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Sample records for resonant x-ray magnetic

  1. Element Selective X-ray Detected Magnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Goulon, J.; Rogalev, A.; Wilhelm, F.; Jaouen, N.; Goulon-Ginet, C.; Goujon, G.; Youssef, J. Ben; Indenbom, M. V.

    2007-01-19

    Element selective X-ray Detected Magnetic Resonance (XDMR) was measured on exciting the Fe K-edge in a high quality YIG thin film. Resonant pumping at high microwave power was achieved in the nonlinear foldover regime and X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) was used to probe the time-invariant change of the magnetization {delta}Mz due to the precession of orbital magnetization densities of states (DOS) at the Fe sites. This challenging experiment required us to design a specific instrumentation which is briefly described.

  2. Resonant magnetic scattering of polarized soft x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Sacchi, M.; Hague, C.F.; Gullikson, E.M.; Underwood, J.

    1997-04-01

    Magnetic effects on X-ray scattering (Bragg diffraction, specular reflectivity or diffuse scattering) are a well known phenomenon, and they also represent a powerful tool for investigating magnetic materials since it was shown that they are strongly enhanced when the photon energy is tuned across an absorption edge (resonant process). The resonant enhancement of the magnetic scattering has mainly been investigated at high photon energies, in order to match the Bragg law for the typical lattice spacings of crystals. In the soft X-ray range, even larger effects are expected, working for instance at the 2p edges of transition metals of the first row or at the 3d edges of rare earths (300-1500 eV), but the corresponding long wavelengths prevent the use of single crystals. Two approaches have been recently adopted in this energy range: (i) the study of the Bragg diffraction from artificial structures of appropriate 2d spacing; (ii) the analysis of the specular reflectivity, which contains analogous information but has no constraints related to the lattice spacing. Both approaches have their own specific advantages: for instance, working under Bragg conditions provides information about the (magnetic) periodicity in ordered structures, while resonant reflectivity can easily be related to electronic properties and absorption spectra. An important aspect common to all the resonant X-ray scattering techniques is the element selectivity inherent to the fact of working at a specific absorption edge: under these conditions, X-ray scattering becomes in fact a spectroscopy. Results are presented for films of iron and cobalt.

  3. X-ray resonant reflection from magnetic multilayers: Recursion matrix algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, S. A.; Sinha, S. K.

    2000-06-01

    Recursion equations for 2x2 scattering matrices have been derived to calculate resonant x-ray reflection from magnetic multilayers. The solution has been basically reduced to that found in Stepanov et al, Phys. Rev. B 57, 4829 (1998) for grazing incidence x-ray diffraction from crystalline multilayers. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  4. Magnetic x-ray linear dichroism in resonant and non-resonant Gd 4f photoemission

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S.; Gammon, W.J.; Pappas, D.P.

    1997-04-01

    The enhancement of the magnetic linear dichroism in resonant 4f photoemission (MLDRPE) is studied from a 50 monolayer film of Gd/Y(0001). The ALS at beamline 7.0.1 provided the source of linearly polarized x-rays used in this study. The polarized light was incident at an angle of 30 degrees relative to the film plane, and the sample magnetization was perpendicular to the photon polarization. The linear dichroism of the 4f core levels is measured as the photon energy is tuned through the 4d-4f resonance. The authors find that the MLDRPE asymmetry is strongest at the resonance. Near the threshold the asymmetry has several features which are out of phase with the fine structure of the total yield.

  5. Magnetic symmetries in neutron and resonant x-ray Bragg diffraction patterns of four iridium oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovesey, S. W.; Khalyavin, D. D.; Manuel, P.; Chapon, L. C.; Cao, G.; Qi, T. F.

    2012-12-01

    The magnetic properties of Sr2IrO4, Na2IrO3, Sr3Ir2O7 and CaIrO3 are discussed, principally in the light of experimental data in recent literature for Bragg intensities measured in x-ray diffraction with enhancement at iridium L-absorption edges. The electronic structure factors we report, which incorporate parity-even and acentric entities, serve the immediate purpose of making full use of crystal and magnetic symmetry to refine our knowledge of the magnetic properties of the four iridates from resonant x-ray diffraction data. They also offer a platform on which to interpret future investigations, using dichroic signals, resonant x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction, for example, as well as ab initio calculations of electronic structure. Unit-cell structure factors, suitable for x-ray Bragg diffraction enhanced by an electric dipole-electric dipole (E1-E1) event, reveal exactly which iridium multipoles are visible, e.g., a magnetic dipole parallel to the crystal c-axis (z-axis) and an electric quadrupole with yz-like symmetry in the specific case of CaIrO3. Magnetic space-groups are assigned to Sr2IrO4, Sr3Ir2O7 and CaIrO3, namely, PIcca, PAban and Cm‧cm‧, respectively, in the Belov-Neronova-Smirnova notation. The assignment for Sr2IrO4 is possible because of our new high-resolution neutron diffraction data, gathered on a powder sample. In addition, the new data are used to show that the ordered magnetic moment of an Ir4+ ion in Sr2IrO4 does not exceed 0.29(4) μB. Na2IrO3 has two candidate magnetic space-groups that are not resolved with currently available resonant x-ray data.

  6. Extended reciprocal space observation of artificial spin ice with x-ray resonant magnetic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perron, J.; Anghinolfi, L.; Tudu, B.; Jaouen, N.; Tonnerre, J.-M.; Sacchi, M.; Nolting, F.; Lüning, J.; Heyderman, L. J.

    2013-12-01

    Soft x-ray resonant magnetic scattering is an element-sensitive technique that enables the characterization of the magnetic properties of a wide variety of systems. Here we apply this technique to study lithographically produced artificial spin ice, a particular class of magnetically frustrated systems comprising arrays of nanomagnets. Using a CCD detector we can access a large fraction of the reciprocal space at once, allowing us to easily distinguish the signatures of the magnetic ground-state ordering. Comparing the dichroic signal at the position of the Bragg peaks with model calculations based on the kinematical theory of x-ray diffraction, we are able to determine the number of reversed moments as a function of applied magnetic field for each of the two sublattices. This study demonstrates the benefit of having direct access to a significant fraction of the reciprocal space, and opens the way towards more sophisticated x-ray based experiments on artificial spin ice such as scattering of coherent x-ray beams to explore the dynamics of thermally activated systems.

  7. Single-pulse resonant magnetic scattering using a soft x-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Gutt, C.; Streit-Nierobisch, S.; Stadler, L.-M.; Faeustlin, R. R.; Treusch, R.; Feldhaus, J.; Weckert, E.; Vartanyants, I. A.; Gruebel, G.; Pfau, B.; Guenther, C. M.; Koennecke, R.; Eisebitt, S.; Froemter, R.; Kobs, A.; Stickler, D.; Oepen, H. P.; Grunze, M.; Rosenhahn, A.; Wilhein, T.

    2010-03-01

    We report on single-pulse resonant magnetic scattering experiments using soft x-ray pulses generated by the free-electron laser FLASH at DESY. We could record a magnetic diffraction pattern from a Co/Pt multilayer sample at the Co M{sub 2,3} edge with a single 30-fs-long FEL pulse. The analysis of the magnetic small-angle scattering signal for subsequent pulses indicates a threshold energy density below which there is no indication that the magnetic properties of the sample might be altered.

  8. X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging fusion for cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jinwoo; Radau, Perry; Xu, Robert; Wright, Graham A

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) can effectively treat left ventricle (LV) driven Heart Failure (HF). However, 30% of the CRT recipients do not experience symptomatic benefit. Recent studies show that the CRT response rate can reach 95% when the LV pacing lead is placed at an optimal site at a region of maximal LV dyssynchrony and away from myocardial scars. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (CMR) can identify the optimal site in three dimensions (3D). 3D CMR data can be registered to clinical standard x-ray fluoroscopy to achieve an optimal pacing of the LV. We have developed a 3D CMR to 2D x-ray image registration method for CRT procedures. We have employed the LV pacing lead on x-ray images and coronary sinus on MR data as landmarks. The registration method makes use of a guidewire simulation algorithm, edge based image registration technique and x-ray C-arm tracking to register the coronary sinus and pacing lead landmarks. PMID:27025953

  9. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in ultrathin Co|Ni multilayer films studied with ferromagnetic resonance and magnetic x-ray microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macià, F.; Warnicke, P.; Bedau, D.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.; Arena, D. A.; Kent, A. D.

    2012-11-01

    Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectroscopy, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectroscopy and magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy (MTXM) experiments have been performed to gain insight into the magnetic anisotropy and domain structure of ultrathin Co|Ni multilayer films with a thin permalloy layer underneath. MTXM images with a spatial resolution better than 25 nm were obtained at the Co L3 edge down to an equivalent thickness of Co of only 1 nm, which establishes a new lower boundary on the sensitivity limit of MTXM. Domain sizes are shown to be strong functions of the anisotropy and thickness of the film.

  10. Technology Preview: X-Ray Fused With Magnetic Resonance During Invasive Cardiovascular Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Luis F.; de Silva, Ranil; Ozturk, Cengizhan; Sonmez, Merdim; Stine, Annette M.; Raval, Amish N.; Raman, Venkatesh K.; Sachdev, Vandana; Aviles, Ronnier J.; Waclawiw, Myron A.; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Background We have developed and validated a system for real-time X-ray fused with magnetic resonance imaging, MRI (XFM), to guide catheter procedures with high spatial precision. Our implementation overlays roadmaps—MRI-derived soft-tissue features of interest—onto conventional X-ray fluoroscopy. We report our initial clinical experience applying XFM, using external fiducial markers, electrocardiogram (ECG)-gating, and automated real-time correction for gantry and table movement. Methods This prospective case series for technical development was approved by the NHLBI Institutional Review Board and included 19 subjects. Multimodality external fiducial markers were affixed to patients’ skin before MRI, which included contrast-enhanced, 3D T1-weighted, or breath-held and ECG-gated 2D steady state free precession imaging at 1.5T. MRI-derived roadmaps were manually segmented while patients were transferred to a calibrated X-ray fluoroscopy system. Image spaces were registered using the fiducial markers and thereafter permitted unrestricted gantry rotation, table panning, and magnification changes. Static and ECG-gated MRI data were transformed from 3D to 2D to correspond with gantry and table position and combined with live X-ray images. Results Clinical procedures included graft coronary arteriography, right ventricular free-wall biopsy, and iliac and femoral artery recanalization and stenting. MRI roadmaps improved operator confidence, and in the biopsy cases, outperformed the best available alternative imaging modality. Registration errors were increased when external fiducial markers were affixed to more mobile skin positions, such as over the abdomen. Conclusion XFM using external fiducial markers is feasible during X-ray guided catheter treatments. Multimodality image fusion may prove a useful adjunct to invasive cardiovascular procedures. PMID:18022851

  11. Plain X-ray, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of telangiectatic osteosarcoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Koutoulidis, Vasilios; Koureas, Andreas; Moulopoulos, Lia; Gouliamos, Athanasios

    2009-01-01

    An 18-year-old male patient presented with chronic nonspecific pain of three months located at his left proximal tibia. The patient was admitted to our department for plain X-ray, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging examination. Plain X-ray and computed tomography revealed a geographic lytic lesion at the medial aspect of the proximal tibia. Biopsy of the lesion showed telangiectatic osteosarcoma. Image findings of all modalities are presented. PMID:19918488

  12. A complete software application for automatic registration of x-ray mammography and magnetic resonance images

    SciTech Connect

    Solves-Llorens, J. A.; Rupérez, M. J. Monserrat, C.; Lloret, M.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: This work presents a complete and automatic software application to aid radiologists in breast cancer diagnosis. The application is a fully automated method that performs a complete registration of magnetic resonance (MR) images and x-ray (XR) images in both directions (from MR to XR and from XR to MR) and for both x-ray mammograms, craniocaudal (CC), and mediolateral oblique (MLO). This new approximation allows radiologists to mark points in the MR images and, without any manual intervention, it provides their corresponding points in both types of XR mammograms and vice versa. Methods: The application automatically segments magnetic resonance images and x-ray images using the C-Means method and the Otsu method, respectively. It compresses the magnetic resonance images in both directions, CC and MLO, using a biomechanical model of the breast that distinguishes the specific biomechanical behavior of each one of its three tissues (skin, fat, and glandular tissue) separately. It makes a projection of both compressions and registers them with the original XR images using affine transformations and nonrigid registration methods. Results: The application has been validated by two expert radiologists. This was carried out through a quantitative validation on 14 data sets in which the Euclidean distance between points marked by the radiologists and the corresponding points obtained by the application were measured. The results showed a mean error of 4.2 ± 1.9 mm for the MRI to CC registration, 4.8 ± 1.3 mm for the MRI to MLO registration, and 4.1 ± 1.3 mm for the CC and MLO to MRI registration. Conclusions: A complete software application that automatically registers XR and MR images of the breast has been implemented. The application permits radiologists to estimate the position of a lesion that is suspected of being a tumor in an imaging modality based on its position in another different modality with a clinically acceptable error. The results show that the

  13. X-Ray Detected Magnetic Resonance: A Unique Probe of the Precession Dynamics of Orbital Magnetization Components

    PubMed Central

    Goulon, Jośe; Rogalev, Andrei; Goujon, Gérard; Wilhelm, Fabrice; Ben Youssef, Jamal; Gros, Claude; Barbe, Jean-Michel; Guilard, Roger

    2011-01-01

    X-ray Detected Magnetic Resonance (XDMR) is a novel spectroscopy in which X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) is used to probe the resonant precession of local magnetization components in a strong microwave pump field. We review the conceptual bases of XDMR and recast them in the general framework of the linear and nonlinear theories of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). Emphasis is laid on the information content of XDMR spectra which offer a unique opportunity to disentangle the precession dynamics of spin and orbital magnetization components at given absorbing sites. For the sake of illustration, we focus on selected examples in which marked differences were found between FMR and XDMR spectra simultaneously recorded on ferrimagnetically ordered iron garnets. With pumping capabilities extended up to sub-THz frequencies, high-field XDMR should allow us to probe the precession of orbital magnetization components in paramagnetic organometallic complexes with large zero-field splitting. Even more challenging, we suggest that XDMR spectra might be recorded on selected antiferromagnetic crystals for which orbital magnetism is most often ignored in the absence of any supporting experimental evidence. PMID:22272105

  14. Investigations of the (R)nickel germanide intermetallic compounds by X-ray resonant magnetic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Woo

    2005-11-01

    The x-ray magnetic scattering (XRMS) intensities of the Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, and Tm L2,3 edges were investigated using two isostructural samples [Gd1/4Tb1/4Dy1/4Ho 1/4]Ni2Ge2 and [Gd1/3Er1/3Tm 1/3]Ni2Ge2 in order to elucidate systematics in the underlying resonance process. Taken together with theoretical linearized augmented planewave (LAPW) calculations employing LDA + U, we found that the XRMS intensity at the heavy rare-earth L edges is strongly related to the 4f-5d exchange interaction and that the branching ratio arises from the effects of spin orbit coupling in the 5d band. For Gd, the 4f-5 d exchange interaction is large and dominant over not only the spin orbit coupling but also other interactions. Therefore, the XRMS intensity of Gd L3 and L2 edges most closely reflects the state of 4f moments. In the pure GdNi2Ge2 compound, large antiferromagnetic (AFM) domains were found, comparable to the x-ray beam size. Single domain scattering was measured carefully with a very small beam size for various azimuth angles and temperatures. From this measurement, a second transition at 16 K in bulk measurements was identified as a transformation from a collinear squared-up structure at high temperature, to a tilted helical structure below 16 K. Since the XRMS scattering cross-section is strongly dependent on the magnetic moment direction, the AFM domain structure was imaged by the XRMS intensity. From single domain scattering data, the ratio of the spin moments in the collinear and the spiral structure of GdNi2Ge2 at the second magnetic transition temperature were derived and used to estimate the magnetic anisotropy energy of Gd. Surprisingly, the estimated magnetic anisotropy energy of Gd in this compound is much higher than that of pure Gd metal (about a order of magnitude). This is expected to be the effect of the anisotropy in 5d conduction band. More theoretical study is necessary to understand this observation.

  15. X-ray Resonant Scattering Study of the Magnetic Phase Diagram of Multiferroic TbMnO3

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, S.B.; Walker, H.C.; Ewings, R.A.; Fabrizi, F.; Mannix, D.; Mazzoli, C.; Paolasini, L.; Prabhakaran, D.; Boothroyd, A.T.; McMorrowa, D.F.

    2009-10-15

    We present the magnetic phase diagram of multiferroic TbMnO{sub 3} for H {parallel} b determined using X-ray resonant scattering at the Tb L{sub 3}-edge. Investigations of two different magnetic domains, C-type and F-type, demonstrate very similar behavior in high applied magnetic fields, with a low temperature incommensurate to commensurate transition at H {approx_equal} 4.5 T, concurrent with the polarization flop observed in bulk magnetoelectric measurements.

  16. Phonon effects on x-ray absorption and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemausat, Ruidy; Cabaret, Delphine; Gervais, Christel; Brouder, Christian; Trcera, Nicolas; Bordage, Amélie; Errea, Ion; Mauri, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    In material sciences, spectroscopic approaches combining ab initio calculations with experiments are commonly used to accurately analyze the experimental spectral data. Most state-of-the-art first-principles calculations are usually performed assuming an equilibrium static lattice. Yet, nuclear motion affects spectra even when reduced to the zero-point motion at 0 K. We propose a framework based on density-functional theory that includes quantum thermal fluctuations in theoretical x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies and allows to well describe temperature effects observed experimentally. Within the Born-Oppenheimer and quasiharmonic approximations, we incorporate the nuclear motion by generating several nonequilibrium configurations from the dynamical matrix. The averaged calculated XANES and NMR spectral data have been compared to experiments in MgO. The good agreement obtained between experiments and calculations validates the developed approach, which suggests that calculating the XANES spectra at finite temperature by averaging individual nonequilibrium configurations is a suitable approximation. This study highlights the relevance of phonon renormalization and the relative contributions of thermal expansion and nuclear dynamics on NMR and XANES spectra on a wide range of temperatures.

  17. Quantitative imaging of cell-permeable magnetic resonance contrast agents using x-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Endres, Paul J; Macrenaris, Keith W; Vogt, Stefan; Allen, Matthew J; Meade, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    The inability to transduce cellular membranes is a limitation of current magnetic resonance imaging probes used in biologic and clinical settings. This constraint confines contrast agents to extracellular and vascular regions of the body, drastically reducing their viability for investigating processes and cycles in developmental biology. Conversely, a contrast agent with the ability to permeate cell membranes could be used in visualizing cell patterning, cell fate mapping, gene therapy, and, eventually, noninvasive cancer diagnosis. Therefore, we describe the synthesis and quantitative imaging of four contrast agents with the capability to cross cell membranes in sufficient quantity for detection. Each agent is based on the conjugation of a Gd(III) chelator with a cellular transduction moiety. Specifically, we coupled Gd(III)-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid DTPA and Gd(III)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid with an 8-amino acid polyarginine oligomer and an amphipathic stilbene molecule, 4-amino-4'-(N,N-dimethylamino)stilbene. The imaging modality that provided the best sensitivity and spatial resolution for direct detection of the contrast agents is synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF). Unlike optical microscopy, SR-XRF provides two-dimensional images with resolution 10(3) better than (153)Gd gamma counting, without altering the agent by organic fluorophore conjugation. The transduction efficiency of the intracellular agents was evaluated by T(1) analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to determine the efficacy of each chelate-transporter combination. PMID:17150161

  18. Static magnetic proximity effect in Pt /Ni1 -xFex bilayers investigated by x-ray resonant magnetic reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klewe, C.; Kuschel, T.; Schmalhorst, J.-M.; Bertram, F.; Kuschel, O.; Wollschläger, J.; Strempfer, J.; Meinert, M.; Reiss, G.

    2016-06-01

    We present x-ray resonant magnetic reflectivity (XRMR) as a very sensitive tool to detect proximity induced interface spin polarization in Pt/FM heterostructures. Different XRMR experiments are carried out and the results are evaluated for their dependence on the magneto-optical depth profile, the photon energy, the optical parameters, and the ferromagnetic material. We demonstrate that a detailed analysis of the reflected x-ray intensity gives insight into the spatial distribution of the spin polarization of a nonmagnetic metal across the interface to a ferromagnetic layer. The evaluation of the experimental results with simulations based on optical data from ab initio calculations provides the induced magnetic moment per Pt atom in the spin-polarized volume adjacent to the ferromagnet. For a series with different ferromagnetic materials consisting of Pt/Fe, Pt/Ni33Fe67 , Pt/Ni81Fe19 (permalloy), and Pt/Ni bilayers we find the largest spin polarization in Pt/Fe and a much smaller magnetic proximity effect in Pt/Ni. Additional XRMR experiments with varying photon energy are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions for the energy dependence of the magneto-optical parameters and allow identifying the optical dispersion δ and absorption β across the Pt L3-absorption edge.

  19. A theoretical framework for absorption (dichroism) and the resonance-enhanced scattering of x-rays by magnetic materials: I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovesey, Stephen W.; Balcar, Ewald

    1996-12-01

    The scattering length common to the attenuation coefficient and cross-sections for the resonance-enhanced scattering of x-rays suffers from a dependence on a spectrum of virtual, intermediate states which contain next to no useful information about the environment of the atoms. It is the dependence of the scattering length on intermediate states that sets the x-ray techniques apart from neutron scattering and other techniques which directly probe properties of magnetic materials, and limits the usefulness of physical intuition in the interpretation of empirical x-ray data. As a step toward a legible interpretation, in a language of standard atomic variables, an investigation is reported of a modified scattering length constructed to possess a structure similar to the scattering length for magnetic neutron scattering, namely, it has the mathematical structure of a spherical tensor operator, to which all Racah's methods for electrons in an open valence shell can be applied. In the process of reaching this goal, the influence of the intermediate states on the scattering length is reduced by summing over a limited set of quantum numbers for the intermediate states. Topics covered in the investigation include the attenuation coefficient for x-rays passing through a foil of magnetic material, dichroism, and the cross-sections for resonance-enhanced elastic (Bragg) and inelastic scattering of x-rays by magnetic materials. The treatment of polarization in the primary beam admits states of partial polarization, described by a Stokes vector. Both jj-coupling and Russell - Saunders coupling schemes for the valence states are explored.

  20. [Characterization of biochar by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance].

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong-yu; Jin, Jie; Yan, Yu; Han, Lan-fang; Kang, Ming-jie; Wang, Zi-ying; Zhao, Ye; Sun, Ke

    2014-12-01

    The wood (willow branch) and grass (rice straw) materials were pyrolyzed at different temperatures (300, 450 and 600 °C) to obtain the biochars used in the present study. The biochars were characterized using elementary analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and solid state 13C cross-polarization and magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C NMR) to illuminate the structure and composition of the biochars which were derived from the different thermal temperatures and biomass. The results showed that the H/C, O/C and (O+N)/C ratios of the biochars decreased with the increase in the pyrolysis temperatures. The surface polarity and ash content of the grass-derived biochars were higher than those of the wood-derived biochars. The minerals of the wood-derived biochars were mainly covered by the organic matter; in contrast, parts of the mineral surfaces of the grass-derived biochars were not covered by organic matter? The 13C NMR of the low temperature-derived biochars revealed a large contribution of aromatic carbon, aliphatic carbon, carboxyl and carbonyl carbon, while the high temperature-derived biochars contained a large amount of aromatic carbon. Moreover, the wood-derived biochars produced at low heat treatment temperatures contained more lignin residues than grass-derived ones, probably due to the existence of high lignin content in the feedstock soures of wood-derived biochars. The results of the study would be useful for environmental application of biochars. PMID:25881450

  1. X-Ray Magnetic Resonance Fusion to Internal Markers and Utility in Congenital Heart Disease Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Dori, Yoav; Sarmiento, Marily; Glatz, Andrew C.; Gillespie, Matthew J.; Jones, Virginia M.; Harris, Matthew A.; Whitehead, Kevin K.; Fogel, Mark A.; Rome, Jonathan J.

    2012-01-01

    Background X-ray magnetic resonance fusion (XMRF) allows for use of 3D data during cardiac catheterization. However, to date, technical requirements have limited the use of this modality in clinical practice. We report on a new internal-marker XMRF method that we have developed and describe how we used XMRF during cardiac catheterization in congenital heart disease. Methods and Results XMRF was performed in a phantom and in 23 patients presenting for cardiac catheterization who also needed cardiac MRI for clinical reasons. The registration process was performed in <5 minutes per patient, with minimal radiation (0.004 to 0.024 mSv) and without contrast. Registration error was calculated in a phantom and in 8 patients using the maximum distance between angiographic and 3D model boundaries. In the phantom, the measured error in the anteroposterior projection had a mean of 1.15 mm (standard deviation, 0.73). The measured error in patients had a median of 2.15 mm (interquartile range, 1.65 to 2.56 mm). Internal markers included bones, airway, image artifact, calcifications, and the heart and vessel borders. The MRI data were used for road mapping in 17 of 23 (74%) cases and camera angle selection in 11 of 23 (48%) cases. Conclusions Internal marker–based registration can be performed quickly, with minimal radiation, without the need for contrast, and with clinically acceptable accuracy using commercially available software. We have also demonstrated several potential uses for XMRF in routine clinical practice. This modality has the potential to reduce radiation exposure and improve catheterization outcomes. PMID:21536785

  2. Electronic and magnetic properties of manganite thin films with different compositions and its correlation with transport properties: An X-ray resonant magnetic scattering study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Singh, Surendra; Freeland, J. W.; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Jeen, H.; Biswas, A.

    2014-12-08

    Here, we present x-ray resonant magnetic dichroism and x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements of the temperature dependence of magnetism in Pr-doped La-Ca-Mn-O films grown on (110) NdGaO3 substrates. We observed thermal hysteresis of the ferromagnetism in one film that also showed large thermal hysteresis of ~18K in transport measurements. While in a second film of a different nominal chemistry, which showed very small thermal hysteresis ~3K in transport measurements, no thermal hysteresis of the ferromagnetism was observed. As a result, these macroscopic properties are correlated with evolution of surface magnetization across metal insulator transition for these films as observed bymore » soft x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements.« less

  3. Electronic and magnetic properties of manganite thin films with different compositions and its correlation with transport properties: An X-ray resonant magnetic scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Surendra; Freeland, J. W.; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Jeen, H.; Biswas, A.

    2014-12-08

    Here, we present x-ray resonant magnetic dichroism and x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements of the temperature dependence of magnetism in Pr-doped La-Ca-Mn-O films grown on (110) NdGaO3 substrates. We observed thermal hysteresis of the ferromagnetism in one film that also showed large thermal hysteresis of ~18K in transport measurements. While in a second film of a different nominal chemistry, which showed very small thermal hysteresis ~3K in transport measurements, no thermal hysteresis of the ferromagnetism was observed. As a result, these macroscopic properties are correlated with evolution of surface magnetization across metal insulator transition for these films as observed by soft x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements.

  4. Electronic and magnetic properties of manganite thin films with different compositions and its correlation with transport properties: An X-ray resonant magnetic scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Surendra; Freeland, J. W.; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Jeen, H.; Biswas, A.

    2014-12-14

    Here, we present x-ray resonant magnetic dichroism and x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements of the temperature dependence of magnetism in Pr-doped La-Ca-Mn-O films grown on (110) NdGaO{sub 3} substrates. We observed thermal hysteresis of the ferromagnetism in one film that also showed large thermal hysteresis of ∼18 K in transport measurements. While in a second film of a different nominal chemistry, which showed very small thermal hysteresis ∼3 K in transport measurements, no thermal hysteresis of the ferromagnetism was observed. These macroscopic properties are correlated with evolution of surface magnetization across metal insulator transition for these films as observed by soft x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements.

  5. Resonant inelastic scattering in dilute magnetic semiconductors by x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, K. |; Jia, J.J.; Underwood, J.H.

    1997-04-01

    As modern, technologically important materials have become more complex, element specific techniques have become invaluable in studying the electronic structure of individual components from the system. Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) and absorption (SXA) spectroscopies provide a unique means of measuring element and angular momentum density of electron states, respectively, for the valence and conducting bands in complex materials. X-ray absorption and the decay through x-ray emission are generally assumed to be two independent one-photon processes. Recent studies, however have demonstrated that SXF excited near the absorption threshold generate an array of spectral features that depend on nature of materials, particularly on the localization of excited states in s and d-band solids and that these two processes can no be longer treated as independent. Resonant SXF offers thus the new way to study the dynamics of the distribution of electronic valence states in the presence of a hole which is bound to the electron low lying in the conduction band. This process can simulate the interaction between hole-electron pair in wide gap semiconductors. Therefore such studies can help in understanding of transport and optics phenomena in the wide gap semiconductors. The authors report the result of Mn and S L-resonant emission in Zn{sub 1{minus}x}Mn{sub x}S (with x=0.2 and 0.3) and MnS as the energy of exciting radiation is tuned across the Mn and S L{sub 3,2} absorption edge, along with the resonant excited spectra from elemental Mn as a reference.

  6. Years of Magnetic X-Ray Dichroism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Laan, Gerrit

    A historical overview of magnetic x-ray dichroism is presented. I describe the first theoretical and experimental results that have led to the development of this powerful technique for element-specific magnetometry. The theoretical progress of the sum rules is also described, starting with the spinorbit sum rule for the isotropic spectrum which led on to the spin and orbital moment sum rules for x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. The latter has been particularly useful to understand the magnetic anisotropy in thin films and multilayers. Further developments of circular dichroism in (resonant) photoemission and Auger, as well as x-ray detected optical activity, also are summarized. Currently, magnetic x-ray dichroism finds a wide application in x-ray spectroscopy and imaging for the study of magnetic materials and it is considered to be one of the most important discoveries in the field of magnetism in the last few decennia. It is hard to imagine modern research into magnetism without the aid of polarized x-rays.

  7. Application of polarized neutron reflectometry and x-ray resonant magnetic reflectometry for determining the inhomogeneous magnetic structure in Fe/Gd multilayers.

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, E. A.; Haskel, D.; te Velthuis, S. G. E.; Jiang, J. S.; Kirby, B. J.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of the magnetic structure of multilayer [Fe (35 {angstrom})/Gd (50 {angstrom}){sub 5}] with variation in temperature and an applied magnetic field was determined using a complementary approach combining polarized neutron and X-ray resonant magnetic reflectometry. Self-consistent simultaneous analysis of X-ray and neutron spectra allowed us to determine the elemental and depth profiles in the multilayer structure with unprecedented accuracy, including the identification of an inhomogeneous intralayer magnetic structure with near-atomic resolution.

  8. Nanocrystalline tin oxide: Possible origin of its weak ferromagnetism deduced from nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng; Lian, Yadong; Gu, Min; Yu, Ji; Tang, Tong B.; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Weiyi

    2016-09-01

    Nanocrystalline tin oxide was fabricated, with molar ratio O/Sn determined as 1.40, 1.55, 1.79, 1.92 and 1.96 from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. They displayed weak ferromagnetism, the sample with O/Sn = 1.55 showing the maximum saturation magnetization reaching almost 8 ×10-3 emu /g at room temperature. 119Sn nuclear magnetic resonance allowed the deduction, based on four resolved resonance peaks, that their Sn ions had four possible coordination numbers, namely 3, 4, 5 and 6. The relative fraction of 4-coordinated cations was the one found to bear positive linear correlation with saturation magnetization of the sample. It is surmised that magnetism in tin oxide results mainly from 4-coordination Sn ions, of valance about +3, as estimated from the binding energies of their 3d photoelectron emission levels.

  9. Molecular structure of di-aryl-aldimines by multinuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalvo-González, Rubén; Ariza-Castolo, Armando

    2003-08-01

    The complete 1H, 13C and 15N NMR analyses for a series of 25 diaryl-aldimines containing phenyl, pyridyl, pyrazolone and furanyl moieties are described herein. Detailed evaluation of substituent chemical shift and coupling constant effects showed that interaction between the lone pair of the pyrazolone carbonyl group or the nitrogen of 2-substitued pyridines with the aldimine hydrogen increases the 1J CH value and shifts the resonance signal for this hydrogen to high frequency, in the 1H NMR spectra. The X-ray crystal structure analysis of pyrazolone substituted aldimines evidenced the planarity of the aryl groups which are conjugated with the CN double bond. In the case of the N-(2-pyridinemethylene)-1,5-dimethyl-2-phenyl-1,2-dihydro-pyrazol-3-one, two rotamers were observed in the same unit cell.

  10. X-rays and magnetism.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Peter; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    Magnetism is among the most active and attractive areas in modern solid state physics because of intriguing phenomena interesting to fundamental research and a manifold of technological applications. State-of-the-art synthesis of advanced magnetic materials, e.g. in hybrid structures paves the way to new functionalities. To characterize modern magnetic materials and the associated magnetic phenomena, polarized x-rays have emerged as unique probes due to their specific interaction with magnetic materials. A large variety of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed to quantify in an element, valence and site-sensitive way properties of ferro-, ferri-, and antiferromagnetic systems, such as spin and orbital moments, and to image nanoscale spin textures and their dynamics with sub-ns time and almost 10 nm spatial resolution. The enormous intensity of x-rays and their degree of coherence at next generation x-ray facilities will open the fsec time window to magnetic studies addressing fundamental time scales in magnetism with nanometer spatial resolution. This review will give an introduction into contemporary topics of nanoscale magnetic materials and provide an overview of analytical spectroscopy and microscopy tools based on x-ray dichroism effects. Selected examples of current research will demonstrate the potential and future directions of these techniques. PMID:26288956

  11. A Comparison of Rapid-Scanning X-Ray Fluorescence Mapping And Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Localize Brain Iron Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    McCrea, R.P.E.; Harder, S.L.; Martin, M.; Buist, R.; Nichol, H.

    2009-05-26

    The clinical diagnosis of many neurodegenerative disorders relies primarily or exclusively on observed behaviors rather than measurable physical tests. One of the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD) is the presence of amyloid-containing plaques associated with deposits of iron, copper and/or zinc. Work in other laboratories has shown that iron-rich plaques can be seen in the mouse brain in vivo with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a high-field strength magnet but this iron cannot be visualized in humans using clinical magnets. To improve the interpretation of MRI, we correlated iron accumulation visualized by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, an element-specific technique with T1, T2, and susceptibility weighted MR (SWI) in a mouse model of AD. We show that SWI best shows areas of increased iron accumulation when compared to standard sequences.

