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Sample records for respiratory chain activity

  1. Respiratory chain supercomplexes.

    PubMed

    Schägger, H

    2001-01-01

    Respiratory chain supercomplexes have been isolated from mammalian and yeast mitochondria, and bacterial membranes. Functional roles of respiratory chain supercomplexes are catalytic enhancement, substrate channelling, and stabilization of complex I by complex III in mammalian cells. Bacterial supercomplexes are characterized by their relatively high detergent-stability compared to yeast or mammalian supercomplexes that are stable to sonication. The mobility of substrate cytochrome c increases in the order bacterial, yeast, and mammalian respiratory chain. In bacterial supercomplexes, the electron transfer between complexes III and IV involves movement of the mobile head of a tightly bound cytochrome c, whereas the yeast S. cerevisiae seems to use substrate channelling of a mobile cytochrome c, and mammalian respiratory chains have been described to use a cytochrome c pool. Dimeric ATP synthase seems to be specific for mitochondrial OXPHOS systems. Monomeric complex V was found in Acetobacterium woodii and Paracoccus denitrificans. PMID:11798023

  2. Hypoxia-Mediated Impairment of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Inhibits the Bactericidal Activity of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Melanie; Gerlach, Roman G.; Popp, Isabel; Matuszak, Jasmin; Mahapatro, Mousumi; Castiglione, Kirstin; Chakravortty, Dipshikha; Willam, Carsten; Hensel, Michael; Bogdan, Christian

    2012-01-01

    In infected tissues oxygen tensions are low. As innate immune cells have to operate under these conditions, we analyzed the ability of macrophages (Mϕ) to kill Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus in a hypoxic microenvironment. Oxygen restriction did not promote intracellular bacterial growth but did impair the bactericidal activity of the host cells against both pathogens. This correlated with a decreased production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) and reactive nitrogen intermediates. Experiments with phagocyte NADPH oxidase (PHOX) and inducible NO synthase (NOS2) double-deficient Mϕ revealed that in E. coli- or S. aureus-infected cells the reduced antibacterial activity during hypoxia was either entirely or partially independent of the diminished PHOX and NOS2 activity. Hypoxia impaired the mitochondrial activity of infected Mϕ. Inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain activity during normoxia (using rotenone or antimycin A) completely or partially mimicked the defective antibacterial activity observed in hypoxic E. coli- or S. aureus-infected wild-type Mϕ, respectively. Accordingly, inhibition of the respiratory chain of S. aureus-infected, normoxic PHOX−/− NOS2−/− Mϕ further raised the bacterial burden of the cells, which reached the level measured in hypoxic PHOX−/− NOS2−/− Mϕ cultures. Our data demonstrate that the reduced killing of S. aureus or E. coli during hypoxia is not simply due to a lack of PHOX and NOS2 activity but partially or completely results from an impaired mitochondrial antibacterial effector function. Since pharmacological inhibition of the respiratory chain raised the generation of ROI but nevertheless phenocopied the effect of hypoxia, ROI can be excluded as the mechanism underlying the antimicrobial activity of mitochondria. PMID:22252868

  3. Exploring membrane respiratory chains.

    PubMed

    Marreiros, Bruno C; Calisto, Filipa; Castro, Paulo J; Duarte, Afonso M; Sena, Filipa V; Silva, Andreia F; Sousa, Filipe M; Teixeira, Miguel; Refojo, Patrícia N; Pereira, Manuela M

    2016-08-01

    Acquisition of energy is central to life. In addition to the synthesis of ATP, organisms need energy for the establishment and maintenance of a transmembrane difference in electrochemical potential, in order to import and export metabolites or to their motility. The membrane potential is established by a variety of membrane bound respiratory complexes. In this work we explored the diversity of membrane respiratory chains and the presence of the different enzyme complexes in the several phyla of life. We performed taxonomic profiles of the several membrane bound respiratory proteins and complexes evaluating the presence of their respective coding genes in all species deposited in KEGG database. We evaluated 26 quinone reductases, 5 quinol:electron carriers oxidoreductases and 18 terminal electron acceptor reductases. We further included in the analyses enzymes performing redox or decarboxylation driven ion translocation, ATP synthase and transhydrogenase and we also investigated the electron carriers that perform functional connection between the membrane complexes, quinones or soluble proteins. Our results bring a novel, broad and integrated perspective of membrane bound respiratory complexes and thus of the several energetic metabolisms of living systems. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27044012

  4. Synthesis and biological activities of the respiratory chain inhibitor aurachin D and new ring versus chain analogues

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu-Wen; Herrmann, Jennifer; Zang, Yi; Grellier, Philippe; Prado, Soizic

    2013-01-01

    Summary Aurachins are myxobacterial 3-farnesyl-4(1H)-quinolone derived compounds initially described as respiratory chain inhibitors, more specifically as inhibitors of various cytochrome complexes. They are also known as potent antibiotic compounds. We describe herein the first synthesis of aurachin D through a key Conrad–Limpach reaction. The same strategy was used to reach some ring as opposed to chain analogues, allowing for the description of structure–activity relationships. Biological screening of the analogues showed antiparasitic, cytotoxic, antibacterial and antifungal activities, and depletion of the mitochondrial membrane potential. The strongest activity was found on Plasmodium falciparum with a selectivity index of 345, compared to Vero cells, for the natural product and its geranyl analogue. The loss of mitochondrial membrane potential induced by aurachins in human U-2 OS osteosarcoma cells was studied, showing the best activity for aurachin D and a naphthalene analogue, yet without totally explaining the observed cytotoxic activity of the compounds. Finally, a synthetic entry is given to the complete carboheterocyclic core of aurachin H through the N-oxidation/epoxidation of aurachin D and a shorter chain analogue, followed by subsequent biomimetic cyclization. PMID:23946854

  5. Differential inhibitory effects of methylmalonic acid on respiratory chain complex activities in rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Pettenuzzo, Leticia F; Ferreira, Gustavo da C; Schmidt, Anna Laura; Dutra-Filho, Carlos S; Wyse, Angela T S; Wajner, Moacir

    2006-02-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia is an inherited metabolic disorder biochemically characterized by tissue accumulation of methylmalonic acid (MMA) and clinically by progressive neurological deterioration and kidney failure, whose pathophysiology is so far poorly established. Previous studies have shown that MMA inhibits complex II of the respiratory chain in rat cerebral cortex, although no inhibition of complexes I-V was found in bovine heart. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the in vitro effect of 2.5mM MMA on the activity of complexes I-III, II, II-III and IV in striatum, hippocampus, heart, liver and kidney homogenates from young rats. We observed that MMA caused a significant inhibition of complex II activity in striatum and hippocampus (15-20%) at low concentrations of succinate in the medium, but not in the peripheral tissues. We also verified that the inhibitory property of MMA only occurred after exposing brain homogenates for at least 10 min with the acid, suggesting that this inhibition was mediated by indirect mechanisms. Simultaneous preincubation with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and catalase (CAT) plus superoxide dismutase (SOD) did not prevent MMA-induced inhibition of complex II, suggesting that common reactive oxygen (superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical) and nitric (nitric oxide) species were not involved in this effect. In addition, complex II-III (20-35%) was also inhibited by MMA in all tissues tested, and complex I-III only in the kidney (53%) and liver (38%). In contrast, complex IV activity was not changed by MMA in all tissues studied. These results indicate that MMA differentially affects the activity of the respiratory chain pending on the tissues studied, being striatum and hippocampus more vulnerable to its effect. In case our in vitro data are confirmed in vivo in tissues from methylmalonic acidemic patients, it is feasible that that the present findings may be

  6. Impairment of the mitochondrial respiratory chain activity in diethylnitrosamine-induced rat hepatomas: possible involvement of oxygen free radicals.

    PubMed

    Boitier, E; Merad-Boudia, M; Guguen-Guillouzo, C; Defer, N; Ceballos-Picot, I; Leroux, J P; Marsac, C

    1995-07-15

    Alterations in the energy metabolism of cancer cells have been reported for many years. However, the deleterious mechanisms involved in these deficiencies have not yet been clearly proved. The main goal of this study was to decipher the harmful mechanisms responsible for the respiratory chain deficiencies in the course of diethylnitrosamine (DENA)-induced rat hepatocarcinogenesis, where mitochondrial DNA abnormalities had been previously reported. The respiratory activity of freshly isolated hepatoma mitochondria, assessed by oxygen consumption experiments and enzymatic assays, presented a severe complex I deficiency 19 months after DENA treatment, and later on, in addition, a defective complex III activity. Since respiratory complex subunits are encoded by both nuclear and mitochondrial genes, we checked whether the respiratory chain defects were due to impaired synthesis processes. The specific immunodetection of complex I failed to show any alterations in the steady-state levels of both nuclear and mitochondrial encoded subunits in the hepatomas. Moreover, in vitro protein synthesis experiments carried out on freshly isolated hepatoma mitochondria did not bring to light any modifications in the synthesis of the mitochondrial subunits of the respiratory complexes, whatever the degree of tumor progression. Finally, Southern blot analysis of mitochondrial DNA did not show any major mitochondrial DNA rearrangements in DENA-induced hepatomas. Because the synthetic processes of respiratory complexes did not seem to be implicated in the respiratory chain impairment, these deficiencies could be partly ascribed to a direct toxic impact of highly reactive molecules on these complexes, thus impairing their function. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is an important generator of noxious, reactive oxygen free radicals such as superoxide and H2O2, which are normally catabolized by powerful antioxidant scavengers. Nineteen months after DENA treatment, a general collapse of

  7. Acute Carnosine Administration Increases Respiratory Chain Complexes and Citric Acid Cycle Enzyme Activities in Cerebral Cortex of Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Levy W; Cararo, José H; Maravai, Soliany G; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Kist, Luiza W; Guerra Martinez, Camila; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Bogo, Maurício R; Hipkiss, Alan R; Streck, Emilio L; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C

    2016-10-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is an imidazole dipeptide synthesized in excitable tissues of many animals, whose biochemical properties include carbonyl scavenger, anti-oxidant, bivalent metal ion chelator, proton buffer, and immunomodulating agent, although its precise physiological role(s) in skeletal muscle and brain tissues in vivo remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vivo effects of acute carnosine administration on various aspects of brain bioenergetics of young Wistar rats. The activity of mitochondrial enzymes in cerebral cortex was assessed using a spectrophotometer, and it was found that there was an increase in the activities of complexes I-III and II-III and succinate dehydrogenase in carnosine-treated rats, as compared to vehicle-treated animals. However, quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) data on mRNA levels of mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins (nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-α (Ppargc1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam)) were not altered significantly and therefore suggest that short-term carnosine administration does not affect mitochondrial biogenesis. It was in agreement with the finding that immunocontent of respiratory chain complexes was not altered in animals receiving carnosine. These observations indicate that acute carnosine administration increases the respiratory chain and citric acid cycle enzyme activities in cerebral cortex of young rats, substantiating, at least in part, a neuroprotector effect assigned to carnosine against oxidative-driven disorders. PMID:26476839

  8. Prediction of Muscle Energy States at Low Metabolic Rates Requires Feedback Control of Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Activity by Inorganic Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Joep P. J.; Jeneson, Jeroen A. L.; van Oorschot, Joep W. M.; Prompers, Jeanine J.; Nicolay, Klaas; Hilbers, Peter A. J.; van Riel, Natal A. W.

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of the 100-fold dynamic range of mitochondrial ATP synthesis flux in skeletal muscle was investigated. Hypotheses of key control mechanisms were included in a biophysical model of oxidative phosphorylation and tested against metabolite dynamics recorded by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS). Simulations of the initial model featuring only ADP and Pi feedback control of flux failed in reproducing the experimentally sampled relation between myoplasmic free energy of ATP hydrolysis (ΔGp = ΔGpo′+RT ln ([ADP][Pi]/[ATP]) and the rate of mitochondrial ATP synthesis at low fluxes (<0.2 mM/s). Model analyses including Monte Carlo simulation approaches and metabolic control analysis (MCA) showed that this problem could not be amended by model re-parameterization, but instead required reformulation of ADP and Pi feedback control or introduction of additional control mechanisms (feed forward activation), specifically at respiratory Complex III. Both hypotheses were implemented and tested against time course data of phosphocreatine (PCr), Pi and ATP dynamics during post-exercise recovery and validation data obtained by 31P MRS of sedentary subjects and track athletes. The results rejected the hypothesis of regulation by feed forward activation. Instead, it was concluded that feedback control of respiratory chain complexes by inorganic phosphate is essential to explain the regulation of mitochondrial ATP synthesis flux in skeletal muscle throughout its full dynamic range. PMID:22470528

  9. Respiratory Chain of Plant Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Bayard T.

    1976-01-01

    Oxidation of the respiratory chain carriers of anaerobic, CO-saturated skunk cabbage (Symplocarpus foetidus) mitochondria, by means of an O2 pulse, proceeds primarily through the cyanide-insensitive alternate oxidase, since the oxidation of cytochromes a and a3 takes place with a half-time of 3 seconds, corresponding to the rate of dissociation of CO from reduced cytochrome a3. Ubiquinone and part of the flavoprotein are oxidized within 1 second under these conditions, and this rapid rate of oxidation is strongly inhibited by m-chlorobenzhydroxamic acid (mCLAM), a specific inhibitor of the alternate oxidase of plant mitochondria. The rate of ubiquinone oxidation under these conditions in white potato (Solanum tuberosum) mitochondria, which have no alternate oxidase, is the same as that in skunk cabbage mitochondria treated with mCLAM. Ubiquinone, thus identified as the carrier common to both the cytochrome and alternate oxidase pathways, is linked to the alternate oxidase by a flavoprotein of midpoint potential 50 millivolts more negative with which it is in equilibrium. This arrangement provides a switch for diverting electron transport primarily through the cytochrome pathway under state 3 conditions and primarily through the alternate oxidase pathway under state 4 conditions. PMID:16659709

  10. Activation of protein phosphatase 2A is responsible for increased content and inactivation of respiratory chain complex i induced by all-trans retinoic acid in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Papa, F; Sardaro, N; Lippolis, R; Panelli, D; Scacco, S

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) on cell growth and respiratory chain complex I in human keratinocyte cultures. Keratinocyte treatment results in increased level of GRIM-19 and other subunits of complex I, in particular of their carbonylated forms, associated with inhibition of its enzymatic activity. The results show that in keratinocytes ATRA-promoted phosphatase activity controls the proteostasis and activity of complex I. PMID:27358125

  11. In vitro effect of manganese chloride exposure on reactive oxygen species generation and respiratory chain complexes activities of mitochondria isolated from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Surong; Fu, Juanling; Zhou, Zongcan

    2004-02-01

    Manganese (Mn) is known to induce mitochondrial dysfunction in excessive dose; however the mechanisms underlying its action are not elucidated clearly. To determine if Mn2+ can act directly on mitochondria or indirectly by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS), isolated mitochondria were exposed to different concentration of Mn2+ (5, 50, 500, 1000 microM). ROS generation, respiratory control ratio (RCR), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and respiratory chain complexes activities were investigated. Dose-dependent inhibition of respiratory chain complexes and induction of ROS were observed; these changes were paralleled by decreasing of respiratory control ratio (RCR) both with succinate or glutamate + malate. Further investigation indicated that the membrane potential determined by Rhodamine123 release decreased after MnCl2 exposure at 1000 microM. In addition, effects of the antioxidants NAC (500 microM), GSH (500 microM) and Vitamin C (500 microM) were studied at 500 microM Mn2+. The results indicate that the effect of Mn2+ exposure on respiratory chain is not site-specific, and antioxidants can protect the mitochondria function by reducing the formation of free radicals. PMID:14630064

  12. Ambroxol inhibits neutrophil respiratory burst activated by alpha chain integrin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Peroni, D G; Moser, S; Gallo, G; Pigozzi, R; Tenero, L; Zanoni, L; Boner, A L; Piacentini, G L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the possible anti-oxidant effect(s) of Ambroxol on neutrophils activated by ligand-binding of the drug with membrane-associated adhesion integrin CD11a and to estimate dose-response changes in oxygen free radical production. The amount of free radical production by anti-CD11a- and anti-CD4-coated neutrophils stimulated with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and challenged with increasing concentration of Ambroxol, was evaluated within a time frame of 90 minutes. A significant dose-dependent effect response of Ambroxol on O2‾ production by cells coated with anti-CD11a antibody was observed. This preliminary study opens a new perspective on the therapeutic role of Ambroxol as an antioxidant drug and for its potential use in controlling oxidative stress, particularly in leukocyte-dependent inflammation. PMID:24355223

  13. The Respiratory Chain of Alkaliphilic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Terry Ann Krulwich

    2008-01-29

    Alkaliphilic bacteria that grow at extremely high pH are confronted by particular bioenergetic problems in carrying out oxidative phosphorylation. This project focused on the properties and adaptations of the respiratory chain. The respiratory chain as a whole, the redox poises of its components and several individual complexes of the respiratory chain of alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 have been characterized as part of this project and, importantly, this project has helped support the development of genetic tools that make B. pseudofirmus OF4 the most genetically tractable and, hence, most bioenergetically characterized extreme alkaliphile. Evidence has been obtained for a pivotal role of the cca3-type terminal oxidase in oxidative phosphorylation, especially at high pH and motifs that may be relevant to that special role have been identified.

  14. Administration of Harmine and Imipramine Alters Creatine Kinase and Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Activities in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Réus, Gislaine Z.; Stringari, Roberto B.; Gonçalves, Cinara L.; Scaini, Giselli; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Jeremias, Gabriela C.; Jeremias, Isabela C.; Ferreira, Gabriela K.; Streck, Emílio L.; Hallak, Jaime E.; Zuardi, Antônio W.; Crippa, José A.; Quevedo, João

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluated mitochondrial respiratory chain and creatine kinase activities after administration of harmine (5, 10, and 15 mg/kg) and imipramine (10, 20, and 30 mg/kg) in rat brain. After acute treatment occurred an increase of creatine kinase in the prefrontal with imipramine (20 and 30 mg/kg) and harmine in all doses, in the striatum with imipramine (20 and 30 mg/kg) and harmine (5 and 10 mg/kg); harmine (15 mg/kg) decreased creatine kinase. In the chronic treatment occurred an increase of creatine kinase with imipramine (20 mg/kg), harmine (5 mg/kg) in the prefrontal with imipramine (20 and 30 mg/kg) and harmine (5 and 10 mg/kg) in the striatum. In the acute treatment, the complex I increased in the prefrontal with harmine (15 mg/kg) and in the striatum with harmine (10 mg/kg); the complex II decreased with imipramine (20 and 30 mg/kg) in the striatum; the complex IV increased with imipramine (30 mg/kg) in the striatum. In the chronic treatment, the complex I increased with harmine (5 mg/kg) in the prefrontal; the complex II increased with imipramine (20 mg/kg) in the prefrontal; the complex IV increased with harmine (5 mg/kg) in the striatum. Finally, these findings further support the hypothesis that harmine and imipramine could be involved in mitochondrial function. PMID:21969912

  15. Ganoderma lucidum (Fr.) P. Karst enhances activities of heart mitochondrial enzymes and respiratory chain complexes in the aged rat.

    PubMed

    Sudheesh, N P; Ajith, T A; Janardhanan, K K

    2009-10-01

    Aging is associated with increased oxidative damage at multiple cellular levels, decline in cellular energy production and enhanced free radical status. The effect of the medicinal mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum on the activities of tricarboxylic acid (Krebs) cycle enzymes and mitochondrial complexes I-IV of the electron transport chain in aged rats were investigated. The activity of Krebs cycle enzymes, isocitrate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase as well as mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, and IV were determined in heart of aged male Wistar rats orally administrated with 70% ethanolic extract (50 and 250 mg/kg) of G. lucidum. DL-alpha-lipoic acid (100 mg/kg) was taken as the positive control. Administration of the G. lucidum, once daily for 15 days, was significantly (P < 0.05) effective to enhance the Krebs cycle dehydrogenases, and mitochondrial electron transport chain complex IV activities in aged rats. The profound activity of the extract can be correlated to the significant antioxidant property of G. lucidum. The results of the study revealed that G. lucidum is effective to ameliorate the age associated decline of cellular energy status. PMID:19123066

  16. Respiratory chain supercomplexes of mitochondria and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schägger, Hermann

    2002-09-10

    Respiratory chain complexes are fragments of larger structural and functional units, the respiratory chain supercomplexes or "respirasomes", which exist in bacterial and mitochondrial membranes. Supercomplexes of mitochondria and bacteria contain complexes III, IV, and complex I, with the notable exception of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which does not possess complex I. These supercomplexes often are stable to sonication but sensitive to most detergents except digitonin. In S. cerevisiae, a major component linking complexes III and IV together is cardiolipin.In Paracoccus denitrificans, complex I itself is rather detergent-sensitive and thus could not be obtained in detergent-solubilized form so far. However, it can be isolated as part of a supercomplex. Stabilization of complex I by binding to complex III was also found in human mitochondria. Further functional roles of the organization in a supercomplex are catalytic enhancement by reducing diffusion distances of substrates or, depending on the organism, channelling of the substrates quinone and cytochrome c. This makes redox reactions less dependent of midpoint potentials of substrates, and permits electron flow at low degree of substrate reduction.A dimeric state of ATP synthase seems to be specific for mitochondria. Exclusively, monomeric ATP synthase was found in Acetobacterium woodii, in P. denitrificans, and in spinach chloroplasts. PMID:12206908

  17. Biogenesis of mitochondria in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) curds subjected to temperature stress and recovery involves regulation of the complexome, respiratory chain activity, organellar translation and ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Rurek, Michal; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej M; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2015-01-01

    The biogenesis of the cauliflower curd mitochondrial proteome was investigated under cold, heat and the recovery. For the first time, two dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis was used to study the plant mitochondrial complexome in heat and heat recovery. Particularly, changes in the complex I and complex III subunits and import proteins, and the partial disintegration of matrix complexes were observed. The presence of unassembled subunits of ATP synthase was accompanied by impairment in mitochondrial translation of its subunit. In cold and heat, the transcription profiles of mitochondrial genes were uncorrelated. The in-gel activities of respiratory complexes were particularly affected after stress recovery. Despite a general stability of respiratory chain complexes in heat, functional studies showed that their activity and the ATP synthesis yield were affected. Contrary to cold stress, heat stress resulted in a reduced efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation likely due to changes in alternative oxidase (AOX) activity. Stress and stress recovery differently modulated the protein level and activity of AOX. Heat stress induced an increase in AOX activity and protein level, and AOX1a and AOX1d transcript level, while heat recovery reversed the AOX protein and activity changes. Conversely, cold stress led to a decrease in AOX activity (and protein level), which was reversed after cold recovery. Thus, cauliflower AOX is only induced by heat stress. In heat, contrary to the AOX activity, the activity of rotenone-insensitive internal NADH dehydrogenase was diminished. The relevance of various steps of plant mitochondrial biogenesis to temperature stress response and recovery is discussed. PMID:25617518

  18. Nuclear Control of Respiratory Chain Expression by Nuclear Respiratory Factors and PGC-1-Related Coactivator

    PubMed Central

    Scarpulla, Richard C.

    2010-01-01

    Expression of the respiratory apparatus depends on both nuclear and mitochondrial genes. Although these genes are sequestered in distinct cellular organelles, their transcription relies on nucleus-encoded factors. Certain of these factors are directed to the mitochondria, where they sponsor the bi-directional transcription of mitochondrial DNA. Others act on nuclear genes that encode the majority of the respiratory subunits and many other gene products required for the assembly and function of the respiratory chain. The nuclear respiratory factors, NRF-1 and NRF-2, contribute to the expression of respiratory subunits and mitochondrial transcription factors and thus have been implicated in nucleo-mitochondrial interactions. In addition, coactivators of the PGC-1 family serve as mediators between the environment and the transcriptional machinery governing mitochondrial biogenesis. One family member, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator PGC-1-related coactivator (PRC), is an immediate early gene product that is rapidly induced by mitogenic signals in the absence of de novo protein synthesis. Like other PGC-1 family members, PRC binds NRF-1 and activates NRF-1 target genes. In addition, PRC complexes with NRF-2 and HCF-1 (host cell factor-1) in the activation of NRF-2-dependent promoters. HCF-1 functions in cell-cycle progression and has been identified as an NRF-2 coactivator. The association of these factors with PRC is suggestive of a role for the complex in cell growth. Finally, shRNA-mediated knock down of PRC expression results in a complex phenotype that includes the inhibition of respiratory growth on galactose and the loss of respiratory complexes. Thus, PRC may help integrate the expression of the respiratory apparatus with the cell proliferative program. PMID:19076454

  19. Mitochondrial Cristae Shape Determines Respiratory Chain Supercomplexes Assembly and Respiratory Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cogliati, Sara; Frezza, Christian; Soriano, Maria Eugenia; Varanita, Tatiana; Quintana-Cabrera, Ruben; Corrado, Mauro; Cipolat, Sara; Costa, Veronica; Casarin, Alberto; Gomes, Ligia C.; Perales-Clemente, Ester; Salviati, Leonardo; Fernandez-Silva, Patricio; Enriquez, Jose A.; Scorrano, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Summary Respiratory chain complexes assemble into functional quaternary structures called supercomplexes (RCS) within the folds of the inner mitochondrial membrane, or cristae. Here, we investigate the relationship between respiratory function and mitochondrial ultrastructure and provide evidence that cristae shape determines the assembly and stability of RCS and hence mitochondrial respiratory efficiency. Genetic and apoptotic manipulations of cristae structure affect assembly and activity of RCS in vitro and in vivo, independently of changes to mitochondrial protein synthesis or apoptotic outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. We demonstrate that, accordingly, the efficiency of mitochondria-dependent cell growth depends on cristae shape. Thus, RCS assembly emerges as a link between membrane morphology and function. PMID:24055366

  20. Hexavalent chromium targets mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I to induce reactive oxygen species-dependent caspase-3 activation in L-02 hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fang; Li, Yanhong; Dai, Lu; Deng, Yuanyuan; Zou, Yue; Li, Peng; Yang, Yuan; Zhong, Caigao

    2012-09-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], which is used for various industrial applications, such as leather tanning and chroming, can cause a number of human diseases including inflammation and cancer. Cr(VI) exposure leads to severe damage to the liver, but the mechanisms involved in Cr(VI)-mediated toxicity in the liver are unclear. The present study provides evidence that Cr(VI) enhances reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation by inhibiting the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex (MRCC) I. Cr(VI) did not affect the expression levels of antioxidative proteins such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and thioredoxin (Trx), indicating that the antioxidative system was not involved in Cr(VI)-induced ROS accumulation. We found that ROS mediated caspase-3 activation partially depends on the downregulation of the heat shock protein (HSP) 70 and 90. In order to confirm our hypothesis that ROS plays a key role in Cr(VI)-mediated cytotoxicity, we used N-acetylcysteine (NAC) to inhibit the accumulation of ROS. NAC successfully blocked the inhibition of HSP70 and HSP90 as well as the activation of caspase-3, suggesting that ROS is essential in Cr(VI)-induced caspase-3 activation. By applying different MRCC substrates as electron donors, we also confirmed that Cr(VI) could accept the electrons leaked from MRCC I and the reduction occurs at MRCC I. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that Cr(VI) induces ROS-dependent caspase-3 activation by inhibiting MRCC I activity, and MRCC I has been identified as a new target and a new mechanism for the apoptosis-inducing activity displayed by Cr(VI). PMID:22710416

  1. Genetics and molecular pathogenesis of mitochondrial respiratory chain diseases.

    PubMed

    Hanna, M G; Nelson, I P

    1999-05-01

    Dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain has been recognised as a cause of human disease for over 30 years. Advances in the past 10 years have led to a better understanding of the genetics and molecular pathogenesis of many of these disorders. Over 100 primary defects in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are now implicated in the pathogenesis of a group of disorders which are collectively known as the mitochondrial encephalomyopathies, and which most frequently involve skeletal muscle and/or the central nervous system. Although impaired oxidative phosphorylation is likely to be the final common pathway leading to the cellular dysfunction associated with such mtDNA mutations, the complex relationship between genotype and phenotype remains largely unexplained. Most of the genes which encode the respiratory chain reside in the nucleus, yet only five nuclear genes have been implicated in human respiratory chain diseases. There is evidence that respiratory chain dysfunction is present in common neurological diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease. The precise cause of this respiratory chain dysfunction and its relationship to the disease process are unclear. This review focuses upon respiratory chain disorders associated with primary defects in mtDNA. PMID:10379358

  2. Metformin-induced inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain increases FGF21 expression via ATF4 activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kook Hwan; Jeong, Yeon Taek; Kim, Seong Hun; Jung, Hye Seung; Park, Kyong Soo; Lee, Hae-Youn; Lee, Myung-Shik

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •Metformin induces FGF21 expression in an AMPK independent manner. •Metformin enhances FGF21 expression by inhibiting mitochondrial complex I activity. •The PERK-eIF2α-ATF4 axis is required for metformin-induced FGF21 expression. •Metformin activates the ATF4-FGF21 axis in the liver of mouse. •Metformin increases serum FGF21 level in diabetic human subjects. -- Abstract: Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is an endocrine hormone that exhibits anti-obesity and anti-diabetes effects. Because metformin is widely used as a glucose-lowering agent in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), we investigated whether metformin modulates FGF21 expression in cell lines, and in mice or human subjects. We found that metformin increased the expression and release of FGF21 in a diverse set of cell types, including rat hepatoma FaO, primary mouse hepatocytes, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Intriguingly, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was dispensable for the induction of FGF21 by metformin. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), which are additional targets of metformin, were not involved in metformin-induced FGF21 expression. Importantly, inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity by metformin resulted in FGF21 induction through PKR-like ER kinase (PERK)-eukaryotic translation factor 2α (eIF2α)-activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). We showed that metformin activated ATF4 and increased FGF21 expression in the livers of mice, which led to increased serum levels of FGF21. We also found that serum FGF21 level was increased in human subjects with T2D after metformin therapy for 6 months. In conclusion, our results indicate that metformin induced expression of FGF21 through an ATF4-dependent mechanism by inhibiting mitochondrial respiration independently of AMPK. Therefore, FGF21 induction by metformin might explain a portion of the beneficial metabolic effects of metformin.

  3. Mitochondrial Protein Interaction Mapping Identifies Regulators of Respiratory Chain Function.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Brendan J; Wilkerson, Emily M; Veling, Mike T; Minogue, Catie E; Xia, Chuanwu; Beebe, Emily T; Wrobel, Russell L; Cho, Holly; Kremer, Laura S; Alston, Charlotte L; Gromek, Katarzyna A; Dolan, Brendan K; Ulbrich, Arne; Stefely, Jonathan A; Bohl, Sarah L; Werner, Kelly M; Jochem, Adam; Westphall, Michael S; Rensvold, Jarred W; Taylor, Robert W; Prokisch, Holger; Kim, Jung-Ja P; Coon, Joshua J; Pagliarini, David J

    2016-08-18

    Mitochondria are essential for numerous cellular processes, yet hundreds of their proteins lack robust functional annotation. To reveal functions for these proteins (termed MXPs), we assessed condition-specific protein-protein interactions for 50 select MXPs using affinity enrichment mass spectrometry. Our data connect MXPs to diverse mitochondrial processes, including multiple aspects of respiratory chain function. Building upon these observations, we validated C17orf89 as a complex I (CI) assembly factor. Disruption of C17orf89 markedly reduced CI activity, and its depletion is found in an unresolved case of CI deficiency. We likewise discovered that LYRM5 interacts with and deflavinates the electron-transferring flavoprotein that shuttles electrons to coenzyme Q (CoQ). Finally, we identified a dynamic human CoQ biosynthetic complex involving multiple MXPs whose topology we map using purified components. Collectively, our data lend mechanistic insight into respiratory chain-related activities and prioritize hundreds of additional interactions for further exploration of mitochondrial protein function. PMID:27499296

  4. Differential reconstitution of mitochondrial respiratory chain activity and plasma redox state by cysteine and ornithine in a model of cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Ushmorov, A; Hack, V; Dröge, W

    1999-07-15

    The mechanism of wasting, as it occurs in malignant diseases and various etiologically unrelated conditions, is still poorly understood. We have, therefore, studied putative cause/effect relationships in a murine model of cancer cachexia, C57BL/6 mice bearing the fibrosarcoma MCA-105. The plasma of these mice showed decreased albumin and increased glutamate levels, which are typically found in practically all catabolic conditions. Skeletal muscles from tumor-bearing mice were found to have an abnormally low mitochondrial respiratory chain activity (mito.RCA) and significantly decreased glutathione (GSH) levels. The decrease in mito.RCA was correlated with an increase in the i.m. GSH disulfide/GSH ratio, the plasma cystine/thiol ratio, and the GSH disulfide/GSH ratio in the bile. This is indicative of a generalized shift in the redox state extending through different body fluids. Treatment of tumor-bearing mice with ornithine, a precursor of the radical scavenger spermine, reversed both the decrease in mito.RCA and the change in the redox state, whereas treatment with cysteine, a GSH precursor, normalized only the redox state. Treatment of normal mice with difluoromethyl-ornithine, a specific inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase and spermine biosynthesis, inhibited the mito.RCA in the skeletal muscle tissue, thus illustrating the importance of the putrescine/spermine pathway in the maintenance of mito.RCA. Ornithine, cysteine, and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) also reconstituted the abnormally low concentrations of the GSH precursor glutamate in the skeletal muscle tissue of tumor-bearing mice. Higher doses, however, enhanced tumor growth and increased the plasma glucose level in normal mice. In the latter, cysteine and NAC also decreased i.m. catalase and GSH peroxidase activities. Taken together, our studies on the effects of ornithine, cysteine, and NAC illuminate some of the mechanistic pathways involved in cachexia and suggest targets for therapeutic intervention

  5. Mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV deficiency complicated with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Hashimura, Yuya; Morioka, Ichiro; Hisamatsu, Chieko; Yokoyama, Naoki; Taniguchi-Ikeda, Mariko; Yokozaki, Hiroshi; Murayama, Kei; Ohtake, Akira; Itoh, Kyoko; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Iijima, Kazumoto

    2016-07-01

    A female infant born at 36 weeks gestational age with birthweight 2135 g, and who developed respiratory disorder, hyperlactacidemia and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy after birth, was admitted to hospital at 3 days of age. After admission, bilious emesis, abdominal distention, and passage disorder of the gastrointestinal tract were resistant to various drugs. Exploratory laparotomy was performed at 93 days of age, but no organic lesions were identified and normal Meissner/Auerbach nerve plexus was confirmed, which led to a clinical diagnosis of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO). She was diagnosed with mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV deficiency on histopathology of the abdominal rectus muscle and enzyme activity measurement. This is the first report of a neonate with mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiency with intractable CIPO. CIPO can occur in neonates with mitochondrial respiratory chain disorder, necessitating differential diagnosis from Hirschsprung disease. PMID:27264907

  6. Mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders in the Old Order Amish population.

    PubMed

    Ghaloul-Gonzalez, Lina; Goldstein, Amy; Walsh Vockley, Catherine; Dobrowolski, Steven F; Biery, Amy; Irani, Afifa; Ibarra, Jordan; Morton, D Holmes; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Vockley, Jerry

    2016-08-01

    The Old Order Amish populations in the US are one of the Plain People groups and are descendants of the Swiss Anabaptist immigrants who came to North America in the early eighteenth century. They live in numerous small endogamous demes that have resulted in reduced genetic diversity along with a high prevalence of specific genetic disorders, many of them autosomal recessive. Mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiencies arising from mitochondrial or nuclear DNA mutations have not previously been reported in the Plain populations. Here we present four different Amish families with mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders. Mutations in two mitochondrial encoded genes leading to mitochondrial respiratory chain disorder were identified in two patients. In the first case, MELAS syndrome caused by a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation (m.3243A>G) was identified in an extended Amish pedigree following a presentation of metabolic strokes in the proband. Characterization of the extended family of the proband by a high resolution melting assay identified the same mutation in many previously undiagnosed family members with a wide range of clinical symptoms. A MELAS/Leigh syndrome phenotype caused by a mtDNA mutation [m.13513G>A; p.Asp393Asn] in the ND5 gene encoding the ND5 subunit of respiratory chain complex I was identified in a patient in a second family. Mutations in two nuclear encoded genes leading to mitochondrial respiratory chain disorder were also identified in two patients. One patient presented with Leigh syndrome and had a homozygous deletion in the NDUFAF2 gene, while the second patient had a homozygous mutation in the POLG gene, [c.1399G>A; p.Ala467Thr]. Our findings identify mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency as a cause of disease in the Old Order Amish that must be considered in the context of otherwise unexplained systemic disease, especially if neuromuscular symptoms are present. PMID:27344355

  7. Phosphatidylethanolamine and Cardiolipin Differentially Affect the Stability of Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Supercomplexes

    PubMed Central

    Böttinger, Lena; Horvath, Susanne E.; Kleinschroth, Thomas; Hunte, Carola; Daum, Günther; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Becker, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial inner membrane contains two non-bilayer‐forming phospholipids, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and cardiolipin (CL). Lack of CL leads to destabilization of respiratory chain supercomplexes, a reduced activity of cytochrome c oxidase, and a reduced inner membrane potential Δψ. Although PE is more abundant than CL in the mitochondrial inner membrane, its role in biogenesis and assembly of inner membrane complexes is unknown. We report that similar to the lack of CL, PE depletion resulted in a decrease of Δψ and thus in an impaired import of preproteins into and across the inner membrane. The respiratory capacity and in particular the activity of cytochrome c oxidase were impaired in PE-depleted mitochondria, leading to the decrease of Δψ. In contrast to depletion of CL, depletion of PE did not destabilize respiratory chain supercomplexes but favored the formation of larger supercomplexes (megacomplexes) between the cytochrome bc1 complex and the cytochrome c oxidase. We conclude that both PE and CL are required for a full activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and the efficient generation of the inner membrane potential. The mechanisms, however, are different since these non-bilayer‐forming phospholipids exert opposite effects on the stability of respiratory chain supercomplexes. PMID:22971339

  8. Respiratory Chain of Colorless Algae II. Cyanophyta

    PubMed Central

    Webster, D. A.; Hackett, D. P.

    1966-01-01

    Whole cell difference spectra of the blue-green algae, Saprospira grandis, Leucothrix mucor, and Vitreoscilla sp. have one, or at the most 2, broad α-bands near 560 mμ. At −190° these bands split to give 4 peaks in the α-region for b and c-type cytochromes, but no α-band for a-type cytochromes is visible. The NADH oxidase activity of these organisms was shown to be associated with particulate fractions of cell homogenates. The response of this activity to inhibitors differed from the responses of the NADH oxidase activities of particulate preparations from the green algae and higher plants to the same inhibitors, but is more typical of certain bacteria. No cytochrome oxidase activity was present in these preparations. The respiration of Saprospira and Vitreoscilla can be light-reversibly inhibited by CO, and all 3 organisms have a CO-binding pigment whose CO complex absorbs near 570, 535, and 417 mμ. The action spectrum for the light reversal of CO-inhibited Vitreoscilla respiration shows maxima at 568, 534, and 416 mμ. The results suggest that the terminal oxidase in these blue-greens is an o-type cytochrome. Images PMID:5932404

  9. Superoxide generation by the respiratory chain of tumor mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Konstantinov, A A; Peskin, A V; Popova EYu; Khomutov, G B; Ruuge, E K

    1987-10-29

    O2-. generation by the succinate oxidase segment of the respiratory chain of mitochondria and submitochondrial particles from hepatoma 22a and hepatoma Zajdela has been studied with the use of the Tiron method. In the presence of succinate, superoxide generation is induced by antimycin, 2-n-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide or funiculosin, and is inhibited by mucidin, myxothiazol or cyanide. The rate of O2-. generation in the antimycin-inhibited state is maximal at the [succinate]/[fumarate] ratio of 1:10 and diminishes at more positive and more negative redox potentials. These characteristics of O2-.-generation are the same as observed earlier in submitochondrial particles from normal tissues. Accordingly, the mechanism of superoxide production is suggested to be the same in tumor and normal mitochondria, namely, autoxidation of the unstable ubisemiquinone in the ubiquinol-oxidizing centre o of cytochrome bc1 complex. With respect to the rate of O2-. generation, the hepatoma mitochondrial membranes are approximately twice as active as bovine heart submitochondrial particles and exceed those from rat liver by more than one order of magnitude. PMID:2822106

  10. Mitochondrial disorders caused by mutations in respiratory chain assembly factors

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Francisca; Kotarsky, Heike; Fellman, Vineta; Moraes, Carlos T.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Mitochondrial diseases involve the dysfunction of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system. This group of diseases presents with heterogeneous clinical symptoms affecting mainly organs with high energy demands. Defects in the multimeric complexes comprising the OXPHOS system have a dual genetic origin, mitochondrial or nuclear DNA. Although many nuclear DNA mutations involve genes coding for subunits of the respiratory complexes, the majority of mutations found to date affect factors that do not form part of the final complexes. These assembly factors or chaperones have multiple functions ranging from cofactor insertion to proper assembly/stability of the complexes. Although significant progress has been made in the last few years in the discovery of new assembly factors, the function of many remains elusive. Here, we describe assembly factors or chaperones that are required for respiratory chain complex assembly and their clinical relevance. PMID:21680271

  11. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is required for organismal adaptation to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Hamanaka, Robert B.; Weinberg, Samuel E.; Reczek, Colleen R.; Chandel, Navdeep S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hypoxia-Inducible Factors (HIFs) are crucial for cellular and organismal adaptation to hypoxia. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is the largest consumer of oxygen in most mammalian cells; however, it is unknown whether the respiratory chain is necessary for in vivo activation of HIFs and organismal adaptation to hypoxia. HIF-1 activation in the epidermis has been shown to be a key regulator of the organismal response to hypoxic conditions, including renal production of erythropoietin (Epo). Therefore, we conditionally deleted expression of TFAM in mouse epidermal keratinocytes. TFAM is required for maintenance of the mitochondrial genome and TFAM-null cells are respiratory-deficient. TFAM loss in epidermal keratinocytes reduced epidermal levels of HIF-1α protein and diminished the hypoxic induction of HIF-dependent transcription in epidermis. Furthermore, epidermal TFAM deficiency impaired hypoxic induction of renal Epo expression. Our results demonstrate that the mitochondrial respiratory chain is essential for in vivo HIF activation and organismal adaptation to hypoxia. PMID:27068470

  12. Age-associated mosaic respiratory chain deficiency causes trans-neuronal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Eric; Terzioglu, Mügen; Sterky, Fredrik Hansson; Sörensen, Lene; Galter, Dagmar; Olson, Lars; Wilbertz, Johannes; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2008-05-15

    Heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations (mutations present only in a subset of cellular mtDNA copies) arise de novo during the normal ageing process or may be maternally inherited in pedigrees with mitochondrial disease syndromes. A pathogenic mtDNA mutation causes respiratory chain deficiency only if the fraction of mutated mtDNA exceeds a certain threshold level. These mutations often undergo apparently random mitotic segregation and the levels of normal and mutated mtDNA can vary considerably between cells of the same tissue. In human ageing, segregation of somatic mtDNA mutations leads to mosaic respiratory chain deficiency in a variety of tissues, such as brain, heart and skeletal muscle. A similar pattern of mutation segregation with mosaic respiratory chain deficiency is seen in patients with mitochondrial disease syndromes caused by inherited pathogenic mtDNA mutations. We have experimentally addressed the role of mosaic respiratory chain deficiency in ageing and mitochondrial disease by creating mouse chimeras with a mixture of normal and respiratory chain-deficient neurons in cerebral cortex. We report here that a low proportion (>20%) of respiratory chain-deficient neurons in the forebrain are sufficient to cause symptoms, whereas premature death of the animal occurs only if the proportion is high (>60-80%). The presence of neurons with normal respiratory chain function does not only prevent mortality but also delays the age at which onset of disease symptoms occur. Unexpectedly, respiratory chain-deficient neurons have adverse effect on normal adjacent neurons and induce trans-neuronal degeneration. In summary, our study defines the minimal threshold level of respiratory chain-deficient neurons needed to cause symptoms and also demonstrate that neurons with normal respiratory chain function ameliorate disease progression. Finally, we show that respiratory chain-deficient neurons induce death of normal neurons by a trans-neuronal degeneration

  13. Respiratory chain deficiency in aged spinal motor neurons☆

    PubMed Central

    Rygiel, Karolina A.; Grady, John P.; Turnbull, Doug M.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia, muscle wasting, and strength decline with age, is an important cause of loss of mobility in the elderly individuals. The underlying mechanisms are uncertain but likely to involve defects of motor nerve, neuromuscular junction, and muscle. Loss of motor neurons with age and subsequent denervation of skeletal muscle has been recognized as one of the contributing factors. This study investigated aspects of mitochondrial biology in spinal motor neurons from elderly subjects. We found that protein components of complex I of mitochondrial respiratory chain were reduced or absent in a proportion of aged motor neurons–a phenomenon not observed in fetal tissue. Further investigation showed that complex I-deficient cells had reduced mitochondrial DNA content and smaller soma size. We propose that mitochondrial dysfunction in these motor neurons could lead to the cell loss and ultimately denervation of muscle fibers. PMID:24684792

  14. Cell Type-Specific Modulation of Respiratory Chain Supercomplex Organization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dayan; Li, Bin; Qiu, Ruyi; Fang, Hezhi; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory chain complexes are organized into large supercomplexes among which supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is the only one that can directly transfer electrons from NADH to oxygen. Recently, it was reported that the formation of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in mice largely depends on their genetic background. However, in this study, we showed that the composition of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is well conserved in various mouse and human cell lines. Strikingly, we found that a minimal supercomplex In + IIIn, termed "lowest supercomplex" (LSC) in this study because of its migration at the lowest position close to complex V dimers in blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was associated with complex IV to form a supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in some, but not all of the human and mouse cells. In addition, we observed that the 3697G>A mutation in mitochondrial-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) in one patient with Leigh's disease specifically affected the assembly of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn containing LSC, leading to decreased cellular respiration and ATP generation. In conclusion, we showed the existence of LSC In + IIIn + IVn and impairment of this supercomplex causes disease. PMID:27338358

  15. Kinetics of electron transfer through the respiratory chain.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Qusheng; Bethke, Craig M

    2002-01-01

    We show that the rate at which electrons pass through the respiratory chain in mitochondria and respiring prokaryotic cells is described by the product of three terms, one describing electron donation, one acceptance, and a third, the thermodynamic drive. We apply the theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics in the context of the chemiosmotic model of proton translocation and energy conservation. This approach leads to a closed-form expression that predicts steady-state electron flux as a function of chemical conditions and the proton motive force across the mitochondrial inner membrane or prokaryotic cytoplasmic membrane. The rate expression, derived considering reverse and forward electron flow, is the first to account for both thermodynamic and kinetic controls on the respiration rate. The expression can be simplified under specific conditions to give rate laws of various forms familiar in cellular physiology and microbial ecology. The expression explains the nonlinear dependence of flux on electrical potential gradient, its hyperbolic dependence on substrate concentration, and the inhibiting effects of reaction products. It provides a theoretical basis for investigating life under unusual conditions, such as microbial respiration in alkaline waters. PMID:12324402

  16. Cell Type-Specific Modulation of Respiratory Chain Supercomplex Organization

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dayan; Li, Bin; Qiu, Ruyi; Fang, Hezhi; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory chain complexes are organized into large supercomplexes among which supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is the only one that can directly transfer electrons from NADH to oxygen. Recently, it was reported that the formation of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in mice largely depends on their genetic background. However, in this study, we showed that the composition of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is well conserved in various mouse and human cell lines. Strikingly, we found that a minimal supercomplex In + IIIn, termed “lowest supercomplex” (LSC) in this study because of its migration at the lowest position close to complex V dimers in blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was associated with complex IV to form a supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in some, but not all of the human and mouse cells. In addition, we observed that the 3697G>A mutation in mitochondrial-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) in one patient with Leigh’s disease specifically affected the assembly of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn containing LSC, leading to decreased cellular respiration and ATP generation. In conclusion, we showed the existence of LSC In + IIIn + IVn and impairment of this supercomplex causes disease. PMID:27338358

  17. Kinetics of electron transfer through the respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qusheng; Bethke, Craig M

    2002-10-01

    We show that the rate at which electrons pass through the respiratory chain in mitochondria and respiring prokaryotic cells is described by the product of three terms, one describing electron donation, one acceptance, and a third, the thermodynamic drive. We apply the theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics in the context of the chemiosmotic model of proton translocation and energy conservation. This approach leads to a closed-form expression that predicts steady-state electron flux as a function of chemical conditions and the proton motive force across the mitochondrial inner membrane or prokaryotic cytoplasmic membrane. The rate expression, derived considering reverse and forward electron flow, is the first to account for both thermodynamic and kinetic controls on the respiration rate. The expression can be simplified under specific conditions to give rate laws of various forms familiar in cellular physiology and microbial ecology. The expression explains the nonlinear dependence of flux on electrical potential gradient, its hyperbolic dependence on substrate concentration, and the inhibiting effects of reaction products. It provides a theoretical basis for investigating life under unusual conditions, such as microbial respiration in alkaline waters. PMID:12324402

  18. The NDUFB6 subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I is required for electron transfer activity: A proof of principle study on stable and controlled RNA interference in human cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Loublier, Sandrine; Bayot, Aurelien; Rak, Malgorzata; El-Khoury, Riyad; Benit, Paule; Rustin, Pierre

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} NDUFB6 is required for activity of mitochondrial complex I in human cell lines. {yields} Lentivirus based RNA interference results in frequent off target insertions. {yields} Flp-In recombinase mediated miRNA insertion allows gene-specific extinction. -- Abstract: Molecular bases of inherited deficiencies of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I are still unknown in a high proportion of patients. Among 45 subunits making up this large complex, more than half has unknown function(s). Understanding the function of these subunits would contribute to our knowledge on mitochondrial physiology but might also reveal that some of these subunits are not required for the catalytic activity of the complex. A direct consequence of this finding would be the reduction of the number of candidate genes to be sequenced in patients with decreased complex I activity. In this study, we tested two different methods to stably extinct complex I subunits in cultured cells. We first found that lentivirus-mediated shRNA expression frequently resulted in the unpredicted extinction of additional gene(s) beside targeted ones. This can be ascribed to uncontrolled genetic material insertions in the genome of the host cell. This approach thus appeared inappropriate to study unknown functions of a gene. Next, we found it possible to specifically extinct a CI subunit gene by direct insertion of a miR targeting CI subunits in a Flp site (HEK293 Flp-In cells). By using this strategy we unambiguously demonstrated that the NDUFB6 subunit is required for complex I activity, and defined conditions suitable to undertake a systematic and stable extinction of the different supernumerary subunits in human cells.

  19. Chain reconfiguration in active noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Nairhita; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi

    2016-05-01

    In a typical single molecule experiment, the dynamics of an unfolded protein is studied by determining the reconfiguration time using long-range Förster resonance energy transfer, where the reconfiguration time is the characteristic decay time of the position correlation between two residues of the protein. In this paper we theoretically calculate the reconfiguration time for a single flexible polymer in the presence of active noise. The study suggests that though the mean square displacement grows faster, the chain reconfiguration is always slower in the presence of long-lived active noise with exponential temporal correlation. Similar behavior is observed for a worm-like semi-flexible chain and a Zimm chain. However it is primarily the characteristic correlation time of the active noise and not the strength that controls the increase in the reconfiguration time. In brief, such active noise makes the polymer move faster but the correlation loss between the monomers becomes slow.

  20. A respiratory chain controlled signal transduction cascade in the mitochondrial intermembrane space mediates hydrogen peroxide signaling

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Heide Christine; Gerbeth, Carolin; Thiru, Prathapan; Vögtle, Nora F.; Knoll, Marko; Shahsafaei, Aliakbar; Samocha, Kaitlin E.; Huang, Cher X.; Harden, Mark Michael; Song, Rui; Chen, Cynthia; Kao, Jennifer; Shi, Jiahai; Salmon, Wendy; Shaul, Yoav D.; Stokes, Matthew P.; Silva, Jeffrey C.; Bell, George W.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Ruland, Jürgen; Meisinger, Chris; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) govern cellular homeostasis by inducing signaling. H2O2 modulates the activity of phosphatases and many other signaling molecules through oxidation of critical cysteine residues, which led to the notion that initiation of ROS signaling is broad and nonspecific, and thus fundamentally distinct from other signaling pathways. Here, we report that H2O2 signaling bears hallmarks of a regular signal transduction cascade. It is controlled by hierarchical signaling events resulting in a focused response as the results place the mitochondrial respiratory chain upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase Lyn, Lyn upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase SYK (Syk), and Syk upstream of numerous targets involved in signaling, transcription, translation, metabolism, and cell cycle regulation. The active mediators of H2O2 signaling colocalize as H2O2 induces mitochondria-associated Lyn and Syk phosphorylation, and a pool of Lyn and Syk reside in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Finally, the same intermediaries control the signaling response in tissues and species responsive to H2O2 as the respiratory chain, Lyn, and Syk were similarly required for H2O2 signaling in mouse B cells, fibroblasts, and chicken DT40 B cells. Consistent with a broad role, the Syk pathway is coexpressed across tissues, is of early metazoan origin, and displays evidence of evolutionary constraint in the human. These results suggest that H2O2 signaling is under control of a signal transduction pathway that links the respiratory chain to the mitochondrial intermembrane space-localized, ubiquitous, and ancient Syk pathway in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. PMID:26438848

  1. A respiratory chain controlled signal transduction cascade in the mitochondrial intermembrane space mediates hydrogen peroxide signaling.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Heide Christine; Gerbeth, Carolin; Thiru, Prathapan; Vögtle, Nora F; Knoll, Marko; Shahsafaei, Aliakbar; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Huang, Cher X; Harden, Mark Michael; Song, Rui; Chen, Cynthia; Kao, Jennifer; Shi, Jiahai; Salmon, Wendy; Shaul, Yoav D; Stokes, Matthew P; Silva, Jeffrey C; Bell, George W; MacArthur, Daniel G; Ruland, Jürgen; Meisinger, Chris; Lodish, Harvey F

    2015-10-20

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) govern cellular homeostasis by inducing signaling. H2O2 modulates the activity of phosphatases and many other signaling molecules through oxidation of critical cysteine residues, which led to the notion that initiation of ROS signaling is broad and nonspecific, and thus fundamentally distinct from other signaling pathways. Here, we report that H2O2 signaling bears hallmarks of a regular signal transduction cascade. It is controlled by hierarchical signaling events resulting in a focused response as the results place the mitochondrial respiratory chain upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase Lyn, Lyn upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase SYK (Syk), and Syk upstream of numerous targets involved in signaling, transcription, translation, metabolism, and cell cycle regulation. The active mediators of H2O2 signaling colocalize as H2O2 induces mitochondria-associated Lyn and Syk phosphorylation, and a pool of Lyn and Syk reside in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Finally, the same intermediaries control the signaling response in tissues and species responsive to H2O2 as the respiratory chain, Lyn, and Syk were similarly required for H2O2 signaling in mouse B cells, fibroblasts, and chicken DT40 B cells. Consistent with a broad role, the Syk pathway is coexpressed across tissues, is of early metazoan origin, and displays evidence of evolutionary constraint in the human. These results suggest that H2O2 signaling is under control of a signal transduction pathway that links the respiratory chain to the mitochondrial intermembrane space-localized, ubiquitous, and ancient Syk pathway in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. PMID:26438848

  2. Endothelin involvement in respiratory centre activity.

    PubMed

    Albertini, M; Lafortuna, C L; Ciminaghi, B; Mazzola, S; Clement, M G

    2001-09-01

    To evaluate the role of endothelin (ET) in respiratory homeostasis we studied the effects of the ET(A) and ET(B) receptor blocking agent bosentan on respiratory mechanics and control in seven anaesthetised spontaneously breathing pigs, for 180 min after single bolus administration (20 mg/kg i.v.). The results show that the block of ET receptors induced a significant increase in compliance and decrease in resistance of the respiratory system, entailing a significant reduction of diaphragmatic electromyographic activity, without affecting the centroid frequency of the power spectrum. Bosentan administration induced a significant increase in tidal volume (V(T)), accompanied by a significant decrease in respiratory frequency, without any significant change in pulmonary ventilation, CO(2) arterial blood gas pressure or pH. Since the relationship between V(T) and inspiratory time remained substantially constant after bosentan administration, the changes in respiratory pattern appear to be the result of an upward shift in inspiratory off-switch threshold. Both inspiratory and expiratory times during occluded breathing were increased by block of ET receptors, suggesting also a central respiratory neuromodulator effect of ET. In conclusion the present results suggest that the block of ET receptors in spontaneously breathing pigs exerts a role on mechanical properties of the respiratory system as well as on peripheral and central mechanisms of breathing control. PMID:11728166

  3. Caffeic acid attenuates rat liver reperfusion injury through sirtuin 3-dependent regulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Mu, Hong-Na; Li, Quan; Pan, Chun-Shui; Liu, Yu-Ying; Yan, Li; Hu, Bai-He; Sun, Kai; Chang, Xin; Zhao, Xin-Rong; Fan, Jing-Yu; Han, Jing-Yan

    2015-08-01

    Sirtuin 3 (Sirt3) plays critical roles in regulating mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. However, whether Sirt3 is involved in liver ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury remains elusive. Caffeic acid (CA) is a natural antioxidant derived from Salvia miltiorrhiza. Whether CA protects against liver I/R injury through regulating Sirt3 and the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) is unclear. This study investigated the effect of CA on liver I/R injury, microcirculatory disturbance, and potential mechanisms, particularly focusing on Sirt3-dependent MRC. Liver I/R of male Sprague-Dawley rats was established by occlusion of portal area vessels for 30 min followed by 120 min of reperfusion. CA (15 mg/kg/h) was continuously infused via the femoral vein starting 30 min before ischemia. After I/R, Sirt3 expression, and MRC activity decreased, acetylation of NADH dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] 1 alpha subcomplex subunit 9 and succinate dehydrogenase complex, subunit A, flavoprotein variant provoked, and the liver microcirculatory disturbance and injury were observed. Treatment with CA attenuated liver injury, inhibited Sirt3 down-expression, and up-regulated MRC activity. CA attenuated rat liver microcirculatory disturbance and oxidative injury through regulation of Sirt3 and the mitochondrial respiratory chain. PMID:25960048

  4. The Role of Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase in Apoptosis Induction in Response to Inhibition of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex III

    PubMed Central

    Khutornenko, A. A.; Dalina, A. A.; Chernyak, B. V.; Chumakov, P. M.; Evstafieva, A. G.

    2014-01-01

    A mechanism for the induction of programmed cell death (apoptosis) upon dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain has been studied. Previously, we had found that inhibition of mitochondrial cytochrome bc1, a component of the electron transport chain complex III, leads to activation of tumor suppressor p53, followed by apoptosis induction. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is coupled to the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway via the mitochondrial enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH). The p53 activation induced in response to the inhibition of the electron transport chain complex III has been shown to be triggered by the impairment of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis due to the suppression of DHODH. However, it remained unclear whether the suppression of the DHODH function is the main cause of the observed apoptotic cell death. Here, we show that apoptosis in human colon carcinoma cells induced by the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex III inhibition can be prevented by supplementation with uridine or orotate (products of the reaction catalyzed by DHODH) rather than with dihydroorotate (a DHODH substrate). We conclude that apoptosis is induced in response to the impairment of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis caused by the inhibition of DHODH. The conclusion is supported by the experiment showing that downregulation of DHODH by RNA interference leads to accumulation of the p53 tumor suppressor and to apoptotic cell death. PMID:24772329

  5. Fluoride Increases Superoxide Production and Impairs the Respiratory Chain in ROS 17/2.8 Osteoblastic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fina, Brenda Lorena; Lombarte, Mercedes; Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Rigalli, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    It is known that fluoride produces oxidative stress. Inflammation in bone tissue and an impairment of the respiratory chain of liver have been described in treatments with fluoride. Whether the impairment of the respiratory chain and oxidative stress are related is not known. The aim of this work was to study the effects of fluoride on the production of superoxide radical, the function of the respiratory chain and the increase in oxidative stress in ROS 17/2.8 osteoblastic cells. We measured the effect of fluoride (100 µM) on superoxide production, oxygen consumption, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activities of cultured cells following the treatment with fluoride. Fluoride decreased oxygen consumption and increased superoxide production immediately after its addition. Furthermore, chronic treatment with fluoride increased oxidative stress status in osteoblastic cells. These results indicate that fluoride could damage bone tissue by inhibiting the respiratory chain, increasing the production of superoxide radicals and thus of the others reactive oxygen species. PMID:24964137

  6. Decoding Warburg's hypothesis: tumor-related mutations in the mitochondrial respiratory chain

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Heredia, Jose M.; Carnero, Amancio

    2015-01-01

    Otto Warburg observed that cancer cells derived their energy from aerobic glycolysis by converting glucose to lactate. This mechanism is in opposition to the higher energy requirements of cancer cells because oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) produces more ATP from glucose. Warburg hypothesized that this phenomenon occurs due to the malfunction of mitochondria in cancer cells. The rediscovery of Warburg's hypothesis coincided with the discovery of mitochondrial tumor suppressor genes that may conform to Warburg's hypothesis along with the demonstrated negative impact of HIF-1 on PDH activity and the activation of HIF-1 by oncogenic signals such as activated AKT. This work summarizes the alterations in mitochondrial respiratory chain proteins that have been identified and their involvement in cancer. Also discussed is the fact that most of the mitochondrial mutations have been found in homoplasmy, indicating a positive selection during tumor evolution, thereby supporting their causal role. PMID:26462158

  7. Injury and differentiation following inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV in rat oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ziabreva, Iryna; Campbell, Graham; Rist, Julia; Zambonin, Jessica; Rorbach, Joanna; Wydro, Mateusz M; Lassmann, Hans; Franklin, Robin J M; Mahad, Don

    2010-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte lineage cells are susceptible to a variety of insults including hypoxia, excitotoxicity, and reactive oxygen species. Demyelination is a well-recognized feature of several CNS disorders including multiple sclerosis, white matter strokes, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, and disorders due to mitochondrial DNA mutations. Although mitochondria have been implicated in the demise of oligodendrocyte lineage cells, the consequences of mitochondrial respiratory chain defects have not been examined. We determine the in vitro impact of established inhibitors of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV or cytochrome c oxidase on oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and mature oligodendrocytes as well as on differentiation capacity of OPCs from P0 rat. Injury to mature oligodendrocytes following complex IV inhibition was significantly greater than to OPCs, judged by cell detachment and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) changes, although viability of cells that remained attached was not compromised. Active mitochondria were abundant in processes of differentiated oligodendrocytes and MMP was significantly greater in differentiated oligodendrocytes than OPCs. MMP dissipated following complex IV inhibition in oligodendrocytes. Furthermore, complex IV inhibition impaired process formation within oligodendrocyte lineage cells. Injury to and impaired process formation of oligodendrocytes following complex IV inhibition has potentially important implications for the pathogenesis and repair of CNS myelin disorders. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20665559

  8. Mitochondrial Ca2+ influx targets cardiolipin to disintegrate respiratory chain complex II for cell death induction

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, M-S; Schwall, C T; Pazarentzos, E; Datler, C; Alder, N N; Grimm, S

    2014-01-01

    Massive Ca2+ influx into mitochondria is critically involved in cell death induction but it is unknown how this activates the organelle for cell destruction. Using multiple approaches including subcellular fractionation, FRET in intact cells, and in vitro reconstitutions, we show that mitochondrial Ca2+ influx prompts complex II of the respiratory chain to disintegrate, thereby releasing an enzymatically competent sub-complex that generates excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) for cell death induction. This Ca2+-dependent dissociation of complex II is also observed in model membrane systems, but not when cardiolipin is replaced with a lipid devoid of Ca2+ binding. Cardiolipin is known to associate with complex II and upon Ca2+ binding coalesces into separate homotypic clusters. When complex II is deprived of this lipid, it disintegrates for ROS formation and cell death. Our results reveal Ca2+ binding to cardiolipin for complex II disintegration as a pivotal step for oxidative stress and cell death induction. PMID:24948011

  9. Nuclear Respiratory Factor 1 Controls Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2A Transcription to Provide a Mechanism for Coordinate Expression of Respiratory Chain Subunits*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Bindu; Yu, Gengsheng; Gulick, Tod

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear respiratory factors NRF1 and NRF2 regulate the expression of nuclear genes encoding heme biosynthetic enzymes, proteins required for mitochondrial genome transcription and protein import, and numerous respiratory chain subunits. NRFs thereby coordinate the expression of nuclear and mitochondrial genes relevant to mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration. Only two of the nuclear-encoded respiratory chain subunits have evolutionarily conserved tissue-specific forms: the cytochrome c oxidase (COX) subunits VIa and VIIa heart/muscle (H) and ubiquitous (L) isoforms. We used genome comparisons to conclude that the promoter regions of COX6AH and COX7AH lack NRF sites but have conserved myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) elements. We show that MEF2A mRNA is induced with forced expression of NRF1 and that the MEF2A 5′-regulatory region contains an evolutionarily conserved canonical element that binds endogenous NRF1 in chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. NRF1 regulates MEF2A promoter-reporters according to overexpression, RNA interference underexpression, and promoter element mutation studies. As there are four mammalian MEF2 isotypes, we used an isoform-specific antibody in ChIP to confirm MEF2A binding to the COX6AH promoter. These findings support a role for MEF2A as an intermediary in coordinating respiratory chain subunit expression in heart and muscle through a NRF1 → MEF2A → COXH transcriptional cascade. MEF2A also bound the MEF2A and PPARGC1A promoters in ChIP, placing it within a feedback loop with PGC1α in controlling NRF1 activity. Interruption of this cascade and loop may account for striated muscle mitochondrial defects in mef2a null mice. Our findings also account for the previously described indirect regulation by NRF1 of other MEF2 targets in muscle such as GLUT4. PMID:18222924

  10. Nuclear respiratory factor 1 controls myocyte enhancer factor 2A transcription to provide a mechanism for coordinate expression of respiratory chain subunits.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Bindu; Yu, Gengsheng; Gulick, Tod

    2008-05-01

    Nuclear respiratory factors NRF1 and NRF2 regulate the expression of nuclear genes encoding heme biosynthetic enzymes, proteins required for mitochondrial genome transcription and protein import, and numerous respiratory chain subunits. NRFs thereby coordinate the expression of nuclear and mitochondrial genes relevant to mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration. Only two of the nuclear-encoded respiratory chain subunits have evolutionarily conserved tissue-specific forms: the cytochrome c oxidase (COX) subunits VIa and VIIa heart/muscle (H) and ubiquitous (L) isoforms. We used genome comparisons to conclude that the promoter regions of COX6A(H) and COX7A(H) lack NRF sites but have conserved myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) elements. We show that MEF2A mRNA is induced with forced expression of NRF1 and that the MEF2A 5'-regulatory region contains an evolutionarily conserved canonical element that binds endogenous NRF1 in chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. NRF1 regulates MEF2A promoter-reporters according to overexpression, RNA interference underexpression, and promoter element mutation studies. As there are four mammalian MEF2 isotypes, we used an isoform-specific antibody in ChIP to confirm MEF2A binding to the COX6A(H) promoter. These findings support a role for MEF2A as an intermediary in coordinating respiratory chain subunit expression in heart and muscle through a NRF1 --> MEF2A --> COX(H) transcriptional cascade. MEF2A also bound the MEF2A and PPARGC1A promoters in ChIP, placing it within a feedback loop with PGC1alpha in controlling NRF1 activity. Interruption of this cascade and loop may account for striated muscle mitochondrial defects in mef2a null mice. Our findings also account for the previously described indirect regulation by NRF1 of other MEF2 targets in muscle such as GLUT4. PMID:18222924

  11. Respiratory chain defect of myocardial mitochondria in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy of Doberman pinscher dogs.

    PubMed

    McCutcheon, L J; Cory, C R; Nowack, L; Shen, H; Mirsalami, M; Lahucky, R; Kovac, L; O'Grady, M; Horne, R; O'Brien, P J

    1992-11-01

    Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM) is a primary myocardial disease of unknown cause. We tested the hypothesis that IDCM was associated with a myocardial metabolic defect by determining a comprehensive biochemical profile of metabolite concentrations and enzyme activities for the major metabolic pathways of the myocardium. We used the Doberman pinscher breed as a naturally occurring canine model of IDCM and compared its myocardial profile with that of healthy adult mongrels. Compared with controls, myocardium in IDCM had markedly reduced mitochondrial electron transport activity and myoglobin concentration, in association with acidosis and energy depletion following anoxic challenge: 60% decreased NADH dehydrogenase and 50% decreased ATP synthetase activities; 90% decreased myoglobin concentration; and 30% reduced ATP and 50% increased lactate and proton concentrations. Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-transport ATPase was decreased by 42%. There was a 15% compensatory increase in fatty acid oxidation and Krebs cycle activity. Other biochemical changes were mild by comparison with the mitochondrial defects. We conclude that IDCM is associated with a marked impairment of mitochondrial production of ATP, arising from decreased activity of the mitochondrial electron transport system, including myoglobin. These changes may be secondary to an underlying genetic defect or may indicate a deficiency of the mitochondrial respiratory chain that predisposes this breed to heart failure. PMID:1338376

  12. Presentation and clinical investigation of mitochondrial respiratory chain disease. A study of 51 patients.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M J; Schaefer, J A; Johnson, M A; Morris, A A; Turnbull, D M; Bindoff, L A

    1995-04-01

    Defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain are associated with a great variety of clinical disorders. Whilst recognition of these conditions is increasing, the need for sophisticated biochemical and molecular studies has tended to limit both their investigation and diagnosis to a few specialist centres. Using a group of 51 patients with histochemically, biochemically and/or genetically defined respiratory chain defects, we have examined both the clinical heterogeneity of these disorders and how they may be investigated most effectively in non-specialist centres. We evaluated the use of the following routinely available clinical investigations--fasting intermediary metabolites (lactate, pyruvate, ketone bodies, etc.) in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, serum creatine kinase estimation, EMG, EEG, CT, MRI and histological/histochemical muscle biopsy analysis. Our studies show that, in addition to well-recognized syndromes (e.g. chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia, mitochondrial encephalopathy lactic acidosis and stroke like episodes, and myoclonus epilepsy with ragged red-fibres, a significant number of patients present with non-specific encephalopathic disorders. Furthermore, even within those categories of respiratory chain disease which have been genetically defined, a wide variation of presenting symptoms and signs were found. Where there was initial doubt concerning the diagnosis, the following clinical features were helpful in suggesting respiratory chain disease: ophthalmoplegia; a maternal pattern of inheritance; the presence of myopathy or deafness in association with encephalopathy. Of the clinical investigations we assessed, elevated lactate in blood or cerebrospinal fluid and low density lesions in the basal ganglia were helpful in identifying patients with respiratory chain dysfunction. Histochemical analysis of muscle was, however, the single most useful investigation being diagnostic in patients with chronic progressive external

  13. Modeling the respiratory chain complexes with biothermokinetic equations - the case of complex I.

    PubMed

    Heiske, Margit; Nazaret, Christine; Mazat, Jean-Pierre

    2014-10-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain plays a crucial role in energy metabolism and its dysfunction is implicated in a wide range of human diseases. In order to understand the global expression of local mutations in the rate of oxygen consumption or in the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) it is useful to have a mathematical model in which the changes in a given respiratory complex are properly modeled. Our aim in this paper is to provide thermodynamics respecting and structurally simple equations to represent the kinetics of each isolated complexes which can, assembled in a dynamical system, also simulate the behavior of the respiratory chain, as a whole, under a large set of different physiological and pathological conditions. On the example of the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-ubiquinol-oxidoreductase (complex I) we analyze the suitability of different types of rate equations. Based on our kinetic experiments we show that very simple rate laws, as those often used in many respiratory chain models, fail to describe the kinetic behavior when applied to a wide concentration range. This led us to adapt rate equations containing the essential parameters of enzyme kinetic, maximal velocities and Henri-Michaelis-Menten like-constants (KM and KI) to satisfactorily simulate these data. PMID:25064016

  14. The effects of acetylcolletotrichin on the mitochondrial respiratory chain

    PubMed Central

    Foucher, Bernard; Chappell, J. B.; McGivan, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    1. Acetylcolletotrichin is a phytotoxic compound that has been isolated from the culture medium of the fungus Colletotrichum capsici (Grove et al., 1966). 2. With isolated liver and kidney mitochondria acetylcolletotrichin markedly inhibited the oxidation of succinate and those substrates with NAD-linked dehydrogenases, but did not inhibit the oxidation of ascorbate in the presence of tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine. In this respect its action was similar to that of antimycin A. 3. Acetylcolletotrichin differed from antimycin in that, even at high concentrations which produced a maximal inhibitory effect, its action was partially reversed by uncoupling agents. Also acetylcolletotrichin had no detectable effect on the oxidative activity of blowfly flight-muscle mitochondria and was not very effective with heart mitochondria. 4. Acetylcolletotrichin inhibited the oxidative activity of liver mitochondria more markedly when respiration was stimulated by ADP together with phosphate and was less effective when respiration was stimulated by uncoupling agents. 5. There was an unusual interaction between the succinate oxidation system and the oxidation of glutamate together with malate. Thus, glutamate together with malate, even in the presence of rotenone, markedly decreased the effectiveness of acetylcolletotrichin in inhibiting succinate oxidation. 6. These effects were paralleled in the observed redox changes of cytochrome c. 7. The unusual behaviour of the cytochromes b in the presence of acetylcolletotrichin is described, and it is suggested tentatively that this inhibitor acts between cytochromes b with absorption maxima at 30°C of approximately 560 and 565nm. PMID:4372992

  15. Reduced respiratory neural activity elicits phrenic motor facilitation.

    PubMed

    Mahamed, Safraaz; Strey, Kristi A; Mitchell, Gordon S; Baker-Herman, Tracy L

    2011-03-15

    We hypothesized that reduced respiratory neural activity elicits compensatory mechanisms of plasticity that enhance respiratory motor output. In urethane-anesthetized and ventilated rats, we reversibly reduced respiratory neural activity for 25-30 min using: hypocapnia (end tidal CO(2)=30 mmHg), isoflurane (~1%) or high frequency ventilation (HFV; ~100 breaths/min). In all cases, increased phrenic burst amplitude was observed following restoration of respiratory neural activity (hypocapnia: 92±22%; isoflurane: 65±22%; HFV: 54±13% baseline), which was significantly greater than time controls receiving the same surgery, but no interruptions in respiratory neural activity (3±5% baseline, p<0.05). Hypocapnia also elicited transient increases in respiratory burst frequency (9±2 versus 1±1bursts/min, p<0.05). Our results suggest that reduced respiratory neural activity elicits a unique form of plasticity in respiratory motor control which we refer to as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF). iPMF may prevent catastrophic decreases in respiratory motor output during ventilatory control disorders associated with abnormal respiratory activity. PMID:21167322

  16. Reduced respiratory neural activity elicits phrenic motor facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Mahamed, Safraaz; Strey, Kristi A.; Mitchell, Gordon S.; Baker-Herman, Tracy L.

