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Sample records for resonant soft-x-ray emission

  1. Role of screening and angular distributions in resonant soft-x-ray emission of CO

    SciTech Connect

    Skytt, P.; Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K.

    1997-04-01

    In the present work the authors focus on two particular properties of resonant X-ray emission, namely core hole screening of the excited electron, and anisotropy caused by the polarization of the exciting synchrotron radiation. The screening of the core hole by the excited electron causes energy shifts and intensity variations in resonant spectra compared to the non-resonant case. The linear polarization of the synchrotron radiation and the dipole nature of the absorption process create a preferential alignment selection of the randomly oriented molecules in the case of resonant excitation, producing an anisotropy in the angular distribution of the emitted X-rays. The authors have chosen CO for this study because this molecule has previously served as a showcase for non-resonant X-ray emission, mapping the valence electronic structure differently according to the local selection rules. With the present work they take interest in how this characteristic feature of the spectroscopy is represented in the resonant case.

  2. Electronic structure of multiferroic BiFeO3 by resonant soft-x-ray emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Tohru; Higuchi, T.; Liu, Y.-S.; Yao, P.; Glans, P.-A.; Guo, Jinghua; Chang, C.; Wu, Z.; Sakamoto, W.; Itoh, N.; Shimura, T.; Yogo, T.; Hattori, T.

    2008-07-11

    The electronic structure of multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3} has been studied using soft-X-ray emission spectroscopy. The fluorescence spectra exhibit that the valence band is mainly composed of O 2p state hybridized with Fe 3d state. The band gap corresponding to the energy separation between the top of the O 2p valence band and the bottom of the Fe 3d conduction band is 1.3 eV. The soft-X-ray Raman scattering reflects the features due to charge transfer transition from O 2p valence band to Fe 3d conduction band. These findings are similar to the result of electronic structure calculation by density functional theory within the local spin-density approximation that included the effect of Coulomb repulsion between localized d states.

  3. Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of vanadium oxides andrelated compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Thorsten

    2004-11-01

    substituting for Zn a 2{sup +} state in the ZnO lattice. Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) technique is used to confirm the existence of ferromagnetic ordering at temperatures as high as 425K. The ab initio calculations were found to be consistent with the observation of ferromagnetism arising from fully polarized Mn 2{sup +} state. The key to observed room temperature ferromagnetism in this system is the low temperature processing, which prevents formation of clusters, secondary phases and the host ZnO from becoming n-type. The electronic structure of the same Mn doped ZnO thin films studied using XAS, XES and RIXS. revealed a strong hybridization between Mn 3d and O 2p states, which is an important characteristic of a Dilute magnetic Semiconductor (DMS). It is shown that the various processing conditions like sintering temperature, dopant concentration and the properties of precursors used for making of DMS have a great influence on the final properties. Use of various experimental techniques to verify the physical properties, and to understand the mechanism involved to give rise to ferromagnetism is presented. Methods to improve the magnetic moment in Mn doped ZnO are also described. New promising DMS materials (such as Cu doped ZnO are explored). The demonstrated new capability to fabricate powder, pellets, and thin films of room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors thus makes possible the realization of a wide range of complex elements for a variety of new multifunctional phenomena related to Spintronic devices as well as magneto-optic components.

  4. Electronic Structure in Thin Film Organic Semiconductors Studied using Soft X-ray Emission and Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,Y.; Downes, J.; Wang, S.; Learmonth, T.; Plucinski, L.; Matsuura, A.; McGuinness, C.; Glans, P.; Bernardis, S.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The electronic structure of thin films of the organic semiconductors copper and vanadyl (VO) phthalocyanine (Pc) has been measured using resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering. For Cu-Pc we report the observation of two discrete states near E{sub F}. This differs from published photoemission results, but is in excellent agreement with density functional calculations. For VO-Pc, the vanadyl species is shown to be highly localized. Both dipole forbidden V 3d to V 3d*, and O 2p to V 3d* charge transfer transitions are observed, and explained in a local molecular orbital model.

  5. Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering for Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Young, Athony; Hexemer, Alexander; Padmore, Howard

    2015-03-01

    Over the past a few years, we have developed Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering (RSoXS) and constructed the first dedicated resonant soft x-ray scattering beamline at the Advanced Light Source, LBNL. RSoXS combines soft x-ray spectroscopy with x-ray scattering thus offers statistical information for 3D chemical morphology over a large length scale range from nanometers to micrometers. Its unique chemical sensitivity, large accessible size scale, molecular bond orientation sensitivity with polarized x-rays and high coherence have shown great potential for chemical/morphological structure characterization for many classes of materials. Some recent development of in-situ soft x-ray scattering with in-vacuum sample environment will be discussed. In order to study sciences in naturally occurring conditions, we need to overcome the sample limitations set by the low penetration depth of soft x-rays and requirement of high vacuum. Adapting to the evolving environmental cell designs utilized increasingly in the Electron Microscopy community, customized designed liquid/gas environmental cells will enable soft x-ray scattering experiments on biological, electro-chemical, self-assembly, and hierarchical functional systems in both static and dynamic fashion. Recent RSoXS results on organic electronics, block copolymer thin films, and membrane structure will be presented.

  6. Resonant soft X-ray scattering on protein solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Dan; Le, Thinh; Wang, Cheng; Zwart, Peter; Gomez, Esther; Gomez, Enrique

    Protein structure is crucial for biological function, such that characterizing protein folding and packing is important for the design of therapeutics and enzymes. We propose resonant soft X-ray scattering (RSOXS) as an approach to study proteins and other biological assemblies in solution. Calculations of the scattering contrast suggest that soft X-ray scattering is more sensitive than hard X-ray scattering, because of contrast generated at the absorption edges of constituent elements such as carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. We have examined the structure of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in solution by RSOXS. We find that by varying incident X-ray energies, we are able to achieve higher scattering contrast near the absorption edge. From our RSOXS scattering result we are able to reconstruct the structure of BSA in 3D. These RSOXS results also agree with hard X-ray experiments, including crystallographic data. Our study demonstrates the potential of RSOXS for studying protein structure in solution.

  7. Soft X-Ray Emissions from Planets and Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, A.; Gladstone, G. R.; Elsner, R. F.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Grodent, D.; Lewis, W. S.; Crary, F. J.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Howell, R. R.; Johnson, R. E.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The soft x-ray energy band (less than 4 keV) is an important spectral regime for planetary remote sensing, as a wide variety of solar system objects are now known to shine at these wavelengths. These include Earth, Jupiter, comets, moons, Venus, and the Sun. Earth and Jupiter, as magnetic planets, are observed to emanate strong x-ray emissions from their auroral (polar) regions, thus providing vital information on the nature of precipitating particles and their energization processes in planetary magnetospheres. X rays from low latitudes have also been observed on these planets, resulting largely from atmospheric scattering and fluorescence of solar x-rays. Cometary x-rays are now a well established phenomena, more than a dozen comets have been observed at soft x-ray energies, with the accepted production mechanism being charge-exchange between heavy solar wind ions and cometary neutrals. Also, Lunar x-rays have been observed and are thought to be produced by scattering and fluorescence of solar x-rays from the Moon's surface. With the advent of sophisticated x-ray observatories, e.g., Chandra and XMM-Newton, the field of planetary x-ray astronomy is advancing at a much faster pace. The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) has recently captured soft x-rays from Venus. Venusian x-rays are most likely produced through fluorescence of solar x-rays by C and O atoms in the upper atmosphere. Very recently, using CXO we have discovered soft x-rays from the moons of Jupiter-Io, Europa, and probably Ganymede. The plausible source of the x-rays from the Galilean satellites is bombardment of their surfaces by energetic (greater than 10 KeV) ions from the inner magnetosphere of Jupiter. The Io plasma Torus (IPT) is also discovered by CXO to be a source of soft x-rays by CXO have revealed a mysterious pulsating (period approx. 45 minutes) x-ray hot spot is fixed in magnetic latitude and longitude and is magnetically connected to a region in the outer magnetosphere of Jupiter. These

  8. Quantifying the Exospheric Component of Soft X-ray Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, Kip; Collier, Michael R.; Snowden, Steven L.; Robertson, Ina; Hansen, Kenneth; Cravens, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    High charge state heavy ions in the solar wind exchange charge with ambient neutral gas. This process creates a product ion in an excited state. During the radiative cascade process, EUV and X-ray photons are emitted with energies in the range of about 100 eV to 1 keV. Because the terrestrial exospheric density at the nominal magnetopause location is relatively high, approx. 10 cu cm, solar wind charge exchange, or SWCX, can be observed by Earth-orbiting soft X-ray instruments such as the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counters (PSPC). In this presentation, we will compare simulated and observed soft Xray emission during an event on August 18-19, 1991 and discuss the role of exospheric SWCX emission for this and other events.

  9. Resonant magnetic scattering of polarized soft x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Sacchi, M.; Hague, C.F.; Gullikson, E.M.; Underwood, J.

    1997-04-01

    Magnetic effects on X-ray scattering (Bragg diffraction, specular reflectivity or diffuse scattering) are a well known phenomenon, and they also represent a powerful tool for investigating magnetic materials since it was shown that they are strongly enhanced when the photon energy is tuned across an absorption edge (resonant process). The resonant enhancement of the magnetic scattering has mainly been investigated at high photon energies, in order to match the Bragg law for the typical lattice spacings of crystals. In the soft X-ray range, even larger effects are expected, working for instance at the 2p edges of transition metals of the first row or at the 3d edges of rare earths (300-1500 eV), but the corresponding long wavelengths prevent the use of single crystals. Two approaches have been recently adopted in this energy range: (i) the study of the Bragg diffraction from artificial structures of appropriate 2d spacing; (ii) the analysis of the specular reflectivity, which contains analogous information but has no constraints related to the lattice spacing. Both approaches have their own specific advantages: for instance, working under Bragg conditions provides information about the (magnetic) periodicity in ordered structures, while resonant reflectivity can easily be related to electronic properties and absorption spectra. An important aspect common to all the resonant X-ray scattering techniques is the element selectivity inherent to the fact of working at a specific absorption edge: under these conditions, X-ray scattering becomes in fact a spectroscopy. Results are presented for films of iron and cobalt.

  10. Plasma Emission Profile Recreation using Soft X-Ray Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, J. W.; Mauel, M. E.; Levesque, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    With sufficient views from multiple diode arrays, soft X-ray tomography is an invaluable plasma diagnostic because it is a non-perturbing method to reconstruct the emission within the interior of the plasma. In preparation for the installation of new SXR arrays in HBT-EP, we compute high-resolution tomographic reconstructions of discharges having kink-like structures that rotate nearly rigidly. By assuming a uniform angular mapping from the kink mode rotation, Δϕ ~ ωΔ t, a temporal sequence from a single 16-diode fan array represents as many as 16 x 100 independent views. We follow the procedure described by Wang and Granetz and use Bessel basis functions to take the inverse Radon transform. This transform is fit to our data using a least-squares method to estimate the internal SXR emissivity as a sum of polar functions. By varying different parameters of the transformation, we optimize the quality of our recreation of the emission profile and quantify how the reconstruction changes with the azimuthal order of the transform. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  11. Soft X-Ray Emissions from Planets and Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, A.; Gladstone, G. R.; Elsner, R. F.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Grodent, D.; Cravens, T. E.; Howell, R. R.; Metzger, A. E.; Ostgaard, N.; Maurellis, A.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A wide variety of solar system planetary bodies are now known to radiate in the soft x-ray energy (<5 keV) regime. These include planets (Earth, Jupiter, Venus, Saturn): bodies having thick atmosphere and with/without intrinsic magnetic field; planetary satellites (Moon, Io, Europa, Ganymede): bodies with no/thin atmosphere; and comets and Io plasma torus: bodies having extended tenuous atmosphere. Several different mechanisms have been proposed to explain the generation of soft x-rays from these objects. whereas in the hard x-ray energy range (>10 keV) x-rays mainly result from electron bremsstrahlung process. In this paper we present a brief review of the x-ray observations on each of the planetary bodies and discuss their characteristics and proposed source mechanisms.

  12. Critical Reexamination of Resonant Soft X-Ray Bragg Forbidden Reflections in Magnetite

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, S.B.; Di Matteo, S.; Beale, T.A.W.; Joly, Y.; Mazzoli, C.; Hatton, P.D.; Bencok, P.; Yakhou, F.; Brabers, V.A.M.

    2009-05-01

    Magnetite, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, displays a highly complex low-temperature crystal structure that may be charge and orbitally ordered. Many of the recent experimental claims of such ordering rely on resonant soft x-ray diffraction at the oxygen K and iron L edges. We have reexamined this system and undertaken soft x-ray diffraction experiments on a high-quality single crystal. Contrary to previous claims in the literature, we show that the intensity observed at the Bragg forbidden (001/2){sub c} reflection can be explained purely in terms of the low-temperature structural displacements around the resonant atoms. This does not necessarily mean that magnetite is not charge or orbitally ordered but rather that the present sensitivity of resonant soft x-ray experiments does not allow conclusive demonstration of such ordering.

  13. Investigation of the Ionic Hydration in Aqueous Salt Solutions by Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jeyachandran, Y L; Meyer, F; Benkert, A; Bär, M; Blum, M; Yang, W; Reinert, F; Heske, C; Weinhardt, L; Zharnikov, M

    2016-08-11

    Understanding the molecular structure of the hydration shells and their impact on the hydrogen bond (HB) network of water in aqueous salt solutions is a fundamentally important and technically relevant question. In the present work, such hydration effects were studied for a series of representative salt solutions (NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, MgCl2, and KBr) by soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering (RIXS). The oxygen K-edge XES spectra could be described with three components, attributed to initial state HB configurations in pure water, water molecules that have undergone an ultrafast dissociation initiated by the X-ray excitation, and water molecules in contact with salt ions. The behavior of the individual components, as well as the spectral shape of the latter component, has been analyzed in detail. In view of the role of ions in such effects as protein denaturation (i.e., the Hofmeister series), we discuss the ion-specific nature of the hydration shells and find that the results point to a predominant role of anions as compared to cations. Furthermore, we observe a concentration-dependent suppression of ultrafast dissociation in all salt solutions, associated with a significant distortion of intact HB configurations of water molecules facilitating such a dissociation. PMID:27442708

  14. Resonant soft x-ray emission spectroscopy of V{sub 2}O{sub 3}, VO{sub 2} and NaV{sub 2}O{sub 5}

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, T.; Duda, L.-C.; Augustsson, A.; Guo, J.-H.; Nordgren, J.; Downes, J.E.; McGuinness, C.; Smith, K.E.; Dhalenne, G.; Revcolevschi, A.; Klemm, M.; Horn, S.

    2004-03-03

    Resonant soft X-ray emission (RSXE) spectra of V2O3, VO2 and NaV2O5 were recorded for a series of excitation energies at resonances of the V L- and O K-absorption band. The V L- and O K-emission in these vanadium oxide bands possess considerable overlap. By resonant excitation we can tune the energy to the absorption thresholds, thereby eliminating this overlap. Hereby we obtain the V 3d and O 2p projected density-of-states of the valence band. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) is found to be weak in V2O3, which we explain as being due to its metallic character at room temperature. Vanadium dioxide (VO2), semiconducting at room temperature, shows considerable RIXS features only at the O K-emission band. Distinct RIXS structures are visible in the RSXE spectra of the insulator NaV2O5. In the emission spectra excited at the V L-thresholds of this ternary vanadium oxide, dexcitations of the V dxy subband at an energy loss of -1:7 eV are observed. Our observation, that RIXS is stronger for insulators than for metals, should be taken advantage of for studying insulator-to-metal transitions in vanadium compounds in the future.

  15. Using Resonant Soft X-rays to Reveal Internal Organic Thin Film Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gann, Eliot

    This dissertation details the establishment and expansion of resonant soft X-ray scattering techniques to reveal the internal structure of organic thin films. These films are increasingly important in numerous electronic systems, including organic thin film transistors, organic photovoltaics, and organic light emitting diodes. These devices use the electrical properties of polymers to respectively turn on and off conduction, turn light into electricity, and create light. The performance of each of these systems depends critically on their physical structure but unfortunately, traditional techniques fail to adequately characterize that structure. This dissertation will explore the use of soft X-ray scattering to reveal the mesoscale structure or organic electronic devices. This begins with an overview of the field to make the case for soft X-rays being an appropriate and novel tool. Next, to explain how to collect accurate soft X-ray scattering, the development of a new and unique soft X-ray scattering facility will be presented. Having the tools, the next step is to develop scattering theories and models for understanding and correctly analyzing scattering from these complicated devices. This includes development and comparison of analysis techniques and theory to simulate scattering. This simulation system is then used in the development of a theory to understand the novel phenomenon of anisotropic X-ray scattering from isotropic organic samples. Finally, I will describe the development and first use of a method able to simultaneously measure size scales and chemical structure with depth sensitivity in thin films: Grazing Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering. This work provides valuable understanding and tools to the field of materials characterization, opening up new opportunities for principled design of organic electronics.

  16. Soft x-ray emission spectra of lithium fluoride excited by synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, K.L.; Zhang, C.H.; Callcott, T.A.; Arakawa, E.T.; Ederer, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    A core excited Li atom is perhaps the simplest cation defect that can be introduced into LiF. It frequently binds an electron in an electronic state, whose properties dominate both the soft x-ray absorption and soft x-ray emission properties of LiF. This phenomena was examined using a new, very high efficiency, emission spectrometer. Exciton and valence band peaks were observed which decay with time and are replaced by a metallic Li peak at 54 eV.

  17. Characteristics of the soft X-ray emission from laser-produced highly charged platinum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Hiroyuki; Arai, Goki; Kondo, Yoshiki; Dinh, Thanh-Hung; Dunne, Padraig; O’Sullivan, Gerry; Ejima, Takeo; Hatano, Tadashi; Jiang, Weihua; Nishikino, Masaharu; Sasaki, Akira; Sunahara, Atsushi; Higashiguchi, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    We characterized the spectral structure of the soft X-ray emission and determined the plasma parameters in laser-produced highly charged platinum plasmas. The spectral structure observed originated from Pt21+ to Pt34+ ions, emissions from which overlapped to produce a high output flux in the carbon-window soft X-ray spectral region. Using dual laser pulse irradiation, we observed the maximum output flux, which was 20% larger than that obtained under single-laser irradiation, and the evolution of a strongly absorbed spectral structure, which was attributed to the effects of both opacity and long-scale length of the expanding pre-plasma.

  18. Energetics and timing of the hard and soft X-ray emissions in white light flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neidig, Donald F.; Kane, Sharad R.

    1993-01-01

    By comparing the light curves in optical, hard X-ray, and soft X-ray wavelengths for eight well-observed flares, we confirm previous results indicating that the white light flare (WLF) is associated with the flare impulsive phase. The WLF emission peaks within seconds after the associated hard X-ray peak, and nearly two minutes before the 1-8 A soft X-ray peak. It is further shown that the peak power in nonthermal electrons above 50 keV is typically an order of magnitude larger, and the power in 1-8 A soft X-rays radiated over 2pi sr, at the time of the WLF peak, is an order of magnitude smaller than the peak WLF power.

  19. Investigation of self-filtering unstable resonator for soft x-ray lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani-Moghadam, G.; Farahbod, A. H.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, it is proposed that the self-filtering unstable resonator (SFUR) is suitable for soft x-ray lasers which have active medium with a short-gain-lifetime. In order to evaluate the idea, we have analyzed the self-filtering unstable resonator in two dimensions with Ne-like Fe soft x-ray active medium for transitions 2p5 3 p → 2p5 3 s and 3d9 4 d → 3d9 4 p at 25.5 nm. The role of field-limiting aperture in mode propagation has been shown. Moreover, beam quality factor M2 has been calculated and output mode behavior studied and compared with a plane-parallel (PP) resonator of equal length. The calculations indicate that the M2 factor in SFUR resonator is smaller than PP resonator and therefore output beam divergence is lower and the mode quality is much better. It is expected that a high quality beam of soft x-ray laser with brightness of the order 1013 W / cm2 sr and energy more than 10 nJ may be achievable with a properly designed diffraction-filtered unstable resonator.

  20. Probing symmetry and symmetry breaking in resonant soft-x-ray fluorescence spectra of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K.; Guo, J.

    1997-04-01

    Conventional non-resonant soft X-ray emission brings about information about electronic structure through its symmetry and polarization selectivity, the character of which is governed by simple dipole rules. For centro-symmetric molecules with the emitting atom at the inversion center these rules lead to selective emission through the required parity change. For the more common classes of molecules which have lower symmetry or for systems with degenerate core orbitals (delocalized over identical sites), it is merely the local symmetry selectivity that provides a probe of the local atomic orbital contribution to the molecular orbital. For instance, in X-ray spectra of first row species the intensities essentially map the p-density at each particular atomic site, and, in a molecular orbital picture, the contribution of the local p-type atomic orbitals in the LCAO description of the molecular orbitals. The situation is different for resonant X-ray fluorescence spectra. Here strict parity and symmetry selectivity gives rise to a strong frequency dependence for all molecules with an element of symmetry. In addition to symmetry selectivity the strong frequency dependence of resonant X-ray emission is caused by the interplay between the shape of a narrow X-ray excitation energy function and the lifetime and vibrational broadenings of the resonantly excited core states. This interplay leads to various observable effects, such as linear dispersion, resonance narrowing and emission line (Stokes) doubling. Also from the point of view of polarization selectivity, the resonantly excited X-ray spectra are much more informative than the corresponding non-resonant spectra. Examples are presented for nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide molecules.

  1. Molecular orientation in soft matter thin films studied by resonant soft X-ray reflectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Mezger, Markus; Jerome, Blandine; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Valvidares, Manuel; Gullikson, Eric; Giglia, Angelo; Mahne, Nicola; Nannarone, Stefano

    2011-01-12

    We present a technique to study depth profiles of molecular orientation in soft matter thin films with nanometer resolution. The method is based on dichroism in resonant soft X-ray reflectivity using linear s- and p-polarization. It combines the chemical sensitivity of Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy to specific molecular bonds and their orientation relative to the polarization of the incident beam with the precise depth profiling capability of X-ray reflectivity. We demonstrate these capabilities on side chain liquid crystalline polymer thin films with soft X-ray reflectivity data at the carbon K edge. Optical constants of the anisotropic refractive index ellipsoid were obtained from a quantitative analysis using the Berreman formalism. For films up to 50 nm thickness we find that the degree of orientation of the long axis exhibits no depth variation and isindependent of the film thickness.

  2. Emission Line Spectra in the Soft X-Ray Region 20-75 (Angstrom)

    SciTech Connect

    Lepson, J K; Beiersdorfer, P; Chen, H; Behar, E; Kahn, S M

    2002-06-18

    As part of a project to complete a comprehensive catalogue of astrophysically relevant emission lines in support of new-generation X-ray observatories using the Lawrence Livermore electron beam ion traps EBIT-I and EBIT-II, we studied emission lines of argon and sulfur in the soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet region. Here we present observations of Ar IX through Ar XVI and S VII through S XIV between 20 and 75 {angstrom} to illustrate our work.

  3. Emission Line Spectra in the Soft X-ray Region 20 - 75 Angstroms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepson, J. K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Behar, E.; Kahn, S. M.

    2002-01-01

    As part of a project to complete a comprehensive catalogue of astrophysically relevant emission lines in support of new-generation X-ray observatories using the Lawrence Livermore electron beam ion traps EBIT-I and EDIT-II, emission lines of argon and sulfur in the soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet region were studied. Observations of Ar IX through Ar XVI and S VII through S XIV between 20 and 75 Angstrom are presented to illustrate our work.

  4. The Soft X-Ray Emission Component of Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabbiano, Giuseppina

    1998-01-01

    Work included the analysis of the HRJ observations of the Sombrero galaxy (Fabbiano and Juda) published in Ap.J. This paper discussed the discovery of a point-like x-ray source at the nucleus of the galaxy, which is suspected to host a massive black hole. More work was done on the analysis of the Observation of M94 in support of an AXAF proposal. We have also analyzed the M81 data by adding to our observation the entire set of the archival ROSAT data. We plan to write up the results for publication. Both galaxies have nuclei optically similar to that of the Sombrero galaxy. The nucleus of M81 is a known x-ray source. The M94 data has revealed a point-like nuclear source superposed on more diffuse emission.

  5. Probing the graphite band structure with resonant soft-x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, J.A.; Shirley, E.L.; Hudson, E.A.

    1997-04-01

    Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation offers several advantages over surface sensitive spectroscopies for probing the electronic structure of complex multi-elemental materials. Due to the long mean free path of photons in solids ({approximately}1000 {angstrom}), SXF is a bulk-sensitive probe. Also, since core levels are involved in absorption and emission, SXF is both element- and angular-momentum-selective. SXF measures the local partial density of states (DOS) projected onto each constituent element of the material. The chief limitation of SXF has been the low fluorescence yield for photon emission, particularly for light elements. However, third generation light sources, such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS), offer the high brightness that makes high-resolution SXF experiments practical. In the following the authors utilize this high brightness to demonstrate the capability of SXF to probe the band structure of a polycrystalline sample. In SXF, a valence emission spectrum results from transitions from valence band states to the core hole produced by the incident photons. In the non-resonant energy regime, the excitation energy is far above the core binding energy, and the absorption and emission events are uncoupled. The fluorescence spectrum resembles emission spectra acquired using energetic electrons, and is insensitive to the incident photon`s energy. In the resonant excitation energy regime, core electrons are excited by photons to unoccupied states just above the Fermi level (EF). The absorption and emission events are coupled, and this coupling manifests itself in several ways, depending in part on the localization of the empty electronic states in the material. Here the authors report spectral measurements from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  6. A setup for resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering on liquids at free electron laser light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kunnus, Kristjan; Schreck, Simon; Foehlisch, Alexander; Eckert, Sebastian; Beye, Martin; Suljoti, Edlira; Weniger, Christian; Wernet, Philippe; Kalus, Christian; Nordlund, Dennis; Zhang, Wenkai; Hartsock, Robert W.; Gaffney, Kelly J.; Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J.; Kennedy, Brian; and others

    2012-12-15

    We present a flexible and compact experimental setup that combines an in vacuum liquid jet with an x-ray emission spectrometer to enable static and femtosecond time-resolved resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements from liquids at free electron laser (FEL) light sources. We demonstrate the feasibility of this type of experiments with the measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source FEL facility. At the FEL we observed changes in the RIXS spectra at high peak fluences which currently sets a limit to maximum attainable count rate at FELs. The setup presented here opens up new possibilities to study the structure and dynamics in liquids.

  7. Efficient soft x-ray emission source at 13.5 nm by use of a femtosecond-laser-produced Li-based microplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Rajyaguru, Chirag; Kubodera, Shoichi; Sasaki, Wataru; Yugami, Noboru; Kikuchi, Takashi; Kawata, Shigeo; Andreev, Alex

    2005-06-01

    A proof-of-principle experiment was demonstrated to optimize a Li-based microjet target coupled to dual subpicosecond laser pulses as a 13.5 nm soft x-ray emission source. An optimum pulse duration of 450 fs to achieve a maximum emission at 13.5 nm was well explained by the resonant absorption process. Utilization of dual femtosecond pulses revealed that the optimum pulse separation around 500 ps was necessary to achieve a maximum soft x-ray conversion efficiency of 0.2%, where plasma hydrodynamics could not be neglected. A one-fluid two-temperature hydrodynamic simulation reproduced this optimum pulse separation behavior.

  8. Investigation of the amorphous to crystalline phase transition of chemical solution deposited Pb(Zr30Ti70)O3 thin films by soft x-ray absorption and soft x-ray emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schneller, T.; Schneller, T.; Kohlstedt, H.; Petraru, A.; Waser, R.; Guo, J.; Denlinger, J.; Learmonth, T.; Glans, Per-Andres; Smith, K. E.

    2008-08-01

    Chemical solution deposited (CSD) complex oxide thin films attract considerable interest in various emerging fields as for example, fuel cells, ferroelectric random access memories or coated conductors. In the present paper the results of soft-x-ray spectroscopy between 100 eV and 500 eV on the amorphous to crystalline phase transition of ferroelectric PbZr{sub 0.3}Ti{sub 0.7}O{sub 3} (PZT) thin films are presented. Five CSD samples derived from the same wafer coated with a PZT film pyrolyzed at 350 C were heat treated at different temperatures between 400 C and 700 C. At first the sample were morphologically and electrically characterized. Subsequently the soft-x-ray absorption and emission experiments were performed at the undulator beamline 8.0 of the Advanced Light Source of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Soft-x-ray absorption spectra were acquired for the Ti L{sub 2,3-}, O K-, and C K-edge thresholds by using simultaneously the total electron yield (TEY) and total fluorescence yield (TFY) detection methods. For two samples, annealed at 400 C and 700 C, respectively, the resonant inelastic soft-x-ray spectroscopy (RIXS) was applied for various excitation energies near the Ti L-, O K-edges. We observed clear evidence of a rutile phase at untypically low temperatures. This rutile phase transforms into the perovskite phase upon increasing annealing temperature. These results are discussed in the framework of current microscopic models of the PZT (111) texture selection.

  9. Application of CVD diamonds as dosimeters of soft X-ray emission from plasma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krása, J.; Juha, L.; Vorlíček, V.; Cejnarová, A.

    2004-05-01

    The thermoluminescent properties of polycrystalline chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond, as free-standing CVD cutting tool material, type CVDITE-CDM (De Beers Company), were studied with respect to its use in the dosimetry of soft X-ray emission from laser-produced plasma. The range of linearity for 5.9-keV radiation was measured to be only two orders of magnitude, ranging from a sensitivity threshold of ˜0.01 to ˜2 Gy. In this linearity range, the sensitivity of CVD diamonds is about 65 times lower than the sensitivity of TLD-100 dosimeters. The unpolished (grained) face of CVD diamonds shows ˜1.5-times higher thermoluminescence (TL) response after irradiation than the polished face, in the high-temperature range, but the polished face shows slightly higher TL response in the low-temperature range. A strong TL sensitivity to the blue portion of the visible light spectrum was measured. Simultaneous irradiation of TLD-100 dosimeters and CVD diamonds by soft X-rays emitted from a laser-produced plasma showed that CVDITE-CDM diamonds can be applied as detectors of intense soft X-ray radiation.

  10. Single-pulse resonant magnetic scattering using a soft x-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Gutt, C.; Streit-Nierobisch, S.; Stadler, L.-M.; Faeustlin, R. R.; Treusch, R.; Feldhaus, J.; Weckert, E.; Vartanyants, I. A.; Gruebel, G.; Pfau, B.; Guenther, C. M.; Koennecke, R.; Eisebitt, S.; Froemter, R.; Kobs, A.; Stickler, D.; Oepen, H. P.; Grunze, M.; Rosenhahn, A.; Wilhein, T.

    2010-03-01

    We report on single-pulse resonant magnetic scattering experiments using soft x-ray pulses generated by the free-electron laser FLASH at DESY. We could record a magnetic diffraction pattern from a Co/Pt multilayer sample at the Co M{sub 2,3} edge with a single 30-fs-long FEL pulse. The analysis of the magnetic small-angle scattering signal for subsequent pulses indicates a threshold energy density below which there is no indication that the magnetic properties of the sample might be altered.

  11. Resonant Soft X-Ray Contrast Variation Methods as Composition-Specific Probes of Thin Polymer Film Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, Cynthia; Welch, Cynthia F.; Hjelm, Rex P.; Mang, Joseph T.; Hawley, Marilyn E.; Wrobleski, Debra A.; Orler, E. Bruce; Kortright, Jeffrey B

    2008-04-04

    We have developed complementary soft x-ray scattering and reflectometry techniques that allow for the morphological analysis of thin polymer films without resorting to chemical modification or isotopic 2 labeling. With these techniques, we achieve significant, x-ray energy-dependent contrast between carbon atoms in different chemical environments using soft x-ray resonance at the carbon edge. Because carbon-containing samples absorb strongly in this region, the scattering length density depends on both the real and imaginary parts of the atomic scattering factors. Using a model polymer film of poly(styrene-b-methyl methacrylate), we show that the soft x-ray reflectivity data is much more sensitive to these atomic scattering factors than the soft x-ray scattering data. Nevertheless, fits to both types of data yield useful morphological details on the polymer?slamellar structure that are consistent with each other and with literature values.

  12. Nuclear dynamics and spectator effects in resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering of gas-phase water molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Weinhardt, Lothar; Benkert, Andreas; Meyer, Frank; Blum, Monika; Wilks, Regan G.; Yang, Wanli; Baer, Marcus; Reinert, Friedrich; and others

    2012-04-14

    The electronic structure of gas-phase H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O molecules has been investigated using resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS). We observe spectator shifts for all valence orbitals when exciting into the lowest three absorption resonances. Strong changes of the relative valence orbital emission intensities are found when exciting into the different absorption resonances, which can be related to the angular anisotropy of the RIXS process. Furthermore, excitation into the 4a{sub 1} resonance leads to nuclear dynamics on the time scale of the RIXS process; we find evidence for vibrational coupling and molecular dissociation in both, the spectator and the participant emission.

  13. Intrinsic disc emission and the soft X-ray excess in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Done, Chris; Davis, S. W.; Jin, C.; Blaes, O.; Ward, M.