  12. Resonant X-ray magnetic scattering studies of the TmNi 2B 2C spin density wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannix, Danny; Thompson, Paul; Brown, Simon; Bouchenoire, Laurence; Canfield, Paul

    2004-11-01

    We report on polarisation resolved, resonant X-ray magnetic scattering (RXMS) studies of the spin density wave (SDW) formed in the TmNi 2B 2C superconductor. From this high wave-vector resolution investigation, we find the incommensurate magnetic SDW propagation vector to be ( 0±τ0±τ0) with τ=0.096 rlu, slightly larger than the value previously deduced from magnetic neutron studies ( τ=0.093 rlu). The widths of the SDW peaks at 1 K are consistent with long-range magnetic order and we have deduced a magnetic correlation length of ∼1200 Å. When the incident photons are tuned to the Tm L 3 absorption edge, the RXMS energy response consists of a double peak feature, arising from both dipole (E1) transitions, probing the 5d conduction band polarisation, and quadrupole (E2) transitions, probing the Tm 4f magnetic moments. The RXMS wave-vector dependences of the (0± τ 0± τ L) SDW satellites are consistent with the transverse spin-density wave structure, with moments orientated along the crystallographic c-axis, originally proposed from neutron-scattering measurements. Our RXMS data are also in good agreement with the magnetic neutron-scattering response for the thermal evolution of the magnetic moments down to 1 K and in deducing a Nèel temperature of T=1.5 K. However, the RXMS probe reveals a small shift of the magnetic propagation vector of the order 3×10 -3 rlu along the (1 1 0) direction, on decreasing temperature below TN. Using very high-resolution X-ray studies with a conventional Si(1 1 1) analyser, no change in width or position is found below TN or Tc. We have also not observed any charge modulation peaks at 2τ, indicating that the SDW does not couple to the lattice.

  13. Interaction between x-ray and magnetic vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Veenendaal, Michel

    2015-12-01

    The interaction between two topological objects, an x-ray beam carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) and a magnetic vortex, is studied theoretically. The resonant x-ray scattering intensity is calculated as a function of the relative position of the magnetic and x-ray vortices. For a homogeneous system, the charge scattering is zero. For magnetic scattering, the intensity profile strongly depends on the relative topological indices of the x-ray and magnetic singularities. A strong enhancement in the intensity profile is observed for equal winding factors. Additionally, the profile displays edge effects, which depend on the scattering conditions, the radial dependence of the magnetic vortex, and the Laguerre-Gaussian mode of the OAM x-ray beam. The potential of resonant OAM x-ray scattering from magnetic vortices opens the door to study the dynamics and switching of magnetic vortices.

  14. Magnetic order of multiferroic ErMn2O5 studied by resonant soft x-ray Bragg diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staub, U.; Bodenthin, Y.; García-Fernández, M.; de Souza, R. A.; Garganourakis, M.; Golovenchits, E. I.; Sanina, V. A.; Lushnikov, S. G.

    2010-04-01

    Resonant magnetic soft x-ray diffraction is used to study the magnetic order of the Mn sublattices in multiferroic ErMn2O5 . Data were collected at the MnL2,3 edges as a function of temperature, incident polarization, including the analysis of scattered polarizations for selected azimuths. The energy dependence of the magnetic reflections depends on the azimuthal angle in the commensurate magnetic (CM) ferroelectric (FE) phase, indicating different contributions to the scattering. In the incommensurate magnetic [two-dimensional (2D)-ICM] phase, the two observed reflections ( 1/2±δx 0 1/4+δz ) have distinct energy dependences too. Different origins of these differences in spectral shape are discussed. The azimuthal angle dependence at the L3 edge can only be qualitatively described by a generalized magnetic model. The observed discrepancies may indicate the importance of magnetoelectric multipole scattering to these reflections. Reciprocal mesh scans show diffuse scattering along q and perpendicular to q as well as along the ( h 0 0) direction in the CM phase. Diffuse scattering is also observed along ( h 0 0) in the one-dimensional-ICM phase. At higher temperatures, in the 2D-ICM phase, the diffuse magnetic scattering is almost isotropic.

  15. Construction of hydrodynamic bead models from high-resolution X-ray crystallographic or nuclear magnetic resonance data.

    PubMed Central

    Byron, O

    1997-01-01

    Computer software such as HYDRO, based upon a comprehensive body of theoretical work, permits the hydrodynamic modeling of macromolecules in solution, which are represented to the computer interface as an assembly of spheres. The uniqueness of any satisfactory resultant model is optimized by incorporating into the modeling procedure the maximal possible number of criteria to which the bead model must conform. An algorithm (AtoB, for atoms to beads) that permits the direct construction of bead models from high resolution x-ray crystallographic or nuclear magnetic resonance data has now been formulated and tested. Models so generated then act as informed starting estimates for the subsequent iterative modeling procedure, thereby hastening the convergence to reasonable representations of solution conformation. Successful application of this algorithm to several proteins shows that predictions of hydrodynamic parameters, including those concerning solvation, can be confirmed. PMID:8994627

  16. X-ray induced demagnetization of single-molecule magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Dreiser, Jan; Westerström, Rasmus; Piamonteze, Cinthia; Nolting, Frithjof; Rusponi, Stefano; Brune, Harald; Yang, Shangfeng; Popov, Alexey; Dunsch, Lothar; Greber, Thomas

    2014-07-21

    Low-temperature x-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements on the endohedral single-molecule magnet DySc{sub 2}N@C{sub 80} at the Dy M{sub 4,5} edges reveal a shrinking of the opening of the observed hysteresis with increasing x-ray flux. Time-dependent measurements show that the exposure of the molecules to x-rays resonant with the Dy M{sub 5} edge accelerates the relaxation of magnetization more than off-resonant x-rays. The results cannot be explained by a homogeneous temperature rise due to x-ray absorption. Moreover, the observed large demagnetization cross sections indicate that the resonant absorption of one x-ray photon induces the demagnetization of many molecules.

  17. Imaging Systems for Medical Diagnosis: Fundamentals and Technical Solutions - X-Ray Diagnostics- Computed Tomography - Nuclear Medical Diagnostics - Magnetic Resonance Imaging - Ultrasound Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krestel, Erich

    1990-10-01

    Erick Krestel, Editor Imaging Systems for Medical Diagnostics This book provides physicians and clinical physicists with detailed information on todya's imaging modalities and assists them in selecting the optimal system for each clinical application. Physicists, engineers and computer specialists engaged in research and development and sales departments will also find this book to be of considerable use. It may also be employed at universities, training centers and in technical seminars. The physiological and physical fundamentals are explained in part 1. The technical solutions contained in part 2 illustrate the numerous possibilities available in x-ray diagnostics, computed tomography, nuclear medical diagnostics, magnetic resonance imaging, sonography and biomagnetic diagnostics. Overview of Contents Physiology of vision Image quality X-ray and gamma radiation X-ray diagnostics Computed tomography Nuclear medical diagnostics Magnetic resonance imaging Sonography Biomagnetic diagnostics

  18. In vivo measurement of body composition of chickens using quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR)and dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    QMR is a nuclear magnetic resonance based method for measuring the fat, lean and water content of the total body of the live animal. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of QMR for measuring the body composition of chickens while comparing QMR results to those obtained by dual X-ray ab...

  19. Spin-flop transition on Gd5Ge4 observed by x-ray resonant magnetic scattering and first-principles calculations of magnetic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, L.; Kreyssig, A.; Nandi, S.; Jia, S.; Lee, Y. B.; Lang, J. C.; Islam, Z.; Lograsso, T.; Schlagel, D.; Pecharsky, V.; Gschneidner, K.; Canfield, P.; Harmon, B.; McQueeney, R.; Goldman, A.

    2008-02-21

    X-ray resonant magnetic scattering was employed to study a fully reversible spin-flop transition in orthorhombic Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} and to elucidate details of the magnetic structure in the spin-flop phase. The orientation of the moments at the three Gd sites flop 90{sup o} from the c axis to the a axis when a magnetic field, H{sub sf} = 9 kOe, is applied along the c axis at T = 9 K. The magnetic space group changes from Pnm'a to Pn'm'a' for all three Gd sublattices. The magnetic anisotropy energy determined from experimental measurements is in good agreement with the calculations of the magnetic anisotropy based on the spin-orbit coupling of the conduction electrons and an estimation of the dipolar interactions anisotropy. No significant magnetostriction effects were observed at the spin-flop transition.

  20. Characterization of the phosphoserine of pepsinogen using /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance: corroboration of X-ray crystallographic results

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S.P.; Bridger, W.A.; James, M.N.G.

    1986-10-21

    The endogenous phosphoserine residue in porcine pepsinogen has been titrated with use of phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (/sup 31/P NMR). It has an observed pK/sub a/sub 2// of 6.7 and a narrow line width (approx. =10 Hz). The phosphate can be readily removed by an acid phosphatase from potato; however, it is resistant to hydrolysis by several alkaline phosphatases. The X-ray crystal structure of porcine pepsinogen at 1.8-A resolution shows a rather weak and diffuse region of electron density in the vicinity of the phosphorylated serine residue. This suggests considerable dynamic mobility or conformational disorder of the phosphate. In order to define more fully this behavior the NMR data have been used to corroborate these crystallographic results. All these physical data are consistent with a highly mobile phosphoserine residue on the surface of the zymogen and freely exposed to solvent. In addition, certain properties of this phosphoserine moiety on pepsinogen are similar to those of one of the phosphorylated residues of ovalbumin. The possible significance of this is discussed.

  1. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction and resonant X-ray magnetic scattering at helium-3 temperatures in high magnetic fields at beamline P09 at PETRA III.

    PubMed

    Francoual, S; Strempfer, J; Warren, J; Liu, Y; Skaugen, A; Poli, S; Blume, J; Wolff-Fabris, F; Canfield, P C; Lograsso, T

    2015-09-01

    The resonant scattering and diffraction beamline P09 at PETRA III at DESY is equipped with a 14 T vertical field split-pair magnet. A helium-3 refrigerator is available that can be fitted inside the magnet's variable-temperature insert. Here the results of a series of experiments aimed at determining the beam conditions permitting operations with the He-3 insert are presented. By measuring the tetragonal-to-orthorhombic phase transition occurring at 2.1 K in the Jahn-Teller compound TmVO4, it is found that the photon flux at P09 must be attenuated down to 1.5 × 10(9) photons s(-1) for the sample to remain at temperatures below 800 mK. Despite such a reduction of the incident flux and the subsequent use of a Cu(111) analyzer, the resonant X-ray magnetic scattering signal at the Tm LIII absorption edge associated with the spin-density wave in TmNi2B2C below 1.5 K is intense enough to permit a complete study in magnetic field and at sub-Kelvin temperatures to be carried out. PMID:26289272

  2. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.; Lima, E.; Huang, X.; Krupin, O.; Seu, K.; Parks, D.; Kevan, S.; Kisslinger, K.; McNulty, I.; Gambino, R.; Mangin, S.; Roy, S. and Fischer, P.

    2011-07-14

    We report the first proof-of-principle experiment of iterative phase retrieval from magnetic x-ray diffraction. By using the resonant x-ray excitation process and coherent x-ray scattering, we show that linearly polarized soft x rays can be used to image both the amplitude and the phase of magnetic domain structures. We recovered the magnetic structure of an amorphous terbium-cobalt thin film with a spatial resolution of about 75 nm at the Co L{sub 3} edge at 778 eV. In comparison with soft x-ray microscopy images recorded with Fresnel zone plate optics at better than 25 nm spatial resolution, we find qualitative agreement in the observed magnetic structure.

  3. X-ray spectroscopy of magnetic CVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matt, Giorgio

    I discuss two topics in X-ray spectroscopy of magnetic CVs: reflection from the white dwarf surface, and opacity effects in the post shock plasma. I also briefly mention future observational perspectives, with particular emphasis on the Constellation X-ray mission.

  4. Temperature and field dependent magnetization in a sub-μm patterned Co/FeRh film studied by resonant x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lounis, Lounès; Spezzani, Carlo; Delaunay, Renaud; Fortuna, Franck; Obstbaum, Martin; Günther, Stefan; Back, Christian H.; Popescu, Horia; Vidal, Franck; Sacchi, Maurizio

    2016-05-01

    We studied the temperature and field dependence of the magnetization in a Co/FeRh/MgO(0 0 1) film patterned into a matrix of sub-μm sized rectangles, using element selective resonant scattering of polarized soft x-rays. We show that it is possible to reverse partially the magnetization of the Co layer in a thermal cycle that crosses the FeRh antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic transition. Our results support interest in patterned Co/FeRh films and their potential for achieving temperature induced magnetization switching.

  5. Structure of nanocrystalline calcium silicate hydrates: insights from X-ray diffraction, synchrotron X-ray absorption and nuclear magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Grangeon, Sylvain; Claret, Francis; Roosz, Cédric; Sato, Tsutomu; Gaboreau, Stéphane; Linard, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    The structure of nanocrystalline calcium silicate hydrates (C–S–H) having Ca/Si ratios ranging between 0.57 ± 0.05 and 1.47 ± 0.04 was studied using an electron probe micro-analyser, powder X-ray diffraction, 29Si magic angle spinning NMR, and Fourier-transform infrared and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopies. All samples can be described as nanocrystalline and defective tobermorite. At low Ca/Si ratio, the Si chains are defect free and the Si Q 3 and Q 2 environments account, respectively, for up to 40.2 ± 1.5% and 55.6 ± 3.0% of the total Si, with part of the Q 3 Si being attributable to remnants of the synthesis reactant. As the Ca/Si ratio increases up to 0.87 ± 0.02, the Si Q 3 environment decreases down to 0 and is preferentially replaced by the Q 2 environment, which reaches 87.9 ± 2.0%. At higher ratios, Q 2 decreases down to 32.0 ± 7.6% for Ca/Si = 1.38 ± 0.03 and is replaced by the Q 1 environment, which peaks at 68.1 ± 3.8%. The combination of X-ray diffraction and NMR allowed capturing the depolymerization of Si chains as well as a two-step variation in the layer-to-layer distance. This latter first increases from ∼11.3 Å (for samples having a Ca/Si ratio <∼0.6) up to 12.25 Å at Ca/Si = 0.87 ± 0.02, probably as a result of a weaker layer-to-layer connectivity, and then decreases down to 11 Å when the Ca/Si ratio reaches 1.38 ± 0.03. The decrease in layer-to-layer distance results from the incorporation of interlayer Ca that may form a Ca(OH)2-like structure, nanocrystalline and intermixed with C–S–H layers, at high Ca/Si ratios. PMID:27275135

  6. X-ray resonant Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, P.L.; LeBrun, T.; Deslattes, R.D.

    1995-08-01

    X-ray resonant Raman scattering presents great promise as a high-resolution spectroscopic probe of the electronic structure of matter. Unlike other methods, the technique avoids the loss of energy resolution resulting from the lifetime broadening of short-lived core-excited states. In addition, measurements of polarization and angular anisotropies yield information on the symmetries of electronic states of atoms and molecules. We studied the L{sub 3} edge of xenon, where the lifetime broadening is a major feature of the spectra recorded previously. X-ray fluorescence spectra were taken of both the L{alpha}{sub l,2} and L{beta}{sub 2,15} peaks over a range of energies from 10 eV below the edge to 40 eV above. These spectra show the evolution of resonant Raman scattering into characteristic fluorescence as the photon energy is scanned across the edge, and confirm several features of these spectra such as asymmetries in resonant peak shapes due to the onset of the ionization continuum. These results constitute the most comprehensive study of X-ray resonant Raman scattering to date, and were submitted for publication. Studies of other cases are under way, and new instruments that would match the unique characteristics of the APS - and thus render a new range of experiments possible - are under consideration.

  7. Inelastic magnetic X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platzman, P. M.; Tzoar, N.

    1985-04-01

    The theory of magnetic X-ray scattering is used to discuss the possibilities for employing inelastic scattering to probe the magnetic properties of condensed matter systems. In particular, it is shown how the interference between the nonmagnetic (Compton) and magnetic scattering arising from the use of circularly polarized X-rays is absolutely essential in such experiments. The very beautiful preliminary experiments by Sakai and Ono (1976) on Fe which use circularly polarized Moessbauer gamma-rays will be discussed. They already show the sensitivity of the technique to the 'magnetic form factor'. In addition, the physics of a unique quarter wave plate employed in obtaining circularly polarized X-rays is considered, and the implications of this advance for doing such experiments on existing synchrotron X-ray sources are discussed.

  8. A theoretical framework for dichroism and the resonance-enhanced scattering of x-rays by magnetic materials: II. Quadrupolar absorption events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovesey, Stephen W.

    1996-12-01

    Previous work with the resonant scattering length that is based on an atomic model and dipolar absorption events is extended to encompass quadrupolar absorption events. The scattering length is the common element in calculations of the attenuation coefficient, dichroism and the cross-sections for elastic and inelastic resonance-enhanced scattering of x-rays by magnetic materials. Both jj-coupling and Russell - Saunders coupling schemes for the atomic electrons are utilized; included are tables of relevant Racah unit-tensor operators for the valence shell 0953-8984/8/50/025/img1.

  9. Measurement of midfemoral shaft geometry: repeatability and accuracy using magnetic resonance imaging and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Woodhead, H J; Kemp, A F; Blimkie CJR; Briody, J N; Duncan, C S; Thompson, M; Lam, A; Howman-Giles, R; Cowell, C T

    2001-12-01

    Although macroscopic geometric architecture is an important determinant of bone strength, there is limited published information relating to the validation of the techniques used in its measurement. This study describes new techniques for assessing geometry at the midfemur using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and examines both the repeatability and the accuracy of these and previously described DXA methods. Contiguous transverse MRI (Philips 1.5T) scans of the middle one-third femur were made in 13 subjects, 3 subjects with osteoporosis. Midpoint values for total width (TW), cortical width (CW), total cross-sectional area (TCSA), cortical cross-sectional area (CCSA), and volumes from reconstructed three-dimensional (3D) images (total volume [TV] and cortical volume [CVol]) were derived. Midpoint TW and CW also were determined using DXA (Lunar V3.6, lumbar software) by visual and automated edge detection analysis. Repeatability was assessed on scans made on two occasions and then analyzed twice by two independent observers (blinded), with intra- and interobserver repeatability expressed as the CV (CV +/- SD). Accuracy was examined by comparing MRI and DXA measurements of venison bone (and Perspex phantom for MRI), against "gold standard" measures made by vernier caliper (width), photographic image digitization (area) and water displacement (volume). Agreement between methods was analyzed using mean differences (MD +/- SD%). MRI CVs ranged from 0.5 +/- 0.5% (TV) to 3.1 +/- 3.1% (CW) for intraobserver and 0.55 +/- 0.5% (TV) to 3.6 +/- 3.6% (CW) for interobserver repeatability. DXA results ranged from 1.6 +/- 1.5% (TW) to 4.4 +/- 4.5% (CW) for intraobserver and 3.8 +/- 3.8% (TW) to 8.3 +/- 8.1% (CW) for interobserver variation. MRI accuracy was excellent for TV (3.3 +/- 6.4%), CVol (3.5 +/- 4.0%), TCSA (1.8 +/- 2.6%), and CCSA (1.6 +/- 4.2%) but not TW (4.1 +/- 1.4%) or CW (16.4 +/14.9%). DXA results were TW (6.8 +/- 2

  10. Schumann resonance frequency increase during solar X-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldugin, V. C.; Maltsev, Y. P.; Vasiljev, A. N.; Schokotov, A. Y.; Belyajev, G. G.

    2004-01-01

    Variations of the first mode Schumann resonance frequency in the Kola Peninsula and of the first and second mode frequencies in Kamchatka during seven days of March-April 2001, when the intensive solar X-ray bursts occurred, are studied with 5 min averaging. All X-ray bursts were accompanied by ˜0.2 Hz increase in the first mode frequency, at least in one of the magnetic components. Duration of the increases coincided with that of the bursts. For the second mode the increase (in average by ˜0.3 Hz) was registered in most events, when the ELF noise level was not very high.

  11. Early experience with X-ray magnetic resonance fusion for low-flow vascular malformations in the pediatric interventional radiology suite.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tiffany J; Girard, Erin; Shellikeri, Sphoorti; Setser, Randolph; Vossough, Arastoo; Ho-Fung, Victor; Cahill, Anne Marie

    2016-03-01

    This technical innovation describes our experience using an X-ray magnetic resonance fusion (XMRF) software program to overlay 3-D MR images on real-time fluoroscopic images during sclerotherapy procedures for vascular malformations at a large pediatric institution. Five cases have been selected to illustrate the application and various clinical utilities of XMRF during sclerotherapy procedures as well as the technical limitations of this technique. The cases demonstrate how to use XMRF in the interventional suite to derive additional information to improve therapeutic confidence with regards to the extent of lesion filling and to guide clinical management in terms of intraprocedural interventional measures. PMID:26681438

  12. Spin Projection of Empty Partial Density of States by Resonant X-ray Scattering (RXS): Application to Materials with Different Magnetic Ordering

    SciTech Connect

    Draeger, Guenter; Machek, Pavel

    2003-01-24

    We report the first experimental spin projections of empty partial density of states in antiferromagnetic NiO and CuO, paramagnetic MnO and in ferrimagnetic Dy3Fe5O12 by means of resonant X-ray scattering (RXS). Resolving resonantly scattered K{alpha}1,2 , K{beta}1,3 , L{alpha}1 and L1 core line spectra into their spin-up and spin-down components the spin character of the dipole- and quadrupole-excited conduction band states can quantitatively be analyzed. Since the method employs spin conservation in the RXS process and local spin references, it needs neither circularly polarized radiation nor sample magnetization for measuring the spectra. Hence, antiferro- and paramagnetic materials can be investigated as well. In the paper, the basic idea of the novel method, its experimental realization and the data treatment are reported including the spectra decomposition into the spin-up and spin-down components by using Principal Component Analysis (PCA). New and unambiguous results will be presented providing the opportunity to verify experimentally the results of spin-dependent (LSDA+U) calculations. So we argue the new spectroscopy complements X-ray magnetic dichroism, which is silent for antiferro- and paramagnetic materials. In fact, the novel method gives insight into the spin polarization of conduction band states in correlated materials, independently on their magnetic ordering.

  13. Novel motor design for rotating anode x-ray tubes operating in the fringe field of a magnetic resonance imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Shin, Mihye; Hinshaw, Waldo; Bennett, N. Robert; Pelc, Norbert; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Using hybrid x-ray/MR (XMR) systems for image guidance during interventional procedures could enhance the diagnosis and treatment of neurologic, oncologic, cardiovascular, and other disorders. The authors propose a close proximity hybrid system design in which a C-arm fluoroscopy unit is placed immediately adjacent to the solenoid magnet of a MR system with a minimum distance of 1.2 m between the x-ray and MR imaging fields of view. Existing rotating anode x-ray tube designs fail within MR fringe field environments because the magnetic fields alter the electron trajectories in the x-ray tube and act as a brake on the induction motor, reducing the rotation speed of the anode. In this study the authors propose a novel motor design that avoids the anode rotation speed reduction. Methods: The proposed design replaces the permanent magnet stator found in brushed dc motors with the radial component of the MR fringe field. The x-ray tube is oriented such that the radial component of the MR fringe field is orthogonal to the cathode-anode axis. Using a feedback position sensor and the support bearings as electrical slip rings, the authors use electrical commutation to eliminate the need for mechanical brushes and commutators. A vacuum compatible prototype of the proposed motor design was assembled, and its performance was evaluated at various operating conditions. The prototype consisted of a 3.1 in. diameter anode rated at 300 kHU with a ceramic rotor that was 5.6 in. in length and had a 2.9 in. diameter. The material chosen for all ceramic components was MACOR, a machineable glass ceramic developed by Corning Inc. The approximate weight of the entire assembly was 1750 g. The maximum rotation speed, angular acceleration, and acceleration time of the motor design were investigated, as well as the dependence of these parameters on rotor angular offset, magnetic field strength, and field orientation. The resonance properties of the authors’ assembly were also

  14. Novel motor design for rotating anode x-ray tubes operating in the fringe field of a magnetic resonance imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Pelc, Norbert; Shin Mihye; Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca; Bennett, N. Robert

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Using hybrid x-ray/MR (XMR) systems for image guidance during interventional procedures could enhance the diagnosis and treatment of neurologic, oncologic, cardiovascular, and other disorders. The authors propose a close proximity hybrid system design in which a C-arm fluoroscopy unit is placed immediately adjacent to the solenoid magnet of a MR system with a minimum distance of 1.2 m between the x-ray and MR imaging fields of view. Existing rotating anode x-ray tube designs fail within MR fringe field environments because the magnetic fields alter the electron trajectories in the x-ray tube and act as a brake on the induction motor, reducing the rotation speed of the anode. In this study the authors propose a novel motor design that avoids the anode rotation speed reduction. Methods: The proposed design replaces the permanent magnet stator found in brushed dc motors with the radial component of the MR fringe field. The x-ray tube is oriented such that the radial component of the MR fringe field is orthogonal to the cathode-anode axis. Using a feedback position sensor and the support bearings as electrical slip rings, the authors use electrical commutation to eliminate the need for mechanical brushes and commutators. A vacuum compatible prototype of the proposed motor design was assembled, and its performance was evaluated at various operating conditions. The prototype consisted of a 3.1 in. diameter anode rated at 300 kHU with a ceramic rotor that was 5.6 in. in length and had a 2.9 in. diameter. The material chosen for all ceramic components was MACOR, a machineable glass ceramic developed by Corning Inc. The approximate weight of the entire assembly was 1750 g. The maximum rotation speed, angular acceleration, and acceleration time of the motor design were investigated, as well as the dependence of these parameters on rotor angular offset, magnetic field strength, and field orientation. The resonance properties of the authors' assembly were also

  15. Wide-Angle X-Ray Scattering and Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data Combined to Test Models for Cellulose Microfibrils in Mung Bean Cell Walls1

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Roger H.; Hill, Stefan J.; Harris, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    A synchrotron wide-angle x-ray scattering study of mung bean (Vigna radiata) primary cell walls was combined with published solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance data to test models for packing of (1→4)-β-glucan chains in cellulose microfibrils. Computer-simulated peak shapes, calculated for 36-chain microfibrils with perfect order or uncorrelated disorder, were sharper than those in the experimental diffractogram. Introducing correlated disorder into the models broaden the simulated peaks but only when the disorder was increased to unrealistic magnitudes. Computer-simulated diffractograms, calculated for 24- and 18-chain models, showed good fits to experimental data. Particularly good fits to both x-ray and nuclear magnetic resonance data were obtained for collections of 18-chain models with mixed cross-sectional shapes and occasional twinning. Synthesis of 18-chain microfibrils is consistent with a model for cellulose-synthesizing complexes in which three cellulose synthase polypeptides form a particle and six particles form a rosette. PMID:24154621

  16. Resonant X-ray emission with a standing wave excitation

    PubMed Central

    Ruotsalainen, Kari O.; Honkanen, Ari-Pekka; Collins, Stephen P.; Monaco, Giulio; Moretti Sala, Marco; Krisch, Michael; Hämäläinen, Keijo; Hakala, Mikko; Huotari, Simo

    2016-01-01

    The Borrmann effect is the anomalous transmission of x-rays in perfect crystals under diffraction conditions. It arises from the interference of the incident and diffracted waves, which creates a standing wave with nodes at strongly absorbing atoms. Dipolar absorption of x-rays is thus diminished, which makes the crystal nearly transparent for certain x-ray wave vectors. Indeed, a relative enhancement of electric quadrupole absorption via the Borrmann effect has been demonstrated recently. Here we show that the Borrmann effect has a significantly larger impact on resonant x-ray emission than is observable in x-ray absorption. Emission from a dipole forbidden intermediate state may even dominate the corresponding x-ray spectra. Our work extends the domain of x-ray standing wave methods to resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy and provides means for novel spectroscopic experiments in d- and f-electron systems. PMID:26935531

  17. Conformational isomerism in solid state of AMG 853--structure studies using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Kiang, Y-H; Nagapudi, Karthik; Wu, Tian; Peterson, Matthew L; Jona, Janan; Staples, Richard J; Stephens, Peter W

    2015-07-01

    Investigation of an additional resonance peak in the (19) F solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of AMG 853, a dual antagonist of DP and CRTH2 previously in clinical development for asthma, has led to the identification of two conformational isomers coexisting in the crystal lattice in a continuous composition range between 89.7%:10.3% and 96.5%:3.5%. These two isomers differ in the chloro-flurorophenyl moiety orientation-the aromatic ring is flipped by 180° in these two isomers. The level of the minor isomer is directly measured through integration of the two peaks in the (19) F solid-state NMR spectrum. The values obtained from the NMR data are in excellent agreement with the degree of disorder of the fluorine atom in the crystal structure, refined using both single-crystal and high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction data. PMID:25912152

  18. X-ray resonator with pear-shaped reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Churikov, V A

    2003-11-30

    An X-ray resonator design is proposed in which peculiar pear-shaped reflectors, which are grazing-incidence X-ray mirrors, serve as optical elements. Special features of this resonator are relatively high reflector efficiencies and the axial symmetry of the output radiation. (resonators)

  19. PEGylated NaHoF4 nanoparticles as contrast agents for both X-ray computed tomography and ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ni, Dalong; Zhang, Jiawen; Bu, Wenbo; Zhang, Chen; Yao, Zhenwei; Xing, Huaiyong; Wang, Jing; Duan, Fei; Liu, Yanyan; Fan, Wenpei; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Shi, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that multimodal imaging can integrate the advantages of different imaging modalities by overcoming their individual limitations. As ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be inevitably used in future MRI/X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner, it is highly expected to develop high-performance nano-contrast agents for ultra-high field MR and CT dual-modality imaging, which has not been reported yet. Moreover, specific behavior of nano-contrast agents for ultra-high field MRI is a challenging work and still remains unknown. Herein, a novel type of NaHoF4 nanoparticles (NPs) with varied particle sizes were synthesized and explored as high-performance dual-modality contrast agents for ultra-high field MR and CT imaging. The specific X-ray absorption and MR relaxivity enhancements with varied nanoparticle diameters (3 nm, 7 nm, 13 nm and 29 nm) under different magnetic field (1.5/3.0/7.0 T) are investigated. Based on experimental results and theoretical analysis, the Curie and dipolar relaxation mechanisms of NaHoF4 NPs are firstly separated. Our results will greatly promote the future medical translational development of the NaHoF4 nano-contrast agents for ultra-high field MR/CT dual-modality imaging applications. PMID:26546914

  20. Magnetization dynamics in an exchange-coupled NiFe/CoFe bilayer studied by x-ray detected ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenning, G. B. G.; Shelford, L. R.; Cavill, S. A.; Hoffmann, F.; Haertinger, M.; Hesjedal, T.; Woltersdorf, G.; Bowden, G. J.; Gregory, S. A.; Back, C. H.; de Groot, P. A. J.; van der Laan, G.

    2015-01-01

    Exchange-coupled hard and soft magnetic layers find extensive use in data storage applications, for which their dynamical response has great importance. With bulk techniques, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), it is difficult to access the behaviour and precise influence of each individual layer. By contrast, the synchrotron radiation-based technique of x-ray detected ferromagnetic resonance (XFMR) allows element-specific and phase-resolved FMR measurements in the frequency range 0.5-11 GHz. Here, we report the study of the magnetization dynamics of an exchange-coupled Ni0.81Fe0.19 (43.5 nm)/Co0.5Fe0.5 (30 nm) bilayer system using magnetometry and vector network analyser FMR, combined with XFMR at the Ni and Co L2 x-ray absorption edges. The epitaxially grown bilayer exhibits two principal resonances denoted as the acoustic and optical modes. FMR experiments show that the Kittel curves of the two layers cannot be taken in isolation, but that their modelling needs to account for an interlayer exchange coupling. The angular dependence of FMR indicates a collective effect for the modes of the magnetically hard CoFe and soft NiFe layer. The XFMR precessional scans show that the acoustic mode is dominated by the Ni signal with the Co and Ni magnetization precessing in phase, whereas the optical mode is dominated by the Co signal with the Co and Ni magnetization precessing in anti-phase. The response of the Co signal at the Ni resonance, and vice versa, show induced changes in both amplitude and phase, which can be ascribed to the interface exchange coupling. An interesting aspect of phase-resolved XFMR is the ability to distinguish between static and dynamic exchange coupling. The element-specific precessional scans of the NiFe/CoFe bilayer clearly have the signature of static exchange coupling, in which the effective field in one layer is aligned along the magnetization direction of the other layer.

  1. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism imaging with hard X-rays.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Ueji, Y; Okitsu, K; Matsushita, T; Amemiya, Y

    2001-05-01

    X-ray polarization-contrast images resulting from X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) in the hard X-ray region have been successfully recorded for the first time. The apparatus used consisted of an X-ray polarizer, double X-ray phase retarders, and a high-spatial-resolution X-ray charge-coupled-device detector. The sample used was a hexagonal-close-packed cobalt polycrystal foil having a thickness of about 4 microns. The X-ray polarization-contrast image resulting from XMCD was observed at a photon energy of 10 eV above the cobalt K-absorption edge (7709 eV). The observed contrast in the image was reversed by inversion of the magnetic field. Furthermore, the contrast was reversed again at a photon energy of 32 eV above the cobalt K-absorption edge. PMID:11486407

  2. Non-destructive Analysis of Oil-Contaminated Soil Core Samples by X-ray Computed Tomography and Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Relaxometry: a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuhata, Yuji; Nishiwaki, Junko; Kawabe, Yoshishige; Utsuzawa, Shin; Jinguuji, Motoharu

    2010-01-01

    Non-destructive measurements of contaminated soil core samples are desirable prior to destructive measurements because they allow obtaining gross information from the core samples without touching harmful chemical species. Medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) and time-domain low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry were applied to non-destructive measurements of sandy soil core samples from a real site contaminated with heavy oil. The medical CT visualized the spatial distribution of the bulk density averaged over the voxel of 0.31 × 0.31 × 2 mm3. The obtained CT images clearly showed an increase in the bulk density with increasing depth. Coupled analysis with in situ time-domain reflectometry logging suggests that this increase is derived from an increase in the water volume fraction of soils with depth (i.e., unsaturated to saturated transition). This was confirmed by supplementary analysis using high-resolution micro-focus X-ray CT at a resolution of ∼10 μm, which directly imaged the increase in pore water with depth. NMR transverse relaxation waveforms of protons were acquired non-destructively at 2.7 MHz by the Carr–Purcell–Meiboom–Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence. The nature of viscous petroleum molecules having short transverse relaxation times (T2) compared to water molecules enabled us to distinguish the water-saturated portion from the oil-contaminated portion in the core sample using an M0–T2 plot, where M0 is the initial amplitude of the CPMG signal. The present study demonstrates that non-destructive core measurements by medical X-ray CT and low-field NMR provide information on the groundwater saturation level and oil-contaminated intervals, which is useful for constructing an adequate plan for subsequent destructive laboratory measurements of cores. PMID:21258437

  3. High-energy magnetic excitations in overdoped La2 -xSrxCuO4 studied by neutron and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakimoto, S.; Ishii, K.; Kimura, H.; Fujita, M.; Dellea, G.; Kummer, K.; Braicovich, L.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Debeer-Schmitt, L. M.; Granroth, G. E.

