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Sample records for resource area oregon

  1. Mineral resources of the Hawk Mountain Wilderness Study Area, Honey County, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Turrin, B.D.; Conrad, J.E.; Plouff, D.; King, H.D. ); Swischer, C.C. ); Mayerle, R.T.; Rains, R.L. )

    1989-01-01

    The Hawk Mountain Wildeness Study Area in south-central Oregon is underlain by Miocene age basalt, welded tuff, and interbedded sedimentary rock. The western part of this study area has a low mineral resource potential for gold. There is a low mineral resource potential for small deposits of uranium in the sedimentary rocks. This entire study area has a low potential for geothermal and oil and gas resources. There are no mineral claims or identified resources in this study area.

  2. Mineral resources of the Orejana Canyon Wilderness Study Area, Harney county, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, J.E.; King, H.D.; Gettings, M.E.; Diggles, M.F.; Sawatzky, D.L. ); Benjamin, D.A. )

    1988-01-01

    The Orejana Canyon Wilderness Study Area in south-central Oregon is discussed. It is underlain by Miocene age basalts and interbedded sediments and rhyolite welded tuff. The study area has low mineral resource potential for gold and silver along the Orejana Rim escarpment. There is low mineral resource potential for tin in some exposures of the rhyolite tuff and low potential for oil and gas resources. There are no mining claims or identified mineral resources in the study area.

  3. Mineral resources of the Upper Leslie Gulch and Slocum Creek Wilderness Study Areas, Malheur County, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Meulen, D.B.; Griscom, A.; King, H.D. ); Benham, J.R. )

    1989-01-01

    The Upper Leslie Gulch and Slocum Creek Wilderness Areas are located within Mahogany Mountain caldera of eastern Oregon. In both study areas, caldera-forming tuffs and intrusions have a moderate potential for uranium and thorium resources and a low potential for zinc resources. Both study areas have a low potential for lithium resources. Rhyolite dikes and plugs that intrude both study areas have a low potential for gold, silver, mercury, and zinc resources. North-trending fault zones within and adjacent to the Solcum Creek Wilderness Study Area have a moderate potential for geothemal resources. The Upper Leslie Gulch Wilderness Study Area has an unknown potential for geothermal resources.

  4. Mineral resources of the Home Creek wilderness study area, Harney County, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Meulen, D.B.; Griscom, A.; King, H.D.; Vercoutere, T.L.; Moyle, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    This book discusses the Home Creek Wilderness Study Area, on the western slope of Steens Mountain in the northern Basin and Range physiographic province of southeastern Oregon. The area is underlain by Miocene Steens Basalt. Isolated outcrops of the Devine Canyon ash-flow tuff unconformably overlie the Steens Basalt. Pleistocene shoreline deposits and Holocene dunes are exposed in the western part of the study area, moderate potential for sand and gravel resources in lake shoreline deposits, and low potential for geothermal energy throughout the study area.

  5. OLALLIE ROADLESS AREA, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George W.; Neumann, Terry R.

    1984-01-01

    The Olallie Roadless Area, Oregon, is devoid of mines and mineral prospects, and a mineral-resource evaluation of the area did not identify any mineral-resource potential. There is no evidence that fossil fuels are present in the roadless area. Nearby areas in Clackamas, Marion, Jefferson, and Wasco Counties are characterized by higher-than-normal heat flow and by numerous thermal springs, some of which have been partly developed. this may indicate that the region has some, as yet undefined, potential for the development of geothermal energy. Lack of thermal springs or other evidence of localized geothermal anomalies within the roadless area may be the result of masking by young, nonconductive rock units and by the flooding out and dilution of rising thermal waters by cool meteoric water.

  6. Mineral resources of the Fifteen Mile Creek, Oregon Canyon, Twelve Mile Creek, and Willow Creek Wilderness Study Areas, Malheur and Harney counties, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.A.; Rytuba, J.J.; Plouff, D.; Vercountere, T.L.; Turner, R.L.; Sawatzky, D.L. ); Leszcykowski, A.M.; Peters, T.J.; Schmauch, S.W.; Winters, R.A. )

    1988-01-01

    The four contiguous study areas are located in a volcanic terrane dominated by tuffs that were erupted from calderas of the McDermitt Caldera complex and the Whitehorse Caldera. None of these areas have identified resources, despite the proximity of mercury, uranium, and lithium mineralization to the south. The southern parts of the Fifteen Mile Creek and the Oregon Canyon Wilderness Study Areas have a low potential for mercury and uranium. The southern parts of the Fifteen Mile Creek, Oregon Canyon, and Willow Creek and the northwestern part of the Oregon Wilderness Study Areas have low potential for antimony, bismuth, mercury, silver,molybdenum, and zinc. In the Oregon Canyon Wilderness Study Area, the tuff of Oregon Canyon and the rim of the caldera of the McDermitt Caldera complex have a low potential for gold and silver in epithermal veins. The study areas have a low potential for zeolite minerals, oil and gas, and geothermal energy throughout, and restricted parts of the study areas have a low potential for pumice, rare-earth elements, zirconium, and decorative building stone.

  7. PINE CREEK ROADLESS AREA, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George W.; Denton, David K., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Examination of the Pine Creek Roadless Area, Oregon indicates that there is little likelihood for the occurrence of energy or metallic mineral resources in the area. No mines or mineral prospects were identified during the investigation. Although nearby parts of Harney Basin are characterized by higher than normal heat flow, indicating that the region as a whole may have some as yet undefined potential for the occurrence of the geothermal energy resources, no potential for this resource was identified in the roadless area.

  8. Mineral resources of the Sagebrush Focal Areas of Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2016-01-01

    Scientific Investigations Report 2016–5089 and accompanying data releases are the products of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Sagebrush Mineral-Resource Assessment (SaMiRA). The assessment was done at the request of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to evaluate the mineral-resource potential of some 10 million acres of Federal and adjacent lands in Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming. The need for this assessment arose from the decision by the Secretary of the Interior to pursue the protection of large tracts of contiguous habitat for the greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Western United States. One component of the Department of Interior plan to protect the habitat areas includes withdrawing selected lands from future exploration and development of mineral and energy resources, including copper, gold, silver, rare earth elements, and other commodities used in the U.S. economy. The assessment evaluates the potential for locatable minerals such as gold, copper, and lithium and describes the nature and occurrence of leaseable and salable minerals for seven Sagebrush Focal Areas and additional lands in Nevada (“Nevada additions”) delineated by BLM. Supporting data are available in a series of USGS data releases describing mineral occurrences (the USGS Mineral Deposit Database or “USMIN”), oil and gas production and well status, previous mineral-resource assessments that covered parts of the areas studied, and a compilation of mineral-use cases based on data provided by BLM, as well as results of the locatable mineral-resource assessment in a geographic information system. The present assessment of mineral-resource potential will contribute to a better understanding of the economic and environmental trade-offs that would result from closing the designated 10 million acres of Federal lands to mineral entry.

  9. MOUNT JEFFERSON PRIMITIVE AREA, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George W.; Pattee, Eldon C.

    1984-01-01

    Mineral and reconnaissance geothermal surveys of the Mount Jefferson Primitive Area in the Cascade Range of Oregon indicate little likelihood that metallic or nonmetallic mineral or energy resources exist in the area. Several mining claims, presumably located for gold, are present, but analyses of samples from the claims failed to detect the presence of gold or other valuable metals. Rock for construction purposes is abundantly present, but better and more accessible deposits are available in adjacent areas.

  10. Mineral resources of the Sheepshead Mountains, Wildcat Canyon, and Table Mountain Wilderness Study Areas, Malheur and Harney counties, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrod, D.R.; Griscom, A.; Turner, R.L.; Minor, S.A.; Graham, D.E.; Buehler, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    The Sheepshead Mountains, Wildcat Canyon, and Table Mountain Wilderness Study Areas encompass most of the Sheepshead Mountains in southeast Oregon. The mountains comprise several fault blocks of middle and late Miocene basalt, basaltic andesite, andesite, and dacite lava; pyroclastic and sedimentary rocks are minor. The three wilderness study areas have low resource potential for gold, silver, and oil and gas. A few small areas have low-to-high resource potential for diatomite, as indicated by the occurrence of low-grade diatomite. Some fault zones have a moderate potential for geothermal energy.

  11. Geophysical studies of the Crump Geyser known geothermal resource area, Oregon, in 1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plouff, Donald

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical studies in support of the resource appraisal of the Crump Geyser Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). This area was designated as a KGRA by the USGS, and this designation became effective on December 24, 1970. The land classification standards for a KGRA were established by the Geothermal Steam Act of 1970 (Public Law 91-581). Federal lands so classified required competitive leasing for the development of geothermal resources. The author presented an administrative report of USGS geophysical studies entitled 'Geophysical background of the Crump Geyser area, Oregon, KGRA' to a USGS resource committee on June 17, 1975. This report, which essentially was a description of geophysical data and a preliminary interpretation without discussion of resource appraisal, is in Appendix 1. Reduction of sheets or plates in the original administrative report to page-size figures, which are listed and appended to the back of the text in Appendix 1, did not seem to significantly degrade legibility. Bold print in the text indicates where minor changes were made. A colored page-size index and tectonic map, which also show regional geology not shown in figure 2, was substituted for original figure 1. Detailed descriptions for the geologic units referenced in the text and shown on figures 1 and 2 were separately defined by Walker and Repenning (1965) and presumably were discussed in other reports to the committee. Heavy dashed lines on figures 1 and 2 indicate the approximate KGRA boundary. One of the principal results of the geophysical studies was to obtain a gravity map (Appendix 1, fig. 10; Plouff, and Conradi, 1975, pl. 9), which reflects the fault-bounded steepness of the west edge of sediments and locates the maximum thickness of valley sediments at about 10 kilometers south of Crump Geyser. Based on the indicated regional-gravity profile and density-contrast assumptions for the two-dimensional profile, the maximum

  12. DESCHUTES CANYON ROADLESS AREA, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George W.; Winters, Richard A.

    1984-01-01

    An examination of the Deschutes Canyon Roadless Area, Oregon indicated that the area is devoid of mines and active mineral prospects or claims and that there is little likelihood for the occurrence of metallic or nonmetallic mineral resources. There is no evidence to indicate that mineral fuels are present in the roadless area. Nearby parts of central Jefferson County on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation are characterized by higher-than-normal heat flow and by numerous thermal springs, some of which have been partly developed. This may indicate that the region has some as yet undefined potential for the development of geothermal energy.

  13. Mineral resources of the Albert Rim wilderness study area, Lake County, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Sherlock, M.G.; Gettings, M.E. King, H.D.; Neumann, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on the 23,760-acre Abert Rim Wilderness Study Area for mineral resources (known) and mineral resource potential (undiscovered). No mineral resources were identified. A field reconnaissance of the study area revealed no areas of alteration that might be associated with mineralization. Results of geochemical analysis do not suggest mineralization. Rocks associated with gold and mercury mineralization are located in the surrounding region. Geophysical analysis suggests that these rock types may be located at shallow depths under parts of the study area. Therefore, parts of the study area have low potential for gold, mercury, and uranium. The entire study area has moderate potential for geothermal resources and low potential for oil and gas.

  14. Mineral resources of the Sheep Mountain Wilderness Study Area, Baker County, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, R.P.; Roback, R.C.; Turner, R.L.; Jachens, R.C.; Close, T.J.; Rains, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Sheep Mountain Wilderness Study Area covers approximately 7,000 acres on the west side of Hells Canyon between Brownlee and Oxbow dams. No mineral resources were identified within the study area. Most of the area is underlain by basalt, which is located too far from possible markets to be valuable as construction material. Plutonic and metasedimentary rocks exposed in the southeastern part of the area have low potential for polymetallic vein deposits that may contain silver, lead, zinc, copper, and gold. The study area has no potential for geothermal energy, energy minerals, or oil and gas resources.

  15. Mineral resources of the Blue Canyon and Owyhee Breaks Wilderness Study Areas, Malheur County, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Vandey Meulen, D.B.; Barlock, V.E.; Plumley, P.S.; Frisken, J.G.; Griscom, A. ); Causey, J.D. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on Blue Canyon and Owyhee Breaks Wilderness Study Areas are underlain by Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks. The study area, which includes parts of a high plateau and the Mahogany Mountain Caldera, has undergone basin-and-range extensional tectonism and occupies a regional lacustrine basin cut by faults. Blue Canyon Wilderness Study Area contains identified resources of jasper and perlite. Owyhee Breaks Wilderness Study Area contains occurrences of bentonite, jasper, and zeolite minerals. The resource potential is high for gold, solver, mercury, and molybdenum; moderate for additional gold, bentonite, diatomite, and geothermal; and low for zinc, fluorite, oil, and gas.

  16. Geology and geothermal resources of the Santiam Pass area of the Oregon Cascade Range, Deschutes, Jefferson and Linn Counties, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, B.E.

    1992-10-01

    This open-file report presents the results of the Santiam Pass drilling program. The first phase of this program was to compile all available geological, geophysical and geothermal data for the Santiam Pass area and select a drill site on the basis of these data (see Priest and others, 1987a), A summary of the drilling operations and costs associated with the project are presented in chapter 1 by Hill and Benoit. An Overview of the geology of the Santiam Pass area is presented by Hill and Priest in chapter 2. Geologic mapping and isotopic age determinations in the Santiam Pass-Mount Jefferson area completed since 1987 are summarized in chapter 2. One of the more important conclusions reached in chapter 2 is that a minimum of 2 km vertical displacement has occurred in the High Cascade graben in the Santiam Pass area. The petrology of the Santiam Pass drill core is presented by Hill in chapter 3. Most of the major volcanic units in the core have been analyzed for major, minor, and trace element abundances and have been studied petrographically. Three K-Ar ages are interpreted in conjunction with the magnetostratigraphy of the core to show that the oldest rocks in the core are approximately 1.8 Ma. Geothermal and geophysical data collected from the Santiam Pass well are presented by Blackwell in chapter 4. The Santiam Pass well failed to penetrate beneath the zone of lateral groundwater flow associated with highly permeable Quaternary volcanic rocks. Calculated geothermal gradients range from about 50[degree]C/km at depth 700-900 m, to roughly 110[degree]C/km from 900 m to the bottom of the well at 929 m. Heat-flow values for the bottom part of the hole bracket the regional average for the High Cascades. Blackwell concludes that heat flow along the High Cascades axis is equal to or higher than along the western edge of the High Cascades.

  17. Assessment of the water resources of the Grand Ronde area, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, K.A.; Risley, J.C.; Caldwell, R.R.; McFarland, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    Stream hydrographs show that throughout the Grand Ronde area most precipitation follows surface or shallow subsurface pathways to streams, resulting in rapid runoff and little natural water storage within the basin. Limited storage and low aquifer permeability restrict base flow to streams, and streamflows therefore decline rapidly once precipitation ceases. Shallow ground water and springs occur throughout the area, but because of the low permeability of aquifer materials, nearly all wells and springs have low yields. Water quality in streams, wells, and springs is generally good, but saline ground water has been reported on a number of drillers' logs for the study area and in several previous investigations of nearby areas. Further development of water resources in the Grand Ronde area is likely to be constrained by existing downstream water rights, the low permeability of geologic materials throughout the area, and possibly the intrusion of saline water. However, construction of facilities to store available water and thus compensate for low yields could provide a reliable, sustainable water supply for the Grand Ronde area.

  18. NORTHWEST OREGON PILOT STUDY AREA (USA): A WATERSHED ASSESSMENT OF LANDSCAPE CHANGE AND IMPACTS TO AQUATIC RESOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies of future management and policy options based on different assumptions provide a mechanism to examine possible outcomes and especially their likely benefits and consequences. The Northwest Oregon Pilot Study Area encompasses approximately 59,167 km2 and comprises a mixtur...

  19. HELLS CANYON STUDY AREA, OREGON AND IDAHO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, George C.; Close, Terry J.

    1984-01-01

    The Hells Canyon study area occupies nearly 950 sq mi along and near Hells Canyon of the Snake River in northeast Oregon and west-central Idaho. Geologic, geochemical, aeromagnetic, and mine and prospect investigations to determine the mineral-resource potential of the area were carried out. As a result, 42 sq mi or about 4 percent of the lands, in 21 separate areas, were classified as having probable or substantiated resource potential for base and precious metals, molybdenum, and tungsten. No energy resource potential was identified in this study.

  20. Ground-water resources of the Clatsop Plains sand-dune area, Clatsop County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frank, F.J.

    1970-01-01

    Although the average annual precipitation of the Clatsop Plains is 78.5 inches, the area is not without problems of water supply. The Clatsop Plains area ix underlain by Tertiary bedrock of low permeability that stores and yields small quantities of ground water, which may be of poor chemical quality. This Tertiary bedrock furnishes only minor ground-water discharge to maintain the base flow of streams. The flow of rivers and creeks, normally abundant during the wet season, decreases greatly during the dry summer months. The lowlands are overlain by extensive deposits of dune and beach sand. The dune sand is permeable and can absorb and store, as fresh water, a large percentage of the annual precipitation. In the central part of the dune area, the saturated thickness of the sand ranges from 95 to more than 150 feet. Most of the ground water in the sand discharges to the ocean through beach-line seeps and underflow. Much of the water now being discharged to the ocean could be recovered by pumping from properly located, designed, and constructed wells. Three test wells drilled as part of this study are capable of yielding 100 gallons per minute although they are equipped with only short lengths of well screen. It is estimated that 2,500 acre-feet of ground water per year per square mile of area may be available for withdrawal in the 10 square mile area that is most favorable for development. The water from the dune sand is soft to moderately hard, has a low chloride concentration, and is of generally good chemical quality; however, at places it is weakly acidic and contains sufficient dissolved iron to make iron removal necessary for some uses. Ground water from shallow depths beneath a few swampy low-lying areas is brown and contains excessive concentrations of iron.

  1. Mount Hood Wilderness and adjacent areas, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, T.E.C.; Causey, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Mount Hood Wilderness, Oregon, was conducted in 1980. Geochemical data indicate two areas of substantiated mineral-resource potential containing weak epithermal mineralization: an area on the north side of Zigzag Mountain, where vein-type lead-zinc-silver deposits occur and an area on the south side of Zigzag Mountain, where the upper part of a quartz diorite pluton has propylitic alteration associated with mineralization of copper, gold, silver, lead, and zinc in discontinuous veins. Geothermal-resource potential for low- to intermediate-temperature (less than 248/sup 0/F) hot-water systems in the wilderness is probable in three areas. Part of the wilderness is classified as a Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA), which is considered to have probable geothermal-resource potential, and two parts of the wilderness have been included in geothermal lease areas.

  2. Mineral Resources of the Hells Canyon Study Area, Wallowa County, Oregon, and Idaho and Adams Counties, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, George C.; Gualtieri, James L.; Close, Terry J.; Federspiel, Francis E.; Leszcykowski, Andrew M.

    2007-01-01

    Field studies supporting the evaluation of the mineral potential of the Hells Canyon study area were carried out by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mines in 1974-76 and 1979. The study area includes (1) the Hells Canyon Wilderness; (2) parts of the Snake River, Rapid River, and West Fork Rapid River Wild and Scenic Rivers; (3) lands included in the second Roadless Area Review and Evaluation (RARE II); and (4) part of the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area. The survey is one of a series of studies to appraise the suitability of the area for inclusion in the National Wilderness Preservation System as required by the Wilderness Act of 1964. The spectacular and mineralized area covers nearly 950 mi2 (2,460 km2) in northeast Oregon and west-central Idaho at the junction of the Northern Rocky Mountains and the Columbia Plateau.

  3. Steller Cove. Oregon Zoo Teacher Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Kristin

    The goal of this teacher guide is to promote education by providing resources and information to aid classroom teachers in using the Oregon Zoo as an educational setting. The unit also emphasizes the integration of science, mathematics, reading, writing, speaking, and problem solving. It is designed for grades 3-5 and is based on the Oregon State…

  4. The Zoo, Benchmarks & You: How To Reach the Oregon State Benchmarks with Zoo Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document aligns Oregon state educational benchmarks and standards with Oregon Zoo resources. Benchmark areas examined include English, mathematics, science, social studies, and career and life roles. Brief descriptions of the programs offered by the zoo are presented. (SOE)

  5. Selected administrative, land, and resource data for known geothermal resources areas in Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhardt, H.E.; Brook, C.A.; Smith, F.W.

    1980-01-01

    The data are compiled from published and unpublished classification, lease-scale evaluation, and resources assessment documents prepared by the Geological Survey and are current to December 1980. The KGRA's are listed alphabetically for each state.

  6. HOMESTEAD, LAKE FORK, AND LICK CREEK ROADLESS AREAS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, James G.; Conyac, Martin D.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey concluded that the Homestead, Lake Fork and Lick Creek Roadless Area, Oregon offer little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources in the bedrock. Probable mineral-resource potential is assigned to the west and north parts of the Lake Fork Roadless Area, where gold resources may occur in glacial deposits and alluvium transported into this area from sources outside the roadless area to the west.

  7. GEARHART MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS AND CONTIGUOUS ROADLESS AREA, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George W.; Ridenour, James

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource appraisal of the Gearhart Mountain Wilderness and contiguous roadless area in Oregon indicates that it is devoid of mines and mineral prospects and that there is little likelihood that metallic mineral resources occur in the area. Higher than normal heat flow characterizes the region containing Gearhart Mountain, indicating that it may have some potential, as yet undefined, for the occurrence of geothermal energy resources, but no geothermal resources were identified in this study.

  8. Oregon Low-Temperature-Resource Assessment Program. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, G.R.; Black, G.L.; Woller, N.M.

    1981-01-01

    Numerous low-temperature hydrothermal systems are available for exploitation throughout the Cascades and eastern Oregon. All of these areas have heat flow significantly higher than crustal averages and many thermal aquifers. In northeastern Oregon, low temperature geothermal resources are controlled by regional stratigraphic aquifers of the Columbia River Basalt Group at shallow depths and possibly by faults at greater depths. In southeastern Oregon most hydrothermal systems are of higher temperature than those of northeastern Oregon and are controlled by high-angle fault zones and layered volcanic aquifers. The Cascades have very high heat flow but few large population centers. Direct use potential in the Cascades is therefore limited, except possibly in the cities of Oakridge and Ashland, where load may be great enough to stimulate development. Absence of large population centers also inhibits initial low temperature geothermal development in eastern Oregon. It may be that uses for the abundant low temperature geothermal resources of the state will have to be found which do not require large nearby population centers. One promising use is generation of electricity from freon-based biphase electrical generators. These generators will be installed on wells at Vale and Lakeview in the summer of 1982 to evaluate their potential use on geothermal waters with temperatures as low as 80/sup 0/C (176/sup 0/F).

  9. Geology and geothermal resources of the Santiam Pass area of the Oregon Cascade Range, Deschutes, Jefferson and Linn Counties, Oregon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, B.E.

    1992-10-01

    This open-file report presents the results of the Santiam Pass drilling program. The first phase of this program was to compile all available geological, geophysical and geothermal data for the Santiam Pass area and select a drill site on the basis of these data (see Priest and others, 1987a), A summary of the drilling operations and costs associated with the project are presented in chapter 1 by Hill and Benoit. An Overview of the geology of the Santiam Pass area is presented by Hill and Priest in chapter 2. Geologic mapping and isotopic age determinations in the Santiam Pass-Mount Jefferson area completed since 1987 are summarized in chapter 2. One of the more important conclusions reached in chapter 2 is that a minimum of 2 km vertical displacement has occurred in the High Cascade graben in the Santiam Pass area. The petrology of the Santiam Pass drill core is presented by Hill in chapter 3. Most of the major volcanic units in the core have been analyzed for major, minor, and trace element abundances and have been studied petrographically. Three K-Ar ages are interpreted in conjunction with the magnetostratigraphy of the core to show that the oldest rocks in the core are approximately 1.8 Ma. Geothermal and geophysical data collected from the Santiam Pass well are presented by Blackwell in chapter 4. The Santiam Pass well failed to penetrate beneath the zone of lateral groundwater flow associated with highly permeable Quaternary volcanic rocks. Calculated geothermal gradients range from about 50{degree}C/km at depth 700-900 m, to roughly 110{degree}C/km from 900 m to the bottom of the well at 929 m. Heat-flow values for the bottom part of the hole bracket the regional average for the High Cascades. Blackwell concludes that heat flow along the High Cascades axis is equal to or higher than along the western edge of the High Cascades.

  10. NORTH FORK JOHN DAY RIVER ROADLESS AREA, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, James G.; Conyac, Martin D.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the North Fork John Day River Roadless Area in Oregon indicates that a narrow belt along the river has a substantiated resource potential for placer gold, and several other drainages tributary to the North Fork a probable resource potential for placer or lode gold. Further study of the roadless area may reveal other areas with a potential for gold, and could help to delineate bedrock or additional placer resources, especially in drainages tributary to the North Fork. This work could also point to other mineral deposits near the roadless boundary.

  11. 76 FR 37059 - Siuslaw National Forest; Oregon; Oregon Dunes NRA Management Area 10 (C) Route and Area Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... Forest Service Siuslaw National Forest; Oregon; Oregon Dunes NRA Management Area 10 (C) Route and Area... Dunes Plan) in order to: (1) Designate Off Highway Vehicle (OHV), also called Off Road Vehicle (ORV) routes within Management Area (MA) 10 (C) of the Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area (ODNRA) beyond...

  12. Natural resources inventory and monitoring in Oregon with ERTS imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonson, G. H.; Paine, D. P.; Poulton, C. E.; Lawrence, R. D.; Sherzog, J. H.; Murray, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Multidiscipline team interpretation of ERTS satellite and highflight imagery is providing resource and land use information needed for land use planning in Oregon. A coordinated inventory of geology, soil-landscapes, forest and range vegetation, and land use for Crook County, illustrates the value of this approach for broad area and state planning. Other applications include mapping fault zones, inventory of forest clearcut areas, location of forest insect damage, and monitoring irrigation development. Computer classification is being developed for use in conjunction with visual interpretation.

  13. Mineral resources of the Devil's Garden Lava Bed, Squaw Ridge Lava Bed, and Four Craters Lava Bed Wilderness Study Areas, Lake County, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, W.J.; King, H.D.; Gettings, M.E. ); Johnson, F.L. )

    1988-01-01

    The Devel's Garden lava Bed, Squaw Ridge Lava Bed, and Four Craters Lava Bed Wilderness Study Areas include approximately 70,940 acres and are underlain entirely by Pleistocene or Holocene lava flows and associated sediments. There is no evidence of hydrothermal alteration in the study areas. No resources were identified in the study areas, but there is low potential for perlite resources in the southern part of the Devil's Garden Lava Bed and the northern half of the Squaw Ridge Lava Bed areas. All three study areas have low potential for geothermal resources and for oil and gas resources.

  14. Potential hydrologic effects of developing coal and other geo-energy resources of Oregon; a review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sidle, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    Southwestern Oregon has several hundred million tons of good-quality minable coal. Because of the dip of the coal beds, the only economical method of mining would be by underground methods. In addition, minor occurrences of low-quality coal have been noted at more than 20 sites in both western and northeastern Oregon. About 2 million acres are now under lease for petroleum and gas exploration across the State. Natural gas was discovered in northwestern Oregon in 1979, and current production is about 17 million cubic feet per day from five wells. Thirteen Known Geothermal Resource Areas in several parts of the State cover 432,000 acres, and more than 420,000 acres are under lease for geothermal exploration. No hydrologic impacts have been noted from exploration and production of coal or other geoenergy resources in Oregon. (USGS)

  15. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Baker Quadrangle, Oregon and Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardi, M L; Robins, J W

    1982-05-01

    The Baker Quadrangle, Oregon, and Idaho, was evaluated to identify areas containing geologic environments favorable for uranium deposits. The criteria used was developed for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Stream-sediment reconnaissance and detailed surface studies were augmented by subsurface-data interpretion and an aerial radiometric survey. Results indicate that lower Pliocene sedimentary rocks in the Lower Powder River Valley-Virtue Flat basin are favorable characteristics, they remain unevaluated because of lack of subsurface data. Tertiary sandstones, possibly present at depth in the Long and Cascade Valleys, also remain unevaluated due to lack of subsurface data. All remaining environments in the Baker Quadrangle are unfavorable for all classes of uranium deposits.

  16. National Uranium Resource Evaluation, Klamath Falls Quadrangle, Oregon and California

    SciTech Connect

    Castor, S.B.; Berry, M.R.; Robins, J.W.

    1982-07-01

    The Klamath Falls Quadrangle, Oregon, was evaluated to identify and delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits according to criteria developed for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation. Surface radiometric reconnaissance and geochemical sampling were used for overall evaluation of the quadrangle. Detailed rock sampling, geologic mapping, and examinations of uranium mines and occurrences were performed in suspected favorable areas. Results of the work indicate good potential for shallow hydrothermal volcanogenic uranium deposits in the Lakeview favorable area, which comprises a northwest-trending belt of rhyolite intrusions in the eastern half of the quadrangle. The young age, peraluminous chemistry, and low thorium-to-uranium ratios of the rhyolite intrusions, as well as low uranium content of groundwater samples, indicate that uranium has not been leached from the intrusions by ground water. Therefore, supergene uranium deposits are not likely in the area. Scattered occurrences of ash-flow tuff in the east half of the quadrangle that contain high uranium and (or) thorium contents, and four occurrences of secondary uranium minerals in ash-flow tuff, indicate possible uranium deposits in ash flows in a poorly defined area that is partially coextensive with the Lakeview favorable area. Small granitic plutons with associated quartz-tourmaline breccia veins and base-metal occurrences may also be favorable for uranium deposits but were not examined during this study.

  17. Child and Family Resource Program (Salem, Oregon). Program Description.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Development Associates, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Successful coordination of social service agencies, aimed at serving eligible families with children from the prenatal period to age 8, has been the focus of the Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP) in Salem, Oregon, one of 11 sites in this Head Start affiliated program. The Salem program also includes an infant-toddler program emphasizing…

  18. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Jordan Valley Quadrangle, Oregon and Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, M R; Castor, S B; Robins, J W

    1982-04-01

    The Jordan Valley Quadrangle, Oregon and Idaho, was evaluated to identify and delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits in accordance with criteria developed for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation. Surface radiometric reconnaissance and geochemical sampling were used for overall evaluation of the quadrangle. Detailed rock sampling, geologic mapping, and examination of uranium deposits and occurrences were performed in areas suspected to be favorable. The northeast part of the McDermitt caldera within the quadrangle is favorable for volcanogenic deposits associated with the ring-fracture zone. The favorable area contains the Aurora uranium deposit, the Bretz mercury mine, and the Cottonwood Creek occurrence. The Triangle Ranch area and the Snake River Plain, both in the northeast part of the quadrangle, have environments that may be favorable for uranium deposits in sandstone but are considered unevaluated due to lack of subsurface data and lack of detailed investigations. Rocks in the remainder of the quadrangle are considered unfavorable for uranium deposits because of low uranium contents, basic to intermediate compositions, or lack of favorable structures.

  19. Potential hydrologic effects of developing coal and other geoenergy resources in Oregon: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Sidle, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    Geoenergy resources in Oregon, in addition to coal, include noncommercial deposits of oil shale, natural gas, and geothermal heat. Commercial quantities of natural gas were discovered at Mist in northwestern Oregon in 1979. Gas presently is being produced from five wells and additional exploratory drilling is underway. More than 2 million acres of Oregon land is under lease for petroleum and natural gas exploration, mostly in the Astoria embayment-Willamette syncline, central (Oregon) Paleozoic-Mesozoic basin, and eastern Tertiary nonmarine basin. The Cascade Range and eastern Oregon contain sizable resources of geothermal heat, of which a small part has been developed for space heating at Klamath Falls and Lakeview. Thirteen Known Geothermal Resource Areas (KGRA's) comprising 432,000 acres have been identified, 422,000 acres are currently leased for geothermal development. KGRA's judged to have potential for generation of electrical power are Newberry Crater, Crump Geyser, and Alvord Desert. No adverse hydrologic effects have been noted to date from coal or other geoenergy exploration or development in Oregon, and no effects are expected if federal and state regulations are adhered to. The southwestern Oregon coals would have to be mined by underground methods. Potential hydrologic impacts would be local increases in sedimentation, turbidity, and mineralization of surface and ground water. Water-quality degradation, including both thermal pollution and increased concentrations of dissolved minerals, could result from geothermal development. Other potential problems include land subsidence and consumptive use of water associated with both coal and geothermal development. 53 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. 76 FR 46320 - Notice of Public Meeting, Southeast Oregon Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting, Southeast Oregon Resource Advisory Council AGENCY... Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Southeast Oregon Resource Advisory Council (RAC) will meet as... meetings will take place at the Sunridge Inn, 1 Sunridge Lane, Baker City, Oregon 97814. FOR...

  1. 78 FR 8016 - Establishment of the Elkton Oregon Viticultural Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... affect viticulture, such as climate, geology, soil, physical features, and elevation, that make the.... 130 in the Federal Register on June 19, 2012 (77 FR 36433), proposing to establish the Elkton Oregon... proposed viticultural area include climate and topography. The notice also compared the...

  2. RIPARIAN AREAS OF AN AGRICULTURAL LANDSCAPE IN WESTERN OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Willamette Valley is a productive, diversified agricultural area in western Oregon. Pastureland and grass seed fields, mostly located on poorly drained soils, account for 60% of the agricultural land in the valley. The size and character of Willamette Valley streams and ass...

  3. Geologic assessment of undiscovered hydrocarbon resources of the Western Oregon and Washington Province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geologic Survey Western Oregon and Washington Province Team; Brownfield, Michael E.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Le, P.A.; GIS Spatial Data Team

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment is to develop geology-based hypotheses regarding the potential for additions to oil and gas reserves in priority areas of the United States, focusing on the distribution, quantity, and availability of oil and natural gas resources. The USGS has completed an assessment of the undiscovered, technically recoverable oil and gas resources in western Oregon and Washington (USGS Western Oregon and Washington Province 5004). The province includes all of Oregon and Washington north of the Klamath Mountains and west of the crest of the Cascade Range, and extends offshore to the 3-mi limit of State waters on the west and to the International Boundary in the Straits of Juan de Fuca and Canada on the north. It measures about 450 mi north-south and 50 to 160 mi east-west, encompassing more than 51,000 mi2. The assessment of the Western Oregon and Washington Province is geology based and used the total petroleum system (TPS) concept. The geologic elements of a TPS include hydrocarbon source rocks (source rock maturation and hydrocarbon generation and migration), reservoir rocks (quality and distribution), and traps for hydrocarbon accumulation. Using these geologic criteria, two conventional and one unconventional (continuous) total petroleum systems were defined, with one assessment unit (AU) in each TPS: (1) the Cretaceous-Tertiary Composite TPS and the Western Oregon and Washington Conventional Gas AU, (2) the Tertiary Marine TPS and the Tertiary-Marine Gas AU, and (3) the Tertiary Coalbed Gas TPS and the Eocene Coalbed Gas AU, in which a cell-based methodology was used to estimate coalbed-gas resources.

  4. Overview with methods and procedures of the U.S. Geological Survey mineral-resource assessment of the Sagebrush Focal Areas of Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming: Chapter A in Mineral resources of the Sagebrush Focal Areas of Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2016-01-01

    This report, chapter A of Scientific Investigations Report 2016–5089, provides an overview of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Sagebrush Mineral-Resource Assessment (SaMiRA). The report also describes the methods, procedures, and voluminous fundamental reference information used throughout the assessment. Data from several major publicly available databases and other published sources were used to develop an understanding of the locatable, leaseable, and salable mineral resources of this vast area. This report describes the geologic, mineral-occurrence, geochemical, geophysical, remote-sensing, and Bureau of Land Management mineral-case-status data used for the assessment, along with the methods for evaluating locatable mineral-resource potential. The report also discusses energy-resource data (oil and gas, coal, and geothermal) used in the assessment. Appendixes include summary descriptive mineral-deposit models that provide the criteria necessary to assess for the pertinent locatable minerals and market-demand commodity profiles for locatable mineral commodities relevant to the project. Datasets used in the assessment are available as USGS data releases.

  5. Reconnaissance geologic map and mineral resource potential of the Gearhart Mountain Wilderness and Roadless Area (6225), Lake and Klamath counties, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George W.; Ridenour, James

    1982-01-01

    The Gearhart Mountain Wilderness, Lake and Klamath Counties, Oreg., is devoid of mines and mineral prospects and there are no known mining claims within the area. Furthermore, the results of this mineral appraisal indicate that there is little likelihood that commercial deposits of metallic minerals will be found in the area. Commercial uranium deposits, like those at the White King and Lucky Lass mines about 16 mi (~25 km) to the southeast of the wilderness, and deposits of mercury, like those south-southeast of the wilderness, are not likely to be found within the wilderness, even though all of these areas are characterized by middle and late Cenozoic intrusive and extrusive volcanic rocks. Rock of low commercial value for construction purposes is present, but better and more accessible deposits are present in adjacent regions. There is no evidence to indicate that mineral fuels are present in the area. Higher than normal heat floe characterizes the region containing Gerheart Mountain, indicating that it may have some, as yet undefined, potential for the development of geothermal energy. Data are not available to determine whether this higher than normal heat flow is meaningful in terms of a potential energy source or as a guide to possible future exploration; lack of thermal springs or other evidence of localized geothermal anomalies within the Gerhart Mountain suggest, however, that the potential for the development of geothermal energy is probably low.

  6. Geologic Assessment of Undiscovered Gas Resources of the Eastern Oregon and Washington Province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey Eastern Oregon and Washington Province Assessment Team, (compiler)

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment is to develop geology-based hypotheses regarding the potential for additions to oil and gas reserves in priority areas of the United States, focusing on the distribution, quantity, and availability of oil and natural gas resources. The USGS has completed an assessment of the undiscovered oil and gas potential of the Eastern Oregon and Washington Province of Oregon and Washington (USGS Province 5005). The province is a priority Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) province for the National Assessment because of its potential for oil and gas resources. The assessment of this province is based on geologic principles and uses the total petroleum system concept. The geologic elements of a total petroleum system include hydrocarbon source rocks (source rock maturation, hydrocarbon generation and migration), reservoir rocks (stratigraphy, sedimentology, petrophysical properties), and hydrocarbon traps (trap formation and timing). In the Eastern Oregon and Washington Province, the USGS used this geologic framework to define one total petroleum system and two assessment units within the total petroleum system, and quantitatively estimated the undiscovered gas resources within each assessment unit.

  7. 75 FR 5563 - Notice of a Meeting of the Northeast Oregon Forests Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... Forest Service Notice of a Meeting of the Northeast Oregon Forests Resource Advisory Committee (RAC... Federal Advisory Committees Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Northeast Oregon Forest Resource Advisory Committee... a Committee to discuss selection of Title II projects under Public Law 110-343, H.R. 1424,...

  8. 77 FR 50080 - Notice of a Meeting of the Northeast Oregon Forests Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... Forest Service Notice of a Meeting of the Northeast Oregon Forests Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY... Advisory Committees Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Northeast Oregon Forest Resource Advisory Committee (RAC... Committee to discuss selection of Title II projects under Public Law 110-343, H.R. 1424, the...

  9. U.S. hydropower resource assessment for Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, A.M.; Francfort, J.E.

    1998-03-01

    The US Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the undeveloped hydropower potential in the United States. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory for this purpose. HES measures the undeveloped hydropower resources available in the US, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a menu-driven program that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report describes the resource assessment results for the State of Oregon.

  10. 77 FR 54608 - Southeast Oregon Resource Advisory Council (RAC); Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... will be held at the BLM Burns District Office, 28910 Hwy 20 West, in Hines, Oregon 97738. FOR FURTHER..., 28910 Highway 20 West, Hines, Oregon 97738, (541) 573-4519 or email tmartina@blm.gov . Persons who use...

  11. 75 FR 41987 - Regulated Navigation Areas; Bars Along the Coasts of Oregon and Washington; Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ... Along the Coasts of Oregon and Washington; Amendment'' in the Federal Register (75 FR 18449). We...; Bars Along the Coasts of Oregon and Washington'' in the Federal Register (74 FR 59098), which... is making a change to the Regulated Navigation Area (RNA) covering the Umpqua River Bar in Oregon...

  12. Oregon Trust Agreement Planning Project : Potential Mitigations to the Impacts on Oregon Wildlife Resources Associated with Relevant Mainstem Columbia River and Willamette River Hydroelectric Projects.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-10-01

    A coalition of the Oregon wildlife agencies and tribes (the Oregon Wildlife Mitigation Coalition) have forged a cooperative effort to promote wildlife mitigation from losses to Oregon wildlife resources associated with the four mainstream Columbia River and the eight Willamette River Basin hydroelectric projects. This coalition formed a Joint Advisory Committee, made up of technical representatives from all of the tribes and agencies, to develop this report. The goal was to create a list of potential mitigation opportunities by priority, and to attempt to determine the costs of mitigating the wildlife losses. The information and analysis was completed for all projects in Oregon, but was gathered separately for the Lower Columbia and Willamette Basin projects. The coalition developed a procedure to gather information on potential mitigation projects and opportunities. All tribes, agencies and interested parties were contacted in an attempt to evaluate all proposed or potential mitigation. A database was developed and minimum criteria were established for opportunities to be considered. These criteria included the location of the mitigation site within a defined area, as well as other criteria established by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Costs were established for general habitats within the mitigation area, based on estimates from certified appraisers. An analysis of the cost effectiveness of various types of mitigation projects was completed. Estimates of operation and maintenance costs were also developed. The report outlines strategies for gathering mitigation potentials, evaluating them, determining their costs, and attempting to move towards their implementation.

  13. Mineral resource potential map of the Kalmiopsis Wilderness, southwestern Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, Norman J; Miller, Michael S.; Grimes, David J.; Leinz, Reinhard W.; Blakely, Richard J.; Lipin, Bruce R.; Foose, Michael P.; Gray, Floyd

    1982-01-01

    Under the provisions of the Wilderness Act (Public Law 88-577, September 3, 1964) and the Joint conference Report on Senate Bill 4, 88th Congress, the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mines have been conducting mineral surveys of wilderness and primitive areas. Areas officially designated as "wilderness," wild," or "canoe" when the act was passed were incorporated into the National Wilderness Preservation System, and some of them are presently being studied. The act provided that areas under consideration for wilderness designation should be studied for suitability for incorporation into the Wilderness System. The mineral surveys constitute one aspect of the suitability studies. The act directs that the results of such surveys are to be made available to the public and be submitted to the President and the Congress. This report discusses the results of a mineral survey of the Kalmiopsis Wilderness, Siskiyou National Forest, Josephine and Curry Counties, Oregon. The area was established as a wilderness by Public Law 88-577, September 1964.

  14. 75 FR 10687 - Regulated Navigation Areas; Bars Along the Coasts of Oregon and Washington; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Areas; Bars Along the Coasts of... establishing regulated navigation areas for bars along the coasts of Oregon and Washington. That document....1325 Regulated Navigation Areas; Bars Along the Coasts of Oregon and Washington. (a) * * * (12)...

  15. 77 FR 67832 - Southeast Oregon Resource Advisory Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ..., conservation, and general interests. They provide advice to BLM and Forest Service resource managers regarding... the upcoming meetings include but are not limited to: Travel management planning; Cooperative..., management, and planning efforts; wilderness, wilderness study areas, and wilderness...

  16. SCHLUMBERGER SOUNDING RESULTS OVER THE NEWBERRY VOLCANO AREA, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bisdorf, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    Schlumberger soundings were made in the Newberry volcano area of Oregon to categorize the electrical properties of possible Cascade geothermal systems. An east-west geoelectric cross section constructed from the interpreted soundings shows a low-resistivity zone in the caldera, that corresponds to the increase in thermal gradient observed in a U. S. Geological Survey test well. Another low resistivity zone about 600 m deep is present just to the west of the caldera boundary. A north-south geoelectric cross section shows the configuration of the western low-resistivity zone. Maps of interpreted resistivity at depths of 750 and 1000 m show that the main low resistivity area west of the caldera has two tongues, one oriented easterly and the other oriented southerly.

  17. 76 FR 24854 - Notice of a Meeting of the Northeast Oregon Forests Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ...Pursuant to the authorities in the Federal Advisory Committees Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Northeast Oregon Forest Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet on May 19, 2011 in John Day, Oregon. The purpose of the meeting is to meet as a Committee to discuss selection of Title II projects under Public Law 110-343, H.R. 1424, the Reauthorization of the Secure Rural Schools and community Self-......

  18. 75 FR 33241 - Notice of a Meeting of the Northeast Oregon Forests Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ...Pursuant to the authorities in the Federal Advisory Committees Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Northeast Oregon Forest Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet on June 22, 2010 in John Day, Oregon. The purpose of the meeting is to meet as a Committee to discuss selection of Title II projects under Public Law 110-343, H.R. 1424, the Reauthorization of the Secure Rural Schools and community Self-......

  19. 75 FR 57976 - Designation of Service Area for Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs of Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Designation of Service Area for Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs of... Tribes of Warm Springs of Oregon, Warm Springs, Oregon (Warm Springs Tribe) for financial assistance and...: The Warm Springs Tribe submitted to BIA a request with supporting documentation to modify its...

  20. Hydrology of the dunes area north of Coos Bay, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robison, J.H.

    1973-01-01

    Hydrology of a 20-square-mile area of dunes along the central Oregon coast was studied. The area is underlain by 80 to 150 feet of Quaternary dune and marine sand which overlies Tertiary marine clay and shale. Ground water for industrial and municipal use is being withdrawn at a rate of 4 million gallons per day. Original plans to withdraw as much as 30 million gallons per day are evidently limited by the prospect of excessive lowering of levels in shallow lakes near the wells, and possibly sea-water intrusion, if water-level gradients are reversed. At the present stage of development there are 18 production wells, each capable of producing 200-300 gallons per minute from the lower part of the sand deposits. Except for thin layers of silt, clay, and organic matter, the deposits of sand are clean and uniform; horizontal permeability is two orders of magnitude times the vertical permeability. Because of the low vertical permeability, drawdown cones are not evident in the upper part of the aquifer adjacent to the wells. However, present pumping lowers general water levels in the lakes and the shallow ground-water zone as much as several feet. A two-layer electric analog model was built to analyze effects of present and projected development as well as any alternate plans. Model results were used to develop curves for short-term prediction of water levels.

  1. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 85-309-1739, Oregon Department of Human Resources, Health Division, Gypsy Moth Control Project, Eugene, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, L.J.; Huemann, M.; Sokolow, R.; Elefant, S.

    1986-10-01

    Evaluation of occupational and general public exposure to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) during application of this microbial agent for control of the gypsy moth was requested by the Oregon State Department of Human Resources, Health Division, located in Portland. Bt was applied by helicopter on about 250,000 acres of forest, rural, and urban areas in 1985 and 1986. Project operational plans, accident prevention, safety plans, personal protective-equipment usage, and work practices were reviewed and evaluated. Personal exposure and area air monitoring for Bt was carried out during application. Air sampling indicated there was a widespread exposure potential. The author recommends that care be taken by those employees handling Bt in solution and that splashing of Bt to the eye be avoided due to possible corneal ulcer development. The dispersing-agent Plyac is recommended for use in handling the waste-disposal problem. Access to the mixing and application areas should be restricted.

  2. Adapting natural resource management to climate change: The South Central Oregon and Northern Rockies Adaptation Partnerships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halofsky, J.; Peterson, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Concrete ways to adapt to climate change are needed to help natural resource managers take the first steps to incorporate climate change into management and take advantage of opportunities to balance the negative effects of climate change. We recently initiated two science-management climate change adaptation partnerships, one with three national forests and one national park in south central Oregon, and the other with 16 national forests, three national parks and other stakeholders in the northern Rockies region. Goals of both partnerships were to: (1) synthesize published information and data to assess the exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity of key resource areas, including water use, infrastructure, fisheries, and vegetation and disturbance; (2) develop science-based adaptation strategies and tactics that will help to mitigate the negative effects of climate change and assist the transition of biological systems and management to a warmer climate; (3) ensure adaptation strategies and tactics are incorporated into relevant planning documents; and (4) foster an enduring partnership to facilitate ongoing dialogue and activities related to climate change in the partnerships regions. After an initial vulnerability assessment by agency and university scientists and local resource specialists, adaptation strategies and tactics were developed in a series of scientist-manager workshops. The final vulnerability assessments and adaptation actions are incorporated in technical reports. The partnerships produced concrete adaptation options for national forest and other natural resource managers and illustrated the utility of place-based vulnerability assessments and scientist-manager workshops in adapting to climate change.

  3. An Assessment of 4th-, 8th-, and 11th-Grade Students' Environmental Science Knowledge Related to Oregon's Marine Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Michael J.

    1996-01-01

    Assesses the understanding that a sample of Oregon public school students (n=159) had of geology, physical and chemical characteristics, ecology, and natural resources as related to a marine environment. Results indicate that student understanding in some areas does not progress beyond the early grades and that the interdisciplinary approach of…

  4. Science: Teaching and Learning to Standards. Oregon Teacher Resources. 2005-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Department of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this science education document is to provide resources and advice for teachers, professional development personnel, and teacher educators to help them implement state standards in Oregon's schools. To move all students to these standards, educators must have an environment where several things occur: (a) all teachers are informed…

  5. 75 FR 44975 - Notice of Intent To Solicit Nominations, Western Oregon Resource Advisory Committees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-30

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Intent To Solicit Nominations, Western Oregon Resource Advisory Committees AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Call for Nominations. SUMMARY: The... Secretary, through the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), on the selection and prioritization of...

  6. Conceptual Model of the Klamath Falls, Oregon Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect

    Prucha, R.H.; Benson, S.M.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1987-01-20

    Over the last 50 years significant amounts of data have been obtained from the Klamath Falls geothermal resource. To date, the complexity of the system has stymied researchers, leading to the development of only very generalized hydrogeologic and geothermal models of the area. Recently, the large quantity of available temperature data have been re-evaluated, revealing new information on subsurface heat flow and locations of faults in the system. These inferences are supported by borehole, geochemical, geophysical, and hydrologic data. Based on re-evaluation of all available data, a detailed conceptual model for the Klamath Falls geothermal resource is proposed. 1 tab., 8 figs., 21 refs.