    2012-03-01

    Narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies have low-mass black holes and mass accretion rates close to (or exceeding) Eddington, so a standard blackbody accretion disc should peak in the extreme ultraviolet. However, the lack of true absorption opacity in the disc means that the emission is better approximated by a colour temperature corrected blackbody, and this colour temperature correction is large enough (˜2.4) that the bare disc emission from a zero spin black hole can extend into the soft X-ray bandpass. Part of the soft X-ray excess seen in these objects must be intrinsic emission from the disc unless the vertical structure is very different to that predicted. None the less, this is not the whole story even for the extreme NLS1 as the shape of the soft excess is much broader than predicted by a bare disc spectrum, indicating some Compton upscattering by warm, optically thick material. We associate this with the disc itself, so it must ultimately be powered by mass accretion. We build an energetically self-consistent model assuming that the emission thermalizes to a (colour temperature corrected) blackbody only at large radii. At smaller radii the gravitational energy is split between powering optically thick Comptonized disc emission (forming the soft X-ray excess) and an optically thin corona above the disc (forming the tail to higher energies). We show examples of this model fit to the extreme NLS1 RE J1034+396, and to the much lower Eddington fraction broad-line Seyfert 1 PG 1048+231. We use these to guide our fits and interpretations of three template spectra made from co-adding multiple sources to track out a sequence of active galactic nucleus (AGN) spectra as a function of L/LEdd. Both the individual objects and template spectra show the surprising result that the Compton upscattered soft X-ray excess decreases in importance with increasing L/LEdd. The strongest soft excesses are associated with low mass accretion rate AGN rather than being tied to some

  14. Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering Studies of Multiferroic YMn2O5

    SciTech Connect

    Partzsch, S.; Wilkins, S.B.; Schierle, E.; Soltwisch, V.; Hill, J.P.; Weschke, E.; Souptel, D.; Buchner, B.; Geck, J.

    2011-06-17

    We performed soft x-ray resonant scattering at the MnL{sub 2,3}- and OK edges of YMn{sub 2}O{sub 5}. While the resonant intensity at the MnL{sub 2,3} edges represent the magnetic order parameter, the resonant scattering at the OK edge is found to be directly related to the macroscopic ferroelectric polarization. The latter observation reveals the important role of the spin-dependent Mn-O hybridization for the multiferroicity of YMn{sub 2}O{sub 5}. We present details about how to obtain correct energy dependent lineshapes and discuss the origin of the resonant intensity at the OK edge.

  15. STELLAR WIND INDUCED SOFT X-RAY EMISSION FROM CLOSE-IN EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Kislyakova, K. G.; Lammer, H.; Fossati, L.; Johnstone, C. P.; Holmström, M.; Zaitsev, V. V.

    2015-01-30

    In this Letter, we estimate the X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets. We show that the Solar/Stellar Wind Charge Exchange Mechanism (SWCX), which produces soft X-ray emission, is very effective for hot Jupiters. In this mechanism, X-ray photons are emitted as a result of the charge exchange between heavy ions in the solar wind and the atmospheric neutral particles. In the solar system, comets produce X-rays mostly through the SWCX mechanism, but it has also been shown to operate in the heliosphere, in the terrestrial magnetosheath, and on Mars, Venus, and the Moon. Since the number of emitted photons is proportional to the solar wind mass flux, this mechanism is not very effective for the solar system giants. Here we present a simple estimate of the X-ray emission intensity that can be produced by close-in extrasolar giant planets due to charge exchange with the heavy ions of the stellar wind. Using the example of HD 209458b, we show that this mechanism alone can be responsible for an X-ray emission of ≈10{sup 22} erg s{sup –1}, which is 10{sup 6} times stronger than the emission from the Jovian aurora. We discuss also the possibility of observing the predicted soft X-ray flux of hot Jupiters and show that despite high emission intensities they are unobservable with current facilities.

  16. Stelllar wind induced soft X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kislyakova, Kristina; Fossati, Luca; Johnstone, Colin P.; Holmström, Mats; Zaitsev, Valery V.; Lammer, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    We estimate the X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets. We show that the Solar/Stellar Wind Charge Exchange Mechanism (SWCX) which produces soft X-ray radiation is very effective for hot Jupiters. In this mechanism, X-ray photons are produces by charge exchange between heavy ions in the solar wind and the atmospheric neutral particles. This mechanism is know to generate X-ray emission of comets in the Solar system. It has also been shown to operate in the heliosphere, in the terrestrial magnetosheath, and on Mars, Venus and Moon. Since the number of emitted photons is proportional to the solar wind mass flux, this mechanism is not effective for the Solar system giants. We present a simple estimate of the X-ray emission intensity that can be produced by close-in extrasolar Hot Jupiters due to charge exchange with the heavy ions of the stellar wind. Using the example of HD 209458b, we show that this mechanism alone can be responsible for an X-ray emission of ≈ 1022 erg s‑1, which is 106 times stronger than the emission from the Jovian aurora. We discuss the possibility to observe the predicted soft X-ray flux of hot Jupiters and show that despite high emission intensities they are unobservable with current facilities.

  17. Isotope Effects in the Resonant Inelastic Soft X-ray Scattering Maps of Gas-Phase Methanol.

    PubMed

    Benkert, A; Meyer, F; Hauschild, D; Blum, M; Yang, W; Wilks, R G; Bär, M; Reinert, F; Heske, C; Weinhardt, L

    2016-04-14

    The electronic structure of gas-phase methanol molecules (H3COH, H3COD, and D3COD) at atmospheric pressure was investigated using resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the O K and C K edges. We observe strong changes of the relative emission intensities of all valence orbitals as a function of excitation energy, which can be related to the symmetries of the involved orbitals causing an angularly anisotropic RIXS intensity. Furthermore, all observed emission lines are subject to strong spectator shifts of up to -0.9 eV at the O K edge and up to -0.3 eV at the C K edge. At the lowest O K resonance, we find clear evidence for dissociation of the methanol molecule on the time scale of the RIXS process, which is illustrated by comparing X-ray emission spectra of regular and deuterated methanol. PMID:27003748

  18. Resonant soft X-ray scattering study of twist bend nematic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chenhui; Young, Anthony; Wang, Cheng; Hexemer, Alexander; Li, Quan; Lavrentovich, Oleg; Walba, David; Tuchband, Michael; Shuai, Min; Clark, Noel

    Liquid crystals (LCs) form many interesting nano-scale structures, many of which can be probed with X-ray scattering techniques, typically hard X-rays due to its high penetrating power. However, in the hard X-ray regime, the scattering contrast of some LC nanostructures can be extremely low due to their weak electron density modulation. Here we show it is possible to use resonant soft x-rays to probe the helical pitch of the newly discovered twist bend nematic phase, which is purely a twist bend structure with no electron density modulation. The in-situ temperature dependent measurement will be presented and discussed. This work together with our previous study on the helical nanofilament B4 phase shows the great potential of soft x-ray scattering in liquid crystals. Supported by the Director of the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  19. Soft X-Ray Emission Analysis Of A Pulsed Capillary Discharge Operated In Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, M. P.; Valenzuela, J. C.; Wyndham, E. S.; Favre, M.; Chuaqui, H.; Bhuyan, H.

    2014-05-01

    We present results from a pulsed capillary ns discharge source, operated in Nitrogen and N/He mixtures, in an alumina capillary 2.1mm long with outer diameter of 6.3mm and inner diameter of 1.6mm. The electrical energy stored is 0.5J with peak current of 6kA. Fast charging from an IGBT based pulsed power circuit allows operation at 35-600 Hz with voltages in the range of 18-24kV. Characteristic time-integrated N/He spectra were recorded and analyzed for values of 20-200 Å, with clear evidence of He-like Nitrogen emission at 28.8Å, which represents a possible source for water window soft x-ray microscopy. Filtered diode measurements reveal the influence of axial electron beams, generated by hollow cathode dynamics, on the x-ray emission in the range of 300-450 eV. We discuss optimal voltage applied and pressure conditions for soft x-ray generation. Time-integrated MCP images of a filtered slit-wire system delivered clear evidence of full wall detachment with ~500μm in radial size for the entire emission range and ~200μm for the emission in the 300-450 eV range.

  20. Discovery of Soft X-Ray Emission From Io, Europa and the Io Plasma Torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R. F.; Gladstone, G. R.; Waite, J. H.; Crary, F. J.; Howell, R. R.; Johnson, R. E.; Ford, P. G.; Metzger, A. E.; Hurley, K. C.; Feigelson, E. D.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We report the discovery of soft (0.25 - 2 keV) x-ray emission from the moons Io and Europa, probably Ganymede, and from the Io Plasma Torus (IPT). Bombardment by energetic (greater than 10 keV) H, O, and S ions from the region of the IPT seems the likely source of the x-ray emission from the Galilean moons. According to our estimates, fluorescent x-ray emission excited by solar x-rays, even during flares from the active Sun, charge-exchange processes, previously invoked to explain Jupiter's x-ray aurora and cometary x-ray emission, and ion stripping by dust grains fall to account for the observed emission. On the other hand, bremsstrahlung emission of soft X-rays from non-thermal electrons in the few hundred to few thousand eV range may account for a substantial fraction of the observed x-ray flux from the IPT.

  1. Simulation of Soft X-Ray Emission Lines from the Missing Baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Taotao; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Sanders, Wilton T.; Houck, John; Davé, Romeel; Katz, Neal; Weinberg, David H.; Hernquist, Lars

    2005-04-01

    We study the soft X-ray emission (0.1-1 keV) from the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) in a hydrodynamic simulation of a cold dark matter universe. Our main goal is to investigate how such emission can be explored with a combination of imaging and spectroscopy and to motivate future X-ray missions. We first present high-resolution images of the X-ray emission in several energy bands in which emission from different ion species dominates. We pick three different areas to study the high-resolution spectra of X-rays from the WHIM: (1) a galaxy group, (2) a filament, and (3) an underluminous region. By taking into account the background X-ray emission from AGNs and foreground emission from the Galaxy, we compute composite X-ray spectra of the selected regions. We briefly investigate angular clustering of the soft X-ray emission, finding a strong signal. Most interestingly, the combination of high spectral resolution and angular information allows us to map the emission from the WHIM in three dimensions. We cross-correlate the positions of galaxies in the simulation with this redshift map of emission and detect the presence of six different ion species (Ne IX, Fe XVII, O VII, O VIII, N VII, and C VI) in the large-scale structure traced by the galaxies. Finally, we show how such emission can be detected and studied with future X-ray satellites, with particular attention to a proposed mission, the Missing Baryon Explorer (MBE). We present simulated observations of the WHIM gas with MBE.

  2. Development of soft X-ray emission spectrometer for EPMA/SEM and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, H.; Murano, T.; Takakura, M.; Asahina, S.; Terauchi, M.; Koike, M.; Imazono, T.; Koeda, M.; Nagano, T.

    2016-02-01

    A newly developed wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray emission spectrometer (WD-SXES) with two kinds of gratings, JS50XL and JS200N, were installed on electron probe microanalysers (EPMA) and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). The new detector covers the energy range from 50 to 210 eV with an energy resolution of better than 0.2 eV at Al-L emission on Al metal. With this low energy range and high energy resolution, various kinds of X-ray lines of K, L, M, N emission spectra from lithium to uranium could be observed and chemical state analysis carried out. This WD-SXES has also a high potential for analysing trace light elements under 100 ppm. The design, having no mechanically scanning components, allows parallel spectral acquisition over the entire energy range of each grating (50 to 170 eV and 70 to 210 eV).

  3. The Soft X-Ray Emission in a Large Sample of Galaxy Clusters with ROSAT PSPC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonamente, Massimiliano; Lieu, Richard; Joy, Marshall K.; Nevalainen, Jukka H.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The study of soft X-ray emission of 38 X-ray selected galaxy clusters observed by ROSAT PSPC indicates that the soft excess phenomenon may be a common occurrence in galaxy clusters. Excess soft X-ray radiation, above the contribution from the hot intra-cluster medium, is evident in a large fraction of sources, and is clearly detected with large statistical significance in the deepest observations. The investigation relies on new, high resolution 21 cm HI observations. The sample selection also features analysis of infrared images, to further ensure reliability of results with respect to the characteristics of Galactic absorption. The possibility of background or calibration effects as cause of the excess emission is likewise investigated; a detailed analysis of the distribution of the excess emission with respect to detector position and Galactic HI column density shows that the excess emission is a genuine celestial phenomenon. We find evidence for a preferential distribution of the soft excess emission at distances larger than approx. 150-200 kpc from the centers of clusters; this behavior may be naturally explained in the context of a non-thermal Inverse-Compton scenario. Alternatively, we propose that the phenomenon maybe caused by thermal emission of very large-scale 'warm' filaments seen in recent hydrodynamic simulations. This new interpretation relieves the very demanding requirements of either the traditional intra-cluster 'warm' gas and the non-thermal scenarios. We also investigate the possibility of the soft excess originating from unresolved, X-ray faint cluster galaxies.

  4. Introducing a New Capability at SSRL: Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jun-Sik; Jang, Hoyoung; Lu, Donghui; Kao, Chi-Chang

    Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) at SLAC recently developed a setup for the resonant soft x-ray scattering (RSXS). In general, the RSXS technique uniquely probes not only structural information, but also chemical specific information. This is because this technique can explore the spatial periodicities of charge, orbital, spin, and lattice with spectroscopic aspect. Moreover, the soft x-ray range is particularly relevant for a study of soft materials as it covers the K-edge of C, N, F, and O, as well as the L-edges of transition metals and M-edges of rare-earth elements. Hence, the RSXS capability has been regarded as a very powerful technique for investigating the intrinsic properties of materials such as quantum- and energy-materials. The RSXS capability at the SSRL composes of in-vacuum 4-circle diffractometer. There are also the fully motorized sample-motion manipulations. Also, the sample can be cooled down to 25 K via the liquid helium. This capability has been installed at BL 13-3, where the photon source is from elliptically polarized undulator (EPU). Covering the photon energies is from 230 eV to 1400 eV. Furthermore, this EPU system offers more degree of freedoms for controlling x-ray polarizations (linear and circular). Using the advance of controlling x-ray polarization, we can also investigate a morphology effect of local domain/grain in materials. The detailed introduction of the RSXS end-station and several results will be touched in this poster presentation.

  5. Unraveling skyrmion spin texture using resonant soft x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sujoy

    2015-03-01

    The recent discovery of skyrmions, that were originally predicted in context of high energy physics, in magnetic materials has sparked tremendous interest in the research community due to its rich physics and potential in spintronics applications. Skyrmions have an unusual spin texture that manifests as magnetic knot and can be easily moved around. Understanding the fundamental physics and mechanisms for controlling their dynamical properties presents important scientific challenges. So far experimental verifications of the skyrmions in magnetic systems have come from neutron scattering and Lorentz transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. In this talk we report the first observation of the skyrmions using resonant soft x-ray scattering. We have used soft x-rays tuned to the Cu L3 edge to diffract off the skyrmion lattice in a multiferroic Cu2OSeO3 compound. We show that in Cu2OSeO3 there exist two skyrmion lattices arising due to the two inequivalent Cu-O sublattices that have two different magnetically active d-orbitals. The two skyrmion sublattices are mutually rotated with respect to each other. The angle of rotation could be changed by an external magnetic field, thereby indicating possible existence of a new phase. We have also studied skyrmion spin texture in an ultra-thin Fe/Gd multilayer that shows perpendicular anisotropy. The Fe/Gd sample exhibits a near perfect aligned stripe phase. Within a small range of temperature and magnetic field we observe a hexagonal scattering pattern due to skyrmion bubbles. Analysis of the scattering pattern suggests that the skyrmion lattice unit cell contains two skyrmions. The biskyrmion state is also revealed by Lorentz TEM images. The near room temperature discovery of skyrmion in a technology relevant material is a significant step towards using skyrmions in magnetic devices. Work at LBNL was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy (Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231).

  6. Resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering of CdS: a two-dimensional electronic structure map approach

    SciTech Connect

    Weinhardt, L.; Fuchs, O.; Fleszar, A.; Bar, M.; Blum, M.; Weigand, M.; Denlinger, J.D.; Yang, W.; Hanke, W.; Umbach, E.; Heske, C.

    2008-09-24

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) with soft x-rays is uniquely suited to study the elec-tronic structure of a variety of materials, but is currently limited by low (fluorescence yield) count rates. This limitation is overcome with a new high-transmission spectrometer that allows to measure soft x-ray RIXS"maps." The S L2,3 RIXS map of CdS is discussed and compared with density functional calculations. The map allows the extraction of decay channel-specific"absorp-tion spectra," giving detailed insight into the wave functions of occupied and unoccupied elec-tronic states.

  7. Electrochemical flowcell for in-situ investigations by soft x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwanke, C.; Lange, K. M.; Golnak, R.; Xiao, J.

    2014-10-15

    A new liquid flow-cell designed for electronic structure investigations at the liquid-solid interface by soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented. A thin membrane serves simultaneously as a substrate for the working electrode and solid state samples as well as for separating the liquid from the surrounding vacuum conditions. In combination with counter and reference electrodes this approach allows in-situ studies of electrochemical deposition processes and catalytic reactions at the liquid-solid interface in combination with potentiostatic measurements. As model system in-situ monitoring of the deposition process of Co metal from a 10 mM CoCl{sub 2} aqueous solution by X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented.

  8. Chemical Analysis of Impurity Boron Atoms in Diamond Using Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Iihara, Junji; Takebe, Toshihiko; Denlinger, Jonathan D.

    2008-03-29

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and molecular orbital calculations confirm that boron atoms in CVD-B-diamond substitute for carbon atoms in the diamond lattice to form covalent B-C bonds, while boron atoms in HPT-B-diamond react with the impurity nitrogen atoms to form hexagonal boron nitride. This suggests that the high purity diamond without nitrogen impurities is necessary to synthesize p-type B-diamond semiconductors.

  9. Detection of EUV/Soft X-ray bremsstrahlung emission at terrestrial altitudes above 750 km

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsiyannis, A.; Dominique, M.; De Keyser, J.; Berghmans, D.; Michel, K.; Dammasch, I. E.; Borremans, K.; De Donder, E.; Ben Moussa, A.

    2015-12-01

    LYRA is a fast radiometer on-board the PROBA-2 mission designed to observe the solar activity from UV to Soft X-rays and consists of three redundant units of four different optical bandpasses each. Since the start of operation in 2010, LYRA regularly observes disturbances with a characteristic signature that have no direct solar origin. Instead the frequency of occurrence correlates with the ApA_p index of geomagnetic activity on Earth's surface and the location of these detections coincides with the McIlwain L ≈ 3 zon. By comparing the wavelength sensitivity of the main PROBA-2 instruments, the wavelength range of the detected photons can be narrowed down to the range of 0.07-1 KeV (1-17 nm) and the altitudes of their source to those above PROBA-2's orbit (~750 km). A discussion on the magnetospheric origins of this emission is included.

  10. Analysis of Order Formation in Block Copolymer Thin Films Using Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Virgili, J.M.; Tao, Y.; Kortright, J.B.; Balsara, N.P.; Segalman, R.A.; /UC, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-07-13

    The lateral order of poly(styrene-block-isoprene) copolymer (PS-b-PI) thin films is characterized by the emerging technique of resonant soft X-ray scattering (RSOXS) at the carbon {pi}* resonance and compared to ordering in bulk samples of the same materials measured using conventional small-angle X-ray scattering. We show resonance using theory and experiment that the loss of scattering intensity expected with a decrease in sample volume in the case of thin films can be overcome by tuning X-rays to the {pi}* resonance of PS or PI. Using RSOXS, we study the microphase ordering of cylinder- and sphere-forming PS-b-PI thin films and compare these results to position space data obtained by atomic force microscopy. Our ability to examine large sample areas ({approx}9000 {micro}m{sup 2}) by RSOXS enables unambiguous identification of the lateral lattice structure in the thin films. In the case of the sphere-forming copolymer thin film, where the spheres are hexagonally arranged, the average sphere-to-sphere spacing is between the bulk (body-centered cubic) nearest neighbor and bulk unit cell spacings. In the case of the cylinder-forming copolymer thin film, the cylinder-to-cylinder spacing is within experimental error of that obtained in the bulk.

  11. Coronal O VI emission observed with UVCS/SOHO during solar flares: Comparison with soft X-ray observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, S.; Giordano, S.; Raymond, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we derive the O VI 1032 Å luminosity profiles of 58 flares, during their impulsive phase, based on off-limb measurements by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) aboard the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The O VI luminosities from the transition region plasma (here defined as the region with temperatures 5.0 ≤ log T (K) ≤ 6.0) were inferred from the analysis of the resonantly scattered radiation of the O VI coronal ions. The temperature of maximum ionization for O VI is log Tmax (K) = 5.47. By comparison with simultaneous soft X-ray measurements, we investigate the likely source (chromospheric evaporation, footpoint emission, or heated prominence ejecta) for the transition region emission observed during the impulsive phase. In our study, we find evidence of the main characteristics predicted by the evaporation scenario. Specifically, most O VI flares precede the X-ray peaks typically by several minutes with a mean of 3.2 ± 0.1 min, and clear correlations are found between the soft X-ray and transition region luminosities following power laws with indices ~ 0.7 ± 0.3. Overall, the results are consistent with transition region emission originating from chromospheric evaporation; the thermal X-ray emission peaks after the emission from the evaporation flow as the loops fill with hot plasma. Finally, we were able to infer flow speeds in the range ~20-100 km s-1 for one-third of the events, 14 of which showed speeds between 60 and 80 km s-1. These values are compatible with those found through direct spectroscopic observations at transition region temperatures by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode.

  12. Correlative Analysis of Hard and Soft X-ray Emissions in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, Dominic M.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes research performed under the Phase 3 Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) Guest Investigator Program. The objective of this work is to study different mechanisms of solar flare heating by comparing their predictions with simultaneous hard and soft X-ray observations. The datasets used in this work consist of hard X-ray observations from the CGRO Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) and soft X-ray observations from the Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) and Soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on the Japanese Yohkoh spacecraft.

  13. Soft x-ray emission and absorption studies of semiconductors and organic molecular solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagarescu, Cristian B.

    A combination of soft x-ray absorption (SXA) and soft x-ray emission (SXE) spectroscopy with tunable synchrotron radiation was developed and used to study the bulk electronic structure of semiconductors and organic superconductors. Soft x-ray emission measures the chemically and orbitally resolved partial density of occupied electronic states (PDOS) while in absorption the partial density of unoccupied states is measured. Due to their high technological relevance, there has been a renewed interest in the electronic properties of the wide band-gap nitride semiconductors GaN, AlN, InN and their alloys. The valence- and conduction-band partial densities of states of GaN and AlN were measured and found in good agreement with theoretical results. In the AlxGa1-xN (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) alloy system, N 2p → 1s emission measurements allowed the motion of the elementally resolved bulk valence-band maximum to be monitored as a function of the Al content. In the same system, conclusive experimental evidence for the presence of N 2p-Ga 3d hybridized states was provided by the evolution of a N 2p emission feature situated below the bottom of the valence-band. with the Ga content. In the related oxide semiconductor CdO, the existence of O 2p-Cd 4d hybridized states was verified and their energy position was measured by recording emission from O 2 p states. The issue of identifying contributions of non-equivalent chemical sites to the electronic structure of a complex, organic solid was approached using a combination of SXA and SXE with tunable excitation energy. Two organic superconductors based on the bis-ethylenedithio-tetrathiafulvalene (BEDT-TTF, or ET) molecule, kappa-ET 2Cu[N(CN)2]Br and kappa-ET2Cu(SCN)2 were investigated. The bulk C 2p occupied and unoccupied PDOS of kappa-ET2Cu[N(CN)2]Br and kappa-ET 2Cu(SCN)2 were measured and found to be quite similar, reflecting mostly contributions from the common conductive ET layers. Dependence of the C 2p → 1s emission spectra on

  14. SOFT X-RAY EMISSION LINES OF S VII-S XIV IN PROCYON

    SciTech Connect

    Li, F.; Liang, G. Y.; Zhao, G. E-mail: gzhao@bao.ac.cn

    2013-01-01

    Observational data for cool star Procyon available from the Chandra Data Public Archive are co-added and analyzed with as high a signal-to-noise ratio as possible. The soft X-ray emission lines of highly charged sulfur ions (S VII-S XV) are investigated in the 30-80 A range. A collisional-radiative model is constructed to predict line emissivities of sulfur ions using updated excitation data from the R-matrix method. Theoretical line fluxes and line intensity ratios are calculated, and theoretical spectra are constructed with a Gaussian profile with a line width of 0.06 A. By comparing predicted emission lines with observed ones, several strong emission lines are identified for the first time. Some misassignments of lines in previous works are also corrected. By comparing our results with those from the Chianti (v6) model, this work provides insight into the completeness and accuracy of the atomic data of sulfur ions in the Chianti (v6) database.

  15. Temperature and emission measure from GOES soft X-ray measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Howard A.

    1994-10-01

    This paper provides a detailed description of the procedure used for computing color temperature and emission measure from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) X-ray data, including a table of constants for Synchronous Meteorological Satellite (SMS) and GOES X-ray sensors that are necessary for reducing the archived data from these satellites. Temperature and theoretical current tables were constructed, for individual GOES sensors, from laboratory calibrations of instrument responses and from synthetic solar X-ray spectra generated by two models of solar thermal X-ray emission: Raymond-Smith and Mewe-Alkemade. Example tables are shown and others are available on request. Errors that may be incurred from the use of GOES X-ray data in the computation of flare temperatures and emission measures may be classified under four major groups: instrument induced errors, including errors of calibration and random measurements errors; environmentally induced errors, due primarily to the ambient energetic electron background; solar influences, including the consequences of the isothermal assumption and the single-source assumption; and uncertainties in the modelled solar synthetic spectrum. These error sources are discussed separately, and a rough estimation of the collective error is made where this is quantitatively feasible. Finally, temperatures and emission measures are computed from GOES data and are compared with those derived from Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) and Hinotori soft X-ray spectrometer data and from broadband photometric data from the PROGNOZ satellite.

  16. On the diffuse soft X-ray emission from the nuclear region of M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ji-Ren; Mao, Shu-De

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of the diffuse soft X-ray emission from the nuclear region of M51 combining both XMM-Newton RGS and Chandra data. Most of the RGS spectrum of M51 can be fitted with a thermal model with a temperature of ∼ 0.5 keV except for the O VII triplet, which is forbidden-line dominated. The Fe L-shell lines peak around the southern cloud, where the O VIII and N VII Lyα lines also peak. In contrast, the peak of the O VII forbidden line is about 10″ offset from that of the other lines, indicating that it is from a spatially distinct component. The spatial distribution of the O VII triplet mapped by the Chandra data shows that most of the O VII triplet flux is located at faint regions near edges, instead of the southern cloud where other lines peak. This distribution of the O VII triplet is inconsistent with the photoionization model. Other mechanisms that could produce the anomalous O VII triplet, including a recombining plasma and charge exchange X-ray emission, are discussed.

  17. X-Ray Emission from the Soft X-Ray Transient Aquila X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco

    1998-01-01

    Aquila X-1 is the most prolific of soft X-ray transients. It is believed to contain a rapidly spinning neutron star sporadically accreting near the Eddington limit from a low-mass companion star. The interest in studying the repeated X-ray outbursts from Aquila X-1 is twofold: (1) studying the relation between optical, soft and hard X-ray emission during the outburst onset, development and decay; (2) relating the spectral component to thermal and non-thermal processes occurring near the magnetosphere and in the boundary layer of a time-variable accretion disk. Our investigation is based on the BATSE monitoring of Aquila X-1 performed by our group. We observed Aquila X-1 in 1997 and re-analyzed archival information obtained in April 1994 during a period of extraordinary outbursting activity of the source in the hard X-ray range. Our results allow, for the first time for this important source, to obtain simultaneous spectral information from 2 keV to 200 keV. A black body (T = 0.8 keV) plus a broken power-law spectrum describe accurately the 1994 spectrum. Substantial hard X-ray emission is evident in the data, confirming that the accretion phase during sub-Eddington limit episodes is capable of producing energetic hard emission near 5 x 10(exp 35) ergs(exp -1). A preliminary paper summarizes our results, and a more comprehensive account is being written. We performed a theoretical analysis of possible emission mechanisms, and confirmed that a non-thermal emission mechanism triggered in a highly sheared magnetosphere at the accretion disk inner boundary can explain the hard X-ray emission. An anticorrelation between soft and hard X-ray emission is indeed prominently observed as predicted by this model.

  18. Charge-transfer induced EUV and soft X-ray emissions in the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutroumpa, D.; Lallement, R.; Kharchenko, V.; Dalgarno, A.; Pepino, R.; Izmodenov, V.; Quémerais, E.

    2006-12-01

    Aims.We study the EUV/soft X-ray emission generated by charge transfer between solar wind heavy ions and interstellar neutral atoms and variations of the X-ray intensities and spectra with the line of sight direction, the observer location, the solar cycle phase and the solar wind anisotropies, and a temporary enhancement of the solar wind similar to the event observed by Snowden et al. (2004) during the XMM-Hubble Deep Field North exposure. Methods: .Using recent observations of the neutral atoms combined with updated cross-sections and cascading photon spectra we have computed self-consistent distributions of interstellar hydrogen, helium and highly charged solar wind ions for a stationary solar wind and we have constructed monochromatic emission maps and spectra. We have evaluated separately the contribution of the heliosheath and heliotail, and included X-ray emission of the excited solar wind ions produced in sequential collisions to the signal. Results: .In most practicable observations, the low and medium latitude X-ray emission is significantly higher at minimum activity than at maximum, especially around December. This occurs due to a strong depletion of neutrals during the high activity phase, which is not compensated by an increase of the solar wind flux. For high latitudes the emission depends on the ion species in a complex way. Intensity maps are in general significantly different for observations separated by six-month intervals. Secondary ions are found to make a negligible contribution to the X-ray line of sight intensities, because their density becomes significant only at large distances. The contribution of the heliosheath-heliotail is always smaller than 5%. We can reproduce both the intensity range and the temporal variation of the XMM-HDFN emission lines in the 0.52-0.75 keV interval, using a simple enhanced solar wind spiral stream. This suggests a dominant heliospheric origin for these lines, before, during and also after the event.

  19. Discovery of Soft X-Ray Emission from Io, Europa and the Io Plasma Torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R. F.; Gladstone, G. R.; Waite, J. H.; Crary, F. J.; Howell, R. R.; Johnson, R. E.; Ford, P. G.; Metzger, A. E.; Hurley, K. C.; Feigelson, E. D.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory observed the Jovian system for about 24 hours on 25-26 Nov 1999 with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), in support of the Galileo flyby of Io, and for about 10 hours on 18 Dec 2000 with the imaging array of the High Resolution Camera (HRC-I), in support of the Cassini flyby of Jupiter. Analysis of these data have revealed soft (0.25--2 keV) x-ray emission from the moons Io and Europa, probably Ganymede, and from the Io Plasma Torus (IPT). Bombardment by energetic (greater than 10 keV) H, O, and S ions from the region of the IPT seems the likely source of the x-ray emission from the Galilean moons. According to our estimates, fluorescent x-ray emission excited by solar x-rays is about an order of magnitude too weak even during flares from the active Sun to account for the observed x-ray flux from the IPT. Charge-exchange processes, previously invoked to explain Jupiter's x-ray aurora and cometary x-ray emission, and ion stripping by dust grains both fall by orders of magnitude. On the other hand, we calculate that bremsstrahlung emission of soft X-rays from non-thermal electrons in the few hundred to few thousand eV range accounts for roughly one third of the observed x-ray flux from the IPT. Extension of the far ultraviolet (FUV) IPT spectrum likely also contributes.

  20. X-ray/UV variability and the origin of soft X-ray excess emission from II Zw 177

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Main

    We study a detailed broad-band X-ray/UV emission from the narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy II Zw 177 based on two XMM-Newton and single Swift/XRT observations. Both XMM-Newton observations show the soft X-ray excess emission below 2 keV when the best-fit 2 - 10 keV power law is extrapolated down to 0.3 keV. We find the blurred reflection from an ionized accretion disc and Comptonized disc emission both describe the observed soft excess well. We find a remarkable trend of decreasing UV flux with increasing soft X-ray excess and power law emission. We suggest that this could be due to that the external edge of corona hide a fraction of accretion disk. Co-Author: Prof. Gulab C. Dewangan (IUCAA), Prof. Ranjeev Misra (IUCAA), Pramod Kumar (Nanded university)

  1. Study of soft X-ray emission from Z-pinches with a complex atomic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, G. S.; Zaitsev, V. I.; Grabovski, E. V.; Fedulov, M. V.; Aleksandrov, V. V.; Lakhtyushko, N. I.

    2010-03-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies of Z-pinches produced by implosion of aluminum and tungsten cylindrical wire arrays in the Angara-5-1 facility. The electron temperature T e and density n e of the high-temperature pinch plasma have been determined by analyzing line emission from multicharged ions. For the same mass and radius of the array and the same number of wires in it, the intensity of line emission of H- and He-like Al ions from an imploded Al + W wire array containing even a small amount of tungsten (7 wt %) is one order of magnitude lower than that from an Al array. As the W content increases, the total soft X-ray (SXR) yield increases, while the duration of the SXR pulse decreases. For the 30% W content in the array, the power and duration of the SXR pulse are nearly the same as those recorded during the implosion of a W array with the same linear mass and radius and the same number of wires. Results are also presented from experiments with nested wire arrays in which the outer and inner shells were made of Al and W wires, respectively. It is found that, in this case, the effect of tungsten on the line emission of aluminum is much weaker than that in experiments with arrays in which tungsten and aluminum wires were placed in the same shell, even if the mass of the inner (tungsten) shell was larger than that of the outer (aluminum) one. At the same time, the inner W shell plays a significant role in the implosion dynamics of a nested wire array, reducing the duration of the SXR pulse and increasing the SXR power.

  2. Study of soft X-ray emission from Z-pinches with a complex atomic composition

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, G. S.; Zaitsev, V. I.; Grabovski, E. V.; Fedulov, M. V.; Aleksandrov, V. V.; Lakhtyushko, N. I.

