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Sample records for resonant controller ppir

  1. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    DOEpatents

    Chang, J.J.

    1995-07-18

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality. 5 figs.

  2. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jim J.

    1995-07-18

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality.

  3. Voltage control of ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ziyao; Peng, Bin; Zhu, Mingmin; Liu, Ming

    2016-05-01

    Voltage control of magnetism in multiferroics, where the ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity are simultaneously exhibiting, is of great importance to achieve compact, fast and energy efficient voltage controllable magnetic/microwave devices. Particularly, these devices are widely used in radar, aircraft, cell phones and satellites, where volume, response time and energy consumption is critical. Researchers realized electric field tuning of magnetic properties like magnetization, magnetic anisotropy and permeability in varied multiferroic heterostructures such as bulk, thin films and nanostructure by different magnetoelectric (ME) coupling mechanism: strain/stress, interfacial charge, spin-electromagnetic (EM) coupling and exchange coupling, etc. In this review, we focus on voltage control of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) in multiferroics. ME coupling-induced FMR change is critical in microwave devices, where the electric field tuning of magnetic effective anisotropic field determines the tunability of the performance of microwave devices. Experimentally, FMR measurement technique is also an important method to determine the small effective magnetic field change in small amount of magnetic material precisely due to its high sensitivity and to reveal the deep science of multiferroics, especially, voltage control of magnetism in novel mechanisms like interfacial charge, spin-EM coupling and exchange coupling.

  4. Acoustic resonance techniques for quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, D.N.

    1992-09-01

    Acoustic resonance based nondestructive techniques are described that can be used for both process and quality control in manufacturing. The Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (AS) technique is highlighted for its capability in fluid property (flow, density, viscosity, and speed of sound) monitoring. Possible applications of these noninvasive techniques for textile manufacturing are pointed out.

  5. Acoustic resonance techniques for quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, D.N.

    1992-01-01

    Acoustic resonance based nondestructive techniques are described that can be used for both process and quality control in manufacturing. The Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (AS) technique is highlighted for its capability in fluid property (flow, density, viscosity, and speed of sound) monitoring. Possible applications of these noninvasive techniques for textile manufacturing are pointed out.

  6. Temperature controller for crystal resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turlington, T. R.

    1980-01-01

    Controller operates on less than 5W prime power and heats crystal from -10 C to 75 C in less than 45s. Unit is faster and more accurate (to within 0.7 C) than other inexpensive controllers and faster and less expensive than very precise controllers in vacuum flasks.

  7. Bifurcation control of subsynchronous resonance using TCSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alomari, Majdi M.; Zhu, Jian Guo

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents the use of Thyristor-Controlled Series Capacitor (TCSC) to control bifurcations of subsynchronous resonance (SSR) in multimachine power system. The modified second system of the IEEE second benchmark model of subsynchronous resonance is considered. The dynamics of the damper windings, automatic voltage regulator (AVR), and power system stabilizer (PSS) on SSR in power system are included. In the case of neglecting TCSC, the results show that the operating point of the system loses stability via subcritical Hopf bifurcation. When we add TCSC to the system, all bifurcations are eliminated. Therefore, the Thyristor-Controlled compensated system never loses stability at any realistic firing angle.

  8. THE SNS RESONANCE CONTROL COOLING SYSTEM CONTROL VALVE UPGRADE PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Derrick C; Schubert, James Phillip; Tang, Johnny Y

    2008-01-01

    The normal-conducting linac of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) uses 10 separate Resonance Control Cooling System (RCCS) water skids to control the resonance of 6 Drift Tube Linac (DTL) and 4 Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) accelerating structures. The RCCS water skids use 2 control valves; one to regulate the chilled water flow and the other to bypass water to a chilled water heat exchanger. These valves have hydraulic actuators that provide position and feedback to the control system. Frequency oscillations occur using these hydraulic actuators due to their coarse movement and control of the valves. New pneumatic actuator and control positioners have been installed on the DTL3 RCCS water skid to give finer control and regulation of DTL3 cavity temperature. This paper shows a comparison of resonance control performance for the two valve configurations.

  9. Control of Cavity Resonance Using Oscillatory Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarfe, Alison Lamp; Chokani, Ndaona

    2000-01-01

    The near-zero net mass oscillatory blowing control of a subsonic cavity flow has been experimentally investigated. An actuator was designed and fabricated to provide both steady and oscillatory blowing over a range of blowing amplitudes and forcing frequencies. The blowing was applied just upstream of the cavity front Wall through interchangeable plate configurations These configurations enabled the effects of hole size, hole shape, and blowing angle to be examined. A significant finding is that in terms of the blowing amplitude, the near zero net mass oscillatory blowing is much more effective than steady blowing; momentum coefficients Lip two orders of magnitude smaller than those required for steady blowing are sufficient to accomplish the same control of cavity resonance. The detailed measurements obtained in the experiment include fluctuating pressure data within the cavity wall, and hot-wire measurements of the cavity shear layer. Spectral and wavelet analysis techniques are applied to understand the dynamics and mechanisms of the cavity flow with control. The oscillatory blowing, is effective in enhancing the mixing in the cavity shear layer and thus modifying the feedback loop associated with the cavity resonance. The nonlinear interactions in the cavity flow are no longer driven by the resonant cavity modes but by the forcing associated with the oscillatory blowing. The oscillatory blowing does not suppress the mode switching behavior of the cavity flow, but the amplitude modulation is reduced.

  10. Plasmon resonant liposomes for controlled drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knights-Mitchell, Shellie S.; Romanowski, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Nanotechnology use in drug delivery promotes a reduction in systemic toxicity, improved pharmacokinetics, and better drug bioavailability. Liposomes continue to be extensively researched as drug delivery systems (DDS) with formulations such as Doxil® and Ambisome® approved by FDA and successfully marketed in the United States. However, the limited ability to precisely control release of active ingredients from these vesicles continues to challenge the broad implementation of this technology. Moreover, the full potential of the carrier to sequester drugs until it can reach its intended target has yet to be realized. Here, we describe a liposomal DDS that releases therapeutic doses of an anticancer drug in response to external stimulus. Earlier, we introduced degradable plasmon resonant liposomes. These constructs, obtained by reducing gold on the liposome surface, facilitate spatial and temporal release of drugs upon laser light illumination that ultimately induces an increase in temperature. In this work, plasmon resonant liposomes have been developed to stably encapsulate and retain doxorubicin at physiological conditions represented by isotonic saline at 37o C and pH 7.4. Subsequently, they are stimulated to release contents either by a 5o C increase in temperature or by laser illumination (760 nm and 88 mW/cm2 power density). Successful development of degradable plasmon resonant liposomes responsive to near-infrared light or moderate hyperthermia can provide a new delivery method for multiple lipophilic and hydrophilic drugs with pharmacokinetic profiles that limit clinical utility.

  11. Resonant mode controllers for launch vehicle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, Ken E.; Roth, Mary Ellen

    1992-01-01

    Electro-mechanical actuator (EMA) systems are currently being investigated for the National Launch System (NLS) as a replacement for hydraulic actuators due to the large amount of manpower and support hardware required to maintain the hydraulic systems. EMA systems in weight sensitive applications, such as launch vehicles, have been limited to around 5 hp due to system size, controller efficiency, thermal management, and battery size. Presented here are design and test data for an EMA system that competes favorably in weight and is superior in maintainability to the hydraulic system. An EMA system uses dc power provided by a high energy density bipolar lithium thionyl chloride battery, with power conversion performed by low loss resonant topologies, and a high efficiency induction motor controlled with a high performance field oriented controller to drive a linear actuator.

  12. Nonlinear resonance control of unsteady hydrodynamic actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Annaswamy, Anuradha

    2005-11-01

    The nonlinear resonance properties of inferior olive neurons, that are responsible for restoring balance in animals, are considered for control of periodic flapping foils. The approach is motivated by a need to make the unsteady foils of a recently demonstrated Biorobotic Autonomous Underwater Vehicle at NUWC fault tolerant because many foils work in phase to allow the vehicle undertake precision maneuvering motions. Limit cycle properties are used to restore variables such as roll, pitch bias and frequency subsequent to pulse or impulse disturbances. Stabilization is demonstrated in a full scale foil in a water tank.

  13. How the pharyngeal resonator is controlled articulatorily

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esling, John H.

    2005-04-01

    Indigenous languages of North America, especially west coast Vancouver Island Nuuchahnulth and Interior BC Salish, illustrate an extensive range of use of the pharyngeal resonator. The pharynx is classified as part of the laryngeal articulator (rather than lingual) because the laryngeal constrictor mechanism (controlling changes from the glottis to the aryepiglottic folds) is the principal articulator whose movements determine the shape of the pharynx. The Nuuchahnulth (Nootka) dialects (e.g., Ahousaht) and Thompson, Moses-Columbia, and Spokane/Kalispel Salish varieties all close the larynx completely for the speech sound epiglottal stop. With the airway optimally shut, the pharynx is small; the aryepiglottic folds are pressed against the epiglottic tubercle, the tongue is retracted, and the larynx is raised. There are good indications that the thyroarytenoid, aryepiglottic, thyroepiglottic, hyoglossus and hyothyroid muscles participate in this buckling maneuvre. These languages also contain either a pharyngeal fricative or approximant (at the same place of articulation but with less stricture) and, in Thompson, also pharyngealized uvulars (with even less stricture). Pharyngeal resonance in all of these cases is dependent initially on the shortening of the supraglottic tube and subsequently on the combined effect of tongue retraction and larynx raising reducing the volume immediately above the supraglottic tube.

  14. Passive separation control by acoustic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. L.; Spedding, G. R.

    2013-10-01

    At transitional Reynolds numbers, the laminar boundary layer separation and possible reattachment on a smooth airfoil, or wing section, are notoriously sensitive to small variations in geometry or in the fluid environment. We report here on the results of a pilot study that adds to this list of sensitivities. The presence of small holes in the suction surface of an Eppler 387 wing has a transformative effect upon the aerodynamics, by changing the mean chordwise separation line location. These changes are not simply a consequence of the presence of the small cavities, which by themselves have no effect. Acoustic resonance in the backing cavities generates tones that interact with intrinsic flow instabilities. Possible consequences for passive flow control strategies are discussed together with potential problems in measurements through pressure taps in such flow regimes.

  15. Resonance modeling and control via magnetorheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letelier, Mario F.; Siginer, Dennis A.; Stockle, Juan S.

    2016-08-01

    A method to model and minimize resonant structural oscillations using magnetorheological dampers is presented. The response of the magnetorheological fluid flowing in a circular tube under a pressure gradient to the applied variable magnetic field is tailored to determine the optimum stress field in the fluid to mitigate resonance effects.

  16. Toward broadband electroacoustic resonators through optimized feedback control strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulandet, R.; Lissek, H.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the design of broadband electroacoustic resonators for low-frequency room equalization. An electroacoustic resonator denotes a loudspeaker used as a membrane resonator, the acoustic impedance of which can be modified through proportional feedback control, to match a target impedance. However, such impedance matching only occurs over a limited bandwidth around resonance, which can limit its use for the low-frequency equalization of rooms, requiring an effective control at least up to the Schroeder frequency. Previous experiments have shown that impedance matching can be achieved over a range of a few octaves using a simple proportional control law. But there is still a limit to the feedback gain, beyond which the feedback-controlled loudspeaker becomes non-dissipative. This paper evaluates the benefits of using PID control and phase compensation techniques to improve the overall performance of the electroacoustic resonator. More specifically, it is shown that some adverse effects due to high-order dynamics in the moving-coil transducer can be mitigated. The corresponding control settings are also identified with equivalent electroacoustic resonator parameters, allowing a straightforward design of the controller. Experimental results using PID control and phase compensation are finally compared in terms of sound absorption performances. As a conclusion the overall performances of electroacoustic resonators for damping the modal resonances inside a duct are presented, along with general discussions on practical implementation and the extension to actual room modes damping.

  17. Narrowband feedback for narrowband control of resonant and non-resonant vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Myeong; Brennan, Michael J.; Abreu, Gustavo L. C. M.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a simple feedback methodology that uses second order filters to control narrowband resonant and non-resonant vibration of a structural system. In particular, a single degree-of-freedom system is studied throughout the paper. The idea of the methodology is based on the fact that direct feedback is effective for in-phase vibration control. Thus, the position, velocity and acceleration are respectively fed back to control the low, resonant and high frequency vibration of the system. Each of these is passed through a band pass filter of second order that is inserted to extract and feed back the in-phase signal component only. This is called narrowband feedback. It is demonstrated with experiments that narrowband feedback is useful for narrowband control of resonant and non-resonant vibration.

  18. Controlling light with resonant plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Waele, R.

    2009-06-01

    Plasmons are collective oscillations of free electrons in a metal. At optical frequencies plasmons enable nanoscale confinement of light in metal nanostructures. This ability has given rise to many applications in e.g. photothermal cancer treatment, light trapping in photovoltaic cells, and sensing. Metal nanostructures also allow for manipulation of optical energy, providing such functionalities as guiding or redirecting light at the nanoscale. This thesis focuses on nanoscale control of light using three types of metal nanostructures: 1) arrays of coupled metal nanoparticles, 2) metal nanowires, and 3) (coupled) coaxial waveguides. Chapter 3 describes the optical behavior of a metal nanoparticle array illuminated sideways along the array axis. Confocal microscopy shows that field concentrates on just a few particles at the front or back side of the particle chain. By changing the illumination wavelength we can control which side of the chain becomes excited. In chapter 4 we discuss angle resolved transmission measurements to determine the dispersion relation of plasmon modes in Au and Ag particle arrays. Our results confirm that far-field dynamic interactions between particles are important, even for structures five times smaller than the wavelength. Taking into account dynamic interactions we calculate that the propagation length in plasmon particle arrays can be as much as 10 μm, which is an order of magnitude higher than previously estimated using quasi-electrostatic theory. In chapter 5 we show that metal nanowires behave as plasmon resonators. We use cathodoluminescence imaging spectroscopy to determine the eigenmodes in 500-1200-nm-long Au nanowires at a resolution less than 10 nm. By combining spectral and spatial information we determine the dispersion relation for plasmons confined within the metal nanowires. Chapter 6 focuses on coaxial plasmon waveguides. Optical transmission measurements on coaxial apertures in a Ag film point out that the plasmon

  19. Phase-Shift Control of Resonant Frequencies of Magnetostatic Wave Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Takuro; Nakazawa, Hiroaki

    1994-05-01

    We discuss a possible technique to control the resonant frequencies of a straight-edge magnetostatic wave (MSW) resonator without changing the external applied magnetic field and the circuit parameters of a feedback load circuit. The method is to use two additional microstrip electrodes at the edges of the resonator and two varactor diodes connected in series. Upon varying the bias voltages to the varactor diodes, the input admittance at the center electrode can be changed. Theoretical investigation reveals that very large resonant frequency shifts can be obtained by changing only the bias voltage change to the varactor diodes, which may be useful in mobile telephone applications in the gigaherz frequency range.

  20. Modification of piezoelectric vibratory gyroscope resonator parameters by feedback control.

    PubMed

    Loveday, P W; Rogers, C A

    1998-01-01

    A method for analyzing the effect of feedback control on the dynamics of piezoelectric resonators used in vibratory gyroscopes has been developed. This method can be used to determine the feasibility of replacing the traditional mechanical balancing operations, used to adjust the resonant frequency, by displacement feedback and for determining the velocity feedback required to produce a particular bandwidth. Experiments were performed on a cylindrical resonator with discrete piezoelectric actuation and sensing elements to demonstrate the principles. Good agreement between analysis and experiment was obtained, and it was shown that this type of resonator could be balanced by displacement feedback. The analysis method presented also is applicable to micromachined piezoelectric gyroscopes. PMID:18244281

  1. Controller for Driving a Piezoelectric Actuator at Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldrich, Jack; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi; Chang, Zensheu

    2008-01-01

    A digital control system based partly on an extremum-seeking control algorithm tracks the changing resonance frequency of a piezoelectric actuator or an electrically similar electromechanical device that is driven by a sinusoidal excitation signal and is required to be maintained at or near resonance in the presence of uncertain, changing external loads and disturbances. Somewhat more specifically, on the basis of measurements of the performance of the actuator, this system repeatedly estimates the resonance frequency and alters the excitation frequency as needed to keep it at or near the resonance frequency. In the original application for which this controller was developed, the piezoelectric actuator is part of an ultrasonic/sonic drill/corer. Going beyond this application, the underlying principles of design and operation are generally applicable to tracking changing resonance frequencies of heavily perturbed harmonic oscillators. Resonance-frequency-tracking analog electronic circuits are commercially available, but are not adequate for the present purpose for several reasons: The input/output characteristics of analog circuits tend to drift, often necessitating recalibration, especially whenever the same controller is used in driving a different resonator. In the case of an actuator in a system that has multiple modes characterized by different resonance frequencies, an analog controller can tune erroneously to one of the higher-frequency modes. The lack of programmability of analog controllers is problematic when faults occur, and is especially problematic for preventing tuning to a higher-frequency mode. In contrast, a digital controller can be programmed to restrict itself to a specified frequency range and to maintain stability even when the affected resonator is driven at high power and subjected to uncertain disturbances and variable loads. The present digital control system (see figure) is implemented by means of an algorithm that comprises three main

  2. Algorithms and implementations of APT resonant control system

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi-Ming; Regan, A.

    1997-08-01

    A digital signal processor is implemented to control resonant frequency of the RFQ prototype in APT/LEDA. Two schemes are implemented to calculate the resonant frequency of RFQ. One uses the measurement of the forward and reflected fields. The other uses the measurement of the forward and transmitted fields. The former is sensitive and accurate when the operation frequency is relatively far from the resonant frequency. The latter gives accurate results when the operation frequency is close to the resonant frequency. Linearized algorithms are derived to calculate the resonant frequency of the RFQ efficiently using a fixed-point DSP. The control frequency range is about 100kHz for 350MHz operation frequency. A frequency agile scheme is employed using a dual direct digital synthesizer to drive klystron at the cavity`s resonant frequency (not necessarily the required beam resonant frequency) in power-up mode to quickly the cavity to the desired resonant frequency. This paper will address the algorithm implementation, error analysis, as well as related hardware design issues.

  3. Geochemical Controls on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Rosemary; Prasad, Manika; Keating, Kristina

    2003-11-11

    OAK-B135 Our research objectives are to determine, through an extensive set of laboratory experiments, the effect of the specific mineralogic form of iron and the effect of the distribution of iron on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation mechanisms. In the first nine months of this project, we have refined the experimental procedures to be used in the acquisition of the laboratory NMR data; have ordered, and conducted preliminary measurements on, the sand samples to be used in the experimental work; and have revised and completed the theoretical model to use in this project. Over the next year, our focus will be on completing the first phase of the experimental work where the form and distribution of the iron in the sands in varied.

  4. Optical control of Magnetic Feshbach Resonances using Closed Channel EIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannathan, Arunkumar; Arunkumar, Nithya; Joseph, James; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    Optical techniques can provide rapid temporal control and high-resolution spatial control of interactions in cold gases enabling the study of non-equilibrium strongly interacting Fermi gases. We use electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the closed channel to control magnetic Feshbach resonances in an optically-trapped mixture of the two lowest hyperfine states of a 6 Li Fermi gas. In our experiments, the narrow Feshbach resonance is tuned by up to 3 G. For the broad resonance, the spontaneous lifetime is increased to 0.4 s at the dark state resonance, compared to 0.5 ms for single field tuning. We present a new model of light-induced loss spectra, employing continuum-dressed basis states, that agrees in shape and magnitude with loss measurements for both broad and narrow resonances. Using this model, we predict the trade-off between tunability and loss for the broad resonance in 6 Li, showing that our two-field method substantially reduces the two-body loss rate compared to single field methods for same tuning range. This research is supported by AFOSR, NSF, ARO, and DOE.

  5. Acoustic control in enclosures using optimally designed Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driesch, Patricia Lynne

    A virtual design methodology is developed to minimize the noise in enclosures with optimally designed, passive, acoustic absorbers (Helmholtz resonators). A series expansion of eigen functions is used to represent the acoustic absorbers as external volume velocities, eliminating the need for a solution of large matrix eigen value problems. A determination of this type (efficient model/reevaluation approach) significantly increases the design possibilities when optimization techniques are implemented. As a benchmarking exercise, this novel methodology was experimentally validated for a narrowband acoustic assessment of two optimally designed Helmholtz resonators coupled to a 2D enclosure. The resonators were tuned to the two lowest resonance frequencies of a 30.5 by 40.6 by 2.5 cm (12 x 16 x 1 inch) cavity with the resonator volume occupying only 2% of the enclosure volume. A maximum potential energy reduction of 12.4 dB was obtained at the second resonance of the cavity. As a full-scale demonstration of the efficacy of the proposed design method, the acoustic response from 90--190 Hz of a John Deere 7000 Ten series tractor cabin was investigated. The lowest cabin mode, referred to as a "boom" mode, proposes a significant challenge to a noise control engineer since its anti-node is located near the head of the operator and often generates unacceptable sound pressure levels. Exploiting the low frequency capability of Helmholtz resonators, lumped parameter models of these resonators were coupled to the enclosure via an experimentally determined acoustic model of the tractor cabin. The virtual design methodology uses gradient optimization techniques as a post processor for the modeling and analysis of the unmodified acoustic interior to determine optimal resonator characteristics. Using two optimally designed Helmholtz resonators; potential energy was experimentally reduced by 3.4 and 10.3 dB at 117 and 167 Hz, respectively.

  6. Control of Cavity Resonance Using Steady and Oscillatory Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamp, Alison M.; Chokani, Ndaona

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study to investigate the effect of steady and oscillatory (with zero net mass flux) blowing on cavity resonance is undertaken. The objective is to study the basic mechanisms of the control of cavity resonance. An actuator is designed and calibrated to generate either steady blowing or oscillatory blowing with A zero net mass flux. The results of the experiment show that both steady and oscillatory blowing are effective, and reduce the amplitude of the dominant resonant mode by 1OdB. The oscillatory blowing is however found to be more superior in that the same effectiveness could be accomplished with a momentum coefficient an order of magnitude smaller than for steady blowing. The experiment also confirms the results of previous computations that suggest the forcing frequency for oscillatory blowing must not be at harmonic frequencies of the cavity resonant modes.

  7. Resonance control in SRF cavities at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Schappert, W.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Scorrano, M.; /INFN, Pisa

    2011-03-01

    The Lorentz force can dynamically detune pulsed Superconducting RF cavities. Considerable additional RF power can be required to maintain the accelerating gradient if no effort is made to compensate for this detuning. Compensation systems using piezo actuators have been used successfully at DESY and elsewhere to control Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD). Recently, Fermilab has developed an adaptive compensation system for cavities in the Horizontal Test Stand, in the SRF Accelerator Test Facility, and for the proposed Project X.

  8. Optical distributed sensors for feedback control: Characterization of photorefractive resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Indebetouw, Guy; Lindner, D. K.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the project was to explore, define, and assess the possibilities of optical distributed sensing for feedback control. This type of sensor, which may have some impacts in the dynamic control of deformable structures and the monitoring of small displacements, can be divided into data acquisition, data processing, and control design. Analogue optical techniques, because they are noninvasive and afford massive parallelism may play a significant role in the acquisition and the preprocessing of the data for such a sensor. Assessing these possibilities was the aim of the first stage of this project. The scope of the proposed research was limited to: (1) the characterization of photorefractive resonators and the assessment of their possible use as a distributed optical processing element; and (2) the design of a control system utilizing signals from distributed sensors. The results include a numerical and experimental study of the resonator below threshold, an experimental study of the effect of the resonator's transverse confinement on its dynamics above threshold, a numerical study of the resonator above threshold using a modal expansion approach, and the experimental test of this model. A detailed account of each investigation, including methodology and analysis of the results are also included along with reprints of published and submitted papers.

  9. Control of resonance phenomenon in flexible structures via active support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakolpour Saleh, A. R.; Mailah, M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper introduces the concept of active support to cope with the resonance phenomenon in the flexible structures. A valid computational platform for the flexible structure was first presented via a finite difference (FD) approach. Then, the active support mechanism was applied to the simulation algorithm through which the performance of the proposed methodology in suppressing the resonance phenomenon was evaluated. The flexible structure was thus excited with the external disturbance and the system response with and without the effect of the active support was investigated through a simulation study. The simulation outcomes clearly demonstrated effective resonance suppression in the flexible structure. Finally, an experimental rig was developed to investigate the validity of the proposed technique. The experimental results revealed an acceptable agreement with the simulation outcomes through which the validity of the proposed control method was affirmed.

  10. Controlling condensate collapse and expansion with an optical Feshbach resonance.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mi; DeSalvo, B J; Ramachandhran, B; Pu, H; Killian, T C

    2013-03-22

    We demonstrate control of the collapse and expansion of an (88)Sr Bose-Einstein condensate using an optical Feshbach resonance near the (1)S(0)-(3)P(1) intercombination transition at 689 nm. Significant changes in dynamics are caused by modifications of scattering length by up to ± 10a(bg), where the background scattering length of (88)Sr is a(bg) = -2a(0) (1a(0) = 0.053 nm). Changes in scattering length are monitored through changes in the size of the condensate after a time-of-flight measurement. Because the background scattering length is close to zero, blue detuning of the optical Feshbach resonance laser with respect to a photoassociative resonance leads to increased interaction energy and a faster condensate expansion, whereas red detuning triggers a collapse of the condensate. The results are modeled with the time-dependent nonlinear Gross-Pitaevskii equation. PMID:25166803

  11. Full controlling of Fano resonances in metal-slit superlattice.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zi-Lan; Yogesh, Natesan; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Wen-Jie; Dong, Jian-Wen; Ouyang, Zhengbiao; Wang, Guo Ping

    2015-01-01

    Controlling of the lineshape of Fano resonance attracts much attention recently due to its wide capabilities for lasing, biosensing, slow-light applications and so on. However, the controllable Fano resonance always requires stringent alignment of complex symmetry-breaking structures and thus the manipulation could only be performed with limited degrees of freedom and narrow tuning range. Furthermore, there is no report so far on independent controlling of both the bright and dark modes in a single structure. Here, we semi-analytically show that the spectral position and linewidth of both the bright and dark modes can be tuned independently and/or simultaneously in a simple and symmetric metal-slit superlattice, and thus allowing for a free and continuous controlling of the lineshape of both the single and multiple Fano resonances. The independent controlling scheme is applicable for an extremely large electromagnetic spectrum range from optical to microwave frequencies, which is demonstrated by the numerical simulations with real metal and a microwave experiment. Our findings may provide convenient and flexible strategies for future tunable electromagnetic devices. PMID:26680258

  12. Full controlling of Fano resonances in metal-slit superlattice

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zi-Lan; Yogesh, Natesan; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Wen-Jie; Dong, Jian-Wen; Ouyang, Zhengbiao; Wang, Guo Ping

    2015-01-01

    Controlling of the lineshape of Fano resonance attracts much attention recently due to its wide capabilities for lasing, biosensing, slow-light applications and so on. However, the controllable Fano resonance always requires stringent alignment of complex symmetry-breaking structures and thus the manipulation could only be performed with limited degrees of freedom and narrow tuning range. Furthermore, there is no report so far on independent controlling of both the bright and dark modes in a single structure. Here, we semi-analytically show that the spectral position and linewidth of both the bright and dark modes can be tuned independently and/or simultaneously in a simple and symmetric metal-slit superlattice, and thus allowing for a free and continuous controlling of the lineshape of both the single and multiple Fano resonances. The independent controlling scheme is applicable for an extremely large electromagnetic spectrum range from optical to microwave frequencies, which is demonstrated by the numerical simulations with real metal and a microwave experiment. Our findings may provide convenient and flexible strategies for future tunable electromagnetic devices. PMID:26680258

  13. Stochastic resonance-a nonlinear control theory interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repperger, D. W.; Farris, K. A.

    2010-07-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is an effect that has been known (Benzi, R., Sutera, A., and Vulpiani, A. (1981), 'The Mechanism of Stochastic Resonance', Journal of Physics, A14, L453-L457) for almost three decades and has been extensively studied in biology, statistics, signal processing and in numerous other eclectic areas (Wiesenfeld, K., and Moss, F. (1995), 'Stochastic Resonance and the Benefits of Noise: From Ice Ages to Crayfish and Squids', Nature, 373, 33-36). Herein, a nonlinear control theory analysis is conducted on how to better understand the class of systems that may exhibit the SR effect. Using nonlinear control theory methods, equilibrium points are manipulated to create the SR response (similar to shaping dynamical response in a phase plane). From this approach, a means of synthesising and designing the appropriate class of nonlinear systems is introduced. New types of nonlinear dynamics that demonstrate the SR effects are discovered, which may have utility in control theory as well as in many diverse applications. A numerical simulation illustrates some powerful attributes of these systems.

  14. Study to eliminate ground resonance using active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, F. K.

    1984-01-01

    The effectiveness of active control blade feathering in increasing rotor body damping and the possibility to eliminate ground resonance instabilities were investigated. An analytical model representing rotor flapping and lead-lag degrees of freedom and body pitch, roll, longitudinal and lateral motion is developed. Active control blade feathering is implemented as state variable feedback through a conventional swashplate. The influence of various feedback states, feedback gain, and weighting between the cyclic controls is studied through stability and response analyses. It is shown that blade cyclic inplane motion, roll rate and roll acceleration feedback can add considerable damping to the system and eliminate ground resonance instabilities, which the feedback phase is also a powerful parameter, if chosen properly, it maximizes augmentation of the inherent regressing lag mode damping. It is shown that rotor configuration parameters, like blade root hinge offset, flapping stiffness, and precone considerably influence the control effectiveness. It is found that active control is particularly powerful for hingeless and bearingless rotor systems.

  15. Noise control using a plate radiator and an acoustic resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An active noise control subassembly for reducing noise caused by a source (such as an aircraft engine) independent of the subassembly. A noise radiating panel is bendably vibratable to generate a panel noise canceling at least a portion of the source noise. A piezoceramic actuator plate is connected to the panel. A front plate is spaced apart from the panel and the first plate, is positioned generally between the source noise and the panel, and has a sound exit port. A first pair of spaced-apart side walls each generally abut the panel and the front plate so as to generally enclose a front cavity to define a resonator.

  16. Control of resonant frequencies in adaptive structures by prestressing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baycan, Can M.; Utku, Senol; Wada, Ben K.

    1992-01-01

    The natural vibration frequencies of a structure can be affected by inducing stress in the structure. The success of this kind of control of the resonant frequencies of a truss structure depends on the geometry of the structure. It is shown that in adaptive truss structures the method is effective for vibrations in less stiff directions, such as the normal direction of the plane containing all of the bars of a node, suggesting its applicability for cable, membrane, and thin plate and shell structures.

  17. Controlling chaos-assisted directed transport via quantum resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jintao; Zou, Mingliang; Luo, Yunrong; Hai, Wenhua

    2016-06-01

    We report on the first demonstration of chaos-assisted directed transport of a quantum particle held in an amplitude-modulated and tilted optical lattice, through a resonance-induced double-mean displacement relating to the true classically chaotic orbits. The transport velocity is controlled by the driving amplitude and the sign of tilt, and also depends on the phase of the initial state. The chaos-assisted transport feature can be verified experimentally by using a source of single atoms to detect the double-mean displacement one by one, and can be extended to different scientific fields.

  18. Guided-mode resonant polarization-controlled tunable color filters.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mohammad Jalal; Khaleque, Tanzina; Magnusson, Robert

    2014-05-19

    We demonstrate efficient guided-mode resonant polarization-controlled tunable color filters. The devices consist of subwavelength gratings that are partially etched into a thin silicon-nitride film deposited on a glass substrate. Two color filters with grating periods of 300 nm and 370 nm are designed and fabricated. The 300-nm device exhibits green and blue colors and the 370-nm device generates red and yellow colors for TE and TM polarization, respectively. The pixels have a spectral bandwidth of ~12 nm with efficiencies exceeding 90% for TE polarization and 80% for TM polarization. The devices may find application in displays, image sensors, and biomedical imaging technologies. PMID:24921349

  19. Mode Orientation Control For Sapphire Dielectric Ring Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago, David G.; Dick, G. John; Prata, Aluizio

    1996-01-01

    Small sapphire tuning wedge used in technique for solving mode-purity problem associated with sapphire dielectric-ring resonator part of cryogenic microwave frequency discriminator. Breaks quasi-degeneracy of two modes and allows selective coupling to just one mode. Wedge mounted on axle entering resonator cavity and rotated while resonator cryogenically operating in vacuum. Furthermore, axle moved vertically to tune resonant frequency.

  20. FPGA platform for MEMS Disc Resonance Gyroscope (DRG) control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keymeulen, Didier; Peay, Chris; Foor, David; Trung, Tran; Bakhshi, Alireza; Withington, Phil; Yee, Karl; Terrile, Rich

    2008-04-01

    Inertial navigation systems based upon optical gyroscopes tend to be expensive, large, power consumptive, and are not long lived. Micro-Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) based gyros do not have these shortcomings; however, until recently, the performance of MEMS based gyros had been below navigation grade. Boeing and JPL have been cooperating since 1997 to develop high performance MEMS gyroscopes for miniature, low power space Inertial Reference Unit applications. The efforts resulted in demonstration of a Post Resonator Gyroscope (PRG). This experience led to the more compact Disc Resonator Gyroscope (DRG) for further reduced size and power with potentially increased performance. Currently, the mass, volume and power of the DRG are dominated by the size of the electronics. This paper will detail the FPGA based digital electronics architecture and its implementation for the DRG which will allow reduction of size and power and will increase performance through a reduction in electronics noise. Using the digital control based on FPGA, we can program and modify in real-time the control loop to adapt to the specificity of each particular gyro and the change of the mechanical characteristic of the gyro during its life time.

  1. Sawtooth control in ITER using ion cyclotron resonance heating

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, I. T.; Graves, J P; Johnson, T.; Asunta, O.; Bonoli, P.; Choi, M.; Jaeger, E. F.; Jucker, M.; Sauter, O.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical modeling of the effects of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) on the stability of the internal kink mode suggests that ICRH should be considered as an essential sawtooth control tool in ITER. Sawtooth control using ICRH is achieved by directly affecting the energy of the internal kink mode rather than through modification of the magnetic shear by driving localized currents. Consequently, ICRH can be seen as complementary to the planned electron cyclotron current drive actuator, and indeed will improve the efficacy of current drive schemes. Simulations of the ICRH distribution using independent RF codes give confidence in numerical predictions that the stabilizing influence of the fusion-born alphas can be negated by appropriately tailored minority (3)He ICRH heating in ITER. Finally, the effectiveness of all sawtooth actuators is shown to increase as the q = 1 surface moves towards the manetic axis, whilst the passive stabilization arising from the alpha and NBI particles decreases.

  2. Temperature-controlled surface plasmon resonance in VO (2) nanorods.

    PubMed

    Lopez, R; Haynes, T E; Boatner, L A; Feldman, L C; Haglund, R F

    2002-08-01

    The optical properties of VO(2) nanoparticles formed in an amorphous SiO(2) host by stoichiometric ion implantation of vanadium and oxygen and thermal annealing have been determined and correlated with the particle size and morphology. The results show that that the temperature-controlled semiconductor-to-metal phase transition of the VO(2) nanophase precipitates turns on the classical surface plasmon resonance, with specific features that depend on the size and aspect ratio of the VO(2) particles. This effect improves the optical contrast between the metallic and semiconducting states in the near-IR region of the spectrum as a result of dielectric confinement that is due to the SiO(2) host. A fiber-optic application is demonstrated, as is the ability to control the characteristics of the phase transition by using ion implantation to dope the VO(2) nanoparticles with tungsten or titanium ions. PMID:18026439

  3. Probing electric field control of magnetism using ferromagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ziyao; Trassin, Morgan; Gao, Ya; Gao, Yuan; Qiu, Diana; Ashraf, Khalid; Nan, Tianxiang; Yang, Xi; Bowden, S R; Pierce, D T; Stiles, M D; Unguris, J; Liu, Ming; Howe, Brandon M; Brown, Gail J; Salahuddin, S; Ramesh, R; Sun, Nian X

    2015-01-01

    Exchange coupled CoFe/BiFeO3 thin-film heterostructures show great promise for power-efficient electric field-induced 180° magnetization switching. However, the coupling mechanism and precise qualification of the exchange coupling in CoFe/BiFeO3 heterostructures have been elusive. Here we show direct evidence for electric field control of the magnetic state in exchange coupled CoFe/BiFeO3 through electric field-dependent ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy and nanoscale spatially resolved magnetic imaging. Scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis images reveal the coupling of the magnetization in the CoFe layer to the canted moment in the BiFeO3 layer. Electric field-dependent ferromagnetic resonance measurements quantify the exchange coupling strength and reveal that the CoFe magnetization is directly and reversibly modulated by the applied electric field through a ~180° switching of the canted moment in BiFeO3. This constitutes an important step towards robust repeatable and non-volatile voltage-induced 180° magnetization switching in thin-film multiferroic heterostructures and tunable RF/microwave devices. PMID:25631924

  4. Sawtooth control in JET with ITER relevant low field side resonance ion cyclotron resonance heating and ITER-like wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, J. P.; Lennholm, M.; Chapman, I. T.; Lerche, E.; Reich, M.; Alper, B.; Bobkov, V.; Dumont, R.; Faustin, J. M.; Jacquet, P.; Jaulmes, F.; Johnson, T.; Keeling, D. L.; Liu, Yueqiang; Nicolas, T.; Tholerus, S.; Blackman, T.; Carvalho, I. S.; Coelho, R.; Van Eester, D.; Felton, R.; Goniche, M.; Kiptily, V.; Monakhov, I.; Nave, M. F. F.; Perez von Thun, C.; Sabot, R.; Sozzi, C.; Tsalas, M.

    2015-01-01

    New experiments at JET with the ITER-like wall show for the first time that ITER-relevant low field side resonance first harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) can be used to control sawteeth that have been initially lengthened by fast particles. In contrast to previous (Graves et al 2012 Nat. Commun. 3 624) high field side resonance sawtooth control experiments undertaken at JET, it is found that the sawteeth of L-mode plasmas can be controlled with less accurate alignment between the resonance layer and the sawtooth inversion radius. This advantage, as well as the discovery that sawteeth can be shortened with various antenna phasings, including dipole, indicates that ICRH is a particularly effective and versatile tool that can be used in future fusion machines for controlling sawteeth. Without sawtooth control, neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) and locked modes were triggered at very low normalised beta. High power H-mode experiments show the extent to which ICRH can be tuned to control sawteeth and NTMs while simultaneously providing effective electron heating with improved flushing of high Z core impurities. Dedicated ICRH simulations using SELFO, SCENIC and EVE, including wide drift orbit effects, explain why sawtooth control is effective with various antenna phasings and show that the sawtooth control mechanism cannot be explained by enhancement of the magnetic shear. Hybrid kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic stability calculations using MISHKA and HAGIS unravel the optimal sawtooth control regimes in these ITER relevant plasma conditions.

  5. Electro-Mechanical Actuator. DC Resonant Link Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, Kenneth E.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed on the 68 HP electro-mechanical actuator (EMA) system developed on NASA contract for the Electrical Actuation (ELA) Technology Bridging Program. The system was designed to demonstrate the capability of large, high power linear ELAs for applications such as Thrust Vector Control (TVC) on rocket engines. It consists of a motor controller, drive electronics and a linear actuator capable of up to 32,00 lbs loading at 7.4 inches/second. The drive electronics are based on the Resonant DC link concept and operate at a nominal frequency of 55 kHz. The induction motor is a specially designed high speed, low inertia motor capable of a 68 peak HP. The actuator was originally designed by MOOG Aerospace under an internal R & D program to meet Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) TVC requirements. The design was modified to meet this programs linear rate specification of 7.4 inches/second. The motor and driver were tested on a dynamometer at the Martin Marietta Space Systems facility. System frequency response, step response and force-velocity tests were conducted at the MOOG Aerospace facility. A complete description of the system and all test results can be found in the body of the report.

  6. Ultrafast electrical control of a resonantly driven single photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Bennett, A. J. Ellis, D. J. P.; Shields, A. J.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2014-08-04

    We demonstrate generation of a pulsed stream of electrically triggered single photons in resonance fluorescence, by applying high frequency electrical pulses to a single quantum dot in a p-i-n diode under resonant laser excitation. Single photon emission was verified, with the probability of multiple photon emission reduced to 2.8%. We show that despite the presence of charge noise in the emission spectrum of the dot, resonant excitation acts as a “filter” to generate narrow bandwidth photons.

  7. Sonic resonator control and method for determining component concentration in multiple-component liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, S.Y.

    1982-10-29

    This invention teaches a control to be used in smelting aluminum by the electrolysis breakdown of alumina (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) in a molten electrolyte heated to approximately 950 to 1000/sup 0/C. The invention provides a sonic resonator and control that can accurately detect the resonant frequency of the resonator in the molten electrolyte. The resonator preferably is made with tubular side wall 1/4 of the sonic wavelength, or is a quarter wave resonator. A wave generator inputs a signal having a range of frequencies that includes the resonant frequency, so that a peak resonant output at the resonant frequency can be detected on an oscilloscope or like detector. This instantaneous resonant frequency is then checked against an accurate data base correlating the resonant frequencies of the resonator in the electrolyte at specific alumina concentrations normally experienced throughout the electrolysis cycle. The electrolysis cycle can thus be controlled and recharged at any predetermined low alumina concentration greater than where the anode effect phase of the cycle normally might begin.

  8. Sonic resonator control and method for determining component concentration in multiple component molten liquids

    DOEpatents

    Shen, Sin-Yan

    1984-01-01

    This invention teaches a control to be used in smelting aluminum by the electrolysis breakdown of alumina (A1.sub.2 O.sub.3) in a molten electrolyte heated to approximately 950.degree.-1000.degree. C. The invention provides a sonic resonator and control that can accurately detect the resonant frequency of the resonator in the molten electrolyte. The resonator preferably is made with tubular side wall 1/4 of the sonic wavelength, or is a quarter wave resonator. A wave generator inputs a signal having a range of frequencies that includes the resonant frequency, so that a peak resonant output at the resonant frequency can be detected on an oscilloscope or like detector. This instantaneous resonant frequency is then checked against an accurate data base correlating the resonant frequencies of the resonator in the electrolyte at specific alumina concentrations normally experienced throughout the electrolysis cycle. The electrolysis cycle can thus be controlled and recharged at any predetermined low alumina concentration greater than where the anode effect phase of the cycle normally might begin.

  9. Theory of electrically controlled resonant tunneling spin devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. -Y.; Cartoixa, Xavier

    2004-01-01

    We report device concepts that exploit spin-orbit coupling for creating spin polarized current sources using nonmagnetic semiconductor resonant tunneling heterostructures, without external magnetic fields. The resonant interband tunneling psin filter exploits large valence band spin-orbit interaction to provide strong spin selectivity.

  10. Asymptotic model for shape resonance control of diatomics by intense non-resonant light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crubellier, Anne; González-Férez, Rosario; Koch, Christiane P.; Luc-Koenig, Eliane

    2015-04-01

    We derive a universal model for atom pairs interacting with non-resonant light via the polarizability anisotropy, based on the long range properties of the scattering. The corresponding dynamics can be obtained using a nodal line technique to solve the asymptotic Schrödinger equation. It consists of imposing physical boundary conditions at long range and vanishing the wavefunction at a position separating the inner zone and the asymptotic region. We show that nodal lines which depend on the intensity of the non-resonant light can satisfactorily account for the effect of the polarizability at short range. The approach allows to determine the resonance structure, energy, width, channel mixing and hybridization even for narrow resonances.

  11. Magnetically-controlled Fano resonance in wavefunction-coupled QPCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Myoung-Gu

    In this thesis, we describe the observation of a resonant interaction between coupled quantum point contacts (QPCs) that we attribute to a Fano resonance, caused by the self-consistent formation of a bound-state (BS) in one of the QPCs. The presence of this BS (in the "swept QPC") is detected by making measurements of the conductance of the other QPC, which therefore serves as a detector. A key feature of our work is the demonstration of a strong modulation of the detector resonance by applying a perpendicular magnetic field (B⊥). This induces a distinct asymmetry (with respect to magnetic-field reversal) in the magneto-conductance of the detector, which is shown to be due to the influence magnetic electron focusing. In this effect, the electron trajectories correspond to classical skipping orbits, which undergo complete motion due to the high mobility of the two-dimensional electron gas. At even higher B⊥, the detector resonance, which at zero magnetic field is only weakly asymmetric, evolves into the classic, highly asymmetric, Fano form. Such asymmetry indicates that the nonresonant contribution to detector resonance becomes comparable to the resonant one at high fields. We explain these results in terms of two key properties of quantum-dot eigenstates in a magnetic field, namely: the tendency for their wavefunctions to be compressed towards the center of the quantum-dot potential, and; that for their eigenenergies to increase due to the associated enhancement in the effective degree of confinement. In this thesis, we confirm these ideas by performing a Fock-Darwin analysis to account for the evolution of the detector Fano resonance in the magnetic field. The strong modulations of the Fano resonance that we observe as a function of B⊥ are shown to represent a new manifestation of this ubiquitous resonance.

  12. Controllable optomechanical coupling in serially-coupled triple resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chenguang Zhao, Yunsong; Fan, Jiahua; Zhu, Lin

    2014-12-15

    Radiation pressure can efficiently couple mechanical modes with optical modes in an optical cavity. The coupling efficiency is quite dependent on the interaction between the optical mode and mechanical mode. In this report, we investigate a serially-coupled triple resonator system, where a freestanding beam is placed in the vicinity of the middle resonator. In this coupled system, we demonstrate that the mechanical mode of the free-standing beam can be selectively coupled to different resonance supermodes through the near field interaction.

  13. Control of Transport-Barrier Relaxations by Resonant Magnetic Perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Leconte, M.; Beyer, P.; Benkadda, S.

    2009-01-30

    Transport-barrier relaxation oscillations in the presence of resonant magnetic perturbations are investigated using three-dimensional global fluid turbulence simulations from first principles at the edge of a tokamak. It is shown that resonant magnetic perturbations have a stabilizing effect on these relaxation oscillations and that this effect is due mainly to a modification of the pressure profile linked to the presence of both residual magnetic island chains and a stochastic layer.

  14. Fluid mechanics and passive control of the flow-excited Helmholtz resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaboch, Paul Edward

    A flow excited Helmholtz resonator was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The analysis was focused on a simplified momentum balance integrated over the region of the orifice. The resulting expressions were used to guide an experimental program designed to obtain measurements of the resonator pressure under flow excitation, as well as the dynamics of the shear layer in the orifice using Particle Image Velocimetry. The PIV results provided a detailed representation of the shear layer vorticity field, as well as the equivalent hydrodynamic forcing of the resonator. The forcing magnitude was found to increase with speed over a range of flow speeds. A model was proposed that provides a prediction of the resonator pressure fluctuations based on the thickness of the approach boundary layer, the free stream speed, the acoustic properties of the resonator and the spatial growth rate of the shear layer across the orifice. The model was shown to provide an accurate representation of the resonating frequency as well as the magnitude of the resonance to within a few dB. Various passive flow control methods were examined to reduce the flow-excited resonance. Foam and tuned absorbers were employed to control the acoustic properties of the resonator. Both methods succeeded in reducing the flow-excited resonance. The hydrodynamic forcing was controlled through both changes to the orifice geometry and with the disruption of the approach flow. Most changes to the orifice geometry resulted in significant decreases in the magnitude of the resonance. Thickening and rounding the upstream and down stream edges of the orifice was found to increase the resonance. Obstructions placed upstream of the orifice to disrupt the approach flow decreased the resonance to varying levels of success. Comparisons were made to a full-scale vehicle. Both microphone and PIV measurements were acquired for a full-scale vehicle and compared to simplified small scale models. The fundamental flow

  15. Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perozzi, E.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A resonance in CELESTIAL MECHANICS occurs when some of the quantities characterizing the motion of two or more celestial bodies can be considered as commensurable, i.e. their ratio is close to an integer fraction. In a simplified form, this can be expressed as ...

  16. Communication: Control of the fragment state distributions produced upon decay of an isolated resonance state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Vela, A.

    2016-04-01

    Control of the fragment state distributions produced upon decay of a resonance state is achieved by using a weak laser field consisting of two pulses with a varying time delay between them. It is shown that specific product fragment states can be significantly favored or quenched. The efficiency and flexibility of the control method are found to increase with increasing resonance width. The control scheme is completely independent of the specific system to which it is applied, which makes its applicability universal.

  17. Sawtooth-Control Mechanism using Toroidally Propagating Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance Waves in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, J. P.; Coda, S.; Chapman, I.

    2009-02-13

    The sawtooth control mechanism in plasmas employing off-axis toroidally propagating ion cyclotron resonance waves in tokamaks is reinvestigated. The radial drift excursion of energetic passing ions distributed asymmetrically in the velocity parallel to the magnetic field determines stability when the rational q=1 surface resides within a narrow region centered about the shifted fundamental cyclotron resonance.

  18. Temperature compensation method for the resonant frequency of a differential vibrating accelerometer using electrostatic stiffness control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungshin; Rhim, Jaewook

    2012-09-01

    Differential vibrating accelerometer (DVA) is a resonant-type sensor which detects the change in the resonant frequency in the presence of acceleration input, i.e. inertial loading. However, the resonant frequency of micromachined silicon resonators is sensitive to the temperature change as well as the input acceleration. Therefore, to design a high-precision vibrating accelerometer, the temperature sensitivity of the resonant frequency has to be predicted and compensated accurately. In this study, a temperature compensation method for resonant frequency is proposed which controls the electrostatic stiffness of the dual-ended tuning fork (DETF) using the temperature-dependent dc voltage between the parallel plate electrodes. To do this, the electromechanical model is derived first to predict the change in the electrostatic stiffness and the resonant frequency resulting from the dc voltage between the resonator and the electrodes. Next, the temperature sensitivity of the resonant frequency is modeled, estimated and compared with the measured values. Then it is shown that the resonant frequency of the DETF can be kept constant in the operating temperature range by applying the temperature-dependent driving voltage to the parallel plate electrodes. The proposed method is validated through experiment.

  19. Fast resonator reset in circuit QED using open quantum system optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, Samuel; Andersen, Christian Kraglund; Venkatraman, Jayameenakshi; Blais, Alexandre

    Practical implementations of quantum information processing requires repetitive qubit readout. In circuit QED, where readout is performed using a resonator dispersively coupled to the qubits, the measurement repetition rate is limited by the resonator reset time. This reset is usually performed passively by waiting several resonator decay times. Alternatively, it was recently shown that a simple pulse sequence allows to decrease the reset time to twice the resonator decay time. In this work, we show how to further optimize the ring-down pulse sequence by using optimal control theory for open quantum systems. Using a new implementation of the open GRAPE algorithm that is well suited to large Hilbert spaces, we find active resonator reset procedures that are faster than a single resonator decay time. Simple quantum speed limits for this kind of active reset processes will be discussed

  20. Optical Control of Magnetic Feshbach Resonances by Closed-Channel Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannathan, A.; Arunkumar, N.; Joseph, J. A.; Thomas, J. E.

    2016-02-01

    We control magnetic Feshbach resonances in an optically trapped mixture of the two lowest hyperfine states of a 6Li Fermi gas, using two optical fields to create a dark state in the closed molecular channel. In the experiments, the narrow Feshbach resonance is tuned by up to 3 G. For the broad resonance, the spontaneous lifetime is increased to 0.4 s at the dark-state resonance, compared to 0.5 ms for single-field tuning. We present a new model of light-induced loss spectra, employing continuum-dressed basis states, which agrees in shape and magnitude with loss measurements for both broad and narrow resonances. Using this model, we predict the trade-off between tunability and loss for the broad resonance in 6Li, showing that our two-field method substantially reduces the two-body loss rate compared to single-field methods for the same tuning range.

  1. Quantum well micro-resonator optical modulator based on electrically controlled coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Taylor, Geoff W.

    2013-09-01

    Micro-resonator optical modulators fabricated with Si/SiO2 planar waveguides have been reported for the optical interconnect application and the modulation is achieved by control of the resonant frequency through resonator index change. In these devices, thermal control is used to adjust/stabilize the resonant frequency and the input coupling constant. In this paper, an III-V based micro-resonator is described in which the modulation is achieved through voltage control of the input coupling parameter and the resonator frequency is adjusted/stabilized through control of the resonator index. This approach offers significant advantages for integrated circuit based optical connectivity. The modulator performance is analyzed via FDTD simulation with refractive index profiles based on measured absorption parameters. The performance is confirmed via MATLAB and a circuit based model for HSPICE is developed and run in a transient simulator to confirm the modulator speed and eye diagram characteristics yielding an extinction ratio of 10.7 dB, a bandwidth of 31 GHz and a energy consumption <2.5 fJ/bit for device dimensions of 28×4 µm2.

  2. Harmonic Resonance Analysis for PEP II Power Factor Control Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corvin, C.

    1997-05-01

    Recent upgrades to the high voltage utility distribution network at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center have been accompanied by the installation of a large number of power supplies associated with the PEP-II B Factory project. These power supplies include a diverse assortment of single and three phase units, in two, six and twelve pulse configurations, with chopped, pulsed and continuous loading. Viewed as harmonic power sources in a range from a hundred to several kilohertz, they have the potential to be in resonance with the utility system network, a condition to be avoided. This paper analyzes and evaluates these resonance conditions with a view toward adding electric power factor correction upgrades to achieve substantial cost savings associated with power factor penalty avoidance. Similar studies and upgrades at SLAC in the past have reduced electric power costs over time by several hundred thousand dollars, thus providing the incentive to evaluate the recent upgrades to the PEP-II utility network.

  3. Optical control of a magnetic Feshbach resonance in an ultracold Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zhengkun; Wang, Pengjun; Huang, Lianghui; Meng, Zengming; Hu, Hui; Zhang, Jing

    2013-10-01

    We use laser light near resonant with a molecular bound-to-bound transition to control a magnetic Feshbach resonance in ultracold Fermi gases of 40K atoms. The spectrum of excited molecular states is measured by applying a laser field that couples the ground Feshbach molecular state to electronically excited molecular states. Nine strong bound-to-bound resonances are observed below the 2P1/2+2S1/2 threshold. We use radio-frequency spectroscopy to characterize the laser-dressed bound state near a specific bound-to-bound resonance and show clearly the shift of the magnetic Feshbach resonance using light. The demonstrated technology could be used to modify interatomic interactions with high spatial and temporal resolutions in the crossover regime from a Bose-Einstein condensate to a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superfluid.

  4. Nonlinear Phenomena and Resonant Parametric Perturbation Control in QR-ZCS Buck DC-DC Converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Fei-Hu; Liu, Feng-Shao; Hsieh, Hui-Chang

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the chaotic phenomena and to control in current-mode controlled quasi-resonant zero-current-switching (QR-ZCS) DC-DC buck converters, and to present control of chaos by resonant parametric perturbation control methods. First of all, MATLAB/SIMULINK is used to derive a mathematical model for QR-ZCS DC-DC buck converters, and to simulate the converters to observe the waveform of output voltages, inductance currents and phase-plane portraits from the period-doubling bifurcation to chaos by changing the load resistances. Secondly, using resonant parametric perturbation control in QR-ZCS buck DC-DC converters, the simulation results of the chaotic converter form chaos state turn into stable state period 1, and improve ripple amplitudes of converters under the chaos, to verify the validity of the proposes method.