    2015-05-01

    We have performed neutron inelastic scattering and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the Cu-L3 edge to study high-energy magnetic excitations at energy transfers of more than 100 meV for overdoped La2 -xSrxCuO4 with x =0.25 (Tc=15 K) and x =0.30 (nonsuperconducting) using identical single-crystal samples for the two techniques. From constant-energy slices of neutron-scattering cross sections, we have identified magnetic excitations up to ˜250 meV for x =0.25 . Although the width in the momentum direction is large, the peak positions along the (π ,π ) direction agree with the dispersion relation of the spin wave in the nondoped La2CuO4 (LCO), which is consistent with the previous RIXS results of cuprate superconductors. Using RIXS at the Cu-L3 edge, we have measured the dispersion relations of the so-called paramagnon mode along both (π ,π ) and (π ,0 ) directions. Although in both directions the neutron and RIXS data connect with each other and the paramagnon along (π ,0 ) agrees well with the LCO spin-wave dispersion, the paramagnon in the (π ,π ) direction probed by RIXS appears to be less dispersive and the excitation energy is lower than the spin wave of LCO near (π /2 ,π /2 ) . Thus, our results indicate consistency between neutron inelastic scattering and RIXS, and elucidate the entire magnetic excitation in the (π ,π ) direction by the complementary use of two probes. The polarization dependence of the RIXS profiles indicates that appreciable charge excitations exist in the same energy range of magnetic excitations, reflecting the itinerant character of the overdoped sample. A possible anisotropy in the charge excitation intensity might explain the apparent differences in the paramagnon dispersion in the (π ,π ) direction as detected by the x-ray scattering.

  4. Furthering the understanding of silicate-substitution in α-tricalcium phosphate: an X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Duncan, J; Hayakawa, S; Osaka, A; MacDonald, J F; Hanna, J V; Skakle, J M S; Gibson, I R

    2014-03-01

    High-purity (SupT) and reagent-grade (ST), stoichiometric and silicate-containing α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP: ST0/SupT0 and Si-TCP x=0.10: ST10/SupT10) were prepared by solid-state reaction based on the substitution mechanism Ca3(PO4)(2-x)(SiO4)x. Samples were determined to be phase pure by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Rietveld analysis performed on the XRD data confirmed inclusion of Si in the α-TCP structure as determined by increases in unit cell parameters; particularly marked increases in the b-axis and β-angle were observed. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) confirmed the presence of expected levels of Si in Si-TCP compositions as well as significant levels of impurities (Mg, Al and Fe) present in all ST samples; SupT samples showed both expected levels of Si and a high degree of purity. Phosphorus ((31)P) magic-angle-spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) measurements revealed that the high-purity reagents used in the synthesis of SupT0 can resolve the 12 expected peaks in the (31)P spectrum of α-TCP compared to the low-purity ST0 that showed significant spectral line broadening; line broadening was also observed with the inclusion of Si which is indicative of induced structural disorder. Silicon ((29)Si) MAS NMR was also performed on both Si-TCP samples which revealed Q(0) species of Si with additional Si Q(1)/Q(2) species that may indicate a potential charge-balancing mechanism involving the inclusion of disilicate groups; additional Q(4) Si species were also observed, but only for ST10. Heating and cooling rates were briefly investigated by (31)P MAS NMR which showed no significant line broadening other than that associated with the emergence of β-TCP which was only realised with the reagent-grade sample ST0. This study provides an insight into the structural effects of Si-substitution in α-TCP and could provide a basis for understanding how substitution affects the physicochemical properties of the material. PMID:24287162

  5. Magnetic Excitations in Thin Film Ba2 IrO4 and Sr2 IrO4 Probed by Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, J. P.; Lupascu, A.; Gretarsson, H.; Upton, M. H.; Kim, J.; Islam, Z.; Uchida, M.; Schlom, D. G.; Shen, K. M.; Nichols, J.; Terzic, J.; Cao, G.; Seo, S. S. A.; Katukuri, V. M.; Hozoi, L.; van den Brink, J.; Stoll, H.; Kim, Y.-J.

    2014-03-01

    We have performed resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements on epitaxial thin film samples of the layered perovskite iridates Ba2IrO4 and Sr2IrO4. These materials display a novel Jeff = 1/2 Mott insulating ground state driven by strong 5d spin-orbit coupling effects. By studying 10 to 50 nm thin film samples grown on a variety of different substrates (GSO, STO, LSAT), we have investigated the impact of applied tensile/compressive strain on the characteristic magnetic and electronic excitations of these materials. Unlike other perturbations, such as doping or applied magnetic field, we find that applied strain does not alter the magnetic structure of Ba2IrO4 or Sr2IrO4. However, strain does affect the magnetic energy scales of these systems, providing a means of tuning both the ordering temperature (Tn) and the magnetic exchange interactions (J). In addition, we show that the dispersion of the low-lying magnon and spin-orbit exciton modes is renormalized by strain-induced structural changes.

  6. Mn L{sub 2,3} edge resonant x-ray scattering in manganites: Influence of the magnetic state

    SciTech Connect

    Stojic, N.; Binggeli, N.; Altarelli, M.

    2005-09-01

    We present an analysis of the dependence of the resonant orbital-order and magnetic scattering spectra on the spin configuration. We consider an arbitrary spin direction with respect to the local crystal field axis, thus lowering significantly the local symmetry. To evaluate the atomic scattering in this case, we generalized the Hannon-Trammel formula and implemented it inside the framework of atomic multiplet calculations in a crystal field. For an illustration, we calculate the magnetic and orbital scattering in the CE phase of La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}MnO{sub 4} in the cases when the spins are aligned with the crystal lattice vector a (or equivalently b) and when they are rotated in the ab-plane by 45 deg. with respect to this axis. Magnetic spectra differ for the two cases. For the orbital scattering, we show that for the former configuration there is a non-negligible {sigma}{yields}{sigma}{sup '} ({pi}{yields}{pi}{sup '}) scattering component, which vanishes in the 45 deg. case, while the {sigma}{yields}{pi}{sup '} ({pi}{yields}{sigma}{sup '}) components are similar in the two cases. From the consideration of two 90 deg. spin canted structures, we conclude there is a significant dependence of the orbital scattering spectra on the spin arrangement. Recent experiments detected a sudden decrease of the orbital scattering intensity upon increasing the temperature above the Neel temperature in La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}MnO{sub 4}. We discuss this behavior considering the effect of different types of misorientations of the spins on the orbital scattering spectrum.

  7. Locking of iridium magnetic moments to the correlated rotation of oxygen octahedra in Sr₂IrO₄ revealed by x-ray resonant scattering.

    PubMed

    Boseggia, S; Walker, H C; Vale, J; Springell, R; Feng, Z; Perry, R S; Moretti Sala, M; Rønnow, H M; Collins, S P; McMorrow, D F

    2013-10-23

    Sr2IrO4 is a prototype of the class of Mott insulators in the strong spin-orbit interaction (SOI) limit described by a Jeff = 1/2 ground state. In Sr2IrO4, the strong SOI is predicted to manifest itself in the locking of the canting of the magnetic moments to the correlated rotation by 11.8(1)° of the oxygen octahedra that characterizes its distorted layered perovskite structure. Using x-ray resonant scattering at the Ir L3 edge we have measured accurately the intensities of Bragg peaks arising from different components of the magnetic structure. From a careful comparison of integrated intensities of peaks due to basal-plane antiferromagnetism, with those due to b-axis ferromagnetism, we deduce a canting of the magnetic moments of 12.2(8)°. We thus confirm that in Sr2IrO4 the magnetic moments rigidly follow the rotation of the oxygen octahedra, indicating that, even in the presence of significant non-cubic structural distortions, it is a close realization of the Jeff = 1/2 state. PMID:24067396

  8. Resonant x-ray scattering investigation of magnetic ordering in NpAs(1 - x)Se(x) (x = 0.05, 0.10).

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, V H; Paixão, J A; Costa, M M R; Mannix, D; Bombardi, A; Rebizant, J; Lander, G H

    2011-01-19

    A resonant x-ray scattering investigation of the NpAs(1 - x)Se(x) system with single crystals of 5 and 10% Se content is reported. The main features of the magnetic phase diagram previously studied by neutron scattering were confirmed. The coexistence within a single domain of ferro- and antiferro-components in the low-T ferrimagnetic phase was established, as well as the single-k character of the incommensurate phase and of the antiferromagnetic component of the ferrimagnetic phase. A tetragonal lattice distortion was found in the ferro- and ferrimagnetic phases which is not compatible with the proposed model for the ferromagnetic phase. The study of ferromagnetism was carried out using polarization analysis of the diffracted beam to separate the scattering intensities originating from magnetism and charge, which are superimposed in reciprocal space. The magnetic character of the ferromagnetic signal calculated from the measured intensities in the polarization analysis σπ and σσ channels was confirmed by analysis of the corresponding temperature dependence. PMID:21406852

  9. X-ray suppression in gamma-ray bursts through resonant Compton scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    An X-ray that scatters with an electron in the first Landau level of a strong magnetic field is converted into a gamma ray. This process has a resonant cross section at X-ray energies and is therefore highly likely to occur even when the first Landau level is sparsely populated. Converted X-rays are cyclotron absorbed, maintaining the equilibrium between the cyclotron photon density and the population of the first Landau level. By suppressing a neutron star's black body emission, this mechanism can produce a gamma-ray burst with a low X-ray flux.

  10. Nanoscale Imaging of Buried Structures with Elemental Specificity Using Resonant X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Changyong; Bergstrom, Raymond; Ramunno-Johnson, Damien; Jiang, Huaidong; Miao, Jianwei; Paterson, David; Jonge, Martin D. de; McNulty, Ian; Lee, Jooyoung; Wang, Kang L.

    2008-01-18

    We report the first demonstration of resonant x-ray diffraction microscopy for element specific imaging of buried structures with a pixel resolution of {approx}15 nm by exploiting the abrupt change in the scattering cross section near electronic resonances. We performed nondestructive and quantitative imaging of buried Bi structures inside a Si crystal by directly phasing coherent x-ray diffraction patterns acquired below and above the Bi M{sub 5} edge. We anticipate that resonant x-ray diffraction microscopy will be applied to element and chemical state specific imaging of a broad range of systems including magnetic materials, semiconductors, organic materials, biominerals, and biological specimens.

  11. Synthesis, Characterization, In Vitro Phantom Imaging, and Cytotoxicity of A Novel Graphene-Based Multimodal Magnetic Resonance Imaging - X-Ray Computed Tomography Contrast Agent.

    PubMed

    Lalwani, Gaurav; Sundararaj, Joe Livingston; Schaefer, Kenneth; Button, Terry; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2014-06-14

    Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs), synthesized using potassium permanganate-based oxidation and exfoliation followed by reduction with hydroiodic acid (rGNP-HI), have intercalated manganese ions within the graphene sheets, and upon functionalization with iodine, show excellent potential as biomodal contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). Structural characterization of rGNP-HI nanoparticles with low- and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) showed disc-shaped nanoparticles (average diameter, 200 nm, average thickness, 3 nm). Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis confirmed the presence of intercalated manganese. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of rGNP-HI confirmed the reduction of oxidized GNPs (O-GNPs), absence of molecular and physically adsorbed iodine, and the functionalization of graphene with iodine as polyiodide complexes (I3 (-) and I5 (-)). Manganese and iodine content were quantified as 5.1 ± 0.5 and 10.54 ± 0.87 wt% by inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and ion-selective electrode measurements, respectively. In vitro cytotoxicity analysis, using absorbance (LDH assay) and fluorescence (calcein AM) based assays, performed on NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts and A498 human kidney epithelial cells, showed CD50 values of rGNP-HI between 179-301 µg/ml, depending on the cell line and the cytotoxicity assay. CT and MRI phantom imaging of rGNP-HI showed high CT (approximately 3200% greater than HI at equimolar iodine concentration) and MRI (approximately 59% greater than equimolar Mn(2+) solution) contrast. These results open avenues for further in vivo safety and efficacy studies towards the development of carbon nanostructure-based multimodal MRI-CT contrast agents. PMID:24999431

  12. Synthesis, Characterization, In Vitro Phantom Imaging, and Cytotoxicity of A Novel Graphene-Based Multimodal Magnetic Resonance Imaging - X-Ray Computed Tomography Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Lalwani, Gaurav; Sundararaj, Joe Livingston; Schaefer, Kenneth; Button, Terry; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2014-01-01

    Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs), synthesized using potassium permanganate-based oxidation and exfoliation followed by reduction with hydroiodic acid (rGNP-HI), have intercalated manganese ions within the graphene sheets, and upon functionalization with iodine, show excellent potential as biomodal contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). Structural characterization of rGNP-HI nanoparticles with low- and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) showed disc-shaped nanoparticles (average diameter, 200 nm, average thickness, 3 nm). Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis confirmed the presence of intercalated manganese. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of rGNP-HI confirmed the reduction of oxidized GNPs (O-GNPs), absence of molecular and physically adsorbed iodine, and the functionalization of graphene with iodine as polyiodide complexes (I3− and I5−). Manganese and iodine content were quantified as 5.1 ± 0.5 and 10.54 ± 0.87 wt% by inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and ion-selective electrode measurements, respectively. In vitro cytotoxicity analysis, using absorbance (LDH assay) and fluorescence (calcein AM) based assays, performed on NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts and A498 human kidney epithelial cells, showed CD50 values of rGNP-HI between 179-301 µg/ml, depending on the cell line and the cytotoxicity assay. CT and MRI phantom imaging of rGNP-HI showed high CT (approximately 3200% greater than HI at equimolar iodine concentration) and MRI (approximately 59% greater than equimolar Mn2+ solution) contrast. These results open avenues for further in vivo safety and efficacy studies towards the development of carbon nanostructure-based multimodal MRI-CT contrast agents. PMID:24999431

  13. X-ray resonant magnetic scattering investigations of hexagonal multiferroics RMnO3 (R = Dy, Ho, Er)

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, Shibabrata

    2009-01-01

    Electricity and magnetism were unified into a common subject by James Clerk Maxwell in the nineteenth century yielding the electromagnetic theory. Four equations govern the dynamics of electric charges and magnetic fields, commonly known as Maxwell's equations. Maxwell's equations demonstrate that an accelerated charged particle can produce magnetic fields and a time varying magnetic field can induce a voltage - thereby linking the two phenomena. However, in solids, electric and magnetic ordering are most often considered separately and usually with good reason: the electric charges of electrons and ions are responsible for the charge effects, whereas the electron spin governs magnetic properties.

  14. Deconvoluting Protein (Un)folding Structural Ensembles Using X-Ray Scattering, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Nasedkin, Alexandr; Marcellini, Moreno; Religa, Tomasz L.; Freund, Stefan M.; Menzel, Andreas; Fersht, Alan R.; Jemth, Per; van der Spoel, David; Davidsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The folding and unfolding of protein domains is an apparently cooperative process, but transient intermediates have been detected in some cases. Such (un)folding intermediates are challenging to investigate structurally as they are typically not long-lived and their role in the (un)folding reaction has often been questioned. One of the most well studied (un)folding pathways is that of Drosophila melanogaster Engrailed homeodomain (EnHD): this 61-residue protein forms a three helix bundle in the native state and folds via a helical intermediate. Here we used molecular dynamics simulations to derive sample conformations of EnHD in the native, intermediate, and unfolded states and selected the relevant structural clusters by comparing to small/wide angle X-ray scattering data at four different temperatures. The results are corroborated using residual dipolar couplings determined by NMR spectroscopy. Our results agree well with the previously proposed (un)folding pathway. However, they also suggest that the fully unfolded state is present at a low fraction throughout the investigated temperature interval, and that the (un)folding intermediate is highly populated at the thermal midpoint in line with the view that this intermediate can be regarded to be the denatured state under physiological conditions. Further, the combination of ensemble structural techniques with MD allows for determination of structures and populations of multiple interconverting structures in solution. PMID:25946337

  15. Soft x-ray coherent diffraction imaging on magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaowen; Lee, James; Mishra, Shrawan; Parks, Daniel; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Shapiro, David; Roy, Sujoy; Kevan, Steve; Stxm Team At Als Collaboration; Soft X-Ray Microscopy Group At Als Collaboration; Soft X-ray scattering at ALS, LBL Team

    2014-03-01

    Coherent soft X-rays diffraction imaging enable coherent magnetic resonance scattering at transition metal L-edge to be probed so that magnetic domains could be imaged with very high spatial resolution with phase contrast, reaching sub-10nm. One of the overwhelming advantages of using coherent X-rays is the ability to resolve phase contrast images with linearly polarized light with both phase and absorption contrast comparing to real-space imaging, which can only be studied with circularly polarized light with absorption contrast only. Here we report our first results on high-resolution of magnetic domains imaging of CoPd multilayer thin film with coherent soft X-ray ptychography method. We are aiming to resolve and understand magnetic domain wall structures with the highest obtainable resolution here at Advanced Light Source. In principle types of magnetic domain walls could be studied so that Neel or Bloch walls can be distinguished by imaging. This work at LBNL was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the US Department of Energy (contract no. DE-AC02- 05CH11231).

  16. High-energy magnetic excitations in overdoped La2-xSrxCuO4 studied by neutron and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wakimoto, S.; Ishii, K.; Kimura, H.; Fujita, M.; Dellea, G.; Kummer, K.; Braicovich, L.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Debeer-Schmitt, Lisa M.; Granroth, Garrett E.

    2015-05-21

    We have performed neutron inelastic scattering and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the Cu-L3 edge to study high-energy magnetic excitations at energy transfers of more than 100 meV for overdoped La2₋xSrxCuO4 with x=0.25 (Tc=15 K) and x=0.30 (nonsuperconducting) using identical single-crystal samples for the two techniques. From constant-energy slices of neutron-scattering cross sections, we have identified magnetic excitations up to ~250 meV for x=0.25. Although the width in the momentum direction is large, the peak positions along the (π,π) direction agree with the dispersion relation of the spin wave in the nondoped La2CuO4 (LCO), which is consistent with themore » previous RIXS results of cuprate superconductors. Using RIXS at the Cu-L3 edge, we have measured the dispersion relations of the so-called paramagnon mode along both (π,π) and (π,0) directions. Although in both directions the neutron and RIXS data connect with each other and the paramagnon along (π,0) agrees well with the LCO spin-wave dispersion, the paramagnon in the (π,π) direction probed by RIXS appears to be less dispersive and the excitation energy is lower than the spin wave of LCO near (π/2,π/2). Thus, our results indicate consistency between neutron inelastic scattering and RIXS, and elucidate the entire magnetic excitation in the (π,π) direction by the complementary use of two probes. The polarization dependence of the RIXS profiles indicates that appreciable charge excitations exist in the same energy range of magnetic excitations, reflecting the itinerant character of the overdoped sample. Lastly, we find a possible anisotropy in the charge excitation intensity might explain the apparent differences in the paramagnon dispersion in the (π,π) direction as detected by the x-ray scattering.« less

  17. Tb_1-xY_xNi_2Ge_2: Investigation of the magnetic structure using x-ray resonant exchange scattering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wermeille, D.; Song, C.; Goldman, A. I.; Canfield, P. C.; Islam, Z.

    2001-03-01

    TbNi_2Ge2 exhibits two distinct magnetic phase transitions. One is from the high-temperature paramagnetic state to a long period antiferromagnetic phase at the Néel temperature (T_N=16.8 K) with a propagation vector τ_1=(0 0 0.758), and the other is at a lower temperature (T_t=9.3 K), where the system locks into a commensurate phase τ_1=(0 0 3/4). Additional magnetic Bragg reflections corresponding to τ_2=(1/2 1/2 0) and τ_3=(1/2 1/2 1/2) develop [1]. Recent theoretical work on Gd_1-xEu_xNi_2Ge2 [2] has suggested the connection between the band filling and the value of the ordering wave-vector of the magnetically ordered state. In this talk, we will present the results of x-ray resonant exchange scattering on the three compounds of the pseudo- ternary series Tb_1-xY_xNi_2Ge2 with x=0, 0,1 and 0.35. A comparison between the magnetic phase in the different compositions will be discussed. The magnetic ordering wave-vector, as well as the order parameter will be presented. [1] Z. Islam et al. PRB 58 8522 (1998). [2] Z. Islam et al. PRL 83 2817 (1999). The synchrotron work was performed at the Midwest Universities Collaborative Access Team (MU-CAT) sector at the Advanced Photon Source supported by U.S. DOE, BES, OS, through the Ames Laboratory under Contract No. W-31-109-Eng-38.

  18. Resonant Auger Effect at High X-Ray Intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Rohringer, N; Santra, R

    2008-03-27

    The resonant Auger effect of atomic neon exposed to high-intensity x-ray radiation in resonance with the 1s {yields} 3p transition is discussed. High intensity here means that the x-ray peak intensity is sufficient ({approx} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) to induce Rabi oscillations between the neon ground state and the 1s{sup -1}3p ({sup 1}P) state within the relaxation lifetime of the inner-shell vacancy. For the numerical analysis presented, an effective two-level model, including a description of the resonant Auger decay process, is employed. Both coherent and chaotic x-ray pulses are treated. The latter are used to simulate radiation from x-ray free-electron lasers based on the principle of self-amplified spontaneous emission. Observing x-ray-driven atomic population dynamics in the time domain is challenging for chaotic pulse ensembles. A more practical option for experiments using x-ray free-electron lasers is to measure the line profiles in the kinetic energy distribution of the resonant Auger electron. This provides information on both atomic population dynamics and x-ray pulse properties.

  19. Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering for Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Young, Athony; Hexemer, Alexander; Padmore, Howard

    2015-03-01

    Over the past a few years, we have developed Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering (RSoXS) and constructed the first dedicated resonant soft x-ray scattering beamline at the Advanced Light Source, LBNL. RSoXS combines soft x-ray spectroscopy with x-ray scattering thus offers statistical information for 3D chemical morphology over a large length scale range from nanometers to micrometers. Its unique chemical sensitivity, large accessible size scale, molecular bond orientation sensitivity with polarized x-rays and high coherence have shown great potential for chemical/morphological structure characterization for many classes of materials. Some recent development of in-situ soft x-ray scattering with in-vacuum sample environment will be discussed. In order to study sciences in naturally occurring conditions, we need to overcome the sample limitations set by the low penetration depth of soft x-rays and requirement of high vacuum. Adapting to the evolving environmental cell designs utilized increasingly in the Electron Microscopy community, customized designed liquid/gas environmental cells will enable soft x-ray scattering experiments on biological, electro-chemical, self-assembly, and hierarchical functional systems in both static and dynamic fashion. Recent RSoXS results on organic electronics, block copolymer thin films, and membrane structure will be presented.

  20. Investigations of the R5(SixGe1-x)4 Intermetallic Compounds by X-Ray Resonant Magnetic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lizhi Tan

    2008-08-18

    The XRMS experiment on the Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} system has shown that, below the Neel temperature, T{sub N} = 127 K, the magnetic unit cells is the same as the chemical unit cell. From azimuth scans and the Q dependence of the magnetic scattering, all three Gd sites in the structure were determined to be in the same magnetic space group Pnma. The magnetic moments are aligned along the c-axis and the c-components of the magnetic moments at the three different sites are equal. The ferromagnetic slabs are stacked antiferromagnetically along the b-direction. They found an unusual order parameter curve in Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4}. A spin-reorientation transition is a possibility in Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4}, which is similar to the Tb{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} case. Tb{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} possesses the same Sm{sub 5}Ge{sub 4}-type crystallographic structure and the same magnetic space group as Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} does. The difference in magnetic structure is that Tb{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} has a canted one but Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} has nearly a collinear one in the low temperature antiferromagnetic phase. The competition between the magneto-crystalline anisotropy and the nearest-neighbor magnetic exchange interactions may allow a 3-dimensional canted antiferromagnetic structure in Tb{sub 5}Ge{sub 4}. The spin-reorientation transition in both Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} and Tb{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} may arise from the competition between the magnetic anisotropy from the spin-orbit coupling of the conduction electrons and the dipolar interactions anisotropy.

  1. Resonant soft X-ray scattering on protein solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Dan; Le, Thinh; Wang, Cheng; Zwart, Peter; Gomez, Esther; Gomez, Enrique

    Protein structure is crucial for biological function, such that characterizing protein folding and packing is important for the design of therapeutics and enzymes. We propose resonant soft X-ray scattering (RSOXS) as an approach to study proteins and other biological assemblies in solution. Calculations of the scattering contrast suggest that soft X-ray scattering is more sensitive than hard X-ray scattering, because of contrast generated at the absorption edges of constituent elements such as carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. We have examined the structure of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in solution by RSOXS. We find that by varying incident X-ray energies, we are able to achieve higher scattering contrast near the absorption edge. From our RSOXS scattering result we are able to reconstruct the structure of BSA in 3D. These RSOXS results also agree with hard X-ray experiments, including crystallographic data. Our study demonstrates the potential of RSOXS for studying protein structure in solution.

  2. First Principles Calculations for X-ray Resonant Spectra and Elastic Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Yongbin Lee

    2006-05-01

    In this thesis, we discuss applications of first principles methods to x-ray resonant spectra and elastic properties calculation. We start with brief reviews about theoretical background of first principles methods, such as density functional theory, local density approximation (LDA), LDA+U, and the linear augmented plane wave (LAPW) method to solve Kohn-Sham equations. After that we discuss x-ray resonant scattering (XRMS), x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and the branching problem in the heavy rare earths Ledges. In the last chapter we discuss the elastic properties of the second hardest material AlMgB{sub 14}.

  3. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Mascali, David; Castro, Giuseppe; Biri, Sándor; Rácz, Richárd; Pálinkás, József; Caliri, Claudia; Celona, Luigi; Neri, Lorenzo; Romano, Francesco Paolo; Torrisi, Giuseppe; Gammino, Santo

    2016-02-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs-Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed "on-line" during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and the beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure. PMID:26931918

  4. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascali, David; Castro, Giuseppe; Biri, Sándor; Rácz, Richárd; Pálinkás, József; Caliri, Claudia; Celona, Luigi; Neri, Lorenzo; Romano, Francesco Paolo; Torrisi, Giuseppe; Gammino, Santo

    2016-02-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed "on-line" during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and the beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure.

  5. Resonance transition radiation X-ray laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Max B.; Piestrup, Melvin A.

    1991-01-01

    A free electron laser is proposed using a periodic dielectric and helical magnetic field. Periodic synchronism between the electrons and the optical wave is obtained at the period of the dielectric and not at the period of the helical magnetic field. The synchronism condition and the gain of the new device are derived. The effects on the gain from dephasing and beam expansion due to elastic scattering of the electrons in the periodic medium are included in the gain calculation. Examples of the resonance transition radiation laser and klystron are given. Operation at photon energies between 2.5 and 3.5 keV with net gain up to 12 percent is feasible using high electron-beam energies of 3 and 5 GeV. Moderate (300-MeV) beam energy allows operation between 80 to 110 eV with up to 57 percent net gain using a klystron design. In both cases, rapid foil heating may limit operation to a single electron-beam pulse.

  6. X-ray holographic imaging of magnetic order in meander domain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spezzani, Carlo; Popescu, Horia; Fortuna, Franck; Delaunay, Renaud; Tortarolo, Marina; Jaouen, Nicolas; Sacchi, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    We performed x-ray holography experiments using synchrotron radiation. By analyzing the scattering of coherent circularly polarized x-rays tuned at the Co-2p resonance, we imaged perpendicular magnetic domains in a Co/Pd multilayer. We compare results obtained for continuous and laterally confined films.

  7. Applications of soft x-ray magnetic dichroism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Laan, G.

    2013-04-01

    Applications of x-ray magnetic circular and linear dichroism (XMCD and XMLD) are reviewed in the soft x-ray region, covering the photon energy range 0.4-2 keV, which includes important absorption edges such as the 3d transition metal L2,3 and rare earth M4,5. These techniques enable a broad range of novel and exciting studies such as on the electronic properties and magnetic ordering of novel nanostructured systems. XMCD has a sensitivity better than 0.01 monolayer (at the surface) and due to simple detection methods, such as electron yield and fluorescence yield, it has become a workhorse technique in physics and materials science. It is the only element-specific technique able to distinguish between the spin and orbital parts of the magnetic moments. The applications are vast, e.g., in x-ray holographic imaging, XMCD gives a spatial resolution of tens of nm. While many studies in the past were centered on physics, more recently new applications have emerged in areas such as chemistry, biology and earth and environmental sciences. For instance, XMCD allows the determination of the cation occupations in spinels and other ternary oxides. In scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM), XMCD enables us to map biogenic magnetite redox changes resulting in a surprising degree of variation on the nanoscale. Another recent development is ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) detected by time-resolved XMCD which opens the door to element-, site- and layer-specific dynamical measurements. By exploiting the time structure of the pulsed synchrotron radiation from the storage ring the relative phase of precession in the individual magnetic layers of a multilayer stack can be determined.

  8. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering from molecules and atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, U.; Deslattes, R.D.; Miyano, K.E.; Southworth, S.H.

    1995-12-31

    X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy is one of the most powerful methods for the understanding of the electronic structure of matter. We report here on fluorescence experiments in the 2 to 6 keV photon energy range using tunable synchrotron radiation and the resulting experimental programs on resonant inelastic scattering in atoms and on polarization measurements in resonant molecular excitations.

  9. PEGylated hybrid ytterbia nanoparticles as high-performance diagnostic probes for in vivo magnetic resonance and X-ray computed tomography imaging with low systemic toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Pu, Fang; Liu, Jianhua; Jiang, Liyan; Yuan, Qinghai; Li, Zhengqiang; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2013-05-01

    Novel nanoparticulate contrast agents with low systemic toxicity and inexpensive character have exhibited more advantages over routinely used small molecular contrast agents for the diagnosis and prognosis of disease. Herein, we designed and synthesized PEGylated hybrid ytterbia nanoparticles as high-performance nanoprobes for X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging both in vitro and in vivo. These well-defined nanoparticles were facile to prepare and cost-effective, meeting the criteria as a biomedical material. Compared with routinely used Iobitridol in clinic, our PEG-Yb2O3:Gd nanoparticles could provide much significantly enhanced contrast upon various clinical voltages ranging from 80 kVp to 140 kVp owing to the high atomic number and well-positioned K-edge energy of ytterbium. By the doping of gadolinium, our nanoparticulate contrast agent could perform perfect MR imaging simultaneously, revealing similar organ enrichment and bio-distribution with the CT imaging results. The super improvement in imaging efficiency was mainly attributed to the high content of Yb and Gd in a single nanoparticle, thus making these nanoparticles suitable for dual-modal diagnostic imaging with a low single-injection dose. In addition, detailed toxicological study in vitro and in vivo indicated that uniformly sized PEG-Yb2O3:Gd nanoparticles possessed excellent biocompatibility and revealed overall safety.Novel nanoparticulate contrast agents with low systemic toxicity and inexpensive character have exhibited more advantages over routinely used small molecular contrast agents for the diagnosis and prognosis of disease. Herein, we designed and synthesized PEGylated hybrid ytterbia nanoparticles as high-performance nanoprobes for X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging both in vitro and in vivo. These well-defined nanoparticles were facile to prepare and cost-effective, meeting the criteria as a biomedical material

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the calcaneus: preliminary assessment of trabecular bone-dependent regional variations in marrow relaxation time compared with dual X-ray absorptiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guglielmi, G.; Selby, K.; Blunt, B. A.; Jergas, M.; Newitt, D. C.; Genant, H. K.; Majumdar, S.

    1996-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Marrow transverse relaxation time (T2*) in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging may be related to the density and structure of the surrounding trabecular network. We investigated regional variations of T2* in the human calcaneus and compared the findings with bone mineral density (BMD), as measured by dual X-ray absorpiometry (DXA). Short- and long-term precisions were evaluated first to determine whether MR imaging would be useful for the clinical assessment of disease status and progression in osteoporosis. METHODS: Gradient-recalled echo MR images of the calcaneus were acquired at 1.5 T from six volunteers. Measurements of T2* were compared with BMD and (for one volunteer) conventional radiography. RESULTS: T2* values showed significant regional variation; they typically were shortest in the superior region of the calcaneus. There was a linear correlation between MR and DXA measurements (r = .66 for 1/T2* versus BMD). Differences in T2* attributable to variations in analysis region-of-interest placement were not significant for five of the six volunteers. Sagittal MR images had short- and long-term precision errors of 4.2% and 3.3%, respectively. For DXA, the precision was 1.3% (coefficient of variation). CONCLUSION: MR imaging may be useful for trabecular bone assessment in the calcaneus. However, given the large regional variations in bone density and structure, the choice of an ROI is likely to play a major role in the accuracy, precision, and overall clinical efficacy of T2* measurements.

  11. High resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the calcaneus: age-related changes in trabecular structure and comparison with dual X-ray absorptiometry measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouyang, X.; Selby, K.; Lang, P.; Engelke, K.; Klifa, C.; Fan, B.; Zucconi, F.; Hottya, G.; Chen, M.; Majumdar, S.; Genant, H. K.

    1997-01-01

    A high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol, together with specialized image processing techniques, was applied to the quantitative measurement of age-related changes in calcaneal trabecular structure. The reproducibility of the technique was assessed and the annual rates of change for several trabecular structure parameters were measured. The MR-derived trabecular parameters were compared with calcaneal bone mineral density (BMD), measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in the same subjects. Sagittal MR images were acquired at 1.5 T in 23 healthy women (mean age: 49.3 +/- 16.6 [SD]), using a three-dimensional gradient echo sequence. Image analysis procedures included internal gray-scale calibration, bone and marrow segmentation, and run-length methods. Three trabecular structure parameters, apparent bone volume (ABV/TV), intercept thickness (I.Th), and intercept separation (I.Sp) were calculated from the MR images. The short- and long-term precision errors (mean %CV) of these measured parameters were in the ranges 1-2% and 3-6%, respectively. Linear regression of the trabecular structure parameters vs. age showed significant correlation: ABV/TV (r2 = 33.7%, P < 0.0037), I.Th (r2 = 26.6%, P < 0.0118), I.Sp (r2 = 28.9%, P < 0.0081). These trends with age were also expressed as annual rates of change: ABV/TV (-0.52%/year), I.Th (-0.33%/year), and I.Sp (0.59%/year). Linear regression analysis also showed significant correlation between the MR-derived trabecular structure parameters and calcaneal BMD values. Although a larger group of subjects is needed to better define the age-related changes in trabecular structure parameters and their relation to BMD, these preliminary results demonstrate that high-resolution MRI may potentially be useful for the quantitative assessment of trabecular structure.