    2010-03-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies of Z-pinches produced by implosion of aluminum and tungsten cylindrical wire arrays in the Angara-5-1 facility. The electron temperature T{sub e} and density n{sub e} of the high-temperature pinch plasma have been determined by analyzing line emission from multicharged ions. For the same mass and radius of the array and the same number of wires in it, the intensity of line emission of H- and He-like Al ions from an imploded Al + W wire array containing even a small amount of tungsten (7 wt %) is one order of magnitude lower than that from an Al array. As the W content increases, the total soft X-ray (SXR) yield increases, while the duration of the SXR pulse decreases. For the 30% W content in the array, the power and duration of the SXR pulse are nearly the same as those recorded during the implosion of a W array with the same linear mass and radius and the same number of wires. Results are also presented from experiments with nested wire arrays in which the outer and inner shells were made of Al and W wires, respectively. It is found that, in this case, the effect of tungsten on the line emission of aluminum is much weaker than that in experiments with arrays in which tungsten and aluminum wires were placed in the same shell, even if the mass of the inner (tungsten) shell was larger than that of the outer (aluminum) one. At the same time, the inner W shell plays a significant role in the implosion dynamics of a nested wire array, reducing the duration of the SXR pulse and increasing the SXR power.

  3. A rotating tomographic imager for solar extreme-ultraviolet/soft X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davila, Joseph M.; Thompson, W. T.

    1992-04-01

    A concept is presented for a high-resolution EUV/soft-X-ray imager that has much in common with the medical imaging procedure of tomography. The resulting instrument is compatible with a simpler, less costly spin-axis-stabilized spacecraft. To demonstrate the fidelity of the reconstruction procedure, the observation and reconstruction is simulated to compare the results with the original image.

  4. A rotating tomographic imager for solar extreme-ultraviolet/soft X-ray emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Joseph M.; Thompson, W. T.

    1992-01-01

    A concept is presented for a high-resolution EUV/soft-X-ray imager that has much in common with the medical imaging procedure of tomography. The resulting instrument is compatible with a simpler, less costly spin-axis-stabilized spacecraft. To demonstrate the fidelity of the reconstruction procedure, the observation and reconstruction is simulated to compare the results with the original image.

  5. Soft X-ray emission in kink-unstable coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, R. F.; Vilmer, N.; Brun, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Solar flares are associated with intense soft X-ray emission generated by the hot flaring plasma in coronal magnetic loops. Kink-unstable twisted flux-ropes provide a source of magnetic energy that can be released impulsively and may account for the heating of the plasma in flares. Aims: We investigate the temporal, spectral, and spatial evolution of the properties of the thermal continuum X-ray emission produced in such kink-unstable magnetic flux-ropes and discuss the results of the simulations with respect to solar flare observations. Methods: We computed the temporal evolution of the thermal X-ray emission in kink-unstable coronal loops based on a series of magnetohydrodynamical numerical simulations. The numerical setup consisted of a highly twisted loop embedded in a region of uniform and untwisted background coronal magnetic field. We let the kink instability develop, computed the evolution of the plasma properties in the loop (density, temperature) without accounting for mass exchange with the chromosphere. We then deduced the X-ray emission properties of the plasma during the whole flaring episode. Results: During the initial (linear) phase of the instability, plasma heating is mostly adiabatic (as a result of compression). Ohmic diffusion takes over as the instability saturates, leading to strong and impulsive heating (up to more than 20 MK), to a quick enhancement of X-ray emission, and to the hardening of the thermal X-ray spectrum. The temperature distribution of the plasma becomes broad, with the emission measure depending strongly on temperature. Significant emission measures arise for plasma at temperatures higher than 9 MK. The magnetic flux-rope then relaxes progressively towards a lower energy state as it reconnects with the background flux. The loop plasma suffers smaller sporadic heating events, but cools down globally by thermal conduction. The total thermal X-ray emission slowly fades away during this phase, and the high

  6. Study of soft X-ray emission during wire array implosion under plasma focus conditions at the PF-3 facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dan’ko, S. A.; Mitrofanov, K. N.; Krauz, V. I.; Myalton, V. V.; Zhuzhunashvili, A. I.; Vinogradov, V. P.; Kharrasov, A. M.; Anan’ev, S. S.; Vinogradova, Yu. V.; Kalinin, Yu. G.

    2015-11-15

    Results of measurements of soft X-ray emission with photon energies of <1 keV under conditions of a plasma focus (PF) experiment are presented. The experiments were carried out at the world’s largest PF device—the PF-3 Filippov-type facility (I ⩽ 3 MA, T/4 ≈ 15–20 µs, W{sub 0} ⩽ 3 MJ). X-ray emission from both a discharge in pure neon and with a tungsten wire array placed on the axis of the discharge chamber was detected. The wire array imploded under the action of the electric current intercepted from the plasma current sheath of the PF discharge in neon. The measured soft X-ray powers from a conventional PF discharge in gas and a PF discharge in the presence of a wire array were compared for the first time.

  7. Nuclear dynamics in the core-excited state of aqueous ammonia probed by resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Weinhardt, L.; Weigand, M.; Fuchs, O.; Baer, M.; Blum, M.; Denlinger, J. D.; Yang, W.; Umbach, E.; Heske, C.

    2011-09-01

    The electronic structure of aqueous NH{sub 3} and ND{sub 3} has been investigated using resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering. Spectral features of different processes involving nuclear dynamics in the core-excited state can be identified. When exciting into the lowest core-excited state, we find a strong isotope effect and clear evidence for ultrafast proton dynamics. Furthermore, a strong vibronic coupling is observed and, in the case of aqueous NH{sub 3}, a vibrational fine structure can be resolved.

  8. The Soft X-ray and Narrow-line Emission of Mrk 573 on Kiloparsec Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Martin, O.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Perez Garcia, A. M.; Ramos Almeida, C.

    2010-11-01

    We present a study of the circumnuclear region of the nearby Seyfert galaxy Mrk 573 using Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data. We have studied the morphology of the soft (<2 keV) X-rays comparing it with the [O III] and Hα HST images. The soft X-ray emission is resolved into a complex extended region. The X-ray morphology shows a biconical region extending up to 12 arcsec (4 kpc) in projection from the nucleus. A strong correlation between the X-rays and the highly ionized gas seen in the [O III]λ5007 Å image is reported. Moreover, we have studied the line intensities detected with the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) and used them to fit the low-resolution EPIC/XMM-Newton and ACIS/Chandra spectra. The RGS/XMM-Newton spectrum is dominated by emission lines of C VI, O VII, O VIII, Fe XVII, and Ne IX, among other highly ionized species. A good fit is obtained using these emission lines found in the RGS/XMM-Newton spectrum as a template for Chandra spectra of the nucleus and extended emission, coincident with the cone-like structures seen in the [O III]/Hα map. The photoionization model Cloudy provides a reasonable fit for both the nuclear region and the cone-like structures showing that the dominant excitation mechanism is photoionization. For the nucleus the emission is modeled using two phases: a high ionization [log (U) = 1.23] and a low ionization [log (U) = 0.13]. For the high-ionization phase the transmitted and reflected components are in a 1:2 ratio, whereas for the low ionization the reflected component dominates. For the extended emission, we successfully reproduced the emission with two phases. The first phase shows a higher ionization parameter for the northwest (log (U) = 0.9) than for the southeast cone (log (U) = 0.3). Moreover, this phase is transmission dominated for the southeast cone and reflection dominated for the northwest cone. The second phase shows a low-ionization parameter (log (U) = -3) and is

  9. THE SOFT X-RAY AND NARROW-LINE EMISSION OF Mrk 573 ON KILOPARSEC SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Martin, O.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Garcia, A. M. Perez

    2010-11-10

    We present a study of the circumnuclear region of the nearby Seyfert galaxy Mrk 573 using Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data. We have studied the morphology of the soft (<2 keV) X-rays comparing it with the [O III] and H{alpha} HST images. The soft X-ray emission is resolved into a complex extended region. The X-ray morphology shows a biconical region extending up to 12 arcsec (4 kpc) in projection from the nucleus. A strong correlation between the X-rays and the highly ionized gas seen in the [O III]{lambda}5007 A image is reported. Moreover, we have studied the line intensities detected with the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) and used them to fit the low-resolution EPIC/XMM-Newton and ACIS/Chandra spectra. The RGS/XMM-Newton spectrum is dominated by emission lines of C VI, O VII, O VIII, Fe XVII, and Ne IX, among other highly ionized species. A good fit is obtained using these emission lines found in the RGS/XMM-Newton spectrum as a template for Chandra spectra of the nucleus and extended emission, coincident with the cone-like structures seen in the [O III]/H{alpha} map. The photoionization model Cloudy provides a reasonable fit for both the nuclear region and the cone-like structures showing that the dominant excitation mechanism is photoionization. For the nucleus the emission is modeled using two phases: a high ionization [log (U) = 1.23] and a low ionization [log (U) = 0.13]. For the high-ionization phase the transmitted and reflected components are in a 1:2 ratio, whereas for the low ionization the reflected component dominates. For the extended emission, we successfully reproduced the emission with two phases. The first phase shows a higher ionization parameter for the northwest (log (U) = 0.9) than for the southeast cone (log (U) = 0.3). Moreover, this phase is transmission dominated for the southeast cone and reflection dominated for the northwest cone. The second phase shows a low-ionization parameter (log (U

  10. An ultrahigh-vacuum apparatus for resonant diffraction experiments using soft x rays (hnu=300-2000 eV).

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T; Chainani, A; Takata, Y; Tanaka, Y; Oura, M; Tsubota, M; Senba, Y; Ohashi, H; Mochiku, T; Hirata, K; Shin, S

    2009-02-01

    We have developed an ultrahigh-vacuum instrument for resonant diffraction experiments using polarized soft x rays in the energy range of hnu=300-2000 eV at beamline BL17SU of SPring-8. The diffractometer consists of modified differentially pumped rotary feedthroughs for theta-2theta stages, a sample manipulator with motor-controlled x-y-z-, tilt (chi)-, and azimuth (phi)-axes, and a liquid helium flow-type cryostat for temperature dependent measurements between 30 and 300 K. Test results indicate that the diffractometer exhibits high reproducibility (better than 0.001 degrees ) for a Bragg reflection of alpha-quartz 100 at a photon energy of hnu=1950 eV. Typical off- and on-resonance Bragg reflections in the energy range of 530-1950 eV could be measured using the apparatus. The results show that x-ray diffraction experiments with energy-, azimuth-, and incident photon polarization-dependence can be reliably measured using soft x rays in the energy range of approximately 300-2000 eV. The facility can be used for resonant diffraction experiments across the L-edge of transition metals, M-edge of lanthanides, and up to the Si K-edge of materials. PMID:19256660

  11. Soft-x-ray spectroscopy study of nanoscale materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J.-H.

    2005-07-30

    The ability to control the particle size and morphology of nanoparticles is of crucial importance nowadays both from a fundamental and industrial point of view considering the tremendous amount of high-tech applications. Controlling the crystallographic structure and the arrangement of atoms along the surface of nanostructured material will determine most of its physical properties. In general, electronic structure ultimately determines the properties of matter. Soft X-ray spectroscopy has some basic features that are important to consider. X-ray is originating from an electronic transition between a localized core state and a valence state. As a core state is involved, elemental selectivity is obtained because the core levels of different elements are well separated in energy, meaning that the involvement of the inner level makes this probe localized to one specific atomic site around which the electronic structure is reflected as a partial density-of-states contribution. The participation of valence electrons gives the method chemical state sensitivity and further, the dipole nature of the transitions gives particular symmetry information. The new generation synchrotron radiation sources producing intensive tunable monochromatized soft X-ray beams have opened up new possibilities for soft X-ray spectroscopy. The introduction of selectively excited soft X-ray emission has opened a new field of study by disclosing many new possibilities of soft X-ray resonant inelastic scattering. In this paper, some recent findings regarding soft X-ray absorption and emission studies of various nanostructured systems are presented.

  12. Temporal behavior of unresolved transition array emission in water window soft x-ray spectral region from multiply charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Thanh-Hung; Suzuki, Yuhei; Arai, Goki; Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Hasegawa, Noboru; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Nishikino, Masaharu; Higashiguchi, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    We have characterized the spectral structure and the temporal history of the laser-produced high-Z multi-charged ion plasmas for the efficient water window soft x-ray sources. Strong unresolved transition array emission was observed due to 4d-4f and 4f-5g transitions from Au, Pb, and Bi plasmas in the 280-700 eV photon energy region. The temporal behavior of the emission was essentially similar of that of the laser pulse with a slight delay between different transitions. These results provide feedback for accurate modeling of the atomic processes with the radiative hydrodynamic simulations.

  13. Temporal behavior of unresolved transition array emission in water window soft x-ray spectral region from multiply charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, Thanh-Hung Suzuki, Yuhei; Arai, Goki; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Hasegawa, Noboru; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Nishikino, Masaharu

    2015-09-21

    We have characterized the spectral structure and the temporal history of the laser-produced high-Z multi-charged ion plasmas for the efficient water window soft x-ray sources. Strong unresolved transition array emission was observed due to 4d–4f and 4f–5g transitions from Au, Pb, and Bi plasmas in the 280–700 eV photon energy region. The temporal behavior of the emission was essentially similar of that of the laser pulse with a slight delay between different transitions. These results provide feedback for accurate modeling of the atomic processes with the radiative hydrodynamic simulations.

  14. Soft X-ray emission from the Lupus Loop and Sn 1006 supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, P. F., Jr.; Hearn, D. R.; Richardson, J. A.; Behnken, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    X-ray maps of the Lupus region have been obtained in a raster scan observation from SAS 3. These show the Lupus Loop to be a faint extended source of soft X-rays with a temperature about 2.5 million K. The most prominent feature of the region is the A.D. 1006 supernova remnant, which is unexpectedly bright at 0.2-1.0 keV. One speculative interpretation of the low-energy flux from SN 1006 is as blackbody radiation from a hot neutron star.

  15. The very soft X-ray emission of X-ray-faint early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellegrini, S.; Fabbiano, G.

    1994-01-01

    A recent reanaylsis of Einstein data, and new ROSAT observations, have revealed the presence of at least two components in the X-ray spectra of X-ray faint early-type galaxies: a relatively hard component (kT greater than 1.5 keV), and a very soft component (kT approximately 0.2-0.3 keV). In this paper we address the problem of the nature of the very soft component and whether it can be due to a hot interstellar medium (ISM), or is most likely originated by the collective emission of very soft stellar sources. To this purpose, hydrodynamical evolutionary sequences for the secular behavior of gas flows in ellipticals have been performed, varying the Type Ia supernovae rate of explosion, and the dark matter amount and distribution. The results are compared with the observational X-ray data: the average Einstein spectrum for six X-ray faint early-type galaxies (among which are NGC 4365 and NGC 4697), and the spectrum obtained by the ROSAT pointed observation of NGC 4365. The very soft component could be entirely explained with a hot ISM only in galaxies such as NGC 4697, i.e., when the depth of the potential well-on which the average ISM temperature strongly depends-is quite shallow; in NGC 4365 a diffuse hot ISM would have a temperature larger than that of the very soft component, because of the deeper potential well. So, in NGC 4365 the softest contribution to the X-ray emission comes certainly from stellar sources. As stellar soft X-ray emitters, we consider late-type stellar coronae, supersoft sources such as those discovered by ROSAT in the Magellanic Clouds and M31, and RS CVn systems. All these candidates can be substantial contributors to the very soft emission, though none of them, taken separately, plausibly accounts entirely for its properties. We finally present a model for the X-ray emission of NGC 4365, to reproduce in detail the results of the ROSAT pointed observation, including the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) spectrum and radial

  16. Soft X-Ray and Vacuum Ultraviolet Based Spectroscopy of the Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G

    2011-03-17

    The subjects of discussion included: VUV photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Synchrotron-radiation-based photoelectron spectroscopy, Soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy, Soft x-ray emission spectroscopy, Inverse photoelectron spectroscopy, Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy, Low energy IPES, Resonant inverse photoelectron spectroscopy.

  17. Quantitative resonant soft x-ray reflectivity of ultrathin anisotropic organic layers: Simulation and experiment of PTCDA on Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, R.; Mahne, N.; Koshmak, K.; Giglia, A.; Doyle, B. P.; Mukherjee, S.; Nannarone, S.; Pasquali, L.

    2016-07-01

    Resonant soft X-ray reflectivity at the carbon K edge, with linearly polarized light, was used to derive quantitative information of film morphology, molecular arrangement, and electronic orbital anisotropies of an ultrathin 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) film on Au(111). The experimental spectra were simulated by computing the propagation of the electromagnetic field in a trilayer system (vacuum/PTCDA/Au), where the organic film was treated as an anisotropic medium. Optical constants were derived from the calculated (through density functional theory) absorption cross sections of the single molecule along the three principal molecular axes. These were used to construct the dielectric tensor of the film, assuming the molecules to be lying flat with respect to the substrate and with a herringbone arrangement parallel to the substrate plane. Resonant soft X-ray reflectivity proved to be extremely sensitive to film thickness, down to the single molecular layer. The best agreement between simulation and experiment was found for a film of 1.6 nm, with flat laying configuration of the molecules. The high sensitivity to experimental geometries in terms of beam incidence and light polarization was also clarified through simulations. The optical anisotropies of the organic film were experimentally determined and through the comparison with calculations, it was possible to relate them to the orbital symmetry of the empty electronic states.

  18. Quantitative resonant soft x-ray reflectivity of ultrathin anisotropic organic layers: Simulation and experiment of PTCDA on Au.

    PubMed

    Capelli, R; Mahne, N; Koshmak, K; Giglia, A; Doyle, B P; Mukherjee, S; Nannarone, S; Pasquali, L

    2016-07-14

    Resonant soft X-ray reflectivity at the carbon K edge, with linearly polarized light, was used to derive quantitative information of film morphology, molecular arrangement, and electronic orbital anisotropies of an ultrathin 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) film on Au(111). The experimental spectra were simulated by computing the propagation of the electromagnetic field in a trilayer system (vacuum/PTCDA/Au), where the organic film was treated as an anisotropic medium. Optical constants were derived from the calculated (through density functional theory) absorption cross sections of the single molecule along the three principal molecular axes. These were used to construct the dielectric tensor of the film, assuming the molecules to be lying flat with respect to the substrate and with a herringbone arrangement parallel to the substrate plane. Resonant soft X-ray reflectivity proved to be extremely sensitive to film thickness, down to the single molecular layer. The best agreement between simulation and experiment was found for a film of 1.6 nm, with flat laying configuration of the molecules. The high sensitivity to experimental geometries in terms of beam incidence and light polarization was also clarified through simulations. The optical anisotropies of the organic film were experimentally determined and through the comparison with calculations, it was possible to relate them to the orbital symmetry of the empty electronic states. PMID:27421398

  19. Soft X-Ray Emission Lines of Argon, ArIX -- ArXVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepson, J. K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Behar, E.; Kahn, S. M.

    2002-04-01

    The soft x-ray region of 20 - 50 Å is nearly unknown territory to astrophysicists. This spectral band remains virtually unstudied, even in solar observations, and laboratory measurements are similarly lacking. Spectra obtained from Chandra and XMM-Newton X-Ray Observatories show a wealth of lines in this region, albeit weak in most cases. Most of these lines remain unidentified as observations have now outpaced the available databases. In support of these missions we have undertaken laboratory measurements of astrophysically relevant ions in the extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions using the Livermore electron beam ion trap EBIT-II. We present here results of argon, covering ArIX - ArXVI between 20 - 50 Åand compare our spectra with calculations from the Hebrew University - Lawrence Livermore Atomic Code HULLAC. EBIT-II data agree broadly with HULLAC calculations, with accuracy of ± 0.3 Å for most major lines. Given the density of lines in Chandra and XMM-Newton spectra, this accuracy is often insufficient for line identification in the absence of careful laboratory mesaurements. Work performed under auspices of DOE by UC LLNL and funded by NASA SARA.

  20. Depth-resolved soft x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy in nanostructures via standing-wave excited photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Kronast, F.; Ovsyannikov, R.; Kaiser, A.; Wiemann, C.; Yang, S.-H.; Locatelli, A.; Burgler, D.E.; Schreiber, R.; Salmassi, F.; Fischer, P.; Durr, H.A.; Schneider, C.M.; Eberhardt, W.; Fadley, C.S.

    2008-11-24

    We present an extension of conventional laterally resolved soft x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy. A depth resolution along the surface normal down to a few {angstrom} can be achieved by setting up standing x-ray wave fields in a multilayer substrate. The sample is an Ag/Co/Au trilayer, whose first layer has a wedge profile, grown on a Si/MoSi2 multilayer mirror. Tuning the incident x-ray to the mirror Bragg angle we set up standing x-ray wave fields. We demonstrate the resulting depth resolution by imaging the standing wave fields as they move through the trilayer wedge structure.

  1. Correlation between Soft X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectra of the Nitrogen Atoms within Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Yuka; Tokushima, Takashi; Takahashi, Osamu; Hoke, Hiroshi; Takamuku, Toshiyuki

    2016-08-01

    Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been performed on the N K-edge of two imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ([C2mim][TFSA]) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([C2mim][Br]), to clarify the electronic structures of the ILs. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has also been applied to the ILs by excitation at various X-ray energies according to the XAS spectra. It was possible to fully associate the XAS peaks with the XES peaks. Additionally, both XAS and XES spectra of the ILs were well reproduced by the theoretical spectra for a single-molecule model on [C2mim](+) and [TFSA](-) using density functional theory. The assignments for the XAS and XES peaks of the ILs were accomplished from both experimental and theoretical approaches. The theoretical XAS and XES spectra of [C2mim](+) and [TFSA](-) did not significantly depend on the conformations of the ions. The reproducibility of the theoretical spectra for the single-molecule model suggested that the interactions between the cations and anions are very weak in the ILs, thus scarcely influencing the electronic structures of the nitrogen atoms. PMID:27388151

  2. Characteristics of x-ray emission from optically thin high-Z plasmas in the soft x-ray region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Hayato; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Yuhei; Arai, Goki; Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Tamura, Naoki; Sudo, Shigeru; Koike, Fumihiro; Suzuki, Chihiro

    2015-07-01

    The characteristics of soft x-ray emission from optically thin high-Z plasmas of gold, lead and bismuth were investigated with the large helical device. Compared to optically thicker laser-produced plasmas, significantly different spectral structures were observed due to the difference in opacities and electron temperatures. Peak structures appearing in unresolved transition arrays were identified by calculations using atomic structure codes. The main contributors of discrete line emission in each case were Pd-, Ag-, and Rh-like ion stages. The present calculations point to the overestimation of contributions for 4p-4d transitions based on intensity estimates arising purely from gA distributions that predict strong emission from 4p-4d transitions. Understanding of such spectral emission is not only important for the completion of databases of high-Z highly ion charge states but also the development of promising high brightness sources for biological imaging applications.

  3. X-ray/UV variability and the origin of soft X-ray excess emission from II Zw 177

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Main; Dewangan, Gulab C.; Misra, Ranjeev; Pawar, Pramod K.

    2016-03-01

    We study X-ray and UV emission from the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy II Zw 177 using a 137 ks long and another 13 ks short XMM-Newton observation performed in 2012 and 2001, respectively. Both observations show soft X-ray excess emission contributing 76.9 ± 4.9 per cent in 2012 and 58.8 ± 10.2 per cent in 2001 in the 0.3-2 keV band. We find that both blurred reflection from an ionized disc and Comptonized disc emission describe the observed soft excess well. Time-resolved spectroscopy on scales of ˜20 ks reveals strong correlation between the soft excess and the power-law components. The fractional variability amplitude Fvar derived from EPIC-pn light curves at different energy bands is nearly constant (Fvar ˜ 20 per cent). This is in contrast to other active galactic nuclei where the lack of short term variation in soft X-ray excess emission has been attributed to intense light bending in the framework of the `lamppost' model. Thus, the variations in power-law emission are most likely intrinsic to corona rather than just due to the changes of height of compact corona. The variable UV emission (Fvar ˜ 1 per cent) is uncorrelated to any of the X-ray components on short time-scales suggesting that the UV emission is not dominated by the reprocessed emission. The gradual observed decline in the UV emission in 2012 may be related to the secular decline due to the changes in the accretion rate. In this case, the short term X-ray variability is not due to the changes in the seed photons but intrinsic to the hot corona.

  4. Observations of soft X-ray emission and plasma dynamics of a compact capillary discharge operated in xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Valenzuela, J. C.; Wyndham, E. S.; Favre, M.; Chuaqui, H.

    2013-09-15

    We report observations of a low stored energy, low inductance compact capillary discharge operated in xenon. Even though the stored electrical energy is less than 1 J, significant output in the optical windows at 110 and 135 Å is measured. The soft X-ray emission is time-resolved and the conversion energy of the source is obtained. A lower bound to the conversion efficiency at 110 Å ± 2% and 135 Å ± 1% of 3.6% and 1.6% is obtained, respectively. The use of moiré-schlieren optical diagnostic allows the evolution of the line electron density. In particular, we observe a significant degree of compression in a tight on axis pinch as well as radial compression waves. The temporal evolution of the X-ray emission, which occurs during the current reversal and later, is discussed in relation to work in argon discharges and in relation to model calculations.

  5. Time-resolved resonant soft x-ray diffraction with free-electron lasers: Femtosecond dynamics across the Verwey transition in magnetite

    SciTech Connect

    Pontius, N.; Kachel, T.; Schuessler-Langeheine, C.; Schlotter, W. F.; Beye, M.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Wurth, W.; Chang, C. F.; Foehlisch, A.; Berglund, M.; Metcalf, P.

    2011-05-02

    Resonant soft x-ray diffraction (RSXD) with femtosecond (fs) time resolution is a powerful tool for disentangling the interplay between different degrees of freedom in strongly correlated electron materials. It allows addressing the coupling of particular degrees of freedom upon an external selective perturbation, e.g., by an optical or infrared laser pulse. Here, we report a time-resolved RSXD experiment from the prototypical correlated electron material magnetite using soft x-ray pulses from the free-electron laser FLASH in Hamburg. We observe ultrafast melting of the charge-orbital order leading to the formation of a transient phase, which has not been observed in equilibrium.

  6. Observing soft X-ray line emission from the interstellar medium with X-ray calorimeter on a sounding rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, J.; Edwards, B.; Juda, M.; Mccammon, D.; Skinner, M.; Kelley, R.; Moseley, H.; Schoelkopf, R.; Szymkowiak, A.

    1990-01-01

    For an X-ray calorimeter working at 0.1 K, the energy resolution ideally can be as good as one eV for a practical detector. A detector with a resolution of 17 eV FWHM at 6 keV has been constructed. It is expected that this can be improved by a factor of two or more. With X-ray calorimeters flown on a sounding rocket, it should be possible to observe soft X-ray line emission from the interstellar medium over the energy range 0.07 to 1 keV. Here, a preliminary design for an X-ray calorimeter rocket experiment and the spectrum which might be observed from an equilibrium plasma are presented. For later X-ray calorimeter sounding rocket experiments, it is planned to add an aluminum foil mirror with collecting area of about 400 sq cm to observe line features from bright supernova remnants.

  7. Probing substrate-induced perturbations on the band structure of graphene on Ni(1 1 1) by soft X-ray emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Vinogradov, Nikolay; Preobrajenski, Alexei; Butorin, Sergei; Zhu, Junfa; Guo, Jinghua

    2013-08-01

    The influence of substrate-induced perturbations on the band structure of graphene has been investigated by soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) for graphene on Ni(1 1 1). The band-dispersion features of graphene on Ni(1 1 1) are different from those of HOPG and 'quasi-freestanding' graphene (graphene/Cu) because of the strong interfacial interaction. By comparing the XES spectra excited with energy at the π∗ resonance of HOPG, graphene/Cu and graphene/Ni in detail, we find that the spectral shape change can be directly related to the different electronic states hybridization strength of graphene on metal substrates, supplying a feasible way for investigating the graphene-metal bonding strength.

  8. Electronic Structure of the ID Conductor K0.3MoO3 studied using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and soft x-ray emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Learmonth, T.; Glans, P.-A.; McGuinness, C.; Plucinski, L.; Zhang, Y.; Guo, J.-H.; Greenblatt, M.; Smith, K.E.

    2008-09-24

    The electronic structure of the quasi-one dimensional conductor K{sub 0.3}MoO{sub 3} has been measured using high resolution resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The data is compared to that from the related two dimensional insulator {alpha}-MoO{sub 3}. Scattering features are observed from both oxides that are explained in terms of the band momentum selectivity of the scattering process, allowing a comparison of the scattering data to recent band structure calculations.

  9. Evolution and Activity in the Solar Corona: A Comparison of Coronal and Chromospheric Structures Seen in Soft X-Rays, White Light and H-Alpha Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagenal, Fran

    2001-01-01

    The work completed under this project, 'Evolution and Activity in the Solar Corona: A Comparison of Coronal and Chromospheric Structures Seen in Soft X-Rays, White Light and H-Alpha Emission', includes the following presentations: (1) Analysis of H-alpha Observations of High-altitude Coronal Condensations; (2) Multi-spectral Imaging of Coronal Activity; (3) Measurement and Modeling of Soft X-ray Loop Arcades; (4) A Study of the Origin and Dynamics of CMEs; and various poster presentations and thesis dissertations.

  10. Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering studies of charge orders in high-temperature cuperates with Transition Edge Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yizhi; Abbamonte, Peter; Rodolakis, Fanny; McChesney, Jessica; Tatsuno, Hideyuki; Joe, Young Il; Fowler, Joe; Morgan, Kelsey; Doriese, William; Swetz, Daniel; Ullom, Joel

    Resonant Soft X-ray studies of high Tc cuperates have implied a complex yet unresolved relationship between charge orders, anitferromagnetism and superconductivity. Unfortunately, at resonance the inelastic florescence background makes it hard to distinguish weak charge orders. To eliminate this issue, we have developed an energy-resolving detector comprised of 240-pixels superconducting Transition-Edge Sensor microcalorimeters. These superconducting sensors obtain exquisite resolution by exploiting the superconducting-to-normal transition to transduce photon energy to temperature and by operating at cryogenic temperatures (~ 100 mK) where thermal noise is minimal. Initial commissioning was accomplished at Advanced Photon Source Sector 29 in August 2015 and have demonstrated 1.0 eV resolution below 1 keV with efficiency (solid angle × quantum efficiency) ~ 50 times than that of grating spectrometers. An experiment to study charge orders in LBCO, LESCO and YBCO as a function of doping will take place in November 2015. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02-06ER46285.

  11. Analysis of Order Formation in Block Copolymer Thin Films UsingResonant Soft X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Virgili, Justin M.; Tao, Yuefei; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Balsara,Nitash P.; Segalman, Rachel A.

    2006-11-27

    The lateral order of poly(styrene-block-isoprene) copolymer(PS-b-PI) thin films is characterized by the emerging technique ofresonant soft X-ray scattering (RSOXS) at the carbon K edge and comparedto ordering in bulk samples of the same materials measured usingconventional small-angle X-ray scattering. We show resonance using theoryand experiment that the loss of scattering intensity expected with adecrease in sample volume in the case of thin films can be overcome bytuning X-rays to the pi* resonance of PS or PI. Using RSOXS, we study themicrophase ordering of cylinder- and phere-forming PS-b-PI thin films andcompare these results to position space data obtained by atomic forcemicroscopy. Our ability to examine large sample areas (~;9000 mu m2) byRSOXS enables unambiguous identification of the lateral lattice structurein the thin films. In the case of the sphere-forming copolymer thin film,where the spheres are hexagonally arranged, the average sphere-to-spherespacing is between the bulk (body-centered cubic) nearest neighbor andbulk unit cell spacings. In the case of the cylinder-forming copolymerthin film, the cylinder-to-cylinder spacing is within experimental errorof that obtained in the bulk.

  12. Soft x-ray emission spectra and ferromagnetism in wide-gap doped semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surkova, T. P.; Galakhov, V. R.; Kurmaev, É. Z.

    2009-01-01

    A study is made of the resonant and nonresonant L x-ray emission spectra of impurities in the semiconducting compounds ZnS:Mn, ZnO:Mn, ZnO:Co, and Co2O:Mn. An analysis of the Mn L2,3 x-ray emission spectra of Zn1-xMnxS (x=0.1-0.3) reveals that the Mn impurities do not form clusters in the ZnS lattice. Studies of the Mn L2,3 spectra and electronic structure of epitaxial films of Zn0.8Mn0.2O annealed at different temperatures show that the cause of the observed suppression of ferromagnetism at T >600°C is segregation of Mn atoms. In this case the Mn atoms occupy both Zn sites and interstitial positions. For Zn1-xCoxO (x =0.02, 0.06, and 0.10) the absence of free carriers that could mediate an exchange interaction between Co ions is established. Mn L2,3 x-ray emission measurements show that in Mn-doped oxides Cu2O synthesized at 650 and 800°C the Mn atoms are found both in interstitial positions and occupy Cu sites, but the configurations of these defects depend on the synthesis temperature. A decrease of the Curie temperature with increasing synthesis temperature may be explained as a manifestation of antiferromagnetic superexchange between substituent Mn atoms via oxygen.

