assessment. There are ethical issues unique to the forensic evaluation, because the forensic evaluator's duty is to the person, court, or agency requesting the evaluation, rather than to the patient. The forensic…

  3. Trojan resonant dynamics, stability, and chaotic diffusion, for parameters relevant to exoplanetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páez, Rocío Isabel; Efthymiopoulos, Christos

    2015-02-01

    The possibility that giant extrasolar planets could have small Trojan co-orbital companions has been examined in the literature from both viewpoints of the origin and dynamical stability of such a configuration. Here we aim to investigate the dynamics of hypothetical small Trojan exoplanets in domains of secondary resonances embedded within the tadpole domain of motion. To this end, we consider the limit of a massless Trojan companion of a giant planet. Without other planets, this is a case of the elliptic restricted three body problem (ERTBP). The presence of additional planets (hereafter referred to as the restricted multi-planet problem, RMPP) induces new direct and indirect secular effects on the dynamics of the Trojan body. The paper contains a theoretical and a numerical part. In the theoretical part, we develop a Hamiltonian formalism in action-angle variables, which allows us to treat in a unified way resonant dynamics and secular effects on the Trojan body in both the ERTBP or the RMPP. In both cases, our formalism leads to a decomposition of the Hamiltonian in two parts, . , called the basic model, describes resonant dynamics in the short-period (epicyclic) and synodic (libration) degrees of freedom, while contains only terms depending trigonometrically on slow (secular) angles. is formally identical in the ERTBP and the RMPP, apart from a re-definition of some angular variables. An important physical consequence of this analysis is that the slow chaotic diffusion along resonances proceeds in both the ERTBP and the RMPP by a qualitatively similar dynamical mechanism. We found that this is best approximated by the paradigm of `modulational diffusion'. In the paper's numerical part, we then focus on the ERTBP in order to make a detailed numerical demonstration of the chaotic diffusion process along resonances. Using color stability maps, we first provide a survey of the resonant web for characteristic mass parameter values of the primary, in which the

  4. Virtual Acoustics: Evaluation of Psychoacoustic Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Current virtual acoustic displays for teleconferencing and virtual reality are usually limited to very simple or non-existent renderings of reverberation, a fundamental part of the acoustic environmental context that is encountered in day-to-day hearing. Several research efforts have produced results that suggest that environmental cues dramatically improve perceptual performance within virtual acoustic displays, and that is possible to manipulate signal processing parameters to effectively reproduce important aspects of virtual acoustic perception in real-time. However, the computational resources for rendering reverberation remain formidable. Our efforts at NASA Ames have been focused using a several perceptual threshold metrics, to determine how various "trade-offs" might be made in real-time acoustic rendering. This includes both original work and confirmation of existing data that was obtained in real rather than virtual environments. The talk will consider the importance of using individualized versus generalized pinnae cues (the "Head-Related Transfer Function"); the use of head movement cues; threshold data for early reflections and late reverberation; and consideration of the necessary accuracy for measuring and rendering octave-band absorption characteristics of various wall surfaces. In addition, a consideration of the analysis-synthesis of the reverberation within "everyday spaces" (offices, conference rooms) will be contrasted to the commonly used paradigm of concert hall spaces.

  5. Changes of Schumann resonance parameters during the solar proton event of 14 July 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldugin, V. C.; Maltsev, Y. P.; Vasiljev, A. N.; Shvets, A. V.; Nikolaenko, A. P.

    2003-03-01

    The ELF measurements in Russian observatories Lovozero (the Kola Peninsula) and Lekhta (Karelija) during the solar proton event of 14 July 2000 show the decrease of frequencies of the first and second Schumann resonance modes of ˜0.4 Hz and the increase of the first-mode bandwidth from 0.8 to 1.5 Hz. The solar X-ray burst, preceding the proton precipitation, is accompanied by the increase of the first-mode frequency. Approximate formulas for frequencies and qualities of the two first modes are found for a two-layer model of the Schumann resonator (SR). The changes of the SR parameters are a response of the Earth-ionosphere resonator to large-scale disturbances of the polar ionosphere.

  6. Parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy and its application to weak signal detection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinjing; Zhang, Tao

    2015-02-15

    The parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy (PSRSE) method is introduced for the detection of a very weak signal in the presence of strong noise. The effect of stochastic resonance on the detection is optimized using parameters obtained in spectral entropy analysis. Upon processing employing the PSRSE method, the amplitude of the weak signal is enhanced and the noise power is reduced, so that the frequency of the signal can be estimated with greater precision through spectral analysis. While the improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio is similar to that obtained using the Duffing oscillator algorithm, the computational cost reduces from O(N{sup 2}) to O(N). The PSRSE approach is applied to the frequency measurement of a weak signal made by a vortex flow meter. The results are compared with those obtained applying the Duffing oscillator algorithm.

  7. Classification of hydrological parameter sensitivity and evaluation of parameter transferability across 431 US MOPEX basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Huiying; Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Bao, Jie; Sun, Yu; Tesfa, Teklu; Ruby Leung, L.

    2016-05-01

    The Community Land Model (CLM) represents physical, chemical, and biological processes of the terrestrial ecosystems that interact with climate across a range of spatial and temporal scales. As CLM includes numerous sub-models and associated parameters, the high-dimensional parameter space presents a formidable challenge for quantifying uncertainty and improving Earth system predictions needed to assess environmental changes and risks. This study aims to evaluate the potential of transferring hydrologic model parameters in CLM through sensitivity analyses and classification across watersheds from the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX) in the United States. The sensitivity of CLM-simulated water and energy fluxes to hydrological parameters across 431 MOPEX basins are first examined using an efficient stochastic sampling-based sensitivity analysis approach. Linear, interaction, and high-order nonlinear impacts are all identified via statistical tests and stepwise backward removal parameter screening. The basins are then classified according to their parameter sensitivity patterns (internal attributes), as well as their hydrologic indices/attributes (external hydrologic factors) separately, using Principal component analysis (PCA) and expectation-maximization (EM) - based clustering approach. Similarities and differences among the parameter sensitivity-based classification system (S-Class), the hydrologic indices-based classification (H-Class), and the Koppen climate classification systems (K-Class) are discussed. Within each parameter sensitivity-based classification system (S-Class) with similar parameter sensitivity characteristics, similar inversion modeling setups can be used for parameter calibration, and the parameters and their contribution or significance to water and energy cycling may also be more transferrable. This classification study provides guidance on identifiable parameters, and on parameterization and inverse model design for CLM but the

  8. RIPL - Reference Input Parameter Library for Calculation of Nuclear Reactions and Nuclear Data Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Capote, R. , E-Mail: r.capotenoy@iaea.org; Herman, M.; Oblozinsky, P.; Young, P.G.; Goriely, S.; Belgya, T.; Ignatyuk, A.V.; Koning, A.J.; Hilaire, S.; Plujko, V.A.; Avrigeanu, M.; Bersillon, O.; Chadwick, M.B.; Fukahori, T.; Ge, Zhigang; Han, Yinlu; Kailas, S.; Kopecky, J.; Maslov, V.M.; Reffo, G.

    2009-12-15

    We describe the physics and data included in the Reference Input Parameter Library, which is devoted to input parameters needed in calculations of nuclear reactions and nuclear data evaluations. Advanced modelling codes require substantial numerical input, therefore the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has worked extensively since 1993 on a library of validated nuclear-model input parameters, referred to as the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL). A final RIPL coordinated research project (RIPL-3) was brought to a successful conclusion in December 2008, after 15 years of challenging work carried out through three consecutive IAEA projects. The RIPL-3 library was released in January 2009, and is available on the Web through (http://www-nds.iaea.org/RIPL-3/). This work and the resulting database are extremely important to theoreticians involved in the development and use of nuclear reaction modelling (ALICE, EMPIRE, GNASH, UNF, TALYS) both for theoretical research and nuclear data evaluations. The numerical data and computer codes included in RIPL-3 are arranged in seven segments: MASSES contains ground-state properties of nuclei for about 9000 nuclei, including three theoretical predictions of masses and the evaluated experimental masses of Audi et al. (2003). DISCRETE LEVELS contains 117 datasets (one for each element) with all known level schemes, electromagnetic and {gamma}-ray decay probabilities available from ENSDF in October 2007. NEUTRON RESONANCES contains average resonance parameters prepared on the basis of the evaluations performed by Ignatyuk and Mughabghab. OPTICAL MODEL contains 495 sets of phenomenological optical model parameters defined in a wide energy range. When there are insufficient experimental data, the evaluator has to resort to either global parameterizations or microscopic approaches. Radial density distributions to be used as input for microscopic calculations are stored in the MASSES segment. LEVEL DENSITIES contains

  9. RIPL - Reference Input Parameter Library for Calculation of Nuclear Reactions and Nuclear Data Evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capote, R.; Herman, M.; Obložinský, P.; Young, P. G.; Goriely, S.; Belgya, T.; Ignatyuk, A. V.; Koning, A. J.; Hilaire, S.; Plujko, V. A.; Avrigeanu, M.; Bersillon, O.; Chadwick, M. B.; Fukahori, T.; Ge, Zhigang; Han, Yinlu; Kailas, S.; Kopecky, J.; Maslov, V. M.; Reffo, G.; Sin, M.; Soukhovitskii, E. Sh.; Talou, P.

    2009-12-01

    We describe the physics and data included in the Reference Input Parameter Library, which is devoted to input parameters needed in calculations of nuclear reactions and nuclear data evaluations. Advanced modelling codes require substantial numerical input, therefore the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has worked extensively since 1993 on a library of validated nuclear-model input parameters, referred to as the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL). A final RIPL coordinated research project (RIPL-3) was brought to a successful conclusion in December 2008, after 15 years of challenging work carried out through three consecutive IAEA projects. The RIPL-3 library was released in January 2009, and is available on the Web through http://www-nds.iaea.org/RIPL-3/. This work and the resulting database are extremely important to theoreticians involved in the development and use of nuclear reaction modelling (ALICE, EMPIRE, GNASH, UNF, TALYS) both for theoretical research and nuclear data evaluations. The numerical data and computer codes included in RIPL-3 are arranged in seven segments: MASSES contains ground-state properties of nuclei for about 9000 nuclei, including three theoretical predictions of masses and the evaluated experimental masses of Audi et al. (2003). DISCRETE LEVELS contains 117 datasets (one for each element) with all known level schemes, electromagnetic and γ-ray decay probabilities available from ENSDF in October 2007. NEUTRON RESONANCES contains average resonance parameters prepared on the basis of the evaluations performed by Ignatyuk and Mughabghab. OPTICAL MODEL contains 495 sets of phenomenological optical model parameters defined in a wide energy range. When there are insufficient experimental data, the evaluator has to resort to either global parameterizations or microscopic approaches. Radial density distributions to be used as input for microscopic calculations are stored in the MASSES segment. LEVEL DENSITIES contains

  10. RIPL-Reference Input Parameter Library for Calculation of Nuclear Reactions and Nuclear Data Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Capote, R.; Herman, M.; Capote,R.; Herman,M.; Oblozinsky,P.; Young,P.G.; Goriely,S.; Belgy,T.; Ignatyuk,A.V.; Koning,A.J.; Hilaire,S.; Pljko,V.A.; Avrigeanu,M.; Bersillon,O.; Chadwick,M.B.; Fukahori,T.; Ge, Zhigang; Han,Yinl,; Kailas,S.; Kopecky,J.; Maslov,V.M.; Reffo,G.; Sin,M.; Soukhovitskii,E.Sh.; Talou,P

    2009-12-01

    We describe the physics and data included in the Reference Input Parameter Library, which is devoted to input parameters needed in calculations of nuclear reactions and nuclear data evaluations. Advanced modelling codes require substantial numerical input, therefore the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has worked extensively since 1993 on a library of validated nuclear-model input parameters, referred to as the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL). A final RIPL coordinated research project (RIPL-3) was brought to a successful conclusion in December 2008, after 15 years of challenging work carried out through three consecutive IAEA projects. The RIPL-3 library was released in January 2009, and is available on the Web through http://www-nds.iaea.org/RIPL-3/. This work and the resulting database are extremely important to theoreticians involved in the development and use of nuclear reaction modelling (ALICE, EMPIRE, GNASH, UNF, TALYS) both for theoretical research and nuclear data evaluations. The numerical data and computer codes included in RIPL-3 are arranged in seven segments: MASSES contains ground-state properties of nuclei for about 9000 nuclei, including three theoretical predictions of masses and the evaluated experimental masses of Audi et al. (2003). DISCRETE LEVELS contains 117 datasets (one for each element) with all known level schemes, electromagnetic and {gamma}-ray decay probabilities available from ENSDF in October 2007. NEUTRON RESONANCES contains average resonance parameters prepared on the basis of the evaluations performed by Ignatyuk and Mughabghab. OPTICAL MODEL contains 495 sets of phenomenological optical model parameters defined in a wide energy range. When there are insufficient experimental data, the evaluator has to resort to either global parameterizations or microscopic approaches. Radial density distributions to be used as input for microscopic calculations are stored in the MASSES segment. LEVEL DENSITIES contains

  11. sup 56 Fe resonance parameters for neutron energies up to 850 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Perey, C.M.; Perey, F.G.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Larson, N.M.

    1990-12-01

    High-resolution neutron measurements for {sup 56}Fe-enriched iron targets were made at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in transmission below 20 MeV and in differential elastic scattering below 5 MeV. Transmission measurements were also performed with a natural iron target below 160 keV. The transmission data were analyzed from 5 to 850 keV with the multilevel R-matrix code SAMMY which uses Bayes' theorem for the fitting process. This code provides energies and neutron widths of the resonances inside the 5- to 850-keV energy region, as well as possible parameterization for resonances external to the analyzed region to describe the smooth cross section from a few eV to 850 keV. The resulting set of resonance parameters yields the accepted values for the thermal total and capture cross sections. The differential elastic-scattering data at several scattering angles were compared to theoretical calculations from 40 to 850 keV using the R-matrix code RFUNC based on the Blatt-Biedenharn formalism. Various combinations of spin and parity were tried to predict cross sections for the well defined {ell} > 0 resonances; comparison of these predictions with the data allowed us to determine the most likely spin and parity assignments for these resonances. The results of a capture data analysis by Corvi et al. (COR84), from 2 to 350 keV, were combined with our results to obtain the radiation widths of the resonances below 350 keV observed in transmission, capture, and differential elastic-scattering experiments.

  12. High resonant mass sensor evaluation: An effective method

    SciTech Connect

    Tseytlin, Yakov M.

    2005-11-15

    Micro- and nanocantilever mass sensors in higher resonant oscillation modes are very sensitive to an additional mass, which is positioned along their length except for the nodal points. However, the known evaluation methods of this sensitivity are usually complicated, which is not effective in applications for atomic force microscopy. Our solution is simple, unified, and based on the superposition force method, which allows us to estimate effective spring constants, effective mass factors, and correct prediction of sensitivity for nano- and microcantilevers along their length in higher resonant modes. Simple analytical and computer aided calculation algorithms are developed. Calculation results are close to the experimental and computer simulation data within a few percent.

  13. JUPITER PROJECT - JOINT UNIVERSAL PARAMETER IDENTIFICATION AND EVALUATION OF RELIABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The JUPITER (Joint Universal Parameter IdenTification and Evaluation of Reliability) project builds on the technology of two widely used codes for sensitivity analysis, data assessment, calibration, and uncertainty analysis of environmental models: PEST and UCODE.

  14. A novel parameter-induced stochastic resonance phenomena in fractional Fourier domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lifeng; Wang, Huiqi; Lv, Wangyong; Zhong, Suchuan

    2016-08-01

    The parameter-induced stochastic resonance (SR) phenomenon in a novel self-adaptive dynamical system driven by linear frequency modulated (LFM) signal and additive noise is considered from the view of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). It is found that the dynamical system can be perfectly analyzed by equivalently transforming it into a traditional first-order linear dynamical system driven by periodic signal and additive noise in fractional Fourier transform (FrFT) domain with an optimal rotated angle, and the theoretical analysis and simulation results show that output SNR exhibits the SR behavior when it is plotted as a function of the system parameter. Furthermore, the optimal value of adjusted parameter is obtained, and the possible area of SNR gain is theoretically determined only by center-frequency and modulated frequency of the driving LFM signal.

  15. Parameter optimization analysis to minimize the polarization error in a localized thermal tunable fiber ring resonator gyro.

    PubMed

    Bobbili, Prasada Rao; Nayak, Jagannath; Pinnoji, Prerana Dabral; Rama Koti Reddy, D V

    2016-03-10

    The accuracy of the resonant frequency servo loop is a major concern for the high-performance operation of a resonant fiber optic gyro. For instance, a bias error as large as tens or even hundreds of degrees/hour has been observed at the demodulated output of the resonant frequency servo loop. The traditional frequency servo mechanism is not an efficient tool to address this problem. In our previous work, we proposed a novel method to minimize the laser frequency noise to the level of the shot noise by refractive index modulation by a thermally tunable resonator. In this paper, we performed the parameter optimization for the resonator coil, multifunction integrated-optics chip, and couplers by the transition matrix using the Jones matrix methodology to minimize the polarization error. With the optimized parameter values, we achieved the bias value of the resonator fiber optic gyro to 1.924°/h. PMID:26974794

  16. Longitudinal NMR parameter measurements of Japanese pear fruit during the growing process using a mobile magnetic resonance imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geya, Yuto; Kimura, Takeshi; Fujisaki, Hirotaka; Terada, Yasuhiko; Kose, Katsumi; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Gemma, Hiroshi; Sekozawa, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Longitudinal nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameter measurements of Japanese pear fruit (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai, Kosui) were performed using an electrically mobile magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system with a 0.2 T and 16 cm gap permanent magnet. To measure the relaxation times and apparent diffusion coefficients of the pear fruit in relation to their weight, seven pear fruits were harvested almost every week during the cell enlargement period and measured in a research orchard. To evaluate the in situ relaxation times, six pear fruits were longitudinally measured for about two months during the same period. The measurements for the harvested samples showed good agreement with the in situ measurements. From the measurements of the harvested samples, it is clear that the relaxation rates of the pear fruits linearly change with the inverse of the linear dimension of the fruits, demonstrating that the relaxation mechanism is a surface relaxation. We therefore conclude that the mobile MRI system is a useful device for measuring the NMR parameters of outdoor living plants.

  17. Symmetric Resonance Charge Exchange Cross Section Based on Impact Parameter Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, Kazem; Murphy, Kendrah; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Using a two-state impact parameter approximation, a calculation has been carried out to obtain symmetric resonance charge transfer cross sections between nine ions and their parent atoms or molecules. Calculation is based on a two-dimensional numerical integration. The method is mostly suited for hydrogenic and some closed shell atoms. Good agreement has been obtained with the results of laboratory measurements for the ion-atom pairs H+-H, He+-He, and Ar+-Ar. Several approximations in a similar published calculation have been eliminated.

  18. Neutron total cross section and resonance parameters of /sup 231/Pa

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, A.R.Z.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Patterson, J.R.

    1981-08-01

    Time-of-flight measurements of the neutron total cross section of /sup 231/Pa were carried out, in the energy range 0.01 to 10,000 eV, on two sample thicknesses using the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator as the pulsed neutron source. The multilevel R matrix code MULTI, which includes instrumental resolution and the Doppler broadening, has been used to fit the data. The resonance parameters obtained from the present multilevel R matrix analysis of /sup 231/Pa transmission data from 0.03 to 120 eV are given. 14 refs.

  19. Statistical method of evaluation of flip-flop dynamical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieczorek, P. Z.; Opalski, L. J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents statistical algorithm and measurement system for precise evaluation of flip-flop dynamical parameters in asynchronous operation. The analyzed flip-flop parameters are failure probability, MTBF and propagation delay. It is shown how these parameters depend on metastable operation of flip-flops. The numerical and hardware solutions shown in article allow for precise and reliable comparison of flip-flops. Also the analysis of influence of flip-flop electrical parameters of flip-flop electrical parameters on their metastable operation is possible with use of presented statistical method. Statistical estimation of parameters of flip-flops in which metastability occurs, seems to be more reliable than standard empirical methods of flip-flop analysis. Presented method allows for showing inaccuracies in theoretical model of metastability.

  20. [Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation of coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Bayraktaroğlu, Selen; Alper, Hüdaver

    2008-07-01

    Considerable advances have been achieved in cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology, and MRI has become an important noninvasive imaging tool in the management of coronary artery disease. Cardiac MRI can provide information about myocardial perfusion, viability and contractile reserve. The information obtained not only provides diagnostic information but also has an important prognostic value. This article reviews the recent advances in cardiac MRI for evaluation of coronary artery disease. PMID:18611838

  1. A magnetic resonance imaging study on the articulatory and acoustic speech parameters of Malay vowels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The phonetic properties of six Malay vowels are investigated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize the vocal tract in order to obtain dynamic articulatory parameters during speech production. To resolve image blurring due to the tongue movement during the scanning process, a method based on active contour extraction is used to track tongue contours. The proposed method efficiently tracks tongue contours despite the partial blurring of MRI images. Consequently, the articulatory parameters that are effectively measured as tongue movement is observed, and the specific shape of the tongue and its position for all six uttered Malay vowels are determined. Speech rehabilitation procedure demands some kind of visual perceivable prototype of speech articulation. To investigate the validity of the measured articulatory parameters based on acoustic theory of speech production, an acoustic analysis based on the uttered vowels by subjects has been performed. As the acoustic speech and articulatory parameters of uttered speech were examined, a correlation between formant frequencies and articulatory parameters was observed. The experiments reported a positive correlation between the constriction location of the tongue body and the first formant frequency, as well as a negative correlation between the constriction location of the tongue tip and the second formant frequency. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is an effective tool for the dynamic study of speech production. PMID:25060583

  2. Best parameters selection for wavelet packet-based compression of magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Abu-Rezq, A N; Tolba, A S; Khuwaja, G A; Foda, S G

    1999-10-01

    Transmission of compressed medical images is becoming a vital tool in telemedicine. Thus new methods are needed for efficient image compression. This study discovers the best design parameters for a data compression scheme applied to digital magnetic resonance (MR) images. The proposed technique aims at reducing the transmission cost while preserving the diagnostic information. By selecting the wavelet packet's filters, decomposition level, and subbands that are better adapted to the frequency characteristics of the image, one may achieve better image representation in the sense of lower entropy or minimal distortion. Experimental results show that the selection of the best parameters has a dramatic effect on the data compression rate of MR images. In all cases, decomposition at three or four levels with the Coiflet 5 wavelet (Coif 5) results in better compression performance than the other wavelets. Image resolution is found to have a remarkable effect on the compression rate. PMID:10529302

  3. FRETView: a computer program to simplify the process of obtaining fluorescence resonance energy transfer parameters.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Nathan; Dyer, Joanne; Martí, Angel A; Solomon, Marissa; Turro, Nicholas J

    2007-08-01

    The process of modeling the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process for a donor-acceptor pair can be rather challenging, yet few computer programs exist that allow such modeling to be done with relative ease. In order to address this, we have developed a Java-based program, FRETView, which allows numerous FRET parameters to be obtained with just a few mouse clicks. Being a Java-based program, it runs equally well on all the major operating systems such as Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, Solaris. The program allows the user to effortlessly input pertinent information about the donor-acceptor pair, including the absorption and/or emission spectra, and outputs the calculated FRET parameters in table format, as well as graphical plots. PMID:17668122

  4. Rough parameter dependence in climate models and the role of Ruelle-Pollicott resonances

    PubMed Central

    Chekroun, Mickaël David; Neelin, J. David; Kondrashov, Dmitri; McWilliams, James C.; Ghil, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Despite the importance of uncertainties encountered in climate model simulations, the fundamental mechanisms at the origin of sensitive behavior of long-term model statistics remain unclear. Variability of turbulent flows in the atmosphere and oceans exhibits recurrent large-scale patterns. These patterns, while evolving irregularly in time, manifest characteristic frequencies across a large range of time scales, from intraseasonal through interdecadal. Based on modern spectral theory of chaotic and dissipative dynamical systems, the associated low-frequency variability may be formulated in terms of Ruelle-Pollicott (RP) resonances. RP resonances encode information on the nonlinear dynamics of the system, and an approach for estimating them—as filtered through an observable of the system—is proposed. This approach relies on an appropriate Markov representation of the dynamics associated with a given observable. It is shown that, within this representation, the spectral gap—defined as the distance between the subdominant RP resonance and the unit circle—plays a major role in the roughness of parameter dependences. The model statistics are the most sensitive for the smallest spectral gaps; such small gaps turn out to correspond to regimes where the low-frequency variability is more pronounced, whereas autocorrelations decay more slowly. The present approach is applied to analyze the rough parameter dependence encountered in key statistics of an El-Niño–Southern Oscillation model of intermediate complexity. Theoretical arguments, however, strongly suggest that such links between model sensitivity and the decay of correlation properties are not limited to this particular model and could hold much more generally. PMID:24443553

  5. Evaluation of Regional Storage-Discharge Parameters from Recession Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, B. F.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Subsurface storage and discharge are important components of watershed behaviors to rainfall-runoff responses. The current representations of subsurface-surface relationships are poor in land surface models; such poor representation limits the application of land surface models to evaluate current and future conjunctive water management scenarios. The aim of this research is to derive storage-discharge relationships using streamflow recession hydrograph analysis for watersheds located throughout California. Regression analyses are performed to evaluate empirical storage-discharge parameters as a function of physical watershed parameters and catchment hydrologic characteristics. We illustrate how such regional empirical evaluations provide functional relationships consistent with historic literature to develop parameters for surface-subsurface interaction in fine-resolution land surface models for California.

  6. Multi-parameter sensing with a single magnetoelastic sensor by applying loads on the null locations of multiple resonant modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeRouin, Andrew; Ghee Ong, Keat

    2016-03-01

    Magnetoelastic sensors are mass sensitive sensors commonly used for stress and pressure measurement, as well as chemical and biological monitoring when combined with a functionalized coating. Magnetoelastic sensors are typically made of free-standing, rectangular strips of magnetoelastic materials that exhibit longitudinal, extensional vibrations due to the excitation of magnetic fields. A single magnetoelastic sensor is generally used to monitor one parameter since only the fundamental resonant frequency is measured. Multiple-parameter sensing in close proximity has previously been achieved by using multiple magnetoelastic sensors of different dimensions and tracking their resonant frequencies independently. However, this requires a large surface area and inconvenient layout of dissimilarly shaped sensors. This paper presents a technique for monitoring multiple parameters with a single magnetoelastic sensor by applying separate mass loads at the null points (points of zero vibration) of multiple resonant modes. Applying a load at a null location does not affect the corresponding resonant mode but alters the resonant frequencies of other modes. Therefore, by isolating the variables of interest to multiple null points and simultaneously measuring the resonant frequency shifts of related resonant modes, the masses at each null location can be calculated. Results showed that changing the coverage at a null location along the width of the sensor can be used to minimize the loading effect on the corresponding resonant mode. In contrast, changing the lengthwise coverage can maximize the loading effect on other resonant modes, thus increasing the mass sensitivity of the sensor. Furthermore, simultaneously applying loads to null points of multiple resonant modes had a nearly additive effect, allowing detection of multiple parameters with a single magnetoelastic sensor.

  7. Study and Optimization of CPT Resonance Parameters in 87 Rb/Ar/Ne Microcells Aimed for Application in Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masian, Y.; Sivak, A.; Sevostianov, D.; Vassiliev, V.; Velichansky, V.

    The paper shows the presents results of studies of small-size rubidium cells with argon and neon buffer gases, produced by a patent pended technique of laser welding [Fishman et al. (2014)]. Cells were designed for miniature frequency standard. Temperature dependence of the frequency of the coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance was measured and used to optimize the ratio of partial pressures of buffer gases. The influence of duration and regime of annealing on the CPT-resonance frequency drift was investigated. The parameters of the FM modulation of laser current for two cases which correspond to the highest amplitude of CPT resonance and to the smallest light shifts of the resonance frequency were determined. The temperature dependences of the CPT resonance frequency were found to be surprisingly different in the two cases. A non-linear dependence of CPT resonance frequency on the temperature of the cell with the two extremes was revealed for one of these cases.

  8. Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions.

    PubMed

    Costabel, Stephan; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2013-04-01

    [1] For characterizing water flow in the vadose zone, the water retention curve (WRC) of the soil must be known. Because conventional WRC measurements demand much time and effort in the laboratory, alternative methods with shortened measurement duration are desired. The WRC can be estimated, for instance, from the cumulative pore size distribution (PSD) of the investigated material. Geophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry have successfully been applied to recover PSDs of sandstones and limestones. It is therefore expected that the multiexponential analysis of the NMR signal from water-saturated loose sediments leads to a reliable estimation of the WRC. We propose an approach to estimate the WRC using the cumulative NMR relaxation time distribution and approximate it with the well-known van-Genuchten (VG) model. Thereby, the VG parameter n, which controls the curvature of the WRC, is of particular interest, because it is the essential parameter to predict the relative hydraulic conductivity. The NMR curves are calibrated with only two conventional WRC measurements, first, to determine the residual water content and, second, to define a fixed point that relates the relaxation time to a corresponding capillary pressure. We test our approach with natural and artificial soil samples and compare the NMR-based results to WRC measurements using a pressure plate apparatus and to WRC predictions from the software ROSETTA. We found that for sandy soils n can reliably be estimated with NMR, whereas for samples with clay and silt contents higher than 10% the estimation fails. This is the case when the hydraulic properties of the soil are mainly controlled by the pore constrictions. For such samples, the sensitivity of the NMR method for the pore bodies hampers a plausible WRC estimation. Citation: Costabel, S., and U. Yaramanci (2013), Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions, Water

  9. The Application of Multiobjective Genetic Algorithm to the Parameter Optimization of Single-Well Potential Stochastic Resonance Algorithm Aimed at Simultaneous Determination of Multiple Weak Chromatographic Peaks

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Bingren; Wu, Xiaohong; Liu, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous determination of multiple weak chromatographic peaks via stochastic resonance algorithm attracts much attention in recent years. However, the optimization of the parameters is complicated and time consuming, although the single-well potential stochastic resonance algorithm (SSRA) has already reduced the number of parameters to only one and simplified the process significantly. Even worse, it is often difficult to keep amplified peaks with beautiful peak shape. Therefore, multiobjective genetic algorithm was employed to optimize the parameter of SSRA for multiple optimization objectives (i.e., S/N and peak shape) and multiple chromatographic peaks. The applicability of the proposed method was evaluated with an experimental data set of Sudan dyes, and the results showed an excellent quantitative relationship between different concentrations and responses. PMID:24526920

  10. Evaluation of trapping parameters of annealed natural quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Rui; Wei, Ming-Jian; Song, Bo; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Qiu-Yue; Pan, Bao-Lin; Li, Teng-Fei

    2016-05-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) trapping parameters of annealed quartz have been investigated. The apparent TL peaks observed at temperatures of 133 °C, 211 °C, 266 °C and 405 °C, respectively, were named Peak I, Peak II, Peak III and Peak IV. The Tm - Tstop method is applied to investigate the number of peaks and their positions, and to obtain the trap distributions in the quartz. Peak shape (PS), Hoogenstraaten method (Various Heating Rates Method, VHR), and Computerized Glow Curve Deconvolution (CGCD) are used to evaluate the trapping parameters of the annealed quartz. The glow curve can be considered as a superposition of at least nine overlapping peaks. These peaks show up at 133 °C, 211 °C, 266 °C, 308 °C, 333 °C, 384 °C, 441 °C, 466 °C and 484 °C. The PS method can be only used in evaluating the parameters for Peaks I. The VHR method can be used in evaluating the trapping parameters for the first three peaks. CGCD method is complementary to obtaining parameters for the sub-peaks, and the thermal quenching correction with the Urbach's method is necessary. The Urbach's coefficient for the quartz is 30.03 kTm.

  11. The calculation of electrical parameters of AT-cut quartz crystal resonators with the consideration of material viscosity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji; Zhao, Wenhua; Du, Jianke; Hu, Yuantai

    2011-01-01

    Electrical parameters like resistance and quality factor of a quartz crystal resonator cannot be determined through vibration analysis without considering the presence of material dissipation. In this study, we use the first-order Mindlin plate equations of piezoelectric plates for thickness-shear vibrations of a simple resonator model with partial electrodes. We derive the expressions of electrical parameters with emphasis on the resistance that is related to the imaginary part of complex elastic constants, or the viscosity, of quartz crystal. Since all electrical parameters are frequency dependent, this procedure provides the chance to study the frequency behavior of crystal resonators with a direct formulation. We understand that the electrical parameters are strongly affected by the manufacturing process, with the plating techniques in particular, but the theoretical approach we presented here will be the first step for the precise estimation of such parameters and their further applications in the analysis of nonlinear behavior of resonators. We calculated the parameters from our simple resonator model of AT-cut quartz crystal with the first-order Mindlin plate theory to demonstrate the procedure and show that the numerical results are consistent with earlier measurements. PMID:20594568

  12. A Novel Parameter for Ramp Metering and Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Jia, Yuanhua; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Feng; Ao, Guchang

    Real and scientific traffic flow parameter are the basis to make efficient traffic control strategy and establish control function and this will leads to an appropriate and impartial reflection to efficiency and equity of control property. Intelligent control is a new development where the control problem is to find the combination of control measures that result in the best road performance and control effectiveness. The problems of intelligent metering evaluation for local ramp are considered. In this paper, a novel ramp queuing parameter-the reduplicated waiting time was posed using the queuing theory. With in-situ traffic flow data, comparison between the novel and previous parameters are made to clarify the advantages of the novel parameter.

  13. The Dependence Of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Image Contrast On Intrinsic And Operator-Selectable Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrli, F. W.; MacFall, J. R.; Glover, G. H.

    1983-12-01

    In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) the image pixel value is governed by four intrinsic parameters: the spin density ρ, the spin-lattice relaxation time T1, the spin-spin relaxation time T2 and, for non-stationary spins, the flow velocity v. The extent to which the signal is weighted toward one or several parameters is related to the history of the spin system preceding the detection pulse. In the present work T1 and T2 were determined in vivo for several regions in the CNS from inversion-recovery (T1) And multiple-echo (T2) images, using least-squares fitting procedures. From averaged values of T1 and T2 in grey matter, white matter and CSF, the signal intensity was calculated on the basis of the Bloch equations and plotted as a function of the intrinsic parameters for the three most common imaging pulse sequences. These data are in excellent agreement with images, recorded from normal volunteers on an experimental whole-body imaging system operating at 12.8 MHz (0.3T). The graphical presentation of contrast further will provide the radiologist with a straightforward tool for image interpretation.

  14. Resonance parameters of the first 1/2+ state in Be9 and astrophysical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burda, O.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Richter, A.; Forssén, C.; Brown, B. A.

    2010-07-01

    Spectra of the Be9(e,e') reaction have been measured at the Superconducting Darmstadt Electron Linear Accelerator at an electron energy of E0=73 MeV and scattering angles of 93° and 141° with high-energy resolution up to excitation energies of Ex=8 MeV. The astrophysically relevant resonance parameters of the first excited 1/2+ state of Be9 have been extracted in a one-level approximation of R-matrix theory, resulting in resonance energy ER=1.748(6) MeV and width ΓR=274(8) keV, which are in good agreement with the latest Be9(γ,n) experiment but with considerably improved uncertainties. However, the reduced B(E1) transition strength deduced from an extrapolation of the (e,e') data to the photon point is smaller by a factor of two. Implications of the new results for possible production of C12 in neutron-rich astrophysical scenarios are discussed.

  15. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of pericardial disease

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Muhammad; Watkin, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Pericardial diseases are commonly encountered in clinical practice and may present as an isolated process or in association with various systemic conditions. Traditionally transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) has been the method of choice for the evaluation of suspected pericardial disease but increasingly computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are also being used as part of a rational multi-modality imaging approach tailored to the specific clinical scenario. This paper reviews the role of CT and MRI across the spectrum of pericardial diseases. PMID:27429911

  16. Evaluation of hail suppression programme effectiveness using radar derived parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Satyanarayana; Paulitsch, Helmut; Teschl, Reinhard; Süsser-Rechberger, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is evaluating "the operational hail suppression programme" in the province of Styria, Austria "for the year 2015". For the evaluation purpose the HAILSYS software tool was developed by integrating single polarization C-band weather radar data, aircraft trajectory, radiosonde freezing level data, hail events and crop damages information from the ground. The hail related radar derived parameters are: hail mass aloft, hail mass flux, probability of hail, vertical integrated hail mass, hail kinetic energy flux, and storm severity index. The spatial maps of hail kinetic energy and hail mass were developed to evaluate the seeding effect. The time history plots of vertical integrated hail mass, hail mass aloft and the probability of hail are drawn over an entire cell lifetime. The sensitivity and variation of radar hail parameters over time and associated changes due to cloud seeding will be presented.

  17. Determination of molecular spectroscopic parameters and energy-transfer rates by double-resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinfeld, J. I.; Foy, B.; Hetzler, J.; Flannery, C.; Klaassen, J.; Mizugai, Y.; Coy, S.

    1990-01-01

    The spectroscopy of small to medium-size polyatomic molecules can be extremely complex, especially in higher-lying overtone and combination vibrational levels. The high density of levels also complicates the understanding of inelastic collision processes, which is required to model energy transfer and collision broadening of spectral lines. Both of these problems can be addressed by double-resonance spectroscopy, i.e., time-resolved pump-probe measurements using microwave, infrared, near-infrared, and visible-wavelength sources. Information on excited-state spectroscopy, transition moments, inelastic energy transfer rates and propensity rules, and pressure-broadening parameters may be obtained from such experiments. Examples are given for several species of importance in planetary atmospheres, including ozone, silane, ethane, and ammonia.

  18. Parameter Sensitivity Evaluation of the CLM-Crop model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewniak, B. A.; Zeng, X.; Mametjanov, A.; Anitescu, M.; Norris, B.; Kotamarthi, V. R.

    2011-12-01

    In order to improve carbon cycling within Earth System Models, crop representation for corn, spring wheat, and soybean species has been incorporated into the latest version of the Community Land Model (CLM), the land surface model in the Community Earth System Model. As a means to evaluate and improve the CLM-Crop model, we will determine the sensitivity of various crop parameters on carbon fluxes (such as GPP and NEE), yields, and soil organic matter. The sensitivity analysis will perform small perturbations over a range of values for each parameter on individual grid sites, for comparison with AmeriFlux data, as well as globally so crop model parameters can be improved. Over 20 parameters have been identified for evaluation in this study including carbon-nitrogen ratios for leaves, stems, roots, and organs; fertilizer applications; growing degree days for each growth stage; and more. Results from this study will be presented to give a better understanding of the sensitivity of the various parameters used to represent crops, which will help improve the overall model performance and aid with determining future influences climate change will have on cropland ecosystems.

  19. Blind Source Parameters for Performance Evaluation of Despeckling Filters.

    PubMed

    Biradar, Nagashettappa; Dewal, M L; Rohit, ManojKumar; Gowre, Sanjaykumar; Gundge, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    The speckle noise is inherent to transthoracic echocardiographic images. A standard noise-free reference echocardiographic image does not exist. The evaluation of filters based on the traditional parameters such as peak signal-to-noise ratio, mean square error, and structural similarity index may not reflect the true filter performance on echocardiographic images. Therefore, the performance of despeckling can be evaluated using blind assessment metrics like the speckle suppression index, speckle suppression and mean preservation index (SMPI), and beta metric. The need for noise-free reference image is overcome using these three parameters. This paper presents a comprehensive analysis and evaluation of eleven types of despeckling filters for echocardiographic images in terms of blind and traditional performance parameters along with clinical validation. The noise is effectively suppressed using the logarithmic neighborhood shrinkage (NeighShrink) embedded with Stein's unbiased risk estimation (SURE). The SMPI is three times more effective compared to the wavelet based generalized likelihood estimation approach. The quantitative evaluation and clinical validation reveal that the filters such as the nonlocal mean, posterior sampling based Bayesian estimation, hybrid median, and probabilistic patch based filters are acceptable whereas median, anisotropic diffusion, fuzzy, and Ripplet nonlinear approximation filters have limited applications for echocardiographic images. PMID:27298618

  20. Blind Source Parameters for Performance Evaluation of Despeckling Filters

    PubMed Central

    Biradar, Nagashettappa; Dewal, M. L.; Rohit, ManojKumar; Gowre, Sanjaykumar; Gundge, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    The speckle noise is inherent to transthoracic echocardiographic images. A standard noise-free reference echocardiographic image does not exist. The evaluation of filters based on the traditional parameters such as peak signal-to-noise ratio, mean square error, and structural similarity index may not reflect the true filter performance on echocardiographic images. Therefore, the performance of despeckling can be evaluated using blind assessment metrics like the speckle suppression index, speckle suppression and mean preservation index (SMPI), and beta metric. The need for noise-free reference image is overcome using these three parameters. This paper presents a comprehensive analysis and evaluation of eleven types of despeckling filters for echocardiographic images in terms of blind and traditional performance parameters along with clinical validation. The noise is effectively suppressed using the logarithmic neighborhood shrinkage (NeighShrink) embedded with Stein's unbiased risk estimation (SURE). The SMPI is three times more effective compared to the wavelet based generalized likelihood estimation approach. The quantitative evaluation and clinical validation reveal that the filters such as the nonlocal mean, posterior sampling based Bayesian estimation, hybrid median, and probabilistic patch based filters are acceptable whereas median, anisotropic diffusion, fuzzy, and Ripplet nonlinear approximation filters have limited applications for echocardiographic images. PMID:27298618

  1. Elbow magnetic resonance imaging: imaging anatomy and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hauptfleisch, Jennifer; English, Collette; Murphy, Darra

    2015-04-01

    The elbow is a complex joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often the imaging modality of choice in the workup of elbow pain, especially in sports injuries and younger patients who often have either a history of a chronic repetitive strain such as the throwing athlete or a distinct traumatic injury. Traumatic injuries and alternative musculoskeletal pathologies can affect the ligaments, musculotendinous, cartilaginous, and osseous structures of the elbow as well as the 3 main nerves to the upper limb, and these structures are best assessed with MRI.Knowledge of the complex anatomy of the elbow joint as well as patterns of injury and disease is important for the radiologist to make an accurate diagnosis in the setting of elbow pain. This chapter will outline elbow anatomy, basic imaging parameters, compartmental pathology, and finally applications of some novel MRI techniques. PMID:25835585

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance evaluation of stroke: a preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, R.N.; Willcott, M.R.; Schneiders, N.J.; Ford, J.J.; Derman, H.S.

    1983-10-01

    Nine patients who had acute and subacute stroke were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using a 6-MHz Bruker Instruments proton scanner. A modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequence was used for signal detection. The resultant string of spin-echoes was Fourier transformed into projections that were subsequently back-projected to a series of spin-echo images. From these images, spin density and T/sub 2/ were calculated for each pixel. The NMR scans revealed stroke in each of the patients, while CT demonstrated only eight of the lesions. T/sub 2/ was prolonged in all of the ischemic regions and is the most sensitive NMR parameter in detecting stroke. These preliminary results suggest that NMR scanning of patients who have acute stroke may be cliniclly useful, and that the T/sub 2/ component of the NRM signal is most important.

  3. Towards in vivo imaging of intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer parameters.

    PubMed

    Gaind, Vaibhav; Webb, Kevin J; Kularatne, Sumith; Bouman, Charles A

    2009-08-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a nonradiative energy transfer process based on dipole-dipole interaction between donor and acceptor fluorophores that are spatially separated by a distance of a few nanometers. FRET has proved to be of immense value in the study of cellular function and the underlying cause of disease due to, for example, protein misfolding (of consequence in Alzheimer's disease). The standard parameterization in intramolecular FRET is the lifetime and yield, which can be related to the donor-acceptor (DA) distance. FRET imaging has thus far been limited to in vitro or near-surface microscopy because of the deleterious effects of substantial scatter. We show that it is possible to extract the microscopic FRET parameters in a highly scattering environment by incorporating the FRET kinetics of an ensemble of DA molecules connected by a flexible or rigid linker into an optical diffusion tomography (ODT) framework. We demonstrate the efficacy of our approach for extracting the microscopic DA distance through simulations and an experiment using a phantom with scattering properties similar to tissue. Our method will allow the in vivo imaging of FRET parameters in deep tissue, and hence provide a new vehicle for the fundamental study of disease. PMID:19649115

  4. Diurnal and seasonal variations in the Schumann resonance parameters observed at Chinese observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongjuan; Yu, Haiyan; Cao, Bingxia; Qiao, Xiaolin

    2013-06-01

    The Schumann resonances (SRs) are of great significance for probing the global circuit. The diurnal and seasonal variations in mode amplitudes and frequencies of the first four modes of SR magnetic components based on 2 years measurements at the stations located in China are firstly presented here. The frequencies of all the four modes have their maxima during boreal winter and minima during summer, while the mode amplitudes change oppositely. The variations of both frequencies and amplitudes show their strong relationships with the lighting activity in south-east Asia (0800 UT) which is the nearest source to the observatories in China, while the other sources in Africa (1400 UT) and South America (2000 UT) have less effects on the mode amplitudes of both magnetic components. The effect of day-night asymmetry on SR parameters is estimated by a 3D-FDTD model of the Earth-ionosphere cavity with a single pulse traveling around the equator in a day. Two models of the Earth-ionosphere cavity, namely, a symmetric cavity and a cavity with day-night asymmetric conductivity profile are exploited. It is clear that the minima in the diurnal patterns of the mode frequencies near local sunrise/sunset times are mainly related to the migrations of the global lighting activity, not the day-night ionosphere asymmetry. Moreover, it is concluded that the ionosphere-induced variations of SR parameters including mode frequencies and amplitudes are much smaller than the variations resulting from lighting activity.

  5. Extracting the resonance parameters from experimental data on scattering of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaandrager, P.; Rakityansky, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    A new parametrization of the multi-channel S-matrix is used to fit scattering data and then to locate the resonances as its poles. The S-matrix is written in terms of the corresponding “in” and “out” Jost matrices which are expanded in the Taylor series of the collision energy E around an appropriately chosen energy E0. In order to do this, the Jost matrices are written in a semi-analytic form where all the factors (involving the channel momenta and Sommerfeld parameters) responsible for their “bad behavior” (i.e., responsible for the multi-valuedness of the Jost matrices and for branching of the Riemann surface of the energy) are given explicitly. The remaining unknown factors in the Jost matrices are analytic and single-valued functions of the variable E and are defined on a simple energy plane. The expansion is done for these analytic functions and the expansion coefficients are used as the fitting parameters. The method is tested on a two-channel model, using a set of artificially generated data points with typical error bars and a typical random noise in the positions of the points.

  6. Achieving high bit rate logical stochastic resonance in a bistable system by adjusting parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ding-Xin; Gu, Feng-Shou; Feng, Guo-Jin; Yang, Yong-Min; Ball, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    The phenomenon of logical stochastic resonance (LSR) in a nonlinear bistable system is demonstrated by numerical simulations and experiments. However, the bit rates of the logical signals are relatively low and not suitable for practical applications. First, we examine the responses of the bistable system with fixed parameters to different bit rate logic input signals, showing that an arbitrary high bit rate LSR in a bistable system cannot be achieved. Then, a normalized transform of the LSR bistable system is introduced through a kind of variable substitution. Based on the transform, it is found that LSR for arbitrary high bit rate logic signals in a bistable system can be achieved by adjusting the parameters of the system, setting bias value and amplifying the amplitudes of logic input signals and noise properly. Finally, the desired OR and AND logic outputs to high bit rate logic inputs in a bistable system are obtained by numerical simulations. The study might provide higher feasibility of LSR in practical engineering applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51379526).

  7. [Value of electrogastrographic parameters in evaluation of gastric myoelectrical activity].

    PubMed

    Tabor, S; Thor, P J; Pitala, A; Laskiewicz, J

    1999-01-01

    Electrogastrography (EGG) is presently the only non-invasive method for the evaluation of gastric myoelectrical activity. In relation to the more and more described disturbances of the basic electrical rhythm in different pathological units EGG has been applied on a still larger scale. However, the data obtained from the EGG record do not reflect directly the gastric motility. This method allows only to make an indirect evaluation of the gastric motor disturbances. It still entails a great number of investigations so as to attain a better precisions of the evaluations of its clinical usefulness in gastroenterological diagnostics. This thesis presents the basic information on the methodology, the parameters under evaluation and the clinical application of the EGG method. PMID:10909472

  8. Performance Evaluation and Parameter Identification on DROID III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumb, Julianna J.

    2011-01-01

    The DROID III project consisted of two main parts. The former, performance evaluation, focused on the performance characteristics of the aircraft such as lift to drag ratio, thrust required for level flight, and rate of climb. The latter, parameter identification, focused on finding the aerodynamic coefficients for the aircraft using a system that creates a mathematical model to match the flight data of doublet maneuvers and the aircraft s response. Both portions of the project called for flight testing and that data is now available on account of this project. The conclusion of the project is that the performance evaluation data is well-within desired standards but could be improved with a thrust model, and that parameter identification is still in need of more data processing but seems to produce reasonable results thus far.

  9. Evaluation of acoustical parameters of a Brazilian popular housing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Jos A. C.; Diniz, Fabiano B.; Ferreira, Andressa M. C.; Zannin, Paulo T.

    2003-10-01

    This article presents the results obtained from the evaluation of the acoustical insulation parameters determined in situ in a popular residence projected to offer an option to combat the housing deficit of the low income Brazilian population. This evaluation has been carried out according to the statements of the standards ISO 140-4 and 140-5, which state about this type of measurement. The results have shown that the surveyed house presents a satisfactory performance if compared to the standard of the Brazilian civil construction, but it is not adequate if compared to the demands of the international standards.

  10. First-principles calculation of parameters of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in solids.

    PubMed

    Kadantsev, Eugene S; Ziegler, Tom

    2010-12-01

    The hyperfine A-tensor and Zeeman g-tensor parameterize the interaction of an 'effective' electron spin with the magnetic field due to the nuclear spin and the homogeneous external magnetic field, respectively. The A- and g-tensors are the quantities of primary interest in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. In this paper, we review our work [E.S. Kadantsev, T. Ziegler, J. Phys. Chem. A 2008, 112, 4521; E. S. Kadantsev, T. Ziegler, J. Phys. Chem. A 2009, 113, 1327] on the calculation of these EPR parameters under periodic boundary conditions (PBC) from first-principles. Our methodology is based on the Kohn-Sham DFT (KS DFT), explicit usage of Bloch basis set made up of numerical and Slater-type atomic orbitals (NAOs/STOs), and is implemented in the 'full potential' program BAND. Our implementation does not rely on the frozen core approximation. The NAOs/STOs basis is well suited for the accurate representation of the electron density near the nuclei, a prerequisite for the calculation of highly accurate hyperfine parameters. In the case of g-tensor, our implementation is based on the method of Van Lenthe et al. [E. van Lenthe, P. E. S. Wormer, A. van der Avoird, J. Chem. Phys. 1997, 107, 2488] in which the spin-orbital coupling is taken into account variationally. We demonstrate the viability of our scheme by calculating EPR parameters of paramagnetic defects in solids. We consider the A-tensor of 'normal' and 'anomalous' muonium defect in IIIA-VA semiconductors as well as the S2 anion radical in KCl host crystal lattice. PMID:20821407

  11. Evaluation of muscle injury using magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBlanc, A. D.; Jaweed, M.; Evans, H.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate spin echo T2 relaxation time changes in thigh muscles after intense eccentric exercise in healthy men. Spin echo and calculated T2 relaxation time images of the thighs were obtained on several occasions after exercise of one limb; the contralateral limb served as control. Muscle damage was verified by elevated levels of serum creatine kinase (CK). Thirty percent of the time no exercise effect was discernible on the magnetic resonance (MR) images. In all positive MR images (70%) the semitendinosus muscle was positive, while the biceps femoris, short head, and gracilis muscles were also positive in 50% and 25% of the total cases, respectively. The peak T2 relaxation time and serum CK were correlated (r = 0.94, p<0.01); temporal changes in muscle T2 relaxation time and serum CK were similar, although T2 relaxation time remained positive after serum CK returned to background levels. We conclude that magnetic resonance imaging can serve as a useful tool in the evaluation of eccentric exercise muscle damage by providing a quantitative indicator of damage and its resolution as well as the specific areas and muscles.

  12. EVALUATION AND TESTING OF A LOW-B SPOKE RESONATOR

    SciTech Connect

    T. TAJIMA; D. I MONTOYA; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    Within the framework of the Advanced Accelerator Applications (AAA) project we are interested in building and testing low-{beta} spoke resonators (cavities). To familiarize us with the specifics of these structures Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) kindly loaned us one of their spoke cavities for evaluation. This is a {beta}=0.291 2-gap resonator at 340 MHz. We benchmarked our computer codes by comparing room temperature measurements of frequency, tuning sensitivity, tuning forces, etc. with our 3D simulation results. The cavity was tested at both 4 K and 2 K. The results showed maximum accelerating gradients of 12.5 MV/m (4 K) and 12.3 MV/m (2 K), which correspond to a peak electric field of 40 MV/m and a peak magnetic field of 1063 Oe. Q{sub 0} values at 5 MV/m also exceeded by more than a factor 2 of present AAA specification. These results encouraged us toward development of spoke cavities for the low energy section (6.7 MeV to 109 MeV) of ADTF (Accelerator-Driven Test Facility) of AAA project.

  13. Theory and experimental verifications of the resonator Q and equivalent electrical parameters due to viscoelastic and mounting supports losses.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yook-Kong; Patel, Mihir S; Tanaka, Masako

    2010-08-01

    A novel analytical/numerical method for calculating the resonator Q and its equivalent electrical parameters due to viscoelastic, conductivity, and mounting supports losses is presented. The method presented will be quite useful for designing new resonators and reducing the time and costs of prototyping. There was also a necessity for better and more realistic modeling of the resonators because of miniaturization and the rapid advances in the frequency ranges of telecommunication. We present new 3-D finite elements models of quartz resonators with viscoelasticity, conductivity, and mounting support losses. The losses at the mounting supports were modeled by perfectly matched layers (PMLs). A previously published theory for dissipative anisotropic piezoelectric solids was formulated in a weak form for finite element (FE) applications. PMLs were placed at the base of the mounting supports to simulate the energy losses to a semi-infinite base substrate. FE simulations were carried out for free vibrations and forced vibrations of quartz tuning fork and AT-cut resonators. Results for quartz tuning fork and thickness shear AT-cut resonators were presented and compared with experimental data. Results for the resonator Q and the equivalent electrical parameters were compared with their measured values. Good equivalences were found. Results for both low- and high-Q AT-cut quartz resonators compared well with their experimental values. A method for estimating the Q directly from the frequency spectrum obtained for free vibrations was also presented. An important determinant of the quality factor Q of a quartz resonator is the loss of energy from the electrode area to the base via the mountings. The acoustical characteristics of the plate resonator are changed when the plate is mounted onto a base substrate. The base affects the frequency spectra of the plate resonator. A resonator with a high Q may not have a similarly high Q when mounted on a base. Hence, the base is an

  14. Density functional theory computation of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance parameters in light and heavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, Kiplangat

    This thesis illustrates the utilization of Density functional theory (DFT) in calculations of gas and solution phase Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) properties of light and heavy nuclei. Computing NMR properties is still a challenge and there are many unknown factors that are still being explored. For instance, influence of hydrogen-bonding; thermal motion; vibration; rotation and solvent effects. In one of the theoretical studies of 195Pt NMR chemical shift in cisplatin and its derivatives illustrated in Chapter 2 and 3 of this thesis. The importance of representing explicit solvent molecules explicitly around the Pt center in cisplatin complexes was outlined. In the same complexes, solvent effect contributed about half of the J(Pt-N) coupling constant. Indicating the significance of considering the surrounding solvent molecules in elucidating the NMR measurements of cisplatin binding to DNA. In chapter 4, we explore the Spin-Orbit (SO) effects on the 29Si and 13C chemical shifts induced by surrounding metal and ligands. The unusual Ni, Pd, Pt trends in SO effects to the 29Si in metallasilatrane complexes X-Si-(mu-mt)4-M-Y was interpreted based on electronic and relativistic effects rather than by structural differences between the complexes. In addition, we develop a non-linear model for predicting NMR SO effects in a series of organics bonded to heavy nuclei halides. In chapter 5, we extend the idea of "Chemist's orbitals" LMO analysis to the quantum chemical proton NMR computation of systems with internal resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds. Consequently, we explicitly link the relationship between the NMR parameters related to H-bonded systems and intuitive picture of a chemical bond from quantum calculations. The analysis shows how NMR signatures characteristic of H-bond can be explained by local bonding and electron delocalization concepts. One shortcoming of some of the anti-cancer agents like cisplatin is that they are toxic and researchers are looking for

  15. Parameter uncertainty and variability in evaluative fate and exposure models.

    PubMed

    Hertwich, E G; McKone, T E; Pease, W S

    1999-12-01

    The human toxicity potential, a weighting scheme used to evaluate toxic emissions for life cycle assessment and toxics release inventories, is based on potential dose calculations and toxicity factors. This paper evaluates the variance in potential dose calculations that can be attributed to the uncertainty in chemical-specific input parameters as well as the variability in exposure factors and landscape parameters. A knowledge of the uncertainty allows us to assess the robustness of a decision based on the toxicity potential; a knowledge of the sources of uncertainty allows us to focus our resources if we want to reduce the uncertainty. The potential dose of 236 chemicals was assessed. The chemicals were grouped by dominant exposure route, and a Monte Carlo analysis was conducted for one representative chemical in each group. The variance is typically one to two orders of magnitude. For comparison, the point estimates in potential dose for 236 chemicals span ten orders of magnitude. Most of the variance in the potential dose is due to chemical-specific input parameters, especially half-lives, although exposure factors such as fish intake and the source of drinking water can be important for chemicals whose dominant exposure is through indirect routes. Landscape characteristics are generally of minor importance. PMID:10765456

  16. Treatment time reduction through parameter optimization in magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coon, Joshua

    Magnetic Resonance guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MRgHIFU) treatments are a promising modality for cancer treatments in which a focused beam of ultrasound energy is used to kill tumor tissue. However, obstacles still exist to its widespread clinical implementation, including long treatment times. This research demonstrates reductions in treatment times through intelligent selection of the user-controllable parameters, including: the focal zone treatment path, focal zone size, focal zone spacing, and whether to treat one or several focal zone locations at any given time. Several treatments using various combinations of these parameters were simulated using a finite difference method to solve the Pennes bio-heat transfer equation for an ultrasonically heated tissue region with a wide range of acoustic, thermal, geometric, and tumor properties. The total treatment time was iteratively optimized using either a heuristic method or routines included in the Matlab software package, with constraints imposed for patient safety and treatment efficacy. The results demonstrate that large reductions in treatment time are possible through the intelligent selection of user-controllable treatment parameters. For the treatment path, treatment times are reduced by as much as an order of magnitude if the focal zones are arranged into stacks along the axial direction and a middle-front-back ordering is followed. For situations where normal tissue heating constraints are less stringent, these focal zones should have high levels of adjacency to further decrease treatment times; however, adjacency should be reduced in some cases where normal tissue constraints are more stringent. Also, the use of smaller, more concentrated focal zones produces shorter treatment times than larger, more diluted focal zones, a result verified in an agar phantom model. Further, focal zones should be packed using only a small amount of overlap in the axial direction and with a small gap in the

  17. Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costabel, Stephan; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2013-04-01

    For characterizing water flow in the vadose zone, the water retention curve (WRC) of the soil must be known. Because conventional WRC measurements demand much time and effort in the laboratory, alternative methods with shortened measurement duration are desired. The WRC can be estimated, for instance, from the cumulative pore size distribution (PSD) of the investigated material. Geophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry have successfully been applied to recover PSDs of sandstones and limestones. It is therefore expected that the multiexponential analysis of the NMR signal from water-saturated loose sediments leads to a reliable estimation of the WRC. We propose an approach to estimate the WRC using the cumulative NMR relaxation time distribution and approximate it with the well-known van-Genuchten (VG) model. Thereby, the VG parameter n, which controls the curvature of the WRC, is of particular interest, because it is the essential parameter to predict the relative hydraulic conductivity. The NMR curves are calibrated with only two conventional WRC measurements, first, to determine the residual water content and, second, to define a fixed point that relates the relaxation time to a corresponding capillary pressure. We test our approach with natural and artificial soil samples and compare the NMR-based results to WRC measurements using a pressure plate apparatus and to WRC predictions from the software ROSETTA. We found that for sandy soils n can reliably be estimated with NMR, whereas for samples with clay and silt contents higher than 10% the estimation fails. This is the case when the hydraulic properties of the soil are mainly controlled by the pore constrictions. For such samples, the sensitivity of the NMR method for the pore bodies hampers a plausible WRC estimation.

  18. Variability of Schumann resonance parameters observed at low latitude stations in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, X.-Y.; Xiao, Z.; Hao, Y.-Q.; Zhang, D.-H.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the Schumann resonance (SR) parameters observed at low latitude stations in China for the first time. Variations of SR peak frequency and intensity on different timescales (from minutes to years) are analyzed in detail. Diurnal and seasonal variations are shown and the source-observer distance is calculated to confirm the contributions of lightning activity. Differences in the profiles of SR intensity between the NS and EW components are due to the effects of the source-observer distance and the relative position of the observer to the sources. Diurnal frequency variations are more complicated and cannot be directly linked with the three thunderstorm centers. Seasonal variations are clear for intensity but not for frequency. The differences in the diurnal and seasonal variations between the SR intensity and frequency show that the greatest contributor to SR intensity is global lightning activity, while the SR frequency is not affected solely by lightning, as certain other factors involving ionosphere properties may play non-negligible roles. We also emphasize that our observations do not show a distinct day-night change in the SR parameters, and that the SR intensity does not show abrupt changes across terminators. This observation is consistent with previous simulations. Finally, the response of the SR to a solar flare is discussed. The flare leads to a sudden increase of about 0.2 Hz relative to the 2σ level of the SR frequencies in the first three modes, which is in agreement with other works in the literature. This frequency enhancement is explained using theoretical calculations.

  19. A laboratory study to estimate pore geometric parameters of sandstones using complex conductivity and nuclear magnetic resonance for permeability prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, Gordon; Keating, Kristina; Binley, Andrew; Slater, Lee

    2016-06-01

    We estimate parameters from the Katz and Thompson permeability model using laboratory complex electrical conductivity (CC) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data to build permeability models parameterized with geophysical measurements. We use the Katz and Thompson model based on the characteristic hydraulic length scale, determined from mercury injection capillary pressure estimates of pore throat size, and the intrinsic formation factor, determined from multisalinity conductivity measurements, for this purpose. Two new permeability models are tested, one based on CC data and another that incorporates CC and NMR data. From measurements made on forty-five sandstone cores collected from fifteen different formations, we evaluate how well the CC relaxation time and the NMR transverse relaxation times compare to the characteristic hydraulic length scale and how well the formation factor estimated from CC parameters compares to the intrinsic formation factor. We find: (1) the NMR transverse relaxation time models the characteristic hydraulic length scale more accurately than the CC relaxation time (R2 of 0.69 and 0.33 and normalized root mean square errors (NRMSE) of 0.16 and 0.21, respectively); (2) the CC estimated formation factor is well correlated with the intrinsic formation factor (NRMSE=0.23). We demonstrate that that permeability estimates from the joint-NMR-CC model (NRMSE=0.13) compare favorably to estimates from the Katz and Thompson model (NRMSE=0.074). This model advances the capability of the Katz and Thompson model by employing parameters measureable in the field giving it the potential to more accurately estimate permeability using geophysical measurements than are currently possible.