  12. Comparison of Combined X-Ray Radiography and Magnetic Resonance (XMR) Imaging-Versus Computed Tomography-Based Dosimetry for the Evaluation of Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Acher, Peter Rhode, Kawal; Morris, Stephen; Gaya, Andrew; Miquel, Marc; Popert, Rick; Tham, Ivan; Nichol, Janette; McLeish, Kate; Deehan, Charles; Dasgupta, Prokar; Beaney, Ronald; Keevil, Stephen F.

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To present a method for the dosimetric analysis of permanent prostate brachytherapy implants using a combination of stereoscopic X-ray radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (XMR) in an XMR facility, and to compare the clinical results between XMR- and computed tomography (CT)-based dosimetry. Methods and Materials: Patients who had received nonstranded iodine-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy implants underwent XMR and CT imaging 4 weeks later. Four observers outlined the prostate gland on both sets of images. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were derived, and agreement was compared among the observers and between the modalities. Results: A total of 30 patients were evaluated. Inherent XMR registration based on prior calibration and optical tracking required a further automatic seed registration step that revealed a median root mean square registration error of 4.2 mm (range, 1.6-11.4). The observers agreed significantly more closely on prostate base and apex positions as well as outlining contours on the MR images than on those from CT. Coefficients of variation were significantly higher for observed prostate volumes, D90, and V100 parameters on CT-based dosimetry as opposed to XMR. The XMR-based dosimetry showed little agreement with that from CT for all observers, with D90 95% limits of agreement ranges of 65, 118, 79, and 73 Gy for Observers 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Conclusions: The study results showed that XMR-based dosimetry offers an alternative to other imaging modalities and registration methods with the advantages of MR-based prostate delineation and confident three-dimensional reconstruction of the implant. The XMR-derived dose-volume histograms differ from the CT-derived values and demonstrate less interobserver variability.

  13. Correlation of X-Ray Computed Tomography with Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Methods for Pre-Clinical Measurement of Adipose and Lean Tissues in Living Mice

    PubMed Central

    Metzinger, Matthew N.; Miramontes, Bernadette; Zhou, Peng; Liu, Yueying; Chapman, Sarah; Sun, Lucy; Sasser, Todd A.; Duffield, Giles E.; Stack, M. Sharon; Leevy, W. Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Numerous obesity studies have coupled murine models with non-invasive methods to quantify body composition in longitudinal experiments, including X-ray computed tomography (CT) or quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (QMR). Both microCT and QMR have been separately validated with invasive techniques of adipose tissue quantification, like post-mortem fat extraction and measurement. Here we report a head-to-head study of both protocols using oil phantoms and mouse populations to determine the parameters that best align CT data with that from QMR. First, an in vitro analysis of oil/water mixtures was used to calibrate and assess the overall accuracy of microCT vs. QMR data. Next, experiments were conducted with two cohorts of living mice (either homogenous or heterogeneous by sex, age and genetic backgrounds) to assess the microCT imaging technique for adipose tissue segmentation and quantification relative to QMR. Adipose mass values were obtained from microCT data with three different resolutions, after which the data were analyzed with different filter and segmentation settings. Strong linearity was noted between the adipose mass values obtained with microCT and QMR, with optimal parameters and scan conditions reported herein. Lean tissue (muscle, internal organs) was also segmented and quantified using the microCT method relative to the analogous QMR values. Overall, the rigorous calibration and validation of the microCT method for murine body composition, relative to QMR, ensures its validity for segmentation, quantification and visualization of both adipose and lean tissues. PMID:25299952

  14. Comparison of visceral fat mass measurement by dual-X-ray absorptiometry and magnetic resonance imaging in a multiethnic cohort: the Dallas Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Neeland, I J; Grundy, S M; Li, X; Adams-Huet, B; Vega, G L

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) mass, a risk factor for cardiometabolic complications of obesity, is usually measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) but this method is not practical in a clinical setting. In contrast, measurement of VAT by dual-x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) appears to circumvent the limitations of MRI. In this study, we compared measurements of VAT mass by MRI and DXA in the large, multiethnic cohort of the Dallas Heart Study (DHS). Subjects/Methods: About 2689 DHS participants underwent paired measurement of VAT by MRI and DXA. Sex-stratified analyses were performed to evaluate the correlation and agreement between DXA and MRI. Model validation was performed using bootstrapping and inter-reader variability was assessed. Results: Mean age of the cohort was 44 years, with 55% female, 48% Black and 75% overweight/obese participants. Regression analysis showed a linear relationship between DXA and MRI with R2=0.82 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.81–0.84) for females and R2=0.86 (95% CI 0.85–0.88) for males. Mean difference between methods was 0.01 kg for females and 0.09 kg for males. Bland–Altman analysis showed that DXA tended to modestly underestimate VAT compared with MRI at lower VAT levels and overestimate it compared with MRI at higher VAT levels. Results were consistent in analyses stratified by race, body mass index status, waist girth and body fat. Inter-individual reader correlation among 50 randomly selected scans was excellent (inter-class correlation coefficient=0.997). Conclusions: VAT mass quantification by DXA was both accurate and valid among a large, multiethnic cohort within a wide range of body fatness. Further studies including repeat assessments over time will help determine its long-term applicability. PMID:27428873

  15. Femtosecond X-ray magnetic circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy at an X-ray free electron laser.

    PubMed

    Higley, Daniel J; Hirsch, Konstantin; Dakovski, Georgi L; Jal, Emmanuelle; Yuan, Edwin; Liu, Tianmin; Lutman, Alberto A; MacArthur, James P; Arenholz, Elke; Chen, Zhao; Coslovich, Giacomo; Denes, Peter; Granitzka, Patrick W; Hart, Philip; Hoffmann, Matthias C; Joseph, John; Le Guyader, Loïc; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Ohldag, Hendrik; Seaberg, Matthew; Shafer, Padraic; Stöhr, Joachim; Tsukamoto, Arata; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reid, Alex H; Dürr, Hermann A; Schlotter, William F

    2016-03-01

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser is demonstrated with spectra over the Fe L(3,2)-edges. The high brightness of the X-ray free electron laser combined with high accuracy detection of incident and transmitted X-rays enables ultrafast X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of unprecedented sensitivity. This new capability is applied to a study of all-optical magnetic switching dynamics of Fe and Gd magnetic sublattices in a GdFeCo thin film above its magnetization compensation temperature. PMID:27036761

  16. Femtosecond X-ray magnetic circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy at an X-ray free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higley, Daniel J.; Hirsch, Konstantin; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Jal, Emmanuelle; Yuan, Edwin; Liu, Tianmin; Lutman, Alberto A.; MacArthur, James P.; Arenholz, Elke; Chen, Zhao; Coslovich, Giacomo; Denes, Peter; Granitzka, Patrick W.; Hart, Philip; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Joseph, John; Le Guyader, Loïc; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Ohldag, Hendrik; Seaberg, Matthew; Shafer, Padraic; Stöhr, Joachim; Tsukamoto, Arata; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reid, Alex H.; Dürr, Hermann A.; Schlotter, William F.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy using an X-ray free electron laser is demonstrated with spectra over the Fe L3,2-edges. The high brightness of the X-ray free electron laser combined with high accuracy detection of incident and transmitted X-rays enables ultrafast X-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of unprecedented sensitivity. This new capability is applied to a study of all-optical magnetic switching dynamics of Fe and Gd magnetic sublattices in a GdFeCo thin film above its magnetization compensation temperature.

  17. Ultrafast magnetization dynamics studies using an x-ray streakcamera

    SciTech Connect

    Bartelt, A.F.; Comin, A.; Feng, J.; Nasiatka, J.; Padmore, H.A.; Scholl, A.; Young, A.

    2005-07-13

    The spin dynamics of ferromagnetic thin films following an excitation by ultrashort 100-fs near-infrared laser pulses has recently received much attention. Here, a new approach is described using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism to investigated emagnetization and magnetization switching processes. In contrast to magneto-optical measurements, x-ray dichroism has the advantage of determining separately the spin and orbital components of the magnetic moment. The relatively low time resolution of the synchrotron x-ray probe pulses (80 ps FWHM) is overcome by employing an ultrafast x-ray streak camera with a time resolution of <1 ps. A description of the experimental setup including the x-ray/IR laser pulse synchronization and the streak camera is given.

  18. Positioning X-Ray Film With String And Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosa, William D.; Anders, Jeffrey E.

    1990-01-01

    Technique devised to position x-ray film in normally inaccessible places for inspection of welded joints. Lead/magnet markers and string attached to ends of strips of x-ray film to facilitate positioning. Fewer shots required than in random trial-and-error sequence, and resulting images more accurate.

  19. X-ray Polarisation in highly-magnetized neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turolla, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    Radiation emitted in the vicinity of an isolated neutron star is expected to be intrinsically polarized because the high magnetic field (B˜10^{12}-10^{15} G) strongly affects the plasma opacity. The polarization fraction and polarization angle measured by an instrument, however, do not necessary coincide with the intrinsic ones, due to the effects of both quantum electrodynamics in the highly magnetized vacuum around the star (the vacuum polarization) and rotation of the Stokes parameters in the plane perpendicular to the line of sight induced by the non-uniform magnetic field. I'll review theoretical estimates for the polarization observables in the case of thermal surface emission from neutron stars and of the (soft) X-ray emission from magnetars, where magnetospheric reprocessing of radiation by resonant cyclotron scattering is important. The potentials of X-ray polarimetry to probe the physical conditions in neutron star sources and to test, for the first time, vacuum polarization are discussed in connection with the recently proposed polarimetric missions, like XIPE.

  20. Magnetic circular dichroism in the hard X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogalev, A.; Wilhelm, F.

    2015-12-01

    An overview of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectroscopy in the hard X-ray range is presented. A short historical overview shows how this technique has evolved from the early days of X-ray physics to become a workhorse technique in the modern magnetism research As with all X-ray spectroscopies, XMCD has the advantage of being element specific. Interpretation of the spectra based on magneto-optical sum rules can provide unique information about spin and orbital moment carried by absorbing atom in both amplitude and direction, can infer magnetic interactions from element selective magnetization curves, can allow separation of magnetic and non-magnetic components in heterogeneous systems. The review details the technology currently available for XMCD measurements in the hard X-ray range referring to the ESRF beamline ID12 as an example. The strengths of hard X-ray magnetic circular dichroism technique are illustrated with a wide variety of representative examples, such as actinide based ferromagnets, paramagnetism in metals, pure metallic nanoparticles, exchange spring magnets, half metallic ferromagnets, magnetism at interfaces, and dilute magnetic semiconductors. In this way, we aim to encourage researchers from various scientific communities to consider XMCD as a tool to understanding the electronic and magnetic properties of their samples.

  1. X-ray tube with magnetic electron steering

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Kim W.; Turman, Bobby N.; Kaye, Ronald J.; Schneider, Larry X.

    2000-01-01

    An X-ray tube uses a magnetic field to steer electrons. The magnetic field urges electrons toward the anode, increasing the proportion of electrons emitted from the cathode that reach desired portions of the anode and consequently contribute to X-ray production. The magnetic field also urges electrons reflected from the anode back to the anode, further increasing the efficiency of the tube.

  2. Imprinting Magnetic Information in Manganites with X Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garganourakis, M.; Scagnoli, V.; Huang, S. W.; Staub, U.; Wadati, H.; Nakamura, M.; Guzenko, V. A.; Kawasaki, M.; Tokura, Y.

    2012-10-01

    The effect of x rays on an orbital and charge ordered epitaxial film of a Pr0.5Ca0.5MnO3 is presented. As the film is exposed to x rays, the antiferromagnetic response increases and concomitantly the conductivity of the film improve. These results are discussed in terms of a persistent x-ray induced doping, leading to a modification of the magnetic structure. This effect allows writing electronic and magnetic information in the film and represents a novel way of manipulating magnetism.

  3. Imprinting magnetic information in manganites with x rays.

    PubMed

    Garganourakis, M; Scagnoli, V; Huang, S W; Staub, U; Wadati, H; Nakamura, M; Guzenko, V A; Kawasaki, M; Tokura, Y

    2012-10-12

    The effect of x rays on an orbital and charge ordered epitaxial film of a Pr0.5Ca0.5MnO3 is presented. As the film is exposed to x rays, the antiferromagnetic response increases and concomitantly the conductivity of the film improve. These results are discussed in terms of a persistent x-ray induced doping, leading to a modification of the magnetic structure. This effect allows writing electronic and magnetic information in the film and represents a novel way of manipulating magnetism. PMID:23102361

  4. Neonatal body composition: dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, magnetic resonance imaging, and three-dimensional chemical shift imaging versus chemical analysis in piglets.

    PubMed

    Fusch, C; Slotboom, J; Fuehrer, U; Schumacher, R; Keisker, A; Zimmermann, W; Moessinger, A; Boesch, C; Blum, J

    1999-10-01

    An animal study to evaluate dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and spectroscopy for measurement of neonatal body composition was performed. Twenty-three piglets with body weights ranging from 848 to 7550 g were used. After measuring total body water, animals were killed and body composition was assessed using DXA and MR (1.5 T; MR imaging, T1-weighted sagittal spin-echo sequence; MR spectroscopy, three-dimensional chemical shift imaging) as well as chemical carcass analysis (standard methods) after homogenization. Body composition by chemical analysis (percent of body weight, mean +/- SD) was as follows: body water, 75.3 +/- 3.9%; total protein, 13.9 +/- 8.8%; and total fat, 6.5 +/- 3.7%. Absolute content of fat and total ash was 7-674 and 35-237 g, respectively. Mean hydration of fat-free mass was 0.804 +/- 0.011 g/kg and decreased with increasing body weight (r2 = 0.419) independent of age. Using DXA, bone mineral content was highly correlated with calcium content (r2 = 0.992), and calcium per bone mineral content was 44.1 +/- 4.2%. DXA fat mass correlated with total fat (r2 = 0.961). Using MR, spectroscopy and chemical analysis were highly correlated with fat-to-water ratio (r2 = 0.984) and absolute fat content (r2 = 0.988). Total fat by MR imaging volumetry showed a lower correlation (r2 = 0.913) and overestimated total fat by a factor of 2.46. Conversion equations for DXA were developed (total fat = 1.31 x fat mass measured by DXA--68.8; calcium = 0.402 x bone mineral content + 1.7), which improved precision and accuracy of DXA measurements. In conclusion, both DXA and MR spectroscopy give accurate and precise estimates of neonatal body composition and may become valuable tools for the noninvasive assessment of neonatal growth and nutritional status. PMID:10509370

  5. Simultaneous surface plasmon resonance and x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Serrano, A; Rodríguez de la Fuente, O; Collado, V; Rubio-Zuazo, J; Monton, C; Castro, G R; García, M A

    2012-08-01

    We present an experimental setup for the simultaneous measurement of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) on metallic thin films at a synchrotron beamline. The system allows measuring in situ and in real time the effect of x-ray irradiation on the SPR curves to explore the interaction of x-rays with matter. It is also possible to record XAS spectra while exciting SPR in order to study changes in the films induced by the excitation of surface plasmons. Combined experiments recording simultaneously SPR and XAS curves while scanning different parameters can be also carried out. The relative variations in the SPR and XAS spectra that can be detected with this setup range from 10(-3) to 10(-5), depending on the particular experiment. PMID:22938268

  6. Simultaneous surface plasmon resonance and x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, A.; Rodriguez de la Fuente, O.; Collado, V.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Castro, G. R.; Monton, C.; Garcia, M. A.

    2012-08-15

    We present an experimental setup for the simultaneous measurement of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) on metallic thin films at a synchrotron beamline. The system allows measuring in situ and in real time the effect of x-ray irradiation on the SPR curves to explore the interaction of x-rays with matter. It is also possible to record XAS spectra while exciting SPR in order to study changes in the films induced by the excitation of surface plasmons. Combined experiments recording simultaneously SPR and XAS curves while scanning different parameters can be also carried out. The relative variations in the SPR and XAS spectra that can be detected with this setup range from 10{sup -3} to 10{sup -5}, depending on the particular experiment.

  7. X-ray radiation from accreting, magnetized neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, G.G.

    1984-01-01

    A review is given of recent developments in the theory of emission from a magnetized plasma for accreting neutron star conditions. Some observational data on X-ray pulsars are discussed, and present problems are indicated. 26 references.

  8. Magnetically confined wind shocks in X-rays - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ud-Doula, Asif; Nazé, Yaël

    2016-09-01

    A subset (∼ 10%) of massive stars present strong, globally ordered (mostly dipolar) magnetic fields. The trapping and channeling of their stellar winds in closed magnetic loops leads to magnetically confined wind shocks (MCWS), with pre-shock flow speeds that are some fraction of the wind terminal speed. These shocks generate hot plasma, a source of X-rays. In the last decade, several developments took place, notably the determination of the hot plasma properties for a large sample of objects using XMM and Chandra, as well as fully self-consistent MHD modeling and the identification of shock retreat effects in weak winds. Despite a few exceptions, the combination of magnetic confinement, shock retreat and rotation effects seems to be able to account for X-ray emission in massive OB stars. Here we review these new observational and theoretical aspects of this X-ray emission and envisage some perspectives for the next generation of X-ray observatories.

  9. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D.; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J.; Mancuso, Christopher A.; Hogle, Craig W.; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L.; Dorney, Kevin M.; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G.; Fullerton, Eric E.; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M.; Milošević, Dejan B.; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A.; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform. PMID:26534992

  10. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J; Mancuso, Christopher A; Hogle, Craig W; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L; Dorney, Kevin M; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G; Fullerton, Eric E; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M; Milošević, Dejan B; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C

    2015-11-17

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform. PMID:26534992

  11. Frontiers in imaging magnetism with polarized x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Peter

    2015-01-08

    Although magnetic imaging with polarized x-rays is a rather young scientific discipline, the various types of established x-ray microscopes have already taken an important role in state-of-the-art characterization of the properties and behavior of spin textures in advanced materials. The opportunities ahead will be to obtain in a unique way indispensable multidimensional information of the structure, dynamics and composition of scientifically interesting and technologically relevant magnetic materials.

  12. Longitudinal detection of ferromagnetic resonance using x-ray transmission measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Boero, G.; Rusponi, S.; Kavich, J.; Rizzini, A. Lodi; Piamonteze, C.; Nolting, F.; Tieg, C.; Thiele, J.-U.; Gambardella, P.

    2009-12-15

    We describe a setup for the x-ray detection of ferromagnetic resonance in the longitudinal geometry using element-specific transmission measurements. Thin magnetic film samples are placed in a static magnetic field collinear with the propagation direction of a polarized soft x-ray beam and driven to ferromagnetic resonance by a continuous wave microwave magnetic field perpendicular to it. The transmitted photon flux is measured both as a function of the x-ray photon energy and as a function of the applied static magnetic field. We report experiments performed on a 15 nm film of doped Permalloy (Ni{sub 73}Fe{sub 18}Gd{sub 7}Co{sub 2}) at the L{sub 3}/L{sub 2}-edges of Fe, Co, and Ni. The achieved ferromagnetic resonance sensitivity is about 0.1 monolayers/{radical}(Hz). The obtained results are interpreted in the framework of a conductivity tensor based formalism. The factors limiting the sensitivity as well as different approaches for the x-ray detection of ferromagnetic resonance are discussed.

  13. Imaging magnetic structures with a transmission X-ray microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, P.; Eimüller, T.; Schütz, G.; Guttmann, P.; Schmahl, G.; Bayreuther, G.

    2000-05-01

    The X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (X-MCD), i.e., the dependence of the absorption of circularly polarized X-rays on the magnetization of the absorber exhibits at L-edges of transition metals values up to 25%. This can serve as a huge magnetic contrast mechanism in combination with a transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) to image magnetic domains providing a lateral resolution down to about 30 nm. The inherent element-specificity, the possibility to record images in varying external fields within a complete hysteresis loop, the relation of the contrast to local magnetic spin and orbital moments, etc. demonstrate the unique applicability to study the magnetic domain structure in current technical relevant systems like magneto-optics for high density storage media, multilayers for GMR applications or nanostructures for MRAM technology.

  14. Magnetic Untwisting in Most Solar X-Ray Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Falconer, David; Robe, Dominic

    2013-01-01

    From 54 X-ray jets observed in the polar coronal holes by Hinode's X-Ray Telescope (XRT) during coverage in movies from Solar Dynamic Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) taken in its He II 304 Å band at a cadence of 12 s, we have established a basic characteristic of solar X-ray jets: untwisting motion in the spire. In this presentation, we show the progression of few of these X-ray jets in XRT images and track their untwisting in AIA He II images. From their structure displayed in their XRT movies, 19 jets were evidently standard jets made by interchange reconnection of the magnetic-arcade base with ambient open field, 32 were evidently blowout jets made by blowout eruption of the base arcade, and 3 were of ambiguous form. As was anticipated from the >10,000 km span of the base arcade in most polar X-ray jets and from the disparity of standard jets and blowout jets in their magnetic production, few of the standard X-ray jets (3 of 19) but nearly all of the blowout X-ray jets (29 of 32) carried enough cool (T is approximately 105 K) plasma to be seen in their He II movies. In the 32 X-ray jets that showed a cool component, the He II movies show 10-100 km/s untwisting motions about the axis of the spire in all 3 standard jets and in 26 of the 29 blowout jets. Evidently, the open magnetic field in nearly all blowout X-ray jets and probably in most standard X-ray jets carries transient twist. This twist apparently relaxes by propagating out along the open field as a torsional wave. High-resolution spectrograms and Dopplergrams have shown that most Type-II spicules have torsional motions of 10-30 km/s. Our observation of similar torsional motion in X-ray jets strengthens the case for Type-II spicules being made in the same way as X-ray jets, by blowout eruption of a twisted magnetic arcade in the spicule base and/or by interchange reconnection of the twisted base arcade with the ambient open field. This work was funded by NASA's Heliophysics Division

  15. X-ray holographic imaging of magnetic order in patterned Co/Pd multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spezzani, Carlo; Fortuna, Franck; Delaunay, Renaud; Popescu, Horia; Sacchi, Maurizio

    2013-12-01

    We address the role of lateral confinement in determining the micromagnetic structure of small objects featuring perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We have imaged the spatial distribution of magnetic domains in Co/Pd multilayered objects by x-ray holography in transmission mode, a technique based on resonant coherent scattering of polarized x rays. In addition to high spatial resolution and magnetic sensitivity, x-ray holography features chemical selectivity and probes the entire bulk of the magnetic sample. By analyzing and comparing images of several magnetic objects (squares and rectangles with 0.4-3-μm lateral sizes) that underwent the same preparation procedure and magnetic history, we highlight the influence of the object shape and of its orientation with respect to an external field in determining the remanent magnetic microstructure. The discussion of our results is backed by micromagnetic calculations.

  16. Magnetic x-ray dichroism in ultrathin epitaxial films

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J.G.; Goodman, K.W.; Cummins, T.R.

    1997-04-01

    The authors have used Magnetic X-ray Linear Dichroism (MXLD) and Magnetic X-ray Circular Dichroism (MXCD) to study the magnetic properties of epitaxial overlayers in an elementally specific fashion. Both MXLD and MXCD Photoelectron Spectroscopy were performed in a high resolution mode at the Spectromicroscopy Facility of the ALS. Circular Polarization was obtained via the utilization of a novel phase retarder (soft x-ray quarter wave plate) based upon transmission through a multilayer film. The samples were low temperature Fe overlayers, magnetic alloy films of NiFe and CoNi, and Gd grown on Y. The authors results include a direct comparison of high resolution angle resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy performed in MXLD and MXCD modes as well as structural studies with photoelectron diffraction.

  17. The relationship between partial pressure of oxygen and perfusion in two murine tumors after X-ray irradiation: a combined gadopentetate dimeglumine dynamic magnetic resonance imaging and in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry study.

    PubMed

    Goda, F; Bacic, G; O'Hara, J A; Gallez, B; Swartz, H M; Dunn, J F

    1996-07-15

    Changes of partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) and blood perfusion were studied in MTG-B and RIF-1 tumors (n = 5 each) before and after a single 20-Gy dose of X-ray irradiation. Using electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry, we have observed an initial fast decrease of pO2 after irradiation, followed by a slow increase. The time course of these changes was faster in the MTG-B tumors than in the RIF-1 tumors. Gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA) dynamic magnetic resonance imaging studies showed a reduction in uptake of Gd-DTPA at the time of minimum pO2 and a recovery at the time of maximum pO2 in each tumor. Previous work indicates that there is microscopic heterogeneity in tumors, with well-vascularized "capillary regions" being closer to capillaries than poorly vascularized "noncapillary regions." We propose a two-component (slow and fast) model of Gd-DTPA uptake that is designed to quantify the kinetics of these two compartments by analyzing the total tumor uptake kinetics without having to identify specific regions of interest. Total perfusion in the tumors was greatly reduced at the time of minimum oxygenation, and the volume of the slow component increased after irradiation. We conclude that a decrease in blood perfusion is one of the main causes of the decline in pO2 observed after irradiation. PMID:8764132

  18. Stellar X-ray Emission From Magnetically Funneled Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Hans

    Stars and planets form in giant molecular clouds, so they are deeply embedded in their early stages. When they become optically visible, the young stars are still surrounded by a proto-planetary disk, where planets evolve. These stars are called classical T Tauri stars (CTTS). A key, yet poorly constrained, parameter for the disk evolution is the stellar high-energy emission. It can ionize the outer layers of the disk, change its chemistry and even drive photoevaporation of the disk. Thus the spectral shape and the temporal variability of the stellar X-ray and UV emission shapes the gas and dust properties in some regions of the disk. It sets the photoevaporation timescale which provides an upper limit for planet formation. CTTS still actively accrete mass from their disk. The infalling matter is funneled by the stellar magnetic field and impacts on the star close to free fall velocity. A hot accretion shock develops, which emits X-rays which are distinct from any coronal X-rays. Eventually the disk disperses and bulk planet formation comes to an end. X-ray emitting shocks can still occur at a later stage in stellar evolution, if e.g. the magnetic field is strong enough to funnel the stellar wind to collide in the disk midplane. This so-called magnetically confined wind shock model was originally developed for the A0p star IQ Aur. The magnetically funneled accretion model has been successfully tested for CTTS in a small mass range only; the magnetically confined wind shock model lacks a comparison for high-resolution X-ray grating spectra for all but the most massive stars. In this proposal we request funding to analyze three XMM-Newton observations, which will probe X-ray emitting shocks in stars with magnetic fields: DN Tau (observed as category C target in cycle 8), a CTTS with much lower mass than previous CTTS with X- ray grating spectroscopy; MN Lup (to be observed in cycle 9), a prime candidate for simultaneous X-ray/Doppler-imaging studies; and IQ Aur (to

  19. Interference between magnetism and surface roughness in coherent soft X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmim, A.; Tixier, S.; Tiedje, T.; Eisebitt, S.; Lorgen, M.; Scherer, R.; Eberhardt, W.; Luning, J.; Scholl, A.

    2002-06-15

    In coherent soft x-ray scattering from magnetically ordered surfaces there are contributions to the scattering from the magnetic domains, from the surface roughness, and from the diffraction associated with the pinhole aperture used as a coherence filter. In the present work, we explore the interplay between these contributions by analyzing speckle patterns in diffusely scattered x rays from the surface of magnetic thin films. Magnetic contrast from the surface of anti ferro magnetically ordered LaFeO3 films is caused by magnetic linear dichroism in resonant x-ray scattering. The samples studied possess two types of domains with their magnetic orientations perpendicular to each other. By tuning the x-ray energy from one of the two Fe-L3 resonant absorption peaks to the other, the relative amplitudes of the x-ray scattering from the two domains is inverted which results in speckle pattern changes. A theoretical expression is derived for the intensity correlation between the speckle patterns with the magnetic contrast inverted and not inverted. The model is found to be in good agreement with the x-ray-scattering observations and independent measurements of the surface roughness. An analytical expression for the correlation function gives an explicit relation between the change in the speckle pattern and the roughness, and magnetic and aperture scattering. Changes in the speckle pattern are shown to arise from beating of magnetic scattering with the roughness scattering and diffraction from the aperture. The largest effect is found when the surface roughness scatter is comparable in intensity to the magnetic scatter.

  20. Synthesis, X-ray structure, magnetic resonance, and DFT analysis of a soluble copper(II) phthalocyanine lacking C-H bonds.

    PubMed

    Moons, Hans; Łapok, Łukasz; Loas, Andrei; Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Gorun, Sergiu M

    2010-10-01

    The synthesis, crystal structure, and electronic properties of perfluoro-isopropyl-substituted perfluorophthalocyanine bearing a copper atom in the central cavity (F(64)PcCu) are reported. While most halogenated phthalocyanines do not exhibit long-term order sufficient to form large single crystals, this is not the case for F(64)PcCu. Its crystal structure was determined by X-ray analysis and linked to the electronic properties determined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The findings are corroborated by density functional theory (DFT) computations, which agree well with the experiment. X-band continuous-wave EPR spectra of undiluted F(64)PcCu powder, indicate the existence of isolated metal centers. The electron-withdrawing effect of the perfluoroalkyl (R(f)) groups significantly enhances the complexes solubility in organic solvents like alcohols, including via their axial coordination. This coordination is confirmed by X-band (1)H HYSCORE experiments and is also seen in the solid state via the X-ray structure. Detailed X-band CW-EPR, X-band Davies and Mims ENDOR, and W-band electron spin-echo-detected EPR studies of F(64)PcCu in ethanol allow the determination of the principal g values and the hyperfine couplings of the metal, nitrogen, and fluorine nuclei. Comparison of the g and metal hyperfine values of F(64)PcCu and other PcCu complexes in different matrices reveals a dominant effect of the matrix on these EPR parameters, while variations in the ring substituents have only a secondary effect. The relatively strong axial coordination occurs despite the diminished covalency of the C-N bonds and potentially weakening Jahn-Teller effects. Surprisingly, natural abundance (13)C HYSCORE signals could be observed for a frozen ethanol solution of F(64)PcCu. The (13)C nuclei contributing to the HYSCORE spectra could be identified as the pyrrole carbons by means of DFT. Finally, (19)F ENDOR and easily observable paramagnetic NMR were found to relate well to the

  1. X-RAY EMISSION FROM MAGNETIC MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Nazé, Yaël; Petit, Véronique; Rinbrand, Melanie; Owocki, Stan; Cohen, David; Ud-Doula, Asif; Wade, Gregg A.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetically confined winds of early-type stars are expected to be sources of bright and hard X-rays. To clarify the systematics of the observed X-ray properties, we have analyzed a large series of Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, corresponding to all available exposures of known massive magnetic stars (over 100 exposures covering ∼60% of stars compiled in the catalog of Petit et al.). We show that the X-ray luminosity is strongly correlated with the stellar wind mass-loss rate, with a power-law form that is slightly steeper than linear for the majority of the less luminous, lower- M-dot B stars and flattens for the more luminous, higher- M-dot O stars. As the winds are radiatively driven, these scalings can be equivalently written as relations with the bolometric luminosity. The observed X-ray luminosities, and their trend with mass-loss rates, are well reproduced by new MHD models, although a few overluminous stars (mostly rapidly rotating objects) exist. No relation is found between other X-ray properties (plasma temperature, absorption) and stellar or magnetic parameters, contrary to expectations (e.g., higher temperature for stronger mass-loss rate). This suggests that the main driver for the plasma properties is different from the main determinant of the X-ray luminosity. Finally, variations of the X-ray hardnesses and luminosities, in phase with the stellar rotation period, are detected for some objects and they suggest that some temperature stratification exists in massive stars' magnetospheres.

  2. Resonant soft x-ray scattering investigation of orbital and magnetic ordering in La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}MnO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, S.B.; Stojic, N.; Binggeli, N.; Beale, T.A.W.; Hatton, P.D.; Castleton, C.W.M.; Prabhakaran, D.; Boothroyd, A.T.; Altarelli, M.

    2005-06-15

    We report resonant x-ray scattering data of the orbital and magnetic ordering at low temperatures at the Mn L{sub 2,3} edges in La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}MnO{sub 4}. The orderings display complex energy features close to the Mn absorption edges. Systematic modeling with atomic multiplet crystal field calculations was used to extract meaningful information regarding the interplay of spin, orbital, and Jahn-Teller order. These calculations provide a good general agreement with the observed energy dependence of the scattered intensity for a dominant orbital ordering of the d{sub x{sup 2}}{sub -z{sup 2}}/d{sub y{sup 2}}{sub -z{sup 2}} type. In addition, the origins of various spectral features are identified. The temperature dependence of the orbital and magnetic ordering was measured and suggests a strong interplay between the magnetic and orbital order parameters.

  3. Imaging of magnetic domains by transmission x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, P.; Eimüller, T.; Schütz, G.; Guttmann, P.; Schmahl, G.; Pruegl, K.; Bayreuther, G.

    1998-03-01

    The combination of the high-resolution transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) based on the zone plate technique with the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (X-MCD) providing a huge magnetic contrast is a new technique to image magnetic domain structures. It is inherently element specific and contains information on the local spin and orbital moments of the absorbing species that can be obtained by applying magneto-optical sum rules. A lateral spatial resolution depending on the quality of the zone plates down to 30 nm can be achieved. We report on first results at the Fe 0022-3727/31/6/012/img9 edges of Fe both in amorphous and in multilayered Gd-Fe systems. With a TXM set-up at BESSY I adapted to record magnetic images in varying magnetic fields the evolution of magnetic domains within a complete hysteresis loop and magnetic aftereffects have been studied.

  4. Robust x-ray tubes for use within magnetic fields of MR scanners.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhifei; Fahrig, Rebecca; Pelc, Norbert J

    2005-07-01

    A hybrid system that combines an x-ray fluoroscopic system and a magnetic resonance (MR) system can provide physicians with the synergy of exquisite soft tissue contrast (from MR) and high temporal and spatial resolutions (from x ray), which may significantly benefit a number of image-guided interventional procedures. However, the system configuration may require the x-ray tube to be placed in a magnetic field, which can hinder the proper functioning of the x-ray tube by deflecting its electron beam. From knowledge of how the magnetic field affects the electron trajectories, we propose creating another magnetic field along the cathode-anode axis using either solenoids or permanent magnets to reduce the deflection of the electron beam for two cases: a strong and slightly misaligned field or a weak field that is arbitrary in direction. Theoretical analysis is presented and the electron beam is simulated in various external magnetic fields with a finite element modeling program. Results show that both correction schemes enhance the robustness of the x-ray tube operation in an externally applied magnetic field. PMID:16121589

  5. X-rays and magnetism: a review of program in magnetic studies with polarized soft x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Peter; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    Magnetism is among the most active and attractive areas in modern solid state physics because of intriguing phenomena interesting to fundamental research and a manifold of technological applications. State-of-the-art synthesis of advanced magnetic materials, e.g. in hybrid structures paves the way to new functionalities. To characterize modern magnetic materials and the associated magnetic phenomena, polarized x-rays have emerged as unique probes due to their specific interaction with magnetic materials. A large variety of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques have been developed to quantify in an element, valence and site-sensitive way properties of ferro-, ferri-, and antiferromagnetic systems, such as spin and orbital moments, and to image nanoscale spin textures and their dynamics with sub-ns time and almost 10 nm spatial resolution. The enormous intensity of x-rays and their degree of coherence at next generation x-ray facilities will open the fsec time window to magnetic studies addressing fundamental time scales in magnetism with nanometer spatial resolution. This review will give an introduction into contemporary topics of nanoscale magnetic materials and provide an overview of analytical spectroscopy and microscopy tools based on x-ray dichroism effects. Selected examples of current research will demonstrate the potential and future directions of these techniques.