  5. Emission wavelength tuning of fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance.

    PubMed

    Moritake, Y; Kanamori, Y; Hane, K

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated fine emission wavelength tuning of quantum dot (QD) fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance. An asymmetric-double-bar (ADB), which was composed of only two bars with slightly different bar lengths, was used to obtain Fano resonance in the optical region. By changing the short bar length of ADB structures with high dimensional accuracy in the order of 10 nm, resonant wavelengths of Fano resonance were controlled from 1296 to 1416 nm. Fluorescence of QDs embedded in a polymer layer on ADB metamaterials were modified due to coupling to Fano resonance and fine tuning from 1350 to 1376 nm was observed. Wavelength tuning of modified fluorescence was reproduced by analysis using absorption peaks of Fano resonance. Tuning range of modified fluorescence became narrow, which was interpreted by a simple Gaussian model and resulted from comparable FWHM in QD fluorescence and Fano resonant peaks. The results will help the design and fabrication of metamaterial devices with fluorophores such as light sources and biomarkers. PMID:27622503

  6. Controlling Fano resonance of ring/crescent-ring plasmonic nanostructure with Bessel beam.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fajun; Zhu, Weiren; Premaratne, Malin; Zhao, Jianlin

    2014-01-27

    We propose a method to dynamically control the Fano resonance of a ring/crescent-ring gold nanostructure by spatially changing the phase distribution of a probe Bessel beam. We demonstrate that a highly tunable Fano interference between the quadrupole and bright dipole modes can be realized in the near-infrared range. Even though a complex interference between a broad resonance and a narrower resonance lead to these observations, we show that a simple coupled oscillator model can accurately describe the behavior, providing valuable insights into the dynamics of the system. A further analysis of this structure uncovers a series of interesting phenomena such as anticrossing, sign changing of coupling and the spectral inversion of quadrupole and bright dipole modes. We further show that near field enhancement at Fano resonance can be actively controlled by modulating the phase distribution of the exciting incident Bessel beam. PMID:24515223

  7. Controlling phase separation of binary Bose-Einstein condensates via mixed-spin-channel Feshbach resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Tojo, Satoshi; Taguchi, Yoshihisa; Masuyama, Yuta; Hayashi, Taro; Hirano, Takuya; Saito, Hiroki

    2010-09-15

    We investigate controlled phase separation of a binary Bose-Einstein condensate in the proximity of a mixed-spin-channel Feshbach resonance in the |F=1,m{sub F}=+1> and |F=2,m{sub F}=-1> states of {sup 87}Rb at a magnetic field of 9.10 G. Phase separation occurs on the lower-magnetic-field side of the Feshbach resonance while the two components overlap on the higher-magnetic-field side. The Feshbach resonance curve of the scattering length is obtained from the shape of the atomic cloud by comparison with the numerical analysis of coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations.

  8. Coherent control of Kerr nonlinearity via double dark resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahelia, A.; Sahraib, M.; Namdarc, A.; Sadighi-Bonabidd, R.

    2016-03-01

    A theoretical scheme for enhanced Kerr nonlinearity is proposed in a four-level ladder-type atomic system based on double dark resonances (DDRs). We solve the relevant density matrix equations in steady state and utilize the perturbation theory to obtain the analytical expressions for the third order susceptibility of the atomic system. The influence of system parameters on behavior of the first and third order susceptibilities is then discussed. In particular, it is found that an enhanced Kerr nonlinearity with reduced linear and nonlinear absorption is obtained around zero probe detuning under the slow light condition through proper adjusting the laser field intensity and frequency detuning of driving fields. The dressed state analysis is employed to explain the physical origin of the obtained result. The obtained results may be important for all-optical signal processing and quantum information technology.

  9. Early magnetic resonance imaging control after temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis

    PubMed Central

    Ângelo, David Faustino; Sousa, Rita; Pinto, Isabel; Sanz, David; Gil, F. Monje; Salvado, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) lysis and lavage arthrocentesis with viscosupplementation are an effective treatment for acute disc displacement (DD) without reduction. Clinical success seems to be related to multiple factors despite the lack of understanding of its mechanisms. The authors present a case report of 17-year-old women with acute open mouth limitation (12 mm), right TMJ pain-8/10 visual analog scale, right deviation when opening her mouth. The clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis was acute DD without reduction of right TMJ. Right TMJ arthrocentesis was purposed to the patient with lysis, lavage, and viscosupplementation of the upper joint space. After 5 days, a new MRI was performed to confirm upper joint space distension and disc position. Clinical improvement was obtained 5 days and 1 month after arthrocentesis. Upper joint space increased 6 mm and the disc remained displaced. We report the first early TMJ MRI image postoperative, with measurable upper joint space. PMID:26981483

  10. Controlling resonant tunneling in graphene via Fermi velocity engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Jonas R. F.; Pereira, Luiz Felipe C.; Bezerra, C. G.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the resonant tunneling in a single layer graphene superlattice with modulated energy gap and Fermi velocity via an effective Dirac-like Hamiltonian. We calculate the transmission coefficient with the transfer matrix method and analyze the effect of a Fermi velocity modulation on the electronic transmission, in the case of normal and oblique incidence. We find it is possible to manipulate the electronic transmission in graphene by Fermi velocity engineering, and show that it is possible to tune the transmitivity from 0 to 1. We also analyze how a Fermi velocity modulation influences the total conductance and the Fano factor. Our results are relevant for the development of novel graphene-based electronic devices.

  11. Early magnetic resonance imaging control after temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis.

    PubMed

    Ângelo, David Faustino; Sousa, Rita; Pinto, Isabel; Sanz, David; Gil, F Monje; Salvado, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) lysis and lavage arthrocentesis with viscosupplementation are an effective treatment for acute disc displacement (DD) without reduction. Clinical success seems to be related to multiple factors despite the lack of understanding of its mechanisms. The authors present a case report of 17-year-old women with acute open mouth limitation (12 mm), right TMJ pain-8/10 visual analog scale, right deviation when opening her mouth. The clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis was acute DD without reduction of right TMJ. Right TMJ arthrocentesis was purposed to the patient with lysis, lavage, and viscosupplementation of the upper joint space. After 5 days, a new MRI was performed to confirm upper joint space distension and disc position. Clinical improvement was obtained 5 days and 1 month after arthrocentesis. Upper joint space increased 6 mm and the disc remained displaced. We report the first early TMJ MRI image postoperative, with measurable upper joint space. PMID:26981483

  12. Resonant electron tunneling in a tip-controlled potential landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascher, Nikola; Timpu, Flavia; Rössler, Clemens; Ihn, Thomas; Ensslin, Klaus; Reichl, Christian; Wegscheider, Werner

    2014-06-01

    By placing the biased tip of an atomic force microscope at a specific position above a semiconductor surface we can locally shape the potential landscape. Inducing a local repulsive potential in a two-dimensional electron gas near a quantum point contact, one obtains a potential minimum which exhibits a remarkable behavior in transport experiments at high magnetic fields and low temperatures. In such an experiment, we observe distinct and reproducible oscillations in the measured conductance as a function of magnetic field, voltages, and tip position. They follow a systematic behavior consistent with a resonant tunneling mechanism. From the periodicity in the magnetic field we can find the characteristic width of this minimum to be of the order of 100 nm. Surprisingly, this value remains almost the same for different values of the bulk filling factors, although the tip position has to be adjusted by distances of the order of one micron.

  13. High-Q polymer resonators with spatially controlled photo-functionalization for biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Torsten; Mai, Martin; Grossmann, Tobias; Wienhold, Tobias; Hauser, Mario; Mappes, Timo; Kalt, Heinz

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate the applicability of polymeric whispering gallery mode resonators fabricated on silicon as biosensors. Optical measurements on the passive resonators in the visible spectral range yield Q-factors as high as 1.3×107. Local, covalent surface functionalization, is achieved by spatially controlled UV-exposure of a derivative of the photoreactive crosslinker benzophenone. Protein detection is shown using the specific binding of the biotin-streptavidin system.

  14. Gain competition induced mode evolution and resonance control in erbium-doped whispering-gallery microresonators.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Fei; Lei, Fuchuan; Gao, Ming; Yang, Xu; Wang, Chuan; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Yang, Lan; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-05-01

    Precise control of resonance features in microcavities is of significant importance both for researches and applications. By exploiting gain provided by the doped rare earth ions or Raman gain, this can be achieved through changing the pump. Here we propose and experimentally show that by using gain competition, one can also control the evolution of resonance for the probe signal while the pump is kept unchanged. The transition of Lorentz peak, Fano-like resonance and Lorentz dip can be observed from the transmission spectra of the probe signal through tuning the auxiliary control signal. The theory based on coupled-mode theory and laser rate equations by setting the optical gains as time-dependent was constructed. This method can be used in the precise control of transmission spectra and the coupling regime between the waveguide and microcavities. PMID:27137568

  15. Communication: Control of the fragment state distributions produced upon decay of an isolated resonance state.

    PubMed

    García-Vela, A

    2016-04-14

    Control of the fragment state distributions produced upon decay of a resonance state is achieved by using a weak laser field consisting of two pulses with a varying time delay between them. It is shown that specific product fragment states can be significantly favored or quenched. The efficiency and flexibility of the control method are found to increase with increasing resonance width. The control scheme is completely independent of the specific system to which it is applied, which makes its applicability universal. PMID:27083701

  16. Self-other resonance, its control and prosocial inclinations: Brain-behavior relationships.

    PubMed

    Christov-Moore, Leonardo; Iacoboni, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Humans seem to place a positive reward value on prosocial behavior. Evidence suggests that this prosocial inclination is driven by our reflexive tendency to share in the observed sensations, emotions and behavior of others, or "self-other resonance". In this study, we examine how neural correlates of self-other resonance relate to prosocial decision-making. Subjects performed two tasks while undergoing fMRI: observation of a human hand pierced by a needle, and observation and imitation of emotional facial expressions. Outside the scanner, subjects played the Dictator Game with players of low or high income (represented by neutral-expression headshots). Subjects' offers in the Dictator Game were correlated with activity in neural systems associated with self-other resonance and anticorrelated with activity in systems implicated in the control of pain, affect, and imitation. Functional connectivity between areas involved in self-other resonance and top-down control was negatively correlated with subjects' offers. This study suggests that the interaction between self-other resonance and top-down control processes are an important component of prosocial inclinations towards others, even when biological stimuli associated with self-other resonance are limited. These findings support a view of prosocial decision-making grounded in embodied cognition. PMID:26954937

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Volumetric Analysis of the Putamen in Children with ADHD: Combined Type versus Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellington, Tasha McMahon; Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret; Gregory, Amanda Louise; Murphy, Jennifer Mary; Lancaster, Jack Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Volumetric differences in the putamen of boys with ADHD combined subtype with psychopathic traits and controls are investigated. Method: The putamen in 24 archival magnetic resonance imaging scans of 12 boys in residential treatment with symptoms of ADHD and psychopathic traits and 12 community control boys are analyzed using Display…

  18. Edge localized mode control with an edge resonant magnetic perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, R.A.; Boedo, J.A.; Rudakov, D.L.; Evans, T.E.; Osborne, T.H.; Gohil, P.; Groebner, R.J.; Jackson, G.L.; La Haye, R.J.; Leonard, A.W.; Schaffer, M.J.; Snyder, P.B.; West, W.P.; Thomas, P.R.; Becoulet, M.; Harris, J.; Finken, K.-H.; Doyle, E.J.; Rhodes, T.L.; Wang, G.

    2005-05-15

    A low amplitude ({delta}b{sub r}/B{sub T}=1 part in 5000) edge resonant magnetic field perturbation with toroidal mode number n=3 and poloidal mode numbers between 8 and 15 has been used to suppress most large type I edge localized modes (ELMs) without degrading core plasma confinement. ELMs have been suppressed for periods of up to 8.6 energy confinement times when the edge safety factor q{sub 95} is between 3.5 and 4. The large ELMs are replaced by packets of events (possibly type II ELMs) with small amplitude, narrow radial extent, and a higher level of magnetic field and density fluctuations, creating a duty cycle with long 'active' intervals of high transport and short 'quiet' intervals of low transport. The increased transport associated with these events is less impulsive and slows the recovery of the pedestal profiles to the values reached just before the large ELMs without the n=3 perturbation. Changing the toroidal phase of the perturbation by 60 deg. with respect to the best ELM suppression case reduces the ELM amplitude and frequency by factors of 2-3 in the divertor, produces a more stochastic response in the H-mode pedestal profiles, and displays similar increases in small scale events, although significant numbers of large ELMs survive. In contrast to the best ELM suppression case where the type I ELMs are also suppressed on the outboard midplane, the midplane recycling increases until individual ELMs are no longer discernable. The ELM response depends on the toroidal phase of the applied perturbation because intrinsic error fields make the target plasma nonaxisymmetric, and suggests that at least some of the variation in ELM behavior in a single device or among different devices is due to differences in the intrinsic error fields in these devices. These results indicate that ELMs can be suppressed by small edge resonant magnetic field perturbations. Extrapolation to next-step burning plasma devices will require extending the regime of operation to

  19. Non-synchronous control of self-oscillating resonant converters

    DOEpatents

    Glaser, John Stanley; Zane, Regan Andrew

    2002-01-01

    A self-oscillating switching power converter has a controllable reactance including an active device connected to a reactive element, wherein the effective reactance of the reactance and the active device is controlled such that the control waveform for the active device is binary digital and is not synchronized with the switching converter output frequency. The active device is turned completely on and off at a frequency that is substantially greater than the maximum frequency imposed on the output terminals of the active device. The effect is to vary the average resistance across the active device output terminals, and thus the effective output reactance, thereby providing converter output control, while maintaining the response speed of the converter.

  20. Mode competition and mode control in free electron lasers with one and two dimensional Bragg resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, P.N.; Ginzburg, N.S.; Sergeev, A.S.

    1995-12-31

    In the report we present a time domain approach to the theory of FELs with one and two dimensional Bragg resonators. It is demonstrated that traditional 1-D Bragg resonators provide possibilities for effective longitudinal mode control. In particular, simulation of the FEL realized in the joint experiment of JINR (Dybna) and IAP (N. Novgord) confirms achievement of the single mode operating regime with high efficiency of about 20%. However, 1-D Bragg resonators lose their selectivity as the transverse size of the system is increased. We simulate mode competition in FELs with coaxial 1-D Bragg resonators and observe a progressively more complicated azimuthal mode competition pattern as the perimeter of the resonator is increased. At the same time, using 2-D Bragg resonators for the same electron beam and microwave system perimeter gives very fast establishment of the single frequency regime with an azimuthally symmetric operating mode. Therefore, FELs utilising 2-D Bragg resonators with coaxial and planar geometry may be considered as attractive sources of high power spatially coherent radiation in the mm and sub-mm wave bands.

  1. Fano resonance control in a photonic crystal structure and its application to ultrafast switching

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yi Heuck, Mikkel; Hu, Hao; Xue, Weiqi; Peucheret, Christophe; Chen, Yaohui; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Yvind, Kresten; Mørk, Jesper

    2014-08-11

    We experimentally demonstrate a photonic crystal structure that allows easy and robust control of the Fano spectrum. Its operation relies on controlling the amplitude of light propagating along one of the light paths in the structure from which the Fano resonance is obtained. Short-pulse dynamic measurements show that besides drastically increasing the switching contrast, the transmission dynamics itself is strongly affected by the nature of the resonance. The influence of slow-recovery tails implied by a long carrier lifetime can thus be reduced using a Fano resonance due to a hitherto unrecognized reshaping effect of the nonlinear Fano transfer function. As an example, we present a system application of a Fano structure, demonstrating its advantages by the experimental realization of 10 Gbit/s all-optical modulation with optical control power less than 1 mW.

  2. Oscillation control of carbon nanotube mechanical resonator by electrostatic interaction induced retardation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Masaaki; Takei, Kuniharu; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    Despite the superb intrinsic properties of carbon nanotube mechanical resonators, the quality factors at room temperature are 1,000 or less, even in vacuum, which is much lower than that of mechanical resonators fabricated using a top-down approach. This study demonstrates the improvement of the quality factor and the control of nonlinearity of the mechanical resonance of the cantilevered nanotube by electrostatic interaction. The apparent quality factor of the nanotube supported by insulator is improved drastically from approximately 630 to 3200 at room temperature. Results show that retardation of the electrostatic force induced by the contact resistance between the nanotube and the insulator support improves the quality factor. Finite element method calculation reveals that the nonuniform pileup charge on the insulator support strongly influences the nonlinearity of the resonance.

  3. Oscillation control of carbon nanotube mechanical resonator by electrostatic interaction induced retardation

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Masaaki; Takei, Kuniharu; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Despite the superb intrinsic properties of carbon nanotube mechanical resonators, the quality factors at room temperature are 1,000 or less, even in vacuum, which is much lower than that of mechanical resonators fabricated using a top-down approach. This study demonstrates the improvement of the quality factor and the control of nonlinearity of the mechanical resonance of the cantilevered nanotube by electrostatic interaction. The apparent quality factor of the nanotube supported by insulator is improved drastically from approximately 630 to 3200 at room temperature. Results show that retardation of the electrostatic force induced by the contact resistance between the nanotube and the insulator support improves the quality factor. Finite element method calculation reveals that the nonuniform pileup charge on the insulator support strongly influences the nonlinearity of the resonance. PMID:26935657

  4. Design and Verification of a Digital Controller for a 2-Piece Hemispherical Resonator Gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungshin; Yun, Sung Wook; Rhim, Jaewook

    2016-01-01

    A Hemispherical Resonator Gyro (HRG) is the Coriolis Vibratory Gyro (CVG) that measures rotation angle or angular velocity using Coriolis force acting the vibrating mass. A HRG can be used as a rate gyro or integrating gyro without structural modification by simply changing the control scheme. In this paper, differential control algorithms are designed for a 2-piece HRG. To design a precision controller, the electromechanical modelling and signal processing must be pre-performed accurately. Therefore, the equations of motion for the HRG resonator with switched harmonic excitations are derived with the Duhamel Integral method. Electromechanical modeling of the resonator, electric module and charge amplifier is performed by considering the mode shape of a thin hemispherical shell. Further, signal processing and control algorithms are designed. The multi-flexing scheme of sensing, driving cycles and x, y-axis switching cycles is appropriate for high precision and low maneuverability systems. The differential control scheme is easily capable of rejecting the common mode errors of x, y-axis signals and changing the rate integrating mode on basis of these studies. In the rate gyro mode the controller is composed of Phase-Locked Loop (PLL), amplitude, quadrature and rate control loop. All controllers are designed on basis of a digital PI controller. The signal processing and control algorithms are verified through Matlab/Simulink simulations. Finally, a FPGA and DSP board with these algorithms is verified through experiments. PMID:27104539

  5. Design and Verification of a Digital Controller for a 2-Piece Hemispherical Resonator Gyroscope

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungshin; Yun, Sung Wook; Rhim, Jaewook

    2016-01-01

    A Hemispherical Resonator Gyro (HRG) is the Coriolis Vibratory Gyro (CVG) that measures rotation angle or angular velocity using Coriolis force acting the vibrating mass. A HRG can be used as a rate gyro or integrating gyro without structural modification by simply changing the control scheme. In this paper, differential control algorithms are designed for a 2-piece HRG. To design a precision controller, the electromechanical modelling and signal processing must be pre-performed accurately. Therefore, the equations of motion for the HRG resonator with switched harmonic excitations are derived with the Duhamel Integral method. Electromechanical modeling of the resonator, electric module and charge amplifier is performed by considering the mode shape of a thin hemispherical shell. Further, signal processing and control algorithms are designed. The multi-flexing scheme of sensing, driving cycles and x, y-axis switching cycles is appropriate for high precision and low maneuverability systems. The differential control scheme is easily capable of rejecting the common mode errors of x, y-axis signals and changing the rate integrating mode on basis of these studies. In the rate gyro mode the controller is composed of Phase-Locked Loop (PLL), amplitude, quadrature and rate control loop. All controllers are designed on basis of a digital PI controller. The signal processing and control algorithms are verified through Matlab/Simulink simulations. Finally, a FPGA and DSP board with these algorithms is verified through experiments. PMID:27104539

  6. Design of a simple active controller to suppress helicopter air resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, M. D.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1988-01-01

    A coupled rotor/fuselage helicopter analysis with the important effects of blade torsional flexibility, unsteady aerodynamics, and forward flight is presented. Using this mathematical model, a nominal configuration is selected that experiences an air resonance instability throughout most of its flight envelope. A simple multivariable compensator using conventional swashplate inputs and a single body roll rate measurement is then designed. The controller design is based on a linear estimator in conjunction with optimal feedback gains, and the design is done in the frequency domain using the Loop Transfer Recovery method. The controller is shown to suppress the air resonance instability throughout wide range helicopter loading conditions and forward flight speeds.

  7. Temperature-controlled molecular depolarization gates in nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Schroder, Leif; Schroder, Leif; Chavez, Lana; Meldrum, Tyler; Smith, Monica; Lowery, Thomas J.; E. Wemmer, David; Pines, Alexander

    2008-02-27

    Down the drain: Cryptophane cages in combination with selective radiofrequency spin labeling can be used as molecular 'transpletor' units for transferring depletion of spin polarization from a hyperpolarized 'source' spin ensemble to a 'drain' ensemble. The flow of nuclei through the gate is adjustable by the ambient temperature, thereby enabling controlled consumption of hyperpolarization.

  8. A low-level rf control system for a quarter-wave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongwon; Hwang, Churlkew

    2012-06-01

    A low-level rf control system was designed and built for an rf deflector, which is a quarter wave resonator, and was designed to deflect a secondary electron beam to measure the bunch length of an ion beam. The deflector has a resonance frequency near 88 MHz, its required phase stability is approximately ±1° and its amplitude stability is less than ±1%. The control system consists of analog input and output components and a digital system based on a field-programmable gate array for signal processing. The system is cost effective, while meeting the stability requirements. Some basic properties of the control system were measured. Then, the capability of the rf control was tested using a mechanical vibrator made of a dielectric rod attached to an audio speaker system, which could induce regulated perturbations in the electric fields of the resonator. The control system was flexible so that its parameters could be easily configured to compensate for the disturbance induced in the resonator.

  9. One-step resonant controlled-phase gate on distant transmon qutrits in different 1D superconducting resonators

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Ming; Tao, Ming-Jie; Deng, Fu-Guo; Lu Long, Gui

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme to construct the controlled-phase (c-phase) gate on distant transmon qutrits hosted in different resonators inter-coupled by a connected transmon qutrit. Different from previous works for entanglement generation and information transfer on two distant qubits in a dispersive regime in the similar systems, our gate is constructed in the resonant regime with one step. The numerical simulation shows that the fidelity of our c-phase gate is 99.5% within 86.3 ns. As an interesting application of our c-phase gate, we propose an effective scheme to complete a conventional square lattice of two-dimensional surface code layout for fault-tolerant quantum computing on the distant transmon qutrits. The four-step coupling between the nearest distant transmon qutrits, small coupling strengths of the distant transmon qutrits, and the non-population on the connection transmon qutrit can reduce the interactions among different parts of the layout effectively, which makes the layout be integrated with a large scale in an easier way. PMID:26486426

  10. Controlling the Radiation Parameters of a Resonant Medium Excited by a Sequence of Ultrashort Superluminal Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, R. M.; Arkhipov, M. V.; Belov, P. A.; Babushkin, I.; Tolmachev, Yu. A.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of controlling the radiation parameters of a spatially periodic one-dimensional medium consisting of classical harmonic oscillators by means of a sequence of ultrashort pulses that propagate through the medium with a superluminal velocity. We show that, in the spectrum of the transient process, in addition to the radiation at a resonant frequency of oscillators, new frequencies arise that depend on the period of the spatial distribution of the oscillator density, the excitation velocity, and the angle of observation. We have examined in detail the case of excitation of the medium by a periodic sequence of ultrashort pulses that travel with a superluminal velocity. We show that it is possible to excite oscillations of complex shapes and to control the radiation parameters of the resonant medium by changing the relationship between the pulse repetition rate, the medium resonant frequency, and the new frequency.

  11. Ionization Branching Ratio Control with a Resonance Attosecond Clock

    SciTech Connect

    Argenti, Luca; Lindroth, Eva

    2010-07-30

    We investigate the possibility to monitor the dynamics of autoionizing states in real-time and control the yields of different ionization channels in helium by simulating extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pump IR-probe experiments focused on the N=2 threshold. The XUV pulse creates a coherent superposition of doubly excited states which is found to decay by ejecting electrons in bursts. Prominent interference fringes in the photoelectron angular distribution of the 2s and 2p ionization channels are observed, along with significant out-of-phase quantum beats in the yields of the corresponding parent ions.

  12. Dual-Functional Energy-Harvesting and Vibration Control: Electromagnetic Resonant Shunt Series Tuned Mass Dampers.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Lei; Cui, Wen

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel retrofittable approach for dual-functional energy-harvesting and robust vibration control by integrating the tuned mass damper (TMD) and electromagnetic shunted resonant damping. The viscous dissipative element between the TMD and primary system is replaced by an electromagnetic transducer shunted with a resonant RLC circuit. An efficient gradient based numeric method is presented for the parameter optimization in the control framework for vibration suppression and energy harvesting. A case study is performed based on the Taipei 101 TMD. It is found that by tuning the TMD resonance and circuit resonance close to that of the primary structure, the electromagnetic resonant-shunt TMD achieves the enhanced effectiveness and robustness of double-mass series TMDs, without suffering from the significantly amplified motion stroke. It is also observed that the parameters and performances optimized for vibration suppression are close to those optimized for energy harvesting, and the performance is not sensitive to the resistance of the charging circuit or electrical load. PMID:23918165

  13. Double-way spectral tunability for the control of optical nanocavity resonance

    PubMed Central

    Baida, Fadi I.; Grosjean, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy (SNOM) has been successful in finely tuning the optical properties of photonic crystal (PC) nanocavities. The SNOM nanoprobes proposed so far allowed for either redshifting or blueshifting the resonance peak of the PC structures. In this paper, we theoretically demonstrate the possibility of a redshifting (up to +0.65 nm) and a blueshifting (up to −5 nm) the PC cavity resonance wavelength with a single perturbation element. As an example, a fiber bowtie-aperture nano-antenna (BNA) engraved at the apex of a SNOM tip is proposed to play this role. The double-way tunability is the result of a competition between an induced electric dipole (BNA at resonance) leading to a redshift and an induced magnetic dipole (the tip metalcoating) giving rise to a blueshift of the resonance wavelength. We demonstrate that the sign of the spectral shift can be simply controlled through the tip-to-cavity distance. This study opens the way to the full postproduction control of the resonance wavelength of high quality-factor optical cavities. PMID:26642935

  14. Phase control of the transient resonance of the automatic ball balancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalczyk, Jerzy; Pakuła, Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    Hazards related to undesired increases of vibration amplitudes in transient resonance of vibroinsulated rotor systems with automatic ball balancer (ABB) are discussed in the paper. The application of the phase control method with taking into account the limited drive power is proposed for these amplitudes reduction. The high efficiency of this approach is indicated.

  15. Coherent phase control of resonance-mediated two-photon absorption in rare-earth ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shian Lu, Chenhui; Jia, Tianqing; Sun, Zhenrong; Qiu, Jianrong

    2013-11-04

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the quantum coherent control of the resonance-mediated two-photon absorption in rare-earth ions by the phase-shaped femtosecond laser pulse. Our theoretical results show that the resonance-mediated two-photon absorption can be effectively controlled, but the control efficiency depends on the laser repetition rate in real experiment due to the long lifetime and the short decoherence time of the excited state, and the larger laser repetition rate yields the lower control efficiency. These theoretical results are experimentally confirmed in glass sample doped with Er{sup 3+} by utilizing the femtosecond lasers with low repetition rate of 1 kHz and high repetition rate of 80 MHz.

  16. Fan Noise Control Using Herschel-quincke Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Ng, Wing F.; Provenza, Andrew (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The research effort proposed for this NASA NRA is mainly experimental. In addition, Virginia Tech is working in partnership with Goodrich Aerospace, Aerostructures Group for the analytical development needed to support the experimental endeavor, i.e. model development, design, and system studies. In this project, Herschel-Quincke (HQ)liner technology experiments will be performed at the NASA Glenn Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF) facility. A schematic of both inlet and aft HQ-liner systems installed in the ANCF rig as well as a picture of the Glenn facility is shown. The main goal is to simultaneously test in both the inlet and bypass duct sections. The by-pass duct will have HQ-systems in both the inner and outer duct walls. The main advantages of performing tests at the ANCF facility are that the effect of the inlet HQ-system on the by-pass HQ-system and vice versa, can be accurately determined from the in-duct modal data. Another significant advantage is that it offers the opportunity to assess (on a common basis) the proposed noise reduction concept on the ANCF rig which in the past has been used for assessing other active and passive noise reduction strategies.

  17. Fan Noise Control Using Herschel-Quincke Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Ng, Wing F.

    2003-01-01

    The research effort proposed for this NASA NRA is mainly experimental. In addition, Virginia Tech is working in partnership with Goodrich Aerospace, Aerostructures Group for the analytical development needed to support the experimental endeavor, i.e. model development, design, and system studies. In this project, Herschel-Quincke (HQ)liner technology experiments will be performed at the NASA Glenn Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF) facility. A schematic of both inlet and aft HQ-liner systems installed in the ANCF rig as well as a picture of the Glenn facility is shown. The main goal is to simultaneously test in both the inlet and bypass duct sections. The by-pass duct will have HQ-systems in both the inner and outer duct walls. The main advantages of performing tests at the ANCF facility are that the effect of the inlet HQ-system on the by-pass HQ-system and vice versa, can be accurately determined from the in-duct modal data. Another significant advantage is that it offers the opportunity to assess (on a common basis) the proposed noise reduction concept on the ANCF rig which in the past has been used for assessing other active and passive noise reduction strategies.

  18. Control of localized surface plasmon resonance energy in monolayer structures of gold and silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Hiroki; Taniguchi, Taichi; Watanabe, Taichi; Kim, DaeGwi

    2015-10-28

    Monolayer structures of Au and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) were fabricated by a dipping method to realize the control of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) energy. The mean inter-particle distance in the monolayer was controlled by changing the concentration of NPs in the colloidal solution used for the monolayer assembly. The extinction-peak energy of the monolayer structure was red-shifted with decreasing inter-particle distance, reflecting plasmon coupling between NPs. PMID:26411840

  19. Voltage-controlled spin selection in a magnetic resonant tunneling diode.

    PubMed

    Slobodskyy, A; Gould, C; Slobodskyy, T; Becker, C R; Schmidt, G; Molenkamp, L W

    2003-06-20

    We have fabricated all II-VI semiconductor resonant tunneling diodes based on the (Zn,Mn,Be)Se material system, containing dilute magnetic material in the quantum well, and studied their current-voltage characteristics. When subjected to an external magnetic field the resulting spin splitting of the levels in the quantum well leads to a splitting of the transmission resonance into two separate peaks. This is interpreted as evidence of tunneling transport through spin polarized levels, and could be the first step towards a voltage controlled spin filter. PMID:12857209

  20. Controllable surface-plasmon resonance in engineered nanometer epitaxial silicide particles embedded in silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, R. W.; Ksendzov, A.; Iannelli, J. M.; George, T.

    1991-01-01

    Epitaxial CoSi2 particles in a single-crystal silicon matrix are grown by molecular-beam epitaxy using a technique that allows nanometer control over particle size in three dimensions. These composite layers exhibit resonant absorption predicted by effective-medium theory. Selection of the height and diameter of disklike particles through a choice of growth conditions allows tailoring of the depolarization factor and hence of the surface-plasmon resonance energy. Resonant absorption from 0.49 to 1.04 eV (2.5 to 1.2 micron) is demonstrated and shown to agree well with values predicted by the Garnett (1904, 1906) theory using the bulk dielectric constants for CoSi2 and Si.

  1. Passive control of flow-excited acoustic resonance in rectangular cavities using upstream mounted blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaaban, Mahmoud; Mohany, Atef

    2015-04-01

    A passive method for controlling the flow-excited acoustic resonance resulting from subsonic flows over rectangular cavities in channels is investigated. A cavity with length to depth ratio of is tested in air flow of Mach number up to 0.45. When the acoustic resonance is excited, the sound pressure level in the cavity reaches 162 dB. Square blocks are attached to the surface of the channel and centred upstream of the cavity leading edge to suppress the flow-excited acoustic resonance in the cavity. Six blocks of different widths are tested at three different upstream distances. The results show that significant attenuation of up to 30 dB of the excited sound pressure level is achieved using a block with a width to height ratio of 3, while blocks that fill the whole width of the channel amplify the pressure of the excited acoustic resonance. Moreover, it is found that placing the block upstream of the cavity causes the onset of the acoustic resonance to occur at higher flow velocities. In order to investigate the nature of the interactions that lead to suppression of the acoustic resonance and to identify the changes in flow patterns due to the placement of the block, 2D measurements of turbulence intensity in the shear layer and the block wake region are performed. The location of the flow reattachment point downstream of the block relative to the shear layer separation point has a major influence on the suppression level of the excited acoustic resonance. Furthermore, higher attenuation of noise is related to lower span-wise correlation of the shear-layer perturbation.

  2. Acoustic control in a tractor cabin using two optimally designed Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driesch, Patricia L.; Koopmann, Gary H.

    2003-10-01

    A virtual design methodology is developed to minimize the noise in enclosures with optimally designed, passive, 20 acoustic absorbers (Helmholtz resonators). A series expansion of eigenfunctions is used to represent the acoustic=20 absorbers as external volume velocities, eliminating the need for a solution of large matrix eigenvalue problems. A determination of this type (efficient model/reevaluation approach) significantly increases the design possibilities when optimization techniques are implemented. As a full-scale demonstration, the acoustic response from 90-190 Hz of a tractor cabin was investigated. The lowest cabin mode proposes a significant challenge to a noise control engineer since its anti-node is located near the head of the operator and often generates unacceptable sound-pressure levels. Exploiting the low-frequency capability of Helmholtz resonators, lumped parameter models of these resonators were coupled to the enclosure via an experimentally determined acoustic model of the tractor cabin. The virtual design methodology uses gradient optimization techniques as a post-processor for the modeling and analysis of the unmodified acoustic interior to determine optimal resonator characteristics. Using two optimally designed Helmholtz resonators, potential energy was experimentally reduced by 3.4 and 10.3 dB at 117 and 167 Hz, respectively.

  3. Control of crystallographic orientation in diamond synthesis through laser resonant vibrational excitation of precursor molecules

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhi Qiang; Bai, Jaeil; Zhou, Yun Shen; Gao, Yi; Park, Jongbok; Guillemet, Thomas; Jiang, Lan; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Lu, Yong Feng

    2014-01-01

    Crystallographic orientations determine the optical, electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties of crystals. Control of crystallographic orientations has been studied by changing the growth parameters, including temperature, pressure, proportion of precursors, and surface conditions. However, molecular dynamic mechanisms underlying these controls remain largely unknown. Here we achieved control of crystallographic orientations in diamond growth through a joint experimental and theoretical study of laser resonant vibrational excitation of precursor molecules (ethylene). Resonant vibrational excitation of the ethylene molecules using a wavelength-tunable CO2 laser steers the chemical reactions and promotes proportion of intermediate oxide species, which results in preferential growth of {100}-oriented diamond films and diamond single crystals in open air. Quantum molecular dynamic simulations and calculations of chemisorption energies of radicals detected from our mass-spectroscopy experiment provide an in-depth understanding of molecular reaction mechanisms in the steering of chemical reactions and control of crystallographic orientations. This finding opens up a new avenue for controlled chemical vapor deposition of crystals through resonant vibrational excitations to steer surface chemistry. PMID:24694918

  4. A Resonant Pulse Detonation Actuator for High-Speed Boundary Layer Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, B. T.; Cutler, A. D.; Drummond, J. P.; Jones, S. B.

    2004-01-01

    A variety of different types of actuators have been previously investigated as flow control devices. Potential applications include the control of boundary layer separation in external flows, as well as jet engine inlet and diffuser flow control. The operating principles for such devices are typically based on either mechanical deflection of control surfaces (which include MEMS flap devices), mass injection (which includes combustion driven jet actuators), or through the use of synthetic jets (diaphragm devices which produce a pulsating jet with no net mass flow). This paper introduces some of the initial flow visualization work related to the development of a relatively new type of combustion-driven jet actuator that has been proposed based on a pulse detonation principle. The device is designed to utilize localized detonation of a premixed fuel (Hydrogen)-air mixture to periodically inject a jet of gas transversely into the primary flow. Initial testing with airflow successfully demonstrated resonant conditions within the range of acoustic frequencies expected for the design. Schlieren visualization of the pulsating air jet structure revealed axially symmetric vortex flow, along with the formation of shocks. Flow visualization of the first successful sustained oscillation condition is also demonstrated for one configuration of the current test section. Future testing will explore in more detail the onset of resonant combustion and the approach to conditions of sustained resonant detonation.

  5. Duffing revisited: phase-shift control and internal resonance in self-sustained oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo, Sebastián I.; Zanette, Damián H.

    2016-01-01

    We address two aspects of the dynamics of the forced Duffing oscillator which are relevant to the technology of micromechanical devices and, at the same time, have intrinsic significance to the field of nonlinear oscillating systems. First, we study the stability of periodic motion when the phase shift between the external force and the oscillation is controlled - contrary to the standard case, where the control parameter is the frequency of the force. Phase-shift control is the operational configuration under which self-sustained oscillators - and, in particular, micromechanical oscillators - provide a frequency reference useful for time keeping. We show that, contrary to the standard forced Duffing oscillator, under phase-shift control oscillations are stable over the whole resonance curve, and provide analytical approximate expressions for the time dependence of the oscillation amplitude and frequency during transients. Second, we analyze a model for the internal resonance between the main Duffing oscillation mode and a higher-harmonic mode of a vibrating solid bar clamped at its two ends. We focus on the stabilization of the oscillation frequency when the resonance takes place, and present preliminary experimental results that illustrate the phenomenon. This synchronization process has been proposed to counteract the undesirable frequency-amplitude interdependence in nonlinear time-keeping micromechanical devices. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file and one gif file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2015-60517-3

  6. Magnetic resonance velocity imaging derived pressure differential using control volume analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Diagnosis and treatment of hydrocephalus is hindered by a lack of systemic understanding of the interrelationships between pressures and flow of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain. Control volume analysis provides a fluid physics approach to quantify and relate pressure and flow information. The objective of this study was to use control volume analysis and magnetic resonance velocity imaging to non-invasively estimate pressure differentials in vitro. Method A flow phantom was constructed and water was the experimental fluid. The phantom was connected to a high-resolution differential pressure sensor and a computer controlled pump producing sinusoidal flow. Magnetic resonance velocity measurements were taken and subsequently analyzed to derive pressure differential waveforms using momentum conservation principles. Independent sensor measurements were obtained for comparison. Results Using magnetic resonance data the momentum balance in the phantom was computed. The measured differential pressure force had amplitude of 14.4 dynes (pressure gradient amplitude 0.30 Pa/cm). A 12.5% normalized root mean square deviation between derived and directly measured pressure differential was obtained. These experiments demonstrate one example of the potential utility of control volume analysis and the concepts involved in its application. Conclusions This study validates a non-invasive measurement technique for relating velocity measurements to pressure differential. These methods may be applied to clinical measurements to estimate pressure differentials in vivo which could not be obtained with current clinical sensors. PMID:21414222

  7. A Polarization Control System for Intensity-Resolved Guided Mode Resonance Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Sheng-Fu; Chang, Fu-Chen; Chen, Zhi-Heng; Wang, Chih-Ming; Yang, Tsung-Hsun; Chen, Wen-Yih; Chang, Jenq-Yang

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a polarization-control setup for intensity-resolved guided mode resonance sensors is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. The experimental results are in good agreement with the simulation data based on rigorous coupled wave approach calculations. The proposed intensity-resolved measurement setup transfers polarization ellipses, which are produced from guided mode resonance to a linear polarization state under a buffer solution condition, and then suppresses the signals to dark using a polarization-control set. Hence, any changes in the refractive index results in an increase in the intensity signals. Furthermore, no wavelength-resolved or angular-resolved measurement is needed in this scheme. According to the experimental results, a wide linear detection range of 0.014 refractive index units is achieved and the limit of detection is 1.62E-4 RIU. PMID:24625743

  8. Fast electron spin resonance controlled manipulation of spin injection into quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, Andreas Siller, Jan; Schittny, Robert; Krämmer, Christoph; Kalt, Heinz; Hetterich, Michael

    2014-06-23

    In our spin-injection light-emitting diodes, electrons are spin-polarized in a semimagnetic ZnMnSe spin aligner and then injected into InGaAs quantum dots. The resulting electron spin state can be read out by measuring the circular polarization state of the emitted light. Here, we resonantly excite the Mn 3d electron spin system with microwave pulses and perform time-resolved measurements of the spin dynamics. We find that we are able to control the spin polarization of the injected electrons on a microsecond timescale. This electron spin resonance induced spin control could be one of the ingredients required to utilize the quantum dot electrons or the Mn spins as qubits.

  9. Control of acoustic absorption in one-dimensional scattering by resonant scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, A.; Theocharis, G.; Richoux, O.; Romero-García, V.; Pagneux, V.

    2015-12-01

    We experimentally report perfect acoustic absorption through the interplay of the inherent losses and transparent modes with high Q factor. These modes are generated in a two-port, one-dimensional waveguide, which is side-loaded by isolated resonators of moderate Q factor. In symmetric structures, we show that in the presence of small inherent losses, these modes lead to coherent perfect absorption associated with one-sided absorption slightly larger than 0.5. In asymmetric structures, near perfect one-sided absorption is possible (96%) with a deep sub-wavelength sample ( λ / 28 , where λ is the wavelength of the sound wave in the air). The control of strong absorption by the proper tuning of the radiation leakage of few resonators with weak losses will open possibilities in various wave-control devices.

  10. Resonant control of stochastic spatiotemporal dynamics in a tunnel diode by multiple time-delayed feedback.

    PubMed

    Majer, Niels; Schöll, Eckehard

    2009-01-01

    We study the control of noise-induced spatiotemporal current density patterns in a semiconductor nanostructure (double-barrier resonant tunneling diode) by multiple time-delayed feedback. We find much more pronounced resonant features of noise-induced oscillations compared to single time feedback, rendering the system more sensitive to variations in the delay time tau . The coherence of noise-induced oscillations measured by the correlation time exhibits sharp resonances as a function of tau , and can be strongly increased by optimal choices of tau . Similarly, the peaks in the power spectral density are sharpened. We provide analytical insight into the control mechanism by relating the correlation times and mean frequencies of noise-induced breathing oscillations to the stability properties of the deterministic stationary current density filaments under the influence of the control loop. Moreover, we demonstrate that the use of multiple time delays enlarges the regime in which the deterministic dynamical properties of the system are not changed by delay-induced bifurcations. PMID:19257003

  11. A design procedure for the phase-controlled parallel-loaded resonant inverter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Roger J.

    1989-01-01

    High-frequency-link power conversion and distribution based on a resonant inverter (RI) has been recently proposed. The design of several topologies is reviewed, and a simple approximate design procedure is developed for the phase-controlled parallel-loaded RI. This design procedure seeks to ensure the benefits of resonant conversion and is verified by data from a laboratory 2.5 kVA, 20-kHz converter. A simple phasor analysis is introduced as a useful approximation for design purposes. The load is considered to be a linear impedance (or an ac current sink). The design procedure is verified using a 2.5-kVA 20-kHz RI. Also obtained are predictable worst-case ratings for each component of the resonant tank circuit and the inverter switches. For a given load VA requirement, below-resonance operation is found to result in a significantly lower tank VA requirement. Under transient conditions such as load short-circuit, a reversal of the expected commutation sequence is possible.

  12. Flow control using audio tones in resonant microfluidic networks: towards cell-phone controlled lab-on-a-chip devices.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Reid H; Jain, Rahil; Browning, Yoni; Shah, Rachana; Kauffman, Peter; Dinh, Doan; Lutz, Barry R

    2016-08-16

    Fluid control remains a challenge in development of portable lab-on-a-chip devices. Here, we show that microfluidic networks driven by single-frequency audio tones create resonant oscillating flow that is predicted by equivalent electrical circuit models. We fabricated microfluidic devices with fluidic resistors (R), inductors (L), and capacitors (C) to create RLC networks with band-pass resonance in the audible frequency range available on portable audio devices. Microfluidic devices were fabricated from laser-cut adhesive plastic, and a "buzzer" was glued to a diaphragm (capacitor) to integrate the actuator on the device. The AC flowrate magnitude was measured by imaging oscillation of bead tracers to allow direct comparison to the RLC circuit model across the frequency range. We present a systematic build-up from single-channel systems to multi-channel (3-channel) networks, and show that RLC circuit models predict complex frequency-dependent interactions within multi-channel networks. Finally, we show that adding flow rectifying valves to the network creates pumps that can be driven by amplified and non-amplified audio tones from common audio devices (iPod and iPhone). This work shows that RLC circuit models predict resonant flow responses in multi-channel fluidic networks as a step towards microfluidic devices controlled by audio tones. PMID:27416111

  13. Start-up and control method and apparatus for resonant free piston Stirling engine

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, Michael M.

    1984-01-01

    A resonant free-piston Stirling engine having a new and improved start-up and control method and system. A displacer linear electrodynamic machine is provided having an armature secured to and movable with the displacer and having a stator supported by the Stirling engine housing in juxtaposition to the armature. A control excitation circuit is provided for electrically exciting the displacer linear electrodynamic machine with electrical excitation signals having substantially the same frequency as the desired frequency of operation of the Stirling engine. The excitation control circuit is designed so that it selectively and controllably causes the displacer electrodynamic machine to function either as a generator load to extract power from the displacer or the control circuit selectively can be operated to cause the displacer electrodynamic machine to operate as an electric drive motor to apply additional input power to the displacer in addition to the thermodynamic power feedback to the displacer whereby the displacer linear electrodynamic machine also is used in the electric drive motor mode as a means for initially starting the resonant free-piston Stirling engine.

  14. Control of the plasmon resonance from poly-dispersed silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Jae Young; Yun, Changhun; Kim, Ki Hyun; Kim, Wan Ho; Jeon, Sie-Wook; Im, Won Bin; Kim, Jae Pil

    2015-02-01

    Poly-dispersed silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized through a polyol reaction and separated by a centrifuging process to control the target plasmon resonance frequency. When the ratio between the polar side group of polyvinyl pyrrolidone and silver ions is less than 1, AgNPs of various sizes and a broad extinction spectrum can be obtained through a single process. Following the physical separation of the poly-dispersed AgNPs, both the plasmon resonance and the size distribution can be tuned depending on the centrifuging speed. Fitting the measured absorption spectrum using a Mie calculation confirms that the centrifuging method of poly-dispersed AgNPs is compatible with a simple and reliable form of fabrication for selectively extraction AgNPs with a desired size distribution.

  15. Frequency control of a 1163 nm singly resonant OPO based on MgO:PPLN.

    PubMed

    Gross, P; Lindsay, I D; Lee, C J; Nittmann, M; Bauer, T; Bartschke, J; Warring, U; Fischer, A; Kellerbauer, A; Boller, K-J

    2010-03-15

    We report the realization of a singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (SRO) that is designed to provide narrow-bandwidth, continuously tunable radiation at a wavelength of 1163 nm for optical cooling of osmium ions. The SRO is based on periodically poled, magnesium-oxide-doped lithium niobate and pumped at 532 nm. The output coupling of the resonant idler wave is adjusted to yield up to 400 mW of 1163 nm radiation, with a bandwidth of a few megahertz. For continuous frequency tuning of the idler wave, the SRO is equipped with an intracavity etalon, and the cavity length is controlled with a piezo-actuated mirror synchronized to the etalon angle. PMID:20237610

  16. Experimental control of transport resonances in a coherent quantum rocking ratchet

    PubMed Central

    Grossert, Christopher; Leder, Martin; Denisov, Sergey; Hänggi, Peter; Weitz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The ratchet phenomenon is a means to get directed transport without net forces. Originally conceived to rectify stochastic motion and describe operational principles of biological motors, the ratchet effect can be used to achieve controllable coherent quantum transport. This transport is an ingredient of several perspective quantum devices including atomic chips. Here we examine coherent transport of ultra-cold atoms in a rocking quantum ratchet. This is realized by loading a rubidium atomic Bose–Einstein condensate into a periodic optical potential subjected to a biharmonic temporal drive. The achieved long-time coherence allows us to resolve resonance enhancement of the atom transport induced by avoided crossings in the Floquet spectrum of the system. By tuning the strength of the temporal modulations, we observe a bifurcation of a single resonance into a doublet. Our measurements reveal the role of interactions among Floquet eigenstates for quantum ratchet transport. PMID:26852803

  17. High-frequency voltage-controlled-oscillator for use with inverted- mesa quartz resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Wessendorf, K.O.

    1996-08-01

    An oscillator circuit has been developed that uses inverted mesa resonators, in a high precision VCO application, at frequencies historically dominated by SAW designs. This design incorporates a frequency tripler that provides a 600 MHz output capability using a 200 MHz 3{sup rd} overtone resonator. This design has advantages over equivalent SAW alternatives: lower power consumption, superior aging characteristics, linear frequency pulling and low frequency versus temperature sensitivity. The VCO presented demonstrates {gt} +/- 60 ppm pullability (0 to 7V control), tuning linearity better than +/- 5% with phase noise at 1 kHz {lt} -110 DBc/Hz. this oscillator- tripler exploits the nonlinear characteristics of an emitter-coupled pair differential amplifier to obtain a high performance oscillator design.

  18. Experimental control of transport resonances in a coherent quantum rocking ratchet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossert, Christopher; Leder, Martin; Denisov, Sergey; Hänggi, Peter; Weitz, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The ratchet phenomenon is a means to get directed transport without net forces. Originally conceived to rectify stochastic motion and describe operational principles of biological motors, the ratchet effect can be used to achieve controllable coherent quantum transport. This transport is an ingredient of several perspective quantum devices including atomic chips. Here we examine coherent transport of ultra-cold atoms in a rocking quantum ratchet. This is realized by loading a rubidium atomic Bose-Einstein condensate into a periodic optical potential subjected to a biharmonic temporal drive. The achieved long-time coherence allows us to resolve resonance enhancement of the atom transport induced by avoided crossings in the Floquet spectrum of the system. By tuning the strength of the temporal modulations, we observe a bifurcation of a single resonance into a doublet. Our measurements reveal the role of interactions among Floquet eigenstates for quantum ratchet transport.

  19. Broadband wavelength control for optical parametric oscillation in radially-poled whispering gallery resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisenheimer, Sarah-Katharina; Fürst, Josef U.; Schiller, Annelie; Buse, Karsten; Breunig, Ingo

    2016-03-01

    Broadband infrared spectroscopy employing optical parametric oscillation in bow-tie cavities, including a periodically- poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal, is well known. We demonstrate, however, that such spectroscopy is also possible using 2-mm-size monolithic whispering gallery resonators (WGRs). This is achieved in a radially-poled WGR by controlling wavelength tuning despite triple resonance of pump, signal, and idler light. Simulated and measured tuning characteristics of the Type-0 OPOs, pumped at about 1 μm wavelength, coincide. Tuning branches, which are crossed or curved at degeneracy, are present over a spectral range of up to 0.9 µm. As a proof-of-principle experiment, we show that all spectroscopic features of ethanol can be resolved using the idler light between 2.2 and 2.55 μm.

  20. Clutter sensitivity test under controlled field conditions Resonant Microstrip Patch Antenna (RMPA) sensor technology

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-27

    Theoretical research, controlled laboratory tests, and these field test results show that nonmetallic (and metallic) shallowly buried objects can be detected and imaged with the Resonant Microstrip Patch Antenna (RMPA) sensor. The sensor can be modeled as a high Q cavity which capitalizes on its resonant condition sensitivity to scattered waves from buried objects. When the RMPA sensor is swept over a shallowly buried object, the RMPA fed-point impedance (resistance), measured with a Maxwell bridge, changes by tens of percent. The significant change in unprocessed impedance data can be presented in two-dimensional and three-dimensional graphical displays over the survey area. This forms silhouette images of the objects without the application of computationally intensive data processing algorithms. Because RMPA employed electromagnetic waves to illuminate the shallowly buried object, a number of questions and issues arise in the decision to fund or deny funding of the reconfiguration of the RMPA technology into a nonmetallic (metallic) land mine detector.

  1. Experimental control of transport resonances in a coherent quantum rocking ratchet.

    PubMed

    Grossert, Christopher; Leder, Martin; Denisov, Sergey; Hänggi, Peter; Weitz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The ratchet phenomenon is a means to get directed transport without net forces. Originally conceived to rectify stochastic motion and describe operational principles of biological motors, the ratchet effect can be used to achieve controllable coherent quantum transport. This transport is an ingredient of several perspective quantum devices including atomic chips. Here we examine coherent transport of ultra-cold atoms in a rocking quantum ratchet. This is realized by loading a rubidium atomic Bose-Einstein condensate into a periodic optical potential subjected to a biharmonic temporal drive. The achieved long-time coherence allows us to resolve resonance enhancement of the atom transport induced by avoided crossings in the Floquet spectrum of the system. By tuning the strength of the temporal modulations, we observe a bifurcation of a single resonance into a doublet. Our measurements reveal the role of interactions among Floquet eigenstates for quantum ratchet transport. PMID:26852803

  2. Pyrotechnic shock simulation using the controlled response of a resonating bar fixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davie, N. T.

    Test laboratories frequently simulate pyrotechnic shock by mounting test items on various bar or plate fixtures which are excited into resonance by mechanical impact. A method for controlling the longitudinal response of a bar fixture is described. Masses clamped along the bar allow one to select which of the bar's natural frequencies will dominate its response upon impact. A test item mounted on one end of the bar thus experiences a controlled shock environment. This method ultimately provides a predictive means for controlling the shock spectrum shape produced by the simulated pyrotechnic shock. Control of the shock spectrum shape eliminates much of the trial and error usually required to tailor a shock test to satisfy the test requirement. A simple analytical model is described which derives the propagation and reflection of strain waves in the bar fixture. Bar responses predicted by this model agree with actual measurements.

  3. Pyrotechnic shock simulation using the controlled response of a resonating bar fixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, N. T.

    Test laboratories frequently simulate pyrotechnic shock by mounting test items on various bar or plate fixtures which are excited into resonance by mechanical impact. A method for controlling the longitudinal response of a bar fixture is described. Masses clamped along the bar allow one to select which of the bar's natural frequencies will dominate its response upon impact. A test item mounted on one end of the bar thus experiences a controlled shock environment. This method ultimately provides a predictive means for controlling the shock spectrum shape produced by the simulated pyrotechnic shock. Control of the shock spectrum shape eliminates much of the trial and error usually required to tailor a shock test to satisfy the test requirement. A simple analytical model which describes the propagation and reflection of strain waves in the bar fixture is also derived. Bar responses predicted by this model agree with actual measurements.

  4. Pyrotechnic shock simulation using the controlled response of a resonating bar fixture

    SciTech Connect

    Davie, N.T.

    1985-01-01

    Test laboratories frequently simulate pyrotechnic shock by mounting test items on various bar or plate fixtures which are excited into resonance by mechanical impact. The author describes a method for controlling the longitudinal response of a bar fixture. Masses clamped along the bar allow one to select which of the bar's natural frequencies will dominate its response upon impact. A test item mounted on one end of the bar thus experiences a controlled shock environment. This method ultimately provides a predictive means for controlling the shock spectrum shape produced by the simulated pyrotechnic shock. Control of the shock spectrum shape eliminates much of the trial and error usually required to tailor a shock test to satisfy the test requirement. The author also derives a simple analytical model which describes the propagation and reflection of strain waves in the bar fixture. Bar responses predicted by this model agree with actual measurements.

  5. Control system renewal for efficient operation in RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, A; Ozeki, K; Higurashi, Y; Kidera, M; Komiyama, M; Nakagawa, T

    2016-02-01

    A RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (18 GHz ECRIS) is used as an external ion source at the Radioactive Ion Beam Factory (RIBF) accelerator complex to produce an intense beam of medium-mass heavy ions (e.g., Ca and Ar). In most components that comprise the RIBF, the control systems (CSs) are integrated by the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). On the other hand, a non-EPICS-based system has hardwired controllers, and it is used in the 18 GHz ECRIS CS as an independent system. In terms of efficient and effective operation, the 18 GHz ECRIS CS as well as the RIBF CS should be renewed using EPICS. Therefore, we constructed an 18 GHz ECRIS CS by using programmable logic controllers with embedded EPICS technology. In the renewed system, an operational log system was developed as a new feature, for supporting of the 18 GHz ECRIS operation. PMID:26931940

  6. Control system renewal for efficient operation in RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, A.; Ozeki, K.; Higurashi, Y.; Kidera, M.; Komiyama, M.; Nakagawa, T.