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesized that reduced respiratory neural activity elicits compensatory mechanisms of plasticity that enhance respiratory motor output. In urethane-anesthetized and ventilated rats, we reversibly reduced respiratory neural activity for 25–30 min using: hypocapnia (end tidal CO2 = 30 mmHg), isoflurane (~ 1%) or high frequency ventilation (HFV; ~100 breaths/min). In all cases, increased phrenic burst amplitude was observed following restoration of respiratory neural activity (hypocapnia: 92 ± 22%; isoflurane: 65 ± 22%; HFV: 54 ± 13% baseline), which was significantly greater than time controls receiving the same surgery, but no interruptions in respiratory neural activity (3 ± 5% baseline, p<0.05). Hypocapnia also elicited transient increases in respiratory burst frequency (9 ± 2 versus 1 ± 1 bursts/min, p<0.05). Our results suggest that reduced respiratory neural activity elicits a unique form of plasticity in respiratory motor control which we refer to as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF). iPMF may prevent catastrophic decreases in respiratory motor output during ventilatory control disorders associated with abnormal respiratory activity. PMID:21167322

  17. A Comprehensive Genomic Analysis Reveals the Genetic Landscape of Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Nyuzuki, Hiromi; Moriyama, Yohsuke; Mizuno, Yosuke; Hirata, Tomoko; Yatsuka, Yukiko; Yamashita-Sugahara, Yzumi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Kato, Hidemasa; Okuda, Akihiko; Tamaru, Shunsuke; Borna, Nurun Nahar; Banshoya, Kengo; Aigaki, Toshiro; Sato-Miyata, Yukiko; Ohnuma, Kohei; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Nagao, Asuteka; Maehata, Hazuki; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Higasa, Koichiro; Nagasaki, Masao; Yasuda, Jun; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Fushimi, Takuya; Shimura, Masaru; Kaiho-Ichimoto, Keiko; Harashima, Hiroko; Yamazaki, Taro; Mori, Masato; Murayama, Kei; Ohtake, Akira; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders have the highest incidence among congenital metabolic disorders characterized by biochemical respiratory chain complex deficiencies. It occurs at a rate of 1 in 5,000 births, and has phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. Mutations in about 1,500 nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins may cause mitochondrial dysfunction of energy production and mitochondrial disorders. More than 250 genes that cause mitochondrial disorders have been reported to date. However exact genetic diagnosis for patients still remained largely unknown. To reveal this heterogeneity, we performed comprehensive genomic analyses for 142 patients with childhood-onset mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies. The approach includes whole mtDNA and exome analyses using high-throughput sequencing, and chromosomal aberration analyses using high-density oligonucleotide arrays. We identified 37 novel mutations in known mitochondrial disease genes and 3 mitochondria-related genes (MRPS23, QRSL1, and PNPLA4) as novel causative genes. We also identified 2 genes known to cause monogenic diseases (MECP2 and TNNI3) and 3 chromosomal aberrations (6q24.3-q25.1, 17p12, and 22q11.21) as causes in this cohort. Our approaches enhance the ability to identify pathogenic gene mutations in patients with biochemically defined mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies in clinical settings. They also underscore clinical and genetic heterogeneity and will improve patient care of this complex disorder. PMID:26741492

  18. Coenzyme Q biosynthesis and its role in the respiratory chain structure.

    PubMed

    Alcázar-Fabra, María; Navas, Plácido; Brea-Calvo, Gloria

    2016-08-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a unique electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which is synthesized on-site by a nuclear encoded multiprotein complex. CoQ receives electrons from different redox pathways, mainly NADH and FADH2 from tricarboxylic acid pathway, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that support key aspects of the metabolism. Here we explore some lines of evidence supporting the idea of the interaction of CoQ with the respiratory chain complexes, contributing to their superassembly, including respirasome, and its role in reactive oxygen species production in the mitochondrial inner membrane. We also review the current knowledge about the involvement of mitochondrial genome defects and electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase mutations in the induction of secondary CoQ deficiency. This mechanism would imply specific interactions coupling CoQ itself or the CoQ-biosynthetic apparatus with the respiratory chain components. These interactions would regulate mitochondrial CoQ steady-state levels and function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26970214

  19. A Comprehensive Genomic Analysis Reveals the Genetic Landscape of Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Complex Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Kohda, Masakazu; Tokuzawa, Yoshimi; Kishita, Yoshihito; Nyuzuki, Hiromi; Moriyama, Yohsuke; Mizuno, Yosuke; Hirata, Tomoko; Yatsuka, Yukiko; Yamashita-Sugahara, Yzumi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Kato, Hidemasa; Okuda, Akihiko; Tamaru, Shunsuke; Borna, Nurun Nahar; Banshoya, Kengo; Aigaki, Toshiro; Sato-Miyata, Yukiko; Ohnuma, Kohei; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Nagao, Asuteka; Maehata, Hazuki; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Higasa, Koichiro; Nagasaki, Masao; Yasuda, Jun; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Fushimi, Takuya; Shimura, Masaru; Kaiho-Ichimoto, Keiko; Harashima, Hiroko; Yamazaki, Taro; Mori, Masato; Murayama, Kei; Ohtake, Akira; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders have the highest incidence among congenital metabolic disorders characterized by biochemical respiratory chain complex deficiencies. It occurs at a rate of 1 in 5,000 births, and has phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. Mutations in about 1,500 nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins may cause mitochondrial dysfunction of energy production and mitochondrial disorders. More than 250 genes that cause mitochondrial disorders have been reported to date. However exact genetic diagnosis for patients still remained largely unknown. To reveal this heterogeneity, we performed comprehensive genomic analyses for 142 patients with childhood-onset mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies. The approach includes whole mtDNA and exome analyses using high-throughput sequencing, and chromosomal aberration analyses using high-density oligonucleotide arrays. We identified 37 novel mutations in known mitochondrial disease genes and 3 mitochondria-related genes (MRPS23, QRSL1, and PNPLA4) as novel causative genes. We also identified 2 genes known to cause monogenic diseases (MECP2 and TNNI3) and 3 chromosomal aberrations (6q24.3-q25.1, 17p12, and 22q11.21) as causes in this cohort. Our approaches enhance the ability to identify pathogenic gene mutations in patients with biochemically defined mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiencies in clinical settings. They also underscore clinical and genetic heterogeneity and will improve patient care of this complex disorder. PMID:26741492

  20. Respiratory chain cysteine and methionine usage indicate a causal role for thiyl radicals in aging.

    PubMed

    Moosmann, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    The identification of longevity-related structural adaptations in biological macromolecules may yield relevant insights into the molecular mechanisms of aging. In screening fully sequenced animal proteomes for signals associated with longevity, it was found that cysteine depletion in respiratory chain complexes was the by far strongest predictor on the amino acid usage level to co-vary with lifespan. This association was though restricted to aerobic animals, whereas anaerobic animals showed variable cysteine accumulation. By contrast, methionine accumulation, a prominent feature of mitochondrially encoded proteins affording competitive antioxidant protection, was not predictive of longevity, but rather paralleled aerobic metabolic capacity. Hence, the easily oxidized sulfur-containing amino acids cysteine (a thiol) and methionine (a thioether) show doubly diametrical behaviour in two central paradigms of respiratory oxidative stress. From this comparison, it is concluded that only the one-electron oxidation of thiols to thiyl radicals contributes to aging, whereas other forms of sulfur oxidation, especially even-electron oxidation of both thiols and thioethers, are less critically involved, presumably as their consequences may be much more easily repaired. Thiyl radicals may yet act as chain-transfer agents to entail an irreversible intramembrane cross-linking ("plastination") of some of the a priori most hydrophobic and insoluble proteins known, the respiratory chain complexes. PMID:20850516

  1. Obligatory role of membrane events in the regulatory effect of metformin on the respiratory chain function.

    PubMed

    Detaille, Dominique; Guigas, Bruno; Leverve, Xavier; Wiernsperger, Nicolas; Devos, Pierre

    2002-04-01

    From recent findings about the indirect effect of metformin (MET) targeted on the respiratory chain complex I, we reconsidered this question and tried to determine the causality of any alteration at this enzymatic level using Xenopus laevis oocytes. Addition of MET (50 microM) reduced by 40% the rotenone-sensitive activity of complex I only in incubating intact oocytes but not in mitochondria isolated by differential centrifugation. The drug prior injected inside these cells had also no measurable effect. In spite of this and the weak binding of MET to the mitochondrial fraction, there was a fairly good correlation between the marked inhibitory action of MET on complex I and its progressive appearance within the oocyte cytoplasm. The intriguing observation that MET as a liposomal form was again able to exert its role when added directly to isolated mitochondria is in accordance with a membrane-mediated uptake and vesicular routing of MET. Furthermore, a temperature-dependent effect was clearly shown. At 4 degrees, oocytes failed to take up efficiently MET and accordingly its subsequent action on respiration was therefore lost. Likewise, MET transport was hindered and inhibition of complex I totally disappeared when a structural analog, asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA), was placed together with MET either at an identical concentration or in excess. These data strongly support the view that MET may recognise some specific membranous sites, likely belonging to effector systems, before penetrating the cell in a bound state via an obscure endocytotic event which still has to be identified. PMID:11960602

  2. Specific requirements of nonbilayer phospholipids in mitochondrial respiratory chain function and formation.

    PubMed

    Baker, Charli D; Basu Ball, Writoban; Pryce, Erin N; Gohil, Vishal M

    2016-07-15

    Mitochondrial membrane phospholipid composition affects mitochondrial function by influencing the assembly of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes into supercomplexes. For example, the loss of cardiolipin (CL), a signature non-bilayer-forming phospholipid of mitochondria, results in disruption of MRC supercomplexes. However, the functions of the most abundant mitochondrial phospholipids, bilayer-forming phosphatidylcholine (PC) and non-bilayer-forming phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), are not clearly defined. Using yeast mutants of PE and PC biosynthetic pathways, we show a specific requirement for mitochondrial PE in MRC complex III and IV activities but not for their formation, whereas loss of PC does not affect MRC function or formation. Unlike CL, mitochondrial PE or PC is not required for MRC supercomplex formation, emphasizing the specific requirement of CL in supercomplex assembly. Of interest, PE biosynthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can functionally substitute for the lack of mitochondrial PE biosynthesis, suggesting the existence of PE transport pathway from ER to mitochondria. To understand the mechanism of PE transport, we disrupted ER-mitochondrial contact sites formed by the ERMES complex and found that, although not essential for PE transport, ERMES facilitates the efficient rescue of mitochondrial PE deficiency. Our work highlights specific roles of non-bilayer-forming phospholipids in MRC function and formation. PMID:27226479

  3. Phasic Motor Activity of Respiratory and Non-Respiratory Muscles in REM Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Fraigne, Jimmy J.; Orem, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: In this study, we quantified the profiles of phasic activity in respiratory muscles (diaphragm, genioglossus and external intercostal) and non-respiratory muscles (neck and extensor digitorum) across REM sleep. We hypothesized that if there is a unique pontine structure that controls all REM sleep phasic events, the profiles of the phasic twitches of different muscle groups should be identical. Furthermore, we described how respiratory parameters (e.g., frequency, amplitude, and effort) vary across REM sleep to determine if phasic processes affect breathing. Methods: Electrodes were implanted in Wistar rats to record brain activity and muscle activity of neck, extensor digitorum, diaphragm, external intercostal, and genioglossal muscles. Ten rats were studied to obtain 313 REM periods over 73 recording days. Data were analyzed offline and REM sleep activity profiles were built for each muscle. In 6 animals, respiratory frequency, effort, amplitude, and inspiratory peak were also analyzed during 192 REM sleep periods. Results: Respiratory muscle phasic activity increased in the second part of the REM period. For example, genioglossal activity increased in the second part of the REM period by 63.8% compared to the average level during NREM sleep. This profile was consistent between animals and REM periods (η2 = 0.58). This increased activity seen in respiratory muscles appeared as irregular bursts and trains of activity that could affect rythmo-genesis. Indeed, the increased integrated activity seen in the second part of the REM period in the diaphragm was associated with an increase in the number (28.3%) and amplitude (30%) of breaths. Non-respiratory muscle phasic activity in REM sleep did not have a profile like the phasic activity of respiratory muscles. Time in REM sleep did not have an effect on nuchal activity (P = 0.59). Conclusion: We conclude that the concept of a common pontine center controlling all REM phasic events is not supported by our

  4. Repairing oxidized proteins in the bacterial envelope using respiratory chain electrons.

    PubMed

    Gennaris, Alexandra; Ezraty, Benjamin; Henry, Camille; Agrebi, Rym; Vergnes, Alexandra; Oheix, Emmanuel; Bos, Julia; Leverrier, Pauline; Espinosa, Leon; Szewczyk, Joanna; Vertommen, Didier; Iranzo, Olga; Collet, Jean-François; Barras, Frédéric

    2015-12-17

    The reactive species of oxygen and chlorine damage cellular components, potentially leading to cell death. In proteins, the sulfur-containing amino acid methionine is converted to methionine sulfoxide, which can cause a loss of biological activity. To rescue proteins with methionine sulfoxide residues, living cells express methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msrs) in most subcellular compartments, including the cytosol, mitochondria and chloroplasts. Here we report the identification of an enzymatic system, MsrPQ, repairing proteins containing methionine sulfoxide in the bacterial cell envelope, a compartment particularly exposed to the reactive species of oxygen and chlorine generated by the host defence mechanisms. MsrP, a molybdo-enzyme, and MsrQ, a haem-binding membrane protein, are widely conserved throughout Gram-negative bacteria, including major human pathogens. MsrPQ synthesis is induced by hypochlorous acid, a powerful antimicrobial released by neutrophils. Consistently, MsrPQ is essential for the maintenance of envelope integrity under bleach stress, rescuing a wide series of structurally unrelated periplasmic proteins from methionine oxidation, including the primary periplasmic chaperone SurA. For this activity, MsrPQ uses electrons from the respiratory chain, which represents a novel mechanism to import reducing equivalents into the bacterial cell envelope. A remarkable feature of MsrPQ is its capacity to reduce both rectus (R-) and sinister (S-) diastereoisomers of methionine sulfoxide, making this oxidoreductase complex functionally different from previously identified Msrs. The discovery that a large class of bacteria contain a single, non-stereospecific enzymatic complex fully protecting methionine residues from oxidation should prompt a search for similar systems in eukaryotic subcellular oxidizing compartments, including the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:26641313

  5. Repairing oxidized proteins in the bacterial envelope using respiratory chain electrons

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Camille; Agrebi, Rym; Vergnes, Alexandra; Oheix, Emmanuel; Bos, Julia; Leverrier, Pauline; Espinosa, Leon; Szewczyk, Joanna; Vertommen, Didier; Iranzo, Olga; Collet, Jean-François; Barras, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    The reactive species of oxygen (ROS) and chlorine (RCS) damage cellular components, potentially leading to cell death. In proteins, the sulfur-containing amino acid methionine (Met) is converted to methionine sulfoxide (Met-O), which can cause a loss of biological activity. To rescue proteins with Met-O residues, living cells express methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msrs) in most subcellular compartments, including the cytosol, mitochondria and chloroplasts 1-3. Here, we report the identification of an enzymatic system, MsrPQ, repairing Met-O containing proteins in the bacterial cell envelope, a compartment particularly exposed to the ROS and RCS generated by the host defense mechanisms. MsrP, a molybdo-enzyme, and MsrQ, a heme-binding membrane protein, are widely conserved throughout Gram-negative bacteria, including major human pathogens. MsrPQ synthesis is induced by hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a powerful antimicrobial released by neutrophils. Consistently, MsrPQ is essential for the maintenance of envelope integrity under bleach stress, rescuing a wide series of structurally unrelated periplasmic proteins from Met oxidation, including the primary periplasmic chaperone SurA. For this activity, MsrPQ uses electrons from the respiratory chain, which represents a novel mechanism to import reducing equivalents into the bacterial cell envelope. A remarkable feature of MsrPQ is its capacity to reduce both R- and S- diastereoisomers of Met-O, making this oxidoreductase complex functionally different from previously identified Msrs. The discovery that a large class of bacteria contain a single, non-stereospecific enzymatic complex fully protecting Met residues from oxidation should prompt search for similar systems in eukaryotic subcellular oxidizing compartments, including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). PMID:26641313

  6. The respiratory chains of four strains of the alkaliphilic Bacillus clausii.

    PubMed

    Abbrescia, A; Martino, P L; Panelli, D; Sardanelli, A M; Papa, S; Alifano, P; Palese, L L; Gaballo, A

    2014-01-01

    A comparative analysis of terminal respiratory enzymes has been performed on four strains of Bacillus clausii used for preparation of a European probiotic. These four strains originated most probably from a common ancestor through early selection of stable clones for industrial propagation. They exhibit a low level of intra-specific diversity and a high degree of genomic conservation, making them an attractive model to study the different bioenergetics behaviors of alkaliphilic bacilli. The analysis of the different bioenergetics responses has been carried out revealing striking differences among the strains. Two out of the four strains have shown a functional redundancy of the terminal part of the respiratory chain. The biochemical data correlate with the expression level of the mRNA of cytochrome c oxidase and quinol oxidase genes (heme-copper type). The consequences of these different bioenergetics behaviors are also discussed. PMID:25161879

  7. The respiratory chains of four strains of the alkaliphilic Bacillus clausii

    PubMed Central

    Abbrescia, A.; Martino, P.L.; Panelli, D.; Sardanelli, A.M.; Papa, S.; Alifano, P.; Palese, L.L.; Gaballo, A.

    2014-01-01

    A comparative analysis of terminal respiratory enzymes has been performed on four strains of Bacillus clausii used for preparation of a European probiotic. These four strains originated most probably from a common ancestor through early selection of stable clones for industrial propagation. They exhibit a low level of intra-specific diversity and a high degree of genomic conservation, making them an attractive model to study the different bioenergetics behaviors of alkaliphilic bacilli. The analysis of the different bioenergetics responses has been carried out revealing striking differences among the strains. Two out of the four strains have shown a functional redundancy of the terminal part of the respiratory chain. The biochemical data correlate with the expression level of the mRNA of cytochrome c oxidase and quinol oxidase genes (heme-copper type). The consequences of these different bioenergetics behaviors are also discussed. PMID:25161879

  8. Cytotoxicity of mitochondria-targeted resveratrol derivatives: interactions with respiratory chain complexes and ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Nicola; Mattarei, Andrea; Azzolini, Michele; Szabo', Ildiko'; Paradisi, Cristina; Zoratti, Mario; Biasutto, Lucia

    2014-10-01

    We recently reported that mitochondria-targeted derivatives of resveratrol are cytotoxic in vitro, selectively inducing mostly necrotic death of fast-growing and tumoral cells when supplied in the low μM range (N. Sassi et al., Curr. Pharm. Des. 2014). Cytotoxicity is due to H2O2 produced upon accumulation of the compounds into mitochondria. We investigate here the mechanisms underlying ROS generation and mitochondrial depolarization caused by these agents. We find that they interact with the respiratory chain, especially complexes I and III, causing superoxide production. "Capping" free hydroxyls with acetyl or methyl groups increases their effectiveness as respiratory chain inhibitors, promoters of ROS generation and cytotoxic agents. Exposure to the compounds also induces an increase in the occurrence of short transient [Ca(2+)] "spikes" in the cells. This increase is unrelated to ROS production, and it is not the cause of cell death. These molecules furthermore inhibit the F0F1 ATPase. When added to oligomycin-treated cells, the acetylated/methylated ones cause a recovery of the cellular oxygen consumption rates depressed by oligomycin. Since a protonophoric futile cycle which might account for the uncoupling effect is impossible, we speculate that the compounds may cause the transformation of the ATP synthase and/or respiratory chain complex(es) into a conduit for uncoupled proton translocation. Only in the presence of excess oligomycin the most effective derivatives appear to induce the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) within the cells. This may be considered to provide circumstantial support for the idea that the ATP synthase is the molecular substrate for the MPT pore. PMID:24997425

  9. Adaptation of respiratory chain biogenesis to cytochrome c oxidase deficiency caused by SURF1 gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Kovářová, Nikola; Cížková Vrbacká, Alena; Pecina, Petr; Stránecký, Viktor; Pronicka, Ewa; Kmoch, Stanislav; Houštěk, Josef

    2012-07-01

    The loss of Surf1 protein leads to a severe COX deficiency manifested as a fatal neurodegenerative disorder, the Leigh syndrome (LS(COX)). Surf1 appears to be involved in the early step of COX assembly but its function remains unknown. The aim of the study was to find out how SURF1 gene mutations influence expression of OXPHOS and other pro-mitochondrial genes and to further characterize the altered COX assembly. Analysis of fibroblast cell lines from 9 patients with SURF1 mutations revealed a 70% decrease of the COX complex content to be associated with 32-54% upregulation of respiratory chain complexes I, III and V and accumulation of Cox5a subunit. Whole genome expression profiling showed a general decrease of transcriptional activity in LS(COX) cells and indicated that the adaptive changes in OXPHOS complexes are due to a posttranscriptional compensatory mechanism. Electrophoretic and WB analysis showed that in mitochondria of LS(COX) cells compared to controls, the assembled COX is present entirely in a supercomplex form, as I-III₂-IV supercomplex but not as larger supercomplexes. The lack of COX also caused an accumulation of I-III₂ supercomplex. The accumulated Cox5a was mainly present as a free subunit. We have found out that the major COX assembly subcomplexes accumulated due to SURF1 mutations range in size between approximately 85-140kDa. In addition to the originally proposed S2 intermediate they might also represent Cox1-containing complexes lacking other COX subunits. Unlike the assembled COX, subcomplexes are unable to associate with complexes I and III. PMID:22465034

  10. Bioenergetics of the moderately halophilic bacterium Halobacillus halophilus: composition and regulation of the respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Pade, Nadin; Köcher, Saskia; Roeßler, Markus; Hänelt, Inga; Müller, Volker

    2013-06-01

    In their natural environments, moderately halophilic bacteria are confronted not only with high salinities but also with low oxygen tensions due to the high salinities. The growth of H. halophilus is strictly aerobic. To analyze the dependence of respiration on the NaCl concentration and oxygen availability of the medium, resting cell experiments were performed. The respiration rates were dependent on the NaCl concentration of the growth medium, as well as on the NaCl concentration of the assay buffer, indicating regulation on the transcriptional and the activity level. Respiration was accompanied by the generation of an electrochemical proton potential (Δμ(H+)) across the cytoplasmic membrane whose magnitude was dependent on the external pH. Genes encoding proteins involved in respiration and Δμ(H+) generation, such as a noncoupled NADH dehydrogenase (NDH-2), complex II, and complex III, were identified in the genome. In addition, genes encoding five different terminal oxidases are present. Inhibitor profiling revealed the presence of NDH-2 and complex III, but the nature of the oxidases could not be resolved using this approach. Expression analysis demonstrated that all the different terminal oxidases were indeed expressed, but by far the most prominent was cta, encoding cytochrome caa3 oxidase. The expression of all of the different oxidase genes increased at high NaCl concentrations, and the transcript levels of cta and qox (encoding cytochrome aa3 oxidase) also increased at low oxygen concentrations. These data culminate in a model of the composition and variation of the respiratory chain of H. halophilus. PMID:23584768

  11. [Characteristics of the respiratory chain and the oxidative phosphorylation system of mitochondria in the flavinogenic Eremothecium ashbyii strain].

    PubMed

    Zviagil'skaia, R A; Korosteleva, N L; Mironov, V A

    1976-01-01

    Tightly coupled mitochondria were isolated from cells of the flavinogenic strain of Eremothecium ashbyii collected during the logarithmic and stationary growth phases. The composition of the respiratory chain and characteristics of the energy coupling system are described. The mitochondria show a wide spectrum of metabolic activity and oxidize Krebs cycle compenents and exogenous NADH. The terminal segment of the respiratory chain is represented by a typical cytochrome system. The mitochondria of the ascomycete collected during the logarithmic growth phase are characterized by a relatively high content of cytochromes b and c, a high rate of oxidation of NAD-dependent substrates, the presence of lower homologues of ubiquinone, UQ6 and UQ7, and extremely high sensitivity of respiration to the action of antimycin A, low content of a component sensitive to rotenone, contrasting with the operation of all three sites of phosphorylation. Transition to the stationary growth phase is accompanied with a decrease in the rate of oxidation of all substrates studied and a declined effectiveness of oxidative phosphorylation. The data obtained are discussed in relation to the ability of the cells for "overproduction" of flavins. PMID:187903

  12. Possible role of mtDNA depletion and respiratory chain defects in aristolochic acid I-induced acute nephrotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Zhenzhou Bao, Qingli Sun, Lixin Huang, Xin Wang, Tao Zhang, Shuang Li, Han Zhang, Luyong

    2013-01-15

    This report describes an investigation of the pathological mechanism of acute renal failure caused by toxic tubular necrosis after treatment with aristolochic acid I (AAI) in Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats. The rats were gavaged with AAI at 0, 5, 20, or 80 mg/kg/day for 7 days. The pathologic examination of the kidneys showed severe acute tubular degenerative changes primarily affecting the proximal tubules. Supporting these results, we detected significantly increased concentrations of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) in the rats treated with AAI, indicating damage to the kidneys. Ultrastructural examination showed that proximal tubular mitochondria were extremely enlarged and dysmorphic with loss and disorientation of their cristae. Mitochondrial function analysis revealed that the two indicators for mitochondrial energy metabolism, the respiratory control ratio (RCR) and ATP content, were reduced in a dose-dependent manner after AAI treatment. The RCR in the presence of substrates for complex I was reduced more significantly than in the presence of substrates for complex II. In additional experiments, the activity of respiratory complex I, which is partly encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), was more significantly impaired than that of respiratory complex II, which is completely encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). A real-time PCR assay revealed a marked reduction of mtDNA in the kidneys treated with AAI. Taken together, these results suggested that mtDNA depletion and respiratory chain defects play critical roles in the pathogenesis of kidney injury induced by AAI, and that the same processes might contribute to aristolochic acid-induced nephrotoxicity in humans. -- Highlights: ► AAI-induced acute renal failure in rats and the proximal tubule was the target. ► Tubular mitochondria were morphologically aberrant in ultrastructural examination. ► AAI impair mitochondrial bioenergetic function and mtDNA replication.

  13. Respiratory chain of the alkalophilic bacterium Bacillus firmus RAB and its non-alkalophilic mutant derivative.

    PubMed Central

    Kitada, M; Lewis, R J; Krulwich, T A

    1983-01-01

    The membrane-bound respiratory chain components of alkalophilic Bacillus firmus RAB were studied by difference spectroscopy and oxidation-reduction potentiometric titrations. Cytochromes with the following midpoint potentials were identified at pH 9.0: a-type cytochromes, +110 and +210 mV; b-type cytochromes, +20, -120, -280, and -400 mV; and cytochrome c, +60 mV. Only the higher-potential cytochrome a showed an upward shift in midpoint potential when titrated at pH 7.0. Parallel studies of a non-alkalophilic mutant derivative of B. firmus RAB, strain RABN, revealed the presence of only one species each of a-, b-, and c-type cytochromes which exhibited midpoint potentials of +110, -150, and +160 mV, respectively, at pH 7.0. Membranes of both strains were found to contain menaquinone. At pH 9.0, NADH caused the reduction of essentially all of the cytochromes that were seen in fully reduced preparations of wild-type B. firmus RAB membranes. By contrast, at pH 7.0, NADH failed to appreciably reduce the b-type cytochromes. These findings may relate to our recent proposal that an inadequacy in energy transduction (production of a proton motive force) by the alkalophilic respiratory chain at pH 7.0 is what precludes the growth of B. firmus RAB at a neutral pH. PMID:6833181

  14. The respiratory chain supercomplex organization is independent of COX7a2l isoforms.

    PubMed

    Mourier, Arnaud; Matic, Stanka; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Milenkovic, Dusanka

    2014-12-01

    The organization of individual respiratory chain complexes into supercomplexes or respirasomes has attracted great interest because of the implications for cellular energy conversion. Recently, it was reported that commonly used mouse strains harbor a short COX7a2l (SCAFI) gene isoform that supposedly precludes the formation of complex IV-containing supercomplexes. This claim potentially has serious implications for numerous mouse studies addressing important topics in metabolism, including adaptation to space flights. Using several complementary experimental approaches, we show that mice with the short COX7a2l isoform have normal biogenesis and steady-state levels of complex IV-containing supercomplexes and consequently have normal respiratory chain function. Furthermore, we use a mouse knockout of Lrpprc and show that loss of complex IV compromises respirasome formation. We conclude that the presence of the short COX7a2l isoform in the commonly used C57BL/6 mouse strains does not prevent their use in metabolism research. PMID:25470551

  15. The Respiratory Chain Supercomplex Organization Is Independent of COX7a2l Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Mourier, Arnaud; Matic, Stanka; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Milenkovic, Dusanka

    2014-01-01

    Summary The organization of individual respiratory chain complexes into supercomplexes or respirasomes has attracted great interest because of the implications for cellular energy conversion. Recently, it was reported that commonly used mouse strains harbor a short COX7a2l (SCAFI) gene isoform that supposedly precludes the formation of complex IV-containing supercomplexes. This claim potentially has serious implications for numerous mouse studies addressing important topics in metabolism, including adaptation to space flights. Using several complementary experimental approaches, we show that mice with the short COX7a2l isoform have normal biogenesis and steady-state levels of complex IV-containing supercomplexes and consequently have normal respiratory chain function. Furthermore, we use a mouse knockout of Lrpprc and show that loss of complex IV compromises respirasome formation. We conclude that the presence of the short COX7a2l isoform in the commonly used C57BL/6 mouse strains does not prevent their use in metabolism research. PMID:25470551

  16. Extensive respiratory chain defects in inhibitory interneurones in patients with mitochondrial disease

    PubMed Central

    Lax, Nichola Z.; Grady, John; Laude, Alex; Chan, Felix; Hepplewhite, Philippa D.; Gorman, Grainne; Whittaker, Roger G.; Ng, Yi; Cunningham, Mark O.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Mitochondrial disorders are among the most frequently inherited cause of neurological disease and arise due to mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear DNA. Currently, we do not understand the specific involvement of certain brain regions or selective neuronal vulnerability in mitochondrial disease. Recent studies suggest γ‐aminobutyric acid (GABA)‐ergic interneurones are particularly susceptible to respiratory chain dysfunction. In this neuropathological study, we assess the impact of mitochondrial DNA defects on inhibitory interneurones in patients with mitochondrial disease. Methods Histochemical, immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent assays were performed on post‐mortem brain tissue from 10 patients and 10 age‐matched control individuals. We applied a quantitative immunofluorescent method to interrogate complex I and IV protein expression in mitochondria within GABAergic interneurone populations in the frontal, temporal and occipital cortices. We also evaluated the density of inhibitory interneurones in serial sections to determine if cell loss was occurring. Results We observed significant, global reductions in complex I expression within GABAergic interneurones in frontal, temporal and occipital cortices in the majority of patients. While complex IV expression is more variable, there is reduced expression in patients harbouring m.8344A>G point mutations and POLG mutations. In addition to the severe respiratory chain deficiencies observed in remaining interneurones, quantification of GABAergic cell density showed a dramatic reduction in cell density suggesting interneurone loss. Conclusions We propose that the combined loss of interneurones and severe respiratory deficiency in remaining interneurones contributes to impaired neuronal network oscillations and could underlie development of neurological deficits, such as cognitive impairment and epilepsy, in mitochondrial disease. PMID:25786813

  17. Multistationary and Oscillatory Modes of Free Radicals Generation by the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Revealed by a Bifurcation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Selivanov, Vitaly A.; Cascante, Marta; Friedman, Mark; Schumaker, Mark F.; Trucco, Massimo; Votyakova, Tatyana V.

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain transforms energy satisfying cellular demand and generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) that act as metabolic signals or destructive factors. Therefore, knowledge of the possible modes and bifurcations of electron transport that affect ROS signaling provides insight into the interrelationship of mitochondrial respiration with cellular metabolism. Here, a bifurcation analysis of a sequence of the electron transport chain models of increasing complexity was used to analyze the contribution of individual components to the modes of respiratory chain behavior. Our algorithm constructed models as large systems of ordinary differential equations describing the time evolution of the distribution of redox states of the respiratory complexes. The most complete model of the respiratory chain and linked metabolic reactions predicted that condensed mitochondria produce more ROS at low succinate concentration and less ROS at high succinate levels than swelled mitochondria. This prediction was validated by measuring ROS production under various swelling conditions. A numerical bifurcation analysis revealed qualitatively different types of multistationary behavior and sustained oscillations in the parameter space near a region that was previously found to describe the behavior of isolated mitochondria. The oscillations in transmembrane potential and ROS generation, observed in living cells were reproduced in the model that includes interaction of respiratory complexes with the reactions of TCA cycle. Whereas multistationarity is an internal characteristic of the respiratory chain, the functional link of respiration with central metabolism creates oscillations, which can be understood as a means of auto-regulation of cell metabolism. PMID:23028295

  18. Stomatin-Like Protein 2 Is Required for In Vivo Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Supercomplex Formation and Optimal Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Chang, Yu-Han; Wai, Timothy; König, Tim; Dunn, Stanley D.; Langer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Stomatin-like protein 2 (SLP-2) is a mainly mitochondrial protein that is widely expressed and is highly conserved across evolution. We have previously shown that SLP-2 binds the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin and interacts with prohibitin-1 and -2 to form specialized membrane microdomains in the mitochondrial inner membrane, which are associated with optimal mitochondrial respiration. To determine how SLP-2 functions, we performed bioenergetic analysis of primary T cells from T cell-selective Slp-2 knockout mice under conditions that forced energy production to come almost exclusively from oxidative phosphorylation. These cells had a phenotype characterized by increased uncoupled mitochondrial respiration and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. Since formation of mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes (RCS) may correlate with more efficient electron transfer during oxidative phosphorylation, we hypothesized that the defect in mitochondrial respiration in SLP-2-deficient T cells was due to deficient RCS formation. We found that in the absence of SLP-2, T cells had decreased levels and activities of complex I-III2 and I-III2-IV1-3 RCS but no defects in assembly of individual respiratory complexes. Impaired RCS formation in SLP-2-deficient T cells correlated with significantly delayed T cell proliferation in response to activation under conditions of limiting glycolysis. Altogether, our findings identify SLP-2 as a key regulator of the formation of RCS in vivo and show that these supercomplexes are required for optimal cell function. PMID:25776552

  19. Activity of respiratory system during laser irradiation of brain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkulova, N. A.; Sergeyeva, L. I.

    1984-06-01

    The performance of one of the principal links of the respiratory system, the respiratory center, was studied as a function of the exposure of the medulla oblongata and the sensomotor zone of the cerebral hemisphere cortex to low level laser irradiation in the red wavelength of the spectrum. Experiments were done on white rats under barbital anesthesia. Under such conditions a substantial effect was observed on the activity of the respiratory center. Laser light may display activating or inhibitory influences, in some cases the bilateral symmetry of the activity of the respiratory center is affected indicating deep changes in the integrative mechanism of the functioning of the right and left sides of the hemispheres. The laser beam effect depends on many factors: specific light properties, duration of the exposure, repetition of exposures, initial functional state of the CNS, etc.

  20. Nitric oxide inhibits specific enzymes in the Krebs cycle and the respiratory chain of rat hepatocyte mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, J.; Billiar, T.R.; Curran, R.D.; Kim, R.; Simmons, R.L. )

    1990-02-26

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a highly-reactive molecule produced from L-arginine as recently described. In macrophages and tumor cells, NO inhibits specific mitochondrial enzymes presumably by attacking their intrinsic 4Fe-4S centers. The susceptible enzymes include aconitase of the Krebs cycle and oxidoreductase (complex II) of the electron transport chain. The authors have recently demonstrated that hepatocytes (HC) produce NO in large amounts in response to endotoxin and inflammatory cytokines. To determine whether HC suffer a similar enzyme inhibition, the authors exposed rat HC to increasing concentrations of NO solutions for 5 minutes. The activity of aconitase, complex 1, complex 2, and complex 4 (cytochrome oxidase) was determined by measuring O{sub 2} consumption after addition of enzyme-specific substrates. An NO concentration-dependent inhibition of aconitase, complex 1, and complex 2 was measured. After exposure to 0.6 mM solution, the activity of aconitase was blocked to non-measurable values while complex 1 was reduced to 11 + 8%, and complex 2 to 36 + 2% of the activity of control HC. Complex 4 of the respiratory chain remained intact at 100 + 8%. These data indicate that HC, like other cell types, are susceptible to inhibition of important steps of energy production by NO. As NO is produced in response to septic stimuli, this mechanism may play a role in the metabolic dysfunction of HC in sepsis.

  1. [The functional state of the mitochondrial respiratory chain of the small intestine enterocytes of the rats under the low dose rate X-ray total external exposure].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    The influence of the low-rate ionizing radiation (0.055 Gy/min) at the doses of 0.1; 0.5 and 1.0 Gy on the functional state of the mitochondria respiratory chain of the rat small intestine enterocytes was investigated. The dysfunction of the electron transport chain enzymes andchanges in the content of cytochromes b, c, a in themitochondrial inner membrane were revealed 1, 12 and 24 hours after exposure to radiation. The re- vealed disorders indicate early membrane sensitivity to the radiation effect. The inhibition of the H+ -ATPase activity in the studied dose range indicates the decrease of the mitochondrial energy capacity. PMID:25508872

  2. Electrode assemblies composed of redox cascades from microbial respiratory electron transfer chains

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, Andrew J.; Marritt, Sophie; Bradley, Justin; Shi, Liang; McMillan, Duncan G.; Jeuken, Lars J.; Richardson, David; Butt, Julea N.

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory and photosynthetic electron transfer chains are dependent on vectorial electron transfer through a series of redox proteins. Examples include electron transfer from NapC to NapAB nitrate reductase in Paracoccus denitrificans and from CymA to Fcc3 (flavocytochrome c3) fumarate reductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. In the present article, we demonstrate that graphite electrodes can serve as surfaces for the stepwise adsorption of NapC and NapAB, and the stepwise adsorption of CymA and Fcc3. Aspects of the catalytic properties of these assemblies are different from those of NapAB and Fcc3 adsorbed in isolation. We propose that this is due to the formation of NapC-NapAB and of CymA-Fcc3 complexes that are capable of supporting vectorial electron transfer.

  3. Post-Translational Decrease in Respiratory Chain Proteins in the Polg Mutator Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, David N.; Dillman, Allissa A.; Ding, Jinhui; Li, Yan; Cookson, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA damage is thought to be a causal contributor to aging as mice with inactivating mutations in polymerase gamma (Polg) develop a progeroid phenotype. To further understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenotype, we used iTRAQ and RNA-Seq to determine differences in protein and mRNA abundance respectively in the brains of one year old Polg mutator mice compared to control animals. We found that mitochondrial respiratory chain proteins are specifically decreased in abundance in the brains of the mutator mice, including several nuclear encoded mitochondrial components. However, we found no evidence that the changes we observed in protein levels were the result of decreases in mRNA expression. These results show that there are post-translational effects associated with mutations in Polg. PMID:24722488

  4. Alpha-chain disease with involvement of the respiratory tract in a Dutch child

    PubMed Central

    Stoop, J. W.; Ballieux, R. E.; Hijmans, W.; Zegers, B. J. W.

    1971-01-01

    A description is given of an 8-year-old girl of pure Dutch extraction who, since age 4, has shown unclassifiable skin changes, marked eosinophilia and diffuse infiltrative pulmonary changes with enlarged mediastinal lymph glands, dyspnoea and impaired diffusion. The patient's serum contained a large amount of proteins related to the Fc-fragment of IgA. She developed a pharyngeal tumour with the histological characteristics of a paragranuloma. The mucosa of the lower air passages is regarded as a possible site of origin of the abnormal serum protein. The disease was therefore interpreted as a disorder of the secretory IgA system, and this patient could well represent the respiratory form of the alpha-chain disease, described so far. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:4111693

  5. The aerobic respiratory chain of the acidophilic archaeon Ferroplasma acidiphilum: A membrane-bound complex oxidizing ferrous iron.

    PubMed

    Castelle, Cindy J; Roger, Magali; Bauzan, Marielle; Brugna, Myriam; Lignon, Sabrina; Nimtz, Manfred; Golyshina, Olga V; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Guiral, Marianne

    2015-08-01

    The extremely acidophilic archaeon Ferroplasma acidiphilum is found in iron-rich biomining environments and is an important micro-organism in naturally occurring microbial communities in acid mine drainage. F. acidiphilum is an iron oxidizer that belongs to the order Thermoplasmatales (Euryarchaeota), which harbors the most extremely acidophilic micro-organisms known so far. At present, little is known about the nature or the structural and functional organization of the proteins in F. acidiphilum that impact the iron biogeochemical cycle. We combine here biochemical and biophysical techniques such as enzyme purification, activity measurements, proteomics and spectroscopy to characterize the iron oxidation pathway(s) in F. acidiphilum. We isolated two respiratory membrane protein complexes: a 850 kDa complex containing an aa3-type cytochrome oxidase and a blue copper protein, which directly oxidizes ferrous iron and reduces molecular oxygen, and a 150 kDa cytochrome ba complex likely composed of a di-heme cytochrome and a Rieske protein. We tentatively propose that both of these complexes are involved in iron oxidation respiratory chains, functioning in the so-called uphill and downhill electron flow pathways, consistent with autotrophic life. The cytochrome ba complex could possibly play a role in regenerating reducing equivalents by a reverse ('uphill') electron flow. This study constitutes the first detailed biochemical investigation of the metalloproteins that are potentially directly involved in iron-mediated energy conservation in a member of the acidophilic archaea of the genus Ferroplasma. PMID:25896560

  6. Supramolecular organization of bacterial aerobic respiratory chains: From cells and back.

    PubMed

    Melo, Ana M P; Teixeira, Miguel

    2016-03-01

    Aerobic respiratory chains from all life kingdoms are composed by several complexes that have been deeply characterized in their isolated form. These membranous complexes link the oxidation of reducing substrates to the reduction of molecular oxygen, in a process that conserves energy by ion translocation between both sides of the mitochondrial or prokaryotic cytoplasmatic membranes. In recent years there has been increasing evidence that those complexes are organized as supramolecular structures, the so-called supercomplexes and respirasomes, being available for eukaryotes strong data namely obtained by electron microscopy and single particle analysis. A parallel study has been developed for prokaryotes, based on blue native gels and mass spectrometry analysis, showing that in these more simple unicellular organisms such supercomplexes also exist, involving not only typical aerobic-respiration associated complexes, but also anaerobic-linked enzymes. After a short overview of the data on eukaryotic supercomplexes, we will analyse comprehensively the different types of prokaryotic aerobic respiratory supercomplexes that have been thus far suggested, in both bacteria and archaea. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Prof Conrad Mullineaux. PMID:26546715

  7. Cortical NADH during pharmacological manipulations of the respiratory chain and spreading depression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rex, A; Pfeifer, L; Fink, F; Fink, H

    1999-08-01

    The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is one of the main means for energy transfer in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and is an important parameter of cellular metabolism. NADH can be measured by its fluorescence and various fluorometric methods have been developed. In this study, a pulsed nitrogen laser combined with a fibreoptic set-up and photomultipliers was used to induce and measure NADH fluorescence on the cortical surface. The aim of the study was to assess the suitability of the laser induced spectroscopy for in vivo and on-line measurement of NADH in neuroscience and particularly for the assessment of neuronal metabolism. Changes in cerebral blood flow may affect fluorescence measurement. To assess the consequences of alterations in blood flow, the vasodilators glyceryl trinitrate and nimodipine and the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 were applied. The induced hemodynamic changes were verified by colour Doppler sonography. The tests using the vasodilators showed that an increased blood flow in the brain increased not only NADH fluorescence but also the scattered light measured. The vasoconstrictor caused opposite effects. Insertion of a compensation method (subtraction of the scattered light) allowed the exclusion of hemodynamic artifacts. Effects of changes in the cellular metabolism were induced by sodium cyanide, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, or by 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP), an uncoupler of the oxidative phosphorylation. Sodium cyanide induced a transient increase of NADH fluorescence and 2,4-DNP decreased intracellular NADH fluorescence. Furthermore, the repercussions of cortical spreading depressions (CSD), a response of the brain to noxious stimuli, on cortical NADH fluorescence were determined. A single CSD decreased cortical NADH fluorescence for about 1 min, followed by a 5- to 10-min increase. The changes in NADH levels seem to correspond with the excitation and inhibition of neuronal metabolism, respectively. In

  8. Comprehensive measurement of respiratory activity in permeabilized cells using extracellular flux analysis

    PubMed Central

    Salabei, Joshua K.; Gibb, Andrew A.; Hill, Bradford G.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular flux (XF) analysis has become a mainstream method to measure bioenergetic function in cells and tissues. While this technique is commonly used to measure energetics in intact cells, we outline here a detailed XF protocol for measuring respiration in permeabilized cells. Cells are permeabilized using saponin, digitonin, or recombinant perfringolysin O (XF PMP reagent) and provided with specific substrates to measure complex I- or II-mediated respiratory activity, Complex III+IV respiratory activity, or Complex IV activity. Medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines or glutamine may also be provided for measuring fatty acid oxidation or glutamine oxidation, respectively. This protocol allows for such measurements using a minimal number of cells compared with other protocols, without the need for mitochondrial isolation. The results are highly reproducible, and mitochondria remain well coupled. Collectively, this protocol provides comprehensive and detailed information regarding mitochondrial activity and efficiency, and, following preparative steps, takes approximately 6 hours to complete. PMID:24457333

  9. Evaluation of a multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of influenza and respiratory syncytial viruses.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Scala, Alessia; Tagliabue, Claudia; Zampiero, Alberto; Bianchini, Sonia; Principi, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal swabs from 424 children were used to compare the performances of the new multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) RIDA®GENE Flu & RSV kit and monospecific RT-PCR assays in detecting respiratory syncytial and influenza viruses. The easy-to-use kit was highly sensitive and specific and is recommended for routine practice. PMID:26458277

  10. Neuropathologic Characterization of Pontocerebellar Hypoplasia Type 6 Associated With Cardiomyopathy and Hydrops Fetalis and Severe Multisystem Respiratory Chain Deficiency due to Novel RARS2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lax, Nichola Z.; Alston, Charlotte L.; Schon, Katherine; Park, Soo-Mi; Krishnakumar, Deepa; He, Langping; Falkous, Gavin; Ogilvy-Stuart, Amanda; Lees, Christoph; King, Rosalind H.; Hargreaves, Iain P.; Brown, Garry K.; McFarland, Robert; Dean, Andrew F.; Taylor, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Autosomal recessive mutations in the RARS2 gene encoding the mitochondrial arginyl-transfer RNA synthetase cause infantile-onset myoencephalopathy pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 6 (PCH6). We describe 2 sisters with novel compound heterozygous RARS2 mutations who presented perinatally with neurologic features typical of PCH6 but with additional features including cardiomyopathy, hydrops, and pulmonary hypoplasia and who died at 1 day and 14 days of age. Magnetic resonance imaging findings included marked cerebellar hypoplasia, gyral immaturity, punctate lesions in cerebral white matter, and unfused deep cerebral grey matter. Enzyme histochemistry of postmortem tissues revealed a near-global cytochrome c oxidase-deficiency; assessment of respiratory chain enzyme activities confirmed severe deficiencies involving complexes I, III, and IV. Molecular genetic studies revealed 2 RARS2 gene mutations: a c.1A>G, p.? variant predicted to abolish the initiator methionine, and a deep intronic c.613-3927C>T variant causing skipping of exons 6–8 in the mature RARS2 transcript. Neuropathologic investigation included low brain weights, small brainstem and cerebellum, deep cerebral white matter pathology, pontine nucleus neuron loss (in 1 sibling), and peripheral nerve pathology. Mitochondrial respiratory chain immunohistochemistry in brain tissues confirmed an absence of complexes I and IV immunoreactivity with sparing of mitochondrial numbers. These cases expand the clinical spectrum of RARS2 mutations, including antenatal features and widespread mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiencies in postmortem brain tissues. PMID:26083569

  11. An Impaired Respiratory Electron Chain Triggers Down-regulation of the Energy Metabolism and De-ubiquitination of Solute Carrier Amino Acid Transporters.

    PubMed

    Aretz, Ina; Hardt, Christopher; Wittig, Ilka; Meierhofer, David

    2016-05-01

    Hundreds of genes have been associated with respiratory chain disease (RCD), the most common inborn error of metabolism so far. Elimination of the respiratory electron chain by depleting the entire mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, ρ(0) cells) has therefore one of the most severe impacts on the energy metabolism in eukaryotic cells. In this study, proteomic data sets including the post-translational modifications (PTMs) phosphorylation and ubiquitination were integrated with metabolomic data sets and selected enzyme activities in the osteosarcoma cell line 143B.TK(-) A shotgun based SILAC LC-MS proteomics and a targeted metabolomics approach was applied to elucidate the consequences of the ρ(0) state. Pathway and protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analyses revealed a nonuniform down-regulation of the respiratory electron chain, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and the pyruvate metabolism in ρ(0) cells. Metabolites of the TCA cycle were dysregulated, such as a reduction of citric acid and cis-aconitic acid (six and 2.5-fold), and an increase of lactic acid, oxalacetic acid (both twofold), and succinic acid (fivefold) in ρ(0) cells. Signaling pathways such as GPCR, EGFR, G12/13 alpha, and Rho GTPases were up-regulated in ρ(0) cells, which could be indicative for the mitochondrial retrograde response, a pathway of communication from mitochondria to the nucleus. This was supported by our phosphoproteome data, which revealed two main processes, GTPase-related signal transduction and cytoskeleton organization. Furthermore, a general de-ubiquitination in ρ(0) cells was observed, for example, 80S ribosomal proteins were in average threefold and SLC amino acid transporters fivefold de-ubiquitinated. The latter might cause the observed significant increase of amino acid levels in ρ(0) cells. We conclude that an elimination of the respiratory electron chain, e.g. mtDNA depletion, not only leads to an uneven down-regulation of mitochondrial energy pathways, but also

  12. Burst of succinate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase activity in concert with the expression of genes coding for respiratory chain proteins underlies short-term beneficial physiological stress in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Zakharchenko, Marina V; Zakharchenko, A V; Khunderyakova, N V; Tutukina, M N; Simonova, M A; Vasilieva, A A; Romanova, O I; Fedotcheva, N I; Litvinova, E G; Maevsky, E I; Zinchenko, V P; Berezhnov, A V; Morgunov, I G; Gulayev, A A; Kondrashova, M N

    2013-01-01

    Conditions for the realization in rats of moderate physiological stress (PHS) (30-120 min) were selected, which preferentially increase adaptive restorative processes without adverse responses typical of harmful stress (HST). The succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KDH) activity and the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondria were measured in lymphocytes by the cytobiochemical method, which detects the regulation of mitochondria in the organism with high sensitivity. These mitochondrial markers undergo an initial 10-20-fold burst of activity followed by a decrease to a level exceeding the quiescent state 2-3-fold by 120 min of PHS. By 30-60 min, the rise in SDH activity was greater than in KDH activity, while the activity of KDH prevailed over that of SDH by 120 min. The attenuation of SDH hyperactivity during PHS occurs by a mechanism other than oxaloacetate inhibition developed under HST. The dynamics of SDH and KDH activity corresponds to the known physiological replacement of adrenergic regulation by cholinergic during PHS, which is confirmed here by mitochondrial markers because their activity reflects these two types of nerve regulation, respectively. The domination of cholinergic regulation provides the overrestoration of expenditures for activity. In essence, this phenomenon corresponds to the training of the organism. It was first revealed in mitochondria after a single short-time stress episode. The burst of ROS formation was congruous with changes in SDH and KDH activity, as well as in ucp2 and cox3 expression, while the activity of SDH was inversely dependent on the expression of the gene of its catalytic subunit in the spleen. As the SDH activity enhanced, the expression of the succinate receptor decreased with subsequent dramatic rise when the activity was becoming lower. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Bioenergetic dysfunction, adaption and therapy. PMID:22814171

  13. Mice Deficient in the Respiratory Chain Gene Cox6a2 Are Protected against High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Quintens, Roel; Singh, Sarvjeet; Lemaire, Katleen; De Bock, Katrien; Granvik, Mikaela; Schraenen, Anica; Vroegrijk, Irene Olga Cornelia Maria; Costa, Veronica; Van Noten, Pieter; Lambrechts, Dennis; Lehnert, Stefan; Van Lommel, Leentje; Thorrez, Lieven; De Faudeur, Geoffroy; Romijn, Johannes Anthonius; Shelton, John Michael; Scorrano, Luca; Lijnen, Henri Roger; Voshol, Peter Jacobus; Carmeliet, Peter; Mammen, Pradeep Puthenveetil Abraham; Schuit, Frans

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria is responsible for 90% of ATP synthesis in most cells. This essential housekeeping function is mediated by nuclear and mitochondrial genes encoding subunits of complex I to V of the respiratory chain. Although complex IV is the best studied of these complexes, the exact function of the striated muscle-specific subunit COX6A2 is still poorly understood. In this study, we show that Cox6a2-deficient mice are protected against high-fat diet-induced obesity, insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. This phenotype results from elevated energy expenditure and a skeletal muscle fiber type switch towards more oxidative fibers. At the molecular level we observe increased formation of reactive oxygen species, constitutive activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, and enhanced expression of uncoupling proteins. Our data indicate that COX6A2 is a regulator of respiratory uncoupling in muscle and we demonstrate that a novel and direct link exists between muscle respiratory chain activity and diet-induced obesity/insulin resistance. PMID:23460811

  14. Evidence of oxidative stress and mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction in an in vitro model of sepsis-induced kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Quoilin, C; Mouithys-Mickalad, A; Lécart, S; Fontaine-Aupart, M-P; Hoebeke, M

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the role of oxidative stress and/or mitochondrial impairment in the occurrence of acute kidney injury (AKI) during sepsis, we developed a sepsis-induced in vitro model using proximal tubular epithelial cells exposed to a bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS). This investigation has provided key features on the relationship between oxidative stress and mitochondrial respiratory chain activity defects. LPS treatment resulted in an increase in the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX-4), suggesting the cytosolic overexpression of nitric oxide and superoxide anion, the primary reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). This oxidant state seemed to interrupt mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation by reducing cytochrome c oxidase activity. As a consequence, disruptions in the electron transport and the proton pumping across the mitochondrial inner membrane occurred, leading to a decrease of the mitochondrial membrane potential, a release of apoptotic-inducing factors and a depletion of adenosine triphosphate. Interestingly, after being targeted by RNS and ROS, mitochondria became in turn producer of ROS, thus contributing to increase the mitochondrial dysfunction. The role of oxidants in mitochondrial dysfunction was further confirmed by the use of iNOS inhibitors or antioxidants that preserve cytochrome c oxidase activity and prevent mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation. These results suggest that sepsis-induced AKI should not only be regarded as failure of energy status but also as an integrated response, including transcriptional events, ROS signaling, mitochondrial activity and metabolic orientation such as apoptosis. PMID:25019585

  15. Evaluation of the In Vivo and In Vitro Effects of Fructose on Respiratory Chain Complexes in Tissues of Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Macongonde, Ernesto António; Vilela, Thais Ceresér; Scaini, Giselli; Gonçalves, Cinara Ludvig; Ferreira, Bruna Klippel; Costa, Naithan Ludian Fernandes; de Oliveira, Marcos Roberto; Avila Junior, Silvio; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by fructose and fructose-1-phosphate accumulation in tissues and biological fluids of patients. This disease results from a deficiency of aldolase B, which metabolizes fructose in the liver, kidney, and small intestine. We here investigated the effect of acute fructose administration on the activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) in cerebral cortex, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle of male 30-day-old Wistar rats. The rats received subcutaneous injection of sodium chloride (0.9%; control group) or fructose solution (5 μmol/g; treated group). One hour later, the animals were euthanized and the cerebral cortex, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle were isolated and homogenized for the investigations. Acute fructose administration increased complex I-III activity in liver. On the other hand, decreased complexes II and II-III activities in skeletal muscle and MDH in kidney were found. Interestingly, none of these parameters were affected in vitro. Our present data indicate that fructose administration elicits impairment of mitochondrial energy metabolism, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of the HFI patients. PMID:26770008

  16. Evaluation of the In Vivo and In Vitro Effects of Fructose on Respiratory Chain Complexes in Tissues of Young Rats

    PubMed Central

    Macongonde, Ernesto António; Vilela, Thais Ceresér; Scaini, Giselli; Gonçalves, Cinara Ludvig; Ferreira, Bruna Klippel; Costa, Naithan Ludian Fernandes; de Oliveira, Marcos Roberto; Avila, Silvio; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Ferreira, Gustavo Costa; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by fructose and fructose-1-phosphate accumulation in tissues and biological fluids of patients. This disease results from a deficiency of aldolase B, which metabolizes fructose in the liver, kidney, and small intestine. We here investigated the effect of acute fructose administration on the activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) in cerebral cortex, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle of male 30-day-old Wistar rats. The rats received subcutaneous injection of sodium chloride (0.9%; control group) or fructose solution (5 μmol/g; treated group). One hour later, the animals were euthanized and the cerebral cortex, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle were isolated and homogenized for the investigations. Acute fructose administration increased complex I-III activity in liver. On the other hand, decreased complexes II and II-III activities in skeletal muscle and MDH in kidney were found. Interestingly, none of these parameters were affected in vitro. Our present data indicate that fructose administration elicits impairment of mitochondrial energy metabolism, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of the HFI patients. PMID:26770008

  17. Mitochondrial respiratory chain is involved in insulin-stimulated hydrogen peroxide production and plays an integral role in insulin receptor autophosphorylation in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Storozhevykh, Tatiana P; Senilova, Yana E; Persiyantseva, Nadezhda A; Pinelis, Vsevolod G; Pomytkin, Igor A

    2007-01-01

    Background Accumulated evidence suggests that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated in cells during insulin stimulation plays an integral role in insulin receptor signal transduction. The role of insulin-induced H2O2 in neuronal insulin receptor activation and the origin of insulin-induced H2O2 in neurons remain unclear. The aim of the present study is to test the following hypotheses (1) whether insulin-induced H2O2 is required for insulin receptor autophosphorylation in neurons, and (2) whether mitochondrial respiratory chain is involved in insulin-stimulated H2O2 production, thus playing an integral role in insulin receptor autophosphorylation in neurons. Results Insulin stimulation elicited rapid insulin receptor autophosphorylation accompanied by an increase in H2O2 release from cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGN). N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a H2O2 scavenger, inhibited both insulin-stimulated H2O2 release and insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation of insulin receptor. Inhibitors of respiratory chain-mediated H2O2 production, malonate and carbonyl cyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy)-phenylhydrazone (FCCP), inhibited both insulin-stimulated H2O2 release from neurons and insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation of insulin receptor. Dicholine salt of succinic acid, a respiratory substrate, significantly enhanced the effect of suboptimal insulin concentration on the insulin receptor autophosphorylation in CGN. Conclusion Results of the present study suggest that insulin-induced H2O2 is required for the enhancement of insulin receptor autophosphorylation in neurons. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is involved in insulin-stimulated H2O2 production, thus playing an integral role in the insulin receptor autophosphorylation in neurons. PMID:17919343

  18. Alternative oxidase: a respiratory electron transport chain pathway essential for maintaining photosynthetic performance during drought stress.

    PubMed

    Vanlerberghe, Greg C; Martyn, Greg D; Dahal, Keshav

    2016-07-01

    Photosynthesis and respiration are the hubs of energy metabolism in plants. Drought strongly perturbs photosynthesis as a result of both diffusive limitations resulting from stomatal closure, and in some cases biochemical limitations that are associated with a reduced abundance of key photosynthetic components. The effects of drought on respiration, particularly respiration in the light (RL ), are less understood. The plant mitochondrial electron transport chain includes a non-energy conserving terminal oxidase called alternative oxidase (AOX). Several studies have shown that drought increases AOX transcript, protein and maximum capacity. Here we review recent studies comparing wild-type (WT) tobacco to transgenic lines with altered AOX protein amount. Specifically during drought, RL was compromised in AOX knockdown plants and enhanced in AOX overexpression plants, compared with WT. Significantly, these differences in RL were accompanied by dramatic differences in photosynthetic performance. Knockdown of AOX increased the susceptibility of photosynthesis to drought-induced biochemical limitations, while overexpression of AOX delayed the development of such biochemical limitations, compared with WT. Overall, the results indicate that AOX is essential to maintaining RL during drought, and that this non-energy conserving respiration maintains photosynthesis during drought by promoting energy balance in the chloroplast. This review also outlines several areas for future research, including the possibility that enhancement of non-energy conserving respiratory electron sinks may be a useful biotechnological approach to increase plant performance during stress. PMID:27080742

  19. AtFtsH4 perturbs the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and auxin homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengchun; ZHang, Daowei; Yang, Chengwei

    2014-07-25

    Mitochondrial AtFtsH4 protease is one of four inner membrane-bound FtsH proteases in Arabidopsis. We found that the loss of AtFtsH4 regulates Arabidopsis development and architecture by mediating the peroxidase-dependent interplay between hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2) and auxin homeostasis. These morphological changes were correlated with elevated levels of both hydrogen peroxide and peroxidases, which suggested that ftsh4-4 plant was related to the oxidative stress, and that the architecture was caused by the auxin homeostasis perturbation. This view was supported by the expression levels of several auxin signaling genes and auxin binding and transport genes were decreased significantly in ftsh4-4 plants. Taken together, our data published in the May issue of Molecular Plant suggests a link between the lack of AtFtsH4 protease, oxidative stress,s and auxin homeostasis to regulate plant growth and development. However, the detail molecular mechanisms of AtFtSH4 regulating oxidation stress and auxin homeostasis is unclear. Here, we present evidence that the high level accumulated of H 2O 2 in ftsh4-4 may correlates with the decreased mitochondrial respiration genes. We also showed that the decreased auxin level and auxin transport may caused by the inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes. PMID:25061946

  20. Value of brain magnetic resonance imaging in mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders.

    PubMed

    Diogo, Luísa; Cordeiro, Miguel; Garcia, Paula; Fineza, Isabel; Moura, Cristina; Oliveira, Catarina Resende; Veiga, Margarida; Garcia, Teresa; Grazina, Manuela

    2010-03-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) disorders have variable clinical manifestations which are mainly neurologic. Diagnosis in children is more complex than in adults because the classic phenotype, ragged red fibers, and mtDNA mutations are rarely seen in children. Moreover, clinical manifestations of disease in developing brains are less explicit. Although not specific, neuroimaging may be contributory to the diagnosis of these disorders in pediatric patients. Brain magnetic resonance images were reviewed for 133 pediatric patients investigated for a MRC disorder at a single center over a period of 10 years (1997-2006), in an attempt to identify distinctive neuroimaging features of MRC defects. Patients fit into four groups, according to the Bernier criteria: definite (63 cases), probable (53 cases), possible (7 cases) and unlikely diagnosis (10 cases). Brain atrophy (41 cases), supratentorial white matter lesions (14 cases), basal ganglia involvement (9 cases), and delayed myelination (9 cases) were the most frequent anomalies in the definite group, and 8 patients presented Leigh syndrome. Neuroimaging findings of the 63 children in the definite group were compared with the remainder and with those in the possible and unlikely groups. There were no significant differences in brain images between the groups analyzed, and therefore no distinctive brain imaging features were identified specific for MRC disorders. PMID:20159429

  1. Pontine respiratory activity involved in inspiratory/expiratory phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Mörschel, Michael; Dutschmann, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    Control of the timing of the inspiratory/expiratory (IE) phase transition is a hallmark of respiratory pattern formation. In principle, sensory feedback from pulmonary stretch receptors (Breuer–Hering reflex, BHR) is seen as the major controller for the IE phase transition, while pontine-based control of IE phase transition by both the pontine Kölliker–Fuse nucleus (KF) and parabrachial complex is seen as a secondary or backup mechanism. However, previous studies have shown that the BHR can habituate in vivo. Thus, habituation reduces sensory feedback, so the role of the pons, and specifically the KF, for IE phase transition may increase dramatically. Pontine-mediated control of the IE phase transition is not completely understood. In the present review, we discuss existing models for ponto-medullary interaction that may be involved in the control of inspiratory duration and IE transition. We also present intracellular recordings of pontine respiratory units derived from an in situ intra-arterially perfused brainstem preparation of rats. With the absence of lung inflation, this preparation generates a normal respiratory pattern and many of the recorded pontine units demonstrated phasic respiratory-related activity. The analysis of changes in membrane potentials of pontine respiratory neurons has allowed us to propose a number of pontine-medullary interactions not considered before. The involvement of these putative interactions in pontine-mediated control of IE phase transitions is discussed. PMID:19651653

  2. TaClo as a neurotoxic lead: improved synthesis, stereochemical analysis, and inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Bringmann, G; God, R; Feineis, D; Janetzky, B; Reichmann, H

    1995-01-01

    "TaClo", a highly halogenated tetrahydro-beta-carboline derived from the biogenic amine tryptamine ("Ta") and the synthetic hypnotic chloral ("Clo"), has to be considered as a dopaminergic neurotoxin potentially occurring in vivo. For the preparation of TaClo on a large scale, an improved synthetic pathway was elaborated. The distinct neurotoxic activity of TaClo warrants its intensive study also under stereochemical aspects. For this reason, an analytic device for the separation and stereochemical attribution of its two enantiomers, (R)-TaClo and (S)-TaClo, was developed, based on chromatography on a chiral HPLC phase. Elucidation of the absolute configuration was achieved by CD spectroscopy and confirmed by X-ray crystallography. TaClo exhibits highly selective in vitro inhibition of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, the required concentrations being much lower than those needed for related halogen-free beta-carbolines or for MPP+ (1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium ion), the active metabolite of MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine). Furthermore, TaClo as a novel lead structure stimulated chemical and neuropharmacological investigations also on related highly halogenated beta-carbolines. Thus, some of the tested compounds--both potential TaClo metabolites and unnatural derivatives--showed even an enhanced inhibition of the mitochondrial respiration in vitro. PMID:8821061

  3. The diterpenoid ent-16-kauren-19-oic acid acts as an uncoupler of the bacterial respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Torres-Bustos, Janet; Farías, Leonardo; Urzúa, Alejandro; Mendoza, Leonora; Wilkens, Marcela

    2009-06-01

    ent-16-Kauren-19-oic acid is a bacteriolytic diterpenoid present in the resin of the medicinal plant Pseudognaphalium vira vira. The compound and its methyl ester showed strong activity against gram-positive bacteria, whereas the derivative 3beta-hydroxy-ent-kauren-19-oic acid was inactive against all assayed bacteria at the maximal concentration used (250 microg/mL). The bacteriolytic effect of ent-16-kauren-19-oic acid (5 microg/mL) was confirmed with cultures of Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus, whereas the methyl derivative (12 microg/mL) showed only a bacteriostatic effect. Both compounds stimulated oxygen consumption and proton conduction of whole cells, as reflected by an abrupt increase in the extracellular pH. These results indicate that ent-16-kauren-19-oic acid acts as a respiratory chain uncoupler, and that this function is strongly affected by minor structural substitutions, suggesting a tight activity-structure relationship. The ultimate effect of the uncoupling mechanism demonstrated by ent-16-kauren-19-oic acid is bacterial lysis. The disruption of the bacterial membrane integrity caused by the diterpenoid compound was determined using SYTOX Green stain and visualized by fluorescence microscopy. PMID:19296427

  4. Unique quadruple immunofluorescence assay demonstrates mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction in osteoblasts of aged and PolgA(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Philip F; Rocha, Mariana C; Grady, John P; Chrysostomou, Alexia; Hipps, Daniel; Watson, Sharon; Greaves, Laura C; Deehan, David J; Turnbull, Doug M

    2016-01-01

    Fragility fractures caused by osteoporosis affect millions of people worldwide every year with significant levels of associated morbidity, mortality and costs to the healthcare economy. The pathogenesis of declining bone mineral density is poorly understood but it is inherently related to increasing age. Growing evidence in recent years, especially that provided by mouse models, suggest that accumulating somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations may cause the phenotypic changes associated with the ageing process including osteoporosis. Methods to study mitochondrial abnormalities in individual osteoblasts, osteoclasts and osteocytes are limited and impair our ability to assess the changes seen with age and in animal models of ageing. To enable the assessment of mitochondrial protein levels, we have developed a quadruple immunofluorescence method to accurately quantify the presence of mitochondrial respiratory chain components within individual bone cells. We have applied this technique to a well-established mouse model of ageing and osteoporosis and show respiratory chain deficiency. PMID:27553587

  5. Unique quadruple immunofluorescence assay demonstrates mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction in osteoblasts of aged and PolgA−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Philip F.; Rocha, Mariana C.; Grady, John P.; Chrysostomou, Alexia; Hipps, Daniel; Watson, Sharon; Greaves, Laura C.; Deehan, David J.; Turnbull, Doug M.

    2016-01-01

    Fragility fractures caused by osteoporosis affect millions of people worldwide every year with significant levels of associated morbidity, mortality and costs to the healthcare economy. The pathogenesis of declining bone mineral density is poorly understood but it is inherently related to increasing age. Growing evidence in recent years, especially that provided by mouse models, suggest that accumulating somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations may cause the phenotypic changes associated with the ageing process including osteoporosis. Methods to study mitochondrial abnormalities in individual osteoblasts, osteoclasts and osteocytes are limited and impair our ability to assess the changes seen with age and in animal models of ageing. To enable the assessment of mitochondrial protein levels, we have developed a quadruple immunofluorescence method to accurately quantify the presence of mitochondrial respiratory chain components within individual bone cells. We have applied this technique to a well-established mouse model of ageing and osteoporosis and show respiratory chain deficiency. PMID:27553587

  6. Regulation of Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Biogenesis by Estrogens/Estrogen Receptors and Physiological, Pathological and Pharmacological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin-Qiang; Cammarata, Patrick R.; Baines, Christopher P.; Yager, James D.

    2009-01-01

    There has been increasing evidence pointing to the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) as a novel and important target for the actions of 17β-estradiol(E2) and estrogen receptors (ER) in a number of cell types and tissues that have high demands for mitochondrial energy metabolism. This novel E2-mediated mitochondrial pathway involves the cooperation of both nuclear and mitochondrial ERα and ERβ and their co-activators on the coordinate regulation of both nuclear DNA- and mitochondrial DNA-encoded genes for MRC proteins. In this paper, we have: 1) comprehensively reviewed studies that reveal a novel role of estrogens and ERs in the regulation of MRC biogenesis; 2) discussed their physiological, pathological and pharmacological implications in the control of cell proliferation and apoptosis in relation to estrogen-mediated carcinogenesis, anticancer drug resistance in human breast cancer cells, neuro-protection for Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease in brain, cardiovascular protection in human heart and their beneficial effects in lens physiology related to cataract in the eye; and 3) pointed out new research directions to address the key questions in this important and newly emerging area. We also suggest a novel conceptual approach that will contribute to innovative regimines for the prevention or treatment of a wide variety of medical complications based on E2/ER-mediated MRC biogenesis pathway. PMID:19559056

  7. Effect of structured physical activity on respiratory outcomes in sedentary elderly adults with mobility limitations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of structured physical activity on respiratory outcomes in community dwelling elderly adults with mobility limitations. DESIGN: Multicenter, randomized trial of physical activity vs health education, with respiratory variables prespecified as tertiary outcomes over...

  8. Autism associated to a deficiency of complexes III and IV of the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Campos, José; González-Guevara, Lucía; Briones, Paz; López-Gallardo, Ester; Bulán, Nuria; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Ramnarine, Denisse; Montoya, Julio

    2010-09-01

    Autism is the prototype of generalized developmental disorders or what today are called autism spectrum disorders. In most cases it is impossible to detect a specific etiology. It is estimated that a causative diagnosis may be shown in approximately 10-37% of the cases, including, congenital rubella, tuberous sclerosis, chromosome abnormalities such as fragile X syndrome and 22q13.3 deletion syndrome, Angelman, Williams, Smith-Magenis, Sotos, Cornelia de Lange, Möbius, Joubert and Goldenhar syndromes, Ito's hypomelanosis, as well as certain cerebral malformations and several inherited metabolic disorders. The case of a 3-year old girl is described, who was considered as autistic according to the criteria established by the DSM-IV manual for psychiatric disorders. She showed a delay in psychomotor development since she was 18 months old; she pronounces very few words (10), points to some objects, does not look up and it is hard to establish eye contact with her. She has paradoxical deafness and therefore, does not respond when called or when she is given orders, she is beginning to walk. She has not convulsions. Laboratory tests showed an anion gap of 31.6 mEq/L, lactate: 2.55: mmol/L, pyruvate: 0.06 mmol/L, and elevated lactate to/pyruvate ratio: 42.5. Under optical microscopy a muscular biopsy showed a reduction of the diameter of muscular fibers. The study of energy metabolism showed a partial deficiency of complexes III and IV of the respiratory chain, which allowed us to conclude that this was a mitochondrial dysfunction with an autistic clinical spectrum. PMID:21302592

  9. Micromachined polymerase chain reaction system for multiple DNA amplification of upper respiratory tract infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chia-Sheng; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Chang, Chih-Ching; Hsieh, Tsung-Min; Huang, Fu-Chun; Luo, Ching-Hsing

    2005-01-15

    This paper presents a micro polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip for the DNA-based diagnosis of microorganism genes and the detection of their corresponding antibiotic-resistant genes. The micro PCR chip comprises cheap biocompatible soda-lime glass substrates with integrated thin-film platinum resistors as heating/sensing elements, and is fabricated using micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) techniques in a reliable batch-fabrication process. The heating and temperature sensing elements are made of the same material and are located inside the reaction chamber in order to ensure a uniform temperature distribution. This study performs the detection of several genes associated with upper respiratory tract infection microorganisms, i.e. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemopilus influenze, Staphylococcu aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Neisseria meningitides, together with their corresponding antibiotic-resistant genes. The lower thermal inertia of the proposed micro PCR chip relative to conventional bench-top PCR systems enables a more rapid detection operation with reduced sample and reagent consumption. The experimental data reveal that the high heating and cooling rates of the system (20 and 10 degrees C/s, respectively) permit successful DNA amplification within 15 min. The micro PCR chip is also capable of performing multiple DNA amplification, i.e. the simultaneous duplication of multiple genes under different conditions in separate reaction wells. Compared with the large-scale PCR system, it is greatly advantageous for fast diagnosis of multiple infectious diseases. Multiplex PCR amplification of two DNA segments in the same well is also feasible using the proposed micro device. The developed micro PCR chip provides a crucial tool for genetic analysis, molecular biology, infectious disease detection, and many other biomedical applications. PMID:15590288

  10. Use of polymerase chain reaction for diagnosis of picornavirus infection in subjects with and without respiratory symptoms.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, S L; Sanderson, G; Pattemore, P K; Smith, S; Bardin, P G; Bruce, C B; Lambden, P R; Tyrrell, D A; Holgate, S T

    1993-01-01

    Rhinoviruses and enteroviruses are the major members of the picornavirus genus that cause human disease. We compared the polymerase chain reaction and viral culture for the identification of picornaviruses in nasal aspirates from children during episodes of respiratory symptoms and when asymptomatic and from asymptomatic adults. One hundred eight children, aged 9 to 11 years, completed a year-long study. Within 24 to 48 h of a report of respiratory symptoms, a nasal aspirate was taken in the home. Nasal aspirates were also taken from 65 of the children and from 33 normal adults when they had been free of respiratory symptoms for at least 2 weeks. Picornaviruses were isolated by culture for three passages in Ohio HeLa cells in rolling tubes at 33 degrees C and pH 7.0. For the polymerase chain reaction, duplicate 50-microliters samples were amplified with conserved primers from the 5' noncoding region. Picornaviruses generated approximately 380-bp bands in agarose gel electrophoresis; the specificity of these bands was confirmed by filter hybridization with a conserved internal probe. Picornaviruses were isolated by culture in 47 (46 rhinoviruses) of 292 symptomatic episodes (16%), whereas the polymerase chain reaction identified picornavirus genomic material in 146 episodes (50%), including all but one of the culture-positive episodes. As for asymptomatic samples, eight (12%) children and two (4%) adults were positive by the polymerase chain reaction, whereas only one child's specimen was positive by culture. This polymerase chain reaction assay represents a clear advance in the identification of picornavirus infection, with a detection rate threefold greater than the virus culture method. Images PMID:8380179

  11. YME1L controls the accumulation of respiratory chain subunits and is required for apoptotic resistance, cristae morphogenesis, and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Stiburek, Lukas; Cesnekova, Jana; Kostkova, Olga; Fornuskova, Daniela; Vinsova, Kamila; Wenchich, Laszlo; Houstek, Josef; Zeman, Jiri

    2012-03-01

    Mitochondrial ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA) proteases are involved in the quality control and processing of inner-membrane proteins. Here we investigate the cellular activities of YME1L, the human orthologue of the Yme1 subunit of the yeast i-AAA complex, using stable short hairpin RNA knockdown and expression experiments. Human YME1L is shown to be an integral membrane protein that exposes its carboxy-terminus to the intermembrane space and exists in several complexes of 600-1100 kDa. The stable knockdown of YME1L in human embryonic kidney 293 cells led to impaired cell proliferation and apoptotic resistance, altered cristae morphology, diminished rotenone-sensitive respiration, and increased susceptibility to mitochondrial membrane protein carbonylation. Depletion of YME1L led to excessive accumulation of nonassembled respiratory chain subunits (Ndufb6, ND1, and Cox4) in the inner membrane. This was due to a lack of YME1L proteolytic activity, since the excessive accumulation of subunits was reversed by overexpression of wild-type YME1L but not a proteolytically inactive YME1L variant. Similarly, the expression of wild-type YME1L restored the lamellar cristae morphology of YME1L-deficient mitochondria. Our results demonstrate the importance of mitochondrial inner-membrane proteostasis to both mitochondrial and cellular function and integrity and reveal a novel role for YME1L in the proteolytic regulation of respiratory chain biogenesis. PMID:22262461

  12. YME1L controls the accumulation of respiratory chain subunits and is required for apoptotic resistance, cristae morphogenesis, and cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Stiburek, Lukas; Cesnekova, Jana; Kostkova, Olga; Fornuskova, Daniela; Vinsova, Kamila; Wenchich, Laszlo; Houstek, Josef; Zeman, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA) proteases are involved in the quality control and processing of inner-membrane proteins. Here we investigate the cellular activities of YME1L, the human orthologue of the Yme1 subunit of the yeast i‑AAA complex, using stable short hairpin RNA knockdown and expression experiments. Human YME1L is shown to be an integral membrane protein that exposes its carboxy-terminus to the intermembrane space and exists in several complexes of 600–1100 kDa. The stable knockdown of YME1L in human embryonic kidney 293 cells led to impaired cell proliferation and apoptotic resistance, altered cristae morphology, diminished rotenone-sensitive respiration, and increased susceptibility to mitochondrial membrane protein carbonylation. Depletion of YME1L led to excessive accumulation of nonassembled respiratory chain subunits (Ndufb6, ND1, and Cox4) in the inner membrane. This was due to a lack of YME1L proteolytic activity, since the excessive accumulation of subunits was reversed by overexpression of wild-type YME1L but not a proteolytically inactive YME1L variant. Similarly, the expression of wild-type YME1L restored the lamellar cristae morphology of YME1L-deficient mitochondria. Our results demonstrate the importance of mitochondrial inner-membrane proteostasis to both mitochondrial and cellular function and integrity and reveal a novel role for YME1L in the proteolytic regulation of respiratory chain biogenesis. PMID:22262461

  13. The mitochondrial respiratory chain of the secondary green alga Euglena gracilis shares many additional subunits with parasitic Trypanosomatidae.