  6. Orbital and magnetic ordering in Pr1-xCaxMnO3 and Nd1-xSrxMnO3 manganites near half doping studied by resonant soft x-ray powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staub, U.; García-Fernández, M.; Bodenthin, Y.; Scagnoli, V.; de Souza, R. A.; Garganourakis, M.; Pomjakushina, E.; Conder, K.

    2009-06-01

    Here we present resonant soft x-ray diffraction data in the vicinity of the MnL2,3 edges on R1-xTxMnO3 manganites ( R=Pr , Nd and T=Ca , Sr) close to half doping. For Pr0.6Ca0.4MnO3 (PCMO), the energy dependence of the superimposed orbital and magnetic reflections are studied using various incident x-ray polarizations. For Nd0.5Sr0.5MnO3 (NSMO), the energy dependence of the orbital ordering reflection is found to be very similar to that found in other manganites systems. These two results are compared to those presented in the literature on single-crystal samples. Whereas our results are in good agreement with the spectral shape of a superposition of magnetic and orbital signals in PCMO, the magnetic signals are only moderately larger than the orbital signals. The results on NSMO do not agree with previously presented data on single crystals and cast doubt on the proposed occurrence of a double-stripe orbital order.

  7. Detecting magnetic flux distributions in superconductors with polarized x rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Claudia; Audehm, Patrick; Gräfe, Joachim; Ruoß, Stephen; Weigand, Markus; Schmidt, Mathias; Treiber, Sebastian; Bechtel, Michael; Goering, Eberhard; Schütz, Gisela; Albrecht, Joachim

    2014-09-01

    The magnetic flux distribution arising from a high-Tc superconductor is detected and visualized using polarized x rays. Therefore, we introduce a sensor layer, namely, an amorphous, soft-magnetic Co40Fe40B20 cover layer, providing a large x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). Temperature-dependent XMCD spectroscopy on the magnetic layer has been performed. Exploiting the temperature dependence of the critical current density of the superconductor we find a quantitative correlation between the XMCD signal and the in-plane stray field of the superconductor. Magneto-optical Kerr effect experiments on the sensor layer can simulate the stray field of the superconductor and hence verify the correlation. We show that the XMCD contrast in the sensor layer corresponds to the in-plane magnetic flux distribution of the superconductor and can hence be used to image magnetic structures in superconductors.

  8. In situ small-angle x-ray and nuclear resonant scattering study of the evolution of structural and magnetic properties of an Fe thin film on MgO (001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Gagan; Gupta, Ajay; Gupta, Mukul; Schlage, Kai; Wille, H.-C.

    2015-12-01

    Growth of magnetron sputtered Fe films on clean single crystalline MgO (001) substrate has been studied using in situ grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) and grazing incidence nuclear resonant scattering (GINRS) measurements. While GISAXS provides information about morphological changes, GINRS provides information about structural and magnetic properties, thus making it possible to correlate the evolution of magnetic properties with that of morphology and structure of the film. The film exhibits a Volmer-Weber type growth, with percolation transition occurring around 2 nm film thickness. Presence of a finite quadrupole splitting, as seen in GINRS measurements, suggests a significant distortion from cubic symmetry up to a film thickness of 3.5 nm, which can be attributed to hybridization between Fe 3 d and O 2 p orbitals at the interface as well as in-plane tensile strain induced as a result of coalescence of islands. Initially Fe islands exhibit superparamagnetic relaxation, while finite magnetic moment appears upon formation of macroscopic percolation islands. The film exhibits a weak perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA), which vanishes concurrently with disappearance of structural distortion, suggesting that the observed PMA at least partly originates from inherent strain in the film. No presence of any known oxide of Fe was detected at the interface. More precise information about topological and magnetic structure of the interfaces between Fe and MgO layers is obtained using combined x-ray reflectivity and nuclear resonance reflectivity measurements on a 57Fe/MgO multilayer. Measurements show that about two monolayers of Fe at the interface have a reduced hyperfine field, providing evidence for hybridization with O atoms, as predicted by theory.

  9. Microfabrication of High Resolution X-ray Magnetic Calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, W.-T.; Stevenson, Thomas R.; Bandler, Simon R.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Porst, Jan P.; Rotzinger, Hannes; Seidel, George M.

    2009-12-16

    Metallic magnetic calorimeter (MMC) is one of the most promising x-ray detector technologies for providing the very high energy resolution needed for future astronomical x-ray imaging spectroscopy. For this purpose, we have developed micro-fabricated 5x5 arrays of MMC of which each individual pixel has excellent energy resolution as good as 3.4 eV at 6 keV x-ray. Here we report on the fabrication techniques developed to achieve good resolution and high efficiency. These include: processing of a thin insulation layer for strong magnetic coupling between the AuEr sensor film and the niobium pick-up coil; production of overhanging absorbers for enhanced efficiency of x-ray absorption; fabrication on SiN membranes to minimize the effects on energy resolution from athermal phonon loss. We have also improved the deposition of the magnetic sensor film such that the film magnetization is nearly completely that is expected from the AuEr sputter target bulk material. In addition, we have included a study of a positional sensitive design, the Hydra design, which allows thermal coupling of four absorbers to a common MMC sensor and circuit.

  10. Microfabrication of High Resolution X-ray Magnetic Calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Bandler, Simon R.; Kelly, Daniel P.; Porst, Jan P.; Rotzinger, Hannes; Seidel, George M.; Stevenson, Thomas R.

    2009-12-01

    Metallic magnetic calorimeter (MMC) is one of the most promising x-ray detector technologies for providing the very high energy resolution needed for future astronomical x-ray imaging spectroscopy. For this purpose, we have developed micro-fabricated 5×5 arrays of MMC of which each individual pixel has excellent energy resolution as good as 3.4 eV at 6 keV x-ray. Here we report on the fabrication techniques developed to achieve good resolution and high efficiency. These include: processing of a thin insulation layer for strong magnetic coupling between the AuEr sensor film and the niobium pick-up coil; production of overhanging absorbers for enhanced efficiency of x-ray absorption; fabrication on SiN membranes to minimize the effects on energy resolution from athermal phonon loss. We have also improved the deposition of the magnetic sensor film such that the film magnetization is nearly completely that is expected from the AuEr sputter target bulk material. In addition, we have included a study of a positional sensitive design, the Hydra design, which allows thermal coupling of four absorbers to a common MMC sensor and circuit.

  11. Suzaku observations of cyclotron resonances in binary X-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Y.; Mihara, T.; Nagase, F.; Angelini, L.; Dotani, T.; Enoto, T.; Kitamoto, S.; Kohmura, T.; Kokubun, M.; Kotani, T.; Makishima, K.; Naik, S.; Nakajima, M.; Sugita, S.; Sudoh, K.; Suzuki, M.; Takahashi, H.; Yonetoku, D.; Yoshida, A.

    Since the typical magnetic field strengths of neutron stars reach 10 12 Gauss, the cyclotron resonance produced by a transition between Landau levels appears in the X-ray band. Systematic measurements of cyclotron absorption features in bright sources have been carried out extensively with Ginga, RXTE, BeppoSAX, and INTEGRAL. The cyclotron resonance phenomena can now be studied with a higher sensitivity over a wider hard X-ray band than before, thanks to the Hard X-ray Detector onboard the fifth Japanese X-ray satellite, Suzaku, launched in July, 2005. Suzaku observed Hercules X-1 mainly for calibration purposes, and successfully confirmed its well-known cyclotron absorption feature. Furthermore, the transient pulsar A0535+262 was observed with Suzaku on 14 September, 2005, in the decay phase of its minor outburst (Finger, M.F. Renewed Activity from A0535+26. The Astronomer's Telegram, vol. 595, 2005). The cyclotron resonance of A0535+262 was successfully detected in absorption at about 45 keV (Inoue, H., Kunieda, H., White, N., Kelley, R., Mihara, T., Terada, Y., Takahashi, H., Kokubun, M., Makishima, K. Suzaku detection of cyclotron line near 50 keV for A0535+26. The Astronomer's Telegram vol. 595, 2005; Terada, Y., Mihara, T., Nakajima, M., et al. Cyclotron resonance energies at a low X-ray luminosity: A0535+262 observed with Suzaku. ApJL 648, L139-L142, 2006), even though the object was as dim as 30 mCrab at 20 keV. Compared with previous measurements of the same feature achieved at much brighter phases (e.g., Kretschmar, P., Kreykenbohm, I., Pottschmidt, et al. Integral observes possible cyclotron line at 47 keV for 1A0535+262. The Astronomer's Telegram, vol. 601, 2005; Wilson, C.A., Finger, M.H. RXTE confirms cyclotron line near 50 keV for A0535+26. The Astronomer's Telegram 605, 2005), the Suzaku results give a new constraint to luminosity-related changes in the resonance energy that are observed in other binary pulsars (Nakajima, M., Mihara, T., Makishima

  12. Implications of stimulated resonant X-ray scattering for spectroscopy, imaging, and diffraction in the regime from soft to hard X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Simon; Beye, Martin; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    The ultrahigh peak brilliance available at X-ray free-electron lasers opens the possibility to transfer nonlinear spectroscopic techniques from the optical and infrared into the X-ray regime. Here, we present a conceptual treatment of nonlinear X-ray processes with an emphasis on stimulated resonant X-ray scattering as well as a quantitative estimate for the scaling of stimulated X-ray scattering cross sections. These considerations provide the order of magnitude for the required X-ray intensities to experimentally observe stimulated resonant X-ray scattering for photon energies ranging from the extreme ultraviolet to the soft and hard X-ray regimes. At the same time, the regime where stimulated processes can safely be ignored is identified. With this basis, we discuss prospects and implications for spectroscopy, scattering, and imaging experiments at X-ray free-electron lasers.

  13. Logical operations with single x-ray photons via dynamically-controlled nuclear resonances

    PubMed Central

    Gunst, Jonas; Keitel, Christoph H.; Pálffy, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Photonic qubits lie at the heart of quantum information technology, often encoding information in their polarization state. So far, only low-frequency optical and infrared photons have been employed as flying qubits, as the resources that are at present easiest to control. With their essentially different way of interacting with matter, x-ray qubits would bear however relevant advantages: they are extremely robust, penetrate deep through materials, and can be focused down to few-nm waveguides, allowing unprecedented miniaturization. Also, x-rays are resonant to nuclear transitions, which are very well isolated from the environment and present long coherence times. Here, we show theoretically that x-ray polarization qubits can be dynamically controlled by nuclear Mössbauer resonances. The control knob is played by nuclear hyperfine magnetic fields, that allow via fast rotations precise processing of single x-ray quanta polarization. With such rotations, single-qubit and binary logical operations such as a destructive C-NOT gate can be implemented. PMID:27118340

  14. Logical operations with single x-ray photons via dynamically-controlled nuclear resonances.

    PubMed

    Gunst, Jonas; Keitel, Christoph H; Pálffy, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Photonic qubits lie at the heart of quantum information technology, often encoding information in their polarization state. So far, only low-frequency optical and infrared photons have been employed as flying qubits, as the resources that are at present easiest to control. With their essentially different way of interacting with matter, x-ray qubits would bear however relevant advantages: they are extremely robust, penetrate deep through materials, and can be focused down to few-nm waveguides, allowing unprecedented miniaturization. Also, x-rays are resonant to nuclear transitions, which are very well isolated from the environment and present long coherence times. Here, we show theoretically that x-ray polarization qubits can be dynamically controlled by nuclear Mössbauer resonances. The control knob is played by nuclear hyperfine magnetic fields, that allow via fast rotations precise processing of single x-ray quanta polarization. With such rotations, single-qubit and binary logical operations such as a destructive C-NOT gate can be implemented. PMID:27118340

  15. Logical operations with single x-ray photons via dynamically-controlled nuclear resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunst, Jonas; Keitel, Christoph H.; Pálffy, Adriana

    2016-04-01

    Photonic qubits lie at the heart of quantum information technology, often encoding information in their polarization state. So far, only low-frequency optical and infrared photons have been employed as flying qubits, as the resources that are at present easiest to control. With their essentially different way of interacting with matter, x-ray qubits would bear however relevant advantages: they are extremely robust, penetrate deep through materials, and can be focused down to few-nm waveguides, allowing unprecedented miniaturization. Also, x-rays are resonant to nuclear transitions, which are very well isolated from the environment and present long coherence times. Here, we show theoretically that x-ray polarization qubits can be dynamically controlled by nuclear Mössbauer resonances. The control knob is played by nuclear hyperfine magnetic fields, that allow via fast rotations precise processing of single x-ray quanta polarization. With such rotations, single-qubit and binary logical operations such as a destructive C-NOT gate can be implemented.

  16. Magnetic properties of X-ray bright points. [in sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.; Krieger, A. S.; Harvey, J. W.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1977-01-01

    Using high-resolution Kitt Peak National Observatory magnetograms and sequences of simultaneous S-054 soft X-ray solar images, the properties of X-ray bright points (XBP) and ephemeral active regions (ER) are compared. All XBP appear on the magnetograms as bipolar features, except for very recently emerged or old and decayed XBP. The separation of the magnetic bipoles is found to increase with the age of the XBP, with an average emergence growth rate of 2.2 plus or minus 0.4 km per sec. The total magnetic flux in a typical XBP living about 8 hr is found to be about two times ten to the nineteenth power Mx. A proportionality is found between XBP lifetime and total magnetic flux, equivalent to about ten to the twentieth power Mx per day of lifetime.

  17. Evidence for hidden quadrupolar fluctuations behind the octupole order in Ce0.7La0.3B6 from resonant x-ray diffraction in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Takeshi; Michimura, Shinji; Inami, Toshiya; Otsubo, Toru; Tanida, Hiroshi; Iga, Fumitoshi; Sera, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    The multipole ordered phase in Ce0.7La0.3B6, emerging below 1.5 K and named phase IV, has been studied by resonant x-ray diffraction in magnetic fields. By utilizing diamond x-ray phase plates to rotate the incident linear polarization and a conventional crystal analyzer system, full linear polarization analysis has been performed to identify the order parameters. The analysis shows that the Γ5g(Oyz, Ozx, Oxy) quadrupoles are more induced by the field than the Γ3g (O20 and O22) quadrupoles on the Γ5u (Tx+y +zβ) antiferro-octupole order in phase IV. The problem is that this result is contradictory to a mean-field calculation, which inevitably gives the Γ3g quadrupole as the main induced moment. This result indicates that the Γ5g quadrupole order is close in energy. We consider that a large fluctuation of the Γ5g quadrupole is hidden behind the primary ordering of the Γ5u octupole and that the multipolar fluctuation significantly affects the ordering phenomenon.

  18. Investigation of electron trajectories of an x-ray tube in magnetic fields of MR scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Zhifei; Fahrig, Rebecca; Conolly, Steven; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2007-06-15

    A hybrid x-ray/MR system combining an x-ray fluoroscopic system and an open-bore magnetic resonance (MR) system offers advantages from both powerful imaging modalities and thus can benefit numerous image-guided interventional procedures. In our hybrid system configurations, the x-ray tube and detector are placed in the MR magnet and therefore experience a strong magnetic field. The electron beam inside the x-ray tube can be deflected by a misaligned magnetic field, which may damage the tube. Understanding the deflection process is crucial to predicting the electron beam deflection and avoiding potential damage to the x-ray tube. For this purpose, the motion of an electron in combined electric (E) and magnetic (B) fields was analyzed theoretically to provide general solutions that can be applied to different geometries. For two specific cases, a slightly misaligned strong field and a perpendicular weak field, computer simulations were performed with a finite-element method program. In addition, experiments were conducted using an open MRI magnet and an inserted electromagnet to quantitatively verify the relationship between the deflections and the field misalignment. In a strong (B>>E/c; c: speed of light) and slightly misaligned magnetic field, the deflection in the plane of E and B caused by electrons following the magnetic field lines is the dominant component compared to the deflection in the ExB direction due to the drift of electrons. In a weak magnetic field (B{<=}E/c), the main deflection is in the ExB direction and is caused by the perpendicular component of the magnetic field.

  19. Miniature pulsed magnet system for synchrotron x-ray measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, Peter J. E. M. van der; Mathon, Olivier; Strohm, Cornelius; Sikora, Marcin

    2008-07-15

    We have developed a versatile experimental apparatus for synchrotron x-ray measurements in pulsed high magnetic fields. The apparatus consists of a double cryostat incorporating a liquid nitrogen bath to cool the miniature pulsed coil and an independent helium flow cryostat allowing sample temperatures from 4 up to 250 K. The high duty cycle miniature pulsed coils can generate up to 38 T. During experiments at 30 T a repetition rate of 6 pulses/min was routinely reached. Using a 4 kJ power supply, the pulse duration was between 500 {mu}s and 1 ms. The setup was used for nuclear forward scattering measurements on {sup 57}Fe up to 25 T on the ESRF beamline ID18. In another experiment, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism was measured up to 30 T on the ESRF energy dispersive beamline ID24.

  20. Magnetic excitations and phonons simultaneously studied by resonant inelastic x-ray scattering in optimally doped Bi1.5Pb0.55Sr1.6La0.4CuO6 +δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Y. Y.; Hashimoto, M.; Sala, M. Moretti; Amorese, A.; Brookes, N. B.; Dellea, G.; Lee, W.-S.; Minola, M.; Schmitt, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Zhou, K.-J.; Eisaki, H.; Devereaux, T. P.; Shen, Z.-X.; Braicovich, L.; Ghiringhelli, G.

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic excitations in the optimally doped high-Tc superconductor Bi1.5Pb0.55Sr1.6La0.4CuO6 +δ (OP-Bi2201, Tc≃34 K) are investigated by Cu L3 edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS), below and above the pseudogap opening temperature. At both temperatures the broad spectral distribution disperses along the (1,0) direction up to ˜350 meV at zone boundary, similar to other hole-doped cuprates. However, above ˜0.22 reciprocal lattice units, we observe a concurrent intensity decrease for magnetic excitations and quasielastic signals with weak temperature dependence. This anomaly seems to indicate a coupling between magnetic, lattice, and charge modes in this compound. We also compare the magnetic excitation spectra near the antinodal zone boundary in the single layer OP-Bi2201 and in the bilayer optimally doped Bi1.5Pb0.6Sr1.54CaCu2O8 +δ (OP-Bi2212, Tc≃96 K). The strong similarities in the paramagnon dispersion and in their energy at zone boundary indicate that the strength of the superexchange interaction and the short-range magnetic correlation cannot be directly related to Tc, not even within the same family of cuprates.

  1. Toward broad-band x-ray detected ferromagnetic resonance in longitudinal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ollefs, K.; Meckenstock, R.; Spoddig, D.; Römer, F. M.; Hassel, Ch.; Schöppner, Ch.; Farle, M.; Ney, V.; Ney, A.

    2015-06-14

    An ultrahigh-vacuum-compatible setup for broad-band X-ray detected ferromagnetic resonance (XFMR) in longitudinal geometry is introduced which relies on a low-power, continuous-wave excitation of the ferromagnetic sample. A simultaneous detection of the conventional ferromagnetic resonance via measuring the reflected microwave power and the XFMR signal of the X-ray absorption is possible. First experiments on the Fe and Co L{sub 3}-edges of a permalloy film covered with Co nanostripes as well as the Fe and Ni K-edges of a permalloy film are presented and discussed. Two different XFMR signals are found, one of which is independent of the photon energy and therefore does not provide element-selective information. The other much weaker signal is element-selective, and the dynamic magnetic properties could be detected for Fe and Co separately. The dependence of the latter XFMR signal on the photon helicity of the synchrotron light is found to be distinct from the usual x-ray magnetic circular dichroism effect.

  2. Method and apparatus for molecular imaging using x-rays at resonance wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Chapline, G.F. Jr.

    Holographic x-ray images are produced representing the molecular structure of a microscopic object, such as a living cell, by directing a beam of coherent x-rays upon the object to produce scattering of the x-rays by the object, producing interference on a recording medium between the scattered x-rays from the object and unscattered coherent x-rays and thereby producing holograms on the recording surface, and establishing the wavelength of the coherent x-rays to correspond with a molecular resonance of a constituent of such object and thereby greatly improving the contrast, sensitivity and resolution of the holograms as representations of molecular structures involving such constituent. For example, the coherent x-rays may be adjusted to the molecular resonant absorption line of nitrogen at about 401.3 eV to produce holographic images featuring molecular structures involving nitrogen.

  3. Method and apparatus for molecular imaging using X-rays at resonance wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Chapline, Jr., George F.

    1985-01-01

    Holographic X-ray images are produced representing the molecular structure of a microscopic object, such as a living cell, by directing a beam of coherent X-rays upon the object to produce scattering of the X-rays by the object, producing interference on a recording medium between the scattered X-rays from the object and unscattered coherent X-rays and thereby producing holograms on the recording surface, and establishing the wavelength of the coherent X-rays to correspond with a molecular resonance of a constituent of such object and thereby greatly improving the contrast, sensitivity and resolution of the holograms as representations of molecular structures involving such constituent. For example, the coherent X-rays may be adjusted to the molecular resonant absorption line of nitrogen at about 401.3 eV to produce holographic images featuring molecular structures involving nitrogen.

  4. Fabrication of Metallic Magnetic Calorimeter X-ray Detector Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, W.-T.; Adams, J. A.; Bandler, S. R.; Beyer, J.; Denis, K. L.; Eguchi, H.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Rotzinger, H.; Schneider, G. H.; Seidel, G. M.; Stevenson, T. R.; Travers, D. E.

    2008-04-01

    Microcalorimeters with metallic magnetic sensors show great promise for use in astronomical X-ray spectroscopy. We describe the design and fabrication of a lithographically patterned magnetic microcalorimeter. A paramagnetic AuEr film is sputter-deposited as the sensor, which is coupled to a low noise SQUID via a meander superconducting pickup loop used as an inductor. This inductor also provides the magnetic field bias to the sensor. The AuEr film is deposited over this meander such that the field created by a large current flowing in the loop magnetizes the sensor material. The use of thin film techniques in the fabrication of these magnetic sensors not only allows strong magnetic coupling between the sensor and the inductor, it also is scalable for array fabrication.

  5. Phase-resolved x-ray ferromagnetic resonance measurements in fluorescence yield

    SciTech Connect

    Marcham, M. K.; Keatley, P. S.; Neudert, A.; Hicken, R. J.; Cavill, S. A.; Shelford, L. R.; van der Laan, G.; Telling, N. D.; Childress, J. R.; Katine, J. A.; Shafer, P.; Arenholz, E.

    2010-10-14

    Phase-resolved x-ray ferromagnetic resonance (XFMR) has been measured in fluorescence yield, extending the application of XFMR to opaque samples on opaque substrates. Magnetization dynamics were excited in a Co{sub 50}Fe{sub 50}(0.7)/Ni{sub 90}Fe{sub 10}(5) bilayer by means of a continuous wave microwave excitation, while x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectra were measured stroboscopically at different points in the precession cycle. By tuning the x-ray energy to the L{sub 3} edges of Ni and Fe, the dependence of the real and imaginary components of the element specific magnetic susceptibility on the strength of an externally applied static bias field was determined. First results from measurements on a Co{sub 50}Fe{sub 50}(0.7)/Ni{sub 90}Fe{sub 10}(5)/Dy(1) sample confirm that enhanced damping results from the addition of the Dy cap.

  6. Registration of planar bioluminescence to magnetic resonance and x-ray computed tomography images as a platform for the development of bioluminescence tomography reconstruction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, Bradley J.; Klose, Alexander D.; Le, Carl H.; Longo, Valerie A.; Dobrenkov, Konstantine; Vider, Jelena; Koutcher, Jason A.; Blasberg, Ronald G.

    2009-03-01

    The procedures we propose make possible the mapping of two-dimensional (2-D) bioluminescence image (BLI) data onto a skin surface derived from a three-dimensional (3-D) anatomical modality [magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT)] dataset. This mapping allows anatomical information to be incorporated into bioluminescence tomography (BLT) reconstruction procedures and, when applied using sources visible to both optical and anatomical modalities, can be used to evaluate the accuracy of those reconstructions. Our procedures, based on immobilization of the animal and a priori determined fixed projective transforms, should be more robust and accurate than previously described efforts, which rely on a poorly constrained retrospectively determined warping of the 3-D anatomical information. Experiments conducted to measure the accuracy of the proposed registration procedure found it to have a mean error of 0.36+/-0.23 mm. Additional experiments highlight some of the confounds that are often overlooked in the BLT reconstruction process, and for two of these confounds, simple corrections are proposed.

  7. Registration of planar bioluminescence to magnetic resonance and x-ray computed tomography images as a platform for the development of bioluminescence tomography reconstruction algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, Bradley J.; Klose, Alexander D.; Le, Carl H.; Longo, Valerie A.; Dobrenkov, Konstantine; Vider, Jelena; Koutcher, Jason A.; Blasberg, Ronald G.

    2009-01-01

    The procedures we propose make possible the mapping of two-dimensional (2-D) bioluminescence image (BLI) data onto a skin surface derived from a three-dimensional (3-D) anatomical modality [magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT)] dataset. This mapping allows anatomical information to be incorporated into bioluminescence tomography (BLT) reconstruction procedures and, when applied using sources visible to both optical and anatomical modalities, can be used to evaluate the accuracy of those reconstructions. Our procedures, based on immobilization of the animal and a priori determined fixed projective transforms, should be more robust and accurate than previously described efforts, which rely on a poorly constrained retrospectively determined warping of the 3-D anatomical information. Experiments conducted to measure the accuracy of the proposed registration procedure found it to have a mean error of 0.36±0.23 mm. Additional experiments highlight some of the confounds that are often overlooked in the BLT reconstruction process, and for two of these confounds, simple corrections are proposed. PMID:19405773

  8. Cation Ordering in Li[NixMnxCo(1-2x)]O2-Layered Cathode Materials: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), Pair Distribution Function, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy, and Electrochemical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng,D.; Cabana, J.; Breger, J.; Yoon, W.; Grey, C.

    2007-01-01

    Several members of the compositional series Li[NixMnxCo(1-2x)]O2 (0.01 = x = 1/3) were synthesized and characterized. X-ray diffraction results confirm the presence of the layered a-NaFeO2-type structure, while X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy experiments verify the presence of Ni2+, Mn4+, and Co3+. Their local environment and short-range ordering were investigated by using a combination of 6Li magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and neutron pair distribution function (PDF) analysis, associated with reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) calculations. The 6Li MAS NMR spectra of compounds with low Ni/Mn contents (x = 0.10) show several well-resolved resonances, which start to merge when the amount of Ni and Mn increases, finally forming a broad resonance at high Ni/Mn contents. Analysis of the 6Li MAS NMR 6Li[Ni0.02Mn0.02Co0.96]O2 spectrum, is consistent with the formation of Ni2+ and Mn4+ clusters within the transition-metal layers, even at these low-doping levels. The oxidation state of Ni in this high Co content sample strongly depends upon the Li/transition metal ratio of the starting materials. Neutron PDF analysis of the highest Ni/Mn content sample Li[Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3]O2 shows a tendency for Ni cations to be close to Mn cations in the first coordination shell; however, the Co3+ ions are randomly distributed. Analysis of the intensity of the 'LiCoO2' resonance, arising from Li surrounded by Co3+ in its first two cation coordination shells, for the whole series provides further evidence for a nonrandom distribution of the transition-metal cations. The presence of the insulator-to-metal transition seen in the electrochemical profiles of these materials upon charging correlates strongly with the concentration of the 'LiCoO2' resonance.

  9. Resonant and non-resonant X-ray scattering from C 70

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jinghua; Skytt, Per; Wassdahl, Nial; Nordgren, Joseph; Luo, Yi; Vahtras, Olav; Ågren, Hans

    1995-03-01

    Resonant and non-resonant X-ray scattering spectra of the C 70 molecule are presented and analyzed by ab initio Hartree-Fock calculations using a newly developed formalism for symmetry selective inelastic X-ray scattering. Compared to C 60, a weak excitation energy dependence of the spectra features is observed. The change from 'soccer-ball' (I h) to 'rugby-ball' (D 5h) shapes leads to less symmetry selectivity but larrger polarization selectivity. In contrast to C 60, the RIXS spectrum of C 70 molecule is dense even for narrow-band excitation.

  10. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance studies of x-ray irradiated Nafion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragoso, Juan; Usher, Timothy

    2007-03-01

    Fuel cells promise a bright future as power sources for a variety of electronic equipment as well as more power demanding elements. Nafion (DuPont's trademark of a sulfonated tetrafluorethylene polymer modified from Teflon) is the heart of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs) as well as Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs). Fuel cells are used to power electronic equipment on spacecraft, satellites and unpiloted high altitude aircraft, where ionizing radiation can be a concern. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is a spectroscopic technique that is very sensitive to free radicals such as those produced by ionizing radiation therefore EPR can give us a window into the degradation of the Nafion membranes due to the ionizing radiation. Nafion samples were irradiated using a x-ray diffractometer with a copper target operating at 40kV and 55mA for at least 3hrs. X-Band EPR spectroscopy of the irradiated nafion reveals a peak at 3400G with a width of 10G, which decays over time, completely diminishing in a couple of weeks. Preliminary results from the polarization studies on the effects of ionizing radiation will also be presented.

  11. Soft X-ray measurements in magnetic fusion plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botrugno, A.; Gabellieri, L.; Mazon, D.; Pacella, D.; Romano, A.

    2010-11-01

    Soft X-ray diagnostic systems and their successful application in the field of magnetic fusion plasma physics are discussed. Radiation with wavelength in the region of Soft X-Ray (1-30 keV) is largely produced by high temperature plasmas, carrying important information on many processes during a plasma discharge. Soft X-ray diagnostics are largely used in various fusion devices all over the world. These diagnostic systems are able to obtain information on electron temperature, electron density, impurity transport, Magneto Hydro Dynamic instabilities. We will discuss the SXR diagnostic installed on FTU in Frascati (Italy) and on Tore Supra in Cadarache (France), with special emphasis on diagnostic performances. Moreover, we will discuss the two different inversion methods for tomographic reconstruction used in Frascati and in Cadarache, the first one is relied on a guessed topology of iso-emissivity surfaces, the second one on regularization techniques, like minimum Fisher or maximum entropy. Finally, a new and very fast 2D imaging system with energy discrimination and high time resolution will be summarized as an alternative approach of SXR detection system.

  12. Periodic X-ray Emission in Flare Stars: Resonant MHD Absorption?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullan, D. J.; Johnson, M.

    1993-12-01

    Magnetic fields play a role in the heating of coronae in the Sun and cool dwarfs, but the physical processes at work are not yet clear. Several magnetic models have been proposed for coronal heating. In one class of models, resonant absorption of MHD waves in closed loops is believed to be at work. In a very general sense, resonance implies the existence of a preferred frequency. Thus, resonant absorption models would be subject to a decisive test if periodicities could be identified in the coronal emission. We have searched for periodicities in the EINSTEIN X-ray fluxes of 15 cool dwarfs. Statistically significant periodicities have been detected in several stars, including EQ Vir, AD Leo, and Prox Cen. The period detected in Prox Cen is consistent with MHD resonance in the loop for which parameters were derived by Haisch in his study of X-ray light curves in Einstein data. For AD Leo, ROSAT/HRI and EXOSAT data also suggest the presence of periodicity at the same period as in the EINSTEIN data. For EQ Vir, EXOSAT data suggest the presence of the same period as in the EINSTEIN data. However, the statistical significance of the ROSAT and EXOSAT periods is not as good as those for EINSTEIN. This work has been supported by NASA Grant NAGW-2456, by the NASA Space Grant College program, and by the NASA Astrophysical Data Program.

  13. Magnetically-coupled microcalorimeter arrays for x-ray astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandler, Simon

    The "X-ray Surveyor" has been listed by NASA as one of the four major large mission concepts to be studied in the next Astrophysics Decadal Review in its preliminary list of large concepts. One of the key instruments on such a mission would be a very large format X-ray microcalorimeter array, with an array size of greater than 100 thousand pixels. Magnetically-coupled microcalorimeters (MCC) are one of the technologies with the greatest potential to meet the requirements of this mission, and this proposal is one to carry out research specifically to reach the goals of this vision. The "X-ray Surveyor" is a concept for a future mission that will make X-ray observations that are instrumental to understanding the quickly emerging population of galaxies and supermassive black holes at z ~10. The observations will trace the formation of galaxies and their assembly into large-scale structures starting from the earliest possible epochs. This mission would be observing baryons and large-scale physical processes outside of the very densest regions in the local Universe. This can be achieved with an X-ray observatory with similar angular resolution as Chandra but with significantly improved optic area and detector sensitivity. Chandra-scale angular resolution (1" or better) is essential in building more powerful, higher throughput observatories to avoid source confusion and remain photon-limited rather than background-limited. A prime consideration for the microcalorimeter camera on this type of mission is maintaining ~ 1 arcsec spatial resolution over the largest possible field of view, even if this means a slight trade-off against the spectral resolution. A uniform array of 1" pixels covering at least 5'x5' field of view is desired. To reduce the number of sensors read out, in geometries where extremely fine pitch (~50 microns) is desired, the most promising technologies are those in which a thermal sensor such an MCC can read out a sub-array of 20-25 individual 1'

  14. Non-invasive methods for the determination of body and carcass composition in livestock: dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound: invited review.