  20. TRITOX: a multiple parameter evaluation of tritium toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Carsten, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The increased use of nuclear reactors for power generation will lead to the introduction of tritium into the environment. The need for assessing possible immediate and long-term effects of exposure to this tritium led to the development of a broad program directed towards evaluating the possible somatic and genetic effects of continuous exposure to tritiated water (HTO). Among the parameters measured are the genetic, cytogenetic, reproductive efficiency, growth, nonspecific lifetime shortening, bone marrow cellularity and stem cell content, relative biological effectiveness as compared to /sup 137/Cesium gamma exposure, and related biochemical and microdosimetric evaluations. These parameters have been evaluated on animals maintained on HTO at 10 to 100 times the maximum permissible concentration (0.03 - 3.0 ..mu..Ci/ml) for HTO. Dominant lethal mutations, chromosome aberrations in regenerating liver, increased sister chromatid exchanges in bone marrow and reduction in bone marrow stem cell content have been observed at the higher concentrations. The relative biological effectiveness for HTO ingestion as compared to external /sup 137/Cesium gamma exposures has been found to be between 1 and 2.

  1. Measurement of Resonance Parameters of Orbitally Excited Narrow B^0 Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, : T.

    2008-09-01

    The authors report a measurement of resonance parameters of the orbitally excited (L = 1) narrow B{sup 0} mesons in decays to B{sup (*)+}{pi}{sup -} using 1.7 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The mass and width of the B*{sub 2}{sup 0} state are measured to be m(B*{sub 2}{sup 0}) = 5740.2{sub -1.8}{sup +1.7}(stat.){sub -0.8}{sup +0.9}(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2} and {Lambda}(B*{sub 2}{sup 0}) = 22.7{sub -3.2}{sup +3.8}(stat.){sub -10.2}{sup +3.2}(syst.) MeV/c{sub 2}. The mass difference between the B*{sub 2}{sup 0} and B{sub 1}{sup 0} states is measured to be 14.9{sub -2.5}{sup +2.2}(stat.){sub -1.4}{sup +1.2}(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}, resulting in a B{sub 1}{sup 0} mass of 5725.3{sub -2.2}{sup +1.6}(stat.){sub -1.5}{sup +1.4}(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}. This is currently the most precise measurement of the masses of these states and the first measurement of the B*{sub 2}{sup 0} width.

  2. Measurement of resonance parameters of orbitally excited narrow B0 mesons.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; González, B Alvarez; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Griso, S Pagan; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-03-13

    We report a measurement of resonance parameters of the orbitally excited (L=1) narrow B0 mesons in decays to B;{(*)+}pi;{-} using 1.7 fb;{-1} of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The mass and width of the B_{2};{*0} state are measured to be m(B_{2};{*0})=5740.2_{-1.8};{+1.7}(stat)-0.8+0.9(syst) MeV/c;{2} and Gamma(B_{2};{*0})=22.7_{-3.2};{+3.8}(stat)-10.2+3.2(syst) MeV/c;{2}. The mass difference between the B_{2};{*0} and B10 states is measured to be 14.9_{-2.5};{+2.2}(stat)-1.4+1.2(syst) MeV/c;{2}, resulting in a B10 mass of 5725.3_{-2.2};{+1.6}(stat)-1.5+1.4(syst) MeV/c;{2}. This is currently the most precise measurement of the masses of these states and the first measurement of the B_{2};{*0} width. PMID:19392106

  3. Parameter dependence of stochastic resonance in the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model driven by trichotomous noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huiqing; Yang, Tingting; Xu, Yong; Xu, Wei

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the stochastic resonance in a FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model driven by trichotomous noise and periodic signal, focusing on the dependence of properties of stochastic resonance (SR) on system parameters. The stochastic resonance is shown through several different measures: system response, power spectrum and signal-to-noise ratio. Firstly, it is found that whether the neuron can fire regularly depends on the cooperative effect of the signal frequency and the signal amplitude for the deterministic FHN neuron. When the forcing amplitude alone is insufficient to cause the neuron firing, the neuron can fire with the addition of trichotomous noise. Secondly, we show that power spectrum is maximized for an optimal value of the noise correlation time, which is the signature of SR. Finally, from studying SNR, the specific system parameters are found to optimize the SR phenomenon.

  4. Blade resonance parameter identification based on tip-timing method without the once-per revolution sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Haotian; Duan, Fajie; Zhang, Jilong

    2016-01-01

    Blade tip-timing is the most effective method for blade vibration online measurement of turbomachinery. In this article a synchronous resonance vibration measurement method of blade based on tip-timing is presented. This method requires no once-per revolution sensor which makes it more generally applicable in the condition where this sensor is difficult to install, especially for the high-pressure rotors of dual-rotor engines. Only three casing mounted probes are required to identify the engine order, amplitude, natural frequency and the damping coefficient of the blade. A method is developed to identify the blade which a tip-timing data belongs to without once-per revolution sensor. Theoretical analyses of resonance parameter measurement are presented. Theoretic error of the method is investigated and corrected. Experiments are conducted and the results indicate that blade resonance parameter identification is achieved without once-per revolution sensor.

  5. Assessment of uncertainty in parameter evaluation and prediction.

    PubMed

    Meinrath, G; Ekberg, C; Landgren, A; Liljenzin, J O

    2000-02-01

    Like in all experimental science, chemical data is affected by the limited precision of the measurement process. Quality control and traceability of experimental data require suitable approaches to express properly the degree of uncertainty. Noise and bias are nuisance effects reducing the information extractable from experimental data. However, because of the complexity of the numerical data evaluation in many chemical fields, often mean values from data analysis, e.g. multi-parametric curve fitting, are reported only. Relevant information on the interpretation limits, e.g. standard deviations or confidence limits, are either omitted or estimated. Modern techniques for handling of uncertainty in both parameter evaluation and prediction are strongly based on the calculation power of computers. Advantageously, computer-intensive methods like Monte Carlo resampling and Latin Hypercube sampling do not require sophisticated and often unavailable mathematical treatment. The statistical concepts are introduced. Applications of some computer-intensive statistical techniques to chemical problems are demonstrated. PMID:18967855

  6. Parameters of Instrumental Swallowing Evaluations: Describing a Diagnostic Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Pisegna, Jessica M; Langmore, Susan E

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare selected parameters of two swallow evaluations: fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) and the modified barium swallow (MBS) study. This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study. Fifty-five clinicians were asked to watch video recordings of swallow evaluations of 2 patients that were done using fluoroscopy and endoscopy simultaneously. In a randomized order, clinicians viewed 4 edited videos from simultaneous evaluations: the FEES and MBS videos of patient 1 and 2 each taking one swallow of 5 mL applesauce. Clinicians filled out a questionnaire that asked (1) which anatomical sites they could visualize on each video, (2) where they saw pharyngeal residue after a swallow, (3) their overall clinical impression of the pharyngeal residue, and (4) their opinions of the evaluation styles. Clinicians reported a significant difference in the visualization of anatomical sites, 11 of the 15 sites were reported as better-visualized on the FEES than on the MBS video (p < 0.05). Clinicians also rated residue to be present in more locations on the FEES than on the MBS. Clinicians' overall impressions of the severity of residue on the same exact swallow were significantly different depending on the evaluation type (FEES vs. MBS for patient 1 χ(2) = 20.05, p < 0.0001; patient 2 χ(2) = 7.52, p = 0.006), with FEES videos rated more severely. FEES advantages were: more visualization of pharyngeal and laryngeal swallowing anatomy and residue. However, as a result, clinicians provided more severe impressions of residue amount on FEES. On one hand, this suggests that FEES is a more sensitive tool than MBS studies, but on the other hand, clinicians might provide more severe interpretations on FEES. PMID:26987971

  7. A high-fidelity Monte Carlo evaluation of CANDU-6 safety parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Hartanto, D.

    2012-07-01

    Important safety parameters such as the fuel temperature coefficient (FTC) and the power coefficient of reactivity (PCR) of the CANDU-6 (CANada Deuterium Uranium) reactor have been evaluated by using a modified MCNPX code. For accurate analysis of the parameters, the DBRC (Doppler Broadening Rejection Correction) scheme was implemented in MCNPX in order to account for the thermal motion of the heavy uranium nucleus in the neutron-U scattering reactions. In this work, a standard fuel lattice has been modeled and the fuel is depleted by using the MCNPX and the FTC value is evaluated for several burnup points including the mid-burnup representing a near-equilibrium core. The Doppler effect has been evaluated by using several cross section libraries such as ENDF/B-VI, ENDF/B-VII, JEFF, JENDLE. The PCR value is also evaluated at mid-burnup conditions to characterize safety features of equilibrium CANDU-6 reactor. To improve the reliability of the Monte Carlo calculations, huge number of neutron histories are considered in this work and the standard deviation of the k-inf values is only 0.5{approx}1 pcm. It has been found that the FTC is significantly enhanced by accounting for the Doppler broadening of scattering resonance and the PCR are clearly improved. (authors)

  8. Comprehensive evaluation of fracture parameters by dual laterolog data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboorian-Jooybari, Hadi; Dejam, Morteza; Chen, Zhangxin; Pourafshary, Peyman

    2016-08-01

    Reservoir quality and productivity of tight formations depend heavily on the degree of fracture development. In fact, hard and dense carbonate formations may not be considered as net pay without the presence of fractures that convey fluids towards the wellbore. The evaluation of fractures is key to effective reservoir characterization for purposes like well drilling and completion as well as development and simulation of fractured reservoirs. Although imaging technologies such as Formation Micro-Scanners and Imagers (FMS and FMI) provide useful information about fracture properties (i.e., dip angle, porosity, aperture, and permeability), they are very expensive and may not be available in all wells. In this work, fracture parameters are estimated using conventional dual laterolog (DLL) resistivity which includes shallow (LLS) and deep (LLD) responses. This technique is based on electrical resistivity anomalies resulting from the separation of shallow and deep laterolog curves. Fracture parameters that can be calculated by DLL include dip angle, aperture, porosity, permeability, and cementation factor. The accuracy of the parameters calculated using DLL data is validated by the results of FMI in a well in one of the Iranian fractured reservoirs. Contrary to the image logs, the conventional DLL is run routinely in all drilled wells. Therefore, if a reservoir has limited and insufficient data of image logs, as it is often the case, the DLLs can be used as a reliable replacement in the construction of fracture models. Furthermore, DLL has an advantage of deeper evaluation of fractures in comparison with the immediate borehole investigation of image logs.

  9. Analytical modeling of Schumann resonance and ELF propagation parameters on Mars with a multi-layered ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozakiewicz, Joanna; Kulak, Andrzej; Mlynarczyk, Janusz

    2015-11-01

    Two electrically conductive planetary spheres, the ionosphere and the ground, form a spherical waveguide. Within such a planetary cavity a phenomenon called Schumann resonance (SR) can occur. It is a resonance of extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic waves. The resonance parameters are strongly related to the electromagnetic properties of the cavity. On Mars, as there is no liquid water at the planetary surface, the ground has a low conductivity. In such a situation, ELF waves penetrate into the planetary subsurface up to many kilometers depth. To examine the influence of low-conductivity grounds on ELF propagation, we have introduced a recently developed analytical method, which enables to estimate the propagation parameters and explicate their dependence of the ground properties. Since the presented model is fully analytical, it is computationally efficient and can be very useful in finding inverse solutions. To demonstrate the potential of the method, we present the relationship between individual ground properties and the parameters of Schumann resonance. The obtained results indicate that Martian exploration performed by one ELF station located at the planetary surface can reveal, along with the properties of the ionosphere, the existence of liquid water under the Martian surface.

  10. Triangular Ring Resonator: Direct Measurement of the Parity-Odd Parameters of the Photon Sector of SME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exirifard, Qasem

    2014-03-01

    We introduce the Triangular Ring (TR) resonator. We show that the difference between the clockwise and anti-clockwise resonant frequencies of a vacuum TR resonator is sensitive to the birefringence parity-odd parameters of the photon's sector of the minimal Standard Model Extension (mSME): the Standard Model plus all the perturbative parameters encoding the break of the Lorentz symmetry. We report that utilizing the current technology allows for direct measurement of these parameters with a sensitivity of the parity-even ones and improves the best current resonator bounds by couple of orders of magnitudes. We note that, designing an optical table that rotates perpendicular to the gravitational equipotential surface (geoid) allows for direct measurement of the constancy of the light speed at the vicinity of the earth in all directions, in particular, perpendicular to the geoid. If this table could achieve the precision of the ordinary tables, then it would improve the GPS bounds on the constancy of the light speed perpendicular to geoid by about eight orders of magnitude.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of atomic xenon dissolved in Gay-Berne model liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Lintuvuori, Juho; Straka, Michal; Vaara, Juha

    2007-03-01

    We present constant-pressure Monte Carlo simulations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral parameters, nuclear magnetic shielding relative to the free atom as well as nuclear quadrupole coupling, for atomic xenon dissolved in a model thermotropic liquid crystal. The solvent is described by Gay-Berne (GB) molecules with parametrization kappa=4.4, kappa{'}=20.0 , and mu=nu=1 . The reduced pressure of P{*}=2.0 is used. Previous simulations of a pure GB system with this parametrization have shown that upon lowering the temperature, the model exhibits isotropic, nematic, smectic- A , and smectic- B /molecular crystal phases. We introduce spherical xenon solutes and adjust the energy and length scales of the GB-Xe interaction to those of the GB-GB interaction. This is done through first principles quantum chemical calculations carried out for a dimer of model mesogens as well as the mesogen-xenon complex. We preparametrize quantum chemically the Xe nuclear shielding and quadrupole coupling tensors when interacting with the model mesogen, and use the parametrization in a pairwise additive fashion in the analysis of the simulation. We present the temperature evolution of {129/131}Xe shielding and 131Xe quadrupole coupling in the different phases of the GB model. From the simulations, separate isotropic and anisotropic contributions to the experimentally available total shielding can be obtained. At the experimentally relevant concentration, the presence of the xenon atoms does not significantly affect the phase behavior as compared to the pure GB model. The simulations reproduce many of the characteristic experimental features of Xe NMR in real thermotropic LCs: Discontinuity in the value or trends of the shielding and quadrupole coupling at the nematic-isotropic and smectic-A-nematic phase transitions, nonlinear shift evolution in the nematic phase reflecting the behavior of the orientational order parameter, and decreasing shift in the smectic-A phase. The last

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of atomic xenon dissolved in Gay-Berne model liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lintuvuori, Juho; Straka, Michal; Vaara, Juha

    2007-03-01

    We present constant-pressure Monte Carlo simulations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral parameters, nuclear magnetic shielding relative to the free atom as well as nuclear quadrupole coupling, for atomic xenon dissolved in a model thermotropic liquid crystal. The solvent is described by Gay-Berne (GB) molecules with parametrization κ=4.4 , κ'=20.0 , and μ=ν=1 . The reduced pressure of P⋆=2.0 is used. Previous simulations of a pure GB system with this parametrization have shown that upon lowering the temperature, the model exhibits isotropic, nematic, smectic- A , and smectic- B /molecular crystal phases. We introduce spherical xenon solutes and adjust the energy and length scales of the GB-Xe interaction to those of the GB-GB interaction. This is done through first principles quantum chemical calculations carried out for a dimer of model mesogens as well as the mesogen-xenon complex. We preparametrize quantum chemically the Xe nuclear shielding and quadrupole coupling tensors when interacting with the model mesogen, and use the parametrization in a pairwise additive fashion in the analysis of the simulation. We present the temperature evolution of Xe129/131 shielding and Xe131 quadrupole coupling in the different phases of the GB model. From the simulations, separate isotropic and anisotropic contributions to the experimentally available total shielding can be obtained. At the experimentally relevant concentration, the presence of the xenon atoms does not significantly affect the phase behavior as compared to the pure GB model. The simulations reproduce many of the characteristic experimental features of Xe NMR in real thermotropic LCs: Discontinuity in the value or trends of the shielding and quadrupole coupling at the nematic-isotropic and smectic- A -nematic phase transitions, nonlinear shift evolution in the nematic phase reflecting the behavior of the orientational order parameter, and decreasing shift in the smectic- A phase. The last

  13. Evaluation of the IRT Parameter Invariance Property for the MCAT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelkar, Vinaya; Wightman, Linda F.; Luecht, Richard M.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the viability of the property of parameter invariance for the one-parameter (1P), two-parameter (2P), and three-parameter (3P) item response theory (IRT) models for the Medical College Admissions Tests (MCAT). Invariance of item parameters across different gender, ethnic, and language groups and the…

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of anterior cruciate ligament tears: reevaluation of quantitative parameters and imaging findings including a simplified method for measuring the anterior cruciate ligament angle.

    PubMed

    Mellado, J M; Calmet, J; Olona, M; Giné, J; Saurí, A

    2004-05-01

    We evaluated the diagnostic utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for predicting anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears using both quantitative parameters and nonquantitative imaging findings. MRI examinations were retrospectively evaluated in a group of patients with arthroscopically confirmed complete ACL tear and in a control group with arthroscopically confirmed intact ACL. We evaluated multiple MRI features to compare their sensitivity and specificity for detecting ACL tears. Particular emphasis is put on the evaluation of three different quantitative parameters, including a simplified method for measuring the ACL angle. With a threshold value of 45 degrees the ACL angle reached a sensitivity and specificity of 100% for detecting ACL tears. With a threshold value of 0 degrees the Blumensaat angle had a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 98%. Finally, a threshold value of 115 degrees gave the posterior cruciate ligament angle a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity of 82%. Discontinuity was found to be the most useful of the ACL abnormalities. Of the secondary findings anterior tibial displacement was the best predictor of ligamentous injury. However, ACL abnormalities and secondary findings, alone or combined, failed to surpass the diagnostic value of the ACL angle for predicting ACL tears. Quantitative parameters are thus good predictors of ACL tears and may increase the overall sensitivity and specificity of MRI. The ACL angle may be confidently measured in a single MRI section and can be considered to be the most reliable quantitative parameter for detecting ACL tears. PMID:14530852

  15. Evaluation of Neonatal Hemolytic Jaundice: Clinical and Laboratory Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Cherepnalkovski, Anet Papazovska; Krzelj, Vjekoslav; Zafirovska-Ivanovska, Beti; Gruev, Todor; Markic, Josko; Aluloska, Natasa; Zdraveska, Nikolina; Piperkovska, Katica

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neonatal jaundice that occurs in ABO or Rhesus issoimunisation has been recognized as one of the major risk factors for development of severe hyperbilirubinemia and bilirubin neurotoxicity. AIM: Aim of our study was to investigate clinical and laboratory parameters associated with hemolytic jaundice due to Rh and ABO incompatibility and compare results with the group of unspecific jaundice. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred sixty seven (167) neonatal hyperbilirubinemia cases were included in the study, 24.6% of which presented with ABO/Rhesus type hemolytic jaundice, and the rest with unspecific jaundice. Evaluation included: blood count, reticulocites, serum bilirubin, aminotransferases, blood grouping, and Coombs test, also the day of bilirubin peak, duration of the hyperbilirubinemia, and additional bilirubin measurements. RESULTS: We showed significantly lower mean values of hemoglobin, erythrocytes and hematocrit and significantly higher values of reticulocytes in the group of ABO/Rh incompatibility compared to the group of jaundice of unspecific etiology; also an earlier presentation and a higher-grade jaundice in this group. CONCLUSIONS: The laboratory profile in ABO/Rh isoimmunisation cases depicts hemolytic mechanism of jaundice. These cases carry a significant risk for early and severe hyperbilirubinemia and are eligible for neurodevelopmental follow-up. Hematological parameters and blood grouping are simple diagnostic methods that assist the etiological diagnosis of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. PMID:27275310

  16. Neutron Cross Section Processing Methods for Improved Integral Benchmarking of Unresolved Resonance Region Evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Jonathan A.; Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord S.; Brown, Forrest B.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we describe the development and application of computational methods for processing neutron cross section data in the unresolved resonance region (URR). These methods are integrated with a continuous-energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code, thereby enabling their use in high-fidelity analyses. Enhanced understanding of the effects of URR evaluation representations on calculated results is then obtained through utilization of the methods in Monte Carlo integral benchmark simulations of fast spectrum critical assemblies. First, we present a so-called on-the-fly (OTF) method for calculating and Doppler broadening URR cross sections. This method proceeds directly from ENDF-6 average unresolved resonance parameters and, thus, eliminates any need for a probability table generation pre-processing step in which tables are constructed at several energies for all desired temperatures. Significant memory reduction may be realized with the OTF method relative to a probability table treatment if many temperatures are needed. Next, we examine the effects of using a multi-level resonance formalism for resonance reconstruction in the URR. A comparison of results obtained by using the same stochastically-generated realization of resonance parameters in both the single-level Breit-Wigner (SLBW) and multi-level Breit-Wigner (MLBW) formalisms allows for the quantification of level-level interference effects on integrated tallies such as keff and energy group reaction rates. Though, as is well-known, cross section values at any given incident energy may differ significantly between single-level and multi-level formulations, the observed effects on integral results are minimal in this investigation. Finally, we demonstrate the calculation of true expected values, and the statistical spread of those values, through independent Monte Carlo simulations, each using an independent realization of URR cross section structure throughout. It is observed that both probability table

  17. Evaluation of Hemodynamic Parameters as Predictors of Glaucoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Janulevičiene, Ingrida; Ehrlich, Rita; Siesky, Brent; Nedzelskienė, Irena; Harris, Alon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate hemodynamic parameters as possible predictors for glaucoma progression. Methods. An 18-month randomized double-masked cohort study including 30 open-angle glaucoma patients receiving fixed-combination treatment with Dorzolamide/Timolol (DTFC) or Latanoprost/Timolol (LTFC) (n = 15 per group) was performed. Intraocular pressure (IOP), arterial blood pressure (BP), ocular and diastolic perfusion pressures (OPP, DPP), color Doppler imaging, pulsatile ocular blood flow analysis, scanning laser polarimetry, and Humphrey visual field evaluations were included. Results. Both treatments showed statistically similar IOP reduction. Six patients in DTFC and 7 in LTFC group met glaucoma progression criteria. DTFC group had higher OPP, DPP, and lower vascular resistivity indices as compared to the LTFC. Progressing patients had higher nerve fiber index, lower systolic BP, OPP, DPP, higher ophthalmic and central retinal artery vascular resistance, and lower pulse volume (P < .05; t-test). Conclusions. Structural changes consistent with glaucoma progression correlate with non-IOP-dependent risk factors. PMID:21577269

  18. Distinguishing black-hole spin-orbit resonances by their gravitational wave signatures. II. Full parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifirò, Daniele; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Gerosa, Davide; Berti, Emanuele; Kesden, Michael; Littenberg, Tyson; Sperhake, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    Gravitational waves from coalescing binary black holes encode the evolution of their spins prior to merger. In the post-Newtonian regime and on the precession time scale, this evolution has one of three morphologies, with the spins either librating around one of two fixed points ("resonances") or circulating freely. In this paper we perform full parameter estimation on resonant binaries with fixed masses and spin magnitudes, changing three parameters: a conserved "projected effective spin" ξ and resonant family Δ Φ =0 ,π (which uniquely label the source); the inclination θJ N of the binary's total angular momentum with respect to the line of sight (which determines the strength of precessional effects in the waveform); and the signal amplitude. We demonstrate that resonances can be distinguished for a wide range of binaries, except for highly symmetric configurations where precessional effects are suppressed. Motivated by new insight into double-spin evolution, we introduce new variables to characterize precessing black hole binaries which naturally reflects the time scale separation of the system and therefore better encode the dynamical information carried by gravitational waves.

  19. Nonlinear Parameters for a Diagnosis of Micro-Scale Cracks Using a Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (nrus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Yong-Moo; Alam, M. K.; Kim, CheolGi

    2010-02-01

    Micro-scale cracks in a material are one of the major factors for the determination of life of a structure as well as for the structural integrity. Micro-scale cracks caused by materials degradation and damage will affect the resonance spectrum of a sample only very slightly and be masked by the resolution of the frequency spectrum when we use a standard linear Resonance Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) analysis. Micro-scale damages, however, can produce a nonlinear elastic behavior. The nonlinearity can be measured by increasing the dynamic strain i.e. excitation amplitude in a Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (NRUS) device. In this paper a feasibility of NRUS for a diagnosis of micro-cracks are investigated for low carbon steel CT specimens. A shift of resonance frequency and normalized amplitude of resonance pattern are chosen to correlate the micro-scale cracks or damage. These two nonlinear parameters can be a potential tool for the detection of micro-cracks or damage of a material.

  20. Evaluation of sub-microsecond recovery resonators for in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyodo, F.; Subramanian, S.; Devasahayam, N.; Murugesan, R.; Matsumoto, K.; Mitchell, J. B.; Krishna, M. C.

    2008-02-01

    Time-domain (TD) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging at 300 MHz for in vivo applications requires resonators with recovery times less than 1 μs after pulsed excitation to reliably capture the rapidly decaying free induction decay (FID). In this study, we tested the suitability of the Litz foil coil resonator (LCR), commonly used in MRI, for in vivo EPR/EPRI applications in the TD mode and compared with parallel coil resonator (PCR). In TD mode, the sensitivity of LCR was lower than that of the PCR. However, in continuous wave (CW) mode, the LCR showed better sensitivity. The RF homogeneity was similar in both the resonators. The axis of the RF magnetic field is transverse to the cylindrical axis of the LCR, making the resonator and the magnet co-axial. Therefore, the loading of animals, and placing of the anesthesia nose cone and temperature monitors was more convenient in the LCR compared to the PCR whose axis is perpendicular to the magnet axis.

  1. Experimental evaluation of the twofold electromagnetic enhancement theory of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Itoh, Tamitake; Biju, Vasudevanpillai; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2009-02-15

    We examined an electromagnetic (EM) theory of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) using single Ag nanoaggregates. The SERRS-EM theory is characterized by twofold EM enhancement induced by the coupling of plasmon resonance with both excitation and emission of Raman scattering plus fluorescence. The total emission cross-section spectra of enhanced Raman scattering and enhanced fluorescence were calculated using the following parameters: the spectrum of enhancement factor induced by plasmon resonance, resonance Raman scattering overlapped with fluorescence, and excitation wavelengths. The calculations well agreed with experimental total emission cross-section spectra, thus providing strong indications that the SERRS-EM theory is quantitatively correct.

  2. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Herman

    2016-09-01

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3 / 2 , 5 / 2 , 7 / 2, and 9 / 2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  3. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cho, Herman

    2016-02-28

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3/2,5/2,7/2, and 9/2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Furthermore, applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  4. Neutron Resonance Parameters of 238U and the Calculated Cross Sections from the Reich-Moore Analysis of Experimental Data in the Neutron Energy Range from 0 keV to 20 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H

    2005-12-05

    The neutron resonance parameters of {sup 238}U were obtained from a SAMMY analysis of high-resolution neutron transmission measurements and high-resolution capture cross section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) in the years 1970-1990, and from more recent transmission and capture cross section measurements performed at the Geel Linear Accelerator (GELINA). Compared with previous evaluations, the energy range for this resonance analysis was extended from 10 to 20 keV, taking advantage of the high resolution of the most recent ORELA transmission measurements. The experimental database and the method of analysis are described in this report. The neutron transmissions and the capture cross sections calculated with the resonance parameters are compared with the experimental data. A description is given of the statistical properties of the resonance parameters and of the recommended values of the average parameters. The new evaluation results in a slight decrease of the effective capture resonance integral and improves the prediction of integral thermal benchmarks by 70 pcm to 200 pcm.

  5. Evaluated 182,183,184,186W Neutron Cross Sections and Covariances in the Resolved Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect

    Pigni, Marco T; Leal, Luiz C

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently completed the resonance parameter evaluation of four tungsten isotopes, i.e., 182,183,184,186W, in the neutron energy range of thermal up to several keV. This nuclear data work was performed with support from the US Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) in an effort to provide improved tungsten cross section and covariance data for criticality safety analyses. The evaluation methodology uses the Reich-Moore approximation of the R-matrix formalism of the code SAMMY to fit high-resolution measurements performed in 2010 and 2012 at the Geel linear accelerator facility (GELINA), as well as other experimental data sets on natural tungsten available in the EXFOR library. In the analyzed energy range, this work nearly doubles the resolved resonance region (RRR) present in the latest US nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.1. In view of the interest in tungsten for distinct types of nuclear applications and the relatively homogeneous distribution of the isotopic tungsten—namely, 182W(26.5%), 183W(14.31%), 184W(30.64%), and 186W(28.43%) - the completion of these four evaluations represents a significant contribution to the improvement of the ENDF library. This paper presents an overview of the evaluated resonance parameters and related covariances for total and capture cross sections on the four tungsten isotopes.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations: Parameter evaluation, application and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jin

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a theoretical technique for investigating the physical properties of a wide variety of molecules. This dissertation contains my studies on three important parts of the MD simulation: evaluation of parameters in empirical energy functions widely used in MD simulations, application of MD simulation on experimentally interested biological molecules and development of new methods for constraint dynamics simulations. All the work in this thesis made use of CHARMM as an MD simulation tool. The MD simulation uses empirical energy functions parameterized by a set of parameters. These parameters play an important role in the quality of the simulations. I evaluated nine parameter sets from Harvard University and Molecular Simulations, Inc. for protein simulations by the MD simulations of hydrated form of carboxy- myoglobin and interleukin-1/beta, which are rich in two typical protein structure motifs, helix and β sheet structures respectively. It is found that some sets are good at representing helical structure proteins while others are good at β sheet proteins. But all of them need improvement on representing motions at low temperature. Experimental evidence indicates that the 1A coiled-coil domains of the Intermediate Filament (IF) proteins consisting of coiled human keratins 1 and 10 (K1 and K10) are 'hot spots' for substitutional mutations. Some of these mutations are correlated to the human skin diseases-epidermolytic hyperkeratiosis (EH) and epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS). The MD simulation technique is used here for the first time to model and simulate these proteins to elucidate the molecular-level effects of these mutations. Lacking the experimental crystal structures, the initial structure of 1A domain of the wild type Intermediate Filament protein and its mutants were modeled from scratch to reproduce the well- known properties of the proteins of this kind followed by identical MD simulations. The important result is

  7. Far-field beam quality evaluation of high-power unstable resonators TEA CO2 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ruhai; Chen, Ning; Shi, Kui; Wang, Bing

    2013-05-01

    High average power pulsed TEA CO2 lasers have many important applications, such as laser manufacturing, military applications, but there rarely have reports about the theoretical and experimental studies on the virtual confocus resonator of pulsed TEA CO2 laser, especially its far field optical quality. Based on the real date of the unstable resonator modified by the stable resonator of high power TEA CO2, three common theoretical evaluations and analyzes were conducted and compared with the measured results of far field light intensity distribution with 2 kW designed unstable resonator laser with the block ratio is ɛ=0.404. The results show that the unstable resonator can obtain near diffraction limitation and high optical quality beam. The β factor is smaller than 4 times than the stable resonator. Furthermore, the smaller block factor can make higher power in bucket for the unstable resonator. The comprehensive prediction and evaluation of designed unstable resonator need to synthetically use these three theoretical methods of the evaluations. The simulation results, with considering the optical aberration, heat distortion and atmospheric effect, agree well with the real recording image by the infrared imaging system in the distance of 300m. The research of this paper has very important reference value for evaluating the tactical effectiveness and optimization design of high power TEA CO2 laser system with different unstable resonators.

  8. Brain magnetic resonance imaging, aerobic power, and metabolic parameters among 30 asymptomatic scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Tripodi, D; Dupas, B; Potiron, M; Louvet, S; Geraut, C

    2004-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the presence of cerebral lesions in asymptomatic scuba divers and explain the causes of them: potential risk factors associating cardiovascular risk factors, low aerobic capacity, or characteristics of diving (maximum depth, ascent rate). Experienced scuba divers, over 40 years of age, without any decompression sickness (DCS) history were included. We studied 30 scuba divers (instructors) without any clinical symptoms. For all of them, we carried out a clinical examination with fatty body mass determination and we questioned them about their diving habits. A brain Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI), an assessment of maximal oxygen uptake, glycemia, triglyceridemia, and cholesterolemia were systematically carried out. Cerebral spots of high intensity were found at 33 % in the scuba diving group and 30 % in the control group. In the diving group, abnormalities were related to unsafe scuba-diving or metabolic abnormalities. In our study, we did not find a significant relationship between the lesions of the central nervous system, and the age, depth of the dives, number of dives, and ergometric performances (maximal oxygen uptake, V.O (2max), serum level of blood lactate). Nevertheless, we found a significant relationship between the lesions of the central nervous system and ascent rate faster than 10 meters per minute (r = 0.57; p = 0.003) or presence of high level of cholesterolemia (r = 0.6; p = 0.001). We found concordant results using the Cochran's Test: meaningful link between the number of brain lesions and the speed of decompression (Uexp = 14 < Utable = 43; alpha = 0.05, p < 0.01). We concluded that hyperintensities can be explained by preformed nitrogen gas microbubbles and particularly in presence of cholesterol, when the ascent rate is up to 10 meters per minute. So, it was remarkable to note that asymptomatic patients practicing scuba diving either professionally or recreationally, presented lesions of the central nervous

  9. Approaches to real-time tsunami wave parameters evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentyev, Mikhail; Titov, Vasily; Romanenko, Alexey

    2014-05-01

    Timely prediction of tsunami wave parameters is still among actual problems for tsunami risk mitigation. After the Great East Japan Earthquake (Mach 11, 2011) it takes only 20 minutes for tsunami wave to approach the cost of Japan after the quake. Existing models and software applications allow experts to simulate tsunami wave propagation rather fast. However, all the models require knowledge about initial see-face disturbance at tsunami source. Seismic data, available right after the event, provide the information about earthquake magnitude and epicenter location. There are a number of approaches to evaluate the initial see-face disturbance (using knowledge about the trench geo structure, satellite imaging, etc.). One of perspective approaches is to recalculate tsunami wave profiles, recorded by deep-ocean stations like DART buoys or GPS equipment, in terms of initial sea surface displacement. The so-called preliminary calculation strategy suggests that the targeted subduction zone is covered by a number rectangular "unit sources" 50x100 km. Wave propagation from each unit source, caused by the unified shape (typical for the given subduction zone), is calculated in advance other the entire aquatoria. After real event the wave profile, measure at certain sensor, is approximated as linear combination of model signals from the above unit sources, calculated at the same point. Method was proved to be rather accurate. However, it takes valuable time to recover initial displacement at tsunami source in case of larger zone of disturbance (e.g. about 20 minutes for processing tsunami epicenter covered with six unit-sources). We suggest new algorithm for above mentioned model. This is based on Fourier theory and involves orthogonal decomposition of simulated profiles, calculated from the unit sources. It takes only about 1 second to recover tsunami source of twenty unit-sources. This allows one to speak about possibility to develop real-time system for evaluating tsunami.

  10. NERO: a code for the nonlinear evaluation of resonances in one-turn mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todesco, E.; Gemmi, M.; Giovannozzi, M.

    1997-10-01

    We describe a code that evaluates the stability, the position and the width of resonances in four-dimensional symplectic mappings. The code is based on the computation of the resonant perturbative series through the program ARES, and on the analysis of the resonant orbits of the interpolating Hamiltonian. The code is dedicated to the study and to the comparison of the nonlinear behaviour in one-turn betatronic maps.

  11. Evaluation of Elution Parameters for Cesium Ion Exchange Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Burgeson, Ingrid E.; Deschane, Jaquetta R.; Cook, Bryan J.; Blanchard, David L.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2006-08-28

    Cesium ion exchange is one of the planned processes for treating and disposing of waste at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. Radioactive supernatant liquids from the waste tanks will undergo ultrafiltration, followed by cesium ion exchange using a regenerable organic ion exchange resin. Two resins, SuperLig?644 and a Resorcinol-formaldehyde resin are being evaluated for cesium removal and cesium elution characteristics. The main purpose of this study is to optimize the cesium elution to provide a resin which after undergoing elution would meet the U.S. Department of Energy/Office of River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant processing and resin disposal criteria. Columns of each resin type were loaded to greater or equal to 90% breakthrough with a Hanford waste stimulant and eluted with nitric acid. The temperature, flow rate and nitric acid concentration were varied to determine the optimal elution conditions. Temperature and eluant flow rate were the most important elution parameters. As would be predicted based upon kinetic consideration alone, decreasing the eluant flow rate and increasing the temperature provided the optimal elution conditions. Varying the nitric acid concentration did not have a significant effect on the elution; however, elutions performed using both high acid concentration (1M) and elevated temperature (45 C) resulted in resin degradation, causing gas generation and resin bed disruption.

  12. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PARAMETERS OF SEDIMENT EXTRACTION AND FRACTIONATION THAT INFLUENCE TOXICITY AS EVALUATED BY MICROTOX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several physical and chemical parameters of sediment extraction and fractionation of organic compounds that influence bioassay results were evaluated. ach parameter was evaluated with a photoluminescent bacterial bioassay (Microtox) as an end point. hree solvents (acetonitrile, a...

  13. Dual-Channel Single-Molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer to Establish Distance Parameters for RNA Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The increasing interest in RNA nanotechnology and the demonstrated feasibility of using RNA nanoparticles as therapeutics have prompted the need for imaging systems with nanometer-scale resolution for RNA studies. Phi29 dimeric pRNAs can serve as building blocks in assembly into the hexameric ring of the nanomotors, as modules of RNA nanoparciles, and as vehicles for specific delivery of therapeutics to cancers or viral infected cells. The understanding of the 3D structure of this novel RNA dimeric particle is fundamentally and practically important. Although a 3D model of pRNA dimer has been proposed based on biochemical analysis, no distance measurements or X-ray diffraction data have been reported. Here we evaluated the application of our customized single-molecule dual-viewing system for distance measurement within pRNA dimers using single-molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET). Ten pRNA monomers labeled with single donor or acceptor fluorophores at various locations were constructed and eight dimers were assembled. smFRET signals were detected for six dimers. The tethered arm sizes of the fluorophores were estimated empirically from dual-labeled RNA/DNA standards. The distances between donor and acceptor were calculated and used as distance parameters to assess and refine the previously reported 3D model of the pRNA dimer. Distances between nucleotides in pRNA dimers were found to be different from those of the dimers bound to procapsid, suggesting a conformational change of the pRNA dimer upon binding to the procapsid. PMID:20954698

  14. Harvesting rockfall hazard evaluation parameters from Google Earth Street View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partsinevelos, Panagiotis; Agioutantis, Zacharias; Tripolitsiotis, Achilles; Steiakakis, Chrysanthos; Mertikas, Stelios

    2015-04-01

    Rockfall incidents along highways and railways prove extremely dangerous for properties, infrastructures and human lives. Several qualitative metrics such as the Rockfall Hazard Rating System (RHRS) and the Colorado Rockfall Hazard Rating System (CRHRS) have been established to estimate rockfall potential and provide risk maps in order to control and monitor rockfall incidents. The implementation of such metrics for efficient and reliable risk modeling require accurate knowledge of multi-parametric attributes such as the geological, geotechnical, topographic parameters of the study area. The Missouri Rockfall Hazard Rating System (MORH RS) identifies the most potentially problematic areas using digital video logging for the determination of parameters like slope height and angle, face irregularities, etc. This study aims to harvest in a semi-automated approach geometric and qualitative measures through open source platforms that may provide 3-dimensional views of the areas of interest. More specifically, the Street View platform from Google Maps, is hereby used to provide essential information that can be used towards 3-dimensional reconstruction of slopes along highways. The potential of image capturing along a programmable virtual route to provide the input data for photogrammetric processing is also evaluated. Moreover, qualitative characterization of the geological and geotechnical status, based on the Street View images, is performed. These attributes are then integrated to deliver a GIS-based rockfall hazard map. The 3-dimensional models are compared to actual photogrammetric measures in a rockfall prone area in Crete, Greece while in-situ geotechnical characterization is also used to compare and validate the hazard risk. This work is considered as the first step towards the exploitation of open source platforms to improve road safety and the development of an operational system where authorized agencies (i.e., civil protection) will be able to acquire near

  15. A new method of evaluating tight gas sands pore structure from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Liang; Mao, Zhi-qiang; Xie, Xiu-hong

    2016-04-01

    Tight gas sands always display such characteristics of ultra-low porosity, permeability, high irreducible water, low resistivity contrast, complicated pore structure and strong heterogeneity, these make that the conventional methods are invalid. Many effective gas bearing formations are considered as dry zones or water saturated layers, and cannot be identified and exploited. To improve tight gas sands evaluation, the best method is quantitative characterizing rock pore structure. The mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves are advantageous in predicting formation pore structure. However, the MICP experimental measurements are limited due to the environment and economy factors, this leads formation pore structure cannot be consecutively evaluated. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs are considered to be promising in evaluating rock pore structure. Generally, to consecutively quantitatively evaluate tight gas sands pore structure, the best method is constructing pseudo Pc curves from NMR logs. In this paper, based on the analysis of lab experimental results for 20 core samples, which were drilled from tight gas sandstone reservoirs of Sichuan basin, and simultaneously applied for lab MICP and NMR measurements, the relationships of piecewise power function between nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) transverse relaxation T2 time and pore-throat radius Rc are established. A novel method, which is used to transform NMR reverse cumulative curve as pseudo capillary pressure (Pc) curve is proposed, and the corresponding model is established based on formation classification. By using this model, formation pseudo Pc curves can be consecutively synthesized. The pore throat radius distribution, and pore structure evaluation parameters, such as the average pore throat radius (Rm), the threshold pressure (Pd), the maximum pore throat radius (Rmax) and so on, can also be precisely extracted. After this method is extended into field applications, several tight gas

  16. US-based Drug Cost Parameter Estimation for Economic Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Joseph F; Meek, Patrick D; Rosenberg, Marjorie A

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In the US, more than 10% of national health expenditures are for prescription drugs. Assessing drug costs in US economic evaluation studies is not consistent, as the true acquisition cost of a drug is not known by decision modelers. Current US practice focuses on identifying one reasonable drug cost and imposing some distributional assumption to assess uncertainty. Methods We propose a set of Rules based on current pharmacy practice that account for the heterogeneity of drug product costs. The set of products derived from our Rules, and their associated costs, form an empirical distribution that can be used for more realistic sensitivity analyses, and create transparency in drug cost parameter computation. The Rules specify an algorithmic process to select clinically equivalent drug products that reduce pill burden, use an appropriate package size, and assume uniform weighting of substitutable products. Three diverse examples show derived empirical distributions and are compared with previously reported cost estimates. Results The shapes of the empirical distributions among the three drugs differ dramatically, including multiple modes and different variation. Previously published estimates differed from the means of the empirical distributions. Published ranges for sensitivity analyses did not cover the ranges of the empirical distributions. In one example using lisinopril, the empirical mean cost of substitutable products was $444 (range $23–$953) as compared to a published estimate of $305 (range $51–$523). Conclusions Our Rules create a simple and transparent approach to create cost estimates of drug products and assess their variability. The approach is easily modified to include a subset of, or different weighting for, substitutable products. The derived empirical distribution is easily incorporated into one-way or probabilistic sensitivity analyses. PMID:25532826

  17. Generalized Parameter-Adjusted Stochastic Resonance of Duffing Oscillator and Its Application to Weak-Signal Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Zhi-Hui; Leng, Yong-Gang

    2015-01-01

    A two-dimensional Duffing oscillator which can produce stochastic resonance (SR) is studied in this paper. We introduce its SR mechanism and present a generalized parameter-adjusted SR (GPASR) model of this oscillator for the necessity of parameter adjustments. The Kramers rate is chosen as the theoretical basis to establish a judgmental function for judging the occurrence of SR in this model; and to analyze and summarize the parameter-adjusted rules under unmatched signal amplitude, frequency, and/or noise-intensity. Furthermore, we propose the weak-signal detection approach based on this GPASR model. Finally, we employ two practical examples to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach in practical engineering application. PMID:26343671

  18. Evaluation of Linking Methods for Placing Three-Parameter Logistic Item Parameter Estimates onto a One-Parameter Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karkee, Thakur B.; Wright, Karen R.

    2004-01-01

    Different item response theory (IRT) models may be employed for item calibration. Change of testing vendors, for example, may result in the adoption of a different model than that previously used with a testing program. To provide scale continuity and preserve cut score integrity, item parameter estimates from the new model must be linked to the…

  19. Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perozzi, E.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A resonance in CELESTIAL MECHANICS occurs when some of the quantities characterizing the motion of two or more celestial bodies can be considered as commensurable, i.e. their ratio is close to an integer fraction. In a simplified form, this can be expressed as ...

  20. Approximate Schumann resonance parameters for a two-scale-height ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sentman, D. D.

    1990-01-01

    An isotropic, spherically symmetric two-scale-height ionosphere's transverse magnetic mode eigenfrequencies, as well as the height and angular profiles of its electric and magnetic fields, are presently addressed by an approximate solution. The electromagnetic energy in the eigenmodes is equally partitioned between the electric and magnetic fields, allowing a simple expression of the relative degrees of dissipation within the radial and tangential dissipation layers. The results obtained may be relevant to interpretations of the temporal variations in the Schumann resonances.

  1. Design parameters of a resonant infrared photoconductor with unity quantum efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam; Mcmurray, Robert E., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This paper proposes a concept of a resonant infrared photoconductor that has characteristics of 100 percent quantum efficiency, high photoconductive gain, and very low noise equivalent power. Central to this concept is an establishment of a high-finesse absorption cavity internal to the detector element. A theoretical analysis is carried out, demonstrating this concept and providing some design guidelines. A Ge:Ga FIR detector is presently being fabricated using this approach.

  2. Electrostatic Generation of Bulk Acoustic Waves and Electrical Parameters of Si-MEMS Resonators.

    PubMed

    Dulmet, Bernard; Ivan, Mihaela Eugenia; Ballandras, Sylvain

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes an analytical approach to model the generation of bulk acoustic waves in an electrostatically excited silicon MEMS structure, as well as its electromechanical response in terms of static and dynamic displacements, electromechanical coupling, and motional current. The analysis pertains to the single-port electrostatic drive of trapped-energy thickness-extensional (TE) modes in thin plates. Both asymmetric single-side and symmetric double-side electrostatic gap configurations are modeled. Green's function is used to describe the characteristic of the static displacement of the driven surface of the structure versus the dc bias voltage, which allows us to determine the electrical response of the resonator. Optical and electrical characterizations have been performed on resonator samples operating at 10.3 MHz on the fundamental of TE mode under single-side electrostatic excitation. The various figures of merit depend on the dc bias voltage. Typical values of 9000 for the Q-factor, and of 10(-5) for the electromechanical coupling factor k(2) have been obtained with [Formula: see text] for [Formula: see text]-thick gaps. Here-considered modes have a typical temperature coefficients of frequency (TCF) close to -30 ppm/(°)C. We conclude that the practical usability of such electrostatically excited bulk acoustic waves (BAW) resonators essentially depends on the efficiency of the compensation of feed-through capacitance. PMID:26642450

  3. Mechanical design parameters for detection of nuclear signals by magnetic resonance force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, G.J.; Hanlon, J.A.; Lamartine, B.; Hawley, M.; Solem, J.C.; Signer, S.; Jarmer, J.J.; Penttila, S.; Sillerud, L.O.; Pryputniewicz, R.J.

    1993-10-01

    Recent theoretical work has shown that mechanical detection of magnetic resonance from a single nuclear spin is in principle possible. This theory has recently been experimentally validated by the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance signals using microscale cantilevers. Currently we are extending this technology in an attempt to detect nuclear signals which are extending this technology in an attempt to detect nuclear signals which are three orders of magnitude lower in intensity than electron signals. In order to achieve the needed thousand-fold improvement in sensitivity we have undertaken the development of optimized mechanical cantilevers and highly polarized samples. Finite element modeling is used as a tool to simulate cantilever beam dynamics and to optimize the mechanical properties including Q, resonant frequency, amplitude of vibration and spring constant. Simulations are compared to experiments using heterodyne hologram interferometry. Nanofabrication of optimized cantilevers via ion milling will be directed by the outcome of these simulations and experiments. Highly polarized samples are developed using a three-fold approach: (1) high magnetic field strength (2.5T), (2) low temperature (1K), and (3) use of samples polarized by dynamic nuclear polarization. Our recent experiments have demonstrated nuclear polarizations in excess of 50% in molecules of toulene.

  4. Surface Plasmon Resonance Evaluation of Colloidal Metal Aerogel Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Sibille, Laurent; Cronise, Raymond J.; Noever, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging has in the past been applied to the characterization of thin films. In this study we apply the surface plasmon technique not to determine macroscopic spatial variations but rather to determine average microscopic information. Specifically, we deduce the dielectric properties of the surrounding gel matrix and information concerning the dynamics of the gelation process from the visible absorption characteristics of colloidal metal nanoparticles contained in aerogel pores. We have fabricated aerogels containing gold and silver nanoparticles. Because the dielectric constant of the metal particles is linked to that of the host matrix at the surface plasmon resonance, any change 'in the dielectric constant of the material surrounding the metal nanoparticles results in a shift in the surface plasmon wavelength. During gelation the surface plasmon resonance shifts to the red as the average or effective dielectric constant of the matrix increases. Conversely, formation of an aerogel or xerogel through supercritical extraction or evaporation of the solvent produces a blue shift in the resonance indicating a decrease in the dielectric constant of the matrix. From the magnitude of this shift we deduce the average fraction of air and of silica in contact with the metal particles. The surface area of metal available for catalytic gas reaction may thus be determined.

  5. Referencing strategy for the direct comparison of nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics motional parameters in RNA.

    PubMed

    Musselman, Catherine; Zhang, Qi; Al-Hashimi, Hashim; Andricioaei, Ioan

    2010-01-21

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are both techniques that can be used to characterize the structural dynamics of biomolecules and their underlying time scales. Comparison of relaxation parameters obtained through each methodology allows for cross validation of techniques and for complementarity in the analysis of dynamics. Here we present a combined NMR/MD study of the dynamics of HIV-1 transactivation response (TAR) RNA. We compute relaxation constants (R(1), R(2), and NOE) and model-free parameters (S(2) and tau) from a 65 ns molecular dynamics (MD) trajectory and compare them with the respective parameters measured in a domain-elongation NMR experiment. Using the elongated domain as the frame of reference for all computed parameters allows for a direct comparison between experiment and simulation. We see good agreement for many parameters and gain further insight into the nature of the local and global dynamics of TAR, which are found to be quite complex, spanning multiple time scales. For the few cases where agreement is poor, comparison of the dynamical parameters provides insight into the limits of each technique. We suggest a frequency-matching procedure that yields an upper bound for the time scale of dynamics to which the NMR relaxation experiment is sensitive. PMID:20039757

  6. An Analysis Method for Superconducting Resonator Parameter Extraction with Complex Baseline Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    A new semi-empirical model is proposed for extracting the quality (Q) factors of arrays of superconducting microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). The determination of the total internal and coupling Q factors enables the computation of the loss in the superconducting transmission lines. The method used allows the simultaneous analysis of multiple interacting discrete resonators with the presence of a complex spectral baseline arising from reflections in the system. The baseline removal allows an unbiased estimate of the device response as measured in a cryogenic instrumentation setting.

  7. Assessment of Gate Width Size on Lifetime-Based Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Parameter Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sez-Jade; Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Intes, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) enables the observation of interactions at the nanoscale level through the use of fluorescence optical imaging techniques. In FRET, fluorescence lifetime imaging can be used to quantify the fluorescence lifetime changes of the donor molecule, which are associated with proximity between acceptor and donor molecules. Among the FRET parameters derived from fluorescence lifetime imaging, the percentage of donor that interacts with the acceptor (in proximity) can be estimated via model-based fitting. However, estimation of the lifetime parameters can be affected by the acquisition parameters such as the temporal characteristics of the imaging system. Herein, we investigate the effect of various gate widths on the accuracy of estimation of FRET parameters with focus on the near-infrared spectral window. Experiments were performed in silico, in vitro, and in vivo with gate width sizes ranging from 300 ps to 1000 ps in intervals of 100 ps. For all cases, the FRET parameters were retrieved accurately and the imaging acquisition time was decreased three-fold. These results indicate that increasing the gate width up to 1000 ps still allows for accurate quantification of FRET interactions even in the case of short lifetimes such as those encountered with near-infrared FRET pairs. PMID:26557647

  8. Two statistics for evaluating parameter identifiability and error reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doherty, John; Hunt, Randall J.

    2009-01-01

    Two statistics are presented that can be used to rank input parameters utilized by a model in terms of their relative identifiability based on a given or possible future calibration dataset. Identifiability is defined here as the capability of model calibration to constrain parameters used by a model. Both statistics require that the sensitivity of each model parameter be calculated for each model output for which there are actual or presumed field measurements. Singular value decomposition (SVD) of the weighted sensitivity matrix is then undertaken to quantify the relation between the parameters and observations that, in turn, allows selection of calibration solution and null spaces spanned by unit orthogonal vectors. The first statistic presented, "parameter identifiability", is quantitatively defined as the direction cosine between a parameter and its projection onto the calibration solution space. This varies between zero and one, with zero indicating complete non-identifiability and one indicating complete identifiability. The second statistic, "relative error reduction", indicates the extent to which the calibration process reduces error in estimation of a parameter from its pre-calibration level where its value must be assigned purely on the basis of prior expert knowledge. This is more sophisticated than identifiability, in that it takes greater account of the noise associated with the calibration dataset. Like identifiability, it has a maximum value of one (which can only be achieved if there is no measurement noise). Conceptually it can fall to zero; and even below zero if a calibration problem is poorly posed. An example, based on a coupled groundwater/surface-water model, is included that demonstrates the utility of the statistics. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Neutron resonance parameters of /sup 79/Br and /sup 81/Br up to 15 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, M.; Kawarasaki, Y.; Mizumoto, M.

    1980-09-01

    Resonance parameters of separated isotopes of bromine were measured using TOF spectrometer of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute linear accelerator. Transmission and capture measurements were made with /sup 6/Li-glass and Moxon-Rae detectors, on separated isotopes (approx. 98%) of /sup 79/Br and /sup 81/Br. Resonance analyses were made on transmission data with an area analysis code, and on capture data with a Monte-Carlo program CAFIT. For /sup 79/Br gGAMMA/sup 0//sub n/ values for 156 levels below 10 keV are obtained, and for /sup 81/Br 100 levels below 15 keV. Strength functions are obtained: for /sup 79/Br S/sub O/ = (1.27 +- 0.14) x10/sup -4/ below 10 keV, and for /sup 81/Br S/sub O/ = (0.86 +- 0.14)10/sup -4/ below 15 keV. Intermediate structures are observed in the resonances of /sup 81/Br showing clusters of levels at 1.2, 10, 11.5, and 14 keV, where the sum of gGAMMA/sup 0//sub n/ vs. neutron energy shows steep rises.

  10. Neutron total and capture cross section measurements and resonance parameter analysis of tungsten from 0.01 eV to 200 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, C.J.; Block, R.C.; Slovacek, R.E.; Overberg, M.E.; Moretti, B.E.; Burke, J.A.; Leinweber, G.; Drindak, N.J.

    1998-06-15

    Natural tungsten metal was measured using neutron time-of-flight spectroscopy at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) Gaerttner Laboratory linear accelerator to determine the tungsten resonance parameters. Three separate measurements were performed: transmission, capture, and self-indication. Previous measurements did not employ all three experiment types and used less sophisticated methods. The current work improves on the published tungsten data base and reduces resonance parameter uncertainties.

  11. Experimental epiphysiodesis: magnetic resonance imaging evaluation with histopathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Synder, M; Harcke, H T; Conard, K; Bowen, J R

    2001-01-01

    We performed an experimental epiphysiodesis on the tibia in 16 immature New Zealand white rabbits. The purpose was to study the process of trauma-induced growth plate closure. The animals were killed at weekly intervals over 8 weeks. We correlated the histological findings with serial magnetic resonance images. The undamaged, central part of the growth plate became histologically abnormal within 1 week. Mature bone bridge formation in the area of the epiphysiodesis was seen after 3 to 4 weeks. The study suggests that growth arrest starts before the bone bridge formation. Factors regulating cartilage growth may also play a role. PMID:11820437

  12. Sexual dimorphism in tooth morphometrics: An evaluation of the parameters

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Abhishek; Kamath, Venkatesh V.; Satelur, Krishnanand; Rajkumar, Komali; Sundaram, Lavanya

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Sexual dimorphism refers to the variations in tooth size and shape between the sexes. The consistency of these variations is valuable in the identification of the sex of an individual in times of mass disaster when whole body parts get destroyed or are unavailable. There exist differences in the expression of these variables across races and regions. This study aims to tabulate and identify the variations in tooth measurements using standarized reference points in an attempt to establish parameters of sexual dimorphism. Materials and Methods: 100 individuals (50 of each sex) in the age group 19-23 years were assessed for standard morphometric parameters of the maxillary central incisor, canine, premolar and molar. Odontometric measurements of established parameters were recorded from impression casts of the maxillary jaws. The mesiodistal width (MDW), the bucco-ligual width (BLW), the crown length (CL) and the cervical angle (CA) were charted among the teeth. The consistency of the variations was statistically analyzed and a logistic regression table was prepared to identify the sex of the individual from the tooth measurements. Results and Conclusions: The BLW, MDW and CL reflected significant variations among all the teeth to be effective in establishing sexual dimorphism. CA as a parameter was inadequate across all the teeth. The permanent maxillary canine was the most important tooth to be reflective of the gender and statistically significant to be utilized for gender determination. PMID:27051219

  13. The Evaluation of the Parameters in the van Deemter Equation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Harvey W.

    1982-01-01

    Describes experiment expanding on principles behind measuring efficiency of chromatographic columns and allowing calculation of parameters in the van Deemter equation. Easily accomplished in a three-hour period using a gas chromatograph in which gas flow can be changed and measured. Mathematical solutions can be attained with programmable…

  14. Response of early active rheumatoid arthritis to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors: evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Wataru; Nishikawa, Kenichiro; Hirose, Masuko; Nanki, Toshihiro; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory changes (synovitis and bone marrow edema) and destructive changes (bone erosion) were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and their relations with disease activity were assessed during treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. Ten patients with early active RA underwent MRI at 0 and 16 weeks of TNF-inhibitor treatment. The carpal bones of the dominant hand were evaluated by the outcome measures in rheumatology clinical trials MRI score for RA. After 16 weeks, the mean disease activity score (DAS 28) decreased significantly from 5.54 to 2.70, while the number of tender joints, number of swollen joints, and inflammatory parameters were also significantly improved. The mean synovitis and marrow edema scores determined by MRI showed a significant decrease from 6.1 to 2.2 and 12.8 to 6.2, respectively, while the annual bone-erosion progression score decreased from 12.6 to 2.0. Although synovitis persisted in some patients, imaging remission was achieved in two patients. In conclusion, TNF-inhibitor therapy achieved an early decrease of disease activity and MRI revealed amelioration of joint destruction. The MRI score for RA is useful for assessing the early response to TNF inhibitors. PMID:18762862

  15. Qualitative Parameters for Evaluation Procedures of Non-Formal and Informal Learning Achievements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stasiunaitiene, Egle; Kaminskiene, Lina

    2009-01-01

    The article introduces evaluation principles of non-formal and informal learning that determine the quality of evaluation, describes stages of the evaluation procedure, differentiates their qualitative parameters and defines their criteria and indicators. It also brings in the discussion that consideration of qualitative parameters for the…

  16. Anomalous Solute Transport in Saturated Porous Media: Linking Transport Model Parameters to Electrical and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, R. D.; Binley, A. M.; Keating, K.; France, S.; Osterman, G. K.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.

    2013-12-01

    The advection-dispersion equation fails to describe non-Fickian solute transport in saturated porous media, necessitating the use of other models. The dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) model partitions the total porosity into mobile and less-mobile domains with solute exchange between the domains; consequently, the DDMT model can produce a better fit to breakthrough curves (BTCs) in systems defined by more- and less-mobile components. However, direct experimental estimation of DDMT model parameters such as rate of exchange and the mobile and less-mobile porosities remains elusive. Consequently, model parameters are often calculated purely as a model fitting exercise. There is a clear need for material characterization techniques that can offer some insight into the pore space geometrical arrangement, particularly if such techniques can be extended to the field scale. Here, we interpret static direct-current (DC) resistivity, complex resistivity (CR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) geophysical measurements in the characterization of mass transfer parameters. We use two different samples of the zeolite clinoptilolite, a material shown to demonstrate solute mass transfer due to a significant intragranular porosity, along with glass beads as a control. We explore the relation between geophysical and DDMT parameters in conjunction with supporting material characterization methods. Our results reveal how these geophysical measurements can offer some insight into the pore structures controlling the observed anomalous transport behavior.

  17. Evaluation of polarimetric SAR parameters for soil moisture retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Jian-Cheng; Vanzyl, Jakob J.; Engman, Edwin T.

    1992-01-01

    Results of ongoing efforts to develop an algorithm for soil moisture retrieval from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery are reported. Estimates of soil moisture are of great importance in numerous environmental studies, including hydrology, meteorology, and agriculture. Previous studies using extensive scatterometer measurements have established the optimum parameters for moisture retrieval as C-band HH radar operating at incidence angles between 10 to 15 deg. However, these parameters were not tested or verified with imaging radar systems. The results from different investigators showed considerable variability in the relationship between soil moisture and radar backscattering. This variability suggests that those algorithms are site-specific. Furthermore, the small incidence angle requirement limits the spatial application, especially for airborne radar systems.

  18. Experimental evaluation of a modal parameter based system identification procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Minli; Feng, Ningsheng; Hahn, Eric J.

    2016-02-01

    Correct modelling of the foundation of a rotor bearing foundation system (RBFS) is an invaluable asset for the balancing and efficient running of turbomachinery. Numerical experiments have shown that a modal parameter based identification approach could be feasible for this purpose but there is a lack of experimental verification of the suitability of such a modal approach for even the simplest systems. In this paper the approach is tested on a simple experimental rig comprising a clamped horizontal bar with lumped masses. It is shown that apart from damping, the proposed approach can identify reasonably accurately the relevant modal parameters of the rig; and that the resulting equivalent system can predict reasonably well the frequency response of the rig. Hence, the proposed approach shows promise but further testing is required, since application to identifying the foundation of an RBFS involves the additional problem of accurately obtaining the force excitation from motion measurements.