    PubMed

    Perez, Emilie; Lapaille, Marie; Degand, Hervé; Cilibrasi, Laura; Villavicencio-Queijeiro, Alexa; Morsomme, Pierre; González-Halphen, Diego; Field, Mark C; Remacle, Claire; Baurain, Denis; Cardol, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    The mitochondrion is an essential organelle for the production of cellular ATP in most eukaryotic cells. It is extensively studied, including in parasitic organisms such as trypanosomes, as a potential therapeutic target. Recently, numerous additional subunits of the respiratory-chain complexes have been described in Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi. Since these subunits had apparently no counterparts in other organisms, they were interpreted as potentially associated with the parasitic trypanosome lifestyle. Here we used two complementary approaches to characterise the subunit composition of respiratory complexes in Euglena gracilis, a non-parasitic secondary green alga related to trypanosomes. First, we developed a phylogenetic pipeline aimed at mining sequence databases for identifying homologues to known respiratory-complex subunits with high confidence. Second, we used MS/MS proteomics after two-dimensional separation of the respiratory complexes by Blue Native- and SDS-PAGE both to confirm in silico predictions and to identify further additional subunits. Altogether, we identified 41 subunits that are restricted to E. gracilis, T. brucei and T. cruzi, along with 48 classical subunits described in other eukaryotes (i.e. plants, mammals and fungi). This moreover demonstrates that at least half of the subunits recently reported in T. brucei and T. cruzi are actually not specific to Trypanosomatidae, but extend at least to other Euglenozoa, and that their origin and function are thus not specifically associated with the parasitic lifestyle. Furthermore, preliminary biochemical analyses suggest that some of these additional subunits underlie the peculiarities of the respiratory chain observed in Euglenozoa. PMID:24561571

  14. Study of oxidative, enzymatic mitochondrial respiratory chain function and apoptosis in perinatally HIV-infected pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Morén, Constanza; Garrabou, Glòria; Noguera-Julian, Antoni; Rovira, Núria; Catalán, Marc; Hernández, Sandra; Tobías, Ester; Cardellach, Francesc; Fortuny, Clàudia; Miró, Òscar

    2013-10-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity in perinatally human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected pediatric patients has been scarcely investigated. Limited data are available about HIV or antiretroviral (ARV)-mediated mitochondrial damage in this population group, specifically, regarding oxygen consumption and apoptosis approach. We aimed to elucidate whether a given mitochondrial DNA depletion is reflected at downstream levels, to gain insight on the pathology of HIV and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in perinatally HIV-infected pediatric patients. We studied 10 healthy control participants and 20 perinatally HIV-infected pediatric patients (10 under ARV treatment and 10 off treatment). We determined mitochondrial mass, subunits II and IV of complex IV, global and specific mitochondrial enzymatic and oxidative activities, and apoptosis from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Global oxygen consumption was significantly compromised in HIV-infected untreated patients, compared to the control group (0.76 ± 0.01 versus 1.59 ± 0.15; P = 0.014). Apoptosis showed a trend to increase in untreated patients as well. The overall complex (C) CI-III-IV activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) was significantly decreased in HIV-infected treated patients with respect to the control group (1.52 ± 0.38 versus 6.38 ± 1.53; P = 0.02). No statistically significant differences were found between untreated and HAART-treated patients. These findings suggest the pathogenic role of both HIV and HAART in mitochondrial dysfunction in vertical infection. The abnormalities in mitochondrial genome may be downstream reflected through a global alteration of the MRC. Mitochondrial impairment associated with HIV and HAART was generalized, rather than localized, in this series of perinatally HIV-infected patients. PMID:23534415

  15. [The functional state of the mitochondrial respiratory chain of the small intestine enterocytes of the rats under the low dose rate X-ray total external exposure].

    PubMed

    Khizhniak, S V; Stepanova, L I; Grubskaia, L V; Voĭtsitskiĭ, V M

    2013-01-01

    The influence of the low-rate ionizing radiation (0.055 Gy/min) at the doses of 0.1; 0.5 and 1.0 Gy on the functional state of the mitochondria respiratory chain of the rat small intestine enterocytes was investigated. The dysfunction of the electron transport chain enzymes and changes in the content of cytochromes b, c, a in the mitochondrial inner membrane were revealed 1, 12 and 24 hours after exposure to radiation. The revealed disorders indicate early membrane sensitivity to the radiation effect. The inhibition of the H+ -ATPase activity in the studied dose range indicates the decrease of the mitochondrial energy capacity. PMID:25486741

  16. Control of respiration in non-phosphorylating mitochondria is shared between the proton leak and the respiratory chain.

    PubMed Central

    Brand, M D; Hafner, R P; Brown, G C

    1988-01-01

    We measured the relationship between rate of respiration and membrane potential in isolated mitochondria titrated with malonate (to inhibit the electron transport chain) or with uncoupler (to increase the proton conductance of the inner membrane). We used the flux control summation and connectivity theorems of metabolic control theory to calculate the control over non-phosphorylating respiration exerted by the respiratory chain (and associated reactions) and by the leak of protons across the inner membrane. At 37 degrees C the flux control coefficient of the leak over respiration was 0.66; the flux control coefficient of the chain over respiration was 0.34. At 25 degrees C the values were 0.75 and 0.25 respectively. We argue that the basis for previous conclusions that all the control is exerted by the proton leak under similar conditions is invalid. PMID:2849419

  17. Subunits Rip1p and Cox9p of the respiratory chain contribute to diclofenac-induced mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Jolanda S; Orij, Rick; Luttik, Marijke A H; Smits, Gertien J; Vermeulen, Nico P E; Vos, J Chris

    2011-03-01

    The widely used drug diclofenac can cause serious heart, liver and kidney injury, which may be related to its ability to cause mitochondrial dysfunction. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, we studied the mechanisms of diclofenac toxicity and the role of mitochondria therein. We found that diclofenac reduced cell growth and viability and increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Strains increasingly relying on respiration for their energy production showed enhanced sensitivity to diclofenac. Furthermore, oxygen consumption was inhibited by diclofenac, suggesting that the drug inhibits respiration. To identify the site of respiratory inhibition, we investigated the effects of deletion of respiratory chain subunits on diclofenac toxicity. Whereas deletion of most subunits had no effect, loss of either Rip1p of complex III or Cox9p of complex IV resulted in enhanced resistance to diclofenac. In these deletion strains, diclofenac did not increase ROS formation as severely as in the wild-type. Our data are consistent with a mechanism of toxicity in which diclofenac inhibits respiration by interfering with Rip1p and Cox9p in the respiratory chain, resulting in ROS production that causes cell death. PMID:21148204

  18. Immunolocalization of an Alternative Respiratory Chain in Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae Spores: Mitosomes Retain Their Role in Microsporidial Energy Metabolism ▿

    PubMed Central

    Dolgikh, Viacheslav V.; Senderskiy, Igor V.; Pavlova, Olga A.; Naumov, Anton M.; Beznoussenko, Galina V.

    2011-01-01

    Microsporidia are a group of fungus-related intracellular parasites with severely reduced metabolic machinery. They lack canonical mitochondria, a Krebs cycle, and a respiratory chain but possess genes encoding glycolysis enzymes, a glycerol phosphate shuttle, and ATP/ADP carriers to import host ATP. The recent finding of alternative oxidase genes in two clades suggests that microsporidial mitosomes may retain an alternative respiratory pathway. We expressed the fragments of mitochondrial chaperone Hsp70 (mitHsp70), mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (mitG3PDH), and alternative oxidase (AOX) from the microsporidium Antonospora (Paranosema) locustae in Escherichia coli. Immunoblotting with antibodies against recombinant polypeptides demonstrated specific accumulation of both metabolic enzymes in A. locustae spores. At the same time comparable amounts of mitochondrial Hsp70 were found in spores and in stages of intracellular development as well. Immunoelectron microscopy of ultrathin cryosections of spores confirmed mitosomal localization of the studied proteins. Small amounts of enzymes of an alternative respiratory chain in merogonial and early sporogonial stages, alongside their accumulation in mature spores, suggest conspicuous changes in components and functions of mitosomes during the life cycle of microsporidia and the important role of these organelles in parasite energy metabolism, at least at the final stages of sporogenesis. PMID:21296913

  19. Inactivity-induced respiratory plasticity: protecting the drive to breathe in disorders that reduce respiratory neural activity.

    PubMed

    Strey, K A; Baertsch, N A; Baker-Herman, T L

    2013-11-01

    Multiple forms of plasticity are activated following reduced respiratory neural activity. For example, in ventilated rats, a central neural apnea elicits a rebound increase in phrenic and hypoglossal burst amplitude upon resumption of respiratory neural activity, forms of plasticity called inactivity-induced phrenic and hypoglossal motor facilitation (iPMF and iHMF), respectively. Here, we provide a conceptual framework for plasticity following reduced respiratory neural activity to guide future investigations. We review mechanisms giving rise to iPMF and iHMF, present new data suggesting that inactivity-induced plasticity is observed in inspiratory intercostals (iIMF) and point out gaps in our knowledge. We then survey conditions relevant to human health characterized by reduced respiratory neural activity and discuss evidence that inactivity-induced plasticity is elicited during these conditions. Understanding the physiological impact and circumstances in which inactivity-induced respiratory plasticity is elicited may yield novel insights into the treatment of disorders characterized by reductions in respiratory neural activity. PMID:23816599

  20. Interactions between cardiac, respiratory, and brain activity in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musizza, Bojan; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2005-05-01

    The electrical activity of the heart (ECG), respiratory function and electric activity of the brain (EEG) were simultaneously recorded in conscious, healthy humans. Instantaneous frequencies of the heart beat, respiration and α-waves were then determined from 30-minutes recordings. The instantaneous cardiac frequency was defined as the inverse value of the time interval between two consecutive R-peaks. The instantaneous respiratory frequency was obtained from recordings of the excursions of thorax by application of the Hilbert transform. To obtain the instantaneous frequency of α-waves, the EEG signal recorded from the forehead was first analysed using the wavelet transform. Then the frequency band corresponding to α-waves was extracted and the Hilbert transform applied. Synchronization analysis was performed and the direction of coupling was ascertained, using pairs of instantaneous frequencies in each case. It is shown that the systems are weakly bidirectionally coupled. It was confirmed that, in conscious healthy humans, respiration drives cardiac activity. We also demonstrate from these analyses that α-activity drives both respiration and cardiac activity.

  1. Phosphoproteins and the activation of the neutrophil respiratory burst oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, N.; Curnutte, J.T.; Babior, B.M.

    1987-05-01

    The respiratory burst oxidase is a neutrophil enzyme that converts oxygen to O/sub 2//sup -/. It is dormant in resting cells but is activated when the cells are exposed to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). PMA also induces the incorporation of /sup 32/P into certain neutrophil proteins. To determine whether phosphorylation of these proteins is related to oxidase activation, protein phosphorylation was studied in patients with chronic granulomatous disease (GCD), a group of inherited conditions in which oxidase activity is missing. In normals, neutrophil activation by PMA is associated with the phosphorylation inter alia of 48K proteins at pI 7.3 and 7.8. There is also inconstant phosphorylation of a 48K protein at pI 6.8. In 4 patients with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), phosphorylation of pp48/6.8 and pp48/7.3 was absent, while in autosomal recessive CGD, phosphorylation of all 3 of these proteins was absent in 3 patients and significantly diminished in a fourth. These results suggest that the phosphorylation of these proteins is related to the activation of the respiratory burst oxidase. By peptide mapping, these 3 proteins appear to consist of a single peptide species whose pI variability may be due to post-translational modification. The only phosphoamino acid found in pp48/7.3 was phosphoserine.

  2. Use of polyurethane foam deformation sensor to record respiratory activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredov, V. I.; Baranov, V. S.

    1980-05-01

    The sensor developed has some substantial advantages over other known types. It is highly sensitive over a wide range of strain loads. The level of the output signal is linearly related to the force exerted on it, and it is sufficient for direct recording without using amplifiers of electric signals. The sensor is based on elastic, spongy material, polyurethane foam (porolon) with current-conducting material on the pore surface, current-conducting carbon black or electrode paste. The elastic properties of the sensor are built in the actual base of the strain-sensitive element, which simplifies the construction substantially and increases the reliability of the unit. In order to test the possibility of using this sensor to examine respiratory function, human pneumograms were recorded with the subject in a calm state along with the respiratory activity of experimental animals (dogs). Samples of the respiratory curve are shown. The simplicity of design of the sensor makes it possible to use it in various physiological experiments.

  3. Rapid toxicity testing based on mitochondrial respiratory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Haubenstricker, M.E. ); Holodnick, S.E.; Mancy, K.H. ); Brabec, M.J. )

    1990-05-01

    The need exists for rapid and inexpensive methods to determine the health effects of environmental contaminants on biological systems. One of the current research approaches for assessing cytotoxicity is to monitor the respiratory activity of the mitochondrion, a sensitive, nonspecific subcellular target site. Detected changes in mitochondrial function after the addition of a test chemical could be correlated to toxic effects. Mitochondrial respiration can be characterized by three indices: state 3 and state 4 respiratory rates, and the respiratory control ratio (RCR). State 4, the idle or resting state, results when coupled mitochondrial respire in a medium containing inorganic phosphate and a Kreb's cycle substrate in the absence of a phosphate acceptor such as adenosine diphosphate (ADP). In the presence of ADP the respiration rate increases to a maximum (state 3), accompanied by phosphorylation of ADP to adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The ratio of state 3 to state 4, or RCR, indicates how tightly the oxidative phosphorylation process is coupled. The synthesis of ATP by mitochondria is influenced by a number of compounds, most of which are either uncouplers or inhibitors.

  4. Cardiorespiratory Coupling: Common Rhythms in Cardiac, Sympathetic, and Respiratory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Thomas E.; Hsieh, Yee-Hsee; Dhingra, Rishi R.; Baekey, David M.; Galán, Roberto F.; Wehrwein, Erica; Morris, Kendall F.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiorespiratory coupling is an encompassing term describing more than the well-recognized influences of respiration on heart rate and blood pressure. Our data indicate that cardiorespiratory coupling reflects a reciprocal interaction between autonomic and respiratory control systems, and the cardiovascular system modulates the ventilatory pattern as well. For example, cardioventilatory coupling refers to the influence of heart beats and arterial pulse pressure on respiration and is the tendency for the next inspiration to start at a preferred latency after the last heart beat in expiration. Multiple complementary, well-described mechanisms mediate respiration’s influence on cardiovascular function, whereas mechanisms mediating the cardiovascular system’s influence on respiration may only be through the baroreceptors but are just being identified. Our review will describe a differential effect of conditioning rats with either chronic intermittent or sustained hypoxia on sympathetic nerve activity but also on ventilatory pattern variability. Both intermittent and sustained hypoxia increase sympathetic nerve activity after 2 weeks but affect sympatho-respiratory coupling differentially. Intermittent hypoxia enhances sympatho-respiratory coupling, which is associated with low variability in the ventilatory pattern. In contrast, after constant hypobaric hypoxia, 1-to-1 coupling between bursts of sympathetic and phrenic nerve activity is replaced by 2-to-3 coupling. This change in coupling pattern is associated with increased variability of the ventilatory pattern. After baro-denervating hypobaric hypoxic-conditioned rats, splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity becomes tonic (distinct bursts are absent) with decreases during phrenic nerve bursts and ventilatory pattern becomes regular. Thus, conditioning rats to either intermittent or sustained hypoxia accentuates the reciprocal nature of cardiorespiratory coupling. Finally, identifying a compelling physiologic

  5. Inhibition by nilutamide of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and ATP formation. Possible contribution to the adverse effects of this antiandrogen.

    PubMed

    Berson, A; Schmets, L; Fisch, C; Fau, D; Wolf, C; Fromenty, B; Deschamps, D; Pessayre, D

    1994-07-01

    The effects of nilutamide on the mitochondrial respiratory chain were investigated in rats. In isolated mitochondria, nilutamide (100 microM) inhibited respiration that was supported by substrates feeding electrons into complex I of the respiratory chain but did not inhibit respiration that was supported by substrates donating electrons to complexes II, III or IV. Inhibition of complex I occurred without any lag time. In submitochondrial particles, nilutamide (100 microM) decreased both oxygen consumption mediated by NADH and the oxidation of NADH; addition of superoxide dismutase and catalase did not alleviate inhibition. There was no electron spin resonance evidence for detectable mitochondrial formation of the nilutamide nitro anion free radical by submitochondrial particles or for the formation of iron-nitrosyl complexes with mitochondrial Fe-S clusters in isolated hepatocytes. Severe inhibition of complex I by nilutamide (500 microM) led to upstream inhibition of fatty acid beta-oxidation. Nilutamide (100 microM) decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP formation in mitochondria energized by malate plus glutamate. In hepatocytes incubated without glucose, nilutamide (500 microM) led to an early (2 hr) drop in cellular ATP and early (4 hr) toxicity. With 5 mM glucose, however, ATP was not decreased and toxicity was mild at these early times. It was concluded that nilutamide itself inhibited the mitochondrial respiratory chain at the level of complex I and decreased ATP in hepatocytes incubated without glucose, which resulted in early toxicity. In the presence of glucose, ATP was not depleted at early times and delayed toxicity was probably the result of an oxidative stress (as previously reported). PMID:8035313

  6. Reduced cardiolipin content decreases respiratory chain capacities and increases ATP synthesis yield in the human HepaRG cells.

    PubMed

    Peyta, Laure; Jarnouen, Kathleen; Pinault, Michelle; Guimaraes, Cyrille; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Chevalier, Stephan; Dumas, Jean-François; Maillot, François; Hatch, Grant M; Loyer, Pascal; Servais, Stephane

    2016-04-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is a unique mitochondrial phospholipid potentially affecting many aspects of mitochondrial function/processes, i.e. energy production through oxidative phosphorylation. Most data focusing on implication of CL content and mitochondrial bioenergetics were performed in yeast or in cellular models of Barth syndrome. Previous work reported that increase in CL content leads to decrease in liver mitochondrial ATP synthesis yield. Therefore the aim of this study was to determine the effects of moderate decrease in CL content on mitochondrial bioenergetics in human hepatocytes. For this purpose, we generated a cardiolipin synthase knockdown (shCLS) in HepaRG hepatoma cells showing bioenergetics features similar to primary human hepatocytes. shCLS cells exhibited a 55% reduction in CLS gene and a 40% decrease in protein expression resulting in a 45% lower content in CL compared to control (shCTL) cells. Oxygen consumption was significantly reduced in shCLS cells compared to shCTL regardless of substrate used and energy state analyzed. Mitochondrial low molecular weight supercomplex content was higher in shCLS cells (+60%) compared to shCTL. Significant fragmentation of the mitochondrial network was observed in shCLS cells compared to shCTL cells. Surprisingly, mitochondrial ATP synthesis was unchanged in shCLS compared to shCTL cells but exhibited a higher ATP:O ratio (+46%) in shCLS cells. Our results suggest that lowered respiratory chain activity induced by moderate reduction in CL content may be due to both destabilization of supercomplexes and mitochondrial network fragmentation. In addition, CL content may regulate mitochondrial ATP synthesis yield. PMID:26768115

  7. Respiratory-related hypoglossal nerve activity: influence of anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Hwang, J C; St John, W M; Bartlett, D

    1983-09-01

    In decerebrate, vagotomized, paralyzed, and ventilated cats, phrenic and respiratory-related hypoglossal discharges were evident at normocapnic normoxia or hyperoxia. Both increased progressively in hypercapnia or hypoxia. With increasing drive, onset of inspiratory hypoglossal activity began earlier relative to phrenic onset; an early expiratory hypoglossal burst was also observed. Following subanesthetic doses of chloralose, halothane, ketamine, or pentobarbital, hypoglossal activity was depressed much more than phrenic discharge. In moderate hypercapnia or hypoxia, phrenic activity increased more than hypoglossal, whereas, at high drive, the latter rose more sharply in some cats. Electromyograms of the diaphragm and genioglossus were recorded in intact awake cats to determine if their responses and those of decerebrates are comparable. Respiratory-related genioglossal discharge was evident in normocapnia. We conclude that anesthesia suppresses hypoglossal motor activities much more than those of the bulbospinal-phrenic system. Data for decerebrate cats and unanesthetized cats or humans provide no evidence of a differential distribution of chemoreceptor afferents on hypoglossal and bulbospinal-phrenic neurons, as suggested by results in anesthetized animals. PMID:6629915

  8. Activated mouse eosinophils protect against lethal respiratory virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Percopo, Caroline M.; Dyer, Kimberly D.; Ochkur, Sergei I.; Luo, Janice L.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Lee, James J.; Lee, Nancy A.; Domachowske, Joseph B.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are recruited to the airways as a prominent feature of the asthmatic inflammatory response where they are broadly perceived as promoting pathophysiology. Respiratory virus infections exacerbate established asthma; however, the role of eosinophils and the nature of their interactions with respiratory viruses remain uncertain. To explore these questions, we established acute infection with the rodent pneumovirus, pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), in 3 distinct mouse models of Th2 cytokine–driven asthmatic inflammation. We found that eosinophils recruited to the airways of otherwise naïve mice in response to Aspergillus fumigatus, but not ovalbumin sensitization and challenge, are activated by and degranulate specifically in response to PVM infection. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activated eosinophils from both Aspergillus antigen and cytokine-driven asthma models are profoundly antiviral and promote survival in response to an otherwise lethal PVM infection. Thus, although activated eosinophils within a Th2-polarized inflammatory response may have pathophysiologic features, they are also efficient and effective mediators of antiviral host defense. PMID:24297871

  9. Anomalous effect of uncouplers on respiratory chain-linked transhydrogenation in Escherichia coli membranes: evidence for a localized proton pathway?

    PubMed

    Chang, D Y; Hou, C; Bragg, P D

    1992-03-01

    Energization of the pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase in everted membrane vesicles from Escherichia coli JM83 was compared with the process in vesicles of the same strain transformed with the plasmid pDC21 overexpressing this enzyme. Proton translocation was assayed by the quenching of the fluorescence of the probe quinacrine. Agents able to discharge transmembrane proton gradients such as nigericin and the uncouplers 3,3',4',5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone inhibited ATP-dependent transhydrogenation of NADP by NADH and discharged transmembrane proton gradients generated by transhydrogenation of AcNAD by NADPH, by oxidation of NADH, and by hydrolysis of ATP. This was observed in everted membrane vesicles of both strains JM83 and JM83pDC21. These strains differed significantly in the response of the NADH oxidation-dependent transhydrogenase. This reaction was inhibited by nigericin and uncouplers in membrane vesicles of JM83 but there was little inhibition or the reaction was stimulated in JM83pDC21, in spite of the discharge of the NADH oxidation-generated proton gradient measured by quinacrine fluorescence in the latter strain. It is proposed that the transhydrogenase is energized by direct or local (nonbulk phase) proton translocation in membranes of this strain. Uncouplers might facilitate these routes but would not discharge them. The generality of these observations was shown using other strains. NADH oxidase activity was severalfold lower in membrane vesicles of JM83pDC21 compared with JM83. The levels of ubiquinone and cytochromes, and the activities of NADH dehydrogenases I and II, and of cytochrome oxidase, were similar in the two strains. It is concluded that the NADH oxidase activity of JM83pDC21 is low because of the reduced rate of collision between electron-transferring complexes of the respiratory chain due to the large amount of transhydrogenase protein in the membranes of this strain. The large amount of

  10. Mitochondrial Respiratory Pathways Inhibition in Rhizopus oryzae Potentiates Activity of Posaconazole and Itraconazole via Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Fazal; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of mucormycosis has increased drastically in immunocompromised patients. Also the array of targets whose inhibition results in Mucorales death is limited. Recently, researchers identified mitochondria as important regulators of detoxification and virulence mechanisms in fungi. In this context, targeting the mitochondrial respiratory chain may provide a new platform for antifungal development. We hypothesized that targeting respiratory pathways potentiates triazoles activity via apoptosis. We found that simultaneous administration of antimycin A (AA) and benzohydroxamate (BHAM), inhibitors of classical and alternative mitochondrial pathways respectively, resulted in potent activity of posaconazole (PCZ) and itraconazole (ICZ) against Rhizopus oryzae. We observed cellular changes characteristic of apoptosis in R. oryzae cells treated with PCZ or ICZ in combination with AA and BHAM. The fungicidal activity of this combination against R. oryzae was correlated with intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation (ROS), phosphatidylserine externalization, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and increased caspase like activity. DNA fragmentation and condensation assays also revealed apoptosis of R. oryzae cells. These apoptotic features were prevented by the addition of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine. Taken together, these findings suggest that the use of PCZ or ICZ in combination with AA and BHAM makes R. oryzae exquisitely sensitive to treatment with triazoles via apoptosis. This strategy may serve as a new model for the development of improved or novel antifungal agents. PMID:23696824

  11. Comprehensive measurement of respiratory activity in permeabilized cells using extracellular flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Salabei, Joshua K; Gibb, Andrew A; Hill, Bradford G

    2014-02-01

    Extracellular flux (XF) analysis has become a mainstream method for measuring mitochondrial function in cells and tissues. Although this technique is commonly used to measure bioenergetics in intact cells, we outline here a detailed XF protocol for measuring respiration in permeabilized cells. Cells are permeabilized using saponin (SAP), digitonin (DIG) or recombinant perfringolysin O (rPFO) (XF-plasma membrane permeabilizer (PMP) reagent), and they are provided with specific substrates to measure complex I- or complex II-mediated respiratory activity, complex III+IV respiratory activity or complex IV activity. Medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines or glutamine may also be provided for measuring fatty acid (FA) oxidation or glutamine oxidation, respectively. This protocol uses a minimal number of cells compared with other protocols and does not require isolation of mitochondria. The results are highly reproducible, and mitochondria remain well coupled. Collectively, this protocol provides comprehensive and detailed information regarding mitochondrial activity and efficiency, and, after preparative steps, it takes 6-8 h to complete. PMID:24457333

  12. Mitochondrial respiratory pathways inhibition in Rhizopus oryzae potentiates activity of posaconazole and itraconazole via apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Fazal; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of mucormycosis has increased drastically in immunocompromised patients. Also the array of targets whose inhibition results in Mucorales death is limited. Recently, researchers identified mitochondria as important regulators of detoxification and virulence mechanisms in fungi. In this context, targeting the mitochondrial respiratory chain may provide a new platform for antifungal development. We hypothesized that targeting respiratory pathways potentiates triazoles activity via apoptosis. We found that simultaneous administration of antimycin A (AA) and benzohydroxamate (BHAM), inhibitors of classical and alternative mitochondrial pathways respectively, resulted in potent activity of posaconazole (PCZ) and itraconazole (ICZ) against Rhizopus oryzae. We observed cellular changes characteristic of apoptosis in R. oryzae cells treated with PCZ or ICZ in combination with AA and BHAM. The fungicidal activity of this combination against R. oryzae was correlated with intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation (ROS), phosphatidylserine externalization, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and increased caspase like activity. DNA fragmentation and condensation assays also revealed apoptosis of R. oryzae cells. These apoptotic features were prevented by the addition of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine. Taken together, these findings suggest that the use of PCZ or ICZ in combination with AA and BHAM makes R. oryzae exquisitely sensitive to treatment with triazoles via apoptosis. This strategy may serve as a new model for the development of improved or novel antifungal agents. PMID:23696824

  13. Measuring interference of drug-like molecules with the respiratory chain: toward the early identification of mitochondrial uncouplers in lead finding.

    PubMed

    Stock, Ursula; Matter, Hans; Diekert, Kerstin; Dörner, Wolfgang; Dröse, Stefan; Licher, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    The electron transport chain (ETC) couples electron transfer between donors and acceptors with proton transport across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The resulting electrochemical proton gradient is used to generate chemical energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Proton transfer is based on the activity of complex I-V proteins in the ETC. The overall electrical activity of these proteins can be measured by proton transfer using Solid Supported Membrane technology. We tested the activity of complexes I, III, and V in a combined assay, called oxidative phosphorylation assay (oxphos assay), by activating each complex with the corresponding substrate. The oxphos assay was used to test in-house substances from different projects and several drugs currently available on the market that have reported effects on mitochondrial functions. The resulting data were compared to the influence of the respective compounds on mitochondria as determined by oxygen consumption and to data generated with an ATP depletion assay. The comparison shows that the oxidative phosphorylation assay provides both a rapid approach for detecting interaction of compounds with respiratory chain proteins and information on their mode of interaction. Therefore, the oxphos assay is a useful tool to support structure activity relationship studies by allowing early identification of mitotoxicity and for analyzing the outcome of phenotypic screens that are susceptible to the generation of mitotoxicity-related artifacts. PMID:23992120

  14. Measuring Interference of Drug-Like Molecules with the Respiratory Chain: Toward the Early Identification of Mitochondrial Uncouplers in Lead Finding

    PubMed Central

    Matter, Hans; Diekert, Kerstin; Dörner, Wolfgang; Dröse, Stefan; Licher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The electron transport chain (ETC) couples electron transfer between donors and acceptors with proton transport across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The resulting electrochemical proton gradient is used to generate chemical energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Proton transfer is based on the activity of complex I–V proteins in the ETC. The overall electrical activity of these proteins can be measured by proton transfer using Solid Supported Membrane technology. We tested the activity of complexes I, III, and V in a combined assay, called oxidative phosphorylation assay (oxphos assay), by activating each complex with the corresponding substrate. The oxphos assay was used to test in-house substances from different projects and several drugs currently available on the market that have reported effects on mitochondrial functions. The resulting data were compared to the influence of the respective compounds on mitochondria as determined by oxygen consumption and to data generated with an ATP depletion assay. The comparison shows that the oxidative phosphorylation assay provides both a rapid approach for detecting interaction of compounds with respiratory chain proteins and information on their mode of interaction. Therefore, the oxphos assay is a useful tool to support structure activity relationship studies by allowing early identification of mitotoxicity and for analyzing the outcome of phenotypic screens that are susceptible to the generation of mitotoxicity-related artifacts. PMID:23992120

  15. Mitochondrial respiratory-chain adaptations in macrophages contribute to antibacterial host defense.

    PubMed

    Garaude, Johan; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Martínez-Cano, Sarai; Enamorado, Michel; Ugolini, Matteo; Nistal-Villán, Estanislao; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Pelegrín, Pablo; Sander, Leif E; Enríquez, José A; Sancho, David

    2016-09-01

    Macrophages tightly scale their core metabolism after being activated, but the precise regulation of the mitochondrial electron-transport chain (ETC) and its functional implications are currently unknown. Here we found that recognition of live bacteria by macrophages transiently decreased assembly of the ETC complex I (CI) and CI-containing super-complexes and switched the relative contributions of CI and CII to mitochondrial respiration. This was mediated by phagosomal NADPH oxidase and the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent tyrosine kinase Fgr. It required Toll-like receptor signaling and the NLRP3 inflammasome, which were both connected to bacterial viability-specific immune responses. Inhibition of CII during infection with Escherichia coli normalized serum concentrations of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and IL-10 to those in mice treated with dead bacteria and impaired control of bacteria. We have thus identified ETC adaptations as an early immunological-metabolic checkpoint that adjusts innate immune responses to bacterial infection. PMID:27348412

  16. Alterations in enterocyte mitochondrial respiratory function and enzyme activities in gastrointestinal dysfunction following brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ke-Jun; Huang, Hong; Chu, Hui; Yu, Hang; Zhang, Shi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the alterations in rat enterocyte mitochondrial respiratory function and enzyme activities following traumatic brain injury (TBI). METHODS: Fifty-six male SD rats were randomly divided into seven groups (8 rats in each group): a control group (rats with sham operation) and traumatic brain injury groups at 6, 12, 24 h, days 2, 3, and 7 after operation. TBI models were induced by Feendy’s free-falling method. Mitochondrial respiratory function (respiratory control ratio and ADP/O ratio) was measured with a Clark oxygen electrode. The activities of respiratory chain complex I-IV and related enzymes were determined by spectrophotometry. RESULTS: Compared with the control group, the mitochondrial respiratory control ratio (RCR) declined at 6 h and remained at a low level until day 7 after TBI (control, 5.42 ± 0.46; 6 h, 5.20 ± 0.18; 12 h, 4.55 ± 0.35; 24 h, 3.75 ± 0.22; 2 d, 4.12 ± 0.53; 3 d, 3.45 ± 0.41; 7 d, 5.23 ± 0.24, P < 0.01). The value of phosphate-to-oxygen (P/O) significantly decreased at 12, 24 h, day 2 and day 3, respectively (12 h, 3.30 ± 0.10; 24 h, 2.61 ± 0.21; 2 d, 2.95 ± 0.18; 3 d, 2.76 ± 0.09, P < 0.01) compared with the control group (3.46 ± 0.12). Two troughs of mitochondrial respiratory function were seen at 24 h and day 3 after TBI. The activities of mitochondrial complex I (6 h: 110 ± 10, 12 h: 115 ± 12, 24 h: 85 ± 9, day 2: 80 ± 15, day 3: 65 ± 16, P < 0.01) and complex II (6 h: 105 ± 8, 12 h: 110 ± 92, 24 h: 80 ± 10, day 2: 76 ± 8, day 3: 68 ± 12, P < 0.01) were increased at 6 h and 12 h following TBI, and then significantly decreased at 24 h, day 2 and day 3, respectively. However, there were no differences in complex I and II activities between the control and TBI groups. Furthermore, pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity was significantly decreased at 6 h and continued up to 7 d after TBI compared with the control group (6 h: 90 ± 8, 12 h: 85 ± 10, 24 h: 65 ± 12, day 2: 60 ± 9, day 3: 55

  17. Partial comparison of the NxTAG Respiratory Pathogen Panel Assay with the Luminex xTAG Respiratory Panel Fast Assay V2 and singleplex real-time polymerase chain reaction for detection of respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Scala, Alessia; Bianchini, Sonia; Presicce, Maria Lory; Mori, Alessandro; Sciarrabba, Calogero Sathya; Fior, Giulia; Principi, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    In this study, 185 nasopharyngeal swabs were tested to compare the sensitivity and specificity of the Luminex NxTAG (NxTAG) Respiratory Pathogen Panel (RPP) Assay with those of the Luminex Respiratory Virus Panel (RVP) Fast Assay v2 and singleplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The NxTAG Assay identified at least one infectious agent in 164 (88.7%) of the swabs. In 91 (6.2%) tests with negative results with the RVP Fast Assay v2, a virus was identified by the NxTAG (P < 0.001). With the NxTAG Assay, the detection rates were significantly higher for respiratory syncytial virus (P = 0.003), human metapneumovirus (P < 0.001), human rhinovirus/human enterovirus (P = 0.009) and human adenovirus (P < 0.001). Finally, the NxTAG Assay identified M. pneumoniae in 32 of 44 (72.7%) PCR-positive samples. However, the concordance with real-time PCR results was low for both assays. In conclusion, the results indicate that the NxTAG Assay overcomes some of the limitations of previous Luminex assays, although further studies are needed for a more complete evaluation of the new assay. PMID:27401400

  18. Respiratory Activity of the Mycelium of Eremothecium ashbyii.

    PubMed

    Fraile, E R; Zurita, V E

    1967-11-01

    The respiratory activity of the mycelium of Eremothecium ashbyii from submerged cultures was manometrically determined at different stages of its development and the results were statistically analyzed. The experiments were performed in a manner designed to diminish the endogenous respiration without affecting the response to the addition of an exogenous substrate. Lactose was the carbohydrate tested that produced the lowest oxygen consumption. The oxidation of maltose, which was high at 24 hr, decreased by more than 50% at 48 and 55 hr. Glucose and sucrose were actively oxidized by mycelium of three ages. From the intermediates of carbohydrate metabolism, 24-hr mycelium did not produce oxygen consumption with malate, lactate, citrate, fumarate, and alpha-ketoglutarate. At 48 hr, mycelium did not oxidize either lactate or citrate; 55-hr mycelium showed oxygen consumption with all intermediates tested. Acetate and pyruvate always produced high oxygen consumption. Ethyl alcohol produced high oxygen consumption with mycelium of all tested ages. PMID:16349733

  19. Respiratory Activity of the Mycelium of Eremothecium ashbyii

    PubMed Central

    Fraile, Elda R.; Zurita, Victoria E.

    1967-01-01

    The respiratory activity of the mycelium of Eremothecium ashbyii from submerged cultures was manometrically determined at different stages of its development and the results were statistically analyzed. The experiments were performed in a manner designed to diminish the endogenous respiration without affecting the response to the addition of an exogenous substrate. Lactose was the carbohydrate tested that produced the lowest oxygen consumption. The oxidation of maltose, which was high at 24 hr, decreased by more than 50% at 48 and 55 hr. Glucose and sucrose were actively oxidized by mycelium of three ages. From the intermediates of carbohydrate metabolism, 24-hr mycelium did not produce oxygen consumption with malate, lactate, citrate, fumarate, and α-ketoglutarate. At 48 hr, mycelium did not oxidize either lactate or citrate; 55-hr mycelium showed oxygen consumption with all intermediates tested. Acetate and pyruvate always produced high oxygen consumption. Ethyl alcohol produced high oxygen consumption with mycelium of all tested ages. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16349733

  20. Antitussive activity and respiratory system effects of levodropropizine in man.

    PubMed

    Bossi, R; Braga, P C; Centanni, S; Legnani, D; Moavero, N E; Allegra, L

    1988-08-01

    Antitussive activity of the new antitussive drug, levodropropizine (S(-)-3-(4-phenyl-piperazin-1-yl)-propane-1,2-diol, DF 526), was evaluated in healthy volunteers by the classical method of citric acid-induced coughing. Levodropropizine dose-dependently reduced cough frequency. Maximal inhibition was observed at 6 h after administration. Cough intensity was also reduced, as shown by the analysis of cough noise. Levodropropizine, at the dosage of 60 mg t.i.d., had no adverse effects on respiratory function nor on airway clearance mechanisms: in fact, it did not affect spirometric parameters. Levodropropizine had no effects on the rheological properties of mucus nor on ciliary activity of airway epithelium. PMID:3196411

  1. Contribution of a Cyanide-insensitive Alternate Respiratory System to Increases in Formamide Hydro-lyase Activity and to Growth in Stemphylium loti in Vitro1

    PubMed Central

    Rissler, Jane F.; Millar, Roy L.

    1977-01-01

    Stemphylium loti, a pathogen of a cyanogenic plant, possesses a cyanide-insensitive alternate respiratory pathway. In the absence of cytochrome inhibitors, the alternate system had only a minor role in respiration. When S. loti was grown in medium amended with antimycin to block the cytochrome chain, the alternate system accounted for the total oxygen consumption associated with respiration. The contribution of the alternate respiratory system to increases in formamide hydro-lyase (FHL) activity and to growth in S. loti in vitro was assessed. FHL, induced by cyanide, converts cyanide to nontoxic formamide and is partially responsible for the tolerance of S. loti to high concentrations of cyanide in vitro. When the cytochromes were blocked and the cyanide-insensitive respiratory pathway accounted for 100% of the oxygen uptake associated with respiration, FHL activity, but not changes in dry weight, was positively correlated with activity of the alternate pathway. As the alternate pathway activity decreased with increasing concentrations of salicylhydroxamic acid, the level of FHL activity correspondingly decreased. The alternate respiratory system may provide for increases in FHL activity but not for growth. S. loti appears to have two mechanisms for cyanide tolerance in vitro: cyanide-insensitive respiration and FHL activity. The initial activity of FHL for detoxification of cyanide may depend on the alternate respiratory pathway when the cytochromes of the electron transport chain are blocked. PMID:16660201

  2. Identification of Human Adenovirus in Respiratory Samples with Luminex Respiratory Virus Panel Fast V2 Assay and Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Scala, Alessia; Bianchini, Sonia; Zampiero, Alberto; Fossali, Emilio; Principi, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    In order to compare the last version of the Respiratory Virus Panel (RVP) Fast assay for human Adenovirus (hAdv) detection with a specific real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), which is considered the gold standard for hAdv detection, nasopharyngeal samples collected from 309 children (age range, four months to eight years) with respiratory tract infection were tested using the RVP Fast v2 assay (Luminex Molecular Diagnostics, Inc., Toronto, ON, Canada) and a specific TaqMan qPCR to identify hAdv DNA. The RVP Fast v2 assay detected 30/61 (49.2%) hAdv infections that had been identified by real-time qPCR, demonstrating a significantly lower detection rate (p < 0.001). The sensitivity of the RVP Fast v2 assay in comparison to qPCR was lower in younger children (42.9% vs. 57.7%; Cohen's kappa coefficient, 0.53); in samples with co-infections (40.0% vs. 56.7%; Cohen's kappa coefficient, 0.52); and in samples with hAdv type C (45.9% vs. 57.1%; Cohen's kappa coefficient, 0.60). Samples with lower viral loads were associated with a significantly lower sensitivity of the RVP Fast v2 assay (35.1% vs. 68.2%, p = 0.01; Cohen's kappa coefficients, 0.49). The RVP Fast v2 assay has important limitations for the detection of hAdv and cannot be used to evaluate whether hAdvs are the main etiologic agent responsible for an outbreak or when epidemiological studies are performed. PMID:26927078

  3. How does a flexible chain of active particles swell?

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Andreas; Babel, Sonja; ten Hagen, Borge; von Ferber, Christian; Löwen, Hartmut

    2015-03-28

    We study the swelling of a flexible linear chain composed of active particles by analytical theory and computer simulation. Three different situations are considered: a free chain, a chain confined to an external harmonic trap, and a chain dragged at one end. First, we consider an ideal chain with harmonic springs and no excluded volume between the monomers. The Rouse model of polymers is generalized to the case of self-propelled monomers and solved analytically. The swelling, as characterized by the spatial extension of the chain, scales with the monomer number defining a Flory exponent ν which is ν = 1/2, 0, 1 in the three different situations. As a result, we find that activity does not change the Flory exponent but affects the prefactor of the scaling law. This can be quantitatively understood by mapping the system onto an equilibrium chain with a higher effective temperature such that the chain swells under an increase of the self-propulsion strength. We then use computer simulations to study the effect of self-avoidance on active polymer swelling. In the three different situations, the Flory exponent is now ν = 3/4, 1/4, 1 and again unchanged under self-propulsion. However, the chain extension behaves non-monotonic in the self-propulsion strength. PMID:25833607

  4. How does a flexible chain of active particles swell?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Babel, Sonja; ten Hagen, Borge; von Ferber, Christian; Löwen, Hartmut

    2015-03-01

    We study the swelling of a flexible linear chain composed of active particles by analytical theory and computer simulation. Three different situations are considered: a free chain, a chain confined to an external harmonic trap, and a chain dragged at one end. First, we consider an ideal chain with harmonic springs and no excluded volume between the monomers. The Rouse model of polymers is generalized to the case of self-propelled monomers and solved analytically. The swelling, as characterized by the spatial extension of the chain, scales with the monomer number defining a Flory exponent ν which is ν = 1/2, 0, 1 in the three different situations. As a result, we find that activity does not change the Flory exponent but affects the prefactor of the scaling law. This can be quantitatively understood by mapping the system onto an equilibrium chain with a higher effective temperature such that the chain swells under an increase of the self-propulsion strength. We then use computer simulations to study the effect of self-avoidance on active polymer swelling. In the three different situations, the Flory exponent is now ν = 3/4, 1/4, 1 and again unchanged under self-propulsion. However, the chain extension behaves non-monotonic in the self-propulsion strength.

  5. Antiviral activity of carnosic acid against respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory infection and a major public health threat worldwide. To date, no vaccine or effective therapeutic agent has been developed. In a screen for potential therapeutic agents against hRSV, we discovered that an extract of Rosmarinus officinalis exerted a strong inhibitory effect against hRSV infection. Subsequent studies identified carnosic acid as a bioactive constituent responsible for anti-hRSV activity. Carnosic acid has been shown to exhibit potent antioxidant and anti-cancer activities. Anti-RSV activity of carnosic acid was further investigated in this study. Methods Effects of extracts from various plants and subfractions from R. officinalis on hRSV replication were determined by microneutralization assay and plaque assay. Several constituents were isolated from ethyl acetate fraction of R. officinalis and their anti-RSV activities were assessed by plaque assay as well as reverse-transcription quantitative PCR to determine the synthesis of viral RNAs. Results Among the tested bioactive constituents of R. officinalis, carnosic acid displayed the most potent anti-hRSV activity and was effective against both A- and B-type viruses. Carnosic acid efficiently suppressed the replication of hRSV in a concentration-dependent manner. Carnosic acid effectively suppressed viral gene expression without inducing type-I interferon production or affecting cell viability, suggesting that it may directly affect viral factors. A time course analysis showed that addition of carnosic acid 8 hours after infection still effectively blocked the expression of hRSV genes, further suggesting that carnosic acid directly inhibited the replication of hRSV. Conclusions The current study demonstrates that carnosic acid, a natural compound that has already been shown to be safe for human consumption, has anti-viral activity against hRSV, efficiently blocking the replication of this virus. Carnosic

  6. Riboflavin-Responsive and -Non-responsive Mutations in FAD Synthase Cause Multiple Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase and Combined Respiratory-Chain Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Rikke K J; Koňaříková, Eliška; Giancaspero, Teresa A; Mosegaard, Signe; Boczonadi, Veronika; Mataković, Lavinija; Veauville-Merllié, Alice; Terrile, Caterina; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Haack, Tobias B; Auranen, Mari; Leone, Piero; Galluccio, Michele; Imbard, Apolline; Gutierrez-Rios, Purificacion; Palmfeldt, Johan; Graf, Elisabeth; Vianey-Saban, Christine; Oppenheim, Marcus; Schiff, Manuel; Pichard, Samia; Rigal, Odile; Pyle, Angela; Chinnery, Patrick F; Konstantopoulou, Vassiliki; Möslinger, Dorothea; Feichtinger, René G; Talim, Beril; Topaloglu, Haluk; Coskun, Turgay; Gucer, Safak; Botta, Annalisa; Pegoraro, Elena; Malena, Adriana; Vergani, Lodovica; Mazzà, Daniela; Zollino, Marcella; Ghezzi, Daniele; Acquaviva, Cecile; Tyni, Tiina; Boneh, Avihu; Meitinger, Thomas; Strom, Tim M; Gregersen, Niels; Mayr, Johannes A; Horvath, Rita; Barile, Maria; Prokisch, Holger

    2016-06-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiencies (MADDs) are a heterogeneous group of metabolic disorders with combined respiratory-chain deficiency and a neuromuscular phenotype. Despite recent advances in understanding the genetic basis of MADD, a number of cases remain unexplained. Here, we report clinically relevant variants in FLAD1, which encodes FAD synthase (FADS), as the cause of MADD and respiratory-chain dysfunction in nine individuals recruited from metabolic centers in six countries. In most individuals, we identified biallelic frameshift variants in the molybdopterin binding (MPTb) domain, located upstream of the FADS domain. Inasmuch as FADS is essential for cellular supply of FAD cofactors, the finding of biallelic frameshift variants was unexpected. Using RNA sequencing analysis combined with protein mass spectrometry, we discovered FLAD1 isoforms, which only encode the FADS domain. The existence of these isoforms might explain why affected individuals with biallelic FLAD1 frameshift variants still harbor substantial FADS activity. Another group of individuals with a milder phenotype responsive to riboflavin were shown to have single amino acid changes in the FADS domain. When produced in E. coli, these mutant FADS proteins resulted in impaired but detectable FADS activity; for one of the variant proteins, the addition of FAD significantly improved protein stability, arguing for a chaperone-like action similar to what has been reported in other riboflavin-responsive inborn errors of metabolism. In conclusion, our studies identify FLAD1 variants as a cause of potentially treatable inborn errors of metabolism manifesting with MADD and shed light on the mechanisms by which FADS ensures cellular FAD homeostasis. PMID:27259049

  7. Active and passive immunisation against respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Zambon, M

    1999-01-01

    RSV is a major cause of respiratory illness in infants under 2 years of age. Evidence is accumulating that it is also underestimated as a cause of respiratory infection in adults, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals. Active interventions to control the impact of RSV infection have been hampered by a lack of understanding of the immune response to RSV in different age groups. A number of different strategies for developing RSV vaccines have been pursued, including live attenuated vaccines, genetically engineered live and subunit vaccines and peptide vaccines with varying degrees of success. The target populations for RSV vaccines include infants, the elderly and women of childbearing age, but the efficacy of different vaccines may differ according to age. Desirable immune responses and immune correlates of protection to RSV in humans remain uncertain and determining these is critical for introduction of any vaccines. Prophylaxis and treatment of RSV in infants using human immunoglobulin containing high titres of RSV specific neutralising antibody (RSV-Ig) has shown limited success in different infant populations. Prophylaxis of premature infants with RSV-Ig, particularly those with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, has demonstrated limited clinical efficacy against RSV. In contrast, there are significant safety concerns for use of this preparation for prophylaxis in infants with congenital heart disease and no demonstrable efficacy in treatment of RSV disease in healthy infants. The cost of the preparation will limit use to highly selected infant groups. Production of humanized monoclonal antibodies to RSV offers another potential passive immunotherapy intervention for RSV, with increased specific activity and reduced side effects, although its use remains experimental. PMID:10578118

  8. Does breathing type influence electromyographic activity of obligatory and accessory respiratory muscles?

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, M F; Valenzuela, S; Miralles, R; Portus, C; Santander, H; Fuentes, A D; Celhay, I

    2014-11-01

    Craniomandibular electromyographic (EMG) studies frequently include several parameters, e.g. resting, chewing and tooth-clenching. EMG activity during these parameters has been recorded in the elevator muscles, but little is known about the respiratory muscles. The aim of this study was to compare EMG activity in obligatory and accessory respiratory muscles between subjects with different breathing types. Forty male subjects were classified according to their breathing type into two groups of 20 each: costo-diaphragmatic breathing type and upper costal breathing type. Bipolar surface electrodes were placed on the sternocleidomastoid, diaphragm, external intercostal and latissimus dorsi muscles. EMG activity was recorded during the following tasks: (i) normal quiet breathing, (ii) maximal voluntary clenching in intercuspal position, (iii) natural rate chewing until swallowing threshold, (iv) short-time chewing. Diaphragm EMG activity was significantly higher in the upper costal breathing type than in the costo-diaphragmatic breathing type in all tasks (P < 0·05). External intercostal EMG activity was significantly higher in the upper costal breathing type than in the costo-diaphragmatic breathing type in tasks 3 and 4 (P < 0·05). Sternocleidomastoid and latissimus dorsi EMG activity did not show significant differences between breathing types in the tasks studied (P > 0·05). The significantly higher EMG activity observed in subjects with upper costal breathing than in the costo-diaphragmatic breathing type suggests that there could be differences in motor unit recruitment strategies depending on the breathing type. This may be an expression of the adaptive capability of muscle chains in subjects who clinically have a different thoraco-abdominal expansion during inspiration at rest. PMID:25040551

  9. Ionizable Side Chains at Catalytic Active Sites of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic active sites of enzymes of known structure can be well defined by a modern program of computational geometry. The CASTp program was used to define and measure the volume of the catalytic active sites of 573 enzymes in the Catalytic Site Atlas database. The active sites are identified as catalytic because the amino acids they contain are known to participate in the chemical reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. Acid and base side chains are reliable markers of catalytic active sites. The catalytic active sites have 4 acid and 5 base side chains, in an average volume of 1072 Å3. The number density of acid side chains is 8.3 M (in chemical units); the number density of basic side chains is 10.6 M. The catalytic active site of these enzymes is an unusual electrostatic and steric environment in which side chains and reactants are crowded together in a mixture more like an ionic liquid than an ideal infinitely dilute solution. The electrostatics and crowding of reactants and side chains seems likely to be important for catalytic function. In three types of analogous ion channels, simulation of crowded charges accounts for the main properties of selectivity measured in a wide range of solutions and concentrations. It seems wise to use mathematics designed to study interacting complex fluids when making models of the catalytic active sites of enzymes. PMID:22484856

  10. (+)α-Tocopheryl succinate inhibits the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I and is as effective as arsenic trioxide or ATRA against acute promyelocytic leukemia in vivo.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, G A S; Abreu e Lima, R S; Pestana, C R; Lima, A S G; Scheucher, P S; Thomé, C H; Gimenes-Teixeira, H L; Santana-Lemos, B A A; Lucena-Araujo, A R; Rodrigues, F P; Nasr, R; Uyemura, S A; Falcão, R P; de Thé, H; Pandolfi, P P; Curti, C; Rego, E M

    2012-03-01

    The vitamin E derivative (+)α-tocopheryl succinate (α-TOS) exerts pro-apoptotic effects in a wide range of tumors and is well tolerated by normal tissues. Previous studies point to a mitochondrial involvement in the action mechanism; however, the early steps have not been fully elucidated. In a model of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) derived from hCG-PML-RARα transgenic mice, we demonstrated that α-TOS is as effective as arsenic trioxide or all-trans retinoic acid, the current gold standards of therapy. We also demonstrated that α-TOS induces an early dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential in APL cells and studies with isolated mitochondria revealed that this action may result from the inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I. Moreover, α-TOS promoted accumulation of reactive oxygen species hours before mitochondrial cytochrome c release and caspases activation. Therefore, an in vivo antileukemic action and a novel mitochondrial target were revealed for α-TOS, as well as mitochondrial respiratory complex I was highlighted as potential target for anticancer therapy. PMID:21869839

  11. Nonsense mutations in the COX1 subunit impair the stability of respiratory chain complexes rather than their assembly

    PubMed Central

    Hornig-Do, Hue-Tran; Tatsuta, Takashi; Buckermann, Angela; Bust, Maria; Kollberg, Gittan; Rötig, Agnes; Hellmich, Martin; Nijtmans, Leo; Wiesner, Rudolf J

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory chain (RC) complexes are organized into supercomplexes forming ‘respirasomes'. The mechanism underlying the interdependence of individual complexes is still unclear. Here, we show in human patient cells that the presence of a truncated COX1 subunit leads to destabilization of complex IV (CIV) and other RC complexes. Surprisingly, the truncated COX1 protein is integrated into subcomplexes, the holocomplex and even into supercomplexes, which however are all unstable. Depletion of the m-AAA protease AFG3L2 increases stability of the truncated COX1 and other mitochondrially encoded proteins, whereas overexpression of wild-type AFG3L2 decreases their stability. Both full-length and truncated COX1 proteins physically interact with AFG3L2. Expression of a dominant negative AFG3L2 variant also promotes stabilization of CIV proteins as well as the assembled complex and rescues the severe phenotype in heteroplasmic cells. Our data indicate that the mechanism underlying pathogenesis in these patients is the rapid clearance of unstable respiratory complexes by quality control pathways, rather than their impaired assembly. PMID:22252130

  12. The Multicenter Aerobic Iron Respiratory Chain of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Functions as an Ensemble with a Single Macroscopic Rate Constant.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting-Feng; Painter, Richard G; Ban, Bhupal; Blake, Robert C

    2015-07-24

    Electron transfer reactions among three prominent colored proteins in intact cells of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans were monitored using an integrating cavity absorption meter that permitted the acquisition of accurate absorbance data in suspensions of cells that scattered light. The concentrations of proteins in the periplasmic space were estimated to be 350 and 25 mg/ml for rusticyanin and cytochrome c, respectively; cytochrome a was present as one molecule for every 91 nm(2) in the cytoplasmic membrane. All three proteins were rapidly reduced to the same relative extent when suspensions of live bacteria were mixed with different concentrations of ferrous ions at pH 1.5. The subsequent molecular oxygen-dependent oxidation of the multicenter respiratory chain occurred with a single macroscopic rate constant, regardless of the proteins' in vitro redox potentials or their putative positions in the aerobic iron respiratory chain. The crowded electron transport proteins in the periplasm of the organism constituted an electron conductive medium where the network of protein interactions functioned in a concerted fashion as a single ensemble with a standard reduction potential of 650 mV. The appearance of product ferric ions was correlated with the reduction levels of the periplasmic electron transfer proteins; the limiting first-order catalytic rate constant for aerobic respiration on iron was 7,400 s(-1). The ability to conduct direct spectrophotometric studies under noninvasive physiological conditions represents a new and powerful approach to examine the extent and rates of biological events in situ without disrupting the complexity of the live cellular environment. PMID:26041781

  13. The Multicenter Aerobic Iron Respiratory Chain of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Functions as an Ensemble with a Single Macroscopic Rate Constant*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ting-Feng; Painter, Richard G.; Ban, Bhupal; Blake, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Electron transfer reactions among three prominent colored proteins in intact cells of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans were monitored using an integrating cavity absorption meter that permitted the acquisition of accurate absorbance data in suspensions of cells that scattered light. The concentrations of proteins in the periplasmic space were estimated to be 350 and 25 mg/ml for rusticyanin and cytochrome c, respectively; cytochrome a was present as one molecule for every 91 nm2 in the cytoplasmic membrane. All three proteins were rapidly reduced to the same relative extent when suspensions of live bacteria were mixed with different concentrations of ferrous ions at pH 1.5. The subsequent molecular oxygen-dependent oxidation of the multicenter respiratory chain occurred with a single macroscopic rate constant, regardless of the proteins' in vitro redox potentials or their putative positions in the aerobic iron respiratory chain. The crowded electron transport proteins in the periplasm of the organism constituted an electron conductive medium where the network of protein interactions functioned in a concerted fashion as a single ensemble with a standard reduction potential of 650 mV. The appearance of product ferric ions was correlated with the reduction levels of the periplasmic electron transfer proteins; the limiting first-order catalytic rate constant for aerobic respiration on iron was 7,400 s−1. The ability to conduct direct spectrophotometric studies under noninvasive physiological conditions represents a new and powerful approach to examine the extent and rates of biological events in situ without disrupting the complexity of the live cellular environment. PMID:26041781

  14. Thrombin A-Chain: Activation Remnant or Allosteric Effector?

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Isis S. R.; Vanden Hoek, Amanda L.; Pryzdial, Edward L. G.; MacGillivray, Ross T. A.

    2010-01-01

    Although prothrombin is one of the most widely studied enzymes in biology, the role of the thrombin A-chain has been neglected in comparison to the other domains. This paper summarizes the current data on the prothrombin catalytic domain A-chain region and the subsequent thrombin A-chain. Attention is given to biochemical characterization of naturally occurring prothrombin A-chain mutations and alanine scanning mutants in this region. While originally considered to be simply an activation remnant with little physiologic function, the thrombin A-chain is now thought to play a role as an allosteric effector in enzymatic reactions and may also be a structural scaffold to stabilize the protease domain. PMID:22084659

  15. Active impedance of respiratory system in anesthetized cats.

    PubMed

    Zin, W A; Pengelly, L D; Milic-Emili, J

    1982-07-01

    We have assessed the validity of the method of Siafakas et al. (J. Appl. Physiol.: Respirat. Environ. Exercise Physiol. 51: 109-121, 1981) for determining active elastance (E'rs) and flow resistance (R'rs) of the respiratory system. In six cats anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium we have measured flow, volume, and tracheal occlusion pressure during spontaneous breathing. This allowed us to compute E'rs and R'rs. From these data and the occlusion pressure wave we predicted the time course of volume during inspirations with added linear flow resistances (delta R). These were compared to the actual loaded inspirograms. The agreement was generally good, except for small predictable discrepancies with the highest delta R values, which could be attributed to decompression of thoracic gas. These results indicate that the approach of Siakafas et al. to determine E'rs and R'rs is valid. In addition, we have quantified the "terminal inhibition" of inspiratory activity, which occurs toward the end of unoccluded breaths (both loaded and unloaded). PMID:7118628

  16. Single-chain anti-idiotypic antibody retains its specificity to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus GP5.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Wang, Gang; Li, Qiongyi; Du, Yongkun; Du, Taofeng; Mu, Yang; Xiao, Shuqi; Zhao, Qin; Wang, Chengbao; Sun, Yani; Xu, Xingang; Zhang, Gaiping; Hsu, Walter H; Cai, Xuehui; Zhou, En-Min

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody (Mab2-5G2) raised against idiotypic antibodies to membrane glycoprotein GP5 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). The variable regions of the heavy chain (VH) and light chain (VL) of Mab2-5G2 were cloned and connected with a (Gly4Ser)3 linker. The recombinant scFv gene was cloned into the pEasy-E1 vector and expressed in E. coli as inclusion bodies. The expressed scFv-His proteins renatured in a pH and urea gradient buffer retained the same immunological properties as that of Mab2-5G2. Renatured scFv-His protein retained the same characteristics as that of Mab2-5G2 by recognizing and binding to Marc-145 cells. Furthermore, renatured scFv-His along with Mab2-5G2 were used to immunize rabbits to produce anti-anti-idiotypic antibodies (Ab3) that neutralized PRRSV infection of Marc-145 cells. These results demonstrated that the expressed scFv-His protein possessed the same characteristics of Mab2-5G2 and will be suitable for future investigations of Mab2-5G2 antibody structure and its ability to interact with potential PRRSV cellular receptor as well as immunological properties against PRRSV infection. PMID:25448704

  17. Improved Angiostatic Activity of Dasatinib by Modulation with Hydrophobic Chains

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dasatinib is an orally active nonselective tyrosine kinase inhibitor used to treat certain types of adult leukemia. By inhibiting PDGFR-β and SFKs in both tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelial cells, dasatinib inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis. Herein, dasatinib derivatives modified with hydrophobic chains were prepared and evaluated for their in vitro antiproliferative selectivity and their in vivo antiangiogenic activity. For one of the derivatives, modified with a long perfluorinated chain, a significant enhancement in antiangiogenic activity was observed. Combined, these results suggest a possible generic route to modulate the angiostatic activity of drugs. PMID:25815152

  18. Detecting Synfire Chain Activity Using Massively Parallel Spike Train Recording

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Sven; Grün, Sonja; Diesmann, Markus; Gerstein, George L.

    2008-01-01

    The synfire chain model has been proposed as the substrate that underlies computational processes in the brain and has received extensive theoretical study. In this model cortical tissue is composed of a superposition of feedforward subnetworks (chains) each capable of transmitting packets of synchronized spikes with high reliability. Computations are then carried out by interactions of these chains. Experimental evidence for synfire chains has so far been limited to inference from detection of a few repeating spatiotemporal neuronal firing patterns in multiple single-unit recordings. Demonstration that such patterns actually come from synfire activity would require finding a meta organization among many detected patterns, as yet an untried approach. In contrast we present here a new method that directly visualizes the repetitive occurrence of synfire activity even in very large data sets of multiple single-unit recordings. We achieve reliability and sensitivity by appropriately averaging over neuron space (identities) and time. We test the method with data from a large-scale balanced recurrent network simulation containing 50 randomly activated synfire chains. The sensitivity is high enough to detect synfire chain activity in simultaneous single-unit recordings of 100 to 200 neurons from such data, enabling application to experimental data in the near future. PMID:18632888

  19. Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Exerts Antiviral Activity against Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Dabo, Abdoulaye J.; Cummins, Neville; Eden, Edward; Geraghty, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Increased lung levels of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) are frequently observed during respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and elevated MMP9 concentrations are associated with severe disease. However little is known of the functional role of MMP9 during lung infection with RSV. To determine whether MMP9 exerted direct antiviral potential, active MMP9 was incubated with RSV, which showed that MMP9 directly prevented RSV infectivity to airway epithelial cells. Using knockout mice the effect of the loss of Mmp9 expression was examined during RSV infection to demonstrate MMP9’s role in viral clearance and disease progression. Seven days following RSV infection, Mmp9-/- mice displayed substantial weight loss, increased RSV-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and reduced clearance of RSV from the lungs compared to wild type mice. Although total bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cell counts were similar in both groups, neutrophil recruitment to the lungs during RSV infection was significantly reduced in Mmp9-/- mice. Reduced neutrophil recruitment coincided with diminished RANTES, IL-1β, SCF, G-CSF expression and p38 phosphorylation. Induction of p38 signaling was required for RANTES and G-CSF expression during RSV infection in airway epithelial cells. Therefore, MMP9 in RSV lung infection significantly enhances neutrophil recruitment, cytokine production and viral clearance while reducing AHR. PMID:26284919

  20. Emergency department syndromic surveillance providing early warning of seasonal respiratory activity in England.

    PubMed

    Hughes, H E; Morbey, R; Hughes, T C; Locker, T E; Pebody, R; Green, H K; Ellis, J; Smith, G E; Elliot, A J

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal respiratory infections place an increased burden on health services annually. We used a sentinel emergency department syndromic surveillance system to understand the factors driving respiratory attendances at emergency departments (EDs) in England. Trends in different respiratory indicators were observed to peak at different points during winter, with further variation observed in the distribution of attendances by age. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed acute respiratory infection and bronchitis/bronchiolitis ED attendances in patients aged 1-4 years were particularly sensitive indicators for increasing respiratory syncytial virus activity. Using near real-time surveillance of respiratory ED attendances may provide early warning of increased winter pressures in EDs, particularly driven by seasonal pathogens. This surveillance may provide additional intelligence about different categories of attendance, highlighting pressures in particular age groups, thereby aiding planning and preparation to respond to acute changes in EDs, and thus the health service in general. PMID:26415918

  1. Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) supply chain collaboration development methodology

    SciTech Connect

    PETERSEN,MARJORIE B.; CHAPMAN,LEON D.

    2000-03-15

    The Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) project during the last five years of work with the U.S. Integrated Textile Complex (retail, apparel, textile, and fiber sectors) has developed an inter-enterprise supply chain collaboration development methodology. The goal of this methodology is to enable a supply chain to work more efficiently and competitively. The outcomes of this methodology include: (1) A definitive description and evaluation of the role of business cultures and supporting business organizational structures in either inhibiting or fostering change to a more competitive supply chain; (2) ``As-Is'' and proposed ``To-Be'' supply chain business process models focusing on information flows and decision-making; and (3) Software tools that enable and support a transition to a more competitive supply chain, which results form a business driven rather than technologically driven approach to software design. This methodology development will continue in FY00 as DAMA engages companies in the soft goods industry in supply chain research and implementation of supply chain collaboration.

  2. Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) model for supply chain collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    CHAPMAN,LEON D.; PETERSEN,MARJORIE B.

    2000-03-13

    The Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) project during the last five years of work with the U.S. Integrated Textile Complex (retail, apparel, textile, and fiber sectors) has developed an inter-enterprise architecture and collaborative model for supply chains. This model will enable improved collaborative business across any supply chain. The DAMA Model for Supply Chain Collaboration is a high-level model for collaboration to achieve Demand Activated Manufacturing. The five major elements of the architecture to support collaboration are (1) activity or process, (2) information, (3) application, (4) data, and (5) infrastructure. These five elements are tied to the application of the DAMA architecture to three phases of collaboration - prepare, pilot, and scale. There are six collaborative activities that may be employed in this model: (1) Develop Business Planning Agreements, (2) Define Products, (3) Forecast and Plan Capacity Commitments, (4) Schedule Product and Product Delivery, (5) Expedite Production and Delivery Exceptions, and (6) Populate Supply Chain Utility. The Supply Chain Utility is a set of applications implemented to support collaborative product definition, forecast visibility, planning, scheduling, and execution. The DAMA architecture and model will be presented along with the process for implementing this DAMA model.

  3. Nasal swab samples and real-time polymerase chain reaction assays in community-based, longitudinal studies of respiratory viruses: the importance of sample integrity and quality control

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Carefully conducted, community-based, longitudinal studies are required to gain further understanding of the nature and timing of respiratory viruses causing infections in the population. However, such studies pose unique challenges for field specimen collection, including as we have observed the appearance of mould in some nasal swab specimens. We therefore investigated the impact of sample collection quality and the presence of visible mould in samples upon respiratory virus detection by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Methods Anterior nasal swab samples were collected from infants participating in an ongoing community-based, longitudinal, dynamic birth cohort study. The samples were first collected from each infant shortly after birth and weekly thereafter. They were then mailed to the laboratory where they were catalogued, stored at -80°C and later screened by PCR for 17 respiratory viruses. The quality of specimen collection was assessed by screening for human deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) using endogenous retrovirus 3 (ERV3). The impact of ERV3 load upon respiratory virus detection and the impact of visible mould observed in a subset of swabs reaching the laboratory upon both ERV3 loads and respiratory virus detection was determined. Results In total, 4933 nasal swabs were received in the laboratory. ERV3 load in nasal swabs was associated with respiratory virus detection. Reduced respiratory virus detection (odds ratio 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.27-0.44) was observed in samples where the ERV3 could not be identified. Mould was associated with increased time of samples reaching the laboratory and reduced ERV3 loads and respiratory virus detection. Conclusion Suboptimal sample collection and high levels of visible mould can impact negatively upon sample quality. Quality control measures, including monitoring human DNA loads using ERV3 as a marker for epithelial cell components in samples should be undertaken to optimize the

  4. Mitochondrial Morphology and Fundamental Parameters of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Are Altered in Caenorhabditis elegans Strains Deficient in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Homeostasis Processes

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Anthony L.; Rooney, John P.; Kubik, Laura L.; Gonzalez, Claudia P.; Song, Dong Hoon; Meyer, Joel N.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to myriad human diseases and toxicant exposures, highlighting the need for assays capable of rapidly assessing mitochondrial health in vivo. Here, using the Seahorse XFe24 Analyzer and the pharmacological inhibitors dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and oligomycin (ATP-synthase inhibitors), carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (mitochondrial uncoupler) and sodium azide (cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor), we measured the fundamental parameters of mitochondrial respiratory chain function: basal oxygen consumption, ATP-linked respiration, maximal respiratory capacity, spare respiratory capacity and proton leak in the model organism Caenhorhabditis elegans. Since mutations in mitochondrial homeostasis genes cause mitochondrial dysfunction and have been linked to human disease, we measured mitochondrial respiratory function in mitochondrial fission (drp-1)-, fusion (fzo-1)-, mitophagy (pdr-1, pink-1)-, and electron transport chain complex III (isp-1)-deficient C. elegans. All showed altered function, but the nature of the alterations varied between the tested strains. We report increased basal oxygen consumption in drp-1; reduced maximal respiration in drp-1, fzo-1, and isp-1; reduced spare respiratory capacity in drp-1 and fzo-1; reduced proton leak in fzo-1 and isp-1; and increased proton leak in pink-1 nematodes. As mitochondrial morphology can play a role in mitochondrial energetics, we also quantified the mitochondrial aspect ratio for each mutant strain using a novel method, and for the first time report increased aspect ratios in pdr-1- and pink-1-deficient nematodes. PMID:26106885

  5. Respiratory modulation of sympathetic nerve activity is enhanced in male rat offspring following uteroplacental insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Menuet, C; Wlodek, M E; Fong, A Y; Allen, A M

    2016-06-01

    Sympathetic nerve activity to the cardiovascular system displays prominent respiratory-related modulation which leads to the generation of rhythmic oscillations in blood pressure called Traube-Hering waves. An amplification of this respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity is observed in hypertension of both genetic, the spontaneously hypertensive rat, and induced, chronic intermittent hypoxia or maternal protein restriction during gestation, origin. Male offspring of mothers with uteroplacental insufficiency, induced by bilateral uterine vessel ligation at 18 days of gestation, are also hypertensive in adulthood. In this study we examined whether these male offspring display altered respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity at pre-hypertensive ages compared to controls. Respiratory, cardiovascular and sympathetic parameters were examined using the working heart-brainstem preparation in 35 day old male rats that had reduced birth weight due to uteroplacental insufficiency. Whilst all respiratory parameters were not different between groups, we observed an enhanced respiratory-related burst of thoracic sympathetic nerve activity and amplified Traube-Hering waves in the growth-restricted group. This group also showed an increased sympathetic and bradycardic response to activation of peripheral chemoreceptors. The observations add support to the view that altered respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity represents a common mechanism involved in the development of several forms of hypertension. PMID:26593642

  6. Do changes in the coupling between respiratory and sympathetic activities contribute to neurogenic hypertension?

    PubMed

    Zoccal, Daniel B; Paton, Julian F R; Machado, Benedito H

    2009-12-01

    1. It is well known that respiration markedly modulates the sympathetic nervous system. Interactions between pontine and medullary neurons involved in the control of sympathetic and respiratory functions are the main mechanism underlying the respiratory related oscillations in sympathetic nerve activity. 2. Recently, in rats treated with chronic intermittent hypoxia, we demonstrated that alterations in respiratory pattern may drive increased sympathetic outflow and hence the development of systemic hypertension. These experiments, performed in the in situ working heart-brain stem preparation, raise the possibility that enhanced central coupling between respiratory and sympathetic activities could be a potential mechanism underpinning the development and/or the maintenance of neurogenic hypertension. 3. In the present review, we discuss the neural basis of the enhanced entrainment between respiratory and sympathetic neurons in the brain stem that can be induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia and the possible implications of these mechanisms in the genesis of sympathetic overactivity and, consequently, hypertension. PMID:19413588

  7. Inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain function abrogates quartz induced DNA damage in lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Haberzettl, Petra; Albrecht, Catrin; Höhr, Doris; Knaapen, Ad M; Borm, Paul J A; Schins, Roel P F

    2007-04-01

    Respirable quartz dust has been classified as a human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The aim of our study was to investigate the mechanisms of DNA damage by DQ12 quartz in RLE-6TN rat lung epithelial type II cells (RLE). Transmission electron microscopy and flow-cytometry analysis showed a rapid particle uptake (30 min to 4 h) of quartz by the RLE cells, but particles were not found within the cell nuclei. This suggests that DNA strand breakage and induction of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine - as also observed in these cells during these treatment intervals - did not result from direct physical interactions between particles and DNA, or from short-lived particle surface-derived reactive oxygen species. DNA damage by quartz was significantly reduced in the presence of the mitochondrial inhibitors rotenone and antimycin-A. In the absence of quartz, these inhibitors did not affect DNA damage, but they reduced cellular oxygen consumption. No signs of apoptosis were observed by quartz. Flow-cytometry analysis indicated that the reduced DNA damage by rotenone was not due to a possible mitochondria-mediated reduction of particle uptake by the RLE cells. Further proof of concept for the role of mitochondria was shown by the failure of quartz to elicit DNA damage in mitochondria-depleted 143B (rho-0) osteosarcoma cells, at concentrations where it elicited DNA damage in the parental 143B cell line. In conclusion, our data show that respirable quartz particles can elicit oxidative DNA damage in vitro without entering the nuclei of type II cells, which are considered to be important target cells in quartz carcinogenesis. Furthermore, our observations indicate that such indirect DNA damage involves the mitochondrial electron transport chain function, by an as-yet-to-be elucidated mechanism. PMID:17239409

  8. Direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in respiratory specimens in a clinical laboratory by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, B A; Hicks, K E

    1993-01-01

    The emergence of epidemic multiple-drug-resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in conjunction with an increase in the number of reported cases of tuberculosis (TB) represents a major public health problem. In light of a recent outbreak of MDR M. tuberculosis at our center, we began the development of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the rapid diagnosis of pulmonary TB using two sets of primers, one based on the IS6110 repeated sequence of M. tuberculosis and the other based on the protein antigen b (PAB). Reaction conditions were first optimized as to the appropriate extraction protocol and the concentrations of primer pairs, nucleotides, and MgCl2. Following a preliminary evaluation of the assay with clinical specimens, extraction and amplification procedures were further modified. PAB and IS6110 primers detected between 2 and 23 and 0.023 and 0.23 CFU of M. tuberculosis, respectively, in pooled, M. tuberculosis-negative sputa by our optimized PCR assay. After routine processing for mycobacteria, 734 specimens were subsequently amplified. DNA for amplification was obtained by boiling and beating the sediments with Tween 20. For each reaction, DNA (10 microliters) was added to an amplification mixture containing 12 pmol of IS6110 primers, 20 pmol of PAB primers, 2 mM MgCl2, 200 microM nucleotides, and 2.5 U of Taq polymerase and the mixture was then amplified for 40 cycles. The sensitivity and specificity of our PCR assay were 87.2 and 97.7%, respectively. We were unable to interpret the results for seven specimens (1%). In our experience, PCR proved to be a useful rapid diagnostic test for TB in a clinical setting and a valuable epidemiological tool for determining exposure groups in the hospital setting. Our findings also underscore the need for the systematic optimization of PCR assay conditions. Images PMID:8349744

  9. Early Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy in an STXBP1 Patient with Lactic Acidemia and Normal Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong; Bhoj, Elizabeth; McCormick, Elizabeth; Wang, Fengxiang; Snyder, James; Wang, Tiancheng; Zhao, Yan; Kim, Cecilia; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Tian, Lifeng; Falk, Marni J.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of clinical findings have been associated with mutations in Syntaxin Binding Protein 1 (STXBP1), including multiple forms of epilepsy, nonsyndromic intellectual disability, and movement disorders. STXBP1 mutations have recently been associated with mitochondrial pathology, although it remains unclear if this phenotype is a part of the core feature for this gene disorder. We report a 7-year-old boy who presented for diagnostic evaluation of intractable epilepsy, episodic ataxia, resting tremor, and speech regression following a period of apparently normal early development. Mild lactic acidemia was detected on one occasion at the time of an intercurrent illness. Due to the concern for mitochondrial disease, ophthalmologic evaluation was performed that revealed bilateral midperiphery pigmentary mottling. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) testing demonstrated a bilaterally thickened ganglion cell layer in the perifovea. Skeletal muscle biopsy analysis showed no mitochondrial abnormalities or respiratory chain dysfunction. Exome sequencing identified a de novo c.1651C>T (p.R551C) mutation in STXBP1. Although mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported in some individuals, our proband had only mild lactic acidemia and no skeletal muscle tissue evidence of mitochondrial disease pathology. Thus, mitochondrial dysfunction is not an obligate feature of STXBP1 disease. PMID:27069701

  10. Detection of Haemophilus influenzae in respiratory secretions from pneumonia patients by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Abdeldaim, Guma M K; Strålin, Kristoffer; Kirsebom, Leif A; Olcén, Per; Blomberg, Jonas; Herrmann, Björn

    2009-08-01

    A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on the omp P6 gene was developed to detect Haemophilus influenzae. Its specificity was determined by analysis of 29 strains of 11 different Haemophilus spp. and was compared with PCR assays having other target genes: rnpB, 16S rRNA, and bexA. The method was evaluated on nasopharyngeal aspirates from 166 adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia. When 10(4) DNA copies/mL was used as cutoff limit for the method, P6 PCR had a sensitivity of 97.5% and a specificity of 96.0% compared with the culture. Of 20 culture-negative but P6 PCR-positive cases, 18 were confirmed by fucK PCR as H. influenzae. Five (5.9%) of 84 nasopharyngeal aspirates from adult controls tested PCR positive. We conclude that the P6 real-time PCR is both sensitive and specific for identification of H. influenzae in respiratory secretions. Quantification facilitates discrimination between disease-causing H. influenzae strains and commensal colonization. PMID:19446978

  11. The CoQH2/CoQ Ratio Serves as a Sensor of Respiratory Chain Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Guarás, Adela; Perales-Clemente, Ester; Calvo, Enrique; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Loureiro-Lopez, Marta; Pujol, Claire; Martínez-Carrascoso, Isabel; Nuñez, Estefanía; García-Marqués, Fernando; Rodríguez-Hernández, María Angeles; Cortés, Ana; Diaz, Francisca; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Moraes, Carlos T; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Trifunovic, Aleksandra; Navas, Plácido; Vazquez, Jesús; Enríquez, Jose A

    2016-04-01

    Electrons feed into the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) from NAD- or FAD-dependent enzymes. A shift from glucose to fatty acids increases electron flux through FAD, which can saturate the oxidation capacity of the dedicated coenzyme Q (CoQ) pool and result in the generation of reactive oxygen species. To prevent this, the mETC superstructure can be reconfigured through the degradation of respiratory complex I, liberating associated complex III to increase electron flux via FAD at the expense of NAD. Here, we demonstrate that this adaptation is driven by the ratio of reduced to oxidized CoQ. Saturation of CoQ oxidation capacity induces reverse electron transport from reduced CoQ to complex I, and the resulting local generation of superoxide oxidizes specific complex I proteins, triggering their degradation and the disintegration of the complex. Thus, CoQ redox status acts as a metabolic sensor that fine-tunes mETC configuration in order to match the prevailing substrate profile. PMID:27052170

  12. Molecular characterization and mutational analysis of the human B17 subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I.