  13. Modelling the Soft X-Ray and EUV Emission in Classical Novae: EUVE and ROSAT Observations of V1974 Cygni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stringfellow, Guy S.; Bowyer, Stuart

    1996-01-01

    We have conducted an extensive analysis of the observability of Classical Novae with the EUVE Lex/B and Al/Ti/C detectors. Predicted count rates have been computed using optically thin, isothermal plasma models for solar and metal-rich compositions, and hot ONeMg white dwarf model atmospheres. We find EUVE to be quite sensitive to both the EUV and soft X-ray emission emitted by the underlying hot white dwarf during novae outbursts, except for the coolest temperatures with very high intervening hydrogen column density. These results are used to interpret the emission detected during the EUVE all-sky survey of Nova Cygni 1992 (approx. = V1974 Cyg), 279-290 days after visual maximum. We find the best fit to the observed emission from V1974 Cyg arises from a hot ONeMg white dwarf with surface temperature approx. 4 x l0(exp 5) K and a mas of approx. 1.2 solar mass, and derive an interstellar hydrogen column density of approx. 3 x 10(exp 21)/sq cm. Virtually all this emission arises from supersoft X-rays rather than the EUV. We also report the detection of V1974 Cyg with the EUVE Deep Survey detector at 549 days after visual maximum. This observation is compatible with the above properties, indicating that the mechanism responsible for the soft X-ray emission, connected with the underlying white dwarf, had not yet entirely turned off. We also present analysis of a ROSAT PSPC observation which is contemporaneous with the EUVE survey observations; this independently confirms the high column density we derived from the EUVE survey observation. Light curves for the EUVE and ROSAT observations are presented. Statistical tests for variability show that all of these observations are indeed highly variable over various time scales. The EUVE survey data shows one day variations, the EUVE DS data show approx. 30 minute fluctuations, while the ROSAT data vary rapidly on time scales of seconds. The EUVE data shows no periodic variability on any time scale. The implications of the

  14. Chemical state information of bulk specimens obtained by SEM-based soft-X-ray emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Masami; Koshiya, Shogo; Satoh, Futami; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Handa, Nobuo; Murano, Takanori; Koike, Masato; Imazono, Takashi; Koeda, Masaru; Nagano, Tetsuya; Sasai, Hiroyuki; Oue, Yuki; Yonezawa, Zeno; Kuramoto, Satoshi

    2014-06-01

    Electron-beam-induced soft-X-ray emission spectroscopy (SXES) that uses a grating spectrometer has been introduced to a conventional scanning electron microscope (SEM) for characterizing desired specimen areas of bulk materials. The spectrometer was designed as a grazing incidence flat-field optics by using aberration corrected (varied line spacing) gratings and a multichannel plate detector combined with a charge-coupled device camera, which has already been applied to a transmission electron microscope. The best resolution was confirmed as 0.13 eV at Mg L-emission (50 eV), which is comparable with that of recent dedicated electron energy-loss spectroscopy instruments. This SXES-SEM instrument presents density of states of simple metals of bulk Mg and Li. Apparent band-structure effects have been observed in Si L-emission of Si wafer, P L-emission of GaP wafer, and Al L-emissions of intermetallic compounds of AlCo, AlPd, Al2Pt, and Al2Au. PMID:24625988

  15. Magnetic order of multiferroic ErMn2O5 studied by resonant soft x-ray Bragg diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staub, U.; Bodenthin, Y.; García-Fernández, M.; de Souza, R. A.; Garganourakis, M.; Golovenchits, E. I.; Sanina, V. A.; Lushnikov, S. G.

    2010-04-01

    Resonant magnetic soft x-ray diffraction is used to study the magnetic order of the Mn sublattices in multiferroic ErMn2O5 . Data were collected at the MnL2,3 edges as a function of temperature, incident polarization, including the analysis of scattered polarizations for selected azimuths. The energy dependence of the magnetic reflections depends on the azimuthal angle in the commensurate magnetic (CM) ferroelectric (FE) phase, indicating different contributions to the scattering. In the incommensurate magnetic [two-dimensional (2D)-ICM] phase, the two observed reflections ( 1/2±δx 0 1/4+δz ) have distinct energy dependences too. Different origins of these differences in spectral shape are discussed. The azimuthal angle dependence at the L3 edge can only be qualitatively described by a generalized magnetic model. The observed discrepancies may indicate the importance of magnetoelectric multipole scattering to these reflections. Reciprocal mesh scans show diffuse scattering along q and perpendicular to q as well as along the ( h 0 0) direction in the CM phase. Diffuse scattering is also observed along ( h 0 0) in the one-dimensional-ICM phase. At higher temperatures, in the 2D-ICM phase, the diffuse magnetic scattering is almost isotropic.

  16. The simultaneous measurement of energy and linear polarization of the scattered radiation in resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Braicovich, L. Minola, M.; Dellea, G.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Le Tacon, M.; Moretti Sala, M.; Morawe, C.; Peffen, J.-Ch.; Yakhou, F.; Brookes, N. B.; Supruangnet, R.

    2014-11-15

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) in the soft x-ray range is an element-specific energy-loss spectroscopy used to probe the electronic and magnetic excitations in strongly correlated solids. In the recent years, RIXS has been progressing very quickly in terms of energy resolution and understanding of the experimental results, but the interpretation of spectra could further improve, sometimes decisively, from a full knowledge of the polarization of incident and scattered photons. Here we present the first implementation, in a high resolution soft-RIXS spectrometer used to analyze the scattered radiation, of a device allowing the measurement of the degree of linear polarization. The system, based on a graded W/B{sub 4}C multilayer mirror installed in proximity of the CCD detector, has been installed on the AXES spectrometer at the ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility); it has been fully characterized and it has been used for a demonstration experiment at the Cu L{sub 3} edge on a high-T{sub c} superconducting cuprate. The loss in efficiency suffered by the spectrometer equipped with this test facility was a factor 17.5. We propose also a more advanced version, suitable for a routine use on the next generation of RIXS spectrometers and with an overall efficiency up to 10%.

  17. The simultaneous measurement of energy and linear polarization of the scattered radiation in resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Braicovich, L; Minola, M; Dellea, G; Le Tacon, M; Moretti Sala, M; Morawe, C; Peffen, J-Ch; Supruangnet, R; Yakhou, F; Ghiringhelli, G; Brookes, N B

    2014-11-01

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) in the soft x-ray range is an element-specific energy-loss spectroscopy used to probe the electronic and magnetic excitations in strongly correlated solids. In the recent years, RIXS has been progressing very quickly in terms of energy resolution and understanding of the experimental results, but the interpretation of spectra could further improve, sometimes decisively, from a full knowledge of the polarization of incident and scattered photons. Here we present the first implementation, in a high resolution soft-RIXS spectrometer used to analyze the scattered radiation, of a device allowing the measurement of the degree of linear polarization. The system, based on a graded W/B4C multilayer mirror installed in proximity of the CCD detector, has been installed on the AXES spectrometer at the ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility); it has been fully characterized and it has been used for a demonstration experiment at the Cu L3 edge on a high-Tc superconducting cuprate. The loss in efficiency suffered by the spectrometer equipped with this test facility was a factor 17.5. We propose also a more advanced version, suitable for a routine use on the next generation of RIXS spectrometers and with an overall efficiency up to 10%. PMID:25430146

  18. Intense Non-Linear Soft X-Ray Emission from a Hydride Target during Pulsed D Bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George H.; Yang, Yang; Lipson, Andrei; Haque, Munima; Percel, Ian; Romer, Michael

    Radiation emission from low-energy nuclear radiation (LENR) electrodes (both charged-particle and X-rays) represents an important feature of LENR in general. Here, calibration, measurement techniques, and soft X-ray emission results from deuterium bombardment of a Pd target (cathode) placed in a pulsed deuterium glow discharge (PGD) are described. An X-ray intensity of 13.4 mW/cm2 and a dose of 3.3 μJ/cm2 were calculated over a 0.5 ms pulse time from AXUV photodiode radiation detector measurements. A most striking feature is that X-ray energies >600 V are observed with a discharge voltage only about half of that value. To further investigate this phenomenon, emission during room temperature D-desorption from electrolytically loaded Pd:Dx cathodes was also studied. The X-ray emission energy observed was quite similar to the PGD case. However, the intensity in this case was almost 13 orders of magnitude lower due to the much lower deuterium fluxes involved.

  19. Extended soft X-ray emission in Seyfert galaxies: ROSAT HRI observations of NGC 3516, NGC 4151, and Markarian 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morse, Jon A.; Wilson, Andrew S.; Elvis, Martin; Weaver, Kimberly A.

    1995-01-01

    We have used the ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI) to examine the distribution of soft X-rays in three nearby Seyfert galaxies with approximately 4 to 5 arcsecs FWHM spatial resolution. A feature of our analysis is an attempt to remove errors in the aspect solution using a method developed by one of us (J.M.). NGC 4151 shows resolved X-ray emission that is spatially correlated with the optical extended narrow-line region (ENLR), confirming the results obtained with the Einstein HRI by Elvis, Briel, & Henry. NGC 3516 is elongated along a position angle of approximately 40 to 220 deg, similar to the direction of the Z-shaped narrow-line region. MRK 3 is very faint in our HRI image and is probably spatially unresolved. We detect the faint X-ray source approximately 2 arcmins west of the MRK 3 nucleus previously found by Turner, Urry, & Mushotzky. We also detected the BL Lac object BL 1207 + 39 approximately 5 arcmins north-northwest of NGC 4151. This object appears spatially unresolved, but some excess X-ray emission may be observed in the azimuthally averaged radial brightness profile of BL 1207 + 39 between radii of 10 arcsecs and 30 arcsecs when compared to a calibration source. A much deeper image is necessary to confirm this result.

  20. Electronic Structure measurements of MoS2 clusters using Soft x-ray absorption and Emission Spectrscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Buuren, Tony; Bostedt, Christoph; Franco, Nicolas; Terminello, Lou; Wilcoxon, Jess

    2000-03-01

    The electronic structure of well defined MoS2 clusters was investigated using x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopes. MoS2 clusters from 1-10nm in diameter were formed using the inverse micelle synthetic process at room temperature in an inert oil. The cluster size and distribution could be precisely controlled using a high-pressure liquid chromatography system. By measuring the S 2p absorption were are able to measure the change in the conduction band edge of the MoS2 clusters as a function of particle size. We found that the conduction band edge was blue shifted with decreasing clusters size with shifts up to 1.2 eV measured for clusters 2nm in diameter. The valence band density of states was determined by measuring the soft x-ray emission from the S 2p core hole. A shift in the valence band edge together with a dramatic change in the density of states was observed with decreasing cluster size. For 2nm clusters a valence band shift of approximately 1.0 eV was measured. These results are compared to recent theoretical and optical measurments on MoS2 clusters. This work is supported by US Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC04-AL8500 and W-7405-ENG-48.

  1. Spectral observations of the soft X-ray background with solid-state detectors - Evidence for line emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocchia, R.; Arnaud, M.; Blondel, C.; Cheron, C.; Christy, J. C.; Rothenflug, R.; Schnopper, H. W.; Delvaille, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    The soft X-ray radiation from several regions of the sky was observed with solid-state detectors Si(Li) between 0.3 and 1.2 keV during two rocket flights. The thermal nature of the diffuse emission coming from the hot bubble surrounding the solar system is confirmed by the observation of C V-C VI and O VII lines which are typical of a temperature of about 10 to the 6th K. Evidence for the existence of a weak component at a higher temperature is given. This component, well visible in the high latitude spectra, could be produced by a hot galactic halo. In the direction of the enhancement region centered on the North Polar Spur, the radiation excess spectra are well represented by a two-temperature plasma model with rather standard abundances. The two components have temperatures of 10 to the 6th and 4.7 x 10 to the 6th K.

  2. Resonant soft x-ray scattering endstation for time-resolved pump-probe measurements at LCLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yi-De; Doering, Dionisio; Cruz, Alejandro G.; Tahir, Nadeem; Andresen, Nord C.; Chow, Ken P.; Contarato, Devis; Cummings, Curtis L.; Domning, Edward E.; Joseph, John; Pepper, John S.; Smith, Brian V.; Zizka, G.; Ford, Christopher; Lee, Wei-Sheng; Weaver, Matt; Patthey, Luc; Weizeowick, John; Denes, Peter; Hussain, Zahid

    2012-10-01

    Localized charge, spin and orbital degrees of freedom can compete with electronic itinerancy and such competition lies at the heart of emergent material properties. To study these electronic orderings, resonant soft X-ray scattering (RSXS) spectroscopy has been demonstrated as one of the most powerful direct probes, and its time-resolved capability can be implemented through pump-probe technique. The ultrafast/ultra-intense X-ray pulses from LCLS can be used as the probe in the time-resolved RSXS experiments, but the inherent fluctuations in intensity and timing between pulses can degrade the superior temporal resolution. To overcome such fluctuations, a compact fast CCD (cFCCD) was developed to enable shot-by-shot data acquisitions and a dedicated RSXS endstation, constructed to house this cFCCD and other single-channel photon detectors, has been extensively used at both ALS and LCLS. Time-resolved RSXS experiments on La1.75Sr0.25 NiO4 nickelate have revealed an unexpected transient behavior of charge and spin ordering (CO/SO) states. After 800nm laser excitation, the CO can be fully suppressed at higher pump fluence while SO remains detectable, creating a transient state that is not accessible by tuning thermodynamic variables. Furthermore, two distinct time scales are identified in the recovery of CO and can be attributed to the amplitude (fast) and phase (slow) dynamics of order parameter. A new version of cFCCD, with eight times the detection area and the readout electronics moved into vacuum side to minimize the pickup noise, has been developed and will be incorporated into the RSXS endstation.

  3. Development of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray emission spectrometers for transmission electron microscopes--an introduction of valence electron spectroscopy for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Masami; Koike, Masato; Fukushima, Kurio; Kimura, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Two types of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray spectrometers, a high-dispersion type and a conventional one, for transmission electron microscopes were constructed. Those spectrometers were used to study the electronic states of valence electrons (bonding electrons). Both spectrometers extended the acceptable energy regions to higher than 2000 eV. The best energy resolution of 0.08 eV was obtained for an Al L-emission spectrum by using the high-dispersion type spectrometer. By using the spectrometer, C K-emission of carbon allotropes, Cu L-emission of Cu(1-x)Zn(x) alloys and Pt M-emission spectra were presented. The FWHM value of 12 eV was obtained for the Pt Malpha-emission peak. The performance of the conventional one was also presented for ZnS and a section specimen of a multilayer device. W-M and Si-K emissions were clearly resolved. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has an advantage for obtaining spectra from a single crystalline specimen with a defined crystal setting. As an example of anisotropic soft X-ray emission, C K-emission spectra of single crystalline graphite with different crystal settings were presented. From the spectra, density of states of pi- and sigma-bondings were separately derived. These results demonstrated a method to analyse the electronic states of valence electrons of materials in the nanometre scale based on TEM. PMID:20371492

  4. Can Charge Exchange Explain Anomalous Soft X-Ray Emission in the Cygnus Loop?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumbee, R. S.; Henley, D. B.; Stancil, P. C.; Shelton, R. L.; Nolte, J. L.; Wu, Y.; Schultz, D. R.

    2014-06-01

    Recent X-ray studies have shown that supernova shock models are unable to satisfactorily explain X-ray emission in the rim of the Cygnus Loop. In an attempt to account for this "anomalously" enhanced X-ray flux, we fit the region with a model including theoretical charge exchange (CX) data along with shock and background X-ray models. The model includes the CX collisions of O8 +, O7 +, N7 +, N6 +, C6 +, and C5 + with H with an energy of 1 keV u-1 (438 km s-1). The observations reveal a strong emission feature near 0.7 keV that cannot fully be accounted for by a shock model, nor the current CX data. Inclusion of CX, specifically O7 + + H, does provide for a statistically significant improvement over a pure shock model.

  5. CAN CHARGE EXCHANGE EXPLAIN ANOMALOUS SOFT X-RAY EMISSION IN THE CYGNUS LOOP?

    SciTech Connect

    Cumbee, R. S.; Henley, D. B.; Stancil, P. C.; Shelton, R. L.; Nolte, J. L.; Wu, Y.; Schultz, D. R.

    2014-06-01

    Recent X-ray studies have shown that supernova shock models are unable to satisfactorily explain X-ray emission in the rim of the Cygnus Loop. In an attempt to account for this ''anomalously'' enhanced X-ray flux, we fit the region with a model including theoretical charge exchange (CX) data along with shock and background X-ray models. The model includes the CX collisions of O{sup 8} {sup +}, O{sup 7} {sup +}, N{sup 7} {sup +}, N{sup 6} {sup +}, C{sup 6} {sup +}, and C{sup 5} {sup +} with H with an energy of 1 keV u{sup –1} (438 km s{sup –1}). The observations reveal a strong emission feature near 0.7 keV that cannot fully be accounted for by a shock model, nor the current CX data. Inclusion of CX, specifically O{sup 7} {sup +} + H, does provide for a statistically significant improvement over a pure shock model.

  6. Soft X-ray observation of the prompt emission of GRB 100418A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imatani, Ritsuko; Tomida, Hiroshi; Nakahira, Satoshi; Kimura, Masashi; Sakamoto, Takanori; Arimoto, Makoto; Morooka, Yoshitaka; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2015-09-01

    We have observed the prompt emission of GRB 100418A from its beginning captured by the MAXI SSC (0.7-7 keV) on board the International Space Station followed by the Swift XRT (0.3-10 keV) observation. The light curve can be fitted by a combination of a power-law component and an exponential component (the decay constant is 31.6 ± 1.6 s). The X-ray spectrum is well expressed by the Band function with Ep ≤ 8.3 keV. This is the brightest gamma-ray burst showing a very low value of Ep. It satisfies the Yonetoku relation (Ep-Lp). It is also consistent with the Amati relation (Ep-Eiso) within a 2.5σ level.

  7. Reprocessing of Soft X-ray Emission Lines in Black Hole Accretion Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C W; Liedahl, D A; Mathiesen, B F; Jimenez-Garate, M A; Raymond, J C

    2003-10-17

    By means of a Monte Carlo code that accounts for Compton scattering and photoabsorption followed by recombination, we have investigated the radiation transfer of Ly{alpha}, He{alpha}, and recombination continua photons of H- and He-like C, N, O, and Ne produced in the photoionized atmosphere of a relativistic black hole accretion disk. We find that photoelectric opacity causes significant attenuation of photons with energies above the O VIII K-edge; that the conversion efficiencies of these photons into lower-energy lines and recombination continua are high; and that accounting for this reprocessing significantly (by factors of 21% to 105%) increases the flux of the Ly{alpha} and He{alpha} emission lines of H- and He-like C and O escaping the disk atmosphere.

  8. Soft X-ray observation of the prompt emission of GRB 100418A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imatani, Ritsuko; Tomida, Hiroshi; Nakahira, Satoshi; Kimura, Masashi; Sakamoto, Takanori; Arimoto, Makoto; Morooka, Yoshitaka; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    We have observed the prompt emission of GRB 100418A from its beginning captured by the MAXI SSC (0.7-7 keV) on board the International Space Station followed by the Swift XRT (0.3-10 keV) observation. The light curve can be fitted by a combination of a power-law component and an exponential component (the decay constant is 31.6 ± 1.6 s). The X-ray spectrum is well expressed by the Band function with Ep ≤ 8.3 keV. This is the brightest gamma-ray burst showing a very low value of Ep. It satisfies the Yonetoku relation (Ep-Lp). It is also consistent with the Amati relation (Ep-Eiso) within a 2.5σ level.

  9. ROSAT observations of pulsed soft X-ray emission from PSR 1055-52

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegelman, Hakki; Finley, John P.

    1993-01-01

    Utilizing the position-sensitive proportional counter and the high-resolution imager aboard the orbiting X-ray observatory ROSAT, we have detected pulsations at the radio period from the pulsar PSR 1055-52. The pulse shapes are energy-dependent and show a transition at about 0.5 keV where the phase angle of the pulse peak changes by about -120 deg and the pulsed fraction increases from 11 percent to 63 percent toward larger energies. Simple spectral models are found to be unsatisfactory, while multicomponent models, such as a soft blackbody and hard power-law tail, yield better fits to the pulse-height data. The hard power-law tail is consistent with the extension of the recently reported EGRET results and may indicate a common emission mechanism for the X-ray through GeV gamma-ray regime. The soft blackbody component with T(infinity) = (7.5 +/- 0.6) x 10 exp 5 K, if interpreted as the initial cooling of a neutron star, is consistent with standard cooling models and does not require the presence of exotic components.

  10. A simple spherical grating by-pass monochromator dedicated to soft x-ray emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiringhelli, G.; Tagliaferri, A.; Braicovich, L.; Brookes, N. B.

    1998-04-01

    PoLIFEMo (Polarized Light Improved Flux Efficiency Monochromator) is the name of a spherical grating monochromator designed with the purpose of maximizing the photon intensity on a sample. The device is mainly conceived to improve performances of an x-ray emission spectrometer, whose limiting factor is often the counting rate. By keeping the exit slit fixed, it is possible to get a small spot size (˜35 μm vertically) on a sample placed just near the exit slit, without the need of postgrating refocusing optics. No entrance slit is used because of the low beam divergence, allowing the use of a virtual source in a converging beam geometry. The tuning of the output energy is done by translating and pitching the spherical grating. The resolving power is higher than 1000 over the whole energy range (500-1500 eV). A detailed analysis of the optical performances is given, mostly in comparison with the Dragon-type monochromator. The actual realization of the device is described, together with the specific motivations and the experimental performances. PoLIFEMo has been installed on beam line ID12B at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility since July 1996.

  11. The Soft-X-Ray Emission of Ark 120. XMM-Newton, NuSTAR, and the Importance of Taking the Broad View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matt, G.; Marinucci, A.; Guainazzi, M.; Brenneman, L. W.; Elvis, M.; Lohfink, A.; Arevalo, P.; Boggs, S. E.; Cappi, M.; Stern, D.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-01-01

    We present simultaneous XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations of the 'bare' Seyfert 1 galaxy, Ark 120, a system in which ionized absorption is absent. The NuSTAR hard-X-ray spectral coverage allows us to constrain different models for the excess soft-X-ray emission. Among phenomenological models, a cutoff power law best explains the soft-X-ray emission. This model likely corresponds to Comptonization of the accretion disc seed UV photons by a population of warm electrons: using Comptonization models, a temperature of approximately 0.3 kiloelectronvolts and an optical depth of approximately 13 are found. If the UV-to-X-ray OPTXAGNF model is applied, the UV fluxes from the XMM-Newton Optical Monitor suggest an intermediate black hole spin. Contrary to several other sources observed by NuSTAR, no high-energy cutoff is detected with a lower limit of 190 kiloelectronvolts.

  12. Correlating the efficiency and nanomorphology of polymer blend solar cells utilizing resonant soft X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hongping; Collins, Brian A; Gann, Eliot; Wang, Cheng; Ade, Harald; McNeill, Christopher R

    2012-01-24

    Enhanced scattering contrast afforded by resonant soft X-ray scattering (R-SoXS) is used to probe the nanomorphology of all-polymer solar cells based on blends of the donor polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) with either the acceptor polymer poly((9,9-dioctylfluorene)-2,7-diyl-alt-[4,7-bis(3-hexylthien-5-yl)-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole]-2',2"-diyl) (F8TBT) or poly([N,N'-bis(2-octyldodecyl)-11-naphthalene-1,4,5,8-bis(dicarboximide)-2,6-diyl]-alt-5,5'-(2,2'-12-bithiophene)) (P(NDI2OD-T2)). Both P3HT:F8TBT and P3HT:P(NDI2OD-T2) blends processed from chloroform with subsequent annealing exhibit complicated morphologies with a hierarchy of phase separation. A bimodal distribution of domain sizes is observed for P3HT:P(NDI2OD-T2) blends with small domains of size ~5-10 nm that evolve with annealing and larger domains of size ~100 nm that are insensitive to annealing. P3HT:F8TBT blends in contrast show a broader distribution of domain size but with the majority of this blend structured on the 10 nm length scale. For both P3HT:P(NDI2OD-T2) and P3HT:F8TBT blends, an evolution in device performance is observed that is correlated with a coarsening and purification of domains on the 5-10 nm length scale. Grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GI-WAXS) is also employed to probe material crystallinity, revealing P(NDI2OD-T2) crystallites 25-40 nm in thickness that are embedded in the larger domains observed by R-SoXS. A higher degree of P3HT crystallinity is also observed in blends with P(NDI2OD-T2) compared to F8TBT with the propensity of the polymers to crystallize in P3HT:P(NDI2OD-T2) blends hindering the structuring of morphology on the sub-10 nm length scale. This work also underscores the complementarity of R-SoXS and GI-WAXS, with R-SoXS measuring the size of compositionally distinguishable domains and GI-WAXS providing information regarding crystallinity and crystallite thickness. PMID:22168639

  13. X-ray emission from cataclysmic variables with accretion disks. I - Hard X-rays. II - EUV/soft X-ray radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, J.; Raymond, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical models explaining the hard-X-ray, soft-X-ray, and EUV emission of accretion-disk cataclysmic variables in terms of the disk boundary layer (DBL) are developed on the basis of a survey of the published observational data. The data are compared with model predictions in graphs for systems with high or low (greater than or less than 10-Pg/s) accretion rates. Good agreement is obtained both at low accretion rates, where an optically thin rarefied hot (Te = 10 to the 8th K) DBL radiates most of its energy as hard X-rays, and at high accretion rates, where an optically thick 100,000-K DBL radiates most of its energy in the EUV and as soft X-rays. Detailed analysis of the old nova V603 Aql suggests that previous models predicting more detections of soft-X-ray/EUV emissions from thick-DBL objects (Ferland et al., 1982) used inappropriate dwarf masses, interstellar column densities, or classical-nova space densities.

  14. Soft x-ray tomography on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo-Petravic, G.

    1988-12-01

    The tomographic method used for deriving soft x-ray local emissivities on TFTR, using one horizontal array of 60 soft x-ray detectors, is described. This method, which is based on inversion of Fourier components and subsequent reconstruction, has been applied to the study of a sawtooth crash. A flattening in the soft x-ray profile, which we interpret as an m = 1 island, is clearly visible during the precursor phase and its location and width correlate well with those from electron temperature profiles reconstructed from electron cyclotron emission measurement. The limitations of the Fourier method, due notably to the aperiodic nature of the signals in the fast crash phase and the difficulty of obtaining accurately the higher Fourier harmonics, are discussed. 9 refs., 13 figs.

  15. Combining THz laser excitation with resonant soft X-ray scattering at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Joshua J.; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Hwang, Harold Y.; Zarem, Alex; Schlotter, William F.; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P.; Staub, Urs; Johnson, Steven; Mitra, Ankush; Swiggers, Michele; Noonan, Peter; Curiel, G. Ivan; Holmes, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development of new instrumentation at the Linac Coherent Light Source for conducting THz excitation experiments in an ultra high vacuum environment probed by soft X-ray diffraction. This consists of a cantilevered, fully motorized mirror system which can provide 600 kV cm−1 electric field strengths across the sample and an X-ray detector that can span the full Ewald sphere with in-vacuum motion. The scientific applications motivated by this development, the details of the instrument, and spectra demonstrating the field strengths achieved using this newly developed system are discussed. PMID:25931077

  16. Combining THz laser excitation with resonant soft X-ray scattering at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Turner, Joshua J.; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Hwang, Harold Y.; Zarem, Alex; Schlotter, William F.; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P.; Staub, Urs; Johnson, Steven; et al

    2015-04-11

    This paper describes the development of new instrumentation at the Linac Coherent Light Source for conducting THz excitation experiments in an ultra high vacuum environment probed by soft X-ray diffraction. This consists of a cantilevered, fully motorized mirror system which can provide 600 kV cm⁻¹ electric field strengths across the sample and an X-ray detector that can span the full Ewald sphere with in-vacuum motion. The scientific applications motivated by this development, the details of the instrument, and spectra demonstrating the field strengths achieved using this newly developed system are discussed.

  17. Combining THz laser excitation with resonant soft X-ray scattering at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Turner, Joshua J; Dakovski, Georgi L; Hoffmann, Matthias C; Hwang, Harold Y; Zarem, Alex; Schlotter, William F; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P; Staub, Urs; Johnson, Steven; Mitra, Ankush; Swiggers, Michele; Noonan, Peter; Curiel, G Ivan; Holmes, Michael

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the development of new instrumentation at the Linac Coherent Light Source for conducting THz excitation experiments in an ultra high vacuum environment probed by soft X-ray diffraction. This consists of a cantilevered, fully motorized mirror system which can provide 600 kV cm(-1) electric field strengths across the sample and an X-ray detector that can span the full Ewald sphere with in-vacuum motion. The scientific applications motivated by this development, the details of the instrument, and spectra demonstrating the field strengths achieved using this newly developed system are discussed. PMID:25931077

  18. Polars - soft X-ray emitters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwope, Axel

    2011-10-01

    The defining criterion of polars (AM Herculis stars) was their prominent soft X-ray emission, which led to numerous discoveries with the EINSTEIN, EXOSAT, ROSAT and EUVE satellites. XMM-Newton discovered polars however and new polar systems from optical surveys (SDSS, CSS) reveal growing evidence that the prevalence or even the existence of a soft X-ray component may be rather the exception than the rule. Here we propose XMM-Newton observations of 5 optically identified polars to search for soft X-ray spectral components, answer the question why they escaped detection in past X-ray surveys and shed new light on the intrinsic energy distribution and accretion energy release of polars.

  19. Polars - soft X-ray emitters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwope, Axel

    2010-10-01

    The defining criterion of polars (AM Herculis stars) was their prominent soft X-ray emission, which led to numerous discoveries with the EINSTEIN, EXOSAT, ROSAT and EUVE satellites. XMM-Newton observations of those X-ray selected polars and genuine discoveries of new polar systems reveal growing evidence that the prevailence or even the existence of a soft X-ray component may be rather the exception than the rule. In the last decade polars were discovered in optical surveys like the SDSS and the CSS. Here we propose XMM-Newton observations of 5 optically selected polars to search for soft X-ray spectral components, answer the question why they escaped detection in past X-ray surveys and shed new light on the intrinsic energy distribution of polars.

  20. Tokamak T-10 soft x-ray imaging diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrovskij, G. A.; Kislov, D. A.; Lyadina, E. S.; Savrukhin, P. V.

    1991-04-01

    Three arrays of silicon surface-barrier diodes were recently installed on T-10 (R=1.5 m, a=0.3 m). The detectors view the plasma cross section along 58 chords spaced in the poloidal direction at one toroidal location. The tomographic reconstruction technique allows one to obtain the time evolution of the two-dimensional soft x-ray intensity profiles in the energy range of 2.5-15 keV. The field of view covered the main part of the plasma (r/a<0.7) with a spatial resolution as small as 2 cm, which is consistent with the scale of the processes under study. The signals are digitized at rates up to 100 kHz and stored in 464K (total) memory (8K per channel). The measured soft x-ray emission was applicable for investigation of the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, heat and particle transport, and plasma position control. Studies of the evolution of soft x-ray perturbations were made in ohmically and ECRH heated plasmas. It was shown that the effect of ECRH on the plasma parameters (transport coefficients, sawtooth activity, modification of the electron temperature profiles) depends on the position of the EC resonance zone within the plasma cross section. The tomographic reconstruction revealed the different mechanisms of sawtooth crashes in the T-10 plasma.

  1. Electronic structure of ultrathin Fe films on TiO[sub 2](110) studied with soft-x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and resonant photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Diebold, U. Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118-5698 ); Tao, H. ); Shinn, N.D. ); Madey, T.E. )

    1994-11-15

    We report on soft-x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SXPS) of a TiO[sub 2](110) surface during deposition of Fe in the monolayer regime. At low fractional monolayer coverages, the adsorbed Fe atoms are oxidized and Ti cations at the interface become reduced due to Fe adsorption. SXPS from shallow core levels and valence bands show that Fe starts to exhibit metallic character at a coverage of approximately 0.7 equivalent monolayers. Two well separated defect states appear in the band gap of TiO[sub 2] at iron coverages well below one monolayer. We use resonant photoemission to obtain information on the partial density of states, and we assign these defect states as being Fe-derived and Ti-derived states, located at the Fe and Ti sites, respectively. We suggest that a position change of oxygen is involved in the bonding of Fe on the TiO[sub 2](110) surface.

  2. The Multi-Instrument (EVE-RHESSI) DEM for Solar Flares, and Implications for Residual Non-Thermal Soft X-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTiernan, James M.; Caspi, Amir; Warren, Harry

    2015-04-01

    In the soft X-ray energy range, solar flare spectra are typically dominated by thermal emission. The low energy extent of non-thermal emission can only be loosely quantified using currently available X-ray data. To address this issue, we combine observations from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on-board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) with X-ray data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The improvement over the isothermal approximation is intended to resolve the ambiguity in the range where the thermal and non-thermal components may have similar photon fluxes. This "crossover" range can extend up to 30 keV for medium to large solar flares.Previous work (Caspi et.al. 2014ApJ...788L..31C) has concentrated on obtaining DEM models that fit both instruments' observations well. Now we are interested in any breaks and cutoffs in the "residual" non-thermal spectrum; i.e., the RHESSI spectrum that is left over after the DEM has accounted for the bulk of the soft X-ray emission. Thermal emission is again modeled using a DEM that is parametrized as multiple gaussians in temperature; the non-thermal emission is modeled as a photon spectrum obtained using a thin-target emission model ('thin2' from the SolarSoft Xray IDL package). Spectra for both instruments are fit simultaneously in a self-consistent manner. The results for non-thermal parameters then are compared with those found using RHESSI data alone, with isothermal and double-thermal models.

  3. Experimental Benchmark for an Improved Simulation of Absolute Soft-X-Ray Emission from Polystyrene Targets Irradiated with the Nike Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, J. L.; Busquet, M.; Colombant, D. G.; Mostovych, A. N.; Feldman, U.; Klapisch, M.; Seely, J. F.; Brown, C.; Holland, G.

    2005-02-01

    Absolutely calibrated, time-resolved spectral intensity measurements of soft-x-ray emission (hν˜0.1 1.0 keV) from laser-irradiated polystyrene targets are compared to radiation-hydrodynamic simulations that include our new postprocessor, Virtual Spectro. This new capability allows a unified, detailed treatment of atomic physics and radiative transfer in nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions for simple spectra from low-Z materials as well as complex spectra from high-Z materials. The excellent agreement (within a factor of ˜1.5) demonstrates the powerful predictive capability of the codes for the complex conditions in the ablating plasma. A comparison to data with high spectral resolution (E/δE˜1000) emphasizes the importance of including radiation coupling in the quantitative simulation of emission spectra.