    PubMed

    Scholz, A M; Bünger, L; Kongsro, J; Baulain, U; Mitchell, A D

    2015-07-01

    The ability to accurately measure body or carcass composition is important for performance testing, grading and finally selection or payment of meat-producing animals. Advances especially in non-invasive techniques are mainly based on the development of electronic and computer-driven methods in order to provide objective phenotypic data. The preference for a specific technique depends on the target animal species or carcass, combined with technical and practical aspects such as accuracy, reliability, cost, portability, speed, ease of use, safety and for in vivo measurements the need for fixation or sedation. The techniques rely on specific device-driven signals, which interact with tissues in the body or carcass at the atomic or molecular level, resulting in secondary or attenuated signals detected by the instruments and analyzed quantitatively. The electromagnetic signal produced by the instrument may originate from mechanical energy such as sound waves (ultrasound - US), 'photon' radiation (X-ray-computed tomography - CT, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry - DXA) or radio frequency waves (magnetic resonance imaging - MRI). The signals detected by the corresponding instruments are processed to measure, for example, tissue depths, areas, volumes or distributions of fat, muscle (water, protein) and partly bone or bone mineral. Among the above techniques, CT is the most accurate one followed by MRI and DXA, whereas US can be used for all sizes of farm animal species even under field conditions. CT, MRI and US can provide volume data, whereas only DXA delivers immediate whole-body composition results without (2D) image manipulation. A combination of simple US and more expensive CT, MRI or DXA might be applied for farm animal selection programs in a stepwise approach. PMID:25743562

  15. Real-time high-resolution X-ray imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance study of the hydration of pure and Na-doped C3A in the presence of sulfates

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchheim,, A. P.; Dal Molin, D.C.; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid; Provis, J.L.; Fischer, P.; Monteiro, P.J.M.

    2010-12-01

    This study details the differences in real-time hydration between pure tricalcium aluminate (cubic C{sub 3}A or 3CaO {center_dot} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and Na-doped tricalcium aluminate (orthorhombic C{sub 3}A or Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 8}Al{sub 6}O{sub 18}), in aqueous solutions containing sulfate ions. Pure phases were synthesized in the laboratory to develop an independent benchmark for the reactions, meaning that their reactions during hydration in a simulated early age cement pore solution (saturated with respect to gypsum and lime) were able to be isolated. Because the rate of this reaction is extremely rapid, most microscopy methods are not adequate to study the early phases of the reactions in the early stages. Here, a high-resolution full-field soft X-ray imaging technique operating in the X-ray water window, combined with solution analysis by {sup 27}Al nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, was used to capture information regarding the mechanism of C{sub 3}A hydration during the early stages. There are differences in the hydration mechanism between the two types of C{sub 3}A, which are also dependent on the concentration of sulfate ions in the solution. The reactions with cubic C{sub 3}A (pure) seem to be more influenced by higher concentrations of sulfate ions, forming smaller ettringite needles at a slower pace than the orthorhombic C{sub 3}A (Na-doped) sample. The rate of release of aluminate species into the solution phase is also accelerated by Na doping.

  16. Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering Studies of Multiferroic YMn2O5

    SciTech Connect

    Partzsch, S.; Wilkins, S.B.; Schierle, E.; Soltwisch, V.; Hill, J.P.; Weschke, E.; Souptel, D.; Buchner, B.; Geck, J.

    2011-06-17

    We performed soft x-ray resonant scattering at the MnL{sub 2,3}- and OK edges of YMn{sub 2}O{sub 5}. While the resonant intensity at the MnL{sub 2,3} edges represent the magnetic order parameter, the resonant scattering at the OK edge is found to be directly related to the macroscopic ferroelectric polarization. The latter observation reveals the important role of the spin-dependent Mn-O hybridization for the multiferroicity of YMn{sub 2}O{sub 5}. We present details about how to obtain correct energy dependent lineshapes and discuss the origin of the resonant intensity at the OK edge.

  17. Magnetic smart material application to adaptive x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, M. P.; Graham, Michael E.; Vaynman, Semyon; Cao, J.; Takacs, Peter Z.

    2010-09-01

    We discuss a technique of shape modification that can be applied to thin walled ({100-400 micron thickness) electroformed replicated optics or slumped glass optics to improve the near net shape of the mirror as well as the midfrequency ripple. The process involves sputter deposition of a magnetic smart material (MSM) film onto a permanently magnetic material. The MSM material exhibits strains about 400 times stronger than ordinary ferromagnetic materials. The deformation process involves a magnetic write head which traverses the surface, and under the guidance of active metrology feedback, locally magnetizes the surface to impart strain where needed. Designs and basic concepts as applied to space borne X-ray optics will be described.

  18. X-ray resonant exchange scattering of rare-earth nickel borocarbides

    SciTech Connect

    Detlefs, C.

    1997-10-08

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the systematics of the microscopic magnetic order within a series of isostructural compounds and, at the same, to develop the relatively young experimental method of x-ray resonant exchange scattering (XRES). In this thesis, the author presents XRES studies of several rare-earth nickel borocarbides, RNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C. He shows that XRES, similar to the neutron techniques, allows the determination of the orientation of the magnetic moment by measuring the Q-dependence of the scattered intensity of magnetic Bragg reflections. As samples in this study, he chose the recently discovered family of rare-earth nickel borocarbides, RNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C, which display a wide variety of magnetic structures. Furthermore, in several of these materials, long range magnetic order coexists with superconductivity over some temperature range.

  19. Revealing the electronic ground state of ReNiO3 combining Ni-L3 x-ray absorption and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisogni, Valentina; Catalano, Sara; Green, Robert; Gibert, Marta; Scherwitzl, Raoul; Huang, Yaobo; Balandesh, Shadi; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Zubko, Pavlo; Sawatzky, George; Triscone, Jean-Marc; Schmitt, Thorsten

    Rare-earth nickelates ReNiO3 attract a lot of interest thanks to their intriguing physical properties like sharp metal to insulator transition, unusual magnetic order and expected superconductivity in nickelate-based heterostructures. Full understanding of these materials, however, is hampered by the difficulties in describing their electronic ground state (GS). Taking a NdNiO3 thin film as a representative example, we reveal with x-ray absorption and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering unusual coexistence of bound and continuum excitations, providing strong evidence for abundant O 2p holes in the GS of these materials. Using an Anderson impurity model interpretation, we show that these distinct spectral signatures arise from a Ni 3d8 configuration along with holes in the O 2p valence band, confirming suggestions that these materials exhibit a negative charge-transfer energy, with O 2p states extending across the Fermi level.

  20. X-ray absorption near-edge structure and nuclear magnetic resonance study of the lithium-sulfur battery and its components.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manu U M; Arčon, Iztok; Aquilanti, Giuliana; Stievano, Lorenzo; Mali, Gregor; Dominko, Robert

    2014-04-01

    Understanding the mechanism(s) of polysulfide formation and knowledge about the interactions of sulfur and polysulfides with a host matrix and electrolyte are essential for the development of long-cycle-life lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. To achieve this goal, new analytical tools need to be developed. Herein, sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and (6,7) Li magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies on a Li-S battery and its sulfur components are reported. The characterization of different stoichiometric mixtures of sulfur and lithium compounds (polysulfides), synthesized through a chemical route with all-sulfur-based components in the Li-S battery (sulfur and electrolyte), enables the understanding of changes in the batteries measured in postmortem mode and in operando mode. A detailed XANES analysis is performed on different battery components (cathode composite and separator). The relative amounts of each sulfur compound in the cathode and separator are determined precisely, according to the linear combination fit of the XANES spectra, by using reference compounds. Complementary information about the lithium species within the cathode are obtained by using (7) Li MAS NMR spectroscopy. The setup for the in operando XANES measurements can be viewed as a valuable analytical tool that can aid the understanding of the sulfur environment in Li-S batteries. PMID:24497200

  1. Reproducibility and accuracy of body composition assessments in mice by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and time domain nuclear magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Halldorsdottir, Solveig; Carmody, Jill; Boozer, Carol N.; Leduc, Charles A.; Leibel, Rudolph L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the accuracy and reproducibility of dual-energy absorptiometry (DXA; PIXImus™) and time domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR; Bruker Optics) for the measurement of body composition of lean and obese mice. Subjects and measurements Thirty lean and obese mice (body weight range 19–67 g) were studied. Coefficients of variation for repeated (x 4) DXA and NMR scans of mice were calculated to assess reproducibility. Accuracy was assessed by comparing DXA and NMR results of ten mice to chemical carcass analyses. Accuracy of the respective techniques was also assessed by comparing DXA and NMR results obtained with ground meat samples to chemical analyses. Repeated scans of 10–25 gram samples were performed to test the sensitivity of the DXA and NMR methods to variation in sample mass. Results In mice, DXA and NMR reproducibility measures were similar for fat tissue mass (FTM) (DXA coefficient of variation [CV]=2.3%; and NMR CV=2.8%) (P=0.47), while reproducibility of lean tissue mass (LTM) estimates were better for DXA (1.0%) than NMR (2.2%) (

  2. Quantitative x-ray magnetic circular dichroism mapping with high spatial resolution full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray spectro-microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, MacCallum J.; Agostino, Christopher J.; N'Diaye, Alpha T.; Chen, Gong; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter

    2015-05-01

    The spectroscopic analysis of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), which serves as strong and element-specific magnetic contrast in full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy, is shown to provide information on the local distribution of spin (S) and orbital (L) magnetic moments down to a spatial resolution of 25 nm limited by the x-ray optics used in the x-ray microscope. The spatially resolved L/S ratio observed in a multilayered (Co 0.3 nm/Pt 0.5 nm) × 30 thin film exhibiting a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy decreases significantly in the vicinity of domain walls, indicating a non-uniform spin configuration in the vertical profile of a domain wall across the thin film. Quantitative XMCD mapping with x-ray spectro-microscopy will become an important characterization tool for systems with topological or engineered magnetization inhomogeneities.

  3. Quantitative x-ray magnetic circular dichroism mapping with high spatial resolution full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray spectro-microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, MacCallum J.; Agostino, Christopher J.; N'Diaye, Alpha T.; Chen, Gong; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter

    2015-05-07

    The spectroscopic analysis of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), which serves as strong and element-specific magnetic contrast in full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy, is shown to provide information on the local distribution of spin (S) and orbital (L) magnetic moments down to a spatial resolution of 25 nm limited by the x-ray optics used in the x-ray microscope. The spatially resolved L/S ratio observed in a multilayered (Co 0.3 nm/Pt 0.5 nm) × 30 thin film exhibiting a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy decreases significantly in the vicinity of domain walls, indicating a non-uniform spin configuration in the vertical profile of a domain wall across the thin film. Quantitative XMCD mapping with x-ray spectro-microscopy will become an important characterization tool for systems with topological or engineered magnetization inhomogeneities.

  4. High-energy magnetic excitations in overdoped La2-xSrxCuO4 studied by neutron and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wakimoto, S.; Ishii, K.; Kimura, H.; Fujita, M.; Dellea, G.; Kummer, K.; Braicovich, L.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Debeer-Schmitt, Lisa M.; Granroth, Garrett E.

    2015-05-21

    We have performed neutron inelastic scattering and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the Cu-L3 edge to study high-energy magnetic excitations at energy transfers of more than 100 meV for overdoped La2₋xSrxCuO4 with x=0.25 (Tc=15 K) and x=0.30 (nonsuperconducting) using identical single-crystal samples for the two techniques. From constant-energy slices of neutron-scattering cross sections, we have identified magnetic excitations up to ~250 meV for x=0.25. Although the width in the momentum direction is large, the peak positions along the (π,π) direction agree with the dispersion relation of the spin wave in the nondoped La2CuO4 (LCO), which is consistent with the previous RIXS results of cuprate superconductors. Using RIXS at the Cu-L3 edge, we have measured the dispersion relations of the so-called paramagnon mode along both (π,π) and (π,0) directions. Although in both directions the neutron and RIXS data connect with each other and the paramagnon along (π,0) agrees well with the LCO spin-wave dispersion, the paramagnon in the (π,π) direction probed by RIXS appears to be less dispersive and the excitation energy is lower than the spin wave of LCO near (π/2,π/2). Thus, our results indicate consistency between neutron inelastic scattering and RIXS, and elucidate the entire magnetic excitation in the (π,π) direction by the complementary use of two probes. The polarization dependence of the RIXS profiles indicates that appreciable charge excitations exist in the same energy range of magnetic excitations, reflecting the itinerant character of the overdoped sample. Lastly, we find a possible anisotropy in the charge excitation intensity might explain the apparent differences in the paramagnon dispersion in the (π,π) direction as detected by the x-ray scattering.

  5. Electronic Structure of In2O3 from Resonant X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, L.; DeMasi, A; Cho, S; Smith, K; Fuchs, F; Bechstedt, F; Korber, C; Klein, A; Payne, D; Egdell, R

    2009-01-01

    The valence and conduction band structures of In2O3 have been measured using a combination of valence band x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, O K-edge resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy, and O K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Excellent agreement is noted between the experimental spectra and O 2p partial density of states calculated within hybrid density functional theory. Our data are consistent with a direct band gap for In2O3.

  6. Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy-imaging fast spin dynamics inmagnetic nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Peter; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Mesler, Brooke L.; Chao, Weilun; Sakdinawat, Anne E.; Anderson, Erik H.

    2007-06-01

    Magnetic soft X-ray microscopy combines 15nm spatial resolution with 70ps time resolution and elemental sensitivity. Fresnel zone plates are used as X-ray optics and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism serves as magnetic contrast mechanism. Thus scientifically interesting and technologically relevant low dimensional nanomagnetic systems can be imaged at fundamental length and ultrafast time scales in a unique way. Studies include magnetization reversal in magnetic multilayers, nanopatterned systems, vortex dynamics in nanoelements and spin current induced phenomena.

  7. Direct surface magnetometry with photoemission magnetic x-ray dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J.G.; Goodman, K.W.; Schumann, F.O.

    1997-04-01

    Element specific surface magnetometry remains a central goal of synchrotron radiation based studies of nanomagnetic structures. One appealing possibility is the combination of x-ray absorption dichroism measurements and the theoretical framework provided by the {open_quotes}sum rules.{close_quotes} Unfortunately, sum rule analysis are hampered by several limitations including delocalization of the final state, multi-electronic phenomena and the presence of surface dipoles. An alternative experiment, Magnetic X-Ray Dichroism in Photoelectron Spectroscopy, holds out promise based upon its elemental specificity, surface sensitivity and high resolution. Computational simulations by Tamura et al. demonstrated the relationship between exchange and spin orbit splittings and experimental data of linear and circular dichroisms. Now the authors have developed an analytical framework which allows for the direct extraction of core level exchange splittings from circular and linear dichroic photoemission data. By extending a model initially proposed by Venus, it is possible to show a linear relation between normalized dichroism peaks in the experimental data and the underlying exchange splitting. Since it is reasonable to expect that exchange splittings and magnetic moments track together, this measurement thus becomes a powerful new tool for direct surface magnetometry, without recourse to time consuming and difficult spectral simulations. The theoretical derivation will be supported by high resolution linear and circular dichroism data collected at the Spectromicroscopy Facility of the Advanced Light Source.

  8. Towards magnetic 3D x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Peter; Streubel, R.; Im, M.-Y.; Parkinson, D.; Hong, J.-I.; Schmidt, O. G.; Makarov, D.

    2014-03-01

    Mesoscale phenomena in magnetism will add essential parameters to improve speed, size and energy efficiency of spin driven devices. Multidimensional visualization techniques will be crucial to achieve mesoscience goals. Magnetic tomography is of large interest to understand e.g. interfaces in magnetic multilayers, the inner structure of magnetic nanocrystals, nanowires or the functionality of artificial 3D magnetic nanostructures. We have developed tomographic capabilities with magnetic full-field soft X-ray microscopy combining X-MCD as element specific magnetic contrast mechanism, high spatial and temporal resolution due to the Fresnel zone plate optics. At beamline 6.1.2 at the ALS (Berkeley CA) a new rotation stage allows recording an angular series (up to 360 deg) of high precision 2D projection images. Applying state-of-the-art reconstruction algorithms it is possible to retrieve the full 3D structure. We will present results on prototypic rolled-up Ni and Co/Pt tubes and glass capillaries coated with magnetic films and compare to other 3D imaging approaches e.g. in electron microscopy. Supported by BES MSD DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-05-CH11231 and ERC under the EU FP7 program (grant agreement No. 306277).

  9. Nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at high pressure and low temperature

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Wenli; Zhao, Jiyong; Lin, Jung-Fu; Jia, Quanjie; Hu, Michael Y.; Jin, Changqing; Ferry, Richard; Yang, Wenge; Struzhkin, Viktor; Alp, E. Ercan

    2015-01-01

    A new synchrotron radiation experimental capability of coupling nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering with the cryogenically cooled high-pressure diamond anvil cell technique is presented. The new technique permits measurements of phonon density of states at low temperature and high pressure simultaneously, and can be applied to studies of phonon contribution to pressure- and temperature-induced magnetic, superconducting and metal–insulator transitions in resonant isotope-bearing materials. In this report, a pnictide sample, EuFe2As2, is used as an example to demonstrate this new capability at beamline 3-ID of the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. A detailed description of the technical development is given. The Fe-specific phonon density of states and magnetism from the Fe sublattice in Eu57Fe2As2 at high pressure and low temperature were derived by using this new capability. PMID:25931094

  10. Nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at high pressure and low temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bi, Wenli; Zhao, Jiyong; Lin, Jung -Fu; Jia, Quanjie; Hu, Michael Y.; Jin, Changqing; Ferry, Richard; Yang, Wenge; Struzhkin, Viktor; Alp, E. Ercan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a new synchrotron radiation experimental capability of coupling nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering with the cryogenically cooled high-pressure diamond anvil cell technique is presented. The new technique permits measurements of phonon density of states at low temperature and high pressure simultaneously, and can be applied to studies of phonon contribution to pressure- and temperature-induced magnetic, superconducting and metal–insulator transitions in resonant isotope-bearing materials. In this report, a pnictide sample, EuFe2As2, is used as an example to demonstrate this new capability at beamline 3-ID of the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. A detailed description of the technicalmore » development is given. The Fe-specific phonon density of states and magnetism from the Fe sublattice in Eu57Fe2As2 at high pressure and low temperature were derived by using this new capability.« less

  11. X-ray laser resonator for the kilo-electron-volt range

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jie; Tomov, Ivan V.; Er, Ali O.; Rentzepis, Peter M.

    2013-04-29

    We have designed, constructed, and tested an x-ray laser resonator operating in the hard x-ray, keV energy region. This ring x-ray laser cavity is formed by four highly oriented pyrolytic graphite crystals. The crystals are set at the Bragg angles that allow for the complete 360 Degree-Sign round trip of the 2.37 A, 5.23 keV L{sub {alpha}} line of neodymium. In addition, we also present experimental data of a similar ring laser resonator that utilizes the Cr K{sub {alpha}}, 5.41 keV, x-ray line to propagate through the four mirrors of the cavity. The specific properties of these x-ray laser resonator mirrors, including reflection losses and cavity arrangement, are presented.

  12. X-ray Spectroscopy and Magnetism in Mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainctavit, Philippe; Brice-Profeta, Sandrine; Gaudry, Emilie; Letard, Isabelle; Arrio, Marie-Anne

    The objective of this paper is to present the kind of information that can be gained in the field of mineralogy from the use of x-ray magnetic spectroscopies. We review some of the questions that are unsettled and that could benefit from an interdisciplinary approach where magnetism, spectroscopy and mineralogy could be mixed. Most of the attention is focused on iron and some other 3d transition elements. The mineralogy of planetary cores and its relation with known meteorites are exemplified. The various oxide phases in the mantle and the nature of iron in these phases is also underlined. The presence of transition elements in insulating minerals and its relation with macroscopic properties such as the color of gemstones are reviewed. Finally an introduction to paleomagnetism is given with a special attention to nanomaghemites.

  13. Performance of Magnetic Penetration Thermometers for X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagler, P. C.; Adams, J. S.; Balvin, M. A.; Bandler, S. R.; Denis, K. L.; Hsieh, W. T.; Kelly, D. P.; Porst, J. P.; Sadleir, J. E.; Seidel, G. M.; Smith, S. J.; Stevenson, T. R.

    2012-01-01

    The ideal X-ray camera for astrophysics would have more than a million pixels and provide an energy resolution of better than leV FWHM for energies up to 10 keY. We have microfabricated and characterized thin-film magnetic penetration thermometers (MPTs) that show great promise towards meeting these capabilities. MPTs operate in similar fashion to metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs), except that a superconducting sensor takes the place of a paramagnetic sensor and it is the temperature dependence of the superconductor's diamagnetic response that provides the temperature sensitivity. We present a description of the design and performance of our prototype thin-film MPTs with MoAu bilayer sensors, which have demonstrated an energy resolution of approx 2 eV FWHM at 1.5 keY and 4.3 eV FWHM at 5.9 keY.

  14. Magnetic Nature of the 500 meV peak in La2−xSrxCuO4 Observed with Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering at the Cu K-edge

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.P.; Ellis, D.S.; Kim, J.; Wakimoto, S.; Birgeneau, R.J.; Shvyd’ko, Y.; Casa, D.; Gog, T.; Ishii, K.; Ikeuchi, K.; Paramekanti, A.; Kim, Y.-J.

    2010-02-15

    We present a comprehensive study of the temperature and doping dependence of the 500 meV peak observed at q = ({pi},0) in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) experiments on La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}. The intensity of this peak persists above the Neel temperature (T{sub N} = 320 K), but decreases gradually with increasing temperature, reaching zero at around T = 500 K. The peak energy decreases with temperature in close quantitative accord with the behavior of the two-magnon B{sub 1g} Raman peak in La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} and, with suitable rescaling, agrees with the Raman peak shifts in EuBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6} and K{sub 2}NiF{sub 4}. The overall dispersion of this excitation in the Brillouin zone is found to be in agreement with theoretical calculations for a two-magnon excitation. Upon doping, the peak intensity decreases analogous to the Raman mode intensity and appears to track the doping dependence of the spin-correlation length. Taken together, these observations strongly suggest that the 500 meV mode is magnetic in character and is likely a two-magnon excitation.

  15. Gd3+ complex-modified NaLuF4-based upconversion nanophosphors for trimodality imaging of NIR-to-NIR upconversion luminescence, X-Ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ao; Chen, Min; Gao, Yuan; Wu, Dongmei; Feng, Wei; Li, Fuyou

    2012-07-01

    Multimodality molecular imaging has recently attracted much attention, because it can take advantage of individual imaging modalities by fusing together information from several molecular imaging techniques. Herein, we report a multifunctional lanthanide-based nanoparticle for near-infrared to near-infrared (NIR-to-NIR) upconversion luminescence (UCL), X-ray computed tomography (CT) and T(1)-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) trimodality in-vivo imaging. By careful selection of the lanthanide elements, core-shell structured lanthanide-based nanoparticles, NaLuF(4):Yb(3+),Tm(3+)@SiO(2)-GdDTPA nanoparticles (UCNP@SiO(2)-GdDTPA) have been designed and synthesized. We also prove that the application of UCNP@SiO(2)-GdDTPA for NIR-to-NIR UCL, CT and MRI multi-modality in-vivo imaging can be established successfully. In addition, the biological toxicity of UCNP@SiO(2)-GdDTPA is evaluated by the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay and histological analysis of viscera sections. PMID:22560666

  16. An integrative approach combining ion mobility mass spectrometry, X-ray crystallography, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to study the conformational dynamics of α1-antitrypsin upon ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Nyon, Mun Peak; Prentice, Tanya; Day, Jemma; Kirkpatrick, John; Sivalingam, Ganesh N; Levy, Geraldine; Haq, Imran; Irving, James A; Lomas, David A; Christodoulou, John; Gooptu, Bibek; Thalassinos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) methods permit the study of multiple protein species within solution equilibria, whereas ion mobility (IM)-MS can report on conformational behavior of specific states. We used IM-MS to study a conformationally labile protein (α1-antitrypsin) that undergoes pathological polymerization in the context of point mutations. The folded, native state of the Z-variant remains highly polymerogenic in physiological conditions despite only minor thermodynamic destabilization relative to the wild-type variant. Various data implicate kinetic instability (conformational lability within a native state ensemble) as the basis of Z α1-antitrypsin polymerogenicity. We show the ability of IM-MS to track such disease-relevant conformational behavior in detail by studying the effects of peptide binding on α1-antitrypsin conformation and dynamics. IM-MS is, therefore, an ideal platform for the screening of compounds that result in therapeutically beneficial kinetic stabilization of native α1-antitrypsin. Our findings are confirmed with high-resolution X-ray crystallographic and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic studies of the same event, which together dissect structural changes from dynamic effects caused by peptide binding at a residue-specific level. IM-MS methods, therefore, have great potential for further study of biologically relevant thermodynamic and kinetic instability of proteins and provide rapid and multidimensional characterization of ligand interactions of therapeutic interest. PDB Code(s): 4PYW PMID:26011795

  17. Resonant x-ray scattering in 3d-transition-metal oxides: Anisotropy and charge orderings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subías, G.; García, J.; Blasco, J.; Herrero-Martín, J.; Sánchez, M. C.

    2009-11-01

    The structural, magnetic and electronic properties of transition metal oxides reflect in atomic charge, spin and orbital degrees of freedom. Resonant x-ray scattering (RXS) allows us to perform an accurate investigation of all these electronic degrees. RXS combines high-Q resolution x-ray diffraction with the properties of the resonance providing information similar to that obtained by atomic spectroscopy (element selectivity and a large enhancement of scattering amplitude for this particular element and sensitivity to the symmetry of the electronic levels through the multipole electric transitions). Since electronic states are coupled to the local symmetry, RXS reveals the occurrence of symmetry breaking effects such as lattice distortions, onset of electronic orbital ordering or ordering of electronic charge distributions. We shall discuss the strength of RXS at the K absorption edge of 3d transition-metal oxides by describing various applications in the observation of local anisotropy and charge disproportionation. Examples of these resonant effects are (I) charge ordering transitions in manganites, Fe3O4 and ferrites and (II) forbidden reflections and anisotropy in Mn3+ perovskites, spinel ferrites and cobalt oxides. In all the studied cases, the electronic (charge and/or anisotropy) orderings are determined by the structural distortions.

  18. Hard-X-ray magnetic microscopy and local magnetization analysis using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Motohiro

    2014-11-01

    X-ray measurement offers several useful features that are unavailable from other microscopic means including electron-based techniques. By using X-rays, one can observe the internal parts of a thick sample. This technique basically requires no high vacuum environment such that measurements are feasible for wet specimens as well as under strong electric and magnetic fields and even at a high pressure. X-ray spectroscopy using core excitation provides element-selectivity with significant sensitivities to the chemical states and atomic magnetic moments in the matter. Synchrotron radiation sources produce a small and low-divergent X-ray beam, which can be converged to a spot with the size of a micrometer or less using X-ray focusing optics. The recent development in the focusing optics has been driving X-ray microscopy, which has already gone into the era of X-ray nanoscopy. With the use of the most sophisticated focusing devices, an X-ray beam of 7-nm size has successfully been achieved [1]. X-ray microscopy maintains above-mentioned unique features of X-ray technique, being a perfect complement to electron microscopy.In this paper, we present recent studies on magnetic microscopy and local magnetic analysis using hard X-rays. The relevant instrumentation developments are also described. The X-ray nanospectroscopy station of BL39XU at SPring-8 is equipped with a focusing optics consisting of two elliptic mirrors, and a focused X-ray beam with the size of 100 × 100 nm(2) is available [2]. Researchers can perform X-ray absorption spectroscopy: nano-XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure) using the X-ray beam as small as 100 nm. The available X-ray energy is from 5 to 16 keV, which allows nano-XAFS study at the K edges of 3d transition metals, L edges of rare-earth elements and 5d noble metals. Another useful capability of the nanoprobe is X-ray polarization tunability, enabling magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectroscopy with a sub-micrometer resolution. Scanning

  19. Electrostatic focal spot correction for x-ray tubes operating in strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Shin, Mihye; Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: A close proximity hybrid x-ray/magnetic resonance (XMR) imaging system offers several critical advantages over current XMR system installations that have large separation distances (∼5 m) between the imaging fields of view. The two imaging systems can be placed in close proximity to each other if an x-ray tube can be designed to be immune to the magnetic fringe fields outside of the MR bore. One of the major obstacles to robust x-ray tube design is correcting for the effects of the MR fringe field on the x-ray tube focal spot. Any fringe field component orthogonal to the x-ray tube electric field leads to electron drift altering the path of the electron trajectories. Methods: The method proposed in this study to correct for the electron drift utilizes an external electric field in the direction of the drift. The electric field is created using two electrodes that are positioned adjacent to the cathode. These electrodes are biased with positive and negative potential differences relative to the cathode. The design of the focusing cup assembly is constrained primarily by the strength of the MR fringe field and high voltage standoff distances between the anode, cathode, and the bias electrodes. From these constraints, a focusing cup design suitable for the close proximity XMR system geometry is derived, and a finite element model of this focusing cup geometry is simulated to demonstrate efficacy. A Monte Carlo simulation is performed to determine any effects of the modified focusing cup design on the output x-ray energy spectrum. Results: An orthogonal fringe field magnitude of 65 mT can be compensated for using bias voltages of +15 and −20 kV. These bias voltages are not sufficient to completely correct for larger orthogonal field magnitudes. Using active shielding coils in combination with the bias electrodes provides complete correction at an orthogonal field magnitude of 88.1 mT. Introducing small fields (<10 mT) parallel to the x-ray tube electric

  20. Electrostatic focal spot correction for x-ray tubes operating in strong magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Shin, Mihye; Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A close proximity hybrid x-ray/magnetic resonance (XMR) imaging system offers several critical advantages over current XMR system installations that have large separation distances (∼5 m) between the imaging fields of view. The two imaging systems can be placed in close proximity to each other if an x-ray tube can be designed to be immune to the magnetic fringe fields outside of the MR bore. One of the major obstacles to robust x-ray tube design is correcting for the effects of the MR fringe field on the x-ray tube focal spot. Any fringe field component orthogonal to the x-ray tube electric field leads to electron drift altering the path of the electron trajectories. Methods: The method proposed in this study to correct for the electron drift utilizes an external electric field in the direction of the drift. The electric field is created using two electrodes that are positioned adjacent to the cathode. These electrodes are biased with positive and negative potential differences relative to the cathode. The design of the focusing cup assembly is constrained primarily by the strength of the MR fringe field and high voltage standoff distances between the anode, cathode, and the bias electrodes. From these constraints, a focusing cup design suitable for the close proximity XMR system geometry is derived, and a finite element model of this focusing cup geometry is simulated to demonstrate efficacy. A Monte Carlo simulation is performed to determine any effects of the modified focusing cup design on the output x-ray energy spectrum. Results: An orthogonal fringe field magnitude of 65 mT can be compensated for using bias voltages of +15 and −20 kV. These bias voltages are not sufficient to completely correct for larger orthogonal field magnitudes. Using active shielding coils in combination with the bias electrodes provides complete correction at an orthogonal field magnitude of 88.1 mT. Introducing small fields (<10 mT) parallel to the x-ray tube electric

  1. Sapphire hard X-ray Fabry-Perot resonators for synchrotron experiments.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi Wei; Wu, Yu Hsin; Chang, Ying Yi; Liu, Wen Chung; Liu, Hong Lin; Chu, Chia Hong; Chen, Pei Chi; Lin, Pao Te; Fu, Chien Chung; Chang, Shih Lin

    2016-05-01

    Hard X-ray Fabry-Perot resonators (FPRs) made from sapphire crystals were constructed and characterized. The FPRs consisted of two crystal plates, part of a monolithic crystal structure of Al2O3, acting as a pair of mirrors, for the backward reflection (0 0 0 30) of hard X-rays at 14.3147 keV. The dimensional accuracy during manufacturing and the defect density in the crystal in relation to the resonance efficiency of sapphire FPRs were analyzed from a theoretical standpoint based on X-ray cavity resonance and measurements using scanning electron microscopic and X-ray topographic techniques for crystal defects. Well defined resonance spectra of sapphire FPRs were successfully obtained, and were comparable with the theoretical predictions. PMID:27140144

  2. Use of electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source for nondestructive testing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T. S.

    2006-03-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) technique is being used for generating x rays in the low-energy region (<150keV). Recently, the source is used for the calibration of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) badges. In order to qualify the ECR x-ray source for imaging application, the source should give uniform flux over the area under study. Lead collimation arrangement is made to get uniform flux. The flux profile is measured using a teletector at different distance from the port and uniform field region of 10×10cm2 has been marked at 20cm from the x-ray exit port. A digital-to-analog converter (DAC) circuit pack is used for examining the source performance. The required dose for nondestructive testing examination has been estimated using a hospital x-ray machine and it is found to be 0.05mSv. Our source experimental parameters are tuned and the DAC circuit pack was exposed for nearly 7min to get the required dose value. The ECR x-ray source operating parameters are argon pressure: 10-5Torr, microwave power: 350W, and coil current: 0A. The effective energy of the x-ray spectrum is nearly 40keV. The x-ray images obtained from ECR x-ray source and hospital medical radiography machine are compared. It is found that the image obtained from ECR x-ray source is suitable for NDT application.

  3. Use of electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source for nondestructive testing application

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T.S.

    2006-03-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) technique is being used for generating x rays in the low-energy region (<150 keV). Recently, the source is used for the calibration of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) badges. In order to qualify the ECR x-ray source for imaging application, the source should give uniform flux over the area under study. Lead collimation arrangement is made to get uniform flux. The flux profile is measured using a teletector at different distance from the port and uniform field region of 10x10 cm{sup 2} has been marked at 20 cm from the x-ray exit port. A digital-to-analog converter (DAC) circuit pack is used for examining the source performance. The required dose for nondestructive testing examination has been estimated using a hospital x-ray machine and it is found to be 0.05 mSv. Our source experimental parameters are tuned and the DAC circuit pack was exposed for nearly 7 min to get the required dose value. The ECR x-ray source operating parameters are argon pressure: 10{sup -5} Torr, microwave power: 350 W, and coil current: 0 A. The effective energy of the x-ray spectrum is nearly 40 keV. The x-ray images obtained from ECR x-ray source and hospital medical radiography machine are compared. It is found that the image obtained from ECR x-ray source is suitable for NDT application.

  4. Full Polarization Analysis of Resonant Superlattice and Forbidden x-ray Reflections in Magnetite

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, S.B.; Bland, S.R.; Detlefs, B.; Beale, T.A.W.; Mazzoli, C.; Joly, Y.; Hatton, P.D.; Lorenzo, J.E.; Brabers, V.A.M.

    2009-12-02

    Despite being one of the oldest known magnetic materials, and the classic mixed valence compound, thought to be charge ordered, the structure of magnetite below the Verwey transition is complex and the presence and role of charge order is still being debated. Here, we present resonant x-ray diffraction data at the iron K-edge on forbidden (0, 0, 2n+1){sub C} and superlattice (0, 0, 2n+1/2)C reflections. Full linear polarization analysis of the incident and scattered light was conducted in order to explore the origins of the reflections. Through simulation of the resonant spectra we have confirmed that a degree of charge ordering takes place, while the anisotropic tensor of susceptibility scattering is responsible for the superlattice reflections below the Verwey transition. We also report the surprising result of the conversion of a significant proportion of the scattered light from linear to nonlinear polarization.