    PubMed

    Smeitink, J; Loeffen, J; Smeets, R; Triepels, R; Ruitenbeek, W; Trijbels, F; van den Heuvel, L

    1998-08-01

    Bovine NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex 1) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain consists of about 36 nuclear-encoded subunits. We review the current knowledge of the 15 human complex I subunits cloned so far, and report the 598-bp cDNA sequence, the chromosomal localization and the tissue expression of an additional subunit, the B17 subunit. The cDNA open reading frame of B17 comprises 387 bp and encodes a protein of 128 amino acids (calculated Mr 15.5 kDa). There is 82.7% and 78.1% homology, respectively, at the cDNA and amino acid level with the bovine counterpart. The gene of the B17 subunit has been mapped to chromosome 2. Multiple-tissue dot-blots showed ubiquitous expression of the mRNA with relatively higher expression in tissues known for their high energy demand. Of these, kidney showed the highest expression. Mutational analysis of the subunit revealed no mutations or polymorphisms in 20 patients with isolated enzymatic complex I deficiency in cultured skin fibroblasts. PMID:9760212

  13. Mitochondrial respiratory chain Complexes I and IV are impaired by β-amyloid via direct interaction and through Complex I-dependent ROS production, respectively.

    PubMed

    Bobba, A; Amadoro, G; Valenti, D; Corsetti, V; Lassandro, R; Atlante, A

    2013-07-01

    Here we investigate the effect of β-amyloid on mitochondrial respiratory function, i.e. mitochondrial oxygen consumption and membrane potential generation as well as the individual activities of both the mitochondrial Complexes I-IV, that compose mitochondrial electron transport chain, and the ATP synthase, by using homogenate from cerebellar granule cells, treated with low concentrations of β-amyloid, and Alzheimer synaptic-enriched brain samples. We found that β-amyloid caused both a selective defect in Complex I activity associated with an increase (5 fold) of intracellular reactive oxygen species and an impairment of Complex IV likely due to membrane lipid peroxidation. In addition, a 130% increase of the GSSG/GSH ratio was measured in Alzheimer brains with respect to age-matched controls. Knowing the mechanisms of action of β-amyloid could allow to mitigate or even to interrupt the toxic cascade that leads a cell to death. The results of this study represent an important innovation because they offer the possibility to act at mitochondrial level and on specific sites to protect cells, for example by preventing the interaction of β-amyloid with the identified targets, by stabilizing or by restoring mitochondrial function or by interfering with the energy metabolism. PMID:23562762

  14. Purification of Active Respiratory Supercomplex from Bovine Heart Mitochondria Enables Functional Studies*

    PubMed Central

    Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Shimomura, Harunobu; Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Shimada, Satoru; Takahashi, Ryoko; Oosaki, Marika; Ogura, Takashi; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2016-01-01

    To understand the roles of mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes, methods for consistently separating and preparing supercomplexes must be established. To this end, we solubilized supercomplexes from bovine heart mitochondria with digitonin and then replaced digitonin with amphipol (A8–35), an amphiphilic polymer. Afterward, supercomplexes were separated from other complexes by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Twenty-six grams of bovine myocardium yielded 3.2 mg of amphipol-stabilized supercomplex. The purified supercomplexes were analyzed based on their absorption spectra as well as Q10 (ubiquinone with ten isoprene units) and lipid assays. The supercomplex sample did not contain cytochrome c but did contain complexes I, III, and IV at a ratio of 1:2:1, 6 molecules of Q10, and 623 atoms of phosphorus. When cytochrome c was added, the supercomplex exhibited KCN-sensitive NADH oxidation; thus, the purified supercomplex was active. Reduced complex IV absorbs at 444 nm, so we measured the resonance Raman spectrum of the reduced amphipol-solubilized supercomplex and the mixture of amphipol-solubilized complexes I1, III2, and IV1 using an excitation wavelength of 441.6 nm, allowing measurement precision comparable with that obtained for complex IV alone. Use of the purified active sample provides insights into the effects of supercomplex formation. PMID:26698328

  15. Purification of Active Respiratory Supercomplex from Bovine Heart Mitochondria Enables Functional Studies.

    PubMed

    Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Shimomura, Harunobu; Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Shimada, Satoru; Takahashi, Ryoko; Oosaki, Marika; Ogura, Takashi; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2016-02-19

    To understand the roles of mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes, methods for consistently separating and preparing supercomplexes must be established. To this end, we solubilized supercomplexes from bovine heart mitochondria with digitonin and then replaced digitonin with amphipol (A8-35), an amphiphilic polymer. Afterward, supercomplexes were separated from other complexes by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Twenty-six grams of bovine myocardium yielded 3.2 mg of amphipol-stabilized supercomplex. The purified supercomplexes were analyzed based on their absorption spectra as well as Q10 (ubiquinone with ten isoprene units) and lipid assays. The supercomplex sample did not contain cytochrome c but did contain complexes I, III, and IV at a ratio of 1:2:1, 6 molecules of Q10, and 623 atoms of phosphorus. When cytochrome c was added, the supercomplex exhibited KCN-sensitive NADH oxidation; thus, the purified supercomplex was active. Reduced complex IV absorbs at 444 nm, so we measured the resonance Raman spectrum of the reduced amphipol-solubilized supercomplex and the mixture of amphipol-solubilized complexes I1, III2, and IV1 using an excitation wavelength of 441.6 nm, allowing measurement precision comparable with that obtained for complex IV alone. Use of the purified active sample provides insights into the effects of supercomplex formation. PMID:26698328

  16. Redox-induced activation of the proton pump in the respiratory complex I

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vivek; Belevich, Galina; Gamiz-Hernandez, Ana P.; Róg, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Verkhovskaya, Marina L.; Wikström, Mårten; Hummer, Gerhard; Kaila, Ville R. I.

    2015-01-01

    Complex I functions as a redox-linked proton pump in the respiratory chains of mitochondria and bacteria, driven by the reduction of quinone (Q) by NADH. Remarkably, the distance between the Q reduction site and the most distant proton channels extends nearly 200 Å. To elucidate the molecular origin of this long-range coupling, we apply a combination of large-scale molecular simulations and a site-directed mutagenesis experiment of a key residue. In hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we observe that reduction of Q is coupled to its local protonation by the His-38/Asp-139 ion pair and Tyr-87 of subunit Nqo4. Atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations further suggest that formation of quinol (QH2) triggers rapid dissociation of the anionic Asp-139 toward the membrane domain that couples to conformational changes in a network of conserved charged residues. Site-directed mutagenesis data confirm the importance of Asp-139; upon mutation to asparagine the Q reductase activity is inhibited by 75%. The current results, together with earlier biochemical data, suggest that the proton pumping in complex I is activated by a unique combination of electrostatic and conformational transitions. PMID:26330610

  17. Antifungal chromans inhibiting the mitochondrial respiratory chain of pea seeds and new xanthones from Calophyllum caledonicum.

    PubMed

    Hay, A-E; Guilet, D; Morel, C; Larcher, G; Macherel, D; Le Ray, A-M; Litaudon, M; Richomme, P

    2003-12-01

    Two new xanthones, caledonixanthone M 1 and caloxanthone L 2, and one new acid, caledonic acid 6 were isolated from the hexane-soluble extract of the stem bark of Calophyllum caledonicum. In the course of this phytochemical study, seven other known compounds - calothwaitesixanthone, calozeyloxanthone, allanxanthone, isoapetalic acid 3, calolongic acid 4, apetalic acid 5 and isocalolongic acid 7 - were isolated. Their antifungal activity against the growth of the human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus was then investigated. The results indicated that the crude extract, calolongic acid 4 and isocalolongic acid 7 exhibited strong inhibitory effects with MIC (80) values of 8, 4, 2 microg/mL, respectively. Besides, calolongic acid 4, its lactone derivative 4a and isocalolongic acid 7 markedly reduced the respiration of pea seed mitochondria. PMID:14750030

  18. Access to a polymerase chain reaction assay method targeting 13 respiratory viruses can reduce antibiotics: a randomised, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Viral respiratory infections are common worldwide and range from completely benign disease to life-threatening illness. Symptoms can be unspecific, and an etiologic diagnosis is rarely established because of a lack of suitable diagnostic tools. Improper use of antibiotics is common in this setting, which is detrimental in light of the development of bacterial resistance. It has been suggested that the use of diagnostic tests could reduce antibiotic prescription rates. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether access to a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay panel for etiologic diagnosis of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) would have an impact on antibiotic prescription rate in primary care clinical settings. Methods Adult patients with symptoms of ARTI were prospectively included. Nasopharyngeal and throat swabs were analysed by using a multiplex real-time PCR method targeting thirteen viruses and two bacteria. Patients were recruited at 12 outpatient units from October 2006 through April 2009, and samples were collected on the day of inclusion (initial visit) and after 10 days (follow-up visit). Patients were randomised in an open-label treatment protocol to receive a rapid or delayed result (on the following day or after eight to twelve days). The primary outcome measure was the antibiotic prescription rate at the initial visit, and the secondary outcome was the total antibiotic prescription rate during the study period. Results A total sample of 447 patients was randomised. Forty-one were excluded, leaving 406 patients for analysis. In the group of patients randomised for a rapid result, 4.5% (9 of 202) of patients received antibiotics at the initial visit, compared to 12.3% (25 of 204) (P = 0.005) of patients in the delayed result group. At follow-up, there was no significant difference between the groups: 13.9% (28 of 202) in the rapid result group and 17.2% (35 of 204) in the delayed result group (P = 0

  19. PGC-1α/β induced expression partially compensates for respiratory chain defects in cells from patients with mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Sarika; Diaz, Francisca; Iommarini, Luisa; Aure, Karine; Lombes, Anne; Moraes, Carlos T.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator (PGC) family are potent inducers of mitochondrial biogenesis. We have tested the potential effect of increased mitochondrial biogenesis in cells derived from patients harboring oxidative phosphorylation defects due to either nuclear or mitochondrial DNA mutations. We found that the PGC-1α and/or PGC-1β expression improved mitochondrial respiration in cells harboring a complex III or IV deficiency as well as in transmitochondrial cybrids harboring mitochondrial encephalomyopathy lactic acidosis and stroke A3243G tRNA(Leu)UUR gene mutation. The respiratory function improvement was found to be associated with increased levels of mitochondrial components per cell, although this increase was not homogeneous. These results reinforce the concept that increased mitochondrial biogenesis is a promising venue for the treatment of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:19297390

  20. Roles of Oxa1-related inner membrane translocases in assembly of respiratory chain complexes

    PubMed Central

    Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Fiumera, Heather L.; Dujardin, Geneviève; Fox, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    Conclusions The wide phylogenetic distribution of Oxa1-related proteins appears to reflect both the central role of assembling energy-transducing membrane complexes, and the range of roles in their assembly that Oxa1-related protein scan be adapted to. In different species, Oxa1 and its isoforms appear to assist in the assembly of several different substrate proteins. Recent work on the bacterial protein YidC strongly indicates that it is capable of functioning alone as a translocase for hydrophilic domains and an insertase for TM domains. Thus it is highly likely that the eukaryotic members of this family found in mitochondria and chloroplasts directly catalyze these reactions in a co- and/or posttranslational way. It is presently unclear how Oxa1 recognizes its substrates and whether additional factors assist in this, beyond its direct interaction with mitochondrial ribosomes, demonstrated in S. cerevisiae. Given the apparent co-translational nature of in vivo Oxa1 dependent translocation of the Cox2 N-terminal domain, a detailed mechanistic study of this most criticalOxa1 function will need to await the development of a true in vitro translation system derived from the mitochondrial matrix and inner membrane. However, Oxa1is also capable of assisting post-translational insertion and translocation in isolated mitochondria and Cox18 may post-translationally translocate both in vivo and in vitro its only known substrate, the Cox2 C-terminal domain. Thus, biochemical analysis of some of these functions in proteoliposomes may already be possible, taking advantage of the wide variety of mutant forms of S. cerevisiae Oxa1, to examine distinct activities of the protein. It is clear that interpretation of all genetic and biochemical data on Oxa1 and Cox18 will be far more robust when the structure of both proteins in the membrane will be determined. PMID:18522806

  1. Binding of the Respiratory Chain Inhibitor Antimycin to theMitochondrial bc1 Complex: A New Crystal Structure Reveals an AlteredIntramolecular Hydrogen-Bonding Pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Li-shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-05-10

    Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex.Structure-activity-relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicyl-amide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Two previous X-ray structures of antimycin bound to vertebrate bc1 complex gave conflicting results. A new structure reported here of the bovine mitochondrial bc1 complex at 2.28Angstrom resolution with antimycin bound, allows us for the first time to reliably describe the binding of antimycin and shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond described in solution and in the small-molecule structure is replaced by one involving the NH rather than carbonyl O of the amide linkage, with rotation of the amide group relative to the aromatic ring. The phenolic OH and formylamino N form H-bonds with conserved Asp228 of cyt b, and the formylamino O H-bonds via a water molecule to Lys227. A strong density the right size and shape for a diatomic molecule is found between the other side of the dilactone ring and the alpha-A helix.

  2. Pharmacologic targeting of sirtuin and PPAR signaling improves longevity and mitochondrial physiology in respiratory chain complex I mutant Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Shana; Polyak, Erzsebet; Ostrovsky, Julian; Dingley, Stephen D.; Rao, Meera; Kwon, Young Joon; Xiao, Rui; Zhang, Zhe; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Falk, Marni J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) diseases are highly morbid multi-systemic conditions for which few effective therapies exist. Given the essential role of sirtuin and PPAR signaling in mediating both mitochondrial physiology and the cellular response to metabolic stress in RC complex I (CI) disease, we postulated that drugs that alter these signaling pathways either directly (resveratrol for sirtuin, rosiglitazone for PPARγ, fenofibrate for PPARα), or indirectly by increasing NAD+ availability (nicotinic acid), might offer effective treatment strategies for primary RC disease. Integrated effects of targeting these cellular signaling pathways on animal lifespan and multi-dimensional in vivo parameters were studied in gas-1(fc21) relative to wild-type (N2 Bristol) worms. Specifically, animal lifespan, transcriptome profiles, mitochondrial oxidant burden, mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial content, amino acid profiles, stable isotope-based intermediary metabolic flux, and total nematode NADH and NAD+ concentrations were compared. Shortened gas-1(fc21) mutant lifespan was rescued with either resveratrol or nicotinic acid, regardless of whether treatments were begun at the early larval stage or in young adulthood. Rosiglitazone administration beginning in young adult stage animals also rescued lifespan. All drug treatments reversed the most significant transcriptome alterations at the biochemical pathway level relative to untreated gas-1(fc21) animals. Interestingly, increased mitochondrial oxidant burden in gas-1(fc21) was reduced with nicotinic acid but exacerbated significantly by resveratrol and modestly by fenofibrate, with little change by rosiglitazone treatment. In contrast, the reduced mitochondrial membrane potential of mutant worms was further decreased by nicotinic acid but restored by either resveratrol, rosiglitazone, or fenofibrate. Using a novel HPLC assay, we discovered that gas-1(fc21) worms have significant deficiencies of NAD+ and

  3. Detection of Human Metapneumovirus and Respiratory Syncytial Virus by Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Among Hospitalized Young Children in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Parsania, Masoud; Poopak, Behzad; Pouriayevali, Mohammad Hassan; Haghighi, Sama; Amirkhani, Aref; Nateghian, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory infection plays an important role in hospitalization of children in developing countries; detection of viral causes in such infections is very important. The respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common etiological agent of viral lower respiratory tract infection in children, and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is associated with both upper and lower respiratory tract infections among infants and children. Objectives This study evaluated the frequency and seasonal prevalence of hMPV and RSV in hospitalized children under the age of five, who were admitted to Aliasghar children’s hospital of Iran University of Medical Sciences from March 2010 until March 2013. Patients and Methods Nasopharyngeal or throat swabs from 158 hospitalized children with fever and respiratory distress were evaluated for RSV and hMPV RNA by the real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Results Among the 158 children evaluated in this study, 49 individuals (31.1%) had RSV infection while nine individuals (5.7%) had hMPV infection. Five (55.5%) of the hMPV-infected children were male while four (44.5%) were female and 27 (55.2%) of the RSV-infected patients were females and 22 (44.8%) were males. The RSV infections were detected in mainly < one year old children and hMPV infections were detected mainly in > one year old children. Both RSV and hMPV infections had occurred mainly during winter and spring seasons. Conclusions Respiratory syncytial virus was the major cause of acute respiratory infection in children under one-year of age while human metapneumovirus had a low prevalence in this group. The seasonal occurrence of both viruses was the same. PMID:27226877

  4. Chlorogenic acid ameliorates intestinal mitochondrial injury by increasing antioxidant effects and activity of respiratory complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Zhou, Lili; Ruan, Zheng; Mi, Shumei; Jiang, Min; Li, Xiaolan; Wu, Xin; Deng, Zeyuan; Yin, Yulong

    2016-05-01

    Dietary polyphenols are thought to be beneficial for human health by acting as antioxidants. Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is abundant in plant-based foods as an ester of caffeic acid and quinic acid. In this study, we investigated the effects of CGA on mitochondrial protection. Our results demonstrated that pretreatment with CGA ameliorated the intestinal mitochondrial injury induced by H2O2; membrane potential was increased, mitochondrial swelling, levels of reactive oxygen species, contents of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine, and cytochrome c released were decreased. The beneficial effects of CGA were accompanied by an increase in antioxidant and respiratory-chain complex I, IV, and V activities. In trinitrobenzene-sulfonic acid-induced colitic rats indicated that CGA supplementation improved mitochondria ultrastructure and decreased mitochondrial injury. Our results suggest a promising role for CGA as a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant in combating intestinal oxidative injury. Daily intake of diets containing CGA, such as coffee and honeysuckle, may be useful for prevention of intestinal diseases. PMID:26824685

  5. Hypoglossal Neuropathology and Respiratory Activity in Pompe Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Milapjit S.; Elmallah, Mai K.; Falk, Darin J.; Lane, Michael A.; Reier, Paul J.; Byrne, Barry J.; Fuller, David D.

    2011-01-01

    Pompe disease is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with systemic deficiency of acid α-glucosidase (GAA). Respiratory-related problems in Pompe disease include hypoventilation and upper airway dysfunction. Although these problems have generally been attributed to muscular pathology, recent work has highlighted the potential role of central nervous system (CNS) neuropathology in Pompe motor deficiencies. We used a murine model of Pompe disease to test the hypothesis that systemic GAA deficiency is associated with hypoglossal (XII) motoneuron pathology and altered XII motor output during breathing. Brainstem tissue was harvested from adult Gaa−/− mice and the periodic acid Schiff method was used to examine neuronal glycogen accumulation. Semi-thin (2 μm) plastic sections showed widespread medullary neuropathology with extensive cytoplasmic glycogen accumulation in XII motoneuron soma. We next recorded efferent XII bursting in anesthetized and ventilated Gaa−/− and B6/129 mice both before and after bilateral vagotomy. The coefficient of variation of respiratory cycle duration was greater in Gaa−/− compared to B6/129 mice (p < 0.01). Vagotomy caused a robust increase in XII inspiratory burst amplitude in B6/129 mice (239 ± 44% baseline; p < 0.01) but had little impact on burst amplitude in Gaa−/− mice (130 ± 23% baseline; p > 0.05). We conclude that CNS GAA deficiency results in substantial glycogen accumulation in XII motoneuron cell bodies and altered XII motor output. Therapeutic strategies targeting the CNS may be required to fully correct respiratory-related deficits in Pompe disease. PMID:21747768

  6. Mitochondrial free radical overproduction due to respiratory chain impairment in the brain of a mouse model of Rett syndrome: protective effect of CNF1.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Bianca; Valenti, Daniela; de Bari, Lidia; De Rasmo, Domenico; Musto, Mattia; Fabbri, Alessia; Ricceri, Laura; Fiorentini, Carla; Laviola, Giovanni; Vacca, Rosa Anna

    2015-06-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder mainly caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene associated with severe intellectual disability, movement disorders, and autistic-like behaviors. Its pathogenesis remains mostly not understood and no effective therapy is available. High circulating levels of oxidative stress markers in patients and the occurrence of oxidative brain damage in MeCP2-deficient mouse models suggest the involvement of oxidative stress in RTT pathogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism and the origin of the oxidative stress have not been elucidated. Here we demonstrate that a redox imbalance arises from aberrant mitochondrial functionality in the brain of MeCP2-308 heterozygous female mice, a condition that more closely recapitulates that of RTT patients. The marked increase in the rate of hydrogen peroxide generation in the brain of RTT mice seems mainly produced by the dysfunctional complex II of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. In addition, both membrane potential generation and mitochondrial ATP synthesis are decreased in RTT mouse brains when succinate, the complex II respiratory substrate, is used as an energy source. Respiratory chain impairment is brain area specific, owing to a decrease in either cAMP-dependent phosphorylation or protein levels of specific complex subunits. Further, we investigated whether the treatment of RTT mice with the bacterial protein CNF1, previously reported to ameliorate the neurobehavioral phenotype and brain bioenergetic markers in an RTT mouse model, exerts specific effects on brain mitochondrial function and consequently on hydrogen peroxide production. In RTT brains treated with CNF1, we observed the reactivation of respiratory chain complexes, the rescue of mitochondrial functionality, and the prevention of brain hydrogen peroxide overproduction. These results provide definitive evidence of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species overproduction in RTT mouse brain and

  7. Quantitative assessment of oxygen availability: perceived aerobiosis and its effect on flux distribution in the respiratory chain of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Alexeeva, Svetlana; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; Teixeira de Mattos, M Joost

    2002-03-01

    Despite a large number of studies on the role of oxygen in cellular processes, there is no consensus as to how oxygen availability to the cell should be defined, let alone how it should be quantified. Here, a quantitative definition for oxygen availability (perceived aerobiosis) is presented; the definition is based on a calibration with reference to the minimal oxygen supply rate needed for fully oxidative catabolism (i.e., complete conversion of the energy source to CO(2) and water for glucose-limited conditions). This quantitative method is used to show how steady-state electron fluxes through the alternative cytochrome oxidases of Escherichia coli are distributed as a function of the extent of aerobiosis of glucose-limited chemostat cultures. At low oxygen availability the electron flux is mainly via the high-affinity cytochrome bd oxidase, and, at higher oxygen availability, a similar phenomenon occurs but now via the low-affinity cytochrome bo oxidase. The main finding is that the catabolic activities of E. coli (and specifically its respiratory activity) are affected by the actual oxygen availability per unit of biomass rather than by the residual dissolved oxygen concentration of the culture. PMID:11844770

  8. Mitochondrial Respiration Chain Enzymatic Activities in the Human Brain: Methodological Implications for Tissue Sampling and Storage.

    PubMed

    Ronsoni, Marcelo Fernando; Remor, Aline Pertile; Lopes, Mark William; Hohl, Alexandre; Troncoso, Iris H Z; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Boos, Gustavo Luchi; Kondageski, Charles; Nunes, Jean Costa; Linhares, Marcelo Neves; Lin, Kátia; Latini, Alexandra Susana; Walz, Roger

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes enzymatic (MRCCE) activities were successfully evaluated in frozen brain samples. Epilepsy surgery offers an ethical opportunity to study human brain tissue surgically removed to treat drug resistant epilepsies. Epilepsy surgeries are done with hemodynamic and laboratory parameters to maintain physiology, but there are no studies analyzing the association among these parameters and MRCCE activities in the human brain tissue. We determined the intra-operative parameters independently associated with MRCCE activities in middle temporal neocortex (Cx), amygdala (AMY) and head of hippocampus (HIP) samples of patients (n = 23) who underwent temporal lobectomy using multiple linear regressions. MRCCE activities in Cx, AMY and HIP are differentially associated to trans-operative mean arterial blood pressure, O2 saturation, hemoglobin, and anesthesia duration to time of tissue sampling. The time-course between the last seizure occurrence and tissue sampling as well as the sample storage to biochemical assessments were also associated with enzyme activities. Linear regression models including these variables explain 13-17 % of MRCCE activities and show a moderate to strong effect (r = 0.37-0.82). Intraoperative hemodynamic and laboratory parameters as well as the time from last seizure to tissue sampling and storage time are associated with MRCCE activities in human samples from the Cx, AMYG and HIP. Careful control of these parameters is required to minimize confounding biases in studies using human brain samples collected from elective neurosurgery. PMID:26586405

  9. Improved poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) production in Escherichia coli by inactivation of cytochrome bd-II oxidase or/and NDH-II dehydrogenase in low efficient respiratory chains.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiaojie; Lin, Zhenquan; Zhang, Yan; Li, Yifan; Wang, Zhiwen; Chen, Tao

    2014-12-20

    In order to redirect more carbon flux from TCA cycle into poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) biosynthesis pathway via increasing respiratory efficiency, appB and ndh genes encoding cytochrome bd-II oxidase and NDH-II dehydrogenase were inactivated in Escherichia coli JM109/pBHR68. All appB or/and ndh knockout strains exhibited significantly increased PHB accumulation accompanying with increased NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) ratio and intracellular acetyl-CoA pool. Among them, the Δndh strain could accumulate up to 6.16g/L PHB from 20g/L glucose and 3.5g/L PHB from 20g/L xylose, respectively, a 1.76-fold and 3.43-fold increase compared to the wild-type control. The PHB production of this strain reached 28.23g/L in a 5-L fermentor study, which was 2.70-fold as much as that of the wild-type control. These results indicated that inactivating the cytochrome bd-II oxidase or/and NDH-II dehydrogenase of the aerobic respiratory chain is a simple and effective strategy to improve PHB biosynthesis in E. coli. To date, this is the first time to improve PHB production by inactivation of cytochrome bd-II oxidase or/and NDH-II dehydrogenase in low efficient respiratory chains. PMID:25281801

  10. Mutations in NDUFB11, Encoding a Complex I Component of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain, Cause Microphthalmia with Linear Skin Defects Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    van Rahden, Vanessa A.; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Alawi, Malik; Brand, Kristina; Fellmann, Florence; Horn, Denise; Zeviani, Massimo; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome is an X-linked male-lethal disorder also known as MIDAS (microphthalmia, dermal aplasia, and sclerocornea). Additional clinical features include neurological and cardiac abnormalities. MLS syndrome is genetically heterogeneous given that heterozygous mutations in HCCS or COX7B have been identified in MLS-affected females. Both genes encode proteins involved in the structure and function of complexes III and IV, which form the terminal segment of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC). However, not all individuals with MLS syndrome carry a mutation in either HCCS or COX7B. The majority of MLS-affected females have severe skewing of X chromosome inactivation, suggesting that mutations in HCCS, COX7B, and other as-yet-unidentified X-linked gene(s) cause selective loss of cells in which the mutated X chromosome is active. By applying whole-exome sequencing and filtering for X-chromosomal variants, we identified a de novo nonsense mutation in NDUFB11 (Xp11.23) in one female individual and a heterozygous 1-bp deletion in a second individual, her asymptomatic mother, and an affected aborted fetus of the subject’s mother. NDUFB11 encodes one of 30 poorly characterized supernumerary subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, known as complex I (cI), the first and largest enzyme of the MRC. By shRNA-mediated NDUFB11 knockdown in HeLa cells, we demonstrate that NDUFB11 is essential for cI assembly and activity as well as cell growth and survival. These results demonstrate that X-linked genetic defects leading to the complete inactivation of complex I, III, or IV underlie MLS syndrome. Our data reveal an unexpected role of cI dysfunction in a developmental phenotype, further underscoring the existence of a group of mitochondrial diseases associated with neurocutaneous manifestations. PMID:25772934

  11. Mechanisms Underlying Adaptation of Respiratory Network Activity to Modulatory Stimuli in the Mouse Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Marc; De Sa, Rafaël; Cardoit, Laura; Thoby-Brisson, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Breathing is a rhythmic behavior that requires organized contractions of respiratory effector muscles. This behavior must adapt to constantly changing conditions in order to ensure homeostasis, proper body oxygenation, and CO2/pH regulation. Respiratory rhythmogenesis is controlled by neural networks located in the brainstem. One area considered to be essential for generating the inspiratory phase of the respiratory rhythm is the preBötzinger complex (preBötC). Rhythmogenesis emerges from this network through the interplay between the activation of intrinsic cellular properties (pacemaker properties) and intercellular synaptic connections. Respiratory activity continuously changes under the impact of numerous modulatory substances depending on organismal needs and environmental conditions. The preBötC network has been shown to become active during the last third of gestation. But only little is known regarding the modulation of inspiratory rhythmicity at embryonic stages and even less on a possible role of pacemaker neurons in this functional flexibility during the prenatal period. By combining electrophysiology and calcium imaging performed on embryonic brainstem slice preparations, we provide evidence showing that embryonic inspiratory pacemaker neurons are already intrinsically sensitive to neuromodulation and external conditions (i.e., temperature) affecting respiratory network activity, suggesting a potential role of pacemaker neurons in mediating rhythm adaptation to modulatory stimuli in the embryo. PMID:27239348

  12. Phagocyte respiratory burst activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bangwei; Wang, Jinsong; Liu, Zongwei; Shen, Zigang; Shi, Rongchen; Liu, Yu-Qi; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Man; Wu, Yuzhang; Zhang, Zhiren

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation resolution is an active process, the failure of which causes uncontrolled inflammation which underlies many chronic diseases. Therefore, endogenous pathways that regulate inflammation resolution are fundamental and of wide interest. Here, we demonstrate that phagocyte respiratory burst-induced hypoxia activates macrophage erythropoietin signalling to promote acute inflammation resolution. This signalling is activated following acute but not chronic inflammation. Pharmacological or genetical inhibition of the respiratory burst suppresses hypoxia and macrophage erythropoietin signalling. Macrophage-specific erythropoietin receptor-deficient mice and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) mice, which lack the capacity for respiratory burst, display impaired inflammation resolution, and exogenous erythropoietin enhances this resolution in WT and CGD mice. Mechanistically, erythropoietin increases macrophage engulfment of apoptotic neutrophils via PPARγ, promotes macrophage removal of debris and enhances macrophage migration to draining lymph nodes. Together, our results provide evidences of an endogenous pathway that regulates inflammation resolution, with important implications for treating inflammatory conditions. PMID:27397585

  13. Impairment of Respiratory Chain under Nutrient Deficiency in Plants: Does it Play a Role in the Regulation of Iron and Sulfur Responsive Genes?

    PubMed Central

    Vigani, Gianpiero; Briat, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Plant production and plant product quality strongly depend on the availability of mineral nutrients. Among them, sulfur (S) and iron (Fe) play a central role, as they are needed for many proteins of the respiratory chain. Plant mitochondria play essential bioenergetic and biosynthetic functions as well as they have an important role in signaling processes into the cell. Here, by comparing several transcriptomic data sets from plants impaired in their respiratory function with the genes regulated under Fe or S deficiencies obtained from other data sets, nutrient-responsive genes potentially regulated by hypothetical mitochondrial retrograde signaling pathway are evidenced. It leads us to hypothesize that plant mitochondria could be, therefore, required for regulating the expression of key genes involved both in Fe and S metabolisms. PMID:26779219

  14. Assembly of the mitochondrial membrane system. Cytoplasmic mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with lesions in enzymes of the respiratory chain and in the mitochondrial ATPase.

    PubMed

    Tzagoloff, A; Akai, A; Needleman, R B; Zulch, G

    1975-10-25

    Mutants of Saccharomyces cervisiae with defects in enzymes of the electron transfer chain and in the rutamycin-sensitive ATPase have been isolated. Some of the mutants are specifically affected in either cytochrome oxidase, coenzyme QH2-cytochrome c reductase or ATPase. Other strains are deficient in both cytochrome oxidase and coenzyme QH2-cytochrome c reductase but still have rutamycin-sensitive ATPase. All the mutants reported in this study fail to be complemented by a rho0 tester derived from a respiratory competent strain. The meiotic spore progeny obtained by mating the mutants to a respiratory competent haploid yeast, when scored for growth on glycerol, show a non-Mendelian segregation of the phenotype. These two genetic tests indicate the mutations to be cytoplasmically inherited. PMID:171256

  15. Inhibition of protein kinase G activity protects neonatal mouse respiratory network from hyperthermic and hypoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Gary A B; López-Guerrero, Juan J; Dawson-Scully, Ken; Peña, Fernando; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2010-01-22

    In spite of considerable research attention focused on clarifying the mechanisms by which the mammalian respiratory rhythm is generated, little attention has been given to examining how this neuronal circuit can be protected from heat stress. Hyperthermia has a profound effect on neuronal circuits including the circuit that generates breathing in mammals. As temperature of the brainstem increases, respiratory frequency concomitantly rises. If temperature continues to increase respiratory arrest (apnea) and death can occur. Previous research has implicated protein kinase G (PKG) activity in regulating neuronal thermosensitivity of neuronal circuits in invertebrates. Here we examine if pharmacological manipulation of PKG activity in a brainstem slice preparation could alter the thermosensitivity of the fictive neonatal mouse respiratory rhythm. We report a striking effect following alteration of PKG activity in the brainstem such that slices treated with the PKG inhibitor KT5823 recovered fictive respiratory rhythm generation significantly faster than control slices and slices treated with a PKG activator (8-Br-cGMP). Furthermore, slices treated with 8-Br-cGMP arrested fictive respiration at a significantly lower temperature than all other treatment groups. In a separate set of experiments we examined if altered PKG activity could regulate the response of slices to hypoxia by altering the protective switch to fictive gasping. Slices treated with 8-Br-cGMP did not switch to the fictive gasp-like pattern following exposure to hypoxia whereas slices treated with KT5823 did display fictive gasping. We propose that PKG activity inversely regulates the amount of stress the neonatal mammalian respiratory rhythm can endure. PMID:19945442

  16. Recessive Mutations in TRMT10C Cause Defects in Mitochondrial RNA Processing and Multiple Respiratory Chain Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Metodiev, Metodi D; Thompson, Kyle; Alston, Charlotte L; Morris, Andrew A M; He, Langping; Assouline, Zarah; Rio, Marlène; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Pyle, Angela; Griffin, Helen; Siira, Stefan; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Munnich, Arnold; Chinnery, Patrick F; McFarland, Robert; Rötig, Agnès; Taylor, Robert W

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are clinically and genetically diverse, with mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear genes able to cause defects in mitochondrial gene expression. Recently, mutations in several genes encoding factors involved in mt-tRNA processing have been identified to cause mitochondrial disease. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified mutations in TRMT10C (encoding the mitochondrial RNase P protein 1 [MRPP1]) in two unrelated individuals who presented at birth with lactic acidosis, hypotonia, feeding difficulties, and deafness. Both individuals died at 5 months after respiratory failure. MRPP1, along with MRPP2 and MRPP3, form the mitochondrial ribonuclease P (mt-RNase P) complex that cleaves the 5' ends of mt-tRNAs from polycistronic precursor transcripts. Additionally, a stable complex of MRPP1 and MRPP2 has m(1)R9 methyltransferase activity, which methylates mt-tRNAs at position 9 and is vital for folding mt-tRNAs into their correct tertiary structures. Analyses of fibroblasts from affected individuals harboring TRMT10C missense variants revealed decreased protein levels of MRPP1 and an increase in mt-RNA precursors indicative of impaired mt-RNA processing and defective mitochondrial protein synthesis. The pathogenicity of the detected variants-compound heterozygous c.542G>T (p.Arg181Leu) and c.814A>G (p.Thr272Ala) changes in subject 1 and a homozygous c.542G>T (p.Arg181Leu) variant in subject 2-was validated by the functional rescue of mt-RNA processing and mitochondrial protein synthesis defects after lentiviral transduction of wild-type TRMT10C. Our study suggests that these variants affect MRPP1 protein stability and mt-tRNA processing without affecting m(1)R9 methyltransferase activity, identifying mutations in TRMT10C as a cause of mitochondrial disease and highlighting the importance of RNA processing for correct mitochondrial function. PMID:27132592

  17. SUMO Chain-Induced Dimerization Activates RNF4

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Fernandez, Alejandro; Plechanovová, Anna; Hattersley, Neil; Jaffray, Ellis; Tatham, Michael H.; Hay, Ronald T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dimeric RING E3 ligases interact with protein substrates and conformationally restrain the ubiquitin-E2-conjugating enzyme thioester complex such that it is primed for catalysis. RNF4 is an E3 ligase containing an N-terminal domain that binds its polySUMO substrates and a C-terminal RING domain responsible for dimerization. To investigate how RNF4 activity is controlled, we increased polySUMO substrate concentration by ablating expression of SUMO protease SENP6. Accumulation of SUMO chains in vivo leads to ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of RNF4. In vitro we demonstrate that at concentrations equivalent to those found in vivo RNF4 is predominantly monomeric and inactive as an ubiquitin E3 ligase. However, in the presence of SUMO chains, RNF4 is activated by dimerization, leading to both substrate ubiquitylation and autoubiquitylation, responsible for degradation of RNF4. Thus the ubiquitin E3 ligase activity of RNF4 is directly linked to the availability of its polySUMO substrates. PMID:24656128

  18. SUMO chain-induced dimerization activates RNF4.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Fernandez, Alejandro; Plechanovová, Anna; Hattersley, Neil; Jaffray, Ellis; Tatham, Michael H; Hay, Ronald T

    2014-03-20

    Dimeric RING E3 ligases interact with protein substrates and conformationally restrain the ubiquitin-E2-conjugating enzyme thioester complex such that it is primed for catalysis. RNF4 is an E3 ligase containing an N-terminal domain that binds its polySUMO substrates and a C-terminal RING domain responsible for dimerization. To investigate how RNF4 activity is controlled, we increased polySUMO substrate concentration by ablating expression of SUMO protease SENP6. Accumulation of SUMO chains in vivo leads to ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of RNF4. In vitro we demonstrate that at concentrations equivalent to those found in vivo RNF4 is predominantly monomeric and inactive as an ubiquitin E3 ligase. However, in the presence of SUMO chains, RNF4 is activated by dimerization, leading to both substrate ubiquitylation and autoubiquitylation, responsible for degradation of RNF4. Thus the ubiquitin E3 ligase activity of RNF4 is directly linked to the availability of its polySUMO substrates. PMID:24656128

  19. Hypertonic saline activation of p38 MAPK primes the PMN respiratory burst.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, D J; Moore, E E; Biffl, W L; Gonzalez, R J; Moore, H B; Silliman, C C

    2001-10-01

    Investigation of hypertonic saline (HTS) modulation of neutrophils (PMN) cytotoxic responses has generated seemingly contradictory results. Clinically relevant levels of HTS attenuate receptor-mediated p38 MAPK signaling, whereas higher levels activate p38 MAPK. Concurrently, HTS exerts a dose-dependent attenuation of the PMN respiratory burst, most notably at concentrations where p38 MAPK is activated. We hypothesized that HTS-mediated p38 MAPK activation augments the PMN respiratory burst on return to normotonicity. We found that although clinically relevant levels of HTS (Na+ > or = 200 mM) did not activate p38 MAPK, higher concentrations (Na+ > or = 300 mM) resulted in activation comparable with that after PAF stimulation. Transient stimulation with high levels of HTS primed the PMN respiratory burst in response to fMLP and PMA. This effect was attenuated by pretreatment with SB 203580, a p38 MAPK specific inhibitor. We conclude that severe osmotic shock primes the respiratory burst via p38 MAPK signaling, further supporting the role of this signaling cascade in PMN priming. PMID:11580111

  20. Effects of forward head posture on forced vital capacity and respiratory muscles activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Jintae; Park, Soojin; Kim, Youngju; Choi, Yeonsung; Lyu, Hyeonnam

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of forward head posture on forced vital capacity and deep breathing. [Subjects] Twenty-six subjects, divided into the two groups (normal and forward head posture groups), participated in this study. [Methods] Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second were measured using respiratory function instrumentation that met the American Thoracic Society's recommendation for diagnostic spirometry. Accessory respiratory muscle activity during deep breathing was measured by electromyography. A Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the measure variables between the normal and forward head posture group. [Results] Forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second were significantly lower in the forward head posture group than in the normal group. Accessory respiratory muscle activity was also lower in the forward head posture group than in the normal group. In particular, the sternocleidomastoid and pectoralis major activity of the forward head posture group was significantly lower than that of normal group. Activities of the other muscles were generally decreased with forward head posture, but were not significantly different between the two groups. [Conclusion] These results indicate that forward head posture could reduce vital capacity, possibly because of weakness or disharmony of the accessory respiratory muscles. PMID:26957743

  1. A longitudinal study of poor performance and subclinical respiratory viral activity in Standardbred trotters

    PubMed Central

    Back, Helena; Penell, Johanna; Pringle, John; Isaksson, Mats; Ronéus, Nils; Treiberg Berndtsson, Louise; Ståhl, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Introduction While clinical respiratory disease is considered a main cause of poor performance in horses, the role of subclinical respiratory virus infections is less clear and needs further investigation. Aims and objectives In this descriptive longitudinal study the relationship of markers of subclinical respiratory viral activity to occurrence of poor performance in racing Standardbred trotters was investigated. Material and methods 66 elite Standardbred trotters were followed for 13 months by nasal swabs analysed with qPCR for equine influenza virus, equine arteritis virus, equine rhinitis B virus (ERBV), equine herpesvirus type 1(EHV-1) and equine herpesvirus type 4 (EHV-4) and serology to equine rhinitis A virus (ERAV), ERBV, EHV-1 and EHV-4, as well as the acute phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA). Findings on lab analyses were subsequently assessed for possible correlations to workload performance and trainer opinion measures of poor performance. Results Despite occurrence of poor performance and subclinical viral activity the authors were unable to detect association neither between subclinical viral activity and poor performance, nor between SAA elevations and either viral activity or poor performance. Conclusions Consistent with earlier study results, antibody titres to ERBV remained high for at least a year and few horses two years or older were seronegative to either ERAV or ERBV. In absence of clinical signs, serology to common respiratory viruses appears to have little diagnostic benefit in evaluation of poor performance in young athletic horses. PMID:26392904

  2. Analysis of respiratory activity and carbon usage of a mutant of Azotobacter vinelandii impaired in poly-β-hydroxybutyrate synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Lucero; Castillo, Tania; Flores, Celia; Segura, Daniel; Galindo, Enrique; Peña, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the respiratory activity and carbon usage of the mutant strain of A. vinelandii AT6, impaired in poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) production, and their relationship with the synthesis of alginate were evaluated. The alginate yield and the specific oxygen uptake rate were higher (2.5-fold and 62 %, respectively) for the AT6 strain, compared to the control strain (ATCC 9046), both in shake flasks cultures and in bioreactor, under fixed dissolved oxygen tension (1 %). In contrast, the degree of acetylation was similar in both strains. These results, together with the analysis of carbon usage (% C-mol), suggest that in the case of the AT6 strain, the flux of acetyl-CoA (precursor molecule for PHB biosynthesis and alginate acetylation) was diverted to the respiratory chain passing through the tricarboxylic acids cycle, and an important % C-mol was directed through alginate biosynthesis, up to 25.9 % and to a lesser extent, to biomass production (19.7 %). PMID:27154760

  3. [Respiratory behavior].

    PubMed

    Gallego, J; Gaultier, C

    2000-02-01

    The notion of respiratory behaviour is grounded, among other approaches, on studies of neuronal mechanisms of voluntary breathing, clinical data, conditioning experiments and respiratory sensations. The interactions between cortical centres of voluntary breathing and respiratory neurones in the brain stem are poorly understood: voluntary control operates through the direct action of corticomotor centres on respiratory motoneurones; however these cortical structures may directly act on bulbopontine centres, and therefore indirectly on respiratory motoneurones. Recordings in animals of brain stem neuronal activity, brain imaging in humans, and transcortical stimulation of the diaphragm in humans and in animal models support either one or the other hypothesis. The mutual independence of the automatic and the voluntary controls of breathing appears in patients with impaired bulbopontine automatism and operational voluntary control (Central Congenital Hypoventilation Syndrome), and in patients with the reverse impairment (locked-in syndrome). Finally, recent studies in humans and animals show that classical conditioning affects respiratory control and sensations. PMID:10756555

  4. Comparative analysis of respiratory chain and oxidative phosphorylation in Leishmania tarentolae, Crithidia fasciculata, Phytomonas serpens and procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Verner, Zdeněk; Cermáková, Petra; Skodová, Ingrid; Kováčová, Bianka; Lukeš, Julius; Horváth, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are unicellular parasites living in a wide range of host environments, which to large extent shaped their mitochondrial energy metabolism, resulting in quite large differences even among closely related flagellates. In a comparative manner, we analyzed the activities and composition of mitochondrial respiratory complexes in four species (Leishmania tarentolae, Crithidia fasciculata, Phytomonas serpens and Trypanosoma brucei), which represent the main model trypanosomatids. Moreover, we measured the activity of mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, the overall oxygen consumption and the mitochondrial membrane potential in each species. The comparative analysis suggests an inverse relationship between the activities of respiratory complexes I and II, as well as the overall activity of the canonical complexes and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Our comparative analysis shows that mitochondrial functions are highly variable in these versatile parasites. PMID:24556248

  5. Noninvasively measuring respiratory activity of rat primary hepatocyte spheroids by scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryosuke; Zhou, Yuanshu; Horiguchi, Yoshiko; Shiku, Hitoshi; Sonoda, Hiroshi; Itabashi, Naoshi; Yamamoto, Jiro; Saito, Taku; Matsue, Tomokazu; Hisada, Akiko

    2014-01-01

    Construction of an in vitro drug screening method for evaluating drug metabolism and toxicity by using cells is required instead of the conventional in vivo one that uses animals. In order to realize the in vitro study, analyzing the cellular activity or viability noninvasively in advance of the screening is essential. The aim of the current study is to establish a method that can evaluate the cellular activity depending on spheroid sizes by means of oxygen consumption and to determine the valid diameter of hepatocyte spheroids. To measure the respiratory activity of the spheroids, which were formed on a nanopillar sheet, we applied scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). From the viewpoint of high respiratory activity and its small variation, we determined that spheroids with 70 μm in diameter were adequate. We then performed a gene expression analysis by using a real-time PCR to evaluate the correlation with respiratory activity. As a result, a higher expression level of Hnf4α, which is essential for hepatocytes to fulfill many liver functions and is the indicator of well-differentiated hepatocytes, showed relatively higher respiratory activity. We concluded that the noninvasive SECM technique could evaluate the cellular activity of a single spheroid. Noninvasively measuring cellular activity by SECM makes it possible to evaluate the cellular activity prior to a nonclinical test and enables the continued monitoring of the drug response by using single spheroid. SECM becomes a powerful tool to satisfying the increasing demand for an in vitro system in the course of new drug development. PMID:23890543

  6. Reductive activation of E. coli respiratory nitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Ceccaldi, Pierre; Rendon, Julia; Léger, Christophe; Toci, René; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Magalon, Axel; Grimaldi, Stéphane; Fourmond, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    Over the past decades, a number of authors have reported the presence of inactive species in as-prepared samples of members of the Mo/W-bisPGD enzyme family. This greatly complicated the spectroscopic studies of these enzymes, since it is impossible to discriminate between active and inactive species on the basis of the spectroscopic signatures alone. Escherichia coli nitrate reductase A (NarGHI) is a member of the Mo/W-bisPGD family that allows anaerobic respiration using nitrate as terminal electron acceptor. Here, using protein film voltammetry on NarGH films, we show that the enzyme is purified in a functionally heterogeneous form that contains between 20 and 40% of inactive species that activate the first time they are reduced. This activation proceeds in two steps: a non-redox reversible reaction followed by an irreversible reduction. By carefully correlating electrochemical and EPR spectroscopic data, we show that neither the two major Mo(V) signals nor those of the two FeS clusters that are the closest to the Mo center are associated with the two inactive species. We also conclusively exclude the possibility that the major "low-pH" and "high-pH" Mo(V) EPR signatures correspond to species in acid-base equilibrium. PMID:26073890

  7. Respiratory responses to passive and active recovery from exercise.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Niizeki, K; Miyamoto, Y

    1997-02-01

    To investigate the effect of the neural components associated with leg movements on the control of ventilation during recovery from exercise, we recorded the minute ventilation (VE), oxygen uptake (VO2), and carbon dioxide output (VCO2) of eight normal volunteers during recovery from moderate, steady-state cycle exercise (170 W). The recovery phases were undergone separately under two different conditions: 5 min of rest (passive recovery) on a bicycle ergometer and 3 min of pedaling at a work rate of 0W (active recovery) followed by 2 min of rest. The phase-1 responses were observed in all the variables studied at the transition of passive recovery but not in the active recovery phase. The kinetics of VCO2, during the off-transition were significantly faster than those of VE in both recoveries, indicating that the decreases in VCO2 could precede the decreases in VE. Although the levels of VE and VCO2 during active recovery were significantly higher than those during passive recovery, the decline in VE was closely proportional to that of VCO2 under both recovery conditions, with resultant indications of similar VE-VCO2 regression lines. These findings suggest that the flux of CO2 to the lungs is an important determinant of ventilatory drive during recovery, and that neither central command nor neural afferents from contracting muscles are requisite for the control of ventilation during recovery from exercise. PMID:9159643

  8. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction for the detection and differentiation of avian influenza viruses and other poultry respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Rashid, S; Naeem, K; Ahmed, Z; Saddique, N; Abbas, M A; Malik, S A

    2009-12-01

    A multiplex reverse transcription-PCR (mRT-PCR) was developed and standardized for the detection of type A influenza viruses, avian influenza virus (AIV) subtype H7, H9, and H5 hemagglutinin gene with simultaneous detection of 3 other poultry respiratory pathogens, Newcastle disease virus (NDV), infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), and infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). Seven sets of specific oligonucleotide primers were used in this study for the M gene of AIV and hemagglutinin gene of subtypes H7, H9, and H5 of AIV. Three sets of other specific oligonucleotide primers were used for the detection of avian respiratory pathogens other than AIV. The mRT-PCR DNA products were visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis and consisted of DNA fragments of 1,023 bp for M gene of AIV, 149 bp for IBV, 320 bp for NDV, and 647 bp for ILTV. The second set of primers used for m-RT-PCR of H7N3, H9N2, and H5N1 provided DNA products of 300 bp for H7, 456 bp for H5, and 808 bp for H9. The mRT-PCR products for the third format consisted of DNA fragments of 149 bp for IBV, 320 bp for NDV, 647 bp for ILTV, 300 bp for H7, 456 bp for H5, and 808 bp for H9. The sensitivity and specificity of mRT-PCR was determined and the test was found to be sensitive and specific for the detection of AIV and other poultry respiratory pathogens. In this present study, multiplex PCR technique has been developed to simultaneously detect and differentiate the 3 most important subtypes of AIV along with the 3 most common avian respiratory pathogens prevalent in poultry in Pakistan. Therefore, a mRT-PCR that can rapidly differentiate between these pathogens will be very important for the control of disease transmission in poultry and in humans, along with the identification of 3 of the most common respiratory pathogens often seen as mixed infections in poultry, and hence economic losses will be reduced in poultry. PMID:19903950

  9. Effect of cardiopulmonary C fibre activation on the firing activity of ventral respiratory group neurones in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, C G; Bonham, A C

    1997-01-01

    1. Cardiopulmonary C fibre receptor stimulation elicits apnoea and rapid shallow breathing, but the effects on the firing activity of central respiratory neurones are not well understood. This study examined the responses of ventral respiratory group neurones: decrementing expiratory (Edec), augmenting expiratory (Eaug), and inspiratory (I) neurones during cardiopulmonary C fibre receptor-evoked apnoea and rapid shallow breathing. 2. Extracellular neuronal activity, phrenic nerve activity and arterial pressure were recorded in urethane-anaesthetized rats. Cardiopulmonary C fibre receptors were stimulated by right atrial injections of phenylbiguanide. Neurones were tested for antidromic activation from the contra- and ipsilateral ventral respiratory group (VRG), spinal cord and cervical vagus nerve. 3. Edec neurones discharged tonically during cardiopulmonary C fibre-evoked apnoea and rapid shallow breathing, displaying increased burst durations, number of impulses per burst, and mean impulse frequencies. Edec neurones recovered either with the phrenic nerve activity (25 s) or much later (3 min). 4. By contrast, the firing activity of Eaug and most I neurones was decreased, featuring decreased burst durations and number of impulses per burst and increased interburst intervals. Eaug activity recovered in approximately 3 min and inspiratory activity in approximately 1 min. 5. The results indicate that cardiopulmonary C fibre receptor stimulation causes tonic firing of Edec neurones and decreases in Eaug and I neuronal activity coincident with apnoea or rapid shallow breathing. PMID:9365917

  10. Respiratory muscle activity and oxygenation during sleep in patients with muscle weakness.

    PubMed

    White, J E; Drinnan, M J; Smithson, A J; Griffiths, C J; Gibson, G J

    1995-05-01

    Patients with respiratory muscle weakness show nocturnal hypoventilation, with oxygen desaturation particularly during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, but evidence in individuals with isolated bilateral diaphragmatic paresis (BDP) is conflicting. The effect of sleep on relative activity of the different respiratory muscles of such patients and, consequently, the precise mechanisms causing desaturation have not been clarified. We have studied eight patients, four with generalized muscle weakness and four with isolated BDP during nocturnal sleep with measurements including oxygen saturation and surface electromyographic (EMG) activity of various respiratory muscle groups. Nocturnal oxygenation correlated inversely with postural fall in vital capacity, an index of diaphragmatic strength. During REM sleep, hypopnoea and desaturation occurred particularly during periods of rapid eye movements (phasic REM sleep). In most subjects, such events were "central" in type and associated with marked suppression of intercostal muscle activity, but two subjects had recurrent desaturation due to "obstructive" hypopnoea and/or apnoea. Expiratory activity of the external oblique muscle was present whilst awake and during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in seven of the eight subjects in the semirecumbent posture. This probably represents an "accessory inspiratory" effect, which aids passive caudal diaphragmatic motion as the abdominal muscles relax at the onset of inspiration. Expiratory abdominal muscle activity was suppressed in phasic REM sleep, suggesting that loss of this "accessory inspiratory" effect may contribute to "central" hypopnoea. We conclude that, in patients with muscle weakness, nocturnal oxygenation correlates with diaphragmatic strength.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7656954

  11. Activity of bulbar respiratory neurons during fictive coughing and swallowing in the decerebrate cat.

    PubMed Central

    Oku, Y; Tanaka, I; Ezure, K

    1994-01-01

    1. The behaviour of medullary respiratory neurons was studied during fictive coughing and swallowing evoked by electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) in decerebrate, paralysed and artificially ventilated cats. Fictive coughing, swallowing and respiration were monitored by recording activities of the phrenic, hypoglossal and abdominal nerves. 2. Extracellular recordings were made from respiratory neurons in the ventral respiratory group (VRG) and in the Bötzinger complex (BOT). The neuronal types analysed included decrementing inspiratory neurons (I-DEC), augmenting expiratory neurons (E-AUG) and decrementing expiratory neurons (E-DEC) from the BOT area, and augmenting inspiratory neurons (I-AUG) and augmenting expiratory neurons (E-AUG) from the VRG area. 3. During fictive coughing, all the inspiratory and expiratory neurons were active during the inspiratory and expiratory phases of coughing, respectively. The firing of both I-DEC and I-AUG neurons was increased and prolonged in association with the augmented inspiratory activity of the phrenic nerve. The activity of E-AUG neurons of the VRG did not parallel the abdominal nerve activity, suggesting the existence of additional neurons which participate in the generation of abdominal nerve activity during fictive coughing. 4. During fictive swallowing, half of I-DEC neurons fired transiently at the onset of hypoglossal bursts associated with swallowing; the firing was suppressed during the rest of the hypoglossal bursts. Other I-DEC neurons were silent during hypoglossal bursts. Some I-AUG neurons fired during the initial half of hypoglossal bursts, and others were silent. The brief phrenic activity accompanying the swallowing might have originated from this activity in I-AUG neurons. The discharges of all E-AUG neurons (BOT and VRG) and the majority of E-DEC BOT neurons were suppressed during swallowing. 5. We conclude that these five types of respiratory neurons of the BOT and VRG are

  12. Fluctuation analysis-based risk assessment for respiratory virus activity and air pollution associated asthma incidence.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chung-Min; Hsieh, Nan-Hung; Chio, Chia-Pin

    2011-08-15

    Asthma is a growing epidemic worldwide. Exacerbations of asthma have been associated with bacterial and viral respiratory tract infections and air pollution. We correlated the asthma admission rates with fluctuations in respiratory virus activity and traffic-related air pollution, namely particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM₁₀), nitrogen dioxide (NO₂), carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur dioxide (SO₂), and ozone (O₃). A probabilistic risk assessment framework was developed based on a detrended fluctuation analysis to predict future respiratory virus and air pollutant associated asthma incidence. Results indicated a strong association between asthma admission rate and influenza (r=0.80, p<0.05) and SO₂ level (r=0.73, p<0.05) in Taiwan in the period 2001-2008. No significant correlation was found for asthma admission and PM₁₀, O₃, NO₂, and CO. The proposed fluctuation analysis provides a simple correlation exponent describing the complex interactions of respiratory viruses and air pollutants with asthma. This study revealed that there was a 95% probability of having exceeded 2987 asthma admissions per 100,000 population. It was unlikely (30% probability) that the asthma admission rate exceeded 3492 per 100,000 population. The probability of asthma admission risk can be limited to below 50% by keeping the correlation exponent of influenza to below 0.9. We concluded that fluctuation analysis based risk assessment provides a novel predictor of asthma incidence. PMID:21663946

  13. Relationship between respiratory mechanics and postinspiratory muscle activity during muscarinic challenge in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Romero, P V; Lopez-Aguilar, J; Zin, W A

    1996-12-01

    In six spontaneously breathing New Zealand rabbits (weight 2.36 +/- 0.29 kg) anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium (35 mg/kg i.v.) airflow, tidal volume, and tracheal and esophageal pressures were measured. These allowed the determination of breathing pattern parameters, respiratory system and lung resistances, elastances, and time constants, total postinspiratory muscle pressure and its timing parameters. The measurements were performed: (a) under control conditions; (b) after increasing concentrations of aerosolized methacholine (8, 16, 32, and 64 mg/ml); and (c) after aerosolized atropine (1 mg/ml). Methacholine progressively increased intrinsic mechanical load (resistance and elastance) of the respiratory system. Total postinspiratory muscle pressure (Pmus,0) increased in relation to the increase in elastic load. The duration of postinspiratory activity increased mainly because of the decrease in expiratory time. In conclusion, increase in inspiratory activity during expiration is due to two independent mechanisms controlling the amplitude and the relative duration. PMID:9017847

  14. Activity of Oral ALS-008176 in a Respiratory Syncytial Virus Challenge Study.

    PubMed

    DeVincenzo, John P; McClure, Matthew W; Symons, Julian A; Fathi, Hosnieh; Westland, Christopher; Chanda, Sushmita; Lambkin-Williams, Rob; Smith, Patrick; Zhang, Qingling; Beigelman, Leo; Blatt, Lawrence M; Fry, John

    2015-11-19

    BACKGROUND Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a cause of substantial morbidity and mortality. There is no known effective therapy. METHODS We conducted a randomized, double-blind, clinical trial in healthy adults inoculated with RSV. Participants received the oral nucleoside analogue ALS-008176 or placebo 12 hours after confirmation of RSV infection or 6 days after inoculation. Treatment was administered every 12 hours for 5 days. Viral load, disease severity, resistance, and safety were measured throughout the 28-day study period, with measurement beginning before inoculation. The primary end point was the area under the curve (AUC) for viral load, which was assessed immediately before administration of the first dose through the 12th day after inoculation in participants infected with RSV. RESULTS A total of 62 participants received placebo or one of three ALS-008176 dosing regimens: 1 loading dose of 750 mg followed by 9 maintenance doses of 500 mg (group 1), 1 loading dose of 750 mg followed by 9 maintenance doses of 150 mg (group 2), or 10 doses of 375 mg (group 3). In the 35 infected participants (23 of whom were treated with ALS-008176), the AUCs for viral load for groups 1, 2, and 3 and the placebo group were 59.9, 73.7, 133.4, and 500.9 log10 plaque-forming-unit equivalents × hours per milliliter, respectively (P≤0.001). The time to nondetectability on polymerase-chain-reaction assay (P<0.001), the peak viral load (P≤0.001), the AUC for symptom score (P<0.05), and the AUC for mucus weight were lower in all groups receiving ALS-008176 than in the placebo group. Antiviral activity was greatest in the two groups that received a loading dose--viral clearance was accelerated (P≤0.05), and the AUC for viral load decreased by 85 to 88% as compared with the placebo group. Within this small trial, no viral rebound or resistance was identified. There were no serious adverse events, and there was no need for premature discontinuation of the study

  15. Pharmacologic Activation of the Innate Immune System to Prevent Respiratory Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Guanjun; Fridlender, Zvi G.; Cheng, Guang-Shing; Chen, Bei; Mangalmurti, Nilam S.; Saloura, Vassiliki; Yu, Zaifang; Kapoor, Veena; Mozdzanowska, Krystyna; Moon, Edmund; Sun, Jing; Kreindler, James L.; Cohen, Noam A.; Caton, Andrew J.; Erikson, Jan; Albelda, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Drugs that can rapidly inhibit respiratory infection from influenza or other respiratory pathogens are needed. One approach is to engage primary innate immune defenses against viral infection, such as activating the IFN pathway. In this study, we report that a small, cell-permeable compound called 5,6-di-methylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA) can induce protection against vesicular stomatitis virus in vitro and H1N1 influenza A virus in vitro and in vivo through innate immune activation. Using the mouse C10 bronchial epithelial cell line and primary cultures of nasal epithelial cells, we demonstrate DMXAA activates the IFN regulatory factor-3 pathway leading to production of IFN-β and subsequent high-level induction of IFN-β–dependent proteins, such as myxovirus resistance 1 (Mx1) and 2′,5′-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1). Mice treated with DMXAA intranasally elevate mRNA/protein expression of Mx1 and OAS1 in the nasal mucosa, trachea, and lung. When challenged intranasally with a lethal dose of H1N1 influenza A virus, DMXAA reduced viral titers in the lungs and protected 80% of mice from death, even when given at 24 hours before infection. These data show that agents, like DMXAA, that can directly activate innate immune pathways, such as the IFN regulatory factor-3/IFN-β system, in respiratory epithelial cells can be used to protect from influenza pneumonia and potentially in other respiratory viral infections. Development of this approach in humans could be valuable for protecting health care professionals and “first responders” in the early stages of viral pandemics or bioterror attacks. PMID:21148741

  16. On the stoichiometry between uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation and respiratory chains. The catalytic action of SF 6847 (3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxy-benzylidenemalononitrile).

    PubMed

    Terada, H; VAN Dam, K

    1975-06-17

    Titration of State 4 rat-liver mitochondria at pH 7.2 with the uncoupler 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzylidenemalononitrile (SF 6847) at various concentrations of mitochondria and using various substrates indicates that under optimal conditions less than 0.2 molecule of 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzylidenemalononitrile per respiratory chain is sufficient to induce complete uncoupling. This result suggests that there is not a stoichiometric relationship between uncoupler molecules and cytochrome c oxidase, involved in oxidative phosphorylation, or between the former and phosphorylation assemblies. Experiments on the release by 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzylidenemalononitrile of azide-inhibited respiration of State 3 mitochondria and titrations with 5-chloro-3-tert-butyl-2'-chloro-4'-nitrosalicylanilide (S13) of State 4 mitochondria at various mitochondrial concentrations confirm this conclusion. PMID:1138887

  17. Probe-free real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays for the detection and typing of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Eschbaumer, Michael; Li, Wansi (May); Wernike, Kerstin; Marshall, Frank; Czub, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has tremendous impact on the pork industry in North America. The molecular diagnosis of infection with PRRS virus (PRRSV) is hampered by its considerable strain diversity. In this study, 43 previously published or newly developed primers for probe-free real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were evaluated on their sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, and repeatability, using a diverse panel of 36 PRRSV strains as well as other arteriviruses and unrelated porcine viruses. Three primer pairs had excellent diagnostic and analytical sensitivity on par with a probe-based reference assay, absolute specificity to virus genotype and species, as well as over 95% reproducibility and repeatability across a wide dynamic range. PMID:26130848

  18. Oxygen sensing in yeast: Evidence for the involvement of the respiratory chain in regulating the transcription of a subset of hypoxic genes

    PubMed Central

    Kwast, Kurt E.; Burke, Patricia V.; Staahl, Brett T.; Poyton, Robert O.

    1999-01-01

    Oxygen availability affects the transcription of a number of genes in nearly all organisms. Although the molecular mechanisms for sensing oxygen are not precisely known, heme is thought to play a pivotal role. Here, we address the possibility that oxygen sensing in yeast, as in mammals, involves a redox-sensitive hemoprotein. We have found that carbon monoxide (CO) completely blocks the anoxia-induced expression of two hypoxic genes, OLE1 and CYC7, partially blocks the induction of a third gene, COX5b, and has no effect on the expression of other hypoxic or aerobic genes. In addition, transition metals (Co and Ni) induce the expression of OLE1 and CYC7 in a concentration-dependent manner under aerobic conditions. These findings suggest that the redox state of an oxygen-binding hemoprotein is involved in controlling the expression of at least two hypoxic yeast genes. By using mutants deficient in each of the two major yeast CO-binding hemoproteins (cytochrome c oxidase and flavohemoglobin), respiratory inhibitors, and cob1 and ρ0 mutants, we have found that the respiratory chain is involved in the anoxic induction of these two genes and that cytochrome c oxidase is likely the hemoprotein “sensor.” Our findings also indicate that there are at least two classes of hypoxic genes in yeast (CO sensitive and CO insensitive) and imply that multiple pathways/mechanisms are involved in modulating the expression of hypoxic yeast genes. PMID:10318903

  19. Complete amino acid sequence of globin chains and biological activity of fragmented crocodile hemoglobin (Crocodylus siamensis).

    PubMed

    Srihongthong, Saowaluck; Pakdeesuwan, Anawat; Daduang, Sakda; Araki, Tomohiro; Dhiravisit, Apisak; Thammasirirak, Sompong

    2012-08-01

    Hemoglobin, α-chain, β-chain and fragmented hemoglobin of Crocodylus siamensis demonstrated both antibacterial and antioxidant activities. Antibacterial and antioxidant properties of the hemoglobin did not depend on the heme structure but could result from the compositions of amino acid residues and structures present in their primary structure. Furthermore, thirteen purified active peptides were obtained by RP-HPLC analyses, corresponding to fragments in the α-globin chain and the β-globin chain which are mostly located at the N-terminal and C-terminal parts. These active peptides operate on the bacterial cell membrane. The globin chains of Crocodylus siamensis showed similar amino acids to the sequences of Crocodylus niloticus. The novel amino acid substitutions of α-chain and β-chain are not associated with the heme binding site or the bicarbonate ion binding site, but could be important through their interactions with membranes of bacteria. PMID:22648692

  20. Circulating polymerase chain reaction chips utilizing multiple-membrane activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Hao; Chen, Yi-Yu; Liao, Chia-Sheng; Hsieh, Tsung-Min; Luo, Ching-Hsing; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Huei-Huang; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports a new micromachined, circulating, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip for nucleic acid amplification. The PCR chip is comprised of a microthermal control module and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic control module. The microthermal control modules are formed with three individual heating and temperature-sensing sections, each modulating a specific set temperature for denaturation, annealing and extension processes, respectively. Micro-pneumatic valves and multiple-membrane activations are used to form the microfluidic control module to transport sample fluids through three reaction regions. Compared with other PCR chips, the new chip is more compact in size, requires less time for heating and cooling processes, and has the capability to randomly adjust time ratios and cycle numbers depending on the PCR process. Experimental results showed that detection genes for two pathogens, Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes, 777 bps) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae, 273 bps), can be successfully amplified using the new circulating PCR chip. The minimum number of thermal cycles to amplify the DNA-based S. pyogenes for slab gel electrophoresis is 20 cycles with an initial concentration of 42.5 pg µl-1. Experimental data also revealed that a high reproducibility up to 98% could be achieved if the initial template concentration of the S. pyogenes was higher than 4 pg µl-1. The preliminary results of the current paper were presented at the 19th IEEE International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (IEEE MEMS 2006), Istanbul, Turkey, 22-26 January, 2006.

  1. TRMT5 Mutations Cause a Defect in Post-transcriptional Modification of Mitochondrial tRNA Associated with Multiple Respiratory-Chain Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Christopher A.; Kopajtich, Robert; D’Souza, Aaron R.; Rorbach, Joanna; Kremer, Laura S.; Husain, Ralf A.; Dallabona, Cristina; Donnini, Claudia; Alston, Charlotte L.; Griffin, Helen; Pyle, Angela; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Strom, Tim M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Rodenburg, Richard J.; Schottmann, Gudrun; Schuelke, Markus; Romain, Nadine; Haller, Ronald G.; Ferrero, Ileana; Haack, Tobias B.; Taylor, Robert W.; Prokisch, Holger; Minczuk, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Deficiencies in respiratory-chain complexes lead to a variety of clinical phenotypes resulting from inadequate energy production by the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system. Defective expression of mtDNA-encoded genes, caused by mutations in either the mitochondrial or nuclear genome, represents a rapidly growing group of human disorders. By whole-exome sequencing, we identified two unrelated individuals carrying compound heterozygous variants in TRMT5 (tRNA methyltransferase 5). TRMT5 encodes a mitochondrial protein with strong homology to members of the class I-like methyltransferase superfamily. Both affected individuals presented with lactic acidosis and evidence of multiple mitochondrial respiratory-chain-complex deficiencies in skeletal muscle, although the clinical presentation of the two affected subjects was remarkably different; one presented in childhood with failure to thrive and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and the other was an adult with a life-long history of exercise intolerance. Mutations in TRMT5 were associated with the hypomodification of a guanosine residue at position 37 (G37) of mitochondrial tRNA; this hypomodification was particularly prominent in skeletal muscle. Deficiency of the G37 modification was also detected in human cells subjected to TRMT5 RNAi. The pathogenicity of the detected variants was further confirmed in a heterologous yeast model and by the rescue of the molecular phenotype after re-expression of wild-type TRMT5 cDNA in cells derived from the affected individuals. Our study highlights the importance of post-transcriptional modification of mitochondrial tRNAs for faithful mitochondrial function. PMID:26189817

  2. TRMT5 Mutations Cause a Defect in Post-transcriptional Modification of Mitochondrial tRNA Associated with Multiple Respiratory-Chain Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Powell, Christopher A; Kopajtich, Robert; D'Souza, Aaron R; Rorbach, Joanna; Kremer, Laura S; Husain, Ralf A; Dallabona, Cristina; Donnini, Claudia; Alston, Charlotte L; Griffin, Helen; Pyle, Angela; Chinnery, Patrick F; Strom, Tim M; Meitinger, Thomas; Rodenburg, Richard J; Schottmann, Gudrun; Schuelke, Markus; Romain, Nadine; Haller, Ronald G; Ferrero, Ileana; Haack, Tobias B; Taylor, Robert W; Prokisch, Holger; Minczuk, Michal

    2015-08-01

    Deficiencies in respiratory-chain complexes lead to a variety of clinical phenotypes resulting from inadequate energy production by the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system. Defective expression of mtDNA-encoded genes, caused by mutations in either the mitochondrial or nuclear genome, represents a rapidly growing group of human disorders. By whole-exome sequencing, we identified two unrelated individuals carrying compound heterozygous variants in TRMT5 (tRNA methyltransferase 5). TRMT5 encodes a mitochondrial protein with strong homology to members of the class I-like methyltransferase superfamily. Both affected individuals presented with lactic acidosis and evidence of multiple mitochondrial respiratory-chain-complex deficiencies in skeletal muscle, although the clinical presentation of the two affected subjects was remarkably different; one presented in childhood with failure to thrive and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and the other was an adult with a life-long history of exercise intolerance. Mutations in TRMT5 were associated with the hypomodification of a guanosine residue at position 37 (G37) of mitochondrial tRNA; this hypomodification was particularly prominent in skeletal muscle. Deficiency of the G37 modification was also detected in human cells subjected to TRMT5 RNAi. The pathogenicity of the detected variants was further confirmed in a heterologous yeast model and by the rescue of the molecular phenotype after re-expression of wild-type TRMT5 cDNA in cells derived from the affected individuals. Our study highlights the importance of post-transcriptional modification of mitochondrial tRNAs for faithful mitochondrial function. PMID:26189817

  3. Relation Between Prefrontal Cortex Activity and Respiratory Rate During Mental Stress Tasks: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Yuta; Hu, Lizhen; Sakatani, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    In order to clarify the central mechanism controlling respiratory rate during mental stress, we examined the relation between prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity and respiratory rate during mental arithmetic (MA) tasks. Employing two-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), we measured hemoglobin (Hb) concentration changes in the bilateral PFC during MA tasks in normal adults. To evaluate asymmetry of the PFC activity, we calculated the laterality index (LI); (R-L)/(R + L) of oxy-Hb concentration changes (R = right, L = left); positive LI scores indicate right-dominant activity, while negative scores indicate left-dominant activity. For measurements of respiratory rate, we employed a Kinect motion sensor (Microsoft). The MA tasks increased both oxy-Hb in the bilateral PFC and respiratory rate (p < 0.001). In addition, there was a significant correlation between LI and respiratory rate (r = 0.582, p < 0.02). These results indicate that the MA-induced activity in the right PFC was greater than that in the left PFC in subjects with large increases of respiratory rate, suggesting that the right PFC has a greater role in cerebral regulation of respiratory rate during mental stress. PMID:27526145

  4. Stretch activates myosin light chain kinase in arterial smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Barany, K.; Rokolya, A.; Barany, M. )

    1990-11-30

    Stretching of porcine carotid arterial muscle increased the phosphorylation of the 20 kDa myosin light chain from 0.23 to 0.68 mol (32P)phosphate/mol light chain, whereas stretching of phorbol dibutyrate treated muscle increased the phosphorylation from 0.30 to 0.91 mol/mol. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by two-dimensional tryptic phosphopeptide mapping was used to identify the enzyme involved in the stretch-induced phosphorylation. Quantitation of the (32P)phosphate content of the peptides revealed considerable light chain phosphorylation by protein kinase C only in the phorbol dibutyrate treated arterial muscle, whereas most of the light chain phosphorylation was attributable to myosin light chain kinase. Upon stretch of either the untreated or treated muscle, the total increment in (32P)phosphate incorporation into the light chain could be accounted for by peptides characteristic for myosin light chain kinase catalyzed phosphorylation, demonstrating that the stretch-induced phosphorylation is caused by this enzyme exclusively.