  7. Conceptual model of the Klamath Falls, Oregon geothermal area

    SciTech Connect

    Prucha, R.H.; Benson, S.M.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    Over the last 50 years significant amounts of data have been obtained from the Klamath Falls geothermal resource. To date, the complexity of the system has stymied researchers, leading to the development of only very generalized hydrogeologic and geothermal models of the area. Recently, the large quantity of available temperature data have been re-evaluated, revealing new information on subsurface heat flow and locations of faults in the system. These inferences are supported by borehole, geochemical, geophysical, and hydrologic data. Based on re-evaluation of all available data, a detailed conceptual model for the Klamath Falls geothermal resource is proposed.

  8. Geochemical map of the North Fork John Day River Roadless Area, Grant County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, James G.

    1986-01-01

    The North Fork John Day River Roadless Area comprised 21,210 acres in the Umatilla and Wallowa-Whitman National Forests, Grant County, Oregon, about 30 miles northwest of Baker, Oregon. The irregularly shaped area extends for about 1 mile on both sides of a 25-mile segment of the North Fork John Day River from Big Creek on the west to North Fork John Day Campground on the east. Most of the roadless area is in the northern half of the Desolation Butte 15-minute quadrangle. The eastern end of the area is in parts of the Granite and Trout Meadows 7½-minute quadrangles.

  9. Hydrothermal alteration in the Mount Hood Area, Oregon. Bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Bargar, K.E.; Keith, T.E.C.; Beeson, M.H.

    1993-01-01

    The report describes the hydrothermal alteration of numerous outcrop samples collected in the vicinity of Mount Hood, as well as drill cuttings from 13 of the geothermal drill holes for which the authors were able to obtain sample splits. The study is also an outgrowth of a geologic and mineral survey of the Mount Hood Wilderness area in compliance with the Wilderness Act which requires that the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mines evaluate the mineral resource potential of certain specified parcels of government-owned land.

  10. DIAMOND PEAK WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Moyle, Phillip R.

    1984-01-01

    No metallic mineral resources were identified during a mineral survey of the Diamond Peak Wilderness in Oregon. Cinder cones within the wilderness contain substantial cinder resources, but similar deposits that are more accessible occur outside the wilderness. The area could have geothermal resources, but available data are insufficient to evaluate their potential. Several deep holes could be drilled in areas of the High Cascades outside the wilderness, from which extrapolations of the geothermal potential of the several Cascade wilderness could be made.

  11. 75 FR 18055 - Regulated Navigation Areas; Bars Along the Coasts of Oregon and Washington; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Areas; Bars Along the Coasts of Oregon and Washington; Correction Correction In rule document 2010-4769 beginning on page 10687 in the issue of Tuesday, March 9, 2010, make...

  12. SOLE SOURCE AQUIFERS AND SOURCE AREAS IN WASHINGTON, OREGON, AND IDAHO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The map shows sole source aquifers and their source areas in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. Aquifers that have been designated are shown along with those that have been petitioned for designation. County outlines, and the Columbia river system are also shown. The aquifers.tar.g...

  13. 77 FR 36433 - Proposed Establishment of the Elkton Oregon Viticultural Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... Federal Register on March 29, 1984 (49 FR 12246). According to T.D. ATF-170, the Umpqua Valley... (69 FR 70889). The Southern Oregon viticultural area boundary encompasses the established Umpqua... Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau 27 CFR Part 9 RIN 1513-AB88 Proposed Establishment of the...

  14. Lakeview uranium area, Lake County, Oregon - constraints on genetic modelling from a district-scale perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Weissenburger, K.W.

    1984-01-01

    Extent-of-outcrop geologic mapping (1:12,000) on the Cox Flat 7.5-minute quadrangle establishes the stratigraphy and structure near the White King uranium mine, about 25 km northwest of Lakeview, Lake County, Oregon. Bedrock includes an Oligocene andesitic volcanic/sedimentary section, four late Oligocene rhyodacitic ignimbrite sequences, a late Oligocene/Miocene tuffaceous section, locally thick early to late Miocene basaltic flows, and an interbedded sequence of late Miocene (about 7-8 Ma old) felsic tuffs and thin basalt flows. Relatively intense down-to-the northeast normal faulting and southwestward stratal tilting resulted from a pre-Basin-and-Range extensional tectonic regime with an ENE least-principal stress orientation. This faulting and tilting began after the late Oligocene ignimbrite volcanism and before the spread of Coleman Rim-equivalent basalt flows. The interpreted geology constrains genetic models, resource estimates, and exploration strategies for uranium occurrences in the Lakeview area. Fault- and fracture-controlled hydrothermal uranium deposits are restricted to favorable stratigraphic horizons of the Miocene section with the important exception of porous and permeable upper portions of the late Oligocene section. Previous models have stressed the importance of intrusive rhyolite plug domes as sources of uranium and/or heat in ore genesis and targeted exploration efforts at dome contacts. Mass balance and other arguments show that an association with rhyolite domes is not a necessary criterion for ore formation or exploration.

  15. 78 FR 6832 - Call for Nominations for the John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council, Oregon/Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... Bureau of Land Management Call for Nominations for the John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council, Oregon.../ Washington John Day-Snake Resource Advisory Council (RAC). Citizens who serve on this council will provide...-Snake RAC seeks nominations to fill one vacancy in one category: Category Three--Representatives...

  16. The Oregon Oceanbook. An Introduction to the Pacific Ocean off Oregon Including Its Physical Setting and Living Marine Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmenter, Tish; Bailey, Robert

    Developed to integrate fundamental oceanographic concepts with basic research, this book presents information about the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Oregon. Characterizations and descriptions of the marine environment from the coastline to approximately 200 miles offshore are provided for the interested public. Chapter topics include: (1) marine…

  17. Ground water in Myrtle Creek - Glendale area, Douglas County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frank, F.J.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe briefly the occurence of ground water and to present ground-water information that will help water users, public officials, and planners to determine the probability of obtaining adequate quanitities of good-quality ground water in the Myrtle Creek-Glendale area.

  18. Geologic map of the Myrtle Point area, Coos County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldwin, Ewart Merlin

    1969-01-01

    The mapped area lies in theo southern end of the Coos Bay coal field. Coal occurs onle in the upper and lower members of the Coaledo Formation. Nearly all the coal mined in the Coos Bay coal field was from the upper member of the Coaledo Formation. In the mapped area, most of this member has been eroded; only a few hundred feed of the basal strata remains. Allen and Baldwin (1944, p. 131, 116) reported 2 feet 7 inches of coal and bone along Hall creek in the NW1/4NW1/4 sec. 11, T. 29 S., R. 13 W., and 4 feet of coal and bony coal at the Albee prospect near the center of the NE1/4 sec. 4 T. 29 S., 13 W. 

  19. 75 FR 10813 - Notice of Public Meeting, Southeast Oregon Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... will meet at the Burns District Office Conference Room, 28910 Highway 20 West, Hines, Oregon 97738. FOR... 14, 2010 at the Burns District Office Conference Room, 28910 Highway 20 West, Hines, Oregon, from 8...

  20. Resource Contingency Program - Oregon : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hermiston Power Project.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-09-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has statutory responsibilities to supply electrical power to its utility, industrial, and other customers in the Pacific Northwest. In 1990, to cover the outer range of potential load growth with new resources, BPA embarked upon the Resource Contingency Program (RCP). Instead of buying or building generating plants now, BPA has purchased options to acquire power later, if and when it is needed. The decision to acquire any of these option energy projects to fulfill statutory supply obligations will be influenced by Federal system load growth, the outcome of BPA`s Business Plan, required operational changes in Columbia-Snake River Hydroelectric facilities, and the loss of major generating resources. In September 1993, three option development agreements were signed with three proposed natural gas-fired, combined cycle combustion turbine CT projects near Chehalis and Satsop, Washington, and near Hermiston, Oregon. Together these three projects could supply BPA with 1,090 average megawatts (aMW) of power. Under these agreements, sponsors are obtaining permits and conducting project design work, and BPA is completing this EIS process. In September 1993, BPA published a Notice of Intent to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) on these three proposed gas-fired combustion turbine projects and held public scoping meetings in October 1993 at each site. In February 1994, BPA released an Implementation Plan on the proposed scope of the EIS. A draft EIS on the three proposed projects was published in February 1995. The impacts of the Chehalis and Satsop projects located in Washington State will be covered in one EIS document, while the impacts of the Hermiston project located in Oregon are covered in this final EIS document. It is BPA`s intent to continue to base the analysis of impacts on the assumption that all three projects may be constructed at some point in the future.

  1. A Profile of Oregon Counties: Human Resources, Educational, and Economic Indicators Associated with Young Children and Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem. Student Services Section.

    This profile of counties in Oregon covers factors that may predispose youth to grow up at risk of dropping out of high school or not acquiring the skills needed for adult life. The profile presents data on human resources and educational and economic indicators that were collected from state agencies and organizations. For the state as a whole,…

  2. An Assessment of Agriculture and Natural Resource Extension Program Needs on American Indian Reservations in Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singletary, Loretta; Emm, Staci; Hill, George

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of a needs assessment involving American Indians and outreach professionals on reservations in Idaho, Nevada, Oregon and Washington. The survey featured 36 questions about agricultural and natural resource issues that may pose challenges on reservation lands. A comparison between reservation residents and…

  3. A Guide for Vocational Energy Education: Resources, Key People, Classroom Materials. Oregon Vocational Energy Education Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Vocational Association, Gervais.

    Intended as a resource tool for integrating energy and conservation education into the vocational skills areas, this resource guide consists of listings of instructional and technical materials pertaining to 14 vocational curriculum areas. These areas are agriculture, agriculture/agribusiness, architecture, automotive, business, construction,…

  4. 33 CFR 165.1323 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Oregon Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: Willamette River Portland, Oregon Captain of the Port Zone. 165.1323 Section 165.1323 Navigation and..., Oregon Captain of the Port Zone. (a) Location. The following is a regulated navigation area (RNA): All...°34′39″ N, 122°44′43″ W thence to 45°34′44″ N, 122°44′51″ W thence to 45°34′45″ N, 122°44′53″ W...

  5. 33 CFR 165.1322 - Regulated Navigation Area: Willamette River Portland, Oregon Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Oregon Captain of the Port Zone. (a) Location. The following is a regulated navigation area (RNA): All waters of the Willamette River encompassed by a line commencing at 45°34′.47″ N, 122°45′28″ W along the... regulated area. (2) All vessels transiting or accessing the regulated area shall do so at a no wake speed...

  6. Analytical results and sample locality map of stream-sediment, heavy-mineral-concentrate, and rock samples from the Fifteen Mile Creek, Twelve Mile Creek, Oregon Canyon, and Willow Creek Wilderness Study Areas, harney and Malheur Counties, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.J.; Erickson, M.S.; Fey, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    A U.S. Geological Survey report is presented giving the analytical results and sample locality map of stream-sediment, heavy-mineral-concentrate, and rock samples from the Fifteen Mile Creek, Twelve Mile Creek, Oregon Canyon, and Willow Creek Wilderness Study Areas, harney and Malheur Counties, Oregon.

  7. 75 FR 22621 - Notice of Intent To Solicit Nominations, Western Oregon Resource Advisory Committees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... on the date of appointment and will expire on September 30, 2013. DATES: Submit nomination packages... nomination forms are available at the District Offices in western Oregon, and completed nominations should be... Advisory Committee: Glenn Harkleroad, 1300 Airport Lane, North Bend, Oregon 97459, (541) 756-0100....

  8. Questions and Answers About the Effects of Septic Systems on Water Quality in the La Pine Area, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, John S.; Morgan, David S.; Hinkle, Stephen R.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrate levels in the ground-water aquifer underlying the central Oregon city of La Pine and the surrounding area are increasing due to contamination from residential septic systems. This contamination has public health implications because ground water is the sole source of drinking water for area residents. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Deschutes County and the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, studied the movement and chemistry of nitrate in the aquifer and developed computer models that can be used to predict future nitrate levels and to evaluate alternatives for protecting water quality. This fact sheet summarizes the results of that study in the form of questions and answers.

  9. Competitive interactions and resource partitioning between northern spotted owls and barred owls in western Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiens, J. David; Anthony, Robert G.; Forsman, Eric D.

    2014-01-01

    The federally threatened northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) is the focus of intensive conservation efforts that have led to much forested land being reserved as habitat for the owl and associated wildlife species throughout the Pacific Northwest of the United States. Recently, however, a relatively new threat to spotted owls has emerged in the form of an invasive competitor: the congeneric barred owl (S. varia). As barred owls have rapidly expanded their populations into the entire range of the northern spotted owl, mounting evidence indicates that they are displacing, hybridizing with, and even killing spotted owls. The range expansion by barred owls into western North America has made an already complex conservation issue even more contentious, and a lack of information on the ecological relationships between the 2 species has hampered recovery efforts for northern spotted owls. We investigated spatial relationships, habitat use, diets, survival, and reproduction of sympatric spotted owls and barred owls in western Oregon, USA, during 2007–2009. Our overall objective was to determine the potential for and possible consequences of competition for space, habitat, and food between these previously allopatric owl species. Our study included 29 spotted owls and 28 barred owls that were radio-marked in 36 neighboring territories and monitored over a 24-month period. Based on repeated surveys of both species, the number of territories occupied by pairs of barred owls in the 745-km2 study area (82) greatly outnumbered those occupied by pairs of spotted owls (15). Estimates of mean size of home ranges and core-use areas of spotted owls (1,843 ha and 305 ha, respectively) were 2–4 times larger than those of barred owls (581 ha and 188 ha, respectively). Individual spotted and barred owls in adjacent territories often had overlapping home ranges, but interspecific space sharing was largely restricted to broader foraging areas in the home range

  10. Comparative approaches to measuring food access in urban areas: the case of Portland, Oregon.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Andrea L; Bania, Neil; Leete, Laura

    2011-01-01

    GIS methods are used to construct measures of food access for neighbourhoods in the Portland, Oregon, US metropolitan area and the sensitivity of such measures to methodological variation is examined. The level of aggregation of data inputs is varied and the effect of using both Euclidean and street network distances is tested. It is found that, regardless of the level of geographical disaggregation, distance-based measures generate approximately the same conclusions about the distribution of food access in the area. It is also found that, while the relationship between street network and Euclidean distances varies with population density, measures computed with either construct generate the same relative patterns of food access. These findings suggest that results from food access studies employing disparate methodologies can often be compared. PMID:21954485

  11. The comparative evaluation of ERTS-1 imagery for resource inventory in land use planning. [Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonson, G. H. (Principal Investigator); Paine, D. P.; Lawrence, R. D.; Pyott, W. T.; Herzog, J. H.; Murray, R. J.; Norgren, J. A.; Cornwell, J. A.; Rogers, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Multidiscipline team interpretation and mapping of resources for Crook County is nearly complete on 1:250,000 scale enlargements of ERTS-1 imagery. Maps of geology, landforms, soils and vegetation-land use are being interpreted to show limitations, suitabilities and geologic hazards for land use planning. Mapping of lineaments and structures from ERTS-1 imagery has shown a number of features not previously mapped in Oregon. A timber inventory of Ochoco National Forest has been made. Inventory of forest clear-cutting practices has been successfully demonstrated with ERTS-1 color composites. Soil tonal differences in fallow fields shown on ERTS-1 correspond with major soil boundaries in loess-mantled terrain. A digital classification system used for discriminating natural vegetation and geologic materials classes has been successful in separation of most major classes around Newberry Cauldera, Mt. Washington and Big Summit Prairie. Computer routines are available for correction of scanner data variations; and for matching scales and coordinates between digital and photographic imagery. Methods of Diazo film color printing of computer classifications and elevation-slope perspective plots with computer are being developed.

  12. Low-temperature geothermal database for Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Black, G.

    1994-11-01

    The goals of the low-temperature assessment project, performed by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) is aimed primarily at updating the inventory of the nation's low and moderate temperature geothermal resources. The study has begun in Oregon, where the areas of Paisley, Lakeview, Burns/Hines, Lagrande, and Vale were identified over 40 sites as having potential for direct heat utilization. Specifics sites are outlined, detailing water temperature, flow, and current uses of the sites.

  13. Oil and gas developments in West Coast area in 1982. [Canada, Oregon, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Dainty, N.D.; Woltz, D.

    1983-10-01

    Activity was brisk in the onshore area of California during 1982. Four hundred and seventy-five exploratory wells (41.4% successful) were drilled, including the discovery of 2 new oil and 4 new gas fields. The number of wells drilled decreased from a record 486 in 1981 to 475 in 1982; however, the total footage drilled increased from 2,711,217 ft in 1981 to 2,910,277 ft in 1982, and the average footage per well jumped sharply from 5,579 to 6,127 ft. In addition, 2,062 development wells were drilled (97.4% successfully). At various times during the year, up to 10 drilling vessels were active in state and federal waters. Four new offshore discoveries were announced by Texaco, Atlantic Richfield, Oxy, and Union. Texaco's ''Hueso'' discovery is a probable extension of the Chevron-Phillips Point Arguello field announced in October 1981. The field is believed to be a giant oil field containing over 100 million bbl of recoverable reserves. Union, Oxy, and Atlantic Richfield struck oil in the fractured Monterey Shale. Further delineation drilling will be needed to determine field reserves. California's total oil production for 1982 was 401.4 million bbl, a 4% increase from the 1981 record of 385 million bbl. Five unsuccesful wildcats were abandoned in Washington. Although there were some encouraging shows, the accumulations were deemed noncommercial. The bulk of drilling activity in Oregon centered around the Mist gas field. There were no discoveries announced for 1982. Geothermal activity in California was concentrated in The Geysers, Imperial Valley, and Coso areas. Oregon activity continued at the Newberry caldera.

  14. Assessment of Undiscovered Hydrocarbon Resources of the Western Oregon and Washington Province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brownfield, Michael E.; Cook, Troy A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean volumes of 2.2 trillion cubic feet (TCF) of undiscovered natural gas and 15 million barrels of oil (MMBO) in the Western Oregon and Washington Province. More than 67 percent, or 1.5 TCF, of the undiscovered natural gas is continuous gas estimated to be coalbed gas in Tertiary coals in western Oregon and Washington.

  15. Evaluating areas of high conservation value in Western Oregon with a decision-support model.

    PubMed

    Staus, Nancy L; Strittholt, James R; Dellasala, Dominick A

    2010-06-01

    The Northwest Forest Plan was implemented in 1994 to protect habitat for species associated with old-growth forests, including Northern Spotted Owls (Strix occidentailis caurina) in Washington, Oregon, and northern California (U.S.A.). Nevertheless, 10-year monitoring data indicate mixed success in meeting the ecological goals of the plan. We used the ecosystem management decision-support model to evaluate terrestrial and aquatic habitats across the landscape on the basis of ecological objectives of the Northwest Forest Plan, which included maintenance of late-successional and old-growth forest, recovery, and maintenance of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), and viability of Northern Spotted Owls. Areas of the landscape that contained habitat characteristics that supported these objectives were considered of high conservation value. We used the model to evaluate ecological condition of each of the 36, 180 township and range sections of the study area. Eighteen percent of the study area was identified as habitat of high conservation value. These areas were mostly on public lands. Many of the sections that contained habitat of exceptional conservation value were on Bureau of Land Management land that has been considered for management-plan revisions to increase timber harvests. The results of our model can be used to guide future land management in the Northwest Forest Plan area, and illustrate how decision-support models can help land managers develop strategies to better meet their goals. PMID:20184658

  16. STRAWBERRY MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thayer, T.P.; Stotelmeyer, Ronald B.

    1984-01-01

    The Strawberry Mountain Wilderness extends 18 mi along the crest of the Strawberry Range and comprises about 53 sq mi in the Malheur National Forest, Grant County, Oregon. Systematic geologic mapping, geochemical sampling and detailed sampling of prospect workings was done. A demonstrated copper resource in small quartz veins averaging at most 0. 33 percent copper with traces of silver occurs in shear zones in gabbro. Two small areas with substantiated potential for chrome occur near the northern edge of the wilderness. There is little promise for the occurrence of additional mineral or energy resources in the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness.

  17. Geothermal resource area 11, Clark County area development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Pugsley, M.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal Resource Area 11 includes all of the land in Clark County, Nevada. Within this area are nine geothermal anomalies: Moapa Area, Las Vegas Valley, Black Canyon, Virgin River Narrows, Roger's Springs, Indian Springs, White Rock Springs, Brown's Spring, and Ash Creek Spring. All of the geothermal resources in Clark County have relatively low temperatures. The highest recorded temperature is 145{sup 0}F at Black Canyon. The temperatures of the other resources range from 70 to 90{sup 0}F. Because of the low temperature of the resources and, for the most part, the distance of the resources from any population base, the potential for the development of the resources are considered to be somewhat limited.

  18. Geothermal resource area 9: Nye County. Area development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Pugsley, M.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal Resource area 9 encompasses all of Nye County, Nevada. Within this area there are many different known geothermal sites ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/ to over 265/sup 0/ F. Fifteen of the more major sites have been selected for evaluation in this Area Development Plan. Various potential uses of the energy found at each of the resource sites discussed in this Area Development Plan were determined after evaluating the area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities, and comparing those with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the 15 geothermal sites considered in this Area Development Plan are summarized.

  19. Geothermal resource area 3: Elko County. Area development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Pugsley, M.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal Resource Area 3 includes all of the land in Elko County, Nevada. There are in excess of 50 known thermal anomalies in this area. Several of the more major resources have been selected for detailed description and evaluation in this Area Development Plan. The other resources are considered too small, too low in temperature, or too remote to be considered for development in the near future. Various potential uses of the energy found at each of the studied resource sites in Elko County were determined after evaluating the area's physical characteristics; the land ownership and land use patterns; existing population and projected growth rates; transportation facilities and energy requirements. These factors were then compared with resource site specific data to determine the most likely uses of the resource. The uses considered in this evaluation were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories several subdivisions were considered separately. It was determined that several of the geothermal resources evaluated in the Area Development Plan could be commercially developed. The potential for development for the seven sites considered in this study is summarized.

  20. Review of National Teachers Examination by the Oregon State System of Higher Education. 23 Specialty Area Tests from October Review. 2 Specialty Area Tests from May Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State System of Higher Education, Eugene.

    This report summarizes findings on 26 National Teacher Examination specialty area tests provided by faculty reviewers from five Oregon institutions of higher education. Reviewers were asked to judge tests on the basis of: (1) whether students at the reviewer's institution would have the opportunity to acquire the knowledge measured in test items;…

  1. Equal Opportunity Handbook: A Resource on Equal Opportunities for Education and Employment in Oregon Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This handbook is an information source for Oregon public school districts developing policies to ensure equal opportunities in education, employment, and the provision of educational services required by Federal and state laws, regulations, and policies. Not addressed are issues and services for the handicapped or programs for migrants, the…

  2. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Ecological Resources (DRAFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Trettin, C.C.; Tolbert, V.R.; Jones, A.T.; Smith, C.R.; Kalmijn, A.J.

    1994-06-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on ecological resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (COE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 (Fed. Regist. 5925638) withdrawing its Notice of Intent (Fed. Regst. 575433) of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report focus on several areas of Hawaii County, including the southeastern coast, a potential development corridor along the Saddle Road between Hilo and the North Kohala District on the northwestern coast, and on the southeastern coast of Maui. In this report, reference is made to these areas as study areas rather than as areas where proposed or alternative facilities of the HGP would be located. The resource areas addressed herein include terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, and marine ecology. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for future research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

  3. Debris flows from failures Neoglacial-age moraine dams in the Three Sisters and Mount Jefferson wilderness areas, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connor, J. E.; Hardison, J.H.; Costa, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    The highest concentration of lakes dammed by Neoglacial moraines in the conterminous United States is in the Mount Jefferson and Three Sisters Wilderness Areas in central Oregon. Between 1930 and 1980, breakouts of these lakes have resulted in 11 debris flows. The settings and sequences of events leading to breaching and the downstream flow behavior of the resulting debris flows provide guidance on the likelihood and magnitude of future lake breakouts and debris flows.

  4. Assessment of Undiscovered Gas Resources of the Eastern Oregon and Washington Province, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brownfield, Michael E.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Ahlbrandt, Thomas S.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2006-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated a mean of 2.4 trillion cubic feet (TCF) of undiscovered natural gas in the Eastern Oregon and Washington Province. More than 90 percent, or 2.1 TCF, of the estimated undiscovered natural gas is continuous gas estimated to be trapped in Tertiary rocks overlain by the Columbia River Basalt Group.

  5. Mid-Miocene Silicic Volcanism of the Three Fingers - Mahogany Mountain Area, SE Oregon - Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcy, P.; Streck, M. J.; Ferns, M.

    2013-12-01

    Earlier work identified two adjacent caldera systems, the Mahogany Mountain and Three Fingers calderas as the centerpiece of voluminous rhyolitic volcanism on the eastern margin of the Oregon-Idaho graben during the mid-Miocene. Silicic volcanism of Three Fingers-Mahogany Mtn. area is part of the Lake Owyhee volcanic field, Oregon and belongs to widespread rhyolites associated with the Columbia River Basalt province. Here we revisit field evidence and establish relationships between intra-caldera units of Three Fingers and Mahogany Mtn. calderas, and their outflow facies, the tuffs of Spring Creek and Leslie Gulch. In addition, we assess the distribution of entrained mafic clasts and their often anomalously high, nearly ore-grade concentrations of rare earth elements (REE). Previous mapping identified two groups of intra-caldera rhyolite units: 1) intra-caldera tuffs of Spring Creek and Leslie Gulch and 2) younger rhyolite lavas (Trp) within Three Fingers Caldera and cross-cutting rhyolite dikes within the core of Mahogany Mtn. Caldera. Our mapping determines that devitrified Trp of Three Fingers area is equivalent to surrounding often glassy, pumiceous to dense or brecciated rhyolite flows mapped before as intra-caldera tuff of Spring Creek, and all are compositionally indistinguishable from cross-cutting dikes within Mahogany Mtn. Reinterpreted rhyolites of Three Fingers Caldera lack vitroclastic textures and are geochemically distinct from outflow tuff of Spring Creek which in turn can be distinguished from the tuff of Leslie Gulch. Outflow tuff of Spring Creek is Fe-rich, low silica rhyolite (~74 wt.% SiO2, 3 wt.% FeO, ~1600 ppm Ba) as compared to less Fe rich, high-silica rhyolite (~77 wt.% SiO2, 2 wt.% FeO, ~200 ppm Ba) of intra-caldera units. Outflow tuff of Leslie Gulch is also high-silica rhyolite but Ba rich (~1500 ppm). We interpret the investigated Three Fingers area as a rhyolite dome field, erupting subsequent to caldera collapse. There, abundant post

  6. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Ecological resources

    SciTech Connect

    Trettin, C.C.; Tolbert, V.R.; Jones, A.T.; Smith, C.R.; Kalmijn, A.J.

    1995-03-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on ecological resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report focus on several areas of Hawaii County. In this report, reference is made to these areas as study areas rather than as areas where proposed or alternative facilities of the HGP would be located. The resource areas addressed herein include terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, and marine ecology. The scientific background data and related information that were obtained from review of the (1) scientific literature, (2) government and private sector reports, (3) studies done under DOE interagency agreements with the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and with the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE), and (4) observations made during site visits are being made available for future research in these areas.

  7. Assessment of non-economic impacts to coastal recreation and tourism from oil and gas development: A review of selected literature and example-methodology. Inventory and evaluation of Washington and Oregon coastal recreation resources

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, L.E.; Johnson, D.R.; Lee, R.G.

    1991-05-01

    The purpose of the study three-part was to assist Minerals Management Service (MMS) planners in evaluation of the anticipated social impact of proposed oil and gas development on the environment. The Pacific Northwest coastal areas of Washington and Oregon, widely known for their natural beauty, provide a variety of recreational opportunities for both local residents and visitors. In fact, tourism is one of the leading industries in the two states and is an important source of revenue for the economies of many coastal communities. Thus, the Department of Interior, Minerals Management Service (MMS), in anticipation of the proposed Lease Sale 132, funded the research project with the aim of adding to the existing knowledge of Oregon and Washington coastal recreation resources that might be affected by proposed oil and gas development activities.

  8. Remote Sensing of Seasonal Leaf Area Index Across the Oregon Transect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanner, Michael; Johnson, Lee; Miller, John; McCreight, Richard; Freemantle, Jim; Runyon, John; Gong, Peng

    1994-01-01

    Remotely sensed data acquired from four remote-sensing instruments on three different aircraft platforms over a transect of coniferous forest stands in Oregon were analyzed with respect to seasonal leaf area index (LAI). Data from the four instruments were corrected for the varying seasonal and geographic atmospheric conditions present along the transect. Strong logarithmic relationships were observed between seasonal maximum and minimum LAI and the simple ratio (SR) (near infrared/red reflectance) calculated from the broad-spectral-band Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS), as well as from the narrow-spectral-band Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), the Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI), and a Spectron SE590 spectro-radiometer (R(exp 2) = 0.82-0.97). The TMS SR reached an asymptote at an LAI of approx. 7-8. However, the SE590 and the CASI SR continued to increase up to the maximum LAI of 10.6. The variability of the relationship between the AVIRIS SR and LAI increased at stands with LAIs greater than 7, making a trend in the AVIRIS SR-LAI relationship at LAIs greater than 7 difficult to discern. The SRs of the coniferous forest stands measured by the narrow-spectral-band instruments were higher than they were from the broad-spectral-band TMS. This is attributed partially to the integration of the TMS over a broad wavelength region in the red and more strongly to calibration differences between the sensors. Seasonal TMS SR trends for four time periods for some of the stands deviated from the expected seasonal LAI trends, possibly because of smoke and very low sun angles during some of the acquisition periods. However, the expected SR differences for the seasonal minimum and maximum LAI were observed for all of the sensors for nearly all of the forest stands. This study, demonstrates that remotely, sensed data from both broad- and narrow spectral band instruments can provide estimates of LAI for use in forest ecosystems simulation models

  9. Seasonal Agricultural Labor in Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Univ., Corvallis.

    Requested by the governor of Oregon, this 1968 report focuses on seasonal agricultural labor in Oregon. The task force, appointed by the president of Oregon State University, reported on the following areas: (1) the problem in terms of potential unionization, population trends, existing state programs and agencies for the migrants; (2) regulations…

  10. Geology and ground-water resources of the Walla Walla River basin Washington-Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newcomb, R.C.

    1965-01-01

    The Walla Walla River, whose drainage basin of about 1,330 square miles lies astride the Washington-Oregon boundary, drains westward to empty into the Columbia River. The basin slopes from the 5,000-foot crest of the Blue Mountains through a structural and topographic basin to the terraced lands adjoining the Columbia River at an altitude of about 340 feet. The main unit of the topographic basin is the valley plain, commonly called the Walla Walla Valley, which descends from about 1,500 feet at the foot of the mountain slopes to about 500 feet in altitude where the river cuts through the bedrock ridge near Divide. In the Blue Mountains the streams flow in rockbound canyons. Beyond the canyons, near Milton-Freewater and Walla Walla, they pass onto the broad alluvial fans and the terrace lands of the valley.

  11. Lidar-enhanced geologic mapping, examples from the Medford and Hood River areas, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiley, T. J.; McClaughry, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Lidar-based 3-foot digital elevation models (DEMs) and derivatives (slopeshade, hillshade, contours) were used to help map geology across 1700 km2 (650 mi2) near Hood River and Medford, Oregon. Techniques classically applied to interpret coarse DEMs and small-scale topographic maps were adapted to take advantage of lidar's high resolution. Penetration and discrimination of plant cover by the laser system allowed recognition of fine patterns and textures related to underlying geologic units and associated soils. Surficial geologic maps were improved by the ability to examine tiny variations in elevation and slope. Recognition of low-relief features of all sizes was enhanced where pixel elevation ranges of centimeters to meters, established by knowledge of the site or by trial, were displayed using thousands of sequential colors. Features can also be depicted relative to stream level by preparing a DEM that compensates for gradient. Near Medford, lidar-derived contour maps with 1- to 3-foot intervals revealed incised bajada with young, distal lobes defined by concentric contour lines. Bedrock geologic maps were improved by recognizing geologic features associated with surface textures and patterns or topographic anomalies. In sedimentary and volcanic terrain, structure was revealed by outcrops or horizons lying at one stratigraphic level. Creating a triangulated irregular network (TIN) facet from positions of three or more such points gives strike and dip. Each map area benefited from hundreds of these measurements. A more extensive DEM in the plane of the TIN facet can be subtracted from surface elevation (lidar DEM) to make a DEM with elevation zero where the stratigraphic horizon lies at the surface. The distribution of higher and lower stratigraphic horizons can be shown by highlighting areas similarly higher or lower on the same DEM. Poor fit of contacts or faults projected between field traverses suggest the nature and amount of intervening geologic structure

  12. Tables of co-located geothermal-resource sites and BLM Wilderness Study Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, D.; Dorscher, M.

    1982-11-01

    Matched pairs of known geothermal wells and springs with BLM proposed Wilderness Study Areas (WSAs) were identified by inspection of WSA and Geothermal resource maps for the states of Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington and Wyoming. A total of 3952 matches, for geothermal sites within 25 miles of a WSA, were identified. Of these, only 71 (1.8%) of the geothermal sites are within one mile of a WSA, and only an additional 100 (2.5%) are within one to three miles. Approximately three-fourths of the matches are at distances greater than ten miles. Only 12 of the geothermal sites within one mile of a WSA have surface temperatures reported above 50/sup 0/C. It thus appears that the geothermal potential of WSAs overall is minimal, but that evaluation of geothermal resources should be considered in more detail for some areas prior to their designation as Wilderness.

  13. Habitat selection by juvenile Swainson’s thrushes (Catharus ustulatus) in headwater riparian areas, northwestern Oregon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Stephanie R.; Betts, Matthew G.; Huso, Manuela M.; Hagar, Joan C.

    2013-01-01

    Lower order, non-fish-bearing streams, often termed “headwater streams”, have received minimal research effort and protection priority, especially in mesic forests where distinction between riparian and upland vegetation can be subtle. Though it is generally thought that breeding bird abundance is higher in riparian zones, little is known about species distributions when birds are in their juvenile stage – a critical period in terms of population viability. Using radio telemetry, we examined factors affecting habitat selection by juvenile Swainson’s thrushes during the post-breeding period in headwater basins in the Coast Range of Oregon, USA. We tested models containing variables expected to influence the amount of food and cover (i.e., deciduous cover, coarse wood volume, and proximity to stream) as well as models containing variables that are frequently measured and manipulated in forest management (i.e., deciduous and coniferous trees separated into size classes). Juvenile Swainson’s thrushes were more likely to select locations with at least 25% cover of deciduous, mid-story vegetation and more than 2.0 m3/ha of coarse wood within 40 m of headwater streams. We conclude that despite their small and intermittent nature, headwater streams and adjacent riparian areas are selected over upland areas by Swainson’s thrush during the postfledging period in the Oregon Coast Range.

  14. Results of temperature gradient and heat flow in Santiam Pass Area, Oregon, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.L.; Gardner, M.C.; Koenig, J.B.

    1981-08-01

    The conclusions of this report are: (1) There is a weakly defined thermal anomaly within the area examined by temperature-gradient holes in the Santiam Pass area. This is a relict anomaly showing differences in permeability between the High Cascades and Western Cascades areas, more than a fundamental difference in shallow crustal temperatures. (2) The anomaly as defined by the 60 F isotherms at 400 feet follows a north-south trend immediately westward of the Cascade axis in the boundary region. It is clear that all holes spudded into High Cascades rocks result in isothermal and reversal gradients. Holes spudded in Western Cascades rocks result in positive gradients. (3) Cold groundwater flow influences and masks temperature gradients in the High Cascades to a depth of at least 700 feet, especially eastward from the major north-south trending faults. Pleistocene and Holocene rocks are very permeable aquifers. (4) Shallow gradient drilling in the lowlands westward of the faults provides more interpretable information than shallow drilling in the cold-water recharge zones. Topographic and climatological effects can be filtered out of the temperature gradient results. (5) The thermal anomaly seems to have 2 centers: one in the Belknap-Foley area, and one northward in the Sand Mountain area. The anomalies may or may not be connected along a north-south trend. (6) A geothermal effect is seen in holes downslope of the Western-High Cascade boundary. Mixing with cold waters is a powerful influence on temperature gradient data. (7) The temperature-gradient program has not yet examined and defined the geothermal resources potential of the area eastward of the Western Cascades-High Cascades boundary. Holes to 1500-2000 feet in depth are required to penetrate the high permeability-cold groundwater regime. (8) Drilling conditions are unfavorable. There are very few accessible level drill sites. Seasonal access problems and environmental restrictions together with frequent lost

  15. Amphibian and reptile abundance in riparian and upslope areas of five forest types in western Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomez, D.M.; Anthony, R.G.

    1996-01-01

    We compared species composition and relative abundance of herpetofauna between riparian and upslope habitats among 5 forest types (shrub, open sapling-pole, large sawtimber and old-growth conifer forests, and deciduous forests) in Western Oregon. Riparian- and upslope- associated species were identified based on capture frequencies from pitfall trapping. Species richness was similar among forest types but slightly greater in the shrub stands. The abundances of 3 species differed among forest types. Total captures was highest in deciduous forests, intermediate in the mature conifer forests, and lowest in the 2 young coniferous forests. Species richness was similar between stream and upslope habitats; however, captures were higher in riparian than upslope habitat. Tailed frogs (Ascaphus truei), Dunn's salamanders (Plethodon dunni), roughskin newts(Tanicha granulosa), Pacific giant salamanders (Dicamptodon tenebrosus) and red-legged frogs(Rana aurora) were captured more frequently in riparian than upslope habitats. Of these species the red-legged frog and Pacific giant salamander may depend on riparian habitat for at least part of their life requirements, while tailed frogs, Dunn's salamanders and roughskin newts appear to be riparian associated species. In addition, we found Oregon salamanders (Ensatina eschscholtzi) were associated with upslope habitats. We suggest riparian management zones should be al least 75-100 m on each side of the stream and that management for upslope/and or old forest associates may be equally as important as for riparian species.

  16. 77 FR 14414 - Notice of Intent To Revise Resource Management Plans and an Associated Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ...In compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended, and the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Oregon State Office, Portland, Oregon, intends to revise six Resource Management Plans (RMPs) with a single associated Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Western Oregon Planning Area and by this notice is......

  17. Geologic framework for the national assessment of carbon dioxide storage resources: Columbia Basin of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, and the Western Oregon-Washington basins: Chapter D in Geologic framework for the national assessment of carbon dioxide storage resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Covault, Jacob A.; Blondes, Madalyn S.; Cahan, Steven M.; DeVera, Christina A.; Freeman, P.A.; Lohr, Celeste D.

    2013-01-01

    The 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (Public Law 110–140) directs the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to conduct a national assessment of potential geologic storage resources for carbon dioxide (CO2). The methodology used by the USGS for the national CO2 assessment follows that of previous USGS work. The methodology is non-economic and intended to be used at regional to subbasinal scales. This report identifies and contains geologic descriptions of three storage assessment units (SAUs) in Eocene and Oligocene sedimentary rocks within the Columbia, Puget, Willapa, Astoria, Nehalem, and Willamette Basins of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, and focuses on the characteristics, specified in the methodology, that influence the potential CO2 storage resource in those SAUs. Specific descriptions of the SAU boundaries as well as their sealing and reservoir units are included. Properties for each SAU, such as depth to top, gross thickness, porosity, permeability, groundwater quality, and structural reservoir traps, are provided to illustrate geologic factors critical to the assessment. The designated sealing unit in the Columbia Basin is tentatively chosen to be the ubiquitous and thick Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group. As a result of uncertainties regarding the seal integrity of the Columbia River Basalt Group, the SAUs were not quantitatively assessed. Figures in this report show SAU boundaries and cell maps of well penetrations through sealing units into the top of the storage formations. The cell maps show the number of penetrating wells within one square mile and are derived from interpretations of incompletely attributed well data, a digital compilation that is known not to include all drilling. The USGS does not expect to know the location of all wells and cannot guarantee the amount of drilling through specific formations in any given cell shown on the cell maps.

  18. Geothermal exploration assessment and interpretation, Upper Klamah Lake Area, Klamath Basin, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, M.; Goldstein, N.E.; Wollenberg, H.A.

    1980-09-01

    Data from public and private sources on the Klamath Basin geothermal resource are reviewed, synthesized, and reinterpreted. In this, the second and final phase of the work, geological, remote sensing, geochemical, temperature gradient, gravity, aeromagnetic, and electrical resistivity data sets are examined. These data were derived from surveys concentrated on the east and west shores of Upper Klamath Lake. The geological, remote sensing, and potential field data suggest a few northeast-trending discontinuities, which cross the regional north-westerly strike. The near-surface distribution of warm water appears to be related to the intersections of these lineaments and northwest-trending faults. The groundwater geochemical data are reviewed and the various reservoir temperature estimates compared. Particular attention is given to specific electrical conductivities of waters as an interpretational aid to the subsurface resistivity results. A clear trend emerges in the Klamath Falls/Olene Gap area; hotter waters are associated with higher specific conductivities. In the Nuss Lake/Stukel Mountain area the opposite trend prevails, although the relationship is somewhat equivocal.

  19. Mental Health, Health, and Substance Abuse Service Needs for the Native American Rehabilitation Association Northwest (NARA NW) in the Portland, Oregon Metropolitan Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crofoot, Thomas L.; Harris, Naomi; Plumb, Mary Anne; Smith, Keri Slingerland; Gault, Jaime; Brooks, Gloria; Hungry, Lisa; Geary, Artice; Holland, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Consistent with results of previous needs assessments for urban American Indian and Alaska Native populations, a needs assessment in the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area for the Native American Rehabilitation Association Northwest revealed high levels of co-occurring conditions for American Indian and Alaska Native clients, often combining…

  20. Platinum-group element resources in podiform chromitites from California and Oregon.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, N.J.; Singer, D.A.; Moring, B.C.; Carlson, C.A.; McDade, J.M.; Wilson, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    Assays of Pt, Pd, Rh and Ir from approx 280 podiform chromite deposits in Palaeozoic and Mesozoic ophiolites are statistically analysed to estimate their possible by-product value from mining the chromite. The platinum-group elements occur in discrete platinum-group minerals, and in solid solution in Cu-Ni-Fe sulphides. Low grades and small amounts of total platinum-group elements in podiform chromite deposits imply a small resource. -G.J.N.

  1. 75 FR 17950 - Notice of Intent To Prepare Amendments to the Southeastern Oregon Resource Management Plan (RMP...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-08

    ... Management Plan (RMP), Malheur County, OR, and the Lakeview RMP, Lake County, OR, and Associated..., Lake, Harney, and Grant Counties in Oregon and encompass approximately 4.6 million acres of public...

  2. Estimated Depth to Ground Water and Configuration of the Water Table in the Portland, Oregon Area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, Daniel T.

    2008-01-01

    Reliable information on the configuration of the water table in the Portland metropolitan area is needed to address concerns about various water-resource issues, especially with regard to potential effects from stormwater injection systems such as UIC (underground injection control) systems that are either existing or planned. To help address these concerns, this report presents the estimated depth-to-water and water-table elevation maps for the Portland area, along with estimates of the relative uncertainty of the maps and seasonal water-table fluctuations. The method of analysis used to determine the water-table configuration in the Portland area relied on water-level data from shallow wells and surface-water features that are representative of the water table. However, the largest source of available well data is water-level measurements in reports filed by well constructors at the time of new well installation, but these data frequently were not representative of static water-level conditions. Depth-to-water measurements reported in well-construction records generally were shallower than measurements by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in the same or nearby wells, although many depth-to-water measurements were substantially deeper than USGS measurements. Magnitudes of differences in depth-to-water measurements reported in well records and those measured by the USGS in the same or nearby wells ranged from -119 to 156 feet with a mean of the absolute value of the differences of 36 feet. One possible cause for the differences is that water levels in many wells reported in well records were not at equilibrium at the time of measurement. As a result, the analysis of the water-table configuration relied on water levels measured during the current study or used in previous USGS investigations in the Portland area. Because of the scarcity of well data in some areas, the locations of select surface-water features including major rivers, streams, lakes, wetlands, and

  3. Economic impact of public resource supply constraints in northeast Oregon. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, E.C.; Holland, D.W.; Haynes, R.W.; Quigley, T.M.

    1997-04-01

    Traditional, fixed-price (input-output) economic models provide a useful framework for conceptualizing links in a regional economy. Apparent shortcomings in these models, however, severely restrict our ability to deduce valid prescriptions for public policy and economic development. A more efficient approach using regional computable general equilibrium (CGE) models as well as a brief survey of relevant literature is presented. Computable general equilibrium results under several different resource policy scenarios are examined and contrasted with a fixed-price analysis. In the most severe CGE scenario, elimination of Federal range programs caused the loss of 1,371 jobs (2.3 percent of regional employment) and $29 million (1.6 percent) of house income; and an 80-percent reduction in Federal log supplies resulted in the loss of 3,329 jobs (5.5 percent of regional employment), and $76 millin (4.2 percent) of household income. These results do not include positive economic impacts associated with improvement in salmon runs. Economic counter scenarios indicate that increases in tourism and high-technology manufacturing and growth in the population of retirees can largely offset total employment and income losses.

  4. Fires Scorch Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On Wednesday, August 7, 2002, two large Oregon fires merged into a single massive fire of more than 333,000 acres. In southwest Oregon, the Sour Biscuit fire on the Oregon-California state line, and the larger Florence Fire to its north closed the gap between them and created an enormous blaze that retained the name Biscuit Fire. The fire has burned over the Oregon state line into California. This image of the fires and thick smoke was captured by the landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus on August 14, 2002. In this false-color iamge, vegetation is green, burned areas are deep magenta, actively burning fire is bright pink, and smoke is blue. Credit:Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch.

  5. Geothermal resource evaluation of the Yuma area

    SciTech Connect

    Poluianov, E.W.; Mancini, F.P.

    1985-11-29

    This report presents an evaluation of the geothermal potential of the Yuma, Arizona area. A description of the study area and the Salton Trough area is followed by a geothermal analysis of the area, a discussion of the economics of geothermal exploration and exploitation, and recommendations for further testing. It was concluded economic considerations do not favor geothermal development at this time. (ACR)

  6. Mineral and geothermal resource potential of the Mount Hood Wilderness, Clackamas and Hood River Counties, Oregon. Summary report and map

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, T.E.C.; Causey, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    The potential for near-surface mineral resources in the Mount Hood Wilderness is low. Geochemical data suggest two areas of weak epithermal mineralization in the Zigzag Mountain part of the wilderness: (1) the Lost Creek-Burnt Lake-Cast Creek-Short Creek area on the north side of Zigzag Mountain where vein-type lead-zinc-silver mineralization occurs; and (2) the Lady Creek-Laurel Hill area on the south side of Zigzag Mountain where the upper part of a quartz diorite pluton has associated propylitic alteration resulting in some porphyry-type copper, gold, silver, lead, and zinc mineralization. Geothermal-resource potential for low- to intermediate-temperature (less than 248/sup 0/F, 120/sup 0/C) hot-water systems in the wilderness is moderate to high. Part of the wilderness is classified as a Known Geothermal Resources Area (KGRA) and two parts have been included in geothermal lease areas. Rock and gravel sources are present within the wilderness; however, quantities of similar and more accessible deposits are available outside the wilderness. Deposits outside the wilderness are large enough to supply local demand in the foreseeable future.

  7. 50 CFR 660.78 - EFH Conservation Areas off the Coast of Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... §§ 660.360. (a) Thompson Seamount. The boundary of the Thompson Seamount EFH Conservation Area is defined... back to 43°08.83′ N. lat., 124°50.93′ W. long. (j) President Jackson Seamount. The boundary of the President Jackson Seamount EFH Conservation Area is defined by straight lines connecting all of...

  8. 50 CFR 660.78 - EFH Conservation Areas off the Coast of Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... §§ 660.360. (a) Thompson Seamount. The boundary of the Thompson Seamount EFH Conservation Area is defined... back to 43°08.83′ N. lat., 124°50.93′ W. long. (j) President Jackson Seamount. The boundary of the President Jackson Seamount EFH Conservation Area is defined by straight lines connecting all of...

  9. 50 CFR 660.78 - EFH Conservation Areas off the Coast of Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... §§ 660.360. (a) Thompson Seamount. The boundary of the Thompson Seamount EFH Conservation Area is defined... back to 43°08.83′ N. lat., 124°50.93′ W. long. (j) President Jackson Seamount. The boundary of the President Jackson Seamount EFH Conservation Area is defined by straight lines connecting all of...

  10. 50 CFR 660.78 - EFH Conservation Areas off the Coast of Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... §§ 660.360. (a) Thompson Seamount. The boundary of the Thompson Seamount EFH Conservation Area is defined... back to 43°08.83′ N. lat., 124°50.93′ W. long. (j) President Jackson Seamount. The boundary of the President Jackson Seamount EFH Conservation Area is defined by straight lines connecting all of...

  11. 75 FR 18449 - Regulated Navigation Areas; Bars Along the Coasts of Oregon and Washington; Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... Register (74 FR 59098), which established Regulated Navigation Areas covering each of the coastal bars in...: The Coast Guard proposes to change the Regulated Navigation Area (RNA) covering the Umpqua River...

  12. A method for testing land resource area concepts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land Resource Units (LRUs) are defined by the National Soil Survey Handbook as aggregations of soil map units and subunits of Major Land Resource Areas (MLRAs). In the USDA NRCS Land Resource Hierarchy, LRUs are defined as the level between MLRAs and STATSGO and are mapped at 1:1 million scale. They...

  13. Mid-Plains Community College Area Human Resources Development Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mid-Plains Community Coll. Area, North Platte, NE. Office of Institutional Research.