  19. The evaluation of radiation damage parameter for CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilj, V.; Skukan, N.; Jakšić, M.; Pomorski, M.; Kada, W.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T.

    2016-04-01

    There are a few different phenomenological approaches that aim to track the dependence of signal height in irradiated solid state detectors on the fluence of damaging particles. However, none of them are capable to provide a unique radiation hardness parameter that would reflect solely the material capability to withstand high radiation environment. To extract such a parameter for chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, two different diamond detectors were irradiated with proton beams in MeV energy range and subjected afterwards to ion beam induced charge (IBIC) analysis. The change in charge collection efficiency (CCE) due to defects produced was investigated in context of a theoretical model that was developed on the basis of the adjoint method for linearization of the continuity equations of electrons and holes. Detailed modeling of measured data resulted with the first known value of the kσ product for diamond, where k represents the number of charge carriers' traps created per one simulated primary lattice vacancy and σ represents the charge carriers' capture cross section. As discussed in the text, this product could be considered as a true radiation damage parameter.

  20. Determination of GLUT1 Oligomerization Parameters using Bioluminescent Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Looyenga, Brendan; VanOpstall, Calvin; Lee, Zion; Bell, Jed; Lodge, Evans; Wrobel, Katherine; Arnoys, Eric; Louters, Larry

    2016-01-01

    The facilitated glucose transporter GLUT1 (SLC2A1) is an important mediator of glucose homeostasis in humans. Though it is found in most cell types to some extent, the level of GLUT1 expression across different cell types can vary dramatically. Prior studies in erythrocytes—which express particularly high levels of GLUT1—have suggested that GLUT1 is able to form tetrameric complexes with enhanced transport activity. Whether dynamic aggregation of GLUT1 also occurs in cell types with more modest expression of GLUT1, however, is unclear. To address this question, we developed a genetically encoded bioluminescent Förster resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay using the luminescent donor Nanoluciferase and fluorescent acceptor mCherry. By tethering these proteins to the N-terminus of GLUT1 and performing saturation BRET analysis, we were able to demonstrate the formation of multimeric complexes in live cells. Parallel use of flow cytometry and immunoblotting further enabled us to estimate the density of GLUT1 proteins required for spontaneous oligomerization. These data provide new insights into the physiological relevance of GLUT1 multimerization as well as a new variant of BRET assay that is useful for measuring the interactions among other cell membrane proteins in live cells. PMID:27357903

  1. Determination of GLUT1 Oligomerization Parameters using Bioluminescent Förster Resonance Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Looyenga, Brendan; VanOpstall, Calvin; Lee, Zion; Bell, Jed; Lodge, Evans; Wrobel, Katherine; Arnoys, Eric; Louters, Larry

    2016-01-01

    The facilitated glucose transporter GLUT1 (SLC2A1) is an important mediator of glucose homeostasis in humans. Though it is found in most cell types to some extent, the level of GLUT1 expression across different cell types can vary dramatically. Prior studies in erythrocytes-which express particularly high levels of GLUT1-have suggested that GLUT1 is able to form tetrameric complexes with enhanced transport activity. Whether dynamic aggregation of GLUT1 also occurs in cell types with more modest expression of GLUT1, however, is unclear. To address this question, we developed a genetically encoded bioluminescent Förster resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay using the luminescent donor Nanoluciferase and fluorescent acceptor mCherry. By tethering these proteins to the N-terminus of GLUT1 and performing saturation BRET analysis, we were able to demonstrate the formation of multimeric complexes in live cells. Parallel use of flow cytometry and immunoblotting further enabled us to estimate the density of GLUT1 proteins required for spontaneous oligomerization. These data provide new insights into the physiological relevance of GLUT1 multimerization as well as a new variant of BRET assay that is useful for measuring the interactions among other cell membrane proteins in live cells. PMID:27357903

  2. Evaluation of a microwave resonator for predicting grain moisture independent of bulk density

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This work evaluated the ability of a planar whispering mode resonator to predict moisture considering moisture and densities expected in an on-harvester application. A calibration model was developed to accurately predict moisture over the moisture, density and temperature ranges evaluated. This mod...

  3. Clinical evaluation of osseointegration using resonance frequency analysis

    PubMed Central

    Satwalekar, Parth; Nalla, Sandeep; Reddy, Ramaswamy; Chowdary, Sheeba Glory

    2015-01-01

    The stability of the implant at the time of placement and during the development of the osseointegration process are the two major issues governing the implant survival. Implant stability is a mechanical phenomenon related to local factors such as bone quality, quantity, type of placement technique and type of implant used. The application of a user-friendly, clinically reliable, non-invasive method to assess implant stability and the osseointegration process is considered highly desirable. Resonance frequency analysis (RFA) is one such method which shows almost perfect reproducibility and repeatability after statistical analysis. The aim of this paper is to review the various methods used to assess implant stability and on the currently used RFA method which is being highly accepted in the recent times. PMID:26929512

  4. Evaluation of plasma-based transmit coils for magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Webb, A G; Aussenhofer, S A

    2015-12-01

    In this work a new concept for designing transmit coils for magnetic resonance using a plasma is introduced. Unlike conventional coils, a plasma can be turned on and off, eliminating electrical interactions between coils, and enabling radiofrequency-invisibility when desired. A surfatron has been designed to produce a surface-mode wave which propagates along the inner surface of a commercial fluorescent lighting tube. NMR spectra and images have been produced using the plasma as the transmit coil and a copper-based monopole to receive the signal. The transmit efficiency of the plasma tube was estimated, and is currently much lower than that of an equivalently-sized metal-based structure: however, there are many potential methods for increasing the efficiency using a custom-built plasma tube. PMID:26529202

  5. Clinical evaluation of osseointegration using resonance frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Satwalekar, Parth; Nalla, Sandeep; Reddy, Ramaswamy; Chowdary, Sheeba Glory

    2015-01-01

    The stability of the implant at the time of placement and during the development of the osseointegration process are the two major issues governing the implant survival. Implant stability is a mechanical phenomenon related to local factors such as bone quality, quantity, type of placement technique and type of implant used. The application of a user-friendly, clinically reliable, non-invasive method to assess implant stability and the osseointegration process is considered highly desirable. Resonance frequency analysis (RFA) is one such method which shows almost perfect reproducibility and repeatability after statistical analysis. The aim of this paper is to review the various methods used to assess implant stability and on the currently used RFA method which is being highly accepted in the recent times. PMID:26929512

  6. Magnetic resonance evaluation of hydronephrosis in the dog

    SciTech Connect

    Thickman, D.; Kundel, H.; Biery, D.

    1984-07-01

    The ability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to detect and distinguish various stages of obstruction in the canine kidney was investigated. MR images were obtained at acute, subacute, and chronic stages of experimentally produced hydronephrosis. The renal cortex was distinguished from the renal medulla in the normal dog and in the acute and subacute stages of hydronephrosis. T1 relaxation times of the renal cortex and medulla were measured in vitro in 14 normal and nine experimental animals. These values were used to compute the amount of tissue contrast between the cortex and medulla and were compared with the degree of corticomedullary differentiation seen in the image. A relationship was noted between increasing T1 values and increasing water content. Corticomedullary contrast decreased with obstruction. The variation in corticomedullary image contracts may be useful for assessing the duration of hydronephrosis.

  7. Evaluation of Parameters for High Efficiency Transformation of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Suleyman; Thompson, Mitchell G.; Jacobs, Anna C.; Zurawski, Daniel V.; Kirkup, Benjamin C.

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging, nosocomial pathogen that is poorly characterized due to a paucity of genetic tools and methods. While whole genome sequence data from several epidemic and environmental strains have recently become available, the functional characterization of genes is significantly lagging. Efficient transformation is one of the first steps to develop molecular tools that can be used to address these shortcomings. Here we report parameters allowing high efficiency transformation of A. baumannii. Using a multi-factorial experimental design we found that growth phase, voltage, and resistance all significantly contribute to transformation efficiency. The highest efficiency (4.3 × 108 Transformants/μg DNA) was obtained at the stationary growth phase of the bacterium (OD 6.0) using 25 ng of plasmid DNA under 100 Ohms resistance and 1.7 kV/cm voltage. The optimized electroporation parameters reported here provide a useful tool for genetic manipulation of A. baumannii. PMID:26911658

  8. Anomalous solute transport in saturated porous media: Relating transport model parameters to electrical and nuclear magnetic resonance properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Ryan D.; Binley, Andrew; Keating, Kristina; France, Samantha; Osterman, Gordon; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Singha, Kamini

    2015-02-01

    The advection-dispersion equation (ADE) fails to describe commonly observed non-Fickian solute transport in saturated porous media, necessitating the use of other models such as the dual-domain mass-transfer (DDMT) model. DDMT model parameters are commonly calibrated via curve fitting, providing little insight into the relation between effective parameters and physical properties of the medium. There is a clear need for material characterization techniques that can provide insight into the geometry and connectedness of pore spaces related to transport model parameters. Here, we consider proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), direct-current (DC) resistivity, and complex conductivity (CC) measurements for this purpose, and assess these methods using glass beads as a control and two different samples of the zeolite clinoptilolite, a material that demonstrates non-Fickian transport due to intragranular porosity. We estimate DDMT parameters via calibration of a transport model to column-scale solute tracer tests, and compare NMR, DC resistivity, CC results, which reveal that grain size alone does not control transport properties and measured geophysical parameters; rather, volume and arrangement of the pore space play important roles. NMR cannot provide estimates of more-mobile and less-mobile pore volumes in the absence of tracer tests because these estimates depend critically on the selection of a material-dependent and flow-dependent cutoff time. Increased electrical connectedness from DC resistivity measurements are associated with greater mobile pore space determined from transport model calibration. CC was hypothesized to be related to length scales of mass transfer, but the CC response is unrelated to DDMT.

  9. Evaluating System Parameters on a Dragonfly using Simulation and Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatele, Abhinav; Jain, Nikhil; Livnat, Yarden; Pascucci, Valerio; Bremer, Peer-Timo

    2015-04-24

    The dragon y topology is becoming a popular choice for build- ing high-radix, low-diameter networks with high-bandwidth links. Even with a powerful network, preliminary experi- ments on Edison at NERSC have shown that for communica- tion heavy applications, job interference and thus presumably job placement remains an important factor. In this paper, we explore the e ects of job placement, job sizes, parallel workloads and network con gurations on network through- put to better understand inter-job interference. We use a simulation tool called Damsel y to model the network be- havior of Edison and study the impact of various system parameters on network throughput. Parallel workloads based on ve representative communication patters are used and the simulation studies on up to 131,072 cores are aided by a new visualization of the dragon y network.

  10. Evaluation parameters for the alkaline fuel cell oxygen electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, J.; Srinivasan, V.

    1985-01-01

    Studies were made of Pt- and Au-catalyzed porous electrodes, designed for the cathode of the alkaline H2/O2 fuel cell, employing cyclic voltammetry and the floating half-cell method. The purpose was to obtain parameters from the cyclic voltammograms which could predict performance in the fuel cell. It was found that a satisfactory relationship between these two types of measurement could not be established; however, useful observations were made of relative performance of several types of carbon used as supports for noble metal catalysts and of some Au catalysts. The best half-cell performance with H2/O2 in a 35 percent KOH electrolyte at 80 C was given by unsupported fine particle Au on Teflon; this electrode is used in the Orbiter fuel cell.

  11. Relativistic effects in the intermolecular interaction-induced nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of xenon dimer.

    PubMed

    Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Ilias, Miroslav; Jensen, Hans Jorgen Aagaard; Vaara, Juha

    2007-10-28

    Relativistic effects on the (129)Xe nuclear magnetic resonance shielding and (131)Xe nuclear quadrupole coupling (NQC) tensors are examined in the weakly bound Xe(2) system at different levels of theory including the relativistic four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) method. The intermolecular interaction-induced binary chemical shift delta, the anisotropy of the shielding tensor Deltasigma, and the NQC constant along the internuclear axis chi( parallel) are calculated as a function of the internuclear distance. DHF shielding calculations are carried out using gauge-including atomic orbitals. For comparison, the full leading-order one-electron Breit-Pauli perturbation theory (BPPT) is applied using a common gauge origin. Electron correlation effects are studied at the nonrelativistic (NR) coupled-cluster singles and doubles with perturbational triples [CCSD(T)] level of theory. The fully relativistic second-order Moller-Plesset many-body perturbation (DMP2) theory is used to examine the cross coupling between correlation and relativity on NQC. The same is investigated for delta and Deltasigma by BPPT with a density functional theory model. A semiquantitative agreement between the BPPT and DHF binary property curves is obtained for delta and Deltasigma in Xe(2). For these properties, the currently most complete theoretical description is obtained by a piecewise approximation where the uncorrelated relativistic DHF results obtained close to the basis-set limit are corrected, on the one hand, for NR correlation effects and, on the other hand, for the BPPT-based cross coupling of relativity and correlation. For chi( parallel), the fully relativistic DMP2 results obtain a correction for NR correlation effects beyond MP2. The computed temperature dependence of the second virial coefficient of the (129)Xe nuclear shielding is compared to experiment in Xe gas. Our best results, obtained with the piecewise approximation for the binary chemical shift combined with the

  12. /sup 187/Os + n resonance parameters in the interval 27-500 eV neutron energies

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, R.R.; Carlton, R.F.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.

    1982-01-01

    The neutron total cross section for /sup 187/Os, in the energy range, 27 eV to 500 eV, has been measured at the ORELA facility by the neutron time-of-flight technique, utilizing a 2.0 gm osmium sample (n = 0.008401 Os-nuclei/barn) enriched to 70.38% /sup 187/Os. Measurements were performed at a 80 m flight station with an energy resolution, ..delta..E/E, of 0.1% using a /sup 6/Li glass scintillator. Resolved resonances have been analyzed by a Reich-Moore multilevel code (SAMMY) to obtain parameters for 85 resonances up to 500 eV. Preliminary determinations of the level spacing (5 eV) and s-wave strength function (3.9 x 10/sup -4/) for /sup 187/Os are in agreement with recent analyses of the osmium isotopes, made in connection with the use of the Re/Os chronometer for estimating the duration of stellar nucleosynthesis.

  13. Preliminary resolved resonance region evaluation of copper-63 from 0 to 300 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Sobes, V.; Forget, B.; Leal, L.; Guber, K.

    2012-07-01

    A new preliminary evaluation of Cu-63 was done in the energy region from 0 to 300 keV extending the resolved resonance region of the previous, ENDF/B-VII.0, evaluation three-fold. The new evaluation was based on three experimental transmission data sets; two measured at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) and one from the Massachusetts Inst. of Technology Nuclear Reactor (MITR). A total of 275 new resonances were identified and a corresponding set of external resonances was approximated to mock up the external levels. The negative external levels (bound level) were modified to match the thermal cross section values. A preliminary benchmarking calculation was made using 11 ICSBEP benchmarks. This work is in support of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program. (authors)

  14. The far-infrared laser magnetic resonance spectrum of the SiH radical and determination of ground state parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. M.; Curl, R. F.; Evenson, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    The far-infrared laser magnetic resonance spectrum of the SiH radical in the v = O level of its X2Pi state has been recorded. The signals are rather weak. The molecules were generated in the reaction between fluorine atoms and SiH4. Rotational transitions have been detected in both 2Pi1/2 and 2Pi3/2 spin components but no fine structure transitions between the spin components were observed. Proton hyperfine splittings were resolved on some lines. The measurements have been analyzed, subjected to a least-squares fit using an effective Hamiltonian, and the appropriate molecular parameters determined. The weakness of the spectrum and the failure of attempts to power saturate favorable lines are both consistent with a small value for the electric dipole moment for SiH.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of rectal cancer: staging and restaging evaluation.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Courtney C; Sullivan, Patrick S; Kalb, Bobby T; Tipton, Russell G; Hanley, Krisztina Z; Kitajima, Hiroumi D; Dixon, W Thomas; Votaw, John R; Oshinski, John N; Mittal, Pardeep K

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is used to non-invasively stage and restage rectal adenocarcinomas. Accurate staging is important as the depth of tumor extension and the presence or absence of lymph node metastases determines if an individual will undergo preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Accurate description of tumor location is important for presurgical planning. The relationship of the tumor to the anal sphincter in addition to the depth of local invasion determines the surgical approach used for resection. High-resolution T2-weighted imaging is the primary sequence used for initial staging. The addition of diffusion-weighted imaging improves accuracy in the assessment of treatment response on restaging scans. Approximately 10%-30% of individuals will experience a complete pathologic response following chemoradiation with no residual viable tumor found in the resected specimen at histopathologic assessment. In some centers, individuals with no residual tumor visible on restaging MR who are thought to be at high operative risk are monitored with serial imaging and a "watch and wait" approach in lieu of resection. Normal rectal anatomy, MR technique utilized for staging and restaging scans, and TMN staging are reviewed. An overview of surgical techniques used for resection including newer, minimally invasive endoluminal techniques is included. PMID:25759246

  16. Noncontact nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy to evaluate creep damage in an austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, T.; Kusanagi, Y.; Ishii, Y.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we described an evaluating technique of creep damage in an austenitic stainless steel by the combination with an electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) and the nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (NRUS), which was a resonance-based technique exploiting the significant nonlinear behavior of damaged materials. In NRUS, the resonant frequency of an object is studied as a function of the excitation level. As the excitation level increases, the elastic nonlinearity was manifest by a shift in the resonance frequency. The nonlinearity with NRUS showed a peak at 50 % and a minimum at 70 % of the total creep life. This nonlinearity measurement has a potential to assess creep damage advance and predict the creep remaining life of metals.

  17. Resolution of the multichannel anomaly in the extraction of S-matrix resonance-pole parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Ceci, Sasa; Stahov, Jugoslav; Svarc, Alfred; Zauner, Branimir; Watson, Shon

    2008-06-01

    Within the framework of a mathematically well-defined coupled-channel T-matrix model we have improved the existing multichannel pole-extraction procedure based on the numerical analytic continuation of the channel propagator, and for the first time we present the full set of pole parameters for already published amplitudes. Standard single-channel pole-extraction method (speed plot) was then applied to those amplitudes and resulting sets of T-matrix poles were inspected. The anomaly has been established that in some partial waves the pole values extracted using the standard single-channel methods differ not only from the values obtained using the analytic continuation method, but also change from one reaction to another. Inspired by this peculiarity, we have developed a new single-channel pole-extraction method based solely on the assumption of the partial wave analyticity. Since the speed plot turns out to be the lowest order term of the proposed method, the anomaly is understood and resolved.

  18. Tabletop magnetic resonance elastography for the measurement of viscoelastic parameters of small tissue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipek-Ugay, Selcan; Drießle, Toni; Ledwig, Michael; Guo, Jing; Hirsch, Sebastian; Sack, Ingolf; Braun, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of low-cost tabletop MR elastography (MRE) for quantifying the complex shear modulus G∗ of small soft biological tissue samples as provided by pathologists. The MRE system was developed based on a tabletop MRI scanner equipped with a 0.5 T permanent magnet and a tissue sample holder mounted to a loudspeaker. A spin echo sequence was enhanced with motion-encoding gradients of 250 mT/m amplitude synchronized to acoustic vibration frequencies. Shear wave images suitable for elastography were acquired between vibration frequencies of 0.5 and 1 kHz in agarose, ultrasound gel, porcine liver, porcine skeletal muscle, and bovine heart with a spatial resolution of 234 μm pixel edge length. The measured frequency dependence of G∗ agreed well with previous work based on high-field MR systems. The ratio between loss and storage moduli was highest in liver and ultrasound gel, followed by muscle tissue and agarose gel while ultrasound gel and liver showed similarly low storage moduli compared to the other samples. The shear wave to noise ratio is an important imaging criteria for MRE and was about 4.2 times lower for the preliminary setup of the 0.5 T tabletop system compared to a 7 T animal scanner. In the future, the new tabletop MRE system may serve as a low cost device for preclinical research on the correlation of viscoelastic parameters with histopathology of biological samples.

  19. Tabletop magnetic resonance elastography for the measurement of viscoelastic parameters of small tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Ipek-Ugay, Selcan; Drießle, Toni; Ledwig, Michael; Guo, Jing; Hirsch, Sebastian; Sack, Ingolf; Braun, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of low-cost tabletop MR elastography (MRE) for quantifying the complex shear modulus G(∗) of small soft biological tissue samples as provided by pathologists. The MRE system was developed based on a tabletop MRI scanner equipped with a 0.5 T permanent magnet and a tissue sample holder mounted to a loudspeaker. A spin echo sequence was enhanced with motion-encoding gradients of 250 mT/m amplitude synchronized to acoustic vibration frequencies. Shear wave images suitable for elastography were acquired between vibration frequencies of 0.5 and 1 kHz in agarose, ultrasound gel, porcine liver, porcine skeletal muscle, and bovine heart with a spatial resolution of 234 μm pixel edge length. The measured frequency dependence of G(∗) agreed well with previous work based on high-field MR systems. The ratio between loss and storage moduli was highest in liver and ultrasound gel, followed by muscle tissue and agarose gel while ultrasound gel and liver showed similarly low storage moduli compared to the other samples. The shear wave to noise ratio is an important imaging criteria for MRE and was about 4.2 times lower for the preliminary setup of the 0.5 T tabletop system compared to a 7 T animal scanner. In the future, the new tabletop MRE system may serve as a low cost device for preclinical research on the correlation of viscoelastic parameters with histopathology of biological samples. PMID:25554945

  20. Evaluation of Experimental Concepts Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snehota, M.; Cislerova, M.; Gao Amin, M. H.; Hall, L. D.

    2003-04-01

    Laboratory experiments on undisturbed soil cores are an invaluable source of information in the field of soil hydraulics. Good definition of the flow domain and freedom in selection of boundary conditions are the major advantages. In the current study the infiltration-outflow experiments were continuously scanned by the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The experimental concept was based on the vertical downward flow through an undisturbed soil core [Snehota et al., 2002]. The constant pressure was applied at the top surface of the sample by a customized infiltration disc. The tension infiltrations are arranged using the NYBOLT membrane attached. For small positive pressure head (ponded infiltration) the same disc was used with few modifications. At the bottom, the support perforated plate is considered as a seepage face boundary condition. Inflow, outflow and important pressures were recorded by the data acquisition system. Three soil cores of coarse sandy loam soil (Korkusova Hut, Czech Republic) were studied. The set of experiments was performed in the whole-body MR unit. The imaging involved the low-resolution vertical 2D projection of rapid changes during transient parts of an experiment. Horizontal 2D imaging was performed across the whole sample volume during the steady state and the equilibrium stages. MR properties of studied soil allow visualizing water in large pores. Due to high heterogeneity of the soil under study the preferential flow prevails close to saturation. Similar patterns came out from dye tracer experiment. As the result, the MR images were obtained together with the hydraulic and mass balance measurements. In analyzed experiments, the MR signal distribution changes appeared to be higher in the upper part of the sample, as the result of the change in the upper boundary condition. Flow through the bottom of the sample seemed to be restricted by the hydraulics of the support plate. Based on MR imaging analyses modifications at the bottom

  1. Evaluation of oxidative and antioxidative parameters in generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Emhan, Ali; Selek, Salih; Bayazıt, Hüseyin; Fatih Karababa, İbrahim; Katı, Mahmut; Aksoy, Nurten

    2015-12-30

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a prevalent psychiatric disorder. The exact causes of GAD still unknown, in addition to neurochemical and neuroanatomic disorders, genetic and environmental factors are discussed in etiology. In our study we aimed to evaluate the oxidative metabolism's status and investigate the role of oxidative metabolites in GAD. Blood samples were taken from enrolled subjects in appropriate way and total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), and oxidative stress index (OSI) were studied in Harran University Biochemistry Labs. Results were compared between groups. The patients' TOS and OSI levels were significantly higher than control group. The patients' TAS levels were significantly lower than controls'. According to our findings, oxidative stress mechanism might have a role in GAD pathophysiology. In the future, total antioxidants may be used as a biologic marker in GAD etiology but more research is needed. PMID:26564548

  2. Optimization of Regularization Parameters in Compressed Sensing of Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Can Statistical Image Metrics Mimic Radiologists' Perception?

    PubMed Central

    Akasaka, Thai; Fujimoto, Koji; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Okada, Tomohisa; Fushumi, Yasutaka; Yamamoto, Akira; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Togashi, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    In Compressed Sensing (CS) of MRI, optimization of the regularization parameters is not a trivial task. We aimed to establish a method that could determine the optimal weights for regularization parameters in CS of time-of-flight MR angiography (TOF-MRA) by comparing various image metrics with radiologists’ visual evaluation. TOF-MRA of a healthy volunteer was scanned using a 3T-MR system. Images were reconstructed by CS from retrospectively under-sampled data by varying the weights for the L1 norm of wavelet coefficients and that of total variation. The reconstructed images were evaluated both quantitatively by statistical image metrics including structural similarity (SSIM), scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and qualitatively by radiologists’ scoring. The results of quantitative metrics and qualitative scorings were compared. SSIM and SIFT in conjunction with brain masks and CNR of artery-to-parenchyma correlated very well with radiologists’ visual evaluation. By carefully selecting a region to measure, we have shown that statistical image metrics can reflect radiologists’ visual evaluation, thus enabling an appropriate optimization of regularization parameters for CS. PMID:26744843

  3. Key Parameters Evaluation for Hip Prosthesis with Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongqiang; Li, Dichen; Lian, Qin; Li, Xiang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2007-09-01

    Stem length and cross section are two key parameters that influence the stability and longevity of metallic hip prosthesis in the total hip arthroplasty (THA). In order to assess their influence to the stress and fatigue behavior of hip prosthesis, a series model of hip prosthesis with round-shaped or drum-shaped cross section, and with different stem lengths were created. These models were analyzed under both static and dynamic loading conditions with finite element analysis, and dynamic loading represents normal walking was used in the dynamic analysis. The stress on the metallic stem, cement, and adjacent bone were got, micromotion on the cement-metal interface were got too. Safety factors for fatigue life of the hip prothesis were calculated based on data obtained from dynamic analysis. Static analysis shows that drum-shaped cross section can decrease the displacement of the stem, that stress on drum-shaped stem focus on the corner of the femoral neck and the distal part of hip prosthesis, whereas the stress on the round-shaped stem distributes evenly over most part of the stem, and maximum stress on stem prosthesis fluctuates with stem length bottoming out at stem length range from 80 mm to 110 mm, that drum-shaped stems with drum height 8 mm generate more stress at the distal part of stem than drum-shaped stems with drum height 10 mm and round stems do. Dynamic and fatigue analysis shows that drum-shaped stem with drum height 10 mm and stem length 90 mm has the greatest safety factor therefore long fatigue life.

  4. Evaluation of Anthropometric and Metabolic Parameters in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Yaşar; Yilmaz, Süreyya; Güven, Mehmet; Kılınç, Faruk; Kara, Ali Veysel; Yilmaz, Zülfükar; Kırbaş, Gökhan; Tuzcu, Alpaslan Kemal; Yılmaz Aydın, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Sleep disorders have recently become a significant public health problem worldwide and have deleterious health consequences. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common type of sleep-related breathing disorders. We aimed to evaluate anthropometric measurements, glucose metabolism, and cortisol levels in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Materials and Methods. A total of 50 patients with a body mass index ≥30 and major OSA symptoms were included in this study. Anthropometric measurements of the patients were recorded and blood samples were drawn for laboratory analysis. A 24-hour urine sample was also collected from each subject for measurement of 24-hour cortisol excretion. Patients were divided equally into 2 groups according to polysomnography results: control group with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) <5 (n = 25) and OSA group with an AHI ≥5 (n = 25). Results. Neck and waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, late-night serum cortisol, morning serum cortisol after 1 mg dexamethasone suppression test, and 24-hour urinary cortisol levels were significantly higher in OSA patients compared to control subjects. Newly diagnosed DM was more frequent in patients with OSA than control subjects (32% versus 8%, p = 0.034). There was a significant positive correlation between AHI and neck circumference, glucose, and late-night serum cortisol. Conclusions. Our study indicates that increased waist and neck circumferences constitute a risk for OSA regardless of obesity status. In addition, OSA has adverse effects on endocrine function and glucose metabolism. PMID:26257957

  5. Quantifying Uranium Isotope Ratios Using Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry: The Influence of Laser Parameters on Relative Ionization Probability

    SciTech Connect

    Isselhardt, Brett H.

    2011-09-01

    Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) has been developed as a method to measure relative uranium isotope abundances. In this approach, RIMS is used as an element-selective ionization process to provide a distinction between uranium atoms and potential isobars without the aid of chemical purification and separation. We explore the laser parameters critical to the ionization process and their effects on the measured isotope ratio. Specifically, the use of broad bandwidth lasers with automated feedback control of wavelength was applied to the measurement of 235U/238U ratios to decrease laser-induced isotopic fractionation. By broadening the bandwidth of the first laser in a 3-color, 3-photon ionization process from a bandwidth of 1.8 GHz to about 10 GHz, the variation in sequential relative isotope abundance measurements decreased from >10% to less than 0.5%. This procedure was demonstrated for the direct interrogation of uranium oxide targets with essentially no sample preparation. A rate equation model for predicting the relative ionization probability has been developed to study the effect of variation in laser parameters on the measured isotope ratio. This work demonstrates that RIMS can be used for the robust measurement of uranium isotope ratios.

  6. Evaluation of acetabular cup initial fixation by using resonance frequency principle.

    PubMed

    Henys, Petr; Capek, Lukas; Fencl, Jaroslav; Prochazka, Egon

    2015-01-01

    The clinical practice shows that the loosening of acetabular cups is more frequent than stem loosening. With standard cups, the incidence of dislocation failure is highest in the first year after arthroplasty implantation. The aim of the study was to quantitatively evaluate the implant-bone stability of a cementless acetabular cup prosthesis by using a device based on resonance frequency analysis. The evaluation of this device was done by finite element analysis and in vitro experiments. It was shown that not all the resonance frequencies can be measured by our device. The resonance frequencies vary within the range of 500-3000 Hz. The proposed power spectrum measurement gives the information about the absolute stiffness of the press-fit implant. PMID:25655952

  7. Evaluation of brain edema using magnetic resonance proton relaxation times

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Nishimura, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Experimental and clinical studies on the evaluation of water content in cases of brain edema were performed in vivo, using MR proton relaxation times (longitudinal relaxation time, T1; transverse relaxation time, T2). Brain edema was produced in the white matter of cats by the direct infusion method. The correlations between proton relaxation times obtained from MR images and the water content of white matter were studied both in autoserum-infused cats and in saline-infused cats. The correlations between T1 as well as T2 and the water content in human vasogenic brain edema were also examined and compared with the data obtained from the serum group. T1 and T2 showed good correlations with the water content of white matter not only in the experimental animals but also in the clinical cases. The quality of the edema fluid did not influence relaxation time and T1 seemed to represent almost solely the water content of the tissue. T2, however, was affected by the nature of existence of water and was more sensitive than T1 in detecting extravasated edema fluid. It seems feasible therefore to evaluate the water content of brain edema on the basis of T1 values.

  8. The Evaluation of Empirical Resonance Energies as Reaction Enthalpies with Particular Reference to Benzene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Philip; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of experimental resonance energy, explaining how its magnitude depends upon choice of reference molecules from which bond energies are derived. Also explains how it can be evaluated more simply, without recourse to bond energies, as enthalpy change for a reaction predetermined by choice of reference molecules. (JN)

  9. [Optimal imaging parameters and the advantage of cerebrospinal fluid flow image using time-spatial labeling inversion pulse at 3 tesla magnetic resonance imaging: comparison of image quality for 1.5 tesla magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Ozasa, Masaya; Yahata, Seiji; Yoshida, Ayako; Takeyama, Mamoru; Eshima, Mitsuhiro; Shinohara, Maiko; Yamamoto, Takao; Abe, Kayoko

    2014-12-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) imaging by time-spatial labeling inversion pulse (Time-SLIP) technique is labeled by CSF with a selective inversion recovery (IR) pulse as internal tracer, thus making it possible to visualize CSF dynamics non-invasively. The purpose of this study was to clarify labeled CSF signals during various black blood time to inversion (BBTI) values at 3 tesla (T) and 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to determine appropriate CSF imaging parameters at 3 T MRI in 10 healthy volunteers. To calculate optimal BBTI values, ROIs were set in untagged cerebral parenchyma and CSF on the image of the CSF flow from the aqueduct to the fourth ventricle in 1.5 T and 3 T MRI. Visual evaluation of CSF flow also was assessed with changes of matrix and echo time (TE) at 3 T MRI. The mean BBTI value at null point of untagged CSF in 3 T MRI was longer than that of 1.5 T. The MR conditions of the highest visual evaluation were FOV, 14 cm×14 cm; Matrix, 192×192; and TE, 117 ms. CSF imaging using Time-SLIP at 3 T MRI is expected visualization of CSF flow and clarification of CSF dynamics in more detail by setting the optimal conditions because 3 T MRI has the advantage of high contrast and high signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:25672449

  10. Nondestructive evaluation of explosively welded clad rods by resonance acoustic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Y; Tysoe, B; Sim, J; Mirkhani, K; Sinclair, A N; Honarvar, F; Sildva, Harry; Szecket, Alexander; Hardwick, Roy

    2003-07-01

    A resonance acoustic spectroscopy technique is assessed for nondestructive evaluation of explosively welded clad rods. Each rod is modeled as a two-layered cylinder with a spring-mass system to represent a thin interfacial layer containing the weld. A range of interfacial profiles is generated in a set of experimental samples by varying the speed of the explosion that drives the copper cladding into the aluminum core. Excellent agreement is achieved between measured and calculated values of the resonant frequencies of the system, through appropriate adjustment of the interfacial mass and spring constants used in the wave scattering calculations. Destructive analysis of the interface in the experimental specimens confirms that key features of the interfacial profile may be inferred from resonance acoustic spectroscopy analysis applied to ultrasonic measurements. PMID:12788219

  11. BUILDING MODEL ANALYSIS APPLICATIONS WITH THE JOINT UNIVERSAL PARAMETER IDENTIFICATION AND EVALUATION OF RELIABILITY (JUPITER) API

    EPA Science Inventory

    The open-source, public domain JUPITER (Joint Universal Parameter IdenTification and Evaluation of Reliability) API (Application Programming Interface) provides conventions and Fortran-90 modules to develop applications (computer programs) for analyzing process models. The input ...

  12. A COMPUTATIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR EVALUATION OF NPS MANAGEMENT SCENARIOS: ROLE OF PARAMETER UNCERTAINTY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Utility of complex distributed-parameter watershed models for evaluation of the effectiveness of non-point source sediment and nutrient abatement scenarios such as Best Management Practices (BMPs) often follows the traditional {calibrate ---> validate ---> predict} procedure. Des...

  13. Infrared and far-infrared laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the GeH radical - Determination of ground state parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. M.; Evenson, K. M.; Sears, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    The GeH radical has been detected in its ground 2 Pi state in the gas phase reaction of fluorine atoms with GeH4 by laser magnetic resonance techniques. Rotational transitions within both 2 Pi 1/2 and 2 Pi 3/2 manifolds have been observed at far-infrared wavelengths and rotational transitions between the two fine structure components have been detected at infrared wavelengths (10 microns). Signals have been observed for all five naturally occurring isotopes of germanium. Nuclear hyperfine structure for H-1 and Ge-73 has also been observed. The data for the dominant isotope (/Ge-74/H) have been fitted to within experimental error by an effective Hamiltonian to give a set of molecular parameters for the X 2 Pi state which is very nearly complete. In addition, the dipole moment of GeH in its ground state has been estimated from the relative intensities of electric and magnetic dipole transitions in the 10 micron spectrum to be 1.24(+ or - 0.10) D.

  14. TI-205 nuclear magnetic resonance determination of the thermodynamic parameters for the binding of monovalent cations to gramicidins A and C.

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, J F; Fernandez, J Q; Shungu, D C; Whaley, W L; Koeppe, R E; Millett, F S

    1988-01-01

    Thermodynamic parameters for the binding of the monovalent cations, Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+, NH4+, TI+, and Ag+, to gramicidin A and for the binding of TI+ to gramicidin C, incorporated into lysophosphatidylcholine, have been determined using a combination of TI-205 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and competition binding. The thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy and entropy, are discussed in terms of a process involving the transfer of cations from an aqueous to amide environment. PMID:2462930

  15. Modeling of Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy Based Nondestructive Evaluation Using the "XYZ-Algorithm"

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Salahuddin; Bond, Leonard J.

    2007-05-03

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) is employed as a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tool in a number of metal/ceramic forming industries [1]. The presence of volumetric defects in an otherwise flaw-free object affects the resonance characteristics of the object. The changes in resonance behavior depend on the number, locations, volume, and material properties of the defects. Since the normal modes of an object depend on its geometry and the position-dependent material properties, namely the density and the complex elastic stiffness tensor, by accurate measurement of a specimen’s resonance frequencies and amplitudes, one can detect and characterize flaws embedded within it. A correct forward mathematical model to predict resonance characteristics is vital to the required analyses. In this paper, we present several computational results depicting the influence of the presence of embedded flaws/defects in a test specimen having simple geometrical shape. The mathematical model is based on the computationally efficient “XYZ Algorithm” of Visscher et al.

  16. Evaluation of silicon tuning fork resonators under mechanical loads and space-relevant radiation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandi, Tobias; Baborowski, Jacek; Dommann, Alex; Shea, Herbert R.; Cardot, Francis; Neels, Antonia

    2014-10-01

    This work reports on mechanical tests and irradiations made on silicon bulk-acoustic wave resonators. The resonators were based on a tuning fork geometry and actuated by a piezoelectric aluminum nitride layer. They had a resonance frequency of 150 kHz and a quality factor of about 20,000 under vacuum. The susceptibility of the devices to radiation-induced degradation was investigated using Co60 γ-rays and 50 MeV protons with space-relevant doses of up to 170 krad. The performance of the devices after irradiation indicated a high tolerance to both ionizing damage and displacement damage effects. In addition, the device characteristics were evaluated after mechanical shock and vibration tests and only small effects on the devices were observed. In all experiments, no significant changes of the resonance characteristics were observed within the experimental uncertainty, which was below 100 ppm for the resonance frequency. The results support the efforts toward design and fabrication of highly reliable MEMS devices for space applications.

  17. Resonance wood [Picea abies (L.) Karst.]--evaluation and prediction of violin makers' quality-grading.

    PubMed

    Buksnowitz, Christoph; Teischinger, Alfred; Müller, Ulrich; Pahler, Andreas; Evans, Robert

    2007-04-01

    The definition of quality in the field of resonance wood for musical instrument making has attracted considerable interest over decades but has remained incomplete. The current work compares the traditional knowledge and practical experience of violin makers with a material-science approach to objectively characterize the properties of resonance wood. Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] has earned a very high reputation for the construction of resonance tops of stringed instruments and resonance boards of keyboard instruments, and was therefore chosen as the focus of the investigation. The samples were obtained from numerous renowned resonance wood regions in the European Alps and cover the whole range of available qualities. A set of acoustical, anatomical, mechanical and optical material properties was measured on each sample. These measurements were compared with subjective quality grading by violin makers, who estimated the acoustical, optical and overall suitability for violin making. Multiple linear regression models were applied to evaluate the predictability of the subjective grading using the measured material characteristics as predictors. The results show that luthiers are able to estimate wood quality related to visible features, but predictions of mechanical and acoustical properties proved to be very poor. PMID:17471750

  18. Criteria for first- and second-order vibrational resonances and correct evaluation of the Darling-Dennison resonance coefficients using the canonical Van Vleck perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnoshchekov, Sergey V.; Isayeva, Elena V.; Stepanov, Nikolay F.

    2014-12-21

    The second-order vibrational Hamiltonian of a semi-rigid polyatomic molecule when resonances are present can be reduced to a quasi-diagonal form using second-order vibrational perturbation theory. Obtaining exact vibrational energy levels requires subsequent numerical diagonalization of the Hamiltonian matrix including the first- and second-order resonance coupling coefficients. While the first-order Fermi resonance constants can be easily calculated, the evaluation of the second-order Darling-Dennison constants requires more complicated algebra for seven individual cases with different numbers of creation-annihilation vibrational quanta. The difficulty in precise evaluation of the Darling-Dennison coefficients is associated with the previously unrecognized interference with simultaneously present Fermi resonances that affect the form of the canonically transformed Hamiltonian. For the first time, we have presented the correct form of the general expression for the evaluation of the Darling-Dennison constants that accounts for the underlying effect of Fermi resonances. The physically meaningful criteria for selecting both Fermi and Darling-Dennison resonances are discussed and illustrated using numerical examples.

  19. Improved Estimation of Cardiac Function Parameters Using a Combination of Independent Automated Segmentation Results in Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lebenberg, Jessica; Lalande, Alain; Clarysse, Patrick; Buvat, Irene; Casta, Christopher; Cochet, Alexandre; Constantinidès, Constantin; Cousty, Jean; de Cesare, Alain; Jehan-Besson, Stephanie; Lefort, Muriel; Najman, Laurent; Roullot, Elodie; Sarry, Laurent; Tilmant, Christophe; Frouin, Frederique; Garreau, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed at combining different segmentation approaches to produce a robust and accurate segmentation result. Three to five segmentation results of the left ventricle were combined using the STAPLE algorithm and the reliability of the resulting segmentation was evaluated in comparison with the result of each individual segmentation method. This comparison was performed using a supervised approach based on a reference method. Then, we used an unsupervised statistical evaluation, the extended Regression Without Truth (eRWT) that ranks different methods according to their accuracy in estimating a specific biomarker in a population. The segmentation accuracy was evaluated by estimating six cardiac function parameters resulting from the left ventricle contour delineation using a public cardiac cine MRI database. Eight different segmentation methods, including three expert delineations and five automated methods, were considered, and sixteen combinations of the automated methods using STAPLE were investigated. The supervised and unsupervised evaluations demonstrated that in most cases, STAPLE results provided better estimates than individual automated segmentation methods. Overall, combining different automated segmentation methods improved the reliability of the segmentation result compared to that obtained using an individual method and could achieve the accuracy of an expert. PMID:26287691

  20. Update on Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Ultrasound Evaluation of Crohn’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Deepak, Parakkal; Kolbe, Amy B.; Fidler, Jeff L.; Fletcher, Joel G.; Knudsen, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) and abdominal ultrasound are integral parts of multimodality assessments for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Applications include assessing Crohn’s disease (CD) extent and severity, differentiating CD from ulcerative colitis, detecting CD complications, evaluating response to therapy, and demonstrating postoperative recurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging protocols are being developed that may reduce or eliminate the need for intravenous contrast agents and better differentiate inflammatory from fibrotic strictures. MRE scoring systems have been created to objectively quantify disease activity and response to therapy. By utilizing advanced sonographic imaging techniques, including ultrasound contrast and Doppler assessments, the role of abdominal ultrasonography in the evaluation and management of CD continues to expand. Abdominal ultrasound may function as a low-cost, point-of care assessment tool, especially in CD restricted to the terminal ileum and ileocolic anastomosis. PMID:27231453

  1. Update on Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Ultrasound Evaluation of Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Deepak, Parakkal; Kolbe, Amy B; Fidler, Jeff L; Fletcher, Joel G; Knudsen, John M; Bruining, David H

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) and abdominal ultrasound are integral parts of multimodality assessments for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Applications include assessing Crohn's disease (CD) extent and severity, differentiating CD from ulcerative colitis, detecting CD complications, evaluating response to therapy, and demonstrating postoperative recurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging protocols are being developed that may reduce or eliminate the need for intravenous contrast agents and better differentiate inflammatory from fibrotic strictures. MRE scoring systems have been created to objectively quantify disease activity and response to therapy. By utilizing advanced sonographic imaging techniques, including ultrasound contrast and Doppler assessments, the role of abdominal ultrasonography in the evaluation and management of CD continues to expand. Abdominal ultrasound may function as a low-cost, point-of care assessment tool, especially in CD restricted to the terminal ileum and ileocolic anastomosis. PMID:27231453

  2. Efficiency modeling and evaluation of a resonant snubber based soft- switching inverter for motor drive applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, J.S.; Young, R.W.; Ott, G.W.

    1995-12-31

    This paper establishes an analytical model for a resonant snubber based soft-switching inverter. The model adopts loss separation method to evaluate losses in individual components. Because of symmetry of the inverter circuit, the developed model is suitable for both single-phase and three-phase inverters. A single-phase inverter was built and tested with a single-phase induction motor driving a fan load to verify the developed model. The equivalent single-phase induction motor model was curve-fitted from experiment. Analytical results showed reasonable agreement with experiment. The same efficiency evaluation method was then applied to the conventional hard-switching inverter, and the results were compared with that of the soft-switching inverter. The resonant snubber base soft-switching inverter shows substantial efficiency improvement over the hard switching PWM (pulse-width-modulation) inverter, especially in low speed operation.

  3. Plasma drifts deduced from resonance cone asymmetries: II. Evaluation of COREX data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piel, A.; Rohde, V.; Thiemann, H.; Oyama, K. I.

    The data from the COREX instrument are discussed with respect to non-reciprocities in resonance cones for opposing wave propagation directions. The shift of the maxima has a different symmetry from the case of field aligned drifts. Using a generalized drift model the magnitude and direction of the drift is evaluated. Velocities of the order of up to 38 km/s are found. The drift direction is nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field.

  4. Magnetic resonance cholangiographic evaluation of intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile duct variations

    PubMed Central

    Sureka, Binit; Bansal, Kalpana; Patidar, Yashwant; Arora, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    Biliary anatomy and its common and uncommon variations are of considerable clinical significance when performing living donor transplantation, radiological interventions in hepatobiliary system, laparoscopic cholecystectomy, and liver resection (hepatectomy, segmentectomy). Because of increasing trend found in the number of liver transplant surgeries being performed, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) has become the modality of choice for noninvasive evaluation of abnormalities of the biliary tract. The purpose of this study is to describe the anatomic variations of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic biliary tree. PMID:27081220

  5. Acute Cardiac Impairment Associated With Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer: Magnetic Resonance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hatakenaka, Masamitsu; Yonezawa, Masato; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nagao, Michinobu; Matsuo, Yoshio; Kamitani, Takeshi; Higo, Taiki; Nishikawa, Kei; Setoguchi, Taro; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate acute cardiac effects of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained from all participants. The left ventricular function (LVF) of 31 patients with esophageal cancer who received cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil-based CCRT was evaluated using cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging. The patients were classified into two groups according to mean LV dose. The parameters related to LVF were compared between before and during (40 Gy) or between before and after CCRT using a Wilcoxon matched-pairs single rank test, and parameter ratios (during/before CCRT, after/before CCRT) were also compared between the groups with a t test. Data were expressed as mean {+-} SE. Results: In the low LV-dose group (n = 10; mean LV dose <0.6 Gy), LV ejection fraction decreased significantly (before vs. during vs. after CCRT; 62.7% {+-} 2.98% vs. 59.8% {+-} 2.56% vs. 60.6% {+-} 3.89%; p < 0.05). In the high LV-dose group (n = 21; mean LV dose of 3.6-41.2 Gy), LV end-diastolic volume index (before vs. after CCRT; 69.1 {+-} 2.93 vs. 57.0 {+-} 3.23 mL/m{sup 2}), LV stroke volume index (38.6 {+-} 1.56 vs. 29.9 {+-} 1.60 mL/m{sup 2}), and LV ejection fraction (56.9% {+-} 1.79% vs. 52.8% {+-} 1.15%) decreased significantly (p < 0.05) after CCRT. Heart rate increased significantly (before vs. during vs. after CCRT; 66.8 {+-} 3.05 vs. 72.4 {+-} 4.04 vs. 85.4 {+-} 3.75 beats per minute, p < 0.01). Left ventricle wall motion decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in segments 8 (before vs. during vs. after CCRT; 6.64 {+-} 0.54 vs. 4.78 {+-} 0.43 vs. 4.79 {+-} 0.50 mm), 9 (6.88 {+-} 0.45 vs. 5.04 {+-} 0.38 vs. 5.27 {+-} 0.47 mm), and 10 (9.22 {+-} 0.48 vs. 8.08 {+-} 0.34 vs. 8.19 {+-} 0.56 mm). The parameter ratios of LV end-diastolic volume index, stroke volume index, wall motion in segment 9, and heart rate showed significant difference

  6. Profiles of ion beams and plasma parameters on a multi-frequencies microwaves large bore electron cyclotron resonance ion source with permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Yushi; Sakamoto, Naoki; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2012-02-15

    In order to contribute to various applications of plasma and beams based on an electron cyclotron resonance, a new concept on magnetic field with all magnets on plasma production and confinement has been proposed with enhanced efficiency for broad and dense ion beam. The magnetic field configuration consists of a pair of comb-shaped magnet surrounding plasma chamber cylindrically. Resonance zones corresponding for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz frequencies are positioned at spatially different positions. We launch simultaneously multiplex frequencies microwaves operated individually, try to control profiles of the plasma parameters and the extracted ion beams, and to measure them in detail.

  7. Design and evaluation of a 1.1-GHz surface coil resonator for electron paramagnetic resonance-based tooth dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Hirotaka; Hirata, Hiroshi; Petryakov, Sergey; Lesniewski, Piotr; Williams, Benjamin B; Flood, Ann Barry; Swartz, Harold M

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes an optimized design of a surface coil resonator for in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-based tooth dosimetry. Using the optimized resonator, dose estimates with the standard error of the mean of approximately 0.5 Gy were achieved with irradiated human teeth. The product of the quality factor and the filling factor of the resonator was computed as an index of relative signal intensity in EPR tooth dosimetry by the use of 3-D electromagnetic wave simulator and radio frequency circuit design environment (ANSYS HFSS and Designer). To verify the simulated results of the signal intensity in our numerical model of the resonator and a tooth sample, we experimentally measured the radiation-induced signals from an irradiated tooth with an optimally designed resonator. In addition to the optimization of the resonator design, we demonstrated the improvement of the stability of EPR spectra by decontamination of the surface coil resonator using an HCl solution, confirming that contamination of small magnetic particles on the silver wire of the surface coil had degraded the stability of the EPR spectral baseline. PMID:24845300

  8. Evaluation of kinetic constants of biomolecular interaction on optical surface plasmon resonance sensor with Newton Iteration Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Guoliang; Hu, Jiandong; Hu, Fengjiang; Wei, Jianguang; Shi, Liang

    2010-10-01

    In the immunology, there are two important types of biomolecular interaction: antigens-antibodies and receptors-ligands. Monitoring the response rate and affinity of biomolecular interaction can help analyze the protein function, drug discover, genomics and proteomics research. Moreover the association rate constant and dissociation rate constant of receptors-ligands are the important parameters for the study of signal transmission between cells. Recent advances in bioanalyzer instruments have greatly simplified the measurement of the kinetics of molecular interactions. Non-destructive and real-time monitoring the response to evaluate the parameters between antigens and antibodies can be performed by using optical surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor technology. This technology provides a quantitative analysis that is carried out rapidly with label-free high-throughput detection using the binding curves of antigens-antibodies. Consequently, the kinetic parameters of interaction between antigens and antibodies can be obtained. This article presents a low cost integrated SPR-based bioanalyzer (HPSPR-6000) designed by ourselves. This bioanalyzer is mainly composed of a biosensor TSPR1K23, a touch-screen monitor, a microprocessor PIC24F128, a microflow cell with three channels, a clamp and a photoelectric conversion device. To obtain the kinetic parameters, sensorgrams may be modeled using one of several binding models provided with BIAevaluation software 3.0, SensiQ or Autolab. This allows calculation of the association rate constant (ka) and the dissociation rate constant (kd). The ratio of ka to kd can be used to estimate the equilibrium constant. Another kind is the analysis software OriginPro, which can process the obtained data by nonlinear fitting and then get some correlative parameters, but it can't be embedded into the bioanalyzer, so the bioanalyzer don't support the use of OriginPro. This paper proposes a novel method to evaluate the kinetic parameters

  9. Improved Quantification of Cerebral Hemodynamics Using Individualized Time Thresholds for Assessment of Peak Enhancement Parameters Derived from Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nasel, Christian; Kalcher, Klaudius; Boubela, Roland; Moser, Ewald

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Assessment of cerebral ischemia often employs dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with evaluation of various peak enhancement time parameters. All of these parameters use a single time threshold to judge the maximum tolerable peak enhancement delay that is supposed to reliably differentiate sufficient from critical perfusion. As the validity of this single threshold approach still remains unclear, in this study, (1) the definition of a threshold on an individual patient-basis, nevertheless (2) preserving the comparability of the data, was investigated. Methods The histogram of time-to-peak (TTP) values derived from DSC-MRI, the so-called TTP-distribution curve (TDC), was modeled using a double-Gaussian model in 61 patients without severe cerebrovascular disease. Particular model-based zf-scores were used to describe the arterial, parenchymal and venous bolus-transit phase as time intervals Ia,p,v. Their durations (delta Ia,p,v), were then considered as maximum TTP-delays of each phase. Results Mean-R2 for the model-fit was 0.967. Based on the generic zf-scores the proposed bolus transit phases could be differentiated. The Ip-interval reliably depicted the parenchymal bolus-transit phase with durations of 3.4 s–10.1 s (median = 4.3s), where an increase with age was noted (∼30 ms/year). Conclusion Individual threshold-adjustment seems rational since regular bolus-transit durations in brain parenchyma obtained from the TDC overlap considerably with recommended critical TTP-thresholds of 4 s–8 s. The parenchymal transit time derived from the proposed model may be utilized to individually correct TTP-thresholds, thereby potentially improving the detection of critical perfusion. PMID:25521121

  10. Sperm motility parameters to evaluate the seminal quality of Boa constrictor occidentalis, a threatened snake species.

    PubMed

    Tourmente, M; Cardozo, G A; Guidobaldi, H A; Giojalas, L C; Bertona, M; Chiaraviglio, M

    2007-02-01

    Semen quality analysis constitutes a powerful tool to evaluate the fertility potential of males in threatened species. The Argentine boa constrictor or lampalagua (Boa constrictor occidentalis) is a threatened snake species and has been included in Appendix I of CITES. The objective of this work is to characterize the sperm of B. c. occidentalis on the bases of dynamic parameters to improve this species conservation. Dynamic parameters were measured in sperm samples using videomicroscopy and image analysis software. The sperm population showed a high degree of heterogeneity in velocity parameter values and 95% of the cells showed a linear pattern of movement. Studies in other species indicate that the number of motile spermatozoa and their movement speed is directly correlated with fertilization success. This work will help to establish basic parameter values for the evaluation of the reproductive potential of populations of B. c. occidentalis and to resolve questions referred to its reproductive strategies. PMID:16857223

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the chest in the evaluation of cancer patients: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Hochhegger, Bruno; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Santana, Pablo Rydz Pinheiro; Sousa, Arthur Soares; Souza, Luciana Soares; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has several advantages in the evaluation of cancer patients with thoracic lesions, including involvement of the chest wall, pleura, lungs, mediastinum, esophagus and heart. It is a quite useful tool in the diagnosis, staging, surgical planning, treatment response evaluation and follow-up of these patients. In the present review, the authors contextualize the relevance of MRI in the evaluation of thoracic lesions in cancer patients. Considering that MRI is a widely available method with high contrast and spatial resolution and without the risks associated with the use of ionizing radiation, its use combined with new techniques such as cine-MRI and functional methods such as perfusion- and diffusion-weighted imaging may be useful as an alternative tool with performance comparable or complementary to conventional radiological methods such as radiography, computed tomography and PET/CT imaging in the evaluation of patients with thoracic neoplasias. PMID:25798006

  12. Evaluation of microstructural parameters of oxide dispersion strengthened steels from X-ray diffraction profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasenko, Svetlana; Benediktovitch, Andrei; Ulyanenkova, Tatjana; Uglov, Vladimir; Skuratov, Vladimir; O'Connell, Jacques; Neethling, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    The microstructural parameters of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels from measured diffraction profiles were evaluated using an approach where the complex oxide nanoparticles (Y2Ti2O7 and Y4Al2O9) are modeled as spherical inclusions in the steel matrix with coherent or incoherent boundaries. The proposed method enables processing of diffraction data from materials containing spherical inclusions in addition to straight dislocations, and taking into account broadening due to crystallite size and instrumental effects. The parameters of crystallite size distribution modeled by a lognormal distribution function (the parameters m and σ), the strain anisotropy parameter q, the dislocation density ρ, the dislocation arrangement parameter M, the density of oxide nanoparticles ρnp and the nanoparticle radius r0 were determined for the ODS steel samples. The results obtained are in good agreement with the results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  13. Reliability evaluation for failed fuel identification using resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Yoshihiro; Ito, Chikara; Harano, Hideki

    2013-04-01

    In the fast reactors, rapid and accurate identification of a fuel failure event is essential for ensuring safety operation. Isotopic analysis of krypton (Kr) and xenon (Xe) using resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is an effective identification tool, in which Kr and Xe atoms are resonantly ionized by a pulsed laser at 216.7 nm and 249.6 nm, respectively, and then three isotopic ratios: 78Kr/80Kr, 82Kr/80Kr and 126Xe/129Xe are measured to detect the location of the failed fuel assembly. In this paper, we report on the required analytical precision of RIMS estimated from simulation studies as well as the analytical performance of our spectrometer to evaluate the availability of RIMS to the failed fuel identification technique in the fast reactors.

  14. An automated procedure for material parameter evaluation for viscoplastic constitutive models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbrie, P. K.; James, G. H.; Hill, P. S.; Allen, D. H.; Haisler, W. E.

    1988-01-01

    An automated procedure is presented for evaluating the material parameters in Walker's exponential viscoplastic constitutive model for metals at elevated temperature. Both physical and numerical approximations are utilized to compute the constants for Inconel 718 at 1100 F. When intermediate results are carefully scrutinized and engineering judgement applied, parameters may be computed which yield stress output histories that are in agreement with experimental results. A qualitative assessment of the theta-plot method for predicting the limiting value of stress is also presented. The procedure may also be used as a basis to develop evaluation schemes for other viscoplastic constitutive theories of this type.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the liver: New imaging strategies for evaluating focal liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Coenegrachts, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    The early detection of focal liver lesions, particularly those which are malignant, is of utmost importance. The resection of liver metastases of some malignancies (including colorectal cancer) has been shown to improve the survival of patients. Exact knowledge of the number, size, and regional distribution of liver metastases is essential to determine their resectability. Almost all focal liver lesions larger than 10 mm are demonstrated with current imaging techniques but the detection of smaller focal liver lesions is still relatively poor. One of the advantages of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver is better soft tissue contrast (compared to other radiologic modalities), which allows better detection and characterization of the focal liver lesions in question. Developments in MRI hardware and software and the availability of novel MRI contrast agents have further improved the diagnostic yield of MRI in lesion detection and characterization. Although the primary modalities for liver imaging are ultrasound and computed tomography, recent studies have suggested that MRI is the most sensitive method for detecting small liver metastatic lesions, and MRI is now considered the pre-operative standard method for diagnosis. Two recent developments in MRI sequences for the upper abdomen comprise unenhanced diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and keyhole-based dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI (4D THRIVE). DWI allows improved detection (b = 10 s/mm2) of small (< 10 mm) focal liver lesions in particular, and is useful as a road map sequence. Also, using higher b-values, the calculation of the apparent diffusion coefficient value, true diffusion coefficient, D, and the perfusion fraction, f, has been used for the characterization of focal liver lesions. DCE 4D THRIVE enables MRI of the liver with high temporal and spatial resolution and full liver coverage. 4D THRIVE improves evaluation of focal liver lesions, providing multiple arterial and venous phases, and

  16. Recent results of the parameters A and R measurements in the resonance region of the πN-elastic scattering and subsequent investigations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumachev, V. V.; Beloglazov, Yu. A.; Filimonov, E. A.; Kovalev, A. I.; Kozlenko, N. G.; Kruglov, S. P.; Kulbardis, A. A.; Lopatin, I. V.; Novinsky, D. V.; Shchedrov, V. A.; Trautman, V. Yu.; Alekseev, I. G.; Budkovsky, P. E.; Kanavets, V. P.; Koroleva, L. I.; Morozov, B. V.; Nesterov, V. M.; Ryltsov, V. V.; Sulimov, A. D.; Svirida, D. N.; Bazhanov, N. A.; Bunyatova, E. I.

    2008-10-01

    The existing models of baryons usually predict considerably more resonance (three or more in number) than it was found by investigation of elastic pion-nucleon scattering. This disagreement invites further investigation of the pion-nucleon interaction and among other things the measurement of spin rotation parameters A and R in the elastic pion-nucleon scattering. Recent experiments of the PNPI and PNPI-ITEP collaborations resolved a part of twofold ambiguities of the existing partial wave analyses (PWA). These results were used in the last PWA of the George Washington University group SP06. The proposal for the additional spin rotation parameters A and R measurement in the resonance region is motivated. Such additional measurements are necessary to resolve remaining twofold ambiguities of the existing PWAs.

  17. Recent results of the parameters A and R measurements in the resonance region of the {pi}N-elastic scattering and subsequent investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Sumachev, V. V.; Beloglazov, Yu. A.; Filimonov, E. A.; Kovalev, A. I.; Kozlenko, N. G.; Kruglov, S. P.; Kulbardis, A. A.; Lopatin, I. V.; Novinsky, D. V.; Shchedrov, V. A.; Trautman, V. Yu.; Alekseev, I. G.; Budkovsky, P. E.; Kanavets, V. P.; Koroleva, L. I.; Morozov, B. V.; Nesterov, V. M.; Ryltsov, V. V.; Sulimov, A. D.; Svirida, D. N.

    2008-10-13

    The existing models of baryons usually predict considerably more resonance (three or more in number) than it was found by investigation of elastic pion-nucleon scattering. This disagreement invites further investigation of the pion-nucleon interaction and among other things the measurement of spin rotation parameters A and R in the elastic pion-nucleon scattering.Recent experiments of the PNPI and PNPI-ITEP collaborations resolved a part of twofold ambiguities of the existing partial wave analyses (PWA). These results were used in the last PWA of the George Washington University group SP06. The proposal for the additional spin rotation parameters A and R measurement in the resonance region is motivated. Such additional measurements are necessary to resolve remaining twofold ambiguities of the existing PWAs.