  5. Respiratory processes in non-photosynthetic plastids

    PubMed Central

    Renato, Marta; Boronat, Albert; Azcón-Bieto, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    Chlororespiration is a respiratory process located in chloroplast thylakoids which consists in an electron transport chain from NAD(P)H to oxygen. This respiratory chain involves the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase complex, the plastoquinone pool and the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX), and it probably acts as a safety valve to prevent the over-reduction of the photosynthetic machinery in stress conditions. The existence of a similar respiratory activity in non-photosynthetic plastids has been less studied. Recently, it has been reported that tomato fruit chromoplasts present an oxygen consumption activity linked to ATP synthesis. Etioplasts and amyloplasts contain several electron carriers and some subunits of the ATP synthase, so they could harbor a similar respiratory process. This review provides an update on the study about respiratory processes in chromoplasts, identifying the major gaps that need to be addressed in future research. It also reviews the proteomic data of etioplasts and amyloplasts, which suggest the presence of a respiratory electron transport chain in these plastids. PMID:26236317

  6. Respiratory Muscle Activity During Simultaneous Stationary Cycling and Inspiratory Muscle Training.

    PubMed

    Hellyer, Nathan J; Folsom, Ian A; Gaz, Dan V; Kakuk, Alynn C; Mack, Jessica L; Ver Mulm, Jacyln A

    2015-12-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) strengthens the muscles of respiration, improves breathing efficiency, and increases fitness. The IMT is generally performed independently of aerobic exercise; however, it is not clear whether there is added benefit of performing the IMT while simultaneously performing aerobic exercise in terms of activating and strengthening inspiratory muscles. The purpose of our study was to determine the effect of IMT on respiratory muscle electromyography (EMG) activity during stationary cycling in the upright and drops postures as compared with that when the IMT was performed alone. Diaphragm and sternocleidomastoid EMG activity was measured under different resting and cycling postures, with and without the use of the IMT at 40% maximal inspiratory pressure (n = 10; mean age 37). Cycling in an upright posture while simultaneously performing the IMT resulted in a significantly greater diaphragm EMG activity than while performing the IMT at rest in upright or drops postures (p ≤ 0.05). Cycling in drops postures while performing the IMT had a significantly greater diaphragm EMG activity than when performing the IMT at rest in either upright or drops postures (p ≤ 0.05). Sternocleidomastoid muscle activity increased with both cycling and IMT, although posture had little effect. These results support our hypothesis in that the IMT while cycling increases respiratory EMG activity to a significantly greater extent than when performing the IMT solely at rest, suggesting that the combination of IMT and cycling may provide an additive training effect. PMID:26584054

  7. Preventing severe respiratory syncytial virus disease: passive, active immunisation and new antivirals.

    PubMed

    Murray, Joanna; Saxena, Sonia; Sharland, Mike

    2014-05-01

    In most high-income countries palivizumab prophylaxis is considered safe, efficacious and cost-effective for preventing respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospital admissions among specific subgroups of infants born preterm, with chronic lung disease or with congenital heart disease. Virtually all babies acquire RSV during infancy and previously healthy babies are not eligible to receive palivizumab. Emerging evidence suggests some benefit of palivizumab use in reducing recurrent wheeze among infants born preterm. Better longitudinal studies are needed to examine its clinical and cost-effectiveness on recurrent and chronic respiratory illness and associated healthcare burden on resources in the community and hospitals. Since 99% of child deaths attributed to RSV occur in resource poor countries where expensive prophylaxis is not available or affordable, palivizumab has limited potential to impact on the current global burden of RSV lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). A range of candidate vaccines for active immunisation against RSV are now in clinical trials. Two promising new antivirals are also currently in phase I/II trials to test their effectiveness in preventing severe RSV LRTI. These agents may be effective in preventing severe disease and phase III studies are in development. In the absence of effective active immunisation against RSV infection, population level approaches to prevent severe RSV LRTI should continue to focus on reducing prenatal and environmental risk factors including prematurity, smoking and improving hygiene practices. PMID:24464977

  8. Sarcoid-like lymphocytosis of the lower respiratory tract in patients with active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Smiéjan, J M; Cosnes, J; Chollet-Martin, S; Soler, P; Basset, F M; Le Quintrec, Y; Hance, A J

    1986-01-01

    To re-evaluate the relationship between Crohn's disease and sarcoidosis, we compared the numbers and types of cells recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage from normal volunteers and patients with Crohn's disease, with other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, and with sarcoidosis. Patients with Crohn's disease, but not patients with other inflammatory bowel disorders, had an increase in the number of T lymphocytes on the surface of the lower respiratory tract similar to that seen in patients with sarcoidosis. As in sarcoidosis, this lymphocytosis results from an expansion of the T4+ T-lymphocyte subset, is characteristic of patients with active disease only, and is not associated with similar abnormalities in the peripheral blood. Thus, patients with apparently localized Crohn's disease have sarcoid-like lymphocytosis of the lower respiratory tract, a finding that emphasizes the systemic nature of Crohn's disease and the disorder's close relationship to sarcoidosis. PMID:3940500

  9. Cardio-respiratory and daily activity monitor based on FMCW Doppler radar embedded in a wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Postolache, Octavian; Girão, Pedro Silva; Postolache, Gabriela; Gabriel, Joaquim

    2011-01-01

    Unobtrusive monitoring of the cardio-respiratory and daily activity for wheelchair users became nowadays an important challenge, considering population aging phenomena and the increasing of the elderly with chronic diseases that affect their motion capabilities. This work reports the utilization of FMCW (frequency modulated continuous wave) Doppler radar sensors embedded in a manual wheelchair to measure the cardiac and respiratory activities and the physical activity of the wheelchair user. Another radar sensor is included in the system in order to quantify the motor activity through the wheelchair traveled distance, when the user performs the manual operation of the wheelchair. A conditioning circuit including active filters and a microcontroller based primary processing module was designed and implemented to deliver the information through Bluetooth communication protocol to an Android OS tablet computer. The main capabilities of the software developed using Android SDK and Java were the signal processing of Doppler radar measurement channel signals, graphical user interface, data storage and Wi-Fi data synchronization with remote physiological and physical activity database. PMID:22254706

  10. TMPRSS2 Isoform 1 Activates Respiratory Viruses and Is Expressed in Viral Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zmora, Pawel; Moldenhauer, Anna-Sophie; Hofmann-Winkler, Heike; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The cellular protease TMPRSS2 cleaves and activates the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) and TMPRSS2 expression is essential for viral spread and pathogenesis in mice. Moreover, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and other respiratory viruses are activated by TMPRSS2. However, previous studies on viral activation by TMPRSS2 focused on a 492 amino acids comprising form of the protein (isoform 2) while other TMPRSS2 isoforms, generated upon alternative splicing of the tmprss2 mRNA, have not been characterized. Here, we show that the mRNA encoding a TMPRSS2 isoform with an extended N-terminal cytoplasmic domain (isoform 1) is expressed in lung-derived cell lines and tissues. Moreover, we demonstrate that TMPRSS2 isoform 1 colocalizes with HA and cleaves and activates HA. Finally, we show that isoform 1 activates the SARS-CoV spike protein for cathepsin L-independent entry into target cells. Our results indicate that TMPRSS2 isoform 1 is expressed in viral target cells and might contribute to viral activation in the host. PMID:26379044

  11. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus envelope protein ion channel activity promotes virus fitness and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Torres, Jose L; DeDiego, Marta L; Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M; Regla-Nava, Jose A; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Alcaraz, Antonio; Torres, Jaume; Aguilella, Vicente M; Enjuanes, Luis

    2014-05-01

    Deletion of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) envelope (E) gene attenuates the virus. E gene encodes a small multifunctional protein that possesses ion channel (IC) activity, an important function in virus-host interaction. To test the contribution of E protein IC activity in virus pathogenesis, two recombinant mouse-adapted SARS-CoVs, each containing one single amino acid mutation that suppressed ion conductivity, were engineered. After serial infections, mutant viruses, in general, incorporated compensatory mutations within E gene that rendered active ion channels. Furthermore, IC activity conferred better fitness in competition assays, suggesting that ion conductivity represents an advantage for the virus. Interestingly, mice infected with viruses displaying E protein IC activity, either with the wild-type E protein sequence or with the revertants that restored ion transport, rapidly lost weight and died. In contrast, mice infected with mutants lacking IC activity, which did not incorporate mutations within E gene during the experiment, recovered from disease and most survived. Knocking down E protein IC activity did not significantly affect virus growth in infected mice but decreased edema accumulation, the major determinant of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) leading to death. Reduced edema correlated with lung epithelia integrity and proper localization of Na+/K+ ATPase, which participates in edema resolution. Levels of inflammasome-activated IL-1β were reduced in the lung airways of the animals infected with viruses lacking E protein IC activity, indicating that E protein IC function is required for inflammasome activation. Reduction of IL-1β was accompanied by diminished amounts of TNF and IL-6 in the absence of E protein ion conductivity. All these key cytokines promote the progression of lung damage and ARDS pathology. In conclusion, E protein IC activity represents a new determinant for SARS-CoV virulence. PMID:24788150

  12. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Envelope Protein Ion Channel Activity Promotes Virus Fitness and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Torres, Jose L.; DeDiego, Marta L.; Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M.; Regla-Nava, Jose A.; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Alcaraz, Antonio; Torres, Jaume; Aguilella, Vicente M.; Enjuanes, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Deletion of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) envelope (E) gene attenuates the virus. E gene encodes a small multifunctional protein that possesses ion channel (IC) activity, an important function in virus-host interaction. To test the contribution of E protein IC activity in virus pathogenesis, two recombinant mouse-adapted SARS-CoVs, each containing one single amino acid mutation that suppressed ion conductivity, were engineered. After serial infections, mutant viruses, in general, incorporated compensatory mutations within E gene that rendered active ion channels. Furthermore, IC activity conferred better fitness in competition assays, suggesting that ion conductivity represents an advantage for the virus. Interestingly, mice infected with viruses displaying E protein IC activity, either with the wild-type E protein sequence or with the revertants that restored ion transport, rapidly lost weight and died. In contrast, mice infected with mutants lacking IC activity, which did not incorporate mutations within E gene during the experiment, recovered from disease and most survived. Knocking down E protein IC activity did not significantly affect virus growth in infected mice but decreased edema accumulation, the major determinant of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) leading to death. Reduced edema correlated with lung epithelia integrity and proper localization of Na+/K+ ATPase, which participates in edema resolution. Levels of inflammasome-activated IL-1β were reduced in the lung airways of the animals infected with viruses lacking E protein IC activity, indicating that E protein IC function is required for inflammasome activation. Reduction of IL-1β was accompanied by diminished amounts of TNF and IL-6 in the absence of E protein ion conductivity. All these key cytokines promote the progression of lung damage and ARDS pathology. In conclusion, E protein IC activity represents a new determinant for SARS-CoV virulence. PMID:24788150

  13. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Possesses an Antiviral Activity against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Labrie, Josée; Hernandez Reyes, Yenney; Burciaga Nava, Jorge A.; Gagnon, Carl A.; Jacques, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Pigs are often colonized by more than one bacterial and/or viral species during respiratory tract infections. This phenomenon is known as the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) are pathogens that are frequently involved in PRDC. The main objective of this project was to study the in vitro interactions between these two pathogens and the host cells in the context of mixed infections. To fulfill this objective, PRRSV permissive cell lines such as MARC-145, SJPL, and porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) were used. A pre-infection with PRRSV was performed at 0.5 multiplicity of infection (MOI) followed by an infection with App at 10 MOI. Bacterial adherence and cell death were compared. Results showed that PRRSV pre-infection did not affect bacterial adherence to the cells. PRRSV and App co-infection produced an additive cytotoxicity effect. Interestingly, a pre-infection of SJPL and PAM cells with App blocked completely PRRSV infection. Incubation of SJPL and PAM cells with an App cell-free culture supernatant is also sufficient to significantly block PRRSV infection. This antiviral activity is not due to LPS but rather by small molecular weight, heat-resistant App metabolites (<1 kDa). The antiviral activity was also observed in SJPL cells infected with swine influenza virus but to a much lower extent compared to PRRSV. More importantly, the PRRSV antiviral activity of App was also seen with PAM, the cells targeted by the virus in vivo during infection in pigs. The antiviral activity might be due, at least in part, to the production of interferon γ. The use of in vitro experimental models to study viral and bacterial co-infections will lead to a better understanding of the interactions between pathogens and their host cells, and could allow the development of novel prophylactic and therapeutic tools. PMID:24878741

  14. A novel peptide with potent and broad-spectrum antiviral activities against multiple respiratory viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hanjun; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Ke; Chu, Hin; Liu, Dabin; Poon, Vincent Kwok-Man; Chan, Chris Chung-Sing; Leung, Ho-Chuen; Fai, Ng; Lin, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Anna Jin-Xia; Jin, Dong-Yan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    A safe, potent and broad-spectrum antiviral is urgently needed to combat emerging respiratory viruses. In light of the broad antiviral activity of β-defensins, we tested the antiviral activity of 11 peptides derived from mouse β-defensin-4 and found that a short peptide, P9, exhibited potent and broad-spectrum antiviral effects against multiple respiratory viruses in vitro and in vivo, including influenza A virus H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, H7N7, H7N9, SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The antiviral activity of P9 was attributed to its high-affinity binding to viral glycoproteins, as well as the abundance of basic amino acids in its composition. After binding viral particles through viral surface glycoproteins, P9 entered into cells together with the viruses via endocytosis and prevented endosomal acidification, which blocked membrane fusion and subsequent viral RNA release. This study has paved the avenue for developing new prophylactic and therapeutic agents with broad-spectrum antiviral activities. PMID:26911565

  15. Muscle Transcriptional Profile Based on Muscle Fiber, Mitochondrial Respiratory Activity, and Metabolic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuan; Du, Yang; Trakooljul, Nares; Brand, Bodo; Muráni, Eduard; Krischek, Carsten; Wicke, Michael; Schwerin, Manfred; Wimmers, Klaus; Ponsuksili, Siriluck

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a highly metabolically active tissue that both stores and consumes energy. Important biological pathways that affect energy metabolism and metabolic fiber type in muscle cells may be identified through transcriptomic profiling of the muscle, especially ante mortem. Here, gene expression was investigated in malignant hyperthermia syndrome (MHS)-negative Duroc and Pietrian (PiNN) pigs significantly differing for the muscle fiber types slow-twitch-oxidative fiber (STO) and fast-twitch-oxidative fiber (FTO) as well as mitochondrial activity (succinate-dependent state 3 respiration rate). Longissimus muscle samples were obtained 24 h before slaughter and profiled using cDNA microarrays. Differential gene expression between Duroc and PiNN muscle samples were associated with protein ubiquitination, stem cell pluripotency, amyloid processing, and 3-phosphoinositide biosynthesis and degradation pathways. In addition, weighted gene co-expression network analysis within both breeds identified several co-expression modules that were associated with the proportion of different fiber types, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and ATP metabolism. In particular, Duroc results revealed strong correlations between mitochondrion-associated co-expression modules and STO (r = 0.78), fast-twitch glycolytic fiber (r = -0.98), complex I (r=0.72) and COX activity (r = 0.86). Other pathways in the protein-kinase-activity enriched module were positively correlated with STO (r=0.93), while negatively correlated with FTO (r = -0.72). In contrast to PiNN, co-expression modules enriched in macromolecule catabolic process, actin cytoskeleton, and transcription activator activity were associated with fiber types, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and metabolic enzyme activities. Our results highlight the importance of mitochondria for the oxidative capacity of porcine muscle and for breed-dependent molecular pathways in muscle cell fibers. PMID:26681915

  16. Supply Chain Management: Are You Maximizing Your Procurement Activity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbin, James; Jenkins, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Today's purchasing professionals recognize the need to reduce non-value-added procedures (clerical functions) while emphasizing strategic planning. Results-oriented supply-chain managers need superb communication, negotiation, and leadership skills to achieve long-term value and resist the lowest, first- cost bids. (Contains 13 references.) (MLH)

  17. Anticancer activity of branched-chain derivatives of oleic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A number of novel branched-chain derivatives (methyl, n-butyl, phenyl) of methyl oleate were produced by bromination in the allylic position and subsequent treatment with organocuprate reagents. These compounds and their free acid counterparts were tested in vitro for their antiproliferative activi...

  18. Influence of morphine on respiratory activities of phrenic and hypoglossal nerves in cats.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, D; St John, W M

    1986-06-01

    Anesthetic and sedative drugs have been found to diminish the respiratory motor activity of the hypoglossal nerve more than that of the phrenic nerve. This differential depression of motor activity to the upper airway may contribute to the exacerbation of obstructive sleep apnea by sedative drugs. To determine whether morphine has a similar selective action, we recorded phrenic and hypoglossal nerve activities before and after morphine administration in decerebrate, vagotomized cats, paralyzed with gallamine. Morphine diminished the activities of both nerves in most animals, but the responses were highly variable, and no consistent pattern of differential depression was apparent. The variability of the results may reflect the complex nature of opiate actions on the control of breathing. PMID:3738255

  19. Ribose 5-Phosphate Glycation Reduces Cytochrome c Respiratory Activity and Membrane Affinity‡

    PubMed Central

    Hildick-Smith, Gordon J.; Downey, Michael C.; Gretebeck, Lisa M.; Gersten, Rebecca A.; Sandwick, Roger K.

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous glycation of bovine heart cytochrome c (cyt c) by the sugar ribose 5-phosphate (R5P) decreases the ability of the heme protein to transfer electrons in the respiratory pathway and to bind to membranes. Trypsin fragmentation studies suggest the preferential sites of glycation include Lys72 and Lys87/88 of a cationic patch involved in the association of the protein with its respiratory chain partners and with cardiolipin-containing membranes. Reaction of bovine cyt c with R5P (50 mM) for 8 h modified the protein in a manner that decreased its ability to transfer electrons to cytochrome oxidase by 60%. An 18 hour treatment with R5P decreased bovine cyt c’s binding affinity with cardiolipin-containing liposomes by an estimated eightfold. A similar lower binding of glycated cyt c was observed with mitoplasts. The reversal of the effects of R5P on membrane binding by ATP further supports an A-site modification. A significant decrease in the rate of spin state change for ferro-cyt c, thought to be due to cardiolipin insertion disrupting the Met coordination to heme, was found for the R5P-treated cyt c. This change occurred to a greater extent than explained by the permanent attachment of the protein onto the liposome. Turbidity changes resulting from the multi-lamellar liposome fusion that is readily promoted by cyt c binding were not seen for the R5P-glycated cyt c samples. Collectively, these results demonstrate the negative impact that R5P glycation can have on critical electron transfer and membrane association functions of cyt c. PMID:22091532

  20. Mitochondrial Respiratory Defect Causes Dysfunctional Lactate Turnover via AMP-activated Protein Kinase Activation in Human-induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Im, Ilkyun; Jang, Mi-Jin; Park, Seung Ju; Lee, Sang-Hee; Choi, Jin-Ho; Yoo, Han-Wook; Kim, Seyun; Han, Yong-Mahn

    2015-12-01

    A defective mitochondrial respiratory chain complex (DMRC) causes various metabolic disorders in humans. However, the pathophysiology of DMRC in the liver remains unclear. To understand DMRC pathophysiology in vitro, DMRC-induced pluripotent stem cells were generated from dermal fibroblasts of a DMRC patient who had a homoplasmic mutation (m.3398T→C) in the mitochondrion-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (MTND1) gene and that differentiated into hepatocytes (DMRC hepatocytes) in vitro. DMRC hepatocytes showed abnormalities in mitochondrial characteristics, the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, the glycogen storage level, the lactate turnover rate, and AMPK activity. Intriguingly, low glycogen storage and transcription of lactate turnover-related genes in DMRC hepatocytes were recovered by inhibition of AMPK activity. Thus, AMPK activation led to metabolic changes in terms of glycogen storage and lactate turnover in DMRC hepatocytes. These data demonstrate for the first time that energy depletion may lead to lactic acidosis in the DMRC patient by reduction of lactate uptake via AMPK in liver. PMID:26491018

  1. Distribution and Respiratory Activity of Mycobacteria in Household Water System of Healthy Volunteers in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ichijo, Tomoaki; Izumi, Yoko; Nakamoto, Sayuri; Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Nasu, Masao

    2014-01-01

    The primary infectious source of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), which are known as opportunistic pathogens, appears to be environmental exposure, and it is important to reduce the frequency of exposure from environmental sources for preventing NTM infections. In order to achieve this, the distribution and respiratory activity of NTM in the environments must be clarified. In this study, we determined the abundance of mycobacteria and respiratory active mycobacteria in the household water system of healthy volunteers using quantitative PCR and a fluorescent staining method, because household water has been considered as one of the possible infectious sources. We chose healthy volunteer households in order to lessen the effect of possible residential contamination from an infected patient. We evaluated whether each sampling site (bathroom drain, kitchen drain, bath heater pipe and showerhead) have the potential to be the sources of NTM infections. Our results indicated that drains in the bathroom and kitchen sink are the niche for Mycobacterium spp. and M. avium cells were only detected in the bathtub inlet. Both physicochemical and biologic selective pressures may affect the preferred habitat of Mycobacterium spp. Regional differences also appear to exist as demonstrated by the presence (US) or absence (Japan) of Mycobacterium spp. on showerheads. Understanding of the country specific human activities and water usage will help to elucidate the infectious source and route of nontuberculous mycobacterial disease. PMID:25350137

  2. Control of pathogenic effector T-cell activities in situ by PD-L1 expression on respiratory inflammatory dendritic cells during respiratory syncytial virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Yao, S; Jiang, L; Moser, EK; Jewett, LB; Wright, J; Du, J; Zhou, B; Davis, SD; Krupp, NL; Braciale, TJ; Sun, J

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract illness in young infants, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals. We demonstrate here that the co-inhibitory molecule programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) is selectively upregulated on T cells within the respiratory tract during both murine and human RSV infection. Importantly, the interaction of PD-1 with its ligand PD-L1 is vital to restrict the pro-inflammatory activities of lung effector T cells in situ, thereby inhibiting the development of excessive pulmonary inflammation and injury during RSV infection. We further identify that PD-L1 expression on lung inflammatory dendritic cells is critical to suppress inflammatory T-cell activities, and an interferon–STAT1–IRF1 axis is responsible for increased PD-L1 expression on lung inflammatory dendritic cells. Our findings suggest a potentially critical role of PD-L1 and PD-1 interactions in the lung for controlling host inflammatory responses and disease progression in clinical RSV infection. PMID:25465101

  3. Serotonergic raphe magnus cell discharge reflects on-going autonomic and respiratory activities

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Peggy; Gao, Keming; Genzen, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonergic cells are located in a restricted number of brainstem nuclei, send projections to virtually all parts of the central nervous system, and are critical to normal brain function. They discharge tonically at a rate modulated by sleep/wake cycle and, in the case of medullary serotonergic cells in raphe magnus and the adjacent reticular formation (RM), are excited by cold challenge. Yet, beyond behavioral state and cold, endogenous factors that influence serotonergic cell discharge remain largely mysterious. The present study in the anesthetized rat investigated predictors of serotonergic RM cell discharge by testing whether cell discharge correlated to three rhythms observed in blood pressure recordings that averaged >30 minutes in length. A very slow frequency rhythm with a period of minutes, a respiratory rhythm, and a cardiac rhythm were derived from the blood pressure recording. Cross correlations between each of the derived rhythms and cell activity revealed that the discharge of 38 of the 40 serotonergic cells studied was significantly correlated to the very slow and/or respiratory rhythms. Very few serotonergic cells discharged in relation to the cardiac cycle and those that did, did so weakly. The correlations between serotonergic cell discharge and the slow and respiratory rhythms cannot arise from baroreceptive input. Instead we hypothesize that they are by-products of on-going adjustments to homeostatic functions that happen to alter blood pressure. Thus, serotonergic RM cells integrate information about multiple homeostatic activities and challenges and can consequently modulate spinal processes according to the most pressing need of the organism. PMID:17715191

  4. In vitro activity and rodent efficacy of clinafloxacin for bovine and swine respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Michael T.; Quesnell, Rebecca; Tiwari, Raksha; LeMay, Mary; Watts, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Clinafloxacin is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone that was originally developed and subsequently abandoned in the late 1990s as a human health antibiotic for respiratory diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the activity of clinafloxacin as a possible treatment for respiratory disease in cattle and pigs. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommended procedures with recent strains from the Zoetis culture collection. Rodent efficacy was determined in CD-1 mice infected systemically or intranasally with bovine Mannheimia haemolytica or Pasteurella multocida, or swine Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and administered clinafloxacin for determination of ED50 (efficacious dose-50%) values. The MIC90 values for clinafloxacin against bovine P. multocida, M. haemolytica, Histophilus somni, and M. bovis were 0.125, 0.5, 0.125, and 1 μg/ml, respectively, and the MIC90 values against swine P. multocida, A. pleuropneumoniae, S. suis, and M. hyopneumoniae were í0.03, í0.03, 0.125, and í0.008 μg/ml, respectively. Efficacy in mouse models showed average ED50 values of 0.019 mg/kg/dose in the bovine M. haemolytica systemic infection model, 0.55 mg/kg in the bovine P. multocida intranasal lung challenge model, 0.08 mg/kg/dose in the bovine P. multocida systemic infection model, and 0.7 mg/kg/dose in the swine A. pleuropneumoniae systemic infection model. Clinafloxacin shows good in vitro activity and efficacy in mouse models and may be a novel treatment alternative for the treatment of respiratory disease in cattle and pigs. PMID:23785362

  5. Enzymatic and energetic properties of the aerobic respiratory chain-linked NADH oxidase system in the marine bacterium Pseudomonas nautica.

    PubMed

    Cho, K H; Kim, Y J

    2000-08-31

    Membranes of Pseudomonas nautica, grown aerobically on a complex medium, oxidized both NADH and deamino-NADH as substrates. The activity of membrane-bound NADH oxidase was activated by monovalent cations including Na+, Li+, and K+. The activation by Na+ was higher than that by Li+ and K+. The maximum activity of NADH oxidase was obtained at about pH 9.0 in the presence of 0.08 M NaCl. The NADH oxidase activity was completely inhibited by 60 microM 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO), while the NADH:quinone oxidoreductase activity was about 37% inhibited by 60 microM HQNO. The activities of NADH oxidase and NADH:quinone oxidoreductase were about 40% inhibited by 60 microM rotenone. The fluorescence quenching technique revealed that electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone-1 (Q-1) or oxygen generated a membrane potential (deltapsi) which was larger and more stable in the presence of Na+ than in the absence of Na+. However, the All was highly sensitive to a protonophore, carbonyl-cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) even at alkaline pH. PMID:10987141

  6. Modulating antibiotic activity towards respiratory bacterial pathogens by co-medications: a multi-target approach.

    PubMed

    Vandevelde, Nathalie M; Tulkens, Paul M; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2016-07-01

    Non-antibiotic drugs can modulate bacterial physiology and/or antibiotic activity, opening perspectives for innovative therapeutic strategies. Focusing on respiratory pathogens and considering in vitro, in vivo, and clinical data, here we examine the effect of these drugs on the expression of resistance mechanisms, biofilm formation, and intracellular survival, as well as their influence on the activity of antibiotics on bacteria. Beyond the description of the effects observed, we also comment on concentrations that are active and discuss the mechanisms of drug-drug or drug-target interactions. This discussion should be helpful in defining useful targets for adjuvant therapy and establishing the corresponding pharmacophores for further drug fine-tuning. PMID:27094105

  7. Structure-activity relationship of synthetic branched-chain distearoylglycerol (distearin) as protein kinase C activators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Qingzhong; Raynor, R.L.; Wood, M.G. Jr.; Menger, F.M.; Kuo, J.F. )

    1988-09-20

    Several representative branched-chain analogues of distearin (DS) were synthesized and tested for their abilities to activate protein kinase C (PKC) and to compete for the binding of ({sup 3}H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) to the enzyme. Substitutions of stearoyl moieties at sn-1 and sn-2 with 8-methylstearate decreased activities on these parameters, relative to those of the parental diacylglycerol DS, a weak PKC activator. Substitutions with 8-butyl, 4-butyl, or 8-phenyl derivatives, on the other hand, increased activities of the resulting analogues to levels comparable to those seen for diolein (DO), a diacylglycerol prototype shown to be a potent PKC activator. Kinetic analysis indicated that 8-methyldistearin (8-MeDS) acted by decreasing, whereas 8-butyldistearin (8-BuDS) and 8-phenyldistearin (8-PhDS) acted by increasing, the affinities of PKC for phosphatidylserine (PS, a phospholipid cofactor) and Ca{sup 2+} compared to the values seen in the absence or presence of DS. The stimulatory effect of 8-BuDS and 8-PhDS on PKC, as DO, was additive to that of 1,2-(8-butyl)distearoylphosphatidylcholine (1,2(8-Bu)DSPC) and, moreover, they abolished the marked inhibition of the enzyme activity caused by high concentrations of 1,2(8-Bu)DSPC. The present findings demonstrated a structure-activity relationship of the branched-chain DS analogues in the regulation of PKC, perhaps related to their abilities to specifically modify interactions of PKC with PS and/or Ca{sup 2+} critically involved in enzyme activation/inactivation.

  8. Effect of selenite on the morphology and respiratory activity of Phanerochaete chrysosporium biofilms.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Ortiz, Erika J; Pechaud, Yoan; Lauchnor, Ellen; Rene, Eldon R; Gerlach, Robin; Peyton, Brent M; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Lens, Piet N L

    2016-06-01

    The temporal and spatial effects of selenite (SeO3(2-)) on the physical properties and respiratory activity of Phanerochaete chrysosporium biofilms, grown in flow-cell reactors, were investigated using oxygen microsensors and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) imaging. Exposure of the biofilm to a SeO3(2-) load of 1.67mgSeL(-1)h(-1) (10mgSeL(-1) influent concentration), for 24h, resulted in a 20% reduction of the O2 flux, followed by a ∼10% decrease in the glucose consumption rate. Long-term exposure (4days) to SeO3(2-) influenced the architecture of the biofilm by creating a more compact and dense hyphal arrangement resulting in a decrease of biofilm thickness compared to fungal biofilms grown without SeO3(2-). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the effect of SeO3(2-) on the aerobic respiratory activity on fungal biofilms is described. PMID:26935326

  9. Constraining the Lateral Helix of Respiratory Complex I by Cross-linking Does Not Impair Enzyme Activity or Proton Translocation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shaotong; Vik, Steven B

    2015-08-21

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is a multisubunit, membrane-bound enzyme of the respiratory chain. The energy from NADH oxidation in the peripheral region of the enzyme is used to drive proton translocation across the membrane. One of the integral membrane subunits, nuoL in Escherichia coli, has an unusual lateral helix of ∼75 residues that lies parallel to the membrane surface and has been proposed to play a mechanical role as a piston during proton translocation (Efremov, R. G., Baradaran, R., and Sazanov, L. A. (2010) Nature 465, 441-445). To test this hypothesis we have introduced 11 pairs of cysteine residues into Complex I; in each pair one is in the lateral helix, and the other is in a nearby region of subunit N, M, or L. The double mutants were treated with Cu(2+) ions or with bi-functional methanethiosulfonate reagents to catalyze cross-link formation in membrane vesicles. The yields of cross-linked products were typically 50-90%, as judged by immunoblotting, but in no case did the activity of Complex I decrease by >10-20%, as indicated by deamino-NADH oxidase activity or rates of proton translocation. In contrast, several pairs of cysteine residues introduced at other interfaces of N:M and M:L subunits led to significant loss of activity, in particular, in the region of residue Glu-144 of subunit M. The results do not support the hypothesis that the lateral helix of subunit L functions like a piston, but rather, they suggest that conformational changes might be transmitted more directly through the functional residues of the proton translocation apparatus. PMID:26134569

  10. Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Inhibitors Involved in ROS Production Induced by Acute High Concentrations of Iodide and the Effects of SOD as a Protective Factor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingyan; Duan, Qi; Wang, Tingting; Ahmed, Mohamed; Zhang, Na; Li, Yongmei; Li, Lanying; Yao, Xiaomei

    2015-01-01

    A major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is the mitochondria. By using flow cytometry of the mitochondrial fluorescent probe, MitoSOX Red, western blot of mitochondrial ROS scavenger Peroxiredoxin (Prx) 3 and fluorescence immunostaining, ELISA of cleaved caspases 3 and 9, and TUNEL staining, we demonstrated that exposure to 100 μM KI for 2 hours significantly increased mitochondrial superoxide production and Prx 3 protein expression with increased expressions of cleaved caspases 3 and 9. Besides, we indicated that superoxide dismutase (SOD) at 1000 unit/mL attenuated the increase in mitochondrial superoxide production, Prx 3 protein expression, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and improved the relative cell viability at 100 μM KI exposure. However, SOD inhibitor diethyldithiocarbamic acid (DETC) (2 mM), Rotenone (0.5 μM), a mitochondrial complex I inhibitor, and Antimycin A (10 μM), a complex III inhibitor, caused an increase in mitochondrial superoxide production, Prx 3 protein expression, and LDH release and decreased the relative cell viability. We conclude that the inhibitors of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I or III may be involved in oxidative stress caused by elevated concentrations of iodide, and SOD demonstrates its protective effect on the Fischer rat thyroid cell line (FRTL) cells. PMID:26294939

  11. Fine-Tuning of CD8(+) T Cell Mitochondrial Metabolism by the Respiratory Chain Repressor MCJ Dictates Protection to Influenza Virus.

    PubMed

    Champagne, Devin P; Hatle, Ketki M; Fortner, Karen A; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Thornton, Tina M; Yang, Rui; Torralba, Daniel; Tomás-Cortázar, Julen; Jun, Yong Woong; Ahn, Kyo Han; Hansen, Kirk C; Haynes, Laura; Anguita, Juan; Rincon, Mercedes

    2016-06-21

    Mitochondrial respiration is regulated in CD8(+) T cells during the transition from naive to effector and memory cells, but mechanisms controlling this process have not been defined. Here we show that MCJ (methylation-controlled J protein) acted as an endogenous break for mitochondrial respiration in CD8(+) T cells by interfering with the formation of electron transport chain respiratory supercomplexes. Metabolic profiling revealed enhanced mitochondrial metabolism in MCJ-deficient CD8(+) T cells. Increased oxidative phosphorylation and subcellular ATP accumulation caused by MCJ deficiency selectively increased the secretion, but not expression, of interferon-γ. MCJ also adapted effector CD8(+) T cell metabolism during the contraction phase. Consequently, memory CD8(+) T cells lacking MCJ provided superior protection against influenza virus infection. Thus, MCJ offers a mechanism for fine-tuning CD8(+) T cell mitochondrial metabolism as an alternative to modulating mitochondrial mass, an energetically expensive process. MCJ could be a therapeutic target to enhance CD8(+) T cell responses. PMID:27234056

  12. The effects of breathing exercise types on respiratory muscle activity and body function in patients with mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jeong-il; Jeong, Dae-Keun; Choi, Hyun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Fragmentary studies on characteristics of respiratory muscles are being done to increase respiratory capacity by classifying exercises into voluntary respiratory exercise which relieves symptoms and prevents COPD and exercise using breathing exercise equipment. But this study found changes on respiratory pattern through changes on the activity pattern of agonist and synergist respiratory muscles and studied what effect they can have on body function improvement. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen subjects in experimental group I that respiratory exercise of diaphragm and 15 subjects in experimental group II that feedback respiratory exercise were randomly selected among COPD patients to find the effective intervention method for COPD patients. And intervention program was conducted for 5 weeks, three times a week, once a day and 30 minutes a session. They were measured with BODE index using respiratory muscle activity, pulmonary function, the six-minute walking test, dyspnea criteria and BMI Then the results obtained were compared and analyzed. [Results] There was a significant difference in sternocleidomastoid muscle and scalene muscle and in 6-minute walk and BODE index for body function. Thus the group performing feedback respiratory had more effective results for mild COPD patients. [Conclusion] Therefore, the improvement was significant regarding the activity of respiratory muscles synergists when breathing before doing breathing exercise. Although, it is valuable to reduce too much mobilization of respiratory muscles synergists through the proper intervention it is necessary to study body function regarding improvement of respiratory function for patients with COPD. PMID:27064889

  13. The Activity Chain Safety and Liveness Specification of Composite Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; Huang, Xiaomei

    Web service composition is most impressing method for development and deployment of e-business. Description and modeling the behavior requirements of composite Web services for users and verifying composite Web service compliance to specific requirements is an important key in design of services. But most work does not address the issue of how to model the requirements that the BPEL4WS processes are supposed to satisfy. The specifications in verification works are general temporal relation based on activity or scenario in essence. Distinguish with these work, we propose a novel concept of behavior specification based on activity chain in which granularity is between activity and scenario. Chain existence mode, chain absence mode are designed to express such behavioral requirements based on activity chain that is similar with safety or liveness specification based on activity respectively. Encode them on Labeled Transition System LTS and then give them exact operation semantics. Finally, an example is illustrated.

  14. The nonstructural protein 11 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus inhibits NF-κB signaling by means of its deubiquitinating activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dang; Fan, Jinxiu; Fang, Liurong; Luo, Rui; Ouyang, Haiping; Ouyang, Chao; Zhang, Huan; Chen, Huanchun; Li, Kui; Xiao, Shaobo

    2015-12-01

    Since its emergence in the late 1980s, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has been devastating the swine industry worldwide. The causative agent is an Arterivirus, referred to as PRRS virus (PRRSV). The pathogenic mechanisms of PRRS are poorly understood, but are believed to correlate with the ability of PRRSV to inhibit immune responses of the host. However, precisely how the virus is capable of doing so remains obscure. In this study, we showed that PRRSV infection led to reduced ubiquitination of cellular proteins. Screening all of the 12 nonstructural proteins (Nsps) encoded by PRRSV revealed that, apart from the Nsp2 which contains the deubiqintinating (DUB) ovarian tumor (OTU) domain, Nsp11, which encodes a unique and conserved endoribonuclease (NendoU) throughout the Nidovirus order, also possesses DUB activity. In vivo assay demonstrated that Nsp11 specifically removed lysine 48 (K48)-linked polyubiquitin chains and the conserved sites C112, H144, D173, K180, and Y219 were critical for its DUB activity. Remarkably, DUB activity was responsible for the capacity of Nsp11 to inhibit nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation. Mutations abrogating the DUB activity of Nsp11 toward K48-linked polyubiquitin chains of IκBα nullified the suppressive effect on NF-κB. Our data add Nsp11 to the list of DUBs encoded by PRRSV and uncover a novel mechanism by which PRRSV cripples host innate immune responses. PMID:26342881

  15. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus NS4b Protein Inhibits Host RNase L Activation

    PubMed Central

    Thornbrough, Joshua M.; Jha, Babal K.; Yount, Boyd; Goldstein, Stephen A.; Li, Yize; Elliott, Ruth; Sims, Amy C.; Baric, Ralph S.; Silverman, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is the first highly pathogenic human coronavirus to emerge since severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in 2002. Like many coronaviruses, MERS-CoV carries genes that encode multiple accessory proteins that are not required for replication of the genome but are likely involved in pathogenesis. Evasion of host innate immunity through interferon (IFN) antagonism is a critical component of viral pathogenesis. The IFN-inducible oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS)-RNase L pathway activates upon sensing of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Activated RNase L cleaves viral and host single-stranded RNA (ssRNA), which leads to translational arrest and subsequent cell death, preventing viral replication and spread. Here we report that MERS-CoV, a lineage C Betacoronavirus, and related bat CoV NS4b accessory proteins have phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity and antagonize OAS-RNase L by enzymatically degrading 2′,5′-oligoadenylate (2-5A), activators of RNase L. This is a novel function for NS4b, which has previously been reported to antagonize IFN signaling. NS4b proteins are distinct from lineage A Betacoronavirus PDEs and rotavirus gene-encoded PDEs, in having an amino-terminal nuclear localization signal (NLS) and are localized mostly to the nucleus. However, the expression level of cytoplasmic MERS-CoV NS4b protein is sufficient to prevent activation of RNase L. Finally, this is the first report of an RNase L antagonist expressed by a human or bat coronavirus and provides a specific mechanism by which this occurs. Our findings provide a potential mechanism for evasion of innate immunity by MERS-CoV while also identifying a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27025250

  16. MSFC Respiratory Protection Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    CoVan, James P.

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the Marshall Space Flight Center Respiratory Protection program is provided in this poster display. Respiratory protection personnel, building, facilities, equipment, customers, maintenance and operational activities, and Dynatech fit testing details are described and illustrated.

  17. Tetrahydrocannabinol induces brain mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction and increases oxidative stress: a potential mechanism involved in cannabis-related stroke.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Valérie; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Rouyer, Olivier; Charles, Anne-Laure; Singh, François; Auger, Cyril; Schini-Kerth, Valérie; Marescaux, Christian; Raul, Jean-Sébastien; Zoll, Joffrey; Geny, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis has potential therapeutic use but tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), its main psychoactive component, appears as a risk factor for ischemic stroke in young adults. We therefore evaluate the effects of THC on brain mitochondrial function and oxidative stress, key factors involved in stroke. Maximal oxidative capacities V max (complexes I, III, and IV activities), V succ (complexes II, III, and IV activities), V tmpd (complex IV activity), together with mitochondrial coupling (V max/V 0), were determined in control conditions and after exposure to THC in isolated mitochondria extracted from rat brain, using differential centrifugations. Oxidative stress was also assessed through hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, measured with Amplex Red. THC significantly decreased V max (-71%; P < 0.0001), V succ (-65%; P < 0.0001), and V tmpd (-3.5%; P < 0.001). Mitochondrial coupling (V max/V 0) was also significantly decreased after THC exposure (1.8±0.2 versus 6.3±0.7; P < 0.001). Furthermore, THC significantly enhanced H2O2 production by cerebral mitochondria (+171%; P < 0.05) and mitochondrial free radical leak was increased from 0.01±0.01 to 0.10±0.01% (P < 0.001). Thus, THC increases oxidative stress and induces cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction. This mechanism may be involved in young cannabis users who develop ischemic stroke since THC might increase patient's vulnerability to stroke. PMID:25654095

  18. Tetrahydrocannabinol Induces Brain Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Dysfunction and Increases Oxidative Stress: A Potential Mechanism Involved in Cannabis-Related Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Valérie; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Rouyer, Olivier; Charles, Anne-Laure; Singh, François; Auger, Cyril; Schini-Kerth, Valérie; Marescaux, Christian; Raul, Jean-Sébastien; Zoll, Joffrey; Geny, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis has potential therapeutic use but tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), its main psychoactive component, appears as a risk factor for ischemic stroke in young adults. We therefore evaluate the effects of THC on brain mitochondrial function and oxidative stress, key factors involved in stroke. Maximal oxidative capacities Vmax (complexes I, III, and IV activities), Vsucc (complexes II, III, and IV activities), Vtmpd (complex IV activity), together with mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0), were determined in control conditions and after exposure to THC in isolated mitochondria extracted from rat brain, using differential centrifugations. Oxidative stress was also assessed through hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, measured with Amplex Red. THC significantly decreased Vmax (−71%; P < 0.0001), Vsucc (−65%; P < 0.0001), and Vtmpd (−3.5%; P < 0.001). Mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0) was also significantly decreased after THC exposure (1.8±0.2 versus 6.3±0.7; P < 0.001). Furthermore, THC significantly enhanced H2O2 production by cerebral mitochondria (+171%; P < 0.05) and mitochondrial free radical leak was increased from 0.01±0.01 to 0.10±0.01% (P < 0.001). Thus, THC increases oxidative stress and induces cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction. This mechanism may be involved in young cannabis users who develop ischemic stroke since THC might increase patient's vulnerability to stroke. PMID:25654095

  19. Inhibition of human monocyte respiratory burst, degranulation, phospholipid methylation and bactericidal activity by pneumolysin.

    PubMed Central

    Nandoskar, M; Ferrante, A; Bates, E J; Hurst, N; Paton, J C

    1986-01-01

    The interaction between the pneumococcal toxin pneumolysin and human monocytes was examined. At non-cytotoxic concentrations (0.5-2.5 HU/10(6) cells) pneumolysin depressed the oxygen-dependent respiratory burst in monocytes, induced by opsonized zymosan or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). This included depressed hexose-monophosphate shunt activity and hydrogen peroxide production. The toxin also depressed the ability of monocytes to degranulate (measured by release of lysozyme) in response to the above stimuli. Phospholipid transmethylation was also markedly decreased by pretreating monocytes with pneumolysin. These effects on monocyte functions were accompanied by a decreased ability of pneumolysin-treated monocytes to kill Streptococcus pneumoniae, the organism that produces the toxin. Cholesterol, which inhibits the haemolytic activity of the toxin, was shown to abrogate the effects of pneumolysin on monocytes. PMID:3804376

  20. Brush in the bath of active particles: Anomalous stretching of chains and distribution of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui-shu; Zhang, Bo-kai; Li, Jian; Tian, Wen-de; Chen, Kang

    2015-12-01

    The interaction between polymer brush and colloidal particles has been intensively studied in the last two decades. Here, we consider a flat chain-grafted substrate immersed in a bath of active particles. Simulations show that an increase in the self-propelling force causes an increase in the number of particles that penetrate into the brush. Anomalously, the particle density inside the main body of the brush eventually becomes higher than that outside the brush at very large self-propelling force. The grafted chains are further stretched due to the steric repulsion from the intruded particles. Upon the increase of the self-propelling force, distinct stretching behaviors of the chains were observed for low and high grafting densities. Surprisingly, we find a weak descent of the average end-to-end distance of chains at high grafting density and very large force which is reminiscent of the compression effect of a chain in the active bath.

  1. Brush in the bath of active particles: Anomalous stretching of chains and distribution of particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui-shu; Zhang, Bo-kai; Li, Jian; Tian, Wen-de; Chen, Kang

    2015-12-14

    The interaction between polymer brush and colloidal particles has been intensively studied in the last two decades. Here, we consider a flat chain-grafted substrate immersed in a bath of active particles. Simulations show that an increase in the self-propelling force causes an increase in the number of particles that penetrate into the brush. Anomalously, the particle density inside the main body of the brush eventually becomes higher than that outside the brush at very large self-propelling force. The grafted chains are further stretched due to the steric repulsion from the intruded particles. Upon the increase of the self-propelling force, distinct stretching behaviors of the chains were observed for low and high grafting densities. Surprisingly, we find a weak descent of the average end-to-end distance of chains at high grafting density and very large force which is reminiscent of the compression effect of a chain in the active bath. PMID:26671400

  2. Prevalence and Impact of Active and Passive Cigarette Smoking in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, S. Jean; Zhuo, Hanjing; Benowitz, Neal L.; Thompson, B. Taylor; Liu, Kathleen D.; Matthay, Michael A.; Calfee, Carolyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cigarette smoke exposure has recently been found to be associated with increased susceptibility to trauma- and transfusion-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We sought to determine 1) the prevalence of cigarette smoke exposure in a diverse multi-center sample of ARDS patients, and 2) whether cigarette smoke exposure is associated with severity of lung injury and mortality in ARDS. Design Analysis of the Albuterol for the Treatment of ALI (ALTA) and Omega ARDS Network studies. Setting Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network hospitals. Patients Three hundred eighty one patients with ARDS. Interventions None. Measurements NNAL (4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol), a validated tobacco-specific marker, was measured in urine samples from subjects enrolled in two NHLBI ARDS Network randomized controlled trials. Main Results Urine NNAL levels were consistent with active smoking in 36% of ARDS patients and with passive smoking in 41% of nonsmokers (vs 20% and 40% in general population, respectively). Patients with NNAL levels in the active smoking range were younger and had a higher prevalence of alcohol misuse, fewer comorbidities, lower severity of illness, and less septic shock at enrollment compared to patients with undetectable NNAL levels. Despite this lower severity of illness, the severity of lung injury did not significantly differ based on biomarker-determined smoking status. Cigarette smoke exposure was not significantly associated with death after adjusting for differences in age, alcohol use, comorbidities, and severity of illness. Conclusions In this first multicenter study of biomarker-determined cigarette smoke exposure in ARDS patients, we found that active cigarette smoke exposure was significantly more prevalent among ARDS patients compared to population averages. Despite their younger age, better overall health, and lower severity of illness, smokers by NNAL had similar severity of lung injury as patients with

  3. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities.

    PubMed

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-09-16

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3'-5' exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5'-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities. PMID:25197083

  4. One severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus protein complex integrates processive RNA polymerase and exonuclease activities

    PubMed Central

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Posthuma, Clara C.; Collet, Axelle; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.; Decroly, Etienne; Snijder, Eric J.; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    In addition to members causing milder human infections, the Coronaviridae family includes potentially lethal zoonotic agents causing severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome. The ∼30-kb positive-stranded RNA genome of coronaviruses encodes a replication/transcription machinery that is unusually complex and composed of 16 nonstructural proteins (nsps). SARS-CoV nsp12, the canonical RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), exhibits poorly processive RNA synthesis in vitro, at odds with the efficient replication of a very large RNA genome in vivo. Here, we report that SARS-CoV nsp7 and nsp8 activate and confer processivity to the RNA-synthesizing activity of nsp12. Using biochemical assays and reverse genetics, the importance of conserved nsp7 and nsp8 residues was probed. Whereas several nsp7 mutations affected virus replication to a limited extent, the replacement of two nsp8 residues (P183 and R190) essential for interaction with nsp12 and a third (K58) critical for the interaction of the polymerase complex with RNA were all lethal to the virus. Without a loss of processivity, the nsp7/nsp8/nsp12 complex can associate with nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme bearing 3′-5′ exoribonuclease and RNA cap N7-guanine methyltransferase activities involved in replication fidelity and 5′-RNA capping, respectively. The identification of this tripartite polymerase complex that in turn associates with the nsp14 proofreading enzyme sheds light on how coronaviruses assemble an RNA-synthesizing machinery to replicate the largest known RNA genomes. This protein complex is a fascinating example of the functional integration of RNA polymerase, capping, and proofreading activities. PMID:25197083

  5. Respiratory-related activity of cricothyroid muscle in awake normal humans.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, J R; Brancatisano, A; Engel, L A

    1991-05-01

    The role of the cricothyroid muscle (CT) in respiration is unclear. To examine the respiratory-related electrical activity of the CT, we measured its electromyogram (EMG) and compared it with that of the alae nasi (AN) in eight healthy subjects. During quiet breathing the CT EMG phasing was inspiratory in seven subjects. This pattern was similar to the AN with respect to phasing and shape of the integrated EMG. The onset of phasic CT and AN activity related to inspiration preceded flow by 173 +/- 39 and 570 +/- 76 (SE) ms, respectively (P less than 0.01). We measured the duration from onset of phasic activity to peak of the EMG (TA) and the total cycle duration (TT). TA/TT of the CT was 0.29 +/- 0.02, similar to that of the AN (0.28 +/- 0.03). Inspiratory resistive loading, panting, and voluntary hyperventilation increased CT activity above the peak level seen during tidal breathing. Voluntary glottic closure increased CT activity to a level above tonic but below peak tidal activity. The findings suggest that the phasic electrical activity of the CT simulates predominantly that of an upper airway dilator. PMID:1864803

  6. Expanding Voluntary Active-learning Opportunities for Pharmacy Students in a Respiratory Physiology Module

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Hardy; Colthorpe, Kay

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To expand voluntary active-learning opportunities for bachelor of pharmacy students enrolled in a third-year human physiology and pharmacology course and determine whether the additional course components improved learning outcomes. Design Additional voluntary active-learning opportunities including a large-class tutorial, additional formative assessment, and an online discussion were added to the Respiratory Physiology Module of the course. Examination scores were compared with those from previous years. A questionnaire was administered to assess students' perception of the active-learning components. Assessment Mean examination scores increased from 69.3% ± 24.4% in 2003 to 88.9% ± 13.4% in 2004 and 86.9% ± 17.6% in 2005, after the addition of the active-learning components. Students' overall perception of the value of the active-learning activities was positive. Summary The addition of voluntary active-learning course components to a required pharmacy course resulted in improved student examination scores, and decreased failure rate, and were accomplished at low cost and with little additional staff time. PMID:18483596

  7. Respiratory acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    Ventilatory failure; Respiratory failure; Acidosis - respiratory ... Causes of respiratory acidosis include: Diseases of the airways (such as asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease ) Diseases of the chest ( ...

  8. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for weak acid respiratory uncouplers to Vibrio fisheri

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, T.W.; Cronin, M.T.D.

    1997-02-01

    Acute toxicity values of 16 organic compounds thought to elicit their response via the weak acid respiratory uncoupling mechanism of toxic action were secured from the literature. Regression analysis of toxicities revealed that a measured 5-min V. fisheri potency value can be used as a surrogate for the 30-min value. Regression analysis of toxicity versus hydrophobicity, measured as the 1-octanol/water partition coefficient (log K{sub ow}), was used to formulate a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR). The equation log pT{sub 30}{sup {minus}1} = 0.489(log K{sub ow}) + 0.126 was found to be a highly predictive model. This V. fisheri QSAR is statistically similar to QSARs generated from weak acid uncoupler potency data for Pimephales promelas survivability and Tetrahymena pyriformis population growth impairment. This work, therefore, suggests that the weak acid respiratory uncoupling mechanism of toxic action is present in V. fisheri, and as such is not restricted to mitochondria-containing organisms.

  9. Evaluation of respiratory muscle activation in individuals with chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ovechkin, Alexander; Vitaz, Todd; de Paleville, Daniela Terson; Aslan, Sevda; McKay, William

    2010-09-30

    This study was undertaken to physiologically characterize respiratory muscle control in eighteen individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) through comparison with 14 matched non-injured (NI) subjects. Standard pulmonary function measures (FVC, FEV(1), PI(max) and PE(max)) were obtained along with surface electromyographic (sEMG) recording from respiratory muscles. A vector analysis of sEMG was used to calculate Similarity Index (SI) values relating SCI subject sEMG patterns to those produced by NI subjects. SI values for inspiratory and expiratory tasks were very consistent within the NI group, 0.92±0.03 and 0.93±0.04 (mean±SD), respectively. Altered multi-muscle patterns in the SCI group produced SI values that trended lower 0.84±0.11 for inspiratory tasks and were significantly lower, 0.59±0.22 for expiratory tasks. SI values for expiratory tasks were also significantly correlated with SCI levels and pulmonary function measures. These results suggest that pulmonary function after SCI is dependent upon the degree to which multi-muscle activation patterns are disrupted. PMID:20692382

  10. Sox2 Activates Cell Proliferation and Differentiation in the Respiratory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, David H.; Besnard, Valérie; Lange, Alexander W.; Keiser, Angela R.; Wert, Susan E.; Bruno, Michael D.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Sox2, a transcription factor critical for the maintenance of embryonic stem cells and induction of pluripotent stem cells, is expressed exclusively in the conducting airway epithelium of the lung, where it is required for differentiation of nonciliated, goblet, and ciliated cells. To determine the role of Sox2 in respiratory epithelial cells, Sox2 was selectively and conditionally expressed in nonciliated airway epithelial cells and in alveolar type II cells in the adult mouse. Sox2 induced epithelial cell proliferation within 3 days of expression. Epithelial cell proliferation was associated with increased Ki-67 and cyclin D1 staining. Expression of cell cycle genes, including FoxM1, Ccna2 (Cyclin A2), Ccnb2 (Cyclin B2), and Ccnd1 (Cyclin D1), was increased. Consistent with a role in cell proliferation, Sox2 activated the transcription of FoxM1 in vitro. In alveoli, Sox2 caused hyperplasia and ectopic differentiation of epithelial cells to those with morphologic and molecular characteristics of conducting airway epithelium. Sox2 induced the expression of conducting airway epithelial specific genes, including Scgb1a1, Foxj1, Tubb3, and Cyp2f2. Although prolonged expression of Sox2 caused cell proliferation and epithelial hyperplasia, Sox2 did not induce pulmonary tumors. Sox2 induces proliferation of respiratory epithelial cells and, subsequently, partially reprograms alveolar epithelial cells into cells with characteristics of the conducting airways. PMID:20855650

  11. Influence of respiratory motor neurone activity on human autonomic and haemodynamic rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonschorek, A. S.; Lu, L. L.; Halliwill, J. R.; Beightol, L. A.; Taylor, J. A.; Painter, J. A.; Warzel, H.; Eckberg, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    Although humans hold great advantages over other species as subjects for biomedical research, they also bring major disadvantages. One is that among the many rhythmic physiological signals that can be recorded, there is no sure way to know which individual change precedes another, or which change represents cause and which represents effect. In an attempt to deal with the inherent complexity of research conducted in intact human subjects, we developed and used a structural equation model to analyse responses of healthy young men to pharmacological changes of arterial pressure and graded inspiratory resistance, before and after vagomimetic atropine. Our model yielded a good fit of the experimental data, with a system weighted R2 of 0.77, and suggested that our treatments exerted both direct and indirect influences on the variables we measured. Thus, infusions of nitroprusside and phenylephrine exerted all of their direct effects by lowering and raising arterial pressure; the changes of R-R intervals, respiratory sinus arrhythmia and arterial pressure fluctuations that these drugs provoked, were indirect consequences of arterial pressure changes. The only direct effect of increased inspiratory resistance was augmentation of arterial pressure fluctuations. These results may provide a new way to disentangle and understand responses of intact human subjects to experimental forcings. The principal new insight we derived from our modelling is that respiratory gating of vagal-cardiac motor neurone firing is nearly maximal at usual levels of arterial pressure and inspiratory motor neurone activity.

  12. Plasminogen activator induction facilitates recovery of respiratory function following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Minor, Kenneth H; Seeds, Nicholas W

    2008-01-01

    The possibility that plasminogen activator (PA) plays a role in synaptic plasticity was explored in the spinal cord during the crossed phrenic phenomenon (CPP), where respiratory functional plasticity develops following spinal cord injury. Synaptic remodeling on phrenic motorneurons occurs during the characteristic delay period following spinal cord injury before CPP recovery of respiratory function. The molecular mechanisms underlying this plasticity are not well-defined. During the critical 1-2 h delay period required for this synaptic plasticity following a C2 hemisection in mice, uPA and tPA mRNAs are rapidly induced in C4-5 ventral spinal cord neurons in the ipsilateral phrenic motor nucleus (PMN), as are uPA and tPA protein levels. A role for uPA in CPP spinal cord plasticity is confirmed by the impaired ability of uPA knockout mice to acquire a good CPP response by 6 h post-hemisection and their lack of structural remodeling of PMN synapses that underlies development of the CPP response. PMID:18042398

  13. Environmental factors, immune changes and respiratory diseases in troops during military activities.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Chciałowski, Andrzej; Korsak, Jolanta

    2013-06-01

    Combat operations in contemporary theaters of war, as well as combat training, are carried out in all parts of the world, typically in a harsh environment. Specific environmental conditions, such as heat, cold, high-altitudes, desert climates, as well as chemical and biological pollution of both the atmosphere and soil, together with over-exertion, food restrictions, sleep deprivation, and psychological stress can all result in changes in the immune system and the occurrence of associated diseases. Respiratory diseases are one of the most common health problems among military personnel participating in combat training or deployed to operations in areas characterized by difficult climatic and sanitary conditions. They are, therefore, one of the main reasons for military personnel requiring ambulant and hospital treatment. The aim of the study was to discuss the influence of environmental factors and the conditions in which active duty is performed on changes in the immune system and the occurrence of respiratory tract diseases in a military environment. PMID:23403385

  14. Anesthetic activation of central respiratory chemoreceptor neurons involves inhibition of a THIK-1-like background K+ current

    PubMed Central

    Lazarenko, Roman M.; Fortuna, Michal G.; Shi, Yingtang; Mulkey, Daniel K.; Takakura, Ana C.; Moreira, Thiago S.; Guyenet, Patrice G.; Bayliss, Douglas A.

    2010-01-01

    At surgical depths of anesthesia, inhalational anesthetics cause a loss of motor response to painful stimuli (i.e., immobilization) that is characterized by profound inhibition of spinal motor circuits. Yet, although clearly depressed, the respiratory motor system continues to provide adequate ventilation under these same conditions. Here, we show that isoflurane causes robust activation of CO2/pH-sensitive, Phox2b-expressing neurons located in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) of the rodent brainstem, in vitro and in vivo. In brainstem slices from Phox2b-eGFP mice, the firing of pH-sensitive RTN neurons was strongly increased by isoflurane, independent of prevailing pH conditions. At least two ionic mechanisms contributed to anesthetic activation of RTN neurons: activation of a Na+-dependent cationic current and inhibition of a background K+ current. Single cell RT-PCR analysis of dissociated GFP-labeled RTN neurons revealed expression of THIK-1 (K2P13.1), a channel that shares key properties with the native RTN current (i.e., suppression by inhalational anesthetics, weak rectification, inhibition by extracellular Na+, and pH-insensitivity). Isoflurane also increased firing rate of RTN chemosensitive neurons in urethane-anesthetized rats, again independent of CO2 levels. In these animals, isoflurane transiently enhanced activity of the respiratory system, an effect that was most prominent at low levels of respiratory drive and mediated largely by an increase in respiratory frequency. These data indicate that inhalational anesthetics cause activation of RTN neurons, which serve an important integrative role in respiratory control; the increased drive provided by enhanced RTN neuronal activity may contribute, in part, to maintaining respiratory motor activity under immobilizing anesthetic conditions. PMID:20610767

  15. Influence of upper airway sensory receptors on respiratory muscle activation in humans.

    PubMed

    Redline, S; Strohl, K P

    1987-07-01

    We reasoned that neural information from upper airway (UA) sensory receptors could influence the relationship between UA and diaphragmatic neuromuscular responses to hypercapnia. In this study, the electromyographic (EMG) activities of the alae nasi (AN), genioglossus (GG), and chest wall (CW) or diaphragm (Di) to ventilatory loading were assessed in six laryngectomized, tracheostomized human subjects and in six subjects breathing with an intact UA before and after topical UA anesthesia. The EMG activities of the UA and thoracic muscles increased at similar rates with increasing hypercapnia in normal subjects, in subjects whose upper airways were anesthetized, and in laryngectomized subjects breathing with a cervical tracheostomy. Furthermore, in the laryngectomized subjects, respiratory muscle EMG activation increased with resistive inspiratory loading (15 cmH2O X l-1 X s) applied at the level of a cervical tracheostomy. At an average expired CO2 fraction of 7.0%, resistive loading resulted in a 93 +/- 26.3% (SE) increase in peak AN EMG activity, a 39 +/- 2.0% increase in peak GG EMG activity, and a 43.2 +/- 16.5% increase in peak CW (Di) EMG activity compared with control values. We conclude that the ventilatory responses of the UA and thoracic muscles to ventilatory loading are not substantially influenced by laryngectomy or UA anesthesia. PMID:3624139

  16. Respiratory syncytial virus activity and climate parameters during a 12-year period.

    PubMed

    Sirimi, Natalia; Miligkos, Michael; Koutouzi, Foteini; Petridou, Evi; Siahanidou, Tania; Michos, Athanasios

    2016-06-01

    The epidemic pattern of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection during long periods and the factors that determine seasonality are not well studied. In order to correlate the RSV epidemic activity with climate parameters, we conducted a retrospective study of children (0-14 year) who were hospitalized because of respiratory tract infection and had an RSV test performed in the major tertiary pediatric hospital of Greece during a 12-year period (2002-2013). Daily data regarding temperature and humidity were obtained from the Hellenic National Meteorological Service. A total of 2030/7516 (27%) children were tested positive for RSV infection. Among RSV positive children 1945/2030 (95.8%) were infants <1 year. A peak of RSV activity was measured in years 2002, 2003, and 2006 (>35% positive). The RSV season in our area spanned from December to April, with higher incidence during January through March. The peak monthly RSV incidence was observed during February with mean temperature 10.34 °C and mean relative humidity 69.16%. Regarding climate conditions, a statistically significant positive correlation was found between monthly RSV activity and mean monthly relative humidity (rho = 0.66, P-value = 0.02), whereas a negative correlation was found with mean monthly temperature (rho = -0.81, P-value = 0.002). However, in the multivariable analysis, only the effect of mean monthly temperature remained statistically significant (IRR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.68, 0.80). Further understanding of RSV seasonality in different geographic areas would be important in order to timely implement preventing strategies with immunoprophylaxis or future RSV vaccines. PMID:26575521

  17. Epidemic activity of respiratory syncytial virus is related to temperature and rainfall in equatorial tropical countries.

    PubMed

    Gamba-Sanchez, N; Rodriguez-Martinez, C E; Sossa-Briceño, M P

    2016-07-01

    Although viral acute lower respiratory infections (ALRIs) are a major public health problem in tropical low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), and there is growing evidence showing their relationship with meteorological parameters, studies performed in these countries are scarce. In an analytical cross-sectional study, we determined which of the main meteorological parameters (temperature, absolute humidity, rainfall, wind speed, and solar radiation) predicted respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) activity in a population of hospitalized children with ALRI during a 5-year period, from January 2009 to December 2013. Out of a total of 4559 children included in the study (mean age 9·2 ± 8·5 months), 2953 (64·8%) presented RSV infection during the 3-month period from March to May. In the multivariate analysis, after controlling for absolute humidity, wind speed, and solar radiation, temperature [incidence rate ratio (IRR) 2·25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·11-4·53, P = 0·024], and rainfall (IRR 1·01, 95% CI 1·00-1·02, P = 0·044) were independently associated with the monthly number of RSV infections. In conclusion, in Bogota, the capital of a tropical LMIC lying slightly above the equator, RSV activity peaks in the 3-month period from March to May, the main rainy period of the year in the city. In addition, rainfall and temperature are the two most important meteorological parameters that are independently associated with RSV activity in hospitalized children with ALRI in the city. PMID:26888544

  18. Effect of venotropic drugs on the respiratory activity of isolated mitochondria and in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Dominique; Delaive, Edouard; Houbion, Andrée; Eliaers, François; Remacle, José; Michiels, Carine

    2000-01-01

    Several drugs used in the treatment of chronic peripheral ischaemic and venous diseases, i.e. aescine, Cyclo 3, Ginkor Fort, hydroxyethylrutosides, naftidrofuryl, naphthoquinone and procyanidolic oligomers, were tested on the mitochondrial respiratory activity. The results show that all these drugs protected human endothelial cells against the hypoxia-induced decrease in ATP content. In addition, they all induced a concentration-dependent increase in respiratory control ratio (RCR) of liver mitochondria pre-incubated with the drugs for 60 min. The drugs were divided into two groups according to their effects. The first group (A), comprising aescine, Ginkor Fort, naftidrofuryl and naphthoquinone, increased RCR by decreasing state 4 respiration rate. The second group of drugs (B), comprising hydroxyethylrutosides, procyanidolic oligomers and Cyclo 3, increased RCR by increasing state 3 respiration rate. The drugs of group A were able to prevent the inhibition of complexes I and III respectively by amytal and antimycin A while the first two drugs of group B increased adenine nucleotide translocase activity. Cyclo 3 inhibited the carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (mCCP)-induced uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration. None of these seven drugs could protect complexes IV and V, respectively, from inhibition by cyanide and oligomycin. When tested on endothelial cells the drugs of group A, in contrast to group B, prevented the decrease in ATP content induced by amytal or antimycin A. The present results suggest that the protective effects on mitochondrial respiration activity by these venotropic drugs may explain their protective effect on the cellular ATP content in ischaemic conditions and some of their beneficial therapeutic effect in chronic vascular diseases. PMID:10928952

  19. Inspiratory activation is not required for episodic hypoxia-induced respiratory long-term facilitation in postnatal rats

    PubMed Central

    Tadjalli, Arash; Duffin, James; Li, Yan Mei; Hong, Hyunwook; Peever, John

    2007-01-01

    Episodic hypoxia causes repetitive inspiratory activation that induces a form of respiratory plasticity termed long-term facilitation (LTF). While LTF is a function of the hypoxic exposures and inspiratory activation, their relative importance in evoking LTF is unknown. The aims of this study were to: (1) dissociate the relative roles played by episodic hypoxia and respiratory activation in LTF; and (2) determine whether the magnitude of LTF varies as a function of hypoxic intensity. We did this by examining the effects of episodic hypoxia in postnatal rats (15–25 days old), which unlike adult rats exhibit a prominent hypoxia-induced respiratory depression. We quantified inspiratory phrenic nerve activity generated by the in situ working-heart brainstem before, during and for 60 min after episodic hypoxia. We demonstrate that episodic hypoxia evokes LTF despite the fact that it potently suppresses inspiratory activity during individual hypoxic exposures (P < 0.05). Specifically, we show that after episodic hypoxia (three 5 min periods of 10% O2) respiratory frequency increased to 40 ± 3.3% above baseline values over the next 60 min (P < 0.001). Continuous hypoxia (15 min of 10% O2) had no lasting effects on respiratory frequency (P > 0.05). To determine if LTF magnitude was affected by hypoxic intensity, the episodic hypoxia protocol was repeated under three different O2 tensions. We demonstrate that the magnitude and time course of LTF depend on hypoxic severity, with more intense hypoxia inducing a more potent degree of LTF. We conclude that inspiratory activation is not required for LTF induction, and that hypoxia per se is the physiological stimulus for eliciting hypoxia-induced respiratory LTF. PMID:17932158

  20. Mutations in LYRM4, encoding iron–sulfur cluster biogenesis factor ISD11, cause deficiency of multiple respiratory chain complexes

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sze Chern; Friemel, Martin; Marum, Justine E.; Tucker, Elena J.; Bruno, Damien L.; Riley, Lisa G.; Christodoulou, John; Kirk, Edwin P.; Boneh, Avihu; DeGennaro, Christine M.; Springer, Michael; Mootha, Vamsi K.; Rouault, Tracey A.; Leimkühler, Silke; Thorburn, David R.; Compton, Alison G.

    2013-01-01

    Iron–sulfur clusters (ISCs) are important prosthetic groups that define the functions of many proteins. Proteins with ISCs (called iron–sulfur or Fe–S proteins) are present in mitochondria, the cytosol, the endoplasmic reticulum and the nucleus. They participate in various biological pathways including oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), the citric acid cycle, iron homeostasis, heme biosynthesis and DNA repair. Here, we report a homozygous mutation in LYRM4 in two patients with combined OXPHOS deficiency. LYRM4 encodes the ISD11 protein, which forms a complex with, and stabilizes, the sulfur donor NFS1. The homozygous mutation (c.203G>T, p.R68L) was identified via massively parallel sequencing of >1000 mitochondrial genes (MitoExome sequencing) in a patient with deficiency of complexes I, II and III in muscle and liver. These three complexes contain ISCs. Sanger sequencing identified the same mutation in his similarly affected cousin, who had a more severe phenotype and died while a neonate. Complex IV was also deficient in her skeletal muscle. Several other Fe–S proteins were also affected in both patients, including the aconitases and ferrochelatase. Mutant ISD11 only partially complemented for an ISD11 deletion in yeast. Our in vitro studies showed that the l-cysteine desulfurase activity of NFS1 was barely present when co-expressed with mutant ISD11. Our findings are consistent with a defect in the early step of ISC assembly affecting a broad variety of Fe–S proteins. The differences in biochemical and clinical features between the two patients may relate to limited availability of cysteine in the newborn period and suggest a potential approach to therapy. PMID:23814038

  1. Abdominal Muscle Activity during Mechanical Ventilation Increases Lung Injury in Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianming; Wu, Weiliang; Zhu, Yongcheng; Jiang, Ying; Du, Juan; Chen, Rongchang

    2016-01-01

    Objective It has proved that muscle paralysis was more protective for injured lung in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the precise mechanism is not clear. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that abdominal muscle activity during mechanically ventilation increases lung injury in severe ARDS. Methods Eighteen male Beagles were studied under mechanical ventilation with anesthesia. Severe ARDS was induced by repetitive oleic acid infusion. After lung injury, Beagles were randomly assigned into spontaneous breathing group (BIPAPSB) and abdominal muscle paralysis group (BIPAPAP). All groups were ventilated with BIPAP model for 8h, and the high pressure titrated to reached a tidal volume of 6ml/kg, the low pressure was set at 10 cmH2O, with I:E ratio 1:1, and respiratory rate adjusted to a PaCO2 of 35–60 mmHg. Six Beagles without ventilator support comprised the control group. Respiratory variables, end-expiratory volume (EELV) and gas exchange were assessed during mechanical ventilation. The levels of Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 in lung tissue and plasma were measured by qRT-PCR and ELISA respectively. Lung injury scores were determined at end of the experiment. Results For the comparable ventilator setting, as compared with BIPAPSB group, the BIPAPAP group presented higher EELV (427±47 vs. 366±38 ml) and oxygenation index (293±36 vs. 226±31 mmHg), lower levels of IL-6(216.6±48.0 vs. 297.5±71.2 pg/ml) and IL-8(246.8±78.2 vs. 357.5±69.3 pg/ml) in plasma, and lower express levels of IL-6 mRNA (15.0±3.8 vs. 21.2±3.7) and IL-8 mRNA (18.9±6.8 vs. 29.5±7.9) in lung tissues. In addition, less lung histopathology injury were revealed in the BIPAPAP group (22.5±2.0 vs. 25.2±2.1). Conclusion Abdominal muscle activity during mechanically ventilation is one of the injurious factors in severe ARDS, so abdominal muscle paralysis might be an effective strategy to minimize ventilator-induce lung injury. PMID:26745868

  2. SERCA, complex I of the respiratory chain and ATP-synthase inhibition are involved in pleiotropic effects of NS1619 on endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Łukasiak, Agnieszka; Skup, Agata; Chlopicki, Stefan; Łomnicka, Magdalena; Kaczara, Patrycja; Proniewski, Bartosz; Szewczyk, Adam; Wrzosek, Antoni

    2016-09-01

    A large conductance potassium (BKCa) channel opener, NS1619 (1,3-dihydro-1- [2-hydroxy-5-(trifluoromethyl) phenyl]-5-(trifluoromethyl)-2H-benzimidazole-2-one), is well known for its protective effects against ischemia-reperfusion injury; however, the exact mode of its action remains unclear. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of NS1619 on endothelial cells. The endothelial cell line EA.hy926, guinea pig hearts and submitochondrial particles isolated from the heart were used. In the isolated guinea pig hearts, which were perfused using the Langendorff technique, NS1619 caused a dose-dependent increase in coronary flow that was inhibited by L-NAME. In EA.hy926 cells, NS1619 also caused a dose-dependent increase in the intracellular calcium ion concentration [Ca(2+)]i, as measured using the FURA-2 fluorescent probe. Moreover, NS1619 decreased the oxygen consumption rate in EA.hy926 cells, as assessed using a Clark-type oxygen electrode. However, when NS1619 was applied in the presence of oligomycin, the oxygen consumption increased. NS1619 also decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, as measured using a JC-1 fluorescent probe in the presence and absence of oligomycin. Additionally, the application of NS1619 to submitochondrial particles inhibited ATP synthase. In summary, NS1619 has pleiotropic actions on EA.hy926 cells and acts not only as an opener of the BKCa channel in EA.hy926 cells but also as an inhibitor of the respiratory chain component, sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase, which leads to the release of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum. Furthermore, NS1619 has the oligomycin-like property of inhibiting mitochondrial ATP synthase. PMID:27262382

  3. Prevalence of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus detection in aborted fetuses, mummified fetuses and stillborn piglets using quantitative polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    OLANRATMANEE, Em-on; WONGYANIN, Piya; THANAWONGNUWECH, Roongroje; TUMMARUK, Padet

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus detection in aborted fetuses (n=32), mummified fetuses (n=30) and stillborn piglets (n=27) from 10 swine herds in Thailand using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Pooled organs and umbilical cord from each fetus/piglet were homogenized and subjected to RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis. The qPCR was carried out on the ORF7 of the PRRS viral genome using fluorogenic probes for amplified product detection. The results revealed that 67.4% (60/89) of the specimens contained PRRS virus. The virus was found in 65.6% (21/32) of aborted fetuses, 63.3% (19/30) of mummified fetuses and 74.1% (20/27) of stillborn piglets (P=0.664). Genotype 1, genotype 2 and mixed genotypes of PRRS virus were detected in 19.1% (17/89), 25.8% (23/89) and 22.5% (20/89) of the specimens, respectively (P=0.316). PRRS virus antigen was retrieved from both non-PRRS-vaccinated herds (68.2%, 45/66) and PRRS-vaccinated herds (65.2%, 15/23) (P=0.794). These findings indicated that these specimens are important sources of the PRRS viral load and the viral shedding within the herd. Thus, intensive care on the routine management of dead fetuses and stillborn piglets in PRRS virus-positive herds should be emphasized. PMID:25866409

  4. C-Terminus of the B-Chain of Relaxin-3 Is Important for Receptor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Shabanpoor, Fazel; Bathgate, Ross A. D.