  4. Chemical State Mapping of Degraded B4C Control Rod Investigated with Soft X-ray Emission Spectrometer in Electron Probe Micro-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasada, R.; Ha, Y.; Higuchi, T.; Sakamoto, K.

    2016-05-01

    B4C is widely used as control rods in light water reactors, such as the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, because it shows excellent neutron absorption and has a high melting point. However, B4C can melt at lower temperatures owing to eutectic interactions with stainless steel and can even evaporate by reacting with high-temperature steam under severe accident conditions. To reduce the risk of recriticality, a precise understanding of the location and chemical state of B in the melt core is necessary. Here we show that a novel soft X-ray emission spectrometer in electron probe microanalysis can help to obtain a chemical state map of B in a modeled control rod after a high-temperature steam oxidation test.

  5. Setup for in situ investigation of gases and gas/solid interfaces by soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Benkert, A; Blum, M; Meyer, F; Wilks, R G; Yang, W; Bär, M; Reinert, F; Heske, C; Weinhardt, L

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel gas cell designed to study the electronic structure of gases and gas/solid interfaces using soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopies. In this cell, the sample gas is separated from the vacuum of the analysis chamber by a thin window membrane, allowing in situ measurements under atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the gas can be regulated from room temperature up to approximately 600 °C. To avoid beam damage, a constant mass flow can be maintained to continuously refresh the gaseous sample. Furthermore, the gas cell provides space for solid-state samples, allowing to study the gas/solid interface for surface catalytic reactions at elevated temperatures. To demonstrate the capabilities of the cell, we have investigated a TiO2 sample behind a mixture of N2 and He gas at atmospheric pressure. PMID:24517824

  6. Setup for in situ investigation of gases and gas/solid interfaces by soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Benkert, A. E-mail: l.weinhardt@kit.edu; Blum, M.; Meyer, F.; Wilks, R. G.; Yang, W.; Bär, M.; and others

    2014-01-15

    We present a novel gas cell designed to study the electronic structure of gases and gas/solid interfaces using soft x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopies. In this cell, the sample gas is separated from the vacuum of the analysis chamber by a thin window membrane, allowing in situ measurements under atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the gas can be regulated from room temperature up to approximately 600 °C. To avoid beam damage, a constant mass flow can be maintained to continuously refresh the gaseous sample. Furthermore, the gas cell provides space for solid-state samples, allowing to study the gas/solid interface for surface catalytic reactions at elevated temperatures. To demonstrate the capabilities of the cell, we have investigated a TiO{sub 2} sample behind a mixture of N{sub 2} and He gas at atmospheric pressure.

  7. Chemical State Mapping of Degraded B4C Control Rod Investigated with Soft X-ray Emission Spectrometer in Electron Probe Micro-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kasada, R.; Ha, Y.; Higuchi, T.; Sakamoto, K.

    2016-01-01

    B4C is widely used as control rods in light water reactors, such as the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, because it shows excellent neutron absorption and has a high melting point. However, B4C can melt at lower temperatures owing to eutectic interactions with stainless steel and can even evaporate by reacting with high-temperature steam under severe accident conditions. To reduce the risk of recriticality, a precise understanding of the location and chemical state of B in the melt core is necessary. Here we show that a novel soft X-ray emission spectrometer in electron probe microanalysis can help to obtain a chemical state map of B in a modeled control rod after a high-temperature steam oxidation test. PMID:27161666

  8. Chemical State Mapping of Degraded B4C Control Rod Investigated with Soft X-ray Emission Spectrometer in Electron Probe Micro-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kasada, R; Ha, Y; Higuchi, T; Sakamoto, K

    2016-01-01

    B4C is widely used as control rods in light water reactors, such as the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, because it shows excellent neutron absorption and has a high melting point. However, B4C can melt at lower temperatures owing to eutectic interactions with stainless steel and can even evaporate by reacting with high-temperature steam under severe accident conditions. To reduce the risk of recriticality, a precise understanding of the location and chemical state of B in the melt core is necessary. Here we show that a novel soft X-ray emission spectrometer in electron probe microanalysis can help to obtain a chemical state map of B in a modeled control rod after a high-temperature steam oxidation test. PMID:27161666

  9. Soft X-Ray Extended Emissions of Short Gamma-Ray Bursts as Electromagnetic Counterparts of Compact Binary Mergers: Possible Origin and Detectability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Nakauchi, Daisuke; Suwa, Yudai; Sakamoto, Takanori; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the possible origin of extended emissions (EEs) of short gamma-ray bursts with an isotropic energy of ~1050-51 erg and a duration of a few 10 s to ~100 s, based on a compact binary (neutron star (NS)-NS or NS-black hole (BH)) merger scenario. We analyze the evolution of magnetized neutrino-dominated accretion disks of mass ~0.1 M ⊙ around BHs formed after the mergers and estimate the power of relativistic outflows via the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) process. We show that a rotation energy of the BH up to >~ 1052 erg can be extracted with an observed timescale of >~ 30(1 + z) s with a relatively small disk viscosity parameter of α < 0.01. Such a BZ power dissipates by clashing with non-relativistic pre-ejected matter of mass M ~ 10-(2-4) M ⊙, and forms a mildly relativistic fireball. We show that the dissipative photospheric emissions from such fireballs are likely in the soft X-ray band (1-10 keV) for M ~ 10-2 M ⊙, possibly in NS-NS mergers, and in the BAT band (15-150 keV) for M ~ 10-4 M ⊙, possibly in NS-BH mergers. In the former case, such soft EEs can provide a good chance of ˜ 6 yr-1 (Δ Ω softEE/4π) (R}GW/40 yr-1) for simultaneous detections of the gravitational waves with a ~0.°1 angular resolution by soft X-ray survey facilities like the Wide-Field MAXI. Here, ΔΩsoftEE is the beaming factor of the soft EEs and R}GW is the NS-NS merger rate detectable by the advanced LIGO, the advanced Virgo, and KAGRA.

  10. A Deep X-Ray View of the Bare AGN Ark 120. I. Revealing the Soft X-Ray Line Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J. N.; Porquet, D.; Braito, V.; Nardini, E.; Lobban, A.; Turner, T. J.

    2016-09-01

    The Seyfert 1 galaxy Ark 120 is a prototype example of the so-called class of bare nucleus active galactic nuclei (AGNs), whereby there is no known evidence for the presence of ionized gas along the direct line of sight. Here deep (>400 ks exposure), high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of Ark 120 is presented from XMM-Newton observations that were carried out in 2014 March, together with simultaneous Chandra/High Energy Transmission Grating exposures. The high-resolution spectra confirmed the lack of intrinsic absorbing gas associated with Ark 120, with the only X-ray absorption present originating from the interstellar medium (ISM) of our own Galaxy, with a possible slight enhancement of the oxygen abundance required with respect to the expected ISM values in the solar neighborhood. However, the presence of several soft X-ray emission lines are revealed for the first time in the XMM-Newton RGS spectrum, associated with the AGN and arising from the He- and H-like ions of N, O, Ne, and Mg. The He-like line profiles of N, O, and Ne appear velocity broadened, with typical FWHMs of ∼5000 km s‑1, whereas the H-like profiles are unresolved. From the clean measurement of the He-like triplets, we deduce that the broad lines arise from a gas of density n e ∼ 1011 cm‑3, while the photoionization calculations infer that the emitting gas covers at least 10% of 4π steradian. Thus the broad soft X-ray profiles appear coincident with an X-ray component of the optical–UV broad-line region on sub-parsec scales, whereas the narrow profiles originate on larger parsec scales, perhaps coincident with the AGN narrow-line region. The observations show that Ark 120 is not intrinsically bare and substantial X-ray-emitting gas exists out of our direct line of sight toward this AGN.

  11. Soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, D.L.; Rosen, M.D.

    1988-12-01

    One of the elusive dreams of laser physicists has been the development of an x-ray laser. After 25 years of waiting, the x-ray laser has at last entered the scientific scene, although those now in operation are still laboratory prototypes. They produce soft x rays down to about five nanometers. X-ray lasers retain the usual characteristics of their optical counterparts: a very tight beam, spatial and temporal coherence, and extreme brightness. Present x-ray lasers are nearly 100 times brighter that the next most powerful x-ray source in the world: the electron synchrotron. Although Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is widely known for its hard-x-ray laser program which has potential applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative, the soft x-ray lasers have no direct military applications. These lasers, and the scientific tools that result from their development, may one day have a place in the design and diagnosis of both laser fusion and hard x-ray lasers. The soft x-ray lasers now in operation at the LLNL have shown great promise but are still in the primitive state. Once x-ray lasers become reliable, efficient, and economical, they will have several important applications. Chief among them might be the creation of holograms of microscopic biological structures too small to be investigated with visible light. 5 figs.

  12. Microstructure and composition analysis of low-Z/low-Z multilayers by combining hard and resonant soft X-ray reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, P. N.; Rai, S. K.; Srivastava, A. K.; Ganguli, T.; Dhawan, R.; Naik, P. A.

    2016-06-01

    Microstructure and composition analysis of periodic multilayer structure consisting of a low electron density contrast (EDC) material combination by grazing incidence hard X-ray reflectivity (GIXR), resonant soft X-ray reflectivity (RSXR), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are presented. Measurements of reflectivity at different energies allow combining the sensitivity of GIXR data to microstructural parameters like layer thicknesses and interfacing roughness, with the layer composition sensitivity of RSXR. These aspects are shown with an example of 10-period C/B4C multilayer. TEM observation reveals that interfaces C on B4C and B4C on C are symmetric. Although GIXR provides limited structural information when EDC between layers is low, measurements using a scattering technique like GIXR with a microscopic technique like TEM improve the microstructural information of low EDC combination. The optical constants of buried layers have been derived by RSXR. The derived optical constants from the measured RSXR data suggested the presence of excess carbon into the boron carbide layer.

  13. Development of a compact fast CCD camera and resonant soft x-ray scattering endstation for time-resolved pump-probe experiments.

    PubMed

    Doering, D; Chuang, Y-D; Andresen, N; Chow, K; Contarato, D; Cummings, C; Domning, E; Joseph, J; Pepper, J S; Smith, B; Zizka, G; Ford, C; Lee, W S; Weaver, M; Patthey, L; Weizeorick, J; Hussain, Z; Denes, P

    2011-07-01

    The designs of a compact, fast CCD (cFCCD) camera, together with a resonant soft x-ray scattering endstation, are presented. The cFCCD camera consists of a highly parallel, custom, thick, high-resistivity CCD, readout by a custom 16-channel application specific integrated circuit to reach the maximum readout rate of 200 frames per second. The camera is mounted on a virtual-axis flip stage inside the RSXS chamber. When this flip stage is coupled to a differentially pumped rotary seal, the detector assembly can rotate about 100°/360° in the vertical/horizontal scattering planes. With a six-degrees-of-freedom cryogenic sample goniometer, this endstation has the capability to detect the superlattice reflections from the electronic orderings showing up in the lower hemisphere. The complete system has been tested at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and has been used in multiple experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. PMID:21806178

  14. Prominent role of oxygen in the multiferroicity of DyMnO3 and TbMnO3: A resonant soft x-ray scattering spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S. W.; Lee, J. M.; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Shao, YuCheng; Wray, L. Andrew; Chen, J. M.; Qiao, R.; Yang, W. L.; Cao, Y.; Lin, J.-Y.; Schoenlein, R. W.; Chuang, Y.-D.

    2016-07-01

    Oxygen is known to play an important role in the multiferroicity of rare earth manganites; however, how this role changes with rare earth elements is still not fully understood. To address this question, we have used resonant soft x-ray scattering spectroscopy to study the F -type (0 ,τ ,0 ) diffraction peak from the antiferromagnetic order in DyMnO3 and TbMnO3. We focus on the measurements at O K edge of these two manganites, supplemented by the results at Mn L2 and Dy M5 edge of DyMnO3. We show that the electronic states of different elements are coupled more strongly in DyMnO3 than in TbMnO3, presumably due to the stronger lattice distortion and the tendency to develop E-type antiferromagnetism in the ferroelectric state that promote the orbital hybridization. We also show that the anomaly in the correlation length of (0 ,τ ,0 ) peak in DyMnO3 signifies the exchange interaction between Mn and rare earth spins. Our findings reveal the prominent role of oxygen orbitals in the multiferroicity of rare earth manganites and the distinct energetics between them.

  15. Soft X-ray extended emissions of short gamma-ray bursts as electromagnetic counterparts of compact binary mergers: possible origin and detectability

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Takashi; Nakauchi, Daisuke; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Suwa, Yudai; Sakamoto, Takanori; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2014-11-20

    We investigate the possible origin of extended emissions (EEs) of short gamma-ray bursts with an isotropic energy of ∼10{sup 50-51} erg and a duration of a few 10 s to ∼100 s, based on a compact binary (neutron star (NS)-NS or NS-black hole (BH)) merger scenario. We analyze the evolution of magnetized neutrino-dominated accretion disks of mass ∼0.1 M {sub ☉} around BHs formed after the mergers and estimate the power of relativistic outflows via the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) process. We show that a rotation energy of the BH up to ≳ 10{sup 52} erg can be extracted with an observed timescale of ≳ 30(1 + z) s with a relatively small disk viscosity parameter of α < 0.01. Such a BZ power dissipates by clashing with non-relativistic pre-ejected matter of mass M ∼ 10{sup –(2-4)} M {sub ☉}, and forms a mildly relativistic fireball. We show that the dissipative photospheric emissions from such fireballs are likely in the soft X-ray band (1-10 keV) for M ∼ 10{sup –2} M {sub ☉}, possibly in NS-NS mergers, and in the BAT band (15-150 keV) for M ∼ 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉}, possibly in NS-BH mergers. In the former case, such soft EEs can provide a good chance of ∼6 yr{sup −1} (ΔΩ{sub softEE}/4π) (R{sub GW}/40 yr{sup −1}) for simultaneous detections of the gravitational waves with a ∼0.°1 angular resolution by soft X-ray survey facilities like the Wide-Field MAXI. Here, ΔΩ{sub softEE} is the beaming factor of the soft EEs and R{sub GW} is the NS-NS merger rate detectable by the advanced LIGO, the advanced Virgo, and KAGRA.

  16. A new compact soft x-ray spectrometer for resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies at PETRA III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Z.; Peters, H. B.; Hahn, U.; Agâker, M.; Hage, A.; Reininger, R.; Siewert, F.; Nordgren, J.; Viefhaus, J.; Techert, S.

    2015-09-01

    We present a newly designed compact grating spectrometer for the energy range from 210 eV to 1250 eV, which would include the Kα1,2 emission lines of vital elements like C, N, and O. The spectrometer is based on a grazing incidence spherical varied line spacing grating with 2400 l/mm at its center and a radius of curvature of 58 542 mm. First, results show a resolving power of around 1000 at an energy of 550 eV and a working spectrometer for high vacuum (10-4 mbar) environment without losing photon intensity.

  17. A new compact soft x-ray spectrometer for resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies at PETRA III

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Z. E-mail: simone.techert@desy.de; Peters, H. B.; Hahn, U.; Viefhaus, J.; Agåker, M.; Nordgren, J.; Hage, A.; Reininger, R.; Siewert, F.; Techert, S. E-mail: simone.techert@desy.de

    2015-09-15

    We present a newly designed compact grating spectrometer for the energy range from 210 eV to 1250 eV, which would include the Kα{sub 1,2} emission lines of vital elements like C, N, and O. The spectrometer is based on a grazing incidence spherical varied line spacing grating with 2400 l/mm at its center and a radius of curvature of 58 542 mm. First, results show a resolving power of around 1000 at an energy of 550 eV and a working spectrometer for high vacuum (10{sup −4} mbar) environment without losing photon intensity.

  18. Electronic Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials with Photon-in/Photon-out Soft-X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jinghua

    2008-09-22

    The applications of resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy on a variety of carbon systems have yielded characteristic fingerprints. With high-resolution monochromatized synchrotron radiation excitation, resonant inelastic X-ray scattering has emerged as a new source of information about electronic structure and excitation dynamics. Photon-in/photon-out soft-X-ray spectroscopy is used to study the electronic properties of fundamental materials, nanostructure, and complex hydrides and will offer potential in-depth understanding of chemisorption and/or physisorption mechanisms of hydrogen adsorption/desorption capacity and kinetics.

  19. An XMM-Newton Survey of the Soft X-Ray Background. III. The Galactic Halo X-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henley, David B.; Shelton, Robin L.

    2013-08-01

    We present measurements of the Galactic halo's X-ray emission for 110 XMM-Newton sight lines selected to minimize contamination from solar wind charge exchange emission. We detect emission from few million degree gas on ~4/5 of our sight lines. The temperature is fairly uniform (median = 2.22 × 106 K, interquartile range = 0.63 × 106 K), while the emission measure and intrinsic 0.5-2.0 keV surface brightness vary by over an order of magnitude (~(0.4-7) × 10-3 cm-6 pc and ~(0.5-7) × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 deg-2, respectively, with median detections of 1.9 × 10-3 cm-6 pc and 1.5 × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 deg-2, respectively). The high-latitude sky contains a patchy distribution of few million degree gas. This gas exhibits a general increase in emission measure toward the inner Galaxy in the southern Galactic hemisphere. However, there is no tendency for our observed emission measures to decrease with increasing Galactic latitude, contrary to what is expected for a disk-like halo morphology. The measured temperatures, brightnesses, and spatial distributions of the gas can be used to place constraints on models for the dominant heating sources of the halo. We provide some discussion of such heating sources, but defer comparisons between the observations and detailed models to a later paper.

  20. AN XMM-NEWTON SURVEY OF THE SOFT X-RAY BACKGROUND. III. THE GALACTIC HALO X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, David B.; Shelton, Robin L.

    2013-08-20

    We present measurements of the Galactic halo's X-ray emission for 110 XMM-Newton sight lines selected to minimize contamination from solar wind charge exchange emission. We detect emission from few million degree gas on {approx}4/5 of our sight lines. The temperature is fairly uniform (median = 2.22 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K, interquartile range = 0.63 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K), while the emission measure and intrinsic 0.5-2.0 keV surface brightness vary by over an order of magnitude ({approx}(0.4-7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} cm{sup -6} pc and {approx}(0.5-7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} deg{sup -2}, respectively, with median detections of 1.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} cm{sup -6} pc and 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} deg{sup -2}, respectively). The high-latitude sky contains a patchy distribution of few million degree gas. This gas exhibits a general increase in emission measure toward the inner Galaxy in the southern Galactic hemisphere. However, there is no tendency for our observed emission measures to decrease with increasing Galactic latitude, contrary to what is expected for a disk-like halo morphology. The measured temperatures, brightnesses, and spatial distributions of the gas can be used to place constraints on models for the dominant heating sources of the halo. We provide some discussion of such heating sources, but defer comparisons between the observations and detailed models to a later paper.

  1. The Soft X-Ray Emission of Nocturnal Atmosphere During the Descending Phase of 23rd Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Anatoly; Martin, Inacio M.; Pugacheva, Galina

    2012-11-01

    The spectrometer RPS-1 onboard the "CORONAS-F" satellite monitored solar X-rays in the energy range 3-31.5 keV using CdTe solid state detector with thermoelectric semiconductor micro cooler. At shadowed branches of the orbit the device registered X-ray emission of the upper atmosphere that mostly results from the bremsstrahlung radiation of magnetospheric electrons. Long-term observations with the device (July, 2001 to December, 2005) permitted the evaluation of the low energy 3-8 keV X-ray emission flux radiated by the upper nocturnal atmosphere and its dynamics during descending phase of 23 solar cycle

  2. High-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS at the Swiss Light Source for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Strocov, V N; Schmitt, T; Flechsig, U; Schmidt, T; Imhof, A; Chen, Q; Raabe, J; Betemps, R; Zimoch, D; Krempasky, J; Wang, X; Grioni, M; Piazzalunga, A; Patthey, L

    2010-09-01

    The concepts and technical realisation of the high-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS operating in the energy range from 300 to 1600 eV and intended for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) are described. The photon source is an undulator of novel fixed-gap design where longitudinal movement of permanent magnetic arrays controls not only the light polarization (including circular and 0-180 degrees rotatable linear polarizations) but also the energy without changing the gap. The beamline optics is based on the well established scheme of plane-grating monochromator operating in collimated light. The ultimate resolving power E/DeltaE is above 33000 at 1 keV photon energy. The choice of blazed versus lamellar gratings and optimization of their profile parameters is described. Owing to glancing angles on the mirrors as well as optimized groove densities and profiles of the gratings, the beamline is capable of delivering high photon flux up to 1 x 10(13) photons s(-1) (0.01% BW)(-1) at 1 keV. Ellipsoidal refocusing optics used for the RIXS endstation demagnifies the vertical spot size down to 4 microm, which allows slitless operation and thus maximal transmission of the high-resolution RIXS spectrometer delivering E/DeltaE > 11000 at 1 keV photon energy. Apart from the beamline optics, an overview of the control system is given, the diagnostics and software tools are described, and strategies used for the optical alignment are discussed. An introduction to the concepts and instrumental realisation of the ARPES and RIXS endstations is given. PMID:20724785

  3. High-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS at the Swiss Light Source for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    Strocov, V. N.; Schmitt, T.; Flechsig, U.; Schmidt, T.; Imhof, A.; Chen, Q.; Raabe, J.; Betemps, R.; Zimoch, D.; Krempasky, J.; Wang, X.; Grioni, M.; Piazzalunga, A.; Patthey, L.

    2010-01-01

    The concepts and technical realisation of the high-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS operating in the energy range from 300 to 1600 eV and intended for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) are described. The photon source is an undulator of novel fixed-gap design where longitudinal movement of permanent magnetic arrays controls not only the light polarization (including circular and 0–180° rotatable linear polarizations) but also the energy without changing the gap. The beamline optics is based on the well established scheme of plane-grating monochromator operating in collimated light. The ultimate resolving power E/ΔE is above 33000 at 1 keV photon energy. The choice of blazed versus lamellar gratings and optimization of their profile parameters is described. Owing to glancing angles on the mirrors as well as optimized groove densities and profiles of the gratings, the beamline is capable of delivering high photon flux up to 1 × 1013 photons s−1 (0.01% BW)−1 at 1 keV. Ellipsoidal refocusing optics used for the RIXS endstation demagnifies the vertical spot size down to 4 µm, which allows slitless operation and thus maximal transmission of the high-resolution RIXS spectrometer delivering E/ΔE > 11000 at 1 keV photon energy. Apart from the beamline optics, an overview of the control system is given, the diagnostics and software tools are described, and strategies used for the optical alignment are discussed. An introduction to the concepts and instrumental realisation of the ARPES and RIXS endstations is given. PMID:20724785

  4. Soft-x-ray emission spectroscopy study of La2CuO4 and three high-Tc superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnole, V.; Mariot, J.-M.; Hague, C. F.; Michel, C.; Raveau, B.

    1990-03-01

    High-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy measurements have been performed on sintered samples of La2CuO4, La1.85Sr0.15CuO4-δ, YBa2Cu3O7-δ (δ<0.1), and compressed polycrystalline Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ. The Cu Lα and O Kα emission bands, which reflect the local partial Cu 3d and O 2p states, respectively, are compared to photoelectron spectra and ground-state local-density-approximation (LDA) densities-of-states (DOS) calculations. Our results show that solid-state effects are dominant. In particular, the differences in shape of the O Kα emission bands follow the trends predicted by LDA, although it must be stressed that they mainly arise from O 2p states at oxygen sites not directly involved in the Cu-O planes. The Cu-side 3d states, on the other hand, vary little from one cuprate to the next and are more strongly localized than expected from LDA predictions. The Anderson-impurity model calculations of Kotani and co-workers are discussed, and it is concluded that they provide a satisfactory explanation of the Cu Lα emission data, which reflect strong on-site Coulomb interaction. We conclude that the apparently good agreement between LDA-calculated DOS and low-energy photoemission experiments recently reported results from the high sensitivity of the latter to O 2p states. Discrepancies are to be expected in excitation spectra that involve mainly 3d electrons.

  5. Forward Models of Solar Soft X-ray Emissions: What Can They Tell Us About Coronal Heating?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Loraine L.

    2006-06-01

    Forward modeling can yield a lot of insight about processes in the solar corona. For the purposes of constraining proposed coronal heating mechanisms, I have developed a forward modeling approach to predict active region coronal emissions, using magnetic field observations at the photosphere as input. First, I calculate a coronal magnetic field and a set of a few thousand magnetic field lines representing it. Next, I treat each field line as a steadily heated coronal loop, with the heating term approximated as a simple parameterized function based on magnetic field properties. Then I use a 1-D energy balance calculation with steady-state flows to solve for loop temperature and density profiles, using different heating parameterizations to simulate different proposed coronal heating mechanisms. After interpolating these thermodynamic variables to a 3-D grid, I then simulate the image expected from a coronal imaging instrument viewing the simulated active region. I compare the observed image to simulated images using different heating mechanisms to see which heating theories best match the observations.I have performed this forward modeling exercise for 10 active regions using four different heating parameterizations. I find significant differences in the predictive accuracy of the four mechanisms, with the best match from a volumetric heating rate that scales proportionally to average loop magnetic field strength and inversely proportional to field line loop length. However, none of the predicted emissions match well with the observed emissions. The mismatch implies that the corona is likely not heated in a steady-state fashion. I gratefully acknowledge funding support from the NASA GSRP program and the DOD solar MURI project at UC Berkeley for completion of this dissertation.

  6. Soft X-Ray Emission Lines from a Relativistic Accretion Disk in MCG -6-30-15 and Mrk 766

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Sako, M.; Kahn, S. M.; Brinkman, A. C.; Kaastra, J. S.; Page, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) spectra of the Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies MCG -6-30-15 and Mrk 766 are physically and spectroscopically inconsistent with standard models comprising a power-law continuum absorbed by either cold or ionized matter. We propose that the remarkably similar features detected in both objects in the 5 - 35 A band are H-like oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon emission lines, gravitation- ally redshifted and broadened by relativistic effects in the vicinity of a Kerr black hole. We discuss the implications of our interpretation, and demonstrate that the derived parameters can be physically self-consistent.

  7. Fermi Detection of Gamma-Ray Emission from the M2 Soft X-Ray Flare on 2010 June 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhat, P. N.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bregeon, J.; Briggs, M. S.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burgess, J. M.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Gruber, D.; Troja, E.; Casandjian, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The GOES M2-class solar flare, SOL2010-06-12T00:57, was modest in many respects yet exhibited remarkable acceleration of energetic particles. The flare produced an approximately 50 s impulsive burst of hard X- and gamma-ray emission up to at least 400 MeV observed by the Fermi GBM and LAT experiments. The remarkably similar hard X-ray and high-energy gamma-ray time profiles suggest that most of the particles were accelerated to energies greater than or equal to 300 MeV with a delay of approximately 10 s from mildly relativistic electrons, but some reached these energies in as little as approximately 3 s. The gamma-ray line fluence from this flare was about ten times higher than that typically observed from this modest GOES class of X-ray flare. There is no evidence for time-extended greater than 100 MeV emission as has been found for other flares with high-energy gamma rays.

  8. CHIANTI—An Atomic Database for Emission Lines. XIII. Soft X-Ray Improvements and Other Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, E.; Young, P. R.; Dere, K. P.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.

    2013-02-01

    The CHIANTI spectral code consists of two parts: an atomic database and a suite of computer programs in Python and IDL. Together, they allow the calculation of the optically thin spectrum of astrophysical objects and provide spectroscopic plasma diagnostics for the analysis of astrophysical spectra. The database includes atomic energy levels, wavelengths, radiative transition probabilities, collision excitation rate coefficients, ionization, and recombination rate coefficients, as well as data to calculate free-free, free-bound, and two-photon continuum emission. Version 7.1 has been released, which includes improved data for several ions, recombination rates, and element abundances. In particular, it provides a large expansion of the CHIANTI models for key Fe ions from Fe VIII to Fe XIV to improve the predicted emission in the 50-170 Å wavelength range. All data and programs are freely available at http://www.chiantidatabase.org and in SolarSoft, while the Python interface to CHIANTI can be found at http://chiantipy.sourceforge.net.

  9. CHIANTI-AN ATOMIC DATABASE FOR EMISSION LINES. XIII. SOFT X-RAY IMPROVEMENTS AND OTHER CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, E.; Young, P. R.; Dere, K. P.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.

    2013-02-15

    The CHIANTI spectral code consists of two parts: an atomic database and a suite of computer programs in Python and IDL. Together, they allow the calculation of the optically thin spectrum of astrophysical objects and provide spectroscopic plasma diagnostics for the analysis of astrophysical spectra. The database includes atomic energy levels, wavelengths, radiative transition probabilities, collision excitation rate coefficients, ionization, and recombination rate coefficients, as well as data to calculate free-free, free-bound, and two-photon continuum emission. Version 7.1 has been released, which includes improved data for several ions, recombination rates, and element abundances. In particular, it provides a large expansion of the CHIANTI models for key Fe ions from Fe VIII to Fe XIV to improve the predicted emission in the 50-170 A wavelength range. All data and programs are freely available at http://www.chiantidatabase.org and in SolarSoft, while the Python interface to CHIANTI can be found at http://chiantipy.sourceforge.net.

  10. Two-dimensional Electron Temperature Measurements Using Soft X-Ray Emission on the Compact Toroidal Hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herfindal, J. L.; Hartwell, G. J.; Knowlton, S. F.; Maurer, D. A.

    2013-10-01

    Electron temperature measurements are important in characterizing the equilibrium as well as MHD fluctuations in fusion plasmas. The Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH; R0 = 0 . 75 m, ap ~ 0 . 2 m, B <= 0 . 7 T, ne <= 5 × 1019 m-3, Ip <= 80 kA, Te <= 200 eV) torsatron has an extensive collection of emissivity diagnostics: four pinhole type cameras, a bolometer, a spectrometer, and a prototype two-color camera. Improvements have been made on the current prototype two-color camera to reduce the electronic noise and ensure a light-tight camera housing. Amplifiers with a bandwidth of approximately 40 kHz have been implemented for study of both equilibrium and electron temperature fluctuations due to low frequency MHD activity. Electron temperature estimates from the SXR spectrometer, two-color camera, and conductivity measurements are compared. Two additional two-color cameras are currently under construction and will enable the tomographic reconstruction of the electron temperature. This work is supported by the USDoE under grant DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  11. Soft x ray properties of the Geminga pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, J. P.; Ruderman, M.

    1993-01-01

    The ROSAT soft x ray spectrum and pulse profile of the Geminga pulsar are analyzed and interpreted in terms of thermal emission from the surface of the neutron star. The x ray spectrum appears to consist of two blackbody components with T(sub 1) = (5.2 +/- 1.0) x 10 (exp 5) K and T(sub 2) approximately 3 x 10(exp 6) K, respectively. The inferred ratio of surface areas, A(sub 2)/A(sub 1), is approximately 3 x 10(exp -5). Both components are highly modulated at the pulsar rotation period, but the harder x ray pulse is narrower, and leads the main (soft) x ray pulse by about 105 deg of phase. The soft x ray component is interpreted as photospheric cooling of much of the neutron star's surface area, while the small, hot region could be part of the much smaller polar cap heated by energetic particles flowing inward from the magnetospheric accelerator which is responsible for the production of Geminga's gamma rays. Geminga's gamma ray emission is consistent with outer-magnetosphere accelerator models for highly inclined dipoles. These predict the beaming of energetic gamma rays close enough to the star to give copious e(+/-) production in the stellar magnetic field and a large circumstellar pair density from pair inflow toward the surface. These pairs may quench radio emission, and also reflect most of the hard polar cap x rays back to the stellar surface by cyclotron resonance scattering. They are then reemitted from that much larger area at the lower temperature T(sub 1). The single-peaked nature of the x ray pulse and its energy-dependent phase suggest an off-center dipole geometry for the surface magnetic field. Under the assumption that the soft x ray emission comes from the full surface of a neutron star of radius R = 10 km, a distance estimate of (150-400) pc is derived. This range is consistent with the fit interstellar column density of (1.5 +/- 0.5) x 10(exp 20) cm(exp -2). Distances less than 150 pc are probably ruled out both by the lower limit on the column

  12. Origin of Ne emission line of very luminous soft X-ray transient MAXI J0158–744

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtani, Yukari; Morii, Mikio; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the mechanism that reproduced notable spectral features at the ignition phase of the nova explosion observed for a super-Eddington X-ray transient source MAXI J0158–744 in the Small Magellanic Cloud. These features include a strong Ne IX emission line at 0.92 keV with large equivalent widths of 0.32{sub −0.11}{sup +0.21} keV and the absence of the Ne X line at 1.02 keV. In this paper, we calculate the radiative transfer using a Monte Carlo code, taking into account the line blanketing effect due to transitions of N, O, Ne, Mg, and Al ions in an accelerating wind emanating from a white dwarf with a structure based on a spherically symmetric stationary model. We found that the strong Ne IX line can be reproduced if the mass fraction of Ne is enhanced to 10{sup –3} or more and if that of O is reduced to ∼5 × 10{sup –9} or less and that the absence of other lines, including Ne X ions at higher energies, can be also reproduced by the line blanketing effect. This enhancement of the Ne mass fraction indicates that the ejecta are enriched by Ne dredged up from the surface of the white dwarf composed of O, Ne, and Mg rather than C and O, as already pointed out in previous work. We argue that the CNO cycle driving this nova explosion converted most of C and O into N and thus reduced the O mass fraction.