    2016-02-01

    A RIKEN 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (18 GHz ECRIS) is used as an external ion source at the Radioactive Ion Beam Factory (RIBF) accelerator complex to produce an intense beam of medium-mass heavy ions (e.g., Ca and Ar). In most components that comprise the RIBF, the control systems (CSs) are integrated by the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). On the other hand, a non-EPICS-based system has hardwired controllers, and it is used in the 18 GHz ECRIS CS as an independent system. In terms of efficient and effective operation, the 18 GHz ECRIS CS as well as the RIBF CS should be renewed using EPICS. Therefore, we constructed an 18 GHz ECRIS CS by using programmable logic controllers with embedded EPICS technology. In the renewed system, an operational log system was developed as a new feature, for supporting of the 18 GHz ECRIS operation.

  7. Experimental exploration over a quantum control landscape through nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiuyang; Pelczer, István; Riviello, Gregory; Wu, Re-Bing; Rabitz, Herschel

    2014-03-01

    The growing successes in performing quantum control experiments motivated the development of control landscape analysis as a basis to explain these findings. When a quantum system is controlled by an electromagnetic field, the observable as a functional of the control field forms a landscape. Theoretical analyses have revealed many properties of control landscapes, especially regarding their slopes, curvatures, and topologies. A full experimental assessment of the landscape predictions is important for future consideration of controlling quantum phenomena. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is exploited here as an ideal laboratory setting for quantitative testing of the landscape principles. The experiments are performed on a simple two-level proton system in a H2O-D2O sample. We report a variety of NMR experiments roving over the control landscape based on estimation of the gradient and Hessian, including ascent or descent of the landscape, level set exploration, and an assessment of the theoretical predictions on the structure of the Hessian. The experimental results are fully consistent with the theoretical predictions. The procedures employed in this study provide the basis for future multispin control landscape exploration where additional features are predicted to exist.

  8. A micromachined thermally compensated thin film Lamb wave resonator for frequency control and sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingqvist, G.; Arapan, L.; Yantchev, V.; Katardjiev, I.

    2009-03-01

    Micromachined thin film plate acoustic wave resonators (FPARs) utilizing the lowest order symmetric Lamb wave (S0) propagating in highly textured 2 µm thick aluminium nitride (AlN) membranes have been successfully demonstrated (Yantchev and Katardjiev 2007 IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 54 87-95). The proposed devices have a SAW-based design and exhibit Q factors of up to 3000 at a frequency around 900 MHz as well as design flexibility with respect to the required motional resistance. However, a notable drawback of the proposed devices is the non-zero temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) which lies in the range -20 ppm K-1 to -25 ppm K-1. Thus, despite the promising features demonstrated, further device optimization is required. In this work temperature compensation of thin AlN film Lamb wave resonators is studied and experimentally demonstrated. Temperature compensation while retaining at the same time the device electromechanical coupling is experimentally demonstrated. The zero TCF Lamb wave resonators are fabricated onto composite AlN/SiO2 membranes. Q factors of around 1400 have been measured at a frequency of around 755 MHz. Finally, the impact of technological issues on the device performance is discussed in view of improving the device performance.

  9. Fluoropolymer piezoelectrets with tubular channels: resonance behavior controlled by channel geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisani Altafim, Ruy Alberto; Corrêa Altafim, Ruy Alberto; Qiu, Xunlin; Raabe, Sebastian; Wirges, Werner; Basso, Heitor Cury; Gerhard, Reimund

    2012-06-01

    Ferro- or piezoelectrets are dielectric materials with two elastically very different macroscopic phases and electrically charged interfaces between them. One of the newer piezoelectret variants is a system of two fluoroethylenepropylene (FEP) films that are first laminated around a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) template. Then, by removing the PTFE template, a two-layer FEP structure with open tubular channels is obtained. After electrical charging, the channels form easily deformable macroscopic electric dipoles whose changes under mechanical or electrical stress lead to significant direct or inverse piezoelectricity, respectively. Here, different PTFE templates are employed to generate channel geometries that vary in height or width. It is shown that the control of the channel geometry allows a direct adjustment of the resonance frequencies in the tubular-channel piezoelectrets. By combining several different channel widths in a single ferroelectret, it is possible to obtain multiple resonance peaks that may lead to a rather flat frequency-response region of the transducer material. A phenomenological relation between the resonance frequency and the geometrical parameters of a tubular channel is also presented. This relation may help to design piezoelectrets with a specific frequency response.

  10. Quality control and health monitoring of aerospace composites via quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Catherine; Vierkoetter, Stephanie A.

    2005-05-01

    Techniques for quality control and health monitoring of aerospace composite structures must be reliable, nonintrusive and preferably, non-contacting. Quadrupole resonance (QR) spectroscopy can fill this need. Previously, we have demonstrated that Quadrupole Resonance can be used for nondestructive inspection of polymeric fiber-reinforced composites, which can be exploited for both in-service inspection and on-going structural health monitoring.1-6 In this paper we present an extension of this work, applying the QR method to the quality control of composite parts manufactured via pultrusion. In order to use the QR method for quality control of composite parts they must contain a small amount of tiny crystals of a QR active compound. These crystals are embedded in the part during the manufacture by blending it into the uncured resin. The QR active crystals sense any residual strains that may form inside the part during the manufacturing process. The crystals are interrogated via a single-side coil detector head, which transmits radio frequency (RF) pulses into the composite part. The strain-dependent QR response from the crystals is picked up by the same detector head. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that the QR method is very successful at distinguishing composites parts manufactured under optimal conditions from those that were manufactured with a misaligned die or at reduced temperatures. Both QR frequency and line widths were used as a distinguishing parameter.

  11. Logical operations with single x-ray photons via dynamically-controlled nuclear resonances

    PubMed Central

    Gunst, Jonas; Keitel, Christoph H.; Pálffy, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Photonic qubits lie at the heart of quantum information technology, often encoding information in their polarization state. So far, only low-frequency optical and infrared photons have been employed as flying qubits, as the resources that are at present easiest to control. With their essentially different way of interacting with matter, x-ray qubits would bear however relevant advantages: they are extremely robust, penetrate deep through materials, and can be focused down to few-nm waveguides, allowing unprecedented miniaturization. Also, x-rays are resonant to nuclear transitions, which are very well isolated from the environment and present long coherence times. Here, we show theoretically that x-ray polarization qubits can be dynamically controlled by nuclear Mössbauer resonances. The control knob is played by nuclear hyperfine magnetic fields, that allow via fast rotations precise processing of single x-ray quanta polarization. With such rotations, single-qubit and binary logical operations such as a destructive C-NOT gate can be implemented. PMID:27118340

  12. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through stiffness variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of a noise radiating element is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating element is tuned by a plurality of force transmitting mechanisms which contact the noise radiating element. Each one of the force transmitting mechanisms includes an expandable element and a spring in contact with the noise radiating element so that excitation of the element varies the spring force applied to the noise radiating element. The elements are actuated by a controller which receives input of a signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the elements and causes the spring force applied to the noise radiating element to be varied. The force transmitting mechanisms can be arranged to either produce bending or linear stiffness variations in the noise radiating element.

  13. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through variable ring loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of noise radiating structure is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating structure is tuned by a plurality of drivers arranged to contact the noise radiating structure. Excitation of the drivers causes expansion or contraction of the drivers, thereby varying the edge loading applied to the noise radiating structure. The drivers are actuated by a controller which receives input of a feedback signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the drivers, causing them to expand or contract. The noise radiating structure may be either the outer shroud of the engine or a ring mounted flush with an inner wall of the shroud or disposed in the interior of the shroud.

  14. Tuning limitations of the voltage-controlled planar microwave ferrite resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionne, Gerald F.; Oates, Daniel E.

    2012-04-01

    A microwave ferrite microstrip resonator with 15% tunability has been approached by application of mechanical strain alone. The frequency tuning arises from alignment control of the unpolarized pattern of magnetic domains by application of uniaxial stress. A variable stress can be produced by a variable voltage applied to a piezoelectric actuator, without a current-controlled magnetizing circuit. For guidance to performance design, the conditions required for stress-tuning of randomly oriented grains with cubic anisotropy constant K1 are analyzed. To account for magnetoelastic effects, the polycrystalline magnetostriction constant λ is the weighted average over the principal cubic symmetry axes. The analyses produce three results: (1) a relation for the tuning range that reflects a dependence on stress σ instead of magnetic field H, with the key materials parameter becoming λ/K1; (2) the stress dominating condition in the ferrite is σλ/K1 > 2/3 for the magnetic vectors along the axis of σ; and (3) for voltage control, a model for estimating the fraction of electrostatic potential energy from the actuator that is converted to elastic energy in the ferrite substrate of the resonator circuit.

  15. Control of dispersion in fiber coupled resonator-induced transparency structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tian; Yun-Dong, Zhang; Da-Wei, Qi; Run-Zhou, Su; Yan, Bai; Qiang, Xu

    2016-06-01

    Induced transparency phenomena and strong dispersion can be produced in a coupled resonator induced transparency (CRIT) structure. In this paper, we investigate the influences of structure parameters, such as amplitude reflection coefficient and loss, on transmission spectrum and dispersion of CRIT structure, and further study the control of dispersion in the structure. The results show that in the CRIT structure, adjusting the loss of resonators is an effective method of controlling dispersion and producing simultaneous normal and abnormal dispersion. When we choose approximate amplitude reflection coefficients of the two couplers, the decrease of transmittance due to loss could be effectively made up. In the experiment, we achieve the control of dispersion and simultaneous strong normal and abnormal dispersion in the CRIT structure comprised of fiber. The results indicate the CRIT structure has potential applications in optical signal processing and optical communication. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61307076 and 61275066), the National Key Technology Research and Development Program of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2012BAF14B11), and the Postdoctoral Scientific Research Developmental Fund of Heilongjiang Province, China (Grant No. LBH-Q14042).

  16. Optical-bistability-enabled control of resonant light transmission for an atom-cavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, Rahul; Rangwala, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The control of light transmission through a standing-wave Fabry-Pérot cavity containing atoms is theoretically and numerically investigated, when the cavity mode beam and an intersecting control beam are both close to specific atomic resonances. A four-level atomic system is considered and its interaction with the cavity mode is studied by solving for the cavity field and atomic state populations. The conditions for optical bistability of the atom-cavity system are obtained. The response of the intracavity intensity to an intersecting beam on atomic resonance is understood in the presence of stationary atoms (closed system) and nonstatic atoms (open system) in the cavity. The nonstatic system of atoms is modelled by adjusting the atomic state populations to represent the exchange of atoms in the cavity mode, which corresponds to a thermal environment where atoms are moving in and out of the cavity mode volume. The control behavior with three- and two-level atomic systems is also studied, and the rich physics arising out of these systems for closed and open atomic systems is discussed. The solutions to the models are used to interpret the steady-state and transient behavior observed by Sharma et al. [Phys. Rev. A 91, 043824 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.043824.

  17. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through stress variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of a noise radiating element is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating element is tuned by an expandable ring embedded in the noise radiating element. Excitation of the ring causes expansion or contraction of the ring, thereby varying the stress in the noise radiating element. The ring is actuated by a controller which receives input of a feedback signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the ring, causing the ring to expand or contract. Instead of a single ring embedded in the noise radiating panel, a first expandable ring can be bonded to one side of the noise radiating element, and a second expandable ring can be bonded to the other side.

  18. Logical operations with single x-ray photons via dynamically-controlled nuclear resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunst, Jonas; Keitel, Christoph H.; Pálffy, Adriana

    2016-04-01

    Photonic qubits lie at the heart of quantum information technology, often encoding information in their polarization state. So far, only low-frequency optical and infrared photons have been employed as flying qubits, as the resources that are at present easiest to control. With their essentially different way of interacting with matter, x-ray qubits would bear however relevant advantages: they are extremely robust, penetrate deep through materials, and can be focused down to few-nm waveguides, allowing unprecedented miniaturization. Also, x-rays are resonant to nuclear transitions, which are very well isolated from the environment and present long coherence times. Here, we show theoretically that x-ray polarization qubits can be dynamically controlled by nuclear Mössbauer resonances. The control knob is played by nuclear hyperfine magnetic fields, that allow via fast rotations precise processing of single x-ray quanta polarization. With such rotations, single-qubit and binary logical operations such as a destructive C-NOT gate can be implemented.

  19. Logical operations with single x-ray photons via dynamically-controlled nuclear resonances.

    PubMed

    Gunst, Jonas; Keitel, Christoph H; Pálffy, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Photonic qubits lie at the heart of quantum information technology, often encoding information in their polarization state. So far, only low-frequency optical and infrared photons have been employed as flying qubits, as the resources that are at present easiest to control. With their essentially different way of interacting with matter, x-ray qubits would bear however relevant advantages: they are extremely robust, penetrate deep through materials, and can be focused down to few-nm waveguides, allowing unprecedented miniaturization. Also, x-rays are resonant to nuclear transitions, which are very well isolated from the environment and present long coherence times. Here, we show theoretically that x-ray polarization qubits can be dynamically controlled by nuclear Mössbauer resonances. The control knob is played by nuclear hyperfine magnetic fields, that allow via fast rotations precise processing of single x-ray quanta polarization. With such rotations, single-qubit and binary logical operations such as a destructive C-NOT gate can be implemented. PMID:27118340

  20. Photoinduced phase transition in VO2 nanocrystals: ultrafast control of surface-plasmon resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Rini, Matteo; Cavalleri, Andrea; Schoenlein, Robert

    2005-01-01

    We study the ultrafast insulator-to-metal transition in nanoparticles of VO2 , obtained by ion implantation and self-assembly in silica. The nonmagnetic, strongly correlated compound VO2 undergoes a reversible phase transition, which can be photoinduced on an ultrafast time scale. In the nanoparticles, prompt formation of the metallic state results in the appearance of surface-plasmon resonance. We achieve large, ultrafast enhancement of optical absorption in the near-infrared spectral region that encompasses the wavelength range for optical-fiber communications. One can further tailor the response of the nanoparticles by controlling their shape.

  1. Digital systems for automatic control of optical resonators used as gravitational waves interferometric detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, F.; Calloni, E.; de Rosa, R.; di Fiore, L.; Fusco, F.; Milano, L.; Russo, G.

    A feasibility study of a three-level digital control system developed under a joint Italian-French project, called Virgo, is presented. The Virgo antenna includes Fabry-Perot resonant cavity and a dual-wave Michelson interferometer with perpendicular arms 3 km each. The mirrors are seismically insulated through special suspensions and put in vacuum chambers connected by evacuated pipes. A state-of-the-art Nd:YAG laser with extremely low shot noise and high stability is used as a light source.

  2. Quantum state transfer and controlled-phase gate on one-dimensional superconducting resonators assisted by a quantum bus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Ming; Tao, Ming-Jie; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-02-01

    We propose a quantum processor for the scalable quantum computation on microwave photons in distant one-dimensional superconducting resonators. It is composed of a common resonator R acting as a quantum bus and some distant resonators rj coupled to the bus in different positions assisted by superconducting quantum interferometer devices (SQUID), different from previous processors. R is coupled to one transmon qutrit, and the coupling strengths between rj and R can be fully tuned by the external flux through the SQUID. To show the processor can be used to achieve universal quantum computation effectively, we present a scheme to complete the high-fidelity quantum state transfer between two distant microwave-photon resonators and another one for the high-fidelity controlled-phase gate on them. By using the technique for catching and releasing the microwave photons from resonators, our processor may play an important role in quantum communication as well.

  3. Quantum state transfer and controlled-phase gate on one-dimensional superconducting resonators assisted by a quantum bus.

    PubMed

    Hua, Ming; Tao, Ming-Jie; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-01-01

    We propose a quantum processor for the scalable quantum computation on microwave photons in distant one-dimensional superconducting resonators. It is composed of a common resonator R acting as a quantum bus and some distant resonators rj coupled to the bus in different positions assisted by superconducting quantum interferometer devices (SQUID), different from previous processors. R is coupled to one transmon qutrit, and the coupling strengths between rj and R can be fully tuned by the external flux through the SQUID. To show the processor can be used to achieve universal quantum computation effectively, we present a scheme to complete the high-fidelity quantum state transfer between two distant microwave-photon resonators and another one for the high-fidelity controlled-phase gate on them. By using the technique for catching and releasing the microwave photons from resonators, our processor may play an important role in quantum communication as well. PMID:26907366

  4. Quantum state transfer and controlled-phase gate on one-dimensional superconducting resonators assisted by a quantum bus

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Ming; Tao, Ming-Jie; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-01-01

    We propose a quantum processor for the scalable quantum computation on microwave photons in distant one-dimensional superconducting resonators. It is composed of a common resonator R acting as a quantum bus and some distant resonators rj coupled to the bus in different positions assisted by superconducting quantum interferometer devices (SQUID), different from previous processors. R is coupled to one transmon qutrit, and the coupling strengths between rj and R can be fully tuned by the external flux through the SQUID. To show the processor can be used to achieve universal quantum computation effectively, we present a scheme to complete the high-fidelity quantum state transfer between two distant microwave-photon resonators and another one for the high-fidelity controlled-phase gate on them. By using the technique for catching and releasing the microwave photons from resonators, our processor may play an important role in quantum communication as well. PMID:26907366

  5. Self-oscillation of standing spin wave in ring resonator with proportional-integral-derivative control

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, B.; Urazuka, Y.; Chen, H.; Oyabu, S.; Otsuki, H.; Tanaka, T. Matsuyama, K.

    2014-05-07

    We report on numerical analysis on self-oscillation of standing spin wave excited in a nanostructured active ring resonator, consists of a ferromagnetic nanowire with perpendicular anisotropy. The confined resonant modes are along the nanowire length. A positive feedback with proportional-integral-derivative gain control was adopted in the active ring. Stable excitation of the 1st order standing spin wave has been demonstrated with micromagnetic simulations, taking into account the thermal effect with a random field model. The stationary standing spin wave with a pre-determined set variable of precession amplitude was attained within 20 ns by optimizing the proportional-integral-derivative gain control parameters. The result indicates that a monochromatic oscillation frequency f{sub osc} is extracted from the initial thermal fluctuation state and selectively amplified with the positive feedback loop. The obtained f{sub osc} value of 5.22 GHz practically agrees with the theoretical prediction from dispersion relation of the magneto static forward volume wave. It was also confirmed that the f{sub osc} change due to the temperature rise can be compensated with an external perpendicular bias field H{sub b}. The observed quick compensation time with an order of nano second suggests the fast operation speed in the practical device application.

  6. Surface origin and control of resonance Raman scattering and surface band gap in indium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarcón-Lladó, Esther; Brazzini, Tommaso; Ager, Joel W.

    2016-06-01

    Resonance Raman scattering measurements were performed on indium nitride thin films under conditions where the surface electron concentration was controlled by an electrolyte gate. As the surface condition is tuned from electron depletion to accumulation, the spectral feature at the expected position of the (E 1, A 1) longitudinal optical (LO) near 590 cm‑1 shifts to lower frequency. The shift is reversibly controlled with the applied gate potential, which clearly demonstrates the surface origin of this feature. The result is interpreted within the framework of a Martin double resonance, where the surface functions as a planar defect, allowing the scattering of long wavevector phonons. The allowed wavevector range, and hence the frequency, is modulated by the electron accumulation due to band gap narrowing. A surface band gap reduction of over 500 meV is estimated for the conditions of maximum electron accumulation. Under conditions of electron depletion, the full InN bandgap (E g  =  0.65 eV) is expected at the surface. The drastic change in the surface band gap is expected to influence the transport properties of devices which utilize the surface electron accumulation layer.

  7. Control of resonant frequency by currents in graphene: Effect of Dirac field on deflection

    SciTech Connect

    Soodchomshom, Bumned E-mail: fscibns@ku.ac.th

    2014-09-21

    To construct Lagrangian based on plate theory and tight-binding model, deflection-field coupling to Dirac fermions in graphene can be investigated. As have been known, deflection-induced strain may cause an effect on motion of electron, like a pseudo gauge field. In the work, we will investigate the effect of the Dirac field on the motion of the deflection-field in graphene derived from Lagrangian density. Due to the interaction of the deflection- and Dirac-fields, the current-induced surface-tension up to about 4×10⁻³ N/m in graphene membrane is predicted. This result may lead to controllable resonant frequency by currents in graphene. The high resonant frequency is found to be perfectly linearly controlled by both charge and valley currents. Our work reveals the potential of graphene for application of nano-electro-mechanical device and the physics of interaction of electron and deflection-filed in graphene system is investigated.

  8. [Investigation of behavior of "impulsive" and "self-controlled" animals by the method of "emotional resonance"].

    PubMed

    Zaĭchenko, M I; Merzhanova, G Kh; Demina, A V

    2010-01-01

    Rats divided into groups of "impulsive" and "self-controlled" animals by their preference of either high valuable but delayed or a low valuable but immediate food reward were studied by the method of "emotional resonance". It was shown that all rats of the "self-controlled" group choosing a high valuable although delayed reinforcement did not escape the defensive signals of another animal of the same species and for the most part of the trial time preferred to stay in the dark "house". The majority of animals belonging to the "impulsive" group (80%) spent more than a half of the time of the experiment in the bright compartment and thus saved a partner from electrical stimulation. The existence of some general mechanisms that underlie these two types of behavior is discussed. PMID:20469594

  9. Resonant passive-active vibration absorber with integrated force feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høgsberg, Jan; Brodersen, Mark L.; Krenk, Steen

    2016-04-01

    A general format of a two-terminal vibration absorber is constructed by placing a passive unit in series with a hybrid unit, composed of an active actuator in parallel with a second passive element. The displacement of the active actuator is controlled by an integrated feedback control with the difference in force between the two passive elements as input. This format allows passive and active contributions to be combined arbitrarily within the hybrid unit, which results in a versatile absorber format with guaranteed closed-loop stability. This is demonstrated for resonant absorbers with inertia realized passively by a mechanical inerter or actively by the integrated force feedback. Accurate calibration formulae are presented for two particular absorber configurations and the performance is subsequently demonstrated with respect to both equal modal damping and effective response reduction.

  10. Nanophotonic Control of the Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Christian; Zijlstra, Niels; Lagendijk, Ad; Wubs, Martijn; Mosk, Allard P.; Subramaniam, Vinod; Vos, Willem L.

    2012-11-01

    We have studied the influence of the local density of optical states (LDOS) on the rate and efficiency of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from a donor to an acceptor. The donors and acceptors are dye molecules that are separated by a short strand of double-stranded DNA. The LDOS is controlled by carefully positioning the FRET pairs near a mirror. We find that the energy transfer efficiency changes with LDOS, and that, in agreement with theory, the energy transfer rate is independent of the LDOS, which allows one to quantitatively control FRET systems in a new way. Our results imply a change in the characteristic Förster distance, in contrast to common lore that this distance is fixed for a given FRET pair.

  11. Controlling graphene plasmons with resonant metal antennas and spatial conductivity patterns.

    PubMed

    Alonso-González, P; Nikitin, A Y; Golmar, F; Centeno, A; Pesquera, A; Vélez, S; Chen, J; Navickaite, G; Koppens, F; Zurutuza, A; Casanova, F; Hueso, L E; Hillenbrand, R

    2014-06-20

    Graphene plasmons promise unique possibilities for controlling light in nanoscale devices and for merging optics with electronics. We developed a versatile platform technology based on resonant optical antennas and conductivity patterns for launching and control of propagating graphene plasmons, an essential step for the development of graphene plasmonic circuits. We launched and focused infrared graphene plasmons with geometrically tailored antennas and observed how they refracted when passing through a two-dimensional conductivity pattern, here a prism-shaped bilayer. To that end, we directly mapped the graphene plasmon wavefronts by means of an imaging method that will be useful in testing future design concepts for nanoscale graphene plasmonic circuits and devices. PMID:24855026

  12. Control of 3D equilibria with resonant magnetic perturbations in MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munaretto, S.; Chapman, B. E.; Holly, D. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Norval, R. J.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Goetz, J. A.; McCollam, K. J.

    2015-10-01

    To aid in diagnosis of 3D equilibria in the Madison Symmetric Torus, it has become necessary to control the orientation of the equilibria. In reversed field pinch experiments a transition to a 3D equilibrium is common with sufficiently large plasma current (and Lundquist number). Diagnosis of this state is hampered by the fact that the helical structure is stationary but with an orientation that varies shot-to-shot. A resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) technique has been developed to vary controllably the orientation of the 3D equilibria and optimized to minimize the plasma wall interaction due to its use. Application of an RMP now allows alignment of the structure with key diagnostics, including Thomson scattering and an interferometer-polarimeter.

  13. Coherent control of magnetization precession in electrically detected time domain ferromagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Wid, O.; Wahler, M.; Homonnay, N.; Richter, T.; Schmidt, G.

    2015-11-15

    We demonstrate coherent control of time domain ferromagnetic resonance by all electrical excitation and detection. Using two ultrashort magnetic field steps with variable time delay we control the induction decay in yttrium iron garnet (YIG). By setting suitable delay times between the two steps the precession of the magnetization can either be enhanced or completely stopped. The method allows for a determination of the precession frequency within a few precession periods and with an accuracy much higher than can be achieved using fast fourier transformation. Moreover it holds the promise to massively increase precession amplitudes in pulsed inductive microwave magnetometry (PIMM) using low amplitude finite pulse trains. Our experiments are supported by micromagnetic simulations which nicely confirm the experimental results.

  14. Tunneling induced dark states and the controllable resonance fluorescence spectrum in quantum dot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Si-Cong; Wan, Ren-Gang; Tong, Cun-Zhu; Ning, Yong-Qiang; Qin, Li; Liu, Yun

    2014-08-01

    Optical spectroscopy, a powerful tool for probing and manipulating quantum dots (QDs), has been used to investigate the resonance fluorescence spectrum from linear triple quantum dot molecules controlled by tunneling, using atomic physics methods. Interesting features such as quenching and narrowing of the fluorescence are observed. In such molecules the tunneling between the quantum dots can also induce a dark state. The results are explained by the transition properties of the dressed states generated by the coupling of the laser and the tunneling. Unlike the atomic system, in such quantum dot molecules quantum coherence can be induced using tunneling, requiring no coupling lasers, which will allow tunneling controllable quantum dot molecules to be applied to quantum optics and photonics.

  15. High-frequency, resonance-enhanced microactuators with active structures for high-speed flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreth, Phillip Andrew

    The need for actuators that are adaptable for use in a wide array of applications has been the motivation behind actuator development research over the past few years. Recent developments at the Advanced Aero-Propulsion Laboratory (AAPL) at Florida State University have produced a microactuator that uses the unsteadiness of a small-scale impinging jet to produce pulsed, supersonic microjets -- this is referred to as the Resonance-Enhanced Microjet (REM) actuator. Prior studies on these actuators at AAPL have been somewhat limited in that the actuator response has only been characterized through pressure/acoustic measurements and qualitative flow visualizations. Highly-magnified particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were performed to measure the velocity fields of both a 1 mm underexpanded jet and an REM actuator. The results demonstrate that this type of microactuator is capable of producing pulsed, supersonic microjets that have velocities of approximately 400 m/s that are sustained for significant portions of their cycles (> 60 %). These are the first direct velocity measurements of these flowfields, and they allow for a greater understanding of the flow physics associated with this microactuator. The previous studies on the REM actuators have shown that the microactuator volume is among the principal parameters in determining the actuator's maximum-amplitude frequency component. In order to use this actuator in a closed-loop, feedback control system, a modified design that incorporates smart materials is studied. The smart materials (specifically piezoelectric ceramic stack actuators) have been implemented into the microactuator to actively change its geometry, thus permitting controllable changes in the microactuator's resonant frequency. The distinct feature of this design is that the smart materials are not used to produce the primary perturbation or flow from the actuator (which has in the past limited the control authority of other designs) but to

  16. HTS Dual-band Bandpass Filter Using Stub-loaded Hair-pin Resonators with Independently Controllable Bandwidths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, N.; Sugiyama, S.

    We have developed a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) dual-band bandpass filter (BPF) using stub-loaded hair-pin resonators with independently controllable bandwidths. The proposed dual-band BPF is composed of five stub-loaded hair-pin resonators with H-shaped waveguides placed at the center in the spaces between them. The resonator enables independent control of the first and second band resonant frequencies. The main advantage of the proposed filter was to enable independent control of the bandwidths of the first and second band. The coupling coefficient of the second one was controlled by the distance between the resonators, which did not affect the coupling coefficient of the first one. On the other hand, the coupling coefficient of the first one was controlled by the H-shaped waveguide, which did not affect the coupling coefficient of the secondone. An electromagnetic simulator was used to design and analyze the filter. The filter was designed at 3.5 GHz with a 70-MHz (2%) bandwidth for the first band and at 5.0 GHz with a 250-MHz (5%) bandwidth for the second band. The filter was fabricated using YBa2Cu3Oy thin film on a CeO2-bufferd Al2O3 substrate. The measured results agree well with the simulated ones.

  17. Control of Nonadiabatic Passage through a Conical Intersection by a Dynamic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Epshtein, Michael; Yifrach, Yair; Portnov, Alexander; Bar, Ilana

    2016-05-01

    Nonadiabatic processes, dominated by dynamic passage of reactive fluxes through conical intersections (CIs), are considered to be appealing means for manipulating reaction paths, particularly via initial vibrational preparation. Nevertheless, obtaining direct experimental evidence of whether specific-mode excitation affects the passage at the CI is challenging, requiring well-resolved time- or frequency-domain experiments. Here promotion of methylamine-d2 (CH3ND2) molecules to spectral-resolved rovibronic states on the excited S1 potential energy surface, coupled to sensitive D photofragment probing, allowed us to follow the N-D bond fission dynamics. The branching ratios between slow and fast D photofragments and the internal energies of the CH3ND(X̃) photofragments confirm correlated anomalies for predissociation initiated from specific rovibronic states. These anomalies reflect the existence of a dynamic resonance that strongly depends on the energy of the initially excited rovibronic states, the evolving vibrational mode on the repulsive S1 part during N-D bond elongation, and the manipulated passage through the CI that leads to CH3ND radicals excited with C-N-D bending. This resonance plays an important role in the bifurcation dynamics at the CI and can be foreseen to exist in other photoinitiated processes and to control their outcome. PMID:27101349

  18. Twist-controlled resonant tunnelling in graphene/boron nitride/graphene heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, A.; Tu, J. S.; Cao, Y.; Gorbachev, R. V.; Wallbank, J. R.; Greenaway, M. T.; Morozov, V. E.; Morozov, S. V.; Zhu, M. J.; Wong, S. L.; Withers, F.; Woods, C. R.; Kim, Y.-J.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Vdovin, E. E.; Makarovsky, O.; Fromhold, T. M.; Fal'Ko, V. I.; Geim, A. K.; Eaves, L.; Novoselov, K. S.

    2014-10-01

    Recent developments in the technology of van der Waals heterostructures made from two-dimensional atomic crystals have already led to the observation of new physical phenomena, such as the metal-insulator transition and Coulomb drag, and to the realization of functional devices, such as tunnel diodes, tunnel transistors and photovoltaic sensors. An unprecedented degree of control of the electronic properties is available not only by means of the selection of materials in the stack, but also through the additional fine-tuning achievable by adjusting the built-in strain and relative orientation of the component layers. Here we demonstrate how careful alignment of the crystallographic orientation of two graphene electrodes separated by a layer of hexagonal boron nitride in a transistor device can achieve resonant tunnelling with conservation of electron energy, momentum and, potentially, chirality. We show how the resonance peak and negative differential conductance in the device characteristics induce a tunable radiofrequency oscillatory current that has potential for future high-frequency technology.

  19. Microelectromechanical accelerometer with resonance-cancelling control circuit including an idle state

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Dahlon D.; Thelen, Jr., Donald C.; Campbell, David V.

    2001-01-01

    A digital feedback control circuit is disclosed for use in an accelerometer (e.g. a microelectromechanical accelerometer). The digital feedback control circuit, which periodically re-centers a proof mass in response to a sensed acceleration, is based on a sigma-delta (.SIGMA..DELTA.) configuration that includes a notch filter (e.g. a digital switched-capacitor filter) for rejecting signals due to mechanical resonances of the proof mass and further includes a comparator (e.g. a three-level comparator). The comparator generates one of three possible feedback states, with two of the feedback states acting to re-center the proof mass when that is needed, and with a third feedback state being an "idle" state which does not act to move the proof mass when no re-centering is needed. Additionally, the digital feedback control system includes an auto-zero trim capability for calibration of the accelerometer for accurate sensing of acceleration. The digital feedback control circuit can be fabricated using complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, bi-CMOS technology or bipolar technology and used in single- and dual-proof-mass accelerometers.

  20. Parametric resonance in neutrino oscillation: A guide to control the effects of inhomogeneous matter density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Masafumi; Ota, Toshihiko; Saito, Masako; Sato, Joe

    2016-08-01

    Effects of the inhomogeneous matter density on the three-generation neutrino oscillation probability are analyzed. Realistic profile of the matter density is expanded into a Fourier series. Taking in the Fourier modes one by one, we demonstrate that each mode has its corresponding target energy. The high Fourier mode selectively modifies the oscillation probability of the low-energy region. This rule is well described by the parametric resonance between the neutrino oscillation and the matter effect. The Fourier analysis gives a simple guideline to systematically control the uncertainty of the oscillation probability caused by the uncertain density of matter. Precise analysis of the oscillation probability down to the low-energy region requires accurate evaluation of the Fourier coefficients of the matter density up to the corresponding high modes.

  1. Delayed feedback control of stochastic spatiotemporal dynamics in a resonant tunneling diode.

    PubMed

    Stegemann, G; Balanov, A G; Schöll, E

    2006-01-01

    The influence of time-delayed feedback upon the spatiotemporal current density patterns is investigated in a model of a semiconductor nanostructure, namely a double-barrier resonant tunneling diode. The parameters are chosen below the Hopf bifurcation, where the only stable state of the system is a spatially inhomogeneous "filamentary" steady state. The addition of weak Gaussian white noise to the system gives rise to spatially inhomogeneous self-sustained temporal oscillations that can be quite coherent. We show that applying a time-delayed feedback can either increase or decrease the regularity of the noise-induced dynamics in this spatially extended system. Using linear stability analysis, we can explain these effects, depending on the length of the delay interval. Furthermore, we study the influence of this additional control term upon the deterministic behavior of the system, which can change significantly depending on the choice of parameters. PMID:16486254

  2. Controlled ultraviolet resonance energy transfer between bovine serum albumin donors and cadmium sulfide quantum dots acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghali, Mohsen; El-Kemary, Maged; Ramadan, Mahmoud

    2015-08-01

    We report on Förester resonance nergy transfer (FRET) within a bioconjugated system composed of cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots (QDs) and transport protein bovine serum albumin (BSA). The optical properties of these two elements of the bioconjugate were exploited to produce FRET in the ultraviolet (UV) region with a maximum efficiency of 22% from BSA donors to QD acceptors. In contrast to previous studies, which were limited to FRET in the visible light, we used 2.6 nm CdS QDs because they emit light with a shorter wavelength (∼370 nm) that facilitates the UV-FRET process. UV-FRET was controlled by tuning the spectral overlap between BSA and CdS QDs.

  3. Photonic bandgap crystal resonator enhanced, laser controlled modulations of optical interconnects for photonic integrated circuits.

    PubMed

    Teo, Selin H G; Liu, A Q; Zhang, J B; Hong, M H; Singh, J; Yu, M B; Singh, N; Lo, G Q

    2008-05-26

    Ultrafast high-density photonic integrated circuit devices (PICDs) are not easily obtained using traditional index-guiding mechanisms. In this paper, photonic bandgap crystal resonator enhanced, laser-controlled modulations of optical interconnect PICDs were achieved in slab-type mix-guiding configuration - through developed CMOS-compatible processing technologies. The devices, with smallest critical dimensions of 90 nm have footprints of less than 5 x 5 microm(2). Quality-factors an order larger than previously realized was achieved. Through use of effective coupling structures; simultaneous alignment for probing and pumping laser beams, optical measurements of both instantaneous free carriers induced device modulations were obtained together with thermo-optical effects characterizations. PMID:18545494

  4. Enhancement of VUV and EUV generation by field-controlled resonance structures of diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslar, John; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2016-06-01

    Below- and near-threshold harmonic generation provides a potential approach to achieve a high conversion efficiency of vacuum-ultraviolet and extreme-ultraviolet sources for the advancement of spectroscopy. Here, we perform a time-dependent density functional theory study for the nonperturbative treatment of below- and near-threshold harmonic generation of CO and N2 diatomic molecules subject to short near-infrared laser pulses and aligned parallel to the laser field polarization. We find that with the use of different driving laser pulse shapes, we can control and enhance harmonic generation through the excited-state resonance structures. Depending on the pulse shape, the enhancement can reach five to seven orders of magnitude as compared to the reference sine-squared laser pulse of the same duration. The results for different driving laser intensities are also presented and discussed in detail.

  5. Edge Stability and Transport Control with Resonant Magnetic Perturbations in Collisionless Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T E; Moyer, R A; Burrell, K H; Fenstermacher, M E; Joseph, I; Leonard, A W; Osborne, T H; Porter, G D; Schaffer, M J; Snyder, P B; Thomas, P R; Watkins, J G; West, W P

    2006-06-13

    A critical issue for fusion plasma research is the erosion of the first wall of the experimental device due to impulsive heating from repetitive edge magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities known as 'edge-localized modes' (ELMs). Here, we show that the addition of small resonant magnetic field perturbations completely eliminates ELMs while maintaining a steady-state high-confinement (H-mode) plasma. These perturbations induce a chaotic behavior in the magnetic field lines, which reduces the edge pressure gradient below the ELM instability threshold. The pressure gradient reduction results from a reduction in particle content of the plasma, rather than an increase in the electron thermal transport. This is inconsistent with the predictions of stochastic electron heat transport theory. These results provide a first experimental test of stochastic transport theory in a highly rotating, hot, collisionless plasma and demonstrate a promising solution to the critical issue of controlling edge instabilities in fusion plasma devices.

  6. Bistability and steady-state spin squeezing in diamond nanostructures controlled by a nanomechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yong-Hong; Zhang, Xue-Feng; Song, Jie; Wu, E.

    2016-06-01

    As the quantum states of nitrogen vacancy (NV) center can be coherently manipulated and obtained at room temperature, it is important to generate steady-state spin squeezing in spin qubits associated with NV impurities in diamond. With this task we consider a new type of a hybrid magneto-nano-electromechanical resonator, the functionality of which is based on a magnetic-field induced deflection of an appropriate cantilever that oscillates between NV spins in diamond. We show that there is bistability and spin squeezing state due to the presence of the microwave field, despite the damping from mechanical damping. Moreover, we find that bistability and spin squeezing can be controlled by the microwave field and the parameter Vz. Our scheme may have the potential application on spin clocks, magnetometers, and other measurements based on spin-spin system in diamond nanostructures.

  7. Enhancement of VUV and EUV generation by field-controlled resonance structures of diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslar, John; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2016-05-01

    Below- and near-threshold harmonic generation provides a potential approach to achieve a high conversion efficiency of vacuum-ultraviolet and extreme-ultraviolet sources for the advancement of spectroscopy. Here we perform an all-electron time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) study for the nonperturbative treatment of below- and near-threshold harmonic generation of CO and N2 diatomic molecules subject to short near-infrared laser pulses and aligned parallel to the laser field polarization. We find that with the use of different driving laser pulse shapes we can control and enhance harmonic generation through the excited state resonance structures. Our analysis reveals several novel features where the HHG signal is enhanced, boosting the conversion efficiency on the microscopic level. Depending on the pulse shape, the enhancement can reach 5 to 7 orders of magnitude as compared to the reference sine-squared laser pulse of the same duration. This work was partially supported by DOE.

  8. Surface plasmon resonance induced excellent solar control for VO₂@SiO₂ nanorods-based thermochromic foils.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yijie; Huang, Aibin; Li, Yamei; Ji, Shidong; Gao, Yanfeng; Jin, Ping

    2013-10-01

    Transition-metal oxide nanocrystals are novel candidates for being used as the hosts of localized surface plasmon resonance because they exhibit fascinating properties arising from the unique characteristics of their outer-d valence electrons. VO₂(M) nanocrystal is well-known due to its reversible metal-insulator transition (MIT) temperature near room temperature (∼68 °C) corresponding to the appearance/disappearance of localized surface plasmon resonance across the MIT. In this study, a microemulsion-based method was introduced to synthesize VO₂(M)@SiO₂ nanoparticles which were applied to prepare VO₂-based thermochromic foils owing to a strong and tunable surface plasmon resonance in the metallic state. The optical transmittance spectra demonstrates that the employment of surface plasmon resonance in VO₂-based thermochromic foils greatly improves their solar regulating efficiency up to 18.54%, and provides an unprecedented insight in optimizing VO₂-based thermochromic windows for solar control. PMID:23934483

  9. Controlled Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Fano Resonances in Hybrid BEC-Optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasir, Kashif Ammar; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Cavity-optomechanics, a tool to manipulate mechanical effects of light to couple optical field with other physical objects, is the subject of increasing investigations, especially with regards to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). EIT, a result of Fano interference among different atomic transition levels, has acquired a significant importance in many areas of physics, such as atomic physics and quantum optics. However, controllability of such multi-dimensional systems has remained a crucial issue. In this report, we investigate the controllability of EIT and Fano resonances in hybrid optomechanical system composed of cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), trapped inside high-finesse Fabry-Pérot cavity with one vibrational mirror, driven by a single mode optical field and a transverse pump field. The transverse field is used to control the phenomenon of EIT. It is detected that the strength of transverse field is not only efficiently amplifying or attenuating out-going optical mode but also providing an opportunity to enhance the strength of Fano-interactions which leads to the amplification of EIT-window. To observe these phenomena in laboratory, we suggest a certain set of experimental parameters. The results provide a route for tunable manipulation of optical phenomena, like EIT, which could be a significant step in quantum engineering.

  10. Controlled Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Fano Resonances in Hybrid BEC-Optomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Yasir, Kashif Ammar; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cavity-optomechanics, a tool to manipulate mechanical effects of light to couple optical field with other physical objects, is the subject of increasing investigations, especially with regards to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). EIT, a result of Fano interference among different atomic transition levels, has acquired a significant importance in many areas of physics, such as atomic physics and quantum optics. However, controllability of such multi-dimensional systems has remained a crucial issue. In this report, we investigate the controllability of EIT and Fano resonances in hybrid optomechanical system composed of cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), trapped inside high-finesse Fabry-Pérot cavity with one vibrational mirror, driven by a single mode optical field and a transverse pump field. The transverse field is used to control the phenomenon of EIT. It is detected that the strength of transverse field is not only efficiently amplifying or attenuating out-going optical mode but also providing an opportunity to enhance the strength of Fano-interactions which leads to the amplification of EIT-window. To observe these phenomena in laboratory, we suggest a certain set of experimental parameters. The results provide a route for tunable manipulation of optical phenomena, like EIT, which could be a significant step in quantum engineering. PMID:26955789

  11. Controlled Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Fano Resonances in Hybrid BEC-Optomechanics.

    PubMed

    Yasir, Kashif Ammar; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cavity-optomechanics, a tool to manipulate mechanical effects of light to couple optical field with other physical objects, is the subject of increasing investigations, especially with regards to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). EIT, a result of Fano interference among different atomic transition levels, has acquired a significant importance in many areas of physics, such as atomic physics and quantum optics. However, controllability of such multi-dimensional systems has remained a crucial issue. In this report, we investigate the controllability of EIT and Fano resonances in hybrid optomechanical system composed of cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), trapped inside high-finesse Fabry-Pérot cavity with one vibrational mirror, driven by a single mode optical field and a transverse pump field. The transverse field is used to control the phenomenon of EIT. It is detected that the strength of transverse field is not only efficiently amplifying or attenuating out-going optical mode but also providing an opportunity to enhance the strength of Fano-interactions which leads to the amplification of EIT-window. To observe these phenomena in laboratory, we suggest a certain set of experimental parameters. The results provide a route for tunable manipulation of optical phenomena, like EIT, which could be a significant step in quantum engineering. PMID:26955789

  12. Comparative mass spectrometry & nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomic approaches for nutraceuticals quality control analysis: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Farag, Mohamed A

    2014-01-01

    The number of botanical dietary supplements in the market has recently increased primarily due to increased health awareness. Standardization and quality control of the constituents of these plant extracts is an important topic, particularly when such ingredients are used long term as dietary supplements, or in cases where higher doses are marketed as drugs. The development of fast, comprehensive, and effective untargeted analytical methods for plant extracts is of high interest. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are the most informative tools, each of which enables high-throughput and global analysis of hundreds of metabolites in a single step. Although only one of the two techniques is utilized in the majority of plant metabolomics applications, there is a growing interest in combining the data from both platforms to effectively unravel the complexity of plant samples. The application of combined MS and NMR in the quality control of nutraceuticals forms the major part of this review. Finally I will look at the future developments and perspectives of these two technologies for the quality control of herbal materials. PMID:24354527

  13. Predictors of unsuccessful magnetic resonance imaging scanning in older generalized anxiety disorder patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Mohlman, Jan; Eldreth, Dana A; Price, Rebecca B; Chazin, Daniel; Glover, Dorie A

    2012-02-01

    A thorough understanding of the neurobiology of late life anxiety is likely to depend on the use of brain imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is one of the most prevalent anxiety disorders in older adults, and is thus a focus for neurobiological studies using MRI. This study tested 1-3 weeks predictors of unsuccessful scan outcomes (i.e., scan trials in which the participant moved excessively or prematurely terminated the scan) in older adults with GAD (n = 39) and age- and sex-matched nonanxious controls (n = 21). It was hypothesized that successful completion of a prior MRI scan, clinical status (GAD versus control), and scores on the Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI; Peterson et al. 1986), a measure tapping psychological aspects of medical interventions, would predict scan outcome when current diagnoses of claustrophobia were controlled. In logistic regression analyses, unsuccessful scan outcome was predicted by prior MRI completion and ASI Mental Concerns subscale scores, but not clinical status. This model correctly classified 91% of successful and 71% of unsuccessful scans. An alternative model that included a single ASI item rather than Mental Concerns subscale scores showed similar performance, and a model including categorical anxiety sensitivity groups was also effective but slightly less accurate. Implications for improving the success rates of MRI with older adults are discussed. PMID:21318410

  14. Understanding and controlling spin-systems using electron spin resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Mathew

    Single molecule magnets (SMMs) posses multi-level energy structures with properties that make them attractive candidates for implementation into quantum information technologies. However there are some major hurdles that need to be overcome if these systems are to be used as the fundamental components of an eventual quantum computer. One such hurdle is the relatively short coherence times these systems display which severely limits the amount of time quantum information can remain encoded within them. In this dissertation, recent experiments conducted with the intent of bringing this technology closer to realization are presented. The detailed knowledge of the spin Hamiltonian and mechanisms of decoherence in SMMs are absolutely essential if these systems are to be used in technologies. To that effect, experiments were done on a particularly promising SMM, the complex K6[VIV15AsIII 6O42(H2O)] · 8H2O, known as V15. High-field electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements were performed on this system at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. The resulting spectra allowed for detailed analysis of the V15 spin Hamiltonian which will be presented as well as the most precise values yet reported for the g-factors of this system. Additionally, the line widths of the ESR spectra are studied in depth and found to reveal that fluctuations within the spin-orbit interaction are a mechanism for decoherence in V15. A new model for decoherence is presented that describes very well both the temperature and field orientation dependences of the measured ESR line widths. Also essential is the ability to control spin-states of SMMs. Presented in this dissertation as well is the demonstration of the coherent manipulation of the multi-state spin system Mn2+ diluted in MgO by means of a two-tone pulse drive. Through the detuning between the excitation and readout radio frequency pulses it is possible to select the number of photons involved in a Rabi oscillation as well as increase

  15. Resonance scraping

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1986-06-01

    Protons lost in a ring leave at a few preferred locations, determined by some non-linear property of the dipoles. This paper suggests taking control of lost protons by beating the magnets at their own game - by means of a designed resonance used as a beam scraper. It is a study of suitable resonances, including estimates of the required multipole element strengths. The appropriate resonances are two-dimensional. A large number of figures is included.

  16. Precessing cylinders at the second and third resonance: Turbulence controlled by geostrophic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jianfei; Kong, Dali; Zhu, Rixiang; Zhang, Keke

    2015-09-01

    We investigate, via both asymptotic analysis and direct numerical simulation, precessionally driven flow of a homogeneous fluid confined in fluid-filled circular cylinders that rotate rapidly about their symmetry axis and precess about a different axis and that are marked by radius-height aspect ratios Γ =1.045 945 and Γ =1.611 089 . At these radius-height aspect ratios, the Poincaré force resonates directly with the two special inertial modes that have the simplest vertical structure. An asymptotic analytical solution in closed form describing weakly precessing flow is derived in the mantle frame of reference for asymptotically small Ekman numbers, showing quantitative agreement with the result of direct nonlinear numerical simulation. Our numerical simulation makes use of a finite-element method with the three-dimensional tetrahedralization of a cylindrical cavity that allows the construction of dense nodes in the vicinity of the bounding surface of the cavity for resolving the thin viscous boundary layer. It is found that axisymmetric geostrophic flow in the alternating eastward and westward direction can be generated and maintained by nonlinear and viscous effects in the viscous boundary layer. It is also found that, when the precessing rate is moderate and, consequently, the geostrophic flow is weak, nonlinear interaction between the resonant inertial mode and the nonesonant inertial modes driven by the Poincaré force and the boundary-layer influx leads to strongly turbulent flow with irregular temporal-spatial fluctuation. When the cylinders are strongly precessing such that the geostrophic flow becomes predominant, however, the effect of the geostrophic flow controls/stabilizes its nonlinear dynamics, leading to weakly turbulent flow that can be largely described by a dominant quasisteady geostrophic component and a weak nonaxisymmetric component localized in the region where the geostrophic flow is weak.

  17. Controlling output pulse and prepulse in a resonant microwave pulse compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Shlapakovski, A.; Artemenko, S.; Chumerin, P.; Yushkov, Yu.

    2013-02-07

    A resonant microwave pulse compressor with a waveguide H-plane-tee-based energy extraction unit was studied in terms of its capability to produce output pulses that comprise a low-power long-duration (prepulse) and a high-power short-duration part. The application of such combined pulses with widely variable prepulse and high-power pulse power and energy ratios is of interest in the research area of electronic hardware vulnerability. The characteristics of output radiation pulses are controlled by the variation of the H-plane tee transition attenuation at the stage of microwave energy storage in the compressor cavity. Results of theoretical estimations of the parameters tuning range and experimental investigations of the prototype S-band compressor (1.5 MW, 12 ns output pulse; {approx}13.2 dB gain) are presented. The achievable maximum in the prepulse power is found to be about half the power of the primary microwave source. It has been shown that the energy of the prepulse becomes comparable with that of the short-duration (nanosecond) pulse, while the power of the latter decreases insignificantly. The possible range of variation of the prepulse power and energy can be as wide as 40 dB. In the experiments, the prepulse level control within the range of {approx}10 dB was demonstrated.

  18. Multiparametric Classification of Skin from Osteogenesis Imperfecta Patients and Controls by Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Microimaging

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Erin M.; Lin, Ping-Chang; Pleshko, Nancy; Raggio, Cathleen L.; Spencer, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to discriminate between skin biopsies from individuals with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and skin biopsies from individuals without OI. Skin biopsies from nine controls (unaffected) and nine OI patients were imaged to generate maps of five separate MR parameters, T1, T2, km, MTR and ADC. Parameter values were calculated over the dermal region and used for univariate and multiparametric classification analysis. A substantial degree of overlap of individual MR parameters was observed between control and OI groups, which limited the sensitivity and specificity of univariate classification. Classification accuracies ranging between 39% and 67% were found depending on the variable of investigation, with T2 yielding the best accuracy of 67%. When several MR parameters were considered simultaneously in a multivariate analysis, the classification accuracies improved up to 89% for specific combinations, including the combination of T2 and km. These results indicate that multiparametric classification by quantitative MRI is able to detect differences between the skin of OI patients and of unaffected individuals, which motivates further study of quantitative MRI for the clinical diagnosis of OI. PMID:27416032

  19. Control considerations for high frequency, resonant, power processing equipment used in large systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mildice, J. W.; Schreiner, K. E.; Wolff, F.

    1987-01-01

    Addressed is a class of resonant power processing equipment designed to be used in an integrated high frequency (20 KHz domain), utility power system for large, multi-user spacecraft and other aerospace vehicles. It describes a hardware approach, which has been the basis for parametric and physical data used to justify the selection of high frequency ac as the PMAD baseline for the space station. This paper is part of a larger effort undertaken by NASA and General Dynamics to be sure that all potential space station contractors and other aerospace power system designers understand and can comfortably use this technology, which is now widely used in the commercial sector. In this paper, we will examine control requirements, stability, and operational modes; and their hardware impacts from an integrated system point of view. The current space station PMAD system will provide the overall requirements model to develop an understanding of the performance of this type of system with regard to: (1) regulation; (2) power bus stability and voltage control; (3) source impedance; (4) transient response; (5) power factor effects; and (6) limits and overloads.

  20. Control considerations for high frequency, resonant, power processing equipment used in large systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mildice, J. W.; Schreiner, K. E.; Wolff, F.

    1987-01-01

    Addressed is a class of resonant power processing equipment designed to be used in an integrated high frequency (20 KHz domain), utility power system for large, multi-user spacecraft and other aerospace vehicles. It describes a hardware approach, which has been the basis for parametric and physical data used to justify the selection of high frequency ac as the PMAD baseline for the space station. This paper is part of a larger effort undertaken by NASA and General Dynamics to be sure that all potential space station contractors and other aerospace power system designers understand and can comfortably use this technology, which is now widely used in the commercial sector. In this paper, we will examine control requirements, stability, and operational modes; and their hardware impacts from an integrated system point of view. The current space station PMAD system will provide the overall requirements model to develop an understanding of the performance of this type of system with regard to: (1) regulation; (2) power bus stability and voltage control; (3) source impedance; (4) transient response; (5) power factor effects, and (6) limits and overloads.

  1. Controlled-Resonant Surface Tapping-Mode Scanning Probe Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Matthias; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the advancement of a controlled-resonance surface tapping-mode single capillary liquid junction extraction/ESI emitter for mass spectrometry imaging. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to spot sample, lane scan and chemically image in an automated and controlled fashion were demonstrated. Rapid, automated spot sampling was demonstrated for a variety of compound types including the cationic dye basic blue 7, the oligosaccharide cellopentaose, and the protein equine heart cytochrome c. The system was used for lane scanning and chemical imaging of the cationic dye crystal violet in inked lines on glass and for lipid distributions in mouse brain thin tissue sections. Imaging of the lipids in mouse brain tissue under optimized conditions provided a spatial resolution of approximately 35 m based on the ability to distinguish between features observed both in the optical and mass spectral chemical images. The sampling spatial resolution of this system was comparable to the best resolution that has been reported for other types of atmospheric pressure liquid extraction-based surface sampling/ionization techniques used for mass spectrometry imaging.