    2013-01-01

    Human relaxin-3 is a neuropeptide that is structurally similar to human insulin with two chains (A and B) connected by three disulfide bonds. It is expressed primarily in the brain and has modulatory roles in stress and anxiety, feeding and metabolism, and arousal and behavioural activation. Structure-activity relationship studies have shown that relaxin-3 interacts with its cognate receptor RXFP3 primarily through its B-chain and that its A-chain does not have any functional role. In this study, we have investigated the effect of modification of the B-chain C-terminus on the binding and activity of the peptide. We have chemically synthesised and characterized H3 relaxin as C-termini acid (both A and B chains having free C-termini; native form) and amide forms (both chains’ C-termini were amidated). We have confirmed that the acid form of the peptide is more potent than its amide form at both RXFP3 and RXFP4 receptors. We further investigated the effects of amidation at the C-terminus of individual chains. We report here for the first time that amidation at the C-terminus of the B-chain of H3 relaxin leads to significant drop in the binding and activity of the peptide at RXFP3/RXFP4 receptors. However, modification of the A-chain C-terminus does not have any effect on the activity. We have confirmed using circular dichroism spectroscopy that there is no secondary structural change between the acid and amide form of the peptide, and it is likely that it is the local C-terminal carboxyl group orientation that is crucial for interacting with the receptors. PMID:24349312

  5. Characterization of oxidative phosphorylation in the colorless chlorophyte Polytomella sp. Its mitochondrial respiratory chain lacks a plant-like alternative oxidase.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Prieto, Adrián; El-Hafidi, Mohammed; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; González-Halphen, Diego

    2002-07-01

    The presence of an alternative oxidase (AOX) in Polytomella sp., a colorless relative of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, was explored. Oxygen uptake in Polytomella sp. mitochondria was inhibited by KCN (94%) or antimycin (96%), and the remaining cyanide-resistant respiration was not blocked by the AOX inhibitors salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) or n-propylgallate. No stimulation of an AOX activity was found upon addition of either pyruvate, alpha-ketoglutarate, or AMP, or by treatment with DTT. An antibody raised against C. reinhardtii AOX did not recognized any polypeptide band of Polytomella sp. mitochondria in Western blots. Also, PCR experiments and Southern blot analysis failed to identify an Aox gene in this colorless alga. Finally, KCN exposure of cell cultures failed to stimulate an AOX activity. Nevertheless, KCN exposure of Polytomella sp. cells induced diminished mitochondrial respiration (20%) and apparent changes in cytochrome c oxidase affinity towards cyanide. KCN-adapted cells exhibited a significant increase of a-type cytochromes, suggesting accumulation of inactive forms of cytochrome c oxidase. Another effect of KCN exposure was the reduction of the protein/fatty acid ratio of mitochondrial membranes, which may affect the observed respiratory activity. We conclude that Polytomella lacks a plant-like AOX, and that its corresponding gene was probably lost during the divergence of this colorless genus from its close photosynthetic relatives. PMID:12160990

  6. Copper deficiency decreases the protein expression of Complex IV but not Complex I, II, III and V in mitochondrial respiratory chain in rat heart

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary copper (Cu) deficiency impairs mitochondrial respiratory function which is catalyzed by protein complexes. However, there are few reports showing the effect of Cu on the simultaneous expression of the protein subunits for all five respiratory complexes. The present study was undertaken to de...

  7. Molecular changes in mitochondrial respiratory activity and metabolic enzyme activity in muscle of four pig breeds with distinct metabolic types.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan; Trakooljul, Nares; Muráni, Eduard; Krischek, Carsten; Schellander, Karl; Wicke, Michael; Wimmers, Klaus; Ponsuksili, Siriluck

    2016-02-01

    Skeletal muscles are metabolically active and have market value in meat-producing farm animals. A better understanding of biological pathways affecting energy metabolism in skeletal muscle could advance the science of skeletal muscle. In this study, comparative pathway-focused gene expression profiling in conjunction with muscle fiber typing were analyzed in skeletal muscles from Duroc, Pietrain, and Duroc-Pietrain crossbred pigs. Each breed type displayed a distinct muscle fiber-type composition. Mitochondrial respiratory activity and glycolytic and oxidative enzyme activities were comparable among genotypes, except for significantly lower complex I activity in Pietrain pigs homozygous-positive for malignant hyperthermia syndrome. At the transcriptional level, lactate dehydrogenase B showed breed specificity, with significantly lower expression in Pietrain pigs homozygous-positive for malignant hyperthermia syndrome. A similar mRNA expression pattern was shown for several subunits of oxidative phosphorylation complexes, including complex I, complex II, complex IV, and ATP synthase. Significant correlations were observed between mRNA expression of genes in focused pathways and enzyme activities in a breed-dependent manner. Moreover, expression patterns of pathway-focused genes were well correlated with muscle fiber-type composition. These results stress the importance of regulation of transcriptional rate of genes related to oxidative and glycolytic pathways in the metabolic capacity of muscle fibers. Overall, the results further the breed-specific understanding of the molecular basis of metabolic enzyme activities, which directly impact meat quality. PMID:26759028

  8. Relative activity of respiratory muscles during prescribed inspiratory muscle training in healthy people

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ju-hyeon; Kim, Nan-soo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of different intensities of inspiratory muscle training on the relative respiratory muscle activity in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy male volunteers were instructed to perform inspiratory muscle training (0%, 40%, 60%, and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure) on the basis of their individual intensities. The inspiratory muscle training was performed in random order of intensities. Surface electromyography data were collected from the right-side diaphragm, external intercostal, and sternocleidomastoid, and pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, forced vital capacity, and their ratio; peak expiratory flow; and maximal inspiratory pressure) were measured. [Results] Comparison of the relative activity of the diaphragm showed significant differences between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. Furthermore, significant differences were found in sternocleidomastoid relative activity between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. [Conclusion] During inspiratory muscle training in the clinic, the patients were assisted (verbally or through feedback) by therapists to avoid overactivation of their accessory muscles (sternocleidomastoid). This study recommends that inspiratory muscle training be performed at an accurate and appropriate intensity through the practice of proper deep breathing. PMID:27134409

  9. Respiratory water loss in relation to activity in fullterm infants on their first day after birth.

    PubMed

    Riesenfeld, T; Hammarlund, K; Sedin, G

    1987-11-01

    Respiratory water loss (RWL), oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production were measured in ten fullterm infants on their first day after birth, using an open flow-through system with a mass spectrometer, specially equipped with a water channel, for analysis of gas concentrations. Measurements were made both with the infant asleep and during different levels of motor activity. The ambient temperature was maintained at approximately 32.5 degrees C and the ambient relative humidity at 50%. RWL increased from 4.2 +/- 0.7 (SD) mg/kg min when the infant was asleep to 6.3 +/- 1.0 mg/kg min when he or she was awake but calm; with increasing activity there was a further increase in RWL. The oxygen consumption increased from 5.4 +/- 0.9 (SD) ml/kg min during sleep to 6.9 +/- 0.8 (SD) ml/kg min when awake, and also increased further with increasing activity. PMID:3425306

  10. Nighttime instabilities of neurophysiological, cardiovascular, and respiratory activity: integrative modeling and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Shusterman, Vladimir; Troy, William C; Abdelmessih, Medhat; Hoffman, Stacy; Nemec, Jan; Strollo, Patrick J; London, Barry; Lampert, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Unstable (cyclical alternating pattern, or CAP) sleep is associated with surges of sympathetic nervous system activity, increased blood pressure and vasoconstriction, heightened baroreflex sensitivity, and unstable heart rhythm and breathing. In susceptible persons, CAP sleep provokes clinically significant events, including hypertensive crises, sleep-disordered breathing, and cardiac arrhythmias. Here we explore the neurophysiology of CAP sleep and its impact on cardiovascular and respiratory functions. We show that: (i) an increase in neurophysiological recovery rate can explain the emergence of slow, self-sustained, hypersynchronized A1 CAP-sleep pattern and its transition to the faster A2-A3 CAP-sleep patterns; (ii) in a two-dimensional, continuous model of cardiac tissue with heterogeneous action potential duration (APD) distribution, heart rate accelerations during CAP sleep may encounter incompletely recovered electrical excitability in cell clusters with longer APD. If the interaction between short cycle length and incomplete, spatially heterogeneous repolarization persists over multiple cycles, irregularities and asymmetry of depolarization front may accumulate and ultimately lead to a conduction block, retrograde conduction, breakup of activation waves, reentrant activity, and arrhythmias; and (iii) these modeling results are consistent with the nighttime data obtained from patients with structural heart disease (N=13) that show clusters of atrial and ventricular premature beats occurring during the periods of unstable heart rhythm and respiration that accompany CAP sleep. In these patients, CAP sleep is also accompanied by delayed adaptation of QT intervals and T-wave alternans. PMID:26341647

  11. Phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-Kinase Isoforms Exhibit Acyl Chain Selectivity for Both Substrate and Lipid Activator*

    PubMed Central

    Shulga, Yulia V.; Anderson, Richard A.; Topham, Matthew K.; Epand, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate is mostly produced in the cell by phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinases (PIP5K) and has a crucial role in numerous signaling events. Here we demonstrate that in vitro all three isoforms of PIP5K, α, β, and γ, discriminate among substrates with different acyl chains for both the substrates phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) and phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) although to different extents, with isoform γ being the most selective. Fully saturated dipalmitoyl-PtdIns4P was a poor substrate for all three isoforms, but both the 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl and the 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl forms of PtdIns4P were good substrates. Vmax was greater for the 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl form compared with the 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl form, although for PIP5Kβ the difference was small. For the α and γ isoforms, Km was much lower for 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl PtdIns4P, making this lipid the better substrate of the two under most conditions. Activation of PIP5K by phosphatidic acid is also acyl chain-dependent. Species of phosphatidic acid with two unsaturated acyl chains are much better activators of PIP5K than those containing one saturated and one unsaturated acyl chain. PtdIns is a poor substrate for PIP5K, but it also shows acyl chain selectivity. Curiously, there is no acyl chain discrimination among species of phosphatidic acid in the activation of the phosphorylation of PtdIns. Together, our findings indicate that PIP5K isoforms α, β, and γ act selectively on substrates and activators with different acyl chains. This could be a tightly regulated mechanism of producing physiologically active unsaturated phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate species in the cell. PMID:22942276

  12. Mechanical Properties of Respiratory Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Sieck, Gary C.; Ferreira, Leonardo F.; Reid, Michael B.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2014-01-01

    Striated respiratory muscles are necessary for lung ventilation and to maintain the patency of the upper airway. The basic structural and functional properties of respiratory muscles are similar to those of other striated muscles (both skeletal and cardiac). The sarcomere is the fundamental organizational unit of striated muscles and sarcomeric proteins underlie the passive and active mechanical properties of muscle fibers. In this respect, the functional categorization of different fiber types provides a conceptual framework to understand the physiological properties of respiratory muscles. Within the sarcomere, the interaction between the thick and thin filaments at the level of cross-bridges provides the elementary unit of force generation and contraction. Key to an understanding of the unique functional differences across muscle fiber types are differences in cross-bridge recruitment and cycling that relate to the expression of different myosin heavy chain isoforms in the thick filament. The active mechanical properties of muscle fibers are characterized by the relationship between myoplasmic Ca2+ and cross-bridge recruitment, force generation and sarcomere length (also cross-bridge recruitment), external load and shortening velocity (cross-bridge cycling rate), and cross-bridge cycling rate and ATP consumption. Passive mechanical properties are also important reflecting viscoelastic elements within sarcomeres as well as the extracellular matrix. Conditions that affect respiratory muscle performance may have a range of underlying pathophysiological causes, but their manifestations will depend on their impact on these basic elemental structures. PMID:24265238

  13. The Effects of Plantago major on the Activation of the Neutrophil Respiratory Burst.

    PubMed

    Reina, Elaine; Al-Shibani, Nouf; Allam, Eman; Gregson, Karen S; Kowolik, Michael; Windsor, L Jack

    2013-10-01

    Plantago major is a common plant that grows worldwide in temperate zones and is found in fields, lawns, and on the roadsides. Its leaves and seeds have been used in almost all parts of the world for centuries as a wound healer, analgesic, antioxidant, and antibiotic, as well as an immune system modulator, antiviral, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory agent. Baicalein and aucubin are the two most biologically active components of P. major, and both have been shown to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Neutrophils have a pivotal role in wound healing and inflammation. Their principal mechanism of host defense is the killing of pathogens via the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro effects of P. major extract, baicalein, and aucubin on human neutrophil respiratory burst activity. The cytotoxicity of the agents was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. A standard luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) assay was utilized to monitor the respiratory burst of the neutrophils after exposure to P. major extract and its two active ingredients, baicalein and aucubin. Three replicates per group were included in each of the three runs of the experiments and analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for statistical analysis. P. major and baicalein were not toxic to the cells at any of the concentrations examined. Aucubin was toxic to the cells only at the highest concentration tested (P = 0.0081). However, genistein was toxic to the cells at all of the concentrations examined except for the lowest concentration of 16.9 μg/ml (P = 0.985). P. major (-0.10 ± 0.11), aucubin (0.06 ± 0.16), baicalein (-0.10 ± 0.11), and genistein (-0.18 ± 0.07) all significantly (P < 0.0001) inhibited ROS production from the neutrophils. P. major extract inhibited neutrophil ROS production, as did aucubin and baicalein. Therefore, these components should be investigated further with relation to

  14. Dissection of the Caffeate Respiratory Chain in the Acetogen Acetobacterium woodii: Identification of an Rnf-Type NADH Dehydrogenase as a Potential Coupling Site▿

    PubMed Central

    Imkamp, Frank; Biegel, Eva; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Buckel, Wolfgang; Müller, Volker

    2007-01-01

    The anaerobic acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii couples caffeate reduction with electrons derived from hydrogen to the synthesis of ATP by a chemiosmotic mechanism with sodium ions as coupling ions, a process referred to as caffeate respiration. We addressed the nature of the hitherto unknown enzymatic activities involved in this process and their cellular localization. Cell extract of A. woodii catalyzes H2-dependent caffeate reduction. This reaction is strictly ATP dependent but can be activated also by acetyl coenzyme A (CoA), indicating that there is formation of caffeyl-CoA prior to reduction. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed proteins present only in caffeate-grown cells. Two proteins were identified by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry, and the encoding genes were cloned. These proteins are very similar to subunits α (EtfA) and β (EtfB) of electron transfer flavoproteins present in various anaerobic bacteria. Western blot analysis demonstrated that they are induced by caffeate and localized in the cytoplasm. Etf proteins are known electron carriers that shuttle electrons from NADH to different acceptors. Indeed, NADH was used as an electron donor for cytosolic caffeate reduction. Since the hydrogenase was soluble and used ferredoxin as an electron acceptor, the missing link was a ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase. This activity could be determined and, interestingly, was membrane bound. A search for genes that could encode this activity revealed DNA fragments encoding subunits C and D of a membrane-bound Rnf-type NADH dehydrogenase that is a potential Na+ pump. These data suggest the following electron transport chain: H2 → ferredoxin → NAD+ → Etf → caffeyl-CoA reductase. They also imply that the sodium motive step in the chain is the ferredoxin-dependent NAD+ reduction catalyzed by Rnf. PMID:17873051

  15. Dissection of the caffeate respiratory chain in the acetogen Acetobacterium woodii: identification of an Rnf-type NADH dehydrogenase as a potential coupling site.

    PubMed

    Imkamp, Frank; Biegel, Eva; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Buckel, Wolfgang; Müller, Volker

    2007-11-01

    The anaerobic acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii couples caffeate reduction with electrons derived from hydrogen to the synthesis of ATP by a chemiosmotic mechanism with sodium ions as coupling ions, a process referred to as caffeate respiration. We addressed the nature of the hitherto unknown enzymatic activities involved in this process and their cellular localization. Cell extract of A. woodii catalyzes H(2)-dependent caffeate reduction. This reaction is strictly ATP dependent but can be activated also by acetyl coenzyme A (CoA), indicating that there is formation of caffeyl-CoA prior to reduction. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed proteins present only in caffeate-grown cells. Two proteins were identified by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry, and the encoding genes were cloned. These proteins are very similar to subunits alpha (EtfA) and beta (EtfB) of electron transfer flavoproteins present in various anaerobic bacteria. Western blot analysis demonstrated that they are induced by caffeate and localized in the cytoplasm. Etf proteins are known electron carriers that shuttle electrons from NADH to different acceptors. Indeed, NADH was used as an electron donor for cytosolic caffeate reduction. Since the hydrogenase was soluble and used ferredoxin as an electron acceptor, the missing link was a ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase. This activity could be determined and, interestingly, was membrane bound. A search for genes that could encode this activity revealed DNA fragments encoding subunits C and D of a membrane-bound Rnf-type NADH dehydrogenase that is a potential Na(+) pump. These data suggest the following electron transport chain: H(2) --> ferredoxin --> NAD(+) --> Etf --> caffeyl-CoA reductase. They also imply that the sodium motive step in the chain is the ferredoxin-dependent NAD(+) reduction catalyzed by Rnf. PMID:17873051

  16. A novel preterm respiratory mechanics active simulator to test the performances of neonatal pulmonary ventilators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, Paolo; Sciuto, Salvatore Andrea; Silvestri, Sergio

    2002-06-01

    A patient active simulator is proposed which is capable of reproducing values of the parameters of pulmonary mechanics of healthy newborns and preterm pathological infants. The implemented prototype is able to: (a) let the operator choose the respiratory pattern, times of apnea, episodes of cough, sobs, etc., (b) continuously regulate and control the parameters characterizing the pulmonary system; and, finally, (c) reproduce the attempt of breathing of a preterm infant. Taking into account both the limitation due to the chosen application field and the preliminary autocalibration phase automatically carried out by the proposed device, accuracy and reliability on the order of 1% is estimated. The previously indicated value has to be considered satisfactory in light of the field of application and the small values of the simulated parameters. Finally, the achieved metrological characteristics allow the described neonatal simulator to be adopted as a reference device to test performances of neonatal ventilators and, more specifically, to measure the time elapsed between the occurrence of a potentially dangerous condition to the patient and the activation of the corresponding alarm of the tested ventilator.

  17. The respiratory molybdo-selenoprotein formate dehydrogenases of Escherichia coli have hydrogen: benzyl viologen oxidoreductase activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli synthesizes three membrane-bound molybdenum- and selenocysteine-containing formate dehydrogenases, as well as up to four membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenases. Two of the formate dehydrogenases (Fdh-N and Fdh-O) and two of the hydrogenases (Hyd-1 and Hyd-2) have their respective catalytic subunits located in the periplasm and these enzymes have been shown previously to oxidize formate and hydrogen, respectively, and thus function in energy metabolism. Mutants unable to synthesize the [NiFe]-hydrogenases retain a H2: benzyl viologen oxidoreductase activity. The aim of this study was to identify the enzyme or enzymes responsible for this activity. Results Here we report the identification of a new H2: benzyl viologen oxidoreductase enzyme activity in E. coli that is independent of the [NiFe]-hydrogenases. This enzyme activity was originally identified after non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and visualization of hydrogen-oxidizing activity by specific staining. Analysis of a crude extract derived from a variety of E. coli mutants unable to synthesize any [NiFe]-hydrogenase-associated enzyme activity revealed that the mutants retained this specific hydrogen-oxidizing activity. Enrichment of this enzyme activity from solubilised membrane fractions of the hydrogenase-negative mutant FTD147 by ion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction and size-exclusion chromatographies followed by mass spectrometric analysis identified the enzymes Fdh-N and Fdh-O. Analysis of defined mutants devoid of selenocysteine biosynthetic capacity or carrying deletions in the genes encoding the catalytic subunits of Fdh-N and Fdh-O demonstrated that both enzymes catalyze hydrogen activation. Fdh-N and Fdh-O can also transfer the electrons derived from oxidation of hydrogen to other redox dyes. Conclusions The related respiratory molybdo-selenoproteins Fdh-N and Fdh-O of Escherichia coli have hydrogen-oxidizing activity. These findings demonstrate that the

  18. Involvement of oxidants and oxidant-generating enzyme(s) in tumour-necrosis-factor-alpha-mediated apoptosis: role for lipoxygenase pathway but not mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, V B; Spycher, S; Azzi, A

    1995-08-15

    Cellular signalling by the inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) has been suggested to involve generation of low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Certain antioxidants and metal chelators can inhibit cytotoxicity and gene expression in response to TNF alpha in numerous cell types. However, neither the source nor function of TNF alpha-induced oxidant generation is known. Using specific inhibitors, we ruled out involvement of several oxidant-generating enzymes [cyclo-oxygenase (indomethacin), cytochrome P-450 (metyrapone), nitric oxide synthase (NG-methyl-L-arginine), NADPH oxidase (iodonium diphenyl), xanthine oxidase (allopurinol), ribonucleotide reductase (hydroxyurea)] in TNF alpha-mediated apoptosis of the murine fibrosarcoma line, L929. We also demonstrated no role for mitochondrial-derived radicals/respiratory chain in the lytic pathway using specific inhibitors/uncouplers (rotenone, KCN, carboxin, fluoroacetate, antimycin, malonate, carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone) and chloramphenicol-derived respiration-deficient cells. Significant ROS (H2O2, O2-.) generation was not observed in response to TNF alpha in L929 cells using four separate assays. Also, prevention of intracellular H2O2 removal by inhibition of catalase did not potentiate TNF alpha-mediated cell death. These data suggest that neither H2O2 nor O2-. plays a direct role in TNF alpha cytotoxicity. Finally, we suggest a central role for lipoxygenase in TNF alpha-mediated lysis. Three inhibitors of this radical-generating signalling pathway, including an arachidonate analogue (5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid), could protect cells against TNF alpha. The inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid is also a radical scavenger, but it could not protect cells from ROS toxicity at concentrations that effectively prevented TNF alpha killing. Therefore protection by nordihydroguaiaretic acid cannot be due to scavenging of cytotoxic H2O or O2-.. The lipoxygenase product

  19. Cyclothiazide-induced persistent increase in respiratory-related activity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Babiec, Walter E; Faull, Kym F; Feldman, Jack L

    2012-01-01

    Hypoglossal (XII) motoneurons (MNs) innervate the genioglossus muscle of the tongue, which plays an important role in maintaining upper airway patency, particularly during sleep, and modulating upper airway resistance. Discovering methods for inducing long-term increases in genioglossal motoneuronal excitability to AMPA-mediated drive may help in the development of therapeutics for upper airway motor disorders such as obstructive sleep apnoea. We show that the diuretic, anti-hypertensive, AMPA receptor modulator cyclothiazide (CTZ) induces a profound and long-lasting increase in the amplitude of respiratory-related XII nerve activity in rhythmically active neonatal rat medullary slices. Treatment of the slice with CTZ (90 μm) for 1 h increased the integrated XII (∫XII) nerve burst amplitude to 262 ± 23% of pre-treatment control at 1 h post-treatment; much of this increase lasted at least 12 h. The amount of CTZ-induced facilitation (CIF) was dependent upon both CTZ dose and exposure time and was accompanied by a long-lasting increase in endogenous AMPA-mediated drive currents to XII MNs. CIF, however, is not a form of plasticity and does not depend on AMPA or NMDA receptor activation for its induction. Nor does it depend on coincident protein kinase A or C activity. Rather, measurement of mEPSCs along with mass spectrometric analysis of CTZ-treated slices indicates that the cause is prolonged bioavailability of CTZ. These results illustrate a latent residual capacity for potentiating AMPA-mediated inspiratory drive to XII MNs that might be applied to the treatment of upper airway motor deficits. PMID:22753547

  20. Structure–Activity Relationships for Side Chain Oxysterol Agonists of the Hedgehog Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Oxysterols (OHCs) are byproducts of cholesterol oxidation that are known to activate the Hedeghog (Hh) signaling pathway. While OHCs that incorporate hydroxyl groups throughout the scaffold are known, those that act as agonists of Hh signaling primarily contain a single hydroxyl on the alkyl side chain. We sought to further explore how side chain hydroxylation patterns affect oxysterol-mediated Hh activation, by performing a structure–activity relationship study on a series of synthetic OHCs. The most active analogue, 23(R)-OHC (35), demonstrated potent activation of Hh signaling in two Hh-dependent cell lines (EC50 values 0.54–0.65 μM). In addition, OHC 35 was approximately 3-fold selective for the Hh pathway as compared to the liver X receptor, a nuclear receptor that is also activated by endogenous OHCs. Finally, 35 induced osteogenic differentiation and osteoblast formation in cultured cells, indicating functional agonism of the Hh pathway. PMID:24900386

  1. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Inhibitor AZ-27 Differentially Inhibits Different Polymerase Activities at the Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Noton, Sarah L.; Nagendra, Kartikeya; Dunn, Ewan F.; Mawhorter, Michael E.; Yu, Qin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of pediatric respiratory disease. RSV has an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase that transcribes and replicates the viral negative-sense RNA genome. The large polymerase subunit (L) has multiple enzymatic activities, having the capability to synthesize RNA and add and methylate a cap on each of the viral mRNAs. Previous studies (H. Xiong et al., Bioorg Med Chem Lett, 23:6789–6793, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2013.10.018; C. L. Tiong-Yip et al., Antimicrob Agents Chemother, 58:3867–3873, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.02540-14) had identified a small-molecule inhibitor, AZ-27, that targets the L protein. In this study, we examined the effect of AZ-27 on different aspects of RSV polymerase activity. AZ-27 was found to inhibit equally both mRNA transcription and genome replication in cell-based minigenome assays, indicating that it inhibits a step common to both of these RNA synthesis processes. Analysis in an in vitro transcription run-on assay, containing RSV nucleocapsids, showed that AZ-27 inhibits synthesis of transcripts from the 3′ end of the genome to a greater extent than those from the 5′ end, indicating that it inhibits transcription initiation. Consistent with this finding, experiments that assayed polymerase activity on the promoter showed that AZ-27 inhibited transcription and replication initiation. The RSV polymerase also can utilize the promoter sequence to perform a back-priming reaction. Interestingly, addition of AZ-27 had no effect on the addition of up to three nucleotides by back-priming but inhibited further extension of the back-primed RNA. These data provide new information regarding the mechanism of inhibition by AZ-27. They also suggest that the RSV polymerase adopts different conformations to perform its different activities at the promoter. IMPORTANCE Currently, there are no effective antiviral drugs to treat RSV infection. The RSV polymerase is an

  2. Clock-genes and mitochondrial respiratory activity: Evidence of a reciprocal interplay.

    PubMed

    Scrima, Rosella; Cela, Olga; Merla, Giuseppe; Augello, Bartolomeo; Rubino, Rosa; Quarato, Giovanni; Fugetto, Sabino; Menga, Marta; Fuhr, Luise; Relógio, Angela; Piccoli, Claudia; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Capitanio, Nazzareno

    2016-08-01

    In the past few years mounting evidences have highlighted the tight correlation between circadian rhythms and metabolism. Although at the organismal level the central timekeeper is constituted by the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei practically all the peripheral tissues are equipped with autonomous oscillators made up by common molecular clockworks represented by circuits of gene expression that are organized in interconnected positive and negative feed-back loops. In this study we exploited a well-established in vitro synchronization model to investigate specifically the linkage between clock gene expression and the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos). Here we show that synchronized cells exhibit an autonomous ultradian mitochondrial respiratory activity which is abrogated by silencing the master clock gene ARNTL/BMAL1. Surprisingly, pharmacological inhibition of the mitochondrial OxPhos system resulted in dramatic deregulation of the rhythmic clock-gene expression and a similar result was attained with mtDNA depleted cells (Rho0). Our findings provide a novel level of complexity in the interlocked feedback loop controlling the interplay between cellular bioenergetics and the molecular clockwork. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27060253

  3. Activity-based cost management. Part II: Applied to a respiratory protection program.

    PubMed

    Brandt, M T; Levine, S P; Smith, D G; Ettinger, H J; Gallimore, B F

    1998-05-01

    To demonstrate the relevance of activity-based cost management (ABCM) for the occupational and environmental health community, the investigators used data generated by an ABCM model of a respiratory protection program (RPP) to develop options for solving a business problem. The RPP manager in this hypothetical but realistic business scenario is faced with a 25% budget cut and a 10% increase in demand for RPP services. The manager's dilemma is to maintain the integrity of the RPP while absorbing a significant budget cut. Various cost savings options are developed, and the assumptions under which these options operate are presented. It is emphasized that the RPP manager's primary responsibility is to assure worker health and safety by first understanding the technical issues, merits, and implications of any cost-cutting option that may be considered. It is argued that only then should the manager consider the financial merits of the possible solutions to this business problem. In this way worker health and safety, and environmental protection goals, can continue to be achieved in an economic climate of cost cutting and downsizing. PMID:9622907

  4. Respiratory alkalosis

    MedlinePlus

    Alkalosis - respiratory ... leads to shortness of breath can also cause respiratory alkalosis (such as pulmonary embolism and asthma). ... Treatment is aimed at the condition that causes respiratory alkalosis. Breathing into a paper bag -- or using ...

  5. Respiration and respiratory enzyme activity in aerobic and anaerobic cultures of the marine denitrifying bacterium, Pseudomonas perfectomarinus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, T. T.; Garfield, P. C.; Martinez, R.

    1983-03-01

    Oxygen consumption, nitrate reduction, respiratory electron transport activity, and nitrate reductase activity were measured in aerobic and anaerobic cultures of the marine bacterium, Pseudomonas perfectomarinus. The respiratory electron transport activity was closely correlated with oxygen consumption ( r = 0.98) in aerobic cultures and nearly as well correlated with nitrate reductase activity ( r = 0.91) and nitrate reduction ( r = 0.85) in anaerobic cultures. It was also well correlated with biomass in both aerobic ( r = 0.99) and anaerobic ( r = 0.94) cultures supporting the use of tetrazolium reduction as an index of living biomass. Time courses of nitrate and nitrate in the anaerobic cultures demonstrated that at nitrate concentrations above 1 mM, denitrification proceeds stepwise. Time courses of pH in anaerobic cultures revealed a rise from 7 to 8.5 during nitrite reduction indicating net proton utilization. This proton utilization is predicted by the stoichiometry of denitrification. Although the experiments were not under 'simulated in situ' conditions, the results are relevant to studies of denitrification, to bacterial ATP production, and to the respiratory activity of marine plankton in the ocean.

  6. A Comparison of Forward Chaining to Backward Chaining as an Approach to Teaching Manipulative Activities in Industrial Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nannay, Robert W.

    1976-01-01

    The study obtained evidence regarding the learning condition of chaining. The experimental population was 22 female industrial education students at the University of Maryland. A major contribution of the study was the recognition of the backward chaining principle (reversed stimulus-response links) as a meaningful teaching technique. (Author/BP)

  7. Substrate specificity of a long-chain alkylamine-degrading Pseudomonas sp isolated from activated sludge

    PubMed Central

    Louwerse, Annemarie; van der Togt, Bert

    2007-01-01

    A bacterium strain BERT, which utilizes primary long-chain alkylamines as nitrogen, carbon and energy source, was isolated from activated sludge. This rod-shaped motile, Gram-negative strain was identified as a Pseudomonas sp. The substrate spectrum of this Pseudomonas strain BERT includes primary alkylamines with alkyl chains ranging from C3 to C18, and dodecyl-1,3-diaminopropane. Amines with alkyl chains ranging from 8 to 14 carbons were the preferred substrates. Growth on dodecanal, dodecanoic acid and acetic acid and simultaneous adaptation studies indicated that this bacterium initiates degradation through a Calkyl–N cleavage. The cleavage of alkylamines to the respective alkanals in Pseudomonas strain BERT is mediated by a PMS-dependent alkylamine dehydrogenase. This alkylamine dehydrogenase produces stoichiometric amounts of ammonium from octylamine. The PMS-dependent alkylamine was found to oxidize a broad range of long-chain alkylamines. PMS-dependent long-chain aldehyde dehydrogenase activity was also detected in cell-free extract of Pseudomonas strain BERT grown on octylamine. The proposed pathway for the oxidation of alkylamine in strain BERT proceeds from alkylamine to alkanal, and then to the fatty acid. PMID:17492358

  8. Antimicrobial activity of prulifloxacin in comparison with other fluoroquinolones against community-acquired urinary and respiratory pathogens isolated in Greece.

    PubMed

    Karageorgopoulos, D E; Maraki, S; Vatopoulos, A C; Samonis, G; Schito, G C; Falagas, M E

    2013-11-01

    Prulifloxacin, the prodrug of ulifloxacin, is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone rather recently introduced in certain European countries. We compared the antimicrobial potency of ulifloxacin with that of other fluoroquinolones against common urinary and respiratory bacterial pathogens. The microbial isolates were prospectively collected between January 2007 and May 2008 from patients with community-acquired infections in Greece. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined for ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin (for respiratory isolates only), and ulifloxacin using the E-test method. The binary logarithms of the MICs [log2(MICs)] were compared by using the Wilcoxon signed-ranks test. A total of 409 isolates were studied. Ulifloxacin had the lowest geometric mean MIC for the 161 Escherichia coli, 59 Proteus mirabilis, and 22 Staphylococcus saprophyticus urinary isolates, the second lowest geometric mean MIC for the 38 Streptococcus pyogenes respiratory isolates (after moxifloxacin), and the third lowest geometric mean MIC for the 114 Haemophilus influenzae and the 15 Moraxella catarrhalis respiratory isolates (after ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin). Compared with levofloxacin, ulifloxacin had lower log2(MICs) against E. coli (p < 0.001), P. mirabilis (p < 0.001), S. saprophyticus (p < 0.001), and S. pyogenes (p < 0.001). Compared with ciprofloxacin, ulifloxacin had lower log2(MICs) against P. mirabilis (p < 0.001), S. saprophyticus (p = 0.008), and S. pyogenes (p < 0.001), but higher log2(MICs) against H. influenzae (p < 0.001) and M. catarrhalis (p = 0.001). In comparison with other clinically relevant fluoroquinolones, ulifloxacin had the most potent antimicrobial activity against the community-acquired urinary isolates studied and very good activity against the respiratory isolates. PMID:23686506

  9. Electroencephalographic detection of respiratory-related cortical activity in humans: from event-related approaches to continuous connectivity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Anna L; Navarro-Sune, Xavier; Martinerie, Jacques; Pouget, Pierre; Raux, Mathieu; Chavez, Mario; Similowski, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The presence of a respiratory-related cortical activity during tidal breathing is abnormal and a hallmark of respiratory difficulties, but its detection requires superior discrimination and temporal resolution. The aim of this study was to validate a computational method using EEG covariance (or connectivity) matrices to detect a change in brain activity related to breathing. In 17 healthy subjects, EEG was recorded during resting unloaded breathing (RB), voluntary sniffs, and breathing against an inspiratory threshold load (ITL). EEG were analyzed by the specially developed covariance-based classifier, event-related potentials, and time-frequency (T-F) distributions. Nine subjects repeated the protocol. The classifier could accurately detect ITL and sniffs compared with the reference period of RB. For ITL, EEG-based detection was superior to airflow-based detection (P < 0.05). A coincident improvement in EEG-airflow correlation in ITL compared with RB (P < 0.05) confirmed that EEG detection relates to breathing. Premotor potential incidence was significantly higher before inspiration in sniffs and ITL compared with RB (P < 0.05), but T-F distributions revealed a significant difference between sniffs and RB only (P < 0.05). Intraclass correlation values ranged from poor (-0.2) to excellent (1.0). Thus, as for conventional event-related potential analysis, the covariance-based classifier can accurately predict a change in brain state related to a change in respiratory state, and given its capacity for near "real-time" detection, it is suitable to monitor the respiratory state in respiratory and critically ill patients in the development of a brain-ventilator interface. PMID:26864771

  10. Sink or Swim: Learning by Doing in a Supply Chain Integration Activity*

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harnowo, Akhadian S.; Calhoun, Mikelle A.; Monteiro, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Studies show that supply chain integration (SCI) is important to organizations. This article describes an activity that places students in the middle of an SCI scenario. The highly interactive hands-on simulation requires only 50 to 60 minutes of classroom time, may be used with 18 to about 36 students, and involves minimal instructor preparation.…

  11. Synthesis and antimalarial activity of chain substituted pivaloyloxymethyl ester analogues of Fosmidomycin and FR900098.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Thomas; Schlüter, Katrin; Kaula, Uwe; Bergmann, Bärbel; Walter, Rolf D; Geffken, Detlef

    2006-08-01

    Fosmidomycin is a promising antimalarial drug candidate with a unique chemical structure and a novel mode of action. Chain substituted pivaloyloxymethyl ester derivatives of Fosmidomycin and its acetyl analogue FR900098 have been synthesized and their in vitro antimalarial activity versus the Chloroquine sensitive strain 3D7 of Plasmodium falciparum has been determined. PMID:16679022

  12. Antiviral activity in vitro of two preparations of the herbal medicinal product Sinupret® against viruses causing respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Glatthaar-Saalmüller, B; Rauchhaus, U; Rode, S; Haunschild, J; Saalmüller, A

    2011-12-15

    Sinupret(®), a herbal medicinal product made from Gentian root, Primula flower, Elder flower, Sorrel herb, and Verbena herb is frequently used in the treatment of acute and chronic rhinosinusitis and respiratory viral infections such as common cold. To date little is known about its potential antiviral activity. Therefore experiments have been performed to measure the antiviral activity of Sinupret(®) oral drops (hereinafter referred to as "oral drops") and Sinupret(®) dry extract (hereinafter referred to as "dry extract"), in vitro against a broad panel of both enveloped and non-enveloped human pathogenic RNA and DNA viruses known to cause infections of the upper respiratory tract: influenza A, Chile 1/83 (H1N1) virus (FluA), Porcine Influenza A/California/07/2009 (H1N1) virus (pFluA), parainfluenza type 3 virus (Para 3), respiratory syncytial virus, strain Long (RSV), human rhinovirus B subtype 14 (HRV 14), coxsackievirus subtype A9 (CA9), and adenovirus C subtype 5 (Adeno 5). Concentration-dependent antiviral activity (EC(50) between 13.8 and 124.8 μg/ml) of Sinupret(®) was observed against RNA as well as DNA viruses independent of a viral envelope. Remarkable antiviral activity was shown against Adeno 5, HRV 14 and RSV in which dry extract was significantly superior to oral drops. This could be ascertained with different assays as plaque-reduction assays in plaque forming units (PFU), the analyses of a cytopathogenic effect (CPE) and with enzyme immunoassays (ELISA) to determine the amount of newly synthesised virus. Our results demonstrate that Sinupret(®) shows a broad spectrum of antiviral activity in vitro against viruses commonly known to cause respiratory infections. PMID:22112724

  13. Enhanced allergic responsiveness after early childhood infection with respiratory viruses: Are long-lived alternatively activated macrophages the missing link?

    PubMed

    Keegan, Achsah D; Shirey, Kari Ann; Bagdure, Dayanand; Blanco, Jorge; Viscardi, Rose M; Vogel, Stefanie N

    2016-07-01

    Early childhood infection with respiratory viruses, including human rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza, is associated with an increased risk of allergic asthma and severe exacerbation of ongoing disease. Despite the long recognition of this relationship, the mechanism linking viral infection and later susceptibility to allergic lung inflammation is still poorly understood. We discuss the literature and provide new evidence demonstrating that these viruses induce the alternative activation of macrophages. Alternatively activated macrophages (AAM) induced by RSV or influenza infection persisted in the lungs of mice up to 90 days after initial viral infection. Several studies suggest that AAM contribute to allergic inflammatory responses, although their mechanism of action is unclear. In this commentary, we propose that virus-induced AAM provide a link between viral infection and enhanced responses to inhaled allergens. PMID:27178560

  14. Variations of respiratory activity and glutathione in activated sludges exposed to low ozone doses.

    PubMed

    Dziurla, M A; Salhi, M; Leroy, P; Paul, E; Ginestet, Ph; Block, J C

    2005-07-01

    Ozonation is one of the most effective treatments for reducing the production of activated sludges in wastewater treatment plants. However, because microorganisms are present in the form of microcolonies, some bacteria may be exposed to sub-lethal ozone doses that could lead to adaptation and resistance to further exposition to oxidative treatment. This represents a major question as it may limit the effect of the treatment, especially when low ozone doses are applied. The critical ozone dosage, defined as the lowest specific transferred ozone concentration leading to a decrease in the maximum oxygen uptake rate was estimated to range between 0.9 and 13.6mg O(3)g(-1) COD(sludges), according to the sludges tested. The lowest ozone dosage leading to the decrease of GSH and GSHt concentrations could be estimated to be lower than 10mg O(3)g(-1) COD(sludges) for GSH, and close to 10mg O(3)g(-1) COD(sludges) for GSHt. After sludge exposure to low ozone doses, no higher amounts of glutathione were synthesized, suggesting that no development of resistance to ozonation occurred after sludge treatment with low ozone doses. PMID:15972223

  15. Roles of a conserved arginine residue of DsbB in linking protein disulfide-bond-formation pathway to the respiratory chain of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kadokura, Hiroshi; Bader, Martin; Tian, Hongping; Bardwell, James C. A.; Beckwith, Jon

    2000-01-01

    The active-site cysteines of DsbA, the periplasmic disulfide-bond-forming enzyme of Escherichia coli, are kept oxidized by the cytoplasmic membrane protein DsbB. DsbB, in turn, is oxidized by two kinds of quinones (ubiquinone for aerobic and menaquinone for anaerobic growth) in the electron-transport chain. We describe the isolation of dsbB missense mutations that change a highly conserved arginine residue at position 48 to histidine or cysteine. In these mutants, DsbB functions reasonably well aerobically but poorly anaerobically. Consistent with this conditional phenotype, purified R48H exhibits very low activity with menaquinone and an apparent Michaelis constant (Km) for ubiquinone seven times greater than that of the wild-type DsbB, while keeping an apparent Km for DsbA similar to that of wild-type enzyme. From these results, we propose that this highly conserved arginine residue of DsbB plays an important role in the catalysis of disulfide bond formation through its role in the interaction of DsbB with quinones. PMID:11005861

  16. Mitochondrial K(ATP) channels in respiratory neurons and their role in the hypoxic facilitation of rhythmic activity.

    PubMed

    Mironov, S L; Hartelt, N; Ivannikov, M V

    2005-02-01

    Hypoxia is damaging in neurons, but it can also produce beneficial effects by consolidating the activity of neural networks such as facilitation of respiratory activity [T.L. Baker-Herman, D.D. Fuller, R.W. Bavis, A.G. Zabka, F.J. Golder, N.J. Doperalski, R.A. Johnson, J.J. Watters, G.S. Mitchell, Nature Neuroscience 7 (2004) 48-55; J.L. Feldman, G.S. Mitchell, E.E. Nattie, Ann. Rev. Neurosci. 26 (2003) 239-266; D.M. Blitz, J.M. Ramirez, J. Neurophysiol. 87 (2002) 2964-2971]. The underlying mechanisms are unknown, and we hypothesized they may be similar to ischemic preconditioning in the heart, involving mitochondrial K(ATP) (mK(ATP)) channels. By measuring the mitochondrial potential (Psi(m)) and Ca2+ ([Ca2+]m) in neurons of pre-Botzinger complex (pBC), we examined the functional expression of mK(ATP) channels in the respiratory network. The opener of mK(ATP) channels diazoxide decreased Psi(m) and [Ca2+]m both in pBC neurons and in isolated immobilized mitochondria. 5-Hydroxydecanoate (5-HD), the blocker of mK(ATP) channels, increased both Psi(m) and [Ca2+]m. Phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) mimicked the effects of diazoxide. Protein kinase C (PKC) was stimulated during hypoxia that occurred mostly at the mitochondria. Brief hypoxia induced facilitation of the respiratory activity, which was prevented after blockade of mK(ATP) channels with 5-HD and PKC with staurosporine. Diazoxide potentiated the motor output and subsequent application of hypoxia was ineffective. We propose that a PKC-induced stimulation of K(ATP) channels in the mitochondria of respiratory neurons is responsible for the hypoxic facilitation of rhythmic activity. PMID:15680335

  17. Breakthrough curves for toluene adsorption on different types of activated carbon fibers: application in respiratory protection.

    PubMed

    Balanay, Jo Anne G; Floyd, Evan L; Lungu, Claudiu T

    2015-05-01

    Activated carbon fibers (ACF) are considered viable alternative adsorbent materials in respirators because of their larger surface area, lighter weight, and fabric form. The purpose of this study was to characterize the breakthrough curves of toluene for different types of commercially available ACFs to understand their potential service lives in respirators. Two forms of ACF, cloth (AC) and felt (AF), with three surface areas each were tested. ACFs were challenged with six toluene concentrations (50-500 p.p.m.) at constant air temperature (23°C), relative humidity (50%), and air flow (16 l min-1) at different bed depths. Breakthrough data were obtained using continuous monitoring by gas chromatography using a gas sampling valve. The ACF specific surface areas were measured by an automatic physisorption analyzer. Results showed unique shapes of breakthrough curves for each ACF form: AC demonstrated a gradual increase in breakthrough concentration, whereas AF showed abrupt increase in concentration from the breakpoint, which was attributed to the difference in fiber density between the forms. AF has steeper breakthrough curves compared with AC with similar specific surface area. AC exhibits higher 10% breakthrough times for a given bed depth due to higher mass per bed depth compared with AF, indicating more adsorption per bed depth with AC. ACF in respirators may be appropriate for use as protection in environments with toluene concentration at the Occupational Safety and Health Administration Permissible Exposure Limit, or during emergency escape for higher toluene concentrations. ACF has shown great potential for application in respiratory protection against toluene and in the development of thinner, lighter, and more efficient respirators. PMID:25528579

  18. New Respiratory Inductive Plethysmography (RIP) Method for Evaluating Ventilatory Adaptation during Mild Physical Activities.

    PubMed

    Retory, Yann; Niedzialkowski, Pauline; de Picciotto, Carole; Bonay, Marcel; Petitjean, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The pneumotachometer is currently the most accepted device to measure tidal breathing, however, it requires the use of a mouthpiece and thus alteration of spontaneous ventilation is implied. Respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP), which includes two belts, one thoracic and one abdominal, is able to determine spontaneous tidal breathing without the use of a facemask or mouthpiece, however, there are a number of as yet unresolved issues. In this study we aimed to describe and validate a new RIP method, relying on a combination of thoracic RIP and nasal pressure signals taking into account that exercise-induced body movements can easily contaminate RIP thoracic signals by generating tissue motion artifacts. A custom-made time domain algorithm that relies on the elimination of low amplitude artifacts was applied to the raw thoracic RIP signal. Determining this tidal ventilation allowed comparisons between the RIP signal and simultaneously-recorded airflow signals from a calibrated pneumotachometer (PT). We assessed 206 comparisons from 30 volunteers who were asked to breathe spontaneously at rest and during walking on the spot. Comparisons between RIP signals processed by our algorithm and PT showed highly significant correlations for tidal volume (Vt), inspiratory (Ti) and expiratory times (Te). Moreover, bias calculated using the Bland and Altman method were reasonably low for Vt and Ti (0.04 L and 0.02 s, respectively), and acceptable for Te (<0.1 s) and the intercept from regression relationships (0.01 L, 0.06 s, 0.17 s respectively). The Ti/Ttot and Vt/Ti ratios obtained with the two methods were also statistically correlated. We conclude that our methodology (filtering by our algorithm and calibrating with our calibration procedure) for thoracic RIP renders this technique sufficiently accurate to evaluate tidal ventilation variation at rest and during mild to moderate physical activity. PMID:27008313

  19. New Respiratory Inductive Plethysmography (RIP) Method for Evaluating Ventilatory Adaptation during Mild Physical Activities

    PubMed Central

    Retory, Yann; Niedzialkowski, Pauline; de Picciotto, Carole

    2016-01-01

    The pneumotachometer is currently the most accepted device to measure tidal breathing, however, it requires the use of a mouthpiece and thus alteration of spontaneous ventilation is implied. Respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP), which includes two belts, one thoracic and one abdominal, is able to determine spontaneous tidal breathing without the use of a facemask or mouthpiece, however, there are a number of as yet unresolved issues. In this study we aimed to describe and validate a new RIP method, relying on a combination of thoracic RIP and nasal pressure signals taking into account that exercise-induced body movements can easily contaminate RIP thoracic signals by generating tissue motion artifacts. A custom-made time domain algorithm that relies on the elimination of low amplitude artifacts was applied to the raw thoracic RIP signal. Determining this tidal ventilation allowed comparisons between the RIP signal and simultaneously-recorded airflow signals from a calibrated pneumotachometer (PT). We assessed 206 comparisons from 30 volunteers who were asked to breathe spontaneously at rest and during walking on the spot. Comparisons between RIP signals processed by our algorithm and PT showed highly significant correlations for tidal volume (Vt), inspiratory (Ti) and expiratory times (Te). Moreover, bias calculated using the Bland and Altman method were reasonably low for Vt and Ti (0.04 L and 0.02 s, respectively), and acceptable for Te (<0.1 s) and the intercept from regression relationships (0.01 L, 0.06 s, 0.17 s respectively). The Ti/Ttot and Vt/Ti ratios obtained with the two methods were also statistically correlated. We conclude that our methodology (filtering by our algorithm and calibrating with our calibration procedure) for thoracic RIP renders this technique sufficiently accurate to evaluate tidal ventilation variation at rest and during mild to moderate physical activity. PMID:27008313

  20. Respiratory Motion of The Heart and Positional Reproducibility Under Active Breathing Control

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Moran, Jean M.; Kessler, Marc L.; Marsh, Robin B. C; Balter, James M.; Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To reduce cardiotoxicity from breast radiotherapy (RT), innovative techniques are under investigation. Information about cardiac motion with respiration and positional reproducibility under active breathing control (ABC) is necessary to evaluate these techniques. Methods and Materials: Patients requiring loco-regional RT for breast cancer were scanned by computed tomography using an ABC device at various breath-hold states, before and during treatment. Ten patients were studied. For each patient, 12 datasets were analyzed. Mutual information-based regional rigid alignment was used to determine the magnitude and reproducibility of cardiac motion as a function of breathing state. For each scan session, motion was quantified by evaluating the displacement of a point along the left anterior descending artery (LAD) with respect to its position at end expiration. Long-term positional reproducibility was also assessed. Results: Displacement of the LAD was greatest in the inferior direction, moderate in the anterior direction, and lowest in the left-right direction. At shallow breathing states, the average displacement of LAD position was up to 6 mm in the inferior direction. The maximum displacement in any patient was 2.8 cm in the inferior direction, between expiration and deep-inspiration breath hold. At end expiration, the long-term reproducibility (SD) of the LAD position was 3 mm in the A-P, 6 mm in the S-I, and 4 mm in the L-R directions. At deep-inspiration breath hold, long-term reproducibility was 3 mm in the A-P, 7 mm in the S-I, and 3 mm in the L-R directions. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the extent of LAD displacement that occurs with shallow breathing and with deep-inspiration breath hold. This information may guide optimization studies considering the effects of respiratory motion and reproducibility of cardiac position on cardiac dose, both with and without ABC.

  1. Expiratory activation of abdominal muscle is associated with improved respiratory stability and an increase in minute ventilation in REM epochs of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Colin G; Pagliardini, Silvia

    2015-11-01

    Breathing is more vulnerable to apneas and irregular breathing patterns during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in both humans and rodents. We previously reported that robust and recurrent recruitment of expiratory abdominal (ABD) muscle activity is present in rats during REM epochs despite ongoing REM-induced muscle atonia in skeletal musculature. To develop a further understanding of the characteristics of ABD recruitment during REM epochs and their relationship with breathing patterns and irregularities, we sought to compare REM epochs that displayed ABD muscle recruitment with those that did not, within the same rats. Specifically, we investigated respiratory characteristics that preceded and followed recruitment. We hypothesized that ABD muscle recruitment would be likely to occur following respiratory irregularities and would subsequently contribute to respiratory stability and the maintenance of good ventilation following recruitment. Our data demonstrate that epochs of REM sleep containing ABD recruitments (REM(ABD+)) were characterized by increased respiratory rate variability and increased presence of spontaneous brief central apneas. Within these epochs, respiratory events that displayed ABD muscle activation were preceded by periods of increased respiratory rate variability. Onset of ABD muscle activity increased tidal volume, amplitude of diaphragmatic contractions, and minute ventilation compared with the periods preceding ABD muscle activation. These results show that expiratory muscle activity is more likely recruited when respiration is irregular and its recruitment is subsequently associated with an increase in minute ventilation and a more regular respiratory rhythm. PMID:26338455

  2. Activation of hepatic branched-chain 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase by rat liver cytosolic supernatant.

    PubMed

    Hauschildt, S

    1986-10-29

    Hepatic branched-chain 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase is inactivated by nutritional alterations. Reactivation occurs during preincubation of intact mitochondria in the presence of rat liver cytosolic supernatant. Cytosolic supernatant contains two factors capable of reactivating the enzyme. On gel-filtration (Sephadex G-100), one factor (AF1) elutes in the molecular range of 35,000-40,000 and the other factor (AF2) elutes slightly later than inorganic phosphate. AF2 is stable against heat denaturation and treatment with proteinases. It is destroyed by alkaline phosphatase and in the presence of Ap5A, atractyloside, CaCl2 and NaF its stimulatory effect on branched-chain 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase activity is abolished. Inhibition of activation by NaF suggests that a phosphatase might be involved in the activation process. PMID:3768411

  3. The human respiratory gate

    PubMed Central

    Eckberg, Dwain L

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory activity phasically alters membrane potentials of preganglionic vagal and sympathetic motoneurones and continuously modulates their responsiveness to stimulatory inputs. The most obvious manifestation of this ‘respiratory gating’ is respiratory sinus arrhythmia, the rhythmic fluctuations of electrocardiographic R–R intervals observed in healthy resting humans. Phasic autonomic motoneurone firing, reflecting the throughput of the system, depends importantly on the intensity of stimulatory inputs, such that when levels of stimulation are low (as with high arterial pressure and sympathetic activity, or low arterial pressure and vagal activity), respiratory fluctuations of sympathetic or vagal firing are also low. The respiratory gate has a finite capacity, and high levels of stimulation override the ability of respiration to gate autonomic responsiveness. Autonomic throughput also depends importantly on other factors, including especially, the frequency of breathing, the rate at which the gate opens and closes. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia is small at rapid, and large at slow breathing rates. The strong correlation between systolic pressure and R–R intervals at respiratory frequencies reflects the influence of respiration on these two measures, rather than arterial baroreflex physiology. A wide range of evidence suggests that respiratory activity gates the timing of autonomic motoneurone firing, but does not influence its tonic level. I propose that the most enduring significance of respiratory gating is its use as a precisely controlled experimental tool to tease out and better understand otherwise inaccessible human autonomic neurophysiological mechanisms. PMID:12626671

  4. The human respiratory gate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, Dwain L.

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory activity phasically alters membrane potentials of preganglionic vagal and sympathetic motoneurones and continuously modulates their responsiveness to stimulatory inputs. The most obvious manifestation of this 'respiratory gating' is respiratory sinus arrhythmia, the rhythmic fluctuations of electrocardiographic R-R intervals observed in healthy resting humans. Phasic autonomic motoneurone firing, reflecting the throughput of the system, depends importantly on the intensity of stimulatory inputs, such that when levels of stimulation are low (as with high arterial pressure and sympathetic activity, or low arterial pressure and vagal activity), respiratory fluctuations of sympathetic or vagal firing are also low. The respiratory gate has a finite capacity, and high levels of stimulation override the ability of respiration to gate autonomic responsiveness. Autonomic throughput also depends importantly on other factors, including especially, the frequency of breathing, the rate at which the gate opens and closes. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia is small at rapid, and large at slow breathing rates. The strong correlation between systolic pressure and R-R intervals at respiratory frequencies reflects the influence of respiration on these two measures, rather than arterial baroreflex physiology. A wide range of evidence suggests that respiratory activity gates the timing of autonomic motoneurone firing, but does not influence its tonic level. I propose that the most enduring significance of respiratory gating is its use as a precisely controlled experimental tool to tease out and better understand otherwise inaccessible human autonomic neurophysiological mechanisms.

  5. Copper deficiency decreases the protein expression of Complex IV but not Complex I, II, III, or V in mitochondrial respiratory chain in rat heart

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been documented that dietary copper (Cu) deficiency impairs mitochondrial respiratory function which is catalyzed by five membrane-bound multiple protein complexes. However, there are few reports on the simultaneous analysis of Cu effect on the subunit protein expression on all five protein c...

  6. Physical Activity, Cardio-Respiratory Fitness, and Metabolic Traits in Rural Mexican Tarahumara

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Dirk Lund; Alcalá-Sánchez, Imelda; Leal-Berumen, Irene; Conchas-Ramirez, Miguel; Brage, Soren

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To study the association between physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) and cardio-respiratory fitness (CRF) with key metabolic traits and anthropometric measures in the Tarahumara of Mexico. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in five rural communities in Chihuahua, México including 64 adult Tarahumara, mean (SD) age 40.7 (12.9) years. Using a combined accelerometer and heart rate sensor, PAEE was measured over three consecutive days and nights and a sub-maximal step test was carried out in order to (1) calibrate heart rate at the individual level and (2) to estimate CRF. Random blood glucose level and resting blood pressure (BP) were measured with standard anthropometrics. Results Mean (SD) PAEE was 71.2 (30.3) kJ kg−1 day−1 and CRF was 36.6 (6.5) mlO2 min−1 kg−1. Mean (SD) glucose was 127.9 (32.4) mg/dl, with 3.3% having diabetes. Mean (SD) systolic and diastolic BP was 122 (20.8) and 82 (14.8) mm Hg, respectively, with 28.1% having hypertension. Mean body mass index was 27.5 (4.2) kg m−2, with 71.9% being overweight. Following adjustment for age and sex, weak inverse associations were observed between PAEE and systolic BP (β = −0.20, P = 0.27) and diastolic BP (β = −0.16, P = 0.23); and between CRF and systolic BP (β = −0.51, P = 0.14) and diastolic BP (β = −0.53, P = 0.06). The inverse associations with glucose were also weak and not statistically significant for neither PAEE (β = −0.01, P = 0.63) nor CRF (β = −0.05, P = 0.27). Conclusions This study suggests high levels of overweight and hypertension in the Tarahumara, and points to fitness and physical activity as potential intervention targets although findings should be confirmed in larger samples. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22308165

  7. Respiratory burst activity of intestinal macrophages in normal and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mahida, Y R; Wu, K C; Jewell, D P

    1989-01-01

    Macrophages isolated from normal mucosa (greater than 5 cm from tumour) and inflamed mucosa (from patients with inflammatory bowel disease) of colon and ileum were studied for their ability to undergo a respiratory burst as assessed by reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium to formazan. Using phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and opsonised zymosan as triggers, only a minority (median: 8% for zymosan and 9% for PMA) of macrophages isolated from normal colonic mucosa demonstrated release of oxygen radicals. In contrast, a significantly greater (median: 17% for zymosan and 45% for PMA) proportion of macrophages isolated from inflamed colonic mucosa were able to undergo respiratory burst. Studies with normal and inflamed ileum showed similar results. Stimulation of macrophages isolated from normal colon with interferon-gamma produced only a small increase in the proportion of cells showing release of oxygen radicals. We conclude that the respiratory burst capacity of majority of macrophages isolated from normal colon and ileum is downregulated and a greater proportion of macrophages isolated from inflamed colon and ileum are able to undergo a respiratory burst. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2511088

  8. Air contaminants associated with potential respiratory effects from unconventional resource development activities.

    PubMed

    McCawley, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Unconventional natural gas development uses horizontal drilling in conjunction with hydraulic fracturing to gain access to natural gas deposits which may be tightly held in shale deposits and unavailable to conventional vertical drilling operations. The intensive work required to extract this source of energy results in higher than usual numbers of vehicles involved, potential release of emissions from those vehicles in congested zones surrounding the drill site, and release of other contaminants from materials drawn back out of the borehole after fracturing of the shale. Typical contaminants would be diesel exhaust particulate and gases, volatile organic compounds and other hydrocarbons both from diesels and the drilling process, crystalline silica, used as part of the hydraulic fracturing process in kiloton quantities, and methane escaping from the borehole and piping. A rise in respiratory disease with proximity to the process has been reported in nearby communities and both silica and diesel exposures at the worksite are recognized respiratory hazards. Because of the relatively short time this process has been used to the extent it is currently being used, it is not possible to draw detailed conclusions about the respiratory hazards that may be posed. However, based on the traffic volume associated with each drill site and the number of drill sites in any locale, it is possible at least to compare the effects to that of large traffic volume highways which are known to produce some respiratory effects in surrounding areas. PMID:26024346

  9. Learning within the Confines of a Continuing Professional Education Activity: Perspectives from Respiratory Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittnebel, Leonard D.

    2013-01-01

    Continuing professional education (CPE) for respiratory therapists (RTs) represent both a mandate and a desired characteristic of a profession poised to assume a more prominent role in the healthcare landscape. While it is acknowledged that education beyond the professional degree and a lifetime approach to learning is inherent due to the nature…

  10. Comparative analysis of signature genes in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)-infected porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells at differential activation statuses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activation statuses of monocytic cells, e.g. monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), are critically important for antiviral immunity. In particular, some devastating viruses, including porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), are capable of directly infecting these cell...

  11. Human 20S proteasome activity towards fluorogenic peptides of various chain lengths.

    PubMed

    Rut, Wioletta; Drag, Marcin

    2016-09-01

    The proteasome is a multicatalytic protease responsible for the degradation of misfolded proteins. We have synthesized fluorogenic substrates in which the peptide chain was systematically elongated from two to six amino acids and evaluated the effect of peptide length on all three catalytic activities of human 20S proteasome. In the cases of five- and six-membered peptides, we have also synthesized libraries of fluorogenic substrates. Kinetic analysis revealed that six-amino-acid substrates are significantly better for chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activity than shorter peptidic substrates. In the case of trypsin-like activity, a five-amino-acid substrate was optimal. PMID:27176742

  12. Critical COPD respiratory illness is linked to increased transcriptomic activity of neutrophil proteases genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene expression profiling (GEP) in cells obtained from peripheral blood has shown that this is a very useful approach for biomarker discovery and for studying molecular pathogenesis of prevalent diseases. While there is limited literature available on gene expression markers associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), the transcriptomic picture associated with critical respiratory illness in this disease is not known at the present moment. Findings By using Agilent microarray chips, we have profiled gene expression signatures in the whole blood of 28 COPD patients hospitalized with different degrees of respiratory compromise.12 of them needed of admission to the ICU, whilst 16 were admitted to the Respiratory Medicine Service. GeneSpring GX 11.0 software was used for performing statistical comparisons of transcript levels between ICU and non-ICU patients. Ingenuity pathway analysis 8.5 (IPA) and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) were used to select, annotate and visualize genes by function and pathway (gene ontology). T-test showed evidence of 1501 genes differentially expressed between ICU and non-ICU patients. IPA and KEGG analysis of the most representative biological functions revealed that ICU patients had increased levels of neutrophil gene transcripts, being [cathepsin G (CTSG)], [elastase, neutrophil expressed (ELANE)], [proteinase 3 (PRTN3)], [myeloperoxidase (MPO)], [cathepsin D (CTSD)], [defensin, alpha 3, neutrophil-specific (DEFA3)], azurocidin 1 (AZU1)], and [bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI)] the most representative ones. Proteins codified by these genes form part of the azurophilic granules of neutrophils and are involved in both antimicrobial defence and tissue damage. This “neutrophil signature” was paralleled by the necessity of advanced respiratory and vital support, and the presence of bacterial infection. Conclusion Study of transcriptomic signatures in blood suggests an

  13. Luminescence as a Continuous Real-Time Reporter of Promoter Activity in Yeast Undergoing Respiratory Oscillations or Cell Division Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, J. Brian; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes a method for generating yeast respiratory oscillations in continuous culture and monitoring rhythmic promoter activity of the culture by automated real-time recording of luminescence. These techniques chiefly require the use of a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that has been genetically modified to express firefly luciferase under the control of a promoter of interest and a continuous culture bioreactor that incorporates a photomultiplier apparatus for detecting light emission. Additionally, this chapter describes a method for observing rhythmic (cell cycle-related) promoter activity in small batch cultures of yeast through luminescence monitoring. PMID:21468985

  14. Control of abdominal and expiratory intercostal muscle activity during vomiting - Role of ventral respiratory group expiratory neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Alan D.; Tan, L. K.; Suzuki, Ichiro

    1987-01-01

    The role of ventral respiratory group (VRG) expiratory (E) neurons in the control of abdominal and internal intercostal muscle activity during vomiting was investigated in cats. Two series of experiments were performed: in one, the activity of VRG E neurons was recorded during fictive vomiting in cats that were decerebrated, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated; in the second, the abdominal muscle activity during vomiting was compared before and after sectioning the axons of descending VRG E neurons in decerebrate spontaneously breathing cats. The results show that about two-thirds of VRG E neurons that project at least as far caudally as the lower thoracic cord contribute to internal intercostal muscle activity during vomiting. The remaining VRG E neurons contribute to abdominal muscle activation. As shown by severing the axons of the VRG E neurons, other, as yet unidenified, inputs (either descending from the brain stem or arising from spinal reflexes) can also produce abdominal muscle activation.

  15. Flagellar dynamics of a connected chain of active, polar, Brownian particles

    PubMed Central

    Chelakkot, Raghunath; Gopinath, Arvind; Mahadevan, L.; Hagan, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    We show that active, self-propelled particles that are connected together to form a single chain that is anchored at one end can produce the graceful beating motions of flagella. Changing the boundary condition from a clamp to a pivot at the anchor leads to steadily rotating tight coils. Strong noise in the system disrupts the regularity of the oscillations. We use a combination of detailed numerical simulations, mean-field scaling analysis and first passage time theory to characterize the phase diagram as a function of the filament length, passive elasticity, propulsion force and noise. Our study suggests minimal experimental tests for the onset of oscillations in an active polar chain. PMID:24352670

  16. Flagellar dynamics of a connected chain of active, polar, Brownian particles.

    PubMed

    Chelakkot, Raghunath; Gopinath, Arvind; Mahadevan, L; Hagan, Michael F

    2014-03-01

    We show that active, self-propelled particles that are connected together to form a single chain that is anchored at one end can produce the graceful beating motions of flagella. Changing the boundary condition from a clamp to a pivot at the anchor leads to steadily rotating tight coils. Strong noise in the system disrupts the regularity of the oscillations. We use a combination of detailed numerical simulations, mean-field scaling analysis and first passage time theory to characterize the phase diagram as a function of the filament length, passive elasticity, propulsion force and noise. Our study suggests minimal experimental tests for the onset of oscillations in an active polar chain. PMID:24352670

  17. Structure-activity relationships of C1 and C6 side chains of zaragozic acid A derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ponpipom, M M; Girotra, N N; Bugianesi, R L; Roberts, C D; Berger, G D; Burk, R M; Marquis, R W; Parsons, W H; Bartizal, K F; Bergstom, J D

    1994-11-11

    Systematic modification of the C6 acyl side chain of zaragozic acid A, a potent squalene synthase inhibitor, was undertaken to improve its biological activity. Simplification of the C6 side chain to the octanoyl ester has deleterious effects; increasing the linear chain length improves the in vitro activity up to the tetradecanoyl ester. An omega-phenoxy group is a better activity enhancer than an omega-phenyl group. A number of C6 carbamates, ethers, and carbonates were prepared and found to have similar activity profiles as the C6 esters. In the preparation of C6 ethers, C4 and C4,6 bisethers were also isolated; their relative activity is: C6 > C4 > C4,6. These C6 long-chain derivatives are subnanomolar squalene synthase inhibitors; they are, however, only weakly active in inhibiting hepatic cholesterol synthesis in mice. The C6 short-chain derivatives are much less active in vitro, but they all have improved oral activity in mice. Modification of the C1 alkyl side chain of the n-butanoyl analogue (ED50 4.5 mg/kg) did not improve the po activity further. A number of these C6 long-chain derivatives are also potent antifungal agents in vitro. PMID:7966163

  18. Embryo as an active granular fluid: stress-coordinated cellular constriction chains.

    PubMed

    Jason Gao, Guo-Jie; Holcomb, Michael C; Thomas, Jeffrey H; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2016-10-19

    Mechanical stress plays an intricate role in gene expression in individual cells and sculpting of developing tissues. However, systematic methods of studying how mechanical stress and feedback help to harmonize cellular activities within a tissue have yet to be developed. Motivated by our observation of the cellular constriction chains (CCCs) during the initial phase of ventral furrow formation in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo, we propose an active granular fluid (AGF) model that provides valuable insights into cellular coordination in the apical constriction process. In our model, cells are treated as circular particles connected by a predefined force network, and they undergo a random constriction process in which the particle constriction probability P is a function of the stress exerted on the particle by its neighbors. We find that when P favors tensile stress, constricted particles tend to form chain-like structures. In contrast, constricted particles tend to form compact clusters when P favors compression. A remarkable similarity of constricted-particle chains and CCCs observed in vivo provides indirect evidence that tensile-stress feedback coordinates the apical constriction activity. Our particle-based AGF model will be useful in analyzing mechanical feedback effects in a wide variety of morphogenesis and organogenesis phenomena. PMID:27545101

  19. Respiratory papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Alagusundaramoorthy, Sayee Sundar; Agrawal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Papillomas are known to occur in the lower respiratory tract. They are however, rare compared to their occurrence in the upper respiratory tract. These are generally exophytic tumors in the more proximal upper airways however cases with more distal location with an inverted growth pattern have also been described in the literature. These can be solitary or multiple and multifocality associated with multiple papillomas in the upper respiratory/aerodigestive tract. The four major types of respiratory papillomas are (1) Recurrent respiratory papillomas, (2) solitary squamous papillomas, (3) solitary glandular papillomas, (4) mixed papillomas. We review the incidence, etiopathology, diagnosis, and possible treatment modalities and algorithms for these respiratory papillomas. PMID:27625447

  20. Asthmatics with exacerbation during acute respiratory illness exhibit unique transcriptional signatures within the nasal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory illness is the leading cause of asthma exacerbations yet the mechanisms underlying this association remain unclear. To address the deficiencies in our understanding of the molecular events characterizing acute respiratory illness-induced asthma exacerbations, we undertook a transcriptional profiling study of the nasal mucosa over the course of acute respiratory illness amongst individuals with a history of asthma, allergic rhinitis and no underlying respiratory disease. Methods Transcriptional profiling experiments were performed using the Agilent Whole Human Genome 4X44K array platform. Time point-based microarray and principal component analyses were conducted to identify and distinguish acute respiratory illness-associated transcriptional profiles over the course of our study. Gene enrichment analysis was conducted to identify biological processes over-represented within each acute respiratory illness-associated profile, and gene expression was subsequently confirmed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results We found that acute respiratory illness is characterized by dynamic, time-specific transcriptional profiles whose magnitudes of expression are influenced by underlying respiratory disease and the mucosal repair signature evoked during acute respiratory illness. Most strikingly, we report that people with asthma who experience acute respiratory illness-induced exacerbations are characterized by a reduced but prolonged inflammatory immune response, inadequate activation of mucosal repair, and the expression of a newly described exacerbation-specific transcriptional signature. Conclusion Findings from our study represent a significant contribution towards clarifying the complex molecular interactions that typify acute respiratory illness-induced asthma exacerbations. PMID:24433494

  1. Clearance of the heavy and light polypeptide chains of human tissue-type plasminogen activator in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Rijken, D C; Emeis, J J

    1986-01-01

    In order to assess which part of the tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) molecule should be (genetically) modified to obtain more-slowly-clearing mutants, two-chain t-PA and its isolated heavy and light chains were radiolabelled and injected into rats. The vast majority of t-PA and the heavy chain disappeared from the blood circulation with half-lives of 2.3 and 1.0 min respectively. The clearance of the light chain was biphasic, owing to complex-formation with plasma proteinase inhibitors. The disappearance of di-isopropylphospho-light chain, which has a blocked active site, was nearly monophasic, with a half-life of 5.7 min. Organ distribution studies showed that hepatic clearance constituted the major pathway in all cases. These results strongly suggest that t-PA is recognized by the liver primarily through the heavy chain. PMID:3099771

  2. Evidence-based risk assessment and recommendations for physical activity clearance: respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Eves, Neil D; Davidson, Warren J

    2011-07-01

    The 2 most common respiratory diseases are chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Growing evidence supports the benefits of exercise for all patients with these diseases. Due to the etiology of COPD and the pathophysiology of asthma, there may be some additional risks of exercise for these patients, and hence accurate risk assessment and clearance is needed before patients start exercising. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the available literature regarding the risks of exercise for patients with respiratory disease and provide evidence-based recommendations to guide the screening process. A systematic review of 4 databases was performed. The literature was searched to identify adverse events specific to exercise. For COPD, 102 randomized controlled trials that involved an exercise intervention were included (n = 6938). No study directly assessed the risk of exercise, and only 15 commented on exercise-related adverse events. For asthma, 30 studies of mixed methodologies were included (n = 1278). One study directly assessed the risk of exercise, and 15 commented on exercise-related adverse events. No exercise-related fatalities were reported. The majority of adverse events in COPD patients were musculoskeletal or cardiovascular in nature. In asthma patients, exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and (or) asthma symptoms were the primary adverse events. There is no direct evidence regarding the risk of exercise for patients with COPD or asthma. However, based on the available literature, it would appear that with adequate screening and optimal medical therapy, the risk of exercise for these respiratory patients is low. PMID:21800949

  3. Synthesis and antibacterial activities of acylide derivatives bearing an aryl-tetrazolyl chain

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Ling-Xing; Sun, Ping-Hua; Guo, Bao-Qin; Xu, Xing-Jun; Li, Zhi-Qiang; Sun, Jia-Zhi; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Chen, Wei-Min

    2014-01-01

    Seventeen acylides bearing an aryl-tetrazolyl alkyl-substituted side chain were synthesized, starting from clarithromycin, via several reactions including hydrolysis, acetylating, esterification, carbamylation, and Michael addition. The structures of all new compounds were confirmed by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. All these synthesized acylides were evaluated for in vitro antimicrobial activities against gram-positive pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis) and gram-negative pathogens (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli), using the broth microdilution method. Results showed that compounds 10e, 10f, 10g, 10 h, 10o have good antibacterial activities. PMID:25284984

  4. Antiallergic activity of rosmarinic acid esters is modulated by hydrophobicity, and bulkiness of alkyl side chain.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fengxian; Xu, Zhongming; Yonekura, Lina; Yang, Ronghua; Tamura, Hirotoshi

    2015-01-01

    Methyl, propyl and hexyl esters of rosmarinic, caffeic and p-coumaric acids were tested for antiallergic activity, and rosmarinic acid propyl ester exhibited the greatest β-hexosaminidase release suppression (IC50, 23.7 μM). Quadratic correlations between pIC50 and cLogP (r(2) = 0.94, 0.98, and 1.00, respectively) were observed in each acid ester series. The antiallergic activity is modulated by hydrophobicity, and alkyl chain bulkiness. PMID:25686361

  5. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Respiratory failure happens when not enough oxygen passes from your lungs into your blood. Your body's organs, such ... brain, need oxygen-rich blood to work well. Respiratory failure also can happen if your lungs can't ...