  13. Soft x-ray interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the soft x-ray interferometry workshop held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory was to discuss with the scientific community the proposed technical design of the soft x-ray Fourier-transform spectrometer being developed at the ALS. Different design strategies for the instrument`s components were discussed, as well as detection methods, signal processing issues, and how to meet the manufacturing tolerances that are necessary for the instrument to achieve the desired levels of performance. Workshop participants were encouraged to report on their experiences in the field of Fourier transform spectroscopy. The ALS is developing a Fourier transform spectrometer that is intended to operate up to 100 eV. The motivation is solely improved resolution and not the throughput (Jaquinot) or multiplex (Fellgett) advantage, neither of which apply for the sources and detectors used in this spectral range. The proposed implementation of this is via a Mach-Zehnder geometry that has been (1) distorted from a square to a rhombus to get grazing incidence of a suitable angle for 100 eV and (2) provided with a mirror-motion system to make the path difference between the interfering beams tunable. The experiment consists of measuring the emergent light intensity (I(x)) as a function of the path difference (x). The resolving power of the system is limited by the amount of path difference obtainable that is 1 cm (one million half-waves at 200{angstrom} wavelength) in the design thus allowing a resolving power of one million. The free spectral range of the system is limited by the closeness with which the function I(x) is sampled. It is proposed to illuminate a helium absorption cell with roughly 1%-band-width light from a monochromator thus allowing one hundred aliases without spectral overlap even for sampling of I(x) at one hundredth of the Nyquist frequency.

  14. Temperature Tomography of the Soft X-Ray Corona: Measurements of Electron Densities, Tempuratures, and Differential Emission Measure Distributions above the Limb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Acton, Loren W.

    2001-03-01

    We analyze long-exposure and off-pointing Yohkoh/SXT data of the solar corona observed on 1992 August 26. We develop a new (temperature) tomography method that is based on a forward-fitting method of a four-parameter model to the observed soft X-ray fluxes F1(h) and F2(h) of two SXT wavelength filters as a function of height h. The model is defined in terms of a differential emission measure (DEM) distribution dEM(h, T)/dT, which includes also a temperature dependence of density scale heights λn(T)=qλλT and allows us to quantify deviations (qλ≠1) from hydrostatic equilibrium (qλ=1). This parametrization facilitates a proper line-of-sight integration and relates the widely used filter ratio temperature TFR to the peak of the DEM distribution. A direct consequence of the multi-scale height atmosphere is that the filter ratio temperature TFR(h) is predicted to increase with height, even if all magnetic field lines are isothermal. Our model fitting reveals that coronal holes and quiet-Sun regions are in perfect hydrostatic equilibrium but that coronal streamers have a scale height that exceeds the hydrostatic scale height by a factor of up to qλ<~2.3, which underscores the dynamic nature of coronal streamers. Our density measurements in coronal holes are slightly lower than most of the white-light polarized brightness inversions and seem to come closer to the requirements of solar wind models. Our DEM model provides also a physical framework for the semiempirical Baumbach-Allen formula and quantifies the temperature ranges and degree of hydrostaticity of the K, L, and F coronae.

  15. Soft X-Ray Observations of the Galactic Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Robin; Kuntz, K. D.

    2003-01-01

    In this project, my co-I (K.D. Kuntz) and I plan to extract the soft X-ray spectrum emitted by the hot gas along a high latitude line of sight. We plan to subtract off the local component (garnered from other observations) in order to isolate the halo component. We then plan to combine this spectral information with the ultraviolet resonance line emission produced by slightly cooler gas along the line of sight and use the two observations as a constraint on models. My co-I, K.D., Kuntz has been working on the determination of the instrumental background. I have not yet drawn any of the funds for this project. I have just moved from J h s Hopkins University to the University of Georgia and anticipate finishing the project while at the University of Georgia.

  16. Dante Soft X-ray Power Diagnostic for NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E; Campbell, K; Turner, R; Holder, J; Landen, O; Glenzer, S; Kauffman, R; Suter, L; Landon, M; Rhodes, M; Lee, D

    2004-04-15

    Soft x-ray power diagnostics are essential for measuring spectrally resolved the total x-ray flux, radiation temperature, conversion efficiency and albedo that are important quantities for the energetics of indirect drive hohlraums. At the Nova or Omega Laser Facilities, these measurements are performed mainly with Dante, but also with DMX and photo-conductive detectors (PCD's). The Dante broadband spectrometer is a collection of absolute calibrated vacuum x-ray diodes, thin filters and x-ray mirrors used to measure the soft x-ray emission for photon energies above 50 eV.

  17. Soft X-Ray Tomography in HSX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, V.; Almagri, A. F.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Likin, K.

    2003-10-01

    Under certain discharge conditions, HSX plasmas exhibit a sudden loss of stored energy followed by fluctuations of the order of few kHz in both the stored energy and the soft x-ray (SXR) signals. These are measured by a diamagnetic loop and a set of PIPS detectors respectively. To help understand the origin of these crashes and the nature of the oscillations, as well as to measure basic plasma properties such as position and shape, a SXR tomography system is under development in HSX. A single array of 20 silicon p-n junction photodiodes is installed on the device and, in the near future, the diagnostic system will be expanded to several arrays in order to obtain tomographic reconstructions of the SXR emission. Initial SXR and stored energy measurements during these crashing discharges as well as the results of the one-array reconstruction will be presented. Implementation details of the complete tomographic system will be shown as well.

  18. Superconducting transition at 38 K in insulating-overdoped La2CuO4-La1.64Sr0.36CuO4 superlattices: evidence for interface electronic redistribution from resonant soft X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Smadici, S; Lee, J C T; Wang, S; Abbamonte, P; Logvenov, G; Gozar, A; Cavellin, C Deville; Bozovic, I

    2009-03-13

    We use resonant soft x-ray scattering (RSXS) to quantify the hole distribution in a superlattice of insulating La2CuO4 (LCO) and overdoped La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO). Despite its nonsuperconducting constituents, this structure is superconducting with T_{c}=38 K. We found that the conducting holes redistribute electronically from LSCO to the LCO layers. The LCO layers were found to be optimally doped, suggesting they are the main drivers of superconductivity. Our results demonstrate the utility of RSXS for separating electronic from structural effects at oxide interfaces. PMID:19392148

  19. Superconducting Transition at 38 K in Insulating-Overdoped La2CuO4 - La1.64Sr0.36CuO4 Superlattices: Evidence for Interface Electronic Redistribution from Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Smadici, S.; Lee, J; Wang, S; Abbamonte, P; Logvenov, G; Gozar, A; Deville Cavellin, C; Bozovic, I

    2009-01-01

    We use resonant soft x-ray scattering (RSXS) to quantify the hole distribution in a superlattice of insulating La2CuO4 (LCO) and overdoped La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO). Despite its nonsuperconducting constituents, this structure is superconducting with Tc=38 K. We found that the conducting holes redistribute electronically from LSCO to the LCO layers. The LCO layers were found to be optimally doped, suggesting they are the main drivers of superconductivity. Our results demonstrate the utility of RSXS for separating electronic from structural effects at oxide interfaces.

  20. Superconducting Transition at 38 K in Insulating-Overdoped La2CuO4-La1:64Sr0:36CuO4 Superlattices: Evidence for Interface Electronic Redistribution from Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Smadici, S.; Bozovic, I.; Lee, J. C. T.; Wang, S.; Abbamonte, P.; Logvenov, G.; Gozar, A.; Deville Cavellin, C.

    2009-03-12

    We use resonant soft x-ray scattering (RSXS) to quantify the hole distribution in a superlattice of insulating La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} (LCO) and overdoped La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} (LSCO). Despite its nonsuperconducting constituents, this structure is superconducting with T{sub c} = 38 K. We found that the conducting holes redistribute electronically from LSCO to the LCO layers. The LCO layers were found to be optimally doped, suggesting they are the main drivers of superconductivity. Our results demonstrate the utility of RSXS for separating electronic from structural effects at oxide interfaces.

  1. Applications of soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C.H.

    1993-08-01

    The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft x-ray lasers provide unique advantages for novel applications. Imaging of biological specimens using x-ray lasers has been demonstrated by several groups. Other applications to fields such as chemistry, material science, plasma diagnostics, and lithography are beginning to emerge. We review the current status of soft x-ray lasers from the perspective of applications, and present an overview of the applications currently being developed.

  2. Soft x-ray virtual diagnostics for tokamak simulations.

    PubMed

    Kim, J S; Zhao, L; Bogatu, I N; In, Y; Turnbull, A; Osborne, T; Maraschek, M; Comer, K

    2009-11-01

    The numerical toolset, FAR-TECH Virtual Diagnostic Utility, for generating virtual experimental data based on theoretical models and comparing it with experimental data, has been developed for soft x-ray diagnostics on DIII-D. The virtual (or synthetic) soft x-ray signals for a sample DIII-D discharge are compared with the experimental data. The plasma density and temperature radial profiles needed in the soft x-ray signal modeling are obtained from experimental data, i.e., from Thomson scattering and electron cyclotron emission. The virtual soft x-ray diagnostics for the equilibriums have a good agreement with the experimental data. The virtual diagnostics based on an ideal linear instability also agree reasonably well with the experimental data. The agreements are good enough to justify the methodology presented here for utilizing virtual diagnostics for routine comparison of experimental data. The agreements also motivate further detailed simulations with improved physical models such as the nonideal magnetohydrodynamics contributions (resistivity, viscosity, nonaxisymmetric error fields, etc.) and other nonlinear effects, which can be tested by virtual diagnostics with various stability modeling. PMID:19947727

  3. Soft x-ray virtual diagnostics for tokamak simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J. S.; Zhao, L.; Bogatu, I. N.; In, Y.; Turnbull, A.; Osborne, T.; Maraschek, M.; Comer, K.

    2009-11-15

    The numerical toolset, FAR-TECH Virtual Diagnostic Utility, for generating virtual experimental data based on theoretical models and comparing it with experimental data, has been developed for soft x-ray diagnostics on DIII-D. The virtual (or synthetic) soft x-ray signals for a sample DIII-D discharge are compared with the experimental data. The plasma density and temperature radial profiles needed in the soft x-ray signal modeling are obtained from experimental data, i.e., from Thomson scattering and electron cyclotron emission. The virtual soft x-ray diagnostics for the equilibriums have a good agreement with the experimental data. The virtual diagnostics based on an ideal linear instability also agree reasonably well with the experimental data. The agreements are good enough to justify the methodology presented here for utilizing virtual diagnostics for routine comparison of experimental data. The agreements also motivate further detailed simulations with improved physical models such as the nonideal magnetohydrodynamics contributions (resistivity, viscosity, nonaxisymmetric error fields, etc.) and other nonlinear effects, which can be tested by virtual diagnostics with various stability modeling.

  4. Soft X-ray synchrotron radiation investigations of actinidematerials systems utilizing X-ray emission spectroscopy and resonantinelastic X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Shuh, D.K.; Butorin, S.M.; Guo, J.-H.; Nordgren, J.

    2004-01-03

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) methods have been utilized with increasing frequency over the past several years to study topics in actinide science, ranging from those of a fundamental nature to those that address a specifically-targeted technical need. In particular, the emergence of microspectroscopic and fluorescence-based techniques have permitted investigations of actinide materials at sources of soft x-ray SR. Spectroscopic techniques with fluorescence-based detection are useful for actinide investigations since they are sensitive to small amounts of material and the information sampling depth may be varied. These characteristics also serve to simplify both sample preparation and safety considerations. Examples of investigations using these fluorescence techniques will be described along with their results, as well as the prospects for future investigations utilizing these methodologies.

  5. Optical design of a spectrometer-monochromator for the extreme-ultraviolet and soft-x-ray emission of high-order harmonics.

    PubMed

    Poletto, Luca; Tondello, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo

    2003-11-01

    A grazing-incidence spectrometer-monochromator for diagnostics and application of the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) and soft-x-ray high-order harmonics generated by the interaction between a few-optical-cycle laser pulse and a gas jet has been fabricated. We address the necessity of high-resolution spectral and spatial analyses of the high-order harmonics as well as their use as short EUV backlighters in pump-probe experiments. The spectrometer that we present uses a variable-line-spaced flat grating illuminated in the converging light coming from a toroidal mirror. The spectrum is stigmatic, and the focal surface is almost flat in a wide spectral region. The detector is a microchannel plate intensifier with a phosphor screen optically coupled to a CCD camera; it can be moved by means of a linear drive to acquire different portions of the spectrum in the 5-75-nm region. The resolution is almost limited by the pixel size of the detector. We apply the same optical scheme to achieve a constant-deviation-angle monochromator by substituting an exit slit for the detector block: The rotation of the grating gives the spectral scanning. A monochromator for the 5-50 nm spectral region is achieved. PMID:14649280

  6. Modeled soft X-ray solar irradiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent

    1994-01-01

    Solar soft X-rays have historically been inaccurately modeled in both relative variations and absolute magnitudes by empirical solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance models. This is a result of the use of a limited number of rocket data sets which were primarily associated with the calibration of the AE-E satellite EUV data set. In this work, the EUV91 solar EUV irradiance model has been upgraded to improve the accuracy of the 3.0 to 5.0 nm relative irradiance variations. The absolute magnitude estimate of the flux in this wavelength range has also been revised upwards. The upgrade was accomplished by first digitizing the SOLRAD 11 satellite 4.4 to 6.0 nm measured energy flux data set, then extracting and extrapolating a derived 3.0 to 5.0 nm photon flux from these data, and finally by performing a correlation between these derived data and the daily and 81-day mean 10.7 cm radio flux emission using a multiple linear regression technique. A correlation coefficient of greater than 0.9 was obtained between the dependent and independent data sets. The derived and modeled 3.0 to 5.0 nm flux varies by more than an order of magnitude over a solar cycle, ranging from a flux below 1 x 10(exp 8) to a flux greater than 1 x 10(exp 9) photons per sq cm per sec. Solar rotational (27-day) variations in the flux magnitude are a factor of 2. The derived and modeled irradiance absolute values are an order of magnitude greater than previous values from rocket data sets related to the calibration of the AE-E satellite.

  7. Soft X-ray measurements in magnetic fusion plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botrugno, A.; Gabellieri, L.; Mazon, D.; Pacella, D.; Romano, A.

    2010-11-01

    Soft X-ray diagnostic systems and their successful application in the field of magnetic fusion plasma physics are discussed. Radiation with wavelength in the region of Soft X-Ray (1-30 keV) is largely produced by high temperature plasmas, carrying important information on many processes during a plasma discharge. Soft X-ray diagnostics are largely used in various fusion devices all over the world. These diagnostic systems are able to obtain information on electron temperature, electron density, impurity transport, Magneto Hydro Dynamic instabilities. We will discuss the SXR diagnostic installed on FTU in Frascati (Italy) and on Tore Supra in Cadarache (France), with special emphasis on diagnostic performances. Moreover, we will discuss the two different inversion methods for tomographic reconstruction used in Frascati and in Cadarache, the first one is relied on a guessed topology of iso-emissivity surfaces, the second one on regularization techniques, like minimum Fisher or maximum entropy. Finally, a new and very fast 2D imaging system with energy discrimination and high time resolution will be summarized as an alternative approach of SXR detection system.

  8. Ionized Absorbers in Active Galactic Nuclei and Very Steap Soft X-Ray Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiore, Fabrizio; White, Nicholas (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Steep soft X-ray (0.1-2 keV) quasars share several unusual properties: narrow Balmer lines, strong Fe II emission, large and fast X-ray variability, and a rather steep 2-10 keV spectrum. These intriguing objects have been suggested to be the analogues of Galactic black hole candidates in the high, soft state. We present here results from ASCA observations for two of these quasars: NAB 0205 + 024 and PG 1244 + 026. Both objects show similar variations (factor of approximately 2 in 10 ks), despite a factor of approximately 10 difference in the 0.5-10 keV luminosity (7.3 x 10(exp 43) erg/s for PG 1244 + 026 and 6.4 x 10(exp 44) erg/s for NAB 0205 + 024, assuming isotropic emission, H(sub 0) = 50.0 and q(sub 0) = 0.0). The X-ray continuum of the two quasars flattens by 0.5-1 going from the 0.1-2 keV band towards higher energies, strengthening recent results on another half-dozen steep soft X-ray active galactic nuclei. PG 1244 + 026 shows a significant feature in the '1-keV' region, which can be described either as a broad emission line centered at 0.95 keV (quasar frame) or as edge or line absorption at 1.17 (1.22) keV. The line emission could be a result of reflection from a highly ionized accretion disc, in line with the view that steep soft X-ray quasars are emitting close to the Eddington luminosity. Photoelectric edge absorption or resonant line absorption could be produced by gas outflowing at a large velocity (0.3-0.6 c).

  9. Soft x-ray polarimeter laboratory tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Kendrah D.; Marshall, Herman L.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Jenks, Kevin; Sommer, Sophie J. B.; Marshall, Eric A.

    2010-07-01

    Multilayer-coated optics can strongly polarize X-rays and are central to a new design of a broad-band, soft X-ray polarimeter. We have begun laboratory work to verify the performance of components that could be used in future soft X-ray polarimetric instrumentation. We have reconfigured a 17 meter beamline facility, originally developed for testing transmission gratings for Chandra, to include a polarized X-ray source, an X-ray-dispersing transmission grating, and a multilayer-coated optic that illuminates a CCD detector. The X-rays produced from a Manson Model 5, multi-anode source are polarized by a multilayer-coated flat mirror. The current configuration allows for a 180 degree rotation of the source in order to rotate the direction of polarization. We will present progress in source characterization and system modulation measurements as well as null and robustness tests.

  10. Small scale H I structure and the soft X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahoda, K.; Mccammon, D.; Lockman, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    The observed anticorrelation between diffuse soft X-ray flux and H I column density has been explained as absorption of soft X-rays produced in a hot galactic halo, assuming that the neutral interstellar material is sufficiently clumped to reduce the soft X-ray absorption cross section by a factor of two to three. A 21 cm emission line study of H I column density variations at intermediate and high galactic latitudes to 10' spatial resolution has been done. The results confirm conclusions from preliminary work at coarser resolution, and in combination with other data appear to rule out the hypothesis that clumping of neutral interstellar matter on any angular scale significantly reduces X-ray absorption cross sections in the 0.13 - 0.28 keV energy range. It is concluded therefore that the observed anticorrelation is not primarily a consequence of absorption of soft X-rays produced in a hot galactic halo.

  11. Soft x-ray laser microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DiCicco, D.; Meixler, L.; Skinner, C.H.; Suckewer, S.; Hirschberg, J.; Kohen, E.

    1987-12-31

    Microscopes based on soft X-ray lasers possess unique advantages in bridging the gap between high resolution electron microscopy of dehydrated, stained cells and light microscopy at comparatively low resolution of unaltered live cells. The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft X-ray lasers make them ideal for flash imaging of live specimens. The Princeton soft X-ray laser is based on a magnetically confined laser produced carbon plasma. Radiation cooling after the laser pulse produces rapid recombination which produces a population inversion and high gain. A full account is given in a companion paper in this volume. The important characteristics of the laser beam produced by this device are 1 to 3 mJ of 18.2 nm radiation in a 10 to 30 nsec pulse with a divergence of 5 mrad. The 18.2 nm wavelength, while outside the water window, does provide a factor of 3 difference in absorption coefficients between oxygen and carbon.

  12. Soft x-ray laser microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DiCicco, D. ); Meixler, L.; Skinner, C.H.; Suckewer, S. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Hirschberg, J.; Kohen, E. . Dept. of Physics)

    1987-01-01

    Microscopes based on soft X-ray lasers possess unique advantages in bridging the gap between high resolution electron microscopy of dehydrated, stained cells and light microscopy at comparatively low resolution of unaltered live cells. The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft X-ray lasers make them ideal for flash imaging of live specimens. The Princeton soft X-ray laser is based on a magnetically confined laser produced carbon plasma. Radiation cooling after the laser pulse produces rapid recombination which produces a population inversion and high gain. A full account is given in a companion paper in this volume. The important characteristics of the laser beam produced by this device are 1 to 3 mJ of 18.2 nm radiation in a 10 to 30 nsec pulse with a divergence of 5 mrad. The 18.2 nm wavelength, while outside the water window, does provide a factor of 3 difference in absorption coefficients between oxygen and carbon.

  13. Disentangling AGN and Star Formation in Soft X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Heckman, T. M.; Ptak, A.

    2012-01-01

    We have explored the interplay of star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in soft X-rays (0.5-2 keV) in two samples of Seyfert 2 galaxies (Sy2s). Using a combination of low-resolution CCD spectra from Chandra and XMM-Newton, we modeled the soft emission of 34 Sy2s using power-law and thermal models. For the 11 sources with high signal-to-noise Chandra imaging of the diffuse host galaxy emission, we estimate the luminosity due to star formation by removing the AGN, fitting the residual emission. The AGN and star formation contributions to the soft X-ray luminosity (i.e., L(sub x,AGN) and L(sub x,SF)) for the remaining 24 Sy2s were estimated from the power-law and thermal luminosities derived from spectral fitting. These luminosities were scaled based on a template derived from XSINGS analysis of normal star-forming galaxies. To account for errors in the luminosities derived from spectral fitting and the spread in the scaling factor, we estimated L(sub x,AGN) and L(sub x,SF))from Monte Carlo simulations. These simulated luminosities agree with L(sub x,AGN) and L(sub x,SF) derived from Chandra imaging analysis within a 3sigma confidence level. Using the infrared [Ne ii]12.8 micron and [O iv]26 micron lines as a proxy of star formation and AGN activity, respectively, we independently disentangle the contributions of these two processes to the total soft X-ray emission. This decomposition generally agrees with L(sub x,SF) and L(sub x,AGN) at the 3 sigma level. In the absence of resolvable nuclear emission, our decomposition method provides a reasonable estimate of emission due to star formation in galaxies hosting type 2 AGNs.

  14. DISENTANGLING AGN AND STAR FORMATION IN SOFT X-RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Heckman, T. M.; Ptak, A.

    2012-10-20

    We have explored the interplay of star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in soft X-rays (0.5-2 keV) in two samples of Seyfert 2 galaxies (Sy2s). Using a combination of low-resolution CCD spectra from Chandra and XMM-Newton, we modeled the soft emission of 34 Sy2s using power-law and thermal models. For the 11 sources with high signal-to-noise Chandra imaging of the diffuse host galaxy emission, we estimate the luminosity due to star formation by removing the AGN, fitting the residual emission. The AGN and star formation contributions to the soft X-ray luminosity (i.e., L{sub x,AGN} and L{sub x,SF}) for the remaining 24 Sy2s were estimated from the power-law and thermal luminosities derived from spectral fitting. These luminosities were scaled based on a template derived from XSINGS analysis of normal star-forming galaxies. To account for errors in the luminosities derived from spectral fitting and the spread in the scaling factor, we estimated L{sub x,AGN} and L{sub x,SF} from Monte Carlo simulations. These simulated luminosities agree with L{sub x,AGN} and L{sub x,SF} derived from Chandra imaging analysis within a 3{sigma} confidence level. Using the infrared [Ne II]12.8 {mu}m and [O IV]26 {mu}m lines as a proxy of star formation and AGN activity, respectively, we independently disentangle the contributions of these two processes to the total soft X-ray emission. This decomposition generally agrees with L{sub x,SF} and L{sub x,AGN} at the 3{sigma} level. In the absence of resolvable nuclear emission, our decomposition method provides a reasonable estimate of emission due to star formation in galaxies hosting type 2 AGNs.

  15. Soft x-ray scattering using FEL radiation for probing near-solid density plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Toleikis, S; Faustlin, R R; Cao, L; Doppner, T; Dusterer, S; Forster, E; Fortmann, C; Glenzer, S H; Gode, S; Gregori, G; Irsig, R; Laarmann, T; Lee, H J; Li, B; Meiwes-Broer, K; Przystawik, A; Radcliffe, P; Redmer, R; Tavella, F; Thiele, R; Tiggesbaumker, J; Truong, N X; Uschmann, I; Zastrau, U; Tschentscher, T

    2009-03-03

    We report on soft x-ray scattering experiments on cryogenic hydrogen and simple metal targets. As a source of intense and ultrashort soft x-ray pulses we have used free-electron laser radiation at 92 eV photon energy from FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. X-ray pulses with energies up to 100 {micro}J and durations below 50 fs provide interaction with the target leading simultaneously to plasma formation and scattering. Experiments exploiting both of these interactions have been carried out, using the same experimental setup. Firstly, recording of soft x-ray inelastic scattering from near-solid density hydrogen plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures confirms the feasibility of this diagnostics technique. Secondly, the soft x-ray excitation of few electronvolt solid-density plasmas in simple metals could be studied by recording soft x-ray line and continuum emission integrated over emission times from fs to ns.

  16. Soft X-ray Microscopy of Green Cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, P. J. M.; Mancio, M.; Kirchheim, A. P.; Chae, R.; Ha, J.; Fischer, P.; Tyliszczak, T.

    2011-09-01

    The present status of the cement and concrete industry is not sustainable. The production of Portland cement is responsible for 7% of the CO2 emissions in the world and existing reinforced concrete infrastructure is deteriorating at a fast pace. The change in the existing technology requires new developments in our understanding of the nanostructure of hydration products and the complex deterioration reactions. We have been developing an elaborate research program to advance the existing cement and concrete science by characterizing its nanostructure by synchrotron radiation. A new generation of green cements is being studied using high-resolution soft x-ray microscopy at the nano-level.

  17. Soft X-ray Microscopy of Green Cements

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, P. J. M.; Mancio, M.; Chae, R.; Ha, J.; Kirchheim, A. P.; Fischer, P.; Tyliszczak, T.

    2011-09-09

    The present status of the cement and concrete industry is not sustainable. The production of Portland cement is responsible for 7% of the CO{sub 2} emissions in the world and existing reinforced concrete infrastructure is deteriorating at a fast pace. The change in the existing technology requires new developments in our understanding of the nanostructure of hydration products and the complex deterioration reactions. We have been developing an elaborate research program to advance the existing cement and concrete science by characterizing its nanostructure by synchrotron radiation. A new generation of green cements is being studied using high-resolution soft x-ray microscopy at the nano-level.

  18. A soft X-ray image of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Aschenbach, B.; Hasinger, G.; Pfeffermann, E.; Snowden, S. L.

    1991-01-01

    A soft X-ray image of the moon obtained by the Roentgen Observatory Satellite ROSAT clearly shows a sunlit crescent, demonstrating that the moon's X-ray luminosity arises from backscattering of solar X-rays. The moon's optically dark side is also X-ray dark, and casts a distinct shadow on the diffuse cosmic X-ray background. Unexpectedly, the dark side seems to emit X-rays at a level about one percent of that of the bright side; this emission very probably results from energetic solar-wind electrons striking the moon's surface.

  19. The Geminga Pulsar: Soft X-Ray Variability and an EUVE Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Martin, Christopher; Marshall, Herman L.; Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We observed the Geminga pulsar with the EUVE satellite, detecting pulsed emission in the Deep Survey imager. Joint spectral fits of the EUVE flux with ROSAT PSPC data are consistent with thermal plus power-law models in which the thermal component makes the dominant contribution to the soft X-ray flux seen by EUVE and ROSAT. The data are consistent with blackbody emission of T = (4 - 6) x 10(exp 5) K over most of the surface of the star at the measured parallax distance of 160 pc. Although model atmospheres are more realistic, and can fit the data with effective temperatures a factor of 2 lower, current data would not discriminate between these and blackbody models. We also find evidence for variability of Geminga's soft X-ray pulse shape. Narrow dips in the light curve that were present in 1991 had largely disappeared in 1993/1994, causing the pulsed fraction to decline from 32% to 18%. If the dips are attributed to cyclotron resonance scattering by an e1 plasma on closed magnetic field lines, then the process that resupplies that plasma must be variable.

  20. The Geminga Pulsar: Soft X-Ray Variability and an EUVE Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Martin, Christopher; Marshall, Herman L.

    1996-01-01

    We observed the Geminga pulsar with the EUVE satellite, detecting pulsed emission in the Deep Survey imager. Joint spectral fits of the EUVE flux with ROSAT PSPC data are consistent with thermal plus power-law models in which the thermal component makes the dominant contribution to the soft X-ray flux seen by EUVE and ROSAT. The data are consistent with blackbody emission of T = (4-6) x 10(exp 5) K over most of the surface of the star at the measured parallax distance of 160 pc. Although model atmospheres are more realistic, and can fit the data with effective temperatures a factor of 2 lower, current data would not discriminate between these and blackbody models. We also find evidence for variability of Geminga's soft X-ray pulse shape. Narrow dips in the light curve that were present in 1991 had largely disappeared in 1993/1994, causing the pulsed fraction to decline from 32% to 18%. If the dips are attributed to cyclotron resonance scattering by an e(+/-) plasma on closed magnetic field lines, then the process that resupplies that plasma must be variable.

  1. The prominent role of oxygen in the multiferroicity of DyMnO3 and TbMnO3: a resonant soft x-ray scattering spectroscopy study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    S. W. Huang; Lee, J. M.; Jeng, H. -T.; Shao, Y.; Wray, L. A.; Chen, J. M.; Qiao, R.; Yang, W. L.; Cao, Y.; Lin, J. -Y.; et al

    2016-07-21

    Oxygen is known to play an important role in the multiferroicity of rare earth manganites; however, how this role changes with rare earth elements is still not fully understood. To address this question, we have used resonant soft x-ray scattering spectroscopy to study the F-type (0; ; 0) diffraction peak from the antiferromagnetic order in DyMnO3 and TbMnO3. We focus on the measurements at O K-edge of these two manganites, supplemented by the results at Mn L2- and Dy M5-edge of DyMnO3. We show that the electronic states of di erent elements are coupled more strongly in DyMnO3 than inmore » TbMnO3, presumably due to the stronger lattice distortion and the tendency to develop E-type antiferromagnetism in the ferroelectric state that promote the orbital hybridization. We also show that the anomaly in the correlation length of (0; ; 0) peak in DyMnO3 signifies the exchange interaction between Mn and rare earth spins, which is absent in TbMnO3. Our findings reveal the prominent role of oxygen orbitals in the multiferroicity of rare earth manganites and the distinct energetics between them.« less

  2. Orbital and magnetic ordering in Pr1-xCaxMnO3 and Nd1-xSrxMnO3 manganites near half doping studied by resonant soft x-ray powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staub, U.; García-Fernández, M.; Bodenthin, Y.; Scagnoli, V.; de Souza, R. A.; Garganourakis, M.; Pomjakushina, E.; Conder, K.

    2009-06-01

    Here we present resonant soft x-ray diffraction data in the vicinity of the MnL2,3 edges on R1-xTxMnO3 manganites ( R=Pr , Nd and T=Ca , Sr) close to half doping. For Pr0.6Ca0.4MnO3 (PCMO), the energy dependence of the superimposed orbital and magnetic reflections are studied using various incident x-ray polarizations. For Nd0.5Sr0.5MnO3 (NSMO), the energy dependence of the orbital ordering reflection is found to be very similar to that found in other manganites systems. These two results are compared to those presented in the literature on single-crystal samples. Whereas our results are in good agreement with the spectral shape of a superposition of magnetic and orbital signals in PCMO, the magnetic signals are only moderately larger than the orbital signals. The results on NSMO do not agree with previously presented data on single crystals and cast doubt on the proposed occurrence of a double-stripe orbital order.

  3. Interface science in nanoparticles: An electronic structure view of photon-in/photon-out soft-X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jinghua

    The ability to control the particle size and morphology of nanoparticles is of crucial importance nowadays both from a fundamental and industrial point of view considering nanostructured 3d metal compounds in the applications of solar photovoltaic, sunlight water splitting and photoelectrochemical cells, chemical and biosensors, etc. In the soft X-ray region, the question tends to be, what are the electrons doing as they migrated between the atoms? Soft-X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy have basic features that are important to interface science. X-ray is originating from an electronic transition between a localized core state and a valence state that makes this probe localized to one specific atomic site and gives the method chemical state sensitivity and further, particular symmetry information. The possibility to select the energy of the excitation has created an extra degree of freedom and opens a new field of study by disclosing many new possibilities of soft-X-ray resonant inelastic scattering. In this presentation, recent findings regarding X-ray spectroscopic studies of various nanomaterials are presented. Also, in situ characterization of nanocrystal suspensions demonstrated the way for real-time studies of nanomaterial growth and chemical reactions.

  4. European XFEL: Soft X-Ray instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Molodtsov, S. L.

    2011-12-15

    The currently constructed European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) will generate new knowledge in almost all the technical and scientific disciplines that are shaping our daily life-including nanotechnology, medicine, pharmaceutics, chemistry, materials science, power engineering and electronics. On 8 January 2009, civil engineering work (tunnels, shafts, halls) has been started at all three construction sites. In this presentation status and parameters of the European XFEL facility and instrumentation as well as planned research applications particularly in the range of soft X-rays are reviewed.

  5. Electronic structure investigation of Ti3 AlC2 , Ti3 SiC2 , and Ti3 GeC2 by soft x-ray emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnuson, M.; Palmquist, J.-P.; Mattesini, M.; Li, S.; Ahuja, R.; Eriksson, O.; Emmerlich, J.; Wilhelmsson, O.; Eklund, P.; Högberg, H.; Hultman, L.; Jansson, U.

    2005-12-01

    The electronic structures of epitaxially grown films of Ti3AlC2 , Ti3SiC2 , and Ti3GeC2 have been investigated by bulk-sensitive soft x-ray emission spectroscopy. The measured high-resolution Ti L , C K , Al L , Si L , and Ge M emission spectra are compared with ab initio density-functional theory including core-to-valence dipole matrix elements. A qualitative agreement between experiment and theory is obtained. A weak covalent Ti-Al bond is manifested by a pronounced shoulder in the Ti L emission of Ti3AlC2 . As Al is replaced with Si or Ge, the shoulder disappears. For the buried Al and Si layers, strongly hybridized spectral shapes are detected in Ti3AlC2 and Ti3SiC2 , respectively. As a result of relaxation of the crystal structure and the increased charge-transfer from Ti to C, the Ti-C bonding is strengthened. The differences between the electronic structures are discussed in relation to the bonding in the nanolaminates and the corresponding change of materials properties.