    This Human Resource Development Plan represents an effort to systematize human resources and personnel development at Mid-Plains Community College Area (MPCCA). The need for creating such a plan was specifically cited by North Central consultant evaluators, and a Human Resources Development (HRD) Steering Committee was established in spring 1994…

  14. Storm runoff as related to urbanization in the Portland, Oregon-Vancouver, Washington area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1980-01-01

    A series of equations was developed to provide a better method of determining flood frequencies in the Portland-Vancouver urban area than is now available. The resulting regression equations can be used to compute peak discharge and storm runoff with a standard error of estimate of approximately 30 percent. Basins used to define the regression equations ranged in size from 0.2 to 26 square miles. Those physical basin parameters that proved to be significant are: drainage area, effective impervious area, storage, rainfall intensity, basin slope, and soil infiltration. The equations indicate that total urbanization of an undeveloped basin can increase peak discharge as much as 3? times and almost double the volume of storm runoff. Impervious area, as delineated by mapping techniques, proved to be an inadequate physical parameter for use in the regression equations because builders and planners have devised many methods of routing storm runoff from impervious areas to the main channel (in effect, speeding up or slowing down the response to the storm). In some parts of the study area, storm runoff was diverted into dry wells and never entered the main channel. To define the effect of this rerouting, the digital model was used to find an effective impervious area that would 'best fit' the rainfall-runoff data. Field estimates to verify the effectiveness of the impervious area for two of the basins showed that optimizations were within 20 percent of those shown by the digital model. Users of these data who may find the effective impervious area a difficult, expensive, and time-consuming parameter to obtain have an alternative. The combination of land-use type I (parks, forests, and vacant lots) and Type II (agriculture) proved to be an excellent inverse indicator of impervious area. Land-use types I and II, coupled with the street-gutter density, an indication of effective routing, provide the user with alternative indices of urbanization.

  15. Area Studies: Europe. Teacher's Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blouin, Virginia; And Others

    This resource unit on the study of Europe at the sixth grade level focuses on European culture as seen through five major strands from the social sciences: anthropology-sociology, history, geography, economics, and political science. Among objectives which the student is to achieve are the following: 1) identify on a map major European regions,…

  16. Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Volume I.

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomquist, R. Gordon

    1985-06-01

    The objective was to consolidate and evaluate all geologic, environmental, and legal and institutional information in existing records and files, and to apply a uniform methodology to the evaluation and ranking of sites to allow the making of creditable forecasts of the supply of geothermal energy which could be available in the region over a 20 year planning horizon. A total of 1265 potential geothermal resource sites were identified from existing literature. Site selection was based upon the presence of thermal and mineral springs or wells and/or areas of recent volcanic activity and high heat flow. 250 sites were selected for detailed analysis. A methodology to rank the sites by energy potential, degree of developability, and cost of energy was developed. Resource developability was ranked by a method based on a weighted variable evaluation of resource favorability. Sites were ranked using an integration of values determined through the cost and developability analysis. 75 figs., 63 tabs.

  17. Oregon trails revisted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, A. J.; Alexander, C. J.; Hall, M. J.; Isaacson, D. L.; Murray, R. J.; Schrumpf, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    Oregon State University's Environmental Remote Sensing Applications Laboratory (ERSAL) has six full-time researchers with expertise in a variety of biological, Earth, atmospheric and computer sciences as well as image interpretation and statistical techniques. The primary emphasis of the ERSAL research and demonstration program is the development and application of remote sensing technology in operational resource management programs. LANDSAT multi-spectral, multi-date digital data and imagery are utilized in concert with high altitude NASA-acquired photography, low altitude ERSAL-acquired photography, and field observations and data to provide customized, inexpensive and useful final products. Synopses are given of 9 applications projects conducted in Oregon.

  18. Selected elements and organic chemicals in streambed sediment in the Salem area, Oregon, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, Dwight Q.

    2002-01-01

    The high levels of contaminants in some Salem area streams indicates the need for further study to assess the biological effects of these contaminants. Future monitoring in the Salem area could include bioassays using benthic invertebrates and the measurement of organochlorine compounds, including DDT, DDE, DDD, and dieldrin in fish tissue. Because resident fish may be consumed by humans and wildlife, fish tissue analyses would be helpful to determine the health risk associated with fish consumption.

  19. Availability and quality of ground water in the Winston area, Douglas County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robison, J.H.; Collins, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    A map of the Winston area, Douglas County, Oreg., shows areal geology and locations and chemical diagrams of wells with water analyses. Another map of the area has diagrams showing the depth to water, pumping level, total depth, and yields of selected wells. Reported yields of wells range from less than 1 to as much as 70 gallons per minute; the average is less than 10. A table listing chemical analyses of water shows that, although most ground water is of adequate quality for domestic use, some wells yield water with dissolved constituents in excess of recommended limits. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. 50 CFR 660.398 - EFH Conservation Areas off the Coast of Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... is detailed at § 660.306 and § 660.385. (a) Thompson Seamount. The boundary of the Thompson Seamount.... long.; and connecting back to 43°08.83′ N. lat., 124°50.93′ W. long. (j) President Jackson Seamount. The boundary of the President Jackson Seamount EFH Conservation Area is defined by straight...

  1. 33 CFR 165.1325 - Regulated Navigation Areas; Bars Along the Coasts of Oregon and Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... engaged in carrying paying passengers. (11) Small passenger vessel means a vessel inspected under 46 CFR subchapter T or 46 CFR subchapter K. (12) Uninspected passenger vessel means an uninspected vessel— (i) Of at... passengers. (13) Unsafe condition exists when the wave height within a regulated navigation area...

  2. Volcanic signature of Basin and Range extension on the shrinking Cascade arc, Klamath Falls-Keno area, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priest, George R.; Hladky, Frank R.; Mertzman, Stanley A.; Murray, Robert B.; Wiley, Thomas J.

    2013-08-01

    geologic mapping of the Klamath Falls-Keno area revealed the complex relationship between subduction, crustal extension, and magmatic composition of the southern Oregon Cascade volcanic arc. Volcanism in the study area at ~7-4 Ma consisted of calc-alkaline basaltic andesite and andesite lava flowing over a relatively flat landscape. Local angular unconformities are evidence that Basin and Range extension began at by at least ~4 Ma and continues today with fault blocks tilting at a long-term rate of ~2°/Ma to 3°/Ma. Minimum NW-SE extension is ~1.5 km over ~28 km (~5%). High-alumina olivine tholeiite (HAOT) or low-K, low-Ti transitional high-alumina olivine tholeiite (LKLT) erupted within and adjacent to the back edge of the calc-alkaline arc as the edge receded westward at a rate of ~10 km/Ma at 2.7-0.45 Ma. The volcanic front migrated east much slower than the back arc migrated west: ~0 km/Ma for 6-0.4 Ma calc-alkaline rocks; ~0.7 km/Ma, if ~6 Ma HAOT-LKLT is included; and ~1 km/Ma, if highly differentiated 17-30 Ma volcanic rocks of the early Western Cascades are included. Declining convergence probably decreased asthenospheric corner flow, decreasing width of calc-alkaline and HAOT-LKLT volcanism and the associated heat flow anomaly, the margins of which focused on Basin and Range extension and leakage of HAOT-LKLT magma to the surface. This declining corner flow combined with steepening slab dip shifted the back arc west. Compensation of extension by volcanic intrusion and extrusion allowed growth of imposing range-front fault scarps only behind the trailing edge of the shrinking arc.

  3. Northwest Geothermal Corp. 's (NGC) plan of exploration, Mt. Hood Area, Clackamas County, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The Area Geothermal Supervisor (AGS) received a Plan of Operations (POO) from Northwest Geothermal Corporation (NGC) on 2/12/80. In the POO, NGC proposed two operations: testing and abandoning an existing 1219 meter (m) geothermal temperature gradient hole, designated as OMF No. 1, and drilling and testing a new 1524 m geothermal exploratory hole, to be designated as OMF No. 7A. The POO was amended on 5/6/80, to provide for the use of an imp

  4. Ground water in the Eola-Amity Hills area, northern Willamette Valley, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, Don

    1967-01-01

    The Eola-Amity Hills area ,comprises about 230 square miles on the west side of the Willamette Valley between Salem and McMinnville, Oreg. The area is largely rural, and agriculture is the principal occupation. Rocks ranging in age from Eocene to Recent underlie the area. The oldest rocks are a sequence more than 5,000 feet thick of marine-deposited shale and siltstone strata, with thin interbeds of sandstone that range in age from Eocene to middle Oligocene. They are widely exposed in and west of the Eola-Amity Hills and underlie younger sedimentary and volcanic rocks throughout the study area. In the Eola-Amity Hills and Red Hills of Dundee, the Columbia River Group, a series of eastward-dipping basaltic lava flows locally of Miocene age, and conformably overlies the marine sedimentary rocks. The Columbia River Group ranges in thickness from less than 1 foot to about 900 feet and has an average thickness of about 200 feet. The formation is exposed in the Eola-Amity Hills and Red Hills of Dundee and, at places, extends to the east beneath younger rocks. Overlying the Columbia River Group and marine sedimentary rocks are nonmarine sedimentary deposits that range in thickness from less than 1 foot, where they lap up (to an altitude of about 200 ft) on the flanks of the higher hills, to several hundred feet along the east margin of the study area. These deposits include the Troutdale Formation of Pliocene age, the Willamette Silt of late Pleistocene age, and alluvium of the Willamette River and its tributaries. The Troutdale Formation and the alluvium of the Willamette River contain the most productive aquifers in the Eola-Amity Hills area. These aquifers, which consist mainly of sand and gravel, generally yield moderate to large quantities of water to properly constructed wells. Basalt of the Columbia River Group yields small to moderate quantities of water to wells, and the marine sedimentary rocks and Willamette Silt generally yield small but adequate quantities

  5. The comparative evaluation of ERTS-1 imagery for resource inventory in land use planning. [Oregon - Newberry Caldera, Mt. Washington, and Big Summit Prairie in Crook County

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrumpf, B. J. (Principal Investigator); Simonson, G. H.; Paine, D. P.; Lawrence, R. D.; Pyott, W. T.; Herzog, J. H.; Murray, R. J.; Norgren, J. A.; Cornwell, J. A.; Rogers, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Multidiscipline team interpretation and mapping of resources for Crook County is complete on 1:250,000 scale enlargements of ERTS imagery and 1:120,000 hi-flight photography. Maps of geology, soils, vegetation-land use and land resources units were interpreted to show limitations, suitabilities, and geologic hazards for land use planning. Mapping of lineaments and structures from ERTS imagery has shown a number of features not previously mapped in Oregon. A multistage timber inventory of Ochoco National Forest was made, using ERTS images as the first stage. Inventory of forest clear-cutting practices was successfully demonstrated with color composites. Soil tonal differences in fallow fields correspond with major soil boundaries in loess-mantled terrain. A digital classification system used for discriminating natural vegetation and geologic material classes was successful in separating most major classes around Newberry Caldera, Mt. Washington, and Big Summit Prairie.

  6. Timing of cut-and-fill sequences in the John Day Formation (Eocene-Oligocene), Painted Hills area, central Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Bestland, E.A.; Retallack, G.J. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Swisher, C.C. III ); Fremd, T.J. )

    1993-04-01

    Large-scale cut-and-fill features in the Eocene-Oligocene part of the John Day Formation in the Pained Hills area of central Oregon can be interpreted as terrestrial depositional sequences, mapped as lithostratigraphic units, and correlated to North American Land Mammal Ages (NALMA). New laser-fusion 40Ar/39Ar single-crystal ages from the John Day Formation provide evidence for the timing of these sequences and a revised placement of the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. The sequences are bound by erosional surfaces that have relief of up to 60 m, are marked in places by claystone breccias full of reworked soil clasts, and separate otherwise conformable strata. The lowermost depositional sequence in the John Day Formation contains very well developed, Fe- and Al-rich paleosols, laterite horizons, and the welded tuff of member A (39.7 my), and probably correlates to the Duchesean and Chadronian NALMA. These brick-rid claystones are sharply truncated by prominent detrital laterite horizon. Overlying this basal sequence is a second sequence of much less well developed paleosols, abundant tuffs and lacustrine tuffaceous claystones. This sequence contains a distinctive biotite tuff (33 my) and the type locality of the Bridge Creek fossil flora and probably correlates to the Orellan NALMA. Above this biotite tuff are alternating red, dark gray, and tan paleosols and a prominent crystal vitric tuff (32.7 my). The Eocene-Oligocene boundary lies between these two sequences, associated with the laterite horizon that truncates the basal red beds. A major truncation surface cuts this sequence and is overlain by a third sequence of thin red paleosols which probably correlates with the Whitneyan NALMA. Above this is a fourth sequence (Arikareean NALMA) consisting of greenish-tan paleosols, a crystal vitric tuff near its base (29.8 my) and the Picture Gorge Ignimbrite (28.7 my).

  7. Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility Study of Lacustrine Sediments Recovered From the Deschutes River (Pringle Falls, Oregon) Area.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, J.; Herrero-Bervera, E.

    2004-12-01

    We have studied a total of 827 samples drilled from five widely spaced profiles sampled along the Deschutes river Oregon . The five profiles sampled recorded a high-resolution paleomagnetic record of the Pringle Falls magnetic polarity episode (ca. 218+/- 10 ka) and are characterized by diatomaceous lacustrine sediments. This lacustrine sedimentary sequence that was sampled was part of an extensive prehistoric fluvial and lacustrine complex that formed east of the Cascade Mountains during the last 1.0 Ma. The lake appears to have resulted from a late Pliocene/Pleistocene rise in the base level to the east of the of the sampling area near the western margin of the Basin and Range structural province and is related to the development of the extensive volcanism associated with the Newberry volcano. Present outcrops and subsurface distribution of these lakes are to the west and north of the volcano, and their distribution appears to have been influenced by the development of streams and rivers systems draining the Newberry volcanic center as well as the Cascades themselves. We have conducted anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) measurements in order to investigate if the acquisition of their fabrics during their formation was primary or secondary and also the characteristics of such fabrics. We conducted low-field vs susceptibility analysis to determine the magnetic carriers of the sediments and we found that the main magnetic carrier is pure magnetite (Curie point 575 oC). The magnetic grain size indicated SD-PSD magnetite. The magnetic fabrics of the 5 different profiles indicated that the sediments were deposited with the minima axes (Kmin) perpendicular to the bedding plane of the sediments. The sediments are also characterized by a strongly oblate fabric that is confined to the bedding plane of the sediments, in addition since the fabric is entirely foliated without a superimposed lineation then the sediments were deposited almost on a horizontal surface

  8. Hydrothermal Chloride Flux from the Area of Ongoing Uplift West of South Sister Volcano, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundstrom, E. A.; Randolph-flagg, N. G.; Newman, A. C.; Murveit, A. M.; Mariner, R. H.; Evans, W. C.; Hurwitz, S.; Ingebritsen, S.

    2011-12-01

    Uplift west of South Sister began in 1997 at a rate of 3-5 cm/yr and is ongoing at a rate of ~1 cm/yr. Many springs in the area of uplift have anomalous chloride (up to 20 mg/L) and sulfate concentrations (up to 20 mg/L), are anomalously warm (up to 5oC above expected ambient), and have high 3He/4He ratios (up to 8.6 times RA). There is a strong intercorrelation among chloride (Cl-) concentration, temperature, and 3He concentration, suggesting a common magmatic source. Since uplift was detected in 2002 we have monitored hydrothermal Cl flux at two locations: the first site several hundred m below the spring vent with the highest 3He/4He ratio and the second site ~20 km downstream of that spring in Separation Creek, which captures the total hydrothermal Cl flux (~12 g/s) from the ~175 km2 area of uplift. Best fit lines for long-term trend in Cl flux at both sites have shallow slopes ( < 0.2 g/s per year at Separation Creek). There is, however, a strong seasonality to the Cl flux. At the site with the highest 3He/4He ratio, the Cl flux varies from ~0.1 g/s in late spring to ~0.2 g/s in late fall. The periods of decrease/increase in Cl flux coincide with presence/absence of snow cover. The temperature at the vent with highest 3He/4He ratio shows almost constant temperature (ranging from 7.7-7.8oC over a 13-month period of record in 2009-2010). Spectral analysis done using a 0.5-2.5 cycle/day bandpass filter shows significant peaks at diurnal and semi-diurnal frequencies for Cl flux, discharge, temperature, and specific-conductance time series from both sites, suggesting sensitivity to Earth tides. Data gaps and changes in sampling interval complicate determination of significance at longer (fortnightly to annual) periods. Published compilations indicate that earthquake-induced hydrologic changes are fairly common for seismic energy density e > 0.01 J/m3 (Wang and Manga, Earthquakes and Water, 2010), and during the 2002-2010 period of record, local to regional

  9. The Area Resource File: A Manpower Planning and Research Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Wilbert

    The computerized data file, the Area Resource File (ARF), was originally used in determining locations of nationwide Health Education Centers (AHEC). It has been more recently employed in general and comparative geographic statistical analysis of health resources in counties throughout the country. This aid contains seven general categories of…

  10. RESTORATION OF STREAM PHYSICAL HABITAT AND FOOD RESOURCES: INFLUENCE ON JUVENILE COHO GROWTH AND SALMON DERIVED NUTRIENT INCORPORATION IN COASTAL OREGON STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT - Stream restoration in Western Oregon and Washington includes physical habitat improvement and salmon carcass additions. However, few studies examine the effects of carcass placement on juvenile fish in western Oregon, and in particular the interaction with physical hab...

  11. Timber resource statistics for the San Joaquin and southern resource areas of California. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Waddell, K.L.; Bassett, P.M.

    1997-05-01

    This report is a summary of timber resource statistics for the San Joaquin and Southern Resource Areas of California. Data were collected as part of a statewide multiresource inventory. The inventory sampled private and public lands except reserved areas and National Forests. The National Forest System provided data from regional inventories of some areas. Area information for parks and other reserves was obtained directly from the organizations managing these areas. Statistical tables summarize all ownerships and provide estimates of land area, timber volume, growth, mortality, and harvest. Estimates of periodic change of timberland area and timber volume are presented for all ownerships outside National Forests.

  12. The Oregon Geothermal Planning Conference

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-02

    Oregon's geothermal resources represent a large portion of the nation's total geothermal potential. The State's resources are substantial in size, widespread in location, and presently in various stages of discovery and utilization. The exploration for, and development of, geothermal is presently dependent upon a mixture of engineering, economic, environmental, and legal factors. In response to the State's significant geothermal energy potential, and the emerging impediments and incentives for its development, the State of Oregon has begun a planning program intended to accelerate the environmentally prudent utilization of geothermal, while conserving the resource's long-term productivity. The program, which is based upon preliminary work performed by the Oregon Institute of Technology's Geo-Heat Center, will be managed by the Oregon Department of Energy, with the assistance of the Departments of Economic Development, Geology and Mineral Industries, and Water Resources. Funding support for the program is being provided by the US Department of Energy. The first six-month phase of the program, beginning in July 1980, will include the following five primary tasks: (1) coordination of state and local agency projects and information, in order to keep geothermal personnel abreast of the rapidly expanding resource literature, resource discoveries, technological advances, and each agency's projects. (2) Analysis of resource commercialization impediments and recommendations of incentives for accelerating resource utilization. (3) Compilation and dissemination of Oregon geothermal information, in order to create public and potential user awareness, and to publicize technical assistance programs and financial incentives. (4) Resource planning assistance for local governments in order to create local expertise and action; including a statewide workshop for local officials, and the formulation of two specific community resource development plans. (5) Formulation and

  13. Natural resources as an area of the law

    SciTech Connect

    Getches, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    Increased commercial activity and legislative intervention have focused greater attention on the legal issues surrounding the discovery, development, regulation, use, and protection of natural resources. Anyone who wants to use or affect natural resources faces regulatory challenges. Non-profit organizations have forced the government to be more responsible, but have also increased the legal activity in technically complex areas. Law schools are responding by moving natural resources from specialty courses to a respected part of the curriculum. Several law foundations are promoting legal scholarship in the field with symposia which examine, interpret, and criticize natural resources law. 54 references. (DCK)

  14. Evaluation of organic compounds and trace elements in Amazon Creek Basin, Oregon, September 1990. Water resources investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Rinella, F.A.

    1993-12-31

    In September 1990, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Lane Council of Governments and the city of Eugene, conducted a reconnaissance study of water quality in Amazon Creek, Oregon. The purpose of the study was to identify the extent of trace-element and organic-compound contamination within the Basin. Water and bottom-sediment samples were collected during a summer low-flow condition and analyzed for different classes of organic compounds, including many from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s priority pollutant list. Bottom-sediment samples also were analyzed for trace elements typically associated with urban runoff.

  15. Mineral resources and mineral resource potential of the Panamint Dunes Wilderness Study Area, Inyo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, G.L.; Kilburn, J.E.; Conrad, J.E.; Leszcykowski, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    This report presents the results of a mineral survey of the Panamint Dunes Wilderness Study Area (CDCA-127), California Desert Conservation Area, Inyo County, California. The Panamint Dunes Wilderness Study Area has an identified volcanic cinder resource and few areas with mineral resource potential. Hydrothermal deposits of lead-zinc-silver occur in veins and small replacement bodies along and near the Lemoigne thrust fault on the eastern side of the wilderness study area. Two workings, the Big Four mine with 35,000 tons of inferred subeconomic lead-zinc-silver resources and a moderate potential for additional resources, and the Apple 1 claim with low potential for lead-zinc-silver resources, are surrounded by the study area but are specifically excluded from it. A low resource potential for lead-zinc-silver is assigned to other exposures along the Lemoigne thrust, although metallic minerals were not detected at these places. The Green Quartz prospect, located near the northern tip of the study area, has low resource potential for copper in quartz pegmatities in quartz monzonite of the Hunter Mountain batholith. Nonmetallic mineral resources consist of volcanic cinders and quartz sand. An estimated 900,000 tons of inferred cinder reserves are present at Cal Trans borrow pit MS 242, on the southern margin of the study area. The Panamint Valley dune field, encompassing 480 acres in the north-central part of the study area, has only low resource potential for silica because of impurities. Other sources of silica and outside the study area are of both higher purity and closer to possible markets. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Paleomagnetism of the Pringle Falls Polarity Episode Recovered From the Deschutes River (Pringle Falls, Oregon) Area: A Revisited Study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, J. K.; Herrero-Bervera, E.

    2005-12-01

    We have studied a total of 827 samples drilled from five widely spaced profiles sampled along the Deschutes River Oregon. The five profiles sampled recorded a high-resolution paleomagnetic record of the Pringle Falls magnetic polarity episode (ca. 218+/- 10 ka) and are characterized by diatomaceous lacustrine sediments. This sedimentary sequence that was sampled was part of an extensive prehistoric fluvial and lacustrine complex that formed east of the Cascade Mountains during the last 1.0 Ma. The lake appears to have resulted from a late Pliocene/Pleistocene rise in the base level to the east of the sampling area near the western margin of the Basin and Range structural province and is related to the development of the extensive volcanism associated with the Newberry volcano. We have conducted paleomagnetic and rock magnetic studies in order to investigate the reproducibility of the paleomagnetic signal throughout the 5 km of the sampling of the five profiles. We conducted low-field vs. susceptibility analysis to determine the magnetic carriers of the sediments and we found that the main magnetic carrier is pure magnetite (Curie point 575 oC). The magnetic grain size indicated SD-MD magnetite. The demagnetization of the sediments was done by means of alternating field methods and the determination of the mean directions by principal component analyses. The level of detail of the paleo-signal of these five records is highly consistent since they are characterized by rapidly deposited sediments (greater than 10 cm/kyr) that provide detailed representation of field behavior during the excursion. The VGP paths are highly internally consistent and are defined by a clockwise loop traveling from high northern latitudes over the eastern part of North America and the North Atlantic to South America and then to high southern latitudes and that return to high northern latitudes through the Pacific and over Kamchatka. This last clockwise looping is characteristic of other

  17. Fires Scorch Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In southwest Oregon, the Biscuit Fire continues to grow. This Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) image from August 14, 2002, shows the burn scar associated with the enormous blaze. The visualization uses ASTER's 30-meter-resolution, short-wave infrared bands to minimize smoke contamination and enhance the burn scar, which appears purple amid green vegetation. Actively burning areas of the fire appear very light purple. More than 6,000 fire personnel are assigned to the Biscuit Fire, which was 390, 276 acres as of Friday morning, August 15, and only 26 percent contained. Among the resources threatened are thousands of homes, three nationally designated wild and scenic rivers, and habitat for several categories of plants and animals at risk of extinction. Firefighters currently have no estimate as to when the fire might be contained. Credit: This image was acquired on an expedited basis as part of NASA Wildfire Response Team activities. Image courtesy Mike Abrams, Simon Hook, and the ASTER team at EROS Data Center DAAC.

  18. Geothermal Resource Area 6: Lander and Eureka Counties. Area development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.; Pugsley, M.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal Resource Area 6 includes Lander and Eureka Counties. There are several different geothermal resources ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/F to in excess of 400/sup 0/F within this two county area. Eleven of these resources are considered major and have been selected for evaluation in this area development plan. The various potential uses of the energy found at each of the 11 resource sites were determined after evaluating the study area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities. These were then compared with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the geothermal sites considered are summarized.

  19. Hot Dry Rock resources of the Clear Lake area, California

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, K.L.; Potter, R.M.; Peake, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Hot Dry Rock resources of the Clear Lake area of northern California are hot, large and areally uniform. The geological situation is special, probably overlying a slabless window caused by interaction between tectonic plates. Consequent magmatic processes have created a high-grade resource, in which the 300{degree}C isotherm is continuous, subhorizontal, and available at the shallow depth of 2.4 to 4.7 km over an area of 800 km{sup 2}. The region is very favorable for HDR development.

  20. Avian use of Norris Hill Wind Resource Area, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Harmata, A.; Podruzny, K.; Zelenak, J.

    1998-07-01

    This document presents results of a study of avian use and mortality in and near a proposed wind resource area in southwestern Montana. Data collected in autumn 1995 through summer 1996 represented preconstruction condition; it was compiled, analyzed, and presented in a format such that comparison with post-construction data would be possible. The primary emphasis of the study was recording avian migration in and near the wind resource area using state-of-the-art marine surveillance radar. Avian use and mortality were investigated during the breeding season by employing traditional avian sampling methods, radiotelemetry, radar, and direct visual observation. 61 figs., 34 tabs.

  1. Chapter D. Effects of Urbanization on Stream Ecosystems in the Willamette River Basin and Surrounding Area, Oregon and Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, Ian R.; Sobieszczyk, Steven; Carpenter, Kurt D.; Arnsberg, Andrew J.; Johnson, Henry M.; Hughes, Curt A.; Sarantou, Michael J.; Rinella, Frank A.

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the effects of urbanization on physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of stream ecosystems in 28 watersheds along a gradient of urbanization in the Willamette River basin and surrounding area, Oregon and Washington, from 2003 through 2005. The study that generated the report is one of several urban-effects studies completed nationally by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Watersheds were selected to minimize natural variability caused by factors such as geology, elevation, and climate, and to maximize coverage of different stages of urban development among watersheds. Because land use or population density alone often are not a complete measure of urbanization, a combination of land use, land cover, infrastructure, and socioeconomic variables were integrated into a multimetric urban intensity index (UII) to represent the degree of urban development in each watershed. Physical characteristics studied include stream hydrology, stream temperature, and habitat; chemical characteristics studied include sulfate, chloride, nutrients, pesticides, dissolved and particulate organic and inorganic carbon, and suspended sediment; and biological characteristics studied include algal, macroinvertebrate, and fish assemblages. Semipermeable membrane devices, passive samplers that concentrate trace levels of hydrophobic organic contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls, also were used. The objectives of the study were to (1) examine physical, chemical, and biological responses along the gradient of urbanization and (2) determine the major physical, chemical, and landscape variables affecting the structure of aquatic communities. Common effects documented in the literature of urbanization on instream physical, chemical, and biological characteristics, such as increased contaminants, increased streamflow flashiness, increased concentrations of chemicals, and changes in

  2. Representative well models for eight geothermal-resource areas

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, C.C.; Lin, Y.T.; Livesay, B.J.

    1983-02-01

    Representative well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal-resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. The models were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. The nature, construction, and validation of the models are presented.

  3. Workforce: Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This fact sheet states that in 2006, a good education is no longer just a way for an individual to get ahead. It is also the best way a state can get ahead -- and therefore a real economic priority. A state must ensure that all of its citizens have access to a college education. In Oregon, a state recovering from the 2000-03 recession, the demand…

  4. Oregon Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Smoke Plumes from the B&B Complex Fires, Oregon     ... The results indicate that the tops of the two main plumes originating from the B&B complex differ in altitude by about 1-2 ... The  animation  depicts a "multi-angle fly-over" of the plumes, and was generated using red-band data from MISR's vertical and ...

  5. Timber resource statistics for the north interior resource area of California. Forest Service research bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Waddell, K.L.; Bassett, P.M.

    1997-03-01

    This report is a summary of timber resource statistics for the North Interior Resource Area of California, which includes Lassen, Modoc, Shasta, Siskiyou, and Trinity Counties. Data were collected as part of a statewide multiresource inventory. The inventory sampled private and public lands except reserved areas and National Forests. The National Forest System provided data from regional inventories of the Lassen, Mendocino, Modoc, Six Rivers, Plumas, Shasta-Trinity, Rogue River, and Toiyabe National Forests. Area information for parks and other reserves was obtained directly from the organizations managing these areas. Statistical tables summarize all ownerships and provide estimates of land area, timber volume, growth, mortality , and harvest. Estimates of periodic change of timberland area and timber volume are presented for all ownerships outside National Forests.

  6. Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Volume II.

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomquist, R. Gordon

    1985-06-01

    This volume contains appendices on: (1) resource assessment - electrical generation computer results; (2) resource assessment summary - direct use computer results; (3) electrical generation (high temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (4) direct utilization (low temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (5) electrical generation computer program CENTPLANT and related documentation; (6) electrical generation computer program WELLHEAD and related documentation; (7) direct utilization computer program HEATPLAN and related documentation; (8) electrical generation ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; (9) direct utilization ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; and (10) life cycle cost analysis computer program and related documentation. (ACR)

  7. Geothermal Resource Area 5, Churchill, Douglas, Lyon and Storey Counties area development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Pugsley, M.

    1981-01-01

    Within this four county area there are many known geothermal resources ranging in temperature from 70 to over 350{sup 0}F. Thirteen of these resources are considered major and have been selected for evaluation. Various potential uses of the energy found were determined after evaluating the study area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities. These factors were then compared with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation; space heating; recreation; industrial process heat; and agriculture.

  8. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Socioeconomics

    SciTech Connect

    Saulsbury, J.W.; Sorensen, B.M.; Reed, R.M.; Schexnayder, S.M.

    1995-03-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background information on socioeconomic resources collected during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3--4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The USDOE published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. This document provides background information on socioeconomic resources in Hawaii County, with particular emphasis on the Puna District. Information is being made available for use by others in conducting future socioeconomic impact assessments in this area. this report describes existing socioeconomic resources in the areas studied and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. The socioeconomic resources described are primarily those that would be affected by employment and population growth associated with any future large-scale development. These resource categories are population, housing, land use, economic structure, infrastructure and public services, local government revenues and expenditures, and tourism and recreation.

  9. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Socioeconomics (DRAFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Saulsbury, J.W.; Sorensen, B.M.; Schexnayder, S.M.

    1994-06-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background information on socioeconomic resources collected during the preparation of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 (Fed. Regis. 5925638), withdrawing its Notice of Intent (Fed Regis. 57:5433), of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGPEIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. This document provides background information on socioeconomic resources in Hawaii County, with particular emphasis on the Puna District (Fig. 1). Information is being made available for use by others in conducting future socioeconomic impact assessments in this area. This report describes existing socioeconomic resources in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. The socioeconomic resources described are primarily those that would be affected by employment and population growth associated with any future large-scale development. These resource categories are (1) population, (2) housing, (3) land use, (4) economic structure (primarily employment and income), (5) infrastructure and public services (education, ground transportation, police and fire protection, water, wastewater, solid waste disposal, electricity, and emergency planning), (6) local government revenues and expenditures, and (7) tourism and recreation.

  10. Fires Scorch Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In southwestern Oregon, the Florence Fire (north) and the Sour Biscuit Fire (south) continued to burn virtually out of control on July 21, 2002. Numerous evacuation notices have been issued for residents in the area as the fires remain difficult to control due to the steep, rugged terrain of the Klamath Mountains. This image is from the Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper. Credit:Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch.

  11. Institutional Commitment to Sustainability: An Evaluation of Natural Resource Extension Programs in Universities in Alabama and Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broussard, Shorna R.; Bliss, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to determine institutional commitment to sustainability by examining Natural Resource Extension program inputs, activities, and participation. Design/methodology/approach: A document analysis of Natural Resource Extension planning and reporting documents was conducted to provide contextual and historical…

  12. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Cultural environment and aesthetic resources

    SciTech Connect

    Trettin, L.D.; Petrich, C.H.; Saulsbury, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on the cultural environment and aesthetic resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The cultural environment in the Geothermal Resource Zone (GRZ) and associated study area consists of Native Hawaiian cultural and religious practices and both Native Hawaiian and non-Native Hawaiian cultural resources. This report consists of three sections: (1) a description of Native Hawaiian cultural and religious rights, practices, and values; (2) a description of historic, prehistoric, and traditional Native Hawaiian sites; and (3) a description of other (non-native) sites that could be affected by development in the study area. Within each section, the level of descriptive detail varies according to the information currently available. The description of the cultural environment is most specific in its coverage of the Geothermal Resource Subzones in the Puna District of the island of Hawaii and the study area of South Maui. Ethnographic and archaeological reports by Cultural Advocacy Network Developing Options and International Archaeological Research Institute, Inc., respectively, supplement the descriptions of these two areas with new information collected specifically for this study. Less detailed descriptions of additional study areas on Oahu, Maui, Molokai, and the island of Hawaii are based on existing archaeological surveys.

  13. Radon in homes of the Portland, Oregon Area: Radon data from local radon testing companies collected by CRM (Continuous Radon Measurement) machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, H.; Lindsey, K.; Linde, T.; Burns, S. F.

    2013-12-01

    Students from the Department of Geology at Portland State University paired up with the Oregon Health Authority to better understand radon gas values in homes of the Portland metropolitan area. This study focuses on radon values collected by continuous radon measurement (CRM) machines, taken by local radon testing companies. The local companies participating in this study include Alpha Environmental Services, Inc., Cascade Radon, Environmental Works, The House Detectives, LLC, and Soil Solutions Environmental Services, Inc. In total, 2491 radon readings spanning across 77 zip codes were collected from local companies in the Portland metropolitan area. The maximum value, average value, percentage of homes greater than 4 pCi/L and total rank sum was calculated and used to determine the overall radon potential for each zip code (Burns et al., 1998). A list and four maps were produced showing the results from each category. Out of the total records, 24 zip codes resulted in high radon potential and the average reading for the entire Portland Metropolitan area was 3.7 pCi/L. High potential zip codes are thought to be a result of sand and gravel (Missoula Flood deposits) and faults present in the subsurface. The CRM data was compared with both long-term and short-term data provided by the Oregon Health Authority to validate radon potentials in each zip code. If a home is located in a zip code with high or moderate radon potential across two types of data sets, it is recommended that those homes be tested for radon gas.

  14. Water resources of the Cumberland area, Maryland-West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, R. R.; LeFever, F. F.; Martin, R. O. R.; Otton, E. G.

    1950-01-01

    The report was prepared in response to a request from the United States Department of Commerce, which desired an appraisal of the water resources of the Cumberland atra in order to evaluate the effect of the availability of water on the economic development of the area. Accordingly, the purpose of this report is to summarize the available water information and to describe the hydrologic factors that affect the availability of water.

  15. MAP OF ECOREGIONS OF OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ecoregions of Oregon have been identified, mapped, and described and provide a geographic structure for environmental resources research, assessment, monitoring, and management. This project is part of a larger effort by the U.S. EPA to create a national, hierarchical ecoregi...

  16. Predation by Oregon spotted frogs (Rana pretiosa) on Western toads (Bufo boreas) in Oregon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearl, Christopher A.; Hayes, M.P.

    2002-01-01

    Toads of the genus Bufo co-occur with true frogs (family Ranidae) throughout their North American ranges. Yet, Bufo are rarely reported as prey for ranid frogs, perhaps due to dermal toxins that afford them protection from some predators. We report field observations from four different localities demonstrating that Oregon spotted frogs (Rana pretiosa) readily consume juvenile western toads (Bufo boreas) at breeding sites in Oregon. Unpalatability thought to deter predators of selected taxa and feeding mode may not protect juvenile stages of western toads from adult Oregon spotted frogs. Activity of juvenile western toads can elicit ambush behavior by Oregon spotted frog adults. Our review of published literature suggests that regular consumption of toadlets sets Oregon spotted frogs apart from most North American ranid frogs. Importance of the trophic context of juvenile western toads as a seasonally important resource to Oregon spotted frogs needs critical investigation.

  17. Analytical results and sample locality map of stream-sediment, heavy-mineral-concentrate, and rock samples from the Camp Creek and Cottonwood Creek Wilderness Study Areas, Malheur County, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Johnes, Erickson, M.S.; Fey, D.L.; Kennedy, K.R.; Gent, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    A U.S. Geological Survey report is presented giving the analytical results and sample locality map of stream-sediment, heavy-mineral-concentrate, and rock samples from the Camp Creek and Cottonwood Creek Wilderness Study Areas, Malheur County, Oregon.

  18. The Oregon Career and Technical Education Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Steven; Richards, Amanda

    2008-01-01

    Oregon educators, policymakers, and business people are working together to increase the number and quality of Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs in secondary and postsecondary institutions. CTE is an integral component of Oregon's education and workforce development system and prepares students for careers in areas ranging from the…

  19. Oregon geology - parent of the soil, foundation for the vine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, Ray

    2006-01-01

    This presentation describes USGS geologic mapping in western Oregon, geologic map products, a thumbnail sketch of geologic history, a discussion of new mapping in progress in northwest Oregon, a tour of northwest Oregon geologic units, their relation to new American Viticultural Areas, and online sources of information.

  20. Energy and other resource conservation within urbanizing areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Peter G.

    1982-05-01

    The reported research seeks to answer several questions regarding energy conservation within urbanizing areas. As a practical matter, to what extent can dependence upon exhaustible resources be reduced? Can these reductions be achieved without severely impairing social well-being and environmental quality? And, what seem to be the prevailing institutional constraints limiting energy conservation within urbanizing areas? The study area was the proposed “downtown” of The Woodlands, a new town north of Houston, Texas. Two plans were developed for this area. In one, no particular attempt was made to conserve energy (conventional plan), while in the other, energy conservation was a primary consideration (conservation plan). For both plans, estimates were made of energy consumption within buildings, in the transportation sector, and in the actual production of building materials themselves (embodied energy). In addition, economic and environmental analyses were performed, including investigation of other resource issues such as water supply, solid waste disposal, stormwater management, and atmospheric emissions. Alternative on-site power systems were also investigated. Within the bounds of economic feasibility and development practicality, it was found that application of energy-conserving methods could yield annual energy savings of as much as 23%, and reduce dependence on prime fuels by 30%. Adverse economic effects on consumers were found to be minimal and environmental quality could be sustained. The major institutional constraints appeared to be those associated with traditional property ownership and with the use of common property resources. The resistance to change of everyday practices in land development and building industries also seemed to constrain potential applications.

  1. 76 FR 33341 - Notice of Intent to prepare a Resource Management Plan for the West Eugene Wetlands Planning Area...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... Wetlands Planning Area in the State of Oregon and Associated Environmental Impact Statement AGENCY: Bureau... Wetlands Planning Area and by this notice is announcing the beginning of the scoping process to solicit public comments and identify issues. The West Eugene Wetlands Planning Area comprises approximately...

  2. Fires Scorch Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In southwestern Oregon, the Florence Fire (north) and the Sour Biscuit Fire (south) continue to burn virtually out of control. Numerous evacuation notices have been issued for residents in the area as the fires remain difficult to control due to the steep, rugged terrain of the Klamath Mountains. This false-color image from the Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper was acquired on July 21, 2002. In the image, vegetation is green, burned areas are deep magenta, active fire is bright pink, and smoke is light blue. Credit:Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch.

  3. “Our vanishing glaciers”: One hundred years of glacier retreat in Three Sisters Area, Oregon Cascade Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connor, James E.

    2014-01-01

    In August 1910, thirty-nine members of the Mazamas Mountaineering Club ascended the peaks of the Three Sisters in central Oregon. While climbing, geologist Ira A. Williams photographed the surrounding scenery, including images of Collier Glacier. One hundred years later, U.S. Geological Survey research hydrologist Jim E. O’Connor matched those documented photographs with present day images — the result of which is a stunning lapse of glacial change in the Three Sister region. O’Connor asserts that “glaciers exist by the grace of climate,” and through a close examination of the history of the region’s glaciers, he provides an intriguing glimpse into the history of geological surveys and glacial studies in the Pacific Northwest, including their connection to significant scientific advances of the nineteenth century. The work of scientists and mountaineers who have monitored and recorded glacier changes for over a century allows us to see dramatic changes in a landscape that is especially sensitive to ongoing climate change.

  4. Development of an Interactive Shoreline Management Tool for the Lower Wood River Valley, Oregon - Phase I: Stage-Volume and Stage-Area Relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haluska, Tana L.; Snyder, Daniel T.

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the parcel and inundation area geographic information system (GIS) layers for various surface-water stages. It also presents data tables containing the water stage, inundation area, and water volume relations developed from analysis of detailed land surface elevation derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data recently collected for the Wood River Valley at the northern margin of Agency Lake in Klamath County, Oregon. Former shoreline wetlands that have been cut off from Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes by dikes might in the future be reconnected to Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes by breaching the dikes. Issues of interest associated with restoring wetlands in this way include the area that will be inundated, the volume of water that may be stored, the change in wetland habitat, and the variation in these characteristics as surface-water stage is changed. Products from this analysis can assist water managers in assessing the effect of breaching dikes and changing surface-water stage. The study area is in the approximate former northern margins of Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes in the Wood River Valley.

  5. Geohydrology and digital simulation of the ground-water flow system in the Umatilla Plateau and Horse Heaven Hills area, Oregon and Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies-Smith, A.; Bolke, E.L.; Collins, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Columbia Plateau is underlain by massive basalt flows, with a composite thickness of about 10,000 ft. Structural features within the study area include a series of anticline-syncline pairs. The main avenues of groundwater movement in the basalt are the interflow zone between basalt flows. Individual interflow zones may be rather extensive in the lateral direction and are largely isolated from overlying and underlying interflows by poorly permeable basalt flow centers. Four aquifers were defined for this study. The uppermost aquifer (layer 1) consists of unconsolidated deposits of gravel, sand, silt, and clay that overlie the basalt: layer 2 consists of the Saddle Mountains Basalt, layer 3 the Wanapum Basalt, and layer 4 consists of the upper thousand ft of Grande Ronde Basalt. Recharge to the groundwater system is from precipitation, leakage from streams, and seepage from surface water irrigation. Natural discharge of aquifers is principally to streams. Discharge by groundwater pumpage from the study area ranged from approximately 2,000 acre-ft in 1950 to 144,000 acre-ft in 1980. About 85% of the total pumpage in 1980 was from the Oregon part of the study area. Water level declines of over 300 ft occur locally in parts of the study area. (USGS)

  6. The Shoreline Management Tool, an ArcMap Tool for Analyzing Water Depth, Inundated Area, Volume, and Selected Habitats, with an Example for the Lower Wood River Valley, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, D. T.; Haluska, T. L.; Respini-Irwin, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Shoreline Management Tool is a GIS-based program developed to assist water- and land-resource managers in assessing the benefits and impacts of changes in surface-water stage on water depth, inundated area, and water volume. In addition, the tool can be used to identify aquatic or terrestrial habitat areas where conditions may be suitable for specific plants or animals as defined by user-specified criteria, including water depth, land-surface slope, and land-surface aspect or to delineate areas for use in determining a variety of hydrologic budget components such as surface-water storage, precipitation, runoff, or evapotranspiration. The Shoreline Management Tool consists of two parts, a graphical user interface for use with ArcMap GIS software to interact with the user to define scenarios and map results, and a spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel® developed to display tables and graphs of the results. The graphical user interface allows the user to define a scenario consisting of an inundation level (stage), land areas (parcels), and habitats (areas meeting user-specified conditions) based on water depth, slope, and aspect criteria. The tool uses data consisting of land-surface elevation, tables of stage/volume and stage/area, and delineated parcel boundaries to produce maps (data layers) of inundated areas and areas that meet the habitat criteria. The tool can be run in a Single-Time Scenario mode or in a Time-Series Scenario mode which uses an input file of dates and associated stages. The spreadsheet portion of the tool uses a macro to process the results from the graphical user interface to create tables and graphs of inundated water volume, inundated area, dry area, and mean water depth for each land parcel based on the user-specified stage. The macro also creates tables and graphs of the area, perimeter, and number of polygons comprising the user-specified habitat areas within each parcel. The Shoreline Management Tool is designed to be highly transferable

  7. Geology and mineral and energy resources, Roswell Resource Area, New Mexico; an interactive computer presentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tidball, Ronald R.; Bartsch-Winkler, S. B.

    1995-01-01

    This Compact Disc-Read Only Memory (CD-ROM) contains a program illustrating the geology and mineral and energy resources of the Roswell Resource Area, an administrative unit of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in east-central New Mexico. The program enables the user to access information on the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, mining history, metallic and industrial mineral commodities, hydrocarbons, and assessments of the area. The program was created with the display software, SuperCard, version 1.5, by Aldus. The program will run only on a Macintosh personal computer. This CD-ROM was produced in accordance with Macintosh HFS standards. The program was developed on a Macintosh II-series computer with system 7.0.1. The program is a compiled, executable form that is nonproprietary and does not require the presence of the SuperCard software.

  8. Advocating for active living on the rural-urban fringe: a case study of planning in the Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Adler, Sy; Dobson, Noelle; Fox, Karen Perl; Weigand, Lynn

    2008-06-01

    This case study is about the politics of incorporating active-living elements into a concept plan for a new community of about 68,000 people on the edge of the Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area. Development on the rural-urban fringe is ongoing in metropolitan areas around the United States. In this article, we evaluate the product of the concept-planning process from the standpoint of the extent to which environmental elements conducive to active living were included. We also analyze four issues in which challenges to the incorporation of active-living features surfaced: choices related to transportation facilities, the design and location of retail stores, the location of schools and parks, and the location of a new town center. Overall, the Damascus/Boring Concept Plan positions the area well to promote active living. Analyses of the challenges that emerged yielded lessons for advocates regarding ways to deal with conflicts between facilitating active living and local economic development and related tax-base concerns and between active-living elements and school-district planning autonomy as well as the need for advocates to have the capacity to present alternatives to the usual financial and design approaches taken by private- and public-sector investors. PMID:18469172

  9. Remote Area Power Supply (RAPS) load and resource profiles.

    SciTech Connect

    Giles, Lauren; Skolnik, Edward G.; Marchionini, Brian; Fall, Ndeye K.

    2007-07-01

    In 1997, an international team interested in the development of Remote Area Power Supply (RAPS) systems for rural electrification projects around the world was organized by the International Lead Zinc Research Organization (ILZRO) with the support of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The team focused on defining load and resource profiles for RAPS systems. They identified single family homes, small communities, and villages as candidates for RAPS applications, and defined several different size/power requirements for each. Based on renewable energy and resource data, the team devised a ''strawman'' series of load profiles. A RAPS system typically consists of a renewable and/or conventional generator, power conversion equipment, and a battery. The purpose of this report is to present data and information on insolation levels and load requirements for ''typical'' homes, small communities, and larger villages around the world in order to facilitate the development of robust design practices for RAPS systems, and especially for the storage battery component. These systems could have significant impact on areas of the world that would otherwise not be served by conventional electrical grids.

  10. Session: What can we learn from developed wind resource areas

    SciTech Connect

    Thelander, Carl; Erickson, Wally

    2004-09-01

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop was composed of two parts intended to examine what existing science tells us about wind turbine impacts at existing wind project sites. Part one dealt with the Altamont Wind Resource area, one of the older wind projects in the US, with a paper presented by Carl Thelander titled ''Bird Fatalities in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: A Case Study, Part 1''. Questions addressed by the presenter included: how is avian habitat affected at Altamont and do birds avoid turbine sites; are birds being attracted to turbine strings; what factors contribute to direct impacts on birds by wind turbines at Altamont; how do use, behavior, avoidance and other factors affect risk to avian species, and particularly impacts those species listed as threatened, endangered, or of conservation concern, and other state listed species. The second part dealt with direct impacts to birds at new generation wind plants outside of California, examining such is sues as mortality, avoidance, direct habitat impacts from terrestrial wind projects, species and numbers killed per turbine rates/MW generated, impacts to listed threatened and endangered species, to USFWS Birds of Conservation Concern, and to state listed species. This session focused on newer wind project sites with a paper titled ''Bird Fatality and Risk at New Generation Wind Projects'' by Wally Erickson. Each paper was followed by a discussion/question and answer period.

  11. Fires Scorch Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In southwestern Oregon, the Florence Fire (north) and the Sour Biscuit Fire (south) continue to grow explosively. This image from the Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus was captured on July 29, 2002. The Florence Fire had grown to 50,000 acres and the Sour Biscuit Fire had grown to 16,000 acres. Numerous evacuation notices remain in effect. In this false-color image, vegetation is green, burned areas are deep magenta, actively burning fronts are bright pink, and smoke is blue. Credit:Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch.