  6. Respiratory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The general anatomy and function of the human respiratory system is summarized. Breathing movements, control of breathing, lung volumes and capacities, mechanical relations, and factors relevant to respiratory support and equipment design are discussed.

  7. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase activity in peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes from patients with atopic dermatitis: correlation with respiratory atopy.

    PubMed

    Sawai, T; Ikai, K; Uehara, M

    1998-05-01

    We determined the cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase (cAMP-PDE) activity in peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes from 100 patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) aged 13-57 years (mean +/- SD, 29.8 +/- 17.7 years). The correlation between cAMP-PDE activity and clinical parameters such as the severity of eczema and a personal or family predisposition to atopic respiratory diseases (ARD) (asthma or allergic rhinitis) was examined. Although the enzymic activity varied from normal to very high in the AD patients, cAMP-PDE activity was significantly (P < 0.005) elevated in AD patients (42.1 +/- 22.0 units) as compared with the normal controls (12.4 +/- 5.6) and clinical control subjects (13.4 +/- 9.5). In contrast, we found no correlation between cAMP-PDE activity and the severity of eczema when AD patients were classified into four categories (remission, mild, moderate and severe) according to the extent of their skin involvement. Furthermore, we found that systemic corticosteroid therapy in severe AD patients did not alter the cAMP-PDE activity. cAMP-PDE activity was significantly (P < 0.01) higher in those AD patients who had a personal history of ARD (47.2 +/- 11.2) than in AD patients with a family history of ARD (37.2 +/- 17.4) and those without a personal or family history ('pure' AD) (34.4 +/- 19.8). Nevertheless, the cAMP-PDE activity was significantly higher even in 'pure' AD patients than in the controls. These results suggest that an elevation of cAMP-PDE activity is closely related to a predisposition to respiratory atopy, and does not follow inflammation in AD patients. PMID:9666832

  8. Kinesin's light chains inhibit the head- and microtubule-binding activity of its tail.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yao Liang; Rice, Sarah E

    2010-06-29

    Kinesin-1 is a microtubule-based motor comprising two heavy chains (KHCs) and two light chains (KLCs). Motor activity is precisely regulated to avoid futile ATP consumption and to ensure proper intracellular localization of kinesin-1 and its cargoes. The KHC tail inhibits ATPase activity by interacting with the enzymatic KHC heads, and the tail also binds microtubules. Here, we present a role for the KLCs in regulating both the head- and microtubule-binding activities of the kinesin-1 tail. We show that KLCs reduce the affinity of the head-tail interaction over tenfold and concomitantly repress the tail's regulatory activity. We also show that KLCs inhibit tail-microtubule binding by a separate mechanism. Inhibition of head-tail binding requires steric and electrostatic factors. Inhibition of tail-microtubule binding is largely electrostatic, pH dependent, and mediated partly by a highly negatively charged linker region between the KHC-interacting and cargo-binding domains of the KLCs. Our data support a model wherein KLCs promote activation of kinesin-1 for cargo transport by simultaneously suppressing tail-head and tail-microtubule interactions. KLC-mediated inhibition of tail-microtubule binding may also influence diffusional movement of kinesin-1 on microtubules, and kinesin-1's role in microtubule transport/sliding. PMID:20547877

  9. Kinesin’s light chains inhibit the head- and microtubule-binding activity of its tail

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yao Liang; Rice, Sarah E.

    2010-01-01

    Kinesin-1 is a microtubule-based motor comprising two heavy chains (KHCs) and two light chains (KLCs). Motor activity is precisely regulated to avoid futile ATP consumption and to ensure proper intracellular localization of kinesin-1 and its cargoes. The KHC tail inhibits ATPase activity by interacting with the enzymatic KHC heads, and the tail also binds microtubules. Here, we present a role for the KLCs in regulating both the head- and microtubule-binding activities of the kinesin-1 tail. We show that KLCs reduce the affinity of the head-tail interaction over tenfold and concomitantly repress the tail’s regulatory activity. We also show that KLCs inhibit tail-microtubule binding by a separate mechanism. Inhibition of head-tail binding requires steric and electrostatic factors. Inhibition of tail-microtubule binding is largely electrostatic, pH dependent, and mediated partly by a highly negatively charged linker region between the KHC-interacting and cargo-binding domains of the KLCs. Our data support a model wherein KLCs promote activation of kinesin-1 for cargo transport by simultaneously suppressing tail-head and tail-microtubule interactions. KLC-mediated inhibition of tail-microtubule binding may also influence diffusional movement of kinesin-1 on microtubules, and kinesin-1’s role in microtubule transport/sliding. PMID:20547877

  10. Sensitive electrochemical assaying of DNA methyltransferase activity based on mimic-hybridization chain reaction amplified strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linqun; Liu, Yuanjian; Li, Ying; Zhao, Yuewu; Wei, Wei; Liu, Songqin

    2016-08-24

    A mimic-hybridization chain reaction (mimic-HCR) amplified strategy was proposed for sensitive electrochemically detection of DNA methylation and methyltransferase (MTase) activity In the presence of methylated DNA, DNA-gold nanoparticles (DNA-AuNPs) were captured on the electrode by sandwich-type assembly. It then triggered mimic-HCR of two hairpin probes to produce many long double-helix chains for numerous hexaammineruthenium (III) chloride ([Ru(NH3)6](3+), RuHex) inserting. As a result, the signal for electrochemically detection of DNA MTase activity could be amplified. If DNA was non-methylated, however, the sandwich-type assembly would not form because the short double-stranded DNAs (dsDNA) on the Au electrode could be cleaved and digested by restriction endonuclease HpaII (HapII) and exonuclease III (Exo III), resulting in the signal decrement. Based on this, an electrochemical approach for detection of M.SssI MTase activity with high sensitivity was developed. The linear range for M.SssI MTase activity was from 0.05 U mL(-1) to 10 U mL(-1), with a detection limit down to 0.03 U mL(-1). Moreover, this detecting strategy held great promise as an easy-to-use and highly sensitive method for other MTase activity and inhibition detection by exchanging the corresponding DNA sequence. PMID:27496999

  11. Mass dependence of the activation enthalpy and entropy of unentangled linear alkane chains

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Cheol; Douglas, Jack F.

    2015-10-14

    The mass scaling of the self-diffusion coefficient D of polymers in the liquid state, D ∼ M{sup β}, is one of the most basic characteristics of these complex fluids. Although traditional theories such as the Rouse and reptation models of unentangled and entangled polymer melts, respectively, predict that β is constant, this exponent for alkanes has been estimated experimentally to vary from −1.8 to −2.7 upon cooling. Significantly, β changes with temperature T under conditions where the chains are not entangled and at temperatures far above the glass transition temperature T{sub g} where dynamic heterogeneity does not complicate the description of the liquid dynamics. Based on atomistic molecular dynamics simulations on unentangled linear alkanes in the melt, we find that the variation of β with T can be directly attributed to the dependence of the enthalpy ΔH{sub a} and entropy ΔS{sub a} of activation on the number of alkane backbone carbon atoms, n. In addition, we find a sharp change in the melt dynamics near a “critical” chain length, n ≈ 17. A close examination of this phenomenon indicates that a “buckling transition” from rod-like to coiled chain configurations occurs at this characteristic chain length and distinct entropy-enthalpy compensation relations, ΔS{sub a} ∝ ΔH{sub a}, hold on either side of this polymer conformational transition. We conclude that the activation free energy parameters exert a significant influence on the dynamics of polymer melts that is not anticipated by either the Rouse and reptation models. In addition to changes of ΔH{sub a} and ΔS{sub a} with M, we expect changes in these free energy parameters to be crucial for understanding the dynamics of polymer blends, nanocomposites, and confined polymers because of changes of the fluid free energy by interfacial interactions and geometrical confinement.

  12. Mass dependence of the activation enthalpy and entropy of unentangled linear alkane chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Cheol; Douglas, Jack F.

    2015-10-01

    The mass scaling of the self-diffusion coefficient D of polymers in the liquid state, D ˜ Mβ, is one of the most basic characteristics of these complex fluids. Although traditional theories such as the Rouse and reptation models of unentangled and entangled polymer melts, respectively, predict that β is constant, this exponent for alkanes has been estimated experimentally to vary from -1.8 to -2.7 upon cooling. Significantly, β changes with temperature T under conditions where the chains are not entangled and at temperatures far above the glass transition temperature Tg where dynamic heterogeneity does not complicate the description of the liquid dynamics. Based on atomistic molecular dynamics simulations on unentangled linear alkanes in the melt, we find that the variation of β with T can be directly attributed to the dependence of the enthalpy ΔHa and entropy ΔSa of activation on the number of alkane backbone carbon atoms, n. In addition, we find a sharp change in the melt dynamics near a "critical" chain length, n ≈ 17. A close examination of this phenomenon indicates that a "buckling transition" from rod-like to coiled chain configurations occurs at this characteristic chain length and distinct entropy-enthalpy compensation relations, ΔSa ∝ ΔHa, hold on either side of this polymer conformational transition. We conclude that the activation free energy parameters exert a significant influence on the dynamics of polymer melts that is not anticipated by either the Rouse and reptation models. In addition to changes of ΔHa and ΔSa with M, we expect changes in these free energy parameters to be crucial for understanding the dynamics of polymer blends, nanocomposites, and confined polymers because of changes of the fluid free energy by interfacial interactions and geometrical confinement.

  13. Unfolded protein response activation reduces secretion and extracellular aggregation of amyloidogenic immunoglobulin light chain

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Christina B.; Ryno, Lisa M.; Plate, Lars; Morgan, Gareth J.; Hulleman, John D.; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Wiseman, R. Luke

    2014-01-01

    Light-chain amyloidosis (AL) is a degenerative disease characterized by the extracellular aggregation of a destabilized amyloidogenic Ig light chain (LC) secreted from a clonally expanded plasma cell. Current treatments for AL revolve around ablating the cancer plasma cell population using chemotherapy regimens. Unfortunately, this approach is limited to the ∼70% of patients who do not exhibit significant organ proteotoxicity and can tolerate chemotherapy. Thus, identifying new therapeutic strategies to alleviate LC organ proteotoxicity should allow AL patients with significant cardiac and/or renal involvement to subsequently tolerate established chemotherapy treatments. Using a small-molecule screening approach, the unfolded protein response (UPR) was identified as a cellular signaling pathway whose activation selectively attenuates secretion of amyloidogenic LC, while not affecting secretion of a nonamyloidogenic LC. Activation of the UPR-associated transcription factors XBP1s and/or ATF6 in the absence of stress recapitulates the selective decrease in amyloidogenic LC secretion by remodeling the endoplasmic reticulum proteostasis network. Stress-independent activation of XBP1s, or especially ATF6, also attenuates extracellular aggregation of amyloidogenic LC into soluble aggregates. Collectively, our results show that stress-independent activation of these adaptive UPR transcription factors offers a therapeutic strategy to reduce proteotoxicity associated with LC aggregation. PMID:25157167

  14. The relative importance of respiratory water loss in scorpions is correlated with species habitat type and activity pattern.

    PubMed

    Gefen, Eran

    2011-01-01

    Scorpions exhibit some of the lowest recorded water loss rates compared with those of other terrestrial arthropods of similar body size. Evaporative water loss (EWL) includes cuticular transpiration and respiratory water loss (RWL) from gas exchange surfaces, that is, book lung lamellae. Estimated fractions of cuticular and respiratory losses currently available from the literature show considerable variation, at least partly as a result of differences in methodology. This study reports RWL rates and their relative importance in scorpions from two families (Buthidae and Scorpionidae), including both xeric and mesic species (or subspecies). Two of the included Buthidae were surface-dwelling species, and another inhabits empty burrows of other terrestrial arthropods. This experimental design enabled correlating RWL importance with scorpion phylogeny, habitat type, and/or homing behavior. Buthidae species exhibited significantly lower EWL rates compared with those of Scorpionidae, whereas effects of habitat type and homing behavior were not significant. Resting RWL rates were not significantly affected by scorpion phylogeny, but rates for the xeric species (totaling ~10% of EWL rates at 30°C) were significantly lower compared with those of mesic species. These lower RWL values were correlated with significantly lower H(2)O/CO(2) emission rates in xeric species. The experimental setup and ~24-h duration of each individual recording allowed estimating the effect of interspecific variation in activity on RWL proportions. The high respiratory losses in active hydrated Scorpio maurus fuscus, totaling 30% of EWL, suggest that behavioral discretion in this species is a more likely mechanism for body water conservation under stressful conditions when compared with the responses of other studied species. PMID:21133796

  15. Effect of Ganoderma lucidum on the activities of mitochondrial dehydrogenases and complex I and II of electron transport chain in the brain of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ajith, T A; Sudheesh, N P; Roshny, D; Abishek, G; Janardhanan, K K

    2009-03-01

    Dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, being direct intracellular source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), is important in the pathogenesis of number of ageing associated human disorders. Effect of ethanol extract of Ganoderma lucidum on the activities of mitochondrial dehydrogenases; complex I and II of electron transport chain have been evaluated in the aged rat brain. Aged male Wistar rats were administered with ethanol extract of G. lucidum (50 and 250mg/kg, p.o) once daily for 15 days. Similarly DL-alpha-lipoic acid (100mg/kg, p.o) administered group was kept as the reference standard. Young and aged rats administered with water were kept as young and aged control, respectively. The effect of treatment was assessed by estimating the activities of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (alpha-KGDH), pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), complex I and II in the mitochondria of rat brain. Results of the study demonstrated that the extract of G. lucidum (50 and 250mg/kg) significantly (p<0.01) enhanced the activities of PDH, alpha-KGDH, SDH, complex I and II when compared to that of the aged control animals. The level of the lipid peroxidation was significantly lowered (p<0.01) in the G. lucidum treated group with respect to that of aged control. However, we could not find any statistically significant difference between the activities of enzymes in groups treated with 50 and 250mg/kg of G. lucidum. The activity exhibited by the extract of G. lucidum in the present study can be partially correlated to its antioxidant activity. The results of the study concluded that the extract of G. lucidum may effective to improve the function of mitochondria in aged rat brain, suggest its possible therapeutic application against ageing associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19041385

  16. Respiratory muscle activity during REM sleep in patients with diaphragm paralysis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J R; Dunroy, H M A; Corfield, D R; Hart, N; Simonds, A K; Polkey, M I; Morrell, M J

    2004-01-13

    The diaphragm is the main inspiratory muscle during REM sleep. It was hypothesized that patients with isolated bilateral diaphragm paralysis (BDP) might not be able to sustain REM sleep. Polysomnography with EMG recordings was undertaken from accessory respiratory muscles in patients with BDP and normal subjects. Patients with BDP had a normal quantity of REM sleep (mean +/- SD, 18.6 +/- 7.5% of total sleep time) achieved by inspiratory recruitment of extradiaphragmatic muscles in both tonic and phasic REM, suggesting brainstem reorganization. PMID:14718717

  17. A Trypanosoma brucei Kinesin Heavy Chain Promotes Parasite Growth by Triggering Host Arginase Activity

    PubMed Central

    De Muylder, Géraldine; Daulouède, Sylvie; Lecordier, Laurence; Uzureau, Pierrick; Morias, Yannick; Van Den Abbeele, Jan; Caljon, Guy; Hérin, Michel; Holzmuller, Philippe; Semballa, Silla; Courtois, Pierrette; Vanhamme, Luc; Stijlemans, Benoît; De Baetselier, Patrick; Barrett, Michael P.; Barlow, Jillian L.; McKenzie, Andrew N. J.; Barron, Luke; Wynn, Thomas A.; Beschin, Alain; Vincendeau, Philippe; Pays, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    Background In order to promote infection, the blood-borne parasite Trypanosoma brucei releases factors that upregulate arginase expression and activity in myeloid cells. Methodology/Principal findings By screening a cDNA library of T. brucei with an antibody neutralizing the arginase-inducing activity of parasite released factors, we identified a Kinesin Heavy Chain isoform, termed TbKHC1, as responsible for this effect. Following interaction with mouse myeloid cells, natural or recombinant TbKHC1 triggered SIGN-R1 receptor-dependent induction of IL-10 production, resulting in arginase-1 activation concomitant with reduction of nitric oxide (NO) synthase activity. This TbKHC1 activity was IL-4Rα-independent and did not mirror M2 activation of myeloid cells. As compared to wild-type T. brucei, infection by TbKHC1 KO parasites was characterized by strongly reduced parasitaemia and prolonged host survival time. By treating infected mice with ornithine or with NO synthase inhibitor, we observed that during the first wave of parasitaemia the parasite growth-promoting effect of TbKHC1-mediated arginase activation resulted more from increased polyamine production than from reduction of NO synthesis. In late stage infection, TbKHC1-mediated reduction of NO synthesis appeared to contribute to liver damage linked to shortening of host survival time. Conclusion A kinesin heavy chain released by T. brucei induces IL-10 and arginase-1 through SIGN-R1 signaling in myeloid cells, which promotes early trypanosome growth and favors parasite settlement in the host. Moreover, in the late stage of infection, the inhibition of NO synthesis by TbKHC1 contributes to liver pathogenicity. PMID:24204274

  18. Effects of tour boats on dolphin activity examined with sensitivity analysis of Markov chains.

    PubMed

    Dans, Silvana Laura; Degrati, Mariana; Pedraza, Susana Noemí; Crespo, Enrique Alberto

    2012-08-01

    In Patagonia, Argentina, watching dolphins, especially dusky dolphins (Lagenorhynchus obscurus), is a new tourist activity. Feeding time decreases and time to return to feeding after feeding is abandoned and time it takes a group of dolphins to feed increase in the presence of boats. Such effects on feeding behavior may exert energetic costs on dolphins and thus reduce an individual's survival and reproductive capacity or maybe associated with shifts in distribution. We sought to predict which behavioral changes modify the activity pattern of dolphins the most. We modeled behavioral sequences of dusky dolphins with Markov chains. We calculated transition probabilities from one activity to another and arranged them in a stochastic matrix model. The proportion of time dolphins dedicated to a given activity (activity budget) and the time it took a dolphin to resume that activity after it had been abandoned (recurrence time) were calculated. We used a sensitivity analysis of Markov chains to calculate the sensitivity of the time budget and the activity-resumption time to changes in behavioral transition probabilities. Feeding-time budget was most sensitive to changes in the probability of dolphins switching from traveling to feeding behavior and of maintaining feeding behavior. Thus, an increase in these probabilities would be associated with the largest reduction in the time dedicated to feeding. A reduction in the probability of changing from traveling to feeding would also be associated with the largest increases in the time it takes dolphins to resume feeding. To approach dolphins when they are traveling would not affect behavior less because presence of the boat may keep dolphins from returning to feeding. Our results may help operators of dolphin-watching vessels minimize negative effects on dolphins. PMID:22624561

  19. Piezotolerance of the respiratory terminal oxidase activity of the piezophilic Shewanella violacea DSS12 as compared with non-piezophilic Shewanella species.

    PubMed

    Tamegai, Hideyuki; Ota, Yuuya; Haga, Minami; Fujimori, Hiroki; Kato, Chiaki; Nogi, Yuichi; Kawamoto, Jun; Kurihara, Tatsuo; Sambongi, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    The facultative piezophile Shewanella violacea DSS12 is known to alter its respiratory components under the influence of hydrostatic pressure during growth, suggesting that it has a respiratory system that functions in adaptation to high pressure. We investigated the pressure- and temperature-dependencies of the respiratory terminal oxidase activity of the membrane of S. violacea relative to non-piezophilic Shewanella species. We observed that the activity in the membrane of S. violacea was more resistant to high pressure than those of non-piezophilic Shewanella even though DSS12 was cultured under atmospheric pressure. On the other hand, the temperature dependency of this activity was almost the same for all of the tested strain regardless of optimal growth temperature. Both high pressure and low temperature are expected to lower protein flexibility, causing a decrease in enzyme activity, but the results of this study suggest that the mechanism maintaining enzyme activity under high hydrostatic pressure is different from that at low temperature. Additionally, the responses of the activity to the pressure- and temperature-changes were independent of membrane lipid composition. Therefore, the piezotolerance of the respiratory terminal oxidases of S. violacea is perhaps dependent on the properties of the protein itself and not on the lipid composition of the membrane. Our observations suggest that S. violacea constitutively express piezotolerant respiratory terminal oxidases that serve adaptation to the deep-sea environment. PMID:21597190

  20. Expression of the Bovine NK-Lysin Gene Family and Activity against Respiratory Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junfeng; Yang, Chingyuan; Tizioto, Polyana C; Huang, Huan; Lee, Mi O K; Payne, Harold R; Lawhon, Sara D; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Taylor, Jeremy F; Womack, James E

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the genomes of many mammals that have a single NK-lysin gene, the cattle genome contains a family of four genes, one of which is expressed preferentially in the lung. In this study, we compared the expression of the four bovine NK-lysin genes in healthy animals to animals challenged with pathogens known to be associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq). The expression of several NK-lysins, especially NK2C, was elevated in challenged relative to control animals. The effects of synthetic peptides corresponding to functional region helices 2 and 3 of each gene product were tested on both model membranes and bio-membranes. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that these peptides adopted a more helical secondary structure upon binding to an anionic model membrane and liposome leakage assays suggested that these peptides disrupt membranes. Bacterial killing assays further confirmed the antimicrobial effects of these peptides on BRD-associated bacteria, including both Pasteurella multocida and Mannhemia haemolytica and an ultrastructural examination of NK-lysin-treated P. multocida cells by transmission electron microscopy revealed the lysis of target membranes. These studies demonstrate that the expanded bovine NK-lysin gene family is potentially important in host defense against pathogens involved in bovine respiratory disease. PMID:27409794

  1. Expression of the Bovine NK-Lysin Gene Family and Activity against Respiratory Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junfeng; Yang, Chingyuan; Tizioto, Polyana C.; Huang, Huan; Lee, Mi O. K.; Payne, Harold R.; Lawhon, Sara D.; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Womack, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the genomes of many mammals that have a single NK-lysin gene, the cattle genome contains a family of four genes, one of which is expressed preferentially in the lung. In this study, we compared the expression of the four bovine NK-lysin genes in healthy animals to animals challenged with pathogens known to be associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq). The expression of several NK-lysins, especially NK2C, was elevated in challenged relative to control animals. The effects of synthetic peptides corresponding to functional region helices 2 and 3 of each gene product were tested on both model membranes and bio-membranes. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that these peptides adopted a more helical secondary structure upon binding to an anionic model membrane and liposome leakage assays suggested that these peptides disrupt membranes. Bacterial killing assays further confirmed the antimicrobial effects of these peptides on BRD-associated bacteria, including both Pasteurella multocida and Mannhemia haemolytica and an ultrastructural examination of NK-lysin-treated P. multocida cells by transmission electron microscopy revealed the lysis of target membranes. These studies demonstrate that the expanded bovine NK-lysin gene family is potentially important in host defense against pathogens involved in bovine respiratory disease. PMID:27409794

  2. Defensive activation to (un)predictable interoceptive threat: The NPU respiratory threat test (NPUr).

    PubMed

    Schroijen, Mathias; Fantoni, Simona; Rivera, Carmen; Vervliet, Bram; Schruers, Koen; van den Bergh, Omer; van Diest, Ilse

    2016-06-01

    Potentially life-threatening interoceptive sensations easily engage the behavioral defensive system. Resulting fear and anxiety toward interoceptive threat are functionally distinct states that are hypothesized to play a prominent role in the etiology of panic disorder. The present study aimed to investigate whether fear- and anxiety-potentiated startle responses occur to predictable and unpredictable interoceptive threat, respectively. Therefore, we modified the NPU threat test (Schmitz & Grillon, ) and replaced the aversive electrocutaneous stimulus with an aversive interoceptive stimulus (a breathing occlusion, making it briefly impossible to breathe). Healthy participants (N = 48) underwent three instructed conditions. A visual cue signaled the occlusion in the predictable condition (P), whereas another cue was unrelated to the occurrence of the occlusion in the unpredictable condition (U). The safe condition (N) also had a visual cue, but no occlusion. Both fear- and anxiety-potentiated startle blink responses were observed in response to predictable and unpredictable respiratory threat, respectively. The current study presents and validates the NPU respiratory threat test (NPUr) as an ecologically valid paradigm to study both anxiety and fear in response to a panic-relevant interoceptive threat. The paradigm allows future testing of contextual generalization, investigation of different clinical groups, and more explicit comparisons of defensive responding to interoceptive versus exteroceptive threats. PMID:26879710

  3. Automated determination of wakefulness and sleep in rats based on non-invasively acquired measures of movement and respiratory activity

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Tao; Mott, Christopher; Mollicone, Daniel; Sanford, Larry D.

    2012-01-01

    The current standard for monitoring sleep in rats requires labor intensive surgical procedures and the implantation of chronic electrodes which have the potential to impact behavior and sleep. With the goal of developing a non-invasive method to determine sleep and wakefulness, we constructed a non-contact monitoring system to measure movement and respiratory activity using signals acquired with pulse Doppler radar and from digitized video analysis. A set of 23 frequency and time-domain features were derived from these signals and were calculated in 10 s epochs. Based on these features, a classification method for automated scoring of wakefulness, non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) and REM in rats was developed using a support vector machine (SVM). We then assessed the utility of the automated scoring system in discriminating wakefulness and sleep by comparing the results to standard scoring of wakefulness and sleep based on concurrently recorded EEG and EMG. Agreement between SVM automated scoring based on selected features and visual scores based on EEG and EMG were approximately 91% for wakefulness, 84% for NREM and 70% for REM. The results indicate that automated scoring based on non-invasively acquired movement and respiratory activity will be useful for studies requiring discrimination of wakefulness and sleep. However, additional information or signals will be needed to improve discrimination of NREM and REM episodes within sleep. PMID:22178621

  4. Tissue-specific mtDNA abundance from exome data and its correlation with mitochondrial transcription, mass and respiratory activity.

    PubMed

    D'Erchia, Anna Maria; Atlante, Anna; Gadaleta, Gemma; Pavesi, Giulio; Chiara, Matteo; De Virgilio, Caterina; Manzari, Caterina; Mastropasqua, Francesca; Prazzoli, Gian Marco; Picardi, Ernesto; Gissi, Carmela; Horner, David; Reyes, Aurelio; Sbisà, Elisabetta; Tullo, Apollonia; Pesole, Graziano

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells contain a population of mitochondria, variable in number and shape, which in turn contain multiple copies of a tiny compact genome (mtDNA) whose expression and function is strictly coordinated with the nuclear one. mtDNA copy number varies between different cell or tissues types, both in response to overall metabolic and bioenergetics demands and as a consequence or cause of specific pathological conditions. Here we present a novel and reliable methodology to assess the effective mtDNA copy number per diploid genome by investigating off-target reads obtained by whole-exome sequencing (WES) experiments. We also investigate whether and how mtDNA copy number correlates with mitochondrial mass, respiratory activity and expression levels. Analyzing six different tissues from three age- and sex-matched human individuals, we found a highly significant linear correlation between mtDNA copy number estimated by qPCR and the frequency of mtDNA off target WES reads. Furthermore, mtDNA copy number showed highly significant correlation with mitochondrial gene expression levels as measured by RNA-Seq as well as with mitochondrial mass and respiratory activity. Our methodology makes thus feasible, at a large scale, the investigation of mtDNA copy number in diverse cell-types, tissues and pathological conditions or in response to specific treatments. PMID:25446395

  5. Endomorphin analog analgesics with reduced abuse liability, respiratory depression, motor impairment, tolerance, and glial activation relative to morphine.

    PubMed

    Zadina, James E; Nilges, Mark R; Morgenweck, Jenny; Zhang, Xing; Hackler, Laszlo; Fasold, Melita B

    2016-06-01

    Opioids acting at the mu opioid receptor (MOR) are the most effective analgesics, however adverse side effects severely limit their use. Of particular importance, abuse liability results in major medical, societal, and economic problems, respiratory depression is the cause of fatal overdoses, and tolerance complicates treatment and increases the risk of side effects. Motor and cognitive impairment are especially problematic for older adults. Despite the host of negative side effects, opioids such as morphine are commonly used for acute and chronic pain conditions. Separation of analgesia from unwanted effects has long been an unmet goal of opioid research. Novel MOR agonist structures may prove critical for greater success. Here we tested metabolically stable analogs of the endomorphins, endogenous opioids highly selective for the MOR. Compared to morphine, the analogs showed dramatically improved analgesia-to-side-effect ratios. At doses providing equal or greater antinociception than morphine in the rat, the analogs showed reduced a) respiratory depression, b) impairment of motor coordination, c) tolerance and hyperalgesia, d) glial p38/CGRP/P2X7 receptor signaling, and e) reward/abuse potential in both conditioned place preference and self-administration tests. Differential effects on glial activation indicate a mechanism for the relative lack of side effects by the analogs compared to morphine. The results suggest that endomorphin analogs described here could provide gold standard pain relief mediated by selective MOR activation, but with remarkably safer side effect profiles compared to opioids like morphine. PMID:26748051

  6. East Coast Fever Caused by Theileria parva Is Characterized by Macrophage Activation Associated with Vasculitis and Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Fry, Lindsay M; Schneider, David A; Frevert, Charles W; Nelson, Danielle D; Morrison, W Ivan; Knowles, Donald P

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure and death in East Coast Fever (ECF), a clinical syndrome of African cattle caused by the apicomplexan parasite Theileria parva, has historically been attributed to pulmonary infiltration by infected lymphocytes. However, immunohistochemical staining of tissue from T. parva infected cattle revealed large numbers of CD3- and CD20-negative intralesional mononuclear cells. Due to this finding, we hypothesized that macrophages play an important role in Theileria parva disease pathogenesis. Data presented here demonstrates that terminal ECF in both Holstein and Boran cattle is largely due to multisystemic histiocytic responses and resultant tissue damage. Furthermore, the combination of these histologic changes with the clinical findings, including lymphadenopathy, prolonged pyrexia, multi-lineage leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia is consistent with macrophage activation syndrome. All animals that succumbed to infection exhibited lymphohistiocytic vasculitis of small to medium caliber blood and lymphatic vessels. In pulmonary, lymphoid, splenic and hepatic tissues from Holstein cattle, the majority of intralesional macrophages were positive for CD163, and often expressed large amounts of IL-17. These data define a terminal ECF pathogenesis in which parasite-driven lymphoproliferation leads to secondary systemic macrophage activation syndrome, mononuclear vasculitis, pulmonary edema, respiratory failure and death. The accompanying macrophage phenotype defined by CD163 and IL-17 is presented in the context of this pathogenesis. PMID:27195791

  7. East Coast Fever Caused by Theileria parva Is Characterized by Macrophage Activation Associated with Vasculitis and Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, David A.; Frevert, Charles W.; Nelson, Danielle D.; Morrison, W. Ivan; Knowles, Donald P.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory failure and death in East Coast Fever (ECF), a clinical syndrome of African cattle caused by the apicomplexan parasite Theileria parva, has historically been attributed to pulmonary infiltration by infected lymphocytes. However, immunohistochemical staining of tissue from T. parva infected cattle revealed large numbers of CD3- and CD20-negative intralesional mononuclear cells. Due to this finding, we hypothesized that macrophages play an important role in Theileria parva disease pathogenesis. Data presented here demonstrates that terminal ECF in both Holstein and Boran cattle is largely due to multisystemic histiocytic responses and resultant tissue damage. Furthermore, the combination of these histologic changes with the clinical findings, including lymphadenopathy, prolonged pyrexia, multi-lineage leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia is consistent with macrophage activation syndrome. All animals that succumbed to infection exhibited lymphohistiocytic vasculitis of small to medium caliber blood and lymphatic vessels. In pulmonary, lymphoid, splenic and hepatic tissues from Holstein cattle, the majority of intralesional macrophages were positive for CD163, and often expressed large amounts of IL-17. These data define a terminal ECF pathogenesis in which parasite-driven lymphoproliferation leads to secondary systemic macrophage activation syndrome, mononuclear vasculitis, pulmonary edema, respiratory failure and death. The accompanying macrophage phenotype defined by CD163 and IL-17 is presented in the context of this pathogenesis. PMID:27195791

  8. Measurement of Long-Chain Fatty Acyl-CoA Synthetase Activity.

    PubMed

    Füllekrug, Joachim; Poppelreuther, Margarete

    2016-01-01

    Long-chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetases (ACS) are a family of essential enzymes of lipid metabolism, activating fatty acids by thioesterification with coenzyme A. Fatty acyl-CoA molecules are then readily utilized for the biosynthesis of storage and membrane lipids, or for the generation of energy by ß-oxidation. Acyl-CoAs also function as transcriptional activators, allosteric inhibitors, or precursors for inflammatory mediators. Recent work suggests that ACS enzymes may drive cellular fatty acid uptake by metabolic trapping, and may also regulate the channeling of fatty acids towards specific metabolic pathways. The implication of ACS enzymes in widespread lipid associated diseases like type 2 diabetes has rekindled interest in this protein family. Here, we describe in detail how to measure long-chain fatty acyl-CoA synthetase activity by a straightforward radiometric assay. Cell lysates are incubated with ATP, coenzyme A, Mg(2+), and radiolabeled fatty acid bound to BSA. Differential phase partitioning of fatty acids and acyl-CoAs is exploited to quantify the amount of generated acyl-CoA by scintillation counting. The high sensitivity of this assay also allows the analysis of small samples like patient biopsies. PMID:26552674

  9. Mn2+ activates skinned smooth muscle cells in the absence of myosin light chain phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Hoar, P E; Kerrick, W G

    1988-08-01

    Two effects of Mn2+ on skinned fibers from chicken gizzard smooth muscle were observed, dependent on the presence or absence of dithiothreitol (DTT) reducing agent. One involves protein oxidation (in the absence of DTT) with production of a "latch"-like state, and the other involves direct Mn2+ activation of contractile proteins. Cells activated by Mn2+ in the presence of ATP and the absence of Ca2+, Mg2+ and DTT did not relax when transferred to normal relaxing solutions. In contrast, when 5 mM DTT was included in the Mn2+ contracting solution to prevent protein oxidation by Mn2+, the cells still contracted when exposed to Mn2+, but relaxed rapidly when the Mn2+ was removed. In the presence of DTT both the Mn2+ activation and the relaxation following removal of Mn2+ were more rapid than normal Ca2+-activated contractions and relaxations. The skinned fibers activated by Mn2+ in the absence of DTT showed little active shortening unless DTT was added. This rigor-like state is probably due to oxidation of contractile proteins since the cells relaxed when exposed to a relaxing solution containing DTT (50 mM) and then contracted again in response to Ca2+ and relaxed normally. The Mn2+ activation was not associated with myosin light chain phosphorylation, in contrast to Ca2+-activated contractions. PMID:3186428

  10. Cardiac myosin light chain is phosphorylated by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent and -independent kinase activities.

    PubMed

    Chang, Audrey N; Mahajan, Pravin; Knapp, Stefan; Barton, Hannah; Sweeney, H Lee; Kamm, Kristine E; Stull, James T

    2016-07-01

    The well-known, muscle-specific smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) (smMLCK) and skeletal muscle MLCK (skMLCK) are dedicated protein kinases regulated by an autoregulatory segment C terminus of the catalytic core that blocks myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) binding and phosphorylation in the absence of Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM). Although it is known that a more recently discovered cardiac MLCK (cMLCK) is necessary for normal RLC phosphorylation in vivo and physiological cardiac performance, information on cMLCK biochemical properties are limited. We find that a fourth uncharacterized MLCK, MLCK4, is also expressed in cardiac muscle with high catalytic domain sequence similarity with other MLCKs but lacking an autoinhibitory segment. Its crystal structure shows the catalytic domain in its active conformation with a short C-terminal "pseudoregulatory helix" that cannot inhibit catalysis as a result of missing linker regions. MLCK4 has only Ca(2+)/CaM-independent activity with comparable Vmax and Km values for different RLCs. In contrast, the Vmax value of cMLCK is orders of magnitude lower than those of the other three MLCK family members, whereas its Km (RLC and ATP) and KCaM values are similar. In contrast to smMLCK and skMLCK, which lack activity in the absence of Ca(2+)/CaM, cMLCK has constitutive activity that is stimulated by Ca(2+)/CaM. Potential contributions of autoregulatory segment to cMLCK activity were analyzed with chimeras of skMLCK and cMLCK. The constitutive, low activity of cMLCK appears to be intrinsic to its catalytic core structure rather than an autoinhibitory segment. Thus, RLC phosphorylation in cardiac muscle may be regulated by two different protein kinases with distinct biochemical regulatory properties. PMID:27325775

  11. Intermittent reductions in respiratory neural activity elicit spinal TNF-α-independent, atypical PKC-dependent inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Baertsch, Nathan A.

    2015-01-01

    In many neural networks, mechanisms of compensatory plasticity respond to prolonged reductions in neural activity by increasing cellular excitability or synaptic strength. In the respiratory control system, a prolonged reduction in synaptic inputs to the phrenic motor pool elicits a TNF-α- and atypical PKC-dependent form of spinal plasticity known as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF). Although iPMF may be elicited by a prolonged reduction in respiratory neural activity, iPMF is more efficiently induced when reduced respiratory neural activity (neural apnea) occurs intermittently. Mechanisms giving rise to iPMF following intermittent neural apnea are unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that iPMF following intermittent reductions in respiratory neural activity requires spinal TNF-α and aPKC. Phrenic motor output was recorded in anesthetized and ventilated rats exposed to brief intermittent (5, ∼1.25 min), brief sustained (∼6.25 min), or prolonged sustained (30 min) neural apnea. iPMF was elicited following brief intermittent and prolonged sustained neural apnea, but not following brief sustained neural apnea. Unlike iPMF following prolonged neural apnea, spinal TNF-α was not required to initiate iPMF during intermittent neural apnea; however, aPKC was still required for its stabilization. These results suggest that different patterns of respiratory neural activity induce iPMF through distinct cellular mechanisms but ultimately converge on a similar downstream pathway. Understanding the diverse cellular mechanisms that give rise to inactivity-induced respiratory plasticity may lead to development of novel therapeutic strategies to treat devastating respiratory control disorders when endogenous compensatory mechanisms fail. PMID:25673781

  12. Intermittent reductions in respiratory neural activity elicit spinal TNF-α-independent, atypical PKC-dependent inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation.

    PubMed

    Baertsch, Nathan A; Baker-Herman, Tracy L

    2015-04-15

    In many neural networks, mechanisms of compensatory plasticity respond to prolonged reductions in neural activity by increasing cellular excitability or synaptic strength. In the respiratory control system, a prolonged reduction in synaptic inputs to the phrenic motor pool elicits a TNF-α- and atypical PKC-dependent form of spinal plasticity known as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF). Although iPMF may be elicited by a prolonged reduction in respiratory neural activity, iPMF is more efficiently induced when reduced respiratory neural activity (neural apnea) occurs intermittently. Mechanisms giving rise to iPMF following intermittent neural apnea are unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that iPMF following intermittent reductions in respiratory neural activity requires spinal TNF-α and aPKC. Phrenic motor output was recorded in anesthetized and ventilated rats exposed to brief intermittent (5, ∼1.25 min), brief sustained (∼6.25 min), or prolonged sustained (30 min) neural apnea. iPMF was elicited following brief intermittent and prolonged sustained neural apnea, but not following brief sustained neural apnea. Unlike iPMF following prolonged neural apnea, spinal TNF-α was not required to initiate iPMF during intermittent neural apnea; however, aPKC was still required for its stabilization. These results suggest that different patterns of respiratory neural activity induce iPMF through distinct cellular mechanisms but ultimately converge on a similar downstream pathway. Understanding the diverse cellular mechanisms that give rise to inactivity-induced respiratory plasticity may lead to development of novel therapeutic strategies to treat devastating respiratory control disorders when endogenous compensatory mechanisms fail. PMID:25673781

  13. Effects of ambient ozone on respiratory function in active, normal children

    SciTech Connect

    Spektor, D.M.; Lippmann, M.; Lioy, P.J.; Thurston, G.D.; Citak, K.

    1988-01-01

    Respiratory functions were measured daily by spirometry over four weeks at a summer camp in northwestern New Jersey. Multiple regression analyses indicated that O{sub 3} concentration, cumulative daily O{sub 3} exposure, ambient temperature, and humidity were the most explanatory environmental variables for daily variations in function, and that O{sub 3} concentration had the strongest influence on FVC, PEFR, and MMEf. For FEV1, cumulative daily O{sub 3} exposure and heat stress had greater relative effects. Linear regressions were performed for each child between O{sub 3} concentration and function, and all average slopes were significantly negative (p <0.05) for PVC, FEV1, PEFR and MMEF for all children, and for boys and girls separately. The implications of these short-term effects are unknown. However, the results in these free living children are comparable to those found in chamber studies with comparable exposures.

  14. Multi-channel optical sensor-array for measuring ballistocardiograms and respiratory activity in bed.

    PubMed

    Brüser, Christoph; Kerekes, Anna; Winter, Stefan; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Our work covers improvements in sensors and signal processing for unobtrusive, long-term monitoring of cardiac (and respiratory) rhythms using only non-invasive vibration sensors. We describe a system for the unobtrusive monitoring of vital signs by means of an array of novel optical ballistocardiography (BCG) sensors placed underneath a regular bed mattress. Furthermore, we analyze the systems spatial sensitivity and present proof-of-concept results comparing our system to a more conventional BCG system based on a single electromechanical-film (EMFi) sensor. Our preliminary results suggest that the proposed optical multi-channel system could have the potential to reduce beat-to-beat heart rate estimation errors, as well as enable the analysis of more complex breathing patterns. PMID:23367061

  15. In Vitro Antiviral Activity of Germacrone Against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jiaping; Bai, Xiaolei; Cui, Tiantian; Zhou, Han; Chen, Yao; Xie, Jiexiong; Shi, Qingwei; Wang, Heng; Zhang, Guihong

    2016-09-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is one of the most serious diseases affecting the swine industry worldwide; however, there is no efficient control strategies against PRRSV at present. Therefore, development of new antiviral treatment strategies is urgently needed. As reported, germacrone can efficiently impair influenza virus replication. In this study, we exploited whether germacrone has the potential to inhibit PRRSV infection. Our results showed that the germacrone significantly inhibited replication of PRRSV in vitro and repressed the synthesis of viral RNA and protein. However, it did not block PRRSV binding and entry. Further studies confirmed that germacrone impaired PRRSV replication at an early stage, and inhibited infection of both classic and highly pathogenic type II PRRSV strains. Collectively, our findings imply that the germacrone has the potential to be used as an anti-PRRSV drug. PMID:27178541

  16. Cholesterol side chain analogs but not its ether analogs possess cholesterol-lowering activity.

    PubMed

    Lei, Lin; Wang, Xiaobo; Huang, Weihuan; Liu, Yuwei; Zheng, Fangrui; Ma, Ka Ying; Li, Yuk Man; Wang, Lijun; Man, Sun Wa; Zhang, Chengnan; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2015-02-01

    Cholesterol analogs can be used to treat hypercholesterolemia. The present study was to test the effects of cholesteryl 3β-ethoxy (CE) and cholesteryl 3β-methoxy (CM) on plasma total cholesterol (TC) compared with that of β-sitosterol (SI) in hamsters fed a high cholesterol diet. CM and CE are the methoxy and ethoxy analogs of cholesterol while SI is an analog of cholesterol having an additional ethyl group on the side chain. Results showed that SI at a dose of 0.1% could effectively reduce plasma TC by 18%. The analysis of sterols in the plasma and liver did not detect the presence of SI, proving that it was poorly absorbed in the intestine. In contrast, both CE and CM had no effect on plasma TC. However, CE and CM were found to accumulate in both plasma and liver, indicating that they could be well absorbed in the intestine. It was therefore concluded that analogs having different side chains possessed plasma TC-lowering activity, while analogs or derivatives on the hydroxyl group had no hypocholesterolemic activity. PMID:25536519

  17. Therapeutic activity of multiple common γ-chain cytokine inhibition in acute and chronic GVHD.

    PubMed

    Hechinger, Anne-Kathrin; Smith, Benjamin A H; Flynn, Ryan; Hanke, Kathrin; McDonald-Hyman, Cameron; Taylor, Patricia A; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Hackanson, Björn; Leonhardt, Franziska; Prinz, Gabriele; Dierbach, Heide; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Kovarik, Jiri; Blazar, Bruce R; Zeiser, Robert

    2015-01-15

    The common γ chain (CD132) is a subunit of the interleukin (IL) receptors for IL-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-15, and IL-21. Because levels of several of these cytokines were shown to be increased in the serum of patients developing acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), we reasoned that inhibition of CD132 could have a profound effect on GVHD. We observed that anti-CD132 monoclonal antibody (mAb) reduced acute GVHD potently with respect to survival, production of tumor necrosis factor, interferon-γ, and IL-6, and GVHD histopathology. Anti-CD132 mAb afforded protection from GVHD partly via inhibition of granzyme B production in CD8 T cells, whereas exposure of CD8 T cells to IL-2, IL-7, IL-15, and IL-21 increased granzyme B production. Also, T cells exposed to anti-CD132 mAb displayed a more naive phenotype in microarray-based analyses and showed reduced Janus kinase 3 (JAK3) phosphorylation upon activation. Consistent with a role of JAK3 in GVHD, Jak3(-/-) T cells caused less severe GVHD. Additionally, anti-CD132 mAb treatment of established chronic GVHD reversed liver and lung fibrosis, and pulmonary dysfunction characteristic of bronchiolitis obliterans. We conclude that acute GVHD and chronic GVHD, caused by T cells activated by common γ-chain cytokines, each represent therapeutic targets for anti-CD132 mAb immunomodulation. PMID:25352130

  18. Influence of Transmural Pressure and Cytoskeletal Structure on NF-κB Activation in Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Haas, Caroline; Ghadiali, Samir N.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory epithelial cells are exposed to complex mechanical forces which are often modulated during pathological conditions such as Otitis Media and acute lung injury. The transduction of these mechanical forces into altered inflammatory signaling may play an important role in the persistence of disease conditions and inflammation. In this study, we investigated how static and oscillatory pressures altered the activation of NF-κB inflammatory pathways and how changes in the actin cytoskeleton influenced the mechanotransduction of pressure into NF-κB activation. An in vitro system was used to apply static and oscillatory pressures to alveolar epithelial cells cultured at an air–liquid interface. Latrunculin A and Jasplakinolide were used to alter the cytoskeleton and tight-junction structure and ELISA was used to monitor activation of NF-κB. Results indicate that both static and oscillatory pressures can activate NF-κB and that this activation is magnitude-dependent at low oscillation frequencies only. Jasplakinolide treated cells did not exhibit significant changes in normalized NF-κB activation compared to unloaded controls while Latrunculin treated cells exhibited increases in normalized NF-κB activation only at low frequency or static pressures. These results indicate that altering the actin cytoskeleton may be a useful way to mitigate the mechanotransduction of pressure forces into inflammatory signaling. PMID:22956984

  19. Production of an active feline interferon in the cocoon of transgenic silkworms using the fibroin H-chain expression system

    SciTech Connect

    Kurihara, H. . E-mail: Hiroyuki_Kurihara@nts.toray.co.jp; Sezutsu, H.; Tamura, T.; Yamada, K.

    2007-04-20

    We constructed the fibroin H-chain expression system to produce recombinant proteins in the cocoon of transgenic silkworms. Feline interferon (FeIFN) was used for production and to assess the quality of the product. Two types of FeIFN fusion protein, each with N- and C-terminal sequences of the fibroin H-chain, were designed to be secreted into the lumen of the posterior silk glands. The expression of the FeIFN/H-chain fusion gene was regulated by the fibroin H-chain promoter domain. The transgenic silkworms introduced these constructs with the piggyBac transposon-derived vector, which produced the normal sized cocoons containing each FeIFN/H-chain fusion protein. Although the native-protein produced by transgenic silkworms have almost no antiviral activity, the proteins after the treatment with PreScission protease to eliminate fibroin H-chain derived N- and C-terminal sequences from the products, had very high antiviral activity. This H-chain expression system, using transgenic silkworms, could be an alternative method to produce an active recombinant protein and silk-based biomaterials.

  20. Chromophore-Assisted Light Inactivation of Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain Complex II in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wojtovich, Andrew P.; Wei, Alicia Y.; Sherman, Teresa A.; Foster, Thomas H.; Nehrke, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria play critical roles in meeting cellular energy demand, in cell death, and in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and stress signaling. Most Caenorhabditis elegans loss-of-function (lf) mutants in nuclear-encoded components of the respiratory chain are non-viable, emphasizing the importance of respiratory function. Chromophore-Assisted Light Inactivation (CALI) using genetically-encoded photosensitizers provides an opportunity to determine how individual respiratory chain components contribute to physiology following acute lf. As proof-of-concept, we expressed the ‘singlet oxygen generator’ miniSOG as a fusion with the SDHC subunit of respiratory complex II, encoded by mev-1 in C. elegans, using Mos1-mediated Single Copy Insertion. The resulting mev-1::miniSOG transgene complemented mev-1 mutant phenotypes in kn1 missense and tm1081(lf) deletion mutants. Complex II activity was inactivated by blue light in mitochondria from strains expressing active miniSOG fusions, but not those from inactive fusions. Moreover, light-inducible phenotypes in vivo demonstrated that complex II activity is important under conditions of high energy demand, and that specific cell types are uniquely susceptible to loss of complex II. In conclusion, miniSOG-mediated CALI is a novel genetic platform for acute inactivation of respiratory chain components. Spatio-temporally controlled ROS generation will expand our understanding of how the respiratory chain and mitochondrial ROS influence whole organism physiology. PMID:27440050

  1. Chromophore-Assisted Light Inactivation of Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain Complex II in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wojtovich, Andrew P; Wei, Alicia Y; Sherman, Teresa A; Foster, Thomas H; Nehrke, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria play critical roles in meeting cellular energy demand, in cell death, and in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and stress signaling. Most Caenorhabditis elegans loss-of-function (lf) mutants in nuclear-encoded components of the respiratory chain are non-viable, emphasizing the importance of respiratory function. Chromophore-Assisted Light Inactivation (CALI) using genetically-encoded photosensitizers provides an opportunity to determine how individual respiratory chain components contribute to physiology following acute lf. As proof-of-concept, we expressed the 'singlet oxygen generator' miniSOG as a fusion with the SDHC subunit of respiratory complex II, encoded by mev-1 in C. elegans, using Mos1-mediated Single Copy Insertion. The resulting mev-1::miniSOG transgene complemented mev-1 mutant phenotypes in kn1 missense and tm1081(lf) deletion mutants. Complex II activity was inactivated by blue light in mitochondria from strains expressing active miniSOG fusions, but not those from inactive fusions. Moreover, light-inducible phenotypes in vivo demonstrated that complex II activity is important under conditions of high energy demand, and that specific cell types are uniquely susceptible to loss of complex II. In conclusion, miniSOG-mediated CALI is a novel genetic platform for acute inactivation of respiratory chain components. Spatio-temporally controlled ROS generation will expand our understanding of how the respiratory chain and mitochondrial ROS influence whole organism physiology. PMID:27440050

  2. Sirtuin 1 regulates dendritic cell activation and autophagy during Respiratory Syncytial Virus-induced immune responses1

    PubMed Central

    Owczarczyk, Anna B.; Schaller, Matthew A.; Reed, Michelle; Rasky, Andrew J.; Lombard, David B.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infection in children worldwide. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an NAD+ dependent deacetylase, has been associated with the induction of autophagy and the regulation of inflammatory mediators. We found that Sirt1 was upregulated in mouse lung after RSV infection. Infected animals that received EX-527, a selective SIRT1 inhibitor, displayed exacerbated lung pathology, with increased mucus production, elevated viral load, and enhanced Th2 cytokine production. Gene expression analysis of isolated cell populations revealed that Sirt1 was most highly upregulated in RSV-treated dendritic cells (DCs). Upon RSV infection, EX-527-treated DCs, Sirt1 siRNA-treated DCs, or DCs from conditional knockout (Sirt1f/f-CD11c–Cre+) mice showed downregulated inflammatory cytokine gene expression and attenuated autophagy. Finally, RSV infection of Sirt1f/f-CD11c–Cre+ mice resulted in altered lung and lymph node cytokine responses, leading to exacerbated pathology. These data indicate that SIRT1 promotes DC activation associated with autophagy-mediated processes during RSV infection, thereby directing efficient antiviral immune responses. PMID:26157176

  3. Synthesis of Isomeric Phosphoubiquitin Chains Reveals that Phosphorylation Controls Deubiquitinase Activity and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Huguenin-Dezot, Nicolas; De Cesare, Virginia; Peltier, Julien; Knebel, Axel; Kristaryianto, Yosua Adi; Rogerson, Daniel T; Kulathu, Yogesh; Trost, Matthias; Chin, Jason W

    2016-07-26

    Ubiquitin is post-translationally modified by phosphorylation at several sites, but the consequences of these modifications are largely unknown. Here, we synthesize multi-milligram quantities of ubiquitin phosphorylated at serine 20, serine 57, and serine 65 via genetic code expansion. We use these phosphoubiquitins for the enzymatic assembly of 20 isomeric phosphoubiquitin dimers, with different sites of isopeptide linkage and/or phosphorylation. We discover that phosphorylation of serine 20 on ubiquitin converts UBE3C from a dual-specificity E3 ligase into a ligase that primarily synthesizes K48 chains. We profile the activity of 31 deubiquitinases on the isomeric phosphoubiquitin dimers in 837 reactions, and we discover that phosphorylation at distinct sites in ubiquitin can activate or repress cleavage of a particular linkage by deubiquitinases and that phosphorylation at a single site in ubiquitin can control the specificity of deubiquitinases for distinct ubiquitin linkages. PMID:27425610

  4. Interactions of mitochondria-targeted and untargeted ubiquinones with the mitochondrial respiratory chain and reactive oxygen species. Implications for the use of exogenous ubiquinones as therapies and experimental tools.

    PubMed

    James, Andrew M; Cochemé, Helena M; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P

    2005-06-01

    Antioxidants, such as ubiquinones, are widely used in mitochondrial studies as both potential therapies and useful research tools. However, the effects of exogenous ubiquinones can be difficult to interpret because they can also be pro-oxidants or electron carriers that facilitate respiration. Recently we developed a mitochondria-targeted ubiquinone (MitoQ10) that accumulates within mitochondria. MitoQ10 has been used to prevent mitochondrial oxidative damage and to infer the involvement of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in signaling pathways. However, uncertainties remain about the mitochondrial reduction of MitoQ10, its oxidation by the respiratory chain, and its pro-oxidant potential. Therefore, we compared MitoQ analogs of varying alkyl chain lengths (MitoQn, n = 3-15) with untargeted exogenous ubiquinones. We found that MitoQ10 could not restore respiration in ubiquinone-deficient mitochondria because oxidation of MitoQ analogs by complex III was minimal. Complex II and glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase reduced MitoQ analogs, and the rate depended on chain length. Because of its rapid reduction and negligible oxidation, MitoQ10 is a more effective antioxidant against lipid peroxidation, peroxynitrite and superoxide. Paradoxically, exogenous ubiquinols also autoxidize to generate superoxide, but this requires their deprotonation in the aqueous phase. Consequently, in the presence of phospholipid bilayers, the rate of autoxidation is proportional to ubiquinol hydrophilicity. Superoxide production by MitoQ10 was insufficient to damage aconitase but did lead to hydrogen peroxide production and nitric oxide consumption, both of which may affect cell signaling pathways. Our results comprehensively describe the interaction of exogenous ubiquinones with mitochondria and have implications for their rational design and use as therapies and as research tools to probe mitochondrial function. PMID:15788391

  5. Downregulation of protein kinase PKR activation by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus at its early stage infection.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yueqiang; Ma, Zexu; Wang, Rong; Yang, Liping; Nan, Yuchen; Zhang, Yan-Jin

    2016-05-01

    The interferon-induced double-strand RNA activated protein kinase (PKR) plays an important role in antiviral response. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) on PKR activation. Here we report that PRRSV inhibited PKR activation during its early stage infection of primary pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs). PRRSV infection led to lower level of phosphorylated PKR in comparison with mock-infected cells. The PKR inhibition was sustained until 10h post infection in the presence of polyI:C, a synthetic analog of double-stranded RNA activating PKR. PKR-mediated phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF2α was also lower in the PRRSV-infected PAMs during the early stage infection. Interestingly, inactivated PRRSV was capable to inhibit the PKR activation until 6h post infection. This suggests that structural components of PRRSV virions were responsible for the inhibition, although PRRSV replication was needed for longer inhibition. These results indicate that the downregulation of PKR activation during early infection stage should be essential for PRRSV to avoid the antiviral response to initiate replication. This finding contributes to our understanding on PRRSV interaction with host innate immune response and reveal a target for control of PRRSV infection. PMID:27066702

  6. Inhibition of respiratory burst activity in alveolar macrophages by bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids: characterization of drug-cell interaction.

    PubMed

    Ma, J Y; Barger, M W; Ma, J K; Castranova, V

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of various bisbenzylisoquinoline (BBIQ) alkaloids on respiratory burst activity of alveolar macrophages and to characterize the interaction of these drugs with alveolar phagocytes. BBIQ alkaloids were chosen for study because they exhibit a wide range of antifibrotic potencies in a rat model, with tetrandrine being very effective and tubocurarine being ineffective. These drugs inhibited zymosan-stimulated oxygen consumption with a potency sequence of tetrandrine (TT) approximately fangchinoline (FA) > berbamine (BE) approximately cepharanthine (CE) approximately cycleanine (CY) > tubocurarine (TU). This inhibition of respiratory burst activity could not be attributed to a drug-induced decline in the ATP content of these pneumocytes. Drug binding to alveolar macrophages was directly dependent on temperature and drug concentration. The sequence for binding capacity was FA > TT approximately BE approximately CY > CE > TU. Therefore, there was no simple relationship between binding capacity and inhibitory potency. Binding capacity was not related to lipophilicity of these alkaloids. In addition, tetrandrine failed to bind to metabolically dead cells or sonicated macrophage preparations. These data suggest that the interaction of BBIQ alkaloids with phagocytes is not simply nonspecific binding to membrane lipids. Alteration of the cytoskeletal system with vinblastine, taxol, or cytochalasin B decreased tetrandrine binding by approximately 33% when added separately and by 93% when added jointly. Pre-exposure of alveolar macrophages to stimulants increased the ability of BBIQ alkaloids to inhibit both oxygen consumption and superoxide release. These data suggest that the mechanism by which BBIQ alkaloids inhibit activation of phagocytes involves microtubules and bules and microfilaments. Pre-exposure of macrophages to stimulants would change the conformation of cytoskeletal components and may make these structures

  7. Medium Chain Fatty Acids Are Selective Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor (PPAR) γ Activators and Pan-PPAR Partial Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Steven D.; Lin, Jean Z.; Cvoro, Aleksandra; Silveira, Rodrigo L.; Martínez, Leandro; Souza, Paulo C. T.; Saidemberg, Daniel; Deng, Tuo; Amato, Angela Angelica; Togashi, Marie; Hsueh, Willa A.; Phillips, Kevin; Palma, Mário Sérgio; Neves, Francisco A. R.; Skaf, Munir S.; Webb, Paul; Polikarpov, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) act through peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) γ to increase insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes (T2DM), but deleterious effects of these ligands mean that selective modulators with improved clinical profiles are needed. We obtained a crystal structure of PPARγ ligand binding domain (LBD) and found that the ligand binding pocket (LBP) is occupied by bacterial medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs). We verified that MCFAs (C8–C10) bind the PPARγ LBD in vitro and showed that they are low-potency partial agonists that display assay-specific actions relative to TZDs; they act as very weak partial agonists in transfections with PPARγ LBD, stronger partial agonists with full length PPARγ and exhibit full blockade of PPARγ phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (cdk5), linked to reversal of adipose tissue insulin resistance. MCFAs that bind PPARγ also antagonize TZD-dependent adipogenesis in vitro. X-ray structure B-factor analysis and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that MCFAs weakly stabilize C-terminal activation helix (H) 12 relative to TZDs and this effect is highly dependent on chain length. By contrast, MCFAs preferentially stabilize the H2-H3/β-sheet region and the helix (H) 11-H12 loop relative to TZDs and we propose that MCFA assay-specific actions are linked to their unique binding mode and suggest that it may be possible to identify selective PPARγ modulators with useful clinical profiles among natural products. PMID:22649490

  8. Chain length dependence of non-surface activity and micellization behavior of cationic amphiphilic diblock copolymers.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arjun; Yusa, Shin-ichi; Matsuoka, Hideki; Saruwatari, Yoshiyuki

    2014-04-01

    The cationic and anionic amphiphilic diblock copolymers with a critical chain length and block ratio do not adsorb at the air/water interface but form micelles in solution, which is a phenomenon called "non-surface activity". This is primarily due to the high charge density of the block copolymer, which creates a strong image charge effect at the air/water interface preventing adsorption. Very stable micelle formation in bulk solution could also play an important role in the non-surface activity. To further confirm these unique properties, we studied the adsorption and micellization behavior of cationic amphiphilic diblock copolymers of poly(n-butyl acrylate)-b-poly(3-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl)trimethylammonium chloride) (PBA-b-PDMC) with different molecular weights of hydrophobic blocks but with the same ionic block length. These block copolymers were successfully prepared via consecutive reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The block copolymer with the shortest hydrophobic block length was surface-active; the solution showed surface tension reduction and foam formation. However, above the critical block ratio, the surface tension of the solution did not decrease with increasing polymer concentration, and there was no foam formation, indicating lack of surface activity. After addition of 0.1 M NaCl, stable foam formation and slight reduction of surface tension were observed, which is reminiscent of the electrostatic nature of the non-surface activity. Fluorescence and dynamic and static light scattering measurements showed that the copolymer with the shortest hydrophobic block did not form micelles, while the block copolymers formed spherical micelles having radii of 25-30 nm. These observations indicate that micelle formation is also important for non-surface activity. Upon addition of NaCl, cmc did not decrease but rather increased as observed for non-surface-active block copolymers previously studied. The micelles formed were

  9. Shigella flexneri suppresses NF-κB activation by inhibiting linear ubiquitin chain ligation.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Maarten F; Liu, Zixu; Chen, Didi; Alto, Neal M

    2016-01-01

    The linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) is a multimeric E3 ligase that catalyses M1 or linear ubiquitination of activated immune receptor signalling complexes (RSCs). Mutations that disrupt linear ubiquitin assembly lead to complex disease pathologies including immunodeficiency and autoinflammation in both humans and mice, but microbial toxins that target LUBAC function have not yet been discovered. Here, we report the identification of two homologous Shigella flexneri type III secretion system effector E3 ligases IpaH1.4 and IpaH2.5, which directly interact with LUBAC subunit Heme-oxidized IRP2 ubiquitin ligase-1 (HOIL-1L) and conjugate K48-linked ubiquitin chains to the catalytic RING-between-RING domain of HOIL-1-interacting protein (HOIP). Proteasomal degradation of HOIP leads to irreversible inactivation of linear ubiquitination and blunting of NF-κB nuclear translocation in response to tumour-necrosis factor (TNF), IL-1β and pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Loss of function studies in mammallian cells in combination with bacterial genetics explains how Shigella evades a broad spectrum of immune surveillance systems by cooperative inhibition of receptor ubiquitination and reveals the critical importance of LUBAC in host defence against pathogens. PMID:27572974

  10. Metabolic transistor strategy for controlling electron transfer chain activity in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui; Tuli, Leepika; Bennett, George N.; San, Ka-Yiu

    2015-01-01

    A novel strategy to finely control a large metabolic flux by using a “metabolic transistor” approach was established. In this approach a small change in the level or availability of an essential component for the process is controlled by adding a competitive reaction that affects a precursor or an intermediate in its biosynthetic pathway. The change of the basal level of the essential component, considered as a base current in a transistor, has a large effect on the flux through the major pathway. In this way, the fine-tuning of a large flux can be accomplished. The “metabolic transistor” strategy was applied to controlling electron transfer chain function by manipulation of the quinone synthesis pathway in Escherichia coli. The achievement of a theoretical yield of lactate production under aerobic conditions via this strategy upon manipulation of the biosynthetic pathway of the key participant, ubiquinone-8 (Q8), in an E. coli strain provides an in vivo, genetically tunable means to control the activity of the electron transfer chain and manipulate the production of reduced products while limiting consumption of oxygen to a defined amount. PMID:25596510

  11. Detection of respiratory enzyme activity in Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts using redox dyes and immunofluorescence techniques.

    PubMed

    Iturriaga, R; Zhang, S; Sonek, G J; Stibbs, H

    2001-07-30

    The fluorescent redox dye 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC), combined with fluorescein-labeled antibodies, was tested for the simultaneous detection of the respiratory electron transport system (ETS) activity and enumeration of Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts by spectral microfluorometry and epifluorescence microscopy. The reduction of CTC and p-iodonitrotetrazolium violet (INT), a non-fluorescent redox dye, was compared with propidium iodide (PI) and fluorescein diacetate (FDA) for the measurements of Giardia cyst viability over time. According to the PI and FDA staining techniques, nearly 60% of the cysts tested viable at the beginning of the observations; after 21 days their viability decreased to 5%. The redox dyes indicated that approximately 4-10% of the cysts were metabolically active 48 h after they were shed, followed by a decline in enzyme activity to near undetectable levels after 4 days. Spectral analysis on individual cysts indicated that the fluorescence emission of the reduced CTC and the fluorescein-labeled antibodies is distinctive for each compound and suitable for their simultaneous determination by microphotometry, flow cytometry and epifluorescence microscopy. The fluorescence signal remained without alteration when the cysts were transferred onto microscope slides coated with an optical embedding medium and stored at -20 degrees C. The fluorescence intensity of the reduced CTC, when properly standardized, can provide quantitative measurements of ETS activity of the cysts. This is the first report of a method to determine enzyme redox activity on intact cysts applicable to water, laboratory and animal samples. PMID:11412910

  12. Complement-mediated neutrophil activation in sepsis- and trauma-related adult respiratory distress syndrome. Clarification with radioaerosol lung scans

    SciTech Connect

    Tennenberg, S.D.; Jacobs, M.P.; Solomkin, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Complement-mediated neutrophil activation (CMNA) has been proposed as an important pathogenic mechanism causing acute microvascular lung injury in the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). To clarify the relationship between CMNA and evolving lung injury, we studied 26 patients with multiple trauma and sepsis within 24 hours of risk establishment for ARDS. Pulmonary alveolar-capillary permeability (PACP) was quantified as the clearance rate of a particulate radioaerosol. Seventeen patients (65%) had increased PACP (six developed ARDS) while nine (35%) had normal PACP (none developed ARDS; clearance rates of 3.4%/min and 1.5%/min, respectively). These patients, regardless of evidence of early lung injury, had elevated plasma C3adesArg levels and neutrophil chemotactic desensitization to C5a/C5adesArg. Plasma C3adesArg levels correlated weakly, but significantly, with PACP. Thus, CMNA may be a necessary, but not a sufficient, pathogenic mechanism in the evolution of ARDS.

  13. Blood or Urine IP-10 Cannot Discriminate between Active Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases Different from Tuberculosis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Linda; Cannas, Angela; Aloi, Francesco; Nsubuga, Martin; Sserumkuma, Joseph; Nazziwa, Ritah Angella; Jugheli, Levan; Lukindo, Tedson; Girardi, Enrico; Reither, Klaus; Goletti, Delia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Interferon-γ inducible protein 10 (IP-10), either in blood or in urine, has been proposed as a tuberculosis (TB) biomarker for adults. This study aims to evaluate the potential of IP-10 diagnostics in children from Uganda, a high TB-endemic country. Methods. IP-10 was measured in the blood and urine concomitantly taken from children who were prospectively enrolled with suspected active TB, with or without HIV infection. Clinical/microbiological parameters and commercially available TB-immune assays (tuberculin skin test (TST) and QuantiFERON TB-Gold In-Tube (QFT-IT)) were concomitantly evaluated. Results. One hundred twenty-eight children were prospectively enrolled. The analysis was performed on 111 children: 80 (72%) of them were HIV-uninfected and 31 (27.9%) were HIV-infected. Thirty-three healthy adult donors (HAD) were included as controls. The data showed that IP-10 is detectable in the urine and blood of children with active TB, independent of HIV status and age. However, although IP-10 levels were higher in active TB children compared to HAD, the accuracy of identifying “active TB” was low and similar to the TST and QFT-IT. Conclusion. IP-10 levels are higher in children with respiratory illness compared to controls, independent of “TB status” suggesting that the evaluation of this parameter can be used as an inflammatory marker more than a TB test. PMID:26346028

  14. Activation of NF-κB by nucleocapsid protein of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Luo, Rui; Fang, Liurong; Jiang, Yunbo; Jin, Hui; Wang, Yanwei; Wang, Dang; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2011-02-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is a critical transcription factor in innate and adaptive immune response as well as cell proliferation and survival. Previous studies have demonstrated that porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection activated NF-κB pathways through IκB degradation in MARC-145 cells and alveolar macrophages. To evaluate the mechanisms behind this, we investigated the role of PRRSV structural proteins in the regulation of NF-κB. In this study, we screened the structural proteins of PRRSV by NF-κB DNA-binding assay and luciferase activity assay and demonstrated that PRRSV nucleocapsid (N) protein could activate NF-κB in MARC-145 cells. Furthermore, we revealed that the region between aa 30 and 73 of N protein was essential for its function in the activation of NF-κB. These results presented here provide a basis for understanding molecular mechanism of PRRSV infection and inflammation response. PMID:21063763

  15. Evaluation of neural reflex activation as a mode of action for the acute respiratory effects of ozone.

    PubMed

    Prueitt, Robyn L; Goodman, Julie E

    2016-09-01

    Exposure to elevated levels of ozone has been associated with a variety of respiratory-related health endpoints in both epidemiology and controlled human exposure studies, including lung function decrements and airway inflammation. A mode of action (MoA) for these effects has not been established, but it has been proposed that they may occur through ozone-induced activation of neural reflexes. We critically reviewed experimental studies of ozone exposure and neural reflex activation and applied the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) mode-of-action/human relevance framework to evaluate the biological plausibility and human relevance of this proposed MoA. Based on the currently available experimental data, we found that the proposed MoA of neural reflex activation is biologically plausible for the endpoint of ozone-induced lung function decrements at high ozone exposures, but further studies are needed to fill important data gaps regarding the relevance of this MoA at lower exposures. A role for the proposed MoA in ozone-induced airway inflammation is less plausible, as the evidence is conflicting and is also of unclear relevance given the lack of studies conducted at lower exposures. The evidence suggests a different MoA for ozone-induced inflammation that may still be linked to the key events in the proposed MoA, such that neural reflex activation may have some degree of involvement in modulating ozone-induced neutrophil influx, even if it is not a direct role. PMID:27569521

  16. [Activity of tigecycline against pathogen bacteria isolated in respiratory infectious disease in Europe. TEST study 2004-2007].

    PubMed

    Rio, Y; Okamba, P; Staal, A; Didion, J; Jurin, F

    2009-02-01

    Tigecycline (TGC), a semisynthetic glycylcycline, has a documented activity on Gram+ and Gram- pathogens including oxacillin-resistant (MRSA) and an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (TEST) is an international surveillance study designed to assess the in vitro activity of TGC and 11 comparators against a range of important clinical pathogens from both the community and the hospital. The aim of this study was to assess efficacy of TGC, using this database, against pathogens implicated in community or hospital pneumonia and sinusitis. A total of 4163 isolates were consecutively collected in 21 European countries during three years (2004-2007). In all center, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) were determinated with the same Microscan panel (Dade-Behring). Tigecycline exhibited a good activity against respiratory pathogens, with the exception of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Hundred percent of cocci Gram+ (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus sp.) and 100% of Haemophilus sp. are inhibited with 0.5 mg/L, without effect of an associated beta-lactam resistance mechanism. TGC is active in vitro on 89% of Enterobacteriaceae, with MIC 90 less or equal to 2mg/L. Eighty-nine percent of Enterobacter sp. and 77% of Serratia sp. are susceptible with range of MIC 90 from 2 to 4 mg/L. These interesting results obtained in vitro are to be strengthened by clinical studies. PMID:18829182

  17. Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease Involves a Cysteinyl Leukotriene-Driven IL-33-Mediated Mast Cell Activation Pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Kanaoka, Yoshihide; Barrett, Nora A; Feng, Chunli; Garofalo, Denise; Lai, Juying; Buchheit, Kathleen; Bhattacharya, Neil; Laidlaw, Tanya M; Katz, Howard R; Boyce, Joshua A

    2015-10-15

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), a severe eosinophilic inflammatory disorder of the airways, involves overproduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs), activation of airway mast cells (MCs), and bronchoconstriction in response to nonselective cyclooxygenase inhibitors that deplete homeostatic PGE2. The mechanistic basis for MC activation in this disorder is unknown. We now demonstrate that patients with AERD have markedly increased epithelial expression of the alarmin-like cytokine IL-33 in nasal polyps, as compared with polyps from aspirin-tolerant control subjects. The murine model of AERD, generated by dust mite priming of mice lacking microsomal PGE2 synthase (ptges(-/-) mice), shows a similar upregulation of IL-33 protein in the airway epithelium, along with marked eosinophilic bronchovascular inflammation. Deletion of leukotriene C4 synthase, the terminal enzyme needed to generate cysLTs, eliminates the increased IL-33 content of the ptges(-/-) lungs and sharply reduces pulmonary eosinophilia and basal secretion of MC products. Challenges of dust mite-primed ptges(-/-) mice with lysine aspirin induce IL-33-dependent MC activation and bronchoconstriction. Thus, IL-33 is a component of a cysLT-driven innate type 2 immune response that drives pathogenic MC activation and contributes substantially to AERD pathogenesis. PMID:26342029

  18. Effects of ambient ozone on respiratory function in active, normal children

    SciTech Connect

    Spektor, D.M.; Lippmann, M.; Lioy, P.J.; Thurston, G.D.; Citak, K.; James, D.J.; Bock, N.; Speizer, F.E.; Hayes, C.

    1988-02-01

    Respiratory functions were measured on a daily basis by spirometry over a period of 4 wk at a summer camp at Fairview Lake in northwestern New Jersey. Fifty-three boys and 38 girls 8 to 15 yr of age participated in the study on at least 7 days; 37 children were in residence for 4 wk, 34 for the first 2 wk only; and 20 for the last 2 wk. There were 72 whites, 15 blacks, 3 Asians, and 1 Hispanic in the study group. Multiple regression analyses indicated that the O/sub 3/ concentration in the previous hour, the cumulative daily O/sub 3/ exposure during the hours between 9 A.M. and the function measurement, ambient temperature, and humidity were the most explanatory environmental variables for daily variations in function, with the 1 - h O/sub 3/ concentration having the strongest influence. Linear regressions were performed for each child between O/sub 3/ concentration and function, and all average slopes were significantly negative (p less than 0.05) for FVC, FEV1, PEFR, and FEF25-75 for all children, and for boys and girls separately. Comparable results were obtained in data subsets (i.e., children studied during the first or second 2 wk only, and for data sets truncated at O/sub 3/ less than 80 and O/sub 3/ less than 60 ppb). The average regression slopes (+/- SE) for FVC and FEV1, respectively, were -1.03 +/- 0.24 and -1.42 +/- 0.17 ml/ppb, whereas for PEFR and FEF25-75 they were -6.78 +/- 0.73 and -2.48 +/- 0.26 ml/s/ppb.