  6. Soft X-ray spectroscopy of the Cygnus Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntaffer, Randall L.

    My thesis work consisted of the design, fabrication and launch of a sounding rocket payload to observe the spectrum of the soft X-ray emission from the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant. This payload was designated the Cygnus X-ray Emission Spectroscopic Survey (CyXESS) and launched from White Sands Missile Range on November 20th, 2006. The novel X-ray spectrograph incorporated a wire- grid collimator feeding an array of gratings in the extreme off-plane mount which ultimately dispersed the spectrum onto never before flown Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors. This instrument recorded 65 seconds of usable data between 43-49.5 Å in two prominent features. The first feature near 45 Å is dominated by the He-like triplet of O VII in second order with contributions from Mg X and Si IX-Si XII in first order, while the second feature near 47.5 Å is first order S IX and S X. Fits to the spectra give an equilibrium plasma at log( T )=6.2 ( kT e =0.14 keV) and near cosmic abundances. This is consistent with previous observations, which demonstrated that the soft x-ray emission from the Cygnus Loop is dominated by interactions between the initial blast wave with the walls of a precursor formed cavity surrounding the Cygnus Loop.

  7. Soft x-ray transmission gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, E. T.; Caldwell, P. J.; Williams, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    A technique was developed for producing transmission diffraction gratings suitable for use in the soft x-ray region. Thin self-supporting films of a transparent material are overlaid with several thousand opaque metallic strips per mm. Gratings with 2100, 2400, and 5600 1/mm have been produced and tested. Representative spectra over the wavelength range from 17.2 to 40.0 nm are given for a grating consisting of a 120-nm-thick Al support layer overlaid with 2400, 34-nm-thick, Ag strips/mm. The absolute transmittance is approx. 13% at 30 nm, and the efficiency in the first order is approx. 16%. The observed resolution of approx. 2A is acceptable for many of the potential applications. These gratings have several advantages over the two presently available alternatives in the soft x-ray region (i.e., reflection gratings used at grazing incidence and free-standing metallic wire transmission gratings). Fabrication is relatively quick, simple, and cheap. The support layer can also serve as a filter and help conduct excessive heat away. Higher line densities and hence higher resolutions are possible, and when used at normal incidence the spectra are aberration free. Suitable materials, component thicknesses, and line densities can be chosen to produce a grating of optimum characteristics for a particular application.

  8. Soft x-ray laser microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, P.I.

    1990-10-01

    The program consisted of two phases (Phase I and Phase II). The goal of the Phase I (first year program) was to design and construct the Soft X-ray Laser Contact Microscope. Such microscope was constructed and adapted to PPL's 18.2nm soft X-ray Laser (SXL), which in turn was modified and prepared for microscopy experiments. Investigation of the photoresist response to 18.2nm laser radiation and transmissivity of 0.1m thick silicion-nitride (Si[sub 3]N[sub 4]) windows were important initial works. The goal of the first year of Phase II was to construct X-ray contact microscope in combination with existing optical phase microscope, already used by biologists. In the second year of Phase II study of dehydrated Horeseshoe Crab and Hela cancer cells were performed with COXRALM. Also during Phase II, the Imaging X-Ray Laser Microscope (IXRALM) was designed and constructed. This paper describes the development of each of the microscopes and their application for research.

  9. THE EFFECT OF UV/SOFT X-RAY EXCESS EMISSION ON THE WARM ABSORBER PROPERTIES OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI—A CASE STUDY OF IRAS 13349+2438

    SciTech Connect

    Laha, Sibasish; Dewangan, Gulab C.; Kembhavi, Ajit K.; Chakravorty, Susmita E-mail: gulabd@iucaa.ernet.in

    2013-11-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) to X-ray continuum of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is important for maintaining the ionization and thermal balance of the warm absorbers (WAs). However, the spectra in the sensitive energy range ∼13.6-300 eV are unobservable due to Galactic extinction. Moreover, many AGNs show soft X-ray excess emission of varying strength in the 0.1-2 keV band, whose origin is still highly debated. This soft excess connects to the UV bump in the unobserved region of 13.6-300 eV. Here, we investigate the effect of the assumed physical model for the soft excess on the flux of the unobserved part of the spectrum and its effect on the WA properties. We perform a case study using XMM-Newton observations of the bright Seyfert 1 galaxy IRAS 13349+2438 with WA features. Two different physical models for the soft excess (blurred Compton reflection from an ionized disk and optically thick thermal Comptonization of the disk photons) predict different fluxes in the unobserved energy range. However, the current X-ray data quality does not allow us to distinguish between them using derived WA parameters. This, in turn, implies that it is difficult to determine the origin of the soft excess emission using the WA features.

  10. Resonant Carbon K -Edge Soft X-Ray Scattering from Lattice-Free Heliconical Molecular Ordering: Soft Dilative Elasticity of the Twist-Bend Liquid Crystal Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chenhui; Tuchband, Michael R.; Young, Anthony; Shuai, Min; Scarbrough, Alyssa; Walba, David M.; Maclennan, Joseph E.; Wang, Cheng; Hexemer, Alexander; Clark, Noel A.

    2016-04-01

    Resonant x-ray scattering shows that the bulk structure of the twist-bend liquid crystal phase, recently discovered in bent molecular dimers, has spatial periodicity without electron density modulation, indicating a lattice-free heliconical nematic precession of orientation that has helical glide symmetry. In situ study of the bulk helix texture of the dimer CB7CB shows an elastically confined temperature-dependent minimum helix pitch, but a remarkable elastic softness of pitch in response to dilative stresses. Scattering from the helix is not detectable in the higher temperature nematic phase.

  11. On the Lack of a Soft X-Ray Excess from Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregman, Joel N.; Lloyd-Davies, Edward J.

    2006-06-01

    A soft X-ray excess has been claimed to exist in and around a number of galaxy clusters, and this emission has been attributed to the warm-hot intergalactic medium that may constitute most of the baryons in the local universe. We have reexamined a study of the XMM-Newton observations on this topic by Kaastra and coworkers and find that the X-ray excess (or deficit) depends on Galactic latitude and appears to be most closely related to the surface brightness of the 1/4 keV emission, which is largely due to emission from the local hot bubble and the halo of the Milky Way. We suggest that the presence of the soft X-ray excess is due to incorrect subtraction of the soft X-ray background. An analysis is performed for which we choose a 1/4 keV background that is similar to the background near the cluster (and a similar H I column). We find that the soft X-ray excess largely disappears using our background subtraction and conclude that these soft X-ray excesses are not associated with the target clusters. We also show that the detections of ``redshifted'' O VII lines claimed by Kaastra and coworkers are correlated with solar system charge exchange emission, suggesting that they are not extragalactic either.

  12. Soft X-ray polarimeter-spectrometer SOLPEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steslicki, Marek; Sylwester, Janusz; Plocieniak, Stefan; Bakala, Jaroslaw; Szaforz, Zaneta Anna; Scislowski, Daniel; Kowalinski, Miroslaw; Hernandez, Jose; Vadimovich Kuzin, Sergey; Shestov, Sergey

    2015-08-01

    We present an innovative soft X-ray polarimeter and spectrometer SOLPEX. The instrument will be mounted aboard the ISS within the Russian science complex KORTES. The measurements to be made by SOLPEX are expected to be of unprecedented quality in terms of sensitivity to detect the soft-X- ray polarization of solar emission emanating from active regions and flares in particular. Simultaneous measurements of the polarization degree and the other characteristics (eg. evolution of the spectra) constitute the last, rather unexplored area of solar X-ray spectroscopy providing substantial diagnostic potential. Second important science task to be addressed are the measurements of Doppler shifts in selected X-ray spectral emission lines formed in hot flaring sources. The novel-type Dopplerometer (flat Bragg crystal drum unit) is planned to be a part of SOLPEX and will allow to measure line Doppler shifts in absolute terms with unprecedented time resolution (fraction of a second) during the impulsive flare phases. We shall present some details of the SolpeX instrument and discuss observing sequences in a view of science objectives to be reached.

  13. The soft x ray telescope for Solar-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. A.; Acton, L. W.; Bruner, M. E.; Lemen, J. R.; Strong, K. T.

    1989-01-01

    The Solar-A satellite being prepared by the Institute for Sapce and Astronautical Sciences (ISAS) in Japan is dedicated to high energy observations of solar flares. The Soft X Ray Telescope (SXT) is being prepared to provide filtered images in the 2 to 60 A interval. The flight model is now undergoing tests in the 1000 foot tunnel at MSFC. Launch will be in September 1991. Earlier resolution and efficiency tests on the grazing incidence mirror have established its performance in soft x rays. The one-piece, two mirror grazing incidence telescope is supported in a strain free mount separated from the focal plane assembly by a carbon-epoxy metering tube whose windings and filler are chosen to minimize thermal and hygroscopic effects. The CCD detector images both the x ray and the concentric visible light aspect telescope. Optical filters provide images at 4308 and 4700 A. The SXT will be capable of producing over 8000 of the smallest partial frame images per day, or fewer but larger images, up to 1024 x 1024 pixel images. Image sequence with two or more of the five x ray analysis filters, with automatic exposure compensation to optimize the charge collection by the CCD detector, will be used to provide plasma diagnostics. Calculations using a differential emission measure code were used to optimize filter selection over the range of emission measure variations and to avoid redundancy, but the filters were chosen primarily to give ratios that are monotonic in plasma temperature.

  14. Soft x-ray coherent diffraction imaging on magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaowen; Lee, James; Mishra, Shrawan; Parks, Daniel; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Shapiro, David; Roy, Sujoy; Kevan, Steve; Stxm Team At Als Collaboration; Soft X-Ray Microscopy Group At Als Collaboration; Soft X-ray scattering at ALS, LBL Team

    2014-03-01

    Coherent soft X-rays diffraction imaging enable coherent magnetic resonance scattering at transition metal L-edge to be probed so that magnetic domains could be imaged with very high spatial resolution with phase contrast, reaching sub-10nm. One of the overwhelming advantages of using coherent X-rays is the ability to resolve phase contrast images with linearly polarized light with both phase and absorption contrast comparing to real-space imaging, which can only be studied with circularly polarized light with absorption contrast only. Here we report our first results on high-resolution of magnetic domains imaging of CoPd multilayer thin film with coherent soft X-ray ptychography method. We are aiming to resolve and understand magnetic domain wall structures with the highest obtainable resolution here at Advanced Light Source. In principle types of magnetic domain walls could be studied so that Neel or Bloch walls can be distinguished by imaging. This work at LBNL was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the US Department of Energy (contract no. DE-AC02- 05CH11231).

  15. Radiance line ratios Ly-β/Ly-α, Ly-γ/Ly-α, Ly-δ/Ly-α, and Ly-ε/Ly-α for soft X-ray emissions following charge exchange between C6+ and Kr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianarijaona, V. M.; Wulf, D.; McCammon, D.; Seely, D. G.; Havener, C. C.

    2015-05-01

    The radiance line ratios Ly-β/Ly-α, Ly-γ/Ly-α, Ly-δ/Ly-α, and Ly-ε/Ly-α for soft X-ray emission following charge exchange (CX) between C6+ and Kr are reported for collision energies between approximately 320 and 46,000 eV/u. The corresponding collision velocities (250-3000 km/s) are characteristic of the solar wind. X-ray spectra were obtained at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Multicharged Ion Research Facility using a microcalorimeter X-ray detector with a resolution on the order of 10 eV FWHM. The measured Ly-ε/Ly-α is zero for all considered energies and suggests that very little, if any, capture to 6p occurs. The measured Ly-β/Ly-α and Ly-γ/Ly-α ratios intersect and form a well resolved node around (950 ± 50) km/s, which could be used as an astrophysical velocity indicative tool. The results reported here are compared to calculations for C6+ + H since no published theory for C6+ + Kr is known to exist. Double-electron-capture (DEC) and other multi-electron processes are possible. True double capture is estimated to be only 10% of the single-electron-capture (SEC).

  16. Soft X-ray observations of the interacting galaxies NGC 1808 and NGC 1792

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlem, Michael; Hartner, Gisela D.; Junkes, Norbert

    1994-01-01

    The soft X-ray emission from both galaxies NGC 1808 and NGC 1792, which we investigated using the ROSAT HRI and Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC), comes most probably from X-ray binaries and/or from hot ionized gas in powerful supernovae and supernova remnants. The distribution of the soft X-ray emission in NGC 1808, which is very well correlated with the distribution of 'radio knots' in the central starburst, suggests that hot gas dominates the emission in the ROSAT band. This is consistent with the results of PSPC observations by Junkes et al. The total soft X-ray luminosity in the ROSAT band of NGC 1808 of 1.2 x 10(exp 41) ergs/s is relatively high compared with other nearby starburst galaxies. Soft X-ray emission of diffuse hot ionized gas that is associated with the outflow traced by the conspicuous dust filaments protruding from the plane has been detected. Its luminosity in the ROSAT band is greater than or equal to 3 x 10(exp 39) ergs/s, i.e., several percent of the total soft X-ray luminosity. Thus, NGC 1808 is another example for a 'superwind' galaxy. The soft X-ray radiation from NGC 1792 is more likely to be dominated by a population of high-mass X-ray binaries or young powerful supernovae which are associated with the high-level star formation going on in the very prominent H II regions along its spiral arms, with possibly an additional contribution of diffuse hot ionized gas. The soft X-ray luminosities of individual sources lie in the range of 5 x 10(exp 38) to 2.7 x 10(exp 39) ergs/s, thus exceeding by far the Eddington luminosity of an accreting neutron star. The peaks of some of these soft X-ray luminous sources are offset with respect to the H II regions by a few hundred parsecs. Accordingly, if the soft X-ray sources should originate from the H II regions, their relative velocities with respect to the ambient medium have to be as high as approximately 100 km/s.

  17. PSPC soft x-ray observations of Seyfert 2 galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; Urry, C. M.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1993-01-01

    We present the results from ROSAT PSPC soft x-ray (0.1-2.0 keV) observations of six Seyfert 2 galaxies, chosen from the brightest Seyfert 2s detected with the Einstein Imaging Proportional Counter. All of the targets were detected with the ROSAT PSPC. Spatial analysis shows that the source density within a few arcmin of each Seyfert 2 galaxy is a factor of approximately eight higher than in the rest of the inner field of view of the PSPC images. In NGC1365 it appears that the serendipitous sources may be x-ray binary systems in the host galaxy. The proximity of the serendipitous sources, typically within a few arcmin of the target Seyfert 2, means that previous x-ray observations of the Seyfert 2 galaxies have been significantly contaminated, and that source confusion is important on a spatial scale of approximately 1 arcmin. Some spectra, most notably Mrk3 and NGC1365, indicate the presence of a high equivalent width soft x-ray line blend consistent with unresolved iron L and oxygen K emission.

  18. Tunable Soft X-Ray Oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtele, Jonathan; Gandhi, Punut; Gu, X-W; Fawley, William M; Reinsch, Matthia; Penn, Gregory; Kim, K-J; Lindberg, Ryan; Zholents, Alexander

    2010-09-17

    A concept for a tunable soft x-ray free electron laser (FEL) photon source is presented and studied numerically. The concept is based on echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG), wherein two modulator-chicane sections impose high harmonic structure with much greater efficacy as compared to conventional high harmonic FELs that use only one modulator-chicane section. The idea proposed here is to replace the external laser power sources in the EEHG modulators with FEL oscillators, and to combine the bunching of the beam with the production of radiation. Tunability is accomplished by adjusting the magnetic chicanes while the two oscillators remain at a fixed frequency. This scheme eliminates the need to develop coherent sources with the requisite power, pulse length, and stability requirements by exploiting the MHz bunch repetition rates of FEL continuous wave (CW) sources driven by superconducting (SC) linacs. We present time-dependent GINGER simulation results for an EEHG scheme with an oscillator modulator at 43 nm employing 50percent reflective dielectric mirrors and a second modulator employing an external, 215-nm drive laser. Peak output of order 300 MW is obtained at 2.7 nm, corresponding to the 80th harmonic of 215 nm. An alternative single-cavity echo-oscillator scheme based on a 13.4 nm oscillator is investigated with time-independent simulations that a 180-MW peak power at final wavelength of 1.12 nm. Three alternate configurations that use separate bunches to produce the radiation for EEHG microbunching are also presented. Our results show that oscillator-based soft x-ray FELs driven by CWSC linacs are extremely attractive because of their potential to produce tunable radiation at high average power together with excellent longitudinal coherence and narrow spectral bandwidth.

  19. TRANSIENT EXTREMELY SOFT X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE UNUSUALLY BRIGHT CATACLYSMIC VARIABLE IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER M3: A NEW CV X-RAY LUMINOSITY RECORD?

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, W. S.; Heinke, C. O.; Elsner, R. F.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Edmonds, P. D.; Grindlay, J. E.

    2011-05-01

    We observed the accreting white dwarf (WD) 1E1339.8+2837 (1E1339) in the globular cluster M3 in 2003 November, 2004 May, and 2005 January, using the Chandra ACIS-S detector. The source was observed in 1992 to possess traits of a supersoft X-ray source (SSS), with a 0.1-2.4 keV luminosity as large as 2 x 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1}, after which time the source's luminosity fell by roughly two orders of magnitude, adopting a hard X-ray spectrum more typical of cataclysmic variables (CVs). Our observations confirm 1E1339's hard CV-like spectrum, with photon index {Gamma} = 1.3 {+-} 0.2. We found 1E1339 to be highly variable, with a 0.5-10 keV luminosity ranging from (1.4 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} to 8.5{sup +4.9}{sub -4.6} x 10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1}, with 1E1339's maximum luminosity being perhaps the highest yet recorded for hard X-ray emission from a WD. In 2005 January, 1E1339 displayed substantial low-energy emission below {approx}0.3 keV. Although current Chandra responses cannot properly model this emission, its bolometric luminosity appears comparable to or greater than that of the hard spectral component. This raises the possibility that the supersoft X-ray emission seen from 1E1339 in 1992 may have shifted to the far-UV.

  20. Super-soft X-ray emission on day 6.4 from nova LMC N1968-12a strongly suggests a very high mass white dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, K. L.; Osborne, J. P.; Darnley, M. J.; Henze, M.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Schwarz, G. J.; Shore, S. N.; Starrfield, S.; Williams, S. C.

    2016-01-01

    Swift observations of the 2016 outburst of LMCN 1968-12a (ATel #8578, #8586, #8587) have been continuing daily. The early XRT spectrum, covering 2016 Jan 23 - 25 (days 2.07-4.26 after outburst), can be modelled by a single temperature optically thin emission component of kT & gt; 0.9 keV and NH = (8.3 +21.7/-7.8)x1021 cm-2, with a mean 0.3-10 keV observed flux of (5.1 +8.2/-2.3)x10-13 erg cm-2 s-1. After this time, an increase in soft emission (counts below ~1 keV) was seen, although at first this appeared to be related to a decrease in the absorbing column; no corresponding increase in X-ray count rate was found, remaining around 0.016 count s-1. On 2016 Jan 27 (day 6.4), the X-ray count rate rose to 0.05 count s-1 with the emission being dominated by counts below 1 keV. We identify this as the start of the super-soft source (SSS) phase.

  1. Soft x-ray laser gain measurements in a recombining plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, S.; Skinner, C.H.; Milchberg, H.; Keane, C.; Voorhees, D.

    1985-03-01

    An enhancement of approx. 100 of stimulated emission over spontaneous emission of the CVI 182 A line (one-pass gain approx. = 6.5) was measured in a recombining, magnetically confined plasma column by two independent techniques using intensity calibrated XUV monochromators. Additional confirmation that the enhancement was due to stimulated emission has been obtained with a soft x-ray mirror.

  2. Initial Operation of the NSTX Fast Tangential Soft X-Ray Camera

    SciTech Connect

    B.C. Stratton; R. Feder; S. von Goeler; G.F. Renda; J.L. Lowrance; V.J. Mastrocola

    2004-05-11

    Fast, two-dimensional, soft x-ray imaging is a powerful technique for the study of MHD instabilities in tokamak plasmas. We have constructed an ultra-fast frame rate soft x-ray camera for the National Spherical Torus Experiment. It is based on a recently developed 64 x 64 pixel CCD camera capable of capturing 300 frames at up to 500,000 frames per second. A pinhole aperture images the plasma soft x-ray emission (0.2-10 keV) onto a P47 scintillator deposited on a fiber-optic faceplate; the scintillator visible light output is detected and amplified by a demagnifying image intensifier and lens-coupled to the CCD chip. A selection of beryllium foils provides discrimination of low-energy emission. The system is installed on NSTX with a wide-angle tangential view of the plasma. Initial plasma data and an assessment of the system performance are presented.

  3. Development of a numerically controlled elastic emission machining system for fabricating mandrels of ellipsoidal focusing mirrors used in soft x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Yoshinori; Kume, Takehiro; Motoyama, Hiroto; Hiraguri, Kentaro; Hashizume, Hirokazu; Mimura, Hidekazu

    2013-09-01

    Ellipsoidal mirrors are one of the most promising types of X-ray mirror, because the mirror can focus X-rays to nanometer size with a large aperture and no chromatic aberration. However, so far ideal ellipsoidal mirrors cannot be realized by any manufacturing methods. One of the reasons is there is no fabrication method to process their inside surface with a diameter of several millimeters with nanometer-level accuracy. We propose and develop a manufacturing process of the ellipsoidal mirror. First, a master which has the reversed shape is prepared using grinding, polishing and Elastic Emission Machining (EEM). EEM can finish the surface shape to within 2nm (RMS). Then, the ellipsoidal mirror is produced by replicating the surface using an electroforming deposition method. By conducting the process without any stress at room temperature, replicating the surface roughness and shape with nanometer order accuracy is possible. In this paper, we report the current status of manufacturing of the ellipsoidal mirror.

  4. AN XMM-NEWTON SURVEY OF THE SOFT X-RAY BACKGROUND. II. AN ALL-SKY CATALOG OF DIFFUSE O VII AND O VIII EMISSION INTENSITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, David B.; Shelton, Robin L.

    2012-10-15

    We present an all-sky catalog of diffuse O VII and O VIII line intensities, extracted from archival XMM-Newton observations. This catalog supersedes our previous catalog, which covered the sky between l = 120 Degree-Sign and l = 240 Degree-Sign . We attempted to reduce the contamination from near-Earth solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission by excluding times of high solar wind proton flux from the data. Without this filtering, we were able to extract measurements from 1868 observations. With this filtering, nearly half of the observations became unusable, and only 1003 observations yielded measurements. The O VII and O VIII intensities are typically {approx}2-11 and {approx}<3 photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} (line unit, L.U.), respectively, although much brighter intensities were also recorded. Our data set includes 217 directions that have been observed multiple times by XMM-Newton. The time variation of the intensities from such directions may be used to constrain SWCX models. The O VII and O VIII intensities typically vary by {approx}<5 and {approx}<2 L.U. between repeat observations, although several intensity enhancements of >10 L.U. were observed. We compared our measurements with models of the heliospheric and geocoronal SWCX. The heliospheric SWCX intensity is expected to vary with ecliptic latitude and solar cycle. We found that the observed oxygen intensities generally decrease from solar maximum to solar minimum, both at high ecliptic latitudes (which is as expected) and at low ecliptic latitudes (which is not as expected). The geocoronal SWCX intensity is expected to depend on the solar wind proton flux incident on the Earth and on the sightline's path through the magnetosheath. The intensity variations seen in directions that have been observed multiple times are in poor agreement with the predictions of a geocoronal SWCX model. We found that the oxygen lines account for {approx}40%-50% of the 3/4 keV X-ray background that is not due to

  5. Emission-Line Spectra of Ar IX-Ar XVI in the Soft X-Ray Region 20-50 Å

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepson, J. K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Behar, E.; Kahn, S. M.

    2003-06-01

    As part of a larger project to complete a comprehensive catalog of astrophysically relevant emission lines in support of new-generation X-ray observatories using the Lawrence Livermore electron beam ion traps EBIT-I and EBIT-II, we present observations of argon lines in the extreme-ultraviolet region. Our database includes wavelength measurements with standard errors, relative intensities, and line assignments for Ar IX-Ar XVI between 20 and 50 Å. The experimental data are complemented with a full set of calculations using the Hebrew University Lawrence Livermore Atomic Code (HULLAC). Despite differences in calculated and measured wavelengths, we find the calculated lines to be of great utility in analyzing our laboratory spectra. The calculated line intensities are generally sufficient to identify the strongest transitions in each charge state. We note, however, an underestimation by theory of the strength of the 3s-->2p lines relative to the 3d-->2p lines in Ar IX, Ar X, and Ar XI. The laboratory data are compared with Chandra observations of Procyon, resulting in the identification of an Ar IX line that was previously thought to be from S IX.

  6. Soft X-Ray Polarimetry with a CubeSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    2016-07-01

    We describe an instrument capable of measuring the polarization of astrophysical sources in soft X-rays that can be accomplished at modest cost by exploiting CubeSats as novel vehicles for high energy astrophysics. The instrument would re-use technologies that will be demonstrated on the HaloSat cubesat that is currently under construction. Potential target include thermally-emitting isolated neutron stars and blazars. Measurement of the polarization of X-rays emitted from the surface of a highly magnetized neutron star provides a means to test a unique signature of strong-field quantum electrodynamics and probe the neutron star magnetic field and X-ray emission geometry. Polarization measurements of blazars should strongly constrain jet emission models.

  7. Deexcitation Dynamics of Superhydrogenated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Cations after Soft-x-Ray Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitsma, G.; Boschman, L.; Deuzeman, M. J.; González-Magaña, O.; Hoekstra, S.; Cazaux, S.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.

    2014-08-01

    We have investigated the response of superhydrogenated gas-phase coronene cations upon soft x-ray absorption. Carbon (1s)⟶π⋆ transitions were resonantly excited at hν =285 eV. The resulting core hole is then filled in an Auger decay process, with the excess energy being released in the form of an Auger electron. Predominantly highly excited dications are thus formed, which cool down by hydrogen emission. In superhydrogenated systems, the additional H atoms act as a buffer, quenching loss of native H atoms and molecular fragmentation. Dissociation and transition state energies for several H loss channels were computed by means of density functional theory. Using these energies as input into an Arrhenius-type cascade model, very good agreement with the experimental data is found. The results have important implications for the survival of polyaromatic hydrocarbons in the interstellar medium and reflect key aspects of graphene hydrogenation.

  8. Wide field-of-view soft X-ray imaging for solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, B. M.; Collier, M. R.; Kuntz, K. D.; Porter, F. S.; Sibeck, D. G.; Snowden, S. L.; Carter, J. A.; Collado-Vega, Y.; Connor, H. K.; Cravens, T. E.; Read, A. M.; Sembay, S.; Thomas, N. E.

    2016-04-01

    Soft X-ray imagers can be used to study the mesoscale and macroscale density structures that occur whenever and wherever the solar wind encounters neutral atoms at comets, the Moon, and both magnetized and unmagnetized planets. Charge exchange between high charge state solar wind ions and exospheric neutrals results in the isotropic emission of soft X-ray photons with energies from 0.1 to 2.0 keV. At Earth, this process occurs primarily within the magnetosheath and cusps. Through providing a global view, wide field-of-view imaging can determine the significance of the various proposed solar wind-magnetosphere interaction mechanisms by evaluating their global extent and occurrence patterns. A summary of wide field-of-view (several to tens of degrees) soft X-ray imaging is provided including slumped micropore microchannel reflectors, simulated images, and recent flight results.

  9. Reflection soft X-ray microscope and method

    DOEpatents

    Suckewer, Szymon; Skinner, Charles H.; Rosser, Roy

    1993-01-01

    A reflection soft X-ray microscope is provided by generating soft X-ray beams, condensing the X-ray beams to strike a surface of an object at a predetermined angle, and focusing the X-ray beams reflected from the surface onto a detector, for recording an image of the surface or near surface features of the object under observation.

  10. Reflection soft X-ray microscope and method

    DOEpatents

    Suckewer, S.; Skinner, C.H.; Rosser, R.

    1993-01-05

    A reflection soft X-ray microscope is provided by generating soft X-ray beams, condensing the X-ray beams to strike a surface of an object at a predetermined angle, and focusing the X-ray beams reflected from the surface onto a detector, for recording an image of the surface or near surface features of the object under observation.

  11. Soft x-ray spectroscopy studies of novel electronic materials using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newby, David, Jr.

    surface evolution of these films is discussed, and the effects of different gas environments on oxygen vacancy concentration are elucidated. LSMO is commonly used in commercial fuel cell devices. Here the resonant soft x-ray emission (RIXS) spectrum of LSMO is examined, and it is shown that the inelastic x-ray emission structure of LSMO arises from local atomic multiplet effects.

  12. Soft X-ray Absorption Edges in LMXBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The XMM observation of LMC X-2 is part of our program to study X-ray absorption in the interstellar medium (ISM). This program includes a variety of bright X-ray binaries in the Galaxy as well as the Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC). LMC X-2 is located near the heart of the LMC. Its very soft X-ray spectrum is used to determine abundance and ionization fractions of neutral and lowly ionized oxygen of the ISM in the LMC. The RGS spectrum so far allowed us to determine the O-edge value to be for atomic O, the EW of O-I in the ls-2p resonance absorption line, and the same for O-II. The current study is still ongoing in conjunction with other low absorption sources like Sco X-1 and the recently observed X-ray binary 4U 1957+11.

  13. VUV and soft x-ray spectroscopy of actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C. G.; Joyce, J. J.; Durakiewicz, T.; Guziewicz, E.

    2004-01-01

    Optical and photoelectron spectroscopies using VUV and Soft X-ray photons are powerful tools for studies of elemental and compound actinides. Large changes in the relative atomic cross sections of the 5f, 6d and sp electrons allow decomposition of the character of the valence bands using photoemission. Resonant enhancement of photoelectrons and Auger electrons at the 5d core threshold further aids the decomposition and gives a measure of elemental specificity. Angle-resolved photoemission can be used to map the momentum dependence of the electronic states. The large changes in relative cross section with photon energy yields further details when the mapping is done at equivalent points in multiple zones. Spectra for well understood rare earth materials will be presented to establish spectral characteristics for known atomic character initial states. These signatures will be applied to the case of USb to investigate f-d hybridization near the Fermi level.

  14. Point diffraction interferometry at soft x-ray wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Sommargren, G.E.; Hostetler, R.

    1993-07-01

    To achieve the image performance necessary for soft x-ray projection lithography, interferometric testing at the design wavelength is required to accurately characterize the wavefront of the imaging system. The wavefront depends not only on the surface figure of the individual optics and on their relative alignment, but also on aperture dependent phase shifts induced by the resonant multilayer coatings on the optical surfaces. This paper describes the design and lithographic fabrication of an array of point diffraction interferometers on a silicon nitride membrane that has been over-coated with a spatially graded partially transmitting film to provide fringe contrast control. Experimental results using a visible light analogue (larger pinholes and different transmission gradient) will be shown.

  15. Soft X-ray FEL simulation in PAL-XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Chi Hyun; Ko, In Soo; Parc, Yong Woon; Han, Jang Hui

    2015-10-01

    The soft X-ray beamline in the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray Free Electron Laser (PAL-XFEL) will provide a photon beam with a wavelength from 1 nm to 3 nm in the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mode by using an electron beam with a 3.15-GeV beam energy. Linearly polarized radiation will be supplied by using six planar undulators (PUs). The linearly-polarized radiation powers at 1 (3) nm can reach 10.2 (30) GW. Polarization of the radiation will be controlled by applying the reverse undulator tapering scheme to the PUs and adding two helical undulators (HUs). The circularly-polarized radiation powers at 1 (3) nm will be 3.11 (11.73) GW. The degrees of circular polarization will be larger than 0.99 for both wavelengths. Three options for the future upgrade of the beamline to increase the radiation power are proposed.

  16. First Terrestrial Soft X-ray Aurora Observations by Chandra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Ostgaard, Nikolai; Chang, Shen-Wu; Metzger, Albert E.; Majeed, Tariq

    2004-01-01

    Northern polar "auroral" regions of Earth was observed by High-Resolution Camera in imaging mode (T32C-I) aboard Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO) during mid December 2003 - mid April 2004. Ten CXO observations, each approximately 20 min duration, were made in a non-conventional method (due to CXO technical issues), such that Chandra was aimed at a fixed point in sky and the Earth's polar cusp was allowed to drift through the HRC-I field-of-view. The observations were performed when CXO was near apogee and timed during northern winter mostly near midnight (6 hr), except two observations which occurred around 1200 UT, so that northern polar region is entirely in dark and solar fluoresced x-ray contamination can be avoided. These observations were aimed at searching the Earth's soft x-ray aurora and to do a comparative study with Jupiter's x-ray aurora, where a pulsating x-ray hot-spot near the northern magnetic pole has been observed by Chandra that implies a particle source region near Jupiter's magnetopause, and entry of heavy solar wind ions due to high-latitude reconnection as a viable explanation for the soft x-ray emissions. The first Chandra soft (0.1-2 keV) x-ray observations of Earth's aurora show that it is highly variable (intense arc, multiple arcs, diffuse, at times almost absent). In at least one of the observations an isolated blob of emission is observed where we expect cusp to be: giving indication of solar wind charge-exchange signature in x-rays. We are comparing the Chandra x-ray observations with observations at other wavelengths and particle data from Earth-orbiting satellites and solar wind measurements from near-Earth ACE and SOH0 spacecraft. Preliminary results from these unique CXO-Earth observations will be presented and discussed.