  12. The community resource management area mechanism: a strategy to manage African forest resources for REDD+

    PubMed Central

    Asare, Rebecca A.; Kyei, Andrew; Mason, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Climate change poses a significant threat to Africa, and deforestation rates have increased in recent years. Mitigation initiatives such as REDD+ are widely considered as potentially efficient ways to generate emission reductions (or removals), conserve or sustainably manage forests, and bring benefits to communities, but effective implementation models are lacking. This paper presents the case of Ghana's Community Resource Management Area (CREMA) mechanism, an innovative natural resource governance and landscape-level planning tool that authorizes communities to manage their natural resources for economic and livelihood benefits. This paper argues that while the CREMA was originally developed to facilitate community-based wildlife management and habitat protection, it offers a promising community-based structure and process for managing African forest resources for REDD+. At a theoretical level, it conforms to the ecological, socio-cultural and economic factors that drive resource-users’ decision process and practices. And from a practical mitigation standpoint, the CREMA has the potential to help solve many of the key challenges for REDD+ in Africa, including definition of boundaries, smallholder aggregation, free prior and informed consent, ensuring permanence, preventing leakage, clarifying land tenure and carbon rights, as well as enabling equitable benefit-sharing arrangements. Ultimately, CREMA's potential as a forest management and climate change mitigation strategy that generates livelihood benefits for smallholder farmers and forest users will depend upon the willingness of African governments to support the mechanism and give it full legislative backing, and the motivation of communities to adopt the CREMA and integrate democratic decision-making and planning with their traditional values and natural resource management systems. PMID:23878338

  13. The community resource management area mechanism: a strategy to manage African forest resources for REDD+.

    PubMed

    Asare, Rebecca A; Kyei, Andrew; Mason, John J

    2013-01-01

    Climate change poses a significant threat to Africa, and deforestation rates have increased in recent years. Mitigation initiatives such as REDD+ are widely considered as potentially efficient ways to generate emission reductions (or removals), conserve or sustainably manage forests, and bring benefits to communities, but effective implementation models are lacking. This paper presents the case of Ghana's Community Resource Management Area (CREMA) mechanism, an innovative natural resource governance and landscape-level planning tool that authorizes communities to manage their natural resources for economic and livelihood benefits. This paper argues that while the CREMA was originally developed to facilitate community-based wildlife management and habitat protection, it offers a promising community-based structure and process for managing African forest resources for REDD+. At a theoretical level, it conforms to the ecological, socio-cultural and economic factors that drive resource-users' decision process and practices. And from a practical mitigation standpoint, the CREMA has the potential to help solve many of the key challenges for REDD+ in Africa, including definition of boundaries, smallholder aggregation, free prior and informed consent, ensuring permanence, preventing leakage, clarifying land tenure and carbon rights, as well as enabling equitable benefit-sharing arrangements. Ultimately, CREMA's potential as a forest management and climate change mitigation strategy that generates livelihood benefits for smallholder farmers and forest users will depend upon the willingness of African governments to support the mechanism and give it full legislative backing, and the motivation of communities to adopt the CREMA and integrate democratic decision-making and planning with their traditional values and natural resource management systems. PMID:23878338

  14. The Preston Geothermal Resources; Renewed Interest in a Known Geothermal Resource Area

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Thomas R.; Worthing, Wade; Cannon, Cody; Palmer, Carl; Neupane, Ghanashyam; McLing, Travis L; Mattson, Earl; Dobson, Patric; Conrad, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The Preston Geothermal prospect is located in northern Cache Valley approximately 8 kilometers north of the city of Preston, in southeast Idaho. The Cache Valley is a structural graben of the northern portion of the Basin and Range Province, just south of the border with the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP). This is a known geothermal resource area (KGRA) that was evaluated in the 1970's by the State of Idaho Department of Water Resources (IDWR) and by exploratory wells drilled by Sunedco Energy Development. The resource is poorly defined but current interpretations suggest that it is associated with the Cache Valley structural graben. Thermal waters moving upward along steeply dipping northwest trending basin and range faults emanate in numerous hot springs in the area. Springs reach temperatures as hot as 84° C. Traditional geothermometry models estimated reservoir temperatures of approximately 125° C in the 1970’s study. In January of 2014, interest was renewed in the areas when a water well drilled to 79 m (260 ft) yielded a bottom hole temperature of 104° C (217° F). The well was sampled in June of 2014 to investigate the chemical composition of the water for modeling geothermometry reservoir temperature. Traditional magnesium corrected Na-K-Ca geothermometry estimates this new well to be tapping water from a thermal reservoir of 227° C (440° F). Even without the application of improved predictive methods, the results indicate much higher temperatures present at much shallower depths than previously thought. This new data provides strong support for further investigation and sampling of wells and springs in the Northern Cache Valley, proposed for the summer of 2015. The results of the water will be analyzed utilizing a new multicomponent equilibrium geothermometry (MEG) tool called Reservoir Temperature Estimate (RTEst) to obtain an improved estimate of the reservoir temperature. The new data suggest that other KGRAs and overlooked areas may need to be

  15. Oregon Health Go Local: A Retrospective Look.

    PubMed

    Ford, Emily; Hannon, Todd

    2010-04-01

    MedlinePlus® Go Local is the National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health's Internet resource that allows individuals to find health services in their local communities. Oregon Health Go Local recently joined the network of active Go Local projects. This paper describes the planning and development of Oregon Health Go Local, with a discussion of the success and challenges of initiating such a project. Funding, marketing, volunteer coordination, data acquisition, and taxonomy are discussed. PMID:20640231

  16. Oregon Health Go Local: A Retrospective Look

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Emily; Hannon, Todd

    2010-01-01

    MedlinePlus® Go Local is the National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health's Internet resource that allows individuals to find health services in their local communities. Oregon Health Go Local recently joined the network of active Go Local projects. This paper describes the planning and development of Oregon Health Go Local, with a discussion of the success and challenges of initiating such a project. Funding, marketing, volunteer coordination, data acquisition, and taxonomy are discussed. PMID:20640231

  17. Ground-water resources of the Dayton area, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norris, Stanley Eugene; Spieker, Andrew Maute

    1966-01-01

    The principal aquifers of the Dayton area are sand and gravel layers in the 150- to 250-foot thick glacial deposits filling the river valleys (Miami River and its tributaries), which were originally cut in bedrock by preglacial streams. The upper and lower aquifers are separated by a poorly permeable till-rich zone, which confines the water in the lower aquifer; recharge to the lower aquifer is by vertical leakage through the till zone. The upper aquifer is pumped extensively only at Rohrers Island well field of Dayton, where water levels are kept high by artificial recharge. Although few cities in Ohio are as abundantly endowed with ground-water resources as Dayton, the demand is estimated to rise to quantities that cannot be supplied by the year 2000. A comprehensive plan for conservation is needed to meet future growth.

  18. Wind speed forecasting in the central California wind resource area

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, E.F.

    1997-12-31

    A wind speed forecasting program was implemented in the summer seasons of 1985 - 87 in the Central California Wind Resource Area (WRA). The forecasting program is designed to use either meteorological observations from the WRA and local upper air observations or upper air observations alone to predict the daily average windspeed at two locations. Forecasts are made each morning at 6 AM and are valid for a 24 hour period. Ease of use is a hallmark of the program as the daily forecast can be made using data entered into a programmable HP calculator. The forecasting program was the first step in a process to examine whether the electrical energy output of an entire wind power generation facility or defined subsections of the same facility could be predicted up to 24 hours in advance. Analysis of the results of the summer season program using standard forecast verification techniques show the program has skill over persistence and climatology.

  19. Mineral resources of the Little High Rock Canyon Wilderness Study Area, Humboldt and Washoe counties, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, W.J.; Turner, R.L.; Plouff, D.

    1987-01-01

    The Little High Rock Canyon Wilderness Study Area consists of approximately 52,143 acres of flat-lying Tertiary volcanic rocks and associated sediments. No resources were identified in the study area, but three areas contain moderate potential for epithermal gold and silver resources. The rest of the area has low potential for epithermal gold and silver resources. The study area also contains three small areas of low potential for perlite, pozzolan, and uranium.

  20. 78 FR 45270 - Notice of Realty Action; Proposed Modified Competitive Sale of Public Land in Jackson County, Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... proposed sale must be submitted in writing to the BLM Ashland Resource Area Field Manager (see the... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Realty Action; Proposed Modified Competitive Sale of Public Land in... County, Oregon, by modified competitive bidding sale procedures for the approved appraised fair...

  1. Oregon State University Governmental Impact Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Univ., Corvallis.

    Interactions between the government and Oregon State University were assessed with attention to the following areas: employment and personnel administration (regulations regarding equal opportunity, affirmative action, and nondiscrimination); students and student life (regulations regarding admissions, financial aid, records management, special…

  2. Assessing economic impacts to coastal recreation and tourism from oil and gas development in the Oregon and Washington Outer Continental Shelf. Inventory and evaluation of Washington and Oregon coastal recreation resources

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, G.M.; Johnson, N.S.; Chapman, D.

    1991-05-01

    The purpose of the three-part study was to assist Materials Management Service (MMS) planners in evaluation of the anticipated social impact of proposed oil and gas development on the environment. The purpose of the report is primarily to analyze the econometric models of the Dornbusch study. The authors examine, in detail, key aspects of the gravity, consumer surplus, and economic effects (input-output) models. The purpose is two-fold. First, the authors evaluate the performance of the model in satisfying the objective for which it was developed: analyzing economic impacts of OCS oil and gas development in California. Second, the authors evaluate the applicability of the modeling approach employed in the Dornbusch study for analyzing potential OCS development impacts in Washington and Oregon. At the end of the report, the authors offer suggestions for any future study of economic impacts of OCS development in Washington and Oregon. The recommendations concern future data gathering procedures and alternative modeling approaches for measuring economic impacts.

  3. Monitoring recharge in areas of seasonally frozen ground in the Columbia Plateau and Snake River Plain, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, Mark; Josberger, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Seasonally frozen ground occurs over approximately one‑third of the contiguous United States, causing increased winter runoff. Frozen ground generally rejects potential groundwater recharge. Nearly all recharge from precipitation in semi-arid regions such as the Columbia Plateau and the Snake River Plain in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, occurs between October and March, when precipitation is most abundant and seasonally frozen ground is commonplace. The temporal and spatial distribution of frozen ground is expected to change as the climate warms. It is difficult to predict the distribution of frozen ground, however, because of the complex ways ground freezes and the way that snow cover thermally insulates soil, by keeping it frozen longer than it would be if it was not snow covered or, more commonly, keeping the soil thawed during freezing weather. A combination of satellite remote sensing and ground truth measurements was used with some success to investigate seasonally frozen ground at local to regional scales. The frozen-ground/snow-cover algorithm from the National Snow and Ice Data Center, combined with the 21-year record of passive microwave observations from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager onboard a Defense Meteorological Satellite Program satellite, provided a unique time series of frozen ground. Periodically repeating this methodology and analyzing for trends can be a means to monitor possible regional changes to frozen ground that could occur with a warming climate. The Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System watershed model constructed for the upper Crab Creek Basin in the Columbia Plateau and Reynolds Creek basin on the eastern side of the Snake River Plain simulated recharge and frozen ground for several future climate scenarios. Frozen ground was simulated with the Continuous Frozen Ground Index, which is influenced by air temperature and snow cover. Model simulation results showed a decreased occurrence of frozen ground that coincided with

  4. CHARLES SHELDON ANTELOPE RANGE AND SHELDON NATIONAL ANTELOPE REFUGE, NEVADA AND OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cathrall, J.B.; Tuchek, E.T.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Charles Sheldon Antelope Range and Sheldon National Antelope Refuge, in Humboldt and Washoe Counties, Nevada, and Lake and Harney Counties, Oregon, was conducted. The investigation identified areas of mineral-resource potential within the range and refuge. The range and refuge have areas of substantiated resource potential for precious opal and uranium, a demonstrated resource of decorative building stone, and areas with probable resource potential for mercury and for base- and precious-metal sulfide deposits. Reservoir temperatures, estimated from the analysis of thermal springs, indicate that a probable potential for geothermal resources exists in two areas in the range. No other energy resources were identitied in the area.

  5. 7 CFR 600.9 - Major land resource area soil survey offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Major land resource area soil survey offices. 600.9... CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL ORGANIZATION § 600.9 Major land resource area soil... soil survey production. Major land resource area soil survey offices (MO) provide the...

  6. 7 CFR 600.9 - Major land resource area soil survey offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Major land resource area soil survey offices. 600.9... CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL ORGANIZATION § 600.9 Major land resource area soil... soil survey production. Major land resource area soil survey offices (MO) provide the...

  7. 7 CFR 600.9 - Major land resource area soil survey offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Major land resource area soil survey offices. 600.9... CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL ORGANIZATION § 600.9 Major land resource area soil... soil survey production. Major land resource area soil survey offices (MO) provide the...

  8. 7 CFR 600.9 - Major land resource area soil survey offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Major land resource area soil survey offices. 600.9... CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL ORGANIZATION § 600.9 Major land resource area soil... soil survey production. Major land resource area soil survey offices (MO) provide the...

  9. 7 CFR 600.9 - Major land resource area soil survey offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Major land resource area soil survey offices. 600.9... CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL ORGANIZATION § 600.9 Major land resource area soil... soil survey production. Major land resource area soil survey offices (MO) provide the...

  10. Transportation study for the Geysers Geothermal Resource Area

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    Potential cumulative impacts on the transportation system are assessed and recommendations are made as to options for handling future transportation development. The area is served by state highways, county roads, and an internal network of private roads. Access into the area is limited, and the roads must handle a variety of traffic including an unusually high percentage of heavy trucks transporting construction equipment and materials, hazardous chemicals, and toxic wastes. In conducting the transportation study public documents on geothermal power plant developments were researched and field trips to inspect the transportation facilities were made. People who have a special interest in the transportation system were also interviewed. In addition, traffic, accident, and road data were analyzed. Traffic forecasts based on projected geothermal resource develpoment were made. All access roads are of substandard design and efficient in structural adequacy. With projected traffic at 40% above the current level for most of the next six years, it is expected that cumulative impacts will cause accelerated degradation of the existing roads.

  11. The Conterminous United States Mineral Appraisal Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral resources maps of the Medford 1 degree x 2 degrees Quadrangle, Oregon and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, James G.; Blakely, R.J.; Johnson, M.G.; Page, N.J.; Peterson, J.A.; Singer, D.A.; Whittington, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Medford 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangle in southern Oregon and northern California was studied by an interdisciplinary research team to appraise its mineral resources. The appraisal is based on geological, geochemical, and geophysical field and laboratory investigations, the results of which are published as a folio of maps, figures, and tables, with accompanying discussions. This circular provides background information on the investigations and integrates the information presented in the folio. The bibliography lists selected references to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral deposits of the Medford 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangle.

  12. Tectonic setting of the Portland-Vancouver area, Oregon and Washington: constraints from low-altitude aeromagnetic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, R.J.; Wells, R.E.; Yelin, T.S.; Madin, I.P.; Beeson, M.H.

    1995-01-01

    Seismic activity in the Portland-Vancouver metropolitan area may be associated with various mapped faults that locally offset volcanic basement of Eocene age and younger. This volcanic basement is concealed in most places by young deposits, vegetation, and urban development. The US Geological Survey conducted an aeromagnetic survey in September 1992 to investigate the extent of these mapped faults and possibly to help identify other seismic and volcanic hazards in the area. The survey was flown approximately 240 m above terrain, along flight lines spaced 460 m apart, and over an area about 50 ?? 50 km. -from Authors

  13. Ground-water resources of Riverton irrigation project area, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morris, Donald Arthur; Hackett, O.M.; Vanlier, K.E.; Moulder, E.A.; Durum, W.H.

    1959-01-01

    The Riverton irrigation project area is in the northwestern part of the Wind River basin in west-central Wyoming. Because the annual precipitation is only about 9 inches, agriculture, which is the principal occupation in the area, is dependent upon irrigation. Irrigation by surface-water diversion was begum is 1906; water is now supplied to 77,716 acres and irrigation has been proposed for an additional 31,344 acres. This study of the geology and ground-water resources of the Riverton irrigation project, of adjacent irrigated land, and of nearby land proposed for irrigation was begun during the summer of 1948 and was completed in 1951. The purpose of the investigation was to evaluate the ground-water resources of the area and to study the factors that should be considered in the solution of drainage and erosional problems within the area. The Riverton irrigation project area is characterized by flat to gently sloping stream terraces, which are flanked by a combination of badlands, pediment slopes, and broad valleys. These features were formed by long-continued erosion in an arid climate of the essentially horizontal, poorly consolidated beds of the Wind River formation. The principal streams of the area flow south-eastward. Wind River and Fivemile Creek are perennial streams and the others are intermittent. Ground-water discharge and irrigation return flow have created a major problem in erosion control along Fivemile Creek. Similar conditions might develop along Muddy and lower Cottonwood Creeks when land in their drainage basins is irrigated. The bedrock exposed in the area ranges in age from Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary (middle Eocene). The Wind River formation of early and middle Eocene age forms the uppermost bedrock formation in the greater part of the area. Unconsolidated deposits of Quaternary age, which consist of terrace gravel, colluvium, eolian sand and silt. and alluvium, mantle the Wind River formation in much of the area. In the irrigated parts

  14. Low-cost computer classification of land cover in the Portland area, Oregon, by signature extension techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaydos, Leonard

    1978-01-01

    The cost of classifying 5,607 square kilometers (2,165 sq. mi.) in the Portland area was less than 8 cents per square kilometer ($0.0788, or $0.2041 per square mile). Besides saving in costs, this and other signature extension techniques may be useful in completing land use and land cover mapping in other large areas where multispectral and multitemporal Landsat data are available in digital form but other source materials are generally lacking.

  15. Klamath Falls geothermal field, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

    1989-09-01

    Klamath Falls, Oregon, is located in a Known Geothermal Resource Area which has been used by residents, principally to obtain geothermal fluids for space heating, at least since the turn of the century. Over 500 shallow-depth wells ranging from 90 to 2,000 ft (27 to 610 m) in depth are used to heat (35 MWt) over 600 structures. This utilization includes the heating of homes, apartments, schools, commercial buildings, hospital, county jail, YMCA, and swimming pools by individual wells and three district heating systems. Geothermal well temperatures range from 100 to 230{degree}F (38 to 110{degree}C) and the most common practice is to use downhole heat exchangers with city water as the circulating fluid. Larger facilities and district heating systems use lineshaft vertical turbine pumps and plate heat exchangers. Well water chemistry indicates approximately 800 ppM dissolved solids, with sodium sulfate having the highest concentration. Some scaling and corrosion does occur on the downhole heat exchangers (black iron pipe) and on heating systems where the geo-fluid is used directly. 73 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Mineral resource potential map of the Natural Area Roadless Area, Baker County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cathcart, James B.; Patterson, Sam H.; Crandall, Thomas M.

    1983-01-01

    The Natural Area Roadless Area, which is in the Osceola National Forest in Baker County, Fla., is underlain by sedimentary rocks containing phosphate deposits that are not a potential mineral resource by todays standards. The region has a low potential for oil and gas and virtually no potential for other valuable minerals. The phosphate deposits are either slightly low in tonnage and P2O5 content, high in MgO and/or Fe2O3 + Al2O3, or the ratio of CaO to P2O5 is too high for deposits that can be mined profitably at the present time. A low potential for oil and gas is indicated by the numerous dry holes in the region and the absence of the formations that contain these hydrocarbons in southern and westernmost Florida. The only mineral material that has been produced in the study area is clayey sand, used in stabilizing Forest Service roads. This type of clayey sand has no particular value because there are virtually unlimited quantities in the surrounding region. The peaty material in the area is too high in ash content to be mined. Large quantities of limestone underlie the area but are too deeply buried to be quarried. Heavy-mineral and clay deposits, which are mined elsewhere in northern peninsular Florida, are not present in the study area.

  17. Mineral resources of the Honeycombs Wilderness Study Area, Washakie County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Peper, J.D.; Hill, R.H.; Kulik, D.M.; Almquist, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Honeycombs Wilderness Study Area in Washakie County, Wyo., has no identified mineral or energy resources. A moderate resource potential exists for oil and gas, for undiscovered subsurface coal in the northeastern and southeastern parts of the study area, and for industrial commodities, sand and gravel, mudstone, and sandstone along the western and northern edges of this study area. The Honeycombs Wilderness Study Area has a low resource potential for uranium and no resource potential for metals other than subsurface titanium or for geothermal resources. The potential for subsurface titanium in placer deposits is unknown in this study area.

  18. Mineral resources of the Bull Mountain Wilderness Study Area, Garfield and Wayne counties, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Dubiel, R.F.; Bromfield, C.S.; Church, S.E.; Kemp, W.M.; Larson, M.J.; Peterson, F.

    1988-01-01

    The US Geological Survey and the US Bureau of Mines conducted studies to appraise the mineral resources and mineral resource potential of the Bull Mountain Wilderness Study Area. The study area contains sedimentary rocks ranging in age from Jurassic and Triassic( ) to Cretaceous that have been intruded by Tertiary igneous stocks, lacoliths, and bysmaliths. No mines or prospects or identified resources are present within the study area. The northern half of the Bull Mountain Wilderness Study Area has a high mineral resource potential for gypsum, and the entire study area has a low resource potential for uranium and vanadium, coal, oil and gas, and geothermal energy.

  19. Resources

    MedlinePlus

    ... palate - resources Colon cancer - resources Cystic fibrosis - resources Depression - resources Diabetes - resources Digestive disease - resources Drug abuse - resources Eating disorders - resources Elder care - resources Epilepsy - resources Family troubles - ...

  20. Mineral resources and mineral resource potential of the Saline Valley and Lower Saline Wilderness Study Areas, Inyo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Wrucke, C.T.; Marsh, S.P.; Raines, G.L.; Werschky, R.S.; Blakely, R.J.; Hoover, D.B.; McHugh, E.L.; Rumsey, C.M.; Gaps, R.S.; Causey, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    This report presents the results of a mineral survey of the Saline Valley Wilderness Study Area and the Lower Saline Wilderness Study Area, California Desert Conservation Area, Inyo County, California. The Saline Valley Wilderness Study Area and the Lower Saline Wilderness Study Area were studied in 1981-83 using geologic, geochemical, remote sensing, and geophysical surveys and the examination of mines and prospects to evaluate mineral resources and the potential for mineral resources. The Saline Valley Wilderness Study Area has a high potential for the occurrence of gold resources in two areas. One area, largely outside the study area, is in the vicinity of the Crater mine in the Last Chance Range, and it has potential for the occurrence of gold in a disseminated deposit in an epithermal environment. The other area is in Marble Canyon in the western part of the study area, and it has high potential for the occurrence of gold placer deposits. Marble Canyon also has a moderate potential for gold in placer deposits downstream from the area of high potential. Seven areas, scattered from the Inyo Mountains to the Last Chance Range, have a low potential for the occurrence of gold in disseminated deposits, and one area that lies astride the border of Death Valley National Monument has a low potential for the occurrence of gold in vein deposits. The southern end of Eureka Valley has a low potential for the occurrence of lithium and uranium resources in buried sedimentary deposits for the occurrence of lithium and uranium resources in buried sedimentary deposits beneath the valley floor. Demonstrated resources of native sulfur exist at the Crater mine but no resource potential was identified nearby in adtacent parts of the study area. 3 figs. (ACR)

  1. Mineral resources of the Santa Rose Mountains Wilderness Study Area, Riverside County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Calzia, J.P.; Madden-McGuire, D.J.; Oliver, H.W.; Schreiner, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Santa Rosa Mountains Wilderness Study Area covers 68,051 acres in the Santa Rose Mountains, California. An appraisal of the mineral resources (known) and an assessment of mineral resource potential (undiscovered) of this wilderness study area were made at the request of the US Bureau of Land Management. Geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral surveys indicate that the study area has high potential for tungsten and marble resources, moderate potential for gold, and no potential for oil, natural gas, and geothermal resources.

  2. Mineral resources of the Meadow Valley Range Wilderness Study Area, Lincoln and Clark counties, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Pampeyan, E.H.; Blank, H.R. Jr. ); Campbell, H.W. )

    1988-01-01

    The authors report that no mines or active prospects are located within the study area. The only identified resource is perlite. The northern part of the study area has moderate resource potential for zeolites,marekanite (Apache tears), agate, and opaline rock associated with the perlite, and tin. The southern part of the study area has low resource potential for sediment-hosted gold, silver, zinc, copper, and lead. The study area has moderate potential for oil and gas resources. Identified resources of vanadium are present outside the study area and about 800,000 tons of subeconomic metalliferous resources are inferred in the outcrop area, however the potential for undiscovered vanadium resources within the immediately adjacent study area is unknown.

  3. Mantle Helium and Carbon Isotopes in Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters Area, Central Oregon: Evidence for Renewed Volcanic Activity or a Long Term Steady State System?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Soest, M. C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Evans, William C.; Mariner, R.H.

    2002-01-01

    Here we present the helium and carbon isotope results from the initial study of a fluid chemistry-monitoring program started in the summer of 2001 near the South Sister volcano in central Oregon. The Separation Creek area which is several miles due west of the volcano is the locus of strong crustal uplift currently occurring at a rate of 4-5 cm/yr (Wicks, et. al., 2001).Helium [RC/RA = 7.44 and 8.61 RA (RC/R A = (3He/4He)sample-. air corrected/(3He/4He)air))] and carbon (??13C = -11.59 to -9.03??? vs PDB) isotope data and CO2/3He (5 and 9 ?? 109) show that bubbling cold springs in the Separation Creek area near South Sister volcano carry a strong mantle signal, indicating the presence of fresh basaltic magma in the volcanic plumbing system. There is no evidence though, to directly relate this signal to the crustal uplift that is currently taking place in the area, which started in 1998. The geothermal system in the area is apparently much longer lived and shows no significant changes in chemistry compared to data from the early 1990s. Hot springs in the area, which are relatively far removed from the volcanic edifice, do not carry a strong mantle signal in helium isotope ratios (2.79 to 5.08 RA), unlike the cold springs, and also do not show any significant changes in helium isotope ratios compared to literature data for the same springs of over two decades ago. The cold springs of the Separation Creek area form a very diffuse but significant low temperature geothermal system, that should, due to its close vicinity to the center of up uplift, be more sensitive to changes in the deeper volcanic plumbing system than the far removed hot springs and therefore require much more study and consideration when dealing with volcano monitoring in the Cascade range or possibly with geothermal exploration in general.

  4. 33 CFR 165.1311 - Olympic View Resource Area, Tacoma, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Olympic View Resource Area... Olympic View Resource Area, Tacoma, WA. (a) Regulated area. A regulated navigation area is established on... design, remedial action, habitat mitigation, or monitoring activities associated with the Olympic...

  5. Intelligent Resource Management for Local Area Networks: Approach and Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meike, Roger

    1988-01-01

    The Data Management System network is a complex and important part of manned space platforms. Its efficient operation is vital to crew, subsystems and experiments. AI is being considered to aid in the initial design of the network and to augment the management of its operation. The Intelligent Resource Management for Local Area Networks (IRMA-LAN) project is concerned with the application of AI techniques to network configuration and management. A network simulation was constructed employing real time process scheduling for realistic loads, and utilizing the IEEE 802.4 token passing scheme. This simulation is an integral part of the construction of the IRMA-LAN system. From it, a causal model is being constructed for use in prediction and deep reasoning about the system configuration. An AI network design advisor is being added to help in the design of an efficient network. The AI portion of the system is planned to evolve into a dynamic network management aid. The approach, the integrated simulation, project evolution, and some initial results are described.

  6. National Training Center Fort Irwin expansion area aquatic resources survey

    SciTech Connect

    Cushing, C.E.; Mueller, R.P.

    1996-02-01

    Biologists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) were requested by personnel from Fort Irwin to conduct a biological reconnaissance of the Avawatz Mountains northeast of Fort Irwin, an area for proposed expansion of the Fort. Surveys of vegetation, small mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and aquatic resources were conducted during 1995 to characterize the populations and habitats present with emphasis on determining the presence of any species of special concern. This report presents a description of the sites sampled, a list of the organisms found and identified, and a discussion of relative abundance. Taxonomic identifications were done to the lowest level possible commensurate with determining the status of the taxa relative to its possible listing as a threatened, endangered, or candidate species. Consultation with taxonomic experts was undertaken for the Coleoptera ahd Hemiptera. In addition to listing the macroinvertebrates found, the authors also present a discussion related to the possible presence of any threatened or endangered species or species of concern found in Sheep Creek Springs, Tin Cabin Springs, and the Amargosa River.

  7. Mineral resources of the Swasey Mountain and Howell Peak Wilderness Study Areas, Millard County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, D.A.; Zimbelman, D.R.; Campbell, D.L.; Duval, J.S.; Cook, K.L.; Podwysocki, M.H.; Brickey, D.W.; Yambrick, R.A.; Tuftin, S.E.

    1989-01-01

    The Swasey Mountain and the Howell Peak Wilderness Study Areas are underlain by an east-dipping sequence of carbonate rocks, shale, and quartzite of Cambrian age. The Sand Pass mineralized area, immediately northwest of the Swasey Mountain Wilderness Study Area, contains numerous occurrences of jasperoid, small igneous intrusions of Tertiary age, and geochemical anomalies; the mineralized area has been explored for gold. Although no identified resources of metals are known in or near the wilderness study areas, the distribution of geologic structures and stream-sediment geochemical anomalies indicates there is a moderate potential for undiscovered resources of lead, zinc, copper, molybdenum, silver, and gold. An area of moderate potential for undiscovered resources of these metals extends south and east into the Swasey Mountain Wilderness Study Area from the Sand Pass mineralized area. A second area of moderate potential for undiscovered resources of these metals extends from the southern part of the Swasey Mountain Wilderness Study Area across the western part of the Howell Peak Wilderness Study Area. Both study areas contain inferred subeconomic resources of quartzite, high-purity limestone, and sand and gravel. Both areas have moderate resource potential for high-purity limestone and dolomite. Fossils, especially trilobites, of interest to collectors are present in both areas. The potential for undiscovered resources is moderate for oil and gas and is low for geothermal energy within the study areas. There is no potential for undiscovered resources of coal.

  8. Mineral resources of the Sacatar Meadows Wilderness study Area, Tulare and Inyo counties, California

    SciTech Connect

    Diggles, M.F.; Frisken, J.G.; Griscom, A.; Kuizon, L.

    1988-01-01

    At the request of the US Bureau of Land Management, approximately 11,447 acres of the Sacatar Meadows Wilderness Study Area were evaluated for mineral resources (known) and mineral resource potential (undiscovered). No mineral resources were identified. There are five areas of low mineral resource potential (tungsten and molybdenum) in and near the study area. The host rocks for these minerals are Mesozoic-age granitic rocks of the Sierra Nevada Batholith and calcareous metamorphic roof-pendant rocks. The area has no geothermal energy, energy mineral, or oil and gas resource potential.

  9. Mineral resources of the Baboquivari Peak and Coyote Mountains wilderness study areas, Pima County, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Nowlan, G.A.; Haxel, G.B.; Hanna, W.F.; Pitkin, J.A.; Diveley-White, D.V.; McDonnell, J.R.; Lundby, W.

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses the Baboquivari Peak Wilderness Study Area which is underlain by Jurassic sedimentary, volcanic, and granitic rocks which were intruded by a network of middle Tertiary rhyolite dikes. This wilderness study area has no identified resources. This wilderness study area has a high potential for resources of gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, barium, bismuth, manganese, molybdenum, and tungsten in veins associated with felsic to intermediate intrusions. A low potential for resources of thorium, beryllium, and bismuth in pegmatites; a low potential for gold and silver resources in paleo-placer deposits; and a low potential for molybdenum resources in an inferred porphyry molybdenum deposit exists in this wilderness study area.

  10. Mineral resources of the Massacre Rim Wilderness Study Area, Washoe County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Bergquist, J.R.; Plouff, D.; Turner, R.L.; Causey, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    The Massacre Rim Wilderness Study Area encompasses 23,260 acres in Northwest Nevada. There is moderate mineral resource potential for gold, silve, and mercury in hydrothermal deposits in the eastern part of the study area. There is moderate mineral resource potential for uranium throughout the study area. There is no potential for oil and gas in the study area. The potential for geothermal resources is unknown.

  11. Health Hazard Evaluation Report No. HETA-81-083-933, Salem Area Family Counseling Service, Salem, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Apol, A.G.

    1981-08-01

    In November 1980, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a request for a Health Hazard Evaluation from the Salem Area Family Counseling Service to determine the cause of the adverse health responses (headache, dizziness, irritation of the eyes and throat, dry and sore throat, fatigue, and lethargy) experienced by six of the seven employees in the office. NIOSH conducted an environmental survey on December 29-30, 1980. Due to the persistence of symptoms after the carpets and drapes were steamed cleaned, and the ventilation system cleaned, the firm relocated in another office building. Two months after relocation, the symptoms appeared to have disappeared.

  12. Resources

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diabetes - resources Digestive disease - resources Drug abuse - resources Eating disorders - resources Elder care - resources Epilepsy - resources Family troubles - resources Gastrointestinal disorders - resources Hearing impairment - resources ...

  13. School-Based Adolescent Health Programs: The Oregon Approach. Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Kate M.

    Oregon has implemented a successful school-based clinic demonstration program. It was the first state to fund directly school-based clinics that provide comprehensive health services, including birth control counseling, to high school students. The program is administered through the Health Division of the Oregon Department of Human Resources,…

  14. 30 CFR 937.700 - Oregon Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-468.997, pertaining to the control of water pollution. (2) ORS 498.002 and ORS 498.705, protecting... Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.700 Oregon...

  15. The Whiz Kid: Terry Reese--Oregon State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    We should be grateful that Terry Reese had to work his way through college. As a work-study student, taught to do cartographic cataloging in the University, of Oregon's map library, he discovered the mental challenges libraries offered. Later he became Oregon State University (OSU)'s cataloger for networked resources and digital unit production…

  16. 30 CFR 937.700 - Oregon Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.700 Oregon Federal program. (a) This part contains all rules that are applicable to surface coal mining operations in...

  17. 30 CFR 937.700 - Oregon Federal program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.700 Oregon Federal program. (a) This part contains all rules that are applicable to surface coal mining operations in...

  18. Mineral Resources of the Morey and Fandango Wilderness Study Areas, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, David A.; Nash, J. Thomas; Plouff, Donald; McDonnell, John R., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The Morey (NV-060-191) and Fandango (NV-060-190) Wilderness Study Areas are located in the northern Hot Creek Range about 25 mi north of Warm Springs, Nev. At the request of the Bureau of Land Management, 46,300 acres of the Morey and Fandango Wilderness Study Areas were studied. In this report, the area studied is referred to as 'the wilderness study area', or simply 'the study area'. Geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral surveys were conducted by the USGS and the USBM in 1984 to appraise the identified mineral resources and to assess the mineral resource potential of the study areas. These studies indicate that there are small identified resources of zinc, lead, and silver at the Lead Pipe property in the Fandango Wilderness Study Area, several areas of high potential for the occurrence of gold resources in the Fandango study area, small areas of low and moderate potential for the occurrence of silver, lead, and zinc resources in the Fandango study area, areas of moderate and high potential for the occurrence of silver, lead, and zinc resources in the Morey study area, and an area of low potential for copper, molybdenum, and tin in the Morey study area. Both study areas have low resource potential for petroleum, natural gas, uranium, and geothermal energy.

  19. Arsenic levels in Oregon waters.

    PubMed Central

    Stoner, J C; Whanger, P D; Weswig, P H

    1977-01-01

    The arsenic content of well water in certain areas of Oregon can range up to 30 to 40 times the U.S.P.H.S. Drinking Water Standard of 1962, where concentrations in excess of 50 ppb are grounds for rejection. The elevated arsenic levels in water are postulated to be due to volcanic deposits. Wells in central Lane County, Oregon, that are known to contain arsenic rich water are in an area underlain by a particular group of sedimentary and volcanic rocks, which geologists have named the Fischer formation. The arsenic levels in water from wells ranged from no detectable amounts to 2,000 ppb. In general the deeper wells contained higher arsenic water. The high arsenic waters are characterized by the small amounts of calcium and magnesium in relation to that of sodium, a high content of boron, and a high pH. Water from some hot springs in other areas of Oregon was found to range as high as 900 ppb arsenic. Arsenic blood levels ranged from 32 ppb for people living in areas where water is low in arsenic to 250 ppb for those living in areas where water is known to contain high levels of arsenic. Some health problems associated with consumption of arsenic-rich water are discussed. PMID:908291

  20. State of Oregon 4th biennial energy plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    State law directs the Oregon Department of Energy (ODOE) to prepare an energy plan every two years. This is the Fourth Biennial Energy Plan. The Plan is a policy blueprint for how to best meet Oregon's future energy needs. It identifies the key energy issues facing the state and sets forth policies and actions to achieve our energy goals of reliable, least-cost, and environmentally safe supply. This book presents: Oregon's demand and supply picture today. The progress Oregon has made toward energy efficiency. Oregon's energy demand and supply outlook for the next 20 years. Estimates of cost-effective conservation and other resources that could contribute to the state's energy supply. The major energy-related health, safety, and environmental issues facing the state. A strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 20 percent from 1988 levels by 2005. A two-year Action Plant that spells out ODOE's recommended actions for achieving Oregon's energy goals.

  1. Wind Resource Mapping for United States Offshore Areas: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.

    2006-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is producing validated wind resource maps for priority offshore regions of the United States. This report describes the methodology used to validate the maps and to build a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) database to classify the offshore wind resource by state, water depth, distance from shore, and administrative unit.

  2. Mineral resources of the Tunnison Mountain Wilderness Study Area, Lassen County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.A.; Frisken, J.G.; Plouff, D.; Goeldner, C.A.; Munts, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    The part of the Tunnison Mountain Wilderness Study Area requested for mineral surveys encompasses 8,445 acres in northeastern California. The area contains Tertiary pyroclastic rocks, basaltic andesite flows, and basalt flows. There are no identified resources and it is unlikely that metallic minerals or oil and gas are present. Geothermal areas south and southwest of the study area suggest that the area may have potential for geothermal energy resources. Therefore, it has been assigned low potential for such resources; however, the mountainous geologic terrane differs from the sediment-filled valleys where the known resources are located.

  3. Using Mosix for Wide-Area Compuational Resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maddox, Brian G.

    2004-01-01

    One of the problems with using traditional Beowulf-type distributed processing clusters is that they require an investment in dedicated computer resources. These resources are usually needed in addition to pre-existing ones such as desktop computers and file servers. Mosix is a series of modifications to the Linux kernel that creates a virtual computer, featuring automatic load balancing by migrating processes from heavily loaded nodes to less used ones. An extension of the Beowulf concept is to run a Mosixenabled Linux kernel on a large number of computer resources in an organization. This configuration would provide a very large amount of computational resources based on pre-existing equipment. The advantage of this method is that it provides much more processing power than a traditional Beowulf cluster without the added costs of dedicating resources.

  4. Mineral resources of the Henry's Lake Wilderness Study Area, Fremont County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Tysdal, R.G.; Kulik, D.M.; Peters, T.J.

    1988-06-10

    A mineral-resource survey of the 350-acre Henry's Lake Wilderness Study Area (ID-035-077) was made in 1986-87. No identified resources (known) or currently active claims exist within or adjacent to the wilderness study area. There is potential for several types of undiscovered mineral resources within the study area. The southwestern part of the wilderness study area, along the Madison Range fault, is rated as having a moderate energy-resource potential for geothermal water; the remainder of the study area has a low potential for resources of this commodity. A small outcrop of marble in the southernmost part of the study area has a low mineral-resource potential for talc; for talc in marble possibly concealed beneath the study area the mineral-resource potential is rated as unknown. The study area has a low mineral-resource potential for iron in hematite-mineralized amphibolite gneiss, and for gold, silver, and uranium. The area has no mineral-resource potential for phosphate, because the host strata have been eroded; and no resource potential for oil and gas.

  5. 76 FR 62819 - Notice of Intent To Amend the Resource Management Plan for the San Luis Resource Area, Colorado...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Intent To Amend the Resource Management Plan for the San Luis Resource Area, Colorado, and Associated Environmental Assessment AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management..., the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) San Luis Valley Public Lands Center, Monte Vista,...

  6. Geological Studies of the Salmon River Suture Zone and Adjoining Areas, West-Central Idaho and Eastern Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuntz, Mel A., (Edited By); Snee, Lawrence W.

    2007-01-01

    The papers in this volume describe petrologic, structural, and geochemical studies related to geographic areas adjacent to and including the Salmon River suture zone. We therefore start this volume by defining and giving a general description of that suture zone. The western margin of the North American continent was the setting for complex terrane accretion and large-scale terrane translation during Late Cretaceous and Eocene time. In western Idaho, the boundary that separates the Paleozoic-Mesozoic accreted oceanic, island-arc rocks on the west from Precambrian continental metamorphic and sedimentary rocks on the east is called the Salmon River suture zone (SRSZ). Readers will note that the term 'Salmon River suture zone' is used in the title of this volume and in the text of several of the papers and the term 'western Idaho suture zone' is used in several other papers in this volume. Both terms refer to the same geologic feature and reflect historical usage and custom; thus no attempt has been made by the editors to impose or demand a single term by the various authors of this volume. The suture zone is marked by strong lithologic and chemical differences. Rocks adjacent to the suture zone are characterized by high-grade metamorphism and much structural deformation. In addition, the zone was the locus of emplacement of plutons ranging in composition from tonalite to monzogranite during and after the final stages of accretion of the oceanic terrane to the North American continent. The contents of this paper consists of seven chapters.

  7. Mineral and Energy Resources of the Roswell Resource Area, East-Central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartsch-Winkler, Susan B., (Edited By); Donatich, Alessandro J.

    1995-01-01

    The sedimentary formations of the Roswell Resource Area have significant mineral and energy resources. Some of the pre-Pennsylvanian sequences in the Northwestern Shelf of the Permian Basin are oil and gas reservoirs, and Pennsylvanian rocks in Tucumcari Basin are reservoirs of oil and gas as well as source rocks for oil and gas in Triassic rocks. Pre-Permian rocks also contain minor deposits of uranium and vanadium, limestone, and gases. Hydrocarbon reservoirs in Permian rocks include associated gases such as carbon dioxide, helium, and nitrogen. Permian rocks are mineralized adjacent to the Lincoln County porphyry belt, and include deposits of copper, uranium, manganese, iron, polymetallic veins, and Mississippi-Valley-type lead-zinc. Industrial minerals in Permian rocks include fluorite, barite, potash, halite, polyhalite, gypsum, anhydrite, sulfur, limestone, dolomite, brine deposits (iodine and bromine), aggregate (sand), and dimension stone. Doubly terminated quartz crystals, called 'Pecos diamonds' and collected as mineral specimens, occur in Permian rocks along the Pecos River. Mesozoic sedimentary rocks are hosts for copper, uranium, and small quantities of gold-silver-tellurium veins, as well as significant deposits of oil and gas, carbon dioxide, asphalt, coal, and dimension stone. Mesozoic rocks contain limited amounts of limestone, gypsum, petrified wood, and clay. Tertiary rocks host ore deposits commonly associated with intrusive rocks, including platinum-group elements, iron skarns, manganese, uranium and vanadium, molybdenum, polymetallic vein deposits, gold-silver-tellurium veins, and thorium-rare-earth veins. Museum-quality quartz crystals are associated with Tertiary intrusive rocks. Industrial minerals in Tertiary rocks include fluorite, vein- and bedded-barite, caliche, limestone, and aggregate. Tertiary and Quaternary sediments host important placer deposits of gold and titanium, and occurrences of silver and uranium. Important industrial

  8. The 3D Elevation Program: summary for Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carswell, William J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Elevation data are essential to a broad range of business uses, including forest resources management, wildlife and habitat management, national security, recreation, and many others. In the State of Oregon, elevation data are critical for river and stream resource management; forest resources management; water supply and quality; infrastructure and construction management; wildfire management, planning and response; natural resources conservation; and other business uses. Today, high-density light detection and ranging (lidar) data are the primary source for deriving elevation models and other datasets. The Oregon Lidar Consortium (OLC), led by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI), has developed partnerships with Federal, State, Tribal, and local agencies to acquire quality level 1 data in areas of shared interest. The goal of OLC partners is to acquire consistent, high-resolution and high-quality statewide coverage to support existing and emerging applications enabled by lidar data. The National Enhanced Elevation Assessment evaluated multiple elevation data acquisition options to determine the optimal data quality and data replacement cycle relative to cost to meet the identified requirements of the user community. The evaluation demonstrated that lidar acquisition at quality level 2 for the conterminous United States and quality level 5 ifsar data for Alaska with a 6- to 10-year acquisition cycle provided the highest benefit/cost ratios. The 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) initiative selected an 8-year acquisition cycle for the respective quality levels. 3DEP, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Office of Management and Budget Circular A–16 lead agency for terrestrial elevation data, responds to the growing need for high-quality topographic data and a wide range of other 3D representations of the Nation’s natural and constructed features.

  9. Wilderness study area, mineral resources of the Sleeping Giant, Lewis and Clark County, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Tysdal, G.; Reynold, M.W.; Carlson, R.R.; Kleinkopf, M.D.; Rowan, L.C. ); Peters, T.J. )

    1991-01-01

    A Mineral resource survey was conducted in 1987 by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mines to evaluate mineral resources (known) and mineral resource potential (undiscovered) of the Sleeping Giant Wilderness Study Area (MT-075-111) in Lewis and Clark County, Montana. The only economic resource in the study area is an inferred 1.35-million-ton reserve of decorative stone (slate); a small gold placer resource is subeconomic. A high resource potential for decorative slate exists directly adjacent to the area of identified slate resource and in the northeastern part of the study area. The rest of the study area has a low potential for decorative slate. The westernmost part of the study area has a moderate resource potential for copper and associated silver in state-bound deposits in green beds and limestone; potential is low in the rest of the study are. The study area has a low resource potential for sapphires in placer deposits, gold in placer deposits (exclusive of subeconomic resource mentioned above), phosphate in the Spokane Formation, diatomite in lake deposits, uranium, oil, gas, geothermal energy, and no resource potential for phosphate in the Phosphoria Formation.

  10. Mineral resources of the Prospect Mountain Wilderness Study Area, Carbon County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    du Bray, E.A.; Bankey, V.; Hill, R.H.; Ryan, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    The Prospect Mountain Wilderness Study Area is about 20 mi east-southeast of Encampment in Carbon County, Wyoming. This study area is underlain by middle Proterozoic gabbro, granite, and hornblende gneiss, which is locally cut by pegmatite dikes. There are no identified resources and no potential for undiscovered energy resources in this study area. Resource potential for all undiscovered metallic commodities and for industrial mineral is low.

  11. Do Children in Rural Areas Still Have Different Access to Health Care? Results from a Statewide Survey of Oregon's Food Stamp Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devoe, Jennifer E.; Krois, Lisa; Stenger, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if rural residence is independently associated with different access to health care services for children eligible for public health insurance. Methods: We conducted a mail-return survey of 10,175 families randomly selected from Oregon's food stamp population (46% rural and 54% urban). With a response rate of 31%, we used a…

  12. AN EVALUATION OF LOCAL EDUCATIONAL EXTENSION TELEVISION PROGRAMS BY RURAL PEOPLE AND AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION AGENTS IN THE METROPOLITAN AREA OF PORTLAND, OREGON.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BARON, LLOYD C.

    OBJECTIVES OF THIS STUDY WERE TO DETERMINE THE EXTENT TO WHICH SELECTED GROUPS OF RURAL PEOPLE IN METROPOLITAN PORTLAND, OREGON, VIEWED AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION TELECASTS ON PORTLAND COMMERCIAL STATIONS AND USED THE INFORMATION GAINED TO GET SUGGESTIONS FOR IMPROVING THE SCHEDULING, TYPES, AND CONTENT OF FUTURE PROGRAMS. QUESTIONNAIRES WERE SENT TO…

  13. Summary of the mineral- and energy-resource endowment, BLM roswell resource area, east-central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartsch-Winkler, S.; Sutphin, D.M.; Ball, M.M.; Korzeb, S.L.; Kness, R.F.; Dutchover, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    In this summary of two comprehensive resource reports produced by the U.S. Bureau of Mines and the U.S. Geological Survey for the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, we discuss the mineral- and energyresource endowment of the 14-millon-acre Roswell Resource Area, New Mexico, managed by the Bureau of Land Management. The Bureau and Survey reports result from separate studies that are compilations of published and unpublished data and integrate new findings on the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, mineral, industrial, and energy commodities, and resources for the seven-county area. The reports have been used by the Bureau of Land Management in preparation of the Roswell Resource Area Resource Management Plan, and will have future use in nationwide mineral- and energy-resource inventories and assessments, as reference and training documents, and as public-information tools. In the Roswell Resource Area, many metals, industrial mineral commodities, and energy resources are being, or have been, produced or prospected. These include metals and high-technology materials, such as copper, gold, silver, thorium, uranium and/or vanadium, rare-earth element minerals, iron, manganese, tungsten, lead, zinc, and molybdenum; industrial mineral resources, including barite, limestone/dolomite, caliche, clay, fluorspar, gypsum, scoria, aggregate, and sand and gravel; and fuels and associated resources, such as oil, gas, tar sand and heavy oil, coal, and gases associated with hydrocarbons. Other commodities that have yet to be identified in economic concentrations include potash, halite, polyhalite, anhydrite, sulfur, feldspar, building stone and decorative rock, brines, various gases associated with oil and gas exploration, and carbon dioxide. ?? 1993 Oxford University Press.

  14. The application of remotely sensed data in support of emergency rehabilitation of wildfire-damage areas. [Bridge Creek fire area, Deschutes National Forest, Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaacson, D. L.; Smith, H. G.; Alexander, C. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The depth, texture, and water holding capacity of the soil before the fire in the Bridge Creek area of Deschutes National Forest (1979) were determined from available aerial photography and LANDSAT MSS digital data. Three days after the fire was out, complete coverage of the burned area was acquired on 35 mm color infrared film from a near vertical or low oblique perspective. These photographs were used in assessing the condition of vegetation, and in predicting the likelihood of survival. Negatives from vertical natural photography obtained during the same flight were used to produce 3R prints from which large scale mosaics of the entire burned area were obtained. LANDSAT MSS data obtained on the day the fire was under control were used to evaluate vegetative vigor (by calculating a band 7/band 5 ratio value for each spectral class) and to determine the boundary between altered and unaltered land.