  2. Quantum phase transition of light in a one-dimensional photon-hopping-controllable resonator array

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Chunwang; Gao Ming; Deng Zhijiao; Dai Hongyi; Chen Pingxing; Li Chengzu

    2011-10-15

    We give a concrete experimental scheme for engineering the insulator-superfluid transition of light in a one-dimensional (1D) array of coupled superconducting stripline resonators. In our proposed architecture, the on-site interaction and the photon-hopping rate can be tuned independently by adjusting the transition frequencies of the charge qubits inside the resonators and at the resonator junctions, respectively, which permits us to systematically study the quantum phase transition of light in a complete parameter space. By combining the techniques of photon-number-dependent qubit transition and fast readout of the qubit state using a separate low-Q resonator mode, the statistical property of the excitations in each resonator can be obtained with a high efficiency. An analysis of the various decoherence sources and disorders shows that our scheme can serve as a guide to upcoming experiments involving a small number of coupled resonators.

  3. Resonant behavior of dielectric objects (electrostatic resonances).

    PubMed

    Fredkin, D R; Mayergoyz, I D

    2003-12-19

    Resonant behavior of dielectric objects occurs at certain frequencies for which the object permittivity is negative and the free-space wavelength is large in comparison with the object dimensions. Unique physical features of these resonances are studied and a novel technique for the calculation of resonance values of permittivity, and hence resonance frequencies, is proposed. Scale invariance of resonance frequencies, unusually strong orthogonality properties of resonance modes, and a two-dimensional phenomenon of "twin" spectra are reported. The paper concludes with brief discussions of optical controllability of these resonances in semiconductor nanoparticles and a plausible, electrostatic resonance based, mechanism for nucleation and formation of ball lightning. PMID:14754117

  4. A process to control light in a micro resonator through a coupling modulation by surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Guofang; Li, Yuan; Hu, Chunguang; Lei, Lihua; Guo, Yanchuan

    2016-01-01

    A novel process to control light through the coupling modulation by surface acoustic wave (SAW) is presented in an optical micro resonator. An optical waveguide modulator of a racetrack resonator on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology is took as an example to explore the mechanism. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) is developed to simulate the acousto-optical (AO) modulator using the mechanism. An analytical method is presented to verify our proposal. The results show that the process can work well as an optical modulator by SAW. PMID:27485470

  5. A process to control light in a micro resonator through a coupling modulation by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Guofang; Li, Yuan; Hu, Chunguang; Lei, Lihua; Guo, Yanchuan

    2016-08-01

    A novel process to control light through the coupling modulation by surface acoustic wave (SAW) is presented in an optical micro resonator. An optical waveguide modulator of a racetrack resonator on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology is took as an example to explore the mechanism. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) is developed to simulate the acousto-optical (AO) modulator using the mechanism. An analytical method is presented to verify our proposal. The results show that the process can work well as an optical modulator by SAW.

  6. A process to control light in a micro resonator through a coupling modulation by surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guofang; Li, Yuan; Hu, Chunguang; Lei, Lihua; Guo, Yanchuan

    2016-01-01

    A novel process to control light through the coupling modulation by surface acoustic wave (SAW) is presented in an optical micro resonator. An optical waveguide modulator of a racetrack resonator on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology is took as an example to explore the mechanism. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) is developed to simulate the acousto-optical (AO) modulator using the mechanism. An analytical method is presented to verify our proposal. The results show that the process can work well as an optical modulator by SAW. PMID:27485470

  7. Polarized linewidth-controllable double-trapping electromagnetically induced transparency spectra in a resonant plasmon nanocavity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Luojia; Gu, Ying; Chen, Hongyi; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Cui, Yiping; Gerardot, Brian D.; Gong, Qihuang

    2013-01-01

    Surface plasmons with ultrasmall optical mode volume and strong near field enhancement can be used to realize nanoscale light-matter interaction. Combining surface plasmons with the quantum system provides the possibility of nanoscale realization of important quantum optical phenomena, including the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), which has many applications in nonlinear quantum optics and quantum information processing. Here, using a custom-designed resonant plasmon nanocavity, we demonstrate polarized position-dependent linewidth-controllable EIT spectra at the nanoscale. We analytically obtain the double coherent population trapping conditions in a double-Λ quantum system with crossing damping, which give two transparent points in the EIT spectra. The linewidths of the three peaks are extremely sensitive to the level spacing of the excited states, the Rabi frequencies and detunings of pump fields, and the Purcell factors. In particular the linewidth of the central peak is exceptionally narrow. The hybrid system may have potential applications in ultra-compact plasmon-quantum devices. PMID:24096943

  8. The role of mechanical resonance in the neural control of swimming in fishes

    PubMed Central

    Tytell, Eric D.; Hsu, Chia-Yu; Fauci, Lisa J.

    2014-01-01

    The bodies of many fishes are flexible, elastic structures; if you bend them, they spring back. Therefore, they should have a resonant frequency: a bending frequency at which the output amplitude is maximized for a particular input. Previous groups have hypothesized that swimming at this resonant frequency could maximize efficiency, and that a neural circuit called the central pattern generator might be able to entrain to a mechanical resonance. However, fishes swim in water, which may potentially damp out many resonant effects. Additionally, their bodies are elongated, which means that bending can occur in complicated ways along the length of the body. We review previous studies of the mechanical properties of fish bodies, and then present new data that demonstrate complex bending properties of elongated fish bodies. Resonant peaks in amplitude exist, but there may be many of them depending on the body wavelength. Additionally, they may not correspond to the maximum swimming speed. Next, we describe experiments using a closed-loop preparation of the lamprey, in which a preparation of the spinal cord is linked to a real-time simulation of the muscle and body properties, allowing us to examine resonance entrainment as we vary the simulated resonant frequency. We find that resonance entrainment does occur, but is rare. Gain had a significant, though weak, effect, and a nonlinear muscle model produced resonance entrainment more often than a linear filter. We speculate that resonance may not be a critical effect for efficient swimming in elongate, anguilliform swimmers, though it may be more important for stiffer carangiform and thunniform fishes. PMID:24433627

  9. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for myocardial perfusion and diastolic function—reference control values for women

    PubMed Central

    Bakir, May; Wei, Janet; Nelson, Michael D.; Mehta, Puja K.; Haftbaradaran, Afsaneh; Jones, Erika; Gill, Edward; Sharif, Behzad; Slomka, Piotr J.; Li, Debiao; Shufelt, Chrisandra L.; Minissian, Margo; Berman, Daniel S.; Bairey Merz, C. Noel

    2016-01-01

    Angina, heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) are more common in women and are associated with adverse cardiovascular prognosis. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) is established for assessment of left ventricular (LV) morphology and systolic function and is increasingly used to assess myocardial perfusion and diastolic function. Indeed, stress CMRI allows measurement of myocardial perfusion reserve index (MPRI) using semi-quantitative techniques, and quantification of LV volumetric filling patterns provides valuable insight into LV diastolic function. The utility of these two techniques remains limited, because reference control values for MPRI and LV diastolic function in asymptomatic middle-aged, women have not previously been established. To address this limitation, we recruited twenty women, without clinical cardiovascular disease or cardiovascular risk factors, with normal maximal Bruce protocol exercise treadmill testing. Subjects underwent CMRI (1.5 tesla) using a standardized protocol of adenosine stress and rest perfusion and LV cinematic imaging. Commercially available with automated CMRI segmentation was used for calculation of MPRI, LV filling profiles, and ejection fraction. Mean age was 54±9 years and mean body mass index was 25±4 kg/m3. The exercise treadmill testing results demonstrated a normotensive group with normal functional capacity and hemodynamic response. We report reference control values for semi-quantitative MPRI as well as measures of LV systolic and diastolic function including ejection fraction, stroke volume, peak filling rate (PFR), PFR adjusted for end-diastolic volume (EDV) and stroke volume, time to PFR, and EDV index. The data herein provide reference values for MPRI and diastolic function in a cohort of healthy, middle-aged of women. These reference values may be used for comparison with a variety

  10. Surface plasmon resonance induced excellent solar control for VO2@SiO2 nanorods-based thermochromic foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yijie; Huang, Aibin; Li, Yamei; Ji, Shidong; Gao, Yanfeng; Jin, Ping

    2013-09-01

    Transition-metal oxide nanocrystals are novel candidates for being used as the hosts of localized surface plasmon resonance because they exhibit fascinating properties arising from the unique characteristics of their outer-d valence electrons. VO2(M) nanocrystal is well-known due to its reversible metal-insulator transition (MIT) temperature near room temperature (~68 °C) corresponding to the appearance/disappearance of localized surface plasmon resonance across the MIT. In this study, a microemulsion-based method was introduced to synthesize VO2(M)@SiO2 nanoparticles which were applied to prepare VO2-based thermochromic foils owing to a strong and tunable surface plasmon resonance in the metallic state. The optical transmittance spectra demonstrates that the employment of surface plasmon resonance in VO2-based thermochromic foils greatly improves their solar regulating efficiency up to 18.54%, and provides an unprecedented insight in optimizing VO2-based thermochromic windows for solar control.Transition-metal oxide nanocrystals are novel candidates for being used as the hosts of localized surface plasmon resonance because they exhibit fascinating properties arising from the unique characteristics of their outer-d valence electrons. VO2(M) nanocrystal is well-known due to its reversible metal-insulator transition (MIT) temperature near room temperature (~68 °C) corresponding to the appearance/disappearance of localized surface plasmon resonance across the MIT. In this study, a microemulsion-based method was introduced to synthesize VO2(M)@SiO2 nanoparticles which were applied to prepare VO2-based thermochromic foils owing to a strong and tunable surface plasmon resonance in the metallic state. The optical transmittance spectra demonstrates that the employment of surface plasmon resonance in VO2-based thermochromic foils greatly improves their solar regulating efficiency up to 18.54%, and provides an unprecedented insight in optimizing VO2-based thermochromic

  11. Ultrafast optical control using the Kerr nonlinearity in hydrogenated amorphous silicon microcylindrical resonators

    PubMed Central

    Vukovic, N.; Healy, N.; Suhailin, F. H.; Mehta, P.; Day, T. D.; Badding, J. V.; Peacock, A. C.

    2013-01-01

    Microresonators are ideal systems for probing nonlinear phenomena at low thresholds due to their small mode volumes and high quality (Q) factors. As such, they have found use both for fundamental studies of light-matter interactions as well as for applications in areas ranging from telecommunications to medicine. In particular, semiconductor-based resonators with large Kerr nonlinearities have great potential for high speed, low power all-optical processing. Here we present experiments to characterize the size of the Kerr induced resonance wavelength shifting in a hydrogenated amorphous silicon resonator and demonstrate its potential for ultrafast all-optical modulation and switching. Large wavelength shifts are observed for low pump powers due to the high nonlinearity of the amorphous silicon material and the strong mode confinement in the microcylindrical resonator. The threshold energy for switching is less than a picojoule, representing a significant step towards advantageous low power silicon-based photonic technologies. PMID:24097126

  12. Active control of the volume acquisition noise in functional magnetic resonance imaging: Method and psychoacoustical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, John; Akeroyd, Michael A.; Summerfield, A. Quentin; Palmer, Alan R.

    2001-12-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a noninvasive tool for observing correlates of neural activity in the brain while a subject listens to sound. However, intense acoustic noise is generated in the process of capturing MR images. This noise stimulates the auditory nervous system, limiting the dynamic range available for displaying stimulus-driven activity. The noise is potentially damaging to hearing and is distracting for the subject. In an active noise control (ANC) system, a reference sample of a noise is processed to form a sound which adds destructively with the noise at the listener's ear. We describe an implementation of ANC in the electromagnetically hostile and physically compact MRI scanning environment. First, a prototype system was evaluated psychoacoustically in the laboratory, using the electrical drive to a noise-generating loudspeaker as the reference. This system produced 10-20 dB of subjective noise-reduction between 250 Hz and 1 kHz, and smaller amounts at higher frequencies. The system was modified to operate in a real MR scanner where the reference was obtained by recording the acoustic scanner noise. Objective reduction by 30-40 dB of the most intense component in scanner noises was realized between 500 Hz and 3500 Hz, and subjective reduction of 12 dB and 5 dB in tests at frequencies of 600 Hz and at 1.9 kHz, respectively. Although the benefit of ANC is limited by transmission paths to the cochlea other than air-conduction routes from the auditory meatus, ANC achieves worthwhile attenuation even in the frequency range of maximum bone conduction (1.5-2 kHz). ANC should, therefore, be generally useful during auditory fMRI.

  13. Control of Ferromagnetic Resonance in Thin Films through Nanostructuring and Interfacial Torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklenar, Joseph

    Ferromagnetic resonance and associated spin wave resonant excitations are studied in two different contexts. In the first context, magnetic excitations are studied in magnetic thin films that have periodic perturbations produced by by patterning nanostructured hole arrays on, or within the magnetic thin film, or by depositing a magnetic thin film on a colloidal crystal. In either scenario, it is found that the ferromagnetic resonant excitations can be modified by the imprinted periodicities. The second area of study focuses on new ways to drive ferromagnetic thin films into resonance through interfacial spin-transfer-torque. The interfacial torque studied here is from the spin Hall effect. The films are magnetized in an arbitrary orientation both within and out of the plane of the film. By studying the ferromagnetic resonance in arbitrarily magnetized states it is found that the interfacial torques may have unexpected field-angular dependencies. This work also develops a simple model based on previously existing ideas to understand the out-of-plane angular dependence of ferromagnetic resonance driven by spin Hall effects.

  14. Implementation of an operator intervention system for remote control of the RIKEN 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, A.; Furukawa, K.; Higurashi, Y.; Nakagawa, T.

    2014-02-01

    The control system for the RIKEN 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source (28 GHz SC-ECRIS) consists of a distributed control system based on the experimental physics and industrial control system. To maintain the beam quality for the long beam-service time at the radioactive isotope beam factory, beam tuning to prevent subtle changes in the 28 GHz SC-ECRIS conditions is required. Once this is achieved, it should then be possible to check conditions and operate the ion source at any time. We have designed a web-based operational interface to remotely control the ion source, but for access and control from several locations, suitable access security, policies, and methods are required. We thus implemented an operator intervention system that makes it possible to safely access the network externally with the permission of on-site accelerator operators in the control room.

  15. Adaptive Feedforward Compensation by Specified Step Settling Considering Resonance Frequency Variation and Constraint on Control Input Amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yoshihiro; Wada, Masatake; Iwasaki, Makoto; Hirai, Hiromu

    This paper presents an adaptive feedfowad (FF) compensation method based on a deadbeat control framework for fast and precise positioning in mechatronic systems. The conventional FF compensation approach can design a FF compensator by considering both the frequency shaping and amplitude of FF control input, to suppress the response variations due to the perturbations in plant resonance frequency. However, since the conventional approach is not adaptive against frequency variations, an overshoot and/or undershoot response at the settling region would deteriorate the positioning performance. In this research, therefore, the proposed FF compensation approach with an adaptive identification system for the resonance frequency is adopted to achieve the desired positioning performance. The effectiveness of the proposed FF compensation approach has been verified by experiments using a prototype of an industrial positioning device.

  16. Dynamic control of the asymmetric Fano resonance in side-coupled Fabry–Pérot and photonic crystal nanobeam cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tong; Chau, Fook Siong; Zhou, Guangya; Deng, Jie

    2015-11-30

    Fano resonance is a prevailing interference phenomenon that stems from the intersection between discrete and continuum states in many fields. We theoretically and experimentally characterize the asymmetric Fano lineshape in side-coupled waveguide Fabry–Pérot and photonic crystal nanobeam cavities. The measured quality-factor of the Fano resonance before tuning is 28 100. A nanoelectromechanical systems bidirectional actuator is integrated seamlessly to control the shape of the Fano resonance through in-plane translations in two directions without sacrificing the quality-factor. The peak intensity level of the Fano resonance can be increased by 8.5 dB from 60 nW to 409 nW while the corresponding dip intensity is increased by 12.8 dB from 1 nW to 18 nW. The maximum recorded quality-factor throughout the tuning procedure is up to 32 500. Potential applications of the proposed structure include enhancing the sensitivity of sensing, reconfigurable nanophotonics devices, and on-chip intensity modulator.

  17. Dynamic control of the asymmetric Fano resonance in side-coupled Fabry-Pérot and photonic crystal nanobeam cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tong; Chau, Fook Siong; Deng, Jie; Zhou, Guangya

    2015-11-01

    Fano resonance is a prevailing interference phenomenon that stems from the intersection between discrete and continuum states in many fields. We theoretically and experimentally characterize the asymmetric Fano lineshape in side-coupled waveguide Fabry-Pérot and photonic crystal nanobeam cavities. The measured quality-factor of the Fano resonance before tuning is 28 100. A nanoelectromechanical systems bidirectional actuator is integrated seamlessly to control the shape of the Fano resonance through in-plane translations in two directions without sacrificing the quality-factor. The peak intensity level of the Fano resonance can be increased by 8.5 dB from 60 nW to 409 nW while the corresponding dip intensity is increased by 12.8 dB from 1 nW to 18 nW. The maximum recorded quality-factor throughout the tuning procedure is up to 32 500. Potential applications of the proposed structure include enhancing the sensitivity of sensing, reconfigurable nanophotonics devices, and on-chip intensity modulator.

  18. Active chromatic control and resonant improvement on the transverse-phase-modulation-induced group delay of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Fang; Xu, Lei; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Guoquan; Xu, Jingjun

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we reviewed the theoretical and experimental studies on the manipulation of the group delay of light based on the transverse phase modulation effect induced by a Gaussian beam. We introduced the basic theory of slow and fast lights in a thin nonlinear material based on the transverse phase modulation effect. We introduced a simple but effective technique to actively and chromatically control the group velocity of light at arbitrary wavelength, therefore, eliminating the requirements on the optical nonlinearity and the photonic resonance at the signal wavelength. Furthermore, a technique to improve the transverse-modulation-induced relative delay of light in nonlinear media through the combination of an optical nonlinearity and a resonant Fabry-Perot cavity was introduced and theoretically demonstrated in ruby as an example. The introduction of a resonant Fabry-Perot cavity can improve the relative delay by orders of magnitude. The techniques of active chromatic manipulation and resonant improvement of the group delay of light may have potential applications in optical information processing and optical communication network.

  19. Energy losses of nanomechanical resonators induced by atomic force microscopy-controlled mechanical impedance mismatching

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Johannes; Isacsson, Andreas; Seitner, Maximilian J.; Kotthaus, Jörg P.; Weig, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    Clamping losses are a widely discussed damping mechanism in nanoelectromechanical systems, limiting the performance of these devices. Here we present a method to investigate this dissipation channel. Using an atomic force microscope tip as a local perturbation in the clamping region of a nanoelectromechanical resonator, we increase the energy loss of its flexural modes by at least one order of magnitude. We explain this by a transfer of vibrational energy into the cantilever, which is theoretically described by a reduced mechanical impedance mismatch between the resonator and its environment. A theoretical model for this mismatch, in conjunction with finite element simulations of the evanescent strain field of the mechanical modes in the clamping region, allows us to quantitatively analyse data on position and force dependence of the tip-induced damping. Our experiments yield insights into the damping of nanoelectromechanical systems with the prospect of engineering the energy exchange in resonator networks. PMID:24594876

  20. Effect of Resonances on the Coherent Control of the Photoionization and Photodissociation of HI and DI

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, L.; Fiss, J.A.; Gordon, R.J.; Suto, K.; Wada, R.; Seideman, T.

    1997-11-01

    The phase lag between the ionization and dissociation products of HI and DI molecules obtained by one- and three-photon excitation was measured as a function of excitation energy in the vicinity of a molecular resonance. The phase lag was observed to have an asymmetric profile with a deep minimum near the center of the resonance. A strong isotope effect was also observed. A theoretical analysis, using projection operators to partition the Lippmann-Schwinger equation, showed that a molecular phase is responsible for the energy dependence of the phase lag. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Controlling magnetic Feshbach resonances in polar open-shell molecules with nonresonant light.

    PubMed

    Tomza, Michał; González-Férez, Rosario; Koch, Christiane P; Moszynski, Robert

    2014-03-21

    Magnetically tunable Feshbach resonances for polar paramagnetic ground-state diatomics are too narrow to allow for magnetoassociation starting from trapped, ultracold atoms. We show that nonresonant light can be used to engineer the Feshbach resonances in their position and width. For nonresonant field intensities of the order of 10(9) W/cm(2), we find the width to be increased by 3 orders of magnitude, reaching a few Gauss. This opens the way for producing ultracold molecules with sizable electric and magnetic dipole moments and thus for many-body quantum simulations with such particles. PMID:24702365

  2. Electron spin resonance of ultraviolet radiation induced defects in ZnO thermal control coating pigment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mookherji, T.

    1972-01-01

    Electron spin resonance measurements on variously treated zinc oxide powders reveal that the resonance signal at g = 1.956 is due to one electron trapped oxygen ion vacancy level, at a depth of (0.31 plus or minus 0.02) eV below the conduction band. The electrons at this level are delocalized. Schottky barrier influences nearly the entire bulk of the powder sample, and the bending of the bands caused by chemisorbed oxygen puts the vacancy level above the Fermi level almost through the entire bulk.

  3. Controlling chaos in a fast diode resonator using extended time-delay autosynchronization: Experimental observations and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Sukow, David W.; Bleich, Michael E.; Gauthier, Daniel J.; Socolar, Joshua E. S.

    1997-12-01

    We stabilize unstable periodic orbits of a fast diode resonator driven at 10.1 MHz (corresponding to a drive period under 100 ns) using extended time-delay autosynchronization. Stabilization is achieved by feedback of an error signal that is proportional to the difference between the value of a state variable and an infinite series of values of the state variable delayed in time by integral multiples of the period of the orbit. The technique is easy to implement electronically and it has an all-optical counterpart that may be useful for stabilizing the dynamics of fast chaotic lasers. We show that increasing the weights given to temporally distant states enlarges the domain of control and reduces the sensitivity of the domain of control on the propagation delays in the feedback loop. We determine the average time to obtain control as a function of the feedback gain and identify the mechanisms that destabilize the system at the boundaries of the domain of control. A theoretical stability analysis of a model of the diode resonator in the presence of time-delay feedback is in good agreement with the experimental results for the size and shape of the domain of control. (c) 1997 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12779682

  4. Time-delayed feedback control of coherence resonance near subcritical Hopf bifurcation: theory versus experiment.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Vladimir; Feoktistov, Alexey; Vadivasova, Tatyana; Schöll, Eckehard; Zakharova, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Using the model of a generalized Van der Pol oscillator in the regime of subcritical Hopf bifurcation, we investigate the influence of time delay on noise-induced oscillations. It is shown that for appropriate choices of time delay, either suppression or enhancement of coherence resonance can be achieved. Analytical calculations are combined with numerical simulations and experiments on an electronic circuit. PMID:25833433

  5. Time-delayed feedback control of coherence resonance near subcritical Hopf bifurcation: Theory versus experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Vladimir; Feoktistov, Alexey; Vadivasova, Tatyana; Schöll, Eckehard; Zakharova, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Using the model of a generalized Van der Pol oscillator in the regime of subcritical Hopf bifurcation, we investigate the influence of time delay on noise-induced oscillations. It is shown that for appropriate choices of time delay, either suppression or enhancement of coherence resonance can be achieved. Analytical calculations are combined with numerical simulations and experiments on an electronic circuit.

  6. Time-delayed feedback control of coherence resonance near subcritical Hopf bifurcation: Theory versus experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, Vladimir; Feoktistov, Alexey; Vadivasova, Tatyana; Schöll, Eckehard Zakharova, Anna

    2015-03-15

    Using the model of a generalized Van der Pol oscillator in the regime of subcritical Hopf bifurcation, we investigate the influence of time delay on noise-induced oscillations. It is shown that for appropriate choices of time delay, either suppression or enhancement of coherence resonance can be achieved. Analytical calculations are combined with numerical simulations and experiments on an electronic circuit.

  7. Chaos control of the micro-electro-mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shaohua; Sun, Quanping; Cheng, Wei

    2016-04-01

    This paper addresses chaos control of the micro-electro- mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer. To reveal the mechanism of the micro- electro-mechanical resonator, the phase diagrams and corresponding time histories are given to research the nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior, and Homoclinic and heteroclinic chaos which relate closely with the appearance of chaos are presented based on the potential function. To eliminate the effect of chaos, an adaptive dynamic surface control scheme with extended state observer is designed to convert random motion into regular motion without precise system model parameters and measured variables. Putting tracking differentiator into chaos controller solves the `explosion of complexity' of backstepping and poor precision of the first-order filters. Meanwhile, to obtain high performance, a neural network with adaptive law is employed to approximate unknown nonlinear function in the process of controller design. The boundedness of all the signals of the closed-loop system is proved in theoretical analysis. Finally, numerical simulations are executed and extensive results illustrate effectiveness and robustness of the proposed scheme.

  8. A new sawtooth control mechanism relying on toroidally propagating ion cyclotron resonance frequency waves: Theory and Joint European Torus tokamak experimental evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, J. P.; Coda, S.; Chapman, I. T.; Lennholm, M.

    2010-05-15

    The sawtooth control mechanism in plasmas employing toroidally propagating ion cyclotron resonance waves is extended. The asymmetrically distributed energetic passing ions are shown to modify the ideal internal kink mode when the position of the minority ion cyclotron resonance resides within a narrow region close to the q=1 surface. An analytical treatment of the internal kink mode in the presence of model distribution function with parallel velocity asymmetry is developed. The fast ion mechanism explains the strong sensitivity of sawteeth to resonance position, and moreover is consistent with dedicated Joint European Torus [F. Romanelli, Nucl. Fusion 49, 104006 (2009)] experiments which controlled sawteeth despite negligible current drive.

  9. Controlling optical properties of metallic multi-shell nanoparticles through suppressed surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Acapulco, Jesus A I; Hong, Soonchang; Kim, Seong Kyu; Park, Sungho

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report the surface plasmon resonance of plasmonic multi-shell nanoparticles compared to bimetallic Ag/Au hollow nanospheres of similar final size, shape, and percent composition. The surface plasmon resonance of solid and hollow nanoparticles exhibited a quadrupole mode that was particularly prominent around the 100 nm size regime, while multi-shell nanoparticles did not show a quadrupole mode at a similar size. In the latter case, the quadrupole mode of the outermost nanoshell was suppressed by the dipole modes of the inner shells, and the suppression of the quadrupole mode was not affected by the shape of the inner nanostructures. Light interaction of the multi-shell nanoparticle was investigated through simulated electromagnetic field distribution obtained by finite-difference time domain (FDTD) calculations which were in a good agreement with the results of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). PMID:26414420

  10. Controllable plasmonic sensing based on Fano resonance in a cavity coupled defective MDM waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yongyi; Zhan, Shiping; Liu, Qiong; Liu, Yunxin

    2016-07-01

    We report a simple plasmonic sensor based on the Fano resonance in a cavity coupled defective metal–dielectric–metal (MDM) waveguide. A theoretical expression for characterizing the sensing property is first derived. We show the formation and evolution of Fano resonance in this cavity coupled waveguide system. Based on the derived theoretical expression and the numerical analysis, we find that the cavity length plays an important role for tuning and optimizing the sensing performance. A highest figure of merit (FOM) of ~6100 is obtained. This plasmonic sensor possesses the advantages of easy fabrication and compactness. The findings and the proposed structure may provide some guidance for the fundamental research of the integrated plasmonic nanosensor applications and designs.

  11. Gold nanoparticles with externally controlled, reversible shifts of local surface plasmon resonance bands.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Mustafa S; Jensen, Gary C; Penaloza, David P; Seery, Thomas A P; Pendergraph, Samuel A; Rusling, James F; Sotzing, Gregory A

    2009-11-17

    We have achieved reversible tunability of local surface plasmon resonance in conjugated polymer functionalized gold nanoparticles. This property was facilitated by the preparation of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) containing polynorbornene brushes on gold nanoparticles via surface-initiated ring-opening metathesis polymerization. Reversible tuning of the surface plasmon band was achieved by electrochemically switching the EDOT polymer between its reduced and oxidized states. PMID:19839619

  12. Control of the symmetry breaking in double-well potentials by the resonant nonlinearity management

    SciTech Connect

    Nistazakis, H. E.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.; Malomed, B. A.; Kevrekidis, P. G.

    2011-03-15

    We introduce a one-dimensional model of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), combining the double-well potential, which is a usual setting for the onset of spontaneous-symmetry-breaking (SSB) effects, and time-periodic modulation of the nonlinearity, which may be implemented by means of the Feshbach-resonance-management (FRM) technique. Both cases of the nonlinearity that is repulsive or attractive on the average are considered. In the former case, the main effect produced by the application of the FRM is spontaneous self-trapping of the condensate in either of the two potential wells in parameter regimes where it would remain untrapped in the absence of the management. In the weakly nonlinear regime, the frequency of intrinsic oscillations in the FRM-induced trapped state is very close to half the FRM frequency, suggesting that the effect is accounted for by a parametric resonance. In the case of the attractive nonlinearity, the FRM-induced effect is the opposite, i.e., enforced detrapping of a state which is self-trapped in its unmanaged form. In the latter case, the frequency of oscillations of the untrapped mode is close to a quarter of the driving frequency, suggesting that a higher-order parametric resonance may account for this effect.

  13. Optical whispering-gallery mode resonators for applications in optical communication and frequency control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grutter, Karen Esther

    High quality factor (Q) optical whispering gallery mode resonators are a key component in many on-chip optical systems, such as delay lines, modulators, and add-drop filters. They are also a convenient, compact structure for studying optomechanical interactions on-chip. In all these applications, optical Q is an important factor for high performance. For optomechanical reference oscillators in particular, high mechanical Q is also necessary. Previously, optical microresonators have been made in a wide variety of materials, but it has proven challenging to demonstrate high optical Q and high mechanical Q in a single, integrated device. This work demonstrates a new technique for achieving high optical Q on chip, a fully-integrated tunable filter with ultra-narrow minimum bandwidth, and the effect of material choice and device design on optical Q, mechanical Q and phase noise in microring optomechanical oscillators. To achieve a high optical Q, phosphosilicate glass (PSG) is studied as a resonator material. The low melting point of PSG enables wafer-scale reflow, which reduces sidewall roughness without significantly changing lithographically-defined dimensions. With this process, optical Qs up to 1.5 x 10. 7 are achieved, overten times higher than typical silicon optical resonators. These high-Q PSG resonators are then integrated with MEMS-actuated waveguides in a tunable-bandwidth filter. Due to the high Q of the PSG resonator, this device has a best-to-date minimum bandwidth of 0.8 GHz, with a tuning range of 0.8 to 8.5GHz. Finally, microring optomechanical oscillators (OMOs) in PSG, stoichiometric silicon nitride, and silicon are fabricated, and their performance is compared after characterization via a tapered optical fiber in vacuum. The silicon nitride device has the best performance, with a mechanical Q of more than 1 x 10. 4and record-breaking OMO phase noise of -102 dBc/Hz at a 1 kHz offset from a 72 MHz carrier.

  14. Experimental verification and stability state space analysis of CLL-T series parallel resonant converter with fuzzy controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Chinnadurai; Madheswaran, Muthusamy

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a closed loop CLL-T (capacitor inductor inductor) series parallel resonant converter (SPRC) has been simulated and the performance is analyzed. A three element CLL-T SPRC working under load independent operation (voltage type and current type load) is presented in this paper. The stability and AC analysis of CLL-T SPRC has been developed using state space technique and the regulation of output voltage is done by using Fuzzy controller. The simulation study indicates the superiority of fuzzy control over the conventional control methods. The proposed approach is expected to provide better voltage regulation for dynamic load conditions. A prototype 300 W, 100 kHz converter is designed and built to experimentally demonstrate, dynamic and steady state performance for the CLL-T SPRC are compared from the simulation studies.

  15. Ultrafast Control of a Surface Plasmon Resonance via the Insulator to Metal Transition in V02 Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rini, Matteo; Cavalleri, Andrea; Lopez, R.; Boatner, Lynn A; Haglund, Jr, Richard F; Haynes, Tony E; Feldman, Leonard C.

    2005-01-01

    We report on the study of the ultrafast insulator-to-metal transition in nanoparticles of strongly correlated VO2. The particles are grown by ion-implantation and self-assembly in a Silica matrix and can be switched between the insulating and metallic phase within less than 100 fs. The prompt formation of the metallic state results in the appearance of a surface-plasmon resonance that is absent in the bulk and can be further tailored by controlling the particle shape.

  16. A line-of-sight electron cyclotron emission receiver for electron cyclotron resonance heating feedback control of tearing modes.

    PubMed

    Oosterbeek, J W; Bürger, A; Westerhof, E; de Baar, M R; van den Berg, M A; Bongers, W A; Graswinckel, M F; Hennen, B A; Kruijt, O G; Thoen, J; Heidinger, R; Korsholm, S B; Leipold, F; Nielsen, S K

    2008-09-01

    An electron cyclotron emission (ECE) receiver inside the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) transmission line has been brought into operation. The ECE is extracted by placing a quartz plate acting as a Fabry-Perot interferometer under an angle inside the electron cyclotron wave (ECW) beam. ECE measurements are obtained during high power ECRH operation. This demonstrates the successful operation of the diagnostic and, in particular, a sufficient suppression of the gyrotron component preventing it from interfering with ECE measurements. When integrated into a feedback system for the control of plasma instabilities this line-of-sight ECE diagnostic removes the need to localize the instabilities in absolute coordinates. PMID:19044409

  17. Closed-loop control of flow-induced sound in a flow duct with downstream resonant cavities.

    PubMed

    Lu, Z B; Halim, D; Cheng, L

    2013-03-01

    A closed-loop-controlled surface perturbation technique was developed for controlling the flow-induced sound in a flow duct and acoustic resonance inside downstream cavities. The surface perturbation was created by piezo-ceramic THUNDER (THin layer composite UNimorph Driver and sEnsoR) actuators embedded underneath the surface of a test model with a semi-circular leading edge. A modified closed-loop control scheme based on the down-sampling theory was proposed and implemented due to the practical vibration characteristic limitation of THUNDER actuators. The optimally tuned control achieved a sound pressure reduction of 17.5 dB in the duct and 22.6 dB inside the cavity at the vortex shedding frequency, respectively. Changes brought up by the control in both flow and acoustic fields were analyzed in terms of the spectrum phase shift of the flow field over the upper surface of the test model, and a shift in the vortex shedding frequency. The physical mechanism behind the control was investigated in the view of developing an optimal control strategy. PMID:23464018

  18. Wavelength-controlled external-cavity laser with a silicon photonic crystal resonant reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, A. A.; Liles, Alexandros A.; Persheyev, Saydulla; Debnath, Kapil; O'Faolain, Liam

    2016-03-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of an alternative design of external-cavity hybrid lasers consisting of a III-V Semiconductor Optical Amplifier with fiber reflector and a Photonic Crystal (PhC) based resonant reflector on SOI. The Silicon reflector comprises a polymer (SU8) bus waveguide vertically coupled to a PhC cavity and provides a wavelength-selective optical feedback to the laser cavity. This device exhibits milliwatt-level output power and sidemode suppression ratio of more than 25 dB.

  19. Electronic-state-controlled reset operation in quantum dot resonant-tunneling single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Q. C.; Zhu, Z. Q.; An, Z. H.; Song, J. D.; Choi, W. J.

    2014-02-03

    The authors present a systematic study of an introduced reset operation on quantum dot (QD) single photon detectors operating at 77 K. The detectors are based on an AlAs/GaAs/AlAs double-barrier resonant tunneling diode with an adjacent layer of self-assembled InAs QDs. Sensitive single-photon detection in high (dI)/(dV) region with suppressed current fluctuations is achieved. The dynamic detection range is extended up to at least 10{sup 4} photons/s for sensitive imaging applications by keeping the device far from saturation by employing an appropriate reset frequency.

  20. Power requirements for electron cyclotron current drive and ion cyclotron resonance heating for sawtooth control in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, I. T.; Graves, J. P.; Sauter, O.; Zucca, C.; Asunta, O.; Buttery, R. J.; Coda, S.; Goodman, T.; Igochine, V.; Johnson, T.; Jucker, M.; La Haye, R. J.; Lennholm, M.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2013-06-01

    13 MW of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) power deposited inside the q = 1 surface is likely to reduce the sawtooth period in ITER baseline scenario below the level empirically predicted to trigger neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs). However, since the ECCD control scheme is solely predicated upon changing the local magnetic shear, it is prudent to plan to use a complementary scheme which directly decreases the potential energy of the kink mode in order to reduce the sawtooth period. In the event that the natural sawtooth period is longer than expected, due to enhanced α particle stabilization for instance, this ancillary sawtooth control can be provided from >10MW of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) power with a resonance just inside the q = 1 surface. Both ECCD and ICRH control schemes would benefit greatly from active feedback of the deposition with respect to the rational surface. If the q = 1 surface can be maintained closer to the magnetic axis, the efficacy of ECCD and ICRH schemes significantly increases, the negative effect on the fusion gain is reduced, and off-axis negative-ion neutral beam injection (NNBI) can also be considered for sawtooth control. Consequently, schemes to reduce the q = 1 radius are highly desirable, such as early heating to delay the current penetration and, of course, active sawtooth destabilization to mediate small frequent sawteeth and retain a small q = 1 radius. Finally, there remains a residual risk that the ECCD + ICRH control actuators cannot keep the sawtooth period below the threshold for triggering NTMs (since this is derived only from empirical scaling and the control modelling has numerous caveats). If this is the case, a secondary control scheme of sawtooth stabilization via ECCD + ICRH + NNBI, interspersed with deliberate triggering of a crash through auxiliary power reduction and simultaneous pre-emptive NTM control by off-axis ECCD has been considered, permitting long transient periods with high fusion

  1. Controlled generation of nonlinear resonances through sinusoidal lattice modes in Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Priyam; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2015-12-01

    We study Bose-Einstein condensate in the combined presence of time modulated optical lattice and harmonic trap in the mean-field approach. Through the self-similar method, we show the existence of sinusoidal lattice modes in this inhomogeneous system, commensurate with the lattice potential. A significant advantage of this system is wide tunability of the parameters through chirp management. The combined effect of the interaction, harmonic trap and lattice potential leads to the generation of nonlinear resonances, exactly where the matter wave changes its direction. When the harmonic trap is switched off, the BEC undergoes a nonlinear compression for the static optical lattice potential. For better understanding of chirp management and the nature of the sinusoidal excitation, we investigate the energy spectrum of the condensate, which clearly reveals the generation of nonlinear resonances in the appropriate regime. We have also identified a classical dynamical phase transition occurring in the system, where loss of superfluidity takes the superfluid phase to an insulating state.

  2. A Ku band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer using an arbitrary waveform generator for quantum control experiments at millikelvin temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yap, Yung Szen; Tabuchi, Yutaka; Negoro, Makoto; Kagawa, Akinori; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    We present a 17 GHz (Ku band) arbitrary waveform pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer for experiments down to millikelvin temperatures. The spectrometer is located at room temperature, while the resonator is placed either in a room temperature magnet or inside a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator; the operating temperature range of the dilution unit is from ca. 10 mK to 8 K. This combination provides the opportunity to perform quantum control experiments on electron spins in the pure-state regime. At 0.6 T, spin echo experiments were carried out using γ-irradiated quartz glass from 1 K to 12.3 mK. With decreasing temperatures, we observed an increase in spin echo signal intensities due to increasing spin polarizations, in accordance with theoretical predictions. Through experimental data fitting, thermal spin polarization at 100 mK was estimated to be at least 99%, which was almost pure state. Next, to demonstrate the ability to create arbitrary waveform pulses, we generate a shaped pulse by superposing three Gaussian pulses of different frequencies. The resulting pulse was able to selectively and coherently excite three different spin packets simultaneously-a useful ability for analyzing multi-spin system and for controlling a multi-qubit quantum computer. By applying this pulse to the inhomogeneously broadened sample, we obtain three well-resolved excitations at 8 K, 1 K, and 14 mK. PMID:26133831

  3. A Ku band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer using an arbitrary waveform generator for quantum control experiments at millikelvin temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, Yung Szen; Tabuchi, Yutaka; Negoro, Makoto; Kagawa, Akinori; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2015-06-15

    We present a 17 GHz (Ku band) arbitrary waveform pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer for experiments down to millikelvin temperatures. The spectrometer is located at room temperature, while the resonator is placed either in a room temperature magnet or inside a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator; the operating temperature range of the dilution unit is from ca. 10 mK to 8 K. This combination provides the opportunity to perform quantum control experiments on electron spins in the pure-state regime. At 0.6 T, spin echo experiments were carried out using γ-irradiated quartz glass from 1 K to 12.3 mK. With decreasing temperatures, we observed an increase in spin echo signal intensities due to increasing spin polarizations, in accordance with theoretical predictions. Through experimental data fitting, thermal spin polarization at 100 mK was estimated to be at least 99%, which was almost pure state. Next, to demonstrate the ability to create arbitrary waveform pulses, we generate a shaped pulse by superposing three Gaussian pulses of different frequencies. The resulting pulse was able to selectively and coherently excite three different spin packets simultaneously—a useful ability for analyzing multi-spin system and for controlling a multi-qubit quantum computer. By applying this pulse to the inhomogeneously broadened sample, we obtain three well-resolved excitations at 8 K, 1 K, and 14 mK.

  4. A Ku band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer using an arbitrary waveform generator for quantum control experiments at millikelvin temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Yung Szen; Tabuchi, Yutaka; Negoro, Makoto; Kagawa, Akinori; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    We present a 17 GHz (Ku band) arbitrary waveform pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer for experiments down to millikelvin temperatures. The spectrometer is located at room temperature, while the resonator is placed either in a room temperature magnet or inside a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator; the operating temperature range of the dilution unit is from ca. 10 mK to 8 K. This combination provides the opportunity to perform quantum control experiments on electron spins in the pure-state regime. At 0.6 T, spin echo experiments were carried out using γ-irradiated quartz glass from 1 K to 12.3 mK. With decreasing temperatures, we observed an increase in spin echo signal intensities due to increasing spin polarizations, in accordance with theoretical predictions. Through experimental data fitting, thermal spin polarization at 100 mK was estimated to be at least 99%, which was almost pure state. Next, to demonstrate the ability to create arbitrary waveform pulses, we generate a shaped pulse by superposing three Gaussian pulses of different frequencies. The resulting pulse was able to selectively and coherently excite three different spin packets simultaneously—a useful ability for analyzing multi-spin system and for controlling a multi-qubit quantum computer. By applying this pulse to the inhomogeneously broadened sample, we obtain three well-resolved excitations at 8 K, 1 K, and 14 mK.

  5. The Onset of Resonance-Controlled Instability in Spherical Bubble Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, R. Glynn; Gaitan, D. Felipe

    1996-01-01

    Single bubble dynamics are investigated using acoustic techniques for isolation and manipulation. The goal of the investigations is to understand the dynamic origin of the various phenomena that bubbles exhibit: light emission, enhanced mass transport, chaotic and quasiperiodic oscillations, and translations. Once understood, acoustically manipulated bubbles can serve as platforms for materials effects on free surfaces, using surfactants to alter surface rheology and observing how that affects both dynamics and also mass transport. The effects of gravity on the problem will be shown to be significant. The first set of observations from 1g experimentation are presented. These observations are of the onset conditions for instability of the spherical shape of the bubble. For the size range 55-90 microns in diameter we observe instability governed by resonant mode coupling, which is significantly affected by the buoyant force and its effects.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance linewidth and spin diffusion in {sup 29}Si isotopically controlled silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Hiroshi; Itoh, Kohei M.; Vlasenko, Leonid S.

    2008-10-15

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study was performed with n-type silicon single crystals containing {sup 29}Si isotope abundance f ranges from 1.2% to 99.2%. The nuclear spin diffusion coefficient D has been determined from the linewidth of significantly enhanced {sup 29}Si NMR signals utilizing a developed dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) method. The {sup 29}Si NMR linewidth depends linearly on f, at least when f<10%, and approaches {proportional_to}f{sup 1/2} dependence when f>50%. The estimated {sup 29}Si nuclear spin diffusion time T{sub sd} between phosphorus atoms used for DNP is more than ten times shorter than the nuclear polarization time T{sub 1}{sup p} of {sup 29}Si nuclei around phosphorus. Therefore, the regime of 'rapid spin diffusion' is realized in the DNP experiments.

  7. Hand movements classification for myoelectric control system using adaptive resonance theory.

    PubMed

    Jahani Fariman, H; Ahmad, Siti A; Hamiruce Marhaban, M; Alijan Ghasab, M; Chappell, Paul H

    2016-03-01

    This research proposes an exploratory study of a simple, accurate, and computationally efficient movement classification technique for prosthetic hand application. Surface myoelectric signals were acquired from the four muscles, namely, flexor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis, biceps brachii, and triceps brachii, of four normal-limb subjects. The signals were segmented, and the features were extracted with a new combined time-domain feature extraction method. Fuzzy C-means clustering method and scatter plot were used to evaluate the performance of the proposed multi-feature versus Hudgins' multi-feature. The movements were classified with a hybrid Adaptive Resonance Theory-based neural network. Comparative results indicate that the proposed hybrid classifier not only has good classification accuracy (89.09%) but also a significantly improved computation time. PMID:26581764

  8. Dipolar Decoupling in Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy using Optimal Control Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, William; Haas, Holger; Budakian, Raffi

    We present data showing how a modified gradient ascent pulse engineering method can be used to design nuclear magnetic resonance pulses that perform a single unitary transformation over a large range of maximum Rabi field strengths (B1) , while decoupling the secular dipolar interactions between spins. We designed dipolar-decoupling π-pulses that perform well over spins feeling maximum B1 fields from 131 - 274 G . By combining these π-pulses into a simple multiple pulse sequence, with fields produced by a silver microwire, we have increased T2* in a polystyrene sample attached to the tip of a silicon nanowire from 11 μs to ~ 250 ms . This dipolar decoupling could be used to improve the spatial resolution of nano-MRI experiments and to allow spectroscopy of chemical shifts in nanoscale samples.

  9. Coherent control of atomic excitation using off-resonant strong few-cycle pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Pankaj K.; Eleuch, Hichem; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.

    2010-10-15

    We study the dynamics of a two-level system driven by an off-resonance few-cycle pulse which has a phase jump {phi} at t=t{sub 0}, in contrast to many-cycle pulses, under the nonrotating-wave approximation (NRWA). We give a closed form analytical solution for the evolution of the probability amplitude |C{sub a}(t)| for the upper level. Using the appropriate pulse parameters like the phase jump {phi}, jump time t{sub 0}, pulse width {tau}, frequency {nu}, and Rabi frequency {Omega}{sub 0} the population transfer after the pulse is gone can be optimized and, for the pulse considered here, an enhancement factor of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} was obtained.

  10. Controllable emission of a dipolar source coupled with a magneto-dielectric resonant subwavelength scatterer

    PubMed Central

    Rolly, Brice; Geffrin, Jean-Michel; Abdeddaim, Redha; Stout, Brian; Bonod, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that a local excitation of a single scatterer of relative dielectric permittivity ε = 6 permits to excite broad dipolar and quadrupolar electric and magnetic resonances that shape the emission pattern in an unprecedented way. By suitably positioning the feed with respect to the sphere at a λ/3 distance, this compact antenna is able to spectrally sort the electromagnetic emission either in the forward or in the backward direction, together with a high gain in directivity. Materials with ε = 6 can be found in the whole spectrum of frequencies promising Mie antennas to become an enabling technology in numbers of applications, ranging from quantum single photon sources to telecommunications. PMID:24165924

  11. Development and characterization of high-frequency resonance-enhanced microjet actuators for control of high-speed jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Puja; Gustavsson, Jonas P. R.; Alvi, Farrukh S.

    2016-05-01

    For flow control applications requiring high-frequency excitation, very few actuators have sufficient dynamic response and/or control authority to be useful in high-speed flows. Due to this reason, experiments involving high-frequency excitation, attempted in the past, have been limited to either low-frequency actuation with reasonable control authority or moderate-frequency actuation with limited control authority. The current work expands on the previous development of the resonance-enhanced microactuators to design actuators that are capable of producing high-amplitude pulses at much higher frequencies [{O} (10 kHz)]. Using lumped element modeling, two actuators have been designed with nominal frequencies of 20 and 50 kHz. Extensive benchtop characterization using acoustic measurements as well as optical diagnostics using a high-resolution micro-schlieren setup is employed to characterize the dynamic response of these actuators. The actuators performed at a range of frequencies, 20.3-27.8 and 54.8-78.2 kHz, respectively. In addition to providing information on the actuator flow physics and performance at various operating conditions, this study serves to develop easy-to-integrate high-frequency actuators for active control of high-speed jets. Preliminary testing of these actuators is performed by implementing the 20-kHz actuator on a Mach 0.9 free jet flow field for noise reduction. Acoustic measurements in the jet near field demonstrate attenuation of radiated noise at all observation angles.

  12. Ultrafast active control of localized surface plasmon resonances in silicon bowtie antennas.

    PubMed

    Berrier, Audrey; Ulbricht, Ronald; Bonn, Mischa; Rivas, Jaime Gómez

    2010-10-25

    Localized surface plasmon polaritons (LSPPs) provide an efficient means of achieving extreme light concentration. In recent years, their active control has become a major aspiration of plasmonic research. Here, we demonstrate direct control of semiconductor bowtie antennas, enabling active excitation of LSPPs, at terahertz (THz) frequencies. We modify the LSPPs by ultrafast optical modulation of the free carrier density in the plasmonic structure itself, allowing for active control of the semiconductor antennas on picosecond timescales. Moreover, this control enables the manipulation of the field intensity enhancements in ranges of four orders of magnitude. PMID:21164664

  13. Integration of near-field probes and photonic crystal nanocavities for precise and low-loss resonance control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, Xiongyeu; Zhou, Guangya; Chau, Fook Siong

    2011-03-01

    Research interest for silicon nanophotonics is a topic of heavy interest currently due to the requirements for high density communications of integrated devices with small footprints in the semiconductor industry. Silicon photonic crystals (PhC) are nanoscale subwavelength periodic structures that possess the capability to induce strong interaction between light and matter. PhC nanocavities utilizes the photonic bandgap effect to trap certain frequencies of light within a small confined region for a diverse range of applications such as enhancement and suppression of spontaneous emission, efficient and compact lasers, add/drop multiplexers, optical filters and sensing etc. In this paper, we describe a mechanically-perturbative near-field probe with a special design shape to achieve low-loss and precise resonance control of PhC nanocavities. One-dimensional (1D) PhC are chosen for our study due to the ease of integrating with low-loss SOI waveguide technology and easy integration with nanomechanical structures. Sub-micron microelectromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS) technology is introduced as an ideal integration platform with such near-field probe designs due to its capabilities to accurately control fine displacements without the need of bulky equipment such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning near field microscope (SNOM) or highly sensitive piezo-controlled micromanipulator stages. We propose that such near-field probe designs are capable of achieving large resonance spectral shift of up to few nm with high re-configurability, highly accurate actuation displacements, low power consumption, and portability. In this work, we propose an approach utilizing numerical methods to study and characterize the electromagnetic interaction between PhC nanocavities and nanomechanically displaced near-field nano-probes.

  14. Optimal design of passive viscous dampers for controlling the resonant response of orthotropic plates under high-speed moving loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Rodrigo, M. D.; Museros, P.

    2011-03-01

    In this article, the resonant response of plates traversed by moving loads is addressed being its main application the dynamic performance of railway bridges under high-speed traffic. An innovative alternative to reduce the deck inadmissible oscillations that may appear in short simply supported structures in resonant conditions is proposed, based on artificially increasing the superstructure damping by retrofitting the deck with fluid viscous dampers. A particular auxiliary structure transforming the deck vertical deflection into relative movement within the devices is envisaged, being the main objectives of the study to optimise the retrofitting system parameters and to prove its efficiency under the action of railway vehicles. For these purposes, the retrofitted deck behaviour is first investigated using an orthotropic plate model under harmonic excitation. On the basis of an analytical approach, a dimensionless version of the equations of motion is presented, the governing parameters are extracted and an intensive sensitivity analysis of the plate response is performed. Finally, analytical closed-form expressions for the optimal dampers constants are derived and their adequacy is numerically evaluated. To this end, an existing bridge belonging to the Spanish Railway network is analysed using a three-dimensional finite element code specifically programmed by the authors for this application. In the end the controlling effect of the retrofitting system and the applicability of the optimal parameters analytical expressions are proven for a wide range of circulating velocities.

  15. More Specific Signal Detection in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging by False Discovery Rate Control for Hierarchically Structured Systems of Hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    Schildknecht, Konstantin; Tabelow, Karsten; Dickhaus, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Signal detection in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) inherently involves the problem of testing a large number of hypotheses. A popular strategy to address this multiplicity is the control of the false discovery rate (FDR). In this work we consider the case where prior knowledge is available to partition the set of all hypotheses into disjoint subsets or families, e. g., by a-priori knowledge on the functionality of certain regions of interest. If the proportion of true null hypotheses differs between families, this structural information can be used to increase statistical power. We propose a two-stage multiple test procedure which first excludes those families from the analysis for which there is no strong evidence for containing true alternatives. We show control of the family-wise error rate at this first stage of testing. Then, at the second stage, we proceed to test the hypotheses within each non-excluded family and obtain asymptotic control of the FDR within each family at this second stage. Our main mathematical result is that this two-stage strategy implies asymptotic control of the FDR with respect to all hypotheses. In simulations we demonstrate the increased power of this new procedure in comparison with established procedures in situations with highly unbalanced families. Finally, we apply the proposed method to simulated and to real fMRI data. PMID:26914144

  16. Electronic properties of epitaxial cerium oxide films during controlled reduction and oxidation studied by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Gasperi, Gabriele; Amidani, Lucia; Benedetti, Francesco; Boscherini, Federico; Glatzel, Pieter; Valeri, Sergio; Luches, Paola

    2016-07-27

    We investigated the evolution of the electronic structure of cerium oxide ultrathin epitaxial films during reduction and oxidation processes using resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at the Ce L3 absorption edge, a technique sensitive to the electronic configurations at the 4f levels and in the 5d band thanks to its high energy resolution. We used thermal treatments in high vacuum and in oxygen partial pressure to induce a controlled and reversible degree of reduction in cerium oxide ultrathin epitaxial films of different thicknesses. Two dominant spectral components contribute to the measured spectra at the different degrees of oxidation/reduction. In ultrathin films a modification of the electronic properties associated with platinum substrate proximity and with dimensionality is identified. The different electronic properties induce a higher reducibility in ultrathin films, ascribed to a decrease of the surface oxygen vacancy formation energy. PMID:27405957

  17. (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonance assignments of translationally-controlled tumor protein from photosynthetic microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xingzhe; Xiao, Yan; Cui, Qiu; Feng, Yingang

    2015-10-01

    Translationally-controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is a eukaryote-conserved protein with crucial roles in cellular growth. It has also been proposed that plant TCTP has functions specific to plant, while no structure of TCTP from photosynthetic organism has been reported. Nannochloropsis is a photosynthetic microalga with high yield of lipid and high-value polyunsaturated fatty acid, which is promising for biodiesel production. Study of growth-related proteins may provide new clue for improving the yield of lipid. TCTP from Nannochloropsis oceanica shares low sequence identity with structure-known TCTPs. Here we reported the NMR resonance assignments of TCTP from N. oceanica for further structural and functional studies. PMID:25680850

  18. Resonances and resonance widths

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1986-05-01

    Two-dimensional betatron resonances are much more important than their simple one-dimensional counterparts and exhibit a strong dependence on the betatron phase advance per cell. A practical definition of ''width'' is expanded upon in order to display these relations in tables. A primarily pedagogical introduction is given to explain the tables, and also to encourage a wider capability for deriving resonance behavior and wider use of ''designer'' resonances.