  5. Collective nature of spin excitations in superconducting cuprates probed by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Minola, M; Dellea, G; Gretarsson, H; Peng, Y Y; Lu, Y; Porras, J; Loew, T; Yakhou, F; Brookes, N B; Huang, Y B; Pelliciari, J; Schmitt, T; Ghiringhelli, G; Keimer, B; Braicovich, L; Le Tacon, M

    2015-05-29

    We used resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) with and without analysis of the scattered photon polarization, to study dispersive spin excitations in the high temperature superconductor YBa_{2}Cu_{3}O_{6+x} over a wide range of doping levels (0.1≤x≤1). The excitation profiles were carefully monitored as the incident photon energy was detuned from the resonant condition, and the spin excitation energy was found to be independent of detuning for all x. These findings demonstrate that the largest fraction of the spin-flip RIXS profiles in doped cuprates arises from magnetic collective modes, rather than from incoherent particle-hole excitations as recently suggested theoretically [Benjamin et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 247002 (2014)]. Implications for the theoretical description of the electron system in the cuprates are discussed. PMID:26066453

  6. Soft X-Ray Magnetic Imaging of Focused Ion Beam Lithographically Patterned Fe Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Paul J.; Shen, Tichan H.; Grundy, PhilJ.; Im, Mi Young; Fischer, Peter; Morton, Simon A.; Kilcoyne, Arthur D.L.

    2008-11-09

    We illustrate the potential of modifying the magnetic behavior and structural properties of ferromagnetic thin films using focused ion beam 'direct-write' lithography. Patterns inspired by the split-ring resonators often used as components in meta-materials were defined upon 15 nm Fe films using a 30 keV Ga{sup +} focused ion beam at a dose of 2 x 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup -2}. Structural, chemical and magnetic changes to the Fe were studied using transmission soft X-ray microscopy at the ALS, Berkeley CA. X-ray absorption spectra showed a 23% reduction in the thickness of the film in the Ga irradiated areas, but no change to the chemical environment of Fe was evident. X-ray images of the magnetic reversal process show domain wall pinning around the implanted areas, resulting in an overall increase in the coercivity of the film. Transmission electron microscopy showed significant grain growth in the implanted regions.

  7. Soft x-ray ptychography studies of nanoscale magnetic and structural correlations in thin SmCo5 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Fischer, P.; Neu, V.; Elefant, D.; Lee, J. C. T.; Shapiro, D. A.; Farmand, M.; Tyliszczak, T.; Shiu, H.-W.; Marchesini, S.; Roy, S.; Kevan, S. D.

    2016-02-01

    High spatial resolution magnetic x-ray spectromicroscopy at x-ray photon energies near the cobalt L3 resonance was applied to probe an amorphous 50 nm thin SmCo5 film prepared by off-axis pulsed laser deposition onto an x-ray transparent 200 nm thin Si3N4 membrane. Alternating gradient magnetometry shows a strong in-plane anisotropy and an only weak perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, which is confirmed by magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy images showing over a field of view of 10 μm a primarily stripe-like domain pattern but with local labyrinth-like domains. Soft x-ray ptychography in amplitude and phase contrast was used to identify and characterize local magnetic and structural features over a field of view of 1 μm with a spatial resolution of about 10 nm. There, the magnetic labyrinth domain patterns are accompanied by nanoscale structural inclusions that are primarily located in close proximity to the magnetic domain walls. Our analysis suggests that these inclusions are nanocrystalline Sm2Co17 phases with nominally in-plane magnetic anisotropy.

  8. X-ray studies of neutron stars and their magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makishima, K.

    2016-05-01

    Utilizing results obtained over the past quarter century mainly with Japanese X-ray astronomy satellites, a review is given to some aspects of neutron stars (NSs), with a particular emphasis on the magnetic fields (MFs) of mass-accreting NSs and magnetars. Measurements of electron cyclotron resonance features in binary X-ray pulsars, using the Ginga and Suzaku observatories, clarified that their surface MFs are concentrated in a narrow range of (1?7) × 10^8 T. Extensive studies of magnetars with Suzaku reinforced their nature as neutron stars with truly strong MFs, and revealed several important clues to their formation, evolution, and physical states. Taking all these results into account, a discussion is made on the origin and evolution of these strong MFs. One possible scenario is that the MF of NSs is a manifestation of some fundamental physics, e.g., neutron spin alignment or chirality violation, and the MF makes transitions from strong to weak states.

  9. Unraveling skyrmion spin texture using resonant soft x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sujoy

    2015-03-01

    The recent discovery of skyrmions, that were originally predicted in context of high energy physics, in magnetic materials has sparked tremendous interest in the research community due to its rich physics and potential in spintronics applications. Skyrmions have an unusual spin texture that manifests as magnetic knot and can be easily moved around. Understanding the fundamental physics and mechanisms for controlling their dynamical properties presents important scientific challenges. So far experimental verifications of the skyrmions in magnetic systems have come from neutron scattering and Lorentz transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. In this talk we report the first observation of the skyrmions using resonant soft x-ray scattering. We have used soft x-rays tuned to the Cu L3 edge to diffract off the skyrmion lattice in a multiferroic Cu2OSeO3 compound. We show that in Cu2OSeO3 there exist two skyrmion lattices arising due to the two inequivalent Cu-O sublattices that have two different magnetically active d-orbitals. The two skyrmion sublattices are mutually rotated with respect to each other. The angle of rotation could be changed by an external magnetic field, thereby indicating possible existence of a new phase. We have also studied skyrmion spin texture in an ultra-thin Fe/Gd multilayer that shows perpendicular anisotropy. The Fe/Gd sample exhibits a near perfect aligned stripe phase. Within a small range of temperature and magnetic field we observe a hexagonal scattering pattern due to skyrmion bubbles. Analysis of the scattering pattern suggests that the skyrmion lattice unit cell contains two skyrmions. The biskyrmion state is also revealed by Lorentz TEM images. The near room temperature discovery of skyrmion in a technology relevant material is a significant step towards using skyrmions in magnetic devices. Work at LBNL was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy (Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231).

  10. Octupole Magnet For Soft X Ray Magnetic Dichroism Experiments: Design and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Arenholz, Elke; Prestemon, Soren O.

    2004-05-12

    An octupole magnet endstation for soft x ray magnetic dichroism measurements has been developed at the Advanced Light Source. The system consists of an eight pole electromagnet that surrounds a small vacuum chamber. The magnet provides fields up to 0.9 T that can be applied in any direction relative to the incoming x ray beam. High precision magnetic circular and linear dichroism spectra can be obtained reversing the magnetic field for each photon energy in an energy scan. Moreover, the field dependence of all components of the magnetization vector can be studied in detail by choosing various angles of x ray incidence while keeping the relative orientation of magnetic field and sample fixed.

  11. Octupole magnet for soft X ray magnetic dichroism experiments: Design and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Arenholz, Elke; Prestemon, Soren O.

    2003-08-24

    An octupole magnet endstation for soft x-ray magnetic dichroism measurements has been developed at the Advanced Light Source. The system consists of an eight pole electromagnet that surrounds a small vacuum chamber. The magnet provides fields up to 0.9 T that can be applied in any direction relative to the incoming x-ray beam. High precision magnetic circular and linear dichroism spectra can be obtained reversing the magnetic field for each photon energy in an energy scan. Moreover, the field dependence of all components of the magnetization vector can be studied in detail by choosing various angles of x-ray incidence while keeping the relative orientation of magnetic field and sample fixed.

  12. A 23Na magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance, XANES, and high-temperature X-ray diffraction study of NaUO3, Na4UO5, and Na2U2O7.

    PubMed

    Smith, A L; Raison, P E; Martel, L; Charpentier, T; Farnan, I; Prieur, D; Hennig, C; Scheinost, A C; Konings, R J M; Cheetham, A K

    2014-01-01

    The valence state of uranium has been confirmed for the three sodium uranates NaU(V)O3/[Rn](5f(1)), Na4U(VI)O5/[Rn](5f(0)), and Na2U(VI)2O7/[Rn](5f(0)), using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Solid-state (23)Na magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) measurements have been performed for the first time, yielding chemical shifts at -29.1 (NaUO3), 15.1 (Na4UO5), and -14.1 and -19 ppm (Na1 8-fold coordinated and Na2 7-fold coordinated in Na2U2O7), respectively. The [Rn]5f(1) electronic structure of uranium in NaUO3 causes a paramagnetic shift in comparison to Na4UO5 and Na2U2O7, where the electronic structure is [Rn]5f(0). A (23)Na multi quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) study on Na2U2O7 has confirmed a monoclinic rather than rhombohedral structure with evidence for two distinct Na sites. DFT calculations of the NMR parameters on the nonmagnetic compounds Na4UO5 and Na2U2O7 have permitted the differentiation between the two Na sites of the Na2U2O7 structure. The linear thermal expansion coefficients of all three compounds have been determined using high-temperature X-ray diffraction: αa = 22.7 × 10(-6) K(-1), αb = 12.9 × 10(-6) K(-1), αc = 16.2 × 10(-6) K(-1), and αvol = 52.8 × 10(-6) K(-1) for NaUO3 in the range 298-1273 K; αa = 37.1 × 10(-6) K(-1), αc = 6.2 × 10(-6) K(-1), and αvol = 81.8 × 10(-6) K(-1) for Na4UO5 in the range 298-1073 K; αa = 6.7 × 10(-6) K(-1), αb = 14.4 × 10(-6) K(-1), αc = 26.8 × 10(-6) K(-1), αβ = -7.8 × 10(-6) K(-1), and αvol = -217.6 × 10(-6) K(-1) for Na2U2O7 in the range 298-573 K. The α to β phase transition reported for the last compound above about 600 K was not observed in the present studies, either by high-temperature X-ray diffraction or by differential scanning calorimetry. PMID:24350659

  13. X-ray magneto-optic KERR effect studies of spring magnet heterostructures.

    SciTech Connect

    Kortright, J. B.; Kim, S.-K.; Fullerton, E. E.; Jiang, J. S.; Bader, S. D.

    2000-11-01

    The complex 3-dimensional magnetization reversal behavior of Sin-Co/Fe exchange spring films is used to test the sensitivity of different resonant soft x-ray magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) measurements to changes in longitudinal and transverse moments within the SOIIFe layer and to changes in these moments in depth within the Fe layer. As in the visible MOKE, changes in longitudinal and net transverse moments are resolved by measuring both Kerr rotation and intensity loops in the near the Fe 2p core resonance. These x-ray MOKE signals measured using linear incident polarization are more directly interpreted in terms of longitudinal and transverse moments than are the same signals measured using elliptical polarization. Varying photon energy near the Fe L3line is shown to be an effective means of resolving distinctly different reversal behavior at the top and bottom of the 20 nm thick Fe layer resulting from the strong exchange coupling at the Sin-Co/Fe interface. Measured x-ray MOKE spectra and signals are in qualitative agreement with those calculated using standard magneto-optical formalisms incorporating interference between different layers and measured helicity-dependent magneto-optical constants for Fe.

  14. X-ray magneto-optic Kerr effect studies of spring magnet heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kortright, J.B.; Kim, Sang-Koog; Fullerton, E.E.; Jiang, J.S.; Bader, S.D.

    2000-11-02

    The complex 3-dimensional magnetization reversal behavior of Sm-Co/Fe exchange spring films is used to test the sensitivity of different resonant soft x-ray magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) measurements to changes in longitudinal and transverse moments within the soft Fe layer and to changes in these moments in depth within the Fe layer. As in the visible MOKE, changes in longitudinal and net transverse moments are resolved by measuring both Kerr rotation and intensity loops, respectively, near the Fe 2p core resonance. These x-ray MOKE signals measured using linear incident polarization are more directly interpreted in terms of longitudinal and transverse moments than are the same signals measured using elliptical polarization. Varying photon energy near the Fe L{sub 3} line is shown to be an effective means of resolving distinctly different reversal behavior at the top and bottom of the 20 nm thick Fe layer resulting from the strong exchange coupling at the Sm-Co/Fe interface. Measured x-ray MOKE spectra and signals are in qualitative agreement with those calculated using standard magneto-optical formalisms incorporating interference between different layers and measured helicity-dependent magneto-optical constants for Fe.

  15. The high-field magnet endstation for X-ray magnetic dichroism experiments at ESRF soft X-ray beamline ID32.

    PubMed

    Kummer, K; Fondacaro, A; Jimenez, E; Velez-Fort, E; Amorese, A; Aspbury, M; Yakhou-Harris, F; van der Linden, P; Brookes, N B

    2016-03-01

    A new high-field magnet endstation for X-ray magnetic dichroism experiments has been installed and commissioned at the ESRF soft X-ray beamline ID32. The magnet consists of two split-pairs of superconducting coils which can generate up to 9 T along the beam and up to 4 T orthogonal to the beam. It is connected to a cluster of ultra-high-vacuum chambers that offer a comprehensive set of surface preparation and characterization techniques. The endstation and the beam properties have been designed to provide optimum experimental conditions for X-ray magnetic linear and circular dichroism experiments in the soft X-ray range between 400 and 1600 eV photon energy. User operation started in November 2014. PMID:26917134

  16. Comparison of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with dual-photon absorptiometry and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in the measurement of thoracic vertebral bone mineral density: compressive force versus bone mineral.

    PubMed

    Myers, T J; Battocletti, J H; Mahesh, M; Gulati, M; Wilson, C R; Pintar, F; Reinartz, J

    1994-05-01

    31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS) measurements were made on human T2 and T3 vertebral bodies. The bone mineral content (BMC) of isolated vertebral bodies minus the posterior elements and disks was measured using (1) NMRS on a 3.5 T, 85 mm bore GE Medical Systems NT-150 superconducting spectrometer, (2) a Lunar Corporation DPX-L dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanner in an anterior-posterior (AP) orientation, (3) a Norland Corporation XR26 DXA scanner, also in an AP direction, and (4) a Norland Corporation model 2600 dual-photon absorptiometry (DPA) densitometer in both the AP and superior-inferior (SI) directions. Vertebral body volumes were measured using a water displacement technique to determine volume bone mineral densities (VBMD). They were then compressed to failure using an electrohydraulic testing device, followed by ashing in a muffle furnace at 700 degrees C for 18 h. Correlations of BMC between NMRS and DPA, DXA and ashing were excellent (0.96 < or = r < or = 0.99); in a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test, means were not statistically different at a p level of 0.757. The correlations of VBMD between NMRS and the other methods were not as good (0.83 < or = r < or = 0.95); in a one-way ANOVA test, means were not statistically different at a p level of 0.089. BMC was a better predictor of ultimate compressive failure than VBMD for all six methods. For NMRS, the regression coefficient for BMC was r2 = 0.806, compared with r2 = 0.505 for VBMD. NMRS may prove an alternative to present methods of determining bone mineral. PMID:8069051

  17. A simulation of X-ray shielding for a superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin Yong; Won, Mi-Sook; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Choi, Seyong; Ok, Jung-Woo; Choi, Jeong-Sik; Kim, Byoung-Chul

    2014-02-15

    It is generally assumed that large amounts of x-rays are emitted from the ion source of an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) instrument. The total amount of x-rays should be strictly limited to avoid the extra heat load to the cryostat of the superconducting ECR ion source, since they are partly absorbed by the cold mass into the cryostat. A simulation of x-ray shielding was carried out to determine the effective thickness of the x-ray shield needed via the use of Geant4. X-ray spectra of the 10 GHz Nanogan ECR ion source were measured as a function of the thickness variation in the x-ray shield. The experimental results were compared with Geant4 results to verify the effectiveness of the x-ray shield. Based on the validity in the case of the 10 GHz ECR ion source, the x-ray shielding results are presented by assuming the spectral temperature of the 28 GHz ECR ion source.

  18. On the maximum accretion luminosity of magnetized neutron stars: connecting X-ray pulsars and ultraluminous X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtukov, Alexander A.; Suleimanov, Valery F.; Tsygankov, Sergey S.; Poutanen, Juri

    2015-12-01

    We study properties of luminous X-ray pulsars using a simplified model of the accretion column. The maximal possible luminosity is calculated as a function of the neutron star (NS) magnetic field and spin period. It is shown that the luminosity can reach values of the order of 1040 erg s-1 for the magnetar-like magnetic field (B ≳ 1014 G) and long spin periods (P ≳ 1.5 s). The relative narrowness of an area of feasible NS parameters which are able to provide higher luminosities leads to the conclusion that L ≃ 1040 erg s-1 is a good estimate for the limiting accretion luminosity of an NS. Because this luminosity coincides with the cut-off observed in the high-mass X-ray binaries luminosity function which otherwise does not show any features at lower luminosities, we can conclude that a substantial part of ultraluminous X-ray sources are accreting neutron stars in binary systems.

  19. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and x-ray absorption spectroscopy of novel magnetic thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, M.A.; Ju, H.L.; Krishnan, K.M.

    1997-04-01

    The optimization of the magnetic properties of materials for a wide range of applications requires a dynamic iteration between synthesis, property measurements and characterization at appropriate length scales. The authors interest arises both from the increased appreciation of the degree to which magnetic properties can be influenced by tailored microstructures and the ability to characterize them by x-ray scattering/dichroism techniques. Preliminary results of this work at the ALS on `giant` moment in {alpha}{double_prime}-Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} and `colossal` magnetoresistance in manganite perovskites is presented here. It has recently been claimed that {alpha}{double_prime}-Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} possesses a giant magnetization of 2.9 T ({approximately}2300 emu/cc) when grown on lattice-matched In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As(001) and Fe/GaAs(001). However, attempts at growth on simpler substrates have resulted in only a modest enhancement in moment and often in multiphase mixtures. Theoretical calculations based on the band structure of Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} predict values for the magnetization around 2.3 T ({approximately}1780 emu/cc), well below Sugita`s claims, but consistent with the magnetization reported by several other workers. Using appropriate sum rules applied to the integrated MCD spectrum, they hope to determine the magnetic moment of the iron species in the {alpha}{double_prime}-Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} films and other phases and resolve the orbital and spin contributions to the moment. There is also rapidly growing interest in the `colossal magnetoresistance` effect observed in manganese oxides for both fundamental and commercial applications. To address some of these issues the authors have measured the electron energy loss spectra (EELS) of manganese perovskites at room temperature.

  20. X-ray scattering study of pyrochlore iridates: Crystal structure, electronic, and magnetic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, J. P.; Gretarsson, H.; Lee, E. K. H.; Tian, Di; Kim, J.; Upton, M. H.; Casa, D.; Gog, T.; Islam, Z.; Jeon, Byung-Gu; Kim, Kee Hoon; Desgreniers, S.; Kim, Yong Baek; Julian, S. J.; Kim, Young-June

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of the pyrochlore iridates Eu2Ir2O7 and Pr2Ir2O7 using a combination of resonant elastic x-ray scattering, x-ray powder diffraction, and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS). The structural parameters of Eu2Ir2O7 have been examined as a function of temperature and applied pressure, with a particular emphasis on regions of the phase diagram where electronic and magnetic phase transitions have been reported. We find no evidence of crystal symmetry change over the range of temperatures (˜6 to 300 K) and pressures (˜0.1 to 17 GPa) studied. We have also investigated the electronic and magnetic excitations in single-crystal samples of Eu2Ir2O7 and Pr2Ir2O7 using high-resolution Ir L3-edge RIXS. In spite of very different ground state properties, we find that these materials exhibit qualitatively similar excitation spectra, with crystal field excitations at ˜3 -5 eV, spin-orbit excitations at ˜0.5 -1 eV, and broad low-lying excitations below ˜0.15 eV. In single-crystal samples of "Eu-rich" Eu2Ir2O7 (found to possess an actual stoichiometry of Eu2.18Ir1.82O7.06 ) we observe highly damped magnetic excitations at ˜45 meV, which display significant momentum dependence. We compare these results with recent dynamical structure factor calculations.

  1. Imaging nanoscale magnetic structures with polarized soft x-ray photons

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, P.; Im, M.-Y.

    2010-01-18

    Imaging nanoscale magnetic structures and their fast dynamics is scientifically interesting and technologically of highest relevance. The combination of circularly polarized soft X-ray photons which provide a strong X-ray magnetic circular dichroism effect at characteristic X-ray absorption edges, with a high resolution soft X-ray microscope utilizing Fresnel zone plate optics allows to study in a unique way the stochastical behavior in the magnetization reversal process of thin films and the ultrafast dynamics of magnetic vortices and domain walls in confined ferromagnetic structures. Future sources of fsec short and high intense soft X-ray photon pulses hold the promise of magnetic imaging down to fundamental magnetic length and time scales.

  2. Measurement of the high energy component of the x-ray spectra in the VENUS electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, D.; Benitez, J. Y.; Lyneis, C. M.; Todd, D. S.; Ropponen, T.; Ropponen, J.; Koivisto, H.; Gammino, S.

    2008-03-15

    High performance electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources, such as VENUS (Versatile ECR for NUclear Science), produce large amounts of x-rays. By studying their energy spectra, conclusions can be drawn about the electron heating process and the electron confinement. In addition, the bremsstrahlung from the plasma chamber is partly absorbed by the cold mass of the superconducting magnet, adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. Germanium or NaI detectors are generally used for x-ray measurements. Due to the high x-ray flux from the source, the experimental setup to measure bremsstrahlung spectra from ECR ion sources is somewhat different from that for the traditional nuclear physics measurements these detectors are generally used for. In particular, the collimation and background shielding can be problematic. In this paper, we will discuss the experimental setup for such a measurement, the energy calibration and background reduction, the shielding of the detector, and collimation of the x-ray flux. We will present x-ray energy spectra and cryostat heating rates depending on various ion source parameters, such as confinement fields, minimum B-field, rf power, and heating frequency.

  3. Extracting paramagnon excitations from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamsal, Jagat; Montfrooij, Wouter

    2016-06-01

    Resonant x-ray scattering experiments on high-temperature superconductors and related cuprates have revealed the presence of intense paramagnon scattering at high excitation energies, of the order of several hundred meV. The excitation energies appear to show very similar behavior across all compounds, ranging from magnetically ordered, via superconductors, to heavy fermion systems. However, we argue that this apparent behavior has been inferred from the data through model fitting which implicitly imposes such similarities. Using model fitting that is free from such restrictions, we show that the paramagnons are not nearly as well defined as has been asserted previously, and that some paramagnons might not represent propagating excitations at all. Our work indicates that the data published previously in the literature will need to be reanalyzed with proper models.

  4. Innovative uses of X-ray FEL and the pulsed magnets: High magnetic field X-ray scattering studies on quantum materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, H.; Nojiri, H.; Gerber, S.; Lee, W.-S.; Zhu, D.; Lee, J.-S.; Kao, C.-C.

    X-ray scattering under high magnetic fields provides unique opportunities for solving many scientific puzzles in quantum materials, such as strongly correlated electron systems. Incorporating high magnetic field capability presents serious challenges at an x-ray facility, including the limitation on the maximum magnetic field even with a DC magnet (up to ~20 Tesla), expensive cost in development, radiation damage, and limited flexibility in the experimental configuration. These challenges are especially important when studying the symmetry broken state induced by the high magnetic field are necessary, for example, exploring intertwined orders between charge density wave (CDW) and high Tc superconductivity. Moreover, a gap in magnetic field strengths has led to many discrepancies and puzzling issues for understanding strongly correlated systems - is a CDW competing or more intimately intertwined with high-temperature superconductivity. To bridge this gap and resolve these experimental discrepancies, one needs an innovative experimental approach. Here, we will present a new approach to x-ray scattering under high magnetic field up to 28 Teals by taking advantage of brilliant x-ray free electron laser (FEL). The FEL generates sufficiently high photon flux for single shot x-ray scattering experiment. In this talk, we will also present the first demonstration about the field induced CDW order in YBCO Ortho-VIII with 28 Tesla, which show the totally unexpected three-dimensional behavior.

  5. Magnetic fields in X-ray emitting A-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, C.; Hubrig, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2008-04-01

    A common explanation for the observed X-ray emission of A-type stars is the presence of a hidden late-type companion. While this hypothesis can be shown to be correct in some cases, there is also evidence suggesting that low-mass companions cannot be the proper cause for the observed X-ray activity in all cases. Babel and Montmerle (1997) presented a theoretical framework to explain the X-ray emission from magnetic Ap/Bp stars, focusing on the A0p star IQ Aur. We test whether this theoretical model is capable of explaining the observed X-ray emissions. We present observations of 13 A-type stars that have been associated with X-ray emission detected by ROSAT. To determine the mean longitudinal magnetic field strength we measured the circular polarization in the wings of the Balmer lines using FORS 1. Although the emission of those objects with magnetic fields does fit the prediction of the Babel & Montmerle model, not all X-ray detections are related to the presence of a magnetic field. Additionally, the strengths of magnetic fields do not correlate with the X-ray luminosity and thus the magnetically-confined wind shock model cannot explain the X-ray emission from all investigated stars.

  6. Topological X-Rays Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We continue our study of topological X-rays begun in Lynch ["Topological X-rays and MRI's," iJMEST 33(3) (2002), pp. 389-392]. We modify our definition of a topological magnetic resonance imaging and give an affirmative answer to the question posed there: Can we identify a closed set in a box by defining X-rays to probe the interior and without…

  7. Neutron and X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Magnetic Order in Uranium-Based Heavy Fermion Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lussier, Jean-Guy

    UPt_3, URu_2 Si_2, UNi_2 Al_3 and UPd_2 Al_3 form a special group among the uranium alloys because they exhibit heavy fermion character, magnetic order and superconductivity. This main interest in the study of this group of compounds resides in the simultaneous occurrence of magnetism and superconductivity at low temperature. Such a state could potentially involve an unconventional superconducting pairing mechanism, different from that contained in standard BCS theory. In this thesis, the magnetic states of three of these materials (URu_2Si _2, UNi_2Al _3 and UPd_2Al _3) is investigated with neutron and the relatively new resonant magnetic X-ray scattering techniques. The work presented here on URu_2Si _2 follows an earlier effort that demonstrated the applicabililty of the resonant X-ray technique to this weak magnetic system. Access to reciprocal space was extended in order to confirm the multipolar form of the resonant X-ray cross-section and to explore the limits of the technique compared to neutron scattering. The situation with the newly discovered UNi_2Al _3 and UPd_2Al _3 was different since their magnetic structure and phases needed first to be established. This task was achieved using two magnetic probes (neutron and X-ray scattering). Several magnetic order parameters in the normal and in the superconducting phase were also measured. The incommensurate magnetic order found in UNi_2Al_3 by neutron scattering constitutes the first observation of long range order in this compound. Other measurements on this compound provided some clues about the evolution of the magnetic structure in high magnetic fields.

  8. Magnetic ordering and transitions of EuSe studied by x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, B.; Granado, E.; Abramof, E.; Torres, L.; Lechner, R. T.; Springholz, G.; Bauer, G.

    2010-05-01

    The magnetic phase diagram and thermal expansion of EuSe is revisited using a high-quality 3200-Å -thick epitaxial film grown over a (111)BaF2 substrate. Resonant magnetic x-ray diffraction experiments reveal a highly hysteretic magnetic phase diagram between 1.8 and TN˜4.7K , in which two antiferromagnetic phases with propagation vectors k⃗I=[(1)/(4),(1)/(4),-(1)/(4)] (represented by ↑↑↓↓ ) and k⃗II=[(1)/(2),(1)/(2),-(1)/(2)](↑↓↑↓) are observed. In addition, a defective phase with k⃗III=[h,h,-h]((1)/(4)x-ray diffraction experiments show unit-cell hysteretic distortions that correlate with the transitions to the different magnetic phases existing below TN .

  9. Probing symmetry and symmetry breaking in resonant soft-x-ray fluorescence spectra of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K.; Guo, J.

    1997-04-01

    Conventional non-resonant soft X-ray emission brings about information about electronic structure through its symmetry and polarization selectivity, the character of which is governed by simple dipole rules. For centro-symmetric molecules with the emitting atom at the inversion center these rules lead to selective emission through the required parity change. For the more common classes of molecules which have lower symmetry or for systems with degenerate core orbitals (delocalized over identical sites), it is merely the local symmetry selectivity that provides a probe of the local atomic orbital contribution to the molecular orbital. For instance, in X-ray spectra of first row species the intensities essentially map the p-density at each particular atomic site, and, in a molecular orbital picture, the contribution of the local p-type atomic orbitals in the LCAO description of the molecular orbitals. The situation is different for resonant X-ray fluorescence spectra. Here strict parity and symmetry selectivity gives rise to a strong frequency dependence for all molecules with an element of symmetry. In addition to symmetry selectivity the strong frequency dependence of resonant X-ray emission is caused by the interplay between the shape of a narrow X-ray excitation energy function and the lifetime and vibrational broadenings of the resonantly excited core states. This interplay leads to various observable effects, such as linear dispersion, resonance narrowing and emission line (Stokes) doubling. Also from the point of view of polarization selectivity, the resonantly excited X-ray spectra are much more informative than the corresponding non-resonant spectra. Examples are presented for nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide molecules.

  10. Resonant X-Ray Scattering Studies of Charge Order in Cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comin, Riccardo; Damascelli, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    X-ray techniques have been used for more than a century to study the atomic and electronic structure in practically any type of material. The advent of correlated electron systems, in particular complex oxides, brought about new scientific challenges and opportunities for the advancement of conventional X-ray methods. In this context, the need for new approaches capable of selectively sensing new forms of orders involving all degrees of freedom -- charge, orbital, spin, and lattice -- paved the way for the emergence and success of resonant X-ray scattering, which has become an increasingly popular and powerful tool for the study of electronic ordering phenomena in solids. We review the recent resonant X-ray scattering breakthroughs in the copper oxide high-temperature superconductors, in particular regarding the phenomenon of charge order, a broken-symmetry state occurring when valence electrons self-organize into periodic structures. After a brief historical perspective on charge order, we outline the milestones in the development of resonant X-ray scattering as well as the basic theoretical formalism underlying its unique capabilities. The rest of the review focuses on the recent contributions of resonant scattering to the advancements in our description and understanding of charge order. To conclude, we propose a series of present and upcoming challenges and discuss the future outlook for this technique.

  11. Molecular orientation in soft matter thin films studied by resonant soft X-ray reflectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Mezger, Markus; Jerome, Blandine; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Valvidares, Manuel; Gullikson, Eric; Giglia, Angelo; Mahne, Nicola; Nannarone, Stefano

    2011-01-12

    We present a technique to study depth profiles of molecular orientation in soft matter thin films with nanometer resolution. The method is based on dichroism in resonant soft X-ray reflectivity using linear s- and p-polarization. It combines the chemical sensitivity of Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy to specific molecular bonds and their orientation relative to the polarization of the incident beam with the precise depth profiling capability of X-ray reflectivity. We demonstrate these capabilities on side chain liquid crystalline polymer thin films with soft X-ray reflectivity data at the carbon K edge. Optical constants of the anisotropic refractive index ellipsoid were obtained from a quantitative analysis using the Berreman formalism. For films up to 50 nm thickness we find that the degree of orientation of the long axis exhibits no depth variation and isindependent of the film thickness.

  12. Lifetime-vibrational interference effects in resonantly excited x-ray emission spectra of CO

    SciTech Connect

    Skytt, P.; Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K.

    1997-04-01

    The parity selection rule for resonant X-ray emission as demonstrated for O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} can be seen as an effect of interference between coherently excited degenerate localized core states. One system where the core state degeneracy is not exact but somewhat lifted was previously studied at ALS, namely the resonant X-ray emission of amino-substituted benzene (aniline). It was shown that the X-ray fluorescence spectrum resulting from excitation of the C1s at the site of the {open_quotes}aminocarbon{close_quotes} could be described in a picture separating the excitation and the emission processes, whereas the spectrum corresponding to the quasi-degenerate carbons could not. Thus, in this case it was necessary to take interference effects between the quasi-degenerate intermediate core excited states into account in order to obtain agreement between calculations and experiment. The different vibrational levels of core excited states in molecules have energy splittings which are of the same order of magnitude as the natural lifetime broadening of core excitations in the soft X-ray range. Therefore, lifetime-vibrational interference effects are likely to appear and influence the band shapes in resonant X-ray emission spectra. Lifetime-vibrational interference has been studied in non-resonant X-ray emission, and in Auger spectra. In this report the authors discuss results of selectively excited soft X-ray fluorescence spectra of molecules, where they focus on lifetime-interference effects appearing in the band shapes.

  13. Critical Reexamination of Resonant Soft X-Ray Bragg Forbidden Reflections in Magnetite

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, S.B.; Di Matteo, S.; Beale, T.A.W.; Joly, Y.; Mazzoli, C.; Hatton, P.D.; Bencok, P.; Yakhou, F.; Brabers, V.A.M.

    2009-05-01

    Magnetite, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, displays a highly complex low-temperature crystal structure that may be charge and orbitally ordered. Many of the recent experimental claims of such ordering rely on resonant soft x-ray diffraction at the oxygen K and iron L edges. We have reexamined this system and undertaken soft x-ray diffraction experiments on a high-quality single crystal. Contrary to previous claims in the literature, we show that the intensity observed at the Bragg forbidden (001/2){sub c} reflection can be explained purely in terms of the low-temperature structural displacements around the resonant atoms. This does not necessarily mean that magnetite is not charge or orbitally ordered but rather that the present sensitivity of resonant soft x-ray experiments does not allow conclusive demonstration of such ordering.

  14. Studying Nanoscale Magnetism and its Dynamics with Soft X-ray Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mccall, Monnikue M; Fischer, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Magnetic soft X-ray microscopy allows for imaging magnetic structures at a spatial resolution down to 15nm and a time resolution in the sub-100ps regime. Inherent elemental specificity can be used to image the magnetic response of individual components such as layers in multilayered systems. This review highlights current achievements and discusses the future potential of magnetic soft X-ray microscopy at fsec X-ray sources where snapshot images of ultrafast spin dynamics with a spatial resolution below 10nm will become feasible.

  15. X-ray effects in charge-ordered manganites: A magnetic mechanism of persistent photoconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Keimer, B.; Casa, D.; Kiryukhin, V.; Saleh, O.A.; Hill, J.P.; Tomioka, Y.; Tokura, Y. |

    1998-12-31

    Charge-ordered manganites of composite Pr{sub 1{minus}x}(Ca{sub 1{minus}y}Sr{sub y}){sub x}MnO{sub 3} exhibit persistent photoconductivity when illuminated by x-rays. The authors review transport and x-ray diffraction data as functions of x-ray exposure, magnetic field, and temperature which shed light on the origin of this unusual behavior. The experimental evidence suggests that the mechanism primarily involves a ferromagnetic polarization of local spins by hot electrons generated by the x-rays.