  15. Mineral resources of the Mt. Hillers Wilderness Study Area, Garfield County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Dubiel, R.F.; Bromfield, C.S.; Church, S.E.; Kemp, W.M.; Larson, M.J.; Peterson, F. ); Neubert, J.T. )

    1988-01-01

    Geologic mapping, sedimentologic studies, and geochemical analyses indicate that the eastern half of the Mt. Hillers Wilderness Study Area has a high resource potential for uranium and vanadium and a low resource potential for other metals and coal. The central part of the study area has a moderate potential for base and precious metals. The western part of the study area has a moderate resource potential for coal and uranium and vanadium and a low resource potential for all other metals. Inferred subeconomic resources of sand and gravel and stone present in the study area have no unique qualities and are not likely to be developed. The entire wilderness study area has low resource potential for oil and gas and geothermal energy.

  16. Natural resource economic implications of geothermal area use

    SciTech Connect

    Darby, d'E Charles

    1993-01-28

    Large-scale use of geothermal energy is likely to result in depletion of natural resources that support both biodiversity and other human uses. Most of the problems could be averted with competent planning and adherence to agreed conditions, but they commonly develop because they are not perceived to be directly geothermal in origin and hence are not taken into account adequately. Some of the implications of such issues are discussed below, with particular reference to countries where all or most resources are held under traditional principals of custom ownership.

  17. Oregon Trail Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Park Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The road to the U.S. West, known as the Oregon Trail, had its first real traffic in 1843 when a group of about 1000 people left Independence, Missouri and traveled west. This teacher's guide contains short descriptions of the main landmarks and stopping points that were significant along the northwest portion of the Oregon Trail. The guide is…

  18. Biological science in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorsteinson, Lyman

    2005-01-01

    Fishing is an important part of Oregon's culture. The Western Fisheries Research Center (WFRC) has been conducting research in Oregon for many years to provide information that can be used by managers to help keep fish and other parts of the ecosystem healthy. Below are examples of some of WFRC's studies.

  19. Mineral resources of the Tunnison Mountains Wilderness Study Area, Lassen County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.A.; Friskin, J.G.; Plouff, D.; Goeldner, C.A. ); Munts, S.R. )

    1988-01-01

    The part of the Tunnison Mountain Wilderness Study Area requested for mineral surveys encompasses 8,445 acres in northeastern California. The area contains Tertiary pyroclastic rocks, basaltic andesite flows, and basalt flows. There are no identified resources and it is unlikely that metallic minerals or oil and gas are present. Geothermal areas south and southwest of the study area suggest that the area may have potential for geothermal energy sources. Therefore, it has been assigned low potential for such resources; however, the mountainous geologic terrane differs from the sediment-filled valleys where the known resources are located.

  20. University of Oregon: GPS-based Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Vignola, F.; Andreas, A.

    2013-08-22

    A partnership with the University of Oregon and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) data to compliment existing resource assessment data collection by the university.

  1. Mineral resources of the Lost Spring Canyon wilderness study area, Grand County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Soulliere, S.J.; Lee, G.K.; Case, J.E.; Gese, D.D.

    1988-01-01

    This book discusses the Lost Spring Canyon Wilderness Study Area which is about 15 miles north of Moab, Utah, and covers 3,880 acres adjacent to Arches National Park. Investigations by the U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Bureau of Mines conclude that the study area has no identified economic mineral resources, but has inferred subeconomic resources of sandstone and sand and gravel. There is a moderate energy resource potential for undiscovered oil and gas, potash, and halite, and a low resource potential for undiscovered geothermal resources and all metals, including uranium and manganese.

  2. Managing coastal area resources by stated choice experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Wirtz, Kai W.

    2010-02-01

    In many coastal regions, oil spills can be considered as one of the most important and certainly the most noticeable forms of marine pollution. Efficient contingency management responding to oil spills on waters, which aims at minimizing pollution effects on coastal resources, turns out to be critically important. Such a decision making highly depends on the importance attributed to different coastal economic and ecological resources. Economic uses can, in principal, be addressed by standard measures such as value added. However, there is a missing of market in the real world for natural goods. Coastal resources such as waters and beach cannot be directly measured in money terms, which increases the risk of being neglected in a decision making process. This paper evaluates these natural goods of coastal environment in a hypothetical market by employing stated choice experiments. Oil spill management practice in German North Sea is used as an example. Results from a pilot survey show that during a combat process, beach and eider ducks are of key concerns for households. An environmental friendly combat option has to be a minor cost for households. Moreover, households with less children, higher monthly income and a membership of environmental organization are more likely to state that they are willing to pay for combat option to prevent coastal resources from an oil pollution. Despite that choice experiments require knowledge of designing questionnaire and statistical skills to deal with discrete choices and conducting a survey is time consumed, the results have important implications for oil spill contingency management. Overall, such a stated preference method can offer useful information for decision makers to consider coastal resources into a decision making process and can further contribute to finding a cost-effective oil preventive measure, also has a wide application potential in the field of Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM).

  3. Mineral resources of the Sweetwater Canyon Wilderness Study Area, Fremont County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Day, W.C.; Hill, R.H.; Kulik, D.M.; Scott, D.C.; Hausel, W.D.

    1988-01-01

    The combined investigations of the US Geological Survey, the US Bureau of Mines, and the Geological Survey of Wyoming have identified gold resources in a lode-type gold vein west of the Sweetwater Canyon Wilderness Study Area in the adjacent Lewiston mining district. Extensions of this vein into the study area may contain 20,000 tons of gold resources; however, subsurface sampling is needed to determine if such resources are present in the study area. A high resource potential for placer-type gold deposits and a low resource potential for placer-type tin and tungsten deposits in the Quaternary gravels along the Sweetwater River and Strawberry Creek exists. In the Precambrian greenstone rocks of the western part of the study area, there is a high mineral resource potential for lode-type gold and a low resource potential for lode-type tin and tungsten deposits. In the Precambrian granitoid rocks of the eastern part of the study area, a low potential for lode-type tin and tungsten exists, and in the entire study area, a low resource potential for uranium exists. There is no resource potential for oil, gas, or geothermal energy in the entire study area.

  4. Mineral resources of the Scorpion Wilderness study area, Garfield and Kane counties, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch-Winkler, S.; Jones, J.L.; Kilburn, J.E.; Cady, J.W.; Duval, J.S.; Cook, K.L. ); Lane, M.E.; Corbetta, P.A. )

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the Scorpion Wilderness Study Area which covers 14,978 acres in south- central Utah in Garfield and Kane counties. No mining claims or oil and gas leases or lease applications extend inside this study-area boundary. Demonstrated subeconomic resources of less than 30,000 tons of gypsum are in this study area. The mineral resource potential is low for undiscovered gypsum in the Carmel Formation, for undiscovered uranium in the Chinle Formation in the subsurface, and for undiscovered metals other than uranium. The energy resource potential is low for geothermal resources and is moderate for oil, gas, and carbon dioxide.

  5. Mineral resources of the Petaca Pinta wilderness study area, Cibola County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, C.H.; Nowlan, G.A.; Bankey, V.; Hannigan, B.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the Petaca Pinta Wilderness Study Area in west-central New Mexico (11,688 acres) which is a small mesa with near-vertical 300-ft cliffs of Jurassic-age and Cretaceous-age sandstone overlying Triassic-age shale that forms steep slopes. This study area contains no identified metallic mineral resources but has inferred subeconomic resources of sandstone and sand. This study area has a low resource potential for undiscovered deposits of metals, including uranium, and has a moderate resource potential for the occurrence of oil and gas.

  6. Mineral resources of the Bobcat Draw Badlands Wilderness Study Area, Bir Horn and Washakie Counties, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, A.B.; Carlson, R.R.; Kulik, D.M.; Lundby, W.

    1989-01-01

    The Bobcat Draw Wilderness Study Area is in the Bighorn Basin about 45 mi west of Worland, Wyoming, and is underlain by early Tertiary sedimentary rocks. No resources were identified in this study area, which lacks mines or prospects, but is mostly under lease for oil and gas. This study area has a high potential for oil and gas and for subeconomic resources of coal and a moderate potential for a deep-seated geothermal energy resource. The resource potential for oil shale and metals, including uranium, is low.

  7. Mineral resources of the Rockhouse Wilderness Study Area, Kern and Tulare Counties, California

    SciTech Connect

    Diggles, M.F.; Jachens, R.C.; Peters, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    The Rockhouse Wilderness Study Area has an identified inferred marginal economic resource of turquoise at the Blue Gem prospect and has six areas of mineral resource potential. There is potential for undiscovered resources of the following commodities: turquoise (high, moderate, and low potential); tungsten and molybdenum (moderate); and barite, silver, arsenic, lead, antimony, and zinc (low). Host rocks for the minerals are Mesozoic granitic rocks of the Sierra Nevada batholith and Paleozoic and (or) Mesozoic metamorphic roof-remnant rocks. The area has no geothermal energy or oil and gas resource potential.

  8. Geologic Reconnaissance of the Antelope-Ashwood Area, North-Central Oregon: With Emphasis on the John Day Formation of Late Oligocene and Early Miocene Age

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, Dallas L.

    1964-01-01

    This report briefly describes the geology of an area of about 750 square miles in Jefferson, Wasco, Crook, and Wheeler Counties, Oregon. About 16,000 feet of strata that range in age from pre-Tertiary to Quaternary are exposed. These include the following units: pre-Tertiary slate, graywacke, conglomerate, and meta-andesite; Clarno Formation of Eocene age - lava flows, volcanic breccia, tuff, and tuffaceous mudstone, chiefly of andesitic composition; John Day Formation of late Oligocene and early Miocene age - pyroclastic rocks, flows, and domes, chiefly of rhyolitic composition; Columbia River Basalt of middle Miocene age - thick, columnar jointed flows of very fine grained dense dark-gray basalt; Dalles Formation of Pliocene age - bedded tuffaceous sandstone, siltstone, and conglomerate; basalt of Pliocene or Pleistocene age - lava flows of porous-textured olivine basalt; and Quaternary loess, landslide debris, and alluvium. Unconformities separate pre-Tertiary rocks and Clarno Formation, Clarno and John Day Formations, John Day Formation and Columbia River Basalt, and Columbia River Basalt and Dalles Formation. The John Day Formation, the only unit studied in detail, consists of about 4,000 feet of tuff, lapilli tuff, strongly to weakly welded rhyolite ash flows, and less abundant trachyandesite flows and rhyolite flows and domes. The formation was divided into nine mappable members in part of the area, primarily on the basis of distinctive ledge-forming welded ash-flow sheets. Most of the sheets are composed of stony rhyolite containing abundant lithophysae and sparse phenocrysts. One sheet contains 10 to 20 percent phenocrysts, mostly cryptoperthitic soda sanidine, but including less abundant quartz, myrmekitic intergrowths of quartz and sanidine, and oligoclase. The rhyolitic ash flows and lava flows were extruded from nearby vents, in contrast to some of the interbedded air-fall tuff and lapilli tuff of dacitic and andesitic composition that may have been

  9. Mineral resources of the Kofa Unit 4 North Wilderness Study Area, Yuma County, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrod, D.R.; Smith, D.B.; Kleinkopf, M.D.; Gese, D.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Kofa Unit 4 North Wilderness Study Area (AZ-050-033) is located in Yuma County, southwestern Arizona. At the request of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, 1,380 acres of the Kofa Unit 4 North Wilderness Study Area were evaluated for mineral resources (known) and mineral resource potential (undiscovered). Throughout the report, reference to the Kofa Unit 4 North Wilderness Study Area or to the study area refers only to that part of the wilderness study area for which mineral surveys were requested by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. Low resource potential for geothermal energy exists northwest of the range-bounding faults of the study area. The study area has no resource potential for oil or gas.

  10. Mineral resources of the Fiddler Butte (East) Wilderness study area, Garfield County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Dubiel, R.F.; Lee, G.K.; OrKild, P.P. ); Gese, D.D. )

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the Fiddler Butte (East) Wilderness Study Area which comprises 5,700 acres east of the Henry Mountains, Garfield County, Utah, between the Dirty Devil River and the Colorado River. Field and laboratory studies investigated the identified (known) resources and the mineral resource potential (undiscovered resources). This study area has identified resources of tar sands (heavy oil-impregnated sandstones) in the northeastern part of the study area; an inferred subeconomic resource of high-magnesium dolomite within the Navajo Sandstone; inferred subeconomic resources of the common variety materials, sand, gravel, and stone; and petrified wood suitable for collecting and polishing. The southwestern part of the study area has a moderate mineral resource potential for undiscovered tar sands as localized deposits within the White Rim Sandstone. This entire study area has a moderate resource potential for undiscovered uranium and vanadium, for oil and gas, and for small isolated occurrences of precious (gold and silver) metals, and a low resource potential for geothermal resources and other undiscovered metals.

  11. Cyclic deposits and hummocky cross-stratification of probable storm origins in Upper Cretaceous rocks of the Cape Sebastian area, southwestern Oregon.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, R.E.; Clifton, H.

    1982-01-01

    Cyclic deposits containing hummocky cross-stratification occur in the upper part of the Cape Sebastian Sandstone, a shallow marine transgressive sandstone of Late Cretaceous age on the southern Oregon coast. The cycles consist, where complete, of a lower hummocky cross-stratified sandstone, a middle planar- and ripple-bedded sandstone with a shale bed in its middle part, and an upper bioturbated sandstone. Depositional conditions are interpreted from the characteristics of these cycles. -from Authors

  12. Mineral resources of the Spring Creek Canyon Wilderness Study Area, Iron County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Van Loenen, R.E.; Blank, H.R. Jr.; Sable, E.G.; Lee, G.K.; Cook, K.L.; Zelten, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    In 1986 and 1987 the US Geological Survey and the US Bureau of Mines appraised the mineral resources and the mineral resource potential of the Spring Creek Canyon Wilderness Study Area in southwestern Utah. This study area contains principally Mesozoic sedimentary rocks exposed along the Hurricane Fault and in canyons adjacent to Zion National Park. Inferred subeconomic resources of common variety sand, sandstone, and limestone occur in this study area. The Spring Creek Canyon Wilderness Study Area has a moderate potential for undiscovered resources of oil and gas in small fields. This study area has a low potential for all metals (including copper, silver, and uranium) and geothermal resources. There is no potential for coal or gypsum.

  13. Analysis of Water Resource Utilization Potential for Jiangsu Coastal Area ' in Nantong City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Li; Liu, Jin-Tao; Ni, Jian-Jun

    2015-04-01

    Along with the advance of the growth of population and social economy, requirements for water quality and quantity in coastal areas is getting higher and higher, but due to the uneven distribution of rainfall years and water exploitation, use and management level, the influence of the shortage of water resources is increasingly prominent, seriously restricting the social and economic sustainable development in this region. Accordingly, water resource utilization potential in Jiangsu coastal region is vital for water security in the region. Taking Nantong City as the study area, the regional water resources development and utilization status were evaluated. In this paper, the meaning of water resources, water resources development and utilization, and water resources development and utilization of the three stages of concepts such as system were discussed. Then the development and utilization of regional water resource evaluation were carried out, and the significance of regional society, economy, resources and environment and its development status quo of water resources were exploited. According to conditions and area source, an evaluation index system for development and utilization of water resources of Nantong was built up. The index layer was composed of 16 indicators. In this study, analytic hierarchy process (AHP) was used to determine of weights of indicators at all levels in the index system. Multistage fuzzy comprehensive evaluation model was selected to evaluate the water resources development and utilization status of Nantong, and then water resource utilization potential of Nantong was analyzed.

  14. Mineral resources of the Encampment River Canyon Wilderness Study Area, Carbon County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    du Bray, E.A.; Bankey, V.; Hill, R.H.; Ryan, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    The Encampment River Canyon Wilderness Study Area is about 4 mi south of Encampment, in Carbon County, Wyoming. This study area is underlain by Archean felsic gneiss and early Proterozoic quartzite; both are intruded by minor middle Proterozoic mafic plutonic rock. Gneiss occurs throughout the eastern and northwestern parts of the study area; whereas, quartzite occurs in the western and southwestern parts. This study area has no identified resources and no potential for energy resources. Resource potential for all undiscovered metallic commodities and for undiscovered industrial minerals is low.

  15. The New Oregon Trail: Accountability for Results. Special Report #7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Anne; Dunkle, Margaret

    This report was designed to help policy makers and concerned citizens understand the context, culture, and history that set the stage for Oregon's efforts to reform state government, including those areas of government that affect education. This text offers a "snapshot" of what Oregon is doing to improve results, such as setting benchmarks to…

  16. Guidelines for Personnel Policy Formulation in the Oregon Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Board of Education, Salem.

    In order to insure a measure of consistency in the area of personnel relations, while retaining the flexibility necessary to meet local needs, the Oregon Board of Education has published this list of guidelines for personnel policy formulation in the Oregon community colleges. Based on statutory authority, the guidebook outlines required personnel…

  17. Connecting Rural Oregon Libraries to the Internet, or "Will it Fit in My Car?".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Cheryl; Cross, Judy

    1998-01-01

    Describes Jumpstart, a Web site providing remote access to government information in CD-ROM format, developed by Oregon State University's Valley Library, as a joint venture with the Oregon State Library and the Portland Area Library System to provide hardware, software, and training to rural school and public libraries in Oregon that have limited…

  18. Survey of potential geopressured resource areas in California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyal, S.K.; Robertson-Tait, A.; Kraemer, M.; Buening, N.

    1993-03-01

    This paper presents the initial results of a survey of the occurrence and characteristics of geopressured fluid resources in California using the publicly- available database involving more than 150,000 oil and gas wells drilled in the State. Of the 975 documented on-shore oil and gas pools studied, about 42% were identified as potentially geopressured. Geothermal gradients in California oil and gas fields lie within the normal range of 1 F to 2 F per 100 feet. Except for the Los Angeles Basin, there was no evidence of higher temperatures or temperature gradients in geopressured pools.

  19. Evaluation of Baltazor known geothermal resources area, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isherwood, W.F.; Mabey, D.R.

    1978-01-01

    By virtue of the Geothermal Steam Act of 1970, the U.S. Geological Survey is required to appraise geothermal resources of the United States prior to competitive lease sales. This appraisal involves coordinated input from a variety of disciplines, starting with reconnaissance geology and geophysics. This paper describes how the results of several geophysical methods used in KGRA evaluation were interpreted by the authors, two geophysicists, involved with both the Evaluation Committee and the research program responsible for obtaining and interpreting the geophysical data to be used by the committee. ?? 1979.

  20. Mineral resources of the Wah Wah Mountains Wilderness Study Area, Beaver and Millard Counties, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, L.J.; Duttweiler, K.A.; Campbell, D.L.; Duval, J.S.; Podwysocki, M.H.; Bankey, V.; Cook, K.L.; Brown, S.D.

    1989-01-01

    The Wah Wah Mountains Wilderness Study Area is in western Utah about 32 mi west of Milford, Utah, and 43 mi east of Garrison, Nevada. This study area consists mostly of Paleozoic carbonate rocks in a block-faulted mountain range. Tertiary volcanic rocks crop out in the northern and southern parts of this study area. The rock outcrops at the southern end of this study area lie within the contact-metamorphic aureole of several Tertiary dioritic and rhyolitic stocks exposed south of this study area. Identified resources with industrial or agricultural applications include inferred subeconomic resources of limestone, dolomite, sandstone, quartzite, and volcanic rock. Inferred subeconomic iron-rich material was also identified at two small iron prospects along the southwestern study-area boundary. Several areas in the southern part of the wilderness study area have a moderate mineral resource potential for undiscovered antimony, zinc, cadmium, and tungsten, associated in places with molybdenum, arsenic, lead, bismuth, and gold in replacement bodies and veins of several types. The rest of this study area has a low mineral resource potential for these metals. This study area has a moderate energy resource potential for oil and natural gas, and a low energy resource potential for uranium and geothermal energy.

  1. Geothermal resource assessment of Canon City, Colorado Area

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharakis, Ted G.; Pearl, Richard Howard

    1982-01-01

    In 1979 a program was initiated to fully define the geothermal conditions of an area east of Canon City, bounded by the mountains on the north and west, the Arkansas River on the south and Colorado Highway 115 on the east. Within this area are a number of thermal springs and wells in two distinct groups. The eastern group consists of 5 thermal artesian wells located within one mile of Colorado Highway 115 from Penrose on the north to the Arkansas river on the south. The western group, located in and adjacent to Canon City, consists of one thermal spring on the south bank of the Arkansas River on the west side of Canon City, a thermal well in the northeast corner of Canon City, another well along the banks of Four Mile Creek east of Canon City and a well north of Canon City on Four Mile Creek. All the thermal waters in the Canon City Embayment, of which the study area is part of, are found in the study area. The thermal waters unlike the cold ground waters of the Canon City Embayment, are a calcium-bicarbonate type and range in temperature from 79 F (26 C) to a high of 108 F (42 C). The total combined surface discharge o fall the thermal water in the study area is in excess of 532 acre feet (A.F.) per year.

  2. Protection of ground water resources in an industrialized area by hydraulic control

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, D.E.; Eiche, G.E.; Rosenthal, G.; Miller, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    Historical releases of trichloroethene from at least two manufacturing facilities in Multnomah County, Oregon, have impacted a regional aquifer composed of vitric sandstone overlying basaltic conglomerate. This aquifer is part of a complex multi-aquifer system formed by lahars from the Cascade Mountains, catastrophic Missoula floods, and other fluvial processes in the Columbia river basin. Numerous facies changes and other complicating factors, including fractures, faults, and folds, complicate the hydrogeology. The city of Portland has 22 production wells in five aquifers to back up surface water supplies. The Portland water utility supplies a population of approximately 750,000 with a normal demand of 100 million gallons per day (MGD). Chemicals released at the manufacturing facilities in the past have spread downgradient via groundwater flow and commingled to create a plume in the sandstone aquifer. The commingled plume is within 1,500 feet of the closest city well. Two manufacturers implemented a joint interim action plan to protect the well field. This cooperative plan focused on protecting groundwater resources in a highly productive aquifer where five backup wells produce more than half the total estimated well field capacity of 90 MGD. Three extraction wells were installed to hydraulically contain the plume during well field pumping. Used in combination with a detection monitoring program, the resource protection system is protective of the Blue Lake aquifer well field. System expansion will be considered as part of a regional remedy.

  3. Mineral resources of eight wilderness study area bordering Zion National Park, Washington and Kane counties, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Von Loenen, R.E.; Sable, E.G.; Blank, H.R. Jr.; Barton, H.N.; Briggs, P.H. ); Zelten, J.E. ); Cook, K.L. )

    1989-01-01

    The weight wilderness study areas are Orderville Canyon, North Fork Virgin River, Deep Creek, Goose Creek Canyon, Beartrap Canyon, La Verkin Creek Canyon, Taylor Creek Canyon, and Red Butte. The study areas are located on the Kolob Terrace in the canyonlands of southwest Utah. Jurassic sedimentary rocks are exposed in all of the study areas; Cretaceous rocks are present in three of the study areas. The Orderville Canyon, North Fork Virgin River, and Deep Creek study areas have inferred subeconomic resources of gypsum. Inferred subeconomic resources of common-variety sandstone occur in all of the study areas. Inferred subeconomic resources of limestone occur in all but the Red Butte study area. All of the study areas have a moderate potential for oil and gas and a low potential for all metals (including silver and uranium) and geothermal sources.

  4. Mineral resources of the Henry's Lake Wilderness Study Area, Fremont County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Tysdal, R.G. ); Peters, T.J. )

    1988-01-01

    The authors report on the 350-acre Henry's Lake Wilderness Study Area in the southern part of the Madison Range. Fremont County, Idaho, and is about 17 miles north of the hamlet of Islan Park. The southwestern part of the wilderness study area, along the Madison Range Fault, is rated as having a moderate energy resource potential for geothermal water, and the remainder of the study area has a low potential for this resource.

  5. Power resources of Snake River between Huntington, Oregon and Lewiston, Idaho: Chapter C in Contributions to the hydrology of the United States, 1923-1924

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoyt, William Glenn

    1925-01-01

    Thousands of people are familiar with that part of Snake River where it flows for more than 300 miles in a general westward course across the plains of southern Idaho, but few have traversed the river where it flows northward and for 200 miles forms the boundary between Idaho and Oregon and for 30 miles the boundary between Idaho and Washington. Below the mining town of Homestead, Oreg., which is the end of a branch line of the Oregon Short Line Railroad, Snake River finds its way through the mountain ranges that seem to block its way to Columbia River in a canyon which, though not so well known, so majestic, nor so kaleidoscopic in color, is in some respects worthy of comparison with the Grand Canyon of the Colorado, for at some places it is deeper and narrower than the Grand Canyon at El Tovar. The Snake, unlike the Colorado, can be reached at many points through the valleys of tributary streams, and the early prospectors no doubt thoroughly explored all parts of the canyon. To traverse the river between Homestead, Oreg., and Lewiston, Idaho, is, however, a difficult undertaking and there are only a few records of boat journeys through the entire stretch. It has long been known that this portion of Snake River contains large potential water powers, but until recently no detailed surveys or examinations covering the entire stretch of the river had been made to determine their location or extent. A railroad has been proposed between Homestead and Lewiston which would provide a direct connection between the railroad systems of northern and southern Idaho. One function of the Geological Survey is to determine the possible interface between transportation routes on land and potential water-power development, and the information set forth in this paper has a bearing on that problem.

  6. Mineral resources of the Buffalo Hump and Sand Dunes Addition Wilderness Study Areas, Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, A.B.; Barbon, H.N.; Kulik, D.M. ); McDonnell, J.R. Jr. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors present a study to assess the potential for undiscovered mineral resources and appraise the identified resources of the Buffalo Hump and Sand Dunes Addition Wilderness Study Areas, southwestern Wyoming, There are no mines, prospects, or mineralized areas nor any producing oil or gas wells; however, there are occurrences of coal, claystone and shale, and sand. There is a moderate resource potential for oil shale and natural gas and a low resource potential for oil, for metals, including uranium, and for geothermal sources.

  7. Mineral resources of the Redcloud Peak and Handies Peak Wilderness Study Areas, Hinsdale County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, R.F.; Grauch, R.I.; Hon, K.; Bove, D.J.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Korzeb, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    The Redcloud Peak and Handies Peak Wilderness Study Areas are located 2-12 mi southwest of Lake City, CO. Much of the study areas has high mineral resource potential for precious and base metals in various ore deposit types. The rest of the study areas has moderate potential for these commodities. Two areas in the Redcloud Peak study area have moderate potential for molybdenum and copper in quartz monzonite-associated porphyry deposits. Part of the Handies Peak study area has moderate potential for molybdenum in granite-related porphyry deposits. The southwestern part of the Redcloud Peak study area has high potential for uranium in vein-type deposits. Moderate potential for this commodity extends over other parts of both study areas. The mineral resource potential for gold and silver (in clastic-sediment-hosted disseminated-type epithermal deposits) is low in those parts of both study areas underlain by the Henson Member of the Silverton Volcanics. The mineral and energy resource potential for aluminum (in alunite deposits), uranium (in disseminated deposits), and geothermal sources is low throughout both study areas. Based on currently available data, there is no energy resource potential for coal, oil, and natural gas. The study areas have no identified resources.

  8. Carnotite resources of the Calamity group area, Mesa County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stager, Harold K.

    1951-01-01

    The Calamity group area, which includes 28 unpatented Government claims and enclosed fractions of public domain, lies along the east rim of Calamity Mesa, Mesa County, Colo.  From 1915 through 1944, about 10,000 tons of carnotite ore, averaging about 1.0 percent U3O8 and 2.5 percent V2O5, was produced from mines in this group (tons in this report are short tons).  Production from this area from August 1949 to January 1, 1951, totaled 8,100 tons of ore with an average grade of 0.36 percent U3O8 and 1.66 percent V2O5, containing about 58,600 pounds of U3O8 and 268,000 pounds of V2O5.

  9. Ground-water resources of the Lexington, Kentucky, area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faust, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    Ground water in the Lexington, Kentucky, area occurs in Ordovician Limestones in which cavity development is generally limited to about 100 feet below land surface. Some wells produce about 300 gallons per minute in some of the large stream valleys , about 50 gallons per minute in the rolling upland and small stream valleys, and about 5 gallons per minute on hilltops and steep slopes. Many wells throughout the area do not furnish adequate water for domestic supplies because no significant water-bearing openings are penetrated during drilling. Ground-water use is limited mostly to domestic and stock supplies and a few small public supplies. Ground water is generally a calcium bicarbonate type and in places contains sodium chloride and (or) hydrogen sulfide. Bacterial pollution of ground water is widespread because of direct recharge of polluted runoff and streamflow to cavernous limestones. (Woodard-USGS)

  10. Mineral resources of the Raymond Mountain Wilderness Study Area, Lincoln county, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, K.; Evans, J.P.; Hill, R.H.; Bankey, V.; Lane, E.

    1990-01-01

    The paper reports on the Raymond Mountain Wilderness Study Area which encompasses most of the Sublette Range of western Lincoln County, Wyo. The study area consists of upper Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks that form part of the Idaho-Wyoming-Utah overthrust belt. There are no identified mineral or energy resources in the wilderness study area. The study area has moderate energy resource potential for oil and gas. Mineral resource potential for vanadium and phosphate is low because the Phosphoria Formation is deeply buried beneath the wilderness study area and contains unweathered units having low P{sub 2}O{sub 5} values. The mineral resource potential for coal, other metals, including uranium, high-purity limestone or dolostone, and geothermal energy is low.

  11. Mineral resources of the Owl Creek Wilderness Study Area, Hot Springs County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Bove, D.J.; Carlson, R.R.; Kulik, D.M.; Lundby, W.

    1989-01-01

    At the request of the US Bureau of Land Management, 710 acres of the Owl Creek Wilderness Study Area were studied for mineral endowment. Field and laboratory studies were conducted by the US Geological Survey and the US Bureau of Mines. A search of US Bureau of Land Management, State, and County records showed no current or previous mining claim activity and, other than common-variety sand and gravel, no mineral resources were identified during field examination of this study area. Sand and gravel is classified as an inferred subeconomic resource; however, the remoteness of this area precludes much usage of this material. About two-thirds of this study area is under lease for oil and gas. This entire study area has a moderate resource potential for undiscovered oil and gas and a low resource potential for undiscovered metals, coal, zeolites, and geothermal energy.

  12. Mineral resources of the Owl Creek Wilderness Study Area, Hot Springs County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Bove, D.J.; Carlson, R.R.; Kulik, D.M.; Lundby, W.

    1989-01-01

    At the request of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, 710 acres of the Owl Creek Wilderness Study Area were studied for mineral endowment. Field and labortory studies were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mines. A search of U.S. Bureau of Land Management, State, and county records showed no current or previous mining claim activity and, other than common-variety sand and gravel, no mineral resources were identified during field examination of the study area. Sand and gravel is classified as an inferred subeconomic resource; however, the remoteness of the area precludes much usage of the material. About two-thirds of the study area is under lease for oil and gas. The entire study area has moderate resource potential for undiscovered oil and gas and low resource potential for undiscovered metals, coal, zeolites, and geothermal energy.

  13. Water resources of the Ochlockonee River area, Northwest Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascale, Charles A.; Wagner, Jeffry R.

    1982-01-01

    The Ochlockonee River area, in the northwest Florida panhandle, receives an average of 57 inches of rainfall per year. Water use in 1975 averaged 11.4 million gallons per day. Much of the rainfall that is not lost to evaporation enters the surficial sand aquifer, seeps to streams, or enters the water-bearing zone of the upper confining unit above the Floridan aquifer. The water-bearing zone of the upper confining unit is important for rural domestic supplies, storage of water and recharge to the Floridan aquifer. The Floridan aquifer underlies all the area and is the principal source of municipal supplies. The potentiometric surface of the upper part of the Floridan aquifer ranges from about 50 feet higher than that of the middle and lower part of the aquifer in southwestern Gadsden County to about 10 feet higher in southeastern Gadsden County. Saline water occurs naturally at relatively shallow depths within the Floridan aquifer. Stream discharge is about 1,000 million gallons per day; minimum discharge is about 285 million gallons per day. The chemical quality of most streams in the study area is acceptable for most uses. (USGS)

  14. Mineral resources of the Devils Playground and Twin Buttes Wilderness study areas, Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Van Loenen, R.E.; Bryant, W.A. ); Lane, M.E. )

    1991-01-01

    The Devils Playground and Twin Buttes Wilderness Study Areas are contiguous, covering an area totalling 26,800 acres in Southwest Wyoming. The study areas have been withdrawn from mining claim location because of the rich oil shale deposits in the region. In addition, Minerals management Service considers the areas to have moderate development potential for sodium (trona), with as much as 1.2 billion tons of inferred resources. The study areas are classic sites for vertebrate fossils, yielding many thousands of specimens now in museums. Chert beds are common, and it is prized by collectors for its banded appearance. The study area shave a high resource potential for undiscovered natural gas. The study areas have a moderate potential for zeolites. A low potential exists for coal resources (coal is present at great depths) and for undiscovered metallic minerals.

  15. Resource Guide for Field Study of the Cedar Keys Area on Florida's Gulf Coast. Resource Monograph No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Felicia E.

    This resource monograph is one of a series designed as a teaching guide for field studies. Each guide centers around the exploration, observation, and interpretation of a field site in one of the four geological areas of Florida. Incorporated into the guides are many of the subject-matter schemes of the Earth Science Curriculum Program (ESCP) and…

  16. Water resources of the Descanso Area, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duell, L.F., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrologic information was collected during water year 1988 (October 1987 to September 1988) to evaluate the effects of current pumping on groundwater levels in the Descanso area in south-central San Diego County. Water year 1988 was a period of near-normal precipitation and runoff. The groundwater system in the area consists of aquifers in the metamorphic and granitic bedrock and in the overlying regolith (weathered bedrock). Most wells penetrate both aquifers, but the regolith is the source of most water pumped from wells. Groundwater storage in 1988 was estimated to be 800 to 2,000 acre-ft in the regolith and 300 to 3,000 acre-ft in bedrock. Recharge to the groundwater system from infiltration of precipitation and streamflow was estimated to be about 1,000 acre-ft. Pumpage, which was estimated to be 170 acre-ft, had little effect on groundwater storage. Water levels in wells were nearly the same at the end of the water year as at the beginning. Groundwater quality generally was suitable for domestic uses. Concentrations of iron and manganese , although nontoxic, exceeded California maximum contaminant levels for domestic drinking water in some wells. (USGS)

  17. Sustaining Jamaica's forests: The protected areas resource conservation project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berke, Philip R.; Beatley, Timothy

    1995-07-01

    This study examines Jamaica's attempt to protect a tropical forest reserve. The biophysical setting, and the types and magnitude of forest development pressures are reviewed. Next, Jamaica's approach to developing new land-use strategies and compatible environmental protection and economic development programs are examined. Finally, the practical and theoretical implications by which institutions can be designed to encourage planning for sustainable development are reviewed. The implications suggest how to provide an appropriate mix of cooperation and market competition, by which people acting in their own interests accomplish socially equitable economic development, while protecting the environment for the benefit of future generations. The experience illustrates that effective long-term protection of natural areas requires the building of local relationships and support, the development of local economic activities supportive of conservation, the defining of clear boundaries, and significant monitoring and enforcement. Long-term protection of the Blue and John Crow mountains, and other important natural areas of Jamaica, will also require the development of a workable and enforceable system of land-use planning for the island, and adjustments to the economic incentive structure so that sustainable, nonextractive uses of natural capital are placed on equal footing with other economic uses (e.g., coffee production).

  18. Solar Resource Mapping of AL Duqm Industrial Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Hatmi, Yousuf; Tan, C. S.; Al-Yahyai, Sultan al; Al-Badi, Abdullah

    2016-03-01

    The Sultanate of Oman has one of the highest percentages of potential solar radiation in the world, which puts it in an outstanding position to horde electricity generation plants through photovoltaic solar systems. Oman consists of 11 governorates, and each governorate is divided into many Willyiah, which are made up of small villages. Willyiah of Al Duqm is located in Al Wusta Governorate (19°39’42”N 57°42’17”E) in central-eastern Oman. This paper proposes the use of a monthly average hourly diffuse illuminance from meteorological data and from a Geographic Information System (GIS) to identify the best plots suitable for installing photovoltaic solar farms in the Al Duqm Industrial Area. Solar data collected in this study shows that the highest average annual solar radiation data recorded is 5,764 Wh/m2 in the Al Duqm area. Solar radiation data from 2000 to 2012 has been collected for further analysis. The Annual Energy Production (AEP) simulated using ArcGIS ranges between 6,028 Wh/m2 and 3,668 Wh/m2. This shows a very close estimation between simulation results and the data collected from the meteorological department in Oman.

  19. A survey of potential geopressured resource areas in California

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyal, S.K.; Robertson-Tait, A.; Kraemer, M.; Buening, N.

    1993-01-28

    This paper presents the initial results of a survey of the occurrence and characteristics of geopressured fluid resources in California using the publicly-available database involving more than 150,000 oil and gas wells drilled in the State. Of the 975 documented on-shore oil and gas pools studied, about 42% were identified as potentially geopressured. Geothermal gradients in California oil and gas fields lie within the normal range of 1°F to 2°F per 100 feet. Except for the Los Angeles Basin, there was no evidence of higher temperatures or temperature gradients in geopressured pools. The porosity of geopressured pools shows the same normal distribution as for normal pressured pools, with a mode in the range of 20 to 25%. The salinity distribution of both the geopressured and normal pressured pools appear to be bimodal, each with two peak ranges of 0 to 10,000 and 25,000 to 30,000 ppm. Compared to the U.S. Gulf Coast region, geopressured pools in California display much lower water salinities, and therefore, should have a higher solubility for methane. Geopressured pools in California occur in the depth range of less than 1,000 feet to more than 18,000 feet. The modal depth of geopressured pools in California is 2,000 to 4,000 feet, much shallower than that encountered in the Gulf Coast region. The distribution of thickness of geopressured pools is similar to that of normal pressured pools, the majority being less than 250 feet thick. The distributions of the volume of geopressured and normal pressured pools are similar, the modal value being in the range of I to 10 billion cubic feet.

  20. Water resources of the Utica-Rome area, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halberg, Henry N.; Hunt, O.P.; Pauszek, F.H.

    1963-01-01

    The Utica-Rome area is along the Mohawk River and New York State Erie (Barge) Canal about midway between Lake Ontario and Albany. It encompasses about 390 square miles centered around the industrial cities of Utica and Rome. The Mohawk River, its tributary West Canada Creek, and a system of reservoirs and diversions to maintain the flow in the barge-canal system, assure an ample water supply for the foreseeable needs of the area. The water from these sources is generally of good chemical quality requiring little treatment, although that from the Mohawk River is only fair and may require some treatment for sensitive industrial processes. Additional surface water is available from smaller streams in the area, particularly Oriskany and Sauquoit Creeks, but the water from these sources is hard, and has a dissolved-solids content of more than 250 ppm (parts per million). Ground water is available in moderate quantities from unconsolidated sand and gravel deposits in the river valleys and buried bedrock channels, and in small quantities from bedrock formations and less permeable unconsolidated deposits. The quality of water from sand and gravel, and bedrock ranges from good to poor. However, where necessary, the quality can be improved with treatment. The Mohawk River is the source of the largest quantity of water in the area. The flow of the stream below Delta Dam equals or exceeds 108 mgd (million gallons per day) 90 percent of the time, and at Little Falls it equals or exceeds 560 mgd 90 percent of the time. The flow between these two points is increased by additions from Oriskany, Sauquoit, and West Canada Creeks and from many smaller tributary streams. The flow is also increased by diversions from outside the area, from the Black and Chenango Rivers and West Canada Creek for improvement of navigation in the Erie (Barge) Canal, and from West Canada and East Branch Fish Creeks for the public supplies of Utica and Rome. Much of the public-supply water eventually

  1. Water resources of Okaloosa County and adjacent areas, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trapp, Henry; Pascale, C.A.; Foster, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    Okaloosa County, in the northwest Florida panhandle, uses the Floridan aquifer for water supply, although it also has abundant surface water and ground water in the surficial sand-and-gravel aquifer. Water levels have declined locally more than 90 feet in the upper limestone of the Floridan aquifer. The Floridan aquifer is overlain by the Pensacola clay confining bed, and the Bucatunna Clay subdivides it into two limestone units. Water in the upper limestone is generally of good quality. The lower limestone probably contains saline water. Average daily stream discharge is about 2,500 million gallons. Stream discharge does not diminish excessively during droughts, owing to high base runoff. Water levels in the Floridan aquifer will decline as long as pumping increases in the present areas of withdrawal. The decline could be alleviated by redistribution of pumping, artificial recharge, and the use of the sand-and-gravel aquifer or streams. (Woodard-USGS)

  2. Mineral resources and mineral resource potential of the Little Sand Spring Wilderness Study Area, Inyo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Wrucke, C.T.; Werschky, R.S.; Raines, G.L.; Blakely, R.I.; Hoover, D.B.; Miller, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    The Little Sand Spring Wilderness Study Area, located in relatively subdued mountainous terrain that borders the east side of the north end of Death Valley, was studied using geologic, geochemical, remote sensing, and geophysical techniques and mine and prospect surveys to evaluate the potential for mineral resources. The area has a moderate potential for silver in vein deposits, a low potential for the occurrence of gold in disseminated deposits, and a low potential for the occurrence of molybdenum in a molybdenum stockwork deposit. Lithium and nonmetallic commodities consisting of carbonate rock, clay, nitrate, perlite, and pumicite were identified in the wilderness study area, but no evidence of a resource potential for them or for oil and gas was identified. Large quantities of sand and gravel are available for local use. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Mineral resources of the Negro Bill Canyon Wilderness Study Area, Grand County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch-Winkler, S.; Case, J.E.; Barton, A.N.; Cuval, J.S. ); Lane, M.E. )

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on the Negro Bill Canyon (UT-060-138) Wilderness Study Area. It is in southeastern Utah in Grand County southeast of Arches National Monument and covers 7,620 acres. No mineral resources are identified in the study area. Lode mining claims cover the western part of the Negro Bill Canyon Wilderness Study Area; there are no patented claims in the study area. The mineral resource potential for gypsum, potash, halite, and bentonite on the surface and in the subsurface beneath the wilderness study area is high. The energy and mineral resource potential for oil, gas, carbon dioxide, uranium and vanadium on the surface and beneath the wilderness study area is moderate. The potential for helium gas, geothermal sources, and metals other than uranium and vanadium is low.

  4. The Area Resource File (ARF). A Health Professions Planning and Research Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applied Management Sciences, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    This report presents a description and sample products of the Area Resource File (ARF), a computer-based county-specific health resources information system which consolidates U.S. data on the health professions, hospital and nursing home facilities, hospital utilization levels, health professions training, hospital expenditures, Medicare…

  5. A Resource Manual for Career Education in the Des Moines Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake Univ., Des Moines, IA.

    Information contained in this resource manual is designed to help educators become more familiar with career opportunities available to high school graduates in the local (Des Moines) labor market, and employer requirements for entry into these career areas. Fifteen occupational clusters are investigated: Agribusiness and natural resources,…

  6. Mineral resources of the New Water Mountains Wilderness Study Area, La Paz County, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrod, D.R.; Smith, D.B.; Koch, R.D.; Hanna, W.F.; Pitkin, J.A.; Lane, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    The New Water Mountains Wilderness Study Area, situated in La Paz County, west-central Arizona, locally has a moderate resource potential for gold and silver from replacement-type deposits occurring in Paleozoic marble in the western and north-central parts of the area, and a low resource potential for copper, lead, zinc, and manganese localized in fault zones that cut Tertiary volcanic rocks near the eastern edge of the range. Resource potential is low for geothermal energy or oil and gas. There is an unknown resource potential for lime, which could be developed from Paleozoic marble in the north-central part of the area. Sand and gravel occur in the area, but these materials are abundant closer to markets in the region.

  7. Mineral resources of the Behind the Rocks Wilderness Study Area, Grand and San Juan counties, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, C.G.; Toth, M.I.; Case, J.E.; Green, G.N.; Barton, H.N.; Thompson, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The Behind the Rocks Wilderness Study Area consists of 12,635 acres in Grand and San Juan counties, Utah. This study area is on the west flank of a northwest-trending collapsed salt anticline near Moab, Utah, and is underlain by gently west dipping, highly fractured sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic and Mesozoic age. Inferred subeconomic resources of potash and halite in the subsurface, and sandstone at the surface occurs in the Behind the Rocks Wilderness Study Area. This study area has a high potential for undiscovered resources of oil and gas, a low potential for undiscovered resources of uranium, vanadium, copper, gold, silver, other metals, and geothermal energy, and an unknown potential for the rare-earth mineral, braitschite. There is no resource potential for coal.

  8. Mineral resources of the Sierra Estrella Wilderness Study Area, Maricopa County, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, W.J.; Goldfarb, R.J.; Bankey, V.; Jones, S.L.; Korzeb, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    The Sierra Estrella Wilderness Study Area covers approximately 14,190 acres in the Sierra Estrella in south-central Arizona. No mineral resources were identified in this study area. The area is underlain mostly by Precambrian gneiss, schist, and granitic rocks, all of which contain pegmatites. There is a low resource potential for gold and silver in epithermal type vein deposits and associated copper as well as for mica in the pegmatites. Sediments on the southwest side of the Sierra Estrella Wilderness Study Area have a low resource potential for gold in placer deposits and for oil and gas. There is also a moderate potential for low-temperature geothermal resources in these sediments.

  9. Landslide assessment of Newell Creek Canyon, Oregon City, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Growney, L.; Burris, L.; Garletts, D.; Walsh, K. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    A study has been conducted in Newell Creek Canyon near Oregon City, Oregon, T3S, T2S, R2E. A landslide inventory has located 53 landslides in the 2.8 km[sup 2] area. The landslides range in area from approximately 15,000m[sup 2] to 10m[sup 2]. Past slides cover an approximate 7% of the canyon area. Landslide processes include: slump, slump-translational, slump-earthflow and earthflow. Hard, impermeable clay-rich layers in the Troutdale Formation form the failure planes for most of the slides. Slopes composed of Troutdale material may seem to be stable, but when cuts and fills are produced, slope failure is common because of the perched water tables and impermeable failure planes. Good examples of cut and fill failures are present on Highway 213 which passes through Newell Creek Canyon. Almost every cut and fill has failed since the road construction began. The latest failure is in the fill located at mile-post 2.1. From data gathered, a slope stability risk map was generated. Stability risk ratings are divided into three groups: high, moderate and low. High risk of slope instability is designated to all landslides mapped in the slide inventory. Moderate risk is designated to slopes in the Troutdale Formation greater than 8[degree]. Low risk is designated to slopes in the Troutdale Formation less than 8[degree].

  10. Mineral resources of the Dominguez Canyon Wilderness Study Area, Delta, Mesa, and Montrose counties, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, M.I.; Patterson, C.G.; Kulik, D.M.; Schreiner, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Dominguez Canyon Wilderness Study Area in Delta, Mesa, and Montrose counties, Colorado, contains flat-lying sedimentary rocks of Triassic to Cretaceous age underlain by Proterozoic crystalline rocks. Investigations by the US Geological Survey and US Bureau of Mines revealed that the wilderness study area has low mineral resource potential for metals, including uranium, oil and gas, coal, and geothermal energy. No identified resources are present.

  11. Mineral resources of the Teton Wilderness and adjacent areas, Teton, Fremont, and Park countries, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Antweiler, J.C.; Love, J.D.; Prostka, H.J.; Kulik, D.M.; Anderson, L.A. ); Williams, F.E.; Jinks, J.E.; Light, T.D. )

    1989-01-01

    This report presents a mineral survey of the Teton Wilderness and the adjacent Teton Corridor and DuNoir study areas in Northwest Wyoming conducted in 1972-74 by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mines. The area has a moderate potential for oil and gas resources and a moderate to low potential for gold and copper resources.

  12. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Geological hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Staub, W.P.; Reed, R.M.

    1995-03-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on geologic hazards during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. This report presents a review of current information on geologic hazards in the Hawaiian Islands. Interrelationships among these hazards are discussed. Probabilities of occurrence of given geologic hazards are provided in various regions where sufficient geologic or historical data are available. Most of the information contained herein is compiled from recent US Geological Survey (USGS) publications and USGS open-file reports related to this project. This report describes the natural geologic hazards present in the area and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. Geologic hazards originate both onshore and offshore. Onshore geologic hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, surface rupture, landslides, uplift and subsidence occur mainly on the southern third of the island of Hawaii (hereinafter referred to as Hawaii). Offshore geologic hazards are more widely distributed throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Examples of offshore geologic hazards are submarine landslides, turbidity currents, and seismic sea waves (tsunamis).

  13. Mineral Resources of the Wabayuma Peak Wilderness Study Area, Mohave County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conway, Clay M.; Hassemer, Jerry R.; Knepper, Daniel H.; Pitkin, James A.; Jachens, Robert C.; Chatman, Mark L.