  18. Evaluation of patello-femoral alignment by CT scans: interobserver reliability of several parameters.

    PubMed

    Dei Giudici, Luca; Enea, Davide; Pierdicca, Laura; Cecconi, Stefano; Ulisse, Serena; Arima, Serena; Giovagnoni, Andrea; Gigante, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Patello-femoral malalignment (PFM) is a common cause of disability often related to patello-femoral syndrome (PFS). Several causes have been taken into account; a proper diagnosis requires instrumental imaging and a methodical evaluation of different parameters. The aim of the present study was to identify the most reliable parameters for measuring patello-femoral and inferior limb alignment by CT. Twenty randomly selected patients suffering from PFS for a total of 40 knees were studied by static CT scans in order to assess patellar tilt, patellar displacement, patellar and trochlear morphology and inferior limb alignment. All known parameters were measured; the variability of the measurements between observers was evaluated by boxplots, Pearson's correlation coefficients, and infraclass correlation coefficient [ICC(2,1)] based on a two-way random effect model. Bland-Altman mean differences and 95 % limits of agreement were computed for each pair of measurements. Patellar tilt parameters appeared equally reliable; patellar displacement is best measured with BoTot that showed an ICC of 0.889; morphology is best measured with WibergTot, with an ICC of 0.862; lastly, for the inferior limb alignment parameters' analysis, FTV outperformed the others in terms of reliability. The present study allowed us to select a limited number of reliable parameters in the evaluation of patello-femoral and inferior limb alignment. The use of these parameters may also result in a more reliable comparison of studies on PFM and in a better evaluation of the treatment outcomes. PMID:25851081

  19. Evaluation of Three Methods for Determining EMG-Muscle Force Parameter Estimates for the Shoulder Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Gatti, Christopher J.; Doro, Lisa Case; Langenderfer, Joseph E.; Mell, Amy G.; Maratt, Joseph D.; Carpenter, James E.; Hughes, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    Background Accurate prediction of in vivo muscle forces is essential for relevant analyses of musculoskeletal biomechanics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate three methods for predicting muscle forces of the shoulder by comparing calculated muscle parameters, which relate electromyographic activity to muscle forces. Methods Thirteen subjects performed sub-maximal, isometric contractions consisting of six actions about the shoulder and two actions about the elbow. Electromyography from 12 shoulder muscles and internal shoulder moments were used to determine muscle parameters using traditional multiple linear regression, principal-components regression, and a sequential muscle parameter determination process using principal-components regression. Muscle parameters were evaluated based on their sign (positive or negative), standard deviations, and error between the measured and predicted internal shoulder moments. Findings It was found that no method was superior with respect to all evaluation criteria. The sequential principal-components regression method most frequently produced muscle parameters that could be used to estimate muscle forces, multiple regression best predicted the measured internal shoulder moments, and the results of principal-components regression fell between those of sequential principal-components regression and multiple regression. Interpretation The selection of a muscle parameter estimation method should be based on the importance of the evaluation criteria. Sequential principal-components regression should be used if a greater number of physiologically accurate muscle forces are desired, while multiple regression should be used for a more accurate prediction of measured internal shoulder moments. However, all methods produced muscle parameters which can be used to predict in vivo muscle forces of the shoulder. PMID:17945401

  20. Cardiac and somatic parameters in zebrafish: tools for the evaluation of cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Rafael; Vásquez, Isabel Cristina

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a worldwide public health problem. To date, extensive research has been conducted to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms that trigger cardiovascular diseases and to evaluate therapeutic options. Animal models are widely used to achieve these goals, and zebrafish have emerged as a low-cost model that produces rapid results. Currently, a large body of research is devoted to the cardiovascular development and diverse cardiovascular disorders of zebrafish embryos and larvae. However, less research has been conducted on adult zebrafish specimens. In this study, we evaluated a method to obtain and to evaluate morphometric parameters (of both the entire animal and the heart) of adult zebrafish. We used these data to calculate additional parameters, such as body mass index, condition factor and cardiac somatic index. This method and its results can be used as reference for future studies that aim to evaluate the pathophysiological aspects of the zebrafish cardiovascular system. PMID:26553553

  1. Study of the selection of indicator parameters in marine water quality evaluation and the evaluation methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Pan, Delu; Wang, Difeng; Fu, Dongyang

    2014-10-01

    In order to obtain the indicator types which must be introduced in marine water quality evaluation as well as the suitable evaluation methodology, GB3097-1997 National Marine Water Quality Standards is, in the first place, analyzed to establish a hypothetical sample which is consisting of 2000 stances, each stance containing the information of 21 indicators. And then a stepwise discriminant method is utilized to filter the 21 indicators in accordance with their water quality classification discriminant abilities. And finally, 6 indicators with significant discriminant ability, biochemical oxygen demand(BOD5), oil type(Oil), total phosphorus(P), cadmium(Cd), cyanide(HH) and chemical oxygen demand(COD), are selected and the water quality evaluation chart of the corresponding six indicators is also established. Theoretically, the water quality indicator types and the suitable evaluation methodology, which must be introduced when the water quality evaluation is done in all the waters under the jurisdiction of China, are discussed in this paper, providing theoretical basis for the subsequent marine water quality evaluation based on field observation.

  2. Important Physiological Parameters and Physical Activity Data for Evaluating Exposure Modeling Performance: a Synthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this report is to develop a database of physiological parameters needed for understanding and evaluating performance of the APEX and SHEDS exposure/intake dose rate model used by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as part of its regulatory activities. The A...

  3. SENSITIVE PARAMETER EVALUATION FOR A VADOSE ZONE FATE AND TRANSPORT MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents information pertaining to quantitative evaluation of the potential impact of selected parameters on output of vadose zone transport and fate models used to describe the behavior of hazardous chemicals in soil. The Vadose 2one Interactive Processes (VIP) model...

  4. Subsonic flight test evaluation of a propulsion system parameter estimation process for the F100 engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Gilyard, Glenn B.

    1992-01-01

    An adaptive-performance-seeking control system which optimizes the quasi-steady-state performance of the F-15 propulsion system is discussed. This paper presents flight- and ground-test evaluations of the propulsion system parameter-estimation process used by the performance seeking control system. The estimator consists of a compact propulsion system model and an extended Kalman filter. The extended Kalman filter estimates five engine component deviation parameters from measured inputs. The compact model uses measurements and Kalman-filter estimates as inputs to predict unmeasured propulsion parameters such as net propulsive force and fan stall margin. The ability to track trends and estimate absolute values of propulsion system parameters was demonstrated. For example, thrust stand results show a good correlation especially in trends between the performance seeking control estimated and measured thrust.

  5. Evaluation of robust wave image processing methods for magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing Nan; Shan, Xiang; Xiang, Kui; An, Ning; Xu, Jinzhang; Huang, Weimin; Kobayashi, Etsuko

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a promising modality for in vivo quantification and visualization of soft tissue elasticity. It involves three stages of processes for (1) external excitation, (2) wave imaging and (3) elasticity reconstruction. One of the important issues to be addressed in MRE is wave image processing and enhancement. In this study we approach it from three different ways including phase unwrapping, directional filtering and noise suppression. The relevant solutions were addressed briefly. Some of them were implemented and evaluated on both simulated and experimental MRE datasets. The results confirm that wave image enhancement is indispensable before carrying out MRE elasticity reconstruction. PMID:25222934

  6. Inverse modeling approach for evaluation of kinetic parameters of a biofilm reactor using tabu search.

    PubMed

    Kumar, B Shiva; Venkateswarlu, Ch

    2014-08-01

    The complex nature of biological reactions in biofilm reactors often poses difficulties in analyzing such reactors experimentally. Mathematical models could be very useful for their design and analysis. However, application of biofilm reactor models to practical problems proves somewhat ineffective due to the lack of knowledge of accurate kinetic models and uncertainty in model parameters. In this work, we propose an inverse modeling approach based on tabu search (TS) to estimate the parameters of kinetic and film thickness models. TS is used to estimate these parameters as a consequence of the validation of the mathematical models of the process with the aid of measured data obtained from an experimental fixed-bed anaerobic biofilm reactor involving the treatment of pharmaceutical industry wastewater. The results evaluated for different modeling configurations of varying degrees of complexity illustrate the effectiveness of TS for accurate estimation of kinetic and film thickness model parameters of the biofilm process. The results show that the two-dimensional mathematical model with Edward kinetics (with its optimum parameters as mu(max)rho(s)/Y = 24.57, Ks = 1.352 and Ki = 102.36) and three-parameter film thickness expression (with its estimated parameters as a = 0.289 x 10(-5), b = 1.55 x 10(-4) and c = 15.2 x 10(-6)) better describes the biofilm reactor treating the industry wastewater. PMID:25306783

  7. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Kissing Bonds using Local Defect Resonance (LDR) Spectroscopy: A Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delrue, S.; Tabatabaeipour, M.; Hettler, J.; Van Den Abeele, K.

    With the growing demand from industry to optimize and further develop existing Non-Destructive Testing & Evaluation (NDT&E) techniques or new methods to detect and characterize incipient damage with high sensitivity and increased quality, ample efforts have been devoted to better understand the typical behavior of kissing bonds, such as delaminations and cracks. Recently, it has been shown experimentally that the nonlinear ultrasonic response of kissing bonds could be enhanced by using Local Defect Resonance (LDR) spectroscopy. LDR spectroscopy is an efficient NDT technique that takes advantage of the characteristic fre- quencies of the defect (defect resonances) in order to provide maximum acoustic wave-defect interaction. In fact, for nonlinear methodologies, the ultrasonic excitation of the sample should occur at either multiples or integer ratios of the characteristic defect resonance frequencies, in order to obtain the highest signal-to-noise response in the nonlinear LDR spectroscopy. In this paper, the potential of using LDR spectroscopy for the detection, localization and characterization of kissing bonds is illustrated using a 3D simulation code for elastic wave propagation in materials containing closed but dynamically active cracks or delaminations. Using the model, we are able to define an appropriate method, based on the Scaling Subtraction Method (SSM), to determine the local defect resonance frequencies of a delamination in a composite plate and to illustrate an increase in defect nonlinearity due to LDR. The simulation results will help us to obtain a better understanding of the concept of LDR and to assist in the further design and testing of LDR spectroscopy for the detection, localization and characterization of kissing bonds.

  8. Evaluation of nonlocal parameter in the vibrations of single-walled carbon nanotubes with initial strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash, B.; Ansari, R.

    2010-06-01

    Based upon a nonlocal shell model accounting for the small-scale effects, the vibration characteristics of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different boundary conditions subjected to initial strain are studied in this paper. The set of governing equations of motion is numerically solved by a method that emerged from incorporating the radial point interpolation approximation within the framework of the generalized differential quadrature method. The effectiveness of the present nonlocal shell model is assessed by the molecular dynamics simulations as a benchmark of good accuracy. Accordingly, nonlocal parameters for clamped and cantilever SWCNTs with thicknesses of 0.066 and 0.34 nm are proposed due to the uncertainty that exists in defining nanotube wall thickness. The simulation results show that the resonant frequencies of SWCNTs are very sensitive to the initial strain, although small.

  9. Electrical and ionic conductivity effects on magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of CuI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesinowski, James P.; Ladouceur, Harold D.; Purdy, Andrew P.; Miller, Joel B.

    2010-12-01

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of two different types of conductivity, electrical and ionic, upon magic-angle spinning NMR spectra. The experimental demonstration of these effects involves 63Cu, 65Cu, and 127I variable temperature MAS-NMR experiments on samples of γ-CuI, a Cu+-ion conductor at elevated temperatures as well as a wide bandgap semiconductor. We extend previous observations that the chemical shifts depend very strongly upon the square of the spinning-speed as well as the particular sample studied and the magnetic field strength. By using the 207Pb resonance of lead nitrate mixed with the γ-CuI as an internal chemical shift thermometer we show that frictional heating effects of the rotor do not account for the observations. Instead, we find that spinning bulk CuI, a p-type semiconductor due to Cu+ vacancies in nonstoichiometric samples, in a magnetic field generates induced AC electric currents from the Lorentz force that can resistively heat the sample by over 200 °C. These induced currents oscillate along the rotor spinning axis at the spinning speed. Their associated heating effects are disrupted in samples containing inert filler material, indicating the existence of macroscopic current pathways between micron-sized crystallites. Accurate measurements of the temperature-dependence of the 63Cu and 127I chemical shifts in such diluted samples reveal that they are of similar magnitude (ca. 0.27 ppm/K) but opposite sign (being negative for 63Cu), and appear to depend slightly upon the particular sample. This relationship is identical to the corresponding slopes of the chemical shifts versus square of the spinning speed, again consistent with sample heating as the source of the observed large shift changes. Higher drive-gas pressures are required to spin samples that have higher effective electrical conductivities, indicating the presence of a braking effect arising from the induced currents produced by rotating a

  10. Electrical and ionic conductivity effects on magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of CuI.

    PubMed

    Yesinowski, James P; Ladouceur, Harold D; Purdy, Andrew P; Miller, Joel B

    2010-12-21

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of two different types of conductivity, electrical and ionic, upon magic-angle spinning NMR spectra. The experimental demonstration of these effects involves (63)Cu, (65)Cu, and (127)I variable temperature MAS-NMR experiments on samples of γ-CuI, a Cu(+)-ion conductor at elevated temperatures as well as a wide bandgap semiconductor. We extend previous observations that the chemical shifts depend very strongly upon the square of the spinning-speed as well as the particular sample studied and the magnetic field strength. By using the (207)Pb resonance of lead nitrate mixed with the γ-CuI as an internal chemical shift thermometer we show that frictional heating effects of the rotor do not account for the observations. Instead, we find that spinning bulk CuI, a p-type semiconductor due to Cu(+) vacancies in nonstoichiometric samples, in a magnetic field generates induced AC electric currents from the Lorentz force that can resistively heat the sample by over 200 °C. These induced currents oscillate along the rotor spinning axis at the spinning speed. Their associated heating effects are disrupted in samples containing inert filler material, indicating the existence of macroscopic current pathways between micron-sized crystallites. Accurate measurements of the temperature-dependence of the (63)Cu and (127)I chemical shifts in such diluted samples reveal that they are of similar magnitude (ca. 0.27 ppm/K) but opposite sign (being negative for (63)Cu), and appear to depend slightly upon the particular sample. This relationship is identical to the corresponding slopes of the chemical shifts versus square of the spinning speed, again consistent with sample heating as the source of the observed large shift changes. Higher drive-gas pressures are required to spin samples that have higher effective electrical conductivities, indicating the presence of a braking effect arising from the induced currents produced by

  11. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the new tooth wear measurement parameters

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hak; Nam, Shin-Eun

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, there has been an increasing interest in the preservation of natural dentition and the proper occlusion related to tooth wear for quality of life. To overcome the problems of the existing qualitative tooth wear analysis method, virtual three-dimensional models have been used. This study was designed to develop and validate a new quantitative method using tooth wear measurement parameters with angles obtained from virtual vectors and planes of the three-dimensional models. Sixteen parameters were evaluated in the virtual models of 20 students (7.57±1.55 years old) and 20 adults (56.85±6.34 years old). There were 12 angle and 4 height parameters, and the number of parameters measured from the virtual planes and vectors were 10 and 6, respectively. For each parameter, means and standard deviations were calculated, and an unpaired sample t test was performed to compare the young and the adult groups. Also, differences between the means were determined and expressed as percentages. The results were statistically significant between the two groups (P<0.001). In general, parameters using virtual vectors showed greater change than virtual plane. Although there were statistically significant differences among all parameters using virtual planes (P<0.001), the changes of the three angles were similar, except distolingual cusp angle. It was found that the parameters using virtual vectors were effective and tooth wear took place in both buccal and lingual cusps. Likewise, the validation of the new measurement parameters suggests that they can also be applied in the assessment of tooth wear related to dental biomaterials. PMID:26770880

  12. Evaluation and interpretation of Thematic Mapper ratios in equations for estimating corn growth parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dardner, B. R.; Blad, B. L.; Thompson, D. R.; Henderson, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    Reflectance and agronomic Thematic Mapper (TM) data were analyzed to determine possible data transformations for evaluating several plant parameters of corn. Three transformation forms were used: the ratio of two TM bands, logarithms of two-band ratios, and normalized differences of two bands. Normalized differences and logarithms of two-band ratios responsed similarly in the equations for estimating the plant growth parameters evaluated in this study. Two-term equations were required to obtain the maximum predictability of percent ground cover, canopy moisture content, and total wet phytomass. Standard error of estimate values were 15-26 percent lower for two-term estimates of these parameters than for one-term estimates. The terms log(TM4/TM2) and (TM4/TM5) produced the maximum predictability for leaf area and dry green leaf weight, respectively. The middle infrared bands TM5 and TM7 are essential for maximizing predictability for all measured plant parameters except leaf area index. The estimating models were evaluated over bare soil to discriminate between equations which are statistically similar. Qualitative interpretations of the resulting prediction equations are consistent with general agronomic and remote sensing theory.

  13. Slope stability susceptibility evaluation parameter (SSEP) rating scheme - An approach for landslide hazard zonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghuvanshi, Tarun Kumar; Ibrahim, Jemal; Ayalew, Dereje

    2014-11-01

    In this paper a new slope susceptibility evaluation parameter (SSEP) rating scheme is presented which is developed as an expert evaluation approach for landslide hazard zonation. The SSEP rating scheme is developed by considering intrinsic and external triggering parameters that are responsible for slope instability. The intrinsic parameters which are considered are; slope geometry, slope material (rock or soil type), structural discontinuities, landuse and landcover and groundwater. Besides, external triggering parameters such as, seismicity, rainfall and manmade activities are also considered. For SSEP empirical technique numerical ratings are assigned to each of the intrinsic and triggering parameters on the basis of logical judgments acquired from experience of studies of intrinsic and external triggering factors and their relative impact in inducing instability to the slope. Further, the distribution of maximum SSEP ratings is based on their relative order of importance in contributing instability to the slope. Finally, summation of all ratings for intrinsic and triggering parameter based on actual observation will provide the expected degree of landslide in a given land unit. This information may be utilized to develop a landslide hazard zonation map. The SSEP technique was applied in the area around Wurgessa Kebelle of North Wollo Zonal Administration, Amhara National Regional State in northern Ethiopia, some 490 km from Addis Ababa. The results obtained indicates that 8.33% of the area fall under Moderately hazard and 83.33% fall within High hazard whereas 8.34% of the area fall under Very high hazard. Further, in order to validate the LHZ map prepared during the study, active landslide activities and potential instability areas, delineated through inventory mapping was overlain on it. All active landslide activities and potential instability areas fall within very high and high hazard zone. Thus, the satisfactory agreement confirms the rationality of

  14. Evaluation Of Automated Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Relaxometry For Analysis Of Silicone Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    M. H. Wilson

    2009-10-02

    Screening studies and Design of Experiments (DoE) were performed to evaluate measurement variation of a new, non-destructive Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) test system designed to assess age-induced degradation of Outer Pressure Pads (OPP). The test method and results from 54,275 measurements are described. A reduction in measurement error was obtained after metal support struts were replaced with plastic support struts adjacent to the front position of the test chamber. However, remaining interference and a lack of detecting any age-related degradation prevent the use of the NMR system as a non-destructive surveillance test for OPPs. A cursory evaluation of the system with cellular silicone samples obtained more uniform results with increased error as measurements approached the sample’s edge.

  15. Evaluation of Possible Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Diagnostic Techniques for Tokamak Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Zweben; T.W. Kornack; D. Majeski; G. Schilling; C.H. Skinner; R. Wilson

    2002-08-05

    Potential applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diagnostic techniques to tokamak experiments are evaluated. NMR frequencies for hydrogen isotopes and low-Z nuclei in such experiments are in the frequency range approximately equal to 20-200 MHz, so existing RF [radio-frequency] antennas could be used to rotate the spin polarization and to make the NMR measurements. Our tentative conclusion is that such measurements are possible if highly spin polarized H or (superscript)3He gas sources (which exist) are used to fuel these plasmas. In addition, NMR measurements of the surface layers of the first wall (without plasma) may also be possible, e.g., to evaluate the inventory of tritium inside the vessel.

  16. Differential uncertainty analysis for evaluating the accuracy of S-parameter retrieval methods for electromagnetic properties of metamaterial slabs.

    PubMed

    Hasar, Ugur Cem; Barroso, Joaquim J; Sabah, Cumali; Kaya, Yunus; Ertugrul, Mehmet

    2012-12-17

    We apply a complete uncertainty analysis, not studied in the literature, to investigate the dependences of retrieved electromagnetic properties of two MM slabs (the first one with only split-ring resonators (SRRs) and the second with SRRs and a continuous wire) with single-band and dual-band resonating properties on the measured/simulated scattering parameters, the slab length, and the operating frequency. Such an analysis is necessary for the selection of a suitable retrieval method together with the correct examination of exotic properties of MM slabs especially in their resonance regions. For this analysis, a differential uncertainty model is developed to monitor minute changes in the dependent variables (electromagnetic properties of MM slabs) in functions of independent variables (scattering (S-) parameters, the slab length, and the operating frequency). Two complementary approaches (the analytical approach and the dispersion model approach) each with different strengths are utilized to retrieve the electromagnetic properties of various MM slabs, which are needed for the application of the uncertainty analysis. We note the following important results from our investigation. First, uncertainties in the retrieved electromagnetic properties of the analyzed MM slabs drastically increase when values of electromagnetic properties shrink to zero or near resonance regions where S-parameters exhibit rapid changes. Second, any low-loss or medium-loss inside the MM slabs due to an imperfect dielectric substrate or a finite conductivity of metals can decrease these uncertainties near resonance regions because these losses hinder abrupt changes in S-parameters. Finally, we note that precise information of especially the slab length and the operating frequency is a prerequisite for accurate analysis of exotic electromagnetic properties of MM slabs (especially multiband MM slabs) near resonance regions. PMID:23263141

  17. Evaluation of multiatlas label fusion for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging orbital segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Swetasudha; Asman, Andrew J.; Khare, Shweta P.; Thompson, Lindsey; Mawn, Louise A.; Smith, Seth A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Multiatlas methods have been successful for brain segmentation, but their application to smaller anatomies remains relatively unexplored. We evaluate seven statistical and voting-based label fusion algorithms (and six additional variants) to segment the optic nerves, eye globes, and chiasm. For nonlocal simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), we evaluate different intensity similarity measures (including mean square difference, locally normalized cross-correlation, and a hybrid approach). Each algorithm is evaluated in terms of the Dice overlap and symmetric surface distance metrics. Finally, we evaluate refinement of label fusion results using a learning-based correction method for consistent bias correction and Markov random field regularization. The multiatlas labeling pipelines were evaluated on a cohort of 35 subjects including both healthy controls and patients. Across all three structures, nonlocal spatial STAPLE (NLSS) with a mixed weighting type provided the most consistent results; for the optic nerve NLSS resulted in a median Dice similarity coefficient of 0.81, mean surface distance of 0.41 mm, and Hausdorff distance 2.18 mm for the optic nerves. Joint label fusion resulted in slightly superior median performance for the optic nerves (0.82, 0.39 mm, and 2.15 mm), but slightly worse on the globes. The fully automated multiatlas labeling approach provides robust segmentations of orbital structures on magnetic resonance imaging even in patients for whom significant atrophy (optic nerve head drusen) or inflammation (multiple sclerosis) is present. PMID:25558466

  18. A preliminary evaluation of an F100 engine parameter estimation process using flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maine, Trindel A.; Gilyard, Glenn B.; Lambert, Heather H.

    1990-01-01

    The parameter estimation algorithm developed for the F100 engine is described. The algorithm is a two-step process. The first step consists of a Kalman filter estimation of five deterioration parameters, which model the off-nominal behavior of the engine during flight. The second step is based on a simplified steady-state model of the 'compact engine model' (CEM). In this step the control vector in the CEM is augmented by the deterioration parameters estimated in the first step. The results of an evaluation made using flight data from the F-15 aircraft are presented, indicating that the algorithm can provide reasonable estimates of engine variables for an advanced propulsion-control-law development.

  19. A preliminary evaluation of an F100 engine parameter estimation process using flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maine, Trindel A.; Gilyard, Glenn B.; Lambert, Heather H.

    1990-01-01

    The parameter estimation algorithm developed for the F100 engine is described. The algorithm is a two-step process. The first step consists of a Kalman filter estimation of five deterioration parameters, which model the off-nominal behavior of the engine during flight. The second step is based on a simplified steady-state model of the compact engine model (CEM). In this step, the control vector in the CEM is augmented by the deterioration parameters estimated in the first step. The results of an evaluation made using flight data from the F-15 aircraft are presented, indicating that the algorithm can provide reasonable estimates of engine variables for an advanced propulsion control law development.

  20. Classification of the micro and nanoparticles and biological agents by neural network analysis of the parameters of optical resonance of whispering gallery mode in dielectric microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saetchnikov, Vladimir A.; Tcherniavskaia, Elina A.; Schweiger, Gustav; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2011-07-01

    A novel technique for the label-free analysis of micro and nanoparticles including biomolecules using optical micro cavity resonance of whispering-gallery-type modes is being developed. Various schemes of the method using both standard and specially produced microspheres have been investigated to make further development for microbial application. It was demonstrated that optical resonance under optimal geometry could be detected under the laser power of less 1 microwatt. The sensitivity of developed schemes has been tested by monitoring the spectral shift of the whispering gallery modes. Water solutions of ethanol, ascorbic acid, blood phantoms including albumin and HCl, glucose, biotin, biomarker like C reactive protein so as bacteria and virus phantoms (gels of silica micro and nanoparticles) have been used. Structure of resonance spectra of the solutions was a specific subject of investigation. Probabilistic neural network classifier for biological agents and micro/nano particles classification has been developed. Several parameters of resonance spectra as spectral shift, broadening, diffuseness and others have been used as input parameters to develop a network classifier for micro and nanoparticles and biological agents in solution. Classification probability of approximately 98% for probes under investigation have been achieved. Developed approach have been demonstrated to be a promising technology platform for sensitive, lab-on-chip type sensor which can be used for development of diagnostic tools for different biological molecules, e.g. proteins, oligonucleotides, oligosaccharides, lipids, small molecules, viral particles, cells as well as in different experimental contexts e.g. proteomics, genomics, drug discovery, and membrane studies.

  1. Evaluation of some coagulation parameters in hepatic coccidiosis experimentally induced with Eimeria stiedai in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Cam, Y; Cetin, E; Iça, A; Atalay, O; Cetin, N

    2006-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate some coagulation parameters in hepatic coccidiosis experimentally induced with Eimeria stiedai in rabbits. Fourteen healthy New Zealand rabbits were equally divided into two groups. One group received no treatment, the other group was orally inoculated with 40 000 sporulated oocysts of E. stiedai in a 1 ml inoculum using a catheter. At day 24 after inoculation, blood samples were collected into sodium citrate-containing tubes to evaluate some coagulation parameters. Although statistically not significant, infected rabbits had prolonged prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time compared with rabbits in the control group. A significant reduction (P < 0.05) was observed in the level of fibrinogen of infected rabbits compared with that of the controls. A slight decrease in thrombocyte counts of infected rabbits was not statistically significant. PMID:16629990

  2. A parameter estimation algorithm for spatial sine testing - Theory and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rost, R. W.; Deblauwe, F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the theory and an evaluation of a spatial sine testing parameter estimation algorithm that uses directly the measured forced mode of vibration and the measured force vector. The parameter estimation algorithm uses an ARMA model and a recursive QR algorithm is applied for data reduction. In this first evaluation, the algorithm has been applied to a frequency response matrix (which is a particular set of forced mode of vibration) using a sliding frequency window. The objective of the sliding frequency window is to execute the analysis simultaneously with the data acquisition. Since the pole values and the modal density are obtained from this analysis during the acquisition, the analysis information can be used to help determine the forcing vectors during the experimental data acquisition.

  3. Evaluation and optimization of the structural parameter of diesel nozzle basing on synchrotron radiation imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z.; Gao, Y.; Gong, H.; Li, L.

    2016-04-01

    Lacking of efficient methods, industry currently uses one only parameter—fuel flow rate—to evaluate the nozzle quality, which is far from satisfying the current emission regulations worldwide. By utilizing synchrotron radiation high energy X-ray in Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF), together with the imaging techniques, the 3D models of two nozzles with the same design dimensions were established, and the influence of parameters fluctuation in the azimuthal direction were analyzed in detail. Results indicate that, due to the orifice misalignment, even with the same design dimension, the inlet rounding radius of orifices differs greatly, and its fluctuation in azimuthal direction is also large. This difference will cause variation in the flow characteristics at orifice outlet and then further affect the spray characteristics. The study also indicates that, more precise investigation and insight into the evaluation and optimization of diesel nozzle structural parameter are needed.

  4. Evaluation of kinetic parameters for water soluble crystals by thermo gravimetric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rama, S.; Surendra Dilip, C.; Perumal, Rajesh Narayana

    2015-01-01

    This work elevates the relevance of kinetic parameters of nucleation and thermal decomposition for water soluble crystals. The positive soluble Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate (KDP) and negative soluble Lithium Sulfate Monohydrate (LSMH) materials were chosen for the kinetic evaluation. The results obtained from the classical nucleation theory are verified with the kinetic parameters which are evaluated from thermo gravimetric analysis. Nucleation parameters of a crystallization process such as interfacial energy (σ), volume free energy (ΔGv), critical energy barrier for nucleation (ΔG*), radius of the critical nucleus (r*) and nucleation rate (J) of the positive (KDP) and negative solubility (LSMH) crystals are determined from the classical nucleation theory of solubility-enthalpy relation. The kinetic parameters viz. the order of reaction, enthalpy, Gibbs free energy of activation, frequency factor, and entropy of activation are obtained from the TG based models viz. Horowitz-Metzger, Coats-Redfern and Piloyan-Novikova. The effect of varying temperature with relative variation on Gibbs free energy for both positive and negative solubility crystals is also discussed. The developed model holds good for both positive and negative solubility crystals.

  5. New parameters for a better evaluation of vegetative bioremediation, leaching, and phytodesalination.

    PubMed

    Rabhi, Mokded; Atia, Abdallah; Abdelly, Chedly; Smaoui, Abderrazak

    2015-10-21

    Vegetative bioremediation of calcareous sodic and saline-sodic soils is a biological approach for soil desalination by plants. It is based on three main processes: (i) sodium release from cation exchange sites, (ii) its leaching, and/or (iii) phytodesalination (Na(+) uptake by plant roots and its accumulation in shoots). Leaching needs sufficient rainfall and/or adequate irrigation. Thus, under non-leaching conditions, phytodesalination is the only existing process in terms of sodium removal. Several works tried to evaluate these processes; used plants were grown in field, in lysimeters, or in non-perforated pots. The evaluation of vegetative bioremediation, leaching, and phytodesalination was mainly based on plant analyses (including biomass production, sodium accumulation, test culture, and co-culture) and soil analyses (porosity, salinity, sodicity...). Nevertheless, used parameters are not enough to ensure comparisons between results found in different investigations. The present study introduces new parameters like phytodesalination efficiency, yield, and rate as well as vegetative bioremediation and leaching yields and rates. Our study is also illustrated by an estimation of all parameters for several previously-published data from our own works and those of other authors. Obtained results showed usefulness of these parameters and some of them can be extended to heavy metal phytoexraction. PMID:26254216

  6. Development of spiral density waves and evaluation of their parameters: a computer experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Grivnev, E.M.

    1985-07-01

    Numerical experiments with a disk of N = 250 interacting test-particles show that the velocity field does manifest development of the spiral density waves predicted by the Lin theory. The parameters of these simulated waves are evaluated in a nonlinear treatment. Similar N-body computer models can be employed to analyze the spiral structure in loosely wound galaxies such as NGC 3310 whose underlying equilibrium state is strongly perturbed.

  7. Evaluation of Lauha bhasma on classical analytical parameters - A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Prasanta Kumar; Choudhary, A K; Prajapati, P K

    2008-01-01

    Lauha Bhasma is the most widely used bhasma preparation in therapeutics, but till date the temperature pattern to prepare Lauha Bhasma in electric muffle furnace is not fixed. So in this pilot study an attempt has been made to confirm the appropriate temperature pattern to prepare Lauha Bhasma. And emphasis has been given to evaluate this prepared Lauha Bhasma on classical analytical parameter, which reflects the physical and chemical properties of the Bhasma. PMID:22557274

  8. Evaluation of Lauha bhasma on classical analytical parameters – A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Prasanta Kumar; Choudhary, A. K.; Prajapati, P. K.

    2008-01-01

    Lauha Bhasma is the most widely used bhasma preparation in therapeutics, but till date the temperature pattern to prepare Lauha Bhasma in electric muffle furnace is not fixed. So in this pilot study an attempt has been made to confirm the appropriate temperature pattern to prepare Lauha Bhasma. And emphasis has been given to evaluate this prepared Lauha Bhasma on classical analytical parameter, which reflects the physical and chemical properties of the Bhasma. PMID:22557274

  9. An information-measuring system for evaluating performance parameters of lighting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abulkhanov, Stanislav R.; Kharitonov, Sergey I.

    2016-04-01

    We propose the design of an information-measuring system for evaluating performance parameters of lighting devices. The system comprises four basic components: a software-hardware complex for designing lighting devices, an emulator of natural and technogeneous effects on an optical surface, an optical surface condition analyzer, and a lighting-device laboratory test unit. With this system, the duration of optical device certification tests can be reduced by several orders of magnitude when compared to full-scale tests.

  10. Multi-frequency weak signal detection based on wavelet transform and parameter compensation band-pass multi-stable stochastic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dongying; li, Pei; An, Shujun; Shi, Peiming

    2016-03-01

    In actual fault diagnosis, useful information is often submerged in heavy noise, and the feature information is difficult to extract. A novel weak signal detection method aimed at the problem of detecting multi-frequency signals buried under heavy background noise is proposed based on wavelet transform and parameter compensation band-pass multi-stable stochastic resonance (SR). First, the noisy signal is processed by parameter compensation, with the noise and system parameters expanded 10 times to counteract the effect of the damping term. The processed signal is decomposed into multiple signals of different scale frequencies by wavelet transform. Following this, we adjust the size of the scaled signals' amplitudes and reconstruct the signals; the weak signal frequency components are then enhanced by multi-stable stochastic resonance. The enhanced components of the signal are processed through a band-pass filter, leaving the enhanced sections of the signal. The processed signal is analyzed by FFT to achieve detection of the multi-frequency weak signals. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed method can enhance the signal amplitude, can effectively detect multi-frequency weak signals buried under heavy noise and is valuable and usable for bearing fault signal analysis.

  11. Evaluation of a classification method for biodegradable solid wastes using anaerobic degradation parameters.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Phoungthong, Khamphe; Lü, Fan; Shao, Li-Ming; He, Pin-Jing

    2013-12-01

    We studied the biochemical and anaerobic degradation characteristics of 29 types of materials to evaluate the effects of a physical composition classification method for degradable solid waste on the computation of anaerobic degradation parameters, including the methane yield potential (L0), anaerobic decay rate (k), and carbon sequestration factor (CSF). Biochemical methane potential tests were conducted to determine the anaerobic degradation parameters of each material. The results indicated that the anaerobic degradation parameters of nut waste were quite different from those of other food waste and nut waste was classified separately. Paper was subdivided into two categories according to its lignin content: degradable paper with lignin content of <0.05 g g VS(-1), and refractory paper with lignin content >0.15 g g VS(-1). The L0, k, and CSF parameters of leaves, a type of garden waste, were similar to those of grass. This classification method for degradable solid waste may provide a theoretical basis that facilitates the more accurate calculation of anaerobic degradation parameters. PMID:24045172

  12. Subsonic flight test evaluation of a propulsion system parameter estimation process for the F100 engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Gilyard, Glenn B.

    1992-01-01

    Integrated engine-airframe optimal control technology may significantly improve aircraft performance. This technology requires a reliable and accurate parameter estimator to predict unmeasured variables. To develop this technology base, NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility (Edwards, CA), McDonnell Aircraft Company (St. Louis, MO), and Pratt & Whitney (West Palm Beach, FL) have developed and flight-tested an adaptive performance seeking control system which optimizes the quasi-steady-state performance of the F-15 propulsion system. This paper presents flight and ground test evaluations of the propulsion system parameter estimation process used by the performance seeking control system. The estimator consists of a compact propulsion system model and an extended Kalman filter. The extended Laman filter estimates five engine component deviation parameters from measured inputs. The compact model uses measurements and Kalman-filter estimates as inputs to predict unmeasured propulsion parameters such as net propulsive force and fan stall margin. The ability to track trends and estimate absolute values of propulsion system parameters was demonstrated. For example, thrust stand results show a good correlation, especially in trends, between the performance seeking control estimated and measured thrust.

  13. Evaluation of unconfined-aquifer parameters from pumping test data by nonlinear least squares

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heidari, M.; Moench, A.

    1997-01-01

    Nonlinear least squares (NLS) with automatic differentiation was used to estimate aquifer parameters from drawdown data obtained from published pumping tests conducted in homogeneous, water-table aquifers. The method is based on a technique that seeks to minimize the squares of residuals between observed and calculated drawdown subject to bounds that are placed on the parameter of interest. The analytical model developed by Neuman for flow to a partially penetrating well of infinitesimal diameter situated in an infinite, homogeneous and anisotropic aquifer was used to obtain calculated drawdown. NLS was first applied to synthetic drawdown data from a hypothetical but realistic aquifer to demonstrate that the relevant hydraulic parameters (storativity, specific yield, and horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivity) can be evaluated accurately. Next the method was used to estimate the parameters at three field sites with widely varying hydraulic properties. NLS produced unbiased estimates of the aquifer parameters that are close to the estimates obtained with the same data using a visual curve-matching approach. Small differences in the estimates are a consequence of subjective interpretation introduced in the visual approach.

  14. Evaluation of Net Infiltration Uncertainty for Multiple Uncertain Input Parameters Using Latin Hypercube Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faybishenko, B.; McCurley, R. D.; Wang, J. Y.

    2004-12-01

    To assess, via numerical simulation, the effect of 12 uncertain input parameters (characterizing soil and rock properties and boundary [meteorological] conditions), on net infiltration uncertainty, the Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) technique (a modified Monte Carlo approach using a form of stratified sampling) was used. Each uncertain input parameter is presented using a probability distribution function, characterizing the epistemic uncertainty (which arises from the lack of knowledge about parameters-an uncertainty that can be reduced as new information becomes available). One hundred LHS realizations (using the code LHS V2.50 developed at Sandia National Laboratories) of the uncertain input parameters were used to simulate the net infiltration over the Yucca Mountain repository footprint. Simulations were carried out using the code INFIL VA-2.a1 (a modified USGS code INFIL V2.0). The results of simulations were then used to determine the net infiltration probability distribution function. According to theoretical considerations, for 12 uncertain input parameters, from 15 to 36 realizations using the LHS technique should be sufficient to get meaningful results. In this presentation, we will show that the theoretical considerations may significantly underestimate the required number of realizations for the evaluation of the correlation between the net infiltration and uncertain input parameters. We will demonstrate that the calculated net infiltration rate (presented as a probability distribution function) oscillates as a function of simulation runs, and that the correlation between net infiltration rate and the uncertain input parameters depends on the number of simulation runs. For example, the correlation coefficient between the soil (or rock) permeability and net infiltration stabilizes only after 60-80 realizations. The results of the correlation analysis show that the correlation to net infiltration is highest for precipitation, bedrock permeability

  15. Use of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Evaluate the Redox State In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    SWARTZ, HAROLD M.; KHAN, NADEEM; KHRAMTSOV, VALERY V.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an overview of how electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) can be used to measure redox-related parameters in vivo. The values of this approach include that the measurements are made under fully physiological conditions, and some of the measurements cannot be made by other means. Three complementary approaches are used with in vivo EPR: the rate of reduction or reactions of nitroxides, spin trapping of free radicals, and measurements of thiols. All three approaches already have produced unique and useful information. The measurement of the rate of decrease of nitroxides technically is the simplest, but difficult to interpret because the measured parameter, reduction in the intensity of the nitroxide signal, can occur by several different mechanisms. In vivo spin trapping can provide direct evidence for the occurrence of specific free radicals in vivo and reflect relative changes, but accurate absolute quantification remains challenging. The measurement of thiols in vivo also appears likely to be useful, but its development as an in vivo technique is at an early stage. It seems likely that the use of in vivo EPR to measure redox processes will become an increasingly utilized and valuable tool. PMID:17678441

  16. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and radionuclide imaging in the evaluation of renal transplant failure

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, M.S.; Tanasescu, D.E.; Waxman, A.D.; Crues, J.V. III

    1988-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was compared with radionuclide scintigraphy (RNS) in 16 patients with renal transplants undergoing renal failure to determine which modality could best discriminate between rejection, acute tubular necrosis (ATN), and cyclosporin nephrotoxicity (CN). Although all rejecting transplants had reduced corticomedullary differentiation (CMD) on T1-weighted MR images, four of five cases of ATN had appearances that could not be distinguished from rejection. A normal CMD suggests nonrejection, but diminished CMD is nonspecific. Tc-99m DTPA/I-131 hippuran RNS was superior to MRI in differentiating rejection from ATN. Although ATN and CN have similar RNS patterns, this distinction can usually be made based on the clinical time course. Other potential uses of MRI in the evaluation of the renal transplants are discussed.

  17. Usefulness of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for evaluating solitary pulmonary nodules

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) poses a challenge to radiologists. Chest computed tomography (CT) is considered the standard technique for assessing morphologic findings and intrathoracic spread of an SPN. Although the clinical role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for SPNs remains limited, considerable experience has been gained with MRI of thoracic diseases. Dynamic MRI and dynamic CT are useful for differentiating between malignant and benign SPNs (especially tuberculomas and hamartomas). Furthermore, dynamic MRI is useful for assessing tumor vascularity, interstitium, and vascular endothelial growth factor expression, and for predicting survival outcome among patients with peripheral pulmonary carcinoma. These advantages make dynamic MRI a promising method and a potential biomarker for characterizing tumor response to anti-angiogenic treatment as well as for predicting survival outcomes after treatment. PMID:18331971

  18. The prevalence of wrist ganglia in an asymptomatic population: magnetic resonance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lowden, C M; Attiah, M; Garvin, G; Macdermid, J C; Osman, S; Faber, K J

    2005-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on the wrists of 103 asymptomatic volunteers. The images were evaluated independently by two musculoskeletal radiologists and one orthopaedic surgeon. Wrist ganglia were identified in 53 out of the 103 wrists. The average long and short axes measurements were 8 mm (range 3-22) and 3 mm (range 2-10), respectively. Seventy per cent of the ganglia originated from the palmar capsule in the region of the interval between the radioscaphocapitate ligament and the long radiolunate ligament. Fourteen per cent of the ganglia were dorsal and originated from the dorsal, distal fibres of the scapholunate ligament. Two ganglia had surrounding soft tissue oedema and one had an associated intraosseous component. Unlike previous surgical and pathological series, our study showed that palmar wrist ganglia are more common than dorsal wrist ganglia. The vast majority of these asymptomatic ganglia occur without associated ligamentous disruption, soft tissue oedema or intraosseous communication. PMID:15862373

  19. Usefulness of magnetic resonance angiography for the evaluation of varices at hepaticojejunostomy after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Fujii, Tohru; Ohtsuka, Yoshikazu; Sugo, Hiroyuki; Kawasaki, Seiji; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    A 7-year-old Japanese girl who had undergone living-donor liver transplantation (LT) at the age of 10 months for decompensated liver cirrhosis caused by biliary atresia presented with recurrent episodes of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) with anemia. Over the following 6 years, she experienced five episodes of GIB requiring hospitalization. Subsequent evaluations including repeat esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), colonoscopy (CS), contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT), and Meckel’s scan all failed to reveal a bleeding source. However, varices at the site of hepaticojejunostomy were detected on abdominal ultrasonography and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) at the age of 7 years. MRA might be more helpful than contrast-enhanced CT for identifying such bleeding. PMID:26034644

  20. Cavernosal nerve functionality evaluation after magnetic resonance imaging-guided transurethral ultrasound treatment of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Sammet, Steffen; Partanen, Ari; Yousuf, Ambereen; Sammet, Christina L; Ward, Emily V; Wardrip, Craig; Niekrasz, Marek; Antic, Tatjana; Razmaria, Aria; Farahani, Keyvan; Sokka, Shunmugavelu; Karczmar, Gregory; Oto, Aytekin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility of using therapeutic ultrasound as an alternative treatment option for organ-confined prostate cancer. METHODS: In this study, a trans-urethral therapeutic ultrasound applicator in combination with 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance was used for real-time multi-planar MRI-based temperature monitoring and temperature feedback control of prostatic tissue thermal ablation in vivo. We evaluated the feasibility and safety of MRI-guided trans-urethral ultrasound to effectively and accurately ablate prostate tissue while minimizing the damage to surrounding tissues in eight canine prostates. MRI was used to plan sonications, monitor temperature changes during therapy, and to evaluate treatment outcome. Real-time temperature and thermal dose maps were calculated using the proton resonance frequency shift technique and were displayed as two-dimensional color-coded overlays on top of the anatomical images. After ultrasound treatment, an evaluation of the integrity of cavernosal nerves was performed during prostatectomy with a nerve stimulator that measured tumescence response quantitatively and indicated intact cavernous nerve functionality. Planned sonication volumes were visually correlated to MRI ablation volumes and corresponding histo-pathological sections after prostatectomy. RESULTS: A total of 16 sonications were performed in 8 canines. MR images acquired before ultrasound treatment were used to localize the prostate and to prescribe sonication targets in all canines. Temperature elevations corresponded within 1 degree of the targeted sonication angle, as well as with the width and length of the active transducer elements. The ultrasound treatment procedures were automatically interrupted when the temperature in the target zone reached 56 °C. In all canines erectile responses were evaluated with a cavernous nerve stimulator post-treatment and showed a tumescence response after stimulation with an electric current. These

  1. Quantitative evaluation of proteins with bicinchoninic acid (BCA): resonance Raman and surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering-based methods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Yu, Zhi; Lee, Youngju; Wang, Xu; Zhao, Bing; Jung, Young Mee

    2012-12-21

    A rapid and highly sensitive bicinchoninic acid (BCA) reagent-based protein quantitation tool was developed using competitive resonance Raman (RR) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) methods. A chelation reaction between BCA and Cu(+), which is reduced by protein in an alkaline environment, is exploited to create a BCA-Cu(+) complex that has strong RR and SERRS activities. Using these methods, protein concentrations in solutions can be quantitatively measured at concentrations as low as 50 μg mL(-1) and 10 pg mL(-1). There are many advantages of using RR and SERRS-based assays. These assays exhibit a much wider linear concentration range and provide an additional one (RR method) to four (SERRS method) orders of magnitude increase in detection limits relative to UV-based methods. Protein-to-protein variation is determined using a reference to a standard curve at concentrations of BSA that exhibits excellent recoveries. These novel methods are extremely accurate in detecting total protein concentrations in solution. This improvement in protein detection sensitivity could yield advances in the biological sciences and medical diagnostic field and extend the applications of reagent-based protein assay techniques. PMID:23099478

  2. Anatomic and Functional Evaluation of Central Lymphatics With Noninvasive Magnetic Resonance Lymphangiography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Young; Hwang, Hye Sun; Lee, Ho Yun; Cho, Jong Ho; Kim, Hong Kwan; Lee, Kyung Soo; Shim, Young Mog; Zo, Jaeil

    2016-03-01

    Accurate assessment of the lymphatic system has been limited due to the lack of optimal diagnostic methods. Recently, we adopted noncontrast magnetic resonance (MR) lymphangiography to evaluate the central lymphatic channel. We aimed to investigate the feasibility and the clinical usefulness of noninvasive MR lymphangiography for determining lymphatic disease.Ten patients (age range 42-72 years) with suspected chylothorax (n = 7) or lymphangioma (n = 3) who underwent MR lymphangiography were included in this prospective study. The thoracic duct was evaluated using coronal and axial images of heavily T2-weighted sequences, and reconstructed maximum intensity projection. Two radiologists documented visualization of the thoracic duct from the level of the diaphragm to the thoracic duct outlet, and also an area of dispersion around the chyloma or direct continuity between the thoracic duct and mediastinal cystic mass.The entire thoracic duct was successfully delineated in all patients. Lymphangiographic findings played a critical role in identifying leakage sites in cases of postoperative chylothorax, and contributed to differential diagnosis and confirmation of continuity with the thoracic duct in cases of lymphangioma, and also in diagnosing Gorham disease, which is a rare disorder. In patients who underwent surgery, intraoperative findings were matched with lymphangiographic imaging findings.Nonenhanced MR lymphangiography is a safe and effective method for imaging the central lymphatic system, and can contribute to differential diagnosis and appropriate preoperative evaluation of pathologic lymphatic problems. PMID:27015184

  3. Evaluation of Coronal Shock Wave Velocities from the II Type Radio Bursts Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanin, V. V.; Isaeva, E. A.; Kravetz, R. O.

    The work presents the results of research of connection between the coronal shock waves and the parameters of type II (mII) meter-decameter bursts in 25-180 MHz band for 66 solar proton events. The velocities of coronal shock waves for this two cases where determined. In the first case the velocities of the shock waves was evaluated according to the Newkirck model and in the second case - directly from the type II radio burst parameters. The calculated values of shock waves velocity was compared with the same velocity values that is published on NGDC site. The comparative analysis showed that precision of coronal shock waves velocity estimation which gets directly from type II radio bursts parameters was higher than the same one which used the Newkirck model. Research showed that there is exist the sufficiently strong connection between the shock wave velocity and the delay of type II burst intensity maximum on the second harmonica. Correlation coefficient between the studied parameters was equal to ≍ 0.65.

  4. QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF ANTERIOR SEGMENT PARAMETERS IN THE ERA OF IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Dorairaj, Syril; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.; Ritch, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To review the parameters for quantitative assessment of the anterior segment and iridocorneal angle and to develop a comprehensive schematic for the evaluation of angle anatomy and pathophysiology by high-resolution imaging. Methods The published literature of the last 15 years was reviewed, analyzed, and organized into a construct for assessment of anterior segment processes. Results Modern anterior segment imaging techniques have allowed us to devise new quantitative parameters to improve the information obtained. Ultrasound biomicroscopy, slit-lamp optical coherence tomography, and anterior segment optical coherence tomography provide high-resolution images for analysis of physiologic and pathologic processes. These include iridocorneal angle analysis (eg, angle opening distance, angle recess area, trabecular-iris space area), anterior and posterior chamber depth and area, iris and ciliary body cross-sectional area and volume, quantitative anatomic relationships between structures, and videographic analysis of iris movement and accommodative changes under various conditions. Modern devices permit imaging of the entire anterior chamber, allowing calculation of anterior chamber and pupillary diameters and correlating these with measurement of anterior chamber dynamics in light vs dark conditions. We have tabulated all reported anterior segment measurement modalities and devised a construct for assessment of normal and abnormal conditions. Conclusion Quantitative measurement of static and dynamic anterior segment parameters, both normal and abnormal, provides a broad range of parameters for analysis of the numerous aspects of the pathophysiology of the anterior segment of the eye. PMID:18427599

  5. Evaluation of multivariate linear regression and artificial neural networks in prediction of water quality parameters

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This paper examined the efficiency of multivariate linear regression (MLR) and artificial neural network (ANN) models in prediction of two major water quality parameters in a wastewater treatment plant. Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) as well as indirect indicators of organic matters are representative parameters for sewer water quality. Performance of the ANN models was evaluated using coefficient of correlation (r), root mean square error (RMSE) and bias values. The computed values of BOD and COD by model, ANN method and regression analysis were in close agreement with their respective measured values. Results showed that the ANN performance model was better than the MLR model. Comparative indices of the optimized ANN with input values of temperature (T), pH, total suspended solid (TSS) and total suspended (TS) for prediction of BOD was RMSE = 25.1 mg/L, r = 0.83 and for prediction of COD was RMSE = 49.4 mg/L, r = 0.81. It was found that the ANN model could be employed successfully in estimating the BOD and COD in the inlet of wastewater biochemical treatment plants. Moreover, sensitive examination results showed that pH parameter have more effect on BOD and COD predicting to another parameters. Also, both implemented models have predicted BOD better than COD. PMID:24456676

  6. Correlation of magnetic resonance signal characteristics and perfusion parameters assessed by volume perfusion computed tomography in hepatocellular carcinoma: Impact on lesion characterization

    PubMed Central

    Grözinger, Gerd; Bitzer, Michael; Syha, Roland; Ketelsen, Dominik; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Lauer, Ulrich; Horger, Marius

    2016-01-01

    AIM To find out if magnetic resonance (MR)-signal characteristics of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) correlate with perfusion parameters assessed by volume perfusion computed tomography (VPCT). METHODS From October 2009 to January 2014, 26 (mean age, 69.3 years) patients with 36 HCC lesions who underwent both VPCT and MR liver imaging were analysed. We compared signal intensity in the T1w- and T2w-images and wash-in/wash-out kinetics on post-contrast MR images with mean values of blood flow (BF, mL/100 mL per minute), blood volume (BV, mL/100 mL), k-trans (mL/100 mL per minute), arterial liver perfusion (mL/100 mL per minute), portal venous perfusion and hepatic perfusion index (HPI, %) obtained by VPCT. Signal intensity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was classified hyper/iso/hypointense compared with surrounding liver parenchyma. RESULTS Signal intensity on native T1w- and T2w-images was hyper/iso/hypo in 4/16/16 and 21/14/1 lesions, respectively. Wash-in and wash-out contrast kinetics were found on MRI in 33 of 36 lesions (91.7%) and 25 of 36 lesions (69.4%), respectively. The latter was observed significantly more often in higher graded lesions (P < 0.005). HPI was 94.7% ± 6.5%. There was no significant relationship between lesion’s MR-signal intensity, MR signal combinations, size and any of the VPCT-perfusion parameters. However HPI was constantly high in all HCC lesions. CONCLUSION VPCT parameters add limited value to MR-lesion characterization. However in HCC lesions with atypical MR signal characteristics HPI can add a parameter to ensure HCC diagnosis. PMID:27551338

  7. Comparison of three lines of broiler breeders differing in ascites susceptibility or growth rate. 1. Relationship between acoustic resonance data and embryonic or hatching parameters.

    PubMed

    Tona, K; Kemps, B; Bruggeman, V; Bamelis, F; De Smit, L; Onagbesan, O; De Baerdemaeker, J; Decuypere, E

    2005-09-01

    Ascites is a prevalent cardiovascular disease among modern broilers with negative impacts on production and animal welfare. The peak of mortality due to ascites occurs at the end of the growing period, but the etiology of this problem may start during embryonic development. A few recent reports have demonstrated that the signs of ascites susceptibility are manifested during the late stages of incubation. In the current study, we used a nondestructive method based on egg acoustic resonance parameters [resonant frequency (RF) and damping] to establish a relationship between embryo physiological events during early development in broiler eggs and susceptibility to ascites. The hatching eggs of 3 broiler lines differing in ascites susceptibility were used for this study: ascites-resistant dam line (DAR), ascites-sensitive dam line (DAS), and ascites-sensitive sire line (SASL). These lines were selected on the basis of fast growth, high breast meat yield, and ascites induction at low temperatures such that the order of ascites susceptibility in terms of mortality was SASL > DAS > DAR. Eggs were incubated under standard conditions in forced-draft incubators. We measured egg weights at setting, albumen pH, Haugh units (HU) at setting, and embryo weights at d 11 and 18, at internal pipping (IP), and at hatch. The durations of IP, external pipping (EP), and hatching were also determined. At 2 hourly periods during incubation, egg RF and damping were also measured. There were differences in egg weights between DAR and SASL vs. DAS, but albumen HU, albumen pH, and the ratio of yolk weight to egg weight were similar. There were differences in RF, damping, embryonic growth rates, and hatching events. Changes in resonant frequency and damping, which certainly suggest eggshell differences among lines, were not totally related to variations in physiological events during early and late embryonic development. A comparison between DAR and DAS, between DAS and SASL, or DAR and SASL

  8. Measurement and calculation of the Stark-broadening parameters for the resonance lines of singly ionized calcium and magnesium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. W.; Sanchez, A.; Greig, J. R.; Griem, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    The electron-impact-broadened profiles of the resonance lines of singly ionized calcium and magnesium have been measured using an electromagnetically driven shock tube and a rapid-scanning Fabry-Perot spectrometer. For an electron density of 10 to the 17th power per cu cm and a temperature of 19,000 K, we found the Lorentzian half-width of the Ca+ line to be 0.086 A plus or minus 10% and of the Mg+ line to be 0.044 A plus or minus 10%. Using the quantum-mechanical theory of Barnes and Peach and our semiclassical calculation for the calcium lines, we found that the temperature dependence of the theoretical curves is close to that measured, although both theories predict actual values which are somewhat large.

  9. Evaluation of Experimental Parameters in the Accelerated Aging of Closed-Cell Foam Insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, Therese K; Vanderlan, Michael; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2012-12-01

    The thermal conductivity of many closed-cell foam insulation products changes over time as production gases diffuse out of the cell matrix and atmospheric gases diffuse into the cells. Thin slicing has been shown to be an effective means of accelerating this process in such a way as to produce meaningful results. Efforts to produce a more prescriptive version of the ASTM C1303 standard test method led to the ruggedness test described here. This test program included the aging of full size insulation specimens for time periods of five years for direct comparison to the predicted results. Experimental parameters under investigation include: slice thickness, slice origin (at the surface or from the core of the slab), thin slice stack composition, product facings, original product thickness, product density, and product type. The test protocol has been completed and this report provides a detailed evaluation of the impact of the test parameters on the accuracy of the 5-year thermal conductivity prediction.

  10. Evaluation of AGNI SFR core neutronics parameters with VESTA and ERANOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecrabet, Fabrice; Haeck, Wim; Chaitanya Tadepalli, Sai

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents the calculation of core neutronics parameters for so called AGNI Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) model performed with ERANOS code and Monte Carlo depletion interface software VESTA. The AGNI core has been developed at IRSN for its own R&D needs, i.e. to test performance of calculation codes for safety assessment of a generation IV SFR project. The ERANOS code is used as reference code for SFR core calculations at IRSN. In this work, VESTA calculations have been performed and compared with corresponding ERANOS results. These calculations have a double purpose: mastering the use of tools for the evaluation of SFR core static neutronics parameters and validate the use of VESTA for SFR cores.

  11. Lineshape of {psi}(3770) and low-lying vector charmonium resonance parameters in e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}}DD

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yuanjiang; Zhao Qiang

    2010-02-01

    We investigate the DD production in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations near threshold in an effective Lagrangian approach. This shows that the lineshape of the cross section near threshold is sensitive to the contributions from {psi}{sup '}, though it is below the DD threshold. The recent experimental data from the BES and Belle collaborations allow us to determine the {psi}{sup '}DD coupling constant, which appears to be consistent with other theoretical studies. As a consequence, the {psi}{sup '}-{psi}(3770) mixing parameter can be extracted around the {psi}(3770) mass region. Resonance parameters for {psi}(3770), X(3900), {psi}(4040), and {psi}(4160) are also investigated. The X(3900) appears as an enhancement at around 3.9 GeV in the Belle data. In addition to treating it as a resonance, we also study the mechanism through which the enhancement is produced by the DD*+c.c. open channel effects. Our result shows that such a possibility cannot be eliminated.

  12. A new parameter to evaluate the quality of fiber count data of slides with relocatable fields.

    PubMed

    Pang, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    Asbestos reference slides with relocatable fields are effective in determining the fiber counting errors and evaluating intercounter precision and accuracy. The process is time consuming and expensive as it requires (a) the analysts to record the number and the positions of the fibers and (b) an experienced microscopist to determine the errors. A new parameter based on the discrepancies between the reported fibers and the verified fibers is being investigated for monitoring the quality of fiber counts. The discrepancies are related to the fiber counting errors. The new process requires the analysts to report only the fibers in each field examined. PMID:17249148

  13. An evaluation of neural networks for identification of system parameters in reactor noise signals

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.F.

    1991-12-31

    Several backpropagation neural networks for identifying fundamental mode eigenvalues were evaluated. The networks were trained and tested on analytical data and on results from other numerical methods. They were then used to predict first mode break frequencies for noise data from several sources. These predictions were, in turn, compared with analytical values and with results from alternative methods. Comparisons of results for some data sets suggest that the accuracy of predictions from neural networks are essentially equivalent to results from conventional methods while other evaluations indicate that either method may be superior. Experience gained from these numerical experiments provide insight for improving the performance of neural networks relative to other methods for identifying parameters associated with experimental data. Neural networks may also be used in support of conventional algorithms by providing starting points for nonlinear minimization algorithms.

  14. An evaluation of neural networks for identification of system parameters in reactor noise signals

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.F.

    1991-01-01

    Several backpropagation neural networks for identifying fundamental mode eigenvalues were evaluated. The networks were trained and tested on analytical data and on results from other numerical methods. They were then used to predict first mode break frequencies for noise data from several sources. These predictions were, in turn, compared with analytical values and with results from alternative methods. Comparisons of results for some data sets suggest that the accuracy of predictions from neural networks are essentially equivalent to results from conventional methods while other evaluations indicate that either method may be superior. Experience gained from these numerical experiments provide insight for improving the performance of neural networks relative to other methods for identifying parameters associated with experimental data. Neural networks may also be used in support of conventional algorithms by providing starting points for nonlinear minimization algorithms.

  15. Numerical approach for the evaluation of Weibull distribution parameters for hydrologic purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierleoni, A.; Di Francesco, S.; Biscarini, C.; Manciola, P.

    2016-06-01

    In hydrology, the statistical description of low flow phenomena is very important in order to evaluate the available water resource especially in a river and the related values can be obviously considered as random variables, therefore probability distributions dealing with extreme values (maximum and/or minimum) of the variable play a fundamental role. Computational procedures for the estimation of the parameters featuring these distributions are actually very useful especially when embedded into analysis software [1][2] or as standalone applications. In this paper a computational procedure for the evaluation of the Weibull[3] distribution is presented focusing on the case when the lower limit of the distribution is not known or not set to a specific value a priori. The procedure takes advantage of the Gumbel[4] moment approach to the problem.

  16. Resonant alteration of propagation in guiding structures with complex Robin parameter and its magnetic-field-induced restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Olendski, O.