  17. In-situ observations of catalytic surface reactions with soft x-rays under working conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoshima, Ryo; Kondoh, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Catalytic chemical reactions proceeding on solid surfaces are an important topic in fundamental science and industrial technologies such as energy conversion, pollution control and chemical synthesis. Complete understanding of the heterogeneous catalysis and improving its efficiency to an ultimate level are the eventual goals for many surface scientists. Soft x-ray is one of the prime probes to observe electronic and structural information of the target materials. Most studies in surface science using soft x-rays have been performed under ultra-high vacuum conditions due to the technical limitation, though the practical catalytic reactions proceed under ambient pressure conditions. However, recent developments of soft x-ray based techniques operating under ambient pressure conditions have opened a door to the in-situ observation of materials under realistic environments. The near-ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (NAP-XPS) using synchrotron radiation enables us to observe the chemical states of surfaces of condensed matters under the presence of gas(es) at elevated pressures, which has been hardly conducted with the conventional XPS technique. Furthermore, not only the NAP-XPS but also ambient-pressure compatible soft x-ray core-level spectroscopies, such as near-edge absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), have been significantly contributing to the in-situ observations. In this review, first we introduce recent developments of in-situ observations using soft x-ray techniques and current status. Then we present recent new findings on catalytically active surfaces using soft x-ray techniques, particularly focusing on the NAP-XPS technique. Finally we give a perspective on the future direction of this emerging technique.

  18. Soft X-Ray Spectra of AGN Discovered Via Their Hard X-Ray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    This final report is a study of the Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Investigation of the soft x-ray spectra of AGN were performed by using their hard x-ray emission. ROSAT observations of AGN was also performed, which allowed for the study of these x-ray spectra and the structures of 7 clusters of galaxies.

  19. The PERCIVAL soft X-ray imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderer, C. B.; Marras, A.; Bayer, M.; Correa, J.; Göttlicher, P.; Lange, S.; Shevyakov, I.; Smoljanin, S.; Tennert, M.; Viti, M.; Xia, Q.; Zimmer, M.; Das, D.; Guerrini, N.; Marsh, B.; Sedgwick, I.; Turchetta, R.; Cautero, G.; Gianoncelli, A.; Giuressi, D.; Menk, R.; Stebel, L.; Yousef, H.; Marchal, J.; Rees, N.; Tartoni, N.; Graafsma, H.

    2015-02-01

    With the increased brilliance of state-of-the-art Synchrotron radiation sources and the advent of Free Electron Lasers enabling revolutionary science on atomic length and time scales with EUV to X-ray photons comes an urgent need for suitable photon imaging detectors. Requirements include high frame rates, very large dynamic range, single-photon counting capability with low probability of false positives, and (multi)-megapixels. PERCIVAL (``Pixelated Energy Resolving CMOS Imager, Versatile And Large'') is currently being developed by a collaboration of DESY, RAL, Elettra, DLS and Pohang to address this need for the soft X-ray regime. PERCIVAL is a monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS), i.e. based on CMOS technology. It will be back-thinned to access its primary energy range of 250 eV to 1 keV with target efficiencies above 90%. According to its preliminary specifications, the roughly 10 × 10 cm2, 3.5k × 3.7k monolithic ``PERCIVAL13M'' sensor will operate at frame rates up to 120 Hz (commensurate with most FELs) and use multiple gains within its 27 μm pixels to measure 1 to ~ 105 (500 eV) simultaneously-arriving photons. A smaller ``PERCIVAL2M'' with ~ 1.4k × 1.5k pixels is also planned. Currently, small-scale back-illuminated prototype systems (160 × 210 pixels of 25 μm pitch) are undergoing detailed testing with X-rays and optical photons. In March 2014, a prototype sensor was tested at 350 eV-2 keV at Elettra's TwinMic beamline. The data recorded include diffraction patterns at 350 eV and 400 eV, knife edge and sub-pixel pinhole illuminations, and comparisons of different pixel types. Another prototype chip will be submitted in fall 2014, first larger sensors could be in hand in late 2015.

  20. Development of small scale soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.; Suckewer, S. . Plasma Physics Lab. Princeton Univ., NJ . Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering); Skinner, C.H.; Voorhees, D. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1991-05-01

    At present rapid progress is being made in the application of soft x-ray lasers to fields such as microscopy and microlithography. A critical factor in the range of suitable applications is the scale and hence cost of the soft x-ray lasers. At Princeton, gain at 183{angstrom} has been obtained with relatively low pump laser energies (as low as 6J) in a portable'' small-scale soft x-ray laser system. We will also discuss aspects of data interpretation and pitfalls to be avoided in measurements of gain in such systems. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Persistence and change in the soft X-ray spectrum of the quasar PG 1211 + 143

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Giommi, P.; Mcdowell, Jonathan

    1991-01-01

    The present study examines two Einstein and three Exosat observations of PG 1211 + 143 over a 6-yr baseline which show that strong steep-spectrum low-energy X-ray emission is a persistent feature of this quasar. Exosat observations of PG 1211 + 143 detected an increase of a factor of 2.3 in its steep soft X-ray flux during 18 days. It is concluded that the bulk of the soft X-ray emission of PG 1211 + 143 comes from a region less than 5 x 10 to the 16th cm across. In another interval of 193 days, the soft X-rays decreased by a factor of 3.7. In the same interval the hard X-rays decreased by a factor of 1.6 + or - 0.05, which suggests a connection between the two energy regimes and argues against variable absorption causing the soft X-ray variations. It is contended that in order to decrease in luminosity so rapidly, a thermal source in PG 1211 + 143 would have to be optically thick to both electron scattering and free-bound absorption.

  2. Filters for soft X-ray solar telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiller, Eberhard; Grebe, Kurt; Golub, Leon

    1990-01-01

    Soft X-ray telescopes require filters that block visible and infrared light and have good soft X-ray transmission. The optical properties of possible materials are discussed, and the fabrication and testing methods for the filters used in a 10-inch normal incidence telescope for 63 A are described. The best performances in the 44-114-A wavelength range are obtained with foils of carbon and rhodium.

  3. Soft x-ray imaging using Polaroid Land films

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.S.; Choi, P.; Deeney, C.

    1988-02-01

    It is demonstrated in this note that optical Polaroid Land films can be used as a convenient detector in the soft x-ray region. The performance of Polaroid 667 film has been found to be comparable to that of the Kodak direct exposure film (DEF) for soft x-ray pinhole imaging. By a suitable choice of multiple filters, qualitative information about a dense plasma has been obtained.

  4. High numerical aperture tabletop soft x-ray diffraction microscopy with 70-nm resolution

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Richard L.; Song, Changyong; Wachulak, Przemyslaw W.; Raymondson, Daisy A.; Paul, Ariel; Amirbekian, Bagrat; Lee, Edwin; Sakdinawat, Anne E.; La-O-Vorakiat, Chan; Marconi, Mario C.; Menoni, Carmen S.; Murnane, Margaret M.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Miao, Jianwei

    2008-01-01

    Light microscopy has greatly advanced our understanding of nature. The achievable resolution, however, is limited by optical wavelengths to ≈200 nm. By using imaging and labeling technologies, resolutions beyond the diffraction limit can be achieved for specialized specimens with techniques such as near-field scanning optical microscopy, stimulated emission depletion microscopy, and photoactivated localization microscopy. Here, we report a versatile soft x-ray diffraction microscope with 70- to 90-nm resolution by using two different tabletop coherent soft x-ray sources—a soft x-ray laser and a high-harmonic source. We also use field curvature correction that allows high numerical aperture imaging and near-diffraction-limited resolution of 1.5λ. A tabletop soft x-ray diffraction microscope should find broad applications in biology, nanoscience, and materials science because of its simple optical design, high resolution, large depth of field, 3D imaging capability, scalability to shorter wavelengths, and ultrafast temporal resolution. PMID:18162534

  5. Atmospheric parameters of a soft X ray selected set of hot DA white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidder, Kenneth Mark

    Soft x-ray/EUV observations provide a sensitive means of probing the structure and composition of the atmospheres of hot hydrogen-rich (DA) white dwarf stars. This is due to the fact that soft x-rays originate from hotter, deeper layers of the photosphere than do longer wavelengths. A primary aim of this research is to expand the sample of DA's observed with soft x-ray instrumentation through a search for serendipitous observations of catalogued hot DA white dwarfs in existing soft x-ray databases. The positional coincidences of 31 catalogued DA's (McCook and Sion 1987) were examined in Einstein IPC and EXOSAT LE fields. As a result, three soft x-ray sources have been identified corresponding to the white dwarfs (WD0631 + 107, WD1113 + 413 and WD0425 + 168) and a fourth source which is probably not due to photospheric thermal emission from the coincident white dwarf. The three detected DA's have relatively low effective temperatures (27,200 +/- 400 K, 26,200 +/- 1100 K and 24,000 +/- 500 K, respectively), as determined independently using complementary optical and UV spectroscopy. Applying these temperature constraints to the soft x-ray photometric data, the photospheres of these stars must be composed of effectively pure hydrogen (n(He)/n(H) less than 10 exp -5), although the hottest star, WD0631 + 107, can have trace levels of homogeneously mixed helium less than 10 exp -4.2. The analysis of the soft x-ray observations are supplemented with independent determinations of temperature, gravity, and V magnitude. The method of determination employed is to fit the well-sampled wings of the broad hydrogen absorption profiles with self-consistent model atmosphere predictions. Precise temperatures and gravities are obtained by fitting the observed profiles independently, then jointly determining a consistent solution for each object. In this effort, a ground-based observation program was established to obtain high quality spectra of the Balmer delta and gamma lines and in

  6. Multi-energy Soft X-ray diagnostic for NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tritz, Kevin; Stutman, Dan; Finkenthal, Michael; Kumar, Deepak; Clayton, Daniel

    2010-11-01

    A high resolution, ``multi-energy'' soft X-ray (ME-SXR) diagnostic is being developed for the NSTX edge plasma. The system will measure with spatial resolution of <=1cm and with ˜10 kHz bandwidth the XUV and SXR emission from the outer NSTX regions, including the pedestal, and will serve for studies of edge particle and electron transport, of ELM dynamics, and other edge phenomena. The system comprises five tangential AXUV diode arrays, viewing the plasma between 0.5emissivity profiles are modeled using a coronal atomic model and a look-up table algorithm. In addition, a Transmission Grating imaging spectrometer is used to constrain the impurity fractions in this model.

  7. Refraction effects in soft x-ray multilayer blazed gratings.

    PubMed

    Voronov, D L; Salmassi, F; Meyer-Ilse, J; Gullikson, E M; Warwick, T; Padmore, H A

    2016-05-30

    A 2500 lines/mm Multilayer Blazed Grating (MBG) optimized for the soft x-ray wavelength range was fabricated and tested. The grating coated with a W/B4C multilayer demonstrated a record diffraction efficiency in the 2nd blazed diffraction order in the energy range from 500 to 1200 eV. Detailed investigation of the diffraction properties of the grating demonstrated that the diffraction efficiency of high groove density MBGs is not limited by the normal shadowing effects that limits grazing incidence x-ray grating performance. Refraction effects inherent in asymmetrical Bragg diffraction were experimentally confirmed for MBGs. The refraction affects the blazing properties of the MBGs and results in a shift of the resonance wavelength of the gratings and broadening or narrowing of the grating bandwidth depending on diffraction geometry. The true blaze angle of the MBGs is defined by both the real structure of the multilayer stack and by asymmetrical refraction effects. Refraction effects can be used as a powerful tool in providing highly efficient suppression of high order harmonics. PMID:27410064

  8. Line identification and lifetime measurements in the XUV and soft X-ray regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellin, I. A.

    1979-01-01

    A summary of the data acquired concerning line identification and lifetime measurements in the xuv and soft X-ray regions for a variety of both resonance transitions and forbidden transitions in ions of astrophysical interest is provided. Particular attention is called to a few papers which appeared in the Astrophysical Journal. These are of special relevance to specific astrophysical data needs. The many experiments completed in areas related to but somewhat outside the confines of the project title are mentioned.

  9. Deconstructing the Spectrum of the Soft X-ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, K. D.; Snowden, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    The soft X-ray background in the 0.1-1.0 keV band is known to be produced by at least three sources; the Local Hot Bubble (LHB), the extragalactic power law (EPL), and a seemingly galactic component that lies outside the bulk of the absorption that is due to the ISM of the galactic disk. This last component, which we call the Trans-Absorption Emission (TAE), has been modeled by a number of groups who have derived disparate measures of its temperature. The differences have arisen from differing assumptions about the structure of the emitting gas and unrecognized methodological difficulties. In particular, spectral fitting methods do not uniquely separate the TAE from the foreground emission that is due the LHB. This "degeneracy" can be resolved using the angular variation of the absorption of the TAE. We show that the TAE cannot be characterized by a single thermal component; no single-component model can be consistent with both the spectral energy distribution of the TAE emission and the angular variation due to absorption by the galactic disk. We use the angular anticorrelation of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey with the galactic absorption to separate local from distant emission components, and to fit the spectral energy distribution of the resulting distant emission. We find that the emission is best described by a two-thermal-component model with logT(sub S) = 6.06(sup +0.14, sub -0.12) and log T(sub H) = 6.42(sup +0.14, sub -0.12). This two-thermal-component TAE fits the ROSAT spectral energy distribution significantly better than single-component models, and is consistent with both angular variation and spectral constraints.

  10. Moon: lunar albedo for soft x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibadov, Subhon

    2016-07-01

    Albedo of the Moon for soft X-rays (0.1-2 keV photons) is determined on the basis of the X-ray luminosity of the Moon detected and measured for the first time by orbital space telescope ROSAT in 1990. It is found that the lunar albedo for the solar soft X-rays is less than the lunar visual region albedo almost thousand times. The data allow to estimate more correctly X-ray luminosity of dusty comets like Hyakutake C/1996 B2 and Hale-Bopp C/1995 O1 due to scattering of solar soft X-rays and to reveal thus the dominant mechanism for production of X-rays in dusty comets.

  11. Effects of soft x-ray irradiation on cell ultrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Thomas W.; Page, Anton M.; Foster, Guy F.; Stead, Anthony D.

    1993-01-01

    The future of x-ray microscopy lies mainly in its potential for imaging fresh, hydrated biological material at a resolution superior to that of light microscopy. For the image to be accepted as representing the cellular organization of the living cell, it is essential that artefacts are not introduced as a result of the image collection system. One possible source of artefacts is cellular damage resulting form the irradiation of the material with soft x rays. Cells of the unicellular alga Chlorella have been examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) following exposure to different doses of monochromatic (380 eV) soft x rays. Extreme ultrastructural damage has been detected following doses of 103 - 104 Gy, in particular loss of cellular membranes such as the internal thylakoid membranes of the chloroplast. This is discussed in relation to dosage commonly used for imaging by soft x-ray microscopy.

  12. Stellar contribution to the galactic soft x-ray background

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, R.; Avni, Y.; Bookbinder, J. R.,Giacconi; Golub, L.; Harnden, F.R. Jr.; Maxson, C.W.; Topka, K.; Vaiana, G.S.

    1981-10-01

    We construct log N-log S relations for stars based on medium x-ray luminosities for dF, dG, and dK stars previously reported for the Einstein Observatory/Center for Astrophysics stellar survey and on a detailed x-ray luminosity function derived here for dM stars, and investigate the stellar contribution to the diffuse soft x-ray background. The principal results are that stars provide approx.20% of the soft x-ray background in the 0.28--1.0 keV passband and therefore contribute significantly to the soft x-ray background in this energy range (with dM stars constituting the dominant contributing class), and that the stellar contribution to the diffuse x-ray background in the 0.15--0.28 keV passband is < or approx. =3%.

  13. Isolated attosecond soft X-rays and water window XAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biegert, Jens

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate generation of isolated attosecond soft X-ray pulses with duration less than 350 as at the carbon K-edge at 284 eV. This reproducible and CEP stable attosecond soft X-ray continuum covers the entire water window from 200 eV to 550 eV with a flux of 7.3x 107 photons/s and corresponds to a pulse energy of 2.9 pJ. We demonstrate the utility of our table-top source through soft X-ray near-edge fine-structure spectroscopy at K-shell absorption edges in condensed matter and retrieve the specific absorption features corresponding to the binding orbitals. We believe that these results herald attosecond material science by bridging the gap between ultrafast temporal resolution and element specific probing at the fundamental absorption edges of matter.

  14. Technology development for soft X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Törmä, P. T.; Sipilä, H. J.; Koskinen, T.; Mattila, M.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray spectroscopy instruments lose part of their performance due to the lack of suitable components for soft X-ray region below 1 keV. Therefore, in the analysis of low atomic number elements including lithium, beryllium, boron and carbon instrument sensitivity is often limited. In this work we describe how the performance of the spectroscopy of soft X-rays is significantly improved when all devices integrated in the spectroscopic instrument are suitable for both soft and hard X-rays. This concept is based on utilizing ultra-thin SiN X-ray windows with proven performance not only as a detector window but also as an X-ray source window. By including a soft-X-ray-sensitive silicon drift detector with efficient surface charge collection in this concept the sensitivity and performance of the instrument is significantly increased.

  15. Analysis of the Electronic Structure of Aqueous Urea and Its Derivatives: A Systematic Soft X-Ray-TD-DFT Approach.

    PubMed

    Tesch, Marc F; Golnak, Ronny; Ehrhard, Felix; Schön, Daniela; Xiao, Jie; Atak, Kaan; Bande, Annika; Aziz, Emad F

    2016-08-16

    Soft X-ray emission (XE), absorption (XA), and resonant inelastic scattering (RIXS) experiments have been conducted at the nitrogen K-edge of urea and its derivatives in aqueous solution and were compared with density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory calculations. This comprehensive study provides detailed information on the occupied and unoccupied molecular orbitals of urea, thiourea, acetamide, dimethylurea, and biuret at valence levels. By identifying the electronic transitions that contribute to the experimental spectral features, the energy gap between the highest occupied and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of each molecule is determined. Moreover, a theoretical approach is introduced to simulate resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectra by adding an extra electron to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, thereby mimicking the real initial state of the core-electron absorption before the subsequent relaxation process. PMID:27416871

  16. Response of the Upper Atmosphere to Variations in the Solar Soft X-Ray Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Scott Martin

    1995-11-01

    Terrestrial Far Ultraviolet (FUV) airglow emissions have been suggested as a means for remote sensing the structure of the upper atmosphere. The energy which leads to the excitation of FUV airglow emissions is solar irradiance at Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray wavelengths. Solar irradiance at these wavelengths is known to be highly variable; studies of Nitric Oxide (NO) in the lower thermosphere have suggested a variability of more than an order of magnitude in the solar soft x-ray irradiance. To properly interpret the FUV airglow, the magnitude of the solar energy deposition must be known. Previous analyses have used the electron impact excited Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) bands of N _2 to infer the flux of photoelectrons in the atmosphere and thus to infer the magnitude of the solar irradiance. This dissertation presents the first simultaneous measurements of the FUV airglow, the major atmospheric constituent densities, and the solar EUV and soft x-ray irradiances. The measurements were made on three flights of an identical sounding rocket payload at different levels of solar activity. The linear response in brightness of the LBH bands to variations in solar irradiance is demonstrated. In addition to the N_2 LBH bands, atomic oxygen lines at 135.6 and 130.4 nm are also studied. Unlike the LBH bands, these emissions undergo radiative transfer effects in the atmosphere. The OI emission at 135.6 nm is found to be well modeled using a radiative transfer calculation and the known excitation processes. Unfortunately, the assumed processes leading to OI 130.4 nm excitation are found to be insufficient to reproduce the observed variability of this emission. Production of NO in the thermosphere is examined; it is shown that a lower than previously reported variability in the solar soft x-ray irradiance is required to explain the variability of NO.

  17. Electron-density measurements in hohlraums using soft-x-ray deflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, C.D.; London, R.A.; Harte, J.A.; Powers, L.V.; Trebes, J.E.

    1998-05-01

    This paper presents design calculations for experiments that measure electron densities of laser heated hohlraums with soft-x-ray moir{acute e} deflectometry. Hydrodynamical simulations of the hohlraums are analyzed to obtain deflection angles of the probing beam and x-ray emission from the hohlraum. The deflection angles and resulting moir{acute e} fringe shifts and fringe contrast are predicted to be sufficient to infer electron-density gradients from measurements. In addition, the self-emission is found to be much lower than that of the probing laser beam, giving a good signal-to-noise ratio. In conclusion, moir{acute e} deflectometry with soft-x-ray lasers has the potential to give valuable information about the electron density in laser driven hohlraums. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Soft X-ray contact microscopy of nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletti, G.; Orsini, F.; Batani, D.; Bernardinello, A.; Desai, T.; Ullschmied, J.; Skala, J.; Kralikova, B.; Krousky, E.; Juha, L.; Pfeifer, M.; Kadlec, Ch.; Mocek, T.; Präg, A.; Renner, O.; Cotelli, F.; Lora Lamia, C.; Zullini, A.

    2004-08-01

    Soft X-ray Contact Microscopy (SXCM) of Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes with typical length ~800 μ m and diameter ~30 μ m has been performed using the PALS laser source of wavelength λ = 1.314~μ m and pulse duration τ (FWHM) = 400 ps. Pulsed soft X-rays were generated using molybdenum and gold targets with laser intensities I ≥ 1014 W/cm2. Images have been recorded on PMMA photo resists and analyzed using an atomic force microscope operating in contact mode. Cuticle features and several internal organs have been identified in the SXCM images including lateral field, cuticle annuli, pharynx, and hypodermal and neuronal cell nuclei.

  19. A soft x-ray octadecyl hydrogen maleate crystal spectrograph

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, P.Z.; Fill, E.E.; Tietang, G.

    1996-03-01

    A crystal spectrograph is described which can be used to investigate laser-produced plasmas in the region of soft x rays at wavelengths of up to 60 A. The spectrograph uses an octadecyl hydrogen maleate crystal with a 2{ital d} of 63.5 A, combined with a very thin carbon filter (3000 A thick). As examples of its application, soft x-ray spectra in the range of 43{endash}51 A from laser plasmas of Si and Cu are presented. A spectral resolution of {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda}=1100 is deduced from the spectra. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Pulsed Capillary Discharge Operated As A Compact Soft X-Ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, M. P.; Wyndham, E. S.; Favre, M.; Valenzuela, J. C.

    2010-07-01

    We analyze experimental results of radiation emission from a compact pulsed capillary ns discharge source, designed for soft x-ray applications, operated in Nitrogen and N/He mixtures at voltages in the range of 18-24kV. The discharge operates in an alumina capillary of length 21mm and 1.6mm inner diameter. The electrical energy stored is ~0.5 J with peak current of ~5kA. Fast charging from an IGBT based pulsed power circuit allows operation at 35-150 Hz. Characteristic time-integrated Nitrogen spectra were recorded from 10-220 Å with clear evidence of He-like Nitrogen line at 28.9 Å, which represents a possible source for a water window soft x-ray microscope. Time-evolution measurements show the influence of axial electron beams, generated by hollow cathode dynamics, on the x-ray emission. We discuss optimal frequency of operation, voltage applied, geometrical and pressure conditions for cathode and anode, for soft x-ray generation. Time-integrated MCP images of a filtered slit-wire system delivered an estimate of the maximum emission energy of our source, as well as clear evidence of full wall detachment, of ~100μm in radial size for the entire emission range.

  1. Soft x-ray magneto-optic Kerr rotation and element-specific hysteresis measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kortright, J.B.; Rice, M.

    1996-03-01

    Soft x-ray magneto-optic Kerr rotation has been measured using a continuously tunable multilayer linear polarizer in the beam reflected form samples in applied magnetic fields. Like magnetic circular dichroism, Kerr rotation in the soft x-ray can be element - specific and much larger than in the visible spectral range when the photon energy is tuned near atomic core resonances. Thus sensitive element-specific hysteresis measurements are possible with this technique. Examples showing large Kerr rotation from an Fe film and element-specific hysteresis loops of the Fe and Cr in an Fe/Cr multilayer demonstrate these new capabilities. Some consequences of the strong anomalous dispersion near the FeL{sub 2,3} edges to the Kerr rotation are discussed.

  2. Resolving the Origin of the Diffuse Soft X-ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Randall K.; Foster, Adam R.; Edgar, Ricard J.; Brickhouse, Nancy S.; Sanders, Wilton T.

    2012-01-01

    In January 1993, the Diffuse X-ray Spectrometer (DXS) measured the first high-resolution spectrum of the diffuse soft X-ray background between 44-80A. A line-dominated spectrum characteristic of a 10(exp 6)K collisionally ionized plasma' was expected but while the observed spectrum was clearly line-dominated, no model would fit. Then in 2003 the Cosmic Hot Interstellar Plasma Spectrometer (CHIPS) launched and observed the diffuse extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectrum between 90- 265A. Although many emission lines were again expected; only Fe IX at 171.1A was detected. The discovery of X-rays from comets led to the realization that heavy ions (Z=6-28) in the solar wind will emit soft X-rays as the ions interact via charge exchange with neutral atoms in the heliosphere and geocorona. Using a new model for solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission, we show that the diffuse soft X-ray background can be understood as a combination of emission from charge exchange onto the slow and fast solar wind together with a more distant and diffuse hot (10(exp 6)K) plasma.

  3. Closing the gap to the diffraction limit: Near wavelength limited tabletop soft x-ray coherent diffractive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, Richard Lunt

    Light microscopy has greatly advanced our understanding of nature. The achievable resolution, however, is limited by optical wavelengths to around 200 nm. Using novel imaging and labeling technologies, resolutions beyond the diffraction limit can be achieved for specialized specimens using techniques such as near-field scanning optical microscopy, stimulated emission depletion microscopy and structured illumination microscopy [1--3]. This dissertation presents a versatile soft x-ray diffraction microscope with 50 nm resolution using tabletop coherent soft x-ray sources. This work represents the first high resolution demonstrations of coherent diffractive or lensless imaging using tabletop extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray sources [4, 5]. This dissertation also presents the first use of field curvature correction in x-ray coherent imaging which allows high numerical aperture imaging and near-diffraction-limited resolution of 1.5lambda. The relevant theory behind high harmonic generation, the primary tabletop source used in this work, will be discussed as well as the theory behind coherent diffractive imaging. Additionally, the first demonstration of tabletop soft x-ray Fourier Transform holography is shown with important applications to shorter wavelength imaging with high harmonic generation with limited flux. A tabletop soft x-ray diffraction microscope should find broad applications in biology, nanoscience, and materials science due to its simple optical design, high resolution, large depth of field, 3D imaging capability, scalability to shorter wavelengths, and ultrafast temporal resolution.

  4. Observations of the structure and evolution of solar flares with a soft X-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorpahl, J. A.; Gibson, E. G.; Landecker, P. B.; Mckenzie, D. L.; Underwood, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Soft X ray flare events were observed with the S-056 X-ray telescope that was part of the ATM complement of instruments aboard SKYLAB. Analyses of these data are reported. The observations are summarized and a detailed discussion of the X-ray flare structures is presented. The data indicated that soft X-ray emitted by a flare come primarily from an intense well-defined core surrounded by a region of fainter, more diffuse emission. An analysis of flare evolution indicates evidence for preliminary heating and energy release prior to the main phase of the flare. Core features are found to be remarkably stable and retain their shape throughout a flare. Most changes in the overall configuration seem to be result of the appearance, disappearance or change in brightness of individual features, rather than the restructuring or reorientation of these features. Brief comparisons with several theories are presented.

  5. An extended soft X-ray source in Delphinus - H2027+19

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, R. A.; Walker, A. B. C.; Charles, P. A.; Nugent, J. J.; Garmire, G. P.

    1980-01-01

    A new extended soft X-ray source has been observed with the HEAO 1 A-2 experiment. The source, H2027+19, emits primarily in the 0.16-0.4 keV band with a total flux in this band of 2 x 10 to the -11th erg/sq cm s. It is found that both simple continuum and coronal plasma models provide good fits to the observed pulse-height spectrum. The most likely physical models are either that the source is an old supernova remnant or that it is a region of enhanced soft X-ray emission surrounding an H I cloud imbedded in a coronal plasma, as suggested by Hayakawa et al. (1979) for the Lupus Loop.

  6. Soft x-ray camera for internal shape and current density measurements on a noncircular tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Fonck, R.J.; Jaehnig, K.P.; Powell, E.T.; Reusch, M.; Roney, P.; Simon, M.P.

    1988-05-01

    Soft x-ray measurements of the internal plasma flux surface shaped in principle allow a determination of the plasma current density distribution, and provide a necessary monitor of the degree of internal elongation of tokamak plasmas with a noncircular cross section. A two-dimensional, tangentially viewing, soft x-ray pinhole camera has been fabricated to provide internal shape measurements on the PBX-M tokamak. It consists of a scintillator at the focal plane of a foil-filtered pinhole camera, which is, in turn, fiber optically coupled to an intensified framing video camera (/DELTA/t />=/ 3 msec). Automated data acquisition is performed on a stand-alone image-processing system, and data archiving and retrieval takes place on an optical disk video recorder. The entire diagnostic is controlled via a PDP-11/73 microcomputer. The derivation of the polodial emission distribution from the measured image is done by fitting to model profiles. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Low electron temperature in ablating materials formed by picosecond soft x-ray laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishino, Masahiko; Hasegawa, Noboru; Nishikino, Masaharu; Pikuz, Tatiana; Skobelev, Igor; Faenov, Anatoly; Inogamov, Nail; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Yamagiwa, Mitsuru

    2015-09-01

    To study the ablation process induced by the soft x-ray laser pulse, we investigated the electron temperature of the ablating material. Focused soft x-ray laser pulses having a wavelength of 13.9 nm and duration of 7 ps were irradiated onto the LiF, Al, and Cu surfaces, and we observed the optical emission from the surfaces by use of an optical camera. On sample surfaces, we could confirm damage structures, but no emission signal in the visible spectral range during ablation could be observed. Then, we estimated the electron temperature in the ablating matter. To consider the radiation from a heated layer, we supposed a black-body radiator as an object. The calculation result was that the electron temperature was estimated to be lower than 1 eV and the process duration was shorter than 1000 ps. The theoretical model calculation suggests the spallative ablation for the interaction between the soft x-ray laser and materials. The driving force for the spallation is an increasing pressure appearing in the heated layer, and the change of the surface is considered to be due to a splash of a molten layer. The model calculation predicts that the soft x-ray laser with the fluence around the ablation threshold can create an electron temperature around 1 eV in a material. The experimental result is in good accordance with the theoretical prediction. Our investigation implies that the spallative ablation occurs in the low electron temperature region of a non-equilibrium state of warm dense matter.

  8. High-resolution multiwire proportional soft x-ray diagnostic measurements on TCV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushkov, A.; Andreev, V.; Camenen, Y.; Pochelon, A.; Klimanov, I.; Scarabosio, A.; Weisen, H.

    2008-02-01

    A multiwire proportional x-ray (MPX) detector is used on the TCV tokamak (Tokamak à configuration variable) as a high spatial and temporal resolution soft x-ray emissivity imaging diagnostic. The MPX system consists of 64 vertically viewing channels and has been designed to complement the existing TCV soft x-ray tomography system by enhancing the spatial resolution. The MPX detector is suitable for the measurement of fast and localized phenomena and can be used, for instance, for the observation of magnetohydrodynamic activity, for the characterization of transport barriers or for an improved determination of the electron cyclotron heating power deposition profile. The MPX detector operates in continuous-current mode and measures the plasma soft x-ray emission in the 3-30keV range with a radial resolution of about 5mm—1% of plasma diameter—and a frequency bandwidth of 50kHz. A detailed description of the MPX detector construction and the principle of its operation are given. The properties of the detector in photon-counting and continuous-current operation modes are studied. The implementation of the system on TCV and experimental results illustrating the potential of the diagnostic are also presented.

  9. Initial operation of the national spherical torus experiment fast tangential soft x-ray camera

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, B.C.; Feder, R.; Goeler, S. von; Renda, G.F.; Mastrocola, V.J.; Lowrance, J.L.

    2004-10-01

    Fast, two-dimensional, soft x-ray imaging is a powerful technique for the study of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in tokamak plasmas. We have constructed an ultra-fast frame rate soft x-ray camera for the national spherical torus experiment (NSTX). It is based on a recently developed 64x64 pixel charge-coupled device (CCD) camera capable of capturing 300 frames at up to 500 000 frames per second. A pinhole aperture images the plasma soft x-ray emission (0.2-10 keV) onto a P47 scintillator deposited on a fiber-optic faceplate; the scintillator visible light output is detected and amplified by a demagnifying image intensifier and lens-coupled to the CCD chip. A selection of beryllium foils provides discrimination of low-energy emission. The system is installed on NSTX with a wide-angle tangential view of the plasma. Initial plasma data and an assessment of the system performance are presented.

  10. Soft x-ray spectroscopy in atmospheric pressure helium

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, M.D.; van der Laan, G.; Flaherty, J.V.; Padmore, H.A. )

    1992-01-01

    We report on an environmental chamber, which is attached to a UHV beamline, in which soft x-ray measurements can be done at atmospheric pressure in helium. X-ray measurements in air can only be performed at energies above about 3 keV because of the strong absorption of soft x rays by oxygen and nitrogen. However, a low-{ital Z} scatterer such as helium has a long absorption length for soft x rays even at atmospheric pressure. Thus, this new chamber allows soft x-ray experiments to be performed on samples with physical properties that are incompatible with UHV conditions, e.g., liquid and frozen aqueous solutions, corrosive materials, etc. A helium-tight tank has been installed behind the vacuum experimental chamber of the double crystal beamline 3.4 at the Daresbury SRS. The tank is purged with helium at atmospheric pressure and the gas in the tank is isolated from the high vacuum of the rest of the beamline by a thin mylar window which is supported on a capillary array. The tank contains a sample stage, two ionization chambers and a parallel-plate gas proportional counter for fluorescence detection of dilute samples, which has produced good results on the {ital K} edges of Cl, S, and P.