    1990-01-01

    The Wabayuma Peak Wilderness Study Area (AZ-020-037/043), for which a mineral survey was requested by the U.S. Bureau of land Management, encompasses 40,118 acres in northwestern Arizona. Fieldwork was carried out in 1986-88 by the U.S. Bureau of Mines and the U.S. Geological Survey to appraise the identified (known) resources and assess the mineral resource potential (undiscovered) of the wilderness study area. Within the Wabayuma Peak Wilderness Study Area are 14 private parcels of land totaling 1,315 acres. The Wabayuma Peak Wilderness Study Area, including the 14 private parcels of land, is herein referred to as the 'wilderness study area' or the 'study area'. The Boriana, Antler, and Copper World mines lie near the east boundary of the study area. The Boriana mine was a major tungsten-producing mine of the United States during World War II. The Antler and Copper World mines produced relatively small amounts of copper and zinc prior to 1970. Copper and zinc were mined within 100 ft of the study area at the Antler mine. The Antler mine contains subeconomic resources of 350,000 to 400,000 short tons of copper-zinc ore; a minimum of 2,000 short tons, at grades of 1 to 4 percent copper and 1 to 2 percent zinc, lie within the study area. No other mineral resources were identified within the study area. Four small tracts in the eastern part and one in the central part of the study area have high resource potential for copper, zinc, and minor lead, silver, and gold in massive sulfide deposits. A large central tract and two eastern tracts have moderate resource potential for the same metals. An eastern and a western tract within the wilderness study area have high resource potential for tungsten, copper, and combinations of beryllium, gold, silver, arsenic, bismuth, molybdenum, tin, indium, thorium, niobium, yttrium, lanthanum, scandium, tantalum, rhenium, lead, zinc, and iron in granite-related tungsten-polymetallic vein deposits. Most of the rest of the study area

  14. Mineral resources of the Holy Cross Wilderness Area, Eagle, Pitkin, and Lake Counties, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, A.R.; Lee, G.K.; Campbell, D.L.; Lundby, W.; Brown, S.D.

    1989-01-01

    The Holy Cross Wilderness Area is in the northern Sawatch Range of central Colorado. This area is underlain principally by Proterozoic metamorphic and igneous rocks, which are unconformably overlain by Paleozoic sedimentary rocks along the flanks of the range. Numerous Late Cretaceous and Tertiary plutons were emplaced into the older rocks, and all rocks are cut by numerous faults. Identified resources in this wilderness area include high-purity limestone and gold-silver ore. Parts of this wilderness area have a high or a moderate resource potential for deposits of base and precious metals and molybdenum, for sand and gravel, and for high-purity limestone.

  15. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Geological Hazards (DRAFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Staub, W.P.

    1994-06-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on geologic hazards during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 (Fed Regis. 5925638) withdrawing its Notice of Intent (Fed Regis. 575433) of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated This report presents a review of current information on geologic hazards in the Hawaiian Islands. Interrelationships among these hazards are discussed. Probabilities of occurrence of given geologic hazards are provided in various regions where sufficient geologic or historical data are available. Most of the information contained herein is compiled from recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) publications and open-file reports. This report describes the natural geologic hazards present in the area and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. Geologic hazards originate both onshore and offshore. Onshore geologic hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, surface rupture, landslides, uplift, and subsidence occur mainly on the southern third of the island of Hawaii (hereinafter referred to as Hawaii). Offshore geologic hazards are more widely distributed throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Examples of offshore geologic hazards are submarine landslides, turbidity currents, and seismic sea waves (tsunamis). First, overviews of volcanic and earthquake activity, and details of offshore geologic hazards is provided for the Hawaiian Islands. Then, a more detailed discussion of onshore geologic hazards is presented with special emphasis on the southern third of Hawaii and the east rift

  16. 30 CFR 937.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining and... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  17. 30 CFR 937.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining and... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  18. 30 CFR 937.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining and... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  19. 30 CFR 937.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining and... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  20. 30 CFR 937.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining and... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  1. Ground-water resources of the El Paso area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sayre, Albert Nelson; Livingston, Penn Poore

    1945-01-01

    El Paso, Tex., and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, and the industries in -that area draw their water supplies from wells, most of which are from 600 to 800 feet deep. In 1906, the estimated average pumpage there was about 1,000,000 gallons a day, and by 1935 it had increased to 15,400,000 gallons a day. The water-bearing beds, consisting of sand and gravel interbedded wire clay, tie in the deep structural trough known as the Hueco bolson, between the Organ and Franklin Mountains on the west, the Hueco, Finlay, and Malone Mountains on the east, the Tularosa Basin on the north, and the mountain ranges of Mexico on the south. From the gorge above El Paso to that beginning near Fort Quitman, about 90 miles southeast .of El Paso, the Rio Grande has eroded a flat-bottomed, steepwalled valley, 6 to 8 miles wide and 225 to 350 feet deep. No other large drainage channels have been developed on the bolson. The valley is known as the El Paso Valley, and the uneroded upland part of the bolson is called the Mesa. In the lowest parts of the El Paso Valley, the water-table is nearly at the surface. The quality of the underground water in the valley varies greatly both vertically and laterally. To a depth of about 400 to 500 feet it is in general too highly mineralized for municipal use, but between about. 500 and 900 feet good water may be obtained from several beds. In the beds between 500 and 900 feet the water level in wells is in places as. much as 20 feet lower than that in the shallow beds. Beneath the Mesa the water level .varies from about 200 feet beneath the surface, where the ground elevation is least, to about 400 feet. where it is highest. The water beneath the Mesa in general is of satisfactory quality and contains less than 500 parts per million of dissolved solids. Two cones of depression in the water table have been formed by the pumping near El Paso--one m the vicinity of the Mesa well field, the other around the Montana well field in the valley. The water

  2. National assessment of geologic carbon dioxide storage resources: allocations of assessed areas to Federal lands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buursink, Marc L.; Cahan, Steven M.; Warwick, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Following the geologic basin-scale assessment of technically accessible carbon dioxide storage resources in onshore areas and State waters of the United States, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that an area of about 130 million acres (or about 200,000 square miles) of Federal lands overlies these storage resources. Consequently, about 18 percent of the assessed area associated with storage resources is allocated to Federal land management. Assessed areas are allocated to four other general land-ownership categories as follows: State lands about 4.5 percent, Tribal lands about 2.4 percent, private and other lands about 72 percent, and offshore areas about 2.6 percent.

  3. Agriculture Cluster Brief. Vocational Education in Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galbraith, Gordon

    This guide sets forth minimum approval criteria for vocational agriculture cluster programs in Oregon. The agriculture cluster program includes instruction in six areas: animal science, soil science, plant science, agricultural economics, agriculture mechanics, and leadership development. The information in the guide is intended for use by…

  4. Mineral resources of the Ragged Top Wilderness Study Area, Pima County, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Nowlan, G.A.; Peterson, J.A.; Pitkin, J.A.; Hanna, W.F.; Kreidler, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    The Ragged Top Wilderness Study Area (AZ-020-197), for which mineral surveys were requested by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, encompasses 4,460 acres in southcentral Arizona. Field work was carried out in 1987 by the U.S. Bureau of Mines and the U.S. Geological Survey to appraise the identified (known) resources and assess the mineral resource potential (undiscovered) of the wilderness study area. The study area includes the northern part of a mineralized area that includes the Silver Bell porphyry copper deposits. Despite this proximity to a major mine and the presence of several mines and prospects within and near the study area, no metallic resources were identified. Part of the southwest corner of the study area has high resource potential for gold, silver, lead, vanadium, barite, molybdenum, copper, and zinc in vein deposits. Adjacent parts of the study area to the north, west, and south have moderate resource potential for zinc, lead, barite, molybdenum, gold, silver, and copper in similar veins.

  5. Archaeological Evidence for a Former Bay at Seaside, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Thomas J.

    1995-05-01

    Cultural shell middens, a common feature of coastal landscapes, preserve a record of past human use of coastal resources and often provide important paleoenvironmental information. Molluscan remains from two shell midden sites, located 0.7 km from the modern Pacific coast at Seaside, Oregon, suggest the former presence of a small sheltered bay at this locality. The modern sand beaches in the Seaside area, stretching for 30 km southward from the mouth of the Columbia River, are exposed to high-energy surf where razor clams ( Siliqua patula) are today the only common bivalve. By contrast, over 90% of molluscan remains (by weight) recovered from the archaeological sites represent species that favor sheltered water. Geologic studies in the Seaside area have shown that the beach prograded some 2 km over the last 4 millennia. The midden evidence suggests that the progradation was accompanied by the infilling of a former bay.

  6. Eighth year projects and activities of the Environmental Remote Sensing Applications Laboratory (ERSAL). [Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, A. J.; Isaacson, D. L.; Schrumpf, B. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Projects completed for the NASA Office of University Affairs include the application of remote sensing data in support of rehabilitation of wild fire damaged areas and the use of LANDSAT 3 return beam vidicon in forestry mapping applications. Continuing projects for that office include monitoring western Oregon timber clearcut; detecting and monitoring wheat disease; land use monitoring for tax assessment in Umatilla, Lake, and Morrow Counties; and the use of Oregon Air National Guard thermal infrared scanning data. Projects funded through other agencies include the remote sensing inventory of elk in the Blue Mountains; the estimation of burned agricultural acreage in the Willamette Valley; a resource inventory of Deschutes County; and hosting a LANDSAT digital workshop.

  7. Geology of the Blue Mountains region of Oregon, Idaho, and Washington; stratigraphy, physiography, and mineral resources of the Blue Mountains region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallier, T. L., (Edited By); Brooks, H.C.

    1994-01-01

    PART 1: Stratigraphic and sedimentological analysis of sedimentary sequences from the Wallowa terrane of northeastern Oregon has provided a unique insight into the paleogeography and depositional history of the terrane, as well as establishing important constraints on its tectonic evolution and accretionary history. Its Late Triassic history is considered here by examining the two most important sedimentary units in the Wallowa terrane-the Martin Bridge Limestone and the Hurwal Formation. Conformably overlying epiclastic volcanic rocks of the Seven Devils Group, the Martin Bridge Limestone comprises shallow-water platform carbonate rocks and deeper water, off-platform slope and basin facies. Regional stratigraphic and tectonic relations suggest that the Martin Bridge was deposited in a narrow, carbonate-dominated (forearc?) basin during a lull in volcanic activity. The northern Wallowa platform was a narrow, rimmed shelf delineated by carbonate sand shoals. Interior parts of the shelf were characterized by supratidal to shallow subtidal carbonates and evaporites, which were deposited in a restricted basin. In the southern Wallowa Mountains, lithofacies of the Martin Bridge are primarily carbonate turbidites and debris flow deposits, which accumulated on a carbonate slope apron adjacent to the northern Wallowa rimmed shelf from which they were derived. Drowning of the platform in the latest Triassic, coupled with a renewed influx of volcanically derived sediments, resulted in the progradation of fine-grained turbidites of the Hurwal Formation over the carbonate platform. Within the Hurwal, Norian conglomerates of the Excelsior Gulch unit contain exotic clasts of radiolarian chert, which were probably derived from the Bakei terrane. Such a provenance provides evidence of a tectonic link between the Baker and Wallowa terranes as early as the Late Triassic, and offers support for the theory that both terranes were part of a more extensive and complex Blue Mountains

  8. Resource assessment and economic analysis: A study of mineral resources in the Altay Mountains area, Xinjiang, China

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.L.; Dorian, J.P.; Otto, J.M.; Johnson, C.J.; Bozich, L.G. ); Songguan, Chen; Jian, Zhao; Yongquan, Dong; Jianguo, Dai )

    1989-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an integrated resource assessment-development planning study conducted on the Altay Mountains area of Xinjiang Autonomous Uygur Region, China. The project was initiated by local Chinese government officials in order to more effectively plan future minerals exploration and development activities in this remote part of China. The study is comprised of four basic components: an initial resource assessment to estimate the type, quality, and quantity of mineral deposits that may occur in the area; a preliminary financial analysis based on the resource assessment estimates to determine which of the predicted deposits would be economic to develop if discovered and developed; a market analysis of the estimated commodities to assess which commodities would be desirable to develop for local, national, and international markets; and an integration of all these data into a comprehensive long-term development plan. The final results indicated that although the Altay Mountains area is richly endowed in synorogenic-synvolcanic nickel, felsic-intermediate massive sulfide, skarn, and stratiform lead-zinc deposits, only two of these deposit types may be economic to develop due to the lack of infrastructure and high capital investment and transportation costs.

  9. Mineral resources of Cactus Plain and East Cactus Plain Wilderness Study Areas, La Paz County, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Tosdal, R.M.; Eppinger, R.G.; Erdman, J.A.; Hanna, W.F.; Pitkin, J.A.; Blank, H.R. Jr.; O'Leary, R.M.; Watterson, J.R. ); Kreidler, T.J. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on geologic, geochemical, and geophysical studies in the Cactus Plain and East Cactus Plain Wilderness Study Areas outlined in areas with moderate to high potential for gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, barite, fluorite, manganese, and sand suitable for foundry, fracturing, and abrasive uses and low resource potential for beryllium, uranium and bentonitic clays.

  10. Mineral resource potential map of the Pyramid Roadless Area, El Dorado County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, Augustus K.; Chaffee, Maurice A.; Scott, Douglas F.

    1983-01-01

    Studies show., there is low potential for small deposits of gold, silver, and base metals in the Pyramid Roadless Area. There are two uranium claims (Cliff Ridge mining claims) located within the roadless area, but samples from this site showed no uranium. There are no indications of geothermal resources, coal, oil, or gas.

  11. 75 FR 6218 - New Melones Lake Area Resource Management Plan, Tuolumne and Calaveras Counties, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-08

    ... published in the Federal Register on November 2, 2009 (74 FR 56656). The written comment period on the Draft... Bureau of Reclamation New Melones Lake Area Resource Management Plan, Tuolumne and Calaveras Counties, CA... a Final RMP/EIS for the New Melones Lake Area. The Final RMP/EIS describes and presents...

  12. Mineral resources of the Warm Springs Wilderness Study Area, Mohave County, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, F.; Jackens, R.C.; Miller, R.J.; Turner, R.L.; Knepper, D.H. Jr.; Pitkin, J.A.; Keith, W.J.; Mariano, J.; Jones, S.L. ); Korzeb, S.L. )

    1990-12-01

    This paper reports on the Warm Springs Wilderness Study Area underlain by Tertiary volcanic rocks overlying Proterozoic basement The northwestern part of the study area has high potential for gold and silver, other parts have moderate to low potential for gold and silver, sand low potential for perlite, zeolite, kaolinite, and geothermal resources.

  13. Geothermal-resource assessment of the Steamboat-Routt Hot Springs area, Colorado. Resources Series 22

    SciTech Connect

    Pearl, R.H.; Zacharakis, T.G.; Ringrose, C.D.

    1983-01-01

    An assessment of the Steamboat Springs region in northwest Colorado was initiated and carried out in 1980 and 1981. The goal of this program was to delineate the geological features controlling the occurrence of the thermal waters (temperatures in excess of 68/sup 0/F (20/sup 0/C)) in this area at Steamboat Springs and 8 miles (12.8 km) north at Routt Hot Springs. Thermal waters from Heart Spring, the only developed thermal water source in the study area, are used in the municipal swimming pool in Steamboat Springs. The assessment program was a fully integrated program consisting of: dipole-dipole, Audio-magnetotelluric, telluric, self potential and gravity geophysical surveys, soil mercury and soil helium geochemical surveys; shallow temperature measurements; and prepartion of geological maps. The investigation showed that all the thermal springs appear to be fault controlled. Based on the chemical composition of the thermal waters it appears that Heart Spring in Steamboat Springs is hydrologically related to the Routt Hot Springs. This relationship was further confirmed when it was reported that thermal waters were encountered during the construction of the new high school in Strawberry Park on the north side of Steamboat Springs. In addition, residents stated that Strawberry Park appears to be warmer than the surrounding country side. Geological mapping has determined that a major fault extends from the Routt Hot Springs area into Strawberry Park.

  14. Mineral resources of the Borah Peak Wilderness Study Area, Custer county, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A.B.; Janecke, S.U.; Skipp, B.; Kleinkopf, M.D.; McCafferty, A.E.; Barton, H.N.; Miller, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the Borah Peak (ID-047-004) Wilderness Study Area and an adjacent tract recommended as suitable for wilderness on the western flank of the Lost River Range in east-central Idaho. An investigation of these areas indicates that they have no known economic mineral resources. They do have occurrences of sand and gravel, dolostone (a source of magnesium metal), limestone, and silica. The areas have low mineral resource potential for barite, all metals, geothermal energy, and oil and gas.

  15. Spectrographic and chemical analyses of rock and soil samples from the Medford 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle, Oregon-California

    SciTech Connect

    Whittington, C.L.; Grimes, D.J.; Peterson, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    The report presents analytical and location data on 3146 rock and 35 soil samples from the Medford 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle, Oregon-California. These data are compiled from mineral resource and geochemical studies in the quadrangle and from similar studies of wilderness areas lying partly or entirely within the quadrangle: the Wild Rogue Wilderness, the Kalmiopsis Wilderness, and the Sky Lakes Roadless Area and Mountain Lakes Wilderness. 14 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. Mineral resources of the South Mccullough Mountains Wilderness Study Area, Clark County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, E.; Anderson, J.L.; Barton, H.N.; Jachens, R.C.; Podwysocki, M.H.; Brickey, D.W. ); Close, T.J. )

    1989-01-01

    The authors present a study of 19,558 acres of the South McCullough Mountains Wilderness Study Area. The study area contains no identified mineral resources and has no areas of high mineral resource potential. However, five areas that make up 20 percent of the study area have a moderate potential either for undiscovered silver, gold, lead, copper, and zinc resources in small vein deposits; for lanthanum and other rare-earth elements, uranium, thorium, and niobium in medium-size carbonatite bodies and dikes; for tungsten and copper in small- to medium-size vein deposits; or for silver and gold in small vein or breccia-pipe deposits. Six areas that makeup 24 percent of the study area have an unknown resource potential either for gold, silver, lead, and copper in small vein deposits; for gold, silver, lead, zinc, copper, and arsenic in small vein or breccia-pipe deposits; for lanthanum and other rare-earth elements, uranium, thorium, and niobium in medium-size carbonatite bodies and dikes; or for tungsten and copper in small vein deposits.

  17. Mineral Resources of the Antelope Wilderness Study Area, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardyman, Richard F.; Poole, Forrest G.; Kleinhampl, Frank J.; Turner, Robert L.; Plouff, Donald; Duval, Joe S.; Johnson, Fredrick L.; Benjamin, David A.

    1987-01-01

    At the request of the U.S. Bureau of land Management, 83,100 acres of the Antelope Wilderness Study Area (NV-4)60-231/241) was studied. In this report the studied area is called the 'wilderness study area', or simply the 'study area.' No identified mineral or energy resources occur within the study area. The southern part of the area has moderate mineral resource potential for undiscovered gold and silver, and the Woodruff Formation in the southern part of the area has high resource potential for undiscovered vanadium, zinc, selenium, molybdenum, and silver (fig. 1). This assessment is based on field geochemical studies in 1984 and 1985 by the U.S. Bureau of Mines and field geochemical studies and geologic mapping by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1984 and 1985. The remainder of the study area has low resource potential for undiscovered gold, silver, lead, zinc, manganese, tin, and molybdenum. The study area also has low resource potential for undiscovered oil and gas resources. The Antelope Wilderness Study Area is about midway between Tonopah and Eureka, Nev., in the northern Hot Creek Range and southern Antelope Range of central Nevada. It is accessible by unimproved dirt roads extending 20 mi (miles) north from U.S. Highway 6 and 40 mi south from U.S. Highway 50 (fig. 2). Most of the study area consists of rugged mountainous terrain having approximately 2,600 ft (feet) of relief. The mountain range is a block tilted gently to the east and bounded on both sides by normal faults that dip steeply to moderately west and have major displacements. Most of the study area is underlain by a thick sequence of Tertiary volcanic rocks that predominantly consist of silicic ash-flow tuff, the Windous Butte Formation. Paleozoic and lower Mesozoic (see geologic time chart in appendix) marine sediments occur along the southern margin of the study area, and lower Paleozoic rocks are exposed in the northeast corner. The areas of exposed Paleozoic-Mesozoic rocks along the southern

  18. Mineral resource assessment map of the Big Gum Swamp Roadless Area, Columbia and Baker counties, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cathcart, J.B.; Cameron, C.C.; Patterson, S.H.

    1986-01-01

    The geology of the Big Cum Swamp Roadless Area, which is discussed briefly in this report, is covered in somewhat more detail in a report by Patterson, Cathcart, Cameron, and Schruben (1984). The mineral resource potential is quite similar to that in the Natural Area Roadless Area outlined by Cathcart, Patterson and Crandall (1983). The Natural Area, which is east of the eastern boundary of the Big Gum Swamp (fig. 1), also was designated a Wilderness Study Area by Public Law 98-430, September 28, 1984.

  19. Analytical results and sample dlocality map of stream-sediment, heavy-mineral-concentrate, and rock samples from the Alvord Desert and East Alvord Wilderness Study Areas (OR-002-074 and OR-002-073A), Malheur and Harney Counties, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Johnes, J.L.; Erickson, M.S.; Turner, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    A U.S. Geological Survey report is presented giving analytical results and sample locality map of stream-sediment, heavy-mineral-concentrate, and rock samples from the Alvord Desert and East Alvord Wilderness Study Areas, Malheur and Harney Counties, Oregon.

  20. Scientific information in support of water resource management of the Big River area, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, David S.; Masterson, John P.; Robinson, Keith W.; Crawley, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    For nearly two decades, the RIWRB has conducted a series of cooperative studies with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The goals of these studies have been to (1) evaluate and characterize the water resources of the BRMA and the greater Big River area, and (2) identify sustainable levels of groundwater use that would minimize effects on water resources. This fact sheet describes the major findings of those studies.

  1. Mineral resources of the Paria-Hackberry Wilderness study area, Kane County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, H.; Bush, A.L.; Tumer, R.L.; Cady, J.W. ); Brown, S.D.; Hannigan, B.J.; Thompson, J.R. )

    1991-01-01

    The Paria-Hackberry Wilderness Study Area, in central Kane County, southern Utah, is region of generally flat-lying, gently folded Jurassic and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks bonded on the east by the east-dipping limb of the East Kaibab Monocline and cut by sheer-walled, narrow canyons. The area selected for study by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management totaled 94,642 acres (148 square miles); because of uncertainty as to final boundaries, the U.S. Geological Survey studies an additional contiguous 41,180 acres (64 square miles). No identified resources of metals or nonmetallic minerals are present in the study area. An unsuccessful attempt to recover flour from the Chinle Formation was made in the early part of the century at the now-abandoned townsite of Paria. The mineral resource potential for all metals, including gold, uranium, barium, silver, strontium, arsenic, antimony, mercury, copper, manganese, cadmium, and zinc, is low for the entire Paria-Hackberry Wilderness Study Area. The likelihood of occurrence of decorative-use gypsum and of sand and gravel is moderate in limited areas of the northern part of the wilderness study are and, for sand and gravel, in a few small occurrences along the Paria River valley. A moderate energy resource potential is assessed for oil and gas and a low potential for geothermal energy, for the entire study area. There is no energy resource potential for coal.

  2. Mineral resources of the Ragged Top Wilderness study area, Pima County, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Nowlan, G.A.; Peterson, J.A.; Pitkin, Hanna, W.F. ); Kreidler, T.J. )

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the Ragged Top Wilderness Study Area in Arizona which contains Proterozoic granite and sedimentary rocks, Cretaceous volcanic rocks and granodiorite porphyry, and Tertiary rhyolite. Part of the Silver Bell Caldera is included in this study area. No metallic resources were identified. The southwest corner has a high and a moderate resource potential for gold, silver, lead, vanadium, barite, molybdenum, copper, and zinc in vein deposits. The east side has a low resource potential for these elements. Parts of this study area have a moderate potential for copper, silver, gold, and molybdenum in porphyry copper deposits, a low potential for uranium deposits in sedimentary rocks, and a low potential for thorium, rare-earth elements, quartz, feldspar, and mica in granite.

  3. Usefulness of ERTS-1 satellite imagery as a data-gathering tool by resource managers in the Bureau of Land Management. [Arizona, California, Oregon, and Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentley, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    ERTS-1 satellite imagery can be an effective data-gathering tool for resource managers. Techniques are developed which allow managers to visually analyze simulated color infrared composite images to map perennial and ephemeral (annual) plant communities. Tentative results indicate that ephemeral plant growth and development and potential to produce forage can be monitored.

  4. 33 CFR 100.1302 - Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. 100.1302 Section 100.1302 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... § 100.1302 Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. (a) Regulated area. All... south by the Marquam Bridge. (b) Definition. For purposes of this section, race area means an area...

  5. 33 CFR 100.1302 - Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. 100.1302 Section 100.1302 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... § 100.1302 Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. (a) Regulated area. All... south by the Marquam Bridge. (b) Definition. For purposes of this section, race area means an area...

  6. 33 CFR 100.1302 - Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. 100.1302 Section 100.1302 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... § 100.1302 Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. (a) Regulated area. All... south by the Marquam Bridge. (b) Definition. For purposes of this section, race area means an area...

  7. The Oregon Walkabout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parnell, Dale

    1974-01-01

    Too often American schools aim to satisfy the self-actualizing and higher-level needs in Maslow's hierarchy, while ignoring survival and security needs. The new State curriculum seeks to correct that deficit. To graduate, an Oregon student in the Class of 1978 will be expected to demonstrate the competencies to function effectively on the job, as…

  8. Oregon hydrologic landscape regions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Individuals who spend time working with streams intuitively come to understand that stream hydrologic and ecological characteristics are related to the attributes of the watersheds in which they occur. This is easy to see in Oregon with its large climatic and geologic variations ...

  9. Oregon State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, Rebecca A.; Ketcham, Patricia L.

    2009-01-01

    Oregon State University (OSU) is located in Corvallis, a community of 53,000 people situated in the heart of the Willamette Valley between Portland and Eugene. Approximately 15,700 undergraduate and 3,400 graduate students, including 2,600 U.S. students of color and 950 international students, are currently enrolled at OSU across 11 academic…

  10. Oregon: Biscuit Wildfire

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... Fire was the most expensive fire fighting effort in Oregon's history, with more than 6,000 personnel assisting the battle to suppress the ... NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Terra spacecraft is managed ...

  11. Oregon's first wind park

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The bringing on-line of the 1.25 MW wind park at Whiskey Run, Oregon, is reported. The park features twenty-five 50 KW wind turbine generators and is expected to produce about three million kilowatt-hours per year for the Pacific Power and Light system.

  12. OREGON ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PROFILE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to Executive Order 12898: Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority and Low Income Populations, and in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, this project will profile the state of Oregon to identify environmental justice communi...

  13. Oregon Social Sciences Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    The study of the social sciences includes: history, civics, geography, and economics to prepare students for responsible citizenship. The Oregon state standards for social sciences sets out common curriculum goals, content standards, information for Benchmark 1 (grade three), Benchmark 2 (grade five), Benchmark 3 (grade eight), and Certificate of…

  14. Cascade Mtns. Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The ground near one of the long-dormant Three Sisters volcanoes in the Cascade Mountains of west-central Oregon has risen approximately 10centimeters in a 10-by-20-km parcel since 1996, meaning that magma or underground lava is slowly flowing into the area, according to a research team from the U.S. Geological Survey. The Three Sisters area -- which contains five volcanoes -- is only about 170 miles from Mount St. Helens, which erupted in 1980. Both are part of the Cascades Range, a line of 27volcanoes stretching from British Columbia in Canada to northern California. This perspective view was created by draping a simulated natural color ASTER image over digital topography from the U.S. Geological Survey National Elevation Dataset.

    This image was acquired on May 28, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, along-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical

  15. 30 CFR 937.762 - Criteria for designating areas as unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for surface coal mining operations. 937.762 Section 937.762 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING... WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.762 Criteria for designating areas as unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. Part 762 of this chapter, Criteria for Designating Areas Unsuitable for Surface Coal...

  16. 30 CFR 937.762 - Criteria for designating areas as unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for surface coal mining operations. 937.762 Section 937.762 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING... WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.762 Criteria for designating areas as unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. Part 762 of this chapter, Criteria for Designating Areas Unsuitable for Surface Coal...

  17. 30 CFR 937.762 - Criteria for designating areas as unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for surface coal mining operations. 937.762 Section 937.762 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING... WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.762 Criteria for designating areas as unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. Part 762 of this chapter, Criteria for Designating Areas Unsuitable for Surface Coal...

  18. 30 CFR 937.762 - Criteria for designating areas as unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for surface coal mining operations. 937.762 Section 937.762 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING... WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.762 Criteria for designating areas as unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. Part 762 of this chapter, Criteria for Designating Areas Unsuitable for Surface Coal...

  19. 30 CFR 937.762 - Criteria for designating areas as unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for surface coal mining operations. 937.762 Section 937.762 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING... WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.762 Criteria for designating areas as unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. Part 762 of this chapter, Criteria for Designating Areas Unsuitable for Surface Coal...

  20. Geothermal resource assessment of the Yucca Mountain Area, Nye County, Nevada. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.; Trexler, D.; Shevenell, L., Garside, L.

    1995-12-01

    An assessment of the geothermal resources within a fifty-mile radius of the Yucca Mountain Project area was conducted to determine the potential for commercial development. The assessment includes collection, evaluation, and quantification of existing geological, geochemical, hydrological, and geophysical data within the Yucca Mountain area as they pertain to geothermal phenomena. Selected geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data were reduced to a set of common-scale digital maps using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for systematic analysis and evaluation. Available data from the Yucca Mountain area were compared to similar data from developed and undeveloped geothermal areas in other parts of the Great Basin to assess the resource potential for future geothermal development at Yucca Mountain. This information will be used in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project to determine the potential suitability of the site as a permanent underground repository for high-level nuclear waste.

  1. Natural resource dependency and decentralized conservation within Kanchenjunga Conservation Area Project, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Parker, Pete; Thapa, Brijesh

    2012-02-01

    Kanchenjunga Conservation Area Project (KCAP) in Nepal is among the first protected areas in the world to institute a completely decentralized system of conservation and development. Proponents of decentralized conservation claim that it increases management efficiency, enhances the responsiveness to local needs, and promotes greater equity among local residents. This study assessed local equity by evaluating the levels of dependencies on natural resources among households and the factors affecting that dependency. Data were collected via detailed surveys among 205 randomly selected households within the KCAP. Natural resource dependency was evaluated by comparing the ratio of total household income to income derived from access to natural resources. Economic, social, and access-related variables were employed to determine potential significant predictors of dependency. Overall, households were heavily dependent on natural resources for their income, especially households at higher elevations and those with more adult members. The households that received remittances were most able to supplement their income and, therefore, drastically reduced their reliance on the access to natural resources. Socio-economic variables, such as land holdings, education, caste, and ethnicity, failed to predict dependency. Household participation in KCAP-sponsored training programs also failed to affect household dependency; however, fewer than 20% of the households had any form of direct contact with KCAP personnel within the past year. The success of the KCAP as a decentralized conservation program is contingent on project capacity-building via social mobilization, training programs, and participatory inclusion in decision making to help alleviate the dependency on natural resources. PMID:22127405

  2. Natural Resource Dependency and Decentralized Conservation Within Kanchenjunga Conservation Area Project, Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Pete; Thapa, Brijesh

    2012-02-01

    Kanchenjunga Conservation Area Project (KCAP) in Nepal is among the first protected areas in the world to institute a completely decentralized system of conservation and development. Proponents of decentralized conservation claim that it increases management efficiency, enhances the responsiveness to local needs, and promotes greater equity among local residents. This study assessed local equity by evaluating the levels of dependencies on natural resources among households and the factors affecting that dependency. Data were collected via detailed surveys among 205 randomly selected households within the KCAP. Natural resource dependency was evaluated by comparing the ratio of total household income to income derived from access to natural resources. Economic, social, and access-related variables were employed to determine potential significant predictors of dependency. Overall, households were heavily dependent on natural resources for their income, especially households at higher elevations and those with more adult members. The households that received remittances were most able to supplement their income and, therefore, drastically reduced their reliance on the access to natural resources. Socio-economic variables, such as land holdings, education, caste, and ethnicity, failed to predict dependency. Household participation in KCAP-sponsored training programs also failed to affect household dependency; however, fewer than 20% of the households had any form of direct contact with KCAP personnel within the past year. The success of the KCAP as a decentralized conservation program is contingent on project capacity-building via social mobilization, training programs, and participatory inclusion in decision making to help alleviate the dependency on natural resources.

  3. Allocation of health care resources in the neonatal and perinatal area -CPS Symposium 1996.

    PubMed

    McMillan, D; Lee, S; Serediak, M; Finn, J; Saigal, S; Walker, C

    1999-01-01

    There have been publically expressed concerns about the costs and allocation of neonatal and perinatal health care resources in Canada and elsewhere for the past 15 years. This paper reports information from a symposium held during the 1996 Canadian Paediatric Society (CPS) annual meeting sponsored by the CPS Section on Perinatal Medicine. Experts in perinatal epidemiology, health care economics, public policy and finance, and consumer perspectives on the outcomes of neonatal and perinatal intensive care explored the following questions: How should the need for health care resources in the neonatal and perinatal area be objectively determined? When there are competing needs between the maternal-newborn area and other areas, how should these be rationalized? What evidence should be used (or should be available) to support the present use of resources? What evidence should be available (or is needed) to change or introduce new uses of resources? The conclusions indicated that there are no generally accepted methods to determine the allocation of health care resources but that considerations need to include population characteristics, desired outcomes, achievable results, values, ethics, legalities, cost-benefit analyses and political objectives. Information from families and adolescents who required the use of high technology and/or high cost programs will contribute individual, family and societal values that complement cost-efficacy analyses. PMID:20212990

  4. Review of water resource potential for developing geothermal resource sites in the western United States

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnichsen, J.C. Jr.

    1980-07-01

    Water resources at 28 known geothermal resource areas (KGRAs) in the western United States are reviewed. Primary emphasis is placed upon examination of the waer resources, both surface and ground, that exist in the vicinity of the KGRAs located in the southwestern states of California, Arizona, Utah, Nevada, and New Mexico. In most of these regions water has been in short supply for many years and consequently a discussion of competing demands is included to provide an appropriate perspective on overall usage. A discussion of the water resources in the vicinity of KGRAs in the States of Montana, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington are also included.

  5. Investing in Educator Data Literacy Improves Student Achievement. Evidence of Impact: The Oregon Data Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Quality Campaign, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Since 2007 the Oregon DATA Project has been investing resources to provide educators on-the-job training around effective data use to improve student achievement. New evidence shows that their efforts are paying off. A 2011 Oregon DATA Project report detailed the impact of their investment in the state's educators, finding the following: (1)…

  6. EVALUATING ECONOMIC INCENTIVE PROGRAMS: A WATERSHED-BASED TMDL PROGRAM IN OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) has been actively working to develop effluent trading opportunities since 1997. With prior EPA funding, Oregon DEQ developed a draft version of a manual titled "Resource Guide to Watershed-Based Trading". This manual outlined...

  7. Mineral resource potential of the Piedra Wilderness Study Area, Archuleta and Hinsdale counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bush, Alfred L.; Condon, Steven M.; Franczyk, Karen J.; Brown, S.Don

    1983-01-01

    The mineral resource potential of the Piedra Wilderness Study Area is low. No occurrences of metallic minerals, of valuable industrial rocks and minerals, or of useful concentrations of organic fuels are known in the study area. However, a noneconomic occurrence of gypsum in the Jurassic Wanakah Formation lies a few hundred feet west of the WSA boundary, is believed to extend into the WSA, and has a low resource potential. Particular attention was paid to the possible occurrence of organic fuels in the Pennsylvanian Hermosa Formation, of uranium and vanadium in the Jurassic Entrada Sandstone and Morrison Formation, and of coal in the Cretaceous Dakota Sandstone. Thin coaly beds in the Dakota have a low resource potential. Extensive sampling of stream sediments, limited sampling of rock outcrops and springs, and a number of scintillometer traverses failed to pinpoint significant anomalies that might be clues to mineral deposits.

  8. Reach: A Multicultural Education Resource Handbook for the San Francisco Bay Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sykes, Vivian; Tricamo, Terese

    The guide will help elementary and secondary school teachers to identify resources for multicultural education in the San Francisco Bay Area. Over 250 entries are included about American Indians, Mexican Americans, Chinese and Japanese Americans, Greek Americans, Jews, and Afro Americans, the groups most thoroughly represented. Almost every entry…

  9. Resource Guide for Educational Services (Student Services) for Colorado Community & Junior Colleges and Area Vocational Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education, Denver.

    This resource guide provides guidelines for the development of a new model for student services delivery systems in Colorado's community colleges and area vocational schools. Introductory material discusses the role of student services in the 1980's and provides information on the development of the proposed model and guidebook. Following a…

  10. 76 FR 45738 - Regulated Navigation Area; Pacific Sound Resources and Lockheed Shipyard EPA Superfund Cleanup...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... navigation area (RNA) on a portion of Elliott Bay in Seattle, Washington. The RNA would protect the seabed in... Resources (PSR) and Lockheed Shipyard superfund cleanup remediation efforts. This RNA would...

  11. On The Directional Signature of The Pringle Falls Polarity Episode Recovered From The Deschutes River (Pringle Falls, Oregon) Area: A Revisited Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Bervera, E.; Canon Tapia, E.

    2008-05-01

    The Pringle Falls excursion is one of ten gobally identified geomagnetic excursions that have been well-dated and well-documented in several marine sediment cores or terrestrial rocks, and that define the Geomagnetic Instability Time Scale (GITS) for the Bruhnes Chron. To study the characteristics of the Pringle Falls polarity episode in detail, we drilled a total of 827 samples from five widely spaced profiles along the Deschutes River in Oregon. The five profiles sampled yield a high-resolution record of the Pringle Falls magnetic polarity episode, providing a detailed representation of field behavior during the excursion. We performed low-field vs. susceptibility analysis to determine the magnetic carriers of the sediments and we found that the main magnetic carrier is pure magnetite (Curie point 575 degrees C). The magnetic grain size indicated SD-MD magnetite. The demagnetization of the sediments was done by means of alternating field methods and the determination of the mean directions by principal component analyses. The VGP paths of each profile are very similar to each other. All of them define a clockwise loop traveling from high northern latitudes over the eastern part of North America and the North Atlantic to South America and higher southern latitudes, then returning to high northern latitudes through the Pacific and over Kamchatka. This last clockwise looping is characteristic of other recently found excursions like the Iceland basin excursion (IBE, 188 ka). The published age of the Pringle falls excursion (ca. 218 +/-14 ka) and the most recent radiometric ages at the Pringle Falls site (weighted mean 211 +/- 13 ka, Singer et al., 2008, EPSL, 267, 584-595), indicate that paleomagnetic polarity episodes of different ages may all have similar transition polar paths. This observation would seem to suggest that a common mechanism of the generation of the paleofield is involved in controlling the excursions at least during the Bruhnes Chron.

  12. Quaternary volcanics from the Broken Top volcano area, Oregon High Cascades: Varied low pressure processes in calc-alkaline magma chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, J.R. . Div. of Science and Math)

    1992-01-01

    Broken Top (BT) is a Quaternary composite volcano in the central Oregon High Cascades. Volcanics in the vicinity of BT range from basalt to rhyodacite with a paucity of andesite. Most pre- and syn-BT lavas were generated through low pressure crystal fractionation (CF) in small, short-lived chambers. Mixing superimposed on CF generally involved magmas with minimal compositional differences. Lavas erupted from BT are dominantly phenocryst-rich bas. andesite which exhibits evidence for a mixing origin. Whole-rock and phenocryst compositions suggest mixing between basalt and andesite. The andesite can be explained by low pressure CF of the basalt. Latest BT activity consisted of bas. andesite, dacite, and rhyodacite lavas which were generated through CF. During BT activity, andesite was produced by CF during rapid sidewall crystallization and ponded at the top of the chamber. Mixing most likely took place during eruptive events, but evidence for a persistent presence of mixed (hybrid) magma in the chamber suggests incomplete evacuation of mixed magma. With time, the andesite layer became less significant due to decreasing rates of sidewall crystallization and/or frequent eruption/replenishment, more widespread crystal settling resulted in eruption of CF-generated bas. andesite and low-Si dacite. Rapid crystallization of dacitic magma followed by buoyant segregation yielded rhyodacite. These processes operating during the latest stages of the BT activity were likely similar to those operating in the short-lived chambers. Paucity of CF-generated andesite is explained by: (1) low density crust which retards andesite ascent, and (2) rapid crystallization over the dacite range. While significant amounts of andesite were produced in the longer-lived BT system, it rarely erupted unmixed.

  13. Mineral resource potential map of the Great Rift Instant Study Area, Blaine, Butte, Minidoka, and Power counties, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ridenour, James; Stotelmeyer, Ronald B.; Kuntz, Mel A.; Mabey, Don R.; Champion, Duane E.; Lefebvre, Richard H.; Stanley, W.D.

    1983-01-01

    Locating speculative resources (uraniferous sediment, auriferous gravel, and geothermal reservoirs) and hypothetical resources (oil and gas) that may underlie the geologically young lava flows of the study area would require extensive geophysical exploration and drilling.

  14. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1986. Volume 4. Northern Central Valley Basins and the Great Basin from Honey Lake Basin to Oregon State Line

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullen, J.R.; Shelton, W.F.; Simpson, R.G.; Grillo, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1986 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains discharge records for 156 gaging stations; stage and contents for 37 lakes and reservoirs; water precipitation data for 2 stations; and water quality for 8 stations. Also included is one water-quality partial-record station. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  15. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1987. Volume 2. Pacific Slope Basins from Arroyo Grande to Oregon State Line Except Central Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, S.; Markham, K.L.; Shelton, W.F.; Trujillo, L.F.

    1988-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1987 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water. quality in wells. Volume 2 contains discharge records for 123 gaging stations; stage and contents for 7 lakes and reservoirs; and water quality for 29 stations. Also included are 1 partial-record station and 24 water-quality partial-record stations, These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  16. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1984; Volume 2. Pacific Slope Basins from Arroyo Grande to Oregon State Line except Central Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, S.; Markham, K.L.; Piro, V.; Shelton, W.F.; Grillo, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1984 water year for California consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 2 contains discharge records for 132 gaging stations; stage and contents for 18 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 11 stations; water levels for 9 observation wells. Also included are 2 low-flow partial-record stations and 19 water-quality partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  17. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1988. Volume 2. Pacific Slope Basins from Arroyo Grande to Oregon State Line Except Central Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markham, K.L.; Palmer, J.R.; Shelton, W.F.; Trujillo, L.F.

    1989-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1988 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 2 contains discharge records for 123 gaging stations; stage and contents for 7 lakes and reservoirs; and water quality for 38 stations. Also included is l low-flow partial-record station and 22 water-quality partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  18. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1990. Volume 4. Northern Central Valley Basins and the Great Basin from Honey Lake Basin to Oregon State Line

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullen, J.R.; Shelton, W.F.; Markham, K.L.; Anderson, S.W.

    1991-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1990 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains discharge records for 182 gaging stations; stage and contents for 34 lakes and reservoirs; precipitation data for 3 stations; and water quality. for 12 stations. Also included is one low-flow partial-record station. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  19. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1989. Volume 4. Northern Central Valley Basins and the Great Basin from Honey Lake Basin to Oregon State Line

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, S.W.; Mullen, J.R.; Shelton, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1989 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains discharge records for 177 gaging stations; stage and contents for 34 lakes and reservoirs; precipitation data for 3 stations; and water quality for 9 stations. Also included is one low-flow partial-record station. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  20. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1983 Volume 2. Pacific Slope Basins from Arroyo Grande to Oregon State Line except Central Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, S.; Markham, K.L.; Piro, V.; Shelton, W.F.; Grillo, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    Hater resources data for the 1983 water year for California consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 2 contains discharge records for 145 gaging stations; stage and contents for 19 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 17 stations; water levels for 67 observation wells. Also included are 2 low-flow partial-record stations and 18 water-quality partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Hater Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  1. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1985. Volume 4. Northern California Valley Basins and the Great Basin from Honey Lake Basin to Oregon State Line

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullen, J.R.; Shelton, W.F.; Simpson, R.G.; Grillo, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1985 water year for California consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; and stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains discharge records for 155 gaging stations; stage and contents for 29 lakes and reservoirs; water precipitation data for 2 stations; and water quality for 16 stations. Also included are 7 water-quality partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  2. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1989. Volume 2. Pacific Slope Basins from Arroyo Grande to Oregon State Line except Central Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palmer, J.R.; Shelton, W.F.; Trujillo, L.F.; Markham, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1989 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water. quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 2 contains discharge records for 127 gaging stations, stage and contents for 7 lakes and reservoir and water quality for 32 stations. Also included is 1 low-flow partial-record station and 22 waterquality partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the u.s. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  3. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1988. Volume 4. Northern Central Valley Basins and The Great Basin from Honey Lake Basin to Oregon State Line

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelton, W.F.; Anderson, S.W.; Mullen, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1988 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wellso Volume 4 contains discharge records for 160 gaging stations; stage and contents for 35 lakes and reservoirs; water precipitation data for 2 stations; and water quality for 9 stations Also included is one low-flow partial-record station. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  4. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1985. Volume 2. Pacific Slope Basins from Arroyo Grande to Oregon State Line except Central Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, S.; Markham, K.L.; Trujillo, L.F.; Shelton, W.F.; Grillo, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1985 water year for California consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; and stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 2 contains discharge records for 133 gaging stations; stage and contents for 9 lakes and reservoirs; and water quality for 34 stations. Also included are 3 low-flow partial-record stations and 1 water-quality partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  5. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1986. Volume 2. Pacific Slope Basins from Arroyo Grande to Oregon State Line except Central Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, S.; Markham, K.L.; Shelton, W.F.; Trujillo, L.F.; Grillo, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1986 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 2 contains discharge records for 132 gaging stations; stage and contents for 11 lakes and reservoirs; and water quality for 32 stations. Also included are 4 partial-record stations and 24 water-quality partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  6. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1982, Volume 2. Pacific Slope Basins from Arroyo Grande to Oregon State Line except Central Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markham, K.L.; Piro, V.; Shelton, W.F.; Weston, M.W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1982 water year for California consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 2 contains discharge records for 153 gaging stations; stage and contents for 12 lakes and. reservoirs; water quality for 19 stations; water levels for 73 observation wells. Also included are 1 low-flow partial-record station and 13 water-quality partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  7. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1987. Volume 4. Northern Central Valley Basins and The Great Basin from Honey Lake Basin to Oregon State Line

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mullen, J.R.; Shelton, W.F.; Simpson, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1987 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains discharge records for 154 gaging stations; stage and contents for 33 lakes and reservoirs; water precipitation data for 2 stations; and water quality for 5 stations. Also included is one low-flow partial-record station. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  8. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1997. Volume 4. Northern Central Valley Basins and the Great Basin from Honey Lake Basin to Oregon State Line

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rockwell, G.L.; Friebel, M.F.; Webster, M.D.; Anderson, S.W.

    1998-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1997 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams, stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains discharge records for 176 gaging stations and 1 partial-record station, stage and contents for 45 lakes and reservoirs, gage-height records for 3 stations, precipitation data for 3 stations, and water quality data for 14 stations and 6 waterquality partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  9. Water Resources Data -- California, Water Year 2003, Volume 4. Northern Central Valley Basins and The Great Basin from Honey Lake Basin to Oregon State Line

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friebel, M.F.; Webster, M.D.; Rockwell, G.L.; Smithson, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2003 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams, stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains discharge records for 195 gaging stations, stage and contents for 62 lakes and reservoirs, gage-height records for 1 station, water quality for 33 streamflow-gaging stations and 8 partial-record stations. Also included are 4 miscellaneous partial-record sites. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  10. Water Resources Data--California, Water Year 2001. Volume 4. Northern Central Valley Basins and The Great Basin from Honey Lake Basin to Oregon State Line

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rockwell, G.L.; Smithson, J.R.; Friebel, M.F.; Webster, M.D.

    2002-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2001 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams, stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains discharge records for 191 gaging stations, stage and contents for 53 lakes and reservoirs, gage-height records for 1 station, and water quality for 18 stations. Also included are 3 miscellaneous partial-record sites, and 3 parital-record water-quality stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  11. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1998. Volume 4. Northern Central Valley Basins and the Great Basin from Honey Lake Basin to Oregon State Line

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friebel, M.F.; Webster, M.D.; Anderson, S.W.; Rockwell, G.L.; Smithson, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1998 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams, stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains discharge records for 176 gaging stations and 1 partial-record station, stage and contents for 45 lakes and reservoirs, gage-height records for 1 station, precipitation data for 3 stations, and water quality for 14 stations and 7 waterquality partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  12. Water Resources Data--California, Water Year 2000. Volume 4. Northern Central Valley Basins and The Great Basin from Honey Lake Basin to Oregon State Line

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, S.W.; Rockwell, G.L.; Smithson, J.R.; Friebel, M.F.; Webster, M.D.

    2001-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2000 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams, stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains discharge records for 190 gaging stations and 5 partial-record stations, stage and contents for 60 lakes and reservoirs, gage-height records for 1 station, precipitation data for 3 stations, and water quality for 10 stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  13. Water resources data-California, water year 2004. volume 4. northern central valley basins and the Great Basin from Honey Lake basin to Oregon state line

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webster, M.D.; Rockwell, G.L.; Friebel, M.F.; Brockner, S.J.

    2005-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2004 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams, stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains discharge records for 188 gaging stations, stage and contents for 62 lakes and reservoirs, gage-height records for 1 station, water quality for 20 streamflow-gaging stations and 1 partial-record stations. Also included are 4 miscellaneous partial-record sites. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  14. Water Resources Data--California, Water Year 2002, Volume 4. Northern Central Valley Basins and The Great Basin from Honey Lake Basin to Oregon State Line

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smithson, J.R.; Friebel, M.F.; Webster, M.D.; Rockwell, G.L.

    2002-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 2002 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams, stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains discharge records for 191 gaging stations, stage and contents for 60 lakes and reservoirs, gage-height records for 2 stations, and water quality for 21 stations. Also included are 4 miscellaneous partial-record sites. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  15. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1996. Volume 4. Northern Central Valley Basins and the Great Basin from Honey Lake Basin to Oregon State Line

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, S.W.; Rockwell, G.L.; Friebel, M.F.; Webster, M.D.