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Solutions of the wave equation are analyzed for the confined circular geometry with complex Robin boundary conditions. > Sharp extremum is found in the energy dependence on the imaginary part of the extrapolation length. > Nonzero real part of the Robin length or/and magnetic field wipe out the resonance. - Abstract: Solutions of the scalar Helmholtz wave equation are derived for the analysis of the transport and thermodynamic properties of the two-dimensional disk and three-dimensional infinitely long straight wire in the external uniform longitudinal magnetic field B under the assumption that the Robin boundary condition contains extrapolation length {Lambda} with nonzero imaginary part {Lambda}{sub i}. As a result of this complexity, the self-adjointness of the Hamiltonian is lost, its eigenvalues E become complex too and the discrete bound states of the disk characteristic for the real {Lambda} turn into the corresponding quasibound states with their lifetime defined by the eigenenergies imaginary parts E{sub i}. Accordingly, the longitudinal flux undergoes an alteration as it flows along the wire with its attenuation/amplification being E{sub i}-dependent too. It is shown that, for zero magnetic field, the component E{sub i} as a function of the Robin imaginary part exhibits a pronounced sharp extremum with its magnitude being the largest for the zero real part {Lambda}{sub r} of the extrapolation length. Increasing magnitude of {Lambda}{sub r} quenches the E{sub i} - {Lambda}{sub i} resonance and at very large {Lambda}{sub r} the eigenenergies E approach the asymptotic real values independent of {Lambda}{sub i}. The extremum is also wiped out by the magnetic field when, for the large B, the energies tend to the Landau levels. Mathematical and physical interpretations of the obtained results are provided; in particular, it is shown that the finite lifetime of the disk quasibound states stems from the {Lambda}{sub i}-induced currents flowing

  17. Positional pelvic organ prolapse (POP) evaluation using open, weight-bearing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Boris; Stothers, Lynn; Lazare, Darren; Macnab, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of patients with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is completed in the supine position. Open magnetic resonance imaging (MRO) uses vertical magnets, allowing imaging in a variety of upright postures. This pilot study used MRO to evaluate the change of prolapse in different positions compared to non-prolapsed images. Methods: In total, 11 women (6 POP, 5 controls) aged 24 to 65 years had 12 MRO images (midline sagittal pelvic line) consecutively when supine, sitting and standing with a full and empty bladder. Lengths between the lowest point of the bladder to the pubococcygeal (PC) and pubopromontoreal (PP) lines in each image were compared, and the ratio of bladder area under the PC and PP lines to the total bladder area. Results: Significant elongation between the PC line and lowest point of the bladder was evident in subjects with POP comparing supine and standing images (p = 0.03), but not controls (p = 0.07). Similarly, this axis was significantly longer in cystocele subjects versus controls only in the standing position. Bladder area under the PC line was significantly increased between supine and standing positions only among subjects with cystocele (p < 0.01), and significantly larger among the study group in the standing position (p < 0.005), less significant in the supine position (p = 0.015), and not significant in the sitting position (p = 0.3). Conclusions: MRO imaging allows us to investigate the effects of upright position and weight bearing on the staging of POP. Imaging patients when sitting and standing identified that significant changes occur in the maximal descent of the bladder. PMID:26225170

  18. Evaluation of Traumatic Spine by Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Correlation with Neurological Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Magu, Sarita; Yadav, Rohtas Kanwar; Bala, Manju

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective study. Purpose To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings with clinical profile and neurological status of the patient and to correlate the MRI findings with neurological recovery of the patients and predict the outcome. Overview of Literature Previous studies have reported poor neurological recovery in patients with cord hemorrhage, as compared to cord edema in spine injury patients. High canal compromise, cord compression along with higher extent of cord injury also carries poor prognostic value. Methods Neurological status of patients was assessed at the time of admission and discharge in as accordance with the American Spine Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale. Mean stay in hospital was 14.11±5.74 days. Neurological status at admission and neurological recovery at discharge was compared with various qualitative cord findings and quantitative parameters on MRI. In 27 patients, long-term follow-up was done at mean time of 285.9±43.94 days comparing same parameters. Results Cord edema and normal cord was associated with favorable neurological outcome. Cord contusion showed lesser neurological recovery, as compared to cord edema. Cord hemorrhage was associated with worst neurological status at admission and poor neurological recovery. Mean canal compromise (MCC), mean spinal cord compression (MSCC) and lesion length values were higher in patients presenting with ASIA A impairment scale injury and showed decreasing trends towards ASIA E impairment scale injury. Patients showing neurological recovery had lower mean MCC, MSCC, and lesion length, as compared to patients showing no neurological recovery (p<0.05). Conclusions Cord hemorrhage, higher MCC, MSCC, and lesion length values have poor prognostic value in spine injury patients. PMID:26435794

  19. Pineapple juice as a negative oral contrast agent in magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography: a preliminary evaluation.

    PubMed

    Riordan, R D; Khonsari, M; Jeffries, J; Maskell, G F; Cook, P G

    2004-12-01

    The quality of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) images is frequently degraded by high signal from the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study is to evaluate pineapple juice (PJ) as an oral negative contrast agent in MRCP. Preliminary in vitro evaluation demonstrated that PJ shortened T(2) relaxation time and hence decreased T(2) signal intensity on a standard MRCP sequence to a similar degree to a commercially available negative contrast agent (ferumoxsil). Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry assay demonstrated a high manganese concentration in PJ of 2.76 mg dl(-1), which is likely to be responsible for its T(2) imaging properties. MRCP was subsequently performed in 10 healthy volunteers, before and at 15 min and 30 min following ingestion of 400 ml of PJ. Images were assessed blindly by two Consultant Radiologists using a standard grading technique based on contrast effect (degree of suppression of bowel signal), and image effect (diagnostic quality). There were statistically significant improvements in contrast and image effect between pre and post PJ images. There was particularly significant improvement in visualization of the pancreatic duct, but no significant difference between 15 min and 30 min post PJ images. Visualization of the ampulla, common bile duct, common hepatic and central intrahepatic ducts were also significantly improved at 15 min following PJ. Our results demonstrate that PJ, may be used as an alternative to commercially available negative oral contrast agent in MRCP. PMID:15569640

  20. Quantitative morphologic evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging during and after treatment of childhood leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Reddick, Wilburn E.; Laningham, Fred H.; Glass, John O.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Medical advances over the last several decades, including CNS prophylaxis, have greatly increased survival in children with leukemia. As survival rates have increased, clinicians and scientists have been afforded the opportunity to further develop treatments to improve the quality of life of survivors by minimizing the long-term adverse effects. When evaluating the effect of antileukemia therapy on the developing brain, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been the preferred modality because it quantifies morphologic changes objectively and noninvasively. Method and results Computer-aided detection of changes on neuroimages enables us to objectively differentiate leukoencephalopathy from normal maturation of the developing brain. Quantitative tissue segmentation algorithms and relaxometry measures have been used to determine the prevalence, extent, and intensity of white matter changes that occur during therapy. More recently, diffusion tensor imaging has been used to quantify microstructural changes in the integrity of the white matter fiber tracts. MR perfusion imaging can be used to noninvasively monitor vascular changes during therapy. Changes in quantitative MR measures have been associated, to some degree, with changes in neurocognitive function during and after treatment Conclusion In this review, we present recent advances in quantitative evaluation of MR imaging and discuss how these methods hold the promise to further elucidate the pathophysiologic effects of treatment for childhood leukemia. PMID:17653705

  1. Contribution of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in the evaluation of coronary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Mavrogeni, Sophie; Markousis-Mavrogenis, George; Kolovou, Genovefa

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) allows the nonradiating assessment of coronary arteries; to achieve better image quality cardiorespiratory artefacts should be corrected. Coronary MRA (CMRA) at the moment is indicated only for the detection of abnormal coronary origin, coronary artery ectasia and/or aneurysms (class I indication) and coronary bypass grafts (class II indication). CMRA utilisation for coronary artery disease is not yet part of clinical routine. However, the lack of radiation is of special value for the coronary artery evaluation in children and women. CMRA can assess the proximal part of coronary arteries in almost all cases. The best results have been observed in the evaluation of the left anterior descending and the right coronary artery, while the left circumflex, which is located far away from the coil elements, is frequently imaged with reduced quality, compared to the other two. Different studies detected an increase in wall thickness of the coronaries in patients with type I diabetes and abnormal renal function. Additionally, the non-contrast enhanced T1-weighed images detected the presence of thrombus in acute myocardial infarction. New techniques using delayed gadolinium enhanced imaging promise the direct visualization of inflamed plaques in the coronary arteries. The major advantage of CMR is the potential of an integrated protocol offering assessment of coronary artery anatomy, cardiac function, inflammation and stress perfusion-fibrosis in the same study, providing an individualized clinical profile of patients with heart disease. PMID:25349650

  2. Cardiac dysfunction in the diabetic rat: quantitative evaluation using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Loganathan, Rajprasad; Bilgen, Mehmet; Al-Hafez, Baraa; Alenezy, Mohammed D; Smirnova, Irina V

    2006-01-01

    Background Diabetes is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In particular, type 1 diabetes compromises the cardiac function of individuals at a relatively early age due to the protracted course of abnormal glucose homeostasis. The functional abnormalities of diabetic myocardium have been attributed to the pathological changes of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Methods In this study, we used high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate the left ventricular functional characteristics of streptozotocin treated diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats (8 weeks disease duration) in comparison with age/sex matched controls. Results Our analyses of EKG gated cardiac MRI scans of the left ventricle showed a 28% decrease in the end-diastolic volume and 10% increase in the end-systolic volume of diabetic hearts compared to controls. Mean stroke volume and ejection fraction in diabetic rats were decreased (48% and 28%, respectively) compared to controls. Further, dV/dt changes were suggestive of phase sensitive differences in left ventricular kinetics across the cardiac cycle between diabetic and control rats. Conclusion Thus, the MRI analyses of diabetic left ventricle suggest impairment of diastolic and systolic hemodynamics in this rat model of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Our studies also show that in vivo MRI could be used in the evaluation of cardiac dysfunction in this rat model of type 1 diabetes. PMID:16595006

  3. Aptamer selection by direct microfluidic recovery and surface plasmon resonance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dausse, Eric; Barré, Aurélien; Aimé, Ahissan; Groppi, Alexis; Rico, Alain; Ainali, Chrysanthi; Salgado, Gilmar; Palau, William; Daguerre, Emilie; Nikolski, Macha; Toulmé, Jean-Jacques; Di Primo, Carmelo

    2016-06-15

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based SELEX approach has been used to raise RNA aptamers against a structured RNA, derived from XBP1 pre-mRNA, that folds as two contiguous hairpins. Thanks to the design of the internal microfluidic cartridge of the instrument, the selection was performed during the dissociation phase of the SPR analysis by recovering the aptamer candidates directly from the target immobilized onto the sensor chip surface. The evaluation of the pools was performed by SPR, simultaneously, during the association phase, each time the amplified and transcribed candidates were injected over the immobilized target. SPR coupled with SELEX from the first to the last round allowed identifying RNA aptamers that formed highly stable loop-loop complexes (KD equal to 8nM) with the hairpin located on the 5' side of the target. High throughput sequencing of two key rounds confirmed the evolution observed by SPR and also revealed the selection of hairpins displaying a loop not fully complementary to the loop of its target. These candidates were selected mainly because they bound 79 times faster to the target than those having a complementary loop. SELEX coupled with SPR is expected to speed up the selection process because selection and evaluation are performed simultaneously. PMID:26874109

  4. Evaluation of masticatory activity during unilateral single tooth clenching using muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Okada, C; Yamaguchi, S; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, M; Hattori, Y

    2016-08-01

    Masticatory muscle activity during teeth clenching is affected by occlusal pattern. However, few studies have performed simultaneous evaluation of all masticatory activities during teeth clenching under various occlusal conditions. The aim of this study was to use muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging (mfMRI) to evaluate the effects of changes in occlusal point on masticatory activity during single tooth clenching. Changes in mean proton transverse relaxation time (∆T2) as an index of activity in all masticatory muscles during left unilateral clenching at the first molar or first premolar for 1 min were examined in nine healthy volunteers. Bite force was maintained at 40% of the maximum voluntary clenching force. The ∆T2 values of the masseter and lateral pterygoid muscles were analysed separately for superficial and deep layers, and for superior and inferior heads. The ∆T2 values for the ipsilateral deep masseter were significantly lower, and for the superior head of the ipsilateral lateral pterygoid muscles were significantly higher, after left first premolar clenching compared to left first molar clenching. These results quantitatively demonstrate a significant increase in activity of the superior head of the ipsilateral lateral pterygoid muscle and a significant decrease in activity of the ipsilateral deep masseter muscle with forward displacement of the occlusal contact point during unilateral tooth clenching. PMID:27113040

  5. Multi-Group Formulation of the Temperature-Dependent Resonance Scattering Model and its Impact on Reactor Core Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Ghrayeb, Shadi Z.; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.; Ouisloumen, Mohamed; Ivanov, Kostadin N.

    2014-01-01

    A multi-group formulation for the exact neutron elastic scattering kernel is developed. It incorporates the neutron up-scattering effects, stemming from lattice atoms thermal motion and accounts for it within the resulting effective nuclear cross-section data. The effects pertain essentially to resonant scattering off of heavy nuclei. The formulation, implemented into a standalone code, produces effective nuclear scattering data that are then supplied directly into the DRAGON lattice physics code where the effects on Doppler Reactivity and neutron flux are demonstrated. The correct accounting for the crystal lattice effects influences the estimated values for the probability of neutron absorption and scattering, which in turn affect the estimation of core reactivity and burnup characteristics. The results show an increase in values of Doppler temperature feedback coefficients up to -10% for UOX and MOX LWR fuels compared to the corresponding values derived using the traditional asymptotic elastic scattering kernel. This paper also summarizes the results done on this topic to date.

  6. Evaluation of Anaerobic Biofilm Reactor Kinetic Parameters Using Ant Colony Optimization.

    PubMed

    Satya, Eswari Jujjavarapu; Venkateswarlu, Chimmiri

    2013-09-01

    Fixed bed reactors with naturally attached biofilms are increasingly used for anaerobic treatment of industry wastewaters due their effective treatment performance. The complex nature of biological reactions in biofilm processes often poses difficulty in analyzing them experimentally, and mathematical models could be very useful for their design and analysis. However, effective application of biofilm reactor models to practical problems suffers due to the lack of knowledge of accurate kinetic models and uncertainty in model parameters. In this work, an inverse modeling approach based on ant colony optimization is proposed and applied to estimate the kinetic and film thickness model parameters of wastewater treatment process in an anaerobic fixed bed biofilm reactor. Experimental data of pharmaceutical industry wastewater treatment process are used to determine the model parameters as a consequence of the solution of the rigorous mathematical models of the process. Results were evaluated for different modeling configurations derived from the combination of mathematical models, kinetic expressions, and optimization algorithms. Analysis of results showed that the two-dimensional mathematical model with Haldane kinetics better represents the pharmaceutical wastewater treatment in the biofilm reactor. The mathematical and kinetic modeling of this work forms a useful basis for the design and optimization of industry wastewater treating biofilm reactors. PMID:24065871

  7. A path model for evaluating dosing parameters for children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Gannotti, Mary E; Christy, Jennifer B; Heathcock, Jill C; Kolobe, Thubi H A

    2014-03-01

    Dosing of pediatric rehabilitation services for children with cerebral palsy (CP) has been identified as a national priority. Establishing dosing parameters for pediatric physical therapy interventions is critical for informing clinical decision making, health policy, and guidelines for reimbursement. The purpose of this perspective article is to describe a path model for evaluating dosing parameters of interventions for children with CP. The model is intended for dose-related and effectiveness studies of pediatric physical therapy interventions. The premise of the model is: Intervention type (focus on body structures, activity, or the environment) acts on a child first through the family, then through the dose (frequency, intensity, time), to yield structural and behavioral changes. As a result, these changes are linked to improvements in functional independence. Community factors affect dose as well as functional independence (performance and capacity), influencing the relationships between type of intervention and intervention responses. The constructs of family characteristics; child characteristics (eg, age, level of severity, comorbidities, readiness to change, preferences); plastic changes in bone, muscle, and brain; motor skill acquisition; and community access warrant consideration from researchers who are designing intervention studies. Multiple knowledge gaps are identified, and a framework is provided for conceptualizing dosing parameters for children with CP. PMID:24231231

  8. Evaluation of Anaerobic Biofilm Reactor Kinetic Parameters Using Ant Colony Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Satya, Eswari Jujjavarapu; Venkateswarlu, Chimmiri

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Fixed bed reactors with naturally attached biofilms are increasingly used for anaerobic treatment of industry wastewaters due their effective treatment performance. The complex nature of biological reactions in biofilm processes often poses difficulty in analyzing them experimentally, and mathematical models could be very useful for their design and analysis. However, effective application of biofilm reactor models to practical problems suffers due to the lack of knowledge of accurate kinetic models and uncertainty in model parameters. In this work, an inverse modeling approach based on ant colony optimization is proposed and applied to estimate the kinetic and film thickness model parameters of wastewater treatment process in an anaerobic fixed bed biofilm reactor. Experimental data of pharmaceutical industry wastewater treatment process are used to determine the model parameters as a consequence of the solution of the rigorous mathematical models of the process. Results were evaluated for different modeling configurations derived from the combination of mathematical models, kinetic expressions, and optimization algorithms. Analysis of results showed that the two-dimensional mathematical model with Haldane kinetics better represents the pharmaceutical wastewater treatment in the biofilm reactor. The mathematical and kinetic modeling of this work forms a useful basis for the design and optimization of industry wastewater treating biofilm reactors. PMID:24065871

  9. An evaluation of earthquake hazard parameters in the Iranian Plateau based on the Gumbel III distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Hiwa; Bayrak, Yusuf

    2016-04-01

    The Gumbel's third asymptotic distribution (GIII) of the extreme value method is employed to evaluate the earthquake hazard parameters in the Iranian Plateau. This research quantifies spatial mapping of earthquake hazard parameters like annual and 100-year mode beside their 90 % probability of not being exceeded (NBE) in the Iranian Plateau. Therefore, we used a homogeneous and complete earthquake catalogue during the period 1900-2013 with magnitude M w ≥ 4.0, and the Iranian Plateau is separated into equal area mesh of 1° late × 1° long. The estimated result of annual mode with 90 % probability of NBE is expected to exceed the values of M w 6.0 in the Eastern part of Makran, most parts of Central and East Iran, Kopeh Dagh, Alborz, Azerbaijan, and SE Zagros. The 100-year mode with 90 % probability of NBE is expected to overpass the value of M w 7.0 in the Eastern part of Makran, Central and East Iran, Alborz, Kopeh Dagh, and Azerbaijan. The spatial distribution of 100-year mode with 90 % probability of NBE uncovers the high values of earthquake hazard parameters which are frequently connected with the main tectonic regimes of the studied area. It appears that there is a close communication among the seismicity and the tectonics of the region.

  10. A Path Model for Evaluating Dosing Parameters for Children With Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Christy, Jennifer B.; Heathcock, Jill C.; Kolobe, Thubi H.A.

    2014-01-01

    Dosing of pediatric rehabilitation services for children with cerebral palsy (CP) has been identified as a national priority. Establishing dosing parameters for pediatric physical therapy interventions is critical for informing clinical decision making, health policy, and guidelines for reimbursement. The purpose of this perspective article is to describe a path model for evaluating dosing parameters of interventions for children with CP. The model is intended for dose-related and effectiveness studies of pediatric physical therapy interventions. The premise of the model is: Intervention type (focus on body structures, activity, or the environment) acts on a child first through the family, then through the dose (frequency, intensity, time), to yield structural and behavioral changes. As a result, these changes are linked to improvements in functional independence. Community factors affect dose as well as functional independence (performance and capacity), influencing the relationships between type of intervention and intervention responses. The constructs of family characteristics; child characteristics (eg, age, level of severity, comorbidities, readiness to change, preferences); plastic changes in bone, muscle, and brain; motor skill acquisition; and community access warrant consideration from researchers who are designing intervention studies. Multiple knowledge gaps are identified, and a framework is provided for conceptualizing dosing parameters for children with CP. PMID:24231231

  11. Evaluation of voice pathology based on the estimation of vocal fold biomechanical parameters.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Vilda, P; Fernández-Baillo, R; Nieto, A; Díaz, F; Fernández-Camacho, F J; Rodellar, V; Alvarez, A; Martínez, R

    2007-07-01

    Voice disorders are a source of increasing concern as normal voice quality is a social demand for at least one third of the population in developed countries in cases where voice is an essential resource in professional exercise. In addition, the growing exposure to certain pathogenic factors such as smoking, alcohol abuse, air pollution, and acoustic contamination, and other problems such as gastro-esopharyngeal reflux or allergy as well as aging, aggravate voice disorders. Voice pathologies justify the assignment of larger resources to prevention policies, early detection, and less aggressive treatments. Traditional pathology detection relies on perceptive evaluation methods (GRABS), acoustic analysis, and visual inspection (indirect laryngoscopy, and modern fibro-endo-stroboscopy). This article describes a method for voice pathology detection based on the noninvasive estimation of vocal cord biomechanical parameters derived from voice using specific signal processing methods. Preliminary results using records from patients showing four frequent causes of voice pathology (nodules, polyps, chronic laryngitis, and Reinke's edema) are given. The results show that the alteration (distortion, unbalance, or deviation) of cord biomechanical parameters may serve as an indicator of pathology. Statistical methods based on hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis reveal that combining biomechanical estimates with classic perturbation parameters increases the accuracy of acoustic analysis, improving the detection of voice pathology. This research could open new possibilities for noninvasive screening of vocal fold pathologies and could be used in the implantation of e-health voice care services. PMID:16549321

  12. A highly-efficient technique for evaluating bond-orientational order parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winczewski, Szymon; Dziedzic, Jacek; Rybicki, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel, highly-efficient approach for the evaluation of bond-orientational order parameters (BOPs). Our approach exploits the properties of spherical harmonics and Wigner 3 j-symbols to reduce the number of terms in the expressions for BOPs, and employs simultaneous interpolation of normalised associated Legendre polynomials and trigonometric functions to dramatically reduce the total number of arithmetic operations. Using realistic test cases, we show how the above, combined with a CPU-cache-friendly data structure, leads to a 10 to 50-fold performance increase over approaches currently in use, depending on the size of the interpolation grids and the machine used. As the proposed approach is an approximation, we demonstrate that the errors it introduces are well-behaved, controllable and essentially negligible for practical grid sizes. We benchmark our approach against other structure identification methods (centro-symmetry parameter (CSP), common neighbour analysis (CNA), common neighbourhood parameter (CNP) and Voronoi analysis), generally regarded as much faster than BOPs, and demonstrate that our formulation is able to outperform them for all studied systems.

  13. A possible parameter for gait clinimetric evaluation in Parkinson’s disease patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lescano, C. N.; Rodrigo, S. E.; Christian, D. A.

    2016-04-01

    The strength and usefulness of a rating scale for describing disease evolution relies on the accurate determination of variations representing clinically relevant changes. In this sense, the habitually used Hoehn-Yahr (HY) Scale for Parkinson Disease (PD) in its modified version distinguishes between the 2 and 2.5 stages to explain if the bilateral involvement is or is not accompanied by body balance impairment. Nevertheless, this scaling does not allow for differentiating the symptoms and signs associated with each stage accurately. Considering this difference, this work aims at analyzing some gait parameters-stance and swing phase times and magnitude of the vertical component of ground reaction force during the gait cycle-of PD patients classified as HY=2 and HY=2.5 in contrast with healthy subjects (HY=0), with the purpose of assessing whether there is a statistically significant difference among all these HY categories. For all gait parameters evaluated, the results indicated significant differences between HY=0 and HY=2.5. However, only the magnitude of the vertical component of ground reaction force presented relevant differences between HY=2 and 2.5. As expected, therefore, these results show the potential of such parameter to clinimetrically identify the level of gait impairment/disability in PD patients on the Hoehn-Yahr Scale.

  14. Acoustic evaluation of the Helmholtz resonator treatment in the NASA Lewis 8- by 6-foot supersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, Laurence J.; Gordon, Elliot B.

    1989-01-01

    The acoustic consequences of sealing the Helmholtz resonators of the NASA Lewis 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (8x6 SWT) were experimentally evaluated. This resonator sealing was proposed in order to avoid entrapment of hydrogen during tests of advanced hydrogen-fueled engines. The resonators were designed to absorb energy in the 4- to 20-Hz range; thus, this investigation is primarily concerned with infrasound. Limited internal and external noise measurements were made at tunnel Mach numbers ranging from 0.5 to 2.0. Although the resonators were part of the acoustic treatment installed because of a community noise problem their sealing did not seem to indicate a reoccurrence of the problem would result. Two factors were key to this conclusion: (1) A large bulk treatment muffler downstream of the resonators was able to make up for much of the attenuation originally provided by the resonators, and (2) there was no noise source in the tunnel test section. The previous community noise problem occurred when a large ramjet was tested in an open-loop tunnel configuration. If a propulsion system producing high noise levels at frequencies of less than 10 Hz were tested, the conclusion on community noise would have to be reevaluated.

  15. Evaluation of MEGAN-CLM parameter sensitivity to predictions of isoprene emissions from an Amazonian rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, J. A.; Jardine, K.; Guenther, A. B.; Chambers, J. Q.; Tribuzy, E.

    2014-09-01

    Tropical trees are known to be large emitters of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), accounting for up to 75% of the global isoprene budget. Once in the atmosphere, these compounds influence multiple processes associated with air quality and climate. However, uncertainty in biogenic emissions is two-fold, (1) the environmental controls over isoprene emissions from tropical forests remain highly uncertain; and (2) our ability to accurately represent these environmental controls within models is lacking. This study evaluated the biophysical parameters that drive the global Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) embedded in a biogeochemistry land surface model, the Community Land Model (CLM), with a focus on isoprene emissions from an Amazonian forest. Upon evaluating the sensitivity of 19 parameters in CLM that currently influence isoprene emissions by using a Monte Carlo analysis, up to 61% of the uncertainty in mean isoprene emissions was caused by the uncertainty in the parameters related to leaf temperature. The eight parameters associated with photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) contributed in total to only 15% of the uncertainty in mean isoprene emissions. Leaf temperature was strongly correlated with isoprene emission activity (R2 = 0.89). However, when compared to field measurements in the Central Amazon, CLM failed to capture the upper 10-14 °C of leaf temperatures throughout the year (i.e., failed to represent ~32 to 46 °C), and the spread observed in field measurements was not representative in CLM. This is an important parameter to accurately simulate due to the non-linear response of emissions to temperature. MEGAN-CLM 4.0 overestimated isoprene emissions by 60% for a Central Amazon forest (5.7 mg m-2 h-1 vs. 3.6 mg m-2 h-1), but due to reductions in leaf area index (LAI) by 28% in MEGAN-CLM 4.5 isoprene emissions were within 7% of observed data (3.8 mg m-2 h-1). When a slight adjustment to leaf temperature was made to

  16. Evaluating the electrical discharge machining (EDM) parameters with using carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sari, M. M.; Noordin, M. Y.; Brusa, E.

    2012-09-01

    Electrical discharge machining (EDM) is one of the most accurate non traditional manufacturing processes available for creating tiny apertures, complex or simple shapes and geometries within parts and assemblies. Performance of the EDM process is usually evaluated in terms of surface roughness, existence of cracks, voids and recast layer on the surface of product, after machining. Unfortunately, the high heat generated on the electrically discharged material during the EDM process decreases the quality of products. Carbon nanotubes display unexpected strength and unique electrical and thermal properties. Multi-wall carbon nanotubes are therefore on purpose added to the dielectric used in the EDM process to improve its performance when machining the AISI H13 tool steel, by means of copper electrodes. Some EDM parameters such as material removal rate, electrode wear rate, surface roughness and recast layer are here first evaluated, then compared to the outcome of EDM performed without using nanotubes mixed to the dielectric. Independent variables investigated are pulse on time, peak current and interval time. Experimental evidences show that EDM process operated by mixing multi-wall carbon nanotubes within the dielectric looks more efficient, particularly if machining parameters are set at low pulse of energy.

  17. Evaluation of Toxicity Effects of Asafetida on Biochemical, Hematological, and Histological Parameters in Male Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Seyyed Majid; Yadegari, Maryam; Mirjalily, Aghdas; Rezvani, Mohammd Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Asafetida is traditionally used in folklore medicine for the treatment of various ailments. To validate its use in traditional medicine, it is important to evaluate its toxicity in the animal system. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the toxicological effects of asafetida in Wistar albino rats. Materials and Methods: Acute toxicity tests were conducted by the oral administration of 250, 500, and 1,000 mg/kg body weight of the animal. In chronic study, animals were administered with various doses of asafetida (25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg body weight) for a period of 6 weeks. At end of experiment, the effects of asafetida on hematological, renal, and hepatic markers and histological parameters were analyzed. Results: In acute toxicity study, no mortality was seen up to 72 h of the administration of asafetida. No signs of neurological and behavioral changes were noticed within 24 h. In the chronic study, the asafetida intake has changed the hematological parameters such as red blood cell (RBC), white blood cell (WBC), hematocrit (HCT), and platelets. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were significantly increased in treated animals. The plasma level of urea and creatinine were not altered by the administration of asafetida throughout the study. Histopathology study indicates hepatotoxicity, but no signs of prominent pathological changes in kidney. Conclusions: Asafetida did not show any acute toxicity, but chronic administration could have undesirable effects on hepatocytes and hematological factors. PMID:26862262

  18. Evaluation of medium composition and fermentation parameters on pullulan production by Aureobasidium pullulans.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kuan-Chen; Demirci, Ali; Catchmark, Jeffrey M

    2011-04-01

    The goal of this study was to enhance pullulan production by evaluating the effects of different fermentation parameters. Various carbon sources and their concentrations, yeast extract (YE) concentrations, fermentation temperatures and various pH profiles were examined. The optimal growth condition for pullulan production by Aureobasidium pullulans has been found as 75 g/L of sucrose as carbon source, 3 g/L of YE and cultivation temperature at 30 (°)C. Under these conditions with an initial pH at 5, 20.7 g/L of final pullulan concentration and 0.22 g/L/h maximum production rate were obtained. Later on, various pH profiles, agitation speeds, aerations and fed-batch fermentation were evaluated. The results demonstrated that pullulan production was enhanced to 25.8 g/L after 7-day cultivation with a 0.68 -g/L/h maximum production rate. There was no significant improvement of pullulan production from fed-batch fermentation. The optimal kinetics parameters were as follows: initial pH at 2.0, switched to pH 5.0 after 72 h and kept constant; agitation speed at 200 rpm; aeration at 1.5 vvm. The quality analysis demonstrated that the pullulan content produced from optimal conditions was 94.5% and its viscosity was 2.3 centipoise (cP). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy also suggested that pullulan dominated the produced exopolysaccharide. PMID:21421674

  19. Comparative Evaluation of Inversion Approaches of the Radiative Transfer Model for Estimation of Crop Biophysical Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mridha, Nilimesh; Sahoo, Rabi N.; Sehgal, Vinay K.; Krishna, Gopal; Pargal, Sourabh; Pradhan, Sanatan; Gupta, Vinod K.; Kumar, Dasika Nagesh

    2015-04-01

    The inversion of canopy reflectance models is widely used for the retrieval of vegetation properties from remote sensing. This study evaluates the retrieval of soybean biophysical variables of leaf area index, leaf chlorophyll content, canopy chlorophyll content, and equivalent leaf water thickness from proximal reflectance data integrated broadbands corresponding to moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer, thematic mapper, and linear imaging self scanning sensors through inversion of the canopy radiative transfer model, PROSAIL. Three different inversion approaches namely the look-up table, genetic algorithm, and artificial neural network were used and performances were evaluated. Application of the genetic algorithm for crop parameter retrieval is a new attempt among the variety of optimization problems in remote sensing which have been successfully demonstrated in the present study. Its performance was as good as that of the look-up table approach and the artificial neural network was a poor performer. The general order of estimation accuracy for parameters irrespective of inversion approaches was leaf area index > canopy chlorophyll content > leaf chlorophyll content > equivalent leaf water thickness. Performance of inversion was comparable for broadband reflectances of all three sensors in the optical region with insignificant differences in estimation accuracy among them.

  20. Information Theory Approach to Evaluate the Geomagnetic and Ionospheric Response to Solar Wind Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seemala, G. K.; R, S.; Bhaskara, V.; Ramesh, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of space weather and understanding onset o geomagnetic storms is increasing day by day as the space missions increase. It is known from the ground-based and space-borne observations that a geomagnetic storm is a temporary disturbance of earth's magnetosphere caused by a solar wind and/or solar eruptions. Geomagnetic storms are more disruptive now than in the past because of our greater dependence on technical systems that can be affected by electric currents and energetic particles high in the Earth's magnetosphere. It is known that number of phenomena occurs during the space weather events; and there are many un-solved questions like solar wind coupling with magnetosphere and ionosphere, relationship between geomagnetic storms & sub-storms etc. To evaluate contribution of various interplanetary parameters that have major role in the geomagnetic storm/geomagnetic variations, the information theory approach is used. In information theory, the measure of uncertainty or randomness of a signal can be quantified by using Shannon entropy or entropy for short. And Transfer entropy is capable of quantifying the directional flow of information between two signals. Thus the Transfer entropy is capable of distinguishing effectively driving and responding signals. In this study, we use Transfer entropy function on Solar wind parameters and ground magnetic data to derive the drivers and relations between them, and also study their contributed effect on ionospheric TEC. In this presentation, we will evaluate and present the results obtained, and discuss about the driving forces on the geomagnetic field disturbances.

  1. Evaluating an Online Resourcefulness Training Intervention Pilot Test Using Six Critical Parameters.

    PubMed

    Musil, Carol M; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A; Burant, Christopher J; Toly, Valerie B; Warner, Camille B

    2015-12-01

    Few resources are available to help grandmother caregivers to grandchildren manage their complex family situations that may have immediate and long-term consequences for themselves and their families. Resourcefulness training is an intervention designed to help grandmothers improve their ability to deal with these problems. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the necessity, feasibility, acceptability, fidelity, safety, and effectiveness (i.e., effect sizes) of an online, computer-based resourcefulness training intervention that was adapted from a face-to-face intervention. Twelve grandmothers raising or living with grandchildren participated in the pilot intervention that included (a) watching an instructional video on resourcefulness, (b) completing two online questionnaires over a 6-week time period, and (c) writing in an online journal every day for 4 weeks. Data are evaluated within the context of the six parameters important to intervention development. Qualitative and quantitative results provide initial support for all six parameters. Recommendations to improve aspects of the intervention are discussed. PMID:26738997

  2. Selecting robust solutions from a trade-off surface through the evaluation of the distribution of parameter sets in objective space and parameter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumedah, G.; Berg, A. A.; Wineberg, M.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrological models are increasingly been calibrated using multi-objective genetic algorithms (GAs). Multi-objective GAs facilitate the evaluation of several model evaluation objectives and the examination of massive combinations of parameter sets. Usually, the outcome is a set of several equally-accurate parameter sets which make-up a trade-off surface between the objective functions often referred to as Pareto set. The Pareto set describes a decision-front in a way that each solution has unique values in parameter space with competing accuracy in objective space. An automated framework of choosing a single from such a trade-off surface has not been thoroughly investigated in the model calibration literature. As a result, this presentation will demonstrate an automated selection of robust solutions from a trade-off surface using the distribution of solutions in both objective space and parameter space. The trade-off surface was generated using the Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm II (NSGA-II) to calibrate the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) for streamflow simulation based on model bias and root mean square error. Our selection method generates solutions with unique properties including a representative pathway in parameter space, a basin of attraction or the center of mass in objective space, and a proximity to the origin in objective space. Additionally, our framework determines a robust solution as a balanced compromise for the distribution of solutions in objective space and parameter space. That is, the robust solution emphasizes stability in model parameter values and in objective function values in a way that similarity in parameter space implies similarity in objective space.

  3. Economic analysis of royalactin production under uncertainty: Evaluating the effect of parameter optimization

    PubMed Central

    Torres‐Acosta, Mario A.; Aguilar‐Yañez, Jose M.; Rito‐Palomares, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Royalactin is a protein with several different potential uses in humans. Research, in insects and in mammalian cells, has shown that it can accelerate cell division and prevent apoptosis. The method of action is through the use of the epidermal growth factor receptor, which is present in humans. Potential use in humans could be to lower cholesterolemic levels in blood, and to elicit similar effects to those seen in bees, e.g., increased lifespan. Mass production of Royalactin has not been accomplished, though a recent article presented a Pichia pastoris fermentation and recovery by aqueous two‐phase systems at laboratory scale as a possible basis for production. Economic modelling is a useful tool with which compare possible outcomes for the production of such a molecule and in particular, to locate areas where additional research is needed and optimization may be required. This study uses the BioSolve software to perform an economic analysis on the scale‐up of the putative process for Royalactin. The key parameters affecting the cost of production were located via a sensitivity analysis and then evaluated by Monte Carlo analysis. Results show that if titer is not optimized the strategy to maintain a low cost of goods is process oriented. After optimization of this parameter the strategy changes to a product‐oriented and the target output becomes the critical parameter determining the cost of goods. This study serves to provide a framework for the evaluation of strategies for future production of Royalactin, by analyzing the factors that influence its cost of manufacture. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 31:744–749, 2015 PMID:25737309

  4. Parameter Choice and Constraint in Hydrologic Models for Evaluating Land Use Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrologic models are used to answer questions, from simple, "what is the expected 100-year peak flow for a basin?", to complex, "how will land use change alter flow pathways, flow time series, and water chemistry?" Appropriate model structure and complexity depend on the questions being addressed. Numerous studies of simple transfer models for converting climate signals into streamflows suggest that only three or four parameters are needed. The conceptual corollary to such models is a single hillslope bucket with storage, evapotranspiration, fast flow, and slow flow. While having the benefit of low uncertainty, such models are ill-suited to addressing land use questions. Land use questions require models that can simulate effects of changes in vegetation, alterations of soil characteristics, and resulting changes in flow pathways. For example, minimum goals for a hydrologic model evaluating bioenergy feedstock production might include: 1) calculate Horton overland flow based on surface conductivities and saturated surface flow based on relative moisture content in the topsoils, 2) allow reinfiltration of Horton overland flow created by bare soils, compacted soils, and pavement (roads, logging roads, skid trails, landings), 3) account for root zone depth and LAI in transpiration calculations, 4) allow mixing of hillslope flows in the riparian aquifer, 5) allow separate simulation of the riparian soils and vegetation and upslope soils and vegetation, 6) incorporate important aspects of topography and stratigraphy, and 7) estimate residence times in different flow paths. How many parameters are needed for such a model, and what information beside streamflow can be collected to constrain the parameters? Additional information that can be used for evaluating and testing watershed models are in-situ conductivity measurements, soil porosity, soil moisture dynamics, shallow perched groundwater behavior, interflow occurrence, groundwater behavior, regional ET estimates

  5. Evaluation of Nutritional Biochemical Parameters in Haemodialysis Patients over a Ten-year Period

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso, AIQ; Castillo, RF; Jimenez, FJ Gomez; Negrillo, AM Nuñez

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: Protein-energy malnutrition as well as systemic inflammation and metabolic disorders are common in patients with chronic kidney failure who require renal replacement therapy (haemodialysis). Such malnutrition is a factor that significantly contributes to their morbidity and mortality. This study evaluated the nutritional status of haemodialysis patients by assessing biochemical and anthropometric parameters in order to determine whether these patients suffered disorders reflecting nutritional deterioration directly related to time on haemodialysis. Subjects and Method: This research comprised 90 patients of both genders with chronic kidney failure, who regularly received haemodialysis at our unit over a period of ten years. The patients' blood was tested quarterly for plasma albumin, total cholesterol and total proteins, and tested monthly for transferrin. The patients' weight, height and body mass index (BMI) were monitored. Body mass index was calculated using the formula: weight (kg)/height (m2) and classified in one of the following categories defined in the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Database on Body Mass Index: (i) underweight [BMI < 18.50], (ii) normal [BMI 18.50 – 24.99], (iii) overweight [BMI 25 – 29.99], (iv) obese [BMI ≥ 30]. Results: In the ten-year period of the study, the patients experienced a substantial decline in their biochemical parameters. Nevertheless, their BMI did not show any significant changes despite the patients' state of malnutrition. Conclusions: The prevalence of malnutrition in haemodialysis patients was evident. Nevertheless, the BMI of the subjects did not correspond to the biochemical parameters measured. Consequently, the results showed that the nutritional deterioration of these patients was mainly reflected in their biochemical parameters rather than in their anthropometric measurements. PMID:26426172

  6. Evaluating Processes, Parameters and Observations Using Cross Validation and Computationally Frugal Sensitivity Analysis Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foglia, L.; Mehl, S.; Hill, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    Sensitivity analysis methods are used to identify measurements most likely to provide important information for model development and predictions and therefore identify critical processes. Methods range from computationally demanding Monte Carlo and cross-validation methods, to very computationally efficient linear methods. The methods are able to account for interrelations between parameters, but some argue that because linear methods neglect the effects of model nonlinearity, they are not worth considering when examining complex, nonlinear models of environmental systems. However, when faced with computationally demanding models needed to simulate, for example, climate change, the chance of obtaining fundamental insights (such as important and relationships between predictions and parameters) with few model runs is tempting. In the first part of this work, comparisons of local sensitivity analysis and cross-validation are conducted using a nonlinear groundwater model of the Maggia Valley, Southern Switzerland; sensitivity analysis are then applied to an integrated hydrological model of the same system where the impact of more processes and of using different sets of observations on the model results are considered; applicability to models of a variety of situations (climate, water quality, water management) is inferred. Results show that the frugal linear methods produced about 70% of the insight from about 2% of the model runs required by the computationally demanding methods. Regarding important observations, linear methods were not always able to distinguish between moderately and unimportant observations. However, they consistently identified the most important observations which are critical to characterize relationships between parameters and to assess the worth of potential new data collection efforts. Importance both to estimate parameters and predictions of interest was readily identified. The results suggest that it can be advantageous to consider local

  7. Evaluation of the acromiohumeral distance by means of magnetic resonance imaging umerus☆

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira França, Flávio; Godinho, André Couto; Ribeiro, Elísio José Salgado; Falster, Lorenzo; Búrigo, Lucas Emanuel Gava; Nunes, Rafael Berenstein

    2016-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the relationship between the size, degree of retraction and topography of rotator cuff injuries and the degree of rise of the humeral head, and to evaluate the influence of gravity, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods We evaluated 181 shoulder MRIs from 160 patients aged over 45 years, between November 2013 and July 2014. The patients were divided into two groups: one control (no lesion or partial damage to the rotator cuff); and the other with complete tears of the rotator cuff. We measured the acromiohumeral distance in the sagittal plane, and established the shortest distance between the apex of the head and the acromion. Results In this study, 96 examinations on female patients (53.04%) and 58 on male patients (46.96%) were evaluated. The mean age was 63.27 years: in the control group, 61.46; and in the group with injuries, 65.19. From analysis on the measurements of the subacromial space, we observed significantly higher values in the control group (7.71 mm) than in the group with injuries (6.99). In comparing the control group with some specific subgroup, i.e. posterosuperior (6.77), anteroposterior-superior (4.16) and retraction Patte III (5.01), we confirmed the importance of topography and degree of retraction in relation to the rise of the humeral head. Conclusion The rise of the humeral head was directly related to the size, degree of retraction and topography of the rotator cuff injuries, with greater degrees of rise in cases of superior and posterior lesions and anteroposterior-superior (massive) lesions. The assessment using MRI was not influenced by the force of gravity. PMID:27069885

  8. Can a combination of ultrasonographic parameters accurately evaluate concussion and guide return-to-play decisions?

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Michael S; Dupuis, Janae E; Bargoil, Jessica M; Foster, Dana C

    2015-09-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury, often referred to as concussion, is a common, potentially debilitating, and costly condition. One of the main challenges in diagnosing and managing concussion is that there is not currently an objective test to determine the presence of a concussion and to guide return-to-play decisions for athletes. Traditional neuroimaging tests, such as brain magnetic resonance imaging, are normal in concussion, and therefore diagnosis and management are guided by reported symptoms. Some athletes will under-report symptoms to accelerate their return-to-play and others will over-report symptoms out of fear of further injury or misinterpretation of underlying conditions, such as migraine headache. Therefore, an objective measure is needed to assist in several facets of concussion management. Limited data in animal and human testing indicates that intracranial pressure increases slightly and cerebrovascular reactivity (the ability of the cerebral arteries to auto-regulate in response to changes in carbon dioxide) decreases slightly following mild traumatic brain injury. We hypothesize that a combination of ultrasonographic measurements (optic nerve sheath diameter and transcranial Doppler assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity) into a single index will allow for an accurate and non-invasive measurement of intracranial pressure and cerebrovascular reactivity, and this index will be clinically relevant and useful for guiding concussion diagnosis and management. Ultrasound is an ideal modality for the evaluation of concussion because it is portable (allowing for evaluation in many settings, such as on the playing field or in a combat zone), radiation-free (making repeat scans safe), and relatively inexpensive (resulting in nearly universal availability). This paper reviews the literature supporting our hypothesis that an ultrasonographic index can assist in the diagnosis and management of concussion, and it also presents limited data regarding the

  9. Technique for liposuction fat reimplantation and long-term volume evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hörl, H W; Feller, A M; Biemer, E

    1991-03-01

    Injection with one's own fat tissue remains controversial due to a lack of objective data pertaining to postoperative volume control. Facial defects in a total of 53 patients were repaired using autogenous fat tissue. The fatty tissue was obtained from the lower abdomen, buttocks, or inner portion of the upper thigh and then suspended before injection in a solution of 250 ml Ringer's solution, 50 ml distilled water, and 0.7 ml hyaluronidase. The fatty tissue was collected by a filter integrated within the suction system and subsequently prepared, as follows: (1) Cell detritus, blood constituents, and local anesthetic were flushed away by using a physiological Ringer's solution. (2) The defects were filled by using a finely calibrated, locked injection, whereby the desired amount of fatty tissue could be accurately instilled. (3) Injection was carefully performed directly under the cutis through a large lumen cannula and under close observation to avoid the injection of any fatty tissue intracutaneously. Before the procedure, the augmented areas had been evaluated by using magnetic resonance imaging (in T1-weighted images). Postoperatively, the sites were once again documented for volume at control intervals of 6 days, and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. The volumes were computer-calculated integrally from the sum of the area of all the layers according to the following formula:v = (d + g).E(ai). Despite the use of hyaluronidase as well as an atraumatic liposuction technique, microscopic examination revealed 40% of the aspirated cells to have defective cell membranes. Without hyaluronidase, this figure rose to 50%. One-year follow-up in 10 patients showed that through the break-down of these damaged cells, a particularly high volume loss of 49% was documentable at 3 months after the procedure. Further follow-up at 6 months showed that average volume decline had risen to a total of 55%, whereas, at 9 months as well as 12 months, no further loss could be detected. Autogenous

  10. Evaluation of the applicability of Helmholtz resonators for low frequency acoustic liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderwal, J. M. M.

    1988-09-01

    A literature study was performed on the acoustic behavior of those Helmholtz resonator type liners which are most promising for low frequency sound absorption in aero-engine applications. The equations for the acoustic impedance of various types of Helmholtz resonators were analyzed as well as the conditions for the validity of these equations. An experimental program is defined for a further analysis of various types of resonators.

  11. Litchi freshness rapid non-destructive evaluating method using electronic nose and non-linear dynamics stochastic resonance model

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Xiaoguo; Liu, Wei; Hui, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, litchi freshness rapid non-destructive evaluating method using electronic nose (e-nose) and non-linear stochastic resonance (SR) was proposed. EN responses to litchi samples were continuously detected for 6 d Principal component analysis (PCA) and non-linear stochastic resonance (SR) methods were utilized to analyze EN detection data. PCA method could not totally discriminate litchi samples, while SR signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) eigen spectrum successfully discriminated all litchi samples. Litchi freshness predictive model developed using SNR eigen values shows high predictive accuracy with regression coefficients R2 = 0 .99396. PMID:25920547

  12. Controlling precise magnetic field configuration around electron cyclotron resonance zone for enhancing plasma parameters and beam current

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Keisuke Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Kimura, Daiju; Imai, Youta; Kumakura, Sho; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-15

    Multi-charged ion source which has wide operating conditions is required in various application fields. We have constructed tandem type ECR ion source (ECRIS); one of the features of its main stage is an additional coil for controlling magnetic field distribution around the mirror bottom precisely. Here the effect of magnetic field variation caused by the additional coil is experimentally considered in terms of plasma parameters and beam current as the first investigation of the main stage plasma. Furthermore, behavior of magnetic lines of force flowing from the ECR zone is calculated, and is compared with measurement results aiming for better understanding of interrelationship between plasma production and ion beam generation on the ECRIS.

  13. Benchmark Testing of a New 56Fe Evaluation for Criticality Safety Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, Luiz C; Ivanov, E.

    2015-01-01

    The SAMMY code was used to evaluate resonance parameters of the 56Fe cross section in the resolved resonance energy range of 0–2 MeV using transmission data, capture, elastic, inelastic, and double differential elastic cross sections. The resonance analysis was performed with the code SAMMY that fits R-matrix resonance parameters using the generalized least-squares technique (Bayes’ theory). The evaluation yielded a set of resonance parameters that reproduced the experimental data very well, along with a resonance parameter covariance matrix for data uncertainty calculations. Benchmark tests were conducted to assess the evaluation performance in benchmark calculations.

  14. Evaluation of Computational Techniques for Parameter Estimation and Uncertainty Analysis of Comprehensive Watershed Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, H.; Arabi, M.; Records, R.

    2012-12-01

    The structural complexity of comprehensive watershed models continues to increase in order to incorporate inputs at finer spatial and temporal resolutions and simulate a larger number of hydrologic and water quality responses. Hence, computational methods for parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis of complex models have gained increasing popularity. This study aims to evaluate the performance and applicability of a range of algorithms from computationally frugal approaches to formal implementations of Bayesian statistics using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques. The evaluation procedure hinges on the appraisal of (i) the quality of final parameter solution in terms of the minimum value of the objective function corresponding to weighted errors; (ii) the algorithmic efficiency in reaching the final solution; (iii) the marginal posterior distributions of model parameters; (iv) the overall identifiability of the model structure; and (v) the effectiveness in drawing samples that can be classified as behavior-giving solutions. The proposed procedure recognize an important and often neglected issue in watershed modeling that solutions with minimum objective function values may not necessarily reflect the behavior of the system. The general behavior of a system is often characterized by the analysts according to the goals of studies using various error statistics such as percent bias or Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient. Two case studies are carried out to examine the efficiency and effectiveness of four Bayesian approaches including Metropolis-Hastings sampling (MHA), Gibbs sampling (GSA), uniform covering by probabilistic rejection (UCPR), and differential evolution adaptive Metropolis (DREAM); a greedy optimization algorithm dubbed dynamically dimensioned search (DDS); and shuffle complex evolution (SCE-UA), a widely implemented evolutionary heuristic optimization algorithm. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is used to simulate hydrologic and

  15. Radiographic Evaluation of Valvular Heart Disease With Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Correlation.

    PubMed

    Lempel, Jason K; Bolen, Michael A; Renapurkar, Rahul D; Azok, Joseph T; White, Charles S

    2016-09-01

    Valvular heart disease is a group of complex entities with varying etiologies and clinical presentations. There are a number of imaging tools available to supplement clinical evaluation of suspected valvular heart disease, with echocardiography being the most common and clinically established, and more recent emergence of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging as additional supportive techniques. Yet even with these newer and more sophisticated modalities, chest radiography remains one of the earliest and most common diagnostic examinations performed during the triage of patients with suspected cardiac dysfunction. Recognizing the anatomic and pathologic features of cardiac radiography including the heart's adaptation to varying hemodynamic changes can provide clues to the radiologist regarding the underlying etiology. In this article, we will elucidate several principles relating to chamber modifications in response to pressure and volume overload as well as radiographic appearances associated with pulmonary fluid status and cardiac dysfunction. We will also present a pattern approach to optimize analysis of the chest radiograph for valvular heart disease, which will help guide the radiologist down a differential diagnostic pathway and create a more meaningful clinical report. PMID:27548877

  16. Molecular magnetic resonance probe targeting VEGF165: preparation and in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    You, Xiao-Guang; Tu, Rong; Peng, Ming-Li; Bai, Yu-Jie; Tan, Mingqian; Li, Han-Jian; Guan, Jing; Wen, Li-Jun

    2014-01-01

    A new method for imaging the tumor human vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (VEGF 165) is presented. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probe was prepared by crosslinking ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles to the aptamer for tumor vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (VEGF165-aptamer). The molecular probe was evaluated for its in vitro and in vivo activities toward VEGF165. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that the VEGF165-aptamer-USPIO nanoparticles conjugate specifically binds to VEGF165 in vitro. A cell proliferation test showed that VEGF165-aptamer-USPIO seems to block the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells induced by free VEGF165, suggesting that VEGF165 is an effective target of this molecular probe. In xenograft mice carrying liver cancer that expresses VEGF165, T2-weighted imaging of the tumor displayed marked negative enhancement 3 h after the intravenous administration of VEGF165-aptamer-USPIO. The enhancement disappeared 6 h after administration of the probe. These results suggest the targeted imaging effect of VEGF165-aptamer-USPIO probe in vivo for VEGF165-expressing tumors. This is the first report of a targeted MRI molecular probe based on USPIO and VEGF165-aptamer. PMID:24729581

  17. Magnetic resonance enterography for the evaluation of the deep small intestine in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Kazuo; Takenaka, Kento; Kitazume, Yoshio; Fujii, Toshimitsu; Matsuoka, Katsuyoshi; Kimura, Maiko; Nagaishi, Takashi; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2016-04-01

    For the control of Crohn's disease (CD) a thorough assessment of the small intestine is essential; several modalities may be utilized, with cross-sectional imaging being important. Magnetic resonance (MR) enterography, i.e., MRE is recommended as a modality with the highest accuracy for CD lesions. MRE and MR enteroclysis are the two methods performed following distension of the small intestine. MRE has sensitivity and specificity comparable to computed tomography enterography (CTE); although images obtained using MRE are less clear compared with CTE, MRE does not expose the patient to radiation and is superior for soft-tissue contrast. Furthermore, it can assess not only static but also dynamic and functional imaging and reveals signs of CD, such as abscess, comb sign, fat edema, fistula, lymph node enhancement, less motility, mucosal lesions, stricture, and wall enhancement. Several indices of inflammatory changes and intestinal damage have been proposed for objective evaluation. Recently, diffusion-weighted imaging has been proposed, which does not need bowel preparation and contrast enhancement. Comprehension of the characteristics of MRE and other modalities is important for better management of CD. PMID:27175112

  18. Magnetic resonance enterography for the evaluation of the deep small intestine in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Takenaka, Kento; Kitazume, Yoshio; Fujii, Toshimitsu; Matsuoka, Katsuyoshi; Kimura, Maiko; Nagaishi, Takashi; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    For the control of Crohn's disease (CD) a thorough assessment of the small intestine is essential; several modalities may be utilized, with cross-sectional imaging being important. Magnetic resonance (MR) enterography, i.e., MRE is recommended as a modality with the highest accuracy for CD lesions. MRE and MR enteroclysis are the two methods performed following distension of the small intestine. MRE has sensitivity and specificity comparable to computed tomography enterography (CTE); although images obtained using MRE are less clear compared with CTE, MRE does not expose the patient to radiation and is superior for soft-tissue contrast. Furthermore, it can assess not only static but also dynamic and functional imaging and reveals signs of CD, such as abscess, comb sign, fat edema, fistula, lymph node enhancement, less motility, mucosal lesions, stricture, and wall enhancement. Several indices of inflammatory changes and intestinal damage have been proposed for objective evaluation. Recently, diffusion-weighted imaging has been proposed, which does not need bowel preparation and contrast enhancement. Comprehension of the characteristics of MRE and other modalities is important for better management of CD. PMID:27175112

  19. Resonance Raman Spectroscopic Evaluation of Skin Carotenoids as a Biomarker of Carotenoid Status for Human Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mayne, Susan T.; Cartmel, Brenda; Scarmo, Stephanie; Jahns, Lisa; Ermakov, Igor V.; Gellermann, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Resonance Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) is a non-invasive method that has been developed to assess carotenoid status in human tissues including human skin in vivo. Skin carotenoid status has been suggested as a promising biomarker for human studies. This manuscript describes research done relevant to the development of this biomarker, including its reproducibility, validity, feasibility for use in field settings, and factors that affect the biomarker such as diet, smoking, and adiposity. Recent studies have evaluated the response of the biomarker to controlled carotenoid interventions, both supplement-based and dietary [e.g., provision of a high-carotenoid fruit and vegetable (F/V)-enriched diet], demonstrating consistent response to intervention. The totality of evidence supports the use of skin carotenoid status as an objective biomarker of F/V intake, although in the cross-sectional setting, diet explains only some of the variation in this biomarker. However, this limitation is also a strength in that skin carotenoids may effectively serve as an integrated biomarker of health, with higher status reflecting greater F/V intake, lack of smoking, and lack of adiposity. Thus, this biomarker holds promise as both a health biomarker and an objective indicator of F/V intake, supporting its further development and utilization for medical and public health purposes. PMID:23823930

  20. Evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging-negative drug-resistant epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aashit K.; Mittal, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    A structural brain lesion in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE) greatly increases the likelihood of identification of the seizure focus and ultimately seizure-free outcome following resective epilepsy surgery. In contrast, surgical outcomes of true non-lesional DRE are less favorable. Therefore, discovery of an underlying lesion is paramount in the pre-surgical work-up of patients with DRE. Over the years, the surgical treatment of pharmacoresistant epilepsy has evolved from straightforward lesional cases to include cases with hippocampal sclerosis. With the advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), most cases of mesial temporal sclerosis became more easily identifiable on pre-operative neuroimaging. With the widespread use of high-resolution MRI with epilepsy protocols over the last two decades, our ability to visualize subtle structural changes has been greatly enhanced. However, there are some cases of lesional epilepsy, which remain unidentified on these routine MRIs. In such “non-lesional” refractory epilepsies, further investigation with advanced neuroimaging techniques, including metabolic imaging, as well as electrophysiological studies may help to identify the previously non-visualized focal brain abnormalities. In this review, we outline the current status for evaluation of MRI-negative DRE. PMID:24791094

  1. Updates in advanced diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging techniques in the evaluation of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Lawrence, Edward Malnor; Mazaheri, Yousef; Sala, Evis

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) is considered part of the standard imaging protocol for the evaluation of patients with prostate cancer. It has been proven valuable as a functional tool for qualitative and quantitative analysis of prostate cancer beyond anatomical MRI sequences such as T2-weighted imaging. This review discusses ongoing controversies in DW-MRI acquisition, including the optimal number of b-values to be used for prostate DWI, and summarizes the current literature on the use of advanced DW-MRI techniques. These include intravoxel incoherent motion imaging, which better accounts for the non-mono-exponential behavior of the apparent diffusion coefficient as a function of b-value and the influence of perfusion at low b-values. Another technique is diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI). Metrics from DKI reflect excess kurtosis of tissues, representing its deviation from Gaussian diffusion behavior. Preliminary results suggest that DKI findings may have more value than findings from conventional DW-MRI for the assessment of prostate cancer. PMID:26339460

  2. Early characteristic findings in bowleg deformities: evaluation using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Mukai, S; Suzuki, S; Seto, Y; Kashiwagi, N; Hwang, E S

    2000-01-01

    We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate bowleg deformities in infancy. Twenty-five tibiae of 13 infants were examined and divided into two groups based on MRI findings: group A had high intensity area in the medial epiphyseal cartilage on T2-weighted images. Group B had depression of medial physis and abnormal signal in the perichondrial region in addition to the epiphyseal lesion. At the final follow-up, all cases in group A demonstrated normal lower leg alignments, whereas five cases in group B showed characteristic roentogenographic findings of Blount's disease. The improvement rate of metaphyseal-diaphyseal angle was correlated with this classification. These findings suggested that abnormal findings in physis and perichondrial region might be preliminary findings in early stage of Blount's disease. The high intensity areas in the medial epiphyseal cartilage were commonly found among the cases with bowing deformities, which suggested that there might be a common pathomechanism between physiologic bowing and infantile Blount's disease. PMID:11008740

  3. The Emerging Role of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Evaluation of Metabolic Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Mavrogeni, S; Markousis-Mavrogenis, G; Markussis, V; Kolovou, G

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss the role of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) in the diagnosis, risk stratification, and follow-up of metabolic cardiomyopathies. The classification of myocardial diseases, proposed by WHO/ISFC task force, distinguished specific cardiomyopathies, caused by metabolic disorders, into 4 types: 1) endocrine disorders, 2) storage or infiltration disorders (amyloidosis, hemochromatosis and familial storage disorders), 3) nutritional disorders (Kwashiorkor, beri-beri, obesity, and alcohol), and 4) diabetic heart. Thyroid disease, pheochromocytoma, and growth hormone excess or deficiency may contribute to usually reversible dilated cardiomyopathy. Glucogen storage diseases can be presented with myopathy, liver, and heart failure. Lysosomal storage diseases can provoke cardiac hypertrophy, mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias. Hereditary hemochromatosis, an inherited disorder of iron metabolism, leads to tissue iron overload in different organs, including the heart. Cardiac amyloidosis is the result of amyloid deposition in the heart, formed from breakdown of normal or abnormal proteins that leads to increased heart stiffness, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and heart failure. Finally, nutritional disturbances and metabolic diseases, such as Kwashiorkor, beri-beri, obesity, alcohol consumption, and diabetes mellitus may also lead to severe cardiac dysfunction. CMR, through its capability to reliably assess anatomy, function, inflammation, rest-stress myocardial perfusion, myocardial fibrosis, aortic distensibility, iron and/or fat deposition can serve as an excellent tool for early diagnosis of heart involvement, risk stratification, treatment evaluation, and long term follow-up of patients with metabolic cardiomyopathies. PMID:26197853

  4. The clinical value of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of meniscal disorders.

    PubMed

    Raunest, J; Oberle, K; Loehnert, J; Hoetzinger, H

    1991-01-01

    This prospective double-blind study was designed to evaluate the capability of magnetic resonance imaging to serve as a diagnostic tool in patients who have a clinically suspected disorder of the meniscus. The imaging studies provided a diagnostic accuracy of 72 per cent, a sensitivity of 88 per cent, and a specificity of 57 per cent. The positive and negative predictive values were 66 and 83 per cent. The diagnostic sensitivity was 94 per cent for lesions of the medial meniscus; this value differed significantly from that of 78 per cent for lesions of the lateral meniscus (p less than 0.05). The 37 per cent specificity for lesions of the medial meniscus was extremely low compared with the rate of 69 per cent for lesions of the lateral meniscus (p less than 0.01). In the intermediate part of the meniscus, the diagnostic sensitivity was 37 per cent on the medial side and 23 per cent on the lateral side; these values were significantly less than the average of 74 per cent for the other meniscal segments (p less than 0.001). The imaging studies provided an over-all accuracy of 67 per cent in the detection of degeneration of the meniscus, 78 per cent in the identification of meniscal tears, and 82 per cent in the delineation of postoperative lesions. PMID:1985979

  5. Evaluation of an Automated Analysis Tool for Prostate Cancer Prediction Using Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Roethke, Matthias C.; Kuru, Timur H.; Mueller-Wolf, Maya B.; Agterhuis, Erik; Edler, Christopher; Hohenfellner, Markus; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Hadaschik, Boris A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic performance of an automated analysis tool for the assessment of prostate cancer based on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) of the prostate. Methods A fully automated analysis tool was used for a retrospective analysis of mpMRI sets (T2-weighted, T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced, and diffusion-weighted sequences). The software provided a malignancy prediction value for each image pixel, defined as Malignancy Attention Index (MAI) that can be depicted as a colour map overlay on the original images. The malignancy maps were compared to histopathology derived from a combination of MRI-targeted and systematic transperineal MRI/TRUS-fusion biopsies. Results In total, mpMRI data of 45 patients were evaluated. With a sensitivity of 85.7% (with 95% CI of 65.4–95.0), a specificity of 87.5% (with 95% CI of 69.0–95.7) and a diagnostic accuracy of 86.7% (with 95% CI of 73.8–93.8) for detection of prostate cancer, the automated analysis results corresponded well with the reported diagnostic accuracies by human readers based on the PI-RADS system in the current literature. Conclusion The study revealed comparable diagnostic accuracies for the detection of prostate cancer of a user-independent MAI-based automated analysis tool and PI-RADS-scoring-based human reader analysis of mpMRI. Thus, the analysis tool could serve as a detection support system for less experienced readers. The results of the study also suggest the potential of MAI-based analysis for advanced lesion assessments, such as cancer extent and staging prediction. PMID:27454770

  6. Evaluation of aortic stenosis by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging: comparison with established routine clinical techniques

    PubMed Central

    Kupfahl, C; Honold, M; Meinhardt, G; Vogelsberg, H; Wagner, A; Mahrholdt, H; Sechtem, U

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether direct planimetry of aortic valve area (AVA) by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is a reliable tool for determining the severity of aortic stenosis compared with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE), and cardiac catheterisation. Methods: 44 symptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis were studied. By cardiac catheterisation AVA was calculated by the Gorlin equation. AVA was measured with CMR from steady state free precession (true fast imaging with steady state precession) by planimetry. AVA was also determined from TOE images by planimetry and from TTE images by the continuity equation. Results: Bland-Altman analysis evaluating intraobserver and interobserver variability showed a very small bias for both (−0.016 and 0.019, respectively; n  =  20). Bias and limits of agreement between CMR and TTE were 0.05 (−0.35, 0.44) cm2 (n  =  37), between CMR and TOE 0.02 (−0.39, 0.42) cm2 (n  =  32), and between CMR and cardiac catheterisation 0.09 (−0.30, 0.47) cm2 (n  =  36). The sensitivity and specificity of CMR to detect AVA ⩽ 0.80 cm2 measured by cardiac catheterisation was 78% and 89%, of TOE 70% and 70%, and of TTE 74% and 67%, respectively. Conclusion: CMR planimetry is highly reliable and reproducible. Further, CMR planimetry had the best sensitivity and specificity of all non-invasive methods for detecting severe aortic stenosis in comparison with cardiac catheterisation. Therefore, CMR planimetry of AVA with steady state free precession is a new powerful diagnostic tool, particularly for patients with uncertain or discrepant findings by other modalities. PMID:15253962

  7. Multidetector Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Craniovertebral junction Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Dhadve, Rajshree U.; Garge, Shaileshkumar S.; Vyas, Pooja D.; Thakker, Nirav R.; Shah, Sonali H.; Jaggi, Sunila T.; Talwar, Inder A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Craniovertebral junction (CVJ) abnormalities constitute an important group of treatable neurological disorders with diagnostic dilemma. Their precise diagnosis, identification of probable etiology, and pretreatment evaluation significantly affects prognosis and quality of life of patients. Aims: The study was to classify various craniovertebral junction disorders according to their etiology and to define the importance of precise diagnosis for pretreatment evaluation with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods: This is a prospective observational study of 62 patients referred to our department between October 2012 and September 2014. All patients suspected to have a craniovertebral junction disorder were included in the study, from all age groups and both genders. Detailed clinical history was taken. Radiographs of cervical spine were collected if available. All patients were subjected to MDCT and/or MRI. Results: In our study of 62 patients; 39 were males and 23 were females, with male to female ratio of 1.6:1. Most common age group was 2nd -3rd decade (19 patients, 30.64%). Developmental anomalies (33 patients, 53.22%) were the most common etiology group followed by traumatic (10 patients, 16.12%), degenerative (eight patients, 12.90%), infective (four patients, 6.45%), inflammatory and neoplastic (three patients each, 4.8%), and no cause found in one patient. Conclusions: CVJ abnormalities constitute an important group of treatable neurological disorders, especially in certain ethnic groups and are approached with much caution by clinicians. Thus, it is essential that radiologists should be able to make a precise diagnosis of craniovertebral junction abnormalities, classify them into etiological group, and rule out important mimickers on MDCT and/or MRI, as this information ultimately helps determine the management of such abnormalities, prognosis, and quality of life of patients. PMID

  8. Self-sustained oscillation limit of tube bundle resonant noise. (Phase 1: Evaluation equation of oscillation limit)

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, M.; Fujita, K.; Hasegawa, N.