  19. Effects of aging and tactile stochastic resonance on postural performance and postural control in a sensory conflict task.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Marius; Pourmoghaddam, Amir; Lee, Beom-Chan; Layne, Charles S

    2015-01-01

    Postural control in certain situations depends on functioning of tactile or proprioceptive receptors and their respective dynamic integration. Loss of sensory functioning can lead to increased risk of falls in challenging postural tasks, especially in older adults. Stochastic resonance, a concept describing better function of systems with addition of optimal levels of noise, has shown to be beneficial for balance performance in certain populations and simple postural tasks. In this study, we tested the effects of aging and a tactile stochastic resonance stimulus (TSRS) on balance of adults in a sensory conflict task. Nineteen older (71-84 years of age) and younger participants (22-29 years of age) stood on a force plate for repeated trials of 20 s duration, while foot sole stimulation was either turned on or off, and the visual surrounding was sway-referenced. Balance performance was evaluated by computing an Equilibrium Score (ES) and anterior-posterior sway path length (APPlength). For postural control evaluation, strategy scores and approximate entropy (ApEn) were computed. Repeated-measures ANOVA, Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, and Mann-Whitney U-tests were conducted for statistical analysis. Our results showed that balance performance differed between older and younger adults as indicated by ES (p = 0.01) and APPlength (0.01), and addition of vibration only improved performance in the older group significantly (p = 0.012). Strategy scores differed between both age groups, whereas vibration only affected the older group (p = 0.025). Our results indicate that aging affects specific postural outcomes and that TSRS is beneficial for older adults in a visual sensory conflict task, but more research is needed to investigate the effectiveness in individuals with more severe balance problems, for example, due to neuropathy. PMID:25884289

  20. Controlled manipulation of elastomers with radiation: Insights from multiquantum nuclear-magnetic-resonance data and mechanical measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.; Weisgraber, T.; Dinh, L. N.; Gee, R. H.; Wilson, T.; Chinn, S.; Maxwell, R. S.

    2011-03-15

    Filled and cross-linked elastomeric rubbers are versatile network materials with a multitude of applications ranging from artificial organs and biomedical devices to cushions, coatings, adhesives, interconnects, and seismic-isolation, thermal, and electrical barriers. External factors such as mechanical stress, temperature fluctuations, or radiation are known to create chemical changes in such materials that can directly affect the molecular weight distribution (MWD) of the polymer between cross-links and alter the structural and mechanical properties. From a materials science point of view it is highly desirable to understand, affect, and manipulate such property changes in a controlled manner. Unfortunately, that has not yet been possible due to the lack of experimental characterization of such networks under controlled environments. In this work we expose a known rubber material to controlled dosages of {gamma} radiation and utilize a newly developed multiquantum nuclear-magnetic-resonance technique to characterize the MWD as a function of radiation. We show that such data along with mechanical stress-strain measurements are amenable to accurate analysis by simple network models and yield important insights into radiation-induced molecular-level processes.

  1. Brain Changes in Long-Term Zen Meditators Using Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Diffusion Tensor Imaging: A Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Fayed, Nicolás; Lopez del Hoyo, Yolanda; Andres, Eva; Serrano-Blanco, Antoni; Bellón, Juan; Aguilar, Keyla; Cebolla, Ausias; Garcia-Campayo, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This work aimed to determine whether 1H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are correlated with years of meditation and psychological variables in long-term Zen meditators compared to healthy non-meditator controls. Materials and Methods Design. Controlled, cross-sectional study. Sample. Meditators were recruited from a Zen Buddhist monastery. The control group was recruited from hospital staff. Meditators were administered questionnaires on anxiety, depression, cognitive impairment and mindfulness. 1H-MRS (1.5 T) of the brain was carried out by exploring four areas: both thalami, both hippocampi, the posterior superior parietal lobule (PSPL) and posterior cingulate gyrus. Predefined areas of the brain were measured for diffusivity (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) by MR-DTI. Results Myo-inositol (mI) was increased in the posterior cingulate gyrus and Glutamate (Glu), N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) and N-acetyl-aspartate/Creatine (NAA/Cr) was reduced in the left thalamus in meditators. We found a significant positive correlation between mI in the posterior cingulate and years of meditation (r = 0.518; p = .019). We also found significant negative correlations between Glu (r = −0.452; p = .045), NAA (r = −0.617; p = .003) and NAA/Cr (r = −0.448; P = .047) in the left thalamus and years of meditation. Meditators showed a lower Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) in the left posterior parietal white matter than did controls, and the ADC was negatively correlated with years of meditation (r = −0.4850, p = .0066). Conclusions The results are consistent with the view that mI, Glu and NAA are the most important altered metabolites. This study provides evidence of subtle abnormalities in neuronal function in regions of the white matter in meditators. PMID:23536796

  2. Attenuation of wall disturbances in an electron cyclotron resonance oxygen–argon plasma using real time control

    SciTech Connect

    Keville, Bernard Gaman, Cezar; Turner, Miles M.; Zhang, Yang; Daniels, Stephen; Holohan, Anthony M.

    2014-07-01

    Present practice in plasma-assisted semiconductor manufacturing specifies recipes in terms of inputs such as gas flow rates, power and pressure. However, ostensibly identical chambers running identical recipes may produce very different results. Extensive chamber matching, i.e., initial iterative, empirical tuning of the process recipe, which entails time-consuming, ex situ statistical analysis of process metrics such as etch depth, uniformity, anisotropy and selectivity, is required to ensure acceptable results. Once matched, chambers are run open loop and are thus sensitive to disturbances such as actuator drift, wall seasoning and substrate loading, which may impact negatively on process reproducibility. An alternative approach, which may obviate the need for chamber matching and reduce the sensitivity of process metrics to exogenous disturbances, would be to specify a recipe in terms of quantities such as active species densities, and to regulate these in real time by adjusting the inputs with a suitable control algorithm. In this work, real time control of an electron cyclotron resonance O{sub 2}/Ar plasma used for photoresist ashing has been implemented. The design of elementary, model-based algorithms for the control of the argon 750 and oxygen 844 line intensities measured by optical emission spectroscopy is described. Fluorination of the chamber walls by means of an SF{sub 6} plasma prior to ashing inhibits wall recombination of oxygen radicals resulting in an approximately 20% increase in ash rate in the open loop case. However, closed loop control almost completely attenuates the effect of fluorination, thus demonstrating the efficacy of the control algorithms in ensuring a reproducible ash rate in the face of a wall disturbance.

  3. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Gulf War Illness Revealed by 31Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Koslik, Hayley J.; Hamilton, Gavin; Golomb, Beatrice A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Approximately 1/3 of 1990-1 Gulf War veterans developed chronic multisymptom health problems. Implicated exposures bear mechanisms that adversely affect mitochondria. Symptoms emphasize fatigue, cognition and muscle (brain and muscle are aerobically demanding); with protean additional domains affected, compatible with mitochondrial impairment. Recent evidence supports treatments targeting cell bioenergetics (coenzyme10) to benefit Gulf War illness symptoms. However, no evidence has directly documented mitochondrial or bioenergetic impairment in Gulf War illness. Objective We sought to objectively assess for mitochondrial dysfunction, examining post-exercise phosphocreatine-recovery time constant (PCr-R) using 31Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (31P-MRS), in Gulf War veterans with Gulf War illness compared to matched healthy controls. PCr-R has been described as a “robust and practical” index of mitochondrial status. Design and Participants Case-control study from 2012–2013. Fourteen community-dwelling Gulf War veterans and matched controls from the San Diego area comprised 7 men meeting CDC and Kansas criteria for Gulf War illness, and 7 non-deployed healthy controls matched 1∶1 to cases on age, sex, and ethnicity. Outcome Measure Calf muscle phosphocreatine was evaluated by 31P-MRS at rest, through 5 minutes of foot pedal depression exercise, and in recovery, to assess PCr-R. Paired t-tests compared cases to matched controls. Results PCr-R was significantly prolonged in Gulf War illness cases vs their matched controls: control values, mean±SD, 29.0±8.7 seconds; case values 46.1±18.0 seconds; difference 17.1±14.9 seconds; p = 0.023. PCr-R was longer for cases relative to their matched controls for all but one pair; moreover while values clustered under 31 seconds for all but one control, they exceeded 35 seconds (with a spread up to 70 seconds) for all but one case. Discussion These data provide the first direct evidence

  4. Laser-induced wavelength-controlled self-assembly of colloidal quasi-resonant quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Tsipotan, Aleksey S; Gerasimova, Marina A; Slabko, Vitaliy V; Aleksandrovsky, Aleksandr S

    2016-05-16

    Self-assembly of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots controlled solely by laser-induced interaction is demonstrated for the first time. Pairs of CdTe nanoparticles are formed under irradiation with nanosecond pulses at wavelengths 555 or 560 nm. Formation of pairs is justified by corresponding changes of absorption spectra. Conditions of the experiment are in excellent agreement with those predicted by the theory of laser-induced dipole-dipole interaction of QDs. The fraction of QDs assembled into pairs is up to 47%. PMID:27409936

  5. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study of cognitive control and neurosensory deficits in mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Andrew R; Hanlon, Faith M; Dodd, Andrew B; Ling, Josef M; Klimaj, Stefan D; Meier, Timothy B

    2015-11-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury patients (mTBI) frequently report symptoms of increased distractability and sensory disturbances during mutisensory stimulation. These common post-concussive symptoms could putatively result from dysfunction within the cognitive control network (CCN; top-down) or from unisensory cortex (bottom-up) itself. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and high-resolution structural data were therefore prospectively collected during a multisensory (audio-visual) cognitive control task from 46 mTBI patients within 3 weeks of injury and 46 matched healthy controls (HC), with a subset of participants returning at 4 months. Multisensory stimuli were presented at two frequencies to manipulate cognitive and perceptual load. Patients self-reported more cognitive, emotional, somatic, vestibular and visual symptoms relative to HC, which improved, but did not entirely resolve, over the 4 month follow-up period. There were no group differences in behavior or functional activation during cognitive control (incongruent--congruent trials). In contrast, patients exhibited abnormal activation within different regions of visual cortex that depended on whether attention was focused on auditory or visual information streams. Patients also exhibited increased activation within bilateral inferior parietal lobules during higher cognitive/perceptual loads, suggesting a compensatory mechanism to achieve similar levels of behavioral performance. Functional abnormalities within the visual cortex and inferior parietal lobules were only partially resolved at 4 months post-injury, suggesting that neural abnormalities may take longer to resolve than behavioral measures used in most clinical settings. In summary, current results indicate that abnormalities within unisensory cortex (particularly visual areas) following mTBI, which likely contribute to deficits commonly reported during multisensory stimulation. PMID:26493161

  6. A Dual-Mode Bandpass Filter with Multiple Controllable Transmission-Zeros Using T-Shaped Stub-Loaded Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zh.; Wang, C.; Kim, N. Y.

    2014-01-01

    A dual-mode broadband bandpass filter (BPF) with multiple controllable transmission-zeros using T-shaped stub-loaded resonators (TSSLRs) is presented. Due to the symmetrical plane, the odd-even-mode theory can be adopted to characterize the BPF. The proposed filter consists of a dual-mode TSSLR and two modified feed-lines, which introduce two capacitive and inductive source-load (S-L) couplings. Five controllable transmission zeros (TZs) can be achieved for the high selectivity and the wide stopband because of the tunable amount of coupling capacitance and inductance. The center frequency of the proposed BPF is 5.8 GHz, with a 3 dB fraction bandwidth of 8.9%. The measured insertion and return losses are 1.75 and 28.18 dB, respectively. A compact size and second harmonic frequency suppression can be obtained by the proposed BPF with S-L couplings. PMID:24688406

  7. Magnetically-Assisted Remote Controlled Microcatheter Tip Deflection under Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hetts, Steven W; Saeed, Maythem; Martin, Alastair; Lillaney, Prasheel; Losey, Aaron; Yee, Erin Jeannie; Sincic, Ryan; Do, Loi; Evans, Lee; Malba, Vincent; Bernhardt, Anthony F; Wilson, Mark W; Patel, Anand; Arenson, Ronald L; Caton, Curtis; Cooke, Daniel L

    2013-01-01

    X-ray fluoroscopy-guided endovascular procedures have several significant limitations, including difficult catheter navigation and use of ionizing radiation, which can potentially be overcome using a magnetically steerable catheter under MR guidance. The main goal of this work is to develop a microcatheter whose tip can be remotely controlled using the magnetic field of the MR scanner. This protocol aims to describe the procedures for applying current to the microcoil-tipped microcatheter to produce consistent and controllable deflections. A microcoil was fabricated using laser lathe lithography onto a polyimide-tipped endovascular catheter. In vitro testing was performed in a waterbath and vessel phantom under the guidance of a 1.5-T MR system using steady-state free precession (SSFP) sequencing. Various amounts of current were applied to the coils of the microcatheter to produce measureable tip deflections and navigate in vascular phantoms. The development of this device provides a platform for future testing and opportunity to revolutionize the endovascular interventional MRI environment. PMID:23609143

  8. Non-resonant dynamic stark control of vibrational motion with optimized laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Esben F; Henriksen, Niels E

    2016-06-28

    The term dynamic Stark control (DSC) has been used to describe methods of quantum control related to the dynamic Stark effect, i.e., a time-dependent distortion of energy levels. Here, we employ analytical models that present clear and concise interpretations of the principles behind DSC. Within a linearly forced harmonic oscillator model of vibrational excitation, we show how the vibrational amplitude is related to the pulse envelope, and independent of the carrier frequency of the laser pulse, in the DSC regime. Furthermore, we shed light on the DSC regarding the construction of optimal pulse envelopes - from a time-domain as well as a frequency-domain perspective. Finally, in a numerical study beyond the linearly forced harmonic oscillator model, we show that a pulse envelope can be constructed such that a vibrational excitation into a specific excited vibrational eigenstate is accomplished. The pulse envelope is constructed such that high intensities are avoided in order to eliminate the process of ionization. PMID:27369515

  9. Non-resonant dynamic stark control of vibrational motion with optimized laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Esben F.; Henriksen, Niels E.

    2016-06-01

    The term dynamic Stark control (DSC) has been used to describe methods of quantum control related to the dynamic Stark effect, i.e., a time-dependent distortion of energy levels. Here, we employ analytical models that present clear and concise interpretations of the principles behind DSC. Within a linearly forced harmonic oscillator model of vibrational excitation, we show how the vibrational amplitude is related to the pulse envelope, and independent of the carrier frequency of the laser pulse, in the DSC regime. Furthermore, we shed light on the DSC regarding the construction of optimal pulse envelopes - from a time-domain as well as a frequency-domain perspective. Finally, in a numerical study beyond the linearly forced harmonic oscillator model, we show that a pulse envelope can be constructed such that a vibrational excitation into a specific excited vibrational eigenstate is accomplished. The pulse envelope is constructed such that high intensities are avoided in order to eliminate the process of ionization.

  10. Resonant optical control of the structural distortions that drive ultrafast demagnetization in Cr2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, V. G.; Dal Conte, S.; Miller, T. A.; Viola, D.; Luppi, E.; Véniard, V.; Cerullo, G.; Wall, S.

    2016-07-01

    We study how the color and polarization of ultrashort pulses of visible light can be used to control the demagnetization processes of the antiferromagnetic insulator Cr2O3 . We utilize time-resolved second harmonic generation (SHG) to probe how changes in the magnetic and structural state evolve in time. We show that varying the pump photon-energy to excite either localized transitions within the Cr or charge transfer states leads to markedly different dynamics. Through a full polarization analysis of the SHG signal, symmetry considerations, and density functional theory calculations, we show that, in the nonequilibrium state, SHG is sensitive to both lattice displacements and changes to the magnetic order, which allows us to conclude that different excited states couple to phonon modes of different symmetries. Furthermore, the spin-scattering rate depends on the induced distortion, enabling us to control the timescale for the demagnetization process. Our results suggest that selective photoexcitation of antiferromagnetic insulators allows fast and efficient manipulation of their magnetic state.

  11. A Poly Adenine-Mediated Assembly Strategy for Designing Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering Substrates in Controllable Manners.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Jiang, Xiangxu; Wang, Houyu; Wang, Siyi; Wang, Hui; Sun, Bin; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2015-07-01

    In this article, we introduce a Poly adenine (Poly A)-assisted fabrication method for rationally designing surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) substrates in controllable and reliable manners, enabling construction of core-satellite SERRS assemblies in both aqueous and solid phase (e.g., symmetric core (Au)-satellite (Au) nanoassemblies (Au-Au NPs), and asymmetric Ag-Au NPs-decorated silicon wafers (Ag-Au NPs@Si)). Of particular significance, assembly density is able to be controlled by varying the length of the Poly A block (e.g., 10, 30, and 50 consecutive adenines at the 5' end of DNA sequence, Poly A10/A30/A50), producing the asymmetric core-satellite nanoassemblies with adjustable surface density of Au NPs assembly on core NPs surface. Based on quantitative interrogation of the relationship between SERRS performance and assemble density, the Ag-Au NPs@Si featuring the strongest SERRS enhancement factor (EF ≈ 10(7)) and excellent reproducibility can be achieved under optimal conditions. We further employ the resultant Ag-Au NPs@Si as a high-performance SERRS sensing platform for the selective and sensitive detection of mercury ions (Hg(2+)) in a real system, with a low detection limit of 100 fM, which is ∼5 orders of magnitude lower than the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)-defined limit (10 nM) in drinkable water. These results suggest the Poly A-mediated assembly method as new and powerful tools for designing high-performance SERRS substrates with controllable structures, facilitating improvement of sensitivity, reliability, and reproducibility of SERRS signals. PMID:26028356

  12. Nanosecond-pulse-controlled higher-order sideband comb in a GaAs optomechanical disk resonator in the non-perturbative regime

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Hao; Si, Liu-Gang; Lü, Xin-You; Yang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Ying

    2014-10-15

    We propose an interesting scheme for tunable high-order sideband comb generation by utilizing ultrastrong optomechanical interaction in a GaAs optomechanical disk resonator beyond the perturbative approximation. We analyze the nonlinear nature of the optomechanical interaction, and give a full description of the non-perturbative effects. It is shown, within the non-perturbative regime, that high-order sideband comb with large intensities can be realized and controlled in a GaAs optomechanical disk resonator with experimentally achievable system parameters, and the non-perturbative regime leads to rich and nontrivial behavior.

  13. Modeling of divertor particle and heat loads during application of resonant magnetic perturbation fields for ELM control in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, O.; Becoulet, M.; Cahyna, P.; Evans, T. E.; Feng, Y.; Frerichs, H.; Kirschner, A.; Kukushkin, A.; Laengner, R.; Lunt, T.; Loarte, A.; Pitts, R.; Reiser, D.; Reiter, D.; Saibene, G.; Samm, U.

    2013-07-01

    First results from three-dimensional modeling of the divertor heat and particle flux pattern during application of resonant magnetic perturbation fields as ELM control scheme in ITER with the EMC3-Eirene fluid plasma and kinetic neutral transport code are discussed. The formation of a helical magnetic footprint breaks the toroidal symmetry of the heat and particle fluxes. Expansion of the flux pattern as far as 60 cm away from the unperturbed strike line is seen with vacuum RMP fields, resulting in a preferable heat flux spreading. Inclusion of plasma response reduces the radial extension of the heat and particle fluxes and results in a heat flux peaking closer to the unperturbed level. A strong reduction of the particle confinement is found. 3D flow channels are identified as a consistent reason due to direct parallel outflow from inside of the separatrix. Their radial inward expansion and hence the level of particle pump out is shown to be dependent on the perturbation level.

  14. Optically controlled low-power on-off mode resonant tunneling oscillator with a heterojunction phototransistor switch.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kiwon; Park, Jaehong; Lee, Jooseok; Yang, Kyounghoon

    2015-03-15

    We report an optically controlled low-power on-off mode oscillator based on a resonant tunneling diode (RTD) that is monolithically integrated with a heterojunction phototransistor (HPT) optical switch. In order to achieve a low-power operation at a wavelength of 1.55 μm an InP-based quantum-effect tunneling diode is used for microwave signal generation based on a unique negative differential conductance (NDC) characteristic of the RTD at a low applied voltage. In addition, the high-gain HPT is used for converting incident optical data to an electrical data signal. The fabricated on-off mode oscillator shows a low-power consumption of 5 mW and a high-data-rate of 1  Gb/s at an oscillation frequency of 4.7 GHz. A good energy efficiency of 5  pJ/bit has been obtained due to the low DC power consumption along with high-data-rate performance of the RTD-based optoelectronic integration scheme. PMID:25768172

  15. Construction of a controllable Förster resonance energy transfer system based on G-quadruplex for DNA sensing.

    PubMed

    Yue, Qiaoli; Shen, Tongfei; Wang, Changna; Wang, Lei; Li, Haibo; Xu, Shuling; Wang, Huaisheng; Liu, Jifeng

    2013-02-15

    Conjugations of oligonucleotides, chromophores, and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) can be used for energy transfer assays to detect DNA. Herein, a homogenous Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) system employing two-step modification of oligonucleotide on GNPs was reported. The distance between the donor (fluorescein attached onto DNA) and the acceptor (GNPs) was controlled by using the G-rich DNA. In the presence of porphyrin or berberine, which can act as ligands of G-quadruplexes, the G-rich DNA spacer can result into G-quadruplex structure. Therefore, the intimate contact between the fluorophore and the GNP results in efficient energy transfer and fluorescence quenching. After hybridization with target DNA, the G-quadruplex stretched and resulted in an enhancement of fluorescence. So the present FRET system can be used for target DNA sensing with detection limit as low as 40 pM (S/N=3). In this study, a relation between the fluorescence quenching efficiency and GNP sizes was found and bigger GNPs had higher fluorescence enhancement after hybridization with target DNA. PMID:22794935

  16. Controllable copper deficiency in Cu2-xSe nanocrystals with tunable localized surface plasmon resonance and enhanced chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lie, Shao Qing; Wang, Dong Mei; Gao, Ming Xuan; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2014-08-01

    Copper chalcogenide nanocrystals (CuCNCs) as a type of semiconductor that can also act as efficient catalysts are rarely reported. Herein, we study water-soluble size-controlled Cu2-xSe nanocrystals (NCs), which are copper deficient and could be prepared by a redox reaction with the assistance of surfactants. We found them to have strong near-infrared localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties originating from the holes in the valence band, and also catalytic activity of more than a 500-fold enhancement of chemiluminescence (CL) in a luminol-H2O2 system. Investigations into the mechanisms behind these results showed that the high concentration of free carriers in Cu2-xSe NCs, which are derived from their high copper deficiencies that make Cu2-xSe NCs both good electron donors and acceptors with high ionic mobility, could greatly enhance the catalytic ability of Cu2-xSe NCs to facilitate electron-transfer processes and the decomposition of H2O2 into OH&z.rad; and O2&z.rad;-, which are the commonly accepted key intermediates in luminol CL enhancement. Thus, it can be concluded that controllable copper deficiencies that are correlated with their near-infrared LSPR are critically responsible for the effective catalysis of Cu2-xSe NCs in the enhanced CL.Copper chalcogenide nanocrystals (CuCNCs) as a type of semiconductor that can also act as efficient catalysts are rarely reported. Herein, we study water-soluble size-controlled Cu2-xSe nanocrystals (NCs), which are copper deficient and could be prepared by a redox reaction with the assistance of surfactants. We found them to have strong near-infrared localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties originating from the holes in the valence band, and also catalytic activity of more than a 500-fold enhancement of chemiluminescence (CL) in a luminol-H2O2 system. Investigations into the mechanisms behind these results showed that the high concentration of free carriers in Cu2-xSe NCs, which are derived from

  17. Excitonic surface lattice resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphrey, A. D.; Gentile, M. J.; Barnes, W. L.

    2016-08-01

    Electromagnetic resonances are important in controlling light at the nanoscale. The most studied such resonance is the surface plasmon resonance that is associated with metallic nanostructures. Here we explore an alternative resonance, the surface exciton-polariton resonance, one based on excitonic molecular materials. Our study is based on analytical and numerical modelling. We show that periodic arrays of suitable molecular nanoparticles may support surface lattice resonances that arise as a result of coherent interactions between the particles. Our results demonstrate that excitonic molecular materials are an interesting alternative to metals for nanophotonics; they offer the prospect of both fabrication based on supramolecular chemistry and optical functionality arising from the way the properties of such materials may be controlled with light.

  18. Mode jumping of split-ring resonator metamaterials controlled by high-permittivity BST and incident electric fields

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiaojian; Zeng, Xinxi; Cui, Tie Jun; Lan, Chuwen; Guo, Yunsheng; Zhang, Hao Chi; Zhang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the resonant modes of split-ring resonator (SRR) metamaterials that contain high-permittivity BST block numerically and experimentally. We observe interesting mode-jumping phenomena from the BST-included SRR absorber structure as the excitation wave is incident perpendicularly to the SRR plane. Specifically, when the electric field is parallel to the SRR gap, the BST block in the gap will induce a mode jumping from the LC resonance to plasmonic resonance (horizontal electric-dipole mode), because the displacement current excited by the Mie resonance in the dielectric block acts as a current channel in the gap. When the electric field is perpendicular to the gap side, the plasmonic resonance mode (vertical electric-dipole mode) in SRR changes to two joint modes contributed simultaneously by the back layer, SRR and BST block, as a result of connected back layer and SRR layer by the displacement current in the BST dielectric block. Based on the mode jumping effect as well as temperature and electric-field dependent dielectric constant, the BST-included SRR metamaterials may have great potentials for the applications in electromagnetic switches and widely tunable metamaterial devices. PMID:27502844

  19. Mode jumping of split-ring resonator metamaterials controlled by high-permittivity BST and incident electric fields.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaojian; Zeng, Xinxi; Cui, Tie Jun; Lan, Chuwen; Guo, Yunsheng; Zhang, Hao Chi; Zhang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the resonant modes of split-ring resonator (SRR) metamaterials that contain high-permittivity BST block numerically and experimentally. We observe interesting mode-jumping phenomena from the BST-included SRR absorber structure as the excitation wave is incident perpendicularly to the SRR plane. Specifically, when the electric field is parallel to the SRR gap, the BST block in the gap will induce a mode jumping from the LC resonance to plasmonic resonance (horizontal electric-dipole mode), because the displacement current excited by the Mie resonance in the dielectric block acts as a current channel in the gap. When the electric field is perpendicular to the gap side, the plasmonic resonance mode (vertical electric-dipole mode) in SRR changes to two joint modes contributed simultaneously by the back layer, SRR and BST block, as a result of connected back layer and SRR layer by the displacement current in the BST dielectric block. Based on the mode jumping effect as well as temperature and electric-field dependent dielectric constant, the BST-included SRR metamaterials may have great potentials for the applications in electromagnetic switches and widely tunable metamaterial devices. PMID:27502844

  20. Mode jumping of split-ring resonator metamaterials controlled by high-permittivity BST and incident electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaojian; Zeng, Xinxi; Cui, Tie Jun; Lan, Chuwen; Guo, Yunsheng; Zhang, Hao Chi; Zhang, Qian

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the resonant modes of split-ring resonator (SRR) metamaterials that contain high-permittivity BST block numerically and experimentally. We observe interesting mode-jumping phenomena from the BST-included SRR absorber structure as the excitation wave is incident perpendicularly to the SRR plane. Specifically, when the electric field is parallel to the SRR gap, the BST block in the gap will induce a mode jumping from the LC resonance to plasmonic resonance (horizontal electric-dipole mode), because the displacement current excited by the Mie resonance in the dielectric block acts as a current channel in the gap. When the electric field is perpendicular to the gap side, the plasmonic resonance mode (vertical electric-dipole mode) in SRR changes to two joint modes contributed simultaneously by the back layer, SRR and BST block, as a result of connected back layer and SRR layer by the displacement current in the BST dielectric block. Based on the mode jumping effect as well as temperature and electric-field dependent dielectric constant, the BST-included SRR metamaterials may have great potentials for the applications in electromagnetic switches and widely tunable metamaterial devices.

  1. Electromagnetic wave energy flow control with a tunable and reconfigurable coupled plasma split-ring resonator metamaterial: A study of basic conditions and configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtzanidis, Konstantinos; Pederson, Dylan M.; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-05-01

    We propose and study numerically a tunable and reconfigurable metamaterial based on coupled split-ring resonators (SRRs) and plasma discharges. The metamaterial couples the magnetic-electric response of the SRR structure with the electric response of a controllable plasma slab discharge that occupies a volume of the metamaterial. Because the electric response of a plasma depends on its constitutive parameters (electron density and collision frequency), the plasma-based metamaterial is tunable and active. Using three-dimensional numerical simulations, we analyze the coupled plasma-SRR metamaterial in terms of transmittance, performing parametric studies on the effects of electron density, collisional frequency, and the position of the plasma slab with respect to the SRR array. We find that the resonance frequency can be controlled by the plasma position or the plasma-to-collision frequency ratio, while transmittance is highly dependent on the latter.

  2. Electromechanical actuator with controllable motion, fast response rate, and high-frequency resonance based on graphene and polydiacetylene.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiajie; Huang, Lu; Li, Na; Huang, Yi; Wu, Yingpeng; Fang, Shaoli; Oh, Jiyoung; Kozlov, Mikhail; Ma, Yanfeng; Li, Feifei; Baughman, Ray; Chen, Yongsheng

    2012-05-22

    Although widely investigated, novel electromechanical actuators with high overall actuation performance are still in urgent need for various practical and scientific applications, such as robots, prosthetic devices, sensor switches, and sonar projectors. In this work, combining the properties of unique environmental perturbations-actuated deformational isomerization of polydiacetylene (PDA) and the outstanding intrinsic features of graphene together for the first time, we design and fabricate an electromechanical bimorph actuator composed of a layer of PDA crystal and a layer of flexible graphene paper through a simple yet versatile solution approach. Under low applied direct current (dc), the graphene-PDA bimorph actuator with strong mechanical strength can generate large actuation motion (curvature is about 0.37 cm(-1) under a current density of 0.74 A/mm(2)) and produce high actuation stress (more than 160 MPa/g under an applied dc of only 0.29 A/mm(2)). When applying alternating current (ac), this actuator can display reversible swing behavior with long cycle life under high frequencies even up to 200 Hz; significantly, while the frequency and the value of applied ac and the state of the actuators reach an appropriate value, the graphene-PDA actuator can produce a strong resonance and the swing amplitude will jump to a peak value. Moreover, this stable graphene-PDA actuator also demonstrates rapidly and partially reversible electrochromatic phenomenon when applying an ac. Two mechanisms-the dominant one, electric-induced deformation, and a secondary one, thermal-induced expansion of PDA-are proposed to contribute to these interesting actuation performances of the graphene-PDA actuators. On the basis of these results, a mini-robot with controllable direction of motion based on the graphene-PDA actuator is designed to illustrate the great potential of our discoveries for practical use. Combining the unique actuation mechanism and many outstanding properties of

  3. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging versus standard neuronavigation for the neurosurgical treatment of glioblastoma: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Kubben, Pieter L.; Scholtes, Felix; Schijns, Olaf E.M.G.; ter Laak-Poort, Mariël P.; Teernstra, Onno P.M.; Kessels, Alfons G. H.; van Overbeeke, Jacobus J.; Martin, Didier H.; van Santbrink, Henk

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although the added value of increasing extent of glioblastoma resection is still debated, multiple technologies can assist neurosurgeons in attempting to achieve this goal. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) might be helpful in this context, but to date only one randomized trial exists. Methods: We included 14 adults with a supratentorial tumor suspect for glioblastoma and an indication for gross total resection in this randomized controlled trial of which the interim analysis is presented here. Participants were assigned to either ultra-low-field strength iMRI-guided surgery (0.15 Tesla) or to conventional neuronavigation-guided surgery (cNN). Primary endpoint was residual tumor volume (RTV) percentage. Secondary endpoints were clinical performance, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and survival. Results: Median RTV in the cNN group is 6.5% with an interquartile range of 2.5-14.75%. Median RTV in the iMRI group is 13% with an interquartile range of 3.75-27.75%. A Mann-Whitney test showed no statistically significant difference between these groups (P =0.28). Median survival in the cNN group is 472 days, with an interquartile range of 244-619 days. Median survival in the iMRI group is 396 days, with an interquartile range of 191-599 days (P =0.81). Clinical performance did not differ either. For HRQOL only descriptive statistics were applied due to a limited sample size. Conclusion: This interim analysis of a randomized trial on iMRI-guided glioblastoma resection compared with cNN-guided glioblastoma resection does not show an advantage with respect to extent of resection, clinical performance, and survival for the iMRI group. Ultra-low-field strength iMRI does not seem to be cost-effective compared with cNN, although the lack of a valid endpoint for neurosurgical studies evaluating extent of glioblastoma resection is a limitation of our study and previous volumetry-based studies on this topic. PMID:24991473

  4. Enhanced optical nonlinearity and fiber-optical frequency comb controlled by a single atom in a whispering-gallery-mode microtoroid resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiahua; Zhang, Suzhen; Yu, Rong; Zhang, Duo; Wu, Ying

    2014-11-01

    Based on a single atom coupled to a fiber-coupled, chip-based microresonator [B. Dayan et al., Science 319, 1062 (2008), 10.1126/science.1152261], we put forward a scheme to generate optical frequency combs at driving laser powers as low as a few nanowatts. Using state-of-the-art experimental parameters, we investigate in detail the influences of different atomic positions and taper-resonator coupling regimes on optical-frequency-comb generation. In addition to numerical simulations demonstrating this effect, a physical explanation of the underlying mechanism is presented. We find that the combination of the atom and the resonator can induce a large third-order nonlinearity which is significantly stronger than Kerr nonlinearity in Kerr frequency combs. Such enhanced nonlinearity can be used to generate optical frequency combs if driven with two continuous-wave control and probe lasers and significantly reduce the threshold of nonlinear optical processes. The comb spacing can be well tuned by changing the frequency beating between the driving control and probe lasers. The proposed method is versatile and can be adopted to different types of resonators, such as microdisks, microspheres, microtoroids or microrings.

  5. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alex K.; Jensen, Kenneth J.; Girit, Caglar; Mickelson, William E.; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2011-03-29

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  6. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Girit, Caglar O; Mickelson, William E; Zettl, Alexander K; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2013-11-05

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  7. Steady-state and dynamic characteristics of a 20-kHz spacecraft power system - Control of harmonic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasynczuk, O.; Krause, P. C.; Biess, J. J.; Kapustka, R.

    1990-01-01

    A detailed computer simulation was used to illustrate the steady-state and dynamic operating characteristics of a 20-kHz resonant spacecraft power system. The simulated system consists of a parallel-connected set of DC-inductor resonant inverters (drivers), a 440-V cable, a node transformer, a 220-V cable, and a transformer-rectifier-filter (TRF) AC-to-DC receiver load. Also included in the system are a 1-kW 0.8-pf RL load and a double-LC filter connected at the receiving end of the 20-kHz AC system. The detailed computer simulation was used to illustrate the normal steady-state operating characteristics and the dynamic system performance following, for example, TRF startup. It is shown that without any filtering the given system exhibits harmonic resonances due to an interaction between the switching of the source and/or load converters and the AC system. However, the double-LC filter at the receiving-end of the AC system and harmonic traps connected in series with each of the drivers significantly reduce the harmonic distortion of the 20-kHz bus voltage. Significant additional improvement in the waveform quality can be achieved by including a double-LC filter with each driver.

  8. Microwave field controlled slow and fast light with a coupled system consisting of a nanomechanical resonator and a Cooper-pair box.

    PubMed

    Ma, Peng-Cheng; Xiao, Yin; Yu, Ya-Fei; Zhang, Zhi-Ming

    2014-02-10

    We theoretically demonstrate an efficient method to control slow and fast light in microwave regime with a coupled system consisting of a nanomechanical resonator (NR) and a superconducting Cooper-pair box (CPB). Using the pump-probe technique, we find that both slow and fast light effects of the probe field can appear in this coupled system. Furthermore, we show that a tunable switch from slow light to fast light can be achieved by only adjusting the pump-CPB detuning from the NR frequency to zero. Our coupled system may have potential applications, for example, in optical communication, microwave photonics, and nonlinear optics. PMID:24663653

  9. Local thermal resonance control of GaInP photonic crystal membrane cavities using ambient gas cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Sergei Lian, Jin; Yüce, Emre; Mosk, Allard P.; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaelle; De Rossi, Alfredo

    2015-04-27

    We perform spatially dependent tuning of a GaInP photonic crystal cavity using a continuous wave violet laser. Local tuning is obtained by laser heating of the photonic crystal membrane. The cavity resonance shift is measured for different pump positions and for two ambient gases: He and N{sub 2}. We find that the width of the temperature profile induced in the membrane depends strongly on the thermal conductivity of the ambient gas. For He gas, a narrow spatial width of the temperature profile of 2.8 μm is predicted and verified in experiment.

  10. Resonant control of spins in the quasi-one-dimensional channel by interplay of confinement and Zeeman splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, D. H.; Khodas, M.; Flatté, M. E.

    2014-10-15

    We study the spin transport in a quasi-one-dimensional channel defined in a two-dimensional electron gas. The combined action of geometrical confinement and the spin precession is analyzed. We demonstrate that for certain orientations of the in-plane magnetic field and for specific range of its magnitude the spin polarization exhibits a strong decrease referred to as ballistic spin resonance (BSR). The phenomenon is due to the commensuration of the Zeeman and inter-subband energy splitting. We show that the BSR requires a finite spin-orbit (SO) interaction although the condition for the BSR onset is independent on SO coupling.

  11. Spectroscopic evidence for medium controlled hydrogen bond inhibition of resonance delocalization of charge in complexes of tetrabutylammonium fluoride with phenols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, James H.; Cork, David G.; Tinsdale, Julie A.

    Infrared spectra of tetrabutylammonium fluoride complexes of both 4-cyanophenol and methyl-4-hydroxybenzoate but not 3-cyanophenol reveal the presence of two distinct types of hydrogen bond corresponding to charge localized and partially charge delocalized forms. The latter only occur in polar aprotic protophilic solvents at low temperatures. The activation energies for the interconversion of the two forms reflect the relative abilities of the two groups to delocalize charge through resonance. The chemical shifts of the aromatic protons of the complexes are also medium dependent although the precise nature of this medium dependence is less easily understood.

  12. Lithographic wavelength control of an external cavity laser with a silicon photonic crystal cavity-based resonant reflector.

    PubMed

    Liles, Alexandros A; Debnath, Kapil; O'Faolain, Liam

    2016-03-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of a new design for external cavity hybrid lasers consisting of a III-V semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) with fiber reflector and a photonic crystal (PhC)-based resonant reflector on SOI. The silicon reflector is composed of an SU8 polymer bus waveguide vertically coupled to a PhC cavity and provides a wavelength-selective optical feedback to the laser cavity. This device exhibits milliwatt-level output power and side-mode suppression ratios of more than 25 dB. PMID:26974073

  13. Optical resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention discloses a semi-ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) optical resonator structure comprising a medium including an edge forming a reflective facet and a waveguide within the medium, the waveguide having opposing ends formed by the reflective facet. The performance of the SRFP resonator can be further enhanced by including a Mach-Zehnder interferometer in the waveguide on one side of the gain medium. The optical resonator can be employed in a variety of optical devices. Laser structures using at least one SRFP resonator are disclosed where the resonators are disposed on opposite sides of a gain medium. Other laser structures employing one or more resonators on one side of a gain region are also disclosed.

  14. Feshbach resonances in ultracold gases

    SciTech Connect

    Chin Cheng; Grimm, Rudolf; Julienne, Paul; Tiesinga, Eite

    2010-04-15

    Feshbach resonances are the essential tool to control the interaction between atoms in ultracold quantum gases. They have found numerous experimental applications, opening up the way to important breakthroughs. This review broadly covers the phenomenon of Feshbach resonances in ultracold gases and their main applications. This includes the theoretical background and models for the description of Feshbach resonances, the experimental methods to find and characterize the resonances, a discussion of the main properties of resonances in various atomic species and mixed atomic species systems, and an overview of key experiments with atomic Bose-Einstein condensates, degenerate Fermi gases, and ultracold molecules.

  15. Analysis of brain metabolism by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder suggests a generalized differential ontogenic pattern from controls.

    PubMed

    Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Londoño, Ana C; Pineda, David A; Lopera, Francisco; Palacio, Juan David; Arbelaez, Andres; Acosta, Maria T; Vélez, Jorge I; Castellanos, Francisco Xavier; Muenke, Maximilian

    2012-12-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most common behavioral disorder of childhood. Preliminary studies with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) of the brain have reported differences in brain metabolite concentration-to-Cr ratios between individuals with ADHD and unaffected controls in several frontal brain regions including anterior cingulate cortex. Using multivoxel (1)H-MRS, we compared 14 individuals affected with ADHD to 20 individuals without ADHD from the same genetic isolate. After controlling by sex, age, and multiple testing, we found significant differences at the right posterior cingulate of the Glx/Cr ratio density distribution function between ADHD cases and controls (P < 0.05). Furthermore, we found several interactions of metabolite concentration-to-Cr ratio, age, and ADHD status: Ins/Cr and Glx/Cr ratios at the left posterior cingulate, and NAA/Cr at the splenius, right posterior cingulate, and at the left posterior cingulate. We also found a differential metabolite ratio interaction between ADHD cases and controls for Ins/Cr and NAA/Cr at the right striatum. These results show that: (1) NAA/Cr, Glx/Cr, and Ins/Cr ratios, as reported in other studies, exhibit significant differences between ADHD cases and controls; (2) differences of these metabolite ratios between ADHD cases and controls evolve in specific and recognizable patterns throughout age, a finding that replicates previous results obtained by structural MRI, where is demonstrated that brain ontogeny follows a different program in ADHD cases and controls; (3) Ins/Cr and NAA/Cr ratios, at the right striatum, interact in a differential way between ADHD cases and controls. As a whole, these results replicate previous 1H-MRS findings and add new intriguing differential metabolic and ontogeny patterns between ADHD cases and controls that warrant further pursue. PMID:23012086

  16. Assessing the merits of resonant magnetic perturbations with different toroidal mode numbers for controlling edge localised modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, I. T.; Kirk, A.; Akers, R. J.; Ham, C. J.; Harrison, J. R.; Hawke, J.; Liu, Y. Q.; McClements, K. G.; Pamela, S.; Saarelma, S.; Scannell, R.; Thornton, A. J.; The MAST Team

    2014-12-01

    An increase in ELM frequency has been demonstrated in MAST by applying resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with toroidal mode number, nRMP = 2, 3, 4, 6. It has been observed that the mitigated ELM frequency increases with the amplitude of the applied field provided it is above a critical threshold. This threshold value depends on the mode number of the RMP, with higher nRMP having a larger critical value. For the same ELM frequency, the reduction in the peak heat load on the divertor plates is approximately the same for all RMP configurations. The RMPs give rise to perturbations to the plasma shape, with lobe structures occurring due to the tangled magnetic fields near the X-point, and corrugations of the plasma boundary at the midplane. The X-point lobe length increases linearly with the applied field when above a threshold, with RMPs of higher toroidal mode number giving rise to longer lobes for the same applied resonant field. Similarly, the midplane displacements increase with the applied field strength, though the corrugation amplitude is less dependent upon the RMP configuration. For all nRMP, the RMPs result in enhanced particle transport and a reduction in the pedestal pressure gradient caused by an increased pedestal width, which is found to be consistent with a decrease in the critical pressure at which infinite-n ballooning modes are driven unstable in non-axisymmetric plasmas. The plasma rotation braking is strongest for lowest nRMP whilst the degradation of access to H-mode resultant from the application of RMPs are non-monotonic in nRMP, with the optimal case for both occurring for nRMP = 4. Whilst there are advantages and disadvantages for all RMP configurations, the configurations found to be optimised in terms of pedestal degradation, access to H-mode, plasma rotation and distortion to the plasma configuration in MAST are nRMP = 3 or 4, consistent with the configurations anticipated for use in ITER.

  17. A high-field magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer using an oven-controlled crystal oscillator as the local oscillator of its radio frequency transceiver.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao; Tang, Xin; Tang, Weinan; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2014-09-01

    A home-made high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) spectrometer with multiple receiving channels is described. The radio frequency (RF) transceiver of the spectrometer consists of digital intermediate frequency (IF) circuits and corresponding mixing circuits. A direct digital synthesis device is employed to generate the IF pulse; the IF signal from a down-conversion circuit is sampled and followed by digital quadrature detection. Both the IF generation and the IF sampling use a 50 MHz clock. An oven-controlled crystal oscillator, which has outstanding spectral purity and a compact circuit, is used as the local oscillator of the RF transceiver. A digital signal processor works as the pulse programmer of the spectrometer, as a result, 32 control lines can be generated simultaneously while an event is triggered. Field programmable gate array devices are utilized as the auxiliary controllers of the IF generation, IF receiving, and gradient control. High performance, including 1 μs time resolution of the soft pulse, 1 MHz receiving bandwidth, and 1 μs time resolution of the gradient waveform, is achieved. High-quality images on a 1.5 T MRI system using the spectrometer are obtained. PMID:25273752

  18. A Versatile Theranostic Delivery Platform Integrating Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Computed Tomography, pH/cis-Diol Controlled Release, and Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yu-Jui; Chou, Shang-Wei; Shyue, Jing-Jong; Lin, Shih-Yao; Hsiao, Jong-Kai; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2016-06-28

    The functions of biomedical imaging, cancer targeting, and controlled release of therapeutic agents were integrated into a drug delivery platform to proof its diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities. This versatile nanocomposite is based on the strategic design of wormlike mesoporous silica nanocarriers that are decorated with extremely small iron oxide nanoparticles, having a prominent T1-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) signal. The controlled release function was then achieved through the grafting of polyalcohol saccharide derivative ligands onto the surfaces of mesoporous silica nanoparticles to conjugate with boronic acid functionalized gold nanoparticles, which acted as the gate and the source of computed tomography (CT) signals. This versatile platform thus exhibited a MRI/CT dual imaging property drawing on the strong points to offset the weaknesses of each, rendering more accurate diagnosis. The capping of gold nanoparticles controlled with the hydrolysis of boronate ester bonds provides the reversible opening/closing process, avoiding further release of drug once the nanocomposite leaves the cell or tissue. To endow this platform with targeting ability, protocatechuic acid was utilized as a linker to connect folic acid with the boronic acid of the gold nanoparticles. The anchor of targeting moiety, folic acid, enriched this platform and enhanced the specific cellular uptake toward cells with folate receptor. This integrated drug delivery platform was then loaded with the antitumor agent doxorubicin, demonstrating its power for targeted delivery, bioimaging, and controlled release chemotherapy to reduce the undesired side effects of chemotherapy. PMID:27163375

  19. Control of the plasmonic resonance of a graphene coated plasmonic nanoparticle array combined with a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Sio, Luciano; Cataldi, Ugo; Bürgi, Thomas; Tabiryan, Nelson; Bunning, Timothy J.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a switchable plasmonic device based on a conductive graphene oxide (cGO) coated plasmonic nanoparticle (NP) array, layered with nematic liquid crystal (NLC) as an active medium. A monolayer of NPs has been immobilized on a glass substrate through electrostatic interaction, and then grown in place using nanochemistry. This monolayer is then coated with a thin (less then 100nm) cGO film which acts simultaneously as both an electro-conductive and active medium. The combination of the conductive NP array with a separate top cover substrate having both cGO and a standard LC alignment layer is used for aligning a NLC film in a hybrid configuration. The system is analysed in terms of morphological and electro-optical properties. The spectral response of the sample characterized after each element is added (air, cGO, NLC) reveals a red-shift of the localized plasmonic resonance (LPR) frequency of approximately 62nm with respect to the NP array surrounded by air. The application of an external voltage (8Vpp) is suitable to modulate (blue shift) the LPR frequency by approximately 22nm.

  20. Tunable resonant and non-resonant interactions between a phase qubit and LC resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allman, Michael Shane; Whittaker, Jed D.; Castellanos-Beltran, Manuel; Cicak, Katarina; da Silva, Fabio; Defeo, Michael; Lecocq, Florent; Sirois, Adam; Teufel, John; Aumentado, Jose; Simmonds, Raymond W.

    2014-03-01

    We use a flux-biased radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device (rf SQUID) with an embedded flux-biased direct current (dc) SQUID to generate strong resonant and non-resonant tunable interactions between a phase qubit and a lumped-element resonator. The rf-SQUID creates a tunable magnetic susceptibility between the qubit and resonator providing resonant coupling rates from zero to near the ultra-strong coupling regime. By modulating the magnetic susceptibility, non-resonant parametric coupling achieves rates > 100 MHz . Nonlinearity of the magnetic susceptibility also leads to parametric coupling at subharmonics of the qubit-resonator detuning. Controllable coupling is generically important for constructing coupled-mode systems ubiquitous in physics, useful for both, quantum information architectures and quantum simulators. This work supported by NIST and NSA grant EAO140639.

  1. Dispersive tristability in microring resonators.

    PubMed

    Dumeige, Yannick; Féron, Patrice

    2005-12-01

    Combining a transfer matrix analysis and slowly varying envelope approximation, we propose a simple method to describe steady states associated with dispersive multistability in coupled microring resonators. This approach allows us to consider nonlinear interactions between independent forward and backward propagative fields. We applied this simple formalism first to decrease the tristability intensity threshold in linearly coupled resonators and second to optically control the tristable behavior in a single microring resonator. PMID:16486080

  2. Protocol for a prospective magnetic resonance imaging study on supraspinal lower urinary tract control in healthy subjects and spinal cord injury patients undergoing intradetrusor onabotulinumtoxinA injections for treating neurogenic detrusor overactivity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The control of the lower urinary tract is a complex, multilevel process involving both the peripheral and central nervous system. Due to lesions of the neuraxis, most spinal cord injury patients suffer from neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, which may jeopardise upper urinary tract function and has a negative impact on health-related quality of life. However, the alterations to the nervous system following spinal cord injury causing neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction and potential effects of treatments such as intradetrusor onabotulinumtoxinA injections on lower urinary tract control are poorly understood. Methods/Design This is a prospective structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging study investigating the supraspinal lower urinary tract control in healthy subjects and spinal cord injury patients undergoing intradetrusor onabotulinumtoxinA injections for treating neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Neuroimaging data will include structural magnetic resonance imaging (T1-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging) as well as functional, i.e. blood oxygen level-dependent sensitive magnetic resonance imaging using a 3 T magnetic resonance scanner. The functional magnetic resonance imaging will be performed simultaneously to three different bladder stimulation paradigms using an automated magnetic resonance compatible and synchronised pump system. All subjects will undergo two consecutive and identical magnetic resonance imaging measurements. Healthy subjects will not undergo any intervention between measurements but spinal cord injury patients will receive intradetrusor onabotulinumtoxinA injections for treating neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Parameters of the clinical assessment including bladder diary, urinalysis, medical history, neuro-urological examination, urodynamic investigation as well as standardised questionnaires regarding lower urinary tract function and quality of life will serve as co-variates in the magnetic

  3. Plasmofluidic Disk Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min-Suk; Ku, Bonwoo; Kim, Yonghan

    2016-01-01

    Waveguide-coupled silicon ring or disk resonators have been used for optical signal processing and sensing. Large-scale integration of optical devices demands continuous reduction in their footprints, and ultimately they need to be replaced by silicon-based plasmonic resonators. However, few waveguide-coupled silicon-based plasmonic resonators have been realized until now. Moreover, fluid cannot interact effectively with them since their resonance modes are strongly confined in solid regions. To solve this problem, this paper reports realized plasmofluidic disk resonators (PDRs). The PDR consists of a submicrometer radius silicon disk and metal laterally surrounding the disk with a 30-nm-wide channel in between. The channel is filled with fluid, and the resonance mode of the PDR is strongly confined in the fluid. The PDR coupled to a metal-insulator-silicon-insulator-metal waveguide is implemented by using standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. If the refractive index of the fluid increases by 0.141, the transmission spectrum of the waveguide coupled to the PDR of radius 0.9 μm red-shifts by 30 nm. The PDR can be used as a refractive index sensor requiring a very small amount of analyte. Plus, the PDR filled with liquid crystal may be an ultracompact intensity modulator which is effectively controlled by small driving voltage. PMID:26979929

  4. Plasmofluidic Disk Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Min-Suk; Ku, Bonwoo; Kim, Yonghan

    2016-03-01

    Waveguide-coupled silicon ring or disk resonators have been used for optical signal processing and sensing. Large-scale integration of optical devices demands continuous reduction in their footprints, and ultimately they need to be replaced by silicon-based plasmonic resonators. However, few waveguide-coupled silicon-based plasmonic resonators have been realized until now. Moreover, fluid cannot interact effectively with them since their resonance modes are strongly confined in solid regions. To solve this problem, this paper reports realized plasmofluidic disk resonators (PDRs). The PDR consists of a submicrometer radius silicon disk and metal laterally surrounding the disk with a 30-nm-wide channel in between. The channel is filled with fluid, and the resonance mode of the PDR is strongly confined in the fluid. The PDR coupled to a metal-insulator-silicon-insulator-metal waveguide is implemented by using standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. If the refractive index of the fluid increases by 0.141, the transmission spectrum of the waveguide coupled to the PDR of radius 0.9 μm red-shifts by 30 nm. The PDR can be used as a refractive index sensor requiring a very small amount of analyte. Plus, the PDR filled with liquid crystal may be an ultracompact intensity modulator which is effectively controlled by small driving voltage.

  5. Fabrication of a microtoroidal resonator with picometer precise resonant wavelength.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Fei; Lei, Fuchuan; Gao, Ming; Yang, Xu; Qin, Guo-Qing; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-08-01

    Fabricating an optical microresonator with precise resonant wavelength is of significant importance for fundamental research and practical applications. Here, we develop an effective method to fabricate ultra-high Q microtoroid with picometer-precise resonant wavelength. Our method adds a tuning reflow process, using low-power CO2 laser pulses, to the traditional fabrication process. It can tailor resonant wavelength to a red or blue direction by choosing a proper laser power. Also, this shift can be controlled by the exposure time. Meanwhile, quality factor remains nearly unchanged during this tailoring process. Our method can greatly reduce the difficulties of experiments where precise resonances are required. PMID:27472629

  6. A functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation of motor control in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome during imagined and executed movements.

    PubMed

    Zapparoli, Laura; Porta, Mauro; Gandola, Martina; Invernizzi, Paola; Colajanni, Valeria; Servello, Domenico; Zerbi, Alberto; Banfi, Giuseppe; Paulesu, Eraldo

    2016-02-01

    The current study investigated the neural correlates of voluntary motor control in 24 adult Gilles de la Tourette (GTS) patients. We examined whether imagination and the execution of the same voluntary movement - finger oppositions with either hand - were associated with specific patterns of activation. We also explored whether these patterns correlated with the severity of the syndrome, as measured by the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) for motor tics. The presence of brain morphometric abnormalities was also assessed using voxel-based morphometry. Crucial to our experiment was the manipulation of the presence of an explicit motor outflow in the tasks. We anticipated a reduction in the ticking manifestation during the explicit motor task and brain activation differences between GTS patients and 24 age/gender-matched normal controls. The anticipated differences were all evident in the form of hyperactivations in the GTS patients in the premotor and prefrontal areas for both motor tasks for both hands; however, the motor imagery hyperactivations also involved rostral pre-frontal and temporo-parietal regions of the right hemisphere. The blood oxygen level-dependent responses of the premotor cortices during the motor imagery task were significantly correlated with the YGTSS scores. In contrast, no significant brain morphometric differences were found. This study provides evidence of a different neurofunctional organisation of motor control between adult patients with GTS and healthy controls that is independent from the actual execution of motor acts. The presence of an explicit motor outflow in GTS mitigates the manifestation of tics and the need for compensatory brain activity in the brain regions showing task-dependent hyperactivations. PMID:26566185

  7. Electro-mechanical energy conversion system having a permanent magnet machine with stator, resonant transfer link and energy converter controls

    DOEpatents

    Skeist, S. Merrill; Baker, Richard H.

    2006-01-10

    An electro-mechanical energy conversion system coupled between an energy source and an energy load comprising an energy converter device including a permanent magnet induction machine coupled between the energy source and the energy load to convert the energy from the energy source and to transfer the converted energy to the energy load and an energy transfer multiplexer to control the flow of power or energy through the permanent magnetic induction machine.