    1997-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1996 water year for California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams, stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs, and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains discharge records for 180 gaging stations, stage and contents for 45 lakes and reservoirs, gage-height records for 5 stations, precipitation data for 3 stations, and water quality for 15 stations. Also included is 1 low-flow partial-record station. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  16. Mineral resources of the East Fork High Rock Canyon Wilderness Study Area, Washoe and Humboldt counties, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Plouff, J.A.A.; Turner, R.L.; Schmauch, S.W.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mines conducted investigations to assess the mineral resource potential and appraise the identified resources of the East Fork High Rock Canyon Wilderness Study Area in northwestern Nevada. The study area has moderate mineral resource potential for gold, silver, and mercury and for zeolite minerals. A low potential exists for geothermal energy resources, and potential for oil and gas is unknown.

  17. Catchment Area Treatment (CAT) Plan and Crop Area Optimization for Integrated Management in a Water Resource Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, R. K.; Thomas, T.; Galkate, R. V.; Ghosh, N. C.; Singh, S.

    2013-09-01

    A scientifically developed catchment area treatment (CAT) plan and optimized pattern of crop areas may be the key for sustainable development of water resource, profitability in agriculture and improvement of overall economy in drought affected Bundelkhand region of Madhya Pradesh (India). In this study, an attempt has been made to develop a CAT plan using spatial variation of geology, geomorphology, soil, drainage, land use in geographical information system for selection of soil and water conservation measures and crop area optimization using linear programming for maximization of return considering water availability, area affinity, fertilizers, social and market constraints in Benisagar reservoir project of Chhatarpur district (M.P.). The scientifically developed CAT plan based on overlaying of spatial information consists of 58 mechanical measure (49 boulder bunds, 1 check dam, 7 cully plug and 1 percolation tank), 2.60 km2 land for agro forestry, 2.08 km2 land for afforestation in Benisagar dam and 67 mechanical measures (45 boulder bunds and 22 gully plugs), 7.79 km2 land for agro forestry, 5.24 km2 land for afforestation in Beniganj weir catchment with various agronomic measures for agriculture areas. The linear programming has been used for optimization of crop areas in Benisagar command for sustainable development considering various scenarios of water availability, efficiencies, affinity and fertilizers availability in the command. Considering present supply condition of water, fertilizers, area affinity and making command self sufficient in most of crops, the net benefit can be increase to Rs. 1.93 crores from 41.70 km2 irrigable area in Benisagar command by optimizing cropping pattern and reducing losses during conveyance and application of water.

  18. Geothermal resource areas database for monitoring the progress of development in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, J.D.; Lepman, S.R.; Leung, K.; Phillips, S.L.

    1981-01-01

    The Geothermal Resource Areas Database (GRAD) and associated data system provide broad coverage of information on the development of geothermal resources in the United States. The system is designed to serve the information requirements of the National Progress Monitoring System. GRAD covers development from the initial exploratory phase through plant construction and operation. Emphasis is on actual facts or events rather than projections and scenarios. The selection and organization of data are based on a model of geothermal development. Subjects in GRAD include: names and addresses, leases, area descriptions, geothermal wells, power plants, direct use facilities, and environmental and regulatory aspects of development. Data collected in the various subject areas are critically evaluated, and then entered into an on-line interactive computer system. The system is publically available for retrieval and use. The background of the project, conceptual development, software development, and data collection are described here. Appendices describe the structure of the database in detail.

  19. Geothermal resource areas database for monitoring the progress of development in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J. D.; Lepman, S. R.; Leung, K. N.; Phillips, S. L.

    1981-01-01

    The Geothermal Resource Areas Database (GRAD) and associated data system provide broad coverage of information on the development of geothermal resources in the United States. The system is designed to serve the information requirements of the National Progress Monitoring System. GRAD covers development from the initial exploratory phase through plant construction and operation. Emphasis is on actual facts or events rather than projections and scenarios. The selection and organization of data are based on a model of geothermal development. Subjects in GRAD include: names and addresses, leases, area descriptions, geothermal wells, power plants, direct use facilities, and environmental and regulatory aspects of development. Data collected in the various subject areas are critically evaluated, and then entered into an on-line interactive computer system. The system is publically available for retrieval and use. The background of the project, conceptual development, software development, and data collection are described as well as the structure of the database.

  20. Water Resources Data for California, water year 1984. Volume 4. Northern Central Valley Basins and the Great Basin from Honey Lake Basin to Oregon State Line

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fogelman, R.P.; Mullen, J.R.; Shelton, W.F.; Simpson, R.G.; Grillo, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1984 water year for California consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains discharge records for 152 gaging stations; stage and contents for 25 lakes and reservoirs; water precipitation data for 2 stations; water quality for 9 stations; water levels for 12 and water quality for 46 observation wells. Also included is one low-flow partialrecord station and 19 water-quality partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and federal agencies in California.

  1. Water Resources Data for California Water Year 1982, Volume 4. Northern California Valley Basins and the Great Basin from Honey Lake Basin to Oregon State Line

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fogelman, R.P.; Mullen, J.R.; Shelton, W.F.; Simpson, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1982 water year for California consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains discharge records for 163 gaging stations; stage and contents for 27 lakes and reservoirs; precipitation data for 2 stations; water quality for 7 stations; and water levels for 54 observation wells, Also included are 4 crest-stage partial-record stations and 4 low-flow partial-record stations. Additional wator data are collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data collection program, and are published as special investigations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the u.s. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  2. Water Resources Data for California, Water Year 1983, Volume 4. Northern California Valley Basins and the Great Basin from Honey Lake Basin to Oregon State Line

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fogelman, R.P.; Mullen, J.R.; Shelton, W.F.; Simpson, R.G.; Grillo, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    Water-resources data for the 1983 water year for California consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 4 contains discharge records for 153 gaging stations; stage and contents for 25 lakes and reservoirs; precipitation data for 2 stations; water quality for 7 stations; and water levels for 147 observation wells. Also included is one low-flow partial-record station. Additional water data are collected at various sites, not part of the systematic data collection program, and are published as special investigations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  3. Water Resources Data, California, Water Year 1990. Volume 2. Pacific Slope Basins from Arroyo Grande to Oregon State Line except Central Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelton, W.F.; Trujillo, L.F.; Markham, K.L.; Palmer, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Water resources data for the 1990 water year for. California consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents in lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality in wells. Volume 2 contains discharge records for 125 streamflow-gaging stations and 1 low-flow partial-record station; stage and contents for 7 lakes and reservoirs; precipitation records for 4 stations; and water-quality records for 29 streamflow-gaging stations and 10 water-quality partial-record stations. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in California.

  4. Geology and phosphate resources of the Hawley Creek area, Lemhi County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberlindacher, Peter; Hovland, Robert David

    1979-01-01

    Phosphate resources occur within the Retort Phosphatic Shale Member of the Permian Phosphoria Formation in the Hawley Creek area, near Leadore, in east-central Idaho. About 12 square miles (31 km2 ) of the Retort Member and enclosing rocks were mapped at a scale of 1:12,000 to evaluate the leasable Federal mineral resources. The Retort has an average thickness of 73 feet (22.3 m) and 12.9 linear miles (20.8 linear km) of outcrop within the area mapped. Rock samples taken from a bulldozer trench were analyzed for phosphate content and for minor trace elements. Analyses show a cumulative thickness of 8.7 feet ( 2.7 m) of medium-grade phosphate rock ( 24 to 31 percent P2O5) and 33.4 feet (10.2 m) of low-grade phosphate rock (16 to 24 percent P2O5). Minor elements in the Retort include uranium, vanadium, fluorine, cadmium, chromium, nickel, molybdenum, silver, and rare earths. These minor elements are potential byproducts of any future phosphate production in the Hawley Creek area. In addition, analyses of six phosphate rock samples taken from a prospect trench show a cumulative thickness of 14.9 ft (4.5 m) at 17.6 percent P2O5. Indicated phosphate resources are calculated for phosphate beds under less than 600 feet (183.0 m) of overburden. Approximately 36.5 feet (11.1 m), representing 50 percent of the total Retort Member, were measured in trench CP-71. There are 80.42 million short tons (72.96 million metric tons) of medium-grade phosphate rock, and 308.76 million short tons ( 280.10 million metric tons) of low-grade phosphate rock in the Retort Member within the map area. Because the thickness and grade of the phosphate beds for each block are based on the recovered section from CP-71, the calculated phosphate resource estimates represent a minimum. Other mineral resources in the area are thorium (35 ppm) in a Precambrian (?) granite body located immediately west of the Hawley Creek area; oil and gas accumulations may occur beneath the Medicine Lodge thrust system

  5. Geology and coal resources of the Foidel Creek EMRIA site and surrounding area, Routt County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryer, Thomas A.

    1977-01-01

    Terrigenous clastic sediments of the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group (Campanian) in the southeastern part of the Yampa coal field in Routt County, northwestern Colorado, contain many beds of bituminous coal. Lower, middle, and upper coal groups are recognized. The middle coal group, in the lower coal-bearing member of the Williams Fork Formation, contains two thick, persistent coal beds in the Foidel Creek area. The Wadge coal bed, stratigraphically the higher of the two, reaches thicknesses of 3.7 meters, and is strippable beneath large areas on the south slope of Eckman Park. Coal resources of the Wadge bed in the Foidel Creek area--an area of 134 square kilometers, as defined in this study--are estimated to be 317 million metric tons. The Foidel Creek EMRIA reclamation study site--an area of 10.9 square kilometers--contains about 36.1 million metric tons of Wadge coal, as much as 28.1 million metric tons of which occur beneath overburden 61 meters or less in thickness. About 52 meters lower in the section, the Wolf Creek coal bed locally exceeds 6.1 meters in thickness. Coal resources of the Wolf Creek bed in the Foidel Creek area are estimated to be 434 million metric tons. The Foidel Creek EMRIA reclamation study site contains an estimated 49.7 million metric tons of Wolf Creek coal.

  6. Indians In Oregon Today. Oregon Middle School - High School Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepper, Floy

    2004-01-01

    The main purpose of this publication is to provide current, accurate information to teachers and students about the Indian tribes living in the state of Oregon. Too often information about Indian tribes is stereotypic, inaccurate, and outdated. A number of Indian tribes have worked on the development of this document, using the "Oregon Indians:…

  7. The utilization and management of plant resources in rural areas of the Limpopo Province, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most rural people in the Limpopo Province depend on plant resources to meet their livelihood needs. However, there is insufficient recorded information regarding their use and management. The current study therefore was carried out in selected villages of the Limpopo Province, to close this knowledge gap. Methods Information was collected from 60 people residing in two villages, using a semi-structured questionnaire, supplemented with field observations. Results A total of 47 wild plant species (95% indigenous and 5% exotics) from 27 families, mostly from the Fabaceae (17%), Anacardiaceae (9%), and Combretaceae (9%) were documented. These species were used primarily for firewood (40%), food (36%) and medicine (29%). Significantly used species included Sclerocarya birrea (85%), Combretum kraussii (35%) and Harpephyllum caffrum (35%). Local traditional rules and regulations including taboos, social beliefs and fines are in place to aid in the management of communal resources. However, a significant number (67%) of participants mentioned that they were not pleased with these rules and regulations. Conclusion The current study concluded that plant resources still play an important role in the surveyed rural areas of the Limpopo Province. Furthermore, for sustainable utilization and long-term conservation of plants in these areas the government should assist communities in the management of their plant resources. PMID:23590903

  8. 33 CFR 165.1336 - Regulated Navigation Area; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott Bay, Seattle, WA. 165.1336 Section... Area; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott Bay, Seattle, WA. (a... the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and others in the Pacific Sound Resources and...

  9. 33 CFR 165.1336 - Regulated Navigation Area; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott Bay, Seattle, WA. 165.1336 Section... Area; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott Bay, Seattle, WA. (a... the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and others in the Pacific Sound Resources and...

  10. ESTIMATION OF LEAF AREA INDEX IN OPEN-CANOPY PONDEROSA PINE FORESTS AT DIFFERENT SUCCESSIONAL STAGES AND MANAGEMENT REGIMES IN OREGON. (R828309)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Leaf area and its spatial distribution are key parameters in describing canopy characteristics. They determine radiation regimes and influence mass and energy exchange with the atmosphere. The evaluation of leaf area in conifer stands is particularly challengi...

  11. Hot dry rock resources of the Clear Lake Area, Northern California

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, K.L.

    1994-10-01

    The Geysers-Clear Lake geothermal area of northern California is underlain by an asthenospheric upwarp. The upwarp was generated at a slabless window trailing the northward-moving Mendocino triple junction. The geothermal area lies immediately east of the Rodgers Creek rather than the San Andreas fault because of a transform jump in progress. Decompression melting of the mantle has led to basaltic underplating, and crustal anatexis. The high heat flow is due to conduction through a thin lithosphere and the latent heat of solidifying basalt, while the uniformity is due to the distribution of sources over a wide area of large flatlying sills, The Hot Dry Rock resource has heat flow exceeding 4 HFU over an area exceeding 800 km2.

  12. Reconnaissance of geothermal resources near US naval facilities in the San Diego area, California

    SciTech Connect

    Youngs, L.G.

    1984-01-01

    A reconnaissance study has found little evidence of potential geothermal resources useful at naval facilities in the greater San Diego metropolitan area. However, there is a zone of modest elevated water well temperatures and slightly elevated thermal gradients that may include the eastern portion of the Imperial Beach Naval Air Station south of San Diego Bay. An increase of 0.3/sup 0/ to 0.4/sup 0/F/100 ft over the regional thermal gradient of 1.56/sup 0/F/100 ft was conservatively calculated for this zone. The thermal gradient can be used to predict 150/sup 0/F temperatures at a depth of approximately 4000 ft. This zone of greatest potential for a viable geothermal resource lies within a negative gravity anomaly thought to be caused by a tensionally developed graben, approximately centered over the San Diego Bay. Water well production in this zone is good to high, with 300 gpm often quoted as common for wells in this area. The concentration of total dissolved solids (TDS) in the deeper wells in this zone is relatively high due to intrusion of sea water. Productive geothermal wells may have to be drilled to depths economically infeasible for development of the resource in the area of discussion.

  13. Lyme Disease in Oregon

    PubMed Central

    Doggett, J. Stone; Kohlhepp, Sue; Gresbrink, Robert; Metz, Paul; Gleaves, Curt; Gilbert, David

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of Lyme disease in Oregon is calculated from cases reported to the Oregon State Health Division. We reviewed the exposure history of reported cases of Lyme disease and performed field surveys for infected Ixodes pacificus ticks. The incidence of Lyme disease correlated with the distribution of infected I. pacificus ticks. PMID:18448697

  14. Hispanics in Oregon's Workforce, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Brenda; Wood, Mary

    This report describes the Latino workforce in Oregon, outlining employment, income, education, and unemployment data. A brief history of Hispanics in the state notes that most of Oregon's Hispanics are of Mexican origin and that the state's Hispanic population grew 66 percent between 1990 and 1997. The history of migrant agricultural labor in…

  15. Assessment of water resources in lead-zinc mined areas in Cherokee County, Kansas, and adjacent areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spruill, T.B.

    1984-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate water-resource problems related to abandoned lead and zinc mines in Cherokee County, and adjacent areas in Oklahoma and Missouri. Discontinuities and perforations, which were produced by mining in the confining shale west of the Pennsylvanian-Mississippian geologic contact, have created artificial groundwater recharge and discharge areas. Abandoned wells and drill holes present the greatest contamination hazard to water supplies in the deep aquifer. There is a potential for downward movement from the shallow to the deep aquifer throughout the study area, with greatest potential in Ottawa County, Oklahoma. Principal effects of abandoned mines on groundwater quality are lowered pH and increased concentrations of sulfate and trace metals of water in the mines. No conclusive evidence of lateral migration of contaminated mine water from the mines into the water-supply wells adjacent to the mines was found. Analyses of water from the deep aquifer did not indicate trace-metal contamination. The effects of abandoned mines on streamwater quality are most severe in Short Creek and Tar Creek. Increased concentrations of zinc and manganese were observed in the Spring River below Short Creek Kansas. (USGS)

  16. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Medford Quadrangle Oregon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Medford, Oregon, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of three miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twelve miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 2925 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  17. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Roseburg Quadrangle, Oregon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Roseburg, Oregon, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1596 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  18. A Forest Vegetation Database for Western Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busing, Richard T.

    2004-01-01

    Data on forest vegetation in western Oregon were assembled for 2323 ecological survey plots. All data were from fixed-radius plots with the standardized design of the Current Vegetation Survey (CVS) initiated in the early 1990s. For each site, the database includes: 1) live tree density and basal area of common tree species, 2) total live tree density, basal area, estimated biomass, and estimated leaf area; 3) age of the oldest overstory tree examined, 4) geographic coordinates, 5) elevation, 6) interpolated climate variables, and 7) other site variables. The data are ideal for ecoregional analyses of existing vegetation.

  19. Avian Monitoring and Risk Assessment at the San Gorgonio Wind Resource Area

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.; Tom, J.; Neumann, N.; Erickson, W. P.; Strickland, M. D.; Bourassa, M.; Bay, K. J.; Sernka, K. J.

    2005-08-01

    The primary objective of this study at the San Gorgonio Wind Resource Area was to estimate and compare bird utilization, fatality rates, and the risk index among factors including bird taxonomic groups, wind turbine and reference areas, wind turbine sizes and types, and geographic locations. The key questions addressed to meet this objective include: (1) Are there any differences in the level of bird activity, called ''utilization rate'' or ''use'', with the operating wind plant and within the surrounding undeveloped areas (reference area)?; (2) Are there any differences in the rate of bird fatalities (or avian fatality) within the operating wind plant or the surrounding undeveloped areas (reference area)?; (3) Does bird use, fatality rates, or bird risk index vary according to the geographic location, type and size of wind turbine, and/or type of bird within the operating wind plant and surrounding undeveloped areas (reference area)?; and (4) How do raptor fatality rates at San Gorgonio compare to other wind projects with comparable data?

  20. Potential impact of lava flows on regional water supplies: case study of central Oregon Cascades volcanism and the Willamette Valley, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deligne, Natalia; Cashman, Katharine; Grant, Gordon; Jefferson, Anne

    2013-04-01

    Lava flows are often considered to be natural hazards with localized bimodal impact - they completely destroy everything in their path, but apart from the occasional forest fire, cause little or no damage outside their immediate footprint. However, in certain settings, lava flows can have surprising far reaching impacts with the potential to cause serious problems in distant urban areas. Here we present results from a study of the interaction between lava flows and surface water in the central Oregon Cascades, USA, where we find that lava flows in the High Cascades have the potential to cause considerable water shortages in Eugene, Oregon (Oregon's second largest metropolitan area) and the greater Willamette Valley (home to ~70% of Oregon's population). The High Cascades host a groundwater dominated hydrological regime with water residence times on the order of years. Due to the steady output of groundwater, rivers sourced in the High Cascades are a critical water resource for Oregon, particularly in August and September when it has not rained for several months. One such river, the McKenzie River, is the sole source of drinking water for Eugene, Oregon, and prior to the installation of dams in the 1960s accounted for ~40% of late summer river flow in the Willamette River in Portland, 445 river km downstream of the source of the McKenzie River. The McKenzie River has been dammed at least twice by lava flows during the Holocene; depending the time of year that these eruptions occurred, we project that available water would have decreased by 20% in present-day Eugene, Oregon, for days to weeks at a time. Given the importance of the McKenzie River and its location on the margin of an active volcanic area, we expect that future volcanic eruptions could likewise impact water supplies in Eugene and the greater Willamette Valley. As such, the urban center of Eugene, Oregon, and also the greater Willamette Valley, is vulnerable to the most benign of volcanic hazards, lava

  1. 33 CFR 165.1336 - Regulated Navigation Area; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott Bay, Seattle, WA. 165.1336 Section... Area; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott Bay, Seattle, WA....

  2. Petroleum potential of Oregon and Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Billo, S.M. )

    1990-06-01

    The states of Oregon and Washington border the Pacific Ocean within an area of diverse topography, climate, and vegetation with altitudes ranging from sea level to more than 8,000 ft. The Mesozoic and Paleozoic rocks are quasi-eugeosynclinal but badly indurated and/or metamorphosed, implying that almost all the pre-Tertiary rocks were unfavorable for oil and gas except some 700 mi{sup 2} of outcropping Mesozoic rocks exposed through windows in the overlying volcanics along the SW extension of the Blue and the Klamath mountains, accordingly. A profound angular and erosional unconformity separates the Tertiary sediments and volcanics from the older rocks. During Late Mesozoic and Tertiary time, uplift accompanied by erosion caused the removal of large areas of metamorphosed sediments and the development of pre-Miocene surface of large relief. Crustal movements of Late Miocene age produced NW-SE folds in Washington, and NS folds in the Coast range of Oregon. Some of the exploration methods (excluding wildcat drilling) were inconvenient. Seismic and gravity methods are impeded, the first by glacial till, basalt flows, sills, and dikes, and the second by laccoliths. Although the region is not the best place for hustling, drilling activity for development of potential oil and gas ushered 78% success rate in Oregon, and Shell and Exxon earned significant bonus bids in Washington.

  3. Fires Scorch Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In southwestern Oregon, the Florence Fire (north) and the Sour Biscuit Fire (south) continue to grow explosively. This image from the Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus was captured on July 29, 2002. The Florence Fire had grown to 50,000 acres and the Sour Biscuit Fire had grown to 16,000 acres. Numerous evacuation notices remain in effect. Thick smoke from the actively burning eastern perimeter of the Florence Fire is billowing southward and mingling with the Biscuit Fire smoke. Credit:Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch.

  4. On the Oregon trail.

    PubMed

    Kitzhaber, J; Kemmy, A M

    1995-10-01

    On the eve of the 21st century, governments around the world are struggling to resolve the dual problems of health care cost and access. My own experience in addressing these issues as they manifest themselves in the US, and particularly in the state of Oregon, convinces me that successful health care reform, anywhere in the world, must sooner or later grapple with two questions: what are we buying with our health care dollars, and how do these expenditures relate to health? PMID:8556290

  5. OREGON ECOLOGICAL REGIONS AND SUBREGIONS FOR WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To aid the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in producing a State Clean Water Strategy and in managing water resources, scientists working with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have defined an initial set of regions and subregions of the state with po...

  6. DELINEATION OF THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE'S PLACE IN OREGON EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    COMMUNITY COLLEGES IN OREGON, HAVING RESOURCES AND FLEXIBILITY TO MEET MANY DEMANDS FOR POST-HIGH SCHOOL EDUCATION, ARE INTENDED TO OFFER BROAD, COMPREHENSIVE PROGRAMS IN BOTH ACADEMIC AND VOCATIONAL FIELDS. THEY SHOULD BE (1) LOCAL, WITHIN COMMUTING RANGE FOR MOST OF THEIR STUDENTS, (2) OPEN TO ALL WHO CAN PROFIT FROM THEIR PROGRAMS, (3) PART OF…

  7. Assessment of water resources in lead-zinc mined areas in Cherokee County, Kansas, and adjacent areas

    SciTech Connect

    Spruill, T.B.

    1987-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate water resources problems related to abandoned lead and zinc mines in Cherokee County, Kansas, and adjacent areas in Missouri and Oklahoma. Past mining activities have caused changes in the geohydrology of the area. Discharge of mine-contaminated groundwater to Tar Creek occurs in Oklahoma from drill holes and shafts where the potentiometric surface of the shallow aquifer is above the land surface. Pumping of the deep aquifer has resulted in a potential for downward movement of water from the shallow aquifer. Water from mines in the eastern area contained dissolved solids concentrations of < 500 mg/L a median pH of 3.9, sulfate concentrations that ranged between 98 and 290 mg/L, and median concentrations for zinc of 37,600 micrograms/L (ug/L) for lead of 240 ug/L, for cadmium of 180 ug/L, for iron of 70 ug/L, for manganese of 240 ug/L, and for silica of 15 mg/L. Water from mines in the western area contained dissolved solids concentrations of generally > 500 mg/L, a median pH of 6.8, sulfate concentrations that ranged between 170 and 2,150 mg/L, and median concentrations for zinc of 3,200 ug/L for lead of 0 ug/L. No conclusive evidence of lateral migration of water from the mines into domestic well water supplies in the shallow aquifer was found in the study area in Kansas. Effects of abandoned lead and zinc mines on tributaries of the Spring River in the eastern area are most severe in Short Creek. Drainage from tailings cause large concentrations of sulfate, zinc, and cadmium in Tar Creek in Kansas. Compared with four other major streams in the western area in Kansas, Tar Creek contained the largest low flow concentrations of sulfate (910 mg/L), zinc (5,800 ug/L), and cadmium (40 ug/L). 45 refs., 23 figs., 26 tabs.

  8. Wildlife resource utilisation at Moremi Game Reserve and Khwai community area in the Okavango Delta, Botswana.

    PubMed

    Mbaiwa, Joseph E

    2005-10-01

    This paper uses the concept of sustainable development to examine the utilisation of wildlife resources at Moremi Game Reserve (MGR) and Khwai community area (NG 18/19) in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. Using both secondary and primary data sources, results show that the establishment of MGR in 1963 led to the displacement of Khwai residents from their land; affected Basarwa's hunting and gathering economy; marked the beginning of resource conflicts between Khwai residents and wildlife managers; and, led to the development of negative attitudes of Khwai residents towards wildlife conservation. Since the late 1980s, a predominantly foreign owned tourism industry developed in and around MGR, however, Khwai residents derive insignificant benefits from it and hence resource conflicts increased. In an attempt to address problems of resource conflicts and promote sustainable wildlife utilisation, the Botswana Government adopted the Community-Based Natural Resource Management (CBNRM) programme, which started operating at Khwai village in 2000. The CBNRM programme promotes local participation in natural resource management and rural development through tourism. It is beginning to have benefits to Khwai residents such as income generation, employment opportunities and local participation in wildlife management. These benefits from CBNRM are thus having an impact in the development of positive attitudes of Khwai residents towards wildlife conservation and tourism development. This paper argues that if extended to MGR, CBNRM has the potential of minimising wildlife conflicts between Khwai residents and the wildlife-tourism sectors. This approach may in the process promote the sustainable wildlife use in and around MGR. PMID:16115724

  9. Final Scientific / Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration Program, Truckhaven Area, Imperial County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Layman Energy Associates, Inc.

    2006-08-15

    With financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Layman Energy Associates, Inc. (LEA) has completed a program of geothermal exploration at the Truckhaven area in Imperial County, California. The exploratory work conducted by LEA included the following activities: compilation of public domain resource data (wells, seismic data, geologic maps); detailed field geologic mapping at the project site; acquisition and interpretation of remote sensing imagery such as aerial and satellite photographs; acquisition, quality control and interpretation of gravity data; and acquisition, quality control and interpretation of resistivity data using state of the art magnetotelluric (MT) methods. The results of this exploratory program have allowed LEA to develop a structural and hydrologic interpretation of the Truckhaven geothermal resource which can be used to guide subsequent exploratory drilling and resource development. Of primary significance, is the identification of an 8 kilometer-long, WNW-trending zone of low resistivity associated with geothermal activity in nearby wells. The long axis of this low resistivity zone is inferred to mark a zone of faulting which likely provides the primary control on the distribution of geothermal resources in the Truckhaven area. Abundant cross-faults cutting the main WNW-trending zone in its western half may indicate elevated fracture permeability in this region, possibly associated with thermal upwelling and higher resource temperatures. Regional groundwater flow is inferred to push thermal fluids from west to east along the trend of the main low resistivity zone, with resource temperatures likely declining from west to east away from the inferred upwelling zone. Resistivity mapping and well data have also shown that within the WNW-trending low resistivity zone, the thickness of the Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary section above granite basement ranges from 1,900–2,600 meters. Well data indicates the lower part of this

  10. Use of modeling to protect, plan, and manage water resources in catchment areas.

    PubMed

    Constant, Thibaut; Charrière, Séverine; Lioeddine, Abdejalil; Emsellem, Yves

    2016-08-01

    The degradation of water resources by diffuse pollution, mainly due to nitrate and pesticides, is an important matter for public health. Restoration of the quality of natural water catchments by focusing on their catchment areas is therefore a national priority in France. To consider catchment areas as homogeneous and to expend an equal effort on the entire area inevitably leads to a waste of time and money, and restorative actions may not be as efficient as intended. The variability of the pedological and geological properties of the area is actually an opportunity to invest effort on smaller areas, simply because every action is not equally efficient on every kind of pedological or geological surface. Using this approach, it is possible to invest in a few selected zones that will be efficient in terms of environmental results. The contributive hydraulic areas (CHA) concept is different from that of the catchment area. Because the transport of most of the mobile and persistent pollutants is primarily driven by water circulation, the concept of the CHA is based on the water pathway from the surface of the soil in the catchment area to the well. The method uses a three-dimensional hydrogeological model of surface and groundwater integrated with a geographic information system called Watermodel. The model calculates the contribution (m(3)/h or %) of each point of the soil to the total flow pumped in a well. Application of this model, partially funded by the Seine Normandy Basin Agency, to the catchment of the Dormelles Well in the Cretaceous chalk aquifer in the Orvanne valley, France (catchment area of 23,000 ha at Dormelles, county 77), shows that 95 % of the water pumped at the Dormelles Well comes from only 26 % of the total surface area of the catchment. Consequently, an action plan to protect the water resource will be targeted at the 93 farmers operating in this source area rather than the total number of farmers (250) across the entire 23,000 ha. Another

  11. [Soil water resource use limit in semi-arid loess hilly area].

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhong-sheng

    2010-12-01

    Taking Caragana korshinskii as test object, and by using neutron probe, a long term observation was conducted on the soil water and plant growth during the process of vegetation restoration in semi-arid loess hilly area. The results showed that after seeding on waste land, the capability of plant community in conserving soil and water was promoted with time, with the depth of roots to absorb and use soil water increased and the soil water content reduced. Then, the dried soil layer appeared, and its deepness and thickness increased with increasing plant age. Therefore, the plant use of soil water had a limit, soil water resource use limit, i.e., the soil water storage when the deepness of dried soil layer was equal to the largest depth that rain could recharge. In the C. korshinskii woodland in semi-arid loess hilly area, the soil water resource use limit in 0-290 cm layer was 249.4 mm. When the soil water storage in woodland was close or equal to the soil water resource use limit, effective measures should be taken to decrease soil evapotranspiration or increase soil water supply to ensure the sustainable water use of plant roots. PMID:21442986

  12. Ground-water resources of the St. James area, South-central Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ropes, L.H.

    1969-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the quality and quantity of the ground-water resources in the area of St. James, Minnesota. St. James is located in the center of Watonwan County in south-central Minnesota. The area is covered by a thick layer of glacial drift which is underlain by Cretaceous, Cambrian, and Precambrian rocks. St. James presently obtains its water supply from two aquifers. One is a Cretaceous sandstone 160 feet below the surface, in which two wells are completed. This aquifer yields abundant water but it is of poor quality and is expensive to treat. The second source, tapped by three municipal wells, is a surficial sand and gravel deposit less than 40 feet thick at the well field. This aquifer produces water of better quality, but its extent and capacity are not known. There are other wells in the area completed at depths ranging from 15 to 500 feet.

  13. Mineral resources of the Indian Creek, Bridger Jack Mesa, and Butler Wash Wilderness Study Areas, San Juan County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, C.G.; Toth, M.I.; Case, J.E.; Barton, H.N.; Green, G.N.; Schreiner, R.A.; Thompson, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Indian Creek, Bridger Jack Mesa, and Butler Wash Wilderness Study Areas are located in San Juan County, southeastern Utah. These areas consist of nearly flat-lying sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic and Mesozoic age that are in places extensively faulted, forming horsts and grabens, or they are gently domed by flowage of the bedded salts of the Paradox Member of the Hermosa Formation. Inferred subeconomic resources of potash and halite are present in the Paradox beneath the Indian Creek Wilderness Study Area, but their likelihood for development is low. Inferred subeconomic resources of sandstone and small amounts of sand and gravel exist within these wilderness study areas, but because of their abundance throughout the region, their distance to current markets, and their lack of unique properties, these materials have no current likelihood for development. No uranium resources were identified at the surface in these wilderness study areas. However, the potential for undiscovered resources of uranium and by-products vanadium and copper is high for the north quarter of the Bridger Jack Mesa Wilderness Study Area; the mineral resource potential for these elements is low for the Butler Wash, Indian Creek and the remainder of the Bridger Jack Mesa Wilderness Study Areas. The potential for oil and gas resources is moderate in all three wilderness study areas. The mineral resource potential for potash and halite beneath the Bridger Jack Mesa and Butler Wash Wilderness Study Areas is low. The resource potential for gold and silver is low in all three wilderness study areas and the mineral resource potential for the rare-earth element braitschite is unknown in all three wilderness study areas.

  14. Oregon Coastal Observing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosro, M.; Allen, J. S.; Barth, J. A.; Egbert, G. D.; Huyer, A.; Smith, R. L.; Grantham, B. A.; Lubchenco, J.; Menge, B. A.

    2002-12-01

    Since 1997, a growing system of sustained coastal measurements, together with a high-resolution, data-assimilating coastal modeling program, have been used off Oregon to study the response of the coastal ocean to forcing at a range of space and time scales. The measurements include a large array of HF radars, which permit time-series mapping of the surface circulation over most of the Oregon coast; both long-term and short-term moored components, which provide time-series sampling through the water column; and repeat hydrographic, ADCP and surface drifter sampling, including the Newport Hydrographic Line (which has been sampled since the 1960s). At interannual frequencies, these measurements show changes in the alongshore circulation over the continental slope accompanying ENSO. At seasonal and storm frequencies, the strength and persistence of spatial patterns in wind-driven currents and the importance of bathymetry in steering the circulation are seen. Discovery of episodic phenomena, such as the recent finding of a hypoxic pool and associated die-off of fish and crabs on the continental shelf off Heceta Head, are made possible by repeated sampling.

  15. A simulation/optimization model for groundwater resources management in the Afram Plains area, Ghana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yidana, S.M.

    2008-01-01

    A groundwater flow simulation model was developed using available hydrogeo logical data to A groundwater flow simulation model was developed using available hydrogeological data to describe groundwater flow in the Afram Plains area. A nonlinear optimization model was then developed and solved for the management of groundwater resources to meet irrigation and household needs. The objective was to maximize groundwater extraction for irrigation activities from the shallow aquifers of the southern Voltaian Sedimentary Basin that underly the area This would improve food security, raise the standard of living and ultimately alleviate poverty in the Afram Plains. The calibrated flow model is in tandem with the general hydrochemical evolution of groundwater in the area and fits the observed data with about a 98% degree of confidence. Groundwater resources may not be the limiting factor in the development of irrigated agriculture. Groundwater has tremendous potential to meet current and future irrigation needs. It was determined from this study that profit from maize irrigation in the Afram Plains area could rise from US$301, 000 in 2007 to over US$3.5 million by the end of the last management period (2013) as irrigation practice is improved, and the economic strength to increase the acreage for irrigation improves. Even with these margins of profit, the drawdown constraint was not reached in any of the management periods. It is expected that rechargefrom the irrigation water would reclaim the lost hydraulic head. The single significant constraint was the amount of land area that could be developed for irrigation in the area. The profit obtained per unit cubic meter of water used also improved over the same management period.

  16. DOES ANTHROPOGENIC ACTIVITIES OR NATURE DOMINATE THE SHAPING OF THE LANDSCAPE IN THE OREGON PILOT STUDY AREA FOR 1990-1997?

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed a simple method to locate changes in vegetation greenness, which can be used to identify areas under stress. The method only requires inexpensive NDVI data, which can be derived from many sources, and basic statistical and mapping software. AVHRR data are useful fo...

  17. Mineral resources of the Desolation Canyon, Turtle Canyon, and Floy Canyon Wilderness Study Areas, Carbon Emery, and Grand counties, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Cashion, W.B.; Kilburn, J.E.; Barton, H.N.; Kelley, K.D.; Kulik, D.M. ); McDonnell, J.R. )

    1990-09-01

    This paper reports on the Desolation Canyon, Turtle Canyon, and Floy Canyon Wilderness Study Areas which include 242,000 acres, 33,690 acres, and 23,140 acres. Coal deposits underlie all three study areas. Coal zones in the Blackhawk and Nelsen formations have identified bituminous coal resources of 22 million short tons in the Desolation Canyon Study Area, 6.3 million short tons in the Turtle Canyon Study Area, and 45 million short tons in the Floy Canyon Study Area. In-place inferred oil shale resources are estimated to contain 60 million barrels in the northern part of the Desolation Canyon area. Minor occurrences of uranium have been found in the southeastern part of the Desolation Canyon area and in the western part of the Floy Canyon area. Mineral resource potential for the study areas is estimated to be for coal, high for all areas, for oil and gas, high for the northern tract of the Desolation Canyon area and moderate for all other tracts, for bituminous sandstone, high for the northern part of the Desolation Canyon area, and low for all other tracts, for oil shale, low in all areas, for uranium, moderate for the Floy Canyon area and the southeastern part of the Desolation Canyon area and low for the remainder of the areas, for metals other than uranium, bentonite, zeolites, and geothermal energy, low in all areas, and for coal-bed methane unknown in all three areas.

  18. 30 CFR 937.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 937.764 Section 937.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  19. 30 CFR 937.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 937.764 Section 937.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  20. 30 CFR 937.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 937.764 Section 937.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  1. 30 CFR 937.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 937.764 Section 937.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  2. 75 FR 52369 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland, OR... Science and Industry, Portland, OR. The human remains were removed from an area in the vicinity of The... Oregon Museum of Science and Industry professional staff in consultation with representatives of...

  3. Review of lignite resources of western Tennessee and the Jackson Purchase area, western Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, Paul C.; Warwick, Peter D.; Thomas, Roger E.; Nichols, Douglas J.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: This review of the lignite deposits of western Tennessee and the Jackson Purchase area in western Kentucky (Fig. 1) is a preliminary report on part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Coal Resource Assessment of the Gulf Coastal Plain Coal Province. Lignite deposits of western Kentucky and Tennessee are an extension of the Gulf Coastal Plain Coal Province (Cushing and others, 1964), and currently are not economic to mine. These deposits have not been extensively investigated or developed as an energy resource. This review includes a description of the geology of the lignite-bearing units, a discussion of the available coal quality data, and information on organic petrology. Palynological data for lignite samples collected in Kentucky and Tennessee as part of this work are presented in an Appendix.

  4. Stratigraphy and coal resources of the Makarwal area, Trans-Indus Mountains, Mianwali District, Pakistan

    SciTech Connect

    Danilchik, W.; Shah, S.M.I.

    1987-01-01

    Sedimentary rocks ranging in age from Permian to Pleistocene underlie the Trans-Indus Mountains of Pakistan. The sequence, which is more than 20,000 feet thick, consists of 20 formations and members. New names have been proposed and type sections designated for five of the formations described. The Makarwal coal field is located in the Surghar Range. The coal-bearing strata are of Paleocene age and are overlain by younger Tertiary rocks that exceed 15,000 feet in total thickness. The coal is produced from a single bed that ranges in thickness from 2 feet to more than 10 feet. Easily accessible coal, once the principal mineral resource of the area, is mostly depleted, but more than 16 million tons of undeveloped reserves are available. Other mineral resources include abundant reserves of limestone, dolomite, greensand, glass sand, and iron-bearing rocks.

  5. Assessing landscape scale wildfire exposure for highly valued resources in a Mediterranean area.

    PubMed

    Alcasena, Fermín J; Salis, Michele; Ager, Alan A; Arca, Bachisio; Molina, Domingo; Spano, Donatella

    2015-05-01

    We used a fire simulation modeling approach to assess landscape scale wildfire exposure for highly valued resources and assets (HVR) on a fire-prone area of 680 km(2) located in central Sardinia, Italy. The study area was affected by several wildfires in the last half century: some large and intense fire events threatened wildland urban interfaces as well as other socioeconomic and cultural values. Historical wildfire and weather data were used to inform wildfire simulations, which were based on the minimum travel time algorithm as implemented in FlamMap. We simulated 90,000 fires that replicated recent large fire events in the area spreading under severe weather conditions to generate detailed maps of wildfire likelihood and intensity. Then, we linked fire modeling outputs to a geospatial risk assessment framework focusing on buffer areas around HVR. The results highlighted a large variation in burn probability and fire intensity in the vicinity of HVRs, and allowed us to identify the areas most exposed to wildfires and thus to a higher potential damage. Fire intensity in the HVR buffers was mainly related to fuel types, while wind direction, topographic features, and historically based ignition pattern were the key factors affecting fire likelihood. The methodology presented in this work can have numerous applications, in the study area and elsewhere, particularly to address and inform fire risk management, landscape planning and people safety on the vicinity of HVRs. PMID:25613434

  6. Assessing Landscape Scale Wildfire Exposure for Highly Valued Resources in a Mediterranean Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcasena, Fermín J.; Salis, Michele; Ager, Alan A.; Arca, Bachisio; Molina, Domingo; Spano, Donatella

    2015-05-01

    We used a fire simulation modeling approach to assess landscape scale wildfire exposure for highly valued resources and assets (HVR) on a fire-prone area of 680 km2 located in central Sardinia, Italy. The study area was affected by several wildfires in the last half century: some large and intense fire events threatened wildland urban interfaces as well as other socioeconomic and cultural values. Historical wildfire and weather data were used to inform wildfire simulations, which were based on the minimum travel time algorithm as implemented in FlamMap. We simulated 90,000 fires that replicated recent large fire events in the area spreading under severe weather conditions to generate detailed maps of wildfire likelihood and intensity. Then, we linked fire modeling outputs to a geospatial risk assessment framework focusing on buffer areas around HVR. The results highlighted a large variation in burn probability and fire intensity in the vicinity of HVRs, and allowed us to identify the areas most exposed to wildfires and thus to a higher potential damage. Fire intensity in the HVR buffers was mainly related to fuel types, while wind direction, topographic features, and historically based ignition pattern were the key factors affecting fire likelihood. The methodology presented in this work can have numerous applications, in the study area and elsewhere, particularly to address and inform fire risk management, landscape planning and people safety on the vicinity of HVRs.

  7. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Tests Area Project FY 2003 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    J., B C; F., E G; K., E B; L., F D; J., H L; Max, H; Bryant, H G; B., K A; E., M J; A., P G; P., R T; K., S D; F.B., T A; W., W R; Mavrik, Z; Pihong, Z

    2004-08-17

    This report describes FY 2003 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The present report is organized on a topical basis and contains five chapters that reflect the range of technical work performed by LLNL-CBND during FY 2003. Although we have emphasized investigations that were led by CBND, we also participated in a variety of collaborative studies with other UGTA and HRMP contract organizations including the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and Bechtel Nevada (BN).

  8. Resources and instructional strategies effective middle school science teachers use to improve content area reading skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaver, Melanie S.

    This study examined the resources and instructional strategies effective middle school science teachers use to improve content area reading skills. Reading instruction in the middle school years should follow the natural cognitive progression that occurs in the adolescent brain from learning to read to reading to learn. Scientific reading is a different type of reading than most middle school students are accustomed to. It is important to understand that students will continue to be expected to read non-fiction critically for success in the 21st century. Effective teachers know this, and they perceive themselves as teachers of reading regardless of the content area in which their expertise lies. This qualitative research study was conducted at a rural middle school with three science teachers who employ before, during, and after literacy strategies when reading the textbook content with their students. The methodologies used in this study were interviews, observations, and document collection. The results of this study revealed the students' reading difficulties perceived by the teacher participants, the literacy strategies used by the teacher participants, the instructional resources the teacher participants used to improve comprehension, and the need for professional development in content area literacy.

  9. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY2005 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Hudson, G B; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Nimz, G J; Ramon, E C; Rose, T P; Shuller, L; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

    2007-03-23

    This report describes FY 2005 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains five chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and Bechtel Nevada (BN).

  10. Corrosion prevention of Oregon's reinforced coastal bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Cryer. C.B; Gallardo, M. L.

    2004-06-01

    The Oregon Department of Transportation (Oregon DOT) maintains more than 120 coastal bridges; many are reinforced concrete structures over 15 m (50 ft) in length. Twelve of these bridges are historic structures. Oregon DOT is concerned about the ongoing deterioration of these bridges, rising maintenance and repair costs, and the need to protect Oregon’s large investment in coastal bridges. Over 80,000 m2 (850,000 ft2) of coastal bridge surface have been repaired and protected from further chloride-induced corrosion damage by using conductive coating anodes. Most of the anode area is thermal-sprayed (TS) Zn. Other anode materials include TS Ti, Zn-hydrogel, and conductive carbon paint. TS Zn anodes are estimated to have a service life exceeding 25 years but exhibit increasing anode polarization with age. Catalyzed TS Ti anodes develop no significant anode polarization and have exhibited stable long-term performance over 8 years of service. Galvanic Zn-hydrogel anodes produce a stable protection current with no evidence of aging effects over 6 years of service. The conductive carbon paint anode operates at a low anode current density and consumption rate with a low rate of acidification at the anode-concrete interface, which has contributed to a stable protection current over 17 years of service.

  11. Orientation study of the Lake Sunapee area, New Hampshire. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Karfunkel, B. S.; Sargent, K. A.

    1982-08-01

    An orientation study was conducted in the area of Lake Sunapee, New Hampshire, in preparation for a hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance in glacial terrain. The study was carried out by the Savannah River Laboratory as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE). Ground water, lake water, stream water, lake sediment, and stream sediment samples were collected at 188 sites. The concentrations of uranium and other elements were determined by neutron activation analysis. This report is issued in draft form, without detailed technical and copy editing. This was done to make the report available to the public before the end of the NURE program.

  12. Effectiveness of airborne multispectral thermal data for karst groundwater resources recognition in coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatti, Stefano; Fusilli, Lorenzo; Palombo, Angelo; Santini, Federico; Pascucci, Simone

    2013-04-01

    Currently the detection, use and management of groundwater in karst regions can be considered one of the most significant procedures for solving water scarcity problems during periods of low rainfall this because groundwater resources from karst aquifers play a key role in the water supply in karst areas worldwide [1]. In many countries of the Mediterranean area, where karst is widespread, groundwater resources are still underexploited, while surface waters are generally preferred [2]. Furthermore, carbonate aquifers constitute a crucial thermal water resource outside of volcanic areas, even if there is no detailed and reliable global assessment of thermal water resources. The composite hydrogeological characteristics of karst, particularly directions and zones of groundwater distribution, are not up till now adequately explained [3]. In view of the abovementioned reasons the present study aims at analyzing the detection capability of high spatial resolution thermal remote sensing of karst water resources in coastal areas in order to get useful information on the karst springs flow and on different characteristics of these environments. To this purpose MIVIS [4, 5] and TASI-600 [6] airborne multispectral thermal imagery (see sensors' characteristics in Table 1) acquired on two coastal areas of the Mediterranean area interested by karst activity, one located in Montenegro and one in Italy, were used. One study area is located in the Kotor Bay, a winding bay on the Adriatic Sea surrounded by high mountains in south-western Montenegro and characterized by many subaerial and submarine coastal springs related to deep karstic channels. The other study area is located in Santa Cesarea (Italy), encompassing coastal cold springs, the main local source of high quality water, and also a noticeable thermal groundwater outflow. The proposed study shows the preliminary results of the two airborne deployments on these areas. The preprocessing of the multispectral thermal imagery

  13. Effectiveness of airborne multispectral thermal data for karst groundwater resources recognition in coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatti, Stefano; Fusilli, Lorenzo; Palombo, Angelo; Santini, Federico; Pascucci, Simone

    2013-04-01

    Currently the detection, use and management of groundwater in karst regions can be considered one of the most significant procedures for solving water scarcity problems during periods of low rainfall this because groundwater resources from karst aquifers play a key role in the water supply in karst areas worldwide [1]. In many countries of the Mediterranean area, where karst is widespread, groundwater resources are still underexploited, while surface waters are generally preferred [2]. Furthermore, carbonate aquifers constitute a crucial thermal water resource outside of volcanic areas, even if there is no detailed and reliable global assessment of thermal water resources. The composite hydrogeological characteristics of karst, particularly directions and zones of groundwater distribution, are not up till now adequately explained [3]. In view of the abovementioned reasons the present study aims at analyzing the detection capability of high spatial resolution thermal remote sensing of karst water resources in coastal areas in order to get useful information on the karst springs flow and on different characteristics of these environments. To this purpose MIVIS [4, 5] and TASI-600 [6] airborne multispectral thermal imagery (see sensors' characteristics in Table 1) acquired on two coastal areas of the Mediterranean area interested by karst activity, one located in Montenegro and one in Italy, were used. One study area is located in the Kotor Bay, a winding bay on the Adriatic Sea surrounded by high mountains in south-western Montenegro and characterized by many subaerial and submarine coastal springs related to deep karstic channels. The other study area is located in Santa Cesarea (Italy), encompassing coastal cold springs, the main local source of high quality water, and also a noticeable thermal groundwater outflow. The proposed study shows the preliminary results of the two airborne deployments on these areas. The preprocessing of the multispectral thermal imagery

  14. 76 FR 43704 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Amendment to the 1992 Three Rivers Resource Management Plan for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... Management Plan for Land Tenure in the Skull Creek Area and Associated Environmental Assessment, Oregon... planning criteria related to the Amendment to the Three Rivers Resource Management Plan for the Skull Creek...: This plan amendment and associated EA will address a proposed land disposal in the Skull Creek...