    1995-12-01

    Self-sustained oscillation limit of tube bundle resonant noise is studied in this paper. Excited acoustic energy and dissipating one in tube bundle are derived theoretically. In the exciting stage, the acoustic field is considered to be fed back to the flow field as the inlet flow fluctuation. And the acoustic damping is considered to induce the dissipating energy. Based on the energy balance of both and dimensional analysis, a new simple evaluation equation of self-sustained oscillation limit is proposed concerning on tube bundle resonant noise. A typical experimental results are evaluated based on this equation. The results are roughly good, but this suggests that model analysis of both exciting energy and dissipating one is necessary for more precise evaluation.

  9. Dynamic range evaluation of linear permanent magnet machine through design parameters estimation and continuous motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Dae-Joon; Lee, Sung-Ho; Jang, Seok-Myeong

    2008-04-01

    In the case of the manufactured linear permanent magnet synchronous machines (PMLSMs), dynamic range evaluation for system efficiency and performance limits is difficult to accomplish because of the moving length restriction with mover and the absence of interface between the design field and control field. To solve this problem, this paper presents a dynamic analysis based on design parameters by magnetic field analysis of the linear PM machine. And then, maximum operating range of the system is estimated considering the control method of a fixed dc-link voltage of the inverter. This analysis is verified from the dynamic experiments through continuous progressive motion of the manufactured disk-type PMLSM by current control.

  10. Evaluation of the toxic and genotoxic potential of acid mine drainage using physicochemical parameters and bioassays.

    PubMed

    Netto, E; Madeira, R A; Silveira, F Z; Fiori, M A; Angioleto, E; Pich, C T; Geremias, R

    2013-05-01

    Carboniferous activity generates acid mine drainage (AMD) which is capable of unleashing toxic effects on the exposed biota. The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxic and genotoxic potential of untreated-AMD and AMD treated with calcinated sediment, using physicochemical parameters and bioassays. Results revealed that untreated-AMD presented low pH values and elevated concentrations of the metals Fe, Al, Mn, Zn and Cu. High acute toxicity was observed in Artemia sp. and Daphnia magna, and sub-chronic toxicity and genotoxicity in Allium cepa L. as well as scission of plasmid DNA exposed to untreated-AMD. Treatment of AMD with calcinated sediment promoted the reduction of acidity and the removal of metals, as well as a reduction in toxic and genotoxic effects. In conclusion, the calcinated sediment can be used as an alternative AMD treatment. PMID:23518284

  11. Calculation of parameters for inspection planning and evaluation: mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, P.T.; Mullen, M.F.

    1982-08-01

    As part of Task C.35 (Calculation of Parameters for Inspection Planning and Evaluation) of the US Program of Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has performed some quantitative analyses of IAEA inspection activities for mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facilities. There were four distinct efforts involved in this task. These were as follows: show the effect on a material balance verification of using two variables measurement methods in some strata; perform additional calculations for the reference facility described in STR-89; modify the INSPECT computer programs to be used as an after-inspection analysis tool, as well as a preinspection planning tool; provide written comments and explantations of text and graphs of the first draft of STR-89, Safeguards Considerations for Mixed-Oxide Fuel Element Fabrication Facilities, by W. Bahm, T. Shea, and D. Tolchenkov, System Studies Section, IAEA.

  12. Evaluation of crack parameters by a nonlinear frequency-mixing laser ultrasonics method.

    PubMed

    Mezil, Sylvain; Chigarev, Nikolay; Tournat, Vincent; Gusev, Vitalyi

    2016-07-01

    The local evaluation of several parameters of a crack is realized with a nonlinear laser ultrasonic method. The method is based on the sample excitation by two laser beams, independently intensity modulated at two cyclic frequencies ωH and ωL (ωH≫ωL) and on the detection of nonlinear frequency-mixing ultrasonic components at frequencies ωH±nωL (n an integer). Frequency-mixing is a nonlinear process originating from the modulation of the crack state at low frequency ωL by laser-induced thermo-elastic stresses, which causes in turn the modulation of the acoustic waves at frequency ωH reflected/transmitted by the crack. We carry experiments with increasing laser power and observe a non-monotonous variation in the amplitude of up to 6 nonlinear sidelobes. We also improve a previously introduced theoretical model which leads to interpreting the experimental observations by the combined action on the crack of the thermo-elastic waves at low frequency ωL and of the stationary thermo-elastic stresses at ω=0. The latter are induced by the average laser power absorbed by the sample. While thermo-elastic wave can periodically modulate the parameters of the crack up to its periodic opening/closing, the stationary heating could cause complete local closure of the crack. By fitting the experimental amplitude evolutions for all monitored sidelobes with the theoretically predicted ones, various local parameters of the crack are extracted, including its local width and effective rigidity. PMID:27090110

  13. IRSN working program status on tools for evaluation of SFR cores static neutronics safety parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, E.; Tiberi, V.; Ecrabet, F.; Chegrani, Y.; Canuti, E.; Bisogni, D.; Sargeni, A.; Bernard, F.

    2012-07-01

    As technical support of the French Nuclear Safety Authority, IRSN will be in charge of safety assessment of any future project of Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) that could be built in France. One of the main safety topics will deal with reactivity control. Since the design and safety assessment of the last two SFR plants in France (Phenix and Superphenix, more than thirty years ago), methods, codes and safety objectives have evolved. That is why a working program on core neutronic simulations has been launched in order to be able to evaluate accuracy of future core characteristics computations. The first step consists in getting experienced with the ERANOS well-known deterministic code used in the past for Phenix and Superphenix. Then Monte-Carlo codes have been tested to help in the interpretation of ERANOS results and to define what place this kind of codes can have in a new SFR safety demonstration. This experience is based on open benchmark computations. Different cases are chosen to cover a wide range of configurations. The paper shows, as an example, criticality results obtained with ERANOS, SCALE and MORET, and the first conclusions based on these results. In the future, this work will be extended to other safety parameters such as sodium void and Doppler effects, kinetic parameters or flux distributions. (authors)

  14. Evaluation of Optical Low Coherence Reflectometry Parameters in Patients with Exfoliation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beyazyıldız, Emrullah; Beyazyıldız, Özlem; Günaydın, Süleyman; Şimşek, Mert; Yılmazbaş, Pelin; Öztürk, Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate optical low coherence reflectometry (OLCR) parameters in patients with exfoliation syndrome (EXS) undergoing cataract surgery. Methods. Forty-seven eyes of 47 patients with EXS (Group 1), and 55 eyes of 55 healthy subjects (Group 2) were included in the study. Anterior chamber depth (ACD), lens thickness (LT), axial length (AL), central corneal thickness (CCT), horizontal corneal length (HCL), and pupil diameter (PD) parameters were measured by OLCR (Lenstar LS 900, Haag-Streit) and compared between groups. Shapiro-Wilk test and Mann Whitney U tests were used for statistical analyses. Results. The mean ACD, HCL, and PD values were significantly lower in EXS group than in healthy subjects (P = 0.01, P = 0.04, and P < 0.001, resp.). The mean LT was significantly higher in EXS group than in healthy subjects (P = 0.007). There was no significant difference between groups in means of AXL and CCT. Conclusions. According to OLCR measures, eyes with EXS have shallower ACD, smaller PD, thicker LT, shorter HCL, and no significantly different CCT levels. PMID:26060577

  15. Introduction of Environmentally Degradable Parameters to Evaluate the Biodegradability of Biodegradable Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao; Song, Cunjiang; Geng, Weitao; Li, Qiang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Kong, Meimei; Wang, Shufang

    2012-01-01

    Environmentally Degradable Parameter (EdK) is of importance in the describing of biodegradability of environmentally biodegradable polymers (BDPs). In this study, a concept EdK was introduced. A test procedure of using the ISO 14852 method and detecting the evolved carbon dioxide as an analytical parameter was developed, and the calculated EdK was used as an indicator for the ultimate biodegradability of materials. Starch and polyethylene used as reference materials were defined as the EdK values of 100 and 0, respectively. Natural soil samples were inoculated into bioreactors, followed by determining the rates of biodegradation of the reference materials and 15 commercial BDPs over a 2-week test period. Finally, a formula was deduced to calculate the value of EdK for each material. The EdK values of the tested materials have a positive correlation to their biodegradation rates in the simulated soil environment, and they indicated the relative biodegradation rate of each material among all the tested materials. Therefore, the EdK was shown to be a reliable indicator for quantitatively evaluating the potential biodegradability of BDPs in the natural environment. PMID:22675455

  16. Evaluation of maturity and stability parameters of composts prepared from agro-industrial wastes.

    PubMed

    Raj, Dev; Antil, R S

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate changes in physical, chemical and biological parameters to assess the maturity and stability of composts prepared from mixture of different farm and agro-industrial wastes over a period of 150 days. All the composts appeared granular, dark grey in color without foul odor and attained an ambient temperature at 120 days of composting indicating the stable nature of composts. Correlation analysis showed that the optimal values of the selected parameters for our experimental conditions are as follows: organic matter loss >42%, C:N ratio <15, water soluble organic carbon (C(w)):organic N (N(org)) ratio <0.55, humic acid (HA):fulvic acid (FA) ratio >1.9, humification index (HI) >30%, cation exchange capacity (CEC):total organic carbon (TOC) ratio >1.7 and germination index (GI) >70%. Compost enriched with sewage sludge, pressmud and poultry waste matured earlier compared to composts either enriched with distillery effluent or un-enriched. PMID:21075622

  17. Electrical parameter evaluation of a 1 MW HTS motor via analysis and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, S. K.; Kwon, Y. K.; Kim, H. M.; Kim, S. H.; Lee, J. D.; Kim, Y. C.; Park, H. J.; Kwon, W. S.; Park, G. S.

    2009-06-01

    A 1 MW class HTS (high-temperature superconducting) synchronous motor has been developed. Design concerns of the developed motor are focused on smaller machine size and higher efficiency than conventional motors or generators with the same rating simultaneously reducing expensive Bi-2223 HTS wire which is used for superconducting field coil carrying the operating current around 30 K (-243 °C). Influence of an important parameter, synchronous reactance, has been analyzed on the machine performances such as voltage variation and output power during motor and generator operation. The developed motor was also analyzed by three-dimensional electromagnetic FEM (finite element method) to get magnetic field distribution, inductance, electromagnetic stress and so forth. This motor is aimed to be utilized for industrial application such as large motors operating in large plants. The HTS field coil of the developed motor is cooled by way of Neon thermosiphon mechanism and the stator (armature) coil is cooled by water through hollow copper conductor. This paper also describes evaluation of some electrical parameters from performance test results which were obtained at steady state in generator and motor mode of our HTS machine.

  18. Evaluating the Surface Topography of Pyrolytic Carbon Finger Prostheses through Measurement of Various Roughness Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Andrew; Talwalkar, Sumedh C.; Trail, Ian A.; Joyce, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    The articulating surfaces of four different sizes of unused pyrolytic carbon proximal interphalangeal prostheses (PIP) were evaluated though measuring several topographical parameters using a white light interferometer: average roughness (Sa); root mean-square roughness (Sq); skewness (Ssk); and kurtosis (Sku). The radii of the articulating surfaces were measured using a coordinate measuring machine, and were found to be: 2.5, 3.3, 4.2 and 4.7 mm for proximal, and 4.0, 5.1, 5.6 and 6.3 mm for medial components. ANOVA was used to assess the relationship between the component radii and each roughness parameter. Sa, Sq and Ssk correlated negatively with radius (p = 0.001, 0.001, 0.023), whilst Sku correlated positively with radius (p = 0.03). Ergo, the surfaces with the largest radii possessed the better topographical characteristics: low roughness, negative skewness, high kurtosis. Conversely, the surfaces with the smallest radii had poorer topographical characteristics. PMID:27089375

  19. Evaluation of earthquake parameters used in the Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madlazim; Prastowo, Tjipto

    2016-02-01

    Twenty-two of a total of 30 earthquake events reported by the Indonesian Agency for Geophysics, Climatology and Meteorology during the time period 2007-2010 were falsely issued as tsunamigenic by the Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (Ina-TEWS). These 30 earthquakes were of different magnitudes and occurred in different locations. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of the Ina-TEWS using common earthquake parameters, including the earthquake magnitude, origin time, depth, and epicenter. In total, 298 datasets assessed by the Ina-TEWS and the global centroid moment tensor (CMT) method were assessed. The global CMT method is considered by almost all seismologists to be a reference for the determination of these parameters as they have been proved to be accurate. It was found that the earthquake magnitude, origin time, and depth provided by the Ina-TEWS were significantly different from those given in the global CMT catalog, whereas the latitude and longitude positions of the events provided by both tsunami assessment systems were coincident. The performance of the Ina-TEWS, particularly in terms of accuracy, remains questionable and needs to be improved.

  20. A comparative evaluation of semen parameters in pre- and post-Hurricane Katrina human population.

    PubMed

    Baran, Caner; Hellstrom, Wayne J; Sikka, Suresh C

    2015-01-01

    A natural disaster leading to accumulation of environmental contaminants may have substantial effects on the male reproductive system. Our aim was to compare and assess semen parameters in a normospermic population residing in the Southern Louisiana, USA area pre- and post-Hurricane Katrina. We retrospectively evaluated semen analyses data (n = 3452) of 1855 patients who attended the Tulane University Andrology/Fertility Clinic between 1999 and 2013. The study inclusion criteria were men whose semen analyses showed ≥ 1.5 ml volume; ≥15 million ml -1 sperm concentration; ≥39 million total sperm count; ≥40% motility; >30% morphology, with an abstinence interval of 2-7 days. After the inclusion criteria applied to the population, 367 normospermic patients were included in the study. Descriptive statistics and group-based analyses were performed to interpret the differences between the pre-Katrina (Group 1, 1999-2005) and the post-Katrina (Group 2, 2006-2013) populations. There were significant differences in motility, morphology, number of white blood cell, immature germ cell count, pH and presence of sperm agglutination, but surprisingly there were no significant differences in sperm count between the two populations. This long-term comparative analysis further documents that a major natural disaster with its accompanied environmental issues can influence certain semen parameters (e.g., motility and morphology) and, by extension, fertility potential of the population of such areas. PMID:25677132

  1. Lymphedematous skin and subcutis: in vivo high resolution magnetic resonance imaging evaluation.

    PubMed

    Idy-Peretti, I; Bittoun, J; Alliot, F A; Richard, S B; Querleux, B G; Cluzan, R V

    1998-05-01

    Physico-chemical and morphologic parameters of skin layers and subcutaneous tissue in lymphedematous limb were studied in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging. High resolution images were obtained with a depth resolution of about 70 microm, using a specific surface gradient coil specially designed for skin imaging and connected to a standard whole-body imager at 1.5 T. Twenty-one patients with unilateral lower extremity lymphedema (11 primary and 10 secondary) were examined. Skin thickness, relaxation times, and relative proton density were calculated in lymphedematous limbs and in contralateral extremities. In diseased limbs, the average skin thickness (2.17 mm) was significantly larger (p = 1.5 x 10(-4)) than that of contralateral limb (1.14 mm). Major cutaneous alterations due to lymphedema took place in dermis. In lymphedematous dermis, the significant increase of relaxation time values could be due to a shift in the equilibrium of water inside this tissue in relation to the interactions between macromolecules and water molecules. In lymphedematous epidermis our results showed an increase in the number of free water protons. Information about water and fat distribution in lymphedema was also obtained using chemical shift weighted images. Our results demonstrated a water retention diffusely spread over the entire dermis, and an important fluid retention located in the interlobular spacing and beside the superficial fascia. Inside the subcutis, the mean thickness of the superficial fat lobules was increased more than that of the deep fat lobules. From all the various measurements we could not distinguish primary from secondary lymphedema. PMID:9579546

  2. Evaluating Machine Learning Regression Algorithms for Operational Retrieval of Biophysical Parameters: Opportunities for Sentinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrelst, Jochem; Rivera, J. P.; Alonso, L.; Guanter, L.; Moreno, J.

    2012-04-01

    ESA’s upcoming satellites Sentinel-2 (S2) and Sentinel-3 (S3) aim to ensure continuity for Landsat 5/7, SPOT- 5, SPOT-Vegetation and Envisat MERIS observations by providing superspectral images of high spatial and temporal resolution. S2 and S3 will deliver near real-time operational products with a high accuracy for land monitoring. This unprecedented data availability leads to an urgent need for developing robust and accurate retrieval methods. Machine learning regression algorithms could be powerful candidates for the estimation of biophysical parameters from satellite reflectance measurements because of their ability to perform adaptive, nonlinear data fitting. By using data from the ESA-led field campaign SPARC (Barrax, Spain), it was recently found [1] that Gaussian processes regression (GPR) outperformed competitive machine learning algorithms such as neural networks, support vector regression) and kernel ridge regression both in terms of accuracy and computational speed. For various Sentinel configurations (S2-10m, S2- 20m, S2-60m and S3-300m) three important biophysical parameters were estimated: leaf chlorophyll content (Chl), leaf area index (LAI) and fractional vegetation cover (FVC). GPR was the only method that reached the 10% precision required by end users in the estimation of Chl. In view of implementing the regressor into operational monitoring applications, here the portability of locally trained GPR models to other images was evaluated. The associated confidence maps proved to be a good indicator for evaluating the robustness of the trained models. Consistent retrievals were obtained across the different images, particularly over agricultural sites. To make the method suitable for operational use, however, the poorer confidences over bare soil areas suggest that the training dataset should be expanded with inputs from various land cover types.

  3. Evaluation of bone metabolism in newborn twins using quantitative ultrasound and biochemical parameters.

    PubMed

    Kara, Semra; Güzoğlu, Nilüfer; Göçer, Emine; Arıkan, Fatma Inci; Dilmen, Uğur; Dallar Bilge, Yıldız

    2016-03-01

    Metabolic bone disease (MBD) is one of the important complications of prematurity. Early and adequate nutritional interventions may reduce the incidence and potential complications of MBD. The present study aimed to evaluate bone metabolism in twins via biochemical parameters and quantitative ultrasound (QUS) and to compare the results between twin pairs. Moreover, twin infants were evaluated in terms of potential risk factors likely to have impact on MBD. Forty-three pairs of twins were included in the study. Serum calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and alkaline phosphatase concentrations were assessed and bone mineral density was measured using QUS (speed of sound, SOS) at postnatal 30 d. Co-twin with the higher birth weight was assigned to Group 1 (n = 36) and the other twin was assigned to Group 2 (n = 36). Birth weight and head circumference were significantly higher in the infants of Group 1 compared with Group 2. No significant difference was found among the groups in terms of gender, history of resuscitation, length of stay in intensive care unit (ICU) or in the incubator, duration of total parenteral nutrition (TPN), type of nutrition, vitamin D use, biochemical parameters, and the SOS value. The factors likely to affect SOS, including type of pregnancy, maternal drug use, gender of infant, birth weight, head circumference at birth, gestational week, length of stay at the ICU, duration of TPN, type of nutrition, resuscitation, vitamin D use, and levels of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and alkaline phosphatase were entered into the model. The phosphorus level and the maternal drug use were found to be the factors that significantly reduced SOS, whereas pregnancy after assisted reproductive techniques was found to be a significant enhancing factor. PMID:25777793

  4. Evaluating the safety of intracameral bevacizumab application using oxidative stress and apoptotic parameters in corneal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Akal, Ali; Ulas, Turgay; Goncu, Tugba; Guldur, Muhammet Emin; Kocarslan, Sezen; Taskin, Abdullah; Sezen, Hatice; Ozkan, Kudret; Yilmaz, Omer Faruk; Buyukhatipoglu, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the possible effects of intracameral bevacizumab on oxidative stress parameters and apoptosis in corneal tissue. METHODS In total, 30 rats were assigned randomly into the following three groups of 10 rats each: a sham group (Group 1; n=10), a control group [Group 2; balanced salt solution (BSS) was administered at 0.01 mL; n=10], and a treatment group (Group 3; bevacizumab was administered at 0.25 mg/0.01 mL; n=10). The total antioxidant status (TAS) and the total oxidant status (TOS) in the corneal tissue and blood samples were measured, and the oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated. Additionally, corneal tissue histopathology was evaluated for caspase-3 and -8 staining and apoptotic activity. RESULTS In the blood samples, the TAS, TOS, and OSI levels were not significantly different (all P>0.05). Compared with the sham and control groups, the TOS and OSI levels in the corneal tissues were significantly different in the bevacizumab group (all P<0.05). No statistically significant differences were observed between the sham and control groups (all P>0.05). However, compared with the sham and control groups, greater immunohistochemical staining for caspases-3 and -8 and an elevated level of apoptotic activity were observed in the bevacizumab group. CONCLUSION This study revealed that intracameral bevacizumab injections seemed to be systemically safe but may have elicited local toxic effects in the corneal tissue, as indicated by the oxidative stress parameters and histopathological evaluations. PMID:26309865

  5. Evaluation and optimisation of propofol pharmacokinetic parameters in cats for target-controlled infusion.

    PubMed

    Cattai, A; Pilla, T; Cagnardi, P; Zonca, A; Franci, P

    2016-05-14

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a pharmacokinetic model-driven infusion of propofol in premedicated cats. In a first step, propofol (10 mg/kg) was administered intravenously over 60 seconds to induce anaesthesia for the elective neutering of seven healthy cats, premedicated intramuscularly with 0.3 mg/kg methadone, 0.01 mg/kg medetomidine and 2 mg/kg ketamine. Venous blood samples were collected over 240 minutes, and propofol concentrations were measured via a validated high-performance liquid chromatography assay. Selected pharmacokinetic parameters, determined by a three-compartment open linear model, were entered into a computer-controlled infusion pump (target-controlled infusion-1 (TCI-1)). In a second step, TCI-1 was used to induce and maintain general anaesthesia in nine cats undergoing neutering. Predicted and measured plasma concentrations of propofol were compared at specific time points. In a third step, the pharmacokinetic parameters were modified according to the results from the use of TCI-1 and were evaluated again in six cats. For this TCI-2 group, the median values of median performance error and median absolute performance error were -1.85 per cent and 29.67 per cent, respectively, indicating that it performed adequately. Neither hypotension nor respiratory depression was observed during TCI-1 and TCI-2. Mean anaesthesia time and time to extubation in the TCI-2 group were 73.90 (±20.29) and 8.04 (±5.46) minutes, respectively. PMID:27044652

  6. Evaluation of the Prostate Bed for Local Recurrence After Radical Prostatectomy Using Endorectal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Liauw, Stanley L.; Pitroda, Sean P.; Eggener, Scott E.; Stadler, Walter M.; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Vannier, Michael W.; Oto, Aytek

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To summarize the results of a 4-year period in which endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was considered for all men referred for salvage radiation therapy (RT) at a single academic center; to describe the incidence and location of locally recurrent disease in a contemporary cohort of men with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy (RP), and to identify prognostic variables associated with MRI findings in order to define which patients may have the highest yield of the study. Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2011, 88 men without clinically palpable disease underwent eMRI for detectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) after RP. The median interval between RP and eMRI was 32 months (interquartile range, 14-57 months), and the median PSA level was 0.30 ng/mL (interquartile range, 0.19-0.72 ng/mL). Magnetic resonance imaging scans consisting of T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging were evaluated for features consistent with local recurrence. The prostate bed was scored from 0-4, whereby 0 was definitely normal, 1 probably normal, 2 indeterminate, 3 probably abnormal, and 4 definitely abnormal. Local recurrence was defined as having a score of 3-4. Results: Local recurrence was identified in 21 men (24%). Abnormalities were best appreciated on T2-weighted axial images (90%) as focal hypointense lesions. Recurrence locations were perianastomotic (67%) or retrovesical (33%). The only risk factor associated with local recurrence was PSA; recurrence was seen in 37% of men with PSA >0.3 ng/mL vs 13% if PSA {<=}0.3 ng/mL (P<.01). The median volume of recurrence was 0.26 cm{sup 3} and was directly associated with PSA (r=0.5, P=.02). The correlation between MRI-based tumor volume and PSA was even stronger in men with positive margins (r=0.8, P<.01). Conclusions: Endorectal MRI can define areas of local recurrence after RP in a minority of men without clinical evidence of disease, with yield related to PSA

  7. Modifications in Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Parameters After α-Particle-Emitting {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab Therapy of HER2-Expressing Ovarian Cancer Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Heyerdahl, Helen; Røe, Kathrine; Brevik, Ellen Mengshoel; Dahle, Jostein

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of α-particle-emitting {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab radioimmunotherapy on tumor vasculature to increase the knowledge about the mechanisms of action of {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab. Methods and Materials: Human HER2-expressing SKOV-3 ovarian cancer xenografts were grown bilaterally in athymic nude mice. Mice with tumor volumes 253 ± 36 mm{sup 3} (mean ± SEM) were treated with a single injection of either {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab at a dose of 1000 kBq/kg body weight (treated group, n=14 tumors) or 0.9% NaCl (control group, n=10 tumors). Dynamic T1-weighted contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) was used to study the effect of {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab on tumor vasculature. DCEMRI was performed before treatment and 1, 2, and 3 weeks after therapy. Tumor contrast-enhancement curves were extracted voxel by voxel and fitted to the Brix pharmacokinetic model. Pharmacokinetic parameters for the tumors that underwent radioimmunotherapy were compared with the corresponding parameters of control tumors. Results: Significant increases of k{sub ep}, the rate constant of diffusion from the extravascular extracellular space to the plasma (P<.05), and k{sub el,} the rate of clearance of contrast agent from the plasma (P<.01), were seen in the radioimmunotherapy group 2 and 3 weeks after injection, compared with the control group. The product of k{sub ep} and the amplitude parameter A, associated with increased vessel permeability and perfusion, was also significantly increased in the radioimmunotherapy group 2 and 3 weeks after injection (P<.01). Conclusions: Pharmacokinetic modeling of MRI contrast-enhancement curves evidenced significant alterations in parameters associated with increased tumor vessel permeability and tumor perfusion after {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab treatment of HER2-expressing ovarian cancer xenografts.

  8. ESTIMATES OF GENETIC PARAMETERS AND AN EVALUATION OF GENOTYPE X ENVIRONMENT INTERACTION FOR WEANING WEIGHT IN NELLORE CATTLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Records of 105,645 Nellore calves born from 1977 to 1994 in eight different regions of Brazil were used to estimate genetic parameters for weaning weight (kg). The objective of this study was to estimate genetic and environmental parameters and evaluate genotype x environment interaction for weaning...

  9. Evaluation of an active magnetic resonance tracking system for interstitial brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Pan, Li; Tokuda, Junichi; Schmidt, Ehud J.; Seethamraju, Ravi T.; Dumoulin, Charles L.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In gynecologic cancers, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the modality of choice for visualizing tumors and their surroundings because of superior soft-tissue contrast. Real-time MR guidance of catheter placement in interstitial brachytherapy facilitates target coverage, and would be further improved by providing intraprocedural estimates of dosimetric coverage. A major obstacle to intraprocedural dosimetry is the time needed for catheter trajectory reconstruction. Herein the authors evaluate an active MR tracking (MRTR) system which provides rapid catheter tip localization and trajectory reconstruction. The authors assess the reliability and spatial accuracy of the MRTR system in comparison to standard catheter digitization using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CT. Methods: The MRTR system includes a stylet with microcoils mounted on its shaft, which can be inserted into brachytherapy catheters and tracked by a dedicated MRTR sequence. Catheter tip localization errors of the MRTR system and their dependence on catheter locations and orientation inside the MR scanner were quantified with a water phantom. The distances between the tracked tip positions of the MRTR stylet and the predefined ground-truth tip positions were calculated for measurements performed at seven locations and with nine orientations. To evaluate catheter trajectory reconstruction, fifteen brachytherapy catheters were placed into a gel phantom with an embedded catheter fixation framework, with parallel or crossed paths. The MRTR stylet was then inserted sequentially into each catheter. During the removal of the MRTR stylet from within each catheter, a MRTR measurement was performed at 40 Hz to acquire the instantaneous stylet tip position, resulting in a series of three-dimensional (3D) positions along the catheter’s trajectory. A 3D polynomial curve was fit to the tracked positions for each catheter, and equally spaced dwell points were then generated along the curve. High

  10. Evaluation of an active magnetic resonance tracking system for interstitial brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Damato, Antonio L.; Chen, Yue; Tse, Zion; Pan, Li; Tokuda, Junichi; Seethamraju, Ravi T.; Dumoulin, Charles L.; Schmidt, Ehud J.; Cormack, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In gynecologic cancers, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the modality of choice for visualizing tumors and their surroundings because of superior soft-tissue contrast. Real-time MR guidance of catheter placement in interstitial brachytherapy facilitates target coverage, and would be further improved by providing intraprocedural estimates of dosimetric coverage. A major obstacle to intraprocedural dosimetry is the time needed for catheter trajectory reconstruction. Herein the authors evaluate an active MR tracking (MRTR) system which provides rapid catheter tip localization and trajectory reconstruction. The authors assess the reliability and spatial accuracy of the MRTR system in comparison to standard catheter digitization using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CT. Methods: The MRTR system includes a stylet with microcoils mounted on its shaft, which can be inserted into brachytherapy catheters and tracked by a dedicated MRTR sequence. Catheter tip localization errors of the MRTR system and their dependence on catheter locations and orientation inside the MR scanner were quantified with a water phantom. The distances between the tracked tip positions of the MRTR stylet and the predefined ground-truth tip positions were calculated for measurements performed at seven locations and with nine orientations. To evaluate catheter trajectory reconstruction, fifteen brachytherapy catheters were placed into a gel phantom with an embedded catheter fixation framework, with parallel or crossed paths. The MRTR stylet was then inserted sequentially into each catheter. During the removal of the MRTR stylet from within each catheter, a MRTR measurement was performed at 40 Hz to acquire the instantaneous stylet tip position, resulting in a series of three-dimensional (3D) positions along the catheter’s trajectory. A 3D polynomial curve was fit to the tracked positions for each catheter, and equally spaced dwell points were then generated along the curve. High

  11. A laser gyro with a four-mirror square resonator: quantitative estimation of the dependence of the synchronisation zone parameters of the frequencies of counterpropagating waves on the active-medium gain

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, Evgenii A

    2012-05-31

    For a laser gyro with a four-mirror square resonator (with a perimeter of 20 cm) we have calculated, on the basis of the previously developed [see Bondarenko E.A. Quantum Electron., 41, 824 (2011)] model, the dependence of the parameters of the synchronisation zone of the frequencies of counterpropagating waves on the active-medium gain. The results obtained are in qualitative agreement with known experimental data for gyroscopes with three-mirror resonators.

  12. In vivo quantitative evaluation of vascular parameters for angiogenesis based on sparse principal component analysis and aggregated boosted trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fengjun; Liu, Junting; Qu, Xiaochao; Xu, Xianhui; Chen, Xueli; Yang, Xiang; Cao, Feng; Liang, Jimin; Tian, Jie

    2014-12-01

    To solve the multicollinearity issue and unequal contribution of vascular parameters for the quantification of angiogenesis, we developed a quantification evaluation method of vascular parameters for angiogenesis based on in vivo micro-CT imaging of hindlimb ischemic model mice. Taking vascular volume as the ground truth parameter, nine vascular parameters were first assembled into sparse principal components (PCs) to reduce the multicolinearity issue. Aggregated boosted trees (ABTs) were then employed to analyze the importance of vascular parameters for the quantification of angiogenesis via the loadings of sparse PCs. The results demonstrated that vascular volume was mainly characterized by vascular area, vascular junction, connectivity density, segment number and vascular length, which indicated they were the key vascular parameters for the quantification of angiogenesis. The proposed quantitative evaluation method was compared with both the ABTs directly using the nine vascular parameters and Pearson correlation, which were consistent. In contrast to the ABTs directly using the vascular parameters, the proposed method can select all the key vascular parameters simultaneously, because all the key vascular parameters were assembled into the sparse PCs with the highest relative importance.

  13. Quantifiable Imaging Biomarkers for Evaluation of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament Using 3-T Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Katharine J.; Surowiec, Rachel K.; Ho, Charles P.; Devitt, Brian M.; Fripp, Jurgen; Smith, W. Sean; Spiegl, Ulrich J.; Dornan, Grant J.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as T2 and T2 star (T2*) mapping, have been used to evaluate ligamentous tissue in vitro and to identify significant changes in structural integrity of a healing ligament. These studies lay the foundation for a clinical study that uses quantitative mapping to evaluate ligaments in vivo, particularly the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). To establish quantitative mapping as a clinical tool for identifying and evaluating chronic or acute PCL injuries, T2 and T2* values first must be determined for an asymptomatic population. Purpose: To quantify T2 and T2* mapping properties, including texture variables (entropy, variance, contrast, homogeneity), of the PCL in an asymptomatic population. It was hypothesized that biomarker values would be consistent throughout the ligament, as measured across 3 clinically relevant subregions (proximal, middle, and distal thirds) in the asymptomatic cohort. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Unilateral knee MRI scans were acquired for 25 asymptomatic subjects with a 3.0-T MRI system using T2 and T2* mapping sequences in the sagittal plane. The PCL was manually segmented and divided into thirds (proximal, middle, and distal). Summary statistics for T2 and T2* values were calculated. Intra- and interrater reliability was assessed across 3 raters to 2 time points. Results: The asymptomatic PCL cohort had mean T2 values of 36.7, 29.2, and 29.6 ms in the distal, middle, and proximal regions, respectively. The distal PCL exhibited significantly higher mean, variance, and contrast and lower homogeneity of T2 values than the middle and proximal subregions (P < .05). T2* results exhibited substantial positive skew and were therefore presented as median and quartile (Q) values. Median T2* values were 7.3 ms (Q1-Q3, 6.8-8.9 ms), 7.3 ms (Q1-Q3, 7.0-8.5 ms), and 7.3 ms (Q1-Q3, 6.4-8.2 ms) in the distal, middle, and proximal subregions

  14. Fiber-optic sensors for monitoring patient physiological parameters: a review of applicable technologies and relevance to use during magnetic resonance imaging procedures.

    PubMed

    Dziuda, Łukasz

    2015-01-01

    The issues involved with recording vital functions in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment using fiber-optic sensors are considered in this paper. Basic physiological parameters, such as respiration and heart rate, are fundamental for predicting the risk of anxiety, panic, and claustrophobic episodes in patients undergoing MRI examinations. Electronic transducers are generally hazardous to the patient and are prone to erroneous operation in heavily electromagnetically penetrated MRI environments; however, nonmetallic fiber-optic sensors are inherently immune to electromagnetic effects and will be crucial for acquiring the above-mentioned physiological parameters. Forty-seven MRI-tested or potentially MRI-compatible sensors have appeared in the literature over the last 20 years. The author classifies these sensors into several categories and subcategories, depending on the sensing element placement, method of application, and measure and type. The author includes five in-house-designed fiber Bragg grating based sensors and shares experience in acquiring physiological measurements during MRI scans. This paper aims to systematize the knowledge of fiber-optic techniques for recording life functions and to indicate the current directions of development in this area. PMID:25594625

  15. Fiber-optic sensors for monitoring patient physiological parameters: a review of applicable technologies and relevance to use during magnetic resonance imaging procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziuda, Łukasz

    2015-01-01

    The issues involved with recording vital functions in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment using fiber-optic sensors are considered in this paper. Basic physiological parameters, such as respiration and heart rate, are fundamental for predicting the risk of anxiety, panic, and claustrophobic episodes in patients undergoing MRI examinations. Electronic transducers are generally hazardous to the patient and are prone to erroneous operation in heavily electromagnetically penetrated MRI environments; however, nonmetallic fiber-optic sensors are inherently immune to electromagnetic effects and will be crucial for acquiring the above-mentioned physiological parameters. Forty-seven MRI-tested or potentially MRI-compatible sensors have appeared in the literature over the last 20 years. The author classifies these sensors into several categories and subcategories, depending on the sensing element placement, method of application, and measurand type. The author includes five in-house-designed fiber Bragg grating based sensors and shares experience in acquiring physiological measurements during MRI scans. This paper aims to systematize the knowledge of fiber-optic techniques for recording life functions and to indicate the current directions of development in this area.

  16. An analytical method for estimating the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance parameters of organic compounds with complex free induction decays for radiation effects studies

    SciTech Connect

    Iselin, L.H.

    1992-12-31

    The use of {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as a radiation dosimetry tool has only recently been explored. An analytical method for analyzing {sup 14}N NQR complex free induction decays is presented with the background necessary to conduct pulsed NQR experiments. The {sup 14}N NQR energy levels and possible transitions are derived in step-by-step detail. The components of a pulsed NQR spectrometer are discussed along with the experimental techniques for conducting radiation effects experiments using the spectrometer. Three data analysis techniques -- the power spectral density Fourier transform, state space singular value decomposition (HSVD), and nonlinear curve fitting (using the downhill simplex method of global optimization and the Levenberg-Marquart method) -- are explained. These three techniques are integrated into an analytical method which uses these numerical techniques in this order to determine the physical NQR parameters. Sample data sets of urea and guanidine sulfate data are used to demonstrate how these methods can be employed to analyze both simple and complex free induction decays. By determining baseline values for biologically significant organics, radiation effects on the NQR parameters can be studied to provide a link between current radiation dosimetry techniques and the biological effects of radiation.

  17. Evaluation of partial widths and branching ratios from resonance wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Goldzak, Tamar; Gilary, Ido; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2010-11-15

    A quantum system in a given resonance state has different open channels for decay. Partial widths are the decay rates of the resonance (metastable) state into the different open channels. Here we present a rigorous derivation of the partial widths from the solution of a time-dependent Schroedinger equation with outgoing boundary conditions. We show that the sum of the partial widths obtained from the resonance wave function is equal to the total width. The difference with respect to previous studies on partial widths and branching ratios is discussed.

  18. Aerobic Training after Myocardial Infarction: Remodeling Evaluated by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Izeli, Nataly Lino; dos Santos, Aurélia Juliana; Crescêncio, Júlio César; Gonçalves, Ana Clara Campagnolo Real; Papa, Valéria; Marques, Fabiana; Pazin-Filho, Antônio; Gallo-Júnior, Lourenço; Schmidt, André

    2016-01-01

    Background Numerous studies show the benefits of exercise training after myocardial infarction (MI). Nevertheless, the effects on function and remodeling are still controversial. Objectives To evaluate, in patients after (MI), the effects of aerobic exercise of moderate intensity on ventricular remodeling by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). Methods 26 male patients, 52.9 ± 7.9 years, after a first MI, were assigned to groups: trained group (TG), 18; and control group (CG), 8. The TG performed supervised aerobic exercise on treadmill twice a week, and unsupervised sessions on 2 additional days per week, for at least 3 months. Laboratory tests, anthropometric measurements, resting heart rate (HR), exercise test, and CMR were conducted at baseline and follow-up. Results The TG showed a 10.8% reduction in fasting blood glucose (p = 0.01), and a 7.3-bpm reduction in resting HR in both sitting and supine positions (p < 0.0001). There was an increase in oxygen uptake only in the TG (35.4 ± 8.1 to 49.1 ± 9.6 mL/kg/min, p < 0.0001). There was a statistically significant decrease in the TG left ventricular mass (LVmass) (128.7 ± 38.9 to 117.2 ± 27.2 g, p = 0.0032). There were no statistically significant changes in the values of left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) and ejection fraction in the groups. The LVmass/EDV ratio demonstrated a statistically significant positive remodeling in the TG (p = 0.015). Conclusions Aerobic exercise of moderate intensity improved physical capacity and other cardiovascular variables. A positive remodeling was identified in the TG, where a left ventricular diastolic dimension increase was associated with LVmass reduction. PMID:26959403

  19. Further Evaluation of the Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) Technique for Assaying Plutonium in Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    J. W. Sterbentz; D. L. Chichester

    2011-09-01

    This is an end-of-year report (Fiscal Year (FY) 2011) for the second year of effort on a project funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241). The goal of this project is to investigate the feasibility of using Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) to assay plutonium in commercial light-water-reactor spent fuel. This project is part of a larger research effort within the Next-Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) to evaluate methods for assaying plutonium in spent fuel, the Plutonium Assay Challenge. The second-year goals for this project included: (1) assessing the neutron source strength needed for the NRTA technique, (2) estimating count times, (3) assessing the effect of temperature on the transmitted signal, (4) estimating plutonium content in a spent fuel assembly, (5) providing a preliminary assessment of the neutron detectors, and (6) documenting this work in an end of the year report (this report). Research teams at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and at several universities are also working to investigate plutonium assay methods for spent-fuel safeguards. While the NRTA technique is well proven in the scientific literature for assaying individual spent fuel pins, it is a newcomer to the current NGSI efforts studying Pu assay method techniques having just started in March 2010; several analytical techniques have been under investigation within this program for two to three years or more. This report summarizes work performed over a nine month period from January-September 2011 and is to be considered a follow-on or add-on report to our previous published summary report from December 2010 (INL/EXT-10-20620).

  20. Magnetic Resonance Image Evaluation of Temporomandibular Joint Osteophytes: Influence of Clinical Factors and Artrogenics Changes.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Eduardo; Remedi, Marcelo Pereira; Ferreira, Luciano Ambrosio; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires

    2016-03-01

    This research aims to examine the presence of osteophyte in patients with arthrogenic temporomandibular disorders through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); to investigate the influence of sex and clinical symptoms in its prevalence; and the position of the osteophytes in the condyle. The study was based on 100 MRI and on reports of patients, which corresponded to the evaluation of 200 joints. Patients of both sexes were aged from 18 to 82 years (average = 49.48) and were subjected to the aforementioned examination from January 2006 to March 2009. The assessment considered the type of disc displacement, the presence of effusion, bone marrow edema, condyle changes, joint noise and pain. The MRI machine used was the GE Signa HDX (General Electric, Milwaukee, WI), with T1 and T2-weighted, 1.5 T magnetic field, sagittal oblique (mouth closed, mouth open) and coronal (mouth closed) imaging, with spherical surface coil and an asymmetric matrix. All images were interpreted by an experienced radiologist. A total of 28% (n = 56) of the temporomandibular joints showed osteophytes on the anterior surface of the mandible. No relationship was found between sex and osteophytes. The authors found a statistically significant difference between osteophytes and disc displacement without reduction (P < 0.001). The presence of osteophytes suggested a possible cause and effect relationship between osteoarthritis and disc displacement without reduction; the osteophyte was always located in the anterior surface of condyle, regardless of the sex variable; no significant difference was found between osteophytes and the main complaints of the patient. PMID:26825745

  1. Active control of the volume acquisition noise in functional magnetic resonance imaging: Method and psychoacoustical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, John; Akeroyd, Michael A.; Summerfield, A. Quentin; Palmer, Alan R.

    2001-12-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a noninvasive tool for observing correlates of neural activity in the brain while a subject listens to sound. However, intense acoustic noise is generated in the process of capturing MR images. This noise stimulates the auditory nervous system, limiting the dynamic range available for displaying stimulus-driven activity. The noise is potentially damaging to hearing and is distracting for the subject. In an active noise control (ANC) system, a reference sample of a noise is processed to form a sound which adds destructively with the noise at the listener's ear. We describe an implementation of ANC in the electromagnetically hostile and physically compact MRI scanning environment. First, a prototype system was evaluated psychoacoustically in the laboratory, using the electrical drive to a noise-generating loudspeaker as the reference. This system produced 10-20 dB of subjective noise-reduction between 250 Hz and 1 kHz, and smaller amounts at higher frequencies. The system was modified to operate in a real MR scanner where the reference was obtained by recording the acoustic scanner noise. Objective reduction by 30-40 dB of the most intense component in scanner noises was realized between 500 Hz and 3500 Hz, and subjective reduction of 12 dB and 5 dB in tests at frequencies of 600 Hz and at 1.9 kHz, respectively. Although the benefit of ANC is limited by transmission paths to the cochlea other than air-conduction routes from the auditory meatus, ANC achieves worthwhile attenuation even in the frequency range of maximum bone conduction (1.5-2 kHz). ANC should, therefore, be generally useful during auditory fMRI.

  2. Implant stability evaluation by resonance frequency analysis in the fit lock technique. A clinical study.

    PubMed

    Falisi, Giovanni; Galli, Massimo; Velasquez, Pedro Vittorini; Rivera, Juan Carlos Gallegos; Di Paolo, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Surgical procedures for the application of implants in the lateral-superior sectors are affected by the availability of the residual bone. When this condition is lower than 5 mm it is recommended that techniques involving two therapeutic phases, a reconstructive and an applicative one, as reported in the international literature, are adopted. The authors propose here a new method with the potential to apply implants simultaneously with the reconstructive phase. The aim of this longitudinal retrospective study was to evaluate the stability of implants applied with the fit lock technique in the upper maxillarys in us with bone availability lower than 4 mm by measuring resonance frequency at different follow-up periods The seme as urements, carried out on 30 implants, were analysed with specific statistical procedures. The results indicate that the stability of the implants inserted with the fit lock method increases progressively over time in a statistically significant manner. The stability recorded after one year from the insertion (ISQ T2) is significantly higher than that recorded after six months (ISQ T1), and this is significantly higher than that recorded at the time of implant placement (ISQ T0). The implants inserted in the maxillary zones with scarce bone availability and applied with this technique showed a similar stability as reported with other techniques. In light of the results, the authors confirm that the primary stability represents the basic requirement to guarantee a correct healing of the implant and demonstrate that the fit lock technique also all ows reaching this condition when bone availability is minimal. PMID:23991271

  3. Evaluation of Angiographic and Technical Aspects of Carotid Stenting with Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blasel, Stella Hattingen, Elke; Berkefeld, Joachim; Kurre, Wiebke; Morawe, Gerald; Zanella, Friedhelm; Rochemont, Richard Du Mesnil de

    2009-07-15

    The detection of clinically silent ischemic lesions on postprocedural diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images has become a preferred method for the description of embolic risks. The purpose of this single-center study was to evaluate whether diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) could determine material related or technical risk factors of filter-protected carotid stenting. Eighty-four patients with symptomatic severe ({>=}60%) carotid artery stenoses received filter-protected carotid stenting. Standard DWI (b = 1000) was performed within 48 h before and after carotid stenting. The occurrence and load of new postinterventional DWI lesions were assessed. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine risk factors associated with DWI lesions, with emphasis on technical factors such as use of different access devices (guiding catheter method vs. long carotid sheath method), type of stent (open-cell nitinol stent vs. closed-cell Wallstent), and protective device (filters with 80-{mu}m vs. 110-120-{mu}m pore size). Markers for generalized atherosclerosis and for degree and site of stenosis were assessed to allow comparison of adequate risk profiles. Access, protective device, and stent type were not significantly associated with new embolic DWI lesions when we compared patients with equivalent risk profiles (long carotid sheath method 48% [11 of 23] vs. guiding catheter method 44% [27 of 61], Wallstent 47% [15 of 32] vs. nitinol stent 44% [23 of 52], and small pore size filter 61% [11 of 18] vs. large pore size filter 41% [27 of 66]). Single-center DWI studies with a moderate number of cases are inadequate for proper assessment of the embolic risk of technical- or material-related risk factors in carotid stenting. Larger multicenter studies with more cases are needed.

  4. Implementation and evaluation of simultaneous video-electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Umair J; Kokkinos, Vasileios; Carmichael, David W; Rodionov, Roman; Gasston, David; Duncan, John S; Lemieux, Louis

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate that the addition of simultaneous and synchronised video to electroencephalography (EEG)-correlated functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) could increase recorded information without data quality reduction. We investigated the effect of placing EEG, video equipment and their required power supplies inside the scanner room, on EEG, video and MRI data quality, and evaluated video-EEG-fMRI by modelling a hand motor task. Gradient-echo, echo-planner images (EPI) were acquired on a 3-T MRI scanner at variable camera positions in a test object [with and without radiofrequency (RF) excitation], and human subjects. EEG was recorded using a commercial MR-compatible 64-channel cap and amplifiers. Video recording was performed using a two-camera custom-made system with EEG synchronization. An in-house script was used to calculate signal to fluctuation noise ratio (SFNR) from EPI in test object with variable camera positions and in human subjects with and without concurrent video recording. Five subjects were investigated with video-EEG-fMRI while performing hand motor task. The fMRI time series data was analysed using statistical parametric mapping, by building block design general linear models which were paradigm prescribed and video based. Introduction of the cameras did not alter the SFNR significantly, nor did it show any signs of spike noise during RF off conditions. Video and EEG quality also did not show any significant artefact. The Statistical Parametric Mapping{T} maps from video based design revealed additional blood oxygen level-dependent responses in the expected locations for non-compliant subjects compared to the paradigm prescribed design. We conclude that video-EEG-fMRI set up can be implemented without affecting the data quality significantly and may provide valuable information on behaviour to enhance the analysis of fMRI data. PMID:20233646

  5. Evaluation of a quantitative magnetic resonance imaging system for whole body composition analysis in rodents.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Joshua P; Zhang, Minzhi; Wang, ChuanFeng; Kuskowski, Michael A; Novak, Colleen M; Levine, James A; Billington, Charles J; Kotz, Catherine M

    2010-08-01

    We evaluated the EchoMRI-900 combination rat and mouse quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) body composition method in comparison to traditional whole-body chemical carcass composition analysis (CCA) for measurements of fat and fat-free mass in rodents. Live and postmortem (PM) QMR fat and lean mass measurements were obtained for lean, obese and outbred strains of rats and mice, and compared with measurements obtained using CCA. A second group of rats was measured before and after 18 h food or water deprivation. Significant positive correlations between QMR and CCA fat and lean mass measurements were shown for rats and mice. Although all live QMR fat and lean measurements were more precise than CCA for rats, values obtained for mice significantly differed from CCA for lean mass only. QMR performed PM slightly overestimated fat and lean values relative to live QMR but did not show lower precision than live QMR. Food deprivation reduced values for both fat and lean mass; water deprivation reduced estimates of lean mass only. In summary, all measurements using this QMR system were comparable to those obtained by CCA, but with higher overall precision, similar to previous reports for the murine QMR system. However, PM QMR measurements slightly overestimated live QMR values, and lean and fat mass measurements in this QMR system are influenced by hydration status and animal size, respectively. Despite these caveats, we conclude that the EchoMRI QMR system offers a fast in vivo method of body composition analysis, well correlated to but with greater overall precision than CCA. PMID:20057373

  6. Quantitative evaluation of ozone and selected climate parameters in a set of EMAC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righi, M.; Eyring, V.; Gottschaldt, K.-D.; Klinger, C.; Frank, F.; Jöckel, P.; Cionni, I.

    2015-03-01

    Four simulations with the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model have been evaluated with the Earth System Model Validation Tool (ESMValTool) to identify differences in simulated ozone and selected climate parameters that resulted from (i) different setups of the EMAC model (nudged vs. free-running) and (ii) different boundary conditions (emissions, sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and sea ice concentrations (SICs)). To assess the relative performance of the simulations, quantitative performance metrics are calculated consistently for the climate parameters and ozone. This is important for the interpretation of the evaluation results since biases in climate can impact on biases in chemistry and vice versa. The observational data sets used for the evaluation include ozonesonde and aircraft data, meteorological reanalyses and satellite measurements. The results from a previous EMAC evaluation of a model simulation with nudging towards realistic meteorology in the troposphere have been compared to new simulations with different model setups and updated emission data sets in free-running time slice and nudged quasi chemistry-transport model (QCTM) mode. The latter two configurations are particularly important for chemistry-climate projections and for the quantification of individual sources (e.g., the transport sector) that lead to small chemical perturbations of the climate system, respectively. With the exception of some specific features which are detailed in this study, no large differences that could be related to the different setups (nudged vs. free-running) of the EMAC simulations were found, which offers the possibility to evaluate and improve the overall model with the help of shorter nudged simulations. The main differences between the two setups is a better representation of the tropospheric and stratospheric temperature in the nudged simulations, which also better reproduce stratospheric water vapor concentrations, due to the improved simulation of

  7. Quantitative evaluation of ozone and selected climate parameters in a set of EMAC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righi, M.; Eyring, V.; Gottschaldt, K.-D.; Klinger, C.; Frank, F.; Jöckel, P.; Cionni, I.

    2014-10-01

    Four simulations with the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model have been evaluated with the Earth System Model Validation Tool (ESMValTool) to identify differences in simulated ozone and selected climate parameters that resulted from (i) different setups of the EMAC model (nudged vs. free-running) and (ii) different boundary conditions (emissions, sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and sea-ice concentrations (SICs)). To assess the relative performance of the simulations, quantitative performance metrics are calculated consistently for the climate parameters and ozone. This is important for the interpretation of the evaluation results since biases in climate can impact on biases in chemistry and vice versa. The observational datasets used for the evaluation include ozonesonde and aircraft data, meteorological reanalyses and satellite measurements. The results from a previous EMAC evaluation of a model simulation with weak nudging towards realistic meteorology in the troposphere have been compared to new simulations with different model setups and updated emission datasets in free-running timeslice and nudged Quasi Chemistry-Transport Model (QCTM) mode. The latter two configurations are particularly important for chemistry-climate projections and for the quantification of individual sources (e.g. transport sector) that lead to small chemical perturbations of the climate system, respectively. With the exception of some specific features which are detailed in this study, no large differences that could be related to the different setups of the EMAC simulations (nudged vs. free-running) were found, which offers the possibility to evaluate and improve the overall model with the help of shorter nudged simulations. The main differences between the two setups is a better representation of the tropospheric and stratospheric temperature in the nudged simulations, which also better reproduce stratospheric water vapour concentrations, due to the improved simulation of

  8. Evaluation of the dosimetric parameters for 125I brachytherapy determined in prostate medium using CT images.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Takashi; Yorozu, Atsunori; Ohashi, Toshio; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Maruyama, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, the prostate medium determined from the CT images of 149 patients was developed. The dosimetric parameters such as Λ, g(L)(r) and F(r, θ) used in TG-43U1-based calculation for an iodine-125 ((125)I) brachytherapy-source were examined using Monte Carlo code Geant4. Clinical dosimetry parameters such as the D(90) were evaluated among a subgroup of 50 randomly selected patients who had been treated with permanent brachytherapy between January 2008 and December 2008 at the Tokyo Medical Center. The results show a slight difference in the dose rate constant Λ (within 1.0%). The radial dose function g(L)(r) exhibits a prominent difference in the region over 3 cm, and this difference is maintained within 2.9% in the region close to the source. The calculated values of F(r, θ) for the prostate medium were similar to values for water (within 1%), except in the longitudinal axis. A comparison of D(90) values shows a systematic dose overestimation of 2.8 ± 0.7 Gy in water, where the distribution of the differences can be seen with a spread of 1.8 ± 0.3% compared to that in prostate medium. It was concluded that the introduction of any kind of tissue correction for the TG-43U1-based calculation was not necessary to allow for the differences in elemental compositions and densities between water and prostate medium. PACS number: 87.00.00; 87.55.dk; 87.55.K-; 87.56.B-. PMID:20921822

  9. LUMPED-PARAMETER MODEL ANALYSES OF DATA FROM THE 1992 NEW HOUSE EVALUATION PROJECT - FLORIDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents analyses of Phase 2 data from the Florida Radon Research Program's New House Evaluation Project (NHEP) that were performed using a lumped-parameter model. The houses evaluated in Phase 2 were monitored by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) and the Univers...

  10. Use of Noninvasive Parameters to Evaluate Swiss Webster Mice During Trypanosoma cruzi Experimental Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Campos, Jerônimo D S; Hoppe, Luanda Y; Duque, Thabata L A; de Castro, Solange Lisboa; Oliveira, Gabriel M

    2016-04-01

    Until now, there has been neither an agreed-upon experimental model nor descriptors of the clinical symptoms that occur over the course of acute murine infection. The aim of this work is to use noninvasive methods to evaluate clinical signs in Swiss Webster mice that were experimentally infected with the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi during acute phase (Inf group). Infected mice showed evident clinical changes beginning in the second week of infection (wpi) when compared to the noninfected group (NI): (1) animals in hunched postures, closed eyes, lowered ears, peeling skin, increased piloerection, prostration, and social isolation; (2) significant decrease in body weight (Inf: 26.2 ± 2.6 g vs. NI: 34.2 ± 2.5 g) and in chow (1.5 ± 0.3 vs. 6.3 ± 0.5 mg) and water (2.4 ± 0.5 vs. 5.8 ± 0.7 ml) intake; (3) significant decrease of spontaneous activity as locomotor parameters: distance (0.64 ± 0.06 vs. 1.8 ± 0.13 m), velocity (1.9 ± 0.3 vs. 6.7 ± 1.5 cm/sec), and exploratory behavior by frequency (1.0 ± 0.5 vs. 5.7 ± 1.0 events) and duration (1.4 ± 0.3 vs. 5.1 ± 0.5 sec in central arena region); (4) significant increase in the PR (41.7 ± 8.7 vs. 27.6 ± 1.9 msec) and QT intervals (39.7 ± 2.0 vs. 27.5 ± 4.0 msec), and a decreased cardiac frequency (505 ± 52.8 vs. 774 ± 17.8 msec), showing a marked sinus bradycardia and an atrioventricular block. At 3 and 4 wpi, the surviving animals showed a tendency of recovery in body weight, food intake, locomotor activity, and exploratory interest. Through the use of noninvasive parameters, we were able to monitor the severity of the infection in individuals prior to death. Our perspective is the application of noninvasive methods to describe clinical signs over the course of acute infection complementing the preclinical evaluation of new agents, alone or in combination with benznidazole. PMID:26741817

  11. Trabecular bone structural parameters evaluated using dental cone-beam computed tomography: cellular synthetic bones

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study compared the adequacy of dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and micro computed tomography (micro-CT) in evaluating the structural parameters of trabecular bones. Methods The cellular synthetic bones in 4 density groups (Groups 1–4: 0.12, 0.16, 0.20, and 0.32 g/cm3) were used in this study. Each group comprised 8 experimental specimens that were approximately 1 cm3. Dental CBCT and micro-CT scans were conducted on each specimen to obtain independent measurements of the following 4 trabecular bone structural parameters: bone volume fraction (BV/TV), specific bone surface (BS/BV), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th.), and trabecular separation (Tb.Sp.). Wilcoxon signed ranks tests were used to compare the measurement variations between the dental CBCT and micro-CT scans. A Spearman analysis was conducted to calculate the correlation coefficients (r) of the dental CBCT and micro-CT measurements. Results and Conclusion Of the 4 groups, the BV/TV and Tb.Th. measured using dental CBCT were larger compared with those measured using micro-CT. By contrast, the BS/BV measured using dental CBCT was significantly less compared with those measured using micro-CT. Furthermore, in the low-density groups (Groups 1 and 2), the Tb.Sp. measured using dental CBCT was smaller compared with those measured using micro-CT. However, the Tb.Sp. measured using dental CBCT was slightly larger in the high-density groups (Groups 3 and 4) than it was in the low density groups. The correlation coefficients between the BV/TV, BS/BV, Tb.Th., and Tb.Sp. values measured using dental CBCT and micro-CT were 0.9296 (p < .001), 0.8061 (p < .001), 0.9390 (p < .001), and 0.9583 (p < .001), respectively. Although the dental CBCT and micro-CT approaches exhibited high correlations, the absolute values of BV/TV, BS/BV, Tb.Th., Tb.Sp. differed significantly between these measurements. Additional studies must be conducted to evaluate using dental CBCT in clinical practice. PMID

  12. Evaluation of Parameter Uncertainty Reduction in Groundwater Flow Modeling Using Multiple Environmental Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, B. W.; Gardner, P.