  19. Worms on a plane: simulation studies of an active nematic phase of flexible chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Michael; Najafi, Mohammad; Selinger, Robin

    2015-03-01

    We present simulation studies of flexible nematogen ``worms'' composed of soft spheres assembled into flexible polymer-like chains. These elongated, flexible chains are confined to a planar substrate with periodic boundary conditions or else confined within bounding walls. We consider a variety of driving mechanisms including unidirectional gliding and gliding with random reversals. We also model actuation via kinesin motor clusters which attach and travel along a pair of neighboring chains of opposite polarity, producing inter-chain sliding forces and driving the chains in opposite directions. We examine resulting nematic order, defect nucleation, motion, and annihilation, and density fluctuations as a function of chain length, flexibility, density, and driving mechanism. In a geometry where the chains are constrained to move in tandem with tight spacing, we observe spontaneous formation of organized beating. We compare our results to experimental and theoretical studies of gliding bacteria and kinesin-driven microtubules. Supported by NSF DMR-1409658 and NSF DMR-1106014.

  20. A Model for the Interfacial Kinetics of Phospholipase D Activity on Long-Chain Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Majd, Sheereen; Yusko, Erik C.; Yang, Jerry; Sept, David; Mayer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The membrane-active enzyme phospholipase D (PLD) catalyzes the hydrolysis of the phosphodiester bond in phospholipids and plays a critical role in cell signaling. This catalytic reaction proceeds on lipid-water interfaces and is an example of heterogeneous catalysis in biology. Recently we showed that planar lipid bilayers, a previously unexplored model membrane for these kinetic studies, can be used for monitoring interfacial catalytic reactions under well-defined experimental conditions with chemical and electrical access to both sides of the lipid membrane. Employing an assay that relies on the conductance of the pore-forming peptide gramicidin A to monitor PLD activity, the work presented here reveals the kinetics of hydrolysis of long-chain phosphatidylcholine lipids in situ. We have developed an extension of a basic kinetic model for interfacial catalysis that includes product activation and substrate depletion. This model describes the kinetic behavior very well and reveals two kinetic parameters, the specificity constant and the interfacial quality constant. This approach results in a simple and general model to account for product accumulation in interfacial enzyme kinetics. PMID:23823233

  1. Synthesis and Antiplasmodial Activity of Novel Chloroquine Analogues with Bulky Basic Side Chains.

    PubMed

    Tasso, Bruno; Novelli, Federica; Tonelli, Michele; Barteselli, Anna; Basilico, Nicoletta; Parapini, Silvia; Taramelli, Donatella; Sparatore, Anna; Sparatore, Fabio

    2015-09-01

    Chloroquine is commonly used in the treatment and prevention of malaria, but Plasmodium falciparum, the main species responsible for malaria-related deaths, has developed resistance against this drug. Twenty-seven novel chloroquine (CQ) analogues characterized by a side chain terminated with a bulky basic head group, i.e., octahydro-2H-quinolizine and 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexahydro-1,5-methano-8H-pyrido[1,2-a][1,5]diazocin-8-one, were synthesized and tested for activity against D-10 (CQ-susceptible) and W-2 (CQ-resistant) strains of P. falciparum. Most compounds were found to be active against both strains with nanomolar or sub-micromolar IC50 values. Eleven compounds were found to be 2.7- to 13.4-fold more potent than CQ against the W-2 strain; among them, four cytisine derivatives appear to be of particular interest, as they combine high potency with low cytotoxicity against two human cell lines (HMEC-1 and HepG2) along with easier synthetic accessibility. Replacement of the 4-NH group with a sulfur bridge maintained antiplasmodial activity at a lower level, but produced an improvement in the resistance factor. These compounds warrant further investigation as potential drugs for use in the fight against malaria. PMID:26213237

  2. Lipidomic analysis and electron transport chain activities in C57BL/6J mouse brain mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Kiebish, Michael A.; Han, Xianlin; Cheng, Hua; Lunceford, Adam; Clarke, Catherine F.; Moon, Hwi; Chuang, Jeffrey H.; Seyfried, Thomas N.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the lipidome and electron transport chain activities in purified non-synaptic (NS) and synaptic (Syn) mitochondria from C57BL/6J mouse cerebral cortex. Contamination from subcellular membranes, especially myelin, has hindered past attempts to accurately characterize the lipid composition of brain mitochondria. An improved Ficoll and sucrose discontinuous gradient method was employed that yielded highly enriched mitochondrial populations free of myelin contamination. The activities of Complexes I, II, III, and II/III were lower in Syn than in NS mitochondria, while Complexes I/III and IV activities were similar in both populations. Shotgun lipidomics showed that levels of cardiolipin (Ptd2Gro) were lower, whereas levels of ceramide and phosphatidylserine were higher in Syn than in NS mitochondria. Coenzyme Q9 and Q10 was also lower in Syn than in NS mitochondria. Gangliosides, phosphatidic acid, sulfatides, and cerebrosides were undetectable in brain mitochondria. The distribution of Ptd2Gro molecular species was similar in both populations and formed a unique pattern, consisting of seven major molecular species groups, when arranged according to mass to charge ratios. Remodeling involving choline and ethanolamine phosphoglycerides could explain Ptd2Gro heterogeneity. NS and Syn mitochondrial lipidomic heterogeneity could influence energy metabolism, which may contribute to metabolic compartmentation of the brain. PMID:18373617

  3. High sensitivity detection of active botulinum neurotoxin by glyco-quantitative polymerase chain-reaction.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Seok Joon; Jeong, Eun Ji; Yoo, Yung Choon; Cai, Chao; Yang, Gi-Hyeok; Lee, Jae Chul; Dordick, Jonathan S; Linhardt, Robert J; Lee, Kyung Bok

    2014-03-01

    The sensitive detection of highly toxic botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) from Clostridium botulinum is of critical importance because it causes human illnesses if foodborne or introduced in wounds and as an iatrogenic substance. Moreover, it has been recently considered a possible biological warfare agent. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in BoNT detection technologies, including mouse lethality assays, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and endopeptidase assays and by mass spectrometry. Critical assay requirements, including rapid assay, active toxin detection, sensitive and accurate detection, still remain challenging. Here, we present a novel method to detect active BoNTs using a Glyco-quantitative polymerase chain-reaction (qPCR) approach. Sialyllactose, which interacts with the binding-domain of BoNTs, is incorporated into a sialyllactose-DNA conjugate as a binding-probe for active BoNT and recovered through BoNT-immunoprecipitation. Glyco-qPCR analysis of the bound sialyllactose-DNA is then used to detect low attomolar concentrations of BoNT and attomolar to femtomolar concentrations of BoNT in honey, the most common foodborne source of infant botulism. PMID:24506443

  4. Quantitation of DNA methyltransferase activity via chronocoulometry in combination with rolling chain amplification.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jingjing; Liu, Yuanjian; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Yuanjian; Liu, Songqin

    2016-11-15

    In this paper, a rolling chain amplification (RCA) strategy was proposed for chronocoulometric detection of DNA methyltransferase (MTase) activity. Briefly, after the double DNA helix structure was assembled on the surface of gold electrode, it was first methylated by M. SssI MTase and then RCA was realized in the presence of E. coli and phi29 DNA polymerase. Successively, numerous hexaammineruthenium (III) chloride ([Ru(NH3)6)(3+), RuHex) were adsorbed on replicons by electrostatic interaction and generated a large electrochemical readout, the signal was "on". On the contrary, in the absence of M. SssI MTase, the methylated CpG site in the unmethylated double DNA helix structure could be specifically recognized and cleaved by HpaII, resulting in a disconnection of RCA from the electrode. This led seldom RuHex to be absorbed onto the surface of electrode, the signal was "off". Based on the proposed strategy, the activity of M. SssI MTase was assayed in the range of 0.5-60U/mL with a detection limit of 0.09U/mL (S/N=3). In addition, the inhibition of procaine and epicatechin on M. SssI MTase activity was evaluated. When the proposed method was applied in complex matrix such as human serum samples, acceptable accuracy, precision and high sensitivity were achieved. Therefore, the proposed method was a potential useful mean for clinical diagnosis and drug development. PMID:27155113

  5. The thermal tolerance of crayfish could be estimated from respiratory electron transport system activity.

    PubMed

    Simčič, Tatjana; Pajk, Franja; Jaklič, Martina; Brancelj, Anton; Vrezec, Al

    2014-04-01

    Whether electron transport system (ETS) activity could be used as an estimator of crayfish thermal tolerance has been investigated experimentally. Food consumption rate, respiration rates in the air and water, the difference between energy consumption and respiration costs at a given temperature ('potential growth scope', PGS), and ETS activity of Orconectes limosus and Pacifastacus leniusculus were determined over a temperature range of 5-30°C. All concerned parameters were found to be temperature dependent. The significant correlation between ETS activity and PGS indicates that they respond similarly to temperature change. The regression analysis of ETS activity as an estimator of thermal tolerance at the mitochondrial level and PGS as an indicator of thermal tolerance at the organismic level showed the shift of optimum temperature ranges of ETS activity to the right for 2° in O. limosus and for 3° in P. leniusculus. Thus, lower estimated temperature optima and temperatures of optimum ranges of PGS compared to ETS activity could indicate higher thermal sensitivity at the organismic level than at a lower level of complexity (i.e. at the mitochondrial level). The response of ETS activity to temperature change, especially at lower and higher temperatures, indicates differences in the characteristics of the ETSs in O. limosus and P. leniusculus. O. limosus is less sensitive to high temperature. The significant correlation between PGS and ETS activity supports our assumption that ETS activity could be used for the rapid estimation of thermal tolerance in crayfish species. PMID:24679968

  6. A Single Amino Acid Deletion in the Matrix Protein of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Confers Resistance to a Polyclonal Swine Antibody with Broadly Neutralizing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Luca N.; Monday, Nicholas; Calvert, Jay G.; Rowland, Raymond R. R.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of virus neutralization (VN) activity in 176 pigs infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) identified one pig with broadly neutralizing activity. A Tyr-10 deletion in the matrix protein provided escape from broad neutralization without affecting homologous neutralizing activity. The role of the Tyr-10 deletion was confirmed through an infectious clone with a Tyr-10 deletion. The results demonstrate differences in the properties and specificities of VN responses elicited during PRRSV infection. PMID:25855739

  7. Site-specific fatty chain-modified exenatide analogs with balanced glucoregulatory activity and prolonged in vivo activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lidan; Huang, Xun; Han, Jing; Cai, Xingguang; Dai, Yuxuan; Chu, Yingying; Wang, Chuandong; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2016-06-15

    The therapeutic utility of exenatide (Ex-4) is limited due to short plasma half-life of 2.4h and thus numerous approaches have been used to obtain a longer action time. However, such strategies often attend to one thing and lose another. The study aimed to identify a candidate with balanced glucoregulatory activity and prolonged in vivo activity. A series of fatty chain conjugates of Ex-4 were designed and synthesized. First, thirteen cysteine modified peptides (1-13) were prepared. Peptides 1, 10, and 13 showed improved glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor activate potency and were thus selected for second step modifications to yield conjugates I-1-I-9. All conjugates retained significant GLP-1 receptor activate potency and more importantly exerted enhanced albumin-binding properties and in vitro plasma stability. The protracted antidiabetic effects of the most stable I-3 were further confirmed by both multiple intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test and hypoglycemic efficacies test in vivo. Furthermore, once daily injection of I-3 to streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic mice achieved long-term beneficial effects on hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) lowering and glucose tolerance. Once daily injection of I-3 to diet induced obesity (DIO) mice also achieved favorable effects on food intake, body weight, and blood chemistry. Our results suggested that I-3 was a promising agent deserving further investigation to treat obesity patients with diabetes. PMID:27155328

  8. Elafin (elastase-specific inhibitor) has anti-microbial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Simpson, A J; Maxwell, A I; Govan, J R; Haslett, C; Sallenave, J M

    1999-06-11

    Elafin (elastase-specific inhibitor) is a low molecular weight inhibitor of neutrophil elastase which is secreted in the lung. Using synthetic peptides corresponding to full-length elafin (H2N-1AVT.....95Q-OH), the NH2-terminal domain (H2N-1AVT.....50K-OH) and the COOH-terminal domain (H2N-51PGS.....95Q-OH), we demonstrate that elafin's anti-elastase activity resides exclusively in the COOH-terminus. Several characteristics of elafin suggest potential anti-microbial activity. The anti-microbial activity of elafin, and of its two structural domains, was tested against the respiratory pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Elafin killed both bacteria efficiently, with 93% killing of P. aeruginosa by 2.5 microM elafin and 48% killing of S. aureus by 25 microM elafin. For both organisms, full-length elafin was required to optimise bacterial killing. These findings represent the first demonstration of co-existent anti-proteolytic and anti-microbial functions for elafin. PMID:10386612

  9. Respiratory activity and mitochondrial membrane associated with fruit senescence in postharvest peaches in response to UV-C treatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenfeng; Cao, Shifeng; Su, Xinguo; Jiang, Yueming

    2014-10-15

    The effect of 3.0kJ/m(2) ultraviolet-C (UV-C) treatment on respiratory activity and mitochondrial membrane associated with fruit senescence in peach fruit stored at 20°C for 8days was investigated. UV-C treatment could reduce senescence development, as evidenced by higher fruit firmness due to inhibition of respiration rate via reducing succinic dehydrogenase and cytochrome C oxidase activity. Meanwhile, the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase in the UV-C-treated fruit were much higher than those in control fruit, resulting in lower levels of superoxide radicals (O2(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). In addition, this treatment maintained a higher level of mitochondrial membrane fluidity and inhibited opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Our results suggest that the induction of antioxidant enzymes to scavenge O2(-) and H2O2 by UV-C treatment was associated with the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane integrity, which also played an important role in senescence retardation in peach fruit. PMID:24837916

  10. An Off-Line Implementation of the Stable Isotope Technique for Measurements of Alternative Respiratory Pathway Activities1

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Oscar W.; Waldron, Susan; Jones, Hamlyn G.

    2001-01-01

    In situ measurements of alternative respiratory pathway activity are needed to provide insight into the energy efficiency of plant metabolism under various conditions in the field. The only reliable method at present to measure alternative oxidase (AOX) activity is through measurement of changes in δ18O(O2), which to date has only been used in laboratory environments. We have developed a cuvette system to measure partitioning of electrons to AOX that is suitable for off-line use and for field experiments. Plant samples are enclosed in airtight cuvettes and O2 consumption is monitored. Gas samples from the cuvette are stored in evacuated gas containers until measurement of δ18O(O2). We have validated this method using differing plant material to assess AOX activity. Fractionation factors were calculated from δ18O(O2) measurements, which could be measured with an accuracy and precision to 0.1‰ and 0.3‰, respectively. Potential sources of error are discussed and quantified. Our method provides results similar to those obtained with laboratory incubations on-line to a mass spectrometer but greatly increases the potential for adoption of the stable isotope method. PMID:11706206

  11. Scaling up strategies of the chronic respiratory disease programme of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (Action Plan B3: Area 5).

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Farrell, J; Crooks, G; Hellings, P; Bel, E H; Bewick, M; Chavannes, N H; de Sousa, J Correia; Cruz, A A; Haahtela, T; Joos, G; Khaltaev, N; Malva, J; Muraro, A; Nogues, M; Palkonen, S; Pedersen, S; Robalo-Cordeiro, C; Samolinski, B; Strandberg, T; Valiulis, A; Yorgancioglu, A; Zuberbier, T; Bedbrook, A; Aberer, W; Adachi, M; Agusti, A; Akdis, C A; Akdis, M; Ankri, J; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Ansotegui, I J; Anto, J M; Arnavielhe, S; Arshad, H; Bai, C; Baiardini, I; Bachert, C; Baigenzhin, A K; Barbara, C; Bateman, E D; Beghé, B; Kheder, A Ben; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bergmann, K C; Bieber, T; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Bjermer, L; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Boner, A L; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Bosnic-Anticevitch, S; Boulet, L P; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Braido, F; Briggs, A H; Brightling, C E; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Burney, P G; Bush, A; Caballero-Fonseca, F; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M A; Calverley, P M; Camargos, P A M; Canonica, G W; Camuzat, T; Carlsen, K H; Carr, W; Carriazo, A; Casale, T; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Chatzi, L; Chen, Y Z; Chiron, R; Chkhartishvili, E; Chuchalin, A G; Chung, K F; Ciprandi, G; Cirule, I; Cox, L; Costa, D J; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; Darsow, U; De Carlo, G; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; De Manuel Keenoy, E; Demoly, P; Denburg, J A; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dray, G; Dubakiene, R; Durham, S R; Dykewicz, M S; El-Gamal, Y; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L M; Fletcher, M; Fiocchi, A; Fink Wagner, A; Fonseca, J; Fokkens, W J; Forastiere, F; Frith, P; Gaga, M; Gamkrelidze, A; Garces, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gemicioğlu, B; Gereda, J E; González Diaz, S; Gotua, M; Grisle, I; Grouse, L; Gutter, Z; Guzmán, M A; Heaney, L G; Hellquist-Dahl, B; Henderson, D; Hendry, A; Heinrich, J; Heve, D; Horak, F; Hourihane, J O' B; Howarth, P; Humbert, M; Hyland, M E; Illario, M; Ivancevich, J C; Jardim, J R; Jares, E J; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Julge, K; Jung, K S; Just, J; Kaidashev, I; Kaitov, M R; Kalayci, O; Kalyoncu, A F; Keil, T; Keith, P K; Klimek, L; Koffi N'Goran, B; Kolek, V; Koppelman, G H; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Lambrecht, B; Lau, S; Larenas-Linnemann, D; Laune, D; Le, L T T; Lieberman, P; Lipworth, B; Li, J; Lodrup Carlsen, K; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Magard, Y; Magnan, A; Mahboub, B; Mair, A; Majer, I; Makela, M J; Manning, P; Mara, S; Marshall, G D; Masjedi, M R; Matignon, P; Maurer, M; Mavale-Manuel, S; Melén, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Meltzer, E O; Menzies-Gow, A; Merk, H; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Mohammad, G M Y; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; Mösges, R; Mullol, J; Nafti, S; Namazova-Baranova, L; Naclerio, R; Neou, A; Neffen, H; Nekam, K; Niggemann, B; Ninot, G; Nyembue, T D; O'Hehir, R E; Ohta, K; Okamoto, Y; Okubo, K; Ouedraogo, S; Paggiaro, P; Pali-Schöll, I; Panzner, P; Papadopoulos, N; Papi, A; Park, H S; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pawankar, R; Pengelly, R; Pfaar, O; Picard, R; Pigearias, B; Pin, I; Plavec, D; Poethig, D; Pohl, W; Popov, T A; Portejoie, F; Potter, P; Postma, D; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Raciborski, F; Radier Pontal, F; Repka-Ramirez, S; Reitamo, S; Rennard, S; Rodenas, F; Roberts, J; Roca, J; Rodriguez Mañas, L; Rolland, C; Roman Rodriguez, M; Romano, A; Rosado-Pinto, J; Rosario, N; Rosenwasser, L; Rottem, M; Ryan, D; Sanchez-Borges, M; Scadding, G K; Schunemann, H J; Serrano, E; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Schulz, H; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Simons, F E R; Sisul, J C; Skrindo, I; Smit, H A; Solé, D; Sooronbaev, T; Spranger, O; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Sunyer, J; Thijs, C; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valia, E; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; van Hage, M; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vellas, B; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Vichyanond, P; Viegi, G; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagenmann, M; Wallaert, B; Walker, S; Wang, D Y; Wahn, U; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Williams, S; Wright, J; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yusuf, O M; Zaidi, A; Zar, H J; Zernotti, M E; Zhang, L; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Mercier, J

    2016-01-01

    Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) focuses on the integrated care of chronic diseases. Area 5 (Care Pathways) was initiated using chronic respiratory diseases as a model. The chronic respiratory disease action plan includes (1) AIRWAYS integrated care pathways (ICPs), (2) the joint initiative between the Reference site MACVIA-LR (Contre les MAladies Chroniques pour un VIeillissement Actif) and ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma), (3) Commitments for Action to the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing and the AIRWAYS ICPs network. It is deployed in collaboration with the World Health Organization Global Alliance against Chronic Respiratory Diseases (GARD). The European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing has proposed a 5-step framework for developing an individual scaling up strategy: (1) what to scale up: (1-a) databases of good practices, (1-b) assessment of viability of the scaling up of good practices, (1-c) classification of good practices for local replication and (2) how to scale up: (2-a) facilitating partnerships for scaling up, (2-b) implementation of key success factors and lessons learnt, including emerging technologies for individualised and predictive medicine. This strategy has already been applied to the chronic respiratory disease action plan of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. PMID:27478588

  12. Distribution, activity and function of short-chain alkane degrading phylotypes in hydrothermal vent sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. M.; Joye, S. B.; Hoarfrost, A.; Girguis, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    hydrocarbon species characteristic of these metalliferous sediments. These systems are also characterized by sharp physicochemical gradients that have been shown to have a pronounced effect on microbial ecology and activity. Sediments were collected from a Middle Valley field with relatively high concentrations of short-chain alkanes and incubated in anaerobic batch reactors with each individual alkane (C1, C2, C3 and C4, respectively) at a range of temperatures (25, 55 and 75 °C) to mimic environmental physico-chemical conditions in a closed system. Stable carbon isotope ratios and radiotracer incubations provide clear evidence for C2-C4 alkane oxidation in the sediments over time. Upon identifying sediments with anaerobic alkane oxidation activity, microbial communities were screened via 16S rRNA pyrosequencing, and key phylotypes were then quantified using both molecular and microscopic methods. There were shifts in overall community composition and putative alkane-oxidizing phylotypes after the incubation period with the alkane substrates. These are the first evidence to date indicating that anaerobic C2-C4 alkane oxidation occurs across a broad range of temperatures in metalliferous sediments.

  13. Selective downregulation of mitochondrial electron transport chain activity and increased oxidative stress in human atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Emelyanova, Larisa; Ashary, Zain; Cosic, Milanka; Negmadjanov, Ulugbek; Ross, Gracious; Rizvi, Farhan; Olet, Susan; Kress, David; Sra, Jasbir; Tajik, A Jamil; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson L; Shi, Yang; Jahangir, Arshad

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria are critical for maintaining normal cardiac function, and a deficit in mitochondrial energetics can lead to the development of the substrate that promotes atrial fibrillation (AF) and its progression. However, the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and AF in humans is still not fully defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate differences in the functional activity of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes and oxidative stress in right atrial tissue from patients without (non-AF) and with AF (AF) who were undergoing open-heart surgery and were not significantly different for age, sex, major comorbidities, and medications. The overall functional activity of the electron transport chain (ETC), NADH:O2 oxidoreductase activity, was reduced by 30% in atrial tissue from AF compared with non-AF patients. This was predominantly due to a selective reduction in complex I (0.06 ± 0.007 vs. 0.09 ± 0.006 nmol·min(-1)·citrate synthase activity(-1), P = 0.02) and II (0.11 ± 0.012 vs. 0.16 ± 0.012 nmol·min(-1)·citrate synthase activity(-1), P = 0.003) functional activity in AF patients. Conversely, complex V activity was significantly increased in AF patients (0.21 ± 0.027 vs. 0.12 ± 0.01 nmol·min(-1)·citrate synthase activity(-1), P = 0.005). In addition, AF patients exhibited a higher oxidative stress with increased production of mitochondrial superoxide (73 ± 17 vs. 11 ± 2 arbitrary units, P = 0.03) and 4-hydroxynonenal level (77.64 ± 30.2 vs. 9.83 ± 2.83 ng·mg(-1) protein, P = 0.048). Our findings suggest that AF is associated with selective downregulation of ETC activity and increased oxidative stress that can contribute to the progression of the substrate for AF. PMID:27199126

  14. Multiple cis Regulatory Elements Control RANTES Promoter Activity in Alveolar Epithelial Cells Infected with Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Casola, Antonella; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Haeberle, Helene; Elliott, Todd F.; Lin, Rongtuan; Jamaluddin, Mohammad; Brasier, Allan R.

    2001-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) produces intense pulmonary inflammation, in part through its ability to induce chemokine synthesis in infected airway epithelial cells. RANTES (regulated upon activation, normally T-cell expressed and presumably secreted) is a CC chemokine which recruits and activates monocytes, lymphocytes, and eosinophils, all cell types present in the lung inflammatory infiltrate induced by RSV infection. In this study, we analyzed the mechanism of RSV-induced RANTES promoter activation in human type II alveolar epithelial cells (A549 cells). Promoter deletion and mutagenesis experiments indicate that RSV requires the presence of five different cis regulatory elements, located in the promoter fragment spanning from −220 to +55 nucleotides, corresponding to NF-κB, C/EBP, Jun/CREB/ATF, and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) binding sites. Although site mutations of the NF-κB, C/EBP, and CREB/AP-1 like sites reduce RSV-induced RANTES gene transcription to 50% or less, only mutations affecting IRF binding completely abolish RANTES inducibility. Supershift and microaffinity isolation assays were used to identify the different transcription factor family members whose DNA binding activity was RSV inducible. Expression of dominant negative mutants of these transcription factors further established their central role in virus-induced RANTES promoter activation. Our finding that the presence of multiple cis regulatory elements is required for full activation of the RANTES promoter in RSV-infected alveolar epithelial cells supports the enhanceosome model for RANTES gene transcription, which is absolutely dependent on binding of IRF transcription factors. The identification of regulatory mechanisms of RANTES gene expression is fundamental for rational design of inhibitors of RSV-induced lung inflammation. PMID:11413310

  15. The respiratory burst is not required for killing of intracellular and extracellular parasites by a lymphokine-activated macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Scott, P; James, S; Sher, A

    1985-06-01

    The macrophage cell line, IC-21, was found to be incapable of producing the oxygen products associated with the respiratory burst. However, IC-21 cells were activated by lymphokine (LK) to kill intracellular (Leishmania donovani amastigotes) and extracellular (Schistosoma mansoni larvae) parasites, as well as tumor cells. In each case, the cytotoxicity exhibited by activated IC-21 cells and activated peritoneal macrophages was indistinguishable. However, nonactivated IC-21 cells were unable to kill L. donovani log-growth phase promastigotes, while nonactivated peritoneal macrophages destroyed greater than 90% of the initial infection. These results indicate that amastigotes and schistosome larvae are susceptible to killing by nonoxidative cytotoxic mechanism induced by lymphokine activation but, on the other hand, support the concept that the killing of log-growth phase promastigotes by nonactivated cells is dependent upon the respiratory burst. We propose that the IC-21 cell line may be a useful model for studying nonoxidative killing functions of activated macrophages. PMID:2988973

  16. Global gene expression profiling in infants with acute respiratory syncytial virus broncholitis demonstrates systemic activation of interferon signaling networks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of pediatric lower respiratory tract infections and has a high impact on pediatric emergency department utilization. Variation in host response may influence the pathogenesis and disease severity. We evaluated global gene expression profiles to be...

  17. Activation of NF-κB and respiratory burst following Aspergillus fumigatus stimulation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sun, He; Xu, Xiao-yong; Tian, Xiao-li; Shao, Hong-tao; Wu, Xiao-dong; Wang, Quan; Su, Xin; Shi, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Dectin-2, a C-type lectin receptor (CLR), plays an essential role in mediating nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation and anti-fungal immunity in response to Candida albicans infection. However, the molecular mechanisms and function of Dectin-2 signaling in response to infection by the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus have not been characterized. In order to characterize Dectin-2 signaling in response to A. fumigatus infection, activation of Dectin-2 was analyzed at both transcriptional and translational levels. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) phosphorylation, NF-κB activation and cytokine production downstream of Dectin-2 activation were also investigated. In addition, Dectin-2-Syk function and its ability to mediate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and elimination of A. fumigatus conidia was examined. We demonstrate that Syk is involved in Dectin-2-induced IκBα (inhibitor of kappa B protein) phosphorylation and NF-κB activation following A. fumigatus stimulation in a time dependent manner. Silencing of Dectin-2 and Syk as well as Syk inhibition blocks NF-κB activation and cytokine secretion. Furthermore, the killing of A. fumigatus conidia and ROS production are significantly affected by Dectin-2 or Syk silencing as well as Syk inhibition. Swelling and germination of the fungus followed by hyphae formation and not the resting and heat-inactivated form of A. fumigatus mediate the activation of Dectin-2 signaling. In conclusion, Syk plays an essential role in IκBα kinase phosphorylation, NF-κB activation, and ROS production mediated by Dectin-2 activation in response to A. fumigatus infection. PMID:23886693

  18. Synthesis and biological evaluation of open-chain analogs of cyclic peptides as inhibitors of cellular Shp2 activity.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Xiao-Li; Yin, Wen-Hui; Tian, Xia; Ma, Zhen-Jie; Fan, Shi-Ming; Han, Jian-Rong; Liu, Shouxin

    2015-05-15

    A series of open-chain analogs of cyclic peptides was designed and synthesized using sansalvamide A as a model compound. All compounds exhibited low antitumor activity. Furthermore, the evaluation of their inhibitory potency toward IMPDH, SHP2, ACHE, proteasome, MAGL, and cathepsin B showed that all of the compounds were potent against protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2. Specifically, compounds 1a, 1d, 2b, and 2f were found to inhibit SHP2 with IC50 values in the low micromolar range and good selectivity. Based on the molecular docking results, the binding modes of the chain cyclic peptides in the active center of SHP2 were discussed. PMID:25865131

  19. Respiratory acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... when the lungs cannot remove all of the carbon dioxide the body produces. This causes body fluids, especially ... Acute respiratory acidosis is a condition in which carbon dioxide builds up very quickly, before the kidneys can ...

  20. Impaired mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis in respiratory chain-deficient cells but efficient compensation of energetic disadvantage by enhanced anaerobic glycolysis due to low ATP steady state levels

    SciTech Connect

    Kleist-Retzow, Juergen-Christoph von ||. E-mail: juergen-christoph.vonkleist@uk-koeln.de; Hue-Tran Hornig-Do; Schauen, Matthias; Eckertz, Sabrina; Tuan Anh Duong Dinh; Stassen, Frank; Lottmann, Nadine; Bust, Maria; Galunska, Bistra; Wielckens, Klaus; Hein, Wolfgang; Beuth, Joseph; Braun, Jan-Matthias; Fischer, Juergen H.; Ganitkevich, Vladimir Y. |; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Wiesner, Rudolf J. |

    2007-08-15

    Energy-producing pathways, adenine nucleotide levels, oxidative stress response and Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis were investigated in cybrid cells incorporating two pathogenic mitochondrial DNA point mutations, 3243A > G and 3302A > G in tRNA{sup Leu(UUR)}, as well as Rho{sup 0} cells and compared to their parental 143B osteosarcoma cell line. All cells suffering from a severe respiratory chain deficiency were able to proliferate as fast as controls. The major defect in oxidative phosphorylation was efficiently compensated by a rise in anaerobic glycolysis, so that the total ATP production rate was preserved. This enhancement of glycolysis was enabled by a considerable decrease of cellular total adenine nucleotide pools and a concomitant shift in the AMP + ADP/ATP ratios, while the energy charge potential was still in the normal range. Further important consequences were an increased production of superoxide which, however, was neither escorted by major changes in the antioxidative defence systems nor was it leading to substantial oxidative damage. Most interestingly, the lowered mitochondrial membrane potential led to a disturbed intramitochondrial calcium homeostasis, which most likely is a major pathomechanism in mitochondrial diseases.

  1. Kinetic studies on novel plasminogen activators. Demonstration of fibrin enhancement for hybrid enzymes comprising the A-chain of plasmin (Lys-78) and B-chain of tissue-type plasminogen activator (Ile-276) or urokinase (Ile-159).

    PubMed Central

    Fears, R; Dodd, I; Ferres, H; Robinson, J H

    1990-01-01

    The activation of plasminogen by two novel hybrid enzymes, constructed from the A-chain of plasmin and the B-chains of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) or urokinase, was compared with the activation by the parent enzymes. Basal kinetic constants for 'Lys-plasminogen' (human plasminogen with N-terminal lysine) and 'Glu-plasminogen' (human plasminogen with N-terminal glutamic acid) activation were similar to those of the parent activators. The Km for plasminogen turnover for both hybrid enzymes was considerably decreased in the presence of both soluble fibrin and a mimic, a CNBr digest of fibrinogen. These enhancements and the related apparent negative co-operativity are similar to the behaviour of t-PA itself. The results are discussed with regard to the molecular features involved in the mechanism of fibrin stimulation. PMID:2139324

  2. Effects of 3 hours a week of physical activity on body fat and cardio-respiratory parameters in obese boys.

    PubMed

    Vajda, I; Mészáros, J; Mészáros, Z; Prókai, A; Sziva, A; Photiou, A; Zsidegh, P

    2007-09-01

    The prevalence of overweight or fat children and adolescents has markedly increased in Hungary during the past three decades. Among the possible factors insufficient physical activity and a relative or absolute excess of calorie intake associated to it can be regarded as the most important ones. The aim of the study was to analyse the effects of a 20-week aerobic exercise on body composition and on the exercise tested cardio-respiratory functions in 10-year-old obese boys. Obesity was defined by a BMI greater than the cut-off value reported by Cole and co-workers (5) and a relative body fat content above 30% (13). Of the study group 21 volunteer children completed the program; the contrast group contained 28 obese boys. Mean calendar age was 10.03 +/- 0.26 in the study group (S) and 9.88 +/- 0.29 in the control group (C). The members of group S had two curricular physical education (PE) classes a week and three extracurricular aerobic physical activity sessions of 60 min net time in the afternoon, on Mondays (swimming and water games), Wednesdays (folk dance) and Fridays (soccer). Group C had only 2 PE classes a week. Anthropometric and spiroergometric data were collected in the middle of January and June of 2004. Relative body fat content and BMI did not increase during the observation period in contrast to the significant increase of both in the control group. Peak minute ventilation, aerobic power, oxygen pulse, and running distance (performed on a treadmill) increased in group S, and did not change in group C. The program was considered successful despite that the changes in the observed physiological and physical indicators appeared to be slight. However, the 5-month elevated level of physical activity brought about such development in the physical status of the obese subjects that might be an appropriate basis for regular training. Fortunately, the cardio-respiratory functions of the investigated boys were not affected yet by obesity, consequently the really

  3. A specific phospholipase C activity regulates phosphatidylinositol levels in lung surfactant of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spyridakis, Spyros; Leondaritis, George; Nakos, George; Lekka, Marilena E; Galanopoulou, Dia

    2010-03-01

    Lung surfactant (LS) is a lipid-rich material lining the inside of the lungs. It reduces surface tension at the liquid/air interface and thus, it confers protection of the alveoli from collapsing. The surface-active component of LS is dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine, while anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) and primarily phosphatidylglycerol are involved in the stabilization of the LS monolayer. The exact role of PtdIns in this system is not well-understood; however, PtdIns levels change dramatically during the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) evolution. In this report we present evidence of a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) activity in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, which may regulate PtdIns levels. Characterization of this extracellular activity showed specificity for PtdIns and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, sharing the typical substrate concentration-, pH-, and calcium-dependencies with mammalian PI-PLCs. Fractionation of BAL fluid showed that PI-PLC did not co-fractionate with large surfactant aggregates, but it was found mainly in the soluble fraction. Importantly, analysis of BAL samples from control subjects and from patients with ARDS showed that the PI-PLC specific activity was decreased by 4-fold in ARDS samples concurrently with the increase in BAL PtdIns levels. Thus, we have identified for the first time an extracellular PI-PLC enzyme activity that may be acutely involved in the regulation of PtdIns levels in LS. PMID:19491339

  4. Antiviral activity of recombinant porcine surfactant protein A against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Lan; Zheng, Qisheng; Zhang, Yuanpeng; Li, Pengcheng; Fu, Yanfeng; Hou, Jibo; Xiao, Xilong

    2016-07-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has caused significant economic losses in the swine industry worldwide. However, there is not an ideal vaccine to provide complete protection against PRRSV. Thus, the need for new antiviral strategies to control PRRSV still remains. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) belongs to the family of C-type lectins, which can exert antiviral activities. In this present study, we assessed the antiviral properties of recombinant porcine SP-A (RpSP-A) on PRRSV infection in Marc 145 cells and revealed its antiviral mechanism using a plaque assay, real-time qPCR, western blotting analysis and an attachment and penetration assay. Our results showed that RpSP-A could inhibit the infectivity of PRRSV in Marc 145 cells and could reduce the total RNA and protein level. The attachment assay indicated that RpSP-A in the presence of Ca(2+) could largely inhibit Marc 145 cell attachment; however, in the penetration assay, it was relatively inactive. Furthermore, our study suggested that virus progeny released from infected Marc145 cells were blocked by RpSP-A from infecting other cells. We conclude that RpSP-A has antiviral activity against PRRSV, most probably by blocking viral attachment and the cell-to-cell transmission pathway, and therefore, RpSP-A holds promise as a novel antiviral agent against PRRSV. PMID:27101074

  5. Antimicrobial activity of extracts of local cough mixtures on upper respiratory tract bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Adeleye, I A; Opiah, L

    2003-09-01

    The punched-hole and the paper disc diffusion methods were used in screening for the antimicrobial activity of six common ingredients used locally in cough mixtures, against the following bacteria: Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus. Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp, Salmonella paratyphi, Shigella dysenteria, Shigella sonnei and Candida albicans. The results, evaluated as the diameter of zone of inhibition of microbial growth, showed that lime, garlic onion, onion and honey were active against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus faecalis, Candida albicans, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp and Shigella dysenteriae. Bitter-kola nut extract and palm kernel oil showed no antimicrobial activities against any of the tested organisms. None of the extracts inhibited the growth of Salmonella paratyphi and Shigella sonnei and the most susceptible organisms were Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. PMID:14649097

  6. Evolutionary origins of retinoid active short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases of SDR16C family.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, Olga V; Chang, Chenbei; Berlett, Michael C; Kedishvili, Natalia Y

    2015-06-01

    Vertebrate enzymes that belong to the 16C family of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR16C) were shown to play an essential role in the control of retinoic acid (RA) levels during development. To trace the evolution of enzymatic function of SDR16C family, and to examine the origins of the pathway for RA biosynthesis from vitamin A, we identified putative SDR16C enzymes through the extensive search of available genome sequencing data in a subset of species representing major metazoan phyla. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that enzymes from protostome, non-chordate deuterostome and invertebrate chordate species are found in three clades of SDR16C family containing retinoid active enzymes, which are retinol dehydrogenase 10 (RDH10), retinol dehydrogenases E2 (RDHE2) and RDHE2-similar, and dehydrogenase reductase (SDR family) member 3 (DHRS3). For the initial functional analysis, we cloned RDH10- and RDHE2-related enzymes from the early developmental stages of a non-chordate deuterostome, green sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, and an invertebrate chordate, sea squirt Ciona intestinalis. In situ hybridization revealed that these proteins are expressed in a pattern relevant to development, while assays performed on proteins expressed in mammalian cell culture showed that they possess retinol-oxidizing activity as their vertebrate homologs. The existence of invertebrate homologs of DHRS3 was inferred from the analysis of phylogeny and cofactor-binding residues characteristic of preference for NADP(H). The presence of invertebrate homologs in the DHRS3 group of SDR16C is interesting in light of the complex mutually activating interaction, which we have recently described for human RDH10 and DHRS3 enzymes. Further functional analysis of these homologs will establish whether this interaction evolved to control retinoid homeostasis only in vertebrates, or is also conserved in pre-vertebrates. PMID:25451586

  7. Activation of respiratory epithelial cells by wood smoke particles persists beyond immediate exposure.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biological effect of particles on epithelial cells involves, in part, oxidant generation and a cascade of reactions culminating in inflammatory mediator release. Whether there is an immediate short-lived activation or continued persistent response of the cells to the particle...

  8. Different respiratory activities of mitochondria isolated from the subendocardium and subepicardium of the canine heart.

    PubMed

    Camici, P; Ursini, F; Galiazzo, F; Bellitto, L; Pelosi, G; Marzilli, M; L'Abbate, A; Barsacchi, R

    1984-01-01

    Mitochondria were prepared from the subendocardial and subepicardial layers of the canine left ventricle. The oxidation rates of palmitate, palmitoyl carnitine and pyruvate of the mitochondria obtained from the two cardiac layers were measured. The cytochrome content and the specific activities of different beta oxidation and Krebs cycle enzymes were also measured in the two mitochondrial populations. Mitochondria isolated from the ENDO layer showed significantly higher oxidation rates than mitochondria from the EPI layer for all the three substrates. No statistically significant differences in cytochrome c+c1 and a+a3 content were found in mitochondria isolated from the two regions. No significant transmural differences were found in fatty acyl CoA, L-3-hydroxy fatty acyl CoA, succinic and malic dehydrogenase specific activities, whilst isocitric dehydrogenase (NADP) specific activity was significantly higher in mitochondria isolated from the inner layer. In conclusion, the mitochondria isolated from the inner left ventricular layer of the canine heart show a higher oxidative capacity than subepicardial mitochondria. This difference could partly be explained by the higher specific activity of isocitric dehydrogenase in this layer. These properties of subendocardial mitochondria could represent a metabolic support for the greater contractile performance of this layer. PMID:6487238

  9. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nonstructural protein 1beta modulates host innate immune response by antagonizing IRF3 activation.

    PubMed

    Beura, Lalit K; Sarkar, Saumendra N; Kwon, Byungjoon; Subramaniam, Sakthivel; Jones, Clinton; Pattnaik, Asit K; Osorio, Fernando A

    2010-02-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection of swine leads to a serious disease characterized by a delayed and defective adaptive immune response. It is hypothesized that a suboptimal innate immune response is responsible for the disease pathogenesis. In the study presented here we tested this hypothesis and identified several nonstructural proteins (NSPs) with innate immune evasion properties encoded by the PRRS viral genome. Four of the total ten PRRSV NSPs tested were found to have strong to moderate inhibitory effects on beta interferon (IFN-beta) promoter activation. The strongest inhibitory effect was exhibited by NSP1 followed by, NSP2, NSP11, and NSP4. We focused on NSP1alpha and NSP1beta (self-cleavage products of NSP1 during virus infection) and NSP11, three NSPs with strong inhibitory activity. All of three proteins, when expressed stably in cell lines, strongly inhibited double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) signaling pathways. NSP1beta was found to inhibit both IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3)- and NF-kappaB-dependent gene induction by dsRNA and Sendai virus. Mechanistically, the dsRNA-induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 were strongly inhibited by NSP1beta. Moreover, when tested in a porcine myelomonocytic cell line, NSP1beta inhibited Sendai virus-mediated activation of porcine IFN-beta promoter activity. We propose that this NSP1beta-mediated subversion of the host innate immune response plays an important role in PRRSV pathogenesis. PMID:19923190

  10. A novel p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) specific inhibitor suppresses respiratory syncytial virus and influenza A virus replication by inhibiting virus-induced p38 MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myung-Soo; Heo, Jinyuk; Yi, Chae-Min; Ban, Junsu; Lee, Noh-Jin; Lee, Na-Rae; Kim, Sang Won; Kim, Nam-Jung; Inn, Kyung-Soo

    2016-08-26

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza A virus are leading causes of acute lower respiratory infectious disease. Respiratory diseases caused by RSV and influenza A virus result in serious economic burden and life-threatening disease for immunocompromised people. With the revelation that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity in host cells is crucial for infection and replication of RSV and influenza A virus, inhibition of p38 MAPK activity has been suggested as a potential antiviral therapeutic strategy. However, the low selectivity and high toxicity of the p38 MAPK inhibitors necessitate the development of better inhibitors. Herein, we report the synthesis of a novel p38 MAPK inhibitor, NJK14047, with high kinase selectivity. In this work, it was demonstrated that NJK14047 inhibits RSV- and influenza A-mediated p38 MAPK activation in epithelial cells. Subsequently, NJK14047 treatment resulted in decreased viral replication and viral mRNA synthesis. In addition, secretion of interleukin-6 from infected cells was greatly diminished by NJK14047, suggesting that it can ameliorate immunopathological responses to RSV and influenza A. Collectively, the results suggest that NJK14047 has therapeutic potential to treat respiratory viral infection through the suppression of p38 MAPK activation, which is suggested to be an essential step for respiratory virus infection. PMID:27346133

  11. Heavy Chain Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells often prevents proper absorption of nutrients from food (malabsorption), resulting in severe diarrhea and weight loss. A rare form that affects the respiratory tract also exists. Blood tests are done when alpha heavy chain disease is suspected. Serum protein electrophoresis, measurement of ...

  12. In situ treatment with activated carbon reduces bioaccumulation in aquatic food chains.

    PubMed

    Kupryianchyk, D; Rakowska, M I; Roessink, I; Reichman, E P; Grotenhuis, J T C; Koelmans, A A

    2013-05-01

    In situ activated carbon (AC) amendment is a new direction in contaminated sediment management, yet its effectiveness and safety have never been tested on the level of entire food chains including fish. Here we tested the effects of three different AC treatments on hydrophobic organic chemical (HOC) concentrations in pore water, benthic invertebrates, zooplankton, and fish (Leuciscus idus melanotus). AC treatments were mixing with powdered AC (PAC), mixing with granular AC (GAC), and addition-removal of GAC (sediment stripping). The AC treatments resulted in a significant decrease in HOC concentrations in pore water, benthic invertebrates, zooplankton, macrophytes, and fish. In 6 months, PAC treatment caused a reduction of accumulation of polychlorobiphenyls (PCB) in fish by a factor of 20, bringing pollutant levels below toxic thresholds. All AC treatments supported growth of fish, but growth was inhibited in the PAC treatment, which was likely explained by reduced nutrient concentrations, resulting in lower zooplankton (i.e., food) densities for the fish. PAC treatment may be advised for sites where immediate ecosystem protection is required. GAC treatment may be equally effective in the longer term and may be adequate for vulnerable ecosystems where longer-term protection suffices. PMID:23544454

  13. Human mesenchymal stem cell behavior on segmented polyurethanes prepared with biologically active chain extenders.

    PubMed

    Kavanaugh, Taylor E; Clark, Amy Y; Chan-Chan, Lerma H; Ramírez-Saldaña, Maricela; Vargas-Coronado, Rossana F; Cervantes-Uc, José M; Hernández-Sánchez, Fernando; García, Andrés J; Cauich-Rodríguez, Juan V

    2016-02-01

    The development of elastomeric, bioresorbable and biocompatible segmented polyurethanes (SPUs) for use in tissue-engineering applications has attracted considerable interest because of the existing need of mechanically tunable scaffolds for regeneration of different tissues, but the incorporation of osteoinductive molecules into SPUs has been limited. In this study, SPUs were synthesized from poly (ε-caprolactone)diol, 4,4'-methylene bis(cyclohexyl isocyanate) using biologically active compounds such as ascorbic acid, L-glutamine, β-glycerol phosphate, and dexamethasone as chain extenders. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) revealed the formation of both urethanes and urea linkages while differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic mechanical analysis, X-ray diffraction and mechanical testing showed that these polyurethanes were semi-crystalline polymers exhibiting high deformations. Cytocompatibility studies showed that only SPUs containing β-glycerol phosphate supported human mesenchymal stem cell adhesion, growth, and osteogenic differentiation, rendering them potentially suitable for bone tissue regeneration, whereas other SPUs failed to support either cell growth or osteogenic differentiation, or both. This study demonstrates that modification of SPUs with osteogenic compounds can lead to new cytocompatible polymers for regenerative medicine applications. PMID:26704555

  14. Active site dynamics in the zinc-dependent medium chain alcohol dehydrogenase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Patrick J.; Britton, K. Linda; Fisher, Martin; Esclapez, Julia; Pire, Carmen; Bonete, Maria Jose; Ferrer, Juan; Rice, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Despite being the subject of intensive investigations, many aspects of the mechanism of the zinc-dependent medium chain alcohol dehydrogenase (MDR) superfamily remain contentious. We have determined the high-resolution structures of a series of binary and ternary complexes of glucose dehydrogenase, an MDR enzyme from Haloferax mediterranei. In stark contrast to the textbook MDR mechanism in which the zinc ion is proposed to remain stationary and attached to a common set of protein ligands, analysis of these structures reveals that in each complex, there are dramatic differences in the nature of the zinc ligation. These changes arise as a direct consequence of linked movements of the zinc ion, a zinc-bound bound water molecule, and the substrate during progression through the reaction. These results provide evidence for the molecular basis of proton traffic during catalysis, a structural explanation for pentacoordinate zinc ion intermediates, a unifying view for the observed patterns of metal ligation in the MDR family, and highlight the importance of dynamic fluctuations at the metal center in changing the electrostatic potential in the active site, thereby influencing the proton traffic and hydride transfer events. PMID:19131516

  15. Pyridoxine-derived organoselenium compounds with glutathione peroxidase-like and chain-breaking antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay P; Poon, Jia-Fei; Butcher, Ray J; Engman, Lars

    2014-09-22

    One of the vitamin B6 vitamers, pyridoxine, was modified to incorporate selenium in various oxidation states in place of the methyl group in position 2. Such compounds were conveniently accessed by treatment of bis-4,5-(carboethoxy)-2-iodo-3-pyridinol with disodium diselenide and LiAlH4 -reduction. After work-up, selone 7 was isolated in good yield as an air-stable crystalline material. Hydrogen bonding to the neighboring hydroxyl group, as revealed by the short intramolecular Se⋅⋅⋅H distance in the crystal structure is likely to provide extra stabilization to the compound. Computational studies showed that selone 7 is more stable than the corresponding selenol tautomer by 12.2 kcal mol(-1) . Hydrogen peroxide oxidation of the selone 7 afforded diselenide 12, and, on further oxidation, seleninic acid 13. Treatment of the seleninic acid with thiophenol provided an isolable selenosulfide 14. The glutathione peroxidase-like properties of the pyridoxine-derived compounds were assessed by using the coupled reductase method. Seleninic acid 13 was found to be twofold more active than ebselen. The chain-breaking capacity of the pyridoxine compounds were studied in a water/chlorobenzene membrane model containing linoleic acid as an oxidizable substrate and N-acetylcysteine as a thiol reducing agent. Diselenide 15 could match α-tocopherol when it comes to reactivity towards peroxyl radicals and inhibition time. PMID:25123932

  16. Nonmuscle myosin light chain kinase activity modulates radiation-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Mathew, Biji; Wu, Xiaomin; Shimizu, Yuka; Rizzo, Alicia N.; Dudek, Steven M.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.; Hecker, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Radiotherapy as a primary treatment for thoracic malignancies induces deleterious effects, such as acute or subacute radiation-induced lung injury (RILI). Although the molecular etiology of RILI is controversial and likely multifactorial, a potentially important cellular target is the lung endothelial cytoskeleton that regulates paracellular gap formation and the influx of macromolecules and fluid to the alveolar space. Here we investigate the central role of a key endothelial cytoskeletal regulatory protein, the nonmuscle isoform of myosin light chain kinase (nmMLCK), in an established murine RILI model. Our results indicate that thoracic irradiation significantly augmented nmMLCK protein expression and enzymatic activity in murine lungs. Furthermore, genetically engineered mice harboring a deletion of the nmMLCK gene (nmMLCK−/− mice) exhibited protection from RILI, as assessed by attenuated vascular leakage and leukocyte infiltration. In addition, irradiated wild-type mice treated with two distinct MLCK enzymatic inhibitors, ML-7 and PIK (peptide inhibitor of kinase), also demonstrated attenuated RILI. Taken together, these data suggests a key role for nmMLCK in vascular barrier regulation in RILI and warrants further examination of RILI strategies that target nmMLCK. PMID:27252850

  17. Nonmuscle myosin light chain kinase activity modulates radiation-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Mathew, Biji; Wu, Xiaomin; Shimizu, Yuka; Rizzo, Alicia N; Dudek, Steven M; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Jacobson, Jeffrey R; Hecker, Louise; Garcia, Joe G N

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy as a primary treatment for thoracic malignancies induces deleterious effects, such as acute or subacute radiation-induced lung injury (RILI). Although the molecular etiology of RILI is controversial and likely multifactorial, a potentially important cellular target is the lung endothelial cytoskeleton that regulates paracellular gap formation and the influx of macromolecules and fluid to the alveolar space. Here we investigate the central role of a key endothelial cytoskeletal regulatory protein, the nonmuscle isoform of myosin light chain kinase (nmMLCK), in an established murine RILI model. Our results indicate that thoracic irradiation significantly augmented nmMLCK protein expression and enzymatic activity in murine lungs. Furthermore, genetically engineered mice harboring a deletion of the nmMLCK gene (nmMLCK(-/-) mice) exhibited protection from RILI, as assessed by attenuated vascular leakage and leukocyte infiltration. In addition, irradiated wild-type mice treated with two distinct MLCK enzymatic inhibitors, ML-7 and PIK (peptide inhibitor of kinase), also demonstrated attenuated RILI. Taken together, these data suggests a key role for nmMLCK in vascular barrier regulation in RILI and warrants further examination of RILI strategies that target nmMLCK. PMID:27252850

  18. Sp1-mediated nonmuscle myosin light chain kinase expression and enhanced activity in vascular endothelial growth factor–induced vascular permeability

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Despite the important role played by the nonmuscle isoform of myosin light chain kinase (nmMLCK) in vascular barrier regulation and the implication of both nmMLCK and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), the role played by nmMLCK in VEGF-induced vascular permeability is poorly understood. In this study, the role played by nmMLCK in VEGF-induced vascular hyperpermeability was investigated. Human lung endothelial cell barrier integrity in response to VEGF is examined in both the absence and the presence of nmMLCK small interfering RNAs. Levels of nmMLCK messenger RNA (mRNA), protein, and promoter activity expression were monitored after VEGF stimulation in lung endothelial cells. nmMYLK promoter activity was assessed using nmMYLK promoter luciferase reporter constructs with a series of nested deletions. nmMYLK transcriptional regulation was further characterized by examination of a key transcriptional factor. nmMLCK plays an important role in VEGF-induced permeability. We found that activation of the VEGF signaling pathway in lung endothelial cells increases MYLK gene product at both mRNA and protein levels. Increased nmMLCK mRNA and protein expression is a result of increased nmMYLK promoter activity, regulated in part by binding of the Sp1 transcription factor on triggering by the VEGF signaling pathway. Taken together, these findings suggest that MYLK is an important ARDS candidate gene and a therapeutic target that is highly influenced by excessive VEGF concentrations in the inflamed lung. PMID:26697178

  19. Synthesis and antiviral activity evaluation of acyclic 2'-azanucleosides bearing a phosphonomethoxy function in the side chain.

    PubMed

    Koszytkowska-Stawińska, Mariola; De Clercq, Erik; Balzarini, Jan

    2009-06-01

    Acyclic 2'-azanucleosides with a phosphonomethoxy function in the side chain were obtained by coupling of diethyl {2-[N-(pivaloyloxymethyl)-N-(p-toluenesulfonyl)amino]ethoxymethyl}phosphonate with the pyrimidine nucleobases via the Vorbrüggen-type protocol. The compounds were evaluated in vitro for activity against a broad variety of RNA and DNA viruses. PMID:19442526

  20. The role of stretch-activated ion channels in acute respiratory distress syndrome: finally a new target?

    PubMed

    Schwingshackl, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) and oxygen therapy (hyperoxia; HO) comprise the cornerstones of life-saving interventions for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Unfortunately, the side effects of MV and HO include exacerbation of lung injury by barotrauma, volutrauma, and propagation of lung inflammation. Despite significant improvements in ventilator technologies and a heightened awareness of oxygen toxicity, besides low tidal volume ventilation few if any medical interventions have improved ARDS outcomes over the past two decades. We are lacking a comprehensive understanding of mechanotransduction processes in the healthy lung and know little about the interactions between simultaneously activated stretch-, HO-, and cytokine-induced signaling cascades in ARDS. Nevertheless, as we are unraveling these mechanisms we are gathering increasing evidence for the importance of stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) in the activation of lung-resident and inflammatory cells. In addition to the discovery of new SAC families in the lung, e.g., two-pore domain potassium channels, we are increasingly assigning mechanosensing properties to already known Na(+), Ca(2+), K(+), and Cl(-) channels. Better insights into the mechanotransduction mechanisms of SACs will improve our understanding of the pathways leading to ventilator-induced lung injury and lead to much needed novel therapeutic approaches against ARDS by specifically targeting SACs. This review 1) summarizes the reasons why the time has come to seriously consider SACs as new therapeutic targets against ARDS, 2) critically analyzes the physiological and experimental factors that currently limit our knowledge about SACs, and 3) outlines the most important questions future research studies need to address. PMID:27521425

  1. A recombinant, soluble, single-chain class I major histocompatibility complex molecule with biological activity.

    PubMed Central

    Mage, M G; Lee, L; Ribaudo, R K; Corr, M; Kozlowski, S; McHugh, L; Margulies, D H

    1992-01-01

    Heterodimeric class I major histocompatibility complex molecules, which consist of a 45-kDa heavy-chain and a 12-kDa beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) light chain, bind endogenously synthesized peptides for presentation to antigen-specific T cells. We have synthesized a gene encoding a single-chain, soluble class I molecule derived from mouse H-2Dd, in which the carboxyl terminus of beta 2m is linked via a peptide spacer to the amino terminus of the heavy chain. The chimeric protein is secreted efficiently from transfected L cells, is thermostable, and when loaded with an appropriate antigenic peptide, stimulates an H-2Dd-restricted antigen-specific T-cell hybridoma. Thus, functional binding of peptide does not require the complete dissociation of beta 2m, implying that a heavy chain/peptide complex is not an obligate intermediate in the assembly of the heavy-chain/beta 2m/peptide heterotrimer. Single-chain major histocompatibility complex molecules uniformly loaded with peptide have potential uses for structural studies, toxin or fluor conjugates, and vaccines. Images PMID:1438262

  2. Mitochondrial respiratory activity in porcine longissimus muscle fibers of different pig genetics in relation to their meat quality.

    PubMed

    Werner, C; Natter, R; Schellander, K; Wicke, M

    2010-05-01

    The pig genetics of Duroc, Pietrain (MHS homozygote negative, PiNN), Pietrain (MHS homozygote positive, PiPP) and a F2-Duroc-Pietrain cross-breed were analyzed. The animals had comparable (P>0.05) carcass weights, but the PiPP pigs had higher carcass yield and lean meat values (P<0.05). Considering the meat quality characteristics, the PiPP showed a faster pH drop and higher electrical conductivity, drip loss, shear force as well as lightness and redness values (P<0.05). The PiPP animals had less slow-twitch-oxidative (STO) and more fast-twitch-glycolytic (FTG) muscle fibers, whereas the results of the Duroc animals were converse (P<0.05). The STO and FTG fibers of the PiPP animals were larger than those of the other genetics (P<0.05). The analysis of the mitochondrial respiratory activity (MRA) using permeabilized longissimus muscle fibers resulted in no differences between the pig genetics before and immediately after slaughter. During chilling the MRA decreased in all pigs but to a higher extent in the PiPP pigs (P<0.05). PMID:20374876

  3. Changes in the Size of the Active Microbial Pool Explain Short-Term Soil Respiratory Responses to Temperature and Moisture

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Villegas, Alejandro; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Dukes, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    abiotic conditions activated soil microorganisms. We conclude that soil respiratory responses to short-term changes in environmental conditions are better explained by changes in AMB than in TMB. These results suggest that decomposition models that explicitly represent microbial carbon pools should take into account the active microbial pool, and researchers should be cautious in comparing modeled microbial pool sizes with measurements of TMB. PMID:27148213

  4. Changes in the Size of the Active Microbial Pool Explain Short-Term Soil Respiratory Responses to Temperature and Moisture.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Villegas, Alejandro; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Dukes, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    abiotic conditions activated soil microorganisms. We conclude that soil respiratory responses to short-term changes in environmental conditions are better explained by changes in AMB than in TMB. These results suggest that decomposition models that explicitly represent microbial carbon pools should take into account the active microbial pool, and researchers should be cautious in comparing modeled microbial pool sizes with measurements of TMB. PMID:27148213

  5. Effects of different activity and inactivity paradigms on myosin heavy chain gene expression in striated muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, K. M.; Haddad, F.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this mini-review is to summarize findings concerning the role that different models of muscular activity and inactivity play in altering gene expression of the myosin heavy chain (MHC) family of motor proteins in mammalian cardiac and skeletal muscle. This was done in the context of examining parallel findings concerning the role that thyroid hormone (T(3), 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine) plays in MHC expression. Findings show that both cardiac and skeletal muscles of experimental animals are initially undifferentiated at birth and then undergo a marked level of growth and differentiation in attaining the adult MHC phenotype in a T(3)/activity level-dependent fashion. Cardiac MHC expression in small mammals is highly sensitive to thyroid deficiency, diabetes, energy deprivation, and hypertension; each of these interventions induces upregulation of the beta-MHC isoform, which functions to economize circulatory function in the face of altered energy demand. In skeletal muscle, hyperthyroidism, as well as interventions that unload or reduce the weight-bearing activity of the muscle, causes slow to fast MHC conversions. Fast to slow conversions, however, are seen under hypothyroidism or when the muscles either become chronically overloaded or subjected to intermittent loading as occurs during resistance training and endurance exercise. The regulation of MHC gene expression by T(3) or mechanical stimuli appears to be strongly regulated by transcriptional events, based on recent findings on transgenic models and animals transfected with promoter-reporter constructs. However, the mechanisms by which T(3) and mechanical stimuli exert their control on transcriptional processes appear to be different. Additional findings show that individual skeletal muscle fibers have the genetic machinery to express simultaneously all of the adult MHCs, e.g., slow type I and fast IIa, IIx, and IIb, in unique combinations under certain experimental conditions. This degree of

  6. Antimicrobial characterisation of CEM-101 activity against respiratory tract pathogens, including multidrug-resistant pneumococcal serogroup 19A isolates.

    PubMed

    Farrell, David J; Sader, Helio S; Castanheira, Mariana; Biedenbach, Douglas J; Rhomberg, Paul R; Jones, Ronald N

    2010-06-01

    CEM-101 is a novel fluorinated macrolide-ketolide with potent activity against bacterial pathogens that are susceptible or resistant to other macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLS(B))-ketolide agents. CEM-101 is being developed for oral and parenteral use in moderate to moderately severe community-acquired bacterial pneumonia. The objective of this study was to assess the activity of CEM-101 and comparators against contemporary respiratory tract infection (RTI) isolates. A worldwide sample of organisms was used, including Streptococcus pneumoniae [n=168; 59.3% erythromycin-resistant and 18 multidrug-resistant (MDR) serogroup 19A strains], Moraxella catarrhalis (n=21; 11 beta-lactamase positive), Haemophilus influenzae (n=100; 48 beta-lactamase positive), Haemophilus parainfluenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus (n=12), and Legionella pneumophila (n=30). Testing and interpretation were performed using reference Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute methods. CEM-101 was very potent against S. pneumoniae [minimum inhibitory concentration for 90% of the organisms (MIC90)=0.25 mg/L; highest MIC at 0.5 mg/L] and was 2- and > or =32-fold more active than telithromycin and clindamycin, respectively. CEM-101 also demonstrated potent activity against S. pneumoniae MDR-19A strains (MIC90=0.5 mg/L). CEM-101 was the most potent antimicrobial agent tested against L. pneumophila, with all MIC values at < or = 0.015 mg/L (telithromycin MIC90=0.03 mg/L). CEM-101 was as potent as azithromycin against Haemophilus spp. RTI pathogens (MIC90=2 mg/L), with no variations for beta-lactamase production. CEM-101 MIC values against M. catarrhalis were all at < or =0.5mg/L. Interestingly, CEM-101 potency was ca. 6 log(2) dilutions greater than telithromycin MIC results among 44 beta-haemolytic streptococci having telithromycin MICs > or = 2 mg/L. CEM-101 exhibited the greatest potency and widest spectrum of activity against RTI pathogens among the tested MLS(B)-ketolide agents

  7. Vanillin suppresses Kupffer cell-related colloidal carbon-induced respiratory burst activity in isolated perfused rat liver: anti-inflammatory implications.

    PubMed

    Galgani, José E; Núñez, Bárbara; Videla, Luis A

    2012-12-01

    The inhibition of NADPH oxidase has become a potential therapeutic target for oxidative stress-related diseases. We investigated whether vanillin modifies hepatic O(2) consumption associated with Kupffer cell functioning. The influence of vanillin on Kupffer cell functioning was studied in isolated perfused rat liver by colloidal carbon (CC) infusion (0.5 mg ml(-1)), concomitantly with sinusoidal efflux of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as an organ viability parameter. CC infusion increased the rate of O(2) consumption of the liver above basal values, an effect that represents the respiratory burst activity of Kupffer cells. However, CC-dependent respiratory burst activity was suppressed by previous infusion of 2 mM vanillin. Vanillin did not affect the liver CC uptake rate and liver sinusoidal efflux of LDH efflux. These findings, elicited by vanillin, were reproduced by the well-established NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. In conclusion, vanillin suppresses the respiratory burst activity of Kupffer cells as assessed in intact liver, which may be associated with the inhibition of macrophage NADPH oxidase activity. Such a finding may have relevance in conditions underlying Kupffer cell-dependent up-regulation of the expression and release of pro-inflammatory mediators by redox-dependent mechanisms. PMID:23007174

  8. Applicability of tetrazolium salts for the measurement of respiratory activity and viability of groundwater bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatzinger, P.B.; Palmer, P.; Smith, R.L.; Penarrieta, C.T.; Yoshinari, T.

    2003-01-01

    A study was undertaken to measure aerobic respiration by indigenous bacteria in a sand and gravel aquifer on western Cape Cod, MA using tetrazolium salts and by direct oxygen consumption using gas chromatography (GC). In groundwater and aquifer slurries, the rate of aerobic respiration calculated from the direct GC assay was more than 600 times greater than that using the tetrazolium salt 2-(4-iodophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyl tetrazolium chloride (INT). To explain this discrepancy, the toxicity of INT and two additional tetrazolium salts, sodium 3???-[1-(phenylamino)-carbonyl]-3,4-tetrazolium]-bis(4-methoxy-6-nitro) benzenesulfonic acid hydrate (XTT) and 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC), to bacterial isolates from the aquifer was investigated. Each of the three tetrazolium salts was observed to be toxic to some of the groundwater isolates at concentrations normally used in electron transport system (ETS) and viability assays. For example, incubation of cells with XTT (3 mM) caused the density of four of the five groundwater strains tested to decline by more than four orders of magnitude. A reasonable percentage (>57%) of cells killed by CTC and INT contained visible formazan crystals (the insoluble, reduced form of the salts) after 4 h of incubation. Thus, many of the cells reduced enough CTC or INT prior to dying to be considered viable by microscopic evaluation. However, one bacterium (Pseudomonas fluorescens) that remained viable and culturable in the presence of INT and CTC, did not incorporate formazan crystals into more than a few percent of cells, even after 24 h of incubation. This strain would be considered nonviable based on traditional tetrazolium salt reduction assays. The data show that tetrazolium salt assays are likely to dramatically underestimate total ETS activity in groundwater and, although they may provide a reasonable overall estimate of viable cell numbers in a community of groundwater bacteria, some specific strains may

  9. Anti-hepatoma human single-chain Fv antibody and adriamycin conjugates with potent antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Liu, Yan-Hong; Li, Yue-Hui; Jiang, Yan; Xie, Ping-Li; Zhou, Guo-Hua; Li, Guan-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    To construct an improved biological missile, an immunoconjugate ADM-Dex-ScFv-SA3 was synthesized, which was composed of a hepatocellular carcinoma-specific, single-chain Fv antibody (ScFv-SA3) and a highly potent cytotoxic drug, adriamycin (ADM), as the warhead. Oxidized Dextran T10 (Dex-T10) was used as a linker to connect these two moieties. The 40 KD soluble anti-hepatoma human Trx-ScFv-SA3 protein was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3), using a prokaryotic expression vector, pET21a (+)-Trx-ScFv-SA3-His. It was purified using a His-Tag Ni-Agarose column and identified by western blot. The activity of Trx-ScFv-SA3 was verified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunocytochemistry to confirm that it specifically binds to the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2. To prepare ADM-Dex-ScFv-SA3, ADM was conjugated to the antibody at a molar ratio of 14.21:1. The antitumor effect of the conjugate was tested by MTT assay, plate colony formation assay and xenografts in a nude mice experimental model. In vitro experiments revealed that ADM-Dex-ScFv-SA3 could bind to tumor cells selectively and inhibit the proliferation and the colony formation ability of HepG2 cells. In vivo experiments showed that ADM-Dex-ScFv-SA3 suppressed the tumor growth and prolonged the median survival time in tumor-bearing mice. Tumor histology slides indicated a significantly slower tumor tissue proliferation in the ADM-Dex-ScFv-SA3 group. These data indicate that the targeted drug, ADM-Dex-ScFv-SA3, may be a highly potent and selective therapy for the treatment of hepatoma. PMID:24239629

  10. Antibacterial activity of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids against Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Desbois, Andrew P; Lawlor, Keelan C

    2013-11-01

    New compounds are needed to treat acne and superficial infections caused by Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus due to the reduced effectiveness of agents used at present. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) are attracting attention as potential new topical treatments for Gram-positive infections due to their antimicrobial potency and anti-inflammatory properties. This present study aimed to investigate the antimicrobial effects of six LC-PUFAs against P. acnes and S. aureus to evaluate their potential to treat infections caused by these pathogens. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined against P. acnes and S. aureus, and the LC-PUFAs were found to inhibit bacterial growth at 32-1024 mg/L. Generally, P. acnes was more susceptible to the growth inhibitory actions of LC-PUFAs, but these compounds were bactericidal only for S. aureus. This is the first report of antibacterial activity attributed to 15-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid (15-OHEPA) and 15-hydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (HETrE), while the anti-P. acnes effects of the six LC-PUFAs used herein are novel observations. During exposure to the LC-PUFAs, S. aureus cells were killed within 15-30 min. Checkerboard assays demonstrated that the LC-PUFAs did not antagonise the antimicrobial potency of clinical agents used presently against P. acnes and S. aureus. However, importantly, synergistic interactions against S. aureus were detected for combinations of benzoyl peroxide with 15-OHEPA, dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (DGLA) and HETrE; and neomycin with 15-OHEPA, DGLA, eicosapentaenoic acid, γ-linolenic acid and HETrE. In conclusion, LC-PUFAs warrant further evaluation as possible new agents to treat skin infections caused by P. acnes and S. aureus, especially in synergistic combinations with antimicrobial agents already used clinically. PMID:24232668

  11. Antibacterial Activity of Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids against Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Desbois, Andrew P.; Lawlor, Keelan C.

    2013-01-01

    New compounds are needed to treat acne and superficial infections caused by Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus due to the reduced effectiveness of agents used at present. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) are attracting attention as potential new topical treatments for Gram-positive infections due to their antimicrobial potency and anti-inflammatory properties. This present study aimed to investigate the antimicrobial effects of six LC-PUFAs against P. acnes and S. aureus to evaluate their potential to treat infections caused by these pathogens. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined against P. acnes and S. aureus, and the LC-PUFAs were found to inhibit bacterial growth at 32–1024 mg/L. Generally, P. acnes was more susceptible to the growth inhibitory actions of LC-PUFAs, but these compounds were bactericidal only for S. aureus. This is the first report of antibacterial activity attributed to 15-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid (15-OHEPA) and 15-hydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (HETrE), while the anti-P. acnes effects of the six LC-PUFAs used herein are novel observations. During exposure to the LC-PUFAs, S. aureus cells were killed within 15–30 min. Checkerboard assays demonstrated that the LC-PUFAs did not antagonise the antimicrobial potency of clinical agents used presently against P. acnes and S. aureus. However, importantly, synergistic interactions against S. aureus were detected for combinations of benzoyl peroxide with 15-OHEPA, dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (DGLA) and HETrE; and neomycin with 15-OHEPA, DGLA, eicosapentaenoic acid, γ-linolenic acid and HETrE. In conclusion, LC-PUFAs warrant further evaluation as possible new agents to treat skin infections caused by P. acnes and S. aureus, especially in synergistic combinations with antimicrobial agents already used clinically. PMID:24232668

  12. Biological short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) production from waste-activated sludge affected by surfactant.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Su; Chen, Yinguang; Zhou, Qi; Gu, Guowei

    2007-07-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), the preferred carbon sources for biological nutrient removal, are the important intermediate products in sludge anaerobic fermentation. Sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) is a widespread used surfactant, which can be easily found in waste-activated sludge (WAS). In this investigation, the effect of SDBS on SCFAs production from WAS was investigated, and the potential of using fermentative SCFAs to promote enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) was tested. Results showed that the total SCFAs production increased significantly in the presence of SDBS at room temperature. At fermentation time of 6 days, the maximum SCFAs was 2599.1mg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/L in the presence of SDBS 0.02g/g, whereas it was only 339.1mg (COD)/L in the absence of SDBS. The SCFAs produced in the case of SDBS 0.02g/g and fermentation time 6 days consisted of acetic acid (27.1%), propionic acid (22.8%), iso-valeric acid (20.1%), iso-butyric acid (11.9%), n-butyric acid (10.4%) and n-valeric acid (7.7%). It was found that during sludge anaerobic fermentation, the solubilization of sludge particulate organic-carbon and hydrolysis of solubilized substrate as well as acidification of hydrolyzed products were all increased in the presence of SDBS, while the methane formation was decreased, the SCFAs production was therefore remarkably improved. Further investigation showed that the production of SCFAs enhanced by SDBS was caused mainly by biological effects, rather than by chemical effects and SDBS decomposition. With the fermentative SCFAs as the main carbon source, the EBPR maintained high phosphorus removal efficiency ( approximately 97%). PMID:17499838

  13. Synthesis, characterization and antitumor activities of some steroidal derivatives with side chain of 17-hydrazone aromatic heterocycle.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jianguo; Liu, Liang; Zhao, Dandan; Gan, Chunfang; Huang, Xin; Xiao, Qi; Qi, Binbin; Yang, Lei; Huang, Yanmin

    2015-03-01

    Here a series of dehydroepiandrosterone-17-hydrazone and estrone-17-hydrazone derivatives possessing various aromatic heterocycle structures in 17-side chain of their steroidal nucleus were synthesized and their structures were evaluated. The antiproliferative activity of synthesized compounds against some cancer cells was investigated. The results have demonstrated that some dehydroepiandrosterone-17-hydrazone derivatives show distinct antiproliferative activity against some cancer cells through inducing cancer cell apoptosis, and compound 8 with a quinoline structure in 17-side chain displays excellent antiproliferative activity in vitro against SGC 7901 cancer cell (human gastric carcinoma) with an IC50 value of 1 μM. In addition, estrone-17-hydrazone derivatives having a key feature of indole group in the structure showed a special obvious cytotoxicity against HeLa cells, but almost inactive against other cells. The information obtained from the studies is valuable for the design of novel steroidal chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:25578734

  14. Synthesis and activities of branched-chain aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in threonine deaminase mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A L; Whitfield, S M; Williams, L S

    1978-01-01

    Valyl-, isoleucyl-, and leucyl-tRNA synthetase activities were examined in an Escherichia coli K-12 strain that possessed a deletion of three genes of the ilv gene cluster, ilvD, A, and C, and in a strain with the same deletion that also carried the lambdadilvCB bacteriophage. It was observed that the branched-chain tRNA synthetase activities of both strains were considerably less than those of the normal strain during growth in unrestricted medium. Furthermore, during an isoleucine limitation, there was a further reduction in isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase activity and an absence of the isoleucine-mediated derepression of valyl-tRNA synthetase formation in both of these mutants, as compared with the normal strain. In addition, it was observed that these branched-chain synthetase activities were reduced in steady-state cultures of several ilvA point mutants. However, upon the introduction of the ilv operon to these ilvA mutants by use of lambda bacteriophage, there was a specific increase in the branched-chain synthetase activities to levels comparable to those of the normal strain. These results support our previous findings that the stability and repression control of synthesis of these synthetases require some product(s) missing in the ilvDAC deletion strain and strongly suggest this component is some form of the ilvA gene product, threonine deaminase. PMID:348689

  15. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... from inhaling smoke or harmful fumes Treatment for respiratory failure depends on whether the condition is acute (short-term) or chronic (ongoing) and how severe it is. It also depends on the underlying cause. You may receive oxygen therapy and other treatment to help you breathe. NIH: ...

  16. Influence of age on respiratory modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure and baroreflex function in humans

    PubMed Central

    Shantsila, Alena; McIntyre, David B.; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Fadel, Paul J.; Paton, Julian F. R.; Pickering, Anthony E.

    2015-01-01

    New Findings What is the central question of this study? Does ageing influence the respiratory‐related bursting of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and the association between the rhythmic fluctuations in MSNA and blood pressure (Traube–Hering waves) that occur with respiration? What is the main finding and its importance? Despite the age‐related elevation in MSNA, the cyclical inhibition of MSNA during respiration is similar between young and older individuals. Furthermore, central respiratory–sympathetic coupling plays a