  8. Tunable Resonant Scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagu, Jean I.

    1987-01-01

    The most attractive features of resonant scanners are high reliability and eternal life as well as extremely low wobble and jitter. Power consumption is also low, electronic drive is simple, and the device is capable of handling large beams. All of these features are delivered at a low cost in a small package. The resonant scanner's use in numerous high precision applications, however, has been limited because of the difficulty in controlling its phase and resonant frequency. This paper introduces the concept of tunable/controllable resonant scanners, discusses their features, and offers a number of tuning techniques. It describes two angular scanner designs and presents data on tunable range and life tests. It also reviews applications for these new tunable resonant scanners that preserve the desirable features of earlier models while removing the old problems with synchronization or time base flexibility. The three major types of raster scanning applications where the tunable resonant scanner may be of benefit are: 1. In systems with multiple time bases such as multiple scanner networks or with scanners keyed to a common clock (the line frequency or data source) or a machine with multiple resonant scanners. A typical application is image and text transmission, also a printer with a large data base where a buffer is uneconomical. 2. In systems sharing data processing or laser equipment for reasons of cost or capacity, typically multiple work station manufacturing processes or graphic processes. 3. In systems with extremely precise time bases where the frequency stability of conventional scanners cannot be relied upon.

  9. Magnetoelectric resonance engine

    SciTech Connect

    Moscrip, W.M.

    1992-09-15

    This patent describes a magnetoelectric resonance thermal machine. It comprises a reciprocating, multiple-piston, Alpha-type Stirling-cycle mechanical assembly; an electronic quadrature phase-lock circuit; an ancillary external energy and mass transfer subsystem; and a master microcomputer control system.

  10. Enhanced control of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex neurophysiology with real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) neurofeedback training and working memory practice.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Matthew S; Kane, Jessica H; Weisend, Michael P; Parker, Jason G

    2016-01-01

    Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) neurofeedback can be used to train localized, conscious regulation of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals. As a therapeutic technique, rt-fMRI neurofeedback reduces the symptoms of a variety of neurologic disorders. To date, few studies have investigated the use of self-regulation training using rt-fMRI neurofeedback to enhance cognitive performance. This work investigates the utility of rt-fMRI neurofeedback as a tool to enhance human cognition by training healthy individuals to consciously control activity in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). A cohort of 18 healthy participants in the experimental group underwent rt-fMRI neurofeedback from the left DLPFC in five training sessions across two weeks while 7 participants in the control group underwent similar training outside the MRI and without rt-fMRI neurofeedback. Working memory (WM) performance was evaluated on two testing days separated by the five rt-fMRI neurofeedback sessions using two computerized tests. We investigated the ability to control the BOLD signal across training sessions and WM performance across the two testing days. The group with rt-fMRI neurofeedback demonstrated a significant increase in the ability to self-regulate the BOLD signal in the left DLPFC across sessions. WM performance showed differential improvement between testing days one and two across the groups with the highest increases observed in the rt-fMRI neurofeedback group. These results provide evidence that individuals can quickly gain the ability to consciously control the left DLPFC, and this training results in improvements of WM performance beyond that of training alone. PMID:26348555

  11. Controlling precise magnetic field configuration around electron cyclotron resonance zone for enhancing plasma parameters and beam current

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Keisuke Kurisu, Yosuke; Nozaki, Dai; Kimura, Daiju; Imai, Youta; Kumakura, Sho; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2014-02-15

    Multi-charged ion source which has wide operating conditions is required in various application fields. We have constructed tandem type ECR ion source (ECRIS); one of the features of its main stage is an additional coil for controlling magnetic field distribution around the mirror bottom precisely. Here the effect of magnetic field variation caused by the additional coil is experimentally considered in terms of plasma parameters and beam current as the first investigation of the main stage plasma. Furthermore, behavior of magnetic lines of force flowing from the ECR zone is calculated, and is compared with measurement results aiming for better understanding of interrelationship between plasma production and ion beam generation on the ECRIS.

  12. All-Optical Control of Nonlinear Self-Focusing in Plasmas Using Non-Resonantly Driven Plasma Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmykov, S. Y.; Shadwick, B. A.; Downer, M. C.

    2010-11-04

    Excitation of plasma density perturbations by an initially bi-color laser pulse helps to control nonlinear refraction in the plasma and enables various types of laser self-guiding. In this report we consider a setup that not only makes possible the transport of laser energy over cm-long relatively dense plasmas (n{sub 0} = 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}) but also transforms the pulse into the unique format inaccessible to the conventional amplification techniques (relativistically intense periodic trains of few-cycle spikes). This well focusable pulse train is a novel light source interesting for ultra-fast high-field science applications. The opposite case of suppression of nonlinear self-focusing and dynamical self-guiding of an over-critical multi-frequency pulse is proposed for the proof-of-principle experimental study.

  13. A sub-Angstrom Sample Scanner for Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM): Contact Mechanics and Controlled Damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Shih-Hui; Dougherty, William; Garbini, Joseph; Sidles, John; MacBeth, Melissa

    2001-03-01

    A 3-D scan head for MRFM faces three challenges: 1) Experiments are conducted under ultrahigh vacuum and cryogenic conditions; 2) The scanner must achieve sub-Angstrom resolution; 3) Interferometric detection requires a stiff, compact mechanism. Our strategy is to use a piezoceramic tube to actuate two modes of positioning: "coarse positioning" to generate large range motion, and "fine positioning" to create high-resolution linear actuation. Inertial stick-slip friction is used for coarse positioning. We have applied contact mechanics to solve for the deflection and friction forces between the slider and piezoceramic actuator. Simulation combining classical contact theory with the reset integrator friction model of Hassig agrees closely with our experiments. The use of feedback control to damp piezoceramic tube oscillation during stick-slip cycles is an innovation in our design. Coarse steps as small as 2 nm are consistently achieved.

  14. Discrete resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivaldi, Franco

    2015-12-01

    The concept of resonance has been instrumental to the study of Hamiltonian systems with divided phase space. One can also define such systems over discrete spaces, which have a finite or countable number of points, but in this new setting the notion of resonance must be re-considered from scratch. I review some recent developments in the area of arithmetic dynamics which outline some salient features of linear and nonlinear stable (elliptic) orbits over a discrete space, and also underline the difficulties that emerge in their analysis.

  15. Discrete resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivaldi, Franco

    The concept of resonance has been instrumental to the study of Hamiltonian systems with divided phase space. One can also define such systems over discrete spaces, which have a finite or countable number of points, but in this new setting the notion of resonance must be re-considered from scratch. I review some recent developments in the area of arithmetic dynamics which outline some salient features of linear and nonlinear stable (elliptic) orbits over a discrete space, and also underline the difficulties that emerge in their analysis.

  16. Laser Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, L. L. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An optical resonator cavity configuration has a unitary mirror with oppositely directed convex and concave reflective surfaces disposed into one fold and concertedly reversing both ends of a beam propagating from a laser rod disposed between two total internal reflection prisms. The optical components are rigidly positioned with perpendicularly crossed virtual rooflines by a compact optical bed. The rooflines of the internal reflection prisms, are arranged perpendicularly to the axis of the laser beam and to the optical axes of the optical resonator components.

  17. Advanced nuclear magnetic resonance lanthanide probe analyses of short-range conformational interrelations controlling ribonucleic acid structures.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, S; Inagaki, F; Miyazawa, T

    1981-05-12

    An advanced method was developed for lanthanide-probe analyses of the conformations of flexible biomolecules such as nucleotides. The new method is to determine structure parameters (such as internal-rotation angles) and population parameters for local conformational equilibria of flexible sites, together with standard deviations of these parameters. As the prominent advantage of this method, the interrelations among local conformations of flexible sites may be quantitatively elucidated from the experimental data of lanthanide-induced shifts and relaxations and vicinal coupling constants. As a structural unit of ribonucleic acids, the molecular conformations and conformational equilibria of uridine 3'-monophosphate in aqueous solution were analyzed. The stable local conformers about the C3'-O3' bond are the G+ (phi' = 281 +/- 11 degrees) and G- (phi' = 211 +/- 8 degrees) forms. The internal rotation about the C3'-O3' bond and the ribose-ring puckering are interrelated; 97 +/- 5% of the C3'-endo ribose ring is associated with the G- form while 70 +/- 22% o the C2'-endo ribose ring is associated with the G+ form. An interdependency also exists between the internal rotation about the C4'-C5' bond and the ribose-ring puckering. These short-range conformational interrelations are probably important in controlling the dynamic aspects of ribonucleic acid structures. PMID:6166319

  18. Right Ventricular Sex Differences in Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Characterised by Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Pair-Matched Case Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Andrew J.; Capener, Dave; Hammerton, Charlotte; Thomas, Steven M.; Elliot, Charlie; Condliffe, Robin; Wild, Jim M.; Kiely, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Sex differences exist in both the prevalence and survival of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). Men are less frequently affected by the condition but have worse outcome as compared to females. We sought to characterise the sex related differences in right ventricular remodelling in age matched male and female patients with IPAH using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods A case controlled pair-matched study was conducted with patients matched by age and sex. Steady state free precession (SSFP) MRI of the heart was performed at 1.5T. Cardiac volume, function and mass measurements were corrected for age, sex and BSA according to reference data. Results 40 age and sex matched patients with IPAH were identified. The mean age was 57 (SD 17) in both male and female cohorts. Men had proportionally lower right ventricular (RV) ejection fraction, RV stroke volume and LV stroke volume than females, p=0.028, p=0.007 and p=0.013, respectively. However, there was no significant difference in RV mass or haemodynamic indices of mPAP and PVR between males and females. Conclusion Male patients with IPAH have proportionally worse RV function despite similar afterload. We hypothesise that adaptive remodelling of the RV in response to increased afterload in IPAH is more effective in females. PMID:25996939

  19. Modulation of Intracellular Quantum Dot to Fluorescent Protein Förster Resonance Energy Transfer via Customized Ligands and Spatial Control of Donor–Acceptor Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Field, Lauren D.; Walper, Scott A.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Oh, Eunkeu; Medintz, Igor L.; Delehanty, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how to controllably modulate the efficiency of energy transfer in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based assemblies is critical to their implementation as sensing modalities. This is particularly true for sensing assemblies that are to be used as the basis for real time intracellular sensing of intracellular processes and events. We use a quantum dot (QD) donor -mCherry acceptor platform that is engineered to self-assemble in situ wherein the protein acceptor is expressed via transient transfection and the QD donor is microinjected into the cell. QD-protein assembly is driven by metal-affinity interactions where a terminal polyhistidine tag on the protein binds to the QD surface. Using this system, we show the ability to modulate the efficiency of the donor–acceptor energy transfer process by controllably altering either the ligand coating on the QD surface or the precise location where the QD-protein assembly process occurs. Intracellularly, a short, zwitterionic ligand mediates more efficient FRET relative to longer ligand species that are based on the solubilizing polymer, poly(ethylene glycol). We further show that a greater FRET efficiency is achieved when the QD-protein assembly occurs free in the cytosol compared to when the mCherry acceptor is expressed tethered to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. In the latter case, the lower FRET efficiency is likely attributable to a lower expression level of the mCherry acceptor at the membrane combined with steric hindrance. Our work points to some of the design considerations that one must be mindful of when developing FRET-based sensing schemes for use in intracellular sensing. PMID:26690153

  20. Modulation of Intracellular Quantum Dot to Fluorescent Protein Förster Resonance Energy Transfer via Customized Ligands and Spatial Control of Donor-Acceptor Assembly.

    PubMed

    Field, Lauren D; Walper, Scott A; Susumu, Kimihiro; Oh, Eunkeu; Medintz, Igor L; Delehanty, James B

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how to controllably modulate the efficiency of energy transfer in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based assemblies is critical to their implementation as sensing modalities. This is particularly true for sensing assemblies that are to be used as the basis for real time intracellular sensing of intracellular processes and events. We use a quantum dot (QD) donor -mCherry acceptor platform that is engineered to self-assemble in situ wherein the protein acceptor is expressed via transient transfection and the QD donor is microinjected into the cell. QD-protein assembly is driven by metal-affinity interactions where a terminal polyhistidine tag on the protein binds to the QD surface. Using this system, we show the ability to modulate the efficiency of the donor-acceptor energy transfer process by controllably altering either the ligand coating on the QD surface or the precise location where the QD-protein assembly process occurs. Intracellularly, a short, zwitterionic ligand mediates more efficient FRET relative to longer ligand species that are based on the solubilizing polymer, poly(ethylene glycol). We further show that a greater FRET efficiency is achieved when the QD-protein assembly occurs free in the cytosol compared to when the mCherry acceptor is expressed tethered to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. In the latter case, the lower FRET efficiency is likely attributable to a lower expression level of the mCherry acceptor at the membrane combined with steric hindrance. Our work points to some of the design considerations that one must be mindful of when developing FRET-based sensing schemes for use in intracellular sensing. PMID:26690153

  1. Apparatus for investigating resonance with application to magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Sytil; Jones, Dyan L.; Gross, Josh; Zollman, Dean

    2015-11-01

    Resonance is typically studied in the context of either a pendulum or a mass on a spring. We have developed an apparatus that enables beginning students to investigate resonant behavior of changing magnetic fields, in addition to the properties of the magnetic field due to a wire and the superposition of magnetic fields. In this resonant system, a compass oscillates at a frequency determined by the compass's physical properties and an external magnetic field. While the analysis is mathematically similar to that of the pendulum, this apparatus has an advantage that the magnetic field is easily controlled, while it is difficult to control the strength of gravity. This apparatus has been incorporated into a teaching module on magnetic resonance imaging.

  2. System and method for regulating resonant inverters

    DOEpatents

    Stevanovic, Ljubisa Dragoljub; Zane, Regan Andrew

    2007-08-28

    A technique is provided for direct digital phase control of resonant inverters based on sensing of one or more parameters of the resonant inverter. The resonant inverter control system includes a switching circuit for applying power signals to the resonant inverter and a sensor for sensing one or more parameters of the resonant inverter. The one or more parameters are representative of a phase angle. The resonant inverter control system also includes a comparator for comparing the one or more parameters to a reference value and a digital controller for determining timing of the one or more parameters and for regulating operation of the switching circuit based upon the timing of the one or more parameters.

  3. Pharmacologic Modulation of Hand Pain in Osteoarthritis: A Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study Using Naproxen

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Duncan; Krause, Kristina; O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan; Thacker, Michael A; Huggins, John P; Vennart, William; Massat, Nathalie J; Choy, Ernest; Williams, Steven C R; Howard, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    Objective In an attempt to shed light on management of chronic pain conditions, there has long been a desire to complement behavioral measures of pain perception with measures of underlying brain mechanisms. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we undertook this study to investigate changes in brain activity following the administration of naproxen or placebo in patients with pain related to osteoarthritis (OA) of the carpometacarpal (CMC) joint. Methods A placebo-controlled, double-blind, 2-period crossover study was performed in 19 individuals with painful OA of the CMC joint of the right hand. Following placebo or naproxen treatment periods, a functionally relevant task was performed, and behavioral measures of the pain experience were collected in identical fMRI examinations. Voxelwise and a priori region of interest analyses were performed to detect between-period differences in brain activity. Results Significant reductions in brain activity following treatment with naproxen, compared to placebo, were observed in brain regions commonly associated with pain perception, including the bilateral primary somatosensory cortex, thalamus, and amygdala. Significant relationships between changes in perceived pain intensity and changes in brain activity were also observed in brain regions previously associated with pain intensity. Conclusion This study demonstrates the sensitivity of fMRI to detect the mechanisms underlying treatments of known efficacy. The data illustrate the enticing potential of fMRI as an adjunct to self-report for detecting early signals of efficacy of novel therapies, both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic, in small numbers of individuals with persistent pain. PMID:25533872

  4. Effects of Coenzyme Q10 on Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Metabolism in Statin Users Assessed Using 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: a Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Buettner, Catherine; Greenman, Robert L.; Ngo, Long H.; Wu, Jim S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Statins partially block the production of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an essential component for mitochondrial function. Reduced skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity has been proposed to be a cause of statin myalgia and can be measured using 31phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS). The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of CoQ10 oral supplementation on mitochondrial function in statin users using 31P-MRS. Design/Setting In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study, 21 adults aged 47–73 were randomized to statin+placebo (n=9) or statin+CoQ10 (n=12). Phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery kinetics of calf muscles were assessed at baseline (off statin and CoQ10) and 4 weeks after randomization to either statin+CoQ10 or statin+placebo. Results Baseline and post-treatment PCr recovery kinetics were assessed for 19 participants. After 4 weeks of statin+ CoQ10 or statin+placebo, the overall relative percentage change (100*(baseline−follow up)/baseline) in PCr recovery time was −15.1% compared with baseline among all participants, (p-value=0.258). Participants randomized to statin+placebo (n=9) had a relative percentage change in PCr recovery time of −18.9%, compared to −7.7% among participants (n=10) receiving statin+CoQ10 (p-value=0.448). Conclusions In this pilot study, there was no significant change in mitochondrial function in patients receiving 4 weeks of statin+CoQ10 oral therapy when compared to patients on statin+placebo. PMID:27610419

  5. Single spin magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  6. Single spin magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution. PMID:27378060

  7. If It's Resonance, What is Resonating?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon under the name "resonance," which, is based on the mathematical analogy between mechanical resonance and the behavior of wave functions in quantum mechanical exchange phenomena was described. The resonating system does not have a structure intermediate between those involved in the resonance, but instead a structure which is further…

  8. Anti-resonance mixing filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Paul S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    In a closed loop control system that governs the movement of an actuator a filter is provided that attenuates the oscillations generated by the actuator when the actuator is at a resonant frequency. The filter is preferably coded into the control system and includes the following steps. Sensing the position of the actuator with an LVDT and sensing the motor position where motor drives the actuator through a gear train. When the actuator is at a resonant frequency, a lag is applied to the LVDT signal and then combined with the motor position signal to form a combined signal in which the oscillation generated by the actuator are attenuated. The control system then controls ion this combined signal. This arrangement prevents the amplified resonance present on the LVDT signal, from causing control instability, while retaining the steady state accuracy associated with the LVDT signal. It is also a characteristic of this arrangement that the signal attenuation will always coincide with the load resonance frequency of the system so that variations in the resonance frequency will not effectuate the effectiveness of the filter.

  9. Using a hybrid system (Cooper pair box plus nanomechanical resonator) in the presence of Kerr nonlinearities and losses to control the entropy of the subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde, C.; Castro, A. N.; Baseia, B.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the Jaynes-Cummings model to describe the interaction of a Cooper pair box and a nanomechanical resonator in the presence of a Kerr medium and losses. The evolution of the entropy of both subsystems and the Cooper pair box population inversion were calculated numerically. It was found that population inversion and entropy increase when the frequency of the nanoresonator is time-dependent, even in the presence of losses; the effect is very sensitive to detuning and disappears in resonant regime. We also compare effects of the losses on each subsystem.

  10. Large enhancement of fluorescence efficiency from CdSe/ZnS quantum dots induced by resonant coupling to spatially controlled surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Song, Jung-Hoon; Atay, Tolga; Shi, Sufei; Urabe, Hayato; Nurmikko, Arto V

    2005-08-01

    Nanoengineered fluorescent response is reported from semiconductor core-shell (CdSe/ZnS) quantum dots in proximity to the surface plasmon polariton field of periodic Ag nanoparticle arrays. Tuning the surface plasmon polariton resonance to the quantum dot exciton emission band results in an enhancement of up to approximately 50-fold in the overall fluorescence efficiency, in a design where each Ag nanoparticle is interconnected by a continuous Ag thin film. Propagating modes of surface plasmon resonances have a direct impact on the fluorescence enhancement. PMID:16089488

  11. International Frequency Control Symposium. Proceedings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The following topics are dealt with: sensors; atomic clocks; space applications; GPS; stability; synchronisation; time keeping; BAW resonators; SAW resonators; STW; frequency control; oscillators; and aging.

  12. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    DOEpatents

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  13. Tunable Fano resonance in a single-ring-resonator-based add/drop interferometer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kaiyang; Liu, Xiaoqi; Yu, Changqiu; Zhang, Yundong

    2013-07-10

    We theoretically study a single-ring-resonator-based add/drop interferometer to achieve tunable Fano resonance. The Fano resonance results from the interference of two resonant beams propagating in the ring resonator. The line shapes of the Fano resonance are tunable by controlling the coupling coefficients between the waveguide and ring resonator. The spectra of the drop port and through port of the add/drop interferometer are horizontally mirror-symmetric. A box-like spectral response can be produced with the proper coupling coefficient owing to the double resonances. When the phase difference between the two light inputs to the add/drop interferometer is compensated, a doubled free spectral range can be obtained. PMID:23852203

  14. Josephson Junctions Help Measure Resonance And Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javadi, Hamid H. S.; Mcgrath, William R.; Bumble, Bruce; Leduc, Henry G.

    1994-01-01

    Electrical characteristics of superconducting microstrip transmission lines measured at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. Submicron Josephson (super-conductor/insulator/superconductor) junctions used as both voltage-controlled oscillators and detectors to measure frequencies (in range of hundreds of gigahertz) of high-order resonant electromagnetic modes of superconducting microstrip transmission-line resonators. This oscillator/detector approach similar to vacuum-tube grid dip meters and transistor dip meters used to probe resonances at much lower frequencies.

  15. Resonance test system

    DOEpatents

    Musial, Walter; White, Darris

    2011-05-31

    An apparatus (10) for applying at least one load to a specimen (12) according to one embodiment of the invention may comprise a mass (18). An actuator (20) mounted to the specimen (12) and operatively associated with the mass (18) moves the mass (18) along a linear displacement path (22) that is perpendicular to a longitudinal axis of the specimen (12). A control system (26) operatively associated with the actuator (20) operates the actuator (20) to reciprocate the mass (18) along the linear displacement path (22) at a reciprocating frequency, the reciprocating frequency being about equal to a resonance frequency of the specimen (12) in a test configuration.

  16. Attosecond transient absorption in dense gases: Exploring the interplay between resonant pulse propagation and laser-induced line-shape control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chen-Ting; Sandhu, Arvinder; Camp, Seth; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Gaarde, Mette B.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the evolution of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral line shapes in an optically thick helium gas under near-infrared (IR) perturbation. In our experimental and theoretical work, we systematically vary the IR intensity, time-delay, gas density, and IR polarization parameters to study line-shape modifications induced by collective interactions in a regime beyond the single-atom response of a thin, dilute gas. In both experiment and theory, we find that specific features in the frequency-domain absorption profile, and their evolution with propagation distance, can be attributed to the interplay between resonant attosecond pulse propagation and IR-induced phase shifts. Our calculations show that this interplay also manifests itself in the time domain, with the IR pulse influencing the reshaping of the XUV pulse propagating in the resonant medium.

  17. Giant electric field control of magnetism and narrow ferromagnetic resonance linewidth in FeCoSiB/Si/SiO2/PMN-PT multiferroic heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Wang, X.; Xie, L.; Hu, Z.; Lin, H.; Zhou, Z.; Nan, T.; Yang, X.; Howe, B. M.; Jones, J. G.; Brown, G. J.; Sun, N. X.

    2016-06-01

    It has been challenging to achieve combined strong magnetoelectric coupling and narrow ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) linewidth in multiferroic heterostructures. Electric field induced large effective field of 175 Oe and narrow FMR linewidth of 40 Oe were observed in FeCoSiB/Si/SiO2/PMN-PT heterostructures with substrate clamping effect minimized through removing the Si substrate. As a comparison, FeCoSiB/PMN-PT heterostructures with FeCoSiB film directly deposited on PMN-PT showed a comparable voltage induced effective magnetic field but a significantly larger FMR linewidth of 283 Oe. These multiferroic heterostructures exhibiting combined giant magnetoelectric coupling and narrow ferromagnetic resonance linewidth offer great opportunities for integrated voltage tunable RF magnetic devices.

  18. Whispering gallery mode resonators based on radiation-sensitive materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor); Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor); Handley, Timothy A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonators formed of radiation-sensitive materials to allow for permanent tuning of their resonance frequencies in a controlled manner. Two WGM resonators may be cascaded to form a composite filter to produce a second order filter function where at least one WGM resonator is formed a radiation-sensitive material to allow for proper control in the overlap of the two filter functions.

  19. Micro-machined resonator oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, D.R.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Bivens, H.M.; Wessendorf, K.O.

    1994-08-16

    A micro-miniature resonator-oscillator is disclosed. Due to the miniaturization of the resonator-oscillator, oscillation frequencies of one MHz and higher are utilized. A thickness-mode quartz resonator housed in a micro-machined silicon package and operated as a telemetered sensor beacon'' that is, a digital, self-powered, remote, parameter measuring-transmitter in the FM-band. The resonator design uses trapped energy principles and temperature dependence methodology through crystal orientation control, with operation in the 20--100 MHz range. High volume batch-processing manufacturing is utilized, with package and resonator assembly at the wafer level. Unique design features include squeeze-film damping for robust vibration and shock performance, capacitive coupling through micro-machined diaphragms allowing resonator excitation at the package exterior, circuit integration and extremely small (0.1 in. square) dimensioning. A family of micro-miniature sensor beacons is also disclosed with widespread applications as bio-medical sensors, vehicle status monitors and high-volume animal identification and health sensors. The sensor family allows measurement of temperatures, chemicals, acceleration and pressure. A microphone and clock realization is also available. 21 figs.

  20. Micro-machined resonator oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; Bivens, Hugh M.; Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    1994-01-01

    A micro-miniature resonator-oscillator is disclosed. Due to the miniaturization of the resonator-oscillator, oscillation frequencies of one MHz and higher are utilized. A thickness-mode quartz resonator housed in a micro-machined silicon package and operated as a "telemetered sensor beacon" that is, a digital, self-powered, remote, parameter measuring-transmitter in the FM-band. The resonator design uses trapped energy principles and temperature dependence methodology through crystal orientation control, with operation in the 20-100 MHz range. High volume batch-processing manufacturing is utilized, with package and resonator assembly at the wafer level. Unique design features include squeeze-film damping for robust vibration and shock performance, capacitive coupling through micro-machined diaphragms allowing resonator excitation at the package exterior, circuit integration and extremely small (0.1 in. square) dimensioning. A family of micro-miniature sensor beacons is also disclosed with widespread applications as bio-medical sensors, vehicle status monitors and high-volume animal identification and health sensors. The sensor family allows measurement of temperatures, chemicals, acceleration and pressure. A microphone and clock realization is also available.

  1. Cascaded resonant bridge converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, Thomas A. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A converter for converting a low voltage direct current power source to a higher voltage, high frequency alternating current output for use in an electrical system where it is desired to use low weight cables and other circuit elements. The converter has a first stage series resonant (Schwarz) converter which converts the direct current power source to an alternating current by means of switching elements that are operated by a variable frequency voltage regulator, a transformer to step up the voltage of the alternating current, and a rectifier bridge to convert the alternating current to a direct current first stage output. The converter further has a second stage series resonant (Schwarz) converter which is connected in series to the first stage converter to receive its direct current output and convert it to a second stage high frequency alternating current output by means of switching elements that are operated by a fixed frequency oscillator. The voltage of the second stage output is controlled at a relatively constant value by controlling the first stage output voltage, which is accomplished by controlling the frequency of the first stage variable frequency voltage controller in response to second stage voltage. Fault tolerance in the event of a load short circuit is provided by making the operation of the first stage variable frequency voltage controller responsive to first and second stage current limiting devices. The second stage output is connected to a rectifier bridge whose output is connected to the input of the second stage to provide good regulation of output voltage wave form at low system loads.

  2. Reliable and integrated technique for determining resonant frequency in radio frequency resonators. Application to a high-precision resonant cavity-based displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauregui, Rigoberto; Asua, Estibaliz; Portilla, Joaquin; Etxebarria, Victor

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a reliable and integrated technique for determining the resonant frequency of radio frequency resonators, which can be of interest for different purposes. The approach uses a heterodyne scheme as phase detector coupled to a voltage-controlled oscillator. The system seeks the oscillator frequency that produces a phase null in the resonator, which corresponds to the resonant frequency. A complete explanation of the technique to determine the resonant frequency is presented and experimentally tested. The method has been applied to a high-precision displacement sensor based on resonant cavity, obtaining a theoretical nanometric precision.

  3. Cavity- and waveguide-resonators in electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Webb, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Cavity resonators are widely used in electron paramagnetic resonance, very high field magnetic resonance microimaging and also in high field human imaging. The basic principles and designs of different forms of cavity resonators including rectangular, cylindrical, re-entrant, cavity magnetrons, toroidal cavities and dielectric resonators are reviewed. Applications in EPR and MRI are summarized, and finally the topic of traveling wave MRI using the magnet bore as a waveguide is discussed. PMID:25456314

  4. A multimode electromechanical parametric resonator array

    PubMed Central

    Mahboob, I.; Mounaix, M.; Nishiguchi, K.; Fujiwara, A.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2014-01-01

    Electromechanical resonators have emerged as a versatile platform in which detectors with unprecedented sensitivities and quantum mechanics in a macroscopic context can be developed. These schemes invariably utilise a single resonator but increasingly the concept of an array of electromechanical resonators is promising a wealth of new possibilities. In spite of this, experimental realisations of such arrays have remained scarce due to the formidable challenges involved in their fabrication. In a variation to this approach, we identify 75 harmonic vibration modes in a single electromechanical resonator of which 7 can also be parametrically excited. The parametrically resonating modes exhibit vibrations with only 2 oscillation phases which are used to build a binary information array. We exploit this array to execute a mechanical byte memory, a shift-register and a controlled-NOT gate thus vividly illustrating the availability and functionality of an electromechanical resonator array by simply utilising higher order vibration modes. PMID:24658349

  5. Tuning Concept for Resonant Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sydnor, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Deviations from resonance detected by sampling phases. Automatic tuner feedback control system derives error signal from E and H plane probe signals. Control objective to maintain phase difference between E and H at 90 degrees. Technique estimated to sensitive to fractional frequency deviation of about 5 X 10-16 and applicable not only to masers but also other microwave elements, including klystrons, general purpose oscillators, and frequency standards.

  6. Magnetic resonance of slotted circular cylinder resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Junjie; Liu, Shiyang; Lin, Zhifang; Chui, S. T.

    2008-07-01

    By a rigorous full-wave approach, a systemic study is made on the magnetic resonance of slotted circular cylinder resonators (SCCRs) made of a perfect conductor for the lossless case. This is a two-dimensional analog of the split-ring resonator and may serve as an alternative type of essential constituent of electromagnetic metamaterials. It is found that the resonance frequency can be modulated by changing the geometrical parameters and the dielectrics filling in the cavity and the slot. An approximate empirical expression is presented for magnetic resonance frequency of SCCRs from the viewpoint of an L-C circuit system. Finally, it is demonstrated that the SCCR structure can be miniaturized to less than 1/150 resonant wavelength in size with the dielectrics available currently.

  7. Fabrication of Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor Surface with Control of the Non-Specific Adsorption and Affinity for the Detection of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene Using an Antifouling Copolymer

    PubMed Central

    Yatabe, Rui; Onodera, Takeshi; Toko, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    We fabricated a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor using a hydrophilic polymer for the highly sensitive detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). The hydrophilic polymer was made from mono-2-(methacryloyloxy)ethylsuccinate (MES) and 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. The detection of TNT was carried out by displacement assay with the SPR measurement. In displacement assay, the affinity between anti-TNT antibody and the sensor surface, affects to the sensitivity. In the SPR measurement, non-specific adsorption should be controlled because SPR sensor cannot discriminate between specific and non-specific adsorption. Therefore, the affinity and non-specific adsorption were controlled by changing the ratio of HEMA to MES. A detection limit of 0.4 ng/ml (ppb) for TNT was achieved using a sensor surface with the lowest affinity without non-specific adsorption. PMID:25152884

  8. Viscoelastic coupling of nanoelectromechanical resonators.

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, Robert Joseph; Staton, Alan W.

    2009-09-01

    This report summarizes work to date on a new collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) to utilize nanoelectromechanical resonators designed at Caltech as platforms to measure the mechanical properties of polymeric materials at length scales on the order of 10-50 nm. Caltech has succeeded in reproducibly building cantilever resonators having major dimensions on the order of 2-5 microns. These devices are fabricated in pairs, with free ends separated by reproducible gaps having dimensions on the order of 10-50 nm. By controlled placement of materials that bridge the very small gap between resonators, the mechanical devices become coupled through the test material, and the transmission of energy between the devices can be monitored. This should allow for measurements of viscoelastic properties of polymeric materials at high frequency over short distances. Our work to date has been directed toward establishing this measurement capability at Sandia.

  9. Hadronic resonances enhanced by thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramés, T. F.; Valcarce, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a neat example of a meson-baryon system where the vicinity of two different thresholds enhances the binding of a hadronic resonance, a pentaquark. As a consequence the pattern of states may change when moving among different flavor sectors, what poses a warning on naive extrapolations to heavy flavor sectors based on systematic expansions. For this purpose we simultaneously analyze the N D bar and NB two-hadron systems looking for possible bound states or resonances. When a resonance is controlled by a coupled-channel effect, going to a different flavor sector may enhance or diminish the binding. This effect may, for example, generate significant differences between the charmonium and bottomonium spectra above open-flavor thresholds or pentaquark states in the open-charm and open-bottom sectors.

  10. A mechanical memory with a dc modulation of nonlinear resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Hyunho; Shim, Seung-Bo; Jung, Minkyung; Khim, Zheong G.; Kim, Jinhee

    2010-07-01

    We present a mechanical memory device based on dynamic motion of a nanoelectromechanical (NEM) resonator. The NEM resonator exhibits clear nonlinear resonance characteristics which can be controlled by the dc bias voltage. For memory operations, the NEM resonator is driven to the nonlinear resonance region, and binary values are assigned to the two allowed states on the bifurcation branch. The transition between memory states is achieved by modulating the nonlinear resonance characteristics with dc bias voltage. Our device works at room temperature and modest vacuum conditions with a maximum operation frequency of about 5 kHz.

  11. Integral resonator gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shcheglov, Kirill V. (Inventor); Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Hayworth, Ken J. (Inventor); Wiberg, Dean V. (Inventor); Yee, Karl Y. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention discloses an inertial sensor having an integral resonator. A typical sensor comprises a planar mechanical resonator for sensing motion of the inertial sensor and a case for housing the resonator. The resonator and a wall of the case are defined through an etching process. A typical method of producing the resonator includes etching a baseplate, bonding a wafer to the etched baseplate, through etching the wafer to form a planar mechanical resonator and the wall of the case and bonding an end cap wafer to the wall to complete the case.

  12. Poles as the only true resonant-state signals extracted from a worldwide collection of partial-wave amplitudes using only one, well controlled pole-extraction method

    SciTech Connect

    Hadzimehmedovic, M.; Osmanovic, H.; Stahov, J.; Ceci, S.; Svarc, A.

    2011-09-15

    Each and every energy-dependent partial-wave analysis is parametrizing the pole positions in a procedure defined by the way the continuous energy dependence is implemented. These pole positions are, henceforth, inherently model dependent. To reduce this model dependence, we use only one, coupled-channel, unitary, fully analytic method based on the isobar approximation to extract the pole positions from each available member of the worldwide collection of partial-wave amplitudes, which are understood as nothing more but a good energy-dependent representation of genuine experimental numbers assembled in a form of partial-wave data. In that way, the model dependence related to the different assumptions on the analytic form of the partial-wave amplitudes is avoided, and the true confidence limit for the existence of a particular resonant state, at least in one model, is established. The way the method works and first results are demonstrated for the S{sub 11} partial wave.

  13. Tunable superconducting microstrip resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamyan, A. A.; Kubatkin, S. E.; Danilov, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    We report on a simple yet versatile design for a tunable superconducting microstrip resonator. Niobium nitride is employed as the superconducting material and aluminum oxide, produced by atomic layer deposition, as the dielectric layer. We show that the high quality of the dielectric material allows to reach the internal quality factors in the order of Qi˜104 in the single photon regime. Qi rapidly increases with the number of photons in the resonator N and exceeds 105 for N ˜10 -50 . A straightforward modification of the basic microstrip design allows to pass a current bias through the strip and to control its kinetic inductance. We achieve a frequency tuning δf =62 MHz around f0=2.4 GHz for a fundamental mode and δf =164 MHz for a third harmonic. This translates into a tuning parameter Qiδf /f0=150 . The presented design can be incorporated into essentially any superconducting circuitry operating at temperatures below 2.5 K.

  14. A mirrorless spinwave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinel, Olivier; Everett, Jesse L.; Hosseini, Mahdi; Campbell, Geoff T.; Buchler, Ben C.; Lam, Ping Koy

    2015-12-01

    Optical resonance is central to a wide range of optical devices and techniques. In an optical cavity, the round-trip length and mirror reflectivity can be chosen to optimize the circulating optical power, linewidth, and free-spectral range (FSR) for a given application. In this paper we show how an atomic spinwave system, with no physical mirrors, can behave in a manner that is analogous to an optical cavity. We demonstrate this similarity by characterising the build-up and decay of the resonance in the time domain, and measuring the effective optical linewidth and FSR in the frequency domain. Our spinwave is generated in a 20 cm long Rb gas cell, yet it facilitates an effective FSR of 83 kHz, which would require a round-trip path of 3.6 km in a free-space optical cavity. Furthermore, the spinwave coupling is controllable enabling dynamic tuning of the effective cavity parameters.

  15. A mirrorless spinwave resonator

    PubMed Central

    Pinel, Olivier; Everett, Jesse L.; Hosseini, Mahdi; Campbell, Geoff T.; Buchler, Ben C.; Lam, Ping Koy

    2015-01-01

    Optical resonance is central to a wide range of optical devices and techniques. In an optical cavity, the round-trip length and mirror reflectivity can be chosen to optimize the circulating optical power, linewidth, and free-spectral range (FSR) for a given application. In this paper we show how an atomic spinwave system, with no physical mirrors, can behave in a manner that is analogous to an optical cavity. We demonstrate this similarity by characterising the build-up and decay of the resonance in the time domain, and measuring the effective optical linewidth and FSR in the frequency domain. Our spinwave is generated in a 20 cm long Rb gas cell, yet it facilitates an effective FSR of 83 kHz, which would require a round-trip path of 3.6 km in a free-space optical cavity. Furthermore, the spinwave coupling is controllable enabling dynamic tuning of the effective cavity parameters. PMID:26655839

  16. Tunable Magnetic Resonance via Interlayer Exchange Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Wilson, Jeffrey; Simons, Rainee; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John

    Magnetic resonance is a critical property of magnetic materials for the applications in microwave devices and novel spintronics devices. The resonance frequency is commonly controlled with an external magnetic field generated by an energy-inefficient and bulky electromagnet. The search for tuning the resonance frequency without electromagnets has attracted tremendous attention. The voltage control of resonance frequency has been demonstrated in multiferroic heterostructures through magnetoelastic effect. However, the frequency tunable range is limited. We propose a paradigm to tune the magnetic resonance frequency by recognizing the huge interlayer exchange field and the existence of the high-frequency modes in coupled oscillators. We demonstrate the optical mode in exchange coupled magnetic layers which occurred at much higher frequencies than coherent ferromagnetic resonance. We further demonstrated a large resonance frequency tunable range from 11GHz to 21 GHz in a spin valve device by in-situ manipulating of the exchange interaction. The technique developed here is far more efficient than the conventional methods of using electromagnets and multiferroics. This new scheme will have an immediate impact on applications based on magnetic resonance.

  17. Neutron resonance averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    The principles of resonance averaging as applied to neutron capture reactions are described. Several illustrations of resonance averaging to problems of nuclear structure and the distribution of radiative strength in nuclei are provided. 30 refs., 12 figs.

  18. Nanomechanical resonance detector

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Jeffrey C; Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-10-29

    An embodiment of a nanomechanical frequency detector includes a support structure and a plurality of elongated nanostructures coupled to the support structure. Each of the elongated nanostructures has a particular resonant frequency. The plurality of elongated nanostructures has a range of resonant frequencies. An embodiment of a method of identifying an object includes introducing the object to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the object. An embodiment of a method of identifying a molecular species of the present invention includes introducing the molecular species to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the molecular species.

  19. Investigations on an all-tunable fiber ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, K.; Fernandez, A.; Llopis, O.

    2016-01-01

    The architecture of an all-tunable optical fiber ring resonator is described in detail in this paper. This architecture has been firstly modeled using an original CAD approach. The simulation results demonstrate a total control of both the absolute frequency and the free spectral range of the final optical resonance comb generated by the optical resonator. The different experimental setups used to characterize the tunable resonator are described and the obtained results proving the concept are also provided.

  20. An Inexpensive Resonance Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dukes, Phillip

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenon of resonance is applicable to almost every branch of physics. Without resonance, there wouldn't be televisions or stereos, or even swings on the playground. However, resonance also has undesirable side effects such as irritating noises in the car and the catastrophic events such as helicopters flying apart. In this article, the…

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Teens > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A Text Size What's ... Exam Safety Getting Your Results What Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of safe, painless testing ...

  2. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew, E. R.

    2009-06-01

    Author's preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Basic theory; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Measurement of nuclear properties and general physical applications; 5. Nuclear magnetic resonance in liquids and gases; 6. Nuclear magnetic resonance in non-metallic solids; 7. Nuclear magnetic resonance in metals; 8. Quadrupole effects; Appendices 1-6; Glossary of symbols; Bibliography and author index; Subject index.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging-radioguided occult lesion localization (ROLL) in breast cancer using Tc-99m macro-aggregated albumin and distilled water control

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided wire localization presents several challenges apart from the technical difficulties. An alternative to this conventional localization method using a wire is the radio-guided occult lesion localization (ROLL), more related to safe surgical margins and reductions in excision volume. The purpose of this study was to establish a safe and reliable magnetic resonance imaging-radioguided occult lesion localization (MRI-ROLL) technique and to report our initial experience with the localization of nonpalpable breast lesions only observed on MRI. Methods Sixteen women (mean age 53.2 years) with 17 occult breast lesions underwent radio-guided localization in a 1.5-T MR system using a grid-localizing system. All patients had a diagnostic MRI performed prior to the procedure. An intralesional injection of Technetium-99m macro-aggregated albumin followed by distilled water was performed. After the procedure, scintigraphy was obtained. Surgical resection was performed with the help of a gamma detector probe. The lesion histopathology and imaging concordance; the procedure’s positive predictive value (PPV), duration time, complications, and accuracy; and the rate of exactly excised lesions evaluated with MRI six months after the surgery were assessed. Results One lesion in one patient had to be excluded because the radioactive substance came back after the injection, requiring a wire placement. Of the remaining cases, there were four malignant lesions, nine benign lesions, and three high-risk lesions. Surgical histopathology and imaging findings were considered concordant in all benign and high-risk cases. The PPV of MRI-ROLL was greater if the indication for the initial MR examination was active breast cancer. The median procedure duration time was 26 minutes, and all included procedures were defined as accurate. The exact and complete lesion removal was confirmed in all (100%) patients who underwent six-month postoperative MRI

  4. Magnetic Resonance in an Atomic Vapor Excited by a Mechanical Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying-Ju; Eardley, Matthew; Knappe, Svenja; Moreland, John; Hollberg, Leo; Kitching, John

    2006-12-01

    We demonstrate a direct resonant interaction between the mechanical motion of a mesoscopic resonator and the spin degrees of freedom of a sample of neutral atoms in the gas phase. This coupling, mediated by a magnetic particle attached to the tip of the miniature mechanical resonator, excites a coherent precession of the atomic spins about a static magnetic field. The novel coupled atom-resonator system may enable development of low-power, high-performance sensors, and enhance research efforts connected with the manipulation of cold atoms, quantum control, and high-resolution microscopy.

  5. Computational modeling of distinct neocortical oscillations driven by cell-type selective optogenetic drive: separable resonant circuits controlled by low-threshold spiking and fast-spiking interneurons.

    PubMed

    Vierling-Claassen, Dorea; Cardin, Jessica A; Moore, Christopher I; Jones, Stephanie R

    2010-01-01

    Selective optogenetic drive of fast-spiking (FS) interneurons (INs) leads to enhanced local field potential (LFP) power across the traditional "gamma" frequency band (20-80 Hz; Cardin et al., 2009). In contrast, drive to regular-spiking (RS) pyramidal cells enhances power at lower frequencies, with a peak at 8 Hz. The first result is consistent with previous computational studies emphasizing the role of FS and the time constant of GABA(A) synaptic inhibition in gamma rhythmicity. However, the same theoretical models do not typically predict low-frequency LFP enhancement with RS drive. To develop hypotheses as to how the same network can support these contrasting behaviors, we constructed a biophysically principled network model of primary somatosensory neocortex containing FS, RS, and low-threshold spiking (LTS) INs. Cells were modeled with detailed cell anatomy and physiology, multiple dendritic compartments, and included active somatic and dendritic ionic currents. Consistent with prior studies, the model demonstrated gamma resonance during FS drive, dependent on the time constant of GABA(A) inhibition induced by synchronous FS activity. Lower-frequency enhancement during RS drive was replicated only on inclusion of an inhibitory LTS population, whose activation was critically dependent on RS synchrony and evoked longer-lasting inhibition. Our results predict that differential recruitment of FS and LTS inhibitory populations is essential to the observed cortical dynamics and may provide a means for amplifying the natural expression of distinct oscillations in normal cortical processing. PMID:21152338

  6. Computational Modeling of Distinct Neocortical Oscillations Driven by Cell-Type Selective Optogenetic Drive: Separable Resonant Circuits Controlled by Low-Threshold Spiking and Fast-Spiking Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Vierling-Claassen, Dorea; Cardin, Jessica A.; Moore, Christopher I.; Jones, Stephanie R.

    2010-01-01

    Selective optogenetic drive of fast-spiking (FS) interneurons (INs) leads to enhanced local field potential (LFP) power across the traditional “gamma” frequency band (20–80 Hz; Cardin et al., 2009). In contrast, drive to regular-spiking (RS) pyramidal cells enhances power at lower frequencies, with a peak at 8 Hz. The first result is consistent with previous computational studies emphasizing the role of FS and the time constant of GABAA synaptic inhibition in gamma rhythmicity. However, the same theoretical models do not typically predict low-frequency LFP enhancement with RS drive. To develop hypotheses as to how the same network can support these contrasting behaviors, we constructed a biophysically principled network model of primary somatosensory neocortex containing FS, RS, and low-threshold spiking (LTS) INs. Cells were modeled with detailed cell anatomy and physiology, multiple dendritic compartments, and included active somatic and dendritic ionic currents. Consistent with prior studies, the model demonstrated gamma resonance during FS drive, dependent on the time constant of GABAA inhibition induced by synchronous FS activity. Lower-frequency enhancement during RS drive was replicated only on inclusion of an inhibitory LTS population, whose activation was critically dependent on RS synchrony and evoked longer-lasting inhibition. Our results predict that differential recruitment of FS and LTS inhibitory populations is essential to the observed cortical dynamics and may provide a means for amplifying the natural expression of distinct oscillations in normal cortical processing. PMID:21152338

  7. Ovenized microelectromechanical system (MEMS) resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, Roy H; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kim, Bongsang

    2014-03-11

    An ovenized micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) resonator including: a substantially thermally isolated mechanical resonator cavity; a mechanical oscillator coupled to the mechanical resonator cavity; and a heating element formed on the mechanical resonator cavity.

  8. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yungsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe-based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  9. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  10. Microwave raytracing in large overmoded industrial resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Feher, L.; Link, G.; Thumm, M.

    1995-12-31

    High power millimeter waves are important for industrial processing of dielectric materials. Uniform and homogeneous electromagnetic field distributions within the resonators are desired for controllable production rates. Precise knowledge of the stationary field deposition is therefore essential for microwave oven design and application. The industrial resonators that we are interested in here, make great demands for computer simulation in memory allocation and computational speed, because of the resonator`s dimensions ({approximately} m) compared to the small microwave wavelength ({approximately} mm). This is particularly important in three dimensions, which leads to computationally intensive numerical optimizations using standard schemes for solving Maxwell`s equations, such as Finite Difference-, Finite Element methods etc. Optical approaches promise a much more flexible engineering support for designing and optimizing resonator conditions even on smaller workstations. Investigations and results based on a generalization of Fermat`s principle for wave propagation will be presented and compared to measurements performed on a 30 GHz gyrotron installation.

  11. Resonance self-shielding methodology in MPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Collins, B.; Kochunas, B.; Martin, W.; Kim, K. S.; Williams, M.

    2013-07-01

    The resonance self-shielding methods of the neutron transport code Michigan Parallel Characteristics based Transport (MPACT) are described in this paper. Two resonance-integral table based methods are utilized to resolve the resonance self-shielding effect. The subgroup method is a mature approach used in MPACT as the basic functionality for the resonance calculation. Another new iterative method, named the embedded self-shielding method is also implemented in MPACT. Comparisons of the two methods as well as their numerical verifications are presented. The results show that MPACT is capable of modeling the resonance self-shielding in a variety of PWR benchmarking cases, including difficult fuel lattice cases with poison, control rods or mixed gadolinia fuel rods. (authors)

  12. Resonance-spacing tuning over whole free spectral range in a single microring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ge; Yuan, Shuai; Li, Danping; Xia, Jinsong

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present a single microring resonator structure formed by incorporating a reflectivity-tunable loop mirror for the tuning of resonance spacing. Based on the optical mode-splitting in the resonator structure, spacing between two adjacent resonances can be tuned from zero to one whole free spectral range (FSR) by controlling the coupling strength between the two counter-propagating degenerate modes in the microring resonator. In experiment, by integrating metallic microheater, the resonance-spacing tuning over the whole FSR (1.17 nm) is achieved within 9.82 mW heating power dissipation. The device is expected to have potential applications in reconfigurable optical filtering and microwave photonics.

  13. Optical Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Paul; Bouchon, Patrick; Haïdar, Riad; Pardo, Fabrice

    2014-08-01

    Helmholtz resonators are widely used acoustic components able to select a single frequency. Here, based on an analogy between acoustics and electromagnetism wave equations, we present an electromagnetic 2D Helmholtz resonator made of a metallic slit-box structure. At the resonance, the light is funneled in the λ/800 apertures, and is subsequently absorbed in the cavity. As in acoustics, there is no higher order of resonance, which is an appealing feature for applications such as photodetection or thermal emission. Eventually, we demonstrate that the slit is of capacitive nature while the box behaves inductively. We derive an analytical formula for the resonance wavelength, which does not rely on wave propagation and therefore does not depend on the permittivity of the material filling the box. Besides, in contrast with half-wavelength resonators, the resonance wavelength can be engineered by both the slit aspect ratio and the box area.

  14. Magnetic resonance energy and topological resonance energy.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Jun-Ichi

    2016-04-28

    Ring-current diamagnetism of a polycyclic π-system is closely associated with thermodynamic stability due to the individual circuits. Magnetic resonance energy (MRE), derived from the ring-current diamagnetic susceptibility, was explored in conjunction with graph-theoretically defined topological resonance energy (TRE). For many aromatic molecules, MRE is highly correlative with TRE with a correlation coefficient of 0.996. For all π-systems studied, MRE has the same sign as TRE. The only trouble with MRE may be that some antiaromatic and non-alternant species exhibit unusually large MRE-to-TRE ratios. This kind of difficulty can in principle be overcome by prior geometry-optimisation or by changing spin multiplicity. Apart from the semi-empirical resonance-theory resonance energy, MRE is considered as the first aromatic stabilisation energy (ASE) defined without referring to any hypothetical polyene reference. PMID:26878709

  15. Resonance splitting in gyrotropic ring resonators.

    PubMed

    Jalas, Dirk; Petrov, Alexander; Krause, Michael; Hampe, Jan; Eich, Manfred

    2010-10-15

    We present the theoretical concept of an optical isolator based on resonance splitting in a silicon ring resonator covered with a magneto-optical polymer cladding. For this task, a perturbation method is derived for the modes in the cylindrical coordinate system. A polymer magneto-optical cladding causing a 0.01 amplitude of the off-diagonal element of the dielectric tensor is assumed. It is shown that the derived resonance splitting of the clockwise and counterclockwise modes increases for smaller ring radii. For the ring with a radius of approximately 1.5μm, a 29GHz splitting is demonstrated. An integrated optical isolator with a 10μm geometrical footprint is proposed based on a critically coupled ring resonator. PMID:20967092

  16. Electric-optic resonant phase modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chien-Chung (Inventor); Robinson, Deborah L. (Inventor); Hemmati, Hamid (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An electro-optic resonant cavity is used to achieve phase modulation with lower driving voltages. Laser damage thresholds are inherently higher than with previously used integrated optics due to the utilization of bulk optics. Phase modulation is achieved at higher speeds with lower driving voltages than previously obtained with non-resonant electro-optic phase modulators. The instant scheme uses a data locking dither approach as opposed to the conventional sinusoidal locking schemes. In accordance with a disclosed embodiment, a resonant cavity modulator has been designed to operate at a data rate in excess of 100 Mbps. By carefully choosing the cavity finesse and its dimension, it is possible to control the pulse switching time to within 4 ns and to limit the required switching voltage to within 10 V. Experimentally, the resonant cavity can be maintained on resonance with respect to the input laser signal by monitoring the fluctuation of output intensity as the cavity is switched. This cavity locking scheme can be applied by using only the random data sequence, and without the need of additional dithering of the cavity. Compared to waveguide modulators, the resonant cavity has a comparable modulating voltage requirement. Because of its bulk geometry, resonant cavity modulator has the potential of accommodating higher throughput power. Furthermore, mode matching into a bulk device is easier and typically can be achieved with higher efficiency. On the other hand, unlike waveguide modulators which are essentially traveling wave devices, the resonant cavity modulator requires that the cavity be maintained in resonance with respect to the incoming laser signal. An additional control loop is incorporated into the modulator to maintain the cavity on resonance.

  17. High-power flip-chip-bonded silicon hybrid laser for temperature-control-free operation with micro-ring resonator-based modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, S.; Jeong, S.-H.; Akiyama, T.; Sekiguchi, S.; Kurahashi, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Morito, K.

    2013-02-01

    A silicon (Si)-based, large-scale optical I/O chip will be a key device for a large-bandwidth, low-cost optical interconnection employed in future high-performance computing systems. For these Si optical I/O chips, a significant improvement in energy cost is strongly expected, hence, the use of micro ring-resonator (RR) based modulator is assumed to be a promising approach. In order to handle a narrow and temperature-dependent operation bandwidth of the RR-based modulator, we have proposed a novel Si transmitter that uses a cascaded RR MZ modulator and RR-based Si hybrid laser. The RR-based Si hybrid laser is an external cavity laser integrating an InP SOA and a Si mirror chip comprising a RR and DBR mirror. The SOA is flip-chip bonded to the Si mirror chip utilizing a precise flip-chip bonding technology. The fabricated Si hybrid laser exhibited a low threshold current of 9.4mA, a high output power of <15 mW, and a large wall-plug efficiency of 7.6% at 20°C. In addition, the device maintained a stable single longitudinal mode lasing and a low RIN level of <-130 dB/Hz for 20-60°C. We also fabricated an integrated Si transmitter combining a cascaded RR MZ modulator and RR-based Si hybrid laser. The 20-RR cascaded MZ modulator exhibited a 1-nm operation bandwidth using multiple low-Q RRs. The modulator was driven with 10Gbps PRBS signal. For a temperature range between 25 and 60°C, the lasing wavelength exhibited a red-shift of 2.5 nm, nevertheless, we confirmed clear eye openings without adjusting the operating wavelength of the modulator.