    2013-12-01

    Calibration of groundwater flow models for the purpose of evaluating flow and aquifer heterogeneity typically uses observations of hydraulic head in wells and appropriate boundary conditions. Environmental tracers have a wide variety of decay rates and input signals in recharge, resulting in a potentially broad source of additional information to constrain flow rates and heterogeneity. A numerical study was conducted to evaluate the reduction in uncertainty during model calibration using observations of various environmental tracers and combinations of tracers. A synthetic data set was constructed by simulating steady groundwater flow and transient tracer transport in a high-resolution, 2-D aquifer with heterogeneous permeability and porosity using the PFLOTRAN software code. Data on pressure and tracer concentration were extracted at well locations and then used as observations for automated calibration of a flow and transport model using the pilot point method and the PEST code. Optimization runs were performed to estimate parameter values of permeability at 30 pilot points in the model domain for cases using 42 observations of: 1) pressure, 2) pressure and CFC11 concentrations, 3) pressure and Ar-39 concentrations, and 4) pressure, CFC11, Ar-39, tritium, and He-3 concentrations. Results show significantly lower uncertainty, as indicated by the 95% linear confidence intervals, in permeability values at the pilot points for cases including observations of environmental tracer concentrations. The average linear uncertainty range for permeability at the pilot points using pressure observations alone is 4.6 orders of magnitude, using pressure and CFC11 concentrations is 1.6 orders of magnitude, using pressure and Ar-39 concentrations is 0.9 order of magnitude, and using pressure, CFC11, Ar-39, tritium, and He-3 concentrations is 1.0 order of magnitude. Data on Ar-39 concentrations result in the greatest parameter uncertainty reduction because its half-life of 269

  13. Cardiac sarcoidosis evaluated with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance and contrast-enhanced 64-slice computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Smedema, Jan-Peter; Truter, Rene; de Klerk, Petra A; Zaaiman, Leonie; White, Leonie; Doubell, Anton F

    2006-09-20

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system granulomatous disorder of unknown etiology with symptomatic cardiac involvement in up to 7% of patients. The clinical features of sarcoid heart disease include congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, conduction disturbances, and sudden death. We evaluated the value of contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography in delineating myocardial scar and granulomatous inflammation by comparing our findings with gadolinium magnetic resonance in a patient diagnosed with cardiac sarcoidosis. PMID:16257460

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Evaluation of Developmental Delay in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Naziya P.; Murthy, G.S.N.; Nori, Madhavi; Abkari, Anand; Pooja, B.K.; Venkateswarlu, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Developmental delay is defined as significant delay in one or more developmental domains. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is the best modality to investigate such patients. Evaluation of a child with developmental delay is important not only because it allows early diagnosis and treatment but also helpful for parental counseling regarding the outcome of their child and to identify any possible risk of recurrence in the siblings. Thus this study was undertaken to evaluate the developmental delay in Indian children which will help the clinicians in providing an estimation of the child’s ultimate developmental potential and organize specific treatment requirement and also relieve parental apprehension. Aims and Objectives: To study the prevalence of normal and abnormal MRI in pediatric patients presenting with developmental delay and further categorize the abnormal MRI based on its morphological features. Materials and Methods: It is a prospective, observational & descriptive study of MRI Brain in 81 paediatric patients (46 Males and 35 Females), aged between three months to 12 years; presenting with developmental delay in Deccan College of Medical Sciences, Hyderabad; over a period of three years (Sept 2011 to Sept 2014). MRI brain was done on 1.5T Siemens Magnetom Essenza & 0.35T Magnetom C with appropriate sequences and planes after making the child sleep/sedated/ anesthetized. Various anatomical structures like Ventricles, Corpus callosum, etc were systematically assessed. The MRI findings were divided into various aetiological subgroups. Results: Normal MRI findings were seen in 32% cases and 68% had abnormal findings of which the proportion of Traumatic/ Neurovascular Diseases, Congenital & Developmental, Metabolic and Degenerative, neoplastic and non specific were 31%, 17%, 10%, 2.5% and 7.5% respectively. The ventricles and white matter mainly the corpus callosum were the most commonly affected anatomical structures. The diagnostic yield was

  15. Is echocardiography or magnetic resonance imaging superior for precoarctation angioplasty evaluation?

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, A M; Banerjee, A; Donnelly, L F; Schwartz, D C

    1997-09-01

    We compared the dimensions of the aorta obtained by two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography (echo) (median, 2.5 mo preangioplasty) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (median, 4.2 mo preangioplasty) to those obtained by angiography (cath) in 13 patients (age, 7.7 +/- 1.6 yr; mean +/- SEM) who underwent evaluation for coarctation balloon angioplasty between April 1993-January 1996. Echo measurements were obtained from the suprasternal and subcostal sagittal planes, MRI measurements from axial and sagittal oblique views, and cath measurements from the straight lateral or oblique views. Measurements of the diameters of the aortic isthmus, coarctation, descending aorta at the diaphragm, and isthmus length were made by all three modalities. Presence of aorto-aortic collaterals was determined, and the coarctation length was delineated. Investigators were blinded to other measurement data prior to statistical analysis. Data analysis by repeated analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls testing revealed no statistically significant difference between systolic pressure gradient by clinical examination (32.2 +/- 5.9 mm Hg), peak instantaneous Doppler evaluation (37.5 +/- 2.9 mm Hg), or preangioplasty systolic pressure gradient (32.1 +/- 3.3 mm Hg). With the exception of measurements of the descending aorta (echo, 11.7 +/- 0.9 mm vs. MRI, 13.3 +/- 0.8 mm vs. cath, 14.0 +/- 1.3 mm; P = 0.04), there was no statistically significant difference in dimensions of the aortic isthmus (9.2 +/- 0.6 mm vs. 10.5 +/- 0.9 mm vs. 10.8 +/- 0.9 mm), coarctation site diameter (4.8 +/- 0.6 mm vs. 5.6 +/- 0.9 mm vs. 5.3 +/- 0.8 mm), or isthmus length (12.4 +/- 2.1 mm vs. 12.1 +/- 2.2 mm vs. 10.9 +/- 1.7 mm). The correlation coefficients derived from comparisons of MRI vs. cath to echo vs. cath were similar for all dimensions except for isthmus length (P < 0.01). MRI demonstrated aorto-aortic collaterals more frequently than echo, while echocardiography better demonstrated

  16. Interference effect in the dipole and nondipole anisotropy parameters of the Kr 4p photoelectrons in the vicinity of the Kr (3d){sup -1{yields}}np resonant excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Ricz, S.; Ricsoka, T.; Holste, K.; Borovik, A. Jr.; Bernhardt, D.; Schippers, S.; Mueller, A.; Koever, A.; Varga, D.

    2010-04-15

    The angular distribution of the Kr 4p photoelectrons was investigated in the photon energy range of the (3d){sup -1{yields}}np resonant excitations. The experimental dipole ({beta}) and nondipole ({gamma} and {delta}) anisotropy parameters were determined for the spin-orbit components of the Kr 4p shell. A simple theoretical model was developed for the description of the photoionization and excitation processes. An interference effect was observed between the direct photoionization and the resonant excitation participator Auger decay processes in the photon energy dependence of the experimental anisotropy parameters.

  17. ICA analysis of fMRI with real-time constraints: an evaluation of fast detection performance as function of algorithms, parameters and a priori conditions

    PubMed Central

    Soldati, Nicola; Calhoun, Vince D.; Bruzzone, Lorenzo; Jovicich, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) techniques offer a data-driven possibility to analyze brain functional MRI data in real-time. Typical ICA methods used in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), however, have been until now mostly developed and optimized for the off-line case in which all data is available. Real-time experiments are ill-posed for ICA in that several constraints are added: limited data, limited analysis time and dynamic changes in the data and computational speed. Previous studies have shown that particular choices of ICA parameters can be used to monitor real-time fMRI (rt-fMRI) brain activation, but it is unknown how other choices would perform. In this rt-fMRI simulation study we investigate and compare the performance of 14 different publicly available ICA algorithms systematically sampling different growing window lengths (WLs), model order (MO) as well as a priori conditions (none, spatial or temporal). Performance is evaluated by computing the spatial and temporal correlation to a target component as well as computation time. Four algorithms are identified as best performing (constrained ICA, fastICA, amuse, and evd), with their corresponding parameter choices. Both spatial and temporal priors are found to provide equal or improved performances in similarity to the target compared with their off-line counterpart, with greatly reduced computation costs. This study suggests parameter choices that can be further investigated in a sliding-window approach for a rt-fMRI experiment. PMID:23378835

  18. Practice Parameters for the Clinical Evaluation and Treatment of Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Morgenthaler, Timothy I.; Lee-Chiong, Teofilo; Alessi, Cathy; Friedman, Leah; Aurora, R. Nisha; Boehlecke, Brian; Brown, Terry; Chesson, Andrew L.; Kapur, Vishesh; Maganti, Rama; Owens, Judith; Pancer, Jeffrey; Swick, Todd J.; Zak, Rochelle

    2007-01-01

    The expanding science of circadian rhythm biology and a growing literature in human clinical research on circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSDs) prompted the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) to convene a task force of experts to write a review of this important topic. Due to the extensive nature of the disorders covered, the review was written in two sections. The first review paper, in addition to providing a general introduction to circadian biology, addresses “exogenous” circadian rhythm sleep disorders, including shift work disorder (SWD) and jet lag disorder (JLD). The second review paper addresses the “endogenous” circadian rhythm sleep disorders, including advanced sleep phase disorder (ASPD), delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD), irregular sleep-wake rhythm (ISWR), and the non–24-hour sleep-wake syndrome (nonentrained type) or free-running disorder (FRD). These practice parameters were developed by the Standards of Practice Committee and reviewed and approved by the Board of Directors of the AASM to present recommendations for the assessment and treatment of CRSDs based on the two accompanying comprehensive reviews. The main diagnostic tools considered include sleep logs, actigraphy, the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ), circadian phase markers, and polysomnography. Use of a sleep log or diary is indicated in the assessment of patients with a suspected circadian rhythm sleep disorder (Guideline). Actigraphy is indicated to assist in evaluation of patients suspected of circadian rhythm disorders (strength of recommendation varies from “Option” to “Guideline,” depending on the suspected CRSD). Polysomnography is not routinely indicated for the diagnosis of CRSDs, but may be indicated to rule out another primary sleep disorder (Standard). There is insufficient evidence to justify the use of MEQ for the routine clinical evaluation of CRSDs (Option). Circadian phase markers are useful to determine circadian phase and confirm

  19. Objective evaluation of two deworming regimens in young Thoroughbreds using parasitological and performance parameters.

    PubMed

    Bellaw, Jennifer L; Pagan, Joe; Cadell, Steve; Phethean, Eileen; Donecker, John M; Nielsen, Martin K

    2016-05-15

    Parasitic helminths of equids are capable of causing ill-thrift, clinical disease, and death. Although young horses are the most susceptible to parasitic disease and are the most intensively treated cohort, deworming regimens are rarely evaluated within this age group. This study objectively evaluated the impact of deworming regimen on fecal egg counts (FECs), growth rates, and body-condition scores in young Thoroughbreds. Forty-eight Thoroughbred foals from three central Kentucky farms were randomly allocated to two treatment groups: an interval dose program receiving bi-monthly rotations of pyrantel pamoate and ivermectin and a daily deworming group receiving daily rations of pyrantel tartrate feed additive throughout the study, oxibendazole at two months of age, and moxidectin treatments at 9.5 and 16.5 months of age. Pre- and post-treatment eggs per gram of feces (EPGs) of Parascaris spp. and strongyle family parasites, gel/paste dewormer efficacies, and monthly weights and body condition scores were collected. Ascarid and strongyle FECs were not significantly different between groups but were significantly influenced by horse age with strongyle counts continually increasing and ascarid counts peaking at 4.5 months of age. Reduced strongyle efficacies of ivermectin and moxidectin were observed on two farms with consistently low pyrantel pamoate efficacies on all three farms. Ivermectin also exhibited reduced ascarid efficacy. Average daily gain did not differ significantly between groups and was only significantly influenced by age, mirroring average daily gain reference data for Kentucky Thoroughbreds born in 2013. Body condition scores also did not differ between groups, remaining in the optimal range (5-6) for the duration of the study. Management practices resulting in growth rates matching the reference data and in optimal body condition scores compensate for the negative impacts of parasitism even in cases of reduced drug efficacy. Performance parameters

  20. 2H nuclear magnetic resonance order parameter profiles suggest a change of molecular shape for phosphatidylcholines containing a polyunsaturated acyl chain.

    PubMed Central

    Holte, L. L.; Peter, S. A.; Sinnwell, T. M.; Gawrisch, K.

    1995-01-01

    Solid-state 2H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine the orientational order parameter profiles for a series of phosphatidylcholines with perdeuterated stearic acid, 18:0d35, in position sn-1 and 18:1 omega 9, 18:2 omega 6, 18:3 omega 3, 20:4 omega 6, 20:5 omega 3, or 22:6 omega 3 in position sn-2. The main phase transition temperatures were derived from a first moment analysis, and order parameter profiles of sn-1 chains were calculated from dePaked nuclear magnetic resonance powder patterns. Comparison of the profiles at 37 degrees C showed that unsaturation causes an inhomogenous disordering along the sn-1 chain. Increasing sn-2 chain unsaturation from one to six double bonds resulted in a 1.6-kHz decrease in quadrupolar splittings of the sn-1 chain in the upper half of the chain (or plateau region) and maximum splitting difference of 4.4 kHz at methylene carbon 14. The change in chain order corresponds to a decrease in the 18:0 chain length of 0.4 +/- 0.2 A with 18:2 omega 6 versus 18:1 omega 9 in position sn-2. Fatty acids containing three or more double bonds in sn-2 showed a decrease in sn-1 chain length of 0.7 +/- 0.2 A compared with 18:1 omega 9. The chain length of all lipids decreased with increasing temperature. Highly unsaturated phosphatidylcholines (three or more double bonds in sn-2) had shorter sn-1 chains, but the chain length was somewhat less sensitive to temperature. The profiles reveal that the sn-1 chain exhibits a selective increase in motional freedom in a region located toward the bottom half of the chain as sn-2 unsaturation is increased. This corresponds to an area increase around carbon atom number 14 that is three to four times greater than the increase for the top part of the chain. A similar asymmetric decrease in order, largest toward the methyl end of the chain, was observed when 1 -palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylethanolamine goes from a lamellar to an inverse hexagonal (H,,) phase. This is consistent with a

  1. Estimation of parameters for evaluating subsurface microcracks in glass with in-line digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiupin; Gao, Wanrong; He, Yong

    2016-01-20

    In this work, a new method for imaging subsurface damage (SSD) is proposed, which is, to the best of our knowledge, the first application of the in-line digital holographic microscopy (IDHM) to the reconstruction of the subsurface damage in glass. By combination of the in-line arrangement and an objective lens to image the hologram on the CCD surface, the method is characterized by its high resolution in both the lateral and depth directions. Then the three-dimensional reconstruction of the microcracks within the glass was realized by numerically focusing en-face images at different depths, and the sizes of SSD along the transversal and depth directions were estimated. Based on the experimental results, the cracks can be divided into two categories: one is that the cracks begin from the surface of optical elements, the other is totally within the components. To indicate the propagation or development trajectory of the cracks and predict the magnitude of the laser-induced damage threshold, the relative intensity distributions of the light scattered by the cracks compared with the ones without cracks were also reconstructed. In this case all the required parameters for evaluating SSD are obtained with our IDHM system, so that the SSD produced in the manufacturing process can be reduced or removed more easily to optimize the performance of the optical component and extend its lifetime. These results provide the guidance for the optical system design of precision measurements. PMID:26835955

  2. Evaluating the Spatio-Temporal Factors that Structure Network Parameters of Plant-Herbivore Interactions

    PubMed Central

    López-Carretero, Antonio; Díaz-Castelazo, Cecilia; Boege, Karina; Rico-Gray, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    Despite the dynamic nature of ecological interactions, most studies on species networks offer static representations of their structure, constraining our understanding of the ecological mechanisms involved in their spatio-temporal stability. This is the first study to evaluate plant-herbivore interaction networks on a small spatio-temporal scale. Specifically, we simultaneously assessed the effect of host plant availability, habitat complexity and seasonality on the structure of plant-herbivore networks in a coastal tropical ecosystem. Our results revealed that changes in the host plant community resulting from seasonality and habitat structure are reflected not only in the herbivore community, but also in the emergent properties (network parameters) of the plant-herbivore interaction network such as connectance, selectiveness and modularity. Habitat conditions and periods that are most stressful favored the presence of less selective and susceptible herbivore species, resulting in increased connectance within networks. In contrast, the high degree of selectivennes (i.e. interaction specialization) and modularity of the networks under less stressful conditions was promoted by the diversification in resource use by herbivores. By analyzing networks at a small spatio-temporal scale we identified the ecological factors structuring this network such as habitat complexity and seasonality. Our research offers new evidence on the role of abiotic and biotic factors in the variation of the properties of species interaction networks. PMID:25340790

  3. Low-level laser therapy on skeletal muscle inflammation: evaluation of irradiation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantineo, Matías; Pinheiro, João P.; Morgado, António M.

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated the effect of different irradiation parameters in low-level laser therapy (LLLT) for treating inflammation induced in the gastrocnemius muscle of rats through cytokines concentration in systemic blood and analysis of muscle tissue. We used continuous (830 and 980 nm) and pulsed illuminations (830 nm). Animals were divided into five groups per wavelength (10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 mW), and a control group. LLLT was applied during 5 days with a constant irradiation time and area. TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-2, and IL-6 cytokines were quantified by ELISA. Inflammatory cells were counted using microscopy. Identical methodology was used with pulsed illumination. Average power (40 mW) and duty cycle were kept constant (80%) at five frequencies (5, 25, 50, 100, and 200 Hz). For continuous irradiation, treatment effects occurred for all doses, with a reduction of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 cytokines and inflammatory cells. Continuous irradiation at 830 nm was more effective, a result explained by the action spectrum of cytochrome c oxidase (CCO). Best results were obtained for 40 mW, with data suggesting a biphasic dose response. Pulsed wave irradiation was only effective for higher frequencies, a result that might be related to the rate constants of the CCO internal electron transfer process.

  4. Evaluation of control parameters for Spray-In-Air (SIA) aqueous cleaning for shuttle RSRM hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. J.; Deweese, C. D.

    1995-01-01

    HD-2 grease is deliberately applied to Shuttle Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) D6AC steel hardware parts as a temporary protective coating for storage and shipping. This HD-2 grease is the most common form of surface contamination on RSRM hardware and must be removed prior to subsequent surface treatment. Failure to achieve an acceptable level of cleanliness (HD-2 calcium grease removal) is a common cause of defect incidence. Common failures from ineffective cleaning include poor adhesion of surface coatings, reduced bond performance of structural adhesives, and failure to pass cleanliness inspection standards. The RSRM hardware is currently cleaned and refurbished using methyl chloroform (1,1,1-trichloroethane). This chlorinated solvent is mandated for elimination due to its ozone depleting characteristics. This report describes an experimental study of an aqueous cleaning system (which uses Brulin 815 GD) as a replacement for methyl chloroform. Evaluation of process control parameters for this cleaner are discussed as well as cleaning mechanisms for a spray-in-air process.

  5. Stability evaluation of parameter estimation of multi-Rayleigh model for ultrasound B-mode image of liver fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Shohei; Ohashi, Minori; Hirata, Shinnosuke; Hachiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    A diagnosis of liver fibrosis using an ultrasound B-mode image has the advantages of real-time observation and noninvasive properties. In our previous study, a multi-Rayleigh model was proposed to express a probability density function (PDF) of echo amplitudes from a fibrotic liver. From the multi-Rayleigh model, fibrosis parameters, such as the amount of fibrotic tissue and its progressive ratio, can be extracted. To quantitatively evaluate liver fibrosis using the multi-Rayleigh model, it is important to evaluate the stability of the estimation method of multi-Rayleigh model parameters. In this study, a numerical simulation using random variables following the multi-Rayleigh model was performed and the estimation stability of the parameters of the multi-Rayleigh model with two components was examined. From the simulation results, it was found that estimation becomes unstable under a certain condition owing to statistical variations of moments, which are inputs in the estimation algorithm. The instability of estimated parameters could be evaluated by focusing on changes in moments upon changes in multi-Rayleigh model parameters. It was indicated that we can evaluate the reliability of the estimated parameters of the multi-Rayleigh model only from the estimated values.

  6. Estimation of Ecosystem Parameters of the Community Land Model with DREAM: Evaluation of the Potential for Upscaling Net Ecosystem Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks Franssen, H. J.; Post, H.; Vrugt, J. A.; Fox, A. M.; Baatz, R.; Kumbhar, P.; Vereecken, H.

    2015-12-01

    Estimation of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) by land surface models is strongly affected by uncertain ecosystem parameters and initial conditions. A possible approach is the estimation of plant functional type (PFT) specific parameters for sites with measurement data like NEE and application of the parameters at other sites with the same PFT and no measurements. This upscaling strategy was evaluated in this work for sites in Germany and France. Ecosystem parameters and initial conditions were estimated with NEE-time series of one year length, or a time series of only one season. The DREAM(zs) algorithm was used for the estimation of parameters and initial conditions. DREAM(zs) is not limited to Gaussian distributions and can condition to large time series of measurement data simultaneously. DREAM(zs) was used in combination with the Community Land Model (CLM) v4.5. Parameter estimates were evaluated by model predictions at the same site for an independent verification period. In addition, the parameter estimates were evaluated at other, independent sites situated >500km away with the same PFT. The main conclusions are: i) simulations with estimated parameters reproduced better the NEE measurement data in the verification periods, including the annual NEE-sum (23% improvement), annual NEE-cycle and average diurnal NEE course (error reduction by factor 1,6); ii) estimated parameters based on seasonal NEE-data outperformed estimated parameters based on yearly data; iii) in addition, those seasonal parameters were often also significantly different from their yearly equivalents; iv) estimated parameters were significantly different if initial conditions were estimated together with the parameters. We conclude that estimated PFT-specific parameters improve land surface model predictions significantly at independent verification sites and for independent verification periods so that their potential for upscaling is demonstrated. However, simulation results also indicate

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance using electronic referencing: method validation and evaluation of the measurement uncertainties for the quantification of benzoic acid in orange juice.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Bruno C; de Carvalho, Lucas J

    2015-02-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance measurements have become more popular over the last decade. The introduction of new methods and experimental parameters has been of fundamental importance in the development of new applications. Amongst these new developments is the introduction of electronic referencing for quantifications. The use of electronic referencing eliminates errors in the analyses as a result of weighting of internal standards as well as undesired problems as a result of the solubility of the standards in the analyte solution and chemical interactions between the analyte and the internal standard. In this work, we have studied the quantification of a very important analyte in a food matrix, benzoic acid in orange juice, as a model to the validation and measurement uncertainty estimation of electronic referencing using (1)H NMR in food analyses. The referencing method applied was the pulse length-based concentration measurement. Method was validated and showed good results for the precision and accuracy parameters evaluated. A certified reference material and a reference material candidate were analyzed, and extremely good results were obtained. Reported relative expanded uncertainties are in the 1.07-1.39% range that can be considered an extremely good performance for the analysis of a food complex matrix. Measurement uncertainty was evaluated by two different approaches, and the pulse calibrations for the samples and for the reference have been shown to account for approximately 80% of the total uncertainty of the measurement. PMID:25303142

  8. Evaluating Swallowing Muscles Essential for Hyolaryngeal Elevation by Using Muscle Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, William G.; Hindson, David F.; Langmore, Susan E.; Zumwalt, Ann C.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Reduced hyolaryngeal elevation, a critical event in swallowing, is associated with radiation therapy. Two muscle groups that suspend the hyoid, larynx, and pharynx have been proposed to elevate the hyolaryngeal complex: the suprahyoid and longitudinal pharyngeal muscles. Thought to assist both groups is the thyrohyoid, a muscle intrinsic to the hyolaryngeal complex. Intensity modulated radiation therapy guidelines designed to preserve structures important to swallowing currently exclude the suprahyoid and thyrohyoid muscles. This study used muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging (mfMRI) in normal healthy adults to determine whether both muscle groups are active in swallowing and to test therapeutic exercises thought to be specific to hyolaryngeal elevation. Methods and Materials: mfMRI data were acquired from 11 healthy subjects before and after normal swallowing and after swallowing exercise regimens (the Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide). Whole-muscle transverse relaxation time (T2 signal, measured in milliseconds) profiles of 7 test muscles were used to evaluate the physiologic response of each muscle to each condition. Changes in effect size (using the Cohen d measure) of whole-muscle T2 profiles were used to determine which muscles underlie swallowing and swallowing exercises. Results: Post-swallowing effect size changes (where a d value of >0.20 indicates significant activity during swallowing) for the T2 signal profile of the thyrohyoid was a d value of 0.09; a d value of 0.40 for the mylohyoid, 0.80 for the geniohyoid, 0.04 for the anterior digastric, and 0.25 for the posterior digastric-stylohyoid in the suprahyoid muscle group; and d values of 0.47 for the palatopharyngeus and 0.28 for the stylopharyngeus muscles in the longitudinal pharyngeal muscle group. The Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide swallowing exercises showed significant effect size changes for all muscles tested, except for the thyrohyoid. Conclusions

  9. A carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of inter-proton pair order parameters: a new approach to study order and dynamics in phospholipid membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Urbina, J A; Moreno, B; Arnold, W; Taron, C H; Orlean, P; Oldfield, E

    1998-09-01

    We report a simple new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic method to investigate order and dynamics in phospholipids in which inter-proton pair order parameters are derived by using high resolution 13C cross-polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR combined with 1H dipolar echo preparation. The resulting two-dimensional NMR spectra permit determination of the motionally averaged interpair second moment for protons attached to each resolved 13C site, from which the corresponding interpair order parameters can be deducted. A spin-lock mixing pulse before cross-polarization enables the detection of spin diffusion amongst the different regions of the lipid molecules. The method was applied to a variety of model membrane systems, including 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC)/sterol and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC)/sterol model membranes. The results agree well with previous studies using specifically deuterium labeled or predeuterated phospholipid molecules. It was also found that efficient spin diffusion takes place within the phospholipid acyl chains, and between the glycerol backbone and choline headgroup of these molecules. The experiment was also applied to biosynthetically 13C-labeled ergosterol incorporated into phosphatidylcholine bilayers. These results indicate highly restricted motions of both the sterol nucleus and the aliphatic side chain, and efficient spin exchange between these structurally dissimilar regions of the sterol molecule. Finally, studies were carried out in the lamellar liquid crystalline (L alpha) and inverted hexagonal (HII) phases of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE). These results indicated that phosphatidylethanolamine lamellar phases are more ordered than the equivalent phases of phosphatidylcholines. In the HII (inverted hexagonal) phase, despite the increased translational freedom, there is highly constrained packing of the lipid molecules, particularly in

  10. Estimate of interstellar helium parameters from Prognoz 6 and Voyager 1/2 - EUV resonance glow measurements taking into account a possible redshift in the solar line profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassefiere, E.; Dalaudier, F.; Bertaux, J. L.

    1988-07-01

    Voyager 1 and 2 observations at 58.4 nm are used to reanalyze the He I 58.4 nm interplanetary resonance glow measurements made by two EUV photometers aboard Prognoz 6. It is shown that model fitting using a low temperature (7000 + or - 2000 K) and velocity (21.5 + or - 2.5 km/s) resolves several contradictions concerning the physics of the coupling between neutrals and protons at the heliopause and the comparison with independent measurements of the solar line width. New solar parameter values of 36 + or - 6 km/s for the solar line half width at 1/e, 9 + or - 3 km/s for the redshift of the solar line, and 1.4 (+ 0.6 - 0.3) x 10 to the 7th for the lifetime are proposed. It is pointed out that if the redshift assumption is valid, a weak differentiation between helium and hydrogen at the heliospheric interface is implied.

  11. Measurement of the CP-Violation Parameter sin2Φ₁ with a New Tagging Method at the Υ(5S) Resonance

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sato, Y.; Yamamoto, H.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; et al

    2012-04-23

    We report a measurement of the CP-violation parameter sin2Φ₁ at the Υ(5S) resonance using a new tagging method, called “B-π tagging.” In Υ(5S) decays containing a neutral B meson, a charged B, and a charged pion, the neutral B is reconstructed in the J/ψK0SCP-eigenstate decay channel. The initial flavor of the neutral B meson at the moment of the Υ(5S) decay is opposite to that of the charged B and may thus be inferred from the charge of the pion without reconstructing the charged B. From the asymmetry between B-π⁺ and Bπ⁻ tagged J/ψK0S yields, we determine sin2Φ₁=0.57±0.58(stat)±0.06(syst). The resultsmore » are based on 121 fb⁻¹ of data recorded by the Belle detector at the KEKB e⁺e⁻ collider.« less

  12. Measurement of the CP-Violation Parameter sin2Φ₁ with a New Tagging Method at the Υ(5S) Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Y.; Yamamoto, H.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, P.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I.-S.; Cho, K.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Fast, J. E.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hyun, H. J.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwabuchi, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Julius, T.; Kapusta, P.; Kawasaki, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Kobayashi, N.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kumar, R.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Liu, C.; Liu, Z. Q.; Louvot, R.; McOnie, S.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Muramatsu, N.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nishida, S.; Nishimura, K.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Poluektov, A.; Röhrken, M.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sanuki, T.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Seidl, R.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Stypula, J.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tanaka, S.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Wicht, J.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamashita, Y.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2012-04-23

    We report a measurement of the CP-violation parameter sin2Φ₁ at the Υ(5S) resonance using a new tagging method, called “B-π tagging.” In Υ(5S) decays containing a neutral B meson, a charged B, and a charged pion, the neutral B is reconstructed in the J/ψK0SCP-eigenstate decay channel. The initial flavor of the neutral B meson at the moment of the Υ(5S) decay is opposite to that of the charged B and may thus be inferred from the charge of the pion without reconstructing the charged B. From the asymmetry between B-π⁺ and Bπ⁻ tagged J/ψK0S yields, we determine sin2Φ₁=0.57±0.58(stat)±0.06(syst). The results are based on 121 fb⁻¹ of data recorded by the Belle detector at the KEKB e⁺e⁻ collider.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging and BMB score in the evaluation of bone involvement in Gaucher’s disease patients*

    PubMed Central

    de Mello, Ricardo Andrade Fernandes; Mello, Melissa Bozzi Nonato; Pessanha, Laís Bastos

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate by magnetic resonance imaging changes in bone marrow of patients undergoing treatment for type I Gaucher’s disease. Materials and Methods Descriptive, cross-sectional study of Gaucher’s disease patients submitted to 3 T magnetic resonance imaging of femurs and lumbar spine. The images were blindly reviewed and the findings were classified according to the semiquantitative bone marrow burden (BMB) scoring system. Results All of the seven evaluated patients (three men and four women) presented signs of bone marrow infiltration. Osteonecrosis of the femoral head was found in three patients, Erlenmeyer flask deformity in five, and no patient had vertebral body collapse. The mean BMB score was 11, ranging from 9 to 14. Conclusion Magnetic resonance imaging is currently the method of choice for assessing bone involvement in Gaucher’s disease in adults due to its high sensitivity to detect both focal and diffuse bone marrow changes, and the BMB score is a simplified method for semiquantitative analysis, without depending on advanced sequences or sophisticated hardware, allowing for the classification of the disease extent and assisting in the treatment monitoring. PMID:26379319

  14. Evaluation of ventricular geometry and performance in congenital heart disease utilizing magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogel, Mark A.

    1994-05-01

    We have recently embarked on a systematic evaluation of the regional and global mechanical processes of the systemic, morphologic right ventricle (RV) which is in either a single or dual chambered circulation as well as single left ventricles (LV). An MRI tagging technique which lays down 2 sets of parallel stripes perpendicular to each other on the myocardium as well as standard cine MRI were utilized. Finite strain analysis was applied to the grid lines to derive principle strains and the motion of the intersection points were tracked through systole to determine regional radial shortening and twist. Cine sequences were used to derive the various parameters of ventricular geometry and performance as well as visualizing flow profiles in the aorta. We noted a marked decrease in vol, EF, and CO in the Fontan group of patients when compared to other surgical subgroups. It is hypothesized that atrial stiffening by surgical placement of baffles may contribute to the observed changes in ventricular mechanics. Aortic flow profiles in the reconstructed aorta were noted to be heterogenous across the aortic diameter.

  15. Evaluation of tropical water sources and mollusks in southern Brazil using microbiological, biochemical, and chemical parameters.

    PubMed

    Souza, Doris Sobral Marques; Ramos, Ana Paula Dores; Nunes, Fabrício Flores; Moresco, Vanessa; Taniguchi, Satie; Leal, Diego Averaldo Guiguet; Sasaki, Silvio Tarou; Bícego, Márcia Caruso; Montone, Rosalinda Carmela; Durigan, Maurício; Teixeira, Adriano Luiz; Pilotto, Mariana Rangel; Delfino, Nicésio; Franco, Regina Maura Bueno; Melo, Cláudio Manoel Rodrigues de; Bainy, Afonso Celso Dias; Barardi, Célia Regina Monte

    2012-02-01

    Florianópolis, a city located in the Santa Catarina State in southern Brazil, is the national leading producer of bivalve mollusks. The quality of bivalve mollusks is closely related to the sanitary conditions of surrounding waters where they are cultivated. Presently, cultivation areas receive large amounts of effluents derived mainly from treated and non-treated domestic, rural, and urban sewage. This contributes to the contamination of mollusks with trace metals, pesticides, other organic compounds, and human pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, and protozoan. The aim of this study was to perform a thorough diagnosis of the shellfish growing areas in Florianópolis, on the coast of Santa Catarina. The contamination levels of seawater, sediments, and oysters were evaluated for their microbiological, biochemical, and chemical parameters at five sea sites in Florianópolis, namely three regular oyster cultivation areas (Sites 1, 2, and oyster supplier), a polluted site (Site 3), and a heavily polluted site (Site 4). Samples were evaluated at day zero and after 14 days. Seawater and sediment samples were collected just once, at the end of the experiment. Antioxidant defenses, which may occur in contaminated environments in response to the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by organisms, were analyzed in oysters, as well as organic compounds (in oysters and sediment samples) and microbiological contamination (in oysters and seawater samples). The results showed the presence of the following contaminants: fecal coliforms in seawater samples (four sites), human adenovirus (all sites), human noroviruses GI and GII (two sites), Hepatitis A viruses (one site), JC Polyomavirus in an oyster sample from the oyster supplier, Giardia duodenalis cysts, and Cryptosporidium sp oocysts (one site). Among organochlorine pesticides, only DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) and HCH (hexachlorocyclohexane) were detected in some sediment and oysters samples in very

  16. Radiation Pneumonitis After Hypofractionated Radiotherapy: Evaluation of the LQ(L) Model and Different Dose Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Borst, Gerben R.; Ishikawa, Masayori; Nijkamp, Jasper

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the linear quadratic (LQ) model for hypofractionated radiotherapy within the context of predicting radiation pneumonitis (RP) and to investigate the effect if a linear (L) model in the high region (LQL model) is used. Methods and Materials: The radiation doses used for 128 patients treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy were converted to the equivalent doses given in fractions of 2 Gy for a range of {alpha}/{beta} ratios (1 Gy to infinity) according to the LQ(L) model. For the LQL model, different cut-off values between the LQ model and the linear component were used. The Lyman model parameters were fitted to the events of RP grade 2 or higher to derive the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). The lung dose was calculated as the mean lung dose and the percentage of lung volume (V) receiving doses higher than a threshold dose of xGy (V{sub x}). Results: The best NTCP fit was found if the mean lung dose, or V{sub x}, was calculated with an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3 Gy. The NTCP fit of other {alpha}/{beta} ratios and the LQL model were worse but within the 95% confidence interval of the NTCP fit of the LQ model with an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3 Gy. The V{sub 50} NTCP fit was better than the NTCP fit of lower threshold doses. Conclusions: For high fraction doses, the LQ model with an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3 Gy was the best method for converting the physical lung dose to predict RP.

  17. Systems based on photogrammetry to evaluation of built heritage: tentative guidelines and control parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valença, J.

    2014-06-01

    Technological innovations based on close-range imaging have arisen. The developments are related with both the advances in mathematical algorithms and acquisition equipment. This evolution allows to acquire data with large and powerful sensors and the fast and efficient processing of data. In general, the preservation of built heritage have applied these technological innovations very successfully in their different areas of intervention, namely, photogrammetry, digital image processing and multispectral image analysis. Furthermore, commercial packages of software and hardware have emerged. Thus, guidelines to best-practice procedures and to validate the results usually obtained should be established. Therefore, simple and easy to understand concepts, even for nonexperts in the field, should relate the characteristics of: (i) objects under study; (ii) acquisition conditions; (iii) methods applied; and (iv) equipment applied. In this scope, the limits of validity of the methods and a comprehensive protocol to achieve the required precision and accuracy for structural analysis is a mandatory task. Application of close-range photogrammetry to build 3D geometric models and for evaluation of displacements are herein presented. Parameters such as distance-to-object, sensor size and focal length, are correlated to the precision and accuracy achieved for displacement in both experimental and on site environment. This paper shows an early stage study. The aim consist in defining simple expressions to estimate the characteristics of the equipment and/or the conditions for image acquisition, depending on the required precision and accuracy. The results will be used to define tentative guidelines considered the all procedure, from image acquisition to final results of coordinates and displacements.

  18. Prospective evaluation of healthy Ragdoll cats for chronic kidney disease by routine laboratory parameters and ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Paepe, Dominique; Bavegems, Valérie; Combes, Anaïs; Saunders, Jimmy H; Daminet, Sylvie

    2013-10-01

    Ragdoll breeder organisations often forewarn Ragdoll cat owners that renal problems may develop as a result of polycystic kidney disease (PKD), chronic interstitial nephritis, familial renal dysplasia or nephrocalcinosis. Healthy Ragdoll and non-Ragdoll cats were prospectively evaluated by measuring serum creatinine and urea concentrations, routine urinalysis and abdominal ultrasonography. All Ragdoll cats also underwent genetic PKD testing. One hundred and thirty-three Ragdoll and 62 control cats were included. Ragdoll cats had significantly lower serum urea concentrations and higher urinary specific gravity. However, median creatinine concentration, median urinary protein-to-creatinine ratio, and the proportion of cats with serum creatinine or urea concentration exceeding the reference interval did not differ. One or more renal ultrasonographical changes were detected in 66/133 (49.6%) Ragdoll and in 25/62 (40%) control cats. Ragdoll cats showed significantly more frequent segmental cortical lesions (7.5% versus 0%), abnormal renal capsule (19.5% versus 8%) and echogenic urine (51.9% versus 25.8%). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) was ultrasonographically suspected in 7/133 (5.3%) Ragdoll and in none of the control cats, which approached significance. Laboratory parameters confirmed kidney dysfunction only in 1/7 of these Ragdoll cats. All Ragdoll cats were PKD negative. In conclusion, first, breed-specific serum creatinine reference intervals are not likely required for Ragdoll cats. Second, renal ultrasonographical abnormalities are common, both in Ragdoll and non-Ragdoll cats. Third, healthy young Ragdoll cats are uncommonly affected by PKD and CKD, but an increased susceptibility of Ragdoll cats to develop CKD cannot be excluded. Finally, Ragdoll cats are predisposed to segmental cortical lesions, which may indicate renal infarction or cortical scarring. PMID:23413268

  19. Evaluation of Sensitivity and Robustness of Geothermal Resource Parameters Using Detailed and Approximate Stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whealton, C.; Jordan, T. E.; Frone, Z. S.; Smith, J. D.; Horowitz, F. G.; Stedinger, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate assessment of the spatial variation of geothermal heat is key to distinguishing among locations for geothermal project development. Resource assessment over large areas can be accelerated by using existing subsurface data collected for other purposes, such as petroleum industry bottom-hole temperature (BHT) datasets. BHT data are notoriously noisy but in many sedimentary basins their abundance offsets the potential low quality of an individual BHT measurement. Analysis requires description of conductivity stratigraphy, which for thousands of wells with BHT values is daunting. For regional assessment, a streamlined method is to approximate the thickness and conductivity of each formation using a set of standard columns rescaled to the sediment thickness at a location. Surface heat flow and related geothermal resource metrics are estimated from these and additional parameters. This study uses Monte Carlo techniques to compare the accuracy and precision of thermal predictions at single locations by the streamlined approach to well-specific conductivity stratigraphy. For 77 wells distributed across the Appalachian Basin of NY, PA, and WV, local geological experts made available detailed information on unit thicknesses . For the streamlined method we used the Correlation of Stratigraphic Units of North America (COSUNA) columns. For both data sets, we described thermal conductivity of the strata using generic values or values from the geologically similar Anadarko Basin. The well-specific surface heat flow and temperature-at-depth were evaluated using a one-dimensional conductive heat flow model. This research addresses the sensitivity of the estimated geothermal output to the model inputs (BHT, thermal conductivity) and the robustness of the approximate stratigraphic column assumptions when estimating the geothermal output. This research was conducted as part of the Dept. of Energy Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis program.

  20. A laser gyro with a four-mirror square resonator: formulas for simulating the dynamics of the synchronisation zone parameters of the frequencies of counterpropagating waves during the device operation in the self-heating regime

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, E A

    2014-04-28

    For a laser gyro with a four-mirror square resonator we have developed a mathematical model, which allows one to simulate the temporal behaviour of the synchronisation zone parameters of the frequencies of counterpropagating waves in a situation when the device operates in the self-heating regime and is switched-on at different initial temperatures. (laser gyroscopes)

  1. Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy, as Applied to Nondestructive Evaluation and Characterization of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composite Materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Timothy Marvin

    1996-08-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) can be an elegantly simple nondestructive evaluation tool. The resonance spectrum of any specimen is dependent on, and sensitive at ppm levels to, its density, geometry, elastic and thermal properties, and boundary conditions. The measurement of spectrum is fast, taking between 15 and 90 seconds with state-of-the-art instrumentation, making it appropriate for following properties as a function of temperature. Parts per million changes in specimen density, geometry, elastic moduli, temperature, and boundary conditions are detected with RUS. A novel apparatus is presented for driving and detecting the mechanical resonance of objects with major dimensions ranging from 0.1 cm to 33 cm. The noise floor of the apparatus is characterized using a high Q titanium alloy and a low Q graphite/epoxy composite. The apparatus is used to measure the amplitude/frequency resonance spectra of right rectangular parallelepiped (RRP) specimens of four different lay-ups of AS4/3501-6 carbon fiber reinforced epoxy (CFRE) composite material at room temperature and at one degree C intervals between -177^circC and 25 ^circC. It is important to know the mechanical properties of this material at low temperatures for underwater, polar, and space applications. The temperature dependence of the second order elastic moduli are calculated from the resonance spectra of the AS4/3501-6 RRPs. High power ultrasound is used to enhance the cure of AS4/3501-6 CFRE composite. Composite panels are insonified through the caul plate, by a high power ultrasonic horn, while curing. Stiffness enhancements of five percent are observed. The resonance spectrum of a steel caul plate is used to monitor the degree of cure of AS4/3501-6 CFRE composite panels in real time. Because the curing composite acts to change the boundary conditions, the resonance spectrum changes as the composite cures. RUS is used to screen a variety of high precision engineered parts for mechanical defects

  2. Evaluation on two-port configuration of a Lamé-mode octagonal microelectromechanical systems resonator driven by sliding driving electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujishita, Katsuhiro; Tanigawa, Hiroshi; Furutsuka, Takashi; Suzuki, Kenichiro

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we report significant improvements for microelectromechanical system (MEMS) resonators. In our previous work, the reduction in gap between a driving electrode (DE) and a resonant plate was achieved by sliding DEs, showing a clear resonance at 12 MHz. However, it needed a large pull-in voltage and an elaborate measurement technique. In this study, we design soft springs for DEs and evaluate a two-port configuration to cancel feedthrough current. Measurement results show that the pull-in voltage is successfully decreased by one-third that for the previous resonator and a resonance is observed in a fabricated two-port circuit. Such a pull-in voltage can be sufficiently generated from a 2.5 V source in combination with a charge pump circuit. These results are useful for adopting the MEMS resonators to real applications.

  3. The Role of Magnetic Resonance Enterography in the Evaluation of Non-Crohn׳s Pathologies.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Nyree; Westerland, Olwen

    2016-08-01

    In the young patient population, magnetic resonance enterography is fast becoming a preferred imaging tool for the investigation of patients with non-Crohn׳s small bowel and mesenteric pathologies. Its advantages include lack of ionizing radiation and high-contrast resolution. This review discusses the range of small bowel and mesenteric pathologies that can be easily demonstrated with this technique. PMID:27342893

  4. Resonance Raman spectroscopic evaluation of skin carotenoids as a biomarker of carotenoid status for human studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resonance Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) is a non-invasive method that has been developed to assess carotenoid status in human tissues including human skin in vivo. Skin carotenoid status, as assessed by RRS, has been suggested as a promising biomarker for use in human studies. This manuscript describes...

  5. Radiation-Induced Damage to Microstructure of Parotid Gland: Evaluation Using High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, Tomoko; Kodani, Kazuhiko; Michimoto, Koichi; Fujii, Shinya; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To elucidate the radiation-induced damage to the microstructure of the parotid gland using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Methods and Materials: High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the parotid gland was performed before radiotherapy (RT) and during the RT period or {<=}3 weeks after RT completion for 12 head-and-neck cancer patients using a 1.5-T scanner with a microscopy coil. The maximal cross-sectional area of the gland was evaluated, and changes in the internal architecture of the gland were assessed both visually and quantitatively. Results: Magnetic resonance images were obtained at a median parotid gland dose of 36 Gy (range, 11-64). According to the quantitative analysis, the maximal cross-sectional area of the gland was reduced, the width of the main duct was narrowed, and the intensity ratio of the main duct lumen to background was significantly decreased after RT (p <.0001). According to the visual assessment, the width of the main duct tended to narrow and the contrast of the duct lumen tended to be decreased, but no significant differences were noted. The visibility of the duct branches was unclear in 10 patients (p = .039), and the septum became dense in 11 patients (p = .006) after RT. Conclusion: High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive method of evaluating radiation-induced changes to the internal architecture of the parotid gland. Morphologic changes in the irradiated parotid gland were demonstrated during the RT course even when a relatively small dose was delivered to the gland.

  6. Evaluating the Robustness of Graded Response Model and Classical Test Theory Parameter Estimates to Deviant Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinar, Evan F.; Zickar, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the influence of deviant scale items on item parameter estimates of focal scale items and person parameter estimates through a comparison of item response theory (IRT) and classical test theory (CTT) models. Used Monte Carlo methods to explore results from a pilot investigation of job attitude data. Discusses implications for researchers…

  7. Using an ensemble smoother to evaluate parameter uncertainty of an integrated hydrological model of Yanqi basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; McLaughlin, Dennis; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang; Li, WenPeng; Dong, XinGuang

    2015-10-01

    Model uncertainty needs to be quantified to provide objective assessments of the reliability of model predictions and of the risk associated with management decisions that rely on these predictions. This is particularly true in water resource studies that depend on model-based assessments of alternative management strategies. In recent decades, Bayesian data assimilation methods have been widely used in hydrology to assess uncertain model parameters and predictions. In this case study, a particular data assimilation algorithm, the Ensemble Smoother with Multiple Data Assimilation (ESMDA) (Emerick and Reynolds, 2012), is used to derive posterior samples of uncertain model parameters and forecasts for a distributed hydrological model of Yanqi basin, China. This model is constructed using MIKESHE/MIKE11software, which provides for coupling between surface and subsurface processes (DHI, 2011a-d). The random samples in the posterior parameter ensemble are obtained by using measurements to update 50 prior parameter samples generated with a Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) procedure. The posterior forecast samples are obtained from model runs that use the corresponding posterior parameter samples. Two iterative sample update methods are considered: one based on an a perturbed observation Kalman filter update and one based on a square root Kalman filter update. These alternatives give nearly the same results and converge in only two iterations. The uncertain parameters considered include hydraulic conductivities, drainage and river leakage factors, van Genuchten soil property parameters, and dispersion coefficients. The results show that the uncertainty in many of the parameters is reduced during the smoother updating process, reflecting information obtained from the observations. Some of the parameters are insensitive and do not benefit from measurement information. The correlation coefficients among certain parameters increase in each iteration, although they generally

  8. Evaluation of second-order texture parameters for sea ice classification from radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokr, Mohammed E.

    1991-06-01

    With the advent of airborne and spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems, sea ice classification from SAR images has become an important research subject. Since gray tone alone has proven to be of limited capability in differentiating ice types, texture has naturally become an attractive avenue to explore. Accordingly, performance of texture quantification parameters as related to their ability to discriminate ice types has to be examined. SAR image appearance depends on radar parameters involved in the image construction procedures from the doppler history record. Therefore the feasibility of using universal texture/ice type relationships that hold for all combinations of radar parameters also has to be investigated. To that end, imagery data from three different SAR systems were used in this study. Five conventional texture parameters, derived from the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), were examined. Two of them were modified to ensure their invariant character under linear gray tone transformations. Results indicated that all parameters were highly correlated. The parameters did not, in general, vary with the computational variables used in generating co-occurrence matrices. Ice types can be identified uniquely by the mean value of any texture parameter. The relatively high variability of texture parameters, however, confuses ice discrimination, particularly of smoother ice types. Ice classification was conducted using a per-pixel maximum likelihood supervised scheme. When texture was combined with gray tone, the overall average classification accuracy was improved. Texture was successful in improving the classification accuracy of multiyear ice but was less promising in discriminating first-season ice types. The best two GLCM texture parameters, according to the computed overall average classification accuracies, were the inverse difference moment and the entropy. A brief description of GLCM texture parameters as related to ice's physical

  9. Evaluation of Optical Quality Parameters and Ocular Aberrations in Multifocal Intraocular Lens Implanted Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hun; Lee, Kwanghyun; Ahn, Ji Min; Kim, Eung Kweon; Sgrignoli, Bradford

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the correlations between optical quality parameters obtained from the double-pass system and ocular aberrations obtained from the ray-tracing aberrometer in multifocal intraocular lens (IOL) implanted eyes. Materials and Methods Twenty eyes from 20 patients were enrolled in this study. Modulation transfer function cutoff frequency, The Strehl ratio, objective scatter index, and objective pseudo-accommodation obtained from the double-pass system were compared with root mean square (RMS) total aberration, RMS higher-order aberration, and spherical aberration obtained from the ray-tracing aberrometer. Additionally, parameters of the double-pass system and ray-tracing aberrometer were compared with manifested refraction values and subjective visual acuity, respectively. Results There was no statistically significant correlation between optical quality parameters obtained from the double-pass system and ocular aberrations, except between the Strehl ratio and RMS total aberration (r=-0.566, p=0.018). No significant correlations were found between the parameters of both devices, and manifested refraction values or subjective visual acuity. Conclusion Optical quality parameters, especially the Strehl ratio, in multifocal IOL implanted eyes were affected by RMS total aberration. Further studies based on accurate measurements of ocular aberrations and additional optical quality parameters are needed to delineate relationships between optical quality parameters and ocular aberrations in multifocal IOL implanted eyes. PMID:25048505

  10. Parasitic analysis and π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke model for complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor Lamb wave resonator with accurate two-port Y-parameter characterizations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Goh, Wang Ling; Chai, Kevin T-C; Mu, Xiaojing; Hong, Yan; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Je, Minkyu

    2016-04-01

    The parasitic effects from electromechanical resonance, coupling, and substrate losses were collected to derive a new two-port equivalent-circuit model for Lamb wave resonators, especially for those fabricated on silicon technology. The proposed model is a hybrid π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke (PiBVD) model that accounts for the above mentioned parasitic effects which are commonly observed in Lamb-wave resonators. It is a combination of interdigital capacitor of both plate capacitance and fringe capacitance, interdigital resistance, Ohmic losses in substrate, and the acoustic motional behavior of typical Modified Butterworth-Van Dyke (MBVD) model. In the case studies presented in this paper using two-port Y-parameters, the PiBVD model fitted significantly better than the typical MBVD model, strengthening the capability on characterizing both magnitude and phase of either Y11 or Y21. The accurate modelling on two-port Y-parameters makes the PiBVD model beneficial in the characterization of Lamb-wave resonators, providing accurate simulation to Lamb-wave resonators and oscillators. PMID:27131699

  11. Parasitic analysis and π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke model for complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor Lamb wave resonator with accurate two-port Y-parameter characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Goh, Wang Ling; Chai, Kevin T.-C.; Mu, Xiaojing; Hong, Yan; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Je, Minkyu

    2016-04-01

    The parasitic effects from electromechanical resonance, coupling, and substrate losses were collected to derive a new two-port equivalent-circuit model for Lamb wave resonators, especially for those fabricated on silicon technology. The proposed model is a hybrid π-type Butterworth-Van Dyke (PiBVD) model that accounts for the above mentioned parasitic effects which are commonly observed in Lamb-wave resonators. It is a combination of interdigital capacitor of both plate capacitance and fringe capacitance, interdigital resistance, Ohmic losses in substrate, and the acoustic motional behavior of typical Modified Butterworth-Van Dyke (MBVD) model. In the case studies presented in this paper using two-port Y-parameters, the PiBVD model fitted significantly better than the typical MBVD model, strengthening the capability on characterizing both magnitude and phase of either Y11 or Y21. The accurate modelling on two-port Y-parameters makes the PiBVD model beneficial in the characterization of Lamb-wave resonators, providing accurate simulation to Lamb-wave resonators and oscillators.

  12. Ultrasonic evaluation of the Jahn-Teller effect parameters. Application to ZnSe:Cr2 +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudkov, V. V.; Bersuker, I. B.; Zhevstovskikh, I. V.; Korostelin, Yu V.; Landman, A. I.

    2011-03-01

    A method is constructed that uses ultrasonic experiments to evaluate the parameters of the Jahn-Teller (JT) effect in impurity centers in crystals. The method is based on measurements of temperature dependent attenuation and phase velocity and does not require assumptions about mechanisms of relaxation. The results are illustrated by measurements performed on the impurity system ZnSe:Cr2 + , in which the Cr2 + ion has a threefold degenerate T term in the ground state, subject to the T\\otimes (e+t_2) JT problem. Ultrasound propagation anomalies show that the main JT distortions of the tetrahedral environment of the Cr2 + ion are of tetragonal E type and hence the lowest branch of the adiabatic potential energy surface (APES) is formed in accordance with the T\\otimes e problem. With dopant concentration 3.8 × 1018 cm - 3 the modulus of the constant of linear vibronic coupling to tetragonal E type vibrations is determined by two independent experiments: |FE| = 5.49 × 10 - 5 dyn revealed from attenuation measurements, while a slightly different value |FE| = 5.57 × 10 - 5 dyn emerges from phase velocity measurements. Contributions of other active vibronic modes to the elastic modulus Cl = (C11 + C12 + 2C44)/2 are analyzed and it is shown that the influence of the totally symmetric mode is negligible. Using additional information about this system obtained from independent sources, we also estimated the primary force constant in the E direction (KE≈(1.4-4.2) × 104 dyn cm - 1) and orthorhombic and trigonal saddle points of the APES in the five-dimensional space of the tetragonal and trigonal coordinates, their stabilization energies being EJTO≈81-450 cm - 1 and EJTT≈48-417 cm - 1, respectively (the variations of the KE, EJTO and EJTT values are due to different literature data for EJTE). With these data the APES of the JT linear T\\otimes (e+t_2) problem for the Cr2 + ion in the ZnSe:Cr2 + system is revealed.

  13. Bench-scale evaluation of drinking water treatment parameters on iron particles and water quality.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Safiur; Gagnon, Graham A

    2014-01-01

    Discoloration of water resulting from suspended iron particles is one of the main customer complaints received by water suppliers. However, understanding of the mechanisms of discoloration as well as role of materials involved in the process is limited. In this study, an array of bench scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the impact of the most common variables (pH, PO4, Cl2 and DOM) on the properties of iron particles and suspensions derived from the oxygenation of Fe(II) ions in NaHCO3 buffered synthetic water systems. The most important factors as well as their rank influencing iron suspension color and turbidity formation were identified for a range of water quality parameters. This was accomplished using a 2(4) full factorial design approach at a 95% confidence level. The statistical analysis revealed that phosphate was found to be the most significant factor to alter color (contribution: 37.9%) and turbidity (contribution: 45.5%) in an iron-water system. A comprehensive study revealed that phosphate and chlorine produced iron suspension with reduced color and turbidity, made ζ-potential more negative, reduced the average particle size, and increased iron suspension stability. In the presence of DOM, color was observed to increase but a reverse trend was observed to decrease the turbidity and to alter particle size distribution. HPSEC results suggest that higher molecular weight fractions of DOM tend to adsorb onto the surfaces of iron particles at early stages, resulting in alteration of the surface charge of iron particles. This in turn limits particles aggregation and makes iron colloids highly stable. In the presence of a phosphate based corrosion inhibitor, this study demonstrated that color and turbidity resulting from suspended iron were lower at a pH value of 6.5 (compared to pH of 8.5). The same trend was observed in presence of DOM. This study also suggested that iron colloid suspension color and turbidity in chlorinated drinking water

  14. Quantitative non-destructive evaluation of composite materials based on ultrasonic parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James G.

    1987-01-01

    Research into the nondestructive evaluation of advanced reinforced composite laminates is summarized. The applicability of the Framers-Kronig equations to the nondestructive evaluation of composite materials is described.

  15. Quantitative evaluation of blinking in surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering and fluorescence by electromagnetic mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Tamitake; Iga, Mitsuhiro; Tamaru, Hiroharu; Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Biju, Vasudevanpillai; Ishikawa, Mitsuru

    2012-01-01

    We analyze blinking in surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) and surface enhanced fluorescence (SEF) of rhodamine 6G molecules as intensity and spectral instability by electromagnetic (EM) mechanism. We find that irradiation of intense NIR laser pulses induces blinking in SERRS and SEF. Thanks to the finding, we systematically analyze SERRS and SEF from stable to unstable using single Ag nanoparticle (NP) dimers. The analysis reveals two physical insights into blinking as follows. (1) The intensity instability is inversely proportional to the enhancement factors of decay rate of molecules. The estimation using the proportionality suggests that separation of the molecules from Ag NP surfaces is several angstroms. (2) The spectral instability is induced by blueshifts in EM enhancement factors, which have spectral shapes similar to the plasmon resonance. This analysis provides us with a quantitative picture for intensity and spectral instability in SERRS and SEF within the framework of EM mechanism.

  16. Evaluation of Hydatid Disease of the Heart with Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kotoulas, Grigoris K.; Magoufis, George L.; Gouliamos, Athanasios D.; Athanassopoulou, Alexandra K.; Roussakis, Arcadios C.; Koulocheri, Dimitra P.; Kalovidouris, Angelos; Vlahos, Labros

    1996-05-15

    Two patients with cardiac involvement of hydatid disease are presented: one with hydatid cyst of the interventricular septum and pulmonary arteries and the other with multiple pulmonary cysts associated with intracardiac and pericardial cysts. The ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to provide a global view of cardiac anatomy in any plane with high contrast between flowing blood and soft tissue ensures it an important role in the diagnosis and preoperative assessment of hydatid disease of the heart.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Other Imaging Modalities in Diagnostic and Tumor Response Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lambregts, Doenja M J; Maas, Monique; Stokkel, Marcel P M; Beets-Tan, Regina G H

    2016-07-01

    Functional imaging is emerging as a valuable contributor to the clinical management of patients with rectal cancer. Techniques such as diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, perfusion imaging, and positron emission tomography can offer meaningful insights into tissue architecture, vascularity, and metabolism. Moreover, new techniques targeting other aspects of tumor biology are now being developed and studied. This study reviews the potential role of functional imaging for the diagnosis, treatment monitoring, and assessment of prognosis in patients with rectal cancer. PMID:27238470

  18. Evaluation of immunological and physiological parameters associated with an infectious bovine rhinotracheitis viral challenge in beef steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate the effects infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (IBRV) has on immunological and physiological parameters of cattle; 12 Angus crossbred steers (228.82 ± 22.15 kg) were randomly assigned to either a Control group or an IBRV challenged group. Prior to the challenge, steers were fitted w...

  19. GRS Method for Uncertainties Evaluation of Parameters in a Prospective Fast Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peregudov, A.; Andrianova, O.; Raskach, K.; Tsibulya, A.

    2014-04-01

    A number of recent studies have been devoted to the uncertainty estimation of reactor calculation parameters by the GRS (Generation Random Sampled) method. This method is based on direct sampling input data resulting in formation of random sets of input parameters which are used for multiple calculations. Once these calculations are performed, statistical processing of the calculation results is carried out to determine the mean value and the variance of each calculation parameter of interest. In our study this method is used to estimate the uncertainty of calculation parameters (keff, power density, dose rate) of a prospective sodium-cooled fast reactor. Neutron transport calculations were performed by the nodal diffusion code TRIGEX and Monte Carlo code MMK.