  15. Probabilistic, Seismically-Induced Landslide Hazard Mapping of Western Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, M. J.; Sharifi Mood, M.; Gillins, D. T.; Mahalingam, R.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake-induced landslides can generate significant damage within urban communities by damaging structures, obstructing lifeline connection routes and utilities, generating various environmental impacts, and possibly resulting in loss of life. Reliable hazard and risk maps are important to assist agencies in efficiently allocating and managing limited resources to prepare for such events. This research presents a new methodology in order to communicate site-specific landslide hazard assessments in a large-scale, regional map. Implementation of the proposed methodology results in seismic-induced landslide hazard maps that depict the probabilities of exceeding landslide displacement thresholds (e.g. 0.1, 0.3, 1.0 and 10 meters). These maps integrate a variety of data sources including: recent landslide inventories, LIDAR and photogrammetric topographic data, geology map, mapped NEHRP site classifications based on available shear wave velocity data in each geologic unit, and USGS probabilistic seismic hazard curves. Soil strength estimates were obtained by evaluating slopes present along landslide scarps and deposits for major geologic units. Code was then developed to integrate these layers to perform a rigid, sliding block analysis to determine the amount and associated probabilities of displacement based on each bin of peak ground acceleration in the seismic hazard curve at each pixel. The methodology was applied to western Oregon, which contains weak, weathered, and often wet soils at steep slopes. Such conditions have a high landslide hazard even without seismic events. A series of landslide hazard maps highlighting the probabilities of exceeding the aforementioned thresholds were generated for the study area. These output maps were then utilized in a performance based design framework enabling them to be analyzed in conjunction with other hazards for fully probabilistic-based hazard evaluation and risk assessment. a) School of Civil and Construction

  16. Geothermal Gradients in Oregon, 1985-1994

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    This data set is comprised of three groups of temperature-depth data. All the sites are located in southeastern Oregon. The first is a set of 7 wells logged during 1993 in south central Oregon in the Basin and Range province. All these wells, with the exception of the Blue Mountain Oil well, are water wells. These wells were part of a geothermal reconnaissance of this area. The Blue Mountain oil well of this set has been described by Sass et al. (1971) as well. Gannet in the vicinity of the Vale, Oregon (Bowen and Blackwell, 1972; Blackwell et al., 1978) geothermal system in Malheur County. These wells were logged in 1986 during a study of the area described by Gannett (1988). There are 17 wells (plus one relog) in this data set. All these wells are in a small area just east of the town of Vale in Malheur County. The second set of data consists of a group of wells that were logged by Marshall The third set of data represents the results of an exploration project in the general area of the Lake Owyhee thermal area in Malheur County. This data set is comprised of 16 wells. This data set was collected by Hunt Energy Corporation and made available though the efforts of Roger Bowers. A small scale map of the locations of the wells is shown in Figure 1. The well location and some pertinent information about the wells is shown in Table 1. The detailed lists of temperature-depth data and plots for each well, either individually or with a group, follow the list of references cited.

  17. Mantle helium and carbon isotopes in Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters area, Central Oregon: Evidence for renewed volcanic activity or a long term steady state system?

    SciTech Connect

    van Soest, M.C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Evans, W.C.; Mariner, R.H.

    2002-04-30

    Cold bubbling springs in the Separation Creek area, the locus of current uplift at South Sister volcano show strong mantle signatures in helium and carbon isotopes and CO{sub 2}/{sup 3}He. This suggests the presence of fresh basaltic magma in the volcanic plumbing system. Currently there is no evidence to link this system directly to the uplift, which started in 1998. To the contrary, all geochemical evidence suggests that there is a long-lived geothermal system in the Separation Creek area, which has not significantly changed since the early 1990s. There was no archived helium and carbon data, so a definite conclusion regarding the strong mantle signature observed in these tracers cannot yet be drawn. There is a distinct discrepancy between the yearly magma supply required to explain the current uplift (0.006 km{sup 3}/yr) and that required to explain the discharge of CO{sub 2} from the system (0.0005 km{sup 3}/yr). This discrepancy may imply that the chemical signal associated with the increase in magma supply has not reached the surface yet. With respect to this the small changes observed at upper Mesa Creek require further attention, due to the recent volcanic vent in that area it may be the location were the chemical signal related to the uplift can most quickly reach the surface. Occurrence of such strong mantle signals in cold/diffuse geothermal systems suggests that these systems should not be ignored during volcano monitoring or geothermal evaluation studies. Although the surface-expression of these springs in terms of heat is minimal, the chemistry carries important information concerning the size and nature of the underlying high-temperature system and any changes taking place in it.

  18. Mineral resources of the Marble Canyon Wilderness Study Area, White Pine County, Nevada, and Millard County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Diggles, M.F.; Nowlan, G.A.; Blank, H.R. Jr.; Marcus, S.M. ); Kness, R.F. )

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on the Marble Canyon Wilderness Study Area that has large inferred subeconomic resources of ordinary limestone and marble. This area of faulted and metamorphosed Paleozoic to Quaternary rocks has zones within it of high and moderate mineral resource potential for limestone and marble, moderate and low potential for barite, and low potential for gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, tungsten, molybdenum, beryllium, and fluorite. The entire study area has moderate potential for oil and gas and low potential for geothermal energy resources.

  19. Orientation study of the Chattanooga Shale Area, Soddy-Daisy, Tennessee. National Uranium Resource Evaluation program

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, K. A.

    1982-08-01

    An orientation study was conducted in the Soddy-Daisy area, Tennessee, in preparation for a hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance in the Cumberland Plateau and the Valley and Ridge Provinces. The area was chosen because of the excellent exposure of the Chattanooga Shale. The study was carried out by the Savannah River Laboratory as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE). A total of 40 ground water, 36 surface water, and 88 sediment samples were obtained. The concentrations of uranium and other elements were determined by neutron activation analysis. This report is issued in draft form, without detailed technical and copy editing. This was done to make the report available to the public before the end of the NURE program. 4 figures, 6 tables.

  20. Flora of the Mayacmas Mountains. [Listing of 679 species in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, J.A.

    1981-09-01

    This flora describes the plants that occur within the Mayacmas Mountain Range of northern California. It is the result of ten years of environmental assessment by the author in the Geysers Geothermal Resource area, located in the center of the Mayacmas Range. The flora includes notes on plant communities and ecology of the area, as well as habitat and collection data for most of the 679 species covered. Altogether 74 families, 299 genera and 679 species are included in the flora. The work is divided into eight subdivisions: trees; shrubs; ferns and fern allies; aquatic plants; tules, sedges, and rushes; lilies and related plants; dicot herbs; and grasses. Within each subdivision, family, genera and species are listed alphabetically. Keys are provided at the beginning of each subdivision. A unique combination of physical, environmental and geologic factors have resulted in a rich and diverse flora in the Mayacmas. Maps have been provided indicating known locations for species of rare or limited occurrence.

  1. Scientist and teacher perspectives on developing scientific educational resources for urban natural areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Carole

    The formation of effective educational partnerships between teachers and scientists is increasingly called for as a way to enhance the quality of science education. The purpose of this study is to investigate the experiences and perspectives of scientists and teachers during the collaborative development of science education resources for urban natural areas and to identify best practices for engaging these stakeholders in curriculum development. An analysis of the convergent and divergent perspectives among scientists and teachers helped to organize a set of essential strategies and approaches for advancing the practice of science education within the context of a local urban natural area. Further analysis of these perspectives revealed underlying attitudes, opinions and implications that can help guide future collaboration between educators and scientists.

  2. Ground Water Atlas of the United States: Segment 7, Idaho, Oregon, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitehead, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    The States of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, which total 248,730 square miles, compose Segment 7 of this Atlas. The area is geologically and topographically diverse and contains a wealth of scenic beauty, natural resources, and ground and surface water that generally are suitable for all uses. Most of the area of Segment 7 is drained by the Columbia River, its tributaries, and other streams that discharge to the Pacific Ocean. Exceptions are those streams that flow to closed basins in southeastern Oregon and northern Nevada and to the Great Salt Lake in northern Utah. The Columbia River is one of the largest rivers in the Nation. The downstream reach of the Columbia River forms most of the border between Oregon and Washington. In 1990, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington had populations of 1.0 million, 2.8 million, and 4.9 million, respectively. The more densely populated parts are in lowland areas and stream valleys. Many of the mountains, the deserts, and the upland areas of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington lack major population centers. Large areas of Idaho and Oregon are uninhabited and are mostly public land (fig. 1) where extensive ground-water development is restricted. Surface water is abundant in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, though not always available when and where needed. In some places, surface water provides much of the water used for public-supply, domestic and commercial, agricultural (primarily irrigation and livestock watering), and industrial purposes. In arid parts of Segment 7, however, surface water has long been fully appropriated, chiefly for irrigation. Ground water is used when and where surface-water supplies are lacking. Ground water is commonly available to shallow wells that are completed in unconsolidated-deposit aquifers that consist primarily of sand and gravel but contain variable quantities of clay and silt. Many large-yield public-supply and irrigation wells and thousands of domestic wells are completed in these types of aquifers

  3. Status of Oregon's Bull Trout.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, David V.; Hanson, Mary L.; Hooton, Robert M.

    1997-10-01

    Limited historical references indicate that bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in Oregon were once widely spread throughout at least 12 basins in the Klamath River and Columbia River systems. No bull trout have been observed in Oregon's coastal systems. A total of 69 bull trout populations in 12 basins are currently identified in Oregon. A comparison of the 1991 bull trout status (Ratliff and Howell 1992) to the revised 1996 status found that 7 populations were newly discovered and 1 population showed a positive or upgraded status while 22 populations showed a negative or downgraded status. The general downgrading of 32% of Oregon's bull trout populations appears largely due to increased survey efforts and increased survey accuracy rather than reduced numbers or distribution. However, three populations in the upper Klamath Basin, two in the Walla Walla Basin, and one in the Willamette Basin showed decreases in estimated population abundance or distribution.

  4. Evaluation of the geothermal resource in the area of Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Jiracek, G.R.; Swanberg, C.A.; Morgan, P.; Parker, M.D.

    1983-07-01

    Factors indicating a potential geothermal resource near Albuquerque are: (1) nearby volcanoes active as recently as 120,000 years ago, (2) gravity interpretation indicating a potential reservoir averaging 1.5 km thickness, (3) high heat flow near the city, (4) warm waters (>30/sup 0/C) in municipal wells, (5) recent seismicity indicating active faulting, thereby, allowing the possibility of deep hydrothermal circulation, (6) high shallow (<30 m) temperature gradients (>100/sup 0/C/km) discovered in our drillholes, (7) deeper (<500 m) gradients from water wells exceeding 80/sup 0/C/km, and (8) chemical analyses of 88 groundwater samples yielding estimated base reservoir temperatures as high as 190/sup 0/C. An area of elevated shallow temperature gradients (less than or equal to 140/sup 0/C/km) was discovered a few kilometers west of Albuquerque by our 69 hole drilling program. Resistivity, magnetic, and gravity measurements combined with computer modeling suggests that heated ground water is forced closer to the surface here by flow over a buried ridge. A well drilled nearby yielded the highest recorded temperature in the Albuquerque area at its maximum depth (32.8/sup 0/C at 364 m). The deep gradient is 35/sup 0/C/km. An oil test well close by reported large volumes of water at 1 km; therefore, the possibility of a low temperature (>50/sup 0/C) geothermal resource exists west of Albuquerque at less than 1 km depth.

  5. Assessment of water resources in lead-zinc mined areas in Cherokee County, Kansas, and adjacent areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spruill, Timothy B.

    1987-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate water-resources problems related to abandoned lead and zinc mines in Cherokee County, Kansas, and adjacent areas in Missouri and Oklahoma. Past mining activities have caused changes in the hydrogeology of the area. Lead and zinc mining has caused discontinuities and perforations in the confining shale west of the Pennsylvanian-Mississippian geologic contact (referred to as the western area), which have created artificial ground-water recharge and discharge areas. Recharge to the shallow aquifer (rocks of Mississippian age) through collapses, shafts, and drill holes in the shale has caused the formation of a ground-water 'mound' in the vicinity of the Picher Field in Kansas and Oklahoma. Discharge of mine-contaminated ground water to Tar Creek occurs in Oklahoma from drill holes and shafts where the potentiometric surface of the shallow aquifer is above the land surface. Mining of ore in the shallow aquifer has resulted in extensive fracturing and removal of material, which has created highly transmissive zones and voids and increased ground-water storage properties of the aquifer. In the area east of the Pennsylvanian-Mississippian geologic contact (referred to as the eastern area), fractured rock and tailings on the land surface increased the amount of water available for infiltration to the shallow aquifer; in the western area, tailings on the impermeable shale created artificial, perched aquifer systems that slowly drain to surface streams. Pumping of the deep aquifer (rocks of Cambrian and Ordovician age) by towns and industries, which developed as a result of the mining industry, has resulted in a potential for downward movement of water from the shallow aquifer. The potential is greatest in Ottawa County, Oklahoma. Because of the large volume of water that may be transported from the shallow to the deep aquifer, open drill holes or casings present the greatest contamination hazard to water supplies in the deep aquifer. Mining

  6. [MATCHE: Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and Homemaking Education.] Economically Depressed Areas Strand: Core. Module III-A-3: Community Resources for Economically Depressed Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Fresno. Dept. of Home Economics.

    This competency-based preservice home economics teacher education module on community resources for economically depressed areas is the third in a set of four core modules on teaching home economics in economically depressed areas. (This set is part of a larger set of sixty-seven modules on the Management Approach to Teaching Consumer and…

  7. High-potential geothermal energy resource areas of Nigeria and their geologic and geophysical assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Babalola, O.O.

    1984-04-01

    The widespread occurrence of geothermal manifestations in Nigeria is significant because the wide applicability and relative ease of exploitation of geothermal energy is of vital importance to an industrializing nation like Nigeria. There are two known geothermal resource areas (KGRAs) in Nigeria: the Ikogosi Warm Springs of Ondo State and the Wikki Warm Springs of Bauchi State. These surficial effusions result from the circulation of water to great depths through faults in the basement complex rocks of the area. Within sedimentary areas, high geothermal gradient trends are identified in the Lagos subbasin, the Okitipupa ridge, the Auchi-Agbede are of the Benin flank/hinge line, and the Abakaliki anticlinorium. The deeper Cretaceous and Tertiary sequences of the Niger delta are geopressured geothermal horizons. In the Benue foldbelt, extending from the Abalaliki anticlinorium to the Keana anticline and the Zambuk ridge, several magmatic intrusions emplaced during the Late Cretaceous line the axis of the Benue trough. Positive Bouguer gravity anomalies also parallel this trough and are interpreted to indicate shallow mantle. Parts of this belt and the Ikom, the Jos plateau, Bauchi plateau, and the Adamawa areas, experienced Cenozoic volcanism and magmatism.

  8. Mineral resource potential map of the Savannah Roadless Area, Liberty County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patterson, Sam H.; Schmidt, Walter; Crandall, Thomas M.

    1982-01-01

    The Savannah Roadless Area is underlain by sedimentary rocks having low potential for oil and gas and minerals. The low potential for oil or gas notwithstanding, the possibilities for discovery cannot be ruled out because the area and nearby lands have not been thoroughly explored. No minerals have been mined within the Savannah Roadless Area, and the only production nearby has been the digging of clayey sand used in stabilizing U.S. Forest Service roads. Fuller's earth, quartz sand and gravel, clayey sand, and common clay presently are produced elsewhere in the region, and limestone and peat have been produced in the past. No clay suitable for structural clay products or fuller's earth is present in the roadless area; however, a bed of quartz sand and gravel of excellent quality was penetrated at a depth interval of 37-50 ft by one drill hole. Although this bed is coarser grained-and therefore is more suitable for many uses-than the sand deposits worked elsewhere in the Big Bend region, its mineral resource potential is reduced by the thickness of overburden above it and by its distance from markets in population centers. The Apalachicola National Forest has been explored for phosphate and reconnoitered for heavy minerals, but no valuable deposits of either have been found.

  9. Mineral resource potential of the Eagle Mountains Wilderness Study Area (CDCA-334), Riverside County, California. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.E.; Whittington, C.L.; Grauch, V.J.S.; McColly, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic, geochemical, and geophysical investigations and a survey of mines and prospects indicate that those parts of the Eagle Mountains Wilderness Study Area (chiefly in the northwest half) that are intruded by propylitically altered mafic dikes or intermediate, hornblende porphyry dikes with spatially associated quartz veins and shear zones have moderate or high potential for the presence of undiscovered low- to medium-grade gold, silver, and tungsten resources. High stream-sediment concentrations of molybdenum suggest that parts of those areas intruded by the dikes also contain molybdenum-bearing minerals and thus have moderate or high potential for the presence of undiscovered molybdenum resources. However, there has been no recorded production of molybdenum in the region and any resources that may be present in the study area are likely to be significant only if the mineralized quartz veins and shear zones are manifestations of an extensive subsurface quartz-vein stockwork system. All areas with moderate or high potential for gold, silver, tungsten, or molybdenum resources also have low potential for the presence of undiscovered copper and lead resources. Low potential for the presence of undiscovered tin and thorium resources exists throughout the wilderness study area. Sand, gravel, and stone suitable for construction materials are found in the study area, but similar or better quality materials are abundant and accessible outside the area. No new mineral occurrence was located during this study. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Mineral resources of the Coal Canyon, Spruce Canyon, and Flume Canyon Wilderness Study Areas, Grand county, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, R.P.; Gaccetta, J.D.; Kulik, D.M.; Kreidler, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the Coal Canyon, Spruce Canyon, and Flume Canyon Wilderness Study Areas in the Book and Roan Cliffs in Grand Country, Utah, approximately 12 miles west of the Colorado state line. The wilderness study areas consist of a series of deep, stair-step-sided canyons and high ridges eroded into the flatlying sedimentary rocks of the Book Cliffs. Demonstrated coal reserves totaling 22,060,800 short tons and demonstrated subeconomic coal resources totaling 39,180,000 short tons are in the Coal Canyon Wilderness Study Area. Also, inferred subeconomic coal resources totaling 143,954,000 short tons are within the Coal Canyon Wilderness Study Area. No known deposits of industrial minerals are in any of the study area. All three of the wilderness study areas have a high resource potential for undiscovered deposits of coal and for undiscovered oil and gas.

  11. Mineral and geothermal resource potential of Wild Cattle Mountain and Heart Lake roadless areas Plumas, Shasta, and Tehama Counties, California

    SciTech Connect

    Muffler, L.J.P.; Clynne, M.A.; Cook, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The results of geological, geochemical, and geophysical surveys in Wild Cattle Mountain and Heart Lake Roadless Areas indicate no potential for metallic or non-metallic mineral resources in the areas and no potential for coal or petroleum energy resources. However, Wild Cattle Mountain Roadless Area and part of Heart Lake Roadless Area lie in Lassen Known Geothermal Resources Area, and much of the rest of Heart Lake Roadless Area is subject to non-competitive geothermal lease applications. Both areas are adjacent to Lassen Volcanic National Park, which contains extensive areas of fumaroles, hot springs, and hydrothermally altered rock; voluminous silicic volcanism occurred here during late Pleistocene and Holocene time. Geochemical data and geological interpretation indicate that the thermal manifestations in the Park and at Morgan and Growler Hot Springs (immediately west of Wild Cattle Mountain Roadless Area) are part of the same large geothermal system. Consequently, substantial geothermal resources are likely to be discovered in Wild Cattle Mountain Roadless Area and cannot be ruled out for Heart Lake Roadless Area.

  12. Investigation of Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources in the Sonoma Valley Area, California

    SciTech Connect

    Youngs, Leslie G.; Chapman, Rodger H.; Chase, Gordon W.; Bezore, Stephen P.; Majmundar, Hasu H.

    1983-01-01

    The Sonoma Valley area contains low-temperature geothermal resources (20 C {le} T {le} 90 C) having the potential for useful development. Sonoma Valley residents, local governments and institutions, private developers, and manufacturers may be able to utilize the geothermal resources as an alternate energy source. Historically, there have been at least six geothermal spring areas developed in the Sonoma Valley. Four of these (Boyes Hot Springs, Fetter's Hot Springs, Agua Caliente Springs, and the Sonoma State Hospital warm spring) lie on a linear trend extending northwestward from the City of Sonoma. Detailed geophysical surveys delineated a major fault trace along the east side of the Sonoma Valley in association with the historic geothermal areas. Other fault traces were also delineated revealing a general northwest-trending structural faulting fabric underlying the valley. Water wells located near the ''east side'' fault have relatively high boron concentrations. Geochemical evidence may suggest the ''east side'' fault presents a barrier to lateral fluid migration but is a conduit for ascending fluids. Fifteen of the twenty-nine geothermal wells or springs located from literature research or field surveys are located along or east of this major fault in a 10 km (6.2 miles) long, narrow zone. The highest recorded water temperature in the valley appears to be 62.7 C (145 F) at 137.2 meters (450 feet) in a well at Boyes Hot Springs. This is consistent with the geothermal reservoir temperature range of 52-77 C (126-171 F) indicated by geothermometry calculations performed on data from wells in the area. Interpretation of data indicates a low-temperature geothermal fluid upwelling or ''plume'', along the ''east side'' fault with subsequent migration into permeable aquifers predominantly within volcanic strata. It is quite likely other geothermal fluid ''plumes'' in association with faulting are present within the Sonoma Valley area. A 5.8 km{sup 2} geothermal zone

  13. Bat mortality and activity at a Northern Iowa wind resource area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jain, A.A.; Koford, Rolf R.; Hancock, A.W.; Zenner, G.G.

    2011-01-01

    We examined bat collision mortality, activity and species composition at an 89-turbine wind resource area in farmland of north-central Iowa from mid-Apr. to mid-Dec., 2003 and mid-Mar. to mid-Dec., 2004. We found 30 bats beneath turbines on cleared ground and gravel access areas in 2003 and 45 bats in 2004. After adjusting for search probability, search efficiency and scavenging rate, we estimated total bat mortality at 396 ?? 72 (95 ci) in 2003 and 636 ?? 112 (95 ci) in 2004. Although carcasses were mostly migratory tree bats, we found a considerable proportion of little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus). We recorded 1465 bat echolocation call files at turbine sites ( 34.88 call files/detector-night) and 1536 bat call files at adjacent non-turbine sites ( 36.57 call files/detector-night). Bat activity did not differ significantly between turbine and non-turbine sites. A large proportion of recorded call files were made by Myotis sp. but this may be because we detected activity at ground level only. There was no relationship between types of turbine lights and either collision mortality or echolocation activity. The highest levels of bat echolocation activity and collision mortality were recorded during Jul. and Aug. during the autumn dispersal and migration period. The fatality rates for bats in general and little brown bats in particular were higher at the Top of Iowa Wind Resource Area than at other, comparable studies in the region. Future efforts to study behavior of bats in flight around turbines as well as cumulative impact studies should not ignore non-tree dwelling bats, generally regarded as minimally affected. ?? 2011, American Midland Naturalist.

  14. Oregon Trail Mushrooms geothermal loan guaranty application, Malheur County, Oregon: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    The action assessed is the guaranty of a loan by the Geothermal Loan Guaranty Office of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to finance the construction and operation of a mushroom-growing facility that will use geothermal (hot) water for process and space heat. The project consists of two separate facilities: a growing facility located just outside of the eastern limit of the city of Vale, Oregon (Malheur County, Oregon) and a composting facility located about 6.4 km (4 miles) southwest of the city limits (also in Malheur County, Oregon). Five test wells have been drilled into the geothermal resource at the growing site. Either well No. 4 or well No. 5 will serve as a production well. All geothermal fluids will be reinjected into the geothermal aquifer, so either well No. 3 will be used for this purpose, wells Nos. 1 and 2 will be deepened, or a new well will be drilled on the site. A cold-water well will be drilled at the growing site, and another will be drilled at the composting site. The environmental effects of the proposed project are not expected to be significant.

  15. Disconnects Between Audiences, Resources, and Initiatives: Key Findings of the Coastal Areas Climate Change Education Partnership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller-Karger, F. E.; Ryan, J. G.; Feldman, A.; Gilbes, F.; Trotz, M.; McKayle, C.; Stone, D.; Plank, L.; Meisels, G.; Peterson, M.; Reynolds, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Coastal Areas Climate Change Education (CACCE) Partnership focused on defining a plan for effective education on climate change and its salient issues in coastal communities Florida and the US Caribbean territories. The approach included assessing perceptions and needs of stakeholders, evaluating the nature of available educational and information resources, and establishing a partnership that includes the public and professional organizations most relevant in planning and in addressing the resiliency of coastal communities. Information gathering activities included surveys among K-12 educators and students on climate change perceptions and current classroom activities in both Florida and the Caribbean territories; surveys of professional urban and land-use planners across Florida regarding their understanding of related in their professional practice; and conducting an inventory of relevant educational materials and information resources. Survey results showed a range of misperceptions about climate change, its causes and its likely impacts. At present, students and teachers in high and middle schools show poor understanding of climate science, and minimal time is spent in instruction on climate change in science courses in Florida and Puerto Rico schools. Also, there has to be professional development efforts and access to rich instructional content in a continuum spanning schools and professional communities including planners (which we surveyed). Architects and engineers are communities that also need to be surveyed and included in future efforts. A major obstacle to efforts at providing continuing education for planners and municipal officials is the lack of consensus on and access to regionally-specific scientific data regarding climate impacts and the relevant instructional content. It is difficult for professionals to prepare for climate change if they cannot define impacts in the Florida-Caribbean region and its coastal urban areas. Across over 1000

  16. Evidence of enhanced atmospheric ammoniacal nitrogen in Hells Canyon national recreation area: implications for natural and cultural resources.

    PubMed

    Geiser, Linda H; Ingersoll, Anne R; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Copeland, Scott A

    2008-09-01

    Agriculture releases copious fertilizing pollutants to air sheds and waterways of the northwestern United States. To evaluate threats to natural resources and historic rock paintings in remote Hells Canyon, Oregon and Idaho, deposition of ammonia (NH3), nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) at five stations along 60 km of the Snake River valley floor were passively sampled from July 2002 through June 2003, and ozone data and particulate chemistry were obtained from the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) station at Hells Canyon. NH3 concentrations were high; biweekly averages peaked at 5-19 ppb in spring and summer and the nutrient-laden Snake River is a likely source. Fine particulate ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) averaged 2.6 microg/m3 during the 20% of worst visibility days with winter drainage of air masses from the Snake River Basin and possibly long distance transport from southern California. Other pollutants were within background ranges. NH3 is corrosive to clay-based pictographs; nitrogen deposition can alter natural biotic communities and terrestrial ecosystem processes at levels reported here. PMID:18817115

  17. Allocating conservation resources between areas where persistence of a species is uncertain.

    PubMed

    McDonald-Madden, Eve; Chadès, Iadine; McCarthy, Michael A; Linkie, Matthew; Possingham, Hugh P

    2011-04-01

    Research on the allocation of resources to manage threatened species typically assumes that the state of the system is completely observable; for example whether a species is present or not. The majority of this research has converged on modeling problems as Markov decision processes (MDP), which give an optimal strategy driven by the current state of the system being managed. However, the presence of threatened species in an area can be uncertain. Typically, resource allocation among multiple conservation areas has been based on the biggest expected benefit (return on investment) but fails to incorporate the risk of imperfect detection. We provide the first decision-making framework for confronting the trade-off between information and return on investment, and we illustrate the approach for populations of the Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) in Kerinci Seblat National Park. The problem is posed as a partially observable Markov decision process (POMDP), which extends MDP to incorporate incomplete detection and allows decisions based on our confidence in particular states. POMDP has previously been used for making optimal management decisions for a single population of a threatened species. We extend this work by investigating two populations, enabling us to explore the importance of variation in expected return on investment between populations on how we should act. We compare the performance of optimal strategies derived assuming complete (MDP) and incomplete (POMDP) observability. We find that uncertainty about the presence of a species affects how we should act. Further, we show that assuming full knowledge of a species presence will deliver poorer strategic outcomes than if uncertainty about a species status is explicitly considered. MDP solutions perform up to 90% worse than the POMDP for highly cryptic species, and they only converge in performance when we are certain of observing the species during management: an unlikely scenario for many

  18. Geophysical investigation and assessment of the Rye Patch Known Geothermal Resource Area, Rye Patch, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Mark Richmond

    A gravity and ground-based magnetic survey was conducted at the Rye Patch Known Geothermal Resource Area located at Rye Patch, Nevada. The purpose of the study was to attempt to further delineate the geothermal reservoir and/or to identify potential drilling targets. The survey consisted of collecting data at 264 new stations to augment data from 203 stations collected in 2008. Information from previous seismic, aeromagnetic and geochemical investigations was also examined and incorporated. Filtering methods including removal of a polynomial trend surface and wavelength filtering were utilized on the gravity data to remove the strong regional overprint caused by the large density contrast between the low density alluvium within the valley versus the near-surface higher density rock in the higher elevations. After filtering, the Rye Patch Fault, the Range Front Fault, an east-west trending feature at the location of "southeast" fault, and another possible fault at the southern end of the study area are observable in the Rye Patch geothermal anomaly area. In the Humboldt House anomaly area, the northeast trending features identified by MacNight et al. (2005) and Ellis (2011) are not discernable although there is a significant gravity low in this area. Based on estimates arrived at by using 2nd derivative methods, fault dip angles are on the order of 80° and are consistent with previous conceptual models of the site. Computer modeling indicates that the fault blocks may also be rotated back to the east. Due to errors in collecting diurnal information, the ground-based magnetic information was of limited use. Anomalies identified with the magnetic data do however correlate with the locations of anomalies identified using gravity and aeromagnetic surveys. Results indicate that gravity methods can be an effective method of defining approximate fault locations, lengths, and approximate trends and dip angles.

  19. Mapping imperviousness using TM data in water resources reservation area of Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongen; Qiu, Yanling; Tong, Xiaohua; Zhang, Yalei; Zhao, Jianfu

    2006-12-01

    The rapid growth of impervious land covers within urbanizing regions holds many negative implications for environmental quality. The study region is the drinking water conservation areas of Shanghai, which is very important to the megalopolis. Mapping of imperviousness has shown important potentials to acquire such information in great spatial detail but the actual mapping process has been challenged by the heterogeneity of urban and suburb environment and the spatial and spectra capabilities of the sensor. This study focused on mapping the imperviousness fraction using linear spectral unmixing in the area from Landsat satellite remote sensing data. Development of high-quality fraction images depends greatly on the selection of suitable endmembers. A multi-endmemer linear spectral unmixing were evaculated. In the approach, each of the class hold multi-image-endmember representing the heterogeneity of them. The best fraction images were chosen to determine the imperviousness. An unconstrained least-squares solution was used to unmix the MNF components into fraction images. The multi-endmember linear spectral unmixing is then used to map imperviousness fraction for the years of 1987, 1997 and 2006 in upper region of Huangpu River, respectively. In the water resources reservation of Shanghai, the impervious surface area increases approximately 3 times from 1987 to 2002.

  20. Mobile Bay, Alabama area seen in Skylab 4 Earth Resources Experiment Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A near vertical view of the Mobile Bay, Alabama area seen in this Skylab 4 Earth Resources Experiment Package S190-B (five-inch earth terrain camera) photograph taken from the Skylab space station in earth orbit. North of Mobile the Tombigbee and Alabama Rivers join to form the Mobile River. Detailed configuration of the individual stream channels and boundaries can be defined as the Mobile River flows into Mobile Bay and into the Gulf of Mexico. The Mobile River Valley with its numerous stream channels is a distinct light shade in contrast to the dark green shade of the adjacent areas. The red coloration of Mobile Bay reflects the sediment load carried into the bay by the rivers. The westerly movement of the shore currents at the mouth of Mobile Bay is shown by the contrasting light blue of the sediment-laden current the the blue of the Gulf. Agricultural areas east and west of Mobile Bay are characterized by a rectangular pattern in green to white shades. Color variations may reflect

  1. Preliminary results of 3D inversion of the EarthScope Oregon MT data using the integral equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, A.; Gribenko, A.; Cuma, M.; Zhdanov, M. S.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper we apply 3D inversion to MT data collected in Oregon as a part of the EarthScope project. We use the integral equation method as a forward modeling engine. Quasi-analytical approximation with a variable background (QAVB) method of Frechet derivative calculation is applied. This technique allows us to simplify the inversion algorithm and to use just one forward modeling on every iteration step. The receiver footprint approach considerably reduces the computational resources needed to invert the large volumes of data covering vast areas. The data set, which was used in the inversion, was obtained through the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS). The long-period MT data was collected in Eastern Oregon in 2006. The inverted electrical conductivity distribution agrees reasonably well with geological features of the region as well as with 3D MT inversion results obtained by other researchers. The geoelectrical model of the Oregon deep interior produced by 3D inversion indicates several lithospheres' electrical conductivity anomalies, including a linear zone marked by low-high conductivity transition along the Klamath Blue Mountain Lineament associated with a linear trend of gravity minima. High electrical conductivity values occur in the upper crust under the accreted terrains in the Blue Mountains region.

  2. Pressure Indicators of Wood Resource Use in an Atlantic Forest Area, Northeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Medeiros, Patrícia Muniz; de Almeida, Alyson Luiz Santos; da Silva, Taline Cristina; de Albuquerque, Ulysses Paulino

    2011-03-01

    Wood resources are often used to support the needs of the local population. In order to protect biodiversity and resources, conservation strategies need to consider what types of wood use have the strongest impacts on forested areas. This study aimed to identify the use categories that put higher pressure on an Atlantic forest region located in the municipality of Igarassu in Pernambuco, northeastern Brazil. To conduct the study, we measured the volume of all wood products in 62 surveyed residences and registered the average replacement time for such products. The fuelwood category was most important locally and accounted for 92% of annual wood consumption. However, the construction category harvests more destructively and concentrates on the consumption of a few wood species. Therefore we recommend the fuelwood category to be the main focus of conservation effforts. In addition, the most important species for construction purposes (e.g., Eschweilera ovata (Cambess.) Miers, Apuleia leiocarpa (Vogel) J.F. Macbr. and Pogonophora schomburgkiana Miers ex Benth) should also be considered as a priority for conservation.

  3. Pressure indicators of wood resource use in an Atlantic forest area, northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros, Patrícia Muniz; de Almeida, Alyson Luiz Santos; da Silva, Taline Cristina; de Albuquerque, Ulysses Paulino

    2011-03-01

    Wood resources are often used to support the needs of the local population. In order to protect biodiversity and resources, conservation strategies need to consider what types of wood use have the strongest impacts on forested areas. This study aimed to identify the use categories that put higher pressure on an Atlantic forest region located in the municipality of Igarassu in Pernambuco, northeastern Brazil. To conduct the study, we measured the volume of all wood products in 62 surveyed residences and registered the average replacement time for such products. The fuelwood category was most important locally and accounted for 92% of annual wood consumption. However, the construction category harvests more destructively and concentrates on the consumption of a few wood species. Therefore we recommend the fuelwood category to be the main focus of conservation effforts. In addition, the most important species for construction purposes (e.g., Eschweilera ovata (Cambess.) Miers, Apuleia leiocarpa (Vogel) J.F. Macbr. and Pogonophora schomburgkiana Miers ex Benth) should also be considered as a priority for conservation. PMID:21301833

  4. Bird Mortaility at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: March 1998--September 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, K. S.; Thelander, C. G.

    2005-09-01

    Over the past 15 years, research has shown that wind turbines in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (APWRA) kill many birds, including raptors, which are protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA), the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, and/or state and federal Endangered Species Acts. Early research in the APWRA on avian mortality mainly attempted to identify the extent of the problem. In 1998, however, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) initiated research to address the causal relationships between wind turbines and bird mortality. NREL funded a project by BioResource Consultants to perform this research directed at identifying and addressing the causes of mortality of various bird species from wind turbines in the APWRA.With 580 megawatts (MW) of installed wind turbine generating capacity in the APWRA, wind turbines there provide up to 1 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) of emissions-free electricity annually. By identifying and implementing new methods and technologies to reduce or resolve bird mortality in the APWRA, power producers may be able to increase wind turbine electricity production at the site and apply similar mortality-reduction methods at other sites around the state and country.

  5. Integrated Potential-field Studies in Support of Energy Resource Assessment in Frontier Areas of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. D.; Saltus, R. W.; Potter, C. J.; Stanley, R. G.; Till, A. B.

    2008-05-01

    In frontier areas of Alaska, potential-field studies play an important role in characterizing the geologic structure of sedimentary basins having potential for undiscovered oil and gas resources. Two such areas are the Yukon Flats basin in the east-central interior of Alaska, and the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in northeastern Alaska. The Yukon Flats basin is a potential source of hydrocarbon resources for local consumption and possible export. Knowledge of the subsurface configuration of the basin is restricted to a few seismic reflection profiles covering a limited area and one well. The seismic profiles were reprocessed and reinterpreted in preparation for an assessment of the oil and gas resources of the basin. The assessment effort required knowledge of the basin configuration away from the seismic profiles, as well as an understanding of the nature of the underlying basement. To extend the interpretation of the basin thickness across the entire area of the basin, an iterative Jachens-Moring gravity inversion was performed on gridded quasi-isostatic residual gravity anomaly data. The inversion was constrained to agree with the interpreted basement surface along the seismic profiles. In addition to the main sedimentary depocenter interpreted from the seismic data as having over 8 km of fill, the gravity inversion indicated a depocenter with over 7 km of fill in the Crooked Creek sub-basin. Results for the Crooked Creek sub-basin are consistent with magnetic and magnetotelluric modeling, but they await confirmation by drilling or seismic profiling. Whether hydrocarbon source rocks are present in the pre-Cenozoic basement beneath Yukon Flats is difficult to determine because extensive surficial deposits obscure the bedrock geology, and no deep boreholes penetrate basement. The color and texture patterns in a red-green-blue composite image consisting of reduced-to-the-pole aeromagnetic data (red), magnetic potential (blue), and

  6. Evaluating Vulnerability and Resilience between Urban and Rural Area in a Regional Water Resources System under Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T. M.; Tung, C. P.; Li, M. H.; Tsao, J. H.; Lin, C. Y.

    2014-12-01

    To the threat of climate change, the risk of water resources vary in different area but the same system because of the structure of water supply system and the different sensitivity and exposure to climate for different urbanization area. For example, the urban area with high population density is sensitive to any disturbance from drought and the rural area with unpopular tap water system is insensitive to disturbance of drought but highly risk to water shortage. The resilience of water supply relies on water storage from reservoirs or lakes and water management in urban area but relies on intake from groundwater in rural area. The strategies to water resources should be considered with the water mass flow between urban and rural area. To strengthen the whole water resources system, also, it is important to find where the vulnerability from, how to reduce it and how to build up the resilience for both urban and rural area. This study aims to evaluate the vulnerability and resilience of water resources in different township and city but in the same system. An integrated tool - TaiWAP (Taiwan Water Resources Assessment Program) for climate change vulnerability assessment on water resources is used for climate impact assessment. For the simulation of the complex water supply system, the system dynamics model- VENSIM which is connected with TaiWAP is adopted to simulate a water supply system and evaluate risk of each township and city in a water supply system. The cause of vulnerability will be identified and discussed in both urban and rural. The strategies to reduce vulnerability of water resources for urban and rural will be proposed and discussed in this study.

  7. Mineral resource potential map of the lower San Francisco Wilderness study area and contiguous roadless area, Greenlee County, Arizona and Catron and Grant Counties, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ratte, James C.; Hassemer, Jerry R.; Martin, Ronny A.; Lane, Michael

    1982-01-01

    The Lower San Francisco Wilderness Study Area consists of a narrow strip 1-2 mi (2-3 km) wide between the rims of the San Francisco River canyon. The wilderness study area has a moderately high potential for geothermal resources, a low to moderate potential for base metal or precious metal resources in middle to upper Tertiary volcanic rocks, essentially no oil, gas, or coal potential, and a largely unassessable potential for metal deposits related to Laramide igneous intrusions in pre-Tertiary or lower Tertiary rocks that underlie the area. The contiguous roadless area, which borders the New Mexico half of the wilderness study area, mainly on the north side of the San Francisco River, has a low to moderate potential for molybdenum or copper deposits related to intrusive igneous rocks in the core of a volcano of dacitic composition at Goat Basin.

  8. Curriculum Guide for "In Search of the Oregon Trail."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Susan Booth

    This curriculum guide for a PBS 2-part, 180-minute video, "In Search of the Oregon Trail" (narrated by Stacy Keach), provides information to help teachers develop lesson plans. The guide is comprised of 12 lessons incorporating 31 video chapters. Curriculum areas include history, geography, economics, sociology, ethnic studies, civics and…

  9. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Oregon. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater,…

  10. Distribution of cattle grazing in a northeastern Oregon riparian pasture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Livestock grazing of a northeastern Oregon riparian pasture was monitored using high-frequency GPS tracking of cattle and high-resolution aerial photography. Tracking collars recorded positions, velocity, date, and time at 1-sec intervals. Areas where animals rested and moved were identified and re...

  11. Do poorer people have poorer access to local resources and facilities? The distribution of local resources by area deprivation in Glasgow, Scotland☆

    PubMed Central

    Macintyre, Sally; Macdonald, Laura; Ellaway, Anne

    2008-01-01

    It has commonly been suggested that in modern cities individual or household deprivation (for example, low income or education) is amplified by area level deprivation (for example, lack of jobs or good schools), in ways which damage the health of the poorest and increase health inequalities. The aim of this study was to determine the location of a range of resources and exposures by deprivation in a UK city. We examined the location of 42 resources in Glasgow City, Scotland, in 2005–2006, by quintile of small area deprivation. Measures included number per 1000 population, network distance to nearest resource, and percentage of data zones containing at least one of each type of resource. Twelve resources had higher density in, and/or were closer to or more common in, more deprived neighbourhoods: public nurseries, public primary schools, police stations, pharmacies, credit unions, post offices, bus stops, bingo halls, public swimming pools, public sports centres, outdoor play areas, and vacant and derelict land/buildings. Sixteen had higher density in, and/or were closer to, or more common in, more affluent neighbourhoods: public secondary schools, private schools, banks, building societies, museums/art galleries, railway stations, subway stations, tennis courts, bowling greens, private health clubs, private swimming pools, colleges, A & E hospitals, parks, waste disposal sites, and tourist attractions. Private nurseries, Universities, fire stations, general, dental and ophthalmic practices, pawn brokers, ATMs, supermarkets, fast food chains, cafes, public libraries, golf courses, and cinemas showed no clear pattern by deprivation. Thus it appears that in the early 21st century access to resources does not always disadvantage poorer neighbourhoods in the UK. We conclude that we need to ensure that theories and policies are based on up-to-date and context-specific empirical evidence on the distribution of neighbourhood resources, and to engage in further research

  12. Do poorer people have poorer access to local resources and facilities? The distribution of local resources by area deprivation in Glasgow, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Macintyre, Sally; Macdonald, Laura; Ellaway, Anne

    2008-09-01

    It has commonly been suggested that in modern cities individual or household deprivation (for example, low income or education) is amplified by area level deprivation (for example, lack of jobs or good schools), in ways which damage the health of the poorest and increase health inequalities. The aim of this study was to determine the location of a range of resources and exposures by deprivation in a UK city. We examined the location of 42 resources in Glasgow City, Scotland, in 2005-2006, by quintile of small area deprivation. Measures included number per 1000 population, network distance to nearest resource, and percentage of data zones containing at least one of each type of resource. Twelve resources had higher density in, and/or were closer to or more common in, more deprived neighbourhoods: public nurseries, public primary schools, police stations, pharmacies, credit unions, post offices, bus stops, bingo halls, public swimming pools, public sports centres, outdoor play areas, and vacant and derelict land/buildings. Sixteen had higher density in, and/or were closer to, or more common in, more affluent neighbourhoods: public secondary schools, private schools, banks, building societies, museums/art galleries, railway stations, subway stations, tennis courts, bowling greens, private health clubs, private swimming pools, colleges, A & E hospitals, parks, waste disposal sites, and tourist attractions. Private nurseries, Universities, fire stations, general, dental and ophthalmic practices, pawn brokers, ATMs, supermarkets, fast food chains, cafes, public libraries, golf courses, and cinemas showed no clear pattern by deprivation. Thus it appears that in the early 21st century access to resources does not always disadvantage poorer neighbourhoods in the UK. We conclude that we need to ensure that theories and policies are based on up-to-date and context-specific empirical evidence on the distribution of neighbourhood resources, and to engage in further research on

  13. Evaluation of water resources around Barapukuria coal mine industrial area, Dinajpur, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howladar, M. Farhad; Deb, Pulok Kanti; Muzemder, A. T. M. Shahidul Huqe; Ahmed, Mushfique

    2014-09-01

    Water is a very important natural resource which can be utilized in renewable or non-renewable forms but before utilizing, the evaluation of the quality of this resource is crucial for a particular use. However, the problems of water quality are more severe in areas where the mining and mineral processes' industries are present. In mining processes, several classes of wastes are produced which may turn into ultimately the sources of water quality and environmental degradation. In consequences, the evaluations of water quality for livestock, drinking, irrigation purposes and environmental implications have been carried out around the Barapukuria Coal Mining Industry under different methods and techniques such as primarily the field investigation; secondly the laboratory chemical analysis and thirdly justified the suitability of the laboratory analysis with statistical representation and correlation matrix, Schoeller plot, Piper's Trilinear diagram, Expanded Durov diagram, Wilcox diagram, US salinity diagram, Doneen's chart and others. The results of all surface and ground water samples analysis show that the characteristics and concentrations of all the major physical and chemical parameters such as pH, EC, TDS, Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Fetotal, Cl-, HCO3 -, CO3 2- and SO4 2- are varied from one sample to other but well analogous with the WHO and EQS standard limit for all purposes in the area where the abundance of the major ions is as follows: Ca2+ > Na+ > Mg2+ > K+ > Fetotal = HCO3 - > SO4 2- > Cl- > CO3 2-. The graphical exposition of analytical data demonstrates two major hydrochemical facies for example: calcium-bicarbonate (Ca2+- HCO3 -) and magnesium-bicarbonate (Mg2+- HCO3 -) type facies which directly support the shallow recently recharged alkaline water around the industry. The calculated values for the evaluation classification of water based on TDS, Na%, EC, SAR, PI, RSC, MH, and TH replicate good to excellent use of water for livestock, drinking and

  14. Middle East Studies: A Catalogue of Middle East Studies Resources In or Near Connecticut. Area Studies Resource Guides, Number Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Frank A., Comp.

    This directory of Middle Eastern resource materials in or near Connecticut is designed for use by educators, librarians, media specialists, and the general public. The Middle East is defined as the part of the world known as Southwest Asia/North Africa (SWANA). The information is organized under ten major categories: associations and…

  15. Pygmy Rabbit Surveys on State Lands in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagar, Joan; Lienkaemper, George

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis) is classified by the federal government as a species of concern (i.e., under review by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for consideration as a candidate for listing as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act) because of its specialized habitat requirements and evidence of declining populations. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) lists pygmy rabbits as 'sensitive-vulnerable,' meaning that protective measures are needed if sustainable populations are to be maintained over time (Oregon Natural Heritage Program, 2001). The Oregon Natural Heritage Program considers this species to be threatened with extirpation from Oregon. Pygmy rabbits also are a species of concern in all the other states where they occur (NatureServe, 2004). The Washington population, known as the Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit, was listed as endangered by the federal government in 2003. Historically, pygmy rabbits have been collected from Deschutes, Klamath, Crook, Lake, Grant, Harney, Baker, and Malheur Counties in Oregon. However, the geographic range of pygmy rabbit in Oregon may have decreased in historic times (Verts and Carraway, 1998), and boundaries of the current distribution are not known. Not all potentially suitable sites appear to be occupied, and populations are susceptible to rapid declines and local extirpation (Weiss and Verts, 1984). In order to protect and manage remaining populations on State of Oregon lands, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife needs to identify areas currently occupied by pygmy rabbits, as well as suitable habitats. The main objective of this survey was document to presence or absence of pygmy rabbits on state lands in Malheur, Harney, Lake, and Deschutes counties. Knowledge of the location and extent of pygmy rabbit populations can provide a foundation for the conservation and management of this species in Oregon. The pygmy rabbit is just one of a suite of species of

  16. Taxonomic classification of world map units in crop producing areas of Argentina and Brazil with representative US soil series and major land resource areas in which they occur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huckle, H. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The most probable current U.S. taxonomic classification of the soils estimated to dominate world soil map units (WSM)) in selected crop producing states of Argentina and Brazil are presented. Representative U.S. soil series the units are given. The map units occurring in each state are listed with areal extent and major U.S. land resource areas in which similar soils most probably occur. Soil series sampled in LARS Technical Report 111579 and major land resource areas in which they occur with corresponding similar WSM units at the taxonomic subgroup levels are given.

  17. Mineral resource potential map of the Spanish Peaks Wilderness Study Area, Huerfano and Las Animas counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Budding, Karin E.; Kluender, Steven E.

    1983-01-01

    The depth of several thousand feet at which coal may underlie the surface rocks of the study area makes it a resource with little likelihood of development. The potential for oil and gas appears low because of the apparent lack of structural traps and the intense igneous activity in the area.

  18. Workshops for Developing Competency of Instructors in New and Expanding Areas of Curriculum in Agribusiness and Natural Resources. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Board for Vocational Education, Jackson.

    During the summer of 1973, two workshops were held to increase the competency of agriculture teachers in Mississippi in new and emerging areas of agribusiness and natural resources. One workshop focused on planning programs in the new areas of the pesticide industry, agribusiness economics, agribusiness management, environmental protection, rural…

  19. Resources, resources, resources....

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    Several resources provided by different types of organizations are available to transgender people in the New York area. Some of these organizations include the Gender Identity Project, Harlem United Community AIDS Center, Hetrick Martin Institute, SafeSpace and Youth Enrichment Services (YES). Organization telephone numbers, addresses, and their targeted audiences are provided. PMID:11364801

  20. Analytical results of stream-sediment samples from the Medford 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle, Oregon-California

    SciTech Connect

    Whittington, C.L.; Leinz, R.W.; Speckman, W.S.

    1983-01-01

    The report presents analytical and location data of 1529 stream-sediment samples and their oxide residues (oxalic-acid leachates) from the Medford 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle, Oregon-California. These samples were collected during a geochemical survey of the quadrangle and during mineral resource and geochemical studies of wilderness areas lying partly or entirely within the quadrangle including the Wild Rogue Wilderness, the Kalmiopsis Wilderness, and the Sky Lakes Roadless Area and Mountain Lakes Wilderness. 12 refs., 2 tabs. (ACR)