  18. Effect of DA-9701 on Gastric Motor Function Assessed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Healthy Volunteers: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Min, Yang Won; Min, Byung-Hoon; Kim, Seonwoo; Choi, Dongil; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2015-01-01

    Background Improving gastric accommodation and gastric emptying is an attractive physiological treatment target in patients with functional dyspepsia (FD). We evaluated the effect of DA-9701, a new drug for FD, on gastric motor function after a meal in healthy volunteers using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods Forty healthy volunteers were randomly allocated to receive either DA-9701 or placebo. After 5 days of treatment, subjects underwent gastric MRI (60 min before and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after a liquid test meal). Gastric volume was measured through 3-dimensional reconstruction from MRI data. We analyzed 4 outcome variables including changes in total gastric volume (TGV), proximal TGV, and proximal to distal TGV ratio after a meal and gastric emptying rates after adjusting values at the pre-test meal. Results Changes in TGV and proximal TGV after a meal did not differ between the DA-9701 and placebo groups (difference between groups -25.9 mL, 95% confidence interval [CI] -54.0 to 2.3 mL, P = 0.070 and -2.9 mL, 95% CI -30.3 to 24.5 mL, P = 0.832, respectively). However, pre-treatment with DA-9701 increased postprandial proximal to distal TGV ratio more than placebo (difference between groups 0.93, 95% CI 0.08 to 1.79, P = 0.034). In addition, pre-treatment with DA-9701 significantly increased gastric emptying as compared with placebo (mean difference between groups 3.41%, 95% CI 0.54% to 6.29%, P = 0.021, by mixed model for repeated measures). Conclusion Our results suggested that DA-9701 enhances gastric emptying and does not significantly affect gastric accommodation in healthy volunteers. Further studies to confirm whether DA-9701 enhances these gastric motor functions in patients with FD are warranted. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02091635 PMID:26402448

  19. Measuring frequency response of surface-micromachined resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, William D.; Bright, Victor M.; Dalton, George C.

    1997-09-01

    Resonator structures offer a unique mechanism for characterizing MEMS materials, but measuring the resonant frequency of microstructures is challenging. In this effort a network analyzer system was used to electrically characterize surface-micromachined resonator structures in a carefully controlled pressure and temperature environment.A microscope laser interferometer was used to confirm actual device deflections.Cantilever, comb, and piston resonators fabricated in the DARPA-sponsored MUMPs process were extensively tested. Measured resonator frequency results show reasonable agreement with analytic predictions computed using manufacturer measured film thickness and residual material stress. Alternatively the measured resonant frequency data can be used to extract materials data. Tuning of resonant frequency with DC bias was also investigated. Because the tested devices vary widely in complexity, form a simple cantilever beam to a comb resonator, the data collected is especially well suited for validation testing of MEMS modeling codes.

  20. Biosensing by WGM Microspherical Resonators.

    PubMed

    Righini, Giancarlo C; Soria, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode (WGM) microresonators, thanks to their unique properties, have allowed researchers to achieve important results in both fundamental research and engineering applications. Among the various geometries, microspheres are the simplest 3D WGM resonators; the total optical loss in such resonators can be extremely low, and the resulting extraordinarily high Q values of 10⁸-10⁸ lead to high energy density, narrow resonant-wavelength lines and a lengthy cavity ringdown. They can also be coated in order to better control their properties or to increase their functionality. Their very high sensitivity to changes in the surrounding medium has been exploited for several sensing applications: protein adsorption, trace gas detection, impurity detection in liquids, structural health monitoring of composite materials, detection of electric fields, pressure sensing, and so on. In the present paper, after a general introduction to WGM resonators, attention is focused on spherical microresonators, either in bulk or in bubble format, to their fabrication, characterization and functionalization. The state of the art in the area of biosensing is presented, and the perspectives of further developments are discussed. PMID:27322282

  1. Biosensing by WGM Microspherical Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Righini, Giancarlo C.; Soria, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode (WGM) microresonators, thanks to their unique properties, have allowed researchers to achieve important results in both fundamental research and engineering applications. Among the various geometries, microspheres are the simplest 3D WGM resonators; the total optical loss in such resonators can be extremely low, and the resulting extraordinarily high Q values of 108–109 lead to high energy density, narrow resonant-wavelength lines and a lengthy cavity ringdown. They can also be coated in order to better control their properties or to increase their functionality. Their very high sensitivity to changes in the surrounding medium has been exploited for several sensing applications: protein adsorption, trace gas detection, impurity detection in liquids, structural health monitoring of composite materials, detection of electric fields, pressure sensing, and so on. In the present paper, after a general introduction to WGM resonators, attention is focused on spherical microresonators, either in bulk or in bubble format, to their fabrication, characterization and functionalization. The state of the art in the area of biosensing is presented, and the perspectives of further developments are discussed. PMID:27322282

  2. Baryon Spectroscopy and Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Edwards

    2011-12-01

    A short review of current efforts to determine the highly excited state spectrum of QCD, and in particular baryons, using lattice QCD techniques is presented. The determination of the highly excited spectrum of QCD is a major theoretical and experimental challenge. The experimental investigation of the excited baryon spectrum has been a long-standing element of the hadronic-physics program, an important component of which is the search for so-called 'missing resonances', baryonic states predicted by the quark model based on three constituent quarks but which have not yet been observed experimentally. Should such states not be found, it may indicate that the baryon spectrum can be modeled with fewer effective degrees of freedom, such as in quark-diquark models. In the past decade, there has been an extensive program to collect data on electromagnetic production of one and two mesons at Jefferson Lab, MIT-Bates, LEGS, MAMI, ELSA, and GRAAL. To analyze these data, and thereby refine our knowledge of the baryon spectrum, a variety of physics analysis models have been developed at Bonn, George Washington University, Jefferson Laboratory and Mainz. To provide a theoretical determination and interpretation of the spectrum, ab initio computations within lattice QCD have been used. Historically, the calculation of the masses of the lowest-lying states, for both baryons and mesons, has been a benchmark calculation of this discretized, finite-volume computational approach, where the aim is well-understood control over the various systematic errors that enter into a calculation; for a recent review. However, there is now increasing effort aimed at calculating the excited states of the theory, with several groups presenting investigations of the low-lying excited baryon spectrum, using a variety of discretizations, numbers of quark flavors, interpolating operators, and fitting methodologies. Some aspects of these calculations remain unresolved and are the subject of intense

  3. Composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Hou, H.Q.; Chow, W.W.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-05-01

    The use of two coupled laser cavities has been employed in edge emitting semiconductor lasers for mode suppression and frequency stabilization. The incorporation of coupled resonators within a vertical cavity laser opens up new possibilities due to the unique ability to tailor the interaction between the cavities. Composite resonators can be utilized to control spectral and temporal properties within the laser; previous studies of coupled cavity vertical cavity lasers have employed photopumped structures. The authors report the first composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode consisting of two optical cavities and three monolithic distributed Bragg reflectors. Cavity coupling effects and two techniques for external modulation of the laser are described.

  4. Buckled diamond-like carbon nanomechanical resonators.

    PubMed

    Tomi, Matti; Isacsson, Andreas; Oksanen, Mika; Lyashenko, Dmitry; Kaikkonen, Jukka-Pekka; Tervakangas, Sanna; Kolehmainen, Jukka; Hakonen, Pertti J

    2015-09-21

    We have developed capacitively-transduced nanomechanical resonators using sp(2)-rich diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films as conducting membranes. The electrically conducting DLC films were grown by physical vapor deposition at a temperature of 500 °C. Characterizing the resonant response, we find a larger than expected frequency tuning that we attribute to the membrane being buckled upwards, away from the bottom electrode. The possibility of using buckled resonators to increase frequency tuning can be of advantage in rf applications such as tunable GHz filters and voltage-controlled oscillators. PMID:26284626

  5. Enhancement in the number of trapped atoms in a cesium magneto-optical trap by a near-resonant control laser

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, S.; Gaur, S. J.; Manohar, K. G.; Jagatap, B. N.

    2005-11-15

    We demonstrate enhancement in the number of trapped cesium atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) using a control laser that illuminates only a small faction of the capture region of the trap without interacting with the cold cloud of atoms. The enhancement is maximized when the laser is slightly blue detuned with respect to the cooling transition. Trap loading curves point to approximately a twofold increase in the capture rate, which as a consequence results in the increase in the steady state number of trapped atoms. Enhanced loading is confirmed by MOT loading and decay curves taken under the modulation of the control laser beam. Optical pumping of the inaccessible Zeeman states into the stretched states is suggested as a possible mechanism.

  6. A Resonant Damping Study Using Piezoelectric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Duffy, K. P.; Choi, B. B.; Morrison, C. R.; Jansen, R. H.; Provenza, A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Excessive vibration of turbomachinery blades causes high cycle fatigue (HCF) problems requiring damping treatments to mitigate vibration levels. Based on the technical challenges and requirements learned from previous turbomachinery blade research, a feasibility study of resonant damping control using shunted piezoelectric patches with passive and active control techniques has been conducted on cantilever beam specimens. Test results for the passive damping circuit show that the optimum resistive shunt circuit reduces the third bending resonant vibration by almost 50%, and the optimum inductive circuit reduces the vibration by 90%. In a separate test, active control reduced vibration by approximately 98%.

  7. Tunable cavity resonator including a plurality of MEMS beams

    SciTech Connect

    Peroulis, Dimitrios; Fruehling, Adam; Small, Joshua Azariah; Liu, Xiaoguang; Irshad, Wasim; Arif, Muhammad Shoaib

    2015-10-20

    A tunable cavity resonator includes a substrate, a cap structure, and a tuning assembly. The cap structure extends from the substrate, and at least one of the substrate and the cap structure defines a resonator cavity. The tuning assembly is positioned at least partially within the resonator cavity. The tuning assembly includes a plurality of fixed-fixed MEMS beams configured for controllable movement relative to the substrate between an activated position and a deactivated position in order to tune a resonant frequency of the tunable cavity resonator.

  8. Measurement of optical Feshbach resonances in an ideal gas.

    PubMed

    Blatt, S; Nicholson, T L; Bloom, B J; Williams, J R; Thomsen, J W; Julienne, P S; Ye, J

    2011-08-12

    Using a narrow intercombination line in alkaline earth atoms to mitigate large inelastic losses, we explore the optical Feshbach resonance effect in an ultracold gas of bosonic (88)Sr. A systematic measurement of three resonances allows precise determinations of the optical Feshbach resonance strength and scaling law, in agreement with coupled-channel theory. Resonant enhancement of the complex scattering length leads to thermalization mediated by elastic and inelastic collisions in an otherwise ideal gas. Optical Feshbach resonance could be used to control atomic interactions with high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:21902391

  9. Large mode radius resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    Resonator configurations permitting operation with large mode radius while maintaining good transverse mode discrimination are considered. Stable resonators incorporating an intracavity telescope and unstable resonator geometries utilizing an output coupler with a Gaussian reflectivity profile are shown to enable large radius single mode laser operation. Results of heterodyne studies of pulsed CO2 lasers with large (11mm e sup-2 radius) fundamental mode sizes are presented demonstrating minimal frequency sweeping in accordance with the theory of laser-induced medium perturbations.

  10. Instrument for in-situ orientation of superconducting thin-film resonators used for electron-spin resonance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mowry, Andrew; Kubasek, James; Friedman, Jonathan R.; Chen, Yiming

    2015-01-15

    When used in electron-spin resonance measurements, superconducting thin-film resonators must be precisely oriented relative to the external magnetic field in order to prevent the trapping of magnetic flux and the associated degradation of resonator performance. We present a compact design solution for this problem that allows in-situ control of the orientation of the resonator at cryogenic temperatures. Tests of the apparatus show that when proper alignment is achieved, there is almost no hysteresis in the field dependence of the resonant frequency.

  11. "Effectiveness of continuous vertebral resonant oscillation using the POLD method in the treatment of lumbar disc hernia". A randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    López-Díaz, Juan Vicente; Arias-Buría, José Luis; Lopez-Gordo, Estrella; Lopez Gordo, Sandra; Oyarzún, Alejandra P Aros

    2015-06-01

    This study analyses the efficacy of manual oscillatory therapy, following the POLD technique, for acute Lumbar Disc Hernia (LDH) and compares it to usual treatment. A randomised, controlled, triple-blind pilot clinical trial. The sample of 30 patients was divided into two homogeneous groups to receive usual treatment (A) or treatment with the POLD technique (B). We analysed range of motion and subjective variables such as the severity (visual analogue pain scale (VAS)) and extension of the pain. With the application of POLD therapy, patients presented significant changes on range of motion (forward flexion with p < 0.05) at completion of the trial in comparison with the control group. They showed a significant reduction in the severity of pain with a mean VAS scale for lumbar, glutaeus and thigh pain, which improved from 5.09 to 0.79, 5.07 to 0.97 and 4.43 to 0.49 respectively (p < 0.05), and also when compared to usual treatment (p < 0.05) for all body regions. Moreover, we observed a reduction in pain extension (centralization phenomena) (p < 0.001) in comparison with usual treatment. In our study the POLD Method was shown to be an effective manual therapy approach for reducing the severity and irradiation of the pain in LDH patients with sciatica, and more efficient than usual treatment. PMID:25511449

  12. Resonance-inert stabilization for space stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    An approach to stabilizing control systems is presented which structures controllers like passive mechanical systems. The controller is visualized as a structural part with a passive behavior similar to springs, dashpots, and masses. If such a controller is connected by a proper feedback arrangement, then a passive mechanical plant cannot upset stability, regardless of masses, resonances, and three-dimensional coupling. The concept of resonance-inert stabilization is explained by structuring the controller of a simple feedback loop. Reactive functions, connections, and matrices are defined and used in the stabilization concept. The realization of a possible Skylab control system is discussed and compared with the present design. This example demonstrates the applicability to three-dimensional problems with lagging controllers.

  13. A Randomized Controlled Trial to Assess Pain and Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based (MRI-Based) Structural Spine Changes in Low Back Pain Patients After Yoga Practice.

    PubMed

    Telles, Shirley; Bhardwaj, Abhishek K; Gupta, Ram K; Sharma, Sachin K; Monro, Robin; Balkrishna, Acharya

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The present study aimed at determining whether 12 weeks of yoga practice in patients with chronic LBP and MRI-based degenerative changes would result in differences in: (i) self-reported pain, anxiety, and spinal flexibility; and (ii) the structure of the discs or vertebrae. MATERIAL AND METHODS Sixty-two persons with MRI-proven degenerative intervertebral discs (group mean ±S.D., 36.2±6.4 years; 30 females) were randomly assigned to yoga and control groups. However, testing was conducted on only 40 subjects, so only their data are included in this study. The assessments were: self-reported pain, state anxiety, spinal flexibility, and MRI of the lumbosacral spine, performed using a 1.5 Tesla system with a spinal surface column. The yoga group was taught light exercises, physical postures, breathing techniques, and yoga relaxation techniques for 1 hour daily for 3 months. No intervention was given to the control group except for routine medical care. A repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post hoc analyses (which was Bonferroni-adjusted) was used. The Ethics Committee of Patanjali Research Foundation had approved the study which had been registered in the Clinical Trials Registry of India (CTRI/2012/11/003094). RESULTS The yoga group showed a significant reduction in self-reported pain and state anxiety in a before/after comparison at 12 weeks. A few patients in both groups showed changes in the discs and vertebrae at post-intervention assessment. CONCLUSIONS Within 12 weeks, yoga practice reduced pain and state anxiety but did not alter MRI-proven changes in the intervertebral discs and in the vertebrae. PMID:27619104

  14. The resonator handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jerry D.; Zhou, Shiliang

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to extend resonator theory into the region in which the planar mirror is quite small. Results of the theoretical description are then extended to resonator design and experimental arrangements as discussed in further sections of this work. Finally, a discussion of dielectric measurements for small samples is included as a specific application of this work.

  15. Resonances in heavy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Betts, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    The experimental situation for the study of resonances in heavy-ion collisions is reviewed, with emphasis on the heaviest systems. New data are presented which show some of the systematics of this phenomenon. The narrow resonance structures are established as a feature of the nuclear structure of the composite system rather than a purely entrance channel effect.

  16. The Concept of Resonance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truhlar, Donald G.

    2007-01-01

    A general example of a delocalization system associated with a higher energy than the localized one, which suggests that it is wrong to consider delocalization as equivalent to resonance stabilization, is presented. The meaning of resonance energy as it appears in valence bond theory is described as the lowering of the calculated ground-state…

  17. Unstable optical resonators.

    PubMed

    Kahn, W K

    1966-03-01

    A technique, firmly based on a development from ray optics, is presented for calculating the loss due to the finite sizes of curved mirrors when these form an unstable optical resonator. If paraxial rays launched within such a resonator are confined near the resonator axis, the resonator is termed stable; otherwise it is termed unstable, and is known to have high losses. Siegman has recently presented a geometrical method, brilliantly constructed ad hoc, for calculating these losses in unstable resonators, and indicated where these might be advantageous in laser application. The ray optical theory presented here, which employs the concept of ray modes in an equivalent beam waveguide, is shown to yield results equivalent to those of Siegman for all cases considered by him. However, being derived from conventional ray optics, the validity of the formulas is independently established, and these formulas are immediately applicable to re-entrant resonators and resonators containing inhomogeneous media. The fractional loss per resonator pass is equal to 1-|lambda(2)|, where |lambda(2)| < this 1 is an eigenvalue of the transfer matrix T, representing the corresponding ray transformation. PMID:20048863

  18. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Michael; Bulatowicz, Michael; Clark, Philip; Griffith, Robert; Mirijanian, James; Pavell, James

    2015-05-01

    The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) is being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC). Cold and hot atom interferometer based gyroscopes have suffered from Size, Weight, and Power (SWaP) challenges and limits in bandwidth, scale factor stability, dead time, high rotation rate, vibration, and acceleration. NMRG utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as a reference for determining rotation, providing continuous measurement, high bandwidth, stable scale factor, high rotation rate measurement, and low sensitivity to vibration and acceleration in a low SWaP package. The sensitivity to vibration has been partially tested and demonstrates no measured sensitivity within error bars. Real time closed loop implementation of the sensor significantly decreases environmental and systematic sensitivities and supports a compact and low power digital signal processing and control system. Therefore, the NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost SWaP package. The poster will describe the history, operation, and design of the NMRG. General performance results will also be presented along with recent vibration test results.

  19. Resonant snubber inverter

    DOEpatents

    Lai, J.S.; Young, R.W. Sr.; Chen, D.; Scudiere, M.B.; Ott, G.W. Jr.; White, C.P.; McKeever, J.W.

    1997-06-24

    A resonant, snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the main inverter switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter. 14 figs.

  20. Narrowband resonant transmitter

    DOEpatents

    Hutchinson, Donald P.; Simpson, Marcus L.; Simpson, John T.

    2004-06-29

    A transverse-longitudinal integrated optical resonator (TLIR) is disclosed which includes a waveguide, a first and a second subwavelength resonant grating in the waveguide, and at least one photonic band gap resonant structure (PBG) in the waveguide. The PBG is positioned between the first and second subwavelength resonant gratings. An electro-optic waveguide material may be used to permit tuning the TLIR and to permit the TLIR to perform signal modulation and switching. The TLIR may be positioned on a bulk substrate die with one or more electronic and optical devices and may be communicably connected to the same. A method for fabricating a TLIR including fabricating a broadband reflective grating is disclosed. A method for tuning the TLIR's transmission resonance wavelength is also disclosed.

  1. Resonant snubber inverter

    DOEpatents

    Lai, Jih-Sheng; Young, Sr., Robert W.; Chen, Daoshen; Scudiere, Matthew B.; Ott, Jr., George W.; White, Clifford P.; McKeever, John W.

    1997-01-01

    A resonant, snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the main inverter switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter.

  2. Dual Site-Controlled and Lysosome-Targeted Intramolecular Charge Transfer-Photoinduced Electron Transfer-Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Fluorescent Probe for Monitoring pH Changes in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Baoli; Song, Xuezhen; Wang, Chao; Kong, Xiuqi; Tang, Yonghe; Lin, Weiying

    2016-04-01

    Acidic pH is a critical physiological factor for controlling the activities and functions of lysosome. Herein, we report a novel dual site-controlled and lysosome-targeted intramolecular charge transfer-photoinduced electron transfer-Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (ICT-PET-FRET) fluorescent probe (CN-pH), which was essentially the combination of a turn-on pH probe (CN-1) and a turn-off pH probe (CN-2) by a nonconjugated linker. Coumarin and naphthalimide fluorophores were selected as donor and acceptor to construct the FRET platform. Hydroxyl group and morpholine were simultaneously employed as the two pH sensing sites and controlled the fluorescence of coumarin and naphthalimide units by ICT and PET, respectively. The sensing mechanism of CN-pH to pH was essentially an integration of ICT, PET, and FRET processes. Meanwhile, the morpholine also can serve as a lysosome-targeted group. By combining the two data analysis approaches of the ratios of the two emission intensities (R) and the reverse ratio R' (R' = 1/R), the fluorescent ratio of CN-pH can show proportional relationship to pH values in a very broad range from pH 4.0 to 8.0 with high sensitivity. The probe has been successfully applied for the fluorescence imaging of the lysosomal pH values, as well as ratiometrically visualizing chloroquine-stimulated changes of intracellular pH in living cells. These features demonstrate that the probe can afford practical application in biological systems. PMID:26987045

  3. Controlled-release triple anti-inflammatory therapy based on novel gastroretentive sponges: characterization and magnetic resonance imaging in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Tadros, Mina Ibrahim; Fahmy, Rania Hassan

    2014-09-10

    The current work aimed to develop novel composite sponges of chitosan (CH)-chondroitin sulfate (CS) as a low-density gastroretentive delivery system for lornoxicam (LOR). This triple anti-inflammatory therapy-loaded matrices are expected to expand and float upon contact with gastric fluids for prolonged times. CH and CS solutions (3%, w/w) were prepared, mixed in different ratios, lyophilized, coated with magnesium stearate and compressed. The CH:CS interpolymer complex (IPC) was evaluated via FT-IR, DSC, and XRD. The compressed-sponges were evaluated for appearance, structure, porosity, pore diameter, density, wetting-time, floating characteristics, adhesion-retention, and LOR-release. The gastroretentivity of the best achieved magnetite-loaded sponges was monitored in healthy volunteers via MRI. The interaction between CH (protonated amino groups) and CS (anionic carboxylate/sulfate groups) proved IPC formation. DSC and XRD studies confirmed loss of LOR crystallinity. The sponges possessed interconnecting porous-network structures. The porosity, mean pore diameter, and bulk density of CH:CS (10:3) IPC sponges were 11.779%, 25.4 nm, and 0.670 g/mL, respectively. They showed complete wetting within seconds, gradual size-expansion within minutes and prolonged adhesion for hours. Controlled LOR-release profiles were tailored over 12h to satisfy individual patient needs. Monitoring of sponges via MRI proved their gastroretentivity for at least 5h. PMID:24928130

  4. Quantitative control of poly(ethylene oxide) surface antifouling and biodetection through azimuthally enhanced grating coupled-surface plasmon resonance sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonato, Agnese; Silvestri, Davide; Ruffato, Gianluca; Zacco, Gabriele; Romanato, Filippo; Morpurgo, Margherita

    2013-12-01

    Grating Coupled-Surface Plasmon reflectivity measurements carried out under azimuth and polarization control (GC-SPR φ ≠ 0°) were used to optimize the process of gold surface dressing with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) derivatives of different molecular weight, with the final goal to maximize the discrimination between specific and non-specific binding events occurring at the surface. The kinetics of surface deposition of thiol-ending PEOs (0.3, 2 and 5 kDa), introduced as antifouling layers, was monitored. Non-specific binding events upon immersion of the surfaces into buffers containing either 0.1% bovine serum albumin or 1% Goat Serum, were evaluated as a function of polymer size and density. A biorecognition event between avidin and biotin was then monitored in both buffers at selected low and high polymer surface densities and the contribution of analyte and fouling elements to the signal was precisely quantified. The 0.3 kDa PEO film was unable to protect the surface from non-specific interactions at any tested density. On the other hand, the 2 and 5 kDa polymers at their highest surface densities guaranteed full protection from non-specific interactions from both buffers. These densities were reached upon a long deposition time (24-30 h). The results pave the way toward the application of this platform for the detection of low concentration and small dimension analytes, for which both non-fouling and high instrumental sensitivity are fundamental requirements.

  5. Electro-optic resonant phase modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chien-Chung (Inventor); Hemmati, Hamid (Inventor); Robinson, Deborah L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An electro-optic resonant cavity is used to achieve phase modulation with lower driving voltages. Laser damage thresholds are inherently higher than with previously used integrated optics due to the utilization of bulk optics. Phase modulation is achieved at higher speeds with lower driving voltages than previously obtained with non-resonant electro-optic phase modulators. The instant scheme uses a data locking dither approach as opposed to the conventional sinusoidal locking schemes. In accordance with a disclosed embodiment, a resonant cavity modulator has been designed to operate at a data rate in excess of 100 megabits per sec. By carefully choosing the cavity finesse and its dimension, it is possible to control the pulse switching time to within 4 nano-sec. and to limit the required switching voltage to within 10 V. This cavity locking scheme can be applied by using only the random data sequence, and without the need of dithering of the cavity. Compared to waveguide modulators, the resonant cavity has a comparable modulating voltage requirement. Because of its bulk geometry, the resonant cavity modulator has the potential of accommodating higher throughput power. Mode matching into the bulk device is easier and typically can be achieved with higher efficiency. An additional control loop is incorporated into the modulator to maintain the cavity on resonance.

  6. Stochastic resonance during a polymer translocation process.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Debasish; Muthukumar, M

    2016-04-14

    We have studied the occurrence of stochastic resonance when a flexible polymer chain undergoes a single-file translocation through a nano-pore separating two spherical cavities, under a time-periodic external driving force. The translocation of the chain is controlled by a free energy barrier determined by chain length, pore length, pore-polymer interaction, and confinement inside the donor and receiver cavities. The external driving force is characterized by a frequency and amplitude. By combining the Fokker-Planck formalism for polymer translocation and a two-state model for stochastic resonance, we have derived analytical formulas for criteria for emergence of stochastic resonance during polymer translocation. We show that no stochastic resonance is possible if the free energy barrier for polymer translocation is purely entropic in nature. The polymer chain exhibits stochastic resonance only in the presence of an energy threshold in terms of polymer-pore interactions. Once stochastic resonance is feasible, the chain entropy controls the optimal synchronization conditions significantly. PMID:27083746

  7. Stochastic resonance during a polymer translocation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Debasish; Muthukumar, M.

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the occurrence of stochastic resonance when a flexible polymer chain undergoes a single-file translocation through a nano-pore separating two spherical cavities, under a time-periodic external driving force. The translocation of the chain is controlled by a free energy barrier determined by chain length, pore length, pore-polymer interaction, and confinement inside the donor and receiver cavities. The external driving force is characterized by a frequency and amplitude. By combining the Fokker-Planck formalism for polymer translocation and a two-state model for stochastic resonance, we have derived analytical formulas for criteria for emergence of stochastic resonance during polymer translocation. We show that no stochastic resonance is possible if the free energy barrier for polymer translocation is purely entropic in nature. The polymer chain exhibits stochastic resonance only in the presence of an energy threshold in terms of polymer-pore interactions. Once stochastic resonance is feasible, the chain entropy controls the optimal synchronization conditions significantly.

  8. Stochastic resonance during a polymer translocation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Debasish; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    We study the translocation of a flexible polymer in a confined geometry subjected to a time-periodic external drive to explore stochastic resonance. We describe the equilibrium translocation process in terms of a Fokker-Planck description and use a discrete two-state model to describe the effect of the external driving force on the translocation dynamics. We observe that no stochastic resonance is possible if the associated free-energy barrier is purely entropic in nature. The polymer chain experiences a stochastic resonance effect only in presence of an energy threshold in terms of polymer-pore interaction. Once stochastic resonance is feasible, the chain entropy controls the optimal synchronization conditions significantly.

  9. Tuning of resonance spacing over whole free spectral range based on Autler-Townes splitting in a single microring resonator.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ge; Li, Danping; Zhang, Yong; Yuan, Shuai; Armghan, Ammar; Huang, Qingzhong; Wang, Yi; Yu, Jinzhong; Xia, Jinsong

    2015-10-19

    In this paper, a single microring resonator structure formed by incorporating a reflectivity-tunable loop mirror is demonstrated for the tuning of resonance spacing. Autler-Townes splitting in the resonator is utilized to tune the spacing between two adjacent resonances by controlling the strength of coupling between the two counter-propagating degenerate modes in the microring resonator. A theoretical model based on the transfer matrix method is built to analyze the device. The theoretical analysis indicates that the resonance spacing can be tuned from zero to one free spectral range (FSR). In experiment, by integrating metallic microheater, the tuning of resonance spacing in the range of the whole FSR (1.17 nm) is achieved within 9.82 mW heating power dissipation. The device has potential for applications in reconfigurable optical filtering and microwave photonics. PMID:26480351

  10. Noise in nonlinear nanoelectromechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra Vidal, Diego N.

    Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems (NEMS), due to their nanometer scale size, possess a number of desirable attributes: high sensitivity to applied forces, fast response times, high resonance frequencies and low power consumption. However, ultra small size and low power handling result in unwanted consequences: smaller signal size and higher dissipation, making the NEMS devices more susceptible to external and intrinsic noise. The simplest version of a NEMS, a suspended nanomechanical structure with two distinct excitation states, can be used as an archetypal two state system to study a plethora of fundamental phenomena such as Duffing nonlinearity, stochastic resonance, and macroscopic quantum tunneling at low temperatures. From a technical perspective, there are numerous applications such nanomechanical memory elements, microwave switches and nanomechanical computation. The control and manipulation of the mechanical response of these two state systems can be realized by exploiting a (seemingly) counterintuitive physical phenomenon, Stochastic Resonance: in a noisy nonlinear mechanical system, the presence of noise can enhance the system response to an external stimulus. This Thesis is mainly dedicated to study possible applications of Stochastic Resonance in two-state nanomechanical systems. First, on chip signal amplification by 1/falpha is observed. The effectiveness of the noise assisted amplification is observed to decrease with increasing a. Experimental evidence shows an increase in asymmetry between the two states with increasing noise color. Considering the prevalence of 1/f alpha noise in the materials in integrated circuits, the signal enhancement demonstrated here, suggests beneficial use of the otherwise detrimental noise. Finally, a nanomechanical device, operating as a reprogrammable logic gate, and performing fundamental logic functions such as AND/OR and NAND/NOR is presented. The logic function can be programmed (from AND to OR) dynamically, by

  11. LABCOM resonator Phase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Keres, L.J.

    1990-11-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop quartz crystal resonator designs, production processes, and test capabilities for 5-MHz, 6.2-MHz, and 10-MHz resonators for Tactical Miniature Crystal Oscillator (TMXO) applications. GE Neutron Devices (GEND) established and demonstrated the capability to produce and test quartz crystal resonators for use in the TMXO developed by the US Army ERADCOM (now LABCOM). The goals in this project were based on the ERADCOM statement of work. The scope of work indicated that the resonator production facilities for this project would not be completely independent, but that they would be supported in part by equipment and processes in place at GEND used in US Department of Energy (DOE) work. In addition, provisions for production test equipment or or eventual technology transfer costs to a commercial supplier were clearly excluded from the scope of work. The demonstrated technical capability of the deep-etched blank design is feasible and practical. It can be manufactured in quantity with reasonable yield, and its performance is readily predictable. The ceramic flatpack is a very strong package with excellent hermeticity. The four-point mount supports the crystal to reasonable shock levels and does not perturb the resonator's natural frequency-temperature behavior. The package can be sealed with excellent yields. The high-temperature, high-vacuum processing developed for the TMXO resonator, including bonding the piezoid to its mount with conductive polyimide adhesive, is consistent with precision resonator fabrication. 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  12. Modelling resonant planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emel'yanenko, V.

    2012-09-01

    Many discovered multi-planet systems are in meanmotion resonances. The aim of this work is to study dynamical processes leading to the formation of resonant configurations on the basis of a unified model described earlier [1]. The model includes gravitational interactions of planets and migration of planets due to the presence of a gas disc. For the observed systems 24 Sex, HD 37124, HD 73526, HD 82943, HD 128311, HD 160691, Kepler 9, NN Ser with planets moving in the 2:1 resonance, it is shown that the capture in this resonance occurs at very wide ranges of parameters of both type I and type II migration. Conditions of migration leading to the formation of the resonant systems HD 45364 и HD 200964 (3:2 and 4:3, respectively) are obtained. Formation scenarios are studied for the systems HD 102272, HD 108874, HD 181433, HD 202206 with planets in high order resonances. We discuss also how gravitational interactions of planets and planetesimal discs lead to the breakup of resonant configurations and the formation of systems similar to the 47 UMa system.

  13. Casimir effect on graphene resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Norio

    2016-03-01

    We theoretically investigated the influence of the Casimir effect on mechanical properties of a graphene resonator, where a graphene sheet is located in parallel with a perfectly conducting plate. The Casimir force arising from this effect strongly attracts a graphene sheet to a perfectly conducting plate and increases the tension of a graphene sheet as the separation distance between them decreases. The maximum vertical displacement of a graphene sheet to the substrate increases obeying a power law of a separation distance with an exponent of 4/3 as the separation distance decreases. For small separation distances, the Casimir force is excessively strong for the graphene sheet to maintain a free-standing shape, consequently resulting in the adhesion of the sheet to the substrate below a critical separation distance. The resonant frequency increases over a wide range as the separation distance decreases for large separation distances. However, it then rapidly decreases for small separations and converges to zero at a critical separation. These various behaviors enable the control of a graphene resonator.

  14. Study and validity of 13C stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry and 2H site-specific natural isotopic fractionation by nuclear magnetic resonance isotopic measurements to characterize and control the authenticity of honey.

    PubMed

    Cotte, J F; Casabianca, H; Lhéritier, J; Perrucchietti, C; Sanglar, C; Waton, H; Grenier-Loustalot, M F

    2007-01-16

    Honey samples were analyzed by stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry (SCIRA-MS) and site-specific natural isotopic fractionation measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) to first determine their potentials for characterizing the substance and then to combat adulteration. Honey samples from several geographic and botanical origins were analyzed. The delta(13)C parameter was not significant for characterizing an origin, while the (D/H)(I) ratio could be used to differentiate certain single-flower varieties. Application of the official control method of adding a C(4) syrup (AOAC official method 998.12) to our authentic samples revealed anomalies resulting from SCIRA indices that were more negative than -1 per thousand (permil). A filtration step was added to the experimental procedure and provided results that were compliant with the natural origin of our honey samples. In addition, spiking with a C(4) syrup could be detected starting at 9-10%. The use of SNIF-NMR is limited by the detection of a syrup spike starting only at 20%, which is far from satisfying. PMID:17386484

  15. Methods for precisely controlling the residual stress and temperature coefficient of the frequency of a MEMS resonator based on an AlN cavity silicon-on-insulator platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan; Xu, Jinghui; Zhang, Xiaolin; Wu, Guoqiang; Zhu, Yao; Li, Wei; Gu, Yuandong

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we report an experimentally verified numerical model developed for precisely predicting and controlling the initial bending of a multi-layer-stack composite cantilever structure which is caused by the residual stress of the individual constituting layers, as well as the cantilever’s thermal coefficient of frequency (TCF). The developed model is exemplified using a flexural-mode cantilever resonator according to the process flow of the aluminium nitride (AlN) cavity silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform. The same AlN cavity SOI platform is also utilized to fabricate the exemplified cantilever, which is then used to experimentally verify the accuracy and consistency of the numerical model. The experimental results show a difference of less than 3.5% is observed in terms of the deflection at the tip of the cantilever as compared with the numerical model, demonstrating the accuracy of the developed numerical model and the feasibility to optimize the cantilever’s initial deflection and TCF simultaneously, achieving minimum values for both parameters at the same time.

  16. Spin resonance strength calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Courant,E.D.

    2008-10-06

    In calculating the strengths of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

  17. Tunable Optical Filters Having Electro-optic Whispering-gallery-mode Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor); Matsko, Andrey B. (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Tunable optical filters using whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) optical resonators are described. The WGM optical resonator in a filter exhibits an electro-optical effect and hence is tunable by applying a control electrical signal.

  18. Excitation of dark multipolar plasmonic resonances at terahertz frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Wei, YuMing; Zang, XiaoFei; Zhu, YiMing; Zhuang, SongLin

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally observe the excitation of dark multipolar spoof localized surface plasmon resonances in a hybrid structure consisting of a corrugated metallic disk coupled with a C-shaped dipole resonator. The uncoupled corrugated metallic disk only supports a dipolar resonance in the transmission spectrum due to perfect symmetry of the structure. However, the dark multipolar spoof localized surface plasmon resonances emerge when coupled with a bright C-shaped resonator which is placed in the vicinity of the corrugated metallic disk. These excited multipolar resonances show minimum influence on the coupling distance between the C-shaped resonator and corrugated metallic disk. The resonance frequencies of the radiative modes are controlled by varying the angle of the C-shaped resonator and the inner disk radius, both of which play dominant roles in the excitation of the spoof localized surface plasmons. Observation of such a transition from the dark to radiative nature of multipolar spoof localized plasmon resonances would find potential applications in terahertz based resonant plasmonic and metamaterial devices. PMID:26903382

  19. Cervical Gross Tumor Volume Dose Predicts Local Control Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Diffusion-Weighted Imaging—Guided High-Dose-Rate and Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography—Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dyk, Pawel; Jiang, Naomi; Sun, Baozhou; DeWees, Todd A.; Fowler, Kathryn J.; Narra, Vamsi; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose L.; Schwarz, Julie K.; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging/diffusion weighted-imaging (MRI/DWI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) — positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the definitive treatment of cervical cancer is a novel treatment technique. The purpose of this study was to report our analysis of dose-volume parameters predicting gross tumor volume (GTV) control. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the records of 134 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IB1-IVB cervical cancer treated with combined MRI-guided HDR and IMRT from July 2009 to July 2011. IMRT was targeted to the metabolic tumor volume and lymph nodes by use of FDG-PET/CT simulation. The GTV for each HDR fraction was delineated by use of T2-weighted or apparent diffusion coefficient maps from diffusion-weighted sequences. The D100, D90, and Dmean delivered to the GTV from HDR and IMRT were summed to EQD2. Results: One hundred twenty-five patients received all irradiation treatment as planned, and 9 did not complete treatment. All 134 patients are included in this analysis. Treatment failure in the cervix occurred in 24 patients (18.0%). Patients with cervix failures had a lower D100, D90, and Dmean than those who did not experience failure in the cervix. The respective doses to the GTV were 41, 58, and 136 Gy for failures compared with 67, 99, and 236 Gy for those who did not experience failure (P<.001). Probit analysis estimated the minimum D100, D90, and Dmean doses required for ≥90% local control to be 69, 98, and 260 Gy (P<.001). Conclusions: Total dose delivered to the GTV from combined MRI-guided HDR and PET/CT-guided IMRT is highly correlated with local tumor control. The findings can be directly applied in the clinic for dose adaptation to maximize local control.

  20. Micro-machined resonator

    DOEpatents

    Godshall, N.A.; Koehler, D.R.; Liang, A.Y.; Smith, B.K.

    1993-03-30

    A micro-machined resonator, typically quartz, with upper and lower micro-machinable support members, or covers, having etched wells which may be lined with conductive electrode material, between the support members is a quartz resonator having an energy trapping quartz mesa capacitively coupled to the electrode through a diaphragm; the quartz resonator is supported by either micro-machined cantilever springs or by thin layers extending over the surfaces of the support. If the diaphragm is rigid, clock applications are available, and if the diaphragm is resilient, then transducer applications can be achieved. Either the thin support layers or the conductive electrode material can be integral with the diaphragm. In any event, the covers are bonded to form a hermetic seal and the interior volume may be filled with a gas or may be evacuated. In addition, one or both of the covers may include oscillator and interface circuitry for the resonator.

  1. Micro-machined resonator

    DOEpatents

    Godshall, Ned A.; Koehler, Dale R.; Liang, Alan Y.; Smith, Bradley K.

    1993-01-01

    A micro-machined resonator, typically quartz, with upper and lower micro-machinable support members, or covers, having etched wells which may be lined with conductive electrode material, between the support members is a quartz resonator having an energy trapping quartz mesa capacitively coupled to the electrode through a diaphragm; the quartz resonator is supported by either micro-machined cantilever springs or by thin layers extending over the surfaces of the support. If the diaphragm is rigid, clock applications are available, and if the diaphragm is resilient, then transducer applications can be achieved. Either the thin support layers or the conductive electrode material can be integral with the diaphragm. In any event, the covers are bonded to form a hermetic seal and the interior volume may be filled with a gas or may be evacuated. In addition, one or both of the covers may include oscillator and interface circuitry for the resonator.

  2. Resonances in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Matthias F. M.; Lange, Jens Sören; Pennington, Michael; Bettoni, Diego; Brambilla, Nora; Crede, Volker; Eidelman, Simon; Gillitzer, Albrecht; Gradl, Wolfgang; Lang, Christian B.; Metag, Volker; Nakano, Takashi; Nieves, Juan; Neubert, Sebastian; Oka, Makoto; Olsen, Stephen L.; Pappagallo, Marco; Paul, Stephan; Pelizäus, Marc; Pilloni, Alessandro; Prencipe, Elisabetta; Ritman, Jim; Ryan, Sinead; Thoma, Ulrike; Uwer, Ulrich; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-04-01

    We report on the EMMI Rapid Reaction Task Force meeting 'Resonances in QCD', which took place at GSI October 12-14, 2015. A group of 26 people met to discuss the physics of resonances in QCD. The aim of the meeting was defined by the following three key questions: What is needed to understand the physics of resonances in QCD? Where does QCD lead us to expect resonances with exotic quantum numbers? What experimental efforts are required to arrive at a coherent picture? For light mesons and baryons only those with up, down and strange quark content were considered. For heavy-light and heavy-heavy meson systems, those with charm quarks were the focus. This document summarizes the discussions by the participants, which in turn led to the coherent conclusions we present here.

  3. Resonances in Positronium Hydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiRienzi, Joseph; Drachman, Richard J.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We re-examine the problem of calculating the positions and widths of the lowest-lying resonances in the Ps + H scattering system which consists of two electrons, one positron and one proton. The first of these resonances, for L=0, was found by the methods of complex rotation and stabilization, and later described as a Feshbach resonance lying close to a bound state in the closed-channel e (+) + H (-) system. Recently, results for the L=1 and 2 scattering states were published, and it was found, surprisingly, that there is a larae shift in the positions of these resonances. In this work we repeat the analysis for L=1 and find an unexpected explanation for the shift.

  4. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert

    1991-01-01

    A resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method provides a unique characterization of an object for use in distinguishing similar objects having physical differences greater than a predetermined tolerance. A resonant response spectrum is obtained for a reference object by placing excitation and detection transducers at any accessible location on the object. The spectrum is analyzed to determine the number of resonant response peaks in a predetermined frequency interval. The distribution of the resonance frequencies is then characterized in a manner effective to form a unique signature of the object. In one characterization, a small frequency interval is defined and stepped though the spectrum frequency range. Subsequent objects are similarly characterized where the characterizations serve as signatures effective to distinguish objects that differ from the reference object by more than the predetermined tolerance.

  5. Cylindrical laser resonator

    DOEpatents

    Casperson, Lee W.

    1976-02-24

    The properties of an improved class of lasers is presented. In one configuration of these lasers the radiation propagates radially within the amplifying medium, resulting in high fields and symmetric illumination at the resonator axis. Thus there is a strong focusing of energy at the axis of the resonator. In a second configuration the radiation propagates back and forth in a tubular region of space.

  6. Injector with integrated resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; York, William David; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2014-07-29

    The system may include a turbine engine. The turbine engine may include a fuel nozzle. The fuel nozzle may include an air path. The fuel nozzle may also include a fuel path such that the fuel nozzle is in communication with a combustion zone of the turbine engine. Furthermore, the fuel nozzle may include a resonator. The resonator may be disposed in the fuel nozzle directly adjacent to the combustion zone.

  7. Hexagonal quartz resonator

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Roswell D. M.

    1982-01-01

    A generally flat, relatively thin AT-cut piezoelectric resonator element structured to minimize the force-frequency effect when mounted and energized in a housing. The resonator is in the form of an equilateral hexagon with the X crystallographic axis of the crystal passing through one set of opposing corners with mounting being effected at an adjacent set of corners respectively .+-.60.degree. away from the X axis which thereby results in a substantially zero frequency shift of the operating frequency.

  8. Resonant dielectric metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Loui, Hung; Carroll, James; Clem, Paul G; Sinclair, Michael B

    2014-12-02

    A resonant dielectric metamaterial comprises a first and a second set of dielectric scattering particles (e.g., spheres) having different permittivities arranged in a cubic array. The array can be an ordered or randomized array of particles. The resonant dielectric metamaterials are low-loss 3D isotropic materials with negative permittivity and permeability. Such isotropic double negative materials offer polarization and direction independent electromagnetic wave propagation.

  9. Acoustic resonance for nonmetallic mine detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-04-01

    The feasibility of acoustic resonance for detection of plastic mines was investigated by researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Instrumentation and Controls Division under an internally funded program. The data reported in this paper suggest that acoustic resonance is not a practical method for mine detection. Representative small plastic anti-personnel mines were tested, and were found to not exhibit detectable acoustic resonances. Also, non-metal objects known to have strong acoustic resonances were tested with a variety of excitation techniques, and no practical non-contact method of exciting a consistently detectable resonance in a buried object was discovered. Some of the experimental data developed in this work may be useful to other researchers seeking a method to detect buried plastic mines. A number of excitation methods and their pitfalls are discussed. Excitation methods that were investigated include swept acoustic, chopped acoustic, wavelet acoustic, and mechanical shaking. Under very contrived conditions, a weak response that could be attributed to acoustic resonance was observed, but it does not appear to be practical as a mine detection feature. Transfer properties of soil were investigated. Impulse responses of several representative plastic mines were investigated. Acoustic leakage coupling, and its implications as a disruptive mechanism were investigated.

  10. Resonant nonlinear ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Paul A.; TenCate, James A.; Guyer, Robert A.; Van Den Abeele, Koen E. A.

    2001-01-01

    Components with defects are identified from the response to strains applied at acoustic and ultrasound frequencies. The relative resonance frequency shift .vertline..DELTA..function./.function..sub.0.vertline., is determined as a function of applied strain amplitude for an acceptable component, where .function..sub.0 is the frequency of the resonance peak at the lowest amplitude of applied strain and .DELTA..function. is the frequency shift of the resonance peak of a selected mode to determine a reference relationship. Then, the relative resonance frequency shift .vertline..DELTA..function./.function..sub.0 is determined as a function of applied strain for a component under test, where fo .function..sub.0 the frequency of the resonance peak at the lowest amplitude of applied strain and .DELTA..function. is the frequency shift of the resonance peak to determine a quality test relationship. The reference relationship is compared with the quality test relationship to determine the presence of defects in the component under test.

  11. Optical filter having coupled whispering-gallery-mode resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor); Handley, Timothy A. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Optical filters having at least two coupled whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) optical resonators to produce a second order or higher order filter function with a desired spectral profile. At least one of the coupled WGM optical resonators may be tunable by a control signal to adjust the filtering function.

  12. Method and apparatus for resonant frequency waveform modulation

    DOEpatents

    Taubman, Matthew S [Richland, WA

    2011-06-07

    A resonant modulator device and process are described that provide enhanced resonant frequency waveforms to electrical devices including, e.g., laser devices. Faster, larger, and more complex modulation waveforms are obtained than can be obtained by use of conventional current controllers alone.

  13. Emotional Resonance Deficits in Autistic Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grecucci, Alessandro; Brambilla, Paolo; Siugzdaite, Roma; Londero, Danielle; Fabbro, Franco; Rumiati, Raffaella Ida

    2013-01-01

    According to some theories imitation, defined as an action resonance mechanism, is deficient in autism. In contrast, other theories (e.g., the "top down control of imitation" hypothesis) state that the problem is not in imitation per se but in the way social cues modulate imitative responses. In this study, 15 high-functioning children with autism…

  14. Multiple dynamical resonances in a discrete neuronal model

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Yu

    2005-05-01

    The conditions for the occurrence of different multiple resonances in an excitable neuron model are analyzed numerically. It is shown that the excitable system may display both stochastic and coherence resonance, in response to periodic stimuli in the presence of different intensities of additive and parametric noises. It is found that double coherence resonances may take place in the low-amplitude oscillation regimes, and coherence resonance may persists even in the weak oscillatory regimes for control parameters slightly larger than the Hopf bifurcation point, where the system is in the incipient stage of large-amplitude excitation regime.

  15. On-chip microfluidic tuning of an optical microring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Uriel; Campbell, Kyle; Groisman, Alex; Mookherjea, Shayan; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2006-03-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and operation of a tunable optical filter based on a bus waveguide coupled to a microring waveguide resonator located inside a microchannel in a microfluidic chip. Liquid flowing in the microchannel constitutes the upper cladding of the waveguides. The refractive index of the liquid controls the resonance wavelengths and strength of coupling between the bus waveguide and the resonator. The refractive index is varied by on-chip mixing of two source liquids with different refractive indices. We demonstrate adjustment of the resonance by 2nm and tuning the filter to an extinction ratio of 37dB.

  16. Impact of polydispersity on multipolar resonant scattering in emulsions.

    PubMed

    Mascaro, Benoit; Brunet, Thomas; Poncelet, Olivier; Aristégui, Christophe; Raffy, Simon; Mondain-Monval, Olivier; Leng, Jacques

    2013-04-01

    The influence of size polydispersity on the resonant acoustic properties of dilute emulsions, made of fluorinated-oil droplets, is quantitatively investigated. Ultrasound attenuation and dispersion measurements on various samples with controlled size polydispersities, ranging from 1% to 13%, are found to be in excellent agreement with predictions based on the independent scattering approximation. By relating the particle-size distribution of the synthesized emulsions to the quality factor of the predicted multipolar resonances, the number of observable acoustic resonances is shown to be imposed by the sample polydispersity. These results are briefly discussed into the context of metamaterials for which scattering resonances are central to their effective properties. PMID:23556570

  17. Superconducting resonators with trapped vortices under direct injection of quasiparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nsanzineza, Ibrahim; Patel, Umesh; Dodge, K. R.; McDermott, R. F.; Plourde, B. L. T.

    Nonequilibrium quasiparticles and trapped magnetic flux vortices can significantly impact the performance of superconducting microwave resonant circuits and qubits at millikelvin temperatures. Quasiparticles result in excess loss, reducing resonator quality factors and qubit lifetimes. Vortices trapped near regions of large microwave currents also contribute excess loss. However, vortices located in current-free areas in the resonator or in the ground plane of a device can actually trap quasiparticles and lead to a reduction in the quasiparticle loss. We will describe experiments involving the controlled trapping of vortices in superconducting resonators with direct injection of quasiparticles using Normal metal-Insulator-Superconductor (NIS)-tunnel junctions.

  18. A closed-loop wide-range tunable mechanical resonator for energy harvesting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Christian; Maurath, Dominic; Schock, Wolfram; Mezger, Florian; Manoli, Yiannos

    2009-09-01

    This paper presents a novel electrically tunable structure which can be used as a resonator for vibration-based energy harvesters. The adjustment of the resonance frequency is provided by mechanical stiffening of the structure using piezoelectric actuators. This concept can easily be stand-alone integrated to realize an autonomous, tunable harvester. The resonator was simulated using ANSYS to find the optimum operation point concerning tuning range. The scalability of this tuning concept is also investigated in this work. A phase shift control circuit was developed for very efficient autonomous closed-loop control of the resonance frequency. Prototypes of the resonators were fabricated and measured with and without the control circuit. The tuning voltage can be kept as low as ±5 V leading to a measured resonance shift of ±15% for the larger resonator (40 mm) and around ±8% for the smaller resonator (27 mm). This tuning range can be simply enhanced by increasing the tuning voltage.

  19. Dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay between tunable upconversion nanoparticles and controlled gold nanoparticles for the simultaneous detection of Pb²⁺ and Hg²⁺.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shijia; Duan, Nuo; Shi, Zhao; Fang, Congcong; Wang, Zhouping

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we presented a novel dual fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) system for the simultaneous detection of Pb(2+) and Hg(2+). This system employed two color upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) as the donors, and controlled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as the acceptors. The two donor-acceptor pairs were fabricated by hybridizing the aptamers and their corresponding complementary DNA. Thus, the green and red upconversion fluorescence could be quenched because of a good overlap between the UCNPs fluorescence emission and the AuNPs absorption spectrum. In the presence of Pb(2+) and Hg(2+), the aptamers preferred to bind to their corresponding analytes and formed a G-quadruplexes structure for Pb(2+) and the hairpin-like structure for Hg(2+). As a result, the dual FRET was disrupted, and the green and red upconversion fluorescence was restored. Under optimized experimental conditions, the relative fluorescence intensity increased as the metal ion concentrations were increased, allowing for the quantification of Pb(2+) and Hg(2+). The relationships between the fluorescence intensity and plotting logarithms of ion concentrations were linear in the range from 0.1 to 100 nM for Pb(2+) and 0.5 to 500 nM for Hg(2+), and the detection limits of Pb(2+) and Hg(2+) were 50 pM and 150 pM, respectively. As a practical application, the aptasensor was used to monitor Pb(2+) and Hg(2+) levels in naturally contaminated samples and human serum samples. Ultimately, this type of dual FRET could be used to detect other metal ions or contaminants in food safety analysis and environment monitoring. PMID:25059168

  20. Test component attachment effects on resonant plate pyrotechnic shock simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.R.; Zimmerman, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    An accepted technique for simulating pyrotechnic shock inputs has been the resonant plate test. The plate is designed so that its predominant modes generate the desired frequency content of a given shock test specification. The success of the test is dependent on the engineer's ability to effectively design and control the response of the resonant plate. In designing a test to simulated a pyrotechnic environment, the location and mass of the test item become very important considerations since they have a profound impact on the dynamic response of the resonant plate. A relatively massive test item can change the plates's resonant frequency. Differences in the relative frequencies of the test item's fixture and the resonant plate may also effect the input to the test items. In this study, a simple mock test assembly is used to study test item and resonant plate interactions during a test. The implications of this interaction regarding the deviations of the shock test specification are also discussed. Data from shock tests performed with the test assembly mounted to a rigid mounting surface and a flexible resonant plate are compared. Frequency response functions and shock response spectra are generated from the test data and compared to show the significance of: (1) the relative stiffness of the mounting surface; and (2) the location of the input control point during a resonant plate test. These factors are shown to be particularly important in using resonant plate testing to simulate pyrotechnic shock environments. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Excitation and tuning of Fano-like cavity plasmon resonances in dielectric-metal core-shell resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ping; Wan, Mingjie; Wu, Wenyang; Chen, Zhuo; Wang, Zhenlin

    2016-05-01

    Fano resonances have been realized in plasmonic systems and have found intriguing applications, in which, however, precisely controlled symmetry breaking or particular arrangement of multiple constituents is usually involved. Although simple core-shell type architectures composed of a spherical dielectric core and a concentric metallic shell layer have been proposed as good candidates that support inherent Fano resonances, these theoretical predictions have rarely seen any detailed experimental investigation. Here, we report on the experimental investigation of the magnetic and electric-based multipolar plasmonic Fano resonances in the dielectric-metal core-shell resonators that are formed by wrapping a nearly perfect metal shell layer around a dielectric sphere. We demonstrate that these Fano resonances originate from the interference between the Mie cavity and sphere plasmon resonances. Moreover, we present that the variation on either the dielectric core size or core refractive index allows for easily tuning the observed Fano resonances over a wide spectral range. Our findings are supported by excellent agreement with analytical calculations, and offer unprecedented opportunities for realizing ultrasensitive bio-sensors, lasing and nonlinear optical devices.Fano resonances have been realized in plasmonic systems and have found intriguing applications, in which, however, precisely controlled symmetry breaking or particular arrangement of multiple constituents is usually involved. Although simple core-shell type architectures composed of a spherical dielectric core and a concentric metallic shell layer have been proposed as good candidates that support inherent Fano resonances, these theoretical predictions have rarely seen any detailed experimental investigation. Here, we report on the experimental investigation of the magnetic and electric-based multipolar plasmonic Fano resonances in the dielectric-metal core-shell resonators that are formed by wrapping a

  2. Wave chaos in dielectric resonators: Asymptotic and numerical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tureci, Hakan E.