  20. In vitro evaluation of genotoxic effects under magnetic resonant coupling wireless power transfer.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kohei; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2015-04-01

    Wireless power transfer (WPT) technology using the resonant coupling phenomenon has been widely studied, but there are very few studies concerning the possible relationship between WPT exposure and human health. In this study, we investigated whether exposure to magnetic resonant coupling WPT has genotoxic effects on WI38VA13 subcloned 2RA human fibroblast cells. WPT exposure was performed using a helical coil-based exposure system designed to transfer power with 85.4% efficiency at a 12.5-MHz resonant frequency. The magnetic field at the positions of the cell culture dishes is approximately twice the reference level for occupational exposure as stated in the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. The specific absorption rate at the positions of the cell culture dishes matches the respective reference levels stated in the ICNIRP guidelines. For assessment of genotoxicity, we studied cell growth, cell cycle distribution, DNA strand breaks using the comet assay, micronucleus formation, and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene mutation, and did not detect any significant effects between the WPT-exposed cells and control cells. Our results suggest that WPT exposure under the conditions of the ICNIRP guidelines does not cause detectable cellular genotoxicity. PMID:25853218

  1. Validation of Supervised Automated Algorithm for Fast Quantitative Evaluation of Organ Motion on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, Varuna; Stainsby, Jeffrey A.; Satkunasingham, Janakan; Craig, Tim; Catton, Charles; Chan, Philip; Dawson, Laura; Hensel, Jennifer; Jaffray, David; Milosevic, Michael; Nichol, Alan; Sussman, Marshall S.; Lockwood, Gina; Menard, Cynthia

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To validate a correlation coefficient template-matching algorithm applied to the supervised automated quantification of abdominal-pelvic organ motion captured on time-resolved magnetic resonance imaging. Methods and Materials: Magnetic resonance images of 21 patients across four anatomic sites were analyzed. Representative anatomic points of interest were chosen as surrogates for organ motion. The point of interest displacements across each image frame relative to baseline were quantified manually and through the use of a template-matching software tool, termed 'Motiontrack.' Automated and manually acquired displacement measures, as well as the standard deviation of intrafraction motion, were compared for each image frame and for each patient. Results: Discrepancies between the automated and manual displacements of {>=}2 mm were uncommon, ranging in frequency of 0-9.7% (liver and prostate, respectively). The standard deviations of intrafraction motion measured with each method correlated highly (r = 0.99). Considerable interpatient variability in organ motion was demonstrated by a wide range of standard deviations in the liver (1.4-7.5 mm), uterus (1.1-8.4 mm), and prostate gland (0.8-2.7 mm). The automated algorithm performed successfully in all patients but 1 and substantially improved efficiency compared with manual quantification techniques (5 min vs. 60-90 min). Conclusion: Supervised automated quantification of organ motion captured on magnetic resonance imaging using a correlation coefficient template-matching algorithm was efficient, accurate, and may play an important role in off-line adaptive approaches to intrafraction motion management.

  2. Prediction of the efficacy of surgical intervention in patients with cervical myelopathy by using diffusion tensor 3T-magnetic resonance imaging parameters

    PubMed Central

    Arima, Hironori; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Naito, Kentaro; Yamagata, Toru; Uda, Takehiro; Ohata, Kenji; Takami, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Background: The clinical significance of diffusion tensor (DT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters was analyzed to predict postoperative functional recovery in patients with cervical myelopathy. Materials and Methods: Sixteen patients with cervical myelopathy caused by cervical spondylosis, disk herniation or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament who underwent surgical intervention in our institute were enrolled in this retrospective study. There were 7 men and 9 women, with a mean age of 62.8 years. Clinical assessment was done before surgery and at least 3 months after surgery. All patients underwent whole-body 3.0-Tesla MRI before surgery. DT images (DTIs) were obtained using a single-shot fast spin-echo-based sequence. Mean values of mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) at 6 disk levels of the cervical spine were measured using manual setting of regions of interest. The MD and FA values at the most compressed part were analyzed. Absolute MD and FA values at the most compressed spinal level in patients were transformed into the normalized values with a z-score analysis. Results: MD-z may decrease with the severity of cervical myelopathy. Receiver operating characteristic analysis of MD-z and FA-z suggested that both MD-z and FA-z have clinical validity for predicting the efficacy of surgical intervention, but MD-z was considered to be the most appropriate value to predict the efficacy of surgery. Conclusions: DTIs may be a promising modality to predict functional recovery after surgery. MD changes may reflect spinal cord condition and its reversibility. PMID:26288547

  3. Evaluation of moving-coil loudspeaker and passive radiator parameters using normal-incidence sound transmission measurements: theoretical developments.

    PubMed

    Leishman, Timothy W; Anderson, Brian E

    2013-07-01

    The parameters of moving-coil loudspeaker drivers are typically determined using direct electrical excitation and measurement. However, as electro-mechano-acoustical devices, their parameters should also follow from suitable mechanical or acoustical evaluations. This paper presents the theory of an acoustical method of excitation and measurement using normal-incidence sound transmission through a baffled driver as a plane-wave tube partition. Analogous circuits enable key parameters to be extracted from measurement results in terms of open and closed-circuit driver conditions. Associated tools are presented that facilitate adjacent field decompositions and derivations of sound transmission coefficients (in terms of driver parameters) directly from the circuits. The paper also clarifies the impact of nonanechoic receiving tube terminations and the specific benefits of downstream field decompositions. PMID:23862800

  4. Non centered minor hysteresis loops evaluation based on exponential parameters transforms of the modified inverse Jiles-Atherton model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamimid, M.; Mimoune, S. M.; Feliachi, M.; Atallah, K.

    2014-10-01

    In this present work, a non centered minor hysteresis loops evaluation is performed using the exponential transforms (ET) of the modified inverse Jiles-Atherton model parameters. This model improves the non centered minor hysteresis loops representation. The parameters of the non centered minor hysteresis loops are obtained from exponential expressions related to the major ones. The parameters of minor loops are obtained by identification using the stochastic optimization method “simulated annealing”. The four parameters of JA model (a,α, k and c) obtained by this transformation are applied only in both ascending and descending branches of the non centered minor hysteresis loops while the major ones are applied to the rest of the cycle. This proposal greatly improves both branches and consequently the minor loops. To validate this model, calculated non-centered minor hysteresis loops are compared with measured ones and good agreements are obtained.

  5. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose-Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Schmid, Maximilian P.; Fidarova, Elena; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45-50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy for tumor; {alpha}/{beta} = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV ({+-} 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 ({+-}30) cm{sup 3}, and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 ({+-}14) cm{sup 3}. The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 ({+-}13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 ({+-}20) Gy, 76 ({+-}16) Gy, 70 ({+-}9) Gy, and 60 ({+-}9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19-87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and

  6. Evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Compatible Needles and Interactive Sequences for Musculoskeletal Interventions Using an Open High-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Wonneberger, Uta; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Streitparth, Florian Walter, Thula Rump, Jens Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M.

    2010-04-15

    In this article, we study in vitro evaluation of needle artefacts and image quality for musculoskeletal laser-interventions in an open high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner at 1.0T with vertical field orientation. Five commercially available MRI-compatible puncture needles were assessed based on artefact characteristics in a CuSO4 phantom (0.1%) and in human cadaveric lumbar spines. First, six different interventional sequences were evaluated with varying needle orientation to the main magnetic field B0 (0{sup o} to 90{sup o}) in a sequence test. Artefact width, needle-tip error, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Second, a gradient-echo sequence used for thermometric monitoring was assessed and in varying echo times, artefact width, tip error, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured. Artefact width and needle-tip error correlated with needle material, instrument orientation to B0, and sequence type. Fast spin-echo sequences produced the smallest needle artefacts for all needles, except for the carbon fibre needle (width <3.5 mm, tip error <2 mm) at 45{sup o} to B0. Overall, the proton density-weighted spin-echo sequences had the best CNR (CNR{sub Muscle/Needle} >16.8). Concerning the thermometric gradient echo sequence, artefacts remained <5 mm, and the SNR reached its maximum at an echo time of 15 ms. If needle materials and sequences are accordingly combined, guidance and monitoring of musculoskeletal laser interventions may be feasible in a vertical magnetic field at 1.0T.

  7. Remote detection of trace effluents using Resonance Raman spectroscopy: Field results and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Chen, C.L.

    1995-10-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) possesses many characteristics that are important for detecting, identifying and monitoring chemical effluents. Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon scattering process where an exciting photon of energy h{nu} promotes a molecule to a virtual level and the subsequently emitted photon is shifted in frequency in accordance with the rotational-vibrational structure of the irradiated species, thereby providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. Under resonance enhancement, the Raman scattering cross-sections have been observed to increase up to 6 orders of magnitude above the normal scattering cross-sections, thereby providing the practical basis for a remote chemical sensor. Some of the other advantages that a Raman sensor possesses are: (1) very high selectivity (chemical specific fingerprints), (2) independence of the spectral fingerprint on the excitation wavelength (ability to monitor in the solar blind region), (3) chemical mixture fingerprints are the sum of its individual components (no spectral cross-talk), (4) near independence of the Raman fingerprint to its physical state (very similar spectra for gas, liquid, solid or solutions), (5) no absolute calibration is necessary because all Raman signals observed from a given species can be compared with the Raman signal for N{sub 2}, whose concentration is known very accurately, and (6) insensitivity of the Raman signature to environmental conditions (no quenching, or interference from water vapor). In this presentation, the technology of resonance Raman spectroscopy as applied to the detection of narcotics production activities will be presented along with some recent experimental results.

  8. Simultaneous evaluation of acoustic nonlinearity parameter and attenuation coefficients using the finite amplitude method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing; Jeong, Hyunjo Cho, Sungjong

    2015-07-15

    A novel method to determine acoustic parameters involved in measuring the nonlinearity parameter of fluids or solids is proposed. The approach is based on the measurement of fundamental and second harmonic pressures with a calibrated receiver, and on a nonlinear least squares data-fitting to multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) equations which explicitly define the attenuation and diffraction effects in the quasilinear regime. Results obtained in water validate the proposed method. The choice of suitable source pressure is discussed with regard to the quasilinear approximation involved. The attenuation coefficients are also acquired in nonlinear regime and their relations are discussed.

  9. Study of the influence of reference system in surface finishing parameters evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, A.; Fernández, R.; Pindado, S.; Núñez, P.

    2012-04-01

    In the present paper the influence of the reference system with regard to the characterization of the surface finishing is analyzed. The effect of the reference system's choice on the most representative surface finishing parameters (e.g. roughness average Ra and root mean square values Rq) is studied. The study can also be applied to their equivalent parameters in waviness and primary profiles. Based on ISO and ASME standards, three different types of regression lines (central, mean and orthogonal) are theoretically and experimentally analyzed, identifying the validity and applicability fields of each one depending on profile's geometry.

  10. The Effect of Temperature Dependent Frequency Factor on the Evaluated Trapping Parameters of TSL Glow Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazici, A. N.; Öztürk, Z.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of temperature dependency on frequency factor and its relationship to trapping parameters is discussed by using the peak shape method. The coefficients appearing in the peak shape formula for the calculation of the activation energy have been determined and tabulated for the symmetry factor mg(X) for x=0.50 and 0.75 of the peak intensity. It is found that significant errors occur in the value of the trapping parameters if the temperature dependecy of the frequency factor is not consider.

  11. A method of evaluating quantitative magnetospheric field models by an angular parameter alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiura, M.; Poros, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    The paper introduces an angular parameter, termed alpha, which represents the angular difference between the observed, or model, field and the internal model field. The study discusses why this parameter is chosen and demonstrates its usefulness by applying it to both observations and models. In certain areas alpha is more sensitive than delta-B (the difference between the magnitude of the observed magnetic field and that of the earth's internal field calculated from a spherical harmonic expansion) in expressing magnetospheric field distortions. It is recommended to use both alpha and delta-B in comparing models with observations.

  12. Nondestructive Evaluation of Hybrid Bearing Ceramic Rollers Using Process Compensated Resonant Testing (pcrt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Surendra; Jauriqui, Leanne; Sloan, Trista

    2010-02-01

    We have used Process Compensated Resonant Testing (PCRT) for studying structural integrity and functional performance of ceramic balls used in various auxiliary power units (APUs), propulsion engines, and defense and space missiles. The results show that PCRT is successful in sorting acceptable parts from parts with defects such as micro-structural changes, C-cracks, and scuffs. However, PCRT suffers from limitations, generally not determining the type, size or location of the anomaly. The pursuit of improvements to PCRT is an on-going process.

  13. NONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION OF HYBRID BEARING CERAMIC ROLLERS USING PROCESS COMPENSATED RESONANT TESTING (PCRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Surendra; Jauriqui, Leanne; Sloan, Trista

    2010-02-22

    We have used Process Compensated Resonant Testing (PCRT) for studying structural integrity and functional performance of ceramic balls used in various auxiliary power units (APUs), propulsion engines, and defense and space missiles. The results show that PCRT is successful in sorting acceptable parts from parts with defects such as micro-structural changes, C-cracks, and scuffs. However, PCRT suffers from limitations, generally not determining the type, size or location of the anomaly. The pursuit of improvements to PCRT is an on-going process.

  14. [Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation in utero of Siamese twins].

    PubMed

    Cosson, M; Vinatier, D; Patey, P; Maunoury-Lefebvre, C; Bartkowiak, D; Sault, M C; Monnier, J C

    1990-01-01

    The authors report a case of twins conjoined at the umbilicus and diagnosed by ultrasound after 19 weeks of amenorrhoea in whom an assessment in utero was carried out using magnetic resonance imaging after the patient had been curarized. A review of the literature on this very difficult problem of conjoined twins has given us the possibility to assess the diagnostic measures as well as the prognosis of this pathology. In particular we point out the results that can be obtained using MRI in utero during the second and third trimesters of the pregnancy. PMID:2199566

  15. Modern techniques of magnetic resonance in the evaluation of primary central nervous system lymphoma: contributions to the diagnosis and differential diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Antonio José; Sobreira Guedes, Bruno Vasconcelos; da Silveira da Rocha, Talita Maira Bueno; Maia Junior, Antonio Carlos Martins; Chiattone, Carlos Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    In addition to findings from conventional magnetic resonance imaging, modern magnetic resonance imaging techniques have provided important information about tumor metabolism, in vivo metabolite formation, water molecule diffusion, microvascular density, and blood-brain barrier permeability, all of which have improved the in vivo diagnostic accuracy of this method in the evaluation of primary central nervous system lymphoma. These nonconventional magnetic resonance techniques are useful in the clinical practice because they enhance conventional magnetic resonance imaging by reinforcing the possibility of a diagnosis and by allowing the early detection of disease recurrence. This report is a review of the most relevant contributions of nonconventional magnetic resonance techniques to the imaging diagnosis of primary central nervous system lymphoma, the differential diagnosis of this disease, and the prognosis of patients. This paper aims to describe a wide range of presentations of primary central nervous system lymphoma, their appearance in imaging, and the differential diagnoses of this disease. PMID:26969774

  16. Utilizing magnetic resonance imaging logs, openhole logs, and sidewall core analyses to evaluate shaly sands for water-free production

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.A.; Morganti, J.K.; White, H.J. ); Noblett, B.R. )

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging using the new C Series Magnetic Resonance Imaging Log (MRIL) system is rapidly enhancing formation evaluation throughout the industry. By measuring irreducible water saturations, permeabilities, and effective porosities, MRIL data can help petrophysicists evaluate low-resistivity pays. In these environments, conventional openhole logs may not define all of the pay intervals. The MRIL system can also reduce the number of unnecessary completions in zones of potentially high water cut. MRIL tool theory and log presentations used with conventional logs and sidewall cores are presented along with field examples. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis shows good correlation of varying grain size in sandstones with the T2 distribution and bulk volume irreducible water determined from the MRIL measurements. Analysis of each new well drilled in the study area shows how water-free production zones were defined. Because the MRIL data were not recorded on one of the wells, predictions from the conventional logs and the MRIL data collected on the other two wells were used to estimate productive zones in the first well. Discussion of additional formation characteristics, completion procedures, actual production, and predicted producibility of the shaly sands is presented. Integrated methodologies resulted in the perforation of 3 new wells for a gross initial potential of 690 BOPD and 0 BWPD.

  17. Utilizing magnetic resonance imaging logs, openhole logs, and sidewall core analyses to evaluate shaly sands for water-free production

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.A.; Morganti, J.K.; White, H.J.; Noblett, B.R.

    1996-12-31

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging using the new C Series Magnetic Resonance Imaging Log (MRIL) system is rapidly enhancing formation evaluation throughout the industry. By measuring irreducible water saturations, permeabilities, and effective porosities, MRIL data can help petrophysicists evaluate low-resistivity pays. In these environments, conventional openhole logs may not define all of the pay intervals. The MRIL system can also reduce the number of unnecessary completions in zones of potentially high water cut. MRIL tool theory and log presentations used with conventional logs and sidewall cores are presented along with field examples. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis shows good correlation of varying grain size in sandstones with the T2 distribution and bulk volume irreducible water determined from the MRIL measurements. Analysis of each new well drilled in the study area shows how water-free production zones were defined. Because the MRIL data were not recorded on one of the wells, predictions from the conventional logs and the MRIL data collected on the other two wells were used to estimate productive zones in the first well. Discussion of additional formation characteristics, completion procedures, actual production, and predicted producibility of the shaly sands is presented. Integrated methodologies resulted in the perforation of 3 new wells for a gross initial potential of 690 BOPD and 0 BWPD.

  18. Evaluation of absorption of heparin-DOCA conjugates on the intestinal wall using a surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Kyoon; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Lee, Seulki; Park, Kyeongsoon; Park, Jae Hyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Choi, Kuiwon; Kim, Choong-Yong; Byun, Youngro

    2005-10-01

    We validated the application of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique to reliably determine adhesion of drugs to the intestinal wall using heparin-DOCA conjugates, developed to enhance the oral absorption of poorly absorbed heparin. In this study, heparin conjugates, or deoxycholyl-heparin (H-DOCA) and bisdeoxycholyl-heparin (H-bis-DOCA), were synthesized by covalently coupling the synthesized succinimido deoxycholate (DOCA-NHS) or succinimido bis-deoxycholyl-L-lysine (DOCA-bis-NHS) to amine groups of heparin, and their physicochemical and biological properties were evaluated. To mimic the duodenal and ileal surfaces, duodenal and ileal brush border membrane (BBM) vesicles isolated from Sprauge-Dawley (SD) rats were immobilized onto a biosensor chip composed of dextran derivatives with modified lipophilic residues. The adhesion of heparin conjugates on the BBM surface was evaluated by measuring the SPR response signal. The adhesion of heparin conjugates was significantly dependent on the conjugated DOCA molecules: that is, they showed higher adhesion signal on the ileal BBM surface than that on the duodenal BBM surface. In particular, the solubilized heparin conjugates in DMSO solution presented significantly increased adhesion affinity on the ileal BBM surface. The adhesion of heparin conjugates on the intestinal surfaces was successfully assayed using the surface plasmon resonance technique with the sensor chip on which BBM vesicles were immobilized. PMID:16143485

  19. [The evaluation of mineral crystallinity of mandibular bone tissue using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in patients suffering from renal osteodystrophy].

    PubMed

    Wojtowicz, Andrzej; Dijakiewicz, Maciej; Wandzel, Barbara; Wesołowski, Piotr; Rutkowski, Bolesław; Fiedor, Piotr; Stachowicz, Wacław; Ostrowski, Kazimierz

    2006-01-01

    Mineral crystallinity of bone tissue is subject to changes during one's development, as well as in many systemic diseases, especially renal osteodystrophy. The aim of the study was qualitative evaluation of the mandibular bone tissue in patients suffering from renal osteodytrophy, treated with renal-replacement therapy: hemo-dialysis or allogeneic kidney transplantation. The mineral crystallinity coefficient was evaluated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) based on the observation that ionizing radiation induces paramagnetic centers in hydroxyapatites. The concentration of these centers was used to establish an indicator of crystallinity rate which is a measure of the crystallinity of tissue mineral. On the basis of these results, it is possible to widen the indications for implantological treatment in specific clinical cases. PMID:17479865

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging is superior to radiography in evaluating spinal cord trauma in three bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Stauber, Erik; Holmes, Shannon; DeGhetto, Darlene L; Finch, Nickol

    2007-09-01

    Three bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) found along highways and unable to fly were presented for evaluation. All eagles exhibited sternal recumbency, as well as flaccid hind limb and tail paralysis. Vertebral column and spinal cord trauma were suspected as the cause. One bird died, whereas the remaining 2 birds were stabilized for diagnostic imaging studies. All 3 birds were evaluated by radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnosis and for prognosis in the live birds. Radiographic findings in all 3 birds were inconclusive, whereas MRI results showed extensive damage of the spinal cord and vertebral column, precluding functional recovery. The 2 surviving birds were euthanatized. In all birds, MRI assessments correlated well with necropsy and histopathologic findings. PMID:18087936

  1. Evaluation of Structural Equation Mixture Models: Parameter Estimates and Correct Class Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tueller, Stephen; Lubke, Gitta

    2010-01-01

    Structural equation mixture models (SEMMs) are latent class models that permit the estimation of a structural equation model within each class. Fitting SEMMs is illustrated using data from 1 wave of the Notre Dame Longitudinal Study of Aging. Based on the model used in the illustration, SEMM parameter estimation and correct class assignment are…

  2. Effect of dose and frequency of interferon beta-1a administration on clinical and magnetic resonance imaging parameters in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cocco, Eleonora; Marchi, Piernicola; Floris, Gianluca; Mascia, Maria Giuseppina; Deriu, Marcello; Sirca, Antonella; Mamusa, Elena; Lai, Marina; Mura, Marco; Mallarini, Giorgio; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna

    2006-01-01

    There is still debate over the optimal dosage, frequency and route of administration of interferon (IFN) beta in multiple sclerosis (MS). A prospective, non-randomized, comparative study was performed to evaluate differences in magnetic resonance imaging and clinical outcomes of two IFN beta-1a preparations (30mcg intramuscular [im] once-weekly [qw], AVO; and 22 mcg subcutaneous [sc] three-times-weekly [tiw]; R22). Relapsing-remitting MS patients on one of the two IFN preparations (AVO, n=47; R22, n=48) were assessed at baseline and after 6 months of further treatment. There were no significant differences between the two groups at baseline. Both groups showed significantly reduced relapse rates (F=19.5; p<0.001) from baseline (0.6) to 6-month assessment (0.2; p<0.001). Univariate analysis showed a significant difference in favour of R22 on T2 lesion volume (F=14.4; p<0.001) and T1 black hole lesion load (F=8.5; p=0.004), the latter showing a significant increase in the AVO group (p<0.001). The incidence of patients with new T1 black holes was also higher for AVO than R22 (23.5% vs 8.3%; p=0.025). These results from patients receiving AVO or R22 in normal clinical practice are in line with randomized clinical studies that show the benefits of high-dose, high-frequency administration of IFN beta-1a in MS therapy. PMID:17049133

  3. Evaluation in medical education: A topical review of target parameters, data collection tools and confounding factors

    PubMed Central

    Schiekirka, Sarah; Feufel, Markus A.; Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph; Raupach, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective: Evaluation is an integral part of education in German medical schools. According to the quality standards set by the German Society for Evaluation, evaluation tools must provide an accurate and fair appraisal of teaching quality. Thus, data collection tools must be highly reliable and valid. This review summarises the current literature on evaluation of medical education with regard to the possible dimensions of teaching quality, the psychometric properties of survey instruments and potential confounding factors. Methods: We searched Pubmed, PsycINFO and PSYNDEX for literature on evaluation in medical education and included studies published up until June 30, 2011 as well as articles identified in the “grey literature”. Results are presented as a narrative review. Results: We identified four dimensions of teaching quality: structure, process, teacher characteristics, and outcome. Student ratings are predominantly used to address the first three dimensions, and a number of reliable tools are available for this purpose. However, potential confounders of student ratings pose a threat to the validity of these instruments. Outcome is usually operationalised in terms of student performance on examinations, but methodological problems may limit the usability of these data for evaluation purposes. In addition, not all examinations at German medical schools meet current quality standards. Conclusion: The choice of tools for evaluating medical education should be guided by the dimension that is targeted by the evaluation. Likewise, evaluation results can only be interpreted within the context of the construct addressed by the data collection tool that was used as well as its specific confounding factors. PMID:26421003

  4. Supplementation of Antipsychotic Treatment with the Amino Acid Sarcosine Influences Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Parameters in Left Frontal White Matter in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Strzelecki, Dominik; Podgórski, Michał; Kałużyńska, Olga; Gawlik-Kotelnicka, Oliwia; Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Kotlicka-Antczak, Magdalena; Gmitrowicz, Agnieszka; Grzelak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunction of the glutamatergic system, the main stimulating system in the brain, has a major role in pathogenesis of schizophrenia. The frontal white matter (WM) is partially composed of axons from glutamatergic pyramidal neurons and glia with glutamatergic receptors. The natural amino acid sarcosine, a component of a normal diet, inhibits the glycine type 1 transporter, increasing the glycine level. Thus, it modulates glutamatergic transmission through the glutamatergic ionotropic NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) receptor, which requires glycine as a co-agonist. To evaluate the concentrations of brain metabolites (NAA, N-acetylaspartate; Glx, complex of glutamate, glutamine, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA); mI, myo-inositol; Cr, creatine; Cho, choline) in the left frontal WM, Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy was used. Twenty-five patients randomly chosen from a group of fifty with stable schizophrenia (DSM-IV-TR) and dominant negative symptoms, who were receiving antipsychotic therapy, were administered 2 g of sarcosine daily for six months. The remaining 25 patients received placebo. Assignment was double blinded. 1H-NMR spectroscopy (1.5 T) was performed twice: before and after the intervention. NAA, Glx and mI were evaluated as Cr and Cho ratios. All patients were also assessed twice with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Results were compared between groups and in two time points in each group. The sarcosine group demonstrated a significant decrease in WM Glx/Cr and Glx/Cho ratios compared to controls after six months of therapy. In the experimental group, the final NAA/Cr ratio significantly increased and Glx/Cr ratio significantly decreased compared to baseline values. Improvement in the PANSS scores was significant only in the sarcosine group. In patients with schizophrenia, sarcosine augmentation can reverse the negative effect of glutamatergic system overstimulation, with a simultaneous beneficial increase of NAA

  5. Supplementation of Antipsychotic Treatment with the Amino Acid Sarcosine Influences Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Parameters in Left Frontal White Matter in Patients with Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Strzelecki, Dominik; Podgórski, Michał; Kałużyńska, Olga; Gawlik-Kotelnicka, Oliwia; Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Kotlicka-Antczak, Magdalena; Gmitrowicz, Agnieszka; Grzelak, Piotr

    2015-10-01

    Dysfunction of the glutamatergic system, the main stimulating system in the brain, has a major role in pathogenesis of schizophrenia. The frontal white matter (WM) is partially composed of axons from glutamatergic pyramidal neurons and glia with glutamatergic receptors. The natural amino acid sarcosine, a component of a normal diet, inhibits the glycine type 1 transporter, increasing the glycine level. Thus, it modulates glutamatergic transmission through the glutamatergic ionotropic NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) receptor, which requires glycine as a co-agonist. To evaluate the concentrations of brain metabolites (NAA, N-acetylaspartate; Glx, complex of glutamate, glutamine, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA); mI, myo-inositol; Cr, creatine; Cho, choline) in the left frontal WM, Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (¹H-NMR) spectroscopy was used. Twenty-five patients randomly chosen from a group of fifty with stable schizophrenia (DSM-IV-TR) and dominant negative symptoms, who were receiving antipsychotic therapy, were administered 2 g of sarcosine daily for six months. The remaining 25 patients received placebo. Assignment was double blinded. ¹H-NMR spectroscopy (1.5 T) was performed twice: before and after the intervention. NAA, Glx and mI were evaluated as Cr and Cho ratios. All patients were also assessed twice with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Results were compared between groups and in two time points in each group. The sarcosine group demonstrated a significant decrease in WM Glx/Cr and Glx/Cho ratios compared to controls after six months of therapy. In the experimental group, the final NAA/Cr ratio significantly increased and Glx/Cr ratio significantly decreased compared to baseline values. Improvement in the PANSS scores was significant only in the sarcosine group. In patients with schizophrenia, sarcosine augmentation can reverse the negative effect of glutamatergic system overstimulation, with a simultaneous beneficial increase of NAA

  6. Evaluation of exposure parameters in plain radiography: a comparative study with European guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lança, L; Silva, A; Alves, E; Serranheira, F; Correia, M

    2008-01-01

    Typical distribution of exposure parameters in plain radiography is unknown in Portugal. This study aims to identify exposure parameters that are being used in plain radiography in the Lisbon area and to compare the collected data with European references [Commission of European Communities (CEC) guidelines]. The results show that in four examinations (skull, chest, lumbar spine and pelvis), there is a strong tendency of using exposure times above the European recommendation. The X-ray tube potential values (in kV) are below the recommended values from CEC guidelines. This study shows that at a local level (Lisbon region), radiographic practice does not comply with CEC guidelines concerning exposure techniques. Further national/local studies are recommended with the objective to improve exposure optimisation and technical procedures in plain radiography. This study also suggests the need to establish national/local diagnostic reference levels and to proceed to effective measurements for exposure optimisation. PMID:18430717

  7. Clinical evaluation of nares-vocal cord distance and its correlation with various external body parameters

    PubMed Central

    Sareen, Bhuwan; Kapur, Anu; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Sareen, Parul Bansal; Nischal, Hitesh

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: The optimal visualisation of vocal cords during fibreoptic intubation may be utilised for the nares-vocal cord distance (NVD) estimation. The present study was conducted to measure NVD and to correlate with various external body parameters. Methods: This study was conducted on 50 males and 50 females. We measured NVD and analysed its relationship with height, nares to tragus of ear distance (NED), nares to angle of mandible distance (NMD), sternal length (SL), thyro-mental distance (TMD), sterno-mental distance (SMD) and arm span (AS). Results: The mean NVD of the males was 18.5 ± 1.5 cm, and that of the females was 15.9 ± 1.1 cm. The relationship between the NVD and body height (males P = 0.001, r = 0.463, females P = 0.000, r = 0.555), SL (males P = 0.000, r = 0.463, females P < 0.000, r = 0.801) or AS (males P = 0.000, r = 0.561, females P = 0.000, r = 0.499) showed a significant correlation but NED, NMD, TMD, SMD did not. After combining male and female groups, (n = 100), the correlation of NVD with external body parameters is as follows SL (r = 0.887), height (r = 0.791), AS (r = 0.769), weight (r = 0.531), SMD (r = 0.466), NED (r = 0.459), NMD (r = 0.391), TMD (r = 0.379). Conclusion: The relationship of NVD to external body parameters had strong correlation in all parameters in the combined group; whereas when gender was taken into consideration NVD correlated significantly only with SL, height and AS. PMID:25937646

  8. Application of ANN to evaluate effective parameters affecting failure load and displacement of RC buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakan Arslan, M.

    2009-06-01

    This study investigated the efficiency of an artificial neural network (ANN) in predicting and determining failure load and failure displacement of multi story reinforced concrete (RC) buildings. The study modeled a RC building with four stories and three bays, with a load bearing system composed of columns and beams. Non-linear static pushover analysis of the key parameters in change defined in Turkish Earthquake Code (TEC-2007) for columns and beams was carried out and the capacity curves, failure loads and displacements were obtained. Totally 720 RC buildings were analyzed according to the change intervals of the parameters chosen. The input parameters were selected as longitudinal bar ratio (ρl) of columns, transverse reinforcement ratio (Asw/sc), axial load level (N/No), column and beam cross section, strength of concrete (fc) and the compression bar ratio (ρ'/ρ) on the beam supports. Data from the nonlinear analysis were assessed with ANN in terms of failure load and failure displacement. For all outputs, ANN was trained and tested using of 11 back-propagation methods. All of the ANN models were found to perform well for both failure loads and displacements. The analyses also indicated that a considerable portion of existing RC building stock in Turkey may not meet the safety standards of the Turkish Earthquake Code (TEC-2007).

  9. Evaluation of biophysical parameters of Amrutapatolaksheeravasti Dravya and Karma - An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sandeep Kumar; Srinivasulu, M.; Murthy, V. Krishna

    2013-01-01

    The study aims to observe the effects of Amrutapatolaksheeravasti Dravya (medicated milk enema) in values of biophysical-chemical parameters. The classical Vasti (enema) can be analyzed with the help of biophysical parameters like pH, temperature, and specific gravity (Sp.gr.). Three hundred samples of classically prepared Amrutapatolaksheeravasti were analyzed for pH, temp., Sp.gr. with the calibrated instruments before each Vastikarma. The clinical symptoms based on proper Vastikarma and its complication were recorded and assessed. The parameters - pH, temperature, Sp.gr., and viscosity have shown a significant to highly significant value of correlation coefficient “r” and ‘t’ in relation to successful Vastikarma and retention time of Vasti Dravya respectively. pH <5.8 and temperature >39°C led to anal irritation in Ksheera Vasti. Similarly, pH >6.1 and temperature <32°C resulted in flatulence. The effects of pH and Sp.gr. are due to temperature as both are temperature-based variables. PMID:24501519

  10. Evaluation of an affinity-amplified immunoassay of graphene oxide using surface plasmon resonance biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Nan-Fu; Huang, Teng-Yi; Kuo, Chun-Chuan

    2015-05-01

    We describe a fundamental study on the plasmonic properties and advanced biosensing mechanisms of functionalized graphene. We discuss a specific design using modified carboxyl groups, which can modulate surface plasmon (SP) coupling and provide an advantage for their binding to the sensing layer with high-performance affinity in an immunological reaction. The functionalized graphene-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors have three advantages: high performance, high sensitivity, and excellent molecular kinetic response. In the future, functionalized graphene sheets will make a unique contribution to photonic and SPR diagnosis devices. We wish to highlight the essential characteristics of functionalized graphene-based SPR biosensors to assist researchers in developing and advancing suitable biosensors for unique applications.

  11. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) for the Evaluation of Shear-Force-Dependent Bacterial Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Zagorodko, Oleksandr; Bouckaert, Julie; Dumych, Tetiana; Bilyy, Rostyslav; Larroulet, Iban; Yanguas Serrano, Aritz; Alvarez Dorta, Dimitri; Gouin, Sebastien G.; Dima, Stefan-Ovidiu; Oancea, Florin; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    The colonization of Escherichia coli (E. coli) to host cell surfaces is known to be a glycan-specific process that can be modulated by shear stress. In this work we investigate whether flow rate changes in microchannels integrated on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) surfaces would allow for investigating such processes in an easy and high-throughput manner. We demonstrate that adhesion of uropathogenic E. coli UTI89 on heptyl α-d-mannopyranoside-modified gold SPR substrates is minimal under almost static conditions (flow rates of 10 µL·min−1), and reaches a maximum at flow rates of 30 µL·min−1 (≈30 mPa). This concept is applicable to the investigation of any ligand-pathogen interactions, offering a robust, easy, and fast method for screening adhesion characteristics of pathogens to ligand-modified interfaces. PMID:26018780

  12. Evaluation of adriamycin nephropathy by an in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Oteki, Takaaki; Nagase, Sohji . E-mail: sohji-n@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Yokoyama, Hidekatsu; Ohya, Hiroaki; Akatsuka, Takao; Tada, Mika; Ueda, Atsushi; Hirayama, Aki; koyama, Akio

    2005-07-01

    A rat model for human minimal change nephropathy was obtained by the intravenous injection of adriamycin (ADR) at 5 mg/kg. By using an in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer operating at 700 MHz, the temporal changes in signal intensities of a nitroxide radical, 4-hydroxyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPOL), in the kidneys of rats with ADR nephropathy were investigated. The decay rate of the EPR signal intensity obtained in the kidney is indicative of the renal reducing ability. It was found that the reducing ability in the kidney declined on the 7th day after ADR administration and recovered after the 14th day. Impairment of the reducing ability occurred before the appearance of continuous urinary protein. The in vitro EPR study showed that this impairment of in vivo renal reducing ability is related to impairment of the reducing ability in the mitochondria.

  13. Head trauma evaluated by magnetic resonance and computed tomography: a comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Han, J.G.; Kaufman, B.; Alfidi, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images and computed tomograms of 25 patients with head trauma were compared. MR proved to be superior in many ways for demonstrating extracerebral as well as intracerebral traumatic lesions. Isodense subdural hemotomas, which present a diagnostic dilemma on CT images were clearly seen on MR, regardless of their varying CT densities. In a case of epidural hematoma, the dura mater was shown directly as nearly devoid of signal on MR. Direct coronal images provided excellent visualization of extracerebral collections along the peritentorial space and subtemporal area. In a patient with intracerebral hematoma CT failed to demonstrate residual parenchymal changes in a 3-month follow-up study, but MR clearly depicted the abnormalities. The superiority of MR over CT was also well illustrated in a patient with post-traumatic osteomyelitis of the calvarium.

  14. Evaluation of multi-layered graphene surface plasmon resonance-based transmission type fiber optic sensor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jang Ah; Kulkarni, Atul; Kang, Junmo; Amin, Rashid; Choi, Jae-Boong; Park, Sung Ha; Kim, Taesung

    2012-07-01

    Graphene is a zero band-gap semi-metal with remarkable electromagnetic and mechanical characteristics. This study is the first ever attempt to use graphene in the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor as replacement material for gold/silver. Graphene, comprised of a single atomic layer of carbon, is a purely two-dimensional material and it is an ideal candidate for use as a biosensor because of its high surface-to-volume ratio. This sensor is based on the resonance occasion of the surface plasmon wave (SPW) according to the dielectric constants of each metal film and detected material in gas or aqueous phase. Graphene in the SPR sensor is expected to enlarge the range of analyte to bio-aerosols based on the superior electromagnetic properties of graphene. In this study, a SPR-based fiber optic sensor coated with multi-layered graphene is described. The multi-layered graphene film synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on Ni substrate was transferred on the sensing region of an optical fiber. The graphene coated SPR sensor is used to analyze the interaction between structured DNA biotin and Streptavidin is analyzed. Transmitted light after passing through the sensing region is measured by a spectrometer and multimeter. As the light source, blue light which of 450 to 460 nm in wavelength was used. We observed the SPR phenomena in the sensor and show the contrary trends between bare fiber and graphene coated fiber. The fabricated graphene based fiber optic sensor shows excellent detection sensitivity of the interaction between structured DNA and Streptavidin. PMID:22966575

  15. Early evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging guided focused ultrasound sonication in the treatment of uterine fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Himabindu, Y.; Sriharibabu, M.; Nyapathy, Vinay; Mishra, Anindita

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Uterine leiomyomas (fibroids) are common cause of morbidity in women of reproductive age group. High intensity focused ultrasound with the imaging guidance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) known as magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound sonication (MRgFUS) is now available. However, there are no available studies with this non invasive modality of treatment in Indian subjects. The objective of this study was to determine the safety and clinical efficacy of MRgFUS in the treatment of uterine fibroids. Methods: This prospective study included 32 consecutive women with clinically symptomatic uterine fibroids who were treated with MRgFUS from February 2011 to October 2011. Pre and post treatment symptom severity scores (SSS) were assessed at the time of enrolment and at one, three and six months follow up using a validated uterine fibroid symptom - quality of life questionnaire (UFS-QOL). Pre and post treatment fibroid volumes were compared immediately after treatment and at six months follow up using contrast enhanced MRI scan. Non perfused volume (NPV) ratios were calculated and correlated with fibroid volume reductions immediately after the treatment and at the end of six months follow up. Results: This procedure was well tolerated by the patients and procedure related adverse effects were non significant. Significant reductions in SSS were seen at one, three and six month intervals after the treatment (P<0.01). Significant reductions were noticed in fibroid volumes at six months follow up compared to pretreatment fibroid volumes (P<0.01). Significant positive correlations were observed between NPV ratios and reduction in fibroid volumes at six months follow-up (r=0.659, P<0.01). Interpretation & conclusions: MRgFUS is relatively a safe and effective non invasive treatment modality for treating uterine fibroids in selected patients. Its long term efficacy is yet to be tested and compared with other available minimally invasive

  16. Comparison of Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Parameters across MR Imagers and Field Strengths: Evaluation in Upper Abdominal Organs.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Sebastiano; Donati, Olivio F; Froehlich, Johannes M; Thoeny, Harriet C

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To determine the reproducibility of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) parameters measured in upper abdominal organs with magnetic resonance (MR) imagers from different vendors and with different field strengths. Materials and Methods This prospective study was approved by the independent ethics committees of Kanton Bern and Kanton Zurich, and signed informed consent was obtained from all participants. Abdominal diffusion-weighted images in 10 healthy men (mean age, 37 years ± 8 [standard deviation]) were acquired by using 1.5- and 3.0-T MR imagers from three different vendors. Two readers independently delineated regions of interest that were used to measure IVIM parameters (diffusion coefficient [Dt], perfusion fraction [Fp], and pseudodiffusion coefficient [Dp]) in the left and right lobes of the liver, and in the pancreas, spleen, renal cortex, and renal medulla. Measurement reproducibility between readers was assessed with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Variability across MR imagers was analyzed by using between- and within-subject coefficients of variation (CVs) and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results Between-reader reproducibility was high for Dt (ICC, 94.6%), intermediate for Fp (ICC, 81.7%), and low for Dp (ICC, 69.5%). Between- and within-subject CVs of Dt were relatively high (>20%) in the left lobe of the liver and relatively low (<10%) in the renal cortex and renal medulla. CVs generally exceeded 15% for Fp values and 20% for Dp. ANOVA indicated significant differences (P < .05) between MR imagers. Conclusion IVIM parameters in the upper abdomen may differ substantially across MR imagers. (©) RSNA, 2015 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26678455

  17. Evaluation of Effecting Parameters on Optimum Arrangement of Urban Land Uses and Assessment of Their Compatibility Using Adjacency Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaezi, S.; Mesgari, M. S.; Kaviary, F.

    2015-12-01

    Todays, stability of human life is threatened by a set of parameters. So sustainable urban development theory is introduced after the stability theory to protect the urban environment. In recent years, sustainable urban development gains a lot of attraction by different sciences and totally becomes a final target for urban development planners and managers to use resources properly and to establish a balanced relationship among human, community, and nature. Proper distribution of services for decreasing spatial inequalities, promoting the quality of living environment, and approaching an urban stability requires an analytical understanding of the present situation. Understanding the present situation is the first step for making a decision and planning effectively. This paper evaluates effective parameters affecting proper arrangement of land-uses using a descriptive-analytical method, to develop a conceptual framework for understanding of the present situation of urban land-uses, based on the assessment of their compatibility. This study considers not only the local parameters, but also spatial parameters are included in this study. The results indicate that land-uses in the zone considered here are not distributed properly. Considering mentioned parameters and distributing service land-uses effectively cause the better use of these land-uses.

  18. Critical evaluation of parameter consistency and predictive uncertainty in hydrological modeling: A case study using Bayesian total error analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyer, Mark; Renard, Benjamin; Kavetski, Dmitri; Kuczera, George; Franks, Stewart William; Srikanthan, Sri

    2009-12-01

    The lack of a robust framework for quantifying the parametric and predictive uncertainty of conceptual rainfall-runoff (CRR) models remains a key challenge in hydrology. The Bayesian total error analysis (BATEA) methodology provides a comprehensive framework to hypothesize, infer, and evaluate probability models describing input, output, and model structural error. This paper assesses the ability of BATEA and standard calibration approaches (standard least squares (SLS) and weighted least squares (WLS)) to address two key requirements of uncertainty assessment: (1) reliable quantification of predictive uncertainty and (2) reliable estimation of parameter uncertainty. The case study presents a challenging calibration of the lumped GR4J model to a catchment with ephemeral responses and large rainfall gradients. Postcalibration diagnostics, including checks of predictive distributions using quantile-quantile analysis, suggest that while still far from perfect, BATEA satisfied its assumed probability models better than SLS and WLS. In addition, WLS/SLS parameter estimates were highly dependent on the selected rain gauge and calibration period. This will obscure potential relationships between CRR parameters and catchment attributes and prevent the development of meaningful regional relationships. Conversely, BATEA provided consistent, albeit more uncertain, parameter estimates and thus overcomes one of the obstacles to parameter regionalization. However, significant departures from the calibration assumptions remained even in BATEA, e.g., systematic overestimation of predictive uncertainty, especially in validation. This is likely due to the inferred rainfall errors compensating for simplified treatment of model structural error.

  19. Precision Measurements of the 278 keV {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}) and the 151 keV {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}) Resonance Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Borowski, M.; Lieb, K. P.; Uhrmacher, M.; Bolse, W.

    2009-01-28

    In thin film technology, analytical methods for monitoring the deposition of oxide and nitride coatings and the effects of corrosive, laser and ion-beam treatments have attracted considerable attention. For depth-profiling the concentrations of light isotopes, resonant nuclear reaction analysis is an excellent non-destructive ion-beam analytical tool. We report here on precision measurements of the 278 keV {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}) and the 151 keV {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}) resonances using the high-resolution proton beam of the Goettingen IONAS accelerator. The deduced resonance energies E{sub R} and total widths {gamma}(in the laboratory system) are E{sub R} = 277.60(27) keV and {gamma} = 1115(33) eV for the {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}) resonance, and E{sub R} = 150.97(26) keV and {gamma} = 178(35) eV for the {sup 18}O(p,{alpha}) resonance. These values are significantly more precise than the ones quoted in the literature.

  20. Change in resonance parameters of a linear molecule as it bends: Evidence in electron-impact vibrational transitions of hot COS and CO2 molecules*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Masamitsu; Ishijima, Yohei; Kato, Hidetoshi; Mogi, Daisuke; Takahashi, Yoshinao; Fukae, Katsuya; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Shimamura, Isao

    2016-05-01

    Inelastic and superelastic electron-impact vibrational excitation functions of hot carbonyl sulphide COS (and hot CO2) are measured for electron energies from 0.5 to 3.0 eV (1.5 to 6.0 eV) and at a scattering angle of 90°. Based on the vibrational populations and the principle of detailed balance, these excitation functions are decomposed into contributions from state-to-state vibrational transitions involving up to the second bending overtone (030) in the electronically ground state. Both the 2 Π resonance for COS around 1.2 eV and the 2 Π u resonance for CO2 around 3.8 eV are shifted to lower energies as the initial vibrational state is excited in the bending mode. The width of the resonance hump for COS changes only little as the molecule bends, whereas that of the overall boomerang resonance for CO2 becomes narrower. The angular distribution of the electrons resonantly scattered by hot COS and hot CO2 is also measured. The different shapes depending on the vibrational transitions and gas temperatures are discussed in terms of the symmetry of the vibrational wave functions.

  1. Evaluation of Biochemical Parameters and Genetic Markers for Association with Meat Tenderness in South African Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A large proportion of South African feedlot cattle are crossbreds of Brahman (BrX, Bos indicus), and Simmental (SiX, Bos taurus). A sample of 20 grain fed bulls from each of these crossbreeds was used to compare meat quality with that of the small frame indigenous Nguni (NgX, Sanga) by evaluating a ...

  2. EVALUATION OF CLIGEN PRECIPITATION PARAMETERS AND THEIR IMPLICATION ON WEPP RUNOFF AND EROSION PREDICTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The quality of synthesized daily weather directly affects the output of hydrological and agricultural response models. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the ability of the CLIGEN model to reproduce daily, monthly, and annual precipitation amounts, extremes, and storm patterns (i.e. storm...

  3. An Evaluation of the Permittivity of Two Different Rock Types Using Microwave Resonator and Waveguide Cutoff Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olkkonen, Martta-Kaisa; Eskelinen, Pekka; Huuskonen-Snicker, Eeva; Pellinen, Terhi; Olmos Martinez, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Methods of measuring the complex permittivity of different rock types are demonstrated in the frequency range from 6 GHz to 17 GHz. The used methods are based on the cylindrical resonator and waveguide cutoff frequency principles. This study is part of a larger research project that aims to characterize the electrical properties of asphalt for road surveying purposes. The studied rock types are metavolcanic rock with intermediate composition and pegmatite. The permittivity values gained with the resonator method are 6.2 for the metavolcanic rock and 4.5 for the pegmatite rock type, whereas the imaginary parts are 0.04 and 0.02. The permittivity values gained with the cutoff frequency method are 6.17 and 4.76 respectively. A reference measurement was made only for the metavolcanic rock in a transmission configuration with two antennas and the permittivity result was 6.21. The three different methods provide consistent permittivity values and are suitable for reliable permittivity evaluation.

  4. Automatic Mapping Extraction from Multiecho T2-Star Weighted Magnetic Resonance Images for Improving Morphological Evaluations in Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shaode; Xie, Yaoqin

    2013-01-01

    Mapping extraction is useful in medical image analysis. Similarity coefficient mapping (SCM) replaced signal response to time course in tissue similarity mapping with signal response to TE changes in multiecho T2-star weighted magnetic resonance imaging without contrast agent. Since different tissues are with different sensitivities to reference signals, a new algorithm is proposed by adding a sensitivity index to SCM. It generates two mappings. One measures relative signal strength (SSM) and the other depicts fluctuation magnitude (FMM). Meanwhile, the new method is adaptive to generate a proper reference signal by maximizing the sum of contrast index (CI) from SSM and FMM without manual delineation. Based on four groups of images from multiecho T2-star weighted magnetic resonance imaging, the capacity of SSM and FMM in enhancing image contrast and morphological evaluation is validated. Average contrast improvement index (CII) of SSM is 1.57, 1.38, 1.34, and 1.41. Average CII of FMM is 2.42, 2.30, 2.24, and 2.35. Visual analysis of regions of interest demonstrates that SSM and FMM show better morphological structures than original images, T2-star mapping and SCM. These extracted mappings can be further applied in information fusion, signal investigation, and tissue segmentation. PMID:24379892

  5. Biomechanical evaluation of oversized drilling technique on primary implant stability measured by insertion torque and resonance frequency analysis

    PubMed Central

    Santamaría-Arrieta, Gorka; Brizuela-Velasco, Aritza; Fernández-González, Felipe J.; Chávarri-Prado, David; Chento-Valiente, Yelko; Solaberrieta, Eneko; Diéguez-Pereira, Markel; Yurrebaso-Asúa, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the influence of implant site preparation depth on primary stability measured by insertion torque and resonance frequency analysis (RFA). Material and Methods Thirty-two implant sites were prepared in eight veal rib blocks. Sixteen sites were prepared using the conventional drilling sequence recommended by the manufacturer to a working depth of 10mm. The remaining 16 sites were prepared using an oversize drilling technique (overpreparation) to a working depth of 12mm. Bone density was determined using cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). The implants were placed and primary stability was measured by two methods: insertion torque (Ncm), and RFA (implant stability quotient [ISQ]). Results The highest torque values were achieved by the conventional drilling technique (10mm). The ANOVA test confirmed that there was a significant correlation between torque and drilling depth (p<0.05). However, no statistically significant differences were obtained between ISQ values at 10 or 12 mm drilling depths (p>0.05) at either measurement direction (cortical and medullar). No statistical relation between torque and ISQ values was identified, or between bone density and primary stability (p >0.05). Conclusions Vertical overpreparation of the implant bed will obtain lower insertion torque values, but does not produce statistically significant differences in ISQ values. Key words:Implant stability quotient, overdrilling, primary stability, resonance frequency analysis, torque. PMID:27398182

  6. Förster resonance energy transfer, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. III. Exact stochastic path integral evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Moix, Jeremy M.; Ma, Jian; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-03-07

    A numerically exact path integral treatment of the absorption and emission spectra of open quantum systems is presented that requires only the straightforward solution of a stochastic differential equation. The approach converges rapidly enabling the calculation of spectra of large excitonic systems across the complete range of system parameters and for arbitrary bath spectral densities. With the numerically exact absorption and emission operators, one can also immediately compute energy transfer rates using the multi-chromophoric Förster resonant energy transfer formalism. Benchmark calculations on the emission spectra of two level systems are presented demonstrating the efficacy of the stochastic approach. This is followed by calculations of the energy transfer rates between two weakly coupled dimer systems as a function of temperature and system-bath coupling strength. It is shown that the recently developed hybrid cumulant expansion (see Paper II) is the only perturbative method capable of generating uniformly reliable energy transfer rates and emission spectra across a broad range of system parameters.

  7. Förster resonance energy transfer, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. III. Exact stochastic path integral evaluation.

    PubMed

    Moix, Jeremy M; Ma, Jian; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-03-01

    A numerically exact path integral treatment of the absorption and emission spectra of open quantum systems is presented that requires only the straightforward solution of a stochastic differential equation. The approach converges rapidly enabling the calculation of spectra of large excitonic systems across the complete range of system parameters and for arbitrary bath spectral densities. With the numerically exact absorption and emission operators, one can also immediately compute energy transfer rates using the multi-chromophoric Förster resonant energy transfer formalism. Benchmark calculations on the emission spectra of two level systems are presented demonstrating the efficacy of the stochastic approach. This is followed by calculations of the energy transfer rates between two weakly coupled dimer systems as a function of temperature and system-bath coupling strength. It is shown that the recently developed hybrid cumulant expansion (see Paper II) is the only perturbative method capable of generating uniformly reliable energy transfer rates and emission spectra across a broad range of system parameters. PMID:25747062

  8. Successive evaluation of multiple parameters in individual cells: the SEMPIC photometric system.

    PubMed

    Dörmer, P; Pachmann, K; Lau, B

    1978-12-28

    An automated microphotometric system has been designed for the successive assessment of a maximum number of parameters from individual cells. The hardware and software elements are described as well as the various photometric functions that can be performed. The aim is to obtain a multiparameter analysis of morphology, cytochemistry, cell surface characteristics, and metabolic activity including cell cycle characteristics for any set of cells selected from a sample. The combination of DNA synthesis rate determination in a really quantitative approach with the analysis of features of nuclear chromatin texture opens up a new field for associating morphology with functional properties. Examples of application are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the system in a heterogeneous cell population of a very limited sample size. For this purpose, human peripheral blood cells grown in diffusion chambers in preirradiated mice were investigated. It is shown that, depending on their functions, different cell types may have quite different nuclear-to-cell area ratios. Further, a crude morphological parameter, such as the degree of basophilia of Giemsa-stained cells, may be associated with the rate of DNA synthesis, thus bearing information on the replicative activity of a cell. Cell surface properties related to the leukemia-associated cALL antigen are investigated in a human-derived cell line and correlated with cell-cycle characteristics. It is concluded that different antigenic sites rather than cell-cycle dependent differences of antigen density account for the outcome of a bimodal distribution. PMID:283066

  9. Parameters affecting resin-anchored cable bolt performance: Results of in situ evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Zelanko, J.C.; Mucho, T.P.; Compton, C.S.; Long, L.E.; Bailey, P.E.

    1995-11-01

    Cable bolt support techniques, including hardware and anchorage systems, continue to evolve to meet US mining requirements. For cable support systems to be successfully implemented into new ground control areas, the mechanics of this support and the potential range of performance need to be better understood. To contribute to this understanding, a series of 36 pull tests were performed on 10 ft long cable bolts using various combinations of hole diameters, resin formulations, anchor types, and with and without resin dams. These test provided insight as to the influence of these four parameters on cable system performance. Performance was assessed in terms of support capacity (maximum load attained in a pull test), system stiffness (assessed from two intervals of load-deformation), and from the general load-deformation response. Three characteristic load-deformation responses were observed. An Analysis of Variance identified a number of main effects and interactions of significance to support capacity and stiffness. The factorial experiment performed in this study provides insight to the effects of several design parameters associated with resin-anchored cable bolts.

  10. Evaluation and optimization of handle design parameters of a grass trimming machine.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Zulquernain

    2008-01-01

    The grass trimming machine is a widely used agricultural machine for cutting grass by the roadside and in other areas in Malaysia. Hand-arm vibration (HAV) syndrome is very common among workers operating power tools and performing similar work for extended periods. Grass trimming involves the use of a motorized cutter spinning at high speed, resulting in high levels of HAV among its operators. The existing D-shape handle causes HAV-related stress and operational load in operators. This research proposes a new design of a handle of the grass trimming machine. When this new design was compared with the old one, it was found that the new handle resulted in 18% lower HAV. To find the lowest HAV, 3 critical parameters of the new handle (length, angle and material of the cap of the handle) were optimized using the Taguchi quality tool. Appropriately selected parameters of the new handle significantly reduced the occurrence of HAV among grass trimmers. PMID:18954544

  11. Quantitative evaluation of sonophoresis efficiency and its dependence on sonication parameters and particle size.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kun Loong; Zhou, Yufeng

    2015-03-01

    Transdermal drug delivery makes a critical contribution to medical practice and some advantages over conventional oral administration and hypodermic injection. Enhancement of percutaneous absorption or penetration of therapeutic agents (ie, drugs and macromolecules) by ultrasound, termed sonophoresis, has been applied and studied for decades. In this study, the penetration percentage through porcine ear skin specimens was determined quantitatively by measuring the fluorescence from nanoparticles of 60, 220, and 840 nm in size in a receptor chamber at different sonication parameters (ie, duty cycle, 20%-100%; acoustic intensity, 0.3-1.0 W/cm(2); duration, 7-30 minutes; and frequency, 1 MHz). In general, the sonophoresis efficiency increased with the acoustic intensity, duty cycle, and sonication duration but decreased with the particle size (mean ± SD, 62.6% ± 5.4% for 60-nm versus 11.9% ± 1.1% for 840-nm polystyrene nanospheres after 30 minutes of sonication at 0.5 W/cm(2) and a 100% duty cycle; P < .05). On scanning electron microscopy the pore size remained the same (≈100 μm), but more flakes were observed with the progress of sonication. In summary, sonophoresis efficiency is dependent on the ultrasound parameters and particle size. Sufficient sonication would lead to satisfactory penetration of even submicrometer objects through the pores. PMID:25715372

  12. Evaluating the impact of cell culture process parameters on monoclonal antibody N-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Marija; Villiger, Thomas K; Morbidelli, Massimo; Soos, Miroslav

    2014-10-20

    Bioreactor process parameters influence the N-linked glycosylation profile of the produced monoclonal antibodies. A systematic assessment of their impact is a prerequisite for providing controllability over glycosylation, one of the most critical quality attributes of therapeutic antibodies. In this study we investigated the effect of single and combined chemical and mechanical stress parameters on the glycan microheterogeneity of an IgG1 antibody using a shift-experiment procedure in batch cultures. The N-linked glycosylation profile of the murine IgG1 was found to be highly complex since it included terminal galactosylation and sialylation, as well as variable core-fucosylation. Within a pH range of 6.8 to 7.8 differences in galactosylation and sialylation of approximately 50% were obtained. Variation of dissolved oxygen tension (10-90% air saturation) resulted in a maximum variability of 20% in galactosylation and 30% in sialylation. In contrast, no significant effect on the glycosylation profile was observed when osmolarity increased from 320 to 420 mOsm/kg and sparging from 0.05 to 0.2 vvm. In this study a better understanding of bioprocess-related factors affecting critical quality attributes under the scope of QbD is provided and can bring us one step closer towards desired and targeted glycosylation for future therapeutic proteins. PMID:25173615

  13. Detailed evaluation of the performance of microfluidic T mixers using fluorescence and ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masca, Sergiu I.; Rodriguez-Mendieta, Iñigo R.; Friel, Claire T.; Radford, Sheena E.; Smith, D. Alastair

    2006-05-01

    A reliable device that produces efficient mixing with a short dead time has enormous utility in the kinetic analysis of biochemical and chemical processes. We have designed two different T mixers that use moderate flow rates (0.2-0.4ml/s), can monitor reactions up to several milliseconds, and achieve mixing times as low as 20μs. The two mixers are easy to build and dismantle, reliable, and can perform hundreds of experiments without blocking. The first mixer comprises a stainless steel block, containing a microchannel, glued to a quartz cuvette, containing a 200×200μm2 observation channel defining a conventional T mixer. The reactions are monitored by imaging the length of the observation channel onto a charge-coupled device camera. In the second mixer the entire T (200×200μm2 internal cross section) is contained within a 40-mm-long quartz cuvette. We have adopted a novel approach to controlling the entrance channel bore by inserting a stainless steel wire in order to increase the linear speed of the impinging fluids. Using a dye to visualize the flow profile inside the second T mixer, it was shown that in this T geometry segregation of the reactants is observed in the junction between the inlet channels and the observation channel (T junction) and mixing occurs entirely in the observation channel. We thoroughly tested the two mixers through several kinetic reactions using both fluorescence and ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy measurements. We show that both mixers provide efficient mixing with nominal dead times (using 1:10 v /v dilution), calculated using the quenching of the fluorescence of N-acetyl-L-tryptophanamide by N-bromosuccinimide, of 200±20 and 100±10μs, for each mixer, respectively. However, the ability to monitor within the inlet channels and the entire observation channel of the second mixer shows that this standard approach to estimating the dead time is artifactual, since it relies on assuming a constant flow speed throughout the

  14. Mapping regions of equifinality in the parameter space - A method to evaluate inverse estimates and to plan experimental boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrer, Markus; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2010-05-01

    Only the combination of physical models and experiments can elucidate the processes of reactive transport in porous media. Column scale percolation experiments offer a great opportunity to identify and quantify processes of reactive transport. In contrast to batch experiments, approximately natural flow dynamics can be realized. However, due to the complexity of interactions and wide range of parameters the experiment can be insensitive to the wanted process and misinterpretation of the results is likely. In the proposed talk we want to show how numerical tools can be applied for thorough planning and evaluation of experiments. The central tool are maps of regions of equifinality, which are gained by a thorough sensitivity analysis of the parameter space. This tool can help on the one hand to plan the experimental boundary conditions such that the results are sensitive to the wanted process. On the other hand, they provide information on the reliability of inversely gained parameters of flow and transport. In the proposed talk we want to show from all three phases of the method. In the first phase the equifinality maps are used to choose an appropriate boundary condition for the experiment. In the second phase, the according column experiments are conducted and simulated inversely. We show break-through curves from such experiments with materials from different soils, sites and materials (Coke oven sites, abandoned industrial sites, destruction debris, municipal waste incineration ash). The columns were subjected to multiple flow interruptions and different flow velocities and parameters of reactive transport were gained in inverse simulations. The third phase consisted of an evaluation of the reliability of the parameters applying again maps of equifinality. Some drawbacks of the model could be identified and gave valuable hints on the actual processes.

  15. Evaluation of Sedimentary and Terrain Parameters from MARDI Camera Imaging and Stereogrammetry at Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minitti, M. E.; Garvin, J. B.; Yingst, R. A.; Maki, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) provides mm-resolution imaging of an ~0.92 m by 0.64 cm patch of the Martian surface beneath the rover. Since Sol 310, MARDI has acquired images under twilight illumination to optimize image quality for quantitative sedimentology analysis. This imaging, carried out after each rover drive, permits systematic measurement of clast size distribution, inter-clast spacing distribution, and surface areal coverage. Sedimentological parameters derived from these observations include clast sorting (mean/var of size) and other characteristics related to transport mechanisms or in-place weathering. Measured surface parameters (e.g., clast sorting) can be correlated with surface units qualitatively defined (e.g., smooth, rocky, outcrop) in images obtained by HiRISE, MSL Mastcam and MSL Navcam. In addition, a preliminary longitudinal analysis has been conducted to examine possible source regions for the bulk of the gravels by correlating sedimentary parameters with distance from either Peace Valles or Mt. Sharp, with evidence of trends associated with inter-clast spacing. Sets of stereo MARDI images that allow the creation of high vertical precision (±2 mm) digital elevation models (DEMs) have also been acquired via two techniques. First, MARDI images taken at each step of comprehensive wheel imaging activities yield 5 MARDI images with ~50% overlap. Second, two MARDI sidewalk video imaging mode (SVIM) experiments yielded a continuous set of images during a rover drive with 75-82% overlap. DEMs created via either technique can be used to quantify terrain properties and measure clast cross-sectional shapes. The microtopographic properties of the Sol 651 surface (e.g., mean/sigma of local elevation and slopes) and its sub-cm texture a