  16. Time-Resolved X-Ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism - A Selective Probe of Magnetization Dynamics on Nanosecond Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzini, Stefania; Vogel, Jan; Bonfim, Marlio; Fontaine, Alain

    Many synchrotron radiation techniques have been developed in the last 15 years for studying the magnetic properties of thin-film materials. The most attractive properties of synchrotron radiation are its energy tunability and its time structure. The first property allows measurements in resonant conditions at an absorption edge of each of the magnetic elements constituting the probed sample, and the latter allows time-resolved measurements on subnanosecond timescales. In this review, we introduce some of the synchrotron-based techniques used for magnetic investigations. We then describe in detail X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and how time-resolved XMCD studies can be carried out in the pump-probe mode. Finally, we illustrate some applications to magnetization reversal dynamics in spin valves and tunnel junctions, using fast magnetic field pulses applied along the easy magnetization axis of the samples. Thanks to the element-selectivity of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, the magnetization dynamics of the soft (Permalloy) and the hard (cobalt) layers can be studied independently. In the case of spin valves, this allowed us to show that two magnetic layers that are strongly coupled in a static regime can become uncoupled on nanosecond timescales.Present address: Universidade Federal do Paraná, Centro Politécnico CP 19011, Curitiba - PR CEP 81531-990, Brazil

  17. Neptunium multipoles and resonant x-ray Bragg diffraction by neptunium dioxide (NpO2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovesey, S. W.; Detlefs, C.; Rodríguez-Fernández, A.

    2012-06-01

    The low-temperature ordered state of neptunium dioxide (NpO2) remains enigmatic. After decades of experimental and theoretical efforts, long-range order of a time-odd (magnetic) high-order atomic multipole moment is now generally considered to be the fundamental order parameter, the most likely candidate being a magnetic triakontadipole (rank 5). To date, however, direct experimental observation of the primary order parameter remains outstanding. In the light of new experimental findings, we re-examine the effect of crystal symmetry on the atomic multipoles and the resulting x-ray resonant scattering signature. Our simulations use the crystallographic point group \\bar {3}m (D3d), because corresponding magnetic groups \\bar {3}{m}^{\\prime}, {\\bar {3}}^{\\prime}{m}^{\\prime} and {\\bar {3}}^{\\prime}m are shown by us to be at odds with a wealth of experimental results. In addition to the previously observed (secondary) quadrupole order, we derive expressions for higher-order multipoles that might be observed in future experiments. In particular, magnetic octupole moments are predicted to contribute to Np M2,3 and L2,3 resonant scattering via E2-E2 events. The Lorentzian-squared lineshape observed at the M4 resonance is shown to be the result of the anisotropy of the 3p3/2 core levels. Quantitative comparison of our calculations to the measured data yields a core-hole width Γ = 2.60(7) eV and a core-state exchange energy \\vert \\varepsilon (\\frac{1}{2})\\vert =0.7 6(2) eV.

  18. Neptunium multipoles and resonant x-ray Bragg diffraction by neptunium dioxide (NpO2).

    PubMed

    Lovesey, S W; Detlefs, C; Rodríguez-Fernández, A

    2012-06-27

    The low-temperature ordered state of neptunium dioxide (NpO(2)) remains enigmatic. After decades of experimental and theoretical efforts, long-range order of a time-odd (magnetic) high-order atomic multipole moment is now generally considered to be the fundamental order parameter, the most likely candidate being a magnetic triakontadipole (rank 5). To date, however, direct experimental observation of the primary order parameter remains outstanding. In the light of new experimental findings, we re-examine the effect of crystal symmetry on the atomic multipoles and the resulting x-ray resonant scattering signature. Our simulations use the crystallographic point group ̅3m (D(3d)), because corresponding magnetic groups ̅3m', ̅3'm', and ̅3'm are shown by us to be at odds with a wealth of experimental results. In addition to the previously observed (secondary) quadrupole order, we derive expressions for higher-order multipoles that might be observed in future experiments. In particular, magnetic octupole moments are predicted to contribute to Np M(2,3) and L(2,3) resonant scattering via E2–E2 events. The Lorentzian-squared lineshape observed at the M(4) resonance is shown to be the result of the anisotropy of the 3p(3/2) core levels. Quantitative comparison of our calculations to the measured data yields a core–hole width Γ = 2.60(7) eV and a core-state exchange energy [absolute value]ε(1/2)[absolute value] = 0.76(2) eV. PMID:22652978

  19. Nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at high pressure and low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Wenli; Zhao, Jiyong; Lin, Jung -Fu; Jia, Quanjie; Hu, Michael Y.; Jin, Changqing; Ferry, Richard; Yang, Wenge; Struzhkin, Viktor; Alp, E. Ercan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a new synchrotron radiation experimental capability of coupling nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering with the cryogenically cooled high-pressure diamond anvil cell technique is presented. The new technique permits measurements of phonon density of states at low temperature and high pressure simultaneously, and can be applied to studies of phonon contribution to pressure- and temperature-induced magnetic, superconducting and metal–insulator transitions in resonant isotope-bearing materials. In this report, a pnictide sample, EuFe2As2, is used as an example to demonstrate this new capability at beamline 3-ID of the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. A detailed description of the technical development is given. The Fe-specific phonon density of states and magnetism from the Fe sublattice in Eu57Fe2As2 at high pressure and low temperature were derived by using this new capability.

  20. Resonant x-ray scattering study of SmNi_2Ge_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Zahirul; Lang, J.; Vasiliu-Doloc, L.; Srajer, G.; Canfield, P.

    2001-03-01

    Recently it was established that a strong Fermi-surface nesting is responsible for the magnetic ordering vector in the rare-earth nickel germanide (RNi_2Ge_2) compounds [Z. Islam et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 2817 (1999)]. In this work, using the x-ray resonant exchange scattering technique, we confirm that the magnetic structures of SmNi_2Ge2 are also in accordance with nesting. This material orders in an incommensurate antiferromagnetic (AF) structure characterized by a single propagation vector, q=(0 0 q_z). The value of qz is temperature dependent and approaches ~0.775 r.l.u. near TN = 17.8 K. Below Tt = 11.8 K, the AF structure is characterized by qz = 0.79±0.002, indicating a long-period ordered phase. Both ordered phases are consistent with a basal-plane helical structure. The temperature dependence of the helical structures is consistent with the theory of `superzone' gap. In addition, a strong quadrupolar resonance below the Sm L_III-edge was observed and compared to recent theoretical work. (The work at APS was supported by the U.S. DOE under contract no. W-31-109-Eng-38 and, in part, by the State of Illinois under HECA.)

  1. Resonant photo-pumping x-ray-laser scheme using intense characteristic x rays for water-window radiation generation

    SciTech Connect

    Kawachi, Tetsuya; Kato, Yoshiaki

    2011-12-15

    A line pair for a resonant photo-pumping x-ray-laser scheme is proposed in which the wavelength matching between the aluminum K{alpha}{sub 2} line ({lambda}= 0.833 95 nm) and the 2p{sup 6}-(2p{sub 1/2},4d{sub 3/2}){sub 1} transition of the neonlike zinc ions ({lambda}= 0.834 00 nm) is used. The population kinetics code of the neonlike zinc ions in plasma under irradiation of the aluminum K{alpha} line shows that substantial amplification gain can be generated in the transition of (2p{sub 1/2},3p{sub 1/2}){sub 0}-(2p{sub 1/2},4d{sub 3/2}){sub 1} at a wavelength of 3.5 nm. We also investigate the experimental arrangement of this scheme, which implies that this scheme is feasible with the present ultra-short-pulse-laser technology.

  2. X-Ray Comb Generation from Nuclear-Resonance-Stabilized X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Oscillator for Fundamental Physics and Precision Metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B. W.; Kim, K. -J.

    2015-03-31

    An x-ray free-electron laser oscillator (XFELO) is a next-generation x-ray source, similar to free-electron laser oscillators at VUV and longer wavelengths but using crystals as high-reflectivity x-ray mirrors. Each output pulse from an XFELO is fully coherent with high spectral purity. The temporal coherence length can further be increased drastically, from picoseconds to microseconds or even longer, by phase-locking successive XFELO output pulses, using the narrow nuclear resonance lines of nuclei such as Fe-57 as a reference. We show that the phase fluctuation due to the seismic activities is controllable and that due to spontaneous emission is small. The fluctuation of electron-bunch spacing contributes mainly to the envelope fluctuation but not to the phase fluctuation. By counting the number of standing-wave maxima formed by the output of the nuclear-resonance-stabilized (NRS) XFELO over an optically known length, the wavelength of the nuclear resonance can be accurately measured, possibly leading to a new length or frequency standard at x-ray wavelengths. A NRS-XFELO will be an ideal source for experimental x-ray quantum optics as well as other fundamental physics. The technique can be refined for other, narrower resonances such as Ta-181 or Sc-45.

  3. Magnetic fields in A-type stars associated with X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, C.; Hubrig, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2008-06-01

    A common explanation for the observed X-ray emission of A-type stars is the presence of a hidden late-type companion. While this assumption can be shown to be correct in some cases, a number of lines of evidence suggests that low-mass companions cannot be the correct cause for the observed activity in all cases. A model explains the X-ray emission for magnetic Ap/Bp stars, focusing on the A0p star IQ Aur. In this paper we test whether this theoretical model is able to explain the observed X-ray emission. We present the observations of 13 A-type stars that have been associated with X-ray emission detected by ROSAT. To determine the mean longitudinal magnetic field strength we measured the circular polarization in the wings of the Balmer lines using FORS1. Although the emission of those objects that possess magnetic fields fits the prediction of the Babel and Montmerle model, not all X-ray detections are connected to the presence of a magnetic field. Additionally, the measured magnetic fields do not correlate with the X-ray luminosity. Accordingly, the magnetically confined wind shock model cannot explain the X-ray emission from all the presented stars.

  4. A long-lived coronal X-ray arcade. [force-free magnetic field analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, J. P.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Krall, K. R.; Wu, S. T.; Smith, J. B., Jr.; Speich, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    A large, long-lived, soft X-ray emitting arch system observed during a Skylab mission is analyzed. The supposition is that these arches owe their stability to the stable coronal magnetic-field configuration. A global constant alpha force-free magnetic field analysis, is used to describe the arches which stayed in the same approximate position for several solar rotations. A marked resemblance is noted between the theoretical magnetic field configuration and the observed X-ray emmitting feature.

  5. K{beta} resonant x-ray emission spectra in MnF{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, M.; Parlebas, J. C.; Uozumi, T.; Kotani, A.; Kao, C.-C.

    2000-01-15

    We report experimental and theoretical results on Mn K{beta} resonant x-ray emission spectra (K{beta} RXES) at the pre-edge region of K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy in a powdered MnF{sub 2} sample. The experimental results are studied theoretically in terms of coherent second-order optical process, using a MnF{sub 6}{sup -4} cluster model with the effects of intra-atomic multiplet coupling and interatomic hybridization in the space of three configurations and taking into account both the Mn 1s-3d quadrupole excitation and the Mn 1s-4p dipole excitation. The agreement between theory and experiment is good. Moreover, we show that if the sample is a single crystal the resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy caused by the quadrupole excitation has a strong sensitivity to the angle of the incident photon. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  6. X-rays from magnetic intermediate mass Ap/Bp stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robrade, Jan

    2016-09-01

    The X-ray emission of magnetic intermediate mass Ap/Bp stars is reviewed and put into context of intrinsic as well as extrinsic hypotheses for its origin. New X-ray observations of Ap/Bp stars are presented and combined with an updated analysis of the available datasets, providing the largest sample of its type that is currently available. In the studied stars the X-ray detections are found predominantly among the more massive, hotter and more luminous targets. Their X-ray properties are quite diverse and beside strong soft X-ray emission significant magnetic activity is frequently present. While a connection between more powerful winds and brighter X-ray emission is expected in intrinsic models, the scatter in X-ray luminosity at given bolometric luminosity is so far unexplained and several observational features like X-ray light curves and flaring, luminosity distributions and spectral properties are often similar to those of low-mass stars. It remains to be seen if these features can be fully reproduced by magnetospheres of intermediate mass stars. The article discusses implications for magnetically confined wind-shock models (MCWS) and stellar magnetospheres under the assumption that the intrinsic model is applicable, but also examines the role of possible companions. Further, related magnetospheric phenomena are presented and an outlook on future perspectives is given.

  7. Uranium Hydridoborates: Synthesis, Magnetism, and X-ray/Neutron Diffraction Structures.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, H; Gackstatter, A; Kupfer, T; Radacki, K; Franke, S; Meyer, K; Fucke, K; Lemée-Cailleau, M-H

    2015-08-17

    While uranium hydridoborate complexes containing the [BH4](-) moiety have been well-known in the literature for many years, species with functionalized borate centers remained considerably rare. We were now able to prepare several uranium hydridoborates (1-4) with amino-substituted borate moieties with high selectivity by smooth reaction of [Cp*2UMe2] (Cp* = C5Me5) and [Cp'2UMe2] (Cp' = 1,2,4-tBu3C5H2) with the aminoborane H2BN(SiMe3)2. A combination of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, deuteration experiments, magnetic SQUID measurements, and X-ray/neutron diffraction studies was used to verify the anticipated molecular structures and oxidation states of 1-4 and helped to establish a linear tridentate coordination mode of the borate anions. PMID:26247295

  8. Evidence for Resonance Scattering in the X-ray Spectrum of Zeta Puppis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leutenegger, Maurice

    2008-01-01

    We present XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer observations of pairs of X-ray emission line profiles from the 0 star Zeta Pup that originate from the same He-like ion. The two profiles in each pair have different shapes and cannot both be consistently fit by models assuming the same wind parameters. We show that the differences in profile shape can be accounted for in a model including the effects of resonance scattering, which affects the resonance line in the pair but not the intercombination line. This implies that resonance scattering is also important in single resonance lines, where its effect is difficult to distinguish from a low effective continuum optical depth in the wind. Thus, resonance scattering may help reconcile X-ray line profile shapes with literature mass-loss rates.

  9. Using Resonant Soft X-rays to Reveal Internal Organic Thin Film Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gann, Eliot

    This dissertation details the establishment and expansion of resonant soft X-ray scattering techniques to reveal the internal structure of organic thin films. These films are increasingly important in numerous electronic systems, including organic thin film transistors, organic photovoltaics, and organic light emitting diodes. These devices use the electrical properties of polymers to respectively turn on and off conduction, turn light into electricity, and create light. The performance of each of these systems depends critically on their physical structure but unfortunately, traditional techniques fail to adequately characterize that structure. This dissertation will explore the use of soft X-ray scattering to reveal the mesoscale structure or organic electronic devices. This begins with an overview of the field to make the case for soft X-rays being an appropriate and novel tool. Next, to explain how to collect accurate soft X-ray scattering, the development of a new and unique soft X-ray scattering facility will be presented. Having the tools, the next step is to develop scattering theories and models for understanding and correctly analyzing scattering from these complicated devices. This includes development and comparison of analysis techniques and theory to simulate scattering. This simulation system is then used in the development of a theory to understand the novel phenomenon of anisotropic X-ray scattering from isotropic organic samples. Finally, I will describe the development and first use of a method able to simultaneously measure size scales and chemical structure with depth sensitivity in thin films: Grazing Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering. This work provides valuable understanding and tools to the field of materials characterization, opening up new opportunities for principled design of organic electronics.

  10. Electronic Structure in Thin Film Organic Semiconductors Studied using Soft X-ray Emission and Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,Y.; Downes, J.; Wang, S.; Learmonth, T.; Plucinski, L.; Matsuura, A.; McGuinness, C.; Glans, P.; Bernardis, S.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The electronic structure of thin films of the organic semiconductors copper and vanadyl (VO) phthalocyanine (Pc) has been measured using resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering. For Cu-Pc we report the observation of two discrete states near E{sub F}. This differs from published photoemission results, but is in excellent agreement with density functional calculations. For VO-Pc, the vanadyl species is shown to be highly localized. Both dipole forbidden V 3d to V 3d*, and O 2p to V 3d* charge transfer transitions are observed, and explained in a local molecular orbital model.

  11. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements using an X-ray phase retarder on the BM25 A-SpLine beamline at the ESRF

    PubMed Central

    Boada, Roberto; Laguna-Marco, María Ángeles; Gallastegui, Jon Ander; Castro, Germán R.; Chaboy, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Circularly polarized X-rays produced by a diamond X-ray phase retarder of thickness 0.5 mm in the Laue transmission configuration have been used for recording X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) on the bending-magnet beamline BM25A (SpLine) at the ESRF. Field reversal and helicity reversal techniques have been used to carry out the measurements. The performance of the experimental set-up has been demonstrated by recording XMCD in the energy range from 7 to 11 keV. PMID:20400827

  12. Strong higher-order resonant contributions to x-ray line polarization in hot plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Chintan; Amaro, Pedro; Steinbrügge, Rene; Beilmann, Christian; Bernitt, Sven; Fritzsche, Stephan; Surzhykov, Andrey; Crespo López-Urrutia, José R.; Tashenov, Stanislav

    2016-06-01

    We studied angular distributions of x rays emitted in resonant recombination of highly charged iron and krypton ions, resolving dielectronic, trielectronic, and quadruelectronic channels. A tunable electron beam drove these processes, inducing x rays registered by two detectors mounted along and perpendicular to the beam axis. The measured emission asymmetries comprehensively benchmarked full-order atomic calculations. We conclude that accurate polarization diagnostics of hot plasmas can only be obtained under the premise of inclusion of higher-order processes that were neglected in earlier work.

  13. Strong higher-order resonant contributions to x-ray line polarization in hot plasmas.

    PubMed

    Shah, Chintan; Amaro, Pedro; Steinbrügge, Rene; Beilmann, Christian; Bernitt, Sven; Fritzsche, Stephan; Surzhykov, Andrey; Crespo López-Urrutia, José R; Tashenov, Stanislav

    2016-06-01

    We studied angular distributions of x rays emitted in resonant recombination of highly charged iron and krypton ions, resolving dielectronic, trielectronic, and quadruelectronic channels. A tunable electron beam drove these processes, inducing x rays registered by two detectors mounted along and perpendicular to the beam axis. The measured emission asymmetries comprehensively benchmarked full-order atomic calculations. We conclude that accurate polarization diagnostics of hot plasmas can only be obtained under the premise of inclusion of higher-order processes that were neglected in earlier work. PMID:27415199

  14. X-ray-spectroscopy analysis of electron-cyclotron-resonance ion-source plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, J. P.; Martins, M. C.; Parente, F.; Costa, A. M.; Marques, J. P.; Indelicato, P.

    2010-12-15

    Analysis of x-ray spectra emitted by highly charged ions in an electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source (ECRIS) may be used as a tool to estimate the charge-state distribution (CSD) in the source plasma. For that purpose, knowledge of the electron energy distribution in the plasma, as well as the most important processes leading to the creation and de-excitation of ionic excited states are needed. In this work we present a method to estimate the ion CSD in an ECRIS through the analysis of the x-ray spectra emitted by the plasma. The method is applied to the analysis of a sulfur ECRIS plasma.

  15. Multidimensional Attosecond Resonant X-Ray Spectroscopy of Molecules: Lessons from the Optical Regime

    PubMed Central

    Mukamel, Shaul; Healion, Daniel; Zhang, Yu; Biggs, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    New free-electron laser and high-harmonic generation X-ray light sources are capable of supplying pulses short and intense enough to perform resonant nonlinear time-resolved experiments in molecules. Valence-electron motions can be triggered impulsively by core excitations and monitored with high temporal and spatial resolution. We discuss possible experiments that employ attosecond X-ray pulses to probe the quantum coherence and correlations of valence electrons and holes, rather than the charge density alone, building on the analogy with existing studies of vibrational motions using femtosecond techniques in the visible regime. PMID:23245522

  16. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering at the limit of subfemtosecond natural lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Marchenko, T.; Journel, L.; Marin, T.; Guillemin, R.; Carniato, S.; Simon, M.; Zitnik, M.; Kavcic, M.; Bucar, K.; Mihelic, A.; Hoszowska, J.; Cao, W.

    2011-04-14

    We present measurements of the resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) spectra of the CH{sub 3}I molecule in the hard-x-ray region near the iodine L{sub 2} and L{sub 3} absorption edges. We show that dispersive RIXS spectral features that were recognized as a fingerprint of dissociative molecular states can be interpreted in terms of ultrashort natural lifetime of {approx}200 attoseconds in the case of the iodine L-shell core-hole. Our results demonstrate the capacity of the RIXS technique to reveal subtle dynamical effects in molecules with sensitivity to nuclear rearrangement on a subfemtosecond time scale.

  17. Toroidal silicon polarization analyzer for resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuan; Casa, Diego; Kim, Jungho; Gog, Thomas; Li, Chengyang; Burns, Clement

    2016-08-01

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) is a powerful probe for studying electronic excitations in materials. Standard high energy RIXS measurements do not measure the polarization of the scattered x-rays, which is unfortunate since it carries information about the nature and symmetry of the excitations involved in the scattering process. Here we report the fabrication of thin Si-based polarization analyzers with a double-concave toroidal surface, useful for L-edge RIXS studies in heavier atoms such as the 5-d transition metals. PMID:27587100

  18. Magnetic properties of GdT2Zn20 (T = Fe, Co) investigated by x-ray diffraction and spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    J. R. L. Mardegan; Fabbris, G.; Francoual, S.; Veiga, L. S. I.; Strempfer, J.; Haskel, D.; Ribeiro, R. A.; Avila, M. A.; Giles, C.

    2016-01-26

    In this study, we investigate the magnetic and electronic properties of the GdT2Zn20 (T=Fe and Co) compounds using x-ray resonant magnetic scattering (XRMS), x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). The XRMS measurements reveal that GdCo2Zn20 has a commensurate antiferromagnetic spin structure with a magnetic propagation vector →/τ = (12,12,12) below the Néel temperature (TN ~ 5.7 K). Only the Gd ions carry a magnetic moment forming an antiferromagnetic structure with magnetic representation Γ6. For the ferromagnetic GdFe2Zn20 compound, an extensive investigation was performed at low temperature and under magnetic field using XANES and XMCD. Amore » strong XMCD signal of about 12.5% and 9.7% is observed below the Curie temperature (TC ~ 85K) at the Gd L2 and L3 edges, respectively. In addition, a small magnetic signal of about 0.06% of the jump is recorded at the Zn K edge, suggesting that the Zn 4p states are spin polarized by the Gd 5d extended orbitals.« less

  19. Spin pumping through a topological insulator probed by x-ray detected ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, A. I.; Baker, A. A.; Collins-McIntyre, L. J.; Hesjedal, T.; van der Laan, G.

    2016-02-01

    In the field of spintronics, the generation of a pure spin current (without macroscopic charge flow) through spin pumping of a ferromagnetic (FM) layer opens up the perspective of a new generation of dissipation-less devices. Microwave driven ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) can generate a pure spin current that enters adjacent layers, allowing for both magnetization reversal (through spin-transfer torque) and to probe spin coherence in non-magnetic materials. However, standard FMR is unable to probe multilayer dynamics directly, since the measurement averages over the contributions from the whole system. The synchrotron radiation-based technique of x-ray detected FMR (XFMR) offers an elegant solution to this drawback, giving access to element-, site-, and layer-specific dynamical measurements in heterostructures. In this work, we show how XFMR has provided unique information to understand spin pumping and spin transfer torque effects through a topological insulator (TI) layer in a pseudo-spin valve heterostructure. We demonstrate that TIs function as efficient spin sinks, while also allowing a limited dynamic coupling between ferromagnetic layers. These results shed new light on the spin dynamics of this novel class of materials, and suggest future directions for the development of room temperature TI-based spintronics.

  20. Probing single magnon excitations in Sr₂IrO₄ using O K-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Dean, M. P. M.; Liu, J.; Chiuzbaian, S. G.; Jaouen, N.; Nicolaou, A.; Yin, W. G.; Rayan Serrao, C.; Ramesh, R.; Ding, H.; Hill, J. P.

    2015-04-28

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the L-edge of transition metal elements is now commonly used to probe single magnon excitations. Here we show that single magnon excitations can also be measured with RIXS at the K-edge of the surrounding ligand atoms when the center heavy metal elements have strong spin-orbit coupling. This is demonstrated with oxygen K-edge RIXS experiments on the perovskite Sr₂IrO₄, where low energy peaks from single magnon excitations were observed. This new application of RIXS has excellent potential to be applied to a wide range of magnetic systems based on heavy elements, for which the L-edge RIXS energy resolutions in the hard X-ray region is usually poor.

  1. Probing single magnon excitations in Sr₂IrO₄ using O K-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, X.; Dean, M. P. M.; Liu, J.; Chiuzbaian, S. G.; Jaouen, N.; Nicolaou, A.; Yin, W. G.; Rayan Serrao, C.; Ramesh, R.; Ding, H.; et al

    2015-04-28

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the L-edge of transition metal elements is now commonly used to probe single magnon excitations. Here we show that single magnon excitations can also be measured with RIXS at the K-edge of the surrounding ligand atoms when the center heavy metal elements have strong spin-orbit coupling. This is demonstrated with oxygen K-edge RIXS experiments on the perovskite Sr₂IrO₄, where low energy peaks from single magnon excitations were observed. This new application of RIXS has excellent potential to be applied to a wide range of magnetic systems based on heavy elements, for which the L-edgemore » RIXS energy resolutions in the hard X-ray region is usually poor.« less

  2. Resonantly photo-pumped nickel-like erbium X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    A resonantly photo-pumped X-ray laser (10) that enhances the gain of seve laser lines that also lase because of collisional excitations and recombination processes, is described. The laser comprises an aluminum (12) and erbium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like erbium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped by line emission from hydrogen-like aluminum ions (32).

  3. Resonant elastic X-ray scattering in chemistry and materials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helliwell, J. R.; Helliwell, M.; Kaucic, V.; Logar, N. Z.

    2012-06-01

    The applications of anomalous scattering for locating metal atoms and discriminating between different elements has increased when optimised with synchrotron X-radiation.The on-resonance effect enhances the targeted elemental signal and allows small occupancies to be determined, including in situations of a mixed metal population at a single atomic site. Thus the applications of resonant elastic X-ray scattering in biological, inorganic and materials chemistry is being widely applied to single crystals, which is our emphasis, but also powders, fibres, solutions, amorphous and thin film states of matter. Recent developments have included the use of high photon energies (upto 100 keV) as well as softer X-rays (2 keV). The various instrument and technical capabilities have improved in the last 15 years. This ease of measurement of the resonant scattering signals along with absorption edge shifts indicates an expansion to the measurement of multiple data sets, to allow monitoring of redox changes. Whilst crystal structure determination in biological crystallography has been revolutionised by the MAD method, it is not a requirement for chemical or materials crystallography, as other phasing techniques are routine. Synchrotron source upgrades will allow nano-sized X-ray beams to be more widely available. The new X-ray lasers suggest new capabilities too.

  4. Investigation of self-filtering unstable resonator for soft x-ray lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani-Moghadam, G.; Farahbod, A. H.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, it is proposed that the self-filtering unstable resonator (SFUR) is suitable for soft x-ray lasers which have active medium with a short-gain-lifetime. In order to evaluate the idea, we have analyzed the self-filtering unstable resonator in two dimensions with Ne-like Fe soft x-ray active medium for transitions 2p5 3 p → 2p5 3 s and 3d9 4 d → 3d9 4 p at 25.5 nm. The role of field-limiting aperture in mode propagation has been shown. Moreover, beam quality factor M2 has been calculated and output mode behavior studied and compared with a plane-parallel (PP) resonator of equal length. The calculations indicate that the M2 factor in SFUR resonator is smaller than PP resonator and therefore output beam divergence is lower and the mode quality is much better. It is expected that a high quality beam of soft x-ray laser with brightness of the order 1013 W / cm2 sr and energy more than 10 nJ may be achievable with a properly designed diffraction-filtered unstable resonator.

  5. Role of screening and angular distributions in resonant soft-x-ray emission of CO

    SciTech Connect

    Skytt, P.; Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K.

    1997-04-01

    In the present work the authors focus on two particular properties of resonant X-ray emission, namely core hole screening of the excited electron, and anisotropy caused by the polarization of the exciting synchrotron radiation. The screening of the core hole by the excited electron causes energy shifts and intensity variations in resonant spectra compared to the non-resonant case. The linear polarization of the synchrotron radiation and the dipole nature of the absorption process create a preferential alignment selection of the randomly oriented molecules in the case of resonant excitation, producing an anisotropy in the angular distribution of the emitted X-rays. The authors have chosen CO for this study because this molecule has previously served as a showcase for non-resonant X-ray emission, mapping the valence electronic structure differently according to the local selection rules. With the present work they take interest in how this characteristic feature of the spectroscopy is represented in the resonant case.

  6. Double-confocal resonator for X-ray generation via intracavity Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, M.

    1995-12-31

    There has been a growing interest in developing compact X-ray sources through Thomson scattering of a laser beam by a relativistic electron beam. For higher X-ray flux it is desirable to have the scattering to occur inside an optical resonator where the laser power is higher. In this paper I propose a double-confocal resonator design optimized for head-on Thomson scattering inside an FEL oscillator and analyze its performance taking into account the diffraction and FEL gain. A double confocal resonator is equivalent to two confocal resonators in series. Such a resonator has several advantages: it couples electron beam through and X-ray out of the cavity with holes on cavity mirrors, thus allowing the system to be compact; it supports the FEL mode with minimal diffraction loss through the holes; it provides a laser focus in the forward direction for a better mode overlap with the electron beam; and it provides a focus at the same location in the backward direction for higher Thomson scattering efficiency; in addition, the mode size at the focal point and hence the Rayleigh range can be adjusted simply through intracavity apertures; furthermore, it gives a large mode size at the mirrors to reduce power loading. Simulations as well as analytical results will be presented. Also other configurations of intracavity Thomson scattering where the double-confocal resonator could be useful will be discussed.

  7. Resonant soft X-ray scattering study of twist bend nematic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chenhui; Young, Anthony; Wang, Cheng; Hexemer, Alexander; Li, Quan; Lavrentovich, Oleg; Walba, David; Tuchband, Michael; Shuai, Min; Clark, Noel

    Liquid crystals (LCs) form many interesting nano-scale structures, many of which can be probed with X-ray scattering techniques, typically hard X-rays due to its high penetrating power. However, in the hard X-ray regime, the scattering contrast of some LC nanostructures can be extremely low due to their weak electron density modulation. Here we show it is possible to use resonant soft x-rays to probe the helical pitch of the newly discovered twist bend nematic phase, which is purely a twist bend structure with no electron density modulation. The in-situ temperature dependent measurement will be presented and discussed. This work together with our previous study on the helical nanofilament B4 phase shows the great potential of soft x-ray scattering in liquid crystals. Supported by the Director of the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  8. Soft x-ray ptychography studies of nanoscale magnetic and structural correlations in thin SmCo5 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, P.; Shi, X.; Neu, V.; Elefant, D.; Lee, J. C. T.; Shapiro, D. A.; Farmand, M.; Tyliszczak, T.; Shiu, W.; Marchesini, S.; Roy, S.; Kevan, S. D.

    Soft x-ray ptychographic imaging was applied to probe an amorphous 50 nm thin SmCo5 film prepared by off-axis pulsed laser deposition and exhibiting a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Amplitude and phase contrast images, retrieved at photon energies near the cobalt L3 resonance, were used to identify and characterize magnetic and structural features with a spatial resolution of about10 nm. Aside from the common magnetic labyrinth domain pattern, nanoscale structural inclusions were identified that are primarily located in close proximity to the magnetic domain walls. X-ray absorption spectroscopy suggests that these inclusions are nanocrystalline Sm2Co17 phases with nominally in-plane magnetic anisotropy. Our results indicate that x-ray ptychographic imaging enables fruitful studies of magnetic and structural correlations at length scales relevant to emerging magnetic and spintronic devices. Supported by the Director of the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DEAC02-05CH11231.

  9. High-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS at the Swiss Light Source for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Strocov, V N; Schmitt, T; Flechsig, U; Schmidt, T; Imhof, A; Chen, Q; Raabe, J; Betemps, R; Zimoch, D; Krempasky, J; Wang, X; Grioni, M; Piazzalunga, A; Patthey, L

    2010-09-01

    The concepts and technical realisation of the high-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS operating in the energy range from 300 to 1600 eV and intended for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) are described. The photon source is an undulator of novel fixed-gap design where longitudinal movement of permanent magnetic arrays controls not only the light polarization (including circular and 0-180 degrees rotatable linear polarizations) but also the energy without changing the gap. The beamline optics is based on the well established scheme of plane-grating monochromator operating in collimated light. The ultimate resolving power E/DeltaE is above 33000 at 1 keV photon energy. The choice of blazed versus lamellar gratings and optimization of their profile parameters is described. Owing to glancing angles on the mirrors as well as optimized groove densities and profiles of the gratings, the beamline is capable of delivering high photon flux up to 1 x 10(13) photons s(-1) (0.01% BW)(-1) at 1 keV. Ellipsoidal refocusing optics used for the RIXS endstation demagnifies the vertical spot size down to 4 microm, which allows slitless operation and thus maximal transmission of the high-resolution RIXS spectrometer delivering E/DeltaE > 11000 at 1 keV photon energy. Apart from the beamline optics, an overview of the control system is given, the diagnostics and software tools are described, and strategies used for the optical alignment are discussed. An introduction to the concepts and instrumental realisation of the ARPES and RIXS endstations is given. PMID:20724785

  10. High-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS at the Swiss Light Source for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    Strocov, V. N.; Schmitt, T.; Flechsig, U.; Schmidt, T.; Imhof, A.; Chen, Q.; Raabe, J.; Betemps, R.; Zimoch, D.; Krempasky, J.; Wang, X.; Grioni, M.; Piazzalunga, A.; Patthey, L.

    2010-01-01

    The concepts and technical realisation of the high-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS operating in the energy range from 300 to 1600 eV and intended for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) are described. The photon source is an undulator of novel fixed-gap design where longitudinal movement of permanent magnetic arrays controls not only the light polarization (including circular and 0–180° rotatable linear polarizations) but also the energy without changing the gap. The beamline optics is based on the well established scheme of plane-grating monochromator operating in collimated light. The ultimate resolving power E/ΔE is above 33000 at 1 keV photon energy. The choice of blazed versus lamellar gratings and optimization of their profile parameters is described. Owing to glancing angles on the mirrors as well as optimized groove densities and profiles of the gratings, the beamline is capable of delivering high photon flux up to 1 × 1013 photons s−1 (0.01% BW)−1 at 1 keV. Ellipsoidal refocusing optics used for the RIXS endstation demagnifies the vertical spot size down to 4 µm, which allows slitless operation and thus maximal transmission of the high-resolution RIXS spectrometer delivering E/ΔE > 11000 at 1 keV photon energy. Apart from the beamline optics, an overview of the control system is given, the diagnostics and software tools are described, and strategies used for the optical alignment are discussed. An introduction to the concepts and instrumental realisation of the ARPES and RIXS endstations is given. PMID:20724785