    Dielectric optical micro-resonators and micro-lasers represent a realization of a wave-chaotic system, where the lack of symmetry in the resonator shape leads to non-integrable ray dynamics in the short-wavelength limit. Understanding and controlling the emission properties of such resonators requires the investigation of the correspondence between classical phase space structures of the ray motion inside the resonator and wave-functions. Semi-classical approaches to the resonances of deformed cylindrical resonators are analyzed first within the closed limit, which corresponds to the quantum billiard problem from the field of quantum chaos. The results are then generalized to the dielectric case. We develop an efficient numerical algorithm to calculate the quasi-bound modes of dielectric resonators, which play a crucial role in determining the emission properties of micro-lasers based on dielectric resonators. Resonances based on stable periodic ray orbits of dielectric cavities are constructed in the short-wavelength limit using the parabolic equation method, and an associated wavevector quantization rule for the complex wavenumbers is derived. The effect of discrete symmetries of the resonator is analyzed and shown to give rise to quasi-degenerate multiplets. A recent experiment on lasing emission from deformed GaN micro-cavities is analyzed, leading to the appearance of scarred modes and non-specular effects in the farfield emission pattern. A framework is presented for treating the non-linear laser equations in a form suitable for treating the dielectric micro-lasers.

  3. Mechanically Tunable Dielectric Resonator Metasurfaces at Visible Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Gutruf, Philipp; Zou, Chengjun; Withayachumnankul, Withawat; Bhaskaran, Madhu; Sriram, Sharath; Fumeaux, Christophe

    2016-01-26

    Devices that manipulate light represent the future of information processing. Flat optics and structures with subwavelength periodic features (metasurfaces) provide compact and efficient solutions. The key bottleneck is efficiency, and replacing metallic resonators with dielectric resonators has been shown to significantly enhance performance. To extend the functionalities of dielectric metasurfaces to real-world optical applications, the ability to tune their properties becomes important. In this article, we present a mechanically tunable all-dielectric metasurface. This is composed of an array of dielectric resonators embedded in an elastomeric matrix. The optical response of the structure under a uniaxial strain is analyzed by mechanical-electromagnetic co-simulations. It is experimentally demonstrated that the metasurface exhibits remarkable resonance shifts. Analysis using a Lagrangian model reveals that strain modulates the near-field mutual interaction between resonant dielectric elements. The ability to control and alter inter-resonator coupling will position dielectric metasurfaces as functional elements of reconfigurable optical devices. PMID:26617198

  4. Resonant ultrasound spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert; Visscher, William M.; Fisk, Zachary

    1990-01-01

    An ultrasound resonant spectrometer determines the resonant frequency spectrum of a rectangular parallelepiped sample of a high dissipation material over an expected resonant response frequency range. A sample holder structure grips corners of the sample between piezoelectric drive and receive transducers. Each transducer is mounted on a membrane for only weakly coupling the transducer to the holder structure and operatively contacts a material effective to remove system resonant responses at the transducer from the expected response range. i.e., either a material such as diamond to move the response frequencies above the range or a damping powder to preclude response within the range. A square-law detector amplifier receives the response signal and retransmits the signal on an isolated shield of connecting cabling to remove cabling capacitive effects. The amplifier also provides a substantially frequency independently voltage divider with the receive transducer. The spectrometer is extremely sensitive to enable low amplitude resonance to be detected for use in calculating the elastic constants of the high dissipation sample.

  5. MACHINERY RESONANCE AND DRILLING

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R.; Fowley, M.

    2010-01-23

    New developments in vibration analysis better explain machinery resonance, through an example of drill bit chattering during machining of rusted steel. The vibration of an operating drill motor was measured, the natural frequency of an attached spring was measured, and the two frequencies were compared to show that the system was resonant. For resonance to occur, one of the natural frequencies of a structural component must be excited by a cyclic force of the same frequency. In this case, the frequency of drill bit chattering due to motor rotation equaled the spring frequency (cycles per second), and the system was unstable. A soft rust coating on the steel to be drilled permitted chattering to start at the drill bit tip, and the bit oscillated on and off of the surface, which increased the wear rate of the drill bit. This resonant condition is typically referred to as a motor critical speed. The analysis presented here quantifies the vibration associated with this particular critical speed problem, using novel techniques to describe resonance.

  6. Resonances in Positronium Hydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, Richard J.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recently, Ho and his colleagues have calculated the positions and widths of a series of resonances in the Ps+H scattering system, using the complex -rotation method and have compared them with estimates that I made many years ago using a quite different technique. I assumed that the resonance mechanism was the existence in the rearrangement channel [e+ + H-] of an infinite series of perturbed Coulomb bound states. Although these must be broadened and shifted by coupling with the open scattering channel, I expected them to lie very close to the actual resonance positions. To verify this, I did a model calculation for S-waves, including the coupling, and found that the first two resonances were not shifted very far from their unperturbed position. The new, detailed calculation agrees with this result, but when the P-wave was examined it was found, surprisingly, that the lowest resonance indeed moved up in energy by a large amount. With the help of Joseph DiRienzi of the College of Notre Dame of Maryland I am now extending the old calculation to P- and D-waves, in an attempt to understand this unexpected energy shift. Results will be presented at the Workshop.

  7. Gigahertz resonance characteristics of nanotube linear motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jeong-Won; Choi, Young Gyu; Ryu, Gi Han; Won, Chung Sang

    2008-08-01

    We investigated a linear carbon nanotube motor serving as the key building block for nanoscale motion control by using molecular dynamics simulations. This linear nanomotor, is based on the electrostatically telescoping multi-walled carbon-nanotube with ultralow intershell sliding friction, is controlled by the gate potential with the capacitance feedback sensing. The resonant harmonic peaks are induced by the interference between the driving frequencies and its self-frequency. The temperature is very important factor to operate this nanomotor.

  8. A novel resonant pressure sensor with boron diffused silicon resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junbo; Shi, Xiaojing; Liu, Lei; Wu, Zhengwei; Chen, Deyong; Zhao, Jinmin; Li, Shourong

    2008-12-01

    To improve the performance of the micro-machined resonant pressure sensor and simplify its fabrication process, a novel structure is proposed in which the boron diffused silicon (up to 15um thickness) and the bulk silicon are used as the resonant beam and pressure membrane respectively. The structural parameters were optimized through FEM to achieve the better sensitivity, and the relationships between the structural parameters and the sensitivity were established. Moreover, the fabrication processes were discussed to increase the product rate and the pressure sensor with the optimal structural parameters was fabricated by the bulk silicon MEMS processes. In order to enhance the signal of the sensor and make the closed-looped control of the sensor easily, electromagnetic excitation and detection was applied. However there is so high noise coming from the distributing capacitances between the diffused silicon layer and electrodes that reduce the signal to noise ratio of the sensor. Through the analysis of the micro-structure of the sensor, the asymmetrical excitation circuit was used to reduce the noise and then the detection circuit was designed for this sensor. The resonator of the sensor was packaged in the low vacuum condition so that the high quality factor (Q) with about 10000 can be achieved. Experimental tests were carried out for the sensor over the range of -80kPa to 100kPa, the results show that the sensitivity of the sensor is about 20kHz/100kPa, the sensitivity is 0.01%F.S. and the nonlinearity is about 1.8%.

  9. Collider Signal I :. Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Tim M. P.

    2010-08-01

    These TASI lectures were part of the summer school in 2008 and cover the collider signal associated with resonances in models of physics beyond the Standard Model. I begin with a review of the Z boson, one of the best-studied resonances in particle physics, and review how the Breit-Wigner form of the propagator emerges in perturbation theory and discuss the narrow width approximation. I review how the LEP and SLAC experiments could use the kinematics of Z events to learn about fermion couplings to the Z. I then make a brief survey of models of physics beyond the Standard Model which predict resonances, and discuss some of the LHC observables which we can use to discover and identify the nature of the BSM physics. I finish up with a discussion of the linear moose that one can use for an effective theory description of a massive color octet vector particle.

  10. Three-pion resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcilazo, H.; Mathelitsch, L.

    1994-03-01

    We investigate the continuum three-pion problem within a relativistic three-body model that takes into account the ππ S and P waves. The dynamical input of the two-body subsystem is given by separable potentials, which yield a good fit to the ππ scattering data and resonance parameters up to a two-body invariant mass of 900MeV. We introduce a parameter ν expressing the ambiguity in the reduction of a fully relativistic theory to a three-dimensional one. The masses and widths of the ω, a 1(1260), and π(1300) mesons, which decay predominantly into three pions, are reasonably well described by our model. The h 1(1170) meson, however, which also decays into three pions, cannot be explained as a three-pion resonance. Some πρ Argand diagrams are shown in those channels where resonances exist.

  11. Quartz resonator processing system

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Roswell D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is a single chamber ultra-high vacuum processing system for the oduction of hermetically sealed quartz resonators wherein electrode metallization and sealing are carried out along with cleaning and bake-out without any air exposure between the processing steps. The system includes a common vacuum chamber in which is located a rotatable wheel-like member which is adapted to move a plurality of individual component sets of a flat pack resonator unit past discretely located processing stations in said chamber whereupon electrode deposition takes place followed by the placement of ceramic covers over a frame containing a resonator element and then to a sealing stage where a pair of hydraulic rams including heating elements effect a metallized bonding of the covers to the frame.

  12. Magnetostrictive resonance excitation

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Ricardo B.; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani

    1992-01-01

    The resonance frequency spectrum of a magnetostrictive sample is remotely determined by exciting the magnetostrictive property with an oscillating magnetic field. The permeability of a magnetostrictive material and concomitant coupling with a detection coil varies with the strain in the material whereby resonance responses of the sample can be readily detected. A suitable sample may be a magnetostrictive material or some other material having at least one side coated with a magnetostrictive material. When the sample is a suitable shape, i.e., a cube, rectangular parallelepiped, solid sphere or spherical shell, the elastic moduli or the material can be analytically determined from the measured resonance frequency spectrum. No mechanical transducers are required and the sample excitation is obtained without contact with the sample, leading to highly reproducible results and a measurement capability over a wide temperature range, e.g. from liquid nitrogen temperature to the Curie temperature of the magnetostrictive material.

  13. Physics of Sports: Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, David

    2000-04-01

    When force is applied by an athlete to sports equipment resonances can occur. Just a few examples are: the ringing of a spiked volleyball, the strumming of a golf club shaft during a swing, and multiple modes induced in an aluminum baseball bat when striking a ball. Resonances produce acoustic waves which, if conditions are favorable, can be detected off the playing field. This can provide a means to evaluate athletic performance during game conditions. Results are given from the use of a simple hand-held acoustic detector - by a spectator sitting in the stands - to determine how hard volleyballs were spiked during college and high school games.

  14. Method for resonant measurement

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, G.W.; Migliori, A.; Dixon, R.D.

    1996-03-05

    A method of measurement of objects to determine object flaws, Poisson`s ratio ({sigma}) and shear modulus ({mu}) is shown and described. First, the frequency for expected degenerate responses is determined for one or more input frequencies and then splitting of degenerate resonant modes are observed to identify the presence of flaws in the object. Poisson`s ratio and the shear modulus can be determined by identification of resonances dependent only on the shear modulus, and then using that shear modulus to find Poisson`s ratio using other modes dependent on both the shear modulus and Poisson`s ratio. 1 fig.

  15. Magnetic resonance annual, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1987-01-01

    This book features reviews of high-resolution MRI of the knee, MRI of the normal and ischmeic hip, MRI of the heart, and temporomandibular joint imaging, as well as thorough discussion on artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging. Contributors consider the clinical applications of gadolinium-DTPA in magnetic resonance imaging and the clinical use of partial saturation and saturation recovery sequences. Timely reports assess the current status of rapid MRI and describe a new rapid gated cine MRI technique. Also included is an analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow effects during MRI of the central nervous system.

  16. Pygmy resonances and nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoneva, Nadia; Lenske, Horst

    2015-05-01

    A microscopic theoretical approach based on a self-consistent density functional theory for the nuclear ground state and QRPA formalism extended with multi-phonon degrees of freedom for the nuclear excited states is implemented in investigations of new low-energy modes called pygmy resonances. Advantage of the method is the unified description of low-energy multiphonon excitations, pygmy resonances and core polarization effects. This is found of crucial importance for the understanding of the fine structure of nuclear response functions at low energies. Aspects of the precise knowledge of nuclear response functions around the neutron threshold are discussed in a connection to nucleosynthesis.

  17. Method for resonant measurement

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, George W.; Migliori, Albert; Dixon, Raymond D.

    1996-01-01

    A method of measurement of objects to determine object flaws, Poisson's ratio (.sigma.) and shear modulus (.mu.) is shown and described. First, the frequency for expected degenerate responses is determined for one or more input frequencies and then splitting of degenerate resonant modes are observed to identify the presence of flaws in the object. Poisson's ratio and the shear modulus can be determined by identification of resonances dependent only on the shear modulus, and then using that shear modulus to find Poisson's ratio using other modes dependent on both the shear modulus and Poisson's ratio.

  18. Field resonance propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, A. C.

    1979-01-01

    A propulsion concept was developed based on a proposed resonance between coherent, pulsed electromagnetic wave forms, and gravitational wave forms (or space-time metrics). Using this concept a spacecraft propulsion system potentially capable of galactic and intergalactic travel without prohibitive travel times was designed. The propulsion system utilizes recent research associated with magnetic field line merging, hydromagnetic wave effects, free-electron lasers, laser generation of megagauss fields, and special structural and containment metals. The research required to determine potential, field resonance characteristics and to evaluate various aspects of the spacecraft propulsion design is described.

  19. Hexagonal quartz resonator

    DOEpatents

    Peters, R.D.M.

    1982-11-02

    A generally flat, relatively thin AT-cut piezoelectric resonator element structured to minimize the force-frequency effect when mounted and energized in a housing. The resonator is in the form of an equilateral hexagon with the X crystallographic axis of the crystal passing through one set of opposing corners with mounting being effected at an adjacent set of corners respectively [+-]60[degree] away from the X axis which thereby results in a substantially zero frequency shift of the operating frequency. 3 figs.

  20. Resonant optical gun.

    PubMed

    Maslov, A V; Bakunov, M I

    2014-05-01

    We propose a concept of a structure-a resonant optical gun-to realize an efficient propulsion of dielectric microparticles by light forces. The structure is based on a waveguide in which a reversal of the electromagnetic momentum flow of the incident mode is realized by exciting a whispering gallery resonance in the microparticle. The propelling force can reach the value up to the theoretical maximum of twice the momentum flow of the initial wave. The force density oscillates along the particle periphery and has very large amplitude. PMID:24784113

  1. Magnetic plasmonic Fano resonance at optical frequency.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yanjun; Hu, Zhijian; Li, Ziwei; Zhu, Xing; Fang, Zheyu

    2015-05-13

    Plasmonic Fano resonances are typically understood and investigated assuming electrical mode hybridization. Here we demonstrate that a purely magnetic plasmon Fano resonance can be realized at optical frequency with Au split ring hexamer nanostructure excited by an azimuthally polarized incident light. Collective magnetic plasmon modes induced by the circular electric field within the hexamer and each of the split ring can be controlled and effectively hybridized by designing the size and orientation of each ring unit. With simulated results reproducing the experiment, our suggested configuration with narrow line-shape magnetic Fano resonance has significant potential applications in low-loss sensing and may serves as suitable elementary building blocks for optical metamaterials. PMID:25594885

  2. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technology for Medical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinger, Thomas F.; Lauterbur, Paul C.

    1984-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance proton imaging provides anatomical definition of normal and abnormal tissues with a contrast and detection sensitivity superior to those of x-ray computed tomography in the human head and pelvis and parts of the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems. Recent improvements in technology should lead to advances in diagnostic imaging of the breast and regions of the abdomen. Selected-region nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of protons, carbon-13, and phosphorus-31 has developed into a basic science tool for in vivo studies on man and a unique tool for clinical diagnoses of metabolic disorders. At present, nuclear magnetic resonance is considered safe if access to the magnet environment is controlled. Technological advances employing field strengths over 2 teslas will require biophysical studies of heating and static field effects.

  3. Temperature Sensors Based on WGM Optical Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute; Itchenko, Vladimir; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2008-01-01

    A proposed technique for measuring temperature would exploit differences between the temperature dependences of the frequencies of two different electromagnetic modes of a whispering gallery-mode (WGM) optical resonator. An apparatus based on this technique was originally intended to be part of a control system for stabilizing a laser frequency in the face of temperature fluctuations. When suitably calibrated, apparatuses based on this technique could also serve as precise temperature sensors for purposes other than stabilization of lasers. A sensor according to the proposal would include (1) a transparent WGM dielectric resonator having at least two different sets of modes characterized by different thermo-optical constants and (2) optoelectronic instrumentation for measuring the difference between the temperature-dependent shifts of the resonance frequencies of the two sets of modes.

  4. Harmonics and Resonance Issues with Wind Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Bradt, M.; Badrzadeh, Babak; Camm, E H; Castillo, Nestor; Mueller, David; Siebert, T.; Schoene, Jens; Smith, Travis M; Starke, Michael R; Walling, R.

    2011-01-01

    Wind plants are susceptible to lightly-damped resonances which can attract and amplify ambient grid harmonic distortion and magnify wind turbine harmonic generation. Long-accepted harmonic modeling assumptions and practices are not appropriate for wind plants. VSCs are not ideal current sources and grid impedance is important. Attention to modeling detail and thorough evaluation over range of conditions is critical to meaningful analysis. In general, wind turbines are very slight sources of harmonics. Most harmonic issues are a result of resonance, caused by capacitor banks (for reactive power compensation) or from the extensive underground cabling in a collector system. Converter controls instability can be exacerbated by power system resonances. In some cases this has caused severe voltage distorDon and other problems. The IEEE 519 recommended guidelines are very restrictive. I recommend that they are used to resolve serious harmonic issues, and not to create petty problems.

  5. A seismic metamaterial: The resonant metawedge

    PubMed Central

    Colombi, Andrea; Colquitt, Daniel; Roux, Philippe; Guenneau, Sebastien; Craster, Richard V.

    2016-01-01

    Critical concepts from three different fields, elasticity, plasmonics and metamaterials, are brought together to design a metasurface at the geophysical scale, the resonant metawedge, to control seismic Rayleigh waves. Made of spatially graded vertical subwavelength resonators on an elastic substrate, the metawedge can either mode convert incident surface Rayleigh waves into bulk elastic shear waves or reflect the Rayleigh waves creating a “seismic rainbow” effect analogous to the optical rainbow for electromagnetic metasurfaces. Time-domain spectral element simulations demonstrate the broadband efficacy of the metawedge in mode conversion while an analytical model is developed to accurately describe and predict the seismic rainbow effect; allowing the metawedge to be designed without the need for extensive parametric studies and simulations. The efficiency of the resonant metawedge shows that large-scale mechanical metamaterials are feasible, will have application, and that the time is ripe for considering many optical devices in the seismic and geophysical context. PMID:27283587

  6. A seismic metamaterial: The resonant metawedge.

    PubMed

    Colombi, Andrea; Colquitt, Daniel; Roux, Philippe; Guenneau, Sebastien; Craster, Richard V

    2016-01-01

    Critical concepts from three different fields, elasticity, plasmonics and metamaterials, are brought together to design a metasurface at the geophysical scale, the resonant metawedge, to control seismic Rayleigh waves. Made of spatially graded vertical subwavelength resonators on an elastic substrate, the metawedge can either mode convert incident surface Rayleigh waves into bulk elastic shear waves or reflect the Rayleigh waves creating a "seismic rainbow" effect analogous to the optical rainbow for electromagnetic metasurfaces. Time-domain spectral element simulations demonstrate the broadband efficacy of the metawedge in mode conversion while an analytical model is developed to accurately describe and predict the seismic rainbow effect; allowing the metawedge to be designed without the need for extensive parametric studies and simulations. The efficiency of the resonant metawedge shows that large-scale mechanical metamaterials are feasible, will have application, and that the time is ripe for considering many optical devices in the seismic and geophysical context. PMID:27283587

  7. A seismic metamaterial: The resonant metawedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombi, Andrea; Colquitt, Daniel; Roux, Philippe; Guenneau, Sebastien; Craster, Richard V.

    2016-06-01

    Critical concepts from three different fields, elasticity, plasmonics and metamaterials, are brought together to design a metasurface at the geophysical scale, the resonant metawedge, to control seismic Rayleigh waves. Made of spatially graded vertical subwavelength resonators on an elastic substrate, the metawedge can either mode convert incident surface Rayleigh waves into bulk elastic shear waves or reflect the Rayleigh waves creating a “seismic rainbow” effect analogous to the optical rainbow for electromagnetic metasurfaces. Time-domain spectral element simulations demonstrate the broadband efficacy of the metawedge in mode conversion while an analytical model is developed to accurately describe and predict the seismic rainbow effect; allowing the metawedge to be designed without the need for extensive parametric studies and simulations. The efficiency of the resonant metawedge shows that large-scale mechanical metamaterials are feasible, will have application, and that the time is ripe for considering many optical devices in the seismic and geophysical context.

  8. Resonant transmission of light in chains of high-index dielectric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelev, Roman S.; Filonov, Dmitry S.; Petrov, Mihail I.; Krasnok, Alexander E.; Belov, Pavel A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2015-10-01

    We study numerically, analytically, and experimentally the resonant transmission of light in a waveguide formed by a periodic array of high-index dielectric nanoparticles with a side-coupled resonator. We demonstrate that a resonator with high enough Q -factor provides the conditions for the Fano-type interference allowing one to control the resonant transmission of light. We suggest a practical realization of this resonant effect based on the quadrupole resonance of a dielectric particle and demonstrate it experimentally for ceramic disks at microwave frequencies.

  9. Sensing Based on Fano-Type Resonance Response of All-Dielectric Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Semouchkina, Elena; Duan, Ran; Semouchkin, George; Pandey, Ravindra

    2015-01-01

    A new sensing approach utilizing Mie resonances in metamaterial arrays composed of dielectric resonators is proposed. These arrays were found to exhibit specific, extremely high-Q factor (up to 15,000) resonances at frequencies corresponding to the lower edge of the array second transmission band. The observed resonances possessed with features typical for Fano resonances (FRs), which were initially revealed in atomic processes and recently detected in macro-structures, where they resulted from interference between local resonances and a continuum of background waves. Our studies demonstrate that frequencies and strength of Fano-type resonances in all-dielectric arrays are defined by interaction between local Mie resonances and Fabry-Perot oscillations of Bloch eigenmodes that makes possible controlling the resonance responses by changing array arrangements. The opportunity for obtaining high-Q responses in compact arrays is investigated and promising designs for sensing the dielectric properties of analytes in the ambient are proposed. PMID:25905701

  10. Sensing based on Fano-type resonance response of all-dielectric metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Semouchkina, Elena; Duan, Ran; Semouchkin, George; Pandey, Ravindra

    2015-01-01

    A new sensing approach utilizing Mie resonances in metamaterial arrays composed of dielectric resonators is proposed. These arrays were found to exhibit specific, extremely high-Q factor (up to 15,000) resonances at frequencies corresponding to the lower edge of the array second transmission band. The observed resonances possessed with features typical for Fano resonances (FRs), which were initially revealed in atomic processes and recently detected in macro-structures, where they resulted from interference between local resonances and a continuum of background waves. Our studies demonstrate that frequencies and strength of Fano-type resonances in all-dielectric arrays are defined by interaction between local Mie resonances and Fabry-Perot oscillations of Bloch eigenmodes that makes possible controlling the resonance responses by changing array arrangements. The opportunity for obtaining high-Q responses in compact arrays is investigated and promising designs for sensing the dielectric properties of analytes in the ambient are proposed. PMID:25905701

  11. Micromachined double resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Roman (Inventor); Tang, Tony K. (Inventor); Shcheglov, Kirill (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A micromachined resonator mountable to an external support structure has a proof mass coupled to a base structure by a first spring structure, the base structure having a plurality of electrodes, and a second spring structure coupling the base structure to the external support structure.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Bradley, W.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present a review of magnetic resonance imaging. Many topics are explored from instrumentation, spectroscopy, blood flow and sodium imaging to detailed clinical applications such as the differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis or adrenal adenoma. The emphasis throughout is on descriptions of normal multiplanar anatomy and pathology as displayed by MRI.

  13. Proton resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shriner, J.F. Jr.

    1991-11-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Complete Level Scheme for {sup 30}P; A Search for Resonances Suitable for Tests of Detailed-Balance Violation; The Fourier Transform as a Tool for Detecting Chaos; Entrance Channel Correlations in p + {sup 27}Al; The Parity Dependence of Level Densities in {sup 49}V; and A Computer Program for the Calculation of Angular Momentum Coupling.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Annual, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1985-01-01

    The inaugural volume of Magnetic Resonance Annual includes reviews of MRI of the posterior fossa, cerebral neoplasms, and the cardiovascular and genitourinary systems. A chapter on contrast materials outlines the mechanisms of paramagnetic contrast enhancement and highlights several promising contrast agents.

  15. Double resonator cantilever accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.

    1984-01-01

    A digital quartz accelerometer includes a pair of spaced double-ended tuning forks fastened at one end to a base and at the other end through a spacer mass. Transverse movement of the resonator members stresses one and compresses the other, providing a differential frequency output which is indicative of acceleration.

  16. Double resonator cantilever accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, D.R.

    1982-09-23

    A digital quartz accelerometer includes a pair of spaced double-ended tuning forks fastened at one end to a base and at the other end through a spacer mass. Transverse movement of the resonator members stresses one and compresses the other, providing a differential frequency output which is indicative of acceleration.

  17. Resonance Ionization, Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, J. P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is an analytical technique that uses photons from lasers to resonantly excite an electron from some initial state of a gaseous atom through various excited states of the atom or molecule. Described are the apparatus, some analytical applications, and the precision and accuracy of the technique. Lists 26 references. (CW)

  18. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1959-08-01

    A cavity excitation circuit is described for rapidly building up and maintaining high-level oscillations in a resonant cavity. The circuit overcomes oscillation buildup slowing effects such as ion locking in the cavity by providing for the selective application of an amplified accelerating drive signal to the main cavity exciting oscillator during oscillation buildup and a direct drive signal to the oscillator thereafter.

  19. RESONATOR PARTICLE SEPARATOR

    DOEpatents

    Blewett, J.P.; Kiesling, J.D.

    1963-06-11

    A wave-guide resonator structure is designed for use in separating particles of equal momentum but differing in mass, having energies exceeding one billion eiectron volts. The particles referred to are those of sub-atomic size and are generally produced as a result of the bombardment of a target by a beam such as protons produced in a high energy accelerator. In the resonator a travelling electric wave is produced which travels at the same rate of speed as the unwanted particle which is thus deflected continuously over the length of the resonator. The wanted particle is slightly out of phase with the travelling wave so that over the whole length of the resonator it has a net deflection of substantially zero. The travelling wave is established in a wave guide of rectangular cross section in which stubs are provided to store magnetic wave energy leaving the electric wave energy in the main structure to obtain the desired travelling wave and deflection. The stubs are of such shape and spacing to establish a critical mathemitical relationship. (AEC)

  20. Screening Resonances In Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, P.

    1998-12-01

    When it was suggested that a new recombination mechanism (Resonant Radiative Recombination (RRR)) which, based on very general physical arguments, should happen in dense plasmas and promises to provide useful information for the local temperature and density diagnostics of plasmas, they assumed the existence of screening resonances. For model potentials the existence of screening resonances has been demonstrated beyond reasonable doubt in a number of calculations. The key question, how well those potentials describe the dominant effects of a real plasma remains open. The relation of theoretical predictions to experimentally measurable effects is an important issue at the present stage of their research. In particular, RRR is expected to account for enhanced recombination rates of low energetic electrons with their ions, since the first stage is the resonant capture of a slow electron by an atom or ion. The mechanism that traps an electron is a combination of complicated many-body interactions of the ions and electrons. For clarity they start here, however, with a discussion in terms of local potential traps the shapes of which are determined predominantly and in an average way by two factors: the degree of screening present at the ionic site and the degree of short-range order in the immediate neighborhood of this ion.

  1. Width of nonlinear resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuma, S.

    1984-03-01

    Two approximations are made, one essential and the other not so essential but convenient to keep the analytical treatment manageable: (1) Only one nonlinear resonance is considered at a time so that the treatment is best suited when the tune is close to one resonance only. To improve this approximation, one must go to the next order which involves a canonical transformation of dynamical variables. Analytical treatment of more than one resonance is not possible for general cases. (2) In the formalism using the action-angle variables, the Hamiltonian can have terms which are independent of the angle variables. These terms are called phase-independent terms or shear terms. The tune is then a function of the oscillation amplitudes. In the lowest-order treatment, the (4N)-pole components but not the (4N + 2)-pole components contribute to this dependence. In deriving the resonance width analytically, one ignores these terms in the Hamiltonian for the sake of simplicity. If these are retained, one needs at least three extra parameters and the analytical treatment becomes rather unwieldy.

  2. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  3. Improved ultraviolet resonance lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, A. M.

    1970-01-01

    Removal of the seal area from the path of the lamp discharge eliminates the gradual deterioration of lithium fluoride window surfaces from condensation of products formed by interaction of a resonant rare-gas discharge with window sealing materials. The discharge is confined to the inner tube.

  4. Control of Ferromagnetic Resonance Frequency and Frequency Linewidth by Electrical Fields in FeCo/[Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3]0.68-[PbTiO3]0.32(011) Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuoc, Nguyen N.; Ong, C. K.

    2016-06-01

    We report our detailed investigation of the electrical tuning of the ferromagnetic resonance frequency and frequency linewidth in multiferroic heterostructures consisting of FeCo thin films grown onto [Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3) O3]0.68-[PbTiO3]0.32 (PMN-PT) substrates with NiFe underlayers. Our study shows that the electrical tuning range of both ferromagnetic resonance frequency and frequency linewidth in this FeCo/PMN-PT heterostructure can be very large. Specifically, the resonance frequency can be tuned from 1.8 GHz to 10.3 GHz, and the frequency linewidth can be changed from 1.6 GHz to 7.3 GHz. The electrical tuning of these microwave properties is discussed in conjunction with the result from the static magnetic characterization and is explained based on the strain-driven magnetoelectric heterostructured effect.

  5. Electrochemical electron paramagnetic resonance utilizing loop gap resonators and micro-electrochemical cells.

    PubMed

    Tamski, Mika A; Macpherson, Julie V; Unwin, Patrick R; Newton, Mark E

    2015-09-28

    A miniaturised electrochemical cell design for Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) studies is reported. The cell incorporates a Loop Gap Resonator (LGR) for EPR investigation of electrochemically generated radicals in aqueous (and other large dielectric loss) samples and achieves accurate potential control for electrochemistry by using micro-wires as working electrodes. The electrochemical behaviour of the cell is analysed with COMSOL finite element models and the EPR sensitivity compared to a commercial TE011 cavity resonator using 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl (TEMPOL) as a reference. The electrochemical EPR performance is demonstrated using the reduction of methyl viologen as a redox probe in both water and acetonitrile. The data reported herein suggest that sub-micromolar concentrations of radical species can be detected in aqueous samples with accurate potential control, and that subtle solution processes coupled to electron transfer, such as comproportionation reactions, can be studied quantitatively using EPR. PMID:26291423

  6. Test component attachment effects on resonant plate pyrotechnic shock simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, R. Glenn; Zimmerman, Roger M.

    An accepted technique for simulating pyrotechnic shock inputs has been the resonant plate test. The plate is designed so that its predominant modes generate the desired frequency content of a given shock test specification. The success of the test is dependent on the engineer's ability to effectively design and control the response of the resonant plate. In designing a test to simulate a pyrotechnic environment, the location and mass of the test item become very important considerations since they have a profound impact on the dynamic response of the resonant plate. A relatively massive test item can change the plates's resonant frequency. Differences in the relative frequencies of the test item's fixture and the resonant plate may also effect the input to the test items. In this study, a simple mock test assembly is used to study test item and resonant plate interactions during a test. The implications of this interaction regarding the deviations of the shock test specification are also discussed. Data from shock tests performed with the test assembly mounted to a rigid mounting surface and a flexible resonant plate are compared. Frequency response functions and shock response spectra are generated from the test data and compared to show the significance of: (1) the relative stiffness of the mounting surface; and (2) the location of the input control point during a resonant plate test.

  7. Multi-frequency modes in superconducting resonators: Bridging frequency gaps in off-resonant couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Christian Kraglund; Mølmer, Klaus

    2015-03-01

    A SQUID inserted in a superconducting waveguide resonator imposes current and voltage boundary conditions that makes it suitable as a tuning element for the resonator modes. If such a SQUID element is subject to a periodically varying magnetic flux, the resonator modes acquire frequency side bands. We calculate the multi-frequency eigenmodes and these can couple resonantly to physical systems with different transition frequencies and this makes the resonator an efficient quantum bus for state transfer and coherent quantum operations in hybrid quantum systems. As an example of the application, we determine their coupling to transmon qubits with different frequencies and we present a bi-chromatic scheme for entanglement and gate operations. In this calculation, we obtain a maximally entangled state with a fidelity F = 95 % . Our proposal is competitive with the achievements of other entanglement-gates with superconducting devices and it may offer some advantages: (i) There is no need for additional control lines and dephasing associated with the conventional frequency tuning of qubits. (ii) When our qubits are idle, they are far detuned with respect to each other and to the resonator, and hence they are immune to cross talk and Purcell-enhanced decay.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research. PMID:25659942

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-02-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research.

  10. Energy saver prototype accelerating resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, Q.; May, M.; Miller, H.W.; Reid, J.; Turkot, F.; Webber, R.; Wildman, D.

    1981-06-01

    A fixed frequency rf accelerating resonator has been built and tested for the Fermilab Energy Saver. The design parameters and prototype resonator test results are given. The resonator features a high permeability nickel alloy resistor which damps unwanted modes and corona rolls designed with the aid of the computer code SUPERFISH. In bench measurements, the prototype resonator has achieved peak accelerating voltages of 500 kV for a 1% duty cycle and cw operation at 360 kV. 4 refs.

  11. Microwave Resonators Containing Diamond Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John; Maleki, Lutfollah; Wang, Rabi T.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic diamond dielectric bodies proposed for use in cylindrical resonators helping to stabilize frequencies of some microwave oscillators. Acting in conjunction with metal resonator cavities in which mounted, such dielectric bodies support "whispering-gallery" waveguide modes characterized by desired frequencies of resonance and by electro-magnetic-field configurations limiting dissipation of power on metal surfaces outside dielectric bodies. Performances at room temperature might exceed those of liquid-nitrogen-cooled sapphire-based resonators.

  12. Raman Scattering at Resonant or Near-Resonant Conditions: A Generalized Short-Time Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Abdelsalam; Sun, Yu-Ping; Miao, Quan; Ågren, Hans; Gel'mukhanov, Faris

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the dynamics of resonant Raman scattering in the course of the frequency detuning. The dephasing in the time domain makes the scattering fast when the photon energy is tuned from the absorption resonance. This makes frequency detuning to act as a camera shutter with a regulated scattering duration and provides a practical tool of controlling the scattering time in ordinary stationary measurements. The theory is applied to resonant Raman spectra of a couple of few-mode model systems and to trans-1,3,5-hexatriene and guanine-cytosine (G-C) Watson-Crick base pairs (DNA) molecules. Besides some particular physical effects, the regime of fast scattering leads to a simplification of the spectrum as well as to the scattering theory itself. Strong overtones appear in the Raman spectra when the photon frequency is tuned in the resonant region, while in the mode of fast scattering, the overtones are gradually quenched when the photon frequency is tuned more than one vibrational quantum below the first absorption resonance. The detuning from the resonant region thus leads to a strong purification of the Raman spectrum from the contamination by higher overtones and soft modes and purifies the spectrum also in terms of avoidance of dissociation and interfering fluorescence decay of the resonant state. This makes frequency detuning a very useful practical tool in the analysis of the resonant Raman spectra of complex systems and considerably improves the prospects for using the Raman effect for detection of foreign substances at ultra-low concentrations.

  13. Repetitive resonant railgun power supply

    DOEpatents

    Honig, E.M.; Nunnally, W.C.

    1985-06-19

    A repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. The supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles.

  14. Repetitive resonant railgun power supply

    DOEpatents

    Honig, Emanuel M.; Nunnally, William C.

    1988-01-01

    A repetitive resonant railgun power supply provides energy for repetitively propelling projectiles from a pair of parallel rails. The supply comprises an energy storage capacitor, a storage inductor to form a resonant circuit with the energy storage capacitor and a magnetic switch to transfer energy between the resonant circuit and the pair of parallel rails for the propelling of projectiles.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Facility (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Magnetic Resonance Facility capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. Liquid and solid-state analysis capability for a variety of biomass, photovoltaic, and materials characterization applications across NREL. NREL scientists analyze solid and liquid samples on three nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers as well as an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer.

  16. On the resonances and polarizabilities of split ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-García, J.; Martín, F.; Baena, J. D.; Marqués, R.; Jelinek, L.

    2005-08-01

    In this paper, the behavior at resonance of split ring resonators (SRRs) and other related topologies, such as the nonbianisotropic SRR and the broadside-coupled SRR, are studied. It is shown that these structures exhibit a fundamental resonant mode (the quasistatic resonance) and other higher-order modes which are related to dynamic processes. The excitation of these modes by means of a properly polarized time varying magnetic and/or electric fields is discussed on the basis of resonator symmetries. To verify the electromagnetic properties of these resonators, simulations based on resonance excitation by nonuniform and uniform external fields have been performed. Inspection of the currents at resonances, inferred from particle symmetries and full-wave electromagnetic simulations, allows us to predict the first-order dipolar moments induced at the different resonators and to develop a classification of the resonances based on this concept. The experimental data, obtained in SRR-loaded waveguides, are in agreement with the theory and point out the rich phenomenology associated with these planar resonant structures.

  17. Resonance characteristics of waveguide-coupled polyimide microring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hak-Phil; Park, Jong-Jin; Ryoo, Hyun-Ho; Gol Lee, Seung; Beom Hoan, O.; Lee, El-Hang

    2003-01-01

    We report for the first time on the resonance characteristics of a polyimide-based micro-ring resonator model. The resonator consists of a microring coupled to a pair of waveguides. Using the finite-difference time-domain method, we were able to obtain resonance peaks, from which the resonance wavelength could be identified. For a resonator with a microring of 10 μm diameter, known as the minimum for a lossless microring, we found the free spectral range of 46.65 nm, and quality factor of 588. These are excellent values strongly supporting the outstanding utility and quality of the microring resonators for wavelength-division multiplexing filter applications.

  18. Isolated post resonator mesogyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Challoner, Dorian; Peay, Chris; Wellman, Joanne; Shcheglov, Kirill; Hayworth, Ken; Wiberg, Dean; Yee, Karl; Sipppola, Clayton

    2004-01-01

    A new symmetric vibratory gyroscope principle has been devised in which a central post proof mass is counter-rocked against an outer sensing plate such that the motion is isolated from the gyroscope case. Prototype gyroscopes have been designed and fabricated with micromachined silicon at mesoscale (20-cm resonator width), vs. microscale (e.g., 2-mm resonator width) to achieve higher sensitivity and machined precision. This novel mesogyro design arose out of an ongoing technical cooperation between JPL and Boeing begun in 1997 to advance the design of micro-inertial sensors for low-cost space applications. This paper describes the theory of operation of the mesogyro and relationships with other vibratory gyroscopes, the mechanical design, closed loop electronics design, bulk silicon fabrication and packaged gyroscope assembly and test methods. The initial packaged prototype test results are reported for what is believed to be the first silicon mesogyroscope.

  19. Resonant SIMP dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Soo-Min; Lee, Hyun Min

    2016-07-01

    We consider a resonant SIMP dark matter in models with two singlet complex scalar fields charged under a local dark U(1)D. After the U(1)D is broken down to a Z5 discrete subgroup, the lighter scalar field becomes a SIMP dark matter which has the enhanced 3 → 2 annihilation cross section near the resonance of the heavier scalar field. Bounds on the SIMP self-scattering cross section and the relic density can be fulfilled at the same time for perturbative couplings of SIMP. A small gauge kinetic mixing between the SM hypercharge and dark gauge bosons can be used to make SIMP dark matter in kinetic equilibrium with the SM during freeze-out.

  20. [Magnetic resonance, an introduction].

    PubMed

    Cabrera Rueda, D J; Fernández Herrerías, G

    2000-09-01

    What would you explain to a patient if he/she had to undergo a magnetic resonance imagery session? Do you know if a person wearing a pacemaker can undergo an MRI? These and many other questions are answered in the following article since magnetic resonance imagery is a very useful diagnostic medium; however, it is one which not everyone has been able to get to know and use. The authors shed light on this diagnostic technique for nurses starting with its physical foundations; since knowing these aids professionals to correctly plan our treatments and improves the attention provided to patients who undergo this test. The authors also list the specific components in this device, the possible biological effects, the detractions and some basic recommendations. PMID:11111673

  1. Resonant Cascaded Downconversion

    SciTech Connect

    Weedbrook, Christian; Parrett, Ben; Kheruntsyan, Karen; Drummond, Peter; Pooser, Raphael C; Pfister, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    We analyze an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) in which cascaded down-conversion occurs inside a cavity resonant for all modes but the initial pump. Due to the resonant cascade design, the OPO presents two {chi}{sup (2)}-level oscillation thresholds that are therefore much lower than for a {chi}{sup (3)} OPO. This is promising for reaching the regime of an effective third-order nonlinearity well above both thresholds. Such a {chi}{sup (2)} cascaded device also has potential applications in frequency conversion to far-infrared regimes. But, most importantly, it can generate novel multipartite quantum correlations in the output radiation, which represent a step beyond squeezed or entangled light. The output can be highly non-Gaussian and therefore not describable by any semiclassical model. In this paper, we derive quantum stochastic equations in the positive-P representation and undertake an analysis of steady-state and dynamical properties of this system.

  2. Photorefractivity in WGM resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Strekalov, Dmitry; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Maleki, Lute

    2006-01-01

    We report on observation of photorefractive effects in whispering gallery mode resonators made of as-grown and magnesium doped lithium niobate and lithium tantalate in the near as well as far infrared. The effects manifested themselves as dynamic modification of the spectra as well as quality factors of the resonators coupled to the laser radiation. We have observed a significant (exceeding 10-4) change of the ordinary index of refraction of all the materials exposed with 780 nm light. Photorefractive effects have also been detected at 1550 nm. Our experiments support the conclusion that the photorefractivity does not have a distinct red boundary. We show that the maximum saturated refractive index change in the infrared is of the same order of magnitude as in the visible light.

  3. Auger resonant Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Azuma, Y.; LeBrun, T.; MacDonald, M.; Southworth, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    As noted above, traditional spectroscopy of the electronic structure of the inner shells of atoms, molecules, and solids is limited by the lifetime broadening of the core-excited states. This limitation can also be avoided with the non-radiative analog of X-ray Raman scattering - resonant Auger Raman spectroscopy. We have used this technique to study the K-shell excitation spectrum of argon as the photon energy is continuously scanned across threshold.

  4. Damping of nanomechanical resonators.

    PubMed

    Unterreithmeier, Quirin P; Faust, Thomas; Kotthaus, Jörg P

    2010-07-01

    We study the transverse oscillatory modes of nanomechanical silicon nitride strings under high tensile stress as a function of geometry and mode index m≤9. Reproducing all observed resonance frequencies with classical elastic theory we extract the relevant elastic constants. Based on the oscillatory local strain we successfully predict the observed mode-dependent damping with a single frequency-independent fit parameter. Our model clarifies the role of tensile stress on damping and hints at the underlying microscopic mechanisms. PMID:20867737

  5. Tandem resonator reflectance modulator

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Ian J.; Wendt, Joel R.

    1994-01-01

    A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors.

  6. Tandem resonator reflectance modulator

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, I.J.; Wendt, J.R.

    1994-09-06

    A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors. 8 figs.

  7. Resonant diphoton phenomenology simplified

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panico, Giuliano; Vecchi, Luca; Wulzer, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    A framework is proposed to describe resonant diphoton phenomenology at hadron colliders in full generality. It can be employed for a comprehensive model-independent interpretation of the experimental data. Within the general framework, few benchmark scenarios are defined as representative of the various phenomenological options and/or of motivated new physics scenarios. Their usage is illustrated by performing a characterization of the 750 GeV excess, based on a recast of available experimental results.

  8. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  9. Resonant non-gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Flauger, Raphael; Pajer, Enrico E-mail: ep295@cornell.edu

    2011-01-01

    We provide a derivation from first principles of the primordial bispectrum of scalar perturbations produced during inflation driven by a canonically normalized scalar field whose potential exhibits small sinusoidal modulations. A potential of this type has been derived in a class of string theory models of inflation based on axion monodromy. We use this model as a concrete example, but we present our derivations and results for a general slow-roll potential with superimposed modulations. We show analytically that a resonance between the oscillations of the background and the oscillations of the fluctuations is responsible for the production of an observably large non-Gaussian signal. We provide an explicit expression for the shape of this resonant non-Gaussianity. We show that there is essentially no overlap between this shape and the local, equilateral, and orthogonal shapes, and we stress that resonant non-Gaussianity is not captured by the simplest version of the effective field theory of inflation. We hope our analytic expression will be useful to further observationally constrain this class of models.

  10. Undulator induced resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.; Morton, P.; Spencer, J.; Winick, H.

    1983-08-01

    Undulators appear to be nearly ideal radiation sources for use in storage rings because of their high brightness and small perturbation on stored beam characteristics. We consider the effects of higher-order magnetic field errors and show how they increase beam size and may lead to unstable growth of betatron oscillations. We have observed such effects in SPEAR at betatron tunes satisfying the equations: 3nu/sub x/ + nu/sub y/ = 21 and nu/sub x/ + 3nu/sub y/ = 21. The widths of these resonances were measured to be GAMMA = 0.008 +- 0.004. They are clearly visible on the synchrotron light monitors with a very dynamic and characteristic beam blow-up pattern (reminiscent of a Miller beer label). A model is developed which predicts the locations of resonances, their widths and the projected shapes observed on the light monitors. By inducing such high-order coupling resonances one could study such things as the beam distribution in electron rings or possibly turbulent motion in proton rings.

  11. RESONATOR PARTICLE SEPARATOR

    DOEpatents

    Blewett, J.P.

    1962-01-01

    A wave guide resonator structure is described for use in separating particles of equal momentum but differing in mass and having energies exceeding one billion electron volts. The particles are those of sub-atomic size and are generally produced as a result of the bombardment of a target by a beam such as protons produced in a high-energy accelerator. In this wave guide construction, the particles undergo preferential deflection as a result of the presence of an electric field. The boundary conditions established in the resonator are such as to eliminate an interfering magnetic component, and to otherwise phase the electric field to obtain a traveling wave such as one which moves at the same speed as the unwanted particle. The latter undergoes continuous deflection over the whole length of the device and is, therefore, eliminated while the wanted particle is deflected in opposite directions over the length of the resonator and is thus able to enter an exit aperture. (AEC)

  12. Hyperbolic resonances of metasurface cavities.

    PubMed

    Keene, D; Durach, M

    2015-07-13

    We propose a new class of optical resonator structures featuring one or two metasurface reflectors or metacavities and predict that such resonators support novel hyperbolic resonances. As an example of such resonances we introduce hyperbolic Tamm plasmons (HTPs) and hyperbolic Fabry-Perot resonances (HFPs). The hyperbolic optical modes feature low-loss incident power re-distribution over TM and TE polarization output channels, clover-leaf anisotropic dispersion, and other unique properties which are tunable and are useful for multiple applications. PMID:26191916

  13. Aberration correction of unstable resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Construction of aspheric reflectors for unstable resonator lasers to provide an arbitrary laser mode inside the resonator to correct aberrations of an output beam by the construction of the shape of an end reflector opposite the output reflector of the resonator cavity, such as aberrations resulting from refraction of a beam exiting the solid of the resonator having an index of refraction greater than 1 or to produce an aberration in the output beam that will precisely compensate for the aberration of an optical train into which the resonator beam is coupled.

  14. Enhancement of artificial magnetism via resonant bianisotropy.

    PubMed

    Markovich, Dmitry; Baryshnikova, Kseniia; Shalin, Alexander; Samusev, Anton; Krasnok, Alexander; Belov, Pavel; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    All-dielectric "magnetic light" nanophotonics based on high refractive index nanoparticles allows controlling magnetic component of light at nanoscale without having high dissipative losses. The artificial magnetic optical response of such nanoparticles originates from circular displacement currents excited inside those structures and strongly depends on geometry and dispersion of optical materials. Here an approach for enhancing of magnetic response via resonant bianisotropy effect is proposed and analyzed. The key mechanism of enhancement is based on electric-magnetic interaction between two electrically and magnetically resonant nanoparticles of all-dielectric dimer. It was shown that proper geometrical arrangement of the dimer in respect to the incident illumination direction allows flexible control over all vectorial components of the magnetic moment, tailoring the latter in the dynamical range of 100% and delivering enhancement up to 36% relative to performances of standalone spherical particles. The proposed approach provides pathways for designs of all-dielectric metamaterials and metasurfaces with strong magnetic responses. PMID:26941126

  15. Optical feshbach resonance using the intercombination transition.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, K; Kasa, K; Kitagawa, M; Takahashi, Y

    2008-11-14

    We report control of the scattering wave function by an optical Feshbach resonance effect using ytterbium atoms. The narrow intercombination line (1S0-3P1) is used for efficient control as proposed by Ciuryło et al. [Phys. Rev. A 71, 030701(R) (2005)10.1103/PhysRevA.71.030701]. The manipulation of the scattering wave function is monitored with the change of a photoassociation rate caused by another laser. The optical Feshbach resonance is especially efficient for isotopes with large negative scattering lengths such as 172Yb, and we have confirmed that the scattering phase shift divided by the wave number, which gives the scattering length in the zero energy limit, is changed by about 30 nm. PMID:19113335

  16. Enhancement of artificial magnetism via resonant bianisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovich, Dmitry; Baryshnikova, Kseniia; Shalin, Alexander; Samusev, Anton; Krasnok, Alexander; Belov, Pavel; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    All-dielectric “magnetic light” nanophotonics based on high refractive index nanoparticles allows controlling magnetic component of light at nanoscale without having high dissipative losses. The artificial magnetic optical response of such nanoparticles originates from circular displacement currents excited inside those structures and strongly depends on geometry and dispersion of optical materials. Here an approach for enhancing of magnetic response via resonant bianisotropy effect is proposed and analyzed. The key mechanism of enhancement is based on electric-magnetic interaction between two electrically and magnetically resonant nanoparticles of all-dielectric dimer. It was shown that proper geometrical arrangement of the dimer in respect to the incident illumination direction allows flexible control over all vectorial components of the magnetic moment, tailoring the latter in the dynamical range of 100% and delivering enhancement up to 36% relative to performances of standalone spherical particles. The proposed approach provides pathways for designs of all-dielectric metamaterials and metasurfaces with strong magnetic responses.

  17. Van der Waals Forces in Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacBeth, Melissa; Garbini, Joseph; Sidles, John; Dougherty, William; Chao, Shih-Hui

    2001-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy detects modulated spin-gradient forces by means of a soft, high phQ cantilever. When the magnetic tip of the cantilever is brought close to the sample surface, static forces significantly change the net restoring force, altering the cantilever mechanical resonance frequency. This frequency shift can be very large compared to the width of the cantilever resonance. As previously demonstrated, active feedback control of the cantilever motion greatly improves cantilever dynamics. The control algorithm is obtained by formal optimal control techniques and implemented with a digital signal processor (DSP). We have recently enabled the DSP to continuously evaluate the frequency of the cantilever as the tip approaches the sample and seamlessly adapt control parameters for optimized performance. Tip-sample approach under adaptive control can avoid snap-in and obtain much smaller separations than uncontrolled approach, and the static potential is reliably characterized.

  18. Persistence, resistance, resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsadka, Maayan

    Sound cannot travel in a vacuum, physically or socially. The ways in which sound operates are a result of acoustic properties, and the ways by which it is considered to be music are a result of social constructions. Therefore, music is always political, regardless of its content: the way it is performed and composed; the choice of instrumentation, notation, tuning; the medium of its distribution; its inherent hierarchy and power dynamics, and more. My compositional praxis makes me less interested in defining a relationship between music and politics than I am in erasing---or at least blurring---the borders between them. In this paper I discuss the aesthetics of resonance and echo in their metaphorical, physical, social, and musical manifestations. Also discussed is a political aesthetic of resonance, manifested through protest chants. I transcribe and analyze common protest chants from around the world, categorizing and unifying them as universal crowd-mobilizing rhythms. These ideas are explored musically in three pieces. Sumud: Rhetoric of Resistance in Three Movements, for two pianos and two percussion players, is a musical interpretation of the political/social concept of sumud, an Arabic word that literally means "steadfastness" and represents Palestinian non-violent resistance. The piece is based on common protest rhythms and uses the acoustic properties inherent to the instruments. The second piece, Three Piano Studies, extends some of the musical ideas and techniques used in Sumud, and explores the acoustic properties and resonance of the piano. The final set of pieces is part of my Critical Mess Music Project. These are site-specific musical works that attempt to blur the boundaries between audience, performers and composer, in part by including people without traditional musical training in the process of music making. These pieces use the natural structure and resonance of an environment, in this case, locations on the UCSC campus, and offer an active

  19. Nonlinear bounce resonances between magnetosonic waves and equatorially mirroring electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lunjin; Maldonado, Armando; Bortnik, Jacob; Thorne, Richard M.; Li, Jinxing; Dai, Lei; Zhan, Xiaoya

    2015-08-01

    Equatorially mirroring energetic electrons pose an interesting scientific problem, since they generally cannot resonate with any known plasma waves and hence cannot be scattered down to lower pitch angles. Observationally it is well known that the flux of these equatorial particles does not simply continue to build up indefinitely, and so a mechanism must necessarily exist that transports these particles from an equatorial pitch angle of 90° down to lower values. However, this mechanism has not been uniquely identified yet. Here we investigate the mechanism of bounce resonance with equatorial noise (or fast magnetosonic waves). A test particle simulation is used to examine the effects of monochromatic magnetosonic waves on the equatorially mirroring energetic electrons, with a special interest in characterizing the effectiveness of bounce resonances. Our analysis shows that bounce resonances can occur at the first three harmonics of the bounce frequency (nωb, n = 1, 2, and 3) and can effectively reduce the equatorial pitch angle to values where resonant scattering by whistler mode waves becomes possible. We demonstrate that the nature of bounce resonance is nonlinear, and we propose a nonlinear oscillation model for characterizing bounce resonances using two key parameters, effective wave amplitude à and normalized wave number k~z. The threshold for higher harmonic resonance is more strict, favoring higher à and k~z, and the change in equatorial pitch angle is strongly controlled by k~z. We also investigate the dependence of bounce resonance effects on various physical parameters, including wave amplitude, frequency, wave normal angle and initial phase, plasma density, and electron energy. It is found that the effect of bounce resonance is sensitive to the wave normal angle. We suggest that the bounce resonant interaction might lead to an observed pitch angle distribution with a minimum at 90°.

  20. Quasi-monolithic tunable optical resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbore, Mark (Inventor); Tapos, Francisc (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An optical resonator has a piezoelectric element attached to a quasi-monolithic structure. The quasi-monolithic structure defines an optical path. Mirrors attached to the structure deflect light along the optical path. The piezoelectric element controllably strains the quasi-monolithic structure to change a length of the optical path by about 1 micron. A first feedback loop coupled to the piezoelectric element provides fine control over the cavity length. The resonator may include a thermally actuated spacer attached to the cavity and a mirror attached to the spacer. The thermally actuated spacer adjusts the cavity length by up to about 20 microns. A second feedback loop coupled to the sensor and heater provides a coarse control over the cavity length. An alternative embodiment provides a quasi-monolithic optical parametric oscillator (OPO). This embodiment includes a non-linear optical element within the resonator cavity along the optical path. Such an OPO configuration is broadly tunable and capable of mode-hop free operation for periods of 24 hours or more.